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Sample records for expressing simian immunodeficiency

  1. Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Disruption through Altered Mucosal MicroRNA Expression in Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gaulke, Christopher A.; Porter, Matthew; Han, Yan-Hong; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Grishina, Irina; George, Michael D.; Dang, Angeline T.; Ding, Shou-Wei; Jiang, Guochun; Korf, Ian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epithelial barrier dysfunction during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has largely been attributed to the rapid and severe depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Although it is known that changes in mucosal gene expression contribute to intestinal enteropathy, the role of small noncoding RNAs, specifically microRNA (miRNA), has not been investigated. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected nonhuman primate model of HIV pathogenesis, we investigated the effect of viral infection on miRNA expression in intestinal mucosa. SIV infection led to a striking decrease in the expression of mucosal miRNA compared to that in uninfected controls. This decrease coincided with an increase in 5′-3′-exoribonuclease 2 protein and alterations in DICER1 and Argonaute 2 expression. Targets of depleted miRNA belonged to molecular pathways involved in epithelial proliferation, differentiation, and immune response. Decreased expression of several miRNA involved in maintaining epithelial homeostasis in the gut was localized to the proliferative crypt region of the intestinal epithelium. Our findings suggest that SIV-induced decreased expression of miRNA involved in epithelial homeostasis, disrupted expression of miRNA biogenesis machinery, and increased expression of XRN2 are involved in the development of epithelial barrier dysfunction and gastroenteropathy. IMPORTANCE MicroRNA (miRNA) regulate the development and function of intestinal epithelial cells, and many viruses disrupt normal host miRNA expression. In this study, we demonstrate that SIV and HIV disrupt expression of miRNA in the small intestine during infection. The depletion of several key miRNA is localized to the proliferative crypt region of the gut epithelium. These miRNA are known to control expression of genes involved in inflammation, cell death, and epithelial maturation. Our data indicate that this disruption might be caused by altered expression of mi

  2. Two Orphan Seven-Transmembrane Segment Receptors Which Are Expressed in CD4-positive Cells Support Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Farzan, Michael; Choe, Hyeryun; Martin, Kathleen; Marcon, Luisa; Hofmann, Wolfgang; Karlsson, Gunilla; Sun, Ying; Barrett, Peter; Marchand, Nathalie; Sullivan, Nancy; Gerard, Norma; Gerard, Craig; Sodroski, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    Clinical isolates of primate immunodeficiency viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), enter target cells by sequential binding to CD4 and the chemokine receptor CCR5, a member of the seven-transmembrane receptor family. HIV-1 variants which use additional chemokine receptors are present in the central nervous system or emerge during the course of infection. Simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV) have been shown to use CCR5 as a coreceptor, but no other receptors for these viruses have been identified. Here we show that two orphan seven-transmembrane segment receptors, gpr1 and gpr15, serve as coreceptors for SIV, and are expressed in human alveolar macrophages. The more efficient of these, gpr15, is also expressed in human CD4+ T lymphocytes and activated rhesus macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The gpr15 and gpr1 proteins lack several hallmarks of chemokine receptors, but share with CCR5 an amino-terminal motif rich in tyrosine residues. These results underscore the potential diversity of seven-transmembrane segment receptors used as entry cofactors by primate immunodeficiency viruses, and may contribute to an understanding of viral variation and pathogenesis. PMID:9236192

  3. Dynamics of CCR5 Expression by CD4+ T Cells in Lymphoid Tissues during Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Veazey, Ronald S.; Mansfield, Keith G.; Tham, Irene C.; Carville, Angela C.; Shvetz, Daniel E.; Forand, Amy E.; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2000-01-01

    Early viral replication and profound CD4+ T-cell depletion occur preferentially in intestinal tissues of macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Here we show that a much higher percentage of CD4+ T cells in the intestine express CCR5 compared with those found in the peripheral blood, spleen, or lymph nodes. In addition, the selectivity and extent of the CD4+ T-cell loss in SIV infection may depend upon these cells coexpressing CCR5 and having a “memory” phenotype (CD45RA−). Following intravenous infection with SIVmac251, memory CD4+ CCR5+ T cells were selectively eliminated within 14 days in all major lymphoid tissues (intestine, spleen, and lymph nodes). However, the effect on CD4+ T-cell numbers was most profound in the intestine, where cells of this phenotype predominate. The CD4+ T cells that remain after 14 days of infection lacked CCR5 and/or were naive (CD45RA+). Furthermore, when animals in the terminal stages of SIV infection (with AIDS) were examined, virtually no CCR5-expressing CD4+ T cells were found in lymphoid tissues, and all of the remaining CD4+ T cells were naive and coexpressed CXCR4. These findings suggest that chemokine receptor usage determines which cells are targeted for SIV infection and elimination in vivo. PMID:11069995

  4. High beta-chemokine expression levels in lymphoid tissues of simian/human immunodeficiency virus 89.6-vaccinated rhesus macaques are associated with uncontrolled replication of simian immunodeficiency virus challenge inoculum.

    PubMed

    LaFranco-Scheuch, Lisa; Abel, Kristina; Makori, Norbert; Rothaeusler, Kristina; Miller, Christopher J

    2004-06-01

    Viral suppression by noncytolytic CD8+ T cells, in addition to that by classic antiviral CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes, has been described for human immunodeficiency virus and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infections. However, the role of soluble effector molecules, especially beta-chemokines, in antiviral immunity is still controversial. In an attenuated vaccine model, approximately 60% of animals immunized with simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) 89.6 and then challenged intravaginally with SIVmac239 controlled viral replication (viral RNA level in plasma, <10(4) copies/ml) and were considered protected (K. Abel, L. Compton, T. Rourke, D. Montefiori, D. Lu, K. Rothaeusler, L. Fritts, K. Bost, and C. J. Miller, J. Virol. 77:3099-3118, 2003). To determine the in vivo importance of beta-chemokine secretion and CD8+-T-cell proliferation in the control of viral replication in this vaccine model, we examined the relationship between viral RNA levels in the axillary and genital lymph nodes of vaccinated, protected (n = 20) and vaccinated, unprotected (n = 11) monkeys by measuring beta-chemokine mRNA levels and protein expression, the frequency of CD8+ T cells expressing beta-chemokines, and the extent of CD8+-T-cell proliferation. Tissues from uninfected (n = 3) and unvaccinated, SIVmac239-infected (n = 9) monkeys served as controls. Axillary and genital lymph nodes from unvaccinated and vaccinated, unprotected monkeys had significantly higher beta-chemokine mRNA expression levels and increased numbers of beta-chemokine-positive cells than did vaccinated, protected animals. Furthermore, the lymph nodes of vaccinated, unprotected monkeys had significantly higher numbers of beta-chemokine(+) CD8+ T cells than did vaccinated, protected monkeys. Lymph nodes from vaccinated, unprotected animals also had significantly more CD8+-T-cell proliferation and marked lymph node hyperplasia than the lymph nodes of vaccinated, protected monkeys. Thus, higher levels of virus

  5. In Vitro Characterization of a Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Chimera Expressing HIV Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase To Study Antiviral Resistance in Pigtail Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Zandrea; Boltz, Valerie; Palmer, Sarah; Coffin, John M.; Hughes, Stephen H.; KewalRamani, Vineet N.

    2004-01-01

    Antiviral resistance is a significant obstacle in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals. Because nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) specifically target HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and do not effectively inhibit simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) RT, the development of animal models to study the evolution of antiviral resistance has been problematic. To facilitate in vivo studies of NNRTI resistance, we examined whether a SIV that causes immunopathogenesis in pigtail macaques could be made sensitive to NNRTIs. Two simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) were derived from the genetic background of SIVmne: SIV-RT-YY contains RT substitutions intended to confer NNRTI susceptibility (V181Y and L188Y), and RT-SHIVmne contains the entire HIV-1 RT coding region. Both mutant viruses grew to high titers in vitro but had reduced fitness relative to wild-type SIVmne. Although the HIV-1 RT was properly processed into p66 and p51 subunits in RT-SHIVmne particles, the RT-SHIVmne virions had lower levels of RT per viral genomic RNA than HIV-1. Correspondingly, there was decreased RT activity in RT-SHIVmne and SIV-RT-YY particles. HIV-1 and RT-SHIVmne were similarly susceptible to the NNRTIs efavirenz, nevirapine, and UC781. However, SIV-RT-YY was less sensitive to NNRTIs than HIV-1 or RT-SHIVmne. Classical NNRTI resis tance mutations were selected in RT-SHIVmne after in vitro drug treatment and were monitored in a sensitive allele-specific real-time RT-PCR assay. Collectively, these results indicate that RT-SHIVmne may be a useful model in macaques for the preclinical evaluation of NNRTIs and for studies of the development of drug resistance in vivo. PMID:15564466

  6. Simian immunodeficiency virus variants with differential T-cell and macrophage tropism use CCR5 and an unidentified cofactor expressed in CEMx174 cells for efficient entry.

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhoff, F; Pöhlmann, S; Hamacher, M; Means, R E; Kraus, T; Uberla, K; Di Marzio, P

    1997-01-01

    The recent identification of coreceptors that mediate efficient entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) suggests new therapeutic and preventive strategies. We analyzed simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) entry cofactors to investigate whether the macaque SIV model can be used as an experimental model to evaluate these strategies. Similar to primary HIV-1 isolates, a well-characterized molecular clone, SIVmac239, which replicates poorly but efficiently enters into rhesus alveolar macrophages and an envelope variant, SIVmac239/316Env, with an approximately 1,000-fold-higher replicative capacity in macrophages used the beta-chemokine receptor CCR5 for efficient entry. The transmembrane portion of 316Env allowed low-level entry into cells expressing CCR1, CCR2B, and CCR3. A single amino acid substitution in the V3 loop of SIVmac239/316Env, 321P-->S, impaired the ability to enter into the T-B hybrid cell line CEMx174 but had relatively little effect on entry into primary cells and HOS.CD4 cells expressing CCR5. Although CEMx174 cells do not express CCR5, most SIVmac variants entered this hybrid cell line efficiently but did not enter the parental T-cell line CEM. It seems likely that CEMx174 cells express an as-yet-unidentified, perhaps B-cell-derived cofactor which allows efficient entry of SIVmac. PMID:9261370

  7. A single amino acid change in the cytoplasmic domain of the simian immunodeficiency virus transmembrane molecule increases envelope glycoprotein expression on infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    LaBranche, C C; Sauter, M M; Haggarty, B S; Vance, P J; Romano, J; Hart, T K; Bugelski, P J; Marsh, M; Hoxie, J A

    1995-01-01

    We have described a virus termed CP-MAC, derived from the BK28 molecular clone of simian immunodeficiency virus, that was remarkable for its ability to infect Sup-T1 cells with rapid kinetics, cell fusion, and CD4 down-modulation (C. C. LaBranche, M. M. Sauter, B. S. Haggarty, P. J. Vance, J. Romano, T. K. Hart, P. J. Bugelski, and J. A. Hoxie, J. Virol. 68:5509-5522, 1994 [Erratum 68:7665-7667]). Compared with BK28, CP-MAC exhibited a number of changes in its envelope glycoproteins, including a highly stable association between the external (SU) and transmembrane (TM) molecules, a more rapid electrophoretic mobility of TM, and, of particular interest, a marked increase in the level of envelope protein expression on the surface of infected cells. These changes were shown to be associated with 11 coding mutations in the env gene (5 in SU and 6 in TM). In this report, we demonstrate that a single amino acid mutation of a Tyr to a Cys at position 723 (Y723C) in the TM cytoplasmic domain of CP-MAC is the principal determinant for the increased expression of envelope glycoproteins on the cell surface. When introduced into the env gene of BK28, the Y723C mutation produced up to a 25-fold increase in the levels of SU and TM on chronically infected cells, as determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. A similar effect was observed when a Tyr-to-Cys change was introduced at the analogous position (amino acid 721) in the SIVmac239 molecular clone, which, unlike BK28 does not contain a premature stop codon in its TM cytoplasmic tail. Substituting other amino acids, including Ala, Ile, and Ser, at this position produced increases in surface envelope glycoproteins that were similar to that observed for the Cys substitution, while a Tyr-to-Phe mutation produced a smaller increase. These results could not be accounted for by differences in the kinetics or efficiency of envelope glycoprotein processing or by shedding of SU

  8. Early cytokine and chemokine gene expression in lymph nodes of macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus is predictive of disease outcome and vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed Central

    Zou, W; Lackner, A A; Simon, M; Durand-Gasselin, I; Galanaud, P; Desrosiers, R C; Emilie, D

    1997-01-01

    Competitive PCR was used to evaluate the expression of cytokine, granzyme B, and chemokine genes in lymph nodes of macaques recently infected with the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) pathogenic molecular clone SIVmac239 (n = 16), the nonpathogenic vaccine strain SIVmac239 delta nef (n = 8), and the nonpathogenic molecular clone SIVmac1A11 (n = 8). For both SIVmac239 and its nef-deleted derivative, strong expression was observed as early as 7 days postinfection for interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, gamma interferon, and IL-13. The levels of gene induction were equally intense for both viruses despite a lower viral load for SIVmac239 deltanef compared with that for SIVmac239. However, the nature of the cytokine network activation varied with the viral inocula. Primary infection with SIVmac239 was characterized by a higher level of IL-4, IL-10, MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, MCP-1, and RANTES gene expression and a lower level of IL-12 and granzyme B gene expression compared with infection with SIVmac239 delta nef. Thus, infection with nef-deleted SIV was associated with a preferential Th1 versus Th2 pattern of cytokine production. Infection with SIVmac1A11 was characterized by a delayed immune response for all markers tested. The unique patterns of cytokine and chemokine gene expression in lymph nodes correlated nicely with the pathogenic potential of the SIV strains used as well as with differences in their ability to serve as protective vaccines. PMID:8995646

  9. Vaccine-Elicited V3 Loop-Specific Antibodies in Rhesus Monkeys and Control of a Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Expressing a Primary Patient Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Isolate Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Letvin, Norman L.; Robinson, Suzanne; Rohne, Daniela; Axthelm, Michael K.; Fanton, John W.; Bilska, Miroslawa; Palker, Thomas J.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.; Montefiori, David C.

    2001-01-01

    Vaccine-elicited antibodies specific for the third hypervariable domain of the surface gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (V3 loop) were assessed for their contribution to protection against infection in the simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)/rhesus monkey model. Peptide vaccine-elicited anti-V3 loop antibody responses were examined for their ability to contain replication of SHIV-89.6, a nonpathogenic SHIV expressing a primary patient isolate HIV-1 envelope, as well as SHIV-89.6P, a pathogenic variant of that virus. Low-titer neutralizing antibodies to SHIV-89.6 that provided partial protection against viremia following SHIV-89.6 infection were generated. A similarly low-titer neutralizing antibody response to SHIV-89.6P that did not contain viremia after infection with SHIV-89.6P was generated, but a trend toward protection against CD4+ T-lymphocyte loss was seen in these infected monkeys. These observations suggest that the V3 loop on some primary patient HIV-1 isolates may be a partially effective target for neutralizing antibodies induced by peptide immunogens. PMID:11287566

  10. Utilization of C-C chemokine receptor 5 by the envelope glycoproteins of a pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus, SIVmac239.

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, L; Choe, H; Martin, K A; Farzan, M; Ponath, P D; Wu, L; Newman, W; Gerard, N; Gerard, C; Sodroski, J

    1997-01-01

    We examined chemokine receptors for the ability to facilitate the infection of CD4-expressing cells by viruses containing the envelope glycoproteins of a pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus, SIVmac239. Expression of either human or simian C-C chemokine receptor CCR5 allowed the SIVmac239 envelope glycoproteins to mediate virus entry and cell-to-cell fusion. Thus, distantly related immunodeficiency viruses such as SIV and the primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates can utilize CCR5 as an entry cofactor. PMID:9032394

  11. Efficient expression of the human papillomavirus type 16 L1 protein in epithelial cells by using Rev and the Rev-responsive element of human immunodeficiency virus or the cis-acting transactivation element of simian retrovirus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, W; Felber, B K; Zolotukhin, A S; Pavlakis, G N; Schwartz, S

    1995-01-01

    Production of the human papillomavirus (HPV) late gene products L1 and L2 is limited to terminally differentiated keratinocytes. Here, we demonstrate that mRNA encoding the HPV-16 L1 capsid protein contains cis-acting RNA elements that inhibit expression at the posttranscriptional level. While cytoplasmic L1 mRNA is detectable in transfected HeLa cells, L1 protein is not produced. We have identified at least one major inhibitory element that is located within the L1 open reading frame, whereas another negative element had been reported to lie in the 3'-untranslated region of L1. The presence of these elements may explain the lack of HPV late gene expression in undifferentiated epithelial cells. Efficient production of HPV-16 L1 could be achieved with posttranscriptional regulatory elements of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 or simian retrovirus type 1. L1 protein was expressed in the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev from hybrid mRNAs containing the RNA binding site for Rev (Rev-responsive element). In addition, we have achieved efficient expression of L1 from hybrid mRNAs containing a cis-acting transactivation element from simian retrovirus type 1. Our data show that HPV-16 L1 protein production is regulated posttranscriptionally. This regulated expression may allow virus production in terminally differentiated epithelial cells and is probably a conserved and important mechanism for HPV expression. PMID:7637007

  12. Chronic Administration of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Intestinal Anti-Inflammatory MicroRNA Expression during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Lawrance C.; Kumar, Vinay; Torben, Workineh; Stouwe, Curtis Vande; Winsauer, Peter; Amedee, Angela; Molina, Patricia E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recreational and medical use of cannabis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals has increased in recent years. In simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques, chronic administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) inhibited viral replication and intestinal inflammation and slowed disease progression. Persistent gastrointestinal disease/inflammation has been proposed to facilitate microbial translocation and systemic immune activation and promote disease progression. Cannabinoids including Δ9-THC attenuated intestinal inflammation in mouse colitis models and SIV-infected rhesus macaques. To determine if the anti-inflammatory effects of Δ9-THC involved differential microRNA (miRNA) modulation, we profiled miRNA expression at 14, 30, and 60 days postinfection (days p.i.) in the intestine of uninfected macaques receiving Δ9-THC (n = 3) and SIV-infected macaques administered either vehicle (VEH/SIV; n = 4) or THC (THC/SIV; n = 4). Chronic Δ9-THC administration to uninfected macaques significantly and positively modulated intestinal miRNA expression by increasing the total number of differentially expressed miRNAs from 14 to 60 days p.i. At 60 days p.i., ∼28% of miRNAs showed decreased expression in the VEH/SIV group compared to none showing decrease in the THC/SIV group. Furthermore, compared to the VEH/SIV group, THC selectively upregulated the expression of miR-10a, miR-24, miR-99b, miR-145, miR-149, and miR-187, previously been shown to target proinflammatory molecules. NOX4, a potent reactive oxygen species generator, was confirmed as a direct miR-99b target. A significant increase in NOX4+ crypt epithelial cells was detected in VEH/SIV macaques compared to the THC/SIV group. We speculate that miR-99b-mediated NOX4 downregulation may protect the intestinal epithelium from oxidative stress-induced damage. These results support a role for differential miRNA induction in THC-mediated suppression of intestinal

  13. Resistance to simian immunodeficiency virus low dose rectal challenge is associated with higher constitutive TRIM5α expression in PBMC

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background At least six host-encoded restriction factors (RFs), APOBEC3G, TRIM5α, tetherin, SAMHD1, schlafen 11, and Mx2 have now been shown to inhibit HIV and/or SIV replication in vitro. To determine their role in vivo in the resistance of macaques to mucosally-acquired SIV, we quantified both pre-exposure (basal) and post-exposure mRNA levels of these RFs, Mx1, and IFNγ in PBMC, lymph nodes, and duodenum of rhesus macaques undergoing weekly low dose rectal exposures to the primary isolate, SIV/DeltaB670. Results Repetitive challenge divided the monkeys into two groups with respect to their susceptibility to infection: highly susceptible (2–3 challenges, 5 monkeys) and poorly susceptible (≥6 challenges, 3 monkeys). Basal RF and Mx1 expression varied among the three tissues examined, with the lowest expression generally detected in duodenal tissues, and the highest observed in PBMC. The one exception was A3G whose basal expression was greatest in lymph nodes. Importantly, significantly higher basal expression of TRIM5α and Mx1 was observed in PBMC of animals more resistant to mucosal infection. Moreover, individual TRIM5α levels were stable throughout a year prior to infection. Post-exposure induction of these genes was also observed after virus appearance in plasma, with elevated levels in PBMC and duodenum transiently occurring 7–10 days post infection. They did not appear to have an effect on control of viremia. Interestingly, minimal to no induction was observed in the resistant animal that became an elite controller. Conclusions These results suggest that constitutively expressed TRIM5α appears to play a greater role in restricting mucosal transmission of SIV than that associated with type I interferon induction following virus entry. Surprisingly, this association was not observed with the other RFs. The higher basal expression of TRIM5α observed in PBMC than in duodenal tissues emphasizes the understated role of the second barrier to systemic

  14. Expansion of dysfunctional Tim-3-expressing effector memory CD8+ T cells during simian immunodeficiency virus infection in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Burwitz, Benjamin J; Chew, Glen M; Reed, Jason S; Pathak, Reesab; Seger, Elizabeth; Clayton, Kiera L; Rini, James M; Ostrowski, Mario A; Ishii, Naoto; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Hansen, Scott G; Sacha, Jonah B; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C

    2014-12-01

    The T cell Ig- and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) negative immune checkpoint receptor demarcates functionally exhausted CD8(+) T cells arising from chronic stimulation in viral infections like HIV. Tim-3 blockade leads to improved antiviral CD8(+) T cell responses in vitro and, therefore, represents a novel intervention strategy to restore T cell function in vivo and protect from disease progression. However, the Tim-3 pathway in the physiologically relevant rhesus macaque SIV model of AIDS remains uncharacterized. We report that Tim-3(+)CD8(+) T cell frequencies are significantly increased in lymph nodes, but not in peripheral blood, in SIV-infected animals. Tim-3(+)PD-1(+)CD8(+) T cells are similarly increased during SIV infection and positively correlate with SIV plasma viremia. Tim-3 expression was found primarily on effector memory CD8(+) T cells in all tissues examined. Tim-3(+)CD8(+) T cells have lower Ki-67 content and minimal cytokine responses to SIV compared with Tim-3(-)CD8(+) T cells. During acute-phase SIV replication, Tim-3 expression peaked on SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells by 2 wk postinfection and then rapidly diminished, irrespective of mutational escape of cognate Ag, suggesting non-TCR-driven mechanisms for Tim-3 expression. Thus, rhesus Tim-3 in SIV infection partially mimics human Tim-3 in HIV infection and may serve as a novel model for targeted studies focused on rejuvenating HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. PMID:25348621

  15. Reduced Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Replication in Macrophages of Sooty Mangabeys Is Associated with Increased Expression of Host Restriction Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Kiran D.; Mavigner, Maud; Wang, Charlene; Paiardini, Mirko; Sodora, Donald L.; Chahroudi, Ann M.; Bosinger, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Macrophages are target cells of HIV/SIV infection that may play a role in AIDS pathogenesis and contribute to the long-lived reservoir of latently infected cells during antiretroviral therapy (ART). In previous work, we and others have shown that during pathogenic SIV infection of rhesus macaques (RMs), rapid disease progression is associated with high levels of in vivo macrophage infection. In contrast, during nonpathogenic SIV infection of sooty mangabeys (SMs), neither spontaneous nor experimental CD4+ T cell depletion results in substantial levels of in vivo macrophage infection. To test the hypothesis that SM macrophages are intrinsically more resistant to SIV infection than RM macrophages, we undertook an in vitro comparative assessment of monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) from both nonhuman primate species. Using the primary isolate SIVM949, which replicates well in lymphocytes from both RMs and SMs, we found that infection of RM macrophages resulted in persistent SIV-RNA production while SIV-RNA levels in SM macrophage cultures decreased 10- to 100-fold over a similar temporal course of in vitro infection. To explore potential mechanisms responsible for the lower levels of SIV replication and/or production in macrophages from SMs we comparatively assessed, in the two studied species, the expression of the SIV coreceptor as well as the expression of a number of host restriction factors. While previous studies showed that SM monocytes express lower levels of CCR5 (but not CD4) than RM monocytes, the level of CCR5 expression in MDMs was similar in the two species. Interestingly, we found that SM macrophages exhibited a significantly greater increase in the expression of tetherin (P = 0.003) and TRIM22 (P = 0.0006) in response to alpha interferon stimulation and increased expression of multiple host restriction factors in response to lipopolysaccharide stimulation and exposure to SIV. Overall, these findings confirm, in an in vitro infection system

  16. Vaccination of rhesus macaques with a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus proviral DNA vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Sparger, Ellen E. Dubie, Robert A.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Cole, Kelly S.; Chang, W.L.; Luciw, Paul A.

    2008-05-10

    Studies in non-human primates, with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) have demonstrated that live-attenuated viral vaccines are highly effective; however these vaccine viruses maintain a low level of pathogenicity. Lentivirus attenuation associated with deletion of the viral vif gene carries a significantly reduced risk for pathogenicity, while retaining the potential for virus replication of low magnitude in the host. This report describes a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239 provirus that was tested as an attenuated proviral DNA vaccine by inoculation of female rhesus macaques. SIV-specific interferon-{gamma} enzyme-linked immunospot responses of low magnitude were observed after immunization with plasmid containing the vif-deleted SIV provirus. However, vaccinated animals displayed strong sustained virus-specific T cell proliferative responses and increasing antiviral antibody titers. These immune responses suggested either persistent vaccine plasmid expression or low level replication of vif-deleted SIV in the host. Immunized and unvaccinated macaques received a single high dose vaginal challenge with pathogenic SIVmac251. A transient suppression of challenge virus load and a greater median survival time was observed for vaccinated animals. However, virus loads for vaccinated and unvaccinated macaques were comparable by twenty weeks after challenge and overall survival curves for the two groups were not significantly different. Thus, a vif-deleted SIVmac239 proviral DNA vaccine is immunogenic and capable of inducing a transient suppression of pathogenic challenge virus, despite severe attenuation of the vaccine virus.

  17. Neutralization Properties of Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses Infecting Chimpanzees and Gorillas

    PubMed Central

    Barbian, Hannah J.; Decker, Julie M.; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Galimidi, Rachel P.; West, Anthony P.; Learn, Gerald H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Li, Yingying; Pace, Craig S.; Song, Ruijiang; Huang, Yaoxing; Denny, Thomas N.; Mouquet, Hugo; Martin, Loic; Acharya, Priyamvada; Zhang, Baoshan; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Verrips, C. Theo; Strokappe, Nika M.; Rutten, Lucy; McCoy, Laura E.; Weiss, Robin A.; Brown, Corrine S.; Jackson, Raven; Silvestri, Guido; Connors, Mark; Burton, Dennis R.; Shaw, George M.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Ho, David D.; Farzan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Broadly cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies (bNabs) represent powerful tools to combat human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Here, we examined whether HIV-1-specific bNabs are capable of cross-neutralizing distantly related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) infecting central (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) (SIVcpzPtt) and eastern (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) (SIVcpzPts) chimpanzees (n = 11) as well as western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) (SIVgor) (n = 1). We found that bNabs directed against the CD4 binding site (n = 10), peptidoglycans at the base of variable loop 3 (V3) (n = 5), and epitopes at the interface of surface (gp120) and membrane-bound (gp41) envelope glycoproteins (n = 5) failed to neutralize SIVcpz and SIVgor strains. In addition, apex V2-directed bNabs (n = 3) as well as llama-derived (heavy chain only) antibodies (n = 6) recognizing both the CD4 binding site and gp41 epitopes were either completely inactive or neutralized only a fraction of SIVcpzPtt strains. In contrast, one antibody targeting the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 (10E8), functional CD4 and CCR5 receptor mimetics (eCD4-Ig, eCD4-Igmim2, CD4-218.3-E51, and CD4-218.3-E51-mim2), as well as mono- and bispecific anti-human CD4 (iMab and LM52) and CCR5 (PRO140, PRO140-10E8) receptor antibodies neutralized >90% of SIVcpz and SIVgor strains with low-nanomolar (0.13 to 8.4 nM) potency. Importantly, the latter antibodies blocked virus entry not only in TZM-bl cells but also in Cf2Th cells expressing chimpanzee CD4 and CCR5 and neutralized SIVcpz in chimpanzee CD4+ T cells, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) ranging from 3.6 to 40.5 nM. These findings provide new insight into the protective capacity of anti-HIV-1 bNabs and identify candidates for further development to combat SIVcpz infection. PMID:25900654

  18. Induction of Pluripotent Stem Cells from a Cynomolgus Monkey Using a Polycistronic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus–Based Vector, Differentiation Toward Functional Cardiomyocytes, and Generation of Stably Expressing Reporter Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wunderlich, Stephanie; Haase, Alexandra; Merkert, Sylvia; Beier, Jennifer; Schwanke, Kristin; Schambach, Axel; Glage, Silke; Göhring, Gudrun; Curnow, Eliza C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent a novel cell source for regenerative therapies. Many emerging iPSC-based therapeutic concepts will require preclinical evaluation in suitable large animal models. Among the large animal species frequently used in preclinical efficacy and safety studies, macaques show the highest similarities to humans at physiological, cellular, and molecular levels. We have generated iPSCs from cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) as a segue to regenerative therapy model development in this species. Because typical human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based lentiviral vectors show poor transduction of simian cells, a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-based vector was chosen for efficient transduction of cynomolgus skin fibroblasts. A corresponding polycistronic vector with codon-optimized reprogramming factors was constructed for reprogramming. Growth characteristics as well as cell and colony morphology of the resulting cynomolgus iPSCs (cyiPSCs) were demonstrated to be almost identical to cynomolgus embryonic stem cells (cyESCs), and cyiPSCs expressed typical pluripotency markers including OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG. Furthermore, differentiation in vivo and in vitro into derivatives of all three germ layers, as well as generation of functional cardiomyocytes, could be demonstrated. Finally, a highly efficient technique for generation of transgenic cyiPSC clones with stable reporter expression in undifferentiated cells as well as differentiated transgenic cyiPSC progeny was developed to enable cell tracking in recipient animals. In conclusion, our data indicate that cyiPSCs represent a valuable cell source for establishment of macaque-based allogeneic and autologous preclinical cell transplantation models for various fields of regenerative medicine. PMID:23194451

  19. Tissue tropism of simian immunodeficiency virus in rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Wyand, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is a T-lymphotropic lentivirus that is genetically, immunologically, and morphologically related to the human immunodeficiency viruses type 1 and 2 (HIV-1, HIV-2). In rhesus monkeys, SIV induces a progressively fatal immunodeficiency syndrome strikingly similar to human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The tissue and cellular tropism of SIV was determined by immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization using a 3.48 kilobase SIV envelope gene probe labeled with biotin, {sup 35}S, or {sup 3}H. Probes labeled with {sup 35}S nonspecifically bound to tissue eosinophils and produced poor signal resolution compared to tritium labeled probes. Biotin labeled probes did not detect SIV under similar hybridization conditions. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues produced strong hybridization signal with superior morphology compared to frozen tissues. Gastrointestinal, respiratory, and lymphoid tissues most frequently contained SIV RNA. The distribution of SIV did not correlate with sex, or viral inoculum, but was most extensive in animals with SIV induced granulomatous encephalitis. SIV was most frequently observed in lymphocytes and macrophages. In the brain focal granulomas were composed almost entirely of EBM11+, lysozyme+, macrophages which contained large amounts of SIV RNA and p27 core protein detected by the monoclonal antibody R1C7. Cells away from granulomas in the brain parenchyma and around blood vessels contained virus and were compatible with oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Lymph nodes in follicular hyperplasia contained small numbers of SIV positive cells compatible with lymphocytes in the paracortex and mantle zones as well as in cells of the germinal center. Lymph nodes in various stages of follicular depletion with expanded paracortices contained large numbers of cells with SIV RNA in lymphocytes and macrophages.

  20. Limited Protection from a Pathogenic Chimeric Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge following Immunization with Attenuated Simian Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Mark G.; Yalley-Ogunro, Jake; Greenhouse, Jack J.; Brennan, Terry P.; Jiang, Jennifer Bo; VanCott, Thomas C.; Lu, Yichen; Eddy, Gerald A.; Birx, Deborah L.

    1999-01-01

    Two live attenuated single-deletion mutant simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) constructs, SIV239Δnef and SIVPBj6.6Δnef, were tested for their abilities to stimulate protective immunity in macaques. During the immunization period the animals were examined for specific immune responses and virus growth. Each construct generated high levels of specific immunity in all of the immunized animals. The SIV239Δnef construct was found to grow to high levels in all immunized animals, with some animals remaining positive for virus isolation and plasma RNA throughout the immunization period. The SIVPBj6.6Δnef was effectively controlled by all of the immunized animals, with virus mostly isolated only during the first few months following immunization and plasma RNA never detected. Following an extended period of immunization of over 80 weeks, the animals were challenged with a pathogenic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) isolate, SIV89.6PD, by intravenous injection. All of the SIV239Δnef-immunized animals became infected with the SHIV isolate; two of five animals eventually controlled the challenge and three of five animals, which failed to check the immunizing virus, progressed to disease state before the unvaccinated controls. One of five animals immunized with SIVPBj6.6Δnef totally resisted infection by the challenge virus, while three others limited its growth and the remaining animal became persistently infected and eventually died of a pulmonary thrombus. These data indicate that vaccination with attenuated SIV can protect macaques from disease and in some cases from infection by a divergent SHIV. However, if animals are unable to control the immunizing virus, potential damage that can accelerate the disease course of a pathogenic challenge virus may occur. PMID:9882330

  1. Cellular Localization of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus in Lymphoid Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ringler, D. J.; Wyand, M. S.; Walsh, D. G.; MacKey, J. J.; Chalifoux, L. V.; Popovic, M.; Minassian, A. A.; Sehgal, P. K.; Daniel, M. D.; Desrosiers, R. C.; King, N. W.

    1989-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is a lentivirus with genetic relatedness to the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV-1 and HIV-2). It induces a fatal syndrome in rhesus monkeys that closely parallels the clinical course of AIDS in humans. The authors used double-labeling immunohistochemical procedures on rhesus lymph node and spleen taken during different time periods after SIV infection to localize the p27 gag protein to specific cellular immunophenotypes. In animals with follicular hyperplasia, viral protein was found associated predominantly with follicular dendritic cells. Many of these cells showed ultrastructural alterations consisting of swollen dendritic processes contaning electron-dense material. Lentiviral particles were found associated with this cell type only rarely. In lymphoid tissues with other histopathologic changes, macrophages and multinucleate giant cells were the predominant cell types containing detectable quantities of viral protein; smaller numbers of p27+ lymhocytes were present. Ultrastructurally, viral particles were found within the extracellular spce adjacent to tissue macrophages and within membrane-bound vacuoles of giant cells and tissue macrophage. These results show that certain histologic patterns seen during the course of infection correlate with the localization of viral antigen to specific cellular immunophenotypes and that during the disease course, viral protein is preferentially localized in sections of lymphonode and spleen to cells of the macrophage and dendritic cell lineage. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3A, B PMID:2537016

  2. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVagm Dynamics in African Green Monkeys▿

    PubMed Central

    Pandrea, Ivona; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Gautam, Rajeev; Gaufin, Thaidra; Pattison, Melissa; Barnes, Mary; Monjure, Christopher; Stoulig, Crystal; Dufour, Jason; Cyprian, Wayne; Silvestri, Guido; Miller, Michael D.; Perelson, Alan S.; Apetrei, Cristian

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the lack of disease progression in natural simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) hosts are still poorly understood. To test the hypothesis that SIV-infected African green monkeys (AGMs) avoid AIDS due to virus replication occurring in long-lived infected cells, we infected six animals with SIVagm and treated them with potent antiretroviral therapy [ART; 9-R-(2-phosphonomethoxypropyl) adenine (tenofovir) and beta-2,3-dideoxy-3-thia-5-fluorocytidine (emtricitabine)]. All AGMs showed a rapid decay of plasma viremia that became undetectable 36 h after ART initiation. A significant decrease of viral load was observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and intestine. Mathematical modeling of viremia decay post-ART indicates a half-life of productively infected cells ranging from 4 to 9.5 h, i.e., faster than previously reported for human immunodeficiency virus and SIV. ART induced a slight but significant increase in peripheral CD4+ T-cell counts but no significant changes in CD4+ T-cell levels in lymph nodes and intestine. Similarly, ART did not significantly change the levels of cell proliferation, activation, and apoptosis, already low in AGMs chronically infected with SIVagm. Collectively, these results indicate that, in SIVagm-infected AGMs, the bulk of virus replication is sustained by short-lived cells; therefore, differences in disease outcome between SIVmac infection of macaques and SIVagm infection of AGMs are unlikely due to intrinsic differences in the in vivo cytopathicities between the two viruses. PMID:18216122

  3. Impact of Mucosal Inflammation on Oral Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-Ling; Hodara, Vida L.; Chu, Lianrui; Parodi, Laura M.; Smith, Lisa M.; Sexton, Valerie; Cappelli, David; Sodora, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal tissues are the primary route of transmission for most respiratory and sexually transmitted diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). There is epidemiological evidence that genital mucosal inflammation leads to enhanced HIV type 1 (HIV-1) transmission. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of periodontal inflammation on oral HIV transmission using a nonhuman primate model of teeth ligature-induced periodontitis. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) was nontraumatically applied to the gingiva after moderate gingivitis was identified through clinical and immunologic analyses (presence of inflammatory cytokines). Overall oral SIV infection rates were similar in the gingivitis-induced and control groups (5 infections following 12 SIV administrations for each), although more macaques were infected with multiple viral variants in the gingivitis group. SIV infection also affected the levels of antiviral and inflammatory cytokines in the gingival crevicular fluid, and a synergistic effect was observed, with alpha interferon and interferon-inducible protein 10 undergoing significant elevations following SIV infection in macaques with gingivitis compared to controls. These increases in antiviral and inflammatory immune modulators in the SIV-infected gingivitis macaques could also be observed in blood plasma, although the effects at both compartments were generally restricted to the acute phase of the infection. In conclusion, while moderate gingivitis was not associated with increased susceptibility to oral SIV infection, it resulted in elevated levels of cytokines in the oral mucosa and plasma of the SIV-infected macaques. These findings suggest a synergy between mucosal inflammation and SIV infection, creating an immune milieu that impacts the early stages of the SIV infection with potential implications for long-term pathogenesis. PMID:23175379

  4. Mapping the Small RNA Content of Simian Immunodeficiency Virions (SIV)

    PubMed Central

    Brameier, Markus; Ibing, Wiebke; Höfer, Katharina; Montag, Judith; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Motzkus, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that regulatory small non-coding RNAs are not only components of eukaryotic cells and vesicles, but also reside within a number of different viruses including retroviral particles. Using ultra-deep sequencing we have comprehensively analyzed the content of simian immunodeficiency virions (SIV), which were compared to mock-control preparations. Our analysis revealed that more than 428,000 sequence reads matched the SIV mac239 genome sequence. Among these we could identify 12 virus-derived small RNAs (vsRNAs) that were highly abundant. Beside known retrovirus-enriched small RNAs, like 7SL-RNA, tRNALys3 and tRNALys isoacceptors, we also identified defined fragments derived from small ILF3/NF90-associated RNA snaR-A14, that were enriched more than 50 fold in SIV. We also found evidence that small nucleolar RNAs U2 and U12 were underrepresented in the SIV preparation, indicating that the relative number or the content of co-isolated exosomes was changed upon infection. Our comprehensive atlas of SIV-incorporated small RNAs provides a refined picture of the composition of retrovirions, which gives novel insights into viral packaging. PMID:24086438

  5. Mapping the small RNA content of simian immunodeficiency virions (SIV).

    PubMed

    Brameier, Markus; Ibing, Wiebke; Höfer, Katharina; Montag, Judith; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Motzkus, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that regulatory small non-coding RNAs are not only components of eukaryotic cells and vesicles, but also reside within a number of different viruses including retroviral particles. Using ultra-deep sequencing we have comprehensively analyzed the content of simian immunodeficiency virions (SIV), which were compared to mock-control preparations. Our analysis revealed that more than 428,000 sequence reads matched the SIV mac239 genome sequence. Among these we could identify 12 virus-derived small RNAs (vsRNAs) that were highly abundant. Beside known retrovirus-enriched small RNAs, like 7SL-RNA, tRNA(Lys3) and tRNA(Lys) isoacceptors, we also identified defined fragments derived from small ILF3/NF90-associated RNA snaR-A14, that were enriched more than 50 fold in SIV. We also found evidence that small nucleolar RNAs U2 and U12 were underrepresented in the SIV preparation, indicating that the relative number or the content of co-isolated exosomes was changed upon infection. Our comprehensive atlas of SIV-incorporated small RNAs provides a refined picture of the composition of retrovirions, which gives novel insights into viral packaging. PMID:24086438

  6. Mucosal immunity in human and simian immunodeficiency lentivirus infections

    PubMed Central

    Brenchley, JM

    2014-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence indicates that distinct pathological phenomenon occurs within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of progressively simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected Asian macaques and HIV-infected humans compared with other anatomical sites. Massive loss of GI tract lamina propria CD4 T cells, alteration in the profile of lymphocytic cytokine production, changes in the landscape of GI tract antigen-presenting cells, and variations to the structural barrier of the GI tract are hallmarks of progressive HIV/SIV infections. The pathology within the GI tract results in translocation of microbial products from the lumen of the intestine into peripheral circulation. These translocated microbial products directly stimulate the immune system and exacerbate immune activation and, thus, disease progression. Initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) does not restore completely the immunological abnormalities within the GI tract. This incomplete restoration within the GI tract may contribute to the increased mortality observed within HIV-infected individuals treated for decades with cART. Novel therapeutic interventions aimed at enhancing GI tract anatomy and physiology may improve the prognosis of HIV-infected individuals. PMID:23549448

  7. Pathogenesis of simian immunodeficiency virus encephalitis: viral determinants of neurovirulence.

    PubMed Central

    Mankowski, J L; Flaherty, M T; Spelman, J P; Hauer, D A; Didier, P J; Amedee, A M; Murphey-Corb, M; Kirstein, L M; Muñoz, A; Clements, J E; Zink, M C

    1997-01-01

    To examine the relationship between macrophage tropism and neurovirulence, macaques were inoculated with two recombinant hybrid viruses derived from the parent viruses SIVmac239, a lymphocyte-tropic, non-neurovirulent clone, and SIV/17E-Br, a macrophage-tropic, neurovirulent virus strain. The first recombinant, SIV/17E-Cl, contained the portion of the env gene that encodes the surface glycoprotein and a short segment of the transmembrane glycoprotein of SIV/17E-Br in the backbone of SIVmac239. Unlike SIVmac239, SIV/17E-Cl replicated productively in macrophages, demonstrating that sequences in the surface portion of env determine macrophage tropism. None of five macaques inoculated with SIV/17E-Cl developed simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) encephalitis. The second recombinant, SIV/17E-Fr, which contained the entire env and nef genes and the 3' long terminal repeat of SIV/17E-Br in the SIVmac239 backbone, was also macrophage tropic. Six of nine macaques inoculated with SIV/17E-Fr developed SIV encephalitis ranging from mild to moderate in severity, indicating a significant (P = 0.031) difference in the neurovirulence of the two recombinants. In both groups of macaques, CD4+ cell counts declined gradually during infection and there was no significant difference in the rate of the decline between the two groups of macaques. This study demonstrated that macrophage tropism alone is not sufficient for the development of neurological disease. In addition, it showed that while sequences in the surface portion of the envelope gene determine macrophage tropism, additional sequences derived from the transmembrane portion of envelope and/or nef confer neurovirulence. PMID:9223498

  8. Lymphatic Dissemination of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus after Penile Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhong-Min; Dutra, Joseph; Fritts, Linda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is primarily transmitted by heterosexual contact, and approximately equal numbers of men and women worldwide are infected with the virus. Understanding the biology of HIV acquisition and dissemination in men exposed to the virus by insertive penile intercourse is likely to help with the rational design of vaccines that can limit or prevent HIV transmission. To characterize the target cells and dissemination pathways involved in establishing systemic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection, we necropsied male rhesus macaques at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after penile SIV inoculation and quantified the levels of unspliced SIV RNA and spliced SIV RNA in tissue lysates and the number of SIV RNA-positive cells in tissue sections. We found that penile (glans, foreskin, coronal sulcus) T cells and, to a lesser extent, macrophages and dendritic cells are primary targets of infection and that SIV rapidly reaches the regional lymph nodes. At 7 days after inoculation, SIV had disseminated to the blood, systemic lymph nodes, and mucosal lymphoid tissues. Further, at 7 days postinoculation (p.i.), spliced SIV RNA levels were the highest in the genital lymph nodes, indicating that this is the site where the infection is initially amplified. By 14 days p.i., spliced SIV RNA levels were high in all tissues, but they were the highest in the gastrointestinal tract, indicating that the primary site of virus replication had shifted from the genital lymph nodes to the gut. The stepwise pattern of virus replication and dissemination described here suggests that vaccine-elicited immune responses in the genital lymph nodes could help prevent infection after penile SIV challenge. IMPORTANCE To be the most effective, vaccines should produce antiviral immune responses in the anatomic sites of virus replication. Thus, understanding the path taken by HIV from the mucosal surfaces, which are the site of virus exposure, to the deeper tissues where

  9. Impact of simian immunodeficiency virus infection on chimpanzee population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rudicell, Rebecca S; Holland Jones, James; Wroblewski, Emily E; Learn, Gerald H; Li, Yingying; Robertson, Joel D; Greengrass, Elizabeth; Grossmann, Falk; Kamenya, Shadrack; Pintea, Lilian; Mjungu, Deus C; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V; Mosser, Anna; Lehman, Clarence; Collins, D Anthony; Keele, Brandon F; Goodall, Jane; Hahn, Beatrice H; Pusey, Anne E; Wilson, Michael L

    2010-01-01

    Like human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), simian immunodeficiency virus of chimpanzees (SIVcpz) can cause CD4+ T cell loss and premature death. Here, we used molecular surveillance tools and mathematical modeling to estimate the impact of SIVcpz infection on chimpanzee population dynamics. Habituated (Mitumba and Kasekela) and non-habituated (Kalande) chimpanzees were studied in Gombe National Park, Tanzania. Ape population sizes were determined from demographic records (Mitumba and Kasekela) or individual sightings and genotyping (Kalande), while SIVcpz prevalence rates were monitored using non-invasive methods. Between 2002-2009, the Mitumba and Kasekela communities experienced mean annual growth rates of 1.9% and 2.4%, respectively, while Kalande chimpanzees suffered a significant decline, with a mean growth rate of -6.5% to -7.4%, depending on population estimates. A rapid decline in Kalande was first noted in the 1990s and originally attributed to poaching and reduced food sources. However, between 2002-2009, we found a mean SIVcpz prevalence in Kalande of 46.1%, which was almost four times higher than the prevalence in Mitumba (12.7%) and Kasekela (12.1%). To explore whether SIVcpz contributed to the Kalande decline, we used empirically determined SIVcpz transmission probabilities as well as chimpanzee mortality, mating and migration data to model the effect of viral pathogenicity on chimpanzee population growth. Deterministic calculations indicated that a prevalence of greater than 3.4% would result in negative growth and eventual population extinction, even using conservative mortality estimates. However, stochastic models revealed that in representative populations, SIVcpz, and not its host species, frequently went extinct. High SIVcpz transmission probability and excess mortality reduced population persistence, while intercommunity migration often rescued infected communities, even when immigrating females had a chance of being SIVcpz infected

  10. Analysis of simian immunodeficiency virus sequence variation in tissues of rhesus macaques with simian AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, T; Mori, K; Kawahara, T; Ringler, D J; Desrosiers, R C

    1993-01-01

    One rhesus macaque displayed severe encephalomyelitis and another displayed severe enterocolitis following infection with molecularly cloned simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strain SIVmac239. Little or no free anti-SIV antibody developed in these two macaques, and they died relatively quickly (4 to 6 months) after infection. Manifestation of the tissue-specific disease in these macaques was associated with the emergence of variants with high replicative capacity for macrophages and primary infection of tissue macrophages. The nature of sequence variation in the central region (vif, vpr, and vpx), the env gene, and the nef long terminal repeat (LTR) region in brain, colon, and other tissues was examined to see whether specific genetic changes were associated with SIV replication in brain or gut. Sequence analysis revealed strong conservation of the intergenic central region, nef, and the LTR. However, analysis of env sequences in these two macaques and one other revealed significant, interesting patterns of sequence variation. (i) Changes in env that were found previously to contribute to the replicative ability of SIVmac for macrophages in culture were present in the tissues of these animals. (ii) The greatest variability was located in the regions between V1 and V2 and from "V3" through C3 in gp120, which are different in location from the variable regions observed previously in animals with strong antibody responses and long-term persistent infection. (iii) The predominant sequence change of D-->N at position 385 in C3 is most surprising, since this change in both SIV and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 has been associated with dramatically diminished affinity for CD4 and replication in vitro. (iv) The nature of sequence changes at some positions (146, 178, 345, 385, and "V3") suggests that viral replication in brain and gut may be facilitated by specific sequence changes in env in addition to those that impart a general ability to replicate well in

  11. Vaginal transmission of chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency viruses in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y; Brosio, P; Lafaile, M; Li, J; Collman, R G; Sodroski, J; Miller, C J

    1996-01-01

    Chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) that express the env genes derived from distinct HIV type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for the ability to infect rhesus macaques following intravaginal inoculation. SHIVs containing either the HIV-1 HXBc2 or the HIV-1 89.6 envelope glycoproteins were capable of replicating in intravenously inoculated rhesus macaques. However, intravaginal inoculation of animals with these two SHIVs resulted in infection only with the SHIV containing the HIV-1 89.6 glycoprotein. Thus, properties conferred by the envelope glycoproteins in the chimeric virus affect the ability of particular SHIVs to initiate a systemic infection following vaginal inoculation. These results provide indirect support for the hypothesis that the selection of specific viral variants occurs in the genital tracts of individuals exposed to HIV by sexual contact. PMID:8627782

  12. Genetically divergent strains of simian immunodeficiency virus use CCR5 as a coreceptor for entry.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z; Zhou, P; Ho, D D; Landau, N R; Marx, P A

    1997-01-01

    Entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) requires CD4 and one of a family of related seven-transmembrane-domain coreceptors. Macrophage-tropic HIV-1 isolates are generally specific for CCR5, a receptor for the CC chemokines RANTES, MIP-1alpha, and MIP-1beta, while T-cell line-tropic viruses tend to use CXCR4 (also known as fusin, LESTR, or HUMSTR). Like HIV-1, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) requires CD4 on the target cell surface; however, whether it also requires a coreceptor is not known. We report here that several genetically divergent SIV isolates, including SIVmac, SIVsmSL92a, SIVsmLib-1, and SIVcpzGAB, can use human and rhesus CCR5 for entry. CXCR4 did not facilitate entry of any of the simian viruses tested, nor did any of the other known chemokine receptors. Moreover, SIVmac251 that had been extensively passaged in a human transformed T-cell line retained its use of CCR5. Rhesus and human CCR5 differed at only eight amino acid residues, four of which were in regions of the receptor that could be exposed, two in the amino-terminal extracellular region and two in the second extracellular loop. The human coreceptor was as active as the simian for SIV entry. In addition, HIV-1 was able to use the rhesus homologs of the human coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4. The SIV strains tested were specific for CCR5 regardless of whether they were able to replicate in transformed T-cell lines or macrophages and whether they were phenotypically syncytium inducing or noninducing in MT-2 cells. However, SIV replication was not restricted to cells expressing CCR5. SIV strains replicated efficiently in the human transformed lymphoid cell line CEMx174, which does not express detectable amounts of transcripts of CCR5. SIV also replicated in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells that were genetically deficient in CCR5. These findings indicated that, in addition to CCR5, SIV can use one or more unknown coreceptors that are expressed on human PBMCs and CEMx174 cells

  13. Conditional Immune Escape during Chronic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gellerup, Dane D.; Balgeman, Alexis J.; Nelson, Chase W.; Ericsen, Adam J.; Scarlotta, Matthew; Hughes, Austin L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Anti-HIV CD8 T cells included in therapeutic treatments will need to target epitopes that do not accumulate escape mutations. Identifying the epitopes that do not accumulate variants but retain immunogenicity depends on both host major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genetics and the likelihood for an epitope to tolerate variation. We previously found that immune escape during acute SIV infection is conditional; the accumulation of mutations in T cell epitopes is limited, and the rate of accumulation depends on the number of epitopes being targeted. We have now tested the hypothesis that conditional immune escape extends into chronic SIV infection and that epitopes with a preserved wild-type sequence have the potential to elicit epitope-specific CD8 T cells. We deep sequenced simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) from Mauritian cynomolgus macaques (MCMs) that were homozygous and heterozygous for the M3 MHC haplotype and had been infected with SIV for about 1 year. When interrogating variation within individual epitopes restricted by M3 MHC alleles, we found three categories of epitopes, which we called categories A, B, and C. Category B epitopes readily accumulated variants in M3-homozygous MCMs, but this was less common in M3-heterozygous MCMs. We then determined that chronic CD8 T cells specific for these epitopes were more likely preserved in the M3-heterozygous MCMs than M3-homozygous MCMs. We provide evidence that epitopes known to escape from chronic CD8 T cell responses in animals that are homozygous for a set of MHC alleles are preserved and retain immunogenicity in a host that is heterozygous for the same MHC alleles. IMPORTANCE Anti-HIV CD8 T cells that are part of therapeutic treatments will need to target epitopes that do not accumulate escape mutations. Defining these epitope sequences is a necessary precursor to designing approaches that enhance the functionality of CD8 T cells with the potential to control virus replication during chronic

  14. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Infection and Sensing Capacity during Pathogenic and Nonpathogenic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jochems, Simon P.; Jacquelin, Beatrice; Chauveau, Lise; Huot, Nicolas; Petitjean, Gaël; Lepelley, Alice; Liovat, Anne-Sophie; Ploquin, Mickaël J.; Cartwright, Emily K.; Bosinger, Steven E.; Silvestri, Guido; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Lebon, Pierre; Schwartz, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in humans and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in macaques (MAC) lead to chronic inflammation and AIDS. Natural hosts, such as African green monkeys (AGM) and sooty mangabeys (SM), are protected against SIV-induced chronic inflammation and AIDS. Here, we report that AGM plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) express extremely low levels of CD4, unlike MAC and human pDC. Despite this, AGM pDC efficiently sensed SIVagm, but not heterologous HIV/SIV isolates, indicating a virus-host adaptation. Moreover, both AGM and SM pDC were found to be, in contrast to MAC pDC, predominantly negative for CCR5. Despite such limited CD4 and CCR5 expression, lymphoid tissue pDC were infected to a degree similar to that seen with CD4+ T cells in both MAC and AGM. Altogether, our finding of efficient pDC infection by SIV in vivo identifies pDC as a potential viral reservoir in lymphoid tissues. We discovered low expression of CD4 on AGM pDC, which did not preclude efficient sensing of host-adapted viruses. Therefore, pDC infection and efficient sensing are not prerequisites for chronic inflammation. The high level of pDC infection by SIVagm suggests that if CCR5 paucity on immune cells is important for nonpathogenesis of natural hosts, it is possibly not due to its role as a coreceptor. IMPORTANCE The ability of certain key immune cell subsets to resist infection might contribute to the asymptomatic nature of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in its natural hosts, such as African green monkeys (AGM) and sooty mangabeys (SM). This relative resistance to infection has been correlated with reduced expression of CD4 and/or CCR5. We show that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) of natural hosts display reduced CD4 and/or CCR5 expression, unlike macaque pDC. Surprisingly, this did not protect AGM pDC, as infection levels were similar to those found in MAC pDC. Furthermore, we show that AGM pDC did not consistently produce type I

  15. Characterization of multiple mRNA species of simian immunodeficiency virus from macaques in a CD4+ lymphoid cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Park, I W; Steen, R; Li, Y

    1991-01-01

    Cytoplasmic poly(A)+ RNA was isolated from CEMX721.174 cells 5 to 10 days after infection with molecularly cloned simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239. Expression of SIV RNA was analyzed by Northern (RNA) blot hybridization and by sequencing of cDNA clones. As expected, a splice donor site was demonstrated in the untranslated leader sequence outside the left long terminal repeat. The region between pol and env was found to contain at least two splice donor and six splice acceptor sites. Splice acceptor and donor sites in the intergenic region were suitably positioned for expression of vpx, vpr, tat, and rev. Splice acceptor sites at nucleotides 8802 and 8805 were demonstrated in singly and doubly spliced RNAs with the potential of expressing nef and the second exons of tat and rev. Our results demonstrate a complex pattern of alternative splicing of SIV mRNAs. The results are very similar to what has been observed in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected cells, suggesting that both human and simian immunodeficiency viruses are subject to multiple levels of regulation. Images PMID:1674547

  16. Macrophages in Progressive Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    DiNapoli, Sarah R; Hirsch, Vanessa M; Brenchley, Jason M

    2016-09-01

    The cells that are targeted by primate lentiviruses (HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus [SIV]) are of intense interest given the renewed effort to identify potential cures for HIV. These viruses have been reported to infect multiple cell lineages of hematopoietic origin, including all phenotypic and functional CD4 T cell subsets. The two most commonly reported cell types that become infected in vivo are memory CD4 T cells and tissue-resident macrophages. Though viral infection of CD4 T cells is routinely detected in both HIV-infected humans and SIV-infected Asian macaques, significant viral infection of macrophages is only routinely observed in animal models wherein CD4 T cells are almost entirely depleted. Here we review the roles of macrophages in lentiviral disease progression, the evidence that macrophages support viral replication in vivo, the animal models where macrophage-mediated replication of SIV is thought to occur, how the virus can interact with macrophages in vivo, pathologies thought to be attributed to viral replication within macrophages, how viral replication in macrophages might contribute to the asymptomatic phase of HIV/SIV infection, and whether macrophages represent a long-lived reservoir for the virus. PMID:27307568

  17. Broadly Neutralizing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Antibody Gene Transfer Protects Nonhuman Primates from Mucosal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Kevin O.; Wang, Lingshu; Joyce, M. Gordon; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Balazs, Alejandro B.; Cheng, Cheng; Ko, Sung-Youl; Kong, Wing-Pui; Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Duan, Lijie; Foulds, Kathryn E.; Donaldson, Mitzi; Xu, Ling; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Todd, John-Paul; Baltimore, David; Roederer, Mario; Haase, Ashley T.; Kwong, Peter D.; Rao, Srinivas S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) can prevent lentiviral infection in nonhuman primates and may slow the spread of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Although protection by passive transfer of human bnAbs has been demonstrated in monkeys, durable expression is essential for its broader use in humans. Gene-based expression of bnAbs provides a potential solution to this problem, although immune responses to the viral vector or to the antibody may limit its durability and efficacy. Here, we delivered an adeno-associated viral vector encoding a simianized form of a CD4bs bnAb, VRC07, and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective efficacy. The expressed antibody circulated in macaques for 16 weeks at levels up to 66 μg/ml, although immune suppression with cyclosporine (CsA) was needed to sustain expression. Gene-delivered simian VRC07 protected against simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection in monkeys 5.5 weeks after treatment. Gene transfer of an anti-HIV antibody can therefore protect against infection by viruses that cause AIDS in primates when the host immune responses are controlled. IMPORTANCE Sustained interventions that can prevent HIV-1 infection are needed to halt the spread of the HIV-1 pandemic. The protective capacity of anti-HIV antibody gene therapy has been established in mouse models of HIV-1 infection but has not been established for primates. We show here a proof-of-concept that gene transfer of anti-HIV antibody genes can protect against infection by viruses that cause AIDS in primates when host immune responses are controlled. PMID:26041300

  18. Structure and Immunogenicity of Alternative Forms of the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Gag Protein Expressed Using Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Replicon Particles

    PubMed Central

    Cecil, Chad; West, Ande; Collier, Martha; Jurgens, Christy; Madden, Victoria; Whitmore, Alan; Johnston, Robert; Moore, Dominic T.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Davis, Nancy L.

    2007-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) were engineered to express different forms of SIV Gag to compare expression in vitro, formation of intra- and extracellular structures and induction of humoral and cellular immunity in mice. The three forms examined were full-length myristylated SIV Gag (Gagmyr+), full-length Gag lacking the myristylation signal (Gagmyr-), or a truncated form of Gagmyr- comprising only the matrix and capsid domains (MA/CA). Comparison of VRP-infected primary mouse embryo fibroblasts, mouse L929 cells and primate Vero cells showed comparable expression levels for each protein, as well as extracellular virus-like particles (VRP-Gagmyr+), and distinctive cytoplasmic aggregates (VRP-Gagmyr-) with each cell type. VPR were used to immunize BALB/c mice, and immune responses were compared using an interferon (IFN)-γ ELISPOT assay and a serum antibody ELISA. Although all three VRP generated similar levels of IFN-γ-producing cells at 1 week post-boost, at 10 weeks post-boost the MA/CA-VRP-induced response was maintained at a significantly higher level relative to that induced by Gagmyr+-VRP. Antibody responses to MA/CA-VRP and Gagmyr+-VRP were not significantly different. PMID:17275057

  19. CD8+ T cells maintain suppression of simian immunodeficiency virus in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, Maria Cecilia G; Morsey, Brenda; Emanuel, Katy; Lamberty, Benjamin G; Flynn, Claudia T; Fox, Howard S

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) accesses the brain early in infection and can lead to neurocognitive disorders. The brain can also serve as a viral reservoir, but how virus is controlled in the brain is unknown. To examine this, CD8-depleting monoclonal antibody was injected into the cerebrospinal fluid of rhesus monkeys with chronic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection. This treatment led to the rapid increase of SIV in the brain. Virus in the brain is maintained by active suppression from the host immune system. This dynamic interaction can be manipulated in efforts to control and eradicate virus from the brain and other reservoirs. PMID:25035516

  20. C5A Protects Macaques from Vaginal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Veazey, Ronald S.; Chatterji, Udayan; Bobardt, Michael; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E.; Li, Jian; Wang, Xiaolei

    2015-01-01

    A safe and effective vaginal microbicide could decrease human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in women. Here, we evaluated the safety and microbicidal efficacy of a short amphipathic peptide, C5A, in a rhesus macaque model. We found that a vaginal application of C5A protects 89% of the macaques from a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-162P3) challenge. We observed no signs of lesions or inflammation in animals vaginally treated with repeated C5A applications. With its noncellular cytotoxic activity and rare mechanism of action, C5A represents an attractive microbicidal candidate. PMID:26552985

  1. C5A Protects Macaques from Vaginal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Chatterji, Udayan; Bobardt, Michael; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E; Li, Jian; Wang, Xiaolei; Gallay, Philippe A

    2016-01-01

    A safe and effective vaginal microbicide could decrease human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in women. Here, we evaluated the safety and microbicidal efficacy of a short amphipathic peptide, C5A, in a rhesus macaque model. We found that a vaginal application of C5A protects 89% of the macaques from a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-162P3) challenge. We observed no signs of lesions or inflammation in animals vaginally treated with repeated C5A applications. With its noncellular cytotoxic activity and rare mechanism of action, C5A represents an attractive microbicidal candidate. PMID:26552985

  2. Modulation by Morphine of Viral Set Point in Rhesus Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus and Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rakesh; Torres, Cynthia; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Rodriguez, Idia; Martinez, Melween; Staprans, Silvija; Donahoe, Robert M.; Kraiselburd, Edmundo; Stephens, Edward B.; Kumar, Anil

    2004-01-01

    Six rhesus macaques were adapted to morphine dependence by injecting three doses of morphine (5 mg/kg of body weight) for a total of 20 weeks. These animals along with six control macaques were infected intravenously with mixture of simian-human immunodeficiency virus KU-1B (SHIVKU-1B), SHIV89.6P, and simian immunodeficiency virus 17E-Fr. Levels of circulating CD4+ T cells and viral loads in the plasma and the cerebrospinal fluid were monitored in these macaques for a period of 12 weeks. Both morphine and control groups showed precipitous loss of CD4+ T cells. However this loss was more prominent in the morphine group at week 2 (P = 0.04). Again both morphine and control groups showed comparable peak plasma viral load at week 2, but the viral set points were higher in the morphine group than that in the control group. Likewise, the extent of virus replication in the cerebral compartment was more pronounced in the morphine group. These results provide a definitive evidence for a positive correlation between morphine and levels of viral replication. PMID:15452267

  3. A genetically engineered live-attenuated simian-human immunodeficiency virus that co-expresses the RANTES gene improves the magnitude of cellular immunity in rhesus macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Yuya; Inaba, Katsuhisa; Kaneyasu, Kentaro; Ibuki, Kentaro; Himeno, Ai; Okoba, Masashi; Goto, Yoshitaka; Hayami, Masanori; Miura, Tomoyuki; Haga, Takeshi . E-mail: a0d518u@cc.miyazaki-u.ac.jp

    2007-04-25

    Regulated-on-activation-normal-T-cell-expressed-and-secreted (RANTES), a CC-chemokine, enhances antigen-specific T helper (Th) type-1 responses against HIV-1. To evaluate the adjuvant effects of RANTES against HIV vaccine candidate in SHIV-macaque models, we genetically engineered a live-attenuated SHIV to express the RANTES gene (SHIV-RANTES) and characterized the virus's properties in vivo. After the vaccination, the plasma viral loads were same in the SHIV-RANTES-inoculated monkeys and the parental nef-deleted SHIV (SHIV-NI)-inoculated monkeys. SHIV-RANTES provided some immunity in monkeys by remarkably increasing the antigen-specific CD4{sup +} Th cell-proliferative response and by inducing an antigen-specific IFN-{gamma} ELISpot response. The magnitude of the immunity in SHIV-RANTES-immunized animals, however, failed to afford greater protection against a heterologous pathogenic SHIV (SHIV-C2/1) challenge compared to control SHIV-NI-immunized animals. SHIV-RANTES immunized monkeys, elicited robust cellular CD4{sup +} Th responses and IFN-{gamma} ELISpot responses after SHIV-C2/1 challenge. These findings suggest that the chemokine RANTES can augment vaccine-elicited, HIV-specific CD4{sup +} T cell responses.

  4. Chemokine-adjuvanted electroporated DNA vaccine induces substantial protection from simian immunodeficiency virus vaginal challenge.

    PubMed

    Kutzler, M A; Wise, M C; Hutnick, N A; Moldoveanu, Z; Hunter, M; Reuter, M A; Yuan, S; Yan, J; Ginsberg, A A; Sylvester, A; Pahar, B; Carnathan, D G; Kathuria, N; Khan, A S; Montefiori, D; Sardesai, N Y; Betts, M R; Mestecky, J; Marx, P A; Weiner, D B

    2016-01-01

    There have been encouraging results for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. However, many questions remain regarding the quality of immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies. We addressed some of these issues by using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine adjuvanted with plasmid-expressed mucosal chemokines combined with an intravaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaque (RhM) model. We previously reported on the ability of CCR9 and CCR10 ligand (L) adjuvants to enhance mucosal and systemic IgA and IgG responses in small animals. In this study, RhMs were intramuscularly immunized five times with either DNA or DNA plus chemokine adjuvant delivered by electroporation followed by challenge with SIVsmE660. Sixty-eight percent of all vaccinated animals (P<0.01) remained either uninfected or had aborted infection compared with only 14% in the vaccine naïve group. The highest protection was observed in the CCR10L chemokines group, where six of nine animals had aborted infection and two remained uninfected, leading to 89% protection (P<0.001). The induction of mucosal SIV-specific antibodies and neutralization titers correlated with trends in protection. These results indicate the need to further investigate the contribution of chemokine adjuvants to modulate immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies in SIV/HIV protection. PMID:25943275

  5. Chemokine Adjuvanted Electroporated-DNA Vaccine Induces Substantial Protection from Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaginal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hutnick, N A; Moldoveanu, Z; Hunter, M; Reuter, M; Yuan, S; Yan, J; Ginsberg, A; Sylvester, A; Pahar, B; Carnathan, D; Kathuria, N; Khan, A S; Montefiori, D; Sardesai, N Y; Betts, M R; Mestecky, J; Marx, P; Weiner, D B

    2015-01-01

    There have been encouraging results for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. However, many questions remain regarding the quality of immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies. We addressed some of these issues by using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine adjuvanted with plasmid-expressed mucosal chemokines combined with an intravaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaque (RhM) model. We previously reported on the ability of CCR9 and CCR10 ligand (L) adjuvants to enhance mucosal and systemic IgA and IgG in small animals. In this study, RhMs were intramuscularly immunized five times with either DNA or DNA plus chemokine adjuvant delivered by electroporation followed by challenge with SIVsmE660. Sixty-eight percent of all vaccinated animals (P=0.0016) remained either uninfected or had aborted infection compared to only 14% in the vaccine naïve group. The highest protection was observed in the CCR10L chemokines group, where 6 of 9 animals had aborted infection and two remained uninfected, leading to 89% protection (P=0.0003). The induction of mucosal SIV-specific antibodies and neutralization titers correlated with trends in protection. These results indicate the need to further investigate the contribution of chemokine adjuvants to modulate immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies in SIV/HIV protection. PMID:25943275

  6. Plasma Proteomic Analysis of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Wiederin, Jayme L.; Donahoe, Robert M.; Anderson, James R.; Yu, Fang; Fox, Howard S.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Ciborowski, Pawel S.

    2012-01-01

    Lentiviral replication in its target cells affects a delicate balance between cellular co-factors required for virus propagation and immunoregulation for host defense. To better elucidate cellular proteins linked to viral infection we tested plasma from rhesus macaques infected with the simian immunodeficiency viral strain SIVsmm9, prior to, 10 days (acute) and 49 weeks (chronic) after viral infection. Changes in plasma protein content were measured by quantitative mass spectrometry by isobaric Tags for Absolute and Relative Quantitation (iTRAQ) methods. An 81 and 232% increase in SERPINA1 was seen during acute and chronic infection, respectively. Interestingly, gelsolin, vitamin D binding protein and histidine rich glycoprotein were decreased by 45% in acute conditions but returned to baseline during chronic infection. When compared to uninfected controls, a 48–103% increase in leucine rich alpha 2-glycoprotein, vitronectin and ceruloplasmin was observed during chronic viral infection. Observed changes in plasma proteins expression likely represent a compensatory host response to persistent viral infection. PMID:20677826

  7. Molecular and biological characterization of a neurovirulent molecular clone of simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, M T; Hauer, D A; Mankowski, J L; Zink, M C; Clements, J E

    1997-01-01

    To identify the molecular determinants of neurovirulence, we constructed an infectious simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) molecular clone, SIV/17E-Fr, that contained the 3' end of a neurovirulent strain of SIV, SIV/17E-Br, derived by in vivo virus passage. SIV/17E-Fr is macrophage tropic in vitro and neurovirulent in macaques. In contrast, a molecular clone, SIV/17E-Cl, that contains the SU and a portion of the TM sequences of SIV/17E-Br is macrophage tropic but not neurovirulent. To identify the amino acids that accounted for the replication differences between SIV/17E-Fr and SIV/17E-Cl in primary macaque cells in vitro, additional infectious molecular clones were constructed. Analysis of these recombinant viruses revealed that changes in the TM portion of the envelope protein were required for the highest level of replication in primary macaque macrophages and brain cells derived from the microvessel endothelium. In addition, a full-length Nef protein is necessary for optimum virus replication in both of these cell types. Finally, viruses expressing a full-length Nef protein in conjunction with the changes in the TM had the highest specific infectivity in a sMAGI assay. Thus, changes in the TM and nef genes between SIV/17E-Cl and SIV/17E-Fr account for replication differences in vitro and correlate with replication in the central nervous system in vivo. PMID:9223467

  8. Role of TAR RNA splicing in translational regulation of simian immunodeficiency virus from rhesus macaques.

    PubMed Central

    Viglianti, G A; Rubinstein, E P; Graves, K L

    1992-01-01

    The untranslated leader sequences of rhesus macaque simian immunodeficiency virus mRNAs form a stable secondary structure, TAR. This structure can be modified by RNA splicing. In this study, the role of TAR splicing in virus replication was investigated. The proportion of viral RNAs containing a spliced TAR structure is high early after infection and decreases at later times. Moreover, proviruses containing mutations which prevent TAR splicing are significantly delayed in replication. These mutant viruses require approximately 20 days to achieve half-maximal virus production, in contrast to wild-type viruses, which require approximately 8 days. We attribute this delay to the inefficient translation of unspliced-TAR-containing mRNAs. The molecular basis for this translational effect was examined in in vitro assays. We found that spliced-TAR-containing mRNAs were translated up to 8.5 times more efficiently than were similar mRNAs containing an unspliced TAR leader. Furthermore, these spliced-TAR-containing mRNAs were more efficiently associated with ribosomes. We postulate that the level of TAR splicing provides a balance for the optimal expression of both viral proteins and genomic RNA and therefore ultimately controls the production of infectious virions. Images PMID:1629957

  9. Visualization and quantification of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected cells using non-invasive molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiasheng; Cai, Zhengxin; White, Alexander G; Jin, Tao; Wang, Xiaolei; Kadayakkara, Deepak; Anderson, Carolyn J; Ambrose, Zandrea; Young, Won-Bin

    2015-10-01

    In vivo imaging can provide real-time information and three-dimensional (3D) non-invasive images of deep tissues and organs, including the brain, whilst allowing longitudinal observation of the same animals, thus eliminating potential variation between subjects. Current in vivo imaging technologies, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI), can be used to pinpoint the spatial location of target cells, which is urgently needed for revealing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) dissemination in real-time and HIV-1 reservoirs during suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). To demonstrate that in vivo imaging can be used to visualize and quantify simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-transduced cells, we genetically engineered SIV to carry different imaging reporters. Based on the expression of the reporter genes, we could visualize and quantify the SIV-transduced cells via vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein pseudotyping in a mouse model using BLI, PET-CT or MRI. We also engineered a chimeric EcoSIV for in vivo infection study. Our results demonstrated that BLI is sensitive enough to detect as few as five single cells transduced with virus, whilst PET-CT can provide 3D images of the spatial location of as few as 10 000 SIV-infected cells. We also demonstrated that MRI can provide images with high spatial resolution in a 3D anatomical context to distinguish a small population of SIV-transduced cells. The in vivo imaging platform described here can potentially serve as a powerful tool to visualize lentiviral infection, including when and where viraemia rebounds, and how reservoirs are formed and maintained during latency or suppressive ART. PMID:26297664

  10. In Vivo Replication Capacity Rather Than In Vitro Macrophage Tropism Predicts Efficiency of Vaginal Transmission of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus or Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Christopher J.; Marthas, Marta; Greenier, Jennifer; Lu, Ding; Dailey, Peter J.; Lu, Yichen

    1998-01-01

    We used the rhesus macaque model of heterosexual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission to test the hypothesis that in vitro measures of macrophage tropism predict the ability of a primate lentivirus to initiate a systemic infection after intravaginal inoculation. A single atraumatic intravaginal inoculation with a T-cell-tropic molecular clone of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), SIVmac239, or a dualtropic recombinant molecular clone of SIV, SIVmac239/1A11/239, or uncloned dualtropic SIVmac251 or uncloned dualtropic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) 89.6-PD produced systemic infection in all rhesus macaques tested. However, vaginal inoculation with a dualtropic molecular clone of SIV, SIVmac1A11, resulted in transient viremia in one of two rhesus macaques. It has previously been shown that 12 intravaginal inoculations with SIVmac1A11 resulted in infection of one of five rhesus macaques (M. L. Marthas, C. J. Miller, S. Sutjipto, J. Higgins, J. Torten, B. L. Lohman, R. E. Unger, H. Kiyono, J. R. McGhee, P. A. Marx, and N. C. Pedersen, J. Med. Primatol. 21:99–107, 1992). In addition, SHIV HXBc2, which replicates in monkey macrophages, does not infect rhesus macaques following multiple vaginal inoculations, while T-cell-tropic SHIV 89.6 does (Y. Lu, P. B. Brosio, M. Lafaile, J. Li, R. G. Collman, J. Sodroski, and C. J. Miller, J. Virol. 70:3045–3050, 1996). These results demonstrate that in vitro measures of macrophage tropism do not predict if a SIV or SHIV will produce systemic infection after intravaginal inoculation of rhesus macaques. However, we did find that the level to which these viruses replicate in vivo after intravenous inoculation predicts the outcome of intravaginal inoculation with each virus. PMID:9525652

  11. Infection of simian B lymphoblastoid cells with simian immunodeficiency virus is associated with upregulation of CD23 and CD40 cell surface markers.

    PubMed

    Titti, Fausto; Zamarchi, Rita; Maggiorella, Maria Teresa; Sernicola, Leonardo; Geraci, Andrea; Negri, Donatella Rita Maria; Borsetti, Alessandra; Menin, Chiara; D'Andrea, Emma; Modesti, Andrea; Masuelli, Laura; Verani, Paola; Chieco-Bianchi, Luigi; Amadori, Alberto

    2002-09-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) as well as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) induce polyclonal B-cell activation and are associated with the appearance of lymphomas in their respective hosts in either the presence or the absence of other co-infecting viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). However, the pathogenic role of these retroviruses in the development of lymphoproliferative disorders remains poorly understood. To explore the virus-B-cell interactions, two immortalized lymphoblastoid B-cell lines (SL-P1 and SL-691) were established from cynomolgus monkeys that were naturally co-infected with a simian type D retrovirus-2 (SRV-2) and with the herpes virus Macaca fascicularis (HVMF-1). We addressed their susceptibility to SIV infection and the phenotypic modifications associated with SIV infection. In response, both cell lines (1) were co-infected with HVMF-1 (latent infection) and with SRV-2 (productive infection), (2) had a transformed phenotype because they did not require exogenous growth factors, and (3) when injected into mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), generated serially transplantable tumors. The B-cell origin of SL cells was demonstrated by the presence of rearrangements of the IgH gene and by the expression of typical B-cell lineage markers, such as CD20. SL-P1 and SL-691 could be discriminated on the basis of different expressions of CD23 and CD40 and of kappa- and lambda-chains. Most importantly, SL-691 cells, but not SL-P1 cells, were susceptible to chronic noncytolytic SIV infection. This infection occurred in a CD4/CCR5/CXCR4-independent manner and was associated with the upregulated expression of CD23 and CD40 cell surface markers. In addition, CD20 expression, which progressively disappeared in SL-691 noninfected cells, was maintained in the SIV-infected counterpart. These findings support the hypothesis that SIV induce phenotypic perturbations in B cells that might eventually contribute to the development of

  12. Lymphadenopathy in macaques experimentally infected with the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV).

    PubMed Central

    Chalifoux, L. V.; Ringler, D. J.; King, N. W.; Sehgal, P. K.; Desrosiers, R. C.; Daniel, M. D.; Letvin, N. L.

    1987-01-01

    A T-cell tropic lentivirus of macaques the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), has morphologic, growth, and antigenic properties that indicate that it is related to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the etiologic agent of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in humans. Six juvenile macaques developed persistent lymphadenopathy (greater than 3 months in duration) after inoculation with SIV. The histologic appearance of the lymph nodes was characterized by marked follicular hyperplasia with abundant proliferative B cells infiltrating into the paracortex. The number of T8-positive lymphocytes equaled or exceeded the number of T4-positive lymphocytes in the paracortex. These findings, in association with immunologic abnormalities and a previously observed fatal immunodeficiency syndrome in SIV-infected macaques, provide further evidence of the importance of SIV-induced disease in macaques as a model for the study of AIDS. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3037910

  13. IL-4 increases Simian immunodeficiency virus replication despite enhanced SIV immune responses in infected rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Boyer, J D; Nath, B; Schumann, K; Curley, E; Manson, K; Kim, J; Weiner, D B

    2002-05-01

    It is widely believed that a Th1 type CD4 response is critical for enhancement of CD8 immunity and for controlling HIV-1 infection. Th2 type responses, such as what might be seen in a chronic parasitic infection, would sacrifice cellular immunity and thus benefit the virus at the expense of the host. However, there has been little direct examination of the hypothesis in a primate model system. Accordingly, the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infected rhesus macaque model was used to investigate the impact of immunisation with SIV expressing DNA constructs and co-injection with IL-4 on the SIV specific immunological responses, lymphocyte cell counts, as well as the impact on viral load. IL-4 is a Th2 type cytokine, which enhances antibody production and inhibits a CD4 Th1 phenotype. Rhesus macaques were infected with 10 AID50 of SIVmac239 and treated with 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]adenine (PMPA) 9 weeks post-infection. During PMPA treatment, animals were immunised with plasmids that expressed the SIV proteins, env, rev, gag and pol. In addition, they were immunised with a construct that encoded the gene for IL-4. IL-4 co-immunisation increased the neutralizing antibody titres in this group. Importantly, the viral loads in animals vaccinated with IL-4 expressing plasmid increased during the immunisation regimens despite the higher neutralizing antibody titres. In addition, neutralizing antibodies did not correlate with viral set point prior to PMPA treatment, however, there was a correlation between viral loads and antibody titres following the treatment with PMPA. Antibody titres decreased following the suppression of viral load. Importantly, vaccination in the absence of IL-4 protected CD4 levels without increasing viral load. The data support the hypothesis that inappropriate immune bias toward a Th2 pathway would ultimately enhance disease progression. PMID:11943227

  14. A Combination DNA and Attenuated Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine Strategy Provides Enhanced Protection from Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Induced Disease†

    PubMed Central

    Amara, Rama Rao; Patel, Kalpana; Niedziela, Genevieve; Nigam, Pragati; Sharma, Sunita; Staprans, Silvija I.; Montefiori, David C.; Chenareddi, Lakshmi; Herndon, James G.; Robinson, Harriet L.; McClure, Harold M.; Novembre, Francis J.

    2005-01-01

    Among the most effective vaccine candidates tested in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/macaque system, live attenuated viruses have been shown to provide the best protection from challenge. To investigate if preimmunization would increase the level of protection afforded by live attenuated SIVmac239Δnef (Δnef), macaques were given two priming immunizations of DNA encoding SIV Gag and Pol proteins, with control macaques receiving vector DNA immunizations. In macaques receiving the SIV DNA inoculation, SIV-specific cellular but not humoral responses were readily detectable 2 weeks after the second DNA inoculation. Following boosting with live attenuated virus, control of Δnef replication was superior in SIV-DNA-primed macaques versus vector-DNA-primed macaques and was correlated with higher levels of CD8+/gamma-interferon-positive and/or interleukin-2-positive cells. Challenge with an intravenous inoculation of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) strain SHIV89.6p resulted in infection of all animals. However, macaques receiving SIV DNA as the priming immunizations had statistically lower viral loads than control animals and did not develop signs of disease, whereas three of seven macaques receiving vector DNA showed severe CD4+ T-cell decline, with development of AIDS in one of these animals. No correlation of immune responses to protection from disease could be derived from our analyses. These results demonstrate that addition of a DNA prime to a live attenuated virus provided better protection from disease following challenge than live attenuated virus alone. PMID:16306607

  15. Replication of an acutely lethal simian immunodeficiency virus activates and induces proliferation of lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Fultz, P N

    1991-01-01

    A variant of simian immunodeficiency virus from sooty mangabey monkeys (SIVsmm), termed SIVsmmPBj14, was previously identified and shown to induce acute disease and death within 1 to 2 weeks of inoculation of pig-tailed macaques and mangabey monkeys (P. N. Fultz, H. M. McClure, D. C. Anderson, and W. M. Switzer, AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses 5:397-409, 1989). SIVsmmPBj14 differed from its parent virus, SIVsmm9, not only in pathogenicity but also in multiple in vitro properties. As a first approach to understanding the biological and molecular mechanisms responsible for the acute disease and death induced by this variant, virus-host cell interactions of SIVsmmPBj14 and SIVsmm9 were studied. Initial rates of replication of the two viruses were identical in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from normal pig-tailed macaques and mangabey monkeys, but SIVsmmPBj14 infection always resulted in higher yields of virus than did SIVsmm9 infection, as assessed by levels of reverse transcriptase activity in culture supernatants. Surprisingly, despite its cytopathicity for macaque and mangabey CD4+ cells, replication of SIVsmmPBj14 was accompanied by up to 10-fold increases in number of viable cells compared with cell numbers in uninfected or SIVsmm9-infected cultures. Furthermore, SIVsmmPBj14 was shown to infect and replicate in resting PBMC just as efficiently as in mitogen-stimulated PBMC, irrespective of whether exogenous interleukin-2 (IL-2) or antibodies that neutralized IL-2 were added to culture media. Accumulation of virus in culture supernatants of resting PBMC preceded by several days the appearance of activated cells which expressed the IL-2 receptor alpha subunit (CD25), suggesting that activation of cells was not essential for replication. The ability to activate and to induce simian PBMC to proliferate appeared specific for the acutely lethal variant because incorporation of [3H]thymidine by PBMC from naive animals was observed only upon incubation

  16. Neurovirulent simian immunodeficiency virus induces calbindin-D-28K in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Berman, N E; Yong, C; Raghavan, R; Raymond, L A; Joag, S V; Narayan, O; Cheney, P D

    1998-05-01

    Astrocyte activation has been postulated to be a major contributor to functional changes in the brain of AIDS patients. We assessed astrocyte activation in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) model. Four groups of macaque brains were examined: uninoculated controls, animals inoculated with virus that did not cause disease, animals inoculated with virus that caused AIDS but did not cause encephalitis, and animals with SIV encephalitis. We examined expression of calbindin-D-28K, a calcium binding protein that is upregulated in astrocytes during excitotoxic events, as well as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The presence of calbindin in astrocytes was confirmed by double-labeling using confocal microscopy. Increases in calbindin staining were most apparent in the white matter, but increases in GFAP staining were most apparent in middle layers of the cerebral cortex. Six of the seven animals with SIV encephalitis had calbindin immunoreactive astrocytes in the subcortical white matter, corpus callosum, internal capsule, cerebral peduncle, pontine white matter, and cerebellar white matter. Very rarely, a few, very lightly calbindin-immunoreactive astrocytes were present in the uninoculated control brains. The increase in calbindin expression by astrocytes in SIV encephalitis suggests that these cells are subject to calcium toxicity. In uninoculated control macaques, and in macaques inoculated with virus that did not cause disease, GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytes were present throughout the subcortical white matter and in layer I, but very few were found in layers III-V of the cerebral cortex. Two animals that died of AIDS without encephalitis had somewhat higher numbers of GFAP immunoreactive astrocytes in middle cortical layers. In seven animals that received passaged neurovirulent virus and developed both AIDS and encephalitis, the number of GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytes in middle cortical layers was high, indicating widespread astrocyte activation. PMID

  17. Generation and Evaluation of Clade C Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge Stocks

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hui-Wen; Tartaglia, Lawrence J.; Whitney, James B.; Lim, So-Yon; Sanisetty, Srisowmya; Lavine, Christy L.; Seaman, Michael S.; Rademeyer, Cecelia; Williamson, Carolyn; Ellingson-Strouss, Katharine; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Kublin, James

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The development of a panel of mucosally transmissible simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge stocks from multiple virus clades would facilitate preclinical evaluation of candidate HIV-1 vaccines and therapeutics. The majority of SHIV stocks that have been generated to date have been derived from clade B HIV-1 env sequences from viruses isolated during chronic infection and typically required serial animal-to-animal adaptation for establishing mucosal transmissibility and pathogenicity. To capture essential features of mucosal transmission of clade C viruses, we produced a series of SHIVs with early clade C HIV-1 env sequences from acutely HIV-1-infected individuals from South Africa. SHIV-327c and SHIV-327cRM expressed env sequences that were 99.7 to 100% identical to the original HIV-1 isolate and did not require in vivo passaging for mucosal infectivity. These challenge stocks infected rhesus monkeys efficiently by both intrarectal and intravaginal routes, replicated to high levels during acute infection, and established chronic setpoint viremia in 13 of 17 (76%) infected animals. The SHIV-327cRM challenge stock was also titrated for both single, high-dose intrarectal challenges and repetitive, low-dose intrarectal challenges in rhesus monkeys. These SHIV challenge stocks should facilitate the preclinical evaluation of vaccines and other interventions aimed at preventing clade C HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE We describe the development of two related clade C SHIV challenge stocks. These challenge stocks should prove useful for preclinical testing of vaccines and other interventions aimed at preventing clade C HIV-1 infection. PMID:25473043

  18. A Dominant Role for CD8+-T-Lymphocyte Selection in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Sequence Variation†

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, David H.; McDermott, Adrian B.; Krebs, Kendall C.; Dodds, Elizabeth J.; Miller, Jacqueline E.; Gonzalez, Edna J.; Jacoby, Timothy J.; Yant, Levi; Piontkivska, Helen; Pantophlet, Ralph; Burton, Dennis R.; Rehrauer, William M.; Wilson, Nancy; Hughes, Austin L.; Watkins, David I.

    2004-01-01

    CD8+ T lymphocytes (CD8-TL) select viral escape variants in both human immunodeficiency virus and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infections. The frequency of CD8-TL viral escape as well as the contribution of escape to overall virus diversification has not been assessed. We quantified CD8-TL selection in SIV infections by sequencing viral genomes from 35 SIVmac239-infected animals at the time of euthanasia. Here we show that positive selection for sequences encoding 46 known CD8-TL epitopes is comparable to the positive selection observed for the variable loops of env. We also found that >60% of viral variation outside of the viral envelope occurs within recognized CD8-TL epitopes. Therefore, we conclude that CD8-TL selection is the dominant cause of SIV diversification outside of the envelope. PMID:15564508

  19. Induction of Mucosal and Systemic Immunity to a Recombinant Simian Immunodeficiency Viral Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, T.; Bergmeier, L. A.; Panagiotidi, C.; Tao, L.; Brookes, R.; Klavinskis, L. S.; Walker, P.; Walker, J.; Ward, R. G.; Hussain, L.; Gearing, A. J. H.; Adams, S. E.

    1992-11-01

    Heterosexual transmission through the cervico-vaginal mucosa is the principal route of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Africa and is increasing in the United States and Europe. Vaginal immunization with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) had not yet been studied in nonhuman primates. Immune responses in macaques were investigated by stimulation of the genital and gut-associated lymphoid tissue with a recombinant, particulate SIV antigen. Vaginal, followed by oral, administration of the vaccine elicited three types of immunity: (i) gag protein p27-specific, secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the vaginal fluid, (ii) specific CD4^+ T cell proliferation and helper function in B cell p27-specific IgA synthesis in the genital lymph nodes, and (iii) specific serum IgA and IgG, with CD4^+ T cell proliferative and helper functions in the circulating blood.

  20. Quantitation of Productively Infected Monocytes and Macrophages of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Avalos, Claudia R.; Price, Sarah L.; Forsyth, Ellen R.; Pin, Julia N.; Shirk, Erin N.; Bullock, Brandon T.; Queen, Suzanne E.; Li, Ming; Gellerup, Dane; O'Connor, Shelby L.; Zink, M. Christine; Mankowski, Joseph L.; Gama, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the success of combined antiretroviral therapy (ART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection remains a lifelong infection because of latent viral reservoirs in infected patients. The contribution of CD4+ T cells to infection and disease progression has been extensively studied. However, during early HIV infection, macrophages in brain and other tissues are infected and contribute to tissue-specific diseases, such as encephalitis and dementia in brain and pneumonia in lung. The extent of infection of monocytes and macrophages has not been rigorously assessed with assays comparable to those used to study infection of CD4+ T cells and to evaluate the number of CD4+ T cells that harbor infectious viral genomes. To assess the contribution of productively infected monocytes and macrophages to HIV- and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected cells in vivo, we developed a quantitative virus outgrowth assay (QVOA) based on similar assays used to quantitate CD4+ T cell latent reservoirs in HIV- and SIV-infected individuals in whom the infection is suppressed by ART. Myeloid cells expressing CD11b were serially diluted and cocultured with susceptible cells to amplify virus. T cell receptor β RNA was measured as a control to assess the potential contribution of CD4+ T cells in the assay. Virus production in the supernatant was quantitated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Productively infected myeloid cells were detected in blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, lungs, spleen, and brain, demonstrating that these cells persist throughout SIV infection and have the potential to contribute to the viral reservoir during ART. IMPORTANCE Infection of CD4+ T cells and their role as latent reservoirs have been rigorously assessed; however, the frequency of productively infected monocytes and macrophages in vivo has not been similarly studied. Myeloid cells, unlike lymphocytes, are resistant to the cytopathic effects of HIV. Moreover, tissue

  1. CCR6 Functions as a New Coreceptor for Limited Primary Human and Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Salequl; Shimizu, Nobuaki; Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2013-01-01

    More than 12 chemokine receptors (CKRs) have been identified as coreceptors for the entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), type 2 (HIV-2), and simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) into target cells. The expression of CC chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6) on Th17 cells and regulatory T cells make the host cells vulnerable to HIV/SIV infection preferentially. However, only limited information is available concerning the specific role of CCR6 in HIV/SIV infection. We examined CCR6 as a coreceptor candidate in this study using NP-2 cell line-based in-vitro studies. Normally, CD4-transduced cell line, NP-2/CD4, is strictly resistant to all HIV/SIV infection. When CCR6 was transduced there, the resultant NP-2/CD4/CCR6 cells became susceptible to HIV-1HAN2, HIV-2MIR and SIVsmE660, indicating coreceptor roles of CCR6. Viral antigens in infected cells were detected by IFA and confirmed by detection of proviral DNA. Infection-induced syncytia in NP-2/CD4/CCR6 cells were detected by Giemsa staining. Amount of virus release through CCR6 has been detected by RT assay in spent culture medium. Sequence analysis of proviral DNA showed two common amino acid substitutions in the C2 envelope region of HIV-2MIR clones propagated through NP-2/CD4/CCR6 cells. Conversely, CCR6-origin SIVsmE660 clones resulted two amino acid changes in the V1 region and one change in the C2 region. The substitutions in the C2 region for HIV-2MIR and the V1 region of SIVsmE660 may confer selection advantage for CCR6-use. Together, the results describe CCR6 as an independent coreceptor for HIV and SIV in strain-specific manner. The alteration of CCR6 uses by viruses may influence the susceptibility of CD4+ CCR6+ T-cells and dendritic cell subsets in vivo and therefore, is important for viral pathogenesis in establishing latent infections, trafficking, and transmission. However, clinical relevance of CCR6 as coreceptor in HIV/SIV infections should be investigated further. PMID:24009735

  2. The paradox of simian immunodeficiency virus infection in sooty mangabeys: active viral replication without disease progression.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Lisa A

    2004-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsm causes an asymptomatic infection in its natural host, the sooty mangabey, but induces an immunodeficiency syndrome very similar to human AIDS when transferred to a new host species such as the rhesus macaque. Unexpectedly, SIVsm replication dynamics is comparable in the two species, with rapid accumulation of viral mutations and a high viral load detected in both mangabeys and macaques. In contrast, clear differences are observed in immune parameters. Pathogenic SIV infection in macaques is associated with decreased CD4+ T cell numbers and signs of generalized immune activation, such as increased numbers of cycling and apoptotic T cells, hyperplasic lymphoid tissues, and exacerbated immune responses. Mangabeys with asymptomatic SIV infection show normal T cell regeneration parameters and signs of a moderate immune response, appropriate in the setting of chronic viral infection. The comparative analysis of simian models thus suggests that viral load alone cannot account for progression to disease, and that the capacity of primate lentiviruses to induce abnormal immune activation underlies AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:14766388

  3. Effects of Soluble CD4 on Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection of CD4-Positive and CD4-Negative Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schenten, Dominik; Marcon, Luisa; Karlsson, Gunilla B.; Parolin, Cristina; Kodama, Toshiaki; Gerard, Norma; Sodroski, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    A soluble form of the CD4 receptor (sCD4) can either enhance or inhibit the infection of cells by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and human immunodeficiency virus. We investigated the basis for these varying effects by studying the entry of three SIV isolates into CD4-positive and CD4-negative cells expressing different chemokine receptors. Infection of CD4-negative cells depended upon the viral envelope glycoproteins and upon the chemokine receptor, with CCR5 and gpr15 being more efficient than STRL33. Likewise, enhancement of infection by sCD4 was observed when CCR5- and gpr15-expressing target cells were used but not when those expressing STRL33 were used. The sCD4-mediated enhancement of virus infection of CD4-negative, CCR5-positive cells was related to the sCD4-induced increase in binding of the viral gp120 envelope glycoprotein to CCR5. Inhibitory effects of sCD4 could largely be explained by competition for virus attachment to cellular CD4 rather than other detrimental effects on virus infectivity (e.g., disruption of the envelope glycoprotein spike). Consistent with this, the sCD4-activated SIV envelope glycoprotein intermediate on the virus was long-lived. Thus, the net effect of sCD4 on SIV infectivity appears to depend upon the degree of enhancement of chemokine receptor binding and upon the efficiency of competition for cellular CD4. PMID:10364284

  4. Lymphocyte Activation during Acute Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus SHIV89.6PD Infection in Macaques†

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Marianne; Waterman, Paul M.; Mitchen, Jacque L.; Djavani, Mahmoud; Brown, Charles; Trivedi, Parul; Horejsh, Douglas; Dykhuizen, Marta; Kitabwalla, Moiz; Pauza, C. David

    1999-01-01

    Host-virus interactions control disease progression in human immunodeficiency virus-infected human beings and in nonhuman primates infected with simian or simian/human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIV). These interactions evolve rapidly during acute infection and are key to the mechanisms of viral persistence and AIDS. SHIV89.6PD infection in rhesus macaques can deplete CD4+ T cells from the peripheral blood, spleen, and lymph nodes within 2 weeks after exposure and is a model for virulent, acute infection. Lymphocytes isolated from blood and tissues during the interval of acute SHIV89.6PD infection have lost the capacity to proliferate in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA). T-cell unresponsiveness to mitogen occurred within 1 week after mucosal inoculation yet prior to massive CD4+ T-cell depletion and extensive virus dissemination. The lack of mitogen response was due to apoptosis in vitro, and increased activation marker expression on circulating T cells in vivo coincided with the appearance of PHA-induced apoptosis in vitro. Inappropriately high immune stimulation associated with rapid loss of mature CD4+ T cells suggested that activation-induced cell death is a mechanism for helper T-cell depletion in the brief period before widespread virus dissemination. Elevated levels of lymphocyte activation likely enhance SHIV89.6PD replication, thus increasing the loss of CD4+ T cells and diminishing the levels of virus-specific immunity that remain after acute infection. The level of surviving immunity may dictate the capacity to control virus replication and disease progression. We describe this level of immune competence as the host set point to show its pivotal role in AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:10559340

  5. Emergence of CD4 Independence Envelopes and Astrocyte Infection in R5 Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Model of Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Ke; Leda, Ana Rachel; Tsai, Lily; Knight, Heather; Harbison, Carole; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Westmoreland, Susan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in the central nervous system (CNS) is characterized by replication in macrophages or brain microglia that express low levels of the CD4 receptor and is the cause of HIV-associated dementia and related cognitive and motor disorders that affect 20 to 30% of treatment-naive patients with AIDS. Independent viral envelope evolution in the brain has been reported, with the need for robust replication in resident CD4low cells, as well as CD4-negative cells, such as astrocytes, proposed as a major selective pressure. We previously reported giant-cell encephalitis in subtype B and C R5 simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected macaques (SHIV-induced encephalitis [SHIVE]) that experienced very high chronic viral loads and progressed rapidly to AIDS, with varying degrees of macrophage or microglia infection and activation of these immune cells, as well as astrocytes, in the CNS. In this study, we characterized envelopes (Env) amplified from the brains of subtype B and C R5 SHIVE macaques. We obtained data in support of an association between severe neuropathological changes, robust macrophage and microglia infection, and evolution to CD4 independence. Moreover, the degree of Env CD4 independence appeared to correlate with the extent of astrocyte infection in vivo. These findings further our knowledge of the CNS viral population phenotypes that are associated with the severity of HIV/SHIV-induced neurological injury and improve our understanding of the mechanism of HIV-1 cellular tropism and persistence in the brain. IMPORTANCE Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of astrocytes in the brain has been suggested to be important in HIV persistence and neuropathogenesis but has not been definitively demonstrated in an animal model of HIV-induced encephalitis (HIVE). Here, we describe a new nonhuman primate (NHP) model of R5 simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-induced encephalitis

  6. Pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus infection is associated with expansion of the enteric virome

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Scott; Thackray, Larissa B.; Zhao, Guoyan; Presti, Rachel; Miller, Andrew; Droit, Lindsay; Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Kambal, Amal; Duan, Erning; Stanley, Kelly; Kramer, Joshua; Macri, Sheila C.; Permar, Sallie R.; Schmitz, Joern E.; Mansfield, Keith; Brenchley, Jason M.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Wang, David; Barouch, Dan H.; Virgin, Herbert W.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection is associated with enteropathy which likely contributes to AIDS progression. To identify candidate etiologies for AIDS enteropathy, we used next generation sequencing to define the enteric virome during SIV infection in nonhuman primates. Pathogenic, but not non-pathogenic, SIV infection was associated with significant expansion of the enteric virome. We identified at least 32 previously undescribed enteric viruses during pathogenic SIV infection and confirmed their presence using viral culture and PCR testing. We detected unsuspected mucosal adenovirus infection associated with enteritis as well as parvovirus viremia in animals with advanced AIDS, indicating the pathogenic potential of SIV-associated expansion of the enteric virome. No association between pathogenic SIV infection and the family-level taxonomy of enteric bacteria was detected. Thus, enteric viral infections may contribute to AIDS enteropathy and disease progression. These findings underline the importance of metagenomic analysis of the virome for understanding AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:23063120

  7. Induction of Simian AIDS in Infant Rhesus Macaques Infected with CCR5- or CXCR4-Utilizing Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Viruses Is Associated with Distinct Lesions of the Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, R. A.; Canfield, Don R.; Esser, Ursula; Adamson, Lourdes A.; Brown, Charles R.; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Gardner, Murray B.; Harouse, Janet M.; Luciw, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    Newborn rhesus macaques were infected with two chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) strains which contain unique human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) env genes and exhibit distinct phenotypes. Infection with either the CCR5-specific SHIVSF162P3 or the CXCR4-utilizing SHIVSF33A resulted in clinical manifestations consistent with simian AIDS. Most prominent in this study was the detection of severe thymic involution in all SHIVSF33A-infected infants, which is very similar to HIV-1-induced thymic dysfunction in children who exhibit a rapid pattern of disease progression. In contrast, SHIVSF162P3 induced only a minor disruption in thymic morphology. Consistent with the distribution of the coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5 within the thymus, the expression of SHIVSF162P3 was restricted to the thymic medulla, whereas SHIVSF33A was preferentially detected in the cortex. This dichotomy of tissue tropism is similar to the differential tropism of HIV-1 isolates observed in the reconstituted human thymus in SCID-hu mice. Accordingly, our results show that the SHIV-monkey model can be used for the molecular dissection of cell and tissue tropisms controlled by the HIV-1 env gene and for the analysis of mechanisms of viral immunopathogenesis in AIDS. Furthermore, these findings could help explain the rapid progression of disease observed in some HIV-1-infected children. PMID:14747577

  8. Unraveling the Pathogenesis of HIV Peripheral Neuropathy: Insights from a Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Macaque Model

    PubMed Central

    Mangus, Lisa M.; Dorsey, Jamie L.; Laast, Victoria A.; Ringkamp, Matthias; Ebenezer, Gigi J.; Hauer, Peter; Mankowski, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is the most frequent neurologic complication in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It affects over one third of infected patients, including those receiving effective combination antiretroviral therapy. The pathogenesis of HIV-associated peripheral neuropathy (HIV-PN) remains poorly understood. Clinical studies are complicated because both HIV and antiretroviral treatment cause damage to the peripheral nervous system. To study HIV-induced peripheral nervous system (PNS) damage, a unique simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/pigtailed macaque model of HIV-PN that enabled detailed morphologic and functional evaluation of the somatosensory pathway throughout disease progression was developed. Studies in this model have demonstrated that SIV induces key pathologic features that closely resemble HIV-induced alterations, including inflammation and damage to the neuronal cell bodies in somatosensory ganglia and decreased epidermal nerve fiber density. Insights generated in the model include: finding that SIV alters the conduction properties of small, unmyelinated peripheral nerves; and that SIV impairs peripheral nerve regeneration. This review will highlight the major findings in the SIV-infected pigtailed macaque model of HIV-PN, and will illustrate the great value of a reliable large animal model to show the pathogenesis of this complex, HIV-induced disorder of the PNS. PMID:24615443

  9. Antigenic stimulation specifically reactivates the replication of archived simian immunodeficiency virus genomes in chronically infected macaques.

    PubMed

    Renoux, Céline; Wain-Hobson, Simon; Hurtrel, Bruno; Cheynier, Rémi

    2005-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) diversification is a direct consequence of viral replication and occurs principally in secondary lymphoid organs where CD4(+) T cells are activated and proliferate. However, the evolution of viral quasispecies may also be driven by various nonexclusive mechanisms, including adaptation to specific immune responses and modification of viral fitness. Analysis of viral quasispecies in SIV-infected macaques subjected to repeated antigenic stimulations allowed us to demonstrate transient expansions of SIV populations that were highly dependent upon activation of antigen-specific T cells. T-cell clones expanded in response to a particular antigen were infected by a specific viral population and persisted for prolonged periods. Upon a second stimulation by encounter with the same antigen, these specific genomes were at the origin of a new burst of replication, leading to rapid but transient replacement of the viral quasispecies in blood. Finally, longitudinal analysis of SIV sequence variation during and between antigenic stimulations revealed that viral evolution is mostly constrained to periods of strong immunological activity. PMID:16103175

  10. The cytoplasmic domain of simian immunodeficiency virus transmembrane protein modulates infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, L; Emerman, M; Tiollais, P; Sonigo, P

    1989-01-01

    A striking characteristic of the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) is the presence of a nonsense mutation in the env gene resulting in the synthesis of a truncated transmembrane protein lacking the cytoplasmic domain. By mutagenesis of an infectious molecular clone of SIVmac142, we investigated the function of the cytoplasmic domain and the significance of the env nonsense mutation. When the nonsense codon (TAG) was replaced by a glutamine codon (CAG), the virus infected HUT78 cells with markedly delayed kinetics. This negative effect was counterselected in vitro as reversion of the slow phenotype frequently occurred. The sequencing of one revertant revealed the presence of a new stop codon three nucleotides 5' to the original mutation. Deletions or an additional nonsense mutation introduced 3' to the original stop codon did not modify SIV infectivity. In contrast, the same deletions or nonsense mutation introduced in the clone in which the stop codon was replaced by CAG abolished infectivity. These results indicated that the envelope domain located 3' to the stop codon is not necessary for in vitro replication. However, the presence of this domain in SIV transmembrane protein leads to a reduced infectivity. This negative effect might correspond to a function controlling the rate of spread of the virus during in vivo infection. Images PMID:2778881

  11. CD4-independent, CCR5-dependent infection of brain capillary endothelial cells by a neurovirulent simian immunodeficiency virus strain

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, Aimee L.; Mankowski, Joseph L.; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Margulies, Barry J.; Lee, Benhur; Rucker, Joseph; Sharron, Matthew; Hoffman, Trevor L.; Berson, Joanne F.; Zink, M. Christine; Hirsch, Vanessa M.; Clements, Janice E.; Doms, Robert W.

    1997-01-01

    Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) are targets of CD4-independent infection by HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains in vitro and in vivo. Infection of BCECs may provide a portal of entry for the virus into the central nervous system and could disrupt blood–brain barrier function, contributing to the development of AIDS dementia. We found that rhesus macaque BCECs express chemokine receptors involved in HIV and SIV entry including CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4, and STRL33, but not CCR2b, GPR1, or GPR15. Infection of BCECs by the neurovirulent strain SIV/17E-Fr was completely inhibited by aminooxypentane regulation upon activation, normal T cell expression and secretion in the presence or absence of ligands, but not by eotaxin or antibodies to CD4. We found that the envelope (env) proteins from SIV/17E-Fr and several additional SIV strains mediated cell–cell fusion and virus infection with CD4-negative, CCR5-positive cells. In contrast, fusion with cells expressing the coreceptors STRL33, GPR1, and GPR15 was CD4-dependent. These results show that CCR5 can serve as a primary receptor for SIV in BCECs and suggest a possible CD4-independent mechanism for blood–brain barrier disruption and viral entry into the central nervous system. PMID:9405683

  12. Differential Dynamics of CD4+ and CD8+ T-Lymphocyte Proliferation and Activation in Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Amitinder; Hale, Corrina L.; Ramanujan, Saroja; Jain, Rakesh K.; Johnson, R. Paul

    2000-01-01

    Although lymphocyte turnover in chronic human immunodeficiency virus and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection has been extensively studied, there is little information on turnover in acute infection. We carried out a prospective kinetic analysis of lymphocyte proliferation in 13 rhesus macaques inoculated with pathogenic SIV. A short-lived dramatic increase in circulating Ki-67+ lymphocytes observed at 1 to 4 weeks was temporally related to the onset of SIV replication. A 5- to 10-fold increase in Ki-67+ CD8+ T lymphocytes and a 2- to 3-fold increase in Ki-67+ CD3− CD8+ natural killer cells accounted for >85% of proliferating lymphocytes at peak proliferation. In contrast, there was little change in the percentage of Ki-67+ CD4+ T lymphocytes during acute infection, although transient increases in Ki-67− and Ki-67+ CD4+ T lymphocytes expressing CD69, Fas, and HLA-DR were observed. A two- to fourfold decline in CD4+ T lymphocytes expressing CD25 and CD69 was seen later in SIV infection. The majority of Ki-67+ CD8+ T lymphocytes were phenotypically CD45RA− CD49dhi Fashi CD25− CD69− CD28− HLA-DR− and persisted at levels twofold above baseline 6 months after SIV infection. Increased CD8+ T-lymphocyte proliferation was associated with cell expansion, paralleled the onset of SIV-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity, and had an oligoclonal component. Thus, divergent patterns of proliferation and activation are exhibited by CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in early SIV infection and may determine how these cells are differentially affected in AIDS. PMID:10954541

  13. Early- and Intermediate-Stage Variants of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Replicate Efficiently in Cells Lacking CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Forte, Serene; Harmon, Mary-Elizabeth; Pineda, Mario J.; Overbaugh, Julie

    2003-01-01

    Primate lentiviruses are thought to use the chemokine receptor CCR5 as the major coreceptor for entry into cells. Here we show that some variants of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replicate efficiently in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) lacking a functional CCR5. There were differences in the replication patterns of sequential variants that evolved during SIVMne infection; the late-stage pathogenic variants were unable to replicate in PBMCs lacking CCR5, whereas the early- and intermediate-stage viruses replicated as well in PBMCs lacking CCR5 as they did in cells with wild-type CCR5. The coreceptor specificities of these sequential variants were compared using indicator cell lines expressing known SIV coreceptors. Among the known SIV coreceptors, there were none that were functional for the early and intermediate variants but not the late-stage variants, suggesting that the coreceptor used for replication in PBMCs may be a coreceptor that has not yet been described. Because some variants replicate with high efficiency in peripheral blood cells using this as yet uncharacterized cellular receptor, this coreceptor may be important for viral entry of some target cell populations in the host. PMID:12915585

  14. Host cell species-specific effect of cyclosporine A on simian immunodeficiency virus replication

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An understanding of host cell factors that affect viral replication contributes to elucidation of the mechanism for determination of viral tropism. Cyclophilin A (CypA), a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase), is a host factor essential for efficient replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in human cells. However, the role of cyclophilins in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication has not been determined. In the present study, we examined the effect of cyclosporine A (CsA), a PPIase inhibitor, on SIV replication. Results SIV replication in human CEM-SS T cells was not inhibited but rather enhanced by treatment with CsA, which inhibited HIV-1 replication. CsA treatment of target human cells enhanced an early step of SIV replication. CypA overexpression enhanced the early phase of HIV-1 but not SIV replication, while CypA knock-down resulted in suppression of HIV-1 but not SIV replication in CEM-SS cells, partially explaining different sensitivities of HIV-1 and SIV replication to CsA treatment. In contrast, CsA treatment inhibited SIV replication in macaque T cells; CsA treatment of either virus producer or target cells resulted in suppression of SIV replication. SIV infection was enhanced by CypA overexpression in macaque target cells. Conclusions CsA treatment enhanced SIV replication in human T cells but abrogated SIV replication in macaque T cells, implying a host cell species-specific effect of CsA on SIV replication. Further analyses indicated a positive effect of CypA on SIV infection into macaque but not into human T cells. These results suggest possible contribution of CypA to the determination of SIV tropism. PMID:22225545

  15. IL-21-producer CD4+ T cell kinetics during primary simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shoi; Seki, Sayuri; Matano, Tetsuro; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    IL-21 signaling is important for T cell and B cell-mediated clearance of chronic viral infections. While non-cognate follicular helper CD4+ T cells (TFH) are indicated to be pivotal in providing IL-21-mediated help to activated B cells within germinal centers, how this signaling may be disrupted in early AIDS virus infection is not clear. In this study, we assessed the lineage and kinetics of peripheral blood IL-21-producing CD4+ T cells in primary simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of rhesus macaques. After SIV challenge, antigen-nonspecific IL-21 production was observed in Th1, Th2 and Th17 cells with Th1 dominance. While IL-21+ Th2 and IL-21+ Th17 showed variable kinetics, an increase in total IL-21+ CD4+ T cells and IL-21+ Th1 from week 3 to week 8 was observed, preceding plasma SIV-specific IgG development from week 5 to week 12. SIV Gag-specific IL-21+ CD4+ T cells detectable at week 2 were decreased in frequencies at week 5. Results imply that kinetics of IL-21+ CD4+ T cells comprised of multiple lineages, potentially targeted by SIV with a bias of existing frequencies during their precursor stage, associate with availability of cooperative B-cell help provided through a proportionate precursor pool developing into TFH and subsequent anti-SIV antibody responses. PMID:23791954

  16. Whole body positron emission tomography imaging of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaques.

    PubMed Central

    Scharko, A M; Perlman, S B; Hinds PW2nd; Hanson, J M; Uno, H; Pauza, C D

    1996-01-01

    Pathogenesis of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in rhesus macaques begins with acute viremia and then progresses to a distributed infection in the solid lymphoid tissues, which is followed by a process of cellular destruction leading to terminal disease and death. Blood and tissue specimens show the progress of infection at the cellular level but do not reveal the pattern of infection and host responses occurring throughout the body. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with intravenous 2-18F-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) could identify activated lymphoid tissues in a living animal and whether this pattern would reflect the extent of SIV infection. PET images from SIV-infected animals were distinguishable from uninfected controls and revealed a pattern consistent with widespread lymphoid tissue activation. Significant FDG accumulation in colon along with mesenteric and ileocaecal lymph nodes was found in SIV infection, especially during terminal disease stages. Areas of elevated FDG uptake in the PET images were correlated with productive SIV infection using in situ hybridization as a test for virus replication. PET-FDG images of SIV-infected animals correlated sites of virus replication with high FDG accumulation. These data show that the method can be used to evaluate the distribution and activity of infected tissues in a living animal without biopsy. Fewer tissues had high FDG uptake in terminal animals than midstage animals, and both were clearly distinguishable from uninfected animal scans. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8692831

  17. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Variants That Differ in Pathogenicity Differ in Fitness under Rapid Cell Turnover Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Voronin, Yegor; Overbaugh, Julie; Emerman, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) has been shown to progress through a number of changes that lead to the emergence of pathogenic viral variants in macaques initially infected with a mildly cytopathic variant, SIVMneCL8. One of these late-stage isolates, SIVMne170, replicates to high levels in vivo and causes a rapid disease course when reintroduced into naïve macaques, resulting in a viral set point up to 3,000-fold higher than the set point of the parental virus, SIVMneCL8. However, in cell culture both viruses replicate with similar kinetics. One major difference between in vivo and in vitro cultures is the life span of the infected cells. Here, we manipulated the life span of infected cells in vitro, and we show that the fitness of SIVMne170 in cultures with a limited cell life span dramatically increased compared to its fitness in cultures with a nonlimited life span of cells. The increase in fitness was at least partially due to the fact that the rapid turnover system eliminates the negative influence of the cytopathic effects associated with replication of SIVMne170. Because the relative fitness of SIVMneCL8 and SIVMne170 observed in the rapid turnover system more accurately reflects their fitness in vivo, the system represents an improved approach to comparing relative fitness of viruses. PMID:16306580

  18. Simian immunodeficiency virus selectively infects proliferating CD4+ T cells in neonatal rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolei; Xu, Huanbin; Pahar, Bapi; Alvarez, Xavier; Green, Linda C.; Dufour, Jason; Moroney-Rasmussen, Terri; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2010-01-01

    Infants infected with HIV have a more severe course of disease and persistently higher viral loads than HIV-infected adults. However, the underlying pathogenesis of this exacerbation remains obscure. Here we compared the rate of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell proliferation in intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues of neonatal and adult rhesus macaques, and of normal and age-matched simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)–infected neonates. The results demonstrate infant primates have much greater rates of CD4+ T-cell proliferation than adult macaques, and that these proliferating, recently “activated” CD4+ T cells are infected in intestinal and other lymphoid tissues of neonates, resulting in selective depletion of proliferating CD4+ T cells in acute infection. This depletion is accompanied by a marked increase in CD8+ T-cell activation and production, particularly in the intestinal tract. The data indicate intestinal CD4+ T cells of infant primates have a markedly accelerated rate of proliferation and maturation resulting in more rapid and sustained production of optimal target cells (activated memory CD4+ T cells), which may explain the sustained “peak” viremia characteristic of pediatric HIV infection. Eventual failure of CD4+ T-cell turnover in intestinal tissues may indicate a poorer prognosis for HIV-infected infants. PMID:20716768

  19. A truncated form of Nef selected during pathogenic reversion of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239Deltanef increases viral replication.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Lisa A; Metzner, Karin J; Ivanovic, Tijana; Cheng, Hua; Louis-Virelizier, Jean; Connor, Ruth I; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia

    2003-01-01

    The live, attenuated vaccine simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239Deltanef efficiently protects rhesus macaques against infection with wild-type SIVmac but occasionally causes CD4(+) T-cell depletion and progression to simian AIDS (SAIDS). Virus recovered from a vaccinated macaque (Rh1490) that progressed to SAIDS had acquired an additional deletion in the nef gene, resulting in a frameshift that restored the original nef open reading frame (R. I. Connor, D. C. Montefiori, J. M. Binley, J. P. Moore, S. Bonhoeffer, A. Gettie, E. A. Fenamore, K. E. Sheridan, D. D. Ho, P. J. Dailey, and P. A. Marx, J. Virol. 72:7501-7509, 1998). Intravenous inoculation of the Rh1490 viral isolate into four naive rhesus macaques induced CD4(+) T-cell depletion and disease in three out of four animals within 2 years, indicating a restoration of virulence. A DNA fragment encompassing the truncated nef gene amplified from the Rh1490 isolate was inserted into the genetic backbone of SIVmac239. The resulting clone, SIVmac239-Delta2nef, expressed a Nef protein of approximately 23 kDa, while the original SIVmac239Deltanef clone expressed a shorter protein of 8 kDa. The revertant form of Nef did not cause downregulation of CD4, CD3, or major histocompatibility complex class I. The infectivity of SIVmac239-Delta2nef was similar to that of SIVmac239Deltanef in single-cycle assays using indicator cell lines. In contrast, SIVmac239-Delta2nef replicated more efficiently than SIVmac239Deltanef in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures infected under unstimulated conditions. The p27 Gag antigen levels in SIVmac239-Delta2nef-infected cultures were still lower than those obtained with wild-type SIVmac239, consistent with a partial recovery of Nef function. The transcriptional activity of long terminal repeat (LTR)-luciferase constructs containing the nef deletions did not differ markedly from that of wild-type LTR. Introduction of a premature stop codon within Nef-Delta2 abolished the

  20. Capture and Transfer of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus by Macaque Dendritic Cells Is Enhanced by DC-SIGN

    PubMed Central

    Yu Kimata, Monica T.; Cella, Marina; Biggins, Julia E.; Rorex, Colin; White, Robert; Hicks, Sarah; Wilson, Joelle M.; Patel, Parul G.; Allan, Jonathan S.; Colonna, Marco; Kimata, Jason T.

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are among the first cells encountered by human and simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV and SIV) following mucosal infection. Because these cells efficiently capture and transmit virus to T cells, they may play a major role in mediating HIV and SIV infection. Recently, a C-type lectin protein present on DCs, DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), was shown to efficiently bind and present HIV and SIV to CD4+, coreceptor-positive cells in trans. However, the significance of DC-SIGN for virus transmission and pathogenesis in vivo remains unclear. Because SIV infection of macaques may represent the best model to study the importance of DC-SIGN in HIV infection, we cloned and characterized pig-tailed macaque DC-SIGN and generated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against it. We demonstrate that, like human DC-SIGN, pig-tailed macaque DC-SIGN (ptDC-SIGN) is expressed on DCs and macrophages but not on monocytes, T cells, or B cells. Moderate levels of ptDC-SIGN expression were detected on the surface of DCs, and low-level expression was found on macrophages. Additionally, we show that ptDC-SIGN efficiently binds and transmits replication-competent SIVmne variants to CD4+, coreceptor-positive cells. Moreover, transmission of virus between pig-tailed macaque DCs and CD4+ T cells is largely ptDC-SIGN dependent. Interestingly, MAbs directed against ptDC-SIGN vary in the capacity to block transmission of different SIVmne variants. These data demonstrate that ptDC-SIGN plays a central role in transmitting virus from macaque DCs to T cells, and they suggest that SIVmne variants may differ in their interactions with ptDC-SIGN. Thus, SIVmne infection of pig-tailed macaques may provide an opportunity to investigate the significance of DC-SIGN in primate lentiviral infections. PMID:12414925

  1. Cloning and Analysis of Sooty Mangabey Alternative Coreceptors That Support Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVsmm Entry Independently of CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Sarah T. C.; Riddick, Nadeene E.; Francella, Nicholas; Paiardini, Mirko; Vanderford, Thomas H.; Li, Bing; Apetrei, Cristian; Sodora, Donald L.; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Silvestri, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Natural host sooty mangabeys (SM) infected with simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsmm do not develop AIDS despite high viremia. SM and other natural hosts express very low levels of CCR5 on CD4+ T cells, and we recently showed that SIVsmm infection and robust replication occur in vivo in SM genetically lacking CCR5, indicating the use of additional entry pathways. SIVsmm uses several alternative coreceptors of human origin in vitro, but which molecules of SM origin support entry is unknown. We cloned a panel of putative coreceptors from SM and tested their ability to mediate infection, in conjunction with smCD4, by pseudotypes carrying Envs from multiple SIVsmm subtypes. smCXCR6 supported efficient infection by all SIVsmm isolates with entry levels comparable to those for smCCR5, and smGPR15 enabled entry by all isolates at modest levels. smGPR1 and smAPJ supported low and variable entry, whereas smCCR2b, smCCR3, smCCR4, smCCR8, and smCXCR4 were not used by most isolates. In contrast, SIVsmm from rare infected SM with profound CD4+ T cell loss, previously reported to have expanded use of human coreceptors, including CXCR4, used smCXCR4, smCXCR6, and smCCR5 efficiently and also exhibited robust entry through smCCR3, smCCR8, smGPR1, smGPR15, and smAPJ. Entry was similar with both known alleles of smCD4. These alternative coreceptors, particularly smCXCR6 and smGPR15, may support virus replication in SM that have restricted CCR5 expression as well as SM genetically lacking CCR5. Defining expression of these molecules on SM CD4+ subsets may delineate distinct natural host target cell populations capable of supporting SIVsmm replication without CD4+ T cell loss. PMID:22090107

  2. Molecular Evolution Analysis of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope in Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques: Implications for Challenge Dose Selection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Mariana; Landskron, Lisa; Lai, Rachel P. J.; McKinley, Trevelyan J.; Bogers, Willy M.; Verschoor, Ernst J.; Dubbes, Rob; Barnett, Susan W.; Frost, Simon D. W.; Heeney, Jonathan L.

    2011-01-01

    Since the demonstration that almost 80% of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections result from the transmission of a single variant from the donor, biological features similar to those of HIV mucosal transmission have been reported for macaques inoculated with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Here we describe the early diversification events and the impact of challenge doses on viral kinetics and on the number of variants transmitted in macaques infected with the chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus SHIVsf162p4. We show that there is a correlation between the dose administered and the number of variants transmitted and that certain inoculum variants are preferentially transmitted. This could provide insight into the viral determinants of transmission and could aid in vaccine development. Challenge through the mucosal route with high doses results in the transmission of multiple variants in all the animals. Such an unrealistic scenario could underestimate potential intervention measures. We thus propose the use of molecular evolution analysis to aid in the determination of challenge doses that better mimic the transmission dynamics seen in natural HIV-1 infection. PMID:21795341

  3. The effects of an ActRIIb receptor Fc fusion protein ligand trap in juvenile simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Karyn E.; Guo, Wen; Serra, Carlo; Beck, Matthew; Wachtman, Lynn; Hoggatt, Amber; Xia, Dongling; Pearson, Chris; Knight, Heather; O’Connell, Micheal; Miller, Andrew D.; Westmoreland, Susan V.; Bhasin, Shalender

    2015-01-01

    There are no approved therapies for muscle wasting in children infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which portends poor disease outcomes. To determine whether a soluble ActRIIb receptor Fc fusion protein (ActRIIB.Fc), a ligand trap for TGF-β/activin family members including myostatin, can prevent or restore loss of lean body mass and body weight in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected juvenile rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Fourteen pair-housed, juvenile male rhesus macaques were inoculated with SIVmac239 and, 4 wk postinoculation (WPI) treated with intramuscular injections of 10 mg ⋅ kg−1 ⋅ wk−1 ActRIIB.Fc or saline placebo. Body weight, lean body mass, SIV titers, and somatometric measurements were assessed monthly for 16 wk. Age-matched SIV-infected rhesus macaques were injected with saline. Intervention groups did not differ at baseline. Gains in lean mass were significantly greater in the ActRIIB.Fc group than in the placebo group (P < 0.001). Administration of ActRIIB.Fc was associated with greater gains in body weight (P = 0.01) and upper arm circumference than placebo. Serum CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts and SIV copy numbers did not differ between groups. Administration of ActRIIB.Fc was associated with higher muscle expression of myostatin than placebo. ActRIIB.Fc effectively blocked and reversed loss of body weight, lean mass, and fat mass in juvenile SIV-infected rhesus macaques.—O’Connell, K. E., Guo, W., Serra, C., Beck, M., Wachtman, L., Hoggatt, A., Xia, D., Pearson, C., Knight, H., O’Connell, M., Miller, A. D., Westmoreland, S. V., Bhasin, S. The effects of an ActRIIb receptor Fc fusion protein ligand trap in juvenile simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaques. PMID:25466897

  4. Accumulation of functionally immature myeloid dendritic cells in lymph nodes of rhesus macaques with acute pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Wijewardana, Viskam; Bouwer, Anthea L; Brown, Kevin N; Liu, Xiangdong; Barratt-Boyes, Simon M

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) are key mediators of innate and adaptive immunity to virus infection, but the impact of HIV infection on the mDC response, particularly early in acute infection, is ill-defined. We studied acute pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of rhesus macaques to address this question. The mDC in blood and bone marrow were depleted within 12 days of intravenous infection with SIVmac251, associated with a marked proliferative response. In lymph nodes, mDC were apoptotic, activated and proliferating, despite normal mDC numbers, reflecting a regenerative response that compensated for mDC loss. Blood mDC had increased expression of MHC class II, CCR7 and CD40, whereas in lymph nodes these markers were significantly decreased, indicating that acute infection induced maturation of mDC in blood but resulted in accumulation of immature mDC in lymph nodes. Following SIV infection, lymph node mDC had an increased capacity to secrete tumour necrosis factor-α upon engagement with a Toll-like receptor 7/8 ligand that mimics exposure to viral RNA, and this was inversely correlated with MHC class II and CCR7 expression. Lymph node mDC had an increased ability to capture and cleave soluble antigen, confirming their functionally immature state. These data indicate that acute SIV infection results in increased mDC turnover, leading to accumulation in lymph nodes of immature mDC with an increased responsiveness to virus stimulation. PMID:24684292

  5. Variable course of primary simian immunodeficiency virus infection in lymph nodes: relation to disease progression.

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, L; Cumont, M C; Montagnier, L; Hurtrel, B

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the dynamics of spread of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in the lymphoid organs, we sequentially analyzed the viral burden in lymph nodes (LN) of eight rhesus macaques inoculated intravenously with a high or low dose of the pathogenic SIVmac 251 isolate. For each animal, four axillary or inguinal LN were collected during the first weeks of infection and a fifth LN was taken 6 or 8 months later to estimate disease progression. Measurement of SIV RNA by in situ hybridization showed that all of the macaques studied had a phase of acute viral replication in LN between 7 and 14 days postinoculation which paralleled that observed in the blood. In a second phase, productive infection was controlled and viral particles were trapped in the germinal centers that developed in LN. While the peaks of productive infection were similar for the eight animals, marked differences in the numbers of productively infected cells that persisted in LN after primary infection were seen. Differences were less pronounced in the blood, where productive infection was efficiently controlled in all cases. The persistence of productively infected cells in LN after primary infection was found to be associated with more rapid disease progression, as measured by the decrease of the T4/T8 ratio and the occurrence of clinical signs. However, the persistence of a significant level of viral particles in germinal centers was observed even in animals that remained healthy over a 1- to 2-year observation period. This study indicates that the course of primary SIV infection in LN is variable, and it suggests that the initial capacity of the host to control productive infection in LN may determine the rate of disease progression. Images PMID:7916061

  6. Adaptive evolution of simian immunodeficiency viruses isolated from two conventional progressor macaques with neuroaids

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Brian T; Korber, Bette T

    2008-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus infection of macaques may result in neuroAIDS, a feature more commonly observed in macaques with rapid progressive disease than in those with conventional disease. This is the first report of two conventional progressors (H631 and H636) with encephalitis in rhesus macaques inoculated with a derivative of SIVsmES43-3. Phylogenetic analyses of viruses isolated from the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from both animals demonstrated tissue compartmentalization. Additionally, virus from the central nervous system (CNS) was able to infect primary macaque monocyte-derived macrophages more efficiently than virus from plasma. Conversely, virus isolated from plasma was able to replicate better in peripheral blood mononuclear cells than virus from CNS. We speculate that these viruses were under different selective pressures in their separate compartments. Furthermore, these viruses appear to have undergone adaptive evolution to preferentially replicate in their respective cell targets. Analysis of the number of potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGS) in gp160 showed that there was a statistically significant loss of PNGS in viruses isolated from CNS in both macaques compared to SIVsmE543-3. Moreover, virus isolated from the brain in H631, had statistically significant loss of PNGS compared to virus isolated from CSF and plasma of the same animal. It is possible that the brain isolate may have adapted to decrease the number of PNGS given that humoral immune selection pressure is less likely to be encountered in the brain. These viruses provide a relevant model to study the adaptations required for SIV to induce encephalitis.

  7. Normal T-cell turnover in sooty mangabeys harboring active simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, L A; Lewin, S R; Zhang, L; Gettie, A; Luckay, A; Martin, L N; Skulsky, E; Ho, D D; Cheng-Mayer, C; Marx, P A

    2000-02-01

    Sooty mangabeys naturally infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) remain healthy though they harbor viral loads comparable to those in rhesus macaques that progress to AIDS. To assess the immunologic basis of disease resistance in mangabeys, we compared the effect of SIV infection on T-cell regeneration in both monkey species. Measurement of the proliferation marker Ki-67 by flow cytometry showed that mangabeys harbored proliferating T cells at a level of 3 to 4% in peripheral blood irrespective of their infection status. In contrast, rhesus macaques demonstrated a naturally high fraction of proliferating T cells (7%) that increased two- to threefold following SIV infection. Ki-67(+) T cells were predominantly CD45RA(-), indicating increased proliferation of memory cells in macaques. Quantitation of an episomal DNA product of T-cell receptor alpha rearrangement (termed alpha1 circle) showed that the concentration of recent thymic emigrants in blood decreased with age over a 2-log unit range in both monkey species, consistent with age-related thymic involution. SIV infection caused a limited decrease of alpha1 circle numbers in mangabeys as well as in macaques. Dilution of alpha1 circles by T-cell proliferation likely contributed to this decrease, since alpha1 circle numbers and Ki-67(+) fractions correlated negatively. These findings are compatible with immune exhaustion mediated by abnormal T-cell proliferation, rather than with early thymic failure, in SIV-infected macaques. Normal T-cell turnover in SIV-infected mangabeys provides an explanation for the long-term maintenance of a functional immune system in these hosts. PMID:10627531

  8. Biological, molecular, and structural analysis of a cytopathic variant from a molecularly cloned simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    LaBranche, C C; Sauter, M M; Haggarty, B S; Vance, P J; Romano, J; Hart, T K; Bugelski, P J; Hoxie, J A

    1994-01-01

    Some isolates of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) have been shown to infect Sup-T1 cells with slow kinetics and in the absence of cytopathic effects, including cell fusion or CD4 down-modulation (J. A. Hoxie, B. S. Haggarty, S. Bonser, J. Rackowski, H. Shan, and P. Kanki, J. Virol. 62:2557-2568, 1988). In the present study, we describe the isolation and characterization of a SIVmac variant, derived from the BK28 infectious molecular clone, that became highly cytopathic for Sup-T1 cells. This variant, termed CP-MAC, exhibited a number of differences from BK28, including (i) an altered tropism which largely restricted its host range to Sup-T1 cells, (ii) the ability to induce cell fusion and CD4 down-modulation, and (iii) a highly stable interaction of its external (SU) and transmembrane (TM) envelope glycoproteins. In addition, a marked increase in the level of surface envelope glycoproteins was observed both on CP-MAC-infected cells and on virions. The CP-MAC env gene was PCR amplified from infected cells, and sequence analysis identified five amino acid changes in SU and six in TM compared with BK28. The introduction of these changes into BK28 was shown to fully reconstitute the biological and morphological properties of CP-MAC. The limited number of mutations in CP-MAC should enable the molecular determinants to be more precisely defined and help to identify the underlying mechanisms responsible for the striking biological and structural alterations exhibited by this virus. Images PMID:8057433

  9. Incomplete protection, but suppression of virus burden, elicited by subunit simian immunodeficiency virus vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Z R; Edmonson, P F; Maul, D H; O'Neil, S P; Mossman, S P; Thiriart, C; Fabry, L; Van Opstal, O; Bruck, C; Bex, F

    1994-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of immunization with either simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Env glycoprotein (Env), Env plus Gag proteins (Gag-Env), or whole inactivated virus (WIV), with or without recombinant live vaccinia vector (VV) priming, in protecting 23 rhesus macaques (six vaccine and two control groups) from challenge with SIVmac251 clone BK28. Vaccination elicited high titers of syncytium-inhibiting and anti-Env (gp120/gp160) antibodies in all vaccinated macaques and anti-Gag (p27) antibodies in groups immunized with WIV or Gag-Env. Only WIV-immunized macaques developed anticell (HuT78) antibodies. After homologous low-dose intravenous virus challenge, we used frequency of virus isolation, provirus burden, and change in antibody titers to define four levels of resistance to SIV infection as follows. (i) No infection ("sterilizing" immunity) was induced only in WIV-immunized animals. (ii) Abortive infection (strong immunity) was defined when virus or provirus were detected early in the postchallenge period but not thereafter and no evidence of virus or provirus was detected in terminal tissues. This response was observed in two animals (one VV-Env and one Gag-Env). (iii) Suppression of infection (incomplete or partial immunity) described a gradient of virus suppression manifested by termination of viremia, declining postchallenge antibody titers, and low levels (composite mean = 9.1 copies per 10(6) cells) of provirus detectable in peripheral blood mononuclear cells or lymphoid tissues at termination (40 weeks postchallenge). This response occurred in the majority (8 of 12) of subunit-vaccinated animals. (iv) Active infection (no immunity) was characterized by persistent virus isolation from blood mononuclear cells, increasing viral antibody titers postchallenge, and high levels (composite mean = 198 copies per 10(6) cells) of provirus in terminal tissues and blood. Active infection developed in all controls and two of three VV-Gag-Env-immunized animals

  10. Characterization of Primary Isolate-Like Variants of Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, John M.; Earl, Patricia L.; Moss, Bernard; Reimann, Keith A.; Wyand, Michael S.; Manson, Kelledy H.; Bilska, Miroslawa; Zhou, Jin Tao; Pauza, C. David; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Burton, Dennis R.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Letvin, Norman L.; Montefiori, David C.

    1999-01-01

    Several different strains of simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) that contain the envelope glycoproteins of either T-cell-line-adapted (TCLA) strains or primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are now available. One of the advantages of these chimeric viruses is their application to studies of HIV-1-specific neutralizing antibodies in preclinical AIDS vaccine studies in nonhuman primates. In this regard, an important consideration is the spectrum of antigenic properties exhibited by the different envelope glycoproteins used for SHIV construction. The antigenic properties of six SHIV variants were characterized here in neutralization assays with recombinant soluble CD4 (rsCD4), monoclonal antibodies, and serum samples from SHIV-infected macaques and HIV-1-infected individuals. Neutralization of SHIV variants HXBc2, KU2, 89.6, and 89.6P by autologous and heterologous sera from SHIV-infected macaques was restricted to an extent that these viruses may be considered heterologous to one another in their major neutralization determinants. Little or no variation was seen in the neutralization determinants on SHIV variants 89.6P, 89.6PD, and SHIV-KB9. Neutralization of SHIV HXBc2 by sera from HXBc2-infected macaques could be blocked with autologous V3-loop peptide; this was less true in the case of SHIV 89.6 and sera from SHIV 89.6-infected macaques. The poorly immunogenic but highly conserved epitope for monoclonal antibody IgG1b12 was a target for neutralization on SHIV variants HXBc2, KU2, and 89.6 but not on 89.6P and KB9. The 2G12 epitope was a target for neutralization on all five SHIV variants. SHIV variants KU2, 89.6, 89.6P, 89.6PD, and KB9 exhibited antigenic properties characteristic of primary isolates by being relatively insensitive to neutralization in peripheral blood mononuclear cells with serum samples from HIV-1-infected individuals and 12-fold to 38-fold less sensitive to inhibition with recombinant soluble CD4 than TCLA

  11. Foci of Endemic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Wild-Living Eastern Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii)

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Mario L.; Lukasik, Magdalena; Kamenya, Shadrack; Li, Yingying; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Bailes, Elizabeth; Muller, Martin N.; Emery, Melissa; Goldenberg, David A.; Lwanga, Jeremiah S.; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Nerrienet, Eric; McClure, Harold M.; Heeney, Jonathan L.; Watts, David P.; Pusey, Anne E.; Collins, D. Anthony; Wrangham, Richard W.; Goodall, Jane; Brookfield, John F. Y.; Sharp, Paul M.; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2003-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus of chimpanzees (SIVcpz) is the immediate precursor to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), yet remarkably, the distribution and prevalence of SIVcpz in wild ape populations are unknown. Studies of SIVcpz infection rates in wild chimpanzees are complicated by the species' endangered status and by its geographic location in remote areas of sub-Saharan Africa. We have developed sensitive and specific urine and fecal tests for SIVcpz antibody and virion RNA (vRNA) detection and describe herein the first comprehensive prevalence study of SIVcpz infection in five wild Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii communities in east Africa. In Kibale National Park in Uganda, 31 (of 52) members of the Kanyawara community and 39 (of ∼145) members of the Ngogo community were studied; none were found to be positive for SIVcpz infection. In Gombe National Park in Tanzania, 15 (of 20) members of the Mitumba community, 51 (of 55) members of the Kasekela community, and at least 10 (of ∼20) members of the Kalande community were studied. Seven individuals were SIVcpz antibody and/or vRNA positive, and two others had indeterminate antibody results. Based on assay sensitivities and the numbers and types of specimens analyzed, we estimated the prevalence of SIVcpz infection to be 17% in Mitumba (95% confidence interval, 10 to 40%), 5% in Kasekela (95% confidence interval, 4 to 7%), and 30% in Kalande (95% confidence interval, 15 to 60%). For Gombe as a whole, the SIVcpz prevalence was estimated to be 13% (95% confidence interval, 7 to 25%). SIVcpz infection was confirmed in five chimpanzees by PCR amplification of partial pol and gp41/nef sequences which revealed a diverse group of viruses that formed a monophyletic lineage within the SIVcpzPts radiation. Although none of the 70 Kibale chimpanzees tested SIVcpz positive, we estimated the likelihood that a 10% or higher prevalence existed but went undetected because of sampling and assay limitations; this

  12. Amplification of a Complete Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Genome from Fecal RNA of a Wild Chimpanzee

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Mario L.; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Bailes, Elizabeth; Kamenya, Shadrack; Muller, Martin N.; Lukasik, Magdalena; Pusey, Anne E.; Collins, D. Anthony; Wrangham, Richard W.; Goodall, Jane; Shaw, George M.; Sharp, Paul M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2003-01-01

    Current knowledge of the genetic diversity of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVcpz) infection of wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) is incomplete since few isolates, mostly from captive apes from Cameroon and Gabon, have been characterized; yet this information is critical for understanding the origins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and the circumstances leading to the HIV-1 pandemic. Here, we report the first full-length SIVcpz sequence (TAN1) from a wild chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) from Gombe National Park (Tanzania), which was obtained noninvasively by amplification of virion RNA from fecal samples collected under field conditions. Using reverse transcription-PCR and a combination of generic and strain-specific primers, we amplified 13 subgenomic fragments which together spanned the entire TAN1 genome (9,326 bp). Distance and phylogenetic tree analyses identified TAN1 unambiguously as a member of the HIV-1/SIVcpz group of viruses but also revealed an extraordinary degree of divergence from all previously characterized SIVcpz and HIV-1 strains. In Gag, Pol, and Env proteins, TAN1 differed from west-central African SIVcpz and HIV-1 strains on average by 36, 30, and 51% of amino acid sequences, respectively, approaching distance values typically found for SIVs from different primate species. The closest relative was SIVcpzANT, also from a P. t. schweinfurthii ape, which differed by 30, 25, and 44%, respectively, in these same protein sequences but clustered with TAN1 in all major coding regions in a statistically highly significant manner. These data indicate that east African chimpanzees, like those from west-central Africa, are naturally infected by SIVcpz but that their viruses comprise a second, divergent SIVcpz lineage which appears to have evolved in relative isolation for an extended period of time. Our data also demonstrate that noninvasive molecular epidemiological studies of SIVcpz in wild chimpanzees are feasible and that

  13. An env gene derived from a primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolate confers high in vivo replicative capacity to a chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, K A; Li, J T; Voss, G; Lekutis, C; Tenner-Racz, K; Racz, P; Lin, W; Montefiori, D C; Lee-Parritz, D E; Lu, Y; Collman, R G; Sodroski, J; Letvin, N L

    1996-01-01

    To explore the roles played by specific human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genes in determining the in vivo replicative capacity of AIDS viruses, we have examined the replication kinetics and virus-specific immune responses in rhesus monkeys following infection with two chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs). These viruses were composed of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239 expressing HIV-1 env and the associated auxiliary HIV-1 genes tat, vpu, and rep. Virus replication was assessed during primary infection of rhesus monkeys by measuring plasma SIVmac p27 levels and by quantifying virus replication in lymph nodes using in situ hybridization. SHIV-HXBc2, which expresses the HIV-1 env of a T-cell-tropic, laboratory-adapted strain of HIV-1 (HXBc2), replicated well in rhesus monkey peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) in vitro but replicated only to low levels when inoculated in rhesus monkeys. In contrast, SHIV-89.6 was constructed with the HIV-1 env gene of a T-cell- and macrophage-tropic clone of a patient isolate of HIV-1 (89.6). This virus replicated to a lower level in monkey PBL in vitro but replicated to a higher degree in monkeys during primary infection. Moreover, monkeys infected with SHIV-89.6 developed an inversion in the PBL CD4/CD8 ratio coincident with the clearance of primary viremia. The differences in the in vivo consequences of infection by these two SHIVs could not be explained by differences in the immune responses elicited by these viruses, since infected animals had comparable type-specific neutralizing antibody titers, proliferative responses to recombinant HIV-1 gp120, and virus-specific cytolytic effector T-cell responses. With the demonstration that a chimeric SHIV can replicate to high levels during primary infection in rhesus monkeys, this model can now be used to define genetic determinants of HIV-1 pathogenicity. PMID:8627800

  14. A Putative G Protein-Coupled Receptor, RDC1, Is a Novel Coreceptor for Human and Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Nobuaki; Soda, Yasushi; Kanbe, Katsuaki; Liu, Hui-yu; Mukai, Ryozaburo; Kitamura, Toshio; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2000-01-01

    More than 10 G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been shown to act as coreceptors for infection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). We have isolated HIV-1 variants infectious to primary brain-derived CD4-positive cells (BT-3 and BT-20/N) and U87/CD4 glioma cells that are resistant to T-cell line-tropic (T-tropic), macrophage-tropic (M-tropic), and T- and M-tropic (dualtropic) (X4, R5, and R5X4) HIV-1 strains. These primary brain-derived cells were also highly susceptible to HIV-2ROD, HIV-2SBL6669, and SIVmndGB-1. A factor or coreceptor that determines the susceptibility of these brain-derived cells to these HIV and SIV strains has not been fully identified. To identify this coreceptor, we examined amino acid sequences of all known HIV and SIV coreceptors and noticed that tyrosine residues are well conserved in their extracellular amino-terminal domains. By this criterion, we selected 18 GPCRs as candidates of coreceptors for HIV and SIV strains infectious to these brain-derived cells. mRNA expression of an orphan GPCR, RDC1, was detected in the brain-derived cells, the C8166 T-cell line, and peripheral blood lymphocytes, all of which are susceptible to HIV-1 variants, but not in macrophages, which are resistant to them. When a CD4-expressing cell line, NP-2/CD4, which shows strict resistance to infection not only with HIV-1 but also with HIV-2 or SIV, was transduced with the RDC1 gene, the cells became highly susceptible to HIV-2 and SIVmnd strains but to neither M- nor T-tropic HIV-1 strains. The cells also acquired a low susceptibility to the HIV-1 variants. These findings indicate that RDC1 is a novel coreceptor for several HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV strains which infect brain-derived cells. PMID:10623723

  15. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection of Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) Shares Features of Both Pathogenic and Non-pathogenic Lentiviral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Edward J. D.; Schmidt, Fabian; Kondova, Ivanela; Niphuis, Henk; Hodara, Vida L.; Clissold, Leah; McLay, Kirsten; Guerra, Bernadette; Redrobe, Sharon; Giavedoni, Luis D.; Lanford, Robert E.; Murthy, Krishna K.; Rouet, François; Heeney, Jonathan L.

    2015-01-01

    The virus-host relationship in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infected chimpanzees is thought to be different from that found in other SIV infected African primates. However, studies of captive SIVcpz infected chimpanzees are limited. Previously, the natural SIVcpz infection of one chimpanzee, and the experimental infection of six chimpanzees was reported, with limited follow-up. Here, we present a long-term study of these seven animals, with a retrospective re-examination of the early stages of infection. The only clinical signs consistent with AIDS or AIDS associated disease was thrombocytopenia in two cases, associated with the development of anti-platelet antibodies. However, compared to uninfected and HIV-1 infected animals, SIVcpz infected animals had significantly lower levels of peripheral blood CD4+ T-cells. Despite this, levels of T-cell activation in chronic infection were not significantly elevated. In addition, while plasma levels of β2 microglobulin, neopterin and soluble TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (sTRAIL) were elevated in acute infection, these markers returned to near-normal levels in chronic infection, reminiscent of immune activation patterns in ‘natural host’ species. Furthermore, plasma soluble CD14 was not elevated in chronic infection. However, examination of the secondary lymphoid environment revealed persistent changes to the lymphoid structure, including follicular hyperplasia in SIVcpz infected animals. In addition, both SIV and HIV-1 infected chimpanzees showed increased levels of deposition of collagen and increased levels of Mx1 expression in the T-cell zones of the lymph node. The outcome of SIVcpz infection of captive chimpanzees therefore shares features of both non-pathogenic and pathogenic lentivirus infections. PMID:26360709

  16. Type 3 innate lymphoid cell depletion is mediated by TLRs in lymphoid tissues of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Lackner, Andrew A; Veazey, Ronald S

    2015-12-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) type 3, also known as lymphoid tissue inducer cells, plays a major role in both the development and remodeling of organized lymphoid tissues and the maintenance of adaptive immune responses. HIV/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection causes breakdown of intestinal barriers resulting in microbial translocation, leading to systemic immune activation and disease progression. However, the effects of HIV/SIV infection on ILC3 are unknown. Here, we analyzed ILC3 from mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues in chronically SIV-infected macaques and uninfected controls. ILC3 cells were defined and identified in macaque lymphoid tissues as non-T, non-B (lineage-negative), c-Kit(+)IL-7Rα(+) (CD117(+)CD127(+)) cells. These ILC3 cells highly expressed CD90 (∼ 63%) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor and produced IL-17 (∼ 63%), IL-22 (∼ 36%), and TNF-α (∼ 72%) but did not coexpress CD4 or NK cell markers. The intestinal ILC3 cell loss correlated with the reduction of total CD4(+) T cells and T helper (Th)17 and Th22 cells in the gut during SIV infection (P < 0.001). Notably, ILC3 could be induced to undergo apoptosis by microbial products through the TLR2 (lipoteichoic acid) and/or TLR4 (LPS) pathway. These findings indicated that persistent microbial translocation may result in loss of ILC3 in lymphoid tissues in SIV-infected macaques, further contributing to the HIV-induced impairment of gut-associated lymphoid tissue structure and function, especially in mucosal tissues. PMID:26283536

  17. Chronic Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Administration May Not Attenuate Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Disease Progression in Female Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Amedee, Angela M.; Nichols, Whitney A.; LeCapitaine, Nicole J.; Stouwe, Curtis Vande; Birke, Leslie L.; Lacour, Nedra; Winsauer, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) frequently use cannabinoids, either recreationally by smoking marijuana or therapeutically (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol; Δ9-THC dronabinol). Previously, we demonstrated that chronic Δ9-THC administration decreases early mortality in male simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques. In this study, we sought to examine whether similar protective effects resulted from chronic cannabinoid administration in SIV-infected female rhesus macaques. Clinical and viral parameters were evaluated in eight female rhesus macaques that received either Δ9-THC (0.18–0.32 mg/kg, intramuscularly, twice daily) or vehicle (VEH) starting 28 days prior to intravenous inoculation with SIVmac251. SIV disease progression was assessed by changes in body weight, mortality, viral levels in plasma and mucosal sites, and lymphocyte subsets. In contrast to our results in male animals, chronic Δ9-THC did not protect SIV-infected female rhesus macaques from early mortality. Markers of SIV disease, including viral load and CD4+/CD8+ ratio, were not altered by Δ9-THC compared to control females; however, females that received chronic Δ9-THC did not gain as much weight as control animals. In addition, Δ9-THC administration increased total CXCR4 expression in both peripheral and duodenal CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes prior to SIV inoculation. Although protection from early mortality was not evident, chronic Δ9-THC did not affect clinical markers of SIV disease progression. The contrasting effects of chronic Δ9-THC in males versus females remain to be explained, but highlight the need for further studies to explore the sex-dependent effects of Δ9-THC and other cannabinoids on the HIV disease course and their implications for virus transmission. PMID:25113915

  18. Next-Generation mRNA Sequencing Reveals Pyroptosis-Induced CD4+ T Cell Death in Early Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Lymphoid Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wuxun; Demers, Andrew J.; Ma, Fangrui; Kang, Guobin; Yuan, Zhe; Wan, Yanmin; Li, Yue; Xu, Jianqing; Lewis, Mark

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lymphoid tissues (LTs) are the principal sites where human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replicates and virus-host interactions take place, resulting in immunopathology in the form of inflammation, immune activation, and CD4+ T cell death. The HIV-1 pathogenesis in LTs has been extensively studied; however, our understanding of the virus-host interactions in the very early stages of infection remains incomplete. We investigated virus-host interactions in the rectal draining lymph nodes (dLNs) of rhesus macaques at different times after intrarectal inoculation (days postinoculation [dpi]) with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). At 3 dpi, 103 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected using next-generation mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq). At 6 and 10 dpi, concomitant with increased SIV replication, 366 and 1,350 DEGs were detected, respectively, including upregulation of genes encoding proteins that play a role in innate antiviral immune responses, inflammation, and immune activation. Notably, genes (IFI16, caspase-1, and interleukin 1β [IL-1β]) in the canonical pyroptosis pathway were significantly upregulated in expression. We further validated increased pyroptosis using flow cytometry and found that the number of CD4+ T cells expressing activated caspase-1 protein, the hallmark of ongoing pyroptosis, were significantly increased, which is correlated with decreased CD4+ T cells in dLNs. Our results demonstrated that pyroptosis contributes to the CD4+ T cell death in vivo in early SIV infection, which suggests that pyroptosis may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of SIV, and by extension, that of HIV-1, since pyroptosis not only induces CD4+ T cell death but also amplifies inflammation and immune activation. Thus, blocking CD4+ T cell pyroptosis could be a complementary treatment to antiretroviral therapy. IMPORTANCE Although secondary lymphoid tissues (LTs) are principal sites of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication

  19. Acute Effects of Pathogenic Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge on Vaccine-Induced Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses to Gag in Rhesus Macaques†

    PubMed Central

    Steger, Krista K.; Waterman, Paul M.; Pauza, C. David

    1999-01-01

    Simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection in macaques provides a convenient model for testing vaccine efficacy and for understanding viral pathogenesis in AIDS. We immunized macaques with recombinant, Salmonella typhimurium (expressing Gag) or soluble Gag in adjuvant to generate T-cell-dependent lymphoproliferative or serum antibody responses. Immunized animals were challenged by intrarectal inoculation with SHIV89.6PD. Virus infection was accompanied by rapid losses of lymphoproliferative responses to Gag or phytohemagglutinin. By 8 weeks, mitogen responses recovered to near normal levels but antigen-specific immunity remained at low or undetectable levels. Serum antibody levels were elevated initially by virus exposure but soon dropped well below levels achieved by immunization. Our studies show a rapid depletion of preexisting Gag-specific CD4+ T cells that prevent or limit subsequent antiviral cellular and humoral immune responses during acute SHIV infection. PMID:9971763

  20. Effect of a cellulose acetate phthalate topical cream on vaginal transmission of simian immunodeficiency virus in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Manson, K H; Wyand, M S; Miller, C; Neurath, A R

    2000-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection continues to spread in developing countries, mostly through heterosexual transmission. The development of a safe and cost-effective topical microbicide, effective against a range of STDs including HIV-1, would greatly impact the ongoing epidemic. When formulated in a vehicle, a micronized form of cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP), which is an inactive pharmaceutical excipient, has been shown to inactivate HIV-1, herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, cytomegalovirus, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis, Haemophilus ducreyi, and Chlamydia trachomatis in vitro. Formulated CAP was also shown to be effective against herpes simplex virus type 2 in vivo. Here we show that a formulation of CAP protected four of six rhesus monkeys from vaginal infection with simian immunodeficiency virus. Thus, CAP may be a candidate for use as a topical microbicide for preventing HIV-1 infection in humans. PMID:11036053

  1. Animal model of mucosally transmitted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 disease: intravaginal and oral deposition of simian/human immunodeficiency virus in macaques results in systemic infection, elimination of CD4+ T cells, and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Joag, S V; Adany, I; Li, Z; Foresman, L; Pinson, D M; Wang, C; Stephens, E B; Raghavan, R; Narayan, O

    1997-05-01

    Chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) consists of the env, vpu, tat, and rev genes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on a background of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). We derived a SHIV that caused CD4+ cell loss and AIDS in pig-tailed macaques (S. V. Joag, Z. Li, L. Foresman, E. B. Stephens, L. J. Zhao, I. Adany, D. M. Pinson, H. M. McClure, and O. Narayan, J. Virol. 70:3189-3197, 1996) and used a cell-free stock of this virus (SHIV(KU-1)) to inoculate macaques by the intravaginal route. Macaques developed high virus burdens and severe loss of CD4+ cells within 1 month, even when inoculated with only a single animal infectious dose of the virus by the intravaginal route. The infection was characterized by a burst of virus replication that peaked during the first week following intravenous inoculation and a week later in the intravaginally inoculated animals. Intravaginally inoculated animals died within 6 months, with CD4+ counts of <30/microl in peripheral blood, anemia, weight loss, and opportunistic infections (malaria, toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia). To evaluate the kinetics of virus spread, we inoculated macaques intravaginally and euthanized them after 2, 4, 7, and 15 days postinoculation. In situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry revealed cells expressing viral RNA and protein in the vagina, uterus, and pelvic and mesenteric lymph nodes in the macaque euthanized on day 2. By day 4, virus-infected cells had disseminated to the spleen and thymus, and by day 15, global elimination of CD4+ T cells was in full progress. Kinetics of viral replication and CD4+ loss were similar in an animal inoculated with pathogenic SHIV orally. This provides a sexual-transmission model of human AIDS that can be used to study the pathogenesis of mucosal infection and to evaluate the efficacy of vaccines and drugs directed against HIV-1. PMID:9094679

  2. Strong, but Age-Dependent, Protection Elicited by a Deoxyribonucleic Acid/Modified Vaccinia Ankara Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Kannanganat, Sunil; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Nabi, Rafiq; Kozlowski, Pamela A.; Montefiori, David C.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Wrammert, Jens; Keele, Brandon F.; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Sahu, Sujata; Lifton, Michelle; Santra, Sampa; Basu, Rahul; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L.; Amara, Rama Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background. In this study, we analyzed the protective efficacy of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) macaque 239 (SIVmac239) analogue of the clinically tested GOVX-B11 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)/modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) human immunodeficiency virus vaccine. Methods. The tested vaccine used a DNA immunogen mutated to mimic the human vaccine and a regimen with DNA deliveries at weeks 0 and 8 and MVA deliveries at weeks 16 and 32. Twelve weekly rectal challenges with 0.3 animal infectious doses of SIV sootey mangabey E660 (SIVsmE660) were administered starting at 6 months after the last immunization. Results. Over the first 6 rectal exposures to SIVsmE660, <10-year-old tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5)α-permissive rhesus macaques showed an 80% reduction in per-exposure risk of infection as opposed to a 46% reduction in animals over 10 years old; and, over the 12 challenges, they showed a 72% as opposed to a 10% reduction. Analyses of elicited immune responses suggested that higher antibody responses in the younger animals had played a role in protection. Conclusions. The simian analogue of the GOVX-B11 HIV provided strong protection against repeated rectal challenges in young adult macaques. PMID:27006959

  3. Intravaginal inoculation of rhesus macaques with cell-free simian immunodeficiency virus results in persistent or transient viremia.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C J; Marthas, M; Torten, J; Alexander, N J; Moore, J P; Doncel, G F; Hendrickx, A G

    1994-01-01

    The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-rhesus macaque model of heterosexual human immunodeficiency virus transmission consists of atraumatic application of cell-free SIVmac onto the intact vaginal mucosa of mature female rhesus macaques. This procedure results in systemic infection, and eventually infected animals develop the clinical signs and pathologic changes of simian AIDS. To achieve 100% transmission with the virus stocks used to date, multiple intravaginal inoculations are required. The current titration study utilized two stocks of SIVmac and demonstrated that a single intravaginal dose of cell-free SIV can reliably produce infection in rhesus macaques. This study also demonstrated that some animals intravaginally inoculated with cell-free SIVmac develop transient viremia characterized by a limited ability to isolate virus from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and lymph node mononuclear cells and no seroconversion to SIV antigen. SIV could be isolated from the peripheral lymph nodes of transiently viremic animals only during periods of viremia and not at times when SIV was not detected in circulating mononuclear cells. Thus, peripheral lymphoid tissues were not reservoirs of infection in the transiently viremic animals. Taken together, these results suggest either that the SIV infection was cleared in the transiently viremic animals or that SIV infection is limited to a compartment of the genital mucosal immune system that cannot be assessed by monitoring SIV infection in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and peripheral lymphoid tissue. PMID:8083977

  4. Strong, but Age-Dependent, Protection Elicited by a Deoxyribonucleic Acid/Modified Vaccinia Ankara Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Kannanganat, Sunil; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Nabi, Rafiq; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Montefiori, David C; LaBranche, Celia C; Wrammert, Jens; Keele, Brandon F; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Sahu, Sujata; Lifton, Michelle; Santra, Sampa; Basu, Rahul; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L; Amara, Rama Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background.  In this study, we analyzed the protective efficacy of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) macaque 239 (SIVmac239) analogue of the clinically tested GOVX-B11 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)/modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) human immunodeficiency virus vaccine. Methods.  The tested vaccine used a DNA immunogen mutated to mimic the human vaccine and a regimen with DNA deliveries at weeks 0 and 8 and MVA deliveries at weeks 16 and 32. Twelve weekly rectal challenges with 0.3 animal infectious doses of SIV sootey mangabey E660 (SIVsmE660) were administered starting at 6 months after the last immunization. Results.  Over the first 6 rectal exposures to SIVsmE660, <10-year-old tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5)α-permissive rhesus macaques showed an 80% reduction in per-exposure risk of infection as opposed to a 46% reduction in animals over 10 years old; and, over the 12 challenges, they showed a 72% as opposed to a 10% reduction. Analyses of elicited immune responses suggested that higher antibody responses in the younger animals had played a role in protection. Conclusions.  The simian analogue of the GOVX-B11 HIV provided strong protection against repeated rectal challenges in young adult macaques. PMID:27006959

  5. Breakthrough Virus Neutralization Resistance as a Correlate of Protection in a Nonhuman Primate Heterologous Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine Challenge Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Fang-Hua; Mason, Rosemarie; Welles, Hugh; Learn, Gerald H.; Keele, Brandon F.; Roederer, Mario

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Comprehensive assessments of immune correlates of protection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine trials are essential to vaccine design. Neutralization sieve analysis compares the neutralization sensitivity of the breakthrough transmitted/founder (TF) viruses from vaccinated and control animals to infer the molecular mechanisms of vaccine protection. Here, we report a robust neutralization sieve effect in a nonhuman primate simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vaccine trial (DNA prime/recombinant adenovirus type 5 [rAd5] boost) (VRC-10-332) that demonstrated substantial protective efficacy and revealed a genetic signature of neutralization resistance in the C1 region of env. We found significant enrichment for neutralization resistance in the vaccine compared to control breakthrough TF viruses when tested with plasma from vaccinated study animals, plasma from chronically SIV-infected animals, and a panel of SIV-specific monoclonal antibodies targeting six discrete Env epitopes (P < 0.008 for all comparisons). Neutralization resistance was significantly associated with the previously identified genetic signature of resistance (P < 0.0001), and together, the results identify virus neutralization as a correlate of protection. These findings further demonstrate the in vivo relevance of our previous in vitro analyses of the SIVsmE660 challenge stock, which revealed a broad range of neutralization sensitivities of its component viruses. In sum, this report demonstrates proof-of-concept that phenotypic sieve analyses can elucidate mechanistic correlates of immune protection following vaccination and raises a cautionary note for SIV and SHIV (simian-human immunodeficiency virus) vaccine studies that employ challenge strains with envelope glycoproteins that fail to exhibit neutralization resistance profiles typical of TF viruses. IMPORTANCE With more than 2 million new infections annually, the development of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 is a global

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of a Reference Stock of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus RNA (SIVmac251/32H/L28) Determined by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Adrian; Ham, Claire; Almond, Neil

    2016-01-01

    A reference preparation for simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) RNA nucleic acid assays was characterized by complete genome deep sequencing. The entire coding sequence and flanking long terminal repeats, including minority species, were determined. This information will inform SIV research investigations and aid evaluation and development of amplification assays for SIV RNA quantification. PMID:27231355

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of a Reference Stock of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus RNA (SIVmac251/32H/L28) Determined by Deep Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Adrian; Ham, Claire; Almond, Neil; Berry, Neil

    2016-01-01

    A reference preparation for simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) RNA nucleic acid assays was characterized by complete genome deep sequencing. The entire coding sequence and flanking long terminal repeats, including minority species, were determined. This information will inform SIV research investigations and aid evaluation and development of amplification assays for SIV RNA quantification. PMID:27231355

  8. Dual Simian Foamy Virus/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infections in Persons from Côte d’Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Switzer, William M.; Tang, Shaohua; Zheng, HaoQiang; Shankar, Anupama; Sprinkle, Patrick S.; Sullivan, Vickie; Granade, Timothy C.; Heneine, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Zoonotic transmission of simian retroviruses in West-Central Africa occurring in primate hunters has resulted in pandemic spread of human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs) and human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLVs). While simian foamy virus (SFV) and simian T- lymphotropic virus (STLV)-like infection were reported in healthy persons exposed to nonhuman primates (NHPs) in West-Central Africa, less is known about the distribution of these viruses in Western Africa and in hospitalized populations. We serologically screened for SFV and STLV infection using 1,529 specimens collected between 1985 and 1997 from Côte d’Ivoire patients with high HIV prevalence. PCR amplification and analysis of SFV, STLV, and HIV/SIV sequences from PBMCs was used to investigate possible simian origin of infection. We confirmed SFV antibodies in three persons (0.2%), two of whom were HIV-1-infected. SFV polymerase (pol) and LTR sequences were detected in PBMC DNA available for one HIV-infected person. Phylogenetic comparisons with new SFV sequences from African guenons showed infection likely originated from a Chlorocebus sabaeus monkey endemic to Côte d’Ivoire. 4.6% of persons were HTLV seropositive and PCR testing of PBMCs from 15 HTLV seroreactive persons identified nine with HTLV-1 and one with HTLV-2 LTR sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that two persons had STLV-1-like infections, seven were HTLV-1, and one was an HTLV-2 infection. 310/858 (53%), 8/858 (0.93%), and 18/858 (2.1%) were HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-positive but undifferentiated by serology, respectively. No SIV sequences were found in persons with HIV-2 antibodies (n = 1) or with undifferentiated HIV results (n = 7). We document SFV, STLV-1-like, and dual SFV/HIV infection in Côte d’Ivoire expanding the geographic range for zoonotic simian retrovirus transmission to West Africa. These findings highlight the need to define the public health consequences of these infections. Studying dual HIV-1/SFV infections in

  9. Dual Simian Foamy Virus/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infections in Persons from Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Switzer, William M; Tang, Shaohua; Zheng, HaoQiang; Shankar, Anupama; Sprinkle, Patrick S; Sullivan, Vickie; Granade, Timothy C; Heneine, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Zoonotic transmission of simian retroviruses in West-Central Africa occurring in primate hunters has resulted in pandemic spread of human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs) and human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLVs). While simian foamy virus (SFV) and simian T- lymphotropic virus (STLV)-like infection were reported in healthy persons exposed to nonhuman primates (NHPs) in West-Central Africa, less is known about the distribution of these viruses in Western Africa and in hospitalized populations. We serologically screened for SFV and STLV infection using 1,529 specimens collected between 1985 and 1997 from Côte d'Ivoire patients with high HIV prevalence. PCR amplification and analysis of SFV, STLV, and HIV/SIV sequences from PBMCs was used to investigate possible simian origin of infection. We confirmed SFV antibodies in three persons (0.2%), two of whom were HIV-1-infected. SFV polymerase (pol) and LTR sequences were detected in PBMC DNA available for one HIV-infected person. Phylogenetic comparisons with new SFV sequences from African guenons showed infection likely originated from a Chlorocebus sabaeus monkey endemic to Côte d'Ivoire. 4.6% of persons were HTLV seropositive and PCR testing of PBMCs from 15 HTLV seroreactive persons identified nine with HTLV-1 and one with HTLV-2 LTR sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that two persons had STLV-1-like infections, seven were HTLV-1, and one was an HTLV-2 infection. 310/858 (53%), 8/858 (0.93%), and 18/858 (2.1%) were HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-positive but undifferentiated by serology, respectively. No SIV sequences were found in persons with HIV-2 antibodies (n = 1) or with undifferentiated HIV results (n = 7). We document SFV, STLV-1-like, and dual SFV/HIV infection in Côte d'Ivoire expanding the geographic range for zoonotic simian retrovirus transmission to West Africa. These findings highlight the need to define the public health consequences of these infections. Studying dual HIV-1/SFV infections in

  10. The effects of an ActRIIb receptor Fc fusion protein ligand trap in juvenile simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Karyn E; Guo, Wen; Serra, Carlo; Beck, Matthew; Wachtman, Lynn; Hoggatt, Amber; Xia, Dongling; Pearson, Chris; Knight, Heather; O'Connell, Micheal; Miller, Andrew D; Westmoreland, Susan V; Bhasin, Shalender

    2015-04-01

    There are no approved therapies for muscle wasting in children infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which portends poor disease outcomes. To determine whether a soluble ActRIIb receptor Fc fusion protein (ActRIIB.Fc), a ligand trap for TGF-β/activin family members including myostatin, can prevent or restore loss of lean body mass and body weight in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected juvenile rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Fourteen pair-housed, juvenile male rhesus macaques were inoculated with SIVmac239 and, 4 wk postinoculation (WPI) treated with intramuscular injections of 10 mg ⋅ kg(-1) ⋅ wk(-1) ActRIIB.Fc or saline placebo. Body weight, lean body mass, SIV titers, and somatometric measurements were assessed monthly for 16 wk. Age-matched SIV-infected rhesus macaques were injected with saline. Intervention groups did not differ at baseline. Gains in lean mass were significantly greater in the ActRIIB.Fc group than in the placebo group (P < 0.001). Administration of ActRIIB.Fc was associated with greater gains in body weight (P = 0.01) and upper arm circumference than placebo. Serum CD4(+) T-lymphocyte counts and SIV copy numbers did not differ between groups. Administration of ActRIIB.Fc was associated with higher muscle expression of myostatin than placebo. ActRIIB.Fc effectively blocked and reversed loss of body weight, lean mass, and fat mass in juvenile SIV-infected rhesus macaques. PMID:25466897

  11. RON Receptor Tyrosine Kinase, a Negative Regulator of Inflammation, is Decreased During Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Associated Central Nervous System Disease1

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Daniele C; Clements, Janice E; Henderson, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    Expressed on tissue resident macrophages, the receptor tyrosine kinase, RON, functions to maintain inflammation homeostasis by activating genes that promote wound repair and resolve inflammation while repressing genes that perpetuate tissue damage and cell death. Chronic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection is associated with dysregulated inflammation and we hypothesize that diminished RON expression contributes to the development of end organ diseases such as HIV-1 associated central nervous system (CNS) disease. To explore RON function in vivo, we utilized CNS tissue from a well characterized simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) macaque model and examined the temporal regulation of RON in the brain during the course of infection. Following prolonged SIV infection, RON expression was inversely correlated with the development of CNS disease; RON was maintained in animals that did not develop CNS lesions and was reduced in SIV infected macaques that demonstrated moderate to severe inflammatory lesions. Arginase-1 expression was reduced in the brain during late infection whereas expression of the inflammatory genes, IL-12p40 and TNFα, were elevated. To validate a role for RON in regulating HIV-1 in primary cells, we used human tissue resident macrophages isolated from tonsil as a tractable cell model. RON signaling in tissue resident macrophages, both ligand dependent and independent, limited HIV-1 replication. Furthermore, prolonged HIV-1 infection in vitro resulted in down-regulation of RON. We propose a model in which, following chronic HIV-1 infection in the brain, RON expression is decreased, genes that quell inflammation are repressed, and inflammatory mediators are induced to promote tissue inflammation. PMID:24043899

  12. Envelope residue 375 substitutions in simian-human immunodeficiency viruses enhance CD4 binding and replication in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Kong, Rui; Ding, Wenge; Lee, Fang-Hua; Parker, Zahra; Kim, Eunlim; Learn, Gerald H; Hahn, Paul; Policicchio, Ben; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Deleage, Claire; Hao, Xingpei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Gorman, Jason; Gardner, Matthew; Lewis, Mark G; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Santra, Sampa; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona; Alam, S Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D; Farzan, Michael; Chertova, Elena; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Doms, Robert W; Montefiori, David C; Haynes, Barton F; Sodroski, Joseph G; Kwong, Peter D; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M

    2016-06-14

    Most simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) bearing envelope (Env) glycoproteins from primary HIV-1 strains fail to infect rhesus macaques (RMs). We hypothesized that inefficient Env binding to rhesus CD4 (rhCD4) limits virus entry and replication and could be enhanced by substituting naturally occurring simian immunodeficiency virus Env residues at position 375, which resides at a critical location in the CD4-binding pocket and is under strong positive evolutionary pressure across the broad spectrum of primate lentiviruses. SHIVs containing primary or transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype A, B, C, or D Envs with genotypic variants at residue 375 were constructed and analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Bulky hydrophobic or basic amino acids substituted for serine-375 enhanced Env affinity for rhCD4, virus entry into cells bearing rhCD4, and virus replication in primary rhCD4 T cells without appreciably affecting antigenicity or antibody-mediated neutralization sensitivity. Twenty-four RMs inoculated with subtype A, B, C, or D SHIVs all became productively infected with different Env375 variants-S, M, Y, H, W, or F-that were differentially selected in different Env backbones. Notably, SHIVs replicated persistently at titers comparable to HIV-1 in humans and elicited autologous neutralizing antibody responses typical of HIV-1. Seven animals succumbed to AIDS. These findings identify Env-rhCD4 binding as a critical determinant for productive SHIV infection in RMs and validate a novel and generalizable strategy for constructing SHIVs with Env glycoproteins of interest, including those that in humans elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies or bind particular Ig germ-line B-cell receptors. PMID:27247400

  13. Efavirenz Therapy in Rhesus Macaques Infected with a Chimera of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Containing Reverse Transcriptase from Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Hofman, Michael J.; Higgins, Joanne; Matthews, Timothy B.; Pedersen, Niels C.; Tan, Chalet; Schinazi, Raymond F.; North, Thomas W.

    2004-01-01

    The specificity of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNRTIs) for the RT of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has prevented the use of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in the study of NNRTIs and NNRTI-based highly active antiretroviral therapy. However, a SIV-HIV-1 chimera (RT-SHIV), in which the RT from SIVmac239 was replaced with the RT-encoding region from HIV-1, is susceptible to NNRTIs and is infectious to rhesus macaques. We have evaluated the antiviral activity of efavirenz against RT-SHIV and the emergence of efavirenz-resistant mutants in vitro and in vivo. RT-SHIV was susceptible to efavirenz with a mean effective concentration of 5.9 ± 4.5 nM, and RT-SHIV variants selected with efavirenz in cell culture displayed 600-fold-reduced susceptibility. The efavirenz-resistant mutants of RT-SHIV had mutations in RT similar to those of HIV-1 variants that were selected under similar conditions. Efavirenz monotherapy of RT-SHIV-infected macaques produced a 1.82-log-unit decrease in plasma viral-RNA levels after 1 week. The virus load rebounded within 3 weeks in one treated animal and more slowly in a second animal. Virus isolated from these two animals contained the K103N and Y188C or Y188L mutations. The RT-SHIV-rhesus macaque model may prove useful for studies of antiretroviral drug combinations that include efavirenz. PMID:15328115

  14. Infectious Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype C from an African Isolate: Rhesus Macaque Model

    PubMed Central

    Ndung'u, Thumbi; Lu, Yichen; Renjifo, Boris; Touzjian, Neal; Kushner, Nicholas; Pena-Cruz, Victor; Novitsky, Vladimir A.; Lee, Tun-Hou; Essex, Max

    2001-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype C is responsible for more than 56% of all infections in the HIV and AIDS pandemic. It is the predominant subtype in the rapidly expanding epidemic in southern Africa. To develop a relevant model that would facilitate studies of transmission, pathogenesis, and vaccine development for this subtype, we generated SHIVMJ4, a simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) chimera based on HIV-1 subtype C. SHIVMJ4 contains the majority of env, the entire second exon of tat, and a partial sequence of the second exon of rev, all derived from a CCR5-tropic, primary isolate envelope clone from southern Africa. SHIVMJ4 replicated efficiently in human, rhesus, and pig-tailed macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro but not in CEMx174 cells. To assess in vivo infectivity, SHIVMJ4 was intravenously inoculated into four rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). All four animals became infected as determined through virus isolation, PCR analysis, and viral loads of 107 to 108 copies of viral RNA per ml of plasma during the primary infection phase. We have established a CCR5-tropic SHIVMJ4/rhesus macaque model that may be useful in the studies of HIV-1 subtype C immunology and biology and may also facilitate the evaluation of vaccines to control the spread of HIV-1 subtype C in southern Africa and elsewhere. PMID:11689623

  15. Elevated Plasma Viral Loads in Romidepsin-Treated Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques on Suppressive Combination Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Gregory Q; Oswald, Kelli; Lara, Abigail; Shoemaker, Rebecca; Smedley, Jeremy; Macallister, Rhonda; Coalter, Vicky; Wiles, Adam; Wiles, Rodney; Li, Yuan; Fast, Randy; Kiser, Rebecca; Lu, Bing; Zheng, Jim; Alvord, W Gregory; Trubey, Charles M; Piatak, Michael; Deleage, Claire; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Geleziunas, Romas; Lifson, Jeffrey D

    2016-03-01

    Replication-competent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persists in infected people despite suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), and it represents a major obstacle to HIV functional cure or eradication. We have developed a model of cART-mediated viral suppression in simian human immunodeficiency virus (SIV) mac239-infected Indian rhesus macaques and evaluated the impact of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) romidepsin (RMD) on viremia in vivo. Eight macaques virologically suppressed to clinically relevant levels (<30 viral RNA copies/ml of plasma), using a three-class five-drug cART regimen, received multiple intravenous infusions of either RMD (n = 5) or saline (n = 3) starting 31 to 54 weeks after cART initiation. In vivo RMD treatment resulted in significant transient increases in acetylated histone levels in CD4(+) T cells. RMD-treated animals demonstrated plasma viral load measurements for each 2-week treatment cycle that were significantly higher than those in saline control-treated animals during periods of treatment, suggestive of RMD-induced viral reactivation. However, plasma virus rebound was indistinguishable between RMD-treated and control-treated animals for a subset of animals released from cART. These findings suggest that HDACi drugs, such as RMD, can reactivate residual virus in the presence of suppressive antiviral therapy and may be a valuable component of a comprehensive HIV functional cure/eradication strategy. PMID:26711758

  16. Longitudinal assessment of fractional anisotropy alterations caused by simian immunodeficiency virus infection: a preliminary diffusion tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhenchao; Dong, Enqing; Liu, Jiaojiao; Liu, Zhenyu; Wei, Wenjuan; Wang, Bo; Li, Hongjun; Tian, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies found that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection led to white matter (WM) microstructure degeneration. Most of the DTI studies were cross-sectional and thus merely investigated only one specific point in the disease. In order to systematically study the WM impairments caused by HIV infection, more longitudinal studies are needed. However, longitudinal studies on HIV patients are very difficult to conduct. To address this question, we employed the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus monkeys model to carry out a longitudinal DTI study. We aimed to longitudinally access the WM abnormalities of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys by studying the fractional anisotropy (FA) alterations with Tract Based Spatial Statistic (TBSS) analysis. Four rhesus monkeys inoculated intravenously with SIVmac239 were utilized in the study. DTI scans and peripheral blood CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell counts were acquired prior to virus inoculation (as the baseline) and in the 12th and 24th week postvirus inoculation. Significant FA alterations were found in the two areas of the inferotemporal regions (iTE), respectively located in the ventral subregion of posterior iTE (iTEpv) and the dorsal subregion of iTE (iTEpd). The decreased FA values in iTEpd were found significantly negatively correlated with the elevated peripheral blood CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratios. It might suggest that WM in iTEpd was still impaired even though the immune dysfunction alleviated temporally. PMID:26438160

  17. Characterization of the Drug Resistance Profiles of Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac239

    PubMed Central

    Hassounah, Said A.; Liu, Yannan; Quashie, Peter K.; Oliveira, Maureen; Moisi, Daniela; Brenner, Bluma G.; Sandstrom, Paul A.; Mesplède, Thibault

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously showed that the simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239 is susceptible to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase (IN) strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) and that the same IN drug resistance mutations result in similar phenotypes in both viruses. Now we wished to determine whether tissue culture drug selection studies with SIV would yield the same resistance mutations as in HIV. Tissue culture selection experiments were performed using rhesus macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) infected with SIVmac239 viruses in the presence of increasing concentrations of dolutegravir (DTG), elvitegravir (EVG), and raltegravir (RAL). We now show that 22 weeks of selection pressure with DTG yielded a mutation at position R263K in SIV, similar to what has been observed in HIV, and that selections with EVG led to emergence of the E92Q substitution, which is a primary INSTI resistance mutation in HIV associated with EVG treatment failure. To study this at a biochemical level, purified recombinant SIVmac239 wild-type (WT) and E92Q, T97A, G118R, Y143R, Q148R, N155H, R263K, E92Q T97A, E92Q Y143R, R263K H51Y, and G140S Q148R recombinant substitution-containing IN enzymes were produced, and each of the characteristics strand transfer, 3′-processing activity, and INSTI inhibitory constants was assessed in cell-free assays. The results show that the G118R and G140S Q148R substitutions decreased Km′ and Vmax′/Km′ for strand transfer compared to those of the WT. RAL and EVG showed reduced activity against both viruses and against enzymes containing Q148R, E92Q Y143R, and G140S Q148R. Both viruses and enzymes containing Q148R and G140S Q148R showed moderate levels of resistance against DTG. This study further confirms that the same mutations associated with drug resistance in HIV display similar profiles in SIV. IMPORTANCE Our goal was to definitively establish whether HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) share similar resistance

  18. Ability of herpes simplex virus vectors to boost immune responses to DNA vectors and to protect against challenge by simian immunodeficiency virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Amitinder . E-mail: amitinder_kaur@hms.harvard.edu; Sanford, Hannah B.; Garry, Deirdre; Lang, Sabine; Klumpp, Sherry A.; Watanabe, Daisuke; Bronson, Roderick T.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Rosati, Margherita; Pavlakis, George N.; Felber, Barbara K.; Knipe, David M.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.

    2007-01-20

    The immunogenicity and protective capacity of replication-defective herpes simplex virus (HSV) vector-based vaccines were examined in rhesus macaques. Three macaques were inoculated with recombinant HSV vectors expressing Gag, Env, and a Tat-Rev-Nef fusion protein of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Three other macaques were primed with recombinant DNA vectors expressing Gag, Env, and a Pol-Tat-Nef-Vif fusion protein prior to boosting with the HSV vectors. Robust anti-Gag and anti-Env cellular responses were detected in all six macaques. Following intravenous challenge with wild-type, cloned SIV239, peak and 12-week plasma viremia levels were significantly lower in vaccinated compared to control macaques. Plasma SIV RNA in vaccinated macaques was inversely correlated with anti-Rev ELISPOT responses on the day of challenge (P value < 0.05), anti-Tat ELISPOT responses at 2 weeks post challenge (P value < 0.05) and peak neutralizing antibody titers pre-challenge (P value 0.06). These findings support continued study of recombinant herpesviruses as a vaccine approach for AIDS.

  19. Early stages of simian immunodeficiency virus infection in lymph nodes. Evidence for high viral load and successive populations of target cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, L.; Isola, P.; Cumont, M. C.; Claessens-Maire, M. A.; Hurtrel, M.; Montagnier, L.; Hurtrel, B.

    1994-01-01

    Lymph nodes obtained from 14 macaques sacrificed at early time points following experimental inoculation with simian immunodeficiency virus were analyzed by in situ hybridization for virus load and virus cellular tropism. The lymph nodes presented a remarkably high viral load during the early phase of infection, as viral RNA was detected in as many as 2% of lymph node cells 1 week after inoculation. At this stage, macrophages and T4 lymphocytes were identified by combined immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization as the target cells of the virus. Simian immunodeficiency virus-positive macrophages concentrated in the subcapsular sinuses, suggesting an entry of infected cells via the afferent lymphatics. A shift in the pattern of viral infection was observed at 2 weeks after inoculation, with a concentration of viral RNA in the germinal centers of the developing lymphoid follicles. Follicular dendritic cells were found to be the major target of the virus at this stage. Follicular dendritic cells were associated with high levels of viral RNA but little or no detectable viral DNA, suggesting that the virus was present mostly in the form of viral particles trapped at the cell surface. Follicular dendritic cell-associated virus persisted at high levels for 2 months before subsiding, indicating that follicular dendritic cells constituted a major reservoir of the virus during the early stages of simian immunodeficiency virus infection. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8203463

  20. Modulation of Type I Interferon-Associated Viral Sensing during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in African Green Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Jochems, Simon P.; Petitjean, Gaël; Kunkel, Désirée; Liovat, Anne-Sophie; Ploquin, Mickaël J.; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Lebon, Pierre; Jacquelin, Béatrice

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), such as African green monkeys (AGMs), do not progress to AIDS when infected with SIV. This is associated with an absence of a chronic type I interferon (IFN-I) signature. It is unclear how the IFN-I response is downmodulated in AGMs. We longitudinally assessed the capacity of AGM blood cells to produce IFN-I in response to SIV and herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. Phenotypes and functions of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and other mononuclear blood cells were assessed by flow cytometry, and expression of viral sensors was measured by reverse transcription-PCR. pDCs displayed low BDCA-2, CD40, and HLA-DR expression levels during AGM acute SIV (SIVagm) infection. BDCA-2 was required for sensing of SIV, but not of HSV, by pDCs. In acute infection, AGM peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) produced less IFN-I upon SIV stimulation. In the chronic phase, the production was normal, confirming that the lack of chronic inflammation is not due to a sensing defect of pDCs. In contrast to stimulation by SIV, more IFN-I was produced upon HSV stimulation of PBMCs isolated during acute infection, while the frequency of AGM pDCs producing IFN-I upon in vitro stimulation with HSV was diminished. Indeed, other cells started producing IFN-I. This increased viral sensing by non-pDCs was associated with an upregulation of Toll-like receptor 3 and IFN-γ-inducible protein 16 caused by IFN-I in acute SIVagm infection. Our results suggest that, as in pathogenic SIVmac infection, SIVagm infection mobilizes bone marrow precursor pDCs. Moreover, we show that SIV infection modifies the capacity of viral sensing in cells other than pDCs, which could drive IFN-I production in specific settings. IMPORTANCE The effects of HIV/SIV infections on the capacity of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) to produce IFN-I in vivo are still incompletely defined. As IFN-I can restrict viral replication, contribute to inflammation

  1. Importance of the intracytoplasmic domain of the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) envelope glycoprotein for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Luciw, P A; Shaw, K E; Shacklett, B L; Marthas, M L

    1998-12-01

    SIVmac1A11 and SIVmac239 are nonpathogenic and pathogenic molecular clones in rhesus macaques, respectively. Although these viruses exhibit approximately 98% nucleotide and amino acid sequence homology, differences are found in the length of the translation frames for several genes. SIVmac239 has a premature stop codon in nef, whereas SIVmac1A11 has a premature stop codon in vpr and two premature stop codons in the intracytoplasmic domain of the env-transmembrane (TM) subunit. Recombinant viruses, constructed through reciprocal exchange of large DNA restriction enzyme fragments between SIVmac1A11 and SIVmac239, were evaluated in adult rhesus macaques. This in vivo analysis revealed that two or more regions of the SIVmac genome were essential for high virus load and disease progression (Marthas et al., 1993. J. Virol. 67, 6047-6055). An important gap in knowledge remaining from this study was whether the premature stop codons in env-TM of recombinant virus SIV1A11/239gag-env/1A11 (Full-length vpr and nef, two stop codons in env-TM) reverted to coding triplets in vivo. Here, we report that viral sequences in macaques, which succumbed to an AIDS-like disease after infection with SIV1A11/239gag-env/1A11, exhibited reversion of both env-TM stop codons. In addition, antibodies to the intracytoplasmic domain of env-TM were detected in macaques containing revertant virus and showing disease; this finding indicates that this domain of the env glycoprotein was expressed in vivo. Thus selection for viral variants with full-length env-TM demonstrated that the cytoplasmic domain of the SIVmac env glycoprotein plays a role in viral persistence and immunodeficiency in primates. PMID:9875311

  2. Central nervous system-specific consequences of simian immunodeficiency virus Gag escape from major histocompatibility complex class I-mediated control.

    PubMed

    Beck, Sarah E; Queen, Suzanne E; Viscidi, Raphael; Johnson, Darius; Kent, Stephen J; Adams, Robert J; Tarwater, Patrick M; Mankowski, Joseph L

    2016-08-01

    In the fourth decade of the HIV epidemic, the relationship between host immunity and HIV central nervous system (CNS) disease remains incompletely understood. Using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/macaque model, we examined CNS outcomes in pigtailed macaques expressing the MHC class I allele Mane-A1*084:01 which confers resistance to SIV-induced CNS disease and induces the prototypic viral escape mutation Gag K165R. Insertion of gag K165R into the neurovirulent clone SIV/17E-Fr reduced viral replication in vitro compared to SIV/17E-Fr. We also found lower cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), but not plasma, viral loads in macaques inoculated with SIV/17E-Fr K165R versus those inoculated with wildtype. Although escape mutation K165R was genotypically stable in plasma, it rapidly reverted to wildtype Gag KP9 in both CSF and in microglia cultures. We induced robust Gag KP9-specific CTL tetramer responses by vaccinating Mane-A*084:01-positive pigtailed macaques with a Gag KP9 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine. Upon SIV/17E-Fr challenge, vaccinated animals had lower SIV RNA in CSF compared to unvaccinated controls, but showed no difference in plasma viral loads. These data clearly demonstrate that viral fitness in the CNS is distinct from the periphery and underscores the necessity of understanding the consequences of viral escape in CNS disease with the advent of new therapeutic vaccination strategies. PMID:26727909

  3. Evidence against extracellular exposure of a highly immunogenic region in the C-terminal domain of the simian immunodeficiency virus gp41 transmembrane protein.

    PubMed

    Postler, Thomas S; Martinez-Navio, José M; Yuste, Eloísa; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2012-01-01

    The generally accepted model for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein topology includes a single membrane-spanning domain. An alternate model has been proposed which features multiple membrane-spanning domains. Consistent with the alternate model, a high percentage of HIV-1-infected individuals produce unusually robust antibody responses to a region of envelope, the so-called "Kennedy epitope," that in the conventional model should be in the cytoplasm. Here we show analogous, robust antibody responses in simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaques to a region of SIVmac239 envelope located in the C-terminal domain, which in the conventional model should be inside the cell. Sera from SIV-infected rhesus macaques consistently reacted with overlapping oligopeptides corresponding to a region located within the cytoplasmic domain of gp41 by the generally accepted model, at intensities comparable to those observed for immunodominant areas of the surface component gp120. Rabbit serum raised against this highly immunogenic region (HIR) reacted with SIV envelope in cell surface-staining experiments, as did monoclonal anti-HIR antibodies isolated from an SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaque. However, control experiments demonstrated that this surface staining could be explained in whole or in part by the release of envelope protein from expressing cells into the supernatant and the subsequent attachment to the surfaces of cells in the culture. Serum and monoclonal antibodies directed against the HIR failed to neutralize even the highly neutralization-sensitive strain SIVmac316. Furthermore, a potential N-linked glycosylation site located close to the HIR and postulated to be outside the cell in the alternate model was not glycosylated. An artificially introduced glycosylation site within the HIR was also not utilized for glycosylation. Together, these data support the conventional model of SIV envelope as a type Ia transmembrane

  4. Spontaneous substitutions in the vicinity of the V3 analog affect cell tropism and pathogenicity of simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, V M; Martin, J E; Dapolito, G; Elkins, W R; London, W T; Goldstein, S; Johnson, P R

    1994-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) exists within tissues of infected macaques as a mixture of diverse genotypes. The goal of this study was to investigate the biologic significance of this variation in terms of cellular tropism and pathogenicity. PCR was used to amplify and clone 3'-half genomes from the spleen of an immunodeficiency SIV-infected pig-tailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina). Eight infectious clones were generated by ligation of respective 3' clones into a related SIVsm 5' clone, and virus stocks were generated by transient transfection. Four of these viruses were infectious for macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Three viruses with distinct tropism for macaque PBMC or MDM were tested for in vivo infectivity and pathogenicity. The ability of these three viruses to infect PBMC and macrophages correlated with differences in infectivity and pathogenicity. Thus, a virus that was infectious for both PBMC and MDM was highly infectious for macaques and induced AIDS in half of the inoculated animals. In contrast, virus that was less infectious for PBMC and not infectious for MDM induced only transient viremia. Finally, a virus that was not infectious for either primary cell type did not infect macaques. Chimeric clones exchanging portions of the envelope gene of the 62A and smH4 molecular clones and a series of point mutants were used to map the determinant of tropism to a 60-amino-acid region of gp120 encompassing the V3 analog of SIV. Naturally occurring mutations within this region were critical for determining tropism and, as a result, pathogenicity of these SIVsm clones. Images PMID:8139042

  5. Live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus vaccination confers superinfection resistance against macrophage-tropic and neurovirulent wild-type SIV challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Claire; Alden, Jack; Clarke, Sean; Stebbings, Richard; Stott, Jim; Ferguson, Deborah; Almond, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination with live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in non-human primate species provides a means of characterizing the protective processes of retroviral superinfection and may lead to novel advances of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS vaccine design. The minimally attenuated SIVmacC8 vaccine has been demonstrated to elicit early potent protection against pathogenic rechallenge with genetically diverse viral isolates in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). In this study, we have characterized further the biological breadth of this vaccine protection by assessing the ability of both the nef-disrupted SIVmacC8 and its nef-intact counterpart SIVmacJ5 viruses to prevent superinfection with the macrophage/neurotropic SIVmac239/17E-Fr (SIVmac17E-Fr) isolate. Inoculation with either SIVmacC8 or SIVmacJ5 and subsequent detailed characterization of the viral replication kinetics revealed a wide range of virus–host outcomes. Both nef-disrupted and nef-intact immunizing viruses were able to prevent establishment of SIVmac17E-Fr in peripheral blood and secondary lymphoid tissues. Differences in virus kinetics, indicative of an active process, identified uncontrolled replication in one macaque which although able to prevent SIVmac17E-Fr superinfection led to extensive neuropathological complications. The ability to prevent a biologically heterologous, CD4-independent/CCR5+ viral isolate and the macrophage-tropic SIVmac316 strain from establishing infection supports the hypothesis that direct target cell blocking is unlikely to be a central feature of live lentivirus vaccination. These data provide further evidence to demonstrate that inoculation of a live retroviral vaccine can deliver broad spectrum protection against both macrophage-tropic as well as lymphocytotropic viruses. These data add to our knowledge of live attenuated SIV vaccines but further highlight potential safety concerns of vaccinating with a live retrovirus. PMID:25834093

  6. Molecular epidemiology of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsm in U.S. primate centers unravels the origin of SIVmac and SIVstm.

    PubMed

    Apetrei, Cristian; Kaur, Amitinder; Lerche, Nicholas W; Metzger, Michael; Pandrea, Ivona; Hardcastle, Johnny; Falkenstein, Shelley; Bohm, Rudolf; Koehler, Jeffrey; Traina-Dorge, Vicki; Williams, Tessa; Staprans, Silvija; Plauche, Gail; Veazey, Ronald S; McClure, Harold; Lackner, Andrew A; Gormus, Bobby; Robertson, David L; Marx, Preston A

    2005-07-01

    Retrospective molecular epidemiology was performed on samples from four sooty mangabey (SM) colonies in the United States to characterize simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsm diversity in SMs and to trace virus circulation among different primate centers (PCs) over the past 30 years. The following SIVsm sequences were collected from different monkeys: 55 SIVsm isolates from the Tulane PC sampled between 1984 and 2004, 10 SIVsm isolates from the Yerkes PC sampled in 2002, 7 SIVsm isolates from the New Iberia PC sampled between 1979 and 1986, and 8 SIVsm isolates from the California PC sampled between 1975 and 1977. PCR and sequencing were done to characterize the gag, pol, and env gp36 genes. Phylogenetic analyses were correlated with the epidemiological data. Our analysis identified nine different divergent phylogenetic lineages that cocirculated in these four SM colonies in the Unites States in the past 30 years. Lineages 1 to 5 have been identified previously. Two of the newly identified SIVsm lineages found in SMs are ancestral to SIVmac251/SIVmac239/SIVmne and SIVstm. We further identified the origin of these two macaque viruses in SMs from the California National Primate Research Center. The diversity of SIVsm isolates in PCs in the United States mirrors that of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M subtypes and offers a model for the molecular epidemiology of HIV and a new approach to vaccine testing. The cocirculation of divergent SIVsm strains in PCs resulted in founder effects, superinfections, and recombinations. This large array of SIVsm strains showing the same magnitude of diversity as HIV-1 group M subtypes should be extremely useful for modeling the efficacy of vaccination strategies under the real-world conditions of HIV-1 diversity. The genetic variability of SIVsm strains among PCs may influence the diagnosis and monitoring of SIVsm infection and, consequently, may bias the results of pathogenesis studies. PMID:15994793

  7. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Replicates to High Levels in Naturally Infected African Green Monkeys without Inducing Immunologic or Neurologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Suzanne R.; Staprans, Silvija I.; White, Robert; Whitehead, Evelyn M.; Feinberg, Mark B.; Allan, Jonathan S.

    2001-01-01

    African green monkeys can maintain long-term persistent infection with simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVagm) without developing AIDS and thus provide an important model for understanding mechanisms of natural host resistance to disease. This study assessed the levels and anatomic distribution of SIVagm in healthy, naturally infected monkeys. Quantitative competitive reverse transcriptase PCR assays developed to measure SIVagm from two African green monkey subspecies demonstrated high levels of SIV RNA in plasma (>6 × 106 RNA copies/ml) in sabaeus and vervet monkeys. Infectious virus was readily recovered from plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells and shown to be highly cytopathic in human cell lines and macrophages. SIVagm DNA levels were highest in the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting that the gut is a major site for SIVagm replication in vivo. Appreciable levels of virus were also found within the brain parenchyma and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), with lower levels detected in peripheral blood cells and lymph nodes. Virus isolates from the CSF and brain parenchyma readily infected macrophages in culture, whereas lymph node isolates were more restricted to growth in human T-cell lines. Comparison of env V2-C4 sequences showed extensive amino acid diversity between SIVagm recovered from the central nervous system and that recovered from lymphoid tissues. Homology between brain and CSF viruses, macrophage tropism, and active replication suggest compartmentalization in the central nervous system without associated neuropathology in naturally infected monkeys. These studies provide evidence that the nonpathogenic nature of SIVagm in the natural host can be attributed neither to more effective host control over viral replication nor to differences in the tissue and cell tropism from those for human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected humans or SIV-infected macaques. PMID:11160730

  8. A Vaccine against CCR5 Protects a Subset of Macaques upon Intravaginal Challenge with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac251

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Zoe; Jayashankar, Kartika; Peabody, Julianne; Montefiori, David; LaBranche, Celia C.; Keele, Brandon F.; Jensen, Kara; Abel, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative to targeting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), we have developed vaccines targeting CCR5, a self-protein critically involved in HIV replication and pathogenesis. By displaying peptides derived from CCR5 at high density on the surface of virus-like particles, we can efficiently induce high-titer IgG antibodies against this self-molecule. Here, we investigated whether prophylactic immunization of rhesus macaques with a particle-based vaccine targeting two regions of macaque CCR5 could prevent or suppress vaginal infection with highly virulent SIVmac251. Twelve macaques were vaccinated with a bacteriophage Qß-based vaccine targeting macaque CCR5 (Qß.CCR5). Six control animals were immunized with the Qß platform alone. All animals immunized with Qß.CCR5 developed high-titer anti-CCR5 antibody responses. Macaques were vaginally challenged with a high dose of SIVmac251. The mean peak viral RNA levels in the vaccinated groups were 30-fold lower than in the control group (106.8 versus 108.3 copies/ml plasma). Three of the 12 vaccinated macaques dramatically suppressed simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication: peak viral loads were low (103 to 104 RNA copies/ml), and SIV RNA became undetectable from 6 weeks onward. No viral RNA or DNA could be detected in colon and lymph node biopsy specimens collected 13 months after challenge. In vivo depletion of CD8+ cells failed to induce a viral rebound. However, once anti-CCR5 antibody responses had waned, the 3 animals became infected after intravaginal and/or intravenous rechallenge. In conclusion, vaccination against CCR5 was associated with dramatic suppression of virus replication in a subset (25%) of macaques. These data support further research of vaccination against CCR5 to combat HIV infection. PMID:24307581

  9. Protection of Macaques against Pathogenic Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus 89.6PD by Passive Transfer of Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mascola, John R.; Lewis, Mark G.; Stiegler, Gabriela; Harris, Dawn; VanCott, Thomas C.; Hayes, Deborah; Louder, Mark K.; Brown, Charles R.; Sapan, Christine V.; Frankel, Sarah S.; Lu, Yichen; Robb, Merlin L.; Katinger, Hermann; Birx, Deborah L.

    1999-01-01

    The role of antibody in protection against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) has been difficult to study in animal models because most primary HIV-1 strains do not infect nonhuman primates. Using a chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) based on the envelope of a primary isolate (HIV-89.6), we performed passive-transfer experiments in rhesus macaques to study the role of anti-envelope antibodies in protection. Based on prior in vitro data showing neutralization synergy by antibody combinations, we evaluated HIV immune globulin (HIVIG), and human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2F5 and 2G12 given alone, compared with the double combination 2F5/2G12 and the triple combination HIVIG/2F5/2G12. Antibodies were administered 24 h prior to intravenous challenge with the pathogenic SHIV-89.6PD. Six control monkeys displayed high plasma viremia, rapid CD4+-cell decline, and clinical AIDS within 14 weeks. Of six animals given HIVIG/2F5/2G12, three were completely protected; the remaining three animals became SHIV infected but displayed reduced plasma viremia and near normal CD4+-cell counts. One of three monkeys given 2F5/2G12 exhibited only transient evidence of infection; the other two had marked reductions in viral load. All monkeys that received HIVIG, 2F5, or 2G12 alone became infected and developed high-level plasma viremia. However, compared to controls, monkeys that received HIVIG or MAb 2G12 displayed a less profound drop in CD4+ T cells and a more benign clinical course. These data indicate a general correlation between in vitro neutralization and protection and suggest that a vaccine that elicits neutralizing antibody should have a protective effect against HIV-1 infection or disease. PMID:10196297

  10. Soluble human CD4 elicits an antibody response in rhesus monkeys that inhibits simian immunodeficiency virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Mamoru; Chen, Zheng W.; Tsubota, Hiroshi; Lord, C.I.; Levine, C.G.; Letvin, N.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys infected with the simian immunodeficiency virus of macaques (SIV{sub mac}) demonstrate significant virologic and clinical improvement as a result of treatment with human recombinant soluble CD4 (rsCD4). The authors show that human rsCD4 does not efficiently inhibit SIV{sub mac} replication in bone marrow macrophages of rhesus monkeys and does not significantly augment bone marrow hematopoietic colony formation in vitro. However, plasma of human rsCD4-treated rhesus monkeys does exhibit significant anti-SIV{sub mac} activity in vitro. Plasma of these animals efficiently blocks SIV{sub mac} replicaton in peripheral blood lymphocytes and bone marrow macrophages. It also increases granulocyte/macrophage colony formation in vitro by bone marrow cells of SIV{sub mac}-infected monkeys. This plasma and the IgG fraction of plasma from a rhesus monkey immunized with human rsCD4 in adjuvant demonstrate reactivity with a soluble form of the rhesus monkey CD4 molecule, exhibit binding to CD4{sup +} but not CD8{sup +} concanavalin A-activated rhesus monkey peripheral blood lymphocytes, and precipitate the CD4 molecule from surface-labeled activated rhesus monkey peripheral blood lymphocytes. Moreover, anti-viral activity is demonstrable in the IgG fraction of plasma from a human rsCD4-immunized monkey. These studies raise the possibility that a modified human CD4 molecule serving as an immunogen might elicit an antibody response that could potentially induce a beneficial therapeutic response in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals.

  11. Spatiotemporal dynamics of simian immunodeficiency virus brain infection in CD8+ lymphocyte-depleted rhesus macaques with neuroAIDS.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Samantha L; Rife, Brittany D; Lamers, Susanna L; Nolan, David J; Veras, Nazle M C; Prosperi, Mattia C F; Burdo, Tricia H; Autissier, Patrick; Nowlin, Brian; Goodenow, Maureen M; Suchard, Marc A; Williams, Kenneth C; Salemi, Marco

    2014-12-01

    Despite the success of combined antiretroviral therapy in controlling viral replication in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders, commonly referred to as neuroAIDS, remain a frequent and poorly understood complication. Infection of CD8(+) lymphocyte-depleted rhesus macaques with the SIVmac251 viral swarm is a well-established rapid disease model of neuroAIDS that has provided critical insight into HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder onset and progression. However, no studies so far have characterized in depth the relationship between intra-host viral evolution and pathogenesis in this model. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) env gp120 sequences were obtained from six infected animals. Sequences were sampled longitudinally from several lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues, including individual lobes within the brain at necropsy, for four macaques; two animals were sacrificed at 21 days post-infection (p.i.) to evaluate early viral seeding of the brain. Bayesian phylodynamic and phylogeographic analyses of the sequence data were used to ascertain viral population dynamics and gene flow between peripheral and brain tissues, respectively. A steady increase in viral effective population size, with a peak occurring at ~50-80 days p.i., was observed across all longitudinally monitored macaques. Phylogeographic analysis indicated continual viral seeding of the brain from several peripheral tissues throughout infection, with the last migration event before terminal illness occurring in all macaques from cells within the bone marrow. The results strongly supported the role of infected bone marrow cells in HIV/SIV neuropathogenesis. In addition, our work demonstrated the applicability of Bayesian phylogeography to intra-host studies in order to assess the interplay between viral evolution and pathogenesis. PMID:25205684

  12. Modulation of Gut-Specific Mechanisms by Chronic Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Administration in Male Rhesus Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus: A Systems Biology Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Amedee, Angela M.; LeCapitaine, Nicole J.; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Mohan, Mahesh; Winsauer, Peter J.; Vande Stouwe, Curtis; McGoey, Robin R.; Auten, Matthew W.; LaMotte, Lynn; Chandra, Lawrance C.; Birke, Leslie L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Our studies have demonstrated that chronic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration results in a generalized attenuation of viral load and tissue inflammation in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected male rhesus macaques. Gut-associated lymphoid tissue is an important site for HIV replication and inflammation that can impact disease progression. We used a systems approach to examine the duodenal immune environment in 4- to 6-year-old male rhesus monkeys inoculated intravenously with SIVMAC251 after 17 months of chronic THC administration (0.18–0.32 mg/kg, intramuscularly, twice daily). Duodenal tissue samples excised from chronic THC- (N=4) and vehicle (VEH)-treated (N=4) subjects at ∼5 months postinoculation showed lower viral load, increased duodenal integrin beta 7+(β7) CD4+ and CD8+ central memory T cells, and a significant preferential increase in Th2 cytokine expression. Gene array analysis identified six genes that were differentially expressed in intestinal samples of the THC/SIV animals when compared to those differentially expressed between VEH/SIV and uninfected controls. These genes were identified as having significant participation in (1) apoptosis, (2) cell survival, proliferation, and morphogenesis, and (3) energy and substrate metabolic processes. Additional analysis comparing the duodenal gene expression in THC/SIV vs. VEH/SIV animals identified 93 differentially expressed genes that participate in processes involved in muscle contraction, protein folding, cytoskeleton remodeling, cell adhesion, and cell signaling. Immunohistochemical staining showed attenuated apoptosis in epithelial crypt cells of THC/SIV subjects. Our results indicate that chronic THC administration modulated duodenal T cell populations, favored a pro-Th2 cytokine balance, and decreased intestinal apoptosis. These findings reveal novel mechanisms that may potentially contribute to cannabinoid-mediated disease modulation. PMID:24400995

  13. Envelope-specific B-cell populations in African green monkeys chronically infected with simian immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruijun; Martinez, David R.; Nguyen, Quang N.; Pollara, Justin; Arifin, Trina; Stolarchuk, Christina; Foulger, Andrew; Amos, Josh D.; Parks, Robert; Himes, Jonathon E.; Wang, Minyue; Edwards, Regina W.; Trama, Ashley M.; Vandergrift, Nathan; Colvin, Lisa; Dewar, Ken; Juretic, Nikoleta; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Ferrari, Guido; Liao, Hua-Xin; Permar, Sallie R.

    2016-01-01

    African green monkeys (AGMs) are natural primate hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Interestingly, features of the envelope-specific antibody responses in SIV-infected AGMs are distinct from that of HIV-infected humans and SIV-infected rhesus monkeys, including gp120-focused responses and rapid development of autologous neutralization. Yet, the lack of genetic tools to evaluate B-cell lineages hinders potential use of this unique non-human primate model for HIV vaccine development. Here we define features of the AGM Ig loci and compare the proportion of Env-specific memory B-cell populations to that of HIV-infected humans and SIV-infected rhesus monkeys. AGMs appear to have a higher proportion of Env-specific memory B cells that are mainly gp120 directed. Furthermore, AGM gp120-specific monoclonal antibodies display robust antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and CD4-dependent virion capture activity. Our results support the use of AGMs to model induction of functional gp120-specific antibodies by HIV vaccine strategies. PMID:27381634

  14. Mechanisms of protection induced by attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus. I. Protection cannot be transferred with immune serum.

    PubMed

    Almond, N; Rose, J; Sangster, R; Silvera, P; Stebbings, R; Walker, B; Stott, E J

    1997-08-01

    To evaluate its role in protection, immune serum was collected from four macaques which were chronically infected with live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmacC8) and had resisted challenge with wild-type SIVmacJ5. The immune serum was transferred to two naive cynomolgus macaques by intraperitoneal injection (11 ml/kg). Four control macaques received an intraperitoneal injection of normal saline. One day later, all macaques were challenged with 10 MID50 of the J5M challenge stock of SIV. After challenge, all macaques became infected as determined by virus co-culture and diagnostic PCR. Virus loads in PBMC at 2 weeks post-challenge were indistinguishable between the two groups of macaques. Thus, the failure of passive immunization to transfer protection indicates that serum components alone are not sufficient to mediate the potent protection obtained using live attenuated vaccines. This is the first time that serum has been transferred from animals known to be protected against superinfection. PMID:9266988

  15. Simian immunodeficiency virus (mac 251-32H) transmembrane protein sequence remains conserved throughout the course of infection in macaques.

    PubMed

    Slade, A; Jones, S; Almond, N; Kitchin, P

    1993-02-01

    Two cynomolgus macaques were infected with a genetically complex challenge stock of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac251-32H). The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify the env gp41, rev, and nef overlapping coding sequences from provirus present in the blood of both animals at 1, 6, and 15 months post infection (p.i.). The predominant, env sequences found in both animals at the three time points were very similar to that found in the original 11/88 challenge stock. The functionally important hydrophobic fusion and membrane-spanning domains within gp41 remained conserved throughout the course of infection. Nucleotide variation within the region corresponding to the REV response element (RRE) was limited to four positions, none of which were predicted to cause any significant disruption to the secondary structure of the RRE. Very little genetic variation was observed in and around the cluster of potential glycosylation sites of the external portion of gp41. However, the existence of a previously assigned variable region elsewhere in the cytoplasmic domain of gp41 was confirmed. The three gene loci (env, rev, and nef) examined varied independently. All changes in the predominant protein sequences were brought about by single nucleotide substitutions only. After 15 months of infection with SIV, 1 animal was sick from SIV-induced disease whereas the other remained healthy. In-frame stop codons within the transmembrane protein occurred with a much greater frequency in the healthy animal. PMID:8457380

  16. Envelope-specific B-cell populations in African green monkeys chronically infected with simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruijun; Martinez, David R; Nguyen, Quang N; Pollara, Justin; Arifin, Trina; Stolarchuk, Christina; Foulger, Andrew; Amos, Josh D; Parks, Robert; Himes, Jonathon E; Wang, Minyue; Edwards, Regina W; Trama, Ashley M; Vandergrift, Nathan; Colvin, Lisa; Dewar, Ken; Juretic, Nikoleta; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Ferrari, Guido; Liao, Hua-Xin; Permar, Sallie R

    2016-01-01

    African green monkeys (AGMs) are natural primate hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Interestingly, features of the envelope-specific antibody responses in SIV-infected AGMs are distinct from that of HIV-infected humans and SIV-infected rhesus monkeys, including gp120-focused responses and rapid development of autologous neutralization. Yet, the lack of genetic tools to evaluate B-cell lineages hinders potential use of this unique non-human primate model for HIV vaccine development. Here we define features of the AGM Ig loci and compare the proportion of Env-specific memory B-cell populations to that of HIV-infected humans and SIV-infected rhesus monkeys. AGMs appear to have a higher proportion of Env-specific memory B cells that are mainly gp120 directed. Furthermore, AGM gp120-specific monoclonal antibodies display robust antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and CD4-dependent virion capture activity. Our results support the use of AGMs to model induction of functional gp120-specific antibodies by HIV vaccine strategies. PMID:27381634

  17. Envelope Glycoprotein Internalization Protects Human and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Cells from Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    von Bredow, Benjamin; Arias, Juan F.; Heyer, Lisa N.; Gardner, Matthew R.; Farzan, Michael; Rakasz, Eva G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cytoplasmic tails of human and simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV and SIV, respectively) envelope glycoproteins contain a highly conserved, membrane-proximal endocytosis motif that prevents the accumulation of Env on the surface of infected cells prior to virus assembly. Using an assay designed to measure the killing of virus-infected cells by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), we show that substitutions in this motif increase the susceptibility of HIV-1- and SIV-infected cells to ADCC in a manner that directly correlates with elevated Env levels on the surface of virus-infected cells. In the case of HIV-1, this effect is additive with a deletion in vpu recently shown to enhance the susceptibility of HIV-1-infected cells to ADCC as a result of tetherin-mediated retention of budding virions on the cell surface. These results reveal a previously unappreciated role for the membrane-proximal endocytosis motif of gp41 in protecting HIV-1- and SIV-infected cells from antibody responses by regulating the amount of Env present on the cell surface. IMPORTANCE This study reveals an unappreciated role for the membrane-proximal endocytosis motif of gp41 in protecting HIV-1- and SIV-infected cells from elimination by Env-specific antibodies. Thus, strategies designed to interfere with this mechanism of Env internalization may improve the efficacy of antibody-based vaccines and antiretroviral therapies designed to enhance the immunological control of HIV-1 replication in chronically infected individuals. PMID:26269175

  18. Abrogation of Attenuated Lentivirus-Induced Protection in Rhesus Macaques by Administration of Depo-Provera before Intravaginal Challenge with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus mac239

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Kristina; Rourke, Tracy; Lu, Ding; Bost, Kristen; McChesney, Michael B.; Miller, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    In nonhuman primate models of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, live attenuated lentiviruses provide the most reliable protection from systemic and mucosal challenge with pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Although live attenuated lentiviruses may never be used in humans because of safety concerns, understanding the nature of the protective immune mechanisms induced by live attenuated vaccines in primate models will be useful for developing other vaccine approaches. Approximately 60% of rhesus macaques immunized with nonpathogenic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) strain 89.6 are protected from infection or clinical disease after intravaginal (IVAG) challenge with pathogenic SIVmac239. The goal of the present study was to determine whether administration of Depo-Provera before IVAG challenge with SIV decreases the protective efficacy of infection with SHIV89.6. The rate of protection after IVAG challenge with SIVmac239 was significantly lower (P < .05), and the acute postchallenge plasma viral RNA levels were significantly higher (P < .006), in Depo-Provera–treated, SHIV89.6-immunized macaques than in Depo-Provera–naive, SHIV89.6-immunized macaques. In the primate model of sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus, treatment with progesterone before IVAG challenge with a pathogenic virus can decrease the efficacy of a model “vaccine.” PMID:15478078

  19. Personality and serotonin transporter genotype interact with social context to affect immunity and viral set-point in simian immunodeficiency virus disease.

    PubMed

    Capitanio, John P; Abel, Kristina; Mendoza, Sally P; Blozis, Shelley A; McChesney, Michael B; Cole, Steve W; Mason, William A

    2008-07-01

    From the beginning of the AIDS epidemic, stress has been a suspected contributor to the wide variation seen in disease progression, and some evidence supports this idea. Not all individuals respond to a stressor in the same way, however, and little is known about the biological mechanisms by which variations in individuals' responses to their environment affect disease-relevant immunologic processes. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus/rhesus macaque model of AIDS, we explored how personality (Sociability) and genotype (serotonin transporter promoter) independently interact with social context (Stable or Unstable social conditions) to influence behavioral expression, plasma cortisol concentrations, SIV-specific IgG, and expression of genes associated with Type I interferon early in infection. SIV viral RNA set-point was strongly and negatively correlated with survival as expected. Set-point was also associated with expression of interferon-stimulated genes, with CXCR3 expression, and with SIV-specific IgG titers. Poorer immune responses, in turn, were associated with display of sustained aggression and submission. Personality and genotype acted independently as well as in interaction with social condition to affect behavioral responses. Together, the data support an "interactionist" perspective [Eysenck, H.J., 1991. Personality, stress and disease: an interactionist perspective. Psychol. Inquiry 2, 221-232] on disease. Given that an important goal of HIV treatment is to maintain viral set-point as low as possible, our data suggest that supplementing anti-retroviral therapy with behavioral or pharmacologic modulation of other aspects of an organism's functioning might prolong survival, particularly among individuals living under conditions of threat or uncertainty. PMID:17719201

  20. Identification of the V1 region as a linear neutralizing epitope of the simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Jurkiewicz, E; Hunsmann, G; Schäffner, J; Nisslein, T; Lüke, W; Petry, H

    1997-01-01

    The sequence variability of viral structure polypeptides has been associated with immune escape mechanisms. The V1 region of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is a highly variable region of the SIVmac env gene. Here, we describe the V1 region as a linear neutralizing epitope. V1 region-specific neutralizing antibodies (NAb) were first demonstrated in a rabbit infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus carrying the env gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 strain ben (HIV-2ben). Since we detected in this animal V1 region-specific NAb that were able to neutralize not only human immunodeficiency virus type 2 but also SIVmac32H, we investigated whether a similar immune response is evoked in macaques (Macaca mulatta) either infected with SIVmac or immunized with the external glycoprotein (gp130) of the same virus. Distinctly lower NAb titers were found in the SIVmac-infected animals than in the gp130-immunized macaques. Since the NAb titers in both groups were high enough for competition experiments, we used five overlapping peptides encompassing the whole V1 region for a detailed identification of the epitope. In each of the 12 macaques investigated, we detected a high level of NAb reacting with at least one peptide located in the central part of the V1 region. The relatively high degree of divergence, especially within the central part of the V1 region, which characterized the evolution of the retroviral sequences from the original inoculum in the infected macaques suggests the development of escape mutants. Furthermore, 3 of 12 animals developed NAb directed against the amino-terminal end of the V1 region epitope. Sequence analysis, however, revealed relatively low levels of genetic drift and genetic variability within this part of the V1 region. The induction of V1 env-specific NAb not only in gp130-immunized macaques but also in SIVmac-infected animals in combination with the increased genetic variability of this region in vivo indicates a marked biological

  1. Superior Efficacy of a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine Combined with Antiretroviral Prevention in Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Challenged Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Le Grand, Roger; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Dispinseri, Stefania; Gosse, Leslie; Desjardins, Delphine; Shen, Xiaoying; Tolazzi, Monica; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Saidi, Hela; Tomaras, Georgia; Prague, Mélanie; Barnett, Susan W.; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although vaccines and antiretroviral (ARV) prevention have demonstrated partial success against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in clinical trials, their combined introduction could provide more potent protection. Furthermore, combination approaches could ameliorate the potential increased risk of infection following vaccination in the absence of protective immunity. We used a nonhuman primate model to determine potential interactions of combining a partially effective ARV microbicide with an envelope-based vaccine. The vaccine alone provided no protection from infection following 12 consecutive low-dose intravaginal challenges with simian-HIV strain SF162P3, with more animals infected compared to naive controls. The microbicide alone provided a 68% reduction in the risk of infection relative to that of the vaccine group and a 45% reduction relative to that of naive controls. The vaccine-microbicide combination provided an 88% reduction in the per-exposure risk of infection relative to the vaccine alone and a 79% reduction relative to that of the controls. Protected animals in the vaccine-microbicide group were challenged a further 12 times in the absence of microbicide and demonstrated a 98% reduction in the risk of infection. A total risk reduction of 91% was observed in this group over 24 exposures (P = 0.004). These important findings suggest that combined implementation of new biomedical prevention strategies may provide significant gains in HIV prevention. IMPORTANCE There is a pressing need to maximize the impact of new biomedical prevention tools in the face of the 2 million HIV infections that occur each year. Combined implementation of complementary biomedical approaches could create additive or synergistic effects that drive improved reduction of HIV incidence. Therefore, we assessed a combination of an untested vaccine with an ARV-based microbicide in a nonhuman primate vaginal challenge model. The vaccine alone provided no

  2. Construction of Soluble Mamu-B*1703, a Class I Major Histocompatibility Complex of Chinese Rhesus Macaques, Monomer and Tetramer Loaded with a Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Dongyun; Wang, Xiaoying; He, Xianhui; Xu, Lihui; Shi, Huanjing; Gao, Qi; Guo, He

    2009-01-01

    Chinese-descent rhesus macaques have become more prevalent for HIV infection and vaccine investigation than Indian-origin macaques. Most of the currently available data and reagents such as major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I tetramers, however, were derived from Indian-origin macaques due to the dominant use of these animals in history. Although there are significant differences in the immunogenetic background between the two macaque populations, they share a few of common MHC class I alleles. We reported in this study the procedure for preparation of a soluble Mamu-B*1703 (a MHC class I molecule of Chinese macaques) monomer and tetramer loaded with a dominant simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) epitope IW9 (IRYPKTFGW) that was identified to be Mamu-B*1701-restricted in Indian macaques. The DNA fragment encoding the Mamu-B*1703 extracellular domain fused with a BirA substrate peptide (BSP) was amplified from a previously cloned cDNA and inserted into a prokaratic expression vector. In the presence of the antigenic peptide IW9 and light chain β2-microglobulin, the expressed heavy chain was refolded into a soluble monomer. After biotinylation, four monomers were polymerized as a tetramer by phycoerythrin-conjugated streptavidin. The tetramer, having been confirmed to have the right conformation, was a potential tool for investigation of antigen-specific CD8+ T-lymphocytes in SIV vaccine models of Chinese macaques. And our results also suggested that some antigenic peptides reported in Indian-origin macaques could be directly recruited as ligands for construction of Chinese macaque MHC tetramers. PMID:19403061

  3. Initiation of HAART during acute simian immunodeficiency virus infection rapidly controls virus replication in the CNS by enhancing immune activity and preserving protective immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David R.; Gama, Lucio; Queen, Suzanne E.; Li, Ming; Brice, Angela K.; Kelly, Kathleen M.; Mankowski, Joseph L.; Clements, Janice E.

    2012-01-01

    The CNS remains vulnerable to HIV-induced damage despite highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Using a rigorous simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) macaque model of HAART that combines three classes of antiretroviral drugs (a protease inhibitor, a reverse transcriptase inhibitor, and an integrase inhibitor), we examined immune responses and virus replication in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following HAART initiation during acute infection (4 days postinoculation (p. i.)). HAART-treated macaques did not experience the level of acute CD4+ and CD8+ T cell and NK cell count suppression in the peripheral blood normally observed during acute infection. Initiation of HAART produced a rapid four-log decline in viral load in plasma and a slower two-log decline of viral RNA in the CSF over the subsequent 17 days of infection. Despite a dramatic reduction of viral RNA levels in the brain at 21 days p.i., viral DNA levels were not different between the two groups. Expression of most cytokine mRNA in brain of HAART-treated macaques did not significantly differ from untreated controls. Expression of the IFN responsive gene MxA was significantly reduced in the brain of HAART-treated macaques, suggesting control of hyperactive immune responses. Control of virus replication likely was enhanced by significant increases in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell trafficking in the brain of infected animals on HAART therapy and the concomitant increase in levels of IFNγ. Collectively, these data indicate preserved innate and adaptive immune activity in the brain following HAART initiation during acute SIV infection in this macaque model, suggesting profound benefits following acute treatment of SIV. PMID:21165785

  4. Regulatory T-cell markers, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, and virus levels in spleen and gut during progressive simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Boasso, Adriano; Vaccari, Monica; Hryniewicz, Anna; Fuchs, Dietmar; Nacsa, Janos; Cecchinato, Valentina; Andersson, Jan; Franchini, Genoveffa; Shearer, Gene M; Chougnet, Claire

    2007-11-01

    High levels of viral replication occur in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) and other lymphoid tissues (LT) since the early phase of human/simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV/SIV) infection. Regulatory T cells (T(reg)), a subset of immunosuppressive T cells expressing CTLA-4 and the FoxP3 transcription factor, accumulate in LT during HIV/SIV infection. Here we show that FoxP3 and CTLA-4 mRNA are increased in leukocytes from the spleens, lymph nodes (LN), and mucosal sites of chronically SIV-infected macaques with high viremia (SIV(HI)) compared to animals with low viremia (SIV(LO)). FoxP3 and CTLA-4 correlated with SIV RNA levels in tissues; SIV virus levels in the spleen, inguinal LN, mesenteric LN, colon, and jejunum directly correlated with the plasma virus level. Importantly, CTLA-4 and FoxP3 mRNA were predominantly increased in the CD25(-) subpopulation of leukocytes from SIV(HI), further challenging the classical definition of T(reg) as CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells. Similar to CTLA-4 and FoxP3, expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an immunosuppressive enzyme induced by T(reg) in antigen-presenting cells, was increased in the spleens, mesenteric LN, colons, and jejuna from SIV(HI) compared to SIV(LO) and directly correlated to SIV RNA in the same tissues. Accordingly, plasma kynurenine/tryptophan, a marker for IDO enzymatic activity, was significantly higher in SIV(HI) compared to SIV(LO) and correlated with plasma viral levels. Increased T(reg) and IDO in LT of SIV-infected macaques may be the consequence of increased tissue inflammation and/or may favor virus replication during the chronic phase of SIV infection. PMID:17715231

  5. Progressive Truncations C Terminal to the Membrane-Spanning Domain of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Env Reduce Fusogenicity and Increase Concentration Dependence of Env for Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaoxu; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Blumenthal, Robert; West, John; Hunter, Eric

    2003-01-01

    The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) transmembrane (TM) protein, gp41, has multiple functions, which include anchoring the glycoprotein complex in the lipid envelope of the virus and mediating fusion of the virus and host cell membranes. Recently, a series of mutants of the SIVmac239 TM protein that have truncations at the carboxyl terminus of the membrane-spanning domain (MSD) have been characterized (J. T. West, P. Johnston, S. R. Dubay, and E. Hunter, J. Virol. 75:9601-9612, 2001). These mutants retained membrane anchorage but demonstrated reduced fusogenicity and infectivity as the MSD length was shortened. We have established a novel three-color fluorescence assay, which allows qualitative confocal and quantitative flow cytometric analyses, to further characterize the nature of the fusion defect in five of the MSD mutants: TM185, TM186, TM187, TM188, and TM189. Our analysis showed that each mutant could mediate complete lipid and aqueous dye transfer at early time points after effector and target cell mixing. No hemifusion with only lipid dye flux was detected. However, another intermediate fusion stage, which appears to involve small-fusion-pore formation that allowed small aqueous dye transfer but prevented the exchange of large cytoplasmic components, was identified infrequently in mutant-Env-expressing cell and target cell mixtures. Quantitative flow cytometric analysis of these mutants demonstrated that the TM187, TM188, and TM189 mutants were significantly more fusogenic than TM185 and TM186 but remained significantly impaired compared to the wild type. Moreover, fusion efficiency showed an increased dependence on the expression level of glycoproteins, suggesting that, for these mutants, formation of an active fusion complex was an increasingly stochastic event. PMID:12768026

  6. Mutations at the C-terminus of the simian immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein affect gp120-gp41 stability on virions

    SciTech Connect

    Affranchino, Jose L.; Gonzalez, Silvia A. . E-mail: sigonzal@ub.edu.ar

    2006-03-30

    The transmembrane (TM) subunit of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein of the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) contains an unusually long cytoplasmic domain of 164 amino acids. Previously, we identified domains in the SIV TM cytoplasmic tail that are necessary for Env incorporation into virions and viral infectivity. In this study, we investigated the relevance to Env function of the highly conserved sequence comprising the immediate C-terminal 19 residues of TM. To this end, small in-frame deletions as well as a premature stop codon mutation were introduced into the coding region for the SIV TM C-terminus. All the mutant Env glycoproteins were expressed, processed and transported to the cell surface in an essentially wild-type manner. Moreover, the ability of the mutant Env proteins to mediate cell-to-cell fusion was similar to or slightly lower than that of the wild-type Env. However, viruses expressing the mutant Env glycoproteins were found to be poorly infectious in single-cycle infectivity assays. Further characterization of the TM mutant viruses revealed that while exhibiting wild-type levels of the TM protein, they contained significantly lower levels of the Env surface (SU) subunit, which is consistent with increased SU shedding from virions after Env incorporation. This phenotype was independent of Gag processing, since genetic inactivation of the viral protease did not increase SU retention by the resulting immature particles. Our findings indicate that deletions at the C-terminus of the SIV Env promote the instability of the SU-TM association on the virion surface and point to an important role for the TM cytoplasmic domain in modulating Env structure.

  7. The effects of chronic binge alcohol on the genital microenvironment of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected female rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Loganantharaj, Nisha; Nichols, Whitney A; Bagby, Gregory J; Volaufova, Julia; Dufour, Jason; Martin, David H; Nelson, Steve; Amedee, Angela M

    2014-08-01

    Alcohol abuse is a widespread problem among those at risk for and living with HIV and can impact transmission and disease progression. In this study we sought to use the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-macaque model to evaluate the immunological and virological changes in the genital microenvironment of females exposed to chronic alcohol. Female rhesus macaques were treated with alcohol (n=6) or isocaloric sucrose (n=6) for 3 months and then inoculated with SIVmac251. To assess the effects of chronic alcohol on SIV disease and the genital microenvironment, we quantified plasma and genital SIV levels, measured inflammatory cells in genital fluids, and characterized microbial flora by gram stains over 10 weeks post-SIV infection. Following 3 months of alcohol/sucrose treatment, significant differences were observed in the vaginal microenvironment of alcohol-treated animals as compared to controls. Microbial flora of alcohol-treated animals had decreased levels of lactobacillus morphotypes and increased levels of gram-positive cocci relative to sucrose controls. Alcohol-treated animals were also more likely to have white blood cells in vaginal fluids prior to SIV inoculation, which persisted through viral set point. Similar levels of cell-free SIV were observed in plasma and vaginal fluids of both groups, but alcohol-treated animals had a higher incidence and levels of cell-associated SIV shed in vaginal secretions. Chronic alcohol treatment negatively impacts the genital microenvironment prior to and over the course of SIV infection and may increase the risk of genital virus shedding and transmission. PMID:24902876

  8. The cytopathicity of a simian immunodeficiency virus Mne variant is determined by mutations in Gag and Env.

    PubMed Central

    Kimata, J T; Overbaugh, J

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that the rapidly replicating, highly cytopathic, syncytium-inducing (rapid-high/SI) phenotype of simian immunodeficiency virus Mne variants that evolved in macaques inoculated with a slowly replicating, minimally cytopathic, non-syncytium-inducing (slow-low/NSI) molecular clone was not solely the result of changes in the envelope surface protein (Env SU). To define the viral determinants responsible for the change in phenotype, we molecularly cloned a rapid-high/SI variant (designated SIVMne170) derived from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of a pig-tailed macaque that was inoculated with a slow-low/NSI molecular clone, SIVMneCL8. SIVMne170 was SI and replicated with faster kinetics and was more cytopathic than the parent SIVMneCL8 in CEMx174 cells. Additionally, SIVMne170 was more cytopathic for the CD4+ T-cell population than SIVMneCL8 in macaque PBMCs. An analysis of chimeric viruses constructed between the variant SIVMne170 and the parent virus SIVMneCL8 demonstrated that there are determinants encoded within both the 5' and 3' halves of SIVMne170 that independently contribute to its rapid-high/SI phenotype. As we previously observed with other SIVMne variants, the Env SU of SIVMne170 was important for syncytium induction but was not a key determinant of cytopathicity. By contrast, the intracellular domain of the envelope transmembrane protein (Env TM) contributed to both the SI and cytopathic properties of SIVMne170. We also found that the minimal determinant within the 5' half of SIVMne170 that conferred its rapid replication kinetics and cytopathicity mapped to the capsid- and nucleocapsid-encoding regions of gag. Together, these data demonstrate that mutations selected in Gag and Env TM intracytoplasmic tail influence the replication and cytopathicity of SIVMne variants that evolve in the host. PMID:9311845

  9. Rhesus macaques previously infected with simian/human immunodeficiency virus are protected from vaginal challenge with pathogenic SIVmac239.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C J; McChesney, M B; Lü, X; Dailey, P J; Chutkowski, C; Lu, D; Brosio, P; Roberts, B; Lu, Y

    1997-01-01

    Nontraumatic vaginal inoculation of rhesus macaques with a simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SIV/HIV) chimera containing the envelope gene from HIV-1 89.6 (SHIV 89.6) results in systemic infection (Y. Lu, B. Brosio, M. Lafaile, J. Li, R. G. Collman, J. Sodroski, and C. J. Miller, J. Virol. 70:3045-3050, 1996). A total of five rhesus macaques have each been infected by exposure to at least three intravaginal inoculations of SHIV 89.6. The SHIV 89.6 infection is characterized by a transient viremia that evokes humoral and cellular immune responses to HIV and SIV antigens, but disease does not develop in animals infected with SHIV 89.6. To determine if a previous infection with SHIV 89.6 by vaginal inoculation could protect animals from vaginal challenge with pathogenic SIV, all five animals were intravaginally inoculated twice with pathogenic SIV-mac239. After challenge, all of the SHIV-immunized animals had low or undetectable viral RNA levels in plasma compared to control animals. Three of the five of the SHIV-immunized animals remained virus isolation negative for more than 8 months, while two became virus isolation positive. The presence of SIV Gag-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and SIV-specific antibodies in cervicovaginal secretions at the time of challenge was associated with resistance to pathogenic SIV infection after vaginal challenge. These results suggest that protection from sexual transmission of HIV may be possible by effectively stimulating both humoral and cellular antiviral immunity in the systemic and genital mucosal immune compartments. PMID:9032322

  10. Containment of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Cellular Immune Responses and Protection from Rechallenge following Transient Postinoculation Antiretroviral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Rossio, Jeffrey L.; Arnaout, Ramy; Li, Li; Parks, Thomas L.; Schneider, Douglas K.; Kiser, Rebecca F.; Coalter, Vicky J.; Walsh, Geneva; Imming, Robert J.; Fisher, Bradley; Flynn, Bernard M.; Bischofberger, Norbert; Piatak, Michael; Hirsch, Vanessa M.; Nowak, Martin A.; Wodarz, Dominik

    2000-01-01

    To better understand the viral and host factors involved in the establishment of persistent productive infection by primate lentiviruses, we varied the time of initiation and duration of postinoculation antiretroviral treatment with tenofovir {9-[2-(R)-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]adenine}while performing intensive virologic and immunologic monitoring in rhesus macaques, inoculated intravenously with simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsmE660. Postinoculation treatment did not block the initial infection, but we identified treatment regimens that prevented the establishment of persistent productive infection, as judged by the absence of measurable plasma viremia following drug discontinuation. While immune responses were heterogeneous, animals in which treatment resulted in prevention of persistent productive infection showed a higher frequency and higher levels of SIV-specific lymphocyte proliferative responses during the treatment period compared to control animals, despite the absence of either detectable plasma viremia or seroconversion. Animals protected from the initial establishment of persistent productive infection were also relatively or completely protected from subsequent homologous rechallenge. Even postinoculation treatment regimens that did not prevent establishment of persistent infection resulted in downmodulation of the level of plasma viremia following treatment cessation, compared to the viremia seen in untreated control animals, animals treated with regimens known to be ineffective, or the cumulative experience with the natural history of plasma viremia following infection with SIVsmE660. The results suggest that the host may be able to effectively control SIV infection if the initial exposure occurs under favorable conditions of low viral burden and in the absence of ongoing high level cytopathic infection of responding cells. These findings may be particularly important in relation to prospects for control of primate lentiviruses in the settings of

  11. Evaluation of -2 RANTES vaginal microbicide formulations in a nonhuman primate simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge model.

    PubMed

    Kish-Catalone, Tina; Pal, Ranajit; Parrish, John; Rose, Nicholas; Hocker, Lindsey; Hudacik, Lauren; Reitz, Marvin; Gallo, Robert; Devico, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    A potential strategy to combat the worldwide AIDS epidemic is to develop a vaginal microbicide that prevents the sexual transmission of HIV-1. One approach for preventing vaginal HIV transmission is to block the viral coreceptor CCR5 with naturally occurring chemokine ligands. In this study, we used a cynomolgus macaque model to evaluate whether a variant of the CCR5 ligand RANTES (-2 RANTES), tested alone or in a nonphospholipid liposome carrier (Novasomes 7474), blocks vaginal challenge with a CCR5-tropic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV(162P3)). When tested in vitro, the synthetic chemokine potently inhibited SHIV(162P3) infection of cynomolgus macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Colposcopic examinations of treated animals and histological examination of cervicovaginal biopsies showed minimal signs of tissue inflammation following vaginal application of Novasomes 7474, -2 RANTES formulated in Novasomes 7474, or -2 RANTES alone. Following vaginal challenge with SHIV(162P3), complete protection was observed in four of six animals treated vaginally with -2 RANTES (0.13 mM) formulated in Novasomes 7474. However, the same proportion of animals was protected by treatment with Novasomes 7474 carrier alone. Two of five animals treated with 0.5 mM -2 RANTES in PBS were protected from infection. Further, all animals were infected when treated with lower chemokine concentrations. These findings indicate that natural CCR5 ligands may have limited efficacy in stringent nonhuman primate models for vaginal infection. In comparison, liposomal agents such as Novasomes 7474 provide comparatively robust protection against vaginal transmission. PMID:17263630

  12. Noninvasive follow-up of simian immunodeficiency virus infection in wild-living nonhabituated western lowland gorillas in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Etienne, Lucie; Locatelli, Sabrina; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Esteban, Amandine; Butel, Christelle; Liegeois, Florian; Aghokeng, Avelin; Delaporte, Eric; Mpoudi Ngole, Eitel; Peeters, Martine

    2012-09-01

    Simian immunodeficiency viruses infecting western lowland gorillas (SIVgor) are closely related to HIV-1 and are most likely the ancestors of HIV-1 groups O and P. At present, limited data are available on genetic diversity, transmission, viral evolution, and pathogenicity of SIVgor in its natural host. Between 2004 and 2011, 961 putative gorilla fecal samples were collected at the Campo Ma'an National Park, Cameroon. Among them, 16% cross-reacted with HIV-1 antibodies, corresponding to at least 34 infected gorillas. Combining host genotyping and field data, we identified four social groups composed of 7 to 15 individuals each, with SIV rates ranging from 13% to 29%. Eleven SIVgor-infected gorillas were sampled multiple times; two most likely seroconverted during the study period, showing that SIVgor continues to spread. Phylogenetic analysis of partial env and pol sequences revealed cocirculation of closely related and divergent strains among gorillas from the same social group, indicating SIVgor transmissions within and between groups. Parental links could be inferred for some gorillas infected with closely related strains, suggesting vertical transmission, but horizontal transmission by sexual or aggressive behavior was also suspected. Intrahost molecular evolution in one gorilla over a 5-year period showed viral adaptations characteristic of escape mutants, i.e., V1V2 loop elongation and an increased number of glycosylation sites. Here we show for the first time the feasibility of noninvasive monitoring of nonhabituated gorillas to study SIVgor infection over time at both the individual and population levels. This approach can also be applied more generally to study other pathogens in wildlife. PMID:22740419

  13. ALVAC-SIV-gag-pol-env-Based Vaccination and Macaque Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I (A*01) Delay Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac-Induced Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pal, R.; Venzon, D.; Letvin, N. L.; Santra, S.; Montefiori, D. C.; Miller, N. R.; Tryniszewska, E.; Lewis, M. G.; VanCott, T. C.; Hirsch, V.; Woodward, R.; Gibson, A.; Grace, M.; Dobratz, E.; Markham, P. D.; Hel, Z.; Nacsa, J.; Klein, M.; Tartaglia, J.; Franchini, G.

    2002-01-01

    T-cell-mediated immune effector mechanisms play an important role in the containment of human immunodeficiency virus/simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV/SIV) replication after infection. Both vaccination- and infection-induced T-cell responses are dependent on the host major histocompatibility complex classes I and II (MHC-I and MHC-II) antigens. Here we report that both inherent, host-dependent immune responses to SIVmac251 infection and vaccination-induced immune responses to viral antigens were able to reduce virus replication and/or CD4+ T-cell loss. Both the presence of the MHC-I Mamu-A*01 genotype and vaccination of rhesus macaques with ALVAC-SIV-gag-pol-env (ALVAC-SIV-gpe) contributed to the restriction of SIVmac251 replication during primary infection, preservation of CD4+ T cells, and delayed disease progression following intrarectal challenge exposure of the animals to SIVmac251 (561). ALVAC-SIV-gpe immunization induced cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses cumulatively in 67% of the immunized animals. Following viral challenge, a significant secondary virus-specific CD8+ T-cell response was observed in the vaccinated macaques. In the same immunized macaques, a decrease in virus load during primary infection (P = 0.0078) and protection from CD4 loss during both acute and chronic phases of infection (P = 0.0099 and P = 0.03, respectively) were observed. A trend for enhanced survival of the vaccinated macaques was also observed. Neither boosting the ALVAC-SIV-gpe with gp120 immunizations nor administering the vaccine by the combination of mucosal and systemic immunization routes increased significantly the protective effect of the ALVAC-SIV-gpe vaccine. While assessing the role of MHC-I Mamu-A*01 alone in the restriction of viremia following challenge of nonvaccinated animals with other SIV isolates, we observed that the virus load was not significantly lower in Mamu-A*01-positive macaques following intravenous challenge with either SIVmac251 (561) or

  14. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Monoclonal Antibodies Suppress Acute Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Viremia and Limit Seeding of Cell-Associated Viral Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Pegu, Amarendra; Wang, Keyun; McGinnis, Kathleen; Nason, Martha; Foulds, Kathryn; Letukas, Valerie; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Chen, Xuejun; Todd, John Paul; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Rao, Srinivas; Michael, Nelson L.; Robb, Merlin L.; Mascola, John R.; Koup, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) administered shortly after human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can suppress viremia and limit seeding of the viral reservoir, but lifelong treatment is required for the majority of patients. Highly potent broadly neutralizing HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can reduce plasma viremia when administered during chronic HIV-1 infection, but the therapeutic potential of these antibodies during acute infection is unknown. We tested the ability of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-specific broadly neutralizing MAbs to suppress acute simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) replication in rhesus macaques. Four groups of macaques were infected with SHIV-SF162P3 and received (i) the CD4-binding-site MAb VRC01; (ii) a combination of a more potent clonal relative of VRC01 (VRC07-523) and a V3 glycan-dependent MAb (PGT121); (iii) daily cART, all on day 10, just prior to expected peak plasma viremia; or (iv) no treatment. Daily cART was initiated 11 days after MAb administration and was continued for 13 weeks in all treated animals. Over a period of 11 days after a single administration, MAb treatment significantly reduced peak viremia, accelerated the decay slope, and reduced total viral replication compared to untreated controls. Proviral DNA in lymph node CD4 T cells was also diminished after treatment with the dual MAb. These data demonstrate the virological effect of potent MAbs and support future clinical trials that investigate HIV-1-neutralizing MAbs as adjunctive therapy with cART during acute HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE Treatment of chronic HIV-1 infection with potent broadly neutralizing HIV-1 MAbs has been shown to significantly reduce plasma viremia. However, the antiviral effect of MAb treatment during acute HIV-1 infection is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that MAbs targeting the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein both suppress acute SHIV plasma viremia and limit CD4 T cell-associated viral DNA. These

  15. Detection of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus in Semen, Urethra, and Male Reproductive Organs during Efficient Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Matusali, G.; Dereuddre-Bosquet, N.; Le Tortorec, A.; Moreau, M.; Satie, A.-P.; Mahé, D.; Roumaud, P.; Bourry, O.; Sylla, N.; Bernard-Stoecklin, S.; Pruvost, A.; Le Grand, R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A number of men receiving prolonged suppressive highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) still shed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in semen. To investigate whether this seminal shedding may be due to poor drug penetration and/or viral production by long-lived cells within male genital tissues, we analyzed semen and reproductive tissues from macaques chronically infected with simian immunodeficiency virus mac251 (SIVmac251) who were treated for 4 months with HAART, which was intensified over the last 7 weeks with an integrase inhibitor. We showed that a subset of treated animals continued shedding SIV in semen despite efficient HAART. This shedding was not associated with low antiretroviral drug concentrations in semen or in testis, epididymis, seminal vesicles, and prostate. HAART had no significant impact on SIV RNA in the urethra, whereas it drastically reduced SIV RNA levels in the prostate and vas deferens and to a lesser extent in the epididymis and seminal vesicle. The only detectable SIV RNA-positive cells within the male genital tract after HAART were urethral macrophages. SIV DNA levels in genital tissues were not decreased by HAART, suggesting the presence throughout the male genital tract of nonproductively infected cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that 4 months of HAART induced variable and limited control of viral infection in the male reproductive organs, particularly in the urethra, and suggest that infected long-lived cells in the male genital tract may be involved in persistent seminal shedding during HAART. These results pave the way for further investigations of male genital organ infection in long-term-treated infected individuals. IMPORTANCE A substantial subset of men receiving prolonged HAART suppressing viral loads in the blood still harbor HIV in semen, and cases of sexual transmission have been reported. To understand the origin of this persistence, we analyzed the semen and male reproductive tissues from SIV

  16. Gut Mucosal FOXP3+ Regulatory CD4+ T Cells and Nonregulatory CD4+ T Cells Are Differentially Affected by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Rhesus Macaques▿

    PubMed Central

    Allers, Kristina; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Hofmann, Jörg; Unbehaun, Anett; Kunkel, Désirée; Moos, Verena; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Sauermann, Ulrike; Epple, Hans-Jörg; Schneider, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract represents a major site for human and simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV and SIV) replication and CD4+ T-cell depletion. Despite severe depletion of mucosal CD4+ T cells, FOXP3+ regulatory CD4+ T cells (Treg) are highly increased in the gut mucosa of chronically HIV-infected individuals and may contribute to HIV pathogenesis, either by their immunosuppressive function or as a significant target cell population for virus production. Little is known about the susceptibility of mucosal Treg to viral infection and the longitudinal effect of HIV/SIV infection on Treg dynamics. In this study, we determined the level of SIV infection in Treg and nonregulatory CD4+ T cells (non-Treg) isolated from the colon of SIV-infected rhesus macaques. The dynamics of mucosal Treg and alterations in the mucosal CD4+ T-cell pool were examined longitudinally. Our findings indicate that mucosal Treg were less susceptible to productive SIV infection than non-Treg and thus were selectively spared from SIV-mediated cell death. In addition to improved survival, local expansion of Treg by SIV-induced proliferation of the mucosal CD4+ T-cell pool facilitated the accumulation of mucosal Treg during the course of infection. High frequency of mucosal Treg in chronic SIV infection was strongly related to a reduction of perforin-expressing cells. In conclusion, this study suggests that mucosal Treg are less affected by productive SIV infection than non-Treg and therefore spared from depletion. Although SIV production is limited in mucosal Treg, Treg accumulation may indirectly contribute to viral persistence by suppressing antiviral immune responses. PMID:20071575

  17. Impact of Short-Term Combined Antiretroviral Therapy on Brain Virus Burden in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected and CD8+ Lymphocyte-Depleted Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Annamalai, Lakshmanan; Bhaskar, Veena; Pauley, Douglas R.; Knight, Heather; Williams, Kenneth; Lentz, Margaret; Ratai, Eva; Westmoreland, Susan V.; González, R. Gilberto; O'Neil, Shawn P.

    2010-01-01

    Antiretroviral drugs suppress virus burden in the cerebrospinal fluid of HIV-infected individuals; however, the direct effect of antiretrovirals on virus replication in brain parenchyma is poorly understood. We investigated the effect of short-term combined antiretroviral therapy (CART) on brain virus burden in rhesus monkeys using the CD8-depletion model of accelerated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) encephalitis. Four monkeys received CART (consisting of the nonpenetrating agents PMPA and RCV) for four weeks, beginning 28 days after SIV inoculation. Lower virus burdens were measured by real-time RT-PCR in four of four regions of brain from monkeys that received CART as compared with four SIV-infected, untreated controls; however, the difference was only significant for the frontal cortex (P < 0.05). In contrast, significantly lower virus burdens were measured in plasma and four of five lymphoid compartments from animals that received CART. Surprisingly, despite normalization of neuronal function in treated animals, the numbers of activated macrophages/microglia and the magnitude of TNF-α mRNA expression in brain were similar between treated animals and controls. These results suggest that short-term therapy with antiretrovirals that fail to penetrate the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier can reduce brain virus burden provided systemic virus burden is suppressed; however, longer treatment may be required to completely resolve encephalitic lesions and microglial activation, which may reflect the longer half-life of the principal target cells of HIV/SIV in the brain (macrophages) versus lymphoid tissues (T lymphocytes). PMID:20595631

  18. Role of TRIM5α RING domain E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in capsid disassembly, reverse transcription blockade, and restriction of simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonghwa; Tipper, Christopher; Sodroski, Joseph

    2011-08-01

    The mammalian tripartite motif protein, TRIM5α, recognizes retroviral capsids entering the cytoplasm and blocks virus infection. Depending on the particular TRIM5α protein and retrovirus, complete disruption of the TRIM5α RING domain decreases virus-restricting activity to various degrees. TRIM5α exhibits RING domain-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, but the specific role of this activity in viral restriction is unknown. We created a panel of African green monkey TRIM5α (TRIM5α(AGM)) mutants, many of which are specifically altered in RING domain E3 ubiquitin ligase function, and characterized the phenotypes of these mutants with respect to restriction of simian and human immunodeficiency viruses (SIV(mac) and HIV-1, respectively). TRIM5α(AGM) ubiquitin ligase activity was essential for both the accelerated disassembly of SIV(mac) capsids and the disruption of reverse transcription. The levels of SIV(mac) particulate capsids in the cytosol of target cells expressing the TRIM5α variants strongly correlated with the levels of viral late reverse transcripts. RING-mediated ubiquitylation and B30.2(SPRY) domain-determined capsid binding independently contributed to the potency of SIV(mac) restriction by TRIM5α(AGM). In contrast, TRIM5α proteins attenuated in RING ubiquitin ligase function still accelerated HIV-1 capsid disassembly, inhibited reverse transcription, and blocked infection. Replacement of the helix-4/5 loop in the SIV(mac) capsid with the corresponding region of the HIV-1 capsid diminished the dependence of restriction on TRIM5α RING function. Thus, ubiquitylation mediated by the RING domain of TRIM5α(AGM) is essential for blocking SIV(mac) infection at the stage of capsid uncoating. PMID:21680520

  19. Combination Emtricitabine and Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate Prevents Vaginal Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Macaques Harboring Chlamydia trachomatis and Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Radzio, Jessica; Henning, Tara; Jenkins, Leecresia; Ellis, Shanon; Farshy, Carol; Phillips, Christi; Holder, Angela; Kuklenyik, Susan; Dinh, Chuong; Hanson, Debra; McNicholl, Janet; Heneine, Walid; Papp, John; Kersh, Ellen N; García-Lerma, J Gerardo

    2016-05-15

    Genital inflammation associated with sexually transmitted infections increases susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but it is unclear whether the increased risk can reduce the efficacy of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). We investigated whether coinfection of macaques withChlamydia trachomatisandTrichomonas vaginalisdecreases the prophylactic efficacy of oral emtricitabine (FTC)/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF). Macaques were exposed to simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) vaginally each week for up to 16 weeks and received placebo or FTC/TDF pericoitally. All animals in the placebo group were infected with SHIV, while 4 of 6 PrEP recipients remained uninfected (P= .03). Oral FTC/TDF maintains efficacy in a macaque model of sexually transmitted coinfection, although the infection of 2 macaques signals a modest loss of PrEP activity. PMID:26743846

  20. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVagm Efficiently Utilizes Non-CCR5 Entry Pathways in African Green Monkey Lymphocytes: Potential Role for GPR15 and CXCR6 as Viral Coreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Riddick, Nadeene E.; Wu, Fan; Matsuda, Kenta; Whitted, Sonya; Ourmanov, Ilnour; Goldstein, Simoy; Goeken, Robert M.; Plishka, Ronald J.; Buckler-White, Alicia; Brenchley, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT African green monkeys (AGM) are natural hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and infection in these animals is generally nonpathogenic, whereas infection of nonnatural hosts, such as rhesus macaques (RM), is commonly pathogenic. CCR5 has been described as the primary entry coreceptor for SIV in vivo, while human-derived CXCR6 and GPR15 also appear to be used in vitro. However, sooty mangabeys that are genetically deficient in CCR5 due to an out-of-frame deletion are infectible with SIVsmm, indicating that SIVsmm can use alternative coreceptors in vivo. In this study, we examined the CCR5 dependence of SIV strains derived from vervet AGM (SIVagmVer) and the ability of AGM-derived GPR15 and CXCR6 to serve as potential entry coreceptors. We found that SIVagmVer replicated efficiently in AGM and RM peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the presence of the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc, despite the fact that maraviroc was capable of blocking the CCR5-tropic strains SIVmac239, SIVsmE543-3, and simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-AD8 in RM PBMC. We also found that AGM CXCR6 and AGM GPR15, to a lesser extent, supported entry of pseudotype viruses bearing SIVagm envelopes, including SIVagm transmitted/founder envelopes. Lastly, we found that CCR5, GPR15, and CXCR6 mRNAs were detected in AGM and RM memory CD4+ T cells. These results suggest that GPR15 and CXCR6 are expressed on AGM CD4+ T cells and are potential alternative coreceptors for SIVagm use in vivo. These data suggest that the use of non-CCR5 entry pathways may be a common feature of SIV replication in natural host species, with the potential to contribute to nonpathogenicity in these animals. IMPORTANCE African green monkeys (AGM) are natural hosts of SIV, and infection in these animals generally does not cause AIDS, whereas SIV-infected rhesus macaques (RM) typically develop AIDS. Although it has been reported that SIV generally uses CD4 and CCR5 to enter target cells in vivo, other

  1. Critical Role for the Adenosine Pathway in Controlling Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Immune Activation and Inflammation in Gut Mucosal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    He, Tianyu; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Gillespie, Delbert G.; Xu, Cuiling; Stock, Jennifer L.; Ma, Dongzhu; Policicchio, Benjamin B.; Raehtz, Kevin D.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Apetrei, Cristian; Jackson, Edwin K.; Macatangay, Bernard J. C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The role of the adenosine (ADO) pathway in human immunodeficiency virus type 1/simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1/SIV) infection remains unclear. We compared SIVsab-induced changes of markers related to ADO production (CD39 and CD73) and breakdown (CD26 and adenosine deaminase) on T cells from blood, lymph nodes, and intestine collected from pigtailed macaques (PTMs) and African green monkeys (AGMs) that experience different SIVsab infection outcomes. We also measured ADO and inosine (INO) levels in tissues by mass spectrometry. Finally, we assessed the suppressive effect of ADO on proinflammatory cytokine production after T cell receptor stimulation. The baseline level of both CD39 and CD73 coexpression on regulatory T cells and ADO levels were higher in AGMs than in PTMs. Conversely, high INO levels associated with dramatic increases in CD26 expression and adenosine deaminase activity were observed in PTMs during chronic SIV infection. Immune activation and inflammation markers in the gut and periphery inversely correlated with ADO and directly correlated with INO. Ex vivo administration of ADO significantly suppressed proinflammatory cytokine production by T cells in both species. In conclusion, the opposite dynamics of ADO pathway-related markers and contrasting ADO/INO levels in species with divergent proinflammatory responses to SIV infection support a key role of ADO in controlling immune activation/inflammation in nonprogressive SIV infections. Changes in ADO levels predominately occurred in the gut, suggesting that the ADO pathway may be involved in sparing natural hosts of SIVs from developing SIV-related gut dysfunction. Focusing studies of the ADO pathway on mucosal sites of viral replication is warranted. IMPORTANCE The mechanisms responsible for the severe gut dysfunction characteristic of progressive HIV and SIV infection in humans and macaques are not completely elucidated. We report that ADO may play a key role in controlling immune

  2. Identification of a Subset of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1), HIV-2, and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Strains Able To Exploit an Alternative Coreceptor on Untransformed Human Brain and Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Willey, Samantha J.; Reeves, Jacqueline D.; Hudson, Richard; Miyake, Koichi; Dejucq, Nathalie; Schols, Dominique; Clercq, Erik De; Bell, Jeanne; McKnight, Áine; Clapham, Paul R.

    2003-01-01

    The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 are the major coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). At least 12 other chemokine receptors or close relatives support infection by particular HIV and SIV strains on CD4+ transformed indicator cell lines in vitro. However, the role of these alternative coreceptors in vivo is presently thought to be insignificant. Infection of cell lines expressing high levels of recombinant CD4 and coreceptors thus does not provide a true indication of coreceptor use in vivo. We therefore tested primary untransformed cell cultures that lack CCR5 and CXCR4, including astrocytes and brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs), for naturally expressed alternative coreceptors functional for HIV and SIV infection. An adenovirus vector (Ad-CD4) was used to express CD4 in CD4− astrocytes and thus confer efficient infection if a functional coreceptor is present. Using a large panel of viruses with well-defined coreceptor usage, we identified a subset of HIV and SIV strains able to infect two astrocyte cultures derived from adult brain tissue. Astrocyte infection was partially inhibited by several chemokines, indicating a role for the chemokine receptor family in the observed infection. BMVECs were weakly positive for CD4 but negative for CCR5 and CXCR4 and were susceptible to infection by the same subset of isolates that infected astrocytes. BMVEC infection was efficiently inhibited by the chemokine vMIP-I, implicating one of its receptors as an alternative coreceptor for HIV and SIV infection. Furthermore, we tested whether the HIV type 1 and type 2 strains identified were able to infect peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) via an alternative coreceptor. Several strains replicated in Δ32/Δ32 CCR5 PBMCs with CXCR4 blocked by AMD3100. This AMD3100-resistant replication was also sensitive to vMIP-I inhibition. The nature and potential role of this alternative coreceptor(s) in HIV infection

  3. Increased cellular immune responses and CD4+ T-cell proliferation correlate with reduced plasma viral load in SIV challenged recombinant simian varicella virus - simian immunodeficiency virus (rSVV-SIV) vaccinated rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An effective AIDS vaccine remains one of the highest priorities in HIV-research. Our recent study showed that vaccination of rhesus macaques with recombinant simian varicella virus (rSVV) vector – simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) envelope and gag genes, induced neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses to SIV and also significantly reduced plasma viral loads following intravenous pathogenic challenge with SIVMAC251/CX1. Findings The purpose of this study was to define cellular immunological correlates of protection in rSVV-SIV vaccinated and SIV challenged animals. Immunofluorescent staining and multifunctional assessment of SIV-specific T-cell responses were evaluated in both Experimental and Control vaccinated animal groups. Significant increases in the proliferating CD4+ T-cell population and polyfunctional T-cell responses were observed in all Experimental-vaccinated animals compared with the Control-vaccinated animals. Conclusions Increased CD4+ T-cell proliferation was significantly and inversely correlated with plasma viral load. Increased SIV-specific polyfunctional cytokine responses and increased proliferation of CD4+ T-cell may be crucial to control plasma viral loads in vaccinated and SIVMAC251/CX1 challenged macaques. PMID:22889373

  4. Two-Year Follow-Up of Macaques Developing Intermittent Control of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Homolog Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac251 in the Chronic Phase of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shytaj, Iart Luca; Nickel, Gabrielle; Arts, Eric; Farrell, Nicholas; Biffoni, Mauro; Pal, Ranajit; Chung, Hye Kyung; LaBranche, Celia; Montefiori, David; Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Lewis, Mark G.; Sacha, Jonah B.; Palamara, Anna Teresa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Off-therapy control of viremia by HIV-infected individuals has been associated with two likely players: a restricted viral reservoir and an efficient cell-mediated immune response. We previously showed that a combination of highly suppressive antiretroviral therapy and two experimental drugs, i.e., auranofin and buthionine sulfoximine, was able to reduce the viral reservoir, elicit efficient cell-mediated antiviral responses, and induce intermittent posttherapy viral load control in chronically SIVmac251-infected macaques. We here show that the macaques that had received this drug combination and then stopped antiretroviral therapy were also able to maintain low numbers of activated CD4+ T cells at viral rebound. Moreover, these macaques consistently displayed low-level simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) diversity, which was in line with the strong and broadly reactive cell-mediated immune responses against conserved Gag antigens. Extended follow-up showed that the two macaques that had received the complete drug combination remained healthy and did not develop AIDS in 2 years of follow-up after therapy suspension. This disease-free survival is longer than twice the average time of progression to AIDS in SIVmac251-infected rhesus macaques. These results suggest that limited numbers of activated T cells at viral rebound and subsequent development of broadly reactive cell-mediated responses may be interrelated in reducing the viral reservoir. IMPORTANCE The HIV reservoir in CD4+ T cells represents one main obstacle to HIV eradication. Recent studies, however, show that a drastic reduction of this reservoir is insufficient for inducing a functional cure of AIDS. In the present work, we thoroughly studied and subjected to long-term follow-up two macaques showing intermittent control of the virus following suspension of antiretroviral therapy plus an experimental antireservoir treatment, i.e., the gold salt auranofin and the investigational chemotherapeutic

  5. Human and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Mediated Upregulation of the Apoptotic Factor TRAIL Occurs in Antigen-Presenting Cells from AIDS-Susceptible but Not from AIDS-Resistant Species▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nayoung; Dabrowska, Alicja; Jenner, Richard G.; Aldovini, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infections lead to AIDS in humans and rhesus macaques (RM), while they are asymptomatic in species naturally infected with SIV, such as chimpanzees, sooty mangabeys (SM), and African green monkeys (AGM). Differential CD4+ T-cell apoptosis may be responsible for these species-specific differences in susceptibility to disease. To identify factors that influence the different apoptotic responses of these species, we analyzed virus-infected human and nonhuman primate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We found that the apoptotic factor TRAIL was present at higher levels in human and RM PBMC cultures and was mediating, at least in part, CD4+ T-cell apoptosis in these cultures. The species-specific increase in TRAIL and death receptor expression observed with cultures also occurred in vivo in SIV-infected RM but not in SIV-infected SM. In human and RM myeloid immature dendritic cells and macrophages, the virus-induced expression of TRAIL and other interferon-inducible genes, which did not occur in the same cells from chimpanzee, SM, and AGM, was Tat dependent. Our results link the differential induction of TRAIL in human and nonhuman primate cells to species-specific differences in disease susceptibility. PMID:17494085

  6. Human and simian immunodeficiency virus-mediated upregulation of the apoptotic factor TRAIL occurs in antigen-presenting cells from AIDS-susceptible but not from AIDS-resistant species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nayoung; Dabrowska, Alicja; Jenner, Richard G; Aldovini, Anna

    2007-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infections lead to AIDS in humans and rhesus macaques (RM), while they are asymptomatic in species naturally infected with SIV, such as chimpanzees, sooty mangabeys (SM), and African green monkeys (AGM). Differential CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis may be responsible for these species-specific differences in susceptibility to disease. To identify factors that influence the different apoptotic responses of these species, we analyzed virus-infected human and nonhuman primate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We found that the apoptotic factor TRAIL was present at higher levels in human and RM PBMC cultures and was mediating, at least in part, CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis in these cultures. The species-specific increase in TRAIL and death receptor expression observed with cultures also occurred in vivo in SIV-infected RM but not in SIV-infected SM. In human and RM myeloid immature dendritic cells and macrophages, the virus-induced expression of TRAIL and other interferon-inducible genes, which did not occur in the same cells from chimpanzee, SM, and AGM, was Tat dependent. Our results link the differential induction of TRAIL in human and nonhuman primate cells to species-specific differences in disease susceptibility. PMID:17494085

  7. Protective Role of the Virus-Specific Immune Response for Development of Severe Neurologic Signs in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Sopper, Sieghart; Sauer, Ursula; Hemm, Susanne; Demuth, Monika; Müller, Justus; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Hunsmann, Gerhard; ter Meulen, Volker; Dörries, Rüdiger

    1998-01-01

    The pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus-associated motor and cognitive disorders is poorly understood. In this context both a protective and a harmful role of the immune system has been discussed. This question was addressed in the present study by correlating the occurrence of neurologic disease in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques with disease progression and the humoral and cellular intrathecal antiviral immune response. Overt neurologic signs consisting of ataxia and apathy were observed at a much higher frequency in rapid progressor animals (6 of 12) than in slow progressors (1 of 7). Whereas slow progressors mounted a strong antiviral antibody (Ab) response as evidenced by enzyme-linked immunosorbent and immunospot assays, neither virus-specific Ab titers nor Ab-secreting cells could be found in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or brain parenchyma of rapid progressors. Similarly, increased infiltration of CD8+ T cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for viral antigens were detected only in the CSF of slow progressors. The finding that neurologic signs develop frequently in SIV-infected macaques in the absence of an antiviral immune response demonstrates that the immune system does not contribute to the development of motor disorders in these animals. Moreover, the lower incidence of neurologic symptoms in slow progressors with a strong intrathecal immune response suggests a protective role of the virus-specific immunity in immunodeficiency virus-induced central nervous system disease. PMID:9811731

  8. Immune activation and viral burden in acute disease induced by simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsmmPBj14: correlation between in vitro and in vivo events.

    PubMed Central

    Schwiebert, R; Fultz, P N

    1994-01-01

    The simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsmmPBj14 (SIV-PBj14) is an atypical lentivirus that causes acute disease and death in pig-tailed macaques and in vitro replicates efficiently in resting macaque lymphocytes and activates and induces proliferation of lymphocytes. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that production of large quantities of SIV-PBj14 induces widespread immune activation and elaboration of cytokines which lead directly to the death of infected pig-tailed macaques. Following intravenous inoculation of pig-tailed macaques with SIV-PBj14, acute disease developed and was characterized by high levels of plasma viremia, p27gag antigenemia, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-6 (IL-6). All animals died within 10 days of infection, at which time some animals had as many as 100% CD4+ cells in the periphery and lymphoid tissues infected. During the last few days before death, titers of infectious virus in blood increased as much as 10(5)-fold. By using dual-label immunofluorescence assays for detection of cell surface activation markers, both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes were shown to express the IL-2 and transferrin receptors following either in vivo or in vitro infection with SIV-PBj14. Furthermore, in vitro infection of quiescent macaque lymphocytes by SIV-PBj14 was accompanied by proliferation of both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte subsets, as measured by incorporation of [3H]thymidine. Increases in numbers of activated lymphocytes and levels of proinflammatory cytokines in plasma coincided with increased amounts of detectable virus in vivo. Clinical signs of disease and pathologic findings were most consistent with death from a shock-like syndrome, in which acute-phase inflammatory cytokines are known to play a major role. Tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-2, and IL-6 were detected in some cultures infected with SIV-PBj14, but this finding was not consistent. When cytokines were detected, their concentrations were essentially no different

  9. Genetic diversity of simian immunodeficiency viruses from West African green monkeys: evidence of multiple genotypes within populations from the same geographical locale.

    PubMed Central

    Bibollet-Ruche, F; Brengues, C; Galat-Luong, A; Galat, G; Pourrut, X; Vidal, N; Veas, F; Durand, J P; Cuny, G

    1997-01-01

    High simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) seroprevalence rates have been reported in the different African green monkey (AGM) subspecies. Genetic diversity of these viruses far exceeds the diversity observed in the other lentivirus-infected human and nonhuman primates and is thought to reflect ancient introduction of SIV in the AGM population. We investigate here genetic diversity of SIVagm in wild-living AGM populations from the same geographical locale (i.e., sympatric population) in Senegal. For 11 new strains, we PCR amplified and sequenced two regions of the genome spanning the first tat exon and part of the transmembrane glycoprotein. Phylogenetic analysis of these sequences shows that viruses found in sympatric populations cluster into distinct lineages, with at least two distinct genotypes in each troop. These data strongly suggest an ancient introduction of these divergent viruses in the AGM population. PMID:8985351

  10. The NF-kappa B binding site is necessary for efficient replication of simian immunodeficiency virus of macaques in primary macrophages but not in T cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bellas, R E; Hopkins, N; Li, Y

    1993-01-01

    We demonstrate here that the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) binding site in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac) long terminal repeat is essential for efficient virus replication in primary alveolar macrophages but dispensable for efficient replication in primary T cells. Mutation of the NF-kappa B site does not seriously impair replication of a T-cell-tropic SIVmac239 or a macrophagetropic SIVmacEm* in peripheral blood lymphocytes or established CD4+ cell lines; however, mutation of the NF-kappa B site prevents efficient SIVmacEm* replication in primary alveolar macrophages. These data suggest that efficient replication in primary macrophages requires both envelope and long terminal repeat determinants. Images PMID:8474179

  11. Dynamics of Cytokine/Chemokine Responses in Intestinal CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kenway-Lynch, Carys S.; Das, Arpita; Pan, Diganta; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of intestinal CD4+ T cells was associated with decreased production of several T-helper 1 (TH1) and TH2 cytokines and increased production of interleukin 17 (IL-17), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), CCL4, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by CD8+ T cells 21 days after simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in rhesus macaques. Shifting of mucosal TH1 to TH2 or T-cytotoxic 1 (TC1) to TC2 cytokine profiles was not evident. Additionally, both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells showed upregulation of macrophage migration inhibition factor (MIF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-basic) cytokines that have been linked to HIV disease progression. PMID:23966391

  12. Short Communication: A Repeated Simian Human Immunodeficiency Virus Reverse Transcriptase/Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Cochallenge Macaque Model for the Evaluation of Microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Jessica; Derby, Nina; Aravantinou, Meropi; Kleinbeck, Kyle; Frank, Ines; Gettie, Agegnehu; Grasperge, Brooke; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Zydowsky, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Epidemiological studies suggest that prevalent herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection increases the risk of HIV acquisition, underscoring the need to develop coinfection models to evaluate promising prevention strategies. We previously established a single high-dose vaginal coinfection model of simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)/HSV-2 in Depo-Provera (DP)-treated macaques. However, this model does not appropriately mimic women's exposure. Repeated limiting dose SHIV challenge models are now used routinely to test prevention strategies, yet, at present, there are no reports of a repeated limiting dose cochallenge model in which to evaluate products targeting HIV and HSV-2. Herein, we show that 20 weekly cochallenges with 2–50 TCID50 simian human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT) and 107 pfu HSV-2 results in infection with both viruses (4/6 SHIV-RT, 6/6 HSV-2). The frequency and level of vaginal HSV-2 shedding were significantly greater in the repeated exposure model compared to the single high-dose model (p<0.0001). We used this new model to test the Council's on-demand microbicide gel, MZC, which is active against SHIV-RT in DP-treated macaques and HSV-2 and human papillomavirus (HPV) in mice. While MZC reduced SHIV and HSV-2 infections in our repeated limiting dose model when cochallenging 8 h after each gel application, a barrier effect of carrageenan (CG) that was not seen in DP-treated animals precluded evaluation of the significance of the antiviral activity of MZC. Both MZC and CG significantly (p<0.0001) reduced the frequency and level of vaginal HSV-2 shedding compared to no gel treatment. This validates the use of this repeated limiting dose cochallenge model for testing products targeting HIV and HSV-2. PMID:25354024

  13. Expression of human choriogonadotropin in monkey cells using a single simian virus 40 vector.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, V B; Beck, A K; Garramone, A J; Vellucci, V; Lustbader, J; Bernstine, E G

    1985-01-01

    We have inserted the cDNAs coding for both polypeptide subunits, alpha and beta, of human choriogonadotropin (hCG) into a single simian virus 40 expression vector in such a way that they replace the viral VP2 and VP1 coding sequences, respectively. Monkey cells infected with this virus and the appropriate helper virus produce dimeric hCG. hCG produced in this system was shown to chromatograph identically to standard hCG preparations on gel filtration and to be biologically active in the mouse uterine weight assay. Images PMID:2987938

  14. Highly Pathogenic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus mne Variants That Emerge during the Course of Infection Evolve Enhanced Infectivity and the Ability To Downregulate CD4 but Not Class I Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Parul G.; Yu Kimata, Monica T.; Biggins, Julia E.; Wilson, Joelle M.; Kimata, Jason T.

    2002-01-01

    The replicative, cytopathic, and antigenic properties of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) variants influence its replication efficiency in vivo. To further define the viral properties and determinants that may be important for high-level replication in vivo and progression to AIDS, we compared a minimally pathogenic SIVmne molecular clone with two highly pathogenic variants cloned from late stages of infection. Both variants had evolved greater infectivity than the parental clone due to mutations in nef. Interestingly, a pol determinant in one of the highly pathogenic variants also contributed to its increased infectivity. Furthermore, because replication in vivo may also be influenced by the ability of a virus to evade the cellular immune response of the host, we examined whether the variants were more capable of downregulating surface expression of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Decreased MHC class I expression was not observed in cells infected with any of the viruses. Furthermore, the Nef proteins of the highly pathogenic variants only slightly reduced surface MHC class I expression in transfected cells, although they efficiently downregulated CD4. Together, these data demonstrate that mutations which can enhance viral infectivity, as well as CD4 downregulation, may be important for efficient replication of SIV in the host. However, Nef-mediated reduction of MHC class I expression does not appear to be critical for the increased in vivo replicative ability of highly pathogenic late variants. PMID:12050354

  15. Vaccine-Induced Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific CD8+ T-Cell Responses Focused on a Single Nef Epitope Select for Escape Variants Shortly after Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tully, Damien C.; Cruz, Michael A.; Power, Karen A.; Veloso de Santana, Marlon G.; Bean, David J.; Ogilvie, Colin B.; Gadgil, Rujuta; Lima, Noemia S.; Magnani, Diogo M.; Ejima, Keisuke; Allison, David B.; Piatak, Michael; Altman, John D.; Parks, Christopher L.; Rakasz, Eva G.; Capuano, Saverio; Galler, Ricardo; Bonaldo, Myrna C.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Allen, Todd M.; Watkins, David I.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Certain major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) alleles (e.g., HLA-B*27) are enriched among human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals who suppress viremia without treatment (termed “elite controllers” [ECs]). Likewise, Mamu-B*08 expression also predisposes rhesus macaques to control simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication. Given the similarities between Mamu-B*08 and HLA-B*27, SIV-infected Mamu-B*08+ animals provide a model to investigate HLA-B*27-mediated elite control. We have recently shown that vaccination with three immunodominant Mamu-B*08-restricted epitopes (Vif RL8, Vif RL9, and Nef RL10) increased the incidence of elite control in Mamu-B*08+ macaques after challenge with the pathogenic SIVmac239 clone. Furthermore, a correlate analysis revealed that CD8+ T cells targeting Nef RL10 was correlated with improved outcome. Interestingly, this epitope is conserved between SIV and HIV-1 and exhibits a delayed and atypical escape pattern. These features led us to postulate that a monotypic vaccine-induced Nef RL10-specific CD8+ T-cell response would facilitate the development of elite control in Mamu-B*08+ animals following repeated intrarectal challenges with SIVmac239. To test this, we vaccinated Mamu-B*08+ animals with nef inserts in which Nef RL10 was either left intact (group 1) or disrupted by mutations (group 2). Although monkeys in both groups mounted Nef-specific cellular responses, only those in group 1 developed Nef RL10-specific CD8+ T cells. These vaccine-induced effector memory CD8+ T cells did not prevent infection. Escape variants emerged rapidly in the group 1 vaccinees, and ultimately, the numbers of ECs were similar in groups 1 and 2. High-frequency vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells focused on a single conserved epitope and therefore did not prevent infection or increase the incidence of elite control in Mamu-B*08+ macaques. IMPORTANCE Since elite control of chronic-phase viremia is a classic

  16. Identifying the target cell in primary simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection: highly activated memory CD4(+) T cells are rapidly eliminated in early SIV infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Veazey, R S; Tham, I C; Mansfield, K G; DeMaria, M; Forand, A E; Shvetz, D E; Chalifoux, L V; Sehgal, P K; Lackner, A A

    2000-01-01

    It has recently been shown that rapid and profound CD4(+) T-cell depletion occurs almost exclusively within the intestinal tract of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques within days of infection. Here we demonstrate (by three- and four-color flow cytometry) that this depletion is specific to a definable subset of CD4(+) T cells, namely, those having both a highly and/or acutely activated (CD69(+) CD38(+) HLA-DR(+)) and memory (CD45RA(-) Leu8(-)) phenotype. Moreover, we demonstrate that this subset of helper T cells is found primarily within the intestinal lamina propria. Viral tropism for this particular cell type (which has been previously suggested by various studies in vitro) could explain why profound CD4(+) T-cell depletion occurs in the intestine and not in peripheral lymphoid tissues in early SIV infection. Furthermore, we demonstrate that an acute loss of this specific subset of activated memory CD4(+) T cells may also be detected in peripheral blood and lymph nodes in early SIV infection. However, since this particular cell type is present in such small numbers in circulation, its loss does not significantly affect total CD4(+) T cell counts. This finding suggests that SIV and, presumably, human immunodeficiency virus specifically infect, replicate in, and eliminate definable subsets of CD4(+) T cells in vivo. PMID:10590091

  17. Low Frequency of Drug-Resistant Variants Selected by Long-Acting Rilpivirine in Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Containing HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Melody, Kevin; McBeth, Sarah; Kline, Christopher; Kashuba, Angela D. M.; Mellors, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) using antiretroviral drugs is effective in reducing the risk of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, but adherence to the PrEP regimen is needed. To improve adherence, a long-acting injectable formulation of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor rilpivirine (RPV LA) has been developed. However, there are concerns that PrEP may select for drug-resistant mutations during preexisting or breakthrough infections, which could promote the spread of drug resistance and limit options for antiretroviral therapy. To address this concern, we administered RPV LA to macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus containing HIV-1 RT (RT-SHIV). Peak plasma RPV levels were equivalent to those reported in human trials and waned over time after dosing. RPV LA resulted in a 2-log decrease in plasma viremia, and the therapeutic effect was maintained for 15 weeks, until plasma drug concentrations dropped below 25 ng/ml. RT mutations E138G and E138Q were detected in single clones from plasma virus in separate animals only at one time point, and no resistance mutations were detected in viral RNA isolated from tissues. Wild-type and E138Q RT-SHIV displayed similar RPV susceptibilities in vitro, whereas E138G conferred 2-fold resistance to RPV. Overall, selection of RPV-resistant variants was rare in an RT-SHIV macaque model despite prolonged exposure to slowly decreasing RPV concentrations following injection of RPV LA. PMID:26438501

  18. Low Frequency of Drug-Resistant Variants Selected by Long-Acting Rilpivirine in Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Containing HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Melody, Kevin; McBeth, Sarah; Kline, Christopher; Kashuba, Angela D M; Mellors, John W; Ambrose, Zandrea

    2015-12-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) using antiretroviral drugs is effective in reducing the risk of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, but adherence to the PrEP regimen is needed. To improve adherence, a long-acting injectable formulation of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor rilpivirine (RPV LA) has been developed. However, there are concerns that PrEP may select for drug-resistant mutations during preexisting or breakthrough infections, which could promote the spread of drug resistance and limit options for antiretroviral therapy. To address this concern, we administered RPV LA to macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus containing HIV-1 RT (RT-SHIV). Peak plasma RPV levels were equivalent to those reported in human trials and waned over time after dosing. RPV LA resulted in a 2-log decrease in plasma viremia, and the therapeutic effect was maintained for 15 weeks, until plasma drug concentrations dropped below 25 ng/ml. RT mutations E138G and E138Q were detected in single clones from plasma virus in separate animals only at one time point, and no resistance mutations were detected in viral RNA isolated from tissues. Wild-type and E138Q RT-SHIV displayed similar RPV susceptibilities in vitro, whereas E138G conferred 2-fold resistance to RPV. Overall, selection of RPV-resistant variants was rare in an RT-SHIV macaque model despite prolonged exposure to slowly decreasing RPV concentrations following injection of RPV LA. PMID:26438501

  19. Evidence for Early Local Viral Replication and Local Production of Antiviral Immunity upon Mucosal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus SHIV89.6 Infection in Macaca nemestrina

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Zandrea; Larsen, Kay; Thompson, Jannelle; Stevens, Yvonne; Finn, Eric; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Bosch, Marnix L.

    2001-01-01

    Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is largely a result of heterosexual exposure, leading many investigators to evaluate mucosal vaccines for protection against intravaginal (i.vag.) transmission in macaque models of AIDS. Relatively little is known, however, about the dynamics of viral replication and the ensuing immune response following mucosal infection. We have utilized a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) to study the differences in viremia, CD4 T-cell percentages, and mucosal and systemic anti-SHIV humoral and cellular immune responses during primary infection of animals infected either intravenously (i.v.) or i.vag. Positive viral cocultures, peripheral blood mononuclear cell viral load peaks, and CD4 cell declines were delayed by 1 week in the i.vag. inoculated animals compared to the animals infected i.v., demonstrating delayed viral spreading to the periphery. In contrast, mucosal anti-SHIV antibody levels were greater in magnitude and arose more rapidly and mucosal CD8+ T-cell responses were enhanced in the i.vag. group animals, whereas both the magnitudes and times of onset of systemic immune responses for the animals in the two groups did not differ. These observations demonstrate that compartmentalization of viral replication and induction of local antiviral immunity occur in the genital tract early after i.vag. but not i.v. inoculation. Induction of mucosal immunity to target this local, contained replication should be a goal in HIV vaccine development. PMID:11507204

  20. Correlation of Acute Humoral Response with Brain Virus Burden and Survival Time in Pig-Tailed Macaques Infected with the Neurovirulent Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVsmmFGb

    PubMed Central

    O’Neil, Shawn P.; Suwyn, Carolyn; Anderson, Daniel C.; Niedziela, Genevieve; Bradley, Juliette; Novembre, Francis J.; Herndon, James G.; McClure, Harold M.

    2004-01-01

    Infection of pig-tailed macaques with the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) isolate SIVsmmFGb frequently results in SIV encephalitis (SIVE) in addition to immunodeficiency and acquired immune deficiency syndrome. We used in situ hybridization to quantitate the number of SIV-infected cells in brain parenchyma, choroid plexus, and meninges from 17 macaques that developed acquired immune deficiency syndrome after infection with SIVsmmFGb. SIV-infected cells and histopathological lesions of SIVE were identified in 15 of 17 animals (88.2%), including 12 of 12 rapid progressors (RP) and 3 of 5 slow progressors (SP). The parenchymal virus burden was much greater in RP macaques than in the three SP macaques with SIVE (median values of 24.3 versus 0.3 infected cells/mm2, respectively; P < 0.05). Viral load differences between RP and SP with SIVE were less marked in choroid plexus (29.6 versus 12.8 infected cells/mm2, respectively) and meninges (133.0 versus 34.2 infected cells/mm2, respectively). A significant negative correlation was observed between the magnitude of the anti-SIV antibody titer at 1 month after inoculation and brain virus burden at necropsy (r = −0.614; P < 0.01). The close association between immune response and SIVE in this model should prove useful for identifying correlates of immune protection against primate lentiviral encephalitis. PMID:15039205

  1. Oral immunization with recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG simian immunodeficiency virus nef induces local and systemic cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lagranderie, M; Balazuc, A M; Gicquel, B; Gheorghiu, M

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant live Mycobacterium bovis BCG vectors (rBCG) induce strong cellular and humoral immune responses against various antigens after either systemic or oral immunization of mice. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses may contribute to the control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infections whose portal of entry is the gastrointestinal or genital mucosa. In this study, we immunized BALB/c mice with a recombinant BCG SIV nef and observed its behavior in oropharyngeal and target organ lymphoid tissues. The cellular immune responses, particularly the intestinal intraepithelial and systemic CTL responses, were investigated. The results showed that rBCG SIV nef translocated the oropharyngeal mucosa and intestinal epithelium. It diffused to and persisted in target lymphoid organs. Specific SIV Nef peptide proliferative responses and cytokine production were observed. Strong systemic and mucosal CTL responses were induced. In particular, we demonstrated direct specific anti-Nef CTL in intestinal intraepithelial CD8beta+ T cells. These findings provide evidence that orally administered rBCG SIV nef may contribute to local defenses against viral invasion. Therefore, rBCG SIV nef could be a candidate vaccine to protect against SIV infection and may be used to develop an oral rBCG HIV nef vaccine. PMID:9032366

  2. Loss of memory CD4+ T-cells in semi-wild mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) naturally infected with species-specific simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmnd-1.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Edward J D; Schmidt, Fabian; Liégeois, Florian; Kondova, Ivanela; Herbert, Anaïs; Ngoubangoye, Barthelemy; Rouet, François; Heeney, Jonathan L

    2014-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection is found in a number of African primate species and is thought to be generally non-pathogenic. However, studies of wild primates are limited to two species, with SIV infection appearing to have a considerably different outcome in each. Further examination of SIV-infected primates exposed to their natural environment is therefore warranted. We performed a large cross-sectional study of a cohort of semi-wild mandrills with naturally occurring SIV infection, including 39 SIV-negative and 33 species-specific SIVmnd-1-infected animals. This study was distinguished from previous reports by considerably greater sample size, examination of exclusively naturally infected animals in semi-wild conditions and consideration of simian T-lymphotropic virus (STLV) status in addition to SIVmnd-1 infection. We found that SIVmnd-1 infection was associated with a significant and progressive loss of memory CD4(+) T-cells. Limited but significant increases in markers of immune activation in the T-cell populations, significant increases in plasma neopterin and changes to B-cell subsets were also observed in SIV-infected animals. However, no increase in plasma soluble CD14 was observed. Histological examination of peripheral lymph nodes suggested that SIVmnd-1 infection was not associated with a significant disruption of the lymph node architecture. Whilst this species has evolved numerous strategies to resist the development of AIDS, significant effects of SIV infection could be observed when examined in a natural environment. STLVmnd-1 infection also had significant effects on some markers relevant to understanding SIV infection and thus should be considered in studies of SIV infection of African primates where present. PMID:24214347

  3. Vaccine-elicited memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes contribute to Mamu-A*01-associated control of simian/human immunodeficiency virus 89.6P replication in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Seaman, Michael S; Santra, Sampa; Newberg, Michael H; Philippon, Valerie; Manson, Kelledy; Xu, Ling; Gelman, Rebecca S; Panicali, Dennis; Mascola, John R; Nabel, Gary J; Letvin, Norman L

    2005-04-01

    The expression of particular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I alleles can influence the rate of disease progression following lentiviral infections. This effect is a presumed consequence of potent cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses that are restricted by these MHC class I molecules. The present studies have examined the impact of the MHC class I allele Mamu-A*01 on simian/human immunodeficiency virus 89.6P (SHIV-89.6P) infection in unvaccinated and vaccinated rhesus monkeys by exploring the contribution of dominant-epitope specific CTL in this setting. Expression of Mamu-A*01 in immunologically naive monkeys was not associated with improved control of viral replication, CD4+ T-lymphocyte loss, or survival. In contrast, Mamu-A*01+ monkeys that had received heterologous prime/boost immunizations prior to challenge maintained higher CD4+ T-lymphocyte levels and better control of SHIV-89.6P replication than Mamu-A*01- monkeys. This protection was associated with the evolution of high-frequency anamnestic CTL responses specific for a dominant Mamu-A*01-restricted Gag epitope following infection. These data indicate that specific MHC class I alleles can confer protection in the setting of a pathogenic SHIV infection by their ability to elicit memory CTL following vaccination. PMID:15795244

  4. Tracking the Emergence of Host-Specific Simian Immunodeficiency Virus env and nef Populations Reveals nef Early Adaptation and Convergent Evolution in Brain of Naturally Progressing Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Lamers, Susanna L.; Nolan, David J.; Rife, Brittany D.; Fogel, Gary B.; McGrath, Michael S.; Burdo, Tricia H.; Autissier, Patrick; Williams, Kenneth C.; Goodenow, Maureen M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT While a clear understanding of the events leading to successful establishment of host-specific viral populations and productive infection in the central nervous system (CNS) has not yet been reached, the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaque provides a powerful model for the study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intrahost evolution and neuropathogenesis. The evolution of the gp120 and nef genes, which encode two key proteins required for the establishment and maintenance of infection, was assessed in macaques that were intravenously inoculated with the same viral swarm and allowed to naturally progress to simian AIDS and potential SIV-associated encephalitis (SIVE). Longitudinal plasma samples and immune markers were monitored until terminal illness. Single-genome sequencing was employed to amplify full-length env through nef transcripts from plasma over time and from brain tissues at necropsy. nef sequences diverged from the founder virus faster than gp120 diverged. Host-specific sequence populations were detected in nef (∼92 days) before they were detected in gp120 (∼182 days). At necropsy, similar brain nef sequences were found in different macaques, indicating convergent evolution, while gp120 brain sequences remained largely host specific. Molecular clock and selection analyses showed weaker clock-like behavior and stronger selection pressure in nef than in gp120, with the strongest nef selection in the macaque with SIVE. Rapid nef diversification, occurring prior to gp120 diversification, indicates that early adaptation of nef in the new host is essential for successful infection. Moreover, the convergent evolution of nef sequences in the CNS suggests a significant role for nef in establishing neurotropic strains. IMPORTANCE The SIV-infected rhesus macaque model closely resembles HIV-1 immunopathogenesis, neuropathogenesis, and disease progression in humans. Macaques were intravenously infected with identical viral

  5. Neutralizing Antibodies in Sera from Macaques Infected with Chimeric Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Containing the Envelope Glycoproteins of either a Laboratory-Adapted Variant or a Primary Isolate of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Montefiori, David C.; Reimann, Keith A.; Wyand, Michael S.; Manson, Kelledy; Lewis, Mark G.; Collman, Ronald G.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Bolognesi, Dani P.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1998-01-01

    The magnitude and breadth of neutralizing antibodies raised in response to infection with chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) in rhesus macaques were evaluated. Infection with either SHIV-HXB2, SHIV-89.6, or SHIV-89.6PD raised high-titer neutralizing antibodies to the homologous SHIV (SHIV-89.6P in the case of SHIV-89.6PD-infected animals) and significant titers of neutralizing antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains MN and SF-2. With few exceptions, however, titers of neutralizing antibodies to heterologous SHIV were low or undetectable. The antibodies occasionally neutralized heterologous primary isolates of HIV-1; these antibodies required >40 weeks of infection to reach detectable levels. Notable was the potent neutralization of the HIV-1 89.6 primary isolate by serum samples from SHIV-89.6-infected macaques. These results demonstrate that SHIV-HXB2, SHIV-89.6, and SHIV-89.6P possess highly divergent, strain-specific neutralization epitopes. The results also provide insights into the requirements for raising neutralizing antibodies to primary isolates of HIV-1. PMID:9525675

  6. Generation of a neutralization-resistant CCR5 tropic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-MK38) molecular clone, a derivative of SHIV-89.6.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yuki; Yoneda, Mai; Otsuki, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yuji; Kato, Fumihiro; Matsuura, Kanako; Kikukawa, Minako; Matsushita, Shuzo; Hishiki, Takayuki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Miura, Tomoyuki

    2016-05-01

    Previously, we reported that a new genetically diverse CCR5 (R5) tropic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-MK38) adapted to rhesus monkeys became more neutralization resistant to SHIV-infected plasma than did the parental SHIV-KS661 clone. Here, to clarify the significance of the neutralization-resistant phenotype of SHIV in a macaque model, we initially investigated the precise neutralization phenotype of the SHIVs, including SHIV-MK38 molecular clones, using SHIV-MK38-infected plasma, a pooled plasma of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, soluble CD4 and anti-HIV-1 neutralizing mAbs, the epitopes of which were known. The results show that SHIV-KS661 had tier 1 neutralization sensitivity, but monkey-adapted R5 tropic SHIV-MK38 acquired neutralization resistance similar to that of tier 2 or 3 as a clone virus. Sequence analysis of the env gene suggested that the neutralization-resistant phenotype of SHIV-MK38 was acquired by conformational changes in Env associated with the net charge and potential N-linked glycosylation sites. To examine the relationship between neutralization phenotype and stably persistent infection in monkeys, we performed in vivo rectal inoculation experiments using a SHIV-MK38 molecular clone. The results showed that one of three rhesus monkeys exhibited durable infection with a plasma viral load of 105 copies ml- 1 despite the high antibody responses that occurred in the host. Whilst further improvements are required in the development of a challenge virus, it will be useful to generate a neutralization-resistant R5 tropic molecular clone of the SHIV-89.6 lineage commonly used for vaccine development - a result that can be used to explore the foundation of AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:26850058

  7. Perturbations of cell cycle control in T cells contribute to the different outcomes of simian immunodeficiency virus infection in rhesus macaques and sooty mangabeys.

    PubMed

    Paiardini, M; Cervasi, B; Sumpter, B; McClure, H M; Sodora, D L; Magnani, M; Staprans, S I; Piedimonte, G; Silvestri, G

    2006-01-01

    In contrast to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of humans and experimental simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of rhesus macaques (RMs), SIV infection of sooty mangabeys (SMs), a natural host African monkey species, is typically nonpathogenic and associated with preservation of CD4+ T-cell counts despite chronic high levels of viral replication. In previous studies, we have shown that the lack of SIV disease progression in SMs is related to lower levels of immune activation and bystander T-cell apoptosis compared to those of pathogenic HIV/SIV infection (G. Silvestri, D. Sodora, R. Koup, M. Paiardini, S. O'Neil, H. M. McClure, S. I. Staprans, and M. B. Feinberg, Immunity 18:441-452, 2003; G. Silvestri, A. Fedanov, S. Germon, N. Kozyr, W. J. Kaiser, D. A. Garber, H. M. McClure, M. B. Feinberg, and S. I. Staprans, J. Virol. 79:4043-4054, 2005). In HIV-infected patients, increased T-cell susceptibility to apoptosis is associated with a complex cell cycle dysregulation (CCD) that involves increased activation of the cyclin B/p34-cdc2 complex and abnormal nucleolar structure with dysregulation of nucleolin turnover. Here we report that CCD is also present during pathogenic SIV infection of RMs, and its extent correlates with the level of immune activation and T-cell apoptosis. In marked contrast, naturally SIV-infected SMs show normal regulation of cell cycle control (i.e., normal intracellular levels of cyclin B and preserved nucleolin turnover) and a low propensity to apoptosis in both peripheral blood- and lymph node-derived T cells. The absence of significant CCD in the AIDS-free, non-immune-activated SMs despite high levels of viral replication indicates that CCD is a marker of disease progression during lentiviral infection and supports the hypothesis that the preservation of cell cycle control may help to confer the disease-resistant phenotype of SIV-infected SMs. PMID:16378966

  8. Perturbations of Cell Cycle Control in T Cells Contribute to the Different Outcomes of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Rhesus Macaques and Sooty Mangabeys

    PubMed Central

    Paiardini, M.; Cervasi, B.; Sumpter, B.; McClure, H. M.; Sodora, D. L.; Magnani, M.; Staprans, S. I.; Piedimonte, G.; Silvestri, G.

    2006-01-01

    In contrast to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of humans and experimental simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of rhesus macaques (RMs), SIV infection of sooty mangabeys (SMs), a natural host African monkey species, is typically nonpathogenic and associated with preservation of CD4+ T-cell counts despite chronic high levels of viral replication. In previous studies, we have shown that the lack of SIV disease progression in SMs is related to lower levels of immune activation and bystander T-cell apoptosis compared to those of pathogenic HIV/SIV infection (G. Silvestri, D. Sodora, R. Koup, M. Paiardini, S. O’Neil, H. M. McClure, S. I. Staprans, and M. B. Feinberg, Immunity 18:441-452, 2003; G. Silvestri, A. Fedanov, S. Germon, N. Kozyr, W. J. Kaiser, D. A. Garber, H. M. McClure, M. B. Feinberg, and S. I. Staprans, J. Virol. 79:4043-4054, 2005). In HIV-infected patients, increased T-cell susceptibility to apoptosis is associated with a complex cell cycle dysregulation (CCD) that involves increased activation of the cyclin B/p34-cdc2 complex and abnormal nucleolar structure with dysregulation of nucleolin turnover. Here we report that CCD is also present during pathogenic SIV infection of RMs, and its extent correlates with the level of immune activation and T-cell apoptosis. In marked contrast, naturally SIV-infected SMs show normal regulation of cell cycle control (i.e., normal intracellular levels of cyclin B and preserved nucleolin turnover) and a low propensity to apoptosis in both peripheral blood- and lymph node-derived T cells. The absence of significant CCD in the AIDS-free, non-immune-activated SMs despite high levels of viral replication indicates that CCD is a marker of disease progression during lentiviral infection and supports the hypothesis that the preservation of cell cycle control may help to confer the disease-resistant phenotype of SIV-infected SMs. PMID:16378966

  9. Divergent Kinetics of Proliferating T Cell Subsets in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Infection: SIV Eliminates the “First Responder” CD4+ T Cells in Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolei; Xu, Huanbin; Pahar, Bapi; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    Although increased lymphocyte turnover in chronic human immunodeficiency virus and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection has been reported in blood, there is little information on cell turnover in tissues, particularly in primary SIV infection. Here we examined the levels of proliferating T cell subsets in mucosal and peripheral lymphoid tissues of adult macaques throughout SIV infection. To specifically label cells in S-phase division, all animals were inoculated with bromodeoxyuridine 24 h prior to sampling. In healthy macaques, the highest levels of proliferating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were in blood and, to a lesser extent, in spleen. Substantial percentages of proliferating cells were also found in intestinal tissues, including the jejunum, ileum, and colon, but very few proliferating cells were detected in lymph nodes (axillary and mesenteric). Moreover, essentially all proliferating T cells in uninfected animals coexpressed CD95 and many coexpressed CCR5 in the tissues examined. Confocal microscopy also demonstrated that proliferating cells were substantial viral target cells for SIV infection and viral replication. After acute SIV infection, percentages of proliferating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were significantly higher in tissues of chronically infected macaques and macaques with AIDS than in those of the controls. Surprisingly, however, we found that proliferating CD4+ T cells were selectively decreased in very early infection (8 to 10 days postinoculation [dpi]). In contrast, levels of proliferating CD8+ T cells rapidly increased after SIV infection, peaked by 13 to 21 dpi, and thereafter remained significantly higher than those in the controls. Taken together, these findings suggest that SIV selectively infects and destroys dividing, nonspecific CD4+ T cells in acute infection, resulting in homeostatic changes and perhaps continuing loss of replication capacity to respond to nonspecific and, later, SIV-specific antigens. PMID:23596288

  10. Comparative Analysis of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Gag-Specific Effector and Memory CD8+ T Cells Induced by Different Adenovirus Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wendy G.; Jin, Hyun-Tak; West, Erin E.; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Wieland, Andreas; Zilliox, Michael J.; McElrath, M. Juliana

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) vectors are widely used as experimental vaccines against several infectious diseases, but the magnitude, phenotype, and functionality of CD8+ T cell responses induced by different adenovirus serotypes have not been compared. To address this question, we have analyzed simian immunodeficiency virus Gag-specific CD8+ T cell responses in mice following vaccination with Ad5, Ad26, and Ad35. Our results show that although Ad5 is more immunogenic than Ad26 and Ad35, the phenotype, function, and recall potential of memory CD8+ T cells elicited by these vectors are substantially different. Ad26 and Ad35 vectors generated CD8+ T cells that display the phenotype and function of long-lived memory T cells, whereas Ad5 vector-elicited CD8+ T cells are of a more terminally differentiated phenotype. In addition, hepatic memory CD8+ T cells elicited by Ad26 and Ad35 mounted more robust recall proliferation following secondary challenge than those induced by Ad5. Furthermore, the boosting potential was higher following priming with alternative-serotype Ad vectors than with Ad5 vectors in heterologous prime-boost regimens. Anamnestic CD8+ T cell responses were further enhanced when the duration between priming and boosting was extended from 30 to 60 days. Our results demonstrate that heterologous prime-boost vaccine regimens with alternative-serotype Ad vectors elicited more functional memory CD8+ T cells than any of the regimens containing Ad5. In summary, these results suggest that alternative-serotype Ad vectors will prove useful as candidates for vaccine development against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and other pathogens and also emphasize the importance of a longer rest period between prime and boost for generating optimal CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:23175355

  11. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of infant rhesus macaques as a model to test antiretroviral drug prophylaxis and therapy: oral 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine prevents SIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Van Rompay, K K; Marthas, M L; Ramos, R A; Mandell, C P; McGowan, E K; Joye, S M; Pedersen, N C

    1992-01-01

    The prophylactic and therapeutic properties of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) against simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection were tested in four 3-month-old rhesus macaques. The infant monkeys were inoculated intravenously with a low dose (1 to 10 100% animal infectious doses) of uncloned SIVmac. The monkeys were treated orally with 50 mg of AZT per kg of body weight every 8 h; two animals were started on treatment 2 h prior to virus inoculation, and two animals were started on treatment 6 weeks later. All four animals were treated for a period of 6 to 10 weeks. Outward signs of AZT toxicity were absent, but a mild macrocytic anemia occurred soon after therapy was started and resolved shortly after it was discontinued. The two infants that were begun on AZT treatment 2 h prior to virus inoculation never became infected, as demonstrated by the inability to detect cell-free or cell-associated virus in the blood, proviral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, or anti-SIV antibodies. AZT administration over a 10-week period had no detectable effect on the course of disease in the two animals that were begun on treatment after the infection had been established. In addition to demonstrating the prophylactic effect of AZT against low-dose SIV exposure, the study demonstrated the ease with which infant rhesus macaques can be used for antiretroviral drug testing. Images PMID:1489181

  12. Two-Dimensional Gel Based Approaches for the Assessment of N-Linked and O-GlcNAc Glycosylation in Human and Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David R. M.; Mitsak, Megan J.; Elliott, Steven T.; Chen, Dawn; Whelan, Steven A.; Hart, Gerald W.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.

    2009-01-01

    The glycosylation state of envelope glycoproteins in Human and Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses (HIV/SIV) is critical to viral infectivity and tropism, viral protein processing, and in virus evasion of the immune system. Using a rapid fluorescent two-dimensional gel based method coupled with enzymatic pre-treatment of virus with PNGase F (Peptide: N-Glycosidase F) and fluorescent 2D gels or 2D gel Western blotting, we show significant differences in the glycosylation patterns of two SIV strains widely used in animal models of HIV disease and vaccine studies. We also demonstrate the modification of a host protein important in HIV biology (HLA-DR) by O-GlcNAc. Further, this experimental pipeline allows for the identification of the modified protein and the site of N-linked glycosylation by fluorescent two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) and the qualitative and semi-quantitative assessment of viral glycosylation. The method is fully compatible with downstream glycomics analysis. This approach will permit correlation of virus glycosylation status with pathological severity and may serve as a rapid screen of viruses from physiological samples for further study by more advanced MS methodology. PMID:19072736

  13. CD4+-T-Cell and CD20+-B-Cell Changes Predict Rapid Disease Progression after Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Macaques†

    PubMed Central

    Steger, Krista K.; Dykhuizen, Marta; Mitchen, Jacque L.; Hinds, Paul W.; Preuninger, Brenda L.; Wallace, Marianne; Thomson, James; Montefiori, David C.; Lu, Yichen; Pauza, C. David

    1998-01-01

    Simian-human immunodeficiency virus 89.6PD (SHIV89.6PD) was pathogenic after intrarectal inoculation of rhesus macaques. Infection was achieved with a minimum of 2,500 tissue culture infectious doses of cell-free virus stock, and there was no evidence for transient viremia in animals receiving subinfectious doses by the intrarectal route. Some animals experienced rapid progression of disease characterized by loss of greater than 90% of circulating CD4+ T cells, sustained decreases in CD20+ B cells, failure to elicit virus-binding antibodies in plasma, and high levels of antigenemia. Slower-progressing animals had moderate but varying losses of CD4+ T cells; showed increases in circulating CD20+ B cells; mounted vigorous responses to antibodies in plasma, including neutralizing antibodies; and had low or undetectable levels of antigenemia. Rapid progression led to death within 30 weeks after intrarectal inoculation. Plasma antigenemia at 2 weeks after inoculation (P ≤ 0.002), B- and T-cell losses (P ≤ 0.013), and failure to seroconvert (P ≤ 0.005) were correlated statistically with rapid progression. Correlations were evident by 2 to 4 weeks after intrarectal SHIV inoculation, indicating that early events in the host-pathogen interaction determined the clinical outcome. PMID:9445063

  14. Restricted replication of simian immunodeficiency virus strain 239 in macrophages is determined by env but is not due to restricted entry.

    PubMed Central

    Mori, K; Ringler, D J; Desrosiers, R C

    1993-01-01

    Virus derived from the infectious, pathogenic, molecular clone of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) called SIVmac239 replicates poorly in primary rhesus monkey alveolar macrophage cultures. Variants with three to nine amino acid changes in the envelope replicate 100 to 1,000 times more efficiently in these macrophage cultures than parental SIVmac239. Early events, including virus entry into cells, were analyzed by measuring the amounts of newly synthesized viral DNA 14 to 16 h after infection of macrophages by using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction method. SIVmac239 ws found to enter macrophages with an efficiency similar to that of the macrophage-tropic derivatives. The assay indeed measured newly synthesized viral DNA since detection was inhibited by the reverse transcriptase inhibitors azidothymidine and foscarnet and by heat inactivation of the virus stock prior to infection. Furthermore, entry of SIVmac239 and macrophage-tropic variant into macrophages was inhibited by monoclonal antibody against CD4. Analysis of the time course of viral DNA accumulation showed that although initial entry of SIVmac239 into cells occurred normally, subsequent logarithmic increases in the amounts of viral DNA associated with spread of virus through the macrophage cultures was blocked. Increasing the amount of SIVmac239 incubated with macrophages increased the amount of virus entering the cell, but this could not overcome the block to replication. Thus, restricted replication of SIVmac239 in macrophages is determined by the envelope, but surprisingly it is not due to restricted virus entry. Images PMID:7682627

  15. Preclinical Evaluation of HIV Eradication Strategies in the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaque: A Pilot Study Testing Inhibition of Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, Richard M.; Gordon, Shari N.; Vaccari, Monica; Piatak, Michael; Huang, Yong; Deeks, Steven G.; Lifson, Jeffrey; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Even in the setting of maximally suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV persists indefinitely. Several mechanisms might contribute to this persistence, including chronic inflammation and immune dysfunction. In this study, we have explored a preclinical model for the evaluation of potential interventions that might serve to eradicate or to minimize the level of persistent virus. Given data that metabolic products of the inducible enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygeanse (IDO) might foster inflammation and viral persistence, chronically simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected, ART-treated rhesus macaques were treated with the IDO inhibitor 1-methyl tryptophan (1mT). Orally administered 1mT achieved targeted plasma levels, but did not impact tryptophan metabolism or decrease viral RNA or DNA in plasma or in intestinal tissues beyond levels achieved by ART alone. Animals treated with 1mT showed no difference in the levels of T cell activation or differentiation, or in the kinetics or magnitude of viral rebound following cessation of ART. Notwithstanding these negative results, our observations suggest that the chronically SIV-infected rhesus macaque on suppressive ART can serve as a tractable model in which to test and to prioritize the selection of other potential interventions designed to eradicate HIV in vivo. In addition, this model might be used to optimize the route and dose by which such interventions are administered and the methods by which their effects are monitored. PMID:22924680

  16. RECOMBINANT SIMIAN VARICELLA VIRUSES EXPRESSING RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS ANTIGENS ARE IMMUNOGENIC

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Toby M.; Traina-Dorge, Vicki; Davis, Kara A.; Gray, Wayne L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Recombinant simian varicella viruses (rSVVs) were engineered to express respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) antigens. The RSV surface glycoprotein G and second matrix protein M2 (22k) genes were cloned into the SVV genome, and recombinant viruses were characterized in vitro and in vivo. rSVVs were also engineered to express the membrane-anchored or secreted forms of the RSV G protein as well as an RSV G lacking its chemokine mimicry motif (CX3C), which may have different effects on priming the host immune response. The RSV genes were efficiently expressed in rSVV/RSV infected Vero cells as RSV G and M2 transcripts were detected by RT-PCR and RSV antigens were detected by immunofluorescence and immunoblot assays. The rSVVs replicated efficiently in Vero cell culture. Rhesus macaques immunized with rSVV/RSV-G and rSVV/RSV-M2 vaccines produced antibody responses to SVV and RSV antigens. The results demonstrate that recombinant varicella viruses are suitable vectors for expression of RSV antigens and may represent a novel vaccine strategy for immunization against both pathogens. PMID:18272766

  17. Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Containing a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype-E Envelope Gene: Persistent Infection, CD4+ T-Cell Depletion, and Mucosal Membrane Transmission in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Himathongkham, Sunee; Halpin, Nancy S.; Li, Jinling; Stout, Michael W.; Miller, Christopher J.; Luciw, Paul A.

    2000-01-01

    The envelope (env) glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) determines several viral properties (e.g., coreceptor usage, cell tropism, and cytopathicity) and is a major target of antiviral immune responses. Most investigations on env have been conducted on subtype-B viral strains, prevalent in North America and Europe. Our study aimed to analyze env genes of subtype-E viral strains, prevalent in Asia and Africa, with a nonhuman primate model for lentivirus infection and AIDS. To this end, we constructed a simian immunodeficiency virus/HIV-1 subtype-E (SHIV) recombinant clone by replacing the env ectodomain of the SHIV-33 clone with the env ectodomain from the subtype-E strain HIV-1CAR402, which was isolated from an individual in the Central African Republic. Virus from this recombinant clone, designated SHIV-E-CAR, replicated efficiently in macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Accordingly, juvenile macaques were inoculated with cell-free SHIV-E-CAR by the intravenous or intravaginal route; virus replicated in these animals but did not produce hematological abnormalities. In an attempt to elicit the pathogenic potential of the recombinant clone, we serially passaged this viral clone via transfusion of blood and bone marrow through juvenile macaques to produce SHIV-E-P4 (fourth-passage virus). The serially passaged virus established productive infection and CD4+ T-cell depletion in juvenile macaques inoculated by either the intravenous or the intravaginal route. Determination of the coreceptor usage of SHIV-E-CAR and serially passaged SHIV-E-P4 indicated that both of these viruses utilized CXCR4 as a coreceptor. In summary, the serially passaged SHIV subtype-E chimeric virus will be important for studies aimed at developing a nonhuman primate model for analyzing the functions of subtype-E env genes in viral transmission and pathogenesis and for vaccine challenge experiments with macaques immunized with HIV-1 env antigens. PMID:10933692

  18. Prevalence and genetic diversity of simian immunodeficiency virus infection in wild-living red colobus monkeys (Piliocolobus badius badius) from the Taï forest, Côte d'Ivoire SIVwrc in wild-living western red colobus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Sabrina; Liegeois, Florian; Lafay, Bénédicte; Roeder, Amy D; Bruford, Michael W; Formenty, Pierre; Noë, Ronald; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine

    2008-01-01

    Numerous African primates are infected with simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs). It is now well established that the clade of SIVs infecting west-central African chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) and western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) represent the progenitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), whereas HIV-2 results from different cross-species transmissions of SIVsmm from sooty mangabeys (Cercocebus atys atys). We present here the first molecular epidemiological survey of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVwrc) in wild-living western red colobus monkeys (Piliocolobus badius badius) which are frequently hunted by the human population and represent a favourite prey of western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus). We collected faecal samples (n=88) and we assessed individual discrimination by microsatellite analyses and visual observation. We tested the inferred 53 adult individuals belonging to two neighbouring habituated groups for presence of SIVwrc infection by viral RNA (vRNA) detection. We amplified viral polymerase (pol) (650 bp) and/or envelope (env) (570 bp) sequences in 14 individuals, resulting in a minimal prevalence of 26% among the individuals sampled, possibly reaching 50% when considering the relatively low sensitivity of viral RNA detection in faecal samples. With a few exceptions, phylogenetic analysis of pol and env sequences revealed a low degree of intragroup genetic diversity and a general viral clustering related to the social group of origin. However, we found a higher intergroup diversity. Behavioural and demographic data collected previously from these communities indicate that red colobus monkeys live in promiscuous multi-male societies, where females leave their natal group at the sub-adult stage of their lives and where extra-group copulations or male immigration have been rarely observed. The phylogenetic data we obtained seem to reflect these behavioural characteristics. Overall, our results indicate that

  19. Feline immunodeficiency virus OrfA alters gene expression of splicing factors and proteasome-ubiquitination proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sundstrom, Magnus; Chatterji, Udayan; Schaffer, Lana; Rozieres, Sohela de; Elder, John H.

    2008-02-20

    Expression of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) accessory protein OrfA (or Orf2) is critical for efficient viral replication in lymphocytes, both in vitro and in vivo. OrfA has been reported to exhibit functions in common with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) accessory proteins Vpr and Tat, although the function of OrfA has not been fully explained. Here, we use microarray analysis to characterize how OrfA modulates the gene expression profile of T-lymphocytes. The primary IL-2-dependent T-cell line 104-C1 was transduced to express OrfA. Functional expression of OrfA was demonstrated by trans complementation of the OrfA-defective clone, FIV-34TF10. OrfA-expressing cells had a slightly reduced cell proliferation rate but did not exhibit any significant alteration in cell cycle distribution. Reverse-transcribed RNA from cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) or GFP + OrfA were hybridized to Affymetrix HU133 Plus 2.0 microarray chips representing more than 47,000 genome-wide transcripts. By using two statistical approaches, 461 (Rank Products) and 277 (ANOVA) genes were identified as modulated by OrfA expression. The functional relevance of the differentially expressed genes was explored by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. The analyses revealed alterations in genes critical for RNA post-transcriptional modifications and protein ubiquitination as the two most significant functional outcomes of OrfA expression. In these two groups, several subunits of the spliceosome, cellular splicing factors and family members of the proteasome-ubiquitination system were identified. These findings provide novel information on the versatile function of OrfA during FIV infection and indicate a fine-tuning mechanism of the cellular environment by OrfA to facilitate efficient FIV replication.

  20. Feline immunodeficiency virus OrfA alters gene expression of splicing factors and proteasome-ubiquitination proteins.

    PubMed

    Sundstrom, Magnus; Chatterji, Udayan; Schaffer, Lana; de Rozières, Sohela; Elder, John H

    2008-02-20

    Expression of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) accessory protein OrfA (or Orf2) is critical for efficient viral replication in lymphocytes, both in vitro and in vivo. OrfA has been reported to exhibit functions in common with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) accessory proteins Vpr and Tat, although the function of OrfA has not been fully explained. Here, we use microarray analysis to characterize how OrfA modulates the gene expression profile of T-lymphocytes. The primary IL-2-dependent T-cell line 104-C1 was transduced to express OrfA. Functional expression of OrfA was demonstrated by trans complementation of the OrfA-defective clone, FIV-34TF10. OrfA-expressing cells had a slightly reduced cell proliferation rate but did not exhibit any significant alteration in cell cycle distribution. Reverse-transcribed RNA from cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) or GFP+OrfA were hybridized to Affymetrix HU133 Plus 2.0 microarray chips representing more than 47,000 genome-wide transcripts. By using two statistical approaches, 461 (Rank Products) and 277 (ANOVA) genes were identified as modulated by OrfA expression. The functional relevance of the differentially expressed genes was explored by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. The analyses revealed alterations in genes critical for RNA post-transcriptional modifications and protein ubiquitination as the two most significant functional outcomes of OrfA expression. In these two groups, several subunits of the spliceosome, cellular splicing factors and family members of the proteasome-ubiquitination system were identified. These findings provide novel information on the versatile function of OrfA during FIV infection and indicate a fine-tuning mechanism of the cellular environment by OrfA to facilitate efficient FIV replication. PMID:17963812

  1. Efficiency of Cell-Free and Cell-Associated Virus in Mucosal Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hulot, Sandrine L.; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Gombos, Randi B.; Zheng, Yi; Owuor, Joshua; Lifton, Michelle A.; Ayeni, Christian; Najarian, Robert M.; Yeh, Wendy W.; Asmal, Mohammed; Zamir, Gideon; Letvin, Norman L.

    2013-01-01

    Effective strategies are needed to block mucosal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Here, we address a crucial question in HIV-1 pathogenesis: whether infected donor mononuclear cells or cell-free virus plays the more important role in initiating mucosal infection by HIV-1. This distinction is critical, as effective strategies for blocking cell-free and cell-associated virus transmission may be different. We describe a novel ex vivo model system that utilizes sealed human colonic mucosa explants and demonstrate in both the ex vivo model and in vivo using the rectal challenge model in rhesus monkeys that HIV-1-infected lymphocytes can transmit infection across the mucosa more efficiently than cell-free virus. These findings may have significant implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis of mucosal transmission of HIV-1 and for the development of strategies to prevent HIV-1 transmission. PMID:24109227

  2. The quality of chimpanzee T-cell activation and simian immunodeficiency virus/human immunodeficiency virus susceptibility achieved via antibody-mediated T-cell receptor/CD3 stimulation is a function of the anti-CD3 antibody isotype.

    PubMed

    Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; McKinney, Brett A; Duverger, Alexandra; Wagner, Frederic H; Ansari, Aftab A; Kutsch, Olaf

    2008-10-01

    While human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is associated with hyperimmune activation and systemic depletion of CD4(+) T cells, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in sooty mangabeys or chimpanzees does not exhibit these hallmarks. Control of immune activation is thought to be one of the major components that govern species-dependent differences in the disease pathogenesis. A previous study introduced the idea that the resistance of chimpanzees to SIVcpz infection-induced hyperimmune activation could be the result of the expression of select sialic acid-recognizing immunoglobulin (Ig)-like lectin (Siglec) superfamily members by chimpanzee T cells. Siglecs, which are absent on human T cells, were thought to control levels of T-cell activation in chimpanzees and were thus suggested as a cause for the pathogenic differences in the course of SIVcpz or HIV-1 infection. As in human models of T-cell activation, stimulation had been attempted using an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (MAb) (UCHT1; isotype IgG1), but despite efficient binding, UCHT1 failed to activate chimpanzee T cells, an activation block that could be partially overcome by MAb-induced Siglec-5 internalization. We herein demonstrate that anti-CD3 MAb-mediated chimpanzee T-cell activation is a function of the anti-CD3 MAb isotype and is not governed by Siglec expression. While IgG1 anti-CD3 MAbs fail to stimulate chimpanzee T cells, IgG2a anti-CD3 MAbs activate chimpanzee T cells in the absence of Siglec manipulations. Our results thus imply that prior to studying possible differences between human and chimpanzee T-cell activation, a relevant model of chimpanzee T cell activation needs to be established. PMID:18667496

  3. Differential CD4+ T-Lymphocyte Apoptosis and Bystander T-Cell Activation in Rhesus Macaques and Sooty Mangabeys during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Meythaler, Mareike; Martinot, Amanda; Wang, Zichun; Pryputniewicz, Sarah; Kasheta, Melissa; Ling, Binhua; Marx, Preston A.; O'Neil, Shawn; Kaur, Amitinder

    2009-01-01

    In contrast to pathogenic lentiviral infections, chronic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in its natural host is characterized by a lack of increased immune activation and apoptosis. To determine whether these differences are species specific and predicted by the early host response to SIV in primary infection, we longitudinally examined T-lymphocyte apoptosis, immune activation, and the SIV-specific cellular immune response in experimentally infected rhesus macaques (RM) and sooty mangabeys (SM) with controlled or uncontrolled SIV infection. SIVsmE041, a primary SIVsm isolate, reproduced set-point viremia levels of natural SIV infection in SM but was controlled in RM, while SIVmac239 replicated to high levels in RM. Following SIV infection, increased CD8+ T-lymphocyte apoptosis, temporally coinciding with onset of SIV-specific cellular immunity, and elevated plasma Th1 cytokine and gamma interferon-induced chemokine levels were common to both SM and RM. Different from SM, SIV-infected RM showed a significantly higher frequency of peripheral blood activated CD8+ T lymphocytes despite comparable magnitude of the SIV-specific gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunospot response. Furthermore, an increase in CD4+ and CD4−CD8− T-lymphocyte apoptosis and plasma tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand were observed only in RM and occurred in both controlled SIVsmE041 and uncontrolled SIVmac239 infection. These data suggest that the “excess” activated T lymphocytes in RM soon after SIV infection are predominantly of non-virus-specific bystander origin. Thus, species-specific differences in the early innate immune response appear to be an important factor contributing to differential immune activation in natural and nonnatural hosts of SIV infection. PMID:18987149

  4. The Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcription Inhibitor MIV-160 Delivered from an Intravaginal Ring, But Not from a Carrageenan Gel, Protects Against Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-RT Infection

    PubMed Central

    Aravantinou, Meropi; Singer, Rachel; Derby, Nina; Calenda, Giulia; Mawson, Paul; Abraham, Ciby J.; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Goldman, Daniel; Kenney, Jessica; Villegas, Guillermo; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Piatak, Michael; Fernández-Romero, José A.; Zydowsky, Thomas M.; Teleshova, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We previously showed that a carrageenan (CG) gel containing 50 μM MIV-150 (MIV-150/CG) reduced vaginal simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-RT infection of macaques (56%, p>0.05) when administered daily for 2 weeks with the last dose given 8 h before challenge. Additionally, when 100 mg of MIV-150 was loaded into an intravaginal ring (IVR) inserted 24 h before challenge and removed 2 weeks after challenge, >80% protection was observed (p<0.03). MIV-160 is a related NNRTI with a similar IC50, greater aqueous solubility, and a shorter synthesis. To objectively compare MIV-160 with MIV-150, herein we evaluated the antiviral effects of unformulated MIV-160 in vitro as well as the in vivo protection afforded by MIV-160 delivered in CG (MIV-160/CG gel) and in an IVR under regimens used with MIV-150 in earlier studies. Like MIV-150, MIV-160 exhibited potent antiviral activity against SHIV-RT in macaque vaginal explants. However, formulated MIV-160 exhibited divergent effects in vivo. The MIV-160/CG gel offered no protection compared to CG alone, whereas the MIV-160 IVRs protected significantly. Importantly, the results of in vitro release studies of the MIV-160/CG gel and the MIV-160 IVR suggested that in vivo efficacy paralleled the amount of MIV-160 released in vitro. Hundreds of micrograms of MIV-160 were released daily from IVRs while undetectable amounts of MIV-160 were released from the CG gel. Our findings highlight the importance of testing different modalities of microbicide delivery to identify the optimal formulation for efficacy in vivo. PMID:22816564

  5. Early events in tissues during infection with pathogenic (SIVmac239) and nonpathogenic (SIVmac1A11) molecular clones of simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, A. A.; Vogel, P.; Ramos, R. A.; Kluge, J. D.; Marthas, M.

    1994-01-01

    The extent of virus replication, tissue distribution, localization of virus within tissues, and the presence of pathological lesions was examined early after experimental infection of rhesus monkeys with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Three strains of SIV were used: molecularly cloned pathogenic SIVmac239; molecularly cloned nonpathogenic SIVmac1A11; and uncloned pathogenic SIVmac. The major targets of infection in all animals at 2 weeks postinoculation were the thymus and spleen. The distribution of virus within lymphoid organs varied with the viral inoculum: nonpathogenic SIVmac1A11 was present primarily within lymphoid follicles and in the thymic cortex; SIVmac239 was present primarily within periarteriolar lymphoid sheaths in the spleen, the paracortex of lymph nodes, and the medulla of the thymus; uncloned SIVmac was present in all these areas but tended to parallel the distribution of SIVmac239. Animals inoculated with nonpathogenic SIVmac1A11 had fewer SIV-positive cells by in situ hybridization and after 13 weeks postinoculation, virus was undetectable in any tissue from these animals. No significant pathological abnormalities were recognized in animals inoculated with this nonpathogenic virus. In contrast, nearly half of the animals inoculated with either SIVmac or SIVmac239 developed significant pathological lesions, including opportunistic infections by 13 weeks postinoculation, highlighting the virulence of these viruses. Our results indicate marked differences in tissue distribution between pathogenic and nonpathogenic molecular clones of SIV during the acute phase of infection. The most striking differences were the absence of SIVmac1A11 from the central nervous system and thymic medulla. The prominent early involvement of the thymus suggests that infection of this organ is a key event in the induction of immune suppression by SIV. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8053500

  6. Durable Protection from Vaginal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Macaques by Tenofovir Gel and Its Relationship to Drug Levels in Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Dobard, Charles; Sharma, Sunita; Martin, Amy; Pau, Chou-Pong; Holder, Angela; Kuklenyik, Zsuzsanna; Lipscomb, Jonathan; Hanson, Debra L.; Smith, James; Novembre, Francis J.; García-Lerma, J. Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    A vaginal gel containing 1% tenofovir (TFV) was found to be safe and effective in reducing HIV infection in women when used pericoitally. Because of the long intracellular half-life of TFV and high drug exposure in vaginal tissues, we hypothesized that a vaginal gel containing TFV may provide long-lasting protection. Here, we performed delayed-challenge experiments and showed that vaginal 1% TFV gel protected 4/6 macaques against vaginal simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) exposures occurring 3 days after gel application, demonstrating long-lasting protection. Despite continued gel dosing postinfection, neither breakthrough infection had evidence of drug resistance by ultrasensitive testing of SHIV in plasma and vaginal lavage. Analysis of the active intracellular tenofovir diphosphate (TFV-DP) in vaginal lymphocytes collected 4 h to 3 days after gel dosing persistently showed high TFV-DP levels (median, 1,810 fmol/106 cells) between 4 and 24 h that exceed the 95% inhibitory concentration (IC95), reflecting rapid accumulation and long persistence. In contrast to those in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) following oral dosing, TFV-DP levels in vaginal lymphocytes decreased approximately 7-fold by 3 days, exhibiting a much higher rate of decay. We observed a strong correlation between intracellular TFV-DP in vaginal lymphocytes, in vitro antiviral activity, and in vivo protection, suggesting that TFV-DP above the in vitro IC95 in vaginal lymphocytes is a good predictor of high efficacy. Data from this model reveal an extended window of protection by TFV gel that supports coitus-independent use. The identification of protective TFV-DP concentrations in vaginal lymphocytes may facilitate the evaluation of improved delivery methods of topical TFV and inform clinical studies. PMID:22072766

  7. A Modified Zinc Acetate Gel, a Potential Nonantiretroviral Microbicide, Is Safe and Effective against Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Infection In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Jessica; Rodríguez, Aixa; Kizima, Larisa; Seidor, Samantha; Menon, Radhika; Jean-Pierre, Ninochka; Pugach, Pavel; Levendosky, Keith; Derby, Nina; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Paglini, Gabriela; Zydowsky, Thomas M.; Robbiani, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    We previously showed that a prototype gel comprising zinc acetate (ZA) in carrageenan (CG) protected mice against vaginal and rectal herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) challenge as well as macaques against vaginal simian-human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT) challenge. In this work, we modified buffers and cosolvents to obtain a stable, nearly iso-osmolal formulation and evaluated its safety and efficacy against SHIV-RT and HSV-2. In vitro toxicity to lactobacilli and Candida albicans was determined. Macaques were given daily doses of ZA and CG (ZA/CG) or CG alone vaginally for 14 days and challenged with SHIV-RT 24 h later. Mice were challenged vaginally or rectally with HSV-2 immediately after a single gel treatment to measure efficacy or vaginally 12 h after daily gel treatment for 7 days to evaluate the gel's impact on susceptibility to HSV-2 infection. The modified ZA/CG neither affected the viability of lactobacilli or C. albicans nor enhanced vaginal HSV-2 infection after daily ZA/CG treatment. Vaginal SHIV-RT infection of macaques was reduced by 66% (P = 0.006) when macaques were challenged 24 h after the last dose of gel. We observed 60% to 80% uninfected mice after vaginal (P < 0.0001) and rectal (P = 0.008) high-dose HSV-2 challenge. The modified ZA/CG gel is safe and effective in animal models and represents a potential candidate to limit the transmission of HIV and HSV-2. PMID:23752515

  8. Neutralization-Sensitive R5-Tropic Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus SHIV-2873Nip, Which Carries env Isolated from an Infant with a Recent HIV Clade C Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Siddappa, Nagadenahalli B.; Song, Ruijiang; Kramer, Victor G.; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Velu, Vijayakumar; Ong, Helena; Rasmussen, Robert A.; Grisson, Ricky D.; Wood, Charles; Zhang, Hong; Kankasa, Chipeppo; Amara, Rama Rao; Else, James G.; Novembre, Francis J.; Montefiori, David C.; Ruprecht, Ruth M.

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus clade C (HIV-C) accounts for >56% of all HIV infections worldwide. To investigate vaccine safety and efficacy in nonhuman primates, a pathogenic, R5-tropic, neutralization-sensitive simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) carrying HIV-C env would be desirable. We have constructed SHIV-2873Ni, an R5-tropic SHIV carrying a primary pediatric HIV-C env gene isolated from a 2-month-old Zambian infant, who died within 1 year of birth. SHIV-2873Ni was constructed using SHIV-1157ipd3N4 (R. J. Song, A. L. Chenine, R. A. Rasmussen, C. R. Ruprecht, S. Mirshahidi, R. D. Grisson, W. Xu, J. B. Whitney, L. M. Goins, H. Ong, P. L. Li, E. Shai-Kobiler, T. Wang, C. M. McCann, H. Zhang, C. Wood, C. Kankasa, W. E. Secor, H. M. McClure, E. Strobert, J. G. Else, and R. M. Ruprecht. J. Virol. 80:8729-8738, 2006) as the backbone, since the latter contains additional NF-κB sites in the long terminal repeats to enhance viral replicative capacity. The parental virus, SHIV-2873Ni, was serially passaged through five rhesus monkeys (RMs); SHIV-2873Nip, the resulting passaged virus, was reisolated from the fourth recipient about 1 year postinoculation. SHIV-2873Nip was replication competent in RM peripheral blood mononuclear cells of all random donors tested and was exclusively R5 tropic, and its env gene clustered with HIV-C by phylogenetic analysis; its high sensitivity to neutralization led to classification as a tier 1 virus. Indian-origin RMs were inoculated by different mucosal routes, resulting in high peak viral RNA loads. Signs of virus-induced disease include depletion of gut CD4+ T lymphocytes, loss of memory T cells in blood, and thrombocytopenia that resulted in fatal cerebral hemorrhage. SHIV-2873Nip is a highly replication-competent, mucosally transmissible, pathogenic R5-tropic virus that will be useful to study viral pathogenesis and to assess the efficacy of immunogens targeting HIV-C Env. PMID:19019970

  9. Lack of Interleukin-10-Mediated Anti-Inflammatory Signals and Upregulated Interferon Gamma Production Are Linked to Increased Intestinal Epithelial Cell Apoptosis in Pathogenic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Diganta; Kenway-Lynch, Carys S.; Lala, Wendy; Veazey, Ronald S.; Lackner, Andrew A.; Das, Arpita

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an immunomodulatory cytokine that is important for maintenance of epithelial cell (EC) survival and anti-inflammatory responses (AIR). The majority of HIV infections occur through the mucosal route despite mucosal epithelium acting as a barrier to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Therefore, understanding the role of IL-10 in maintenance of intestinal homeostasis during HIV infection is of interest for better characterization of the pathogenesis of HIV-mediated enteropathy. We demonstrated here changes in mucosal IL-10 signaling during simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in rhesus macaques. Disruption of the epithelial barrier was manifested by EC apoptosis and loss of the tight-junction protein ZO-1. Multiple cell types, including a limited number of ECs, produced IL-10. SIV infection resulted in increased levels of IL-10; however, this was associated with increased production of mucosal gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), suggesting that IL-10 was not able to regulate AIR. This observation was supported by the downregulation of STAT3, which is necessary to inhibit production of IFN-γ and TNF-α, and the upregulation of SOCS1 and SOCS3, which are important regulatory molecules in the IL-10-mediated AIR. We also observed internalization of the IL-10 receptor (IL-10R) in mucosal lymphocytes, which could limit cellular availability of IL-10 for signaling and contribute to the loss of a functional AIR. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that internalization of IL-10R with the resultant impact on IL-10 signaling and dysregulation of the IL-10-mediated AIR might play a crucial role in EC damage and subsequent SIV/HIV pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Interleukin-10 (IL-10), an important immunomodulatory cytokine plays a key role to control inflammatory function and homeostasis of the gastrointestinal mucosal immune system. Despite recent advancements in the study of IL-10 and its role in HIV

  10. Compartmentalization of simian immunodeficiency virus replication within secondary lymphoid tissues of rhesus macaques is linked to disease stage and inversely related to localization of virus-specific CTL.

    PubMed

    Connick, Elizabeth; Folkvord, Joy M; Lind, Katherine T; Rakasz, Eva G; Miles, Brodie; Wilson, Nancy A; Santiago, Mario L; Schmitt, Kimberly; Stephens, Edward B; Kim, Hyeon O; Wagstaff, Reece; Li, Shengbin; Abdelaal, Hadia M; Kemp, Nathan; Watkins, David I; MaWhinney, Samantha; Skinner, Pamela J

    2014-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that HIV replication is concentrated in lymph node B cell follicles during chronic infection and that HIV-specific CTL fail to accumulate in large numbers at those sites. It is unknown whether these observations can be generalized to other secondary lymphoid tissues or whether virus compartmentalization occurs in the absence of CTL. We evaluated these questions in SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaques by quantifying SIV RNA(+) cells and SIV-specific CTL in situ in spleen, lymph nodes, and intestinal tissues obtained at several stages of infection. During chronic asymptomatic infection prior to simian AIDS, SIV-producing cells were more concentrated in follicular (F) compared with extrafollicular (EF) regions of secondary lymphoid tissues. At day 14 of infection, when CTL have minimal impact on virus replication, there was no compartmentalization of SIV-producing cells. Virus compartmentalization was diminished in animals with simian AIDS, which often have low-frequency CTL responses. SIV-specific CTL were consistently more concentrated within EF regions of lymph node and spleen in chronically infected animals regardless of epitope specificity. Frequencies of SIV-specific CTL within F and EF compartments predicted SIV RNA(+) cells within these compartments in a mixed model. Few SIV-specific CTL expressed the F homing molecule CXCR5 in the absence of the EF retention molecule CCR7, possibly accounting for the paucity of F CTL. These findings bolster the hypothesis that B cell follicles are immune privileged sites and suggest that strategies to augment CTL in B cell follicles could lead to improved viral control and possibly a functional cure for HIV infection. PMID:25362178

  11. Vaccination of Rhesus Macaques with Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Env V3 Elicits Neutralizing Antibody-Mediated Protection against Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus with a Homologous but Not a Heterologous V3 Motif

    PubMed Central

    Someya, Kenji; Cecilia, Dayaraj; Ami, Yasushi; Nakasone, Tadashi; Matsuo, Kazuhiro; Burda, Sherri; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yoshino, Naoto; Kaizu, Masahiko; Ando, Shuji; Okuda, Kenji; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Yamazaki, Shudo; Yamamoto, Naoki; Honda, Mitsuo

    2005-01-01

    Although the correlates of vaccine-induced protection against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are not fully known, it is presumed that neutralizing antibodies (NAb) play a role in controlling virus infection. In this study, we examined immune responses elicited in rhesus macaques following vaccination with recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin expressing an HIV-1 Env V3 antigen (rBCG Env V3). We also determined the effect of vaccination on protection against challenge with either a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-MN) or a highly pathogenic SHIV strain (SHIV-89.6PD). Immunization with rBCG Env V3 elicited significant levels of NAb for the 24 weeks tested that were predominantly HIV-1 type specific. Sera from the immunized macaques neutralized primary HIV-1 isolates in vitro, including HIV-1BZ167/X4, HIV-1SF2/X4, HIV-1CI2/X4, and, to a lesser extent, HIV-1MNp/X4, all of which contain a V3 sequence homologous to that of rBCG Env V3. In contrast, neutralization was not observed against HIV-1SF33/X4, which has a heterologous V3 sequence, nor was it found against primary HIV-1 R5 isolates from either clade A or B. Furthermore, the viral load in the vaccinated macaques was significantly reduced following low-dose challenge with SHIV-MN, and early plasma viremia was markedly decreased after high-dose SHIV-MN challenge. In contrast, replication of pathogenic SHIV-89.6PD was not affected by vaccination in any of the macaques. Thus, we have shown that immunization with an rBCG Env V3 vaccine elicits a strong, type-specific V3 NAb response in rhesus macaques. While this response was not sufficient to provide protection against a pathogenic SHIV challenge, it was able to significantly reduce the viral load in macaques following challenge with a nonpathogenic SHIV. These observations suggest that rBCG vectors have the potential to deliver an appropriate virus immunogen for desirable immune elicitations. PMID:15650171

  12. Viral determinants of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) virulence in rhesus macaques assessed by using attenuated and pathogenic molecular clones of SIVmac.

    PubMed Central

    Marthas, M L; Ramos, R A; Lohman, B L; Van Rompay, K K; Unger, R E; Miller, C J; Banapour, B; Pedersen, N C; Luciw, P A

    1993-01-01

    To identify viral determinants of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) virulence, two pairs of reciprocal recombinants constructed from a pathogenic (SIVmac239) and a nonpathogenic (SIVmac1A11) molecular clone of SIV were tested in rhesus macaques. A large 6.2-kb fragment containing gag, pol, env, and the regulatory genes from each of the cloned (parental) viruses was exchanged to produce one pair of recombinant viruses (designated SIVmac1A11/239gag-env/1A11 and SIVmac239/1A11gag-env/239 to indicate the genetic origins of the 5'/internal/3' regions, respectively, of the virus). A smaller 1.4-kb fragment containing the external env domain of each of the parental viruses was exchanged to create the second pair (SIVmac1A11/239env/1A11 and SIVmac239/1A11env/239) of recombinant viruses. Each of the two parental and four recombinant viruses was inoculated intravenously into four rhesus macaques, and all 24 animals were viremic by 4 weeks postinoculation (p.i.). Virus could not be isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of any animals infected with SIVmac1A11 after 6 weeks p.i. but was consistently isolated from all macaques inoculated with SIVmac239 for 92 weeks p.i. Virus isolation was variable from animals infected with recombinant viruses; SIVmac1A11/239gag-env/1A11 and SIVmac239/1A11env/239 were isolated most frequently. Animals inoculated with SIVmac239 had 10 to 100 times more virus-infected PBMC than those infected with recombinant viruses. Three animals infected with SIVmac239 died with simian AIDS (SAIDS) during the 2-year observation period after inoculation, and the fourth SIVmac239-infected animal had clinical signs of SAIDS. Two animals infected with recombinant viruses died with SAIDS; one was infected with SIVmac239/1A11gag-env/239, and the other was infected with SIVmac1A11/239gag-env/1A11. The remaining 18 macaques remained healthy by 2 years p.i., and 13 were aviremic. One year after inoculation, peripheral lymph nodes of some of these

  13. A single amino acid substitution within the transmembrane domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpu protein renders simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}) susceptible to rimantadine

    SciTech Connect

    Hout, David R.; Gomez, Lisa M.; Pacyniak, Erik; Miller, Jean-Marie; Hill, M. Sarah; Stephens, Edward B. . E-mail: estephen@kumc.edu

    2006-05-10

    Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that the transmembrane domain (TM) of the Vpu protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contributes to the pathogenesis of SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33} in macaques and that the TM domain of Vpu could be replaced with the M2 protein viroporin from influenza A virus. Recently, we showed that the replacement of the TM domain of Vpu with that of the M2 protein of influenza A virus resulted in a virus (SHIV{sub M2}) that was sensitive to rimantadine [Hout, D.R., Gomez, M.L., Pacyniak, E., Gomez, L.M., Inbody, S.H., Mulcahy, E.R., Culley, N., Pinson, D.M., Powers, M.F., Wong, S.W., Stephens, E.B., 2006. Substitution of the transmembrane domain of Vpu in simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}) with that of M2 of influenza A results in a virus that is sensitive to inhibitors of the M2 ion channel and is pathogenic for pig-tailed macaques. Virology 344, 541-558]. Based on previous studies of the M2 protein which have shown that the His-X-X-X-Trp motif within the M2 is essential to the function of the M2 proton channel, we have constructed a novel SHIV in which the alanine at position 19 of the TM domain was replaced with a histidine residue resulting in the motif His-Ile-Leu-Val-Trp. The SHIV{sub VpuA19H} replicated with similar kinetics as the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33} and pulse-chase analysis revealed that the processing of viral proteins was similar to SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}. This SHIV{sub VpuA19H} virus was found to be more sensitive to the M2 ion channel blocker rimantadine than SHIV{sub M2}. Electron microscopic examination of SHIV{sub VpuA19H}-infected cells treated with rimantadine revealed an accumulation of viral particles at the cell surface and within intracellular vesicles, which was similar to that previously observed to SHIV{sub M2}-infected cells treated with rimantadine. These data indicate that the Vpu protein of HIV-1 can be converted into a rimantadine-sensitive ion channel with the

  14. Immune activation driven by CTLA-4 blockade augments viral replication at mucosal sites in simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cecchinato, Valentina; Tryniszewska, Elzbieta; Ma, Zhong Min; Vaccari, Monica; Boasso, Adriano; Tsai, Wen-Po; Petrovas, Constantinos; Fuchs, Dietmar; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Venzon, David; Shearer, Gene M; Koup, Richard A; Lowy, Israel; Miller, Christopher J; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2008-04-15

    The importance of chronic immune activation in progression to AIDS has been inferred by correlative studies in HIV-infected individuals and in nonhuman primate models of SIV infection. Using the SIV(mac251) macaque model, we directly address the impact of immune activation by inhibiting CTLA-4, an immunoregulatory molecule expressed on activated T cells and a subset of regulatory T cells. We found that CTLA-4 blockade significantly increased T cell activation and viral replication in primary SIV(mac251) infection, particularly at mucosal sites, and increased IDO expression and activity. Accordingly, protracted treatment with anti-CTLA-4 Ab of macaques chronically infected with SIV(mac251) decreased responsiveness to antiretroviral therapy and abrogated the ability of therapeutic T cell vaccines to decrease viral set point. These data provide the first direct evidence that immune activation drives viral replication, and suggest caution in the use of therapeutic approaches for HIV infection in vivo that increase CD4(+) T cell proliferation. PMID:18390726

  15. Loss of IL-17-producing CD8 T cells during late chronic stage of pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Pragati; Kwa, Suefen; Velu, Vijayakumar; Amara, Rama Rao

    2011-01-15

    Progressive disease caused by pathogenic SIV/HIV infections is marked by systemic hyperimmune activation, immune dysregulation, and profound depletion of CD4(+) T cells in lymphoid and gastrointestinal mucosal tissues. IL-17 is important for protective immunity against extracellular bacterial infections at mucosa and for maintenance of mucosal barrier. Although IL-17-secreting CD4 (Th17) and CD8 (Tc17) T cells have been reported, very little is known about the latter subset for any infectious disease. In this study, we characterized the anatomical distribution, phenotype, and functional quality of Tc17 and Th17 cells in healthy (SIV-) and SIV+ rhesus macaques. In healthy macaques, Tc17 and Th17 cells were present in all lymphoid and gastrointestinal tissues studied with predominance in small intestine. About 50% of these cells coexpressed TNF-α and IL-2. Notably, ∼50% of Tc17 cells also expressed the co-inhibitory molecule CTLA-4, and only a minority (<20%) expressed granzyme B suggesting that these cells possess more of a regulatory than cytotoxic phenotype. After SIV infection, unlike Th17 cells, Tc17 cells were not depleted during the acute phase of infection. However, the frequency of Tc17 cells in SIV-infected macaques with AIDS was lower compared with that in healthy macaques demonstrating the loss of these cells during end-stage disease. Antiretroviral therapy partially restored the frequency of Tc17 and Th17 cells in the colorectal mucosa. Depletion of Tc17 cells was not observed in colorectal mucosa of chronically infected SIV+ sooty mangabeys. In conclusion, our results suggest a role for Tc17 cells in regulating disease progression during pathogenic SIV infection. PMID:21148794

  16. Replicating Adenovirus-Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Recombinant Priming and Envelope Protein Boosting Elicits Localized, Mucosal IgA Immunity in Rhesus Macaques Correlated with Delayed Acquisition following a Repeated Low-Dose Rectal SIVmac251 Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Peng; Patterson, L. Jean; Kuate, Seraphin; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Thomas, Michael A.; Venzon, David; Zhao, Jun; DiPasquale, Janet; Fenizia, Claudio; Lee, Eun Mi; Kalisz, Irene; Kalyanaraman, Vaniambadi S.; Pal, Ranajit; Montefiori, David; Keele, Brandon F.

    2012-01-01

    We have shown that sequential replicating adenovirus type 5 host range mutant human immunodeficiency virus/simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV/SIV) recombinant priming delivered first intranasally (i.n.) plus orally and then intratracheally (i.t.), followed by envelope protein boosting, elicits broad cellular immunity and functional, envelope-specific serum and mucosal antibodies that correlate with protection from high-dose SIV and simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenges in rhesus macaques. Here we extended these studies to compare the standard i.n./i.t. regimen with additional mucosal administration routes, including sublingual, rectal, and vaginal routes. Similar systemic cellular and humoral immunity was elicited by all immunization routes. Central and effector memory T cell responses were also elicited by the four immunization routes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and jejunal, rectal, and vaginal tissue samples. Cellular responses in vaginal tissue were more compartmentalized, being induced primarily by intravaginal administration. In contrast, all immunization routes elicited secretory IgA (sIgA) responses at multiple mucosal sites. Following a repeated low-dose intrarectal (i.r.) challenge with SIVmac251 at a dose transmitting one or two variants, protection against acquisition was not achieved except in one macaque in the i.r. immunized group. All immunized macaques exhibited reduced peak viremia compared to that of controls, correlated inversely with prechallenge serum antienvelope avidity, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) titers, and percent antibody-dependent cell-mediated viral inhibition. Both antibody avidity and ADCC titers were correlated with the number of exposures required for infection. Notably, we show for the first time a significant correlation of vaccine-induced sIgA titers in rectal secretions with delayed acquisition. Further investigation of the characteristics and properties of the sIgA should elucidate the

  17. Expression at the cell surface of biologically active fusion and hemagglutinin/neuraminidase proteins of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 from cloned cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, R G; Hiebert, S W; Lamb, R A

    1985-01-01

    cDNAs encoding the mRNAs for the fusion protein (F) and the hemagglutinin/neuraminidase protein (HN) of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 have been inserted into a eukaryotic expression vector under the control of the simian virus 40 late promoter. The F and HN proteins synthesized in recombinant infected cells are indistinguishable in terms of electrophoretic mobility and glycosylation from the proteins synthesized in simian virus 5-infected cells. In addition, the expressed F and HN proteins have been shown to be anchored in the plasma membrane in a biologically active form by indirect live cell immunofluorescence, the F-mediated formation of syncytia, and the ability of HN to cause the hemadsorption of erythrocytes to the infected cell surface. Images PMID:3865176

  18. Full-Length Genome Analyses of Two New Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Strains from Mustached Monkeys (C. Cephus) in Gabon Illustrate a Complex Evolutionary History among the SIVmus/mon/gsn Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Liégeois, Florian; Schmidt, Fabian; Boué, Vanina; Butel, Christelle; Mouacha, Fatima; Ngari, Paul; Mve Ondo, Bertrand; Leroy, Eric; Heeney, Jonathan L.; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine; Rouet, François

    2014-01-01

    The Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) mus/mon/gsn lineage is a descendant of one of the precursor viruses to the HIV-1/SIVcpz/gor viral lineage. SIVmus and SIVgsn were sequenced from mustached and greater spot nosed monkeys in Cameroon and SIVmon from mona monkeys in Cameroon and Nigeria. In order to further document the genetic diversity of SIVmus, we analyzed two full-length genomes of new strains identified in Gabon. The whole genomes obtained showed the expected reading frames for gag, pol, vif, vpr, tat, rev, env, nef, and also for a vpu gene. Analyses showed that the Gabonese SIVmus strains were closely related and formed a monophyletic clade within the SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage. Nonetheless, within this lineage, the position of both new SIVmus differed according to the gene analyzed. In pol and nef gene, phylogenetic topologies suggested different evolutions for each of the two new SIVmus strains whereas in the other nucleic fragments studied, their positions fluctuated between SIVmon, SIVmus-1, and SIVgsn. In addition, in C1 domain of env, we identified an insertion of seven amino acids characteristic for the SIVmus/mon/gsn and HIV‑1/SIVcpz/SIVgor lineages. Our results show a high genetic diversity of SIVmus in mustached monkeys and suggest cross-species transmission events and recombination within SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage. Additionally, in Central Africa, hunters continue to be exposed to these simian viruses, and this represents a potential threat to humans. PMID:25054885

  19. Full-length genome analyses of two new simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains from mustached monkeys (C. Cephus) in Gabon illustrate a complex evolutionary history among the SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage.

    PubMed

    Liégeois, Florian; Schmidt, Fabian; Boué, Vanina; Butel, Christelle; Mouacha, Fatima; Ngari, Paul; Ondo, Bertrand Mve; Leroy, Eric; Heeney, Jonathan L; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine; Rouet, François

    2014-07-01

    The Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) mus/mon/gsn lineage is a descendant of one of the precursor viruses to the HIV-1/SIVcpz/gor viral lineage. SIVmus and SIVgsn were sequenced from mustached and greater spot nosed monkeys in Cameroon and SIVmon from mona monkeys in Cameroon and Nigeria. In order to further document the genetic diversity of SIVmus, we analyzed two full-length genomes of new strains identified in Gabon. The whole genomes obtained showed the expected reading frames for gag, pol, vif, vpr, tat, rev, env, nef, and also for a vpu gene. Analyses showed that the Gabonese SIVmus strains were closely related and formed a monophyletic clade within the SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage. Nonetheless, within this lineage, the position of both new SIVmus differed according to the gene analyzed. In pol and nef gene, phylogenetic topologies suggested different evolutions for each of the two new SIVmus strains whereas in the other nucleic fragments studied, their positions fluctuated between SIVmon, SIVmus-1, and SIVgsn. In addition, in C1 domain of env, we identified an insertion of seven amino acids characteristic for the SIVmus/mon/gsn and HIV‑1/SIVcpz/SIVgor lineages. Our results show a high genetic diversity of SIVmus in mustached monkeys and suggest cross-species transmission events and recombination within SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage. Additionally, in Central Africa, hunters continue to be exposed to these simian viruses, and this represents a potential threat to humans. PMID:25054885

  20. Patterns of viral replication correlate with outcome in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques: effect of prior immunization with a trivalent SIV vaccine in modified vaccinia virus Ankara.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, V M; Fuerst, T R; Sutter, G; Carroll, M W; Yang, L C; Goldstein, S; Piatak, M; Elkins, W R; Alvord, W G; Montefiori, D C; Moss, B; Lifson, J D

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics of plasma viremia were explored in a group of 12 simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) that had received prior immunization with either nonrecombinant or trivalent (gag-pol, env) SIV-recombinant vaccinia viruses. Three distinct patterns of viral replication observed during and following primary viremia accounted for significant differences in survival times. High-level primary plasma viremia with subsequently increasing viremia was associated with rapid progression to AIDS (n = 2). A high-level primary plasma virus load with a transient decline and subsequent progressive increase in viremia in the post-acute phase of infection was associated with progression to AIDS within a year (n = 6). Low levels of primary plasma viremia followed by sustained restriction of virus replication were associated with maintenance of normal lymphocyte subsets and intact lymphoid architecture (n = 4), reminiscent of the profile observed in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected long-term nonprogressors. Three of four macaques that showed this pattern had been immunized with an SIV recombinant derived from the attenuated vaccinia virus, modified vaccinia virus Ankara. These data link the dynamics and extent of virus replication to disease course and suggest that sustained suppression of virus promotes long-term, asymptomatic survival of SIV-infected macaques. These findings also suggest that vaccine modulation of host immunity may have profound beneficial effects on the subsequent disease course, even if sterilizing immunity is not achieved. PMID:8648709

  1. Fatal pancreatitis in simian immunodeficiency virus SIV(mac251)-infected macaques treated with 2',3'-dideoxyinosine and stavudine following cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase blockade.

    PubMed

    Vaccari, Monica; Boasso, Adriano; Fenizia, Claudio; Fuchs, Dietmar; Hryniewicz, Anna; Morgan, Tia; Weiss, Deborah; Doster, Melvin N; Heraud, Jean Michel; Shearer, Gene M; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with immune activation, CD4⁺-T-cell loss, and a progressive decline of immune functions. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) only partially reverses HIV-associated immune dysfunction, suggesting that approaches that target immune activation and improve virus-specific immune responses may be needed. We performed a preclinical study in rhesus macaques infected with the pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus SIV(mac251) and treated with ART. We tested whether vaccination administered together with cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) blockade and treatment with the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitor 1-methyl-D-tryptophan (D-1mT), decreased immune activation and improved vaccine efficacy. The treatment did not augment vaccine immunogenicity; rather, it dramatically increased ART-related toxicity, causing all treated animals to succumb to acute pancreatitis and hyperglycemic coma. The onset of fulminant diabetes was associated with severe lymphocyte infiltration of the pancreas and complete loss of the islets of Langerhans. Thus, caution should be used when considering approaches aimed at targeting immune activation during ART. PMID:22013040

  2. Adjuvanting a DNA vaccine with a TLR9 ligand plus Flt3 ligand results in enhanced cellular immunity against the simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Kwissa, Marcin; Amara, Rama R; Robinson, Harriet L; Moss, Bernard; Alkan, Sefik; Jabbar, Abdul; Villinger, Francois; Pulendran, Bali

    2007-10-29

    DNA vaccines offer promising strategies for immunization against infections. However, their clinical use requires improvements in immunogenicity. We explored the efficacy of Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands (TLR-Ls) on augmenting the immunogenicity of a DNA prime-modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boost vaccine against SIV. Rhesus macaques were injected with Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3)-ligand (FL) to expand dendritic cells (DCs) and were primed with a DNA vaccine encoding immunodeficiency virus antigens mixed with ligands for TLR9 or TLR7/8. Subsequently, the animals were boosted with DNA and twice with recombinant MVA expressing the same antigens. TLR9-L (CpG DNA) mediated activation of DCs in vivo and enhanced the magnitude of antigen-specific CD8(+) interferon (IFN) gamma(+) T cells and polyfunctional CD8(+) T cells producing IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin 2. Although this trial was designed primarily as an immunogenicity study, we challenged the animals with pathogenic SIVmac(251) and observed a reduction in peak viremia and cumulative viral loads in the TLR9-L plus FL-adjuvanted group relative to the unvaccinated group; however, the study design precluded comparisons between the adjuvanted groups and the group vaccinated with DNA/MVA alone. Viral loads were inversely correlated with the magnitude and quality of the immune response. Thus, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines can be augmented with TLR9-L plus FL. PMID:17954572

  3. Expression and coreceptor function of APJ for primate immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed

    Puffer, B A; Sharron, M; Coughlan, C M; Baribaud, F; McManus, C M; Lee, B; David, J; Price, K; Horuk, R; Tsang, M; Doms, R W

    2000-10-25

    APJ is a seven transmembrane domain G-protein-coupled receptor that functions as a coreceptor for some primate immunodeficiency virus strains. The in vivo significance of APJ coreceptor function remains to be elucidated, however, due to the lack of an antibody that can be used to assess APJ expression, and because of the absence of an antibody or ligand that can block APJ coreceptor activity. Therefore, we produced a specific monoclonal antibody (MAb 856) to APJ and found that it detected this receptor in FACS, immunofluorescence, and immunohistochemistry studies. MAb 856 also recognized APJ by Western blot, enabling us to determine that APJ is N-glycosylated. Using this antibody, we correlated APJ expression with coreceptor activity and found that APJ had coreceptor function even at low levels of expression. However, we found that APJ could not be detected by FACS analysis on cell lines commonly used to propagate primate lentiviruses, nor was it expressed on human PBMC cultured under a variety of conditions. We also found that some viral envelope proteins could mediate fusion with APJ-positive, CD4-negative cells, provided that CD4 was added in trans. These findings indicate that in some situations APJ use could render primary cell types susceptible to virus infection, although we have not found any evidence that this occurs. Finally, the peptide ligand for APJ, apelin-13, efficiently blocked APJ coreceptor activity. PMID:11040134

  4. Response of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac251) to raltegravir: a basis for a new treatment for simian AIDS and an animal model for studying lentiviral persistence during antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In this study we successfully created a new approach to ART in SIVmac251 infected nonhuman primates. This drug regimen is entirely based on drugs affecting the pre-integration stages of replication and consists of only two nucleotidic/nucleosidic reverse transcriptase inhibitors (Nt/NRTIs) and raltegravir, a promising new drug belonging to the integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) class. Results In acutely infected human lymphoid CD4+ T-cell lines MT-4 and CEMx174, SIVmac251 replication was efficiently inhibited by raltegravir, which showed an EC90 in the low nanomolar range. This result was confirmed in primary macaque PBMCs and enriched CD4+ T cell fractions. In vivo monotherapy with raltegravir for only ten days resulted in reproducible decreases in viral load in two different groups of animals. When emtricitabine (FTC) and tenofovir (PMPA) were added to treatment, undetectable viral load was reached in two weeks, and a parallel increase in CD4 counts was observed. In contrast, the levels of proviral DNA did not change significantly during the treatment period, thus showing persistence of this lentiviral reservoir during therapy. Conclusions In line with the high conservation of the three main amino acids Y143, Q148 and N155 (responsible for raltegravir binding) and molecular docking simulations showing similar binding modes of raltegravir at the SIVmac251 and HIV-1 IN active sites, raltegravir is capable of inhibiting SIVmac251 replication both in tissue culture and in vivo. This finding may help to develop effective ART regimens for the simian AIDS model entirely based on drugs adopted for treatment in humans. This ART-treated AIDS nonhuman primate model could be employed to find possible strategies for virus eradication from the body. PMID:20233398

  5. Cytokine/Chemokine Responses in Activated CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells Isolated from Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, and Axillary Lymph Nodes during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kenway-Lynch, Carys S.; Das, Arpita; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding the cytokine/chemokine networks in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during the acute phase of infection is crucial to design therapies for the control of early human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication. Here, we measured early changes in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the peripheral blood (PB), bone marrow (BM), and axillary lymph node (ALN) tissue of rhesus macaques infected with SIVMAC251. At 21 days after infection, all tissues showed a statistically significant loss of CD4+ T cells along with immune activation of CD8+ T cells in PB and ALN tissue. Twenty-eight different cytokines/chemokines were quantified in either anti-CD3/28 antibody- or staphylococcal enterotoxin B-stimulated single-positive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. PB CD4+ T cells produced predominantly interleukin-2 (IL-2), whereas CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in tissues produced β-chemokines both before and 21 days after SIV infection. Tissues generally exhibited massive upregulation of many cytokines/chemokines following infection, possibly in an attempt to mitigate the loss of CD4+ T cells. There was no evidence of a T-helper 1 (TH1)-to-TH2 shift in CD4+ T cells or a T-cytotoxic 1 (TC1)-to-TC2 cytokine shift in CD8+ T cells in PB, BM, and ALN T-cell subsets during the acute phase of SIV infection. Despite the upregulation of several important effector cytokines/chemokines (IL-2, IL-12, IL-17, gamma interferon, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, upregulation of β-chemokines (CCL2 and CCL22), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-basic), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and migration inhibition factor (MIF) may provide a poor prognosis either by inducing increased virus replication or by other unknown mechanisms. Therefore, drugs targeting β-chemokines (CCL2 and CCL22), FGF-basic, HGF, or MIF might be important for developing effective vaccines and therapeutics against HIV. IMPORTANCE Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/simian

  6. Limited Contribution of Mucosal IgA to Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV)-Specific Neutralizing Antibody Response and Virus Envelope Evolution in Breast Milk of SIV-Infected, Lactating Rhesus Monkeys▿

    PubMed Central

    Permar, Sallie R.; Wilks, Andrew B.; Ehlinger, Elizabeth P.; Kang, Helen H.; Mahlokozera, Tatenda; Coffey, Rory T.; Carville, Angela; Letvin, Norman L.; Seaman, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Breast milk transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains an important mode of infant HIV acquisition. Interestingly, the majority of infants remain uninfected during prolonged virus exposure via breastfeeding, raising the possibility that immune components in milk prevent mucosal virus transmission. HIV-specific antibody responses are detectable in the milk of HIV-infected women and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected monkeys; however, the role of these humoral responses in virus neutralization and local virus quasispecies evolution has not been characterized. In this study, four lactating rhesus monkeys were inoculated with SIVmac251 and monitored for SIV envelope-specific humoral responses and virus evolution in milk and plasma throughout infection. While the kinetics and breadth of the SIV-specific IgG and IgA responses in milk were similar to those in plasma, the magnitude of the milk responses was considerably lower than that of the plasma responses. Furthermore, a neutralizing antibody response against the inoculation virus was not detected in milk samples at 1 year after infection, despite a measurable autologous neutralizing antibody response in plasma samples obtained from three of four monkeys. Interestingly, while IgA is the predominant immunoglobulin in milk, the milk SIV envelope-specific IgA response was lower in magnitude and demonstrated more limited neutralizing capacity against a T-cell line-adapted SIV compared to those of the milk IgG response. Finally, amino acid mutations in the envelope gene product of SIV variants in milk and plasma samples occurred in similar numbers and at similar positions, indicating that the humoral immune pressure in milk does not drive distinct virus evolution in the breast milk compartment. PMID:21041730

  7. Active influenza virus neuraminidase is expressed in monkey cells from cDNA cloned in simian virus 40 vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A R; Bos, T J; Nayak, D P

    1983-01-01

    We have replaced the late genes of simian virus 40 (SV40) with a cloned cDNA copy of the neuraminidase (NA; EC 3.2.1.18) gene of the WSN (H1N1) strain of human influenza virus. When the SV40-NA recombinant virus was complemented in a lytic infection of monkey cells with a helper virus containing an early region deletion mutant, influenza NA was expressed and readily detected by immunofluorescence as well as by immunoprecipitation of in vivo labeled proteins with monoclonal antibodies against NA. In addition, the expressed NA exhibited enzymatic activity by cleaving the sialic acid residue from alpha-2,3-sialyllactitol. The expressed protein was glycosylated and transported to the cell surface, and it possessed the same molecular weight as the NA of WSN virus grown in monkey cells. Because the structure of NA is quite different from that of other integral membrane proteins and includes an anchoring region at the NH2 terminus consisting of hydrophobic amino acids, we also constructed deletion mutants of NA in this region. Replacement of DNA coding for the first 10 NH2-terminal amino acids with SV40 and linker sequences had no apparent effect on NA expression, glycosylation, transport to the cell surface, or enzymatic activity. However, further deletion of NA DNA encoding the first 26 amino acids abolished NA expression. These data suggest that the hydrophobic NH2-terminal region is multifunctional and is important in biosynthesis and translocation of NA across the membrane as well as in anchoring the protein. Images PMID:6306656

  8. Relative Transmissibility of an R5 Clade C Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Across Different Mucosae in Macaques Parallels the Relative Risks of Sexual HIV-1 Transmission Via Different Routes

    PubMed Central

    Chenine, Agnès L.; Siddappa, Nagadenahalli B.; Kramer, Victor G.; Sciaranghella, Gaia; Rasmussen, Robert A.; Lee, Sandra J.; Santosuosso, Michael; Poznansky, Mark C.; Velu, Vijayakumar; Amara, Rama R.; Souder, Chris; Anderson, Daniel C.; Villinger, François; Else, James G.; Novembre, Francis J.; Strobert, Elizabeth; O’Neil, Shawn P.; Secor, W. Evan; Ruprecht, Ruth M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Worldwide, ~90% of all HIV transmissions occur mucosally; almost all involve R5 strains. Risks of sexual HIV acquisition are highest for rectal, followed by vaginal and then oral exposures. Methods Mucosal lacerations may affect the rank-order of susceptibility to HIV but cannot be assessed in humans. We measured relative virus transmissibility across intact mucosae in macaques using a single stock of SHIV-1157ipd3N4, a simian-human immunodeficiency virus encoding a primary R5 HIV clade C env (SHIV-C). Results The penetrability of rhesus macaque mucosae differed significantly, with rectal challenge requiring the least virus, followed by the vaginal and then oral routes. These findings imply that intrinsic mucosal properties are responsible for the differential mucosal permeability. The latter paralleled the rank-order reported for humans, with relative risk estimates within the range of epidemiologic human studies. To test whether inflammation facilitates virus transmission – as predicted from human studies – we established a macaque model of localized buccal inflammation. Systemic infection occurred across inflamed, but not normal buccal mucosa. Conclusion Our primate data recapitulate virus transmission risks observed in humans, thus establishing R5 SHIV-1157ipd3N4 in macaques as a robust model system to study cofactors involved in human mucosal HIV transmission and its prevention. PMID:20214475

  9. Impact of Viral Dose and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class IB Haplotype on Viral Outcome in Mauritian Cynomolgus Monkeys Vaccinated with Tat upon Challenge with Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus SHIV89.6P ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cafaro, Aurelio; Bellino, Stefania; Titti, Fausto; Maggiorella, Maria Teresa; Sernicola, Leonardo; Wiseman, Roger W.; Venzon, David; Karl, Julie A.; O'Connor, David; Monini, Paolo; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Ensoli, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The effects of the challenge dose and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class IB alleles were analyzed in 112 Mauritian cynomolgus monkeys vaccinated (n = 67) or not vaccinated (n = 45) with Tat and challenged with simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) 89.6Pcy243. In the controls, the challenge dose (10 to 20 50% monkey infectious doses [MID50]) or MHC did not affect susceptibility to infection, peak viral load, or acute CD4 T-cell loss, whereas in the chronic phase of infection, the H1 haplotype correlated with a high viral load (P = 0.0280) and CD4 loss (P = 0.0343). Vaccination reduced the rate of infection acquisition at 10 MID50 (P < 0.0001), and contained acute CD4 loss at 15 MID50 (P = 0.0099). Haplotypes H2 and H6 were correlated with increased susceptibility (P = 0.0199) and resistance (P = 0.0087) to infection, respectively. Vaccination also contained CD4 depletion (P = 0.0391) during chronic infection, independently of the challenge dose or haplotype. PMID:20554774

  10. The regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-09-15

    Despite 15 years of intensive research we still do not have an effective treatment for AIDS, the disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Recent research is, however, revealing some of the secrets of the replication cycle of this complex retrovirus, and this may lead to the development of novel antiviral compounds. In particular the virus uses strategies for gene expression that seem to be unique in the eukaryotic world. These involve the use of virally encoded regulatory proteins that mediate their effects through interactions with specific viral target sequences present in the messenger RNA rather than in the proviral DNA. If there are no cellular counterparts of these RNA-dependent gene-regulation pathways then they offer excellent targets for the development of antiviral compounds. The viral promoter is also subject to complex regulation by combinations of cellular factors that may be functional in different cell types and at different cell states. Selective interference of specific cellular factors may also provide a route to inhibiting viral replication without disrupting normal cellular functions. The aim of this review is to discuss the regulation of HIV-1 gene expression and, as far as it is possible, to relate the observations to viral pathogenesis. Some areas of research into the regulation of HIV-1 replication have generated controversy and rather than rehearsing this controversy we have imposed our own bias on the field. To redress the balance and to give a broader view of HIV-1 replication and pathogenesis we refer you to a number of excellent reviews [Cullen, B. R. (1992) Microbiol. Rev. 56, 375-394; Levy, J. A. (1993) Microbiol. Rev. 57, 183-394; Antoni, B. A., Stein, S. & Rabson, A. B. (1994) Adv. Virus Res. 43, 53-145; Rosen, C. A. & Fenyoe, E. M. (1995) AIDS (Phila.) 9, S1-S3]. PMID:8856047

  11. Elite Control, Gut CD4 T Cell Sparing, and Enhanced Mucosal T Cell Responses in Macaca nemestrina Infected by a Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Lacking a gp41 Trafficking Motif

    PubMed Central

    Breed, Matthew W.; Elser, Samra E.; Torben, Workineh; Jordan, Andrea P. O.; Aye, Pyone P.; Midkiff, Cecily; Schiro, Faith; Sugimoto, Chie; Alvarez-Hernandez, Xavier; Blair, Robert V.; Somasunderam, Anoma; Utay, Netanya S.; Kuroda, Marcelo J.; Pahar, Bapi; Wiseman, Roger W.; O'Connor, David H.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David C.; Marsh, Mark; Li, Yuan; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Keele, Brandon F.; Fultz, Patricia N.; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Deletion of Gly-720 and Tyr-721 from a highly conserved GYxxØ trafficking signal in the SIVmac239 envelope glycoprotein cytoplasmic domain, producing a virus termed ΔGY, leads to a striking perturbation in pathogenesis in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Infected macaques develop immune activation and progress to AIDS, but with only limited and transient infection of intestinal CD4+ T cells and an absence of microbial translocation. Here we evaluated ΔGY in pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina), a species in which SIVmac239 infection typically leads to increased immune activation and more rapid progression to AIDS than in rhesus macaques. In pig-tailed macaques, ΔGY also replicated acutely to high peak plasma RNA levels identical to those for SIVmac239 and caused only transient infection of CD4+ T cells in the gut lamina propria and no microbial translocation. However, in marked contrast to rhesus macaques, 19 of 21 pig-tailed macaques controlled ΔGY replication with plasma viral loads of <15 to 50 RNA copies/ml. CD4+ T cells were preserved in blood and gut for up to 100 weeks with no immune activation or disease progression. Robust antiviral CD4+ T cell responses were seen, particularly in the gut. Anti-CD8 antibody depletion demonstrated CD8+ cellular control of viral replication. Two pig-tailed macaques progressed to disease with persisting viremia and possible compensatory mutations in the cytoplasmic tail. These studies demonstrate a marked perturbation in pathogenesis caused by ΔGY's ablation of the GYxxØ trafficking motif and reveal, paradoxically, that viral control is enhanced in a macaque species typically predisposed to more pathogenic manifestations of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection. IMPORTANCE The pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) reflects a balance between viral replication, host innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses, and sustained immune activation

  12. Cytokine influence on simian immunodeficiency virus replication within primary macrophages. TNF-alpha, but not GMCSF, enhances viral replication on a per-cell basis.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, D. G.; Horvath, C. J.; Hansen-Moosa, A.; MacKey, J. J.; Sehgal, P. K.; Daniel, M. D.; Desrosiers, R. C.; Ringler, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The control of HIV-1 or SIV replication within macrophages is probably influenced by a variety of viral and cellular factors. Of the cellular factors, the authors have studied cytokine influence on SIV replication in vitro utilizing simian alveolar macrophages and uncloned SIVmacMTV, a macrophage-tropic variant. The approach allowed quantification of viral replication on a per-cell basis. As reported for HIV-1 replication in macrophages, TNF-alpha significantly increased SIV production in these macrophage cultures. GMCSF also resulted in marked increases in SIV gag protein in culture supernatants. However, after correcting for differences in total cell numbers and numbers of gag-containing cells in the treated and untreated cultures, GMCSF did not upregulate SIV production on a per-cell basis. IL-6 increased SIV replication little if at all but induced significantly greater cytopathic changes in the treated cultures compared with infected, untreated cultures. In contrast, IFN-gamma greatly decreased replication. Our results for GMCSF, IFN-gamma, and IL-6 are in contrast to previously published reports of cytokine control of HIV-1 growth in target cells, and they stress the importance of cell number analyses and the use of primary cultures in the study of lentiviral replication kinetics in macrophages. Images Figure 5 PMID:1928304

  13. Cell-type specific regulation of gene expression by simian virus 40 T antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Cantalupo, Paul G.; Saenz-Robles, Maria Teresa; Rathi, Abhilasha V.; Beerman, Rebecca W.; Patterson, William H.; Whitehead, Robert H.; Pipas, James M.

    2009-03-30

    SV40 transforms cells through the action of two oncoproteins, large T antigen and small t antigen. Small t antigen targets phosphatase PP2A, while large T antigen stimulates cell proliferation and survival by action on multiple proteins, including the tumor suppressors Rb and p53. Large T antigen also binds components of the transcription initiation complex and several transcription factors. We examined global gene expression in SV40-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts, and in enterocytes obtained from transgenic mice. SV40 transformation alters the expression of approximately 800 cellular genes in both systems. Much of this regulation is observed in both MEFs and enterocytes and is consistent with T antigen action on the Rb-E2F pathway. However, the regulation of many genes is cell-type specific, suggesting that unique signaling pathways are activated in different cell types upon transformation, and that the consequences of SV40 transformation depends on the type of cell targeted.

  14. Interaction of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Vpx and Invariant Chain

    PubMed Central

    Pancio, Heather A.; Vander Heyden, Nancy; Kosuri, Kavitha; Cresswell, Peter; Ratner, Lee

    2000-01-01

    Vpx is a virion-associated protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) and simian immunodeficiency viruses. The yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify invariant chain (Ii) as a cellular protein that interacts with HIV-2 Vpx. Vpx-Ii interaction was confirmed in cell-free reactions using bacterially expressed glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins and by coimmunoprecipitation in transfected and infected cells. In chronically infected cells expressing Vpx, Ii levels were markedly decreased, presumably due to enhanced degradation. These findings suggest that Vpx may disrupt major histocompatibility complex class II antigen presentation. PMID:10846101

  15. Clinical Assessment of a Novel Recombinant Simian Adenovirus ChAdOx1 as a Vectored Vaccine Expressing Conserved Influenza A Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Antrobus, Richard D; Coughlan, Lynda; Berthoud, Tamara K; Dicks, Matthew D; Hill, Adrian VS; Lambe, Teresa; Gilbert, Sarah C

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviruses are potent vectors for inducing and boosting cellular immunity to encoded recombinant antigens. However, the widespread seroprevalence of neutralizing antibodies to common human adenovirus serotypes limits their use. Simian adenoviruses do not suffer from the same drawbacks. We have constructed a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus-vectored vaccine expressing the conserved influenza antigens, nucleoprotein (NP), and matrix protein 1 (M1). Here, we report safety and T-cell immunogenicity following vaccination with this novel recombinant simian adenovirus, ChAdOx1 NP+M1, in a first in human dose-escalation study using a 3+3 study design, followed by boosting with modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing the same antigens in some volunteers. We demonstrate ChAdOx1 NP+M1 to be safe and immunogenic. ChAdOx1 is a promising vaccine vector that could be used to deliver vaccine antigens where strong cellular immune responses are required for protection. PMID:24374965

  16. Clinical assessment of a novel recombinant simian adenovirus ChAdOx1 as a vectored vaccine expressing conserved Influenza A antigens.

    PubMed

    Antrobus, Richard D; Coughlan, Lynda; Berthoud, Tamara K; Dicks, Matthew D; Hill, Adrian Vs; Lambe, Teresa; Gilbert, Sarah C

    2014-03-01

    Adenoviruses are potent vectors for inducing and boosting cellular immunity to encoded recombinant antigens. However, the widespread seroprevalence of neutralizing antibodies to common human adenovirus serotypes limits their use. Simian adenoviruses do not suffer from the same drawbacks. We have constructed a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus-vectored vaccine expressing the conserved influenza antigens, nucleoprotein (NP), and matrix protein 1 (M1). Here, we report safety and T-cell immunogenicity following vaccination with this novel recombinant simian adenovirus, ChAdOx1 NP+M1, in a first in human dose-escalation study using a 3+3 study design, followed by boosting with modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing the same antigens in some volunteers. We demonstrate ChAdOx1 NP+M1 to be safe and immunogenic. ChAdOx1 is a promising vaccine vector that could be used to deliver vaccine antigens where strong cellular immune responses are required for protection. PMID:24374965

  17. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Stimulates the Expression and Production of Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor (SLPI) in Oral Epithelial Cells: a Role for SLPI in Innate Mucosal Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jana, N. K.; Gray, L. R.; Shugars, D. C.

    2005-01-01

    The innate immune response is a key barrier against pathogenic microorganisms such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Because HIV-1 is rarely transmitted orally, we hypothesized that oral epithelial cells participate in the innate immune defense against this virus. We further hypothesized that secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), a 12-kDa mucosal antiviral protein, is a component of the host immune response to this virus. Here we demonstrated constitutive expression and production of SLPI in immortalized human oral keratinocytes. Brief exposure of cells to HIV-1 BaL and HXB2 significantly increased SLPI mRNA and protein production compared to that in mock-exposed cells (P < 0.01), as evaluated by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HIV-1-mediated stimulation of SLPI occurred at the transcriptional level, was dose and time dependent, was elicited by heat-inactivated and infectious viruses, and did not depend on cellular infection. Experiments with purified retroviral proteins showed that the stimulatory effect was induced specifically by external envelope glycoproteins from HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus. SLPI responsiveness to HIV-1 was also observed in an unrelated oral epithelial cell line and in normal (nonimmortalized) human oral epithelial cells isolated from healthy uninfected gingival tissues. In this first report of SLPI regulation by HIV-1, we show that the expression and production of the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory protein can be stimulated in oral epithelial cells by the virus through interactions with gp120 in the absence of direct infection. These findings indicate that SLPI is a component of the oral mucosal response to HIV-1. PMID:15858026

  18. Specific N-linked and O-linked glycosylation modifications in the envelope V1 domain of simian immunodeficiency virus variants that evolve in the host alter recognition by neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Chackerian, B; Rudensey, L M; Overbaugh, J

    1997-01-01

    During progression to AIDS in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Mne-infected macaques, viral variants are selected that encode sequences with serine and threonine changes in variable region 1 (V1) of the surface component of the viral envelope protein (Env-SU). Because these serine and threonine amino acid changes are characteristic of sites for O-linked and N-linked glycosylation, we examined whether they were targets for modification by carbohydrates. For this purpose, we used several biochemical methods for analyzing the Env-SU protein encoded by chimeras of SIVMneCL8 and envelope sequences cloned from an SIVMneCL8-infected Macaca nemestrina during clinical latency and just after the onset of AIDS. The addition of an N-linked glycan was demonstrated by changes in the electrophoretic mobility of Env-SU, and this was verified by specific glycanase digestions and a detailed analysis of the molecular mass of partially purified Env-SU by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Molecular mass calculations by MALDI-TOF MS also demonstrated an increased mass, from 102.3 to 103.5 kDa, associated with serine and threonine residues predicted to be O-linked glycosylation sites. Together, these data provide the first direct evidence that the carbohydrate profile of Env-SU is distinct in SIV variants that evolve during infection of the host. Moreover, our studies show that these changes in glycosylation in V1 were directly associated with changes in antigenicity. Specifically, serine and threonine changes in V1 allowed the virus to escape neutralization by macaque sera that contained antibodies that could neutralize the parental virus, SIVMneCL8. The escape from antibody recognition appeared to be influenced by either O-linked or N-linked carbohydrate additions in V1. Moreover, when glycine residues were engineered at the positions where serine and threonine changes evolve in V1 of SIVMneCL8, there was no change in

  19. Attenuation of Pathogenic Immune Responses during Infection with Human and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV/SIV) by the Tetracycline Derivative Minocycline

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, Julia L.; Szeto, Gregory L.; Engle, Elizabeth L.; Liao, Zhaohao; Shearer, Gene M.; Zink, M. Christine; Graham, David R.

    2014-01-01

    HIV immune pathogenesis is postulated to involve two major mechanisms: 1) chronic innate immune responses that drive T cell activation and apoptosis and 2) induction of immune regulators that suppress T cell function and proliferation. Both arms are elevated chronically in lymphoid tissues of non-natural hosts, which ultimately develop AIDS. However, these mechanisms are not elevated chronically in natural hosts of SIV infection that avert immune pathogenesis despite similarly high viral loads. In this study we investigated whether minocycline could modulate these pathogenic antiviral responses in non-natural hosts of HIV and SIV. We found that minocycline attenuated in vitro induction of type I interferon (IFN) and the IFN-stimulated genes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1) and TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) in human plasmacytoid dendritic cells and PBMCs exposed to aldrithiol-2 inactivated HIV or infectious influenza virus. Activation-induced TRAIL and expression of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) in isolated CD4+ T cells were also reduced by minocycline. Translation of these in vitro findings to in vivo effects, however, were mixed as minocycline significantly reduced markers of activation and activation-induced cell death (CD25, Fas, caspase-3) but did not affect expression of IFNβ or the IFN-stimulated genes IDO1, FasL, or Mx in the spleens of chronically SIV-infected pigtailed macaques. TRAIL expression, reflecting the mixed effects of minocycline on activation and type I IFN stimuli, was reduced by half, but this change was not significant. These results show that minocycline administered after infection may protect against aspects of activation-induced cell death during HIV/SIV immune disease, but that in vitro effects of minocycline on type I IFN responses are not recapitulated in a rapid progressor model in vivo. PMID:24732038

  20. A single amino acid change and truncated TM are sufficient for simian immunodeficiency virus to enter cells using CCR5 in a CD4-independent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bonavia, A.; Bullock, B.T.; Gisselman, K.M.; Margulies, B.J.; Clements, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Entry of HIV and SIV into susceptible cells is mediated by CD4 and chemokine receptors, which act as coreceptors. To study cell entry of SIV, we constructed a cell line, xKLuSIV, derived from non-susceptible human K562 cells, that express the firefly luciferase reporter gene under control of a minimal SIV long terminal repeat (LTR). Using these susceptible cells, we studied the entry of a well-characterized molecularly cloned macrophage-tropic SIV. xKLuSIV cells that express rhesus macaque CD4 and/or the rhesus chemokine receptor CCR5 are susceptible to infection with the macrophage-tropic, neurovirulent strain SIV/17E-Fr, but only xKLuSIV cells expressing both CCR5 and CD4 were susceptible to infection by the macrophage-tropic, non-neurovirulent strain SIV/17E-Cl. CCR5-dependent, CD4-independent infection by SIV/17E-Fr was abrogated by pre-incubation of the cells with AOP-RANTES, a ligand for CCR5. In addition to viral entry occurring by a CD4-independent mechanism, neutralization of SIV/17E-Fr with rhesus mAbs from 3 different neutralization groups blocked entry into xKLuSIV cells by both CD4-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Triggering the env glycoprotein of SIV-17EFr with soluble CD4 had no significant effect in infectivity, but triggering of the same glycoprotein of SIV/17E-Cl allowed it to enter cells in a CD4-independent fashion. Using mutant molecular clones, we studied the determinants for CD4 independence, all of which are confined to the env gene. We report here that truncation of the TM at amino acid 764 and changing a single amino acid (R751G) in the SIV envelope transmembrane protein (TM) conferred the observed CD4-independent phenotype. Our data suggest that the envelope from the neurovirulent SIV/17E-Fr interacts with CCR5 in a CD4-independent manner, and changes in the TM protein of this virus are important components that contribute to neurovirulence in SIV. PMID:16061266

  1. Induction of human interferon gene expression is associated with a nuclear factor that interacts with the site of the human immunodeficiency virus-enhancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hiscott, J.; Alper, D.; Cohen, L.; Leblanc, J.F.; Sportza, L.; Wong, A.; Xanthoudakis, S. )

    1989-06-01

    The relationship between transcription of alpha and beta interferon (IFN-{alpha} and IFN-{beta}) genes and the interaction of IFN promoter-binding transcription factors has been examined in monoblastoid U937 cells following priming with recombinant IFN-{alpha}2 (rIFN-{alpha}2) and Sendai virus induction. Pretreatment of U937 cells with rIFN-{alpha}2 prior to Sendai virus infection increased the mRNA levels of IFN-{alpha}1, IFN-{alpha}2, and IFN-{beta} as well as the final yield of biologically active IFN. Analysis of nuclear protein-IFN promoter DNA interactions by electrophoretic mobility-shift assays demonstrated increased factor binding to IFN-{alpha}1 and IFN-{beta} regulatory domains, although no new induction-specific complexes were identified. On the basis of competition electrophoretic mobility-shift assay results, factors interacting with the IFN-{alpha}1 and IFN-{beta} promoters appear to be distinct DNA-binding proteins. Hybrid promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase fusion plasmids, containing either the IFN-{beta} regulatory element or the human immunodeficiency virus enhancer element linked to the simian virus 40 promoter, were analyzed for virus and phorbol ester inducibility in epithelial and lymphoid cells, respectively. These experiments suggest that induction of IFN gene expression may be controlled in part by transcription regulatory proteins binding to an NF-{kappa}B-like site within the IFN-{beta} promoter.

  2. Expansion of FOXP3+ CD8 T cells with suppressive potential in colorectal mucosa following a pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus infection correlates with diminished antiviral T cell response and viral control.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Pragati; Velu, Vijayakumar; Kannanganat, Sunil; Chennareddi, Lakshmi; Kwa, Suefen; Siddiqui, Mariam; Amara, Rama Rao

    2010-02-15

    FOXP3(+)CD8(+) T cells are present at low levels in humans; however, the function of these cells is not known. In this study, we demonstrate a rapid expansion of CD25(+)FOXP3(+)CD8(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the blood and multiple tissues following a pathogenic SIV infection in rhesus macaques. The expansion was pronounced in lymphoid and colorectal mucosal tissues, preferential sites of virus replication. These CD8 Tregs expressed molecules associated with immune suppressor function such as CTLA-4 and CD39 and suppressed proliferation of SIV-specific T cells in vitro. They also expressed low levels of granzyme B and perforin, suggesting that these cells do not possess killing potential. Expansion of CD8 Tregs correlated directly with acute phase viremia and inversely with the magnitude of antiviral T cell response. Expansion was also observed in HIV-infected humans but not in SIV-infected sooty mangabeys with high viremia, suggesting a direct role for hyperimmune activation and an indirect role for viremia in the induction of these cells. These results suggest an important but previously unappreciated role for CD8 Tregs in suppressing antiviral immunity during immunodeficiency virus infections. These results also suggest that CD8 Tregs expand in pathogenic immunodeficiency virus infections in the nonnatural hosts and that therapeutic strategies that prevent expansion of these cells may enhance control of HIV infection. PMID:20053943

  3. Induction of immune response in macaque monkeys infected with simian-human immunodeficiency virus having the TNF-{alpha} gene at an early stage of infection

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Yuya; Miyazaki, Yasuyuki; Ibuki, Kentaro; Suzuki, Hajime; Kaneyasu, Kentaro; Goto, Yoshitaka; Hayami, Masanori; Miura, Tomoyuki; Haga, Takeshi . E-mail: a0d518u@cc.miyazaki-u.ac.jp

    2005-12-20

    TNF-{alpha} has been implicated in the pathogenesis of, and the immune response against, HIV-1 infection. To clarify the roles of TNF-{alpha} against HIV-1-related virus infection in an SHIV-macaque model, we genetically engineered an SHIV to express the TNF-{alpha} gene (SHIV-TNF) and characterized the virus's properties in vivo. After the acute viremic stage, the plasma viral loads declined earlier in the SHIV-TNF-inoculated monkeys than in the parental SHIV (SHIV-NI)-inoculated monkeys. SHIV-TNF induced cell death in the lymph nodes without depletion of circulating CD4{sup +} T cells. SHIV-TNF provided some immunity in monkeys by increasing the production of the chemokine RANTES and by inducing an antigen-specific proliferation of lymphocytes. The monkeys immunized with SHIV-TNF were partly protected against a pathogenic SHIV (SHIV-C2/1) challenge. These findings suggest that TNF-{alpha} contributes to the induction of an effective immune response against HIV-1 rather than to the progression of disease at the early stage of infection.

  4. Decreased T Follicular Regulatory Cell/T Follicular Helper Cell (TFH) in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques May Contribute to Accumulation of TFH in Chronic Infection.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Ankita; Del Rio Estrada, Perla Mariana; Del Rio, Perla Maria Estrada; Tharp, Greg K; Trible, Ronald P; Amara, Rama R; Chahroudi, Ann; Reyes-Teran, Gustavo; Bosinger, Steven E; Silvestri, Guido

    2015-10-01

    T follicular helper cells (TFH) are critical for the development and maintenance of germinal center (GC) and humoral immune responses. During chronic HIV/SIV infection, TFH accumulate, possibly as a result of Ag persistence. The HIV/SIV-associated TFH expansion may also reflect lack of regulation by suppressive follicular regulatory CD4(+) T cells (TFR). TFR are natural regulatory T cells (TREG) that migrate into the follicle and, similar to TFH, upregulate CXCR5, Bcl-6, and PD1. In this study, we identified TFR as CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+)CXCR5(+)PD1(hi)Bcl-6(+) within lymph nodes of rhesus macaques (RM) and confirmed their localization within the GC by immunohistochemistry. RNA sequencing showed that TFR exhibit a distinct transcriptional profile with shared features of both TFH and TREG, including intermediate expression of FOXP3, Bcl-6, PRDM1, IL-10, and IL-21. In healthy, SIV-uninfected RM, we observed a negative correlation between frequencies of TFR and both TFH and GC B cells, as well as levels of CD4(+) T cell proliferation. Post SIV infection, the TFR/TFH ratio was reduced with no change in the frequency of TREG or TFR within the total CD4(+) T cell pool. Finally, we examined whether higher levels of direct virus infection of TFR were responsible for their relative depletion post SIV infection. We found that TFH, TFR, and TREG sorted from SIV-infected RM harbor comparable levels of cell-associated viral DNA. Our data suggest that TFR may contribute to the regulation and proliferation of TFH and GC B cells in vivo and that a decreased TFR/TFH ratio in chronic SIV infection may lead to unchecked expansion of both TFH and GC B cells. PMID:26297764

  5. Trans-activation of human immunodeficiency virus gene expression is mediated by nuclear events

    SciTech Connect

    Hauber, J.; Perkins, A.; Heimer, E.P.; Cullen, B.R.

    1987-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus encodes a gene product termed tat that is able to activate viral gene expression when present in trans. The mechanism of action of the tat gene product appears to be bimodal, resulting in both an increase in the steady-state level of viral mRNA and the enhanced translation of that RNA. In this report, the authors have examined the mechanism by which tat elevates viral mRNA levels. Data are presented demonstrating that tat acts by increasing the rate of viral transcription, rather than by modulating the stability of viral mRNA. Indirect immunofluorescence was used to show that tat is predominantly localized in the nucleus of expressing cells, a location consistent with a role in the regulation of viral transcription. These results suggest that tat could play a role in human immunodeficiency virus replication essentially similar to that proposed for the trans-acting nuclear gene products described for several other virus species.

  6. Simian hemorrhagic fever virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biological pro...

  7. A Hairpin Ribozyme Inhibits Expression of Diverse Strains of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Mang; Ojwang, Joshua; Yamada, Osamu; Hampel, Arnold; Rapapport, Jay; Looney, David; Wong-Staal, Flossie

    1993-07-01

    Ribozymes have enormous potential as antiviral agents. We have previously reported that a hairpin ribozyme expressed under the control of the β-actin promoter that cleaves human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA in the leader sequence can inhibit HIV-1 (pHXB2gpt) expression. For such a ribozyme in a retroviral vector delivery system to be useful in gene therapy for the treatment of HIV-1 infection, it must be able to inhibit the expression of multiple HIV-1 strains. We have now cloned this ribozyme into various regular expression vectors (including retroviral vectors) by using various gene expression control strategies. Here we show by transient transfection that inhibition of expression of diverse strains of HIV-1 can be achieved by this ribozyme expressed in the proper vectors. These data further support the potential of this hairpin ribozyme as a therapeutic agent for HIV-1.

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus receptor and coreceptor expression on human uterine epithelial cells: regulation of expression during the menstrual cycle and implications for human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yeaman, Grant R; Howell, Alexandra L; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; O'Connell, Denise M; Asin, Susana N; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is primarily a sexually transmitted disease. Identification of cell populations within the female reproductive tract that are initially infected, and the events involved in transmission of infection to other cells, remain to be established. In this report, we evaluated expression of HIV receptors and coreceptors on epithelial cells in the uterus and found they express several receptors critical for HIV infection including CD4, CXCR4, CCR5 and galactosylceramide (GalC). Moreover, expression of these receptors varied during the menstrual cycle. Expression of CD4 and CCR5 on uterine epithelial cells is high throughout the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle when blood levels of oestradiol are high. In contrast, CXCR4 expression increased gradually throughout the proliferative phase. During the secretory phase of the cycle when both oestradiol and progesterone are elevated, CD4 and CCR5 expression decreased whereas CXCR4 expression remained elevated. Expression of GalC on endometrial glands is higher during the secretory phase than during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Because epithelial cells line the female reproductive tract and express HIV receptors and coreceptors, it is likely that they are one of the first cell types to become infected. The hormonal regulation of HIV receptor expression may affect a woman's susceptibility to HIV infection during her menstrual cycle. Moreover, selective coreceptor expression could account for the preferential transmission of R5-HIV-1 strains to women. In addition, these studies provide evidence that the uterus, and potentially the entire upper reproductive tract, are important sites for the initial events involved in HIV infection. PMID:12709027

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus receptor and coreceptor expression on human uterine epithelial cells: regulation of expression during the menstrual cycle and implications for human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yeaman, Grant R; Howell, Alexandra L; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; O'Connell, Denise M; Asin, Susana N; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is primarily a sexually transmitted disease. Identification of cell populations within the female reproductive tract that are initially infected, and the events involved in transmission of infection to other cells, remain to be established. In this report, we evaluated expression of HIV receptors and coreceptors on epithelial cells in the uterus and found they express several receptors critical for HIV infection including CD4, CXCR4, CCR5 and galactosylceramide (GalC). Moreover, expression of these receptors varied during the menstrual cycle. Expression of CD4 and CCR5 on uterine epithelial cells is high throughout the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle when blood levels of oestradiol are high. In contrast, CXCR4 expression increased gradually throughout the proliferative phase. During the secretory phase of the cycle when both oestradiol and progesterone are elevated, CD4 and CCR5 expression decreased whereas CXCR4 expression remained elevated. Expression of GalC on endometrial glands is higher during the secretory phase than during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Because epithelial cells line the female reproductive tract and express HIV receptors and coreceptors, it is likely that they are one of the first cell types to become infected. The hormonal regulation of HIV receptor expression may affect a woman's susceptibility to HIV infection during her menstrual cycle. Moreover, selective coreceptor expression could account for the preferential transmission of R5-HIV-1 strains to women. In addition, these studies provide evidence that the uterus, and potentially the entire upper reproductive tract, are important sites for the initial events involved in HIV infection. PMID:12709027

  10. Expression of wild-type and mutant simian virus 40 large tumor antigens in villus-associated enterocytes of transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S H; Roth, K A; Coopersmith, C M; Pipas, J M; Gordon, J I

    1994-01-01

    The four principal gut epithelial cell lineages undergo continuous and rapid renewal during a geographically well-organized migration along the crypt-to-villus axis. The molecules that regulate their proliferation and differentiation programs are largely unknown. The large tumor antigen (TAg) of wild-type (wt) simian virus 40 (SV40) and its mutant derivatives represent tools for describing the contributions of regulators of the cell cycle to the proliferative state of each lineage. Expression of SV40 TAgwt in postmitotic, villus-associated enterocytes of transgenic mice causes them to reenter the cell cycle without an apparent effect on their state of differentiation. When human KRAS with a Val-12 substitution ([Val12]KRAS) is coexpressed with SV40 TAgwt in villus enterocytes of bitransgenic animals, the two oncoproteins cooperate to produce dedifferentiation (dysplasia). SV40 mutant d11137 expresses a TAg that is unable to complex with p53 but retains N-terminal transforming functions, including the ability to complex pRB, p107, and p300. When SV40 TAgd11137 is expressed in villus enterocytes, they reenter into the cell cycle. However, coexpression of SV40 TAgd11137 and [Val12]KRAS does not produce dysplastic changes. Thus, the N-terminal 121 residues of TAg are sufficient to perturb the proliferative state of the enterocyte but not to produce detectable changes in the state of differentiation when coexpressed with [Val12]KRAS. Images PMID:8041720

  11. The simian varicella virus uracil DNA glycosylase and dUTPase genes are expressed in vivo, but are non-essential for replication in cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Toby M.; Williams, Marshall V.; Traina-Dorge, Vicki; Gray, Wayne L.

    2012-01-01

    Neurotropic herpesviruses express viral deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase) and uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) enzymes which may reduce uracil misincorporation into viral DNA, particularly in neurons of infected ganglia. The simian varicella virus (SVV) dUTPase (ORF 8) and UDG (ORF 59) share 37.7% and 53.9% amino acid identity, respectively, with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) homologs. Infectious SVV mutants defective in either dUTPase (SVV-dUTPase−) or UDG (SVV-UDG−) activity or both (SVV-dUTPase−/UDG−) were constructed using recA assisted endonuclease cleavage (RARE) and a cosmid recombination system. Loss of viral dUTPase and UDG enzymatic activity was confirmed in CV-1 cells infected with the SVV mutants. The SVV-dUTPase−, SVV-UDG−, and SVV-dUTPase−/UDG− mutants replicated as efficiently as wild-type SVV in cell culture. SVV dUTPase and UDG expression was detected in tissues derived from acutely infected animals, but not in tissues derived from latently infected animals. Further studies will evaluate the pathogenesis of SVV dUTPase and UDG mutants and their potential as varicella vaccines. PMID:19200445

  12. Genome-Wide Expression Analysis in Down Syndrome: Insight into Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chong; Jin, Lei; Bai, Yun; Chen, Qimin; Fu, Lijun; Yang, Minjun; Xiao, Huasheng; Zhao, Guoping; Wang, Shengyue

    2012-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused by triplication of Human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) and associated with an array of deleterious phenotypes, including mental retardation, heart defects and immunodeficiency. Genome-wide expression patterns of uncultured peripheral blood cells are useful to understanding of DS-associated immune dysfunction. We used a Human Exon microarray to characterize gene expression in uncultured peripheral blood cells derived from DS individuals and age-matched controls from two age groups: neonate (N) and child (C). A total of 174 transcript clusters (gene-level) with eight located on Hsa21 in N group and 383 transcript clusters including 56 on Hsa21 in C group were significantly dysregulated in DS individuals. Microarray data were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Functional analysis revealed that the dysregulated genes in DS were significantly enriched in two and six KEGG pathways in N and C group, respectively. These pathways included leukocyte trans-endothelial migration, B cell receptor signaling pathway and primary immunodeficiency, etc., which causally implicated dysfunctional immunity in DS. Our results provided a comprehensive picture of gene expression patterns in DS at the two developmental stages and pointed towards candidate genes and molecular pathways potentially associated with the immune dysfunction in DS. PMID:23155455

  13. Simian Varicella Virus: Molecular Virology

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Wayne L.

    2012-01-01

    Simian varicella virus (SVV) is a primate herpesvirus that is closely related to varicella-zoster virus (VZV), the causative agent of varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles). Epizootics of simian varicella occur sporadically in facilities housing Old World monkeys. This review summarizes the molecular properties of SVV. The SVV and VZV genomes are similar in size, structure, and gene arrangement. The 124.5 kilobase pair (kbp) SVV genome includes a 104.7 kbp long (L) component covalently linked to a short (S) component which includes a 4.9 kbp unique short (US) segment flanked by 7.5 kbp inverted repeat sequences. SVV DNA encodes 69 distinct open reading frames (ORFs), three of which are duplicated within the viral inverted repeats. The viral genome is coordinately expressed and immediate early (IE), early, and late genes have been characterized. Genetic approaches have been developed to create SVV mutants, which will be used to study the role of SVV genes in viral pathogenesis, latency, and reactivation. In addition, SVV expressing foreign genes are being investigated as potential recombinant varicella vaccines. PMID:20369316

  14. Replication of simian virus 40 origin-containing DNA during infection with a recombinant Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus expressing large T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, D W; Weber, P C

    1997-01-01

    Autographica californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) has been shown to encode many of the enzymes involved in the replication of its own DNA. Although the AcMNPV genome contains multiple sets of reiterated sequences that are thought to function as origins of DNA replication, no initiator protein has yet been identified in the set of viral replication enzymes. In this study, the ability of a heterologous origin initiator system to promote DNA replication in AcMNPV-infected cells was examined. A recombinant AcMNPV that expressed the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen was surprisingly found to induce the efficient replication of a transfected plasmid containing an SV40 origin. This replication was subsequently found to involve three essential components: (i) T antigen, since replication of SV40 origin-containing plasmids was not induced by wild-type AcMNPV which did not express this protein; (ii) an intact SV40 core origin, since deletion of specific functional motifs within the origin resulted in a loss of replicative abilities; and (iii) one or more AcMNPV-encoded proteins, since viral superinfection was required for plasmid amplification. Characterization of the replicated DNA revealed that it existed as a high-molecular-weight concatemer and underwent significant levels of homologous recombination between inverted repeat sequences. These properties were consistent with an AcMNPV-directed mode of DNA synthesis rather than that of SV40 and suggested that T antigen-SV40 origin complexes may be capable of initiating DNA replication reactions that can be completed by AcMNPV-encoded enzymes. PMID:8985377

  15. Kinetics of cytokine expression during primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Graziosi, C; Gantt, K R; Vaccarezza, M; Demarest, J F; Daucher, M; Saag, M S; Shaw, G M; Quinn, T C; Cohen, O J; Welbon, C C; Pantaleo, G; Fauci, A S

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, we have determined the kinetics of constitutive expression of a panel of cytokines [interleukin (IL) 2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha)] in sequential peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from nine individuals with primary human immunodeficiency virus infection. Expression of IL-2 and IL-4 was barely detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, substantial levels of IL-2 expression were found in mononuclear cells isolated from lymph node. Expression of IL-6 was detected in only three of nine patients, and IL-6 expression was observed when transition from the acute to the chronic phase had already occurred. Expression of IL-10 and TNF-alpha was consistently observed in all patients tested, and levels of both cytokines were either stable or progressively increased over time. Similar to IL-10 and TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma expression was detected in all patients; however, in five of nine patients, IFN-gamma expression peaked very early during primary infection. The early peak in IFN-gamma expression coincided with oligoclonal expansions of CD8+ T cells in five of six patients, and CD8+ T cells mostly accounted for the expression of this cytokine. These results indicate that high levels of expression of proinflammatory cytokines are associated with primary infection and that the cytokine response during this phase of infection is strongly influenced by oligoclonal expansions of CD8+ T cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8633076

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 expression in the central nervous system correlates directly with extent of disease

    SciTech Connect

    Weiser, B.; La Neve, D.; Eilbott, D.J.; Burger, H.; Seidman, R. ); Peress, N. Veterans Administration Medical Center, Northport, NY )

    1990-05-01

    To investigate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis in infected individuals and examine the correlation of HIV-1 expression with extent of clinical and pathologic disease, the authors studied spinal cords from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients with a wide range of spinal cord pathology. By performing in situ hybridization with HIV-1-specific riboprobes, they detected HIV-1 RNA in all 10 cords from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients with a common, characteristic pathologic entity called vacuolar myelopathy but not in 10 control cords from HIV-1-infected and uninfected patients. In the cords from individuals with vacuolar myelopathy, the level of HIV-1 RNA expression correlated directly with extent of spinal cord pathology and clinical findings. These data support a role for HIV-1 int he pathogenesis of tissue damage and related clinical disease in infected individuals.

  17. Vaccination with Tat toxoid attenuates disease in simian/HIV-challenged macaques

    PubMed Central

    Pauza, C. David; Trivedi, Parul; Wallace, Marianne; Ruckwardt, Tracy J.; Le Buanec, Hélene; Lu, Wei; Bizzini, Bernard; Burny, Arséne; Zagury, Daniel; Gallo, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    The Tat protein is essential for HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication and may be an important virulence factor in vivo. We studied the role of Tat in viral pathogenesis by immunizing rhesus macaques with chemically inactivated Tat toxoid and challenging these animals by intrarectal inoculation with the simian/human immunodeficiency virus 89.6PD. Immune animals had significantly attenuated disease with lowered viral RNA, interferon-α, and chemokine receptor expression (CXCR4 and CCR5) on CD4+ T cells; these features of infection have been linked to in vitro effects of Tat and respond similarly to extracellular Tat protein produced during infection. Immunization with Tat toxoid inhibits key steps in viral pathogenesis and should be included in therapeutic or preventive HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:10725402

  18. Transcription factor AP-2 regulates human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, N D; Agranoff, A B; Duckett, C S; Nabel, G J

    1994-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gene expression is regulated by an enhancer region composed of multiple potential cis-acting regulatory sites. Here, we describe binding sites for the transcription factor AP-2 in the HIV-1 long terminal repeat which modulate HIV enhancer function. One site is embedded within the two previously described kappa B elements, and a second site is detected further downstream. DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay experiments demonstrated that AP-2 binds to the site between the kappa B elements. Interestingly, AP-2 and NF-kappa B bind to this region in a mutually exclusive manner. Mutations which disrupt this AP-2-binding site lower basal levels of transcription but do not affect NF-kappa B-mediated induction by tumor necrosis factor alpha in Jurkat T leukemia cells. Images PMID:8084021

  19. Construction and Use of a Replication-Competent Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) that Expresses the Chloramphenicol Acetyltransferase Enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terwilliger, E. F.; Godin, B.; Sodroski, J. G.; Haseltine, W. A.

    1989-05-01

    The construction and properties of an infectious human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that expresses the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase are described. This virus can be used in vitro to screen for drugs that inhibit HIV infection. The marked virus may also be used to trace the routes of infection from the site of inoculation in animal experiments.

  20. Mapping of the viral mRNA encoding a super-T antigen of 115,000 daltons expressed in simian virus 40-transformed rat cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    May, E; Kress, M; Daya-Grosjean, L; Monier, R; May, P

    1981-01-01

    Simian virus 40-transformed V11 F1 clone 1 subclone 7 rat cells produced a considerable amount of an elongated form of large-T antigen with an Mr of 115,000 (115K super-T antigen), but these cells did not produce detectable traces of normal-sized large-T antigen (86,000 daltons) (P. May, M. Kress, M. Lange, and E. May, Cold Spring Harbor Symp. Quant. Biol. 44:189-200, 1980). First, a comparison of the tryptic peptide fingerprints of 115K super-T and large-T antigens suggested that 115K super-T antigen is simian virus 40 coded and contains a duplication of amino acid sequences of large-T antigen. Second, from S1 mapping analysis of 115K super-T mRNA, performed with various restriction fragments of simian virus 40 DNA, it was concluded that super-T mRNA is a form of large-T mRNA containing a tandem duplication of the sequence extending from approximately 0.46 to 0.35 map unit. The duplicated sequence corresponded to that region of the simian virus 40 genome in which 12 of 13 tsA mutation sites are clustered (C. J. Lai and D. Nathans, Virology 66:70-81, 1975). Images PMID:6260978

  1. kappa opioid receptors in human microglia downregulate human immunodeficiency virus 1 expression.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, C C; Gekker, G; Hu, S; Sheng, W S; Shark, K B; Bu, D F; Archer, S; Bidlack, J M; Peterson, P K

    1996-01-01

    Microglial cells, the resident macrophages of the brain, play an important role in the neuropathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and recent studies suggest that opioid peptides regulate the function of macrophages from somatic tissues. We report herein the presence of kappa opioid receptors (KORs) in human fetal microglia and inhibition of HIV-1 expression in acutely infected microglial cell cultures treated with KOR ligands. Using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and sequencing analyses, we found that mRNA for the KOR was constitutively expressed in microglia and determined that the nucleotide sequence of the open reading frame was identical to that of the human brain KOR gene. The expression of KOR in microglial cells was confirmed by membrane binding of [3H]U69,593, a kappa-selective ligand, and by indirect immunofluorescence. Treatment of microglial cell cultures with U50,488 or U69,593 resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of expression of the monocytotropic HIV-1 SF162 strain. This antiviral effect of the kappa ligands was blocked by the specific KOR antagonist, nor-binaltrophimine. These findings suggest that kappa opioid agonists have immunomodulatory activity in the brain, and that these compounds could have potential in the treatment of HIV-1-associated encephalopathy. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8755601

  2. Enhanced expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 correlates with development of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P; Kingsley, L; Armstrong, J; Ding, M; Cottrill, M; Rinaldo, C

    1993-10-01

    The progression to AIDS may be significantly related to the level of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. We have used quantitative cell culture and quantitative DNA and RNA PCR to measure viral load and expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained cross-sectionally and longitudinally from HIV-1-seropositive homosexual men enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Our results indicate that the number of circulating CD4+ T-lymphocytes producing HIV-1 increased as the total number of CD4+ T-cells declined. However, there was no correlation between the number of HIV-1-producing CD4+ cells and the duration of infection. Furthermore, the level of HIV-1 gag RNA increased as the disease progressed and CD4+ cell numbers declined. Subjects who remained asymptomatic with stable CD4+ cell counts, however, maintained a very low level of HIV-1 RNA expression during the entire period of follow-up (38-71 months). In contrast to viral RNA expression, the level of proviral DNA did not change significantly as the disease progressed. However, the level of proviral DNA was significantly higher in AIDS patients than in men who remained asymptomatic. Such increased levels of HIV-1 DNA were detected 34-68 months before the development of AIDS. These results support the role of HIV-1 RNA expression in the development of AIDS. PMID:8103948

  3. Dysregulation of temperature and liver cytokine gene expression in immunodeficient wasted mice

    SciTech Connect

    Libertin, C.R.; Ling-Indeck, L.; Weaver, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Strezoska, V.; Heckert, B.; Woloschak, G.E. |

    1995-04-25

    Wasted mice bear the spontaneous autosomal recessive mutation wst/wst; this genotype is associated with weight loss beginning at 21 days of age, neurologic dysfunction, immunodeficiency at mucosal sites, and increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation. The pathology underlying the disease symptoms is unknown. Experiments reported here were designed to examine thermoregulation and liver expression of specific cytokines in wasted mice and in littermate and parental controls. Our experiments found that wasted mice begin to show a drop in body temperature at 21-23 days following birth, continuing until death at the age of 28 days. Concomitant with that, livers from wasted mice expressed increased amounts of mRNAs specific for cytokines IL,6 and IL-1, the acute phase reactant C-reactive protein, c-jun, and apoptosis-associated Rp-8 when compared to littermate and parental control animals. Levels of {beta}-transforming growth factor (TGF), c-fos, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and ornithine amino transferase (OAT) transcripts were the same in livers from wasted mice and controls. These results suggest a relationship between an acute phase reactant response in wasted mice and temperature dysregulation.

  4. Persistent Gene Expression in Mouse Nasal Epithelia following Feline Immunodeficiency Virus-Based Vector Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, Patrick L.; Burnight, Erin R.; Hickey, Melissa A.; Blissard, Gary W.; McCray, Paul B.

    2005-01-01

    Gene transfer development for treatment or prevention of cystic fibrosis lung disease has been limited by the inability of vectors to efficiently and persistently transduce airway epithelia. Influenza A is an enveloped virus with natural lung tropism; however, pseudotyping feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based lentiviral vector with the hemagglutinin envelope protein proved unsuccessful. Conversely, pseudotyping FIV with the envelope protein from influenza D (Thogoto virus GP75) resulted in titers of 106 transducing units (TU)/ml and conferred apical entry into well-differentiated human airway epithelial cells. Baculovirus GP64 envelope glycoproteins share sequence identity with influenza D GP75 envelope glycoproteins. Pseudotyping FIV with GP64 from three species of baculovirus resulted in titers of 107 to 109 TU/ml. Of note, GP64 from Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus resulted in high-titer FIV preparations (∼109 TU/ml) and conferred apical entry into polarized primary cultures of human airway epithelia. Using a luciferase reporter gene and bioluminescence imaging, we observed persistent gene expression from in vivo gene transfer in the mouse nose with A. californica GP64-pseudotyped FIV (AcGP64-FIV). Longitudinal bioluminescence analysis documented persistent expression in nasal epithelia for ∼1 year without significant decline. According to histological analysis using a LacZ reporter gene, olfactory and respiratory epithelial cells were transduced. In addition, methylcellulose-formulated AcGP64-FIV transduced mouse nasal epithelia with much greater efficiency than similarly formulated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped FIV. These data suggest that AcGP64-FIV efficiently transduces and persistently expresses a transgene in nasal epithelia in the absence of agents that disrupt the cellular tight junction integrity. PMID:16188984

  5. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integration Protein Expressed in Escherichia Coli Possesses Selective DNA Cleaving Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Paula A.; Fyfe, James A.

    1990-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integration protein, a potential target for selective antiviral therapy, was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein, free of detectable contaminating endonucleases, selectively cleaved double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides that mimic the U3 and the U5 termini of linear HIV DNA. Two nucleotides were removed from the 3' ends of both the U5 plus strand and the U3 minus strand; in both cases, cleavage was adjacent to a conserved CA dinucleotide. The reaction was metal-ion dependent, with a preference for Mn2+ over Mg2+. Reaction selectivity was further demonstrated by the lack of cleavage of an HIV U5 substrate on the complementary (minus) strand, an analogous substrate that mimics the U3 terminus of an avian retrovirus, and an HIV U5 substrate in which the conserved CA dinucleotide was replaced with a TA dinucleotide. Such an integration protein-mediated cleavage reaction is expected to occur as part of the integration event in the retroviral life cycle, in which a double-stranded DNA copy of the viral RNA genome is inserted into the host cell DNA.

  6. Expression and characterization of glycophospholipid-anchored human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Salzwedel, K; Johnston, P B; Roberts, S J; Dubay, J W; Hunter, E

    1993-01-01

    Four chimeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) env genes were constructed which encoded the extracellular domain of either the wild-type or a cleavage-defective HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (gp160) fused at one of two different positions in env to a C-terminal glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) attachment signal from the mouse Thy-1.1 glycoprotein. All four of the constructs encoded glycoproteins that were efficiently expressed when Rev was supplied in trans, and the two cleavable forms were processed normally to gp120 and a chimeric "gp41." The chimeric glycoproteins, in contrast to the wild-type glycoprotein, could be cleaved from the surface of transfected cells by treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, indicating that they were anchored in the plasma membrane by a GPI moiety. These GPI-anchored glycoproteins were transported intracellularly at a rate only slightly lower than that of the full-length HIV-1 glycoprotein and were present on the cell surface in equivalent amounts. Nevertheless, all four glycoproteins were defective in mediating both cell-cell and virus-cell fusion as determined by syncytium formation in COS-1-HeLa-T4 cell mixtures and trans complementation of an env-defective HIV-1 genome. Images PMID:8102410

  7. Suppression of Acute Viremia by Short-Term Postexposure Prophylaxis of Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus SHIV-RT-Infected Monkeys with a Novel Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor (GW420867) Allows for Development of Potent Antiviral Immune Responses Resulting in Efficient Containment of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kazuyasu; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Sawada, Shuzo; Villinger, Francois; Sugama, Kazushige; Rosenwith, Brigitte; Heeney, Jonathan L.; Überla, Klaus; Yamazaki, Shudo; Ansari, Aftab A.; Rübsamen-Waigmann, Helga

    2000-01-01

    A nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor, GW420867, was tested for postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) in rhesus macaques experimentally infected with 100 50% tissue culture infective doses of a chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) containing the RT gene of HIV-1 (SHIV-RT). Animals were either mock treated, or treated for 4 weeks starting at 8 or 24 h postinfection (p.i.) with GW420867. While such therapy led to undetectable plasma viremia in three of six monkeys, a transient plasma viremia was noted in the other three treated animals at 2 to 4 weeks following cessation of therapy. Following this transient viremia all drug-treated animals showed low or undetectable levels of plasma viremia up to the last sample examined at 90 weeks p.i. Despite low and/or undetectable viremia, virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte and viral Env-specific proliferative responses were seen in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of both mock- and drug-treated animals as early as 3 weeks p.i. Such virus-specific cellular responses, however, were better maintained in the drug-treated animals than the mock-treated animals. In contrast to the virus-specific cellular response, the magnitude and kinetics of virus specific humoral responses appeared to correlate with the detection of viremia. These data support the view that a short-term PEP with GW420867 permits the generation and maintenance of long-lasting virus-specific cell-mediated immune responses while markedly reducing viral loads to undetectable levels for a prolonged period of time (90 weeks) and leads to long-term disease protection. This model provides a unique means to define mechanisms and correlates of disease protection. PMID:10846052

  8. In vivo modulation of the expressions of Fas and CD25 by intravenous immunoglobulin in common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Artac, Hasibe; Kara, Reyhan; Reisli, Ismail

    2010-03-01

    Although the presence of physiologic anti-CD95 (Fas, APO-1) autoantibodies in intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) preparations is known, the effects of these antibodies in patients with common variable immunodeficiency are unclear (CVID). The aim of the study was to assess the effects of IVIG in Fas expression, activation markers and the subsets of T cells in patients with CVID. We studied 15 cases with CVID and 10 healthy controls with no signs of immunodeficiency. The Fas expression of T cells, activation markers (CD25, CD69 and HLA-DR) and T-cell subsets were analyzed by four-color flow cytometry. We found that the Fas expression of CD3+ T cells in patients was significantly higher than in controls. In addition, there was a significant increase in the Fas expression of CD3+ T cells and CD4+ T cells, and the CD25 expression of CD3+ and CD4+ T cells after IVIG supplementation (P < 0.05). The CD69 and HLA-DR expressions of T cells and CD8+ T cells were not affected by IVIG infusion. Our observation showed that IVIG replacement causes an increase in the Fas and CD25 expressions in patients with CVID. These data suggest that the Fas protein may have an important role in the effects of IVIG for the control of autoimmunity in patients with CVID, as well as in the generation of autoimmune disease. PMID:19730984

  9. Safety and Tolerability of Conserved Region Vaccines Vectored by Plasmid DNA, Simian Adenovirus and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Administered to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Uninfected Adults in a Randomized, Single-Blind Phase I Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hayton, Emma-Jo; Rose, Annie; Ibrahimsa, Umar; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Capone, Stefania; Crook, Alison; Black, Antony P.; Dorrell, Lucy; Hanke, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Trial Design HIV-1 vaccine development has advanced slowly due to viral antigenic diversity, poor immunogenicity and recently, safety concerns associated with human adenovirus serotype-5 vectors. To tackle HIV-1 variation, we designed a unique T-cell immunogen HIVconsv from functionally conserved regions of the HIV-1 proteome, which were presented to the immune system using a heterologous prime-boost combination of plasmid DNA, a non-replicating simian (chimpanzee) adenovirus ChAdV-63 and a non-replicating poxvirus, modified vaccinia virus Ankara. A block-randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled phase I trial HIV-CORE 002 administered for the first time candidate HIV-1- vaccines or placebo to 32 healthy HIV-1/2-uninfected adults in Oxford, UK and elicited high frequencies of HIV-1-specific T cells capable of inhibiting HIV-1 replication in vitro. Here, detail safety and tolerability of these vaccines are reported. Methods Local and systemic reactogenicity data were collected using structured interviews and study-specific diary cards. Data on all other adverse events were collected using open questions. Serum neutralizing antibody titres to ChAdV-63 were determined before and after vaccination. Results Two volunteers withdrew for vaccine-unrelated reasons. No vaccine-related serious adverse events or reactions occurred during 190 person-months of follow-up. Local and systemic events after vaccination occurred in 27/32 individuals and most were mild (severity grade 1) and predominantly transient (<48 hours). Myalgia and flu-like symptoms were more strongly associated with MVA than ChAdV63 or DNA vectors and more common in vaccine recipients than in placebo. There were no intercurrent HIV-1 infections during follow-up. 2/24 volunteers had low ChAdV-63-neutralizing titres at baseline and 7 increased their titres to over 200 with a median (range) of 633 (231-1533) post-vaccination, which is of no safety concern. Conclusions These data demonstrate safety and good

  10. A mutation in caspase-9 decreases the expression of BAFFR and ICOS in patients with immunodeficiency and lymphoproliferation.

    PubMed

    Clemente, N; Boggio, E; Gigliotti, C L; Orilieri, E; Cappellano, G; Toth, E; Valletti, P A; Santoro, C; Quinti, I; Pignata, C; Notarangelo, L D; Dianzani, C; Dianzani, I; Ramenghi, U; Dianzani, U; Chiocchetti, A

    2015-03-01

    Lymphocyte apoptosis is mainly induced by either death receptor-dependent activation of caspase-8 or mitochondria-dependent activation of caspase-9. Mutations in caspase-8 lead to autoimmunity/lymphoproliferation and immunodeficiency. This work describes a heterozygous H237P mutation in caspase-9 that can lead to similar disorders. H237P mutation was detected in two patients: Pt1 with autoimmunity/lymphoproliferation, severe hypogammaglobulinemia and Pt2 with mild hypogammaglobulinemia and Burkitt lymphoma. Their lymphocytes displayed defective caspase-9 activity and decreased apoptotic and activation responses. Transfection experiments showed that mutant caspase-9 display defective enzyme and proapoptotic activities and a dominant-negative effect on wild-type caspase-9. Ex vivo analysis of the patients' lymphocytes and in vitro transfection experiments showed that the expression of mutant caspase-9 correlated with a downregulation of BAFFR (B-cell-activating factor belonging to the TNF family (BAFF) receptor) in B cells and ICOS (inducible T-cell costimulator) in T cells. Both patients carried a second inherited heterozygous mutation missing in the relatives carrying H237P: Pt1 in the transmembrane activator and CAML interactor (TACI) gene (S144X) and Pt2 in the perforin (PRF1) gene (N252S). Both mutations have been previously associated with immunodeficiencies in homozygosis or compound heterozygosis. Taken together, these data suggest that caspase-9 mutations may predispose to immunodeficiency by cooperating with other genetic factors, possibly by downregulating the expression of BAFFR and ICOS. PMID:25569260

  11. Selective induction of toxicity to human cells expressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat by a conditionally cytotoxic adenovirus vector.

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, L K; Arens, M Q; Subramanian, T; Chinnadurai, G

    1990-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs) primarily infect CD4+ T lymphocytes, leading eventually to the development of a systemic immune dysfunction termed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). An attractive strategy to combat HIV-mediated pathogenesis would be to eliminate the initial pool of infected cells and thus prevent disease progression. We have engineered a replication-defective, conditionally cytotoxic adenovirus vector, Ad-tk, whose action is dependent on the targeted expression of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene (tk), cloned downstream of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, in human cells expressing the HIV-1 transcriptional activator Tat. Infection of Tat-expressing human HeLa or Jurkat cells with Ad-tk resulted in high-level tk expression, which was not deleterious to the viability of these cells. However, in the presence of the antiherpetic nucleoside analog ganciclovir, Ad-tk infection resulted in a massive reduction in the viability of these Tat-expressing cell lines. As adenoviruses are natural passengers of the human lymphoid system, our results suggest adenovirus vector-based strategies for the targeted expression, under the control of cis-responsive HIV regulatory elements, of cytotoxic agents in HIV-infected cells for the therapy of HIV-mediated pathogenesis. Images PMID:2247444

  12. Immunophenotypic characterization of the cutaneous exanthem of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys. Apposition of degenerative Langerhans cells and cytotoxic lymphocytes during the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ringler, D. J.; Hancock, W. W.; King, N. W.; Letvin, N. L.; Daniel, M. D.; Desrosiers, R. C.; Murphy, G. F.

    1987-01-01

    A T-cell tropic retrovirus, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), has recently been isolated from immunodeficient rhesus monkeys. This virus has remarkable similarities to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the etiologic agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Subsequent studies of simian infection with SIV have shown it to be a relevant animal model for studying the pathogenesis of AIDS in man. In both HIV-infected humans and SIV-infected monkeys, a cutaneous maculopapular eruption has been described. To date, the pathogenesis and possible relationship of these exanthema to the evolution of systemic immunosuppression have remained obscure. In this study, the mononuclear cell infiltrates that characterize skin rashes of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys were found to be composed predominantly of cells with phenotypic characteristics of cytotoxic/suppressor (T8+) lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Many of these cells expressed membrane-bound interleukin-2 receptor molecules. Double labeling and immunoelectron microscopy revealed these cells in direct contact with degenerative Langerhans cells within the epidermis and dermis. These observations suggest that the cutaneous rash associated with SIV infection may be the consequence of target cell injury of Langerhans cells by effector cells with cytotoxic potential. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3030113

  13. DNA vaccination using expression vectors carrying FIV structural genes induces immune response against feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Cuisinier, A M; Mallet, V; Meyer, A; Caldora, C; Aubert, A

    1997-07-01

    Following inactivated virus vaccination trials, the surface glycoprotein gp120 of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) was considered as one of the determinants for protection. However, several vaccination trials using recombinant Env protein or some peptides failed to induce protection. To understand the role of the gp120 protein in vivo, we vaccinated cats with naked DNA coding for FIV structural proteins gp120 and p10. We analyzed the ability of these vaccinations to induce immune protection and to influence the onset of infection. Injection in cat muscles of expression vectors coding for the FIV gp120 protein induced a humoral response. Cats immunized twice with the gp120 gene showed different patterns after challenge. Two cats were, like the control cats, infected from the second week after infection onwards. The two others maintained a low proviral load with no modification of their antibody pattern. The immune response induced by gp120 DNA injection could control the level of viral replication. This protective-like immune response was not correlated to the humoral response. All the cats immunized with the gp120 gene followed by the p10 gene were infected, like the control cats, from the second week but they developed a complete humoral response against viral proteins after challenge. Furthermore, they showed a sudden but transient drop of the proviral load at 4 weeks after infection. Under these conditions, one injection of the p10 gene after one injection of the gp120 gene was not sufficient to stimulate protection. On the contrary, after a period, it seems to facilitate virus replication. PMID:9269051

  14. Cofactor requirement for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry into a CD4-expressing human cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, R D; Geballe, A P

    1993-01-01

    Expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) receptor CD4 on many nonhuman and some human cell lines is not sufficient to permit HIV-1 infection. We describe a human glioblastoma cell line (U373-MG) which remains resistant to HIV-1 despite the added expression of an authentic CD4 molecule. The block to HIV-1 infection of these cells is strain independent and appears to be at viral entry. Heterokaryons of CD4-expressing U373-MG (U373-CD4) cells fused to HeLa cells allow HIV-1 entry. A U373-CD4/HeLa hybrid clone allows efficient HIV-1 replication. These results suggest that HeLa cells express a factor(s) that can complement the viral entry defect of U373-CD4 cells and is necessary for efficient CD4-mediated HIV-1 infection. Images PMID:7690415

  15. Deletion mutants that affect expression of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen in COS-1 cells after gene transfer with simian virus 40 vectors containing portions of the BamHI K fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Polvino-Bodnar, M; Shedd, D; Miller, G

    1986-01-01

    We have identified sequences that affect the efficient expression of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen (EBNA 1) when the structural portion of its gene, found within the 2.9-kilobase-pair BamHI/HindIII fragment called Ilf, is expressed from a simian virus 40 vector. A set of nested deletions at the BamHI end of the fragment was constructed by using BAL 31 digestion, the addition of linkers, and ligation into pSVOd. The mutants were tested for their ability to express antigen in COS-1 monkey cells by using indirect immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. Deletion endpoints were determined by DNA sequencing of the 5' ends of the mutants. The deletion mutants could be subclassified into four groups based on their ability to express EBNA polypeptide. Mutants that retain more than 106 base pairs upstream from the start of the open reading frame in Ilf exhibit antigen expression indistinguishable from that of wild type. Mutants that invade the structural gene by 1,115 or more bases destroy antigen expression. Mutants that alter the splice acceptor site or invade the open reading frame by a short distance make antigen at a markedly lower frequency. There are three mutants, whose deletions map at -78, -70, and -44 base pairs upstream of the open reading frame, that make reduced levels of EBNA. Since these three mutants differ in the extent to which EBNA expression is impaired, the data suggest that there are several critical regions upstream of the open reading frame that regulate EBNA expression in COS-1 cells. It is not known whether these regulatory sequences, which would be located in an intron in the intact genome, play any role in the expression of EBNA in infected lymphocytes. Images PMID:3009849

  16. Frequent simian foamy virus infection in persons occupationally exposed to nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Switzer, William M; Bhullar, Vinod; Shanmugam, Vedapuri; Cong, Mian-Er; Parekh, Bharat; Lerche, Nicholas W; Yee, JoAnn L; Ely, John J; Boneva, Roumiana; Chapman, Louisa E; Folks, Thomas M; Heneine, Walid

    2004-03-01

    The recognition that AIDS originated as a zoonosis heightens public health concerns associated with human infection by simian retroviruses endemic in nonhuman primates (NHPs). These retroviruses include simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), simian T-cell lymphotropic virus (STLV), simian type D retrovirus (SRV), and simian foamy virus (SFV). Although occasional infection with SIV, SRV, or SFV in persons occupationally exposed to NHPs has been reported, the characteristics and significance of these zoonotic infections are not fully defined. Surveillance for simian retroviruses at three research centers and two zoos identified no SIV, SRV, or STLV infection in 187 participants. However, 10 of 187 persons (5.3%) tested positive for SFV antibodies by Western blot (WB) analysis. Eight of the 10 were males, and 3 of the 10 worked at zoos. SFV integrase gene (int) and gag sequences were PCR amplified from the peripheral blood lymphocytes available from 9 of the 10 persons. Phylogenetic analysis showed SFV infection originating from chimpanzees (n = 8) and baboons (n = 1). SFV seropositivity for periods of 8 to 26 years (median, 22 years) was documented for six workers for whom archived serum samples were available, demonstrating long-standing SFV infection. All 10 persons reported general good health, and secondary transmission of SFV was not observed in three wives available for WB and PCR testing. Additional phylogenetic analysis of int and gag sequences provided the first direct evidence identifying the source chimpanzees of the SFV infection in two workers. This study documents more frequent infection with SFV than with other simian retroviruses in persons working with NHPs and provides important information on the natural history and species origin of these infections. Our data highlight the importance of studies to better define the public health implications of zoonotic SFV infections. PMID:14990698

  17. An 11-kDa form of human immunodeficiency virus protease expressed in Escherichia coli is sufficient for enzymatic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Graves, M C; Lim, J J; Heimer, E P; Kramer, R A

    1988-01-01

    In order to define the protease domain of human immunodeficiency virus 1, various regions of the pol open reading frame were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Antiserum directed against the conserved retroviral protease active site was used to identify pol precursor and processed species containing the presumed protease domain. The smallest product that accumulates is about 11 kDa as measured by NaDodSO4/PAGE. This size agrees with that predicted from the presence in this region of two Phe-Pro sequences, which is one of the cleavage sites recognized by HIV protease. DNA encoding only the predicted 11-kDa protein was cloned, bypassing the need for autoprocessing, and the protein was expressed to a high level in E. coli. This form is active as demonstrated by its ability to specifically cleave protease-deficient pol protein in vivo in E. coli. Extracts of E. coli containing the 11-kDa protease also process human immunodeficiency virus gag substrates in vitro. These results demonstrate that the 11-kDa protease is sufficient for enzymatic activity and are consistent with a major role for this form in virus maturation. Images PMID:3282230

  18. Substitution of the transmembrane domain of Vpu in simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV{sub KU1bMC33}) with that of M2 of influenza A results in a virus that is sensitive to inhibitors of the M2 ion channel and is pathogenic for pig-tailed macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Hout, David R.; Gomez, Melissa L.; Pacyniak, Erik; Gomez, Lisa M.; Fegley, Barbara; Mulcahy, Ellyn R.; Hill, M. Sarah; Culley, Nathan; Pinson, David M.; Nothnick, Warren; Powers, Michael F.; Wong, Scott W.; Stephens, Edward B. . E-mail: estephen@kumc.edu

    2006-01-20

    The Vpu protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 has been shown to shunt the CD4 receptor molecule to the proteasome for degradation and to enhance virus release from infected cells. The exact mechanism by which the Vpu protein enhances virus release is currently unknown but some investigators have shown that this function is associated with the transmembrane domain and potential ion channel properties. In this study, we determined if the transmembrane domain of Vpu could be functionally substituted with that of the prototypical viroporin, the M2 protein of influenza A virus. We constructed chimeric vpu gene in which the transmembrane domain of Vpu was replaced with that of the M2 protein of influenza. This chimeric vpu gene was substituted for the vpu gene in the genome of a pathogenic simian human immunodeficiency virus, SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}. The resulting virus, SHIV{sub M2}, synthesized a Vpu protein that had a slightly different M{sub r} compared to the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}, reflecting the different sizes of the two Vpu proteins. The SHIV{sub M2} was shown to replicate with slightly reduced kinetics when compared to the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33} but electron microscopy revealed that the site of maturation was similar to the parental virus SHIV{sub KU1bMC33}. We show that the replication and spread of SHIV{sub M2} could be blocked with the antiviral drug rimantadine, which is known to target the M2 ion channel. Our results indicate a dose dependent inhibition of SHIV{sub M2} with 100 {mu}M rimantadine resulting in a >95% decrease in p27 released into the culture medium. Rimantadine did not affect the replication of the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}. Examination of SHIV{sub M2}-infected cells treated with 50 {mu}M rimantadine revealed numerous viral particles associated with the cell plasma membrane and within intracytoplasmic vesicles, which is similar to HIV-1 mutants lacking a functional vpu. To determine if SHIV{sub M2} was as pathogenic as

  19. Feline immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase: expression, functional characterization, and reconstitution of the 66- and 51-kilodalton subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Amacker, M; Hottiger, M; Hübscher, U

    1995-01-01

    The two subunits of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) were cloned and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant proteins are enzymatically active as homodimers (p66 and p51) as well as a heterodimer p66/p51. The biochemical properties of the FIV RT are very similar to those of the counterpart of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in being an RNA-dependent and DNA-dependent DNA polymerase. When a double-stranded DNA containing a small gap of 26 nucleotides was tested, we found a new activity of the FIV RT p66/p51 heterodimer--the cat viral enzyme could perform strand displacement DNA synthesis of approximately 300 bases. The FIV RT homodimer p66 alone could carry out limited strand displacement DNA synthesis, but this activity was stimulated by the p51 subunit at a molar ratio of one molecule of p66 to five molecules of p51. On the other hand, the homodimeric p51 itself was unable to fill a small gap of 26 nucleotides in a double-stranded DNA substrate and was not active by itself in strand displacement DNA synthesis. These data are in agreement with an earlier finding of strand displacement DNA synthesis by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RT (M. Hottiger, V.N. Podust, R.L. Thimmig, C.S. McHenry, and U. Hübscher. J. Biol. Chem. 269:986-991, 1994). Our data therefore suggest a general and important function of lentiviral p51 subunits in strand displacement DNA synthesis which appears to be required in later stages of the lentiviral replication cycle, when DNA-dependent DNA synthesis occurs on double-stranded DNA. PMID:7545246

  20. Tumor necrosis factor alpha induces expression of human immunodeficiency virus in a chronically infected T-cell clone.

    PubMed Central

    Folks, T M; Clouse, K A; Justement, J; Rabson, A; Duh, E; Kehrl, J H; Fauci, A S

    1989-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), also known as cachectin, was demonstrated to induce the expression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in a chronically infected T-cell clone (ACH-2). Concentrations of recombinant TNF-alpha as low as 50 pg/ml induced a significant increase over background of HIV expression in the ACH-2 cells as determined by supernatant reverse transcriptase activity. The HIV-inducing effects of TNF-alpha could not be explained by toxic effects on the cells. In addition, both the uninfected parental cell line (A3.01) and the infected ACH-2 cells were shown to have high-affinity receptors for TNF-alpha. Transient-transfection experiments demonstrated that the inductive effects of TNF-alpha were due to specific activation of the HIV long terminal repeat. These studies provide evidence that TNF-alpha may play a role in the mechanisms of pathogenesis of HIV infection. Images PMID:2784570

  1. Inducible gene expression of the human immunodeficiency virus LTR in a replication-incompetent herpes simplex virus vector.

    PubMed

    Warden, M P; Weir, J P

    1996-12-01

    Although replication-incompetent herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors have the capability to express foreign genes, successful development of these vectors for gene delivery would require that expression of the foreign gene be regulated. To investigate the feasibility of obtaining inducible expression of a foreign gene in such a vector, a replication-incompetent HSV vector, vd120/LTR beta, was developed that used the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR) to express the Escherichia coli lacZ gene. Examination of lacZ expression from the HIV-1 LTR in vd120/LTR beta-infected cells indicated that the LTR was active as a promoter under both replicating and nonreplicating conditions, although expression of lacZ under nonreplicating conditions was approximately 4-fold lower. In addition, the LTR expressed lacZ in a manner distinct from that of well-characterized HSV-1 promoters of each temporal class. The effect of the HIV-1 regulatory protein Tat on expression from the LTR in vd120/LTR beta was examined by infection of two different HeLa-derived cell lines that constitutively expressed Tat, HL2/3, and HLtat. Compared to infection of HeLa cells, lacZ expression from vd120/LTR beta-infected HL2/3 and HLtat cells increased from 4- to 24-fold, depending on the multiplicity of vector infection. Sustained expression of lacZ from the LTR in vd120/LTR beta-infected cells was not observed even in the continuous presence of Tat, although vector could be recovered for up to 5 days after infection. However, the amount of recoverable vector decreased during this time, suggesting that cellular cytotoxicity may account for some of the decrease in Tat-mediated expression from the LTR. PMID:8941330

  2. Morphological method for estimation of simian virus 40 infectious titer.

    PubMed

    Landau, S M; Nosach, L N; Pavlova, G V

    1982-01-01

    The cytomorphologic method previously reported for titration of adenoviruses has been employed for estimating the infectious titer of simian virus 40 (SV 40). Infected cells forming intranuclear inclusions were determined. The method examined possesses a number of advantages over virus titration by plaque assay and cytopathic effect. The virus titer estimated by the method of inclusion counting and expressed as IFU/ml (Inclusion Forming Units/ml) corresponds to that estimated by plaque count and expressed as PFU/ml. PMID:6289780

  3. Subnormal albumin gene expression is associated with weight loss in immunodeficient/DNA-repair-deficient wasted mice

    SciTech Connect

    Libertin, C.R.; Weaver, P.; Woloschak, G.E. |; Mobarhan, S.

    1993-09-01

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive mutation wst express a disease syndrome of immunodeficiency, neurologic dysfunction, and increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation. The mice were originally characterized as ``wasted`` because of their dramatic weight loss that begins at 21 days of age and progresses until death at 28-32 days of age. Because of the reported association between abnormal liver status and weight loss, we examined expression of a variety of liver-specific genes in wst/wst 10 mice relative to littermate (wst/{center_dot}) and parental strain (BCF{sub 1}) controls. Interestingly, the results revealed a greater than 67% reduction in albumin mRNA expression in livers derived from wst/wst mice relative to both controls. Expression of alpha-fetoprotein as well as a variety of other liver-specific genes (secretory component, metallothionein, cytochrome P{sub 1}450, transferrin receptor, tumor necrosis factor, and Ia antigen) was unaffected. These results suggest a relationship between low albumin expression and wasting syndromes in mice. In addition, we believe that our data suggest the wasted mouse as a unique model for subnormal albumin expression in humans.

  4. Zoonotic Potential of Simian Arteriviruses

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Adam L.; Lauck, Michael; Sibley, Samuel D.; Friedrich, Thomas C.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Jasinska, Anna J.; Phillips-Conroy, Jane E.; Jolly, Clifford J.; Marx, Preston A.; Apetrei, Cristian; Rogers, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Wild nonhuman primates are immediate sources and long-term reservoirs of human pathogens. However, ethical and technical challenges have hampered the identification of novel blood-borne pathogens in these animals. We recently examined RNA viruses in plasma from wild African monkeys and discovered several novel, highly divergent viruses belonging to the family Arteriviridae. Close relatives of these viruses, including simian hemorrhagic fever virus, have caused sporadic outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever in captive macaque monkeys since the 1960s. However, arterivirus infection in wild nonhuman primates had not been described prior to 2011. The arteriviruses recently identified in wild monkeys have high sequence and host species diversity, maintain high viremia, and are prevalent in affected populations. Taken together, these features suggest that the simian arteriviruses may be “preemergent” zoonotic pathogens. If not, this would imply that biological characteristics of RNA viruses thought to facilitate zoonotic transmission may not, by themselves, be sufficient for such transmission to occur. PMID:26559828

  5. Chemokine receptor expression in the human ectocervix: implications for infection by the human immunodeficiency virus-type I.

    PubMed

    Yeaman, Grant R; Asin, Susana; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; Gonzalez, Jorge L; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W; Howell, Alexandra L

    2004-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) is a sexually transmitted pathogen that can infect cells in the female reproductive tract (FRT). The mechanism of viral transmission within the FRT and the mode of viral spread to the periphery are not well understood. To characterize the frequency of potential targets of HIV infection within the FRT, we performed a systematic study of the expression of HIV receptors (CD4, galactosyl ceramide (GalCer)) and coreceptors (CXCR4 and CCR5) on epithelial cells and leucocytes from the ectocervix. The ectocervix is a likely first site of contact with HIV-1 following heterosexual transmission, and expression of these receptors is likely to correlate with susceptibility to viral infection. We obtained ectocervical tissue specimens from women undergoing hysterectomy, and compared expression of these receptors among patients who were classified as being in the proliferative or secretory phases of their menstrual cycle at the time of hysterectomy, as well as from postmenopausal tissues. Epithelial cells from tissues at early and mid-proliferative stages of the menstrual cycle express CD4, although by late proliferative and secretory phases, CD4 expression was absent or weak. In contrast, GalCer expression was uniform in all stages of the menstrual cycle. CXCR4 expression was not detected on ectocervical epithelial cells and positive staining was only evident on individual leucocytes. In contrast, CCR5 expression was detected on ectocervical epithelial cells from tissues at all stages of the menstrual cycle. Overall, our results suggest that HIV infection of cells in the ectocervix could most likely occur through GalCer and CCR5. These findings are important to define potential targets of HIV-1 infection within the FRT, and for the future design of approaches to reduce the susceptibility of women to infection by HIV-1. PMID:15554931

  6. A novel thymoma-associated immunodeficiency with increased naive T cells and reduced CD247 expression.

    PubMed

    Christopoulos, Petros; Dopfer, Elaine P; Malkovsky, Miroslav; Esser, Philipp R; Schaefer, Hans-Eckart; Marx, Alexander; Kock, Sylvia; Rupp, Nicole; Lorenz, Myriam R; Schwarz, Klaus; Harder, Jan; Martin, Stefan F; Werner, Martin; Bogdan, Christian; Schamel, Wolfgang W A; Fisch, Paul

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms underlying thymoma-associated immunodeficiency are largely unknown, and the significance of increased blood γδ Τ cells often remains elusive. In this study we address these questions based on an index patient with thymoma, chronic visceral leishmaniasis, myasthenia gravis, and a marked increase of rare γδ T cell subsets in the peripheral blood. This patient showed cutaneous anergy, even though he had normal numbers of peripheral blood total lymphocytes as well as CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Despite his chronic infection, analyses of immunophenotypes and spectratyping of his lymphocytes revealed an unusual accumulation of naive γδ and αβ T cells, suggesting a generalized T cell activation defect. Functional studies in vitro demonstrated substantially diminished IL-2 and IFN-γ production following TCR stimulation of his "untouched" naive CD4(+) T cells. Biochemical analysis revealed that his γδ and αβ T cells carried an altered TCR complex with reduced amounts of the ζ-chain (CD247). No mutations were found in the CD247 gene that encodes the homodimeric ζ protein. The diminished presence of CD247 and increased numbers of γδ T cells were also observed in thymocyte populations obtained from three other thymoma patients. Thus, our findings describe a novel type of a clinically relevant acquired T cell immunodeficiency in thymoma patients that is distinct from Good's syndrome. Its characteristics are an accumulation of CD247-deficient, hyporresponsive naive γδ and αβ T cells and an increased susceptibility to infections. PMID:25732729

  7. Upregulation of Surface Feline CXCR4 Expression following Ectopic Expression of CCR5: Implications for Studies of the Cell Tropism of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Brian J.; Cannon, Celia A.; Hosie, Margaret J.

    2002-01-01

    Feline CXCR4 and CCR5 were expressed in feline cells as fusion proteins with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Expression of the EGFP fusion proteins was localized to the cell membrane, and surface expression of CXCR4 was confirmed by using a cross-species-reactive anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibody. Ectopic expression of feline CCR5 enhanced expression of either endogenous feline CXCR4 or exogenous feline or human CXCR4 expressed from a retrovirus vector, indicating that experiments investigating the effect of CCR5 expression on feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection must be interpreted with caution. Susceptibility to infection with cell culture-adapted strains of FIV or to syncytium formation following transfection with a eukaryotic vector expressing an env gene from a cell culture-adapted strain of virus correlated with expression of either human or feline CXCR4, whereas feline CCR5 had no effect. In contrast, neither CXCR4 nor CCR5 rendered cells permissive to either productive infection with primary strains of FIV or syncytium formation following transfection with primary env gene expression vectors. Screening a panel of Ghost cell lines expressing diverse human chemokine receptors confirmed that CXCR4 alone supported fusion mediated by the FIV Env from cell culture-adapted viruses. CXCR4 expression was upregulated in Ghost cells coexpressing CXCR4 and CCR5 or CXCR4, CCR5, and CCR3, and susceptibility to FIV infection could be correlated with the level of CXCR4 expression. The data suggest that β-chemokine receptors may influence FIV infection by modulating the expression of CXCR4. PMID:12186908

  8. Expression of Fc gamma and complement receptors in monocytes of X-linked agammaglobulinaemia and common variable immunodeficiency patients.

    PubMed

    Amoras, A L B; da Silva, M T N; Zollner, R L; Kanegane, H; Miyawaki, T; Vilela, M M S

    2007-12-01

    Recently we reported that monocyte phagocytosis and chemotaxis are impaired in X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVI) patients. Few data exist on the in vivo expression of receptors for the constant region of immunoglobulin (IgG) (Fc gammaR) and complement receptors (CR) in these patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of Fc gammaR and CR on monocytes from XLA and CVI patients and compare it to that of healthy controls. Whole blood samples were obtained from 10 patients with XLA, 12 with CVI and 18 healthy controls. Monocyte phenotype was determined by flow cytometry with gating on CD14+ cells. Surface expression of Fc gammaRI (CD64), Fc gammaRII (CD32) and Fc gammaRIII (CD16), CR1 (CD35) and CR3 (CD11b and CD18) was measured by determination of the proportion of CD14+ cells positive for each receptor and by receptor density. Compared to controls, a significantly higher percentage of CD16 and CD35+ monocytes from XLA (P = 0.002 and P = 0.007, respectively) were observed. The relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) expression of Fc gammaRII (CD32) and Fc gammaRIII (CD16) were significantly lower on CVI monocytes compared to controls (P = 0.001 and P = 0.035, respectively). XLA patients, who have a reduction of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk), showed normal or increased percentages of monocytes expressing Fc gamma and complement receptors. CVI patients, who have normal expression of Btk, showed reduced expression of CD16 and CD32 on monocytes. Inefficient chemotaxis and phagocytosis, reported previously in XLA patients, could be due to defects of cytoplasmatic transduction mechanisms. PMID:17900300

  9. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Tat-Activated Expression of Poliovirus Protein 2A Inhibits mRNA Translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Hong; Baltimore, David

    1989-04-01

    To study the effect of poliovirus protein 2A on cellular RNA translation, the tat control system of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was used. Protein 2A was expressed from a plasmid construct (pHIV/2A) incorporating the HIV long terminal repeat. Protein synthesis was measured by using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase as a reporter gene driven by the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat. When HIV/2A was contransfected with the reporter, addition of a tat-producing plasmid caused at least a 50-fold drop in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase synthesis. A HeLa cell line carrying HIV/2A was established. In it, tat expression caused more than a 10-fold drop in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase synthesis from the reporter plasmid. Furthermore, 2A induction by tat caused cleavage of the cellular translation factor P220, a part of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F. Thus protein 2A can, by itself, carry out the inhibition of cellular protein synthesis characteristic of a poliovirus infection. Also, the HIV tat activation provides a very effective method to control gene expression in mammalian cells.

  10. Enhanced Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Expression and Neuropathogenesis in Knockout Mice Lacking Type I Interferon Responses

    PubMed Central

    He, Hongxia; Sharer, Leroy R.; Chao, Wei; Gu, Chao-Jiang; Borjabad, Alejandra; Hadas, Eran; Kelschenbach, Jennifer; Ichiyama, Koji; Do, Meilan; Potash, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The roles of Type I interferon (IFN) in human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV-1) neuropathogenesis are poorly understood; both protective and deleterious effects of IFN signaling have been described. We used genetically modified mice deficient in the Type I IFN receptor (IFNRKO) to analyze the progress of HIV-1 brain infection and neuropathogenesis in the absence of IFN signaling. IFNRKO and wild-type (WT) mice on the 129xSv/Ev or C57BL/6 strain backgrounds were infected systemically with EcoHIV, a chimeric HIV-1 that productively infects mice. IFNRKO mice showed higher HIV-1 expression in spleen and peritoneal macrophages and greater virus infiltration into the brain compared to WT mice. Neuropathogenesis was studied by histopathological, immunohistochemical, immunofluorescence, and polymerase chain reaction analyses of brain tissues after the virus was inoculated into the brain by stereotaxic intracerebral injection. Both IFNRKO and WT mice showed readily detectable HIV-1 and brain lesions, including microglial activation, astrocytosis, and increased expression of genes coding for inflammatory cytokines and chemokines typical of human HIV-1 brain disease. Parameters of HIV-1 neuropathogenesis, including HIV-1 expression in microglia/macrophages, were significantly greater in IFNRKO than in WT mice. Our results show unequivocally that Type I IFN signaling and responses limit HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis in the brains of mice. PMID:24335529

  11. Differential gene expression of activating Fcγ receptor classifies active tuberculosis regardless of human immunodeficiency virus status or ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, J S; Loxton, A G; Haks, M C; Kassa, D; Ambrose, L; Lee, J-S; Ran, L; van Baarle, D; Maertzdorf, J; Howe, R; Mayanja-Kizza, H; Boom, W H; Thiel, B A; Crampin, A C; Hanekom, W; Ota, M O C; Dockrell, H; Walzl, G; Kaufmann, S H E; Ottenhoff, T H M

    2014-04-01

    New diagnostics and vaccines for tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed, but require an understanding of the requirements for protection from/susceptibility to TB. Previous studies have used unbiased approaches to determine gene signatures in single-site populations. The present study utilized a targeted approach, reverse transcriptase multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (RT-MLPA), to validate these genes in a multisite study. We analysed ex vivo whole blood RNA from a total of 523 participants across four sub-Saharan countries (Ethiopia, Malawi, South Africa, and The Gambia) with differences in TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status. We found a number of genes that were expressed at significantly lower levels in participants with active disease than in those with latent TB infection (LTBI), with restoration following successful TB treatment. The most consistent classifier of active disease was FCGR1A (high-affinity IgG Fc receptor 1 (CD64)), which was the only marker expressed at significantly higher levels in participants with active TB than in those with LTBI before treatment regardless of HIV status or genetic background. This is the first study to identify a biomarker for TB that is not affected by HIV status or geo-genetic differences. These data provide valuable clues for understanding TB pathogenesis, and also provide a proof-of-concept for the use of RT-MLPA in rapid and inexpensive validation of unbiased gene expression findings. PMID:24205913

  12. Impaired B cell receptor signaling is responsible for reduced TACI expression and function in X-linked immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Uslu, Kadriye; Coleman, Adam S; Allman, Windy R; Katsenelson, Nora; Bram, Richard J; Alugupalli, Kishore R; Akkoyunlu, Mustafa

    2014-04-15

    Immune response to T cell independent type 2 (TI-2) Ags, such as bacterial polysaccharides, is severely impaired in X-linked immunodeficient (XID) mice. In this study, we investigated the involvement of a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) or BAFF and their receptors in the unresponsiveness of XID mouse to TI-2 Ags. We discovered that whereas serum BAFF levels were increased, the expression of the APRIL and BAFF receptor transmembrane activator and calcium-modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) was severely reduced in XID B cells. Moreover, B cells from XID mouse were unable to secrete Igs in response to APRIL or BAFF. In correlation with reduced TACI expression and impaired TACI function, APRIL or BAFF did not activate the classical NF-κB pathway in XID cells. Also correlating with the unaltered expression of BAFF receptor, BAFF stimulation induced the activation of the alternative NF-κB pathway in XID cells. Moreover, activation of MAPK pathway was ablated in APRIL-stimulated XID cells. Prestimulation of XID B cells with the TLR9 agonist, CpG led to a significant increase in TACI expression and restored TACI-mediated functions. CpG prestimulation also restored TACI-mediated signaling in APRIL- or BAFF-stimulated XID B cells. Finally, immunization of XID mouse with the prototype TI-2 Ag NP-Ficoll induced IgG and IgM Abs when CpG was given with NP-Ficoll. Collectively, these results suggest that reduced TACI expression is responsible for the unresponsiveness of XID mouse to TI-2 Ags and BCR activation controls TACI expression. PMID:24646744

  13. Improved gene expression in resting macrophages using an oligopeptide derived from Vpr of human immunodeficiency virus type-1

    SciTech Connect

    Mizoguchi, Izuru; Ooe, Yoshihiro; Hoshino, Shigeki; Shimura, Mari; Kasahara, Tadashi; Kano, Shigeyuki; Ohta, Toshiko; Takaku, Fumimaro; Nakayama, Yasuhide; Ishizaka, Yukihito . E-mail: zakay@ri.imcj.go.jp

    2005-12-23

    Vpr, an accessory gene product of human immunodeficiency virus type-1, is thought to transport a viral DNA from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in resting macrophages. Previously, we reported that a peptide encompassing amino acids 52-78 of Vpr (C45D18) promotes the nuclear trafficking of recombinant proteins that are conjugated with C45D18. Here, we present evidence that C45D18, when conjugated with a six-branched cationic polymer of poly(N,N-dimethylaminopropylacrylamide)-block-oligo(4-aminostyrene) (SV: star vector), facilitates gene expression in resting macrophages. Although there was no difference between SV alone and C45D18-SV with respect to gene transduction into growing cells, C45D18-SV resulted in more than 40-fold greater expression of the exogenous gene upon transduction into chemically differentiated macrophages and human quiescent monocyte-derived macrophages. The data suggest that C45D18 contributes to improving the ability of a non-viral vector to transduce macrophages with exogenous genes and we discuss its further application.

  14. Vaccinia virus recombinants expressing chimeric proteins of human immunodeficiency virus and gamma interferon are attenuated for nude mice.

    PubMed Central

    Giavedoni, L D; Jones, L; Gardner, M B; Gibson, H L; Ng, C T; Barr, P J; Yilma, T

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a method for attenuating vaccinia virus recombinants by expressing a fusion protein of a lymphokine and an immunogen. Chimeric genes were constructed that coded for gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and structural proteins of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In this study, we describe the biological and immunological properties of vaccinia virus recombinants expressing chimeric genes of murine or human IFN-gamma with glycoprotein gp120, gag, and a fragment of gp41. All fusion proteins retained the antigenic characteristics of both IFN-gamma and HIV as shown by immunoblot analysis. However, the antiviral activity of IFN-gamma could be demonstrated only for the IFN-gamma-gag fusion protein. In contrast, the attenuating activity of IFN-gamma for nude mice was retained by all of the recombinants, albeit at various rates. Unlike the antiviral activity, the attenuating activity of IFN-gamma was not species specific. Implications for the development of attenuated live recombinant vaccines for AIDS are discussed. Images PMID:1565633

  15. Association of FcRn expression with lung abnormalities and IVIG catabolism in patients with common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Freiberger, T; Grodecká, L; Ravcuková, B; Kurecová, B; Postránecká, V; Vlcek, J; Jarkovský, J; Thon, V; Litzman, J

    2010-09-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) acts as a key regulator of IgG homeostasis and is an important sensor of luminal infection. We analyzed the influence of FcRn expression on disease phenotype and the catabolism of therapeutically administered intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) in 28 patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Patients with generalized bronchiectasis and fibrosis had lower levels of FCRN mRNA compared to patients without these complications (P=0.027 and P=0.041, respectively). Moreover, FCRN mRNA levels correlated negatively with the extent of bronchiectasis and the rate of IgG decline after infusion of IVIG (P=0.027 and P=0.045, respectively). No relationship of FCRN expression with age at disease onset, age at diagnosis, diagnostic delay, IgG levels or frequency of infections before or during replacement immunoglobulin treatment, the presence of lung functional abnormalities, chronic diarrhea, granulomas, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly or autoimmune phenomena was observed. Our results showed that FcRn might play a role in the development of lung structural abnormalities and in the catabolism of IVIG in patients with CVID. PMID:20627700

  16. Epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus regulatory proteins tat, nef, and rev are expressed in normal human tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Parmentier, H. K.; van Wichen, D. F.; Meyling, F. H.; Goudsmit, J.; Schuurman, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    The expression of regulatory proteins tat, rev, and nef of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and tat of HIV-2 was studied in frozen sections of lymph nodes from HIV-1-infected individuals, and various tissues from uninfected persons. In HIV-1-positive lymph nodes, monoclonal antibodies to HIV-1-tat stained solitary cells in the germinal centers and interfollicular zones, and vascular endothelium. Staining by an anti-nef monoclonal antibody was restricted to follicular dendritic cells, whereas anti-rev antibody bound to fibriohistiocytes and high endothelial venules. The antibodies used labeled several cell types in tissues from uninfected individuals. Anti-HIV-1-tat antibodies labeled blood vessels and Hassall's corpuscles in skin and thymus; goblet cells in intestinal tissue and trachea; neural cells in brain and spinal cord; and zymogen-producing cells in pancreas. Anti-rev antibody stained high endothelial venules, Hassall's corpuscles and histiocytes. One anti-nef antibody solely stained follicular dendritic cells in spleen, tonsil, lymph node and Peyer's patches, whereas two other anti-nef antibodies bound to astrocytes, solitary cells in the interfollicular zones of lymph nodes, and skin cells. The current results hamper the immunohistochemical study for pathogenetic and diagnostic use of HIV regulatory protein expression in infected tissue specimens or cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1279980

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and syncytium formation in HeLa cells expressing glycophospholipid-anchored CD4.

    PubMed

    Kost, T A; Kessler, J A; Patel, I R; Gray, J G; Overton, L K; Carter, S G

    1991-06-01

    The CD4 molecule, a glycoprotein expressed primarily on the cell surface of specific T lymphocytes, is thought to function in T-cell antigen recognition and activation. In addition, CD4 serves as a receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by a direct interaction with the HIV-1 surface glycoprotein (gp120). To further characterize the HIV-1-cell interaction, a HeLa cell line was established that expressed a chimeric molecule of CD4 and decay-accelerating factor (DAF). In the chimeric CD4-DAF molecule the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of CD4 were deleted and replaced with the carboxy-terminal 37 amino acids of DAF. This resulted in the anchoring of the extracellular domain of CD4 to the cell membrane via a glycophospholipid linkage. The glycophospholipid-anchored CD4 had a molecular size of approximately 56 to 62 kDa and was released following treatment of the cells with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. HeLa cells expressing the CD4-DAF hybrid could be infected with HIV-1, as evidenced by reverse transcriptase activity, p24 core antigen content, and infectious virus production. In addition, transfection of the HeLa CD4-DAF cells with a plasmid that directs the synthesis of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins or cocultivation with HeLa cells expressing the virus glycoproteins resulted in syncytium formation. These results indicate that the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the CD4 molecule are dispensable for both HIV infection and syncytium formation. PMID:1709701

  18. Immunomodulator expression in trophoblasts from the feline immunodeficiency virus FIV infected cat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    FIV infection frequently compromises pregnancy under experimental conditions and is accompanied by aberrant expression of some placental cytokines. Trophoblasts produce numerous immunomodulators that play a role in placental development and pregnancy maintenance. We hypothesized that FIV infection m...

  19. Effects of gamma rays, ultraviolet radiation, sunlight, microwaves and electromagnetic fields on gene expression mediated by human immunodeficiency virus promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Libertin, C.R.; Woloschak, G.E. |; Panozzo, J.; Groh, K.R.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S.

    1994-10-01

    Previous work by our group and others has shown the modulation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter or long terminal repeat (LTR) after exposure to neutrons and ultraviolet radiations. Using HeLa cells stably transfected with a construct containing the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene, the transcription of which is mediated by the HIV-LTR, we designed experiments to examine the effects of exposure to different types of radiation (such as {gamma} rays, ultraviolet and sunlight irradiations, electromagnetic fields and microwaves) in HIV-LTR-driven expression of CAT. These results demonstrated ultraviolet-light-induced transcription from the HIV promoter, as has been shown by others. Exposure to other DNA-damaging agents such as {gamma} rays and sunlight (with limited exposures) had no significant effect on transcription mediated by HIV-LTR, suggesting that induction of HIV is not mediated by just any type of DNA damage but rather may require specific types of DNA damage. Microwaves did not cause cell killing when cells in culture were exposed in high volumes of medium, and the same cells showed no changes in expression. When microwave exposure was carried out in low volumes of medium (so that excessive heat was generated) induction of HIV-LTR transcription (as assayed by CAT activity) was evident. Electromagnetic field exposures had no effect on expression of HIV-LTR. These results demonstrate that not all types of radiation and not all DNA-damaging agents are capable of inducing HIV. We hypothesize that induction of HIV transcription may be mediated by several different signals exposure to radiation. 22 refs., 8 figs.

  20. LAG3 Expression in Active Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Bonnie L.; Mehra, Smriti; Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Selman, Moises; Khader, Shabaana A.; Kaushal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a highly successful pathogen because of its ability to persist in human lungs for long periods of time. MTB modulates several aspects of the host immune response. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3) is a protein with a high affinity for the CD4 receptor and is expressed mainly by regulatory T cells with immunomodulatory functions. To understand the function of LAG3 during MTB infection, a nonhuman primate model of tuberculosis, which recapitulates key aspects of natural human infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), was used. We show that the expression of LAG3 is highly induced in the lungs and particularly in the granulomatous lesions of macaques experimentally infected with MTB. Furthermore, we show that LAG3 expression is not induced in the lungs and lung granulomas of animals exhibiting latent tuberculosis infection. However, simian immunodeficiency virus–induced reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection results in an increased expression of LAG3 in the lungs. This response is not observed in nonhuman primates infected with non-MTB bacterial pathogens, nor with simian immunodeficiency virus alone. Our data show that LAG3 was expressed primarily on CD4+ T cells, presumably by regulatory T cells but also by natural killer cells. The expression of LAG3 coincides with high bacterial burdens and changes in the host type 1 helper T-cell response. PMID:25549835

  1. Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early gene product trans-activates gene expression from the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, S.; Kamine, J.; Markovitz, D.; Fenrick, R.; Pagano, J.

    1988-03-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients are frequently coinfected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this report, the authors demonstrate that an EBV immediate-early gene product, BamHI MLF1, stimulates expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene linked to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter. The HIV promoter sequences necessary for trans-activation by EBV do not include the tat-responsive sequences. In addition, in contrast to the other herpesvirus trans-activators previously studied, the EBV BamHI MLF1 gene product appears to function in part by a posttranscriptional mechanism, since it increases pHIV-CAT protein activity more than it increases HIV-CAT mRNA. This ability of an EBV gene product to activate HIV gene expression may have biologic consequences in persons coinfected with both viruses.

  2. Dilute passage promotes expression of genetic and phenotypic variants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in cell culture.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Palomino, S; Rojas, J M; Martínez, M A; Fenyö, E M; Nájera, R; Domingo, E; López-Galíndez, C

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the extent of genetic and phenotypic diversification of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) upon 15 serial passages of clonal viral populations in MT-4 cell cultures. Several genetic and phenotypic modifications previously noted during evolution of HIV-1 in infected humans were also observed upon passages of the virus in cell culture. Notably, the transition from non-syncytium-inducing to syncytium-inducing phenotype (previously observed during disease progression) and fixation of amino acid substitutions at the main antigenic loop V3 of gp120 were observed in the course of replication of the virus in MT-4 cell cultures in the absence of immune selection. Interestingly, most genetic and phenotypic alterations occurred upon passage of the virus at a low multiplicity of infection (0.001 infectious particles per cell) rather than at a higher multiplicity of infection (0.1 infectious particles per cell). The degree of genetic diversification attained by HIV-1, estimated by the RNase A mismatch cleavage method and by nucleotide sequencing, is of about 0.03% of genomic sites mutated after 15 serial passages. This value is not significantly different from previous estimates for foot-and-mouth disease virus when subjected to a similar process and analysis. We conclude that several genetic and phenotypic modifications of HIV-1 previously observed in vivo occur also in the constant environment provided by a cell culture system. Dilute passage promotes in a highly significant way the expression of deviant HIV-1 genomes. Images PMID:8474182

  3. Glucagon gene 5'-flanking sequences direct expression of simian virus 40 large T antigen to the intestine, producing carcinoma of the large bowel in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y C; Asa, S L; Drucker, D J

    1992-05-25

    Glucagon and the glucagon-like peptides play important roles in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Previous studies have demonstrated that approximately 1300 base pairs of rat glucagon gene 5'-flanking sequences direct transgene expression to the pancreas and brain, but not to the intestine, of transgenic mice. These observations suggested that different tissue-specific enhancer elements mediate activation of glucagon gene transcription in the pancreas and intestine. We have now generated mice that express SV40 large T antigen under the control of approximately 2000 base pairs of glucagon gene 5'-flanking sequences. Transgene expression was observed in the brain and pancreas in association with the development of pancreatic endocrine tumors. In contrast to the mice described previously, we also detected transgene expression throughout the gastrointestinal tract in endocrine cells of the stomach and small and large intestine. Focal areas of enteroendocrine cell hyperplasia in the large bowel invariably progressed to invasive and metastasizing plurihormonal endocrine carcinoma, which was clinically and pathologically evident by 4 weeks of age. In contrast, transgene expression in the small bowel and stomach was not associated with progression to either hyperplasia or carcinoma. The results of these studies provide functional evidence for the existence of an upstream cis-acting regulatory domain that directs glucagon gene transcription to the endocrine cells of the intestine in transgenic mice. PMID:1587847

  4. Immunodeficiency disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIV in their immune systems and improve their immunity. People who are going to have a planned ... be used to treat certain immunodeficiency conditions. Passive immunity (receiving antibodies produced by another person or animal) ...

  5. Immunodeficiency disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIV in their immune systems and improve their immunity. Patients who are going to have a planned ... be used to treat certain immunodeficiency conditions. Passive immunity (receiving antibodies produced by another person or animal) ...

  6. Intrinsic cellular defenses against human immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Melo, Daniel; Venkatesh, Siddarth; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2012-09-21

    Viral infections are often detrimental to host survival and reproduction. Consequently, hosts have evolved a variety of mechanisms to defend themselves against viruses. A component of this arsenal is a set of proteins, termed restriction factors, which exhibit direct antiviral activity. Among these are several classes of proteins (APOBEC3, TRIM5, Tetherin, and SAMHD1) that inhibit the replication of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses. Here, we outline the features, mechanisms, and evolution of these defense mechanisms. We also speculate on how restriction factors arose, how they might interact with the conventional innate and adaptive immune systems, and how an understanding of these intrinsic cellular defenses might be usefully exploited. PMID:22999946

  7. High Expression of Antiviral Proteins in Mucosa from Individuals Exhibiting Resistance to Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Feria, Manuel Gerónimo; Arcia, David; Aguilar-Jiménez, Wbeimar; Zapata, Wildeman; Rugeles, María Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Background Several soluble factors have been reported to have the capacity of inhibiting HIV replication at different steps of the virus life cycle, without eliminating infected cells and through enhancement of specific cellular mechanisms. Yet, it is unclear if these antiviral factors play a role in the protection from HIV infection or in the control of viral replication. Here we evaluated two cohorts: i) one of 58 HIV-exposed seronegative individuals (HESNs) who were compared with 59 healthy controls (HCs), and ii) another of 13 HIV-controllers who were compared with 20 HIV-progressors. Peripheral blood, oral and genital mucosa and gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) samples were obtained to analyze the mRNA expression of ELAFIN, APOBEC3G, SAMHD1, TRIM5α, RNase 7 and SerpinA1 using real-time PCR. Results HESNs exhibited higher expression of all antiviral factors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), oral or genital mucosa when compared with HCs. Furthermore, HIV-controllers exhibited higher levels of SerpinA1 in GALT. Conclusions These findings suggest that the activity of these factors is compartmentalized and that these proteins have a predominant role depending on the tissue to avoid the infection, reduce the viral load and modulate the susceptibility to HIV infection. PMID:26091527

  8. Immortalization of Human Fetal Hepatocyte by Ectopic Expression of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase, Human Papilloma Virus (E7) and Simian Virus 40 Large T (SV40 T) Antigen Towards Bioartificial Liver Support

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Shibashish; Bader, Augustinus

    2014-01-01

    Background Generation of genetically stable and non-tumoric immortalization cell line from primary cells would be enormously useful for research and therapeutic purposes, but progress towards this goal has so far been limited. It is now universal acceptance that immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes based on recent advances of telomerase biology and oncogene, lead to unlimited population doubling could be the possible source for bioartificial liver device. Methods Immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes cell line by ectopic expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), human papilloma virus gene (E7) and simian virus 40 large T (SV40 T) antigens is main goal of present study. We used an inducible system containing human telomerase and E7, both of which are cloned into responder constructs controlled by doxycycline transactivator. We characterized the immortalized human fetal hepatocyte cells by analysis of green fluorescent cells (GFP) positive cells using flow cytometry (FACs) cell sorting and morphology, proliferative rate and antigen expression by immunohistochemical analysis. In addition to we analysized lactate formation, glucose consumption, albumin secretion and urea production of immortalized human fetal hepatocyte cells. Results After 25 attempts for transfection of adult primary hepatocytes by human telomerase and E7 to immortalize them, none of the transfection systems resulted in the production of a stable, proliferating cell line. Although the transfection efficiency was more than 70% on the first day, the vast majority of the transfected hepatocytes lost their signal within the first 5–7 days. The remaining transfected hepatocytes persisted for 2–4 weeks and divided one or two times without forming a clone. After 10 attempts of transfection human fetal hepatocytes using the same transfection system, we obtained one stable human fetal hepatocytes cell line which was able albumin secretion urea production and glucose

  9. The effects of vinblastine on the expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat.

    SciTech Connect

    Akan, E.; Chang-Liu, C.-M.; Woloschak, G. E.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology

    1997-05-01

    Previous work by our group has demonstrated induction of the HIV-LTR following exposure of cells to various DNA-damaging agents such as ultraviolet (UV) light, cisplatin, and doxorubicin. The current experiments were designed to determine the relative effects of the anti-mitotic drug vinblastine on expression of the HIV-LTR. Using human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells stably transfected with the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) reporter transcriptionally driven by the HIV-LTR promoter, we demonstrated a 9-10-fold induction at 48-72 h following vinblastine treatment. Previous experiments had demonstrated repression of cisplatin or doxorubicin-mediated HIV induction by treatment with salicylic acid. The vinblastine induction also was repressed by salicylic acid treatment, but not by treatment with indomethacin, suggesting a role for the NF{kappa}B pathway in the inductive response. When UV exposure was coupled to the vinblastine treatment, there was no additive or synergistic effect evident, suggesting similar paths of induction between the two agents. Northern blots demonstrated that these agents were operating at the level of transcription and that salicylic acid inhibited vinblastine-mediated induction of HIV-LTR-CAT mRNA only if administered at the same time as vinblastine; addition of salicylic acid 2 h later had no effect on transcript accumulation. All combinations of treatments with vinblastine and/or salicylic acid markedly reduced cell survival.

  10. Activation pathways and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication are not altered in CD4+ T cells expressing the nef protein.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, O; Arenzana-Seisdedos, F; Heard, J M; Danos, O

    1992-05-01

    While recent studies in Rhesus monkeys have pointed out the importance of an intact nef gene for the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), no biological function has been so far unambiguously attributed to its product. Since Nef has been described to possess GTP-binding properties and to down-regulate CD4 cell surface expression, we looked for evidences of Nef interfering with the transduction of activating signals in human CD4+ T cells. We used a murine leukemia retroviral vector to express the HIV-1BRU nef gene in two permanent tumoral T-cell lines (CEM and Jurkat) and in two nonimmortalized, interleukin-2 (IL2)-dependent, T-cell clones. The single copy recombinant provirus integrated in the genome of these cells directed the synthesis of a 27-kD protein with a half-life greater than 5 h. The levels of expression of cell surface molecules involved in T-cell functions (CD4, CD3, CD28, CD29, IL-2 receptor) were not modified in cell populations expressing Nef. In immunocompetent T-cell clones, cell proliferation and lymphokine production in response to activating stimuli (IL-2, alloantigens, phorbol esters, or antibodies directed against CD2, CD3, CD4, CD28) remained unmodified. Moreover, the presence of Nef did not change the kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. PMID:1355346

  11. Comparative molecular genetic analysis of simian and human HIV-1 integrase interactor INI1/SMARCB1/SNF5.

    PubMed

    Pyeon, Dohun; Price, Lenore; Park, In-Woo

    2015-12-01

    Human integrase interactor 1 (INI1/SMARCB1/SNF5) is a chromatin-remodeling molecule that binds to HIV-1 integrase and enhances proviral DNA integration. INI1 is also known as a tumor suppressor gene and has been found to be mutated in several aggressive tumors such as rhabdoid and lymphoid tumors. To study the function of simian INI1, we screened and cloned simian INI1 cDNA from B lymphoma cells of rhesus monkeys using RT-PCR. Sequence analysis showed 23 single nucleotide differences compared to the human ortholog, which, however, did not result in amino acid changes, and the amino acid sequence is therefore 100% conserved between human and simian INI1. Two alternatively spliced isoforms, INI1a and INI1b, were also found in simian INI1. These two isoforms did not show any functional difference in HIV-1 proviral DNA integration and nuclear localization, suggesting that the specificity of simian INI1 would not be a factor preventing HIV-1 infection of a simian host. Nevertheless, INI1b is expressed only in established cancer cell lines such as Jurkat and COS-7 cells, and not in primary cells, suggesting that INIlb could be an indicator of cell transformation. PMID:26350979

  12. Primary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorder (PID) refers to a heterogeneous group of over 130 disorders that result from defects in immune system development and/or function. PIDs are broadly classified as disorders of adaptive immunity (i.e., T-cell, B-cell or combined immunodeficiencies) or of innate immunity (e.g., phagocyte and complement disorders). Although the clinical manifestations of PIDs are highly variable, most disorders involve at least an increased susceptibility to infection. Early diagnosis and treatment are imperative for preventing significant disease-associated morbidity and, therefore, consultation with a clinical immunologist is essential. PIDs should be suspected in patients with: recurrent sinus or ear infections or pneumonias within a 1 year period; failure to thrive; poor response to prolonged use of antibiotics; persistent thrush or skin abscesses; or a family history of PID. Patients with multiple autoimmune diseases should also be evaluated. Diagnostic testing often involves lymphocyte proliferation assays, flow cytometry, measurement of serum immunoglobulin (Ig) levels, assessment of serum specific antibody titers in response to vaccine antigens, neutrophil function assays, stimulation assays for cytokine responses, and complement studies. The treatment of PIDs is complex and generally requires both supportive and definitive strategies. Ig replacement therapy is the mainstay of therapy for B-cell disorders, and is also an important supportive treatment for many patients with combined immunodeficiency disorders. The heterogeneous group of disorders involving the T-cell arm of the adaptive system, such as severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), require immune reconstitution as soon as possible. The treatment of innate immunodeficiency disorders varies depending on the type of defect, but may involve antifungal and antibiotic prophylaxis, cytokine replacement, vaccinations and bone marrow transplantation. This article provides a detailed overview

  13. Analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nef gene sequences present in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Shugars, D C; Smith, M S; Glueck, D H; Nantermet, P V; Seillier-Moiseiwitsch, F; Swanstrom, R

    1993-01-01

    The nef genes of the human immunodeficiency viruses type 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) and the related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) encode a protein (Nef) whose role in virus replication and cytopathicity remains uncertain. As an attempt to elucidate the function of nef, we characterized the nucleotide and corresponding protein sequences of naturally occurring nef genes obtained from several HIV-1-infected individuals. A consensus Nef sequence was derived and used to identify several features that were highly conserved among the Nef sequences. These features included a nearly invariant myristylation signal, regions of sequence polymorphism and variable duplication, a region with an acidic charge, a (Pxx)4 repeat sequence, and a potential protein kinase C phosphorylation site. Clustering of premature stop codons at position 124 was noted in 6 of the 54 Nef sequences. Further analysis revealed four stretches of residues that were highly conserved not only among the patient-derived HIV-1 Nef sequences, but also among the Nef sequences of HIV-2 and the SIVs, suggesting that Nef proteins expressed by these retroviruses are functionally equivalent. The "Nef-defining" sequences were used to evaluate the sequence alignments of known proteins reported to share sequence similarity with Nef sequences and to conduct additional computer-based searches for similar protein sequences. A gene encoding the consensus Nef sequence was also generated. This gene encodes a full-length Nef protein that should be a valuable tool in further studies of Nef function. Images PMID:8043040

  14. Simian-tropic HIV as a model to study drug resistance against integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wares, Melissa; Hassounah, Said; Mesplède, Thibault; Sandstrom, Paul A; Wainberg, Mark A

    2015-04-01

    Drug resistance represents a key aspect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment failure. It is important to develop nonhuman primate models for studying issues of drug resistance and the persistence and transmission of drug-resistant viruses. However, relatively little work has been conducted using either simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) or SIV/HIV recombinant viruses for studying resistance against integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). Here, we used a T-cell-tropic SIV/HIV recombinant virus in which the capsid and vif regions of HIV-1 were replaced with their SIV counterparts (simian-tropic HIV-1 [stHIV-1](SCA,SVIF)) to study the impact of a number of drug resistance substitutions in the integrase coding region at positions E92Q, G118R, E138K, Y143R, S153Y, N155H, and R263K on drug resistance, viral infectivity, and viral replication capacity. Our results show that each of these substitutions exerted effects that were similar to their effects in HIV-1. Substitutions associated with primary resistance against dolutegravir were more detrimental to stHIV-1(SCA,SVIF) infectiousness than were resistance substitutions associated with raltegravir and elvitegravir, consistent with data that have been reported for HIV-1. These findings support the role of stHIV-1(SCA,SVIF) as a useful model with which to evaluate the role of INSTI resistance substitutions on viral persistence, transmissibility, and pathogenesis in a nonhuman primate model. PMID:25583721

  15. Systemic Spironucleosis In Two Immunodeficient Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, C; Kramer, J; Mejia, A; MacKey, J; Mansfield, KG; Miller, AD

    2011-01-01

    Spironucleus spp. are parasites of fish and terrestrial vertebrates including mice and turkeys that rarely cause extraintestinal disease. Two rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were experimentally inoculated with simian immunodeficiency virus mac251 (SIVmac251). Both progressed to simian acquired immune deficiency syndrome (SAIDS) within one year of inoculation and, in addition to common opportunistic infections including rhesus cytomegalovirus, rhesus lymphocryptovirus, and rhesus adenovirus, developed systemic protozoal infections. In the first case, the protozoa were associated with colitis, multifocal abdominal abscessation, and lymphadenitis. In the second case they one of a number of organisms associated with extensive pyogranulomatous pneumonia and colitis. Ultrastructural, molecular, and phylogenetic analysis revealed the causative organism to be a species of Spironucleus closely related to Spironucleus meleagridis of turkeys. This is the first report of extraintestinal infection with Spironucleus sp. in higher mammals and further expands the list of opportunistic infections found in immunocompromised rhesus macaques. PMID:20351359

  16. Cell Cycle- and Vpr-Mediated Regulation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Expression in Primary and Transformed T-Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Gummuluru, Suryaram; Emerman, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Viral protein R (Vpr) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transiently arrests cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle and is a weak transcriptional transactivator. We found that Vpr increased HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) activity in all cells examined but, when expressed at high levels, decreased HIV-1 LTR expression due to cytotoxic effects. Moreover, Vpr-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 LTR-driven transcription was observed in cycling primary human CD4+ T cells but not in terminally differentiated, noncycling primary human macrophages. In single-round infection experiments using primary human CD4+ T cells, proviral clones expressing either wild-type Vpr or Vpr mutants that retained the ability to cause a G2 arrest replicated to higher levels than proviruses lacking Vpr or expressing mutants of Vpr that did not cause an arrest. In support of the hypothesis that enhancement of HIV-1 LTR transcription by Vpr is an indirect effect of the ability of Vpr to delay cells in G2, counterflow centrifugal elutriation of cells into different phases of the cell cycle demonstrated that HIV-1 LTR expression was highest in G2. Finally, the ability of Vpr to upregulate viral transcription was dependent on a minimal promoter containing a functional TATA box and an enhancer. PMID:10364289

  17. Engrafted maternal T cells in a severe combined immunodeficiency patient express T-cell receptor variable beta segments characterized by a restricted V-D-J junctional diversity.

    PubMed

    Sottini, A; Quiròs-Roldan, E; Notarangelo, L D; Malagoli, A; Primi, D; Imberti, L

    1995-04-15

    To better understand the peculiar functional behavior of engrafted maternal T cells in a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) patient, we characterized, at the molecular level, the T-cell repertoire of a SCID child with a high number of engrafted, mature, activated lymphocytes. We found that, although these transplacentally acquired T cells express a random set of T-cell receptor variable beta (TCRBV) segments, the TCRBV transcripts are characterized by an extremely restricted V-D-J junctional diversity. Only a few cDNA clones were dominant among the TCRBV4+, TCRBV6+, and TCRBV20+ populations in engrafted cells, whereas the same TCRBV chains expressed by the mother's lymphocytes had the expected junctional hetero-geneity. Highly diverse and polyclonal junctions were also expressed by maternal cells activated in mixed lymphocyte reaction by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B lymphocytes from the patient, indicating that the strong clonal selection that characterizes the engrafted cells repertoire is probably not due to allorecognition. Furthermore, we report that the repertoire of the transplacentally acquired lymphocytes is dynamic over time and is characterized by waves of expression and contraction of selected clones, expressing different TCRBV segments. These results help to explain some of the abnormal functional behaviors of engrafted maternal cells and raise new questions regarding the mechanisms responsible for the restricted clonal diversity. PMID:7718881

  18. Negative regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 expression in monocytes: role of the 65-kDa plus 50-kDa NF-kappa B dimer.

    PubMed

    Raziuddin; Mikovits, J A; Calvert, I; Ghosh, S; Kung, H F; Ruscetti, F W

    1991-11-01

    Although monocytic cells can provide a reservoir for viral production in vivo, their regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transcription can be either latent, restricted, or productive. These differences in gene expression have not been molecularly defined. In THP-1 cells with restricted HIV expression, there is an absence of DNA-protein binding complex formation with the HIV-1 promoter-enhancer associated with markedly less viral RNA production. This absence of binding was localized to the NF-kappa B region of the HIV-1 enhancer; the 65-kDa plus 50-kDa NF-kappa B heterodimer was preferentially lost. Adding purified NF-kappa B protein to nuclear extracts from cells with restricted expression overcomes this lack of binding. In addition, treatment of these nuclear extracts with sodium deoxycholate restored their ability to form the heterodimer, suggesting the presence of an inhibitor of NF-kappa B activity. Furthermore, treatment of nuclear extracts from these cells that had restricted expression with lipopolysaccharide increased viral production and NF-kappa B activity. Antiserum specific for NF-kappa B binding proteins, but not c-rel-specific antiserum, disrupted heterodimer complex formation. Thus, both NF-kappa B-binding complexes are needed for optimal viral transcription. Binding of the 65-kDa plus 50-kDa heterodimer to the HIV-1 enhancer can be negatively regulated in monocytes, providing one mechanism restricting HIV-1 gene expression. PMID:1946356

  19. Effect of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protein R (vpr) gene expression on basic cellular function of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Y; Cao, J; O'Gorman, M R; Yu, M; Yogev, R

    1996-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr protein affects cell morphology and prevents proliferation of human cells by induction of cell cycle G2 arrest. In this study, we used the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model system to investigate the cellular effects of HIV-1 vpr gene expression. The vpr gene was cloned into an inducible fission yeast gene expression vector and expressed in wild-type S. pombe cells, and using these cells, we were able to demonstrate the specific Vpr-induced effects by induction and suppression of vpr gene expression. Induction of HIV-1 vpr gene expression affected S. pombe at the colonial, cellular, and molecular levels. Specifically, Vpr induced small-colony formation, polymorphic cells, growth delay, and cell cycle G2 arrest. Additionally, Vpr-induced G2 arrest appeared to be independent of cell size and morphological changes. The cell cycle G2 arrest correlated with increased phosphorylation of p34cdc2, suggesting negative regulation of mitosis by HIV-1 Vpr. Treatment of Vpr-induced cell with a protein phosphatase inhibitor, okadaic acid, transiently suppressed cell cycle arrest and morphological changes. This observation implicates possible involvement of protein phosphatase(s) in the effects of Vpr. Together, these data showed that the HIV-1 Vpr-induced cellular changes in S. pombe are similar to those observed in human cells. Therefore, the S. pombe system is suited for further investigation of the HIV-1 vpr gene functions. PMID:8709199

  20. Enhanced PD-1 Expression by T Cells in Cerebrospinal Fluid Does Not Reflect Functional Exhaustion during Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sadagopal, Shanmugalakshmi; Lorey, Shelly L.; Barnett, Louise; Sutherland, Deborah; Basham, Rebecca; Erdem, Husamettin; Kalams, Spyros A.; Haas, David W.

    2010-01-01

    During chronic viral infections, T cells are exhausted due to constant antigen exposure and are associated with enhanced programmed death 1 (PD-1) expression. Deficiencies in the PD-1/programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway are associated with autoimmune diseases, including those of the central nervous system (CNS). To understand the role of PD-1 expression in regulating T-cell immunity in the CNS during chronic infection, we characterized PD-1 expression in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood of individuals with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. PD-1 expression was higher on HIV-specific CD8+ T cells than on total CD8+ T cells in both CSF and blood. PD-1 expression on CSF T cells correlated positively with CSF HIV-1 RNA and inversely with blood CD4+ T-cell counts, suggesting that HIV-1 infection drives higher PD-1 expression on CSF T cells. However, in every HIV-positive individual, PD-1 expression was higher on T cells in CSF than on those in blood, despite HIV-1 RNA levels being lower. Among healthy HIV-negative controls, PD-1 expression was higher in CSF than in blood. Furthermore, frequencies of the senescence marker CD57 were lower on CSF T cells than on blood T cells, consistent with our prior observation of enhanced ex vivo functional capacity of CSF T cells. The higher PD-1 expression level on CSF T cells therefore does not reflect cellular exhaustion but may be a mechanism to downregulate immune-mediated tissue damage in the CNS. As inhibition of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway is pursued as a therapeutic option for viral infections, potential effects of such a blockade on development of autoimmune responses in the CNS should be considered. PMID:19828602

  1. Cocaine-mediated enhancement of virus replication in macrophages: implications for human immunodeficiency virus-associated dementia.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Navneet K; Williams, Rachel; Peng, Fuwang; Tsai, Yi-Jou; Dhillon, Sukhbir; Nicolay, Brandon; Gadgil, Milind; Kumar, Anil; Buch, Shilpa J

    2007-12-01

    Injection drug use has been recognized as a major risk factor for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) from the outset of the epidemic. Cocaine, one of the most widely abused drugs in the United States, can both impair the functions of macrophages and CD4(+) lymphocytes and also activate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 expression in these cells. Because the brain is the target organ for both cocaine and HIV, the objective of the present study was to explore the effects of cocaine on virus replication in macrophages, the target cells for the virus in the central nervous system (CNS). Cocaine markedly enhanced virus production in simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and in U1 cells, a chronically infected promonocytic cell line as monitored by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunocytochemistry. Cocaine treatment also resulted in the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B and transcriptional activation of the HIV-LTR (long terminal repeat) gag-GFP (green fluorescent protein). Analyses of chemokines in cocaine-treated macrophages by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Luminex assays suggested increased expression of interleukin (IL)-10, a cytokine that is known to promote HIV replication in MDMs. In addition to enhancing IL-10 expression, cocaine also caused an up-regulation of the macrophage activation marker, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, in MDMs. The synergistic effect of cocaine on virus replication and its enhancement of host activation markers suggest that cocaine functions at multiple pathways to accelerate HIV-associated dementia (HAD). PMID:18097880

  2. Blockade of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Production in CD4^+ T Cells by an Intracellular CD4 Expressed Under Control of the Viral Long Terminal Repeat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonocore, Linda; Rose, John K.

    1993-04-01

    A retroviral vector was constructed in which a gene encoding a mutated soluble CD4 protein that is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (sCD4-KDEL) is expressed under control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) regulatory elements. HIV-1 infection of a human T-cell line transduced with this vector led to induction of sCD4-KDEL synthesis and a block in transport of the HIV envelope protein to the cell surface. There was a complete block to maturation of infectious HIV-1 in the transduced cells, no viral spread, and little or no syncytium formation. Infected cells gradually disappeared from the culture over a period of 2 months. This intracellular trap for HIV has potential application in gene therapy for AIDS.

  3. Proteinase-resistant factors in human erythrocyte membranes mediate CD4-dependent fusion with cells expressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Dragic, T; Picard, L; Alizon, M

    1995-01-01

    Murine CD4+ cells are resistant to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry and to fusion with cells expressing HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env). The role of human-specific factors in Env/CD4-mediated fusion is shown by the ability of transient cell hybrids formed between CD4+ murine cells and human HeLa cells to fuse with Env+ cells. Fusion events were observed when other human cells, including erythrocytes, were substituted for HeLa cells in the hybrids. Experiments with erythrocyte ghosts showed that the factors allowing Env/CD4-mediated fusion are located in the plasma membrane. These factors were fully active after extensive digestion of erythrocytes with proteinase K or pronase. Nonprotein components of human plasma membranes, possibly glycolipids, could therefore be required for Env/CD4-mediated fusion and virus entry. PMID:7815477

  4. Expression, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 subtype C protease

    SciTech Connect

    Coman, Roxana M.; Robbins, Arthur; Goodenow, Maureen M.; McKenna, Robert; Dunn, Ben M.

    2007-04-01

    Crystals of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 subtype C protease complexed with indinavir and nelfinavir have been grown in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1} and shown to diffract X-rays to 2.3 Å resolution. Crystals of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) subtype C protease (PR) complexed with the clinically used inhibitors indinavir (IDV) and nelfinavir (NFV) have been grown in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with mean unit-cell parameters a = 46.7 (±0.1), b = 59.8 (±0.3), c = 87.0 (±0.4) Å, β = 95.2 (±0.5)°. The crystals of both complexes have been shown to diffract X-rays to 2.3 Å resolution. The diffraction data for the subtype C PR complexes with IDV and NFV were subsequently processed and reduced, with overall R{sub sym} values of 8.4 and 11.4%, respectively. Based on the unit-cell volumes, molecular-replacement results and packing considerations, there are two protease homodimers per crystallographic asymmetric unit in each of the complexes. The data were initially phased using a model based on the crystal structure of HIV-1 subtype B PR; the structures have been determined and further refinement and analysis are in progress. These structures and subsequent studies with other inhibitors will greatly aid in correlating the amino-acid variation between the different HIV PRs and understanding their differential sensitivity and resistance to current drug therapy.

  5. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Related Retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Nájera, Rafael; Herrera, M. I.; Andrés, R. de

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current knowledge on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and related retroviruses, describing basic characteristics of this new group of viruses such as morphologic and genetic structure, biological and cultural properties, virus growth characteristics, genetic variability and virus replication. The discovery of new human and simian retroviruses has prompted the World Health Organization (WHO) to convene a group of experts to establish criteria for their characterization. This will allow rapid identification of new variants that may arise and allow public health measures to be implemented accordingly. Different approaches are made to nomenclature in view of the evolution of knowledge about these viruses, and a system of nomenclature has been proposed by the WHO working group. This system, inspired by the one developed for the influenza viruses, is practical and descriptive, providing information on the origins of the organism and its type. Images PMID:2829446

  6. A human recombinant Fab identifies a human immunodeficiency virus type 1-induced conformational change in cell surface-expressed CD4.

    PubMed Central

    Bachelder, R E; Bilancieri, J; Lin, W; Letvin, N L

    1995-01-01

    To explore the role of the CD4 molecule in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection following initial virus-CD4 binding, we have characterized CD4-specific antibodies raised by immunizing an HIV-1-infected human with human recombinant soluble CD4 (rsCD4). Fabs were selected from a human recombinant Fab library constructed from the bone marrow of this immunized individual. Here, we describe a human rsCD4-specific recombinant Fab clone selected by panning the library over complexes of human rsCD4 and recombinant HIV-1 envelope protein. While this Fab does not bind to CD4-positive T-cell lines or to human T lymphocytes, it recognizes cell surface-expressed CD4 following the incubation of these cells with a recombinant form of HIV-1 gp120 or with HIV-1 virions. The Fab is not HIV-1 envelope specific, since it does not bind to recombinant gp120 or to native cell surface-expressed HIV-1 envelope proteins. As confirmation of its CD4 specificity, we show that this Fab immunoprecipitates a 55-kDa protein, corresponding to the molecular mass of cellular CD4, from an H9 cell lysate. The specificity of this human Fab provides evidence for a virus-induced conformational change in cell surface-expressed on CD4. The characterization of this altered CD4 conformation and its effects on the host cell will be important in defining postbinding events in HIV infection. PMID:7637018

  7. Functional roles for the TATA promoter and enhancers in basal and Tat-induced expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Berkhout, B; Jeang, K T

    1992-01-01

    We have analyzed the contributory role of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) promoter and enhancers in basal and Tat-induced transcription. We found that a minimal promoter competent for basal expression is contained within sequences spanning nucleotides -43 to +80. Basal expression from this HIV-1 promoter was boosted more by the additional presence of the NF-kappa B elements than by the Sp1 elements. The minimal long terminal repeat promoter (-43 to +80), while having an intact TAR sequence, was not Tat inducible. However, the simple addition of short synthetic enhancer motifs (AP1, Oct, Sp1, and NF-kappa B) conferred Tat responsiveness. This ability to respond to Tat was in part dependent on the presence of the HIV-1 promoter. Changing the HIV-1 TATA to other eucaryotic TATA or non-TATA initiators minimally affected basal expression but altered Tat inducibility. Our findings suggest a specific context of functional promoter and enhancer elements that is optimal for Tat trans activation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat. Our results do not allow conclusions about whether Tat acts at the level of initiation or at the level of elongation to be drawn. Images PMID:1727476

  8. Expression and characterization of genetically engineered human immunodeficiency virus-like particles containing modified envelope glycoproteins: implications for development of a cross-protective AIDS vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rovinski, B; Haynes, J R; Cao, S X; James, O; Sia, C; Zolla-Pazner, S; Matthews, T J; Klein, M H

    1992-07-01

    Noninfectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viruslike particles containing chimeric envelope glycoproteins were expressed in mammalian cells by using inducible promoters. We engineered four expression vectors in which a synthetic oligomer encoding gp120 residues 306 to 328 (amino acids YNKRKRIHIGP GRAFYTTKNIIG) from the V3 loop of the MN viral isolate was inserted at various positions within the endogenous HIV-1LAI env gene. Expression studies revealed that insertion of the heterologous V3(MN) loop segment at two different locations within the conserved region 2 (C2) of gp120, either 173 or 242 residues away from the N terminus of the mature subunit, resulted in the secretion of fully assembled HIV-like particles containing chimeric LAI/MN envelope glycoproteins. Both V3 loop epitopes were recognized by loop-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, insertion of the V3(MN) loop segment into other regions of gp120 led to the production of envelope-deficient viruslike particles. Immunization with HIV-like particles containing chimeric envelope proteins induced specific antibody responses against both the autologous and heterologous V3 loop epitopes, including cross-neutralizing antibodies against the HIV-1LAI and HIV-1MN isolates. This study, therefore, demonstrates the feasibility of genetically engineering optimized HIV-like particles capable of eliciting cross-neutralizing antibodies. PMID:1602531

  9. Assembly-defective point mutants of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag precursor phenotypically expressed in recombinant baculovirus-infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, S S; Boulanger, P

    1993-01-01

    Two substitution mutants of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag gene product were isolated after nitrous acid mutagenesis of a recombinant baculovirus expressing a non-N-myristylated, p6-deleted Gag precursor (Pr49). Both mutants failed to assemble intracellular Gag virus-like particles, as does the parental recombinant, and therefore expressed a self-assembly defective (Sad) phenotype in insect cells. The mutations consisted of nonconservative changes involving highly conserved hydrophobic residues in the p24 domain, Leu to Pro at position 268 (L268P) and Leu to Ser at amino acid 322 (L322S). Experimental data suggested that the two mutated residues belonged to functionally different regions of the Gag precursor. (i) A partial complementation effect between the two mutants for Gag precursor assembly was observed in coinfection experiments. (ii) The two mutations showed different phenotypes when placed in the N-myristylated context, of which only the L268P mutation abolished extracellular budding and release of Gag particles at the plasma membrane. Both L268P and L322S mutants had a trans-dominant negative effect on the intracellular assembly of a non-N-myristylated, full-length (Pr55) Gag precursor expressed by a coinfecting recombinant. None of the mutants, however, showed any detectable effect in trans on membrane targeting and budding of the coexpressed N-myristylated wild-type Gag precursor. Images PMID:8474175

  10. Proliferation inhibition of astrocytes, neurons, and non-glial cells by intracellularly expressed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Betty Y; He, Johnny J

    2004-04-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat protein is one of the soluble neurotoxins. Most studies have to date focused on Tat as an extracellular molecule and its role in neuronal apoptosis, as recombinant Tat protein is often used in these studies. In this study, we expressed Tat protein in astrocytes and neurons, and examined its effects on these cells. We found that Tat expression resulted in growth inhibition of astrocytes, neurons, as well as non-glial cells 293T. We further showed that Tat interacted with a number of cell cycle-related proteins including cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D3, Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk1/Cdc2, cdc6, p27, p53, p63, hdlg, and PCNA. These data demonstrate that Tat inhibited cell proliferation when expressed intracellularly, and suggest that Tat interactions with multiple cell cycle regulators may account for this anti-proliferative effect. These results support the notion that Tat-induced neuropathogenesis is mediated by multiple mechanisms involving both intracellular and extracellular Tat protein. PMID:15050687

  11. Regulation of expression driven by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and human T-cell leukemia virus type I long terminal repeats in pluripotential human embryonic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Maio, J.; Brown, F.L. )

    1988-04-01

    Human pluripotential embryonic teratocarcinoma cells differentially expressed gene activity controlled by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) long terminal repeats (LTRs) when differentiation was induced by the morphogen all-trans retinoic acid. The alterations occurred after commitment and before the appearance of the multiple cell types characteristic of these pluripotential cells. After commitment, gene activity controlled by the HIV-1 LTR markedly increased, whereas that controlled by the HTLV-I LTR decreased. Steady-state mRNA levels and nuclear run-on transcription indicated that the increased HIV-1-directed activity during differentiation occurred posttranscriptionally, whereas the decreased HTLV-I activity was at the transcriptional level. Phorbol esters did not cause commitment but strongly enhanced expression by both viral LTRs at the transcriptional level. Differentiating cells gradually lost the ability to respond to phorbol ester stimulation. Experiments with a deletion mutant of the HIV-1 LTR suggested that this was due to imposition of negative regulation during differentiation that was not reversed by phorbol ester induction. Cycloheximide, with or without phorbol ester, slightly stimulated HIV-1-directed activity at the transcriptional level and massively increased the amounts of steady-state mRNA by posttranscriptional superinduction. It appeared, however, that new nuclear protein synthesis was required for maximal transcriptional stimulation by phorbol esters. Thus, changing cellular regulatory mechanisms influenced human retrovirus expression during human embryonic cell differentiation.

  12. Temporal aspects of DNA and RNA synthesis during human immunodeficiency virus infection: Evidence for differential gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sunyoung; Baltimore, D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge ); Byrn, R.; Groopman, J. )

    1989-09-01

    The kinetics of retroviral DNA and RNA synthesis are parameters vital to understanding viral growth, especially for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which encodes several of its own regulatory genes. The authors have established a single-cycle growth condition for HIV in H9 cells, a human CD4{sup +} lymphocyte line. The full-length viral linear DNA is first detectable by 4 h postinfection. During a one-step growth of HIV, amounts of viral DNA gradually increase until 8 to 12 h postinfection and then decrease. The copy number of unintegrated viral DNA is not extraordinarily high even at its peak. Most strikingly, there is a temporal program of RNA accumulation: the earliest RNA is greatly enriched in the 2-kilobase subgenomic mRNA species, while the level of 9.2-kilobase RNA which is both genomic RNA and mRNA remains low until after 24 h of infection. Virus production begins at about 24 h postinfection. Thus, viral DNA synthesis is as rapid as for other retroviruses, but viral RNA synthesis involves temporal alteration in the species that accumulate, presumably as a consequence of viral regulatory genes.

  13. Expression and targeting of human fibroblast activation protein in a human skin/severe combined immunodeficient mouse breast cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Tahtis, Kiki; Lee, Fook-Thean; Wheatley, Jennifer M; Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Park, John E; Smyth, Fiona E; Obata, Yuichi; Stockert, Elisabeth; Hall, Cathrine M; Old, Lloyd J; Rettig, Wolfgang J; Scott, Andrew M

    2003-08-01

    Antigens and receptors that are highly expressed on tumor stromal cells, such as fibroblast activation protein (FAP), are attractive targets for antibody-based therapies because the supporting stroma and vessel network is essential for a solid neoplasm to grow beyond a size of 1-2 mm. The in vivo characterization of antibodies targeting human stromal or vessel antigens is hindered by the lack of an appropriate mouse model system because xenografts in standard mouse models express stromal and vessels elements of murine origin. This limitation may be overcome by the development of a human skin/mouse chimeric model, which is established by transplanting human foreskin on to the lateral flank of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The subsequent inoculation of breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells within the dermis of the transplanted human skin resulted in the production of xenografts expressing stromal and vessel elements of human origin. Widespread expression of human FAP-positive reactive stromal fibroblasts within xenografts was seen up to 2 months posttransplantation and postinjection of cells. Human blood vessel antigen expression also persisted at 2 months posttransplantation and postinjection of cells with murine vessels coexisting with the human vascular supply. The model was subsequently used to evaluate the biodistribution properties of an iodine-131-labeled humanized anti-FAP monoclonal antibody (BIBH-7). The results showed high specific targeting of the stromal compartment of the xenograft, indicating that the model provides a useful and novel approach for the in vivo assessment of the immunotherapeutic potential of molecules targeting human stroma and angiogenic systems. PMID:12939462

  14. Simultaneous Detection of Antibodies to five Simian Viruses in Nonhuman Primates using Recombinant Viral Protein Based Multiplex Microbead ImmunoAssays

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Qi; Guo, Huishan; Tang, Min; Touzjian, Neal; Lerche, Nicholas W.; Lu, Yichen; Yee, JoAnn L.

    2011-01-01

    Routine screening for infectious agents is critical in establishing and maintaining specific pathogen free (SPF) nonhuman primate (NHP) colonies. More efficient, higher throughput, less costly reagent, and reduced sample consumption multiplex microbead immunoassays (MMIAs) using purified viral lysates have been developed previously to address some disadvantages of the traditional individual enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. To overcome some of the technical and biosafety difficulties in preparing antigens from live viruses for viral lysate protein based MMIAs, novel MMIAs using recombinant glycoprotein D precursor (gD) protein of herpesvirus B and four viral gag proteins of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV), Simian T Cell Lymphotropic Virus (STLV), Simian Foamy Virus (SFV) and Simian Betaretrovirus (SRV) as antigens have been developed in the current study. The data showed that the recombinant viral protein based MMIAs detected simultaneously antibodies to each of these five viruses with high sensitivity and specificity, and correlated well with viral lysate based MMIAs. Therefore, recombinant viral protein based MMIA is an effective and efficient routine screening method to determine the infection status of nonhuman primates. PMID:21945221

  15. A Bidirectional SF2/ASF- and SRp40-Dependent Splicing Enhancer Regulates Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 rev, env, vpu, and nef Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Caputi, Massimo; Freund, Marcel; Kammler, Susanne; Asang, Corinna; Schaal, Heiner

    2004-01-01

    The integrated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome is transcribed in a single pre-mRNA that is alternatively spliced into more than 40 mRNAs. We characterized a novel bidirectional exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) that regulates the expression of the HIV-1 env, vpu, rev, and nef mRNAs. The ESE is localized downstream of the vpu-, env-, and nef-specific 3′ splice site no. 5. SF2/ASF and SRp40 activate the ESE and are required for efficient 3′ splice site usage and binding of the U1 snRNP to the downstream 5′ splice site no. 4. U1 snRNP binding to the 5′ splice site no. 4 is required for splicing of the rev and nef mRNAs and to increase expression of the partially spliced env mRNA. Finally, our results indicate that this ESE is necessary for the recruitment of the U1 snRNP to the 5′ splice site no. 4, even when the 5′ splice site and the U1 snRNA have been mutated to obtain a perfect complementary match. The ESE characterized here is highly conserved in most viral subtypes. PMID:15163745

  16. A Spontaneous Deletion within the Desmoglein 3 Extracellular Domain of Mice Results in Hypomorphic Protein Expression, Immunodeficiency, and a Wasting Disease Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kountikov, Evgueni I.; Poe, Jonathan C.; Maclver, Nancie J.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.; Tedder, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Desmoglein 3 is a transmembrane component of desmosome complexes that mediate epidermal cell-to-cell adhesion and tissue integrity. Antibody blockade of desmoglein 3 function in pemphigus vulgaris patients leads to skin blistering (acantholysis) and oral mucosa lesions. Desmoglein 3 deficiency in mice leads to a phenotype characterized by cyclic alopecia in addition to the dramatic skin and mucocutaneous acantholysis observed in pemphigus patients. In this study, mice that developed an overt squeaky (sqk) phenotype were identified with obstructed airways, cyclic hair loss, and severe immunodeficiency subsequent to the development of oral lesions and malnutrition. Single-nucleotide polymorphism–based quantitative trait loci mapping revealed a genetic deletion that resulted in expression of a hypomorphic desmoglein 3 protein with a truncation of an extracellular cadherin domain. Because hypomorphic expression of a truncated desmoglein 3 protein led to a spectrum of severe pathology not observed in mice deficient in desmoglein 3, similar human genetic alterations may also disrupt desmosome function and induce a disease course distinct from pathogenesis of pemphigus vulgaris. PMID:25542773

  17. Targeting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase by intracellular expression of single-chain variable fragments to inhibit early stages of the viral life cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, F; Duan, L; Zhu, M; Bagasra, O; Pomerantz, R J

    1996-01-01

    Novel molecular approaches to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection have received increasing attention because of the lack of effective antiviral drug therapies in vivo. We now demonstrate that cells can be intracellularly immunized by cytoplasmic expression of single-chain variable antibody fragments (SFv) which bind to the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme. The expression of anti-RT SFv in T-lymphocytic cells specifically neutralizes the RT activity in the preintegration stage and affects the reverse transcription process, an early event of the HIV-1 life cycle. Blocking the virus at these early stages dramatically decreased HIV-1 propagation, as well as the HIV-1-induced cytopathic effects in susceptible human T lymphocytes, by impeding the formation of the proviral DNA. These data also demonstrate that intracellular, complete SFvs may gain access to viral proteins of the HIV-1 preintegration complex. These SFvs will provide a tool with which to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in restricting viral replication in HIV-1-infected cells. PMID:8648670

  18. An Escherichia coli Expression Assay and Screen for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Variants with Decreased Susceptibility to Indinavir

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, Laurence; Yang, Shiow-Shong; Rossi, Rick; Zepp, Charlie; Heefner, Donald

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a recombinant Escherichia coli screening system for the rapid detection and identification of amino acid substitutions in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease associated with decreased susceptibility to the protease inhibitor indinavir (MK-639; Merck & Co.). The assay depends upon the correct processing of a segment of the HIV-1 HXB2 gag-pol polyprotein followed by detection of HIV reverse transcriptase activity by a highly sensitive, colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The highly sensitive system detects the contributions of single substitutions such as I84V, L90M, and L63P. The combination of single substitutions further decreases the sensitivity to indinavir. We constructed a library of HIV protease variant genes containing dispersed mutations and, using the E. coli recombinant system, screened for mutants with decreased indinavir sensitivity. The discovered HIV protease variants contain amino acid substitutions commonly associated with indinavir resistance in clinical isolates, including the substitutions L90M, L63P, I64V, V82A, L24I, and I54T. One substitution, W6R, is also frequently found by the screen and has not been reported elsewhere. Of a total of 12,000 isolates that were screened, 12 protease variants with decreased sensitivity to indinavir were found. The L63P substitution, which is also associated with indinavir resistance, increases the stability of the isolated protease relative to that of the native HXB2 protease. The rapidity, sensitivity, and accuracy of this screen also make it useful for screening for novel inhibitors. We have found the approach described here to be useful for the detection of amino acid substitutions in HIV protease that have been associated with drug resistance as well as for the screening of novel compounds for inhibitory activity. PMID:9835523

  19. Divergent Simian Arteriviruses Cause Simian Hemorrhagic Fever of Differing Severities in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Moncla, Louise H.; Weiler, Andrea M.; Charlier, Olivia; Rojas, Oscar; Byrum, Russell; Ragland, Dan R.; Cohen, Melanie; Sanford, Hannah B.; Qin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Simian hemorrhagic fever (SHF) is a highly lethal disease in captive macaques. Three distinct arteriviruses are known etiological agents of past SHF epizootics, but only one, simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV), has been isolated in cell culture. The natural reservoir(s) of the three viruses have yet to be identified, but African nonhuman primates are suspected. Eleven additional divergent simian arteriviruses have been detected recently in diverse and apparently healthy African cercopithecid monkeys. Here, we report the successful isolation in MARC-145 cell culture of one of these viruses, Kibale red colobus virus 1 (KRCV-1), from serum of a naturally infected red colobus (Procolobus [Piliocolobus] rufomitratus tephrosceles) sampled in Kibale National Park, Uganda. Intramuscular (i.m.) injection of KRCV-1 into four cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) resulted in a self-limiting nonlethal disease characterized by depressive behavioral changes, disturbance in coagulation parameters, and liver enzyme elevations. In contrast, i.m. injection of SHFV resulted in typical lethal SHF characterized by mild fever, lethargy, lymphoid depletion, lymphoid and hepatocellular necrosis, low platelet counts, increased liver enzyme concentrations, coagulation abnormalities, and increasing viral loads. As hypothesized based on the genetic and presumed antigenic distance between KRCV-1 and SHFV, all four macaques that had survived KRCV-1 injection died of SHF after subsequent SHFV injection, indicating a lack of protective heterotypic immunity. Our data indicate that SHF is a disease of macaques that in all likelihood can be caused by a number of distinct simian arteriviruses, although with different severity depending on the specific arterivirus involved. Consequently, we recommend that current screening procedures for SHFV in primate-holding facilities be modified to detect all known simian arteriviruses. PMID:26908578

  20. Regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and cytokine gene expression in myeloid cells by NF-kappa B/Rel transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Roulston, A; Lin, R; Beauparlant, P; Wainberg, M A; Hiscott, J

    1995-01-01

    CD4+ macrophages in tissues such as lung, skin, and lymph nodes, promyelocytic cells in bone marrow, and peripheral blood monocytes serve as important targets and reservoirs for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. HIV-1-infected myeloid cells are often diminished in their ability to participate in chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and intracellular killing. HIV-1 infection of myeloid cells can lead to the expression of surface receptors associated with cellular activation and/or differentiation that increase the responsiveness of these cells to cytokines secreted by neighboring cells as well as to bacteria or other pathogens. Enhancement of HIV-1 replication is related in part to increased DNA-binding activity of cellular transcription factors such as NF-kappa B. NF-kappa B binds to the HIV-1 enhancer region of the long terminal repeat and contributes to the inducibility of HIV-1 gene expression in response to multiple activating agents. Phosphorylation and degradation of the cytoplasmic inhibitor I kappa B alpha are crucial regulatory events in the activation of NF-kappa B DNA-binding activity. Both N- and C-terminal residues of I kappa B alpha are required for inducer-mediated degradation. Chronic HIV-1 infection of myeloid cells leads to constitutive NF-kappa B DNA-binding activity and provides an intranuclear environment capable of perpetuating HIV-1 replication. Increased intracellular stores of latent NF-kappa B may also result in rapid inducibility of NF-kappa B-dependent cytokine gene expression. In response to secondary pathogenic infections or antigenic challenge, cytokine gene expression is rapidly induced, enhanced, and sustained over prolonged periods in HIV-1-infected myeloid cells compared with uninfected cells. Elevated levels of several inflammatory cytokines have been detected in the sera of HIV-1-infected individuals. Secretion of myeloid cell-derived cytokines may both increase virus production and contribute to AIDS

  1. Functional role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 vpu.

    PubMed Central

    Terwilliger, E F; Cohen, E A; Lu, Y C; Sodroski, J G; Haseltine, W A

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the role of vpu in the replication and cytopathicity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), infectious proviruses were constructed that were isogenic except for the ability to produce the protein product of vpu. The vpu-encoded protein is shown to decrease the rate of syncytium formation and cell killing in infected CD4+ human T cells, to increase greatly the export of virus particles from infected cells, and to reduce the rate of accumulation of cell-associated viral proteins. The vpu protein complements in trans the defect in a vpu- HIV-1 provirus but does not affect the simian immunodeficiency virus, which lacks vpu. These observations suggest that vpu may contribute to the AIDS epidemic by increasing the transmission efficiency of the virus. Images PMID:2472639

  2. Adeno-associated virus type 2 rep gene-mediated inhibition of basal gene expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 involves its negative regulatory functions.

    PubMed Central

    Oelze, I; Rittner, K; Sczakiel, G

    1994-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2), a human parvovirus which is apathogenic in adults, inhibits replication and gene expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in human cells. The rep gene of AAV-2, which was shown earlier to be sufficient for this negative interference, also down-regulated the expression of heterologous sequences driven by the long terminal repeat (LTR) of HIV-1. This effect was observed in the absence of the HIV-1 transactivator Tat, i.e., at basal levels of LTR-driven transcription. In this work, we studied the involvement of functional subsequences of the HIV-1 LTR in rep-mediated inhibition in the absence of Tat. Mutated LTRs driving an indicator gene (cat) were cointroduced into human SW480 cells together with rep alone or with double-stranded DNA fragments or RNA containing sequences of the HIV-1 LTR. The results indicate that rep strongly enhances the function of negative regulatory elements of the LTR. In addition, the experiments revealed a transcribed sequence element located within the TAR-coding sequence termed AHHH (AAV-HIV homology element derived from HIV-1) which is involved in rep-mediated inhibition. The AHHH element is also involved in down-regulation of basal expression levels in the absence of rep, suggesting that AHHH also contributes to negative regulatory functions of the LTR of HIV-1. In contrast, positive regulatory elements of the HIV-1 LTR such as the NF kappa B and SP1 binding sites have no significant influence on the rep-mediated inhibition. Images PMID:8289357

  3. Neutropenia in primary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sokolic, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Neutropenia is a feature of several primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDDs). Because of the diverse pathophysiologies of the PIDDs and the rarity of each disorder, data are often lacking, leading to the necessity of empiric treatment. Recent developments in the understanding of neutropenia in several of the PIDDs make a review of the data timely. Recent findings The category of severe congenital neutropenia continues to expand. Mutations in G6PC3 have been identified as the cause of neutropenia in a minority of previously molecularly undefined cases. Recent advances have broadened our understanding of the pathophysiology and the clinical expression of this disorder. A possible function of the C16orf57 gene has been hypothesized that may explain the clinical overlap between Clerucuzio-type poikiloderma with neutropenia and other marrow diseases. Plerixafor has been shown to be a potentially useful treatment in the warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infection, and myelokathexis syndrome. Investigations of patients with adenosine deaminase deficient severe combined immunodeficiency have identified neutropenia, and particularly susceptibility to myelotoxins, as a feature of this disorder. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor is the treatment of choice for neutropenia in PIDD, whereas hematopoietic cell transplantation is the only curative option. Summary The number of PIDDs associated with neutropenia has increased, as has our understanding of the range of phenotypes. Additional data and hypotheses have been generated helping to explain the diversity of presentations of neutropenia in PIDDs. PMID:23196894

  4. Expression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in naturally infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells: comparison of a standard co-culture technique with a newly developed microculture method.

    PubMed

    Eberlein, B; Baur, A; Neundorfer, M; Jahn, G

    1991-05-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 29 patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were cultured by two different methods. One was the standard co-culture technique, the other a newly developed microculture method. In this assay 10(6) PBMCs were cultivated in 250 microliters medium, no activating agents or allogeneic cells were present. P24 antigen production measured by this method was found in 7 out of 11 PBMC cultures of patients in the Walter Reed (WR) stage 1 or 2, whereas only 4 samples were positive by the co-culture procedure. Cultures from patients in the later stages of the disease (WR 5/6) showed a higher p24 production by the co-culture method than by the microculture assay. It is assumed that rapidly growing HIV strains can be better assessed by the co-culture method which may select for these strains. P24 expression can be more easily obtained by the microculture technique even in cases where slowly replicating strains may be present. In conclusion, results from the microculture procedure described may be a useful supplementation to findings observed by the co-culture method. PMID:1909827

  5. trans Activation of the simian virus 40 enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, P D; Rio, D C; Botchan, M R

    1986-01-01

    We describe experiments which demonstrated that the simian virus 40 (SV40) enhancer affects certain transcriptional units differently. We also found that a specific enhancer-transcriptional unit interaction can be regulated by trans-acting factors. Using transient assays, we examined the effects of the SV40 enhancer on herpesvirus thymidine kinase (tk) RNA levels when transcription was initiated either by the herpesvirus tk promoter or by an SV40 early promoter-tk fusion. We were unable to detect any effect of the enhancer on transcription from the tk promoter in CV-1 or HeLa cells. However, we found that the addition of T-antigen in trans allowed the enhancer to stimulate expression from the tk promoter. This induction by T-antigen did not require T-antigen-binding sites in cis and appeared to be an indirect effect. In contrast, tk expression from the SV40 early promoter fusion was greatly stimulated by the enhancer in CV-1 cells. Furthermore, in 293 cells the SV40 enhancer had only a marginal effect on the SV40 promoter-tk fusion, whereas it strongly stimulated tk expression from the tk promoter. Our results raise the possibility that the enhancer function may not show cell specificity per se; rather, the interaction between the enhancer and a specific gene may be responsible for cell specificity. We discuss these observations in terms of the SV40 early gene-to-late gene switch that occurs during SV40 lytic growth. Images PMID:3023880

  6. Complex regulation of simian virus 40 early-region transcription from different overlapping promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Buchman, A R; Fromm, M; Berg, P

    1984-01-01

    During simian virus 40 lytic infection there is a shift in initiation sites used to transcribe the early region, which encodes large T and small t antigens. Early in infection, transcription is initiated almost exclusively from sites that are downstream of the origin of DNA replication, whereas transcripts produced later are initiated mainly from sites on the upstream side. We have used mutant virus and specially constructed plasmid DNAs to investigate the factors regulating this transcriptional shift. In our studies simian virus 40 large T antigen appears to mediate the shift in transcription in two ways: first, T antigen represses transcription at the downstream sites late in infection by binding to the region where these RNAs are initiated; second, T antigen promotes transcription from sites on the upstream side by its ability to initiate replication or amplification, or both, of the template DNA. In addition, transcription from the downstream sites is heavily dependent on enhancer sequences located in the 72-base-pair repeat region, whereas transcription from the upstream sites late in infection does not require enhancer sequences. Thus, different overlapping promoters regulate simian virus 40 early-region expression in a manner that apparently coordinates the production of large T antigen with the increase in viral DNA. Images PMID:6092946

  7. Two distinct CCR5 domains can mediate coreceptor usage by human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Doranz, B J; Lu, Z H; Rucker, J; Zhang, T Y; Sharron, M; Cen, Y H; Wang, Z X; Guo, H H; Du, J G; Accavitti, M A; Doms, R W; Peiper, S C

    1997-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is the major fusion coreceptor for macrophage-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). To define the structures of CCR5 that can support envelope (Env)-mediated membrane fusion, we analyzed the activity of homologs, chimeras, and mutants of human CCR5 in a sensitive gene reporter cell-cell fusion assay. Simian, but not murine, homologs of CCR5 were fully active as HIV-1 fusion coreceptors. Chimeras between CCR5 and divergent chemokine receptors demonstrated the existence of two distinct regions of CCR5 that could be utilized for Env-mediated fusion, the amino-terminal domain and the extracellular loops. Dual-tropic Env proteins were particularly sensitive to alterations in the CCR5 amino-terminal domain, suggesting that this domain may play a pivotal role in the evolution of coreceptor usage in vivo. We identified individual residues in both functional regions, Asp-11, Lys-197, and Asp-276, that contribute to coreceptor function. Deletion of a highly conserved cytoplasmic motif rendered CCR5 incapable of signaling but did not abrogate its ability to function as a coreceptor, implying the independence of fusion and G-protein-mediated chemokine receptor signaling. Finally, we developed a novel monoclonal antibody to CCR5 to assist in future studies of CCR5 expression. PMID:9261347

  8. Expression of Nef Downregulates CXCR4, the Major Coreceptor of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, from the Surfaces of Target Cells and Thereby Enhances Resistance to Superinfection▿

    PubMed Central

    Venzke, Stephanie; Michel, Nico; Allespach, Ina; Fackler, Oliver T.; Keppler, Oliver T.

    2006-01-01

    Lentiviral Nef proteins are key factors for pathogenesis and are known to downregulate functionally important molecules, including CD4 and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I), from the surfaces of infected cells. Recently, we demonstrated that Nef reduces cell surface levels of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry coreceptor CCR5 (N. Michel, I. Allespach, S. Venzke, O. T. Fackler, and O. T. Keppler, Curr. Biol. 15:714-723, 2005). Here, we report that Nef downregulates the second major HIV-1 coreceptor, CXCR4, from the surfaces of HIV-infected primary CD4 T lymphocytes with efficiencies comparable to those of the natural CXCR4 ligand, stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha. Analysis of a panel of mutants of HIV-1SF2 Nef revealed that the viral protein utilized the same signature motifs for downmodulation of CXCR4 and MHC-I, including the proline-rich motif P73P76P79P82 and the acidic cluster motif E66E67E68E69. Expression of wild-type Nef, but not of specific Nef mutants, resulted in a perinuclear accumulation of the coreceptor. Remarkably, the carboxy terminus of CXCR4, which harbors the classical motifs critical for basal and ligand-induced receptor endocytosis, was dispensable for the Nef-mediated reduction of surface exposure. Functionally, the ability of Nef to simultaneously downmodulate CXCR4 and CD4 correlated with maximum-level protection of Nef-expressing target cells from fusion with cells exposing X4 HIV-1 envelopes. Furthermore, the Nef-mediated downregulation of CXCR4 alone on target T lymphocytes was sufficient to diminish cells' susceptibility to X4 HIV-1 virions at the entry step. The downregulation of chemokine coreceptors is a conserved activity of Nef to modulate infected cells, an important functional consequence of which is an enhanced resistance to HIV superinfection. PMID:16928758

  9. Subgenomic viral DNA species synthesized in simian cells by human and simian adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Daniell, E

    1981-01-01

    DNA synthesized after infection of simian tissue culture cells (BSC-1 or CV-1) with human adenovirus type 2 or 5 or with simian adenovirus 7 was characterized. It was demonstrated that as much as 40% of the virus-specific DNA in nuclei of infected monkey cells consists of subgenomic pieces. No subgenomic viral DNA species were detected in the nuclei of human (HeLa) cells infected with these adenovirus types. Restriction analysis showed that these short viral DNA molecules contain normal amounts of the sequences from the ends of the viral genome, whereas internal regions are underrepresented. The production of subgenomic DNAs is not correlated with semipermissive infection. Although adenovirus types 2 and 5 are restricted in monkey cells, these cells are fully permissive for simian adenovirus 7. HR404, an adenovirus type 5 mutant which is not restricted in monkey cells, produced the same percentage of subgenomic DNAs as did its wild type (restricted) parent, and coinfection of monkey cells with adenovirus type 5 DNAs. The array of predominant size classes among the heterogeneously sized short DNAs is serotype specific. Extensive plaque purification and comparison of wild-type adenovirus type 5 with several viral mutants indicated that the distribution of aberrant sizes of DNA is characteristic of the virus and not a result of random replicative errors and then enrichment of particular species. Images PMID:6261009

  10. Discovery of cyanovirin-N, a novel human immunodeficiency virus-inactivating protein that binds viral surface envelope glycoprotein gp120: potential applications to microbicide development.

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, M R; Gustafson, K R; McMahon, J B; Shoemaker, R H; O'Keefe, B R; Mori, T; Gulakowski, R J; Wu, L; Rivera, M I; Laurencot, C M; Currens, M J; Cardellina, J H; Buckheit, R W; Nara, P L; Pannell, L K; Sowder, R C; Henderson, L E

    1997-01-01

    We have isolated and sequenced a novel 11-kDa virucidal protein, named cyanovirin-N (CV-N), from cultures of the cyanobacterium (blue-green alga) Nostoc ellipsosporum. We also have produced CV-N recombinantly by expression of a corresponding DNA sequence in Escherichia coli. Low nanomolar concentrations of either natural or recombinant CV-N irreversibly inactivate diverse laboratory strains and primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 as well as strains of HIV type 2 and simian immunodeficiency virus. In addition, CV-N aborts cell-to-cell fusion and transmission of HIV-1 infection. Continuous, 2-day exposures of uninfected CEM-SS cells or peripheral blood lymphocytes to high concentrations (e.g., 9,000 nM) of CV-N were not lethal to these representative host cell types. The antiviral activity of CV-N is due, at least in part, to unique, high-affinity interactions of CV-N with the viral surface envelope glycoprotein gp120. The biological activity of CV-N is highly resistant to physicochemical denaturation, further enhancing its potential as an anti-HIV microbicide. PMID:9210678

  11. Addition of a Single gp120 Glycan Confers Increased Binding to Dendritic Cell-Specific ICAM-3-Grabbing Nonintegrin and Neutralization Escape to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Lue, James; Hsu, Mayla; Yang, David; Marx, Preston; Chen, Zhiwei; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia

    2002-01-01

    The potential role of dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) binding in human immunodeficiency virus transmission across the mucosal barrier was investigated by assessing the ability of simian-human immunodeficiency chimeric viruses (SHIVs) showing varying degrees of mucosal transmissibility to bind the DC-SIGN expressed on the surface of transfected cells. We found that gp120 of the highly transmissible, pathogenic CCR5-tropic SHIVSF162P3 bound human and rhesus DC-SIGN with an efficiency threefold or greater than that of gp120 of the nonpathogenic, poorly transmissible parental SHIVSF162, and this increase in binding to the DC-SIGN of the SHIVSF162P3 envelope gp120 translated into an enhancement of T-cell infection in trans. The presence of an additional glycan at the N-terminal base of the V2 loop of SHIVSF162P3 gp120 compared to that of the parental virus was shown to be responsible for the increase in binding to DC-SIGN. Interestingly, this glycan also conferred escape from autologous neutralization, raising the possibility that the modification occurred as a result of immune selection. Our data suggest that more-efficient binding of envelope gp120 to DC-SIGN could be relevant to the enhanced mucosal transmissibility of SHIVSF162P3 compared to that of parental SHIVSF162. PMID:12239306

  12. In vitro growth characteristics of simian T-lymphotropic virus type III.

    PubMed Central

    Kannagi, M; Yetz, J M; Letvin, N L

    1985-01-01

    The type C retrovirus simian T-lymphotropic virus type III (STLV-III) has been isolated recently from immunodeficient macaque monkeys at the New England Regional Primate Research Center. The present studies were done to define the in vitro growth characteristics of this agent. STLV-III replicates efficiently in interleukin 2-dependent T-cell cultures of macaque peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), less efficiently in such cultures of human and gibbon PBL, and inefficiently in baboon PBL. No replication, as assessed by measuring reverse transcriptase activity in these culture supernatants, could be detected in similarly maintained cultures of chimpanzee, squirrel monkey, and cotton-top tamarin PBL. Like the human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) virus, human T-cell lymphotropic virus III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV), STLV-III replicates in T4+ but not T8+ lymphocytes and its infection of macaque and human lymphocytes can be blocked with monoclonal anti-T4 antibodies. STLV-III differs from the human AIDS virus, however, in its apparent inability to grow in the Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B lymphocytes tested, the differing range of nonhuman primate T-cell populations that support its growth, and its less striking toxicity for T lymphocytes. These studies provide further characterization of an agent that will be extremely important in facilitating the development of vaccines and antiviral therapy for AIDS. PMID:2996002

  13. Spatial Analysis of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Cougars

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David C.; Waller, Lance A.; Biek, Roman

    2010-01-01

    The cougar (Puma concolor) is a large predatory feline found widely in the Americas that is susceptible to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a fast-evolving lentivirus found in wild feline species that is analogous to simian immunodeficiency viruses in wild primates and belongs to the same family of viruses as human immunodeficiency virus. FIV infection in cougars can lead to a weakened immune system that creates opportunities for other infecting agents. FIV prevalence and lineages have been studied previously in several areas in the western United States, but typically without spatially explicit statistical techniques. To describe the distribution of FIV in a sample of cougars located in the northern Rocky Mountain region of North America, we first used kernel density ratio estimation to map the log relative risk of FIV. The risk surface showed a significant cluster of FIV in northwestern Montana. We also used Bayesian cluster models for genetic data to investigate the spatial structure of the feline immunodeficiency virus with virus genetic sequence data. A result of the models was two spatially distinct FIV lineages that aligned considerably with an interstate highway in Montana. Our results suggest that the use of spatial information and models adds novel insight when investigating an infectious animal disease. The results also suggest that the influence of landscape features likely plays an important role in the spatiotemporal spread of an infectious disease within wildlife populations. PMID:21197421

  14. The Rev protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 counteracts the effect of an AU-rich negative element in the human papillomavirus type 1 late 3' untranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, W; Schwartz, S

    1995-01-01

    We have identified a sequence in the late 3' untranslated region of human papillomavirus type 1 mRNAs that acts posttranscriptionally to repress gene expression. Deletion analysis localized the inhibitory element to an AU-rich sequence between nucleotides 6958 and 6984 on the human papillomavirus type 1 genome. This sequence inhibits gene expression in an orientation-dependent manner. Upon transfection of eucaryotic cells with plasmids containing this sequence, approximately 4-fold-lower cytoplasmic mRNA levels and 64- to 128-fold-lower protein levels were produced compared with those produced by plasmids lacking the inhibitory sequence. Interestingly, providing the constitutive transport element of simian retrovirus type 1 in sense orientation counteracted inhibition exerted by the human papillomavirus type 1 sequence. Inhibition could also be overcome by the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev protein in trans and its target sequence, the Rev-responsive element, in cis. Rev is a nuclear protein and acts by promoting nuclear export of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mRNAs encoding structural proteins. Our results are consistent with a model for human papillomavirus type 1 late-gene expression in which mRNAs containing human papillomavirus type 1 inhibitory sequences enter a nonproductive route in the nucleus, resulting in inefficient mRNA utilization. Rev directs mRNA containing inhibitory sequences to a productive route by interacting with the Rev-responsive element. PMID:7707519

  15. The effects of 5-fluorouracil and doxorubicin on expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Panozzo, J.; Akan, E.; Griffiths, T.D.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1996-03-01

    Previous work by many groups has documented induction of the HIV-LTR following exposure of cells to ultraviolet light and other DNA damaging agents. Our experiments set out to determine the relative activation or repression of the HIV-LTR in response to two classes of chemotherapeutic agents: Doxorubicin is a DNA-damage inducing agent, and 5-fluorouracil has an antimetabolic mode of action. Using HeLa cells stably transfected with a construct in which HIV-LTR drives expression of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene, we demonstrated an up to 10-fold induction following doxorubicin treatment in 24 h post-treatment. This induction was repressed by treatment with salicylic acid, suggesting a role for prostaglandin/cyclo-oxygenase pathways and/or NFKB in the inductive response. Induction by 5-fluorouracil, in contrast, was more modest (two-fold at most) though it was consistently elevated over controls.

  16. Feline Tetherin Is Characterized by a Short N-Terminal Region and Is Counteracted by the Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Celestino, Michele; Calistri, Arianna; Del Vecchio, Claudia; Salata, Cristiano; Chiuppesi, Flavia; Pistello, Mauro; Borsetti, Alessandra; Palù, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Tetherin (BST2) is the host cell factor that blocks the particle release of some enveloped viruses. Two putative feline tetherin proteins differing at the level of the N-terminal coding region have recently been described and tested for their antiviral activity. By cloning and comparing the two reported feline tetherins (called here cBST2504 and cBST2*) and generating specific derivative mutants, this study provides evidence that feline tetherin has a shorter intracytoplasmic domain than those of other known homologues. The minimal tetherin promoter was identified and assayed for its ability to drive tetherin expression in an alpha interferon-inducible manner. We also demonstrated that cBST2504 is able to dimerize, is localized at the cellular membrane, and impairs human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particle release, regardless of the presence of the Vpu antagonist accessory protein. While cBST2504 failed to restrict wild-type feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) egress, FIV mutants, bearing a frameshift at the level of the envelope-encoding region, were potently blocked. The transient expression of the FIV envelope glycoprotein was able to rescue mutant particle release from feline tetherin-positive cells but did not antagonize human BST2 activity. Moreover, cBST2504 was capable of specifically immunoprecipitating the FIV envelope glycoprotein. Finally, cBST2504 also exerted its function on HIV-2 ROD10 and on the simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239. Taken together, these results show that feline tetherin does indeed have a short N-terminal region and that the FIV envelope glycoprotein is the predominant factor counteracting tetherin restriction. PMID:22514338

  17. Downregulation of the T-Cell Receptor by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Nef Does Not Protect against Disease Progression▿

    PubMed Central

    Feldmann, Jérôme; Leligdowicz, Aleksandra; Jaye, Assan; Dong, Tao; Whittle, Hilton; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic immune activation is thought to play a major role in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pathogenesis, but the relative contributions of multiple factors to immune activation are not known. One proposed mechanism to protect against immune activation is the ability of Nef proteins from some HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus strains to downregulate the T-cell receptor (TCR)-CD3 complex of the infected cell, thereby reducing the potential for deleterious activation. HIV type 1 (HIV-1) Nef has lost this property. In contrast to HIV-1, HIV-2 infection is characterized by a marked disparity in the disease course, with most individuals maintaining a normal life span. In this study, we examined the relationship between the ability of HIV-2 Nef proteins to downregulate the TCR and immune activation, comparing progressors and nonprogressors. Representative Nef variants were isolated from 28 HIV-2-infected individuals. We assessed their abilities to downregulate the TCR from the surfaces of CD4 T cells. In the same individuals, the activation of peripheral lymphocytes was evaluated by measurement of the expression levels of HLA-DR and CD38. We observed a striking correlation of the TCR downregulation efficiency of HIV-2 Nef variants with immune activation in individuals with a low viral load. This strongly suggests that Nef expression can influence the activation state of the immune systems of infected individuals. However, the efficiency of TCR downregulation by Nef was not reduced in progressing individuals, showing that TCR downregulation does not protect against progression in HIV-2 infection. PMID:19812166

  18. Recurrent Infections May Signal Immunodeficiencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search AAAAI Breadcrumb navigation Home ▸ Conditions & Treatments ▸ Library ▸ Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Library ▸ Recurrent Infections May Signal Immunodeficiencies Share | Recurrent Infections May Signal Immunodeficiencies This article has been reviewed by Thanai Pongdee, MD, FAAAAI ...

  19. Simian virus-40 as a gene therapy vector.

    PubMed

    Vera, Maria; Fortes, Puri

    2004-05-01

    Simian virus-40 (SV40), an icosahedral papovavirus, has recently been modified to serve as a gene delivery vector. Recombinant SV40 vectors (rSV40) are good candidates for gene transfer, as they display some unique features: SV40 is a well-known virus, nonreplicative vectors are easy-to-make, and can be produced in titers of 10(12) IU/ml. They also efficiently transduce both resting and dividing cells, deliver persistent transgene expression to a wide range of cell types, and are nonimmunogenic. Present disadvantages of rSV40 vectors for gene therapy are a small cloning capacity and the possible risks related to random integration of the viral genome into the host genome. Considerable efforts have been devoted to modifing this virus and setting up protocols for viral production. Preliminary therapeutic results obtained both in tissue culture cells and in animal models for heritable and acquired diseases indicate that rSV40 vectors are promising gene transfer vehicles. This article reviews the work performed with SV40 viruses as recombinant vectors for gene transfer. A summary of the structure, genomic organization, and life cycle of wild-type SV40 viruses is presented. Furthermore, the strategies utilized for the development, production, and titering of rSV40 vectors are discussed. Last, the therapeutic applications developed to date are highlighted. PMID:15169607

  20. Detection of virus-specific RNA in simian sarcoma-leukemia virus-infected cells in in situ hybridization to viral complementary DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, S L; Gallo, R C; Miller, N R

    1979-01-01

    An in situ molecular hybridization system which will detect retrovirus RNA in the cytoplasm of individual virus-infected cells has been developed. The technique was applied to cells infected with simian sarcoma-leukemia virus, where the virus-specific RNA was detected by hybridization to simian sarcoma-leukemia virus 3H-labeled complementary DNA. The system is useful for detecting viral RNA-containing cells in the presence of an excess of virus-negative cells and for determining which type of cell in a heterogenous population is expressing viral RNA. Images PMID:224220

  1. Large-T-antigen-p53 complex formation is not cold sensitive in a cold-sensitive transformant induced by simian virus 40 mutant tsA1499.

    PubMed Central

    Bouck, N; Fikes, J; Rundell, M K

    1984-01-01

    F111 rat cells transformed by simian virus 40 mutant tsA1499 are cold sensitive for the expression of transformation. Yet, unlike F111 cells transformed by tsA58, they do not lose the ability to stabilize the transformation-associated host cell protein p53 at the temperature at which transformation is extinguished. Images PMID:6321780

  2. Expression Profiles of Vpx/Vpr Proteins Are Co-related with the Primate Lentiviral Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Yosuke; Miyake, Ariko; Doi, Naoya; Sasada, Hikari; Miyazaki, Yasuyuki; Adachi, Akio; Nomaguchi, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Viruses of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) and some simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) lineages carry a unique accessory protein called Vpx. Vpx is essential or critical for viral replication in natural target cells such as macrophages and T lymphocytes. We have previously shown that a poly-proline motif (PPM) located at the C-terminal region of Vpx is required for its efficient expression in two strains of HIV-2 and SIVmac, and that the Vpx expression levels of the two clones are significantly different. Notably, the PPM sequence is conserved and confined to Vpx and Vpr proteins derived from certain lineages of HIV-2/SIVs. In this study, Vpx/Vpr proteins from diverse primate lentiviral lineages were experimentally and phylogenetically analyzed to obtain the general expression picture in cells. While both the level and PPM-dependency of Vpx/Vpr expression in transfected cells varied among viral strains, each viral group, based on Vpx/Vpr amino acid sequences, was found to exhibit a characteristic expression profile. Moreover, phylogenetic tree analyses on Gag and Vpx/Vpr proteins gave essentially the same results. Taken together, our study described here suggests that each primate lentiviral lineage may have developed a unique expression pattern of Vpx/Vpr proteins for adaptation to its hostile cellular and species environments in the process of viral evolution. PMID:27536295

  3. Expression Profiles of Vpx/Vpr Proteins Are Co-related with the Primate Lentiviral Lineage.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yosuke; Miyake, Ariko; Doi, Naoya; Sasada, Hikari; Miyazaki, Yasuyuki; Adachi, Akio; Nomaguchi, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Viruses of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) and some simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) lineages carry a unique accessory protein called Vpx. Vpx is essential or critical for viral replication in natural target cells such as macrophages and T lymphocytes. We have previously shown that a poly-proline motif (PPM) located at the C-terminal region of Vpx is required for its efficient expression in two strains of HIV-2 and SIVmac, and that the Vpx expression levels of the two clones are significantly different. Notably, the PPM sequence is conserved and confined to Vpx and Vpr proteins derived from certain lineages of HIV-2/SIVs. In this study, Vpx/Vpr proteins from diverse primate lentiviral lineages were experimentally and phylogenetically analyzed to obtain the general expression picture in cells. While both the level and PPM-dependency of Vpx/Vpr expression in transfected cells varied among viral strains, each viral group, based on Vpx/Vpr amino acid sequences, was found to exhibit a characteristic expression profile. Moreover, phylogenetic tree analyses on Gag and Vpx/Vpr proteins gave essentially the same results. Taken together, our study described here suggests that each primate lentiviral lineage may have developed a unique expression pattern of Vpx/Vpr proteins for adaptation to its hostile cellular and species environments in the process of viral evolution. PMID:27536295

  4. Frequent transmission of immunodeficiency viruses among bobcats and pumas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franklin, S.P.; Troyer, J.L.; TerWee, J.A.; Lyren, L.M.; Boyce, W.M.; Riley, S.P.D.; Roelke, M.E.; Crooks, K.R.; VandeWoude, S.

    2007-01-01

    With the exception of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which emerged in humans after cross-species transmissions of simian immunodeficiency viruses from nonhuman primates, immunodeficiency viruses of the family Lentiviridae represent species-specific viruses that rarely cross species barriers to infect new hosts. Among the Felidae, numerous immunodeficiency-like lentiviruses have been documented, but only a few cross-species transmissions have been recorded, and these have not been perpetuated in the recipient species. Lentivirus seroprevalence was determined for 79 bobcats (Lynx rufus) and 31 pumas (Puma concolor) from well-defined populations in Southern California. Partial genomic sequences were subsequently obtained from 18 and 12 seropositive bobcats and pumas, respectively. Genotypes were analyzed for phylogenic relatedness and genotypic composition among the study set and archived feline lentivirus sequences. This investigation of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in bobcats and pumas of Southern California provides evidence that cross-species infection has occurred frequently among these animals. The data suggest that transmission has occurred in multiple locations and are most consistent with the spread of the virus from bobcats to pumas. Although the ultimate causes remain unknown, these transmission events may occur as a result of puma predation on bobcats, a situation similar to that which fostered transmission of HIV to humans, and likely represent the emergence of a lentivirus with relaxed barriers to cross-species transmission. This unusual observation provides a valuable opportunity to evaluate the ecological, behavioral, and molecular conditions that favor repeated transmissions and persistence of lentivirus between species. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Molecular Ecology and Natural History of Simian Foamy Virus Infection in Wild-Living Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weimin; Worobey, Michael; Li, Yingying; Keele, Brandon F.; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Guo, Yuanyuan; Goepfert, Paul A.; Santiago, Mario L.; Ndjango, Jean-Bosco N.; Neel, Cecile; Clifford, Stephen L.; Sanz, Crickette; Kamenya, Shadrack; Wilson, Michael L.; Pusey, Anne E.; Gross-Camp, Nicole; Boesch, Christophe; Smith, Vince; Zamma, Koichiro; Huffman, Michael A.; Mitani, John C.; Watts, David P.; Peeters, Martine; Shaw, George M.; Switzer, William M.; Sharp, Paul M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2008-01-01

    Identifying microbial pathogens with zoonotic potential in wild-living primates can be important to human health, as evidenced by human immunodeficiency viruses types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) and Ebola virus. Simian foamy viruses (SFVs) are ancient retroviruses that infect Old and New World monkeys and apes. Although not known to cause disease, these viruses are of public health interest because they have the potential to infect humans and thus provide a more general indication of zoonotic exposure risks. Surprisingly, no information exists concerning the prevalence, geographic distribution, and genetic diversity of SFVs in wild-living monkeys and apes. Here, we report the first comprehensive survey of SFVcpz infection in free-ranging chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) using newly developed, fecal-based assays. Chimpanzee fecal samples (n = 724) were collected at 25 field sites throughout equatorial Africa and tested for SFVcpz-specific antibodies (n = 706) or viral nucleic acids (n = 392). SFVcpz infection was documented at all field sites, with prevalence rates ranging from 44% to 100%. In two habituated communities, adult chimpanzees had significantly higher SFVcpz infection rates than infants and juveniles, indicating predominantly horizontal rather than vertical transmission routes. Some chimpanzees were co-infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVcpz); however, there was no evidence that SFVcpz and SIVcpz were epidemiologically linked. SFVcpz nucleic acids were recovered from 177 fecal samples, all of which contained SFVcpz RNA and not DNA. Phylogenetic analysis of partial gag (616 bp), pol-RT (717 bp), and pol-IN (425 bp) sequences identified a diverse group of viruses, which could be subdivided into four distinct SFVcpz lineages according to their chimpanzee subspecies of origin. Within these lineages, there was evidence of frequent superinfection and viral recombination. One chimpanzee was infected by a foamy virus from a Cercopithecus

  6. SIV Infection-Mediated Changes in Gastrointestinal Bacterial Microbiome and Virome Are Associated with Immunodeficiency and Prevented by Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Handley, Scott A; Desai, Chandni; Zhao, Guoyan; Droit, Lindsay; Monaco, Cynthia L; Schroeder, Andrew C; Nkolola, Joseph P; Norman, Megan E; Miller, Andrew D; Wang, David; Barouch, Dan H; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    AIDS caused by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection is associated with gastrointestinal disease, systemic immune activation, and, in cross-sectional studies, changes in the enteric virome. Here we performed a longitudinal study of a vaccine cohort to define the natural history of changes in the fecal metagenome in SIV-infected monkeys. Matched rhesus macaques were either uninfected or intrarectally challenged with SIV, with a subset receiving the Ad26 vaccine, an adenovirus vector expressing the viral Env/Gag/Pol antigens. Progression of SIV infection to AIDS was associated with increased detection of potentially pathogenic viruses and bacterial enteropathogens. Specifically, adenoviruses were associated with an increased incidence of gastrointestinal disease and AIDS-related mortality. Viral and bacterial enteropathogens were largely absent from animals protected by the vaccine. These data suggest that the SIV-associated gastrointestinal disease is associated with the presence of both viral and bacterial enteropathogens and that protection against SIV infection by vaccination prevents enteropathogen emergence. PMID:26962943

  7. High Rate of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Infections in Wild Chimpanzees in Northeastern Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Boué, Vanina; Locatelli, Sabrina; Boucher, Floriane; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Butel, Christelle; Esteban, Amandine; Okouga, Alain-Prince; Ndoungouet, Alphonse; Motsch, Peggy; Le Flohic, Guillaume; Ngari, Paul; Prugnolle, Franck; Ollomo, Benjamin; Rouet, François; Liégeois, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of HIV-1 groups M, N, O, and P is the result of four independent cross-species transmissions between chimpanzees (cpz) and gorillas (gor) from central/south Cameroon and humans respectively. Although the first two SIVcpz were identified in wild-born captive chimpanzees in Gabon in 1989, no study has been conducted so far in wild chimpanzees in Gabon. To document the SIVcpz infection rate, genetic diversity, and routes of virus transmission, we analyzed 1458 faecal samples collected in 16 different locations across the country, and we conducted follow-up missions in two of them. We found 380 SIV antibody positive samples in 6 different locations in the north and northeast. We determined the number of individuals collected by microsatellite analysis and obtained an adjusted SIV prevalence of 39.45%. We performed parental analysis to investigate viral spread between and within communities and found that SIVs were epidemiologically linked and were transmitted by both horizontal and vertical routes. We amplified pol and gp41 fragments and obtained 57 new SIVcpzPtt strains from three sites. All strains, but one, clustered together within a specific phylogeographic clade. Given that these SIV positive samples have been collected nearby villages and that humans continue to encroach in ape’s territories, the emergence of a new HIV in this area needs to be considered. PMID:26389939

  8. High Rate of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Infections in Wild Chimpanzees in Northeastern Gabon.

    PubMed

    Boué, Vanina; Locatelli, Sabrina; Boucher, Floriane; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Butel, Christelle; Esteban, Amandine; Okouga, Alain-Prince; Ndoungouet, Alphonse; Motsch, Peggy; Le Flohic, Guillaume; Ngari, Paul; Prugnolle, Franck; Ollomo, Benjamin; Rouet, François; Liégeois, Florian

    2015-09-01

    The emergence of HIV-1 groups M, N, O, and P is the result of four independent cross-species transmissions between chimpanzees (cpz) and gorillas (gor) from central/south Cameroon and humans respectively. Although the first two SIVcpz were identified in wild-born captive chimpanzees in Gabon in 1989, no study has been conducted so far in wild chimpanzees in Gabon. To document the SIVcpz infection rate, genetic diversity, and routes of virus transmission, we analyzed 1458 faecal samples collected in 16 different locations across the country, and we conducted follow-up missions in two of them. We found 380 SIV antibody positive samples in 6 different locations in the north and northeast. We determined the number of individuals collected by microsatellite analysis and obtained an adjusted SIV prevalence of 39.45%. We performed parental analysis to investigate viral spread between and within communities and found that SIVs were epidemiologically linked and were transmitted by both horizontal and vertical routes. We amplified pol and gp41 fragments and obtained 57 new SIVcpzPtt strains from three sites. All strains, but one, clustered together within a specific phylogeographic clade. Given that these SIV positive samples have been collected nearby villages and that humans continue to encroach in ape's territories, the emergence of a new HIV in this area needs to be considered. PMID:26389939

  9. Early depletion of proliferating B cells of germinal center in rapidly progressive simian immunodeficiency virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhiqiang . E-mail: zhiqiang_zhang@merck.com; Casimiro, Danilo R.; Schleif, William A.; Chen, Minchun; Citron, Michael; Davies, Mary-Ellen; Burns, Janine; Liang, Xiaoping; Fu, Tong-Ming; Handt, Larry; Emini, Emilio A.; Shiver, John W.

    2007-05-10

    Lack of virus specific antibody response is commonly observed in both HIV-1-infected humans and SIV-infected monkeys with rapid disease progression. However, the mechanisms underlying this important observation still remain unclear. In a titration study of a SIVmac239 viral stock, three out of six animals with viral inoculation rapidly progressed to AIDS within 5 months. Unexpectedly, there was no obvious depletion of CD4{sup +} T cells in both peripheral and lymph node (LN) compartments in these animals. Instead, progressive depletion of proliferating B cells and disruption of the follicular dendritic cell (FDC) network in germinal centers (GC) was evident in the samples collected at as early as 20 days after viral challenge. This coincided with undetectable, or weak and transient, virus-specific antibody responses over the course of infection. In situ hybridization of SIV RNA in the LN samples revealed a high frequency of SIV productively infected cells and large amounts of accumulated viral RNA in the GCs in these animals. Early severe depletion of GC proliferating B cells and disruption of the FDC network may thus result in an inability to mount a virus-specific antibody response in rapid progressors, which has been shown to contribute to accelerated disease progression of SIV infection.

  10. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis : CSF Biomarkers of SIV Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Bissel, Stephanie J; Kofler, Julia; Nyaundi, Julia; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Wiley, Clayton A

    2016-06-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has led to increased survival of HIV-infected patients but also increased prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. We previously identified YKL40 as a potential cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker of lentiviral central nervous system (CNS) disease in HIV-infected patients and in the macaque model of HIV encephalitis. The aim of this study was to define the specificity and sensitivity along with the predictive value of YKL40 as a biomarker of encephalitis and to assess its relationship to CSF viral load. CSF YKL40 and SIV RNA concentrations were analyzed over the course of infection in 19 SIV-infected pigtailed macaques and statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship to encephalitis. Using these relationships, CSF alterations of 31 neuroimmune markers were studied pre-infection, during acute and asymptomatic infection, at the onset of encephalitis, and at necropsy. YKL40 CSF concentrations above 1122 ng/ml were found to be a specific and sensitive biomarker for the presence of encephalitis and were highly correlated with CSF viral load. Macaques that developed encephalitis had evidence of chronic CNS immune activation during early, asymptomatic, and end stages of infection. At the onset of encephalitis, CSF demonstrated a rise of neuroimmune markers associated with macrophage recruitment, activation and interferon response. CSF YKL40 concentration and viral load are valuable biomarkers to define the onset of encephalitis. Chronic CNS immune activation precedes the development of encephalitis while some responses suggest protection from CNS lentiviral disease. PMID:27059917

  11. Simian immunodeficiency virus infection and immune responses in the pig-tailed macaque testis.

    PubMed

    Winnall, Wendy R; Lloyd, Sarah B; De Rose, Robert; Alcantara, Sheilajen; Amarasena, Thakshila H; Hedger, Mark P; Girling, Jane E; Kent, Stephen J

    2015-03-01

    The testis is a site of immune privilege in rodents, and there is evidence that T cell responses are also suppressed in the primate testis. Local immunosuppression is a potential mechanism for HIV persistence in tissue reservoirs that few studies have examined. The response of the pig-tailed macaque testis to SIVmac239 infection was characterized to test this possibility. Testes were surgically removed during early-chronic (10 wk) and late-chronic (24-30 wk) SIV infection in 4 animals and compared with those from 7 uninfected animals. SIV infection caused only minor disruption to the seminiferous epithelium without marked evidence of inflammation or consistent changes in total intratesticular leukocyte numbers. Infection also led to an increase in the relative proportion of testicular effector memory CD8(+) T cell numbers and a corresponding reduction in central memory CD4(+) T cells. A decrease in the relative proportion of resident-type CD163(+) macrophages and DCs was also observed. SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells were detectable in the testis, 10-11 wk after infection by staining with SIV Gag-specific or Tat-specific MHC-I tetramers. However, testicular CD8(+) T cells from the infected animals had suppressed cytokine responses to mitogen activation. These results support the possibility that local immunosuppression in the testis may be restricting the ability of T cells to respond to SIV or HIV infection. Local immunosuppression in the testis may be an underexplored mechanism allowing HIV persistence. PMID:25605872

  12. Long-Acting Integrase Inhibitor Protects Macaques from Intrarectal Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Chasity D.; Spreen, William R.; Mohri, Hiroshi; Moss, Lee; Ford, Susan; Gettie, Agegnehu; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Bohm, Rudolf P.; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Hong, Zhi; Markowitz, Martin; Ho, David D.

    2015-01-01

    GSK1265744 (GSK744) is an integrase strand-transfer inhibitor that has been formulated as a long-acting (LA) injectable suitable for monthly to quarterly clinical administration. GSK744 LA was administered at two time points 4 weeks apart beginning 1 week before virus administration, and macaques were challenged weekly for 8 weeks. GSK744 LA, at plasma concentrations achievable with quarterly injections in humans, protected all animals against repeated low-dose challenges. In a second experiment, macaques were given GSK744 LA 1 week before virus administration and challenged repeatedly until infection occurred. Protection decreased over time and correlated with the plasma drug levels. With a quarterly dosing schedule in humans, our results suggest that GSK744 LA could potentially decrease adherence problems associated with daily preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP). PMID:24594934

  13. A discrete element 3' of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 mRNA initiation sites mediates transcriptional activation by an HIV trans activator

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobovits, A.; Smith, D.H.; Jakobovits, E.B.; Capon, D.J.

    1988-06-01

    An important point of regulation in the reproductive growth and latency of the human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV, respectively) is provided by virally encoded trans-activators (tat), proteins capable of dramatically increasing viral gene expression. The mechanism of this autostimulatory pathway has remained unclear, however, with substantial effects having been reported at the level of either mRNA accumulation, translational efficiency, or both. The authors' previous findings indicated that trans-activation results primarily from induction of RNA levels but could not distinguish between the roles of transcriptional rate, RNA stabilization, and RNA transport in this event. In addition, the boundaries of tat-responding elements, which would be valuable in elucidating the mode of tat action, are not precisely known. In this study, HIV-1 and HIV-2 long terminal repeat-directed expression was characterized by using in an vitro nuclear transcription assay to clarify this mechanism, and a detailed mutational analysis was undertaken to localize precisely the sequences participating in this process. Two key findings were revealed: an increased transcription rate was the primary event in tat-mediated activation of HIV-1 and HIV-2, and trans-activation was impaired by mutations in two regions, the TATA box and sequences between +19 to +42, a region lacking enhancer activity. These results implicate a discrete 3' regulatory element in the transcriptional activation of the HIVs.

  14. Induction of cellular deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in butyrate-treated cells by simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, S.; Diamond, L.; Baserga, R.

    1981-11-01

    Sodium butyrate (3mM) inhibited the entry into the S phase of quiescent 3T3 cells stimulated by serum, but had no effect on the accumulation of cellular ribonucleic acid. Simian virus 40 infection or manual microinjection of cloned fragments from the simian virus 40 A gene caused quiescent 3T3 cells to enter the S phase even in the presence of butyrate. NGI cells, a line of 3T3 cells transformed by simian virus 40, grew vigorously in 3 mM butyrate. Homokaryons were formed between G/sub 1/ and S-phase 3T3 cells. Butyrate inhibited the induction of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis that usually occurs in G/sub 1/ nuclei when G/sub 1/ cells are fused with S-phase cells. However, when G/sub 1/ 3T3 cells were fused with exponentially growing NGI cells, the 3T3 nuclei were induced to enter deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis. In tsAF8 cells, a ribonucleic acid polymerase II mutant that stops in the G/sub 1/ phase of the cell cycle, no temporal sequence was demonstrated between the butyrate block and the temperature-sensitive block. These results confirm previous reports that certain virally coded proteins can induce cell deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in the absence of cellular functions that are required by serum-stimulated cells. The author's interpretation of these data is that butyrate inhibited cell growth by inhibiting the expression of genes required for the G/sub o/ ..-->.. G/sub 1/ ..-->.. S transition and that the product of the simian virus 40 A gene overrode this inhibition by providing all of the necessary functions for the entry into the S phase.

  15. Susceptibilities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 enzyme and viral variants expressing multiple resistance-engendering amino acid substitutions to reserve transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, V W; Emini, E A; Schleif, W A; Condra, J H; Schneider, C L; Long, W J; Wolfgang, J A; Graham, D J; Gotlib, L; Schlabach, A J

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the potential that multiply resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants may arise during combination nucleoside and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor therapy, we constructed a series of mutant reverse transcriptase enzymes and viruses that coexpressed various combinations of resistance-associated amino acid substitutions. Substitutions at residues 100 (Leu-->Ile) and 181 (Tyr-->Cys), which mediate resistance to the nonnucleosides, suppressed resistance to 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) when coexpressed with AZT-specific substitutions. However, a number of viral variants that exhibited significantly reduced susceptibilities to both classes of inhibitors were constructed. PMID:7522428

  16. Adaptation of Subtype A Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope to Pig-Tailed Macaque Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Humes, Daryl; Overbaugh, Julie

    2011-01-01

    The relevance of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection of macaques to HIV-1 infection in humans depends on how closely SHIVs mimic HIV-1 transmission, pathogenesis, and diversity. Circulating HIV-1 strains are predominantly subtypes C and A and overwhelmingly require CCR5 for entry, yet most SHIVs incorporate CXCR4-using subtype B envelopes (Envs). While pathogenic subtype C-based SHIVs have been constructed, the subtype A-based SHIVs (SHIV-As) constructed to date have been unable to replicate in macaque cells. To understand the barriers to SHIV-A replication in macaque cells, HIVAQ23/SIVvif was constructed by engineering a CCR5-tropic subtype A provirus to express SIV vif, which counters the macaque APOBEC3G restriction. HIVAQ23/SIVvif replicated poorly in pig-tailed macaque (Ptm) lymphocytes, but viruses were adapted to Ptm lymphocytes. Two independent mutations in gp120, G312V (V3 loop) and A204E (C2 region), were identified that increased peak virus levels by >100-fold. Introduction of G312V and A204E to multiple subtype A Envs and substitution of G312 and A204 with other residues increased entry into Ptm cells by 10- to 100-fold. G312V and A204E Env variants continued to require CCR5 for entry but were up to 50- and 200-fold more sensitive to neutralization by IgG1b12 and soluble CD4 and had a 5- to 50-fold increase in their ability to utilize Ptm CD4 compared to their wild-type counterparts. These findings identify the inefficient use of Ptm CD4 as an unappreciated restriction to subtype A HIV-1 replication in Ptm cells and reveal amino acid changes to gp120 that can overcome this barrier. PMID:21325401

  17. ANRIL/CDKN2B-AS shows two-stage clade-specific evolution and becomes conserved after transposon insertions in simians

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes identified in mammals have multiple exons and functional domains, allowing them to bind to polycomb proteins, DNA methyltransferases, and specific DNA sequences to regulate genome methylation. Little is known about the origin and evolution of lncRNAs. ANRIL/CDKN2B-AS consists of 19 exons on human chromosome 9p21 and regulates the expression of three cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKN2A/ARF/CDKN2B). Results ANRIL/CDKN2B-AS originated in placental mammals, obtained additional exons during mammalian evolution but gradually lost them during rodent evolution, and reached 19 exons only in simians. ANRIL lacks splicing signals in mammals. In simians, multiple transposons were inserted and transformed into exons of the ANRIL gene, after which ANRIL became highly conserved. A further survey reveals that multiple transposons exist in many lncRNAs. Conclusions ANRIL shows a two-stage, clade-specific evolutionary process and is fully developed only in simians. The domestication of multiple transposons indicates an impressive pattern of “evolutionary tinkering” and is likely to be important for ANRIL’s structure and function. The evolution of lncRNAs and that of transposons may be highly co-opted in primates. Many lncRNAs may be functional only in simians. PMID:24225082

  18. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... incisions made in the mother’s abdomen and uterus. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Immune System: ...

  19. Recursion-based depletion of human immunodeficiency virus-specific naive CD4(+) T cells may facilitate persistent viral replication and chronic viraemia leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Okada, Seiji; Matano, Tetsuro

    2016-09-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy has made human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection a controllable disease, it is still unclear how viral replication persists in untreated patients and causes CD4(+) T-cell depletion leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in several years. Theorists tried to explain it with the diversity threshold theory in which accumulated mutations in the HIV genome make the virus so diverse that the immune system will no longer be able to recognize all the variants and fail to control the viraemia. Although the theory could apply to a number of cases, macaque AIDS models using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) have shown that failed viral control at the set point is not always associated with T-cell escape mutations. Moreover, even monkeys without a protective major histocompatibility complex (MHC) allele can contain replication of a super infected SIV following immunization with a live-attenuated SIV vaccine, while those animals are not capable of fighting primary SIV infection. Here we propose a recursion-based virus-specific naive CD4(+) T-cell depletion hypothesis through thinking on what may happen in individuals experiencing primary immunodeficiency virus infection. This could explain the mechanism for impairment of virus-specific immune response in the course of HIV infection. PMID:27515208

  20. Disrupted Homeostatic Cytokines Expression in Secondary Lymph Organs during HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lintao; Gao, Jianbao; Li, Yan; Liu, Lina; Yang, Yang; Guo, Bo; Zhu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Research has firmly established that infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) leads to structural disruption in secondary lymph organs (SLOs) and that IL-7 expression by SLOs is downregulated in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaques. However, the foregoing has not been demonstrated in HIV-infected patients. As well, SLO-produced chemokines and cytokines, other than IL-7, have not been tested. In this study, SLOs in HIV-infected patients exhibit decreased levels of lymphoid cytokines, such as IL-7 and C–C motif chemokine ligand 21 (CCL21), due to lower expression of lymphotoxin (LT)-β. Previous research has shown that LT-β is produced mainly by CD4+T cells in rhesus macaques, while our study found the same level of LT-β expressed by CD4+T and CD8+T cells in humans. CD8+T cells substitute for depleted CD4+T cells LT-β production. Only the total number of CD3+T cells can account for the majority of LT-β in human SLOs. This study indicates a possible mechanism and a potential target for improvement of SLO function in HIV-infected patients, a novel adjuvant therapy for AIDS. PMID:27011165

  1. Retroviruses Pseudotyped with the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Protein Efficiently Infect Cells Expressing Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael J.; Dorfman, Tatyana; Li, Wenhui; Wong, Swee Kee; Li, Yanhan; Kuhn, Jens H.; Coderre, James; Vasilieva, Natalya; Han, Zhongchao; Greenough, Thomas C.; Farzan, Michael; Choe, Hyeryun

    2004-01-01

    Infection of receptor-bearing cells by coronaviruses is mediated by their spike (S) proteins. The coronavirus (SARS-CoV) that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) infects cells expressing the receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Here we show that codon optimization of the SARS-CoV S-protein gene substantially enhanced S-protein expression. We also found that two retroviruses, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and murine leukemia virus, both expressing green fluorescent protein and pseudotyped with SARS-CoV S protein or S-protein variants, efficiently infected HEK293T cells stably expressing ACE2. Infection mediated by an S-protein variant whose cytoplasmic domain had been truncated and altered to include a fragment of the cytoplasmic tail of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein was, in both cases, substantially more efficient than that mediated by wild-type S protein. Using S-protein-pseudotyped SIV, we found that the enzymatic activity of ACE2 made no contribution to S-protein-mediated infection. Finally, we show that a soluble and catalytically inactive form of ACE2 potently blocked infection by S-protein-pseudotyped retrovirus and by SARS-CoV. These results permit studies of SARS-CoV entry inhibitors without the use of live virus and suggest a candidate therapy for SARS. PMID:15367630

  2. In Vivo Cellular Tropism of Gorilla Simian Foamy Virus in Blood of Infected Humans

    PubMed Central

    Betsem, Edouard; Montange, Thomas; Buseyne, Florence; Gessain, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Simian foamy viruses (SFV) are retroviruses that are widespread among nonhuman primates. SFV can be transmitted to humans, giving rise to a persistent infection. Only a few data are available concerning the distribution of SFV in human blood cells. Here we purified blood mononuclear cell subsets from 11 individuals infected with a Gorilla gorilla SFV strain and quantified SFV DNA levels by quantitative PCR. SFV DNA was detected in the majority of the CD8+, CD4+, and CD19+ lymphocyte samples and rarely in CD14+ monocyte and CD56+ NK lymphocyte samples. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) SFV DNA counts were 16.0 (11.0 to 49.8), 11.3 (5.9 to 28.3), and 17.2 (2.0 to 25.2) copies/105 cells in CD8+ T lymphocytes, CD4+ T lymphocytes, and CD19+ B lymphocytes, respectively. In the CD4 compartment, SFV DNA was detected in both memory and naive CD4+ T lymphocytes. SFV DNA levels in CD4+ T cells were positively correlated with the duration of the infection. Our study shows with a quantitative method that CD8+, CD4+, and B lymphocytes are major cellular targets of SFV in the blood of infected humans. IMPORTANCE Investigation of SFV infections in humans is important due to the origin of human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and human T cell lymphotropic viruses (HTLV) from cross-species transmission of their simian counterparts to humans. Surprisingly little is known about many aspects of the biology of SFV in infected humans, including quantitative data concerning the cellular targets of SFV in vivo. Here we show that the distribution of SFV DNA among the different leukocyte populations is not homogeneous and that viral load in CD4+ T lymphocytes is correlated with the duration of infection. These new data will help in understanding the biology of retroviral infections in humans and can be useful in the growing field of SFV-based gene therapy. PMID:25210185

  3. Viable deletion mutants in the simian virus 40 early region.

    PubMed Central

    Feunteun, J; Kress, M; Gardes, M; Monier, R

    1978-01-01

    For the purpose of isolating hr-t-like mutants of simian virus 40, we have constructed variants that have lost the unique site for the restriction enzyme Taq I at 0.565. Five mutants have been isolated and characterized by restriction enzyme analysis. All of them produce a normal size T antigen. Four produce a t antigen reduced in size as well as in amount; the fifth one does not seem to make any t antigen at all. The ability of these mutants to transform mouse cells in vitro, as tested by anchorage dependence, is clearly altered; however, the defect is only partial. In the same test, the mutants can complement a tsA mutant for transformation and therefore define a second complementation group in the simian virus 40 early region. Images PMID:212752

  4. Simian Virus 40 Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis: Analysis by Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Tegtmeyer, Peter; Macasaet, Francisco

    1972-01-01

    An agarose-gel electrophoresis technique has been developed to study simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis. Superhelical DNA I, relaxed DNA II, and replicative intermediate (RI) molecules were clearly resolved from one another for analytical purposes. Moreover, the RI molecules could be identified as early or late forms on the basis of their electrophoretic migration in relation to that of DNA II. The technique has been utilized to study the kinetics of simian virus 40 DNA synthesis in pulse and in pulse-chase experiments. The average time required to complete the replication of prelabeled RI molecules and to convert them into DNA I was approximately 10 min under the experimental conditions employed. PMID:4343542

  5. Preclinical Studies of Human Immunodeficiency Virus/AIDS Vaccines: Inverse Correlation between Avidity of Anti-Env Antibodies and Peak Postchallenge Viremia ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun; Lai, Lilin; Amara, Rama Rao; Montefiori, David C.; Villinger, Francois; Chennareddi, Lakshmi; Wyatt, Linda S.; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L.

    2009-01-01

    A major challenge for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS vaccines is the elicitation of anti-Env antibodies (Ab) capable of neutralizing the diversity of isolates in the pandemic. Here, we show that high-avidity, but nonneutralizing, Abs can have an inverse correlation with peak postchallenge viremia for a heterologous challenge. Vaccine studies were conducted in rhesus macaques using DNA priming followed by modified vaccinia Ankara boosting with HIV type 1 (HIV-1) immunogens that express virus-like particles displaying CCR5-tropic clade B (strain ADA) or clade C (IN98012) Envs. Rhesus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was used as an adjuvant for enhancing the avidity of anti-Env Ab responses. Challenge was with simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-162P3, a CCR5-tropic clade B chimera of SIV and HIV-1. Within the groups receiving the clade B vaccine, a strong inverse correlation was found between the avidity of anti-Env Abs and peak postchallenge viremia. This correlation required the use of native but not gp120 or gp140 forms of Env for avidity assays. The high-avidity Ab elicited by the ADA Env had excellent breadth for the Envs of incident clade B but not clade C isolates, whereas the high-avidity Ab elicited by the IN98012 Env had excellent breadth for incident clade C but not clade B isolates. High-avidity Ab elicited by a SHIV vaccine with a dual-tropic clade B Env (89.6) had limited breadth for incident isolates. Our results suggest that certain Envs can elicit nonneutralizing but high-avidity Ab with broad potential for blunting incident infections of the same clade. PMID:19224993

  6. Preclinical studies of human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS vaccines: inverse correlation between avidity of anti-Env antibodies and peak postchallenge viremia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Lai, Lilin; Amara, Rama Rao; Montefiori, David C; Villinger, Francois; Chennareddi, Lakshmi; Wyatt, Linda S; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L

    2009-05-01

    A major challenge for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS vaccines is the elicitation of anti-Env antibodies (Ab) capable of neutralizing the diversity of isolates in the pandemic. Here, we show that high-avidity, but nonneutralizing, Abs can have an inverse correlation with peak postchallenge viremia for a heterologous challenge. Vaccine studies were conducted in rhesus macaques using DNA priming followed by modified vaccinia Ankara boosting with HIV type 1 (HIV-1) immunogens that express virus-like particles displaying CCR5-tropic clade B (strain ADA) or clade C (IN98012) Envs. Rhesus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was used as an adjuvant for enhancing the avidity of anti-Env Ab responses. Challenge was with simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-162P3, a CCR5-tropic clade B chimera of SIV and HIV-1. Within the groups receiving the clade B vaccine, a strong inverse correlation was found between the avidity of anti-Env Abs and peak postchallenge viremia. This correlation required the use of native but not gp120 or gp140 forms of Env for avidity assays. The high-avidity Ab elicited by the ADA Env had excellent breadth for the Envs of incident clade B but not clade C isolates, whereas the high-avidity Ab elicited by the IN98012 Env had excellent breadth for incident clade C but not clade B isolates. High-avidity Ab elicited by a SHIV vaccine with a dual-tropic clade B Env (89.6) had limited breadth for incident isolates. Our results suggest that certain Envs can elicit nonneutralizing but high-avidity Ab with broad potential for blunting incident infections of the same clade. PMID:19224993

  7. Comparison of Immunity Generated by Nucleic Acid-, MF59-, and ISCOM-Formulated Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vaccines in Rhesus Macaques: Evidence for Viral Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Verschoor, Ernst J.; Mooij, Petra; Oostermeijer, Herman; van der Kolk, Mike; ten Haaft, Peter; Verstrepen, Babs; Sun, Yide; Morein, Bror; Åkerblom, Lennart; Fuller, Deborah H.; Barnett, Susan W.; Heeney, Jonathan L.

    1999-01-01

    The kinetics of T-helper immune responses generated in 16 mature outbred rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) within a 10-month period by three different human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine strategies were compared. Immune responses to monomeric recombinant gp120SF2 (rgp120) when the protein was expressed in vivo by DNA immunization or when it was delivered as a subunit protein vaccine formulated either with the MF59 adjuvant or by incorporation into immune-stimulating complexes (ISCOMs) were compared. Virus-neutralizing antibodies (NA) against HIV-1SF2 reached similar titers in the two rgp120SF2 protein-immunized groups, but the responses showed different kinetics, while NA were delayed and their levels were low in the DNA-immunized animals. Antigen-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ) T-helper (type 1-like) responses were detected in the DNA-immunized group, but only after the fourth immunization, and the rgp120/MF59 group generated both IFN-γ and interleukin-4 (IL-4) (type 2-like) responses that appeared after the third immunization. In contrast, rgp120/ISCOM-immunized animals rapidly developed marked IL-2, IFN-γ (type 1-like), and IL-4 responses that peaked after the second immunization. To determine which type of immune responses correlated with protection from infection, all animals were challenged intravenously with 50 50% infective doses of a rhesus cell-propagated, in vivo-titrated stock of a chimeric simian immunodeficiency virus-HIVSF13 construct. Protection was observed in the two groups receiving the rgp120 subunit vaccines. Half of the animals in the ISCOM group were completely protected from infection. In other subunit vaccinees there was evidence by multiple assays that virus detected at 2 weeks postchallenge was effectively cleared. Early induction of potent type 1- as well as type 2-like T-helper responses induced the most-effective immunity. PMID:10074183

  8. The effects of age on glutathione synthesis enzymes in lenses of Old World simians and prosimians.

    PubMed

    Rathbun, W B; Holleschau, A M

    1992-07-01

    The activities of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase and glutathione synthetase, the two enzymes required for glutathione synthesis, were determined as a function of age in lenses of three species of Old World higher primates: orangutan, pigtail monkey and olive baboon. These were compared to enzyme activities in lenses of two prosimians: mouse lemur and galago. gamma-Glutamylcysteine synthetase activity decreased as a function of age in all three Old World simians. The rate of decrease was greatest in the juvenile lenses. In contrast, the enzyme activity increased continuously with age in the galago lens. In the mouse lemur the enzyme activity increased per lens, but was constant when expressed as specific activity or as units per gram of lens. The loss of enzyme activity with age was limited to Old World higher primates apparently representing genetic change. Glutathione synthetase activity decreased logarithmically with age in the lenses of all five species. PMID:1355706

  9. Interleukin 2 Induces CD8^+ T Cell-Mediated Suppression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication in CD4^+ T Cells and This Effect Overrides Its Ability to Stimulate Virus Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinter, Audrey L.; Bende, Steven M.; Hardy, Elena C.; Jackson, Robert; Fauci, Anthony S.

    1995-11-01

    The nonlytic suppression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) production from infected CD4^+ T cells by CD8^+ lymphocytes from HIV-infected individuals is one of the most potent host-mediated antiviral activities observed in vitro. We demonstrate that the pleiotropic cytokine interleukin 2 (IL-2), but not IL-12, is a potent inducer of the CD8^+ HIV suppressor phenomenon. IL-2 induces HIV expression in peripheral blood or lymph node mononuclear cells from HIV-infected individuals in the absence of CD8^+ T cells. However, IL-2 induces CD8^+ T cells to suppress HIV expression when added back to these cultures, and this effect dramatically supersedes the ability of IL-2 to induce HIV expression. Five to 25 times fewer CD8^+ cells were required to obtain comparable levels of inhibition of viral production if they were activated in the presence of IL-2 as compared with IL-12 or no exogenous cytokine. Furthermore, IL-2 appeared either to induce a qualitative increase in HIV suppressor cell activity or to increase the relative frequency of suppressor cells in the activated (CD25^+) CD8^+ populations. Analyses of proviral levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells suggest that CD8^+ T cell-mediated lysis of in vivo infected cells is not induced by IL-2. These results have implications for our understanding of the effects of impaired IL-2 production during HIV disease as well as the overall effects of IL-2-based immunotherapy on HIV replication in vivo.

  10. A seven-transmembrane domain receptor involved in fusion and entry of T-cell-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strains.

    PubMed Central

    Berson, J F; Long, D; Doranz, B J; Rucker, J; Jirik, F R; Doms, R W

    1996-01-01

    Entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) into cells requires binding to CD4 and fusion with a cellular membrane. Fusion does not occur in most nonhuman cells even when they express human CD4, indicating that one or more human accessory factors are required for virus infection. Recently, a seven-transmembrane domain protein has been shown to serve as an accessory factor for T-cell-tropic (T-tropic) HIV-1 isolates (Y. Feng, C. C. Broder, P. E. Kennedy, and E. A. Berger, Science 272:872-877, 1996). Here we show that expression of this glycoprotein, termed fusin, in murine, feline, simian, and quail cell lines, in conjunction with human CD4, rendered these cells fully permissive for HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env)-mediated membrane fusion. Expression of CD4 or fusin alone did not permit fusion. In addition, introduction of fusin and CD4 into a human cell line, U87MG, that is resistant to HIV-1 induced syncytium formation and to infection by HIV-1 when expressing CD4 alone made this cell line permissive for Env-mediated cell-cell fusion. Fusion was observed only with T-tropic Env proteins. Macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) Env proteins from the SF162, ADA, and Ba-L HIV-1 strains did not fuse with cells expressing fusin and CD4, suggesting that M-tropic viruses utilize an accessory molecule other than fusin. Finally, coexpression of fusin and CD4 made both a murine and feline cell line susceptible to virus infection by T-tropic, but not M-tropic, HIV-1 strains. PMID:8709256

  11. Abnormal patterns of equine leucocyte differentiation antigen expression in severe combined immunodeficiency foals suggests the phenotype of normal equine natural killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lunn, D P; McClure, J T; Schobert, C S; Holmes, M A

    1995-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a fatal autosommal disease of Arabian horses that leads to failure of maturation of T- and B-lymphocyte populations, although natural killer (NK) cells are unaffected. Thymic and lymph node tissues from two foals suffering from SCID were examined in an immunohistological study using a panel of monoclonal antibodies recognising equine leucocyte differentiation antigens. In both foals, the majority of cells in lymphoid tissues had an EqCD3-EqCD4-EqCD8+ phenotype, although rare EqCD3+ cells were also detected. The EqCD3-EqCD4-EqCD8+ cells may represent an abnormal lymphocyte differentiation product resulting from the SCID defect, or alternatively may be a normal equine NK cell population. We suggest that the evidence favours the latter proposal, and that equine NK cells in normal horses therefore may be identified by an EqCD3-EqCD8+ phenotype. The implications for the nature of the equine SCID defect are discussed. Images Figure 1 PMID:7751035

  12. Identification of amino acids within the second alpha helical domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpu that are critical for preventing CD4 cell surface expression.

    PubMed

    Hill, M Sarah; Ruiz, Autumn; Schmitt, Kimberly; Stephens, Edward B

    2010-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) encodes for a Vpu protein, which interacts with CD4 resulting in its degradation. In this study, we examined the role of the 10 amino acids within the predicted second alpha-helical domain of the subtype B Vpu cytoplasmic tail in CD4 down-modulation using a VpuEGFP reporter system. Our findings indicate that the invariant leucine at position 63 and, to a lesser extent, the valine at position 68 were required for CD4 down-modulation. Mutation of analogous L63 in Vpu proteins subtypes A2, B(YU-2), C, D, and H also abolished CD4 down-modulation from the cell surface. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that L63A and V68A mutants were capable of binding CD4 and still retained the ability to interact with h-beta-TrCP1. Taken together, these results indicate that amino acid substitutions in the second alpha-helical domain that retain the predicted structure and binding to h-beta-TrCP1 can influence Vpu-mediated CD4 degradation. PMID:19944437

  13. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome *

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N.J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1992-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of the utmost importance. PMID:1544049

  14. [Basics of primary immunodeficiencies].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martínez, Claudia; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva; Hernández-Martínez, Ana Rosa; Blancas-Galicia, Lizbeth

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders, the etiology are the defects in the development or function of the immune system. The principal PID manifestations are the infections in early age, malignancy and diseases of immune dysregulation as autoimmunity and allergy. PIDs are genetics disorders and most of them are inherited as autosomal recessive, also this group of diseases is more prevalent in males and in childhood. The antibody immunodeficiency is the PID more common in adults. The more frequent disorders are the infections in the respiratory tract, abscesses, candidiasis, diarrhea, BCGosis etc. Initial approach included a complete blood count and quantification of immunoglobulins. The delay in diagnosis could be explained due to a perception that the recurrent infections are normal process or think that they are exclusively of childhood. The early diagnosis of PID by primary care physicians is important to opportune treatment and better prognosis. PMID:27174761

  15. E2F1 localizes predominantly to neuronal cytoplasm and fails to induce expression of its transcriptional targets in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-induced neuronal damage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Shyam, Nikhil; Ting, Jenhao H.; Akay, Cagla; Lindl, Kathryn A.; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L.

    2010-01-01

    As human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) does not induce neuronal damage by direct infection, the mechanisms of neuronal damage or loss in HIV associated dementia (HAD) remain unclear. We have shown previously that immunoreactivity of transcription factor, E2F1, increases in neurons, localizing predominantly to the cytoplasm, in HIV-associated pathologies. Here we confirm that E2F1 localization is predominantly cytoplasmic in primary post-mitotic neurons in vitro and cortical neurons in vivo. To determine whether E2F1 contributes to neuronal death in HAD via transactivation of target promoters, we assessed the mRNA and protein levels of several classical E2F1 transcriptional targets implicated in cell cycle progression and apoptosis in an in vitro model of HIV-induced neurotoxicity and in cortical autopsy tissue from patients infected with HIV. By qPCR, we show that mRNA levels of E2F1 transcriptional targets implicated in cell cycle progression (E2F1, cyclin A, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and dyhydrofolate reductase (DHFR)) and apoptosis (caspases 3, 8, 9 and p19ARF) remain unchanged in an in vitro model of HIV-induced neurotoxicity. Further, we show that protein levels of p19ARF, Cyclin A, and PCNA are not altered in vitro or in the cortex of patients with HAD. We propose that the predominantly cytoplasmic localization of E2F1 in neurons may account for the lack of E2F1 target transactivation in neurons responding to HIV-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:20580656

  16. High Eomesodermin Expression among CD57+ CD8+ T Cells Identifies a CD8+ T Cell Subset Associated with Viral Control during Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Simonetta, Federico; Hua, Stéphane; Lécuroux, Camille; Gérard, Sandie; Boufassa, Faroudy; Sáez-Cirión, Asier; Pancino, Gianfranco; Goujard, Cécile; Lambotte, Olivier; Venet, Alain

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT During HIV infection, increased CD57 expression among CD8+ T cells has been associated with immune senescence and defective immune responses. Interestingly, CD57-expressing CD8+ T cells exhibit a dual profile, being simultaneously highly cytotoxic (terminally differentiated effectors) and poorly proliferative (replicative senescent). Recent publications point toward a positive role of CD57-expressing CD8+ T cell subsets, presumably due to their high cytolytic activity. We further investigated the phenotype of CD57-expressing CD8+ T cells in healthy donors and during HIV infection combining CD57 expression to Eomesodermin (EOMES), a T box transcription factor which determines, coordinately with T-bet, effector and memory CD8+ T cell differentiation. We defined in healthy donors two functionally distinct CD57-expressing CD8+ T cell subsets exhibiting different levels of EOMES expression: EOMEShi CD57+ and EOMESint CD57+ CD8+ T cells. EOMEShi CD57+ cells exhibited low cytotoxic activity but preserved proliferative capacity and interleukin 7 (IL-7) receptor expression, whereas EOMESint CD57+ cells exhibited obvious cytotoxic functions and a more terminally differentiated phenotype. We next performed a similar analysis in different contexts of HIV infection: primary infected patients, long-term viremic patients, aviremic patients treated with antiretroviral therapy, and HIV controllers; we demonstrated a higher percentage of CD57-expressing cells in all HIV-infected patients regardless of virological status. When heterogeneity in EOMES expression among CD57 cells was taken into account, we detected significantly higher proportions of EOMEShi CD57+ cells among HIV-specific and nonspecific CD8+ T cells from HIV controllers than in aviremic antiretroviral-treated patients and viremic patients. Importantly, such a peculiar non-terminally differentiated EOMEShi CD57+ phenotypic profile was associated with viral control. IMPORTANCE This study demonstrates that

  17. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, J.M.; Chen, Y.S.; Lindburg, K.; Morales, D.

    1987-09-01

    The inactivation of simian rotavirus Sa-11 and human rotavirus type 2 (Wa) by ozone was compared at 4/sup 0/C by using single-particle virus stocks. Although the human strain was clearly more sensitive, both virus types were rapidly inactivated by ozone concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater at all pH levels tested. Comparison of the virucidal activity of ozone with that of chlorine in identical experiments indicated little significant difference in rotavirus-inactivating efficiencies when the disinfectants were used at concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater.

  18. Characterization of the immune response in ganglia after primary simian varicella virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ouwendijk, Werner J D; Getu, Sarah; Mahalingam, Ravi; Gilden, Don; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Verjans, Georges M G M

    2016-06-01

    Primary simian varicella virus (SVV) infection in non-human primates causes varicella, after which the virus becomes latent in ganglionic neurons and reactivates to cause zoster. The host response in ganglia during establishment of latency is ill-defined. Ganglia from five African green monkeys (AGMs) obtained at 9, 13, and 20 days post-intratracheal SVV inoculation (dpi) were analyzed by ex vivo flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization. Ganglia at 13 and 20 dpi exhibited mild inflammation. Immune infiltrates consisted mostly of CD8(dim) and CD8(bright) memory T cells, some of which expressed granzyme B, and fewer CD11c(+) and CD68(+) cells. Chemoattractant CXCL10 transcripts were expressed in neurons and infiltrating inflammatory cells but did not co-localize with SVV open reading frame 63 (ORF63) RNA expression. Satellite glial cells expressed increased levels of activation markers CD68 and MHC class II at 13 and 20 dpi compared to those at 9 dpi. Overall, local immune responses emerged as viral DNA load in ganglia declined, suggesting that intra-ganglionic immunity contributes to restricting SVV replication. PMID:26676825

  19. Nonhuman primate retroviruses from Cambodia: high simian foamy virus prevalence, identification of divergent STLV-1 strains and no evidence of SIV infection.

    PubMed

    Ayouba, Ahidjo; Duval, Linda; Liégeois, Florian; Ngin, Sopheak; Ahuka-Mundeke, Steve; Switzer, William M; Delaporte, Eric; Ariey, Frédéric; Peeters, Martine; Nerrienet, Eric

    2013-08-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHPs) carry retroviruses such as simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV), simian T-cell lymphotropic viruses (STLV) and simian foamy viruses (SFV). Here, we revisited NHPs from Cambodia to assess the prevalence and diversity of these retroviruses using updated viral detection tools. We screened blood from 118 NHPs consisting of six species (Macaca fascicularis (n=91), Macaca leonine (n=8), Presbytis cristata (n=3), Nycticebus coucang (n=1), Hylobates pileatus (n=14), and Pongo pygmaeus) (n=1) by using a Luminex-based multiplex serology assay that allows the detection of all known SIV/HIV and SFV lineages. We also used highly sensitive PCR assays to detect each simian retrovirus group. Positive PCR products were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed to infer evolutionary histories. Fifty-three of 118 (44.9%) NHPs tested positive for SFV by serology and 8/52 (15.4%), all from M. fascicularis, were PCR-confirmed. The 8 novel SFV sequences formed a highly supported distinct lineage within a clade composed of other macaque SFV. We observed no serological or molecular evidence of SIV infection among the 118 NHP samples tested. Four of 118 (3.3%) NHPs were PCR-positive for STLV, including one M. fascicularis, one P. cristata, and two H. pileatus. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the four novel STLV belonged to the PTLV-1 lineage, outside the African radiation of PTLV-1, like all Asian PTLV identified so far. Sequence analysis of the whole STLV-1 genome from a H. pileatus (C578_Hp) revealed a genetic structure characteristic of PTLV. Similarity analysis comparing the STLV-1 (C578_Hp) sequence with prototype PTLVs showed that C578_Hp is closer to PTLV-1s than to all other types across the entire genome. In conclusion, we showed a high frequency of SFV infection but found no evidence of SIV infection in NHPs from Cambodia. We identified for the first time STLV-1 in a P. cristata and in two H. pileatus. PMID:23612320

  20. Stable Expression of Lentiviral Antigens by Quality-Controlled Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Bryan E.; Asrican, Rose; Lim, So-Yon; Sixsmith, Jaimie D.; Lukose, Regy; Souther, Sommer J. R.; Rayasam, Swati D. G.; Saelens, Joseph W.; Chen, Ching-ju; Seay, Sarah A.; Berney-Meyer, Linda; Magtanong, Leslie; Vermeul, Kim; Pajanirassa, Priyadharshini; Jimenez, Amanda E.; Ng, Tony W.; Tobin, David M.; Porcelli, Steven A.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Schmitz, Joern E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Jacobs, William R.; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-01-01

    The well-established safety profile of the tuberculosis vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), makes it an attractive vehicle for heterologous expression of antigens from clinically relevant pathogens. However, successful generation of recombinant BCG strains possessing consistent insert expression has encountered challenges in stability. Here, we describe a method for the development of large recombinant BCG accession lots which stably express the lentiviral antigens, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp120 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag, using selectable leucine auxotrophic complementation. Successful establishment of vaccine stability stems from stringent quality control criteria which not only screen for highly stable complemented BCG ΔleuCD transformants but also thoroughly characterize postproduction quality. These parameters include consistent production of correctly sized antigen, retention of sequence-pure plasmid DNA, freeze-thaw recovery, enumeration of CFU, and assessment of cellular aggregates. Importantly, these quality assurance procedures were indicative of overall vaccine stability, were predictive for successful antigen expression in subsequent passaging both in vitro and in vivo, and correlated with induction of immune responses in murine models. This study has yielded a quality-controlled BCG ΔleuCD vaccine expressing HIV gp120 that retained stable full-length expression after 1024-fold amplification in vitro and following 60 days of growth in mice. A second vaccine lot expressed full-length SIV Gag for >1068-fold amplification in vitro and induced potent antigen-specific T cell populations in vaccinated mice. Production of large, well-defined recombinant BCG ΔleuCD lots can allow confidence that vaccine materials for immunogenicity and protection studies are not negatively affected by instability or differences between freshly grown production batches. PMID:25924766

  1. Stable Expression of Lentiviral Antigens by Quality-Controlled Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vectors.

    PubMed

    Hart, Bryan E; Asrican, Rose; Lim, So-Yon; Sixsmith, Jaimie D; Lukose, Regy; Souther, Sommer J R; Rayasam, Swati D G; Saelens, Joseph W; Chen, Ching-Ju; Seay, Sarah A; Berney-Meyer, Linda; Magtanong, Leslie; Vermeul, Kim; Pajanirassa, Priyadharshini; Jimenez, Amanda E; Ng, Tony W; Tobin, David M; Porcelli, Steven A; Larsen, Michelle H; Schmitz, Joern E; Haynes, Barton F; Jacobs, William R; Lee, Sunhee; Frothingham, Richard

    2015-07-01

    The well-established safety profile of the tuberculosis vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), makes it an attractive vehicle for heterologous expression of antigens from clinically relevant pathogens. However, successful generation of recombinant BCG strains possessing consistent insert expression has encountered challenges in stability. Here, we describe a method for the development of large recombinant BCG accession lots which stably express the lentiviral antigens, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp120 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag, using selectable leucine auxotrophic complementation. Successful establishment of vaccine stability stems from stringent quality control criteria which not only screen for highly stable complemented BCG ΔleuCD transformants but also thoroughly characterize postproduction quality. These parameters include consistent production of correctly sized antigen, retention of sequence-pure plasmid DNA, freeze-thaw recovery, enumeration of CFU, and assessment of cellular aggregates. Importantly, these quality assurance procedures were indicative of overall vaccine stability, were predictive for successful antigen expression in subsequent passaging both in vitro and in vivo, and correlated with induction of immune responses in murine models. This study has yielded a quality-controlled BCG ΔleuCD vaccine expressing HIV gp120 that retained stable full-length expression after 10(24)-fold amplification in vitro and following 60 days of growth in mice. A second vaccine lot expressed full-length SIV Gag for >10(68)-fold amplification in vitro and induced potent antigen-specific T cell populations in vaccinated mice. Production of large, well-defined recombinant BCG ΔleuCD lots can allow confidence that vaccine materials for immunogenicity and protection studies are not negatively affected by instability or differences between freshly grown production batches. PMID:25924766

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention.

    PubMed

    Davis, Teaniese Latham; DiClemente, Ralph

    2016-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. Surveillance data from 2012 indicate an estimated 1.2 million people aged 13 years and older were living with HIV infection in the United States, and 12.8% do not know their status. There are approximately 50,000 new HIV infections annually. With no available cure for HIV, primary prevention to reduce incident cases of HIV is essential. Strategies to prevent HIV transmission include reducing sexual risk behavior and needle sharing. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has multiple resources available for primary and secondary prevention to reduce disease transmission and severity. PMID:26980130

  3. The PETT series, a new class of potent nonnucleoside inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Ahgren, C; Backro, K; Bell, F W; Cantrell, A S; Clemens, M; Colacino, J M; Deeter, J B; Engelhardt, J A; Hogberg, M; Jaskunas, S R

    1995-01-01

    To identify the minimal structural elements necessary for biological activity, the rigid tricyclic nucleus of the known human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor tetrahydroimidazobenzodiazepinthione was subjected to systematic bond disconnection to obtain simpler structures. A rational selection and testing of modeled analogs containing these potential pharmacophoric moieties led to the discovery of a new series of nonnucleoside inhibitors of RT. The lead compound of this new PETT series of nonnucleoside RT inhibitors, N-(2-phenylethyl)-N'-(2-thiazolyl)thiourea (LY73497), was found to inhibit HIV-1 but not HIV-2 or simian immunodeficiency virus in cell culture at micromolar concentrations. This derivative was also found to inhibit HIV-1 RT. Through an integrated effort involving synthesis and molecular modeling, compounds with nanomolar potency against HIV-1 in cell culture were developed. In these studies, LY300046-HCl was identified as a potent nonnucleoside inhibitor of HIV-1 RT possessing favorable pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:7574525

  4. DNA-dependent protein kinase interacts functionally with the RNA polymerase II complex recruited at the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) long terminal repeat and plays an important role in HIV gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Shilpi; Ochem, Alex; Tyagi, Mudit

    2011-07-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a nuclear protein kinase that specifically requires association with DNA for its kinase activity, plays important roles in the regulation of different DNA transactions, including transcription, replication and DNA repair, as well as in the maintenance of telomeres. Due to its large size, DNA-PK is also known to facilitate the activities of other factors by providing the docking platform at their site of action. In this study, by running several chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrate the parallel distribution of DNA-PK with RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) along the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) provirus before and after activation with tumour necrosis factor alpha. The association between DNA-PK and RNAP II is also long-lasting, at least for up to 4 h (the duration analysed in this study). Knockdown of endogenous DNA-PK using specific small hairpin RNAs expressed from lentiviral vectors resulted in significant reduction in HIV gene expression and replication, demonstrating the importance of DNA-PK for HIV gene expression. Sequence analysis of the HIV-1 Tat protein revealed three potential target sites for phosphorylation by DNA-PK and, by using kinase assays, we confirmed that Tat is an effective substrate of DNA-PK. Through peptide mapping, we found that two of these three potential phosphorylation sites are recognized and phosphorylated by DNA-PK. Mutational studies on the DNA-PK target sites of Tat further demonstrated the functional significance of the Tat-DNA-PK interaction. Thus, overall our results clearly demonstrate the functional interaction between DNA-PK and RNAP II during HIV transcription. PMID:21450944

  5. Cardiac and skeletal myopathy in beta myosin heavy-chain simian virus 40 tsA58 transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    De Leon, J R; Federoff, H J; Dickson, D W; Vikstrom, K L; Fishman, G I

    1994-01-01

    The mechanisms regulating cardiac muscle differentiation and development are incompletely understood. To examine the relationships between cardiocyte proliferation and differentiation, we tested the ability of a fragment from the rat beta myosin heavy-chain (MHC beta) gene to correctly target expression of a thermolabile simian virus 40 large tumor antigen allele (tsA58) in the developing mouse. Transgene expression in the heart was observed as early as 10 days postconception and was developmentally regulated in parallel with the endogenous MHC beta gene. Expression was also detected in developing skeletal muscle, although at low levels. Despite the temperature sensitivity of the mutant large tumor antigen protein, a subset of transgenic mice in several lineages developed marked cardiac and skeletal myopathies. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8290557

  6. Vector-Mediated In Vivo Antibody Expression.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2014-08-01

    This article focuses on a novel vaccine strategy known as vector-mediated antibody gene transfer, with a particular focus on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This strategy provides a solution to the problem of current vaccines that fail to generate neutralizing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 infection and AIDS. Antibody gene transfer allows for predetermination of antibody affinity and specificity prior to "immunization" and avoids the need for an active humoral immune response against the HIV envelope protein. This approach uses recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors, which have been shown to transduce muscle with high efficiency and direct the long-term expression of a variety of transgenes, to deliver the gene encoding a broadly neutralizing antibody into the muscle. Following rAAV vector gene delivery, the broadly neutralizing antibodies are endogenously synthesized in myofibers and passively distributed to the circulatory system. This is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. Vector-mediated gene transfer studies in mice and monkeys with anti-HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-neutralizing antibodies demonstrated long-lasting neutralizing activity in serum with complete protection against intravenous challenge with virulent HIV and SIV. These results indicate that existing potent anti-HIV antibodies can be rapidly moved into the clinic. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV. The general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets such as hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. PMID:26104192

  7. Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Biman; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-04-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common primary immunodeficiency of young adolescents and adults which also affects the children. The disease remains largely under-diagnosed in India and Southeast Asian countries. Although in majority of cases it is sporadic, disease may be inherited in a autosomal recessive pattern and rarely, in autosomal dominant pattern. Patients, in addition to frequent sino-pulmonary infections, are also susceptible to various autoimmune diseases and malignancy, predominantly lymphoma and leukemia. Other characteristic lesions include lymphocytic and granulomatous interstitial lung disease, and nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of gut. Diagnosis requires reduced levels of at least two immunoglobulin isotypes: IgG with IgA and/or IgM and impaired specific antibody response to vaccines. A number of gene mutations have been described in CVID; however, these genetic alterations account for less than 20% of cases of CVID. Flow cytometry aptly demonstrates a disturbed B cell homeostasis with reduced or absent memory B cells and increased CD21(low) B cells and transitional B cell populations. Approximately one-third of patients with CVID also display T cell functional defects. Immunoglobulin therapy remains the mainstay of treatment. Immunologists and other clinicians in India and other South East Asian countries need to be aware of CVID so that early diagnosis can be made, as currently, majority of these patients still go undiagnosed. PMID:26868026

  8. Space Flight Immunodeficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, William T.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has had sufficient concern for the well-being of astronauts traveling in space to create the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), which is investigating several areas of biomedical research including those of immunology. As part of the Immunology, Infection, and Hematology Team, the co-investigators of the Space Flight Immunodeficiency Project began their research projects on April 1, 1998 and are now just into the second year of work. Two areas of research have been targeted: 1) specific immune (especially antibody) responses and 2) non-specific inflammation and adhesion. More precise knowledge of these two areas of research will help elucidate the potential harmful effects of space travel on the immune system, possibly sufficient to create a secondary state of immunodeficiency in astronauts. The results of these experiments are likely to lead to the delineation of functional alterations in antigen presentation, specific immune memory, cytokine regulation of immune responses, cell to cell interactions, and cell to endothelium interactions.

  9. Gut immune dysfunction through impaired innate pattern recognition receptor expression and gut microbiota dysbiosis in chronic SIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Glavan, Tiffany W.; Gaulke, Christopher A; Rocha, Clarissa Santos; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Hirao, Lauren A; Raffatellu, Manuela; Jiang, Guochun; Bäumler, Andreas J.; Goulart, Luiz R.; Dandekar, Satya

    2015-01-01

    HIV targets the gut mucosa early in infection, causing immune and epithelial barrier dysfunction and disease progression. However, gut mucosal sensing and innate immune signaling through mucosal pattern recognition receptors (PRR) during HIV infection and disease progression are not well defined. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaque model of AIDS, we found a robust increase in PRR and inflammatory cytokine gene expression during the acute SIV infection in both peripheral blood and gut mucosa, coinciding with viral replication. PRR expression remained elevated in peripheral blood following the transition to chronic SIV infection. In contrast, massive dampening of PRR expression was detected in the gut mucosa, despite the presence of detectable viral loads. Exceptionally, expression of TLR4 and 8 was down modulated and diverged from expression patterns for most other TLRs in the gut. Decreased mucosal PRR expression was associated with increased abundance of several pathogenic bacterial taxa, including Pasteurellaceae members, Aggregatibacter and Actinobacillus, and Mycoplasmataceae family. Early anti-retroviral therapy led to viral suppression, but only partial maintenance of gut PRR and cytokine gene expression. In summary, SIV infection dampens mucosal innate immunity through PRR dysregulation and may promote immune activation, gut microbiota changes and ineffective viral clearance. PMID:26376368

  10. Gut immune dysfunction through impaired innate pattern recognition receptor expression and gut microbiota dysbiosis in chronic SIV infection.

    PubMed

    Glavan, T W; Gaulke, C A; Santos Rocha, C; Sankaran-Walters, S; Hirao, L A; Raffatellu, M; Jiang, G; Bäumler, A J; Goulart, L R; Dandekar, S

    2016-05-01

    HIV targets the gut mucosa early in infection, causing immune and epithelial barrier dysfunction and disease progression. However, gut mucosal sensing and innate immune signaling through mucosal pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) during HIV infection and disease progression are not well defined. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaque model of AIDS, we found a robust increase in PRRs and inflammatory cytokine gene expression during the acute SIV infection in both peripheral blood and gut mucosa, coinciding with viral replication. PRR expression remained elevated in peripheral blood following the transition to chronic SIV infection. In contrast, massive dampening of PRR expression was detected in the gut mucosa, despite the presence of detectable viral loads. Exceptionally, expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR8 was downmodulated and diverged from expression patterns for most other TLRs in the gut. Decreased mucosal PRR expression was associated with increased abundance of several pathogenic bacterial taxa, including Pasteurellaceae members, Aggregatibacter and Actinobacillus, and Mycoplasmataceae family. Early antiretroviral therapy led to viral suppression but only partial maintenance of gut PRRs and cytokine gene expression. In summary, SIV infection dampens mucosal innate immunity through PRR dysregulation and may promote immune activation, gut microbiota changes, and ineffective viral clearance. PMID:26376368

  11. The Paramyxovirus Simian Virus 5 V Protein Slows Progression of the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Grace Y.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Infection of cells by many viruses affects the cell division cycle of the host cell to favor viral replication. We examined the ability of the paramyxovirus simian parainfluenza virus 5 (SV5) to affect cell cycle progression, and we found that SV5 slows the rate of proliferation of HeLa T4 cells. The SV5-infected cells had a delayed transition from G1 to S phase and prolonged progression through S phase, and some of the infected cells were arrested in G2 or M phase. The levels of p53 and p21CIP1 were not increased in SV5-infected cells compared to mock-infected cells, suggesting that the changes in the cell cycle occur through a p53-independent mechanism. However, the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) was delayed and prolonged in SV5-infected cells. The changes in the cell cycle were also observed in cells expressing the SV5 V protein but not in the cells expressing the SV5 P protein or the V protein lacking its unique C terminus (VΔC). The unique C terminus of the V protein of SV5 was shown previously to interact with DDB1, which is the 127-kDa subunit of the multifunctional damage-specific DNA-binding protein (DDB) heterodimer. The coexpression of DDB1 with V can partially restore the changes in the cell cycle caused by expression of the V protein. PMID:10982362

  12. Intestinal Dysplasia Induced by Simian Virus 40 T Antigen Is Independent of p53

    PubMed Central

    Markovics, Jennifer A.; Carroll, Patrick A.; Robles, M. Teresa Sáenz; Pope, Hannah; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Pipas, James M.

    2005-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing simian virus 40 large T antigen in enterocytes develop intestinal hyperplasia that progresses to dysplasia with age. Hyperplasia is dependent on T antigen binding to the retinoblastoma (pRb) family of tumor suppressor proteins. Mice expressing a truncated T antigen that inactivates the pRb-family, but is defective for binding p53, exhibit hyperplasia but do not progress to dysplasia. We hypothesized that the inhibition of the pRb family leads to entry of enterocytes into the cell cycle, resulting in hyperplasia, while inactivation of p53 is required for progression to dysplasia. Therefore, we examined T antigen/p53 complexes from the intestines of transgenic mice. We found that T antigen did not induce p53 stabilization, and we could not detect T antigen/p53 complexes in villus enterocytes. In contrast, T antigen expression led to a large increase in the levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. Furthermore, mice in which pRb was inactivated by a truncated T antigen in a p53 null background exhibited intestinal hyperplasia but no progression to dysplasia. These data indicate that loss of p53 function does not play a role in T antigen-induced dysplasia in the intestine. Rather, some unknown function of T antigen is essential for progression beyond hyperplasia. PMID:15919904

  13. Investigation of human urine for genomic sequences of the primate polyomaviruses simian virus 40, BK virus, and JC virus.

    PubMed

    Shah, K V; Daniel, R W; Strickler, H D; Goedert, J J

    1997-12-01

    Recent reports of the detection of simian virus 40 (SV40) nucleotide sequences in ependymomas, choroid plexus tumors, osteosarcomas, and mesotheliomas have raised the possibility that SV40, which naturally infects Asian macaques, is circulating among humans. This possibility was examined by performing polymerase chain reaction assays on urine samples of 166 homosexual men, 88 of them human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive, for genomic sequences of SV40 as well as of human polyomaviruses BK virus (BKV) and JC virus (JCV). Tests with masked urine specimens spiked with SV40-transformed cells were included to monitor the SV40 assay. SV40, BKV, and JCV sequences were identified, respectively, in 0, 14%, and 34% of the urine specimens. JCV viruria was far more common (37%) than BKV viruria (5%) in HIV-seronegative persons. HIV infection and more severe immunosuppression were associated with a higher frequency of BKV viruria. In summary, SV40 viruria was not detected among homosexual men who shed human polyomaviruses at a high frequency. PMID:9395377

  14. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors that potently and specifically block human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, D L; Busso, M; Tan, C K; Reusser, F; Palmer, J R; Poppe, S M; Aristoff, P A; Downey, K M; So, A G; Resnick, L

    1991-01-01

    Certain bis(heteroaryl)piperazines (BHAPs) are potent inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) at concentrations lower by 2-4 orders of magnitude than that which inhibits normal cellular DNA polymerase activity. Combination of a BHAP with nucleoside analog HIV-1 RT inhibitors suggested that together these compounds inhibited RT synergistically. In three human lymphocytic cell systems using several laboratory and clinical HIV-1 isolates, the BHAPs blocked HIV-1 replication with potencies nearly identical to those of 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine or 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine; in primary cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, concentrations of these antiviral agents were lower by at least 3-4 orders of magnitude than cytotoxic levels. The BHAPs do not inhibit replication of HIV-2, the simian or feline immunodeficiency virus, or Rauscher murine leukemia virus in culture. Evaluation of a BHAP in HIV-1-infected SCID-hu mice (severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with human fetal lymph node) showed that the compound could block HIV-1 replication in vivo. The BHAPs are readily obtained synthetically and have been extensively characterized in preclinical evaluations. These compounds hold promise for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Images PMID:1717988

  15. An Orphan G Protein-Coupled Receptor, GPR1, Acts as a Coreceptor To Allow Replication of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Types 1 and 2 in Brain-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Nobuaki; Soda, Yasushi; Kanbe, Katsuaki; Liu, Hui-Yu; Jinno, Atsushi; Kitamura, Toshio; Hoshino, Hiroo

    1999-01-01

    Twelve G protein-coupled receptors, including chemokine receptors, act as coreceptors and determinants for the cell tropisms of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). We isolated HIV-1 variants from T-cell-line (T)- and macrophage (M)-tropic (i.e., dualtropic) (R5-R3-X4) HIV-1 strains and also produced six HIV-1 mutants carrying single-point amino acid substitutions at the tip of the V3 region of the Env protein of HIV-1. These variants and three mutants infected brain-derived CD4-positive cells that are resistant to M-, T-, or dualtropic (R5, X4, or R5-X4) HIV-1 strains. However, a factor that determines this cell tropism has not been identified. This study shows that primary brain-derived fibroblast-like cell strains, BT-3 and BT-20/N, as well as a CD4-transduced glioma cell line, U87/CD4, which were susceptible to these HIV-1 variants and mutants and the HIV-2ROD strain, expressed mRNA of an orphan G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), GPR1. When a CD4-positive cell line which was strictly resistant to infection with diverse HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains was transduced with GPR1, the cell line became susceptible to these HIV-1 variants and mutants and to an HIV-2 strain but not to T- or dualtropic HIV-1 strains, and numerous syncytia formed after infection. These results indicate that GPR1 functions as a coreceptor for the HIV-1 variants and mutants and for the HIV-2ROD strain in vitro. PMID:10233994

  16. V3 loop of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reduces cyclin E expression and induces G1 arrest in interleukin 2-dependent T cells.

    PubMed

    Sakaida, H; Kawamata, S; Hattori, T; Uchiyama, T

    1998-01-01

    We previously described that V3 loop derived from the HTLV-III BH10 clone V3-BH10 markedly suppressed IL-2-driven T cell proliferation and produced G1 arrest of the cells. Here, we tested the effect of V3-BH10 on the molecules that are involved in transition from the G1 to S phase of the cell cycle. The effect of V3-BH10 on the IL-2-induced expression of G1 cyclins, Cdk inhibitors, and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRb) was tested by immunoblotting, using the IL-2-dependent CD4-positive cell line Kit 225. Furthermore, IL-2-dependent kinase activity of the cyclin E-Cdk2 complex was investigated with histone H1 as a substrate. V3-BH10 reduced the IL-2-dependent expression of cyclin E, but not that of cyclin D and Cdk inhibitors such as p21 and p27. As the result of reduction of cyclin E, histone H1 kinase activity of the cyclin E-Cdk2 complex was markedly reduced even in the presence of rIL-2, followed by incomplete phosphorylation of pRb. The reduction in hyperphosphorylation of pRb by V3-BH10 led to G1 arrest of the cell cycle. Thus, V3-BH10 induced G1 arrest in IL-2-dependent cell cycle progression by reducing cyclin E expression, which may be one of the mechanisms underlying the dysfunction of T cells in HIV-1-infected people. PMID:9453249

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus endocrinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Uma; Sengupta, Nilanjan; Mukhopadhyay, Prasanta; Roy, Keshab Sinha

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) endocrinopathy encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders. Almost all the endocrine organs are virtually affected by HIV infection. HIV can directly alter glandular function. More commonly secondary endocrine dysfunction occurs due to opportunistic infections and neoplasms in immunocompromised state. The complex interaction between HIV infection and endocrine system may be manifested as subtle biochemical and hormonal perturbation to overt glandular failure. Antiretroviral therapy as well as other essential medications often result in adverse endocrinal consequences. Apart from adrenal insufficiency, hypogonadism, diabetes and bone loss, AIDS wasting syndrome and HIV lipodystrophy need special reference. Endocrinal evaluation should proceed as in other patients with suspected endocrine dysfunction. Available treatment options have been shown to improve quality of life and long-term mortality in AIDS patients. PMID:22028995

  18. Induction of interferon-stimulated genes by Simian virus 40 T antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Rathi, Abhilasha V.; Cantalupo, Paul G.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.; Pipas, James M.

    2010-10-25

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (TAg) is a multifunctional oncoprotein essential for productive viral infection and for cellular transformation. We have used microarray analysis to examine the global changes in cellular gene expression induced by wild-type T antigen (TAg{sup wt}) and TAg-mutants in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). The expression profile of approximately 800 cellular genes was altered by TAg{sup wt} and a truncated TAg (TAg{sup N136}), including many genes that influence cell cycle, DNA-replication, transcription, chromatin structure and DNA repair. Unexpectedly, we found a significant number of immune response genes upregulated by TAg{sup wt} including many interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) such as ISG56, OAS, Rsad2, Ifi27 and Mx1. Additionally, we also observed activation of STAT1 by TAg{sup wt}. Our genetic studies using several TAg-mutants reveal an unexplored function of TAg and indicate that the LXCXE motif and p53 binding are required for the upregulation of ISGs.

  19. cis-active elements from mouse chromosomal DNA suppress simian virus 40 DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Hartl, M; Willnow, T; Fanning, E

    1990-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40)-containing DNA was rescued after the fusion of SV40-transformed VLM cells with permissive COS1 monkey cells and cloned, and prototype plasmid clones were characterized. A 2-kilobase mouse DNA fragment fused with the rescued SV40 DNA, and derived from mouse DNA flanking the single insert of SV40 DNA in VLM cells, was sequenced. Insertion of the intact rescued mouse sequence, or two nonoverlapping fragments of it, into wild-type SV40 plasmid DNA suppressed replication of the plasmid in TC7 monkey cells, although the plasmids expressed replication-competent T antigen. Rat cells were transformed with linearized wild-type SV40 plasmid DNA with or without fragments of the mouse DNA in cis. Although all of the rat cell lines expressed approximately equal amounts of T antigen and p53, transformants carrying SV40 DNA linked to either of the same two replication suppressor fragments produced significantly less free SV40 DNA after fusion with permissive cells than those transformed by SV40 DNA without a cellular insert or with a cellular insert lacking suppressor activity. The results suggest that two independent segments of cellular DNA act in cis to suppress SV40 replication in vivo, either as a plasmid or integrated in chromosomal DNA. Images PMID:2159549

  20. Two Novel Simian Arteriviruses in Captive and Wild Baboons (Papio spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Adam L.; Lauck, Michael; Sibley, Samuel D.; Pecotte, Jerilyn; Rice, Karen; Weny, Geoffrey; Tumukunde, Alex; Hyeroba, David; Greene, Justin; Correll, Michael; Gleicher, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas C.; Jahrling, Peter B.; Kuhn, Jens H.; Goldberg, Tony L.; Rogers, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Since the 1960s, simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV; Nidovirales, Arteriviridae) has caused highly fatal outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever in captive Asian macaque colonies. However, the source(s) of these outbreaks and the natural reservoir(s) of this virus remain obscure. Here we report the identification of two novel, highly divergent simian arteriviruses related to SHFV, Mikumi yellow baboon virus 1 (MYBV-1) and Southwest baboon virus 1 (SWBV-1), in wild and captive baboons, respectively, and demonstrate the recent transmission of SWBV-1 among captive baboons. These findings extend our knowledge of the genetic and geographic diversity of the simian arteriviruses, identify baboons as a natural host of these viruses, and provide further evidence that baboons may have played a role in previous outbreaks of simian hemorrhagic fever in macaques, as has long been suspected. This knowledge should aid in the prevention of disease outbreaks in captive macaques and supports the growing body of evidence that suggests that simian arterivirus infections are common in Old World monkeys of many different species throughout Africa. IMPORTANCE Historically, the emergence of primate viruses both in humans and in other primate species has caused devastating outbreaks of disease. One strategy for preventing the emergence of novel primate pathogens is to identify microbes with the potential for cross-species transmission in their natural state within reservoir species from which they might emerge. Here, we detail the discovery and characterization of two related simian members of the Arteriviridae family that have a history of disease emergence and host switching. Our results expand the phylogenetic and geographic range of the simian arteriviruses and define baboons as a natural host for these viruses. Our findings also identify a potential threat to captive macaque colonies by showing that simian arteriviruses are actively circulating in captive baboons. PMID

  1. Immunogenicity and efficacy of immunodeficiency virus-like particles pseudotyped with the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kuate, Seraphin; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Stoiber, Heribert; Nchinda, Godwin; Floto, Anja; Franz, Monika; Sauermann, Ulrike; Bredl, Simon; Deml, Ludwig; Ignatius, Ralf; Norley, Steve; Racz, Paul; Tenner-Racz, Klara; Steinman, Ralph M.; Wagner, Ralf; Uberla, Klaus . E-mail: klaus.ueberla@ruhr-uni-bochum.de

    2006-07-20

    Vaccination with exogenous antigens such as recombinant viral proteins, immunodeficiency virus-derived whole inactivated virus particles, or virus-like particles (VLP) has generally failed to provide sufficient protection in animal models for AIDS. Pseudotyping VLPs with the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G), which is known to mediate entry into dendritic cells, might allow more efficient stimulation of immune responses. Therefore, we pseudotyped noninfectious immunodeficiency virus-like particles with VSV-G and carried out a preliminary screen of their immunogenicity and vaccination efficacy. Incorporation of VSV-G into HIV-1 VLPs led to hundred-fold higher antibody titers to HIV-1 Gag and enhancement of T cell responses in mice. Repeated vaccination of rhesus monkeys for 65 weeks with VSV-G pseudotyped simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-like particles (VLP[G]) provided initial evidence for efficient suppression of viral load after mucosal challenge with the SIVmac239 virus. Challenge of monkeys after a 28 week vaccination regimen with VLP[G] led to a reduction in peak viremia, but persistent suppression of viral load was not achieved. Due to limitations in the number of animals available for this study, improved efficacy of VSV-G pseudotyped VLPs in nonhuman primates could not be demonstrated. However, mouse experiments revealed that pseudotyping of VLPs with fusion-competent VSV-G clearly improves their immunogenicity. Additional strategies, particularly adjuvants, should be considered to provide greater protection against a challenge with pathogenic immunodeficiency virus.

  2. Specific Initiation Site for Simian Virus 40 Deoxyribonucleic Acid Replication

    PubMed Central

    Thoren, Marilyn M.; Sebring, Edwin D.; Salzman, Norman P.

    1972-01-01

    Replicating simian virus 40 (SV40) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules have been isolated under conditions in which the newly synthesized DNA is uniformly labeled with 3H-thymidine. These newly synthesized strands are released from the replicative intermediate molecules by alkaline treatment, and it has been possible to isolate single-stranded SV40 DNA which varies in size from 157,000 daltons (from molecules that are 10% replicated) to 1,360,000 daltons (85% replicated). The rates of duplex formation of newly synthesized DNA have been used to relate their genetic complexity to the extent of DNA replication. As DNA replication proceeds, the time required to effect 50% renaturation of the newly synthesized DNA increases at a proportional rate. The data establish that DNA replication is not initiated at random, but rather that there is a single specific initiation site for DNA replication. PMID:4342054

  3. Origin and Direction of Simian Virus 40 Deoxyribonucleic Acid Replication

    PubMed Central

    Fareed, George C.; Garon, Claude F.; Salzman, Norman P.

    1972-01-01

    Double-branched, circular, replicating deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules of simian virus 40 (SV40) have been cleaved by the R1 restriction endonuclease from Escherichia coli. This enzyme introduces one double-strand break in SV40 DNA, at a specific site. The site of cleavage in the replicating molecules was used in this study to position the origin and the two branch points. Radioactively labeled molecules fractionated according to their extent of replication were evaluated after cleavage by sedimentation analysis and electron microscopy. The results demonstrate that the R1 cleavage site is 33% of the genome length from the origin of replication and that both branch points are growing points. These data indicate that SV40 DNA replication is bidirectional and confirm other reports which have shown a unique origin of replication. Images PMID:4342055

  4. Molecular evidence of simian virus 40 infections in children

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butel, J. S.; Arrington, A. S.; Wong, C.; Lednicky, J. A.; Finegold, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies have detected simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA in certain human tumors and normal tissues. The significance of human infections by SV40, which was first discovered as a contaminant of poliovirus vaccines used between 1955 and 1963, remains unknown. The occurrence of SV40 infections in unselected hospitalized children was evaluated. Polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequence analyses were done on archival tissue specimens from patients positive for SV40 neutralizing antibody. SV40 DNA was identified in samples from 4 of 20 children (1 Wilms' tumor, 3 transplanted kidney samples). Sequence variation among SV40 regulatory regions ruled out laboratory contamination of specimens. This study shows the presence of SV40 infections in pediatric patients born after 1982.

  5. Simian virus 40 transformation, malignant mesothelioma and brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Fang; Carbone, Michele; Yang, Haining; Gaudino, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) is a DNA virus isolated in 1960 from contaminated polio vaccines, that induces mesotheliomas, lymphomas, brain and bone tumors, and sarcomas, including osteosarcomas, in hamsters. These same tumor types have been found to contain SV40 DNA and proteins in humans. Mesotheliomas and brain tumors are the two tumor types that have been most consistently associated with SV40, and the range of positivity has varied about from 6 to 60%, although a few reported 100% of positivity and a few reported 0%. It appears unlikely that SV40 infection alone is sufficient to cause human malignancy, as we did not observe an epidemic of cancers following the administration of SV40-contaminated vaccines. However, it seems possible that SV40 may act as a cofactor in the pathogenesis of some tumors. In vitro and animal experiments showing cocarcinogenicity between SV40 and asbestos support this hypothesis. PMID:21955238

  6. Transformation of mouse macrophages by simian virus 40.

    PubMed

    Stone, L B; Takemoto, K K

    1970-11-01

    Studies were undertaken to prove that simian virus 40 (SV40) can transform the mouse macrophage, a cell type naturally restricted from deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replication. Balb/C macrophages infected with SV40 demonstrated T-antigen production and induced DNA synthesis simultaneously. In the absence of apparent division, these cells remained T antigen-positive for at least 45 days. SV40 could be rescued from nondividing, unaltered macrophages during the T antigen-producing period. Proliferating transformants appeared at an average of 66 days post-SV40 infection. Established cell lines were T antigen-positive and were negative for infectious virus, but yielded SV40 after fusion with African green monkey kidney cells. Their identity as transformed macrophages was substantiated by evaluation of cellular morphology, phagocytosis, acid phosphatase, beta(1c) synthesis, and aminoacridine incorporation. PMID:4320698

  7. A novel intronic splice site deletion of the IL-2 receptor common gamma chain results in expression of a dysfunctional protein and T-cell-positive X-linked Severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Gray, P E A; Logan, G J; Alexander, I E; Poulton, S; Roscioli, T; Ziegler, J

    2015-02-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency is caused by mutations in the IL-2 receptor common gamma chain and classically presents in the first 6 months of life with predisposition to bacterial, viral and fungal infections. In most instances, affected individuals are lymphopenic with near complete absence of T cells and NK cells. We report a boy who presented at 12 months of age with Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia and a family history consistent with X-linked recessive inheritance. He had a normal lymphocyte count including the presence of T cells and a broad T-cell-receptor diversity, as well as normal surface expression of the common gamma chain (CD132) protein. He however had profound hypogammaglobulinaemia, and IL-2-induced STAT5 phosphorylation was absent. Sequencing of IL-2RG demonstrated a 12-base pair intronic deletion close to the canonical splice site of exon 5, which resulted in a variety of truncated IL2RG mRNA species. A review of the literature identified 4 other patients with T-cell-positive X-SCID, with the current patient being the first associated with an mRNA splicing defect. This case raises the question of how a dysfunctional protein incapable of mediating STAT5 phosphorylation might nonetheless support T-cell development. Possible explanations are that STAT5-mediated signal transduction may be less relevant to IL7-receptor-mediated T-cell development than are other IL7R-induced intracellular transduction pathways or that a low level of STAT5 phosphorylation, undetectable in the laboratory, may be sufficient to support some T-cell development. PMID:25443657

  8. Diagnosis of severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gennery, A; Cant, A

    2001-01-01

    Early diagnosis of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is important to enable prompt referral to a supraregional centre for bone marrow transplantation before the occurrence of end organ damage secondary to infective complications. This review outlines clinical, microbiological, and immunopathological clues that aid the diagnosis of SCID and emphasises the multidisciplinary approach needed to diagnose and treat these infants. Key Words: severe combined immunodeficiency • bone marrow transplantation • adenosine deaminase deficiency PMID:11253129

  9. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Infectivity and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how the infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) results in a profound immunosuppression due predominantly to a selective depletion of helper/inducer T lymphocytes that express the receptor for the virus, as well as neuropsychiatric abnormalities in the brain. (TW)

  10. Slower uncoating is associated with impaired replicative capability of simian-tropic HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Kono, Ken; Takeda, Eri; Tsutsui, Hiromi; Kuroishi, Ayumu; Hulme, Amy E; Hope, Thomas J; Nakayama, Emi E; Shioda, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) productively infects only humans and chimpanzees, but not Old World monkeys, such as rhesus and cynomolgus (CM) monkeys. To establish a monkey model of HIV-1/AIDS, several HIV-1 derivatives have been constructed. We previously generated a simian-tropic HIV-1 that replicates efficiently in CM cells. This virus encodes a capsid protein (CA) with SIVmac239-derived loops between α-helices 4 and 5 (L4/5) and between α-helices 6 and 7 (L6/7), along with the entire vif from SIVmac239 (NL-4/5S6/7SvifS). These SIVmac239-derived sequences were expected to protect the virus from HIV-1 restriction factors in monkey cells. However, the replicative capability of NL-4/5S6/7SvifS in human cells was severely impaired. By long-term cultivation of human CEM-SS cells infected with NL-4/5S6/7SvifS, we succeeded in partially rescuing the impaired replicative capability of the virus in human cells. This adapted virus encoded a G-to-E substitution at the 116(th) position of the CA (NL-4/5SG116E6/7SvifS). In the work described here, we explored the mechanism by which the replicative capability of NL-4/5S6/7SvifS was impaired in human cells. Quantitative analysis (by real-time PCR) of viral DNA synthesis from infected cells revealed that NL-4/5S6/7SvifS had a major defect in nuclear entry. Mutations in CA are known to affect viral core stability and result in deleterious effects in HIV-1 infection; therefore, we measured the kinetics of uncoating of these viruses. The uncoating of NL-4/5S6/7SvifS was significantly slower than that of wild type HIV-1 (WT), whereas the uncoating of NL-4/5SG116E6/7SvifS was similar to that of WT. Our results suggested that the lower replicative capability of NL-4/5S6/7SvifS in human cells was, at least in part, due to the slower uncoating of this virus. PMID:23967315

  11. Localization of the receptor gene for type D simian retroviruses on human chromosome 19.

    PubMed Central

    Sommerfelt, M A; Williams, B P; McKnight, A; Goodfellow, P N; Weiss, R A

    1990-01-01

    Simian retrovirus (SRV) serotypes 1 to 5 are exogenous type D viruses causing immune suppression in macaque monkeys. These viruses exhibit receptor interference with each other, with two endogenous type D viruses of the langur (PO-1-Lu) and squirrel monkey, and with two type C retroviruses, feline endogenous virus (RD114/CCC) and baboon endogenous virus (BaEV), indicating that each utilizes the same cell surface receptor (M. A. Sommerfelt and R. A. Weiss, Virology 176:58-69, 1990). Vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotype particles bearing envelope glycoproteins of RD114, BaEV, and the seven SRV strains were employed to detect receptors expressed in human-rodent somatic cell hybrids segregating human chromosomes. The only human chromosome common to all the susceptible hybrids was chromosome 19. By using hybrids retaining different fragments of chromosome 19, a provisional subchromosomal localization of the receptor gene was made to 19q13.1-13.2. Antibodies previously reported to be specific to a BaEV receptor (L. Thiry, J. Cogniaux-Leclerc, R. Olislager, S. Sprecher-Goldberger, and P. Burkens, J. Virol. 48:697-708, 1983) did not block BaEV, RD114, or SRV pseudotypes or syncytia. Antibodies to known surface markers determined by genes mapped to chromosome 19 did not block virus-receptor interaction. The identity of the receptor remains to be determined. PMID:2173788

  12. Transcriptional trans activators of human and simian foamy viruses contain a small, highly conserved activation domain.

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, E D; He, F; Bogerd, H P; Cullen, B R

    1993-01-01

    The Bel-1 protein of human foamy virus is a potent transcriptional trans activator of its homologous long terminal repeat promoter element. Here, we demonstrate that Bel-1 can also efficiently activate gene expression when targeted to a heterologous promoter by fusion to the DNA-binding motif of the yeast GAL4 protein. Analysis of a series of deletion mutants of Bel-1 generated in this hybrid protein context suggests the presence of a single transcription activation domain that is fully contained within a discrete, approximately 30-amino-acid segment located proximal to the Bel-1 carboxy terminus. Although this short motif can be shown to function effectively in eukaryotic cells of mammalian, avian, and fungal origin, it does not bear any evident sequence homology to the known classes of eukaryotic activation domain. However, this Bel-1 activation domain was found to be fully conserved, in terms of both biological activity and location, in the distantly related Taf trans activator of simian foamy virus type 1. Images PMID:8411385

  13. Cloning and sequencing of viral integration site in human fibroblasts immortalized by simian virus 40.

    PubMed

    Yano, O; Hirano, H; Karasaki, Y; Higashi, K; Nakamura, H; Akiya, S; Gotoh, S

    1991-02-01

    We have analyzed cellular DNA sequences at the viral genome integration site in a human fibroblast cell line VA13 immortalized by simian virus 40 (SV40). The computer analysis of the junctional cellular DNA sequences did not show any homology to the DNA sequences previously reported. This suggests that immortalization by SV40 was not induced by the destruction of any known oncogene or anti-oncogene at the integration site. We did not find the precise substantial sequence homology at the junctional site between the cellular DNA and SV40 DNA, indicating that the recombination mechanism involved does not require precise sequence homology and therefore, SV40 genome was probably not integrated by homologous recombination. Short direct and inverted repeats of 5 to 29 nucleotides were found in the junctional cellular and SV40 DNA. Cellular DNA abutting SV40 DNA was found by the Northern blot analysis to be expressed in diploid human fibroblasts and SV40-transformed cells. The nature of this RNA is now under study. PMID:1851675

  14. Divergent Annexin A1 expression in periphery and gut is associated with systemic immune activation and impaired