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Sample records for expression levels contribute

  1. TRPV1 expression level in isolectin B₄-positive neurons contributes to mouse strain difference in cutaneous thermal nociceptive sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ono, Kentaro; Ye, Yi; Viet, Chi T; Dang, Dongmin; Schmidt, Brian L

    2015-05-01

    Differential thermal nociception across inbred mouse strains has genetic determinants. Thermal nociception is largely attributed to the heat/capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1); however, the contribution of this channel to the genetics of thermal nociception has not been revealed. In this study we compared TRPV1 expression levels and electrophysiological properties in primary sensory neurons and thermal nociceptive behaviors between two (C57BL/6 and BALB/c) inbred mouse strains. Using immunofluorescence and patch-clamp physiology methods, we demonstrated that TRPV1 expression was significantly higher in isolectin B4 (IB4)-positive trigeminal sensory neurons of C57BL/6 relative to BALB/c; the expression in IB4-negative neurons was similar between the strains. Furthermore, using electrophysiological cell classification (current signature method), we showed differences between the two strains in capsaicin sensitivity in IB4-positive neuronal cell types 2 and 13, which were previously reported as skin nociceptors. Otherwise electrophysiological membrane properties of the classified cell types were similar in the two mouse strains. In publicly available nocifensive behavior data and our own behavior data from the using the two mouse strains, C57BL/6 exhibited higher sensitivity to heat stimulation than BALB/c, independent of sex and anatomical location of thermal testing (the tail, hind paw, and whisker pad). The TRPV1-selective antagonist JNJ-17203212 inhibited thermal nociception in both strains; however, removing IB4-positive trigeminal sensory neurons with IB4-conjugated saporin inhibited thermal nociception on the whisker pad in C57BL/6 but not in BALB/c. These results suggest that TRPV1 expression levels in IB4-positive type 2 and 13 neurons contributed to differential thermal nociception in skin of C57BL/6 compared with BALB/c. PMID:25787958

  2. Low-level expression and reversion both contribute to reactivation of herpes simplex virus drug-resistant mutants with mutations on homopolymeric sequences in thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Anthony; Link, Malen A; Furness, Caroline L; Coen, Donald M

    2006-07-01

    Many acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus isolates from patients contain insertions or deletions in homopolymeric sequences in the thymidine kinase (TK) gene (tk). Viruses that have one (G8) or two (G9) base insertions in a run of seven G's (G string) synthesize low levels of active TK (TK-low phenotype), evidently via ribosomal frameshifting. These levels of TK can suffice to permit reactivation from latently infected mouse ganglia, but in a majority of ganglia, especially with the G9 virus, reactivation of virus that has reverted to the TK-positive phenotype predominates. To help address the relative contributions of translational mechanisms and reversion in reactivation, we generated viruses with a base either inserted or deleted just downstream of the G string. Both of these viruses had a TK-low phenotype similar to that of the G8 and G9 viruses but with less reversion. Both of these viruses reactivated from latently infected trigeminal ganglia, albeit inefficiently, and most viruses that reactivated had a uniformly TK-low phenotype. We also generated viruses that have one insertion in a run of six C's or one deletion in a run of five C's. These viruses lack measurable TK activity. However, they reactivated from latently infected ganglia, albeit inefficiently, with the reactivating viruses having reverted to the wild-type TK phenotype. Therefore, for G-string mutants, levels of active TK as low as 0.25% generated by translational mechanisms can suffice for reactivation, but reversion can also contribute. For viruses that lack TK activity due to mutations on other homopolymeric sequences, reactivation can occur via reversion. PMID:16775343

  3. Low-Level Expression and Reversion both Contribute to Reactivation of Herpes Simplex Virus Drug-Resistant Mutants with Mutations on Homopolymeric Sequences in Thymidine Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Anthony; Link, Malen A.; Furness, Caroline L.; Coen, Donald M.

    2006-01-01

    Many acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus isolates from patients contain insertions or deletions in homopolymeric sequences in the thymidine kinase (TK) gene (tk). Viruses that have one (G8) or two (G9) base insertions in a run of seven G's (G string) synthesize low levels of active TK (TK-low phenotype), evidently via ribosomal frameshifting. These levels of TK can suffice to permit reactivation from latently infected mouse ganglia, but in a majority of ganglia, especially with the G9 virus, reactivation of virus that has reverted to the TK-positive phenotype predominates. To help address the relative contributions of translational mechanisms and reversion in reactivation, we generated viruses with a base either inserted or deleted just downstream of the G string. Both of these viruses had a TK-low phenotype similar to that of the G8 and G9 viruses but with less reversion. Both of these viruses reactivated from latently infected trigeminal ganglia, albeit inefficiently, and most viruses that reactivated had a uniformly TK-low phenotype. We also generated viruses that have one insertion in a run of six C's or one deletion in a run of five C's. These viruses lack measurable TK activity. However, they reactivated from latently infected ganglia, albeit inefficiently, with the reactivating viruses having reverted to the wild-type TK phenotype. Therefore, for G-string mutants, levels of active TK as low as 0.25% generated by translational mechanisms can suffice for reactivation, but reversion can also contribute. For viruses that lack TK activity due to mutations on other homopolymeric sequences, reactivation can occur via reversion. PMID:16775343

  4. Contributions of Word-Level and Verbal Skills to Written Expression: Comparison of Learners Who Speak English as a First (L1) and Second Language (L2)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babayigit, Selma

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the role of word-level and verbal skills in writing quality of learners who spoke English as a first (L1) and second (L2) language. One hundred and sixty-eight L1 and L2 learners (M = 115.38 months, SD = 3.57 months) participated in the study. All testing was conducted in English. There was a statistically significant L1…

  5. Time-dependent miR-16 serum fluctuations together with reciprocal changes in the expression level of miR-16 in mesocortical circuit contribute to stress resilient phenotype in chronic mild stress - An animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Zurawek, Dariusz; Kusmider, Maciej; Faron-Gorecka, Agata; Gruca, Piotr; Pabian, Paulina; Kolasa, Magdalena; Solich, Joanna; Szafran-Pilch, Kinga; Papp, Mariusz; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in stress-related pathologies. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying stress resilience are elusive. Using chronic mild stress (CMS), an animal model of depression, we identified animals exhibiting a resilient phenotype. We investigated serum levels of corticosterone, melatonin and 376 mature miRNAs to find peripheral biomarkers associated with the resilient phenotype. miR-16, selected during screening step, was assayed in different brain regions in order to find potential relationship between brain and peripheral alterations in response to stress. Two CMS experiments that lasted for 2 and 7 consecutive weeks were performed. During both CMS procedures, sucrose consumption levels were significantly decreased in anhedonic-like animals (p<0.0001) compared with unstressed animals, whereas the drinking profiles of resilient rats did not change despite the rats being stressed. Serum corticosterone measurements indicated that anhedonic-like animals had blunted hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, whereas resilient animals exhibited dynamic responses to stress. miRNA profiling revealed that resilient animals had elevated serum levels of miR-16 after 7 weeks of CMS (adjusted p-value<0.007). Moreover, resilient animals exhibited reciprocal changes in miR-16 expression level in mesocortical pathway after 2 weeks of CMS (p<0.008). A bioinformatic analysis showed that miR-16 regulates genes involved in the functioning of the nervous system in both humans and rodents. Resilient animals can actively cope with stress on a biochemical level and miR-16 may contribute to a "stress-resistant" behavioral phenotype by pleiotropic modulation of the expression of genes involved in the function of the nervous system. PMID:26628105

  6. Differences in gene expression levels and in enzymatic qualities account for the uneven contribution of superoxide dismutases SodCI and SodCII to pathogenicity in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Bossi, Nara; Ammendola, Serena; Bossi, Lionello

    2006-05-01

    Most Salmonella enterica serovars produce two periplasmic [Cu,Zn] superoxide dismutases, SodCI, which is prophage encoded, and SodCII, encoded by a conserved chromosomal gene. Both enzymes were proposed to enhance Salmonella virulence by protecting bacteria against products of macrophage oxidative burst. However, we previously found SodCI, but not SodCII, to play a role during mouse infection by S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Here we have extended these findings to another serovar of epidemiological relevance: sv Enteritidis. In both serovars, the dominant role of SodCI in virulence correlates with its higher levels in bacteria proliferating in mouse tissues, relative to SodCII. To analyze the basis of these differences, the coding sequences of sodCI and sodCII genes were exchanged with the reciprocal 5'-regions (in serovar Typhimurium). The accumulation patterns of the two proteins in vivo were reversed as a result, indicating that the regulatory determinants lie entirely within the regions upstream from the initiation codon. In the construct with the sodCI gene fused to the sodCII 5'-region, SodCI contribution to virulence was reduced but remained significant. Thus, both, high-level expression and some unidentified qualities of the enzyme participate in the phenotypic dominance of SodCI over SodCII in Salmonella pathogenicity. PMID:16697686

  7. Darwin's contributions to our understanding of emotional expressions

    PubMed Central

    Ekman, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Darwin charted the field of emotional expressions with five major contributions. Possible explanations of why he was able to make such important and lasting contributions are proposed. A few of the important questions that he did not consider are described. Two of those questions have been answered at least in part; one remains a major gap in our understanding of emotion. PMID:19884139

  8. Darwin's contributions to our understanding of emotional expressions.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Paul

    2009-12-12

    Darwin charted the field of emotional expressions with five major contributions. Possible explanations of why he was able to make such important and lasting contributions are proposed. A few of the important questions that he did not consider are described. Two of those questions have been answered at least in part; one remains a major gap in our understanding of emotion. PMID:19884139

  9. NORMAL NASAL GENE EXPRESSION LEVELS USING CDNA ARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Normal Nasal Gene Expression Levels Using cDNA Array Technology.

    The nasal epithelium is a target site for chemically-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity. To detect and analyze genetic events which contribute to nasal tumor development, we first defined the gene expressi...

  10. Sexual differences of imprinted genes' expression levels.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Mohammad; Kim, Hana; Kim, Joomyeong

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, genomic imprinting has evolved as a dosage-controlling mechanism for a subset of genes that play critical roles in their unusual reproduction scheme involving viviparity and placentation. As such, many imprinted genes are highly expressed in sex-specific reproductive organs. In the current study, we sought to test whether imprinted genes are differentially expressed between the two sexes. According to the results, the expression levels of the following genes differ between the two sexes of mice: Peg3, Zim1, Igf2, H19 and Zac1. The expression levels of these imprinted genes are usually greater in males than in females. This bias is most obvious in the developing brains of 14.5-dpc embryos, but also detected in the brains of postnatal-stage mice. However, this sexual bias is not obvious in 10.5-dpc embryos, a developmental stage before the sexual differentiation. Thus, the sexual bias observed in the imprinted genes is most likely attributable by gonadal hormones rather than by sex chromosome complement. Overall, the results indicate that several imprinted genes are sexually different in terms of their expression levels, and further suggest that the transcriptional regulation of these imprinted genes may be influenced by unknown mechanisms associated with sexual differentiation. PMID:24125951

  11. Population-level control of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevozhay, Dmitry; Adams, Rhys; van Itallie, Elizabeth; Bennett, Matthew; Balazsi, Gabor

    2011-03-01

    Gene expression is the process that translates genetic information into proteins, that determine the way cells live, function and even die. It was demonstrated that cells with identical genomes exposed to the same environment can differ in their protein composition and therefore phenotypes. Protein levels can vary between cells due to the stochastic nature of intracellular biochemical events, indicating that the genotype-phenotype connection is not deterministic at the cellular level. We asked whether genomes could encode isogenic cell populations more reliably than single cells. To address this question, we built two gene circuits to control three cell population-level characteristics: gene expression mean, coefficient of variation and non-genetic memory of previous expression states. Indeed, we found that these population-level characteristics were more predictable than the gene expression of single cells in a well-controlled environment. This research was supported by the NIH Director's New Innovator Award 1DP2 OD006481-01 and Welch Foundation Grant C-1729.

  12. How to achieve high-level expression of microbial enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Yang, Haiquan; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Microbial enzymes have been used in a large number of fields, such as chemical, agricultural and biopharmaceutical industries. The enzyme production rate and yield are the main factors to consider when choosing the appropriate expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. Recombinant enzymes have been expressed in bacteria (e.g., Escherichia coli, Bacillus and lactic acid bacteria), filamentous fungi (e.g., Aspergillus) and yeasts (e.g., Pichia pastoris). The favorable and very advantageous characteristics of these species have resulted in an increasing number of biotechnological applications. Bacterial hosts (e.g., E. coli) can be used to quickly and easily overexpress recombinant enzymes; however, bacterial systems cannot express very large proteins and proteins that require post-translational modifications. The main bacterial expression hosts, with the exception of lactic acid bacteria and filamentous fungi, can produce several toxins which are not compatible with the expression of recombinant enzymes in food and drugs. However, due to the multiplicity of the physiological impacts arising from high-level expression of genes encoding the enzymes and expression hosts, the goal of overproduction can hardly be achieved, and therefore, the yield of recombinant enzymes is limited. In this review, the recent strategies used for the high-level expression of microbial enzymes in the hosts mentioned above are summarized and the prospects are also discussed. We hope this review will contribute to the development of the enzyme-related research field. PMID:23686280

  13. Contribution of Groundwater Depletion to Global Mean Sea Level Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambinicio, A.; An, K.; Reager, J. T.; Druffel-Rodriguez, R. E.; Richey, A. S.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Rodell, M.

    2012-12-01

    The contribution of groundwater depletion to Global Mean Sea Level Rise (GMSLR) is an important topic and source of great uncertainty in the GMSLR budget. This research uses gridded GRACE Tellus satellite data to quantify changes in total land water storage, including those of groundwater. Global Land Data Assimilation System land components such as soil moisture, canopy moisture, and snow, are subtracted from the GRACE data to isolate the groundwater component. The resulting trends show that most continents are gaining in groundwater storage, which is consistent with GRACE-based estimates of zero-to-increasing changes in total land water. Results indicate a negative contribution to GMSLR for the GRACE time period, which is in contrast to the positive contribution identified in recent studies.

  14. Distinct contributions of the amygdala and hippocampus to fear expression

    PubMed Central

    Chudasama, Yogita; Izquierdo, Alicia; Murray, Elisabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study attempted to distinguish the independent contributions of the amygdala and hippocampus to fear expression. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with bilateral excitotoxic amygdala lesions (n=4), bilateral excitotoxic hippocampal lesions (n=8), and unoperated controls (n=9) were allowed to reach over a neutral junk object or fear-provoking stimulus (i.e., a rubber snake or a jumping rubber spider) to retrieve a food reward. Monkeys were exposed to each stimulus for 30 seconds. On each trial we recorded the monkey's latency to retrieve the food reward and scored monkeys' whole-body reactions to the object. Confirming previous work we found that, relative to controls, both operated groups showed shorter food-retrieval latencies and exhibited fewer defensive and more approach behaviors when exposed to the fear-provoking stimuli. However, only monkeys with amygdala lesions showed an abnormal, excessive visual interest in the snake and spider. By contrast, monkeys with hippocampal lesions displayed behaviors that were unrelated to the presence of the fear stimuli, thereby indicating a lack of interest in, and emotional reactivity towards, the snake and spider. These data show that the hippocampus and amygdala contribute independently to the overall expression of defensive responses. PMID:20092575

  15. Contribution of Network Connectivity in Determining the Relationship between Gene Expression and Metabolite Concentration Changes

    PubMed Central

    Zelezniak, Aleksej; Sheridan, Steven; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb

    2014-01-01

    One of the primary mechanisms through which a cell exerts control over its metabolic state is by modulating expression levels of its enzyme-coding genes. However, the changes at the level of enzyme expression allow only indirect control over metabolite levels, for two main reasons. First, at the level of individual reactions, metabolite levels are non-linearly dependent on enzyme abundances as per the reaction kinetics mechanisms. Secondly, specific metabolite pools are tightly interlinked with the rest of the metabolic network through their production and consumption reactions. While the role of reaction kinetics in metabolite concentration control is well studied at the level of individual reactions, the contribution of network connectivity has remained relatively unclear. Here we report a modeling framework that integrates both reaction kinetics and network connectivity constraints for describing the interplay between metabolite concentrations and mRNA levels. We used this framework to investigate correlations between the gene expression and the metabolite concentration changes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during its metabolic cycle, as well as in response to three fundamentally different biological perturbations, namely gene knockout, nutrient shock and nutrient change. While the kinetic constraints applied at the level of individual reactions were found to be poor descriptors of the mRNA-metabolite relationship, their use in the context of the network enabled us to correlate changes in the expression of enzyme-coding genes to the alterations in metabolite levels. Our results highlight the key contribution of metabolic network connectivity in mediating cellular control over metabolite levels, and have implications towards bridging the gap between genotype and metabolic phenotype. PMID:24762675

  16. Sex Bias and Maternal Contribution to Gene Expression Divergence in Drosophila Blastoderm Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Mathilde; Villalta, Jacqueline E.; Eisen, Michael B.; Lott, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Early embryogenesis is a unique developmental stage where genetic control of development is handed off from mother to zygote. Yet the contribution of this transition to the evolution of gene expression is poorly understood. Here we study two aspects of gene expression specific to early embryogenesis in Drosophila: sex-biased gene expression prior to the onset of canonical X chromosomal dosage compensation, and the contribution of maternally supplied mRNAs. We sequenced mRNAs from individual unfertilized eggs and precisely staged and sexed blastoderm embryos, and compared levels between D. melanogaster, D. yakuba, D. pseudoobscura and D. virilis. First, we find that mRNA content is highly conserved for a given stage and that studies relying on pooled embryos likely systematically overstate the degree of gene expression divergence. Unlike studies done on larvae and adults where most species show a larger proportion of genes with male-biased expression, we find that transcripts in Drosophila embryos are largely female-biased in all species, likely due to incomplete dosage compensation prior to the activation of the canonical dosage compensation mechanism. The divergence of sex-biased gene expression across species is observed to be often due to lineage-specific decrease of expression; the most drastic example of which is the overall reduction of male expression from the neo-X chromosome in D. pseudoobscura, leading to a pervasive female-bias on this chromosome. We see no evidence for a faster evolution of expression on the X chromosome in embryos (no “faster-X” effect), unlike in adults, and contrary to a previous study on pooled non-sexed embryos. Finally, we find that most genes are conserved in regard to their maternal or zygotic origin of transcription, and present evidence that differences in maternal contribution to the blastoderm transcript pool may be due to species-specific divergence of transcript degradation rates. PMID:26485701

  17. Contribution of small glaciers to global sea level

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    Observed long-term changes in glacier volume and hydrometeorological mass balance models yield data on the transfer of water from glaciers, excluding those in Greenland and Antarctica, to the oceans, The average observed volume change for the period 1900 to 1961 is scaled to a global average by use of the seasonal amplitude of the mass balance. These data are used to calibrate the models to estimate the changing contribution of glaciers to sea level for the period 1884 to 1975. Although the error band is large, these glaciers appear to accountfor a third to half of observed rise in sea level, approximately that fraction not explained by thermal expansion of the ocean.

  18. Altered neurofilament expression does not contribute to Lewy body formation.

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, C.; Petrunka, C.; Weyer, L.; Pollanen, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    Lewy bodies (LBs) are cytoskeletal alterations found in several neurodegenerative disorders. Although neurofilaments are the main constituent of the LB, the precise mechanisms that underlie their formation remain speculative. To examine the pathogenesis of this inclusion, we measured the mRNA level of the low molecular weight neurofilament subunit in the nigral dopaminergic neurons of patients with LB disorders and neurologically normal controls. We found a small but significant decrease in the mean mRNA values in the LB group as compared with controls. However, a comparison of LB-bearing and non-LB-bearing neurons on the same section showed no significant difference between these two neuronal populations. We conclude that altered neurofilament expression is not a major contributory event in the pathogenesis of the LB. The decrease in neurofilament mRNA expression observed in the overall nigral dopaminergic neuronal population of LB disorders probably represents a nonspecific response to neuronal injury independent of LB formation. Images Figure 1 PMID:8546215

  19. Anomalies Thermosteric and Halosteric Contributions to Sea Level Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, C. E.; Polito, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    Sea level anomaly (SLA) is an important indicator of changes in the Earth's climate system because the oceans have great heat storage capacity. The sea level variation is due to combination of thermosteric and halosteric effects. These two effects play significant roles in the annual cycle of the SLA and maintain the thermohaline circulation. Previous studies only considered the thermosteric effect. The main goal of this study was to determine the regions of the global ocean where the variability induced by halosteric effect is equal or higher than that induced by thermosteric effect. We used temperature and salinity data from World Ocean Atlas 2013 (WOA13) with spatial resolution of 1°x1° during the period of 1955 to 2012 to calculate the coefficient of thermal expansion (α), haline contraction (β) and to estimate their contributions to the SLA variation in the global ocean. Our results showed that the thermosteric effect is dominant in the tropical and subtropical regions due to high insolation throughout the year. However, in polar regions, North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans the halosteric effect was the main contributor to SLA variation. In polar regions, the effect occurs because of the lack in temperature variation and the fact that in this region the precipitation rate exceeds evaporation increasing the freshwater input. In the others, the mechanism is still unknown. The linear trend of thermosteric and halosteric components for 1955-2012 is 0.35mm/yr and 0.07mm/yr, respectively. This results shows that halosteric effect should be considered in the heat storage estimation from satellite data, in situ data and numerical modelling contrasting the previous approaches to SLA.

  20. Maternal mortality in rural Gambia: levels, causes and contributing factors.

    PubMed Central

    Walraven, G.; Telfer, M.; Rowley, J.; Ronsmans, C.

    2000-01-01

    A demographic study carried out in a rural area of the Gambia between January 1993 and December 1998 recorded 74 deaths among women aged 15-49 years. Reported here is an estimation of maternal mortality among these 74 deaths based on a survey of reproductive age mortality, which identified 18 maternal deaths by verbal autopsy. Over the same period there were 4245 live births in the study area, giving a maternal mortality ratio of 424 per 100,000 live births. This maternal mortality estimate is substantially lower than estimates made in the 1980s, which ranged from 1005 to 2362 per 100,000 live births, in the same area. A total of 9 of the 18 deaths had a direct obstetric cause--haemorrhage (6 deaths), early pregnancy (2), and obstructed labour (1). Indirect causes of obstetric deaths were anaemia (4 deaths), hepatitis (1), and undetermined (4). Low standards of health care for obstetric referrals, failure to recognize the severity of the problem at the community level, delays in starting the decision-making process to seek health care, lack of transport, and substandard primary health care were identified more than once as probable or possible contributing factors to these maternal deaths. PMID:10859854

  1. MicroRNA-126 Inhibits SOX2 Expression and Contributes to Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Otsubo, Takeshi; Akiyama, Yoshimitsu; Hashimoto, Yutaka; Shimada, Shu; Goto, Kentaro; Yuasa, Yasuhito

    2011-01-01

    Background SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 2 (SOX2) is a crucial transcription factor for the maintenance of embryonic stem cell pluripotency and the determination of cell fate. Previously, we demonstrated that SOX2 plays important roles in growth inhibition through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and that SOX2 expression is frequently down-regulated in gastric cancers. However, the mechanisms underlying loss of SOX2 expression and its target genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we assessed whether microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate SOX2 expression in gastric cancers. Furthermore, we attempted to find downstream target genes of SOX2 contributing to gastric carcinogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed in silico analysis and focused on miRNA-126 (miR-126) as a potential SOX2 regulator. Gain- and loss-of function experiments and luciferase assays revealed that miR-126 inhibited SOX2 expression by targeting two binding sites in the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of SOX2 mRNA in multiple cell lines. In addition, miR-126 was highly expressed in some cultured and primary gastric cancer cells with low SOX2 protein levels. Furthermore, exogenous miR-126 over-expression as well as siRNA-mediated knockdown of SOX2 significantly enhanced the anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of gastric cancer cell lines. We next performed microarray analysis after SOX2 over-expression in a gastric cancer cell line, and found that expression of the placenta-specific 1 (PLAC1) gene was significantly down-regulated by SOX2 over-expression. siRNA- and miR-126-mediated SOX2 knockdown experiments revealed that miR-126 positively regulated PLAC1 expression through suppression of SOX2 expression in gastric cancer cells. Conclusions Taken together, our results indicate that miR-126 is a novel miRNA that targets SOX2, and PLAC1 may be a novel downstream target gene of SOX2 in gastric cancer cells. These findings suggest that aberrant over-expression

  2. Fashioning the Face: Sensorimotor Simulation Contributes to Facial Expression Recognition.

    PubMed

    Wood, Adrienne; Rychlowska, Magdalena; Korb, Sebastian; Niedenthal, Paula

    2016-03-01

    When we observe a facial expression of emotion, we often mimic it. This automatic mimicry reflects underlying sensorimotor simulation that supports accurate emotion recognition. Why this is so is becoming more obvious: emotions are patterns of expressive, behavioral, physiological, and subjective feeling responses. Activation of one component can therefore automatically activate other components. When people simulate a perceived facial expression, they partially activate the corresponding emotional state in themselves, which provides a basis for inferring the underlying emotion of the expresser. We integrate recent evidence in favor of a role for sensorimotor simulation in emotion recognition. We then connect this account to a domain-general understanding of how sensory information from multiple modalities is integrated to generate perceptual predictions in the brain. PMID:26876363

  3. A promoter-level mammalian expression atlas

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Regulated transcription controls the diversity, developmental pathways and spatial organization of the hundreds of cell types that make up a mammal. Using single-molecule cDNA sequencing, we mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) and their usage in human and mouse primary cells, cell lines and tissues to produce a comprehensive overview of mammalian gene expression across the human body. We find that few genes are truly ‘housekeeping’, whereas many mammalian promoters are composite entities composed of several closely separated TSSs, with independent cell-type-specific expression profiles. TSSs specific to different cell types evolve at different rates, whereas promoters of broadly expressed genes are the most conserved. Promoter-based expression analysis reveals key transcription factors defining cell states and links them to binding-site motifs. The functions of identified novel transcripts can be predicted by coexpression and sample ontology enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of the mammalian genome 5 (FANTOM5) project provides comprehensive expression profiles and functional annotation of mammalian cell-type-specific transcriptomes with wide applications in biomedical research. PMID:24670764

  4. CD36 expression contributes to age induced cardiomyopathy in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiac remodeling and impaired cardiac performance in the elderly significantly increase the risk of developing heart disease. Although vascular abnormalities associated with aging contribute to the age-related decline in cardiac function, myocardium-specific events may also be involved. We show th...

  5. Facial Expressions in Context: Contributions to Infant Emotion Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camras, Linda A.

    To make the point that infant emotions are more dynamic than suggested by Differential Emotions Theory, which maintains that infants show the same prototypical facial expressions for emotions as adults do, this paper explores two questions: (1) when infants experience an emotion, do they always show the corresponding prototypical facial…

  6. Decreased Interleukin-20 Expression in Scleroderma Skin Contributes to Cutaneous Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Hideo; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Asano, Yoshihide; Trojanowska, Maria; Nakayama, Wakana; Inoue, Kuniko; Honda, Noritoshi; Kajihara, Ikko; Makino, Katsunari; Fukushima, Satoshi; Ihn, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To clarify the role of interleukin-20 (IL-20) in the regulatory mechanism of extracellular matrix expression and to determine the contribution of IL-20 to the phenotype of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods Protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of collagen, Fli-1, IL-20, and IL-20 receptor (IL-20R) were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array, immunoblotting, immunohistochemical staining, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and real-time PCR. Results PCR array revealed that IL-20 decreased gene expression of α2(I) collagen (0.03-fold), Smad3 (0.02-fold), and endoglin (0.05-fold) in cultured normal dermal fibroblasts. Fli-1 protein expression was induced by IL-20 (~2-fold). The inhibition of collagen by IL-20, the induction of Fli-1 by IL-20, and the reduction of Smad3 and endoglin by IL-20 were also observed in SSc fibroblasts. Serum IL-20 levels were reduced only slightly in SSc patients but were significantly decreased in patients with scleroderma spectrum disorders (the prodromal stage of SSc) compared with those in normal subjects (111.3 pg/ml versus 180.4 pg/ml; P < 0.05). On the other hand, IL-20 mRNA expression in SSc skin was decreased compared with that in normal skin (P < 0.05), which may result in the induction of collagen synthesis in SSc dermal fibroblasts. IL-20R was expressed in normal and SSc fibroblasts. Moreover, IL-20 supplementation by injection into the skin reversed skin fibrosis induced by bleomycin in mice (~0.5-fold). Conclusion IL-20 reduces basal collagen transcription via Fli-1 induction, while down-regulation of Smad3 and endoglin may cancel the effect of transforming growth factor β in SSc fibroblasts. To confirm the therapeutic value of IL-20 and IL-20R, their function and expression in vivo should be further studied. PMID:24470401

  7. Collagen XIX Is Expressed by Interneurons and Contributes to the Formation of Hippocampal Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jianmin; Gorse, Karen; Ramirez, Francesco; Fox, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules contribute to the formation and maintenance of synapses in the mammalian nervous system. We previously discovered a family of nonfibrillar collagens that organize synaptic differentiation at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Although many NMJ-organizing cues contribute to central nervous system (CNS) synaptogenesis, whether similar roles for collagens exist at central synapses remained unclear. In the present study we discovered that col19a1, the gene encoding nonfibrillar collagen XIX, is expressed by subsets of hippocampal neurons. Colocalization with the interneuron-specific enzyme glutamate decarboxylase 67 (Gad67), but not other cell-type-specific markers, suggests that hippocampal expression of col19a1 is restricted to interneurons. However, not all hippocampal interneurons express col19a1 mRNA; subsets of neuropeptide Y (NPY)-, somatostatin (Som)-, and calbindin (Calb)-immunoreactive interneurons express col19a1, but those containing parvalbumin (Parv) or calretinin (Calr) do not. To assess whether collagen XIX is required for the normal formation of hippocampal synapses, we examined synaptic morphology and composition in targeted mouse mutants lacking collagen XIX. We show here that subsets of synaptotagmin 2 (Syt2)-containing hippocampal nerve terminals appear malformed in the absence of collagen XIX. The presence of Syt2 in inhibitory hippocampal synapses, the altered distribution of Gad67 in collagen XIX-deficient subiculum, and abnormal levels of gephyrin in collagen XIX-deficient hippocampal extracts all suggest inhibitory synapses are affected by the loss of collagen XIX. Together, these data not only reveal that collagen XIX is expressed by central neurons, but show for the first time that a nonfibrillar collagen is necessary for the formation of hippocampal synapses. PMID:19937713

  8. Understanding processes contributing to regional sea level change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stammer, Detlef; Gregory, Jonathan

    2011-09-01

    WCRP/IOC Workshop on Regional Sea-Level Change; Paris, France, 7-9 February 2011 . A joint World Climate Research Programme (WCRP)/Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) workshop was held to discuss regional changes of sea level. The workshop was attended by 41 experts from the world over who compared observed regional sea level changes with those inferred from numerical simulations and compared future predictions and their analyses in terms of processes. Satellite altimetry observations continue to be essential in revealing that sea level is changing prominently on a regional scale. However, existing climate models are largely in disagreement about patterns and magnitudes of observed sea level variability, and it is unclear how accurate they may be in predicting regional sea level.

  9. Emotional expression in music: contribution, linearity, and additivity of primary musical cues.

    PubMed

    Eerola, Tuomas; Friberg, Anders; Bresin, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to manipulate musical cues systematically to determine the aspects of music that contribute to emotional expression, and whether these cues operate in additive or interactive fashion, and whether the cue levels can be characterized as linear or non-linear. An optimized factorial design was used with six primary musical cues (mode, tempo, dynamics, articulation, timbre, and register) across four different music examples. Listeners rated 200 musical examples according to four perceived emotional characters (happy, sad, peaceful, and scary). The results exhibited robust effects for all cues and the ranked importance of these was established by multiple regression. The most important cue was mode followed by tempo, register, dynamics, articulation, and timbre, although the ranking varied across the emotions. The second main result suggested that most cue levels contributed to the emotions in a linear fashion, explaining 77-89% of variance in ratings. Quadratic encoding of cues did lead to minor but significant increases of the models (0-8%). Finally, the interactions between the cues were non-existent suggesting that the cues operate mostly in an additive fashion, corroborating recent findings on emotional expression in music (Juslin and Lindström, 2010). PMID:23908642

  10. Emotional expression in music: contribution, linearity, and additivity of primary musical cues

    PubMed Central

    Eerola, Tuomas; Friberg, Anders; Bresin, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to manipulate musical cues systematically to determine the aspects of music that contribute to emotional expression, and whether these cues operate in additive or interactive fashion, and whether the cue levels can be characterized as linear or non-linear. An optimized factorial design was used with six primary musical cues (mode, tempo, dynamics, articulation, timbre, and register) across four different music examples. Listeners rated 200 musical examples according to four perceived emotional characters (happy, sad, peaceful, and scary). The results exhibited robust effects for all cues and the ranked importance of these was established by multiple regression. The most important cue was mode followed by tempo, register, dynamics, articulation, and timbre, although the ranking varied across the emotions. The second main result suggested that most cue levels contributed to the emotions in a linear fashion, explaining 77–89% of variance in ratings. Quadratic encoding of cues did lead to minor but significant increases of the models (0–8%). Finally, the interactions between the cues were non-existent suggesting that the cues operate mostly in an additive fashion, corroborating recent findings on emotional expression in music (Juslin and Lindström, 2010). PMID:23908642

  11. Tissue factor contributes to neutrophil CD11b expression in alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate-treated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Luyendyk, James P.; Flanagan, Kevin C.; Williams, C. David; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Slusser, Joyce G.; Mackman, Nigel

    2011-02-01

    Cholestatic liver injury induced by alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) is provoked by injury to intrahepatic bile ducts and the progression of hepatic necrosis requires the procoagulant protein tissue factor (TF) and extrahepatic cells including neutrophils. Recent studies have shown that myeloid cell TF contributes to neutrophil activation. We tested the hypothesis that myeloid cell TF contributes to neutrophil activation in ANIT-treated mice. TF activity in liver homogenates increased significantly in TF{sup flox/flox} mice treated with ANIT, but not in TF{sup flox/flox}/LysMCre mice (TF{sup {Delta}Myeloid} mice), which have reduced TF expression in monocytes/macrophages and neutrophils. Myeloid cell-specific TF deficiency did not alter expression of the chemokines KC or MIP-2 but reduced hepatic neutrophil accumulation in ANIT-treated mice at 48 h as indicated by tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Myeloid cell TF deficiency significantly reduced CD11b expression by blood neutrophils in ANIT-treated mice, and this was associated with reduced plasma MPO protein levels, an index of neutrophil degranulation. However, myeloid cell-specific TF deficiency had no effect on ANIT-induced coagulation cascade activation. The increase in serum ALT and ALP activities in ANIT-treated mice was reduced by myeloid cell TF deficiency (p < 0.05), but the myeloid cell TF deficiency did not reduce hepatic necrosis at 48 h, as determined by histopathology and morphometry. The results suggest that myeloid cell TF contributes to neutrophil CD11b expression during cholestasis by a coagulation-independent pathway. However, the resultant reduction in neutrophil accumulation/activation is insufficient to substantially reduce ANIT hepatotoxicity, suggesting that myeloid cell TF is only one of many factors modulating hepatic necrosis during cholestasis. - Research Highlights: > Myeloid cell tissue factor contributes to liver procoagulant activity during acute cholestasis. > ANIT

  12. Chronic inflammation contributes to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma by decreasing miR-122 levels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changfei; Deng, Mengmeng; Hu, Jun; Li, Xin; Chen, Lizhao; Ju, Ying; Hao, Junli; Meng, Songdong

    2016-01-01

    Persistent inflammation in chronic hepatitis plays a major role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, the major inflammatory cytokines expressed in chronic hepatitis, IL-6 and TNF-α, induced a marked decrease in microRNA-122 (miR-122) levels, and miR-122 expression was downregulated in the livers of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. The decrease of miR-122 caused upregulation of the proinflammatory chemokine CCL2. IL-6 and TNF-α suppressed miR-122 both by directly downregulating the transcription factor C/EBPα and indirectly upregulating c-myc, which blocks C/EBPα-mediated miR-122 transcription. In addition, IL-6 and TNF-α levels were elevated and miR-122 levels were decreased in mouse and rat models of diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced HCC. Restoration of miR-122 levels through delivery of agomir-122 suppressed DEN-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in mice. Our results show that inflammation-induced miR-122 downregulation in hepatitis contributes to carcinogenesis and suggest that increasing miR-122 may be an effective strategy for preventing HCC development in CHB patients. PMID:26933995

  13. Sox2: regulation of expression and contribution to brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Sheila; Nejad, Romina; Karabork, Merve; Ekinci, Can; Solaroglu, Ihsan; Aldape, Kenneth D; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2016-07-01

    Tumors of the CNS are composed of a complex mixture of neoplastic cells, in addition to vascular, inflammatory and stromal components. Similar to most other tumors, brain tumors contain a heterogeneous population of cells that are found at different stages of differentiation. The cancer stem cell hypothesis suggests that all tumors are composed of subpopulation of cells with stem-like properties, which are capable of self-renewal, display resistance to therapy and lead to tumor recurrence. One of the most important transcription factors that regulate cancer stem cell properties is SOX2. In this review, we focus on SOX2 and the complex network of signaling molecules and transcription factors that regulate its expression and function in brain tumor initiating cells. We also highlight important findings in the literature about the role of SOX2 in glioblastoma and medulloblastoma, where it has been more extensively studied. PMID:27230973

  14. Ice loss and sea level rise contribution from Alaskan glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthier, E.; Schiefer, E.; Clarke, G. K.; Menounos, B.; Rémy, F.; Cazenave, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    Over the last 50 years, retreating glaciers and ice caps (GIC) contributed 0.5 mm/yr to SLR, and one third is believed to originate from ice masses bordering the Gulf of Alaska. However, these estimates of ice wastage in Alaska are based on methods that directly measure mass changes from a limited number of glaciers and extrapolate the results to estimate ice loss for the many thousands of others. Here, using a new glacier inventory with elevation changes derived from sequential digital elevation models (DEMs), we found that, between 1962 and 2006, Alaskan glaciers lost 41.9 ± 8.6 km**3/yr water equivalent (w.e.) and contributed 0.12 ± 0.02 mm/yr to SLR. Our ice loss is 34% lower than previous estimates. Reasons for our lower values include the higher spatial resolution of the glacier inventory used in our study and the complex pattern of ice elevation changes at the scale of individual glaciers and mountain ranges which was not resolved in earlier work. Our ice elevation changes reveal that glacier dynamics (surges, phase of the tidewater cycle, etc...) have a profound effect on the wastage of Alaska glaciers. 3D satellite view of Columbia glacier, Chugach Mountains, Alaska. (Copyright CNES 2007, Distribution Spot Image, processing E. Berthier CNRS)

  15. Math Anxiety--Contributing School and Individual Level Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radišic, Jelena; Videnovic, Marina; Baucal, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    PISA 2003 survey data indicate high levels of mathematics anxiety among students in Serbia. More than a half of Serbian students are concerned with whether they will have difficulties in a mathematics class or earn poor marks. At the same time, the achievement on the mathematical literacy scale is very poor. Building on control-value theory, the…

  16. CONTRIBUTION TO INDOOR OZONE LEVELS OF AN OZONE GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report gives results of a study of a commonly used commercially available ozone generator, undertaken to determine its impact on indoor ozone levels. xperiment were conducted in a typical mechanically ventilated office and in a test house. he generated ozone and the in-room ...

  17. Variation in Hsp70-1A Expression Contributes to Skin Color Diversity.

    PubMed

    Murase, Daiki; Hachiya, Akira; Fullenkamp, Rachel; Beck, Anita; Moriwaki, Shigeru; Hase, Tadashi; Takema, Yoshinori; Manga, Prashiela

    2016-08-01

    The wide range in human skin color results from varying levels of the pigment melanin. Genetic mechanisms underlying coloration differences have been explored, but identified genes do not account for all variation seen in the skin color spectrum. Post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation of factors that determine skin color, including melanin synthesis in epidermal melanocytes, melanosome transfer to keratinocytes, and melanosome degradation, is also critical for pigmentation. We therefore investigated proteins that are differentially expressed in melanocytes derived from either white or African American skin. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry demonstrated that heat shock protein 70-1A (Hsp70-1A) protein levels were significantly higher in African American melanocytes compared with white melanocytes. Hsp70-1A expression significantly correlated with levels of tyrosinase, the rate-limiting melanogenic enzyme, consistent with a proposed role for Hsp70 family members in tyrosinase post-translational modification. In addition, pharmacologic inhibition and small interfering RNA-mediated downregulation of Hsp70-1A correlated with pigmentation changes in cultured melanocytes, modified human skin substitutes, and ex vivo skin. Furthermore, Hsp70-1A inhibition led to increased autophagy-mediated melanosome degradation in keratinocytes. Our data thus reveal that epidermal Hsp70-1A contributes to the diversity of skin color by regulating the amount of melanin synthesized in melanocytes and modulating autophagic melanosome degradation in keratinocytes. PMID:27094592

  18. Do low testosterone levels contribute to the pathogenesis of asthma?

    PubMed

    Canguven, Onder; Albayrak, Selami

    2011-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disorder that causes respiratory hypersensitivity and intermittent obstruction. Airway hyperresponsiveness to both specific and nonspecific stimuli is the hallmark of asthma. Although genetic susceptibility and airway inflammation are believed to play fundamental roles, etiology of asthma is unknown. In most cases, the treatment of asthma focuses on control of factors contributing to asthma severity and pharmacologic therapy including bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory agents. The prevalence of reported asthma is greater in prepubertal boys, with a change to a female predominance after puberty. Many epidemiological studies also suggest that women are at increased risk of developing adult-onset asthma and also suffer from more severe disease than men. This strongly suggests an important role for sex hormones in asthma. Previous articles provided us that, testosterone and/or its metabolites maintain the physiological balance of autoimmunity and protective immunity by preserving the number of regulatory cells. Testosterone is an immunosuppressant and is likely to be protective against immunological and inflammatory processes that trigger asthma. We hypothesized that the testosterone or selective androgen receptor modulators would have beneficial effects on asthma and could decrease the risk of asthmatic attacks. PMID:21282014

  19. Venus Express Contributions to the Study of Planetary Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Hart, R. A.; Zhang, T. L.

    2014-04-01

    Jupiter, and Saturn are expected to generate the electrical potential differences in their clouds sufficient to cause a breakdown in the atmosphere,creating a conducting path for the electric potential to discharge. This high-energy phenomenon creates a hot, high-pressure channel that enables chemical reactions not possible under usual local thermodynamic conditions. Thus it is of some interest to determine if lightning occurs in an atmosphere. While Venus is not usually considered one of the wet planets, lightning has been an object of interest since the Venera landers. It was observed with electromagnetic coils on Venera 11, 12, 13, 14 landers [2]. It was observed with a visible spectrometer on the Venera 9 orbits [1]. It was mapped during solar occultations by the electric antenna on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter [4]. These measurements revealed extensive lightning activity with an electromagnetic energy flux similar to that on Earth. However, the observations were limited in number in the atmosphere and to the nightside from orbit. In order to improve the understanding of Venus lightning, the Venus Express magnetometer was given a 128-Hz sampling rate that could cover much of the ELF frequencies at which lightning could be observed in the weak magnetic fields of the Venus ionosphere [5]. This investigation was immediately successful [3], but mastering the cleaning of the broadband data took several years to accomplish. Furthermore, the high polar latitudes of VEX periapsis were not the ideal locations to conduct the more global survey that was desired. Fortunately, after precessing poleward over the first few years the latitude of periapsis has returned to lower latitudes(Figures 1 and 2) and active electrical storms are now being studied. The charged constituent of the Venus atmosphere need not be water. In fact, we believe it is H2SO4 which polarizes much as water does and which freezes and melts at similar temperatures. If it is H2SO4, we would expect the

  20. Soy protein isolate molecular level contributions to bulk adhesive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Jeanne Norton

    Increasing environmental awareness and the recognized health hazards of formaldehyde-based resins has prompted a strong demand for environmentally-responsible adhesives for wood composites. Soy protein-based adhesives have been shown to be commercially viable with 90-day shelf stability and composite physical properties comparable to those of commercial formaldehyde-based particleboards. The main research focus is to isolate and characterize the molecular level features in soy protein isolate responsible for providing mechanical properties, storage stability, and water resistance during adhesive formulation, processing, and wood composite fabrication. Commercial composite board will be reviewed to enhance our understanding of the individual components and processes required for particleboard production. The levels of protein structure will be defined and an overview of current bio-based technology will be presented. In the process, the logic for utilizing soy protein as a sole binder in the adhesive will be reinforced. Variables such as adhesive components, pH, divalent ions, blend aging, protein molecular weight, formulation solids content, and soy protein functionalization will relate the bulk properties of soy protein adhesives to the molecular configuration of the soybean protein. This work has demonstrated that when intermolecular beta-sheet interactions and protein long-range order is disrupted, viscosity and mechanical properties decrease. Storage stability can be maintained through the stabilization of intermolecular beta-sheet interactions. When molecular weight is reduced through enzymatic digestion, long-range order is disrupted and viscosity and mechanical properties decrease accordingly. Processibility and physical properties must be balanced to increase solids while maintaining low viscosity, desirable mechanical properties, and adequate storage stability. The structure of the soybean protein must be related to the particleboard bulk mechanical

  1. Decreased glycogen synthase kinase-3 levels and activity contribute to Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Nogales, Marta; Hernández, Félix; Miguez, Andrés; Alberch, Jordi; Ginés, Silvia; Pérez-Navarro, Esther; Lucas, José J

    2015-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder characterized by brain atrophy particularly in striatum leading to personality changes, chorea and dementia. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a serine/threonine kinase in the crossroad of many signaling pathways that is highly pleiotropic as it phosphorylates more than hundred substrates including structural, metabolic, and signaling proteins. Increased GSK-3 activity is believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and GSK-3 inhibitors have been postulated as therapeutic agents for neurodegeneration. Regarding HD, GSK-3 inhibitors have shown beneficial effects in cell and invertebrate animal models but no evident efficacy in mouse models. Intriguingly, those studies were performed without interrogating GSK-3 level and activity in HD brain. Here we aim to explore the level and also the enzymatic activity of GSK-3 in the striatum and other less affected brain regions of HD patients and of the R6/1 mouse model to then elucidate the possible contribution of its alteration to HD pathogenesis by genetic manipulation in mice. We report a dramatic decrease in GSK-3 levels and activity in striatum and cortex of HD patients with similar results in the mouse model. Correction of the GSK-3 deficit in HD mice, by combining with transgenic mice with conditional GSK-3 expression, resulted in amelioration of their brain atrophy and behavioral motor and learning deficits. Thus, our results demonstrate that decreased brain GSK-3 contributes to HD neurological phenotype and open new therapeutic opportunities based on increasing GSK-3 activity or attenuating the harmful consequences of its decrease. PMID:26082469

  2. The Level of Expressed Emotion Scale: A Useful Measure of Expressed Emotion in Adolescents?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelis, Sharon M.; Rae, Gordon; Liddell, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Research has suggested that self-report measures of expressed emotion (EE) may be employed as a proxy measure of environmental stress in the home. The appropriateness of the Level of Expressed Emotion scale as a measure of perceived expressed emotion was examined in a sample of adolescents. Participants were 239 male and 422 female adolescents…

  3. Lower Expression of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 67 in the Prefrontal Cortex in Schizophrenia: Contribution of Altered Regulation by Zif268

    PubMed Central

    Kimoto, Sohei; Bazmi, H. Holly; Lewis, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cognitive deficits of schizophrenia may be due at least in part to lower expression of the 67-kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67), a key enzyme for GABA synthesis, in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of individuals with schizophrenia. However, little is known about the molecular regulation of lower cortical GAD67 levels in schizophrenia. The GAD67 promoter region contains a conserved Zif268 binding site, and Zif268 activation is accompanied by increased GAD67 expression. Thus, altered expression of the immediate early gene Zif268 may contribute to lower levels of GAD67 mRNA in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia. Method The authors used polymerase chain reaction to quantify GAD67 and Zif268 mRNA levels in dorsolateral pre-frontal cortex area 9 from 62 matched pairs of schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects, and in situ hybridization to assess Zif268 expression at laminar and cellular levels of resolution. The effects of potentially confounding variables were assessed in human subjects, and the effects of antipsychotic treatments were tested in antipsychotic-exposed monkeys. The specificity of the Zif268 findings was assessed by quantifying mRNA levels for other immediate early genes. Results GAD67 and Zif268 mRNA levels were significantly lower and were positively correlated in the schizophrenia subjects. Both Zif268 mRNA-positive neuron density and Zif268 mRNA levels per neuron were significantly lower in the schizophrenia subjects. These findings were robust to the effects of the confounding variables examined and differed from other immediate early genes. Conclusions Deficient Zif268 mRNA expression may contribute to lower cortical GAD67 levels in schizophrenia, suggesting a potential mechanistic basis for altered cortical GABA synthesis and impaired cognition in schizophrenia. PMID:24874453

  4. mef2 activity levels differentially affect gene expression during Drosophila muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Elgar, Stuart J.; Han, Jun; Taylor, Michael V.

    2008-01-01

    Cell differentiation is controlled by key transcription factors, and a major question is how they orchestrate cell-type-specific genetic programs. Muscle differentiation is a well studied paradigm in which the conserved Mef2 transcription factor plays a pivotal role. Recent genomic studies have identified a large number of mef2-regulated target genes with distinct temporal expression profiles during Drosophila myogenesis. However, the question remains as to how a single transcription factor can control such diverse patterns of gene expression. In this study we used a strategy combining genomics and developmental genetics to address this issue in vivo during Drosophila muscle development. We found that groups of mef2-regulated genes respond differently to changes in mef2 activity levels: some require higher levels for their expression than others. Furthermore, this differential requirement correlates with when the gene is first expressed during the muscle differentiation program. Genes that require higher levels are activated later. These results implicate mef2 in the temporal regulation of muscle gene expression, and, consistent with this, we show that changes in mef2 activity levels can alter the start of gene expression in a predictable manner. Together these results indicate that Mef2 is not an all-or-none regulator; rather, its action is more subtle, and levels of its activity are important in the differential expression of muscle genes. This suggests a route by which mef2 can orchestrate the muscle differentiation program and contribute to the stringent regulation of gene expression during myogenesis. PMID:18198273

  5. Identification of Xenologs and Their Characteristic Low Expression Levels in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Canales, Gilberto; Arellano-Álvarez, Guadalupe; González-Domenech, Carmen M; de la Cruz, Fernando; Moya, Andrés; Delaye, Luis

    2015-06-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a central process in prokaryotic evolution. Once a gene is introduced into a genome by HGT, its contribution to the fitness of the recipient cell depends in part on its expression level. Here we show that in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, xenologs derived from non-cyanobacterial sources exhibited lower expression levels than native genes in the genome. In accord with our observation, xenolog codon adaptation indexes also displayed relatively low expression values. These results are in agreement with previous reports that suggested the relative neutrality of most xenologs. However, we also demonstrated that some of the xenologs detected participated in cellular functions, including iron starvation acclimation and nitrate reduction, which corroborate the role of HGT in bacterial adaptation. For example, the expression levels of some of the xenologs detected are known to increase under iron-limiting conditions. We interpreted the overall pattern as an indication that there is a selection pressure against high expression levels of xenologs. However, when a xenolog protein product confers a selective advantage, natural selection can further modulate its expression level to meet the requirements of the recipient cell. In addition, we show that ORFans did not exhibit significantly lower expression levels than native genes in the genome, which suggested an origin other than xenology. PMID:26040248

  6. Neutrophil elastase modulates cytokine expression: contribution to host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Benabid, Rym; Wartelle, Julien; Malleret, Laurette; Guyot, Nicolas; Gangloff, Sophie; Lebargy, François; Belaaouaj, Azzaq

    2012-10-12

    There is accumulating evidence that following bacterial infection, the massive recruitment and activation of the phagocytes, neutrophils, is accompanied with the extracellular release of active neutrophil elastase (NE), a potent serine protease. Using NE-deficient mice in a clinically relevant model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced pneumonia, we provide compelling in vivo evidence that the absence of NE was associated with decreased protein and transcript levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, MIP-2, and IL-6 in the lungs, coinciding with increased mortality of mutant mice to infection. The implication of NE in the induction of cytokine expression involved at least in part Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4). These findings were further confirmed following exposure of cultured macrophages to purified NE. Together, our data suggest strongly for the first time that NE not only plays a direct antibacterial role as it has been previously reported, but released active enzyme can also modulate cytokine expression, which contributes to host protection against P. aeruginosa. In light of our findings, the long held view that considers NE as a prime suspect in P. aeruginosa-associated diseases will need to be carefully reassessed. Also, therapeutic strategies aiming at NE inhibition should take into account the physiologic roles of the enzyme. PMID:22927440

  7. BMI1 Is Expressed in Canine Osteosarcoma and Contributes to Cell Growth and Chemotherapy Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Withers, Sita S.; Holt, Roseline; Rebhun, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    BMI1, a stem cell factor and member of the polycomb group of genes, has been shown to contribute to growth and chemoresistance of several human malignancies including primary osteosarcoma (OSA). Naturally occurring OSA in the dog represents a large animal model of human OSA, however the potential role of BMI1 in canine primary and metastatic OSA has not been examined. Immunohistochemical staining of canine primary and metastatic OSA tumors revealed strong nuclear expression of BMI1. An identical staining pattern was found in both primary and metastatic human OSA tissues. Canine OSA cell lines (Abrams, Moresco, and D17) expressed high levels of BMI1 compared with canine osteoblasts and knockdown or inhibition of BMI1 by siRNA or by small molecule BMI1-inhibitor PTC-209 demonstrated a role for BMI1 in canine OSA cell growth and resistance to carboplatin and doxorubicin chemotherapy. These findings suggest that inhibition of BMI1 in primary or metastatic OSA may improve response to chemotherapy and that the dog may serve as a large animal model to evaluate such therapy. PMID:26110620

  8. Serum adropin level and ENHO gene expression in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yolbas, Servet; Kara, Murat; Yilmaz, Musa; Aydin, Suleyman; Koca, Suleyman Serdar

    2016-06-01

    Adropin, a secreted protein, is encoded by the energy homeostasis associated (ENHO) gene. It has been implicated in the several physiological and pathological processes such as angiogenesis and apoptosis. Therefore, the aim of present study was to investigate serum adropin levels and ENHO gene expressions in systemic sclerosis (SSc) characterized by vasculopathy, inflammation, and progressive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. The study includes 27 patients with SSc, 39 patients with Behçet's disease (BD), and 20 healthy controls (HC). Serum adropin levels and ENHO gene expressions by peripheral blood mononuclear cells were analyzed by ELISA method and by real-time PCR, respectively. The serum adropin levels were higher in the SSc and BD groups than in the HC group (p = 0.023 and p < 0.001, respectively). However, there were no significant differences among the groups in terms of ENHO gene expressions (p ANOVA = 0.149). There was no significant difference between the limited and diffuse cutaneous subtypes of SSc in terms of serum adropin level and ENHO gene expression. Moreover, serum adropin level and ENHO gene expression were not associated with the disease activity and severity indexes. ENHO gene expression was correlated with the triglyceride levels in the BD group (r = -0.426, p = 0.027). The augmented serum adropin levels may be expected in the chronic inflammatory disease and seem not to be characteristic of only SSc. However, further studies are needed to explain the precise role of adropin in SSc. PMID:27079850

  9. Elevated Aurora B expression contributes to chemoresistance and poor prognosis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqian; Jiang, Chunling; Li, Huilan; Lv, Feng; Li, Xiaoyan; Qian, Xiaolong; Fu, Li; Xu, Bo; Guo, Xiaojing

    2015-01-01

    Aurora-B is a major kinase responsible for appropriate mitotic progression. Elevated expression of Aurora-B has been frequently associated with several types of cancer, including breast cancer. However, it is not clear whether the alteration contributes to tumor responses to therapies and prognosis. In this study, we conducted immunohistochemistry using antibodies against Aurora-B, S1981p-ATM, Ki67, and p53 in paraffin-embedded tumor tissues from 312 invasive breast cancer patients. The correlation between disease-free-survival (DFS) and Aurora-B expression was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to determine whether Aurora-B was an independent prognostic factor for breast cancer. We found that Aurora-B expression was correlated with the proliferation index (P < 0.001) and p53 expression (P = 0.014) in breast cancer tissues. Further we found that Aurora-B expression was associated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.002) and histological grade (P = 0.001). Multivariate analyses indicated that elevated Aurora-B expression predicted a poor survival. In a subgroup of patients that received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, we found that elevated Aurora-B contributed to chemoresistance (P = 0.011). In conclusion, elevated Aurora-B expression in breast cancer patients contributes to chemoresistance and predicts poor prognosis. PMID:25755770

  10. Examining the contribution of handwriting and spelling to written expression in kindergarten children.

    PubMed

    Puranik, Cynthia S; Alotaiba, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examined the development of beginning writing skills in kindergarten children and the contribution of spelling and handwriting to these writing skills after accounting for early language, literacy, cognitive skills, and student characteristics. Two hundred and forty two children were given a battery of cognitive, oral language, reading, and writing measures. They exhibited a range of competency in spelling, handwriting, written expression, and in their ability to express ideas. Handwriting and spelling made statistically significant contributions to written expression, demonstrating the importance of these lower-order transcription skills to higher order text-generation skills from a very early age. The contributions of oral language and reading skills were not significant. Implications of these findings for writing development and instruction are addressed. PMID:23087544

  11. Examining the contribution of handwriting and spelling to written expression in kindergarten children

    PubMed Central

    AlOtaiba, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined the development of beginning writing skills in kindergarten children and the contribution of spelling and handwriting to these writing skills after accounting for early language, literacy, cognitive skills, and student characteristics. Two hundred and forty two children were given a battery of cognitive, oral language, reading, and writing measures. They exhibited a range of competency in spelling, handwriting, written expression, and in their ability to express ideas. Handwriting and spelling made statistically significant contributions to written expression, demonstrating the importance of these lower-order transcription skills to higher order text-generation skills from a very early age. The contributions of oral language and reading skills were not significant. Implications of these findings for writing development and instruction are addressed. PMID:23087544

  12. Glial Elements Contribute to Stress-induced Torsina Expression in the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu; Xiao, Jianfeng; Ueda, Masayuki; Wang, Yue; Hines, Melissa; Nowak, Thaddeus S.; LeDoux, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    DYT1 dystonia is caused by a single GAG deletion in Exon 5 of TOR1A, the gene encoding torsinA, a putative chaperone protein. In this study, central and peripheral nervous system perturbations (transient forebrain ischemia and sciatic nerve transection, respectively) were used to examine the systems biology of torsinA. After forebrain ischemia, quantitative real-time RT-PCR identified increased torsinA transcript levels in hippocampus, cerebral cortex, thalamus, striatum, and cerebellum at 24 h and 7 d. Expression declined toward sham values by 14 d in striatum, thalamus and cortex, and by 21 d in cerebellum and hippocampus. TorsinA transcripts were localized to dentate granule cells and pyramidal neurons in control hippocampus and were moderately elevated in these cell populations at 24 h after ischemia, after which CA1 expression was reduced, consistent with the loss of this vulnerable neuronal population. Increased in situ hybridization signal in CA1 stratum radiatum, stratum lacunosum-moleculare, and stratum oriens at 7 d after ischemia was correlated with the detection of torsinA immunoreactivity in interneurons and reactive astrocytes at 7 and 14 days. Sciatic nerve transection increased torsinA transcript levels between 24 h and 7 days in both ipsilateral and contralateral dorsal root ganglia (DRG). However, increased torsinA immunoreactivity was localized to both ganglion cells and satellite cells in ipsilateral DRG but was restricted to satellite cells contralaterally. These results suggest that torsinA participates in the response of neural tissue to central and peripheral insults and its sustained up-regulation indicates that torsinA may contribute to remodeling of neuronal circuitry. The striking induction of torsinA in astrocytes and satellite cells points to the potential involvement of glial elements in the pathobiology of DYT1 dystonia. PMID:18538941

  13. Enhanced HMGB1 Expression May Contribute to Th17 Cells Activation in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yan; Sandoghchian Shotorbani, Siamak; Su, Zhaoliang; Liu, Yanfang; Tong, Jia; Zheng, Dong; Chen, Jianguo; Liu, Yingzhao; Xu, Yan; Jiao, Zhijun; Wang, Shengjun; Lu, Liwei; Huang, Xinxiang; Xu, Huaxi

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis(RA) is a common autoimmune disease associated with Th17 cells, but what about the effect of high-mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB1) and the relationship between Th17-associated factors and HMGB1 in RA remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the mRNA levels of HMGB1, RORγt, and IL-17 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis by quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR), and the concentrations of HMGB1, IL-17, and IL-23 in plasma were detected by ELISA. And then, the effect of HMGB1 on Th17 cells differentiation was analyzed in vitro. Our clinical studies showed that the mRNAs of HMGB1, RORγt, and IL-17 in patients were higher than that in health control (P < 0.05), especially in active RA patients (P < 0.05). The plasma HMGB1, IL-17, and IL-23 in RA patients were also higher than that in health control (P < 0.05); there was a positive correlation between the expression levels of HMGB1 and the amount of CRP, ERS, and RF in plasma. In vitro, the IL-17-produced CD4+T cells were increased with 100 ng/mL rHMGB1 for 12h, which indicated that the increased HMGB1 might contribute to Th17 cells activation in RA patients. PMID:22110531

  14. Calcium regulates caveolin-1 expression at the transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Kan, Qi-Ming; Li, Yan; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Sato, Toshinori; Yamagata, Sadako; Yamagata, Tatsuya

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 expression is regulated by calcium signaling at the transcriptional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An inhibitor of or siRNA to L-type calcium channel suppressed caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclosporine A or an NFAT inhibitor markedly reduced caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 regulation by calcium signaling is observed in several mouse cell lines. -- Abstract: Caveolin-1, an indispensable component of caveolae serving as a transformation suppressor protein, is highly expressed in poorly metastatic mouse osteosarcoma FBJ-S1 cells while highly metastatic FBJ-LL cells express low levels of caveolin-1. Calcium concentration is higher in FBJ-S1 cells than in FBJ-LL cells; therefore, we investigated the possibility that calcium signaling positively regulates caveolin-1 in mouse FBJ-S1 cells. When cells were treated with the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, cyclosporin A (a calcineurin inhibitor), or INCA-6 (a nuclear factor of activated T-cells [NFAT] inhibitor), caveolin-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels decreased. RNA silencing of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel subunit alpha-1C resulted in suppression of caveolin-1 expression. This novel caveolin-1 regulation pathway was also identified in mouse NIH 3T3 cells and Lewis lung carcinoma cells. These results indicate that caveolin-1 is positively regulated at the transcriptional level through a novel calcium signaling pathway mediated by L-type calcium channel/Ca{sup 2+}/calcineurin/NFAT.

  15. Alternative splicing contributes to the coordinated regulation of ferritin subunit levels in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Cong, Lin; Niu, Jin-Zhi; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2014-01-01

    A constant ratio of ferritin heavy chain homolog (HCH) and light chain homolog (LCH) subunits seems to be required to compose the ferritin heteropolymer protein in insects. However, the mechanism by which insect LCH genes regulate protein levels remains unclear. We report that alternative promoters and alternative splicing contribute to maintaining a constant ratio of the two subunits, BdFer1HCH and BdFer2LCH (ferritin 1 HCH and ferritin 2 LCH), in Bactrocera dorsalis, a notorious quarantine pest. The genes BdFer1HCH and BdFer2LCH were identified with a series of potential transcription factor binding sites and were shown to be clustered within the genome in a “head to head” fashion. Thus, we unearthed a potential post-transcriptional mechanism to regulate the levels of LCH subunits, and confirmed that the expressions of BdFer1HCH and BdFer2LCH were induced by 20-hydroecdysone, iron overload, and immune challenge. PMID:24763285

  16. In plants, expression breadth and expression level distinctly and non-linearly correlate with gene structure

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Compactness of highly/broadly expressed genes in human has been explained as selection for efficiency, regional mutation biases or genomic design. However, highly expressed genes in flowering plants were shown to be less compact than lowly expressed ones. On the other hand, opposite facts have also been documented that pollen-expressed Arabidopsis genes tend to contain shorter introns and highly expressed moss genes are compact. This issue is important because it provides a chance to compare the selectionism and the neutralism views about genome evolution. Furthermore, this issue also helps to understand the fates of introns, from the angle of gene expression. Results In this study, I used expression data covering more tissues and employ new analytical methods to reexamine the correlations between gene expression and gene structure for two flowering plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa. It is shown that, different aspects of expression pattern correlate with different parts of gene sequences in distinct ways. In detail, expression level is significantly negatively correlated with gene size, especially the size of non-coding regions, whereas expression breadth correlates with non-coding structural parameters positively and with coding region parameters negatively. Furthermore, the relationships between expression level and structural parameters seem to be non-linear, with the extremes of structural parameters possibly scale as power-laws or logrithmic functions of expression levels. Conclusion In plants, highly expressed genes are compact, especially in the non-coding regions. Broadly expressed genes tend to contain longer non-coding sequences, which may be necessary for complex regulations. In combination with previous studies about other plants and about animals, some common scenarios about the correlation between gene expression and gene structure begin to emerge. Based on the functional relationships between extreme values of structural

  17. Affective State Level Recognition in Naturalistic Facial and Vocal Expressions.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hongying; Bianchi-Berthouze, Nadia

    2014-03-01

    Naturalistic affective expressions change at a rate much slower than the typical rate at which video or audio is recorded. This increases the probability that consecutive recorded instants of expressions represent the same affective content. In this paper, we exploit such a relationship to improve the recognition performance of continuous naturalistic affective expressions. Using datasets of naturalistic affective expressions (AVEC 2011 audio and video dataset, PAINFUL video dataset) continuously labeled over time and over different dimensions, we analyze the transitions between levels of those dimensions (e.g., transitions in pain intensity level). We use an information theory approach to show that the transitions occur very slowly and hence suggest modeling them as first-order Markov models. The dimension levels are considered to be the hidden states in the Hidden Markov Model (HMM) framework. Their discrete transition and emission matrices are trained by using the labels provided with the training set. The recognition problem is converted into a best path-finding problem to obtain the best hidden states sequence in HMMs. This is a key difference from previous use of HMMs as classifiers. Modeling of the transitions between dimension levels is integrated in a multistage approach, where the first level performs a mapping between the affective expression features and a soft decision value (e.g., an affective dimension level), and further classification stages are modeled as HMMs that refine that mapping by taking into account the temporal relationships between the output decision labels. The experimental results for each of the unimodal datasets show overall performance to be significantly above that of a standard classification system that does not take into account temporal relationships. In particular, the results on the AVEC 2011 audio dataset outperform all other systems presented at the international competition. PMID:23757552

  18. Dscam Expression Levels Determine Presynaptic Arbor Sizes in Drosophila Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hwan; Wang, Xin; Coolon, Rosemary; Ye, Bing

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Expression of the Down syndrome cell-adhesion molecule (Dscam) is increased in the brains of patients with several neurological disorders. Although Dscam is critically involved in many aspects of neuronal development, little is known about either the mechanism that regulates its expression or the functional consequences of dysregulated Dscam expression. Here, we show that Dscam expression levels serve as an instructive code for the size control of presynaptic arbor. Two convergent pathways, involving dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) and fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), control Dscam expression through protein translation. Defects in this regulation of Dscam translation lead to exuberant presynaptic arbor growth in Drosophila somatosensory neurons. Our findings demonstrate a previously unknown aspect of Dscam function and provide insights into how dysregulated Dscam may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurological disorders. PMID:23764288

  19. Sugars and circadian regulation make major contributions to the global regulation of diurnal gene expression in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bläsing, Oliver E; Gibon, Yves; Günther, Manuela; Höhne, Melanie; Morcuende, Rosa; Osuna, Daniel; Thimm, Oliver; Usadel, Björn; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Stitt, Mark

    2005-12-01

    The diurnal cycle strongly influences many plant metabolic and physiological processes. Arabidopsis thaliana rosettes were harvested six times during 12-h-light/12-h-dark treatments to investigate changes in gene expression using ATH1 arrays. Diagnostic gene sets were identified from published or in-house expression profiles of the response to light, sugar, nitrogen, and water deficit in seedlings and 4 h of darkness or illumination at ambient or compensation point [CO(2)]. Many sugar-responsive genes showed large diurnal expression changes, whose timing matched that of the diurnal changes of sugars. A set of circadian-regulated genes also showed large diurnal changes in expression. Comparison of published results from a free-running cycle with the diurnal changes in Columbia-0 (Col-0) and the starchless phosphoglucomutase (pgm) mutant indicated that sugars modify the expression of up to half of the clock-regulated genes. Principle component analysis identified genes that make large contributions to diurnal changes and confirmed that sugar and circadian regulation are the major inputs in Col-0 but that sugars dominate the response in pgm. Most of the changes in pgm are triggered by low sugar levels during the night rather than high levels in the light, highlighting the importance of responses to low sugar in diurnal gene regulation. We identified a set of candidate regulatory genes that show robust responses to alterations in sugar levels and change markedly during the diurnal cycle. PMID:16299223

  20. Increased hepatic CD36 expression contributes to dyslipidemia associated with diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The etiology of type 2 diabetes often involves diet-induced obesity (DIO), which is associated with elevated plasma fatty acids and lipoprotein associated triglycerides. Since aberrant hepatic fatty acid uptake may contribute to this, we investigated whether increased expression of a fatty acid tran...

  1. Abundant contribution of short tandem repeats to gene expression variation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Gymrek, Melissa; Willems, Thomas; Guilmatre, Audrey; Zeng, Haoyang; Markus, Barak; Georgiev, Stoyan; Daly, Mark J.; Price, Alkes L.; Pritchard, Jonathan; Sharp, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of repetitive elements to quantitative human traits is largely unknown. Here, we report a genome-wide survey of the contribution of Short Tandem Repeats (STRs), one of the most polymorphic and abundant repeat classes, to gene expression in humans. Our survey identified 2,060 significant expression STRs (eSTRs). These eSTRs were replicable in orthogonal populations and expression assays. We used variance partitioning to disentangle the contribution of eSTRs from linked SNPs and indels and found that eSTRs contribute 10%–15% of the cis-heritability mediated by all common variants. Further functional genomic analyses showed that eSTRs are enriched in conserved regions, co-localize with regulatory elements, and can modulate certain histone modifications. By analyzing known GWAS hits and searching for new associations in 1,685 deeply-phenotyped whole-genomes, we found that eSTRs are enriched in various clinically-relevant conditions. These results highlight the contribution of short tandem repeats to the genetic architecture of quantitative human traits. PMID:26642241

  2. Changes in microRNA expression contribute to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction in prediabetic NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Roggli, Elodie; Gattesco, Sonia; Caille, Dorothée; Briet, Claire; Boitard, Christian; Meda, Paolo; Regazzi, Romano

    2012-07-01

    During the initial phases of type 1 diabetes, pancreatic islets are invaded by immune cells, exposing β-cells to proinflammatory cytokines. This unfavorable environment results in gene expression modifications leading to loss of β-cell functions. To study the contribution of microRNAs (miRNAs) in this process, we used microarray analysis to search for changes in miRNA expression in prediabetic NOD mice islets. We found that the levels of miR-29a/b/c increased in islets of NOD mice during the phases preceding diabetes manifestation and in isolated mouse and human islets exposed to proinflammatory cytokines. Overexpression of miR-29a/b/c in MIN6 and dissociated islet cells led to impairment in glucose-induced insulin secretion. Defective insulin release was associated with diminished expression of the transcription factor Onecut2, and a consequent rise of granuphilin, an inhibitor of β-cell exocytosis. Overexpression of miR-29a/b/c also promoted apoptosis by decreasing the level of the antiapoptotic protein Mcl1. Indeed, a decoy molecule selectively masking the miR-29 binding site on Mcl1 mRNA protected insulin-secreting cells from apoptosis triggered by miR-29 or cytokines. Taken together, our findings suggest that changes in the level of miR-29 family members contribute to cytokine-mediated β-cell dysfunction occurring during the initial phases of type 1 diabetes. PMID:22537941

  3. Changes in MicroRNA Expression Contribute to Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction in Prediabetic NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Roggli, Elodie; Gattesco, Sonia; Caille, Dorothée; Briet, Claire; Boitard, Christian; Meda, Paolo; Regazzi, Romano

    2012-01-01

    During the initial phases of type 1 diabetes, pancreatic islets are invaded by immune cells, exposing β-cells to proinflammatory cytokines. This unfavorable environment results in gene expression modifications leading to loss of β-cell functions. To study the contribution of microRNAs (miRNAs) in this process, we used microarray analysis to search for changes in miRNA expression in prediabetic NOD mice islets. We found that the levels of miR-29a/b/c increased in islets of NOD mice during the phases preceding diabetes manifestation and in isolated mouse and human islets exposed to proinflammatory cytokines. Overexpression of miR-29a/b/c in MIN6 and dissociated islet cells led to impairment in glucose-induced insulin secretion. Defective insulin release was associated with diminished expression of the transcription factor Onecut2, and a consequent rise of granuphilin, an inhibitor of β-cell exocytosis. Overexpression of miR-29a/b/c also promoted apoptosis by decreasing the level of the antiapoptotic protein Mcl1. Indeed, a decoy molecule selectively masking the miR-29 binding site on Mcl1 mRNA protected insulin-secreting cells from apoptosis triggered by miR-29 or cytokines. Taken together, our findings suggest that changes in the level of miR-29 family members contribute to cytokine-mediated β-cell dysfunction occurring during the initial phases of type 1 diabetes. PMID:22537941

  4. The Mysterious Noh Mask: Contribution of Multiple Facial Parts to the Recognition of Emotional Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Hiromitsu; Nishimura, Ritsuko; Okanoya, Kazuo; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Background A Noh mask worn by expert actors when performing on a Japanese traditional Noh drama is suggested to convey countless different facial expressions according to different angles of head/body orientation. The present study addressed the question of how different facial parts of a Noh mask, including the eyebrows, the eyes, and the mouth, may contribute to different emotional expressions. Both experimental situations of active creation and passive recognition of emotional facial expressions were introduced. Methodology/Principal Findings In Experiment 1, participants either created happy or sad facial expressions, or imitated a face that looked up or down, by actively changing each facial part of a Noh mask image presented on a computer screen. For an upward tilted mask, the eyebrows and the mouth shared common features with sad expressions, whereas the eyes with happy expressions. This contingency tended to be reversed for a downward tilted mask. Experiment 2 further examined which facial parts of a Noh mask are crucial in determining emotional expressions. Participants were exposed to the synthesized Noh mask images with different facial parts expressing different emotions. Results clearly revealed that participants primarily used the shape of the mouth in judging emotions. The facial images having the mouth of an upward/downward tilted Noh mask strongly tended to be evaluated as sad/happy, respectively. Conclusions/Significance The results suggest that Noh masks express chimeric emotional patterns, with different facial parts conveying different emotions This appears consistent with the principles of Noh which highly appreciate subtle and composite emotional expressions, as well as with the mysterious facial expressions observed in Western art. It was further demonstrated that the mouth serves as a diagnostic feature in characterizing the emotional expressions. This indicates the superiority of biologically-driven factors over the traditionally

  5. Dietary fat and corticosterone levels are contributing factors to meal anticipation.

    PubMed

    Namvar, Sara; Gyte, Amy; Denn, Mark; Leighton, Brendan; Piggins, Hugh D

    2016-04-15

    Daily restricted access to food leads to the development of food anticipatory activity and metabolism, which depends upon an as yet unidentified food-entrainable oscillator(s). A premeal anticipatory peak in circulating hormones, including corticosterone is also elicited by daily restricted feeding. High-fat feeding is associated with elevated levels of corticosterone with disrupted circadian rhythms and a failure to develop robust meal anticipation. It is not clear whether the disrupted corticosterone rhythm, resulting from high-fat feeding contributes to attenuated meal anticipation in high-fat fed rats. Our aim was to better characterize meal anticipation in rats fed a low- or high-fat diet, and to better understand the role of corticosterone in this process. To this end, we utilized behavioral observations, hypothalamic c-Fos expression, and indirect calorimetry to assess meal entrainment. We also used the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU486, to dissect out the role of corticosterone in meal anticipation in rats given daily access to a meal with different fat content. Restricted access to a low-fat diet led to robust meal anticipation, as well as entrainment of hypothalamic c-Fos expression, metabolism, and circulating corticosterone. These measures were significantly attenuated in response to a high-fat diet, and animals on this diet exhibited a postanticipatory rise in corticosterone. Interestingly, antagonism of glucocorticoid activity using RU486 attenuated meal anticipation in low-fat fed rats, but promoted meal anticipation in high-fat-fed rats. These findings suggest an important role for corticosterone in the regulation of meal anticipation in a manner dependent upon dietary fat content. PMID:26818054

  6. Quantifying the Effect of DNA Packaging on Gene Expression Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Harold

    2010-10-01

    Gene expression, the process by which the genetic code comes alive in the form of proteins, is one of the most important biological processes in living cells, and begins when transcription factors bind to specific DNA sequences in the promoter region upstream of a gene. The relationship between gene expression output and transcription factor input which is termed the gene regulation function is specific to each promoter, and predicting this gene regulation function from the locations of transcription factor binding sites is one of the challenges in biology. In eukaryotic organisms (for example, animals, plants, fungi etc), DNA is highly compacted into nucleosomes, 147-bp segments of DNA tightly wrapped around histone protein core, and therefore, the accessibility of transcription factor binding sites depends on their locations with respect to nucleosomes - sites inside nucleosomes are less accessible than those outside nucleosomes. To understand how transcription factor binding sites contribute to gene expression in a quantitative manner, we obtain gene regulation functions of promoters with various configurations of transcription factor binding sites by using fluorescent protein reporters to measure transcription factor input and gene expression output in single yeast cells. In this talk, I will show that the affinity of a transcription factor binding site inside and outside the nucleosome controls different aspects of the gene regulation function, and explain this finding based on a mass-action kinetic model that includes competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors.

  7. Protein expression analyses at the single cell level.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Masae; Karagiannis, Peter; Taniguchi, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology explains how genetic information is converted into its end product, proteins, which are responsible for the phenotypic state of the cell. Along with the protein type, the phenotypic state depends on the protein copy number. Therefore, quantification of the protein expression in a single cell is critical for quantitative characterization of the phenotypic states. Protein expression is typically a dynamic and stochastic phenomenon that cannot be well described by standard experimental methods. As an alternative, fluorescence imaging is being explored for the study of protein expression, because of its high sensitivity and high throughput. Here we review key recent progresses in fluorescence imaging-based methods and discuss their application to proteome analysis at the single cell level. PMID:25197931

  8. Untangling the Contributions of Sex-Specific Gene Regulation and X-Chromosome Dosage to Sex-Biased Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Maxwell; Rao, Prashant; Ercan, Sevinc

    2016-09-01

    Dosage compensation mechanisms equalize the level of X chromosome expression between sexes. Yet the X chromosome is often enriched for genes exhibiting sex-biased, i.e., imbalanced expression. The relationship between X chromosome dosage compensation and sex-biased gene expression remains largely unexplored. Most studies determine sex-biased gene expression without distinguishing between contributions from X chromosome copy number (dose) and the animal's sex. Here, we uncoupled X chromosome dose from sex-specific gene regulation in Caenorhabditis elegans to determine the effect of each on X expression. In early embryogenesis, when dosage compensation is not yet fully active, X chromosome dose drives the hermaphrodite-biased expression of many X-linked genes, including several genes that were shown to be responsible for hermaphrodite fate. A similar effect is seen in the C. elegans germline, where X chromosome dose contributes to higher hermaphrodite X expression, suggesting that lack of dosage compensation in the germline may have a role in supporting higher expression of X chromosomal genes with female-biased functions in the gonad. In the soma, dosage compensation effectively balances X expression between the sexes. As a result, somatic sex-biased expression is almost entirely due to sex-specific gene regulation. These results suggest that lack of dosage compensation in different tissues and developmental stages allow X chromosome copy number to contribute to sex-biased gene expression and function. PMID:27356611

  9. Variability among individuals is generated at the gene expression level.

    PubMed

    Peck, Lloyd S; Thorne, Michael A S; Hoffman, Joseph I; Morley, Simon A; Clark, Melody S

    2015-07-01

    Selection acts on individuals, specifically on their differences. To understand adaptation and responses to change therefore requires knowledge of how variation is generated and distributed across traits. Variation occurs on different biological scales, from genetic through physiological to morphological, yet it is unclear which of these carries the most variability. For example, if individual variation is mainly generated by differences in gene expression, variability should decrease progressively from coding genes to morphological traits, whereas if post-translational and epigenetic effects increase variation, the opposite should occur. To test these predictions, we compared levels of variation among individuals in various measures of gene expression, physiology (including activity), and morphology in two abundant and geographically widespread Antarctic molluscs, the clam Laternula elliptica and the limpet Nacella concinna. Direct comparisons among traits as diverse as heat shock protein QPCR assays, whole transcription profiles, respiration rates, burying rate, shell length, and ash-free dry mass were made possible through the novel application of an established metric, the Wentworth Scale. In principle, this approach could be extended to analyses of populations, communities, or even entire ecosystems. We found consistently greater variation in gene expression than morphology, with physiological measures falling in between. This suggests that variability is generated at the gene expression level. These findings have important implications for refining current biological models and predictions of how biodiversity may respond to climate change. PMID:26378322

  10. Dysregulated hepatic expression of glucose transporters in chronic disease: contribution of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase to hepatic glucose uptake

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Sumera; Liaskou, Evaggelia; Fear, Janine; Garg, Abhilok; Reynolds, Gary; Claridge, Lee; Adams, David H.; Newsome, Philip N.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance is common in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD). Serum levels of soluble vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) are also increased in these patients. The amine oxidase activity of VAP-1 stimulates glucose uptake via translocation of transporters to the cell membrane in adipocytes and smooth muscle cells. We aimed to document human hepatocellular expression of glucose transporters (GLUTs) and to determine if VAP-1 activity influences receptor expression and hepatic glucose uptake. Quantitative PCR and immunocytochemistry were used to study human liver tissue and cultured cells. We also used tissue slices from humans and VAP-1-deficient mice to assay glucose uptake and measure hepatocellular responses to stimulation. We report upregulation of GLUT1, -3, -5, -6, -7, -8, -9, -10, -11, -12, and -13 in CLD. VAP-1 expression and enzyme activity increased in disease, and provision of substrate to hepatic VAP-1 drives hepatic glucose uptake. This effect was sensitive to inhibition of VAP-1 and could be recapitulated by H2O2. VAP-1 activity also altered expression and subcellular localization of GLUT2, -4, -9, -10, and -13. Therefore, we show, for the first time, alterations in hepatocellular expression of glucose and fructose transporters in CLD and provide evidence that the semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase activity of VAP-1 modifies hepatic glucose homeostasis and may contribute to patterns of GLUT expression in chronic disease. PMID:25342050

  11. Dysregulated hepatic expression of glucose transporters in chronic disease: contribution of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase to hepatic glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Karim, Sumera; Liaskou, Evaggelia; Fear, Janine; Garg, Abhilok; Reynolds, Gary; Claridge, Lee; Adams, David H; Newsome, Philip N; Lalor, Patricia F

    2014-12-15

    Insulin resistance is common in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD). Serum levels of soluble vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) are also increased in these patients. The amine oxidase activity of VAP-1 stimulates glucose uptake via translocation of transporters to the cell membrane in adipocytes and smooth muscle cells. We aimed to document human hepatocellular expression of glucose transporters (GLUTs) and to determine if VAP-1 activity influences receptor expression and hepatic glucose uptake. Quantitative PCR and immunocytochemistry were used to study human liver tissue and cultured cells. We also used tissue slices from humans and VAP-1-deficient mice to assay glucose uptake and measure hepatocellular responses to stimulation. We report upregulation of GLUT1, -3, -5, -6, -7, -8, -9, -10, -11, -12, and -13 in CLD. VAP-1 expression and enzyme activity increased in disease, and provision of substrate to hepatic VAP-1 drives hepatic glucose uptake. This effect was sensitive to inhibition of VAP-1 and could be recapitulated by H2O2. VAP-1 activity also altered expression and subcellular localization of GLUT2, -4, -9, -10, and -13. Therefore, we show, for the first time, alterations in hepatocellular expression of glucose and fructose transporters in CLD and provide evidence that the semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase activity of VAP-1 modifies hepatic glucose homeostasis and may contribute to patterns of GLUT expression in chronic disease. PMID:25342050

  12. Schizophrenia Gene Expression Profile Reverted to Normal Levels by Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Prieto, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the widespread use of antipsychotics, little is known of the molecular bases behind the action of antipsychotic drugs. A genome-wide study is needed to characterize the genes that affect the clinical response and their adverse effects. Methods: Here we show the analysis of the blood transcriptome of 22 schizophrenia patients before and after medication with atypical antipsychotics by next-generation sequencing. Results: We found that 17 genes, among the 21 495 genes analyzed, have significantly-altered expression after medication (p-value adjusted [Padj] <0.05). Six genes (ADAMTS2, CD177, CNTNAP3, ENTPD2, RFX2, and UNC45B) out of the 17 are among the 200 genes that we characterized with differential expression in a previous study between antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients and controls (Sainz et al., 2013). This number of schizophrenia-altered expression genes is significantly higher than expected by chance (Chi-test, Padj 1.19E-50), suggesting that at least part of the antipsychotic beneficial effects is exerted by modulating the expression of these genes. Interestingly, all six of these genes were overexpressed in patients and reverted to control levels of expression after treatment. We also found a significant enrichment of genes related to obesity and diabetes, known adverse affects of antipsychotics. Conclusions: These results may facilitate understanding of unknown molecular mechanisms behind schizophrenia symptoms and the molecular mechanisms of antipsychotic drugs. PMID:25522406

  13. Diversity of Matriptase Expression Level and Function in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Welman, Arkadiusz; Sproul, Duncan; Mullen, Peter; Muir, Morwenna; Kinnaird, Andrew R.; Harrison, David J.; Faratian, Dana; Brunton, Valerie G.; Frame, Margaret C.

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of matriptase has been reported in a variety of human cancers and is sufficient to trigger tumor formation in mice, but the importance of matriptase in breast cancer remains unclear. We analysed matriptase expression in 16 human breast cancer cell lines and in 107 primary breast tumors. The data revealed considerable diversity in the expression level of this protein indicating that the significance of matriptase may vary from case to case. Matriptase protein expression was correlated with HER2 expression and highest expression was seen in HER2-positive cell lines, indicating a potential role in this subgroup. Stable overexpression of matriptase in two breast cancer cell lines had different consequences. In MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells the only noted consequence of matriptase overexpression was modestly impaired growth in vivo. In contrast, overexpression of matriptase in 4T1 mouse breast carcinoma cells resulted in visible changes in morphology, actin staining and cell to cell contacts. This correlated with downregulation of the cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. These results suggest that the functions of matriptase in breast cancer are likely to be variable and cell context dependent. PMID:22514623

  14. Downregulated Expression of PTPN9 Contributes to Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Growth and Progression.

    PubMed

    Hu, Baoying; Yan, Xia; Liu, Fang; Zhu, Changlai; Zhou, Huiling; Chen, Yuyan; Liu, Jinxia; Gu, Xingxing; Ni, Runzhou; Zhang, Tianyi

    2016-07-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant cancers, whose molecular mechanisms is remains largely. PTPN9 has recently been reported to play a critical role in breast cancer development. However, the role of PTPN9 in human HCC remains elusive. The present study aimed at investigating the potential role of PTPN9 in HCC. Western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to examine the expression of PTPN9 protein in HCC and adjacent non-tumorous tissues in 45 patients. Furthermore, Cell Counting Kit-8, flow cytometry and RNA interference experiments were performed to analyze the role of PTPN9 in the regulation of HCC cell proliferation. We showed that the expression level of PTPN9 was significantly reduced in HCC, compared with adjacent non-tumorous tissues. PTPN9 expression was inversely associated with Tumor size (P = 0.014), serum AFP level (P = 0.004) and Ki-67 expression. Low expression of PTPN9 predicted poor survival in HCC patients. Moreover, PTPN9 interference assay that PTPN9 inhibited cell proliferation in HepG2 cells. Cell apoptosis assay revealed that, silencing of PTPN9 expression significantly reduced cell apoptosis, compared with control ShRNA treatment group. Our results suggested that PTPN9 expression was down-regulated in HCC tumor tissues, and reduced PTPN9 expression was associated with worsened overall survival in HCC patients. Depletion of PTPN9 inhibits the apoptosis and promotes the proliferation of HCC cells. PMID:26715439

  15. Aldosterone Induces Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases-1 Expression and Further Contributes to Collagen Accumulation: From Clinical to Bench Studies.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chi-Sheng; Chou, Chia-Hung; Liao, Che-Wei; Lin, Yen-Tin; Wu, Xue-Ming; Chang, Yi-Yao; Chen, Ying-Hsien; Wu, Vin-Cent; Su, Ming-Jai; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Chen, Ming-Fong; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Lin, Yen-Hung

    2016-06-01

    Aldosterone induces myocardial fibrosis. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) is a key factor of myocardial fibrosis. This study tested the hypothesis that aldosterone induces TIMP-1 expression and contributes to the fibrotic process. We prospectively enrolled 54 patients with primary aldosteronism, and measured plasma TIMP-1 and echocardiographic parameters. In the cell study, we investigated the possible molecular mechanism by which aldosterone induces TIMP-1 secretion and the effects on collagen accumulation. In the animal study, we measured serum TIMP-1 levels, cardiac TIMP-1 levels, and cardiac structure in an aldosterone infusion mouse model using implantation of aldosterone pellets. In patients with primary aldosteronism, plasma TIMP-1 was correlated with 24-hour urinary aldosterone, left ventricular mass, and impairment of left ventricular diastolic function. In human cardiac fibroblasts, TIMP-1 protein and mRNA expressions were significantly increased by aldosterone through the glucocorticoid receptor/PI3K/Akt/nuclear factor-κB pathway. TIMP-1 small-interfering RNA significantly reduced aldosterone-induced collagen accumulation, and aldosterone did not alter the levels of collagen1a1 or matrix metalloproteinase-1 mRNA. The aldosterone-induced TIMP-1 expression was inversely related to matrix metalloproteinase-1 activity. Furthermore, in the animal model, the serum and cardiac levels of TIMP-1 were significantly elevated in the mice that received aldosterone infusion. This elevation was blocked by RU-486 but not by eplerenone, suggesting that the effect was through glucocorticoid receptors. In a long-term aldosterone infusion model, serum TIMP-1 was associated with serum aldosterone level, cardiac structure, and fibrosis. In conclusion, aldosterone induced TIMP-1 expression in vivo and in vitro. This increased TIMP-1 expression resulted in enhanced collagen accumulation via the suppression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 activity. PMID:27113051

  16. CD4+ T Cells Expressing PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 Contribute to HIV Persistence during ART.

    PubMed

    Fromentin, Rémi; Bakeman, Wendy; Lawani, Mariam B; Khoury, Gabriela; Hartogensis, Wendy; DaFonseca, Sandrina; Killian, Marisela; Epling, Lorrie; Hoh, Rebecca; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Hecht, Frederick M; Bacchetti, Peter; Deeks, Steven G; Lewin, Sharon R; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre; Chomont, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    HIV persists in a small pool of latently infected cells despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). Identifying cellular markers expressed at the surface of these cells may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to reduce the size of the HIV reservoir. We hypothesized that CD4+ T cells expressing immune checkpoint molecules would be enriched in HIV-infected cells in individuals receiving suppressive ART. Expression levels of 7 immune checkpoint molecules (PD-1, CTLA-4, LAG-3, TIGIT, TIM-3, CD160 and 2B4) as well as 4 markers of HIV persistence (integrated and total HIV DNA, 2-LTR circles and cell-associated unspliced HIV RNA) were measured in PBMCs from 48 virally suppressed individuals. Using negative binomial regression models, we identified PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 as immune checkpoint molecules positively associated with the frequency of CD4+ T cells harboring integrated HIV DNA. The frequency of CD4+ T cells co-expressing PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 independently predicted the frequency of cells harboring integrated HIV DNA. Quantification of HIV genomes in highly purified cell subsets from blood further revealed that expressions of PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 were associated with HIV-infected cells in distinct memory CD4+ T cell subsets. CD4+ T cells co-expressing the three markers were highly enriched for integrated viral genomes (median of 8.2 fold compared to total CD4+ T cells). Importantly, most cells carrying inducible HIV genomes expressed at least one of these markers (median contribution of cells expressing LAG-3, PD-1 or TIGIT to the inducible reservoir = 76%). Our data provide evidence that CD4+ T cells expressing PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 alone or in combination are enriched for persistent HIV during ART and suggest that immune checkpoint blockers directed against these receptors may represent valuable tools to target latently infected cells in virally suppressed individuals. PMID:27415008

  17. CD4+ T Cells Expressing PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 Contribute to HIV Persistence during ART

    PubMed Central

    Fromentin, Rémi; Bakeman, Wendy; Lawani, Mariam B.; Khoury, Gabriela; Hartogensis, Wendy; DaFonseca, Sandrina; Killian, Marisela; Epling, Lorrie; Hoh, Rebecca; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Hecht, Frederick M.; Bacchetti, Peter; Deeks, Steven G.; Lewin, Sharon R.; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre; Chomont, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    HIV persists in a small pool of latently infected cells despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). Identifying cellular markers expressed at the surface of these cells may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to reduce the size of the HIV reservoir. We hypothesized that CD4+ T cells expressing immune checkpoint molecules would be enriched in HIV-infected cells in individuals receiving suppressive ART. Expression levels of 7 immune checkpoint molecules (PD-1, CTLA-4, LAG-3, TIGIT, TIM-3, CD160 and 2B4) as well as 4 markers of HIV persistence (integrated and total HIV DNA, 2-LTR circles and cell-associated unspliced HIV RNA) were measured in PBMCs from 48 virally suppressed individuals. Using negative binomial regression models, we identified PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 as immune checkpoint molecules positively associated with the frequency of CD4+ T cells harboring integrated HIV DNA. The frequency of CD4+ T cells co-expressing PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 independently predicted the frequency of cells harboring integrated HIV DNA. Quantification of HIV genomes in highly purified cell subsets from blood further revealed that expressions of PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 were associated with HIV-infected cells in distinct memory CD4+ T cell subsets. CD4+ T cells co-expressing the three markers were highly enriched for integrated viral genomes (median of 8.2 fold compared to total CD4+ T cells). Importantly, most cells carrying inducible HIV genomes expressed at least one of these markers (median contribution of cells expressing LAG-3, PD-1 or TIGIT to the inducible reservoir = 76%). Our data provide evidence that CD4+ T cells expressing PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 alone or in combination are enriched for persistent HIV during ART and suggest that immune checkpoint blockers directed against these receptors may represent valuable tools to target latently infected cells in virally suppressed individuals. PMID:27415008

  18. Elevated levels of the second messenger c-di-GMP contribute to antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kajal; Liao, Julie; Petrova, Olga E.; Cherny, K. E.; Sauer, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are highly structured, surface-associated communities. A hallmark of biofilms is their extraordinary resistance to antimicrobial agents that is activated during early biofilm development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and requires the regulatory hybrid SagS and BrlR, a member of the MerR family of multidrug efflux pump activators. However, little is known about the mechanism by which SagS contributes to BrlR activation or drug resistance. Here, we demonstrate that ΔsagS biofilm cells harbor the secondary messenger c-di-GMP at reduced levels similar to those observed in wild-type cells grown planktonically rather than as biofilms. Restoring c-di-GMP levels to wild-type biofilm-like levels restored brlR expression, DNA binding by BrlR, and recalcitrance to killing by antimicrobial agents of ΔsagS biofilm cells. We likewise found that increasing c-di-GMP levels present in planktonic cells to biofilm-like levels (≥55 pmol/mg) resulted in planktonic cells being significantly more resistant to antimicrobial agents, with increased resistance correlating with increased brlR, mexA, and mexE expression and BrlR production. In contrast, reducing cellular c-di-GMP levels of biofilm cells to ≤40 pmol/mg correlated with increased susceptibility and reduced brlR expression. Our findings suggest that a signaling pathway involving a specific c-di-GMP pool regulated by SagS contributes to the resistance of P. aeruginosa biofilms. PMID:24655293

  19. Translation Levels Control Multi-Spanning Membrane Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Cecilia; Bostrom, Jenny; Fuh, Germaine; Lee, Chingwei V.; Huang, Arthur; Vandlen, Richard L.; Yansura, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Attempts to express eukaryotic multi-spanning membrane proteins at high-levels have been generally unsuccessful. In order to investigate the cause of this limitation and gain insight into the rate limiting processes involved, we have analyzed the effect of translation levels on the expression of several human membrane proteins in Escherichia coli (E. coli). These results demonstrate that excessive translation initiation rates of membrane proteins cause a block in protein synthesis and ultimately prevent the high-level accumulation of these proteins. Moderate translation rates allow coupling of peptide synthesis and membrane targeting, resulting in a significant increase in protein expression and accumulation over time. The current study evaluates four membrane proteins, CD20 (4-transmembrane (TM) helixes), the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, 7-TMs) RA1c and EG-VEGFR1, and Patched 1 (12-TMs), and demonstrates the critical role of translation initiation rates in the targeting, insertion and folding of integral membrane proteins in the E. coli membrane. PMID:22563408

  20. Fate of water pumped from underground and contributions to sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yoshihide; Lo, Min-Hui; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Reager, John T.; Famiglietti, James S.; Wu, Ren-Jie; Tseng, Yu-Heng

    2016-08-01

    The contributions from terrestrial water sources to sea-level rise, other than ice caps and glaciers, are highly uncertain and heavily debated. Recent assessments indicate that groundwater depletion (GWD) may become the most important positive terrestrial contribution over the next 50 years, probably equal in magnitude to the current contributions from glaciers and ice caps. However, the existing estimates assume that nearly 100% of groundwater extracted eventually ends up in the oceans. Owing to limited knowledge of the pathways and mechanisms governing the ultimate fate of pumped groundwater, the relative fraction of global GWD that contributes to sea-level rise remains unknown. Here, using a coupled climate-hydrological model simulation, we show that only 80% of GWD ends up in the ocean. An increase in runoff to the ocean accounts for roughly two-thirds, whereas the remainder results from the enhanced net flux of precipitation minus evaporation over the ocean, due to increased atmospheric vapour transport from the land to the ocean. The contribution of GWD to global sea-level rise amounted to 0.02 (+/-0.004) mm yr-1 in 1900 and increased to 0.27 (+/-0.04) mm yr-1 in 2000. This indicates that existing studies have substantially overestimated the contribution of GWD to global sea-level rise by a cumulative amount of at least 10 mm during the twentieth century and early twenty-first century. With other terrestrial water contributions included, we estimate the net terrestrial water contribution during the period 1993-2010 to be +0.12 (+/-0.04) mm yr-1, suggesting that the net terrestrial water contribution reported in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report report is probably overestimated by a factor of three.

  1. Fate of Water Pumped from Underground and Contributions to Sea Level Rise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Yoshihide; Lo, Min-Hui; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Reager, John T.; Famiglietti, James S.; Wu, Ren-Jie; Tseng, Yu-Heng

    2016-01-01

    The contributions from terrestrial water sources to sea-level rise, other than ice caps and glaciers, are highly uncertain and heavily debated1-5. Recent assessments indicate that groundwater depletion (GWD) may become the most important positive terrestrial contribution6-10 over the next 50 years, probably equal in magnitude to the current contributions from glaciers and ice caps6. However, the existing estimates assume that nearly 100% of groundwater extracted eventually ends up in the oceans. Owing to limited knowledge of the pathways and mechanisms governing the ultimate fate of pumped groundwater, the relative fraction of global GWD that contributes to sea-level rise remains unknown. Here, using a coupled climate-hydrological model11,12 simulation, we show that only 80% of GWDends up in the ocean. An increase in runo to the ocean accounts for roughly two-thirds, whereas the remainder results from the enhanced net flux of precipitation minus evaporation over the ocean, due to increased atmospheric vapour transport from the land to the ocean. The contribution of GWD to global sea-level rise amounted to 0.02 (+/- 0.004)mm yr(sup-1) in 1900 and increased to 0.27 (+/- 0.04)mm yr(sup-1) in 2000. This indicates that existing studies have substantially overestimated the contribution of GWD to global sea-level rise by a cumulative amount of at least 10 mm during the twentieth century and early twenty-first century. With other terrestrial water contributions included, we estimate the net terrestrial water contribution during the period 1993-2010 to be +0.12 +/-0.04)mm yr(sup-1), suggesting that the net terrestrialwater contribution reported in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report report is probably overestimated by a factor of three.

  2. Increased CDA expression/activity in males contributes to decreased cytidine analogue half-life and likely contributes to worse outcomes with 5-azacytidine or decitabine therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mahfouz, Reda Z; Jankowska, Ania; Ebrahem, Quteba; Gu, Xiaorong; Visconte, Valeria; Tabarroki, Ali; Terse, Pramod; Covey, Joseph; Chan, Kenneth; Ling, Yonghua; Engelke, Kory J.; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Tiu, Ramon; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Saunthararajah, Yogen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The cytidine analogues 5-azacytidine and decitabine, used to treat myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), produce a molecular epigenetic effect, depletion of DNA-methyltransferase (DNMT1). This action is S-phase dependent. Hence, genetic factors that decrease the half-lives of these drugs could impact efficacy. Documentation of such impact, and elucidation of underlying mechanisms, could lead to improved clinical application. Design Cytidine deaminase (CDA) rapidly inactivates 5-azacytidine/decitabine. The effect of CDA SNP A79C and gender on CDA expression, enzyme activity and drug pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics was examined in mice and humans, and the impact on overall survival (OS) was evaluated in 5-azacytidine/decitabine-treated MDS patients (n=90) and cytarabine-treated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients (n=76). Results By HPLC, plasma CDA activity was decreased as expected in individuals with the SNP A79C. Interestingly and significantly, there was an even larger decrease in females compared to males. Explaining this decrease, liver CDA expression was significantly lower in female versus male mice. As expected, decitabine plasma levels, measured by mass-spectrometry, were significantly higher in females. In mathematical modeling, the detrimental impact of shorter drug half-life (e.g., in males) was greater in low compared to high S-phase fraction disease (e.g., MDS versus AML), since in high S-phase fraction disease, even a short exposure treats a major portion of cells. Accordingly, in multivariate analysis, OS was significantly worse in male versus female MDS patients treated with 5-azacytidine/decitabine. Conclusions Increased CDA expression/activity in males contributes to decreased cytidine analogue half-life and likely contributes to worse outcomes with 5-azacytidine or decitabine therapy. PMID:23287564

  3. Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) CD8+ T-Cells That Express Interferon-Gamma Contribute to HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND)

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, Rachel D.; Hong, Suzi; Crescini, Melanie; Ellis, Ronald; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Spina, Celsa; Letendre, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) continue to affect cognition and everyday functioning despite anti-retroviral treatment (ART). Previous studies focused on mechanisms related to monocyte/macrophage mediated inflammation. However, in the ART era, there is increasing evidence for the involvement of CD8+ T-cells in CNS pathogenesis. Methods To investigate the relationship between T-cell responses and neurocognitive impairment (NCI), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell intracellular cytokine (IFNγ, IL-2, TNFα) and lytic marker (CD107a) expression were assessed in HIV infected subjects who underwent comprehensive neurocognitive (NC) evaluation and either initiated or changed ART. Results Data were collected from 31 participants at 70 visits. The frequency of cytokine expressing T-cells in CSF was significantly higher than in peripheral blood for CD4+T-cells: TNFα, IL-2, IFNγ and CD8+T-cells: IL-2 and IFNγ. Analysis of T-cell activity and NCI as a function of CSF HIV RNA levels suggested a general association between NCI, high CSF CD8+ (but not CD4+T-cell) cytokine expression and CSF HIV RNA <103 copies/ml (p<0.0001). Specifically, CSF CD8+ T-cell IFNγ expression correlated with severity of NCI (r = 0.57, p = 0.004). Multivariable analyses indicated that CSF CD8+T-cell IFNγ and myeloid activation (CD163) contributed equally and independently to cognitive status and a composite variable produced the strongest correlation with NCI (r = 0.83, p = 0.0001). In contrast, CD8+ cytolytic activity (CD107a expression) was negatively correlated with NCI (p = 0.05) but was dependent on CD4 levels >400/μl and low CSF HIV RNA levels (<103 copies/ml). In our longitudinal analysis of 16 subjects, higher CSF CD8+IFNγ expression at baseline predicted NC decline at follow-up (p = 0.02). Severity of NCI at follow-up correlated with level of residual HIV RNA in CSF. Conclusions Presence of IFNγ expressing CD8+ T

  4. Intercellular Variability in Protein Levels from Stochastic Expression and Noisy Cell Cycle Processes

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Mohammad; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A.; Antunes, Duarte; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-01-01

    Inside individual cells, expression of genes is inherently stochastic and manifests as cell-to-cell variability or noise in protein copy numbers. Since proteins half-lives can be comparable to the cell-cycle length, randomness in cell-division times generates additional intercellular variability in protein levels. Moreover, as many mRNA/protein species are expressed at low-copy numbers, errors incurred in partitioning of molecules between two daughter cells are significant. We derive analytical formulas for the total noise in protein levels when the cell-cycle duration follows a general class of probability distributions. Using a novel hybrid approach the total noise is decomposed into components arising from i) stochastic expression; ii) partitioning errors at the time of cell division and iii) random cell-division events. These formulas reveal that random cell-division times not only generate additional extrinsic noise, but also critically affect the mean protein copy numbers and intrinsic noise components. Counter intuitively, in some parameter regimes, noise in protein levels can decrease as cell-division times become more stochastic. Computations are extended to consider genome duplication, where transcription rate is increased at a random point in the cell cycle. We systematically investigate how the timing of genome duplication influences different protein noise components. Intriguingly, results show that noise contribution from stochastic expression is minimized at an optimal genome-duplication time. Our theoretical results motivate new experimental methods for decomposing protein noise levels from synchronized and asynchronized single-cell expression data. Characterizing the contributions of individual noise mechanisms will lead to precise estimates of gene expression parameters and techniques for altering stochasticity to change phenotype of individual cells. PMID:27536771

  5. Intercellular Variability in Protein Levels from Stochastic Expression and Noisy Cell Cycle Processes.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Mohammad; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Antunes, Duarte; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-08-01

    Inside individual cells, expression of genes is inherently stochastic and manifests as cell-to-cell variability or noise in protein copy numbers. Since proteins half-lives can be comparable to the cell-cycle length, randomness in cell-division times generates additional intercellular variability in protein levels. Moreover, as many mRNA/protein species are expressed at low-copy numbers, errors incurred in partitioning of molecules between two daughter cells are significant. We derive analytical formulas for the total noise in protein levels when the cell-cycle duration follows a general class of probability distributions. Using a novel hybrid approach the total noise is decomposed into components arising from i) stochastic expression; ii) partitioning errors at the time of cell division and iii) random cell-division events. These formulas reveal that random cell-division times not only generate additional extrinsic noise, but also critically affect the mean protein copy numbers and intrinsic noise components. Counter intuitively, in some parameter regimes, noise in protein levels can decrease as cell-division times become more stochastic. Computations are extended to consider genome duplication, where transcription rate is increased at a random point in the cell cycle. We systematically investigate how the timing of genome duplication influences different protein noise components. Intriguingly, results show that noise contribution from stochastic expression is minimized at an optimal genome-duplication time. Our theoretical results motivate new experimental methods for decomposing protein noise levels from synchronized and asynchronized single-cell expression data. Characterizing the contributions of individual noise mechanisms will lead to precise estimates of gene expression parameters and techniques for altering stochasticity to change phenotype of individual cells. PMID:27536771

  6. The Cardiomyocyte Molecular Clock Regulates the Circadian Expression of Kcnh2 and Contributes to Ventricular Repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Schroder, Elizabeth A.; Burgess, Don E.; Zhang, Xiping; Lefta, Mellani; Smith, Jennifer L.; Patwardhan, Abhijit; Bartos, Daniel C.; Elayi, Claude S.; Esser, Karyn A.; Delisle, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) follows a diurnal variation. Data suggest the timing of SCD is influenced by circadian (~24 hour) changes in neurohumoral and cardiomyocyte-specific regulation of the heart’s electrical properties. Objective The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors BMAL1 and CLOCK coordinate the circadian expression of select genes. We tested whether Bmal1 expression in cardiomyocytes contributes to K+ channel expression and diurnal changes in ventricular repolarization. Methods We utilized transgenic mice that allow for the inducible cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Bmal1 (iCSΔBmal1−/−). We used quantitative PCR, voltage-clamping, promoter-reporter bioluminescence assays, and electrocardiographic (ECG) telemetry. Results Although several K+ channel gene transcripts were downregulated in iCSΔBmal1−/− mouse hearts, only Kcnh2 exhibited a robust circadian pattern of expression that was disrupted in iCSΔBmal1−/− hearts. Kcnh2 underlies the rapidly activating delayed-rectifier K+ current (IKr), and IKr recorded from iCSΔBmal1−/− ventricular cardiomyocytes was ~50% compared to control myocytes. Promoter-reporter assays demonstrated that the human Kcnh2 promoter is transactivated by the co-expression of BMAL1 and CLOCK. ECG analysis showed iCSΔBmal1−/− mice developed a prolongation in the heart rate corrected QT (QTc) interval during the light (resting)-phase. This was secondary to an augmented circadian rhythm in the uncorrected QT interval without a corresponding change in the RR interval. Conclusion The molecular clock in the heart regulates the circadian expression of Kcnh2, modifies K+ channel gene expression and is important for normal ventricular repolarization. Disruption of the cardiomyocyte circadian clock mechanism likely unmasks diurnal changes in ventricular repolarization that could contribute to an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmias/SCD. PMID:25701773

  7. The Paratenon Contributes to Scleraxis-Expressing Cells during Patellar Tendon Healing

    PubMed Central

    Dyment, Nathaniel A.; Liu, Chia-Feng; Kazemi, Namdar; Aschbacher-Smith, Lindsey E.; Kenter, Keith; Breidenbach, Andrew P.; Shearn, Jason T.; Wylie, Christopher; Rowe, David W.; Butler, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of cells that contribute to tendon healing, specifically extrinsic epitenon/paratenon cells vs. internal tendon fibroblasts, is still debated. The purpose of this study is to determine the location and phenotype of cells that contribute to healing of a central patellar tendon defect injury in the mouse. Normal adult patellar tendon consists of scleraxis-expressing (Scx) tendon fibroblasts situated among aligned collagen fibrils. The tendon body is surrounded by paratenon, which consists of a thin layer of cells that do not express Scx and collagen fibers oriented circumferentially around the tendon. At 3 days following injury, the paratenon thickens as cells within the paratenon proliferate and begin producing tenascin-C and fibromodulin. These cells migrate toward the defect site and express scleraxis and smooth muscle actin alpha by day 7. The thickened paratenon tissue eventually bridges the tendon defect by day 14. Similarly, cells within the periphery of the adjacent tendon struts express these markers and become disorganized. Cells within the defect region show increased expression of fibrillar collagens (Col1a1 and Col3a1) but decreased expression of tenogenic transcription factors (scleraxis and mohawk homeobox) and collagen assembly genes (fibromodulin and decorin). By contrast, early growth response 1 and 2 are upregulated in these tissues along with tenascin-C. These results suggest that paratenon cells, which normally do not express Scx, respond to injury by turning on Scx and assembling matrix to bridge the defect. Future studies are needed to determine the signaling pathways that drive these cells and whether they are capable of producing a functional tendon matrix. Understanding this process may guide tissue engineering strategies in the future by stimulating these cells to improve tendon repair. PMID:23555841

  8. The paratenon contributes to scleraxis-expressing cells during patellar tendon healing.

    PubMed

    Dyment, Nathaniel A; Liu, Chia-Feng; Kazemi, Namdar; Aschbacher-Smith, Lindsey E; Kenter, Keith; Breidenbach, Andrew P; Shearn, Jason T; Wylie, Christopher; Rowe, David W; Butler, David L

    2013-01-01

    The origin of cells that contribute to tendon healing, specifically extrinsic epitenon/paratenon cells vs. internal tendon fibroblasts, is still debated. The purpose of this study is to determine the location and phenotype of cells that contribute to healing of a central patellar tendon defect injury in the mouse. Normal adult patellar tendon consists of scleraxis-expressing (Scx) tendon fibroblasts situated among aligned collagen fibrils. The tendon body is surrounded by paratenon, which consists of a thin layer of cells that do not express Scx and collagen fibers oriented circumferentially around the tendon. At 3 days following injury, the paratenon thickens as cells within the paratenon proliferate and begin producing tenascin-C and fibromodulin. These cells migrate toward the defect site and express scleraxis and smooth muscle actin alpha by day 7. The thickened paratenon tissue eventually bridges the tendon defect by day 14. Similarly, cells within the periphery of the adjacent tendon struts express these markers and become disorganized. Cells within the defect region show increased expression of fibrillar collagens (Col1a1 and Col3a1) but decreased expression of tenogenic transcription factors (scleraxis and mohawk homeobox) and collagen assembly genes (fibromodulin and decorin). By contrast, early growth response 1 and 2 are upregulated in these tissues along with tenascin-C. These results suggest that paratenon cells, which normally do not express Scx, respond to injury by turning on Scx and assembling matrix to bridge the defect. Future studies are needed to determine the signaling pathways that drive these cells and whether they are capable of producing a functional tendon matrix. Understanding this process may guide tissue engineering strategies in the future by stimulating these cells to improve tendon repair. PMID:23555841

  9. Low renal mineralocorticoid receptor expression at birth contributes to partial aldosterone resistance in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Martinerie, Laetitia; Viengchareun, Say; Delezoïde, Anne-Lise; Jaubert, Francis; Sinico, Martine; Prevot, Sophie; Boileau, Pascal; Meduri, Géri; Lombès, Marc

    2009-01-01

    The human neonatal period is characterized by renal immaturity with impaired capacity to regulate water and sodium homeostasis, resembling partial aldosterone resistance. Since aldosterone effects are mediated by the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), we postulated that this hormonal unresponsiveness could be related to low MR expression in the distal nephron. We measured aldosterone and renin levels in umbilical cord blood of healthy newborns. We used qPCR and immunohistochemistry to analyze the expression of MR and key players of the mineralocorticoid signaling pathway, during human and mouse renal development. High aldosterone and renin levels were found at birth. MR mRNA was detected in mouse kidney at day 16 postcoitum (E16), peaking at E18, but its expression was surprisingly very low at birth, rising progressively afterwards. Similar biphasic temporal expression was observed during human renal embryogenesis, with a transient expression between 15 and 24 weeks of gestation but an undetectable immunoreactive MR in late gestational and neonatal kidneys. This cyclic MR expression was tightly correlated with the evolution of the 11β–hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 and the epithelial sodium channel α-subunit. In contrast, glucocorticoid and vasopressin receptors, and aquaporin 2 followed a progressive and sustained evolution during renal maturation. Our study provides first evidence for a low renal MR expression level at birth, despite high aldosterone levels, which could account for compromised postnatal sodium handling. Elucidation of regulatory mechanisms governing MR expression should lead to new strategies for the management of sodium waste in preterms and neonates. PMID:19477942

  10. Deregulation of XBP1 expression contributes to myocardial vascular endothelial growth factor-A expression and angiogenesis during cardiac hypertrophy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Duan, Quanlu; Ni, Li; Wang, Peihua; Chen, Chen; Yang, Lei; Ma, Ben; Gong, Wei; Cai, Zhejun; Zou, Ming-Hui; Wang, Dao Wen

    2016-08-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been reported to be involved in many cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, myocardial ischemia, and hypertension that ultimately result in heart failure. XBP1 is a key ER stress signal transducer and an important pro-survival factor of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in mammalian cells. The aim of this study was to establish a role for XBP1 in the deregulation of pro-angiogenic factor VEGF expression and potential regulatory mechanisms in hypertrophic and failing heart. Western blots showed that myocardial XBP1s protein was significantly increased in both isoproterenol (ISO)-induced and pressure-overload-induced hypertrophic and failing heart compared to normal control. Furthermore, XBP1 silencing exacerbates ISO-induced cardiac dysfunction along with a reduction of myocardial capillary density and cardiac expression of pro-angiogenic factor VEGF-A in vivo. Consistently, experiments in cultured cardiomyocytes H9c2 (2-1) cells showed that UPR-induced VEGF-A upregulation was determined by XBP1 expression level. Importantly, VEGF-A expression was increased in failing human heart tissue and blood samples and was correlated with the levels of XBP1. These results suggest that XBP1 regulates VEGF-mediated cardiac angiogenesis, which contributes to the progression of adaptive hypertrophy, and might provide novel targets for prevention and treatment of heart failure. PMID:27133203

  11. Contributions to the sea level seasonal cycle within the Gulf of Cadiz (Southwestern Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiz, Irene; Tejedor, Begoña; Gómez-Enri, Jesús; Aboitiz, Alazne; Villares, Pilar

    2016-07-01

    The spatial distribution of the sea level seasonal cycle within the Gulf of Cadiz (GoC) has been analysed using monthly maps of sea level anomalies from gridded multi-mission altimeter data, along with monthly means of sea level heights from three tide gauge stations. Moreover, the contribution to the sea level seasonal cycle of atmospheric pressure and wind and the steric effect were evaluated using maps of sea level residuals from the VANI2-ERA hindcast, and a combination of satellite Sea Surface Temperature maps with a very high resolution Temperature and Salinity climatology for the region. The atmospheric contribution accounted for 55-58% of the sea level variance offshore, with this percentage diminishing toward the coast, where the effect of wind stress might be underestimated, especially over regions of complex bathymetry. The steric contribution was addressed by considering local, open ocean, basin-wide and continental shelf steric effects. Results obtained highlighted the oceanographic complexity of the GoC at regional scales. In this sense, the open ocean steric contribution explained the largest percentage of atmospheric-corrected sea level variance at the offshore part of the basin (50-67%) and over the eastern shelf (42-48%), suggesting that the sea level seasonal cycle within the eastern shelf is connected to the large scale circulation system. West of Cape Santa Maria, both over the continental shelf and offshore, the best results were obtained with the local steric contribution, suggesting a decoupling of deep and shallow water sea level variations at the seasonal scale in that region.

  12. Localizing PRL-2 expression and determining the effects of dietary Mg(2+) on expression levels.

    PubMed

    Gungabeesoon, Jeremy; Tremblay, Michel L; Uetani, Noriko

    2016-07-01

    The phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) is a group of protein tyrosine phosphatases that play a key role in cancer progression and metastasis. We previously showed that PRL-2 modulates intracellular Mg(2+) levels and sustains cancer phenotypes by binding to the Mg(2+) transporter CNNM3. However, the physiological functions of PRL-2 in animals remain largely unknown. To better understand which cell types are associated with PRL-2 function, we characterized its expression in mouse tissues using a PRL-2 β-galactosidase reporter mouse model. Our results demonstrated that PRL-2 was ubiquitously expressed, with the highest expression levels observed in the hippocampal pyramidal neurons, ependymal cells, cone and rod photoreceptor cells, endocardium, vascular and bronchial smooth muscle, and collecting ducts in the kidney. On the other hand, PRL-2 expression was undetectable or very low in the parenchymal cells of the liver and pancreas. Our results also indicated that PRL-2 is involved in cell-type-specific Mg(2+) homeostasis and that PRL-2 expression is potentially inversely regulated by dietary Mg(2+) levels. PMID:27015884

  13. Expression of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Contributes to Corneal Inflammation in Experimental Dry Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Soo; Hattori, Takaaki; Park, Eun Young; Stevenson, William; Chauhan, Sunil K.; Dana, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the corneal expression of toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and determine its contribution to the immunopathogenesis of dry eye disease (DED). Methods. Seven to 8-week-old female C57BL/6 mice were housed in a controlled environment chamber and administered scopolamine to induce experimental DED. Mice received intravenous TLR4 inhibitor (Eritoran) to block systemic TLR4-mediated activity. The expression of TLR4 by the corneal epithelium and stroma was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry. Corneal fluorescein staining (CFS) was performed to evaluate clinical disease severity. The corneal expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF, and CCL2), corneal infiltration of CD11b+ antigen-presenting cells, and lymph node frequency of mature MHC-IIhi CD11b+ cells were assessed. Results. The epithelial cells of normal corneas expressed TLR4 intracellularly; however, DED significantly increased the cell surface expression of TLR4. Similarly, flow cytometric analysis of stromal cells revealed a significant increase in the expression of TLR4 proteins by DED-induced corneas as compared with normal corneas. DED increased the mRNA expression of TLR4 in corneal stromal cells, but not epithelial cells. TLR4 inhibition decreased the severity of CFS and significantly reduced the mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF. Furthermore, TLR4 inhibition significantly reduced the corneal infiltration of CD11b+ cells and the lymph node frequency of MHC-IIhi CD11b+ cells. Conclusions. These results suggest that DED increases the corneal expression of TLR4 and that TLR4 participates in the inflammatory response to ocular surface desiccating stress. PMID:22789921

  14. Sea level budget over 2005-2013: missing contributions and data errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieng, H. B.; Cazenave, A.; von Schuckmann, K.; Ablain, M.; Meyssignac, B.

    2015-10-01

    Based on the sea level budget closure approach, this study investigates the residuals between observed global mean sea level (GMSL) and the sum of components (steric sea level and ocean mass) for the period January 2005 to December 2013. The objective is to identify the impact of errors in one or several components of the sea level budget on the residual time series. This is a key issue if we want to constrain missing contributions such as the contribution to sea level rise from the deep ocean (depths not covered by observations). For that purpose, we use several data sets as processed by different groups: six altimetry products for the GMSL, four Argo products plus the ORAS4 ocean reanalysis for the steric sea level and three GRACE-based ocean mass products. We find that over the study time span, the observed differences in trend of the residuals of the sea level budget equation can be as large as ~ 0.55 mm yr-1 (i.e., ~ 17 % of the observed GMSL rate of rise). These trend differences essentially result from differences in trends of the GMSL time series. Using the ORAS4 reanalysis (providing complete geographical coverage of the steric sea level component), we also show that lack of Argo data in the Indonesian region leads to an overestimate of the absolute value of the residual trend by about 0.25 mm yr-1. Accounting for this regional contribution leads to closure of the sea level budget, at least for some GMSL products. At short timescales (from sub-seasonal to interannual), residual anomalies are significantly correlated with ocean mass and steric sea level anomalies (depending on the time span), suggesting that the residual anomalies are related to errors in both GRACE-based ocean mass and Argo-based steric data. Efforts are needed to reduce these various sources of errors before using the sea level budget approach to estimate missing contributions such as the deep ocean heat content.

  15. Fusion pore modulation as a presynaptic mechanism contributing to expression of long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sukwoo; Klingauf, Jürgen; Tsien, Richard W

    2003-04-29

    Working on the idea that postsynaptic and presynaptic mechanisms of long-term potentiation (LTP) expression are not inherently mutually exclusive, we have looked for the existence and functionality of presynaptic mechanisms for augmenting transmitter release in hippocampal slices. Specifically, we asked if changes in glutamate release might contribute to the conversion of 'silent synapses' that show N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) responses but no detectable alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) responses, to ones that exhibit both. Here, we review experiments where NMDA receptor responses provided a bioassay of cleft glutamate concentration, using opposition between peak [glu](cleft )and a rapidly reversible antagonist, L-AP5. We discuss findings of a dramatic increase in peak [glu](cleft) upon expression of pairing-induced LTP (Choi). We present simulations with a quantitative model of glutamatergic synaptic transmission that includes modulation of the presynaptic fusion pore, realistic cleft geometry and a distributed array of postsynaptic receptors and glutamate transporters. The modelling supports the idea that changes in the dynamics of glutamate release can contribute to synaptic unsilencing. We review direct evidence from Renger et al., in accord with the modelling, that trading off the strength and duration of the glutamate transient can markedly alter AMPA receptor responses with little effect on NMDA receptor responses. An array of additional findings relevant to fusion pore modulation and its proposed contribution to LTP expression are considered. PMID:12740115

  16. The genetic architecture of gene expression levels in wild baboons

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Jenny; Zhou, Xiang; Alberts, Susan C; Stephens, Matthew; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    Primate evolution has been argued to result, in part, from changes in how genes are regulated. However, we still know little about gene regulation in natural primate populations. We conducted an RNA sequencing (RNA-seq)-based study of baboons from an intensively studied wild population. We performed complementary expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping and allele-specific expression analyses, discovering substantial evidence for, and surprising power to detect, genetic effects on gene expression levels in the baboons. eQTL were most likely to be identified for lineage-specific, rapidly evolving genes; interestingly, genes with eQTL significantly overlapped between baboons and a comparable human eQTL data set. Our results suggest that genes vary in their tolerance of genetic perturbation, and that this property may be conserved across species. Further, they establish the feasibility of eQTL mapping using RNA-seq data alone, and represent an important step towards understanding the genetic architecture of gene expression in primates. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04729.001 PMID:25714927

  17. The Expression Level of Septin12 Is Critical for Spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Hung; Lin, Yung-Ming; Wang, Ya-Yun; Yu, I-Shing; Lin, Yi-Wen; Wang, Yun-Han; Wu, Ching-Ming; Pan, Hsien-An; Chao, Shin-Chih; Yen, Pauline H.; Lin, Shu-Wha; Kuo, Pao-Lin

    2009-01-01

    Septins belong to a family of polymerizing GTP-binding proteins that are required for many cellular functions, such as membrane compartmentalization, vesicular trafficking, mitosis, and cytoskeletal remodeling. One family member, septin12, is expressed specifically in the testis. In this study, we found septin12 expressed in multiple subcellular compartments during terminal differentiation of mouse germ cells. In humans, the testicular tissues of men with either hypospermatogenesis or maturation arrest had lower levels of SEPTIN12 transcripts than normal men. In addition, increased numbers of spermatozoa with abnormal head, neck, and tail morphologies lacked SEPT12 immunostaining signals, as compared with normal spermatozoa. To elucidate the role of septin12, we generated 129 embryonic stem cells containing a septin12 mutant allele with a deletion in the exons that encode the N-terminal GTP-binding domain. Most chimeras derived from the targeted embryonic stem cells were infertile, and the few fertile chimeras only produced offspring with a C57BL/6 background. Semen analysis of the infertile chimeras showed a decreased sperm count, decreased sperm motility, and spermatozoa with defects involving all subcellular compartments. The testicular phenotypes included maturation arrest of germ cells at the spermatid stage, sloughing of round spermatids, and increased apoptosis of germ cells. Electron microscopic examination of spermatozoa showed misshapen nuclei, disorganized mitochondria, and broken acrosomes. Our data indicate that Septin12 expression levels are critical for mammalian spermiogenesis. PMID:19359518

  18. Sim2 contributes to neuroendocrine hormone gene expression in the anterior hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Goshu, Eleni; Jin, Hui; Lovejoy, John; Marion, Jean-François; Michaud, Jacques L; Fan, Chen-Ming

    2004-05-01

    Paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus maintain homeostasis by modulating pituitary hormonal output. PVN and supraoptic nuclei contain five major cell types: oxytocin-, vasopressin-, CRH-, somatostatin-, and TRH-secreting neurons. Sim1, Arnt2, and Otp genes are essential for terminal differentiation of these neurons. One of their common downstream genes, Brn2, is necessary for oxytocin, vasopressin, and CRH cell differentiation. Here we show that Sim2, a paralog of Sim1, contributes to the expression of Trh and Ss genes in the dorsal preoptic area, anterior-periventricular nucleus, and PVN. Sim2 expression overlaps with Trh- and Ss-expressing cells, and Sim2 mutants contain reduced numbers of Trh and Ss cells. Genetically, Sim1 acts upstream of Sim2 and partially compensates for the loss of Sim2. Comparative expression studies at the anterior hypothalamus at early stages reveal that there are separate pools of Trh cells with distinctive molecular codes defined by Sim1 and Sim2 expression. Together with previous reports, our results demonstrate that Sim1 and Otp utilize two common downstream genes, Brn2 and Sim2, to mediate distinctive sets of neuroendocrine hormone gene expression. PMID:14988428

  19. Enhanced MGMT expression contributes to temozolomide resistance in glioma stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhi-Kun; Shen, Dong; Chen, Yin-Sheng; Yang, Qun-Ying; Guo, Cheng-Cheng; Feng, Bing-Hong; Chen, Zhong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) can remove DNA alkylation adducts, thereby repairing damaged DNA and contributing to the drug resistance of gliomas to alkylating agents. In addition, glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) have been demonstrated to be involved in the recurrence and treatment resistance of gliomas. In this study, we aimed to investigate MGMT expression and regulatory mechanisms in GSCs and the association of MGMT with temozolomide (TMZ) sensitivity. GSCs were enriched from one MGMT-positive cell line (SF-767) and 7 MGMT-negative cell lines (U251, SKMG-4, SKMG-1, SF295, U87, MGR1, and MGR2) through serum-free clone culture. GSCs from the U251G, SKMG-4G, SF295G, and SKMG-1G cell lines became MGMT-positive, but those from the U87G, MGR1G, and MGR2G cell lines remained MGMT-negative. However, all the GSCs and their parental glioma cell lines were positive for nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, GSCs were more resistant to TMZ than their parental glioma cell lines (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) of TMZ between MGMT-positive and MGMT-negative GSCs (P > 0.05). When we treated the MGMT-positive GSCs with TMZ plus MG-132 (an NF-κB inhibitor), the antitumor activity was significantly enhanced compared to that of GSCs treated with TMZ alone (P < 0.05). Furthermore, we found that MGMT expression decreased through the down-regulation of NF-κB expression by MG-132. Our results show that MG-132 may inhibit NF-κB expression and further decrease MGMT expression, resulting in a synergistic effect on MGMT-positive GSCs. These results indicate that enhanced MGMT expression contributes to TMZ resistance in MGMT-positive GSCs. PMID:23958055

  20. Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 Contributes to Transformation of v-Rel-Expressing Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hrdličková, Radmila; Nehyba, Jiří; Bose, Henry R.

    2001-01-01

    The avian homologue of the interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF-4) and a novel splice variant lacking exon 6, IRF-4ΔE6, were isolated and characterized. Chicken IRF-4 is expressed in lymphoid organs, less in small intestine, and lungs. IRF-4ΔE6 mRNA, though less abundant than full-length IRF-4, was detected in lymphoid tissues, with the highest levels observed in thymic cells. IRF-4 is highly expressed in v-Rel-transformed lymphocytes, and the expression of IRF-4 is increased in v-Rel- and c-Rel-transformed fibroblasts relative to control cells. The expression of IRF-4 from retrovirus vectors morphologically transformed primary fibroblasts, increased their saturation density, proliferation, and life span, and promoted their growth in soft agar. IRF-4 and v-Rel cooperated synergistically to transform fibroblasts. The expression of IRF-4 antisense RNA eliminated formation of soft agar colonies by v-Rel and reduced the proliferation of v-Rel-transformed cells. v-Rel-transformed fibroblasts produced interferon 1 (IFN1), which inhibits fibroblast proliferation. Infection of fibroblasts with retroviruses expressing v-Rel resulted in an increase in the mRNA levels of IFN1, the IFN receptor, STAT1, JAK1, and 2′,5′-oligo(A) synthetase. The exogenous expression of IRF-4 in v-Rel-transformed fibroblasts decreased the production of IFN1 and suppressed the expression of several genes in the IFN transduction pathway. These results suggest that induction of IRF-4 expression by v-Rel likely facilitates transformation of fibroblasts by decreasing the induction of this antiproliferative pathway. PMID:11533227

  1. Analysis of gene expression patterns and levels in maize hybrids and their parents.

    PubMed

    Nie, H S; Li, S P; Shan, X H; Wu, Y; Su, S Z; Liu, H K; Han, J Y; Yuan, Y P

    2015-01-01

    Heterosis has greatly contributed to conventional plant breeding and is widely used to increase crop plant productivity. However, although some studies have explored the mechanisms of heterosis at the genomic and transcriptome level, these mechanisms still remain unclear. The growth and development of maize seedlings and immature embryos have an important impact on subsequent production. This study investigated differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between parents and reciprocal hybrids in the seedling leaves, roots, and immature embryo 15 days after pollination using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)-based transcript profiling (cDNA-AFLP). We isolated 180, 170, and 108 genes from the leaves, roots, and immature embryos, respectively, that were differentially expressed between hybrids and parents. Sequencing and functional analysis revealed that 107 transcript-derived fragments in the roots and leaves and 90 in the immature embryos were involved in known functions, whereas many DEGs had roles in plant growth and development, photosynthesis, signal transduction, and seed germination. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis of relative expression levels between reciprocal hybrids and both parental genotypes of selected genes produced results that were consistent with cDNA-AFLP. We validated the expression patterns of 15 selected genes related to heterosis formation and revealed that most showed non-additive expression in one or both hybrids, including dominant, underdominant, and overdominant expression. This indicates that gene-regulatory interactions among parental alleles play an important role in heterosis during the early developmental stages of maize. PMID:26634505

  2. Ocean contribution to seismic gravity changes: the sea level equation for seismic perturbations revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broerse, Taco; Riva, Riccardo; Vermeersen, Bert

    2014-11-01

    During megathrust earthquakes, great ruptures are accompanied by large scale mass redistribution inside the solid Earth and by ocean mass redistribution due to bathymetry changes. These large scale mass displacements can be detected using the monthly gravity maps of the GRACE satellite mission. In recent years it has become increasingly common to use the long wavelength changes in the Earth's gravity field observed by GRACE to infer seismic source properties for large megathrust earthquakes. An important advantage of space gravimetry is that it is independent from the availability of land for its measurements. This is relevant for observation of megathrust earthquakes, which occur mostly offshore, such as the M_{text{w}} ˜ 9 2004 Sumatra-Andaman, 2010 Maule (Chile) and 2011 Tohoku-Oki (Japan) events. In Broerse et al., we examined the effect of the presence of an ocean above the rupture on long wavelength gravity changes and showed it to be of the first order. Here we revisit the implementation of an ocean layer through the sea level equation and compare the results with approximated methods that have been used in the literature. One of the simplifications usually lies in the assumption of a globally uniform ocean layer. We show that especially in the case of the 2010 Maule earthquake, due to the closeness of the South American continent, the uniform ocean assumption is not valid and causes errors up to 57 per cent for modelled peak geoid height changes (expressed at a spherical harmonic truncation degree of 40). In addition, we show that when a large amount of slip occurs close to the trench, horizontal motions of the ocean floor play a mayor role in the ocean contribution to gravity changes. Using a slip model of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake that places the majority of slip close to the surface, the peak value in geoid height change increases by 50 per cent due to horizontal ocean floor motion. Furthermore, we test the influence of the maximum spherical

  3. Low expression of the GILZ may contribute to adipose inflammation and altered adipokine production in human obesity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi-Jeong; Yang, Rong-Ze; Karastergiou, Kalypso; Smith, Steven R; Chang, Jeffery R; Gong, Da-Wei; Fried, Susan K

    2016-07-01

    The glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ), a primary target of glucocorticoids, is expressed in human adipocytes, but its importance in adipocyte function is unknown. Because TNFα is increased in obese adipose tissue and antagonizes a number of glucocorticoid actions, we investigated the interplay of these pathways. GILZ knockdown increased and GILZ overexpression decreased interleukin-6 (IL-6) and leptin mRNA and protein secretion. GILZ knockdown increased the magnitude of the glucocorticoid effect on leptin secretion, but did not affect the glucocorticoid suppression of IL-6. Although GILZ silencing decreased adiponectin mRNA levels, it did not affect the amount of adiponectin secreted. GILZ negatively modulated pro-inflammatory signaling pathways, blocking basal and TNFα-stimulated (1 h) p65 nuclear factor κB nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity by binding to p65 in the cytoplasm. GILZ silencing increased basal ERK1/2 and JNK phosphorylation, and decreased MAPK phosphatase-1 protein levels. Longer term TNFα (4 h or 24 h) treatment decreased GILZ expression in human adipocytes. Furthermore, adipose tissue GILZ mRNA levels were reduced in proportion to the degree of obesity and expression of inflammatory markers. Overall, these results suggest that GILZ antagonizes the pro-inflammatory effects of TNFα in human adipocytes, and its downregulation in obesity may contribute to adipose inflammation and dysregulated adipokine production, and thereby systemic metabolism. PMID:27178044

  4. Ocean Contribution to Seismic Gravity Changes: the Sea Level Equation for Seismic Perturbations Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broerse, T.; Riva, R.; Vermeersen, B. L. A.

    2014-12-01

    During megathrust earthquakes, great ruptures are accompanied by large scale mass redistribution inside the solid Earth and by ocean mass redistribution due to bathymetry changes. These large scale mass displacements can be detected using the monthly gravity maps of the GRACE satellite mission. In recent years it has become increasingly common to use the long wavelength changes in the Earth's gravity field observed by GRACE to infer seismic source properties for large megathrust earthquakes, such as the Mw ~ 9 2004 Sumatra-Andaman, 2010 Maule (Chile) and 2011 Tohoku-Oki (Japan) events. In Broerse et al. (2011) we examined the effect of the presence of an ocean above the rupture on long wavelength gravity changes and showed it to be of the first order. Here we revisit the implementation of an ocean layer through the sea level equation and compare the results with approximated methods that have been used in the literature. One of the simplifications usually lies in the assumption of a globally uniform ocean layer. We show that especially in the case of the 2010 Maule earthquake, due to the closeness of the South American continent, the uniform ocean assumption causes errors up to 57% for modeled peak geoid height changes (expressed at a spherical harmonic truncation degree of 40). In addition, we show that when a large amount of slip occurs close to the trench, horizontal motions of the ocean floor play a mayor role in the ocean contribution to gravity changes. Using a slip model of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake that places the majority of slip close to the surface, the peak value in geoid height change increases by 50% due to horizontal ocean floor motion. When GRACE observations are used to determine earthquake parameters such as seismic moment or source depth, the uniform ocean layer method introduces large biases, depending on the location of the rupture with respect to the continent. The same holds for interpreting shallow slip when horizontal motions are not

  5. Impaired renal corin expression contributes to sodium retention in proteinuric kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    Polzin, Danny; Kaminski, Henriette J.; Kastner, Christian; Wang, Wei; Krämer, Stephanie; Gambaryan, Stepan; Russwurm, Michael; Peters, Harm; Wu, Qingyu; Vandewalle, Alain; Bachmann, Sebastian; Theilig, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    Patients with proteinuric kidney diseases often experience symptoms of salt and water retention. It has been hypothesized that the dysregulated Na+ absorption is due to increased proteolytic cleavage of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and increased Na,K-ATPase expression. Microarray analysis identified a reduced corin mRNA expression in kidneys from rat models of puromycin aminonucleoside-induced nephrotic syndrome (PAN) and acute anti-Thy1 glomerulonephritis (GN). Corin has been shown to convert pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to ANP. Because ANP resistance has been assumed to be a mechanism accounting for volume retention, experiments were undertaken to analyze the renal expression and function of corin. Immunohistochemistry revealed that corin co-localized with ANP. In PAN and GN, kidneys exhibited concomitant increased pro-ANP and decreased ANP protein expression levels consistent with low corin levels. Importantly, kidneys from corin −/− mice showed increased levels of renal β-ENaC, phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) and protein kinase G II (PKGII) when compared to wild-type mice. Similar expression profile was observed in cell culture experiments suggesting that the increase in PDE5 and PKGII could account for the increase in β-ENaC as observed in PAN and GN. To conclude, our data provide novel insights into the mechanisms of volume retention in renal disease with corin as an important new mediator that acts through PKGII induction and ENaC activation. PMID:20613715

  6. Mapping the dynamic expression of Wnt11 and the lineage contribution of Wnt11-expressing cells during early mouse development.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Tanvi; Lin, Lizhu; Li, Ding; Davis, Jennifer; Evans, Sylvia; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Wang, Jianbo

    2015-02-15

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that coordinates polarized cell behavior to regulate tissue morphogenesis during vertebrate gastrulation, neurulation and organogenesis. In Xenopus and zebrafish, PCP signaling is activated by non-canonical Wnts such as Wnt11, and detailed understanding of Wnt11 expression has provided important clues on when, where and how PCP may be activated to regulate tissue morphogenesis. To explore the role of Wnt11 in mammalian development, we established a Wnt11 expression and lineage map with high spatial and temporal resolution by creating and analyzing a tamoxifen-inducible Wnt11-CreER BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenic mouse line. Our short- and long-term lineage tracing experiments indicated that Wnt11-CreER could faithfully recapitulate endogenous Wnt11 expression, and revealed for the first time that cells transiently expressing Wnt11 at early gastrulation were fated to become specifically the progenitors of the entire endoderm. During mid-gastrulation, Wnt11-CreER expressing cells also contribute extensively to the endothelium in both embryonic and extraembryonic compartments, and the endocardium in all chambers of the developing heart. In contrast, Wnt11-CreER expression in the myocardium starts from late-gastrulation, and occurs in three transient, sequential waves: first in the precursors of the left ventricular (LV) myocardium from E7.0 to 8.0; subsequently in the right ventricular (RV) myocardium from E8.0 to 9.0; and finally in the superior wall of the outflow tract (OFT) myocardium from E8.5 to 10.5. These results provide formal genetic proof that the majority of the endocardium and myocardium diverge by mid-gastrulation in the mouse, and suggest a tight spatial and temporal control of Wnt11 expression in the myocardial lineage to coordinate with myocardial differentiation in the first and second heart field progenitors to form the LV, RV and OFT. The insights gained

  7. Cortical and Clonal Contribution of Tbr2 Expressing Progenitors in the Developing Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Vasistha, Navneet A; García-Moreno, Fernando; Arora, Siddharth; Cheung, Amanda F P; Arnold, Sebastian J; Robertson, Elizabeth J; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-10-01

    The individual contribution of different progenitor subtypes towards the mature rodent cerebral cortex is not fully understood. Intermediate progenitor cells (IPCs) are key to understanding the regulation of neuronal number during cortical development and evolution, yet their exact contribution is much debated. Intermediate progenitors in the cortical subventricular zone are defined by expression of T-box brain-2 (Tbr2). In this study we demonstrate by using the Tbr2(Cre) mouse line and state-of-the-art cell lineage labeling techniques, that IPC derived cells contribute substantial proportions 67.5% of glutamatergic but not GABAergic or astrocytic cells to all cortical layers including the earliest generated subplate zone. We also describe the laminar dispersion of clonally derived cells from IPCs using a recently described clonal analysis tool (CLoNe) and show that pair-generated cells in different layers cluster closer (142.1 ± 76.8 μm) than unrelated cells (294.9 ± 105.4 μm). The clonal dispersion from individual Tbr2 positive intermediate progenitors contributes to increasing the cortical surface. Our study also describes extracortical contributions from Tbr2+ progenitors to the lateral olfactory tract and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. PMID:24927931

  8. Cortical and Clonal Contribution of Tbr2 Expressing Progenitors in the Developing Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Vasistha, Navneet A.; García-Moreno, Fernando; Arora, Siddharth; Cheung, Amanda F.P.; Arnold, Sebastian J.; Robertson, Elizabeth J.; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    The individual contribution of different progenitor subtypes towards the mature rodent cerebral cortex is not fully understood. Intermediate progenitor cells (IPCs) are key to understanding the regulation of neuronal number during cortical development and evolution, yet their exact contribution is much debated. Intermediate progenitors in the cortical subventricular zone are defined by expression of T-box brain-2 (Tbr2). In this study we demonstrate by using the Tbr2Cre mouse line and state-of-the-art cell lineage labeling techniques, that IPC derived cells contribute substantial proportions 67.5% of glutamatergic but not GABAergic or astrocytic cells to all cortical layers including the earliest generated subplate zone. We also describe the laminar dispersion of clonally derived cells from IPCs using a recently described clonal analysis tool (CLoNe) and show that pair-generated cells in different layers cluster closer (142.1 ± 76.8 μm) than unrelated cells (294.9 ± 105.4 μm). The clonal dispersion from individual Tbr2 positive intermediate progenitors contributes to increasing the cortical surface. Our study also describes extracortical contributions from Tbr2+ progenitors to the lateral olfactory tract and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. PMID:24927931

  9. Increased expression of formin-like 3 contributes to metastasis and poor prognosis in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yuan-Feng; Xiao, Yi-Sheng; Lu, Ming-Zhi; Luo, Xiao-Jiang; Hu, Guo-Zhu; Deng, Ke-Yu; Wu, Xiao-Mu; Xin, Hong-Bo

    2015-04-01

    Formin-like 3 (FMNL3), a member of diaphanous-related formins subfamily, plays an important role in cytoskeleton reorganization, cell adhesion and cancer cell invasion in vitro. This study aimed to explore the expression of FMNL3 in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cell-lines and tissues, and further evaluate its prognostic value and correlation with the clinicopathological parameters, and also investigate the effects of FMNL3 gene silencing on the growth and metastasis of CRC in vivo. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that FMNL3 protein was distributed in a punctuate aggregation pattern and located mainly in the cytoplasm of glandular cavity side, close to the nucleus of CRC cells. The positive rate of FMNL3 expression was 87.5% (84/96) in CRC, which was significantly higher than that in adjacent normal mucosa (30%, 9/30). Moreover, FMNL3 protein expressed far more in primary CRC with metastasis and corresponding lymph nodes metastatic CRC than in primary CRC without metastasis. Increased expression of FMNL3 was closely correlated with tumor size, differentiation, serosal invasion, and both lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis. However, it was not correlated with patients' age and gender. According to Kaplan-Meier survival analyses, patients with FMNL3 high expression level had lower overall survival rate than that with FMNL3 low expression level. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that high FMNL3 expression was a significant and independent prognostic predictor of patients with CRC. In addition, FMNL3 mRNA and protein levels were substantially up-regulated in CRC-metastasis-derived cell lines, as compared to those in primary-CRC-derived ones. FMNL3 gene silencing suppressed the growth and metastasis of CRC in vivo. In conclusion, FMNL3 plays an important role in the progression and metastasis of CRC and may be a novel potential prognostic predictor and therapeutic target for patients with CRC. PMID:25758200

  10. FNR Regulates Expression of Important Virulence Factors Contributing to Pathogenicity of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Nicolle L.; Nicholson, Bryon; Hussein, Ashraf; Cai, Wentong; Wannemuehler, Yvonne M.; Dell'Anna, Giuseppe; Logue, Catherine M.; Horn, Fabiana; Nolan, Lisa K.

    2014-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is responsible for the majority of urinary tract infections (UTIs), which are some of the world's most common bacterial infections of humans. Here, we examined the role of FNR (fumarate and nitrate reduction), a well-known global regulator, in the pathogenesis of UPEC infections. We constructed an fnr deletion mutant of UPEC CFT073 and compared it to the wild type for changes in virulence, adherence, invasion, and expression of key virulence factors. Compared to the wild type, the fnr mutant was highly attenuated in the mouse model of human UTI and showed severe defects in adherence to and invasion of bladder and kidney epithelial cells. Our results showed that FNR regulates motility and multiple virulence factors, including expression of type I and P fimbriae, modulation of hemolysin expression, and expression of a novel pathogenicity island involved in α-ketoglutarate metabolism under anaerobic conditions. Our results demonstrate that FNR is a key global regulator of UPEC virulence and controls expression of important virulence factors that contribute to UPEC pathogenicity. PMID:25245807

  11. High expression of CAI2, a 9p21-embedded long non-coding RNA, contributes to advanced stage neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Barnhill, Lisa M.; Williams, Richard T.; Cohen, Olga; Kim, Youngjin; Batova, Ayse; Mielke, Jenna A.; Messer, Karen; Pu, Minya; Bao, Lei; Yu, Alice L.; Diccianni, Mitchell B.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a pediatric cancer with significant genomic and biological heterogeneity. p16 and ARF, two important tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 9p21, are inactivated commonly in most cancers but paradoxically overexpressed in neuroblastoma. Here we report that exon γ in p16 is also part of an undescribed long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that we have termed CAI2 (CDKN2A/ARF Intron 2 lncRNA). CAI2 is a single exon gene with a poly A signal located in but independent of the p16/ARF exon 3. CAI2 is expressed at very low levels in normal tissue but is highly expressed in most tumor cell lines with an intact 9p21 locus. Concordant expression of CAI2 with p16 and ARF in normal tissue along with the ability of CAI2 to induce p16 expression suggested that CAI2 may regulate p16 and/or ARF. In neuroblastoma cells transformed by serial passage in vitro, leading to more rapid proliferation, CAI2, p16 and ARF expression all increased dramatically. A similar relationship was also observed in primary neuroblastomas where CAI2 expression was significantly higher in advanced stage neuroblastoma, independently of MYCN amplification. Consistent with its association with high risk disease, CAI2 expression was also significantly associated with poor clinical outcomes, although this effect was reduced when adjusted for MYCN amplification. Taken together, our findings suggested that CAI2 contributes to the paradoxical overexpression of p16 in neuroblastoma, where CAI2 may offer a useful biomarker of high-risk disease. PMID:25028366

  12. Prorenin contributes to angiotensin peptide formation in transgenic rats with rat prorenin expression targeted to the liver.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Duncan J; Karam, Habib; Ménard, Joël; Bruneval, Patrick; Mullins, John J

    2009-12-01

    We reported previously that targeted expression of rat prorenin to the liver under the control of the human alpha1-antitrypsin promoter increased plasma prorenin levels by several-hundred-fold in male transgenic rats and caused cardiac hypertrophy, severe renal lesions, and myocardial fibrosis by 20 weeks of age, despite normal blood pressure. We examined the evolution of the phenotype of male transgenic rats over 12 months and the effects of binephrectomy on the renin-angiotensin (Ang) system. Plasma prorenin levels were >1000-fold higher than in wild type littermates, whereas plasma and renal Ang II levels were no different from wild-type (WT) levels, and kidney renin levels were suppressed in transgenic rats. In contrast to our earlier report, transgenic rats had increased systolic blood pressure at 3 to 12 months of age, and only modest renal lesions and myocardial fibrosis were evident after 6 months of age. Binephrectomy reduced plasma renin activity and concentration and prorenin levels by 50% to 80% and Ang II levels by 90% in WT rats. By contrast, binephrectomy increased plasma renin activity and concentration and prorenin levels by 52.0-, 13.0-, and 5.8-fold, respectively, without change in Ang II levels in transgenic rats. We conclude that, in the animals studied in this report, elevated prorenin levels did not cause renal lesions or myocardial fibrosis during the first 6 months of age. Ang peptide formation consequent to the increased prorenin levels prevented reduction of Ang II levels after binephrectomy and was likely to have contributed to hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and suppression of kidney renin levels in these transgenic rats. PMID:19841286

  13. Processes contributing to resilience of coastal wetlands to sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stagg, Camille L.; Krauss, Ken W.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Cormier, Nicole; Conner, William H.; Swarzenski, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify processes that contribute to resilience of coastal wetlands subject to rising sea levels and to determine whether the relative contribution of these processes varies across different wetland community types. We assessed the resilience of wetlands to sea-level rise along a transitional gradient from tidal freshwater forested wetland (TFFW) to marsh by measuring processes controlling wetland elevation. We found that, over 5 years of measurement, TFFWs were resilient, although some marginally, and oligohaline marshes exhibited robust resilience to sea-level rise. We identified fundamental differences in how resilience is maintained across wetland community types, which have important implications for management activities that aim to restore or conserve resilient systems. We showed that the relative importance of surface and subsurface processes in controlling wetland surface elevation change differed between TFFWs and oligohaline marshes. The marshes had significantly higher rates of surface accretion than the TFFWs, and in the marshes, surface accretion was the primary contributor to elevation change. In contrast, elevation change in TFFWs was more heavily influenced by subsurface processes, such as root zone expansion or compaction, which played an important role in determining resilience of TFFWs to rising sea level. When root zone contributions were removed statistically from comparisons between relative sea-level rise and surface elevation change, sites that previously had elevation rate deficits showed a surplus. Therefore, assessments of wetland resilience that do not include subsurface processes will likely misjudge vulnerability to sea-level rise.

  14. ASSESSMENT OF THE CONTRIBUTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE TO GROUND-LEVEL OZONE CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This assessment is concerned with the possible contributions of ozone transported from the stratosphere through the troposphere down to ground level to the episodic and longer term ozone concentrations measured in urban and rural areas. The episodic impacts would be of concern wi...

  15. Comprehensive analysis of Arabidopsis expression level polymorphisms with simple inheritance.

    PubMed

    Plantegenet, Stephanie; Weber, Johann; Goldstein, Darlene R; Zeller, Georg; Nussbaumer, Cindy; Thomas, Jérôme; Weigel, Detlef; Harshman, Keith; Hardtke, Christian S

    2009-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, gene expression level polymorphisms (ELPs) between natural accessions that exhibit simple, single locus inheritance are promising quantitative trait locus (QTL) candidates to explain phenotypic variability. It is assumed that such ELPs overwhelmingly represent regulatory element polymorphisms. However, comprehensive genome-wide analyses linking expression level, regulatory sequence and gene structure variation are missing, preventing definite verification of this assumption. Here, we analyzed ELPs observed between the Eil-0 and Lc-0 accessions. Compared with non-variable controls, 5' regulatory sequence variation in the corresponding genes is indeed increased. However, approximately 42% of all the ELP genes also carry major transcription unit deletions in one parent as revealed by genome tiling arrays, representing a >4-fold enrichment over controls. Within the subset of ELPs with simple inheritance, this proportion is even higher and deletions are generally more severe. Similar results were obtained from analyses of the Bay-0 and Sha accessions, using alternative technical approaches. Collectively, our results suggest that drastic structural changes are a major cause for ELPs with simple inheritance, corroborating experimentally observed indel preponderance in cloned Arabidopsis QTL. PMID:19225455

  16. Differential alterations in gene expression profiles contribute to time-dependent effects of nandrolone to prevent denervation atrophy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Anabolic steroids, such as nandrolone, slow muscle atrophy, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect are largely unknown. Their effects on muscle size and gene expression depend upon time, and the cause of muscle atrophy. Administration of nandrolone for 7 days beginning either concomitantly with sciatic nerve transection (7 days) or 29 days later (35 days) attenuated denervation atrophy at 35 but not 7 days. We reasoned that this model could be used to identify genes that are regulated by nandrolone and slow denervation atrophy, as well as genes that might explain the time-dependence of nandrolone effects on such atrophy. Affymetrix microarrays were used to profile gene expression changes due to nandrolone at 7 and 35 days and to identify major gene expression changes in denervated muscle between 7 and 35 days. Results Nandrolone selectively altered expression of 124 genes at 7 days and 122 genes at 35 days, with only 20 genes being regulated at both time points. Marked differences in biological function of genes regulated by nandrolone at 7 and 35 days were observed. At 35, but not 7 days, nandrolone reduced mRNA and protein levels for FOXO1, the mTOR inhibitor REDD2, and the calcineurin inhibitor RCAN2 and increased those for ApoD. At 35 days, correlations between mRNA levels and the size of denervated muscle were negative for RCAN2, and positive for ApoD. Nandrolone also regulated genes for Wnt signaling molecules. Comparison of gene expression at 7 and 35 days after denervation revealed marked alterations in the expression of 9 transcriptional coregulators, including Ankrd1 and 2, and many transcription factors and kinases. Conclusions Genes regulated in denervated muscle after 7 days administration of nandrolone are almost entirely different at 7 versus 35 days. Alterations in levels of FOXO1, and of genes involved in signaling through calcineurin, mTOR and Wnt may be linked to the favorable action of nandrolone on denervated muscle. Marked

  17. Increased caspase-3 expression and activity contribute to reduced CD3zeta expression in systemic lupus erythematosus T cells.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Sandeep; Kiang, Juliann G; Fisher, Carolyn U; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Nguyen, Hang T; Kyttaris, Vasileios C; Chowdhury, Bhabadeb; Rus, Violeta; Tsokos, George C

    2005-09-01

    T cells isolated from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) express low levels of CD3zeta-chain, a critical molecule involved in TCR-mediated signaling, but the involved mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study we examined caspase-3 as a candidate for cleaving CD3zeta in SLE T cells. We demonstrate that SLE T cells display increased expression and activity of caspase-3. Treatment of SLE T cells with the caspase-3 inhibitor Z-Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-FMK reduced proteolysis of CD3zeta and enhanced its expression. In addition, Z-Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-FMK treatment increased the association of CD3zeta with lipid rafts and simultaneously reversed the abnormal lipid raft preclustering, heightened TCR-induced calcium responses, and reduced the expression of FcRgamma-chain exclusively in SLE T cells. We conclude that caspase-3 inhibitors can normalize SLE T cell function by limiting the excessive digestion of CD3zeta-chain and suggest that such molecules can be considered in the treatment of this disease. PMID:16116236

  18. Increased expressions of ADAMTS-13 and apoptosis contribute to neuropathology during Toxoplasma gondii encephalitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Dincel, Gungor Cagdas; Atmaca, Hasan Tarik

    2016-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is a protozoan parasite with the potential of causing severe encephalitis among immunocompromised humans and animals. Our previous study showed that T. gondii induces high nitric oxide (NO) production, high glial activation (GFAP) and neurofilament expressions, leading to severe neurodegeneration in toxoplasma encephalitis (TE) in the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of this experimental study was to investigate ADAMTS-13 expression and apoptosis in CNS and to identify whether they have any correlation with toxoplasmosis neuropathology and neurodegeneration. Mice were infected with ME49 strain T. gondii and the levels of ADAMTS-13, caspase 3, caspase 8, caspase 9, TNFR1 and Bcl-xL expressions were examined in brain tissues by immunohistochemistry, during the development and establishment of chronic infections at 10, 30 and 60 days post-infection. Results of the study revealed that the levels of ADAMTS-13 (P < 0.005), caspase 3 (P < 0.05), caspase 8 (P < 0.05), caspase 9 (P < 0.005) and TNFR1 (P < 0.05) expressions in the brain markedly increased while Bcl-xL expression decreased (P < 0.005). The most prominent finding from our study was that 10, 30 and 60 days post-infection ADAMTS-13 increased significantly and this may play an important role in the regulation and protection of the blood-brain barrier integrity and CNS microenvironment in TE. These results also suggest that T. gondii-mediated apoptosis might play a pivotal role and a different type of role in the mechanism of neurodegeneration and neuropathology in the process of TE. Furthermore, expression of ADAMTS-13 might give an idea of the progress and is critical for diagnosis of this disease. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on ADAMTS-13 expression in the CNS of T. gondii-infected mice. PMID:26542631

  19. High Levels of MeCP2 Depress MHC Class I Expression in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Miralvès, Julie; Magdeleine, Eddy; Kaddoum, Lara; Brun, Hélène; Peries, Sophie; Joly, Etienne

    2007-01-01

    Background The expression of MHC class I genes is repressed in mature neurons. The molecular basis of this regulation is poorly understood, but the genes are particularly rich in CpG islands. MeCP2 is a transcriptional repressor that binds to methylated CpG dinucleotides; mutations in this protein also cause the neurodevelopmental disease called Rett syndrome. Because MHC class I molecules play a role in neuronal connectivity, we hypothesised that MeCP2 might repress MHC class I expression in the CNS and that this might play a role in the pathology of Rett syndrome. Methodology We show here that transiently transfected cells expressing high levels of MeCP2 specifically downregulate cell-surface expression of MHC class I molecules in the neuronal cell line N2A and they prevent the induction of MHC class I expression in response to interferon in these cells, supporting our first hypothesis. Surprisingly, however, overexpression of the mutated forms of MeCP2 that cause Rett syndrome had a similar effect on MHC class I expression as the wild-type protein. Immunohistological analyses of brain slices from MECP2 knockout mice (the MeCP2tm1.1Bird strain) demonstrated a small but reproducible increase in MHC class I when compared to their wild type littermates, but we found no difference in MHC class I expression in primary cultures of mixed glial cells (mainly neurons and astrocytes) from the knockout and wild-type mice. Conclusion These data suggest that high levels of MeCP2, such as those found in mature neurons, may contribute to the repression of MHC expression, but we find no evidence that MeCP2 regulation of MHC class I is important for the pathogenesis of Rett syndrome. PMID:18159237

  20. The Expression of c-Myb Correlates with the Levels of Rhabdomyosarcoma-specific Marker Myogenin

    PubMed Central

    Kaspar, Petr; Zikova, Martina; Bartunek, Petr; Sterba, Jaroslav; Strnad, Hynek; Kren, Leos; Sedlacek, Radislav

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb is required for modulation of progenitor cells in several tissues, including skeletal muscle and its upregulation is observed in many human malignancies. Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) are a heterogeneous group of mesodermal tumors with features of developing skeletal muscle. Several miRNAs are downregulated in RMS, including miR-150, a negative regulator of c-Myb expression. Using the C2C12 myoblast cell line, a cellular model of skeletal muscle differentiation, we showed that miR-150 controls c-Myb expression mainly at the level of translation. We hypothesized that a similar mechanism of c-Myb regulation operates in RMS tumors. We examined expression of c-Myb by immunohistochemistry and revealed c-Myb positivity in alveolar and embryonal tumors, the two most common subgroups of RMS. Furthermore, we showed direct correlation between c-Myb production and myogenin expression. Interestingly, high myogenin levels indicate poor prognosis in RMS patients. c-Myb could, therefore, contribute to the tumor phenotype by executing its inhibitory role in skeletal muscle differentiation. We also showed that c-Myb protein is abundant in migratory C2C12 myoblasts and its ectopic expression potentiates cell motility. In summary, our results implicate that metastatic properties of some RMS subtypes might be linked to c-Myb function. PMID:26462877

  1. The Expression of c-Myb Correlates with the Levels of Rhabdomyosarcoma-specific Marker Myogenin.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Petr; Zikova, Martina; Bartunek, Petr; Sterba, Jaroslav; Strnad, Hynek; Kren, Leos; Sedlacek, Radislav

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb is required for modulation of progenitor cells in several tissues, including skeletal muscle and its upregulation is observed in many human malignancies. Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) are a heterogeneous group of mesodermal tumors with features of developing skeletal muscle. Several miRNAs are downregulated in RMS, including miR-150, a negative regulator of c-Myb expression. Using the C2C12 myoblast cell line, a cellular model of skeletal muscle differentiation, we showed that miR-150 controls c-Myb expression mainly at the level of translation. We hypothesized that a similar mechanism of c-Myb regulation operates in RMS tumors. We examined expression of c-Myb by immunohistochemistry and revealed c-Myb positivity in alveolar and embryonal tumors, the two most common subgroups of RMS. Furthermore, we showed direct correlation between c-Myb production and myogenin expression. Interestingly, high myogenin levels indicate poor prognosis in RMS patients. c-Myb could, therefore, contribute to the tumor phenotype by executing its inhibitory role in skeletal muscle differentiation. We also showed that c-Myb protein is abundant in migratory C2C12 myoblasts and its ectopic expression potentiates cell motility. In summary, our results implicate that metastatic properties of some RMS subtypes might be linked to c-Myb function. PMID:26462877

  2. Updating the results of glacier contribution to the sea level change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyurgerov, Mark B.; Abdalati, Waleed Dr. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    I have completed an update of global glacier volume change. All data of glacier annual mass balances, surface area over the period 1945/46 till 2004, outside the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets were included in this update. As the result global glacier volume change have been calculated, also in terms of glacier contribution to sea level change. These results were sent to Working Group 1 and 2 of IPCC-4 as the basis for modeling of sea level towards the end of 2100. In this study I have concentrated on studying glacier systems of different scales, from primary (e.g. Devon ice cap) to regional (e.g. Canadian Arctic), continental scale (e,g., entire Arctic), and global (e.g., change in glacier volume and contribution to sea level rise).

  3. Memory B cells contribute to rapid Bcl6 expression by memory follicular helper T cells.

    PubMed

    Ise, Wataru; Inoue, Takeshi; McLachlan, James B; Kometani, Kohei; Kubo, Masato; Okada, Takaharu; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2014-08-12

    In primary humoral responses, B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) is a master regulator of follicular helper T (TFH) cell differentiation; however, its activation mechanisms and role in memory responses remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that survival of CXCR5(+) TFH memory cells, and thus subsequent recall antibody response, require Bcl6 expression. Furthermore, we show that, upon rechallenge with soluble antigen Bcl6 in memory TFH cells is rapidly induced in a dendritic cell-independent manner and that peptide:class II complexes (pMHC) on cognate memory B cells significantly contribute to this induction. Given the previous evidence that antigen-specific B cells residing in the follicles acquire antigens within minutes of injection, our results suggest that memory B cells present antigens to the cognate TFH memory cells, thereby contributing to rapid Bcl6 reexpression and differentiation of the TFH memory cells during humoral memory responses. PMID:25071203

  4. Memory B cells contribute to rapid Bcl6 expression by memory follicular helper T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ise, Wataru; Inoue, Takeshi; McLachlan, James B.; Kometani, Kohei; Kubo, Masato; Okada, Takaharu; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    In primary humoral responses, B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) is a master regulator of follicular helper T (TFH) cell differentiation; however, its activation mechanisms and role in memory responses remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that survival of CXCR5+ TFH memory cells, and thus subsequent recall antibody response, require Bcl6 expression. Furthermore, we show that, upon rechallenge with soluble antigen Bcl6 in memory TFH cells is rapidly induced in a dendritic cell-independent manner and that peptide:class II complexes (pMHC) on cognate memory B cells significantly contribute to this induction. Given the previous evidence that antigen-specific B cells residing in the follicles acquire antigens within minutes of injection, our results suggest that memory B cells present antigens to the cognate TFH memory cells, thereby contributing to rapid Bcl6 reexpression and differentiation of the TFH memory cells during humoral memory responses. PMID:25071203

  5. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) expression in human malignant gliomas contributes to immune escape and tumour progression.

    PubMed

    Mittelbronn, Michel; Platten, Michael; Zeiner, Pia; Dombrowski, Yvonne; Frank, Brigitte; Zachskorn, Cornelia; Harter, Patrick N; Weller, Michael; Wischhusen, Jörg

    2011-09-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which inhibits apoptosis and promotes angiogenesis, is expressed in cancers suppressing immune surveillance. Its biological role in human glioblastoma is, however, only poorly understood. We examined in-vivo expression of MIF in 166 gliomas and 23 normal control brains by immunohistochemistry. MIF immunoreactivity was enhanced in neoplastic astrocytes in WHO grade II glioma and increased significantly in higher tumour grades (III-IV). MIF expression was further assessed in 12 glioma cell lines in vitro. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that MIF mRNA expression was elevated up to 800-fold in malignant glioma cells compared with normal brain. This translated into high protein levels as assessed by immunoblotting of total cell lysates and by ELISA-based measurement of secreted MIF. Wild-type p53-retaining glioma cell lines expressed higher levels of MIF, which may be connected with the previously described role of MIF as a negative regulator of wild-type p53 signalling in tumour cells. Stable knockdown of MIF by shRNA in glioma cells significantly increased tumour cell susceptibility towards NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Furthermore, supernatant from mock-transfected cells, but not from MIF knockdown cells, induced downregulation of the activating immune receptor NKG2D on NK and CD8+ T cells. We thus propose that human glioma cell-derived MIF contributes to the immune escape of malignant gliomas by counteracting NK and cytotoxic T-cell-mediated tumour immune surveillance. Considering its further cell-intrinsic and extrinsic tumour-promoting effects and the availability of small molecule inhibitors, MIF seems to be a promising candidate for future glioma therapy. PMID:21773885

  6. Hyperglycemia-Suppressed Expression of Serpine1 Contributes to Delayed Epithelial Wound Healing in Diabetic Mouse Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Haijing; Mi, Xiaofan; Gao, Nan; Yan, Chenxi; Yu, Fu-Shin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) are at an increased risk for developing corneal complications, including delayed wound healing. The purpose of this study was to characterize the expression and the function of Serpine1 and other components of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)–proteolytic system in delayed epithelial wound healing in diabetic mouse corneas. Methods. Mice of the strain C57BL/6 were induced to develop diabetes by streptozotocin, and wound-healing assays were performed 10 weeks afterward. Gene expression and/or distribution were assessed by real-time PCR, Western blotting, and/or immunohistochemistry. The role of Serpine1 in mediating epithelial wound closure was determined by subconjunctival injections of neutralizing antibodies in either normal or recombinant protein in diabetic corneas. Enzyme assay for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 was also performed. Results. The expressions of Serpine1 (PAI-1), Plau (uPA), and Plaur (uPA receptor) were upregulated in response to wounding, and these upregulations were significantly suppressed by hyperglycemia. In healing epithelia, Plau and Serpine1 were abundantly expressed at the leading edge of the healing epithelia of normal and, to a lesser extent, diabetic corneas. Inhibition of Serpine1 delayed epithelial wound closure in normal corneas, whereas recombinant Serpine1 accelerated it in diabetic corneas. The Plau and MMP-3 mRNA levels and MMP-3 enzymatic activities were correlated to Serpine1 levels and/or the rates of epithelial wound closure. Conclusions. Serpine1 plays a role in mediating epithelial wound healing and its impaired expression may contribute to delayed wound healing in DM corneas. Hence, modulating uPA proteolytic pathway may represent a new approach for treating diabetic keratopathy. PMID:26024123

  7. Massively Parallel Interrogation of the Effects of Gene Expression Levels on Fitness.

    PubMed

    Keren, Leeat; Hausser, Jean; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Vainberg Slutskin, Ilya; Alisar, Hadas; Kaminski, Sivan; Weinberger, Adina; Alon, Uri; Milo, Ron; Segal, Eran

    2016-08-25

    Data of gene expression levels across individuals, cell types, and disease states is expanding, yet our understanding of how expression levels impact phenotype is limited. Here, we present a massively parallel system for assaying the effect of gene expression levels on fitness in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by systematically altering the expression level of ∼100 genes at ∼100 distinct levels spanning a 500-fold range at high resolution. We show that the relationship between expression levels and growth is gene and environment specific and provides information on the function, stoichiometry, and interactions of genes. Wild-type expression levels in some conditions are not optimal for growth, and genes whose fitness is greatly affected by small changes in expression level tend to exhibit lower cell-to-cell variability in expression. Our study addresses a fundamental gap in understanding the functional significance of gene expression regulation and offers a framework for evaluating the phenotypic effects of expression variation. PMID:27545349

  8. Resolving the Antarctic contribution to sea-level rise: a hierarchical modelling framework†

    PubMed Central

    Zammit-Mangion, Andrew; Rougier, Jonathan; Bamber, Jonathan; Schön, Nana

    2014-01-01

    Determining the Antarctic contribution to sea-level rise from observational data is a complex problem. The number of physical processes involved (such as ice dynamics and surface climate) exceeds the number of observables, some of which have very poor spatial definition. This has led, in general, to solutions that utilise strong prior assumptions or physically based deterministic models to simplify the problem. Here, we present a new approach for estimating the Antarctic contribution, which only incorporates descriptive aspects of the physically based models in the analysis and in a statistical manner. By combining physical insights with modern spatial statistical modelling techniques, we are able to provide probability distributions on all processes deemed to play a role in both the observed data and the contribution to sea-level rise. Specifically, we use stochastic partial differential equations and their relation to geostatistical fields to capture our physical understanding and employ a Gaussian Markov random field approach for efficient computation. The method, an instantiation of Bayesian hierarchical modelling, naturally incorporates uncertainty in order to reveal credible intervals on all estimated quantities. The estimated sea-level rise contribution using this approach corroborates those found using a statistically independent method. © 2013 The Authors. Environmetrics Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25505370

  9. Similar meltwater contributions to glacial sea level changes from Antarctic and northern ice sheets.

    PubMed

    Rohling, Eelco J; Marsh, Robert; Wells, Neil C; Siddall, Mark; Edwards, Neil R

    2004-08-26

    The period between 75,000 and 20,000 years ago was characterized by high variability in climate and sea level. Southern Ocean records of ice-rafted debris suggest a significant contribution to the sea level changes from melt water of Antarctic origin, in addition to likely contributions from northern ice sheets, but the relative volumes of melt water from northern and southern sources have yet to be established. Here we simulate the first-order impact of a range of relative meltwater releases from the two polar regions on the distribution of marine oxygen isotopes, using an intermediate complexity model. By comparing our simulations with oxygen isotope data from sediment cores, we infer that the contributions from Antarctica and the northern ice sheets to the documented sea level rises between 65,000 and 35,000 years ago were approximately equal, each accounting for a rise of about 15 m. The reductions in Antarctic ice volume implied by our analysis are comparable to that inferred previously for the Antarctic contribution to meltwater pulse 1A (refs 16, 17), which occurred about 14,200 years ago, during the last deglaciation. PMID:15329718

  10. Enhanced expression of DNA polymerase eta contributes to cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Han, Chunhua; Zhao, Ran; Cui, Tiantian; Dai, Yuntao; Mao, Charlene; Zhao, Weiqiang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yu, Jianhua; Wang, Qi-En

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) with enhanced tumorigenicity and chemoresistance are believed to be responsible for treatment failure and tumor relapse in ovarian cancer patients. However, it is still unclear how CSCs survive DNA-damaging agent treatment. Here, we report an elevated expression of DNA polymerase η (Pol η) in ovarian CSCs isolated from both ovarian cancer cell lines and primary tumors, indicating that CSCs may have intrinsically enhanced translesion DNA synthesis (TLS). Down-regulation of Pol η blocked cisplatin-induced CSC enrichment both in vitro and in vivo through the enhancement of cisplatin-induced apoptosis in CSCs, indicating that Pol η-mediated TLS contributes to the survival of CSCs upon cisplatin treatment. Furthermore, our data demonstrated a depletion of miR-93 in ovarian CSCs. Enforced expression of miR-93 in ovarian CSCs reduced Pol η expression and increased their sensitivity to cisplatin. Taken together, our data suggest that ovarian CSCs have intrinsically enhanced Pol η-mediated TLS, allowing CSCs to survive cisplatin treatment, leading to tumor relapse. Targeting Pol η, probably through enhancement of miR-93 expression, might be exploited as a strategy to increase the efficacy of cisplatin treatment. PMID:25831546

  11. Progesterone-regulated changes in endometrial gene expression contribute to advanced conceptus development in cattle.

    PubMed

    Forde, N; Carter, F; Fair, T; Crowe, M A; Evans, A C O; Spencer, T E; Bazer, F W; McBride, R; Boland, M P; O'Gaora, P; Lonergan, P; Roche, J F

    2009-10-01

    The postovulatory rise in circulating progesterone (P4) concentrations is associated with increased pregnancy success in beef and dairy cattle. Our study objective was to determine how elevated P4 alters endometrial gene expression to advance conceptus development. Synchronized heifers were inseminated (Day 0) and randomly assigned to pregnant high P4 or to pregnant normal P4. All high P4 groups received a P4-release intravaginal device on Day 3 after insemination that increased P4 concentrations up to Day 7 (P < 0.05). Tissue was collected on Day 5, 7, 13, or 16 of pregnancy, and endometrial gene expression was analyzed using the bovine Affymetrix (Santa Clara, CA) microarrays. Microarray analyses demonstrated that the largest number of P4-regulated genes coincided with the day when the P4 profiles were different for the longest period. Genes with the largest fold change increase (such as DGAT2 and MSTN [also known as GDF8]) were associated with triglyceride synthesis and glucose transport, which can be utilized as an energy source for the developing embryo. Temporal changes occurred at different stages of early pregnancy, with the greatest difference occurring between well-separated stages of conceptus development. Validation of a number of genes by quantitative real-time PCR indicated that P4 supplementation advances endometrial gene expression by altering the time (FABP, DGAT2, and MSTN) or duration (CRYGS) of expression pattern for genes that contribute to the composition of histotroph. PMID:19553605

  12. NFAT5 Contributes to Osmolality-Induced MCP-1 Expression in Mesothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Küper, Christoph; Beck, Franz-X.; Neuhofer, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Increased expression of the C-C chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in mesothelial cells in response to high glucose concentrations and/or high osmolality plays a crucial role in the development of peritoneal fibrosis during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Recent studies suggest that in kidney cells osmolality-induced MCP-1 upregulation is mediated by the osmosensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5). The present study addressed the question of whether activation of NFAT5 by hyperosmolality, as present in PD fluids, contributes to MCP-1 expression in the mesothelial cell line Met5A. Hyperosmolality, induced by addition of glucose, NaCl, or mannitol to the growth medium, increased NFAT5 activity and stimulated MCP-1 expression in Met5A cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of NFAT5 attenuated osmolality-induced MCP-1 upregulation substantially. Hyperosmolality also induced activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB significantly decreased osmolality-induced MCP-1 expression. Taken together, these results indicate that high osmolalities activate the transcription factor NFAT5 in mesothelial cells. NFAT5 in turn upregulates MCP-1, likely in combination with NF-κB, and thus may participate in the development of peritoneal fibrosis during CAPD. PMID:22619484

  13. Alterations in MicroRNA Expression Contribute to Fatty Acid–Induced Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lovis, Pascal; Roggli, Elodie; Laybutt, D. Ross; Gattesco, Sonia; Yang, Jiang-Yan; Widmann, Christian; Abderrahmani, Amar; Regazzi, Romano

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Visceral obesity and elevated plasma free fatty acids are predisposing factors for type 2 diabetes. Chronic exposure to these lipids is detrimental for pancreatic β-cells, resulting in reduced insulin content, defective insulin secretion, and apoptosis. We investigated the involvement in this phenomenon of microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of noncoding RNAs regulating gene expression by sequence-specific inhibition of mRNA translation. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We analyzed miRNA expression in insulin-secreting cell lines or pancreatic islets exposed to palmitate for 3 days and in islets from diabetic db/db mice. We studied the signaling pathways triggering the changes in miRNA expression and determined the impact of the miRNAs affected by palmitate on insulin secretion and apoptosis. RESULTS—Prolonged exposure of the β-cell line MIN6B1 and pancreatic islets to palmitate causes a time- and dose-dependent increase of miR34a and miR146. Elevated levels of these miRNAs are also observed in islets of diabetic db/db mice. miR34a rise is linked to activation of p53 and results in sensitization to apoptosis and impaired nutrient-induced secretion. The latter effect is associated with inhibition of the expression of vesicle-associated membrane protein 2, a key player in β-cell exocytosis. Higher miR146 levels do not affect the capacity to release insulin but contribute to increased apoptosis. Treatment with oligonucleotides that block miR34a or miR146 activity partially protects palmitate-treated cells from apoptosis but is insufficient to restore normal secretion. CONCLUSIONS—Our findings suggest that at least part of the detrimental effects of palmitate on β-cells is caused by alterations in the level of specific miRNAs. PMID:18633110

  14. Multi-level Expression Design Language: Requirement level (MEDL-R) system evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation of the Multi-Level Expression Design Language Requirements Level (MEDL-R) system was conducted to determine whether it would be of use in the Goddard Space Flight Center Code 580 software development environment. The evaluation is based upon a study of the MEDL-R concept of requirement languages, the functions performed by MEDL-R, and the MEDL-R language syntax. Recommendations are made for changes to MEDL-R that would make it useful in the Code 580 environment.

  15. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase Activity Contributes to Local Immune Suppression in the Skin Expressing Human Papillomavirus Oncoprotein E7

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, D; Kassianos, AJ; Tran, LS; Bergot, AS; Gosmann, C; Hofmann, J; Blumenthal, A; Leggatt, GR; Frazer, IH

    2013-01-01

    Chronic infection of anogenital epithelium with human papillomavirus (HPV) promotes development of cancer. Many pathogens evoke immunosuppressive mechanisms to enable persistent infection. We have previously shown that grafted skin expressing HPV16 E7 oncoprotein from a keratin-14 promoter (K14E7) is not rejected by a syngeneic, immunocompetent host. In this study we show that indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) 1, an IFN-γ inducible immunoregulatory molecule, is more highly expressed by langerin−ve dermal dendritic cells from K14E7 skin than nontransgenic control skin. Furthermore, inhibiting IDO activity using 1-D/L-methyl tryptophan promotes K14E7 skin graft rejection. Increased IDO1 expression and activity in K14E7 skin requires IFN-γ and iNKT cells, both of which have been shown to negatively regulate T-cell effector function and suppress K14E7 graft rejection. Further, dendritic cells from K14E7 skin express higher level of IFN-γ receptor (IFN-γR) than dendritic cells from control skin. K14E7 transgenic skin recruits significantly higher number of dendritic cells, independent of IFN-γ and IFN-γR expression. Consistent with these observations in a murine model, we found higher expression of IDO1 and IFN-γ but not IDO2 in the cervical epithelium of patients with HPV-associated cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2/3. Our data support a hypothesis that induction of IDO1 in HPV infected skin contributes to evasion of host immunity. PMID:23652797

  16. Sex determines the expression level of one third of the actively expressed genes in bovine blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Bermejo-Alvarez, P; Rizos, D; Rath, D; Lonergan, P; Gutierrez-Adan, A

    2010-02-23

    Although genetically identical for autosomal Chrs (Chr), male and female preimplantation embryos could display sex-specific transcriptional regulation. To illustrate sex-specific differences at the mRNA level, we compared gene-expression patterns between male and female blastocysts by DNA microarray comparison of nine groups of 60 bovine in vitro-produced blastocysts of each sex. Almost one-third of the transcripts detected showed sexual dimorphism (2,921 transcripts; false-discovery rate, P < 0.05), suggesting that in the absence of hormonal influences, the sex Chrs impose an extensive transcriptional regulation upon autosomal genes. Six genes were analyzed by qPCR in in vivo-derived embryos, which displayed similar sexual dimorphism. Ontology analysis suggested a higher global transcriptional level in females and a more active protein metabolism in males. A gene homolog to an X-linked gene involved in network interactions during spliceosome assembly was found in the Y-Chr. Most of the X-linked-expressed transcripts (88.5%) were up-regulated in females, but most of them (70%) exhibited fold-changes lower than 1.6, suggesting that X-Chr inactivation is partially achieved at the blastocyst stage. Almost half of the transcripts up-regulated in female embryos exhibiting more than 1.6-fold change were present in the X-Chr and eight of them were selected to determine a putative paternal imprinting by gene expression comparison with parthenogenetic embryos. Five (BEX, CAPN6, BEX2, SRPX2, and UBE2A) exhibited a higher expression in females than in parthenotes, suggesting that they are predominantly expressed by the paternal inherited X-Chr and that imprinting may increase the transcriptional skew caused by double X-Chr dosage. PMID:20133684

  17. Sex determines the expression level of one third of the actively expressed genes in bovine blastocysts

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo-Alvarez, P.; Rizos, D.; Rath, D.; Lonergan, P.; Gutierrez-Adan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Although genetically identical for autosomal Chrs (Chr), male and female preimplantation embryos could display sex-specific transcriptional regulation. To illustrate sex-specific differences at the mRNA level, we compared gene-expression patterns between male and female blastocysts by DNA microarray comparison of nine groups of 60 bovine in vitro-produced blastocysts of each sex. Almost one-third of the transcripts detected showed sexual dimorphism (2,921 transcripts; false-discovery rate, P < 0.05), suggesting that in the absence of hormonal influences, the sex Chrs impose an extensive transcriptional regulation upon autosomal genes. Six genes were analyzed by qPCR in in vivo-derived embryos, which displayed similar sexual dimorphism. Ontology analysis suggested a higher global transcriptional level in females and a more active protein metabolism in males. A gene homolog to an X-linked gene involved in network interactions during spliceosome assembly was found in the Y-Chr. Most of the X-linked-expressed transcripts (88.5%) were up-regulated in females, but most of them (70%) exhibited fold-changes lower than 1.6, suggesting that X-Chr inactivation is partially achieved at the blastocyst stage. Almost half of the transcripts up-regulated in female embryos exhibiting more than 1.6-fold change were present in the X-Chr and eight of them were selected to determine a putative paternal imprinting by gene expression comparison with parthenogenetic embryos. Five (BEX, CAPN6, BEX2, SRPX2, and UBE2A) exhibited a higher expression in females than in parthenotes, suggesting that they are predominantly expressed by the paternal inherited X-Chr and that imprinting may increase the transcriptional skew caused by double X-Chr dosage. PMID:20133684

  18. Aberrant expression of zinc transporter ZIP4 (SLC39A4) significantly contributes to human pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhang, Yuqing; Liu, Zijuan; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Wang, Hao; Wang, Xinwen; Zhang, Sheng; Liuzzi, Juan P; Chang, Shou-Mei; Cousins, Robert J; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Logsdon, Craig D; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi

    2007-11-20

    Zinc is an essential trace element and catalytic/structural component used by many metalloenzymes and transcription factors. Recent studies indicate a possible correlation of zinc levels with the cancer risk; however, the exact role of zinc and zinc transporters in cancer progression is unknown. We have observed that a zinc transporter, ZIP4 (SLC39A4), was substantially overexpressed in 16 of 17 (94%) clinical pancreatic adenocarcinoma specimens compared with the surrounding normal tissues, and ZIP4 mRNA expression was significantly higher in human pancreatic cancer cells than human pancreatic ductal epithelium (HPDE) cells. This indicates that aberrant ZIP4 up-regulation may contribute to the pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and progression. We studied the effects of ZIP4 overexpression in pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro and pancreatic cancer progression in vivo. We found that forced expression of ZIP4 increased intracellular zinc levels, increased cell proliferation by 2-fold in vitro, and significantly increased tumor volume by 13-fold in the nude mice model with s.c. xenograft compared with the control cells. In the orthotopic nude mice model, overexpression of ZIP4 not only increased the primary tumor weight (7.2-fold), it also increased the peritoneal dissemination and ascites incidence. Moreover, increased cell proliferation and higher zinc content were also observed in the tumor tissues that overexpressed ZIP4. These data reveal an important outcome of aberrant ZIP4 expression in contributing to pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and progression. It may suggest a therapeutic strategy whereby ZIP4 is targeted to control pancreatic cancer growth. PMID:18003899

  19. Aberrant expression of zinc transporter ZIP4 (SLC39A4) significantly contributes to human pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and progression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Zhang, Yuqing; Liu, Zijuan; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Wang, Hao; Wang, Xinwen; Zhang, Sheng; Liuzzi, Juan P.; Chang, Shou-Mei; Cousins, Robert J.; Fisher, William E.; Brunicardi, F. Charles; Logsdon, Craig D.; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi

    2007-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element and catalytic/structural component used by many metalloenzymes and transcription factors. Recent studies indicate a possible correlation of zinc levels with the cancer risk; however, the exact role of zinc and zinc transporters in cancer progression is unknown. We have observed that a zinc transporter, ZIP4 (SLC39A4), was substantially overexpressed in 16 of 17 (94%) clinical pancreatic adenocarcinoma specimens compared with the surrounding normal tissues, and ZIP4 mRNA expression was significantly higher in human pancreatic cancer cells than human pancreatic ductal epithelium (HPDE) cells. This indicates that aberrant ZIP4 up-regulation may contribute to the pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and progression. We studied the effects of ZIP4 overexpression in pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro and pancreatic cancer progression in vivo. We found that forced expression of ZIP4 increased intracellular zinc levels, increased cell proliferation by 2-fold in vitro, and significantly increased tumor volume by 13-fold in the nude mice model with s.c. xenograft compared with the control cells. In the orthotopic nude mice model, overexpression of ZIP4 not only increased the primary tumor weight (7.2-fold), it also increased the peritoneal dissemination and ascites incidence. Moreover, increased cell proliferation and higher zinc content were also observed in the tumor tissues that overexpressed ZIP4. These data reveal an important outcome of aberrant ZIP4 expression in contributing to pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and progression. It may suggest a therapeutic strategy whereby ZIP4 is targeted to control pancreatic cancer growth. PMID:18003899

  20. Human transcriptional interactome of chromatin contribute to gene co-expression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Transcriptional interactome of chromatin is one of the important mechanisms in gene transcription regulation. By chromatin conformation capture and 3D FISH experiments, several chromatin interactions cases among sequence-distant genes or even inter-chromatin genes were reported. However, on genomics level, there is still little evidence to support these mechanisms. Recently based on Hi-C experiment, a genome-wide picture of chromatin interactions in human cells was presented. It provides a useful material for analysing whether the mechanism of transcriptional interactome is common. Results The main work here is to demonstrate whether the effects of transcriptional interactome on gene co-expression exist on genomic level. While controlling the effects of transcription factors control similarities (TCS), we tested the correlation between Hi-C interaction and the mutual ranks of gene co-expression rates (provided by COXPRESdb) of intra-chromatin gene pairs. We used 6,084 genes with both TF annotation and co-expression information, and matched them into 273,458 pairs with similar Hi-C interaction ranks in different cell types. The results illustrate that co-expression is strongly associated with chromatin interaction. Further analysis using GO annotation reveals potential correlation between gene function similarity, Hi-C interaction and their co-expression. Conclusions According to the results in this research, the intra-chromatin interactome may have relation to gene function and associate with co-expression. This study provides evidence for illustrating the effect of transcriptional interactome on transcription regulation. PMID:21156067

  1. Induction of renal senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) expression by testosterone and its contribution to urinary calcium absorption in male rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Po-Han; Jian, Cai-Yun; Chou, Jou-Chun; Chen, Chien-Wei; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Soong, Christina; Hu, Sindy; Lieu, Fu-Kong; Wang, Paulus S; Wang, Shyi-Wu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of androgen, mainly testosterone, in the expression of renal senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) in male rats. We found that the renal SMP30 expression was up-regulated by endogenous testosterone stimulation during puberty. Interestingly, androgen-deficient orchidectomized (ORX) rats exhibited lower SMP30 mRNA and protein expression in the kidney, and that was restored by testosterone propionate (TP) replacement. Abrogation of androgen receptor (AR) activity by co-treatment with flutamide abolished testosterone-induced SMP30 expression in the kidney as well as in the NRK52E cells. However, SMP30 expression was unaltered in the liver of ORX rats. We also showed a positive correlation between renal SMP30 expression and plasma testosterone level during the aging process. TP-induced SMP30 expression in ovariectomized (OVX) rats was observed and was an evidence to explain the gender difference of SMP30 levels. Immunofluorescence assay showed that renal SMP30 was specifically expressed in the proximal tubular segments of the kidney. The urinary Ca(2+) level was increased in both ORX and male aging rats. Taken together, our results indicate a novel role of testosterone in regulating SMP30 expression specifically in the kidney to contribute to urinary calcium absorption. PMID:27553527

  2. Induction of renal senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) expression by testosterone and its contribution to urinary calcium absorption in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Po-Han; Jian, Cai-Yun; Chou, Jou-Chun; Chen, Chien-Wei; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Soong, Christina; Hu, Sindy; Lieu, Fu-Kong; Wang, Paulus S.; Wang, Shyi-Wu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of androgen, mainly testosterone, in the expression of renal senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) in male rats. We found that the renal SMP30 expression was up-regulated by endogenous testosterone stimulation during puberty. Interestingly, androgen-deficient orchidectomized (ORX) rats exhibited lower SMP30 mRNA and protein expression in the kidney, and that was restored by testosterone propionate (TP) replacement. Abrogation of androgen receptor (AR) activity by co-treatment with flutamide abolished testosterone-induced SMP30 expression in the kidney as well as in the NRK52E cells. However, SMP30 expression was unaltered in the liver of ORX rats. We also showed a positive correlation between renal SMP30 expression and plasma testosterone level during the aging process. TP-induced SMP30 expression in ovariectomized (OVX) rats was observed and was an evidence to explain the gender difference of SMP30 levels. Immunofluorescence assay showed that renal SMP30 was specifically expressed in the proximal tubular segments of the kidney. The urinary Ca2+ level was increased in both ORX and male aging rats. Taken together, our results indicate a novel role of testosterone in regulating SMP30 expression specifically in the kidney to contribute to urinary calcium absorption. PMID:27553527

  3. Host JDP2 expression in the bone marrow contributes to metastatic spread

    PubMed Central

    Barbarov, Yelena; Timaner, Michael; Alishekevitz, Dror; Hai, Tsonwin; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.

    2015-01-01

    The c-Jun Dimerization Protein 2, JDP2, is a basic leucine zipper protein member of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) family of transcription factors. JDP2 typically suppresses gene transcription through multiple mechanisms and plays a dual role in multiple cellular processes, including cell differentiation and proliferation which is dependent on AP-1 function. Whereas the role of JDP2 expression within cancer cells has been studied, its role in stromal cells at the tumor microenvironment is largely unknown. Here we show that mice lacking JDP2 (JDP2−/−) display a reduced rate of metastasis in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and polyoma middle T-antigen (PyMT) breast carcinoma mouse models. The replacement of wild-type bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) with JDP2-deficient BMDCs recapitulates the metastatic phenotype of JDP2−/− tumor-bearing mice. In vitro, conditioned medium of wild-type BMDCs significantly potentiates the migration and invasion capacity of LLC cells as compared to that of JDP2−/− BMDCs. Furthermore, wild-type BMDCs secrete CCL5, a chemokine known to contribute to metastasis, to a greater extent than JDP2−/− BMDCs. The supplementation of CCL5 in JDP2−/− BMDC conditioned medium was sufficient to potentiate the invasion capacity of LLC. Overall, this study suggests that JDP2-expressing BMDCs within the tumor microenvironment contribute to metastatic spread. PMID:26497998

  4. Probabilistic framework for assessing the ice sheet contribution to sea level change

    PubMed Central

    Little, Christopher M.; Urban, Nathan M.; Oppenheimer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Previous sea level rise (SLR) assessments have excluded the potential for dynamic ice loss over much of Greenland and Antarctica, and recently proposed “upper bounds” on Antarctica’s 21st-century SLR contribution are derived principally from regions where present-day mass loss is concentrated (basin 15, or B15, drained largely by Pine Island, Thwaites, and Smith glaciers). Here, we present a probabilistic framework for assessing the ice sheet contribution to sea level change that explicitly accounts for mass balance uncertainty over an entire ice sheet. Applying this framework to Antarctica, we find that ongoing mass imbalances in non-B15 basins give an SLR contribution by 2100 that: (i) is comparable to projected changes in B15 discharge and Antarctica’s surface mass balance, and (ii) varies widely depending on the subset of basins and observational dataset used in projections. Increases in discharge uncertainty, or decreases in the exceedance probability used to define an upper bound, increase the fractional contribution of non-B15 basins; even weak spatial correlations in future discharge growth rates markedly enhance this sensitivity. Although these projections rely on poorly constrained statistical parameters, they may be updated with observations and/or models at many spatial scales, facilitating a more comprehensive account of uncertainty that, if implemented, will improve future assessments. PMID:23404697

  5. Tissue-Level Mechanical Properties of Bone Contributing to Fracture Risk.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Jeffry S; Granke, Mathilde; Singleton, Robert C; Pharr, George M

    2016-08-01

    Tissue-level mechanical properties characterize mechanical behavior independently of microscopic porosity. Specifically, quasi-static nanoindentation provides measurements of modulus (stiffness) and hardness (resistance to yielding) of tissue at the length scale of the lamella, while dynamic nanoindentation assesses time-dependent behavior in the form of storage modulus (stiffness), loss modulus (dampening), and loss factor (ratio of the two). While these properties are useful in establishing how a gene, signaling pathway, or disease of interest affects bone tissue, they generally do not vary with aging after skeletal maturation or with osteoporosis. Heterogeneity in tissue-level mechanical properties or in compositional properties may contribute to fracture risk, but a consensus on whether the contribution is negative or positive has not emerged. In vivo indentation of bone tissue is now possible, and the mechanical resistance to microindentation has the potential for improving fracture risk assessment, though determinants are currently unknown. PMID:27263108

  6. High level of αB-crystallin contributes to the progression of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ming; Gu, Yu-Rong; Cheng, Xi-Gao

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidences indicate the elevated expression of αB-Crystallin (Cryab) is implicated in tumorigenesis. However, the expression and biologic role of Cryab in osteosarcoma (OS) are still unknown. In this study, we showed that Cryab expression was elevated in OS tissues and cell lines, and down-regulation of Cryab in MG-63 and U-2OS cells led to a decline in the cells’ aggressiveness, and reduced secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in vitro, and lower metastasis potential in vivo. Further study indicated that the Cryab expression was positively associated with the activity of ERK1/2 which is responsible for the cells’ aggressiveness and MMP-9 secretion. Clinically, our data confirmed that the high level of Cryab was associated with shorten survival and tumor recurrence for the postoperative OS patients. Together, our results indicate that high level of Cryab is a new adverse outcomes marker for OS patients and may be used as a new therapeutic target. PMID:26789112

  7. Two-loop level rainbowlike supersymmetric contribution to the fermion electric dipole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Nodoka

    2013-01-01

    We calculate the two-loop level electric and chromoelectric dipole moments of the fermion involving the fermion-sfermion inner loop, gaugino, and Higgsino in the minimal supersymmetric standard model, and analyze the chromoelectric dipole moment with the top-stop inner loop. It is found that this contribution is comparable with, and even dominates, in some situations over the Barr-Zee type diagram generated from the CP violation of the top squark sector in TeV scale supersymmetry breaking.

  8. Neuroblastoma patient outcomes, tumor differentiation, and ERK activation are correlated with expression levels of the ubiquitin ligase UBE4B

    PubMed Central

    Woodfield, Sarah E.; Guo, Rong Jun; Liu, Yin; Major, Angela M.; Hollingsworth, Emporia Faith; Indiviglio, Sandra; Whittle, Sarah B.; Mo, Qianxing; Bean, Andrew J.; Ittmann, Michael; Lopez-Terrada, Dolores; Zage, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Background UBE4B is an E3/E4 ubiquitin ligase whose gene is located in chromosome 1p36.22. We analyzed the associations of UBE4B gene and protein expression with neuroblastoma patient outcomes and with tumor prognostic features and histology. Methods We evaluated the association of UBE4B gene expression with neuroblastoma patient outcomes using the R2 Platform. We screened neuroblastoma tumor samples for UBE4B protein expression using immunohistochemistry. FISH for UBE4B and 1p36 deletion was performed on tumor samples. We then evaluated UBE4B expression for associations with prognostic factors and with levels of phosphorylated ERK in neuroblastoma tumors and cell lines. Results Low UBE4B gene expression is associated with poor outcomes in patients with neuroblastoma and with worse outcomes in all patient subgroups. UBE4B protein expression was associated with neuroblastoma tumor differentiation, and decreased UBE4B protein levels were associated with high-risk features. UBE4B protein levels were also associated with levels of phosphorylated ERK. Conclusions We have demonstrated associations between UBE4B gene expression and neuroblastoma patient outcomes and prognostic features. Reduced UBE4B protein expression in neuroblastoma tumors was associated with high-risk features, a lack of differentiation, and with ERK activation. These results suggest UBE4B may contribute to the poor prognosis of neuroblastoma tumors with 1p36 deletions and that UBE4B expression may mediate neuroblastoma differentiation. PMID:27014418

  9. Mesopontine contribution to the expression of active 'twitch' sleep in decerebrate week-old rats.

    PubMed

    Kreider, J C; Blumberg, M S

    2000-07-28

    Myoclonic twitching is a ubiquitous feature of infant behavior that has been used as an index of active sleep. Although the active sleep of infants differs in some ways from the REM sleep of adults, their marked similarities have led many to view them them as homologous behavioral states. Recently, however, this view has been challenged. One avenue for resolving this issue entails examination of the neural substrates of active sleep. If the neural substrates of active sleep were found to be similar to those of REM sleep, then this would support the view that the two states are homologous. Therefore, in the present study, decerebrations were performed in the pons and midbrain to determine whether the mesopontine region is important for the expression of active sleep in infants, just as it is for the expression of REM sleep in adults. It was found that, in comparison to controls, caudal pontine decerebrations reduced myoclonic twitching by 76%, rostral pontine decerebrations reduced twitching by 40%, and midbrain transections had no significant effect on twitching. Moreover, analysis of the temporal organization of twitching indicated that pontine decerebrations predominantly affected high-frequency twitching while leaving unaffected the low-frequency twitching that is thought to be contributed by local spinal circuits at this age. These results indicate that the mesopontine region plays a central role in the expression of active sleep in infant rats. PMID:10924687

  10. The Arabidopsis NADPH oxidases RbohD and RbohF display differential expression patterns and contributions during plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Morales, Jorge; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Zipfel, Cyril; Molina, Antonio; Torres, Miguel-Angel

    2016-03-01

    Plant NADPH oxidases, also known as respiratory burst oxidase homologues (RBOHs), produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that perform a wide range of functions. RbohD and RbohF, two of the 10 Rboh genes present in Arabidopsis, are pleiotropic and mediate diverse physiological processes including the response to pathogens. We hypothesized that the spatio-temporal control of RbohD and RbohF gene expression might be critical in determining their multiplicity of functions. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants with RbohD and RbohF promoter fusions to β-glucuronidase and Luciferase reporter genes were generated. Analysis of these plants revealed a differential expression pattern for RbohD and RbohF throughout plant development and during immune responses. RbohD and RbohF gene expression was differentially modulated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Histochemical stains and in vivo expression analysis showed a correlation between the level of RbohD and RbohF promoter activity, H2O2 accumulation and the amount of cell death in response to the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina. A promoter-swap strategy revealed that the promoter region of RbohD was required to drive production of ROS by this gene in response to pathogens. Moreover, RbohD promoter was activated during Arabidopsis interaction with a non-virulent P. cucumerina isolate, and susceptibility tests with the double mutant rbohD rbohF uncovered a new function for these oxidases in basal resistance. Altogether, our results suggest that differential spatio-temporal expression of the Rboh genes contributes to fine-tune RBOH/NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production and signaling in Arabidopsis immunity. PMID:26798024

  11. Elevated Hapln2 Expression Contributes to Protein Aggregation and Neurodegeneration in an Animal Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinqin; Zhou, Qinbo; Zhang, Shuzhen; Shao, Wei; Yin, Yanqing; Li, Yandong; Hou, Jincan; Zhang, Xinhua; Guo, Yongshun; Wang, Xiaomin; Gu, Xiaosong; Zhou, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common age-associated progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SN). The pathogenesis of PD and the mechanisms underlying the degeneration of DA neurons are still not fully understood. Our previous quantitative proteomics study revealed that hyaluronan and proteoglycan binding link protein 2 (Hapln2) is one of differentially expressed proteins in the substantia nigra tissues from PD patients and healthy control subjects. However, the potential role of Hapln2 in PD pathogenesis remains elusive. In the present study, we characterized the expression pattern of Hapln2. In situ hybridization revealed that Hapln2 mRNA was widely expressed in adult rat brain with high abundance in the substantia nigra. Immunoblotting showed that expression levels of Hapln2 were markedly upregulated in the substantia nigra of either human subjects with Parkinson's disease compared with healthy control. Likewise, there were profound increases in Hapln2 expression in neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rat. Overexpression of Hapln2 in vitro increased vulnerability of MES23.5 cells, a dopaminergic cell line, to 6-hydroxydopamine. Moreover, Hapln2 overexpression led to the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates which were co-localized with ubiquitin and E3 ligases including Parkin, Gp78, and Hrd1 in vitro. Endogenous α-synuclein was also localized in Hapln2-containing aggregates and ablation of Hapln2 led to a marked decrease of α-synuclein in insoluble fraction compared with control. Thus, Hapln2 is identified as a novel factor contributing to neurodegeneration in PD. Our data provides new insights into the cellular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis in PD. PMID:27601993

  12. Elevated Hapln2 Expression Contributes to Protein Aggregation and Neurodegeneration in an Animal Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qinqin; Zhou, Qinbo; Zhang, Shuzhen; Shao, Wei; Yin, Yanqing; Li, Yandong; Hou, Jincan; Zhang, Xinhua; Guo, Yongshun; Wang, Xiaomin; Gu, Xiaosong; Zhou, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common age-associated progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SN). The pathogenesis of PD and the mechanisms underlying the degeneration of DA neurons are still not fully understood. Our previous quantitative proteomics study revealed that hyaluronan and proteoglycan binding link protein 2 (Hapln2) is one of differentially expressed proteins in the substantia nigra tissues from PD patients and healthy control subjects. However, the potential role of Hapln2 in PD pathogenesis remains elusive. In the present study, we characterized the expression pattern of Hapln2. In situ hybridization revealed that Hapln2 mRNA was widely expressed in adult rat brain with high abundance in the substantia nigra. Immunoblotting showed that expression levels of Hapln2 were markedly upregulated in the substantia nigra of either human subjects with Parkinson's disease compared with healthy control. Likewise, there were profound increases in Hapln2 expression in neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rat. Overexpression of Hapln2 in vitro increased vulnerability of MES23.5 cells, a dopaminergic cell line, to 6-hydroxydopamine. Moreover, Hapln2 overexpression led to the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates which were co-localized with ubiquitin and E3 ligases including Parkin, Gp78, and Hrd1 in vitro. Endogenous α-synuclein was also localized in Hapln2-containing aggregates and ablation of Hapln2 led to a marked decrease of α-synuclein in insoluble fraction compared with control. Thus, Hapln2 is identified as a novel factor contributing to neurodegeneration in PD. Our data provides new insights into the cellular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis in PD. PMID:27601993

  13. High level of urokinase plasminogen activator contributes to cholangiocarcinoma invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Thummarati, Parichut; Wijitburaphat, Sitsom; Prasopthum, Aruna; Menakongka, Apaporn; Sripa, Banchob; Tohtong, Rutaiwan; Suthiphongchai, Tuangporn

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) invasion and its correlation with clinicopathological parameters. METHODS: uPA expression in CCA tissue was determined by immunohistochemistry. The level of uPA from two CCA cell lines (HuCCA-1 and KKU-M213) and a non-cancer immortalized cholangiocyte cell line (H69) was monitored by plasminogen-gelatin zymography and western blotting, whereas that of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) protein and uPA receptor (uPAR) mRNA was monitored by western blotting and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Two independent methods were employed to suppress uPA function: a synthetic uPA inhibitor (B428) and silencing of uPA gene expression using siRNA. In vitro invasion of the uPA-disrupted cells was assessed by Matrigel-coated Transwell assay. RESULTS: The immunohistochemical study showed that 75.3% (131/174) of CCA tissues expressed uPA. High uPA expression was correlated with lymphatic invasion and metastasis of CCA patients. Plasminogen-gelatin zymography of the conditioned media and cell-surface eluates showed that both CCA cell lines, but not H69, expressed both secreted and membrane-bound forms of uPA. Although the two CCA cell lines, HuCCA-1 and KKU-M213, expressed a relatively high level of uPA and uPAR, the latter exhibited a much lower degree of in vitro invasiveness, correlating with a high expression of PAI-1 in the latter, but not in the former. Suppressing uPA function with a specific uPA inhibitor, B428, or with siRNA against uPA reduced in vitro invasiveness of KKU-M213 cells, demonstrating the requirement for uPA in the invasiveness of CCA cells. Therefore, our in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that uPA is an important requirement for the invasion process of CCA. CONCLUSION: uPA expression correlates with lymphatic invasion and metastasis in vivo and is required for CCA cell invasion in vitro

  14. Regional and cellular expression of CYP2D6 in human brain: higher levels in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Miksys, Sharon; Rao, Yushu; Hoffmann, Ewa; Mash, Deborah C; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2002-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 is expressed in liver, brain and other extrahepatic tissues where it metabolizes a range of centrally acting drugs and toxins. As ethanol can induce CYP2D in rat brain, we hypothesized that CYP2D6 expression is higher in brains of human alcoholics. We examined regional and cellular expression of CYP2D6 mRNA and protein by RT-PCR, Southern blotting, slot blotting, immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. A significant correlation was found between mean mRNA and CYP2D6 protein levels across 13 brain regions. Higher expression was detected in 13 brain regions of alcoholics (n = 8) compared to nonalcoholics (n = 5) (anovap < 0.0001). In hippocampus this was localized in CA1-3 pyramidal cells and dentate gyrus granular neurons. In cerebellum this was localized in Purkinje cells and their dendrites. Both of these brain regions, and these same cell-types, are known to be susceptible to alcohol damage. For one case, a poor metabolizer (CYP2D6*4/*4), there was no detectable CYP2D6 protein, confirming the specificity of the antibody used. These data suggest that in alcoholics elevated brain CYP2D6 expression may contribute to altered sensitivity to centrally acting drugs and to the mediation of neurotoxic and behavioral effects of alcohol. PMID:12354285

  15. Modelling the thermosteric contribution to global and regional sea-level rise during the last interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singarayer, Joy; Stone, Emma; Whipple, Matthew; Lunt, Dan; Bouttes, Nathaelle; Gregory, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Global sea level during the last interglacial is likely to have been between 5.5 and 9m above present (Dutton and Lambeck, 2012). Recent calculations, taking into account latest NEEM ice core information, suggest that Greenland would probably not have contributed more than 2.2m to this (Stone et al, 2013), implying a considerable contribution from Antarctica. Previous studies have suggested a significant loss from the West Antarctic ice-sheet (e.g. Holden et al, 2010), which could be initiated following a collapse of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and resultant warming in the Southern Ocean. Here, model simulations with FAMOUS and HadCM3 have been performed of the last interglacial under various scenarios of reduced Greenland and Antarctic ice-sheet configurations, and with and without collapsed AMOC. Thermal expansion and changes in regional density structure (resulting from ocean circulation changes) can also influence sea level, in addition to ice mass effects discussed thus far. The HadCM3 and FAMOUS simulations will be used to estimate the contribution to global and regional sea level change in interglacials from the latter two factors using a similar methodology to the IPCC TAR/AR4 estimations of future sea level rise (Gregory and Lowe, 2000). The HadCM3 and FAMOUS both have a rigid lid in their ocean model, and consequently a fixed ocean volume. Thermal expansion can, however, be calculated as a volume change from in-situ density (a prognostic variable from the model). Relative sea surface topography will then be estimated from surface pressure gradients and changes in atmospheric pressure. Dutton A., and Lambeck K., 2013. Ice Volume and Sea Level During the Last Interglacial. Science, 337, 216-219 Gregory J.M. and Lowe J.A., 2000. Predictions of global and regional sea-level using AOGCMs with and without flux adjustment. GRL, 27, 3069-3072 Holden P. et al., 2010. Interhemispheric coupling, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and warm

  16. Decreased Lin7b Expression in Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons May Contribute to Impaired Corticostriatal Connectivity in Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Birgit; Kama, Jibrin A.; Kuhn, Alexandre; Thu, Doris; Orlando, Lianna R.; Dunah, Anthone W.; Gokce, Ozgun; Taylor, David M.; Lambeck, Johann; Friedrich, Bernd; Lindenberg, Katrin S.; Faull, Richard L.M.; Weiller, Cornelius; Young, Anne B.; Luthi-Carter, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Motor dysfunction, cognitive impairment and regional cortical atrophy indicate cerebral cortical involvement in Huntington disease (HD). To address the hypothesis that abnormal corticostriatal connectivity arises from polyglutamine-related alterations in cortical gene expression, we isolated layer 5 cortical neurons by laser-capture microdissection and analyzed transcriptome-wide mRNA changes in them. Enrichment of transcription factor mRNAs including foxp2, tbr1, and neuroD6, and neurotransmission- and plasticity-related RNAs including sema5A, pclo, ntrk2, cntn1 and lin7b were observed. Layer 5 motor cortex neurons of transgenic R6/2 HD mice also demonstrated numerous transcriptomic changes, including decreased expression of mRNAs encoding the lin7 homolog b, (lin7b, also known as veli-2 and mals2). Decreases in LIN7B and CNTN1 RNAs were also detected in human HD layer 5 motor cortex neurons. lin7b, a scaffold protein implicated in synaptic plasticity, neurite outgrowth and cellular polarity, was decreased at the protein level in layer 5 cortical neurons in R6/2 mice and human HD brains. Decreases in Lin7b and Lin7a mRNAs were detected in R6/2 cortex as early as 6 weeks of age, suggesting that this is an early pathogenetic event. Thus, decreased cortical LIN7 expression may contribute to abnormal corticostriatal connectivity in HD. PMID:20720508

  17. Altered Skeletal Muscle Lipase Expression and Activity Contribute to Insulin Resistance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Badin, Pierre-Marie; Louche, Katie; Mairal, Aline; Liebisch, Gerhard; Schmitz, Gerd; Rustan, Arild C.; Smith, Steven R.; Langin, Dominique; Moro, Cedric

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin resistance is associated with elevated content of skeletal muscle lipids, including triacylglycerols (TAGs) and diacylglycerols (DAGs). DAGs are by-products of lipolysis consecutive to TAG hydrolysis by adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and are subsequently hydrolyzed by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). We hypothesized that an imbalance of ATGL relative to HSL (expression or activity) may contribute to DAG accumulation and insulin resistance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We first measured lipase expression in vastus lateralis biopsies of young lean (n = 9), young obese (n = 9), and obese-matched type 2 diabetic (n = 8) subjects. We next investigated in vitro in human primary myotubes the impact of altered lipase expression/activity on lipid content and insulin signaling. RESULTS Muscle ATGL protein was negatively associated with whole-body insulin sensitivity in our population (r = −0.55, P = 0.005), whereas muscle HSL protein was reduced in obese subjects. We next showed that adenovirus-mediated ATGL overexpression in human primary myotubes induced DAG and ceramide accumulation. ATGL overexpression reduced insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis (−30%, P < 0.05) and disrupted insulin signaling at Ser1101 of the insulin receptor substrate-1 and downstream Akt activation at Ser473. These defects were fully rescued by nonselective protein kinase C inhibition or concomitant HSL overexpression to restore a proper lipolytic balance. We show that selective HSL inhibition induces DAG accumulation and insulin resistance. CONCLUSIONS Altogether, the data indicate that altered ATGL and HSL expression in skeletal muscle could promote DAG accumulation and disrupt insulin signaling and action. Targeting skeletal muscle lipases may constitute an interesting strategy to improve insulin sensitivity in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:21498783

  18. MMP-2/MMP-9 plasma level and brain expression in cerebral amyloid angiopathy-associated hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Guillamon, Mar; Martinez-Saez, Elena; Delgado, Pilar; Domingues-Montanari, Sophie; Boada, Cristina; Penalba, Anna; Boada, Mercè; Pagola, Jorge; Maisterra, Olga; Rodriguez-Luna, David; Molina, Carlos A; Rovira, Alex; Alvarez-Sabin, José; Ortega-Aznar, Arantxa; Montaner, Joan

    2012-03-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is one of the main causes of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the elderly. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in blood-brain barrier disruption and ICH pathogenesis. In this study, we determined the levels MMP-2 and MMP-9 in plasma and their brain expression in CAA-associated hemorrhagic stroke. Although MMP-2 and MMP-9 plasma levels did not differ among patients and controls, their brain expression was increased in perihematoma areas of CAA-related hemorrhagic strokes compared with contralateral areas and nonhemorrhagic brains. In addition, MMP-2 reactivity was found in β-amyloid (Aβ)-damaged vessels located far from the acute ICH and in chronic microbleeds. MMP-2 expression was associated to endothelial cells, histiocytes and reactive astrocytes, whereas MMP-9 expression was restricted to inflammatory cells. In summary, MMP-2 expression within and around Aβ-compromised vessels might contribute to the vasculature fatal fate, triggering an eventual bleeding. PMID:21707819

  19. Deep-ocean contribution to sea level and energy budget not detectable over the past decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovel, W.; Willis, J. K.; Landerer, F. W.; Fukumori, I.

    2014-11-01

    As the dominant reservoir of heat uptake in the climate system, the world's oceans provide a critical measure of global climate change. Here, we infer deep-ocean warming in the context of global sea-level rise and Earth's energy budget between January 2005 and December 2013. Direct measurements of ocean warming above 2,000 m depth explain about 32% of the observed annual rate of global mean sea-level rise. Over the entire water column, independent estimates of ocean warming yield a contribution of 0.77 +/- 0.28 mm yr-1 in sea-level rise and agree with the upper-ocean estimate to within the estimated uncertainties. Accounting for additional possible systematic uncertainties, the deep ocean (below 2,000 m) contributes -0.13 +/- 0.72 mm yr-1 to global sea-level rise and -0.08 +/- 0.43 W m-2 to Earth's energy balance. The net warming of the ocean implies an energy imbalance for the Earth of 0.64 +/- 0.44 W m-2 from 2005 to 2013.

  20. Deep Ocean Contribution to Sea Level and Energy Budget Not Detectable over the Past Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovel, W.; Willis, J. K.; Landerer, F. W.; Fukumori, I.

    2014-12-01

    As the dominant reservoir of heat uptake in the climate system, the world's oceans provide a critical measure of global climate change. Here, we infer deep ocean warming in the context of global sea level rise and Earth's energy budget between January 2005 and December 2013 based on satellite altimetry, GRACE and Argo floats. Direct measurements of ocean warming above 2000m depth explain 0.9 +/- 0.15 mm/yr of the observed 2.78 +/- 0.32 mm/yr rate of global mean sea level rise. Over the entire water column, independent estimates of ocean warming yield a contribution of 0.77+/-0.28 mm/yr in sea level rise and agree with the upper ocean estimate to within the estimated uncertainties. Accounting for additional possible systematic uncertainties, the deep ocean (below 2000m) contributes -0.13 +/- 0.72 mm/yr to global sea level rise and -0.08 +/- 0.43 W/m2 to Earth's energy balance. The net warming of the ocean implies an energy imbalance for the Earth of 0.64 ± 0.44 W/m2 from 2005 to 2013.

  1. Naringin promotes differentiation of bone marrow stem cells into osteoblasts by upregulating the expression levels of microRNA-20a and downregulating the expression levels of PPARγ.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jifeng; Li, Jie; Fan, Qinbo

    2015-09-01

    Naringin is a dihydrotestosterone flavonoid compound that significantly inhibits bone loss, improves bone density, and enhances biomechanical anti‑compression performance. Previous studies have demonstrated that naringin improves the activity levels of osteocalcin (OC) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in MC3T3‑E1 osteoblast precursor cells. The present study investigated the effects of naringin on osteoblastic differentiation and inhibition of adipocyte formation in bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs). The levels of osteogenesis were modulated via upregulation of the expression levels of microRNA (miR)‑20a, and downregulation of the expression levels of peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor γ (PPARγ). The results indicated that naringin significantly enhanced BMSC proliferation in a dose‑dependent manner. In addition, naringin significantly increased the mRNA expression levels of OC, ALP, and collagen type I. Furthermore, naringin decreased the protein expression levels of PPARγ, and increased the expression levels of miR‑20a in the BMSCs. These results suggested that miR‑20a may regulate the expression of PPARγ in BMSCs. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report naringin‑induced osteogenesis via upregulation of the expression levels of miR‑20a, and downregulation of the expression levels of PPARγ. These results indicated the important role of naringin in BMSC differentiation. PMID:26126997

  2. Contribution of global groundwater depletion since 1900 to sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.

    2011-01-01

    Removal of water from terrestrial subsurface storage is a natural consequence of groundwater withdrawals, but global depletion is not well characterized. Cumulative groundwater depletion represents a transfer of mass from land to the oceans that contributes to sea-level rise. Depletion is directly calculated using calibrated groundwater models, analytical approaches, or volumetric budget analyses for multiple aquifer systems. Estimated global groundwater depletion during 1900–2008 totals ~4,500 km3, equivalent to a sea-level rise of 12.6 mm (>6% of the total). Furthermore, the rate of groundwater depletion has increased markedly since about 1950, with maximum rates occurring during the most recent period (2000–2008), when it averaged ~145 km3/yr (equivalent to 0.40 mm/yr of sea-level rise, or 13% of the reported rate of 3.1 mm/yr during this recent period).

  3. Contribution of the Patagonia Icefields of South America to sea level rise.

    PubMed

    Rignot, Eric; Rivera, Andrés; Casassa, Gino

    2003-10-17

    Digital elevation models of the Northern and Southern Patagonia Icefields of South America generated from the 2000 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission were compared with earlier cartography to estimate the volume change of the largest 63 glaciers. During the period 1968/1975-2000, these glaciers lost ice at a rate equivalent to a sea level rise of 0.042 +/- 0.002 millimeters per year. In the more recent years 1995-2000, average ice thinning rates have more than doubled to an equivalent sea level rise of 0.105 +/- 0.011 millimeters per year. The glaciers are thinning more quickly than can be explained by warmer air temperatures and decreased precipitation, and their contribution to sea level per unit area is larger than that of Alaska glaciers. PMID:14564005

  4. The land-ice contribution to 21st-century dynamic sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, T.; Ridley, J.; Pardaens, A. K.; Hurkmans, R. T. W. L.; Payne, A. J.; Giesen, R. H.; Lowe, J. A.; Bamber, J. L.; Edwards, T. L.; Oerlemans, J.

    2014-06-01

    Climate change has the potential to influence global mean sea level through a number of processes including (but not limited to) thermal expansion of the oceans and enhanced land ice melt. In addition to their contribution to global mean sea level change, these two processes (among others) lead to local departures from the global mean sea level change, through a number of mechanisms including the effect on spatial variations in the change of water density and transport, usually termed dynamic sea level changes. In this study, we focus on the component of dynamic sea level change that might be given by additional freshwater inflow to the ocean under scenarios of 21st-century land-based ice melt. We present regional patterns of dynamic sea level change given by a global-coupled atmosphere-ocean climate model forced by spatially and temporally varying projected ice-melt fluxes from three sources: the Antarctic ice sheet, the Greenland Ice Sheet and small glaciers and ice caps. The largest ice melt flux we consider is equivalent to almost 0.7 m of global mean sea level rise over the 21st century. The temporal evolution of the dynamic sea level changes, in the presence of considerable variations in the ice melt flux, is also analysed. We find that the dynamic sea level change associated with the ice melt is small, with the largest changes occurring in the North Atlantic amounting to 3 cm above the global mean rise. Furthermore, the dynamic sea level change associated with the ice melt is similar regardless of whether the simulated ice fluxes are applied to a simulation with fixed CO2 or under a business-as-usual greenhouse gas warming scenario of increasing CO2.

  5. Aberrant Mer receptor tyrosine kinase expression contributes to leukemogenesis in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Sherick, A B; Eisenman, K M; Sather, S; McGranahan, A; Armistead, P M; McGary, C S; Hunsucker, S A; Schlegel, J; Martinson, H; Cannon, C; Keating, A K; Earp, H S; Liang, X; DeRyckere, D; Graham, D K

    2013-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) continues to be extremely difficult to treat successfully, and the unacceptably low overall survival rates mandate that we assess new potential therapies to ameliorate poor clinical response to conventional therapy. Abnormal tyrosine kinase activation in AML has been associated with poor prognosis and provides strategic targets for novel therapy development. We found that Mer receptor tyrosine kinase was over-expressed in a majority of pediatric (29/36, 80%) and adult (10/10, 100%) primary AML patient blasts at the time of diagnosis, and 100% of patient samples at the time of relapse. Mer was also found to be expressed in 12 of 14 AML cell lines (86%). In contrast, normal bone marrow myeloid precursors expressed little to no Mer. Following AML cell line stimulation with Gas6, a Mer ligand, we observed activation of prosurvival and proliferative signaling pathways, including phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, MSK1, CREB, ATF1, AKT and STAT6. To assess the phenotypic role of Mer in AML, two independent short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) constructs were used to decrease Mer expression in the AML cell lines Nomo-1 and Kasumi-1. Reduction of Mer protein levels significantly increased rates of myeloblast apoptosis two to threefold in response to serum starvation. Furthermore, myeloblasts with knocked-down Mer demonstrated decreased colony formation by 67–87%, relative to control cell lines (P<0.01). NOD-SCID-gamma mice transplanted with Nomo-1 myeloblasts with reduced levels of Mer had a significant prolongation in survival compared with mice transplanted with the parental or control cell lines (median survival 17 days in parental and control cell lines, versus 32–36 days in Mer knockdown cell lines, P<0.0001). These data suggest a role for Mer in acute myeloid leukemogenesis and indicate that targeted inhibition of Mer may be an effective therapeutic strategy in pediatric and adult AML. PMID:23474756

  6. Aberrant Mer receptor tyrosine kinase expression contributes to leukemogenesis in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lee-Sherick, A B; Eisenman, K M; Sather, S; McGranahan, A; Armistead, P M; McGary, C S; Hunsucker, S A; Schlegel, J; Martinson, H; Cannon, C; Keating, A K; Earp, H S; Liang, X; DeRyckere, D; Graham, D K

    2013-11-14

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) continues to be extremely difficult to treat successfully, and the unacceptably low overall survival rates mandate that we assess new potential therapies to ameliorate poor clinical response to conventional therapy. Abnormal tyrosine kinase activation in AML has been associated with poor prognosis and provides strategic targets for novel therapy development. We found that Mer receptor tyrosine kinase was over-expressed in a majority of pediatric (29/36, 80%) and adult (10/10, 100%) primary AML patient blasts at the time of diagnosis, and 100% of patient samples at the time of relapse. Mer was also found to be expressed in 12 of 14 AML cell lines (86%). In contrast, normal bone marrow myeloid precursors expressed little to no Mer. Following AML cell line stimulation with Gas6, a Mer ligand, we observed activation of prosurvival and proliferative signaling pathways, including phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, MSK1, CREB, ATF1, AKT and STAT6. To assess the phenotypic role of Mer in AML, two independent short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) constructs were used to decrease Mer expression in the AML cell lines Nomo-1 and Kasumi-1. Reduction of Mer protein levels significantly increased rates of myeloblast apoptosis two to threefold in response to serum starvation. Furthermore, myeloblasts with knocked-down Mer demonstrated decreased colony formation by 67-87%, relative to control cell lines (P<0.01). NOD-SCID-gamma mice transplanted with Nomo-1 myeloblasts with reduced levels of Mer had a significant prolongation in survival compared with mice transplanted with the parental or control cell lines (median survival 17 days in parental and control cell lines, versus 32-36 days in Mer knockdown cell lines, P<0.0001). These data suggest a role for Mer in acute myeloid leukemogenesis and indicate that targeted inhibition of Mer may be an effective therapeutic strategy in pediatric and adult AML. PMID:23474756

  7. Decreased SGK1 Expression and Function Contributes to Behavioral Deficits Induced by Traumatic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Licznerski, Pawel; Duric, Vanja; Banasr, Mounira; Alavian, Kambiz N.; Ota, Kristie T.; Kang, Hyo Jung; Jonas, Elizabeth A.; Ursano, Robert; Krystal, John H.; Duman, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to extreme stress can trigger the development of major depressive disorder (MDD) as well as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The molecular mechanisms underlying the structural and functional alterations within corticolimbic brain regions, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and amygdala of individuals subjected to traumatic stress, remain unknown. In this study, we show that serum and glucocorticoid regulated kinase 1 (SGK1) expression is down-regulated in the postmortem PFC of PTSD subjects. Furthermore, we demonstrate that inhibition of SGK1 in the rat medial PFC results in helplessness- and anhedonic-like behaviors in rodent models. These behavioral changes are accompanied by abnormal dendritic spine morphology and synaptic dysfunction. Together, the results are consistent with the possibility that altered SGK1 signaling contributes to the behavioral and morphological phenotypes associated with traumatic stress pathophysiology. PMID:26506154

  8. Genes with monoallelic expression contribute disproportionately to genetic diversity in humans

    PubMed Central

    McCole, Ruth B.; Witwicki, Robert; Gai, Lisa; Lenz, Tobias L.; Wu, C.-ting; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; Gimelbrant, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    An unexpectedly large number of human autosomal genes are subject to monoallelic expression (MAE). Our analysis of 4,227 such genes reveals surprisingly high genetic variation across human populations. This increased diversity is unlikely to reflect relaxed purifying selection. Remarkably, MAE genes exhibit elevated recombination rate and increased density of hypermutable sequence contexts. However, these factors do not fully account for the increased diversity. We find that the elevated nucleotide diversity of MAE genes is also associated with greater allelic age: their variants tend to be older and are enriched in polymorphisms shared with Neanderthals and chimpanzees. Both synonymous and nonsynonymous alleles in MAE genes have elevated average population frequencies. We also observed strong enrichment of the MAE signature among genes reported to evolve under balancing selection. We propose that an important biological function of widespread MAE might be generation of cell-to-cell heterogeneity; the increased genetic variation contributes to this heterogeneity. PMID:26808112

  9. Decreased SGK1 Expression and Function Contributes to Behavioral Deficits Induced by Traumatic Stress.

    PubMed

    Licznerski, Pawel; Duric, Vanja; Banasr, Mounira; Alavian, Kambiz N; Ota, Kristie T; Kang, Hyo Jung; Jonas, Elizabeth A; Ursano, Robert; Krystal, John H; Duman, Ronald S

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to extreme stress can trigger the development of major depressive disorder (MDD) as well as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The molecular mechanisms underlying the structural and functional alterations within corticolimbic brain regions, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and amygdala of individuals subjected to traumatic stress, remain unknown. In this study, we show that serum and glucocorticoid regulated kinase 1 (SGK1) expression is down-regulated in the postmortem PFC of PTSD subjects. Furthermore, we demonstrate that inhibition of SGK1 in the rat medial PFC results in helplessness- and anhedonic-like behaviors in rodent models. These behavioral changes are accompanied by abnormal dendritic spine morphology and synaptic dysfunction. Together, the results are consistent with the possibility that altered SGK1 signaling contributes to the behavioral and morphological phenotypes associated with traumatic stress pathophysiology. PMID:26506154

  10. Genes with monoallelic expression contribute disproportionately to genetic diversity in humans.

    PubMed

    Savova, Virginia; Chun, Sung; Sohail, Mashaal; McCole, Ruth B; Witwicki, Robert; Gai, Lisa; Lenz, Tobias L; Wu, C-ting; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Gimelbrant, Alexander A

    2016-03-01

    An unexpectedly large number of human autosomal genes are subject to monoallelic expression (MAE). Our analysis of 4,227 such genes uncovers surprisingly high genetic variation across human populations. This increased diversity is unlikely to reflect relaxed purifying selection. Remarkably, MAE genes exhibit an elevated recombination rate and an increased density of hypermutable sequence contexts. However, these factors do not fully account for the increased diversity. We find that the elevated nucleotide diversity of MAE genes is also associated with greater allelic age: variants in these genes tend to be older and are enriched in polymorphisms shared by Neanderthals and chimpanzees. Both synonymous and nonsynonymous alleles of MAE genes have elevated average population frequencies. We also observed strong enrichment of the MAE signature among genes reported to evolve under balancing selection. We propose that an important biological function of widespread MAE might be the generation of cell-to-cell heterogeneity; the increased genetic variation contributes to this heterogeneity. PMID:26808112

  11. Recurring exon deletions in the HP (haptoglobin) gene contribute to lower blood cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Boettger, Linda M; Salem, Rany M; Handsaker, Robert E; Peloso, Gina M; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hirschhorn, Joel N; McCarroll, Steven A

    2016-04-01

    One of the first protein polymorphisms identified in humans involves the abundant blood protein haptoglobin. Two exons of the HP gene (encoding haptoglobin) exhibit copy number variation that affects HP protein structure and multimerization. The evolutionary origins and medical relevance of this polymorphism have been uncertain. Here we show that this variation has likely arisen from many recurring deletions, more specifically, reversions of an ancient hominin-specific duplication of these exons. Although this polymorphism has been largely invisible to genome-wide genetic studies thus far, we describe a way to analyze it by imputation from SNP haplotypes and find among 22,288 individuals that these HP exonic deletions associate with reduced LDL and total cholesterol levels. We further show that these deletions, and a SNP that affects HP expression, appear to drive the strong association of cholesterol levels with SNPs near HP. Recurring exonic deletions in HP likely enhance human health by lowering cholesterol levels in the blood. PMID:26901066

  12. Reduction in maternal Polycomb levels contributes to transgenerational inheritance of a response to toxic stress in flies

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Shay; Snir, Orli; Mizrachi, Eran; Galili, Matana; Zaltsman, Inbal; Soen, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    Transgenerational persistence of parental responses to environmental stimuli has been reported in various organisms, but the underlying mechanisms remain underexplored. In one of these reported examples, we have shown that exposure of fly larvae to G418 antibiotic leads to non-Mendelian inheritance of ectopic induction of certain developmental genes. Here we investigate if this inheritance involves changes in mRNA composition within the early, maternal-stage offspring embryos of exposed flies. Exposure to G418 in F1 modified the maternal RNA levels of many genes in their early (F2) embryos. This includes reduction of maternal Polycomb group genes which persisted in the following generation of embryos (F3). To investigate the functional meaning of this reduction, we compared genetically normal embryos of Polycomb mutant females to normal embryos of normal females. Analysis with two different alleles of Polycomb, Pc1 and Pc3, revealed that maternal reduction in Polycomb gene dosage has a positive influence on the inheritance of induced expression. Together, this shows that exposure to G418 stress reduces the maternal levels of Polycomb in the offspring embryos and this reduction contributes to the inheritance of induced expression. PMID:24535443

  13. Modeling ice dynamic contributions to sea level rise from the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schannwell, C.; Barrand, N. E.; Radić, V.

    2015-11-01

    The future ice dynamical contribution to sea level rise (SLR) from 199 ice shelf nourishing drainage basins of the Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet is simulated, using the British Antarctic Survey Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet Model. Simulations of the grounded ice sheet include response to ice shelf collapse, estimated by tracking thermal ice shelf viability limits in 14 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change global climate models ensemble temperature projections. Grounding line retreat in response to ice shelf collapse is parameterized with a new multivariate linear regression model utilizing a range of glaciological and geometric predictor variables. Multimodel means project SLR up to 9.4 mm sea level equivalent (SLE) by 2200, and up to 19 mm SLE by 2300. Rates of SLR from individual drainage basins throughout the peninsula are similar to 2100, yet diverge between 2100 and 2300 due to individual basin characteristics. Major contributors to SLR are the outlet glaciers feeding southern George VI Ice Shelf, accounting for >75% of total SLR in some model runs. Ice sheet thinning induced by ice-shelf removal is large (up to ˜500 m), especially in Palmer Land in the southern Antarctic Peninsula, and may propagate as far as 135 km inland. These results emphasize the importance of the ice dynamical contribution to future sea level of the APIS on decadal to centennial timescales.

  14. The over-expression of cell migratory genes in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma could contribute to metastatic spread.

    PubMed

    Rapa, Elizabeth; Hill, Sophie K; Morten, Karl J; Potter, Michelle; Mitchell, Chris

    2012-06-01

    Alveolar (ARMS) and Embryonal (ERMS) rhabdomyosarcoma differ in their response to current treatments. The ARMS subtype has a less favourable prognosis and often presents with widespread metastases, while the less metastatic ERMS has a 5 year survival rate of more than 80 %. In this study we investigate gene expression differences that could contribute to the high frequency of metastasis in ARMS. Microarray analysis identified significant differences in DNA repair, cell cycle and cell migration between the two RMS subtypes. Two genes up regulated in ARMS and involved in cell migration; the engulfment and cell motility gene 1 (ELMO1) and NEL-like 1 gene (NELL1) were selected for further investigation. Over-expression of ELMO1 significantly increased cell invasion from 24.70 ± 7% to 93 ± 5.4% in primary myoblasts and from 29.43 ± 2.1% to 87.33 ± 4.1% in the ERMS cell line RD. siRNA knockout of ELMO1 in the ARMS cell line RH30 significantly reduced cell invasion from 88.2 ± 3.8% to 35.2 ± 2.5%. Over-expression of NELL1 significantly increased myoblast invasion from 23.6 ± 6.9% to 100 ± 0.1%, but had no effect on invasion of the ERMS cell line RD. These findings suggest that ELMO1 may play a key role in ARMS metastasis. NELL1 increased invasion in primary myoblasts, but other factors required for it to enhance motility were not present in the RD ERMS cell line. Impairing ELMO1 function by pharmacological or siRNA knockdown could be a highly effective approach to reduce the metastatic spread of RMS. PMID:22415709

  15. Contributions to sea level variability along the Norwegian coast for 1960-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, K.; Nilsen, J. E. Ø.; Drange, H.

    2012-05-01

    Global sea level has been rising by about 20 cm during the last century and is expected to continue to rise in the 21st century. The rise and variability is not spatially uniform. To be able to project local changes in relative sea level (RSL), it is important to identify the processes that govern regional RSL variability. In this study, we assess the importance of different contributions to RSL variability along the coast of Norway in the period 1960-2010. By using hydrographic station data at the coast, sea level pressure, and observed vertical land uplift, we compute RSL changes due to thermal expansion, haline contraction, the inverted barometer effect, and land uplift caused by glacial isostatic adjustment. The combination of these contributions is compared to RSL variability observed with tide gauges. For all but the two southernmost stations, the reconstructed RSL explains 70-85% of the observed variability of the monthly sampled time series. The inverted barometer effect is responsible for more than half of the explained variability, while thermosteric height represents the largest contribution to the linear trend. Due to land uplift, the local RSL rise is weaker and partly negative along the Norwegian coast. The residual (observed minus reconstructed) shows a positive trend ranging from 1.3 mm yr-1 to 2.3 mm yr-1. It is speculated that the reason for this is an increase of mass in the ocean due to melting of land-based ice and, to a lesser degree, the combined thermohaline expansion in the deep Nordic seas.

  16. Saharan dust contribution to PM levels: The EC LIFE+ DIAPASON project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbi, G. P.; Wille, H.; Sozzi, R.; Angelini, F.; Barnaba, F.; Costabile, F.; Frey, S.; Bolignano, A.; Di Giosa, A.

    2012-04-01

    The contribution of Saharan-dust advections to both daily and annual PM average values can be significant all over Southern Europe. The most important effects of dust on the number of PM exceedances are mostly observed in polluted areas and large cities. While a wide literature exists documenting episodes of Saharan dust transport towards the Euro-Mediterranean region and Europe in general, a limited number of studies are still available providing statistically significant results on the impact of Saharan dust on the particulate matter loads over the continent. A four-year (2001-2004) study performed in Rome (Italy) found these events to contribute to the average ground PM10 with about 15±10 µg/m3 on about 17% of the days in a year. Since the PM10 yearly average of many traffic stations in Rome is close to 40 μg/m3, these events can cause the PM10 concentration to exceed air quality limit values (50 μg/m3 as daily average) set by the EU Air Quality Directive 2008/50/EC. Although the European legislation allows Member States to subtract the contribution of natural sources before counting PM10 exceedances, definition of an optimal methodology to quantitatively assess such contribution is still in progress. On the basis of the current European Guidelines on the assessment of natural contributions to PM, the DIAPASON project ("Desert-dust Impact on Air quality through model-Predictions and Advanced Sensors ObservatioNs", recently funded under the EC LIFE+ program) has been formulated to provide a robust, user-oriented methodology to assess the presence of desert dust and its contribution to PM levels. To this end, in addition to satellite-based data and model forecasts, the DIAPASON methodology will employ innovative and affordable technologies, partly prototyped within the project itself, as an operational Polarization Lidar-Ceilometer (laser radar) capable of detecting and profiling dust clouds from the ground up to 10 km altitude. The DIAPASON Project (2011

  17. Pou5f1 contributes to dorsoventral patterning by positive regulation of vox and modulation of fgf8a expression.

    PubMed

    Belting, Heinz-Georg; Wendik, Björn; Lunde, Karen; Leichsenring, Manuel; Mössner, Rebecca; Driever, Wolfgang; Onichtchouk, Daria

    2011-08-15

    Pou5f1/Oct-4 in mice is required for maintenance of embryonic pluripotent cell populations. Zebrafish pou5f1 maternal-zygotic mutant embryos (spiel ohne grenzen; MZspg) lack endoderm and have gastrulation and dorsoventral patterning defects. A contribution of Pou5f1 to the control of bmp2b, bmp4 and vox expression has been suggested, however the mechanisms remained unclear and are investigated in detail here. Low-level overexpression of a Pou5f1-VP16 activator fusion protein can rescue dorsalization in MZspg mutants, indicating that Pou5f1 acts as a transcriptional activator during dorsoventral patterning. Overexpression of larger quantities of Pou5f1-VP16 can ventralize wild-type embryos, while overexpression of a Pou5f1-En repressor fusion protein can dorsalize embryos. Lack of Pou5f1 causes a transient upregulation of fgf8a expression after mid-blastula transition, providing a mechanism for delayed activation of bmp2b in MZspg embryos. Overexpression of the Pou5f1-En repressor induces fgf8, suggesting an indirect mechanism of Pou5f1 control of fgf8a expression. Transcription of vox is strongly activated by Pou5f1-VP16 even when translation of zygotically expressed transcripts is experimentally inhibited by cycloheximide. In contrast, bmp2b and bmp4 are not activated under these conditions. We show that Pou5f1 binds to phylogenetically conserved Oct/Pou5f1 sites in the vox promoter, both in vivo (ChIP) and in vitro. Our data reveals a set of direct and indirect interactions of Pou5f1 with the BMP dorsoventral patterning network that serve to fine-tune dorsoventral patterning mechanisms and coordinate patterning with developmental timing. PMID:21621531

  18. Naringenin-Mediated ATF3 Expression Contributes to Apoptosis in Human Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hun Min; Park, Gwang Hun; Eo, Hyun Ji; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2016-01-01

    Naringenin (NAR) as one of the flavonoids observed in grapefruit has been reported to exhibit an anti-cancer activity. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is associated with apoptosis in human colon cancer cells. This study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism by which NAR stimulates ATF3 expression and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells. NAR reduced the cell viability and induced an apoptosis in human colon cancer cells. ATF3 overexpression increased NAR-mediated cleaved PARP, while ATF3 knockdown attenuated the cleavage of PARP by NAR. NAR increased ATF3 expression in both protein and mRNA level, and increased the luciferase activity of ATF3 promoter in a dose-dependent manner. The responsible region for ATF3 transcriptional activation by NAR is located between −317 and −148 of ATF3 promoter. p38 inhibition blocked NAR-mediated ATF3 expression, its promoter activation and apoptosis. The results suggest that NAR induces apoptosis through p38-dependent ATF3 activation in human colon cancer cells. PMID:26797111

  19. Upregulated interleukin-6 expression contributes to erlotinib resistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stanam, Aditya; Love-Homan, Laurie; Joseph, Tisha S; Espinosa-Cotton, Madelyn; Simons, Andrean L

    2015-08-01

    Despite the role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) development and progression, clinical trials involving EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have yielded poor results in HNSCC patients. Mechanisms of acquired resistance to the EGFR TKI erlotinib was investigated by developing erlotinib-resistant HNSCC cell lines and comparing their gene expression profiles with their parental erlotinib-sensitive HNSCC cell lines using microarray analyses and subsequent pathway and network analyses. Erlotinib-resistant HNSCC cells displayed a significant upregulation in immune response and inflammatory pathways compared to parental cells. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) was one of thirteen genes that was significantly differentially expressed in all erlotinib-resistant HNSCC cell lines, which was validated using RT-PCR and ELISA. Blockade of IL-6 signaling using the IL-6 receptor antagonist tocilizumab, was able to overcome erlotinib-resistance in erlotinib-resistant SQ20B tumors in vivo. Overall, erlotinib-resistant HNSCC cells display elevated IL-6 expression levels compared to erlotinib-sensitive HNSCC cells and blockade of the IL-6 signaling pathway may be an effective strategy to overcome resistance to erlotinib and possibly other EGFR TKIs for HNSCC therapy. PMID:25888065

  20. Coastal sea level rise in southern Europe and the nonclimate contribution of vertical land motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WöPpelmann, G.; Marcos, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we extend the advanced approach of combining tide gauge and satellite altimetry data with supplemental equations from adjacent tide gauge records of at least 30 years of common data to investigate the relative importance of the nonclimate contribution of vertical land movement to the observed rates of sea level change along the coasts of southern Europe. The sensitivity tests proved that the advanced approach is robust and accurate at the submillimeter per year level of around 0.4 mm yr-1in estimating rates of vertical land movements. It enabled identifying stations displaying large rates of vertical land movements that must be taken into account when predicting future sea level rise and appraising the exposure to its impacts on populations and assets. The average rate of coastal climate-related sea level rise in the Mediterranean Sea was consequently revisited to be of 1.7 mm yr-1 over the past century, whereas the Atlantic northern Iberian coast revealed a significant high rate of sea level rise in excess of 3.4 mm yr-1 for the past 70 years. Future work should consider applying this powerful approach to other geographic contexts as a useful source of supplementary data for geodynamic studies.

  1. Coastal sea level rise in southern Europe and the nonclimate contribution of vertical land motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woppelmann, G.; Marcos, M.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we extend the advanced approach of combining tide gauge and satellite altimetry data with supplemental equations from adjacent tide gauge records of at least 30 years of common data to investigate the relative importance of the nonclimate contribution of vertical land movement to the observed rates of sea level change along the coasts of southern Europe. The sensitivity tests proved that the advanced approach is robust and accurate at the submillimeter per year level of around 0.4 mm/yr in estimating rates of vertical land movements. It enabled identifying stations displaying large rates of vertical land movements that must be taken into account when predicting future sea level rise and appraising the exposure to its impacts on populations and assets. The average rate of coastal climate-related sea level rise in the Mediterranean Sea was consequently revisited to be of 1.7 mm/yr over the past century, whereas the Atlantic northern Iberian coast revealed a significant high rate of sea level rise in excess of 3.4 mm/yr for the past 70 years. Future work should consider applying this powerful approach to other geographic contexts as a useful source of supplementary data for geodynamic studies.

  2. Intercellular chaperone transmission via exosomes contributes to maintenance of protein homeostasis at the organismal level

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Toshihide; Suzuki, Mari; Fujikake, Nobuhiro; Popiel, H. Akiko; Kikuchi, Hisae; Futaki, Shiroh; Wada, Keiji; Nagai, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    The heat shock response (HSR), a transcriptional response that up-regulates molecular chaperones upon heat shock, is necessary for cell survival in a stressful environment to maintain protein homeostasis (proteostasis). However, there is accumulating evidence that the HSR does not ubiquitously occur under stress conditions, but largely depends on the cell types. Despite such imbalanced HSR among different cells and tissues, molecular mechanisms by which multicellular organisms maintain their global proteostasis have remained poorly understood. Here, we report that proteostasis can be maintained by molecular chaperones not only in a cell-autonomous manner but also in a non–cell-autonomous manner. We found that elevated expression of molecular chaperones, such as Hsp40 and Hsp70, in a group of cells improves proteostasis in other groups of cells, both in cultured cells and in Drosophila expressing aggregation-prone polyglutamine proteins. We also found that Hsp40, as well as Hsp70 and Hsp90, is physiologically secreted from cells via exosomes, and that the J domain at the N terminus is responsible for its exosome-mediated secretion. Addition of Hsp40/Hsp70-containing exosomes to the culture medium of the polyglutamine-expressing cells results in efficient suppression of inclusion body formation, indicating that molecular chaperones non-cell autonomously improve the protein-folding environment via exosome-mediated transmission. Our study reveals that intercellular chaperone transmission mediated by exosomes is a novel molecular mechanism for non–cell-autonomous maintenance of organismal proteostasis that could functionally compensate for the imbalanced state of the HSR among different cells, and also provides a novel physiological role of exosomes that contributes to maintenance of organismal proteostasis. PMID:25918398

  3. Expression Level of Genes Coding for Cell Adhesion Molecules of Cadherin Group in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lorenc, Zbigniew; Opiłka, Mieszko Norbert; Kruszniewska-Rajs, Celina; Rajs, Antoni; Waniczek, Dariusz; Starzewska, Małgorzata; Lorenc, Justyna; Mazurek, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Background Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and also one of the main death causes. Cell adhesion molecules are taking part in specific junctions, contributing to tissue integrality. Lower expression of the cadherins may be correlated with poorer differentiation of the CRC, and its more aggressive phenotype. The aim of the study is to designate the cadherin genes potentially useful for the diagnostics, prognostics, and the treatment of CRC. Material/Method Specimens were collected from 28 persons (14 female and 14 male), who were operated for CRC. The molecular analysis was performed using oligonucleotide microarrays, mRNA used was collected from adenocarcinoma, and macroscopically healthy tissue. The results were validated using qRT-PCR technique. Results Agglomerative hierarchical clustering of normalized mRNA levels has shown 4 groups with statistically different gene expression. The control group was divided into 2 groups, the one was appropriate control (C1), the second (C2) had the genetic properties of the CRC, without pathological changes histologically and macroscopically. The other 2 groups were: LSC (Low stage cancer) and HSC (High stage cancer). Consolidated results of the fluorescency of all of the differential genes, designated two coding E-cadherin (CDH1) with the lower expression, and P-cadherin (CDH3) with higher expression in CRC tissue. Conclusions The levels of genes expression are different for several groups of cadherins, and are related with the stage of CRC, therefore could be potentially the useful marker of the stage of the disease, also applicable in treatment and diagnostics of CRC. PMID:26167814

  4. A reconciled estimate of glacier contributions to sea level rise: 2003 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Alex S; Moholdt, Geir; Cogley, J Graham; Wouters, Bert; Arendt, Anthony A; Wahr, John; Berthier, Etienne; Hock, Regine; Pfeffer, W Tad; Kaser, Georg; Ligtenberg, Stefan R M; Bolch, Tobias; Sharp, Martin J; Hagen, Jon Ove; van den Broeke, Michiel R; Paul, Frank

    2013-05-17

    Glaciers distinct from the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets are losing large amounts of water to the world's oceans. However, estimates of their contribution to sea level rise disagree. We provide a consensus estimate by standardizing existing, and creating new, mass-budget estimates from satellite gravimetry and altimetry and from local glaciological records. In many regions, local measurements are more negative than satellite-based estimates. All regions lost mass during 2003-2009, with the largest losses from Arctic Canada, Alaska, coastal Greenland, the southern Andes, and high-mountain Asia, but there was little loss from glaciers in Antarctica. Over this period, the global mass budget was -259 ± 28 gigatons per year, equivalent to the combined loss from both ice sheets and accounting for 29 ± 13% of the observed sea level rise. PMID:23687045

  5. Understanding the Relative Contributions of Lower-Level Word Processes, Higher-Level Processes, and Working Memory to Reading Comprehension Performance in Proficient Adult Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Although a considerable amount of evidence has been amassed regarding the contributions of lower-level word processes, higher-level processes, and working memory to reading comprehension, little is known about the relationships among these sources of individual differences or their relative contributions to reading comprehension performance. This…

  6. Rabies virus (RV) glycoprotein expression levels are not critical for pathogenicity of RV.

    PubMed

    Wirblich, Christoph; Schnell, Matthias J

    2011-01-01

    Previous comparisons of different rabies virus (RV) strains suggested an inverse relationship between pathogenicity and the amount of glycoprotein produced in infected cells. In order to provide more insight into this relationship, we pursued an experimental approach that allowed us to alter the glycoprotein expression level without altering the glycoprotein sequence, thereby eliminating the contribution of amino acid changes to differences in viral virulence. To this end, we constructed an infectious clone of the highly pathogenic rabies virus strain CVS-N2c and replaced its cognate glycoprotein gene with synthetic versions in which silent mutations were introduced to replace wild-type codons with the most or least frequently used synonymous codons. A recombinant N2c variant containing the fully codon-optimized G gene and three variants carrying a partially codon-deoptimized G gene were recovered on mouse neuroblastoma cells and shown to express 2- to 3-fold more and less glycoprotein, respectively, than wild-type N2c. Pathogenicity studies in mice revealed the WT-N2c virus to be the most pathogenic strain. Variants containing partially codon-deoptimized glycoprotein genes or the codon-optimized gene were less pathogenic than WT-N2c but still caused significant mortality. We conclude that the expression level of the glycoprotein gene does have an impact on pathogenicity but is not a dominant factor that determines pathogenicity. Thus, strategies such as changes in codon usage that aim solely at altering the expression level of the glycoprotein gene do not suffice to render a pathogenic rabies virus apathogenic and are not a viable and safe approach for attenuation of a pathogenic strain. PMID:21068252

  7. Rabies Virus (RV) Glycoprotein Expression Levels Are Not Critical for Pathogenicity of RV▿

    PubMed Central

    Wirblich, Christoph; Schnell, Matthias J.

    2011-01-01

    Previous comparisons of different rabies virus (RV) strains suggested an inverse relationship between pathogenicity and the amount of glycoprotein produced in infected cells. In order to provide more insight into this relationship, we pursued an experimental approach that allowed us to alter the glycoprotein expression level without altering the glycoprotein sequence, thereby eliminating the contribution of amino acid changes to differences in viral virulence. To this end, we constructed an infectious clone of the highly pathogenic rabies virus strain CVS-N2c and replaced its cognate glycoprotein gene with synthetic versions in which silent mutations were introduced to replace wild-type codons with the most or least frequently used synonymous codons. A recombinant N2c variant containing the fully codon-optimized G gene and three variants carrying a partially codon-deoptimized G gene were recovered on mouse neuroblastoma cells and shown to express 2- to 3-fold more and less glycoprotein, respectively, than wild-type N2c. Pathogenicity studies in mice revealed the WT-N2c virus to be the most pathogenic strain. Variants containing partially codon-deoptimized glycoprotein genes or the codon-optimized gene were less pathogenic than WT-N2c but still caused significant mortality. We conclude that the expression level of the glycoprotein gene does have an impact on pathogenicity but is not a dominant factor that determines pathogenicity. Thus, strategies such as changes in codon usage that aim solely at altering the expression level of the glycoprotein gene do not suffice to render a pathogenic rabies virus apathogenic and are not a viable and safe approach for attenuation of a pathogenic strain. PMID:21068252

  8. The contribution of walking to work to adult physical activity levels: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective To objectively examine the contribution to adult physical activity levels of walking to work. Methods Employees (n = 103; 36.3 ± 11.7 years) at 17 workplaces in south-west England, who lived within 2 miles (3.2 km) of their workplace, wore Actigraph accelerometers for seven days during waking hours and carried GPS receivers during the commute to and from work. Physical activity volume (accelerometer counts per minute (cpm)) and intensity (minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA)) were computed overall and during the walk to work. Results Total weekday physical activity was 45% higher in participants who walked to work compared to those travelling by car (524.6. ± 170.4 vs 364.6 ± 138.4 cpm) and MVPA almost 60% higher (78.1 ± 24.9 vs 49.8 ± 25.2 minutes per day). No differences were seen in weekend physical activity, and sedentary time did not differ between the groups. Combined accelerometer and GPS data showed that walking to work contributed 47.3% of total weekday MVPA. Conclusions Walking to work was associated with overall higher levels of physical activity in young and middle-aged adults. These data provide preliminary evidence to underpin the need for interventions to increase active commuting, specifically walking, in adults. PMID:24618001

  9. Blood selenium levels and contribution of food groups to selenium intake in adolescent girls in Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Gudmundsdottir, Edda Y.; Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg; Thorlacius, Arngrimur; Reykdal, Olafur; Gunnlaugsdottir, Helga; Thorsdottir, Inga; Steingrimsdottir, Laufey

    2012-01-01

    Background/objectives Significant changes have been reported in dietary habits and food availability in Iceland that would be expected to compromise selenium intake and status, especially among young people. These include substantial decreases in the consumption of fish and milk, as well as the selenium content of imported wheat. The aim of this study was to assess selenium in the diet and whole blood of adolescent girls, as well as define the most important foods contributing to intake and blood concentrations of selenium. Design The subjects were 96 randomly selected girls, aged 16–20, who answered a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for dietary assessment. Selenium intake from each food group was calculated in µg/day. Blood samples were collected for measurement of whole blood selenium. Results Mean dietary selenium was 51±25 µg/day. Milk/dairy products, including cheese, contributed 36±14% of total dietary selenium; fish 18±12%; and bread/cereal products 13±6%. Mean whole blood selenium was 117±12 µg/l (range 90–208); nearly 90% of subjects were above the optimal level of 100 µg/l. Fish and bread/cereal products were the only foods significantly correlated with selenium in blood (r=0.32; P=0.002 and r=0.22; P=0.04, respectively) while no correlation was found with milk and dairy products in spite of their greater contribution to total selenium intake. Conclusion In this population of Icelandic adolescent girls, selenium intake and status seem acceptable. Judging from associations between intake and blood levels, fish and cereals may be the most important contributors to blood selenium. PMID:22952457

  10. A New Model to Construct Ice Stream Surface Elevation Profiles and Calculate Contributions to Sea-Level Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Yosuke

    Sea-level rise is a problem that affects regions worldwide - from the marshlands of the San Francisco Bay Area to the farmlands in coastal Bangladesh. Three-dimensional ice sheet models are the principle tools to evaluate mass loss from ice sheets that contribute to sea-level rise. We recognize that given the current limitations in representing the full extent of dynamical processes that affect ice sheet mass loss in 3-D ice sheet models, we cannot make reliable forecasts of sea-level rise from melting polar land ice. Thus, we take a completely different approach to gaining insight about the potential effects of climate change-induced perturbations on ice sheets. We build a flowline model that resolves the fast-flowing portions of ice sheets (i.e., ice streams). We express the dynamics along the flowline with (a) vertical shear deformation, (b) horizontal shear deformation, and (c) basal slip. Knowledge accumulated from prior force balance analyses performed on some polar ice streams allows us to form relations between (a) and ( c), and between (a) and (c) combined and (b). Based on these relationships, we numerically construct surface elevation profiles along flowlines centered on ten select ice streams in Greenland and Antarctica, by prescribing three climate change-induced perturbations: grounding line retreat, ice stream widening, and surface mass balance increase. Comparing these constructed profiles to the current observed ones allows us to quantify the effect of these perturbations on the various characteristics that these ten ice streams possess. Pine Island Glacier, which flows over a long overdeepening, will lose more than half of its stored ice volume that is contributable to sea-level rise before it reaches a possible steady state. Recovery Ice Stream, with its slippery base, long stretch of streaming-flow, and longest flowline among those we examined, loses the most mass (812 km3/km width). Jutulstraumen, which has little room to widen and a short

  11. VNN1 Gene Expression Levels and the G-137T Polymorphism Are Associated with HDL-C Levels in Mexican Prepubertal Children

    PubMed Central

    Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Aguayo-de la Rosa, Pablo I.; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; León-Mimila, Paola; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; López-Contreras, Blanca E.; Sánchez-Muñoz, Fausto; Bojalil, Rafael; González-Barrios, Juan Antonio; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Background VNN1 gene expression levels and the G-137T polymorphism have been associated with high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in Mexican American adults. We aim to evaluate the contribution of VNN1 gene expression and the G-137T variant to HDL-C levels and other metabolic traits in Mexican prepubertal children. Methodology/Principal Findings VNN1 mRNA expression levels were quantified in peripheral blood leukocytes from 224 unrelated Mexican-Mestizo children aged 6–8 years (107 boys and 117 girls) and were genotyped for the G-137T variant (rs4897612). To account for population stratification, a panel of 10 ancestry informative markers was analyzed. After adjustment for admixture, the TT genotype was significantly associated with lower VNN1 mRNA expression levels (P = 2.9 × 10−5), decreased HDL-C levels (β = −6.19, P = 0.028) and with higher body mass index (BMI) z-score (β = 0.48, P = 0.024) in the total sample. In addition, VNN1 expression showed a positive correlation with HDL-C levels (r = 0.220; P = 0.017) and a negative correlation with BMI z-score (r = −0.225; P = 0.015) only in girls. Conclusion/Significance Our data suggest that VNN1 gene expression and the G-137T variant are associated with HDL-C levels in Mexican children, particularly in prepubertal girls. PMID:23185446

  12. Contributions of transcription and mRNA decay to gene expression dynamics of fission yeast in response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Marguerat, Samuel; Lawler, Katherine; Brazma, Alvis; Bähler, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    The cooperation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels of control to shape gene regulation is only partially understood. Here we show that a combination of two simple and non-invasive genomic techniques, coupled with kinetic mathematical modeling, affords insight into the intricate dynamics of RNA regulation in response to oxidative stress in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This study reveals a dominant role of transcriptional regulation in response to stress, but also points to the first minutes after stress induction as a critical time when the coordinated control of mRNA turnover can support the control of transcription for rapid gene regulation. In addition, we uncover specialized gene expression strategies associated with distinct functional gene groups, such as simultaneous transcriptional repression and mRNA destabilization for genes encoding ribosomal proteins, delayed mRNA destabilization with varying contribution of transcription for ribosome biogenesis genes, dominant roles of mRNA stabilization for genes functioning in protein degradation, and adjustment of both transcription and mRNA turnover during the adaptation to stress. We also show that genes regulated independently of the bZIP transcription factor Atf1p are predominantly controlled by mRNA turnover, and identify putative cis-regulatory sequences that are associated with different gene expression strategies during the stress response. This study highlights the intricate and multi-faceted interplay between transcription and RNA turnover during the dynamic regulatory response to stress. PMID:25007214

  13. Expression of both B7-1 and CD28 contributes to the IL-2 responsiveness of CTLL-2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Belani, R; Weiner, G J

    1996-01-01

    The CTLL-2 bioassay is used frequently to determine interleukin-2 (IL-2) concentrations in experimental samples, including samples that contain reagents which affect the CD28-B7 interaction. We therefore evaluated whether the CD28-B7 pathway plays a role in the growth of CTLL-2 cells. Flow cytometry demonstrated that CTLL-2 cells express both CD28 and B7-1. CTLA4-immunoglobulin (CTLA4-Ig) inhibited the growth of CTLL-2 cells over a range of IL-2 concentrations, suggesting that the CD28-B7 interaction plays an important role in the growth of CTLL-2 cells. Anti-B7-1 antibody also inhibited CTLL-2 proliferation at all concentrations of IL-2. These results indicate that the CTLL-2 bioassay may not be a reliable means of determining IL-2 levels in experimental samples containing reagents that affect the CD28-B7 interaction. They also suggest that co-expression of CD28 and B7 may contribute to the growth of malignant T cells. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8698390

  14. Contributions to cities' ambient particulate matter (PM): A systematic review of local source contributions at global level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagulian, Federico; Belis, Claudio A.; Dora, Carlos Francisco C.; Prüss-Ustün, Annette M.; Bonjour, Sophie; Adair-Rohani, Heather; Amann, Markus

    2015-11-01

    For reducing health impacts from air pollution, it is important to know the sources contributing to human exposure. This study systematically reviewed and analysed available source apportionment studies on particulate matter (of diameter of 10 and 2.5 microns, PM10 and PM2.5) performed in cities to estimate typical shares of the sources of pollution by country and by region. A database with city source apportionment records, estimated with the use of receptor models, was also developed and available at the website of the World Health Organization. Systematic Scopus and Google searches were performed to retrieve city studies of source apportionment for particulate matter. Six source categories were defined. Country and regional averages of source apportionment were estimated based on city population weighting. A total of 419 source apportionment records from studies conducted in cities of 51 countries were used to calculate regional averages of sources of ambient particulate matter. Based on the available information, globally 25% of urban ambient air pollution from PM2.5 is contributed by traffic, 15% by industrial activities, 20% by domestic fuel burning, 22% from unspecified sources of human origin, and 18% from natural dust and salt. The available source apportionment records exhibit, however, important heterogeneities in assessed source categories and incompleteness in certain countries/regions. Traffic is one important contributor to ambient PM in cities. To reduce air pollution in cities and the substantial disease burden it causes, solutions to sustainably reduce ambient PM from traffic, industrial activities and biomass burning should urgently be sought. However, further efforts are required to improve data availability and evaluation, and possibly to combine with other types of information in view of increasing usefulness for policy making.

  15. Immunosuppressive serum levels in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: pharmaceutical care contribution

    PubMed Central

    CORRÊA, Paulo M.; Zuckermann., Joice; Fischer, Gustavo B.; Castro., Mauro S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cyclosporine and tacrolimus are limited by a narrow therapeutic window. Maintaining immunosuppressive drugs at desired levels may be difficult. Pharmaceutical care emerges as a philosophy of practice that enhances medication use and leads to a better control of serum concentration. Objective: This study aims to evaluate the impact of pharmaceutical care in the maintaining of proper serum levels of immunosuppressive medications in patients who have undergone allo-HSCT. Methods: The study had a quasi-experimental design that included a comparison group. The service model used was pharmacotherapy follow-up, according to an adaptation of the Dader method. The pharmacist consultation was carried out at a day-hospital or at the outpatient hematology clinic as needed. The intervention group consisted of 22 patients seen by a clinical pharmacist. The control group consisted of 44 patients that received standard care. This study aims to evaluate the impact of pharmaceutical care on keeping patient serum levels of cyclosporine and tacrolimus within the desired range. Results: Control group displayed 65% of the proper serum levels of immunosuppressive agents. While In intervention group, the figure was 82% (p = 0.004). Conclusion: The role of the pharmacist in the multidisciplinary team may contribute to a greater success in attaining the patients’ therapeutic targets with regard to the use of immunosuppressant. PMID:27382420

  16. Coastal sea level rise and the non-climate contribution of vertical land motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos, M.; Woppelmann, G.

    2012-12-01

    The rate of coastal sea level change and the relative importance of the non-climate contribution of vertical land movement in the Mediterranean Sea are investigated using an advanced approach of combining tide gauge and satellite altimetry data with supplemental equations from adjacent tide gauge records, suitable for enclosed basins. The sensitivity tests proved that the advanced approach is robust and accurate at the submillimeter per year level of around 0.4 mm/yr in estimating rates of vertical land movements. The average rate of coastal climate-related sea level rise in the Mediterranean Sea was consequently revisited to be of 1.7 mm/yr over the past century. The technique also enabled identifying stations displaying large rates of vertical land movements that must be taken into account when predicting future sea level rise and appraising the exposure to its impacts on populations and assets. Particular case studies will be discussed. An attempt to extend the methodology to the open ocean will be presented and the case of the North American east coast will be discussed.

  17. Antarctic contribution to global sea level in a high CO2 world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golledge, Nicholas R.; Levy, Richard H.; Naish, Timothy R.; McKay, Robert M.; Gasson, Edward G. W.; Kowalewski, Douglas E.; Fogwill, Christopher J.

    2016-04-01

    In 2014 atmospheric CO2 levels exceeded 400 ppm for the first time since the early Pliocene (3.5-5 Ma). Although the rise in global mean surface temperatures that will accompany continued increases in CO2 is hard to predict, proxy evidence from the early Pliocene suggest that these CO2 concentrations, together with higher-than-present summer insolation, were associated with circum-Antarctic seas 2-4° C warmer than present and air temperatures 6-10° C warmer. Large sectors of the present-day Antarctic ice sheet rest on bedrock below sea level, and as such these areas are more sensitive to environmental forcings than ice grounded above sea level because the geometry of their submarine beds allows for runaway retreat in response to relatively small initial perturbations (Thomas & Bentley, 1978; Mengel & Levermann, 2014). Here we present an ice-sheet model ensemble that explores the consequences of a range of air and ocean warming scenarios representative of a higher-than-present CO2 world. Using circum-Antarctic palaeoenvironmental proxy data to constrain the range of likely conditions adjacent to the continent we calculate probability densities of likely sea-level equivalent ice-sheet volume changes relative to present, together with their associated uncertainties, for a range of timeframes. We find that multi-metre sea-level contributions are likely within centuries, increasing to over ten metres within subsequent millennia. Our results are consistent with empirically-based sea-level reconstructions for the Pliocene, and in addition offer new insights into basin-specific responses within the Antarctic continent.

  18. Opc expression, LPS immunotype switch and pilin conversion contribute to serum resistance of unencapsulated meningococci.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Kerstin; Pawlik, Marie-Christin; Claus, Heike; Jarva, Hanna; Meri, Seppo; Vogel, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis employs polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins to cope with human serum complement attack. To screen for factors influencing serum resistance, an assay was developed based on a colorimetric serum bactericidal assay. The screening used a genetically modified sequence type (ST)-41/44 clonal complex (cc) strain lacking LPS sialylation, polysaccharide capsule, the factor H binding protein (fHbp) and MutS, a protein of the DNA repair mechanism. After killing of >99.9% of the bacterial cells by serum treatment, the colorimetric assay was used to screen 1000 colonies, of which 35 showed enhanced serum resistance. Three mutant classes were identified. In the first class of mutants, enhanced expression of Opc was identified. Opc expression was associated with vitronectin binding and reduced membrane attack complex deposition confirming recent observations. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) immunotype switch from immunotype L3 to L8/L1 by lgtA and lgtC phase variation represented the second class. Isogenic mutant analysis demonstrated that in ST-41/44 cc strains the L8/L1 immunotype was more serum resistant than the L3 immunotype. Consecutive analysis revealed that the immunotypes L8 and L1 were frequently observed in ST-41/44 cc isolates from both carriage and disease. Immunotype switch to L8/L1 is therefore suggested to contribute to the adaptive capacity of this meningococcal lineage. The third mutant class displayed a pilE allelic exchange associated with enhanced autoaggregation. The mutation of the C terminal hypervariable region D of PilE included a residue previously associated with increased pilus bundle formation. We suggest that autoaggregation reduced the surface area accessible to serum complement and protected from killing. The study highlights the ability of meningococci to adapt to environmental stress by phase variation and intrachromosomal recombination affecting subcapsular antigens. PMID:23028802

  19. Greenland ice-sheet contribution to sea-level rise buffered by meltwater storage in firn.

    PubMed

    Harper, J; Humphrey, N; Pfeffer, W T; Brown, J; Fettweis, X

    2012-11-01

    Surface melt on the Greenland ice sheet has shown increasing trends in areal extent and duration since the beginning of the satellite era. Records for melt were broken in 2005, 2007, 2010 and 2012. Much of the increased surface melt is occurring in the percolation zone, a region of the accumulation area that is perennially covered by snow and firn (partly compacted snow). The fate of melt water in the percolation zone is poorly constrained: some may travel away from its point of origin and eventually influence the ice sheet's flow dynamics and mass balance and the global sea level, whereas some may simply infiltrate into cold snow or firn and refreeze with none of these effects. Here we quantify the existing water storage capacity of the percolation zone of the Greenland ice sheet and show the potential for hundreds of gigatonnes of meltwater storage. We collected in situ observations of firn structure and meltwater retention along a roughly 85-kilometre-long transect of the melting accumulation area. Our data show that repeated infiltration events in which melt water penetrates deeply (more than 10 metres) eventually fill all pore space with water. As future surface melt intensifies under Arctic warming, a fraction of melt water that would otherwise contribute to sea-level rise will fill existing pore space of the percolation zone. We estimate the lower and upper bounds of this storage sink to be 322 ± 44 gigatonnes and  1,289(+388)(-252) gigatonnes, respectively. Furthermore, we find that decades are required to fill this pore space under a range of plausible future climate conditions. Hence, routing of surface melt water into filling the pore space of the firn column will delay expansion of the area contributing to sea-level rise, although once the pore space is filled it cannot quickly be regenerated. PMID:23135470

  20. Contributions of facial expressions and body language to the rapid perception of dynamic emotions.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Laura; Falvello, Virginia B; Aviezer, Hillel; Todorov, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Correctly perceiving emotions in others is a crucial part of social interactions. We constructed a set of dynamic stimuli to determine the relative contributions of the face and body to the accurate perception of basic emotions. We also manipulated the length of these dynamic stimuli in order to explore how much information is needed to identify emotions. The findings suggest that even a short exposure time of 250 milliseconds provided enough information to correctly identify an emotion above the chance level. Furthermore, we found that recognition patterns from the face alone and the body alone differed as a function of emotion. These findings highlight the role of the body in emotion perception and suggest an advantage for angry bodies, which, in contrast to all other emotions, were comparable to the recognition rates from the face and may be advantageous for perceiving imminent threat from a distance. PMID:25964985

  1. Genetic and Environmental Contributions to the Expression of Handedness in Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, William D.; Adams, Mark James; Weiss, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Most humans are right-handed and, like many behavioral traits, there is good evidence that genetic factors play a role in handedness. Many researchers have argued that nonhuman animal limb or hand preferences are not under genetic control but instead are determined by random, non-genetic factors. We used quantitative genetic analyses to estimate the genetic and environmental contributions to three measures of chimpanzee handedness. Results revealed significant population-level handedness for two of the three measures --- the tube task and manual gestures. Furthermore, significant additive genetic effects for the direction and strength of handedness were found for all three measures, with some modulation due to early social rearing experiences. These findings challenge historical and contemporary views of the mechanisms underlying handedness in nonhuman animals. PMID:23615127

  2. miR-1297 mediates PTEN expression and contributes to cell progression in LSCC

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin; Wang, Hong-liang; Peng, Xin; Zhou, Hui-fang; Wang, Xin

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-1297 was found to be overexpressed in LSCC and contribute to the cell progression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN was confirmed to be a target gene of miR-1297. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of PTEN can rescue the proliferation and invasion ability of miR-1297 downregulated Hep-2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of miR-1297 inhibits tumor growth in vivo. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression after transcription, and are involved in cancer development. Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is one of the most common malignant neoplasms with increasing incidence in recent years. In this paper, we report the overexpression of miR-1297 in LSCC and Hep-2 cells. In addition, PTEN was identified to be directly regulated by miR-1297 through western blot and luciferase activity assay. Furthermore, downregulation of miR-1297 in Hep-2 cells was shown to inhibit cancer cell proliferation, migration, and tumor genesis. Our results document a new epigenetic mechanism for PTEN regulation in LSCC, which is crucial for the development of these tumors.

  3. Contribution of Antarctica to past and future sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deconto, Robert M.; Pollard, David

    2016-03-01

    Polar temperatures over the last several million years have, at times, been slightly warmer than today, yet global mean sea level has been 6–9 metres higher as recently as the Last Interglacial (130,000 to 115,000 years ago) and possibly higher during the Pliocene epoch (about three million years ago). In both cases the Antarctic ice sheet has been implicated as the primary contributor, hinting at its future vulnerability. Here we use a model coupling ice sheet and climate dynamics—including previously underappreciated processes linking atmospheric warming with hydrofracturing of buttressing ice shelves and structural collapse of marine-terminating ice cliffs—that is calibrated against Pliocene and Last Interglacial sea-level estimates and applied to future greenhouse gas emission scenarios. Antarctica has the potential to contribute more than a metre of sea-level rise by 2100 and more than 15 metres by 2500, if emissions continue unabated. In this case atmospheric warming will soon become the dominant driver of ice loss, but prolonged ocean warming will delay its recovery for thousands of years.

  4. Contribution of climate-driven change in continental water storage to recent sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, P.C.D.; Cazenave, A.; Gennero, M.C.

    2003-01-01

    Using a global model of continental water balance, forced by interannual variations in precipitation and near-surface atmospheric temperature for the period 1981-1998, we estimate the sea-level changes associated with climate-driven changes in storage of water as snowpack, soil water, and ground water; storage in ice sheets and large lakes is not considered. The 1981-1998 trend is estimated to be 0.12 mm/yr, and substantial interannual fluctuations are inferred; for 1993-1998, the trend is 0.25 mm/yr. At the decadal time scale, the terrestrial contribution to eustatic (i.e., induced by mass exchange) sea-level rise is significantly smaller than the estimated steric (i.e., induced by density changes) trend for the same period, but is not negligibly small. In the model the sea-level rise is driven mainly by a downtrend in continental precipitation during the study period, which we believe was generated by natural variability in the climate system.

  5. Contribution of Antarctica to past and future sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    DeConto, Robert M; Pollard, David

    2016-03-31

    Polar temperatures over the last several million years have, at times, been slightly warmer than today, yet global mean sea level has been 6-9 metres higher as recently as the Last Interglacial (130,000 to 115,000 years ago) and possibly higher during the Pliocene epoch (about three million years ago). In both cases the Antarctic ice sheet has been implicated as the primary contributor, hinting at its future vulnerability. Here we use a model coupling ice sheet and climate dynamics-including previously underappreciated processes linking atmospheric warming with hydrofracturing of buttressing ice shelves and structural collapse of marine-terminating ice cliffs-that is calibrated against Pliocene and Last Interglacial sea-level estimates and applied to future greenhouse gas emission scenarios. Antarctica has the potential to contribute more than a metre of sea-level rise by 2100 and more than 15 metres by 2500, if emissions continue unabated. In this case atmospheric warming will soon become the dominant driver of ice loss, but prolonged ocean warming will delay its recovery for thousands of years. PMID:27029274

  6. Increased gene expression of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes in adrenal glands contributes to high circulating catecholamines in pigs with tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tomaszek, A; Kiczak, L; Bania, J; Paslawska, U; Zacharski, M; Janiszewski, A; Noszczyk-Nowak, A; Dziegiel, P; Kuropka, P; Ponikowski, P; Jankowska, E A

    2015-04-01

    High levels of circulating catecholamines have been established as fundamental pathophysiological elements of heart failure (HF). However, it is unclear whether the increased gene expression of catecholamine-synthesis enzymes in the adrenal glands contributes to these hormone abnormalities in large animal HF models. We analyzed the mRNA levels of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes: tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) in adrenal glands of 18 pigs with chronic systolic non-ischaemic HF (tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy due to right ventricle pacing) and 6 sham-operated controls. Pigs with severe HF demonstrated an increased expression of TH and DBH (but neither AAAD nor PNMT) as compared to animals with milder HF and controls (P<0.05 in all cases). The increased adrenal mRNA expression of TH and DBH was accompanied by a reduced left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) (P<0.001) and an elevated plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) (P<0.01), the other indices reflecting HF severity. There was a positive relationship between the increased adrenal mRNA expression of TH and DBH, and the high levels of circulating adrenaline and noradrenaline (all P<0.05). The association with noradrenaline remained significant also when adjusted for LVEF and plasma BNP, suggesting a significant contribution of adrenals to the circulating pool of catecholamines in subjects with systolic HF. PMID:25903953

  7. Nasal Associated Lymphoid Tissue of the Syrian Golden Hamster Expresses High Levels of PrPC

    PubMed Central

    Clouse, Melissa D.; Shikiya, Ronald A.; Bartz, Jason C.; Kincaid, Anthony E.

    2015-01-01

    The key event in the pathogenesis of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies is a template-dependent misfolding event where an infectious isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc) comes into contact with native prion protein (PrPC) and changes its conformation to PrPSc. In many extraneurally inoculated models of prion disease this PrPC misfolding event occurs in lymphoid tissues prior to neuroinvasion. The primary objective of this study was to compare levels of total PrPC in hamster lymphoid tissues involved in the early pathogenesis of prion disease. Lymphoid tissues were collected from golden Syrian hamsters and Western blot analysis was performed to quantify PrPC levels. PrPC immunohistochemistry (IHC) of paraffin embedded tissue sections was performed to identify PrPC distribution in tissues of the lymphoreticular system. Nasal associated lymphoid tissue contained the highest amount of total PrPC followed by Peyer’s patches, mesenteric and submandibular lymph nodes, and spleen. The relative levels of PrPC expression in IHC processed tissue correlated strongly with the Western blot data, with high levels of PrPC corresponding with a higher percentage of PrPC positive B cell follicles. High levels of PrPC in lymphoid tissues closely associated with the nasal cavity could contribute to the relative increased efficiency of the nasal route of entry of prions, compared to other routes of infection. PMID:25642714

  8. Strain-level dissection of the contribution of the gut microbiome to human metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenhong; Zhao, Liping

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been linked with metabolic diseases in humans, but demonstration of causality remains a challenge. The gut microbiota, as a complex microbial ecosystem, consists of hundreds of individual bacterial species, each of which contains many strains with high genetic diversity. Recent advances in genomic and metabolomic technologies are facilitating strain-level dissection of the contribution of the gut microbiome to metabolic diseases. Interventional studies and correlation analysis between variations in the microbiome and metabolome, captured by longitudinal sampling, can lead to the identification of specific bacterial strains that may contribute to human metabolic diseases via the production of bioactive metabolites. For example, high-quality draft genomes of prevalent gut bacterial strains can be assembled directly from metagenomic datasets using a canopy-based algorithm. Specific metabolites associated with a disease phenotype can be identified by nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics of urine and other samples. Such multi-omics approaches can be employed to identify specific gut bacterial genomes that are not only correlated with detected metabolites but also encode the genes required for producing the precursors of those metabolites in the gut. Here, we argue that if a causative role can be demonstrated in follow-up mechanistic studies--for example, using gnotobiotic models--such functional strains have the potential to become biomarkers for diagnostics and targets for therapeutics. PMID:27098841

  9. Glacier changes in southeast Alaska and northwest British Columbia and contribution to sea level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, C.F.; Motyka, R.J.; Arendt, A.A.; Echelmeyer, K.A.; Geissler, P.E.

    2007-01-01

    The digital elevation model (DEM) from the 2000 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) was differenced from a composite DEM based on air photos dating from 1948 to 1987 to detennine glacier volume changes in southeast Alaska and adjoining Canada. SRTM accuracy was assessed at ??5 in through comparison with airborne laser altimetry and control locations measured with GPS. Glacier surface elevations lowered over 95% of the 14,580 km2 glacier-covered area analyzed, with some glaciers thinning as much as 640 in. A combination of factors have contributed to this wastage, including calving retreats of tidewater and lacustrine glaciers and climate change. Many glaciers in this region are particularly sensitive to climate change, as they have large areas at low elevations. However, several tidewater glaciers that had historically undergone calving retreats are now expanding and appear to be in the advancing stage of the tidewater glacier cycle. The net average rate of ice loss is estimated at 16.7 ?? 4.4 km3/yr, equivalent to a global sea level rise contribution of 0.04 ?? 0.01 mm/yr. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Photosynthetic properties of boreal bog plant species and their contribution to ecosystem level carbon sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korrensalo, Aino; Hájek, Tomas; Alekseychik, Pavel; Rinne, Janne; Vesala, Timo; Mehtätalo, Lauri; Mammarella, Ivan; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2016-04-01

    Boreal bogs have a low number of plant species, but a large diversity of growth forms. This heterogeneity might explain the seasonally less varying photosynthetic productivity of these ecosystems compared to peatlands with vegetation consisting of fewer growth forms. The differences in photosynthetic properties within bog species and phases of growing season has not been comprehensively studied. Also the role of different plant species for the ecosystem level carbon (C) sink function is insufficiently known. We quantified the seasonal variation of photosynthetic properties in bog plant species and assessed how this variation accounts for the temporal variation in the ecosystem C sink. Photosynthetic light response of 11 vascular plant and 8 Sphagnum moss species was measured monthly over the growing season of 2013. Based on the species' light response parameters, leaf area development and areal coverage, we estimated the ecosystem level gross photosynthesis rate (PG) over the growing season. The level of upscaled PG was verified by comparing it to the ecosystem gross primary production (GPP) estimate calculated based on eddy covariance (EC) measurements. Although photosynthetic parameters differed within plant species and months, these differences were of less importance than expected for the variation in ecosystem level C sink. The most productive plant species at the ecosystem scale were not those with the highest maximum potential photosynthesis per unit of leaf area (Pmax), but those having the largest areal coverage. Sphagnum mosses had 35% smaller Pmax than vascular plants, but had higher photosynthesis at the ecosystem scale throughout the growing season. The contribution of the bog plant species to the ecosystem level PG differed over the growing season. The seasonal variation in ecosystem C sink was mainly controlled by phenology. Sedge PG had a sharp mid-summer peak, but the PG of evergreen shrubs and Sphagna remained rather stable over the growing season

  11. GTP Cyclohydrolase I Expression, Protein, and Activity Determine Intracellular Tetrahydrobiopterin Levels, Independent of GTP Cyclohydrolase Feedback Regulatory Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tatham, Amy L.; Crabtree, Mark J.; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J.; Channon, Keith M.

    2009-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r2 = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r2 = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression. PMID:19286659

  12. GTP cyclohydrolase I expression, protein, and activity determine intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels, independent of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tatham, Amy L; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M

    2009-05-15

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression. PMID:19286659

  13. Altered intracellular pH regulation in cells with high levels of P-glycoprotein expression.

    PubMed

    Young, Gregory; Reuss, Luis; Altenberg, Guillermo A

    2011-01-01

    P-glycoprotein is an ATP-binding-cassette transporter that pumps many structurally unrelated drugs out of cells through an ATP-dependent mechanism. As a result, multidrug-resistant cells that overexpress P-glycoprotein have reduced intracellular steady-state levels of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. In addition, increased cytosolic pH has been a frequent finding in multidrug-resistant cells that express P-glycoprotein, and it has been proposed that this consequence of P-glycoprotein expression may contribute to the lower intracellular levels of chemotherapeutic agents. In these studies, we measured intracellular pH and the rate of acid extrusion in response to an acid load in two cells with very different levels of P-glycoprotein expression: V79 parental cells and LZ-8 multidrug resistant cells. Compared to the wild-type V79 cells, LZ-8 cells have a lower intracellular pH and a slower recovery of intracellular pH after an acid load. The data also show that LZ-8 cells have reduced ability to extrude acid, probably due to a decrease in Na(+)/H(+) exchanger activity. The alterations in intracellular pH and acid extrusion in LZ-8 cells are reversed by 24-h exposure to the multidrug-resistance modulator verapamil. The lower intracellular pH in LZ-8 indicates that intracellular alkalinization is not necessary for multidrug resistance. The reversal by verapamil of the decreased acid-extrusion suggests that P-glycoprotein can affect other membrane transport mechanism. PMID:22003434

  14. Prognostic correlation between MTA2 expression level and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Weijun; Hu, Wei; Yang, Haihua; Ying, Ting; Tian, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Association of MTA2 expression with presence, development, metastasis and prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) was investigated. Methods: 90 CRC-related cases with follow-up information were made into tissue microarrays according to the paired principle of cancer tissues and the adjacent tissues. Subsequently, the expression of MAT2 was detected with immunohistochemical analysis and SPSS software was finally utilized to analyze the relationships between experimental data and clinical indicatives. Results: Expression of MTA2 in CRC tissues were notably higher than their adjacent tissues (P < 0.001) and showed significant positive correlation with tumor grade (r2 > 0, P < 0.01). Moreover, survival analysis indicated that MTA2 expression in cancer tissues, serving as an independent correlation factor, was significantly correlated with poor prognosis (P = 0.004). Conclusions: MTA2 is a crucial biomarker that is closely related with prognosis of CRC and also a potential molecular target for evaluating the prognosis and treatment of CRC. PMID:26261611

  15. Importance and origin of halosteric contribution to sea level change in the southeast Indian Ocean during 2005-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovel, William; Lee, Tong

    2015-02-01

    Steric sea level change has been identified as one of the major contributors to the regional variability of sea level trends observed by satellite altimetry for the past two decades. This contribution varies in space and time. The temperature (thermosteric) contribution to sea level has generally been found to be more important than the salinity (halosteric) effect. Based on sea level measurements from satellite altimetry and temperature and salinity data from Argo floats during 2005-2013, we found that the southeast Indian Ocean experiences a large halosteric contribution to sea level change. The conspicuously large halosteric contribution is associated with a freshening in the upper 300 m. Neither local atmospheric forcing such as Ekman pumping and E - P nor halosteric signal transmitted from the western tropical Pacific can explain this freshening. An enhanced precipitation in the Maritime Continent region and the observed strengthening of the Indonesian throughflow are the likely causes.

  16. Recent sea-level contributions of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Andrew; Wingham, Duncan

    2007-03-16

    After a century of polar exploration, the past decade of satellite measurements has painted an altogether new picture of how Earth's ice sheets are changing. As global temperatures have risen, so have rates of snowfall, ice melting, and glacier flow. Although the balance between these opposing processes has varied considerably on a regional scale, data show that Antarctica and Greenland are each losing mass overall. Our best estimate of their combined imbalance is about 125 gigatons per year of ice, enough to raise sea level by 0.35 millimeters per year. This is only a modest contribution to the present rate of sea-level rise of 3.0 millimeters per year. However, much of the loss from Antarctica and Greenland is the result of the flow of ice to the ocean from ice streams and glaciers, which has accelerated over the past decade. In both continents, there are suspected triggers for the accelerated ice discharge-surface and ocean warming, respectively-and, over the course of the 21st century, these processes could rapidly counteract the snowfall gains predicted by present coupled climate models. PMID:17363663

  17. The contribution of urban runoff to organic contaminant levels in harbour sediments near two Norwegian cities.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Gerard; Pettersen, Arne; Nesse, Elisabeth; Eek, Espen; Helland, Aud; Breedveld, Gijs D

    2008-03-01

    The main aim of the present study was to compare the quality of particle emissions (urban runoff and settling particles in rivers and harbours) to the quality of top-layer bed sediments, for two Norwegian harbours (Oslo and Drammen). A sub-aim was to investigate whether non-industrial urban runoff contributed to the organotin load of sediments, apart from leaching from ship hulls. Time-integrated samples of stormwater runoff were obtained in an innovative manner, by sampling man-holes in the stormwater system. Settling particles were sampled with sediment traps. The study focused on PAHs, PCBs and organotin compounds. Contaminant levels were generally a factor of 2-10 (PAHs) and 3-30 (TBT) lower in emitted riverine and runoff particles than in top-layer bed sediments, except for PCBs in Oslo harbour (only 20-30% lower). Significant levels of tributyltin (TBT; median 140mug/kg) were shown in runoff particles, showing that TBT can also be emitted via urban sources, since the sampled man-holes were not in areas where dry-docking activities take place. Possible land-based TBT sources include long-lasting house paint and use of TBT as PVC stabilizer and timber preservative. Since there are ongoing emissions into the two studied harbour areas, it is concluded that the addition of an actively sorbing capping material such as activated carbon might be the best remediation alternative. PMID:18230401

  18. Rapid wastage of Alaska glaciers and their contribution to rising sea level.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Anthony A; Echelmeyer, Keith A; Harrison, William D; Lingle, Craig S; Valentine, Virginia B

    2002-07-19

    We have used airborne laser altimetry to estimate volume changes of 67 glaciers in Alaska from the mid-1950s to the mid-1990s. The average rate of thickness change of these glaciers was -0.52 m/year. Extrapolation to all glaciers in Alaska yields an estimated total annual volume change of -52 +/- 15 km3/year (water equivalent), equivalent to a rise in sea level (SLE) of 0.14 +/- 0.04 mm/year. Repeat measurements of 28 glaciers from the mid-1990s to 2000-2001 suggest an increased average rate of thinning, -1.8 m/year. This leads to an extrapolated annual volume loss from Alaska glaciers equal to -96 +/- 35 km3/year, or 0.27 +/- 0.10 mm/year SLE, during the past decade. These recent losses are nearly double the estimated annual loss from the entire Greenland Ice Sheet during the same time period and are much higher than previously published loss estimates for Alaska glaciers. They form the largest glaciological contribution to rising sea level yet measured. PMID:12130781

  19. Genetic variants and disease-associated factors contribute to enhanced IRF-5 expression in blood cells of systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Di; Stone, Rivka C.; Program, MD/PhD; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Sangster-Guity, Niquiche; Nordmark, Gunnel; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Wang, Chuan; Alm, Gunnar; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Rönnblom, Lars; Barnes, Betsy J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Genetic variants of the interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) gene are associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility. The contribution of these variants to IRF-5 expression in primary blood cells of SLE patients has not been addressed, nor has the role of type I IFN. The aim of this study was to determine the association between increased IRF-5 expression and the IRF5 risk haplotype in SLE patients. Methods IRF-5 transcript and protein levels in 44 Swedish patients with SLE and 16 healthy controls were measured by quantitative real-time PCR, minigene assay, and flow cytometry. The rs2004640, rs10954213, rs10488631 and the CGGGG indel were genotyped in these patients. Genotypes of these polymorphisms defined a common risk and protective haplotype. Results IRF-5 expression and alternative splicing were significantly upregulated in SLE patients versus healthy donors. Enhanced transcript and protein levels were associated with the risk haplotype of IRF5; rs10488631 gave the only significant independent association that correlated with increased transcription from non-coding exon 1C. Minigene experiments demonstrated an important role for rs2004640 and the CGGGG indel, along with type I IFNs in regulating IRF-5 expression. Conclusions This study provides the first formal proof that IRF-5 expression and alternative splicing are significantly upregulated in primary blood cells of SLE patients. The risk haplotype is associated with enhanced IRF-5 transcript and protein expression in SLE patients. PMID:20112383

  20. PI3K/Akt contributes to increased expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in macrophages exposed to hypoxic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, So Young; Jeong, Eunshil; Joung, Sun Myung; Lee, Joo Young

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxic stress-induced TLR4 expression is mediated by PI3K/Akt in macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PI3K/Akt regulated HIF-1 activation leading to TLR4 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was not involved in TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulforaphane suppressed hypoxia-mediated TLR4 expression by inhibiting PI3K/Akt. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play critical roles in triggering immune and inflammatory responses by detecting invading microbial pathogens and endogenous danger signals. Increased expression of TLR4 is implicated in aggravated inflammatory symptoms in ischemic tissue injury and chronic diseases. Results from our previous study showed that TLR4 expression was upregulated by hypoxic stress mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) at a transcriptional level in macrophages. In this study, we further investigated the upstream signaling pathway that contributed to the increase of TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress. Either treatment with pharmacological inhibitors of PI3K and Akt or knockdown of Akt expression by siRNA blocked the increase of TLR4 mRNA and protein levels in macrophages exposed to hypoxia and CoCl{sub 2}. Phosphorylation of Akt by hypoxic stress preceded nuclear accumulation of HIF-1{alpha}. A PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) attenuated CoCl{sub 2}-induced nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activation of HIF-1{alpha}. In addition, HIF-1{alpha}-mediated upregulation of TLR4 expression was blocked by LY294002. Furthermore, sulforaphane suppressed hypoxia- and CoCl{sub 2}-induced upregulation of TLR4 mRNA and protein by inhibiting PI3K/Akt activation and the subsequent nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activation of HIF-1{alpha}. However, p38 was not involved in HIF-1{alpha} activation and TLR4 expression induced by hypoxic stress in macrophages. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PI3K

  1. Molecular Mechanisms and Evolutionary Processes Contributing to Accelerated Divergence of Gene Expression on the Drosophila X Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Coolon, Joseph D; Stevenson, Kraig R; McManus, C Joel; Yang, Bing; Graveley, Brenton R; Wittkopp, Patricia J

    2015-10-01

    In species with a heterogametic sex, population genetics theory predicts that DNA sequences on the X chromosome can evolve faster than comparable sequences on autosomes. Both neutral and nonneutral evolutionary processes can generate this pattern. Complex traits like gene expression are not predicted to have accelerated evolution by these theories, yet a "faster-X" pattern of gene expression divergence has recently been reported for both Drosophila and mammals. Here, we test the hypothesis that accelerated adaptive evolution of cis-regulatory sequences on the X chromosome is responsible for this pattern by comparing the relative contributions of cis- and trans-regulatory changes to patterns of faster-X expression divergence observed between strains and species of Drosophila with a range of divergence times. We find support for this hypothesis, especially among male-biased genes, when comparing different species. However, we also find evidence that trans-regulatory differences contribute to a faster-X pattern of expression divergence both within and between species. This contribution is surprising because trans-acting regulators of X-linked genes are generally assumed to be randomly distributed throughout the genome. We found, however, that X-linked transcription factors appear to preferentially regulate expression of X-linked genes, providing a potential mechanistic explanation for this result. The contribution of trans-regulatory variation to faster-X expression divergence was larger within than between species, suggesting that it is more likely to result from neutral processes than positive selection. These data show how accelerated evolution of both coding and noncoding sequences on the X chromosome can lead to accelerated expression divergence on the X chromosome relative to autosomes. PMID:26041937

  2. Insert sequence length determines transfection efficiency and gene expression levels in bicistronic mammalian expression vectors

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Andrew J; Gerdes, Bryan C; Kaja, Simon; Koulen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Bicistronic expression vectors have been widely used for co-expression studies since the initial discovery of the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) about 25 years ago. IRES sequences allow the 5’ cap-independent initiation of translation of multiple genes on a single messenger RNA strand. Using a commercially available mammalian expression vector containing an IRES sequence with a 3’ green fluorescent protein fluorescent marker, we found that sequence length of the gene of interest expressed 5’ of the IRES site influences both expression of the 3’ fluorescent marker and overall transfection efficiency of the vector construct. Furthermore, we generated a novel construct expressing two distinct fluorescent markers and found that high expression of one gene can lower expression of the other. Observations from this study indicate that caution is warranted in the design of experiments utilizing an IRES system with a short 5’ gene of interest sequence (<300 bp), selection of single cells based on the expression profile of the 3’ optogenetic fluorescent marker, and assumptions made during data analysis. PMID:24380024

  3. Intestinal Protease-Activated Receptor-2 and Fecal Serine Protease Activity are Increased in Canine Inflammatory Bowel Disease and May Contribute to Intestinal Cytokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    MAEDA, Shingo; OHNO, Koichi; UCHIDA, Kazuyuki; IGARASHI, Hirotaka; GOTO-KOSHINO, Yuko; FUJINO, Yasuhito; TSUJIMOTO, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Serine proteases elicit cellular responses via protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) which is known to regulate inflammation and the immune response. Although the gastrointestinal tract is exposed to large amounts of proteolytic enzymes, the role of PAR-2 in canine inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of PAR-2 activation on inflammatory cytokine/chemokine gene expression in canine intestine and the expression of intestinal PAR-2 and fecal serine protease activity in dogs with IBD. Duodenal biopsies from healthy dogs were cultured and treated ex vivo with trypsin or PAR-2 agonist peptide, and inflammatory cytokine/chemokine gene expression in the tissues was then quantified by real-time PCR. PAR-2 mRNA and protein expression levels in the duodenal mucosa were examined by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Fecal serine protease activity was determined by azocasein assay. In ex vivo-cultured duodenum, trypsin and PAR-2 agonist peptide induced significant up-regulation of mRNA expression levels of interleukin-1 β (IL-1β), IL-8, mucosae-associated epithelial chemokine (MEC) and fractalkine, and this up-regulation was inhibited by a serine protease inhibitor. Duodenal PAR-2 mRNA and protein expression levels were higher in dogs with IBD than in healthy control dogs. Fecal serine protease activity was significantly elevated in dogs with IBD, and the level of activity correlated positively with the clinical severity score. These results suggest that PAR-2 may contribute to the pathogenesis of canine IBD by inducing expression of inflammatory mediators in response to luminal serine proteases. PMID:24829081

  4. Reduced Expression of Galectin-9 Contributes to a Poor Outcome in Colon Cancer by Inhibiting NK Cell Chemotaxis Partially through the Rho/ROCK1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Sun, Jintang; Ma, Chao; Gao, Wenjuan; Song, Bingfeng; Xue, Hao; Chen, Weiliang; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Yun; Shao, Qianqian; Wang, Qingjie; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Jia; Wang, Xiuwen; Wang, Huayang; Zhang, Yun; Yang, Meixiang; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-9 is a widely expressed protein that is involved in immune regulation and tumorpathogenesis and serves as a marker of a poor prognosis in various types of cancers. However, the clinical impact and the precise mechanism by which this protein contributes to colon tumor progression are unclear. In the present study, we detected the expression of galectin-9 and CD56 cells using immunohistochemistry. Spearman's rank correlation was used to clarify the association between galectin-9 expression and natural killer (NK) cell infiltration. The influence of galectin-9 on NK-92 cell migration was evaluated in vitro using transwell chemotaxis assays. The role of rh-galectin-9 in F-actin polarization in NK-92 cells was investigated using laser scanning confocal microscopy. We showed that galectin-9 was expressed in 101 (78.91%) colon tumor tissues and that was expressed at lower levels in these tissues than in para-tumor tissues. Low levels of galectin-9 expression were positively correlated with a poor histological grade and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). A Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that overall survival was longer in patients with high galectin-9 expression in an 8-year follow-up (P<0.05). Spearman's rank correlation indicated that there was a linear correlation between galectin-9 expression and CD56+ NK cell infiltration (R2 = 0.658; P<0.0001). Galectin-9 stimulated migration in human NK-92 cells by affecting F-actin polarization through the Rho/ROCK1 signaling pathway. These results suggest that galectin-9 expression potentially represents a novel mechanism for tumors to escape immune surveillance in colon tumors. PMID:27028892

  5. Reduced Expression of Galectin-9 Contributes to a Poor Outcome in Colon Cancer by Inhibiting NK Cell Chemotaxis Partially through the Rho/ROCK1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Sun, Jintang; Ma, Chao; Gao, Wenjuan; Song, Bingfeng; Xue, Hao; Chen, Weiliang; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Yun; Shao, Qianqian; Wang, Qingjie; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Jia; Wang, Xiuwen; Wang, Huayang; Zhang, Yun; Yang, Meixiang; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-9 is a widely expressed protein that is involved in immune regulation and tumorpathogenesis and serves as a marker of a poor prognosis in various types of cancers. However, the clinical impact and the precise mechanism by which this protein contributes to colon tumor progression are unclear. In the present study, we detected the expression of galectin-9 and CD56 cells using immunohistochemistry. Spearman's rank correlation was used to clarify the association between galectin-9 expression and natural killer (NK) cell infiltration. The influence of galectin-9 on NK-92 cell migration was evaluated in vitro using transwell chemotaxis assays. The role of rh-galectin-9 in F-actin polarization in NK-92 cells was investigated using laser scanning confocal microscopy. We showed that galectin-9 was expressed in 101 (78.91%) colon tumor tissues and that was expressed at lower levels in these tissues than in para-tumor tissues. Low levels of galectin-9 expression were positively correlated with a poor histological grade and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). A Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that overall survival was longer in patients with high galectin-9 expression in an 8-year follow-up (P<0.05). Spearman's rank correlation indicated that there was a linear correlation between galectin-9 expression and CD56+ NK cell infiltration (R2 = 0.658; P<0.0001). Galectin-9 stimulated migration in human NK-92 cells by affecting F-actin polarization through the Rho/ROCK1 signaling pathway. These results suggest that galectin-9 expression potentially represents a novel mechanism for tumors to escape immune surveillance in colon tumors. PMID:27028892

  6. Romo1 expression contributes to oxidative stress-induced death of lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jung Ar; Chung, Jin Sil; Cho, Sang-Ho; Kim, Hyung Jung; Yoo, Young Do

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Romo1 mediates oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production. •Romo1 induction by oxidative stress plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. •Romo1 overexpression correlates with epithelial cell death in patients with IPF. -- Abstract: Oxidant-mediated death of lung epithelial cells due to cigarette smoking plays an important role in pathogenesis in lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, the exact mechanism by which oxidants induce epithelial cell death is not fully understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulator 1 (Romo1) is localized in the mitochondria and mediates mitochondrial ROS production through complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Here, we show that Romo1 mediates mitochondrial ROS production and apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) treatment increased Romo1 expression, and Romo1 knockdown suppressed the cellular ROS levels and cell death triggered by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. In immunohistochemical staining of lung tissues from patients with IPF, Romo1 was mainly localized in hyperplastic alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Romo1 overexpression was detected in 14 of 18 patients with IPF. TUNEL-positive alveolar epithelial cells were also detected in most patients with IPF but not in normal controls. These findings suggest that Romo1 mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells.

  7. Weaknesses in semantic, syntactic and oral language expression contribute to reading difficulties in Chinese dyslexic children.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao-Yun; Ho, Connie Suk-Han

    2014-02-01

    The present study examined the role of weaknesses in some language skills for the reading difficulties among Chinese dyslexic children. Thirty Chinese dyslexic children were compared with 30 chronological age (CA) controls and 30 reading-level (RL) controls on a number of language and reading measures. The results showed that Chinese dyslexic children performed significantly worse than the CA controls but similarly to the RL controls in many of the linguistic measures except that the dyslexic group also performed significantly less well than the RL group in semantic skills and syntactic skills on multiple modifiers. The dyslexic children were found to have difficulties in semantic processing, syntactic skills and oral language expression as compared with the CA controls, which were also found to predict their performance in word recognition and/or sentence comprehension. In addition, measures of semantic discrimination, advanced syntactic word order, and oral narrative also significantly predicted the group membership of having or not having dyslexia. These findings suggest that weaknesses in some semantic and advanced syntactic skills are the potential source of poor word and sentence reading in Chinese developmental dyslexia. Implications of the present findings for the identification of dyslexia were discussed. PMID:23904231

  8. Constitutively High Expression of the Histidine Biosynthetic Pathway Contributes to Nickel Tolerance in Hyperaccumulator PlantsW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Robert A.; Mugford, Sam T.; Rees, Jonathan D.; Campbell, Malcolm M.; Smith, J. Andrew C.

    2005-01-01

    Plants that hyperaccumulate Ni exhibit an exceptional degree of Ni tolerance and the ability to translocate Ni in large amounts from root to shoot. In hyperaccumulator plants in the genus Alyssum, free His is an important Ni binding ligand that increases in the xylem proportionately to root Ni uptake. To determine the molecular basis of the His response and its contribution to Ni tolerance, transcripts representing seven of the eight enzymes involved in His biosynthesis were investigated in the hyperaccumulator species Alyssum lesbiacum by RNA gel blot analysis. None of the transcripts changed in abundance in either root or shoot tissue when plants were exposed to Ni, but transcript levels were constitutively higher in A. lesbiacum than in the congeneric nonaccumulator A. montanum, especially for the first enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway, ATP-phosphoribosyltransferase (ATP-PRT). Comparison with the weak hyperaccumulator A. serpyllifolium revealed a close correlation between Ni tolerance, root His concentration, and ATP-PRT transcript abundance. Overexpression of an A. lesbiacum ATP-PRT cDNA in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana increased the pool of free His up to 15-fold in shoot tissue, without affecting the concentration of any other amino acid. His-overproducing lines also displayed elevated tolerance to Ni but did not exhibit increased Ni concentrations in either xylem sap or shoot tissue, suggesting that additional factors are necessary to recapitulate the complete hyperaccumulator phenotype. These results suggest that ATP-PRT expression plays a major role in regulating the pool of free His and contributes to the exceptional Ni tolerance of hyperaccumulator Alyssum species. PMID:15923352

  9. Megakaryocytes contribute to the bone marrow-matrix environment by expressing fibronectin, type IV collagen and laminin

    PubMed Central

    Malara, Alessandro; Currao, Manuela; Gruppi, Cristian; Celesti, Giuseppe; Viarengo, Gianluca; Buracchi, Chiara; Laghi, Luigi; Kaplan, David L.; Balduini, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Megakaryocytes associate with the bone marrow vasculature where they convert their cytoplasm into proplatelets that protrude through the vascular endothelium into the lumen and release platelets. The extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment plays a critical role in regulating these processes. In this work we demonstrate that, among bone marrow ECM components, fibronectin, type IV collagen and laminin are the most abundant around bone marrow sinusoids and constitute a peri-cellular matrix surrounding megakaryocytes. Most importantly, we report, for the first time, that megakaryocytes express components of the basement membrane and that these molecules contribute to the regulation of megakaryocyte development and bone marrow ECM homeostasis both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, fibronectin induced a three-fold increase in the proliferation rate of mouse hematopoietic stem cells leading to higher megakaryocyte output with respect to cells treated only with thrombopoietin or other matrices. However, megakaryocyte ploidy level in fibronectin-treated cultures was significantly reduced. Stimulation with type IV collagen resulted in a 1.4-fold increase in megakaryocyte output, while all tested matrices supported proplatelet formation to a similar extent in megakaryocytes derived from fetal liver progenitor cells. In vivo, megakaryocyte expression of fibronectin and basement membrane components was up-regulated during bone marrow reconstitution upon 5-fluorouracil induced myelosuppression, while only type IV collagen resulted up-regulated upon induced thrombocytopenia. In conclusion, this work demonstrates that ECM components impact megakaryocyte behavior differently during their differentiation and highlights a new role for megakaryocyte as ECM-producing cells for the establishment of cell niches during bone marrow regeneration. PMID:24357118

  10. The herpes simplex virus regulatory protein ICP27 contributes to the decrease in cellular mRNA levels during infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hardwicke, M A; Sandri-Goldin, R M

    1994-01-01

    We have previously shown that the herpes simplex virus immediate-early regulatory protein ICP27 acts posttranscriptionally to affect mRNA processing (R. M. Sandri-Goldin and G. E. Mendoza, Genes Dev. 6:848-863, 1992). Specifically, in the presence of ICP27, spliced target mRNAs were decreased 5- to 10-fold in transfections with target genes containing a 5' or 3' intron. Here, we have investigated the effect of ICP27 during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection on accumulation of spliced cellular mRNAs. ICP27 viral mutants have been shown to be defective in host shutoff (W. R. Sacks, C. C. Greene, D. P. Aschman, and P. A. Schaffer, J. Virol. 55:796-805, 1985). Therefore, we examined whether ICP27 could contribute to this complex process by decreasing cellular mRNA levels through its effects on host cell splicing. It was found that in infections with viral mutants defective in ICP27, the accumulated levels of three spliced host mRNAs were higher than those seen with wild-type HSV-1. The differences occurred posttranscriptionally as shown by nuclear runoff transcription assays. The stabilities of the spliced products during infection with wild-type or ICP27 mutant viruses were similar, and unspliced precursor mRNA for a viral spliced gene was detected in infections with wild-type HSV-1 but not in infections in which ICP27 was not expressed. These results suggest that the reduction in cellular mRNA levels and the accumulation of pre-mRNA are related and may be caused by an impairment in host cell splicing. These data further show that ICP27 is required for these effects to occur. Images PMID:8035480

  11. SOX2 Expression Is Regulated by BRAF and Contributes to Poor Patient Prognosis in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Ida V.; Löfgren Burström, Anna; Edin, Sofia; Eklöf, Vincy; Öberg, Åke; Stenling, Roger; Palmqvist, Richard; Wikberg, Maria L.

    2014-01-01

    Sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignancy and also one of the main causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Aberrant expression of the transcription factor SOX2 has recently been observed in several cancer types, but its role in CRC has not been fully elucidated. Here we studied the expression of SOX2 in 441 CRC patients by immunohistochemistry and related the expression to clinicopathological and molecular variables and patient prognosis. SOX2 was expressed in 11% of the tumors and was significantly associated to BRAFV600E mutation, but not to KRAS mutations (codon 12 and 13). SOX2 positivity was correlated to poor patient survival, especially in BRAFV600E mutated cases. In vitro studies showed that cells expressing the constitutively active BRAFV600E had increased SOX2 expression, a finding not found in cells expressing KRASG12V. Furthermore, blocking downstream BRAF signalling using a MEK-inhibitor resulted in a decreased expression of SOX2. Since SOX2 overexpression has been correlated to increased migration and invasion, we investigated the SOX2 expression in human CRC liver metastasis and found that a SOX2 positive primary CRC also had SOX2 expression in corresponding liver metastases. Finally we found that cells overexpressing SOX2 in vitro showed enhanced expression of FGFR1, which has been reported to correlate with liver metastasis in CRC. Our novel findings suggest that SOX2 expression is partly regulated by BRAF signalling, and an increased SOX2 expression may promote CRC metastasis and mediate a poor patient prognosis. PMID:25010701

  12. Dose Contribution from High Level Waste Uranium and Plutonium. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, M.C.; Gray, P.L.; d`Entremont, P.D.; Marra, J.E.; Monahon, T.M.

    1994-10-07

    Radiological source terms for safety analyses traditionally have been curie lists of radionuclides. Converting the source term to dose values allows each radionuclide to be evaluated for its impact on dose, which is the purpose of the source term. This report is one in a series of reports establishing source terms for High Level Waste (HLW) by evaluating the dose impact of each radionuclide. These reports will be used in establishing the source terms to be used in HLW Safety Analysis Reports. The purpose of this report is to document the bounding element dose impact of uranium and plutonium in HLW. This technique (use of dose rather than curies) demonstrates vividly the relative importance of these nuclides in accident analyses. A large amount of available data permitted dose values to be established for uranium and plutonium; therefore, these two elements were evaluated independent of other nuclides. Solubility and adsorption data, available for these elements, allow bounding conditions to be established for their contribution to dose for various HLW processes.

  13. Mechanical stress contributes to the expression of the STM homeobox gene in Arabidopsis shoot meristems.

    PubMed

    Landrein, Benoît; Kiss, Annamaria; Sassi, Massimiliano; Chauvet, Aurélie; Das, Pradeep; Cortizo, Millan; Laufs, Patrick; Takeda, Seiji; Aida, Mitsuhiro; Traas, Jan; Vernoux, Teva; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The role of mechanical signals in cell identity determination remains poorly explored in tissues. Furthermore, because mechanical stress is widespread, mechanical signals are difficult to uncouple from biochemical-based transduction pathways. Here we focus on the homeobox gene SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM), a master regulator and marker of meristematic identity in Arabidopsis. We found that STM expression is quantitatively correlated to curvature in the saddle-shaped boundary domain of the shoot apical meristem. As tissue folding reflects the presence of mechanical stress, we test and demonstrate that STM expression is induced after micromechanical perturbations. We also show that STM expression in the boundary domain is required for organ separation. While STM expression correlates with auxin depletion in this domain, auxin distribution and STM expression can also be uncoupled. STM expression and boundary identity are thus strengthened through a synergy between auxin depletion and an auxin-independent mechanotransduction pathway at the shoot apical meristem. PMID:26623515

  14. Chronic stress alters the expression levels of longevity-related genes in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hidalgo, Ana C; Muñoz, Mario F; Herrera, Antonio J; Espinosa-Oliva, Ana M; Stowell, Rianne; Ayala, Antonio; Machado, Alberto; Venero, José L; de Pablos, Rocío M

    2016-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the negative effects of psychological stress on cellular stress during aging and neurodegenerative diseases are poorly understood. The main objective of this study was to test the effect of chronic psychological stress, and the consequent increase of circulating glucocorticoids, on several hippocampal genes involved in longevity. Sirtuin-1, p53, thioredoxin-interacting protein, and heat shock protein 70 were studied at the mRNA and protein levels in stressed and non-stressed animals. Stress treatment for 10 days decreased sirtuin-1 and heat shock protein 70 levels, but increased levels of p53, thioredoxin-interacting protein and the NADPH oxidase enzyme. Examination of protein expression following two months of stress treatment indicated that sirtuin-1 remained depressed. In contrast, an increase was observed for thioredoxin-interacting protein, heat shock protein 70, p53 and the NADPH oxidase enzyme. The effect of stress was reversed by mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. These data suggest that chronic stress could contribute to aging in the hippocampus. PMID:27120255

  15. Level of Aspiration: A Behavioral Expression of Self-Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Richard S.; Felker, Donald W.

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of expectations in self-concept and level of aspiration (LOA) behavior. Specifically, the focus was to investigate self-concept and LOA as covariates and to describe the nature of the relationship if, in fact, one existed. A sample of 80 third and fourth grade students was selected from three…

  16. The contribution of housing renovation to children’s blood lead levels: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Routine renovation of older housing is a risk factor for childhood lead poisoning, but the contribution to children’s blood lead levels is poorly defined for children with lower exposure levels. Methods We examined a prospective cohort of 276 children followed from 6 to 24 months of age. We conducted surveys of renovation activities and residential lead hazards and obtained blood lead level (B-Pb) every six months. We analyzed B-Pb in a repeated measures design using a mixed effects linear model. Results Parent reported interior renovation ranged from 11 to 25% of housing units at the four, 6-month periods. In multivariable analysis, children whose housing underwent interior renovation had a 12% higher mean B-Pb by two years of age compared with children whose housing units were not renovated (p < 0.01). The time between renovation and the child blood lead sample was associated with higher B-Pb (p-value for trend <0.01); compared to children in non-renovated housing, children whose housing units underwent renovation in the prior month had a 17% higher mean B-Pb at two years of age, whereas children whose housing renovation occurred in the prior 2–6 months had an 8% higher mean B-Pb. We also found an association between higher paint lead loading, measured using an X-ray fluorescence (XRF) based paint lead index, and child B-Pb (p = 0.02); for every 10 mg/cm2 increase in paint lead loading index there was a 7.5% higher mean childhood B-Pb. Conclusions In an analysis of data collected before the recent changes to Environmental Protection Agency’s Lead, Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule, routine interior housing renovation was associated with a modest increase in children’s B-Pb. These results are important for the provision of clinical advice, for housing and public health professionals, and for policymakers. PMID:23981571

  17. Constraining the Antarctic contribution to global sea-level change: ANDRILL and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naish, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    Observations, models and paleoclimate reconstructions suggest that Antarctica's marine-based ice sheets behave in an unstable manner with episodes of rapid retreat in response to warming climate. Understanding the processes involved in this "marine ice sheet instability" is key for improving estimates of Antarctic ice sheet contribution to future sea-level rise. Another motivating factor is that far-field sea-level reconstructions and ice sheet models imply global mean sea level (GMSL) was up to 20m and 10m higher, respectively, compared with present day, during the interglacials of the warm Pliocene (~4-3Ma) and Late Pleistocene (at ~400ka and 125ka). This was when atmospheric CO2 was between 280 and 400ppm and global average surface temperatures were 1 to 3°C warmer, suggesting polar ice sheets are highly sensitive to relatively modest increases in climate forcing. Such magnitudes of GMSL rise not only require near complete melt of the Greenland Ice Sheet and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, but a substantial retreat of marine-based sectors of East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Recent geological drilling initiatives on the continental margin of Antarctica from both ship- (e.g. IODP; International Ocean Discovery Program) and ice-based (e.g. ANDRILL/Antarctic Geological Drilling) platforms have provided evidence supporting retreat of marine-based ice. However, without direct access through the ice sheet to archives preserved within sub-glacial sedimentary basins, the volume and extent of ice sheet retreat during past interglacials cannot be directly constrained. Sediment cores have been successfully recovered from beneath ice shelves by the ANDRILL Program and ice streams by the WISSARD (Whillans Ice Stream Sub-glacial Access Research Drilling) Project. Together with the potential of the new RAID (Rapid Access Ice Drill) initiative, these demonstrate the technological feasibility of accessing the subglacial bed and deeper sedimentary archives. In this talk I will outline the

  18. Effect of High Fat Diets on Body Mass, Oleylethanolamide Plasma Levels and Oxytocin Expression in Growing Rats.

    PubMed

    Sospedra, Isabel; Moral, Raquel; Escrich, Raquel; Solanas, Montserrat; Vela, Elena; Escrich, Eduard

    2015-06-01

    Obesity prevalence in developed countries has promoted the need to identify the mechanisms involved in control of feeding and energy balance. We have tested the hypothesis that different fats present in diet composition may contribute in body weight gain and body indexes by regulation of oxytocin gene (oxt) expression in hypothalamus and Oleylethanolamide (OEA) levels in plasma. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed two high fat diets, based on corn (HCO) and extra virgin olive oil (HOO) and results were compared to a low fat diet (LF). LC-MS/MS analysis showed an increasing trend of OEA plasma levels in HOO group, although no significant differences were found. However, body weight gain of LF and HOO were similar and significantly lower than HCO. HCO rats also had higher Lee index than HOO. Rats fed HOO diet showed higher levels of hypothalamic oxt mRNA expression, which could indicate that oxytocin may be modulated by dietary lipids. PMID:25976631

  19. The myostatin gene of Mytilus chilensis evidences a high level of polymorphism and ubiquitous transcript expression.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Acuña, Gustavo; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2014-02-15

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a protein of the Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily and plays a crucial role in muscular development for higher vertebrates. However, its biological function in marine invertebrates remains undiscovered. This study characterizes the full-length sequence of the Mytilus chilensis myostatin gene (Mc-MSTN). Furthermore, tissue transcription patterns and putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were also identified. The Mc-MSTN cDNA sequence showed 3528 base pairs (bp), consisting of 161 bp of 5' UTR, 2,110 bp of 3' UTR, and an open reading frame of 1,257 bp encoding for 418 amino acids and with an RXXR proteolytic site and nine cysteine-conserved residues. Gene transcription analysis revealed that the Mc-MSTN has ubiquitous expression among several tissues, with higher expression in the gonads and mantle than in the digestive gland, gills, and hemolymph. Furthermore, high levels of polymorphisms were detected (28 SNPs in 3'-UTR and 9 SNPs in the coding region). Two SNPs were non-synonymous and involved amino acid changes between Glu/Asp and Thr/Ile. Until now, the MSTN gene has been mainly related to muscle growth in marine bivalves. However, the present study suggests a putative biological function not entirely associated to muscle tissue and contributes molecular evidence to the current debate about the function of the MSTN gene in marine invertebrates. PMID:24334117

  20. Low-level laser therapy promotes dendrite growth via upregulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Chengbo; He, Zhiyong; Xing, Da

    2014-09-01

    Downregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus occurs early in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since BDNF plays a critical role in neuronal survival and dendrite growth, BDNF upregulation may contribute to rescue dendrite atrophy and cell loss in AD. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to regulate neuronal function both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we found that LLLT rescued neurons loss and dendritic atrophy via the increase of both BDNF mRNA and protein expression. In addition, dendrite growth was improved after LLLT, characterized by upregulation of PSD95 expression, and the increase in length, branching, and spine density of dendrites in hippocampal neurons. Together, these studies suggest that upregulation of BDNF with LLLT can ameliorate Aβ-induced neurons loss and dendritic atrophy, thus identifying a novel pathway by which LLLT protects against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Our research may provide a feasible therapeutic approach to control the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Leptin of dermal adipose tissue is differentially expressed during the hair cycle and contributes to adipocyte-mediated growth inhibition of anagen-phase vibrissa hair.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao-Chun; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Chung, Pei-Lun; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Tsai, Yau-Sheng; Hughes, Michael W; Tuan, Tai-Lan; Huang, Lynn L H

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue encircles the lower portion of anagen hair follicles and may regulate hair cycle progression. As leptin is a major adipokine, its level of expression from the dermal white adipose tissue during hair cycle progression was studied. The result shows that leptin level is differentially expressed during hair cycle, the lowest in early anagen phase, upregulated in late anagen phase and the highest in the telogen phase. On the other hand, leptin receptor is detected in keratin 15-positive hair bulge epithelium of both anagen- and telogen-phase hair follicles of mice pelage and vibrissa hair, and hair from human scalp. Leptin contributes to adipocyte-mediated growth inhibition of anagen-phase vibrissa hair as demonstrated in organ culture and coculture system. Our data suggest that leptin of dermal white adipose tissue might regulate hair growth and, therefore, hair cycle progression via leptin receptor on the hair follicle epithelium. PMID:25313970

  2. Identification of a Src Tyrosine Kinase/SIAH2 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Pathway That Regulates C/EBPδ Expression and Contributes to Transformation of Breast Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Tapasree Roy; Sharan, Shikha; Wang, Jun; Pawar, Snehalata A.; Cantwell, Carrie A.; Johnson, Peter F.; Morrison, Deborah K.; Wang, Ju-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta (C/EBPδ, CEBPD) is a tumor suppressor that is downregulated during breast cancer progression but may also promote metastasis. Here, we have investigated the mechanism(s) regulating C/EBPδ expression and its role in human breast cancer cells. We describe a novel pathway by which the tyrosine kinase Src downregulates C/EBPδ through the SIAH2 E3 ubiquitin ligase. Src phosphorylates SIAH2 in vitro and leads to tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of SIAH2 in breast tumor cell lines. SIAH2 interacts with C/EBPδ, but not C/EBPβ, and promotes its polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Src/SIAH2-mediated inhibition of C/EBPδ expression supports elevated cyclin D1 levels, phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (Rb), motility, invasive properties, and survival of transformed cells. Pharmacological inhibition of Src family kinases by SKI-606 (bosutinib) induces C/EBPδ expression in an SIAH2-dependent manner, which is necessary for “therapeutic” responses to SKI-606 in vitro. Ectopic expression of degradation-resistant mutants of C/EBPδ, which do not interact with SIAH2 and/or cannot be polyubiquitinated, prevents full transformation of MCF-10A cells by activated Src (Src truncated at amino acid 531 [Src-531]) in vitro. These data reveal that C/EBPδ expression can be regulated at the protein level by oncogenic Src kinase signals through SIAH2, thus contributing to breast epithelial cell transformation. PMID:22037769

  3. Diverse Kir Expression Contributes to Distinct Bimodal Distribution of Resting Potentials and Vasotone Responses of Arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuqin; Chen, Fangyi; Karasawa, Takatoshi; Ma, Ke-Tao; Guan, Bing-Cai; Shi, Xiao-Rui; Li, Hongzhe; Steyger, Peter S.; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Jiang, Zhi-Gen

    2015-01-01

    The resting membrane potential (RP) of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a major determinant of cytosolic calcium concentration and vascular tone. The heterogeneity of RPs and its underlying mechanism among different vascular beds remain poorly understood. We compared the RPs and vasomotion properties between the guinea pig spiral modiolar artery (SMA), brain arterioles (BA) and mesenteric arteries (MA). We found: 1) RPs showed a robust bimodal distribution peaked at -76 and -40 mV evenly in the SMA, unevenly at -77 and -51 mV in the BA and ~-71 and -52 mV in the MA. Ba2+ 0.1 mM eliminated their high RP peaks ~-75 mV. 2) Cells with low RP (~-45 mV) hyperpolarized in response to 10 mM extracellular K+, while cells with a high RP depolarized, and cells with intermediate RP (~-58 mV) displayed an initial hyperpolarization followed by prolonged depolarization. Moderate high K+ typically induced dilation, constriction and a dilation followed by constriction in the SMA, MA and BA, respectively. 3) Boltzmann-fit analysis of the Ba2+-sensitive inward rectifier K+ (Kir) whole-cell current showed that the maximum Kir conductance density significantly differed among the vessels, and the half-activation voltage was significantly more negative in the MA. 4) Corresponding to the whole-cell data, computational modeling simulated the three RP distribution patterns and the dynamics of RP changes obtained experimentally, including the regenerative swift shifts between the two RP levels after reaching a threshold. 5) Molecular works revealed strong Kir2.1 and Kir2.2 transcripts and Kir2.1 immunolabeling in all 3 vessels, while Kir2.3 and Kir2.4 transcript levels varied. We conclude that a dense expression of functional Kir2.X channels underlies the more negative RPs in endothelial cells and a subset of VSMC in these arterioles, and the heterogeneous Kir function is primarily responsible for the distinct bimodal RPs among these arterioles. The fast Kir-based regenerative shifts

  4. Diverse Kir expression contributes to distinct bimodal distribution of resting potentials and vasotone responses of arterioles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuqin; Chen, Fangyi; Karasawa, Takatoshi; Ma, Ke-Tao; Guan, Bing-Cai; Shi, Xiao-Rui; Li, Hongzhe; Steyger, Peter S; Nuttall, Alfred L; Jiang, Zhi-Gen

    2015-01-01

    The resting membrane potential (RP) of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a major determinant of cytosolic calcium concentration and vascular tone. The heterogeneity of RPs and its underlying mechanism among different vascular beds remain poorly understood. We compared the RPs and vasomotion properties between the guinea pig spiral modiolar artery (SMA), brain arterioles (BA) and mesenteric arteries (MA). We found: 1) RPs showed a robust bimodal distribution peaked at -76 and -40 mV evenly in the SMA, unevenly at -77 and -51 mV in the BA and ~-71 and -52 mV in the MA. Ba(2+) 0.1 mM eliminated their high RP peaks ~-75 mV. 2) Cells with low RP (~-45 mV) hyperpolarized in response to 10 mM extracellular K(+), while cells with a high RP depolarized, and cells with intermediate RP (~-58 mV) displayed an initial hyperpolarization followed by prolonged depolarization. Moderate high K(+) typically induced dilation, constriction and a dilation followed by constriction in the SMA, MA and BA, respectively. 3) Boltzmann-fit analysis of the Ba(2+)-sensitive inward rectifier K(+) (Kir) whole-cell current showed that the maximum Kir conductance density significantly differed among the vessels, and the half-activation voltage was significantly more negative in the MA. 4) Corresponding to the whole-cell data, computational modeling simulated the three RP distribution patterns and the dynamics of RP changes obtained experimentally, including the regenerative swift shifts between the two RP levels after reaching a threshold. 5) Molecular works revealed strong Kir2.1 and Kir2.2 transcripts and Kir2.1 immunolabeling in all 3 vessels, while Kir2.3 and Kir2.4 transcript levels varied. We conclude that a dense expression of functional Kir2.X channels underlies the more negative RPs in endothelial cells and a subset of VSMC in these arterioles, and the heterogeneous Kir function is primarily responsible for the distinct bimodal RPs among these arterioles. The fast Kir

  5. Bisphenol a influences blastocyst implantation via regulating integrin β3 and trophinin expression levels

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xiyan; Wang, Zhengchao; Wang, Xuenan; Dou, Zhaohua; Li, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is to investigate effects of bisphenol A (BPA) on the blastocyst implantation in endometrium. Methods: Pregnant mice were orally administered with BPA. Implantation sites were examined, and serum estrogen level was assayed with ELISA. Protein expression levels were detected with immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. Results: High doses (400 and 600 mg/kg/day) of BPA remarkably reduced the implantation sites in the pregnant mice. No significant differences were observed in the serum estrogen level across the groups. Moreover, high doses (400 and 600 mg/kg/day) of BPA significantly declined the expression level of endometrial estrogen receptor α (ERα) in the pregnant mice. In addition, high doses (400 and 600 mg/kg/day) of BPA significantly declined the expression levels of integrin β3 and trophinin in the endometrium and blastocysts. Conclusion: BPA declines ERα expression in endometrium, and inhibits adhesion protein expression in endometrium and blastocysts, causing the adhesion failure of blastocyst implantation. PMID:26884915

  6. Ectopic Expression of Retrotransposon-Derived PEG11/RTL1 Contributes to the Callipyge Muscular Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuewen; Ectors, Fabien; Davis, Erica E.; Pirottin, Dimitri; Cheng, Huijun; Farnir, Frédéric; Hadfield, Tracy; Cockett, Noelle; Charlier, Carole; Georges, Michel; Takeda, Haruko

    2015-01-01

    The callipyge phenotype is an ovine muscular hypertrophy characterized by polar overdominance: only heterozygous +Mat/CLPGPat animals receiving the CLPG mutation from their father express the phenotype. +Mat/CLPGPat animals are characterized by postnatal, ectopic expression of Delta-like 1 homologue (DLK1) and Paternally expressed gene 11/Retrotransposon-like 1 (PEG11/RTL1) proteins in skeletal muscle. We showed previously in transgenic mice that ectopic expression of DLK1 alone induces a muscular hypertrophy, hence demonstrating a role for DLK1 in determining the callipyge hypertrophy. We herein describe newly generated transgenic mice that ectopically express PEG11 in skeletal muscle, and show that they also exhibit a muscular hypertrophy phenotype. Our data suggest that both DLK1 and PEG11 act together in causing the muscular hypertrophy of callipyge sheep. PMID:26474044

  7. A summary of the COASTALT project and its contribution to the monitoring of coastal sea level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipollini, Paolo; Barbosa, Susana; Coelho, Henrique; Joana Fernandes, M.; Gómez-Enri, Jesus; Gommenginger, Christine; Martin-Puig, Cristina; Vignudelli, Stefano; Woodworth, Philip; Benveniste, Jérôme

    2010-05-01

    that allows users to add their own corrections for research and application purposes. In a related task, innovative retracking techniques have been investigated; these will pave the way to the next generation of retrackers; • in parallel to the development of the processor the project has carried out a full product definition and produced the relevant documentation including a user handbook; • the project has also investigated the use of the new CGDRs in training and outreach activities via the BRAT toolbox, issuing a series of guideline recommendations. Then we will discuss how to continue the COASTALT work in Phase 2 of the Project, in view of the lessons learned so far, in order to further improve coastal altimetry and promote the full uptake of reprocessed coastal altimetry products by the user community. We will conclude by discussing the contribution that coastal altimetry reprocessed data can give to the assessment of the rate of sea level in the very region where the impacts of changing oceans on society are most severely felt, i.e. the coastal zone.

  8. Prostacyclin receptor expression on platelets of humans with type 2 diabetes is inversely correlated with hemoglobin A1c levels.

    PubMed

    Knebel, Stephanie M; Sprague, Randy S; Stephenson, Alan H

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate platelet aggregation can result in thrombosis and tissue ischemia. When compared to healthy human platelets, those of humans with type 2 diabetes (DM2) exhibit increased aggregation when stimulated. Activation of the platelet prostacyclin receptor (IPR) results in cAMP accumulation and inhibition of platelet aggregation. We hypothesized that DM2 platelets express decreased IPR when compared to platelets of healthy humans, resulting in decreased IPR agonist-induced cAMP accumulation. We measured IPR expression with radioligand binding of [(3)H]-iloprost, a stable prostacyclin analog, and with Western blotting of the IPR protein. Iloprost-stimulated platelet cAMP levels were used to identify the functional response to IPR activation. IPR binding, expression of the IPR protein and the levels of cAMP in platelets incubated with iloprost were significantly decreased in DM2 platelets when compared to platelets of healthy humans. IPR expression decreased in platelets as glycemic control of the subjects worsened, as indicated by increased hemoglobin A1c levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that reduced IPR expression in DM2 platelets may contribute to platelet hyperactivity in humans with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25617843

  9. Endogenous galectin-3 expression levels modulate immune responses in galectin-3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Aparna D; Gude, Rajiv P; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Chiplunkar, Shubhada V

    2015-12-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a β-galactoside-binding mammalian lectin, is involved in cancer progression and metastasis. However, there is an unmet need to identify the underlying mechanisms of cancer metastasis mediated by endogenous host galectin-3. Galectin-3 is also known to be an important regulator of immune responses. The present study was aimed at analysing how expression of endogenous galectin-3 regulates host immunity and lung metastasis in B16F10 murine melanoma model. Transgenic Gal-3(+/-) (hemizygous) and Gal-3(-/-) (null) mice exhibited decreased levels of Natural Killer (NK) cells and lower NK mediated cytotoxicity against YAC-1 tumor targets, compared to Gal-3(+/+) (wild-type) mice. On stimulation, Gal-3(+/-) and Gal-3(-/-) mice splenocytes showed increased T cell proliferation than Gal-3(+/+) mice. Intracellular calcium flux was found to be lower in activated T cells of Gal-3(-/-) mice as compared to T cells from Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(+/-) mice. In Gal-3(-/-) mice, serum Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokine levels were found to be lowest, exhibiting dysregulation of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines balance. Marked decrease in serum IFN-γ levels and splenic IFN-γR1 (IFN-γ Receptor 1) expressing T and NK cell percentages were observed in Gal-3(-/-) mice. On recombinant IFN-γ treatment of splenocytes in vitro, Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) 1 and SOCS3 protein expression was higher in Gal-3(-/-) mice compared to that in Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(+/-) mice; suggesting possible attenuation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) 1 mediated IFN-γ signaling in Gal-3(-/-) mice. The ability of B16F10 melanoma cells to form metastatic colonies in the lungs of Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(-/-) mice remained comparable, whereas it was found to be reduced in Gal-3(+/-) mice. Our data indicates that complete absence of endogenous host galectin-3 facilitates lung metastasis of B16F10 cells in mice, which may be contributed by dysregulated immune

  10. Exaggerated IL-15 and Altered Expression of foxp3+ Cell-Derived Cytokines Contribute to Enhanced Colitis in Nlrp3-/- Mice.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Simon A; Ueno, Aito; Tulk, Sarah E; Becker, Helen M; Schenck, L Patrick; Potentier, Mireille S; Li, Yan; Ghosh, Subrata; Muruve, Daniel A; MacDonald, Justin A; Beck, Paul L

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) involves defects in the innate immune system, impairing responses to microbes. Studies have revealed that mutations NLRP3 are associated with CD. We reported previously that Nlrp3-/- mice were more susceptible to colitis and exhibited reduced colonic IL-10 expression. In the current study, we sought to determine how the loss of NLRP3 might be altering the function of regulatory T cells, a major source of IL-10. Colitis was induced in wild-type (WT) and Nlrp3-/- mice by treatment with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS). Lamina propria (LP) cells were assessed by flow cytometry and cytokine expression was assessed. DSS-treated Nlrp3-/- mice exhibited increased numbers of colonic foxp3+ T cells that expressed significantly lower levels of IL-10 but increased IL-17. This was associated with increased expression of colonic IL-15 and increased surface expression of IL-15 on LP dendritic cells. Neutralizing IL-15 in Nlrp3-/- mice attenuated the severity of colitis, decreased the number of colonic foxp3+ cells, and reduced the colonic expression of IL-12p40 and IL-17. These data suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome can regulate intestinal inflammation through noncanonical mechanisms, providing additional insight as to how NLRP3 variants may contribute to the pathogenesis of CD. PMID:27610005

  11. Exaggerated IL-15 and Altered Expression of foxp3+ Cell-Derived Cytokines Contribute to Enhanced Colitis in Nlrp3−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tulk, Sarah E.; Becker, Helen M.; Potentier, Mireille S.; Li, Yan; Ghosh, Subrata; MacDonald, Justin A.; Beck, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) involves defects in the innate immune system, impairing responses to microbes. Studies have revealed that mutations NLRP3 are associated with CD. We reported previously that Nlrp3−/− mice were more susceptible to colitis and exhibited reduced colonic IL-10 expression. In the current study, we sought to determine how the loss of NLRP3 might be altering the function of regulatory T cells, a major source of IL-10. Colitis was induced in wild-type (WT) and Nlrp3−/− mice by treatment with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS). Lamina propria (LP) cells were assessed by flow cytometry and cytokine expression was assessed. DSS-treated Nlrp3−/− mice exhibited increased numbers of colonic foxp3+ T cells that expressed significantly lower levels of IL-10 but increased IL-17. This was associated with increased expression of colonic IL-15 and increased surface expression of IL-15 on LP dendritic cells. Neutralizing IL-15 in Nlrp3−/− mice attenuated the severity of colitis, decreased the number of colonic foxp3+ cells, and reduced the colonic expression of IL-12p40 and IL-17. These data suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome can regulate intestinal inflammation through noncanonical mechanisms, providing additional insight as to how NLRP3 variants may contribute to the pathogenesis of CD. PMID:27610005

  12. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Laurence D.; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Huminiecki, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor) if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds), as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased tissue of expression

  13. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Laurence D; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Forrest, Alistair R R; Huminiecki, Lukasz

    2015-12-01

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor) if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds), as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased tissue of expression

  14. Long-term future contribution of the Greenland ice sheet to sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calov, Reinhard; Robinson, Alex; Ganopolski, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the impact of future cumulative anthropogenic emissions on the fate of the Greenland ice sheet. For this study, we use the polythermal ice sheet model SICOPOLIS, which is bi-directionally coupled with the regional climate model of intermediate complexity REMBO. We constrain our model parameters with simulations over two glacial cycles employing anomalies from the global CLIMBER-2 model. CLIMBER-2 treats the major components or the Earth system, including atmosphere, ocean, terrestrial vegetation and carbon cycle. As constraints we include the cumulative error in ice thickness, the surface mass balance partition (ratio between precipitation and ice discharge) and the ice elevation drop between Eemian and present-day at the NEEM ice core location. Our model includes a new ice discharge parameterization, which describes the ice loss via small-scale outlet glaciers in a heuristic statistical approach. Using the large-ensemble of model versions consistent with our constraints, we estimate the range of the long-term future contribution of the Greenland ice sheet to sea-level rise under global warming. On the 100,000-year time scale, there is a visible modulation over the CO2 signal in the simulated Greenland ice volume caused by the 20,000 years precessional cycle of insolation. In nearly all of our scenarios (500 to 5000 Gt carbon cumulative emissions), the Greenland is sheet fully decays in the future after at least 40,000 years. For the extreme scenario (5000 Gt), the Greenland ice sheet decays much faster - after about 5000 years, while there is still 80% of the ice sheet left after 40,000 years only for the model versions with a low temperature sensitivity and the low cumulative carbon emission scenario (500 Gt). Our results underline that without future negative CO2 emissions, irreversible loss of Greenland ice sheet is essentially unavoidable.

  15. High-level expression of Proteinase K from Tritirachium album Limber in Pichia pastoris using multi-copy expression strains.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hu; Zhai, Chao; Yu, Xianhong; Li, Zhezhe; Tang, Wei; Liu, Yunyun; Ma, Xiaojian; Zhong, Xing; Li, Guolong; Wu, Di; Ma, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    Proteinase K is widely used in scientific research and industries. This report was aimed to achieve high-level expression of proteinase K using Pichia pastoris GS115 as the host strain. The coding sequence of a variant of proteinase K that has higher activity than the wild type protein was chosen and optimized based on the codon usage preference of P. pastoris. The novel open reading frame was synthesized and a series of multi-copy expression vectors were constructed based on the pHBM905BDM plasmid, allowing for the tandem integration of multiple copies of the target gene into the genome of P. pastoris with a single recombination. These strains were used to study the correlation between the gene copy number and the expression level of proteinase K. The results of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) indicated that the tandem expression cassettes were integrated into the host genome stably. Meanwhile, the results of qPCR and enzyme activity assays indicated that the mRNA and protein expression levels of the target gene increased as the gene copy number increased. Moreover, the effect of gene dosage on the expression level of the recombinant protein was more obvious using high-density fermentation. The maximum expression level and enzyme activity of proteinase K, which were obtained from the recombinant yeast strain bearing 5 copies of the target gene after an 84-h induction, were approximately 8.069 mg/mL and 108,295 U/mL, respectively. The recombinant proteinase was purified and characterized. The optimum pH and temperature for the activity of this protease were approximately pH 11 and 55 °C, respectively. PMID:26892536

  16. Histone deacetylation contributes to low extracellular superoxide dismutase expression in human idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Woods, Crystal; Stearman, Robert S; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Ferguson, Bradley S; Swain, Kalin; Bowler, Russell P; Geraci, Mark W; Ihida-Stansbury, Kaori; Stenmark, Kurt R; McKinsey, Timothy A; Domann, Frederick E

    2016-07-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation and histone acetylation, regulate gene expression in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). These mechanisms can modulate expression of extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3 or EC-SOD), a key vascular antioxidant enzyme, and loss of vascular SOD3 worsens outcomes in animal models of pulmonary arterial hypertension. We hypothesized that SOD3 gene expression is decreased in patients with IPAH due to aberrant DNA methylation and/or histone deacetylation. We used lung tissue and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) from subjects with IPAH at transplantation and from failed donors (FD). Lung SOD3 mRNA expression and activity was decreased in IPAH vs. FD. In contrast, mitochondrial SOD (Mn-SOD or SOD2) protein expression was unchanged and intracellular SOD activity was unchanged. Using bisulfite sequencing in genomic lung or PASMC DNA, we found the methylation status of the SOD3 promoter was similar between FD and IPAH. Furthermore, treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine did not increase PASMC SOD3 mRNA, suggesting DNA methylation was not responsible for PASMC SOD3 expression. Though total histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity, acetylated histones, and acetylated SP1 were similar between IPAH and FD, treatment with two selective class I HDAC inhibitors increased SOD3 only in IPAH PASMC. Class I HDAC3 siRNA also increased SOD3 expression. Trichostatin A, a pan-HDAC inhibitor, decreased proliferation in IPAH, but not in FD PASMC. These data indicate that histone deacetylation, specifically via class I HDAC3, decreases SOD3 expression in PASMC and HDAC inhibitors may protect IPAH in part by increasing PASMC SOD3 expression. PMID:27233998

  17. Reversing the reduced level of endometrial GLUT4 expression in polycystic ovary syndrome: a mechanistic study of metformin action

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Cui, Peng; Jiang, Hong-Yuan; Guo, Yan-Rong; Pishdari, Bano; Hu, Min; Feng, Yi; Billig, Håkan; Shao, Ruijin

    2015-01-01

    Conflicting results have been reported regarding whether or not insulin-regulated glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) is expressed in human and rodent endometria. There is an inverse relationship between androgen levels and insulin-dependent glucose metabolism in women. Hyperandrogenemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance are believed to contribute to endometrial abnormalities in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, it has been unclear in previous studies if endometrial GLUT4 expression is regulated by androgen-dependent androgen receptors (ARs) and/or the insulin receptor/Akt/mTOR signaling network. In this study, we demonstrate that GLUT4 is expressed in normal endometrial cells (mainly in the epithelial cells) and is down-regulated under conditions of hyperandrogenemia in tissues from PCOS patients and in a 5α-dihydrotestosterone-induced PCOS-like rat model. Western blot analysis revealed reduced endometrial GLUT4 expression and increased AR expression in PCOS patients. However, the reduced GLUT4 level was not always associated with an increase in AR in PCOS patients when comparing non-hyperplasia with hyperplasia. Using a human tissue culture system, we investigated the molecular basis by which GLUT4 regulation in endometrial hyperplasia tissues is affected by metformin in PCOS patients. We show that specific endogenous organic cation transporter isoforms are regulated by metformin, and this suggests a direct effect of metformin on endometrial hyperplasia. Moreover, we demonstrate that metformin induces GLUT4 expression and inhibits AR expression and blocks insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in the same hyperplasia human tissues. These findings indicate that changes in endometrial GLUT4 expression in PCOS patients involve the androgen-dependent alteration of AR expression and changes in the insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling network. PMID:26045896

  18. Reversing the reduced level of endometrial GLUT4 expression in polycystic ovary syndrome: a mechanistic study of metformin action.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Cui, Peng; Jiang, Hong-Yuan; Guo, Yan-Rong; Pishdari, Bano; Hu, Min; Feng, Yi; Billig, Håkan; Shao, Ruijin

    2015-01-01

    Conflicting results have been reported regarding whether or not insulin-regulated glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) is expressed in human and rodent endometria. There is an inverse relationship between androgen levels and insulin-dependent glucose metabolism in women. Hyperandrogenemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance are believed to contribute to endometrial abnormalities in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, it has been unclear in previous studies if endometrial GLUT4 expression is regulated by androgen-dependent androgen receptors (ARs) and/or the insulin receptor/Akt/mTOR signaling network. In this study, we demonstrate that GLUT4 is expressed in normal endometrial cells (mainly in the epithelial cells) and is down-regulated under conditions of hyperandrogenemia in tissues from PCOS patients and in a 5α-dihydrotestosterone-induced PCOS-like rat model. Western blot analysis revealed reduced endometrial GLUT4 expression and increased AR expression in PCOS patients. However, the reduced GLUT4 level was not always associated with an increase in AR in PCOS patients when comparing non-hyperplasia with hyperplasia. Using a human tissue culture system, we investigated the molecular basis by which GLUT4 regulation in endometrial hyperplasia tissues is affected by metformin in PCOS patients. We show that specific endogenous organic cation transporter isoforms are regulated by metformin, and this suggests a direct effect of metformin on endometrial hyperplasia. Moreover, we demonstrate that metformin induces GLUT4 expression and inhibits AR expression and blocks insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in the same hyperplasia human tissues. These findings indicate that changes in endometrial GLUT4 expression in PCOS patients involve the androgen-dependent alteration of AR expression and changes in the insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling network. PMID:26045896

  19. Gene expression analyses in maize inbreds and hybrids with varying levels of heterosis

    PubMed Central

    Stupar, Robert M; Gardiner, Jack M; Oldre, Aaron G; Haun, William J; Chandler, Vicki L; Springer, Nathan M

    2008-01-01

    Background Heterosis is the superior performance of F1 hybrid progeny relative to the parental phenotypes. Maize exhibits heterosis for a wide range of traits, however the magnitude of heterosis is highly variable depending on the choice of parents and the trait(s) measured. We have used expression profiling to determine whether the level, or types, of non-additive gene expression vary in maize hybrids with different levels of genetic diversity or heterosis. Results We observed that the distributions of better parent heterosis among a series of 25 maize hybrids generally do not exhibit significant correlations between different traits. Expression profiling analyses for six of these hybrids, chosen to represent diversity in genotypes and heterosis responses, revealed a correlation between genetic diversity and transcriptional variation. The majority of differentially expressed genes in each of the six different hybrids exhibited additive expression patterns, and ~25% exhibited statistically significant non-additive expression profiles. Among the non-additive profiles, ~80% exhibited hybrid expression levels between the parental levels, ~20% exhibited hybrid expression levels at the parental levels and ~1% exhibited hybrid levels outside the parental range. Conclusion We have found that maize inbred genetic diversity is correlated with transcriptional variation. However, sampling of seedling tissues indicated that the frequencies of additive and non-additive expression patterns are very similar across a range of hybrid lines. These findings suggest that heterosis is probably not a consequence of higher levels of additive or non-additive expression, but may be related to transcriptional variation between parents. The lack of correlation between better parent heterosis levels for different traits suggests that transcriptional diversity at specific sets of genes may influence heterosis for different traits. PMID:18402703

  20. Dietary Selenium Levels Affect Selenoprotein Expression and Support the Interferon-γ and IL-6 Immune Response Pathways in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Petra A.; Carlson, Bradley A.; Anderson, Christine B.; Seifried, Harold E.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Howard, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium is an essential element that is required to support a number of cellular functions and biochemical pathways. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of reduced dietary selenium levels on gene expression to assess changes in expression of non-selenoprotein genes that may contribute to the physiological consequences of selenium deficiency. Mice were fed diets that were either deficient in selenium or supplemented with selenium in the form of sodium selenite for six weeks. Differences in liver mRNA expression and translation were measured using a combination of ribosome profiling, RNA-Seq, microarrays, and qPCR. Expression levels and translation of mRNAs encoding stress-related selenoproteins were shown to be up-regulated by increased selenium status, as were genes involved in inflammation and response to interferon-γ. Changes in serum cytokine levels were measured which confirmed that interferon-γ, as well as IL-6, were increased in selenium adequate mice. Finally, microarray and qPCR analysis of lung tissue demonstrated that the selenium effects on immune function are not limited to liver. These data are consistent with previous reports indicating that adequate selenium levels can support beneficial immune responses, and further identify the IL-6 and interferon-γ pathways as being responsive to dietary selenium intake. PMID:26258789

  1. GLI1 expression is an important prognostic factor that contributes to the poor prognosis of rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Sun, Chao; Jiang, Jinfang; Xie, Yuwen; Li, Bingcheng; Cui, Xiaobin; Chen, Yunzhao; Liu, Chunxia; Li, Feng

    2016-03-01

    The GLI1 and MDM2 genes are amplified or exhibit copy number gains in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Here, we used immunohistochemistry to determine the relationships between GLI1 and MDM2 protein expression and several clinicopathological variables of RMS. GLI1 and MDM2-positivity rates were 61.36% and 13.64%, respectively. GLI1 expression correlated with presence of the PAX3-FOXO1 fusion gene (P=0.040) and lymph node metastasis (P=0.034), and a significant association was found between GLI1 expression and overall survival (OS) (P=0.008). However, there was no association between MDM2 expression and any of the clinicopathological parameters or OS. Thus, GLI1 may be a biomarker of poor prognosis in RMS patients, and could itself be a therapeutic target. This contrasts with the apparent lack of clinical importance of MDM2 in RMS pathology, at least in the cohorts we examined. PMID:26544916

  2. Mechanical stress contributes to the expression of the STM homeobox gene in Arabidopsis shoot meristems

    PubMed Central

    Landrein, Benoît; Kiss, Annamaria; Sassi, Massimiliano; Chauvet, Aurélie; Das, Pradeep; Cortizo, Millan; Laufs, Patrick; Takeda, Seiji; Aida, Mitsuhiro; Traas, Jan; Vernoux, Teva; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The role of mechanical signals in cell identity determination remains poorly explored in tissues. Furthermore, because mechanical stress is widespread, mechanical signals are difficult to uncouple from biochemical-based transduction pathways. Here we focus on the homeobox gene SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM), a master regulator and marker of meristematic identity in Arabidopsis. We found that STM expression is quantitatively correlated to curvature in the saddle-shaped boundary domain of the shoot apical meristem. As tissue folding reflects the presence of mechanical stress, we test and demonstrate that STM expression is induced after micromechanical perturbations. We also show that STM expression in the boundary domain is required for organ separation. While STM expression correlates with auxin depletion in this domain, auxin distribution and STM expression can also be uncoupled. STM expression and boundary identity are thus strengthened through a synergy between auxin depletion and an auxin-independent mechanotransduction pathway at the shoot apical meristem. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07811.001 PMID:26623515

  3. Oxidative stress contributes to the enhanced expression of Gqα/PLCβ1 proteins and hypertrophy of VSMC from SHR: role of growth factor receptor transactivation.

    PubMed

    Atef, Mohammed Emehdi; Anand-Srivastava, Madhu B

    2016-03-01

    We showed previously that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) exhibit overexpression of Gqα/PLCβ1 proteins, which contribute to increased protein synthesis through the activation of MAP kinase signaling. Because oxidative stress has been shown to be increased in hypertension, the present study was undertaken to examine the role of oxidative stress and underlying mechanisms in enhanced expression of Gqα/PLCβ1 proteins and VSMC hypertrophy. Protein expression was determined by Western blotting, whereas protein synthesis and cell volume, markers for VSMC hypertrophy, were determined by [(3)H]-leucine incorporation and three-dimensional confocal imaging, respectively. The increased expression of Gqα/PLCβ1 proteins, increased protein synthesis, and augmented cell volume exhibited by VSMCs from SHRs were significantly attenuated by antioxidants N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a scavenger of superoxide anion, DPI, an inhibitor of NAD(P)H oxidase. In addition, PP2, AG1024, AG1478, and AG1295, inhibitors of c-Src, insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), respectively, also attenuated the enhanced expression of Gqα/PLCβ1 proteins and enhanced protein synthesis in VSMCs from SHRs toward control levels. Furthermore, the levels of IGF-1R and EGFR proteins and not of PDGFR were also enhanced in VSMCs from SHRs, which were attenuated significantly by NAC, DPI, and PP2. In addition, NAC, DPI, and PP2 also attenuated the enhanced phosphorylation of IGF-1R, PDGFR, EGFR, c-Src, and EKR1/2 in VSMCs from SHRs. These data suggest that enhanced oxidative stress in VSMCs from SHRs activates c-Src, which through the transactivation of growth factor receptors and MAPK signaling contributes to enhanced expression of Gqα/PLCβ1 proteins and resultant VSMC hypertrophy. PMID:26747500

  4. HPV-16 E2 contributes to induction of HPV-16 late gene expression by inhibiting early polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Cecilia; Somberg, Monika; Li, Xiaoze; Backström Winquist, Ellenor; Fay, Joanna; Ryan, Fergus; Pim, David; Banks, Lawrence; Schwartz, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    We provide evidence that the human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein regulates HPV late gene expression. High levels of E2 caused a read-through at the early polyadenylation signal pAE into the late region of the HPV genome, thereby inducing expression of L1 and L2 mRNAs. This is a conserved property of E2 of both mucosal and cutaneous HPV types. Induction could be reversed by high levels of HPV-16 E1 protein, or by the polyadenylation factor CPSF30. HPV-16 E2 inhibited polyadenylation in vitro by preventing the assembly of the CPSF complex. Both the N-terminal and hinge domains of E2 were required for induction of HPV late gene expression in transfected cells as well as for inhibition of polyadenylation in vitro. Finally, overexpression of HPV-16 E2 induced late gene expression from a full-length genomic clone of HPV-16. We speculate that the accumulation of high levels of E2 during the viral life cycle, not only turns off the expression of the pro-mitotic viral E6 and E7 genes, but also induces the expression of the late HPV genes L1 and L2. PMID:22617423

  5. Contribution of allelic variability in prostate specific antigen (PSA) & androgen receptor (AR) genes to serum PSA levels in men with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Sushant V.; Maitra, Anurupa; Roy, Nobhojit; Chavan, Padma R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Wide variability in serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels exists in malignant conditions of the prostate. PSA is expressed in normal range in 20 to 25 per cent of prostate cancer cases even in presence of high grade Gleason score. This study was aimed to assess the influence of genetic variants exhibited by PSA and androgen receptor (AR) genes towards the variable expression of PSA in prostate cancer. Methods: Pre-treatment serum PSA levels from 101 prostate cancer cases were retrieved from medical record. PSA genotype analysis in promoter region and AR gene microsatellite Cytosine/Adenine/Guanine (CAG) repeat analysis in exon 1 region was performed using DNA sequencing and fragment analysis techniques. Results: A total of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PSA promoter region were noted. Only two SNPs viz., 158G/A (P<0.001) in the proximal promoter region and -3845G/A (P<0.001) in enhancer region showed significant association with serum PSA levels. The carriers of homozygous GG genotype (P<0.001) at both of these polymorphic sites showed higher expression of PSA whereas homozygous AA genotype (P<0.001) carriers demonstrated lower PSA levels. The combination effect of PSA genotypes along with stratified AR CAG repeats lengths (long, intermediate and short) was also studied. The homozygous GG genotype along with AR long CAG repeats and homozygous AA genotype along with AR short CAG repeats at position -3845 and -158 showed strong interaction and thus influenced serum PSA levels. Interpretation & conclusions: The genetic variants exhibited by PSA gene at positions -3845G/A and -158G/A may be accountable towards wide variability of serum PSA levels in prostate cancer. Also the preferential binding of G and A alleles at these polymorphic sites along with AR long and short CAG repeats may contribute towards PSA expression. PMID:24820830

  6. Decreased expression of vitamin D receptor may contribute to the hyperimmune status of patients with acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Ge, Meili; Lu, Shihong; Shi, Jun; Feng, Sizhou; Li, Xingxin; Zhang, Jizhou; Wang, Min; Huang, Jinbo; Shao, Yingqi; Huang, Zhendong; Zhang, Jing; Nie, Neng; Zheng, Yizhou

    2016-05-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is an immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndrome. 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2 D3 ], the biologically active metabolite of vitamin D, is a critical modulator of immune response via binding with vitamin D receptor (VDR). Previous studies have established that 1,25(OH)2 D3 and VDR were involved in the pathogenesis of some autoimmune diseases. In this study, we evaluated the involvement of 1,25(OH)2 D3 and VDR on T-cell responses in AA. Plasma 25(OH)D3 levels were comparable between patients with AA and healthy controls. Surprisingly, VDR mRNA was significantly lower in untreated patients with AA than in healthy controls. Subsequent in vitro experiments revealed that 1,25(OH)2 D3 treatment suppressed the proliferation of lymphocytes and inhibited the secretion of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-17A, meanwhile promoting the production of transforming growth factor-β1 in patients with AA. Moreover, 1,25(OH)2 D3 inhibited the differentiation of type 1 and Th17 cells but induced the differentiation of type 2 and regulatory T cells. Interestingly, VDR mRNA was elevated in healthy controls after 1,25(OH)2 D3 treatment, but not in patients with AA. In conclusion, decreased expression of VDR might contribute to the hyperimmune status of AA and appropriate vitamin D supplementation could partly correct the immune dysfunction by strengthening signal transduction through VDR in patients with AA. PMID:26152509

  7. Proinflammatory cytokine expression contributes to brain injury provoked by chronic monocyte activation.

    PubMed Central

    Sirén, A. L.; McCarron, R.; Wang, L.; Garcia-Pinto, P.; Ruetzler, C.; Martin, D.; Hallenbeck, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have proposed that an increased interaction between monocyte/macrophages and blood vessel endothelium predisposes subjects to strokes. The effect of chronic monocyte activation on the development of cerebral infarcts was thus studied in rats after provocation of a modified local Swartzman reaction, in brain vasculature. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two weeks after an IV bolus of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), we studied spontaneous superoxide production, integrin expression, endothelial adhesion of monocytes and the neurological symptoms, brain histology, and cytokine immunoreactivity after a provocative dose of LPS (30-300 microg/rat i.c.v.). RESULTS: Monocyte migration into the brain was stimulated by BCG priming. The incidence of paralysis and death in response to LPS was markedly increased in BCG-primed rats. Histological evaluation of the brains of neurologically impaired and moribund animals revealed intravascular thrombosis and pale and hemorrhagic infarcts. Infiltrates of leukocytes expressing immunoreactive IL-1:, IL-6, and TNF-alpha were found around blood vessels, cerebral ventricles, and meninges, and were accompanied by a profound microglial expression of IL1P, endothelial expression of IL-6, and expression of TNF-alpha and TNF-R 1 in glia and neurons of cortex and hippocampus. Treatment (2 x 100 microg/10 ,I, i.c.v.) with recombinant human (rh-)TNF 55kDa receptor completely prevented, and treatment with rh-IL- I receptor antagonist significantly decreased the incidence of paralysis and death in response to BCG + LPS. The improvement of neurological symptoms was accompanied by reduced histological damage and supppression of IL-1P/ expression in the brain tissue. CONCLUSIONS: The data demonstrate that chronic monocyte activation predisposes subjects to thrombosis and hemorrhage via an exaggerated release of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:11471566

  8. Co-expression of mitosis-regulating genes contributes to malignant progression and prognosis in oligodendrogliomas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanwei; Hu, Huimin; Zhang, Chuanbao; Wang, Haoyuan; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Zheng; Li, Mingyang; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Dabiao; Jiang, Tao

    2015-11-10

    The clinical prognosis of patients with glioma is determined by tumor grades, but tumors of different subtypes with equal malignancy grade usually have different prognosis that is largely determined by genetic abnormalities. Oligodendrogliomas (ODs) are the second most common type of gliomas. In this study, integrative analyses found that distribution of TCGA transcriptomic subtypes was associated with grade progression in ODs. To identify critical gene(s) associated with tumor grades and TCGA subtypes, we analyzed 34 normal brain tissue (NBT), 146 WHO grade II and 130 grade III ODs by microarray and RNA sequencing, and identified a co-expression network of six genes (AURKA, NDC80, CENPK, KIAA0101, TIMELESS and MELK) that was associated with tumor grades and TCGA subtypes as well as Ki-67 expression. Validation of the six genes was performed by qPCR in additional 28 ODs. Importantly, these genes also were validated in four high-grade recurrent gliomas and the initial lower-grade gliomas resected from the same patients. Finally, the RNA data on two genes with the highest discrimination potential (AURKA and NDC80) and Ki-67 were validated on an independent cohort (5 NBTs and 86 ODs) by immunohistochemistry. Knockdown of AURKA and NDC80 by siRNAs suppressed Ki-67 expression and proliferation of gliomas cells. Survival analysis showed that high expression of the six genes corporately indicated a poor survival outcome. Correlation and protein interaction analysis provided further evidence for this co-expression network. These data suggest that the co-expression of the six mitosis-regulating genes was associated with malignant progression and prognosis in ODs. PMID:26468983

  9. Co-expression of mitosis-regulating genes contributes to malignant progression and prognosis in oligodendrogliomas

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanwei; Hu, Huimin; Zhang, Chuanbao; Wang, Haoyuan; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Zheng; Li, Mingyang; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Dabiao; Jiang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The clinical prognosis of patients with glioma is determined by tumor grades, but tumors of different subtypes with equal malignancy grade usually have different prognosis that is largely determined by genetic abnormalities. Oligodendrogliomas (ODs) are the second most common type of gliomas. In this study, integrative analyses found that distribution of TCGA transcriptomic subtypes was associated with grade progression in ODs. To identify critical gene(s) associated with tumor grades and TCGA subtypes, we analyzed 34 normal brain tissue (NBT), 146 WHO grade II and 130 grade III ODs by microarray and RNA sequencing, and identified a co-expression network of six genes (AURKA, NDC80,CENPK, KIAA0101, TIMELESS and MELK) that was associated with tumor grades and TCGA subtypes as well as Ki-67 expression. Validation of the six genes was performed by qPCR in additional 28 ODs. Importantly, these genes also were validated in four high-grade recurrent gliomas and the initial lower-grade gliomas resected from the same patients. Finally, the RNA data on two genes with the highest discrimination potential (AURKA and NDC80) and Ki-67 were validated on an independent cohort (5 NBTs and 86 ODs) by immunohistochemistry. Knockdown of AURKA and NDC80 by siRNAs suppressed Ki-67 expression and proliferation of gliomas cells. Survival analysis showed that high expression of the six genes corporately indicated a poor survival outcome. Correlation and protein interaction analysis provided further evidence for this co-expression network. These data suggest that the co-expression of the six mitosis-regulating genes was associated with malignant progression and prognosis in ODs. PMID:26468983

  10. Down-regulated expression of miR-134 contributes to paclitaxel resistance in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Ting; Wang, Min; Shi, Cong; Zhou, Yingying; Wang, Dandan

    2015-10-01

    MiR-134 has been reported to have a role in the development and progression of various cancers. In this study, we found that miR-134 expression was significantly decreased in chemo-resistant serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. Over-expression of miR-134 enhanced the sensitivity of SKOV3-TR30 cells to paclitaxel, and increased paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Further, Pak2 was identified as a direct target of miR-134, and Pak2-specific siRNA increased cell inhibition rate and promoted paclitaxal-induced apoptosis. By regulating Pak2 expression, miR-134 could mediate Bad phosphorylation at Ser112 and Ser136, which affected cell survival and apoptosis. In conclusion, our findings indicate that repression of miR-134 and consequent up-regulation of Pak2 might contribute to paclitaxel resistance. PMID:26363097

  11. HLA-C expression levels define permissible mismatches in hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Petersdorf, Effie W; Gooley, Theodore A; Malkki, Mari; Bacigalupo, Andrea P; Cesbron, Anne; Du Toit, Ernette; Ehninger, Gerhard; Egeland, Torstein; Fischer, Gottfried F; Gervais, Thibaut; Haagenson, Michael D; Horowitz, Mary M; Hsu, Katharine; Jindra, Pavel; Madrigal, Alejandro; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Ringdén, Olle; Schroeder, Marlis L; Spellman, Stephen R; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Velardi, Andrea; Witt, Campbell S; O'Huigin, Colm; Apps, Richard; Carrington, Mary

    2014-12-18

    Life-threatening graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) limits the use of HLA-C-mismatched unrelated donors in transplantation. Clinicians lack criteria for donor selection when HLA-C-mismatched donors are a patient's only option for cure. We examined the role for HLA-C expression levels to identify permissible HLA-C mismatches. The median fluorescence intensity, a proxy of HLA-C expression, was assigned to each HLA-C allotype in 1975 patients and their HLA-C-mismatched unrelated transplant donors. The association of outcome with the level of expression of patients' and donors' HLA-C allotypes was evaluated in multivariable models. Increasing expression level of the patient's mismatched HLA-C allotype was associated with increased risks of grades III to IV acute GVHD, nonrelapse mortality, and mortality. Increasing expression level among HLA-C mismatches with residue 116 or residue 77/80 mismatching was associated with increased nonrelapse mortality. The immunogenicity of HLA-C mismatches in unrelated donor transplantation is influenced by the expression level of the patient's mismatched HLA-C allotype. HLA-C expression levels provide new information on mismatches that should be avoided and extend understanding of HLA-C-mediated immune responses in human disease. PMID:25323824

  12. HLA-C expression levels define permissible mismatches in hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gooley, Theodore A.; Malkki, Mari; Bacigalupo, Andrea P.; Cesbron, Anne; Du Toit, Ernette; Ehninger, Gerhard; Egeland, Torstein; Fischer, Gottfried F.; Gervais, Thibaut; Haagenson, Michael D.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Hsu, Katharine; Jindra, Pavel; Madrigal, Alejandro; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Ringdén, Olle; Schroeder, Marlis L.; Spellman, Stephen R.; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Velardi, Andrea; Witt, Campbell S.; O’Huigin, Colm; Apps, Richard; Carrington, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Life-threatening graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) limits the use of HLA-C-mismatched unrelated donors in transplantation. Clinicians lack criteria for donor selection when HLA-C-mismatched donors are a patient’s only option for cure. We examined the role for HLA-C expression levels to identify permissible HLA-C mismatches. The median fluorescence intensity, a proxy of HLA-C expression, was assigned to each HLA-C allotype in 1975 patients and their HLA-C-mismatched unrelated transplant donors. The association of outcome with the level of expression of patients’ and donors’ HLA-C allotypes was evaluated in multivariable models. Increasing expression level of the patient’s mismatched HLA-C allotype was associated with increased risks of grades III to IV acute GVHD, nonrelapse mortality, and mortality. Increasing expression level among HLA-C mismatches with residue 116 or residue 77/80 mismatching was associated with increased nonrelapse mortality. The immunogenicity of HLA-C mismatches in unrelated donor transplantation is influenced by the expression level of the patient’s mismatched HLA-C allotype. HLA-C expression levels provide new information on mismatches that should be avoided and extend understanding of HLA-C-mediated immune responses in human disease. PMID:25323824

  13. Excess adenosine A2B receptor signaling contributes to priapism through HIF-1α mediated reduction of PDE5 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Chen; Wen, Jiaming; Zhang, Yujin; Dai, Yingbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Weiru; Qi, Lin; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Kellems, Rodney E.; Xia, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Priapism is featured with prolonged and painful penile erection and is prevalent among males with sickle cell disease (SCD). The disorder is a dangerous urological and hematological emergency since it is associated with ischemic tissue damage and erectile disability. Here we report that phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) gene expression and PDE activity is significantly reduced in penile tissues of two independent priapic models: SCD mice and adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient mice. Moreover, using ADA enzyme therapy to reduce adenosine or a specific antagonist to block A2B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) signaling, we successfully attenuated priapism in both ADA−/− and SCD mice by restoring penile PDE5 gene expression to normal levels. This finding led us to further discover that excess adenosine signaling via ADORA2B activation directly reduces PDE5 gene expression in a hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α)-dependent manner. Overall, we reveal that excess adenosine-mediated ADORA2B signaling underlies reduced penile PDE activity by decreasing PDE5 gene expression in a HIF-1α-dependent manner and provide new insight for the pathogenesis of priapism and novel therapies for the disease.—Ning, C., Wen, J., Zhang, Y., Dai, Y., Wang, W., Zhang, W., Qi, L., Grenz, A., Eltzschig, H. K., Blackburn, M. R., Kellems, R. E., Xia, Y. Excess adenosine A2B receptor signaling contributes to priapism through HIF-1α mediated reduction of PDE5 gene expression. PMID:24614760

  14. Examining the Contribution of Handwriting and Spelling to Written Expression in Kindergarten Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puranik, Cynthia S.; AlOtaiba, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examined the development of beginning writing skills in kindergarten children and the contribution of spelling and handwriting to these writing skills after accounting for early language, literacy, cognitive skills, and student characteristics. Two hundred and forty two children were given a battery of cognitive, oral language,…

  15. Understanding Writing Problems in Young Children: Contributions of Cognitive Skills to the Development of Written Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childress, Amy

    2011-01-01

    While several models of adult writing have been proposed and studied, the development of writing skills in young children has only recently garnered attention. Using measures of fine-motor, language, working memory, and attention/executive functions, the current study explored motor and cognitive skills that may contribute to writing skill in…

  16. Genome-Wide Tuning of Protein Expression Levels to Rapidly Engineer Microbial Traits.

    PubMed

    Freed, Emily F; Winkler, James D; Weiss, Sophie J; Garst, Andrew D; Mutalik, Vivek K; Arkin, Adam P; Knight, Rob; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-11-20

    The reliable engineering of biological systems requires quantitative mapping of predictable and context-independent expression over a broad range of protein expression levels. However, current techniques for modifying expression levels are cumbersome and are not amenable to high-throughput approaches. Here we present major improvements to current techniques through the design and construction of E. coli genome-wide libraries using synthetic DNA cassettes that can tune expression over a ∼10(4) range. The cassettes also contain molecular barcodes that are optimized for next-generation sequencing, enabling rapid and quantitative tracking of alleles that have the highest fitness advantage. We show these libraries can be used to determine which genes and expression levels confer greater fitness to E. coli under different growth conditions. PMID:26478262

  17. Expression partitioning of homeologs and tandem duplications contribute to salt tolerance in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumei; Liu, Zhenshan; Khan, Abul Awlad; Lin, Qi; Han, Yao; Mu, Ping; Liu, Yiguo; Zhang, Hongsheng; Li, Lingyan; Meng, Xianghao; Ni, Zhongfu; Xin, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    Salt stress dramatically reduces crop yield and quality, but the molecular mechanisms underlying salt tolerance remain largely unknown. To explore the wheat transcriptional response to salt stress, we performed high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of 10-day old wheat roots under normal condition and 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after salt stress (HASS) in both a salt-tolerant cultivar and salt-sensitive cultivar. The results demonstrated global gene expression reprogramming with 36,804 genes that were up- or down-regulated in wheat roots under at least one stress condition compared with the controls and revealed the specificity and complexity of the functional pathways between the two cultivars. Further analysis showed that substantial expression partitioning of homeologous wheat genes occurs when the plants are subjected to salt stress, accounting for approximately 63.9% (2,537) and 66.1% (2,624) of the homeologous genes in ‘Chinese Spring’ (CS) and ‘Qing Mai 6’ (QM). Interestingly, 143 salt-responsive genes have been duplicated and tandemly arrayed on chromosomes during wheat evolution and polyploidization events, and the expression patterns of 122 (122/143, 85.3%) tandem duplications diverged dynamically over the time-course of salinity exposure. In addition, constitutive expression or silencing of target genes in Arabidopsis and wheat further confirmed our high-confidence salt stress-responsive candidates. PMID:26892368

  18. Expression partitioning of homeologs and tandem duplications contribute to salt tolerance in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumei; Liu, Zhenshan; Khan, Abul Awlad; Lin, Qi; Han, Yao; Mu, Ping; Liu, Yiguo; Zhang, Hongsheng; Li, Lingyan; Meng, Xianghao; Ni, Zhongfu; Xin, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    Salt stress dramatically reduces crop yield and quality, but the molecular mechanisms underlying salt tolerance remain largely unknown. To explore the wheat transcriptional response to salt stress, we performed high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of 10-day old wheat roots under normal condition and 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after salt stress (HASS) in both a salt-tolerant cultivar and salt-sensitive cultivar. The results demonstrated global gene expression reprogramming with 36,804 genes that were up- or down-regulated in wheat roots under at least one stress condition compared with the controls and revealed the specificity and complexity of the functional pathways between the two cultivars. Further analysis showed that substantial expression partitioning of homeologous wheat genes occurs when the plants are subjected to salt stress, accounting for approximately 63.9% (2,537) and 66.1% (2,624) of the homeologous genes in 'Chinese Spring' (CS) and 'Qing Mai 6' (QM). Interestingly, 143 salt-responsive genes have been duplicated and tandemly arrayed on chromosomes during wheat evolution and polyploidization events, and the expression patterns of 122 (122/143, 85.3%) tandem duplications diverged dynamically over the time-course of salinity exposure. In addition, constitutive expression or silencing of target genes in Arabidopsis and wheat further confirmed our high-confidence salt stress-responsive candidates. PMID:26892368

  19. Hippocampus and Medial Prefrontal Cortex Contributions to Trace and Contextual Fear Memory Expression over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeman, Christopher L.; Bauer, Philip S.; Pierson, Jamie L.; Quinn, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has shown that damage to the dorsal hippocampus (DH) occurring at recent, but not remote, timepoints following acquisition produces a deficit in trace conditioned fear memory expression. The opposite pattern has been observed with lesions to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The present studies address: (1) whether these lesion…

  20. VARIABLE BOUND-SITE CHARGING CONTRIBUTIONS TO SURFACE COMPLEXATION MASS ACTION EXPRESSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One and two pK models of surface complexation reactions between reactive surface sites (>SOH) and the proton (H+) use mass action expressions of the form: Ka={[>SOHn-1z-1]g>SOH(0-1)aH+EXP(-xeY/kT)}/{[>SOHnz]g>SOH(n)} where Ka=the acidity constant, [ ]=reactive species concentrati...

  1. Limited Contribution of DNA Methylation Variation to Expression Regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dazhe; Dubin, Manu; Zhang, Pei; Osborne, Edward J; Stegle, Oliver; Clark, Richard M; Nordborg, Magnus

    2016-07-01

    The extent to which epigenetic variation affects complex traits in natural populations is not known. We addressed this question using transcriptome and DNA methylation data from a sample of 135 sequenced A. thaliana accessions. Across individuals, expression was significantly associated with cis-methylation for hundreds of genes, and many of these associations remained significant after taking SNP effects into account. The pattern of correlations differed markedly between gene body methylation and transposable element methylation. The former was usually positively correlated with expression, and the latter usually negatively correlated, although exceptions were found in both cases. Finally, we developed graphical models of causality that adapt to a sample with heavy population structure, and used them to show that while methylation appears to affect gene expression more often than expression affects methylation, there is also strong support for both being independently controlled. In conclusion, although we find clear evidence for epigenetic regulation, both the number of loci affected and the magnitude of the effects appear to be small compared to the effect of SNPs. PMID:27398721

  2. Limited Contribution of DNA Methylation Variation to Expression Regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pei; Osborne, Edward J.; Stegle, Oliver; Clark, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which epigenetic variation affects complex traits in natural populations is not known. We addressed this question using transcriptome and DNA methylation data from a sample of 135 sequenced A. thaliana accessions. Across individuals, expression was significantly associated with cis-methylation for hundreds of genes, and many of these associations remained significant after taking SNP effects into account. The pattern of correlations differed markedly between gene body methylation and transposable element methylation. The former was usually positively correlated with expression, and the latter usually negatively correlated, although exceptions were found in both cases. Finally, we developed graphical models of causality that adapt to a sample with heavy population structure, and used them to show that while methylation appears to affect gene expression more often than expression affects methylation, there is also strong support for both being independently controlled. In conclusion, although we find clear evidence for epigenetic regulation, both the number of loci affected and the magnitude of the effects appear to be small compared to the effect of SNPs. PMID:27398721

  3. Persistent Prelimbic Cortex Activity Contributes to Enhanced Learned Fear Expression in Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Georgina E.; Pollard, Amelia K.; Halliday, David M.; Mason, Rob; Bredy, Timothy W.; Stevenson, Carl W.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress, are more prevalent in women and are characterized by impaired inhibition of learned fear and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) dysfunction. Here we examined sex differences in fear extinction and mPFC activity in rats. Females showed more learned fear expression during extinction and its recall, but…

  4. Effects of elevated peroxidase levels and corn earworm feeding on gene expression in tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato gene arrays were used to investigate how high levels of transgenic peroxidase expression and feeding by the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, affected expression of defensive and other genes. High peroxidase activity significantly upregulated proteinase inhibitors and a few other defensive gene...

  5. The curli biogenesis genes expression level is unassociated with Enterobacter cloacae hsp60 clusters and PFGE genotypes.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Majid; Bakhshi, Bita; Najar-Peerayeh, Shahin; Behmanesh, Mehrdad

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between Enterobacter cloacae complex subspecies and clusters involved in UTI infections and specific pulsotypes, and to assess the contribution of major curli biogenesis genes (csgD, csgA) expression level to pathogenesis of clusters and genotypes. Based on the PFGE analysis, 37 different profiles were observed among which 8 profiles were common types. Real time PCR of csgD and csgA genes of 50 E. cloacae complex in relation to PFGE and hsp60 genotypes showed that all the genetic clusters are not equally involved in pathogenesis of urinary tract infections. It was elucidated in this study that isolates with common PFGE genotypes belonged to identical hsp60 clusters, and the foremost clusters (VI, III, and V) mainly comprised within PFGE common types. In our study, no significant correlation was detected between the specific hsp60 clusters or PFGE genotypes and the expression level of csgD and csgA genes (P-value > 0.05). This is the first study describing that unequivalent contribution of E. cloacae genotypes and clusters in pathogenesis of UTI, is not owing to varied curli biogenesis expression potential. The PFGE genotyping showed more discriminatory power than hsp60 genotyping for epidemiological studies and source tracking purpose. PMID:27354208

  6. Periostin expression induced by oxidative stress contributes to myocardial fibrosis in a rat model of high salt-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    WU, HAN; CHEN, LIANG; XIE, JUN; LI, RAN; LI, GUAN-NAN; CHEN, QIN-HUA; ZHANG, XIN-LIN; KANG, LI-NA; XU, BIAO

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein involved in fibrosis. The present study investigated the importance of periostin in hypertension-induced myocardial fibrosis. Rats were randomly divided into either the normal group (0.4% NaCl diet; n=8) or hypertension group (8% NaCl diet; n=8). For 36 weeks, the blood pressure and heart rate of the rats were monitored. At week 36, the hearts were extracted for further analysis. Masson's staining and western blotting were performed to determine the levels of periostin protein expression, oxidative stress and fibrosis. In addition, fibroblasts were isolated from adult rats and cultured in vitro, and following treatment with angiotensin II (Ang II) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), western blotting, immunofluorescence and 2′,7′ dichlorodihydrofluorescin staining were performed to examine reactive oxygen species production, and periostin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression levels. The results demonstrated that periostin expression and oxidative stress were increased in hypertensive hearts compared with normal hearts. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that Ang II upregulated the expression levels of periostin and α-SMA compared with the control, whereas, pretreatment with NAC inhibited oxidative stress, periostin and α-SMA expression in fibroblasts. In conclusion, the results of the current study suggested that oxidative stress-induced periostin is involved in myocardial fibrosis and hypertension. The present study demonstrated that periostin inhibition may be a promising approach for the inhibition of hypertension-induced cardiac remodeling. PMID:27220372

  7. The α1 adrenoceptors in ventrolateral orbital cortex contribute to the expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lai; Zhu, Yuan-Mei; Zhang, Yu-Xiang; Liang, Feng; Li, Teng; Gao, Hong-Yu; Huo, Fu-Quan; Yan, Chun-Xia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of microinjection of benoxathian, selective α1 adrenoceptor antagonist, into the ventrolateral orbital cortex (VLO) on morphine-induced behavioral sensitization and its underlying molecular mechanism in rats. A single morphine treatment protocol was used in establishing the behavioral sensitization model. The effect of bilateral intra-VLO benoxathian injection on locomotor activity was examined and the protein expression levels of α1 adrenoceptors and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the VLO were detected after locomotor test. The results showed that a single injection of morphine could induce behavioral sensitization by a low challenge dosage of morphine after a 7-days drug free period. Benoxathian significantly suppressed the expression but not the development of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. Morphine treatment significantly elicited ERK phosphorylation and downregulated the expression level of α1 adrenoceptors in the VLO. In addition, intra-VLO benoxathian injection enhanced the expression levels of α1 adrenoceptors and phosphorylated ERK. These results suggest that α1 adrenoceptors in the VLO are involved in regulating the expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. The effect of decreased locomotor activity by blocking α1 adrenoceptors might be associated with activation of ERK in the VLO. PMID:26520466

  8. UNEP's Work to Implement Good Practice at a Regional Level: Contribution to the UNDESD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogbuigwe, Akpezi

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the contribution made by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) towards enhancing the integration of sustainable development concerns in Africa through its initiative, the Mainstreaming Environment and Sustainability in Africa (MESA) Universities Partnership, during the United Nations Decade of Education for…

  9. Predicting Gene Expression Level from Relative Codon Usage Bias: An Application to Escherichia coli Genome

    PubMed Central

    Roymondal, Uttam; Das, Shibsankar; Sahoo, Satyabrata

    2009-01-01

    We present an expression measure of a gene, devised to predict the level of gene expression from relative codon bias (RCB). There are a number of measures currently in use that quantify codon usage in genes. Based on the hypothesis that gene expressivity and codon composition is strongly correlated, RCB has been defined to provide an intuitively meaningful measure of an extent of the codon preference in a gene. We outline a simple approach to assess the strength of RCB (RCBS) in genes as a guide to their likely expression levels and illustrate this with an analysis of Escherichia coli (E. coli) genome. Our efforts to quantitatively predict gene expression levels in E. coli met with a high level of success. Surprisingly, we observe a strong correlation between RCBS and protein length indicating natural selection in favour of the shorter genes to be expressed at higher level. The agreement of our result with high protein abundances, microarray data and radioactive data demonstrates that the genomic expression profile available in our method can be applied in a meaningful way to the study of cell physiology and also for more detailed studies of particular genes of interest. PMID:19131380

  10. Changes in endogenous gene transcript and protein levels in maize plants expressing the soybean ferritin transgene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic agricultural crops with increased nutritive value present prospects for contributing to public health. However, their acceptance is poor in many countries due to the perception that genetic modification may cause unintended effects on expression of native genes in the host plant. Here, w...

  11. Ectopic expression of Arabidopsis RCI2A gene contributes to cold tolerance in tomato.

    PubMed

    Sivankalyani, Velu; Geetha, Mahalingam; Subramanyam, Kondeti; Girija, Shanmugam

    2015-04-01

    Cold is a major stress that limits the quality and productivity of economically important crops such as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). Generating a cold-stress-tolerant tomato by expressing cold-inducible genes would increase agricultural strategies. Rare cold-inducible 2a (RCI2A) is expressed in Arabidopsis, but its molecular function during cold stress is not fully understood. Here we ectopically expressed Arabidopsis RCI2A in transgenic tomato to evaluate tolerance to cold stress without altering agronomic traits. Biochemical and physiological study demonstrated that expression of RCI2A in transgenic tomato enhanced the activity of peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and reduced the accumulation of H2O2, alleviated lipid peroxidation, increased the accumulation of chlorophyll, reduced chilling-induced membrane damage, retained relative water content and enhanced cold tolerance. A motif search revealed that the motifs of photosystem II (PSII) phosphoproteins PsbJ and PsbH and reaction-center proteins PsbL and PsbK were common to cold-inducible RCI2A and peroxidase proteins RCI3A, tomato peroxidase (TPX1), TPX2, tomato ascorbate peroxidase (APX1), and horseradish peroxidase (HRP-c). In addition to membrane protection, RCI2A may cross talk with PSII-associated proteins or peroxidase family enzymes in response to cold stress. Our findings may strengthen the understanding of the molecular function of RCI2A in cold-stress tolerance. RCI2A could be used to improve abiotic stress tolerance in agronomic crops. PMID:25260337

  12. Aquaporin Expression Contributes to Human Transurothelial Permeability In Vitro and Is Modulated by NaCl

    PubMed Central

    Rubenwolf, Peter C.; Georgopoulos, Nikolaos T.; Kirkwood, Lisa A.; Baker, Simon C.; Southgate, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    It is generally considered that the bladder is impervious and stores urine in unmodified form on account of the barrier imposed by the highly-specialised uro-epithelial lining. However, recent evidence, including demonstration of aquaporin (AQP) expression by human urothelium, suggests that urothelium may be able to modify urine content. Here we have we applied functional assays to an in vitro-differentiated normal human urothelial cell culture system and examined both whether AQP expression was responsive to changes in osmolality, and the effects of blocking AQP channels on water and urea transport. AQP3 expression was up-regulated by increased osmolality, but only in response to NaCl. A small but similar effect was seen with AQP9, but not AQP4 or AQP7. Differentiated urothelium revealed significant barrier function (mean TER 3862 Ω.cm2), with mean diffusive water and urea permeability coefficients of 6.33×10−5 and 2.45×10−5 cm/s, respectively. AQP blockade with mercuric chloride resulted in decreased water and urea flux. The diffusive permeability of urothelial cell sheets remained constant following conditioning in hyperosmotic NaCl, but there was a significant increase in water and urea flux across an osmotic gradient. Taken collectively with evidence emerging from studies in other species, our results support an active role for human urothelium in sensing and responding to hypertonic salt concentrations through alterations in AQP protein expression, with AQP channels providing a mechanism for modifying urine composition. These observations challenge the traditional concept of an impermeable bladder epithelium and suggest that the urothelium may play a modulatory role in water and salt homeostasis. PMID:23028946

  13. Chemically primed bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells show enhanced expression of chemokine receptors contributed to their migration capability

    PubMed Central

    Bidkhori, Hamid Reza; Ahmadiankia, Naghmeh; Matin, Maryam Moghaddam; Heirani-tabasi, Asieh; Farshchian, Moein; Naderi-meshkin, Hojjat; Shahriyari, Mina; Dastpak, Mahtab; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The limited homing potential of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) is the key obstacle in MSC-based therapy. It is believed that chemokines and chemokine receptor interactions play key roles in cellular processes associated with migration. Meanwhile, MSCs express a low level of distinct chemokine receptors and they even lose these receptors on their surface after a few passages which influence their therapeutic applications negatively. This study investigated whether treatment of BM-MSCs with hypoxia-mimicking agents would increase expression of some chemokine receptors and cell migration. Materials and Methods: BM-MSCs were treated at passage 2 for our gene expression profiling. All qPCR experiments were performed by SYBR Green method in CFX-96 Bio-Rad Real-Time PCR. The Boyden chamber assay was utilized to investigate BM-MSC homing. Results: Possible approaches to increasing the expression level of chemokine receptors by different hypoxia-mimicking agents such as valproic acid (VPA), CoCl2, and desferrioxamine (DFX) are described. Results show DFX efficiently up-regulate the CXCR7 and CXCR4 gene expression while VPA increase only the CXCR7 gene expression and no significant change in expression level of CXCR4 and the CXCR7 gene was detectable by CoCl2 treatment. Chemotaxis assay results show that pre-treatment with DFX, VPA, and Cocl2 enhances significantly the migration ability of BM-MSCs compared with the untreated control group and DFX treatment accelerates MSCs homing significantly with a higher rate than VPA and Cocl2 treatments. Conclusion: Our data supports the notion that pretreatment of MSC with VPA and DFX improves the efficiency of MSC therapy by triggering homing regulatory signaling pathways. PMID:27096059

  14. White collar 1-induced photolyase expression contributes to UV-tolerance of Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Brych, Annika; Mascarenhas, Judita; Jaeger, Elaine; Charkiewicz, Elzbieta; Pokorny, Richard; Bölker, Michael; Doehlemann, Gunther; Batschauer, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    Ustilago maydis is a phytopathogenic fungus causing corn smut disease. It also is known for its extreme tolerance to UV- and ionizing radiation. It has not been elucidated whether light-sensing proteins, and in particular photolyases play a role in its UV-tolerance. Based on homology analysis, U. maydis has 10 genes encoding putative light-responsive proteins. Four amongst these belong to the cryptochrome/photolyase family (CPF) and one represents a white collar 1 ortholog (wco1). Deletion mutants in the predicted cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer CPD- and (6-4)-photolyase were impaired in photoreactivation. In line with this, in vitro studies with recombinant CPF proteins demonstrated binding of the catalytic FAD cofactor, its photoreduction to fully reduced FADH(-) and repair activity for cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) or (6-4)-photoproducts, respectively. We also investigated the role of Wco1. Strikingly, transcriptional profiling showed 61 genes differentially expressed upon blue light exposure of wild-type, but only eight genes in the Δwco1 mutant. These results demonstrate that Wco1 is a functional blue light photoreceptor in U. maydis regulating expression of several genes including both photolyases. Finally, we show that the Δwco1 mutant is less tolerant against UV-B due to its incapability to induce photolyase expression. PMID:26687452

  15. Lower expression of Nrdp1 in human glioma contributes tumor progression by reducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hengliang; Du, Jin; Wang, Lei; Zheng, Bao; Gong, Hui; Wu, Yuxuan; Tang, Yuan; Gao, Yong; Yu, Rutong

    2014-10-01

    Ubiquitin ligase Nrdp1 (neuregulin receptor degradation protein 1) plays important roles in multiple physiological process because it can ubiquitinate various substrates such as ErbB3, BRUCE, MyD88, C/EBPβ, and Parkin, and so forth. In addition to the physiological function, it was also found to be involved in tumor progression. It has been shown that loss of Nrdp1 enhances breast cancer cell growth. Up to now, the role of Nrdp1 in glioma has not been elucidated. Here, we reported that Nrdp1 as well as cleaved caspase 3 was lower expressed in human glioma tissues comparing with the nontumorous. And then we found that the expression of Nrdp1 and cleaved caspase 3 was increased in the treatment of Temozolomide (TMZ), a drug for glioma chemotherapy. Further investigation indicated that transient transfection of Nrdp1 significantly promoted cell apoptosis by aggravating the degradation of BRUCE and activation of caspase 3. In addition, overexpression of Nrdp1 augmented TMZ induced apoptosis by evaluating the degradation of BRUCE and the activation of caspase 3, while silencing of Nrdp1 reduced the sensitivity to the TMZ by inhibiting the degradation of BRUCE and the activation of caspase 3 in human glioma cells. These observations show that Nrdp1 is a pro-apoptotic protein in human glioma and lower expression of Nrdp1 in human glioma may promote tumor progression by reducing apoptosis, suggesting that Nrdp1 may be an important regulator in the development of human glioma. PMID:25355637

  16. High VRK1 expression contributes to cell proliferation and survival in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Cui, Xiaopeng; Chen, Yuyan; Shao, Mengting; Shao, Xian; Shen, Yifen; Liu, Qingqing; Wu, Miaomiao; Liu, Jinxia; Ni, Wenkai; Lu, Cuihua; Wan, Chunhua

    2016-03-01

    VRK1 is a member of the vaccinia-related kinase (VRK) family of serine/threonine protein kinases, which is known to play multiple roles in cellular proliferation, cell cycle regulation and carcinogenesis. However, the expression and physiological significance of VRK1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential role of VRK1 in the development and progression of HCC. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis revealed that VRK1 was highly expressed in HCC tissues and cell lines, compared with adjacent nontumorous tissues and LO2 normal hepatocytes. Meanwhile, clinicopathological analysis showed that VRK1 was significantly associated with AJCC stage, Ki-67 and a poor prognosis in HCC specimens. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that VRK1 could serve as an independent prognostic indicator of HCC patients' survival. Furthermore, we found that VRK1 was lowly expressed in serum-starved Huh7 cells, and was progressively increased after serum-refeeding. Finally, flow cytometry, CCK-8 and colony formation assay indicated that the depletion of VRK1 could retard cell cycle progression and reduce cells proliferation in HCC cells. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that VRK1 may be a candidate prognostic biomarker as well as a potential therapeutical target of HCC. PMID:26706601

  17. Contributions of extracellular matrix signaling and tissue architecture to nuclear mechanisms and spatial organization of gene expression control

    PubMed Central

    Lelièvre, Sophie A.

    2009-01-01

    Post-translational modification of histones, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, and DNA methylation are interconnected nuclear mechanisms that ultimately lead to the changes in chromatin structure necessary to carry out epigenetic gene expression control. Tissue differentiation is characterized by a specific gene expression profile in association with the acquisition of a defined tissue architecture and function. Elements critical for tissue differentiation, like extracellular stimuli, adhesion and cell shape properties, and transcription factors all contribute to the modulation of gene expression and thus, are likely to impinge on the nuclear mechanisms of epigenetic gene expression control. In this review, we analyze how these elements modify chromatin structure in a hierarchical manner by acting on the nuclear machinery. We discuss how mechanotransduction via the structural continuum of the cell and biochemical signaling to the cell nucleus integrate to provide a comprehensive control of gene expression. The role of nuclear organization in this control is highlighted, with a presentation of differentiation-induced nuclear structure and the concept of nuclear organization as a modulator of the response to incoming signals. PMID:19328836

  18. Differential contribution of cis-regulatory elements to higher order chromatin structure and expression of the CFTR locus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Kerschner, Jenny L; Gosalia, Nehal; Neems, Daniel; Gorsic, Lidija K; Safi, Alexias; Crawford, Gregory E; Kosak, Steven T; Leir, Shih-Hsing; Harris, Ann

    2016-04-20

    Higher order chromatin structure establishes domains that organize the genome and coordinate gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling transcription of individual loci within a topological domain (TAD) are not fully understood. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene provides a paradigm for investigating these mechanisms.CFTR occupies a TAD bordered by CTCF/cohesin binding sites within which are cell-type-selective cis-regulatory elements for the locus. We showed previously that intronic and extragenic enhancers, when occupied by specific transcription factors, are recruited to the CFTR promoter by a looping mechanism to drive gene expression. Here we use a combination of CRISPR/Cas9 editing of cis-regulatory elements and siRNA-mediated depletion of architectural proteins to determine the relative contribution of structural elements and enhancers to the higher order structure and expression of the CFTR locus. We found the boundaries of the CFTRTAD are conserved among diverse cell types and are dependent on CTCF and cohesin complex. Removal of an upstream CTCF-binding insulator alters the interaction profile, but has little effect on CFTR expression. Within the TAD, intronic enhancers recruit cell-type selective transcription factors and deletion of a pivotal enhancer element dramatically decreases CFTR expression, but has minor effect on its 3D structure. PMID:26673704

  19. Optimality and evolutionary tuning of the expression level of a protein.

    PubMed

    Dekel, Erez; Alon, Uri

    2005-07-28

    Different proteins have different expression levels. It is unclear to what extent these expression levels are optimized to their environment. Evolutionary theories suggest that protein expression levels maximize fitness, but the fitness as a function of protein level has seldom been directly measured. To address this, we studied the lac system of Escherichia coli, which allows the cell to use the sugar lactose for growth. We experimentally measured the growth burden due to production and maintenance of the Lac proteins (cost), as well as the growth advantage (benefit) conferred by the Lac proteins when lactose is present. The fitness function, given by the difference between the benefit and the cost, predicts that for each lactose environment there exists an optimal Lac expression level that maximizes growth rate. We then performed serial dilution evolution experiments at different lactose concentrations. In a few hundred generations, cells evolved to reach the predicted optimal expression levels. Thus, protein expression from the lac operon seems to be a solution of a cost-benefit optimization problem, and can be rapidly tuned by evolution to function optimally in new environments. PMID:16049495

  20. Molecular Motor MYO1C, Acetyltransferase KAT6B and Osteogenetic Transcription Factor RUNX2 Expression in Human Masseter Muscle Contributes to Development of Malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Desh, Heather; Gray, S Lauren; Horton, Michael J; Raoul, Gwenael; Rowlerson, Anthea M; Ferri, Joel; Vieira, Alexandre R; Sciote, James J

    2014-01-01

    Objective Type I myosins are molecular motors necessary for glucose transport in the cytoplasm and initiation of transcription in the nucleus. Two of these, MYO1H and MYO1C, are paralogs which may be important in the development of malocclusion. The objective of this study was to investigate their gene expression in the masseter muscle of malocclusion subjects. Two functionally related proteins known to contribute to malocclusion were also investigated: KAT6B (a chromatin remodeling epigenetic enzyme which is activated by MYO1C) and RUNX2 (a transcription factor regulating osteogenesis which is activated by KAT6B). Design Masseter muscle samples and malocclusion classifications were obtained from orthognathic surgery subjects. Muscle was sectioned and immunostained to determine fiber type properties. RNA was isolated from the remaining sample to determine expression levels for the four genes by TaqMan® RT-PCR. Fiber type properties, gene expression quantities and malocclusion classification were compared. Results There were very significant associations (P<0.0000001) between MYO1C and KAT6B expressions. There were also significant associations (P<0.005) between RUNX2 expression and masseter muscle type II fiber properties. Very few significant associations were identified between MYO1C and masseter muscle fiber type properties. Conclusions The relationship between MYO1C and KAT6B suggests that the two are interacting in chromatin remodeling for gene expression. This is the nuclear myosin1 (NM1) function of MYO1C. A surprising finding is the relationship between RUNX2 and type II masseter muscle fibers, since RUNX2 expression in mature muscle was previously unknown. Further investigations are necessary to elucidate the role of RUNX2 in adult masseter muscle. PMID:24698832

  1. Correlations Between Gene Expression and Mercury Levels in Blood of Boys With and Without Autism

    PubMed Central

    Green, Peter G.; Tian, Yingfang; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Pessah, Isaac N.; Hansen, Robin; Yang, Xiaowei; Teng, Jennifer; Gregg, Jeffrey P.; Ashwood, Paul; Van de Water, Judy; Sharp, Frank R.

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in blood was correlated with mercury levels in blood of 2- to 5-year-old boys with autism (AU) compared to age-matched typically developing (TD) control boys. This was done to address the possibility that the two groups might metabolize toxicants, such as mercury, differently. RNA was isolated from blood and gene expression assessed on whole genome Affymetrix Human U133 expression microarrays. Mercury levels were measured using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed and partial correlations between gene expression and mercury levels were calculated, after correcting for age and batch effects. To reduce false positives, only genes shared by the ANCOVA models were analyzed. Of the 26 genes that correlated with mercury levels in both AU and TD boys, 11 were significantly different between the groups (P(Diagnosis*Mercury) ≤ 0.05). The expression of a large number of genes (n = 316) correlated with mercury levels in TD but not in AU boys (P ≤ 0.05), the most represented biological functions being cell death and cell morphology. Expression of 189 genes correlated with mercury levels in AU but not in TD boys (P ≤ 0.05), the most represented biological functions being cell morphology, amino acid metabolism, and antigen presentation. These data and those in our companion study on correlation of gene expression and lead levels show that AU and TD children display different correlations between transcript levels and low levels of mercury and lead. These findings might suggest different genetic transcriptional programs associated with mercury in AU compared to TD children. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12640-009-9137-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:19937285

  2. How Does Skype, as an Online Communication Software Tool, Contribute to K-12 Administrators' Level of Self-Efficacy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiriakidis, Peter

    2012-01-01

    How does Skype, as an online communication tool, contribute to school and district administrators' reported level of self-efficacy? A sample of n = 39 participants of which 22 were school administrators and 17 were district administrators was purposefully selected to use Skype in their offices with a webcam and microphone to communicate with other…

  3. PAIRED-CITY STUDY TO DETERMINE THE CONTRIBUTION OF SOURCE WATER TYPE TO THE ENDEMIC LEVEL OF MICROBIAL DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Paired-City Study to Determine the Contribution of Source Water Type to the Endemic Level of Microbial Disease

    F Frost PhD, T Kunde MPH, L Harter PhD, T Muller MS, GF Craun PE MPH, RL Calderon MPH PhD

    ABSTRACT

    Context: The effectiveness of current drinking...

  4. DIFFERENTIAL CONTRIBUTION OF β-ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS EXPRESSED ON RADIOSENSITIVE VERSUS RADIORESISTANT CELLS TO PROTECTION AGAINST INFLAMMATION AND MORTALITY IN MURINE ENDOTOXEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Walker-Brown, Jill; Roberts, Margo R.

    2010-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system modulates immune responses via the secretion of catecholamines and subsequent activation of adrenergic receptors (ARs), and systemic catecholamine levels increase markedly in the setting of endotoxemia and sepsis. Previous studies have demonstrated that stimulation of β-ARs by pharmacological agonists attenuates the inflammatory response to LPS observed in vitro, and can increase survival in animal models of endotoxemia and sepsis. However, the consequences of β-AR activation by endogenous catecholamines have not been explored in these settings. Furthermore, the relative contribution of β-ARs expressed on immune versus non-immune cells to LPS-mediated inflammation and mortality is not known. Our first goal was therefore to determine the impact of β-AR stimulation by endogenous catecholamines released during endotoxemia on LPS-mediated inflammation and mortality in vivo. To address this question, we examined the LPS response of mice lacking all three known βAR subtypes, β1-, β2- and β3-AR, and demonstrated that these β-less mice exhibited a net increase in inflammation (increased TNF-α levels and decreased IL-10 levels in serum) and a 50% decrease in survival relative to wildtype animals. The second goal of our study was to determine the relative contribution of β-ARs expressed on radiosensitive immune versus radioresistant cells to the protective action of β-ARs in the setting of endotoxemia. We therefore examined the LPS response of bone marrow chimeras generated between β-less and wildtype mice, and concluded that β-ARs expressed on radioresistant cells play the dominant role in protecting against LPS-mediated mortality and attenuating systemic TNF-α responses. Finally, we determined that β3-AR subtype does not play a significant role in regulating LPS-mediated mortality and inflammation, by evaluating mice lacking the β1- and β2-AR subtypes only. PMID:19333138

  5. High-level expression of the bacterial opd gene in Drosophila melanogaster: improved inducible insecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Benedict, M Q; Scott, J A; Cockburn, A F

    1994-11-01

    The bacterial parathion hydrolase gene (opd) was expressed in transformed D. melanogaster under the control of an hsp70 promoter. Transformed lines carrying chimaeric genes designed for either cytoplasmic or secretory expression exhibited high- or low-level heat-shock-inducible transient resistance to paraoxon respectively. Greatest levels of resistance occurred approximately 12-16 h after heat shock and well after periods of maximal transcription. Insecticide resistance conferred by the cytoplasmic form of opd is expressed as a semidominant trait. PMID:7704308

  6. The contribution of cohesin-SA1 to gene expression and chromatin architecture in two murine tissues.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Ana; Remeseiro, Silvia; Graña, Osvaldo; Pisano, David G; Losada, Ana

    2015-03-31

    Cohesin, which in somatic vertebrate cells consists of SMC1, SMC3, RAD21 and either SA1 or SA2, mediates higher-order chromatin organization. To determine how cohesin contributes to the establishment of tissue-specific transcriptional programs, we compared genome-wide cohesin distribution, gene expression and chromatin architecture in cerebral cortex and pancreas from adult mice. More than one third of cohesin binding sites differ between the two tissues and these show reduced overlap with CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and are enriched at the regulatory regions of tissue-specific genes. Cohesin/CTCF sites at active enhancers and promoters contain, at least, cohesin-SA1. Analyses of chromatin contacts at the Protocadherin (Pcdh) and Regenerating islet-derived (Reg) gene clusters, mostly expressed in brain and pancreas, respectively, revealed remarkable differences that correlate with the presence of cohesin. We could not detect significant changes in the chromatin contacts at the Pcdh locus when comparing brains from wild-type and SA1 null embryos. In contrast, reduced dosage of SA1 altered the architecture of the Reg locus and decreased the expression of Reg genes in the pancreas of SA1 heterozygous mice. Given the role of Reg proteins in inflammation, such reduction may contribute to the increased incidence of pancreatic cancer observed in these animals. PMID:25735743

  7. Dual transcriptional-translational cascade permits cellular level tuneable expression control

    PubMed Central

    Morra, Rosa; Shankar, Jayendra; Robinson, Christopher J.; Halliwell, Samantha; Butler, Lisa; Upton, Mathew; Hay, Sam; Micklefield, Jason; Dixon, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The ability to induce gene expression in a small molecule dependent manner has led to many applications in target discovery, functional elucidation and bio-production. To date these applications have relied on a limited set of protein-based control mechanisms operating at the level of transcription initiation. The discovery, design and reengineering of riboswitches offer an alternative means by which to control gene expression. Here we report the development and characterization of a novel tunable recombinant expression system, termed RiboTite, which operates at both the transcriptional and translational level. Using standard inducible promoters and orthogonal riboswitches, a multi-layered modular genetic control circuit was developed to control the expression of both bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and recombinant gene(s) of interest. The system was benchmarked against a number of commonly used E. coli expression systems, and shows tight basal control, precise analogue tunability of gene expression at the cellular level, dose-dependent regulation of protein production rates over extended growth periods and enhanced cell viability. This novel system expands the number of E. coli expression systems for use in recombinant protein production and represents a major performance enhancement over and above the most widely used expression systems. PMID:26405200

  8. Development of Multigene Expression Signature Maps at the Protein Level from Digitized Immunohistochemistry Slides

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Gregory J.; Dankbar, Stephen C.; Henriksen, Jonathan; Rizzardi, Anthony E.; Rosener, Nikolaus K.; Schmechel, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular classification of diseases based on multigene expression signatures is increasingly used for diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of response to therapy. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is an optimal method for validating expression signatures obtained using high-throughput genomics techniques since IHC allows a pathologist to examine gene expression at the protein level within the context of histologically interpretable tissue sections. Additionally, validated IHC assays may be readily implemented as clinical tests since IHC is performed on routinely processed clinical tissue samples. However, methods have not been available for automated n-gene expression profiling at the protein level using IHC data. We have developed methods to compute expression level maps (signature maps) of multiple genes from IHC data digitized on a commercial whole slide imaging system. Areas of cancer for these expression level maps are defined by a pathologist on adjacent, co-registered H&E slides, allowing assessment of IHC statistics and heterogeneity within the diseased tissue. This novel way of representing multiple IHC assays as signature maps will allow the development of n-gene expression profiling databases in three dimensions throughout virtual whole organ reconstructions. PMID:22438942

  9. Cloning and expression of an inhibitor of microbial metalloproteinases from insects contributing to innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The first IMPI (inhibitor of metalloproteinases from insects) was identified in the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella [Wedde, Weise, Kopacek, Franke and Vilcinskas (1998) Eur. J. Biochem. 255, 535–543]. Here we report cloning and expression of a cDNA coding for this IMPI. The IMPI mRNA was identified among the induced transcripts from a subtractive and suppressive PCR analysis after bacterial challenge of G. mellonella larvae. Induced expression of the IMPI during a humoral immune response was confirmed by real-time PCR, which documented up to 500 times higher amounts of IMPI mRNA in immunized larvae in comparison with untreated ones. The IMPI sequence shares no similarity with those of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases or other natural inhibitors of metalloproteinases, and the recombinant IMPI specifically inhibits thermolysin-like metalloproteinases, but not matrix metalloproteinases. These results support the hypothesis that the IMPI represents a novel type of immune-related protein which is induced and processed during the G. mellonella humoral immune response to inactivate pathogen-associated thermolysin-like metalloproteinases. PMID:15115439

  10. Novel SLC5A2 mutation contributes to familial renal glucosuria: Abnormal expression in renal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lei; Hou, Ping; Liu, Guo-Ping; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Familial renal glucosuria (FRG) is characterized by persistent glucosuria in the presence of normal serum glucose concentrations, while other impairments of tubular function are absent. Mutations in the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SLC5A2) gene have been found to be responsible for FRG. However, direct evidence for the presence of SLC5A2 mutant in renal tissues is very rare. In previous studies, a non-sense mutation (c.1320 G>A:p.W440X) that would cause premature termination of the protein was found. However, the effects in the renal tissues were not reported. In the current study, a patient with FRG and a urinary glucose excretion rate of 8.3 g/day is described, for whom a novel missense mutation (c.1319G>A:p.W440X) was revealed by sequencing. Furthermore, in the immunofluorescence examination of a renal biopsy specimen, SLC5A2 was detected in the apical side of the proximal convoluted tubule, discontinuously decreased in comparison with that in normal and disease controls. The results imply that both wild-type SLC5A2 and mutant SLC5A2 with abnormal distribution were expressed in the renal tissues, and that the reduction of SLC5A2 expression and function were due to the c.1319G>A:p.W440X mutation. The current study provides valuable clues regarding the SLC5A2 molecule from genotype to phenotype in families affected by FRG.

  11. A contribution to the study of plant development evolution based on gene co-expression networks

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Campero, Francisco J.; Lucas-Reina, Eva; Said, Fatima E.; Romero, José M.; Valverde, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Phototrophic eukaryotes are among the most successful organisms on Earth due to their unparalleled efficiency at capturing light energy and fixing carbon dioxide to produce organic molecules. A conserved and efficient network of light-dependent regulatory modules could be at the bases of this success. This regulatory system conferred early advantages to phototrophic eukaryotes that allowed for specialization, complex developmental processes and modern plant characteristics. We have studied light-dependent gene regulatory modules from algae to plants employing integrative-omics approaches based on gene co-expression networks. Our study reveals some remarkably conserved ways in which eukaryotic phototrophs deal with day length and light signaling. Here we describe how a family of Arabidopsis transcription factors involved in photoperiod response has evolved from a single algal gene according to the innovation, amplification and divergence theory of gene evolution by duplication. These modifications of the gene co-expression networks from the ancient unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to the modern brassica Arabidopsis thaliana may hint on the evolution and specialization of plants and other organisms. PMID:23935602

  12. Biomass burning contribution to ambient air particulate levels at Navrongo in the Savannah zone of Ghana.

    PubMed

    Ofosu, Francis G; Hopke, Philip K; Aboh, Innocent J K; Bamford, Samuel A

    2013-09-01

    The concentrations of airborne particulate matter (PM) in Navrongo, a town in the Sahel Savannah Zone of Ghana, have been measured and the major sources have been identified. This area is prone to frequent particulate pollution episodes due to Harmattan dust and biomass burning, mostly from annual bushfires. The contribution of combustion emissions, particularly from biomass and fossil fuel, to ambient air particulate loadings was assessed. Sampling was conducted from February 2009 to February 2010 in Navrongo. Two Gent samplers were equipped to collect PM10 in two size fractions, coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5). Coarse particles are collected on a coated, 8-microm-pore Nuclepore filter. Fine particle samples were sampled with 47-mm-diameter Nuclepore and quartz filters. Elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) concentrations were determined from the quartz filters using thermal optical reflectance (IMPROVE/TOR) methods. Elements were measured on the fine-particle Nuclepore filters using energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence. The average PM2.5 mass concentration obtained at Navrongo was 32.3 microg/m. High carbonaceous concentrations were obtained from November to March, the period of Harmattan dust and severe bush fires. Total carbon was found to contribute approximately 40% of the PM2.5 particulate mass. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) suggested six major sources contributing to the PM2.5 mass. They are two stroke engines, gasoline emissions, soil dust, diesel emissions, biomass burning, and resuspended soil dust. Biomass combustion (16.0%) was identified as second most important source next to soil dust at Navrongo. PMID:24151679

  13. [Expression of erythropoietin receptor in leukemia cells and relation of erythropoietin level with leukemic anemia].

    PubMed

    Feng, Mei; Li, Yu-Cui

    2008-12-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the expression of erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) in leukemic cells and the relationship of serum erythropoietin level with anemia in acute leukemia patients, so as to provide a new theoretical basis for the cytokine therapy in acute leukemia with anemia. The EPOR in 30 AL patients was detected by using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the level of serum erythropoietin was detected by chemiluminescence analysis, the hemoglobin level was assayed by automatic blood counting instrument. The results indicated that EPOR was expressed in 18 out of 30 AL patients, the expression rate of EPOR in AL patients was 60%, however, but the EPOR expression rate in AML was 61.9% (13/21) and 55.6% (5/9) in ALL, the EPOR expression rate was no significant difference between AML and ALL. The EPOR expression rate was significantly lower than that in control group (86.7%) (p<0.05). The relative level of EPOR expression in AML was higher than that in ALL (p<0.05), the average level of EPOR expression in AL was significantly lower than that in control group (p<0.01). The level of sEPO in 30 AL patients was significantly higher than that in control group (p<0.01), and there was negative correlation between the levels of sEPO and Hb (p<0.01). It is concluded that the EPOR is expressed in cells of AL, but the expressive level is low. The EPOR expression rate shows no significant difference between AML and ALL. The mechanism of negative feedback to anemia in acute leukemia is intact. Anemia of acute leukemia is not completely associated with inadequate erythropoietin production and relates to hemopoiesis defect that considered as the main reason. Recombinant human erythropoietin is widely used in treatment of anemia caused by acute leukemia. Whether the treatment with rh-EPO for acute leukemia with anemia will enhance the proliferation of leukemia cells, this problem should be explored further. PMID:19099624

  14. Aberrant expression of the S1P regulating enzymes, SPHK1 and SGPL1, contributes to a migratory phenotype in OSCC mediated through S1PR2

    PubMed Central

    Patmanathan, Sathya Narayanan; Johnson, Steven P.; Lai, Sook Ling; Panja Bernam, Suthashini; Lopes, Victor; Wei, Wenbin; Ibrahim, Maha Hafez; Torta, Federico; Narayanaswamy, Pradeep; Wenk, Markus R.; Herr, Deron R.; Murray, Paul G.; Yap, Lee Fah; Paterson, Ian C.

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a lethal disease with a 5-year mortality rate of around 50%. Molecular targeted therapies are not in routine use and novel therapeutic targets are required. Our previous microarray data indicated sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) metabolism and signalling was deregulated in OSCC. In this study, we have investigated the contribution of S1P signalling to the pathogenesis of OSCC. We show that the expression of the two major enzymes that regulate S1P levels were altered in OSCC: SPHK1 was significantly upregulated in OSCC tissues compared to normal oral mucosa and low levels of SGPL1 mRNA correlated with a worse overall survival. In in vitro studies, S1P enhanced the migration/invasion of OSCC cells and attenuated cisplatin-induced death. We also demonstrate that S1P receptor expression is deregulated in primary OSCCs and that S1PR2 is over-expressed in a subset of tumours, which in part mediates S1P-induced migration of OSCC cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that FTY720 induced significantly more apoptosis in OSCC cells compared to non-malignant cells and that FTY720 acted synergistically with cisplatin to induce cell death. Taken together, our data show that S1P signalling promotes tumour aggressiveness in OSCC and identify S1P signalling as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27160553

  15. Aberrant expression of the S1P regulating enzymes, SPHK1 and SGPL1, contributes to a migratory phenotype in OSCC mediated through S1PR2.

    PubMed

    Patmanathan, Sathya Narayanan; Johnson, Steven P; Lai, Sook Ling; Panja Bernam, Suthashini; Lopes, Victor; Wei, Wenbin; Ibrahim, Maha Hafez; Torta, Federico; Narayanaswamy, Pradeep; Wenk, Markus R; Herr, Deron R; Murray, Paul G; Yap, Lee Fah; Paterson, Ian C

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a lethal disease with a 5-year mortality rate of around 50%. Molecular targeted therapies are not in routine use and novel therapeutic targets are required. Our previous microarray data indicated sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) metabolism and signalling was deregulated in OSCC. In this study, we have investigated the contribution of S1P signalling to the pathogenesis of OSCC. We show that the expression of the two major enzymes that regulate S1P levels were altered in OSCC: SPHK1 was significantly upregulated in OSCC tissues compared to normal oral mucosa and low levels of SGPL1 mRNA correlated with a worse overall survival. In in vitro studies, S1P enhanced the migration/invasion of OSCC cells and attenuated cisplatin-induced death. We also demonstrate that S1P receptor expression is deregulated in primary OSCCs and that S1PR2 is over-expressed in a subset of tumours, which in part mediates S1P-induced migration of OSCC cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that FTY720 induced significantly more apoptosis in OSCC cells compared to non-malignant cells and that FTY720 acted synergistically with cisplatin to induce cell death. Taken together, our data show that S1P signalling promotes tumour aggressiveness in OSCC and identify S1P signalling as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27160553

  16. Taste cell-expressed α-glucosidase enzymes contribute to gustatory responses to disaccharides.

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, Sunil K; Yee, Karen K; Iwata, Shusuke; Kotha, Ramana; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Nichols, Buford L; Mohan, Sankar; Pinto, B Mario; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Margolskee, Robert F

    2016-05-24

    The primary sweet sensor in mammalian taste cells for sugars and noncaloric sweeteners is the heteromeric combination of type 1 taste receptors 2 and 3 (T1R2+T1R3, encoded by Tas1r2 and Tas1r3 genes). However, in the absence of T1R2+T1R3 (e.g., in Tas1r3 KO mice), animals still respond to sugars, arguing for the presence of T1R-independent detection mechanism(s). Our previous findings that several glucose transporters (GLUTs), sodium glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1), and the ATP-gated K(+) (KATP) metabolic sensor are preferentially expressed in the same taste cells with T1R3 provides a potential explanation for the T1R-independent detection of sugars: sweet-responsive taste cells that respond to sugars and sweeteners may contain a T1R-dependent (T1R2+T1R3) sweet-sensing pathway for detecting sugars and noncaloric sweeteners, as well as a T1R-independent (GLUTs, SGLT1, KATP) pathway for detecting monosaccharides. However, the T1R-independent pathway would not explain responses to disaccharide and oligomeric sugars, such as sucrose, maltose, and maltotriose, which are not substrates for GLUTs or SGLT1. Using RT-PCR, quantitative PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry, we found that taste cells express multiple α-glycosidases (e.g., amylase and neutral α glucosidase C) and so-called intestinal "brush border" disaccharide-hydrolyzing enzymes (e.g., maltase-glucoamylase and sucrase-isomaltase). Treating the tongue with inhibitors of disaccharidases specifically decreased gustatory nerve responses to disaccharides, but not to monosaccharides or noncaloric sweeteners, indicating that lingual disaccharidases are functional. These taste cell-expressed enzymes may locally break down dietary disaccharides and starch hydrolysis products into monosaccharides that could serve as substrates for the T1R-independent sugar sensing pathways. PMID:27162343

  17. The contribution of sea-level rise to flooding in large river catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele-Eich, I.; Hopson, T. M.; Gilleland, E.; Lamarque, J.; Hu, A.; Simmer, C.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change is expected to both impact sea level rise as well as flooding. Our study focuses on the combined effect of climate change on upper catchment precipitation as well as on sea-level rise at the river mouths and the impact this will have on river flooding both at the coast and further upstream. We concentrate on the eight catchments of the Amazonas, Congo, Orinoco, Ganges/Brahmaputra/Meghna, Mississippi, St. Lawrence, Danube and Niger rivers. To assess the impact of climate change, upper catchment precipitation as well as monthly mean thermosteric sea-level rise at the river mouth outflow are taken from the four CCSM4 1° 20th Century ensemble members as well as from six CCSM4 1° ensemble members for the RCP scenarios RCP8.5, 6.0, 4.5 and 2.6. Continuous daily time series for average catchment precipitation and discharge are available for each of the catchments. To arrive at a future discharge time series, we used these observations to develop a simple statistical hydrological model which can be applied to the modelled future upper catchment precipitation values. The analysis of this surrogate discharge time series alone already yields significant changes in flood return levels as well as flood duration. Using the geometry of the river channel, the backwater effect of sea-level rise is incorporated in our analysis of both flood frequencies and magnitudes by calculating the effective additional discharge due to the increase in water level at the river mouth outflow, as well as its tapering impact upstream. By combining these effects, our results focus on the merged impact of changes in extreme precipitation with increases in river height due to sea-level rise at the river mouths. Judging from our preliminary results, the increase in effective discharge due to sea-level rise cannot be neglected when discussing late 21st century flooding in the respective river basins. In particular, we find that especially in countries with low elevation gradient, flood

  18. Cysteine protease SpeB expression in group A streptococci is influenced by the nutritional environment but SpeB does not contribute to obtaining essential nutrients.

    PubMed

    Podbielski, A; Woischnik, M; Kreikemeyer, B; Bettenbrock, K; Buttaro, B A

    1999-11-01

    Group A streptococcal (GAS) cysteine protease is a major virulence factor involved in the pathogenesis of purulent and invasive infections. The secreted enzyme cleaves a number of different bacterial and host proteins which could contribute to different stages of the infective processes. It has been proposed that, among these functions, SpeB plays a role in obtaining nutrients during late growth phases. In the present study, speB mutants of various GAS serotypes were found to exhibit unaltered growth characteristics in several complex and chemically defined media (CDM). When amino acid-depleted CDM was prepared, neither SpeB activity on whole proteins added to the medium during incubation nor the addition of SpeB-digested proteins was able to support bacterial growth. SpeB also was unable to liberate iron from iron-containing protein sources added to iron-deficient CDM. However, SpeB levels in culture supernatants changed in response to the protein and glucose content of the media. Using a speB promoter-luciferase reporter, speB expression levels were found to correspond to peptide concentrations in the culture media. The effect appeared to be specific for peptides since addition of peptides derived from various proteins had an affect on expression, while addition of the whole proteins had no effect. Addition of glucose to CDM had no effect on speB expression, while glucose addition to complex medium decreased speB expression. Overall, SpeB did not appear to be directly involved in providing the bacteria with nutritional factors but expression of the speB gene responded to ratios of peptides and carbohydrates in the culture medium. PMID:10753062

  19. Microglia contribute to circuit defects in Mecp2 null mice independent of microglia-specific loss of Mecp2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Dorothy P; Heller, Christopher T; Gunner, Georgia; Heller, Molly; Gordon, Christopher; Hammond, Timothy; Wolf, Yochai; Jung, Steffen; Stevens, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Microglia, the resident CNS macrophages, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Rett Syndrome (RTT), an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder. However, the mechanism by which microglia contribute to the disorder is unclear and recent data suggest that microglia do not play a causative role. Here, we use the retinogeniculate system to determine if and how microglia contribute to pathogenesis in a RTT mouse model, the Mecp2 null mouse (Mecp2tm1.1Bird/y). We demonstrate that microglia contribute to pathogenesis by excessively engulfing, thereby eliminating, presynaptic inputs at end stages of disease (≥P56 Mecp2 null mice) concomitant with synapse loss. Furthermore, loss or gain of Mecp2 expression specifically in microglia (Cx3cr1CreER;Mecp2fl/yor Cx3cr1CreER; Mecp2LSL/y) had little effect on excessive engulfment, synapse loss, or phenotypic abnormalities. Taken together, our data suggest that microglia contribute to end stages of disease by dismantling neural circuits rendered vulnerable by loss of Mecp2 in other CNS cell types. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15224.001 PMID:27458802

  20. Microglia contribute to circuit defects in Mecp2 null mice independent of microglia-specific loss of Mecp2 expression.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Dorothy P; Heller, Christopher T; Gunner, Georgia; Heller, Molly; Gordon, Christopher; Hammond, Timothy; Wolf, Yochai; Jung, Steffen; Stevens, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Microglia, the resident CNS macrophages, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Rett Syndrome (RTT), an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder. However, the mechanism by which microglia contribute to the disorder is unclear and recent data suggest that microglia do not play a causative role. Here, we use the retinogeniculate system to determine if and how microglia contribute to pathogenesis in a RTT mouse model, the Mecp2 null mouse (Mecp2(tm1.1Bird/y)). We demonstrate that microglia contribute to pathogenesis by excessively engulfing, thereby eliminating, presynaptic inputs at end stages of disease (≥P56 Mecp2 null mice) concomitant with synapse loss. Furthermore, loss or gain of Mecp2 expression specifically in microglia (Cx3cr1(CreER);Mecp2(fl/y)or Cx3cr1(Cr)(eER); Mecp2(LSL/y)) had little effect on excessive engulfment, synapse loss, or phenotypic abnormalities. Taken together, our data suggest that microglia contribute to end stages of disease by dismantling neural circuits rendered vulnerable by loss of Mecp2 in other CNS cell types. PMID:27458802

  1. Contribution of piezometric measurement on knowledge and management of low water levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessiere, Hélène; Stollsteiner, Philippe; Allier, Delphine; Nicolas, Jérôme; Gourcy, Laurence

    2014-05-01

    This article is based on a BRGM study on piezometric indicators, threshold values of discharges and groundwater levels for the assessment of potentially pumpable volumes of chalky watersheds. A method for estimating low water levels from groundwater levels is presented from three examples of chalk aquifer; the first one is located in Picardy and the two other in the Champagne Ardennes region. Piezometers with "annual" cycles, used in these examples, are supposed to be representative of the aquifer hydrodynamics. The analysis leads to relatively precise and satisfactory relationships between groundwater levels and observed discharges for this chalky context. These relationships may be useful for monitoring, validation, extension or reconstruction of the low water flow. On the one hand, they allow defining the piezometric levels corresponding to the different alert thresholds of river discharges. On the other hand, they clarify the distribution of low water flow from runoff or the draining of the aquifer. Finally, these correlations give an assessment of the minimum flow for the coming weeks using of the rate of draining of the aquifer. Nevertheless the use of these correlations does not allow to optimize the value of pumpable volumes because it seems to be difficult to integrate the amount of the effective rainfall that may occur during the draining period. In addition, these relationships cannot be exploited for multi-annual cycle systems. In these cases, the solution seems to lie on the realization of a rainfall-runoff-piezometric level model. Therefore, two possibilities are possible. The first one is to achieve each year, on a given date, a forecast for the days or months to come with various frequential distributions rainfalls. However, the forecast must be reiterated each year depending on climatic conditions. The principle of the second method is to simulate forecasts for different rainfall intensities and following different initial conditions. The results

  2. Correlated expression levels of endothelin receptor B and Plexin C1 in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Yajima, Ichiro; Iida, Machiko; Takahashi, Hiro; Inoue, Yuji; Fukushima, Satoshi; Ihn, Hironobu; Takeda, Kozue; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Kato, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Discussion concerning the effect of endothelin receptor B (Ednrb) on melanoma continues because Ednrb has been reported to have both tumor promoting and suppressive effects for melanoma. In order to examine Ednrb-related signaling in melanomagenesis, DNA microarray analysis for a melanoma from a RFP/RET-transgenic mouse (RET-mouse) and a melanoma from an Ednrb-heterozygously deleted RET-mouse [Ednrb(+/-);RET-mouse], in both of which melanoma spontaneously develops, was performed in this study. We found that the expression level of Plexin C1 (PlxnC1), a suppressor for melanoma, in a melanoma from an Ednrb(+/-);RET-mouse was drastically decreased compared to that in a melanoma from a RET-mouse. Therefore, we further examined the correlation between Ednrb and PlxnC1 expression levels in melanomas. PlxnC1 transcript expression levels in melanomas from Ednrb(+/-);RET-mice were lower than those in melanomas from RET-mice. A strong correlation between Ednrb and PlxnC1 transcript expression levels (R = 0.78, p < 0.01) was also found in melanomas from both RET-mice and Ednrb(+/-);RET-mice. Correspondingly, there was a significant correlation between transcript (R = 0.80; p < 0.01) and protein (R = 0.60; p < 0.01) expression levels of EDNRB and PLXNC1 in human primary melanomas. Together with our results showing that the expression level of PLXNC1 transcript was reduced in EDNRB-depleted human melanoma cells, our results showing positively correlated expression levels of Ednrb/EDNRB and PlxnC1/PLXNC1 in melanoma suggest that PlxnC1/PLXNC1 is involved in the Ednrb/EDNRB-mediated suppressive effect on melanoma. PMID:26045990

  3. Sphingomyelinase D from Loxosceles laeta Venom Induces the Expression of MMP7 in Human Keratinocytes: Contribution to Dermonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Mara A; Okamoto, Cinthya K; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute M; van den Berg, Carmen W; Tambourgi, Denise V

    2016-01-01

    Envenomation by Loxosceles spider is characterized by the development of dermonecrosis. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that increased expression/secretion of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, induced by Loxosceles intermedia venom Class 2 SMases D (the main toxin in the spider venom), contribute to the development of cutaneous loxoscelism. In the present study we show that the more potent venom containing the Class 1 SMase D from Loxosceles laeta, in addition to increasing the expression/secretion of MMP2 and MMP9, also stimulates the expression of MMP7 (Matrilysin-1), which was associated with keratinocyte cell death. Tetracycline, a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, prevented cell death and reduced MMPs expression. Considering that L. laeta venom is more potent at inducing dermonecrosis than L. intermedia venom, our results suggest that MMP7 may play an important role in the severity of dermonecrosis induced by L. laeta spider venom SMase D. In addition, the inhibition of MMPs by e.g. tetracyclines may be considered for the treatment of the cutaneous loxoscelism. PMID:27078876

  4. Sphingomyelinase D from Loxosceles laeta Venom Induces the Expression of MMP7 in Human Keratinocytes: Contribution to Dermonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Mara A.; Okamoto, Cinthya K.; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute M.; van den Berg, Carmen W.; Tambourgi, Denise V.

    2016-01-01

    Envenomation by Loxosceles spider is characterized by the development of dermonecrosis. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that increased expression/secretion of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, induced by Loxosceles intermedia venom Class 2 SMases D (the main toxin in the spider venom), contribute to the development of cutaneous loxoscelism. In the present study we show that the more potent venom containing the Class 1 SMase D from Loxosceles laeta, in addition to increasing the expression/secretion of MMP2 and MMP9, also stimulates the expression of MMP7 (Matrilysin-1), which was associated with keratinocyte cell death. Tetracycline, a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, prevented cell death and reduced MMPs expression. Considering that L. laeta venom is more potent at inducing dermonecrosis than L. intermedia venom, our results suggest that MMP7 may play an important role in the severity of dermonecrosis induced by L. laeta spider venom SMase D. In addition, the inhibition of MMPs by e.g. tetracyclines may be considered for the treatment of the cutaneous loxoscelism. PMID:27078876

  5. Spinal astrocyte gap junction and glutamate transporter expression contributes to a rat model of bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Caleb R.; Dougherty, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence implicating astrocytes in multiple forms of chronic pain, as well as in the specific context of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). However, it is still unclear what the exact role of astrocytes may be in the context of CIPN. Findings in oxaliplatin and paclitaxel models have displayed altered expression of astrocytic gap junctions and glutamate transporters as means by which astrocytes may contribute to observed behavioral changes. The current study investigated whether these changes were also generalizable to the bortezomib CIPN. Changes in mechanical sensitivity were verified in bortezomib-treated animals, and these changes were prevented by co-treatment with a glial activation inhibitor (minocycline), a gap junction decoupler (carbenoxolone), and by a glutamate transporter upregulator (ceftriaxone). Immunohistochemistry data at day 30 in bortezomib-treated animals showed increases in expression of GFAP and connexin 43 but decrease in GLAST expression. These changes were prevented by co-treatment with minocycline. Follow-up Western blotting data showed a shift in connexin 43 from a non-phosphorylated state to a phosphorylated state, indicating increased trafficking of expressed connexin 43 to the cell membrane. These data suggest that increases in behavioral sensitivity to cutaneous stimuli may be tied to persistent synaptic glutamate resulting from increased calcium flow between spinal astrocytes. PMID:25446343

  6. Contribution of taxane biosynthetic pathway gene expression to observed variability in paclitaxel accumulation in Taxus suspension cultures

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Rohan A.; Kolewe, Martin E.; Normanly, Jennifer; Walker, Elsbeth L.; Roberts, Susan C.

    2012-01-01

    Variability in product accumulation is one of the major obstacles limiting the widespread commercialization of plant cell culture technology to supply natural product pharmaceuticals. Despite extensive process engineering efforts, which have led to increased yields, plant cells exhibit variability in productivity that is poorly understood. Elicitation of Taxus cultures with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) induces paclitaxel accumulation, but to varying extents in different cultures. In this work, cultures with different aggregation profiles were established to create predictable differences in paclitaxel accumulation upon MeJA elicitation. Expression of known paclitaxel biosynthetic genes in MeJA-elicited cultures exhibiting both substantial (15-fold) and moderate (2-fold) differences in paclitaxel accumulation was analyzed using qRT-PCR. Each population exhibited the characteristic large increase in paclitaxel pathway gene expression following MeJA elicitation; however, differences in expression between populations were minor, and only observed for the cultures with the 15-fold variation in paclitaxel content. These data suggest that although upregulation of biosynthetic pathway gene expression contributes to observed increases in paclitaxel synthesis upon elicitation with MeJA, there are additional factors that need to be uncovered before paclitaxel productivity can be fully optimized. PMID:22095859

  7. Histopathological Features of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors and the Contribution of DOG1 Expression to the Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Beril; Özyılmaz, Filiz; Tokuç, Burcu; Can, Nuray; Taştekin, Ebru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) have KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) mutations affecting receptor tyrosine kinase activity and do not benefit from classic treatment regimens. Aims: The aim of this study was to review the algorithm that may be followed for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis in GISTs by investigating the histomorphological parameters and expression characteristics of classical immunohistochemical antibodies used in routine tests in addition to DOG1 expression. Study Design: Diagnostic accuracy study. Methods: We reevaluated the histological and immunohistochemical parameters of 37 GISTs. The standard immunohistochemical diagnosis and differential diagnosis panel antibodies (CD117, PDGFRα, CD34, vimentin, desmin, SMA, S-100, and Ki67) were studied on the tumor sections. We also used the popular marker DOG1 antibody with accepted sensitivity for GISTs in recent years and the PDGFRα immune marker for which the benefit in routine practice is discussed. Results: Classification according to progressive disease risk groups of the 37 cases revealed that 54% were in the high risk, 19% in the moderate risk, 16% in the low risk, 8% in the very low risk and 8% in the no risk group. Cytological atypia, necrosis, mucosal invasion and the Ki67 index were found to be related to the progressive disease risk groups of the tumors (p<0.05). Positive immunoreaction was observed with CD117 and PDGFRα in all GISTs in the study (100%). Positivity with the DOG1 antibody was found in 33 (89%) cases. CD34 was positive in 62% (23) of the cases. Conclusion: The CD117 antibody still plays a key role in GIST diagnosis. However, the use of DOG1 and PDGFRα antibodies combined with CD117 as sensitive markers can be beneficial. PMID:26740899

  8. Expression of SOFAT by T- and B-lineage cells may contribute to bone loss

    PubMed Central

    JARRY, CHRISTIAN R.; MARTINEZ, ELIZABETH F.; PERUZZO, DAIANE C.; CARREGARO, VANESSA; SACRAMENTO, LAÍS A.; ARAÚJO, VERA C.; WEITZMANN, M. NEALE; NAPIMOGA, MARCELO H.

    2016-01-01

    A novel T cell-secreted cytokine, termed secreted osteoclastogenic factor of activated T cells (SOFAT) that induces osteoclastic bone resorption in a RANKL-independent manner, has been described. Our group have previously reported that SOFAT is highly expressed in gingival tissues of patients with chronic periodontitis suggesting a putative role in the bone loss associated with periodontal disease. The aim of the present study was to identify other potential cellular sources of SOFAT in the bone resorptive lesions of patients with periodontal disease. Gingival tissues were biopsied from systemically healthy subjects without periodontal disease (n=5) and patients with chronic periodontitis (n=5), and the presence of SOFAT was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. The present data demonstrated marked SOFAT staining in diseased periodontal tissues that was predominantly associated with the lymphocytic infiltration of gingival tissues. Notably, in addition to CD3+ T cells, B-lineage cells including plasma cells also exhibited strong staining for SOFAT. As SOFAT has not previously been reported in B-lineage cells, splenic T cells and B cells were further purified from BALB/c mice and activated using CD3/CD28 and lipopolysaccharide, respectively. SOFAT was quantified by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and was shown to be significantly expressed (P<0.05) in both activated T cells and B cells compared with unstimulated cells. These data support a putative role of SOFAT in the bone loss associated with chronic periodontal disease. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, this study demonstrates for the first time that in addition to T cells, B-lineage cells may also be a significant source of SOFAT in inflammatory states. PMID:27035849

  9. Sfermion loop contribution to the two-loop level fermion electric dipole moment in R-parity violating supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Nodoka

    2012-10-01

    We evaluate the Barr-Zee-type two-loop level contribution to the fermion electric and chromo-electric dipole moments with sfermion loop in R-parity violating supersymmetric models. It is found that the Barr-Zee-type fermion dipole moment with sfermion loop acts destructively to the currently known fermion loop contribution, and that it has small effect when the mass of squarks or charged sleptons in the loop is larger than or comparable to that of the sneutrinos, but cannot be neglected if the sneutrinos are much heavier than loop sfermions.

  10. Positronium energy levels at order m α7 : Product contributions in the two-photon-annihilation channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Gregory S.; Tran, Lam M.; Wang, Ruihan

    2016-05-01

    Ongoing improvements in the measurement of positronium transition intervals motivate the calculation of the O (m α7) corrections to these intervals. In this work we focus on corrections to the spin-singlet parapositronium energies involving virtual annihilation to two photons in an intermediate state. We have evaluated all contributions to the positronium S -state energy levels that can be written as the product of a one-loop correction on one side of the annihilation event and another one-loop correction on the other side. These effects contribute Δ E =-0.561971 (25 ) m α7/π3 to the parapositronium ground-state energy.

  11. Association between ADSL, GARS-AIRS-GART, DGAT1, and DECR1 expression levels and pork meat quality traits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X D; Zhang, S J; Ding, Y Y; Feng, Y F; Zhu, H Y; Huang, L; Wu, T; Zhou, J; Yin, Z J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, meat quality traits were compared between Chinese lard- and European lean-type pigs. The association between expression of four genes (ADSL, GARS-AIRS-GART, DGAT1, and DECR1) and meat quality traits was also investigated. Meat quality traits were found to differ significantly between pig breeds. Meat color parameter values (a* and b*) and intramuscular fat content in Anqingliubai were significantly higher than those in Landrace (P < 0.01). Meat pH at 1 and 24 h following slaughter was significantly higher in Landrace than in Wei pigs, and meat inosine monophosphate (IMP) content was significantly higher in Landrace than in Wei and Anqingliubai pigs (both P < 0.01). Expression levels of ADSL, GARS-AIRS-GART, and DGAT1 were higher in longissimus lumborum muscle than in heart or liver tissues. ADSL and GARS-AIRS-GART expression levels were correlated with meat IMP content and pH levels. The results of this study will contribute to the understanding of meat quality traits in Chinese lard- and European lean-type pigs. PMID:26600543

  12. Mass and volume contributions to twentieth-century global sea level rise.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laury; Douglas, Bruce C

    2004-03-25

    The rate of twentieth-century global sea level rise and its causes are the subjects of intense controversy. Most direct estimates from tide gauges give 1.5-2.0 mm yr(-1), whereas indirect estimates based on the two processes responsible for global sea level rise, namely mass and volume change, fall far below this range. Estimates of the volume increase due to ocean warming give a rate of about 0.5 mm yr(-1) (ref. 8) and the rate due to mass increase, primarily from the melting of continental ice, is thought to be even smaller. Therefore, either the tide gauge estimates are too high, as has been suggested recently, or one (or both) of the mass and volume estimates is too low. Here we present an analysis of sea level measurements at tide gauges combined with observations of temperature and salinity in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans close to the gauges. We find that gauge-determined rates of sea level rise, which encompass both mass and volume changes, are two to three times higher than the rates due to volume change derived from temperature and salinity data. Our analysis supports earlier studies that put the twentieth-century rate in the 1.5-2.0 mm yr(-1) range, but more importantly it suggests that mass increase plays a larger role than ocean warming in twentieth-century global sea level rise. PMID:15042085

  13. Unique Expression of Angiotensin Type-2 Receptor in Sex-Specific Distribution of Myelinated Ah-Type Baroreceptor Neuron Contributing to Sex-Dimorphic Neurocontrol of Circulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jia-Ying; Zhou, Yu-Hong; Wu, Di; He, Jian-Li; Han, Li-Min; Liang, Xiao-Bo; Wang, Lu-Qi; Lu, Xiao-Long; Chen, Hanying; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Shou, Weinian; Li, Bai-Yan

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to understand the special expression patterns of angiotensin-II receptor (AT1R and AT2R) in nodose ganglia and nucleus of tractus solitary of baroreflex afferent pathway and their contribution in sex difference of neurocontrol of blood pressure regulation. In this regard, action potentials were recorded in baroreceptor neurons (BRNs) using whole-cell patch techniques; mRNA and protein expression of AT1R and AT2R in nodose ganglia and nucleus of tractus solitary were evaluated using real time-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry at both tissue and single-cell levels. The in vivo effects of 17β-estradiol on blood pressure and AT2R expression were also tested. The data showed that AT2R, rather than AT1R, expression was higher in female than age-matched male rats. Moreover, AT2R was downregulated in ovariectomized rats, which was restored by the administration of 17β-estradiol. Single-cell real time-polymerase chain reaction data indicated that AT2R was uniquely expressed in Ah-type BRNs. Functional study showed that long-term administration of 17β-estradiol significantly alleviated the blood pressure increase in ovariectomized rats. Electrophysiological recordings showed that angiotensin-II treatment increased the neuroexcitability more in Ah- than C-type BRNs, whereas no such effect was observed in A-types. In addition, angiotensin-II treatment prolonged action potential duration, which was not further changed by iberiotoxin. The density of angiotensin-II-sensitive K(+) currents recorded in Ah-types was equivalent with iberiotoxin-sensitive component. In summary, the unique, sex- and afferent-specific expression of AT2R was identified in Ah-type BRNs, and AT2R-mediated KCa1.1 inhibition in Ah-type BRNs may exert great impacts on baroreflex afferent function and blood pressure regulation in females. PMID:26883269

  14. Contribution of climate forcing to sea level variations in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsiopoulos, Dimitrios A.; Vergos, Georgios S.; Tziavos, Ilias N.

    2016-04-01

    With the availability of an abundance of earth observation data from satellite altimetry missions as well as those from the ENVISAT and CRYOSAT-2 satellites, monitoring of the sea level variations is gaining increased importance. In this work, altimetric data sets from the satellite remote sensing missions of ENVISAT and CRYOSAT-2 have been used to study the variations of the Mediterranean sea level. Alongside, a correlation analysis of Sea Level Anomalies (SLAs) with global and regional climatic indexes that influence the ocean state, has been carried out as well. The raw data used were SLAs from the respective altimetric missions, acquired by the on-board altimeters from the ENVISAT satellite for seven consecutive years (2003-2009) and from the CRYOSAT-2 satellite for six consecutive years (2010-2015). Three oscillation indexes have been investigated, as representative of climate-change and seasonal forcing on the sea level. The first one was the well-known Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), the next one the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index and the third, being primarily more representative of the Mediterranean sea state, was the Mediterranean Oscillation Index (MOI). The possible correlation is investigated in both monthly and annual scales, while a regional multiple regression and a principal component analysis (PCA) between the SLAs and oscillation indexes is carried out. Multiple regression and PCA have been used as tools in order to deduce possible correlations between the Mediterranean sea level variations and the aforementioned oscillation indexes, under the assumption that SLA variations are driven by steric forcing. Finally, evidence of the sea level cyclo-stationarity in the Mediterranean Sea is deduced from the analysis of empirically derived covariance functions at monthly intervals from the available SLA data.

  15. Multiple levels of linguistic and paralinguistic features contribute to voice recognition.

    PubMed

    Zarate, Jean Mary; Tian, Xing; Woods, Kevin J P; Poeppel, David

    2015-01-01

    Voice or speaker recognition is critical in a wide variety of social contexts. In this study, we investigated the contributions of acoustic, phonological, lexical, and semantic information toward voice recognition. Native English speaking participants were trained to recognize five speakers in five conditions: non-speech, Mandarin, German, pseudo-English, and English. We showed that voice recognition significantly improved as more information became available, from purely acoustic features in non-speech to additional phonological information varying in familiarity. Moreover, we found that the recognition performance is transferable between training and testing in phonologically familiar conditions (German, pseudo-English, and English), but not in unfamiliar (Mandarin) or non-speech conditions. These results provide evidence suggesting that bottom-up acoustic analysis and top-down influence from phonological processing collaboratively govern voice recognition. PMID:26088739

  16. Multiple levels of linguistic and paralinguistic features contribute to voice recognition

    PubMed Central

    Mary Zarate, Jean; Tian, Xing; Woods, Kevin J. P.; Poeppel, David

    2015-01-01

    Voice or speaker recognition is critical in a wide variety of social contexts. In this study, we investigated the contributions of acoustic, phonological, lexical, and semantic information toward voice recognition. Native English speaking participants were trained to recognize five speakers in five conditions: non-speech, Mandarin, German, pseudo-English, and English. We showed that voice recognition significantly improved as more information became available, from purely acoustic features in non-speech to additional phonological information varying in familiarity. Moreover, we found that the recognition performance is transferable between training and testing in phonologically familiar conditions (German, pseudo-English, and English), but not in unfamiliar (Mandarin) or non-speech conditions. These results provide evidence suggesting that bottom-up acoustic analysis and top-down influence from phonological processing collaboratively govern voice recognition. PMID:26088739

  17. Perceptions of Counselor Characteristics: Contributions of Counselor Sex, Experience, and Disclosure Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Assessed effects of counselor sex, experience, and self-disclosure level on perceived expertness, attractiveness, and trustworthiness. Results indicated expert counselors were rated more expert than nonexpert. Female experts were rated more expert than female nonexperts, but male experts and nonexperts did not differ. High-disclosing counselors…

  18. Decrease in antithrombin III and prothrombin serum levels contribute to coagulation disorders during leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Luis G V; Filho, Antonio F S; Souza, Gisele O; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Romero, Eliete C; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2016-08-01

    Pathogenic bacteria of the genus Leptospira are the causative agent of leptospirosis, an emergent infectious disease that affects humans and animals worldwide. Severe forms of the disease in humans include jaundice, multiple organ failure and intense haemorrhage. Up to now, mechanisms associated with the haemorrhage foci are poorly understood. We report in this work that, despite the low levels of antithrombin III in convalescent human serum samples, virulent, culture-attenuated and saprophyte strains of Leptospira are unable to bind and/or degrade this thrombin inhibitor, suggesting an indirect mechanism of pathogenesis. Lower levels of prothrombin were found in serum samples at the onset and convalescent phase of the disease when compared to normal human sera. The concomitant decreased levels of antithrombin III and prothrombin suggest a process of stimulated coagulation, which is corroborated by the increase of prothrombin fragment F1+2 in the serum samples. Data obtained with hamsters experimentally infected with virulent Leptospira interrogans serovars Kennewicki and Canicola strongly point out that haemorrhage is correlated with decreased levels of thrombin inhibitors and prothrombin. Activated coagulation might lead to an overconsumption of coagulation factors ultimately leading to bleeding and organ failure. PMID:27260249

  19. Background for Community Level Work on Educational Adjustment in Adolescence: Reviewing the Literature on Contributing Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redd, Zakia; Brooks, Jennifer; McGarvey, Ayelish M.

    Given the importance of adolescents' educational adjustment, a key question for those concerned with improving adolescent functioning is what can be done to increase adolescents' levels of educational functioning. This review addresses a number of broad facets of adolescents' educational functioning, including those in the psychological…

  20. Flicker Adaptation of Low-Level Cortical Visual Neurons Contributes to Temporal Dilation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortega, Laura; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    Several seconds of adaptation to a flickered stimulus causes a subsequent brief static stimulus to appear longer in duration. Nonsensory factors, such as increased arousal and attention, have been thought to mediate this flicker-based temporal-dilation aftereffect. In this study, we provide evidence that adaptation of low-level cortical visual…

  1. Leptin and androgens in male obesity: evidence for leptin contribution to reduced androgen levels.

    PubMed

    Isidori, A M; Caprio, M; Strollo, F; Moretti, C; Frajese, G; Isidori, A; Fabbri, A

    1999-10-01

    Leptin circulates in plasma at concentrations that parallel the amount of fat reserves. In obese males, androgen levels decline in proportion to the degree of obesity. Recently, we have shown that in rodent Leydig cells leptin inhibits hCG-stimulated testosterone (T) production via a functional leptin receptor isoform; others have found that leptin inhibits basal and hCG-induced T secretion by testis from adult rats. In this study, we further investigated the relationship linking leptin and androgens in men. Basal and hCG-stimulated leptin and sex hormone levels were studied in a large group of men ranging from normal weight to very obese (body mass index, 21.8-55.7). Initial cross-sectional studies showed that circulating leptin and fat mass (FM) were inversely related with total and free T (r = -0.51 and r = -0.38, P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). Multiple regression analysis indicated that the correlation between leptin or FM and T was not lost after controlling for SHBG and/or LH and/or estradiol (E2) levels and that leptin was the best hormonal predictor of the lower androgen levels in obesity. Dynamic studies showed that in obese men the area under the curve of T and free T to LH/hCG stimulation (5000 IU i.m.) was 30-40% lower than in controls and inversely correlated with leptin levels (r = -0.45 and r = -0.40, P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). Also, LH/hCG-stimulation caused higher increases in 17-OH-progesterone to T ratio in obese men than in controls, whereas no differences were observed between groups either in stimulated E2 levels or in the E2/T ratio. In all subjects, the percentage increases from baseline in the 17-OH-progesterone to T ratio were directly correlated with leptin levels or FM (r = 0.40 and r = 0.45, P < 0.01), but not with E2 or other hormonal variables. In conclusion, our studies, together with previous in vitro findings, indicate that excess of circulating leptin may be an important contributor to the development of reduced

  2. Sea Level Rise and Land Subsidence Contributions to the Signals from the Tide Gauges of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Albert

    2016-06-01

    The tide gauges measure the local oscillations of the sea level vs. the tide gauge instrument. The tide gauge instrument is generally subjected to the general subsidence or uplift of the nearby inland, plus some additional subsidence for land compaction and other localised phenomena. The paper proposes a non-linear model of the relative sea level oscillations including a long term trend for the absolute sea level rise, another term for the subsidence of the instrument, and finally a sinusoidal approximation for the cyclic oscillations of periodicities up to decades. This non-linear model is applied to the tide gauges of China. The paper shows that the limited information available for China does not permit to infer any proper trend for the relative rates of rise, as the tide gauge records are all short or incomplete and the vertical movement of the tide gauge instruments is unassessed. The only tide gauge record of sufficient length that may be assembled for China is obtained by combining the North Point and Quarry Bay tide gauges in Hong Kong (NPQB). This NQPB composite tide gauge record is shown to have similarities with the tide gauge records of Sydney, equally in the West pacific, and San Diego, in the east Pacific, oscillating about the longer term trend mostly determined by the local subsidence. As it is very well known that China generally suffers of land subsidence, and the tide gauge installations may suffer of additional subsidence vs. the inland, it may be concluded from the analysis of the other worldwide tide gauges that the sea levels of China are very likely rising about the same amount of the subsidence of the tide gauges, with the sea level acceleration component still negligible.

  3. Genome distribution of differential homoeologue contributions to leaf gene expression in bread wheat.

    PubMed

    Harper, Andrea L; Trick, Martin; He, Zhesi; Clissold, Leah; Fellgett, Alison; Griffiths, Simon; Bancroft, Ian

    2016-05-01

    Using a combination of de novo transcriptome assembly, a newly developed 9495-marker transcriptome SNP genetic linkage map and comparative genomics approaches, we developed an ordered set of nonredundant transcripts for each of the subgenomes of hexaploid wheat: A (47 160 unigenes), B (59 663 unigenes) and D (40 588 unigenes). We used these as reference sequences against which to map Illumina mRNA-Seq reads derived from young leaf tissue. Transcript abundance was quantified for each unigene. Using a three-way reciprocal BLAST approach, 15 527 triplet sets of homoeologues (one from each genome) were identified. Differential expression (P < 0.05) was identified for 5248 unigenes, with 2906 represented at greater abundance than their two homoeologues and 2342 represented at lower abundance than their two homoeologues. Analysis of gene ontology terms revealed no biases between homoeologues. There was no evidence of genomewide dominance effects, rather the more highly transcribed individual genes were distributed throughout all three genomes. Transcriptome display tile plot, a visualization approach based on CMYK colour space, was developed and used to assess the genome for regions of skewed homoeologue transcript abundance. Extensive striation was revealed, indicative of many small regions of genome dominance (transcripts of homoeologues from one genome more abundant than the others) and many larger regions of genome repression (transcripts of homoeologues from one genome less abundant than the others). PMID:26442792

  4. Heterologous expression of a hydrophobin HFB1 and evaluation of its contribution to producing stable foam.

    PubMed

    Lohrasbi-Nejad, Azadeh; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2016-02-01

    Hydrophobins are small secreted proteins belong to filamentous fungi. These proteins possess a unique ability to self-assemble at air/water interfaces. Hydrophobins have a broad range of biotechnological applications such as stabilizing emulsions and foams, immobilizing proteins on a surface, designing biosensors, affinity tag for protein purification, and drug delivery. We have successfully expressed HFB1 from Trichoderma reesei belonged to class II of hydrophobins in Pichia pastoris. The recombinant gene was under the control of the methanol-inducible AOX1 promoter (alcohol oxidase 1) in the pPICZAα vector. The amount of secreted HFB1 was increased in 90-h using methanol induction. The recombinant HFB1 was purified based on the presence of His-tag and foam formation. Furthermore, HFB1 was able to produce macro and micro stable air bubbles in the liquid due to the presence of hydrophobic patches on its surface. The liquid medium containing HFB1 becomes turbid after shaking, and then the stable bubbles are formed and remained for three weeks. PMID:26431799

  5. Impact of STAT/SOCS mRNA Expression Levels after Major Injury

    PubMed Central

    Brumann, M.; Matz, M.; Kusmenkov, T.; Stegmaier, J.; Biberthaler, P.; Kanz, K.-G.; Mutschler, W.; Bogner, V.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Fulminant changes in cytokine receptor signalling might provoke severe pathological alterations after multiple trauma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the posttraumatic imbalance of the innate immune system with a special focus on the STAT/SOCS family. Methods. 20 polytraumatized patients were included. Blood samples were drawn 0 h–72 h after trauma; mRNA expression profiles of IL-10, STAT 3, SOCS 1, and SOCS 3 were quantified by qPCR. Results. IL-10 mRNA expression increased significantly in the early posttraumatic period. STAT 3 mRNA expressions showed a significant maximum at 6 h after trauma. SOCS 1 levels significantly decreased 6 h–72 h after trauma. SOCS 3 levels were significantly higher in nonsurvivors 6 h after trauma. Conclusion. We present a serial, sequential investigation in human neutrophil granulocytes of major trauma patients evaluating mRNA expression profiles of IL-10, STAT 3, SOCS 1, and SOCS 3. Posttraumatically, immune disorder was accompanied by a significant increase of IL-10 and STAT 3 mRNA expression, whereas SOCS 1 mRNA levels decreased after injury. We could demonstrate that death after trauma was associated with higher SOCS 3 mRNA levels already at 6 h after trauma. To support our results, further investigations have to evaluate protein levels of STAT/SOCS family in terms of posttraumatic immune imbalance. PMID:24648661

  6. Steric contribution to the long-term sea level variations within the Gulf of Cadiz continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiz, Irene; Tejedor, Begoña; Gómez-Enri, Jesús; Aboitiz, Alazne; Villares, Pilar

    2015-04-01

    The response of the long-term coastal sea level variations to the steric contribution has been explored within the Gulf of Cadiz (GoC) for the period 1997-2008 using tide gauge data as well as altimeter-derived sea level anomaly maps (AVISO). In order to remove the atmospheric pressure contribution, tide gauge data were corrected using the inverted barometer (IB) method. The AVISO maps were initially de-corrected using the Dynamic Atmospheric Correction product and then corrected using the same IB method. Steric height (ssh) time series were computed by combining a high resolution climatology (0.1° x 0.1°) with monthly maps of AVHRR sea surface temperature considering a reference depth of 500 m at the open ocean and the bottom depth for shallower areas. In order to evaluate the steric effect on the long-term sea level changes, four types of steric contribution were defined: (1) The ssh values interpolated to the AVISO grid resolution were considered as the local steric effect. (2) The open ocean steric effect was computed by averaging all the steric heights corresponding to grid points located over the 500 m isobath and deeper. (3) The Eastern / Western continental shelf steric contribution was obtained by averaging over those grid points located within each continental shelf. (4) Finally, a basin-wide steric effect was computed by averaging the steric heights all over the GoC. The potential contribution of each of the defined steric effects on the pressure-adjusted sea level was evaluated. The open ocean contribution explained the highest percentage of variance all over the basin with the exception of the western shelf, where the best results were obtained with the local contribution, supporting the idea that the cell of cyclonic circulation found off Cape San Vicente is a local quasi-permanent feature. The fact that the open ocean steric effect explained the highest percentage of variance within the eastern shelf suggested that the deep ocean thermosteric

  7. Quantifying the contribution of chromatin dynamics to stochastic gene expression reveals long, locus-dependent periods between transcriptional bursts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A number of studies have established that stochasticity in gene expression may play an important role in many biological phenomena. This therefore calls for further investigations to identify the molecular mechanisms at stake, in order to understand and manipulate cell-to-cell variability. In this work, we explored the role played by chromatin dynamics in the regulation of stochastic gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells. Results For this purpose, we generated isogenic chicken-cell populations expressing a fluorescent reporter integrated in one copy per clone. Although the clones differed only in the genetic locus at which the reporter was inserted, they showed markedly different fluorescence distributions, revealing different levels of stochastic gene expression. Use of chromatin-modifying agents showed that direct manipulation of chromatin dynamics had a marked effect on the extent of stochastic gene expression. To better understand the molecular mechanism involved in these phenomena, we fitted these data to a two-state model describing the opening/closing process of the chromatin. We found that the differences between clones seemed to be due mainly to the duration of the closed state, and that the agents we used mainly seem to act on the opening probability. Conclusions In this study, we report biological experiments combined with computational modeling, highlighting the importance of chromatin dynamics in stochastic gene expression. This work sheds a new light on the mechanisms of gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells, and argues in favor of relatively slow dynamics with long (hours to days) periods of quiet state. PMID:23442824

  8. Upregulated expression of polycomb protein Ring1 contributes to poor prognosis and accelerated proliferation in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yicheng; Hu, Baoying; Wei, Lixian; Jiang, Dawei; Zhu, Mingyan

    2015-12-01

    Ring finger protein 1 (Ring1) have recently been reported to be closely related to aggressive tumor features in multiple cancer types, including prostate cancer, non-small-cell lung cancer, and bladder cancer. However, the role of Ring1 in human hepatocarcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we aimed at investigating the latent role of Ring1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. The expression of Ring1 was evaluated using Western blot analysis in 8 paired fresh HCC tissues and immunohistochemistry on 98 paraffin-embedded sections from 2005 to 2008. Moreover, RNA interference, CCK-8, colony formation, and flow-cytometry analyses were performed to investigate the role of Ring1 in the regulation of HCC cell proliferation. Compared with adjacent normal tissues, the level of Ring1 was significantly increased in HCC specimens. High expression of Ring1 was associated with histological grade (P = 0.011) and tumor size (P = 0.004), and Ring1 expression was positively related with the proliferation marker Ki-67 (P < 0.001). Moreover, knocking down Ring1 induced growth impairment and G1/S cell cycle arrest in HCC cells. Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that high expression of Ring1 indicated poor prognosis of HCC (P = 0.03). On the basis of these results, we proposed that the expression of Ring1 protein may be a novel indicator of HCC prognosis. PMID:26141041

  9. Angiotensin type 1a receptors on corticotropin-releasing factor neurons contribute to the expression of conditioned fear.

    PubMed

    Hurt, R C; Garrett, J C; Keifer, O P; Linares, A; Couling, L; Speth, R C; Ressler, K J; Marvar, P J

    2015-09-01

    Although generally associated with cardiovascular regulation, angiotensin II receptor type 1a (AT1a R) blockade in mouse models and humans has also been associated with enhanced fear extinction and decreased post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity, respectively. The mechanisms mediating these effects remain unknown, but may involve alterations in the activities of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-expressing cells, which are known to be involved in fear regulation. To test the hypothesis that AT1a R signaling in CRFergic neurons is involved in conditioned fear expression, we generated and characterized a conditional knockout mouse strain with a deletion of the AT1a R gene from its CRF-releasing cells (CRF-AT1a R((-/-)) ). These mice exhibit normal baseline heart rate, blood pressure, anxiety and locomotion, and freeze at normal levels during acquisition of auditory fear conditioning. However, CRF-AT1a R((-/-)) mice exhibit less freezing than wild-type mice during tests of conditioned fear expression-an effect that may be caused by a decrease in the consolidation of fear memory. These results suggest that central AT1a R activity in CRF-expressing cells plays a role in the expression of conditioned fear, and identify CRFergic cells as a population on which AT1 R antagonists may act to modulate fear extinction. PMID:26257395

  10. The Genomic Landscape of Position Effects on Protein Expression Level and Noise in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoshu; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2016-05-25

    Position effect, the influence of the chromosomal location of a gene on its activity, is a fundamental property of the genome. By placing a GFP gene cassette at 482 different locations across all chromosomes in budding yeast, we quantified the position effects on protein expression level and noise at the genomic scale. The position effects are significant, altering the mean protein expression level by up to 15 times and expression noise by up to 20 times. DNA replication timing, 3D chromosomal conformation, and several histone modifications are major covariates of position effects. Essential genes are enriched in genomic regions with inherently low expression noise, supporting the hypothesis that chromosomal clustering of essential genes results from selection against their expressional stochasticity. Position effects exhibit significant interactions with promoters. Together, our results suggest that position effects have shaped the evolution of chromosome organization and should inform future genome engineering efforts. PMID:27185547

  11. How does plant chemical diversity contribute to biodiversity at higher trophic levels?

    PubMed

    Schuman, Meredith C; van Dam, Nicole M; Beran, Franziska; Harpole, W Stanley

    2016-04-01

    Plants, perhaps Earth's most accomplished chemists, produce thousands of specialized metabolites having no direct role in cell division or growth. These phytochemicals vary by taxon, with many taxa producing characteristic substance classes; and within taxa, with individual variation in structural variety and production patterns. Observations of corresponding variation in herbivore metabolism, behavior, and diet breadth motivated the development of chemical ecology research. We discuss the importance of plant biodiversity in general and phytochemical diversity in particular for biodiversity and ecological interactions at higher trophic levels. We then provide an overview of the descriptive, molecular and analytical tools which allow modern biologists to investigate phytochemical diversity and its effects on higher trophic levels, from physiological mechanisms to ecological communities. PMID:27436646

  12. INTERIM ANALYSIS OF THE CONTRIBUTION OF HIGH-LEVEL EVIDENCE FOR DENGUE VECTOR CONTROL.

    PubMed

    Horstick, Olaf; Ranzinger, Silvia Runge

    2015-01-01

    This interim analysis reviews the available systematic literature for dengue vector control on three levels: 1) single and combined vector control methods, with existing work on peridomestic space spraying and on Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis; further work is available soon on the use of Temephos, Copepods and larvivorous fish; 2) or for a specific purpose, like outbreak control, and 3) on a strategic level, as for example decentralization vs centralization, with a systematic review on vector control organization. Clear best practice guidelines for methodology of entomological studies are needed. There is a need to include measuring dengue transmission data. The following recommendations emerge: Although vector control can be effective, implementation remains an issue; Single interventions are probably not useful; Combinations of interventions have mixed results; Careful implementation of vector control measures may be most important; Outbreak interventions are often applied with questionable effectiveness. PMID:26506739

  13. The Transcription Factor Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 Is Expressed after Cerebral Ischemia and Contributes to Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino; Salkowski, Cindy A.; Zhang, Fangyi; Aber, Tracy; Nagayama, Masao; Vogel, Stefanie N.; Elizabeth Ross, M.

    1999-01-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) is involved in the molecular mechanisms of inflammation and apoptosis, processes that contribute to ischemic brain injury. In this study, the induction of IRF-1 in response to cerebral ischemia and its role in ischemic brain injury were investigated. IRF-1 gene expression was markedly upregulated within 12 h of occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in C57BL/6 mice. The expression reached a peak 4 d after ischemia (6.0 ± 1.8-fold; P < 0.001) and was restricted to the ischemic regions of the brain. The volume of ischemic injury was reduced by 23 ± 3% in IRF-1+/− and by 46 ± 9% in IRF-1−/− mice (P < 0.05). The reduction in infarct volume was paralleled by a substantial attenuation in neurological deficits. Thus, IRF-1 is the first nuclear transacting factor demonstrated to contribute directly to cerebral ischemic damage and may be a novel therapeutic target in ischemic stroke. PMID:9989987

  14. Establishing the contribution of lawn mowing to atmospheric aerosol levels in American suburbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. M.; Zahardis, J.; Petrucci, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are a class of wound-induced volatile organic compounds emitted by several plant species. Turf grasses emit a complex profile of GLVs upon mowing, as evidenced by the "freshly cut grass" smell, some of which are readily oxidized in the atmosphere to contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The contribution of lawn-mowing-induced SOA production may be especially impactful at the urban-suburban interface, where urban hubs provide a source of anthropogenic oxidants and SOA while suburban neighborhoods have the potential to emit large quantities of reactive, mow-induced GLVs. This interface provides a unique opportunity to study aerosol formation in a multicomponent system and at a regionally relevant scale. Freshly cut grass was collected from a study site in Essex Junction, Vermont, and was placed inside a 775 L Teflon experimental chamber. Thermal desorption gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS) was used to characterize the emitted GLV profile. Ozone was introduced to the experimental chamber and TD-GC/MS was used to monitor the consumption of these GLVs and the subsequent evolution of gas-phase products, while a scanning mobility particle sizer was used to continuously measure aerosol size distributions and mass loadings as a result of grass clipping ozonolysis. Freshly cut grass was found to emit a complex mixture of GLVs, dominated by {cis}-3-hexenyl acetate (CHA) and {cis}-3-hexenol (HXL), which were released at an initial rate of 1.8 (± 0.5) μg and 0.07 (± 0.03) μg per square meter of lawn mowed with each mowing. Chamber studies using pure standards of CHA and HXL were found to have aerosol yields of 1.2 (± 1.1)% and 3.3 (± 3.1)%, respectively. Using these aerosol yields and the emission rate of CHA and HXL by grass, SOA evolution by ozonolysis of grass clippings was predicted. However, the measured SOA mass produced from the ozonolysis of grass clippings exceeded the predicted amount, by upwards of 150%. The

  15. Establishing the contribution of lawn mowing to atmospheric aerosol levels in American suburbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. M.; Zahardis, J.; Petrucci, G. A.

    2013-09-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are a class of wound-induced volatile organic compounds emitted by several plant species. Turfgrasses emit a complex profile of GLVs upon mowing, as evidenced by the "freshly cut grass" smell, some of which are readily oxidized in the atmosphere to contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The contribution of lawn mowing-induced SOA production may be especially impactful at the urban/suburban interface, where urban hubs provide a source of anthropogenic oxidants and SOA while suburban neighborhoods have the potential to emit large quantities of reactive, mow-induced GLVs. This interface provides a unique opportunity to study aerosol formation in a multi-component system and at a regionally relevant scale. Freshly cut grass was collected from a study site in Essex Junction, Vermont and was placed inside a 775 L Teflon experimental chamber. Thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS) was used to characterize the emitted GLV profile. Ozone was introduced to the experimental chamber and TD-GC/MS was used to monitor the consumption of these GLVs and the subsequent evolution of gas phase products while a scanning mobility particle sizer was used to continuously measure aerosol size distributions and mass loadings as a result of grass clipping ozonolysis. Freshly cut grass found to emit a complex mixture of GLVs, dominated by cis-3-hexenyl acetate and cis-3-hexenol, which were released at an initial rate of 1.8 (±0.5) μg and 0.07 (±0.03) μg per square meter of lawn mowed with each mowing. Chamber studies using pure standards of cis-3-hexenyl acetate (CHA) and cis-3-hexenol (HXL) were found to have aerosol yields of 1.2 (±1.1)% and 3.3 (±3.1)%, respectively. Using these aerosol yields and the emission rate of these CHA and HXL by grass, SOA evolution by ozonolysis of grass clippings was predicted. However, the measured SOA mass produced from the ozonolysis of grass clippings exceeded the predicted amount, by

  16. Emotional Intelligence and Mismatching Expressive and Verbal Messages: A Contribution to Detection of Deception

    PubMed Central

    Wojciechowski, Jerzy; Stolarski, Maciej; Matthews, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Processing facial emotion, especially mismatches between facial and verbal messages, is believed to be important in the detection of deception. For example, emotional leakage may accompany lying. Individuals with superior emotion perception abilities may then be more adept in detecting deception by identifying mismatch between facial and verbal messages. Two personal factors that may predict such abilities are female gender and high emotional intelligence (EI). However, evidence on the role of gender and EI in detection of deception is mixed. A key issue is that the facial processing skills required to detect deception may not be the same as those required to identify facial emotion. To test this possibility, we developed a novel facial processing task, the FDT (Face Decoding Test) that requires detection of inconsistencies between facial and verbal cues to emotion. We hypothesized that gender and ability EI would be related to performance when cues were inconsistent. We also hypothesized that gender effects would be mediated by EI, because women tend to score as more emotionally intelligent on ability tests. Data were collected from 210 participants. Analyses of the FDT suggested that EI was correlated with superior face decoding in all conditions. We also confirmed the expected gender difference, the superiority of high EI individuals, and the mediation hypothesis. Also, EI was more strongly associated with facial decoding performance in women than in men, implying there may be gender differences in strategies for processing affective cues. It is concluded that integration of emotional and cognitive cues may be a core attribute of EI that contributes to the detection of deception. PMID:24658500

  17. A Theoretical Lower Bound for Selection on the Expression Levels of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    We use simple models of the costs and benefits of microbial gene expression to show that changing a protein’s expression away from its optimum by 2-fold should reduce fitness by at least 0.2·P, where P is the fraction the cell’s protein that the gene accounts for. As microbial genes are usually expressed at above 5 parts per million, and effective population sizes are likely to be above 106, this implies that 2-fold changes to gene expression levels are under strong selection, as Ne·s≫1, where Ne is the effective population size and s is the selection coefficient. Thus, most gene duplications should be selected against. On the other hand, we predict that for most genes, small changes in the expression will be effectively neutral. PMID:27289091

  18. A Theoretical Lower Bound for Selection on the Expression Levels of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Price, Morgan N; Arkin, Adam P

    2016-01-01

    We use simple models of the costs and benefits of microbial gene expression to show that changing a protein's expression away from its optimum by 2-fold should reduce fitness by at least [Formula: see text], where P is the fraction the cell's protein that the gene accounts for. As microbial genes are usually expressed at above 5 parts per million, and effective population sizes are likely to be above 10(6), this implies that 2-fold changes to gene expression levels are under strong selection, as [Formula: see text], where Ne is the effective population size and s is the selection coefficient. Thus, most gene duplications should be selected against. On the other hand, we predict that for most genes, small changes in the expression will be effectively neutral. PMID:27289091

  19. IL-10-Expressing Th2 Cells Contribute to the Elevated Antibody Production in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinliang; Ma, Liheng; Yang, Shufeng; Wang, Shaohua; Wei, Xuan; Song, Shuchun

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common autoimmune disease associated with progressive disability, systemic complications, and early death. Multiple lines of evidence have placed adaptive immune responses in the center of RA pathogenesis. However, the functional roles of T helper cells are insufficiently described. Here, we examined the Th2 cell subsets and their functions in RA patients. A downregulation of IL-4(+) cells in CD4(+) T cells were observed in RA patients, indicating a downregulation of Th2 cells, and these results were confirmed by using and CXCR3 and CCR6 surface markers. We then found that CXCR3(-)CCR6(-) Th2 cells can be separated into IL-4(+) (single positive), IL-10(+) (single positive), and IL-4(+)IL-10(+) (double positive) subsets. Further results showed that CXCR5 only expressed on IL-10+ Th2 cells. The CXCR5(+) and CXCR5(-) Th2 cells each exhibited distinctive features in helping B cell antibody secretion. CXCR5(+) Th2 cells were more potent at stimulating total Ig and IgM secretion, while CXCR5(-) Th2 cells were more potent at stimulating IgE. IL-10 was required for helping B cell total Ig, IgM, and IgE production, while IL-4 was required for total Ig and IgE. The frequencies of IL-10(+) and IL-4(+)IL-10(+) Th2 cells were positively correlated with rheumatoid factor titer in vivo. Together, our study demonstrated distinctive subsets within Th2 cells, each with different impacts on antibody production and RA disease. PMID:26956472

  20. The human phenolsulphotransferase polymorphism is determined by the level of expression of the enzyme protein.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A L; Roberts, R C; Coughtrie, M W

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the expression of platelet phenolsulphotransferase (PST) in 60 individuals. Using an antibody which recognizes both forms of PST present in man (P-PST and M-PST), we determined that the polymorphism of platelet P-PST activity is determined by the level of expression of the enzyme protein. The implications for susceptibility to adverse drug reactions and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8257413

  1. An alternative method of enhancing the expression level of heterologous protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Tian, Hong; Bao, Lichen; Dai, Xin; Gao, Xiangdong; Yao, Wenbing

    2014-12-12

    Though numerous strategy options are available for achieving high expression levels of genes in Escherichia coli, not every gene can be efficiently expressed in this organism. By investigating the relationship between the mRNA secondary structure of translational initiation region (TIR) and gene expression in E.coli, we establish a simple method to design sequences of appropriate TIR (from -35 to +36) that meet a specific expression level as we need. Using this method, overexpression of native human humor necrosis factor α and extracellular domain of Her2/neu protein (aa 23-146) in E. coli were achieved. Differences in expression appeared was mainly related to the efficiency of translation initiation and the stability of mRNA secondary structure, because the intracellular mRNA levels analyzed by real-time RT-PCR were quite similar. Our approach can overcome the steric hindrance of translation startup, and therefore promote translation smoothly to acquire high expression of exogenous protein. PMID:25449272

  2. Effects of dietary roughage levels on the expression of adipogenic transcription factors in Wagyu steers.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Kawakami, S-I; Nakanishi, N

    2009-12-01

    We hypothesized that dietary roughage level would alter the expression levels of adipogenic transcription factors in adipose tissue of Japanese black (Wagyu) steers. Steers were fed whole crop rice silage at three levels: (1) high-roughage feeding group, fed 8kg silage and 5kg concentrate (HR); (2) middle roughage feeding group, fed 5kg silage and 6kg concentrate (MR); and (3) low roughage feeding group, fed 2kg silage and 7kg concentrate (LR) from 22 to 30months of age. In subcutaneous adipose tissue, there were no significant differences in the expression of the adipogenic transcription factors and adipocyte size among feeding groups. In mesenteric adipose tissue, the expression of C/EBPα in the LR and MR groups was significantly higher than that in the HR group. Adipocyte size in the mesenteric adipose tissue of the LR group was significantly larger than that of the HR group. In intermuscular adipose tissue, the expression of C/EBPβ-LAP in the LR group was significantly higher than that in the HR group, and the expression of C/EBPβ-LIP in the LR and MR groups was significantly higher than that in the HR group. Adipocyte size in the intermuscular adipose tissue of the LR and MR groups was significantly smaller than that of the HR group. These results suggest that dietary roughage revel affects the adipose tissue depot-specific differences in C/EBP family expression pattern and adipocyte cellularity in Wagyu steers. PMID:20416623

  3. Stable Plastid Transformation for High-Level Recombinant Protein Expression: Promises and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Meili; Li, Yongfei; Xue, Xiaochang; Wang, Xianfeng; Long, Jiangang

    2012-01-01

    Plants are a promising expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. However, low protein productivity remains a major obstacle that limits extensive commercialization of whole plant and plant cell bioproduction platform. Plastid genetic engineering offers several advantages, including high levels of transgenic expression, transgenic containment via maternal inheritance, and multigene expression in a single transformation event. In recent years, the development of optimized expression strategies has given a huge boost to the exploitation of plastids in molecular farming. The driving forces behind the high expression level of plastid bioreactors include codon optimization, promoters and UTRs, genotypic modifications, endogenous enhancer and regulatory elements, posttranslational modification, and proteolysis. Exciting progress of the high expression level has been made with the plastid-based production of two particularly important classes of pharmaceuticals: vaccine antigens, therapeutic proteins, and antibiotics and enzymes. Approaches to overcome and solve the associated challenges of this culture system that include low transformation frequencies, the formation of inclusion bodies, and purification of recombinant proteins will also be discussed. PMID:23093835

  4. Expression of fas protein on CD4+T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Fan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Hui-Guo

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence on the Expression of Fas protein on CD4+ T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne laser in the cases of psoriasis. Methods:the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was determined in the casee of psoriasis(n=5) pre and post-low level laser irradiation(30 min、60min and 120min)by flow cytometry as compared withthe control(n=5). Results:In the cases of psoriasis,the expression of CD4+T FAS protein 21.4+/-3.1% was increased significantly than that of control group 16.8+/-2.1% pre-irradiation, p<0.05in the control,there is no difference between pre and post- irradiation,p>0.05in the cases , the expression of CD4+T Fas protein wae positively corelated to the irradiation times, when the energy density arrived to 22.92J/cm2(60 minutes)and 45.84J/cm2(120minutes), the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was increased significantly as compared with pre-irradiation,p<0.05.Conclusion: The expression of CD4+T Fas protein may be increased by low level He-Ne laser irradiation ,the uncontrolled status of apoptosis could be corrected.

  5. Protein pheromone expression levels predict and respond to the formation of social dominance networks

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Adam C.; Cunningham, Christopher B.; Ruff, James S.; Potts, Wayne K.

    2015-01-01

    Communication signals are key regulators of social networks, and are thought to be under selective pressure to honestly reflect social status, including dominance status. The odors of dominants and nondominants differentially influence behavior, and identification of the specific pheromones associated with, and predictive of, dominance status is essential for understanding the mechanisms of network formation and maintenance. In mice, major urinary proteins (MUPs) are excreted in extraordinary large quantities and expression level has been hypothesized to provide an honest signal of dominance status. Here, we evaluate whether MUPs are associated with dominance in wild-derived mice by analyzing expression levels before, during, and after competition for reproductive resources over three days. During competition, dominant males have 24% greater urinary MUP expression than nondominants. The MUP darcin, a pheromone that stimulates female attraction, is predictive of dominance status: dominant males have higher darcin expression before competition. Dominants also have a higher ratio of darcin to other MUPs before and during competition. These differences appear transient, because there are no differences in MUPs or darcin after competition. We also find MUP expression is affected by sire dominance status: socially naive sons of dominant males have lower MUP expression, but this apparent repression is released during competition. A requisite condition for the evolution of communication signals is honesty, and we provide novel insight into pheromones and social networks by showing that MUP and darcin expression is a reliable signal of dominance status, a primary determinant of male fitness in many species. PMID:25867293

  6. Expression of DNA repair genes in burned skin exposed to low-level red laser.

    PubMed

    Trajano, Eduardo Tavares Lima; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Pôrto, Luís Cristóvão; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2014-11-01

    Although red laser lights lie in the region of non-ionizing radiations in the electromagnetic spectrum, there are doubts whether absorption of these radiations causes lesions in the DNA molecule. Our aim was to investigate the expression of the genes involved with base excision and nucleotide excision repair pathways in skin tissue submitted to burn injury and exposed to low-level red laser. Wistar rats were divided as follows: control group-rats burned and not irradiated, laser group-rats burned and irradiated 1 day after injury for five consecutive days, and later laser group-rats injured and treated 4 days after injury for five consecutive days. Irradiation was performed according to a clinical protocol (20 J/cm(2), 100 mW, continuous wave emission mode). The animals were sacrificed on day 10, and scarred tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, complementary DNA (cDNA) synthesis, and evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Low-level red laser exposure (1) reduces the expression of APE1 messenger (mRNA), (2) increases the expression of OGG1 mRNA, (3) reduces the expression of XPC mRNA, and (4) increases the expression of XPA mRNA both in laser and later laser groups. Red laser exposure at therapeutic fluences alters the expression of genes related to base excision and nucleotide excision pathways of DNA repair during wound healing of burned skin. PMID:24930134

  7. B-chromosome effects on Hsp70 gene expression does not occur at transcriptional level in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Domínguez, Beatriz; Cabrero, Josefa; Camacho, Juan Pedro M; López-León, María Dolores

    2016-10-01

    As intragenomic parasites, B chromosomes can elicit stress in the host genome, thus inducing a response for host adaptation to this kind of continuous parasitism. In the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans, B-chromosome presence has been previously associated with a decrease in the amount of the heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70). To investigate whether this effect is already apparent at transcriptional level, we analyze the expression levels of the Hsp70 gene in gonads and somatic tissues of males and females with and without B chromosomes from two populations, where the predominant B chromosome variants (B2 and B24) exhibit different levels of parasitism, by means of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) on complementary DNA (cDNA). The results revealed the absence of significant differences for Hsp70 transcripts associated with B-chromosome presence in virtually all samples. This indicates that the decrease in HSP70 protein levels, formerly reported in this species, may not be a consequence of transcriptional down-regulation of Hsp70 genes, but the result of post-transcriptional regulation. These results will help to design future studies oriented to identifying factors modulating Hsp70 expression, and will also contribute to uncover the biological role of B chromosomes in eukaryotic genomes. PMID:27334602

  8. An assessment of the contribution of the Greenland ice sheet to future sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, M.; Melia, D. Salas y.

    2012-04-01

    We assess the order of magnitude of future sea level rise due to the melting of the Greenland ice sheet. To this end, we forced GRISLI ice sheet model (LGGE, France) with output from climate simulations run with CNRM-CM5 in the framework of CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5). GRISLI is a 3D thermo-mechanically coupled ice sheet model which mixes shallow ice approximation and shallow shelf approximation. The horizontal resolution is 15km. We use surface mass balance modeled by CNRM-CM5 as a top boundary conditions. CNRM-CM5 is a global coupled climate model developed by CNRM/CERFACS (France). This new global coupled climate model is based on the ocean-atmosphere core formed by the most up-to-date versions of NEMO and ARPEGE-Climat. Surface-atmosphere exchanges, sea ice and river routing are respectively represented by SURFEX v5, Gelato v5 and TRIP models. The atmospheric component of CNRM-CM5 has 31 vertical levels and a horizontal resolution of 1.4°, and the ocean has 42 levels and a horizontal resolution of 1°. GRISLI was forced with the output of a preindustrial simulation run with CNRM-CM5 in order to generate an initial state for the ice sheet that is in near-equilibrium with the preindustrial climate. Then, GRISLI was forced with CNRM-CM5 data from a 1850-2005 historical experiment. From 2006, several scenario experiments run with CNRM-CM5 were run: RCP2.6, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 over 2006-2300. We estimate the additional sea level rise over the whole 21st century. It should be noted that for the RCP8.5 scenario the melting rate of Greenland accelerates very rapidly after the 21st century, which results in almost total melting of Greenland ice sheet before year 2800. This acceleration phenomenon is probably amplified by topographic changes induced by the shrinking of the ice sheet.

  9. Interactions between copy number and expression level of genes involved in fluconazole resistance in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Abbes, Salma; Mary, Charles; Sellami, Hayet; Michel-Nguyen, Annie; Ayadi, Ali; Ranque, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to elucidate the relative involvement of drug resistance gene copy number and overexpression in fluconazole resistance in clinical C. glabrata isolates using a population-based approach. Methods: Fluconazole resistance levels were quantified using the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) via Etest method. Both gene expression levels and gene copy number of CgCDR1, CgPDH1, CgERG11, and CgSNQ2 were assessed via quantitative real-time PCR. The influence of the main effects and first-level interactions of both the expression level and copy number of these genes on fluconazole resistance levels were analyzed using a multivariate statistical model. Results: Forty-three C. glabrata isolates were collected from 30 patients during in a hospital survey. In the multivariate analysis, C. glabrata fluconazole MICs were independently increased by CgSNQ2 overexpression (p < 10−4) and the interaction between CgPDH1 gene copy number and CgPDH1 expression level (p = 0.038). In contrast, both CgPDH1 overexpression (p = 0.049) and the interaction between CgSNQ2 and CgERG11 expression (p = 0.003) led to a significant decrease in fluconazole MICs. Conclusion: Fluconazole resistance in C. glabrata involves complex interactions between drug resistance gene expression and/or copy number. The population-based multivariate analysis highlighted the involvement of the CgSNQ2 gene in fluconazole resistance and the complex effect of the other genes such as PDH1 for which overexpression was associated with reduced fluconazole resistance levels, while the interaction between PDH1 overexpression and copy number was associated with increased resistance levels. PMID:24273749

  10. A century-long simulation of terrestrial water storage change and its contribution to global sea-level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierkens, M. F.; Bosmans, J.; de Graaf, I. E. M.; Sutanudjaja, E.; Schmitz, O.; Wada, Y.; Van Beek, L. P.

    2015-12-01

    Although limited, the contribution of terrestrial water storage (TWS) change to sea-level change is significant enough to be taken into account in sea-level attribution studies. Thus, after being absent in a previous report, TWS was again one of the components taken into account in IPCC assessment report 5. TWS can be effectively observed by analysing gravity anomalies from the GRACE mission or by observing individual components with lidar (surface water level), geodetic surveys (groundwater) and space borne passive and active microwave sensors (soil moisture, snow water equivalent). However, these observation only yield time series of limited length making it difficult to estimate long term trends in TWS as multi-decadal variations. After a short review of recent modelling efforts, we present the results of a century-long (1900-2010) simulation of TWS change with PCR-GLOBWB 2.0 that is fully coupled with a global two-layer groundwater model. In this simulation we include the effects of land cover change, the building of reservoirs and human water use (abstraction from surface and groundwater, water consumption and return flows). The effects of wetland drainage and siltation of reservoirs is corrected for afterwards. We validate TWS estimates for the period 2003-2010 with GRACE estimates. Trends of TWS and its effects on sea-level change are estimated and the main contributions identified. Similarly, we examine multi-year variability in TWS and sea-level change in relation to climate variability.

  11. Contribution of Transcription Factor Binding Site Motif Variants to Condition-Specific Gene Expression Patterns in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rest, Joshua S.; Bullaughey, Kevin; Morris, Geoffrey P.; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2012-01-01

    It is now experimentally well known that variant sequences of a cis transcription factor binding site motif can contribute to differential regulation of genes. We characterize the relationship between motif variants and gene expression by analyzing expression microarray data and binding site predictions. To accomplish this, we statistically detect motif variants with effects that differ among environments. Such environmental specificity may be due to either affinity differences between variants or, more likely, differential interactions of TFs bound to these variants with cofactors, and with differential presence of cofactors across environments. We examine conservation of functional variants across four Saccharomyces species, and find that about a third of transcription factors have target genes that are differentially expressed in a condition-specific manner that is correlated with the nucleotide at variant motif positions. We find good correspondence between our results and some cases in the experimental literature (Reb1, Sum1, Mcm1, and Rap1). These results and growing consensus in the literature indicates that motif variants may often be functionally distinct, that this may be observed in genomic data, and that variants play an important role in condition-specific gene regulation. PMID:22384202

  12. Parvalbumin-Expressing GABAergic Neurons in Mouse Barrel Cortex Contribute to Gating a Goal-Directed Sensorimotor Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Sachidhanandam, Shankar; Sermet, B. Semihcan; Petersen, Carl C.H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Sensory processing in neocortex is primarily driven by glutamatergic excitation, which is counterbalanced by GABAergic inhibition, mediated by a diversity of largely local inhibitory interneurons. Here, we trained mice to lick a reward spout in response to whisker deflection, and we recorded from genetically defined GABAergic inhibitory neurons in layer 2/3 of the primary somatosensory barrel cortex. Parvalbumin-expressing (PV), vasoactive intestinal peptide-expressing (VIP), and somatostatin-expressing (SST) neurons displayed distinct action potential firing dynamics during task performance. Whereas SST neurons fired at low rates, both PV and VIP neurons fired at high rates both spontaneously and in response to whisker stimulation. After an initial outcome-invariant early sensory response, PV neurons had lower firing rates in hit trials compared to miss trials. Optogenetic inhibition of PV neurons during this time period enhanced behavioral performance. Hence, PV neuron activity might contribute causally to gating the sensorimotor transformation of a whisker sensory stimulus into licking motor output. PMID:27149853

  13. Summertime formaldehyde observations in New York City: Ambient levels, sources and its contribution to HOx radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu Chi; Schwab, James J.; Demerjian, Kenneth L.; Bae, Min-Suk; Chen, Wei-Nai; Sun, Yele; Zhang, Qi; Hung, Hui-Ming; Perry, Jacqueline

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of ambient formaldehyde (HCHO), related gases and particulate matter were carried out from the SUNY Albany mobile platform at the Queens College site in New York City (NYC) from 15 July to 3 August 2009. Ambient HCHO was measured using a quantum cascade laser (QCL) trace gas detector. HCHO concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 7.5 ppb with a mean value of 2.2 ± 1.1 ppb. Daily HCHO peaks were nearly always found between 1100 EST (Eastern Standard Time) and noontime throughout the sampling period. HCHO correlated strongly with NOx and black carbon during the traffic rush hours, but around noontime HCHO correlated much better with total oxidants (Ox = O3 + NO2). Using the diurnal pattern of HCHO/BC ratios, we estimated that 70% of HCHO present between 1200 EST to 1500 EST was produced by photochemical reactions. Sources of photochemically produced HCHO were calculated using measured concentrations of hydrocarbons, their reaction kinetics with OH radicals, and HCHO yields. These calculations indicated that isoprene oxidation was the dominant source of HCHO for this period at this site, responsible for 44%, followed by methane (25%) and propene (18%). To assess the impact of HCHO as a radical source, the HOx production rates from HCHO, HONO, O3 photolysis, and alkenes +O3 were calculated as well. Daily averaged HOx production rates from HONO, HCHO, O3 photolysis and alkenes +O3 were 8.6 × 106, 2.3 × 106, 1.7 × 106, 2.1 × 105 molecules cm-3 s-1, respectively, contributing 67, 18, 13 and 2% to the overall daily HOx radical budget from these precursors.

  14. Inheritance of rare functional GCKR variants and their contribution to triglyceride levels in families

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Matthew G.; Raimondo, Anne; Wang, Jian; Ban, Matthew R.; Davis, Mindy I.; Barrett, Amy; Ranft, Jessica; Jagdhuhn, David; Waterstradt, Rica; Baltrusch, Simone; Simeonov, Anton; Collins, Francis S.; Hegele, Robert A.; Gloyn, Anna L.

    2014-01-01

    Significant resources have been invested in sequencing studies to investigate the role of rare variants in complex disease etiology. However, the diagnostic interpretation of individual rare variants remains a major challenge, and may require accurate variant functional classification and the collection of large numbers of variant carriers. Utilizing sequence data from 458 individuals with hypertriglyceridemia and 333 controls with normal plasma triglyceride levels, we investigated these issues using GCKR, encoding glucokinase regulatory protein. Eighteen rare non-synonymous GCKR variants identified in these 791 individuals were comprehensively characterized by a range of biochemical and cell biological assays, including a novel high-throughput-screening-based approach capable of measuring all variant proteins simultaneously. Functionally deleterious variants were collectively associated with hypertriglyceridemia, but a range of in silico prediction algorithms showed little consistency between algorithms and poor agreement with functional data. We extended our study by obtaining sequence data on family members; however, functional variants did not co-segregate with triglyceride levels. Therefore, despite evidence for their collective functional and clinical relevance, our results emphasize the low predictive value of rare GCKR variants in individuals and the complex heritability of lipid traits. PMID:24879641

  15. Ethnicity, educational level and attitudes contribute to parental intentions about genetic testing for child obesity.

    PubMed

    Kocken, Paul L; Theunissen, Meinou H C; Schönbeck, Yvonne; Henneman, Lidewij; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Detmar, Symone B

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess parental beliefs and intentions about genetic testing for their children in a multi-ethnic population with the aim of acquiring information to guide interventions for obesity prevention and management. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in parents of native Dutch children and children from a large minority population (Turks) selected from Youth Health Care registries. The age range of the children was 5-11 years. Parents with lower levels of education and parents of non-native children were more convinced that overweight has a genetic cause and their intentions to test the genetic predisposition of their child to overweight were firmer. A firmer intention to test the child was associated with the parents' perceptions of their child's susceptibility to being overweight, a positive attitude towards genetic testing, and anticipated regret at not having the child tested while at risk for overweight. Interaction effects were found in ethnic and socio-economic groups. Ethnicity and educational level play a role in parental beliefs about child overweight and genetic testing. Education programmes about obesity risk, genetic testing and the importance of behaviour change should be tailored to the cultural and behavioural factors relevant to ethnic and socio-economic target groups. PMID:23389423

  16. Circadian Modulation of Dopamine Levels and Dopaminergic Neuron Development Contributes to Attention Deficiency and Hyperactive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Zhong, Zhaomin; Wang, Mingyong; Chen, Xifeng; Tan, Yicheng; Zhang, Shuqing; He, Wei; He, Xiong; Huang, Guodong; Lu, Haiping; Wu, Ping; Che, Yi; Yan, Yi-Lin; Postlethwait, John H.; Chen, Wenbiao

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in children and adults. While ADHD patients often display circadian abnormalities, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we found that the zebrafish mutant for the circadian gene period1b (per1b) displays hyperactive, impulsive-like, and attention deficit-like behaviors and low levels of dopamine, reminiscent of human ADHD patients. We found that the circadian clock directly regulates dopamine-related genes monoamine oxidase and dopamine β hydroxylase, and acts via genes important for the development or maintenance of dopaminergic neurons to regulate their number and organization in the ventral diencephalic posterior tuberculum. We then found that Per1 knock-out mice also display ADHD-like symptoms and reduced levels of dopamine, thereby showing highly conserved roles of the circadian clock in ADHD. Our studies demonstrate that disruption of a circadian clock gene elicits ADHD-like syndrome. The circadian model for attention deficiency and hyperactive behavior sheds light on ADHD pathogenesis and opens avenues for exploring novel targets for diagnosis and therapy for this common psychiatric disorder. PMID:25673850

  17. Restored expression levels of TET1 decrease the proliferation and migration of renal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    FAN, MIN; HE, XIAOZHOU; XU, XIANLIN

    2015-01-01

    Renal carcinoma is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults and is responsible for ~90–95% of the cases of kidney cancer. Ten-eleven translocation methylcytosine dioxygenase 1 (TET1) is a member of the TET family of enzymes, and is expressed at low levels in multiple malignancies. In the present study, a series of experiments were designed and performed to investigate whether the expression of TET1 is clinically correlated with clinical outcomes in renal carcinoma, and to examine the associations between TET1 expression level and the proliferation and migration in renal carcinoma cells. As a result, TET1 was observed to exhibit markedly low expression levels in 54 tumor tissue samples from 54 patients with renal carcinoma. Furthermore, statistical analysis revealed a clinical correlation between low expression levels of TET1 and the prognosis of patients with renal carcinoma. When TET1 was overexpressed in renal carcinoma cells, the viability and invasive abilities of the cells were decreased, and the rate of apoptosis was increased. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that TET1 is involved in tumor inhibition in renal carcinoma by promoting cell apoptosis and inhibiting cell proliferation and invasion, which may be exploited as a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of renal carcinoma. PMID:26165803

  18. Low-level lasers affect uncoupling protein gene expression in skin and skeletal muscle tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, K. S.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Paoli, F.; Mencalha, A. L.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength, frequency, power, fluence, and emission mode determine the photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological responses of biological tissues to low-level lasers. Free radicals are involved in these responses acting as second messengers in intracellular signaling processes. Irradiated cells present defenses against these chemical species to avoid unwanted effects, such as uncoupling proteins (UCPs), which are part of protective mechanisms and minimize the effects of free radical generation in mitochondria. In this work UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA gene relative expression in the skin and skeletal muscle tissues of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers was evaluated. Samples of the skin and skeletal muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and the evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA expression was differently altered in skin and skeletal muscle tissues exposed to lasers in a wavelength-dependent effect, with the UCP3 mRNA expression dose-dependent. Alteration on UCP gene expression could be part of the biostimulation effect and is necessary to make cells exposed to red and infrared low-level lasers more resistant or capable of adapting in damaged tissues or diseases.

  19. Does Wnt/β-catenin pathway contribute to the stability of DNMT1 expression in urological cancer cell lines?

    PubMed

    Varol, Nuray; Konac, Ece; Bilen, Cenk Y

    2015-05-01

    DNA methylation is considered as one of the most important epigenetic mechanisms and it is catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). DNMT1 abundance has been frequently seen in urogenital system tumors but the reasons for this abundance are not well understood. We aimed to look into the effects of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway on overexpression of DNMT1 and aberrant expression of UHRF1 and HAUSP which are responsible for stability of DNMT1 at transcriptional and protein levels in urogenital cancers. In this context, firstly, Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was activated by using SB216763 which is a glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) β inhibitor. Cell proliferation levels in bladder cancer cells, renal cell carcinoma, and prostate cancer cells treated with GSK3β inhibitor (SB216763) were detected by WST-1 reagent. WIF-1 gene methylation profile was determined by methylation-specific PCR (MSP); expression levels of target genes β-catenin and WIF-1 by real-time PCR; and protein levels of β-catenin, DNMT1, pGSK3β(Ser9), HAUSP, and UHRF1 by Western Blot. Our results indicated that treatment with SB216763 caused an increased cell proliferation at low dose. mRNA levels of β-catenin increased after treatment with SB216273 and protein levels of pGSK3β(Ser9), β-catenin, and DNMT1 increased in comparison to control. HAUSP and UHRF1 were either up-regulated or down-regulated at the same doses depending on the type of cancer. Also, we showed that protein levels of DNMT1, β-catenin, HAUSP, and UHRF1 decreased after re-expression of WIF-1 following treatment with DAC. In Caki-2 cells, β-catenin pathway might have accounted for the stability of DNMT1 expression, whereas such relation is not valid for T24 and PC3 cells. Our findings may offer a new approach for determination of molecular effects of Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway on DNMT1. This may allow us to identify new molecular targets for the treatment of urogenital cancers. PMID:25349215

  20. Effects of phased joint intervention on Rho/ROCK expression levels in patients with portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Wei, Jue; Meng, Wen-Ying; Wang, Na; Wang, Ting; Wang, Yu-Gang

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of phased joint intervention on clinical efficacy and Rho/Rho-associated coil protein kinase (ROCK) expression in patients with portal hypertension complicated by esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB) and hypersplenism. Patients with portal hypertension (n=53) caused by liver cirrhosis complicated by EVB and hypersplenism treated with phased joint intervention were assessed, and portal hemodynamics, blood, liver function, complications, and rebleeding incidence were analyzed. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure Rho, ROCK1 and ROCK2 mRNA expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells prior to and following phased joint intervention, and western blotting was employed to determine the protein expression levels of Rho, ROCK1, ROCK2, phosphorylated (p) myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) and total-MYPT1. All patients underwent an emergency assessment of hemostasis with a 100% success rate. Varicose veins were alleviated, and portal hemodynamics and liver function improved following intervention. Furthermore, preoperative and postoperative expression levels of Rho, ROCK1 and ROCK2 mRNA were higher compared with the control group. Notably, the mRNA expression levels of Rho, ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the postoperative group were significantly lower when compared with the preoperative group. Protein expression levels of Rho, ROCK1, ROCK2 and pMYPT1 in the postoperative group were lower, as compared with the preoperative group. Concentration levels of transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor in peripheral blood were significantly reduced following phased joint intervention. Therefore, the present findings demonstrated that phased joint intervention is able to effectively treat EVB and hypersplenism, and improve liver function. The efficacy of phased joint intervention may be associated with its role in the regulation of the

  1. Different 3' end regions strongly influence the level of gene expression in plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ingelbrecht, I L; Herman, L M; Dekeyser, R A; Van Montagu, M C; Depicker, A G

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the functional role of a 3' end region on the expression of a reporter gene in plant cells. In stably transformed plants, expression of the reporter gene without a plant gene 3' end is variable and depends on the fortuitous presence of polyadenylation signals in the downstream sequences. When the reporter gene is flanked by pBR322 DNA, 3'-processing and polyadenylation occurs at (a) cryptic site(s) within these vector sequences. Using a transient gene expression system, we present a deletion analysis of the 3' end of the octopine synthase gene showing that the most proximal polyadenylation signal per se is not sufficient to ensure expression but that a downstream (G)T-rich sequence is also required. Optimal expression of the fusion gene requires more than 98 base pairs and at most 142 base pairs downstream from the most distal polyadenylation site. We analyzed the expression of chimeric genes with 3' end sequences originating from different plant genes. In the transient expression assay, all constructs direct similar neomycin phosphotransferase II activities. However, in stably transformed tissue, the gene constructs displayed characteristic expression levels which varied as much as 60-fold. This result suggests a role for 3' end sequences in post-transcriptional processes such as efficiency of 3'-processing and/or mRNA stability. PMID:2562510

  2. Relationship between TLR4 and MCP2 expression levels and habitual abortion.

    PubMed

    Li, X P; Song, L N; Tian, L P; Zhang, Y S

    2016-01-01

    Habitual abortion is associated with the altered expression of multiple genes. This study was carried out to investigate the relationship between expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and monocyte chemotactic protein 2 (MCP2 or CCL8) and habitual abortion. This was done by detecting and comparing their relative expression in peripheral blood and placental villi of patients and healthy fertile women. Based on our previous research, 85 subjects with habitual abortion (study group) and 40 healthy fertile women (control group), who were admitted to our hospital between June 2013 and December 2014, were enrolled in this study. After these subjects signed written informed consent, peripheral blood samples and villous tissues were collected, from which the total RNA was extracted. The expression of TLR4 and MCP2 was detected with quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, using GAPDH as a reference control. The expression of TLR4 and MCP2 in the peripheral blood and villous tissues of the study group was significantly higher than that of the control group (P < 0.05). A positive correlation was also observed between the changes in expression levels of TLR4 and MCP2. In conclusion, TLR4 and MCP2 expression correlated with the occurrence of habitual abortion. Detecting expression changes in TLR4 and MCP2 in the peripheral blood is a feasible method for predicting the occurrence of abortion in women of child-bearing age. PMID:27173235

  3. The contribution of lead-contaminated house dust and residential soil to children`s blood lead levels

    SciTech Connect

    Lanphear, B.P.; Matte, T.D.; Rogers, J.

    1998-10-01

    In 1992, the US Congress passed the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act, which requires the promulgation of health-based dust lead and soil lead standards for residential dwellings to prevent undue lead exposure in children. Unfortunately, the levels of lead in house dust and soil that are associated with elevated blood lead levels among US children remain poorly defined. This pooled analysis was done to estimate the contributions of lead-contaminated house dust and soil to children`s blood lead levels. The results of this pooled analysis, the most comprehensive existing epidemiologic analysis of childhood lead exposure, confirm that lead-contaminated house dust is the major source of lead exposure for children. These analyses further demonstrate that a strong relationship between interior dust lead loading and children`s blood lead levels persists at dust lead levels considerably below the US Department of Housing and urban Development`s current post-abatement standards and the Environmental Protection Agency`s guidance levels. Finally, these analyses demonstrate that a child`s age, race, mouthing behaviors, and study-site specific factors influence the predicted blood lead level at a given level of exposure. These data can be used to estimate the potential health impact of alternative health-based lead standards for residential sources of lead exposure.

  4. Inverted barometer contributions to recent sea level changes along the northeast coast of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piecuch, Christopher G.; Ponte, Rui M.

    2015-07-01

    Regional sea level (SL) changes reflect dynamic and isostatic ocean effects. Recent works have interpreted accelerated and extreme SL changes along the northeast coast of North America primarily in terms of dynamic changes; however, dedicated study of isostatic changes related to surface atmospheric pressure loading—the inverted barometer (IB) effect—has been lacking. This investigation uses five different atmospheric pressure products to analyze the influence of the IB effect on annual mean SL from tide gauge records. The IB effect explains ˜25% of interannual SL variance and accounts for ˜50% of the magnitude of a recent extreme event of SL rise along Atlantic Canada and New England. Estimated IB effects also amount to ˜10-30% of recent multidecadal SL accelerations over the Mid-Atlantic Bight and Southern New England. These findings reiterate the need for careful estimation and removal of isostatic effects for studies of dynamic SL.

  5. Slow intestinal transit contributes to elevate urinary p-cresol level in Italian autistic children.

    PubMed

    Gabriele, Stefano; Sacco, Roberto; Altieri, Laura; Neri, Cristina; Urbani, Andrea; Bravaccio, Carmela; Riccio, Maria Pia; Iovene, Maria Rosaria; Bombace, Francesca; De Magistris, Laura; Persico, Antonio M

    2016-07-01

    The uremic toxin p-cresol (4-methylphenol) is either of environmental origin or can be synthetized from tyrosine by cresol-producing bacteria present in the gut lumen. Elevated p-cresol amounts have been previously found in the urines of Italian and French autism spectrum disorder (ASD) children up until 8 years of age, and may be associated with autism severity or with the intensity of abnormal behaviors. This study aims to investigate the mechanism producing elevated urinary p-cresol in ASD. Urinary p-cresol levels were thus measured by High Performance Liquid Chromatography in a sample of 53 Italian ASD children assessed for (a) presence of Clostridium spp. strains in the gut by means of an in vitro fecal stool test and of Clostridium difficile-derived toxin A/B in the feces, (b) intestinal permeability using the lactulose/mannitol (LA/MA) test, (c) frequent use of antibiotics due to recurrent infections during the first 2 years of postnatal life, and (d) stool habits with the Bristol Stool Form Scale. Chronic constipation was the only variable significantly associated with total urinary p-cresol concentration (P < 0.05). No association was found with presence of Clostridium spp. in the gut flora (P = 0.92), augmented intestinal permeability (P = 0.18), or frequent use of antibiotics in early infancy (P = 0.47). No ASD child was found to carry C. difficile in the gut or to release toxin A/B in the feces. In conclusion, urinary p-cresol levels are elevated in young ASD children with increased intestinal transit time and chronic constipation. Autism Res 2016, 9: 752-759. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26437875

  6. Contributing factors in foliar uptake of dissolved inorganic nitrogen at leaf level.

    PubMed

    Wuyts, Karen; Adriaenssens, Sandy; Staelens, Jeroen; Wuytack, Tatiana; Van Wittenberghe, Shari; Boeckx, Pascal; Samson, Roeland; Verheyen, Kris

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the influence of leaf traits, rainwater chemistry, and pedospheric nitrogen (N) fertilisation on the aqueous uptake of inorganic N by physiologically active tree leaves. Leaves of juvenile silver birch and European beech trees, supplied with NH₄NO₃ to the soil at rates from 0 to 200 kg N ha(-1)y(-1), were individually exposed to 100 μl of artificial rainwater containing (15)NH₄(+) or (15)NO₃(-) at two concentration levels for one hour. In the next vegetative period, the experiment was repeated with NH₄(+) at the highest concentration only. The N form and the N concentration in the applied rainwater and, to a lesser extent, the pedospheric N treatment and the leaf traits affected the aqueous foliar N uptake. The foliar uptake of NH₄(+) by birch increased when leaves were more wettable. High leaf N concentration and leaf mass per area enhanced the foliar N uptake, and NO₃(-) uptake in particular, by birch. Variation in the foliar N uptake by the beech trees could not be explained by the leaf traits considered. In the first experiment, N fertilisation stimulated the foliar N uptake in both species, which was on average 1.42-1.78 times higher at the highest soil N dose than at the zero dose. However, data variability was high and the effect was not appreciable in the second experiment. Our data suggest that next to rainwater chemistry (N form and concentration) also forest N status could play a role in the partitioning of N entering the ecosystem through the soil and the canopy. Models of canopy uptake of aqueous N at the leaf level should take account of leaf traits such as wettability and N concentration. PMID:25461099

  7. Do reductions in brain N-acetylaspartate levels contribute to the etiology of some neuropsychiatric disorders?

    PubMed

    Ariyannur, Prasanth S; Arun, Peethambaran; Barry, Erin S; Andrews-Shigaki, Brian; Bosomtwi, Asamoah; Tang, Haiying; Selwyn, Reed; Grunberg, Neil E; Moffett, John R; Namboodiri, Aryan M A

    2013-07-01

    N-acetylaspartate (NAA) is recognized as a noninvasive diagnostic neuronal marker for a host of neuropsychiatric disorders using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Numerous correlative clinical studies have found significant decreases in NAA levels in specific neuronal systems in an array of neuropsychiatric and substance-abuse disorders. We have recently identified the methamphetamine-induced neuronal protein known as "shati" as the NAA biosynthetic enzyme (aspartate N-acetyltransferase [Asp-NAT]; gene Nat8l). We have generated an Nat8l transgenic knockout mouse line to study the functions of NAA in the nervous system. We were unable to breed homozygous Nat8l knockout mice successfully for study and so used the heterozygous mice (Nat8l(+/-) ) for initial characterization. MRS analysis of the Nat8l(+/-) mice indicated significant reductions in NAA in cortex (-38%) and hypothalamus (-29%) compared with wild-type controls, which was confirmed using HPLC (-29% in forebrain). The level of the neuromodulator N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), which is synthesized from NAA, was decreased by 12% in forebrain as shown by HPLC. Behavioral analyses of the heterozygous animals indicated normal behavior in most respects but reduced vertical activity in open-field tests compared with age- and sex-matched wild-type mice of the same strain. Nat8l(+/-) mice also showed atypical locomotor responses to methamphetamine administration, suggesting that NAA is involved in modulating the hyperactivity effect of methamphetamine. These observations add to accumulating evidence suggesting that NAA has specific regulatory functional roles in mesolimbic and prefrontal neuronal pathways either directly or indirectly through impact on NAAG synthesis PMID:23633398

  8. Short-term sleep deprivation impairs spatial working memory and modulates expression levels of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meilan; Yan, Jie; He, Chao; Yang, Li; Tan, Gang; Li, Chao; Hu, Zhian; Wang, Jiali

    2015-06-01

    Hippocampus-dependent learning memory is sensitive to sleep deprivation (SD). Although the ionotropic glutamate receptors play a vital role in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory, however, whether the expression of these receptor subunits is modulated by sleep loss remains unclear. In the present study, western blotting was performed by probing with specific antibodies against the ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and against the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor subunits GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B. In hippocampus, down regulation of surface GluA1 and GluN2A surface expression were observed in both SD groups. However, surface expression level of GluA2, GluA3, GluN1 and GluN2B was significantly up-regulated in 8h-SD rats when compared to the 4h-SD rats. In parallel with the complex changes in AMPA and NMDA receptor subunit expressions, we found the 8h-SD impaired rat spatial working memory in 30-s-delay T-maze task, whereas no impairment of spatial learning was observed in 4h-SD rats. These results indicate that sleep loss alters the relative expression levels of the AMPA and NMDA receptors, thus affects the synaptic strength and capacity for plasticity and partially contributes to spatial memory impairment. PMID:25732956

  9. Multivariate spatio-temporal modelling for assessing Antarctica's present-day contribution to sea-level rise

    PubMed Central

    Zammit-Mangion, Andrew; Rougier, Jonathan; Schön, Nana; Lindgren, Finn; Bamber, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Antarctica is the world's largest fresh-water reservoir, with the potential to raise sea levels by about 60 m. An ice sheet contributes to sea-level rise (SLR) when its rate of ice discharge and/or surface melting exceeds accumulation through snowfall. Constraining the contribution of the ice sheets to present-day SLR is vital both for coastal development and planning, and climate projections. Information on various ice sheet processes is available from several remote sensing data sets, as well as in situ data such as global positioning system data. These data have differing coverage, spatial support, temporal sampling and sensing characteristics, and thus, it is advantageous to combine them all in a single framework for estimation of the SLR contribution and the assessment of processes controlling mass exchange with the ocean. In this paper, we predict the rate of height change due to salient geophysical processes in Antarctica and use these to provide estimates of SLR contribution with associated uncertainties. We employ a multivariate spatio-temporal model, approximated as a Gaussian Markov random field, to take advantage of differing spatio-temporal properties of the processes to separate the causes of the observed change. The process parameters are estimated from geophysical models, while the remaining parameters are estimated using a Markov chain Monte Carlo scheme, designed to operate in a high-performance computing environment across multiple nodes. We validate our methods against a separate data set and compare the results to those from studies that invariably employ numerical model outputs directly. We conclude that it is possible, and insightful, to assess Antarctica's contribution without explicit use of numerical models. Further, the results obtained here can be used to test the geophysical numerical models for which in situ data are hard to obtain. © 2015 The Authors. Environmetrics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25937792

  10. Calpain expression in lymphoid cells. Increased mRNA and protein levels after cell activation.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, R V; Goust, J M; Chakrabarti, A K; Barbosa, E; Hogan, E L; Banik, N L

    1995-02-10

    Although calpain is ubiquitously present in human tissues and is thought to play a role in demyelination, its activity is very low in resting normal lymphocytes. To determine the nature of calpain expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human lymphoid cells, we studied human T lymphocytic, B lymphocytic, and monocytic lines as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Stimulation of cells with the phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in increased calpain mRNA and protein expression. Calpain mRNA expression is also increased in human T cells stimulated with anti-CD3. A dissociation between the increases of RNA and protein suggested that calpain could be released from the cells; the subsequent experiments showed its presence in the extracellular environment. 5,6-Dichloro-1b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a reversible inhibitor of mRNA synthesis, reduced calpain mRNA levels by 50-67% and protein levels by 72-91%. Its removal resulted in resumption of both calpain mRNA and protein synthesis. Cycloheximide, a translational inhibitor, reduced calpain protein levels by 77-81% and calpain mRNA levels by 96% in activated THP-1 cells. Interferon-gamma induced calpain mRNA and protein in U-937 and THP-1 cells. Dexamethasone increased mRNA expression in THP-1 cells. Our results indicate that activation of lymphoid cells results in de novo synthesis and secretion of calpain. PMID:7852311

  11. Reduction of Cellular Expression Levels Is a Common Feature of Functionally Affected Pendrin (SLC26A4) Protein Variants

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Vanessa C S; Bernardinelli, Emanuele; Zocal, Nathalia; Fernandez, Jhonathan A; Nofziger, Charity; Castilho, Arthur M; Sartorato, Edi L; Paulmichl, Markus; Dossena, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Sequence alterations in the pendrin gene (SLC26A4) leading to functionally affected protein variants are frequently involved in the pathogenesis of syndromic and nonsyndromic deafness. Considering the high number of SLC26A4 sequence alterations reported to date, discriminating between functionally affected and unaffected pendrin protein variants is essential in contributing to determine the genetic cause of deafness in a given patient. In addition, identifying molecular features common to the functionally affected protein variants can be extremely useful to design future molecule-directed therapeutic approaches. Here we show the functional and molecular characterization of six previously uncharacterized pendrin protein variants found in a cohort of 58 Brazilian deaf patients. Two variants (p.T193I and p.L445W) were undetectable in the plasma membrane, completely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and showed no transport function; four (p.P142L, p.G149R, p.C282Y and p.Q413R) showed reduced function and significant, although heterogeneous, expression levels in the plasma membrane. Importantly, total expression levels of all of the functionally affected protein variants were significantly reduced with respect to the wild-type and a fully functional variant (p.R776C), regardless of their subcellular localization. Interestingly, reduction of expression may also reduce the transport activity of variants with an intrinsic gain of function (p.Q413R). As reduction of overall cellular abundance was identified as a common molecular feature of pendrin variants with affected function, the identification of strategies to prevent reduction in expression levels may represent a crucial step of potential future therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring the transport activity of dysfunctional pendrin variants. PMID:26752218

  12. Increased hepatic receptor interacting protein kinase 3 expression due to impaired proteasomal functions contributes to alcohol-induced steatosis and liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaogui; Ni, Hong-Min; Dorko, Kenneth; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Nawabi, Atta; Komatsu, Masaaki; Huang, Heqing; Ding, Wen-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure increased hepatic receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIP) 3 expression and necroptosis in the liver but its mechanisms are unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that chronic alcohol feeding plus binge (Gao-binge) increased RIP3 but not RIP1 protein levels in mouse livers. RIP3 knockout mice had decreased serum alanine amino transferase activity and hepatic steatosis but had no effect on hepatic neutrophil infiltration compared with wild type mice after Gao-binge alcohol treatment. The hepatic mRNA levels of RIP3 did not change between Gao-binge and control mice, suggesting that alcohol-induced hepatic RIP3 proteins are regulated at the posttranslational level. We found that Gao-binge treatment decreased the levels of proteasome subunit alpha type-2 (PSMA2) and proteasome 26S subunit, ATPase 1 (PSMC1) and impaired hepatic proteasome function. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of proteasome resulted in the accumulation of RIP3 in mouse livers. More importantly, human alcoholics had decreased expression of PSMA2 and PSMC1 but increased protein levels of RIP3 compared with healthy human livers. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of RIP1 decreased Gao-binge-induced hepatic inflammation, neutrophil infiltration and NF-κB subunit (p65) nuclear translocation but failed to protect against steatosis and liver injury induced by Gao-binge alcohol. In conclusion, results from this study suggest that impaired hepatic proteasome function by alcohol exposure may contribute to hepatic accumulation of RIP3 resulting in necroptosis and steatosis while RIP1 kinase activity is important for alcohol-induced inflammation. PMID:26769846

  13. Differential Expression of Genes that Control Respiration Contribute to Thermal Adaptation in Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri)

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Michael R.; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Narum, Shawn R.

    2015-01-01

    Organisms can adapt to local environmental conditions as a plastic response or become adapted through natural selection on genetic variation. The ability to adapt to increased water temperatures will be of paramount importance for many fish species as the climate continues to warm and water resources become limited. Because increased water temperatures will reduce the dissolved oxygen available for fish, we hypothesized that adaptation to low oxygen environments would involve improved respiration through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). To test this hypothesis, we subjected individuals from two ecologically divergent populations of inland (redband) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri) with historically different temperature regimes (desert and montane) and their F1 progeny to diel cycles of temperature stress and then examined gene expression data for 80 nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS subunits that participate in respiration. Of the 80 transcripts, 7 showed ≥ 2-fold difference in expression levels in gill tissue from desert fish under heat stress whereas the montane fish had none and the F1 only had one differentially expressed gene. A structural analysis of the proteins encoded by those genes suggests that the response could coordinate the formation of supercomplexes and oligomers. Supercomplexes may increase the efficiency of respiration because complexes I, III, and IV are brought into close proximity and oligomerization of complex V alters the macrostructure of mitochondria to improve respiration. Significant differences in gene expression patterns in response to heat stress in a common environment indicate that the response was not due to plasticity but had a genetic basis. PMID:25943341

  14. Elevated Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 not Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Contributes to Progression of Extracranial Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ting; Zhang, Haihong; Cetin, Neslihan; Miller, Emily; Moak, Teri; Suen, James Y.; Richter, Gresham T.

    2016-01-01

    Extracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare but dangerous congenital lesions arising from direct arterial-venous shunts without intervening capillaries. Progressive infiltration, expansion, and soft tissue destruction lead to bleeding, pain, debilitation and disfigurement. The pathophysiology of AVMs is not well understood. Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) are thought to play an important role in pathologic processes underlying many diseases. This study investigates the expression of MMP-9 and MMP-2 in aggressive extracranial AVMs. The differential expression of MMP-9 and its regulatory factors is also examined. Herein we demonstrate that mRNA and protein expressions of MMP-9, but not MMP-2, are significantly higher in AVM tissues compared to normal tissues. The serum level of MMP-9, but not MMP-2, is also elevated in AVM patients compared to healthy controls. MMP-9/neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) complex is also significantly increased in AVM tissues. The MMP-9/ tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases-1 (TIMP-1) complex presents as a major form detected in normal tissues. The increased and aberrant expression of MMP-9 and specific MMP-9 forms may help explain the constitutive vascular remodeling and infiltrative nature of these lesions. Specific MMP-9 inhibitors would be a promising treatment for AVMs. PMID:27075045

  15. Differential Expression of Genes that Control Respiration Contribute to Thermal Adaptation in Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri).

    PubMed

    Garvin, Michael R; Thorgaard, Gary H; Narum, Shawn R

    2015-06-01

    Organisms can adapt to local environmental conditions as a plastic response or become adapted through natural selection on genetic variation. The ability to adapt to increased water temperatures will be of paramount importance for many fish species as the climate continues to warm and water resources become limited. Because increased water temperatures will reduce the dissolved oxygen available for fish, we hypothesized that adaptation to low oxygen environments would involve improved respiration through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). To test this hypothesis, we subjected individuals from two ecologically divergent populations of inland (redband) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri) with historically different temperature regimes (desert and montane) and their F1 progeny to diel cycles of temperature stress and then examined gene expression data for 80 nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS subunits that participate in respiration. Of the 80 transcripts, 7 showed ≥ 2-fold difference in expression levels in gill tissue from desert fish under heat stress whereas the montane fish had none and the F1 only had one differentially expressed gene. A structural analysis of the proteins encoded by those genes suggests that the response could coordinate the formation of supercomplexes and oligomers. Supercomplexes may increase the efficiency of respiration because complexes I, III, and IV are brought into close proximity and oligomerization of complex V alters the macrostructure of mitochondria to improve respiration. Significant differences in gene expression patterns in response to heat stress in a common environment indicate that the response was not due to plasticity but had a genetic basis. PMID:25943341

  16. Expression of IL-37 contributes to the immunosuppressive property of human CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Xu; Wei-min, Li; Tong, Ya-lin; Dong, Ning; Sheng, Zhi-yong; Yao, Yong-ming

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-37 (IL-37) possesses the function of down-regulate systemic and local inflammation. It is unknown whether IL-37 is expressed in human regulatory T cells (Tregs) and its role in modulating the immune response of Tregs. In the present study, cell surface molecules and secretory cytokines were analyzed in order to determine the function of IL-37 in regulating inhibitory effect of human CD4(+)CD25(+)Tregs. Meanwhile, the effects of IL-37 on T cell differentiation and proliferation as co-culture of CD4(+)CD25(+)Treg/CD4(+)CD25(-)T cell were also investigated. It was showed that IL-37 was expressed in cytoplasm of CD4(+)CD25(+)Tregs, and the levels of IL-37 were gradually elevated with the enhanced activity of CD4(+)CD25(+)Tregs. Secretory cytokines such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and interleukin (IL)-10, and expressions of cell surface molecules, including forkhead/winged helix transcription factor p3 (FOXP3) and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen (CTLA)-4, were significantly decreased when IL-37 gene was silenced by siRNA. Furthermore, down-regulation of IL-37 expression in human CD4(+)CD25(+)Tregs obviously promoted proliferation of co-cultured T cell and differentiation, together with observably enhancement of IL-2 formation. These results demonstrated that IL-37 might manifest as a critical protein involving in immunosuppression of human CD4(+)CD25(+)Tregs. PMID:26411375

  17. Differences in codon bias and GC content contribute to the balanced expression of TLR7 and TLR9.

    PubMed

    Newman, Zachary R; Young, Janet M; Ingolia, Nicholas T; Barton, Gregory M

    2016-03-01

    The innate immune system detects diverse microbial species with a limited repertoire of immune receptors that recognize nucleic acids. The cost of this immune surveillance strategy is the potential for inappropriate recognition of self-derived nucleic acids and subsequent autoimmune disease. The relative expression of two closely related receptors, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 and TLR9, is balanced to allow recognition of microbial nucleic acids while limiting recognition of self-derived nucleic acids. Situations that tilt this balance toward TLR7 promote inappropriate responses, including autoimmunity; therefore, tight control of expression is critical for proper homeostasis. Here we report that differences in codon bias limit TLR7 expression relative to TLR9. Codon optimization of Tlr7 increases protein levels as well as responses to ligands, but, unexpectedly, these changes only modestly affect translation. Instead, we find that much of the benefit attributed to codon optimization is actually the result of enhanced transcription. Our findings, together with other recent examples, challenge the dogma that codon optimization primarily increases translation. We propose that suboptimal codon bias, which correlates with low guanine-cytosine (GC) content, limits transcription of certain genes. This mechanism may establish low levels of proteins whose overexpression leads to particularly deleterious effects, such as TLR7. PMID:26903634

  18. Contribution of Hanford liquid effluents to strontium-90 levels in offsite soils

    SciTech Connect

    Jaquish, R.E.

    1993-08-01

    Strontium-90 is a major constituent of liquid effluents entering the Columbia River at the 100-N Area. The Columbia River also contains {sup 90}Sr from world-wide fallout that enters the Columbia River upstream of Hanford. Irrigation water pumped from the Columbia River can deposit {sup 90}Sr on soil where it can be taken up by farm crops. Fallout has also deposited {sup 90}Sr directly on soil by atmospheric deposition. A review of the sources of {sup 90}Sr in soil in the vicinity of Hanford indicates that about 2% can be attributed to Hanford liquid effluents. PNL measurements of {sup 90}Sr in soil at a background location agree with predicted levels of fallout made by the Federal Radiation Council in 1964. Alfalfa is routinely monitored for {sup 90}Sr and is of special interest since it has concentrations higher than other farm crops. The concentrations of {sup 90}Sr in alfalfa measured in the Hanford vicinity are in the range one would expect, based on measured soil concentrations and using uptake factors from an earlier {sup 90}Sr uptake study at Hanford.

  19. TSLP Expression and High Serum TSLP Level Indicate a Poor Prognosis in Gastric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Joji; Saito, Hiroaki; Miyatani, Kozo; Ikeguchi, Masahide; Umekita, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) plays an important role in promoting tumor survival, by manipulating the immune response and angiogenesis. However, the clinical significance of TSLP in gastric cancer is unclear. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate TSLP expression in non-cancerous gastric mucosa and gastric cancer tissue from patients with gastric cancer. Serum TSLP levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Tumors with TSLP expression were significantly larger than those without TSLP expression. TSLP expression was observed more frequently in advanced (T2/T3/T4) than in early (T1) gastric cancer and in stage 3/4 than in stage 1/2. Lymph node metastasis, liver metastasis, positive peritoneal lavage cytology, lymphatic invasion, and vascular invasion occurred significantly more often in TSLP-expressing than in non-expressing tumors. The prognosis of patients with TSLP-positive tumors was significantly worse than that of patients with TSLP-negative tumors. Patients with high serum TSLP concentrations also had a significantly worse prognosis than those with low concentrations. Multivariate analysis identified serum TSLP level as an independent prognostic indicator. Conclusion TSLP is closely related to the progression of gastric cancer and may predict survival in these patients. PMID:26538800

  20. High level expression of kringle 5 fragment of plasminogen in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufei; Zheng, Quan; Gao, Jin; Gu, Jun

    2005-02-01

    Angiogensis can be blocked by inhibitors such as endostatin and angiostatin. The kringle 5 fragment of plasminogen also has a potent inhibitory effect on endothelial cell proliferation and leads to the inhibition of angiogenesis. It has promise in anti-angiogenic therapy due to its small size and potent inhibitory effect. Preparation of kringle 5 has been achieved through the proteolysis of native plasminogen and recombinant DNA technology. Bacterially expressed recombinant kringle 5 is mainly insoluble and expressed at low level. The refolding yield is also low. To produce recombinant human kringle 5 in a large quantity, we have genetically modified a strain of Pichia pastoris. On methanol induction, this strain expressed and secreted biologically active, recombinant kringle 5. The expression level of the engineered strain in culture reached more than 300 mgl(-1). Purification was easily achieved by precipitation, hydrophobic and DEAE ion exchange chromatography. The recovery of recombinant kringle 5 was about 50% after purification. Yeast-expressed kringle 5 has a higher activity in anti-endothelial proliferation than bacterially expressed kringle 5. PMID:15717125

  1. Elevated gene expression levels distinguish human from non-human primate brains

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, Mario; Lachuer, Joel; Zapala, Matthew A.; Redmond, John C.; Kudo, Lili; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Lockhart, David J.; Preuss, Todd M.; Barlow, Carrolee

    2003-01-01

    Little is known about how the human brain differs from that of our closest relatives. To investigate the genetic basis of human specializations in brain organization and cognition, we compared gene expression profiles for the cerebral cortex of humans, chimpanzees, and rhesus macaques by using several independent techniques. We identified 169 genes that exhibited expression differences between human and chimpanzee cortex, and 91 were ascribed to the human lineage by using macaques as an outgroup. Surprisingly, most differences between the brains of humans and non-human primates involved up-regulation, with ≈90% of the genes being more highly expressed in humans. By contrast, in the comparison of human and chimpanzee heart and liver, the numbers of up- and down-regulated genes were nearly identical. Our results indicate that the human brain displays a distinctive pattern of gene expression relative to non-human primates, with higher expression levels for many genes belonging to a wide variety of functional classes. The increased expression of these genes could provide the basis for extensive modifications of cerebral physiology and function in humans and suggests that the human brain is characterized by elevated levels of neuronal activity. PMID:14557539

  2. Targeting of a histone acetyltransferase domain to a promoter enhances protein expression levels in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kwaks, T H J; Sewalt, R G A B; van Blokland, R; Siersma, T J; Kasiem, M; Kelder, A; Otte, A P

    2005-01-12

    Silencing of transfected genes in mammalian cells is a fundamental problem that probably involves the (in)accessibility status of chromatin. A potential solution to this problem is to provide a cell with protein factors that make the chromatin of a promoter more open or accessible for transcription. We tested this by targeting such proteins to different promoters. We found that targeting the p300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain to strong viral or cellular promoters is sufficient to result in higher expression levels of a reporter protein. In contrast, targeting the chromatin-remodeling factor Brahma does not result in stable, higher protein expression levels. The long-term effects of the targeted p300HAT domain on protein expression levels are positively reinforced, when also anti-repressor elements are applied to flank the reporter construct. These elements were previously shown to be potent blockers of chromatin-associated repressors. The simultaneous application of the targeted p300HAT domain and anti-repressor elements conveys long-term stability to protein expression. Whereas no copy number dependency is achieved by targeting of the p300HAT domain alone, copy number dependency is improved when anti-repressor elements are included. We conclude that targeting of protein domains such as HAT domains helps to facilitate expression of transfected genes in mammalian cells. However, the simultaneous application of other genomic elements such as the anti-repressor elements prevents silencing more efficiently. PMID:15607223

  3. Levels of Lycopene β-Cyclase 1 Modulate Carotenoid Gene Expression and Accumulation in Daucus carota

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Juan Camilo; Pizarro, Lorena; Fuentes, Paulina; Handford, Michael; Cifuentes, Victor; Stange, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Plant carotenoids are synthesized and accumulated in plastids through a highly regulated pathway. Lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) is a key enzyme involved directly in the synthesis of α-carotene and β-carotene through the cyclization of lycopene. Carotenoids are produced in both carrot (Daucus carota) leaves and reserve roots, and high amounts of α-carotene and β-carotene accumulate in the latter. In some plant models, the presence of different isoforms of carotenogenic genes is associated with an organ-specific function. D. carota harbors two Lcyb genes, of which DcLcyb1 is expressed in leaves and storage roots during carrot development, correlating with an increase in carotenoid levels. In this work, we show that DcLCYB1 is localized in the plastid and that it is a functional enzyme, as demonstrated by heterologous complementation in Escherichia coli and over expression and post transcriptional gene silencing in carrot. Transgenic plants with higher or reduced levels of DcLcyb1 had incremented or reduced levels of chlorophyll, total carotenoids and β-carotene in leaves and in the storage roots, respectively. In addition, changes in the expression of DcLcyb1 are accompanied by a modulation in the expression of key endogenous carotenogenic genes. Our results indicate that DcLcyb1 does not possess an organ specific function and modulate carotenoid gene expression and accumulation in carrot leaves and storage roots. PMID:23555569

  4. Enhanced expression levels of aquaporin-1 and aquaporin-4 in A549 cells exposed to silicon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaohui; Wang, Hongli; Liu, Wei; Liu, Shupeng; Peng, Zihe; Sun, Yue; Zhao, Jinyuan; Jiang, Qiujie; Liu, Heliang

    2016-09-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins in the cell membranes of mammals, have been reported to be important in maintaining the water balance of the respiratory system. However, little is known regarding the role of AQP in occupational pulmonary diseases such as silicosis. The present study investigated the expression of AQP1 and AQP4 in the human A549 alveolar epithelial cell line stimulated by silica (SiO2). A549 cells were cultured and divided into four groups: Control, SiO2‑stimulated, AQP1 inhibitor and AQP4 inhibitor. The cells of the SiO2‑stimulated group were stimulated with SiO2 dispersed suspension (50 mg/ml). The cells of the inhibitor group were pretreated with mercury (II) chloride (HgCl2; a specific channel inhibitor of AQP1) and 2‑(nicotinamide)‑1,3,4‑thiadiazole (TGN‑020; a specific channel inhibitor of AQP4) and stimulated with SiO2. The mRNA expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 were detected by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the protein expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 were detected by western blotting and immunocytochemistry. Compared with the control group, the expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 mRNA and protein in SiO2‑stimulated groups increased and subsequently decreased (AQP1 peaked at 2 h and AQP4 at 1h; both P<0.001 compared with control group). In the inhibitor group, expression levels were increased compared with controls; however, they were significantly decreased compared with the SiO2‑stimulated group at 2 h (AQP1; P<0.001) and 1 h (AQP4; P<0.001). The expression of AQP1 and AQP4 increased when exposed to SiO2, and this was inhibited by HgCl2 and TGN‑020, suggesting that AQP1 and AQP4 may contribute to A549 cell damage induced by SiO2. AQP1 and AQP4 may thus be involved in the initiation and development of silicosis. PMID:27431275

  5. Association between plasma selenium level and NRF2 target genes expression in humans.

    PubMed

    Reszka, Edyta; Wieczorek, Edyta; Jablonska, Ewa; Janasik, Beata; Fendler, Wojciech; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2015-04-01

    Animal studies in rodent and in vitro studies indicate compensatory role of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like (Nrf2) and Nrf2-regulated antioxidant and phase II biotransformation enzymes for the dietary selenium (Se) deficiency or for the loss of selenoproteins. To explore associations between plasma Se level and NRF2-regulated cytoprotective genes expression, an observational study was conducted in a population of 96 healthy non-smoking men living in Central Poland aged 18-83 years with relatively low plasma Se level. NRF2, KEAP2, CAT, EPHX1, GCLC, GCLM, GPX2, GSR, GSTA1, GSTM1, GSTP1, GSTT1, HMOX1, NQO1, PRDX1, SOD1, SOD2, TXNRD1 transcript levels in peripheral blood leukocytes and polymorphism of NRF2-617C/A (rs6721961) in blood genomic DNA were determined by means of quantitative real-time PCR. Mean plasma Se level was found to be 51.10±15.25μg/L (range 23.86-96.18μg/L). NRF2 mRNA level was positively correlated with expression of investigated NRF2-target genes. The multivariate linear regression adjusting for selenium status showed that plasma Se level was significantly inversely associated only with expression of GSTP1 (β-coef.=-0.270, p=0.009), PRDXR1 (β-coef.=-0.245, p=0.017) and SOD2 with an inverse trend toward significance (β-coef.=-0.186, p=0.074), but without an effect of NRF2 gene variants. NRF2 expression was inversely associated with age (r=-0.23, p=0.03) and body mass index (r=-0.29, p<0.001). The findings may suggest a possible link between plasma Se level and cytoprotective response at gene level in humans. PMID:25524402

  6. Estimating contribution of wildland fires to ambient ozone levels in National Parks in the Sierra Nevada, California.

    PubMed

    Preisler, Haiganoush K; Zhong, Shiyuan Sharon; Esperanza, Annie; Brown, Timothy J; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Tarnay, Leland

    2010-03-01

    Data from four continuous ozone and weather monitoring sites operated by the National Park Service in Sierra Nevada, California, are used to develop an ozone forecasting model and to estimate the contribution of wildland fires on ambient ozone levels. The analyses of weather and ozone data pointed to the transport of ozone precursors from the Central Valley as an important source of pollution in these National Parks. Comparisons of forecasted and observed values demonstrated that accurate forecasts of next-day hourly ozone levels may be achieved by using a time series model with historic averages, expected local weather and modeled PM values as explanatory variables. Results on fire smoke influence indicated occurrence of significant increases in average ozone levels with increasing fire activity. The overall effect on diurnal ozone values, however, was small when compared with the amount of variability attributed to sources other than fire. PMID:19914752

  7. Improved GIA Correction and Antarctic Contribution to Sea-level Rise Observed by GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivins, Erik; James, Thomas; Wahr, John; Schrama, Ernst; Landerer, Felix; Simon, Karen

    2013-04-01

    -65 Gt/yr. The new correction increases the solved-for ice mass imbalance of Antarctica to -57 ± 34 Gt/yr. The revised GIA correction is smaller than past GRACE estimates by about 50 to 90 Gt/yr. The new upper bound to sea-level rise from AIS mass loss averaged over the time span 2003.0 - 2012.0 is about 0.16 ± 0.09 mm/yr. We discuss the differences in spatio-temporal character of the gain-loss regimes of Antarctica over the observing period.

  8. Yucca Mountain and High-Level Nuclear Waste Disposal: Contributions of Mineralogy to Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, A.

    2006-05-01

    High-level nuclear waste from the nuclear power industry and the nuclear weapons complex requires a geologic repository for disposal. The United States has identified a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for this purpose. Site selection and characterization have relied on input from earth scientists, including information about waste form behavior in a repository environment. The question of waste forms is central to the issue of reducing uncertainties in predicting the performance of a geologic repository over thousands to hundreds of thousands of years, the periods covered by standards that govern the release of radioactivity into the environment. The repository characterized by the U.S. Department of Energy at Yucca Mountain will be located in the unsaturated zone and will consequently provide an oxidizing environment for the waste emplaced there. The geochemical environment will have a large impact on the behavior of the waste, the majority of which will be spent nuclear fuel from nuclear power plants. Spent fuel is largely composed of UO2, in addition to a small fraction of fission products and actinides. Studies of natural analogues have shown that UO2 is not stable in an oxidizing environment in the presence of water and will alter to other phases. The ability of these alteration phases to contain radioactivity is still a subject of analysis. Other countries have addressed the issue of waste form stability by selecting a reducing environment in a location below the water table for their repositories. Such a choice increases the durability of spent fuel by orders of magnitude and thus reduces the uncertainties associated with predicting the performance of the repository. In the United States, the emphasis has turned away from the selection of appropriate natural barriers to transport of radioactivity and towards improvement of engineered barriers. This shift reflects a decision to abandon the natural barriers in favor of engineered ones, resulting in the

  9. A Replication Study for Genome-Wide Gene Expression Levels in Two Layer Lines Elucidates Differentially Expressed Genes of Pathways Involved in Bone Remodeling and Immune Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Habig, Christin; Geffers, Robert; Distl, Ottmar

    2014-01-01

    The current replication study confirmed significant differences in gene expression profiles of the cerebrum among the two commercial layer lines Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL) and Lohmann Brown (LB). Microarray analyses were performed for 30 LSL and another 30 LB laying hens kept in the small group housing system Eurovent German. A total of 14,103 microarray probe sets using customized Affymetrix ChiGene-1_0-st Arrays with 20,399 probe sets were differentially expressed among the two layer lines LSL and LB (FDR adjusted P-value <0.05). An at least 2-fold change in expression levels could be observed for 388 of these probe sets. In LSL, 214 of the 388 probe sets were down- and 174 were up-regulated and vice versa for the LB layer line. Among the 174 up-regulated probe sets in LSL, we identified 51 significantly enriched Gene ontology (GO) terms of the biological process category. A total of 63 enriched GO-terms could be identified for the 214 down-regulated probe sets of the layer line LSL. We identified nine genes significantly differentially expressed between the two layer lines in both microarray experiments. These genes play a crucial role in protection of neuronal cells from oxidative stress, bone mineral density and immune response among the two layer lines LSL and LB. Thus, the different regulation of these genes may significantly contribute to phenotypic trait differences among these layer lines. In conclusion, these novel findings provide a basis for further research to improve animal welfare in laying hens and these layer lines may be of general interest as an animal model. PMID:24922511

  10. High MMP-9 Expression May Contribute to Retroprosthetic Membrane Formation after KPro Implantation in Rabbit Corneal Alkali Burn Model

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Minghong; Sang, Wei; Liu, Fuying; Yu, Hai; Zhou, Runhai; Belin, Michael Wellington; Zloty, Peter; Chen, Yingxin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate aqueous humor MMP-9 levels in alkali-burned rabbit cornea following KPr implantation and their roles in RPMs formation. Methods. Left eyes of 36 rabbits received a deep corneal alkali wound. 12 corneas were implanted with KPro and the other 24 control corneas were either penetrating keratoplasty or left without keratoplasty. Aqueous humor MMP-9 and TIMP-1 levels were determined and RPMs were obtained for histopathological and ultrastructural examination. Results. Alkali exposure induced significant increase in aqueous humor MMP-9 level and the data were further enhanced by KPro implantation. By contrast, TMIP-1 levels in aqueous humor showed a decreased trend following corneal alkali burn and KPro surgery. RPMs were developed in 5 out of 10 cases of KPro successfully implanted eyes. Histopathology showed the presence of a large number of fibroblasts and collagen fibers arranged irregularly with inflammatory cells infiltration, and an ingrowth of new blood vessels in this retrokeratoprosthesis fibrous tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis showed positive stain of RPMs for both MMP-9 and TIMP-1. Aqueous humor MMP-9 levels were significantly higher in RPM group postoperatively, while TIMP-1 levels were comparatively lower than that of No-RPM group. Conclusions. Our study evidenced the potential pathophysiological role of MMP-9 expression in RPM formation following KPro implantation. PMID:26949542

  11. The RNA-binding protein gene, hermes, is expressed at high levels in the developing heart.

    PubMed

    Gerber, W V; Yatskievych, T A; Antin, P B; Correia, K M; Conlon, R A; Krieg, P A

    1999-01-01

    In a screen for novel sequences expressed during embryonic heart development we have isolated a gene which encodes a putative RNA-binding protein. This protein is a member of one of the largest families of RNA-binding proteins, the RRM (RNA Recognition Motif) family. The gene has been named hermes (for HEart, RRM Expressed Sequence). The hermes protein is 197-amino acids long and contains a single RRM domain. In situ hybridization analysis indicates that hermes is expressed at highest levels in the myocardium of the heart and to a lesser extent in the ganglion layer of the retina, the pronephros and epiphysis. Expression of hermes in each of these tissues begins at approximately the time of differentiation and is maintained throughout development. Analysis of the RNA expression of the hermes orthologues from chicken and mouse reveals that, like Xenopus, the most prominent tissue of expression is the developing heart. The sequence and expression pattern of hermes suggests a role in post-transcriptional regulation of heart development. PMID:10096065

  12. Expression levels of MHC class I molecules are inversely correlated with promiscuity of peptide binding.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Paul; Meziane, El Kahina; Harrison, Michael; Magiera, Łukasz; Hermann, Clemens; Mears, Laura; Wrobel, Antony G; Durant, Charlotte; Nielsen, Lise Lotte; Buus, Søren; Ternette, Nicola; Mwangi, William; Butter, Colin; Nair, Venugopal; Ahyee, Trudy; Duggleby, Richard; Madrigal, Alejandro; Roversi, Pietro; Lea, Susan M; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are at the heart of adaptive immune responses, playing crucial roles in many kinds of disease and in vaccination. We report that breadth of peptide presentation and level of cell surface expression of class I molecules are inversely correlated in both chickens and humans. This relationship correlates with protective responses against infectious pathogens including Marek's disease virus leading to lethal tumours in chickens and human immunodeficiency virus infection progressing to AIDS in humans. We propose that differences in peptide binding repertoire define two groups of MHC class I molecules strategically evolved as generalists and specialists for different modes of pathogen resistance. We suggest that differences in cell surface expression level ensure the development of optimal peripheral T cell responses. The inverse relationship of peptide repertoire and expression is evidently a fundamental property of MHC molecules, with ramifications extending beyond immunology and medicine to evolutionary biology and conservation. PMID:25860507

  13. BDNF contributes to both rapid and homeostatic alterations in AMPA receptor surface expression in nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reimers, Jeremy M.; Loweth, Jessica A.; Wolf, Marina E.

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in plasticity at glutamate synapses and the effects of repeated cocaine exposure. We recently showed that intracranial injection of BDNF into the rat nucleus accumbens (NAc), a key region for cocaine addiction, rapidly increases AMPA receptor (AMPAR) surface expression. To further characterize BDNF’s role in both rapid AMPAR trafficking and slower, homeostatic changes in AMPAR surface expression, we investigated the effects of acute (30 min) and long-term (24 h) treatment with BDNF on AMPAR distribution in NAc medium spiny neurons from postnatal rats co-cultured with mouse prefrontal cortex (PFC) neurons to restore excitatory inputs. Immunocytochemical studies showed that acute BDNF treatment increased cell surface GluA1 and GluA2 levels, as well as their co-localization, on NAc neurons. This effect of BDNF, confirmed using a protein crosslinking assay, was dependent on ERK but not AKT signaling. In contrast, long-term BDNF treatment decreased AMPAR surface expression on NAc neurons. Based on this latter result, we tested the hypothesis that BDNF plays a role in AMPAR “scaling down” in response to a prolonged increase in neuronal activity produced by bicuculline (24 h). Supporting this hypothesis, decreasing BDNF signaling with the extracellular BDNF scavenger TrkB-Fc prevented the scaling down of GluA1 and GluA2 surface levels in NAc neurons normally produced by bicuculline. In conclusion, BDNF exerts bidirectional effects on NAc AMPAR surface expression, depending on duration of exposure. Furthermore, BDNF’s involvement in synaptic scaling in the NAc differs from its previously described role in the visual cortex. PMID:24712995

  14. Gene expression in diplosporous and sexual Eragrostis curvula genotypes with differing ploidy levels.

    PubMed

    Cervigni, Gerardo D L; Paniego, Norma; Pessino, Silvina; Selva, Juan P; Díaz, Marina; Spangenberg, Germán; Echenique, Viviana

    2008-05-01

    The molecular nature of gene expression during the initiation and progress of diplosporous apomixis is still unknown. Moreover, the basis of the close correlation between diplospory and polyploidy is not clarified yet. A comparative expression analysis was performed based on expressed sequence tags (ESTs) sequencing and differential display in an Eragrostis curvula diplosporous tetraploid genotype (T, 4x apo), a sexual diploid derivative obtained from tissue culture (D, 2x sex) and an artificial sexual tetraploid obtained from the diploid seeds after colchicine treatment (C, 4x sex). From a total of 8,884 unigenes sequenced from inflorescence-derived libraries, 112 (1.26%) showed significant differential expression in individuals with different ploidy level and/or variable reproductive mode. Independent comparisons between plants with different reproductive mode (same ploidy) or different ploidy level (same reproductive mode) allowed the identification of genes modulated in response to diplosporous development or polyploidization, respectively. Surprisingly, a group of genes (Group 3) were differentially expressed or silenced only in the 4x sex plant, presenting similar levels of expression in the 4x apo and the 2x sex genotypes. A group of randomly selected differential genes was validated by QR-PCR. Differential display analysis showed that in general the 4x apo and 4x sex expression profiles were more related and different from the 2x sex one, but confirmed the existence of Group 3-type genes, in both inflorescences and leaves. The possible biological significance for the occurrence of this particular group of genes is discussed. In silico mapping onto the rice genome was used to identify candidates mapping to the region syntenic to the diplospory locus. PMID:18311543

  15. A century-long simulation of terrestrial water storage change and its contribution to global sea-level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierkens, Marc F. P.; Bosmans, Joyce; de Graaf, Inge; Sutandjaja, Edwin; Schmitz, Oliver; Wada, Yoshihide; Wanders, Niko; van Beek, Ludovicus P. H.

    2016-04-01

    Although limited, the contribution of terrestrial water storage (TWS) change to sea-level change is significant enough to be taken into account in sea-level attribution studies. Thus, after being absent in a previous report, TWS was again one of the components taken into account in IPCC assessment report 5. TWS can be effectively observed by analysing gravity anomalies from the GRACE mission or by observing individual components with lidar (surface water level), geodetic surveys (groundwater) and space borne passive and active microwave sensors (soil moisture, snow water equivalent). However, these observation only yield time series of limited length making it difficult to estimate long term trends in TWS as multi-decadal variations. We present the results of a century-long (1900-2014) simulation of TWS change with PCR-GLOBWB 2.0 that is fully coupled with a global two-layer groundwater model. In this simulation we include the effects of land cover change, the building of reservoirs and human water use (abstraction from surface and groundwater, water consumption and return flows). The effects of wetland drainage and siltation of reservoirs is corrected for afterwards. We validate TWS estimates for the period 2003-2010 with GRACE estimates. Trends of TWS and its effects on sea-level change are estimated and the main contributions (humans and climate)identified. Similarly, we examine multi-year variability in TWS and sea-level change in relation to climate variability. Our results show a significant positive trend in TWS due to a trend in precipitation over the first half of the 20th century. In the second part of the 20th century trends in TWS due to dam impoundment and groundwater depletion are evident. Finally, large anomalies, in the order of 5 cm sea-level equivalent, can be seen as a result of interannual climate variability.

  16. Correlation between radiation dose and p53 protein expression levels in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Mariana B; Fernandes, Thiago S; Silva, Edvane B; Amaral, Ademir

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the relationship between p53 protein levels and absorbed doses from in vitro irradiated human lymphocytes. For this, samples of blood from 23 donors were irradiated with 0.5; 1; 2; and 4 Gy from a Cobalt-60 source, and the percentages of lymphocytes expressing p53 were scored using Flow Cytometry. The subjects were divided into 3 groups, in accordance with the p53 levels expressed per radiation dose: low (Group I), high (Group II), and excessive levels (Group III). For all groups, the analyses showed that the p53 expression levels increase with the absorbed dose. Particularly for groups I and II, the correlation between this protein expression and the dose follows the linear-quadratic model, such as for radioinduced chromosomal aberrations. In conclusion, our findings indicate possible applications of this approach in evaluating individual radiosensitivity prior to radiotherapeutical procedures as well as in medical surveillance of occupationally exposed workers. Furthermore, due to the rapidity of flow-cytometric analyses, the methodology here employed would play an important role in emergency responses to a large-scale radiation incident where many people may have been exposed. PMID:26312422

  17. Insect cell transformation vectors that support high level expression and promoter assessment in insect cell culture.

    PubMed

    Shirk, Paul D; Furlong, Richard B

    2016-01-01

    A somatic transformation vector, pDP9, was constructed that provides a simplified means of producing permanently transformed cultured insect cells that support high levels of protein expression of foreign genes. The pDP9 plasmid vector incorporates DNA sequences from the Junonia coenia densovirus that are involved in integration of the densovirus in insect cell chromosomes and a promoter/enhancer system that results in high levels of expression. The plasmid also contains two markers that permit selection of transformed insect cells by antibiotic resistance or by cell-sorting for fluorescent protein expression. Transformation of Bombyx mori Bm5 or Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cultured cells with the pDP9 vectors results in the integration of the pDP9 plasmid into genomic DNA of Bm5 and Sf9 cells. pDP9 contains a multiple cloning site (MCS) 3' of the densoviral P9 promoter and insertion of a protein coding sequence within the MCS results in high level expression by pDP9 transformed cells. P9 driven transcription in the pDP9 transformed Sf9 cells produced foreign gene transcript levels that were 30 fold higher than actin 3 driven transgenes and equivalent to hr5IE1 driven transgenes. The pDP9 vector transformation results in the efficient selection of clones for assessment of promoter activity. PMID:26794473

  18. Insect cell transformation vectors that support high level expression and promoter assessment in insect cell culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A somatic transformation vector, pDP9, was constructed that provides a simplified means of producing permanently transformed cultured insect cells that support high levels of protein expression of foreign genes. The pDP9 plasmid vector incorporates DNA sequences from the Junonia coenia densovirus th...

  19. Elevated interleukin-6 expression levels are associated with intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    DENG, XIAO; ZHAO, FENG; KANG, BAOLIN; ZHANG, XIN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression levels were associated with the onset and progression of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). A comprehensive meta-analysis of the scientific literature from numerous electronic databases was performed, in order to obtain published studies associated with the topic of interest. Relevant case-control studies that had previously assessed a correlation between IL-6 expression levels and IDD were identified using predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The STATA version 12.0 software was used for statistical analysis of the extracted data. A total of 112 studies were initially retrieved, with eight studies meeting the inclusion criteria. These contained a total of 392 subjects, of which 263 were patients with IDD and 129 were healthy controls. A meta-analysis of the eight studies demonstrated that serum IL-6 protein expression levels may be associated with IDD, and this was irrespective of IDD subtype (bulging, protrusion, or sequestration). Notably, serum expression levels of the IL-6 protein were upregulated in intervertebral disc (IVD) protrusion tissue, as compared with normal IVD tissue; thus suggesting that IL-6 may have an important role in the pathophysiological process of IDD. PMID:27073460

  20. High level expression of organophosphorus hydrolase in Pichia pastoris by multicopy ophcM assembly.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Shu, Min; Ma, Lixin; Ni, Hong; Yan, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The residues of organophosphorus pesticides bring serious impact on the environmental safety and people's health. Biodegradation of organophosphorus pesticides is recognized as an ideal method. An organophosphorus hydrolase (OPHCM) from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes was synthesized and expressed in Pichia pastoris. The yield reached approximately 470 mg/l after a 6-d induction in shake flasks. To improve the enzyme production, we describe a novel approach to express OPHCM efficiently with a biobrick assembly method in vitro. Four recombinant plasmids containing 1-4 copies of ophcM-expressing cassettes were constructed and transformed into P. pastoris. Increasing the copy number of ophcM gene enhanced the expression level of OPHCM. The maximum yield and specific activity in P. pastoris harboring two-copy tandem ophcM-expressing cassettes reached 610 mg/l after a 6-d induction in shake flasks and 7.8 g/l in high-density fermentation with specific activity of 13.7 U/mg. The optimum pH and temperature of the recombinant OPHCM activity were 11.0 and 50 °C, respectively. In addition, the enzyme activity of recombinant OPHCM enhanced 57.6% and 30.1% in the presence of 1 mM Cd(2+) and 5% glycerol, respectively. The high expression and good properties of recombinant OPHCM provide an effective solution to solve the pollution of organophosphorus pesticides in the environment. Moreover, the approach for generating multicopy gene expressing vectors here will benefit the study for enhancing the expression level of genes of interest. PMID:26611611

  1. PAQR3 gene expression and its methylation level in colorectal cancer tissues

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ri-Heng; Zhang, Ai-Min; Li, Shuang; Li, Tian-Yang; Wang, Lian-Jing; Zhang, Hao-Ran; Shi, Jian-Wei; Liu, Xiao-Rui; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Ya-Chao; Wei, Teng-Yao; Gao, Ying; Li, Wei; Tang, Hong-Ying; Tang, Mei-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the PAQR3 gene expression and its methylation level in colorectal cancer tissues, as well as the association with colorectal cancer clinical data. In total, 54 cases of colorectal cancer tissue samples and normal adjacent tissue samples were collected between June, 2013 and July, 2014. RT-PCR and western blot analysis were used to detect the mRNA and protein levels of PAQR3 in colorectal samples, respectively. MSP was used to detect the methylation level of PAQR3 gene in colorectal samples, which was compared with colorectal data. The results showed that a decreased expression level of PAQR3 mRNA in colorectal cancer tissues and the expression reduction rate was 57.4% (31/54). Similarly, the expression level of PAQR3 protein was reduced in cancer tissues, and the reduction rate was 46.3% (25/54), while the protein expression reduction rate in cancer adjacent tissue was 5.6% (3/54), and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Furthermore, the methylation rates of PAQR3 in cancer tissues and cancer adjacent tissues were 33.3% (18/54) and 5.6% (3/54), respectively. In addition, PAQR3 mRNA and protein levels in colorectal cancer tissues were associated with the differentiation degree, lymphatic metastasis and tumor infiltration depth. The methylation level of PAQR3 was associated with age, differentiated degree, lymphatic metastasis and tumor infiltration depth. In conclusion, the expression of PAQR3 mRNA and protein in colorectal cancer was reduced and methylation of PAQR3 occurred. Although the PAQR3 mRNA and protein levels were not associated with gender, age or the location of tumor, there was an association with differentiation degree, lymphatic metastasis and tumor infiltration depth. In addition, the methylation level of PAQR3 was not correlated with gender or tumor location, but was correlated with age, differentiation degree, lymphatic metastasis and tumor infiltration depth. PMID:27588124

  2. SIRT1 contributes to aldose reductase expression through modulating NFAT5 under osmotic stress: In vitro and in silico insights.

    PubMed

    Timucin, Ahmet Can; Bodur, Cagri; Basaga, Huveyda

    2015-11-01

    So far, a myriad of molecules were characterized to modulate NFAT5 and its downstream targets. Among these NFAT5 modifiers, SIRT1 was proposed to have a promising role in NFAT5 dependent events, yet the exact underlying mechanism still remains obscure. Hence, the link between SIRT1 and NFAT5-aldose reductase (AR) axis under osmotic stress, was aimed to be delineated in this study. A unique osmotic stress model was generated and its mechanistic components were deciphered in U937 monocytes. In this model, AR expression and nuclear NFAT5 stabilization were revealed to be positively regulated by SIRT1 through utilization of pharmacological modulators. Overexpression and co-transfection studies of NFAT5 and SIRT1 further validated the contribution of SIRT1 to AR and NFAT5. The involvement of SIRT1 activity in these events was mediated via modification of DNA binding of NFAT5 to AR ORE region. Besides, NFAT5 and SIRT1 were also shown to co-immunoprecipitate under isosmotic conditions and this interaction was disrupted by osmotic stress. Further in silico experiments were conducted to investigate if SIRT1 directly targets NFAT5. In this regard, certain lysine residues of NFAT5, when kept deacetylated, were found to contribute to its DNA binding and SIRT1 was shown to directly bind K282 of NFAT5. Based on these in vitro and in silico findings, SIRT1 was identified, for the first time, as a novel positive regulator of NFAT5 dependent AR expression under osmotic stress in U937 monocytes. PMID:26297866

  3. Rabies Virus Vector Transgene Expression Level and Cytotoxicity Improvement Induced by Deletion of Glycoprotein Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Shinya; Sato, Sho; Oyama, Kei; Tsutsui, Ken-Ichiro; Iijima, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    The glycoprotein (G) of rabies virus (RV) is required for binding to neuronal receptors and for viral entry. G-deleted RV vector is a powerful tool for investigating the organization and function of the neural circuits. It gives the investigator the ability to genetically target initial infection to particular neurons and to control trans-synaptic propagation. In this study we have quantitatively evaluated the effect of G gene deletion on the cytotoxicity and transgene expression level of the RV vector. We compared the characteristics of the propagation-competent RV vector (rHEP5.0-CVSG-mRFP) and the G-deleted RV vector (rHEP5.0-ΔG-mRFP), both of which are based on the attenuated HEP-Flury strain and express monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP) as a transgene. rHEP5.0-ΔG-mRFP showed lower cytotoxicity than rHEP5.0-CVSG-mRFP, and within 16 days of infection we found no change in the basic electrophysiological properties of neurons infected with the rHEP5.0-ΔG-mRFP. The mRFP expression level of rHEP5.0-ΔG-mRFP was much higher than that of rHEP5.0-CVSG-mRFP, and 3 days after infection the retrogradely infected neurons were clearly visualized by the expressed fluorescent protein without any staining. This may be due to the low cytotoxicity and/or the presumed change in the polymerase gene (L) expression level of the G-deleted RV vector. Although the mechanisms remains to be clarified, the results of this study indicate that deletion of the G gene greatly improves the usability of the RV vector for studying the organization and function of the neural circuits by decreasing the cytotoxicity and increasing the transgene expression level. PMID:24244660

  4. Leptin receptor gene expression and number in the brain are regulated by leptin level and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sharon E; Nogueiras, Ruben; Morris, Amanda; Tovar, Sulay; Grant, Christine; Cruickshank, Morven; Rayner, D Vernon; Dieguez, Carlos; Williams, Lynda M

    2009-07-15

    Hormone potency depends on receptor availability, regulated via gene expression and receptor trafficking. To ascertain how central leptin receptors are regulated, the effects of leptin challenge, high-fat diet, fasting and refeeding were measured on leptin receptor number and gene expression. These were measured using quantitative (125)I-labelled leptin in vitro autoradiography and in situ hybridisation, respectively. Ob-R (all forms of leptin receptor) expression in the choroid plexus (CP) was unchanged by high-fat diet or leptin challenge, whereas fasting increased but refeeding failed to decrease expression. (125)I-labelled leptin binding to the CP was increased by fasting and returned to basal levels on refeeding. (125)I-Labelled leptin was reduced by leptin challenge and increased by high-fat feeding. Ob-Rb (signalling form) in the arcuate (ARC) and ventromedial (VMH) nuclei was increased after fasting and decreased by refeeding. Leptin challenge increased Ob-Rb expression in the ARC, but not after high-fat feeding. In general, changes in gene expression in the ARC and VMH appeared to be largely due to changes in area rather than density of labelling, indicating that the number of cells expressing Ob-Rb was the parameter that contributed most to these changes. Leptin stimulation of suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3), a marker of stimulation of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (JAK/STAT3) pathway, was unchanged after high-fat diet. Thus, early loss of leptin sensitivity after high-fat feeding is unrelated to down-regulation of leptin receptor expression or number and does not involve the JAK/STAT pathway. The effect of leptin to decrease (125)I-labelled leptin binding and the loss of ability of leptin to up-regulate Ob-Rb expression in the ARC after high-fat feeding offer potential mechanisms for the development of leptin insensitivity in response to both hyperleptinaemia and high-fat diet. PMID:19491239

  5. Glutamate Receptor Antagonist Infusions into the Basolateral and Medial Amygdala Reveal Differential Contributions to Olfactory vs. Context Fear Conditioning and Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, David L.; Paschall, Gayla Y.; Davis, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The basolateral amygdala's involvement in fear acquisition and expression to visual and auditory stimuli is well known. The involvement of the basolateral and other amygdala areas in fear acquisition and expression to stimuli of other modalities is less certain. We evaluated the contribution of the basolateral and medial amygdala to olfactory and…

  6. Evidence for a substantial West Antarctic ice sheet contribution to meltwater pulses and abrupt global sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogwill, C. J.; Turney, C. S.; Golledge, N. R.; Etheridge, D. M.; Rubino, M.; Thornton, D.; Woodward, J.; Winter, K.; van Ommen, T. D.; Moy, A. D.; Curran, M. A.; Rootes, C.; Rivera, A.; Millman, H.

    2015-12-01

    During the last deglaciation (21,000 to 7,000years ago) global sea level rise was punctuated by several abrupt meltwater spikes triggered by the retreat of ice sheets and glaciers world-wide. However, the debate regarding the relative timing, geographical source and the physical mechanisms driving these rapid increases in sea level has catalyzed debate critical to predicting future sea level rise and climate. Here we present a unique record of West Antarctic Ice Sheet elevation change derived from the Patriot Hills blue ice area, located close to the modern day grounding line of the Institute Ice Stream in the Weddell Sea Embayment. Combined isotopic signatures and gas volume analysis from the ice allows us to develop a record of local ice sheet palaeo-altitude that is assessed against independent regional high-resolution ice sheet modeling studies, allowing us to demonstrate that past ice sheet elevations across this sector of the WSE were considerably higher than those suggested by current terrestrial reconstructions. We argue that ice in the WSE had a significant influence on both pre and post LGM sea level rise including MWP-1A (~14.6 ka) and during MWP-1B (11.7-11.6 ka), reconciling past sea level rise and demonstrating for the first time that this sector of the WAIS made a significant and direct contribution to post LGM sea level rise.

  7. The Reduction in Circulating Melatonin Level May Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Ovarian Cancer: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Wan, Jiayi; Zeng, Ke; Tong, Mancy; Lee, Arier C; Ding, Jinxin; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the third most common gynaecological malignancy. Changes in circadian rhythms such as bright light exposure may affect female reproductive physiology. Night shift work is associated with higher risks of developing gynaecological cancers. In addition, the season of birth is also suggested as an important environmental risk factor for developing gynaecological cancers. Melatonin may play an important role in this association as a marker of circadian rhythms. Serum from 96 women with ovarian cancer and 40 healthy women were collected and the level of melatonin was measured. In addition 277 women with ovarian cancer and 1076 controls were retrospectively collected for season of birth analysis over seven years. The serum levels of melatonin were significantly lower in women with ovarian cancer compared with healthy women (p<0.05). However there was no difference in melatonin levels in perimenopausal and postmenopausal patients. In addition, there is no statistically significant difference in seasonal distribution of birth between ovarian cancer patients and the control group. The melatonin levels in ovarian cancer patients and controls were not associated with the season of birth. Our results demonstrate the lower serum levels of melatonin in ovarian cancer patients which may contribute to the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. The incidence of ovarian cancer was not associated with the season of birth. The serum levels of melatonin do not appear to be associated with season of birth in ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27162542

  8. The Reduction in Circulating Melatonin Level May Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Ovarian Cancer: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Wan, Jiayi; Zeng, Ke; Tong, Mancy; Lee, Arier C; Ding, Jinxin; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the third most common gynaecological malignancy. Changes in circadian rhythms such as bright light exposure may affect female reproductive physiology. Night shift work is associated with higher risks of developing gynaecological cancers. In addition, the season of birth is also suggested as an important environmental risk factor for developing gynaecological cancers. Melatonin may play an important role in this association as a marker of circadian rhythms. Serum from 96 women with ovarian cancer and 40 healthy women were collected and the level of melatonin was measured. In addition 277 women with ovarian cancer and 1076 controls were retrospectively collected for season of birth analysis over seven years. The serum levels of melatonin were significantly lower in women with ovarian cancer compared with healthy women (p<0.05). However there was no difference in melatonin levels in perimenopausal and postmenopausal patients. In addition, there is no statistically significant difference in seasonal distribution of birth between ovarian cancer patients and the control group. The melatonin levels in ovarian cancer patients and controls were not associated with the season of birth. Our results demonstrate the lower serum levels of melatonin in ovarian cancer patients which may contribute to the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. The incidence of ovarian cancer was not associated with the season of birth. The serum levels of melatonin do not appear to be associated with season of birth in ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27162542

  9. Effect of temperature on oxidative stress, antioxidant levels and uncoupling protein expression in striped hamsters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Si-Si; Cao, Li-Li; Xu, Wei-Dong; Cao, Jing; Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2015-11-01

    According to the rate of living-free radical hypothesis, higher metabolic rates should increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, the "uncoupling to survive" hypothesis postulates that uncoupling proteins (UCPs) can decrease ROS production by lowering the potential of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in which case the correlation between metabolic rate and ROS levels would be a negative rather than positive. In this study, we examined energy intake, oxidative stress levels, antioxidant activity and the expression of UCPs in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and in the liver, heart, skeletal muscle and brain, of striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis) acclimated to either 5 °C or 32.5 °C. The energy intake of hamsters acclimated to 5 °C increased by 70.7%, whereas the energy intake of hamsters acclimated to 32.5 °C decreased by 31.3%, relative to hamsters kept at room temperature (21 °C) (P<0.05). Malonadialdehyde (MDA) levels, total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activity in BAT significantly decreased in 5 °C group, but increased in 32.5 °C group, relative to the 21 °C group. Neither ROS levels (i.e. H2O2 levels), nor antioxidants in skeletal muscle, liver, heart or brain tissue, were affected by temperature. UCP1 expression in BAT was significantly up-regulated in 5 °C group, but down-regulated in 32.5 °C group, relative to the 21 °C group. UCP3 expression of skeletal muscle was also up-regulated significantly in hamsters acclimated to 5 °C. These results suggest that the relationship between ROS levels and metabolic rate was negative, rather than positive. UCP1 expression in BAT may have played a role in lowering ROS levels. PMID:26244518

  10. Gene expression profiles in mouse embryo fibroblasts lacking stathmin, a microtubule regulatory protein, reveal changes in the expression of genes contributing to cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Ringhoff, Danielle N; Cassimeris, Lynne

    2009-01-01

    Background Stathmin (STMN1) protein functions to regulate assembly of the microtubule cytoskeleton by destabilizing microtubule polymers. Stathmin over-expression has been correlated with cancer stage progression, while stathmin depletion leads to death of some cancer cell lines in culture. In contrast, stathmin-null mice are viable with minor axonopathies and loss of innate fear response. Several stathmin binding partners, in addition to tubulin, have been shown to affect cell motility in culture. To expand our understanding of stathmin function in normal cells, we compared gene expression profiles, measured by microarray and qRT-PCR, of mouse embryo fibroblasts isolated from STMN1+/+ and STMN1-/- mice to determine the transcriptome level changes present in the genetic knock-out of stathmin. Results Microarray analysis of STMN1 loss at a fold change threshold of ≥ 2.0 revealed expression changes for 437 genes, of which 269 were up-regulated and 168 were down-regulated. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis of mRNA expression demonstrated changes in the message levels for STMN4, encoding RB3, a protein related to stathmin, and in alterations to many tubulin isotype mRNAs. KEGG Pathway analysis of the microarray data indicated changes to cell motility-related genes, and qRT-PCR plates specific for focal adhesion and ECM proteins generally confirmed the microarray data. Several microtubule assembly regulators and motors were also differentially regulated in STMN1-/- cells, but these changes should not compensate for loss of stathmin. Conclusion Approximately 50% of genes up or down regulated (at a fold change of ≥ 2) in STMN1-/- mouse embryo fibroblasts function broadly in cell adhesion and motility. These results support models indicating a role for stathmin in regulating cell locomotion, but also suggest that this functional activity may involve changes to the cohort of proteins expressed in the cell, rather than as a direct consequence of stathmin

  11. RING1 proteins contribute to early proximal-distal specification of the forelimb bud by restricting Meis2 expression.

    PubMed

    Yakushiji-Kaminatsui, Nayuta; Kondo, Takashi; Endo, Takaho A; Koseki, Yoko; Kondo, Kaori; Ohara, Osamu; Vidal, Miguel; Koseki, Haruhiko

    2016-01-15

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins play a pivotal role in silencing developmental genes and help to maintain various stem and precursor cells and regulate their differentiation. PcG factors also regulate dynamic and complex regional specification, particularly in mammals, but this activity is mechanistically not well understood. In this study, we focused on proximal-distal (PD) patterning of the mouse forelimb bud to elucidate how PcG factors contribute to a regional specification process that depends on developmental signals. Depletion of the RING1 proteins RING1A (RING1) and RING1B (RNF2), which are essential components of Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), led to severe defects in forelimb formation along the PD axis. We show that preferential defects in early distal specification in Ring1A/B-deficient forelimb buds accompany failures in the repression of proximal signal circuitry bound by RING1B, including Meis1/2, and the activation of distal signal circuitry in the prospective distal region. Additional deletion of Meis2 induced partial restoration of the distal gene expression and limb formation seen in the Ring1A/B-deficient mice, suggesting a crucial role for RING1-dependent repression of Meis2 and likely also Meis1 for distal specification. We suggest that the RING1-MEIS1/2 axis is regulated by early PD signals and contributes to the initiation or maintenance of the distal signal circuitry. PMID:26674308

  12. Reduced gene expression levels after chronic exposure to high concentrations of air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Pavel; Tulupova, Elena; Rossnerova, Andrea; Libalova, Helena; Honkova, Katerina; Gmuender, Hans; Pastorkova, Anna; Svecova, Vlasta; Topinka, Jan; Sram, Radim J

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed the ability of particulate matter (PM) and chemicals adsorbed onto it to induce diverse gene expression profiles in subjects living in two regions of the Czech Republic differing in levels and sources of the air pollution. A total of 312 samples from polluted Ostrava region and 154 control samples from Prague were collected in winter 2009, summer 2009 and winter 2010. The highest concentrations of air pollutants were detected in winter 2010 when the subjects were exposed to: PM of aerodynamic diameter <2.5μm (PM2.5) (70 vs. 44.9μg/m(3)); benzo[a]pyrene (9.02 vs. 2.56ng/m(3)) and benzene (10.2 vs. 5.5μg/m(3)) in Ostrava and Prague, respectively. Global gene expression analysis of total RNA extracted from leukocytes was performed using Illumina Expression BeadChips microarrays. The expression of selected genes was verified by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Gene expression profiles differed by locations and seasons. Despite lower concentrations of air pollutants a higher number of differentially expressed genes and affected KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathways was found in subjects from Prague. In both locations immune response pathways were affected, in Prague also neurodegenerative diseases-related pathways. Over-representation of the latter pathways was associated with the exposure to PM2.5. The qRT-PCR analysis showed a significant decrease in expression of APEX, ATM, FAS, GSTM1, IL1B and RAD21 in subjects from Ostrava, in a comparison of winter 2010 and summer 2009. In Prague, an increase in gene expression was observed for GADD45A and PTGS2. In conclusion, high concentrations of pollutants in Ostrava were not associated with higher number of differentially expressed genes, affected KEGG pathways and expression levels of selected genes. This observation suggests that chronic exposure to air pollution may result in reduced gene expression response with possible negative health consequences. PMID:26298100

  13. The contribution of school-level factors to contraceptive use among adolescents in New York city public high schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Deborah L.

    Every year approximately 17,000 adolescents ages 15-19 become pregnant in New York City. Most of these pregnancies are unintended and only a small percent of adolescents use effective contraception, with wide disparities by race/ethnicity and poverty level. While many studies have identified factors associated with contraceptive use, most research has focused on individual level factors, with little attention to the contribution of the school environment to sexual risk behavior and contraceptive use. This study investigates the effect of school-level factors on contraceptive use among adolescents in NYC public high schools before and after controlling for individual-level factors, and whether this effect varies with race/ethnicity. Using a cross-sectional design, the NYC Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) individual-level datasets for 2007, 2009 and 2011 were linked to a school-level dataset. Variables were selected based on empirical findings on factors associated with sexual behaviors, including contraceptive use, by adolescents. The analytic sample included all YRBS respondents aged 14 or older who reported having sexual intercourse in the past three months and had complete responses to the YRBS questions on contraceptive use at last sex (N=8,054). The chi square test of significance was used to evaluate significant associations between independent variables and contraceptive use in bivariate analyses; variables with a p value < 0.1 were included in the multivariable analyses. Binary and multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to estimate the strength of the associations of school-level factors with contraceptive use among sexually active adolescents. Findings included that use of any contraception and/or hormonal contraception at last sexual intercourse was associated with attending schools with a higher six-year graduation rate, higher percent of students strongly agreeing they were safe in their classrooms, higher percent of teachers at the

  14. Maternal low-level lead exposure reduces the expression of PSA-NCAM and the activity of sialyltransferase in the hippocampi of neonatal rat pups.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiansheng; Fu, Hongjun; Ren, Tieling; Wang, Shuyu; Zhou, Wei; Song, Hong; Han, Yifan; Dong, Shengzhang

    2008-07-01

    Highly polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) is transiently expressed specifically in newly generated cells, and is important for cell migration and neurite outgrowth. Developmental lead (Pb) exposure has been considered to affect the expression of PSA-NCAM, which contributes to the neurotoxicity of Pb exposure. However, the effect of maternal low-level Pb exposure on the expression of PSA-NCAM in neonatal rat pups has not been reported. In the present study, female Wistar rats were exposed to vehicle or different dosages of lead chloride (0.5-4mM PbCl2) 2 weeks before and during pregnancy. This exposure protocol resulted in neonatal rat pups blood Pb levels up to 12.12+/-0.38 microg/dl, and hippocampal Pb levels up to 9.22+/-0.81 microg/g at postnatal day 1 (PND 1). Immunohistochemistry analysis and Western blot analysis revealed that the expressions of PSA-NCAM and NCAM in the hippocampi of neonatal rat pups at PND 1 were significantly reduced by the maternal low-level Pb exposures. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of NCAM and polysialyltransferases (STX and PST), measured by the fluorescent real-time quantitative RT-PCR, dosage-dependently and significantly decreased by 13.26-37.62%, 25.17-59.67%, and 10.78-47.81%, respectively. In addition, the sialyltransferase activity in neonatal rat pups was significantly reduced by 6.23-32.50% in the presence of the low-level Pb exposure, too. Taken together, these results suggest that maternal low-level Pb exposure reduces the expression of PSA-NCAM, NCAM, and the activity of sialyltransferase in the hippocampi of neonatal rat pups, which might contribute to the learning and memory impairments in the developmental pups following maternal low-level Pb exposure. PMID:18499259

  15. Decreased blood riboflavin levels are correlated with defective expression of RFT2 gene in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eli, Maynur; Li, De-Sheng; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Kong, Bing; Du, Chen-Song; Wumar, Maimaitiaili; Mamtimin, Batur; Sheyhidin, Ilyar; Hasim, Ayshamgul

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between blood riboflavin levels and riboflavin transporter 2 (RFT2) gene expression in gastric carcinoma (GC) development. METHODS: High-performance liquid chromatography was used to detect blood riboflavin levels in patients with GC. Real-time fluorogenic quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry were used to analyze the expression of RFT2 mRNA and protein in samples from 60 GC patients consisting of both tumor and normal tissue. RESULTS: A significant decrease in the RFT2 mRNA levels was detected in GC samples compared with those in the normal mucous membrane (0.398 ± 0.149 vs 1.479 ± 0.587; P = 0.040). Tumors exhibited low RFT2 protein expression (75%, 16.7%, 8.3% and 0% for no RFT2 staining, weak staining, medium staining and strong staining, respectively), which was significantly lower than that in the normal mucous membrane (10%, 16.7%, 26.7% and 46.7% for no RFT2 staining, weak staining, medium staining and strong staining, respectively; P < 0.05). Tumors with low RFT2 expression were significantly associated with tumor stage and histological grade. Moreover, a significantly decrease in Uyghur patients was observed compared with Han patients. However, other parameters-gender, tumor location and lymph node metastasis-showed no significant relationship with RFT2 expression. Blood riboflavin levels were reverse correlated with development of GC (1.2000 ± 0.97 569 ng/mL in high tumor stage patients vs 2.5980 ± 1.31 129 ng/mL in low tumor stage patients; P < 0.05). A positive correlation of plasma riboflavin levels with defective expression of RFT2 protein was found in GC patients (χ2 = 2.619; P = 0.019). CONCLUSION: Defective expression of RFT2 is associated with the development of GC and this may represent a mechanism underlying the decreased plasma riboflavin levels in GC. PMID:22791947

  16. Role of EGFR expression levels in the regulation of integrin function by EGF.

    PubMed

    Vial, Daniel; McKeown-Longo, Paula J

    2016-06-01

    Activation of β1 integrins in dormant tumor cells has been linked to metastatic progression, suggesting that therapies designed to maintain β1 integrins in an inactive state may be useful in the prevention of metastatic disease. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that EGF regulates the activation state of the α5β1 integrin in EGFR overexpressing tumor cells through an ERK/p90RSK signaling pathway. Activation of this pathway by EGF resulted in the filamin A dependent inactivation of the α5β1 integrin receptor for fibronectin. The current study was designed to address the role of EGFR overexpression in the regulation of α5β1 integrin activation state by EGF. Lentiviral knockdown of EGFR coupled with limited dilution cloning was used to develop A431 squamous carcinoma cell lines expressing high, moderate, and low levels of EGFR. Inactivation of α5β1 integrin by EGF was shown to correlate with both the level of EGFR expression and the extent of p90RSK phosphorylation, but not with the level of ERK phosphorylation, suggesting that high levels of EGFR promote α5β1 integrin inactivation through sustained activation of p90RSK. Treatment of cells with EGFR kinase inhibitor resulted in a reactivation of the integrin which could be reversed with the phosphatase inhibitor, menadione. Taken together, these findings indicate that p90RSK may function to maintain dormancy in tumor cells expressing high levels of EGFR. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26053065

  17. The level of cytokines and expression of caspase genes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Malysheva, I E; Topchieva, L V; Barysheva, O Y; Kurbatova, I V; Vasykova, O A; Vezikova, N N; Marusenko, I M; Nemova, N N

    2016-05-01

    The level of TNFα and IL6 in the blood plasma of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who received antiinflammatory therapy with methotrexate (MT) was significantly lower than in the patients without MT treatment. The level of caspase 6 and 9 gene transcripts in peripheral blood lymphocytes in patients with rheumatoid arthritic diagnosed for the first time and in patients with MT treatment were not significantly different. At the same time, the level of caspase 3 mRNA expression was significantly higher in the cells of the RA patients with MT therapy compared to the patients without MT therapy. PMID:27417728

  18. Analysis of gene expression levels in individual bacterial cells without image segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, In Hae; Son, Minjun; Hagen, Stephen J.

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a method for extracting gene expression data from images of bacterial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method does not employ cell segmentation and does not require high magnification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence and phase contrast images of the cells are correlated through the physics of phase contrast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate the method by characterizing noisy expression of comX in Streptococcus mutans. -- Abstract: Studies of stochasticity in gene expression typically make use of fluorescent protein reporters, which permit the measurement of expression levels within individual cells by fluorescence microscopy. Analysis of such microscopy images is almost invariably based on a segmentation algorithm, where the image of a cell or cluster is analyzed mathematically to delineate individual cell boundaries. However segmentation can be ineffective for studying bacterial cells or clusters, especially at lower magnification, where outlines of individual cells are poorly resolved. Here we demonstrate an alternative method for analyzing such images without segmentation. The method employs a comparison between the pixel brightness in phase contrast vs fluorescence microscopy images. By fitting the correlation between phase contrast and fluorescence intensity to a physical model, we obtain well-defined estimates for the different levels of gene expression that are present in the cell or cluster. The method reveals the boundaries of the individual cells, even if the source images lack the resolution to show these boundaries clearly.

  19. Enhanced cyclooxygenase-2 expression levels and metalloproteinase 2 and 9 activation by Hexachlorobenzene in human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Florencia; Bastón, Juan Ignacio; Vaccarezza, Agustina; Singla, José Javier; Pontillo, Carolina; Miret, Noelia; Farina, Mariana; Meresman, Gabriela; Randi, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is an organochlorine pesticide that induces toxic reproductive effects in laboratory animals. It is a dioxin-like compound and a weak ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Endometriosis is characterized by the presence of functional endometrial tissues outside the uterine cavity. Experimental studies indicate that exposure to organochlorines can interfere with both hormonal regulation and immune function to promote endometriosis. Altered expression of metalloproteinases (MMPs) in patients with endometriosis, suggests that MMPs may play a critical role. In the endometriotic lesions, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) produced by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), binds to its EP4 receptor (EP4), and via c-Src kinase induces MMPs activation, promoting endometriosis. We examined the HCB action on MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities and expression, COX-2 levels, PGE2 signaling, and the AhR involvement in HCB-induced effects. We have used different in vitro models: (1) human endometrial stromal cell line T-HESC, (2) primary cultures of Human Uterine Fibroblast (HUF), and (3) primary cultures of endometrial stromal cells from eutopic endometrium of control (CESC) and subjects with endometriosis (EESC). Our results show that HCB enhances MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in T-HESC, HUF and ESC cells. The MMP-9 levels were elevated in all models, while the MMP-2 expression only increased in ESC cells. HCB enhanced COX-2 and EP4 expression, PGE2 secretion and the c-Src kinase activation in T-HESC. Besides, we observed that AhR is implicated in these HCB-induced effects. In conclusion, our results show that HCB exposure could contribute to endometriosis development, affecting inflammation and invasion parameters of human endometrial cells. PMID:27038655

  20. Androgen Receptors in a Cichlid Fish, Astatotilapia burtoni: Structure, Localization, and Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    HARBOTT, LENE K.; BURMEISTER, SABRINA S.; WHITE, RICHARD B.; VAGELL, MIKE; FERNALD, RUSSELL D.

    2009-01-01

    Androgens are an important output of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis that controls reproduction in all vertebrates. In male teleosts two androgens, testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone, control sexual differentiation and development in juveniles and reproductive behavior in adults. Androgenic signals provide feedback at many levels of the HPG axis, including the hypothalamic neurons that synthesize and release gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1), but the precise cellular site of androgen action in the brain is not known. Here we describe two androgen receptor subtypes, ARα and ARβ, in the cichlid Astatotilapia burtoni and show that these subtypes are differentially located throughout the adult brain in nuclei known to function in the control of reproduction. ARα was expressed in the ventral part of the ventral telencephalon, the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus and the ventral hypothalamus, whereas ARβ was more widely expressed in the dorsal and ventral telencephalon, the POA, and the ventral and dorsal hypothalamus. We provide the first evidence in any vertebrate that the GnRH1-releasing neurons, which serve as the central control point of the HPG axis, express both subtypes of AR. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we show that A. burtoni AR subtypes have different expression levels in adult tissue, with ARα showing significantly higher expression than ARβ in the pituitary, and ARβ expressed at a higher level than ARα in the anterior and middle brain. These data provide important insight into the role of androgens in regulating the vertebrate reproductive axis. PMID:17614300