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Sample records for expressing hiv antigens

  1. EXPRESSION SYSTEM-DEPENDENT MODULATION OF HIV-1 ENVELOPE GLYCOPROTEIN ANTIGENICITY AND IMMUNOGENICITY

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Leopold; Sheppard, Neil C.; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B.E.; Robson, Cynthia L.; Chen, Hongying; Xu, Xiaodong; Krashias, George; Bonomelli, Camille; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Kwong, Peter D.; Jeffs, Simon A.; Jones, Ian M.; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant expression systems differ in the type of glycosylation they impart on expressed antigens such as the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins, potentially affecting their biological properties. We performed head-to-head antigenic, immunogenic and molecular profiling of two distantly-related Env surface (gp120) antigens produced in different systems: a) mammalian (293F) cells in the presence of kifunensine which impart only high mannose glycans; b) insect (Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9) cells, which confer mainly paucimannosidic glycans; c) Sf9 cells recombinant for mammalian glycosylation enzymes (Sf9 Mimic™), which impart high mannose, hybrid and complex glycans without sialic acid; d) 293F cells, which impart high mannose, hybrid and complex glycans with sialic acid. Molecular models revealed a significant difference in gp120 glycan coverage between the Sf9- and wild-type mammalian cell-derived material that is predicted to impact upon ligand binding sites proximal to glycans. Modelling of solvent-exposed surface electrostatic potentials showed that sialic acid imparts a significant negative surface charge that may influence gp120 antigenicity and immunogenicity. Gp120 expressed in systems that do not incorporate sialic acid displayed increased ligand binding to the CD4-binding and CD4–induced sites compared to those expressed in the system that does, and imparted other more subtle differences in antigenicity in a gp120 subtype-specific manner. Non-sialic acid-containing gp120 was significantly more immunogenic than the sialyated version when administered in two different adjuvants, and induced higher titres of antibodies competing for CD4 binding site ligand-gp120 interaction. These findings suggest that non-sialic acid imparting systems yield gp120 immunogens with modified antigenic and immunogenic properties, considerations which should be considered when selecting expression systems for glycosylated antigens to be used

  2. Modified vaccinia Ankara expressing HIVA antigen stimulates HIV-1-specific CD8 T cells in ELISpot assays of HIV-1 exposed infants☆

    PubMed Central

    Slyker, Jennifer A.; Lohman, Barbara L.; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy A.; Reilly, Marie; Wee, Edmund G.-T.; Dong, Tao; McMichael, Andrew J.; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.; Hanke, Tomas; John-Stewart, Grace

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing HIV-1 antigens (MVA.HIVA) was used in ELISpot assays to monitor HIV-1-specific T cell responses in infants. Responses to MVA.HIVA and HIV-1 peptides were examined in 13 infected and 81 exposed uninfected infants in Nairobi, Kenya. Responses to MVA.HIVA (38%) and peptide stimulation (38%) were similar in frequency (p = 1.0) and magnitude (mean 176 versus 385 HIVSFU/106, p = 0.96) in HIV-1 infected infants. In exposed uninfected infants, MVA.HIVA detected more positive responses and higher magnitude responses as compared to peptide. MVA.HIVA ELISpot is a sensitive method for quantification of HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cell responses in HIV-1 exposed infants. These results demonstrate the relevance of HIV-1 clade A consensus-derived immunogen HIVA for the viruses currently circulating in Nairobi. PMID:16043269

  3. The use of directed evolution to create a stable and immunogenic recombinant BCG expressing a modified HIV-1 Gag antigen.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Rosamund; Bourn, William R; Shephard, Enid; Stutz, Helen; Douglass, Nicola; Mgwebi, Thandi; Meyers, Ann; Chin'ombe, Nyasha; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2014-01-01

    Numerous features make Mycobacterium bovis BCG an attractive vaccine vector for HIV. It has a good safety profile, it elicits long-lasting cellular immune responses and in addition manufacturing costs are affordable. Despite these advantages it is often difficult to express viral antigens in BCG, which results in genetic instability and low immunogenicity. The aim of this study was to generate stable recombinant BCG (rBCG) that express high levels of HIV antigens, by modification of the HIV genes. A directed evolution process was applied to recombinant mycobacteria that expressed HIV-1 Gag fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Higher growth rates and increased GFP expression were selected for. Through this process a modified Gag antigen was selected. Recombinant BCG that expressed the modified Gag (BCG[pWB106] and BCG[pWB206]) were more stable, produced higher levels of antigen and grew faster than those that expressed the unmodified Gag (BCG[pWB105]). The recombinant BCG that expressed the modified HIV-1 Gag induced 2 to 3 fold higher levels of Gag-specific CD4 T cells than those expressing the unmodified Gag (BCG[pWB105]). Mice primed with 10(7) CFU BCG[pWB206] and then boosted with MVA-Gag developed Gag-specific CD8 T cells with a frequency of 1343±17 SFU/10(6) splenocytes, 16 fold greater than the response induced with MVA-Gag alone. Levels of Gag-specific CD4 T cells were approximately 5 fold higher in mice primed with BCG[pWB206] and boosted with MVA-Gag than in those receiving the MVA-Gag boost alone. In addition mice vaccinated with BCG[pWB206] were protected from a surrogate vaccinia virus challenge. PMID:25061753

  4. Mucosal Blood Group Antigen Expression Profiles and HIV Infections: A Study among Female Sex Workers in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Chanzu, Nadia Musimbi; Mwanda, Walter; Oyugi, Julius; Anzala, Omu

    2015-01-01

    Background The ABO blood group antigens are carbohydrate moieties expressed on human red blood cells however; these antigens can also be expressed on some other cells particularly the surface of epithelial cells and may be found in mucosal secretions. In many human populations 80% secrete ABO antigens (termed ‘secretors’) while 20% do not (termed ‘non-secretors’). Furthermore, there are disease conditions that are associated with secretor status. Objective To investigate correlations between secretor status and HIV infection among female sex workers in Nairobi, Kenya. Methodology This cross-sectional study recruited 280 female sex workers aged 18–65 years from the Pumwani Majengo cohort, Kenya. Blood typing was determined by serological techniques using monoclonal antibodies to the ABO blood group antigens. Secretor phenotyping was determined using anti-H specific lectins specific to salivary, vaginal and cervical blood group H antigen using the agglutination inhibition technique and correlated to individual HIV sero-status. Participants were additionally screened for Bacterial vaginosis, Neisseria gonorrhoea and Trichomonas vaginalis. Results Out of the 280 participants, 212 (75.7%) were secretors and 68 (24.3%) were non-secretors. The incidence of all infections: HIV, Bacterial vaginosis, Neisseria gonorrhoea and Trichomonas vaginalis was higher among secretors compared to non-secretors. However, this difference was only statistically significant for HIV infection incidence rates: HIV infected secretors (83.7%) versus HIV un-infected secretors (71.8%) (p = 0.029) Based on ABO phenotype stratification, the incidence of HIV infection was higher among blood group A secretors (26/52 = 50%), in comparison to B (12/39 = 33.3%: p = 0.066), AB (3/9 = 33.3%: p = 0.355), and O secretors (36/112 = 32.1%: p = 0.028). Conclusion This is the first report to document the variable expression of the ABH blood group antigens profiling secretor and non-secretor phenotypes

  5. Live attenuated rubella vectors expressing SIV and HIV vaccine antigens replicate and elicit durable immune responses in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Live attenuated viruses are among our most potent and effective vaccines. For human immunodeficiency virus, however, a live attenuated strain could present substantial safety concerns. We have used the live attenuated rubella vaccine strain RA27/3 as a vector to express SIV and HIV vaccine antigens because its safety and immunogenicity have been demonstrated in millions of children. One dose protects for life against rubella infection. In previous studies, rubella vectors replicated to high titers in cell culture while stably expressing SIV and HIV antigens. Their viability in vivo, however, as well as immunogenicity and antibody persistence, were unknown. Results This paper reports the first successful trial of rubella vectors in rhesus macaques, in combination with DNA vaccines in a prime and boost strategy. The vectors grew robustly in vivo, and the protein inserts were highly immunogenic. Antibody titers elicited by the SIV Gag vector were greater than or equal to those elicited by natural SIV infection. The antibodies were long lasting, and they were boosted by a second dose of replication-competent rubella vectors given six months later, indicating the induction of memory B cells. Conclusions Rubella vectors can serve as a vaccine platform for safe delivery and expression of SIV and HIV antigens. By presenting these antigens in the context of an acute infection, at a high level and for a prolonged duration, these vectors can stimulate a strong and persistent immune response, including maturation of memory B cells. Rhesus macaques will provide an ideal animal model for demonstrating immunogenicity of novel vectors and protection against SIV or SHIV challenge. PMID:24041113

  6. Programmed death-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells is shaped by epitope specificity, T-cell receptor clonotype usage and antigen load

    PubMed Central

    Kløverpris, Henrik N.; McGregor, Reuben; McLaren, James E.; Ladell, Kristin; Stryhn, Anette; Koofhethile, Catherine; Brener, Jacqui; Chen, Fabian; Riddell, Lynn; Graziano, Luzzi; Klenerman, Paul; Leslie, Alasdair; Buus, Søren; Price, David A.; Goulder, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Although CD8+ T cells play a critical role in the control of HIV-1 infection, their antiviral efficacy can be limited by antigenic variation and immune exhaustion. The latter phenomenon is characterized by the upregulation of multiple inhibitory receptors, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1), CD244 and lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3), which modulate the functional capabilities of CD8+ T cells. Design and methods: Here, we used an array of different human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B∗15 : 03 and HLA-B∗42 : 01 tetramers to characterize inhibitory receptor expression as a function of differentiation on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations (n = 128) spanning 11 different epitope targets. Results: Expression levels of PD-1, but not CD244 or LAG-3, varied substantially across epitope specificities both within and between individuals. Differential expression of PD-1 on T-cell receptor (TCR) clonotypes within individual HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations was also apparent, independent of clonal dominance hierarchies. Positive correlations were detected between PD-1 expression and plasma viral load, which were reinforced by stratification for epitope sequence stability and dictated by effector memory CD8+ T cells. Conclusion: Collectively, these data suggest that PD-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells tracks antigen load at the level of epitope specificity and TCR clonotype usage. These findings are important because they provide evidence that PD-1 expression levels are influenced by peptide/HLA class I antigen exposure. PMID:24906112

  7. Efficient expression of nuclear transgenes in the green alga Chlamydomonas: synthesis of an HIV antigen and development of a new selectable marker.

    PubMed

    Barahimipour, Rouhollah; Neupert, Juliane; Bock, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has become an invaluable model system in plant biology. There is also considerable interest in developing this microalga into an efficient production platform for biofuels, pharmaceuticals, green chemicals and industrial enzymes. However, the production of foreign proteins in the nucleocytosolic compartment of Chlamydomonas is greatly hampered by the inefficiency of transgene expression from the nuclear genome. We have recently addressed this limitation by isolating mutant algal strains that permit high-level transgene expression and by determining the contributions of GC content and codon usage to gene expression efficiency. Here we have applied these new tools and explored the potential of Chlamydomonas to produce a recombinant biopharmaceutical, the HIV antigen P24. We show that a codon-optimized P24 gene variant introduced into our algal expression strains give rise to recombinant protein accumulation levels of up to 0.25% of the total cellular protein. Moreover, in combination with an expression strain, a resynthesized nptII gene becomes a highly efficient selectable marker gene that facilitates the selection of transgenic algal clones at high frequency. By establishing simple principles of successful transgene expression, our data open up new possibilities for biotechnological research in Chlamydomonas. PMID:26747175

  8. Antigenic Properties of the HIV Envelope on Virions in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Mengistu, Meron; Lewis, George K.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    The structural flexibility found in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoproteins creates a complex relationship between antigenicity and sensitivity to antiviral antibodies. The study of this issue in the context of viral particles is particularly problematic as conventional virus capture approaches can perturb antigenicity profiles. Here, we employed a unique analytical system based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which measures antibody-virion binding with all reactants continuously in solution. Panels of nine anti-envelope monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and five virus types were used to connect antibody binding profiles with neutralizing activities. Anti-gp120 MAbs against the 2G12 or b12 epitope, which marks functional envelope structures, neutralized viruses expressing CCR5-tropic envelopes and exhibited efficient virion binding in solution. MAbs against CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes considered hidden on functional envelope structures poorly bound these viruses and were not neutralizing. Anti-gp41 MAb 2F5 was neutralizing despite limited virion binding. Similar antigenicity patterns occurred on CXCR4-tropic viruses, except that anti-CD4i MAbs 17b and 19e were neutralizing despite little or no virion binding. Notably, anti-gp120 MAb PG9 and anti-gp41 MAb F240 bound to both CCR5-tropic and CXCR4-tropic viruses without exerting neutralizing activity. Differences in the virus production system altered the binding efficiencies of some antibodies but did not enhance antigenicity of aberrant gp120 structures. Of all viruses tested, only JRFL pseudoviruses showed a direct relationship between MAb binding efficiency and neutralizing potency. Collectively, these data indicate that the antigenic profiles of free HIV particles generally favor the exposure of functional over aberrant gp120 structures. However, the efficiency of virion-antibody interactions in solution inconsistently predicts neutralizing activity in vitro. PMID:24284318

  9. Oral Immunization with a Recombinant Lactococcus lactis-Expressing HIV-1 Antigen on Group A Streptococcus Pilus Induces Strong Mucosal Immunity in the Gut.

    PubMed

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Jones, Andrew; Quigley, Bernard R; Scott, June R; Amara, Rama Rao

    2015-11-15

    The induction of a potent humoral and cellular immune response in mucosal tissue is important for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. Most of the current HIV vaccines under development use the i.m. route for immunization, which is relatively poor in generating potent and long-lived mucosal immune responses. In this article, we explore the ability of an oral vaccination with a probiotic organism, Lactococcus lactis, to elicit HIV-specific immune responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments of BALB/c mice. We expressed the HIV-1 Gag-p24 on the tip of the T3 pilus of Streptococcus pyogenes as a fusion to the Cpa protein (LL-Gag). After four monthly LL-Gag oral immunizations, we observed strong Gag-specific IgG and IgA responses in serum, feces, and vaginal secretions. However, the Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses in the blood were at or below our detection limit. After an i.m. modified vaccinia Ankara/Gag boost, we observed robust Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses both in systemic and in mucosal tissues, including intraepithelial and lamina propria lymphocytes of the small intestine, Peyer's patches, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Consistent with strong immunogenicity, the LL-Gag induced activation of CD11c(+) CD11b(+) dendritic cells in the Peyer's patches after oral immunization. Our results demonstrate that oral immunization with L. lactis expressing an Ag on the tip of the group A Streptococcus pilus serves as an excellent vaccine platform to induce strong mucosal humoral and cellular immunity against HIV. PMID:26482408

  10. Inexpensive Designer Antigen for Anti-HIV Antibody Detection with High Sensitivity and Specificity ▿

    PubMed Central

    Talha, Sheikh M.; Salminen, Teppo; Chugh, Deepti A.; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam; Soukka, Tero; Pettersson, Kim; Khanna, Navin

    2010-01-01

    A novel recombinant multiepitope protein (MEP) has been designed that consists of four linear, immunodominant, and phylogenetically conserved epitopes, taken from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-encoded antigens that are used in many third-generation immunoassay kits. This HIV-MEP has been evaluated for its diagnostic potential in the detection of anti-HIV antibodies in human sera. A synthetic MEP gene encoding these epitopes, joined by flexible peptide linkers in a single open reading frame, was designed and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant HIV-MEP was purified using a single affinity step, yielding >20 mg pure protein/liter culture, and used as the coating antigen in an in-house immunoassay. Bound anti-HIV antibodies were detected by highly sensitive time-resolved fluorometry, using europium(III) chelate-labeled anti-human antibody. The sensitivity and specificity of the HIV-MEP were evaluated using Boston Biomedica worldwide HIV performance, HIV seroconversion, and viral coinfection panels and were found to be comparable with those of commercially available anti-HIV enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kits. The careful choice of epitopes, high epitope density, and an E. coli-based expression system, coupled with a simple purification protocol and the use of europium(III) chelate-labeled tracer, provide the capability for the development of an inexpensive diagnostic test with high degrees of sensitivity and specificity. PMID:20089793

  11. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Vela Ramirez, J.E.; Roychoudhury, R.; Habte, H.H.; Cho, M. W.; Pohl, N. L. B.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells, and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by dendritic cells. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and antigen presenting cells and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  12. Cell surface antigens and function of monocytes and a monocyte-like cell line before and after infection with HIV.

    PubMed

    Mann, D L; Gartner, S; LeSane, F; Blattner, W A; Popovic, M

    1990-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) preferentially infects cells that express the CD4 molecule, including monocytes and cells of the monocyte lineage. The monocyte-like cell line U937 and monocytes isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were infected with HIV-1. Cell surface antigen expression was determined in infected and noninfected cells as was the ability to stimulate in mixed lymphocyte reaction. The CD4 antigen decreased in infected cells U937 and PBL monocytes. MHC class II antigens HLA-DR, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DP increased in HIV-1 infected U937 cells. In infected PBL-derived monocytes, HLA-DR increased, HLA-DQ decreased, and HLA-DP was unchanged. Infected U937 and PBL monocytes were capable of stimulating allogeneic lymphocytes, thus demonstrating retention of the alloantigen presentation function of HIV-1-infected monocytes. PMID:1967231

  13. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Vela Ramirez, J E; Roychoudhury, R; Habte, H H; Cho, M W; Pohl, N L B; Narasimhan, B

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by DCs. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and APCs and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  14. Immune complexes that contain HIV antigens activate peripheral blood T cells.

    PubMed

    Korolevskaya, L B; Shmagel, K V; Saidakova, E V; Shmagel, N G; Chereshnev, V A

    2016-07-01

    Uninfected donor T cells were treated in vitro by model immune complexes that contained either HIV or hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens. Unlike HCV antigen-containing complexes, the immune complexes that contained HIV antigens have been shown to activate peripheral blood T cells of uninfected donors under in vitro conditions. Both the antiviral antibodies and HIV antigen were involved in the activation process. The unique properties of the immune complexes formed by HIV antigens and antiviral antibodies are believed to result from the virus-specific antibody properties and molecular conformation of the antigen-antibody complex. PMID:27595830

  15. Vertebrate Cells Express Protozoan Antigen after Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Mark St. J.; Dvorak, James A.

    1980-04-01

    Epimastigotes, the invertebrate host stage of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite causing Chagas' disease in man, were fused with vertebrate cells by using polyethylene glycol. Hybrid cells were selected on the basis of T. cruzi DNA complementation of biochemical deficiencies in the vertebrate cells. Some clones of the hybrid cells expressed T. cruzi-specific antigen. It might be possible to use selected antigens obtained from the hybrids as vaccines for immunodiagnosis or for elucidation of the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease.

  16. Chronic HIV Infection Enhances the Responsiveness of Antigen Presenting Cells to Commensal Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Lauren H.; Grishina, Irina; Macal, Monica; Hirao, Lauren A.; Hu, William K.; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Gaulke, Christopher A.; Pollard, Richard; Brown, Jennifer; Suni, Maria; Baumler, Andreas J.; Ghanekar, Smita; Marco, Maria L.; Dandekar, Satya

    2013-01-01

    Chronic immune activation despite long-term therapy poses an obstacle to immune recovery in HIV infection. The role of antigen presenting cells (APCs) in chronic immune activation during HIV infection remains to be fully determined. APCs, the frontline of immune defense against pathogens, are capable of distinguishing between pathogens and non-pathogenic, commensal bacteria. We hypothesized that HIV infection induces dysfunction in APC immune recognition and response to some commensal bacteria and that this may promote chronic immune activation. Therefore we examined APC inflammatory cytokine responses to commensal lactobacilli. We found that APCs from HIV-infected patients produced an enhanced inflammatory response to Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 as compared to APCs from healthy, HIV-negative controls. Increased APC expression of TLR2 and CD36, signaling through p38-MAPK, and decreased expression of MAP kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in HIV infection was associated with this heightened immune response. Our findings suggest that chronic HIV infection enhances the responsiveness of APCs to commensal lactobacilli, a mechanism that may partly contribute to chronic immune activation. PMID:24023646

  17. Evaluation of the siemens HIV antigen-antibody immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Vallefuoco, Luca; Aden Abdi, Fatima; Sorrentino, Rosanna; Spalletti-Cernia, Daniela; Mazzarella, Claudia; Barbato, Sara; Perna, Enzo; Buffolano, Wilma; Di Nicuolo, Giuseppe; Portella, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Fourth-generation assays for the simultaneous detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigen and antibodies are available on the international market and are currently used for blood donor screening and for HIV diagnosis. In this study we evaluated the performance of the novel automated fourth-generation ADVIA Centaur® HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay. The assay detected seroconversion at the same bleed or at least one bleed earlier in panels with respect to other assays and showed a detection efficacy equal to those of other assays in a low-titer panel. Samples obtained from blood donors (n = 2,778) or from HIV-positive patients (HIV-1 B subtype, n = 82; non-B subtype, n = 71) were also tested, showing a good correlation with other fourth-generation assays. We assessed the performance of 3 fourth-generation assays for detecting in utero transmitted anti-HIV antibodies and found a more specific detection efficiency with the ADVIA Centaur HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay compared to the other fourth-generation assays. PMID:24557036

  18. Dendritic cells cross-present HIV antigens from live as well as apoptotic infected CD4+ T lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marañón, Concepción; Desoutter, Jean-François; Hoeffel, Guillaume; Cohen, William; Hanau, Daniel; Hosmalin, Anne

    2004-04-01

    A better understanding of the antigen presentation pathways that lead to CD8+ T cell recognition of HIV epitopes in vivo is needed to achieve better immune control of HIV replication. Here, we show that cross-presentation of very small amounts of HIV proteins from apoptotic infected CD4+ T lymphocytes by dendritic cells to CD8+ T cells is much more efficient than other known HIV presentation pathways, i.e., direct presentation of infectious virus or cross-presentation of defective virus. Unexpectedly, dendritic cells also take up actively antigens into endosomes from live infected CD4+ T lymphocytes and cross-present them as efficiently as antigens derived from apoptotic infected cells. Moreover, live infected CD4+ T cells costimulate cross-presenting dendritic cells in the process. Therefore, dendritic cells can present very small amounts of viral proteins from infected T cells either after apoptosis, which is frequent during HIV infection, or not. Thus, if HIV expression is transiently induced while costimulation is enhanced (for instance after IL-2 and IFN immune therapy), this HIV antigen presentation pathway could be exploited to eradicate latently infected reservoirs, which are poorly recognized by patients' immune systems.

  19. Quantitation of CD38 activation antigen expression on CD8+ T cells in HIV-1 infection using CD4 expression on CD4+ T lymphocytes as a biological calibrator.

    PubMed

    Hultin, L E; Matud, J L; Giorgi, J V

    1998-10-01

    For some membrane-associated antigens, the number of molecules expressed per cell carries information about the cell's differentiation and activation state. Quantitating antigen expression by flow cytometry has immediate application in monitoring CD38 expression on CD8+ T cells in human immunodeficiency virus 1-associated disease, where elevated CD38 antigen expression is a marker of CD8+ T-cell activation and a poor prognostic indicator. Reproducible methods are needed in order to quantify such antigens. Here we describe a reproducible method for quantitative fluorescence cytometry (QFCM) that depends on the tightly regulated expression of CD4 antigen on human CD4+ T lymphocytes, which we estimated in a study of 57 normal donors to have an interperson coefficient of variation of 4.9%. Using phycoerythrin (PE)-conjugated CD4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) with a nominal fluorochrome to protein ratio of 1:1 and a nominal published value of approximately 50,000 CD4 antibody molecules bound per CD4+ T lymphocyte, we estimated the number of PE molecules detected per relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) unit on our flow cytometer to be 41 (19, 20). This value is called the "RFI multiplier." To estimate the number of CD38 antibodies bound per CD8+ T cell (CD38-ABC) on patient samples, we multiply the measured CD38 RFI value of CD38 staining using a nominal 1:1 conjugate of CD38-PE by the "RFI multiplier." The measurements for CD4 and CD38 were stable for 2 years despite the use of different mAb lots and the potential for drift in instrumentation. We used this approach in a study of nine flow cytometers in which the interinstrument interlaboratory coefficients of variation for CD3-ABC ranged from 3.3% to 5.8% and those for CD38-ABC ranged from 9.8% to 13.8%. These data indicate that CD4 expression can serve as a biological calibrator to standardize fluorescence intensity measurements in longitudinal and multicenter studies. PMID:9773872

  20. Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines Mediates trans-Infection of HIV-1 from Red Blood Cells to Target Cells and Affects HIV-AIDS Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    He, Weijing; Neil, Stuart; Kulkarni, Hemant; Wright, Edward; Agan, Brian K.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Dolan, Matthew J.; Weiss, Robin A.; Ahuja, Sunil K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) expressed on red blood cells (RBCs) influences plasma levels of HIV-1-suppressive and proinflammatory chemokines such as CCL5/RANTES. DARC is also the RBC receptor for Plasmodium vivax. Africans with DARC −46C/C genotype, which confers a DARC-negative phenotype, are resistant to vivax malaria. Here, we show that HIV-1 attaches to RBCs via DARC, effecting trans-infection of target cells. In African Americans, DARC −46C/C is associated with 40% increase in the odds of acquiring HIV-1. If extrapolated to Africans, ∼11% of the HIV-1 burden in Africa may be linked to this genotype. After infection occurs, however, DARC-negative RBC status is associated with slower disease progression. Furthermore, the disease-accelerating effect of a previously described CCL5 polymorphism is evident only in DARC-expressing and not in DARC-negative HIV-infected individuals. Thus, DARC influences HIV/AIDS susceptibility by mediating trans-infection of HIV-1 and by affecting both chemokine-HIV interactions and chemokine-driven inflammation. PMID:18621010

  1. Fetal Immune Activation to Malaria Antigens Enhances Susceptibility to In Vitro HIV Infection in Cord Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Kevin; Myrie, Latoya; Malhotra, Indu; Mungai, Peter; Muchiri, Eric; Dent, Arlene; King, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    Mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a significant cause of new HIV infections in many countries. To examine whether fetal immune activation as a consequence of prenatal exposure to parasitic antigens increases the risk of MTCT, cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) from Kenyan and North American newborns were examined for relative susceptibility to HIV infection in vitro. Kenyan CBMCs were 3-fold more likely to be infected with HIV than were North American CBMCs (P = .03). Kenyan CBMCs with recall responses to malaria antigens demonstrated enhanced susceptibility to HIV when compared with Kenyan CBMCs lacking recall responses to malaria (P = .03). CD4+ T cells from malaria-sensitized newborns expressed higher levels of CD25 and human leukocyte antigen DR ex vivo, which is consistent with increased immune activation. CD4+ T cells were the primary reservoir of infection at day 4 after virus exposure. Thus, prenatal exposure and in utero priming to malaria may increase the risk of MTCT. PMID:20687848

  2. Fluorescence-linked Antigen Quantification (FLAQ) Assay for Fast Quantification of HIV-1 p24Gag

    PubMed Central

    Gesner, Marianne; Maiti, Mekhala; Grant, Robert; Cavrois, Marielle

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescence-linked antigen quantification (FLAQ) assay allows a fast quantification of HIV-1 p24Gag antigen. Viral supernatant are lysed and incubated with polystyrene microspheres coated with polyclonal antibodies against HIV-1 p24Gag and detector antibodies conjugated to fluorochromes (Figure 1). After washes, the fluorescence of microspheres is measured by flow cytometry and reflects the abundance of the antigen in the lysate. The speed, simplicity, and wide dynamic range of the FLAQ assay are optimum for many applications performed in HIV-1 research laboratories.

  3. Presence of p24-Antigen Associated to Erythrocyte in HIV-Positive Individuals Even in Patients with Undetectable Plasma Viral Load

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Maria Noé; dos Ramos Farias, Maria Sol; Ávila, Maria Mercedes; Rabinovich, Roberto Daniel

    2011-01-01

    , erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen showed viral expression not represented in plasma. Therefore, the determination of erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen may contribute to better understand the kinetics and/or evolution of HIV infection. PMID:21267446

  4. Bicistronic DNA Vaccines Simultaneously Encoding HIV, HSV and HPV Antigens Promote CD8+ T Cell Responses and Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Vinicius C.; Diniz, Mariana O.; Cariri, Francisco A. M. O.; Ventura, Armando M.; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Almeida, Rafael R.; Campos, Marco A.; Lima, Graciela K.; Ferreira, Luís C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Millions of people worldwide are currently infected with human papillomavirus (HPV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). For this enormous contingent of people, the search for preventive and therapeutic immunological approaches represents a hope for the eradication of latent infection and/or virus-associated cancer. To date, attempts to develop vaccines against these viruses have been mainly based on a monovalent concept, in which one or more antigens of a virus are incorporated into a vaccine formulation. In the present report, we designed and tested an immunization strategy based on DNA vaccines that simultaneously encode antigens for HIV, HSV and HPV. With this purpose in mind, we tested two bicistronic DNA vaccines (pIRES I and pIRES II) that encode the HPV-16 oncoprotein E7 and the HIV protein p24 both genetically fused to the HSV-1 gD envelope protein. Mice i.m. immunized with the DNA vaccines mounted antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses, including in vivo cytotoxic responses, against the three antigens. Under experimental conditions, the vaccines conferred protective immunity against challenges with a vaccinia virus expressing the HIV-derived protein Gag, an HSV-1 virus strain and implantation of tumor cells expressing the HPV-16 oncoproteins. Altogether, our results show that the concept of a trivalent HIV, HSV, and HPV vaccine capable to induce CD8+ T cell-dependent responses is feasible and may aid in the development of preventive and/or therapeutic approaches for the control of diseases associated with these viruses. PMID:23951135

  5. SAMHD1 Limits HIV-1 Antigen Presentation by Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bruel, Timothée; Cardinaud, Sylvain; Porrot, Françoise; Prado, Julia G.; Moris, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC) stimulate CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) by presenting endogenous and exogenous viral peptides via major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules. MDDC are poorly susceptible to HIV-1, in part due to the presence of SAMHD1, a cellular enzyme that depletes intracellular deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) and degrades viral RNA. Vpx, an HIV-2/SIVsm protein absent from HIV-1, antagonizes SAMHD1 by inducing its degradation. The impact of SAMHD1 on the adaptive cellular immune response remains poorly characterized. Here, we asked whether SAMHD1 modulates MHC-I-restricted HIV-1 antigen presentation. Untreated MDDC or MDDC pretreated with Vpx were exposed to HIV-1, and antigen presentation was examined by monitoring the activation of an HIV-1 Gag-specific CTL clone. SAMHD1 depletion strongly enhanced productive infection of MDDC as well as endogenous HIV-1 antigen presentation. Time-lapse microscopy analysis demonstrated that in the absence of SAMHD1, the CTL rapidly killed infected MDDC. We also report that various transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV-1 strains poorly infected MDDC and, as a consequence, did not stimulate CTL. Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) pseudotyping of T/F alleviated a block in viral entry and induced antigen presentation only in the absence of SAMHD1. Furthermore, by using another CTL clone that mostly recognizes incoming HIV-1 antigens, we demonstrate that SAMHD1 does not influence exogenous viral antigen presentation. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the antiviral activity of SAMHD1 impacts antigen presentation by DC, highlighting the link that exists between restriction factors and adaptive immune responses. IMPORTANCE Upon viral infection, DC may present antigens derived from incoming viral material in the absence of productive infection of DC or from newly synthesized viral proteins. In the case of HIV, productive infection of DC is blocked at an early

  6. Developmental expression of autoimmune target antigens during organogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Akashi, T; Eishi, Y

    1991-01-01

    A common factor existing among autoimmune target antigens was sought in association with their developmental expression during organogenesis. Autoimmunity against a certain organ was experimentally induced in rats by deliberate immunization with whole tissue extract of the respective organ. Histopathological changes in a target organ of the immunized rats were recorded, and tissue specificity of the raised autoantibodies was immunohistologically examined with tissue sections of normal adult rats. These immune sera were also reacted with tissue sections of a target organ in each stage of organogenesis, and the time of first expression of the target antigen was determined for each immune serum. As a result, induced autoantibodies were directed only to a limited number of tissue antigens, such as thyroid follicular antigens [gestation day 17 (17 GD)], salivary ductal antigens (18 GD), anterior pituitary antigens (21 GD), gastric parietal cell antigens (22 GD), neural myelin antigens (2 days after birth), retinal photo-receptor cell antigens (3 days after birth) and testicular germ cell antigens (4 weeks after birth). They were first expressed on the day indicated in parentheses. Comparing with the development of the immune system, which was monitored by demonstrating CD4- and/or CD8-positive cells in the developing thymus and spleen, a common feature of these potential autoimmune target antigens was found to be that they were expressed either in parallel with, or after, but never before, the development of the immune system. This observation might suggest why only a limited number of self antigens can be autoimmune target antigens among the enormously large number of antigen determinants existing in the whole extract of each organ. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1769700

  7. Clinical evaluation of BioPlex 2200 HIV Ag-Ab, an automated screening method providing discrete detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, HIV-1 antibody, and HIV-2 antibody.

    PubMed

    Salmona, Maud; Delarue, Severine; Delaugerre, Constance; Simon, François; Maylin, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis is essential for optimal therapeutic outcomes in patients infected with HIV. Currently, none of the commercially available fourth-generation assays differentiate HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies (Ab) or the HIV-1 p24 antigen (Ag). The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of a novel assay, the BioPlex 2200 HIV Ag-Ab. This assay uses a multiplex flow immunoassay design allowing the simultaneous detection and identification of antibodies to HIV-1 (groups M and O), HIV-2, and the HIV-1 p24 antigen, in addition to providing a traditional composite result. A total of 1,505 routine serum samples were prospectively tested. Results were compared with those from the Architect HIV Combo assay. The sensitivity of the BioPlex 2200 was 100%. The specificity assessed on repeated false-positive samples was 99.5%. In addition, 524 frozen specimens from patients known to be infected with HIV-1 or HIV-2 were tested. Of these specimens, 420 were infected with HIV-1, including 156 of known genotypes, 86 were infected with HIV-2, 7 were infected with HIV-1 and HIV-2, and 11 were from patients with acute HIV infection. Sensitivity was 100% for the HIV genotypes tested. The differentiation capabilities of the BioPlex 2200 HIV Ag-Ab assay for HIV-1, HIV-2, dual HIV-1/HIV-2, and early infections were 100%, 90.7%, 100%, and 90.9%, respectively. The BioPlex 2200 is a sensitive and specific assay that offers advantages over conventional HIV combo assays, also referred to as fourth-generation assays, to accurately differentiate and report HIV-1 p24 antigen and HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies. PMID:24153130

  8. Stable Expression of Lentiviral Antigens by Quality-Controlled Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vectors.

    PubMed

    Hart, Bryan E; Asrican, Rose; Lim, So-Yon; Sixsmith, Jaimie D; Lukose, Regy; Souther, Sommer J R; Rayasam, Swati D G; Saelens, Joseph W; Chen, Ching-Ju; Seay, Sarah A; Berney-Meyer, Linda; Magtanong, Leslie; Vermeul, Kim; Pajanirassa, Priyadharshini; Jimenez, Amanda E; Ng, Tony W; Tobin, David M; Porcelli, Steven A; Larsen, Michelle H; Schmitz, Joern E; Haynes, Barton F; Jacobs, William R; Lee, Sunhee; Frothingham, Richard

    2015-07-01

    The well-established safety profile of the tuberculosis vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), makes it an attractive vehicle for heterologous expression of antigens from clinically relevant pathogens. However, successful generation of recombinant BCG strains possessing consistent insert expression has encountered challenges in stability. Here, we describe a method for the development of large recombinant BCG accession lots which stably express the lentiviral antigens, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp120 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag, using selectable leucine auxotrophic complementation. Successful establishment of vaccine stability stems from stringent quality control criteria which not only screen for highly stable complemented BCG ΔleuCD transformants but also thoroughly characterize postproduction quality. These parameters include consistent production of correctly sized antigen, retention of sequence-pure plasmid DNA, freeze-thaw recovery, enumeration of CFU, and assessment of cellular aggregates. Importantly, these quality assurance procedures were indicative of overall vaccine stability, were predictive for successful antigen expression in subsequent passaging both in vitro and in vivo, and correlated with induction of immune responses in murine models. This study has yielded a quality-controlled BCG ΔleuCD vaccine expressing HIV gp120 that retained stable full-length expression after 10(24)-fold amplification in vitro and following 60 days of growth in mice. A second vaccine lot expressed full-length SIV Gag for >10(68)-fold amplification in vitro and induced potent antigen-specific T cell populations in vaccinated mice. Production of large, well-defined recombinant BCG ΔleuCD lots can allow confidence that vaccine materials for immunogenicity and protection studies are not negatively affected by instability or differences between freshly grown production batches. PMID:25924766

  9. Stable Expression of Lentiviral Antigens by Quality-Controlled Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Bryan E.; Asrican, Rose; Lim, So-Yon; Sixsmith, Jaimie D.; Lukose, Regy; Souther, Sommer J. R.; Rayasam, Swati D. G.; Saelens, Joseph W.; Chen, Ching-ju; Seay, Sarah A.; Berney-Meyer, Linda; Magtanong, Leslie; Vermeul, Kim; Pajanirassa, Priyadharshini; Jimenez, Amanda E.; Ng, Tony W.; Tobin, David M.; Porcelli, Steven A.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Schmitz, Joern E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Jacobs, William R.; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-01-01

    The well-established safety profile of the tuberculosis vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), makes it an attractive vehicle for heterologous expression of antigens from clinically relevant pathogens. However, successful generation of recombinant BCG strains possessing consistent insert expression has encountered challenges in stability. Here, we describe a method for the development of large recombinant BCG accession lots which stably express the lentiviral antigens, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp120 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag, using selectable leucine auxotrophic complementation. Successful establishment of vaccine stability stems from stringent quality control criteria which not only screen for highly stable complemented BCG ΔleuCD transformants but also thoroughly characterize postproduction quality. These parameters include consistent production of correctly sized antigen, retention of sequence-pure plasmid DNA, freeze-thaw recovery, enumeration of CFU, and assessment of cellular aggregates. Importantly, these quality assurance procedures were indicative of overall vaccine stability, were predictive for successful antigen expression in subsequent passaging both in vitro and in vivo, and correlated with induction of immune responses in murine models. This study has yielded a quality-controlled BCG ΔleuCD vaccine expressing HIV gp120 that retained stable full-length expression after 1024-fold amplification in vitro and following 60 days of growth in mice. A second vaccine lot expressed full-length SIV Gag for >1068-fold amplification in vitro and induced potent antigen-specific T cell populations in vaccinated mice. Production of large, well-defined recombinant BCG ΔleuCD lots can allow confidence that vaccine materials for immunogenicity and protection studies are not negatively affected by instability or differences between freshly grown production batches. PMID:25924766

  10. Expression and immunological characterization of cardamom mosaic virus coat protein displaying HIV gp41 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Damodharan, Subha; Gujar, Ravindra; Pattabiraman, Sathyamurthy; Nesakumar, Manohar; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Vadakkuppattu, Ramanathan D; Usha, Ramakrishnan

    2013-05-01

    The coat protein of cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV), a member of the genus Macluravirus, assembles into virus-like particles when expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. The N and C-termini of the coat protein were engineered with the Kennedy peptide and the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes of gp41 of HIV. The chimeric proteins reacted with sera from HIV positive persons and also stimulated secretion of cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these persons. Thus, a system based on the coat protein of CdMV can be used to display HIV-1 antigens. PMID:23668610

  11. CD40 antigen is expressed by endothelial cells and tumor cells in Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Pammer, J.; Plettenberg, A.; Weninger, W.; Diller, B.; Mildner, M.; Uthman, A.; Issing, W.; Stürzl, M.; Tschachler, E.

    1996-01-01

    The CD40 antigen is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor/nerve growth factor receptor superfamily and is involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Using different monoclonal antibodies, we found CD40 expression by immunohistochemistry on CD31- and CD34-positive Kaposi's sarcoma spindle cells in all tumors of 18 HIV-1 seropositive and 4 HIV-1 seronegative patients. Western blot analysis of tumor lysates detected a 48- to 50-kd glycoprotein corresponding to the CD40 antigen expressed by B lymphocytes. CD40 expression was also detectable in one of four cultures of spindle cells derived from Kaposi sarcoma tissue. Treatment of the CD40-positive spindle cells but not of the CD40-negative ones with interferon-gamma up-regulated CD40 surface expression. Besides on Kaposi sarcoma tumor cells, CD40 was distinctly present on vascular endothelial cells in areas within and adjacent to the tumors and in benign inflammatory lesions such as granulation tissue of HIV-1-negative patients. In contrast, CD34-negative endothelia of thin walled vessels, most likely lymphatics, were predominantly CD40 negative. Only faint or no CD40 expression was found on endothelial cells in normal skin. We conclude from our data that expression of the CD40 antigen by endothelial cells is up-regulated during tissue inflammation. As signaling through CD40 is able to increase cell survival, expression of CD40 by Kaposi sarcoma tumor cells might play an important role in the pathogenesis of this neoplasm. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8623911

  12. Identification, expression, and immunogenicity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded small viral capsid antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, S F; Sun, R; Heston, L; Gradoville, L; Shedd, D; Haglund, K; Rigsby, M; Miller, G

    1997-01-01

    We describe a recombinant antigen for use in serologic tests for antibodies to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). The cDNA for a small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) was identified by immunoscreening of a library prepared from the BC-1 body cavity lymphoma cell line induced into KSHV lytic gene expression by sodium butyrate. The cDNA specified a 170-amino-acid peptide with homology to small viral capsid proteins encoded by the BFRF3 gene of Epstein-Barr virus and the ORF65 gene of herpesvirus saimiri. KSHV sVCA was expressed from a 0.85-kb mRNA present late in lytic KSHV replication in BC-1 cells. This transcript was sensitive to phosphonoacetic acid and phosphonoformic acid, inhibitors of herpesvirus DNA replication. KSHV sVCA expressed in mammalian cells or Escherichia coli or translated in vitro was recognized as an antigen by antisera from KS patients. Rabbit antisera raised to KSHV sVCA expressed in E. coli detected a 22-kDa protein in KSHV-infected human B cells. Overexpressed KSHV sVCA purified from E. coli and used as an antigen in immunoblot screening assay did not cross-react with EBV BFRF3. Antibodies to sVCA were present in 89% of 47 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with KS, in 20% of 54 HIV-positive patients without KS, but in none of 122 other patients including children born to HIV-seropositive mothers and patients with hemophilia, autoimmune disease, or nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Low-titer antibody was detected in three sera from 28 healthy subjects. Antibodies to recombinant sVCA correlate with KS in high-risk populations. Recombinant sVCA can be used to examine the seroepidemiology of infection with KSHV in the general population. PMID:9060668

  13. Antigen Load and Viral Sequence Diversification Determine the Functional Profile of HIV-1–Specific CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Streeck, Hendrik; Brumme, Zabrina L; Anastario, Michael; Cohen, Kristin W; Jolin, Jonathan S; Meier, Angela; Brumme, Chanson J; Rosenberg, Eric S; Alter, Galit; Allen, Todd M; Walker, Bruce D; Altfeld, Marcus

    2008-01-01

    Background Virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes play a key role in the initial reduction of peak viremia during acute viral infections, but display signs of increasing dysfunction and exhaustion under conditions of chronic antigen persistence. It has been suggested that virus-specific CD8+ T cells with a “polyfunctional” profile, defined by the capacity to secrete multiple cytokines or chemokines, are most competent in controlling viral replication in chronic HIV-1 infection. We used HIV-1 infection as a model of chronic persistent viral infection to investigate the process of exhaustion and dysfunction of virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses on the single-epitope level over time, starting in primary HIV-1 infection. Methods and Findings We longitudinally analyzed the polyfunctional epitope-specific CD8+ T cell responses of 18 patients during primary HIV-1 infection before and after therapy initiation or sequence variation in the targeted epitope. Epitope-specific CD8+ T cells responded with multiple effector functions to antigenic stimulation during primary HIV-1 infection, but lost their polyfunctional capacity in response to antigen and up-regulated programmed death 1 (PD-1) expression with persistent viremic infection. This exhausted phenotype significantly decreased upon removal of stimulation by antigen, either in response to antiretroviral therapy or by reduction of epitope-specific antigen load in the presence of ongoing viral replication, as a consequence of in vivo selection of cytotoxic T lymphocyte escape mutations in the respective epitopes. Monofunctionality increased in CD8+ T cell responses directed against conserved epitopes from 49% (95% confidence interval 27%–72%) to 76% (56%–95%) (standard deviation [SD] of the effect size 0.71), while monofunctionality remained stable or slightly decreased for responses directed against escaped epitopes from 61% (47%–75%) to 56% (42%–70%) (SD of the effect size 0.18) (p < 0.05). Conclusion These data

  14. Expression of Plasmodium falciparum surface antigens in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ardeshir, F; Flint, J E; Reese, R T

    1985-01-01

    The asexual blood stages of the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum produce many antigens, only some of which are important for protective immunity. Most of the putative protective antigens are believed to be expressed in schizonts and merozoites, the late stages of the asexual cycle. With the aim of cloning and characterizing genes for important parasite antigens, we used late-stage P. falciparum mRNA to construct a library of cDNA sequences inserted in the Escherichia coli expression vector pUC8. Nine thousand clones from the expression library were immunologically screened in situ with serum from Aotus monkeys immune to P. falciparum, and 95 clones expressing parasite antigens were identified. Mice were immunized with lysates from 49 of the bacterial clones that reacted with Aotus sera, and the mouse sera were tested for their reactivity with parasite antigens by indirect immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and immunoblotting assays. Several different P. falciparum antigens were identified by these assays. Indirect immunofluorescence studies of extracellular merozoites showed that three of these antigens appear to be located on the merozoite surface. Thus, we have identified cDNA clones to three different P. falciparum antigens that may be important in protective immunity. Images PMID:3887406

  15. Expression of Treponema pallidum Antigens in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walfield, Alan M.; Hanff, Philip A.; Lovett, Michael A.

    1982-04-01

    Treponema pallidum DNA was cloned in a bacteriophage. Clones were screened for expression of Treponema pallidum antigens by an in situ radio-immunoassay on nitrocellulose, with the use of subsequent reactions with syphilitic serum and radioiodinated Staphylococcus aureus protein A. One clone, which gave a strong signal, codes for at least seven antigens that react specifically with human antibodies to Treponema pallidum.

  16. HIV-1 Adaptation to Antigen Processing Results in Population-Level Immune Evasion and Affects Subtype Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Tenzer, Stefan; Crawford, Hayley; Pymm, Phillip; Gifford, Robert; Sreenu, Vattipally B.; Weimershaus, Mirjana; de Oliveira, Tulio; Burgevin, Anne; Gerstoft, Jan; Akkad, Nadja; Lunn, Daniel; Fugger, Lars; Bell, John; Schild, Hansjörg; van Endert, Peter; Iversen, Astrid K.N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The recent HIV-1 vaccine failures highlight the need to better understand virus-host interactions. One key question is why CD8+ T cell responses to two HIV-Gag regions are uniquely associated with delayed disease progression only in patients expressing a few rare HLA class I variants when these regions encode epitopes presented by ∼30 more common HLA variants. By combining epitope processing and computational analyses of the two HIV subtypes responsible for ∼60% of worldwide infections, we identified a hitherto unrecognized adaptation to the antigen-processing machinery through substitutions at subtype-specific motifs. Multiple HLA variants presenting epitopes situated next to a given subtype-specific motif drive selection at this subtype-specific position, and epitope abundances correlate inversely with the HLA frequency distribution in affected populations. This adaptation reflects the sum of intrapatient adaptations, is predictable, facilitates viral subtype diversification, and increases global HIV diversity. Because low epitope abundance is associated with infrequent and weak T cell responses, this most likely results in both population-level immune evasion and inadequate responses in most people vaccinated with natural HIV-1 sequence constructs. Our results suggest that artificial sequence modifications at subtype-specific positions in vitro could refocus and reverse the poor immunogenicity of HIV proteins. PMID:24726370

  17. Analysis of Host Gene Expression Profile in HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infected T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Devadas, Krishnakumar; Biswas, Santanu; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Wood, Owen; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Lee, Sherwin; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-01-01

    HIV replication is closely regulated by a complex pathway of host factors, many of them being determinants of cell tropism and host susceptibility to HIV infection. These host factors are known to exert a positive or negative influence on the replication of the two major types of HIV, HIV-1 and HIV-2, thereby modulating virus infectivity, host response to infection and ultimately disease progression profiles characteristic of these two types. Understanding the differential regulation of host cellular factors in response to HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections will help us to understand the apparent differences in rates of disease progression and pathogenesis. This knowledge would aid in the discovery of new biomarkers that may serve as novel targets for therapy and diagnosis. The objective of this study was to determine the differential expression of host genes in response to HIV-1/HIV-2 infection. To achieve this, we analyzed the effects of HIV-1 (MN) and HIV-2 (ROD) infection on the expression of host factors in PBMC at the RNA level using the Agilent Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarray. Differentially expressed genes were identified and their biological functions determined. Host gene expression profiles were significantly changed. Gene expression profiling analysis identified a subset of differentially expressed genes in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected cells. Genes involved in cellular metabolism, apoptosis, immune cell proliferation and activation, cytokines, chemokines, and transcription factors were differentially expressed in HIV-1 infected cells. Relatively few genes were differentially expressed in cells infected with HIV-2. PMID:26821323

  18. HIV-1 Infection of DC: Evidence for the Acquisition of Virus Particles from Infected T Cells by Antigen Uptake Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachari, Narasimhan J.; Alber, Sean; Watkins, Simon C.; Ayyavoo, Velpandi

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal role in transmission and dissemination of HIV-1. Earlier studies reported that DC present at the site of infection trap virus particles via DC-SIGN and transfer the virus to the interacting naïve T cells. This prompted us to ask the question whether DC could acquire virus from infected T cells during DC-T cell interaction. To address this, we investigated the likely transfer of virus from HIV-1 infected T cells to DC and the underlying mechanisms involved. Results indicate that DC acquire virus from infected T cells via antigen uptake mechanism and this results in infection of DC with expression of proteins directed by viral DNA. Further studies with HIV-1 lacking the Env protein also resulted in infection of DC. The use of antibodies against DC-SIGN and DC-SIGN-R ruled out a role for receptor in the infection of DC. Additional data show that DC infection is directly correlated with the ability of DC to take up antigen from infected T cells. Overall, these studies provide evidence to suggest that HIV-1, besides infecting immune cells, also utilizes immunological mechanism(s) to acquire and disseminate virus. PMID:19829715

  19. HIV Susceptibility of human antigen-specific CD4 T cells in AIDS pathogenesis and vaccine response.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haitao; Liu, Fengliang; Kim, Jerome; Ratto-Kim, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    HIV causes infection and progressive depletion of human CD4 T cells. Emerging data have shown that antigen-specific CD4 T-cell subsets manifest differential susceptibility to HIV, potentially leading to pathogen-specific immune failure and opportunistic infections. This concept was recently explored in context of vectors utilized in HIV vaccine trials, and the data suggest that adenovirus type 5(Ad5)-specific CD4 T cells elicited by Ad5-HIV vaccine may be particularly susceptible to HIV, potentially rendering Ad5 vaccine recipients susceptible to HIV acquisition. We here examined recent data regarding the HIV susceptibility of antigen-specific CD4 T cells induced during infection or HIV vaccination and discussed its potential impact on HIV acquisition risk posed by HIV vaccination. PMID:26814372

  20. Murine Monoclonal Antibodies for Antigenic Discrimination of HIV-1 Envelope Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sealy, Robert E.; Jones, Bart G.; Surman, Sherri L.; Branum, Kristen; Howlett, Nanna M.; Flynn, Patricia M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the influenza virus field, antibody reagents from research animals have been instrumental in the characterization of antigenically distinct hemagglutinin and neuraminidase membrane molecules. These small animal reagents continue to support the selection of components for inclusion in human influenza virus vaccines. Other cocktail vaccines against variant pathogens (e.g., polio virus, pneumococcus) are similarly designed to represent variant antigens, as defined by antibody reactivity patterns. However, a vaccine cocktail comprising diverse viral membrane antigens defined in this way has not yet been advanced to a clinical efficacy study in the HIV-1 field. In this study, we describe the preparation of mouse antibodies specific for HIV-1 gp140 or gp120 envelope molecules. Our experiments generated renewable reagents able to discriminate HIV-1 envelopes from one another. Monoclonals yielded more precise discriminatory capacity against their respective immunogens than did a small panel of polyclonal human sera derived from recently HIV-1-infected patients. Perhaps these and other antibody reagents will ultimately support high-throughput cartography studies with which antigenically-distinct envelope immunogens may be formulated into a successful HIV-1 envelope cocktail vaccine. PMID:26544795

  1. Blood Group Antigens C, Lub and P1 May Have a Role in HIV Infection in Africans

    PubMed Central

    Motswaledi, Modisa Sekhamo; Kasvosve, Ishmael; Oguntibeju, Oluwafemi Omoniyi

    2016-01-01

    Background Botswana is among the world’s countries with the highest rates of HIV infection. It is not known whether or not this susceptibility to infection is due to genetic factors in the population. Accumulating evidence, however, points to the role of erythrocytes as potential mediators of infection. We therefore sought to establish the role, if any, of some erythrocyte antigens in HIV infection in a cross-section of the population. Methods 348 (346 HIV-negative and 2 HIV-positive) samples were obtained from the National Blood Transfusion Service as residual samples, while 194 HIV-positive samples were obtained from the Botswana-Harvard HIV Reference Laboratory. Samples were grouped for twenty three antigens. Chi-square or Fischer Exact analyses were used to compare the frequencies of the antigens in the two groups. A stepwise, binary logistic regression was used to study the interaction of the various antigens in the light of HIV-status. Results The Rh antigens C and E were associated with HIV-negative status, while blood group Jka, P1 and Lub were associated with HIV-positive status. A stepwise binary logistic regression analysis yielded group C as the most significant protective blood group while Lub and P1 were associated with significantly higher odds ratio in favor of HIV-infection. The lower-risk-associated group C was significantly lower in Africans compared to published data for Caucasians and might partially explain the difference in susceptibility to HIV-1. Conclusion The most influential antigen C, which also appears to be protective, is significantly lower in Africans than published data for Caucasians or Asians. On the other hand, there appear to be multiple antigens associated with increased risk that may override the protective role of C. A study of the distribution of these antigens in other populations may shed light on their roles in the HIV pandemic. PMID:26900853

  2. A Novel Malaria Vaccine Candidate Antigen Expressed in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Eleni-Muus, Janna; Aldag, Ingo; Samuel, Kay; Creasey, Alison M.; Hartmann, Marcus W. W.; Cavanagh, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Development of effective malaria vaccines is hampered by the problem of producing correctly folded Plasmodium proteins for use as vaccine components. We have investigated the use of a novel ciliate expression system, Tetrahymena thermophila, as a P. falciparum vaccine antigen platform. A synthetic vaccine antigen composed of N-terminal and C-terminal regions of merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1) was expressed in Tetrahymena thermophila. The recombinant antigen was secreted into the culture medium and purified by monoclonal antibody (mAb) affinity chromatography. The vaccine was immunogenic in MF1 mice, eliciting high antibody titers against both N- and C-terminal components. Sera from immunized animals reacted strongly with P. falciparum parasites from three antigenically different strains by immunofluorescence assays, confirming that the antibodies produced are able to recognize parasite antigens in their native form. Epitope mapping of serum reactivity with a peptide library derived from all three MSP-1 Block 2 serotypes confirmed that the MSP-1 Block 2 hybrid component of the vaccine had effectively targeted all three serotypes of this polymorphic region of MSP-1. This study has successfully demonstrated the use of Tetrahymena thermophila as a recombinant protein expression platform for the production of malaria vaccine antigens. PMID:24489871

  3. Detection of a human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle antigenically related to HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garry, R. F.; Fermin, C. D.; Hart, D. J.; Alexander, S. S.; Donehower, L. A.; Luo-Zhang, H.

    1990-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes. The loss of salivary and lacrimal gland function is accompanied by lymphocytic infiltration. Because similar symptoms and glandular pathology are observed in certain persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a search was initiated for a possible retroviral etiology in this syndrome. A human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle that is antigenically related to HIV was detected in lymphoblastoid cells exposed to homogenates of salivary tissue from patients with Sjogren's syndrome. Comparison of this retroviral particle to HIV indicates that they are distinguishable by several ultrastructural, physical, and enzymatic criteria.

  4. Comprehensive Antigenic Map of a Cleaved Soluble HIV-1 Envelope Trimer

    PubMed Central

    Derking, Ronald; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Cupo, Albert; Torres, Jonathan L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Lee, Jeong Hyun; van Montfort, Thijs; de Taeye, Steven W.; Connors, Mark; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Klasse, Per-Johan; Ward, Andrew B.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2015-01-01

    The trimeric envelope (Env) spike is the focus of vaccine design efforts aimed at generating broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to protect against HIV-1 infection. Three recent developments have facilitated a thorough investigation of the antigenic structure of the Env trimer: 1) the isolation of many bNAbs against multiple different epitopes; 2) the generation of a soluble trimer mimic, BG505 SOSIP.664 gp140, that expresses most bNAb epitopes; 3) facile binding assays involving the oriented immobilization of tagged trimers. Using these tools, we generated an antigenic map of the trimer by antibody cross-competition. Our analysis delineates three well-defined epitope clusters (CD4 binding site, quaternary V1V2 and Asn332-centered oligomannose patch) and new epitopes at the gp120-gp41 interface. It also identifies the relationships among these clusters. In addition to epitope overlap, we defined three more ways in which antibodies can cross-compete: steric competition from binding to proximal but non-overlapping epitopes (e.g., PGT151 inhibition of 8ANC195 binding); allosteric inhibition (e.g., PGT145 inhibition of 1NC9, 8ANC195, PGT151 and CD4 binding); and competition by reorientation of glycans (e.g., PGT135 inhibition of CD4bs bNAbs, and CD4bs bNAb inhibition of 8ANC195). We further demonstrate that bNAb binding can be complex, often affecting several other areas of the trimer surface beyond the epitope. This extensive analysis of the antigenic structure and the epitope interrelationships of the Env trimer should aid in design of both bNAb-based therapies and vaccines intended to induce bNAbs. PMID:25807248

  5. Sequential Antigen Panning for Selection of Broadly Cross-Reactive HIV-1-Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei-Yun; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Many phage display techniques drive selection toward the isolation of highly specific antibodies. However, the identification of monoclonal antibodies that are cross-reactive has implications for the development of diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines against pathogens or cancer cells that are able to rapidly generate variants and escape mutants. To identify human monoclonal antibodies with high activity against HIV and broad-spectrum activity, we developed a technique termed sequential antigen panning. This methodology could be used to isolated recombinant antibodies against any antigen that shares epitopes with other antigens. PMID:19554293

  6. Analysis of Host Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens in a Multi-Site Study of Subjects with Different TB and HIV Infection States in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Jayne S.; Lalor, Maeve K.; Black, Gillian F.; Ambrose, Lyn R.; Loxton, Andre G.; Chegou, Novel N.; Kassa, Desta; Mihret, Adane; Howe, Rawleigh; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Gomez, Marie P.; Donkor, Simon; Franken, Kees; Hanekom, Willem; Klein, Michel R.; Parida, Shreemanta K.; Boom, W. Henry; Thiel, Bonnie A.; Crampin, Amelia C.; Ota, Martin; Walzl, Gerhard; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health threat with 9 million new cases and 1.4 million deaths per year. In order to develop a protective vaccine, we need to define the antigens expressed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which are relevant to protective immunity in high-endemic areas. Methods We analysed responses to 23 Mtb antigens in a total of 1247 subjects with different HIV and TB status across 5 geographically diverse sites in Africa (South Africa, The Gambia, Ethiopia, Malawi and Uganda). We used a 7-day whole blood assay followed by IFN-γ ELISA on the supernatants. Antigens included PPD, ESAT-6 and Ag85B (dominant antigens) together with novel resuscitation-promoting factors (rpf), reactivation proteins, latency (Mtb DosR regulon-encoded) antigens, starvation-induced antigens and secreted antigens. Results There was variation between sites in responses to the antigens, presumably due to underlying genetic and environmental differences. When results from all sites were combined, HIV- subjects with active TB showed significantly lower responses compared to both TST- and TST+ contacts to latency antigens (Rv0569, Rv1733, Rv1735, Rv1737) and the rpf Rv0867; whilst responses to ESAT-6/CFP-10 fusion protein (EC), PPD, Rv2029, TB10.3, and TB10.4 were significantly higher in TST+ contacts (LTBI) compared to TB and TST- contacts fewer differences were seen in subjects with HIV co-infection, with responses to the mitogen PHA significantly lower in subjects with active TB compared to those with LTBI and no difference with any antigen. Conclusions Our multi-site study design for testing novel Mtb antigens revealed promising antigens for future vaccine development. The IFN-γ ELISA is a cheap and useful tool for screening potential antigenicity in subjects with different ethnic backgrounds and across a spectrum of TB and HIV infection states. Analysis of cytokines other than IFN-γ is currently on-going to determine correlates of protection, which may

  7. Neutrophil elastase enhances antigen presentation by upregulating human leukocyte antigen class I expression on tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Akhil; Alatrash, Gheath; Philips, Anne V; Qiao, Na; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Kerros, Celine; Diaconu, Iulia; Gall, Victor; Neal, Samantha; Peters, Haley L; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) is an innate immune cell-derived inflammatory mediator that we have shown increases the presentation of tumor-associated peptide antigens in breast cancer. In this study, we extend these observations to show that NE uptake has a broad effect on enhancing antigen presentation by breast cancer cells. We show that NE increases human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression on the surface of breast cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. HLA class I upregulation requires internalization of enzymatically active NE. Western blots of NE-treated breast cancer cells confirm that the expression of total HLA class I as well as the antigen-processing machinery proteins TAP1, LMP2, and calnexin does not change following NE treatment. This suggests that NE does not increase the efficiency of antigen processing; rather, it mediates the upregulation of HLA class I by stabilizing and reducing membrane recycling of HLA class I molecules. Furthermore, the effects of NE extend beyond breast cancer since the uptake of NE by EBV-LCL increases the presentation of HLA class I-restricted viral peptides, as shown by their increased sensitivity to lysis by EBV-specific CD8+ T cells. Together, our results show that NE uptake increases the responsiveness of breast cancer cells to adaptive immunity by broad upregulation of membrane HLA class I and support the conclusion that the innate inflammatory mediator NE enhances tumor cell recognition and increases tumor sensitivity to the host adaptive immune response. PMID:27129972

  8. Protein Expression Analysis of Melanocyte Differentiation Antigen TRP-2.

    PubMed

    Avogadri, Francesca; Gnjatic, Sacha; Tassello, Jodie; Frosina, Denise; Hanson, Nicole; Laudenbach, Megan; Ritter, Erika; Merghoub, Taha; Busam, Klaus J; Jungbluth, Achim A

    2016-03-01

    Melanocyte differentiation antigens, such as gp100, tyrosinase, and Melan-A and their corresponding antibodies HMB45, T311, and A103, are major diagnostic tools in surgical pathology. Little is known about tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2, or dopachrome tautomerase/DCT) another melanocyte differentiation antigen, which is an enzymatic component of melanogenesis. We identified a commercial reagent to TRP-2, monoclonal antibody (mAb) C-9 and undertook a comprehensive analysis to assess its specificity and usefulness for surgical pathology. Subsequently, we analyzed panels of normal tissues and tumors. We show that TRP-2 is regularly expressed in melanocytes of the normal skin. In cutaneous nevi, TRP-2 is present in junctional as well as in dermal nevocytes. In malignant tumors, C-9 reactivity is restricted to melanocytic and related lesions and present in 84% and 58% of primary and metastatic melanomas, respectively. Ten primary melanomas of the anorectal mucosa were all positive. Like the other melanocyte differentiation antigens, TRP-2 was absent in 6 desmoplastic melanomas. Also, only 2 of 9 angiomyolipomas were TRP-2 positive. We conclude that mAb C-9 is a valuable reagent for the analysis of TRP-2 expression in archival surgical pathology material. The expression pattern of TRP-2 in melanocytic and related lesions appears to parallel other melanocyte differentiation antigens, although the overall incidence is lower than other antigens, such as Melan-A or gp100. PMID:26894771

  9. Expression of Lewis antigenic determinants in colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Blasco, E; Torrado, J; Cosme, A; Alvarez, E; Zugasti, A; Gutierrez-Hoyos, A; Arenas, J I

    1989-01-01

    Expression of type 1 and type 2 chain Lewis antigens was studied in 32 rectal adenocarcinoma specimens; the results were correlated with the patients' Lewis phenotype and secretor status. In addition, the pattern of expression of these antigens was analyzed in adjacent and distant normal mucosa. We used an indirect immunofluorescence technique with p-phenylenediamine counterstaining (Oriol technique) and a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against the different antigenic specificities. Normal distal colonic mucosa only expresses monofucosylated structures (Lea and X) arising from activity of the alpha 1-3,4-fucosyltransferase coded by the Le gene. Rectal adenocarcinomas also show Lea and X, but also reexpress blood group antigens ABH and exhibit difucosylated determinants (Leb and Y). The accumulation of mono- and difucosylated type 2 chain in neoplastic processes, independently of the Le and Se genes, could be due to the enzymes coded by reactivation of the H and X genes. Blood group antigens form a complex signal code, genetically regulated, which intervenes in differentiation, growth and cellular recognition processes, and which may undergo important modifications during malignant transformation. These alterations could be useful in the diagnosis and prognosis of some types of carcinoma. PMID:2476347

  10. 5T4 oncofetal antigen expression in ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wrigley, E.; McGown, A.T.; Rennison, J.; Swindell, R.; Crowther, D.; Starzynska, T.; Stern, P.L.

    1995-07-01

    5T4 oncofetal antigen is defined by a monoclonal antibody raised against human placental trophoblast, and recognizes a 72 kD glycoprotein expressed in many different carcinomas but detected only at low levels in some normal epithelia. Analysis of the patterns of expression of 5T4 oncofetal antigen in colorectal carcinomas has indicated a significant association between the presence of the antigen in tumor cells and metastatic spread. The 5T4 antigen expression of 72 epithelial ovarian carcinomas has been investigated by immunohistochemistry; 71% of the carcinomas demonstrated positive 5T4 immunoreactivity in adenocarcinoma cells and/or associated stromal tissue. In order to assess any relationship to prognosis, the 5T4 phenotypes were analyzed with respect to various clinicopathologic features of the tumors and the clinical outcome of the patients assessed by survival and disease-free interval. There was a significant correlation between 5T4 expression and more advanced stage of disease (FIGO stages III and IV) (P < 0.001) and with poorly differentiated tumors (P = 0.036) compared to well or moderately differentiated tumors. Patients with tumors expressing 5T4 were less likely to respond well to adjuvant therapy (P = 0.030) and had a significantly worse outlook in terms of survival (P = 0.033) and disease-free interval (P = 0.033). This significance was not demonstrated as acting independently of FIGO stage and tumor differentiation. PMID:11578488

  11. Expression of antigen tf and galectin-3 in fibroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fibroadenomas are benign human breast tumors, characterized by proliferation of epithelial and stromal components of the terminal ductal unit. They may grow, regress or remain unchanged, as the hormonal environment of the patient changes. Expression of antigen TF in mucin or mucin-type glycoproteins and of galectin-3 seems to contribute to proliferation and transformations events; their expression has been reported in ductal breast cancer and in aggressive tumors. Findings Lectin histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence were used to examine the expression and distribution of antigen TF and galectin-3. We used lectins from Arachis hypogaea, Artocarpus integrifolia, and Amaranthus lecuocarpus to evaluate TF expression and a monoclonal antibody to evaluate galectin-3 expression. We used paraffin-embedded blocks from 10 breast tissues diagnosed with fibroadenoma and as control 10 healthy tissue samples. Histochemical and immunofluorescence analysis showed positive expression of galectin-3 in fibroadenoma tissue, mainly in stroma, weak interaction in ducts was observed; whereas, in healthy tissue samples the staining was also weak in ducts. Lectins from A. leucocarpus and A. integrifolia specificaly recognized ducts in healthy breast samples, whereas the lectin from A. hypogaea recognized ducts and stroma. In fibroadenoma tissue, the lectins from A. integrifolia, A. Hypogaea, and A. leucocarpus recognized mainly ducts. Conclusions Our results suggest that expression of antigen TF and galectin-3 seems to participate in fibroadenoma development. PMID:23265237

  12. Antigenic structures stably expressed by recombinant TGEV-derived vectors.

    PubMed

    Becares, Martina; Sanchez, Carlos M; Sola, Isabel; Enjuanes, Luis; Zuñiga, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are positive-stranded RNA viruses with potential as immunization vectors, expressing high levels of heterologous genes and eliciting both secretory and systemic immune responses. Nevertheless, its high recombination rate may result in the loss of the full-length foreign gene, limiting their use as vectors. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was engineered to express porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) small protein domains, as a strategy to improve heterologous gene stability. After serial passage in tissue cultures, stable expression of small PRRSV protein antigenic domains was achieved. Therefore, size reduction of the heterologous genes inserted in CoV-derived vectors led to the stable expression of antigenic domains. Immunization of piglets with these TGEV vectors led to partial protection against a challenge with a virulent PRRSV strain, as immunized animals showed reduced clinical signs and lung damage. Further improvement of TGEV-derived vectors will require the engineering of vectors with decreased recombination rate. PMID:25108114

  13. Detection and manipulation of live antigen-expressing cells using conditionally stable nanobodies

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jonathan CY; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Etemad, Behzad; Rudolph, Stephanie; Guo, Binggege; Wang, Sui; Ellis, Emily G; Li, Jonathan Z; Cepko, Constance L

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect and/or manipulate specific cell populations based upon the presence of intracellular protein epitopes would enable many types of studies and applications. Protein binders such as nanobodies (Nbs) can target untagged proteins (antigens) in the intracellular environment. However, genetically expressed protein binders are stable regardless of antigen expression, complicating their use for applications that require cell-specificity. Here, we created a conditional system in which the stability of an Nb depends upon an antigen of interest. We identified Nb framework mutations that can be used to rapidly create destabilized Nbs. Fusion of destabilized Nbs to various proteins enabled applications in living cells, such as optogenetic control of neural activity in specific cell types in the mouse brain, and detection of HIV-infected human cells by flow cytometry. These approaches are generalizable to other protein binders, and enable the rapid generation of single-polypeptide sensors and effectors active in cells expressing specific intracellular epitopes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15312.001 PMID:27205882

  14. Exosome targeting of tumor antigens expressed by cancer vaccines can improve antigen immunogenicity and therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Rountree, Ryan B; Mandl, Stefanie J; Nachtwey, James M; Dalpozzo, Katie; Do, Lisa; Lombardo, John R; Schoonmaker, Peter L; Brinkmann, Kay; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Laus, Reiner; Delcayre, Alain

    2011-08-01

    MVA-BN-PRO (BN ImmunoTherapeutics) is a candidate immunotherapy product for the treatment of prostate cancer. It encodes 2 tumor-associated antigens, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), and is derived from the highly attenuated modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) virus stock known as MVA-BN. Past work has shown that the immunogenicity of antigens can be improved by targeting their localization to exosomes, which are small, 50- to 100-nm diameter vesicles secreted by most cell types. Exosome targeting is achieved by fusing the antigen to the C1C2 domain of the lactadherin protein. To test whether exosome targeting would improve the immunogenicity of PSA and PAP, 2 additional versions of MVA-BN-PRO were produced, targeting either PSA (MVA-BN-PSA-C1C2) or PAP (MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2) to exosomes, while leaving the second transgene untargeted. Treatment of mice with MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2 led to a striking increase in the immune response against PAP. Anti-PAP antibody titers developed more rapidly and reached levels that were 10- to 100-fold higher than those for mice treated with MVA-BN-PRO. Furthermore, treatment with MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2 increased the frequency of PAP-specific T cells 5-fold compared with mice treated with MVA-BN-PRO. These improvements translated into a greater frequency of tumor rejection in a PAP-expressing solid tumor model. Likewise, treatment with MVA-BN-PSA-C1C2 increased the antigenicity of PSA compared with treatment with MVA-BN-PRO and resulted in a trend of improved antitumor efficacy in a PSA-expressing tumor model. These experiments confirm that targeting antigen localization to exosomes is a viable approach for improving the therapeutic potential of MVA-BN-PRO in humans. PMID:21670078

  15. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of HIV-1 consensus subtype B envelope glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, Denise L.; Decker, Julie M.; Li Yingying; Weng Zhiping; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Zammit, Kenneth P.; Salazar, Maria G.; Chen, Yalu; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Moldoveanu, Zina; Mestecky, Jiri; Gao Feng; Haynes, Barton F.; Shaw, George M. ||; Muldoon, Mark; Korber, Bette T.M. |; Hahn, Beatrice H. |. E-mail: bhahn@uab.edu

    2007-03-30

    'Centralized' (ancestral and consensus) HIV-1 envelope immunogens induce broadly cross-reactive T cell responses in laboratory animals; however, their potential to elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies has not been fully explored. Here, we report the construction of a panel of consensus subtype B (ConB) envelopes and compare their biologic, antigenic, and immunogenic properties to those of two wild-type Env controls from individuals with early and acute HIV-1 infection. Glycoprotein expressed from full-length (gp160), uncleaved (gp160-UNC), truncated (gp145), and N-linked glycosylation site deleted (gp160-201N/S) versions of the ConB env gene were packaged into virions and, except for the fusion defective gp160-UNC, mediated infection via the CCR5 co-receptor. Pseudovirions containing ConB Envs were sensitive to neutralization by patient plasma and monoclonal antibodies, indicating the preservation of neutralizing epitopes found in contemporary subtype B viruses. When used as DNA vaccines in guinea pigs, ConB and wild-type env immunogens induced appreciable binding, but overall only low level neutralizing antibodies. However, all four ConB immunogens were significantly more potent than one wild-type vaccine at eliciting neutralizing antibodies against a panel of tier 1 and tier 2 viruses, and ConB gp145 and gp160 were significantly more potent than both wild-type vaccines at inducing neutralizing antibodies against tier 1 viruses. Thus, consensus subtype B env immunogens appear to be at least as good as, and in some instances better than, wild-type B env immunogens at inducing a neutralizing antibody response, and are amenable to further improvement by specific gene modifications.

  16. Presenting native-like trimeric HIV-1 antigens with self-assembling nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    He, Linling; de Val, Natalia; Morris, Charles D.; Vora, Nemil; Thinnes, Therese C.; Kong, Leopold; Azadnia, Parisa; Sok, Devin; Zhou, Bin; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A; Nemazee, David; Ward, Andrew B.; Zhu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Structures of BG505 SOSIP.664 trimer in complex with broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) have revealed the critical role of trimeric context for immune recognition of HIV-1. Presentation of trimeric HIV-1 antigens on nanoparticles may thus provide promising vaccine candidates. Here we report the rational design, structural analysis and antigenic evaluation of HIV-1 trimer-presenting nanoparticles. We first demonstrate that both V1V2 and gp120 can be presented in native-like trimeric conformations on nanoparticles. We then design nanoparticles presenting various forms of stabilized gp140 trimer based on ferritin and a large, 60-meric E2p that displays 20 spikes mimicking virus-like particles (VLPs). Particle assembly is confirmed by electron microscopy (EM), while antigenic profiles are generated using representative bNAbs and non-NAbs. Lastly, we demonstrate high-yield gp140 nanoparticle production and robust stimulation of B cells carrying cognate VRC01 receptors by gp120 and gp140 nanoparticles. Together, our study provides an arsenal of multivalent immunogens for HIV-1 vaccine development. PMID:27349934

  17. Presenting native-like trimeric HIV-1 antigens with self-assembling nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    He, Linling; de Val, Natalia; Morris, Charles D; Vora, Nemil; Thinnes, Therese C; Kong, Leopold; Azadnia, Parisa; Sok, Devin; Zhou, Bin; Burton, Dennis R; Wilson, Ian A; Nemazee, David; Ward, Andrew B; Zhu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Structures of BG505 SOSIP.664 trimer in complex with broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) have revealed the critical role of trimeric context for immune recognition of HIV-1. Presentation of trimeric HIV-1 antigens on nanoparticles may thus provide promising vaccine candidates. Here we report the rational design, structural analysis and antigenic evaluation of HIV-1 trimer-presenting nanoparticles. We first demonstrate that both V1V2 and gp120 can be presented in native-like trimeric conformations on nanoparticles. We then design nanoparticles presenting various forms of stabilized gp140 trimer based on ferritin and a large, 60-meric E2p that displays 20 spikes mimicking virus-like particles (VLPs). Particle assembly is confirmed by electron microscopy (EM), while antigenic profiles are generated using representative bNAbs and non-NAbs. Lastly, we demonstrate high-yield gp140 nanoparticle production and robust stimulation of B cells carrying cognate VRC01 receptors by gp120 and gp140 nanoparticles. Together, our study provides an arsenal of multivalent immunogens for HIV-1 vaccine development. PMID:27349934

  18. A nonself sugar mimic of the HIV glycan shield shows enhanced antigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Doores, Katie J.; Fulton, Zara; Hong, Vu; Patel, Mitul K.; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Wormald, Mark R.; Finn, M.G.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2011-08-24

    Antibody 2G12 uniquely neutralizes a broad range of HIV-1 isolates by binding the high-mannose glycans on the HIV-1 surface glycoprotein, gp120. Antigens that resemble these natural epitopes of 2G12 would be highly desirable components for an HIV-1 vaccine. However, host-produced (self)-carbohydrate motifs have been unsuccessful so far at eliciting 2G12-like antibodies that cross-react with gp120. Based on the surprising observation that 2G12 binds nonproteinaceous monosaccharide D-fructose with higher affinity than D-mannose, we show here that a designed set of nonself, synthetic monosaccharides are potent antigens. When introduced to the terminus of the D1 arm of protein glycans recognized by 2G12, their antigenicity is significantly enhanced. Logical variation of these unnatural sugars pinpointed key modifications, and the molecular basis of this increased antigenicity was elucidated using high-resolution crystallographic analyses. Virus-like particle protein conjugates containing such nonself glycans are bound more tightly by 2G12. As immunogens they elicit higher titers of antibodies than those immunogenic conjugates containing the self D1 glycan motif. These antibodies generated from nonself immunogens also cross-react with this self motif, which is found in the glycan shield, when it is presented in a range of different conjugates and glycans. However, these antibodies did not bind this glycan motif when present on gp120.

  19. HIV-1 antibodies and vaccine antigen selectively interact with lipid domains.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Gregory J; Wong, Gene C; Nayak, Rahul; Anasti, Kara; Hirtz, Michael; Shapter, Joseph G; Alam, S Munir; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    The rare, broadly neutralizing antibodies, 4E10 and 2F5, that target the HIV-1 membrane proximal external region also associate with HIV-1 membrane lipids as part of a required first-step in HIV-1 neutralization. HIV-1 virions have high concentration of cholesterol and sphingomyelin, which are able to organize into liquid-ordered domains (i.e., lipid rafts), and could influence the interaction of neutralizing antibodies with epitopes proximal to the membrane. The objective of this research is to understand how these lipid domains contribute to 2F5/4E10 membrane interactions and to antigen presentation in liposomal form of HIV-1 vaccines. To this end we have engineered biomimetic supported lipid bilayers and are able to use atomic force microscopy to visualize membrane domains, antigen clustering, and antibody-membrane interactions. Our results demonstrate that 2F5/4E10 do not interact with highly ordered gel and liquid-ordered domains and exclusively bind to a liquid-disordered lipid phase. This suggests that vaccine liposomes that contain key viral membrane components, such as high cholesterol content, may not be advantageous for 2F5/4E10 vaccine strategies. Rather, vaccine liposomes that primarily contain a liquid-disordered phase may be more likely to elicit production of lipid reactive, 2F5- and 4E10-like antibodies. PMID:25019685

  20. Antigenic properties of a transport-competent influenza HA/HIV Env chimeric protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Ling; Sun Yuliang; Lin Jianguo; Bu Zhigao; Wu Qingyang; Jiang, Shibo; Steinhauer, David A.; Compans, Richard W.; Yang Chinglai . E-mail: chyang@emory.edu

    2006-08-15

    The transmembrane subunit (gp41) of the HIV Env glycoprotein contains conserved neutralizing epitopes which are not well-exposed in wild-type HIV Env proteins. To enhance the exposure of these epitopes, a chimeric protein, HA/gp41, in which the gp41 of HIV-1 89.6 envelope protein was fused to the C-terminus of the HA1 subunit of the influenza HA protein, was constructed. Characterization of protein expression showed that the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins were expressed on cell surfaces and formed trimeric oligomers, as found in the HIV Env as well as influenza HA proteins. In addition, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein expressed on the cell surface can also be cleaved into 2 subunits by trypsin treatment, similar to the influenza HA. Moreover, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein was found to maintain a pre-fusion conformation. Interestingly, the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins on cell surfaces exhibited increased reactivity to monoclonal antibodies against the HIV Env gp41 subunit compared with the HIV-1 envelope protein, including the two broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. Immunization of mice with a DNA vaccine expressing the HA/gp41 chimeric protein induced antibodies against the HIV gp41 protein and these antibodies exhibit neutralizing activity against infection by an HIV SF162 pseudovirus. These results demonstrate that the construction of such chimeric proteins can provide enhanced exposure of conserved epitopes in the HIV Env gp41 and may represent a novel vaccine design strategy for inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV.

  1. Identification of Enterococcus faecalis antigens specifically expressed in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shet, Uttom K.; Park, Sang-Won; Lim, Hyun-Pil; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Kang, Seong Soo; Kim, Se Eun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Molecular mechanism of the pathogenicity of Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis), a suspected endodontic pathogen, has not yet been adequately elucidated due to limited information on its virulence factors. Here we report the identification of in vivo expressed antigens of E. faecalis by using a novel immunoscreening technique called change-mediated antigen technology (CMAT) and an experimental animal model of endodontic infection. Materials and Methods Among 4,500 E. coli recombinant clones screened, 19 positive clones reacted reproducibly with hyperimmune sera obtained from rabbits immunized with E. faecalis cells isolated from an experimental endodontic infection. DNA sequences from 16 of these in vivo-induced (IVI) genes were determined. Results Identified protein antigens of E. faecalis included enzymes involved in housekeeping functions, copper resistance protein, putative outer membrane proteins, and proteins of unknown function. Conclusions In vivo expressed antigens of E. faecalis could be identified by using a novel immune-screening technique CMAT and an experimental animal model of endodontic infection. Detailed analysis of these IVI genes will lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the endodontic infection of E. faecalis. PMID:26587417

  2. Defining the HLA class I-associated viral antigen repertoire from HIV-1-infected human cells.

    PubMed

    Ternette, Nicola; Yang, Hongbing; Partridge, Thomas; Llano, Anuska; Cedeño, Samandhy; Fischer, Roman; Charles, Philip D; Dudek, Nadine L; Mothe, Beatriz; Crespo, Manuel; Fischer, William M; Korber, Bette T M; Nielsen, Morten; Borrow, Persephone; Purcell, Anthony W; Brander, Christian; Dorrell, Lucy; Kessler, Benedikt M; Hanke, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Recognition and eradication of infected cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes is a key defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens. High-throughput definition of HLA class I-associated immunopeptidomes by mass spectrometry is an increasingly important analytical tool to advance our understanding of the induction of T-cell responses against pathogens such as HIV-1. We utilized a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry workflow including de novo-assisted database searching to define the HLA class I-associated immunopeptidome of HIV-1-infected human cells. We here report for the first time the identification of 75 HIV-1-derived peptides bound to HLA class I complexes that were purified directly from HIV-1-infected human primary CD4(+) T cells and the C8166 human T-cell line. Importantly, one-third of eluted HIV-1 peptides had not been previously known to be presented by HLA class I. Over 82% of the identified sequences originated from viral protein regions for which T-cell responses have previously been reported but for which the precise HLA class I-binding sequences have not yet been defined. These results validate and expand the current knowledge of virus-specific antigenic peptide presentation during HIV-1 infection and provide novel targets for T-cell vaccine development. PMID:26467324

  3. [VLP vaccines and effects of HIV-1 Env protein modifications on their antigenic properties].

    PubMed

    Vzorov, A N; Compans, R W

    2016-01-01

    An ideal protective HIV-1 vaccine can elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies, capable of preventing HIV transmission. The strategies of designing vaccines include generation of soluble recombinant proteins which mimic the native Env complex and are able to enhance the immunogenicity of gp120. Recent data indicate that the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein has multiple functions, which can affect the early steps of infection, as well as viral assembly and antigenic properties. Modifications in the CT can be used to induce conformational changes in functional regions of gp120 and to stabilize the trimeric structure, avoiding immune misdirection and induction of non-neutralizing antibody responses. Env-trimers with modified CTs in virus-like particles (VLPs) are able to induce antibodies with broad spectrum neutralizing activity and high avidity and have the potential for developing an effective vaccine against HIV. PMID:27414779

  4. HLA antigen expression in enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Ashton-Key, M; Singh, N; Pan, L X; Smith, M E

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the occurrence of abnormal patterns of HLA-ABC and HLA-DR expression in enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma and to relate such abnormalities to the Epstein Barr virus (EBV) status of the tumours. METHODS: Eleven enteropathy associated T cell lymphomas were immunostained with HC10 (HLA-ABC heavy chain) and TAL 1B5 (HLA-DR alpha chain) monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal anti-beta 2 microglobulin (beta 2m, the HLA-ABC light chain) antibodies. In situ hybridisation for EBV using EBER probes was performed on all cases. RESULTS: Tumour cells of two of 11 patients were EBER positive. One of these showed partial, and the other, complete loss of beta 2m. HLA-DR expression was undetectable in both patients. Of the remaining nine EBER negative tumours, two were HLA-ABC heavy chain negative or showed only occasional positive cells and five of nine showed partial or complete loss of the HLA-ABC light chain, beta 2m. Seven of the nine cases were either negative for HLA-DR or showed weak expression in a proportion of tumour cells. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that low or absent HLA-ABC and HLA-DR antigen expression occurs commonly in enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma. These abnormal patterns of HLA expression may be associated with escape from immune attack which, in a minority of patients, could be directed against EBV antigens. Images PMID:8813950

  5. Differences in antigen-specific CD4+ responses to opportunistic infections in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J; Cooke, Graham S; Kapembwa, Moses S; Kon, Onn M; Grass, Lisa; Sampson, Robert D; Taylor, Graham P; Lalvani, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals with severe immunodeficiency are at risk of opportunistic infection (OI). Tuberculosis (TB) may occur without substantial immune suppression suggesting an early and sustained adverse impact of HIV on Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-specific cell mediated immunity (CMI). This prospective observational cohort study aimed to observe differences in OI-specific and MTB-specific CMI that might underlie this. Using polychromatic flow cytometry, we compared CD4+ responses to MTB, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Candida albicans in individuals with and without HIV infection. MTB-specific CD4+ T-cells were more polyfunctional than virus specific (CMV/EBV) CD4+ T-cells which predominantly secreted IFN-gamma (IFN-γ) only. There was a reduced frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2 (IL-2)-dual-MTB-specific cells in HIV-infected individuals, which was not apparent for the other pathogens. MTB-specific cells were less differentiated especially compared with CMV-specific cells. CD127 expression was relatively less frequent on MTB-specific cells in HIV co-infection. MTB-specific CD4+ T-cells PD-1 expression was infrequent in contrast to EBV-specific CD4+ T-cells. The variation in the inherent quality of these CD4+ T-cell responses and impact of HIV co-infection may contribute to the timing of co-infectious diseases in HIV infection. PMID:26417433

  6. Cloning, heterologous expression and antigenicity of a schistosome cercarial protease.

    PubMed

    Price, H P; Doenhoff, M J; Sayers, J R

    1997-05-01

    A gene coding for the 30 kDa Schistosoma mansoni cercarial protease was amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from genomic DNA templates. Cloning and sequencing of several independent PCR clones revealed the presence of an intron additional to the one described in the original cloning of the gene. The 3 exons were cloned into expression vectors so that they could be expressed as separate glutathione-S-transferase (GST) translational fusions. Recombinant bacteria carrying these expression plasmids expressed the fusion proteins at high levels. Western blotting of bacterial lysates with sera raised against the native S. mansoni cercarial protease showed that all 3 exons were recognized. Thus we have produced recombinant bacteria capable of providing large amounts of an S. mansoni antigen for immunological studies and evaluation as a candidate vaccine. PMID:9149415

  7. Chemical Cross-Linking Stabilizes Native-Like HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimer Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Schiffner, Torben; de Val, Natalia; Russell, Rebecca A.; de Taeye, Steven W.; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Kim, Helen J.; Nieusma, Travis; Brod, Florian; Cupo, Albert; Sanders, Rogier W.; Moore, John P.; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Major neutralizing antibody immune evasion strategies of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer include conformational and structural instability. Stabilized soluble trimers such as BG505 SOSIP.664 mimic the structure of virion-associated Env but nevertheless sample different conformational states. Here we demonstrate that treating BG505 SOSIP.664 trimers with glutaraldehyde or a heterobifunctional cross-linker introduces additional stability with relatively modest effects on antigenicity. Thus, most broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) epitopes were preserved after cross-linking, whereas the binding of most weakly or nonneutralizing antibodies (non-NAb) was reduced. Cross-linking stabilized all Env conformers present within a mixed population, and individual conformers could be isolated by bNAb affinity chromatography. Both positive selection of cross-linked conformers using the quaternary epitope-specific bNAbs PGT145, PGT151, and 3BC315 and negative selection with non-NAbs against the V3 region enriched for trimer populations with improved antigenicity for bNAbs. Similar results were obtained using the clade B B41 SOSIP.664 trimer. The cross-linking method may, therefore, be useful for countering the natural conformational heterogeneity of some HIV-1 Env proteins and, by extrapolation, also vaccine immunogens from other pathogens. IMPORTANCE The development of a vaccine to induce protective antibodies against HIV-1 is of primary public health importance. Recent advances in immunogen design have provided soluble recombinant envelope glycoprotein trimers with near-native morphology and antigenicity. However, these trimers are conformationally flexible, potentially reducing B-cell recognition of neutralizing antibody epitopes. Here we show that chemical cross-linking increases trimer stability, reducing binding of nonneutralizing antibodies while largely maintaining neutralizing antibody binding. Cross-linking followed by positive or negative

  8. Antigenic characterisation of yeast-expressed lyssavirus nucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kucinskaite, Indre; Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Serva, Andrius; Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Johnson, Nicholas; Staniulis, Juozas; Fooks, Anthony R; Müller, Thomas; Sasnauskas, Kestutis; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2007-12-01

    In Europe, three genotypes of the genus Lyssavirus, family Rhabdoviridae, are present, classical rabies virus (RABV, genotype 1), European bat lyssavirus type 1 (EBLV-1, genotype 5) and European bat lyssavirus type 2 (EBLV-2, genotype 6). The entire authentic nucleoprotein (N protein) encoding sequences of RABV (challenge virus standard, CVS, strain), EBLV-1 and EBLV-2 were expressed in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae at high level. Purification of recombinant N proteins by caesium chloride gradient centrifugation resulted in yields between 14-17, 25-29 and 18-20 mg/l of induced yeast culture for RABV-CVS, EBLV-1 and EBLV-2, respectively. The purified N proteins were evaluated by negative staining electron microscopy, which revealed the formation of nucleocapsid-like structures. The antigenic conformation of the N proteins was investigated for their reactivity with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against different lyssaviruses. The reactivity pattern of each mAb was virtually identical between immunofluorescence assay with virus-infected cells, and ELISA and dot blot assay using the corresponding recombinant N proteins. These observations lead us to conclude that yeast-expressed lyssavirus N proteins share antigenic properties with naturally expressed virus protein. These recombinant proteins have the potential for use as components of serological assays for lyssaviruses. PMID:17619134

  9. Expression Cloning of Camelid Nanobodies Specific for Xenopus Embryonic Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Keiji; Sokol, Sergei Y.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental biology relies heavily on the use of conventional antibodies, but their production and maintenance involves significant effort. Here we use an expression cloning approach to identify variable regions of llama single domain antibodies (known as nanobodies), which recognize specific embryonic antigens. A nanobody cDNA library was prepared from lymphocytes of a llama immunized with Xenopus embryo lysates. Pools of bacterially expressed cDNAs were sib-selected for the ability to produce specific staining patterns in gastrula embryos. Three different nanobodies were isolated: NbP1 and NbP3 stained yolk granules, while the reactivity of NbP7 was predominantly restricted to the cytoplasm and the cortex. The isolated nanobodies recognized specific protein bands in immunoblot analysis. A reverse proteomic approach identified NbP1 target antigen as EP45/Seryp, a serine protease inhibitor. Given the unique stability of nanobodies and the ease of their expression in diverse systems, we propose that nanobody cDNA libraries represent a promising resource for molecular markers for developmental biology. PMID:25285446

  10. Plasmodium knowlesi Sporozoite Antigen: Expression by Infectious Recombinant Vaccinia Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey L.; Godson, G. Nigel; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.; Barnwell, John; Moss, Bernard

    1984-04-01

    The gene coding for the circumsporozoite antigen of the malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi was inserted into the vaccinia virus genome under the control of a defined vaccinia virus promoter. Cells infected with the recombinant virus synthesized polypeptides of 53,000 to 56,000 daltons that reacted with monoclonal antibody against the repeating epitope of the malaria protein. Furthermore, rabbits vaccinated with the recombinant virus produced antibodies that bound specifically to sporozoites. These data provide evidence for expression of a cloned malaria gene in mammalian cells and illustrate the potential of vaccinia virus recombinants as live malaria vaccines.

  11. Enhanced Sensitivity for Detection of HIV-1 p24 Antigen by a Novel Nuclease-Linked Fluorescence Oligonucleotide Assay

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Peihu; Li, Xiaojun; Su, Weiheng; Kong, Wei; Kong, Xianggui; Wang, Zhenxin; Wang, Youchun; Jiang, Chunlai; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high detection limit of the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) prevents its application for detection of low concentrations of antigens. To increase the sensitivity for detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, we developed a highly sensitive nuclease-linked fluorescence oligonucleotide assay (NLFOA). Two major improvements were incorporated in NLFOA to amplify antibody-antigen interaction signals and reduce the signal/noise ratio; a large number of nuclease molecules coupled to the gold nanoparticle/streptavidin complex and fluorescent signals generated from fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides by the nuclease. The detection limit of p24 by NLFOA was 1 pg/mL, which was 10-fold more sensitive than the conventional ELISA (10 pg/mL). The specificity was 100% and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 7.8% at low p24 concentration (1.5 pg/mL) with various concentrations of spiked p24 in HIV-1 negative sera. Thus, NLFOA is highly sensitive, specific, reproducible and user-friendly. The more sensitive detection of low p24 concentrations in HIV-1-infected individuals by NLFOA could allow detection of HIV-1 infections that are missed by the conventional ELISA at the window period during acute infection to further reduce the risk for HIV-1 infection due to the undetected HIV-1 in the blood products. Moreover, NLFOA can be easily applied to more sensitive detection of other antigens. PMID:25915630

  12. Enhanced Sensitivity for Detection of HIV-1 p24 Antigen by a Novel Nuclease-Linked Fluorescence Oligonucleotide Assay.

    PubMed

    Fan, Peihu; Li, Xiaojun; Su, Weiheng; Kong, Wei; Kong, Xianggui; Wang, Zhenxin; Wang, Youchun; Jiang, Chunlai; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high detection limit of the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) prevents its application for detection of low concentrations of antigens. To increase the sensitivity for detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, we developed a highly sensitive nuclease-linked fluorescence oligonucleotide assay (NLFOA). Two major improvements were incorporated in NLFOA to amplify antibody-antigen interaction signals and reduce the signal/noise ratio; a large number of nuclease molecules coupled to the gold nanoparticle/streptavidin complex and fluorescent signals generated from fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides by the nuclease. The detection limit of p24 by NLFOA was 1 pg/mL, which was 10-fold more sensitive than the conventional ELISA (10 pg/mL). The specificity was 100% and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 7.8% at low p24 concentration (1.5 pg/mL) with various concentrations of spiked p24 in HIV-1 negative sera. Thus, NLFOA is highly sensitive, specific, reproducible and user-friendly. The more sensitive detection of low p24 concentrations in HIV-1-infected individuals by NLFOA could allow detection of HIV-1 infections that are missed by the conventional ELISA at the window period during acute infection to further reduce the risk for HIV-1 infection due to the undetected HIV-1 in the blood products. Moreover, NLFOA can be easily applied to more sensitive detection of other antigens. PMID:25915630

  13. GB virus type C envelope protein E2 elicits antibodies that react with a cellular antigen on HIV-1 particles and neutralize diverse HIV-1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Emma L; Xiang, Jinhua; McLinden, James H; Kaufman, Thomas M; Chang, Qing; Montefiori, David C; Klinzman, Donna; Stapleton, Jack T

    2010-10-01

    Broadly neutralizing Abs to HIV-1 are well described; however, identification of Ags that elicit these Abs has proven difficult. Persistent infection with GB virus type C (GBV-C) is associated with prolonged survival in HIV-1-infected individuals, and among those without HIV-1 viremia, the presence of Ab to GBV-C glycoprotein E2 is also associated with survival. GBV-C E2 protein inhibits HIV-1 entry, and an antigenic peptide within E2 interferes with gp41-induced membrane perturbations in vitro, suggesting the possibility of structural mimicry between GBV-C E2 protein and HIV-1 particles. Naturally occurring human and experimentally induced GBV-C E2 Abs were examined for their ability to neutralize infectious HIV-1 particles and HIV-1-enveloped pseudovirus particles. All GBV-C E2 Abs neutralized diverse isolates of HIV-1 with the exception of rabbit anti-peptide Abs raised against a synthetic GBV-C E2 peptide. Rabbit anti-GBV-C E2 Abs neutralized HIV-1-pseudotyped retrovirus particles but not HIV-1-pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus particles, and E2 Abs immune-precipitated HIV-1 gag particles containing the vesicular stomatitis virus type G envelope, HIV-1 envelope, GBV-C envelope, or no viral envelope. The Abs did not neutralize or immune-precipitate mumps or yellow fever viruses. Rabbit GBV-C E2 Abs inhibited HIV attachment to cells but did not inhibit entry following attachment. Taken together, these data indicate that the GBV-C E2 protein has a structural motif that elicits Abs that cross-react with a cellular Ag present on retrovirus particles, independent of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. The data provide evidence that a heterologous viral protein can induce HIV-1-neutralizing Abs. PMID:20826757

  14. Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    An antigen is any substance that causes your immune system to produce antibodies against it. This means your immune ... and is trying to fight it off. An antigen may be a substance from the environment, such ...

  15. The HIV-1 gp120/V3 modifies the response of uninfected CD4 T cells to antigen presentation: mapping of the specific transcriptional signature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The asymptomatic phase of HIV-1 infection is characterized by a progressive depletion of uninfected peripheral effector/memory CD4+ T cells that subsequently leads to immune dysfunction and AIDS symptoms. We have previously demonstrated that the presence of specific gp120/V3 peptides during antigen presentation can modify the activation of normal T-cells leading to altered immune function. The aim of the present study was to map the specific transcriptional profile invoked by an HIV-1/V3 epitope in uninfected T cells during antigen presentation. Methods We exposed primary human peripheral blood monocytes to V3 lipopeptides using a liposome delivery system followed by a superantigen-mediated antigen presentation system. We then evaluated the changes in the T-cell transcriptional profile using oligonucleotide microarrays and performed Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) and DAVID analysis. The results were validated using realtime PCR, FACS, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Results Our results revealed that the most highly modulated transcripts could almost entirely be categorized as related to the cell cycle or transcriptional regulation. The most statistically significant enriched categories and networks identified by IPA were associated with cell cycle, gene expression, immune response, infection mechanisms, cellular growth, proliferation and antigen presentation. Canonical pathways involved in energy and cell cycle regulation, and in the co-activation of T cells were also enriched. Conclusions Taken together, these results document a distinct transcriptional profile invoked by the HIV-1/V3 epitope. These data could be invaluable to determine the underlying mechanism by which HIV-1 epitopes interfere with uninfected CD4+ T-cell function causing hyper proliferation and AICD. PMID:21943198

  16. Plasmodium falciparum Variant Surface Antigen Expression Patterns during Malaria

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The variant surface antigens expressed on Plasmodium falciparum–infected erythrocytes are potentially important targets of immunity to malaria and are encoded, at least in part, by a family of var genes, about 60 of which are present within every parasite genome. Here we use semi-conserved regions within short var gene sequence “tags” to make direct comparisons of var gene expression in 12 clinical parasite isolates from Kenyan children. A total of 1,746 var clones were sequenced from genomic and cDNA and assigned to one of six sequence groups using specific sequence features. The results show the following. (1) The relative numbers of genomic clones falling in each of the sequence groups was similar between parasite isolates and corresponded well with the numbers of genes found in the genome of a single, fully sequenced parasite isolate. In contrast, the relative numbers of cDNA clones falling in each group varied considerably between isolates. (2) Expression of sequences belonging to a relatively conserved group was negatively associated with the repertoire of variant surface antigen antibodies carried by the infected child at the time of disease, whereas expression of sequences belonging to another group was associated with the parasite “rosetting” phenotype, a well established virulence determinant. Our results suggest that information on the state of the host–parasite relationship in vivo can be provided by measurements of the differential expression of different var groups, and need only be defined by short stretches of sequence data. PMID:16304608

  17. Cytokine expression of macrophages in HIV-1-associated vacuolar myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Tyor, W R; Glass, J D; Baumrind, N; McArthur, J C; Griffin, J W; Becker, P S; Griffin, D E

    1993-05-01

    Macrophages are frequently present within the periaxonal and intramyelinic vacuoles that are located primarily in the posterior and lateral funiculi of the thoracic spinal cord in HIV-associated vacuolar myelopathy. But the role of these macrophages in the formation of the vacuoles is unclear. One hypothesis is that cytokines, such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, are produced locally by macrophages and have toxic effects on myelin or oligodendrocytes. The resulting myelin damage eventually culminates in the removal of myelin by macrophages and vacuole formation. We studied thoracic spinal cord specimens taken at autopsy from HIV-positive (+) and HIV-negative individuals. The predominant mononuclear cells present in HIV+ spinal cords are macrophages. They are located primarily in the posterior and lateral funiculi regardless of the presence or absence of vacuolar myelopathy. Macrophages and microglia are more frequent in HIV+ than HIV-negative individuals and these cells frequently stain for class I and class II antigens, IL-1, and TNF-alpha. Activated macrophages positive for IL-1 and TNF-alpha are great increased in the posterior and lateral funiculi of HIV+ individuals with and without vacuolar myelopathy, suggesting they are present prior to the development of vacuoles. Cytokines, such as TNF-alpha, may be toxic for myelin or oligodendrocytes, leading to myelin damage and removal by macrophages and vacuole formation. PMID:8492917

  18. NF45 and NF90 Bind HIV-1 RNA and Modulate HIV Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Belshan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A previous proteomic screen in our laboratory identified nuclear factor 45 (NF45) and nuclear factor 90 (NF90) as potential cellular factors involved in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. Both are RNA binding proteins that regulate gene expression; and NF90 has been shown to regulate the expression of cyclin T1 which is required for Tat-dependent trans-activation of viral gene expression. In this study the roles of NF45 and NF90 in HIV replication were investigated through overexpression studies. Ectopic expression of either factor potentiated HIV infection, gene expression, and virus production. Deletion of the RNA binding domains of NF45 and NF90 diminished the enhancement of HIV infection and gene expression. Both proteins were found to interact with the HIV RNA. RNA decay assays demonstrated that NF90, but not NF45, increased the half-life of the HIV RNA. Overall, these studies indicate that both NF45 and NF90 potentiate HIV infection through their RNA binding domains. PMID:26891316

  19. Cutaneous lymphocyte antigen expression on human effector B cells depends on the site and on the nature of antigen encounter.

    PubMed

    Kantele, Anu; Savilahti, Erkki; Tiimonen, Heidi; Iikkanen, Katja; Autio, Soile; Kantele, Jussi M

    2003-12-01

    In contrast to T cells, information on skin-homing B cells expressing the cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA) is sparse. CLA expression on human B cells was investigated among circulating immunoglobulin-secreting cells (ISC) and among antigen-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC) elicited by parenteral, oral or rectal primary immunization, or by parenteral or oral secondary immunization with Salmonella typhi Ty21a. CLA expression was examined by combining cell sorting with an enzyme-linked immunospot assay. Among all ISC, the proportion of CLA(+) cells was 13-21%. Parenteral immunization induced antigen-specific ASC of which 13% were CLA(+), while oral and rectal immunizations were followed by only 1% of CLA(+) ASC (p<0.001). Oral re-immunization was followed by an up-regulation of CLA (34-48%) regardless of the route of priming. Parenteral re-immunization elicited ASC of which 9-14% were CLA(+). In conclusion, the expression of CLA on human effector B cells depends on the site of antigen encounter: intestinal stimulation elicits cells with no CLA, while parenteral encounter elicits significant numbers of CLA(+) cells. Even though primary antigen encounter in the intestine failed to stimulate CLA expression, up-regulation of CLA was found upon intestinal antigen re-encounter. These findings may be of relevance in the pathogenesis of some cutaneous disorders. PMID:14635035

  20. Genetically modified anthrax lethal toxin safely delivers whole HIV protein antigens into the cytosol to induce T cell immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yichen; Friedman, Rachel; Kushner, Nicholas; Doling, Amy; Thomas, Lawrence; Touzjian, Neal; Starnbach, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2000-07-01

    Bacillus anthrax lethal toxin can be engineered to deliver foreign proteins to the cytosol for antigen presentation to CD8 T cells. Vaccination with modified toxins carrying 8-9 amino acid peptide epitopes induces protective immunity in mice. To evaluate whether large protein antigens can be used with this system, recombinant constructs encoding several HIV antigens up to 500 amino acids were produced. These candidate HIV vaccines are safe in animals and induce CD8 T cells in mice. Constructs encoding gag p24 and nef stimulate gag-specific CD4 proliferation and a secondary cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in HIV-infected donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. These results lay the foundation for future clinical vaccine studies.

  1. Genetically modified anthrax lethal toxin safely delivers whole HIV protein antigens into the cytosol to induce T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yichen; Friedman, Rachel; Kushner, Nicholas; Doling, Amy; Thomas, Lawrence; Touzjian, Neal; Starnbach, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2000-01-01

    Bacillus anthrax lethal toxin can be engineered to deliver foreign proteins to the cytosol for antigen presentation to CD8 T cells. Vaccination with modified toxins carrying 8–9 amino acid peptide epitopes induces protective immunity in mice. To evaluate whether large protein antigens can be used with this system, recombinant constructs encoding several HIV antigens up to 500 amino acids were produced. These candidate HIV vaccines are safe in animals and induce CD8 T cells in mice. Constructs encoding gag p24 and nef stimulate gag-specific CD4 proliferation and a secondary cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in HIV-infected donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. These results lay the foundation for future clinical vaccine studies. PMID:10884430

  2. Expression of major histocompatibility antigens in human chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jalleh, R P; Gilbertson, J A; Williamson, R C; Slater, S D; Foster, C S

    1993-10-01

    T-lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine pancreas and liver in patients with chronic pancreatitis has suggested that cell mediated immune mechanisms may play a part in the pathogenesis of this disease. As expression of major histocompatibility (MHC) antigens is a prerequisite for organ specific autoimmunity, the expression of HLA class I (beta 2-microglobulin) and class II (HLA-DR) determinants have been analysed, together with the presence of T-lymphocytes, in 93 patients (64 men and 29 women, mean age 40.6 years) having an operation for chronic pancreatitis. Ethanol (63 patients), recurrent acute pancreatitis (12), congenital lesions (2), and unknown (16) were suggested to be the causes of the disease. Immunohistochemical staining of formalin fixed and paraffin wax embedded tissue sections used conventional immunohistochemical techniques with specific anti-serum samples. No MHC expression was identified in 10 histologically normal pancreatic control specimens or in four cases of chronic pancreatitis secondary to obstruction by neuroendocrine tumours within the head of the pancreas. beta 2-microglobulin expression by pancreatic exocrine epithelial cells was seen in 76 chronic pancreatitis specimens (82%) while HLA-DR was present in 61 (66%). Simultaneous expression of both class I and II determinants was seen in 53 (57%) of cases. MHC determinant expression was not found in 10 cases (11%) of chronic pancreatitis. In the positive specimens, expression was confined to ductal and ductular (interlobular and intralobular) epithelium with no staining of acinar cells. Staining was not related to the suspected cause of the disease or age. T-lymphocytes were more prominent in chronic pancreatitis mean (SEM) (131 (15) cells per high powered field) than controls (5 (1), p < 0.01). Aberrant MHC expression by exocrine pancreatic epithelial cells occurring in the presence of an appreciable T-cell infiltration confirmed that the appropriate cellular conditions were present for

  3. The relationship between MHC antigen expression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Gopas, J; Rager-Zisman, B; Bar-Eli, M; Hämmerling, G J; Segal, S

    1989-01-01

    much less understood) are involved in the selection of the metastatic cell population. 5. Immunogenicity of tumors is not necessarily determined by high levels of MHC antigen expression; it is also dependent on the level of TSA. Thus, immunoselection mediated by T lymphocytes during metastasis formation could be directed against both MHC and TSA antigens. Therefore, low expression of MHC antigens by metastatic cells as a result of immunoselection is not always observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2678949

  4. N(6)-methyladenosine of HIV-1 RNA regulates viral infection and HIV-1 Gag protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tirumuru, Nagaraja; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Lu, Wuxun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The internal N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) methylation of eukaryotic nuclear RNA controls post-transcriptional gene expression, which is regulated by methyltransferases (writers), demethylases (erasers), and m(6)A-binding proteins (readers) in cells. The YTH domain family proteins (YTHDF1-3) bind to m(6)A-modified cellular RNAs and affect RNA metabolism and processing. Here, we show that YTHDF1-3 proteins recognize m(6)A-modified HIV-1 RNA and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell lines and primary CD4(+) T-cells. We further mapped the YTHDF1-3 binding sites in HIV-1 RNA from infected cells. We found that the overexpression of YTHDF proteins in cells inhibited HIV-1 infection mainly by decreasing HIV-1 reverse transcription, while knockdown of YTHDF1-3 in cells had the opposite effects. Moreover, silencing the m(6)A writers decreased HIV-1 Gag protein expression in virus-producing cells, while silencing the m(6)A erasers increased Gag expression. Our findings suggest an important role of m(6)A modification of HIV-1 RNA in viral infection and HIV-1 protein synthesis. PMID:27371828

  5. N6-methyladenosine of HIV-1 RNA regulates viral infection and HIV-1 Gag protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Tirumuru, Nagaraja; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Lu, Wuxun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The internal N6-methyladenosine (m6A) methylation of eukaryotic nuclear RNA controls post-transcriptional gene expression, which is regulated by methyltransferases (writers), demethylases (erasers), and m6A-binding proteins (readers) in cells. The YTH domain family proteins (YTHDF1–3) bind to m6A-modified cellular RNAs and affect RNA metabolism and processing. Here, we show that YTHDF1–3 proteins recognize m6A-modified HIV-1 RNA and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell lines and primary CD4+ T-cells. We further mapped the YTHDF1–3 binding sites in HIV-1 RNA from infected cells. We found that the overexpression of YTHDF proteins in cells inhibited HIV-1 infection mainly by decreasing HIV-1 reverse transcription, while knockdown of YTHDF1–3 in cells had the opposite effects. Moreover, silencing the m6A writers decreased HIV-1 Gag protein expression in virus-producing cells, while silencing the m6A erasers increased Gag expression. Our findings suggest an important role of m6A modification of HIV-1 RNA in viral infection and HIV-1 protein synthesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15528.001 PMID:27371828

  6. HIV infection of monocytes inhibits the T-lymphocyte proliferative response to recall antigens, via production of eicosanoids.

    PubMed Central

    Foley, P; Kazazi, F; Biti, R; Sorrell, T C; Cunningham, A L

    1992-01-01

    Human monocytes infected in vitro with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) soon after adherence to plastic substrate demonstrated a significantly decreased ability to restimulate autologous immune T-lymphocyte proliferation after exposure to soluble (tetanus toxoid) and particulate [herpes simplex virus (HSV)] antigen. Incubation with the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (2-5 microM), prevented inhibition of antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. The inhibitory activity was identified in ultrafiltrates containing the low molecular weight fraction (less than 3000 MW) of supernatants from HIV-infected monocyte cultures. This activity was significantly and markedly reduced in similar ultrafiltrates prepared from indomethacin-treated cultures. Increased concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were detected in ultrafiltrates from HIV-infected monocyte cultures compared with uninfected cultures and cultures preincubated with indomethacin. Ultrafiltrates were inhibitory when added during the presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes but not when removed from monocyte cultures prior to the addition of lymphocytes. In addition, ultrafiltrates inhibited antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation and PHA-induced lymphocyte proliferation to the same extent. These data indicate that cyclo-oxygenase products of arachidonic acid, including PGE2, are produced in excess by HIV-infected monocytes and that PGE2 and perhaps other cyclo-oxygenase products are implicated in the inhibition of antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation via a direct effect on T lymphocytes. PMID:1572689

  7. Expression patterns of the T antigen and the cryptic T antigen in rat fetuses: detection with the lectin amaranthin.

    PubMed

    Sata, T; Zuber, C; Rinderle, S J; Goldstein, I J; Roth, J

    1990-06-01

    The lectin amaranthin, purified from the seeds of Amaranthus caudatus, has been shown to react specifically with the Gal beta 1,3GalNAc-alpha and the NeuAc alpha 2,3Gal beta 1,3GalNAc-alpha sequence which represent the T antigen and the cryptic T antigen, respectively. We report here the development of labeling techniques that apply amaranthin to stain paraffin sections from rat fetuses. Amaranthin staining was inhibited by pre-incubation of lectin-gold complexes with 10 mM Gal beta 1,3GalNAc-alpha-O-benzyl (synthetic T antigen) or 10 mM Gal beta 1,3GalNAc-alpha-O-aminophenylethyl-human serum albumin (T antigen neoglycoprotein), asialoglycophorin, asialofetuin, and asialomucin. The beta-elimination reaction also abolished the lectin staining demonstrating specificity for O-glycosidically linked structures. A comparison with monoclonal anti-T antigen antibody immunostaining demonstrated that amaranthin detects the T antigen and its cryptic form in tissue sections. Application of the galactose oxidase-Schiff sequence abolished amaranthin (and anti-T antibody) binding to the T antigen but not to its cryptic form, and therefore permitted their differentiation in tissue sections. Histochemical evidence was obtained indicating that amaranthin is a more specific anti-T reagent than peanut lectin. Data are presented that show the differential expression of the T antigen and the cryptic T antigen in organs and cells of rat fetuses late in gestation. Therefore, amaranthin can be used for histochemical detection of the T antigen and the cryptic T antigen, and facilitates discrimination between them. PMID:2335739

  8. Co-Administration of Poly I:C and ISCOMs Modifies Antigen Processing in Dendritic Cell Subsets and Enhances HIV Gag-Specific T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kylie M.; Yamamoto, Ayako; Costa, Andreia; Darrah, Patricia A.; Lindsay, Ross W.B.; Hegde, Sonia T.; Johnson, Teresa R.; Flynn, Barbara J.; Lore, Karin; Seder, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Currently approved adjuvants induce protective antibody responses but are more limited for generating cellular immunity. Here we assessed the effect of combining two adjuvants with distinct mechanisms of action on their ability to prime T cells; the TLR3 ligand, polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C), and immunostimulatory complexes (ISCOMs). Each adjuvant was administered alone or together with HIV Gag protein (Gag) and the magnitude, quality and phenotype of Gag-specific T cell responses were assessed. For CD8 T cells, all adjuvants induced a comparable response magnitude, but combining Poly I:C with ISCOMs induced a high frequency of CD127+, IL-2 producing cells with decreased expression of Tbet compared to either adjuvant alone. For CD4 T cells, combining Poly I:C and ISCOMs increased the frequency of multifunctional cells, producing IFNγ, IL-2 and TNF, and the total magnitude of the response compared to either adjuvant alone. CD8 or CD4 T cell responses induced by both adjuvants mediated protection against Gag-expressing Listeria monocytogenes or vaccinia viral infections. Poly I:C and ISCOMs can alter antigen uptake and/or processing and we therefore used fluorescently labeled HIV Gag and DQ-OVA to assess these mechanisms respectively in multiple DC subsets. Poly I:C promoted uptake and retention of antigen, while ISCOMs enhanced antigen degradation. Combining Poly I:C and ISCOMs caused substantial death of DCs but persistence of degraded antigen. These data illustrate how combining adjuvants, such as Poly I:C and ISCOMs that modulate antigen processing and have potent innate activity, can enhance the magnitude, quality and phenotype of T cell immunity. PMID:24089189

  9. Brugia malayi Antigen (BmA) Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection but Neither BmA nor ES-62 Alter HIV-1 Infectivity of DC Induced CD4+ Th-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mouser, Emily E. I. M.; Pollakis, Georgios; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Harnett, William

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of HIV-1 disease is the association of heightened CD4+ T-cell activation with HIV-1 replication. Parasitic helminths including filarial nematodes have evolved numerous and complex mechanisms to skew, dampen and evade human immune responses suggesting that HIV-1 infection may be modulated in co-infected individuals. Here we studied the effects of two filarial nematode products, adult worm antigen from Brugia malayi (BmA) and excretory-secretory product 62 (ES-62) from Acanthocheilonema viteae on HIV-1 infection in vitro. Neither BmA nor ES-62 influenced HIV-1 replication in CD4+ enriched T-cells, with either a CCR5- or CXCR4-using virus. BmA, but not ES-62, had the capacity to bind the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) thereby inhibiting HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ enriched T-cells. As for their effect on DCs, neither BmA nor ES-62 could enhance or inhibit DC maturation as determined by CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression, or the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α. As expected, due to the unaltered DC phenotype, no differences were found in CD4+ T helper (Th) cell phenotypes induced by DCs treated with either BmA or ES-62. Moreover, the HIV-1 susceptibility of the Th-cell populations induced by BmA or ES-62 exposed DCs was unaffected for both CCR5- and CXCR4-using HIV-1 viruses. In conclusion, although BmA has the potential capacity to interfere with HIV-1 transmission or initial viral dissemination through preventing the virus from interacting with DCs, no differences in the Th-cell polarizing capacity of DCs exposed to BmA or ES-62 were observed. Neither antigenic source demonstrated beneficial or detrimental effects on the HIV-1 susceptibility of CD4+ Th-cells induced by exposed DCs. PMID:26808476

  10. HIV-1 Trans Infection of CD4+ T Cells by Professional Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldo, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1990s we have known of the fascinating ability of a complex set of professional antigen presenting cells (APCs; dendritic cells, monocytes/macrophages, and B lymphocytes) to mediate HIV-1 trans infection of CD4+ T cells. This results in a burst of virus replication in the T cells that is much greater than that resulting from direct, cis infection of either APC or T cells, or trans infection between T cells. Such APC-to-T cell trans infection first involves a complex set of virus subtype, attachment, entry, and replication patterns that have many similarities among APC, as well as distinct differences related to virus receptors, intracellular trafficking, and productive and nonproductive replication pathways. The end result is that HIV-1 can sequester within the APC for several days and be transmitted via membrane extensions intracellularly and extracellularly to T cells across the virologic synapse. Virus replication requires activated T cells that can develop concurrently with the events of virus transmission. Further research is essential to fill the many gaps in our understanding of these trans infection processes and their role in natural HIV-1 infection. PMID:24278768

  11. Preferentially Expressed Antigen of Melanoma Prevents Lung Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhengwang; Li, Lei; Lin, Zaijun; Xu, Wei; Han, Shuai; Cao, Wenjiao; Xu, Yunfei; Song, Dianwen; Yang, Xinghai; Xiao, Jianru

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death worldwide. The poor survival rate is largely due to the extensive local invasion and metastasis. However, the mechanisms underlying the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer cells remain largely elusive. In this study, we examined the role of preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma (PRAME) in lung cancer metastasis. Our results show that PRAME is downregulated in lung adenocarcinoma and lung bone metastasis compared with normal human lung. Knockdown of PRAME decreases the expression of E-Cadherin and promotes the proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of lung cancer cells by regulating multiple critical genes, most of which are related to cell migration, including MMP1, CCL2, CTGF, and PLAU. Clinical data analysis reveals that the expression of MMP1 correlates with the clinical features and outcome of lung adenocarcinoma. Taken together, our data demonstrate that PRAME plays a role in preventing the invasion and metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma and novel diagnostic or therapeutic strategies can be developed by targeting PRAME. PMID:27391090

  12. Comparison of HIV-1 protease expression in different fusion forms.

    PubMed

    Wan, M; Takagi, M; Loh, B N; Imanaka, T

    1995-06-01

    Earlier observations showed that the expression of recombinant protease of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 PR) was usually in a low level, and its proteolytic activity and hydrophobicity were believed to be toxic for the host cells. Various constructs were investigated that contained an N-terminal extended HIV-1 PR gene (PR107) in order to find a system which can express this protease in high level. The constructs of PR107 gene expressed as fusion proteins either with glutathione S-transferase (GST) by pGEX-PR107 or with maltose-binding protein (MBP) by pMAL-PR107 showed that the full length of fusion protein exhibited self-cleavage in E. coli. The results from expression experiments indicated that the size of the fusion portion does not affect the self-processing of fused HIV-1 PR to release its mature form, despite the attachment of only one subunit of the dimeric protease to GST or MBP. The construct, pET-PR107, under the control of strong bacteriophage T7 promoter system, did not show clear advantages for expression of this HIV-1 PR. Comparing these three constructs, the pGEX-PR107 system showed the highest expression level. Quantitative immuno-blotting indicated that the amount of HIV-1 PR expressed by pGEX-PR107 was twice that expressed by pMAL-PR107, and thrice that expressed by pET-PR107. More than 1 mg of pure HIV-1 PR from per liter culture of E. coli. DH5 alpha containing pGEX-PR107 can be obtained via the purification procedures [Biochem. Mol. Biol. International, (1995) 35:899-912].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7663445

  13. Testis expressed 19 is a novel cancer-testis antigen expressed in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jianhua; Chen, Yan; Liao, Xinhui; Li, Jiaqiang; Wang, Han; Wu, Chenglong; Zou, Xiaowen; Yang, Gang; Shi, Jing; Luo, Liya; Liu, Litao; Deng, Jianping; Tang, Aifa

    2016-06-01

    Bladder cancer exhibits high mortality as a result of limited therapeutic options and a high recurrence rate. Accordingly, novel treatments such as immunotherapy have emerged as promising therapeutic modalities to prolong overall patient survival and effect a disease cure, which has renewed enthusiasm for the identification of tumor-specific target antigens. Cancer-testis (CT) antigens are recognized as ideal targets for immunotherapy because of their expression features and high immunogenicity profiles. Here, we investigate the expression pattern of a novel CT antigen, testis-expressed 19 (TEX19), in patients with bladder carcinoma and among multiple human tissues. Six bladder cancer cell lines (T24, UM-UC-3, J82, 5637, SW780, and RT4) were also analyzed for TEX19 expression. Our results reveal that TEX19 expression in normal tissue is restricted to human testis. In addition, TEX19 mRNA expression was detected in 60 % (24/40) bladder cancer samples, whereas 58.20 % (110/189) were positive for TEXT19 protein expression. Compared to low-grade tumors, TEX19 exhibited increased expression in high-grade tumors, from 53.69 to 77.14 %, respectively (P = 0.011). TEX19 was also expressed in all six bladder cancer cell lines. Together, our findings suggest that TEX19 represents a novel CT gene and might play a role in the progression of bladder cancer and that this gene therefore provides a potential target for immunotherapy treatment strategies against bladder cancer. PMID:26695143

  14. Differential expression and interaction of host factors augment HIV-1 gene expression in neonatal mononuclear cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaravaradan, Vasudha; Mehta, Roshni; Harris, David T.; Zack, Jerome A.; Ahmad, Nafees

    2010-04-25

    We have previously shown a higher level of HIV-1 replication and gene expression in neonatal (cord) blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) compared with adult blood cells (PBMC), which could be due to differential expression of host factors. We performed the gene expression profile of CBMC and PBMC and found that 8013 genes were expressed at higher levels in CBMC than PBMC and 8028 genes in PBMC than CBMC, including 1181 and 1414 genes upregulated after HIV-1 infection in CBMC and PBMC, respectively. Several transcription factors (NF-kappaB, E2F, HAT-1, TFIIE, Cdk9, Cyclin T1), signal transducers (STAT3, STAT5A) and cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10) were upregulated in CBMC than PBMC, which are known to influence HIV-1 replication. In addition, a repressor of HIV-1 transcription, YY1, was down regulated in CBMC than PBMC and several matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-7, -12, -14) were significantly upregulated in HIV-1 infected CBMC than PBMC. Furthermore, we show that CBMC nuclear extracts interacted with a higher extent to HIV-1 LTR cis-acting sequences, including NF-kappaB, NFAT, AP1 and NF-IL6 compared with PBMC nuclear extracts and retroviral based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) for STAT3 and IL-6 down regulated their own and HIV-1 gene expression, signifying that these factors influenced differential HIV-1 gene expression in CBMC than PBMC.

  15. HIV-infected CD4+ T Cells Use T-bet-dependent Pathway for Production of IL-10 Upon Antigen Recognition.

    PubMed

    Shete, A; Suryawanshi, P; Godbole, S; Pawar, J; Paranjape, R; Thakar, M

    2016-04-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 has been implicated in persistence of pathogens in a number of chronic infections. Infected CD4+ cells upon reactivation with HIV antigens were also shown to produce IL-10, which might contribute to their persistence. Hence, it is crucial to determine mechanisms regulating IL-10 production after activation with HIV antigens for devising effective blocking strategies. In this study, ERK-, T-bet- and FoxP3-dependent pathways were evaluated for their possible roles in IL-10 production by infected CD4+ cells after reactivation with HIV Env. Intracellular and secreted IL-10 levels were determined by flow cytometry and Bioplex assay after treating PBMCs with PD98059, tipifarnib and cyclosporin A for blocking of ERK-, T-bet-and FoxP3-dependent pathways, respectively. Baseline levels of T-bet, pERK were higher in P24+ CD4+ cells as compared to uninfected CD4+ cells, which increased further after activation with Env. Inhibition of T-bet resulted in 2.3-fold reduction of IL-10 expression whereas ERK and FoxP3 inhibition failed to cause suppression of IL-10 expression. Conversely, IL-10 secreted by PBMCs was inhibited maximally after ERK inhibition suggesting its role in regulation of cytokine secretory pathway. IFN-γ was found to be suppressed after treatment with inhibitors of all these pathways. Thus, the study highlighted need for IL-10 blockade along with the use of antigens for therapeutic vaccinations or latency reversal and identified the T-bet-dependent pathway as an important pathway regulating IL-10 production by infected CD4+ cells. However, simultaneous blockade of IFN-γ precludes use of inhibitor of this pathway as an IL-10 blocking strategy. PMID:27028319

  16. HIV Infection Upregulates Caveolin 1 Expression To Restrict Virus Production▿

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shanshan; Wang, Xiao Mei; Nadeau, Peter E.; Mergia, Ayalew

    2010-01-01

    Caveolin 1 (Cav-1) is a major protein of a specific membrane lipid raft known as caveolae. Cav-1 interacts with the gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope, but the role of Cav-1 in HIV replication and pathogenesis is not known. In this report, we demonstrate that HIV infection in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs), THP-1 macrophages, and U87-CD4 cells results in a dramatic upregulation of Cav-1 expression mediated by HIV Tat. The activity of p53 is essential for Tat-induced Cav-1 expression, as our findings show enhanced phosphorylation of serine residues at amino acid positions 15 and 46 in the presence of Tat with a resulting Cav-1 upregulation. Furthermore, inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) blocked phosphorylation of p53 in the presence of Tat. Infection studies of Cav-1-overexpressing cells reveal a significant reduction of HIV production. Taken together, these results suggest that HIV infection enhances the expression of Cav-1, which subsequently causes virus reduction, suggesting that Cav-1 may contribute to persistent infection in macrophages. PMID:20610713

  17. Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8+ T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, Masakazu; Kim, Patrick Y.; Ng, Hwee L.; Ringpis, Gene-Errol E.; Kranz, Emiko; Chan, Joshua; O'Connor, Sean; Yang, Otto O.; Chen, Irvin S.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are artificially engineered receptors that confer a desired specificity to immune effector T cells. As an HIV-1-specific CAR, CD4ζ CAR has been extensively tested in vitro as well as in clinical trials. T cells modified with this CAR mediated highly potent anti-HIV-1 activities in vitro and were well-tolerated in vivo, but exerted limited effects on viral load and reservoir size due to poor survival and/or functionality of the transduced cells in patients. We hypothesize that ectopic expression of CD4ζ on CD8+ T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection, resulting in poor survival of those cells. To test this possibility, highly purified CD8+ T cells were genetically modified with a CD4ζ-encoding lentiviral vector and infected with HIV-1. CD8+ T cells were vulnerable to HIV-1 infection upon expression of CD4ζ as evidenced by elevated levels of p24Gag in cells and culture supernatants. Concurrently, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8+ T cells was reduced relative to control cells upon HIV-1 infection. To protect these cells from HIV-1 infection, we co-expressed two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs previously developed by our group together with CD4ζ. This combination vector was able to suppress HIV-1 infection without impairing HIV-1-dependent effector activities of CD4ζ. In addition, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8+ T cells maintained similar levels to that of the control even under HIV-1 infection. These results suggest that protecting CD4ζ-modified CD8+ T cells from HIV-1 infection is required for prolonged HIV-1-specific immune surveillance. PMID:25998390

  18. Transcriptional Bursting from the HIV-1 Promoter is a Significant Source of Stochastic Noise in HIV-1 Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A; Razooky, B; Cox, Chris D.; Simpson, Michael L; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of noise in gene expression has proven a powerful approach for analyzing gene regulatory architecture. To probe the regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of HIV-1, we analyze noise in gene-expression from HIV-1 s long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter at different HIV-1 integration sites across the human genome. Flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression from the HIV-1 LTR shows high variability (noise) at each integration site. Notably, the measured noise levels are inconsistent with constitutive gene expression models. Instead, quantification of expression noise indicates that HIV-1 gene expression occurs through randomly timed bursts of activity from the LTR and that each burst generates an average of 2 10 mRNA transcripts before the promoter returns to an inactive state. These data indicate that transcriptional bursting can generate high variability in HIV-1 early gene products, which may critically influence the viral fate-decision between active replication and proviral latency.

  19. Two types of nanoparticle-based bio-barcode amplification assays to detect HIV-1 p24 antigen

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background HIV-1 p24 antigen is a major viral component of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) which can be used to identify persons in the early stage of infection and transmission of HIV-1 from infected mothers to infants. The detection of p24 is usually accomplished by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with low detection sensitivity. Here we report the use of two bio-barcode amplification (BCA) assays combined with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gel electrophoresis to quantify HIV-1 p24 antigen. Method A pair of anti-p24 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were used in BCA assays to capture HIV-1 p24 antigen in a sandwich format and allowed for the quantitative measurement of captured p24 using PCR and gel electrophoresis. The first 1 G12 mAb was coated on microplate wells or magnetic microparticles (MMPs) to capture free p24 antigens. Captured p24 in turn captured 1D4 mAb coated gold nanoparticle probes (GNPs) containing double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. One strand of the oligonucleotides was covalently immobilized whereas the unbound complimentary bio-barcode DNA strand could be released upon heating. The released bio-barcode DNA was amplified by PCR, electrophoresed in agarose gel and quantified. Results The in-house ELISA assay was found to quantify p24 antigen with a limit of detection (LOD) of 1,000 pg/ml and a linear range between 3,000 and 100,000 pg/ml. In contrast, the BCA-based microplate method yielded an LOD of 1 pg/ml and a linear detection range from 1 to 10,000 pg/ml. The BCA-based MMP method yielded an LOD of 0.1 pg/ml and a linear detection range from 0.1 to 1,000 pg/ml. Conclusions When combined with PCR and simple gel electrophoresis, BCA-based microplate and MMPs assays can be used to quantify HIV-1 p24 antigen. These methods are 3–4 orders of magnitude more sensitive than our in-house ELISA-based assay and may provide a useful approach to detect p24 in patients newly infected with HIV. PMID

  20. Modulation of Cellular and Viral Gene Expression by the Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Renne, Rolf; Barry, Chris; Dittmer, Dirk; Compitello, Nicole; Brown, Patrick O.; Ganem, Don

    2001-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), also called human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), is the likely etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma and primary effusion lymphoma. Common to these malignancies is that tumor cells are latently infected with KSHV. Viral gene expression is limited to a few genes, one of which is the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), the product of ORF73. Examination of the primary sequence of LANA reveals some structural features reminiscent of transcription factors, leading us to hypothesize that LANA may regulate viral and cellular transcription during latency. In reporter gene-based transient transfection assays, we found that LANA can have either positive or negative effects on gene expression. While expression of a reporter gene from several synthetic promoters was increased in the presence of LANA, expression from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) long terminal repeat (LTR)—and from NF-κB-dependent reporter genes—was reduced by LANA expression. In addition, the promoter of KSHV ORF73 itself is activated up to 5.5-fold by LANA. This autoregulation may be important in tumorigenesis, because two other genes (v-cyclin and v-FLIP) with likely roles in cell growth and survival are also controlled by this element. To identify cellular genes influenced by LANA, we employed cDNA array-based expression profiling. Six known genes (and nine expressed sequence tags) were found to be upregulated in LANA-expressing cell lines. One of these, Staf-50, is known to inhibit expression from the HIV LTR; most of the other known genes are interferon inducible, although the interferon genes themselves were not induced by LANA. These data demonstrate that LANA expression has effects on cellular and viral gene expression. We suggest that, whether direct or indirect in origin, these effects may play important roles in the pathobiology of KSHV infection. PMID:11119614

  1. Expression and Cellular Immunogenicity of a Transgenic Antigen Driven by Endogenous Poxviral Early Promoters at Their Authentic Loci in MVA

    PubMed Central

    Orubu, Toritse; Alharbi, Naif Khalaf; Lambe, Teresa; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Cottingham, Matthew G.

    2012-01-01

    CD8+ T cell responses to vaccinia virus are directed almost exclusively against early gene products. The attenuated strain modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is under evaluation in clinical trials of new vaccines designed to elicit cellular immune responses against pathogens including Plasmodium spp., M. tuberculosis and HIV-1. All of these recombinant MVAs (rMVA) utilize the well-established method of linking the gene of interest to a cloned poxviral promoter prior to insertion into the viral genome at a suitable locus by homologous recombination in infected cells. Using BAC recombineering, we show that potent early promoters that drive expression of non-functional or non-essential MVA open reading frames (ORFs) can be harnessed for immunogenic expression of recombinant antigen. Precise replacement of the MVA orthologs of C11R, F11L, A44L and B8R with a model antigen positioned to use the same translation initiation codon allowed early transgene expression similar to or slightly greater than that achieved by the commonly-used p7.5 or short synthetic promoters. The frequency of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells induced in mice by single shot or adenovirus-prime, rMVA-boost vaccination were similarly equal or marginally enhanced using endogenous promoters at their authentic genomic loci compared to the traditional constructs. The enhancement in immunogenicity observed using the C11R or F11L promoters compared with p7.5 was similar to that obtained with the mH5 promoter compared with p7.5. Furthermore, the growth rates of the viruses were unimpaired and the insertions were genetically stable. Insertion of a transgenic ORF in place of a viral ORF by BAC recombineering can thus provide not only a potent promoter, but also, concomitantly, a suitable insertion site, potentially facilitating development of MVA vaccines expressing multiple recombinant antigens. PMID:22761956

  2. Live attenuated measles vaccine expressing HIV-1 Gag virus like particles covered with gp160DELTAV1V2 is strongly immunogenic

    SciTech Connect

    Guerbois, Mathilde; Moris, Arnaud; Combredet, Chantal; Najburg, Valerie; Ruffie, Claude; Fevrier, Michele; Cayet, Nadege; Brandler, Samantha; Schwartz, Olivier; Tangy, Frederic

    2009-05-25

    Although a live attenuated HIV vaccine is not currently considered for safety reasons, a strategy inducing both T cells and neutralizing antibodies to native assembled HIV-1 particles expressed by a replicating virus might mimic the advantageous characteristics of live attenuated vaccine. To this aim, we generated a live attenuated recombinant measles vaccine expressing HIV-1 Gag virus-like particles (VLPs) covered with gp160DELTAV1V2 Env protein. The measles-HIV virus replicated efficiently in cell culture and induced the intense budding of HIV particles covered with Env. In mice sensitive to MV infection, this recombinant vaccine stimulated high levels of cellular and humoral immunity to both MV and HIV with neutralizing activity. The measles-HIV virus infected human professional antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells and B cells, and induced efficient presentation of HIV-1 epitopes and subsequent activation of human HIV-1 Gag-specific T cell clones. This candidate vaccine will be next tested in non-human primates. As a pediatric vaccine, it might protect children and adolescents simultaneously from measles and HIV.

  3. T Cells Expressing CD19/CD20 Bispecific Chimeric Antigen Receptors Prevent Antigen Escape by Malignant B Cells.

    PubMed

    Zah, Eugenia; Lin, Meng-Yin; Silva-Benedict, Anne; Jensen, Michael C; Chen, Yvonne Y

    2016-06-01

    The adoptive transfer of T cells expressing anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown remarkable curative potential against advanced B-cell malignancies, but multiple trials have also reported patient relapses due to the emergence of CD19-negative leukemic cells. Here, we report the design and optimization of single-chain, bispecific CARs that trigger robust cytotoxicity against target cells expressing either CD19 or CD20, two clinically validated targets for B-cell malignancies. We determined the structural parameters required for efficient dual-antigen recognition, and we demonstrate that optimized bispecific CARs can control both wild-type B-cell lymphoma and CD19(-) mutants with equal efficiency in vivo To our knowledge, this is the first bispecific CAR capable of preventing antigen escape by performing true OR-gate signal computation on a clinically relevant pair of tumor-associated antigens. The CD19-OR-CD20 CAR is fully compatible with existing T-cell manufacturing procedures and implementable by current clinical protocols. These results present an effective solution to the challenge of antigen escape in CD19 CAR T-cell therapy, and they highlight the utility of structure-based rational design in the development of receptors with higher-level complexity. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 498-508. ©2016 AACRSee related Spotlight by Sadelain, p. 473. PMID:27059623

  4. CRISPR-mediated Activation of Latent HIV-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Limsirichai, Prajit; Gaj, Thomas; Schaffer, David V

    2016-03-01

    Complete eradication of HIV-1 infection is impeded by the existence of cells that harbor chromosomally integrated but transcriptionally inactive provirus. These cells can persist for years without producing viral progeny, rendering them refractory to immune surveillance and antiretroviral therapy and providing a permanent reservoir for the stochastic reactivation and reseeding of HIV-1. Strategies for purging this latent reservoir are thus needed to eradicate infection. Here, we show that engineered transcriptional activation systems based on CRISPR/Cas9 can be harnessed to activate viral gene expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further demonstrate that complementing Cas9 activators with latency-reversing compounds can enhance latent HIV-1 transcription and that epigenome modulation using CRISPR-based acetyltransferases can also promote viral gene activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that CRISPR systems are potentially effective tools for inducing latent HIV-1 expression and that their use, in combination with antiretroviral therapy, could lead to improved therapies for HIV-1 infection. PMID:26607397

  5. Differentially-Expressed Pseudogenes in HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditi; Brown, C. Titus; Zheng, Yong-Hui; Adami, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Not all pseudogenes are transcriptionally silent as previously thought. Pseudogene transcripts, although not translated, contribute to the non-coding RNA pool of the cell that regulates the expression of other genes. Pseudogene transcripts can also directly compete with the parent gene transcripts for mRNA stability and other cell factors, modulating their expression levels. Tissue-specific and cancer-specific differential expression of these “functional” pseudogenes has been reported. To ascertain potential pseudogene:gene interactions in HIV-1 infection, we analyzed transcriptomes from infected and uninfected T-cells and found that 21 pseudogenes are differentially expressed in HIV-1 infection. This is interesting because parent genes of one-third of these differentially-expressed pseudogenes are implicated in HIV-1 life cycle, and parent genes of half of these pseudogenes are involved in different viral infections. Our bioinformatics analysis identifies candidate pseudogene:gene interactions that may be of significance in HIV-1 infection. Experimental validation of these interactions would establish that retroviruses exploit this newly-discovered layer of host gene expression regulation for their own benefit. PMID:26426037

  6. Protective Antigens Against Glanders Identified by Expression Library Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Gregory C.; Robida, Mark D.; Judy, Barbara M.; Qazi, Omar; Brown, Katherine A.; Deeraksa, Arpaporn; Taylor, Katherine; Massey, Shane; Loskutov, Andrey; Borovkov, Alex Y.; Brown, Kevin; Cano, Jose A.; Magee, D. Mitchell; Torres, Alfredo G.; Estes, D. Mark; Sykes, Kathryn F.

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia are highly evolved Gram-negative bacteria that primarily infect solipeds but are transmitted to humans by ingestion and cutaneous or aerosol exposures. Heightened concern over human infections of Burkholderia mallei and the very closely related species B. pseudomallei is due to the pathogens’ proven effectiveness as bioweapons, and to the increased potential for natural opportunistic infections in the growing diabetic and immuno-compromised populations. These Burkholderia species are nearly impervious to antibiotic treatments and no vaccine exists. In this study, the genome of the highly virulent B. mallei ATCC23344 strain was examined by expression library immunization for gene-encoded protective antigens. This protocol for genomic-scale functional screening was customized to accommodate the unusually large complexity of Burkholderia, and yielded 12 new putative vaccine candidates. Five of the candidates were individually tested as protein immunogens and three were found to confer significant partial protection against a lethal pulmonary infection in a murine model of disease. Determinations of peripheral blood cytokine and chemokine profiles following individual protein immunizations show that interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-4 are elicited by the three confirmed candidates, but unexpectedly interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α are not. We suggest that these pathogen components, discovered using genetic immunization and confirmed in a conventional protein format, will be useful toward the development of a safe and effective glanders vaccine. PMID:22125550

  7. Cell-type specific regulation of gene expression by simian virus 40 T antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Cantalupo, Paul G.; Saenz-Robles, Maria Teresa; Rathi, Abhilasha V.; Beerman, Rebecca W.; Patterson, William H.; Whitehead, Robert H.; Pipas, James M.

    2009-03-30

    SV40 transforms cells through the action of two oncoproteins, large T antigen and small t antigen. Small t antigen targets phosphatase PP2A, while large T antigen stimulates cell proliferation and survival by action on multiple proteins, including the tumor suppressors Rb and p53. Large T antigen also binds components of the transcription initiation complex and several transcription factors. We examined global gene expression in SV40-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts, and in enterocytes obtained from transgenic mice. SV40 transformation alters the expression of approximately 800 cellular genes in both systems. Much of this regulation is observed in both MEFs and enterocytes and is consistent with T antigen action on the Rb-E2F pathway. However, the regulation of many genes is cell-type specific, suggesting that unique signaling pathways are activated in different cell types upon transformation, and that the consequences of SV40 transformation depends on the type of cell targeted.

  8. Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8{sup +} T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamata, Masakazu; Kim, Patrick Y.; Ng, Hwee L.; Ringpis, Gene-Errol E.; Kranz, Emiko; Chan, Joshua; O'Connor, Sean; Yang, Otto O.; Chen, Irvin S.Y.

    2015-07-31

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are artificially engineered receptors that confer a desired specificity to immune effector T cells. As an HIV-1-specific CAR, CD4ζ CAR has been extensively tested in vitro as well as in clinical trials. T cells modified with this CAR mediated highly potent anti-HIV-1 activities in vitro and were well-tolerated in vivo, but exerted limited effects on viral load and reservoir size due to poor survival and/or functionality of the transduced cells in patients. We hypothesize that ectopic expression of CD4ζ on CD8{sup +} T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection, resulting in poor survival of those cells. To test this possibility, highly purified CD8{sup +} T cells were genetically modified with a CD4ζ-encoding lentiviral vector and infected with HIV-1. CD8{sup +} T cells were vulnerable to HIV-1 infection upon expression of CD4ζ as evidenced by elevated levels of p24{sup Gag} in cells and culture supernatants. Concurrently, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells was reduced relative to control cells upon HIV-1 infection. To protect these cells from HIV-1 infection, we co-expressed two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs previously developed by our group together with CD4ζ. This combination vector was able to suppress HIV-1 infection without impairing HIV-1-dependent effector activities of CD4ζ. In addition, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells maintained similar levels to that of the control even under HIV-1 infection. These results suggest that protecting CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection is required for prolonged HIV-1-specific immune surveillance. - Highlights: • Ectopic expression of CD4ζ CAR in CD8{sup +} T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection. • Co-expression of two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection. • Protecting CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection suppresses its cytopathic effect.

  9. HLA Class II Antigen Expression in Colorectal Carcinoma Tumors as a Favorable Prognostic Marker12

    PubMed Central

    Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Zlobec, Inti; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Arriga, Roberto; Coppola, Andrea; Caratelli, Sara; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Lauro, Davide; Lugli, Alessandro; Han, Junyi; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Ferrone, Cristina; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Tornillo, Luigi; Droeser, Raoul; Rossi, Piero; Attanasio, Antonio; Ferrone, Soldano; Terracciano, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the frequency of HLA class II antigen expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) tumors, its association with the clinical course of the disease, and the underlying mechanism(s). Two tissue microarrays constructed with 220 and 778 CRC tumors were stained with HLA-DR, DQ, and DP antigen-specific monoclonal antibody LGII-612.14, using the immunoperoxidase staining technique. The immunohistochemical staining results were correlated with the clinical course of the disease. The functional role of HLA class II antigens expressed on CRC cells was analyzed by investigating their in vitro interactions with immune cells. HLA class II antigens were expressed in about 25% of the 220 and 21% of the 778 tumors analyzed with an overall frequency of 23%. HLA class II antigens were detected in 19% of colorectal adenomas. Importantly, the percentage of stained cells and the staining intensity were significantly lower than those detected in CRC tumors. However, HLA class II antigen staining was weakly detected only in 5.4% of 37 normal mucosa tissues. HLA class II antigen expression was associated with a favorable clinical course of the disease. In vitro stimulation with interferon gamma (IFNγ) induced HLA class II antigen expression on two of the four CRC cell lines tested. HLA class II antigen expression on CRC cells triggered interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production by resting monocytes. HLA class II antigen expression in CRC tumors is a favorable prognostic marker. This association may reflect stimulation of IL-1β production by monocytes. PMID:24563618

  10. Deletion of fusion peptide or destabilization of fusion core of HIV gp41 enhances antigenicity and immunogenicity of 4E10 epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing; Chen Xi; Jiang Shibo Chen Yinghua

    2008-11-07

    The human monoclonal antibody 4E10 against the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41 demonstrates broad neutralizing activity across various strains, and makes its epitope an attractive target for HIV-1 vaccine development. Although the contiguous epitope of 4E10 has been identified, attempts to re-elicit 4E10-like antibodies have failed, possibly due to the lack of proper conformation of the 4E10 epitope. Here we used pIg-tail expression system to construct a panel of eukaryotic cell-surface expression plasmids encoding the extracellular domain of gp41 with deletion of fusion peptide and/or introduction of L568P mutation that may disrupt the gp41 six-helix bundle core conformation as DNA vaccines for immunization of mice. We found that these changes resulted in significant increase of the antigenicity and immunogenicity of 4E10 epitope. This information is thus useful for rational design of vaccines targeting the HIV-1 gp41 MPER.

  11. Expression and immunogenicity of novel subunit enterovirus 71 VP1 antigens.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Wang, Shixia; Gan, Weihua; Zhang, Wenhong; Ju, Liwen; Huang, Zuhu; Lu, Shan

    2012-04-20

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common viral illness in young children. HFMD is caused by viruses belonging to the enterovirus genus of the picornavirus family. Recently, enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a virulent agent for HFMD with severe clinical outcomes. In the current report, we conducted a pilot antigen engineering study to optimize the expression and immunogenicity of subunit VP1 antigen for the design of EV71 vaccines. DNA immunization was adopted as a simple technical approach to test different designs of VP1 antigens without the need to express VP1 protein in vitro first. Our studies indicated that the expression and immunogenicity of VP1 protein can be improved with alternated VP1 antigen designs. Data presented in the current report revealed novel pathways to optimize the design of VP1 antigen-based EV71 vaccines. PMID:22450314

  12. Production of recombinant botulism antigens: a review of expression systems.

    PubMed

    Moreira, G M S G; Cunha, C E P; Salvarani, F M; Gonçalves, L A; Pires, P S; Conceição, F R; Lobato, F C F

    2014-08-01

    Botulism is a paralytic disease caused by intoxication with neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum. Despite their similar mechanism of action, the botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are classified in eight serotypes (A to H). As to veterinary medicine, the impact of this disease is essentially economic, since different species of production animals can be affected, especially by BoNT/C and D. In human health, botulism is feared in a possible biological warfare, what would involve mainly the BoNT/A, B, E and F. In both cases, the most effective way to deal with botulism is through prevention, which involves vaccination. However, the current vaccines against this disease have several drawbacks on their process of production and, besides this, can be dangerous to producers since it requires certain level of biosafety. This way, recombinant vaccines have been shown to be a great alternative for the development of vaccines against both animal and human botulism. All BoNTs have a 50-kDa light chain (LC) and a 100-kDa heavy chain (HC). The latter one presents two domains of 50 kDa, called the N-terminal (HN) and C-terminal (HC) halves. Among these regions, the HC alone seem to confer the proper immune response against intoxication. Since innumerous studies describe the expression of these distinct regions using different systems, strategies, and protocols, it is difficult to define the best option for a viable vaccine production. Thereby, the present review describes the problematic of botulism and discusses the main advances for the viable production of vaccines for both human and veterinary medicine using recombinant antigens. PMID:24930432

  13. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 specifically induces expression of the B-cell activation antigen CD23

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.; Gregory, C.D.; Rowe, M.; Rickinson, A.B.; Wang, D.; Birkenbach, M.; Kikutani, H.; Kishimoto, T.; Kieff, E.

    1987-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of EBV-negative Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells includes some changes similar to those seen in normal B lymphocytes that have been growth transformed by EBV. The role of individual EBV genes in this process was evaluated by introducing each of the viral genes that are normally expressed in EBV growth-transformed and latently infected lymphoblasts into an EBV-negative BL cell line, using recombinant retrovirus-mediated transfer. Clones of cells were derived that stably express the EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1), EBNA-2, EBNA-3, EBNA-leader protein, or EBV latent membrane protein (LMP). These were compared with control clones infected with the retrovirus vector. All 10 clones converted to EBNA-2 expression differed from control clones or clones expressing other EBV proteins by growth in tight clumps and by markedly increased expression of one particular surface marker of B-cell activation, CD23. Other activation antigens were unaffected by EBNA-2 expression, as were markers already expressed on the parent BL cell line. The results indicate that EBNA-2 is a specific direct or indirect trans-activator of CD23. This establishes a link between an EBV gene and cell gene expression. Since CD23 has been implicated in the transduction of B-cell growth signals, its specific induction by EBNA-2 could be important in EBV induction of B-lymphocyte transformation.

  14. Virulence of Shigella flexneri Hybrids Expressing Escherichia coli Somatic Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Gemski, P.; Sheahan, D. G.; Washington, O.; Formal, S. B.

    1972-01-01

    The genes controlling either Escherichia coli somatic antigen 8 or 25 were conjugally transferred to virulent Shigella flexneri 2a recipients to determine whether the aquisition of these antigens would affect the virulence of the resulting hybrid. A high proportion of such hybrids were found to be rough and hence were avirulent. Some smooth S. flexneri hybrids which replaced their native group antigens with E. coli factor 25 were still virulent in the animal models employed. All S. flexneri O-8 hybrids were uniformly avirulent. Our finding, that S. flexneri hybrids with the chemically divergent E. coli O-8 repeat unit are avirulent whereas some hybrids with the chemically related O-25 repeat unit retain virulence, suggests that the chemical composition and structure of the O side chain of somatic antigens may represent one determining factor for bacterial penetration of mucosal epithelial cells, the primary step in the pathogenesis of bacillary dysentery. Images PMID:4569915

  15. HIV Controller CD4+ T Cells Respond to Minimal Amounts of Gag Antigen Due to High TCR Avidity

    PubMed Central

    Vingert, Benoît; Lambotte, Olivier; Boufassa, Faroudy; Lemaître, Fabrice; Kwok, William W.; Theodorou, Ioannis; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Thèze, Jacques; Chakrabarti, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    HIV controllers are rare individuals who spontaneously control HIV replication in the absence of antiretroviral treatment. Emerging evidence indicates that HIV control is mediated through very active cellular immune responses, though how such responses can persist over time without immune exhaustion is not yet understood. To investigate the nature of memory CD4+ T cells responsible for long-term anti-HIV responses, we characterized the growth kinetics, Vβ repertoire, and avidity for antigen of patient-derived primary CD4+ T cell lines. Specific cell lines were obtained at a high rate for both HIV controllers (16/17) and efficiently treated patients (19/20) in response to the immunodominant Gag293 peptide. However, lines from controllers showed faster growth kinetics than those of treated patients. After normalizing for growth rates, IFN-γ responses directed against the immunodominant Gag293 peptide showed higher functional avidity in HIV controllers, indicating differentiation into highly efficient effector cells. In contrast, responses to Gag161, Gag263, or CMV peptides did not differ between groups. Gag293-specific CD4+ T cells were characterized by a diverse Vβ repertoire, suggesting that multiple clones contributed to the high avidity CD4+ T cell population in controllers. The high functional avidity of the Gag293-specific response could be explained by a high avidity interaction between the TCR and the peptide-MHC complex, as demonstrated by MHC class II tetramer binding. Thus, HIV controllers harbor a pool of memory CD4+ T cells with the intrinsic ability to recognize minimal amounts of Gag antigen, which may explain how they maintain an active antiviral response in the face of very low viremia. PMID:20195518

  16. Identification of Host Micro RNAs That Differentiate HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infection Using Genome Expression Profiling Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Devadas, Krishnakumar; Biswas, Santanu; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Wang, Xue; Lee, Sherwin; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-01-01

    While human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) share many similar traits, major differences in pathogenesis and clinical outcomes exist between the two viruses. The differential expression of host factors like microRNAs (miRNAs) in response to HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections are thought to influence the clinical outcomes presented by the two viruses. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules which function in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. MiRNAs play a critical role in many key biological processes and could serve as putative biomarker(s) for infection. Identification of miRNAs that modulate viral life cycle, disease progression, and cellular responses to infection with HIV-1 and HIV-2 could reveal important insights into viral pathogenesis and provide new tools that could serve as prognostic markers and targets for therapeutic intervention. The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential expression profiles of host miRNAs in cells infected with HIV-1 and HIV-2 in order to identify potential differences in virus-host interactions between HIV-1 and HIV-2. Differential expression of host miRNA expression profiles was analyzed using the miRNA profiling polymerase chain reaction (PCR) arrays. Differentially expressed miRNAs were identified and their putative functional targets identified. The results indicate that hsa-miR 541-3p, hsa-miR 518f-3p, and hsa-miR 195-3p were consistently up-regulated only in HIV-1 infected cells. The expression of hsa-miR 1225-5p, hsa-miR 18a* and hsa-miR 335 were down modulated in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected cells. Putative functional targets of these miRNAs include genes involved in signal transduction, metabolism, development and cell death. PMID:27144577

  17. Identification of Host Micro RNAs That Differentiate HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infection Using Genome Expression Profiling Techniques.

    PubMed

    Devadas, Krishnakumar; Biswas, Santanu; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Wang, Xue; Lee, Sherwin; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-01-01

    While human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) share many similar traits, major differences in pathogenesis and clinical outcomes exist between the two viruses. The differential expression of host factors like microRNAs (miRNAs) in response to HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections are thought to influence the clinical outcomes presented by the two viruses. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules which function in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. MiRNAs play a critical role in many key biological processes and could serve as putative biomarker(s) for infection. Identification of miRNAs that modulate viral life cycle, disease progression, and cellular responses to infection with HIV-1 and HIV-2 could reveal important insights into viral pathogenesis and provide new tools that could serve as prognostic markers and targets for therapeutic intervention. The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential expression profiles of host miRNAs in cells infected with HIV-1 and HIV-2 in order to identify potential differences in virus-host interactions between HIV-1 and HIV-2. Differential expression of host miRNA expression profiles was analyzed using the miRNA profiling polymerase chain reaction (PCR) arrays. Differentially expressed miRNAs were identified and their putative functional targets identified. The results indicate that hsa-miR 541-3p, hsa-miR 518f-3p, and hsa-miR 195-3p were consistently up-regulated only in HIV-1 infected cells. The expression of hsa-miR 1225-5p, hsa-miR 18a* and hsa-miR 335 were down modulated in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected cells. Putative functional targets of these miRNAs include genes involved in signal transduction, metabolism, development and cell death. PMID:27144577

  18. Mendelian and non-mendelian mutations affecting surface antigen expression in Paramecium tetraurelia

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, L.M.; Forney, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    A screening procedure was devised for the isolation of X-ray-induced mutations affecting the expression of the A immobilization antigen (i-antigen) in Paramecium tetraurelia. Two of the mutations isolated by this procedure proved to be in modifier genes. The two genes are unlinked to each other and unlinked to the structural A i-antigen gene. These are the first modifier genes identified in a Paramecium sp. that affect surface antigen expression. Another mutation was found to be a deletion of sequences just downstream from the A i-antigen gene. In cells carrying this mutation, the A i-antigen gene lies in close proximity to the end of a macronuclear chromosome. The expression of the A i-antigen is not affected in these cells, demonstrating that downstream sequences are not important for the regulation and expression of the A i-antigen gene. A stable cell line was also recovered which shows non-Mendelian inheritance of a macronuclear deletion of the A i-antigen gene. This mutant does not contain the gene in its macronucleus, but contains a complete copy of the gene in its micronucleus. In the cytoplasm of wild-type animals, the micronuclear gene is included in the developing macronucleus; in the cytoplasm of the mutant, the incorporation of the A i-antigen gene into the macronucleus is inhibited. This is the first evidence that a mechanism is available in ciliates to control the expression of a gene by regulating its incorporation into developing macronuclei.

  19. Ectopic ATP synthase facilitates transfer of HIV-1 from antigen-presenting cells to CD4+ target cells

    PubMed Central

    Yavlovich, Amichai; Viard, Mathias; Zhou, Ming; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Wang, Ji Ming; Gong, Wanghua; Heldman, Eliahu; Blumenthal, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) act as vehicles that transfer HIV to their target CD4+ cells through an intercellular junction, termed the virologic synapse. The molecules that are involved in this process remain largely unidentified. In this study, we used photoaffinity labeling and a proteomic approach to identify new proteins that facilitate HIV-1 transfer. We identified ectopic mitochondrial ATP synthase as a factor that mediates HIV-1 transfer between APCs and CD4+ target cells. Monoclonal antibodies against the β-subunit of ATP synthase inhibited APC-mediated transfer of multiple strains HIV-1 to CD4+ target cells. Likewise, the specific inhibitors of ATPase, citreoviridin and IF1, completely blocked APC-mediated transfer of HIV-1 at the APC-target cell interaction step. Confocal fluorescent microscopy showed localization of extracellular ATP synthase at junctions between APC and CD4+ target cells. We conclude that ectopic ATP synthase could be an accessible molecular target for inhibiting HIV-1 proliferation in vivo. PMID:22753871

  20. IL-12 release by engineered T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors can effectively Muster an antigen-independent macrophage response on tumor cells that have shut down tumor antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Markus; Kopecky, Caroline; Hombach, Andreas A; Abken, Hinrich

    2011-09-01

    During malignant progression cancer cells tend to lose cell surface expression of MHC and other immune antigens, making them invisible to cytotoxic T cells and therefore inaccessible to tumor antigen-directed immunotherapy. Moreover, cancer cell variants that have lost antigen expression frequently contribute to deadly tumor relapses that occur following treatments that had been initially effective. In an effort to destroy antigen-loss cancer cells in tumors, we created a strategy that combines a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T-cell attack with an engineered local release of the cytokine interleukin 12 (IL-12), which recruits and reinforces macrophage function. Cytotoxic T cells were engineered to release inducible IL-12 upon CAR engagement in the tumor lesion, resulting in destruction of antigen-loss cancer cells that would normally escape. Importantly, elimination of the antigen-loss cancer cells was accompanied by an accumulation of activated macrophages that was critical to the antitumor response, because removing the macrophages abolished the response and restoring them reengaged it. Neutralizing TNF-α also abrogated the elimination of antigen-loss cancer cells, implying this proinflammatory factor in the process. Taken together, our results show how IL-12 supplementation by CAR T cells can target otherwise inaccessible tumor lesions, in a manner associated with reduced systemic toxicity, by recruiting and activating innate immune cells for a proinflammatory response. PMID:21742772

  1. Expression of Human Herpesvirus-6 Antigens in Benign and Malignant Lymphoproliferative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Luppi, Mario; Barozzi, Patrizia; Garber, Richard; Maiorana, Antonio; Bonacorsi, Goretta; Artusi, Tullio; Trovato, Raffaella; Marasca, Roberto; Torelli, Giuseppe

    1998-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry was used to look for the expression of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) antigens in a well characterized series of benign, atypical, and malignant lymphoid lesions, which tested positive for the presence of HHV-6 DNA. A panel of specific antibodies against HHV-6 antigens, characteristic either of the early (p41) or late (p101K, gp106, and gp116) phases of the viral cycle, was applied to the lymphoid tissues from 15 non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas, 14 Hodgkin’s disease cases, 5 angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathies with dysproteinemia, 14 reactive lymphadenopathies, and 2 cases of sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (Rosai-Dorfman disease). In lymphomatous tissues, the expression of late antigens was documented only in reactive cells, and mainly in plasma cells. Of interest, the expression of the early p41 antigen was detected in the so-called “mummified” Reed-Sternberg cells, in two Hodgkin’s disease cases. In reactive lymphadenopathies, the HHV-6 late antigen-expressing cells were plasma cells, histiocytes, and rare granulocytes distributed in interfollicular areas. In both cases of Rosai-Dorfman disease, the p101K showed an intense staining in follicular dendritic cells of germinal centers, whereas the gp106 exhibited an intense cytoplasmic reaction in the abnormal histiocytes, which represent the histological hallmark of the disease. The expression of HHV-6 antigens is tightly controlled in lymphoid tissues. The lack of HHV-6 antigen expression in neoplastic cells and the limited expression in degenerating Reed-Sternberg cells argue against a major pathogenetic role of the virus in human lymphomagenesis. The detection of a rather unique pattern of viral late antigen expression in Rosai-Dorfman disease suggests a possible pathogenetic involvement of HHV-6 in some cases of this rare lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:9736030

  2. Effect of Lewis blood group antigen expression on bacterial adherence to COS-1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, R A; Schaeffer, A J; Anderson, B E; Duncan, J L

    1994-01-01

    Epithelial cells from secretor individuals demonstrate decreased bacterial adherence compared with cells from nonsecretors. Lewis blood group antigen expression is one component of the secretor/nonsecretor phenotype and several epidemiologic studies have suggested a link between Lewis blood group antigen phenotype and susceptibility to urinary tract infections. In this study, we examined the possibility that the expression of the difucosylated Lewis blood group determinants, Leb and Ley (associated with the secretor phenotype), made cells less susceptible to Escherichia coli adherence by masking receptors for pili. COS-1 cells, which do not produce Lewis (Lea, Leb, Le(x), and Ley) blood group antigens, were used as target cells for bacterial adherence. The surface blood group antigen expression pattern of the cells was then modified by cotransfection with plasmids containing DNA inserts encoding alpha (1,2)-fucosyltransferase and alpha (1,3)- and alpha (1,4)-fucosyltransferases, resulting in the expression of Leb and Ley. E. coli HB101 expressing various adhesins (type 1, PapJ96, PapIA2, PapAD110, Prs, and S) from recombinant plasmids bound equally well to untransfected cells and transfected cells expressing Lea and Le(x) (nonsecretor phenotype) and Leb and Ley (secretor phenotype) antigens. We conclude that the presence of Leb and Ley antigens on cells from secretors does not alone mask receptors for E. coli pili or hinder bacterial adherence. PMID:8005692

  3. Multi-scale silica structures for improved HIV-1 Capsid (p24) antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sophia; Hedde, Per Niklas; Venugopalan, Vasan; Gratton, Enrico; Khine, Michelle

    2016-06-20

    Silica (SiO2) micro- and nanostructures fabricated with pre-stressed thermoplastic shrink wrap film have been shown to yield far-field fluorescence signal enhancements over their planar or wrinkled counterparts. The SiO2 structures have previously been used for improved detection of fluorescently labelled proteins and DNA. In this work, we probe the mechanism responsible for the dramatic increases in fluorescence signal intensity. Optical characterization studies attribute the fluorescence signal enhancements to increased surface density and light scattering from the rough SiO2 structures. Using this information, we come up with a theoretical approximation for the enhancement factor based off the scattering effects alone. We show that increased deposition thickness of SiO2 yields improved fluorescence signal enhancements, with an optimal SiO2 thin layer achieved at 20 nm. Finally, we show that the SiO2 substrates serve as a suitable platform for disease diagnostics, and show improved limits of detection (LOD) for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) p24 antigen. PMID:27163263

  4. Composition and Antigenic Effects of Individual Glycan Sites of a Trimeric HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Anna-Janina; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Pritchard, Laura K.; Harvey, David J.; Andev, Rajinder S.; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Struwe, Weston B.; Cupo, Albert; Kumar, Abhinav; Zitzmann, Nicole; Seabright, Gemma E.; Kramer, Holger B.; Spencer, Daniel I.R.; Royle, Louise; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Klasse, Per J.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Moore, John P.; Doores, Katie J.; Crispin, Max

    2016-01-01

    Summary The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer is covered by an array of N-linked glycans that shield it from immune surveillance. The high density of glycans on the trimer surface imposes steric constraints limiting the actions of glycan-processing enzymes, so that multiple under-processed structures remain on specific areas. These oligomannose glycans are recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that are not thwarted by the glycan shield but, paradoxically, target it. Our site-specific glycosylation analysis of a soluble, recombinant trimer (BG505 SOSIP.664) maps the extremes of simplicity and diversity of glycan processing at individual sites and reveals a mosaic of dense clusters of oligomannose glycans on the outer domain. Although individual sites usually minimally affect the global integrity of the glycan shield, we identify examples of how deleting some glycans can subtly influence neutralization by bNAbs that bind at distant sites. The network of bNAb-targeted glycans should be preserved on vaccine antigens. PMID:26972002

  5. HIV-Infected Dendritic Cells Present Endogenous MHC Class II-Restricted Antigens to HIV-Specific CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Pierre-Grégoire; Richetta, Clémence; Rouers, Angéline; Blanchet, Fabien P; Urrutia, Alejandra; Guerbois, Mathilde; Piguet, Vincent; Theodorou, Ioannis; Bet, Anne; Schwartz, Olivier; Tangy, Frédéric; Graff-Dubois, Stéphanie; Cardinaud, Sylvain; Moris, Arnaud

    2016-07-15

    It is widely assumed that CD4(+) T cells recognize antigenic peptides (epitopes) derived solely from incoming, exogenous, viral particles or proteins. However, alternative sources of MHC class II (MHC-II)-restricted Ags have been described, in particular epitopes derived from newly synthesized proteins (so-called endogenous). In this study, we show that HIV-infected dendritic cells (DC) present MHC-II-restricted endogenous viral Ags to HIV-specific (HS) CD4(+) T cells. This endogenous pathway functions independently of the exogenous route for HIV Ag presentation and offers a distinct possibility for the immune system to activate HS CD4(+) T cells. We examined the implication of autophagy, which plays a crucial role in endogenous viral Ag presentation and thymic selection of CD4(+) T cells, in HIV endogenous presentation. We show that infected DC do not use autophagy to process MHC-II-restricted HIV Ags. This is unlikely to correspond to a viral escape from autophagic degradation, as infecting DC with Nef- or Env-deficient HIV strains did not impact HS T cell activation. However, we demonstrate that, in DC, specific targeting of HIV Ags to autophagosomes using a microtubule-associated protein L chain 3 (LC3) fusion protein effectively enhances and broadens HS CD4(+) T cell responses, thus favoring an endogenous MHC-II-restricted presentation. In summary, in DC, multiple endogenous presentation pathways lead to the activation of HS CD4(+) T cell responses. These findings will help in designing novel strategies to activate HS CD4(+) T cells that are required for CTL activation/maintenance and B cell maturation. PMID:27288536

  6. Novel methods for expression of foreign antigens in live vector vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin Yuan; Harley, Regina H.; Galen, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial live vector vaccines represent a vaccine development strategy that offers exceptional flexibility. In this approach, genes encoding protective antigens of unrelated bacterial, viral or parasitic pathogens are expressed in an attenuated bacterial vaccine strain that delivers these foreign antigens to the immune system, thereby eliciting relevant immune responses. Rather than expressing these antigens using low copy expression plasmids, here we pursue expression of foreign proteins from the live vector chromosome. Our strategy is designed to compensate for the inherent disadvantage of loss of gene dosage (vs. plasmid-based expression) by integrating antigen-encoding gene cassettes into multiple chromosomal sites already inactivated in an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi vaccine candidate. We tested expression of a cassette encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) integrated separately into native guaBA, htrA or clyA chromosomal loci. Using single integrations, we show that expression levels of GFPuv are significantly affected by the site of integration, regardless of the inclusion of additional strong promoters within the incoming cassette. Using cassettes integrated into both guaBA and htrA, we observe cumulative synthesis levels from two integration sites superior to single integrations. Most importantly, we observe that GFPuv expression increases in a growth phase-dependent manner, suggesting that foreign antigen synthesis may be “tuned” to the physiology of the live vaccine. We expect this novel platform expression technology to prove invaluable in the development of a wide variety of multivalent live vector vaccines, capable of expressing multiple antigens from both chromosomal and plasmid-based expression systems within a single strain. PMID:23406777

  7. Expression and immunogenicity of novel subunit enterovirus 71 VP1 antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Juan; Wang, Shixia; Gan, Weihua; Zhang, Wenhong; Ju, Liwen; Huang, Zuhu; Lu, Shan

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EV71 is a major emerging infectious disease in many Asian countries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivated EV71 vaccines are in clinical studies but their safety and efficacy are unknown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Developing subunit based EV71 vaccines is significant and novel antigen design is needed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA immunization is an efficient tool to test the immunogenicity of VP1 based EV71 vaccines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple VP1 antigens are developed showing immunogenic potential. -- Abstract: Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common viral illness in young children. HFMD is caused by viruses belonging to the enterovirus genus of the picornavirus family. Recently, enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a virulent agent for HFMD with severe clinical outcomes. In the current report, we conducted a pilot antigen engineering study to optimize the expression and immunogenicity of subunit VP1 antigen for the design of EV71 vaccines. DNA immunization was adopted as a simple technical approach to test different designs of VP1 antigens without the need to express VP1 protein in vitro first. Our studies indicated that the expression and immunogenicity of VP1 protein can be improved with alternated VP1 antigen designs. Data presented in the current report revealed novel pathways to optimize the design of VP1 antigen-based EV71 vaccines.

  8. Cloning, expression, and antigenic characterization of recombinant protein of Mycoplasma gallisepticum expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rocha, T S; Tramuta, C; Catania, S; Matucci, A; Giuffrida, M G; Baro, C; Profiti, M; Bertolotti, L; Rosati, S

    2015-04-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a member of the most important avian mycoplasmas, causing chronic respiratory disease in chickens and leading to important economic losses in the poultry industry. Recombinant technology represents a strategic approach used to achieve highly reliable and specific diagnostic tests in veterinary diseases control: in particular this aspect is crucial for confirming mycoplasma infection and for maintaining mycoplasma-free breeder flocks. In this study, we identified a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (i.e., E2) protein by 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), characterized it in immunoblotting assays, and analyzed its recombinant (r-E2) in a rec-ELISA test. For full-length protein expression in Escherichia coli (EC) a point mutation was introduced. A rabbit antiserum produced against r-E2 was tested in a Western Blot using different samples of Mycoplasma species. The results showed the applicability of site-directed mutagenesis, with a good yield of the r-E2 after purification. Also, anti-E2 serum reacted with all the tested MG strains showing no cross reaction with other mycoplasmas. The developed E2 ELISA test was capable of detecting MG antibodies in the sera examined. Those results demonstrate the antigenic stability of the E2 protein which could represent a recombinant antigen with potential diagnostic applications. PMID:25667423

  9. Fetal exposure to HIV-1 alters chemokine receptor expression by CD4+T cells and increases susceptibility to HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Bunders, Madeleine J; van Hamme, John L; Jansen, Machiel H; Boer, Kees; Kootstra, Neeltje A; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2014-01-01

    Absolute numbers of lymphocytes are decreased in uninfected infants born to HIV-1-infected women (HIV-1-exposed). Although the exact mechanism is unknown, fetal exposure to maternal HIV-1-infection could prime the immune system and affect T cell trafficking. We compared the expression of chemokine receptors on cord blood CD4(+) T cells from HIV-1-exposed children and healthy controls. At baseline CD4(+) T cells had a largely naïve phenotype. However, stimulation with cytokines resulted in an upregulation of inflammatory response-related chemokine receptors on CD4(+) T cells, with HIV-1-exposed infants having a significantly higher frequency of CD4(+) T cells expressing, in particularly Th2 associated chemokine receptors (CCR3 p < 0.01, CCR8 p = 0.03). Numbers of naive CCR7(+) CD4(+) T cells were reduced (p = 0.01) in HIV-1-exposed infants. We further assessed whether the inflammatory phenotype was associated with susceptibility to HIV-1 and detected higher levels of p24 upon in in vitro infection of stimulated CD4(+) T cells of HIV-1-exposed infants. In summary, fetal exposure to HIV-1 primes the immune system in the infant leading to an enhanced immune activation and altered T cell homing, with potential ramifications regarding T cell responses and the acquisition of HIV-1 as an infant. PMID:25341640

  10. Haplotype analysis of HLA-A, -B antigens and -DRB1 alleles in south Indian HIV-1-infected patients with and without pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, S; Selvaraj, P; Swaminathan, S; Alagarasu, K; Narendran, G; Narayanan, P R

    2009-06-01

    We have shown earlier the association of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-A11 with resistance and HLA-B40 and -DR2 with susceptibility to HIV and HIV-TB. In the present study, we have attempted to find out the HLA-DR2 subtypes and the possible HLA-A/-B/-DRB1 haplotype combinations that are associated with susceptibility or resistance to HIV and HIV with pulmonary tuberculosis (HIV+PTB+). HLA-DR2 subtyping was carried out by polymerase chain reaction-based sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe method. Overrepresentation of HLA-DRB1*1501 in HIV-positive PTB-negative (HIV+PTB-) patients (P = 0.004, P(c) = 0.06) and -DRB1*1502 in HIV-positive PTB-positive (HIV+PTB+) patients (P = 0.019) was observed as compared to healthy controls. Haplotype analysis revealed an increased frequency of HLA-A2-DRB1*1501 haplotype in HIV+PTB- patients (P = 0.008) and HLA-A2-DRB1*1502 among HIV+PTB+ patients (P = 0.01) compared to healthy controls. The haplotypes B40-DRB1*1501 and B40-DRB1*04 were found to be moderately increased in HIV+PTB(-) and HIV+PTB+ patients (P < 0.05). The study suggests that HLA-A2-DRB1*1501 haplotype may be associated with HIV infection while HLA-A2-DRB1*1502 haplotype might be associated with susceptibility to PTB in HIV patients. Moreover, HLA-B40-DRB1*1501 and HLA-B40-DRB1*04 haplotypes may be associated with susceptibility to HIV infection and to PTB in HIV patients. PMID:19392836

  11. Expression of PCV2 antigen in the ovarian tissues of gilts.

    PubMed

    Tummaruk, Padet; Pearodwong, Pachara

    2016-03-01

    The present study was performed to determine the expression of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) antigen in the ovarian tissue of naturally infected gilts. Ovarian tissues were obtained from 11 culled gilts. The ovarian tissues sections were divided into two groups according to PCV2 DNA detection using PCR. PCV2 antigen was assessed in the paraffin embedded ovarian tissue sections by immunohistochemistry. A total of 2,131 ovarian follicles (i.e., 1,437 primordial, 133 primary, 353 secondary and 208 antral follicles), 66 atretic follicles and 131 corpora lutea were evaluated. It was found that PCV2 antigen was detected in 280 ovarian follicles (i.e., 239 primordial follicles, 12 primary follicles, 10 secondary follicles and 19 antral follicles), 1 atretic follicles and 3 corpora lutea (P<0.05). PCV2 antigen was detected in primordial follicles more often than in secondary follicles, atretic follicles and corpora lutea (P<0.05). The detection of PCV2 antigen was found mainly in oocytes. PCV2 antigen was found in both PCV2 DNA positive and negative ovarian tissues. It can be concluded that PCV2 antigen is expressed in all types of the ovarian follicles and corpora lutea. Further studies should be carried out to determine the influence of PCV2 on porcine ovarian function and oocyte quality. PMID:26522687

  12. Expression of PCV2 antigen in the ovarian tissues of gilts

    PubMed Central

    TUMMARUK, Padet; PEARODWONG, Pachara

    2015-01-01

    The present study was performed to determine the expression of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) antigen in the ovarian tissue of naturally infected gilts. Ovarian tissues were obtained from 11 culled gilts. The ovarian tissues sections were divided into two groups according to PCV2 DNA detection using PCR. PCV2 antigen was assessed in the paraffin embedded ovarian tissue sections by immunohistochemistry. A total of 2,131 ovarian follicles (i.e., 1,437 primordial, 133 primary, 353 secondary and 208 antral follicles), 66 atretic follicles and 131 corpora lutea were evaluated. It was found that PCV2 antigen was detected in 280 ovarian follicles (i.e., 239 primordial follicles, 12 primary follicles, 10 secondary follicles and 19 antral follicles), 1 atretic follicles and 3 corpora lutea (P<0.05). PCV2 antigen was detected in primordial follicles more often than in secondary follicles, atretic follicles and corpora lutea (P<0.05). The detection of PCV2 antigen was found mainly in oocytes. PCV2 antigen was found in both PCV2 DNA positive and negative ovarian tissues. It can be concluded that PCV2 antigen is expressed in all types of the ovarian follicles and corpora lutea. Further studies should be carried out to determine the influence of PCV2 on porcine ovarian function and oocyte quality. PMID:26522687

  13. Circulating HIV-Specific Interleukin-21(+)CD4(+) T Cells Represent Peripheral Tfh Cells with Antigen-Dependent Helper Functions.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Bruce T; Teigler, Jeffrey E; Pissani, Franco; Oster, Alexander F; Kranias, Gregory; Alter, Galit; Marovich, Mary; Eller, Michael A; Dittmer, Ulf; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Bolton, Diane; Streeck, Hendrik

    2016-01-19

    A central effort in HIV vaccine development is to generate protective broadly neutralizing antibodies, a process dependent on T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. The feasibility of using peripheral blood counterparts of lymph node Tfh cells to assess the immune response and the influence of viral and vaccine antigens on their helper functions remain obscure. We assessed circulating HIV-specific IL-21(+)CD4(+) T cells and showed transcriptional and phenotypic similarities to lymphoid Tfh cells, and hence representing peripheral Tfh (pTfh) cells. pTfh cells were functionally active and B cell helper quality differed depending on antigen specificity. Furthermore, we found higher frequency of pTfh cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cell specimens from the ALVAC+AIDSVAX (RV144) HIV vaccine trial associated with protective antibody responses compared to the non-protective DNA+Ad5 vaccine trial. Together, we identify IL-21(+)CD4(+) T cells as pTfh cells, implicating them as key populations in the generation of vaccine-evoked antibody responses. PMID:26795249

  14. Immune Activation in the Female Genital Tract: Expression Profiles of Soluble Proteins in Women at High Risk for HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Francis, Suzanna C; Hou, Yanwen; Baisley, Kathy; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Watson-Jones, Deborah; Ao, Trong T; Herrera, Carolina; Maganja, Kaballa; Andreasen, Aura; Kapiga, Saidi; Coulton, Gary R; Hayes, Richard J; Shattock, Robin J

    2016-01-01

    Soluble cervicovaginal biomarkers of inflammation, immune activation and risk of HIV acquisition are needed to reliably assess the safety of new biomedical prevention strategies including vaccines and microbicides. However, a fuller understanding of expression profiles in women at high risk for HIV infection is crucial to the effective use of these potential biomarkers in Phase 3 trial settings. We have measured 45 soluble proteins and peptides in cervicovaginal lavage samples from 100 HIV negative women at high risk for HIV infection. Women were followed over one menstrual cycle to investigate modulation by hormonal contraception, menstrual cycle phase, recent sexual exposure and intravaginal practices. Women using injectable DMPA had increased concentration of several soluble proteins of the innate and adaptive immune system, including IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, MIP-1β, IP-10, IL-8, TGF-β, HBD4, IgA, IgG1, and IgG2. Women using combined oral contraceptives had a similar signature. There were differences in concentrations among samples from post-ovulation compared to pre-ovulation, notably increased immunoglobulins. Increased prostate-specific antigen, indicative of recent sexual exposure, was correlated with increased IL-6, MCP-1, and SLPI, and decreased GM-CSF and HBD3. The identified signature profiles may prove critical in evaluating the potential safety and impact on risk of HIV acquisition of different biomedical intervention strategies. PMID:26814891

  15. Immune Activation in the Female Genital Tract: Expression Profiles of Soluble Proteins in Women at High Risk for HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Suzanna C.; Hou, Yanwen; Baisley, Kathy; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Watson-Jones, Deborah; Ao, Trong T.; Herrera, Carolina; Maganja, Kaballa; Andreasen, Aura; Kapiga, Saidi; Coulton, Gary R.; Hayes, Richard J.; Shattock, Robin J.

    2016-01-01

    Soluble cervicovaginal biomarkers of inflammation, immune activation and risk of HIV acquisition are needed to reliably assess the safety of new biomedical prevention strategies including vaccines and microbicides. However, a fuller understanding of expression profiles in women at high risk for HIV infection is crucial to the effective use of these potential biomarkers in Phase 3 trial settings. We have measured 45 soluble proteins and peptides in cervicovaginal lavage samples from 100 HIV negative women at high risk for HIV infection. Women were followed over one menstrual cycle to investigate modulation by hormonal contraception, menstrual cycle phase, recent sexual exposure and intravaginal practices. Women using injectable DMPA had increased concentration of several soluble proteins of the innate and adaptive immune system, including IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, MIP-1β, IP-10, IL-8, TGF-β, HBD4, IgA, IgG1, and IgG2. Women using combined oral contraceptives had a similar signature. There were differences in concentrations among samples from post-ovulation compared to pre-ovulation, notably increased immunoglobulins. Increased prostate-specific antigen, indicative of recent sexual exposure, was correlated with increased IL-6, MCP-1, and SLPI, and decreased GM-CSF and HBD3. The identified signature profiles may prove critical in evaluating the potential safety and impact on risk of HIV acquisition of different biomedical intervention strategies. PMID:26814891

  16. Antigenic properties and diagnostic potential of puumala virus nucleocapsid protein expressed in insect cells.

    PubMed Central

    Vapalahti, O; Lundkvist, A; Kallio-Kokko, H; Paukku, K; Julkunen, I; Lankinen, H; Vaheri, A

    1996-01-01

    Puumala virus (PUU) is a member of the genus Hantavirus in the family Bunyaviridae and the causative agent of nephropathia epidemica, a European form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Sera of nephropathia epidemica patients react specifically with PUU nucleocapsid (N) protein. In order to safely provide large quantities of antigen for diagnostic purposes, PUU Sotkamo strain N protein was expressed by using the baculovirus system in Sf9 insect cells to up to 30 to 50% of the total cellular protein. The recombinant N protein (bac-PUU-N) was solubilized with 6 M urea, dialyzed, and purified by anion-exchange liquid chromatography. In an immunoglobulin M mu-capture assay purified and unpurified bac-PUU-N antigen showed identical results compared with the results of a similar assay based on native PUU antigen grown in Vero E6 cells. An immunoglobulin G monoclonal antibody-capture assay based on unpurified bac-PUU-N also showed results identical to those of an assay with native PUU-N antigen. Moreover, a panel of monoclonal antibodies reactive with eight different epitopes showed identical reactivity patterns with both natural and bac-PUU-N antigen, while two epitopes in PUU-N expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli were not recognized. Puumala hantavirus N protein expressed by the baculovirus system offers a safe and inexpensive source of specific antigen for large-scale diagnostic and seroepidemiological purposes. PMID:8748286

  17. The effects of Ostertagia occidentalis somatic antigens on ovine TLR2 and TLR4 expression

    PubMed Central

    BORJI, Hassan; HAGHPARAST, Alireza; SOLEIMANI, Nooshinmehr; AZIZZADEH, Mohammad; NAZEMSHIRAZI, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recognition of helminth-derived pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), including toll like receptors (TLRs) is the first step towards initiating anti–helminth immune responses. Methods : Using somatic antigens of Ostertagia occidentalis, an important abomasal parasite of ruminants, the expression of ovine TLR2 and TLR4 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was analyzed by real-time quatitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Somatic antigens of O. occidentalis were prepared to stimulate ovine PBMCs in a time and dose dependent manner. Results : A high expression of TLR2 and TLR4 was observed in PBMCs cultured with somatic antigens of the parasites specially when PBMCs were cultured with 100 µg/ml of somatic antigens and incubated for 2h. Up-regulation of TLR2 expression was more pronounced and evident in our study. Conclsusion : Somatic antigens of O. occidentalis have immunostimulatory and dominant role on peripheral immune cells. This study provide for the first time evidence of induction of TLRs in ovine PBMCs by somatic antigen of O. occidentalis PMID:26622306

  18. Cloning, Characterization, and Expression of a 200-Kilodalton Diagnostic Antigen of Babesia bigemina†

    PubMed Central

    Tebele, N.; Skilton, R. A.; Katende, J.; Wells, C. W.; Nene, V.; McElwain, T.; Morzaria, S. P.; Musoke, A. J.

    2000-01-01

    Current serological tests for Babesia bigemina use semipurified merozoite antigens derived from infected erythrocytes. One of the major drawbacks of these tests is that antigen quality can vary from batch to batch. Since the quality of the antigen contributes to the sensitivity and specificity of serological tests, the use of standardized recombinant antigens should ensure consistency in assay quality. Previously, a 200-kDa merozoite antigen (p200) was identified as a candidate diagnostic antigen for use in a serological assay for the detection of B. bigemina antibodies in infected cattle. In this study, we have cloned, characterized, and expressed p200. A 3.5-kbp cDNA clone encoding p200 was isolated and shown to be almost full length, lacking approximately 300 bp at the 5′ end. The predicted amino acid sequence shows that p200 consists of a long, highly charged central repeat region of an uninterrupted α helix, indicative of a fibrous protein. Immunoelectron microscopy localized p200 to the merozoite cytoplasm, suggesting that the antigen may be a structural protein involved in forming filament structures within the cytoskeleton. The 3.5-kbp cDNA was expressed in bacteria as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase (GST), but the yield was poor. To improve the yield, cDNA fragments encoding antigenic domains of p200 were expressed as fusions with GST. One of these fusion proteins, C1A-GST, is composed of a 7-kDa fragment of the p200 repeat region and contains epitopes that react strongly with sera from cattle experimentally infected with B. bigemina. Recombinant C1A-GST should permit the development of an improved enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of antibodies against B. bigemina. PMID:10834983

  19. HLA-A is a Predictor of Hepatitis B e Antigen Status in HIV-Positive African Adults.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Philippa C; Carlson, Jonathan M; Beloukas, Apostolos; Malik, Amna; Jooste, Pieter; Ogwu, Anthony; Shapiro, Roger; Riddell, Lynn; Chen, Fabian; Luzzi, Graz; Jesuthasan, Gerald; Jeffery, Katie; Jojic, Nebojsa; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Carrington, Mary; Goulder, Philip J R; Geretti, Anna Maria; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-04-15

    Outcomes of chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) are varied, with increased morbidity reported in the context of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. The factors driving different outcomes are not well understood, but there is increasing interest in an HLA class I effect. We therefore studied the influence of HLA class I on HBV in an African HIV-positive cohort. We demonstrated that virologic markers of HBV disease activity (hepatitis B e antigen status or HBV DNA level) are associated with HLA-A genotype. This finding supports the role of the CD8(+) T-cell response in HBV control, and potentially informs future therapeutic T-cell vaccine strategies. PMID:26655301

  20. HLA-A is a Predictor of Hepatitis B e Antigen Status in HIV-Positive African Adults

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Philippa C.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Beloukas, Apostolos; Malik, Amna; Jooste, Pieter; Ogwu, Anthony; Shapiro, Roger; Riddell, Lynn; Chen, Fabian; Luzzi, Graz; Jesuthasan, Gerald; Jeffery, Katie; Jojic, Nebojsa; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Carrington, Mary; Goulder, Philip J. R.; Geretti, Anna Maria; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes of chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) are varied, with increased morbidity reported in the context of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. The factors driving different outcomes are not well understood, but there is increasing interest in an HLA class I effect. We therefore studied the influence of HLA class I on HBV in an African HIV-positive cohort. We demonstrated that virologic markers of HBV disease activity (hepatitis B e antigen status or HBV DNA level) are associated with HLA-A genotype. This finding supports the role of the CD8+ T-cell response in HBV control, and potentially informs future therapeutic T-cell vaccine strategies. PMID:26655301

  1. Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes: the importance of chromosomal and nuclear context in VSG expression control

    PubMed Central

    Glover, Lucy; Hutchinson, Sebastian; Alsford, Sam; McCulloch, Richard; Field, Mark C; Horn, David

    2013-01-01

    African trypanosomes are lethal human and animal parasites that use antigenic variation for evasion of host adaptive immunity. To facilitate antigenic variation, trypanosomes dedicate approximately one third of their nuclear genome, including many minichromosomes, and possibly all sub-telomeres, to variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes and associated sequences. Antigenic variation requires transcription of a single VSG by RNA polymerase I (Pol-I), with silencing of other VSGs, and periodic switching of the expressed gene, typically via DNA recombination with duplicative translocation of a new VSG to the active site. Thus, telomeric location, epigenetic controls and monoallelic transcription by Pol-I at an extranucleolar site are prominent features of VSGs and their expression, with telomeres, chromatin structure and nuclear organization all making vitally important contributions to monoallelic VSG expression control and switching. We discuss VSG transcription, recombination and replication control within this chromosomal and sub-nuclear context. PMID:24047558

  2. Tumorigenic activity of Merkel cell polyomavirus T antigens expressed in the stratified epithelium of mice

    PubMed Central

    Spurgeon, Megan E.; Cheng, Jingwei; Bronson, Roderick T.; Lambert, Paul F.; DeCaprio, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is frequently associated with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a highly aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. Most MCC tumors contain integrated copies of the viral genome with persistent expression of the MCPyV large T (LT) and small T (ST) antigen. MCPyV isolated from MCC typically contain wild type ST but truncated forms of LT that retain the N-terminus but delete the C-terminus and render LT incapable of supporting virus replication. To determine the oncogenic activity of MCC tumor-derived T antigens in vivo, a conditional, tissue-specific mouse model was developed. Keratin 14-mediated Cre recombinase expression induced expression of MCPyV T antigens in stratified squamous epithelial cells and Merkel cells of the skin epidermis. Mice expressing MCPyV T antigens developed hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, and acanthosis of the skin with additional abnormalities in whisker pads, footpads and eyes. Nearly half of the mice also developed cutaneous papillomas. Evidence for neoplastic progression within stratified epithelia included increased cellular proliferation, unscheduled DNA synthesis, increased E2F-responsive genes levels, disrupted differentiation, and presence of a DNA damage response. These results indicate that MCPyV T antigens are tumorigenic in vivo, consistent with their suspected etiological role in human cancer. PMID:25596282

  3. Tumorigenic activity of merkel cell polyomavirus T antigens expressed in the stratified epithelium of mice.

    PubMed

    Spurgeon, Megan E; Cheng, Jingwei; Bronson, Roderick T; Lambert, Paul F; DeCaprio, James A

    2015-03-15

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is frequently associated with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a highly aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. Most MCC tumors contain integrated copies of the viral genome with persistent expression of the MCPyV large T (LT) and small T (ST) antigen. MCPyV isolated from MCC typically contains wild-type ST but truncated forms of LT that retain the N-terminus but delete the C-terminus and render LT incapable of supporting virus replication. To determine the oncogenic activity of MCC tumor-derived T antigens in vivo, a conditional, tissue-specific mouse model was developed. Keratin 14-mediated Cre recombinase expression induced expression of MCPyV T antigens in stratified squamous epithelial cells and Merkel cells of the skin epidermis. Mice expressing MCPyV T antigens developed hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, and acanthosis of the skin with additional abnormalities in whisker pads, footpads, and eyes. Nearly half of the mice also developed cutaneous papillomas. Evidence for neoplastic progression within stratified epithelia included increased cellular proliferation, unscheduled DNA synthesis, increased E2F-responsive genes levels, disrupted differentiation, and presence of a DNA damage response. These results indicate that MCPyV T antigens are tumorigenic in vivo, consistent with their suspected etiologic role in human cancer. PMID:25596282

  4. Mechanism of HIV-1 Tat induced inhibition of antigen-specific T cell responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Subramanyam, M; Gutheil, W G; Bachovchin, W W; Huber, B T

    1993-03-15

    HIV-1 Tat has been shown to have an inhibitory effect on the Ag-specific responsiveness of human peripheral T cells. We have previously demonstrated that this retroviral protein binds to and partially inhibits the enzymatic activity of dipeptidyl aminopeptidase type IV (DP IV), also known as CD26, which is expressed on a variety of mammalian tissue, including T lymphocytes. A number of studies have implicated a role for DP IV in the activation of T lymphocytes. By utilizing HIV-1 Tat, as well as ProboroPro, a potent and specific boronic acid analog inhibitor of DP IV, we show here that blocking DP IV partially inactivates Ag and anti-CD3-mediated T cell proliferation. Neither mitogen nor anti-CD2 mediated proliferation of T lymphocytes, however, is impaired by blocking DP IV. The target molecule for the inhibition induced by both compounds was confirmed by the finding that soluble DP IV neutralized the reduced Ag responsiveness. The Ag-specific inhibition could be overcome by the addition of exogenous IL-2, suggesting that blocking or inactivation of DP IV results in a state of anergy, probably by interfering with the delivery or amplification of a signal necessary for IL-2 production. This is further substantiated by the finding that costimulation of human PBMC via the CD28 molecule, which initiates a non-TCR-dependent signaling pathway, overcomes the reduced Ag responsiveness induced by Tat and ProboroPro. The fact that ProboroPro has no impact on stimulation of T cells with PMA and ionomycin implies that blocking DP IV is influencing events before the activation of protein kinase C and Ca2+ flux. These results suggest that DP IV is necessary for amplification of signals generated by the engagement of the TCR-CD3 complex by nominal Ag. PMID:8095514

  5. Humoral immunity to human breast cancer: antigen definition and quantitative analysis of mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Scanlan, M J; Gout, I; Gordon, C M; Williamson, B; Stockert, E; Gure, A O; Jäger, D; Chen, Y T; Mackay, A; O'Hare, M J; Old, L J

    2001-03-30

    The ability of the immune system to recognize structurally altered, amplified or aberrantly expressed proteins can be used to identify molecules of etiologic relevance to cancer and to define targets for cancer immunotherapy. In the current study, ninety-four distinct antigens reactive with serum IgG from breast cancer patients were identified by immunoscreening breast cancer-derived cDNA expression libraries (SEREX). A serological profile was generated for each antigen on the basis of reactivity with allogeneic sera from normal individuals and cancer patients, and mRNA expression profiles for coding sequences were assembled based upon the tissue distribution of expressed sequence tags, Northern blots and real-time RT-PCR. Forty antigens reacted exclusively with sera from cancer patients. These included well-characterized tumor antigens, e.g. MAGE-3, MAGE-6, NY-ESO-1, Her2neu and p53, as well as newly-defined breast cancer antigens, e.g. kinesin 2, TATA element modulatory factor 1, tumor protein D52 and MAGE D, and novel gene products, e.g. NY-BR-62, NY-BR-75, NY-BR-85, and NY-BR-96. With regard to expression profiles, two of the novel gene products, NY-BR-62 and NY-BR-85, were characterized by a high level of testicular mRNA expression, and were overexpressed in 60% and 90% of breast cancers, respectively. In addition, mRNA encoding tumor protein D52 was overexpressed in 60% of breast cancer specimens, while transcripts encoding SNT-1 signal adaptor protein were downregulated in 70% of these cases. This study adds to the growing list of breast cancer antigens defined by SEREX and to the ultimate objective of identifying the complete repertoire of immunogenic gene products in human cancer (the cancer immunome). PMID:12747765

  6. Differential gene expression in HIV-infected individuals following ART.

    PubMed

    Massanella, Marta; Singhania, Akul; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Pier, Rose; Lada, Steven M; White, Cory H; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Blanco, Julià; Richman, Douglas D; Little, Susan J; Woelk, Christopher H

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies of the effect of ART on gene expression in HIV-infected individuals have identified small numbers of modulated genes. Since these studies were underpowered or cross-sectional in design, a paired analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), isolated before and after ART, from a robust number of HIV-infected patients (N=32) was performed. Gene expression was assayed by microarray and 4157 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified following ART using multivariate permutation tests. Pathways and gene ontology (GO) terms over-represented for DEGs reflected the transition from a period of active virus replication before ART to one of viral suppression (e.g., repression of JAK-STAT signaling) and possible prolonged drug exposure (e.g., oxidative phosphorylation pathway) following ART. CMYC was the DEG whose product made the greatest number of interactions at the protein level in protein interaction networks (PINs), which has implications for the increased incidence of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) in HIV-infected patients. The differential expression of multiple genes was confirmed by RT-qPCR including well-known drug metabolism genes (e.g., ALOX12 and CYP2S1). Targets not confirmed by RT-qPCR (i.e., GSTM2 and RPL5) were significantly confirmed by droplet digital (ddPCR), which may represent a superior method when confirming DEGs with low fold changes. In conclusion, a paired design revealed that the number of genes modulated following ART was an order of magnitude higher than previously recognized. PMID:23933117

  7. Differential Gene Expression in HIV-Infected Individuals Following ART

    PubMed Central

    Massanella, Marta; Singhania, Akul; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Pier, Rose; Lada, Steven; White, Cory H.; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Blanco, Julià; Richman, Douglas D.; Little, Susan J.; Woelk, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of the effect of ART on gene expression in HIV-infected individuals have identified small numbers of modulated genes. Since these studies were underpowered or cross-sectional in design, a paired analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), isolated before and after ART, from a robust number of HIV-infected patients (N=32) was performed. Gene expression was assayed by microarray and 4,157 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified following ART using multivariate permutation tests. Pathways and Gene Ontology (GO) terms over-represented for DEGs reflected the transition from a period of active virus replication before ART to one of viral suppression (e.g., repression of JAK-STAT signaling) and possible prolonged drug exposure (e.g. oxidative phosphorylation pathway) following ART. CMYC was the DEG whose product made the greatest number of interactions at the protein level in protein interaction networks (PINs), which has implications for the increased incidence of Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) in HIV-infected patients. The differential expression of multiple genes was confirmed by RT-qPCR including well-known drug metabolism genes (e.g., ALOX12 and CYP2S1). Targets not confirmed by RT-qPCR (i.e., GSTM2 and RPL5) were significantly confirmed by droplet digital (ddPCR), which may represent a superior method when confirming DEGs with low fold changes. In conclusion, a paired design revealed that the number of genes modulated following ART was an order of magnitude higher than previously recognized. PMID:23933117

  8. HIV-1 Alters Intestinal Expression of Drug Transporters and Metabolic Enzymes: Implications for Antiretroviral Drug Disposition.

    PubMed

    Kis, Olena; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Hoque, M Tozammel; Walmsley, Sharon L; Dandekar, Satya; Bendayan, Reina

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of HIV-1 infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the expression of intestinal drug efflux transporters, i.e., P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and metabolic enzymes, such as cytochrome P450s (CYPs), in the human upper intestinal tract. Intestinal biopsy specimens were obtained from HIV-negative healthy volunteers, ART-naive HIV-positive (HIV(+)) subjects, and HIV(+) subjects receiving ART (10 in each group). Intestinal tissue expression of drug transporters and metabolic enzymes was examined by microarray, real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qPCR), and immunohistochemistry analyses. Microarray analysis demonstrated significantly lower expression of CYP3A4 and ABCC2/MRP2 in the HIV(+) ART-naive group than in uninfected subjects. qPCR analysis confirmed significantly lower expression of ABCC2/MRP2 in ART-naive subjects than in the control group, while CYP3A4 and ABCG2/BCRP showed a trend toward decreased expression. Protein expression of MRP2 and BCRP was also significantly lower in the HIV(+) naive group than in the control group and was partially restored to baseline levels in HIV(+) subjects receiving ART. In contrast, gene and protein expression of ABCB1/Pgp was significantly increased in HIV(+) subjects on ART relative to HIV(+) ART-naive subjects. These data demonstrate that the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters is significantly altered in therapy-naive HIV(+) subjects and in those receiving ART. Since CYP3A4, Pgp, MRPs, and BCRP metabolize or transport many antiretroviral drugs, their altered expression with HIV infection may negatively impact drug pharmacokinetics in HIV(+) subjects. This has clinical implications when using data from healthy volunteers to guide ART. PMID:26902756

  9. Direct evidence for cytotoxicity associated with expression of hepatitis delta virus antigen.

    PubMed

    Cole, S M; Gowans, E J; Macnaughton, T B; Hall, P D; Burrell, C J

    1991-05-01

    It has been postulated that hepatocyte injury resulting from infection with hepatitis D virus may be caused by a direct virus cytotoxicity in contrast to immune-mediated injury associated with hepatitis B virus. We have transfected HeLa and HepG2 continuous cell lines with a recombinant plasmid containing the hepatitis D antigen gene under the inducible control of the human metallothionein promoter. The addition of zinc to the cell culture medium then led to the expression of hepatitis D antigen associated with, in the short term, a significant reduction in the rate of RNA but not DNA synthesis and, in the longer term, cell death. The necrotic cells had pyknotic nuclei and shrunken eosinophilic cytoplasm; these necrotic cells resembled the apoptotic bodies seen in hepatitis D virus-related hepatitis. The level of hepatitis D antigen in individual cells that produced these changes was similar to the level of hepatitis D antigen in hepatocytes from a chimpanzee with acute hepatitis D virus infection. We conclude that the expression of hepatitis D antigen resulted in significant cytotoxic changes in these cells, providing strong support for the view that hepatitis D antigen may be specifically cytotoxic to infected hepatocytes in vivo. PMID:1709411

  10. Isolation and characterization of recombinant lambda gt11 bacteriophages expressing four different Mycobacterium intracellulare antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, S L; Rouse, D A; Hussong, D; Chaparas, S D

    1990-01-01

    Four bacteriophages expressing different immunoreactive recombinant Mycobacterium intracellulare antigens were isolated from a lambda gt11 library with monoclonal antibodies to M. intracellulare. These four antibodies reacted with native M. intracellulare proteins of 54, 43, 40/38, and 22 kilodaltons. Southern blot hybridizations with DNA probes prepared from insert fragments of these bacteriophages confirmed the M. intracellulare derivation of the inserts. The physical maps of the immunoreactive phages were deduced by restriction enzyme digestions. The molecular weights of the expressed recombinant antigens were determined by Western (immuno-) blotting. Images PMID:2136733

  11. Cellular gene expression induced by parasite antigens and allergens in neonates from parasite-infected mothers.

    PubMed

    Soboslay, Peter T; Orlikowsky, Thorsten; Huang, Xiangsheng; Gille, Christian; Spring, Bärbel; Kocherscheidt, Lars; Agossou, Abram; Banla, Meba; Bonin, Michael; Köhler, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    Prenatal exposure to parasite antigens or allergens will influence the profile and strength of postnatal immune responses, such contact may tolerize and increase susceptibility to future infections or sensitize to environmental allergens. Exposure in utero to parasite antigens will distinctly alter cellular gene expression in newborns. Gene microarrays were applied to study gene expression in umbilical cord blood cell (UCBC) from parasite-exposed (Para-POS) and non-exposed (Para-NEG) neonates. UCBC were activated with antigens of helminth (Onchocerca volvulus), amoeba (Entamoeba histolytica) or allergens of mite (Dermatophagoides farinae). When UCBC from Para-POS and Para-NEG newborns were exposed to helminth antigens or allergens consistent differences occurred in the expression of genes encoding for MHC class I and II alleles, signal transducers of activation and transcription (STATs), cytokines, chemokines, immunoglobulin heavy and light chains, and molecules associated with immune regulation (SOCS, TLR, TGF), inflammation (TNF, CCR) and apoptosis (CASP). Expression of genes associated with innate immune responses were enhanced in Para-NEG, while in Para-POS, the expression of MHC class II and STAT genes was reduced. Within functional gene networks for cellular growth, proliferation and immune responses, Para-NEG neonates presented with significantly higher expression values than Para-POS. In Para-NEG newborns, the gene cluster and pathway analyses suggested that gene expression profiles may predispose for the development of immunological, hematological and dermatological disorders upon postnatal helminth parasite infection or allergen exposure. Thus, prenatal parasite contact will sensitize without generating aberrant inflammatory immune responses, and increased pro-inflammatory but decreased regulatory gene expression profiles will be present in those neonates lacking prenatal parasite antigen encounter. PMID:27062712

  12. Relative expression levels of the HLA class-I proteins in normal and HIV-infected cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Apps, Richard; Meng, Zhaojing; Del Prete, Gregory Q.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Zhou, Ming; Carrington, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The expression level of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) is known to influence pathological outcomes: pathogens downregulate HLA to evade host immune responses, host inflammatory reactions upregulate HLA, and differences between people in steady-state expression levels of HLA associate with disease susceptibility. Yet precise quantification of relative expression levels of the various HLA loci is difficult due to the tremendous polymorphism of HLA. We report relative expression levels of HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C and HLA-E proteins for the specific haplotype A*02:01, B*44:02, C*05:01, characterized using two independent methods based on flow cytometry and mass spectrometry. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from normal donors showed that HLA-A and HLA-B proteins are expressed at similar levels, which are 13-18 times higher than HLA-C by flow cytometry and 4-5 times higher than HLA-C by mass spectrometry, differences that may reflect variation in the conformation or location of proteins detected. HLA-E was detected at a level 25 times lower than that of HLA-C by mass spectrometry. Primary CD4+ T cells infected with HIV in vitro were also studied since HIV downregulates selective HLA types. HLA-A and -B were reduced on HIV-infected cells by a magnitude that varied between cells in an infected culture. Averaging all infected cells from an individual showed HLA-A to be 1-3 and HLA-B to be 2-5 times higher than HLA-C for different individuals by flow cytometry. These results quantify substantial differences in expression levels of the proteins from different HLA loci, which are very likely physiologically significant on both uninfected and HIV-infected cells. PMID:25754738

  13. Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductases C and D Are Major Antigens Constitutively Expressed by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingrid; Reitan, Liv J.; Holstad, Gudmund; Wiker, Harald G.

    2000-01-01

    Antigens characteristic for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis were identified by crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) and by absorbing out cross-reactive antigens by using a polyclonal and polyvalent Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium antiserum. Two antigens were present in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and not detected in Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. They were identified as antigens 17 and 20 in a CIE reference system for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens. Purified antigen 20 was identified as alkyl hydroperoxide reductase C (AhpC) while the N-terminal part of purified antigen 17 showed 80% homology with alkyl hydroperoxide reductase D (AhpD) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. AhpC had a nonreduced mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis corresponding to a molecular mass of 45 kDa and is probably a homodimer linked with disulfide bridges in its native form. AhpD had a mobility corresponding to 19 kDa. Monospecific rabbit antiserum against AhpC and AhpD reacted with 9 strains of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis but not with 20 other mycobacterial strains except for a Mycobacterium gordonae strain, against which a weak cross-reactive band was produced. Goats experimentally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis had strong gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses toward both AhpC and AhpD, and they also had antibodies against AhpC. The ability of AhpC and AhpD to induce IFN-γ production shows that these proteins potentially could be used in future vaccines or in diagnostic assays. These results further show that AhpC and AhpD are immunologically important proteins which are constitutively and highly expressed in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis without the bacteria being submitted to oxidative stress and that the specificities of antigens can be a matter of different levels of protein expression in various species as well as distinct structural differences. PMID:10639449

  14. Antigenic and 3D structural characterization of soluble X4 and hybrid X4-R5 HIV-1 Env trimers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-1 is decorated with trimeric glycoprotein spikes that enable infection by engaging CD4 and a chemokine coreceptor, either CCR5 or CXCR4. The variable loop 3 (V3) of the HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) is the main determinant for coreceptor usage. The predominant CCR5 using (R5) HIV-1 Env has been intensively studied in function and structure, whereas the trimeric architecture of the less frequent, but more cytopathic CXCR4 using (X4) HIV-1 Env is largely unknown, as are the consequences of sequence changes in and near V3 on antigenicity and trimeric Env structure. Results Soluble trimeric gp140 Env constructs were used as immunogenic mimics of the native spikes to analyze their antigenic properties in the context of their overall 3D structure. We generated soluble, uncleaved, gp140 trimers from a prototypic T-cell line-adapted (TCLA) X4 HIV-1 strain (NL4-3) and a hybrid (NL4-3/ADA), in which the V3 spanning region was substituted with that from the primary R5 isolate ADA. Compared to an ADA (R5) gp140, the NL4-3 (X4) construct revealed an overall higher antibody accessibility, which was most pronounced for the CD4 binding site (CD4bs), but also observed for mAbs against CD4 induced (CD4i) epitopes and gp41 mAbs. V3 mAbs showed significant binding differences to the three constructs, which were refined by SPR analysis. Of interest, the NL4-3/ADA construct with the hybrid NL4-3/ADA CD4bs showed impaired CD4 and CD4bs mAb reactivity despite the presence of the essential elements of the CD4bs epitope. We obtained 3D reconstructions of the NL4-3 and the NL4-3/ADA gp140 trimers via electron microscopy and single particle analysis, which indicates that both constructs inherit a propeller-like architecture. The first 3D reconstruction of an Env construct from an X4 TCLA HIV-1 strain reveals an open conformation, in contrast to recently published more closed structures from R5 Env. Exchanging the X4 V3 spanning region for that of R5 ADA did not alter the open

  15. Internalization and re-expression of antigens of human melanoma cells following exposure to monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.S.; Lumanglas, A.L.; Silva, J.; Ruszala-Mallon, V.; Durr, F.E.

    1987-04-15

    Modulation of the surface membrane of human Sk-Mel-28 melanoma cells by monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 96.5 recognizing p97 determinants was examined using direct radioimmunoassay and indirect fluorescent antibody-staining techniques. It was determined that the majority of /sup 111/In-labeled antibody that remained associated with cells after a 24-hr incubation at 37 degrees C had been internalized because MoAb 96.5 was no longer visible on the cell surface. A second treatment of these cells with the same antibody 24 hr later not only increased the cell-associated radioactivity, reflecting an increase of total antibody bound, but also rendered these cells membrane immunofluorescent again, indicating the re-expression of surface antigens. Autoradiographs of the electrophoretically analyzed membrane components of Sk-Mel-28 cells further demonstrated the appearance of newly synthesized 97-kDa proteins that were immunoprecipitable with MoAb 96.5. Taken together, the present findings suggest that p97 antigens undergo endocytosis in Sk-Mel-28 cells following exposure to MoAb 96.5. However, the same antigens were regenerated and expressed on the cell surface within a period of 24 hr. The re-expression of tumor cell surface antigen following initial internalization of the MoAb-antigen complex may have implications for diagnosis and therapy.

  16. Targeted Surface Expression of an Exogenous Antigen in Stably Transfected Babesia bovis

    PubMed Central

    Laughery, Jacob M.; Knowles, Donald P.; Schneider, David A.; Bastos, Reginaldo G.; McElwain, Terry F.; Suarez, Carlos E.

    2014-01-01

    Babesia bovis is a tick-borne intraerythocytic protozoan responsible for acute disease in cattle which can be controlled by vaccination with attenuated B. bovis strains. Emerging B. bovis transfection technologies may increase the usefulness of these live vaccines. One use of transfected B. bovis parasites may be as a vaccine delivery platform. Previous transfection methods for B. bovis were limited by single expression sites and intracellular expression of transfected antigens. This study describes a novel transfection system in which two exogenous genes are expressed: one for selection and the other for a selected antigen designed to be delivered to the surface of the parasites. The strategy for duplicating the number of transfected genes was based on the use of the putative bidirectional promoter of the B. bovis 1.4 Kb ef-1α intergenic region. The ability of this region to regulate two independent expression sites was demonstrated using a luciferase assay on transiently transfected B. bovis parasites and then incorporated into a stable transfection plasmid to control independent expression of the selectable marker GFP-BSD and another gene of interest. A chimeric gene was synthetized using sequences from the protective B-cell epitopes of Rhipicephalus microplus tick antigen Bm86 along with sequences from the surface exposed B. bovis major surface antigen-1. This chimeric gene was then cloned into the additional expression site of the transfection plasmid. Transfection of the B. bovis Mo7 strain with this plasmid resulted in stable insertion into the ef-1α locus and simultaneous expression of both exogenous genes. Expression of the Bm86 epitopes on the surface of transfected merozoites was demonstrated using immunofluorescence analyses. The ability to independently express multiple genes by the inclusion of a bidirectional promoter and the achievement of surface expression of foreign epitopes advances the potential of transfected B. bovis as a future vaccine

  17. Targeted surface expression of an exogenous antigen in stably transfected Babesia bovis.

    PubMed

    Laughery, Jacob M; Knowles, Donald P; Schneider, David A; Bastos, Reginaldo G; McElwain, Terry F; Suarez, Carlos E

    2014-01-01

    Babesia bovis is a tick-borne intraerythocytic protozoan responsible for acute disease in cattle which can be controlled by vaccination with attenuated B. bovis strains. Emerging B. bovis transfection technologies may increase the usefulness of these live vaccines. One use of transfected B. bovis parasites may be as a vaccine delivery platform. Previous transfection methods for B. bovis were limited by single expression sites and intracellular expression of transfected antigens. This study describes a novel transfection system in which two exogenous genes are expressed: one for selection and the other for a selected antigen designed to be delivered to the surface of the parasites. The strategy for duplicating the number of transfected genes was based on the use of the putative bidirectional promoter of the B. bovis 1.4 Kb ef-1α intergenic region. The ability of this region to regulate two independent expression sites was demonstrated using a luciferase assay on transiently transfected B. bovis parasites and then incorporated into a stable transfection plasmid to control independent expression of the selectable marker GFP-BSD and another gene of interest. A chimeric gene was synthetized using sequences from the protective B-cell epitopes of Rhipicephalus microplus tick antigen Bm86 along with sequences from the surface exposed B. bovis major surface antigen-1. This chimeric gene was then cloned into the additional expression site of the transfection plasmid. Transfection of the B. bovis Mo7 strain with this plasmid resulted in stable insertion into the ef-1α locus and simultaneous expression of both exogenous genes. Expression of the Bm86 epitopes on the surface of transfected merozoites was demonstrated using immunofluorescence analyses. The ability to independently express multiple genes by the inclusion of a bidirectional promoter and the achievement of surface expression of foreign epitopes advances the potential of transfected B. bovis as a future vaccine

  18. Expression of early activation antigen (CD69) during human thymic development.

    PubMed Central

    Jung, L K; Haynes, B F; Nakamura, S; Pahwa, S; Fu, S M

    1990-01-01

    The novel early activation antigen, EA1, has been shown to be induced by mitogens, antigens and the tumour promoter, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), on human lymphocytes. This antigen has been designated to be CD69. EA1 has also been shown to be expressed on thymocytes without exogenous activation stimuli. In order to characterize further the expression of EA1 on thymocytes, the ontogeny of its expression was studied. EA1 appeared between 7 and 9.5 weeks of gestation, after colonization of the thymic rudiment with CD7+ T cell precursors, but before the onset of compartmentalization of the thymus into cortical and medullary zones. After cortico-medullary differentiation, the majority of medullary thymocytes expressed EA1 while only a fraction of the cortical thymocytes expressed this antigen. In the fetal and post-natal cortex, EA1 expression appeared to cluster in the subcapsular cortex. EA1+ cells were also scattered throughout the inner cortex. By two-colour fluorocytometric analysis of post-natal thymocytes, it was shown that EA1 was expressed on 30 to 65% of thymocytes. EA1 was expressed on CD4+ CD8+ as well as on the more immature CD4- CD8- thymocytes. In contrast to circulating T cells, thymocytes were much less responsive to PMA stimulation for the expression of EA1. Molecular characterization showed that EA1 on thymocytes had the same structure as that of activated peripheral T cells. In addition, thymic EA1 was constitutively phosphorylated. Thus, EA1 expression is acquired early during thymic development after colonization of the thymic rudiment by CD7+ T cell precursors. However, the specific role that EA1 may play in the activation and function of developing thymocytes remains to be determined. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:2204504

  19. Differential Impact of PD-1 and/or Interleukin-10 Blockade on HIV-1-Specific CD4 T Cell and Antigen-Presenting Cell Functions

    PubMed Central

    Porichis, Filippos; Hart, Meghan G.; Zupkosky, Jennifer; Barblu, Lucie; Kwon, Douglas S.; McMullen, Ashley; Brennan, Thomas; Ahmed, Rafi; Freeman, Gordon J.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antigen persistence in chronic infections and cancer upregulates inhibitory networks, such as the PD-1 and interleukin-10 (IL-10) pathways, that impair immunity and lead to disease progression. These pathways are attractive targets for immunotherapy, as demonstrated by recent clinical trials of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade in cancer patients. However, in HIV-1 infection not all subjects respond to inhibition of either pathway and the mechanistic interactions between these two networks remain to be better defined. Here we demonstrate that in vitro blockade of PD-L1 and/or IL-10Rα results in markedly different profiles of HIV-1-specific CD4 T cell restoration. Whereas PD-L1 blockade leads to balanced increase in gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-2, and IL-13 secretion, IL-10Rα blockade preferentially restores IFN-γ production. In viremic subjects, combined PD-L1/IL-10Rα blockade results in a striking 10-fold increase in IFN-γ secretion by HIV-1-specific CD4 T cells that is not observed in subjects with spontaneous (elite controllers) or therapy-induced control of viral replication. In contrast to the dramatic increase in IFN-γ production, concurrent blockade has a marginal additive effect on IL-2 production, IL-13 secretion, and HIV-1-specific CD4 T cell proliferation. IFN-γ produced by Thelper cells upregulates PD-L1, HLA I/II, and IL-12 expression by monocytes. The effect of combined blockade on IFN-γ was dependent on reciprocal reinforcement through IL-12. These studies provide crucial information on the different immunoregulatory qualities of PD-1 and IL-10 in progressive disease and link exhausted virus-specific CD4 T cells and monocytes in the regulation of IFN-γ and IL-12 secretion. IMPORTANCE Infection with HIV results in most people in uncontrolled viral replication and progressive weakening of the body defenses. In the absence of antiviral therapy, this process results in clinical disease, or AIDS. An important reason why HIV continues to multiply is

  20. Permanent cell line expressing human factor VIII-related antigen established by hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Edgell, C J; McDonald, C C; Graham, J B

    1983-01-01

    A permanent human cell line, EA . hy 926, has been established that expresses at least one highly differentiated function of vascular endothelium, factor VIII-related antigen. This line was derived by fusing human umbilical vein endothelial cells with the permanent human cell line A549. Hybrid cells that survived in selective medium had more chromosomes than either progenitor cell type and included a marker chromosome from the A549 line. Factor VIII-related antigen can be identified intracellularly in the hybrids by immunofluorescence and accumulates in the culture fluid. Expression of factor VIII-related antigen by these hybrid cells has been maintained for more than 100 cumulative population doublings, including more than 50 passages and three cloning steps. This is evidence that EA . hy 926 represents a permanent line. Images PMID:6407019

  1. Effect of trimerization motifs on quaternary structure, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of a noncleavable HIV-1 gp140 envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Sean X.; Idiart, Rebecca J.; Mariano, Ellaine B.; Chen, Helen; Jiang Peifeng; Xu Li; Ostrow, Kristin M.; Wrin, Terri; Phung, Pham; Binley, James M.; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Ballantyne, John A.; Whalen, Robert G.

    2009-12-05

    The external domains of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (gp120 and the gp41 ectodomain, collectively known as gp140) contain all known viral neutralization epitopes. Various strategies have been used to create soluble trimers of the envelope to mimic the structure of the native viral protein, including mutation of the gp120-gp41 cleavage site, introduction of disulfide bonds, and fusion to heterologous trimerization motifs. We compared the effects on quaternary structure, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of three such motifs: T4 fibritin, a GCN4 variant, and the Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase catalytic subunit. Fusion of each motif to the C-terminus of a noncleavable JRCSF gp140(-) envelope protein led to enhanced trimerization but had limited effects on the antigenic profile and CD4-binding ability of the trimers. Immunization of rabbits provided no evidence that the trimerized gp140(-) constructs induced significantly improved neutralizing antibodies to several HIV-1 pseudoviruses, compared to gp140 lacking a trimerization motif. However, modest differences in both binding specificity and neutralizing antibody responses were observed among the various immunogens.

  2. Surface antigen expression in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clustering analysis, interrelationships and effects of chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hulkkonen, J; Vilpo, L; Hurme, M; Vilpo, J

    2002-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a phenotypically distinguishable form of B-lymphoid leukemias. The regularity of surface membrane antigen expression patterns, their interrelationships as well as the effects of the three frequent chromosomal aberrations, ie 11q deletion, 13q deletion and trisomy 12, were investigated in 35 classic CLL cases by flow cytometry. The two-way cluster analysis of 31 individual antigens revealed three expression patterns: (1) most cells in most cases positive (CD5, CD19, CD20, CD23, CD27, CD40, CD45, CD45RA); (2) most cells in most cases negative (CD10, CD14, CD34, CD122, CD154, mIgG); and (3) a mixed pattern with a variable number of positive cases and a variable percentage of positive cells in individual cases (CD11c, CD21, CD22, CD25, CD38, CD45RO, CD79b, CD80, CD95, CD124, CD126, CD130, FMC7, mIgD, mIgkappa, mIglambda, mIgM). The expressions of several antigens were strongly interdependent, even when antigens belonged to entirely different gene families. Such antigen pairs were: CD11c/CD21; CD19/CD45; CD19/CD79b; CD22/CD45RA; CD23/Igkappa; CD25/mIgM; CD27/CD45; CD45/CD79b; CD45RA/Igkappa. In contrast, the expression of some antigens was mutually exclusive, the best examples being CD45RA/CD45RO, CD38/CD80 and CD45RA/CD80. Deletion of chromosome arm 11q attenuated expression of splicing variant CD45RA, but enhanced CD45RO expression. In contrast, cases of trisomy 12 were associated with enhanced CD45RA and attenuated CD45RO expression. Similarly, trisomy 12 was associated with enhanced CD27 and mIgkappa expression. The variable levels of signaling surface membrane antigens, their interactions and interference by genetic aberrations are likely to affect the clinical progression and drug response of CLL. PMID:11840283

  3. The expression of the Hu (paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis/sensory neuronopathy) antigen in human normal and tumor tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Dalmau, J.; Furneaux, H. M.; Cordon-Cardo, C.; Posner, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    Using immunohistochemistry or Western blot analysis, the authors have studied the expression of the Hu antigen (a neuronal protein identified by the serum of patients with small cell lung cancer and paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis/sensory neuronopathy) in normal human tissues and 115 tumors of different histologic types. In normal tissue, the Hu antigen is highly restricted to the nervous system. In lung tumors, the Hu antigen is restricted in its expression to all small cell carcinomas. A few other neuroendocrine-related tumors, especially neuroblastomas (50%), also express the antigen. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1415481

  4. Differences in the expression of mucus-associated antigens between proximal and distal human colon adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Bara, J.; Nardelli, J.; Gadenne, C.; Prade, M.; Burtin, P.

    1984-01-01

    An immunohistological study showed differences in the expression of mucus-associated gastric M1 and intestinal M3 antigens between the proximal (100 cases) and distal (200 cases) colonic adenocarcinomas. Such a regional difference was not observed in the normal colon. A total of 55% and 78% of proximal tumours produced M1 and M3 antigens, respectively (versus 13% and 47% in the distal tumours). The high percentage of M1 positive proximal cancers could be explained by the higher percentage (i) of mucus-producing tumours, such as signet ring cell (6% vs 1%) or mucinous adenocarcinomas (29% vs 11%); and (ii) of M1(+) well-differentiated adenocarcinomas (45% vs 8.5%) and the presence of undifferentiated carcinoma producing M1 antigens (12% vs 0%). These latter carcinomas were found in older patients (mean age 78 years vs 66 years). These results suggest that, on the proximal side, the stem cells were more often engaged in a differentiation process involving the expression of M antigens than were those of the distal side. Moreover, the proximal stem cells more frequently produce a foetal differentiation program showing simultaneous expression of M3 and M1 antigens (in 48% of proximal tumours, vs 11.5% for the distal side). Around 12% of proximal adenocarcinomas (vs 2% of distal tumours) contained stem cells engaged in a cell differentiation program not observed in the normal adult or foetal colon, involving the predominant expression of M1 antigens associated with an undifferential histological pattern. Images Figure 2 PMID:6324842

  5. Antigen uptake and expression of antigen presentation-related immune genes in flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) after vaccination with an inactivated Edwardsiella tarda immersion vaccine, following hyperosmotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yingli; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Antigen uptake is a critical process for activation of the immune system, and therefore the ability to enhance antigen uptake is a primary consideration in the development of an immersion vaccination of fish. In the present work, flounders (Paralichthys olivaceus) were immersed in three hyperosmotic solutions with 40, 50 and 60‰ salinities, then transferred into seawater of normal salinity (i.e. 30‰) containing formalin-inactivated Edwardsiella tarda for 30 min. The antigen uptake in vaccinated flounder was determined using an absolute quantitative PCR (qPCR). The results showed significantly higher antigen uptake in the tissues of flounders immersed in solutions with 50‰ and 60‰ salinity compared to the control group directly immersed in vaccine (DI) (P < 0.05), and the highest amount of antigen was detected in flounders immersed in the 50‰ salinity solution, whereas there was no significant difference in antigen uptake between the 40‰ salinity group and the DI group (P > 0.05). A rapid and significant increase in antigen uptake was detected in the mucosal-associated tissues including the gill, skin and intestine (P < 0.05) compared with the spleen, kidney and liver. Antigen uptake in the gill and skin both peaked at 30 min post immersion, which was significantly higher than the levels of uptake measured in the other tissues (P < 0.05), and then quickly declined. In contrast, antigen uptake in the spleen, kidney and liver gradually increased 3 h post immersion (hpi). The expression profiles of four antigen presentation-related immune genes (MHC Iα, MHC IIα, CD4-1 and CD8α) were investigated after immersion. These four genes showed a significantly stronger response in the immersed flounders exposed to 50‰ salinity compared with the DI group (P < 0.05). In the mucosal-associated tissues, the expression of MHC Iα and CD8α genes peaked at 24 hpi, while the expression of MHC IIα and CD4-1 genes showed up-regulation in the gill and skin

  6. Induction of cancer testis antigen expression in circulating acute myeloid leukemia blasts following hypomethylating agent monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Pragya; Paluch, Benjamin E.; Matsuzaki, Junko; James, Smitha R.; Collamat-Lai, Golda; Blagitko-Dorfs, Nadja; Ford, Laurie Ann; Naqash, Rafeh; Lübbert, Michael; Karpf, Adam R.; Nemeth, Michael J.; Griffiths, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer testis antigens (CTAs) are promising cancer associated antigens in solid tumors, but in acute myeloid leukemia, dense promoter methylation silences their expression. Leukemia cell lines exposed to HMAs induce expression of CTAs. We hypothesized that AML patients treated with standard of care decitabine (20mg/m2 per day for 10 days) would demonstrate induced expression of CTAs. Peripheral blood blasts serially isolated from AML patients treated with decitabine were evaluated for CTA gene expression and demethylation. Induction of NY-ESO-1 and MAGEA3/A6, were observed following decitabine. Re-expression of NY-ESO-1 and MAGEA3/A6 was associated with both promoter specific and global (LINE-1) hypomethylation. NY-ESO-1 and MAGEA3/A6 mRNA levels were increased irrespective of clinical response, suggesting that these antigens might be applicable even in patients who are not responsive to HMA therapy. Circulating blasts harvested after decitabine demonstrate induced NY-ESO-1 expression sufficient to activate NY-ESO-1 specific CD8+ T-cells. Induction of CTA expression sufficient for recognition by T-cells occurs in AML patients receiving decitabine. Vaccination against NY-ESO-1 in this patient population is feasible. PMID:26883197

  7. Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells efficiently capture HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins via CD4 for antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Sandgren, Kerrie J; Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Forsell, Mattias N; Soldemo, Martina; Adams, William C; Liang, Frank; Perbeck, Leif; Koup, Richard A; Wyatt, Richard T; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Loré, Karin

    2013-07-01

    Advances in HIV-1 vaccine clinical trials and preclinical research indicate that the virus envelope glycoproteins (Env) are likely to be an essential component of a prophylactic vaccine. Efficient Ag uptake and presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) is important for strong CD4(+) Th cell responses and the development of effective humoral immune responses. In this study, we examined the capacity of distinct primary human DC subsets to internalize and present recombinant Env to CD4(+) T cells. Consistent with their specific receptor expression, skin DCs bound and internalized Env via C-type lectin receptors, whereas blood DC subsets, including CD1c(+) myeloid DCs, CD123(+) plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs), and CD141(+) DCs exhibited a restricted repertoire of C-type lectin receptors and relied on CD4 for uptake of Env. Despite a generally poor capacity for Ag uptake compared with myeloid DCs, the high expression of CD4 on PDCs allowed them to bind and internalize Env very efficiently. CD4-mediated uptake delivered Env to EEA1(+) endosomes that progressed to Lamp1(+) and MHC class II(+) lysosomes where internalized Env was degraded rapidly. Finally, all three blood DC subsets were able to internalize an Env-CMV pp65 fusion protein via CD4 and stimulate pp65-specific CD4(+) T cells. Thus, in the in vitro systems described in this paper, CD4-mediated uptake of Env is a functional pathway leading to Ag presentation, and this may therefore be a mechanism used by blood DCs, including PDCs, for generating immune responses to Env-based vaccines. PMID:23729440

  8. RECOMBINANT SIMIAN VARICELLA VIRUSES EXPRESSING RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS ANTIGENS ARE IMMUNOGENIC

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Toby M.; Traina-Dorge, Vicki; Davis, Kara A.; Gray, Wayne L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Recombinant simian varicella viruses (rSVVs) were engineered to express respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) antigens. The RSV surface glycoprotein G and second matrix protein M2 (22k) genes were cloned into the SVV genome, and recombinant viruses were characterized in vitro and in vivo. rSVVs were also engineered to express the membrane-anchored or secreted forms of the RSV G protein as well as an RSV G lacking its chemokine mimicry motif (CX3C), which may have different effects on priming the host immune response. The RSV genes were efficiently expressed in rSVV/RSV infected Vero cells as RSV G and M2 transcripts were detected by RT-PCR and RSV antigens were detected by immunofluorescence and immunoblot assays. The rSVVs replicated efficiently in Vero cell culture. Rhesus macaques immunized with rSVV/RSV-G and rSVV/RSV-M2 vaccines produced antibody responses to SVV and RSV antigens. The results demonstrate that recombinant varicella viruses are suitable vectors for expression of RSV antigens and may represent a novel vaccine strategy for immunization against both pathogens. PMID:18272766

  9. Prognostic significance of 5T4 oncofetal antigen expression in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Starzynska, T; Marsh, P J; Schofield, P F; Roberts, S A; Myers, K A; Stern, P L

    1994-05-01

    The 5T4 oncofetal antigen is a 72 kDa glycoprotein defined by a monoclonal antibody raised against human placental trophoblast and is expressed in many different carcinomas but detected only at low levels in some normal epithelia. Immunohistochemical analysis of the patterns of expression in colorectal carcinomas has indicated a significant association between the presence of the antigen in tumour cells and metastatic spread. The 5T4 antigen phenotype of 72 colorectal cancers has been compared with the clinical outcome of the patients in order to assess its relationship with prognosis. Forty per cent of tumours were 5T4 positive; the remainder were either unlabelled or exhibited stroma-associated labelling only. There was a significant correlation between 5T4 expression in the malignant cells and unfavourable course of disease (P < 0.001). The 5 year survival with 5T4-positive tumours was 22% compared with 75% for patients with 5T4-negative tumours; median survival was 24 versus > 90 months respectively. Stratified analysis showed that 5T4 antigen tumour positivity was acting independently of each of stage, site of tumour, age or sex. There were significant differences in survival for patients with Dukes' B and C stage carcinomas (P = 0.001 and P = 0.034). The results suggest that in colorectal cancer immunohistochemical assessment of 5T4 expression may be useful in identifying patients at high risk for tumour recurrence and for whom additional treatment strategies might be most appropriate. PMID:8180020

  10. ENCYSTATION AND EXPRESSION OF CYST ANTIGENS BY 'GIARDIA LAMBLIA' IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cyst form of Giardia lamblia is responsible for transmission of giardiasis, a major waterborne intestinal disease. These studies demonstrate for the first time expression of cyst antigens and encystation of G. lamblia in vitro by both morphologic and immunologic criteria. The...

  11. Viral Engineering of Chimeric Antigen Receptor Expression on Murine and Human T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hammill, Joanne A; Afsahi, Arya; Bramson, Jonathan L; Helsen, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of a bolus of tumor-specific T lymphocytes into cancer patients is a promising therapeutic strategy. In one approach, tumor specificity is conferred upon T cells via engineering expression of exogenous receptors, such as chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we describe the generation and production of both murine and human CAR-engineered T lymphocytes using retroviruses. PMID:27581020

  12. Identification of antigenic components of Staphylococcus epidermidis expressed during human infection.

    PubMed

    Pourmand, Mohammad R; Clarke, Simon R; Schuman, Richard F; Mond, James J; Foster, Simon J

    2006-08-01

    A spectrum of in vivo-expressed Staphylococcus epidermidis antigens was identified by probing a bacteriophage lambda library of S. epidermidis genomic DNA with human serum from infected and uninfected individuals. This analysis resulted in identification of 53 antigen-encoding loci. Six antigenic polypeptides were expressed from these loci and purified. These polypeptides were the propeptide, mature amidase, and repeat sequence domains of the major autolysin AtlE, GehD (lipase), and two members of a conserved family of surface proteins (ScaA [AaE] and ScaB). AtlE, ScaA, and ScaB all exhibit human ligand binding capacity. Screening a bank of human serum samples revealed that there were significant increases in the amounts of reactive immunoglobulin G in infected individuals compared to the amounts in healthy individuals for the repeat sequence and mature amidase domains of AtlE, ScaB, and GehD. Vaccination of mice with recombinant antigens stimulated an immune response which in vitro opsonized S. epidermidis. In this study we identified prospective candidate antigens for prophylaxis or immunotherapy to control disease. PMID:16861652

  13. High Expression of Water-Soluble Recombinant Antigenic Domains of Toxoplasma gondii Secretory Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhaoshou; Ahn, Hye-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant antigenic proteins of Toxoplasma gondii are alternative source of antigens which are easily obtainable for serodiagnosis of toxoplasmosis. In this study, highly antigenic secretory organellar proteins, dense granular GRA2 and GRA3, rhoptrial ROP2, and micronemal MIC2, were analyzed by bioinformatics approach to express as water-soluble forms of antigenic domains. The transmembrane region and disorder tendency of 4 secretory proteins were predicted to clone the genes into pGEX-4T-1 vector. Recombinant plasmids were transformed into BL21 (DE3) pLysS E. coli, and GST fusion proteins were expressed with IPTG. As a result, GST fusion proteins with GRA225-105, GRA339-138, ROP2324-561, and MIC21-284 domains had respectively higher value of IgG avidity. The rGST-GRA225-105 and rGST-GRA339-138 were soluble, while rGST-ROP2324-561 and rGST-MIC21-284 were not. GRA231-71, intrinsically unstructured domain (IUD) of GRA2, was used as a linker to enhance the solubility. The rGST-GRA231-71-ROP2324-561, a chimeric protein, appeared to be soluble. Moreover, rGST-GRA231-71-MIC21-284 was also soluble and had higher IgG avidity comparing to rGST-MIC21-284. These 4 highly expressed and water-soluble recombinant antigenic proteins may be promising candidates to improve the serodiagnosis of toxoplasmosis in addition to the major surface antigen of SAG1. PMID:25246715

  14. High expression of water-soluble recombinant antigenic domains of Toxoplasma gondii secretory organelles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoshou; Ahn, Hye-Jin; Nam, Ho-Woo

    2014-08-01

    Recombinant antigenic proteins of Toxoplasma gondii are alternative source of antigens which are easily obtainable for serodiagnosis of toxoplasmosis. In this study, highly antigenic secretory organellar proteins, dense granular GRA2 and GRA3, rhoptrial ROP2, and micronemal MIC2, were analyzed by bioinformatics approach to express as water-soluble forms of antigenic domains. The transmembrane region and disorder tendency of 4 secretory proteins were predicted to clone the genes into pGEX-4T-1 vector. Recombinant plasmids were transformed into BL21 (DE3) pLysS E. coli, and GST fusion proteins were expressed with IPTG. As a result, GST fusion proteins with GRA225-105, GRA339-138, ROP2324-561, and MIC21-284 domains had respectively higher value of IgG avidity. The rGST-GRA225-105 and rGST-GRA339-138 were soluble, while rGST-ROP2324-561 and rGST-MIC21-284 were not. GRA231-71, intrinsically unstructured domain (IUD) of GRA2, was used as a linker to enhance the solubility. The rGST-GRA231-71-ROP2324-561, a chimeric protein, appeared to be soluble. Moreover, rGST-GRA231-71-MIC21-284 was also soluble and had higher IgG avidity comparing to rGST-MIC21-284. These 4 highly expressed and water-soluble recombinant antigenic proteins may be promising candidates to improve the serodiagnosis of toxoplasmosis in addition to the major surface antigen of SAG1. PMID:25246715

  15. HIV-1 RT-dependent DNAzyme expression inhibits HIV-1 replication without the emergence of escape viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Ryuichi; Hayafune, Masaaki; Habu, Yuichiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    DNAzymes are easier to prepare and less sensitive to chemical and enzymatic degradation than ribozymes; however, a DNA enzyme expression system has not yet been developed. In this study, we exploited the mechanism of HIV-1 reverse transcription (RT) in a DNA enzyme expression system. We constructed HIV-1 RT-dependent lentiviral DNAzyme expression vectors including the HIV-1 primer binding site, the DNA enzyme, and either a native tRNA (Lys-3), tRMDtRL, or one of two truncated tRNAs (Lys-3), tRMDΔARMtRL or tRMD3′-endtRL. Lentiviral vector-mediated DNAzyme expression showed high levels of inhibition of HIV-1 replication in SupT1 cells. We also demonstrated the usefulness of this approach in a long-term assay, in which we found that the DNAzymes prevented escape from inhibition of HIV. These results suggest that HIV-1 RT-dependent lentiviral vector-derived DNAzymes prevent the emergence of escape mutations. PMID:20833635

  16. Expression and self-assembly of recombinant capsid protein from the antigenically distinct Hawaii human calicivirus.

    PubMed Central

    Green, K Y; Kapikian, A Z; Valdesuso, J; Sosnovtsev, S; Treanor, J J; Lew, J F

    1997-01-01

    The Norwalk and Hawaii viruses are antigenically distinct members of the family Caliciviridae and are considered to be important etiologic agents of epidemic gastroenteritis, with most studies focusing on the role of Norwalk virus. To further investigate the importance of Hawaii virus, Hawaii virus-like particles (VLPs) were produced by expression of its capsid protein in the baculovirus system and these VLPs were used as the antigen in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that was efficient in the detection of a serologic response to Hawaii virus. The ready availability of Hawaii VLPs should enable larger-scale epidemiological studies to further elucidate the importance of this agent. PMID:9196224

  17. Attenuated recombinant vaccinia virus expressing oncofetal antigen (tumor-associated antigen) 5T4 induces active therapy of established tumors.

    PubMed

    Mulryan, Kate; Ryan, Matthew G; Myers, Kevin A; Shaw, David; Wang, Who; Kingsman, Susan M; Stern, Peter L; Carroll, Miles W

    2002-10-01

    The human oncofetal antigen 5T4 (h5T4) is a transmembrane glycoprotein overexpressed by a wide spectrum of cancers, including colorectal, ovarian, and gastric, but with a limited normal tissue expression. Such properties make 5T4 an excellent putative target for cancer immunotherapy. The murine homologue of 5T4 (m5T4) has been cloned and characterized, which allows for the evaluation of immune intervention strategies in "self-antigen" in vivo tumor models. We have constructed recombinant vaccinia viruses based on the highly attenuated and modified vaccinia virus ankara (MVA strain), expressing h5T4 (MVA-h5T4), m5T4 (MVA-m5T4), and Escherichia coli LacZ (MVA-LacZ). Immunization of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice with MVA-h5T4 and MVA-m5T4 constructs induced antibody responses to human and mouse 5T4, respectively. C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice vaccinated with MVA-h5T4 were challenged with syngeneic tumor line transfectants, B16 melanoma, and CT26 colorectal cells that express h5T4. MVA-h5T4-vaccinated mice showed significant tumor retardation compared with mice vaccinated with MVA-LacZ or PBS. In active treatment studies, inoculation with MVA-h5T4 was able to treat established CT26-h5T4 lung tumor and to a lesser extent B16.h5T4 s.c. tumors. Additionally, when C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with MVA-m5T4 were challenged with B16 cells expressing m5T4, resulting growth of the tumors was significantly retarded compared with control animals. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with MVA-m5T4 showed no signs of autoimmune toxicity. These data support the use of MVA-5T4 for tumor immunotherapy. PMID:12481437

  18. Human fibroblasts in idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis express HLA-DR antigens.

    PubMed

    Lee, I

    1991-09-01

    Idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis (IRF) is a rare human disease characterized by non-neoplastic fibroblastic proliferation associated with chronic inflammatory cells; its pathogenesis is obscure. We undertook an immunohistochemical study for the expression of HLA-DR antigens and other immune-related markers by retroperitoneal proliferating fibroblasts and inflammatory cells from 2 IRF patients. Patterns of immunoreactivity were compared with those expressed by human nodular fasciitis (NF) and granulation tissue. In IRF, most fibroblasts immunostained strongly for HLA-DR antigens, whereas fibroblasts in NF and granulation tissue did, not immunostain at all. The fibroblasts did not immunostain for interleukin 2 receptor, C3b receptor, CD-4, CD-8, or Leu-M1 in any of the tissue studied. Most macrophages and lymphocytes in IRF and NF immunostained Strangly for HLA-DR antigens. In IRF, the CD-4 and CD-8 immunostained T-lymphocytes appeared equally distributed. The expression of HLA-DR antigens by fibroblasts in IRF indicates that this rare disease may indeed be an immune-associated hypersensitivity disorder. PMID:1777134

  19. [HIV-1 infection up-regulating expression of interferon-stimulated gene 15 in cell lines].

    PubMed

    Wu, Huan-mei; Sun, Jun; Meng, Zhe-feng; Zhang, Xiao-yan; Xu, Jian-qing

    2013-09-01

    To investigate whether HIV-1 infection affects expression of interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) and determine the antiviral effect of ISG15 in vitro, ISG15 expression at transcription and protein level and supernatant p24 of HIV-1 was detected in various HIV-1 infected or transfected cell lines, respec tively. HIV-1 molecular clone pNL4-3 was used to transfect 293T, TZM-bl and HeLa cells while HIV-1 pseudo-typed virus was used to infect Jurkat, MT-1 and THP-1 cells. After twenty-four hours post infection or transfection, cells were harvested for extraction of total RNAs and subsequently used in real time PCR for quantification of ISG15 transcriptional expression. After forty-eight hours post infection or transfection, cells were harvested for extraction of total proteins to detect ISG15 protein expression. A significant up-regulation of ISG15 at transcription level was observed in HIV-1 infected or transfected cell lines, particulaly in THP-1 and TZM-bl cells. Up-regulation of ISG15 protein was observed only in TZM-bl cell. Cotransfection of ISG15 and HIV-1 indicated that ISG15 inhibited production of HIV-1 progeny virus in a dose and time depend manner in 293T cell but not TZM-bl cell. These results revealed upregulating ISG15 expression in transcriptional level and potential antagonistic mechanism against ISG15 by HIV-1 infection, simultanelusly. PMID:24386835

  20. Generation of Large Numbers of Antigen-Expressing Human Dendritic Cells Using CD14-ML Technology

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Yuya; Haruta, Miwa; Tomita, Yusuke; Matsumura, Keiko; Ikeda, Tokunori; Yuno, Akira; Hirayama, Masatoshi; Nakayama, Hideki; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a method to expand human monocytes through lentivirus-mediated introduction of cMYC and BMI1, and we named the monocyte-derived proliferating cells, CD14-ML. CD14-ML differentiated into functional DC (CD14-ML-DC) upon addition of IL-4, resulting in the generation of a large number of DC. One drawback of this method was the extensive donor-dependent variation in proliferation efficiency. In the current study, we found that introduction of BCL2 or LYL1 along with cMYC and BMI1 was beneficial. Using the improved method, we obtained CD14-ML from all samples, regardless of whether the donors were healthy individuals or cancer patients. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood T cells with CD14-ML-DC that were loaded with cancer antigen-derived peptides led to the establishment of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lines that recognized the peptides. Since CD14-ML was propagated for more than 1 month, we could readily conduct genetic modification experiments. To generate CD14-ML-DC that expressed antigenic proteins, we introduced lentiviral antigen-expression vectors and subjected the cells to 2 weeks of culture for drug-selection and expansion. The resulting antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC successfully induced CD8+ T cell lines that were reactive to CMVpp65 or MART1/MelanA, suggesting an application in vaccination therapy. Thus, this improved method enables the generation of a sufficient number of DC for vaccination therapy from a small amount of peripheral blood from cancer patients. Information on T cell epitopes is not necessary in vaccination with cancer antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC; therefore, all patients, irrespective of HLA type, will benefit from anti-cancer therapy based on this technology. PMID:27050553

  1. Antigenicity and Immunogenicity in HIV-1 Antibody-Based Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Leopold; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2012-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies can protect from infection by immunodeficiency viruses. However, the induction by active vaccination of antibodies that can potently neutralize a broad range of circulating virus strains is a goal not yet achieved, despite more than 2 decades of research. Here we review progress made in the field, from early empirical studies to today’s rational structure-based vaccine antigen design. We discuss the existence of broadly neutralizing antibodies, their implications for epitope discovery and recent progress made in antigen design. Finally, we consider the relationship between antigenicity and immunogenicity for B cell recognition and antibody production, a major hurdle for rational vaccine design to overcome. PMID:23227445

  2. Identification of Preferentially Expressed Antigen of Melanoma as a Potential Tumor Suppressor in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Quan; Li, Lin; Lin, Zaijun; Xu, Wei; Han, Shuai; Zhao, Chenglong; Li, Lei; Cao, Wenjiao; Yang, Xinghai; Wei, Haifeng; Xiao, Jianru

    2016-01-01

    Background Preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma (PRAME) is known as a tumor-associated antigen that is altered in a variety of malignancies, including lung cancer. However, the role of PRAME in lung cancer remains unclear. Material/Methods We analyzed the expression of PRAME in human lung adenocarcinomas and studied the function of PRAME using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced gene knockdown in lung cancer cell lines PC9 and A549. Results We found that PRAME expression is down-regulated in lung adenocarcinomas. Knockdown of PRAME promoted proliferation and suppressed apoptosis of PC9 and A549 cells. Conclusions In line with its roles in controlling cell growth, RPAME regulates multiple critical cell-growth related genes, including IGF1R oncogene. IGF1R up-regulation contributes to increase of cell growth upon the knockdown of PRAME. Taken together, our results suggest that PRAME has inhibitory roles in lung cancer. PMID:27241212

  3. Different serotypes of dengue viruses differently regulate the expression of the host cell antigen processing machinery.

    PubMed

    Gan, Chye Sheng; Yusof, Rohana; Othman, Shatrah

    2015-09-01

    Dengue virus (DV) infection demonstrates an intriguing virus-induced intracellular membrane alteration that results in the augmentation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted antigen presentation. As oppose to its biological function in attracting CD8(+) T-cells, this phenomenon appears to facilitate the immune evasion. However, the molecular events that attribute to the dysregulation of the antigen presenting mechanism (APM) by DV remain obscure. In this study, we aimed to characterize the host cell APM upon infection with all serotypes of whole DV. Cellular RNA were isolated from infected cells and the gene expressions of LMP2, LMP7, TAP1, TAP2, TAPBP, CALR, CANX, PDIA3, HLA-A and HLA-B were analyzed via quantitative PCR. The profiles of the gene expression were further validated. We showed that all four DV serotypes modulate host APM at the proteasomal level with DV2 showing the most prominent expression profile. PMID:25981524

  4. Two methods for the quantitative analysis of surface antigen expression in acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Jolanta

    2004-01-01

    The expression of lineage molecules (CD13 and CD33), c-Kit receptor (CD117), CD34, HLA-DR and adhesion molecule CD49d was assessed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blast cells from 32 cases, using direct and indirect quantitative cytometric analysis. High correlation (r=0.8) was found between antigen expression intensity values calculated by direct analysis method (ABC) and by indirect analysis method (RFI). Moreover, the differences in expression intensity of CD13, CD117 and CD34 antigens were found between leukemic and normal myeloblasts. This may be helpful in identification of leukemic cells in the diagnostics of minimal residual disease after treatment in AML patients. PMID:15493582

  5. Lymphocyte expression of a 90 kD brush border antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Van Leer, E H; Moullier, P; Ronco, P; Verroust, P

    1987-01-01

    This study analyses the expression by rat lymphocytes of six renal brush border (BB) antigens defined by a set of monoclonal antibodies and demonstrates that a 90 kD protein (gp 90), synthesized by BB and glomeruli is found on the surface of T and B cells. The other antigens, including the 330 kD protein involved in Heymann's nephritis--a model of epimembranous glomerulonephritis--are not detectable on the surface of lymphocytes. Immunochemical studies indicate that gp 90 and the related protein immunoprecipitated from thymocyte membranes co-migrate in SDS-PAGE. Quantitative binding analysis shows that the number of antigenic sites is in the same order of magnitude on thymocytes, spleen and bone-marrow lymphocytes as well as on two lines of pre-B and pre-T cells, but considerably lower on a highly differentiated helper T cell line. Images Fig. 4 PMID:3301100

  6. Interferon-γ Reduces Melanosomal Antigen Expression and Recognition of Melanoma Cells by Cytotoxic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Le Poole, I. Caroline; Riker, Adam I.; Quevedo, M. Eugenia; Stennett, Lawrence S.; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Kast, W. Martin; Robinson, June K.; Nickoloff, Brian J.

    2002-01-01

    In malignant melanoma, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are frequently reactive with melanosomal antigens. Achieving complete remissions by peptide therapy is frequently hampered by metastases evading immune recognition. The tumor microenvironment seems to favor reduced expression of target antigens by melanoma cells. Among candidate factors, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) (102 to 103 U/ml) suppressed expression of antigens MART-1, TRP-1, and gp100 by M14 melanoma cells as shown by immunohistology and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, reducing MART-1 expression by >65%. Northern blot analysis revealed that reduced expression was regulated at the transcriptional level, demonstrating a 79% reduction in MART-1 transcript abundance after 32 hours of IFN-γ treatment. To evaluate consequences of IFN-γ exposure for immune recognition, MART-1-responsive T cells were reacted with pretreated HLA-matched melanoma cells. Cytotoxicity was reduced up to 78% by IFN-γ pretreatment, and was restored by addition of MART-1 peptide AAGIGILTV for 2 hours. Examination of melanoma lesions by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed up to 188-fold more abundant IFN-γ transcripts when compared to control skin. Laser capture microdissection and immunohistology localized most IFN-γ-producing T cells to the tumor stroma. Reduced MART-1 expression was frequently observed in adjacent tumor cells. Consequently, IFN-γ may enhance inflammatory responses yet hamper effective recognition of melanoma cells. PMID:11839572

  7. Analysis of T cell responses to chimpanzee adenovirus vectors encoding HIV gag–pol–nef antigen

    PubMed Central

    Herath, S.; Le Heron, A.; Colloca, S.; Bergin, P.; Patterson, S.; Weber, J.; Tatoud, R.; Dickson, G.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses have been shown to be both immunogenic and efficient at presenting HIV proteins but recent trials have suggested that they may play a role in increasing the risk of HIV acquisition. This risk may be associated with the presence of pre-existing immunity to the viral vectors. Chimpanzee adenoviruses (chAd) have low seroprevalence in human populations and so reduce this risk. ChAd3 and chAd63 were used to deliver an HIV gag, pol and nef transgene. ELISpot analysis of T cell responses in mice showed that both chAd vectors were able to induce an immune response to Gag and Pol peptides but that only the chAd3 vector induced responses to Nef peptides. Although the route of injection did not influence the magnitude of immune responses to either chAd vector, the dose of vector did. Taken together these results demonstrate that chimpanzee adenoviruses are suitable vector candidates for the delivery of HIV proteins and could be used for an HIV vaccine and furthermore the chAd3 vector produces a broader response to the HIV transgene. PMID:26546736

  8. Analysis of T cell responses to chimpanzee adenovirus vectors encoding HIV gag-pol-nef antigen.

    PubMed

    Herath, S; Le Heron, A; Colloca, S; Bergin, P; Patterson, S; Weber, J; Tatoud, R; Dickson, G

    2015-12-16

    Adenoviruses have been shown to be both immunogenic and efficient at presenting HIV proteins but recent trials have suggested that they may play a role in increasing the risk of HIV acquisition. This risk may be associated with the presence of pre-existing immunity to the viral vectors. Chimpanzee adenoviruses (chAd) have low seroprevalence in human populations and so reduce this risk. ChAd3 and chAd63 were used to deliver an HIV gag, pol and nef transgene. ELISpot analysis of T cell responses in mice showed that both chAd vectors were able to induce an immune response to Gag and Pol peptides but that only the chAd3 vector induced responses to Nef peptides. Although the route of injection did not influence the magnitude of immune responses to either chAd vector, the dose of vector did. Taken together these results demonstrate that chimpanzee adenoviruses are suitable vector candidates for the delivery of HIV proteins and could be used for an HIV vaccine and furthermore the chAd3 vector produces a broader response to the HIV transgene. PMID:26546736

  9. Adenoviral vectors elicit humoral immunity against variable loop 2 of clade C HIV-1 gp120 via "Antigen Capsid-Incorporation" strategy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Linlin; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Farrow, Anitra L; Derdeyn, Cynthia A; Matthews, Qiana L

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors in combination with the "Antigen Capsid-Incorporation" strategy have been applied in developing HIV-1 vaccines, due to the vectors׳ abilities in incorporating and inducing immunity of capsid-incorporated antigens. Variable loop 2 (V2)-specific antibodies were suggested in the RV144 trial to correlate with reduced HIV-1 acquisition, which highlights the importance of developing novel HIV-1 vaccines by targeting the V2 loop. Therefore, the V2 loop of HIV-1 has been incorporated into the Ad capsid protein. We generated adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying variable loop 2 (V2) of HIV-1 gp120, with the "Antigen Capsid-Incorporation" strategy. To assess the incorporation capabilities on hexon hypervariable region1 (HVR1) and protein IX (pIX), 20aa or full length (43aa) of V2 and V1V2 (67aa) were incorporated, respectively. Immunizations with the recombinant vectors significantly generated antibodies against both linear and discontinuous V2 epitopes. The immunizations generated durable humoral immunity against V2. This study will lead to more stringent development of various serotypes of adenovirus-vectored V2 vaccine candidates, based on breakthroughs regarding the immunogenicity of V2. PMID:26499044

  10. Adenoviral vectors elicit humoral immunity against variable loop 2 of clade C HIV-1 gp120 via “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Linlin; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Farrow, Anitra L.; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Matthews, Qiana L.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors in combination with the “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy have been applied in developing HIV-1 vaccines, due to the vectors’ abilities in incorporating and inducing immunity of capsid-incorporated antigens. Variable loop 2 (V2)-specific antibodies were suggested in the RV144 trial to correlate with reduced HIV-1 acquisition, which highlights the importance of developing novel HIV-1 vaccines by targeting the V2 loop. Therefore, the V2 loop of HIV-1 has been incorporated into the Ad capsid protein. We generated adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying variable loop 2 (V2) of HIV-1 gp120, with the “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy. To assess the incorporation capabilities on hexon hypervariable region1 (HVR1) and protein IX (pIX), 20aa or full length (43aa) of V2 and V1V2 (67aa) were incorporated, respectively. Immunizations with the recombinant vectors significantly generated antibodies against both linear and discontinuous V2 epitopes. The immunizations generated durable humoral immunity against V2. This study will lead to more stringent development of various serotypes of adenovirus-vectored V2 vaccine candidates, based on breakthroughs regarding the immunogenicity of V2. PMID:26499044

  11. Glycoprotein screening in colorectal cancer based on differentially expressed Tn antigen.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongyun; Cheng, Zongyong; Ouyang, Chunhui; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Yanyan; Chen, Shuijiao; Wang, Chunlian; Lu, Fanggen; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Xiaowei

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and the identification of new biomarkers for CRC is valuable for its diagnosis and treatment. We aimed to screen differentially expressed glycoproteins (especially O-glycoproteins) and to identify diagnostic or therapeutic candidates for colorectal cancer (CRC) based on different Tn antigen expression levels. Fresh cancer tissues and adjacent healthy tissues were obtained from CRC patients and classified into three groups based on their Tn antigen expression: CRC with negative Tn expression (CRC Tn‑), CRC with positive Tn expression (CRC Tn+) and normal control without Tn expression (NC). Protein extractions were separated and identified by iTRAQ technology. Glycoproteins and O-glycoproteins were selected using UniProt and DAVID. Deep bioinformatic analysis, including Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KO), was used to annotate this O-glycoprotein interaction network. Subsequently, two O‑glycoproteins were verified by western blotting and immunohistochemistry in either LS174T cells or CRC tissues. We found that 330 differentially expressed proteins were identified by iTRAQ between CRC Tn‑ and NC tissues, 317 between CRC Tn+ and NC tissues, and 316 between CRC Tn‑ and Tn+ tissues. Of the 316 proteins, 55 glycoproteins and 19 O‑glycoproteins were identified and analyzed via deep informatics. Namely, different Tn antigen expression levels in CRC led to differential protein expression patterns, especially for glycoproteins and O‑glycoproteins. Decorin and SORBS1, two representative functional O-glycoproteins, were significantly downregulated in the CRC Tn+ tissues compared with the level in the CRC Tn‑ or NC tissues. Based on this deep bioinformatic analysis, Decorin and SORBS1 are hypothesized to be involved in the TGF‑β and PPAR‑γ signaling pathways, respectively. PMID:27432485

  12. Expression and Immune Responses to MAGE Antigens Predict Survival in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daudi, Sayeema; Eng, Kevin H.; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Morrison, Carl; Miliotto, Anthony; Beck, Amy; Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Groman, Adrienne; Gnjatic, Sacha; Spagnoli, Guillo; Lele, Shashikant; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-01-01

    The MAGE cancer-testis antigens (CTA) are attractive candidates for immunotherapy. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of expression, humoral immunity and prognostic significance of MAGE CTA in human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). mRNA or protein expression frequencies were determined for MAGE-A1, -A3, -A4, -A10 and -C1 (CT7) in tissue samples obtained from 400 patients with EOC. The presence of autologous antibodies against the MAGE antigens was determined from 285 serum samples. The relationships between MAGE expression, humoral immunity to MAGE antigens, and clinico-pathologic characteristics were studied. The individual frequencies of expression were as follows: A1: 15% (42/281), A3: 36% (131/390), A4: 47% (186/399), A10: 52% (204/395), C1: 16% (42/267). Strong concordant expression was noted with MAGE-A1:–A4, MAGE-A1:–C1 and MAGE-A4:–A10 (p<0.0005). Expression of MAGE-A1 or -A10 antigens resulted in poor progression free survival (PFS) (OR 1.44, CI 1.01–2.04, p = 0.044 and OR 1.3, CI 1.03–1.64, p = 0.03, respectively); whereas, MAGE-C1 expression was associated with improved PFS (OR 0.62, CI 0.42–0.92, p = 0.016). The improved PFS observed for MAGE-C1 expression, was diminished by co-expression of MAGE-A1 or -A10. Spontaneous humoral immunity to the MAGE antigens was present in 9% (27/285) of patients, and this predicted poor overall survival (log-rank test p = 0.0137). These findings indicate that MAGE-A1, MAGE-A4, MAGE-A3, and MAGE-A10 are priority attractive targets for polyvalent immunotherapy in ovarian cancer patients. PMID:25101620

  13. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class II antigens in porcine leptospiral nephritis.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, E; Del Piero, F; Aresu, L; Sciarrone, F; Vicari, N; Mattiello, S; Tagliabue, S; Fabbi, M; Scanziani, E

    2009-09-01

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHCII) is required for the presentation of antigens to CD4 helper T cells. During nephritis, not only primary antigen presenting cells such as histiocytes and lymphocytes, but also cytokine-stimulated tubular epithelial cells express MHCII. Leptospirosis in fattening pigs is characterized by several degrees of nephritis, from absence of lesions to severe multifocal tubulo-interstitial inflammation. Renal tissue from 20 8-month-old pigs with spontaneous nephritis and 6 control pigs without renal lesions were investigated for leptospirosis by indirect immunohistochemistry (IHC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). IHC for MHCII also was performed on renal samples. Serum samples were tested for different serovars of Leptospira interrogans. Control pigs were free of interstitial nephritis and negative for leptospirosis by all tests. In pigs with nephritis, serology was positive for serovar Pomona in 19/20 pigs. In 16 of these 19 pigs, leptospiral renal infection was confirmed by PCR and/or indirect IHC. Nephritic lesions were classified histologically into perivascular lymphocytic (4 pigs), lymphofollicular (6 pigs), lymphohistiocytic (8 pigs), and neutrophilic (2 pigs) pattern. MHCII expression by histiocytes and lymphocytes was observed in all lesions. Prominent MHCII expression in regenerating tubular epithelium was observed in lymphofollicular and lymphohistiocytic nephritis. No tubular colocalization between leptospiral and MHCII antigen was observed. Results suggest that during leptospiral nephritis, MHCII contributes to the intensity of the inflammatory response. Furthermore de novo MHCII expression in regenerating tubules may play a role in the defence mechanism against leptospiral tubular colonization. PMID:19179617

  14. Preferentially Expressed Antigen in Melanoma (PRAME) and the PRAME Family of Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Nora; Kewitz, Stefanie; Staege, Martin S

    2016-01-01

    Preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma (PRAME) is the best characterized member of the PRAME family of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins. Mammalian genomes contain multiple members of the PRAME family whereas in other vertebrate genomes only one PRAME-like LRR protein was identified. PRAME is a cancer/testis antigen that is expressed at very low levels in normal adult tissues except testis but at high levels in a variety of cancer cells. In contrast to most other cancer/testis antigens, PRAME is expressed not only in solid tumors but also in leukemia cells. Expression of PRAME and other members of the PRAME family is regulated epigenetically. PRAME interacts with varying pathways that might be directly involved in the malignant phenotype of cancer cells. For instance, PRAME is able to dominantly repress retinoic acid signaling in these cells. On the other hand, PRAME-derived peptides can be recognized as epitopes by cytotoxic T cells and PRAME represents an attractive target for immunological treatment strategies. PMID:26694250

  15. Successful vaccination with a polyvalent live vector despite existing immunity to an expressed antigen.

    PubMed

    Flexner, C; Murphy, B R; Rooney, J F; Wohlenberg, C; Yuferov, V; Notkins, A L; Moss, B

    1988-09-15

    A global vaccination strategy must take into account production and delivery costs as well as efficacy and safety. A heat-stable, polyvalent vaccine that requires only one inoculation and induces a high level of humoral and cellular immunity against several diseases is therefore desirable. A new approach is to use live microorganisms such as mycobacteria, enteric bacteria, adenoviruses, herpesviruses and poxviruses as vaccine vectors. A potential limitation of live polyvalent vaccines, however, is existing immunity within the target population not only to the vector, but to any of the expressed antigens. This could restrict replication of the vector, curtail expression of antigens, and reduce the total immune response to the vaccine. Recently acquired immunity to vaccinia virus can severely limit the efficacy of a live recombinant vaccinia-based vaccine, so a strategy involving closely spaced inoculations with the same vector expressing different antigens may present difficulties. We have constructed a recombinant vaccinia virus that expresses surface proteins from two diverse pathogens, influenza A virus haemagglutinin and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D. Mice that had recently recovered from infection with either HSV-1 or influenza A virus could still be effectively immunized with the double recombinant. PMID:2842693

  16. Comparison of Z and R3 antigen expression and of genes encoding other antigenic markers in invasive human and bovine Streptococcus agalactiae strains from Norway.

    PubMed

    Maeland, Johan A; Radtke, Andreas

    2013-12-27

    Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS) may cause a variety of infectious diseases in humans caused by human GBS and mastitis in cattle caused by bovine GBS. Over the last few years molecular testing has provided evidence that human and bovine GBS have evolved along diverse phylogenetic lines. In the present study 173 invasive human GBS strains and 52 invasive bovine strains were tested for altogether 18 strain-variable and surface-localized antigenic markers including all 10 capsular polysaccharides (CPS) and proteins including Cβ, the alpha-like proteins, R3 and the recently described Z1 and Z2 antigens. PCR was used to detect encoding genes and antibody-based methods to detect expression of antigens. Thirteen of the 18 markers were detected in isolates of both strain categories. Seven of the ten CPS antigens were detected in both groups with types III and V predominating in the human GBS strains, types IV and V in the bovine isolates. Z1, Z2 and/or R3 expression and the genes encoding Cβ, Cα, Alp1, Alp2/3 or R4 (Rib) were detected in both groups. Protein antigen-CPS associations well known for human strains were essentially the same in the bovine isolates. The results show that in spite of evolution along different lines, human and bovine GBS share a variety of surface-exposed antigenic markers, substantiating close relationship between the two GBS subpopulations. PMID:24120184

  17. Rapid and sensitive detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen by immunomagnetic separation coupled with catalytic fluorescent immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Yang, Hang; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a system of magnetic beads (MBs) coupled with catalytic fluorescent immunoassay for rapid and sensitive determination of HIV-1 capsid antigen p24 was developed. p24 was captured by antibody immobilized MBs, and the detection antibody was linked to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) through biotin-streptavidin recognition, catalyzing the oxidation of o-phenylenediamine (OPD) and hydrogen peroxide to produce a fluorescent product. This is the first reported utilization of the fluorescence of OPD oxidation product catalyzed by HRP for immunoassay. Optimization of conditions afforded a low detection limit of 0.5 pg/mL (3σ) for p24 with a linear range of 1.4-90.0 pg/mL. The assay exhibited good reproducibility with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 4.4 %, 4.7 %, and 5.0 % for detecting 1.4 pg/mL, 22.5 pg/mL, and 45.0 pg/mL p24, respectively. The assay can be completed in less than 90 min. Moreover, the proposed method was successfully applied to detect p24 in spiked serum. This method overcomes the interference of MBs to the fluorescence signal and demonstrated higher sensitivity for detection of p24 than conventional ELISA kits. The system could be applied for detecting other antigens with high sensitivity, rapidity, specificity, and simple operation. Graphical Abstract A rapid and sensitive biosensing method coupling immunomagnetic separation and catalytic fluorescence for determination of HIV-1 p24 has been developed. PMID:27351993

  18. Potentiation of the immune response in HIV-1+ individuals.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, T; Underwood, R; Khiroya, R; Bachovchin, W W; Huber, B T

    1996-03-15

    T cells from HIV-1+ individuals have a defect in mounting an antigen specific response. HIV-1 Tat has been implicated as the causative agent of this immunosuppression. We have previously shown that HIV-1 Tat inhibits antigen specific proliferation of normal T cells in vitro by binding to the accessory molecule CD26, a dipeptidase expressed on the surface of activated T cells. We now demonstrate that the defective in vitro recall antigen response in HIV-1 infected individuals can be restored by the addition of soluble CD26, probably by serving as a decoy receptor for HIV-1 Tat. The restored response is comparable to that of an HIV-1- individual, suggesting that early in HIV infection there is a block in the memory cell response, rather than deletion of these cells. PMID:8617888

  19. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of Mycoplasma gallisepticum antigens recognized by sera from infected chickens.

    PubMed

    Krause, D C; Kleven, S H; Lee, K K

    1990-01-01

    A clone bank of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) strain A5969 DNA was prepared in the expression vector phage lambda gt11. Approximately 75% of the resulting phages were recombinants, based upon the insertional inactivation of the lacZ gene of the vector. Clones were screened immunologically with serum prepared from specific-pathogen-free white leghorn chickens that had been infected with aerosolized MG. Approximately 250 clones, or less than 1% of the recombinant phage, reacted positively to various degrees with the test serum and failed to react with serum from uninfected specific-pathogen-free control chickens. A single clone was chosen at random for comparison with a vector control by western immunoblot, revealing a polypeptide of 140,000 molecular weight in the clone profile but not the control profile that reacted with immune serum. Clones expressing MG antigens recognized during infection may provide an improved means for antigen preparation for serologic diagnosis of mycoplasmosis. PMID:2142422

  20. Plant expressed coccidial antigens as potential vaccine candidates in protecting chicken against coccidiosis.

    PubMed

    Sathish, Kota; Sriraman, Rajan; Subramanian, B Mohana; Rao, N Hanumantha; Kasa, Balaji; Donikeni, Jagan; Narasu, M Lakshmi; Srinivasan, V A

    2012-06-22

    Coccidiosis is a disease caused by intracellular parasites belonging to the genus Eimeria. In the present study, we transiently expressed two coccidial antigens EtMIC1 and EtMIC2 as poly histidine-tagged fusion proteins in tobacco. We have evaluated the protective efficacy of plant expressed EtMIC1 as monovalent and as well as bi-valent formulation where EtMIC1 and EtMIC2 were used in combination. The protective efficacy of these formulations was evaluated using homologous challenge in chickens. We observed better serum antibody response, weight gain and reduced oocyst shedding in birds immunized with EtMIC1 and EtMIC2 as bivalent formulation compared to monovalent formulation. However, IFN-γ response was not significant in birds immunized with EtMIC1 compared to the birds immunized with EtMIC2. Our results indicate the potential use of these antigens as vaccine candidates. PMID:22554463

  1. Prevalence of p24 antigen among a cohort of HIV antibody negative blood donors in Sokoto, North Western Nigeria - the question of safety of blood transfusion in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Osaro, Erhabor; Mohammed, Ndakotsu; Zama, Isaac; Yakubu, Abdulrahaman; Dorcas, Ikhuenbor; Festus, Aghedo; Kwaifa, Ibrahim; Sani, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Blood transfusions remain a substantial source of HIV in SSA particularly among children and pregnant women. Aims and objectives: This aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the prevalence of p24 antigen among HIV antibody seronegative blood donors in Sokoto, North West Nigeria. Methods A total of 15,061 HIV antibody negative blood donors with mean age and age range (29.2 ± 8.18 and 18-50 years) were screened for p24 antigen between January 2010 to July 2013 using the Diapro Diagnostic immunoassay kit for P24 antigen (King Hawk Pharmaceuticals Beijing China). Results The overall prevalence of p24 antigen among the HIV antibody negative donors sample was 5.84%. The yearly prevalence was 9.79, 8.12, 2.7 and 2.84% respectively in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013. Of the total number of blood donor tested, 14,968 (99.38%) were males while 93 (0.62%) were females. The prevalence of P24 antigen was significantly higher among male blood donors 873 (5.8%) compared to females 7(0.05%), (p= 0.001). P24 positivity was significantly higher among blood group O blood donors compared to A, B and AB donors (494 (3.29%) compared to 184 (1.89%), 196 (1.30%) and 6 (0.04%)) respectively, p = 0.001). The prevalence of P24 antigen was significantly higher among Rhesus positive blood donors compared to Rhesus negative (807 (5.36%) versus 73 (0.48%), p =0.001). Conclusion Blood transfusion in Nigeria is associated with increased risk of HIV transmission. There is the urgent need to optimize the screening of blood donors in Nigeria by the inclusion of p24 antigen testing into the blood donor screening menu. The Nigerian government urgently need to adopt the WHO blood safety strategies to reduce the risk of transmission of HIV through blood transfusion. PMID:25419301

  2. Restricted expression of LW antigen on subsets of human B and T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, O L; Thomas, D B; Lomas, C G; Tippett, P

    1984-01-01

    NIM-M8 is a monoclonal IgM antibody, specific for the LWab antigen as shown by its reaction with red cells of all donors except those lacking LWa, LWb and LWab. Indirect immunofluorescent staining and cell sorter analyses have shown that LWab is present on a subpopulation of human lymphocytes. Cell fractionation studies indicate that subsets of both B and T cells express LWab and it may, therefore, provide a further marker for heterogeneity in these lymphocyte populations. PMID:6443217

  3. Fezf2 Orchestrates a Thymic Program of Self-Antigen Expression for Immune Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Takaba, Hiroyuki; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Tomofuji, Yoshihiko; Danks, Lynett; Nitta, Takeshi; Komatsu, Noriko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Self-tolerance to immune reactions is established via promiscuous expression of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), leading to the elimination of T cells that respond to self-antigens. The transcriptional regulator Aire has been thought to be sufficient for the induction of TRAs, despite some indications that other factors may promote TRA expression in the thymus. Here, we show that the transcription factor Fezf2 directly regulates various TRA genes in mTECs independently of Aire. Mice lacking Fezf2 in mTECs displayed severe autoimmune symptoms, including the production of autoantibodies and inflammatory cell infiltration targeted to peripheral organs. These responses differed from those detected in Aire-deficient mice. Furthermore, Fezf2 expression and Aire expression are regulated by distinct signaling pathways and promote the expression of different classes of proteins. Thus, two independent factors, Fezf2 and Aire, permit the expression of TRAs in the thymus to ensure immune tolerance. PMID:26544942

  4. CD66 carcinoembryonic antigens mediate interactions between Opa-expressing Neisseria gonorrhoeae and human polymorphonuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Gray-Owen, S D; Dehio, C; Haude, A; Grunert, F; Meyer, T F

    1997-06-16

    Colonization of urogenital tissues by the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae is characteristically associated with purulent exudates of polymorphonuclear phagocytes (PMNs) containing apparently viable bacteria. Distinct variant forms of the phase-variable opacity-associated (Opa) outer membrane proteins mediate the non-opsonized binding and internalization of N. gonorrhoeae by human PMNs. Using overlay assays and an affinity isolation technique, we demonstrate the direct interaction between Opa52-expressing gonococci and members of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family which express the CD66 epitope. Gonococci and recombinant Escherichia coli strains synthesizing Opa52 showed specific binding and internalization by transfected HeLa cell lines expressing the CD66 family members BGP (CD66a), NCA (CD66c), CGM1 (CD66d) and CEA (CD66e), but not that expressing CGM6 (CD66b). Bacterial strains expressing either no opacity protein or the epithelial cell invasion-associated Opa50 do not bind these CEA family members. Consistent with their different receptor specificities, Opa52-mediated interactions could be inhibited by polyclonal anti-CEA sera, while Opa50 binding was instead inhibited by heparin. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, we observed a marked recruitment of CD66 antigen by Opa52-expressing gonococci on both the transfected cell lines and infected PMNs. These data indicate that members of the CEA family constitute the cellular receptors for the interaction with, and internalization of, N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:9218786

  5. Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg antigens enhance Listeria monocytogenes vector HIV-1 vaccine induction of cytotoxic T cells.

    PubMed

    Bui, Cac T; Shollenberger, Lisa M; Paterson, Yvonne; Harn, Donald A

    2014-09-01

    Vaccines are an important public health measure for prevention and treatment of diseases. In addition to the vaccine immunogen, many vaccines incorporate adjuvants to stimulate the recipient's immune system and enhance vaccine-specific responses. While vaccine development has advanced from attenuated organism to recombinant protein or use of plasmid DNA, the development of new adjuvants that safely increase immune responses has not kept pace. Previous studies have shown that the complex mixture of molecules that comprise saline soluble egg antigens (SEA) from Schistosoma mansoni eggs functions to promote CD4(+) T helper 2 (Th2) responses. Therefore, we hypothesized that coadministration of SEA with a Listeria vector HIV-1 Gag (Lm-Gag) vaccine would suppress host cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and T helper 1 (Th1) responses to HIV-1 Gag epitopes. Surprisingly, instead of driving HIV-1 Gag-specific responses toward Th2 type, we found that coadministration of SEA with Lm-Gag vaccine significantly increased the frequency of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing Gag-specific Th1 and CTL responses over that seen in mice administered Lm-Gag only. Analysis of the functionality and durability of vaccine responses suggested that SEA not only enlarged different memory T cell compartments but induced functional and long-lasting vaccine-specific responses as well. These results suggest there are components in SEA that can synergize with potent inducers of strong and durable Th1-type responses such as those to Listeria. We hypothesize that SEA contains moieties that, if defined, can be used to expand type 1 proinflammatory responses for use in vaccines. PMID:24990901

  6. Expression of hepatitis B surface antigen in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris using the GAP promoter.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, A; Chugh, D A; Swaminathan, S; Khanna, N

    2001-06-01

    High-level expression and efficient assembly of Hepatitis B surface Antigen (HBsAg) particles have been reported in Pichia pastoris by integrating a single copy of the HBsAg gene under the control of the alcohol oxidase (AOX1) promoter. However, the time taken to reach peak product concentration is usually very long ( approximately 240 h). In this paper, we describe the expression of HBsAg in P. pastoris using the recently described glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAP) promoter. Unlike the previously described AOX1 promoter based system (in which biomass is generated first followed by methanol-induced antigen production), biomass generation and antigen production occur simultaneously in medium containing glycerol or glucose. Maximal levels of HBsAg expression in case of the single copy AOX1 integrant (attained after 6 days of induction) exceeded the levels of antigen produced by the single copy GAP integrant. However, this was offset by continuous antigen production by the GAP clone. In an attempt to further enhance antigen production levels of the GAP clones, we isolated multicopy Pichia integrants containing up to four copies of the GAP promoter-driven constitutive expression cassette using the Zeocin screening procedure. The data demonstrated a direct correlation between the gene dosage and the levels of HBsAg expressed by the GAP clones. The effect of copy number was additive and the four copy clone resulted in about four-fold higher yield of HBsAg. The majority of HBsAg produced in the constitutive expression system was found to be of particulate form, based on sedimentation behaviour and particle-specific ELISA, suggesting that it has the potential to serve as an effective immunogen. These particles were sensitive to thiol reagents. We also explored the possibility of secreting the GAP expressed HBsAg in P. pastoris. In-frame fusion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-factor secretion signal under the constitutive GAP promoter resulted in

  7. Differential effects of hnRNP D/AUF1 isoforms on HIV-1 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Nicole; Milev, Miroslav P.; Wong, Raymond; Sanmuganantham, Tharmila; Woolaway, Kathryn; Chabot, Benoit; Abou Elela, Sherif; Mouland, Andrew J.; Cochrane, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Control of RNA processing plays a major role in HIV-1 gene expression. To explore the role of several hnRNP proteins in this process, we carried out a siRNA screen to examine the effect of depletion of hnRNPs A1, A2, D, H, I and K on HIV-1 gene expression. While loss of hnRNPs H, I or K had little effect, depletion of A1 and A2 increased expression of viral structural proteins. In contrast, reduced hnRNP D expression decreased synthesis of HIV-1 Gag and Env. Loss of hnRNP D induced no changes in viral RNA abundance but reduced the accumulation of HIV-1 unspliced and singly spliced RNAs in the cytoplasm. Subsequent analyses determined that hnRNP D underwent relocalization to the cytoplasm upon HIV-1 infection and was associated with Gag protein. Screening of the four isoforms of hnRNP D determined that, upon overexpression, they had differential effects on HIV-1 Gag expression, p45 and p42 isoforms increased viral Gag synthesis while p40 and p37 suppressed it. The differential effect of hnRNP D isoforms on HIV-1 expression suggests that their relative abundance could contribute to the permissiveness of cell types to replicate the virus, a hypothesis subsequently confirmed by selective depletion of p45 and p42. PMID:22187150

  8. Prolonged Exposure to HIV Reinforces a Poised Epigenetic Program for PD-1 Expression in Virus-specific CD8 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Youngblood, Ben; Noto, Alessandra; Porichis, Filippos; Akondy, Rama S.; Ndhlovu, Zaza M.; Austin, James W.; Bordi, Rebeka; Procopio, Francesco A.; Miura, Toshiyuki; Allen, Todd M.; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Walker, Bruce D.; Ahmed, Rafi; Boss, Jeremy M.; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre; Kaufmann, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Antigen-specific CD8 T cells play a critical role in controlling HIV infection but eventually lose antiviral functions in part because of expression and signaling through the inhibitory PD-1 receptor. To better understand the impact of prolonged TCR ligation on regulation of PD-1 expression in HIV-specific CD8 T cells we investigated the capacity of virus-specific CD8 T cells to modify the PD-1 epigenetic program following reduction in viral load. We observed that the transcriptional regulatory region was unmethylated in the PD-1hi HIV-specific CD8 T cells while it remained methylated in donor matched naïve cells at acute and chronic stages of infection. Surprisingly, the PD-1 promoter remained unmethylated in HIV-specific CD8 T cells from subjects with a viral load controlled by antiviral therapy for greater than 2 years or from elite controllers. Together these data demonstrate that the epigenetic program at the PD-1 locus becomes fixed following prolonged exposure to HIV virus. PMID:23772031

  9. Mycobacterium avium infection in HIV-1-infected subjects increases monokine secretion and is associated with enhanced viral load and diminished immune response to viral antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Denis, M; Ghadirian, E

    1994-01-01

    The complex interaction between HIV-1 infection and Mycobacterium avium was studied. Viral burden was assessed, as well as immune response to HIV-1 in the context of Myco. avium infections. We also examined serum cytokine levels and cytokine release by blood mononuclear cells in HIV-1-infected subjects, infected or not with Myco. avium. Undetectable serum levels of IL-1, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-6 were found in normal controls and in groups I, II and III of HIV-1-infected subjects. Moderate levels of TNF-alpha, IL-1 and IL-6 were found in the sera of group IV patients. When group IV was subdivided into subjects with and without Myco. avium infections, subjects with Myco, avium infections were shown to have higher serum levels of TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 than those with other infections. Blood mononuclear cells from controls and HIV subjects were stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, and cytokine levels assessed. Cells from group II patients were shown to secrete normal levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6, and lower levels of IL-1 beta; group III subjects released higher levels of IL-6. Patients in group IV had blood cells that released elevated levels of IL-6 and TNF-alpha, and lower levels of IL-1 beta. Group IV subjects with Myco. avium infections had blood cells that released higher levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1 than group IV subjects with other infections. Assessment of viral burden in cells of HIV-1-infected subjects revealed that Myco. avium-infected subjects had a higher level of virus burden and a lower level of lymphoproliferative response to an inactivated gp120-depleted HIV-1 antigen than AIDS subjects with other infections. These data suggest that Myco. avium infections in HIV-1-infected subjects hasten the progression of viral disease, enhance cytokine release and contribute to the anergy to viral antigens. PMID:8033423

  10. Perinatal Exposure to Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Triggers Profound Defects in T Cell Differentiation and Function in Fetal and Postnatal Stages of Life, Including Decreased Responsiveness to HIV Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Lombard, Catherine; Hegde, Venkatesh L.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2011-01-01

    Marijuana abuse is very prominent among pregnant women. Although marijuana cannabinoids have been shown to exert immunosuppression in adults, virtually nothing is known about the effects of marijuana use during pregnancy on the developing immune system of the fetus and during postnatal life. We noted that murine fetal thymus expressed high levels of the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. Moreover, perinatal exposure to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) had a profound effect on the fetus as evidenced by a decrease in thymic cellularity on gestational days 16, 17, and 18 and postgestational day 1 and marked alterations in T cell subpopulations. These outcomes were reversed by CB1/CB2 antagonists, suggesting that THC-mediated these effects through cannabinoid receptors. Thymic atrophy induced in the fetus correlated with caspase-dependent apoptosis in thymocytes. Thymic atrophy was the result of direct action of THC and not based on maternal factors inasmuch as THC was able to induce T cell apoptosis in vitro in fetal thymic organ cultures. It is noteworthy that perinatal exposure to THC also had a profound effect on the immune response during postnatal life. Peripheral T cells from such mice showed decreased proliferative response to T cell mitogen as well as both T cell and antibody response to HIV-1 p17/p24/gp120 antigens. Together, our data demonstrate for the first time that perinatal exposure to THC triggers profound T cell dysfunction, thereby suggesting that the offspring of marijuana abusers who have been exposed to THC in utero may be at a higher risk of exhibiting immune dysfunction and contracting infectious diseases including HIV. PMID:21831965

  11. Serological characterization and gene localization of an Escherichia coli-expressed 37-kilodalton Treponema pallidum antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, G C; Laird, W J; Coates, S R; Mack, D H; Huston, M; Sninsky, J J

    1986-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid containing a 5.6-kilobase-pair DNA fragment of the Treponema pallidum genome was characterized by endonuclease mapping, and the encoded proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and analyzed by use of in vitro transcription and translation. One of the proteins, identified as having a molecular weight of 37,000 (37K protein), was selected for further study. Initially, the seroreactivity of the partially purified 37K antigen was demonstrated by immunoblotting. After its purification to near homogeneity, the cloned T. pallidum protein was assessed for diagnostic significance by radioimmunoassay. Although first identified as seroreactive by screening with secondary syphilitic sera (T. E. Fehniger, A. M. Walfield, T. M. Cunningham, J. D. Radolf, J. N. Miller, and M. A. Lovett, Abstr. Annu. Meet. Am. Soc. Microbiol. 1985, B156, p. 44), the antigen was shown to be serologically reactive with antibodies in serum from all stages of syphilis but was not recognized by serum from controls by both immunoblotting and radioimmune assay. Further, a monospecific polyclonal rabbit antiserum generated to the 37K antigen recognized a polypeptide of the same molecular weight from T. pallidum but did not efficiently recognize proteins from five nonpathogenic treponemes tested. Therefore, because of reactivity with and specificity for T. pallidum antibodies, the 37K antigen may be of serodiagnostic value in the detection of syphilis. Images PMID:3522427

  12. Inhibition of HIV Expression and Integration in Macrophages by Methylglyoxal-Bis-Guanylhydrazone

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Macrophages are a target for infection with HIV and represent one of the viral reservoirs that are relatively resistant to current antiretroviral drugs. Here we demonstrate that methylglyoxal-bis-guanylhydrazone (MGBG), a polyamine analog and potent S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase inhibitor, decreases HIV expression in monocytes and macrophages. MGBG is selectively concentrated by these cells through a mechanism consistent with active transport by the polyamine transporter. Using a macrophage-tropic reporter virus tagged with the enhanced green fluorescent protein, we demonstrate that MGBG decreases the frequency of HIV-infected cells. The effect is dose dependent and correlates with the production of HIV p24 in culture supernatants. This anti-HIV effect was further confirmed using three macrophage-tropic primary HIV isolates. Viral life cycle mapping studies show that MGBG inhibits HIV DNA integration into the cellular DNA in both monocytes and macrophages. IMPORTANCE Our work demonstrates for the first time the selective concentration of MGBG by monocytes/macrophages, leading to the inhibition of HIV-1 expression and a reduction in proviral load within macrophage cultures. These results suggest that MGBG may be useful in adjunctive macrophage-targeted therapy for HIV infection. PMID:26223636

  13. Human leukocyte antigen B distribution in HIV discordant cohort from India.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Deepali V; Chavan, Vijay R; Ahir, Swati P; Kerkar, Shilpa C; Mehta, Preeti R; Mania-Pramanik, Jayanti

    2013-01-01

    Limited reports are available on association of HLA-B with HIV infection from India, a home to the third largest population of HIV infected people in the world. This emphasizes the need to have more information specifically the genetic constitution of HIV serodiscordant couples (DCs), where one spouse is seropositive (HSP) while the other remains seronegative (HSN) even after repeated exposure. Hence, aim of this study was to document association of HLA-B with HIV infection in DCs living in Mumbai, India. A cohort was designed to enroll DCs attending the ICTC/Shakti Clinic of KEM Hospital, Mumbai. A group of unexposed volunteers were also enrolled as healthy controls (HC). HLA-B alleles were typed using sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. Allele frequency comparison was done using 2×2 contingency tables. Results were considered significant, when p<0.05 with two-tailed Fisher's exact test. At HLA-B locus, the frequencies of HLA-B*40;-B*35;-B*07;-B*15;-B*51;-B*44;-B*52;-B*37 and -B*57 were found in decreasing order in the population. Frequency of HLA-B*35 allele was significantly higher (HSP vs HSN; p<0.02 and HSP vs HC; p<0.04) in HSP. HLA-B*40 (HSN vs HSP; p<0.01 and HC vs HSP; p<0.01) and HLA-B*18 (HSN vs HSP; p<0.02) were significantly associated with HSN. Both HSN and HC had similar HLA-B*35 and -B*40 allele frequency. HLA-B*57 allele was observed in 15 individuals (3.69%). However, HLA-B*57:01 which is known to be associated with adverse reactions against Abacavir was observed in 7 of them. HLA-B*39 was observed exclusively in HSP. Our observation in DCs confirmed the association of HLA-B*35 with susceptibility while HLA-B*40 (specifically *B40:06), -B*18 with protection. These identified alleles can be used as possible marker associated with HIV transmission. In India, HLA screening is not carried out before initiation of HIV treatment. However, the presence of HLA-B*57:01 in the population emphasizes the importance of such screening to predict

  14. Expressions of HIV-related stigma among rural-to-urban migrants in China.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yan; Li, Xiaoming; Stanton, Bonita; Fang, Xiaoyi; Lin, Danhua; Wang, Jing; Mao, Rong; Yang, Hongmei

    2008-10-01

    In China, HIV-related stigma is considered as a formidable barrier in the combat against the HIV epidemic. There have been few qualitative investigations on HIV-related stigma in China, especially among a vulnerable population of rural-to-urban migrants. Based on 90 in-depth interviews conducted in 2002-2003 with rural-to-urban migrants in Beijing and Nanjing, China, this study examines the forms and expressions of HIV-related stigma from migrants' perspectives regarding HIV infection and individuals at risk of HIV infection. Consistent with the general framework on stigma, Chinese rural-to-urban migrants' attitudes toward HIV infected individuals take forms of denial, indifference, labeling, separation, rejection, status loss, shame, hopelessness, and fear. These stigmatizing attitudes were mainly derived from fears of AIDS contagion and its negative consequences, fears of being associated with the diseases, and culturally relevant moral judgments. In addition to universal AIDS stigma, both traditional Chinese culture and socially marginalized position of rural migrant population have contributed to culturally unique aspects of stigmatizing attitudes among rural-to-urban migrants. These multifaceted manifestations of HIV-related stigma suggest that HIV stigma reduction intervention needs to address multiple aspects of HIV stigma and stigmatization including personal, cultural, institutional, and structural factors. PMID:18847389

  15. Expressions of HIV-Related Stigma among Rural-to-Urban Migrants in China

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yan; Stanton, Bonita; Fang, Xiaoyi; Lin, Danhua; Wang, Jing; Mao, Rong; Yang, Hongmei

    2008-01-01

    Abstract In China, HIV-related stigma is considered as a formidable barrier in the combat against the HIV epidemic. There have been few qualitative investigations on HIV-related stigma in China, especially among a vulnerable population of rural-to-urban migrants. Based on 90 in-depth interviews conducted in 2002–2003 with rural-to-urban migrants in Beijing and Nanjing, China, this study examines the forms and expressions of HIV-related stigma from migrants' perspectives regarding HIV infection and individuals at risk of HIV infection. Consistent with the general framework on stigma, Chinese rural-to-urban migrants' attitudes toward HIV infected individuals take forms of denial, indifference, labeling, separation, rejection, status loss, shame, hopelessness, and fear. These stigmatizing attitudes were mainly derived from fears of AIDS contagion and its negative consequences, fears of being associated with the diseases, and culturally relevant moral judgments. In addition to universal AIDS stigma, both traditional Chinese culture and socially marginalized position of rural migrant population have contributed to culturally unique aspects of stigmatizing attitudes among rural-to-urban migrants. These multifaceted manifestations of HIV-related stigma suggest that HIV stigma reduction intervention needs to address multiple aspects of HIV stigma and stigmatization including personal, cultural, institutional, and structural factors. PMID:18847389

  16. A Phase 1 Study of a Vaccine Targeting Preferentially Expressed Antigen in Melanoma and Prostate-specific Membrane Antigen in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jeffrey S.; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Goodman, Oscar B.; Cranmer, Lee D.; Marshall, John L.; Miles, Sabrina; Rosario, Dar; Diamond, David C.; Qiu, Zhiyong; Obrocea, Mihail; Bot, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Summary Preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma (PRAME) and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) are tumor-associated antigens implicated in cellular differentiation, genetic stability, and angiogenesis. MKC1106-PP is an immunotherapeutic regimen cotargeting PRAME and PSMA, comprised of a recombinant plasmid (pPRA-PSM encoding fragments derived from both antigens) and 2 peptides (E-PRA and E-PSM derived from PRAME and PSMA, respectively). This multicenter study evaluated MKC1106-PP with a fixed plasmid dose and 2 different peptide doses, administered by intralymph node injection in a prime-boost sequence in human leukocyte antigen-A*0201 and tumor-antigen-positive patients with progressing metastatic solid tumors who had failed standard therapy. Immune monitoring was done by tetramer and enzymatic-linked immune spot analysis. The treatment was well tolerated, with no significant differences in safety, immune response, and clinical outcome relative to peptide doses. Fifteen of 24 evaluable patients showed an immune response, as defined by the expansion of PRAME-specific or PSMA-specific T cells in the blood. There were no partial or complete responses by the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Seven patients showed stable disease (SD) for 6 months or longer, or prostate specific antigen decline: 4 of 10 with prostate carcinoma, 2 of 2 with renal clear cell carcinoma, and 1 of 10 with metastatic melanoma. In addition, there was an association between the induction and persistence of antigen-specific T cells in blood above baseline levels and disease control, defined as SD for 6 months or longer. These results support further development of MKC1106-PP in specific clinical indications. PMID:21760528

  17. The expression of desmosomal and corneodesmosomal antigens shows specific variations during the terminal differentiation of epidermis and hair follicle epithelia.

    PubMed

    Mils, V; Vincent, C; Croute, F; Serre, G

    1992-09-01

    Using five monoclonal antibodies (MAb), we studied by indirect immunofluorescence the desmosomes and a junctional structure specific to cornified layers, the corneodesmosome, in normal and plantar epidermis and in the various sheaths of the anagen hair follicle. The monoclonal antibodies DP1&2.2-15, PG5.1, and DG3.10, specific for desmoplakins I/II, plakoglobin, and desmoglein I, respectively, were used to study the desmosome antigens, and G36-19 and G20-21 to study the corneodesmosome antigens. The distribution and sequence of expression of the five antigens allowed the nine epithelial differentiation pathways studied to be merged into four distinct families: non-plantar epidermis, characterized by the absence of desmosome and corneodesmosome antigens in the stratum corneum; the outer root sheath of the hair follicle, which behaves like the viable layers of the epidermis with regard to the desmosome antigens but does not express the corneodesmosome antigens; plantar epidermis and the three components of the inner root sheath in which the corneodesmosome antigens are present up to the desquamating layer; and the three components of the hair shaft, which are characterized by the absence of expression of both the desmosome and the corneodesmosome antigens in its mature portion. PMID:1506670

  18. Immunological screening of a glycoprotein antigen expressed by Zajdela ascites hepatoma cells on normal rat tissues and tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Nato, F; Goulut, C; Mirshahi, M; Bourrillon, R

    1991-10-01

    Expression of the glycoprotein MII2 antigen originally identified in Zajdela ascites hepatoma cells was investigated in several normal rat tissues and in more or less differentiated tumours using biochemical and immunological approaches. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by fluorography or immunoblotting with an antiserum raised against the purified MII2 antigen revealed that this antigen was absent from normal liver cells. ELISA assays, indirect immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation experiments using the same antiserum showed that this glycoprotein was not expressed in various normal tissues such as liver, spleen, lung, pancreas, intestine and stomach, but it was unexpectedly detected in kidney and thymic tissues. However, the molecular weight of the antigens immunoprecipitated from kidney and thymus was lower than the one of MII2 (Mr of 60,000 versus 110,000-160,000 for purified MII2). No staining was observed in embryonic rat liver at 10 and 20 days of development. Moreover, this antigen was present on the surface of Morris hepatoma 7777, another rapidly proliferating and poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. In contrast, this antigen was not detected on the surface of in vitro Zajdela hepatoma cells (ZHC) or of partially differentiated hepatomas (Faza) which have recovered some hepatic functions. In addition, the MII2 antigen was found on the human non-hepatic HT-29 tumour cell line, under its undifferentiated form (HT-29 G+ subline). The possible relationships between the expression of this antigen and both the malignant transformation process and the differentiation process are discussed. PMID:1656518

  19. HIV-1 Tat elongates the G1 phase and indirectly promotes HIV-1 gene expression in cells of glial origin.

    PubMed

    Kundu, M; Sharma, S; De Luca, A; Giordano, A; Rappaport, J; Khalili, K; Amini, S

    1998-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection of the central nervous system (CNS) gives rise to many of the neurological complications in patients with AIDS. Infection of microglial cells and astrocytes in the brain promotes the release of HIV-1 Tat and other candidate neurotoxins that may be associated with the widespread neuropathology. To examine the contribution of HIV-1 Tat to the interplay between virus and CNS cells, the human astrocytic cell line, U-87MG, was treated with recombinant Tat protein. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis indicated that Tat induces a G1 arrest in these cells. Consistent with this observation, lower levels of cyclin E-Cdk2 kinase activity and phosphorylated Rb were detected in the Tat-treated cells compared with the control cells. Interestingly, our observations indicate that the underphosphorylated form of Rb that is prevalent in Tat-treated cells promotes HIV-1 transcription by a mechanism involving the NF-kappaB enhancer region. Taken together, the data presented here provide the first evidence that the HIV-1 regulatory protein, Tat, may manipulate the host cell cycle to promote viral gene expression. The significance of these findings relates to the current hypothesis that indirect effects of HIV-1 infection of the CNS may contribute to the neurological complications associated with AIDS dementia complex. PMID:9525916

  20. Interferon-beta downregulates expression of VLA-4 antigen and antagonizes interferon-gamma-induced expression of HLA-DQ on human peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Soilu-Hänninen, M; Salmi, A; Salonen, R

    1995-07-01

    We have studied the effect of recombinant human IFN-beta on the basal and IFN-gamma-induced expression of adhesion molecules and class II MHC antigens on human peripheral blood monocytes and on ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) expression of a human umbilical vein endothelial cell line (EAhy 926). We show that IFN-beta downregulates both basal and IFN-gamma-induced expression of VLA-4 (very late activation antigen-4) antigen on monocytes, but has no effect on the expression of CD11a, CD11b, CD11c, L-selectin, CD18, ICAM-1, beta 1-integrin or CD44 on monocytes or ICAM-1 on EAhy 926 cells. We also show that IFN-beta antagonizes the IFN-gamma-induced expression of HLA-DQ-antigen, but not HLA-DR or HLA-DP antigens on monocyte surface. These findings may partially explain the beneficial effect of IFN-beta in multiple sclerosis, since VLA-4-antigen is critical for leukocyte recruitment into inflamed brain and downregulation of HLA-class II expression diminishes antigen presenting capacity of monocytes. PMID:7642754

  1. Potentiation of anthrax vaccines using protective antigen-expressing viral replicon vectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Chao; An, Huai-Jie; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Xu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    DNA vaccines require improvement for human use because they are generally weak stimulators of the immune system in humans. The efficacy of DNA vaccines can be improved using a viral replicon as vector to administer antigen of pathogen. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the conventional non-viral DNA, viral replicon DNA or viral replicon particles (VRP) vaccines encoding different forms of anthrax protective antigen (PA) for specific immunity and protective potency against anthrax. Our current results clearly suggested that these viral replicon DNA or VRP vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) induced stronger PA-specific immune responses than the conventional non-viral DNA vaccines when encoding the same antigen forms, which resulted in potent protection against challenge with the Bacillus anthracis strain A16R. Additionally, the naked PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines without the need for high doses or demanding particular delivery regimens elicited robust immune responses and afforded completely protective potencies, which indicated the potential of the SFV replicon as vector of anthrax vaccines for use in clinical application. Therefore, our results suggest that these PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines may be suitable as candidate vaccines against anthrax. PMID:25102364

  2. Changes in tumor-antigen expression profile as human small-cell lung cancers progress

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Li-Sheng; Hoa, Neil T.; Lambrecht, Nils; Dacosta-Iyer, Maria; Ouyang, Yi; Abolhoda, Amir; Jadus, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our group has previously observed that in patients with small-cell lung cancers (SCLCs), the expression of a tumor antigen, glioma big potassium (gBK) ion channel, is higher at the time of death than when the cancer is first treated by surgical resection. This study aimed to determine whether this dichotomy was common in other potential lung tumor antigens by examining the same patient samples using our more extensive profile analysis of tumor-antigen precursor protein (TAPP). We then tested the hypothesis that therapeutic intervention may inadvertently cause this increased gBK production. Methods SCLC samples (eight surgical resections and three autopsy samples) and three control lungs were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for 42 potential TAPPs that represent potential T-cell-mediated immunological targets. Results Twenty-two TAPP mRNAs displayed the same profile as gBK, i.e., more mRNAs were expressed at autopsy than in their surgical counterparts. B-cyclin and mouse double minute 2, human homolog of P53-binding protein were elevated in both autopsy and surgical specimens above the normal-lung controls. When HTB119 cells were incubated with doxorubicin, gBK was strongly induced, as confirmed by intracellular flow cytometry with a gBK-specific antibody. Conclusion Our findings suggested that more immunological targets became available as the tumor responded to chemotherapy and proceeded toward its terminal stages. PMID:26175925

  3. Particle-based transcutaneous administration of HIV-1 p24 protein to human skin explants and targeting of epidermal antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Rancan, Fiorenza; Amselgruber, Sarah; Hadam, Sabrina; Munier, Sevérine; Pavot, Vincent; Verrier, Bernard; Hackbarth, Steffen; Combadiere, Behazine; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika

    2014-02-28

    Transcutaneous immunization is a promising vaccination strategy for the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. In this study, we investigate the combination of cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping (CSSS) and particle-based antigen delivery to target the HIV-1 p24 protein to skin antigen presenting cells (APC). The CSSS treatment pre-activates skin APC and opens hair follicles, where protein-loaded particles accumulate and allow for sustained delivery of the loaded antigen to perifollicular APC. We found that poly-lactic acid (PLA) and polystyrene (PS) particles targeted the adsorbed HIV-1 p24 protein to the hair follicles. Small amounts of PS and PLA particles were found to translocate to the epidermis and be internalized by skin cells, whereas most of the particles aggregated in the hair follicle canal, where they released the loaded antigen. The p24 protein diffused to the epidermis and dermis and was detected in skin cells, especially in Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. Furthermore, the combination of CSSS and particle-based delivery resulted in activation and maturation of Langerhans cells (HLA-DR, CD80 and CD83). We conclude that particle-based antigen delivery across partially disrupted skin barrier is a feasible and effective approach to needle-free transcutaneous vaccination. PMID:24384300

  4. Design and expression of a short peptide as an HIV detection probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lines, Jamie A.; Yu, Zhiqiang; Dedkova, Larisa M.; Chen, Shengxi

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We designed a short fusion peptide (FP-50) for in vivo expression. •This peptide is a very promising component for detection of gp120 protein. •The detectable level is about 20–200 times lower than previously published methods. •It is a novel probe to detect HIV-1 gp120 during early stages of HIV infection. -- Abstract: To explore a low-cost novel probe for HIV detection, we designed and prepared a 50-amino acid-length short fusion peptide (FP-50) via Escherichia coli in vivo expression. It was employed as a novel probe to detect HIV-1 gp120 protein. The detectable level of gp120 protein using the FP-50 peptide was approximately 20–200 times lower than previously published methods that used a pair of monoclonal antibodies. Thus, this short peptide is a very promising component for detection of gp120 protein during early stages of HIV infection.

  5. Effect of Cocaine on HIV Infection and Inflammasome Gene Expression Profile in HIV Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Atluri, Venkata Subba Rao; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Garcia, Gabriella; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Sagar, Vidya; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Yndart, Adriana; Nair, Madhavan

    2016-01-01

    We have observed significantly increased HIV infection in HIV infected macrophages in the presence of cocaine that could be due to the downregulation of BST2 restriction factor in these cells. In human inflammasome PCR array, among different involved in inflammasome formation, in HIV infected macrophages in the presence of cocaine, we have observed significant upregulation of NLRP3, AIM2 genes and downstream genes IL-1β and PTGS2. Whereas negative regulatory gene MEFV was upregulated, CD40LG and PYDC1 were significantly downregulated. Among various NOD like receptors, NOD2 was significantly upregulated in both HIV alone and HIV plus cocaine treated cells. In the downstream genes, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), CCL7 and IL-6 were significantly up regulated in HIV plus cocaine treated macrophages. We have also observed significant ROS production (in HIV and/or cocaine treated cells) which is one of the indirect-activators of inflammasomes formation. Further, we have observed early apoptosis in HIV alone and HIV plus cocaine treated macrophages which may be resultant of inflammasome formation and cspase-1 activation. These results indicate that in case of HIV infected macrophages exposed to cocaine, increased ROS production and IL-1β transcription serve as an activators for the formation of NLRP3 and AIM2 mediated inflammasomes that leads to caspase 1 mediated apoptosis. PMID:27321752

  6. Effect of Cocaine on HIV Infection and Inflammasome Gene Expression Profile in HIV Infected Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Atluri, Venkata Subba Rao; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Garcia, Gabriella; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Sagar, Vidya; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Yndart, Adriana; Nair, Madhavan

    2016-01-01

    We have observed significantly increased HIV infection in HIV infected macrophages in the presence of cocaine that could be due to the downregulation of BST2 restriction factor in these cells. In human inflammasome PCR array, among different involved in inflammasome formation, in HIV infected macrophages in the presence of cocaine, we have observed significant upregulation of NLRP3, AIM2 genes and downstream genes IL-1β and PTGS2. Whereas negative regulatory gene MEFV was upregulated, CD40LG and PYDC1 were significantly downregulated. Among various NOD like receptors, NOD2 was significantly upregulated in both HIV alone and HIV plus cocaine treated cells. In the downstream genes, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), CCL7 and IL-6 were significantly up regulated in HIV plus cocaine treated macrophages. We have also observed significant ROS production (in HIV and/or cocaine treated cells) which is one of the indirect-activators of inflammasomes formation. Further, we have observed early apoptosis in HIV alone and HIV plus cocaine treated macrophages which may be resultant of inflammasome formation and cspase-1 activation. These results indicate that in case of HIV infected macrophages exposed to cocaine, increased ROS production and IL-1β transcription serve as an activators for the formation of NLRP3 and AIM2 mediated inflammasomes that leads to caspase 1 mediated apoptosis. PMID:27321752

  7. Comparison of Class II HLA antigen expression in normal and carcinomatous human breast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, D.J.; Maurizis, J.C.; Chassagne, J.; Chollet, P.; Plagne, R.

    1985-03-01

    Class II HLA antigen expression in breast carcinoma and normal breast gland cells was compared using a method more accurate than immunofluorescence. This new method involves labeling membrane proteins with /sup 131/I and the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody with /sup 125/I. The isolation and purification of the doubly labeled (/sup 125/I-/sup 131/I) immune complex was performed by affinity chromatography and chromatofocusing successively. When the specific activity of glycoproteins is known, the amount of glycoprotein which bind specifically to the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody can be deduced. In breast carcinoma cells, 1.5 to 2% of the purified glycoproteins bind specifically to the monoclonal antibody, whereas less than 0.3% of normal breast gland cells binds. In contrast, leukemic cells, of which 80 to 90% possess Class II HLA antigens, 2 to 3% of Class II HLA glycoproteins bind specifically with the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody.

  8. The construction and evaluation of SIV/HIV chimeras that express the envelope of European HIV type 1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, S; Jones, S; Stott, E J; Almond, N

    1997-06-10

    The molecular construction of SIV/HIV-1 chimeric viruses (or SHIVs), provides a means of infecting macaques with immunodeficiency viruses that express the envelope protein of HIV-1. However, to date, most SHIVs produced express the envelope of isolates of HIV-1 that have been passaged repeatedly in T cell lines. We have taken SHIV-4 and replaced an NheI-AvrII fragment that encompasses the gp120 region and the extracellular portion of gp41 with the equivalent region of two European isolates of HIV-1 (ACH320.3.1 and HIV-1Han-2). Neither of these viruses had been passaged in T cell lines for prolonged periods prior to molecular cloning. Virus stocks were prepared of both SHIV constructs. In vitro, the relative ability of each clone to replicate in four T cell lines mirrored closely the pattern observed with the parental virus donating the envelope sequences. In vivo, only one of the chimeric viruses was infectious in cynomolgus macaques and its recovery was transient. The factors that affect the replication of SHIVs in vitro and in vivo are discussed. PMID:9171224

  9. Expression of the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CD10) in mesenchymal tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Mechtersheimer, G.; Möller, P.

    1989-01-01

    The expression of the CD10 antigen, formerly designated as common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen and recently identified as neutral endopeptidase, was examined immunohistochemically in 26 benign and in 55 malignant mesenchymal tumors. CD10 expression was found in 4 of 4 leiomyomas, 7 of 10 leiomyosarcomas, 1 of 6 rhabdomyosarcomas, 2 of 2 Triton tumors, 1 of 2 aggressive fibromatoses, 1 of 3 fibrosarcomas, 1 of 4 synovial sarcomas, 1 of 1 giant cell tumors of tendon sheath, 4 of 4 malignant fibrous histiocytomas, 3 of 3 Ewing's sarcomas, and 2 of 3 osteosarcomas. Furthermore, CD10 was expressed consistently in the myoepithelial compartment of 12 fibroadenomas and, in 7 of these cases, in a minor stromal cell population, probably of (myo-) fibroblastic origin. Tumors of adipose tissue (4 lipomas, 5 liposarcomas), tumors of autonomic ganglia (2 ganglioneuromas, 1 ganglioneuroblastoma, 2 neuroblastomas), tumors of peripheral nerves with purely schwannian differentiation (7 malignant schwannomas), and tumors of disputed origin were consistently CD10-negative, however, as were single cases of fibroma and chondrosarcoma. These findings indicate that the expression of CD10 is a frequent but not obligatory feature in some mesenchymal tumors. Therefore CD10 is of value in the differential diagnosis of mesenchymal tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2541615

  10. Enhanced expression of codon optimized Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens in Lactobacillus salivarius

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Christopher D.; Bannantine, John P.; Govender, Rodney; Endersen, Lorraine; Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge; Coffey, Aidan; O'Mahony, Jim; Sleator, Roy D.

    2014-01-01

    It is well documented that open reading frames containing high GC content show poor expression in A+T rich hosts. Specifically, G+C-rich codon usage is a limiting factor in heterologous expression of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) proteins using Lactobacillus salivarius. However, re-engineering opening reading frames through synonymous substitutions can offset codon bias and greatly enhance MAP protein production in this host. In this report, we demonstrate that codon-usage manipulation of MAP2121c can enhance the heterologous expression of the major membrane protein (MMP), analogous to the form in which it is produced natively by MAP bacilli. When heterologously over-expressed, antigenic determinants were preserved in synthetic MMP proteins as shown by monoclonal antibody mediated ELISA. Moreover, MMP is a membrane protein in MAP, which is also targeted to the cellular surface of recombinant L. salivarius at levels comparable to MAP. Additionally, we previously engineered MAP3733c (encoding MptD) and show herein that MptD displays the tendency to associate with the cytoplasmic membrane boundary under confocal microscopy and the intracellularly accumulated protein selectively adheres to the MptD-specific bacteriophage fMptD. This work demonstrates there is potential for L. salivarius as a viable antigen delivery vehicle for MAP, which may provide an effective mucosal vaccine against Johne's disease. PMID:25237653

  11. Differential Effects of Tra2ß Isoforms on HIV-1 RNA Processing and Expression

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Craig; Calimano, Maria; Nemet, Josip; Bubenik, Jodi; Cochrane, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Balanced processing of HIV-1 RNA is critical to virus replication and is regulated by host factors. In this report, we demonstrate that overexpression of either Tra2α or Tra2β results in a marked reduction in HIV-1 Gag/ Env expression, an effect associated with changes in HIV-1 RNA accumulation, altered viral splice site usage, and a block to export of HIV-1 genomic RNA. A natural isoform of Tra2β (Tra2ß3), lacking the N-terminal RS domain, also suppressed HIV-1 expression but had different effects on viral RNA processing. The functional differences between the Tra2β isoforms were also observed in the context of another RNA substrate indicating that these factors have distinct functions within the cell. Finally, we demonstrate that Tra2ß depletion results in a selective reduction in HIV-1 Env expression as well as an increase in multiply spliced viral RNA. Together, the findings indicate that Tra2α/β can play important roles in regulating HIV-1 RNA metabolism and expression. PMID:25970345

  12. The origin of Ia antigen-expressing cells in the rat kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Gurner, A. C.; Smith, J.; Cattell, V.

    1987-01-01

    The lineage of Ia antigen expressing (Ia+) cells that have been detected in the parenchyma and interstitium of the rat kidney has not been defined. The authors have studied the origins of Ia+ cells in chimeric rats using monoclonal antibodies to define cells of bone marrow and parenchymal origin. PVGc RTI rats (recipients) received intravenously 2 X 10(6) bone marrow cells from F1 hybrid PVG RTIc/RTIu rats (donors) 1 day after 1000 rads whole body irradiation. Ia chimerism was monitored in blood and isolated glomeruli by immunofluorescence and in frozen sections by immunoperoxidase, using monoclonal antibodies MRC OX3 (anti-Ia RTIu), MRC OX4 (anti-RTIc and u), and MRC OXI (anti-rat leukocyte common antigen). In normal F1 hybrid kidneys, glomerular cell counts were as follows: OXI+, 7.19 +/- 0.23/gl; OX4+, 3.03 +/- 0.14; OX3+, 2.34 +/- 0.1 (76% detectable expression of RTIu). OXI+, OX4+, and OX3+ cells were codistributed in cells in the interstitium between renal tubules. Proximal tubules were weakly OX4+, OX3+. In chimeric rats 5 days after irradiation, blood leukocytes, and renal OX1+ and OX4+ cells were depleted; OX3+ cells were not detected; by 4 weeks blood leukocytes were restored to normal numbers, and 85% of Ia+ cells were OX3+. By 6 weeks OXI+ and OX4+ cells were restored in glomeruli and interstitium, with increasing expression of OX3+ cells; at 10 weeks 75% of glomerular Ia+ cells were OX3+ (equivalent to detectable level of OX3+ cells in normal F1 hybrids) and OX1+, OX4+, and OX3+ cells appeared in equivalent numbers in the interstitium. Groups of proximal tubules were OX4+ and OX3-. These results in established bone marrow chimeras show that in the normal rat kidney bone marrow derived leukocytes expressing Ia antigen are present in the glomerulus and interstitium. Ia antigen is also expressed on some proximal tubular cells. There is no evidence for endothelial Ia positivity. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2437803

  13. HIV-1 expression induces cyclin D1 expression and pRb phosphorylation in infected podocytes: cell-cycle mechanisms contributing to the proliferative phenotype in HIV-associated nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Peter J; Sunamoto, Masaaki; Husain, Mohammad; Gelman, Irwin H

    2002-01-01

    Background The aberrant cell-cycle progression of HIV-1-infected kidney cells plays a major role in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated nephropathy, however the mechanisms whereby HIV-1 induces infected glomerular podocytes or infected tubular epithelium to exit quiescence are largely unknown. Here, we ask whether the expression of HIV-1 genes in infected podocytes induces cyclin D1 and phospho-pRb (Ser780) expression, hallmarks of cyclin D1-mediated G1 → S phase progression. Results We assessed cyclin D1 and phospho-pRb (Ser780) expression in two well-characterized models of HIV-associated nephropathy pathogenesis: HIV-1 infection of cultured podocytes and HIV-1 transgenic mice (Tg26). Compared to controls, cultured podocytes expressing HIV-1 genes, and podocytes and tubular epithelium from hyperplastic nephrons in Tg26 kidneys, had increased levels of phospho-pRb (Ser780), a target of active cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase-4/6 known to promote G1 → S phase progression. HIV-1-infected podocytes showed markedly elevated cyclin D1 mRNA and cyclin D1 protein, the latter of which did not down-regulate during cell-cell contact or differentiation, suggesting post-transcriptional stabilization of cyclin D1 protein levels by HIV-1. The selective suppression of HIV-1 transcription by the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, flavopiridol, abrogated cyclin D1 expression, underlying the requirement for HIV-1 encoded products to induce cyclin D1. Indeed, HIV-1 virus deleted of nef failed to induce cyclin D1 mRNA to the level of other single gene mutant viruses. Conclusions HIV-1 expression induces cyclin D1 and phospho-pRb (Ser780) expression in infected podocytes, suggesting that HIV-1 activates cyclin D1-dependent cell-cycle mechanisms to promote proliferation of infected renal epithelium. PMID:12241561

  14. Studies on the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen in human colon with the lectin Amaranthin. Normal and neoplastic epithelium express only cryptic T antigen.

    PubMed

    Sata, T; Roth, J; Zuber, C; Stamm, B; Rinderle, S J; Goldstein, I J; Heitz, P U

    1992-02-01

    The lectin Amaranthin has been shown to be highly specific for the galactose beta 1,3 N-acetylgalactosamine-alpha and sialic acid alpha 2,3 galactose beta 1,3 N-acetylgalactosamine-alpha sequence which represents the Thomsen-Friedenreich (T) antigen and its cryptic form, respectively. Previously, we demonstrated the usefulness of gold-labeled Amaranthin for the histochemical detection of the T antigen and its cryptic form. Application of the galactose oxidase (GO)-Schiff sequence abolished lectin binding to the T antigen but not its cryptic form, and therefore permitted their differentiation. In the present study we have analyzed by light and electron microscopy the distribution and subcellular localization of Amaranthin binding sites in normal, dysplastic and neoplastic colonic epithelium. Furthermore, a monoclonal antibody raised against synthetic galactose bera 1,3 N-acetylgalactosamine-alpha-bovine serum albumin was applied as a reagent for the T antigen. In normal colonic mucosa, two different Amaranthin staining patterns existed: (a) reactivity restricted to the lower portion of the crypts which was principally observed in the left colon, and (b) reactivity along the entire length of the crypts and in the surface epithelium with goblet cell staining in the upper portion of the crypts which was principally observed in the right colon. This Amaranthin staining was resistant to GO-Schiff treatment. No immunostaining with the monoclonal anti-T antigen was observed. Investigation of transitional mucosa, adenocarcinomas of different degrees of differentiation and mucinous carcinomas as well as adenomas with different degrees of dysplasia all revealed positive Amaranthin staining. The lectin staining was resistant to GO-Schiff treatment, and immunolabeling with the monoclonal antibody against the T antigen was absent. These results indicate that only the cryptic form of the T antigen is expressed in normal, dysplastic and neoplastic human colonic epithelium. PMID

  15. RRE-dependent HIV-1 Env RNA effects on Gag protein expression, assembly and release

    SciTech Connect

    López, Claudia S.; Sloan, Rachel; Cylinder, Isabel; Kozak, Susan L.; Kabat, David; Barklis, Eric

    2014-08-15

    The HIV-1 Gag proteins are translated from the full-length HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA), whereas the envelope (Env) protein is translated from incompletely spliced Env mRNAs. Nuclear export of vRNAs and Env mRNAs is mediated by the Rev accessory protein which binds to the rev-responsive element (RRE) present on these RNAs. Evidence has shown there is a direct or indirect interaction between the Gag protein, and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Our current work shows that env gene expression impacts HIV-1 Gag expression and function in two ways. At the protein level, full-length Env expression altered Gag protein expression, while Env CT-deletion proteins did not. At the RNA level, RRE-containing Env mRNA expression reduced Gag expression, processing, and virus particle release from cells. Our results support models in which Gag is influenced by the Env CT, and Env mRNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export. - Highlights: • At the protein level, full-length HIV-1 Env alters Gag protein expression. • HIV-1 Env RNA expression reduces Gag levels and virus release. • Env RNA effects on Gag are dependent on the RRE. • RRE-containing Env RNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export.

  16. CD80 antigen expression as a predictor of ex vivo chemosensitivity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kivekäs, Ilkka; Hulkkonen, Janne; Hurme, Mikko; Vilpo, Leena; Vilpo, Juhani

    2002-05-01

    We investigated the correlation between expression of 31 surface membrane antigens and chemosensitivity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 36 patients with CLL. The sensitivity of CLL cells to nine drugs (2'-chlorodeoxyadenosine, cisplatin, chlorambucil, cyclosporin A, doxorubicin, fludarabine, prednisolone, verapamil and vincristine) and two types of irradiation (gamma and UV-irradiation) was determined from dose-response curves of 4-day cultures ex vivo. The results indicated that the CLL cases responding to purine analogs (2'-chlorodeoxyadenosine and fludarabine) can be identified according to CD80 expression: all resistant cases had low or negative CD80 expression. No other correlations were revealed. CD80 may be a surrogate chemosensitivity marker for purine analogs. PMID:11916516

  17. Expression of the Major Surface Antigen of Plasmodium knowlesi Sporozoites in Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shobhona; Godson, G. Nigel

    1985-05-01

    The circumsporozoite protein, a surface antigen of the sporozoite stage of the monkey malarial parasite Plasmodium knowlesi, was expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using an expression vector containing the 5' regulatory region of the yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I gene. It was necessary to eliminate the entire 5' upstream region of the parasite DNA to obtain the expression of this protein. Only the circumsporozoite precursor protein was produced by the yeast transformants, as detected by immunoblotting. About 55 and 20 percent of the circumsporozoite protein produced in yeast was associated with the 25,000g and 150,000g particulate fractions, respectively. The protein could be solubilized in Triton X-100 and was stable in solubilized extracts.

  18. Hepatic expression of the woodchuck hepatitis virus X-antigen during acute and chronic infection and detection of a woodchuck hepatitis virus X-antigen antibody response.

    PubMed

    Jacob, J R; Ascenzi, M A; Roneker, C A; Toshkov, I A; Cote, P J; Gerin, J L; Tennant, B C

    1997-12-01

    The expression and localization of the woodchuck hepatitis virus X-antigen (WHxAg) was examined and compared with other markers of a woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infection using rabbit antisera generated against recombinant WHxAg produced in bacteria. Cellular fractionation studies showed that WHxAg was localized to the soluble and cytoskeletal fractions of the cell when assayed by immunoprecipitation of [35S]-met-cys labeled extracts derived from primary cultures of acute WHV-infected hepatocytes. Immunohistochemical examination of liver from chronic WHV-infected animals showed WHV core antigen (WHcAg) and WHxAg expression in non-neoplastic tissue. The WHxAg was found localized to the cytoplasm of infected cells, similar to WHcAg. WHxAg expression was diminished in the foci of altered hepatocytes and in hepatocellular adenomas but was found in only 1 of 11 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). Hepatic biopsies from woodchucks experimentally inoculated with WHV were examined during the acute phase of infection and during convalescence for WHcAg and WHxAg expression by immunohistochemistry. Concurrent expression of WHcAg and WHxAg was observed during the viremic phase of infection. The two antigens exhibited similar localization to the cell cytoplasm, similar distribution within the liver lobule, and similar patterns of clearance during convalescence. An immune response to WHxAg was documented in some woodchucks following acute WHV infection. These studies further define the woodchuck model of HBV infection and should allow for the investigation of the role of hepadnaviral X-antigen expression in the pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis and HCC. PMID:9398005

  19. Analysis of a cDNA clone expressing a human autoimmune antigen: full-length sequence of the U2 small nuclear RNA-associated B antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Habets, W.J.; Sillekens, P.T.G.; Hoet, M.H.; Schalken, J.A.; Roebroek, A.J.M.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Van de Ven, W.J.M.; Van Venrooij, W.J.

    1987-04-01

    A U2 small nuclear RNA-associated protein, designated B'', was recently identified as the target antigen for autoimmune sera from certain patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other rheumatic diseases. Such antibodies enabled them to isolate cDNA clone lambdaHB''-1 from a phage lambdagt11 expression library. This clone appeared to code for the B'' protein as established by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA. The identity of clone lambdaHB''-1 was further confirmed by partial peptide mapping and analysis of the reactivity of the recombinant antigen with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the 1015-base-pair cDNA insert of clone lambdaHB''-1 revealed a large open reading frame of 800 nucleotides containing the coding sequence for a polypeptide of 25,457 daltons. In vitro transcription of the lambdaHB''-1 cDNA insert and subsequent translation resulted in a protein product with the molecular size of the B'' protein. These data demonstrate that clone lambdaHB''-1 contains the complete coding sequence of this antigen. The deduced polypeptide sequence contains three very hydrophilic regions that might constitute RNA binding sites and/or antigenic determinants. These findings might have implications both for the understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases as well as for the elucidation of the biological function of autoimmune antigens.

  20. PD-1 expression conditions T cell avidity within an antigen-specific repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Sylvain; Vignard, Virginie; Florenceau, Laetitia; Dreno, B.; Khammari, A.; Lang, F.; Labarriere, N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite its negative regulatory role on tumor-specific T cells, Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is also a marker of activated tumor-infiltrating T cells. In cancer, PD-1 blockade partially reverses T cell dysfunction allowing the amplification of tumor reactive T cells. Here, we investigated the role of PD-1 signaling on effector/memory human T cells specific for shared melanoma antigens, derived from blood. We documented for the first time the existence of melanoma-specific T cell clones unable to express PD-1. This stable feature was due to the persistent methylation of the PDCD1 promoter. These PD-1neg clones were of lower avidity than their PD-1pos counterparts, suggesting that high-affinity-specific T cell clones unable to express PD-1 are not or rarely present in peripheral blood, as they are probably eliminated by negative selection, due to their high reactivity. We also documented the existence of such PD-1neg T cell clones in melanoma tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), which also exhibited a lower functional avidity than PD-1pos TIL clones. This clearly shows that PD-1 expression identifies antigen-specific T cell clonotypes of high functional avidity. Finally, we demonstrated that PD-1 blockade during the in vitro selection process of Melan-A-specific T cells favored the amplification of higher avidity T cell clonotypes. This preferential amplification of high-avidity memory T cells upon PD-1 blockade resonates with the expansion of reactive T cells, including neo-antigen-specific T cells observed in anti-PD-1-treated patients. This feature should also be a useful biomarker of clinical efficiency, while providing new insights for adoptive transfer treatments. PMID:26942093

  1. Network-based gene expression analysis of intracranial aneurysm tissue reveals role of antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Krischek, B; Kasuya, H; Tajima, A; Akagawa, H; Sasaki, T; Yoneyama, T; Ujiie, H; Kubo, O; Bonin, M; Takakura, K; Hori, T; Inoue, I

    2008-07-17

    Little is known about the pathology and pathogenesis of the rupture of intracranial aneurysms. For a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in intracranial aneurysm (IA) formation we performed a gene expression analysis comparing ruptured and unruptured aneurysm tissue to a control artery. Tissue samples of six ruptured and four unruptured aneurysms, and four cerebral arteries serving as controls, were profiled using oligonucleotide microarrays. Gene ontology classification of the differentially expressed genes was analyzed and regulatory functional networks and canonical pathways were identified with a network-based computational pathway analysis tool. Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining were performed as confirmation. Analysis of aneurysmal and control tissue revealed 521 differentially expressed genes. The most significantly associated gene ontology term was antigen processing (P=1.64E-16). Further network-based analysis showed the top scoring regulatory functional network to be built around overexpressed major histocompatibility class (MHC) I and II complex related genes and confirmed the canonical pathway "Antigen Presentation" to have the highest upregulation in IA tissue (P=7.3E-10). Real time RT-PCR showed significant overexpression of MHC class II genes. Immunohistochemical staining showed strong positivity for MHC II molecule specific antibody (HLA II), for CD68 (macrophages, monocytes), for CD45RO (T-cells) and HLA I antibody. Our results offer strong evidence for MHC class II gene overexpression in human IA tissue and that antigen presenting cells (macrophages, monocytes) play a key role in IA formation. PMID:18538937

  2. Mycoplasma gallisepticum in vivo induced antigens expressed during infection in chickens.

    PubMed

    Ron, Merav; Gorelick-Ashkenazi, Anna; Levisohn, Sharon; Nir-Paz, Ran; Geary, Steven J; Tulman, Edan; Lysnyansky, Inna; Yogev, David

    2015-02-25

    Until now only a few genes encoding virulence factors have been characterized in the avian pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum. In order to identify candidate targets associated with infection we applied an immunoscreening technique-in vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT)-to detect immunogens of M. gallisepticum strain Rlow expressed preferentially during in vivo infection. We identified 13 in vivo-induced (IVI) proteins that correspond to different functional categories including: previously reported putative virulence factors (GapA, PlpA, Hlp3, VlhA 1.07 and VlhA 4.01), transport (PotE, MGA_0241 and 0654), translation (L2, L23, ValS), chaperone (GroEL) and a protein with unknown function (MGA_0042). To validate the in vivo antigenic reactivity, 10 IVI proteins were tested by Western blot analysis using serum samples collected from chickens experimentally (with strain Rlow) and naturally (outbreaks, N=3) infected with M. gallisepticum. All IVI proteins tested were immunogenic. To corroborate these results, we tested expression of IVI genes in chickens experimentally infected with M. gallisepticum Rlow, and in MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts cell culture by using relative real time reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR). With the exception of MGA_0338, all six genes tested (MGA_1199, 0042, 0654, 0712, 0928 and 0241) were upregulated at least at one time point during experimental infection (2-4 week post-infection). In contrast, the expression of seven out of eight IVI genes (MGA_1199, 0152, 0338, 0042, 0654, 0712, 0928) were downregulated in MRC-5 cell culture at both 2 and 4h PI; MGA_0241 was upregulated 2h PI. Our data suggest that the identified IVI antigens may have important roles in the pathogenesis of M. gallisepticum infection in vivo. PMID:25575879

  3. Molecular cloning and expression in Pichia pastoris of a hypoallergenic antigen 5.

    PubMed

    Vinzón, Sabrina E; Pirpignani, María L; Nowicki, Cristina; Biscoglio de Jiménez Bonino, Mirtha

    2010-09-01

    Stings by insects from the Hymenoptera order can cause life-threatening allergic reactions and impair life quality. Immunotherapy with venom extracts is the most extensively employed treatment to reduce morbidity and mortality, but purified and safer allergy vaccines are needed. Antigen 5 is an important allergen of vespid venoms. We previously reported that Antigen 5 from Polybia scutellaris (Poly s 5) is likely to be a hypoallergenic variant. On the basis of such findings, this work deals with the recombinant expression and purification of Poly s 5 in Pichia pastoris. In order to overcome non-native glycosylation of the recombinant protein, it was necessary to delete a glycosylation site. On the other hand, different strategies were attempted to obtain a satisfactory yield of the protein; moreover, the influence of the methanol concentration in the expression medium was investigated and found to be crucial. Mass spectrometry, N-terminal sequencing, and IgG-binding inhibition assays were performed. Results allowed us to confirm the immunological equivalence between the recombinant and the natural proteins. In conclusion, a novel protocol for the recombinant expression of Poly s 5 in P. pastoris was designed thus bringing about a high yield of the protein useful for clinical and scientific purposes. PMID:20371379

  4. Antigen recognition and presentation in periapical tissues: a role for TLR expressing cells?

    PubMed

    Desai, S V; Love, R M; Rich, A M; Seymour, G J

    2011-02-01

    Bacteria are the prime cause of periapical diseases and root canal microbiology is a well-researched area of endodontics. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are present in periapical lesions of endodontic origin and play a substantial role in recognizing, processing and presenting pathogenic antigens to the adaptive immune system such as an effective and long-lasting immune response is generated against the specific pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are germ-line encoded pathogen recognition receptors (PRR) expressed by various APCs which induce their maturation, lead to gene transcription in the nucleus and the production of several pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Thirteen TLRs have been discovered, 10 of which have been identified in humans so far. Preliminary studies of dental pulp tissue have demonstrated various cell types expressing different TLRs in response to commonly encountered microorganisms. However, there is little information available regarding the expression and function of the various TLRs in human periapical lesions. This review discusses the interactions of various APCs in periapical lesions and the possible roles of different TLRs and APCs in pulp/periapical pathogen recognition and presentation to the adaptive immune system in the initiation and sustaining of periapical diseases. PMID:21083574

  5. Children with postsurgical capillary leak syndrome can be distinguished by antigen expression on neutrophils and monocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnok, Attila; Pipek, Michal; Valet, Guenter; Richter, Jacqueline; Hambsch, Joerg; Schneider, Peter

    1999-04-01

    Our initial studies indicate that children who develop post- operative capillary leak syndrome (CLS) following cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) can be distinguished based on their pre-operative level of circulating cytokines an adhesion molecules. We tested flow cytometric analysis of surface antigen expression as a potential assay for risk assessment of CLS. 24th preoperative blood samples were stained with monoclonal antibodies for the adhesion molecules ICAM-1, LFA1, MAC1, (beta) -integrin, activation markers CD25, CD54, CD69, HLA- DR, CD14 or CD4. Cells were measured on a dual-laser flow cytometer calibrated with microbeads. Antigen expression was detected as mean fluorescence intensity. The data indicate, that neutrophils of CLS patients express preoperatively higher levels of LFA1 and monocytes higher levels of HLA-DR and activation markers thus are in a state of activation. This could in combination with surgical trauma and CPB lead to their additional stimulation and migration into sites of inflammation and induce postoperative CLS. It is planned to set up a Flow-Classification program for individual risk assessment. By discriminate analysis over 80 percent of the patients were correctly classified. Our preliminary study indicates that flow cytometry with its low samples requirements and rapid access of the results could be a powerful tool to perform risk assessment prior to pediatric open heart surgery.

  6. Induction of embryonic major histocompatibility complex antigen expression by gamma-IFN.

    PubMed

    Warner, C M; Almquist, C D; Toulimat, M H; Xu, Y

    1993-07-01

    Preimplantation mouse embryos were incubated in vitro with mouse recombinant gamma-interferon (IFN). The effect of the gamma-IFN on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen expression was tested using an ELISA procedure. It was found that there is a doubling of Db antigens and a tripling of Qa-2 antigens on C57BL/6 mouse embryos cultured from the 8-cell stage for 24 h in the presence of 10(5) units/ml gamma-IFN. The effect of gamma-IFN on the rate of preimplantation embryonic development was tested by culturing 2-cell embryos for 48 h and 8-cell embryos for 24 h in the presence of varying concentrations of gamma-IFN up to 10(6) units/ml. Two methods were used to assess the cell number per embryo after the culture period: incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA, and direct counting of nuclei in fixed and stained embryos. Both methods showed that treatment with gamma-IFN increases the rate of development of preimplantation mouse embryos. Since rate of preimplantation embryonic development is genetically controlled by the Ped gene, it is suggested that gamma-IFN has a direct effect on the Ped gene phenotype of preimplantation mouse embryos. PMID:8229991

  7. Design and Development of Therapies using Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Expressing T cells

    PubMed Central

    Dotti, Gianpietro; Gottschalk, Stephen; Savoldo, Barbara; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2013-01-01

    Summary Investigators developed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) for expression on T cells more than 25 years ago. When the CAR is derived from an antibody, the resultant cell should combine the desirable targeting features of an antibody (e.g. lack of requirement for major histocompatibility complex recognition, ability to recognize non-protein antigens) with the persistence, trafficking and effector functions of a T-cell. This article describes how the past two decades have seen a crescendo of research which has now begun to translate these potential benefits into effective treatments for patients with cancer. We describe the basic design of CARs, describe how antigenic targets are selected, and the initial clinical experience with CART cells. Our review then describes our own and other investigators’ work aimed at improving the function of CARs and reviews the clinical studies in hematological and solid malignancies that are beginning to exploit these approaches. Finally, we show the value of adding additional engineering features to CAR-T cells, irrespective of their target, to render them better suited to function in the tumor environment, and discuss how the safety of these heavily modified cells may be maintained. PMID:24329793

  8. Identification and preliminary characterization of Treponema pallidum protein antigens expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Stamm, L V; Kerner, T C; Bankaitis, V A; Bassford, P J

    1983-08-01

    We have previously described the construction in Escherichia coli K-12 of a hybrid plasmid colony bank of Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) genomic DNA. By screening a portion of this bank with an in situ immunoassay, we identified six E. coli clones that express T. pallidum antigens. In this study, the recombinant plasmids from each of these clones have been analyzed in E. coli maxicells and have been found to encode a number of proteins that are not of vector pBR322 origin and are, therefore, of treponemal origin. In each case, several of these proteins can be specifically precipitated from solubilized maxicell extracts by high-titer experimental rabbit syphilitic serum. Certain of these proteins are also precipitated by high-titer latent human syphilitic sera (HSS). The T. pallidum DNA inserts in these plasmids range in size from 6.2 to 14 kilobase pairs, and from the restriction patterns of the inserts and the protein profiles generated by each plasmid in maxicells, it is apparent that we have recovered a total of four unique clones from our colony bank. Recombinant plasmids pLVS3 and pLVS5 were of particular interest. Plasmid pLVS3 encodes three major protein antigens with molecular weights of 39,000, 35,000, and 25,000. These three proteins, which were not recognized by pooled normal human sera, were efficiently precipitated by most secondary HSS, latent HSS, and late HSS tested. These proteins were also precipitated, although somewhat inefficiently, by most primary HSS tested. Plasmid pLVS5 encodes a major protein antigen with a molecular weight of 32,000 and several minor protein antigens that, although efficiently precipitated by experimental rabbit syphilitic serum, were generally not recognized by the various HSS tested. Evidence is presented indicating that the protein antigens encoded by plasmids pLVS3 and pLVS5 are specific for pathogenic treponemal species. We have also demonstrated that immunoglobulin G antibodies directed against these protein

  9. Reactivation of Latent HIV-1 Expression by Engineered TALE Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, Pedro; Gaj, Thomas; Santa-Marta, Mariana; Goncalves, Joao

    2016-01-01

    The presence of replication-competent HIV-1 –which resides mainly in resting CD4+ T cells–is a major hurdle to its eradication. While pharmacological approaches have been useful for inducing the expression of this latent population of virus, they have been unable to purge HIV-1 from all its reservoirs. Additionally, many of these strategies have been associated with adverse effects, underscoring the need for alternative approaches capable of reactivating viral expression. Here we show that engineered transcriptional modulators based on customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins can induce gene expression from the HIV-1 long terminal repeat promoter, and that combinations of TALE transcription factors can synergistically reactivate latent viral expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further show that complementing TALE transcription factors with Vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhances HIV-1 expression in latency models. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that TALE transcription factors are a potentially effective alternative to current pharmacological routes for reactivating latent virus and that combining synthetic transcriptional activators with histone deacetylase inhibitors could lead to the development of improved therapies for latent HIV-1 infection. PMID:26933881

  10. Gene expression profile of HIV-1 Tat expressing cells: a close interplay between proliferative and differentiation signals

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Cynthia; Santiago, Francisco; Deng, Longwen; Eadie, Carolyne; Zilberman, Irene; Kehn, Kylene; Maddukuri, Anil; Baylor, Shanese; Wu, Kaili; Lee, Chee Gun; Pumfery, Anne; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2002-01-01

    Background Expression profiling holds great promise for rapid host genome functional analysis. It is plausible that host expression profiling in an infection could serve as a universal phenotype in virally infected cells. Here, we describe the effect of one of the most critical viral activators, Tat, in HIV-1 infected and Tat expressing cells. We utilized microarray analysis from uninfected, latently HIV-1 infected cells, as well as cells that express Tat, to decipher some of the cellular changes associated with this viral activator. Results Utilizing uninfected, HIV-1 latently infected cells, and Tat expressing cells, we observed that most of the cellular host genes in Tat expressing cells were down-regulated. The down-regulation in Tat expressing cells is most apparent on cellular receptors that have intrinsic receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activity and signal transduction members that mediate RTK function, including Ras-Raf-MEK pathway. Co-activators of transcription, such as p300/CBP and SRC-1, which mediate gene expression related to hormone receptor genes, were also found to be down-regulated. Down-regulation of receptors may allow latent HIV-1 infected cells to either hide from the immune system or avoid extracellular differentiation signals. Some of the genes that were up-regulated included co-receptors for HIV-1 entry, translation machinery, and cell cycle regulatory proteins. Conclusions We have demonstrated, through a microarray approach, that HIV-1 Tat is able to regulate many cellular genes that are involved in cell signaling, translation and ultimately control the host proliferative and differentiation signals. PMID:12069692