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Sample records for exposure rate synthesis

  1. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Felcher, P.; Chin-Mei Chang-Liu

    1995-06-01

    Experiments examined the effects of radiation dose-rate and protein synthesis inhibition expression of cytoskeletal and matrix elements in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Results demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for neutrons when comparing expression of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin genes. Cycloheximide repressed accumulation of {alpha}-tubulin-mRNA following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or {gamma} rays. Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of actin mRNA. Cycloheximide abrogated induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to {gamma} rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin mRNA accumulation following exposure to radiation. 24 refs., 3 tabs.

  2. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1992-12-31

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements ({gamma}- and {beta}-actin and {alpha}-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Past work from our laboratory had already demonstrated optimum time points and doses for examination of radiation effects on accumulation of specific transcripts. Our results here demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either {alpha}-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Effects of cycloheximide, however, revealed several interesting and novel findings: (1) Cycloheximide repressed accumulation of {alpha}-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or {gamma} rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposure (2) Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of mRNA for actin genes. Cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to {gamma} rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin mRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition, they suggest that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons.

  3. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1993-12-31

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements ({gamma}- and {beta}-actin and {alpha}-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Results demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either a-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Cycloheximide, however, repressed accumulation of {alpha}-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or {gamma} rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposures. Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of mRNA for actin genes. Cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to {gamma} rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin mRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation and that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons.

  4. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1994-05-01

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects Of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements ({gamma}- and {beta}-actin and {alpha}-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Past work from our laboratory had already demonstrated optimum time points and doses for examination of radiation effects on accumulation of specific transcripts. Our results here demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either {alpha}-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Effects of cycloheximide revealed that cycloheximide repressed accumulation of {alpha}-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or {gamma} rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposure. (2) Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of MRNA for actin genes; and that cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to {gamma} rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin MRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation. in addition, they suggest that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons.

  5. Rate in template-directed polymer synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Takuya

    2014-06-01

    We discuss the temporal efficiency of template-directed polymer synthesis, such as DNA replication and transcription, under a given template string. To weigh the synthesis speed and accuracy on the same scale, we propose a template-directed synthesis (TDS) rate, which contains an expression analogous to that for the Shannon entropy. Increasing the synthesis speed accelerates the TDS rate, but the TDS rate is lowered if the produced sequences are diversified. We apply the TDS rate to some production system models and investigate how the balance between the speed and the accuracy is affected by changes in the system conditions.

  6. Prenatal Exposure of Cypermethrin Induces Similar Alterations in Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Cytochrome P450s and Rate-Limiting Enzymes of Neurotransmitter Synthesis in Brain Regions of Rat Offsprings During Postnatal Development.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anshuman; Mudawal, Anubha; Maurya, Pratibha; Jain, Rajeev; Nair, Saumya; Shukla, Rajendra K; Yadav, Sanjay; Singh, Dhirendra; Khanna, Vinay Kumar; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar; Mudiam, Mohana K R; Sethumadhavan, Rao; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Parmar, Devendra

    2016-08-01

    Oral administration of low doses of cypermethrin to pregnant Wistar rats led to a dose-dependent differences in the induction of xenobiotic-metabolizing cytochrome P450s (CYPs) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein in brain regions isolated from the offsprings postnatally at 3 weeks that persisted up to adulthood. Similar alterations were observed in the expression of rate-limiting enzymes of neurotransmitter synthesis in brain regions of rat offsprings. These persistent changes were associated with alterations in circulating levels of growth hormone (GH), cognitive functions, and accumulation of cypermethrin and its metabolites in brain regions of exposed offsprings. Though molecular docking studies failed to identify similarities between the docked conformations of cypermethrin with CYPs and neurotransmitter receptors, in silico analysis identified regulatory sequences of CYPs in the promoter region of rate-limiting enzymes of neurotransmitter synthesis. Further, rechallenge of the prenatally exposed offsprings at adulthood with cypermethrin (p.o. 10 mg/kg × 6 days) led to a greater magnitude of alterations in the expression of CYPs and rate-limiting enzymes of neurotransmitter synthesis in different brain regions. These alterations were associated with a greater magnitude of decrease in the circulating levels of GH and cognitive functions in rechallenged offsprings. Our data has led us to suggest that due to the immaturity of CYPs in fetus or during early development, even the low-level exposure of cypermethrin may be sufficient to interact with the CYPs, which in turn affect the neurotransmission processes and may help in explaining the developmental neurotoxicity of cypermethrin. PMID:26115703

  7. Suppression of glycosaminoglycan synthesis by articular cartilage, but not of hyaluronic acid synthesis by synovium, after exposure to radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hugenberg, S.T.; Myers, S.L.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-04-01

    We recently found that injection of 2 mCi of yttrium 90 (90Y; approximately 23,000 rads) into normal canine knees stimulated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis by femoral condylar cartilage. The present investigation was conducted to determine whether radiation affects cartilage metabolism directly. Rates of GAG synthesis and degradation in normal canine articular cartilage were studied following irradiation. Cultured synovium from the same knees was treated similarly, to determine the effects of irradiation on hyaluronic acid synthesis. Twenty-four hours after exposure to 1,000 rads, 10,000 rads, or 50,000 rads, 35S-GAG synthesis by the cartilage was 93%, 69%, and 37%, respectively, of that in control, nonirradiated cartilage. The effect was not rapidly reversible: 120 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, GAG synthesis remained at only 28% of the control level. Autoradiography showed marked suppression of 35S uptake by chondrocytes after irradiation. Cartilage GAG degradation was also increased following irradiation: 4 hours and 8 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, the cartilage GAG concentration was only 66% and 54%, respectively, of that at time 0, while corresponding values for control, nonirradiated cartilage were 90% and 87%. In contrast to its effects on cartilage GAG metabolism, radiation at these levels had no effect on synovial hyaluronic acid synthesis.

  8. Increased synthesis of folate transporters regulates folate transport in conditions of ethanol exposure and folate deficiency.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Shilpa; More, Deepti; Rahat, Beenish; Khanduja, Krishan Lal; Kaur, Jyotdeep

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption and dietary folate inadequacy are the main contributors leading to folate deficiency (FD). The present study was planned to study regulation of folate transport in conditions of FD and ethanol exposure in human embryonic kidney cell line. Also, the reversible nature of effects mediated by ethanol exposure and FD was determined by folate repletion and ethanol removal. For ethanol treatment, HEK293 cells were grown in medium containing 100 mM ethanol, and after treatment, one group of cells was shifted on medium that was free from ethanol. For FD treatment, cells were grown in folate-deficient medium followed by shifting of one group of cells on folate containing medium. FD as well as ethanol exposure resulted in an increase in folate uptake which was due to an increase in expression of folate transporters, i.e., reduced folate carrier, proton-coupled folate transporter, and folate receptor, both at the mRNA and protein level. The effects mediated by ethanol exposure and FD were reversible on removal of treatment. Promoter region methylation of folate transporters remained unaffected after FD and ethanol exposure. As far as transcription rate of folate transporters is concerned, an increase in rate of synthesis was observed in both ethanol exposure and FD conditions. Additionally, mRNA life of folate transporters was observed to be reduced by FD. An increased expression of folate transporters under ethanol exposure and FD conditions can be attributed to enhanced rate of synthesis of folate transporters. PMID:26433955

  9. Environmental chemical exposures and disturbances of heme synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Daniell, W E; Stockbridge, H L; Labbe, R F; Woods, J S; Anderson, K E; Bissell, D M; Bloomer, J R; Ellefson, R D; Moore, M R; Pierach, C A; Schreiber, W E; Tefferi, A; Franklin, G M

    1997-01-01

    Porphyrias are relatively uncommon inherited or acquired disorders in which clinical manifestations are attributable to a disturbance of heme synthesis (porphyrin metabolism), usually in association with endogenous or exogenous stressors. Porphyrias are characterized by elevations of heme precursors in blood, urine, and/or stool. A number of chemicals, particularly metals and halogenated hydrocarbons, induce disturbances of heme synthesis in experimental animals. Certain chemicals have also been linked to porphyria or porphyrinuria in humans, generally involving chronic industrial exposures or environmental exposures much higher than those usually encountered. A noteworthy example is the Turkish epidemic of porphyria cutanea tarda produced by accidental ingestion of wheat treated with the fungicide hexachlorobenzene. Measurements of excreted heme precursors have the potential to serve as biological markers for harmful but preclinical effects of certain chemical exposures; this potential warrants further research and applied field studies. It has been hypothesized that several otherwise unexplained chemical-associated illnesses, such as multiple chemical sensitivity syndrome, may represent mild chronic cases of porphyria or other acquired abnormalities in heme synthesis. This review concludes that, although it is reasonable to consider such hypotheses, there is currently no convincing evidence that these illnesses are mediated by a disturbance of heme synthesis; it is premature or unfounded to base clinical management on such explanations unless laboratory data are diagnostic for porphyria. This review discusses the limitations of laboratory measures of heme synthesis, and diagnostic guidelines are provided to assist in evaluating the symptomatic individual suspected of having a porphyria. PMID:9114276

  10. Effective biological dose from occupational exposure during nanoparticle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demou, Evangelia; Tran, Lang; Housiadas, Christos

    2009-02-01

    Nanomaterial and nanotechnology safety require the characterization of occupational exposure levels for completing a risk assessment. However, equally important is the estimation of the effective internal dose via lung deposition, transport and clearance mechanisms. An integrated source-to-biological dose assessment study is presented using real monitoring data collected during nanoparticle synthesis. Experimental monitoring data of airborne exposure levels during nanoparticle synthesis of CaSO4 and BiPO4 nanoparticles in a research laboratory is coupled with a human lung transport and deposition model, which solves in an Eulerian framework the general dynamic equation for polydisperse aerosols using particle specific physical-chemical properties. Subsequently, the lung deposition model is coupled with a mathematical particle clearance model providing the effective biological dose as well as the time course of the biological dose build-up after exposure. The results for the example of BiPO4 demonstrate that even short exposures throughout the day can lead to particle doses of 1.10·E+08#/(kg-bw·8h-shift), with the majority accumulating in the pulmonary region. Clearance of particles is slow and is not completed within a working shift following a 1 hour exposure. It mostly occurs via macrophage activity in the alveolar region, with small amounts transported to the interstitium and less to the lymph nodes.

  11. Mercury Exposure and Heart Rate Variability: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Matthew O.; Cheng, Alan; Berger, Ronald D.; Rosman, Lori; Guallar, Eliseo

    2015-01-01

    Background Mercury affects the nervous system and has been implicated in altering heart rhythm and function. We sought to better define its role in modulating heart rate variability, a well-known marker of cardiac autonomic function. Design Systematic review. Methods We searched PubMed, Embase, TOXLINE and DART databases without language restriction. We report findings as a qualitative systematic review because heterogeneity in study design and assessment of exposures and outcomes across studies, as well as other methodological limitations of the literature, precluded a quantitative meta-analysis. Results We identified 12 studies of mercury exposure and heart rate variability in human populations (10 studies involving primarily environmental methylmercury exposure and two studies involving occupational exposure to inorganic mercury) conducted in Japan, the Faroe Islands, Canada, Korea, French Polynesia, Finland and Egypt. The association of prenatal mercury exposure with lower high-frequency band scores (thought to reflect parasympathetic activity) in several studies, in particular the inverse association of cord blood mercury levels with the coefficient of variation of the R-R intervals and with low frequency and high frequency bands at 14 years of age in the Faroe Islands birth cohort study, suggests that early mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity. Studies with later environmental exposures to mercury in children or in adults were heterogeneous and did not show consistent associations. Conclusions The evidence was too limited to draw firm causal inferences. Additional research is needed to elucidate the effects of mercury on cardiac autonomic function, particularly as early-life exposures might have lasting impacts on cardiac parasympathetic function. PMID:26231507

  12. Increased collagen synthesis rate during wound healing in muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shaobo; Salisbury, Jonathan; Preedy, Victor R; Emery, Peter W

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing in muscle involves the deposition of collagen, but it is not known whether this is achieved by changes in the synthesis or the degradation of collagen. We have used a reliable flooding dose method to measure collagen synthesis rate in vivo in rat abdominal muscle following a surgical incision. Collagen synthesis rate was increased by 480% and 860% on days 2 and 7 respectively after surgery in the wounded muscle compared with an undamaged area of the same muscle. Collagen content was increased by approximately 100% at both day 2 and day 7. These results demonstrate that collagen deposition during wound healing in muscle is achieved entirely by an increase in the rate of collagen synthesis. PMID:23526975

  13. Circulating protein synthesis rates reveal skeletal muscle proteome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; King, Chelsea L; Angel, Thomas E; Holmes, William E; Li, Kelvin W; Colangelo, Marc; Price, John C; Turner, Scott M; Bell, Christopher; Hamilton, Karyn L; Miller, Benjamin F; Hellerstein, Marc K

    2016-01-01

    Here, we have described and validated a strategy for monitoring skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in rodents and humans over days or weeks from blood samples. We based this approach on label incorporation into proteins that are synthesized specifically in skeletal muscle and escape into the circulation. Heavy water labeling combined with sensitive tandem mass spectrometric analysis allowed integrated synthesis rates of proteins in muscle tissue across the proteome to be measured over several weeks. Fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of plasma creatine kinase M-type (CK-M) and carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA-3) in the blood, more than 90% of which is derived from skeletal muscle, correlated closely with FSR of CK-M, CA-3, and other proteins of various ontologies in skeletal muscle tissue in both rodents and humans. Protein synthesis rates across the muscle proteome generally changed in a coordinate manner in response to a sprint interval exercise training regimen in humans and to denervation or clenbuterol treatment in rodents. FSR of plasma CK-M and CA-3 revealed changes and interindividual differences in muscle tissue proteome dynamics. In human subjects, sprint interval training primarily stimulated synthesis of structural and glycolytic proteins. Together, our results indicate that this approach provides a virtual biopsy, sensitively revealing individualized changes in proteome-wide synthesis rates in skeletal muscle without a muscle biopsy. Accordingly, this approach has potential applications for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of muscle disorders. PMID:26657858

  14. Circulating protein synthesis rates reveal skeletal muscle proteome dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; King, Chelsea L.; Angel, Thomas E.; Holmes, William E.; Li, Kelvin W.; Colangelo, Marc; Price, John C.; Turner, Scott M.; Bell, Christopher; Hamilton, Karyn L.; Miller, Benjamin F.; Hellerstein, Marc K.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we have described and validated a strategy for monitoring skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in rodents and humans over days or weeks from blood samples. We based this approach on label incorporation into proteins that are synthesized specifically in skeletal muscle and escape into the circulation. Heavy water labeling combined with sensitive tandem mass spectrometric analysis allowed integrated synthesis rates of proteins in muscle tissue across the proteome to be measured over several weeks. Fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of plasma creatine kinase M-type (CK-M) and carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA-3) in the blood, more than 90% of which is derived from skeletal muscle, correlated closely with FSR of CK-M, CA-3, and other proteins of various ontologies in skeletal muscle tissue in both rodents and humans. Protein synthesis rates across the muscle proteome generally changed in a coordinate manner in response to a sprint interval exercise training regimen in humans and to denervation or clenbuterol treatment in rodents. FSR of plasma CK-M and CA-3 revealed changes and interindividual differences in muscle tissue proteome dynamics. In human subjects, sprint interval training primarily stimulated synthesis of structural and glycolytic proteins. Together, our results indicate that this approach provides a virtual biopsy, sensitively revealing individualized changes in proteome-wide synthesis rates in skeletal muscle without a muscle biopsy. Accordingly, this approach has potential applications for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of muscle disorders. PMID:26657858

  15. High-deposition-rate ceramics synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Osterheld, T.H.; Outka, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    Parallel experimental and computational investigations are conducted in this project to develop validated numerical models of ceramic synthesis processes. Experiments are conducted in the High-Temperature Materials Synthesis Laboratory in Sandia`s Combustion Research Facility. A high-temperature flow reactor that can accommodate small preforms (1-3 cm diameter) generates conditions under which deposition can be observed, with flexibility to vary both deposition temperature (up to 1500 K) and pressure (as low as 10 torr). Both mass spectrometric and laser diagnostic probes are available to provide measurements of gas-phase compositions. Experiments using surface analytical techniques are also applied to characterize important processes occuring on the deposit surface. Computational tools developed through extensive research in the combustion field are employed to simulate the chemically reacting flows present in typical industrial reactors. These include the CHEMKIN and Surface-CHEMKIN suites of codes, which permit facile development of complex reaction mechanisms and vastly simplify the implementation of multi-component transport and thermodynamics. Quantum chemistry codes are also used to estimate thermodynamic and kinetic data for species and reactions for which this information is unavailable.

  16. Radiofrequency (microwave) radiation exposure of mammalian cells during UV-induced DNA repair synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Meltz, M.L.; Walker, K.A.; Erwin, D.N.

    1987-05-01

    The effect of continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed-wave (PW) radiofrequency radiation (RFR) in the microwave range on UV-induced DNA repair has been investigated in MRC-5 normal human diploid fibroblasts. RFR exposure at power densities of 1 (or 5) and 10 mW/cm2 gave a maximum specific absorption rate (SAR) (at 10 mW/cm2) of 0.39 +/- 0.15 W/kg for 350 MHz RFR, 4.5 +/- 3.0 W/kg for 850 MHz RFR, and 2.7 +/- 1.6 W/kg for 1.2 GHz RFR. RFR exposures for 1 to 3 h at 37 degrees C, in either continuous-wave or pulsed-wave modes, had no effect on the rate of repair replication label incorporated into preexisting UV-damaged DNA. RFR exposures (PW), with a constant medium temperature of 39 degrees C at 350 and 850 MHz during the repair period after UV damage, also had no effect. Assay for induction of repair synthesis by RFR exposure alone in non-UV irradiated cells was negative for the 350-, 850-, and 1200-MHz CW and PW RFR at 37 degrees C and the 350- and 850-MHz PW RFR at 39 degrees C. RFR does not induce DNA repair under these exposure conditions. In preliminary experiments--with the tissue culture medium maintained at 39 degrees C and RFR exposures (PW) at the frequencies of 350, 850, and 1200 MHz--no effect on incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA undergoing semiconservative synthesis was observed.

  17. Reversible suppression of protein synthesis in concert with polysome disaggregation during anoxia exposure in Littorina littorea.

    PubMed

    Larade, Kevin; Storey, Kenneth B

    2002-03-01

    Many marine invertebrates can live without oxygen for long periods of time, a capacity that is facilitated by the ability to suppress metabolic rate in anoxia to a value that is typically less than 10% of the normal aerobic rate. The present study demonstrates that a reduction in the rate of protein synthesis is one factor in the overall anoxia-induced metabolic suppression in the marine snail, Littorina littorea. The rate of [3H]leucine incorporation into newly translated protein in hepatopancreas isolated from 48 h anoxic snails was determined to be 49% relative to normoxic controls. However, protein concentration in hepatopancreas did not change during anoxia, suggesting a coordinated suppression of net protein turnover. Analysis of hepatopancreas samples from snails exposed to 24-72 h anoxia showed a gradual disaggregation of polysomes into monosomes. A re-aggregation of monosomes into polysomes was observed after 3 h of aerobic recovery. Analysis of fractions from the ribosome profile using radiolabeled probe to detect alpha-tubulin transcripts confirmed a general decrease in protein translation during anoxia exposure (transcript association with polysomes decreased) with a reversal during aerobic recovery. Western blotting of hepatopancreas samples from normoxic, 24 h anoxic, and 1 h aerobic recovered snails demonstrated that eIF-2alpha is substantially phosphorylated during anoxia exposure and dephosphorylated during normoxia and aerobic recovery, suggesting a decrease in translation initiation during anoxia exposure. These results suggest that metabolic suppression during anoxia exposure in L. littorea involves a decrease in protein translation. PMID:12030368

  18. Saran-Chloropel plastic suit worker dose rates from airborne tritium exposure - first exposure hour

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.

    1993-04-20

    Radiological Engineering was requested to develop Tritium Stay Time Chart dose rates for the 9 mil Saran-Chloropel (CPE) plastic suit for a period of one hour or less. Assumptions utilized in previous calculations were revised to better address the first hour of exposure in the suit for emergency situations.

  19. Effects of sound exposure on the growth and intracellular macromolecular synthesis of E. coli k-12

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongzhu; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Microbes, as one of the primary producers of the biosphere, play an important role in ecosystems. Exploring the mechanism of adaptation and resistance of microbial population to various environmental factors has come into focus in the fields of modern microbial ecology and molecular ecology. However, facing the increasingly serious problem of acoustic pollution, very few efforts have been put forth into studying the relation of single cell organisms and sound field exposure. Herein, we studied the biological effects of sound exposure on the growth of E. coli K-12 with different acoustic parameters. The effects of sound exposure on the intracellular macromolecular synthesis and cellular morphology of E. coli K-12 were also analyzed and discussed. Experimental results indicated that E. coli K-12 exposed to sound waves owned a higher biomass and a faster specific growth rate compared to the control group. Also, the average length of E. coli K-12 cells increased more than 27.26%. The maximum biomass and maximum specific growth rate of the stimulation group by 8000 Hz, 80dB sound wave was about 1.7 times and 2.5 times that of the control group, respectively. Moreover, it was observed that E. coli K-12 can respond rapidly to sound stress at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels by promoting the synthesis of intracellular RNA and total protein. Some potential mechanisms may be involved in the responses of bacterial cells to sound stress. PMID:27077011

  20. Effects of sound exposure on the growth and intracellular macromolecular synthesis of E. coli k-12.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shaobin; Zhang, Yongzhu; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Microbes, as one of the primary producers of the biosphere, play an important role in ecosystems. Exploring the mechanism of adaptation and resistance of microbial population to various environmental factors has come into focus in the fields of modern microbial ecology and molecular ecology. However, facing the increasingly serious problem of acoustic pollution, very few efforts have been put forth into studying the relation of single cell organisms and sound field exposure. Herein, we studied the biological effects of sound exposure on the growth of E. coli K-12 with different acoustic parameters. The effects of sound exposure on the intracellular macromolecular synthesis and cellular morphology of E. coli K-12 were also analyzed and discussed. Experimental results indicated that E. coli K-12 exposed to sound waves owned a higher biomass and a faster specific growth rate compared to the control group. Also, the average length of E. coli K-12 cells increased more than 27.26%. The maximum biomass and maximum specific growth rate of the stimulation group by 8000 Hz, 80dB sound wave was about 1.7 times and 2.5 times that of the control group, respectively. Moreover, it was observed that E. coli K-12 can respond rapidly to sound stress at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels by promoting the synthesis of intracellular RNA and total protein. Some potential mechanisms may be involved in the responses of bacterial cells to sound stress. PMID:27077011

  1. Protein synthesis rates in atrophied gastrocnemius muscles after limb immobilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, K. R.; Seider, M. J.; Booth, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    Noting that protein synthesis declines in the gastrocnemius 6 hr after immobilization, the study sought to detect an increase of protein synthesis when the limb was freed, and to examine the effects of exercise on the rate of increase. Rats were used as subjects, with their hind legs in plaster of Paris in plantar flexion to eliminate strain on the gastrocnemius. Periods of immobilization were varied and samples of blood from the muscle were taken to track protein synthesis rates for different groups in immobilization and exercise regimens (running and weightlifting). Synthesis rates declined 3.6% during time in the cast, then increased 6.3%/day after the casts were removed. Both running and weightlifting were found to increase the fractional rate of protein formation in the gastrocnemius muscle when compared with contralateral muscles that were not exercised and were used as controls, suggesting that the mechanism controlling protein synthesis in skeletal muscles is rapidly responsive to changes in muscular contractile activity.

  2. The Exposure Rate Conversion Factor for Nuclear Fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Spriggs, G D

    2009-02-11

    Nuclear fallout is comprised of approximately 2000 radionuclides. About 1000 of these radionuclides are either primary fission products or activated fission products that are created during the burn process. The exposure rate one meter above the surface produced by this complex mixture of radionuclides varies rapidly with time since many of the radionuclides are short-lived and decay numerous times before reaching a stable isotope. As a result, the mixture of radionuclides changes rapidly with time. Using a new code developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the mixture of radionuclides at any given point in time can be calculated. The code also calculates the exposure rate conversion factor (ECF) for all 3864 individual isotopes contained in its database based on the total gamma energy released per decay. Based on the combination of isotope mixture and individual ECFs, the time-dependent variation of the composite exposure rate conversion factor for nuclear fallout can be easily calculated. As example of this new capability, a simple test case corresponding to a 10 kt, uranium-plutonium fuel has been calculated. The results for the time-dependent, composite ECF for this test case are shown in Figure 1. For comparison, we also calculated the composite exposure rate conversion factor using the conversion factors found in Federal Guidance Report No.12 (FGR-12) published by ORNL, which contains the conversion factors for approximately 1000 isotopes. As can be noted from Figure 1, the two functions agree reasonably well at times greater than about 30 minutes. However, they do not agree at early times since FGR-12 does not include all of the short-lived isotopes that are produced in nuclear fallout. It should also be noted that the composite ECF at one hour is 19.7 R/hr per Ci/m{sup 2}. This corresponds to 3148 R/hr per 1 kt per square mile, which agrees reasonably well with the value of 3000 R/hr per 1 kt per square mile as quoted by Glasstone. We have

  3. Cold adaptation increases rates of nutrient flow and metabolic plasticity during cold exposure in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Williams, Caroline M; McCue, Marshall D; Sunny, Nishanth E; Szejner-Sigal, Andre; Morgan, Theodore J; Allison, David B; Hahn, Daniel A

    2016-09-14

    Metabolic flexibility is an important component of adaptation to stressful environments, including thermal stress and latitudinal adaptation. A long history of population genetic studies suggest that selection on core metabolic enzymes may shape life histories by altering metabolic flux. However, the direct relationship between selection on thermal stress hardiness and metabolic flux has not previously been tested. We investigated flexibility of nutrient catabolism during cold stress in Drosophila melanogaster artificially selected for fast or slow recovery from chill coma (i.e. cold-hardy or -susceptible), specifically testing the hypothesis that stress adaptation increases metabolic turnover. Using (13)C-labelled glucose, we first showed that cold-hardy flies more rapidly incorporate ingested carbon into amino acids and newly synthesized glucose, permitting rapid synthesis of proline, a compound shown elsewhere to improve survival of cold stress. Second, using glucose and leucine tracers we showed that cold-hardy flies had higher oxidation rates than cold-susceptible flies before cold exposure, similar oxidation rates during cold exposure, and returned to higher oxidation rates during recovery. Additionally, cold-hardy flies transferred compounds among body pools more rapidly during cold exposure and recovery. Increased metabolic turnover may allow cold-adapted flies to better prepare for, resist and repair/tolerate cold damage. This work illustrates for the first time differences in nutrient fluxes associated with cold adaptation, suggesting that metabolic costs associated with cold hardiness could invoke resource-based trade-offs that shape life histories. PMID:27605506

  4. Exposure Modeling of Residential Air Exchange Rates for NEXUS Participants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to cost and participant burden of personal measurements, air pollution health studies often estimate exposures using local ambient air monitors. Since outdoor levels do not necessarily reflect personal exposures, we developed the Exposure Model for Individuals (EMI) to improv...

  5. Exposure Modeling of Residential Air Exchange Rates for NEXUS Participants.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to cost and participant burden of personal measurements, air pollution health studies often estimate exposures using local ambient air monitors. Since outdoor levels do not necessarily reflect personal exposures, we developed the Exposure Model for Individuals (EMI) to improv...

  6. Heart rate variability with repetitive exposure to music.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Makoto; Kobayashi, Asami; Kawasaki, Chie

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies of physiological responses to music showed inconsistent results, which might be attributable to methodological differences. Heart rate variability has been used to assess activation of the sympathetic and the parasympathetic nervous systems. The present study aimed to examine heart rate variability with repetitive exposure to sedative or excitative music. The participants were 13 undergraduate or graduate students who were each exposed to three conditions sedative music (SM), excitative music (EM), and no music (NM) on different days. Each participant underwent four sessions of one condition in a day. Sedative music and no music each induced both high relaxation and low tension subjectively. However, excitative music decreased perceived tension and increased perceived relaxation as the number of sessions increased. The low-frequency (LF) component of heart rate variability (HRV) and the LF/HF (high-frequency) ratio increased during SM and EM sessions but decreased during NM sessions. The HF component of HRV during SM was higher than that during EM but the same as that during NM. These findings suggest that excitative music decreased the activation of the parasympathetic nervous system. PMID:16038775

  7. Lung cancer in French and Czech uranium miners: Radon-associated risk at low exposure rates and modifying effects of time since exposure and age at exposure.

    PubMed

    Tomasek, Ladislav; Rogel, Agnès; Tirmarche, Margot; Mitton, Nicolas; Laurier, Dominique

    2008-02-01

    Radon is recognized as a public health concern for indoor exposure. Precise quantification derived from occupational exposure in miners is still needed for estimating the risk and the factors that modify the dependence on cumulated exposure. The present paper reports on relationship between radon exposure and lung cancer risk in French and Czech cohorts of uranium miners (n = 10,100). Miners from these two cohorts are characterized by low levels of exposure (average cumulated exposure of less than 60 WLM) protracted over a long period (mean duration of exposure of 10 years) and by a good quality of individual exposure estimates (95% of annual exposures based on radon measurements). The modifying effect of the quality of exposure on the risk is analyzed. A total of 574 lung cancer deaths were observed, which is 187% higher than expected from the national statistics. This significantly elevated risk is strongly associated with cumulated radon exposure. The estimated overall excess relative risk per WLM is 0.027 (95% CI: 0.017-0.043, related to measured exposures). For age at exposure of 30 and 20 years since exposure, the ERR/WLM is 0.042, and this value decreases by approximately 50% for each 10-year increase in age at exposure and time since exposure. The present study emphasizes that the quality of exposure estimates is an important factor that may substantially influence results. Time since exposure and simultaneously age at exposure were the most important effect modifiers. No inverse exposure-rate effect below 4 WL was observed. The results are consistent with estimates of the BEIR VI report using the concentration model at an exposure rate below 0.5 WL. PMID:18220460

  8. Adaptation to Low Temperature Exposure Increases Metabolic Rates Independently of Growth Rates.

    PubMed

    Williams, Caroline M; Szejner-Sigal, Andre; Morgan, Theodore J; Edison, Arthur S; Allison, David B; Hahn, Daniel A

    2016-07-01

    Metabolic cold adaptation is a pattern where ectotherms from cold, high-latitude, or -altitude habitats have higher metabolic rates than ectotherms from warmer habitats. When found, metabolic cold adaptation is often attributed to countergradient selection, wherein short, cool growing seasons select for a compensatory increase in growth rates and development times of ectotherms. Yet, ectotherms in high-latitude and -altitude environments face many challenges in addition to thermal and time constraints on lifecycles. In addition to short, cool growing seasons, high-latitude and - altitude environments are characterized by regular exposure to extreme low temperatures, which cause ectotherms to enter a transient state of immobility termed chill coma. The ability to resume activity quickly after chill coma increases with latitude and altitude in patterns consistent with local adaptation to cold conditions. We show that artificial selection for fast and slow chill coma recovery among lines of the fly Drosophila melanogaster also affects rates of respiratory metabolism. Cold-hardy fly lines, with fast recovery from chill coma, had higher respiratory metabolic rates than control lines, with cold-susceptible slow-recovering lines having the lowest metabolic rates. Fast chill coma recovery was also associated with higher respiratory metabolism in a set of lines derived from a natural population. Although their metabolic rates were higher than control lines, fast-recovering cold-hardy lines did not have faster growth rates or development times than control lines. This suggests that raised metabolic rates in high-latitude and -altitude species may be driven by adaptation to extreme low temperatures, illustrating the importance of moving "Beyond the Mean". PMID:27103615

  9. Voluntary Exercise Regionally Augments Rates of Cerebral Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nadel, Jeffrey; Huang, Tianjian; Xia, Zengyan; Burlin, Thomas; Zametkin, Alan; Smith, Carolyn Beebe

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is a natural form of neurophysiologic stimulation that has known benefits for mental health, maintenance of cerebral function, and stress reduction. Exercise is known to induce an upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and this is thought to be involved in associated increases in neural plasticity. Protein synthesis is also an essential component of adaptive plasticity. We hypothesized that exercise may stimulate changes in brain protein synthesis as part of its effects on plasticity. Here, we applied the quantitative autoradiographic L-[1-14C] leucine method to the in vivo determination of regional rates of cerebral protein synthesis (rCPS) in adult rats following a seven day period of voluntary wheel-running and their sedentary counterparts. In four of 21 brain regions examined, the mean values of rCPS in the exercised rats were statistically significantly higher than in sedentary controls; regions affected were paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, ventral hippocampus as a whole, CA1 pyramidal cell layer in ventral hippocampus, and frontal cortex. Increases in rCPS approached statistical significance in dentate gyrus of the ventral hippocampus. Our results affirm the value of exercise in encouraging hippocampal and possibly cortical neuroplasticity, and also suggest that exercise may modulate stimulation of stress-response pathways. Ultimately, our study indicates that measurement of rCPS with PET might be used as a marker of brain response to exercise in human subjects. PMID:24016692

  10. Combined methodology for estimating dose rates and health effects from exposure to radioactive pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1980-12-01

    The work described in the report is basically a synthesis of two previously existing computer codes: INREM II, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and CAIRD, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The INREM II code uses contemporary dosimetric methods to estimate doses to specified reference organs due to inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. The CAIRD code employs actuarial life tables to account for competing risks in estimating numbers of health effects resulting from exposure of a cohort to some incremental risk. The combined computer code, referred to as RADRISK, estimates numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons due to continuous lifetime inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. Also briefly discussed in this report is a method of estimating numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort due to continuous lifetime exposure to external radiation. This method employs the CAIRD methodology together with dose conversion factors generated by the computer code DOSFACTER, developed at ORNL; these dose conversion factors are used to estimate dose rates to persons due to radionuclides in the air or on the ground surface. The combination of the life table and dosimetric guidelines for the release of radioactive pollutants to the atmosphere, as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977.

  11. Insulin accelerates global and mitochondrial protein synthesis rates in neonatal muscle during sepsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In neonatal pigs, sepsis decreases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle by decreasing translation initiation. However, insulin stimulates muscle protein synthesis despite persistent repression of translation initiation signaling. To determine whether the insulin-induced increase in global rates of m...

  12. A hazardous substance exposure prevention rating method for intervention needs assessment and effectiveness evaluation: the Small Business Exposure Index

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Aims This paper describes the refinement and adaptation to small business of a previously developed method for systematically prioritizing needs for intervention on hazardous substance exposures in manufacturing worksites, and evaluating intervention effectiveness. Methods We developed a checklist containing six unique sets of yes/no variables organized in a 2 × 3 matrix of exposure potential versus exposure protection at three levels corresponding to a simplified hierarchy of controls: materials, processes, and human interface. Each of the six sets of indicator variables was reduced to a high/moderate/low rating. Ratings from the matrix were then combined to generate an exposure prevention 'Small Business Exposure Index' (SBEI) Summary score for each area. Reflecting the hierarchy of controls, material factors were weighted highest, followed by process, and then human interface. The checklist administered by an industrial hygienist during walk-through inspection (N = 149 manufacturing processes/areas in 25 small to medium-sized manufacturing worksites). One area or process per manufacturing department was assessed and rated. A second hygienist independently assessed 36 areas to evaluate inter-rater reliability. Results The SBEI Summary scores indicated that exposures were well controlled in the majority of areas assessed (58% with rating of 1 or 2 on a 6-point scale), that there was some room for improvement in roughly one-third of areas (31% of areas rated 3 or 4), and that roughly 10% of the areas assessed were urgently in need of intervention (rated as 5 or 6). Inter-rater reliability of EP ratings was good to excellent (e.g., for SBEI Summary scores, weighted kappa = 0.73, 95% CI 0.52–0.93). Conclusion The SBEI exposure prevention rating method is suitable for use in small/medium enterprises, has good discriminatory power and reliability, offers an inexpensive method for intervention needs assessment and effectiveness evaluation, and complements

  13. RATE Exposure Assessment Modules - EXA 408, EXA 409

    EPA Science Inventory

    EXA 408 – Interpreting Biomonitoring Data and Using Pharmacokinetic Modeling in Exposure Assessment Widespread acceptance and use of the CDC's National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) database, which, among other things, reports measured concentrations of...

  14. Core-collapse supernova rate synthesis within 11 Mpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Lin; Eldridge, J. J.

    2015-09-01

    The 11 Mpc Hα and Ultraviolet Galaxy Survey (11HUGS) traces the star formation activity of nearby galaxies. In addition, within this volume the detection completeness of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) is high therefore by comparing these observed stellar births and deaths we can make a sensitive test of our understanding of how stars live and die. In this paper, we use the results of the Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis (BPASS) code to simulate the 11HUGS galaxies' Hα and far-ultraviolet (FUV) star formation rate indicators (SFRIs) and simultaneously match the CCSN rate. We find that stellar population including interacting binary stars makes little difference to the total CCSN rate but increases the Hα and FUV fluxes for a constant number of stars being formed. In addition, they significantly increase the predicted rate of Type Ibc SNe relative to Type II SNe to the level observed in the 11HUGS galaxies. We also find that instead of assuming a constant star formation history for the galaxies our best-fitting models have an SFR that peaked more than 3 Myr ago.

  15. 10 CFR 35.2070 - Records of surveys for ambient radiation exposure rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of surveys for ambient radiation exposure rate. 35.2070 Section 35.2070 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2070 Records of surveys for ambient radiation exposure rate. A licensee shall retain a record...

  16. 10 CFR 35.70 - Surveys of ambient radiation exposure rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Surveys of ambient radiation exposure rate. 35.70 Section... Requirements § 35.70 Surveys of ambient radiation exposure rate. (a) In addition to the surveys required by Part 20 of this chapter, a licensee shall survey with a radiation detection survey instrument at...

  17. 10 CFR 35.70 - Surveys of ambient radiation exposure rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Surveys of ambient radiation exposure rate. 35.70 Section 35.70 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL General Technical Requirements § 35.70 Surveys of ambient radiation exposure rate. (a) In addition to the surveys required by Part 20 of this chapter, a licensee...

  18. 10 CFR 35.2070 - Records of surveys for ambient radiation exposure rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Records of surveys for ambient radiation exposure rate. 35.2070 Section 35.2070 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2070 Records of surveys for ambient radiation exposure rate. A licensee shall retain a record...

  19. 10 CFR 35.2070 - Records of surveys for ambient radiation exposure rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Records of surveys for ambient radiation exposure rate. 35.2070 Section 35.2070 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2070 Records of surveys for ambient radiation exposure rate. A licensee shall retain a record...

  20. 10 CFR 35.2070 - Records of surveys for ambient radiation exposure rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Records of surveys for ambient radiation exposure rate. 35.2070 Section 35.2070 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2070 Records of surveys for ambient radiation exposure rate. A licensee shall retain a record...

  1. 10 CFR 35.70 - Surveys of ambient radiation exposure rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Surveys of ambient radiation exposure rate. 35.70 Section... Requirements § 35.70 Surveys of ambient radiation exposure rate. (a) In addition to the surveys required by Part 20 of this chapter, a licensee shall survey with a radiation detection survey instrument at...

  2. 10 CFR 35.70 - Surveys of ambient radiation exposure rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Surveys of ambient radiation exposure rate. 35.70 Section... Requirements § 35.70 Surveys of ambient radiation exposure rate. (a) In addition to the surveys required by Part 20 of this chapter, a licensee shall survey with a radiation detection survey instrument at...

  3. 10 CFR 35.70 - Surveys of ambient radiation exposure rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Surveys of ambient radiation exposure rate. 35.70 Section... Requirements § 35.70 Surveys of ambient radiation exposure rate. (a) In addition to the surveys required by Part 20 of this chapter, a licensee shall survey with a radiation detection survey instrument at...

  4. Skeletal Muscle Myofibrillar and Sarcoplasmic Protein Synthesis Rates Are Affected Differently by Altitude-Induced Hypoxia in Native Lowlanders

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Lars; Haslund, Mads Lyhne; Robach, Paul; van Hall, Gerrit; Calbet, Jose A. L.; Saltin, Bengt; Lundby, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    As a consequence to hypobaric hypoxic exposure skeletal muscle atrophy is often reported. The underlying mechanism has been suggested to involve a decrease in protein synthesis in order to conserve O2. With the aim to challenge this hypothesis, we applied a primed, constant infusion of 1-13C-leucine in nine healthy male subjects at sea level and subsequently at high-altitude (4559 m) after 7–9 days of acclimatization. Physical activity levels and food and energy intake were controlled prior to the two experimental conditions with the aim to standardize these confounding factors. Blood samples and expired breath samples were collected hourly during the 4 hour trial and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained at 1 and 4 hours after tracer priming in the overnight fasted state. Myofibrillar protein synthesis rate was doubled; 0.041±0.018 at sea-level to 0.080±0.018%⋅hr−1 (p<0.05) when acclimatized to high altitude. The sarcoplasmic protein synthesis rate was in contrast unaffected by altitude exposure; 0.052±0.019 at sea-level to 0.059±0.010%⋅hr−1 (p>0.05). Trends to increments in whole body protein kinetics were seen: Degradation rate elevated from 2.51±0.21 at sea level to 2.73±0.13 µmol⋅kg−1⋅min−1 (p = 0.05) at high altitude and synthesis rate similar; 2.24±0.20 at sea level and 2.43±0.13 µmol⋅kg−1⋅min−1 (p>0.05) at altitude. We conclude that whole body amino acid flux is increased due to an elevated protein turnover rate. Resting skeletal muscle myocontractile protein synthesis rate was concomitantly elevated by high-altitude induced hypoxia, whereas the sarcoplasmic protein synthesis rate was unaffected by hypoxia. These changed responses may lead to divergent adaptation over the course of prolonged exposure. PMID:21187972

  5. Rates of synthesis of prealbumin and retinol-binding protein during acute inflammation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Felding, P; Fex, G

    1985-04-01

    The rates of synthesis of prealbumin (PA), retinol-binding protein (RBP), and other plasma proteins were measured in primary monolayer cultures of rat hepatocytes isolated from normal rats and from rats 18 h after induction of an inflammatory reaction by subcutaneous injection of croton oil. The inflammatory pattern of protein synthesis seemed to persist in the isolated hepatocytes for 1-2 days. This pattern included significantly decreased rates of synthesis of PA. The rate of synthesis of RBP was probably also decreased, but significantly less than the rate of PA synthesis. The results support the idea that it is mainly the decreased rate of PA synthesis which is responsible for the decreased plasma concentration of PA, and its ligand RBP and retinol during inflammation. PMID:4039519

  6. MICROBIAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION RATES AND EXPOSURE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the results from a study that examined microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) emissions from six fungi and one bacterial species (Streptomyces spp.) commonly found in indoor environments. Data are presented on peak emission rates from inoculated agar plate...

  7. Exposure to Community Violence among Arab Youth in Israel: Rates and Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.; Leshem, Becky; Guterman, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The research explored the rates and characteristics of exposure to community violence (CV) and its relevance to several sociodemographic factors among a sample of 833 Arab youth aged 14-18 years residing in diverse residential areas in Israel. Data were collected using a self-report questionnaire. The frequency of exposure to CV during the past 12…

  8. Rates and Psychological Effects of Exposure to Family Violence among Sri Lankan University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.; de Zoysa, Piyanjli

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The study had two objectives: to examine the rates of exposure to family violence among students in a non-Western society, with Sri Lanka as a case study and to examine the psychological effects of their exposure. Method: Four hundred seventy six medical students in Sri Lanka were surveyed. A self-administered questionnaire was…

  9. Biosocial Bases of Reactive and Proactive Aggression: The Roles of Community Violence Exposure and Heart Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarpa, Angela; Tanaka, Akiho; Haden, Sara Chiara

    2008-01-01

    In order to more fully understand how individual differences influence adaptation to violence, this study examined the moderating influence of resting heart rate (HR) and HR variability (HRV) between community violence (CV) exposure and child reactive/proactive aggression. Forty 7-13-year-old community children self-reported CV exposure (i.e.,…

  10. EXPOSURE OF CULTURED MYOCYTES TO ZINC RESULTS IN ALTERED BEAT RATE AND INTERCELLULAR COMMUNICATION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of cultured myocytes to zinc results in altered beat rate and intercellular communication

    Graff, Donald W, Devlin, Robert B, Brackhan, Joseph A, Muller-Borer, Barbara J, Bowman, Jill S, Cascio, Wayne E.

    Exposure to ambient air pollution particulate matter (...

  11. Long-term changes in mouse lung following inhalation of a fibrosis-inducing dose of 239PuO2: changes in collagen synthesis and degradation rates.

    PubMed

    McAnulty, R J; Moores, S R; Talbot, R J; Bishop, J E; Mays, P K; Laurent, G J

    1991-01-01

    Mice were exposed by nose-only inhalation to 239PuO2, which resulted in an IAD of 1110 +/- 29 Bq. At various times after exposure, rates of collagen metabolism were measured using validated in vivo methods based on the administration of radiolabelled proline, together with a large flooding dose of unlabelled proline and measurement of its incorporation into lung collagen as hydroxyproline. Dramatic increases in both synthesis and degradation rates of collagen were observed. At 54 days after exposure the fractional synthesis rates in experimental mice were almost five times those in controls (control: 3.2 +/- 0.6%/day, 239PuO2-exposed: 14.5 +/- 0.4%/day) and by 300 days synthesis rates, although declining, were still more than double the control values. A similar pattern of change was observed for collagen degradation. The combination of changes in synthesis and degradation rates led to a 60% increase in lung collagen content by 300 days (control: 3.05 +/- 0.24 mg/lung, 239PuO2-exposed: 4.88 +/- 0.42 mg/lung). The data suggest that extensive remodelling of the lung connective tissue matrix occurs during development of fibrosis and that, over long periods of time, small imbalances between synthesis and degradation may result in quite large increases in protein content. PMID:1671069

  12. VANADIUM EXPOSURE ALTERS SPONTANEOUS BEAT RATE AND GENE EXPRESSION OF CULTURED CARDIAC MYOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air pollution particulate matter (PM) exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Recent toxicological studies report PM-induced changes in a number of cardiac parameters, including heart rate variability, arrhythmias, repolarization, and internal defib...

  13. Comparison of hurricane exposure methods and associations with county fetal death rates, adjusting for environmental quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse effects of hurricanes are increasing as coastal populations grow and events become more severe. Hurricane exposure during pregnancy can influence fetal death rates through mechanisms related to healthcare, infrastructure disruption, nutrition, and injury. Estimation of hu...

  14. Occupational Exposure to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes During Commercial Production Synthesis and Handling.

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, Eelco; Bekker, Cindy; Fransman, Wouter; Brouwer, Derk; Tromp, Peter; Vlaanderen, Jelle; Godderis, Lode; Hoet, Peter; Lan, Qing; Silverman, Debra; Vermeulen, Roel; Pronk, Anjoeka

    2016-04-01

    The world-wide production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has increased substantially in the last decade, leading to occupational exposures. There is a paucity of exposure data of workers involved in the commercial production of CNTs. The goals of this study were to assess personal exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) during the synthesis and handling of MWCNTs in a commercial production facility and to link these exposure levels to specific activities. Personal full-shift filter-based samples were collected, during commercial production and handling of MWCNTs, R&D activities, and office work. The concentrations of MWCNT were evaluated on the basis of EC concentrations. Associations were studied between observed MWCNT exposure levels and location and activities. SEM analyses showed MWCNTs, present as agglomerates ranging between 200nm and 100 µm. Exposure levels of MWCNTs observed in the production area during the full scale synthesis of MWCNTs (N = 23) were comparable to levels observed during further handling of MWCNTs (N = 19): (GM (95% lower confidence limit-95% upper confidence limit)) 41 μg m(-3) (20-88) versus 43 μg m(-3) (22-86), respectively. In the R&D area (N = 11) and the office (N = 5), exposure levels of MWCNTs were significantly (P < 0.05) lower: 5 μg m(-3) (2-11) and 7 μg m(-3) (2-28), respectively. Bagging, maintenance of the reactor, and powder conditioning were associated with higher exposure levels in the production area, whereas increased exposure levels in the R&D area were related to handling of MWCNTs powder. PMID:26613611

  15. Analyzing the effects of mechanical and osmotic loading on glycosaminoglycan synthesis rate in cartilaginous tissues.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Zhu, Qiaoqiao; Gu, Weiyong

    2015-02-26

    The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) plays an important role in cartilaginous tissues to support and transmit mechanical loads. Many extracellular biophysical stimuli could affect GAG synthesis by cells. It has been hypothesized that the change of cell volume is a primary mechanism for cells to perceive the stimuli. Experimental studies have shown that the maximum synthesis rate of GAG is achieved at an optimal cell volume, larger or smaller than this level the GAG synthesis rate decreases. Based on the hypothesis and experimental findings in the literature, we proposed a mathematical model to quantitatively describe the cell volume dependent GAG synthesis rate in the cartilaginous tissues. Using this model, we investigated the effects of osmotic loading and mechanical loading on GAG synthesis rate. It is found our proposed mathematical model is able to well describe the change of GAG synthesis rate in isolated cells or in cartilage with variations of the osmotic loading or mechanical loading. This model is important for evaluating the GAG synthesis activity within cartilaginous tissues as well as understanding the role of mechanical loading in tissue growth or degeneration. It is also important for designing a bioreactor system with proper extracellular environment or mechanical loading for growing tissue at the maximum synthesis rate of the extracellular matrix. PMID:25638034

  16. 10 CFR 35.2070 - Records of surveys for ambient radiation exposure rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Records of surveys for ambient radiation exposure rate. 35.2070 Section 35.2070 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2070 Records of surveys for ambient radiation exposure rate. A licensee shall retain a record of each survey required by § 35.70 for 3...

  17. Synthesis of phosphatidylcholines in ozone-exposed alveolar type II cells isolated from adult rat lung: is glycerolphosphate acyltransferase a rate-limiting enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Haagsman, H.P.; Schuurmans, E.A.; Batenburg, J.J.; van Golde, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    Type II cells were exposed to ozone by gas diffusion through the thin Teflon bottom of culture dishes. The rate of phosphatidylcholine synthesis by type II cells, monitored by the incorporation of (Me-/sup 14/C)choline, was impaired by ozone at concentrations that did not affect other cellular parameters. The enzymes choline kinase and cholinephosphate cytidylyltransferase were not susceptible to inactivation by ozone at concentrations at which the activity of glycerolphosphate acyltransferase was decreased. The enzyme activity of lactate dehydrogenase increased after ozone exposure. The specific activity of choline kinase in the cytosolic fraction of type II cells was fivefold that in whole lung. The metabolism of (Me-/sup 14/C)choline was studied as a function of the choline concentration. Maximal rates of phosphatidylcholine synthesis were already attained at a concentration of 20 microM choline. Exposure of type II cells to ozone did not affect the recovery of label from (Me-/sup 14/C)choline in choline phosphate and CDP choline. However, the maximal rate of phosphatidylcholine synthesis decreased after ozone exposure, which indicates that the decreased apparent activity of glycerolphosphate acyltransferase limits the supply of diacylglycerols and thereby the rate of phosphatidylcholine synthesis. If the flux through the diacylglycerol pathway was stimulated by the addition of palmitic acid, a higher maximal rate of phosphatidylcholine synthesis was observed. The uptake of (Me-/sup 14/C)choline and the recovery of label in CDPcholine were not altered by the addition of different concentrations of palmitate. It is concluded that type II cells take up choline very efficiently, probably due to the high specific activity of choline kinase. At low choline concentrations the rate of phosphatidylcholine synthesis is determined by the supply of CDPcholine.

  18. Postnatal Sulfur Dioxide Exposure Reversibly Alters Parasympathetic Regulation of Heart Rate

    PubMed Central

    Woerman, Amanda L.; Mendelowitz, David

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal sulfur dioxide exposure disrupts parasympathetic regulation of cardiovascular activity. Here, we examine the relative risks of prenatal versus postnatal exposure to the air pollutant, and the reversibility of the cardiovascular effects. Two groups of animals were used for this study. For prenatal exposure, pregnant Sprague-Dawley dams were exposed to 5 parts per million sulfur dioxide for 1 hour daily throughout gestation, and with their pups upon birth to medical-grade air through 6 days postnatal. For postnatal exposure, dams were exposed to air, and upon delivery along with their pups to 5 parts per million sulfur dioxide through postnatal day 6. Electrocardiograms were recorded from pups on postnatal day 5 to examine changes in heart rate. Whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology was used to examine changes in neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons upon sulfur dioxide exposure. Postnatal sulfur dioxide exposure diminished glutamatergic neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons by 40.9% and increased heart rate, whereas prenatal exposure altered neither of these properties. When postnatal exposure concluded on postnatal day 5, excitatory neurotransmission remained decreased through day 6, and returned to basal levels by day 7. Electrocardiograms showed that heart rate remained elevated through day 6 and recovered by day 7. Upon activation of the parasympathetic diving reflex, the response was significantly blunted by postnatal sulfur dioxide exposure through day 7 but recovered by day 8. Postnatal, but not prenatal, exposure to sulfur dioxide can disrupt parasympathetic regulation of cardiovascular activity. Neonates can recover from these effects within 2–3 days of discontinued exposure. PMID:23774227

  19. Postnatal sulfur dioxide exposure reversibly alters parasympathetic regulation of heart rate.

    PubMed

    Woerman, Amanda L; Mendelowitz, David

    2013-08-01

    Perinatal sulfur dioxide exposure disrupts parasympathetic regulation of cardiovascular activity. Here, we examine the relative risks of prenatal versus postnatal exposure to the air pollutant and the reversibility of the cardiovascular effects. Two groups of animals were used for this study. For prenatal exposure, pregnant Sprague-Dawley dams were exposed to 5 parts per million sulfur dioxide for 1 hour daily throughout gestation and with their pups after birth to medical-grade air through 6 days postnatal. For postnatal exposure, dams were exposed to air, and after delivery along with their pups to 5 parts per million sulfur dioxide through postnatal day 6. ECGs were recorded from pups on postnatal day 5 to examine changes in heart rate. Whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology was used to examine changes in neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons in the nucleus ambiguus on sulfur dioxide exposure. Postnatal sulfur dioxide exposure diminished glutamatergic neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons by 40.9% and increased heart rate, whereas prenatal exposure altered neither of these properties. When postnatal exposure concluded on postnatal day 5, excitatory neurotransmission remained decreased through day 6 and returned to basal levels by day 7. ECGs showed that heart rate remained elevated through day 6 and recovered by day 7. On activation of the parasympathetic diving reflex, the response was significantly blunted by postnatal sulfur dioxide exposure through day 7 but recovered by day 8. Postnatal, but not prenatal, exposure to sulfur dioxide can disrupt parasympathetic regulation of cardiovascular activity. Neonates can recover from these effects within 2 to 3 days of discontinued exposure. PMID:23774227

  20. Exposure to wood smoke increases arterial stiffness and decreases heart rate variability in humans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Emissions from biomass combustion are a major source of indoor and outdoor air pollution, and are estimated to cause millions of premature deaths worldwide annually. Whilst adverse respiratory health effects of biomass exposure are well established, less is known about its effects on the cardiovascular system. In this study we assessed the effect of exposure to wood smoke on heart rate, blood pressure, central arterial stiffness and heart rate variability in otherwise healthy persons. Methods Fourteen healthy non-smoking subjects participated in a randomized, double-blind crossover study. Subjects were exposed to dilute wood smoke (mean particle concentration of 314±38 μg/m3) or filtered air for three hours during intermittent exercise. Heart rate, blood pressure, central arterial stiffness and heart rate variability were measured at baseline and for one hour post-exposure. Results Central arterial stiffness, measured as augmentation index, augmentation pressure and pulse wave velocity, was higher after wood smoke exposure as compared to filtered air (p < 0.01 for all), and heart rate was increased (p < 0.01) although there was no effect on blood pressure. Heart rate variability (SDNN, RMSSD and pNN50; p = 0.003, p < 0.001 and p < 0.001 respectively) was decreased one hour following exposure to wood smoke compared to filtered air. Conclusions Acute exposure to wood smoke as a model of exposure to biomass combustion is associated with an immediate increase in central arterial stiffness and a simultaneous reduction in heart rate variability. As biomass is used for cooking and heating by a large fraction of the global population and is currently advocated as a sustainable alternative energy source, further studies are required to establish its likely impact on cardiovascular disease. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01488500 PMID:23742058

  1. Review of Air Exchange Rate Models for Air Pollution Exposure Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessments is estimation of the air exchange rate (AER) for various buildings, where people spend their time. The AER, which is rate the exchange of indoor air with outdoor air, is an important determinant for entry of outdoor air pol...

  2. RESIDENTIAL AIR EXCHANGE RATES FOR USE IN INDOOR AIR AND EXPOSURE MODELING STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data on air exchange rates are important inputs to indoor air quality models. ndoor air models, in turn, are incorporated into the structure of total human exposure models. ragmentary data on residential ventilation rates are available in various governmental reports, journal art...

  3. Rating locomotive crew diesel emission exposure profiles using statistics and Bayesian Decision Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Paul; Bullock, William H

    2014-01-01

    For more than 20 years CSX Transportation (CSXT) has collected exposure measurements from locomotive engineers and conductors who are potentially exposed to diesel emissions. The database included measurements for elemental and total carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatics, aldehydes, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen dioxide. This database was statistically analyzed and summarized, and the resulting statistics and exposure profiles were compared to relevant occupational exposure limits (OELs) using both parametric and non-parametric descriptive and compliance statistics. Exposure ratings, using the American Industrial Health Association (AIHA) exposure categorization scheme, were determined using both the compliance statistics and Bayesian Decision Analysis (BDA). The statistical analysis of the elemental carbon data (a marker for diesel particulate) strongly suggests that the majority of levels in the cabs of the lead locomotives (n = 156) were less than the California guideline of 0.020 mg/m(3). The sample 95th percentile was roughly half the guideline; resulting in an AIHA exposure rating of category 2/3 (determined using BDA). The elemental carbon (EC) levels in the trailing locomotives tended to be greater than those in the lead locomotive; however, locomotive crews rarely ride in the trailing locomotive. Lead locomotive EC levels were similar to those reported by other investigators studying locomotive crew exposures and to levels measured in urban areas. Lastly, both the EC sample mean and 95%UCL were less than the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reference concentration of 0.005 mg/m(3). With the exception of nitrogen dioxide, the overwhelming majority of the measurements for total carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatics, aldehydes, and combustion gases in the cabs of CSXT locomotives were either non-detects or considerably less than the working OELs for the years represented in the database. When compared to the previous American

  4. Emesis as a Screening Diagnostic for Low Dose Rate (LDR) Total Body Radiation Exposure.

    PubMed

    Camarata, Andrew S; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Demidenko, Eugene; Flood, Ann B; Swartz, Harold M; Ali, Arif N

    2016-04-01

    Current radiation disaster manuals list the time-to-emesis (TE) as the key triage indicator of radiation dose. The data used to support TE recommendations were derived primarily from nearly instantaneous, high dose-rate exposures as part of variable condition accident databases. To date, there has not been a systematic differentiation between triage dose estimates associated with high and low dose rate (LDR) exposures, even though it is likely that after a nuclear detonation or radiologic disaster, many surviving casualties would have received a significant portion of their total exposure from fallout (LDR exposure) rather than from the initial nuclear detonation or criticality event (high dose rate exposure). This commentary discusses the issues surrounding the use of emesis as a screening diagnostic for radiation dose after LDR exposure. As part of this discussion, previously published clinical data on emesis after LDR total body irradiation (TBI) is statistically re-analyzed as an illustration of the complexity of the issue and confounding factors. This previously published data includes 107 patients who underwent TBI up to 10.5 Gy in a single fraction delivered over several hours at 0.02 to 0.04 Gy min. Estimates based on these data for the sensitivity of emesis as a screening diagnostic for the low dose rate radiation exposure range from 57.1% to 76.6%, and the estimates for specificity range from 87.5% to 99.4%. Though the original data contain multiple confounding factors, the evidence regarding sensitivity suggests that emesis appears to be quite poor as a medical screening diagnostic for LDR exposures. PMID:26910032

  5. Heart Rate, Stress, and Occupational Noise Exposure among Electronic Waste Recycling Workers.

    PubMed

    Burns, Katrina N; Sun, Kan; Fobil, Julius N; Neitzel, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) is a growing occupational and environmental health issue around the globe. E-waste recycling is a green industry of emerging importance, especially in low-and middle-income countries where much of this recycling work is performed, and where many people's livelihoods depend on this work. The occupational health hazards of e-waste recycling have not been adequately explored. We performed a cross-sectional study of noise exposures, heart rate, and perceived stress among e-waste recycling workers at a large e-waste site in Accra, Ghana. We interviewed 57 workers and continuously monitored their individual noise exposures and heart rates for up to 24 h. More than 40% of workers had noise exposures that exceeded recommended occupational (85 dBA) and community (70 dBA) noise exposure limits, and self-reported hearing difficulties were common. Workers also had moderate to high levels of perceived stress as measured via Cohen's Perceived Stress Scale, and reported a variety of symptoms that could indicate cardiovascular disease. Noise exposures were moderately and significantly correlated with heart rate (Spearman's ρ 0.46, p < 0.001). A mixed effects linear regression model indicated that a 1 dB increase in noise exposure was associated with a 0.17 increase in heart rate (p-value = 0.01) even after controlling for work activities, age, smoking, perceived stress, and unfavorable physical working conditions. These findings suggest that occupational and non-occupational noise exposure is associated with elevations in average heart rate, which may in turn predict potential cardiovascular damage. PMID:26797626

  6. Heart Rate, Stress, and Occupational Noise Exposure among Electronic Waste Recycling Workers

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Katrina N.; Sun, Kan; Fobil, Julius N.; Neitzel, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) is a growing occupational and environmental health issue around the globe. E-waste recycling is a green industry of emerging importance, especially in low-and middle-income countries where much of this recycling work is performed, and where many people’s livelihoods depend on this work. The occupational health hazards of e-waste recycling have not been adequately explored. We performed a cross-sectional study of noise exposures, heart rate, and perceived stress among e-waste recycling workers at a large e-waste site in Accra, Ghana. We interviewed 57 workers and continuously monitored their individual noise exposures and heart rates for up to 24 h. More than 40% of workers had noise exposures that exceeded recommended occupational (85 dBA) and community (70 dBA) noise exposure limits, and self-reported hearing difficulties were common. Workers also had moderate to high levels of perceived stress as measured via Cohen’s Perceived Stress Scale, and reported a variety of symptoms that could indicate cardiovascular disease. Noise exposures were moderately and significantly correlated with heart rate (Spearman’s ρ 0.46, p < 0.001). A mixed effects linear regression model indicated that a 1 dB increase in noise exposure was associated with a 0.17 increase in heart rate (p-value = 0.01) even after controlling for work activities, age, smoking, perceived stress, and unfavorable physical working conditions. These findings suggest that occupational and non-occupational noise exposure is associated with elevations in average heart rate, which may in turn predict potential cardiovascular damage. PMID:26797626

  7. Estimates of exposure rates and fallout arrival times near the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.B. )

    1990-11-01

    One of the tasks of the Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project (ORERP) was to estimate doses to individuals resulting from exposure to fallout from nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Dose estimates are based on estimates of the exposure rate 12 h post-detonation (H + 12) and the time of fallout arrival from events producing discernible fallout at locations off the NTS. These estimates are derived from both published fallout patterns and survey meter readings taken by monitors in the field. Each fallout pattern is digitized, and kriging is used to interpolate estimates of exposure rate and arrival time onto a 10-km grid covering the contours of the pattern. These grid values are then used to calculate estimates at any location of interest within the pattern. Exposure rate is also estimated from the survey meter readings for a particular nuclear event by decay-correcting the measurements near a selected location to H + 12 and then aggregating them into one estimate. Estimates of discernible exposure rate and time of fallout arrival from 74 nuclear events at the NTS are contained in the Town Data Base. Estimates are given for 352 locations in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah. Each record in the data base contains estimates for a specified event and location. The distribution of exposure rate is represented by a geometric mean and standard deviation; the distribution of fallout arrival time is represented by an arithmetic mean and standard deviation. A more extensive description and a listing of the Town Data Base are included in a separate report.

  8. Heart rate variability and particulate exposure in vehicle maintenance workers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Eninger, Robert M; Rosenthal, Frank S

    2004-08-01

    The association between occupational exposure to PM(2.5) and heart rate variability was investigated in a repeated measures, longitudinal study of vehicle maintenance workers occupationally exposed to automobile emissions. Five subjects were monitored for occupational exposure to fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) on 6 workdays using an aerosol photometer, validated with side-by-side sampling with a gravimetric method. End-of-day heart rate variability statistics were derived using short-term electrocardiogram recordings for each participant. Workplace carbon monoxide and outdoor, ambient fine particulate matter were also monitored. Regression statistics were used to investigate associations between same-day PM(2.5) levels and heart rate variability statistics using mixed-effects multiple regression of pooled data. No statistically significant associations were observed between occupational PM(2.5) and measures of heart rate variability. A statistically significant increase in total spectral power was associated with ambient PM(2.5) (p < 0.05). The data suggest a threshold below which no degradation in cardiac autonomic control of healthy workers occurs when challenged by occupational PM(2.5) exposure. This study was limited in population, exposure level, and type of particulate exposures. Additional studies are recommended on broader occupational populations. PMID:15238301

  9. Influence of exposure time on the biotransformation rate of benzo(a)anthracene in fish

    SciTech Connect

    Maagd, P.G.J. de; Poorte, J. de; Sijm, D.T.H.M.; Opperhuizen, A.

    1995-12-31

    Biotransformation of PAH can yield in the formation of carcinogenic metabolites, therefore, determining the rate at which metabolites are formed is of importance to risk assessment. Biotransformation rates can be affected by inducing agents, hormonal status, temperature etc. To determine if biotransformation rates of PAH are influenced by auto-induction, juvenile fathead minnows were exposed to benzo(a)anthracene in water for various exposure times. After exposure for 5, 10, 24, 72, 168 or 336 hours no significant differences between biotransformation rates were found. The variation within each biotransformation rate was less than 20%. From these findings it is concluded that auto-induction by benzo(a)anthracene does not occur in fathead minnow.

  10. Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kocher, D.C.

    1981-08-01

    Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons have been calculated for approximately 500 radionuclides of potential importance in environmental radiological assessments. The dose-rate factors were obtained using the DOSFACTER computer code. The results given in this report incorporate calculation of electron dose-rate factors for radiosensitive tissues of the skin, improved estimates of organ dose-rate factors for photons, based on organ doses for monoenergetic sources at the body surface of an exposed individual, and the spectra of scattered photons in air from monoenergetic sources in an infinite, uniformly contaminated atmospheric cloud, calculation of dose-rate factors for other radionuclides in addition to those of interest in the nuclear fuel cycle, and incorporation of updated radioactive decay data for all radionuclides. Dose-rate factors are calculated for three exposure modes - immersion in contaminated air, immersion in contaminated water, and exposure at a height of 1 m above a contaminated ground surface. The report presents the equations used to calculate the external dose-rate factors for photons and electrons, documentation of the revised DOSFACTER computer code, and a complete tabulation of the calculated dose-rate factors. 30 refs., 12 figs.

  11. Associations between personal exposures and ambient concentrations of nitrogen dioxide: A quantitative research synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Q. Y.; Svendsgaard, D.; Kotchmar, D. J.; Pinto, J. P.

    2012-09-01

    Although positive associations between ambient NO2 concentrations and personal exposures have generally been found by exposure studies, the strength of the associations varied among studies. Differences in results could be related to differences in study design and in exposure factors. However, the effects of study design, exposure factors, and sampling and measurement errors on the strength of the personal-ambient associations have not been evaluated quantitatively in a systematic manner. A quantitative research synthesis was conducted to examine these issues based on peer-reviewed publications in the past 30 years. Factors affecting the strength of the personal-ambient associations across the studies were also examined with meta-regression. Ambient NO2 was found to be significantly associated with personal NO2 exposures, with estimates of 0.42, 0.16, and 0.72 for overall pooled, longitudinal and daily average correlation coefficients based on random-effects meta-analysis. This conclusion was robust after correction for publication bias with correlation coefficients of 0.37, 0.16 and 0.45. We found that season and some population characteristics, such as pre-existing disease, were significant factors affecting the strength of the personal-ambient associations. More meaningful and rigorous comparisons would be possible if greater detail were published on the study design (e.g. local and indoor sources, housing characteristics, etc.) and data quality (e.g., detection limits and percent of data above detection limits).

  12. Relationship of lipogenic enzyme activities to the rate of rat liver fatty acid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, G.; Kelley, D.; Schmidt, P.; Virk, S.; Serrato, C.

    1986-05-01

    The mechanism by which diet regulates liver lipogenesis is unclear. Here the authors report how dietary alterations effect the activities of key enzymes of fatty acid (FA) synthesis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats, 400-500 g, were fasted for 48h and then refed a fat-free, high carbohydrate (HC) diet (75% cal. from sucrose) for 0,3,9,24 and 48h, or refed a HC diet for 48h, then fed a high-fat (HF) diet (44% cal. from corn oil) for 3,9,24 and 48h. The FA synthesis rate and the activities of acetyl CoA carboxylase (AC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), ATP citrate lyase (CL), and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) were determined in the livers. FA synthesis was assayed with /sup 3/H/sub 2/O, enzyme activities were measured spectrophotometrically except for AC which was assayed with /sup 14/C-bicarbonate. There was no change in the activity of AC during fasting or on the HC diet. Fasting decreased the rate of FA synthesis by 25% and the activities of FAS and CL by 50%; refeeding the HC diet induced parallel changes in FA synthesis and the activities of FAS, CL, and G6PDH. After 9h on the HF diet, FA synthesis had decreased sharply, AC activity increased significantly while no changes were detected in the other activities. Subsequently FA synthesis did not change while the activities of the enzymes decreased slowly. These enzymes did not appear to regulate FA synthesis during inhibition of lipogenesis, but FAS, CL or G6PDH may be rate limiting in the induction phase. Other key factors may regulate FA synthesis during dietary alterations.

  13. Design, Synthesis, and Identification of Silicon Incorporated Oxazolidinone Antibiotics with Improved Brain Exposure.

    PubMed

    Seetharamsingh, B; Ramesh, Remya; Dange, Santoshkumar S; Khairnar, Pankaj V; Singhal, Smita; Upadhyay, Dilip; Veeraraghavan, Sridhar; Viswanadha, Srikant; Vakkalanka, Swaroop; Reddy, D Srinivasa

    2015-11-12

    Therapeutic options for brain infections caused by pathogens with a reduced sensitivity to drugs are limited. Recent reports on the potential use of linezolid in treating brain infections prompted us to design novel compounds around this scaffold. Herein, we describe the design and synthesis of various oxazolidinone antibiotics with the incorporation of silicon. Our findings in preclinical species suggest that silicon incorporation is highly useful in improving brain exposures. Interestingly, three compounds from this series demonstrated up to a 30-fold higher brain/plasma ratio when compared to linezolid thereby indicating their therapeutic potential in brain associated disorders. PMID:26617962

  14. Comparison of radon fluxes with gamma-radiation exposure rates and soil /sup 226/Ra concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.A.; Thomas, V.W.

    1984-04-01

    Radon fluxes and contact gamma-radiation-exposure rates were measured at the grid points of rectangular grids on three properties in Edgemont, South Dakota that were known to have deposits of residual radioactivity relatively near to the surface. The coefficient of determination, r/sup 2/, between the radon fluxes and the contact gamma-radiation-exposure rates varied from 0.89 to 0.31 for the three properties. The property having the highest fluxes and residual radioactivity of relatively uniform depth showed the highest correlation between fluxes and exposure rates, and the property having residual radioactivity that varied considerably in depth showed the lowest. Correlations between fluxes and /sup 226/Ra concentrations measured in boreholes that varied in depth from 60 to 195 cm were lower than those between fluxes and exposure rates, indicating that exposure rates are better than /sup 226/Ra measurements for detecting elevated radon fluxes from near-surface deposits. Measurements made on one property at two different times indicated that if the average flux were determined from a large number (40) of measurements at one time, the average flux at a later time could be estimated from a few measurements using the assumption that the change in the flux at individual locations will be equal to the change in the average flux. Flux measurements around two buildings showing elevated indoor radon-daughter concentrations, but around which no residual radioactivity had been discovered by /sup 226/Ra and gamma-radiation measurements, provided no clear indication of the presence of such material, possibly because none was present.

  15. A review of air exchange rate models for air pollution exposure assessments.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Schultz, Bradley D; Sohn, Michael D; Long, Thomas; Langstaff, John; Williams, Ronald; Isaacs, Kristin; Meng, Qing Yu; Stallings, Casson; Smith, Luther

    2014-11-01

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessments is estimation of the air exchange rate (AER) for various buildings where people spend their time. The AER, which is the rate of exchange of indoor air with outdoor air, is an important determinant for entry of outdoor air pollutants and for removal of indoor-emitted air pollutants. This paper presents an overview and critical analysis of the scientific literature on empirical and physically based AER models for residential and commercial buildings; the models highlighted here are feasible for exposure assessments as extensive inputs are not required. Models are included for the three types of airflows that can occur across building envelopes: leakage, natural ventilation, and mechanical ventilation. Guidance is provided to select the preferable AER model based on available data, desired temporal resolution, types of airflows, and types of buildings included in the exposure assessment. For exposure assessments with some limited building leakage or AER measurements, strategies are described to reduce AER model uncertainty. This review will facilitate the selection of AER models in support of air pollution exposure assessments. PMID:23715084

  16. Effect of acute exposure to ozone on heart rate and blood pressure of the conscious rat

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, I.; Simomura, Y.; Yokoyama, E.

    1985-12-01

    Electrocardiogram and arterial blood pressure in conscious and unrestrained rats of various ages were recorded during a 3-hr exposure to filtered air or 1 ppm ozone (O/sub 3/). In general, heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure of rats significantly decreased during exposure to O/sub 3/, whereas these functional parameters remained almost stable during exposure to filtered air. Heart rate usually reached a plateau during the exposure to O/sub 3/. Additionally, PR interval and QRS complex significantly increased and premature atrial contraction and incomplete A-V block were frequently observed during the exposure to O/sub 3/. These circulatory effects of O/sub 3/ were more markedly manifested by rats 11 weeks old than either those 8 or 4 weeks old. On the other hand, no significant difference in the circulatory responses was observed between male and female rats. These circulatory effects of O/sub 3/ may be significant from the viewpoint of health effects, although its mechanisms remain unsolved.

  17. Pain Scores and Exposure Rates After Polypropylene Mesh for Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Illston, Jana; Garris, Jeffrey; Richter, Holly; Wheeler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To characterize pain and exposure after Prolift® placement and identify risk factors. Methods A case series of women who underwent Prolift® vaginal mesh were surveyed. Pain was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. Exposure was evaluated clinically. Results Of 183 eligible patients, 160 completed the survey, and 45 returned for examination. Mean preoperative pain score was 0.97 and postoperative was 1.35 (p=0.12). Pre and postoperative pain scores by compartment were: anterior (1.34 vs 1.25, mean change −0.09, p-value=0.84), posterior (1.30 vs 1.56, mean change 0.26, p-value=0.72), total (0.63 vs 1.34, mean change 0.71, p-value=0.05). Graft exposure was confirmed in 23 of 183 patients (12.6%), although as asymptomatic patients were not examined, the true exposure rate may be under-estimated. Hematoma formation is independently associated with mesh exposure, adjusted OR=18.4 (95%CI 3.4-147.4, p-value =0.01). Conclusion While pain scores did not increase overall, there was a trend towards increased pain score in the patients with total (anterior and posterior) Prolift®. Hematoma formation significantly associated with mesh exposure. PMID:26630890

  18. Residential air exchange rates for use in indoor air and exposure modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Pandian, M D; Ott, W R; Behar, J V

    1993-01-01

    Data on air exchange rates are important inputs to indoor air quality models. Indoor air models, in turn, are incorporated into the structure of total human exposure models. Fragmentary data on residential ventilation rates are available in various governmental reports, journal articles, and contractor reports. Most of the published papers present data on only a few homes to answer very specialized questions, and none of these publications summarize the ventilation rates of a large population of homes across the United States. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has conducted more than 4000 residential perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) measurements and brought them together into a large data base from about 100 studies in the United States and elsewhere. This paper analyzes the BNL PFT data base to generate frequency distributions and summary statistics for different regions of the United States, different seasons, and different levels within the homes. The data analyses suggest that residential ventilation rates are similar in the northeastern and northwestern states but higher in the southwestern states. Winter and fall ventilation rates are similar, but the rates are slightly higher in spring, and much higher in summer. Multi-level residences have higher air exchange rates than single-level residences. Although the BNL data are not a representative sample of homes in the United States, these analyses give insight into the range of air exchange rates found in the United States under a great variety of conditions and are intended for use by developers of models of indoor air quality and total human exposure. PMID:8173341

  19. In-situ real time measurements of net erosion rates of copper during hydrogen plasma exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesler, Leigh; Wright, Graham; Peterson, Ethan; Whyte, Dennis

    2013-10-01

    In order to properly understand the dynamics of net erosion/deposition in fusion reactors, such as tokamaks, a diagnostic measuring the real time rates of net erosion/deposition during plasma exposure is necessary. The DIONISOS experiment produces real time measurements of net erosion/deposition by using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) ion beam analysis simultaneously with plasma exposure from a helicon plasma source. This in-situ method improves on ex-situ weight loss measurements by allowing measurement of possible synergistic effects of high ion implantation rates and net erosion rate and by giving a real time response to changes in plasma parameters. Previous work has validated this new technique for measuring copper (Cu) erosion from helium (He) plasma ion bombardment. This technique is now extended to measure copper erosion due to deuterium and hydrogen plasma ion exposure. Targets used were a 1.5 μm Cu layer on an aluminum substrate. Cu layer thickness is tracked in real time using 1.2 MeV proton RBS. Measured erosion rates will be compared to results from literature and He erosion rates. Supported by US DoE award DE-SC00-02060.

  20. Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates Increased after Exposure to the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH)

    PubMed Central

    Green, Beverly B.; Anderson, Melissa L.; Chubak, Jessica; Baldwin, Laura Mae; Tuzzio, Leah; Catz, Sheryl; Cole, Alison; Vernon, Sally W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) includes comprehensive chronic illness and preventive services, including identifying patients who are overdue for colorectal cancer screening (CRCS). The association between PCMH implementation and CRCS during the Systems of Support to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Trial (SOS) is described. Methods The SOS enrolled 4664 patients from 21 clinics from August 2008 to November 2009. Patients were randomized to usual care, mailed fecal kits, kits plus brief assistance, or kits plus assistance and navigation. A PCMH model that included a workflow for facilitating CRCS was implemented at all study clinics in late 2009. Patients enrolled early had little exposure to the PCMH, whereas patients enrolled later were exposed during most of their first year in the trial. Logistic regression models were used to assess the association between PCMH exposure and CRCS. Results Usual care patients with ≥8 months in the PCMH had higher CRCS rates than those with ≤4 months in the PCMH (adjusted difference, 10.1%; 95% confidence interval, 5.7–14.6). SOS interventions led to significant increases in CRCS, but the magnitude of effect was attenuated by exposure to the PCMH (P for interaction = .01). Conclusion Exposure to a PCMH was associated with higher CRCS rates. Automated mailed and centrally delivered stepped interventions increased CRCS rates, even in the presence of a PCMH. (J Am Board Fam Med 2016;29:191–200.) PMID:26957375

  1. Artificial Targets to Refine Production Rate Scaling Factors for Surface Exposure Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasky, S.; Vermeesch, P.; Baur, H.; Kober, F.; Schlüchter, C.; Wieler, R.

    2005-12-01

    To determine surface exposure ages, an obviously crucial parameter is the production rate of a nuclide of interest at the site of exposure of a given sample. As the cosmic ray intensity depends on the exact location within the troposphere, also the cosmogenic nuclide production rates vary with the geographical position. Accurate scaling of cosmogenic nuclide production rates from a calibration site to another with different geomagnetic latitude and altitude is therefore required. The international community initiated the CRONUS (Cosmic-Ray-Originated NUclide Systematics) project to improve the knowledge on production systematics of cosmogenic nuclides on earth. In our project we approach the "scaling problem'' by measuring the variability of production rates of cosmogenic noble gases (3He and 21Ne) as a function of the geographical position in artificial targets. The idea is to expose artificial targets along altitude and latitude transects during 1-2 years and subsequently measure the cosmic-ray produced 3He and 21Ne concentrations. The vacuum containers built for the experiment are inconel stainless steel tubes. The main target material is quartz, as quartz is the most commonly used mineral for exposure dating and both, cosmogenic helium and neon are produced and retained in the target container. Each target contains 1 kg of artificial quartz sand, and is degassed in vacuum prior to exposure. Blank measurements are carried out after degassing. So far, four artificial targets have been exposed in Antarctica and Tibet. Further targets will be exposed along an altitude transect between sea level and about 4500 m altitude and a latitude transect between 20-50 degrees. Blank measurements for the first exposed targets revealed 21Ne- and 3He-concentrations of about 5·105 and 5·104 atoms per container, respectively. After 1-2 years of exposure we should be able to measure the cosmogenic excess over blank with sufficient accuracy.

  2. Compendium and synthesis of bacterial manganese reduction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandstra, Joel Z.; Ross, Daniel E.; Brantley, Susan L.; Burgos, William D.

    2011-01-01

    We have compiled time-series concentration data for the biological reduction of manganese(III/IV) published between 1985 and 2004 and fit these data with a simple hyperbolic rate expression or, when appropriate, one of its limiting forms. The compiled data and rate constants are available in Electronic Annex EA-1. The zero- and first-order rate constants appear to follow a log-normal distribution that could be used, for example, in predictive modeling of Mn-oxide reduction in a reactive transport scenario. We have also included details of the experimental procedures used to generate each time-series data-set in our compilation. These meta-data—mostly pertaining to the type and concentration of micro-organism, electron donor, and electron acceptor—enable us to examine the rate data for trends. We have computed a number of rudimentary, mono-variate statistics on the compiled data with the hope of stimulating both more detailed statistical analyses of the data and new experiments to fill gaps in the existing data-set. We have also analyzed the data with parametric models based on the log-normal distribution and rate equations that are hyperbolic in the concentration of cells and Mn available for reduction. This parametric analysis allows us to provide best estimates of zero- and first-order rate constants both ignoring and accounting for the meta-data.

  3. Rating the Raters: Legal Exposure of Trustmark Authorities in the Context of Consumer Health Informatics

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    There are three areas of potential legal exposure for an organization such as a trustmark authority involved in e-health quality rating. First, an e-health provider may make a complaint about negative or impliedly negative ratings rendered by the ratings body (false negative). Typically, a negative ratings complaint would rely on defamation or product disparagement causes of action. In some cases such complaints could be defended on the basis of absence of malice (US). Second, the rating body might render a positive rating on e-health data that a third party allegedly relied upon and suffered injury (false positive). While the primary cause of action would be against the e-health data provider, questions may arise as to the possible liability of the trustmark authority. For example, some US liability exposure is possible based on cases involving the potential liability of product warrantors, trade associations, and certifiers or endorsers. Third, a ratings body may face public law liability for its own web misfeasance. Several risk management approaches are possible and would not necessarily be mutually exclusive. These approaches will require careful investigation to assess their risk reduction potential and, in some cases, the introduction of legislation. PMID:11720941

  4. Rating the "Raters": Legal Exposure of Trustmark Authorities in the Context of Consumer Health Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Nicolas P

    2000-01-01

    There are three areas of potential legal exposure for an organization such as a trustmark authority involved in ehealth quality rating. First, an ehealth provider may make a complaint about negative or impliedly negative ratings rendered by the ratings body (false negative). Typically, a negative ratings complaint would rely on defamation or product disparagement causes of action. In some cases such complaints could be defended on the basis of absence of malice (US). Second, the rating body might render a positive rating on ehealth data that a third party allegedly relied upon and suffered injury (false positive). While the primary cause of action would be against the ehealth data provider, questions may arise as to possible liability of the trustmark authority. For example, some US liability exposure is possible based on cases involving the potential liability of product warrantors, trade associations and certifiers or endorsers. Third, a ratings body may face public law liability for its own web misfeasance. Several risk management approaches are possible and would not necessarily be mutually exclusive. These approaches will require careful investigation to assess their risk reduction potential and, in some cases, legislation.

  5. Rating the raters: legal exposure of trustmark authorities in the context of consumer health informatics.

    PubMed

    Terry, N P

    2000-01-01

    There are three areas of potential legal exposure for an organization such as a trustmark authority involved in e-health quality rating. First, an e-health provider may make a complaint about negative or impliedly negative ratings rendered by the ratings body (false negative). Typically, a negative ratings complaint would rely on defamation or product disparagement causes of action. In some cases such complaints could be defended on the basis of absence of malice (US). Second, the rating body might render a positive rating on e-health data that a third party allegedly relied upon and suffered injury (false positive). While the primary cause of action would be against the e-health data provider, questions may arise as to the possible liability of the trustmark authority. For example, some US liability exposure is possible based on cases involving the potential liability of product warrantors, trade associations, and certifiers or endorsers. Third, a ratings body may face public law liability for its own web misfeasance. Several risk management approaches are possible and would not necessarily be mutually exclusive. These approaches will require careful investigation to assess their risk reduction potential and, in some cases, the introduction of legislation. PMID:11720941

  6. UVB Exposure Does Not Accelerate Rates of Litter Decomposition in a Semiarid Riparian Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uselman, S. M.; Snyder, K. A.; Blank, R. R.; Jones, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    Aboveground litter decomposition is controlled mainly by substrate quality and climate factors across terrestrial ecosystems, but photodegradation from exposure to high-intensity ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation may also be important in arid and semi-arid environments. We investigated the interactive effects of UVB exposure and litter quality on decomposition in a Tamarix-invaded riparian ecosystem during the establishment of an insect biological control agent in northern Nevada. Feeding by the northern tamarisk beetle (Diorhabda carinulata) on Tamarix spp. trees leads to altered leaf litter quality and increased exposure to solar UVB radiation from canopy opening. In addition, we examined the dynamics of litter decomposition of the invasive exotic Lepidium latifolium, because it is well-situated to invade beetle-infested Tamarix sites. Three leaf litter types (natural Tamarix, beetle-affected Tamarix, and L. latifolium) differing in substrate quality were decomposed in litterbags for one year in the field. Litterbags were subjected to one of three treatments: (1) Ambient UVB or (2) Reduced UVB (where UVB was manipulated by using clear plastic films that transmit or block UVB), and (3) No Cover (a control used to test for the effect of using the plastic films, i.e. a cover effect). Results showed a large cover effect on rates of decomposition and nutrient release, and our findings suggested that frequent cycles of freeze-thaw, and possibly rainfall intensity, influenced decomposition at this site. Contrary to our expectations, greater UVB exposure did not result in faster rates of decomposition. Greater UVB exposure resulted in decreased rates of decomposition and P release for the lower quality litter and no change in rates of decomposition and nutrient release for the two higher quality litter types, possibly due to a negative effect of UVB on soil microbes. Among litter types, rates of decomposition and net release of N and P followed this ranking: L. latifolium

  7. Does exposure to an artificial ULF magnetic field affect blood pressure, heart rate variability and mood?

    PubMed

    Mitsutake, Gen; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Oinuma, Sachiko; Ferguson, Ian; Cornélissen, Germaine; Wanliss, James; Halberg, Franz

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an artificial magnetic field with an amplitude and frequency equivalent to those of geomagnetic pulsations during geomagnetic storms could affect physiology and psychology. Three healthy volunteers wore anambulatory BP monitor and an ECG recorder around the clock for 12 consecutive weekends in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. In a room shielded against ELF and VLF waves, they were exposed for 8 hours per week to either a 50 nT 0.0016 Hz or a sham magnetic field at one of six circadian stages. Real exposure randomly alternated with sham exposure. They provided saliva and recorded mood and reaction time every 4 hours while awake. Systolic (S) and diastolic (D) blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded every 30 minutes. Spectral analysis of HR variability (HRV) was performed using the maximum entropy method and a complex demodulation method. For these variables, daily means were compared between real and sham exposure, using paired t-tests. Their circadian MESOR, amplitude, and acrophase were analyzed and summarized using single cosinor and population-mean cosinor. Circadian rhythms were demonstrated for HR, SBP, DBP for sham exposure, salivary flow rate, positive affect, vigor, and subjective alertness (p < 0.001, -0.02). One participant showed higher HR, lower LF, HF, and VLF powers, and a steeper power-law slope (p < 0.005, -0.0001) in an early night exposure to the real magnetic field, but not in other circadian stages. There was no significant difference between circadian responses to real and sham exposure in any variable at any circadian stage. PMID:15754834

  8. Important Physiological Parameters and Physical Activity Data for Evaluating Exposure Modeling Performance: a Synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this report is to develop a database of physiological parameters needed for understanding and evaluating performance of the APEX and SHEDS exposure/intake dose rate model used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as part of its regulatory activities. The A...

  9. Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kocher, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes recent modifications of the computer code DOSFACTER, which was developed for the purpose of estimating dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides dispersed in the environment. The modifications and additions which have been made to the calculations outlined above include the following: (1) calculation of electron dose-rate factors for radiosensitive portions of the skin; (2) incorporation of improved estimates of organ dose-rate factors for photons; and (3) calculation of dose-rate factors for additional radio nuclides and incorporation of updated radioactive decay data for all radionuclides. The revised dose-rate factors described in this paper are available upon request from the Radiation Shielding Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  10. Constant rate exposure of pregnant hamsters to arsenate during early gestation

    SciTech Connect

    Ferm, V.H.; Hanlon, D.P.

    1985-08-01

    The teratogenic and embryotoxic effects of constant-rate exposure of pregnant hamsters to arsenate have been examined by means of subcutaneous implants of osmotic minipumps. Different total exposure regimes were established by varying the duration of minipump implants and by varying the concentration of arsenate in the minipumps. Dams were killed on Day 13 pregnancy, 5 days after the critical stage of organogenesis. Numbers of resorptions, dead fetuses, and living fetuses were obtained. Fetal weights, crown-rump lengths, and the incidence of malformations were recorded. Control animals were treated identically with minipumps containing demineralized water. The percentage of malformations per litter, a direct measure of teratogenesis, was dependent only upon the concentration of arsenate in the minipumps. The minimum teratogenic response was achieved with a dose of 70 ..mu..mol/kg dam/24 hr during the critical stages of organogenesis. The embryotoxic (fetotoxic) indicators, fetal weight and crown-rump length, decreased with increases in exposure time and with increased concentrations of arsenate. The resorption rate also depended directly upon duration of exposure and concentration of arsenate in the mini-pump.

  11. Osteoblast fibronectin mRNA, protein synthesis, and matrix are unchanged after exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Gilbertson, V.

    1999-01-01

    The well-defined osteoblast line, MC3T3-E1 was used to examine fibronectin (FN) mRNA levels, protein synthesis, and extracellular FN matrix accumulation after growth activation in spaceflight. These osteoblasts produce FN extracellular matrix (ECM) known to regulate adhesion, differentiation, and function in adherent cells. Changes in bone ECM and osteoblast cell shape occur in spaceflight. To determine whether altered FN matrix is a factor in causing these changes in spaceflight, quiescent osteoblasts were launched into microgravity and were then sera activated with and without a 1-gravity field. Synthesis of FN mRNA, protein, and matrix were measured after activation in microgravity. FN mRNA synthesis is significantly reduced in microgravity (0-G) when compared to ground (GR) osteoblasts flown in a centrifuge simulating earth's gravity (1-G) field 2.5 h after activation. However, 27.5 h after activation there were no significant differences in mRNA synthesis. A small but significant reduction of FN protein was found in the 0-G samples 2.5 h after activation. Total FN protein 27.5 h after activation showed no significant difference between any of the gravity conditions, however, there was a fourfold increase in absolute amount of protein synthesized during the incubation. Using immunofluorescence, we found no significant differences in the amount or in the orientation of the FN matrix after 27.5 h in microgravity. These results demonstrate that FN is made by sera-activated osteoblasts even during exposure to microgravity. These data also suggest that after a total period of 43 h of spaceflight FN transcription, translation, or altered matrix assembly is not responsible for the altered cell shape or altered matrix formation of osteoblasts.

  12. Addressing the recovery of feeding rates in post-exposure feeding bioassays: Cyathura carinata as a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Pais-Costa, Antonia Juliana; Acevedo, Pelayo; Marques, João Carlos; Martinez-Haro, Mónica

    2015-02-15

    Post-exposure bioassays are used in environmental assessment as a cost-effective tool, but the effects of organism's recovery after exposure to pollutant has not yet been addressed in detail. The recoveries of post-exposure feeding rates after being exposed to two sublethal concentrations of cadmium during two different exposure periods (48 h and 96 h) were evaluated under laboratory conditions using the estuarine isopod Cyathura carinata. Results showed that feeding depression was a stable endpoint up to 24 h after cadmium exposure, which is useful for ecotoxicological bioassays. - Highlights: • We studied recovery of post-exposure feeding rates 48–96 h after cadmium exposure. • The assay is based on the isopod Cyathura carinata. • Post-exposure feeding inhibition is a stable sublethal endpoint.

  13. Influence of random daughter exposure rate, unattachment fraction, and disequilibrium on occurrence of lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, F.T.; Palmer, R.F.; Dagle, G.E.; Busch, R.H.; Buschbom, R.L.

    1983-10-01

    Groups of male, specific-pathogen-free (SPF), Wistar rats were exposed to several concentrations of radon daughters and uranium ore dust to clarify the roles of exposure rate, unattached RaA daughters, and the degree of radon daughter disequilibrium, in the development of respiratory system disease. Modeled, human-dosimetric data indicate that the dose to sensitive tissues of the respiratory tract increases with increasing radon-daughter unattachment fraction and degree of disequilibrium. Experimental verification of these dose-effect relationships is needed to protect the health of workers and of the public exposed to radon-daughter environments. Data bearing on these relationships as well as updated results of experiments designed to test the role of radon-daughter exposure rate on lung-tumor incidence are reported. 13 references, 3 tables.

  14. Gender differences in road traffic injury rate using time travelled as a measure of exposure.

    PubMed

    Santamariña-Rubio, Elena; Pérez, Katherine; Olabarria, Marta; Novoa, Ana M

    2014-04-01

    There is no consensus on whether the risk of road traffic injury is higher among men or among women. Comparison between studies is difficult mainly due to the different exposure measures used to estimate the risk. The measures of exposure to the risk of road traffic injury should be people's mobility measures, but frequently authors use other measures such population or vehicles mobility. We compare road traffic injury risk in men and women, by age, mode of transport and severity, using the time people spend travelling as the exposure measure, in Catalonia for the period 2004-2008. This is a cross-sectional study including all residents aged over 3 years. The road traffic injury rate was calculated using the number of people injured, from the Register of Accidents and Victims of the National Traffic Authority as numerator, and the person-hours travelled, from the 2006 Daily Mobility Survey carried out by the Catalan regional government, as denominator. Sex and age specific rates by mode of transport and severity were calculated, and Poisson regression models were fitted. Among child pedestrians and young drivers, males present higher risk of slight and severe injury, and in the oldest groups women present higher risk. The death rate is always higher in men. There exists interaction between sex and age in road traffic injury risk. Therefore, injury risk is higher among men in some age groups, and among women in other groups, but these age groups vary depending on mode of transport and severity. PMID:24384384

  15. Activation, Heating and Exposure Rates for Mo‐99 Experiments with 25‐Disk Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, Charles T. IV

    2012-05-09

    An MCNPX model of the 25-disk target assembly inside the vacuum cube inside the shielded box was prepared. This was used to calculate heating and photon and neutron fluxes throughout the model. Production rates for photonuclear reaction products were calculated using the photon fluxes and ENDF/B-VII cross sections. Measured isomer to ground state yield ratios were used where available. Where not available the new correlation between spin deficit and isomer to ground state yield ratios presented at AccApp'11 was used. The photonuclear production rates and neutron fluxes were input to CINDER2008 for transmutation calculations. A cross section update file was used to supply (n,n') reactions missing from CINDER2008 libraries. Decay photon spectra produced by CINDER2008 were then used to calculate exposure rates using the MCNPX model. Two electron beam irradiations were evaluated. The first was for a thermal test at 15 MeV with 1300 {micro}A incident on one target end and the second was for a production test at 35 MeV with 350 {micro}A incident on both target ends (700 {micro}A total current on target). For the thermal test 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 h irradiation times were simulated, each followed by decay time steps out to 42 days. For the production test 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 h irradiation times were simulated followed by the same decay periods. For all simulations beam FWHMs in x and y were both assumed to be 6 mm. Simulations were run for Mo-100 enriched and natural Mo targets for both tests. It is planned that thermal test will be run for 4 h with natural target disks and production test will be run for 24 h with enriched target disks. Results for these two simulations only are presented in this report. Other results can be made available upon request. Post irradiation exposure rates were calculated at 30 cm distances from left, right, front and back of the following configurations: (1) Shielded box with everything in it (beam pipes, cooling pipes, vacuum cube

  16. Measuring synthesis rates of nitrogen-containing polymers by using stable isotope tracers.

    PubMed

    Fan, M Z; Chiba, L I; Matzat, P D; Yang, X; Yin, Y L; Mine, Y; Stein, H H

    2006-04-01

    The major N-containing polymer compounds in the body include protein, RNA, and DNA. The endogenous gastrointestinal secretions as well as the portal-drained visceral and peripheral immune responses are basic physiological functions. Elevated endogenous secretions and immune activities, as affected by developmental stages, diets, and management factors, decrease the availability of dietary nutrients for peripheral muscle synthesis and deposition. Measurements of in vivo protein, RNA, and DNA synthesis rates associated with the viscera, peripheral immune cells, and skeletal muscles should, in principle, be the sensitive biochemical and cellular endpoints for studying factors affecting nonruminant nutrition, metabolism, and growth. The selection of stable isotope tracers for precursors, routes of tracer delivery, and mass spectrometric analyses of tracer enrichments are the major methodological considerations. To measure in vivo protein, RNA, and DNA synthesis rates, oral feeding with heavy water (2H2O), and continuous infusion of [U-13C]glucose and [15N]Gly intravenously for labeling the sugar moieties ribose and deoxyribose and de novo purine base synthesis have been established. Flooding doses of tracer Phe, for example, L-[ring-2H5]Phe, via the i.p. route are reliable and cost-effective for measuring in vivo protein synthesis rates, especially for the viscera in small nonruminants. Therefore, measurements of the major N-containing polymer synthesis rates in the viscera, the peripheral immune cells, and muscles through oral feeding with 2H2O and/or i.p. flooding doses of Phe tracers are the emerging tools for studying nonruminant nutrition, metabolism, and growth under research and field test conditions. PMID:16582095

  17. Fractional synthesis rates of DNA and protein in rabbit skin are not correlated.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-jun; Chinkes, David L; Wu, Zhanpin; Martini, Wenjun Z; Wolfe, Robert R

    2004-09-01

    We developed a method for measurement of skin DNA synthesis, reflecting cell division, in conscious rabbits by infusing D-[U-(13)C(6)]glucose and L-[(15)N]glycine. Cutaneous protein synthesis was simultaneously measured by infusion of L-[ring-(2)H(5)]phenylalanine. Rabbits were fitted with jugular venous and carotid arterial catheters, and were studied during the infusion of an amino acid solution (10% Travasol). The fractional synthetic rate (FSR) of DNA from the de novo nucleotide synthesis pathway, a reflection of total cell division, was 3.26 +/- 0.59%/d in whole skin and 3.08 +/- 1.86%/d in dermis (P = 0.38). The de novo base synthesis pathway accounted for 76 and 60% of the total DNA FSR in whole skin and dermis, respectively; the contribution from the base salvage pathway was 24% in whole skin and 40% in dermis. The FSR of protein in whole skin was 5.35 +/- 4.42%/d, which was greater (P < 0.05) than that in dermis (2.91 +/- 2.52%/d). The FSRs of DNA and protein were not correlated (P = 0.33), indicating that cell division and protein synthesis are likely regulated by different mechanisms. This new approach enables investigations of metabolic disorders of skin diseases and regulation of skin wound healing by distinguishing the 2 principal components of skin metabolism, which are cell division and protein synthesis. PMID:15333735

  18. Effect of frequency of dosing of plant sterols on plasma cholesterol levels and synthesis rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to compare the effects of plant sterols (PS) consumed as a single dose (single) at breakfast or as three doses consumed with breakfast, lunch and dinner (divided) on plasma lipoprotien levels and cholesterol endogenous fractional synthesis rate (FSR). A randomized, placebo-controll...

  19. In vivo measurement of DNA synthesis rates of colon epithelial cells in carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sylvia Jeewon; Turner, Scott; Killion, Salena; Hellerstein, Marc K. . E-mail: march@nature.berkeley.edu

    2005-05-27

    We describe here a highly sensitive technique for measuring DNA synthesis rates of colon epithelial cells in vivo. Male SD rats were given {sup 2}H{sub 2}O (heavy water). Colon epithelial cells were isolated, DNA was extracted, hydrolyzed to deoxyribonucleosides, and the deuterium enrichment of the deoxyribose moiety was determined by gas chromatographic/mass spectrometry. Turnover time of colon crypts and the time for migration of cells from basal to top fraction of the crypts were measured. These data were consistent with cell cycle analysis and bromodeoxyuridine labeling. By giving different concentrations of a promoter, dose-dependent increases in DNA synthesis rates were detected, demonstrating the sensitivity of the method. Administration of a carcinogen increased DNA synthesis rates cell proliferation in all fractions of the crypt. In conclusion, DNA synthesis rates of colon epithelial cells can be measured directly in vivo using stable-isotope labeling. Potential applications in humans include use as a biomarker for cancer chemoprevention studies.

  20. Protein synthesis rates in rat brain regions and subcellular fractions during aging

    SciTech Connect

    Avola, R.; Condorelli, D.F.; Ragusa, N.; Renis, M.; Alberghina, M.; Giuffrida Stella, A.M.; Lajtha, A.

    1988-04-01

    In vivo protein synthesis rates in various brain regions (cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and striatum) of 4-, 12-, and 24-month-old rats were examined after injection of a flooding dose of labeled valine. The incorporation of labeled valine into proteins of mitochondrial, microsomal, and cytosolic fractions from cerebral cortex and cerebellum was also measured. At all ages examined, the incorporation rate was 0.5% per hour in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus and 0.4% per hour in striatum. Of the subcellular fractions examined, the microsomal proteins were synthesized at the highest rate, followed by cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins. The results obtained indicate that the average synthesis rate of proteins in the various brain regions and subcellular fractions examined is fairly constant and is not significantly altered in the 4 to 24-month period of life of rats.

  1. Exposure to Discrimination and Heart Rate Variability Reactivity to Acute Stress among Women with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julie; Lampert, Rachel; Tennen, Howard; Feinn, Richard

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to racial discrimination has been linked to physiological reactivity. This study investigated self-reported exposure to racial discrimination and parasympathetic [high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV)] and sympathetic (norepinephrine and cortisol) activity at baseline and then again after acute laboratory stress. Lifetime exposure to racial discrimination was measured with the Schedule of Racist Events scale. Thirty-two women (16 Black and 16 White) with type 2 diabetes performed a public speaking stressor. Beat-to-beat intervals were recorded on electrocardiograph recorders, and HF-HRV was calculated using spectral analysis and natural log transformed. Norepinephrine and cortisol were measured in blood. Higher discrimination predicted lower stressor HF-HRV, even after controlling for baseline HF-HRV. When race, age, A1c and baseline systolic blood pressure were also controlled, racial discrimination remained a significant independent predictor of stressor HF-HRV. There was no association between lifetime discrimination and sympathetic markers. In conclusion, preliminary data suggest that among women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), exposure to racial discrimination is adversely associated with parasympathetic, but not sympathetic, reactivity. PMID:24194397

  2. Night Heart Rate Variability and Particulate Exposures among Boilermaker Construction Workers

    PubMed Central

    Cavallari, Jennifer M.; Eisen, Ellen A.; Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Fang, Shona C.; Dobson, Christine B.; Schwartz, Joel; Christiani, David C.

    2007-01-01

    Background Although studies have documented the association between heart rate variability (HRV) and ambient particulate exposures, the association between HRV, especially at night, and metal-rich, occupational particulate exposures remains unclear. Objective Our goal in this study was to investigate the association between long-duration HRV, including nighttime HRV, and occupational PM2.5 exposures. Methods We used 24-hr ambulatory electrocardiograms (ECGs) to monitor 36 male boilermaker welders (mean age of 41 years) over a workday and nonworkday. ECGs were analyzed for HRV in the time domain; rMSSD (square root of the mean squared differences of successive intervals), SDNN (SD of normal-to-normal intervals over entire recording), and SDNNi (SDNN for all 5-min segments) were summarized over 24-hr, day (0730–2130 hours), and night (0000–0700 hours) periods. PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) exposures were monitored over the workday, and 8-hr time-weighted average concentrations were calculated. We used linear regression to assess the associations between HRV and workday particulate exposures. Matched measurements from a nonworkday were used to control for individual cardiac risk factors. Results Mean (± SD) PM2.5 exposure was 0.73 ± 0.50 mg/m3 and ranged from 0.04 to 2.70 mg/m3. We observed a consistent inverse exposure–response relationship, with a decrease in all HRV measures with increased PM2.5 exposure. However, the decrease was most pronounced at night, where a 1-mg/m3 increase in PM2.5 was associated with a change of −8.32 [95% confidence interval (CI), −16.29 to −0.35] msec nighttime rMSSD, −14.77 (95% CI, −31.52 to 1.97) msec nighttime SDNN, and −8.37 (95% CI, −17.93 to 1.20) msec nighttime SDNNi, after adjusting for nonworking nighttime HRV, age, and smoking. Conclusion Metal-rich particulate exposures were associated with decreased long-duration HRV, especially at night. Further research is needed

  3. Multi-exposure laser speckle contrast imaging using a high frame rate CMOS sensor with a field programmable gate array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shen; Hayes-Gill, Barrie R; He, Diwei; Zhu, Yiqun; Morgan, Stephen P

    2015-10-15

    A system has been developed in which multi-exposure laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is implemented using a high frame rate CMOS imaging sensor chip. Processing is performed using a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The system allows different exposure times to be simulated by accumulating a number of short exposures. This has the advantage that the image acquisition time is limited by the maximum exposure time and that regulation of the illuminating light level is not required. This high frame rate camera has also been deployed to implement laser Doppler blood flow processing, enabling a direct comparison of multi-exposure laser speckle imaging and laser Doppler imaging (LDI) to be carried out using the same experimental data. Results from a rotating diffuser indicate that both multi-exposure LSCI and LDI provide a linear response to changes in velocity. This cannot be obtained using single-exposure LSCI, unless an appropriate model is used for correcting the response. PMID:26469570

  4. Effect of cabin ventilation rate on ultrafine particle exposure inside automobiles.

    PubMed

    Knibbs, Luke D; de Dear, Richard J; Morawska, Lidia

    2010-05-01

    We alternately measured on-road and in-vehicle ultrafine (<100 nm) particle (UFP) concentration for 5 passenger vehicles that comprised an age range of 18 years. A range of cabin ventilation settings were assessed during 301 trips through a 4 km road tunnel in Sydney, Australia. Outdoor air flow (ventilation) rates under these settings were quantified on open roads using tracer gas techniques. Significant variability in tunnel trip average median in-cabin/on-road (I/O) UFP ratios was observed (0.08 to approximately 1.0). Based on data spanning all test automobiles and ventilation settings, a positive linear relationship was found between outdoor air flow rate and I/O ratio, with the former accounting for a substantial proportion of variation in the latter (R(2) = 0.81). UFP concentrations recorded in-cabin during tunnel travel were significantly higher than those reported by comparable studies performed on open roadways. A simple mathematical model afforded the ability to predict tunnel trip average in-cabin UFP concentrations with good accuracy. Our data indicate that under certain conditions, in-cabin UFP exposures incurred during tunnel travel may contribute significantly to daily exposure. The UFP exposure of automobile occupants appears strongly related to their choice of ventilation setting and vehicle. PMID:20369882

  5. Agricultural adjuvants: acute mortality and effects on population growth rate of Daphnia pulex after chronic exposure.

    PubMed

    Stark, John D; Walthall, William K

    2003-12-01

    Acute and chronic toxicity of eight agricultural adjuvants (Bond, Kinetic, Plyac, R-11, Silwet L-77, Sylgard 309, X-77, and WaterMaxx) to Daphnia pulex were evaluated with 48-h acute lethal concentration estimates (LC50) and a 10-d population growth-rate measurement, the instantaneous rate of increase (r1). Based on LC50, the order of toxicity was R-11 > X-77 = Sylgard 309 = Silwet L-77 > Kinetic > Bond > Plyac > WaterMaxx; all LC50 estimates were higher than the expected environmental concentration (EEC) of 0.79 mg/L, indicating that none of these adjuvants should cause high levels of mortality in wild D. pulex populations. Extinction, defined as negative population growth rate, occurred after exposure to 0.9 mg/L R-11, 13 mg/L X-77, 25 mg/L Kinetic, 28 mg/L Silwet, 18 mg/L Sylgard, 450 mg/L Bond, 610 mg/L Plyac, and 1,600 mg/L WaterMaxx. Concentrations that caused extinction were substantially below the acute LC50 for R-11, Kinetic, Plyac, X-77, and Bond. The no-observable-effects concentration (NOEC) and lowest-observable-effects concentration (LOEC) for the number of offspring per surviving female after exposure to R-11 were 0.5 and 0.75 mg/L, respectively. The NOEC and LOEC for population size after exposure to R-11 were (1.25 and 0.5 mg/L, respectively. Both of these values were lower than the EEC, indicating that R-11 does have the potential to cause damage to D. pulex populations after application at recommended field rates. The wide range of concentrations causing extinction makes it difficult to generalize about the potential impacts that agricultural adjuvants might have on aquatic ecosystems. Therefore, additional studies that examine effects on other nontarget organisms and determine residues in aquatic ecosystems may be warranted. PMID:14713050

  6. Dose-rate models for human survival after exposure to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Young, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews new estimates of the L/sub 50/ in man by Mole and by Rotblat, the biological processes contributing to hematologic death, the collection of animal experiments dealing with hematologic death, and the use of regression analysis to make new estimates of human mortality based on all relevant animal studies. Regression analysis of animal mortality data has shown that mortality is dependent strongly on dose rate, species, body weight, and time interval over which the exposure is delivered. The model has predicted human LD/sub 50/s of 194, 250, 310, and 360 rad to marrow when the exposure time is a minute, an hour, a day, and a week, respectively.

  7. Preweaning cocaine exposure alters brain glucose metabolic rates following repeated amphetamine administration in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Susan M; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Dow-Edwards, Diana L

    2004-10-15

    Developmental cocaine exposure produces long-term alterations in function of many neuronal circuits. This study examined glucose metabolic rates following repeated amphetamine administration in adult male and female rats pretreated with cocaine during postnatal days (PND) 11-20. PND11-20 cocaine increased the response to amphetamine in many components of the motor system and the dorsal caudate-putamen, in particular, and decreased the metabolic response in the hypothalamus. While amphetamine alone produced widespread increases in metabolism, there were no cocaine-related effects in the mesolimbic, limbic or sensory structures. These data suggest that a brief cocaine exposure during development can alter ontogeny and result in abnormal neuronal responses to repeated psychostimulant administration in adulthood. PMID:15464226

  8. Time course of heart rate variability decline following particulate matter exposures in an occupational cohort.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Jennifer M; Fang, Shona C; Eisen, Ellen A; Schwartz, Joel; Hauser, Russ; Herrick, Robert F; Christiani, David C

    2008-02-01

    Although research suggests that particles influence cardiac autonomic response as evidenced by decreases in heart rate variability (HRV), the time course of the response remains unclear. Using a crossover panel study, we monitored 36 male boilermaker welders, occupationally exposed to metal-rich particulate matter (PM) to investigate the temporal trend of hourly HRV subsequent to PM exposure. Ambulatory electrocardiograms were collected over work (exposure) and non-work (control) periods and the mean of the standard deviations of all normal-to-normal intervals for all 5-min segments (SDNN(i)) was calculated hourly for up to 14-hrs post-work. The exposure-response relationship was examined with linear mixed effects regression models to account for participants monitored over multiple occasions. Models were adjusted for non-work HRV to control for diurnal fluctuations and individual predictors of HRV. The mean (SD) work PM(2. 5) concentration was 1.12 (0.76) mg/m(3). Hourly SDNN(i) was consistently lower post-work as compared to the same time period on a non-work day. HRV was inversely associated with work PM(2. 5) exposures in each of the 14-hrs post-work. The hourly associations suggested an early and later phase response, with the largest regression coefficients observed 2-3 hrs (beta = -6.86 (95% CI: -11.91, -1.81) msec/1 mg/m(3) at 3-hrs), and then 9-13 hrs (beta = -8.60 (95% CI: -17.45, 0.24) msec/1 mg/m(3) at 11-hrs), after adjusting for non-work HRV, smoking status, and age. This investigation demonstrates declines in HRV for up to 14 hours following PM exposure and a multiphase cardiovascular autonomic response with immediate (2 hrs) and delayed (9-13 hrs) responses. PMID:18302049

  9. Addressing the recovery of feeding rates in post-exposure feeding bioassays: Cyathura carinata as a case study.

    PubMed

    Pais-Costa, Antonia Juliana; Acevedo, Pelayo; Marques, João Carlos; Martinez-Haro, Mónica

    2015-02-01

    Post-exposure bioassays are used in environmental assessment as a cost-effective tool, but the effects of organism's recovery after exposure to pollutant has not yet been addressed in detail. The recoveries of post-exposure feeding rates after being exposed to two sublethal concentrations of cadmium during two different exposure periods (48h and 96h) were evaluated under laboratory conditions using the estuarine isopod Cyathura carinata. Results showed that feeding depression was a stable endpoint up to 24h after cadmium exposure, which is useful for ecotoxicological bioassays. PMID:25576796

  10. Size control by rate control in colloidal PbSe quantum dot synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čapek, Richard Karel; Yanover, Dianna; Lifshitz, Efrat

    2015-03-01

    A recently demonstrated approach to control the size of colloidal nanoparticles, ``size control by rate control'', which was validated on the examples of colloidal CdSe- and CdS-quantum dot (CQD) synthesis, appears to be a general strategy for designing technically applicable CQD-syntheses. The ``size control by rate control'' concept allows full-yield syntheses of ensembles of CQDs with different sizes by tuning the solute formation rate. In this work, we extended this strategy to dialkylphosphine enhanced hot-injection synthesis of PbSe-CQDs. Furthermore, we provide new insight into the reaction mechanism of dialkylphosphine enhancement in TOPSe based CQD-syntheses.A recently demonstrated approach to control the size of colloidal nanoparticles, ``size control by rate control'', which was validated on the examples of colloidal CdSe- and CdS-quantum dot (CQD) synthesis, appears to be a general strategy for designing technically applicable CQD-syntheses. The ``size control by rate control'' concept allows full-yield syntheses of ensembles of CQDs with different sizes by tuning the solute formation rate. In this work, we extended this strategy to dialkylphosphine enhanced hot-injection synthesis of PbSe-CQDs. Furthermore, we provide new insight into the reaction mechanism of dialkylphosphine enhancement in TOPSe based CQD-syntheses. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional data about the reaction and growth kinetics, NMR-data and exemplary TEM images of PbSe-CQDs prepared by the procedure described in this publication. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00028a

  11. Paint thinner exposure inhibits testosterone synthesis and secretion in a reversible manner in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Bayram; Canpolat, Sinan; Sandal, Suleyman; Akpolat, Nusret; Kutlu, Selim; Ilhan, Necip; Kelestimur, Haluk

    2006-11-01

    Occupational exposure and sniffing of toluene-based organic solvents is an important public health problem. In this study, we have investigated the effects of paint thinner inhalation on testosterone synthesis and secretion in the male rat. A control group inhaled normal air ventilation. The remaining animals were divided into three groups and exposed to paint thinner in a glassy cage for 15 and 30 days (2 h/day). A group of rats was allowed to recover for 15 days after 30 days of exposure. Toluene concentration (the largest constituent in thinner, 66%) was set at 1500 ppm in the inhaled air. At the end, all animals were decapitated and blood samples obtained. Testes and seminal vesicles were removed and weighed out. Serum total testosterone levels were determined by chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay. Testicular tissue specimens were processed for semi-quantitative evaluation of immunohistochemical testosterone staining and light microscopy. Intensity of immunostaining was evaluated on a scale between 0 (no staining), 1 (minimal), 2 (mild), 3 (moderate) and 4 (strong staining). Serum testosterone levels (ng/ml) were decreased by 15-day (3.31+/-0.61) and 30-day (1.17+/-0.54, p<0.02) thinner exposure compared to the controls (3.91+/-1.03). Another group of rats exposed to thinner for 30 days and then allowed to recover for a period of 15 days had significantly elevated levels of testosterone values (3.77+/-1.1; p<0.05). Immunohistochemical testosterone staining of the cytoplasm of Leydig cells was moderate (3+) and mild (2+) in 15 and 30 days thinner inhalation groups, respectively. Strong staining (4+) was restored following the recovery period. Testicular weight was significantly reduced in all test groups compared to the control values (p<0.01). Diameters of seminiferous tubules were significantly decreased in the solvent exposed groups with enlarged connective tissue. The present findings suggest that paint thinner inhalation inhibits testosterone synthesis

  12. Correlation of External Exposure and Dose Equivalent Rates with Uranium Surface Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, J.C.; Bogard, J.S.; Brown, K.S.; England, C.A.; Hamm, R.N.; Turner, J.E.

    1999-06-01

    This report provides both calculated estimates and measured values of exposure in air and tissue dose from external penetrating radiation at a distance of 1 m from uranium contamination on surfaces at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, in support of the Y-12 Site Radiological Characterization Study. Calculated values are based on the total energy from gamma rays and X rays emitted by uranium and its shordaughters at secular equilibrium. Results of a small number of measurements are provided for comparison. Dose rate values derived here are limited to those of external penetrating radiation from distributed sources with limited surface area and from point sources.

  13. Effect of Growth Rate on Histidine Catabolism and Histidase Synthesis in Aerobacter aerogenes1

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Donald E.; Neidhardt, Frederick C.

    1969-01-01

    A study was made of how the catabolism of a carbon and energy source is affected by the biosynthetic demands of growing bacterial cells. Cultures of Aerobacter aerogenes in l-histidine medium were grown in a chemostat at rates determined by the supply of either sulfate or a required amino acid, l-arginine. It was discovered that the rate at which these cells grow under a biosynthetic restriction determines both the rate and the pattern of histidine degradation. (i) Histidine catabolism is partially coupled to the growth rate. This coupling is achieved by catabolite repression of histidase (histidine ammonia lyase; EC 4.3.1.3.), and also by a slightly decreased in vivo function of this enzyme at low growth rates. (ii) The looseness of the coupling results in a direct relationship between growth rate and growth yield, and possibly is correlated with an altered pattern of carbon flow from histidine. (iii) Sudden decreases in growth rate cause total repression of histidase synthesis for substantial periods of time. (iv) Sudden release of biosynthetic restriction leads rapidly to an increase in the functioning of the cells' complement of histidase, an increase in the rate of synthesis of this enzyme, and an increase in the growth yield from histidine. PMID:5781570

  14. Effects of ovarian endometriotic fluid exposure on fertilization rate of mouse oocytes and subsequent embryo development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accidental exposure of oocyte/cumulus complex to endometriotic fluid is not uncommon during oocyte retrieval. Only two studies were available on this subject and they gave conflicting results. In this study, we used a mouse model to evaluate the effect of controlled exposure of oocytes to ovarian endometriotic fluid. Methods Mouse oocytes/cumulus complexes (n = 862) were divided into 4 groups, and were exposed to endometriotic fluid (group 1), pooled sera from subjects without endometrioma (group 2), phosphate-buffered saline (group 3), and fertilization medium (controls). After five minutes, oocytes were washed and inseminated. Embryo development was observed daily. The quality of hatching blastocysts was assessed by counting the number of inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) cells. Results The fertilization, cleavage and blastocyst formation rates in the four groups were not statistically different. The proportions of hatching/hatched blastocysts from fertilized oocytes in groups 1 and 2 were significantly lower than those in group 3 and controls (P = 0.015). Hatching blastocysts from all groups showed no significant difference in the number of ICM and TE cells. Conclusions Exposure of mouse oocytes/cumulus complexes to endometriotic fluid had subtle detrimental effects on subsequent blastocyst development. However, one should be cautious in projecting the results of this study to contaminated human oocytes in a clinical setting. PMID:23332096

  15. Multiple contexts of exposure: Activity spaces, residential neighborhoods, and self-rated health.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Gregory; Denney, Justin T; Kimbro, Rachel T

    2015-12-01

    Although health researchers have made progress in detecting place effects on health, existing work has largely focused on the local residential neighborhood and has lacked a temporal dimension. Little research has integrated both time and space to understand how exposure to multiple contexts - where adults live, work, shop, worship, and seek healthcare - influence and shape health and well-being. This study uses novel longitudinal data from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey to delve deeper into the relationship between context and health by considering residential and activity space neighborhoods weighted by the amount of time spent in these contexts. Results from multilevel cross-classified logistic models indicate that contextual exposure to disadvantage, residential or non-residential, is independently associated with a higher likelihood of reporting poor or fair health. We also find support for a contextual incongruence hypothesis. For example, adults living in the most disadvantaged neighborhoods are more likely to report poor or fair health when they spend time in more advantaged neighborhoods than in more disadvantaged ones, while residents of more advantaged neighborhoods report worse health when they spend time in more disadvantaged areas. Our results suggest that certain types of place-based cumulative exposures are associated with a sense of relative neighborhood deprivation that potentially manifests in worse health ratings. PMID:26519605

  16. Investigation of exposure rates and radionuclide and trace metal distributions along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, A.T.; Woodruff, R.K.

    1993-09-01

    Studies have been conducted to investigate exposure rates, and radionuclide and trace metal distributions along the Columbia River where it borders the Hanford Site. The last major field study was conducted in 1979. With recently renewed interest in various land use and resource protection alternatives, it is important to have data that represent current conditions. Radionuclides and trace metals were surveyed in Columbia River shoreline soils along the Hanford Site (Hanford Reach). The work was conducted as part of the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The survey consisted of taking exposure rate measurements and soil samples primarily at locations known or expected to have elevated exposure rates.

  17. Optimization of synthesis and peptization steps to obtain iron oxide nanoparticles with high energy dissipation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mérida, Fernando; Chiu-Lam, Andreina; Bohórquez, Ana C.; Maldonado-Camargo, Lorena; Pérez, María-Eglée; Pericchi, Luis; Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH) uses heat generated by magnetic nanoparticles exposed to alternating magnetic fields to cause a temperature increase in tumors to the hyperthermia range (43-47 °C), inducing apoptotic cancer cell death. As with all cancer nanomedicines, one of the most significant challenges with MFH is achieving high nanoparticle accumulation at the tumor site. This motivates development of synthesis strategies that maximize the rate of energy dissipation of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles, preferable due to their intrinsic biocompatibility. This has led to development of synthesis strategies that, although attractive from the point of view of chemical elegance, may not be suitable for scale-up to quantities necessary for clinical use. On the other hand, to date the aqueous co-precipitation synthesis, which readily yields gram quantities of nanoparticles, has only been reported to yield sufficiently high specific absorption rates after laborious size selective fractionation. This work focuses on improvements to the aqueous co-precipitation of iron oxide nanoparticles to increase the specific absorption rate (SAR), by optimizing synthesis conditions and the subsequent peptization step. Heating efficiencies up to 1048 W/gFe (36.5 kA/m, 341 kHz; ILP=2.3 nH m2 kg-1) were obtained, which represent one of the highest values reported for iron oxide particles synthesized by co-precipitation without size-selective fractionation. Furthermore, particles reached SAR values of up to 719 W/gFe (36.5 kA/m, 341 kHz; ILP=1.6 nH m2 kg-1) when in a solid matrix, demonstrating they were capable of significant rates of energy dissipation even when restricted from physical rotation. Reduction in energy dissipation rate due to immobilization has been identified as an obstacle to clinical translation of MFH. Hence, particles obtained with the conditions reported here have great potential for application in nanoscale thermal cancer therapy.

  18. Personal Exposure to Household Particulate Matter, Household Activities and Heart Rate Variability among Housewives

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Li; Chen, Hua-Wei; Han, Bor-Cheng; Liu, Chien-Wei; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Lin, Lian-Yu; Chuang, Kai-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Background The association between indoor air pollution and heart rate variability (HRV) has been well-documented. Little is known about effects of household activities on indoor air quality and HRV alteration. To investigate changes in HRV associated with changes in personal exposure to household particulate matter (PM) and household activities. Methods We performed 24-h continuous monitoring of electrocardiography and measured household PM exposure among 50 housewives. The outcome variables were log10-transformed standard deviation of normal-to-normal (NN) intervals (SDNN) and the square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent NN intervals (r-MSSD). Household PM was measured as the mass concentration of PM with an aerodynamic diameter <2.5 µm (PM2.5). We used mixed-effects models to examine the association between household PM2.5 exposure and log10-transformed HRV indices. Results After controlling for potential confounders, an interquartile range change in household PM2.5 with 1- to 4-h mean was associated with 1.25–4.31% decreases in SDNN and 0.12–3.71% decreases in r-MSSD. Stir-frying, cleaning with detergent and burning incense may increase household PM2.5 concentrations and modify the effects of household PM2.5 on HRV indices among housewives. Conclusions Indoor PM2.5 exposures were associated with decreased SDNN and r-MSSD among housewives, especially during stir-frying, cleaning with detergent and burning incense. PMID:24594880

  19. The exposure history of Jilin and production rates of cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heusser, G.

    1986-01-01

    Jilin, the largest known story meteorite, is a very suitable object for studying the systematics of cosmic ray produced nuclides in stony meteorites. Its well established two stage exposure history even permits to gain information about two different irradiation geometries (2pi and 4pi). All stable and long-lived cosmogenic nuclides measured in Jilin so far correlate well with each other. An example is shown where the Al-26 activities are plotted vs. the spallogenic Ne-21 concentration. These records of cosmic-ray interaction in Jilin can be used both to determine the history of the target and to study the nature of production rate profiles. This is unavoidably a bootstrap process, involving studying one with assumption about the other. Production rate equations are presented and discussed.

  20. Enhanced somatic mutation rates induced in stem cells of mice by low chronic exposure to ethylnitrosourea.

    PubMed Central

    Shaver-Walker, P M; Urlando, C; Tao, K S; Zhang, X B; Heddle, J A

    1995-01-01

    We have found that the somatic mutation rate at the Dlb-1 locus increases exponentially during low daily exposure to ethylnitrosourea over 4 months. This effect, enhanced mutagenesis, was not observed at a lacI transgene in the same tissue, although the two loci respond very similarly to acute doses. Since both mutations are neutral, the mutant frequency was expected to increase linearly with time in response to a constant mutagenic exposure, as it did for lacI. Enhanced mutagenesis does not result from an overall sensitization of the animals, since mice that had first been treated with a low daily dose for 90 days and then challenged with a large acute dose were not sensitized to the acute dose. Nor was the increased mutant frequency due to selection, since animals that were treated for 90 days and then left untreated for up to 60 days showed little change from the 90-day frequency. The effect is substantial: about 8 times as many Dlb-1 mutants were induced between 90 and 120 days as in the first 30 days. This resulted in a reverse dose rate effect such that 90 mg/kg induced more mutants when delivered at 1 mg/kg per day than at 3 mg/kg per day. We postulate that enhanced mutagenesis arises from increased stem cell proliferation and the preferential repair of transcribed genes. Enhanced mutagenesis may be important for risk evaluation, as the results show that chronic exposures can be more mutagenic than acute ones and raise the possibility of synergism between chemicals at low doses. PMID:8524785

  1. Exposure to Persistent Organic Pollutants Increases Hospitalization Rates for Myocardial Infarction with Comorbid Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sergeev, Alexander V.; Carpenter, David O.

    2010-01-01

    Studies suggest that environmental exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) may be an emerging risk factor for ischemic heart disease, including acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, some studies indicate that exposure to POPs may also be a risk factor for hypertension, a well-established risk factor for AMI. To investigate effect of POPs on the environmental burden of cardiovascular disease, a study of AMI with comorbid hypertension in populations environmentally exposed to persistent organic pollutants, based on the zip code of residence, was conducted. Data on hospital discharges for AMI with comorbid hypertension were obtained from the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System for 1993–2004. Patients residing in zip codes containing or abutting POPs contaminated sites were considered environmentally exposed. Relative risks (RR) — with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) — of hospitalization for AMI with comorbid hypertension were estimated by Poisson regression, adjusting for known confounders. Adjusted hospitalization rates for AMI with comorbid hypertension were 12.4% higher in populations residing in proximity to a POPs site (adjusted RR = 1.124, 95% CI 1.025–1.233, p < 0.05), compared to not in proximity to a POPs site. Also, hospitalization rates for AMI with comorbid hypertension were higher in males than in females (adjusted RR = 2.157, 95% CI 2.100–2.215, p < 0.05), in African Americans than in Caucasians (adjusted RR = 1.631, 95% CI 1.483–1.794, p < 0.05), and in older age groups (p for trend <0.05). These findings are consistent with the established effects of non-modifiable risk factors and serve as indirect quality indicators for our model. In conclusion, our results support the hypothesis that environmental exposure to POPs increases the burden of cardiovascular disease in exposed populations. PMID:21562627

  2. Enhancement of Particle Track Etch Rate in CR-39 by UV Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesner, Micah; Ume, Rubab; McLean, James; Sangster, Craig; Regan, Sean

    2015-11-01

    The use of CR-39 plastic as a Solid State Nuclear Track Detector is effective for obtaining data in high-energy particle experiments including inertial confinement fusion. To reveal particle tracks after irradiation, CR-39 is chemically etched at elevated temperatures with NaOH, producing signal pits at the nuclear track sites that are measurable by an optical microscope. CR-39 pieces sometimes also exhibit etch-induced noise, either surface features not caused by nuclear particles. When CR-39 is exposed to high intensity UV light after nuclear irradiation with 5.4 MeV alpha particles and before etching, an increase in etch rates and pit diameters is observed, though UV exposure can also increase noise. We have determined that light from a low pressure mercury vapor lamp (predominantly wavelength 253.7 nm) increases etch rates and pit diameters while causing minimal background noise. Heating CR-39 to elevated temperatures (~80 °C) during UV exposure also improves the signal-to-noise ratio for this process. Surprisingly, initial data from CR-39 irradiated with 3.4 MeV protons and exposed to UV show reduced pit diameters. This material is based in part upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  3. Development and Evaluation of a New Air Exchange Rate Algorithm for the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    between-home and between-city variability in residential pollutant infiltration. This is likely a result of differences in home ventilation, or air exchange rates (AER). The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) model is a population exposure model that uses a pro...

  4. Personal Exposure to Submicrometer Particles and Heart Rate Variability in Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chang-Chuan; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Shiao, Guang-Ming; Lin, Lian-Yu

    2004-01-01

    We conducted a study on two panels of human subjects—9 young adults and 10 elderly patients with lung function impairments—to evaluate whether submicrometer particulate air pollution was associated with heart rate variability (HRV). We measured these subjects’ electrocardiography and personal exposure to number concentrations of submicrometer particles with a size range of 0.02–1 μm (NC0.02–1) continuously during daytime periods. We used linear mixed-effects models to estimate the relationship between NC0.02–1 and log10-transformed HRV, including standard deviation of all normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN), square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent NN intervals (r-MSSD), low frequency (LF, 0.04–0.15 Hz), and high frequency (HF, 0.15–0.40 Hz), adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, tobacco exposure, and temperature. For the young panel, a 10,000-particle/cm3 increase in NC0.02–1 with 1–4 hr moving average exposure was associated with 0.68–1.35% decreases in SDNN, 1.85–2.58% decreases in r-MSSD, 1.32–1.61% decreases in LF, and 1.57–2.60% decreases in HF. For the elderly panel, a 10,000-particle/cm3 increase in NC0.02–1 with 1–3 hr moving average exposure was associated with 1.72–3.00% decreases in SDNN, 2.72–4.65% decreases in r-MSSD, 3.34–5.04% decreases in LF, and 3.61–5.61% decreases in HF. In conclusion, exposure to NC0.02–1 was associated with decreases in both time-domain and frequency-domain HRV indices in human subjects. PMID:15238278

  5. Whole body synthesis rates of DHA from α-linolenic acid are greater than brain DHA accretion and uptake rates in adult rats[S

    PubMed Central

    Domenichiello, Anthony F.; Chen, Chuck T.; Trepanier, Marc-Olivier; Stavro, P. Mark; Bazinet, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is important for brain function, however, the exact amount required for the brain is not agreed upon. While it is believed that the synthesis rate of DHA from α-linolenic acid (ALA) is low, how this synthesis rate compares with the amount of DHA required to maintain brain DHA levels is unknown. The objective of this work was to assess whether DHA synthesis from ALA is sufficient for the brain. To test this, rats consumed a diet low in n-3 PUFAs, or a diet containing ALA or DHA for 15 weeks. Over the 15 weeks, whole body and brain DHA accretion was measured, while at the end of the study, whole body DHA synthesis rates, brain gene expression, and DHA uptake rates were measured. Despite large differences in body DHA accretion, there was no difference in brain DHA accretion between rats fed ALA and DHA. In rats fed ALA, DHA synthesis and accretion was 100-fold higher than brain DHA accretion of rats fed DHA. Also, ALA-fed rats synthesized approximately 3-fold more DHA than the DHA uptake rate into the brain. This work indicates that DHA synthesis from ALA may be sufficient to supply the brain. PMID:24212299

  6. Rates of fetal alcohol exposure among newborns in a high-risk obstetric unit.

    PubMed

    Goh, Y Ingrid; Hutson, Janine R; Lum, Lisa; Roukema, Henry; Gareri, Joey; Lynn, Hazel; Koren, Gideon

    2010-01-01

    Meconium fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) are sensitive and specific biomarkers for prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) in pregnancy. We recently reported a 2.5% rate of FAEE positive meconium in a general population sample of infants born in the region of Grey-Bruce, Ontario. Women in this region with high-risk pregnancies are transferred to a tertiary care facility in London, Ontario. The objective of this study was to determine, in a population-based sample, whether high-risk pregnancies are associated with an increased risk of in utero alcohol exposure. Grey-Bruce residents transferred to the high-risk obstetric unit of St. Joseph's Health Care in London, Ontario were identified and consented to this anonymous prevalence study. Meconium was collected and analyzed for FAEE using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. The prevalence of FAEE positive meconium was compared with the population-based prevalence in the Grey-Bruce. Fifty meconium specimens were collected from August 1, 2006 to July 31, 2007. Fifteen (30%) specimens tested positive for FAEE. The results indicate that infants born in the high-risk obstetric unit had a 12-fold higher risk of screening positive for second and third trimester alcohol exposure compared with infants born in the general population of Grey-Bruce (relative risk=12.04, 95% confidence interval=6.40-22.65, P<.0001). These results suggest that the high-risk pregnancies should be screened for PAE and followed-up for potential diagnosis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. PMID:20584588

  7. High exposure rates of anticoagulant rodenticides in predatory bird species in intensively managed landscapes in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Thomas Kjær; Lassen, Pia; Elmeros, Morten

    2012-10-01

    The extensive use of anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) for rodent control has led to widespread secondary exposure in nontarget predatory wildlife species. We investigated exposure rates and concentrations of five ARs in liver samples from five raptors and six owls from Denmark. A total of 430 birds were analysed. ARs were detected in 84-100 % of individual birds within each species. Multiple AR exposure was detected in 73 % of all birds. Average number of substances detected in individual birds was 2.2 with no differences between owls and raptors. Difenacoum, bromadiolone, and brodifacoum were the most prevalent substances and occurred in the highest concentrations. Second-generation ARs made up 96 % of the summed AR burden. Among the six core species (sample size >30), summed AR concentrations were lower in rough-legged buzzard (Buteo lagopus) and long-eared owl (Asio otus) than in barn owl (Tyto alba), buzzard (B. buteo), kestrel (Falco tinnunculus), and tawny owl (Strix aluco). There was a strong tendency for seasonal variations in the summed AR concentration with levels being lowest during autumn, which is probably related to an influx of less-exposed migrating birds from northern Scandinavia during autumn. High hepatic AR residue concentrations (>100 ng/g wet weight), which have been associated with symptoms of rodenticide poisoning and increased mortality, were recorded high frequencies (12.9-37.4 %) in five of the six core species. The results suggest that the present use of ARs in Denmark, at least locally, may have adverse effects on reproduction and, ultimately, population status in some raptors and owls. PMID:22588365

  8. Gene regulation of UDP-galactose synthesis and transport: Potential rate limiting processes in initiation of milk production in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactose synthesis is believed to be rate-limiting for milk production. However, understanding the molecular events controlling lactose synthesis in humans is still rudimentary. We have utilized our established model of the RNA isolated from breast milk fat globule from 7 healthy exclusively breastfe...

  9. Fluoride exposure regulates the elongation phase of protein synthesis in cultured Bergmann glia cells.

    PubMed

    Flores-Méndez, Marco; Ramírez, Diana; Alamillo, Nely; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; Del Razo, Luz María; Ortega, Arturo

    2014-08-17

    Fluoride is an environmental pollutant present in dental products, food, pesticides and water. The latter, is the greatest source of exposure to this contaminant. Structural and functional damages to the central nervous system are present in exposed population. An established consequence of the neuronal is the release of a substantial amount of glutamate to the extracellular space, leading to an excitotoxic insult. Glutamate exerts its actions through the activation of specific plasma membrane receptors and transporters present in neurons and in glia cells and it is the over-activation of glutamate receptors and transporters, the biochemical hallmark of neuronal and oligodendrocyte cell death. In this context, taking into consideration that fluoride leads to degeneration of cerebellar cells, we took the advantage of the well-established model of cerebellar Bergmann glia cultures to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms inherent to fluoride neurotoxicity that might be triggered in glia cells. We could establish that fluoride decreases [(35)S]-methionine incorporation into newly synthesized polypeptides, in a time-dependent manner, and that this halt in protein synthesis is the result of a decrease in the elongation phase of translation, mediated by an augmentation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 phosphorylation. These results favor the notion of glial cells as targets of fluoride toxicity and strengthen the idea of a critical involvement of glia cells in the function and dysfunction of the brain. PMID:24954634

  10. Determining biotransformation rates of PAH in fish using a static exposure system

    SciTech Connect

    Maagd, P.G.J. de; Sijm, D.T.H.M.; Opperhuizen, A.

    1994-12-31

    In-order to quantify the influence of biotransformation on bioconcentration, juvenile fathead minnows were exposed to aqueous solutions of PAH under static conditions. During the two days of exposure both fish and water samples were taken and analyzed to determine the change in PAH concentrations in both phases with time. A numerical mathematical model was developed to calculate uptake rate constants (k{sub 1}), physico-chemical elimination rate constants (k{sub m}) and biotransformation rate constants (k{sub 2}) from concentrations in fish and water. The model assumes that biotransformation is the only process that is responsible for loss of PAH from the fish-water system. Control experiments were performed to correct for evaporation, degradation and sorption. Of the PAH tested so far (naphthalene, anthracene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene and benzo[a]anthracene) the influence of biotransformation on bioconcentration is most significant for benzo[a]anthracene and fluoranthene. Biotransformation reduced the bioconcentration of benz[a]anthracene with about an order of magnitude.

  11. Incomplete Reversibility of Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate Decline Following Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Sophie; Hamzah, Lisa; Campbell, Lucy J.; Hill, Teresa; Fisher, Martin; Leen, Clifford; Gilson, Richard; Walsh, John; Nelson, Mark; Hay, Phillip; Johnson, Margaret; Chadwick, David; Nitsch, Dorothea; Jones, Rachael; Sabin, Caroline A.; Post, Frank A.; Ainsworth, Jonathan; Anderson, Jane; Babiker, Abdel; Chadwick, David; Delpech, Valerie; Dunn, David; Fisher, Martin; Gazzard, Brian; Gilson, Richard; Gompels, Mark; Hay, Phillip; Hill, Teresa; Johnson, Margaret; Kegg, Stephen; Leen, Clifford; Nelson, Mark; Orkin, Chloe; Palfreeman, Adrian; Phillips, Andrew; Pillay, Deenan; Post, Frank; Sabin, Caroline; Sachikonye, Memory; Schwenk, Achim; Walsh, John; Hill, Teresa; Huntington, Susie; Josie, Sophie; Phillips, Andrew; Sabin, Caroline; Thornton, Alicia; Dunn, David; Glabay, Adam; Orkin, C.; Garrett, N.; Lynch, J.; Hand, J.; de Souza, C.; Fisher, M.; Perry, N.; Tilbury, S.; Churchill, D.; Gazzard, B.; Nelson, M.; Waxman, M.; Asboe, D.; Mandalia, S.; Delpech, V.; Anderson, J.; Munshi, S.; Korat, H.; Poulton, M.; Taylor, C.; Gleisner, Z.; Campbell, L.; Babiker, Abdel; Dunn, David; Glabay, Adam; Gilson, R.; Brima, N.; Williams, I.; Schwenk, A.; Ainsworth, J.; Wood, C.; Miller, S.; Johnson, M.; Youle, M.; Lampe, F.; Smith, C.; Grabowska, H.; Chaloner, C.; Puradiredja, D.; Walsh, J.; Weber, J.; Ramzan, F.; Mackie, N.; Winston, A.; Leen, C.; Wilson, A.; Gompels, M.; Allan, S.; Palfreeman, A.; Moore, A.; Chadwick, D.; Wakeman, K.; Kegg, Stephen; Main, Paul; Mitchell; Hunter; Sachikonye, Memory; Hay, Phillip; Dhillon, Mandip

    2014-01-01

    Background. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) has been linked to renal impairment, but the extent to which this impairment is reversible is unclear. We aimed to investigate the reversibility of renal decline during TDF therapy. Methods. Cox proportional hazards models assessed factors associated with discontinuing TDF in those with an exposure duration of >6 months. In those who discontinued TDF therapy, linear piecewise regression models estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slopes before initiation of, during, and after discontinuation of TDF therapy. Factors associated with not achieving eGFR recovery 6 months after discontinuing TDF were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. Results. We observed declines in the eGFR during TDF exposure (mean slopes, −15.7 mL/minute/1.73 m2/year [95% confidence interval {CI}, −20.5 to −10.9] during the first 3 months and −3.1 mL/minute/1.73 m2/year [95% CI, −4.6 to −1.7] thereafter) and evidence of eGFR increases following discontinuation of TDF therapy (mean slopes, 12.5 mL/minute/1.73 m2/year [95% CI, 8.9–16.1] during the first 3 months and 0.8 mL/minute/1.73 m2/year [95% CI, .1–1.5] thereafter). Following TDF discontinuation, 38.6% of patients with a decline in the eGFR did not experience recovery. A higher eGFR at baseline, a lower eGFR after discontinuation of TDF therapy, and more-prolonged exposure to TDF were associated with an increased risk of incomplete recovery 6 months after discontinuation of TDF therapy. Conclusions. This study shows that a decline in the eGFR during TDF therapy was not fully reversible in one third of patients and suggests that prolonged TDF exposure at a low eGFR should be avoided. PMID:24585896

  12. Reliability of an expert rating procedure for retrospective assessment of occupational exposures in community-based case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Siemiatycki, J; Fritschi, L; Nadon, L; Gérin, M

    1997-03-01

    The most daunting problem in community-based studies of occupational cancer is retrospective exposure assessment. To avoid the error involved in using job title as the exposure variable or self-report of exposure, our team developed an approach based on expert judgment applied to job descriptions obtained by interviewers. A population-based case-control study of cancer and occupation was carried out in Montreal between 1979 and 1986, and over 4,000 job histories were assessed by our team of experts. The job histories of these subjects were evaluated, by consensus, by a team of chemist/hygienists for evidence of exposure to a list of 294 workplace chemicals. In order to evaluate the reliability of this exposure assessment procedure, four years after the rating was completed, we selected 50 job histories at random and had two members of the expert team carry out the same type of coding, blind to the original ratings for these jobs. For 25 job histories, comprising 94 distinct jobs, the pair worked as a consensus panel; for the other 25, comprising 92 distinct jobs, they worked independently. Statistical comparisons were made between the new ratings and the old. Among those rated by consensus, the marginal distribution of exposure prevalence was almost identical between old and new. The weighted kappa for agreement was 0.80. Among items for which both ratings agreed that there had been exposure, there was good agreement on the frequency, concentration, and route of contact. When the two raters worked independently, the levels of agreement between them and between each of them and the original rating was good (kappas around 0.70), though not as high as when they worked together. It is concluded that high levels of reliability are attainable for retrospective exposure assessment by experts. PMID:9055950

  13. Derivation of heating rate dependent exposure strategies for the selective laser melting of thermoplastic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummer, Dietmar; Drexler, Maximilian; Wudy, Katrin

    2015-05-01

    The selective laser melting of polymer powder is for rapid prototyping applications an established technology, although a lack in basic process knowledge appears. Considering demands of series production the selective laser melting technique is faced with varies challenges concerning processable material systems, process strategies and part properties. Consequently basic research is necessary to shift from rapid prototyping to rapid manufacturing of small lot sized series. Based on basic research the high potential of selective laser melting for the production of complex parts without any tools can be opened up. For the derivation of part quality increasing process strategies knowledge about interactions between sub-processes of selective laser melting and resulting part properties is necessary. The selective laser melting consists of three major sub-processes: Geometry exposure, tempering and powder feeding. According to the interaction of sub-processes resulting temperature fields during the selective laser melting process determine the part properties by changing micro structural pore number and distribution. Beneath absolute temperatures also the time-dependency of the thermal fields influences the porosity of molten parts. Present process strategies tend to decrease building time by increasing scanning speed and laser power. Although the absolute energy input into the material is constant for increasing scanning speed and laser power in the same ratio, time dependent material effects are neglected. The heating rate is a combined parameter derived from absolute temperature and time. Within the paper the authors analyze the basic interactions between different heating rates and part properties (e.g. porosity, mechanical strengths). Therefore with different heating rates produced specimens are analyzed with imaging technologies as well as mechanical tests. Based on the done basic investigations new heating rate dependent process strategies can be established

  14. The rate of the molecular clock and the cost of gratuitous protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The nature of the protein molecular clock, the protein-specific rate of amino acid substitutions, is among the central questions of molecular evolution. Protein expression level is the dominant determinant of the clock rate in a number of organisms. It has been suggested that highly expressed proteins evolve slowly in all species mainly to maintain robustness to translation errors that generate toxic misfolded proteins. Here we investigate this hypothesis experimentally by comparing the growth rate of Escherichia coli expressing wild type and misfolding-prone variants of the LacZ protein. Results We show that the cost of toxic protein misfolding is small compared to other costs associated with protein synthesis. Complementary computational analyses demonstrate that there is also a relatively weaker, but statistically significant, selection for increasing solubility and polarity in highly expressed E. coli proteins. Conclusions Although we cannot rule out the possibility that selection against misfolding toxicity significantly affects the protein clock in species other than E. coli, our results suggest that it is unlikely to be the dominant and universal factor determining the clock rate in all organisms. We find that in this bacterium other costs associated with protein synthesis are likely to play an important role. Interestingly, our experiments also suggest significant costs associated with volume effects, such as jamming of the cellular environment with unnecessary proteins. PMID:20920270

  15. Comparison of rates of enamel synthesis in impeded and unimpeded rat incisors.

    PubMed

    Skobe, Z; Heeley, J D; Dobeck, J M; Prostak, K S; Maravelis, L; Stern, D N

    1993-01-01

    Periodic intubations of rats with solutions of fluoride (F) lead to the appearance of bands of disrupted pigmentation in continuously erupting incisors. Distances between fluorotic bands reflect time intervals between intubations. In this experiment, the periodicity of fluorotic banding was used for estimation of the rate of enamel synthesis in impeded and unimpeded rat incisors. Rats kept on a low-F diet and distilled water were intubated two or four times per week with 2 mg NaF/150 g body weight. In a group of rats, one of the mandibular incisors was cut at the gingival margin after two weeks, and intubations were continued for an additional two weeks. In another group of F-intubated rats, incisors were cut or notched at the gingival margin twice, six days apart. Control rats either received the same periodic F intubations or were maintained on the low-F diet without intubation. Measurements of spacing between fluorotic bands were identical in impeded and unimpeded teeth, even though the latter erupted at a faster rate. In an unimpeded mandibular incisors, there was a significant elongation of the secretory zone and a shortening of the pigmentation zone, resulting in reduced pigmentation intensity of the erupted portions of the teeth. The results show that the rate of enamel synthesis is independent of the eruption rate. PMID:8418106

  16. Partial restoration of protein synthesis rates by the small molecule ISRIB prevents neurodegeneration without pancreatic toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, M; Radford, H; Sekine, Y; Moreno, J; Verity, N; le Quesne, J; Ortori, C A; Barrett, D A; Fromont, C; Fischer, P M; Harding, H P; Ron, D; Mallucci, G R

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the PERK branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in response to protein misfolding within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the transient repression of protein synthesis, mediated by the phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α). This is part of a wider integrated physiological response to maintain proteostasis in the face of ER stress, the dysregulation of which is increasingly associated with a wide range of diseases, particularly neurodegenerative disorders. In prion-diseased mice, persistently high levels of eIF2α cause sustained translational repression leading to catastrophic reduction of critical proteins, resulting in synaptic failure and neuronal loss. We previously showed that restoration of global protein synthesis using the PERK inhibitor GSK2606414 was profoundly neuroprotective, preventing clinical disease in prion-infected mice. However, this occured at the cost of toxicity to secretory tissue, where UPR activation is essential to healthy functioning. Here we show that pharmacological modulation of eIF2α-P-mediated translational inhibition can be achieved to produce neuroprotection without pancreatic toxicity. We found that treatment with the small molecule ISRIB, which restores translation downstream of eIF2α, conferred neuroprotection in prion-diseased mice without adverse effects on the pancreas. Critically, ISRIB treatment resulted in only partial restoration of global translation rates, as compared with the complete restoration of protein synthesis seen with GSK2606414. ISRIB likely provides sufficient rates of protein synthesis for neuronal survival, while allowing some residual protective UPR function in secretory tissue. Thus, fine-tuning the extent of UPR inhibition and subsequent translational de-repression uncouples neuroprotective effects from pancreatic toxicity. The data support the pursuit of this approach to develop new treatments for a range of neurodegenerative

  17. Partial restoration of protein synthesis rates by the small molecule ISRIB prevents neurodegeneration without pancreatic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Halliday, M; Radford, H; Sekine, Y; Moreno, J; Verity, N; le Quesne, J; Ortori, C A; Barrett, D A; Fromont, C; Fischer, P M; Harding, H P; Ron, D; Mallucci, G R

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the PERK branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in response to protein misfolding within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the transient repression of protein synthesis, mediated by the phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α). This is part of a wider integrated physiological response to maintain proteostasis in the face of ER stress, the dysregulation of which is increasingly associated with a wide range of diseases, particularly neurodegenerative disorders. In prion-diseased mice, persistently high levels of eIF2α cause sustained translational repression leading to catastrophic reduction of critical proteins, resulting in synaptic failure and neuronal loss. We previously showed that restoration of global protein synthesis using the PERK inhibitor GSK2606414 was profoundly neuroprotective, preventing clinical disease in prion-infected mice. However, this occured at the cost of toxicity to secretory tissue, where UPR activation is essential to healthy functioning. Here we show that pharmacological modulation of eIF2α-P-mediated translational inhibition can be achieved to produce neuroprotection without pancreatic toxicity. We found that treatment with the small molecule ISRIB, which restores translation downstream of eIF2α, conferred neuroprotection in prion-diseased mice without adverse effects on the pancreas. Critically, ISRIB treatment resulted in only partial restoration of global translation rates, as compared with the complete restoration of protein synthesis seen with GSK2606414. ISRIB likely provides sufficient rates of protein synthesis for neuronal survival, while allowing some residual protective UPR function in secretory tissue. Thus, fine-tuning the extent of UPR inhibition and subsequent translational de-repression uncouples neuroprotective effects from pancreatic toxicity. The data support the pursuit of this approach to develop new treatments for a range of neurodegenerative

  18. Clearance and synthesis rates of beta 2-microglobulin in patients undergoing hemodialysis and in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Floege, J.; Bartsch, A.; Schulze, M.; Shaldon, S.; Koch, K.M.; Smeby, L.C. )

    1991-08-01

    Retention of {beta} 2-microglobulin in patients undergoing hemodialysis is associated with a {beta} 2-microglobulin-derived amyloidosis. Removal of {beta} 2-microglobulin by renal replacement therapy has been proposed for the prevention of this amyloidosis. Currently, however, data on the {beta} 2-microglobulin synthesis rate in patients undergoing hemodialysis are scarce, and consequently it remains speculative how much removal would be necessary to counterbalance synthesis. The plasma kinetics of iodine 131-labeled {beta} 2-microglobulin were therefore examined in 11 patients with anuria who were undergoing long-term hemodialysis. Five healthy persons served as controls. Kinetic modeling of the plasma curves showed that the data fitted a two-pool model (r2 greater than 0.96) consisting of a rapid 2 to 4 hour distribution phase followed by a less steep curve, described by the plasma (metabolic) clearance (Clp). Synthetic rates were calculated from Clp and the {beta} 2-microglobulin steady state plasma concentration (plus {beta} 2-microglobulin removal during hemodialysis in the case of high flux hemodialysis). The results showed a significantly higher Clp in normal controls as compared with patients undergoing hemodialysis (65.5 {plus minus} 12.8 ml/min (mean {plus minus} SD) versus 3.4 {plus minus} 0.7 ml/min). In contrast, the {beta} 2-microglobulin synthesis rate in the patient group (3.10 {plus minus} 0.79 mg/kg/day) was not significantly different from that of normal controls (2.40 {plus minus} 0.67 mg/kg/day), which was due to markedly elevated {beta} 2-microglobulin plasma concentrations in the patients (37.6 {plus minus} 14.1 mg/L vs 1.92 {plus minus} 0.27 mg/L). These findings suggest that the presence of end-stage renal disease does not have a significant impact on the beta 2-microglobulin generation rate.

  19. EFFECTS OF PRENATAL DEXAMETHASONE OR TERBUTALINE EXPOSURE ON DEVELOPMENT OF NEURAL AND INTRINSIC CONTROL OF HEART RATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study compares the effects of prenatal exposure to terbutaline (a B-adrenergic agonist) and dexamethasone (a glucocorticoid) on the development of heart rate control mechanisms in the rat. oth drugs produced a persistent reduction in resting hart rate appearing during the 2n...

  20. Aortic baroreflex control of heart rate after 15 days of simulated microgravity exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, Craig G.; Engelke, Keith A.; Convertino, Victor A.; Raven, Peter B.

    1994-01-01

    To determine the effects of simulated microgravity on aortic baroreflex control of heart rate, we exposed seven male subjects to 15 days of bed rest in the 6 deg head-down position. The sensitivity of the aortic-cardiac baroreflex was determined during a steady-state phenylephrine-induced increase in mean arterial pressure combined with lower body negative pressure to counteract central venous pressure increases and neck pressure to offset the increased carotid sinus transmural pressure. The aortic-cardiac baroreflex gain was assessed by determining the ratio of the change in heart rate to the change in mean arterial pressure between baseline conditions and aortic baroreceptor-isolated conditions (i.e., phenylephrine + lower body negative pressure + neck pressure stage). Fifteen days of head-down tilt increased the gain of the aortic-cardiac baroreflex. Reductions in blood volume and/or maximal aerobic capacity may represent the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for increased aortic baroreflex responsiveness after exposure to a ground-based analogue of microgravity.

  1. Cosmogenic nuclides in cometary materials: Implications for rate of mass loss and exposure history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzog, G. F.; Englert, P. A. J.; Reedy, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    As planned, the Rosetta mission will return to earth with a 10-kg core and a 1-kg surface sample from a comet. The selection of a comet with low current activity will maximize the chance of obtaining material altered as little as possible. Current temperature and level of activity, however, may not reliably indicate previous values. Fortunately, from measurements of the cosmogenic nuclide contents of cometary material, one may estimate a rate of mass loss in the past and perhaps learn something about the exposure history of the comet. Perhaps the simplest way to estimate the rate of mass loss is to compare the total inventories of several long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides with the values expected on the basis of model calculations. Although model calculations have become steadily more reliable, application to bodies with the composition of comets will require some extension beyond the normal range of use. In particular, the influence of light elements on the secondary particle cascade will need study, in part through laboratory irradiations of volatile-rich materials. In the analysis of cometary data, it would be valuable to test calculations against measurements of short-lived isotopes.

  2. Reaction Rate Theory of Radiation Exposure and Scaling Hypothesis in Mutation Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, Yuichiro; Nakamura, Issei; Bando, Masako

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a kinetic reaction model for cells with irradiated DNA molecules due to ionizing radiation exposure. Our theory simultaneously accounts for the time-dependent reactions of DNA damage, DNA mutation and DNA repair, and the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in a tissue with a minimal set of model parameters. In contrast to existing theories of radiation exposition, we do not assume the relationships between the total dose and the induced mutation frequency. Our theory provides a universal scaling function that reasonably explains the mega-mouse experiments by Russell and Kelly [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79, 542 (1982)] with different dose rates. Furthermore, we have estimated the effective dose rate, which is biologically equivalent to the ionizing effects other than those caused by artificial irradiation. This value is 1.11 × 10-3 Gy/h, which is significantly larger than the effect caused by natural background radiation.

  3. Synthesis of Phenolics and Flavonoids in Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and Their Effects on Photosynthesis Rate

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemzadeh, Ali; Jaafar, Hawa Z. E.; Rahmat, Asmah

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between phenolics and flavonoids synthesis/accumulation and photosynthesis rate was investigated for two Malaysian ginger (Zingiber officinale) varieties grown under four levels of glasshouse light intensity, namely 310, 460, 630 and 790 μmol m−2s−1. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was employed to identify and quantify the polyphenolic components. The results of HPLC analysis indicated that synthesis and partitioning of quercetin, rutin, catechin, epicatechin and naringenin were high in plants grown under 310 μmol m−2s−1. The average value of flavonoids synthesis in leaves for both varieties increased (Halia Bentong 26.1%; Halia Bara 19.5%) when light intensity decreased. Photosynthetic rate and plant biomass increased in both varieties with increasing light intensity. More specifically, a high photosynthesis rate (12.25 μmol CO2 m−2s−1 in Halia Bara) and plant biomass (79.47 g in Halia Bentong) were observed at 790 μmol m−2s−1. Furthermore, plants with the lowest rate of photosynthesis had highest flavonoids content. Previous studies have shown that quercetin inhibits and salicylic acid induces the electron transport rate in photosynthesis photosystems. In the current study, quercetin was an abundant flavonoid in both ginger varieties. Moreover, higher concentration of quercetin (1.12 mg/g dry weight) was found in Halia Bara leaves grown under 310 μmol m−2s−1 with a low photosynthesis rate. Furthermore, a high content of salicylic acid (0.673 mg/g dry weight) was detected in Halia Bara leaves exposed under 790 μmol m−2s−1 with a high photosynthesis rate. No salicylic acid was detected in gingers grown under 310 μmol m−2s−1. Ginger is a semi-shade loving plant that does not require high light intensity for photosynthesis. Different photosynthesis rates at different light intensities may be related to the absence or presence of some flavonoid and phenolic compounds. PMID:21151455

  4. Assessing the reproducibility of fractional rates of protein synthesis in muscle tissue measured using the flooding dose technique.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Ian D; Brown, James

    2016-07-01

    The flooding dose technique of Garlick et al. (1980) has become the main method for measuring tissue and whole-animal rates of protein synthesis in ectotherms. However, single tissue samples are used to determine rates of protein synthesis and no studies have examined the pattern of flooding in large tissues such as the white muscle in fishes, which can comprise up to 55% of the wet body mass of a fish and which is poorly perfused. The present study has examined, for the first time, the patterns of flooding and measured rates of protein synthesis in five different regions of the white muscle in the Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus ranging in size from 25g to 1.6kg following a flooding dose injection of L-[(3)H]-phenylalanine. The results indicate that the degree of flooding (i.e. free pool specific radioactivity relative to that of the injection solution) and elevation in free phenylalanine concentrations can vary between regions but the calculated fractional rates of protein synthesis were similar in four of the five regions studied. The variability in rates of protein synthesis increased with body size with greater variability observed between regions for fish >1kg in body mass. For consistency between studies, it is recommended that samples are taken from the epaxial muscle in the region below the dorsal fin when measuring fractional rates of white muscle synthesis in fishes. PMID:26970581

  5. Time Course of Heart Rate Variability Response to PM2.5 Exposure from Secondhand Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Garza, Jennifer L.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Zhang, Jinming; Christiani, David C.; Cavallari, Jennifer M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) has been associated with decreased heart rate variability (HRV). However, the time course of this association is unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the association between 15–240 minute SHS-related fine particulate matter (PM2.5) moving averages and indices of HRV. Methods: With a panel study design, we used personal monitors to continuously measure PM2.5 and HRV of 35 participants who were exposed to SHS for approximately 6 hours. Results: We observed negative, significant associations between 5-minute HRV indices and 15 minute PM2.5 moving averages and 240 minute PM2.5 moving averages: there was a significant (p<0.01) 7.5% decrease in the 5-minute square root of the mean squared differences of successive normal heart beats associated with (RMSSD), and a significant (p<0.01) 14.7% decrease in the 5-minute high frequency (HF) power associated with the 15 minute PM2.5 moving averages; there was also a significant (p<0.01) 46.9% decrease in the 5-minute RMSSD, and a significant (p<0.01) 77.7% decrease in the 5-minute high frequency (HF) power associated with the 240 minute PM2.5 moving averages. Conclusions: Our findings that exposure to SHS related PM2.5 was associated with HRV support the hypothesis that SHS can affect the cardiovascular system. The negative associations reported between short and longer term PM2.5 and HRV indicate adverse effects of SHS on the cardiovascular system. PMID:27223894

  6. A long-term rock uplift rate for eastern Crete from exposure dating of marine terraces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobl, M.; Hetzel, R.; Ivy-Ochs, S.; Alfimov, V.; Kubik, P. W.; Fassoulas, C.; Palumbo, L.

    2009-04-01

    The island of Crete in the forearc of the Hellenic subduction zone has a rugged topography with a relief exceeding 2 km. Rock uplift rates of 2-4 mm/a were estimated previously from raised Late Holocene shorelines (Lambeck, 1995) but may not be representative on longer timescales, because earthquakes with up to 9 m of coseismic uplift have recently affected Crete (Stiros, 2001). Here we use marine terraces near Kato Zakros to quantify the long-term rock uplift rate for eastern Crete. Our field investigations and topographic profiles document a flight of at least 15 marine bedrock terraces carved into limestone bedrock. Age constraints for the terraces were obtained by 36Cl exposure dating of bedrock samples and 10Be dating of sandstone cobbles found on some terraces. Our results suggest that the terraces T4 and T5 at elevations of 68 and 76 m, respectively, formed during sea level highstands associated with marine isotope stage 5e, i.e. ~125 ka ago. Correlating the other terraces (T1 to T11) to a sea-level curve for the Red Sea (Siddall et al., 2003) indicates an uplift rate of 0.5-0.6 mm/a during the last 400 ka; significantly lower than previous estimates based on the elevation of Late Holocene shorelines. References Lambeck, K. (1995), Late Pleistocene and Holocene sea-level change in Greece and SW Turkey - a separation of eustatic, isostatic and tectonic contributions. Geophys. J. Int. 122, 1022-1044. Siddall, M., Rohling, E.J., Almogi-Labin, A., Hemleben, C., Meischner, D., Schmelzer, I., and Smeed, D.A. (2003), Sea-level fluctuations during the last glacial cycle. Nature, 423, 853-858. Stiros, S.C. (2001), The AD 365 Crete earthquake and possible seismic clustering during the fourth to sixth centuries AD in the Eastern Mediterranean: a review of historical and archaeological data. J. Struct. Geol., 23, 545-562.

  7. Fetal death and reduced birth rates associated with exposure to lead-contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This ecologic study notes that fetal death rates (FDR) during the Washington DC drinking water "lead crisis" (2000-2004) peaked in 2001 when water lead levels (WLLs) were highest, and were minimized in 2004 after public health interventions were implemented to protect pregnant women. Changes in the DC FDR vs neighboring Baltimore City were correlated to DC WLL (R(2) = 0.72). Birth rates in DC also increased versus Baltimore City and versus the United States in 2004-2006, when consumers were protected from high WLLs. The increased births in DC neighborhoods comparing 2004 versus 2001 was correlated to the incidence of lead pipes (R(2) = 0.60). DC birth rates from 1999 to 2007 correlated with proxies for maternal blood lead including the geometric mean blood lead in DC children (R(2) = 0.68) and the incidence of lead poisoning in children under age 1.3 years (R(2) = 0.64). After public health protections were removed in 2006, DC FDR spiked in 2007-2009 versus 2004-2006 (p < 0.05), in a manner consistent with high WLL health risks to consumers arising from partial lead service line replacements, and DC FDR dropped to historically low levels in 2010-2011 after consumers were protected and the PSLR program was terminated. Re-evaluation of a historic construction-related miscarriage cluster in the USA Today Building (1987-1988), demonstrates that high WLLs from disturbed plumbing were a possible cause. Overall results are consistent with prior research linking increased lead exposure to higher incidence of miscarriages and fetal death, even at blood lead elevations (≈5 μg/dL) once considered relatively low. PMID:24321041

  8. T1 Relaxation Rate (R1) Indicates Nonlinear Mn Accumulation in Brain Tissue of Welders With Low-Level Exposure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Young; Flynn, Michael R; Du, Guangwei; Lewis, Mechelle M; Fry, Rebecca; Herring, Amy H; Van Buren, Eric; Van Buren, Scott; Smeester, Lisa; Kong, Lan; Yang, Qing; Mailman, Richard B; Huang, Xuemei

    2015-08-01

    Although the essential element manganese (Mn) is neurotoxic at high doses, the effects of lower exposure are unclear. MRI T1-weighted (TIW) imaging has been used to estimate brain Mn exposure via the pallidal index (PI), defined as the T1W intensity ratio in the globus pallidus (GP) versus frontal white matter (FWM). PI may not, however, be sensitive to Mn in GP because Mn also may accumulate in FWM. This study explored: (1) whether T1 relaxation rate (R1) could quantify brain Mn accumulation more sensitively; and (2) the dose-response relationship between estimated Mn exposure and T1 relaxation rate (R1). Thirty-five active welders and 30 controls were studied. Occupational questionnaires were used to estimate hours welding in the past 90 days (HrsW) and lifetime measures of Mn exposure. T1W imaging and T1-measurement were utilized to generate PI and R1 values in brain regions of interest (ROIs). PI did not show a significant association with any measure of Mn and/or welding-related exposure. Conversely, in several ROIs, R1 showed a nonlinear relationship to HrsW, with R1 signal increasing only after a critical exposure was reached. The GP had the greatest rate of Mn accumulation. Welders with higher exposure showed significantly higher R1 compared either with controls or with welders with lower exposure. Our data are additional evidence that Mn accumulation can be assessed more sensitively by R1 than by PI. Moreover, the nonlinear relationship between welding exposure and Mn brain accumulation should be considered in future studies and policies. PMID:25953701

  9. T1 Relaxation Rate (R1) Indicates Nonlinear Mn Accumulation in Brain Tissue of Welders With Low-Level Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Young; Flynn, Michael R.; Du, Guangwei; Lewis, Mechelle M.; Fry, Rebecca; Herring, Amy H.; Van Buren, Eric; Van Buren, Scott; Smeester, Lisa; Kong, Lan; Yang, Qing; Mailman, Richard B.; Huang, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    Although the essential element manganese (Mn) is neurotoxic at high doses, the effects of lower exposure are unclear. MRI T1-weighted (TIW) imaging has been used to estimate brain Mn exposure via the pallidal index (PI), defined as the T1W intensity ratio in the globus pallidus (GP) versus frontal white matter (FWM). PI may not, however, be sensitive to Mn in GP because Mn also may accumulate in FWM. This study explored: (1) whether T1 relaxation rate (R1) could quantify brain Mn accumulation more sensitively; and (2) the dose-response relationship between estimated Mn exposure and T1 relaxation rate (R1). Thirty-five active welders and 30 controls were studied. Occupational questionnaires were used to estimate hours welding in the past 90 days (HrsW) and lifetime measures of Mn exposure. T1W imaging and T1-measurement were utilized to generate PI and R1 values in brain regions of interest (ROIs). PI did not show a significant association with any measure of Mn and/or welding-related exposure. Conversely, in several ROIs, R1 showed a nonlinear relationship to HrsW, with R1 signal increasing only after a critical exposure was reached. The GP had the greatest rate of Mn accumulation. Welders with higher exposure showed significantly higher R1 compared either with controls or with welders with lower exposure. Our data are additional evidence that Mn accumulation can be assessed more sensitively by R1 than by PI. Moreover, the nonlinear relationship between welding exposure and Mn brain accumulation should be considered in future studies and policies. PMID:25953701

  10. Influence of Natural Thermal Gradients on Whole Animal Rates of Protein Synthesis in Marine Gammarid Amphipods

    PubMed Central

    Rastrick, Samuel P. S.; Whiteley, Nia M.

    2013-01-01

    Although temperature is known to have an important effect on protein synthesis rates and growth in aquatic ectotherms held in the laboratory, little is known about the effects of thermal gradients on natural populations in the field. To address this issue we determined whole-animal fractional rates of protein synthesis (ks) in four dominant species of gammarid amphipods with different distributions along the coasts of Western Europe from arctic to temperate latitudes. Up to three populations of each species were collected in the summer and ks measured within 48 h. Summer ks values were relatively high in the temperate species, Gammarus locusta, from Portugal (48°N) and Wales (53°N) and were maintained across latitudes by the conservation of translational efficiency. In sharp contrast, summer ks remained remarkably low in the boreal/temperate species G. duebeni from Wales, Scotland (58°N) and Tromsø (70°N), probably as a temporary energy saving strategy to ensure survival in rapidly fluctuating environments of the high intertidal. Values for ks increased in acclimated G. duebeni from Scotland and Tromsø showing a lack of compensation with latitude. In the subarctic/boreal species, G. oceanicus, summer ks remained unchanged in Scotland and Tromsø but fell significantly in Svalbard (79°N) at 5°C, despite a slight increase in RNA content. At 79°N, mean ks was 4.5 times higher in the circumpolar species G. setosus than in G. oceanicus due to a doubling in RNA content. The relationship between whole-animal protein synthesis rates and natural thermal gradients is complex, varies between species and appears to be associated with local temperatures and their variability, as well as changes in other environmental factors. PMID:23544122

  11. Short-Term Exposure to Ozone Does Not Impair Vascular Function or Affect Heart Rate Variability in Healthy Young Men

    PubMed Central

    Barath, Stefan; Langrish, Jeremy P.; Blomberg, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Air pollution exposure is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, yet the role of individual pollutants remains unclear. In particular, there is uncertainty regarding the acute effect of ozone exposure on cardiovascular disease. In these studies, we aimed to determine the effect of ozone exposure on vascular function, fibrinolysis, and the autonomic regulation of the heart. Thirty-six healthy men were exposed to ozone (300 ppb) and filtered air for 75min on two occasions in randomized double-blind crossover studies. Bilateral forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured using forearm venous occlusion plethysmography before and during intra-arterial infusions of vasodilators 2–4 and 6–8h after each exposure. Heart rhythm and heart rate variability (HRV) were monitored during and 24h after exposure. Compared with filtered air, ozone exposure did not alter heart rate, blood pressure, or resting FBF at either 2 or 6h. There was a dose-dependent increase in FBF with all vasodilators that was similar after both exposures at 2–4h. Ozone exposure did not impair vasomotor or fibrinolytic function at 6–8h but rather increased vasodilatation to acetylcholine (p = .015) and sodium nitroprusside (p = .005). Ozone did not affect measures of HRV during or after the exposure. Our findings do not support a direct rapid effect of ozone on vascular function or cardiac autonomic control although we cannot exclude an effect of chronic exposure or an interaction between ozone and alternative air pollutants that may be responsible for the adverse cardiovascular health effects attributed to ozone. PMID:23872581

  12. Rates of various reactions catalyzed by ATP synthase as related to the mechanism of ATP synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Berkich, D.A.; Williams, G.D.; Masiakos, P.T.; Smith, M.B.; Boyer, P.D.; LaNoue, K.F. )

    1991-01-05

    The forward and reverse rates of the overall reaction catalyzed by the ATP synthase in intact rat heart mitochondria, as measured with 32P, were compared with the rates of two partial steps, as measured with 18O. Such rates have been measured previously, but their relationship to one another has not been determined, nor have the partial reactions been measured in intact mitochondria. The partial steps measured were the rate of medium Pi formation from bound ATP (in state 4 this also equals the rate of medium Pi into bound ATP) and the rate of formation of bound ATP from bound Pi within the catalytic site. The rates of both partial reactions can be measured by 31P NMR analysis of the 18O distribution in Pi and ATP released from the enzyme during incubation of intact mitochondria with highly labeled (18O)Pi. Data were obtained in state 3 and 4 conditions with variation in substrate concentrations, temperature, and mitochondrial membrane electrical potential gradient (delta psi m). Although neither binding nor release of ATP is necessary for phosphate/H2O exchange, in state 4 the rate of incorporation of at least one water oxygen atom into phosphate is approximately twice the rate of the overall reaction rate under a variety of conditions. This can be explained if the release of Pi or ATP at one catalytic site does not occur, unless ATP or Pi is bound at another catalytic site. Such coupling provides strong support for the previously proposed alternating site mechanism. In state 3 slow reversal of ATP synthesis occurs within the mitochondrial matrix and can be detected as incorporation of water oxygen atoms into medium Pi even though medium (32P)ATP does not give rise to 32Pi in state 3. These data can be explained by lack of translocation of ATP from the medium to the mitochondrial matrix.

  13. Association of soil arsenic and nickel exposure with cancer mortality rates, a town-scale ecological study in Suzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Liao, Qi Lin; Ma, Zong Wei; Jin, Yang; Hua, Ming; Bi, Jun; Huang, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Heavy metals and arsenic are well-known carcinogens. However, few studies have examined whether soil heavy metals and arsenic concentrations associate with cancer in the general population. In this ecological study, we aimed to evaluate the association of heavy metals and arsenic in soil with cancer mortality rates during 2005-2010 in Suzhou, China, after controlling for education and smoking prevalence. In 2005, a total of 1683 soil samples with a sampling density of one sample every 4 km(2) were analyzed. Generalized linear model with a quasi-Poisson regression was applied to evaluate the association between town-scale cancer mortality rates and soil heavy metal concentrations. Results showed that soil arsenic exposure had a significant relationship with colon, gastric, kidney, lung, and nasopharyngeal cancer mortality rates and soil nickel exposure was significantly associated with liver and lung cancer. The associations of soil arsenic and nickel exposure with colon, gastric, kidney, and liver cancer in male were higher than those in female. The observed associations of soil arsenic and nickel with cancer mortality rates were less sensitive to alternative exposure metrics. Our findings would contribute to the understanding of the carcinogenic effect of soil arsenic and nickel exposure in general population. PMID:25410308

  14. Secondhand tobacco smoke exposure and heart rate variability and inflammation among non-smoking construction workers: a repeated measures study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although it has been well recognized that exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS) is associated with cardiovascular mortality, the mechanisms and time course by which SHS exposure may lead to cardiovascular effects are still being explored. Methods Non-smoking workers were recruited from a local union and monitored inside a union hall while exposed to SHS over approximately 6 hours. Participants were fitted with a continuous electrocardiographic monitor upon enrollment which was removed at the end of a 24-hr monitoring period. A repeated measures study design was used where resting ECGs and blood samples were taken from individuals before SHS exposure (baseline), immediately following SHS exposure (post) and the morning following SHS exposure (next-morning). Inflammatory markers, including high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell count (WBC) were analyzed. Heart rate variability (HRV) was analyzed from the ECG recordings in time (SDNN, rMSSD) and frequency (LF, HF) domain parameters over 5-minute periods. SHS exposure was quantified using a personal fine particulate matter (PM2.5) monitor. Linear mixed effects regression models were used to examine within-person changes in inflammatory and HRV parameters across the 3 time periods. Exposure-response relationships with PM2.5 were examined using mixed effects models. All models were adjusted for age, BMI and circadian variation. Results A total of 32 male non-smokers were monitored between June 2010 and June 2012. The mean PM2.5 from SHS exposure was 132 μg/m3. Immediately following SHS exposure, a 100 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 was associated with declines in HRV (7.8% [standard error (SE) =3%] SDNN, 8.0% (SE = 3.9%) rMSSD, 17.2% (SE = 6.3%) LF, 29.0% (SE = 10.1%) HF) and increases in WBC count 0.42 (SE = 0.14) k/μl. Eighteen hours following SHS exposure, a 100 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 was associated with 24.2% higher CRP levels. Conclusions Our study suggest

  15. Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Plasma Cytokines, and Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Binyao; Deng, Qifei; Zhang, Wangzhen; Feng, Yingying; Dai, Xiayun; Feng, Wei; He, Xiaosheng; Huang, Suli; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xiaohai; Lin, Dafeng; He, Meian; Guo, Huan; Sun, Huizhen; Yuan, Jing; Lu, Jiachun; Hu, Frank B.; Zhang, Xiaomin; Wu, Tangchun

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested associations between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heart rate variability (HRV). However, the roles of plasma cytokines in these associations are limited. In discovery stage of this study, we used Human Cytokine Antibody Arrays to examine differences in the concentrations of 280 plasma cytokines between 8 coke-oven workers and 16 community residents. We identified 19 cytokines with significant different expression (fold change ≥2 or ≤−2, and q-value <5%) between exposed workers and controls. 4 cytokines were selected to validate in 489 coke-oven workers by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in validation stage. We found OH-PAHs were inversely associated with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (p < 0.05), and interquartile range (IQR) increases in OH-PAHs were associated with >16% BDNF decreases. Additionally, OH-PAHs were positively associated with activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (p < 0.05), and IQR increases in OH-PAHs were associated with >20% increases in CRP. We also found significant associations between these cytokines and HRV (p < 0.05), and IQR increases in BDNF and CRP were associated with >8% decreases in HRV. Our results indicated PAH exposure was associated with plasma cytokines, and higher cytokines were associated with decreased HRV, but additional human and potential mechanistic studies are needed. PMID:26758679

  16. Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Plasma Cytokines, and Heart Rate Variability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Binyao; Deng, Qifei; Zhang, Wangzhen; Feng, Yingying; Dai, Xiayun; Feng, Wei; He, Xiaosheng; Huang, Suli; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xiaohai; Lin, Dafeng; He, Meian; Guo, Huan; Sun, Huizhen; Yuan, Jing; Lu, Jiachun; Hu, Frank B; Zhang, Xiaomin; Wu, Tangchun

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested associations between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heart rate variability (HRV). However, the roles of plasma cytokines in these associations are limited. In discovery stage of this study, we used Human Cytokine Antibody Arrays to examine differences in the concentrations of 280 plasma cytokines between 8 coke-oven workers and 16 community residents. We identified 19 cytokines with significant different expression (fold change ≥2 or ≤-2, and q-value <5%) between exposed workers and controls. 4 cytokines were selected to validate in 489 coke-oven workers by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in validation stage. We found OH-PAHs were inversely associated with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (p < 0.05), and interquartile range (IQR) increases in OH-PAHs were associated with >16% BDNF decreases. Additionally, OH-PAHs were positively associated with activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (p < 0.05), and IQR increases in OH-PAHs were associated with >20% increases in CRP. We also found significant associations between these cytokines and HRV (p < 0.05), and IQR increases in BDNF and CRP were associated with >8% decreases in HRV. Our results indicated PAH exposure was associated with plasma cytokines, and higher cytokines were associated with decreased HRV, but additional human and potential mechanistic studies are needed. PMID:26758679

  17. Restrained eating predicts effortful self-control as indicated by heart rate variability during food exposure.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Fay C M; Kleinfeldt, Anne; Kubiak, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    When confronted with food, restrained eaters have to inhibit the pursuit of the short-term goal of enjoying their food for the sake of the long-term goal of controlling their weight. Thus, restrained eating creates a self-control situation. In the present study we investigated the initiation of effortful self-control by food cues in accordance with the level of restrained eating. We expected that a preceding act of self-control would moderate the association between restrained eating and effortful self-control initiated by food cues. Participants (N=111) were randomly assigned to a task requiring self-control or a task not requiring self-control. Subsequently, participants were exposed to palatable food, and effortful self-control was measured via heart rate variability (HRV). Restrained eating was associated with enhanced HRV during food exposure after exercising self-control but not after not exercising self-control. The results indicate that maintaining dieting goals results in food cues initiating effortful self-control after a preceding act of self-control. We suggest considering the effect of acts of self-control when modeling the initial steps on the path from food cues to unsuccessful restrained eating. PMID:26500202

  18. Arginine Depletion by Arginine Deiminase Does Not Affect Whole Protein Metabolism or Muscle Fractional Protein Synthesis Rate in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Juan C.; Didelija, Inka Cajo

    2015-01-01

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depletion can potentially exacerbate the progressive loss of body weight, and especially lean body mass, in cancer patients we determined the effect of arginine depletion by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) on whole body protein synthesis and fractional protein synthesis rate in multiple tissues of mice. ADI-PEG 20 successfully depleted circulating arginine (<1 μmol/L), and increased citrulline concentration more than tenfold. Body weight and body composition, however, were not affected by ADI-PEG 20. Despite the depletion of arginine, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown were maintained in the ADI-PEG 20 treated mice. The fractional protein synthesis rate of muscle was also not affected by arginine depletion. Most tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lungs, stomach, small and large intestine, pancreas) were able to maintain their fractional protein synthesis rate; however, the fractional protein synthesis rate of brain, thymus and testicles was reduced due to the ADI-PEG 20 treatment. Furthermore, these results were confirmed by the incorporation of ureido [14C]citrulline, which indicate the local conversion into arginine, into protein. In conclusion, the intracellular recycling pathway of citrulline is able to provide enough arginine to maintain protein synthesis rate and prevent the loss of lean body mass and body weight. PMID:25775142

  19. Mechanism for differential sensitivity of the chromosome and growth cycles of mammalian cells to the rate of protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, R S; Bonner, W M

    1985-01-01

    It has been documented widely that when the generation times of eucaryotic cells are lengthened by slowing the rate of protein synthesis, the duration of the chromosome cycle (S, G2, and M phases) remains relatively invariant. Paradoxically, when the growth of exponentially growing cultures of CHO cells is partially inhibited with inhibitors of protein synthesis, the immediate effect is a proportionate reduction in the rate of total protein, histone protein, and DNA synthesis. However, on further investigation it was found that over the next 2 h the rates of histone protein and DNA synthesis recover, in some cases completely to the uninhibited rate, while the synthesis rates of other proteins do not recover. We called this process chromosome cycle compensation. The amount of compensation seen in CHO cell cultures can account quantitatively for the relative invariance in the length of the chromosome cycle (S, G2, and M phases) reported for these cells. The mechanism for this compensation involves a specific increase in the levels of histone mRNAs. An invariant chromosome cycle coupled with a lengthening growth cycle must result in a disproportionate lengthening of the G1 phase. Thus, these results suggest that chromosome cycle invariance may be due more to specific cellular compensation mechanisms rather than to the more usual interpretation involving a rate-limiting step for cell cycle progression in the G1 phase. Images PMID:3837839

  20. Mitochondrial DNA, RNA and protein synthesis in normal, hypothyroid and mildly hyperthyroid rat liver during cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Goglia, F; Liverini, G; Lanni, A; Barletta, A

    1988-02-01

    We have examined in isolated liver mitochondria the effect of cold exposure on DNA, RNA and protein synthesis in normal, hypothyroid and mildly hyperthyroid rats. In normal rats DNA polymerase activity increased from the first day of cold exposure remaining high up to the fifteenth day. RNA polymerase and protein synthesis were stimulated from the fifth day of cold exposure, maintaining a high level up to the fifteenth day. These activities were related to serum triiodothyronine (T3) levels. Indeed propylthiouracil (PTU) administration to cold-exposed rats drastically depressed the above activities, whereas T3 administration to PTU-treated cold-exposed rats restored them to about the values prevalent in normal cold-exposed rats. The translation products analyzed by gel electrophoresis showed that different effects may be exerted by T3 depending on whether its circulating levels are physiologically or pharmacologically modified. These findings suggest that T3 may be involved in the regulation of the acclimation process by acting, presumably with a permissive role, on those activities which determine a modification of the mitochondrial morphometric features and an increase in mitochondria number and turnover. PMID:2451625

  1. Cosmogenic Ne-21 exposure ages of glacial boulders constrained by local bedrock erosion rates in Ong Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, D. J.; Balco, G.; Putkonen, J.; Bibby, T.; Giusti, C.; Ball, A. E.; Hedberg, C. P.; Diamond, M. S.; Ringger, K. C.

    2013-12-01

    In order to accurately determine the exposure age of glacial boulders with cosmogenic nuclides, we need to know something about the erosion rate of the rock and any previous exposure the boulder may have had. Commonly, the erosion rate is simply assumed, and inheritance is dealt with by both sampling strategy and removing outliers from the data. In this study, we determine the rock erosion rate by measuring the concentration of cosmogenic Ne-21 in granite bedrock samples. This is used to constrain the exposure age of glacial boulders of the same lithology from the same locale. Ong Valley, Antarctica, (157.5 East, 83.25 South) is an ice-free valley in the Miller Range of the Central Transantarctic Mountains. The valley contains three distinct glacial drifts, and the oldest of these is well defined by an end moraine. We collected samples from six boulders on this end moraine, and six additional samples from the surrounding bedrock that is composed of the same lithology, the Hope Granite. The bedrock samples were collected from the ridge bordering the valley, well above the glacial limit. Because the bedrock samples have not been shielded by ice and have been exposed for millions of years, the concentration of cosmogenic Ne-21 in these samples reflects only the erosion rate of the granite. We separated quartz from the granite samples following standard laboratory methods and measured the concentration of cosmogenic Ne-21 in the quartz at the BGC Noble Gas Thermochronometry Lab. The concentration of cosmogenic Ne-21 in the bedrock samples is interpreted as reflecting only the erosion rate. We can then assume that the erosion rate of the bedrock is equal to the erosion rate of the glacial boulders on the end moraine because they have the same lithology and have been subjected to the same climate conditions during their exposure. With this information, we can better constrain the exposure age of the glacial boulders in Ong Valley.

  2. Effects of acute fresh water exposure on water flux rates and osmotic responses in Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempi)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, R. M.; Patterson, R. M.; Wade, C. E.; Byers, F. M.

    2000-01-01

    Water flux rates and osmotic responses of Kemp's Ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempi) acutely exposed to fresh water were quantified. Salt-water adapted turtles were exposed to fresh water for 4 d before being returned to salt water. During the initial salt water phase, absolute and relative water flux rates were 1.2+/-0.1 l d(-1) and 123.0+/-6.8 ml kg(-1) d(-1), respectively. When turtles were exposed to fresh water, rates increased by approximately 30%. Upon return to salt water, rates decreased to original levels. Plasma osmolality, Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) decreased during exposure to fresh water, and subsequently increased during the return to salt water. The Na(+):K(+) ratio was elevated during the fresh water phase and subsequently decreased upon return to salt water. Aldosterone and corticosterone were not altered during exposure to fresh water. Elevated water flux rates during fresh water exposure reflected an increase in water consumption, resulting in a decrease in ionic and osmotic concentrations. The lack of a change in adrenocorticoids to acute fresh water exposure suggests that adrenal responsiveness to an hypo-osmotic environment may be delayed in marine turtles when compared to marine mammals.

  3. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    applications of NEOTRANS2, indicate that nonlinear threshold-type, dose-response relationships for excess stochastic effects (problematic nonlethal mutations, neoplastic transformation) should be expected after exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays or gamma rays in combination with high-LET alpha radiation. Similar thresholds are expected for low-dose-rate low-LET beta irradiation. We attribute the thresholds to low-dose, low-LET radiation induced protection against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations. The protection is presumed mainly to involve selective elimination of problematic cells via apoptosis. Low-dose, low-LET radiation is presumed to trigger wide-area cell signaling, which in turn leads to problematic bystander cells (e.g., mutants, neoplastically transformed cells) selectively undergoing apoptosis. Thus, this protective bystander effect leads to selective elimination of problematic cells (a tissue cleansing process in vivo). However, this protective bystander effects is a different process from low-dose stimulation of the immune system. Low-dose, low-LET radiation stimulation of the immune system may explain why thresholds for inducing excess cancer appear much larger (possibly more than 100-fold larger) than thresholds for inducing excess mutations and neoplastic transformations, when the dose rate is low. For ionizing radiation, the current risk assessment paradigm is such that the relative risk (RR) is always ¡Ý 1, no matter how small the dose. Our research results indicate that for low-dose or low-dose-rate, low-LET irradiation, RR < 1 may be more the rule than the exception. Directly tied to the current RR paradigm are the billion-dollar cleanup costs for radionuclide-contaminated DOE sites. Our research results suggest that continued use of the current RR paradigm for which RR ¡Ý 1 could cause more harm than benefit to society (e.g., by spreading unwarranted fear about phantom excess risks associated with low-dose low

  4. The rate of protein synthesis in hematopoietic stem cells is limited partly by 4E-BPs

    PubMed Central

    Signer, Robert A.J.; Qi, Le; Zhao, Zhiyu; Thompson, David; Sigova, Alla A.; Fan, Zi Peng; DeMartino, George N.; Young, Richard A.; Sonenberg, Nahum; Morrison, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Adult stem cells must limit their rate of protein synthesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unexplored. Differences in protein synthesis among hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells did not correlate with differences in proteasome activity, total RNA content, mRNA content, or cell division rate. However, adult HSCs had more hypophosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and 4E-BP2 as compared with most other hematopoietic progenitors. Deficiency for 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP2 significantly increased global protein synthesis in HSCs, but not in other hematopoietic progenitors, and impaired their reconstituting activity, identifying a mechanism that promotes HSC maintenance by attenuating protein synthesis. PMID:27492367

  5. Exposure to Sexist Humor and Rape Proclivity: The Moderator Effect of Aversiveness Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero-Sanchez, Monica; Duran, Mercedes; Carretero-Dios, Hugo; Megias, Jesus L.; Moya, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effect of exposure to sexist humor about women on men's self-reported rape proclivity. Earlier studies have shown that exposure to this type of humor increases rape proclivity and that funniness responses to jokes are a key element to consider. However, the role of aversiveness responses has not been…

  6. Gender Differences in the Impact of Warfare Exposure on Self-Rated Health

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joyce M.; Lee, Lewina O.; Spiro, Avron

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study examined gender differences in the impact of warfare exposure on self-reported physical health. METHODS Data are from the 2010 National Survey of Veterans, a nationally representative survey of veterans from multiple eras of service. Regression analyses assessed gender differences in the association between warfare exposure (deployment to a war zone, exposure to casualties) and health status and functional impairment, adjusting for sociodemographics. FINDINGS Women reported better health status but greater functional impairment than men. In men, those who experienced casualties only or both casualties and deployment to a war zone had worse health compared to those who experienced neither stressor or deployment to a war zone only. In women, those who experienced casualties only or both stressors reported worse health than those who experienced war zone only, who did not differ from the unexposed. No association was found between warfare exposure and functional impairment in women, but in men, those who experienced exposure to casualties or both stressors had greater odds of functional impairment compared to those who experienced war zone only or neither stressor. CONCLUSIONS Exposure to casualties may be more predictive of health than deployment to a war zone, especially for men. We did not find a stronger association between warfare exposure and health for women than men. Given that the expansion of women's military roles has allowed them to serve in direct combat, their degree and scope of warfare exposure is likely to increase in the future. PMID:25442366

  7. Development and Evaluation of a New Air Exchange Rate Algorithm for the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model (ISES Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous exposure assessment panel studies have observed considerable seasonal, between-home and between-city variability in residential pollutant infiltration. This is likely a result of differences in home ventilation, or air exchange rates (AER). The Stochastic Human Exposure ...

  8. Development of the town data base: Estimates of exposure rates and times of fallout arrival near the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.B.; McArthur, R.D.; Hutchinson, S.W.

    1994-09-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project, the time of fallout arrival and the H+12 exposure rate were estimated for populated locations in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah that were affected by fallout from one or more nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. Estimates of exposure rate were derived from measured values recorded before and after each test by fallout monitors in the field. The estimate for a given location was obtained by retrieving from a data base all measurements made in the vicinity, decay-correcting them to H+12, and calculating an average. Estimates were also derived from maps produced after most events that show isopleths of exposure rate and time of fallout arrival. Both sets of isopleths on these maps were digitized, and kriging was used to interpolate values at the nodes of a 10-km grid covering the pattern. The values at any location within the grid were then estimated from the values at the surrounding grid nodes. Estimates of dispersion (standard deviation) were also calculated. The Town Data Base contains the estimates for all combinations of location and nuclear event for which the estimated mean H+12 exposure rate was greater than three times background. A listing of the data base is included as an appendix. The information was used by other project task groups to estimate the radiation dose that off-site populations and individuals may have received as a result of exposure to fallout from Nevada nuclear tests.

  9. Increasing the Homogeneity of CAT's Item-Exposure Rates by Minimizing or Maximizing Varied Target Functions while Assembling Shadow Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yuan H.; Schafer, William D.

    2005-01-01

    A computerized adaptive testing (CAT) algorithm that has the potential to increase the homogeneity of CAT's item-exposure rates without significantly sacrificing the precision of ability estimates was proposed and assessed in the shadow-test (van der Linden & Reese, 1998) CAT context. This CAT algorithm was formed by a combination of maximizing or…

  10. Estimated effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences within Los Alamos county in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, Jeffrey J; Mcnaughton, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Many millions of office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the workplace are lacking. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were then used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about nine times greater exposure at home than while in the office (691 mrem yr{sup -1} versus 78 mrem yr{sup -1}). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was 896 mrem yr{sup -1}. These effective dose rates are contrasted against the 100 mrem yr{sup -1} threshold for regulation of a 'radiological worker' defined in the Department of Energy regulations occupational exposure and the 10 mrem yr{sup -1} air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

  11. Probabilistic exposure assessment model to estimate aseptic-UHT product failure rate.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Laure; Albert, Isabelle; Magras, Catherine; Johnson, Nicholas Brian; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic-Ultra-High-Temperature (UHT) products are manufactured to be free of microorganisms capable of growing in the food at normal non-refrigerated conditions at which the food is likely to be held during manufacture, distribution and storage. Two important phases within the process are widely recognised as critical in controlling microbial contamination: the sterilisation steps and the following aseptic steps. Of the microbial hazards, the pathogen spore formers Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus cereus are deemed the most pertinent to be controlled. In addition, due to a relatively high thermal resistance, Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores are considered a concern for spoilage of low acid aseptic-UHT products. A probabilistic exposure assessment model has been developed in order to assess the aseptic-UHT product failure rate associated with these three bacteria. It was a Modular Process Risk Model, based on nine modules. They described: i) the microbial contamination introduced by the raw materials, either from the product (i.e. milk, cocoa and dextrose powders and water) or the packaging (i.e. bottle and sealing component), ii) the sterilisation processes, of either the product or the packaging material, iii) the possible recontamination during subsequent processing of both product and packaging. The Sterility Failure Rate (SFR) was defined as the sum of bottles contaminated for each batch, divided by the total number of bottles produced per process line run (10(6) batches simulated per process line). The SFR associated with the three bacteria was estimated at the last step of the process (i.e. after Module 9) but also after each module, allowing for the identification of modules, and responsible contamination pathways, with higher or lower intermediate SFR. The model contained 42 controlled settings associated with factory environment, process line or product formulation, and more than 55 probabilistic inputs corresponding to inputs with variability

  12. Synthesis of fatty acid ethyl esters in mammalian tissues after ethanol exposure: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zelner, Irene; Matlow, Jeremy N; Natekar, Aniket; Koren, Gideon

    2013-08-01

    The ability to undergo non-oxidative metabolism from ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) varies greatly among tissues and organs. To gain a greater understanding of non-oxidative ethanol metabolism to FAEE, we aimed to collect all published data on FAEE synthesis in mammalian organs and tissues to identify all tissues, organs, and enzymes that are known to, or likely possess FAEE-synthetic activity. A systematic search for relevant papers was performed and two independent reviewers examined potentially relevant abstracts (articles on FAEEs that pertain to ethanol exposure) to determine whether they met the inclusion criteria. Information on FAEE synthesis was retrieved from papers meeting the inclusion/exclusion criteria and summarized by organ/tissue/matrix examined. The systematic search through four databases yielded 78 articles that investigated FAEE synthesis by tissues, tissue fractions and cell lines, and 29 articles that attempted to purify and/or characterize the enzymes involved in FAEE synthesis. Two enzyme activities have been studied: FAEE synthase (FAEES, which conjugates ethanol and free fatty acid) and acyl-CoA: ethanol O-acyltransferase (AEAT, which conjugates ethanol and fatty acyl-CoA). Both activities are expressed by a variety of different enzymes. FAEES activity is the most widely studied and has been purified from several tissues and shown to be associated with several well-known enzymes, while the identity of enzymes possessing AEAT activity remains unknown. The organs and tissues that have been shown to synthesize FAEEs are discussed, with special emphasis on the studies that attempted to elucidate the enzymology of FAEE synthesis in those tissues. PMID:23713893

  13. Effects on salivary flow rate and composition of withdrawal of and re-exposure to the beta 1-selective antagonist metoprolol in a hypertensive patient population.

    PubMed

    Nederfors, T; Dahlöf, C

    1996-06-01

    Secretion rates and composition of unstimulated and chewing-stimulated whole saliva and 3% citric acid stimulated parotid and submandibular-sublingual secretions were studied in 12 hypertensive patients during withdrawal of and re-exposure to antihypertensive pharmacotherapy. All the patients' blood pressures were well controlled by monotherapy with metoprolol, a beta 1-selective adrenoceptor antagonist. Blood pressure measurements and saliva sampling were performed at about 9:30 a.m., 2 h after intake of breakfast, on days 0 (medicated baseline), 7, 14, 28 (nonmedicated experimental values and nonmedicated baseline) and 35 (medicated experimental values). A significant increase in unstimulated whole saliva secretion rate was observed when metoprolol was withdrawn and a corresponding decrease when the drug was reintroduced. A positive correlation was found between diastolic blood pressure levels and chewing-stimulated whole saliva secretion rates. In unstimulated whole saliva and 3% citric acid stimulated submandibular-sublingual secretion, the output of total protein, amylase, potassium, calcium and phosphate was significantly increased during the withdrawal period and decreased when metoprolol was reintroduced. For chewing-stimulated whole saliva, the corresponding changes were restricted to output of total protein and amylase, while for citric acid stimulated parotid secretion, no changes in salivary composition were observed. Finally, in all secretions one or both of the ratios hexosamine/total protein and sialic acid/total protein were affected, indicating a possible effect of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists on salivary protein synthesis. PMID:8831060

  14. Lithium reverses increased rates of cerebral protein synthesis in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong-Hua; Huang, Tianjian; Smith, Carolyn Beebe

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS), an inherited form of cognitive disability, have a wide range of symptoms including hyperactivity, autistic behavior, seizures and learning deficits. FXS is caused by silencing of FMR1 and the consequent absence of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that associates with polyribosomes and negatively regulates translation. In a previous study of a mouse model of FXS (Fmr1 knockout (KO)) we demonstrated that in vivo rates of cerebral protein synthesis (rCPS) were elevated in selective brain regions suggesting that the absence of FMRP in FXS may result in dysregulation of cerebral protein synthesis. Lithium, a drug used clinically to treat bipolar disorder, has been used to improve mood dysregulation in individuals with FXS. We reported previously that in the Fmr1 KO mouse chronic dietary lithium treatment reversed or ameliorated both behavioral and morphological abnormalities. Herein we report that chronic dietary lithium treatment reversed the increased rCPS in Fmr1 KO mice with little effect on wild type mice. We also report our results of analyses of key signaling molecules involved in regulation of mRNA translation. Our analyses indicate that neither effects on the PI3K/Akt nor the MAPK/ERK 1/2 pathway fully account for the effects of lithium treatment on rCPS. Collectively our findings and those from other laboratories on the efficacy of lithium treatment in animal models support further studies in patients with FXS. PMID:22227453

  15. ESTIMATED RATE OF FATAL AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS ATTRIBUTABLE TO ACUTE SOLVENT EXPOSURE AT LOW INHALED CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute solvent exposures may contribute to automobile accidents because they increase reaction time and decrease attention, in addition to impairing other behaviors. These effects resemble those of ethanol consumption, both with respect to behavioral effects and neurological mecha...

  16. A quantitative autoradiographic method for the measurement of local rates of brain protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.E.; Donatoni, P.; Wasterlain, C.G.

    1982-05-01

    We have developed a new method for measuring local rates of brain protein synthesis in vivo. It combines the intraperitoneal injection of a large dose of low specific activity amino acid with quantitative autoradiography. This method has several advantages: 1) It is ideally suited for young or small animals or where immobilizing an animal is undesirable. 2 The amino acid injection ''floods'' amino acid pools so that errors in estimating precursor specific activity, which is especially important in pathological conditions, are minimized. 3) The method provides for the use of a radioautographic internal standard in which valine incorporation is measured directly. Internal standards from experimental animals correct for tissue protein content and self-absorption of radiation in tissue sections which could vary under experimental conditions.

  17. Measuring DNA synthesis rates with [1-13C]glycine.

    PubMed

    Chen, P; Abramson, F P

    1998-05-01

    We have devised and evaluated a stable-isotopic method for measuring DNA synthesis rates. The probe is [1-13C]-glycine that is incorporated into purines via de novo biosynthesis. The human hepatoma cell line HEP G2 was grown in medium containing [1-13C]glycine, the cells were harvested at various times, and the DNA was extracted. Following hydrolysis to the nucleosides, a reversed-phase HPLC separation was used to provide separate peaks for deoxythymidine (dT), deoxyadenosine (dA), and deoxyguanosine (dG). The HPLC effluent was continuously fed into a chemical reaction interface and an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (HPLC/CRI/IRMS). The isotope ratio of the CO2 produced in the CRI was used to monitor for enrichment. The cells were grown continuously for 5 days in labeled medium and also in a 1-day pulse labeling experiment where the washout of label was observed for the subsequent 9 days. As predicted from the role of glycine in de novo purine biosynthesis, the isotope ratio of the pyrimidine dT did not change. However, for the two purines, dA and dG, the characteristic log growth behavior of the cells was observed in their 13C/12C ratios and good agreement in the doubling time was obtained for each type of experiment. Parallel experiments that measured the HEP G2 doubling time in culture using tritiated thymidine incorporation and direct cell counts were carried out compare to our new method with established ones. We believe that the use of [1-13C]-glycine and the HPLC/CRI/IRMS is a highly sensitive and selective approach that forms the basis of a method that can measure DNA synthesis rates using a nonradioactive, nontoxic tracer. PMID:9599574

  18. Relative Rates of Surface and Volume Synthesis Set Bacterial Cell Size.

    PubMed

    Harris, Leigh K; Theriot, Julie A

    2016-06-01

    Many studies have focused on the mechanisms underlying length and width determination in rod-shaped bacteria. Here, we focus instead on cell surface area to volume ratio (SA/V) and demonstrate that SA/V homeostasis underlies size determination. We propose a model whereby the instantaneous rates of surface and volume synthesis both scale with volume. This model predicts that these relative rates dictate SA/V and that cells approach a new steady-state SA/V exponentially, with a decay constant equal to the volume growth rate. To test this, we exposed diverse bacterial species to sublethal concentrations of a cell wall biosynthesis inhibitor and observed dose-dependent decreases in SA/V. Furthermore, this decrease was exponential and had the expected decay constant. The model also quantitatively describes SA/V alterations induced by other chemical, nutritional, and genetic perturbations. We additionally present evidence for a surface material accumulation threshold underlying division, sensitizing cell length to changes in SA/V requirements. PMID:27259152

  19. Effects of limited exposure of rabbit chondrocyte cultures to parathyroid hormone and dibutyryl adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate on cartilage-characteristic proteoglycan synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Y.; Koike, T.; Iwamoto, M.; Kinoshita, M.; Sato, K.; Hiraki, Y.; Suzuki, F.

    1988-05-01

    Treatment of rabbit chondrocyte cultures with PTH or (Bu)2cAMP for 30 h increased by 2- to 3-fold the incorporation of (35S)sulfate and 3H radioactivity with glucosamine as the precursor into large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans characteristically found in cartilage matrix. However, PTH and (Bu)2cAMP did not increase either (35S)sulfate incorporation into small proteoglycans or the incorporation of 3H radioactivity into hyaluronic acid and other glycosaminoglycans. PTH and (Bu)2cAMP also increased the incorporation of (3H) serine into both proteoglycans and total protein. In all cultures described above, the stimulation of (3H)serine incorporation into proteoglycans exceeded that of (3H)serine incorporation into total protein. These data indicate that PTH and (Bu)2cAMP selectively stimulate cartilage proteoglycan synthesis while they increase total protein synthesis. Since cAMP seems to play a mediatory role in the action of PTH, we elected to examine the effects of a limited exposure of chondrocytes to PTH or (Bu)2cAMP on the synthesis of proteoglycans. Treatment with PTH or (Bu)2cAMP for only the initial 2-7 h did not increase the rates of incorporation of (35S)sulfate, the 3H radioactivity with glucosamine, and (3H)serine into proteoglycans, as measured at 30 h, despite the fact that this treatment brought about a rapid and transient rise in the cAMP level. Furthermore, the application of prostaglandin I2 at concentrations that increased cAMP levels in a similar fashion as did PTH did not affect (35S) sulfate incorporation into proteoglycans.

  20. Lead exposure and rate of change in cognitive function in older women

    PubMed Central

    Power, Melinda C; Korrick, Susan; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J; Nie, Linda H; Grodstein, Francine; Hu, Howard; Weuve, Jennifer; Schwartz, Joel; Weisskopf, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    Background Higher long-term cumulative lead exposure predicts faster cognitive decline in older men, but evidence of an association in women is lacking. Objective To determine if there is an association between lead exposure and cognitive decline in women. Methods This study considers a sample of 584 women from the Nurses’ Health Study who live in or near Boston, Massachusetts. We quantified lead exposure using biomarkers of lead exposure assessed in 1993–2004 and evaluated cognitive decline by repeated performance on a telephone battery of cognitive tests primarily assessing learning, memory, executive function, and attention completed in 1995–2008. All cognitive test scores were z-transformed for use in analyses. We used linear mixed models with random effects to quantify the association between each lead biomarker and change in cognition overall and on each individual test. Results Consideration of individual tests showed greater cognitive decline with increased tibia lead concentrations, a measure of long-term cumulative exposure, for story memory and category fluency. The estimated excess annual decline in overall cognitive test z-score per SD increase in tibia bone lead concentration was suggestive, although the confidence intervals included the null (0.024 standard units, 95% confidence interval: −0.053 , 0.004 – an additional decline in function equivalent to being 0.33 years older). We found little support for associations between cognitive decline and patella or blood lead, which provide integrated measures of exposure over shorter timeframes. Conclusions Long-term cumulative lead exposure may be weakly associated with faster cognitive decline in community-dwelling women, at least in some cognitive domains. PMID:24529005

  1. Enhanced skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in pigs treated with somatotropin requires fed amino acids levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic somatotropin (pST) treatment in pigs increases skeletal muscle protein synthesis and circulating insulin, a known promoter of protein synthesis. Previously, we showed that the pST-mediated rise in insulin alone could not account for the pST-induced increase in protein synthesis. This study...

  2. Impact of Heating Rate During Exposure of Laser Molten Parts on the Processing Window of PA12 Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummer, Dietmar; Drexler, Maximilian; Wudy, Katrin

    The additive component manufacturing by selective beam melting of thermoplastic polymer powders can be divided essentially into the following sub-processes: Powder coating, exposure and material consolidation. The mechanical and geometrical properties of a part produced by the selective melting of polymer powders depend toa large extent on these sub-processes. To increase process repeatability basic knowledge about the mutual interactions within the sub-process is of major interest. In the following article the exposure process is focused. Therefore the time dependent energy input into the powder bed is analyzed in its impact on the usable processing window of PA12powder. Thereby parameters like surface temperature, density and strength of molten layers as well as complex body specimens are quantified for varying exposure heating rates. Therefore methods of statistical design of experiments are used. Due to these investigations the derivation of new, the time dependent material behavior of polymers fitting processing strategies is possible.

  3. The role of compartment-specific cysteine synthesis for sulfur homeostasis during H2S exposure in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Birke, Hannah; De Kok, Luit J; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger

    2015-02-01

    Sulfide is the end-product of assimilatory sulfate reduction in chloroplasts. It is then used by O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OAS-TL) to produce cysteine, the source of reduced sulfur in plants. While its formation in chloroplasts is essential for plant metabolism, sulfide is also a potent toxin mainly targeting respiration in mitochondria. Here, the application of sublethal concentrations of sulfide to Arabidopsis thaliana was used to by-pass assimilatory sulfate reduction, resulting in down-regulation of most genes of the pathway. The dualism of sulfide as substrate and toxin was investigated using knock-out mutants of the chloroplast-, mitochondrion- and cytosol-targeted OAS-TL isoforms. Surprisingly, growth retardation due to intoxication by sulfide was independent of the presence or absence of the three OAS-TL isoforms, indicating rapid exchange towards sulfur homoeostasis between the compartments. Cysteine, glutathione and sulfate, and less so S-sulfocysteine, were identified as major sinks for excess sulfide in wild-type plants. Additionally, the concentration of thiosulfate increased 1,000-fold, pointing towards a significant function of thiosulfate formation during H2S exposure. Synthesis of cysteine in the cytosol was found to be particularly important for accumulation of sulfite, sulfate and thiosulfate, indicating an important role for cytosolic OAS-TL for the re-oxidation of sulfide. The results show that thiosulfate and sulfate accumulation is strongly linked to cytosolic cysteine synthesis and that scavenging of sulfide by cysteine synthesis enhances sulfur compound accumulation. However, lack of cysteine synthesis in a subcellular compartment has no crucial consequences for toxicity and subsequent growth retardation. PMID:25416292

  4. Laser-induced synthesis and decay of Tritium under exposure of solid targets in heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmina, E. V.; Timashev, S. F.; Shafeev, G. A.

    2016-03-01

    The processes of laser-assisted synthesis of Tritium nuclei and their laser-induced decay in cold plasma in the vicinity of solid targets (Au, Ti, Se, etc.) immersed into heavy water are experimentally realized at peak laser intensity of 1010-1013 W/cm2. Initial stages of Tritium synthesis and their laser-induced beta-decay are interpreted on the basis of non-elastic interaction of plasma electrons having kinetic energy of 5-10 eV with nuclei of Deuterium and Tritium, respectively.

  5. Effects of short- and long-term exposure to ozone on heart rate and blood pressure of emphysematous rats

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, I.; Yokoyama, E.

    1989-02-01

    Electrocardiogram and arterial blood pressure of elastase-treated emphysematous rats (E rats) and saline-treated control rats (S rats) were recorded continuously during exposure to either 1 ppm ozone (O/sub 3/) for 3 hr or 0.5 ppm O/sub 3/ for 6 hr. The heart rates (HRs) of both groups decreased to about 50 and 65% of the initial levels at the end of 1 ppm and 0.5 ppm O/sub 3/ exposure, respectively. Mean arterial blood pressures (MAPs) also decreased to about 76 and 82%, respectively. There was no significant difference in these responses between E and S rats, although the levels of HRs and MAPs of the E rats were always a little lower than those of the S rats. Another group of E and S rats was continuously exposed to 0.2 ppm O/sub 3/ for 4 weeks. The HRs of both E and S groups decreased to about 81 and 88% of the initial levels on the first day, respectively, although they recovered completely by the third day. No significant difference in the variation of HRs during exposure was noted between E and S rats. However, the HR responses of these rats to a challenge exposure of 0.8 ppm O/sub 3/ for 1.5 hr appeared to be different. That is, S rats were more tolerant of the challenge exposure to O/sub 3/ for 1.5 hr than the E rats.

  6. Exposure to particulate matter in India: A synthesis of findings and future directions.

    PubMed

    Pant, Pallavi; Guttikunda, Sarath K; Peltier, Richard E

    2016-05-01

    Air pollution poses a critical threat to human health with ambient and household air pollution identified as key health risks in India. While there are many studies investigating concentration, composition, and health effects of air pollution, investigators are only beginning to focus on estimating or measuring personal exposure. Further, the relevance of exposures studies from the developed countries in developing countries is uncertain. This review summarizes existing research on exposure to particulate matter (PM) in India, identifies gaps and offers recommendations for future research. There are a limited number of studies focused on exposure to PM and/or associated health effects in India, but it is evident that levels of exposure are much higher than those reported in developed countries. Most studies have focused on coarse aerosols, with a few studies on fine aerosols. Additionally, most studies have focused on a handful of cities, and there are many unknowns in terms of ambient levels of PM as well as personal exposure. Given the high mortality burden associated with air pollution exposure in India, a deeper understanding of ambient pollutant levels as well as source strengths is crucial, both in urban and rural areas. Further, the attention needs to expand beyond the handful large cities that have been studied in detail. PMID:26974362

  7. PM2.5 metal exposures and nocturnal heart rate variability: a panel study of boilermaker construction workers

    PubMed Central

    Cavallari, Jennifer M; Eisen, Ellen A; Fang, Shona C; Schwartz, Joel; Hauser, Russ; Herrick, Robert F; Christiani, David C

    2008-01-01

    Background To better understand the mechanism(s) of particulate matter (PM) associated cardiovascular effects, research priorities include identifying the responsible PM characteristics. Evidence suggests that metals play a role in the cardiotoxicity of fine PM (PM2.5) and in exposure-related decreases in heart rate variability (HRV). We examined the association between daytime exposure to the metal content of PM2.5 and night HRV in a panel study of boilermaker construction workers exposed to metal-rich welding fumes. Methods Twenty-six male workers were monitored by ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) on a workday while exposed to welding fume and a non-workday (baseline). From the ECG, rMSSD (square root of the mean squared differences of successive intervals) was summarized over the night (0:00–7:00). Workday, gravimetric PM2.5 samples were analyzed by x-ray fluorescence to determine metal content. We used linear mixed effects models to assess the associations between night rMSSD and PM2.5 metal exposures both with and without adjustment for total PM2.5. Matched ECG measurements from the non-workday were used to control for individual cardiac risk factors and models were also adjusted for smoking status. To address collinearity between PM2.5 and metal content, we used a two-step approach that treated the residuals from linear regression models of each metal on PM2.5 as surrogates for the differential effects of metal exposures in models for night rMSSD. Results The median PM2.5 exposure was 650 μg/m3; median metal exposures for iron, manganese, aluminum, copper, zinc, chromium, lead, and nickel ranged from 226 μg/m3 to non-detectable. We found inverse linear associations in exposure-response models with increased metal exposures associated with decreased night rMSSD. A statistically significant association for manganese was observed, with a decline of 0.130 msec (95% CI: -0.162, -0.098) in night rMSSD for every 1 μg/m3 increase in manganese. However, even

  8. Transient exposure of human myoblasts to tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits serum and insulin-like growth factor-I stimulated protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Frost, R A; Lang, C H; Gelato, M C

    1997-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) induces cachexia and is postulated to be responsible for muscle wasting in several pathophysiological conditions. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether exposure of human myoblasts to TNF-alpha could directly inhibit the ability of serum or insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to stimulate protein synthesis as assessed by the incorporation of [3H]phenylalanine into protein. Serum and IGF-I stimulated protein synthesis dose dependently. Half-maximal stimulation of protein synthesis occurred at 05% serum and 8 ng/ml of IGF-I, respectively. TNF-alpha inhibited IGF-I-stimulated protein synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, as little as 2 ng/ml of TNF-alpha impaired the ability of IGF-I to stimulate protein synthesis by 33% and, at a dose of 100 ng/ml, TNF-alpha completely prevented the increase in protein synthesis induced by either serum or a maximally stimulating dose of IGF-I. Inhibition of protein synthesis was independent of whether TNF-alpha and growth factors were added to cells simultaneously or if the cells were pretreated with growth factors. Exposure ofmyoblasts to TNF-alpha for 10 min completely inhibited serum-induced stimulation of protein synthesis. TNF-alpha inhibited protein synthesis up to 48 h after addition of the cytokine. TNF-alpha also inhibited serum-stimulated protein synthesis in human myoblasts that were differentiated into myotubes. In contrast, exposure of myoblasts to TNF-alpha had no effect on IGF-I binding and failed to alter the ability of either IGF-I or serum to stimulate [3H]thymidine uptake. These data indicate that transient exposure of myoblasts or myotubes to TNF-alpha inhibits protein synthesis. Thus, the anabolic actions of IGF-I on muscle protein synthesis may be impaired during catabolic conditions in which TNF-alpha is over expressed. PMID:9322924

  9. Change in life cycle parameters and feeding rate of Ceriodaphnia silvestrii Daday (Crustacea, Cladocera) exposure to dietary copper.

    PubMed

    Rodgher, Suzelei; Lombardi, Ana Teresa; Melão, Maria da Graça Gama; Tonietto, Alessandra Emanuelle

    2008-11-01

    Changes in life cycle parameters (survival, growth, reproduction) and feeding rate of the tropical cladoceran Ceriodaphnia silvestrii as affected by Cu contaminated algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata were investigated. The dietary copper exposure ranged from 3 x 10(-15) to 68 x 10(-15) g Cu algal cell(-1). Low waterborne copper exposure (around 10(-10) mol l(-1) free Cu2+ ions) was kept in the experiments. The results show an increasing toxic effect on C. silvestrii with copper increase in algal cells; at the highest copper exposure, all life cycle parameters were significantly affected. A concentration of 38 x 10(-15) g Cu algal cell(-1) reduced egg hatching percentile and the number of neonates produced per female, but did not cause any statistically significant effect on animals survival nor to the number of eggs produced per female. The following sequence of events was observed from the lowest to the highest copper contamination: reproduction, feeding rate, body length and, at last, survival was affected. We conclude that algal cells are an important route of copper exposure and toxicity to cladocerans. PMID:18648932

  10. UVB exposure does not accelerate rates of litter decomposition in a semiarid riparian ecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aboveground litter decomposition is controlled mainly by substrate quality and climate factors across terrestrial ecosystems, but photodegradation from exposure to high-intensity ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation may also be important in arid and semi-arid environments. We investigated the interactive e...

  11. Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Immunizations among Asian American College Students: Infection, Exposure, and Immunity Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Haeok; Kiang, Peter; Watanabe, Paul; Halon, Patricia; Shi, Ling; Church, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, exposure, and immunity among Asian American college students as a basis for evaluating HBV screening and vaccination policy. Participants and Methods: Self-identified Asian American college students aged 18 years or older were examined. Serological tests of HBV surface…

  12. Glutamine metabolism in uricotelic species: variation in skeletal muscle glutamine synthetase, glutaminase, glutamine levels and rates of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Watford, Malcolm; Wu, Guoyao

    2005-04-01

    High intracellular glutamine levels have been implicated in promoting net protein synthesis and accretion in mammalian skeletal muscle. Little is known regarding glutamine metabolism in uricotelic species but chicken breast muscle exhibits high rates of protein accretion and would be predicted to maintain high glutamine levels. However, chicken breast muscle expresses high glutaminase activity and here we report that chicken breast muscle also expresses low glutamine synthetase activity (0.07+/-0.01 U/g) when compared to leg muscle (0.50+/-0.04 U/g). Free glutamine levels were 1.38+/-0.09 and 9.69+/-0.12 nmol/mg wet weight in breast and leg muscles of fed chickens, respectively. Glutamine levels were also lower in dove breast muscle (4.82+/-0.35 nmol/mg wet weight) when compared to leg muscle (16.2+/-1.0 nmol/mg wet weight) and much lower (1.80+/-0.46 nmol/mg wet weight) in lizard leg muscle. In fed chickens, rates of fractional protein synthesis were higher in leg than in breast muscle, and starvation (48 h) resulted in a decrease in both glutamine content and rate of protein synthesis in leg muscle. Thus, although tissue-specific glutamine metabolism in uricotelic species differs markedly from that in ureotelic animals, differences in rates of skeletal muscle protein synthesis are associated with corresponding differences in intramuscular glutamine content. PMID:15763516

  13. The effect of short-term intermittent hypoxic exposure on heart rate variability in a sedentary population.

    PubMed

    Lizamore, C A; Kathiravel, Y; Elliott, J; Hellemans, J; Hamlin, M J

    2016-03-01

    While the effects of instantaneous, single-bout exposure to hypoxia have been well researched, little is known about the autonomic response during, or as an adaptation to, repeated intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE) in a sedentary population. Resting heart rate variability (HRV) and exercise capacity was assessed in 16 participants (8 receiving IHE, [Hyp] and 8 receiving a placebo treatment [C]) before and after a 4-week IHE intervention. Heart rate variability was also measured during an IHE session in the last week of the intervention. Post-intervention, the root mean squared successive difference (rMSSD) increased substantially in Hyp (71.6 ± 52.5%, mean change ± 90% confidence limits) compared to C suggesting an increase in vagal outflow. However, aside from a likely decrease in submaximal exercise heart rate in the Hyp group (-5.0 ± 6.4%) there was little evidence of improved exercise capacity. During the week 4 IHE measurement, HRV decreased during the hypoxic exposure (reduced R-R interval: -7.5 ± 3.2%; and rMSSD: -24.7 ± 17.3%) suggesting a decrease in the relative contribution of vagal activity. In summary, while 4 weeks of IHE is unlikely to improve maximal exercise capacity, it may be a useful means of increasing HRV in people unable to exercise. PMID:27030629

  14. Links between self-reported media violence exposure and teacher ratings of aggression and prosocial behavior among German adolescents.

    PubMed

    Krahé, Barbara; Möller, Ingrid

    2011-04-01

    The relations between adolescents' habitual usage of media violence and their tendency to engage in aggressive and prosocial behavior in a school setting were examined in a cross-sectional study with 1688 7th and 8th graders in Germany who completed measures of violent media exposure and normative acceptance of aggression. For each participant, ratings of prosocial and aggressive behavior were obtained from their class teacher. Media violence exposure was a unique predictor of teacher-rated aggression even when relevant covariates were considered, and it predicted prosocial behavior over and above gender. Path analyses confirmed a direct positive link from media violence usage to teacher-rated aggression for girls and boys, but no direct negative link to prosocial behavior was found. Indirect pathways were identified to higher aggressive and lower prosocial behavior via the acceptance of aggression as normative. Although there were significant gender differences in media violence exposure, aggression, and prosocial behavior, similar path models were identified for boys and girls. PMID:20627370

  15. Estimated dose rates to members of the public from external exposure to patients with {sup 131}I thyroid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Dewji, S. Bellamy, M.; Leggett, R.; Eckerman, K.; Hertel, N.; Sherbini, S.; Saba, M.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Estimated dose rates that may result from exposure to patients who had been administered iodine-131 ({sup 131}I) as part of medical therapy were calculated. These effective dose rate estimates were compared with simplified assumptions under United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 8.39, which does not consider body tissue attenuation nor time-dependent redistribution and excretion of the administered {sup 131}I. Methods: Dose rates were estimated for members of the public potentially exposed to external irradiation from patients recently treated with {sup 131}I. Tissue attenuation and iodine biokinetics were considered in the patient in a larger comprehensive effort to improve external dose rate estimates. The external dose rate estimates are based on Monte Carlo simulations using the Phantom with Movable Arms and Legs (PIMAL), previously developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. PIMAL was employed to model the relative positions of the {sup 131}I patient and members of the public in three exposure scenarios: (1) traveling on a bus in a total of six seated or standing permutations, (2) two nursing home cases where a caregiver is seated at 30 cm from the patient’s bedside and a nursing home resident seated 250 cm away from the patient in an adjacent bed, and (3) two hotel cases where the patient and a guest are in adjacent rooms with beds on opposite sides of the common wall, with the patient and guest both in bed and either seated back-to-back or lying head to head. The biokinetic model predictions of the retention and distribution of {sup 131}I in the patient assumed a single voiding of urinary bladder contents that occurred during the trip at 2, 4, or 8 h after {sup 131}I administration for the public transportation cases, continuous first-order voiding for the nursing home cases, and regular periodic voiding at 4, 8, or 12 h after administration for the hotel room cases. Organ

  16. Estimated dose rates to members of the public from external exposure to patients with 131I thyroid treatment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dewji, S.; Bellamy, M.; Hertel, N.; Leggett, R.; Sherbini, S.; Saba, M.; Eckerman, K.

    2015-03-25

    The purpose of this study is to estimate dose rates that may result from exposure to patients who had been administered iodine-131 (131I) as part of medical therapy were calculated. These effective dose rate estimates were compared with simplified assumptions under United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 8.39, which does not consider body tissue attenuation nor time-dependent redistribution and excretion of the administered 131I. Methods: Dose rates were estimated for members of the public potentially exposed to external irradiation from patients recently treated with 131I. Tissue attenuation and iodine biokinetics were considered in the patient in a larger comprehensivemore » effort to improve external dose rate estimates. The external dose rate estimates are based on Monte Carlo simulations using the Phantom with Movable Arms and Legs (PIMAL), previously developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. PIMAL was employed to model the relative positions of the 131I patient and members of the public in three exposure scenarios: (1) traveling on a bus in a total of six seated or standing permutations, (2) two nursing home cases where a caregiver is seated at 30 cm from the patient’s bedside and a nursing home resident seated 250 cm away from the patient in an adjacent bed, and (3) two hotel cases where the patient and a guest are in adjacent rooms with beds on opposite sides of the common wall, with the patient and guest both in bed and either seated back-to-back or lying head to head. The biokinetic model predictions of the retention and distribution of 131I in the patient assumed a single voiding of urinary bladder contents that occurred during the trip at 2, 4, or 8 h after 131I administration for the public transportation cases, continuous first-order voiding for the nursing home cases, and regular periodic voiding at 4, 8, or 12 h after administration for the hotel room cases. Organ

  17. Breast cancer incidence following low-dose rate environmental exposure: Techa River Cohort, 1956–2004

    PubMed Central

    Ostroumova, E; Preston, D L; Ron, E; Krestinina, L; Davis, F G; Kossenko, M; Akleyev, A

    2008-01-01

    In the 1950s, the Mayak nuclear weapons facility in Russia discharged liquid radioactive wastes into the Techa River causing exposure of riverside residents to protracted low-to-moderate doses of radiation. Almost 10 000 women received estimated doses to the stomach of up to 0.47 Gray (Gy) (mean dose=0.04 Gy) from external γ-exposure and 137Cs incorporation. We have been following this population for cancer incidence and mortality and as in the general Russian population, we found a significant temporal trend of breast cancer incidence. A significant linear radiation dose–response relationship was observed (P=0.01) with an estimated excess relative risk per Gray (ERR/Gy) of 5.00 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.80, 12.76). We estimated that approximately 12% of the 109 observed cases could be attributed to radiation. PMID:19002173

  18. Effects of Oral Exposure Duration and Gastric Energy Content on Appetite Ratings and Energy Intake in Lean Men

    PubMed Central

    Wijlens, Anne G. M.; de Graaf, Cees; Erkner, Alfrun; Mars, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Studies show that longer oral exposure to food leads to earlier satiation and lowers energy intake. Moreover, higher energy content of food has been shown to lead to higher satiety. Up to now, it has not been studied systematically how oral exposure duration and gastric energy content interact in satiety regulation. Thirty-seven men (22 ± 4 years, 22 ± 2 kg/m2) participated in a randomized cross-over trial, in which we independently manipulated: (1) oral exposure duration by modified sham feeding (MSF) for 1 or 8 min; and (2) energy content of gastric load (GL) by a nasogastric tube: 100 kcal/500 mL or 700 kcal/500 mL. Outcome measures were appetite ratings and subsequent energy intake from an ad libitum meal. Energy intake was 35% lower after the GLs with 700 kcal than with 100kcal (p < 0.0001). All appetite ratings were lower in the 700 kcal than in the 100 kcal treatments (area under the curve (AUC); p-values ≤ 0.002); fullness was higher and prospective consumption was lower in the 8 min than in the 1 min MSF treatments (AUC; p-values ≤ 0.02). In conclusion, the current showed that a GL of 700 kcal/500 mL vs. 100 kcal/500 mL increased satiety and lowered energy intake. No additional effects of oral exposure duration could be observed, presumably due to the high contrast in energy between the manipulations. Future research should also focus on the role of oral exposure as such and not only the duration. PMID:26821045

  19. Effects of Oral Exposure Duration and Gastric Energy Content on Appetite Ratings and Energy Intake in Lean Men.

    PubMed

    Wijlens, Anne G M; de Graaf, Cees; Erkner, Alfrun; Mars, Monica

    2016-02-01

    Studies show that longer oral exposure to food leads to earlier satiation and lowers energy intake. Moreover, higher energy content of food has been shown to lead to higher satiety. Up to now, it has not been studied systematically how oral exposure duration and gastric energy content interact in satiety regulation. Thirty-seven men (22 ± 4 years, 22 ± 2 kg/m²) participated in a randomized cross-over trial, in which we independently manipulated: (1) oral exposure duration by modified sham feeding (MSF) for 1 or 8 min; and (2) energy content of gastric load (GL) by a nasogastric tube: 100 kcal/500 mL or 700 kcal/500 mL. Outcome measures were appetite ratings and subsequent energy intake from an ad libitum meal. Energy intake was 35% lower after the GLs with 700 kcal than with 100 kcal (p < 0.0001). All appetite ratings were lower in the 700 kcal than in the 100 kcal treatments (area under the curve (AUC); p-values ≤ 0.002); fullness was higher and prospective consumption was lower in the 8 min than in the 1 min MSF treatments (AUC; p-values ≤ 0.02). In conclusion, the current showed that a GL of 700 kcal/500 mL vs. 100 kcal/500 mL increased satiety and lowered energy intake. No additional effects of oral exposure duration could be observed, presumably due to the high contrast in energy between the manipulations. Future research should also focus on the role of oral exposure as such and not only the duration. PMID:26821045

  20. Occupational exposure and 25-year incidence rate of non-specific lung disease: the Zutphen Study.

    PubMed

    Heederik, D; Kromhout, H; Burema, J; Biersteker, K; Kromhout, D

    1990-12-01

    Information gathered in the Zutphen Study, the Dutch contribution to the Seven Countries Study that started in the 1960s, was used for the present study. In 1960 878 men participated in the physical examination and they were followed for 25 years until 1 July 1985. During this follow-up, their morbidity status was verified regularly. With this information the occurrence of chronic non-specific lung disease (CNSLD) at a specific time was coded by one physician, using strict criteria. The CNSLD diagnosis was based on the following criteria: episodes of respiratory symptoms such as regular cough and phlegm for longer than three months or episodes of wheezing and shortness of breath reported to the survey physician, or: diagnosis of CNSLD, including chronic bronchitis or emphysema by a clinical specialist. Occupation in 1960 was coded and used to generate specific occupational exposures with a Job Exposure Matrix. Because the exact time of diagnosis of CNSLD was known, incidence densities could be calculated. For 804 men a complete set of data was available. A Poisson regression analysis was used to analyse the relationships between the incidence density and independent variables like age, calendar period, occupation and specific occupational exposures. Blue collar workers had a significantly elevated incidence density ratio (IDR) compared to white collar workers (1.82, 95% confidence limits (CL): 1.35, 2.46). Subgroups of blue collar workers, wood and paper workers, textile workers, and tailors, construction workers and transport workers had significantly elevated IDRs also. Of the specific exposures heavy metals, mineral dust and adhesives had a significantly elevated IDR.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2084026

  1. Exposure Error Masks The Relationship Between Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Heart Rate Variability (HRV)

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Helen H.; Zanobetti, Antonella

    2010-01-01

    Objective We examined whether more precise exposure measures would better detect associations between traffic-related pollution, elemental carbon (EC) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and HRV. Methods Repeated 24-h personal and ambient PM2.5, EC, and NO2 were measured for 30 people living in Atlanta, GA. The association between HRV and either ambient concentrations or personal exposures was examined using linear mixed effects models. Results Ambient PM2.5, EC, and NO2 and personal PM2.5 were not associated with HRV. Personal EC and NO2 measured 24-h prior to HRV was associated with decreased rMSSD, PNN50, and HF and with increased LF/HF. RMSSD decreased by 10.97% (95% CI: -18.00,-3.34) for an IQR change in personal EC (0.81 ug/m3). Conclusions Results indicate decreased vagal tone in response to traffic pollutants, which can best be detected with precise personal exposure measures. PMID:20595912

  2. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in supercritical phase carbon dioxide: Recycle rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soti, Madhav

    With increasing oil prices and attention towards the reduction of anthropogenic CO2, the use of supercritical carbon dioxide for Fischer Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) is showing promise in fulfilling the demand of clean liquid fuels. The evidence of consumption of carbon dioxide means that it need not to be removed from the syngas feed to the Fischer Tropsch reactor after the gasification process. Over the last five years, research at SIUC have shown that FTS in supercritical CO2reduces the selectivities for methane, enhances conversion, reduces the net CO2produces in the coal to liquid fuels process and increase the life of the catalyst. The research has already evaluated the impact of various operating and feed conditions on the FTS for the once through process. We believe that the integration of unreacted feed recycle would enhance conversion, increase the yield and throughput of liquid fuels for the same reactor size. The proposed research aims at evaluating the impact of recycle of the unreacted feed gas along with associated product gases on the performance of supercritical CO2FTS. The previously identified conditions will be utilized and various recycle ratios will be evaluated in this research once the recycle pump and associated fittings have been integrated to the supercritical CO2FTS. In this research two different catalysts (Fe-Zn-K, Fe-Co-Zn-K) were analyzed under SC-FTS in different recycle rate at 350oC and 1200 psi. The use of recycle was found to improve conversion from 80% to close to 100% with both catalysts. The experiment recycle rate at 4.32 and 4.91 was clearly surpassing theoretical recycle curve. The steady state reaction rate constant was increased to 0.65 and 0.8 min-1 for recycle rate of 4.32 and 4.91 respectively. Carbon dioxide selectivity was decreased for both catalyst as it was converting to carbon monoxide. Carbon dioxide consumption was increased from 0.014 to 0.034 mole fraction. This concluded that CO2is being used in the system and

  3. Gas phase microreaction: nanomaterials synthesis via plasma exposure of liquid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, Paul; Mahony, Charles; Kelsey, Colin; Hamilton, Neil; Askari, Sadegh; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Diver, Declan; Mariotti, Davide

    2015-09-01

    Plasma-liquid interactions are complex but offer considerable scope for use in nanomaterials synthesis. The introduction of individual picolitre micro-droplets into a steady-state low temperature plasma at atmospheric pressure, offers opportunities for enhanced scope and control of plasma-liquid chemistry and material properties. The gas-phase micro-reactor is similar in concept to liquid bubble microfluidics currently under intense research but with enhanced opportunities for scale-up. For nanomaterials and quantum dot synthesis, the addition of a liquid phase within the plasma expands considerably the scope for core-shell and alloy formation. The synthesis and encapsulation within a liquid droplet allows continuous delivery of nanoparticles to remote sites for plasma medicine, device fabrication or surface coating. We have synthesized Au nanoparticles in flight using AuHCl4 droplets with plasma flight times <0.1 ms. Also, Ag nanoparticles have been synthesized downstream via the delivery of plasma exposed water droplets onto AgNO3 laden substrates. Funding from EPSRC acknowledged (Grants EP/K006088/1 and EP/K006142/1).

  4. Requirements regarding dose rate and exposure time for killing of tumour cells in beta particle radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Veronika; Stenerlöw, Bo; Lundqvist, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify combinations of dose rate and exposure time that have the potential to provide curative treatment with targeted radionuclide therapy applying low dose rate beta irradiation. Methods Five tumour cell lines, U-373MG and U-118MG gliomas, HT-29 colon carcinoma, A-431 cervical squamous carcinoma and SKBR-3 breast cancer, were used. An experimental model with 105 tumour cells in each sample was irradiated with low dose rate beta particles. The criterion for successful treatment was absence of recovery of cells during a follow-up period of 3 months. The initial dose rates were in the range 0.1–0.8 Gy/h, and the cells were continuously exposed for 1, 3 or 7 days. These combinations covered dose rates and doses achievable in targeted radionuclide therapy. Results Continuous irradiation with dose rates of 0.2–0.3 and 0.4–0.6 Gy/h for 7 and 3 days, respectively, could kill all cells in each tumour cell sample. These treatments gave total radiation doses of 30–40 Gy. However, when exposed for just 24 h with about 0.8 Gy/h, only the SKBR-3 cells were successfully treated; all the other cell types recovered. There were large cell type-dependent variations in the growth delay patterns for the cultures that recovered. The U-118MG cells were most resistant and the U-373MG and SKBR-3 cells most sensitive to the treatments. The HT-29 and A-431 cells were intermediate. Conclusion The results serve as a guideline for the combinations of dose rate and exposure time necessary to kill tumour cells when applying low dose rate beta irradiation. The shift from recovery to “cure” fell within a narrow range of dose rate and exposure time combinations. PMID:16718515

  5. The solar UV exposure time required for vitamin D3 synthesis in the human body estimated by numerical simulation and observation in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Miyauchi, Masaatsu; Hirai, Chizuko

    2013-04-01

    After the discovery of Antarctic ozone hole, the negative effect of exposure of human body to harmful solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is widely known. However, there is positive effect of exposure to UV radiation, i.e., vitamin D synthesis. Although the importance of solar UV radiation for vitamin D3 synthesis in the human body is well known, the solar exposure time required to prevent vitamin D deficiency has not been well determined. This study attempted to identify the time of solar exposure required for vitamin D3 synthesis in the body by season, time of day, and geographic location (Sapporo, Tsukuba, and Naha, in Japan) using both numerical simulations and observations. According to the numerical simulation for Tsukuba at noon in July under a cloudless sky, 2.3 min of solar exposure are required to produce 5.5 μg vitamin D3 per 600 cm2 skin. This quantity of vitamin D represents the recommended intake for an adult by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, and the 2010 Japanese Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs). In contrast, it took 49.5 min to produce the same amount of vitamin D3 at Sapporo in the northern part of Japan in December, at noon under a cloudless sky. The necessary exposure time varied considerably with the time of the day. For Tsukuba at noon in December, 14.5 min were required, but at 09:00 68.7 min were required and at 15:00 175.8 min were required for the same meteorological conditions. Naha receives high levels of UV radiation allowing vitamin D3 synthesis almost throughout the year. According to our results, we are further developing an index to quantify the necessary time of UV radiation exposure to produce required amount of vitamin D3 from a UV radiation data.

  6. Continuous Exposure to Low-Dose-Rate Gamma Irradiation Reduces Airway Inflammation in Ovalbumin-Induced Asthma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong Sun; Son, Yeonghoon; Bae, Min Ji; Lee, Seung Sook; Park, Sun Hoo; Lee, Hae June; Lee, Soong In; Lee, Chang Geun; Kim, Sung Dae; Jo, Wol Soon; Kim, Sung Ho; Shin, In Sik

    2015-01-01

    Although safe doses of radiation have been determined, concerns about the harmful effects of low-dose radiation persist. In particular, to date, few studies have investigated the correlation between low-dose radiation and disease development. Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory airway disease that is recognized as a major public health problem. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-dose-rate chronic irradiation on allergic asthma in a murine model. Mice were sensitized and airway-challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) and were exposed to continuous low-dose-rate irradiation (0.554 or 1.818 mGy/h) for 24 days after initial sensitization. The effects of chronic radiation on proinflammatory cytokines and the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were investigated. Exposure to low-dose-rate chronic irradiation significantly decreased the number of inflammatory cells, methylcholine responsiveness (PenH value), and the levels of OVA-specific immunoglobulin E, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-5. Furthermore, airway inflammation and the mucus production in lung tissue were attenuated and elevated MMP-9 expression and activity induced by OVA challenge were significantly suppressed. These results indicate that low-dose-rate chronic irradiation suppresses allergic asthma induced by OVA challenge and does not exert any adverse effects on asthma development. Our findings can potentially provide toxicological guidance for the safe use of radiation and relieve the general anxiety about exposure to low-dose radiation. PMID:26588845

  7. Continuous Exposure to Low-Dose-Rate Gamma Irradiation Reduces Airway Inflammation in Ovalbumin-Induced Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joong Sun; Son, Yeonghoon; Bae, Min Ji; Lee, Seung Sook; Park, Sun Hoo; Lee, Hae June; Lee, Soong In; Lee, Chang Geun; Kim, Sung Dae; Jo, Wol Soon; Kim, Sung Ho; Shin, In Sik

    2015-01-01

    Although safe doses of radiation have been determined, concerns about the harmful effects of low-dose radiation persist. In particular, to date, few studies have investigated the correlation between low-dose radiation and disease development. Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory airway disease that is recognized as a major public health problem. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-dose-rate chronic irradiation on allergic asthma in a murine model. Mice were sensitized and airway-challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) and were exposed to continuous low-dose-rate irradiation (0.554 or 1.818 mGy/h) for 24 days after initial sensitization. The effects of chronic radiation on proinflammatory cytokines and the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were investigated. Exposure to low-dose-rate chronic irradiation significantly decreased the number of inflammatory cells, methylcholine responsiveness (PenH value), and the levels of OVA-specific immunoglobulin E, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-5. Furthermore, airway inflammation and the mucus production in lung tissue were attenuated and elevated MMP-9 expression and activity induced by OVA challenge were significantly suppressed. These results indicate that low-dose-rate chronic irradiation suppresses allergic asthma induced by OVA challenge and does not exert any adverse effects on asthma development. Our findings can potentially provide toxicological guidance for the safe use of radiation and relieve the general anxiety about exposure to low-dose radiation. PMID:26588845

  8. Synthesis Rates and Binding Kinetics of Matrix Products in Engineered Cartilage Constructs Using Chondrocyte-Seeded Agarose Gels

    PubMed Central

    Nims, Robert J.; Cigan, Alexander D.; Albro, Michael B.; Hung, Clark T.; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2013-01-01

    Large-sized cartilage constructs suffer from inhomogeneous extracellular matrix deposition due to insufficient nutrient availability. Computational models of nutrient consumption and tissue growth can be utilized as an efficient alternative to experimental trials to optimize the culture of large constructs; models require system-specific growth and consumption parameters. To inform models of the [bovine chondrocyte]-[agarose gel] system, total synthesis rate (matrix accumulation rate + matrix release rate) and matrix retention fractions of glycosaminoglycans (GAG), collagen, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) were measured either in the presence (continuous or transient) or absence of TGF-β3 supplementation. TGF-β3’s influence on pyridinoline content and mechanical properties was also measured. Reversible binding kinetic parameters were characterized using computational models. Based on our recent nutrient supplementation work, we measured glucose consumption and critical glucose concentration for tissue growth to computationally simulate the culture of a human patella-sized tissue construct, reproducing the experiment of Hung et al., (2003). Transient TGF-β3 produced the highest GAG synthesis rate, highest GAG retention ratio, and highest binding affinity; collagen synthesis was elevated in TGF-β3 supplementation groups over control, with the highest binding affinity observed in the transient supplementation group; both COMP synthesis and retention were lower than those for GAG and collagen. These results informed the modeling of GAG deposition within a large patella construct; this computational example was similar to previous experimental results without further adjustments to modeling parameters. These results suggest that these nutrient consumption and matrix synthesis models are an attractive alternative for optimizing the culture of large-sized constructs. PMID:24284199

  9. Effects of pre- and postnatal polychlorinated biphenyl exposure on metabolic rate and thyroid hormones of white-footed mice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, J.B.; Voltura, M.B.; Tomasi, T.E.

    2001-01-01

    Energy budgets have proven to be a valuable tool for predicting life history from physiological data in terrestrial vertebrates, yet these concepts have not been applied to the physiological effects of contaminants. Contaminants might affect energy budgets by imposing an additional metabolic cost or by reducing the overall amount of energy taken in; either process will reduce the energy available for production (i.e., growth or reproduction). This study examined whole animal energetic effects of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus). Exposure to PCBs is known to reduce concentrations of plasma thyroid hormones, and thyroid hormones exert strong control over the rate of energy metabolism in mammals. Peromyscus leucopus that were proven breeders were fed PCBs in their food at 0, 10, and 25 ppm. Through lactation, offspring were exposed to PCB from conception and were maintained on the maternal diet to adulthood. No effects were seen on energy metabolism (O-2 consumption, measured in adulthood) or on growth, but there were large dose-dependent decreases in thyroid hormone concentrations, particularly T-4. The apparent disparity in our data between unchanged metabolic rates and 50% reductions in T-4 concentrations can be rationalized by noting that free T-3 (the fraction not bound to plasma protein) in treated mice was not significantly different from controls and that metabolism is most strongly influenced by free T-3. Overall, this study did not demonstrate any energetic consequences of PCB exposure in P. leucopus at dietary concentrations up to 25 ppm.

  10. Determining synthesis rates of individual proteins in zebrafish (Danio rerio) with low levels of a stable isotope labelled amino acid.

    PubMed

    Geary, Bethany; Magee, Kieran; Cash, Phillip; Young, Iain S; Whitfield, Phillip D; Doherty, Mary K

    2016-05-01

    The zebrafish is a powerful model organism for the analysis of human cardiovascular development and disease. Understanding these processes at the protein level not only requires changes in protein concentration to be determined but also the rate at which these changes occur on a protein-by-protein basis. The ability to measure protein synthesis and degradation rates on a proteome-wide scale, using stable isotope labelling in conjunction with mass spectrometry is now a well-established experimental approach. With the advent of more selective and sensitive mass spectrometers, it is possible to accurately measure lower levels of stable isotope incorporation, even when sample is limited. In order to challenge the sensitivity of this approach, we successfully determined the synthesis rates of over 600 proteins from the cardiac muscle of the zebrafish using a diet where either 30% or 50% of the L-leucine was replaced with a stable isotope labelled analogue ([(2) H7 ]L-leucine]. It was possible to extract sufficient protein from individual zebrafish hearts to determine the incorporation rate of the label into hundreds of proteins simultaneously, with the two labelling regimens showing a good correlation of synthesis rates. PMID:26929125

  11. Dietary crude protein intake influences rates of whole-body protein synthesis in weanling horses.

    PubMed

    Tanner, S L; Wagner, A L; Digianantonio, R N; Harris, P A; Sylvester, J T; Urschel, K L

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to measure whole-body protein kinetics in weanling horses receiving forage and one of two different concentrates: (1) commercial crude protein (CCP) concentrate, which with the forage provided 4.1 g CP/kg bodyweight (BW)/day (189 mg lysine (Lys)/kg BW/day), and (2) recommended crude protein (RCP) concentrate which, with the same forage, provided 3.1 g CP/kg BW/day (194 mg Lys/kg BW/day). Blood samples were taken to determine the response of plasma amino acid concentrations to half the daily concentrate allocation. The next day, a 2 h-primed, constant infusion of [(13)C]sodium bicarbonate and a 4 h-primed, constant infusion of [1-(13)C]phenylalanine were used with breath and blood sampling to measure breath (13)CO2 and blood [(13)C]phenylalanine enrichment. Horses on the CCP diet showed an increase from baseline in plasma isoleucine, leucine, lysine, threonine, valine, alanine, arginine, asparagine, glutamine, ornithine, proline, serine, and tyrosine at 120 min post-feeding. Baseline plasma amino acid concentrations were greater with the CCP diet for histidine, isoleucine, leucine, threonine, valine, asparagine, proline, and serine. Phenylalanine, lysine, and methionine were greater in the plasma of horses receiving the RCP treatment at 0 and 120 min. Phenylalanine intake was standardized between groups; however, horses receiving the RCP diet had greater rates of phenylalanine oxidation (P = 0.02) and lower rates of non-oxidative phenylalanine disposal (P = 0.04). Lower whole-body protein synthesis indicates a limiting amino acid in the RCP diet. PMID:24973006

  12. Sucrose phosphate synthase activity rises in correlation with high-rate cellulose synthesis in three heterotrophic systems.

    PubMed

    Babb, V M; Haigler, C H

    2001-11-01

    Based on work with cotton fibers, a particulate form of sucrose (Suc) synthase was proposed to support secondary wall cellulose synthesis by degrading Suc to fructose and UDP-glucose. The model proposed that UDP-glucose was then channeled to cellulose synthase in the plasma membrane, and it implies that Suc availability in cellulose sink cells would affect the rate of cellulose synthesis. Therefore, if cellulose sink cells could synthesize Suc and/or had the capacity to recycle the fructose released by Suc synthase back to Suc, cellulose synthesis might be supported. The capacity of cellulose sink cells to synthesize Suc was tested by analyzing the Suc phosphate synthase (SPS) activity of three heterotrophic systems with cellulose-rich secondary walls. SPS is a primary regulator of the Suc synthesis rate in leaves and some Suc-storing, heterotrophic organs, but its activity has not been previously correlated with cellulose synthesis. Two systems analyzed, cultured mesophyll cells of Zinnia elegans L. var. Envy and etiolated hypocotyls of kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), contained differentiating tracheary elements. Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Acala SJ-1) fibers were also analyzed during primary and secondary wall synthesis. SPS activity rose in all three systems during periods of maximum cellulose deposition within secondary walls. The Z. elegans culture system was manipulated to establish a tight linkage between the timing of tracheary element differentiation and rising SPS activity and to show that SPS activity did not depend on the availability of starch for degradation. The significance of these findings in regard to directing metabolic flux toward cellulose will be discussed. PMID:11706202

  13. Ca-41 in iron falls, Grant and Estherville - Production rates and related exposure age calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, D.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.; Vogt, S.; Herzog, G. F.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of the first phase of a Ca-41 cosmogenic studies program aimed at establishing baseline concentrations and trends in selected meteorites and the use of Ca-41 in estimating exposure ages and preatmospheric meteorite radii. The average Ca-41 saturation activity recorded in four small iron falls is 24 +/-1 dpm/kg. This finding, together with measurements at the center and surface of the large iron Grant, indicates that production of Ca-41 from spallation on iron is weakly dependent on shielding to depths as large as 250 g/sq cm. The (K-41)-Ca-41 exposure age of Grant is estimated at 330 +/-50 My, and an upper limit to its terrestrial age of 43 +/-15 ky. A comparison of the Ca-41 contents of stony and metallic material separated from the mesosiderite Estherville identifies low-energy neutron capture on native Ca as a second important channel of production. It is found that the Ca-41 signal in the stone phase from three meteorites correlates with their size, and that the inferred low-energy neutron fluxes vary by a factor of at least 20.

  14. The exposure rate to hepatitis B and C viruses among medical waste handlers in three government hospitals, southern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the rate of and risk factors for exposure to hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) among medical waste handlers. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from December 2014 to January 2015. A total of 152 medical waste handlers (MWH) and 82 non-medical waste handlers (NMWH) were studied. Serum samples were collected from participants and screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) and anti-HCV using rapid immunochromatography assay. MWH were also screened for hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs). RESULTS: The respective prevalence of HBsAg, anti-HBc and anti-HCV was 1.3%, 39.4%, and 0.7% in MWH, compared to 2.4%, 17.1%, and 1.2%, respectively, in NMWH. Among MWH, 58.6% were susceptible to HBV infection. There was a significant difference in the rate of lifetime exposure to HBV in MWH compared with NMWH (odds ratio [OR], 3.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.64 to 6.13). However, there was no significant difference between participant groups with respect to current HBV infection (OR, 0.53; 95%CI, 0.07 to 3.86) or anti-HCV (OR, 0.54; 95%CI, 0.03 to 8.69). Age older than 40 years and working in a hospital laundry were independent predictors of lifetime exposure to HBV infection. Eleven (7.2%) respondents were vaccinated against HBV. CONCLUSIONS: Lifetime exposure to HBV infection was significantly higher in MWH than in NMWH. The majority of MWH was not vaccinated against HBV and thus remains susceptible to contracting the infection. Screening upon hire followed by vaccination of MWH is recommended to reduce the transmission of HBV. PMID:26797221

  15. Synthesis of siderophores by plant-associated metallotolerant bacteria under exposure to Cd(2.).

    PubMed

    Złoch, Michał; Thiem, Dominika; Gadzała-Kopciuch, Renata; Hrynkiewicz, Katarzyna

    2016-08-01

    Rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria are well known producers of siderophores, organic compounds that chelate ferric iron (Fe(3+)), and therefore play an important role in plant growth promotion in metalliferous areas, thereby improving bioremediation processes. However, in addition to their primary function in iron mobilization, siderophores also have the capacity to chelate other heavy metals, such as Al(3+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Pb(2+) and Cd(2+), that can affect homeostasis and the heavy metal tolerance of microorganisms. The main goal of our study was to select the most efficient siderophore-producing bacterial strains isolated from the roots (endophytes) and rhizosphere of Betula pendula L. and Alnus glutinosa L. growing at two heavy metal contaminated sites in southern Poland. Siderophore biosynthesis of these strains in the presence of increasing concentrations of Cd(2+) (0, 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mM) under iron-deficiency conditions was analysed using spectrophotometric chemical tests for hydroxamates, catecholates and phenolates, as well as the separation of bacterial siderophores by HPLC and characterization of their structure by UHPLC-QTOF/MS. We proved that (i) siderophore-producing bacterial strains seems to be more abundant in the rhizosphere (47%) than in root endophytes (18%); (ii) the strains most effective at siderophore synthesis belonged to the genus Streptomyces and were able to secrete three types of siderophores under Cd(2+) stress: hydroxamates, catecholates and phenolates; (iii) in general, the addition of Cd(2+) enhanced siderophore synthesis, particularly ferrioxamine B synthesis, which may indicate that siderophores play a significant role in tolerance to Cd(2+) in Streptomyces sp. PMID:27183333

  16. Rates of breastfeeding and exposure to socio-economic adversity amongst children with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Gore, Nick; Emerson, Eric; Brady, Serena

    2015-04-01

    Children with intellectual disability are at increased risk of experiencing poor health relative to their typically developing peers. Previous research indicates that exposure to socio-economic disadvantage contributes towards this disparity but that additional factors (including parenting practices) may be involved in mediating/moderating pathways. This study examined duration of breastfeeding amongst children with and without intellectual disability by a secondary analysis of data from the UK Millennium Cohort Study. Children with intellectual disability were significantly less likely to have been ever breastfed; breastfed exclusively or at all at 3 months or breastfed at all at 6 months relative to children without intellectual disability. None of these differences remained significant when other psycho-social risk factors for reduced breastfeeding were controlled for. The study adds to both the sparse literature on breastfeeding practices amongst families of children with intellectual disability and research demonstrating relationships between socio-economic disadvantage and wellbeing for children with intellectual disability. PMID:25613368

  17. Measurement of local rates of brain protein synthesis by quantitative autoradiography: validation with L-(/sup 3/H)valine

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.E.; Donatoni, P.; Wasterlain, C.G.

    1982-12-01

    Following the injection of 4-day old rats with 150 mM L-(3,4-/sup 3/H)valine (10 mumol/g, IP) the incorporation of /sup 3/H into protein was linear 2 hours. Valine specific activity in the brain acid-soluble fraction was constant between 30 and 120 min after injection with a mean value of 82.3% of the injectate. Significant amounts of tritated metabolites accumulated in the brain acid-soluble fraction (41.4% of radioactivity at 120 min) but do not prove an impediment to measuring rates of protein synthesis. The rate of protein synthesis in cerebral cortex of the 4-day old rat was measured by quantitative autoradiography using (/sup 3/H)valine and /sup 3/H-sensitive film. The measured rate shows excellent agreement with that found previously using L-(1-/sup 14/C)valine. Our results suggest that (/sup 3/H)valine can be a useful precursor to measure local rates of brain protein synthesis by quantitative autoradiography.

  18. The effects of cutting or of stretching skeletal muscle in vitro on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seider, M. J.; Kapp, R.; Chen, C.-P.; Booth, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    Skeletal muscle preparations using cut muscle fibers have often been used in studies of protein metabolism. The present paper reports an investigation of the effect of muscle cutting or stretching in vitro on the rates of protein synthesis and/or degradation. Protein synthesis and content, and ATP and phosphocreatine levels were monitored in soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles from the rat with various extents of muscle fiber cuts and following stretching to about 120% the resting length. Rates of protein synthesis are found to be significantly lower and protein degradation higher in the cut muscles than in uncut controls, while ATP and phosphocreatine concentrations decreased. Stretched intact muscles, on the other hand, are observed to have higher concentrations of high-energy phosphates than unstretched muscles, while rates of protein degradation were not affected. Results thus demonstrate that the cutting of skeletal muscle fibers alters many aspects of muscle metabolism, and that moderate decreases in ATP concentration do not alter rates of protein concentration in intact muscles in vitro.

  19. Insecticidal efficacy of abamectin against three stored-product insect pests: influence of dose rate, temperature, commodity, and exposure interval.

    PubMed

    Kavallieratos, Nickolas G; Athanassiou, Christos G; Vayias, Basileios J; Mihail, Spyridon B; Tomanović, Zeljko

    2009-06-01

    The insecticidal efficacy of abamectin against adults of Rhyzopertha dominica (F.), Sitophilus oryzae (L.), and Tribolium confusum Jacquelin du Val was assessed under laboratory conditions. The efficacy of abamectin was assessed on two commodities (wheat, Triticum aestivum L. and maize, Zea mays L.) and two temperatures (25 and 30 degrees C). The dose rates used were 0.01, 0.1, 0.5, and 1 ppm. Mortality of the exposed adults in the treated grains was measured after 7, 14 and 21 d (= days), whereas progeny production was assessed 60 d later. Increase of dose rate, exposure interval, and temperature enhanced the efficacy of abamectin. Noticeable mortality was noted for all species after 21 d of exposure, although for S. oryzae, mortality was very high even at 7 d. For dose rates higher than 0.5 ppm, the efficacy of abamectin was higher in maize than in wheat against all species tested. Finally, progeny production was measured for all three species on commodities treated with 0.01 and 0.1 ppm of abamectin. PMID:19610457

  20. Exposure to monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) leads to altered selenoprotein synthesis in a primary human lung cell model

    SciTech Connect

    Meno, Sarah R.; Nelson, Rebecca; Hintze, Korry J.; Self, William T.

    2009-09-01

    Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}), a trivalent metabolite of arsenic, is highly cytotoxic and recent cell culture studies suggest that it might act as a carcinogen. The general consensus of studies indicates that the cytotoxicity of MMA{sup III} is a result of increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A longstanding relationship between arsenic and selenium metabolism has led to the use of selenium as a supplement in arsenic exposed populations, however the impact of organic arsenicals (methylated metabolites) on selenium metabolism is still poorly understood. In this study we determined the impact of exposure to MMA{sup III} on the regulation of expression of TrxR1 and its activity using a primary lung fibroblast line, WI-38. The promoter region of the gene encoding the selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) contains an antioxidant responsive element (ARE) that has been shown to be activated in the presence of electrophilic compounds. Results from radiolabeled selenoproteins indicate that exposure to low concentrations of MMA{sup III} resulted in increased synthesis of TrxR1 in WI-38 cells, and lower incorporation of selenium into other selenoproteins. MMA{sup III} treatment led to increased mRNA encoding TrxR1 in WI-38 cells, while lower levels of mRNA coding for cellular glutathione peroxidase (cGpx) were detected in exposed cells. Luciferase activity of TrxR1 promoter fusions increased with addition of MMA{sup III}, as did expression of a rat quinone reductase (QR) promoter fusion construct. However, MMA{sup III} induction of the TRX1 promoter fusion was abrogated when the ARE was mutated, suggesting that this regulation is mediated via the ARE. These results indicate that MMA{sup III} alters the expression of selenoproteins based on a selective induction of TrxR1, and this response to exposure to organic arsenicals that requires the ARE element.

  1. Stress, temperature, heart rate, and hibernating factors in hamsters. [pathophysiological conditions resulting from exposure to zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.

    1974-01-01

    Pathophysiological conditions resulting from prolonged exposure to zero gravity, cabin constraint, altered ambient environment, whether it be noise, vibrations, high temperatures, or combinations of such factors, are studied in laboratory animals and applied to manned space flight. Results and plans for further study are presented. Specific topics covered include: thermoregulation and its role in reflecting stress and adaptation to the gravity free environment and cabin confinement with its altered circadian forcings; renal function and its measurement in electrolyte distribution and blood flow dynamics; gastronintestinal function and an assessment of altered absorptive capacity in the intestinal mucosa; and catecholamine metabolism in terms of distribution and turnover rates in specific tissues.

  2. Hyperoxic exposure in humans. Effects of 50 percent oxygen on alveolar macrophage leukotriene B4 synthesis.

    PubMed

    Griffith, D E; Garcia, J G; James, H L; Callahan, K S; Iriana, S; Holiday, D

    1992-02-01

    The pathogenesis of oxygen toxicity remains unknown but may involve leukocyte mediated injury. The effects of hyperoxia on several lower respiratory tract parameters were examined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of normal nonsmoking subjects who inhaled a fractional inspired oxygen concentration of 50 percent (mean exposure: 44 h). Evidence that 50 percent O2 produced oxidative stress in the lung included recovery of fluorescent products of lipid peroxidation and partial oxidation of alpha 1-antitrypsin in BAL fluid obtained after O2 exposure. To examine whether alveolar macrophage-derived leukotriene B4 may be generated in response to 50 percent O2, AM were isolated from O2-exposed subjects and compared with AM recovered from subjects breathing room air. Leukotriene B4 levels were elevated in supernatants from both unstimulated and arachidonic acid-stimulated AM obtained from hyperoxia-exposed subjects. In hyperoxia-exposed individuals, LTB4 levels were also elevated in extracted BAL fluid. The percentage of BAL neutrophils was also significantly increased after O2 exposure (2.8 +/- 0.6 vs 1.2 +/- 0.4 percent, p = 0.05). We conclude that an FIO2 of 50 percent inhaled for 44 h is associated with enhanced oxidative stress, stimulation of AM to release LTB4, and a small but significantly increased percentage of neutrophils recovered in BAL fluid. PMID:1310457

  3. Synthesis of low molecular weight thiols in response to Cd exposure in Thlaspi caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Allica, J; Garbisu, C; Becerril, J M; Barrutia, O; García-Plazaola, J I; Zhao, F J; Mcgrath, S P

    2006-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the accumulation of phytochelatins (PCs) and other low molecular weight (LMW) thiols in response to Cd exposure in two contrasting ecotypes differing in Cd accumulation. Using a root elongation test, we found that the highly accumulating ecotype Ganges was more tolerant to Cd than the low Cd-accumulation ecotype Prayon. L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulphoximine (BSO), a potent inhibitor of the gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase gamma-ECS) (an enzyme involved in the PC biosynthetic pathway), increased the Cd sensitivity of Prayon, but had no effect on Ganges. Although PC accumulation increased in response to Cd exposure, no significant differences were observed between the two ecotypes. Cd exposure induced a dose-dependent accumulation of both Cys and a still unidentified LMW thiol in roots of both ecotypes. Root accumulation of Cys and this thiol was higher in Ganges than in Prayon; the ecotypic differences were more pronounced when the plants were treated with BSO. These findings suggest that PCs do not contribute to the Cd hypertolerance displayed by the Ganges ecotype of Thlaspi caerulescens, whereas Cys and other LMW thiols might be involved. PMID:17080963

  4. EXPOSURE TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICLES IN DETROIT ALTERS HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevations in airborne particulate matter (PM) are linked to increased mortality and morbidity in humans with cardiopulmonary disease. Clinical studies show that PM is associated with altered heart rate variability (HRV) and suggests that loss of autonomic control may underlie ca...

  5. The rate of synthesis and decomposition of tissue proteins in hypokinesia and increased muscular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedorov, I. V.; Chernyy, A. V.; Fedorov, A. I.

    1978-01-01

    During hypokinesia and physical loading (swimming) of rats, the radioactivity of skeletal muscle, liver, kidney, heart, and blood proteins was determined after administration of radioactive amino acids. Tissue protein synthesis decreased during hypokinesia, and decomposition increased. Both synthesis and decomposition increased during physical loading, but anabolic processes predominated in the total tissue balance. The weights of the animals decreased in hypokinesia and increased during increased muscle activity.

  6. Evaluation of coral pathogen growth rates after exposure to atmospheric African dust samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lisle, John T.; Garrison, Virginia H.; Gray, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to assess if exposure to atmospheric African dust stimulates or inhibits the growth of four putative bacterial coral pathogens. Atmospheric dust was collected from a dust-source region (Mali, West Africa) and from Saharan Air Layer masses over downwind sites in the Caribbean [Trinidad and Tobago and St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI)]. Extracts of dust samples were used to dose laboratory-grown cultures of four putative coral pathogens: Aurantimonas coralicida (white plague type II), Serratia marcescens (white pox), Vibrio coralliilyticus, and V. shiloi (bacteria-induced bleaching). Growth of A. coralicida and V. shiloi was slightly stimulated by dust extracts from Mali and USVI, respectively, but unaffected by extracts from the other dust sources. Lag time to the start of log-growth phase was significantly shortened for A. coralicida when dosed with dust extracts from Mali and USVI. Growth of S. marcescens and V. coralliilyticus was neither stimulated nor inhibited by any of the dust extracts. This study demonstrates that constituents from atmospheric dust can alter growth of recognized coral disease pathogens under laboratory conditions.

  7. Mechanistic role of water on the rate and selectivity of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on ruthenium catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hibbitts, David D; Loveless, Brett T; Neurock, Matthew; Iglesia, Enrique

    2013-11-18

    Water increases Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) rates on Ru through H-shuttling processes. Chemisorbed hydrogen (H*) transfers its electron to the metal and protonates the O-atom of CO* to form COH*, which subsequently hydrogenates to *HCOH* in the kinetically relevant step. H2 O also increases the chain length of FTS products by mediating the H-transfer steps during reactions of alkyl groups with CO* to form longer-chain alkylidynes and OH*. PMID:24123803

  8. Indoor air exposure to coal and wood combustion emissions associated with a high lung cancer rate in Xuan Wei, China

    SciTech Connect

    Mumford, J.L.; Chapman, R.S.; Harris, D.B.; He, X.Z.; Cac, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    Residents of Xuan Wei County in China have unusually high lung cancer mortality that cannot be attributed to tobacco use or occupational exposure. They are exposed to smoke from unvented, open pit coal or wood fires (often used for cooking and heating). The variation in lung cancer rates among communes within the county suggests that indoor combustion of smoky coal may be the prime determinant of lung cancer. To characterize the air in Xuan Wei homes, samples of the air particles and semivolatile organic compounds were collected from homes located in two communes; one commune has a high rate of lung cancer, and the other has a low rate. Samples collected in the commune where the lung cancer rate is high and where smoky coal is the predominant fuel contained high concentrations of small particles with high organic content; organic extracts of these samples were mutagenic. Samples from homes in the wood-burning commune, which has a low rate of lung cancer, consisted mostly of larger particles of lower organic content and mutagenicity. The smoky coal sample was a mouse skin carcinogen and was a more potent initiator of skin tumors in comparison to the wood or smokeless coal sample.

  9. Indoor air exposure to coal and wood combustion emissions associated with a high lung cancer rate in Xuan Wei, China

    SciTech Connect

    Mumford, J.L.; Chapman, R.S.; Harris, D.B. ); He, X.Z.; Cao, S.R.; Xian, Y.L.; Li, X.M. )

    1989-01-01

    Residents of Xuan Wei County in China have unusually high lung cancer mortality that cannot be attributed to tobacco use or occupational exposure. They are exposed to smoke from unvented, open pit coal or wood fires (often used for cooking and heating). The variation in lung cancer rates among communes within the county suggests that indoor combustion of smoky coal may be the prime determinant of lung cancer. To characterize the air in Xuan Wei homes, samples of air particles and semivolatile organic compounds were collected from homes located in two communes; one commune has a high rate of lung cancer, and the other has a low rate. Samples collected in the commune where the lung cancer rate is high and where smoky coal is the predominant fuel contained high concentrations of small particles with high organic content; organic extracts of these samples were mutagenic. Samples from homes in the wood-burning commune, which has a low rate of lung cancer, consisted mostly of larger particles of lower organic content and mutagenicity. The smoky coal sample was a mouse skin carcinogen and was a more potent initiator of skin tumors in comparison to the wood or smokeless coal sample.

  10. Monte Carlo calculation of dose rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon emitters in soil.

    PubMed

    Clouvas, A; Xanthos, S; Antonopoulos-Domis, M; Silva, J

    2000-03-01

    The dose rate conversion factors D(CF) (absorbed dose rate in air per unit activity per unit of soil mass, nGy h(-1) per Bq kg(-1)) are calculated 1 m above ground for photon emitters of natural radionuclides uniformly distributed in the soil. Three Monte Carlo codes are used: 1) The MCNP code of Los Alamos; 2) The GEANT code of CERN; and 3) a Monte Carlo code developed in the Nuclear Technology Laboratory of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. The accuracy of the Monte Carlo results is tested by the comparison of the unscattered flux obtained by the three Monte Carlo codes with an independent straightforward calculation. All codes and particularly the MCNP calculate accurately the absorbed dose rate in air due to the unscattered radiation. For the total radiation (unscattered plus scattered) the D(CF) values calculated from the three codes are in very good agreement between them. The comparison between these results and the results deduced previously by other authors indicates a good agreement (less than 15% of difference) for photon energies above 1,500 keV. Antithetically, the agreement is not as good (difference of 20-30%) for the low energy photons. PMID:10688452

  11. Intracellular pH Recovery Rates in Bivalve Hemocytes Following Exposure to Acidic Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxton, A.; Wikfors, G. H.

    2012-12-01

    Predictions of ocean acidification effects upon carbonate shell-forming species have caused great concern for the future of shellfisheries. Nevertheless, bivalve species inhabiting an estuarine environment have evolved in these environments with fluctuating pH levels. Previous experimental studies conducted in our laboratory have demonstrated the ability of oyster hemocytes to maintain intracellular homeostasis under acidic external conditions. However, little information is known of this homeostatic mechanism in other molluscan shellfish species present in these same habitats. In the current study we propose to determine if other bivalve species of aquaculture interest also possess this intracellular regulation by applying an in vitro hemocyte pH-recovery assay, previously developed for oysters, on the northern quahog, Mercenaria mercenaria, the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and the softshell clam, Mya arenaria. Preliminary results from the determination of initial intracellular pH levels, the initial step in the rate recovery assay, indicated a pH range between 7.0-7.4. This range was comparable to initial values measured in oysters, and consistent with data reported in the current literature. The second step of the hemocyte pH-recovery assay involves exposing oyster hemocytes to acidic external conditions and measuring the ability of the hemocyte intracellular pH to maintain homeostasis (i.e. recovery rate). Results from the recovery rate process will be presented.

  12. Predictors of self-reported confidence ratings for adult recall of early life sun exposure.

    PubMed

    Relova, Anne-Sharon; Marrett, Loraine D; Klar, Neil; McLaughlin, John R; Ashbury, Fredrick D; Nishri, Diane; Theis, Beth

    2005-07-15

    Use of self-reported confidence ratings may be an efficient method for assessing recall bias. In this exploratory application of the method, the authors examined the relation between case-control status and self-reported confidence ratings. In 2002 and 2003, melanoma cases (n = 141) and controls (n = 143) aged 20-44 years residing in Ontario, Canada, estimated the amounts of time they had spent outdoors in summer activities when they were 6-18 years of age and indicated their confidence in the accuracy of each estimate. The generalized estimating equations extension of logistic regression was used to examine dichotomized confidence ratings (more confident vs. less confident) for activities reported for ages 6-11 years and 12-18 years. Types of activity were associated with more confident reporting for both age strata; as the number of stable outdoor activity periods (total number of similar outdoor periods within each activity) reported by respondents increased, confidence decreased. Cumulative time spent outdoors was also associated with more confidence but reached statistical significance only for the age stratum 12-18 years. There was no statistically significant association between case-control status and self-reported confidence for either age stratum (6-11 years: odds ratio = 0.91; 12-18 years: odds ratio = 1.32), which suggests an absence of recall bias for reported time spent outdoors. PMID:15972935

  13. Optimised geometry to calculate dose rate conversion coefficient for external exposure to photons.

    PubMed

    Askri, B; Manai, K; Trabelsi, A; Baccari, B

    2008-01-01

    A single-parameter geometry to describe soil is achieved for Monte Carlo calculation of absorbed dose rate in air for photon emitters from natural radionuclides. This optimised geometry based on physical assumptions consists of the soil part whose emitted radiation has a given minimum probability to reach the detector. This geometry was implemented in Geant4 toolkit and a significant reduction in computation time was achieved. Simulation tests have shown that for soil represented by a cylinder of 40 m radius and 1 m deep, >98% of the calculated dose rate conversion coefficients in air at 1 m above the ground is generated by only 6% of the soil volume in the case of uniform distribution of radioactivity, and >99.2% of the calculated dose rate for an exponential distribution. When the soil is represented by the entire optimised geometry, 99% of the conversion coefficients values are reached for a soil depth of 1 m and 100% for that of approximately 2 m. PMID:17959610

  14. The characteristics of coarse particulate matter air pollution associated with alterations in blood pressure and heart rate during controlled exposures

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Masako; Bard, Robert L.; Wang, Lu; Das, Ritabrata; Dvonch, J. Timothy; Spino, Catherine; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Sun, Qinghua; Harkema, Jack R.; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Brook, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Although fine particulate matter (PM) air pollution <2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) is a leading cause of global morbidity and mortality, the potential health effects of coarse PM (2.5–10 μm in aerodynamic diameter; PM10–2.5) remain less clearly understood. We aimed to elucidate the components within coarse PM most likely responsible for mediating these hemodynamic alterations. Thirty-two healthy adults (25.9 ± 6.6 years) were exposed to concentrated ambient coarse PM (CAP) (76.2 ± 51.5 μg/m3) and filtered air (FA) for 2 h in a rural location in a randomized double-blind crossover study. The particle constituents (24 individual elements, organic and elemental carbon) were analyzed from filter samples and associated with the blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) changes occurring throughout CAP and FA exposures in mixed model analyses. Total coarse PM mass along with most of the measured elements were positively associated with similar degrees of elevations in both systolic BP and HR. Conversely, total PM mass was unrelated, whereas only two elements (Cu and Mo) were positively associated with and Zn was inversely related to diastolic BP changes during exposures. Inhalation of coarse PM from a rural location rapidly elevates systolic BP and HR in a concentration-responsive manner, whereas the particulate composition does not appear to be an important determinant of these responses. Conversely, exposure to certain PM elements may be necessary to trigger a concomitant increase in diastolic BP. These findings suggest that particulate mass may be an adequate metric of exposure to predict some, but not all, hemodynamic alterations induced by coarse PM mass. PMID:25227729

  15. Exposure to vancomycin causes a shift in the microbial community structure without affecting nitrate reduction rates in river sediments.

    PubMed

    Laverman, Anniet M; Cazier, Thibaut; Yan, Chen; Roose-Amsaleg, Céline; Petit, Fabienne; Garnier, Josette; Berthe, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes have shown to be omnipresent in the environment. In this study, we investigated the effect of vancomycin (VA) on denitrifying bacteria in river sediments of a Waste Water Treatment Plant, receiving both domestic and hospital waste. We exposed these sediments continuously in flow-through reactors to different VA concentrations under denitrifying conditions (nitrate addition and anoxia) in order to determine potential nitrate reduction rates and changes in sedimentary microbial community structures. The presence of VA had no effect on sedimentary nitrate reduction rates at environmental concentrations, whereas a change in bacterial (16S rDNA) and denitrifying (nosZ) community structures was observed (determined by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis). The bacterial and denitrifying community structure within the sediment changed upon VA exposure indicating a selection of a non-susceptible VA population. PMID:25663374

  16. A Quantitative Synthesis of Mercury in Commercial Seafood and Implications for Exposure in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Timothy P.; Fisher, Nicholas S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal that presents public health risks through fish consumption. A major source of uncertainty in evaluating harmful exposure is inadequate knowledge of Hg concentrations in commercially important seafood. Objectives: We examined patterns, variability, and knowledge gaps of Hg in common commercial seafood items in the United States and compared seafood Hg concentrations from our database to those used for exposure estimates and consumption advice. Methods: We developed a database of Hg concentrations in fish and shellfish common to the U.S. market by aggregating available data from government monitoring programs and the scientific literature. We calculated a grand mean for individual seafood items, based on reported means from individual studies, weighted by sample size. We also compared database results to those of federal programs and human health criteria [U.S. Food and Drug Administration Hg Monitoring Program (FDA-MP), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)]. Results: Mean Hg concentrations for each seafood item were highly variable among studies, spanning 0.3–2.4 orders of magnitude. Farmed fish generally had lower grand mean Hg concentrations than their wild counterparts, with wild seafood having 2- to12-fold higher concentrations, depending on the seafood item. However, farmed fish are relatively understudied, as are specific seafood items and seafood imports from Asia and South America. Finally, we found large discrepancies between mean Hg concentrations estimated from our database and FDA-MP estimates for most seafood items examined. Conclusions: The high variability in Hg in common seafood items has considerable ramifications for public health and the formulation of consumption guidelines. Exposure and risk analyses derived from smaller data sets do not reflect our collective, available information on seafood Hg concentrations. PMID:22732656

  17. The rate of X-ray-induced DNA double-strand break repair in the embryonic mouse brain is unaffected by exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Woodbine, Lisa; Haines, Jackie; Coster, Margaret; Barazzuol, Lara; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Sienkiewicz, Zenon; Jeggo, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Following in utero exposure to low dose radiation (10–200 mGy), we recently observed a linear induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and activation of apoptosis in the embryonic neuronal stem/progenitor cell compartment. No significant induction of DSB or apoptosis was observed following exposure to magnetic fields (MF). In the present study, we exploited this in vivo system to examine whether exposure to MF before and after exposure to 100 mGy X-rays impacts upon DSB repair rates. Materials and methods: 53BP1 foci were quantified following combined exposure to radiation and MF in the embryonic neuronal stem/progenitor cell compartment. Embryos were exposed in utero to 50 Hz MF at 300 μT for 3 h before and up to 9 h after exposure to 100 mGy X-rays. Controls included embryos exposed to MF or X-rays alone plus sham exposures. Results: Exposure to MF before and after 100 mGy X-rays did not impact upon the rate of DSB repair in the embryonic neuronal stem cell compartment compared to repair rates following radiation exposure alone. Conclusions: We conclude that in this sensitive system MF do not exert any significant level of DNA damage and do not impede the repair of X-ray induced damage. PMID:25786477

  18. Concentrations of polybromobiphenyls and polybromodiphenyl ethers in home dust: relevance to socio-economic status and human exposure rate.

    PubMed

    Kefeni, Kebede K; Okonkwo, Jonathan O; Botha, Ben M

    2014-02-01

    This study reports on the levels of all major polybromobiphenyls (PBBs) and polybromodiphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in 31 home dust samples collected in Pretoria, South Africa. Low concentrations of PBB and PBDE congeners were detected in 21 and 7 samples, respectively. The Σ10PBDEs concentration ranged from <0.3 to 234 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw) of dust with a median of 18.3 ng g(-1) dw. No significant differences in the total concentration of PBDEs were observed among three socio-economic categories considered. The overall daily intake of PBDEs via ingestion of dust was estimated for children and adults using median concentrations of Σ10PBDEs. Accordingly, for children and adults the exposure rate values are 0.96 and 0.38 ng day(-1), respectively. In addition, the estimated daily dust ingestion exposure rate doses for children and adults with respect to BDE-47 and BDE-99 were by far lower than the reference dose values. It can, therefore, be said that South Africans living in Pretoria are exposed to low concentrations of PBDEs from home environment dust. PMID:24252199

  19. RpoS synthesis is growth rate regulated in Salmonella typhimurium, but its turnover is not dependent on acetyl phosphate synthesis or PTS function.

    PubMed

    Cunning, C; Elliott, T

    1999-08-01

    The RpoS sigma factor of enteric bacteria is either required for or augments the expression of a number of genes that are induced during nutrient limitation, growth into stationary phase, or in response to stresses, including high osmolarity. RpoS is regulated at multiple levels, including posttranscriptional control of its synthesis, protein turnover, and mechanisms that affect its activity directly. Here, the control of RpoS stability was investigated in Salmonella typhimurium by the isolation of a number of mutants specifically defective in RpoS turnover. These included 20 mutants defective in mviA, the ortholog of Escherichia coli rssB/sprE, and 13 mutants defective in either clpP or clpX which encode the protease active on RpoS. An hns mutant was also defective in RpoS turnover, thus confirming that S. typhimurium and E. coli have identical genetic requirements for this process. Some current models predict the existence of a kinase to phosphorylate the response regulator MviA, but no mutants affecting a kinase were recovered. An mviA mutant carrying the D58N substitution altering the predicted phosphorylation site is substantially defective, suggesting that phosphorylation of MviA on D58 is important for its function. No evidence was obtained to support models in which acetyl phosphate or the PTS system contributes to MviA phosphorylation. However, we did find a significant (fivefold) elevation of RpoS during exponential growth on acetate as the carbon and energy source. This behavior is due to growth rate-dependent regulation which increases RpoS synthesis at slower growth rates. Growth rate regulation operates at the level of RpoS synthesis and is mainly posttranscriptional but, surprisingly, is independent of hfq function. PMID:10438755

  20. The effects of strong shock waves on mortality rates and percentages of pulmonary lesions in rats as a function of the number of exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassout, P.; Parmentier, G.

    1978-01-01

    The results of the study reveal that with regard to the pulmonary lesions, twice the number of exposures is compensated for by quartering the overpressure of the wave crest. With regard to the mortality rates, it reveals that halving the overpressure of the wave crest is offset by a 20-fold increase in the number of exposures.

  1. Simultaneous Hypoxia and Low Extracellular pH Suppress Overall Metabolic Rate and Protein Synthesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Brita Singers; Busk, Morten; Overgaard, Jens; Horsman, Michael R.; Alsner, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background The tumor microenvironment is characterized by regions of hypoxia and acidosis which are linked to poor prognosis. This occurs due to an aberrant vasculature as well as high rates of glycolysis and lactate production in tumor cells even in the presence of oxygen (the Warburg effect), which weakens the spatial linkage between hypoxia and acidosis. Methods Five different human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (SiHa, FaDuDD, UTSCC5, UTSCC14 and UTSCC15) were treated with hypoxia, acidosis (pH 6.3), or a combination, and gene expression analyzed using microarray. SiHa and FaDuDD were chosen for further characterization of cell energetics and protein synthesis. Total cellular ATP turnover and relative glycolytic dependency was determined by simultaneous measurements of oxygen consumption and lactate synthesis rates and total protein synthesis was determined by autoradiographic quantification of the incorporation of 35S-labelled methionine and cysteine into protein. Results Microarray analysis allowed differentiation between genes induced at low oxygen only at normal extracellular pH (pHe), genes induced at low oxygen at both normal and low pHe, and genes induced at low pHe independent of oxygen concentration. Several genes were found to be upregulated by acidosis independent of oxygenation. Acidosis resulted in a more wide-scale change in gene expression profiles than hypoxia including upregulation of genes involved in the translation process, for example Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4A, isoform 2 (EIF4A2), and Ribosomal protein L37 (RPL37). Acidosis suppressed overall ATP turnover and protein synthesis by 50%. Protein synthesis, but not total ATP production, was also suppressed under hypoxic conditions. A dramatic decrease in ATP turnover (SiHa) and protein synthesis (both cell lines) was observed when hypoxia and low pHe were combined. Conclusions We demonstrate here that the influence of hypoxia and acidosis causes different responses, both

  2. Mothers' Adult Attachment Interview ratings predict preschool children's IQ following domestic violence exposure.

    PubMed

    Busch, Amy L; Lieberman, Alicia F

    2010-11-01

    This study examined links between mothers' Adult Attachment Interview ratings (AAI; Main, Goldwyn, & Hesse, 2003) and their preschool children's IQ among 70 families who had experienced domestic violence. As predicted, children displayed significantly stronger verbal and perceptual-organizational abilities when their mothers exhibited more secure, i.e. coherent, states of mind regarding attachment. Mothers' coherence of mind on the AAI explained 18% of the variance in children's Verbal IQ and 12% of the variance in children's Performance IQ, after controlling for maternal education. Mothers' attachment security also was related to children's total IQ score, but this association was accounted for by effects on children's Verbal IQ. Children whose mothers were rated as unclassifiable on the AAI and those whose mothers were unresolved/insecure had lower IQ scores. Although mothers who appeared more secure on the AAI were more sensitively responsive toward their children, mediational analyses suggested that there was a direct link between mothers' security and children's IQ that was not explained by sensitive parenting. This suggests that clinical interventions for children exposed to domestic violence should include helping their mothers achieve coherent ways of thinking about their own childhood experiences, including past trauma. PMID:20931412

  3. Alcohol lowers the vasoconstriction threshold in humans without affecting core cooling rate during mild cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C E; Bristow, G K; Elias, D A; Giesbrecht, G G

    1996-01-01

    Elevated blood alcohol levels are often seen in hypothermia and hyperthermia related deaths, leading to the belief that alcohol renders humans poikilothermic. We examined the core temperature (Tco) thresholds for sweating, vasoconstriction and shivering as well as core cooling rates of seven subjects immersed in 28 degrees C water. On two separate days, subjects exercised on an underwater cycle ergometer to elevate Tco above the sweating threshold. They then rested and cooled until they shivered vigorously. Subjects drank orange juice (7 ml.kg-1) prior to immersion during the control trial and 1 ml.kg-1 absolute ethanol, added to orange juice in a 1:6 ratio, during the alcohol trial. Mean blood alcohol concentration (breath analysis) was 0.097 +/- 0.010 g% at the start of cooling and 0.077 +/- 0.008 g% at the end of the cooling period. Alcohol lowered the vasoconstriction threshold by 0.32 +/- 0.2 degrees C and elevated finger tip blood flow, but had no effect on thresholds for sweating and shivering or core cooling rate. Considering these minor effects it is unlikely that moderate alcohol consumption predisposes individuals to hypothermia or hyperthermia via impaired thermoregulation, but rather likely due to behavioral factors. PMID:8897037

  4. Mechanical properties of methacrylate-based model dentin adhesives: effect of loading rate and moisture exposure.

    PubMed

    Singh, Viraj; Misra, Anil; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Ye, Qiang; Park, Jonggu; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanical behavior of model methacrylate-based dentin adhesives under conditions that simulate the wet oral environment. A series of monotonic and creep experiments were performed on rectangular beam samples of dentin adhesive in three-point bending configuration under different moisture conditions. The monotonic test results show a significant effect of loading rate on the failure strength and the linear limit (yield point) of the stress-strain response. In addition, these tests show that the failure strength is low, and the failure occurs at a smaller deformation when the test is performed under continuously changing moisture conditions. The creep test results show that under constant moisture conditions, the model dentin adhesives can have a viscoelastic response under certain low loading levels. However, when the moisture conditions vary under the same low loading levels, the dentin adhesives have an anomalous creep response accompanied by large secondary creep and high strain accumulation. PMID:23744598

  5. Prolonged Adaptation to a Low or High Protein Diet Does Not Modulate Basal Muscle Protein Synthesis Rates – A Substudy

    PubMed Central

    Hursel, Rick; Martens, Eveline A. P.; Gonnissen, Hanne K. J.; Hamer, Henrike M.; Senden, Joan M. G.; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Based on controlled 36 h experiments a higher dietary protein intake causes a positive protein balance and a negative fat balance. A positive net protein balance may support fat free mass accrual. However, few data are available on the impact of more prolonged changes in habitual protein intake on whole-body protein metabolism and basal muscle protein synthesis rates. Objective To assess changes in whole-body protein turnover and basal muscle protein synthesis rates following 12 weeks of adaptation to a low versus high dietary protein intake. Methods A randomized parallel study was performed in 40 subjects who followed either a high protein (2.4 g protein/kg/d) or low protein (0.4 g protein/kg/d) energy-balanced diet (30/35/35% or 5/60/35% energy from protein/carbohydrate/fat) for a period of 12 weeks. A subgroup of 7 men and 8 women (body mass index: 22.8±2.3 kg/m2, age: 24.3±4.9 y) were selected to evaluate the impact of prolonged adaptation to either a high or low protein intake on whole body protein metabolism and basal muscle protein synthesis rates. After the diet, subjects received continuous infusions with L-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine and L-[ring-2H2]tyrosine in an overnight fasted state, with blood samples and muscle biopsies being collected to assess post-absorptive whole-body protein turnover and muscle protein synthesis rates in vivo in humans. Results After 12 weeks of intervention, whole-body protein balance in the fasted state was more negative in the high protein treatment when compared with the low protein treatment (-4.1±0.5 vs -2.7±0.6 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;P<0.001). Whole-body protein breakdown (43.0±4.4 vs 37.8±3.8 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;P<0.03), synthesis (38.9±4.2 vs 35.1±3.6 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;P<0.01) and phenylalanine hydroxylation rates (4.1±0.6 vs 2.7±0.6 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;P<0.001) were significantly higher in the high vs low protein group. Basal muscle protein synthesis rates were maintained on a low

  6. Long-term exposure of proximal tubular epithelial cells to glucose induces transforming growth factor-beta 1 synthesis via an autocrine PDGF loop.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Donald; Brunskill, Nigel; Ito, Takafumi; Phillips, Aled

    2003-12-01

    We have recently reported increased transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 gene transcription in proximal tubular cells within 12 hours of exposure to 25 mmol/L D-glucose, with a requirement for a second stimulus such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to increase its translation in short-term experiments. In the current study we investigated the effect on TGF-beta 1 production of prolonged exposure of proximal tubular cells to high glucose concentrations. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of cell culture supernatant showed significant increase in latent TGF-beta 1 only after 7 days exposure to high glucose. Radiolabeling of glucose-stimulated cells with (3)H amino acids and subsequent immunoprecipitation of TGF-beta 1 demonstrated de novo synthesis from day 5 of high glucose exposure onwards. Similarly, polysome analysis showed enhanced translation of TGF-beta mRNA after 4 or more days of high glucose exposure. TGF-beta 1 synthesis, following addition of glucose, was inhibited by blockade of the PDGF-alpha receptor subunit. Glucose did not alter PDGF expression, nor expression of PDGF alpha-receptors. Activation of the receptor following addition of 25 mm D-glucose could be demonstrated suggesting increased sensitivity to endogenous PDGF. Exposure to glucose activated p38MAP kinase, and inhibition of this activation abrogated both glucose induced TGF-beta 1 transcriptional activation and TGF-beta 1 synthesis. Inhibition of p38MAP kinase did not influence the effect of exogenous PDGF when cells were stimulated sequentially by glucose and PDGF. We postulate that glucose induces an early increase in TGF-beta 1 transcription via activation of p38MAP kinase. In addition, glucose causes a late increase in PDGF-dependent TGF-beta 1 translation by enhancing cellular sensitivity to PDGF. This provides a potential explanation for the clinical observation that prolonged poor glycemic control may contribute to progression of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:14633628

  7. Knickpoint retreat rates from cosmogenic 10Be; 30 exposure ages from western Scotland with implications for paraglacial bedrock incision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, J. D.; Fabel, D.; Codilean, A. T.; Bishop, P.; Hoey, Tb; Schnabel, C.; Xu, S.

    2009-04-01

    When a bedrock river is perturbed by accelerating rock uplift the perturbation is not transmitted instantaneously to the whole landscape; the new base level information must first spread through the channel network to hillslopes. Under detachment-limited conditions the new base level information is spread via knickpoint retreat, the rate of which ultimately governs response times to perturbation and therefore landscape evolution. Yet, owing to difficulties with measuring rates of erosional processes, knickpoint retreat rates are not widely documented. We examine bedrock river response to rapid, continuous rock uplift due to glacio-isostatic rebound following retreat of the Late Devensian icesheet from northern Britain. From four rivers in western Scotland, we infer knickpoint retreat rates from 30 measurements of cosmogenic 10Be concentrations on abandoned, fluvially-sculpted bedrock surfaces downstream of Holocene knickpoints. These data are among the first direct evidence that terrace exposure ages increase downstream consistent with the progressive abandonment of bedrock surfaces in the wake of a retreating knickpoint. We reflect upon our results in the context of paraglacial conditions that we infer to have involved initially high sediment flux declining over the Holocene. A simple unit stream power model is used to demonstrate how knickpoints affect erosional capacity along transient reaches. Bedrock channel width is insensitive to substrate erodibility, but we document here a sharp reduction in channel width at knickpoints, which is largely responsible for up to order-of-magnitude increases in stream power per unit area of the channel bed. The high rates of bedrock river incision that we document for postorogenic western Scotland are comparable to those reported for landside-dominated mountain belts. However, rather than stemming from towering relief or high-magnitude rock uplift, these rapid erosion rates seem to be the product of high sediment flux

  8. Continuous multigram nanoparticle synthesis by high-power, high-repetition-rate ultrafast laser ablation in liquids.

    PubMed

    Streubel, René; Barcikowski, Stephan; Gökce, Bilal

    2016-04-01

    Utilizing a novel laser system consisting of a 500 W, 10 MHz, 3 ps laser source which is fully synchronized with a polygon scanner reaching scanning speeds up to 500 m/s, we explore the possibilities to increase the productivity of nanoparticle synthesis by laser ablation in liquids. By exploiting the high scanning speed, laser-induced cavitation bubbles are spatially bypassed at high repetition rates and continuous multigram ablation rates up to 4 g/h are demonstrated for platinum, gold, silver, aluminum, copper, and titanium. Furthermore, the applicable, ablation-effective repetition rate is increased by two orders of magnitude. The ultrafast ablation mechanisms are investigated for different laser fluences, repetition rates, interpulse distances, and ablation times, while the resulting trends are successfully described by validating a model developed for ultrafast laser ablation in air to hold in liquids as well. PMID:27192268

  9. Brown meagre vocalization rate increases during repetitive boat noise exposures: a possible case of vocal compensation.

    PubMed

    Picciulin, Marta; Sebastianutto, Linda; Codarin, Antonio; Calcagno, Giuliana; Ferrero, Enrico A

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated whether or not boat noise causes variations in brown meagre (Sciaena umbra) vocalizations recorded in a nearshore Mediterranean marine reserve. Six nocturnal experimental sessions were carried out from June to September 2009. In each of them, a recreational boat passed over vocalizing fish 6 times with 1 boat passage every 10 min. For this purpose three different boats were used in random order: an 8.5-m cabin-cruiser (CC), a 5-m fiberglass boat (FB), and a 7-m inflatable boat (INF). In situ continuous acoustic recordings were collected using a self-standing sonobuoy. Because boat noise levels largely exceeded both background noise and S. umbra vocalizations in the species' hearing frequency range, masking of acoustic communication was assumed. Although no immediate effect was observed during a single boat passage, the S. umbra mean pulse rate increased over multiple boat passages in the experimental condition but not in the control condition, excluding that the observed effect was due to a natural rise in fish vocalizations. The observed vocal enhancement may result either from an increased density of callers or from an increased number of pulses/sounds produced by already acoustically active individuals, as a form of vocal compensation. These two explanations are discussed. PMID:23145597

  10. Dietary mercury exposure causes decreased escape takeoff flight performance and increased molt rate in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Carlson, Jenna R; Cristol, Daniel; Swaddle, John P

    2014-10-01

    Mercury is a widespread and persistent environmental contaminant that occurs in aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Recently, songbirds that forage from primarily terrestrial sources have shown evidence of bioaccumulation of mercury, but little research has assessed the effects of mercury on their health and fitness. There are many indications that mercury negatively affects neurological functioning, bioenergetics, and behavior through a variety of mechanisms and in a wide array of avian taxa. Effective flight is crucial to avian fitness and feather molt is an energetically expensive life history trait. Therefore, we investigated whether mercury exposure influenced flight performance and molt in a common songbird, the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Specifically, we dosed the diet of captive starlings with methylmercury cysteine at 0.0, 0.75, or 1.5 μg/g wet weight and recorded changes in flight performance after 1 year of dietary mercury exposure. We also recorded the annual molt of wing feathers. We found that individuals dosed with mercury exhibited decreased escape takeoff flight performance compared with controls and blood mercury was also correlated with an increased rate of molt, which can reduce flight performance and thermoregulatory ability. This study reveals two novel endpoints, flight performance and molt, that may be affected by dietary mercury exposure. These findings suggest a potential impact on wild songbirds exposed to mercury levels comparable to the high dosage levels in the present study. Any decrease in flight efficiency could reduce fitness due to a direct impact on survival during predation events or by decreased efficiency in other critical activities (such as foraging or migration) that require efficient flight. PMID:25030113