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Sample records for expression regulation molecules

  1. A Chemical Screen Identifies Small Molecules that Regulate Hepcidin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gaun, Vera; Patchen, Bonnie; Volovetz, Josephine; Zhen, Aileen W.; Andreev, Aleksandr; Pollastri, Michael P.; Fraenkel, Paula G.

    2014-01-01

    Hepcidin, a peptide hormone produced in the liver, decreases intestinal iron absorption and macrophage iron release via effects on ferroportin. Bone morphogenic protein and Stat3 signaling regulate Hepcidin's transcription. Hepcidin is a potential drug target for patients with iron overload syndromes because its levels are inappropriately low in these individuals. To generate a tool for identifying small molecules that modulate Hepcidin expression, we stably transfected human hepatocytes (HepG2) cells with a reporter construct containing 2.7 kilobases of the human Hepcidin promoter upstream of a firefly reporter gene. We used high throughput methods to screen 10,169 chemicals in duplicate for their effect on Hepcidin expression and cell viability. Regulators were identified as chemicals that caused a change >3 standard deviations above or >1.5 standard deviations below the mean of the other chemicals (z-score >3 or <-1.5), while not adversely affecting cell viability, quantified by fluorescence assay. Following validation assays, we identified 16 chemicals in a broad range of functional classes that promote Hepcidin expression. All of the chemicals identified increased expression of bone morphogenic protein-dependent and/or Stat3-dependent genes, however none of them strongly increased phosphorylation of Smad1,5,8 or Stat3. PMID:24998898

  2. Systemic Sclerosis Patients Present Alterations in the Expression of Molecules Involved in B-Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Lilian; Ferrier, Ashley; Aravena, Octavio; Fonseca, Elianet; Berendsen, Jorge; Biere, Andrea; Bueno, Daniel; Ramos, Verónica; Aguillón, Juan Carlos; Catalán, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The activation threshold of B cells is tightly regulated by an array of inhibitory and activator receptors in such a way that disturbances in their expression can lead to the appearance of autoimmunity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of activating and inhibitory molecules involved in the modulation of B cell functions in transitional, naive, and memory B-cell subpopulations from systemic sclerosis patients. To achieve this, blood samples were drawn from 31 systemic sclerosis patients and 53 healthy individuals. Surface expression of CD86, MHC II, CD19, CD21, CD40, CD22, Siglec 10, CD35, and FcγRIIB was determined by flow cytometry. IL-10 production was evaluated by intracellular flow cytometry from isolated B cells. Soluble IL-6 and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA from supernatants of stimulated B cells. Systemic sclerosis patients exhibit an increased frequency of transitional and naive B cells related to memory B cells compared with healthy controls. Transitional and naive B cells from patients express higher levels of CD86 and FcγRIIB than healthy donors. Also, B cells from patients show high expression of CD19 and CD40, whereas memory cells from systemic sclerosis patients show reduced expression of CD35. CD19 and CD35 expression levels associate with different autoantibody profiles. IL-10+ B cells and secreted levels of IL-10 were markedly reduced in patients. In conclusion, systemic sclerosis patients show alterations in the expression of molecules involved in B-cell regulation. These abnormalities may be determinant in the B-cell hyperactivation observed in systemic sclerosis. PMID:26483788

  3. Expression of classical HLA class I molecules: regulation and clinical impacts: Julia Bodmer Award Review 2015.

    PubMed

    René, C; Lozano, C; Eliaou, J-F

    2016-05-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I genes are ubiquitously expressed, but in a tissue specific-manner. Their expression is primarily regulated at the transcriptional level and can be modulated both positively and negatively by different stimuli. Advances in sequencing technologies led to the identification of new regulatory variants located in the untranslated regions (UTRs), which could influence the expression. After a brief description of the mechanisms underlying the transcriptional regulation of HLA class I genes expression, we will review how the expression levels of HLA class I genes could affect biological and pathological processes. Then, we will discuss on the differential expression of HLA class I genes according to the locus, allele and UTR polymorphisms and its clinical impact. This interesting field of study led to a new dimension of HLA typing, going beyond a qualitative aspect. PMID:27060357

  4. Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression and Signaling During Disease: Regulation by Reactive Oxygen Species and Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Marchese, Michelle E.; Abdala-Valencia, Hiam

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The endothelium is immunoregulatory in that inhibiting the function of vascular adhesion molecules blocks leukocyte recruitment and thus tissue inflammation. The function of endothelial cells during leukocyte recruitment is regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants. In inflammatory sites and lymph nodes, the endothelium is stimulated to express adhesion molecules that mediate leukocyte binding. Upon leukocyte binding, these adhesion molecules activate endothelial cell signal transduction that then alters endothelial cell shape for the opening of passageways through which leukocytes can migrate. If the stimulation of this opening is blocked, inflammation is blocked. In this review, we focus on the endothelial cell adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Expression of VCAM-1 is induced on endothelial cells during inflammatory diseases by several mediators, including ROS. Then, VCAM-1 on the endothelium functions as both a scaffold for leukocyte migration and a trigger of endothelial signaling through NADPH oxidase-generated ROS. These ROS induce signals for the opening of intercellular passageways through which leukocytes migrate. In several inflammatory diseases, inflammation is blocked by inhibition of leukocyte binding to VCAM-1 or by inhibition of VCAM-1 signal transduction. VCAM-1 signal transduction and VCAM-1-dependent inflammation are blocked by antioxidants. Thus, VCAM-1 signaling is a target for intervention by pharmacological agents and by antioxidants during inflammatory diseases. This review discusses ROS and antioxidant functions during activation of VCAM-1 expression and VCAM-1 signaling in inflammatory diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1607–1638. PMID:21050132

  5. Estrogen down-regulates nicotine-induced adhesion molecule expression via nongenomic signal pathway in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajing; Wang, Zhaoxia; Wang, Lianyun; Zhou, Ying; Zhao, Yangxing; Liu, Liming; Yao, Chenjiang; Qiao, Zhongdong

    2006-06-01

    Although gonadal hormone mostly causes genotropic actions through the members of nuclear receptor family, it also can regulate these actions via membrane receptor. To explore the possibility of plasma membrane estrogen receptors (mER) mediating genotropic events, we have investigated estrogen's effect on nicotine-stimulated adhesion molecule expression and evaluated whether this effect depends on calcium, MAPK signal pathway. Fluorescence Spectroscopy analysis of Ca2+ from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) showed through mER, estrogen induced a rapid rise of intracellular free Ca2+ concentration and this rise could not be inhibited by tamoxifen (classic ER inhibitor). In the context of nicotine stimulating, however, estrogen attenuated phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members, extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38 but not c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) in HUVECs and this effect could not still be prevented by tamoxifen. In the meantime, estrogen also down-regulated surface/soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1, sVCAM-1) and endothelial selectin (E-selectin, sE-selectin) levels, which was not abolished by tamoxifen either. Moreover, calcium chelator BAPTA, ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059, p38 inhibitor SB203580 significantly reduced the production of nicotine-activated surface/soluble VCAM-1 and E-selectin and both of the remained levels were no longer regulated by estrogen. Our study here provides the information of decrease effect of mER-mediated estrogen through Ca2+ and ERK1/2, p38 MAPK signaling pathway on nicotine-stimulated expression of surface/soluble VCAM-1 and E-selectin in HUVECs. PMID:16644474

  6. Regulation of CD1d expression by murine tumor cells: escape from immunosurveillance or alternate target molecules?

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Tim; Walter, Wolfgang; Reichert, Torsten E; Maeurer, Markus J

    2002-03-20

    alpha beta+ TCR T cells recognize peptide fragments displayed by MHC-class I or -class II molecules. Recently, additional mechanisms of antigen recognition by T cells have been identified, including CD1-mediated presentation of nonpeptide antigens. Only a limited number of CD1 antigens is retained in the mouse, i.e., the group II CD1 antigens, which are split into CD1D1 and CD1d2. Several T cell subsets have been shown to interact with murine CD1 antigens, including NK cells or "natural T cells" with the invariant V alpha 14 J alpha 281 TCR chain. Even if TAP defects may prevent classical endogenous antigen presentation in tumor cell lines, antigen presentation via CD1 is still functional. Therefore, CD1-mediated recognition of transformed cells by NK cells or "natural T cells" may represent an alternative way for immune surveillance. CD1 cell surface expression in murine tumor cell lines of different histology, including the B cell lymphoma A20, macrophage cell lines J774 and P388D1, mastocytoma P815, thymoma EL-4, melanoma B16, colon adenocarcinoma MC-38 and renal carcinoma Renca is regulated by Th1- (IFN-gamma), Th2- (IL-4, IL-10 and vIL-10) or GM-CSF (Th1/Th2) cytokines, depending on the tumor histology. In order to distinguish between CD1D1 and CD1d2 molecules, we examined differential expression of these CD1 isoforms by ratio RT-PCR: A20, EL-4, P815 and MC-38 cells exclusively express CD1D1 transcripts but not CD1D2 mRNA independent of cytokine treatment. Decreased CD1d expression leads to reduced immune recognition of CD1d+ tumor cells by freshly isolated NK1.1(+) effector cells as defined by cytolysis and IFN-gamma release. Thus, modulation of CD1 expression on tumor cells by cytokines may be advantageous to drive cellular anti-tumor antigen directed immune responses directed against TAP-independent, non-classical MHC restricting molecules. PMID:11920590

  7. Regulation by gut commensal bacteria of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule expression in the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Yasuaki; Murata, Yoji; Park, Jung-Ha; Kotani, Takenori; Imada, Shinya; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okazawa, Hideki; Azuma, Takeshi; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 1 and CEACAM20, immunoglobulin superfamily members, are predominantly expressed in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and co-localized at the apical surface of these cells. We here showed that the expression of mouse CEACAM1 and CEACAM20 at both mRNA and protein levels was markedly reduced in IECs of the small intestine by the treatment of mice with antibiotics against Gram-positive bacteria. The expression of both proteins was also decreased in IECs of the small intestine from germ-free mice, compared with that from control specific-pathogen-free mice. Exposure of intestinal organoids to IFN-γ markedly increased the expression of either CEACAM1 or CEACAM20, whereas the exposure to TNF-α increased the expression of the former protein, but not that of the latter. In contrast, the expression of CEACAM20, but not of CEACAM1, in intestinal organoids was markedly increased by exposure to butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced by bacterial fermentation in the intestine. Collectively, our results suggest that Gram-positive bacteria promote the mRNA expression of CEACAM1 or CEACAM20 in the small intestine. Inflammatory cytokines or butyrate likely participates in such effects of commensal bacteria. PMID:25908210

  8. Developmentally regulated expression by Trypanosoma cruzi of molecules that accelerate the decay of complement C3 convertases

    SciTech Connect

    Rimoldi, M.T.; Sher, A.; Heiny, A.; Lituchy, A.; Hammer, C.H.; Joiner, K.

    1988-01-01

    The authors recently showed that culture-derived metacyclic trypomastigotes (CMT), but not epimastigotes (Epi), of the Miranda 99 strain of Trypanosoma cruzi evade lysis by the human alternative complement pathway because of inefficient binding of factor B to complement component C3b on the parasite surface. These results suggested that CMT and tissue-culture-derived trypomastigotes (TCT), which also activate the alternative pathway poorly, might produce a molecule capable of interfering with factor B binding to C3b. They now demonstrate that CMT and TCT lysates, as well as molecules spontaneously shed from CMT and TCT but not Epi, accelerate decay of /sup 125/I-labeled factor Bb from the alternative-pathway C3 convertase (C3bBb) assembled on zymosan or Epi and also accelerate decay of the classical-pathway C3 convertase (C4b2a) on sheep erythrocytes. Parasites metabolically labeled with (/sup 35/S)methionine spontaneously shed a limited number of radioactive components, ranging in molecular mass from 86 to 155 kDa for trypomastigotes and 25 to 80 kDa for Epi. Decay-accelerating activity within supernatants is inactivated by papain and is coeluted with /sup 35/S-containing polypeptides on FPLC anion-exchange chromatography, suggesting that the active constituents are protein molecules. Molecules with decay-accelerating activity may explain the developmentally regulated resistance to complement-mediated lysis in infective and vertebrate stages for T. cruzi life cycle.

  9. miR-9 modulates the expression of interferon-regulated genes and MHC class I molecules in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Zhao, Zun-Lan; Zhao, Wen-Tao; Fan, Quan-Rong; Wang, Sheng-Chun; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Shi, Jun-Wen; Lin, Xiao-Lin; Yang, Sheng; Xie, Rao-Ying; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Sun, Yong-Liang; Xu, Kang; Yao, Kai-Tai; Xiao, Dong

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► miR-9 can negatively or positively modulate interferon-induced gene expression. ► miR-9 can up-regulate major histocompatibility complex class I molecule expression. ► miR-9 can down-regulate the expression of interleukin-related genes. -- Abstract: The functions of miR-9 in some cancers are recently implicated in regulating proliferation, epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), invasion and metastasis, apoptosis, and tumor angiogenesis, etc. miR-9 is commonly down-regulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), but the exact roles of miR-9 dysregulation in the pathogenesis of NPC remains unclear. Therefore, we firstly used miR-9-expressing CNE2 cells to determine the effects of miR-9 overexpression on global gene expression profile by microarray analysis. Microarray-based gene expression data unexpectedly demonstrated a significant number of up- or down-regulated immune- and inflammation-related genes, including many well-known interferon (IFN)-induced genes (e.g., IFI44L, PSMB8, IRF5, PSMB10, IFI27, PSB9{sub H}UMAN, IFIT2, TRAIL, IFIT1, PSB8{sub H}UMAN, IRF1, B2M and GBP1), major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules (e.g., HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-F and HLA-H) and interleukin (IL)-related genes (e.g., IL20RB, GALT, IL7, IL1B, IL11, IL1F8, IL1A, IL6 and IL7R), which was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Moreover, the overexpression of miR-9 with the miRNA mimics significantly up- or down-regulated the expression of above-mentioned IFN-inducible genes, MHC class I molecules and IL-related genes; on the contrary, miR-9 inhibition by anti-miR-9 inhibitor in CNE2 and 5–8F cells correspondingly decreased or increased the aforementioned immune- and inflammation-related genes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that miR-9 can modulate the expression of IFN-induced genes and MHC class I molecules in human cancer cells, suggesting a novel role of miR-9 in linking inflammation and cancer, which remains to be fully characterized.

  10. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoprotein Modulates Endothelial Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule (VCAM)-1 Expression via Differential Regulation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying I.; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Sun, Chongxiu; DeVerse, J. Sherrod; Radecke, Christopher E.; Mathew, Steven; Edwards, Christina M.; Haj, Fawaz G.; Passerini, Anthony G.; Simon, Scott I.

    2013-01-01

    Circulating triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TGRL) from hypertriglyceridemic subjects exacerbate endothelial inflammation and promote monocyte infiltration into the arterial wall. We have recently reported that TGRL isolated from human blood after a high-fat meal can elicit a pro- or anti-atherogenic state in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC), defined as up- or down-regulation of VCAM-1 expression in response to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) stimulation, respectively. A direct correlation was found between subjects categorized at higher risk for cardiovascular disease based upon serum triglycerides and postprandial production of TGRL particles that increased VCAM-1-dependent monocyte adhesion to inflamed endothelium. To establish how TGRL metabolism is linked to VCAM-1 regulation, we examined endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways. Regardless of its atherogenicity, the rate and extent of TGRL internalization and lipid droplet formation by HAEC were uniform. However, pro-atherogenic TGRL exacerbated ER membrane expansion and stress following TNFα stimulation, whereas anti-atherogenic TGRL ameliorated such effects. Inhibition of ER stress with a chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid decreased TNFα-induced VCAM-1 expression and abrogated TGRL’s atherogenic effect. Activation of ER stress sensors PKR-like ER-regulated kinase (PERK) and inositol requiring protein 1α (IRE1α), and downstream effectors including eukaryotic initiation factor-2α (eIF2α), spliced X-box-binding protein 1 (sXBP1) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), directly correlated with the atherogenic activity of an individual’s TGRL. Modulation of ER stress sensors also correlated with changes in expression of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1), a transcription factor of Vcam-1 responsible for regulation of its expression. Moreover, knockdown studies using siRNA defined a causal relationship between the PERK/eIF2α/CHOP pathway and IRF-1

  11. Differential expression of gp200-MR6 molecule in benign hyperplasia and down-regulation in invasive carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed Central

    al-Tubuly, A. A.; Luqmani, Y. A.; Shousha, S.; Melcher, D.; Ritter, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, we used immunohistochemical and biochemical analysis to show that gp200-MR6, a 200 kDa molecule that is functionally associated with the human interleukin 4 (IL-4) receptor complex, is expressed at high levels on normal breast epithelial tissues, at lower levels on in situ carcinomas, and that the expression is lost in the invasive carcinoma of the breast. Furthermore, a preliminary study showed that benign epithelial hyperplasia of the breast expresses the gp200-MR6 heterogeneously. Two populations of cells have been observed: MR6 positive and MR6 negative. Interestingly, MR6-positive cells were observed to have different morphology from those that were MR6 negative; the nuclei of the former were larger and rounded in shape, whereas the nuclei of the latter were relatively small and oval in shape. In sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blotting, monoclonal antibody MR6 detects the same molecular weight molecule in both normal and transformed tissue, indicating that the molecule is not a product of a truncated gene. The intensity of the gp200-MR6 bands correlates with the immunohistochemical data, indicating that the molecule is expressed at high levels in normal tissue and at lower levels in malignant tissue. These results suggest that analysis of gp200-MR6 expression may be useful in tumour grading and prognostic evaluation in breast cancer. Moreover, the molecule may be involved early in the process of tumorigenesis of the breast, in which a loss or a down-regulation of gp200-MR6 could contribute towards tumour development and progression via an effect on cell growth and differentiation. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8855966

  12. Crosstalk between Protease-activated Receptor 1 and Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Regulates Melanoma Cell Adhesion Molecule (MCAM/MUC18) Expression and Melanoma Metastasis*

    PubMed Central

    Melnikova, Vladislava O.; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Villares, Gabriel J.; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Zigler, Maya; Wang, Hua; Petersson, Frederik; Price, Janet E.; Schroit, Alan; Prieto, Victor G.; Hung, Mien-Chie; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2009-01-01

    The cellular and molecular pathways that regulate platelet activation, blood coagulation, and inflammation are emerging as critical players in cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate a novel signaling mechanism whereby protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) mediates expression of melanoma cell adhesion molecule MCAM/MUC18 (MUC18), a critical marker of melanoma metastasis, via activation of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). We found that PAR1 silencing with small hairpin RNA inhibits MUC18 expression in metastatic melanoma cells by inhibiting CREB phosphorylation, activity, and binding to the MUC18 promoter. We further demonstrate that the PAF/PAFR pathway mediates MUC18 expression downstream of PAR1. Indeed, PAR1 silencing down-regulates PAFR expression and PAF production, PAFR silencing blocks MUC18 expression, and re-expression of PAFR in PAR1-silenced cells rescues MUC18 expression. We further demonstrate that the PAR1-PAFR-MUC18 pathway mediates melanoma cell adhesion to microvascular endothelial cells, transendothelial migration, and metastatic retention in the lungs. Rescuing PAFR expression in PAR1-silenced cells fully restores metastatic phenotype of melanoma, indicating that PAFR plays critical role in the molecular mechanism of PAR1 action. Our results link the two pro-inflammatory G-protein-coupled receptors, PAR1 and PAFR, with the metastatic dissemination of melanoma and suggest that PAR1, PAFR, and MUC18 are attractive therapeutic targets for preventing melanoma metastasis. PMID:19703903

  13. Crosstalk between protease-activated receptor 1 and platelet-activating factor receptor regulates melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM/MUC18) expression and melanoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Melnikova, Vladislava O; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Villares, Gabriel J; Dobroff, Andrey S; Zigler, Maya; Wang, Hua; Petersson, Frederik; Price, Janet E; Schroit, Alan; Prieto, Victor G; Hung, Mien-Chie; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2009-10-16

    The cellular and molecular pathways that regulate platelet activation, blood coagulation, and inflammation are emerging as critical players in cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate a novel signaling mechanism whereby protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) mediates expression of melanoma cell adhesion molecule MCAM/MUC18 (MUC18), a critical marker of melanoma metastasis, via activation of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). We found that PAR1 silencing with small hairpin RNA inhibits MUC18 expression in metastatic melanoma cells by inhibiting CREB phosphorylation, activity, and binding to the MUC18 promoter. We further demonstrate that the PAF/PAFR pathway mediates MUC18 expression downstream of PAR1. Indeed, PAR1 silencing down-regulates PAFR expression and PAF production, PAFR silencing blocks MUC18 expression, and re-expression of PAFR in PAR1-silenced cells rescues MUC18 expression. We further demonstrate that the PAR1-PAFR-MUC18 pathway mediates melanoma cell adhesion to microvascular endothelial cells, transendothelial migration, and metastatic retention in the lungs. Rescuing PAFR expression in PAR1-silenced cells fully restores metastatic phenotype of melanoma, indicating that PAFR plays critical role in the molecular mechanism of PAR1 action. Our results link the two pro-inflammatory G-protein-coupled receptors, PAR1 and PAFR, with the metastatic dissemination of melanoma and suggest that PAR1, PAFR, and MUC18 are attractive therapeutic targets for preventing melanoma metastasis. PMID:19703903

  14. A stromal interaction molecule 1 variant up-regulates matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression by strengthening nucleoplasmic Ca2+ signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fengrong; Zhu, Liping; Cai, Lei; Zhang, Jiwei; Zeng, Xianqin; Li, Jiansha; Su, Yuan; Hu, Qinghua

    2016-04-01

    Very recent studies hold promise to reveal the role of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) in non-store-operated Ca2+ entry. Here we showed that in contrast to cytoplasmic membrane redistribution as previously noted, human umbilical vein endothelial STIM1 with a T-to-C nucleotide transition resulting in an amino acid substitution of leucine by proline in the signal peptide sequence translocated to perinuclear membrane upon intracellular Ca2+ depletion, amplified nucleoplasmic Ca2+ signaling through ryanodine receptor-dependent pathway, and enhanced the subsequent cAMP responsive element binding protein activity, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) gene expression, and endothelial tube forming. The abundance of mutated STIM1 and the MMP-2 expression were higher in native human umbilical vein endothelial cells of patients with gestational hypertension than controls and were significantly correlated with blood pressure. These findings broaden our understanding about structure-function bias of STIM1 and offer unique insights into its application in nucleoplasmic Ca2+, MMP-2 expression, endothelial dysfunction, and pathophysiological mechanism(s) of gestational hypertension. PMID:26775216

  15. Late and persistent up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression by ionizing radiation in human endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gaugler, M H; Squiban, C; van der Meeren, A; Bertho, J M; Vandamme, M; Mouthon, M A

    1997-08-01

    Adhesion molecules play a key role in cellular traffic through vascular endothelium, in particular during the inflammatory response when leukocytes migrate from blood into tissues. Since inflammation is one of the major consequences of radiation injury, we investigated the effect of ionizing radiation on cell-surface expression of the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), the vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Flow cytometry performed on irradiated HUVEC revealed both a time- (from 2 to 10 days) and dose- (from 2 to 10 Gy) dependent up-regulation of basal expression of ICAM-1, and no induction of VCAM-1 or E-selectin. The radiation-induced increase in ICAM-1 expression on HUVEC was correlated with augmented adhesion of neutrophils on irradiated endothelial cells. Interleukin-6 (Il-6) or other soluble factors released by irradiation were not involved in the enhanced ICAM-1 expression by irradiation. Northern blot analysis showed an overexpression of ICAM-1 mRNA from 1 to 6 days after a 10 Gy exposure. Our data suggest that ICAM-1 participates in the radiation-induced inflammatory reaction of the endothelium. PMID:9269313

  16. The cell adhesion molecule DdCAD-1 regulates morphogenesis through differential spatiotemporal expression in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Zhu, Yingyue; Manoharan, Kumararaaj; Yang, Chunxia; Siu, Chi-Hung

    2011-06-01

    During development of Dictyostelium, multiple cell types are formed and undergo a coordinated series of morphogenetic movements guided by their adhesive properties and other cellular factors. DdCAD-1 is a unique homophilic cell adhesion molecule encoded by the cadA gene. It is synthesized in the cytoplasm and transported to the plasma membrane by contractile vacuoles. In chimeras developed on soil plates, DdCAD-1-expressing cells showed greater propensity to develop into spores than did cadA-null cells. When development was performed on non-nutrient agar, wild-type cells sorted from the cadA-null cells and moved to the anterior zone. They differentiated mostly into stalk cells and eventually died, whereas the cadA-null cells survived as spores. To assess the role of DdCAD-1 in this novel behavior of wild-type and mutant cells, cadA-null cells were rescued by the ectopic expression of DdCAD-1-GFP. Morphological studies have revealed major spatiotemporal changes in the subcellular distribution of DdCAD-1 during development. Whereas DdCAD-1 became internalized in most cells in the post-aggregation stages, it was prominent in the contact regions of anterior cells. Cell sorting was also restored in cadA(-) slugs by exogenous recombinant DdCAD-1. Remarkably, DdCAD-1 remained on the surface of anterior cells, whereas it was internalized in the posterior cells. Additionally, DdCAD-1-expressing cells migrated slower than cadA(-) cells and sorted to the anterior region of chimeric slugs. These results show that DdCAD-1 influences the sorting behavior of cells in slugs by its differential distribution on the prestalk and prespore cells. PMID:21561987

  17. Expression of adhesion molecules in leprosy lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, L; Sano, S; Pirmez, C; Salgame, P; Mueller, C; Hofman, F; Uyemura, K; Rea, T H; Bloom, B R; Modlin, R L

    1991-01-01

    Leprosy presents as a clinical spectrum that is precisely paralleled by a spectrum of immunological reactivity. The disease provides a useful and accessible model, in this case in the skin, in which to study the dynamics of cellular immune responses to an infectious pathogen, including the role of adhesion molecules in those responses. In lesions characterized by strong delayed-type hypersensitivity against Mycobacterium leprae (tuberculoid, reversal reaction, and Mitsuda reaction), the overlying epidermis exhibited pronounced keratinocyte intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expression and contained lymphocytes expressing the ICAM-1 ligand, LFA-1. Conversely, in lesions in which delayed-type hypersensitivity was lacking (lepromatous), keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression was low and LFA-1+ lymphocytes were rare. Expression of these adhesion molecules on the cells within the dermal granulomas was equivalent throughout the spectrum of leprosy. The percentage of lymphocytes in these granulomas containing mRNA coding for gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor alpha, synergistic regulators of ICAM-1 expression, paralleled epidermal ICAM-1 expression. In lesions of erythema nodosum leprosum, a reactional state of lepromatous leprosy thought to be due to immune complex deposition, keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression and gamma interferon mRNA+ cells were both prominent. Antibodies to LFA-1 and ICAM-1 blocked the response of both alpha beta and gamma delta T-cell clones in vitro to mycobacteria. Overall, the expression of adhesion molecules by immunocompetent epidermal cells, as well as the cytokines which regulate such expression, correlates with the outcome of the host response to infection. Images PMID:1718871

  18. Stimulation of nuclear receptor REV-ERBs regulates tumor necrosis factor-induced expression of proinflammatory molecules in C6 astroglial cells.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Norimitsu; Tomori, Mizuki; Zhang, Fang Fang; Saeki, Munenori; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, astrocytes maintain homeostasis in the CNS. Following inflammation and injury to the CNS, however, activated astrocytes produce neurotoxic molecules such as cytokines and chemokines, amplifying the initial molecular-cellular events evoked by inflammation and injury. Nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ (REV-ERBs) are crucial in the regulation of inflammation- and metabolism-related gene transcription. The current study sought to elucidate a role of REV-ERBs in rat C6 astroglial cells on the expression of inflammatory molecules following stimulation with the neuroinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Stimulation of C6 cells with TNF (10 ng/ml) significantly increased the mRNA expression of CCL2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9, but not fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and MMP-2. Treatment with either REV-ERB agonists GSK4112 or SR9009 significantly blocked TNF-induced upregulation of CCL2 mRNA and MMP-9 mRNA, but not IL-6 mRNA and iNOS mRNA expression. Furthermore, treatment with RGFP966, a selective histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) inhibitor, potently reversed the inhibitory effects of GSK4112 on TNF-induced expression of MMP-9 mRNA, but not CCL2 mRNA. Expression of Rev-erbs mRNA in C6 astroglial cells, primary cultured rat cortical and spinal astrocytes was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Together, the findings demonstrate an anti-inflammatory effect, downregulating of MMP-9 and CCL2 transcription, of astroglial REV-ERBs activation through HDAC3-dependent and HDAC3-independent mechanisms. PMID:26616049

  19. Differential regulation of expression of the MHC class II molecules RT1.B and RT1.D on rat B lymphocytes: effects of interleukin-4, interleukin-13 and interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, A; Schilder-Tol, E J; Chand, M A; Claessen, N; Lakkis, F G; Pascual, D W; Weening, J J; Aten, J

    1998-01-01

    Susceptibility to induction of both T helper 1- (Th1) and Th2-mediated autoimmunity is multifactorial and involves genetic linkage to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II haplotype. Brown Norway (BN) rats exposed to mercuric chloride develop a Th2-dependent systemic autoimmunity, whereas Lewis rats, which are highly susceptible to Th1-mediated autoimmunity, develop immune suppression after mercuric chloride exposure. Exposure to mercuric chloride is known to enhance B-lymphocyte expression of the MHC class II molecule RT1.B, predominantly in BN rats. We demonstrate that, in contrast, expression of RT1.D was unmodified on these B cells, whereas both RT1.B and RT1.D were up-regulated on epithelial cells. Regulation of B-cell MHC class II isotype expression was further studied in vitro, using BN rat lymph node (LN) cells. Interleukin-4 (IL-4) strongly enhanced B-cell expression of RT1.B (2.8-fold), whereas RT1.D expression was only slightly, although significantly, modified (1.2-fold). B cells from Lewis rats showed a similar IL-4-induced enhancement of RT1.B expression (2.5-fold), whereas, in contrast, RT1.D expression was unmodified. Exposure of LN cells from BN rats to interferon-gamma induced a moderate increase of B-cell MHC class II expression, predominantly of RT1.B. Strong and rapid enhancement of B-cell RT1.D expression was observed after stimulation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin. Rat IL-13 did not modify B-cell MHC class II expression; however, it induced typical morphological changes in peritoneal macrophages. These experiments demonstrate isotype-specific and strain-dependent regulation of MHC class II expression on rat B lymphocytes, which may be of pathophysiological relevance for the strain-dependent susceptibility for Th1- or Th2-mediated autoimmunity. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 PMID:9536116

  20. P2Y2 receptor-mediated lymphotoxin-α secretion regulates intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Seye, Cheikh I; Agca, Yuksel; Agca, Cansu; Derbigny, Wilbert

    2012-03-23

    The proinflammatory cytokine lymphotoxin-α (LTA) is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. However, the mechanisms that regulate its expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) are poorly understood. The ability of exogenous nucleotides to stimulate LTA production was evaluated in VSMC by ELISA. The P2Y(2) nucleotide receptor (P2Y(2)R) agonist UTP stimulates a strong and sustained release of LTA from WT but not P2Y(2)R(-/-) SMC. Assessment of LTA gene transcription by LTA promoter-luciferase construct indicated that LTA levels are controlled at the level of transcription. We show using RNAi techniques that knockdown of the actin-binding protein filamin-A (FLNa) severely impaired nucleotide-induced Rho activation and consequent Rho-mediated LTA secretion. Reintroduction of FLNa in FLNa RNAi SMC rescued UTP-induced LTA expression. In addition, we found that UTP-stimulated LTA secretion is not sensitive to brefeldin A, which blocks the formation of vesicles involved in protein transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus, suggesting that P2Y(2)R/filamin-mediated secretion of LTA is independent of the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi secretory vesicle route. Furthermore, UTP selectively induces ICAM-1 expression in WT but not SMC expressing a truncated P2Y(2)R deficient in LTA secretion. These data suggest that P2Y(2)R recruits FLNa to provide a cytoskeletal scaffold necessary for Rho signaling pathway upstream of LTA release and subsequent stimulation of ICAM-1 expression on vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:22298782

  1. Zeb1 Regulates E-cadherin and Epcam (Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule) Expression to Control Cell Behavior in Early Zebrafish Development*

    PubMed Central

    Vannier, Corinne; Mock, Kerstin; Brabletz, Thomas; Driever, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The ZEB1 transcription factor is best known as an inducer of epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) in cancer metastasis, acting through transcriptional repression of CDH1 (encoding E-cadherin) and the EMT-suppressing microRNA-200s (miR-200s). Here we analyze roles of the ZEB1 zebrafish orthologs, Zeb1a and Zeb1b, and of miR-200s in control of cell adhesion and morphogenesis during gastrulation and segmentation stages. Loss and gain of function analyses revealed that Zeb1 represses cdh1 expression to fine-tune adhesiveness of migrating deep blastodermal cells. Furthermore, Zeb1 acts as a repressor of epcam in the deep cells of the blastoderm and may contribute to control of epithelial integrity of enveloping layer cells, the outermost cells of the blastoderm. We found a similar ZEB1-dependent repression of EPCAM expression in human pancreatic and breast cancer cell lines, mediated through direct binding of ZEB1 to the EPCAM promoter. Thus, Zeb1 proteins employ several evolutionary conserved mechanisms to regulate cell-cell adhesion during development and cancer. PMID:23667256

  2. Small Molecule Proteostasis Regulators for Protein Conformational Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Calamini, Barbara; Silva, Maria Catarina; Madoux, Franck; Hutt, Darren M.; Khanna, Shilpi; Chalfant, Monica A.; Saldanha, Sanjay A.; Hodder, Peter; Tait, Bradley D.; Garza, Dan; Balch, William E.; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2011-01-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is essential for cellular and organismal health. Stress, aging, and the chronic expression of misfolded proteins, however, challenge the proteostasis machinery and the vitality of the cell. Enhanced expression of molecular chaperones, regulated by heat shock transcription factor-1 (HSF-1), has been shown to restore proteostasis in a variety of conformational disease models, suggesting a promising therapeutic approach. We describe the results of a ∼900,000 small molecule screen that identified novel classes of small molecule proteostasis regulators (PRs) that induce HSF-1-dependent chaperone expression and restore protein folding in multiple conformational disease models. The beneficial effects to proteome stability are mediated by HSF-1, DAF-16/FOXO, SKN-1/Nrf-2, and the chaperone machinery through mechanisms that are distinct from current known small molecule activators of the HSR. We suggest that modulation of the proteostasis network by PRs represents a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of a variety of protein conformational diseases. PMID:22198733

  3. Intraepithelial lymphocytes express junctional molecules in murine small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki-Ohara, Kyoko . E-mail: INAGAKI@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp; Sawaguchi, Akira; Suganuma, Tatsuo; Matsuzaki, Goro; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2005-06-17

    Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) that reside at basolateral site regulate the proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells (EC) for providing a first line of host defense in intestine. However, it remains unknown how IEL interact and communicate with EC. Here, we show that IEL express junctional molecules like EC. We identified mRNA expression of the junctional molecules in IEL such as zonula occludens (ZO)-1, occludin and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM) (tight junction), {beta}-catenin and E-cadherin (adherens junction), and connexin26 (gap junction). IEL constitutively expressed occludin and E-cadherin at protein level, while other T cells in the thymus, spleen, liver, mesenteric lymph node, and Peyer's patches did not. {gamma}{delta} IEL showed higher level of these expressions than {alpha}{beta} IEL. The expression of occludin was augmented by anti-CD3 Ab stimulation. These results suggest the possibility of a novel role of IEL concerning epithelial barrier and communication between IEL and EC.

  4. Regulation of gene expression in the nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Stella, A.M.G. ); de Vellis, J. ); Perez-Polo, J.R. 62230.

    1990-01-01

    This book covers subjects under the following topics: Plenary Lecture; Growth factors; Regulation of gene expression in neurons; Cell adhesion molecules and development; Nervous tissue reaction to injury-aging; and Poster presentation.

  5. Differential expression of axon-sorting molecules in mouse olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Naoki; Nakashima, Ai; Hoshina, Naosuke; Ikegaya, Yuji; Takeuchi, Haruki

    2016-08-01

    In the mouse olfactory system, the axons of olfactory sensory neurons that express the same type of odorant receptor (OR) converge to a specific set of glomeruli in the olfactory bulb (OB). It is widely accepted that expressed OR molecules instruct glomerular segregation by regulating the expression of axon-sorting molecules. Although the relationship between the expression of axon-sorting molecules and OR types has been analyzed in detail, those between the expressions of axon-sorting molecules remain to be elucidated. Here we collected the expression profiles of four axon-sorting molecules from a large number of glomeruli in the OB. These molecules demonstrated position-independent mosaic expressions, but their patterns were not identical in the OB. Comparing their expressions identified positive and negative correlations between several pairs of genes even though they showed various expressions. Furthermore, the principal component analysis revealed that the factor loadings in the principal component 1, which explain the largest amount of variation, were most likely to reflect the degree of the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel dependence on the expression of axon-sorting molecules. Thus, neural activity generated through the CNG channel is a major component in the generation of a wide variety of expressions of axon-sorting molecules in glomerular segregation. PMID:27207328

  6. ZDHHC3 Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulates Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Palmitoylation.

    PubMed

    Lievens, Patricia Marie-Jeanne; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Kochlamazashvili, Gaga; Cesca, Fabrizia; Gorinski, Natalya; Galil, Dalia Abdel; Cherkas, Volodimir; Ronkina, Natalia; Lafera, Juri; Gaestel, Matthias; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Dityatev, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) mediates cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. It is broadly expressed in the nervous system and regulates neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and synaptic plasticity. Previous in vitro studies revealed that palmitoylation of NCAM is required for fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2)-stimulated neurite outgrowth and identified the zinc finger DHHC (Asp-His-His-Cys)-containing proteins ZDHHC3 and ZDHHC7 as specific NCAM-palmitoylating enzymes. Here, we verified that FGF2 controlled NCAM palmitoylation in vivo and investigated molecular mechanisms regulating NCAM palmitoylation by ZDHHC3. Experiments with overexpression and pharmacological inhibition of FGF receptor (FGFR) and Src revealed that these kinases control tyrosine phosphorylation of ZDHHC3 and that ZDHHC3 is phosphorylated by endogenously expressed FGFR and Src proteins. By site-directed mutagenesis, we found that Tyr18 is an FGFR1-specific ZDHHC3 phosphorylation site, while Tyr295 and Tyr297 are specifically phosphorylated by Src kinase in cell-based and cell-free assays. Abrogation of tyrosine phosphorylation increased ZDHHC3 autopalmitoylation, enhanced interaction with NCAM, and upregulated NCAM palmitoylation. Expression of ZDHHC3 with tyrosine mutated in cultured hippocampal neurons promoted neurite outgrowth. Our findings for the first time highlight that FGFR- and Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of ZDHHC3 modulates ZDHHC3 enzymatic activity and plays a role in neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:27247265

  7. Mycobacterial Phosphatidylinositol Mannosides Negatively Regulate Host Toll-like Receptor 4, MyD88-dependent Proinflammatory Cytokines, and TRIF-dependent Co-stimulatory Molecule Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Doz, Emilie; Rose, Stéphanie; Court, Nathalie; Front, Sophie; Vasseur, Virginie; Charron, Sabine; Gilleron, Martine; Puzo, Germain; Fremaux, Isabelle; Delneste, Yves; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernhard; Martin, Olivier R.; Quesniaux, Valerie F. J.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates host immune responses through proteins and complex glycolipids. Here, we report that the glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor phosphatidyl-myo-inositol hexamannosides PIM6 or PIM2 exert potent anti-inflammatory activities. PIM strongly inhibited the Toll-like receptor (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation protein 88 (MyD88)-mediated release of NO, cytokines, and chemokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin 12 (IL-12) p40, IL-6, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, and also IL-10 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. This effect was independent of the presence of TLR2. PIM also reduced the LPS-induced MyD88-independent, TIR domain-containing adaptor protein inducing interferon β (TRIF)-mediated expression of co-stimulatory receptors. PIM inhibited LPS/TLR4-induced NFκB translocation. Synthetic PIM1 and a PIM2 mimetic recapitulated these in vitro activities and inhibited endotoxin-induced airway inflammation, TNF and keratinocyte-derived chemokine secretion, and neutrophil recruitment in vivo. Mannosyl, two acyl chains, and phosphatidyl residues are essential for PIM anti-inflammatory activity, whereas the inosityl moiety is dispensable. Therefore, PIM exert potent antiinflammatory effects both in vitro and in vivo that may contribute to the strategy developed by mycobacteria for repressing the host innate immunity, and synthetic PIM analogs represent powerful anti-inflammatory leads. PMID:19561082

  8. Molecular Responses to Small Regulating Molecules against Huanglongbing Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Federico; Dolan, David; Fileccia, Veronica; Reagan, Russell L.; Phu, My; Spann, Timothy M.; McCollum, Thomas G.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.

    2016-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB; citrus greening) is the most devastating disease of citrus worldwide. No cure is yet available for this disease and infected trees generally decline after several months. Disease management depends on early detection of symptoms and chemical control of insect vectors. In this work, different combinations of organic compounds were tested for the ability to modulate citrus molecular responses to HLB disease beneficially. Three small-molecule regulating compounds were tested: 1) L-arginine, 2) 6-benzyl-adenine combined with gibberellins, and 3) sucrose combined with atrazine. Each treatment contained K-phite mineral solution and was tested at two different concentrations. Two trials were conducted: one in the greenhouse and the other in the orchard. In the greenhouse study, responses of 42 key genes involved in sugar and starch metabolism, hormone-related pathways, biotic stress responses, and secondary metabolism in treated and untreated mature leaves were analyzed. TGA5 was significantly induced by arginine. Benzyladenine and gibberellins enhanced two important genes involved in biotic stress responses: WRKY54 and WRKY59. Sucrose combined with atrazine mainly upregulated key genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism such as sucrose-phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase, starch synthase, and α-amylase. Atrazine also affected expression of some key genes involved in systemic acquired resistance such as EDS1, TGA6, WRKY33, and MYC2. Several treatments upregulated HSP82, which might help protect protein folding and integrity. A subset of key genes was chosen as biomarkers for molecular responses to treatments under field conditions. GPT2 was downregulated by all small-molecule treatments. Arginine-induced genes involved in systemic acquired resistance included PR1, WRKY70, and EDS1. These molecular data encourage long-term application of treatments that combine these regulating molecules in field trials. PMID:27459099

  9. Molecular Responses to Small Regulating Molecules against Huanglongbing Disease.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Federico; Dolan, David; Fileccia, Veronica; Reagan, Russell L; Phu, My; Spann, Timothy M; McCollum, Thomas G; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2016-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB; citrus greening) is the most devastating disease of citrus worldwide. No cure is yet available for this disease and infected trees generally decline after several months. Disease management depends on early detection of symptoms and chemical control of insect vectors. In this work, different combinations of organic compounds were tested for the ability to modulate citrus molecular responses to HLB disease beneficially. Three small-molecule regulating compounds were tested: 1) L-arginine, 2) 6-benzyl-adenine combined with gibberellins, and 3) sucrose combined with atrazine. Each treatment contained K-phite mineral solution and was tested at two different concentrations. Two trials were conducted: one in the greenhouse and the other in the orchard. In the greenhouse study, responses of 42 key genes involved in sugar and starch metabolism, hormone-related pathways, biotic stress responses, and secondary metabolism in treated and untreated mature leaves were analyzed. TGA5 was significantly induced by arginine. Benzyladenine and gibberellins enhanced two important genes involved in biotic stress responses: WRKY54 and WRKY59. Sucrose combined with atrazine mainly upregulated key genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism such as sucrose-phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase, starch synthase, and α-amylase. Atrazine also affected expression of some key genes involved in systemic acquired resistance such as EDS1, TGA6, WRKY33, and MYC2. Several treatments upregulated HSP82, which might help protect protein folding and integrity. A subset of key genes was chosen as biomarkers for molecular responses to treatments under field conditions. GPT2 was downregulated by all small-molecule treatments. Arginine-induced genes involved in systemic acquired resistance included PR1, WRKY70, and EDS1. These molecular data encourage long-term application of treatments that combine these regulating molecules in field trials. PMID:27459099

  10. Epithelial adhesion molecules and the regulation of intestinal homeostasis during neutrophil transepithelial migration.

    PubMed

    Sumagin, Ronen; Parkos, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial adhesion molecules play essential roles in regulating cellular function and maintaining mucosal tissue homeostasis. Some form epithelial junctional complexes to provide structural support for epithelial monolayers and act as a selectively permeable barrier separating luminal contents from the surrounding tissue. Others serve as docking structures for invading viruses and bacteria, while also regulating the immune response. They can either obstruct or serve as footholds for the immune cells recruited to mucosal surfaces. Currently, it is well appreciated that adhesion molecules collectively serve as environmental cue sensors and trigger signaling events to regulate epithelial function through their association with the cell cytoskeleton and various intracellular adapter proteins. Immune cells, particularly neutrophils (PMN) during transepithelial migration (TEM), can modulate adhesion molecule expression, conformation, and distribution, significantly impacting epithelial function and tissue homeostasis. This review discusses the roles of key intestinal epithelial adhesion molecules in regulating PMN trafficking and outlines the potential consequences on epithelial function. PMID:25838976

  11. Epithelial adhesion molecules and the regulation of intestinal homeostasis during neutrophil transepithelial migration

    PubMed Central

    Sumagin, Ronen; Parkos, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesion molecules play essential roles in regulating cellular function and maintaining mucosal tissue homeostasis. Some form epithelial junctional complexes to provide structural support for epithelial monolayers and act as a selectively permeable barrier separating luminal contents from the surrounding tissue. Others serve as docking structures for invading viruses and bacteria, while also regulating the immune response. They can either obstruct or serve as footholds for the immune cells recruited to mucosal surfaces. Currently, it is well appreciated that adhesion molecules collectively serve as environmental cue sensors and trigger signaling events to regulate epithelial function through their association with the cell cytoskeleton and various intracellular adapter proteins. Immune cells, particularly neutrophils (PMN) during transepithelial migration (TEM), can modulate adhesion molecule expression, conformation, and distribution, significantly impacting epithelial function and tissue homeostasis. This review discusses the roles of key intestinal epithelial adhesion molecules in regulating PMN trafficking and outlines the potential consequences on epithelial function. PMID:25838976

  12. Gene expression regulation in roots under drought.

    PubMed

    Janiak, Agnieszka; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Stress signalling and regulatory networks controlling expression of target genes are the basis of plant response to drought. Roots are the first organs exposed to water deficiency in the soil and are the place of drought sensing. Signalling cascades transfer chemical signals toward the shoot and initiate molecular responses that lead to the biochemical and morphological changes that allow plants to be protected against water loss and to tolerate stress conditions. Here, we present an overview of signalling network and gene expression regulation pathways that are actively induced in roots under drought stress. In particular, the role of several transcription factor (TF) families, including DREB, AP2/ERF, NAC, bZIP, MYC, CAMTA, Alfin-like and Q-type ZFP, in the regulation of root response to drought are highlighted. The information provided includes available data on mutual interactions between these TFs together with their regulation by plant hormones and other signalling molecules. The most significant downstream target genes and molecular processes that are controlled by the regulatory factors are given. These data are also coupled with information about the influence of the described regulatory networks on root traits and root development which may translate to enhanced drought tolerance. This is the first literature survey demonstrating the gene expression regulatory machinery that is induced by drought stress, presented from the perspective of roots. PMID:26663562

  13. Estrogen Regulation of MicroRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Klinge, Carolyn M

    2009-01-01

    Women outlive men, but life expectancy is not influenced by hormone replacement (estrogen + progestin) therapy. Estrogens appear to protect brain, cardiovascular tissues, and bone from aging. Estrogens regulate genes directly through binding to estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ERα and ERβ) that are ligand-activated transcription factors and indirectly by activating plasma membrane-associated ER which, in turns, activates intracellular signaling cascades leading to altered gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short (19-25 nucleotides), naturally-occurring, non-coding RNA molecules that base-pair with the 3’ untranslated region of target mRNAs. This interaction either blocks translation of the mRNA or targets the mRNA transcript to be degraded. The human genome contains ~ 700-1,200 miRNAs. Aberrant patterns of miRNA expression are implicated in human diseases including breast cancer. Recent studies have identified miRNAs regulated by estrogens in human breast cancer cells, human endometrial stromal and myometrial smooth muscle cells, rat mammary gland, and mouse uterus. The decline of estradiol levels in postmenopausal women has been implicated in various age-associated disorders. The role of estrogen-regulated miRNA expression, the target genes of these miRNAs, and the role of miRNAs in aging has yet to be explored. PMID:19881910

  14. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  15. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2006-10-17

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  16. Coactivators in PPAR-Regulated Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Viswakarma, Navin; Jia, Yuzhi; Bai, Liang; Vluggens, Aurore; Borensztajn, Jayme; Xu, Jianming; Reddy, Janardan K.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α, β (also known as δ), and γ function as sensors for fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives and control important metabolic pathways involved in the maintenance of energy balance. PPARs also regulate other diverse biological processes such as development, differentiation, inflammation, and neoplasia. In the nucleus, PPARs exist as heterodimers with retinoid X receptor-α bound to DNA with corepressor molecules. Upon ligand activation, PPARs undergo conformational changes that facilitate the dissociation of corepressor molecules and invoke a spatiotemporally orchestrated recruitment of transcription cofactors including coactivators and coactivator-associated proteins. While a given nuclear receptor regulates the expression of a prescribed set of target genes, coactivators are likely to influence the functioning of many regulators and thus affect the transcription of many genes. Evidence suggests that some of the coactivators such as PPAR-binding protein (PBP/PPARBP), thyroid hormone receptor-associated protein 220 (TRAP220), and mediator complex subunit 1 (MED1) may exert a broader influence on the functions of several nuclear receptors and their target genes. Investigations into the role of coactivators in the function of PPARs should strengthen our understanding of the complexities of metabolic diseases associated with energy metabolism. PMID:20814439

  17. Expression of apoptotic regulatory molecules in renal cell carcinoma: elevated expression of Fas ligand.

    PubMed

    Olive, C; Cheung, C; Nicol, D; Falk, M C

    1999-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common renal neoplasm. Despite being infiltrated by tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), these TIL are unable to control tumour growth in vivo, suggesting that the cytotoxic capacity of TIL against RCC is impaired, or that the tumour cells are resistant to killing and therefore escape detection by the immune system. It is postulated that the expression of apoptotic regulatory molecules in RCC favours tumour cell survival. The present study has therefore determined the expression of Fas (APO-1/CD95), Fas ligand (Fas L) and bcl-2 in these tumours. The expression of Fas, Fas L and bcl-2 mRNA transcripts was determined in RCC, normal kidney and peripheral blood by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), following RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis from tissues and cell samples. Transcript levels were measured by densitometry after Southern blot hybridization of PCR products with internal radio-labelled oligonucleotide probes; a densitometry score was assigned to each hybridizing DNA band and expressed as a ratio of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase content. In peripheral blood, the expression of Fas L and bcl-2 transcripts was similar between patients and normal healthy individuals; however, Fas transcript expression was significantly down-regulated in the patients' versus normal peripheral blood (P = 0.026). Most interestingly, significantly up-regulated Fas L expression was observed in RCC compared to normal kidney (P = 0.041). In contrast, bcl-2 transcripts were well represented in normal kidney but markedly decreased in RCC (P = 0.021). The expression of Fas transcripts in normal kidney and RCC was variable. These data demonstrate elevated expression of Fas L transcripts in RCC, but the functional relevance of this remains to be investigated. PMID:10101681

  18. mir-29 regulates Mcl-1 protein expression and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mott, J L; Kobayashi, S; Bronk, S F; Gores, G J

    2007-09-13

    Cellular expression of Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member, is tightly regulated. Recently, Bcl-2 expression was shown to be regulated by microRNAs, small endogenous RNA molecules that regulate protein expression through sequence-specific interaction with messenger RNA. By analogy, we reasoned that Mcl-1 expression may also be regulated by microRNAs. We chose human immortalized, but non-malignant, H69 cholangiocyte and malignant KMCH cholangiocarcinoma cell lines for these studies, because Mcl-1 is dysregulated in cells with the malignant phenotype. By in silico analysis, we identified a putative target site in the Mcl-1 mRNA for the mir-29 family, and found that mir-29b was highly expressed in cholangiocytes. Interestingly, mir-29b was downregulated in malignant cells, consistent with Mcl-1 protein upregulation. Enforced mir-29b expression reduced Mcl-1 protein expression in KMCH cells. This effect was direct, as mir-29b negatively regulated the expression of an Mcl-1 3' untranslated region (UTR)-based reporter construct. Enforced mir-29b expression reduced Mcl-1 cellular protein levels and sensitized the cancer cells to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) cytotoxicity. Transfection of non-malignant cells (that express high levels of mir-29) with a locked-nucleic acid antagonist of mir-29b increased Mcl-1 levels and reduced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Thus mir-29 is an endogenous regulator of Mcl-1 protein expression, and thereby, apoptosis. PMID:17404574

  19. mir-29 Regulates Mcl-1 Protein Expression and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Justin L.; Kobayashi, Shogo; Bronk, Steven F.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    Cellular expression of Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member, is tightly regulated. Recently, Bcl-2 expression was shown to be regulated by microRNAs, small endogenous RNA molecules that regulate protein expression through sequence-specific interaction with messenger RNA. By analogy, we reasoned that Mcl-1 expression may also be regulated by microRNAs. We chose human immortalized, but non-malignant, H69 cholangiocyte and malignant KMCH cholangiocarcinoma cell lines for these studies because Mcl-1 is dysregulated in cells with the malignant phenotype. In silico analysis identified a putative target site in the Mcl-1 mRNA for the mir-29 family, and we found that mir-29b was highly expressed in cholangiocytes. Interestingly, mir-29b was downregulated in malignant cells, consistent with Mcl-1 protein upregulation. Enforced mir-29b expression reduced Mcl-1 protein expression in KMCH cells. This effect was direct, as mir-29b negatively regulated expression of an Mcl-1 3’ untranslated region (UTR)-based reporter construct. Enforced mir-29b expression reduced Mcl-1 cellular protein levels and sensitized the cancer cells to TRAIL cytotoxicity. Transfection of non-malignant cells (that express high levels of mir-29) with a locked-nucleic acid antagonist of mir-29b increased Mcl-1 levels and reduced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Thus mir-29 is an endogenous regulator of Mcl-1 protein expression and, thereby, apoptosis. PMID:17404574

  20. Electroacupuncture at Baihui (DU20) acupoint up-regulates mRNA expression of NeuroD molecules in the brains of newborn rats suffering in utero fetal distress

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Liu, Yan; Lin, Qiao-mei; Xue, Lan; Wang, Wei; Xu, Jian-wen

    2016-01-01

    NeuroD plays a key regulatory effect on differentiation of neural stem cells into mature neurons in the brain. Thus, we assumed that electroacupuncture at Baihui (DU20) acupoint in newborn rats exposed to in utero fetal distress would influence expression of NeuroD. Electroacupuncture at Baihui was performed for 20 minutes on 3-day-old (Day 3) newborn Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to in utero fetal distress; electroacupuncture parameters consisted of sparse and dense waves at a frequency of 2–10 Hz. Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR results demonstrated that mRNA expression of NeuroD, a molecule that indicates NeuroD, increased with prolonged time in brains of newborn rats, and peaked on Day 22. The level of mRNA expression was similar between Day 16 and Day 35. These findings suggest that electro acupuncture at Baihui acupoint could effectively increase mRNA expression of molecules involved in NeuroD in the brains of newborn rats exposed to in utero fetal distress. PMID:27212921

  1. Decreased Gene Expressions of Insulin Signal Molecules in Canine Hyperadrenocorticism

    PubMed Central

    NOZAWA, Satoshi; ODA, Hitomi; AKIYAMA, Ran; UEDA, Kaori; SAEKI, Kaori; SHONO, Saori; MARUYAMA, Natsuki; MURATA, Atsuki; TAZAKI, Hiroyuki; MORI, Akihiro; MOMOTA, Yutaka; AZAKAMI, Daigo; SAKO, Toshinori; ISHIOKA, Katsumi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hyperadrenocorticism (HAC) is a common endocrine disorder in dogs, in which excess glucocorticoid causes insulin resistance. Disturbance of insulin action may be caused by multiple factors, including transcriptional modulation of insulin signal molecules which lie downstream of insulin binding to insulin receptors. In this study, gene expressions of insulin signal molecules were examined using neutrophils of the HAC dogs (the untreated dogs and the dogs which had been treated with trilostane). Insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1, IRS-2, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), protein kinase B/Akt kinase (Akt)-2 and protein kinase C (PKC)-lambda were analyzed in the HAC dogs and compared with those from normal dogs. The IRS-1 gene expressions decreased by 37% and 35% of the control dogs in the untreated and treated groups, respectively. The IRS-2 gene expressions decreased by 61% and 72%, the PI3-K gene expressions decreased by 47% and 55%, and the Akt-2 gene expressions decreased by 45% and 56% of the control dogs, similarly. Collectively, gene expressions of insulin signal molecules are suppressed in the HAC dogs, which may partially contribute to the induction of insulin resistance. PMID:24829079

  2. Lysophosphatidic acid regulates adhesion molecules and enhances migration of human oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Thorlakson, Hong H; Schreurs, Olav; Schenck, Karl; Blix, Inger J S

    2016-04-01

    Oral keratinocytes are connected via cell-to-cell adhesions to protect underlying tissues from physical and bacterial damage. Lysophosphatidic acids (LPAs) are a family of phospholipid mediators that have the ability to regulate gene expression, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and cytokine/chemokine secretion, which mediate proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Several forms of LPA are found in saliva and gingival crevicular fluid, but it is unknown how they affect human oral keratinocytes (HOK). The aim of the present study was therefore to examine how different LPA forms affect the expression of adhesion molecules and the migration and proliferation of HOK. Keratinocytes were isolated from gingival biopsies obtained from healthy donors and challenged with different forms of LPA. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry were used to analyze the expression of adhesion molecules. Migration and proliferation assays were performed. Lysophosphatidic acids strongly promoted expression of E-cadherin and occludin mRNAs and translocation of E-cadherin protein from the cytoplasm to the membrane. Occludin and claudin-1 proteins were up-regulated by LPA. Migration of HOK in culture was increased, but proliferation was reduced, by the addition of LPA. This indicates that LPA can have a role in the regulation of the oral epithelial barrier by increasing the expression of adhesion molecules of HOK, by promotion of migration and by inhibition of proliferation. PMID:26913569

  3. Costimulatory molecule expression following exposure to orthopaedic implants wear debris.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, J A; Revell, P A; Al-Saffar, N

    2001-03-01

    Patients with long-term orthopedic implants may develop inflammatory reactions due to the accumulation of biomaterial particles both around the implant and in distant organs. The exact impact of these particles on the normal immune cell function still remain relatively unclear. Activation of T-cells following exposure to biomaterial particles is driven by macrophages and requires synergistic signals primed by both antigen presentation and costimulation. The pattern of costimulatory molecule expression (CD80,CD86) was primarily examined using immunohistochemistry on tissue specimens of bone/implant interface membranes taken from sites of bone erosion. Additionally, costimulatory molecule expression was also assessed in the monocytic leukemia cell line U937 following exposure to clinically relevant titanium aluminum vanadium (TiAlV) and stainless steel particles (FeCrNi) cultured in vitro. This study demonstrates the induction and prominent expression of CD86 on almost all macrophage subsets at the bone/implant interface, including fused forms and large multinucleated giant cells (MNGC). In vitro analysis also indicated phagocytosis of metal particles by differentiated U937 caused significant induction of both CD80 and CD86 (p < 0.01), although the expression of CD86 dominated following prolonged exposure. The data presented highlights that CD86 is the predominant costimulatory molecule ligating to the complementary CD28 molecule at the inflammatory lesion of the interface. We propose that the intracellular presence of indigestible implant material, in addition to elevated costimulatory molecule expression, may promote T-cell inflammatory reactions at sites close to and distant from the orthopedic implant. PMID:11189037

  4. Regulation of the neural niche by the soluble molecule Akhirin.

    PubMed

    Acharjee, Uzzal Kumar; Felemban, Athary Abdulhaleem; Riyadh, Asrafuzzaman M; Ohta, Kunimasa

    2016-06-01

    Though the adult central nervous system has been considered a comparatively static tissue with little turnover, it is well established today that new neural cells are generated throughout life. Neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs) can self-renew and generate all types of neural cells. The proliferation of NS/PCs, and differentiation and fate determination of PCs are regulated by extrinsic factors such as growth factors, neurotrophins, and morphogens. Although several extrinsic factors that influence neurogenesis have already been reported, little is known about the role of soluble molecules in neural niche regulation. In this review, we will introduce the soluble molecule Akhirin and discuss its role in the eye and spinal cord during development. PMID:27134067

  5. The transcriptional regulation of regucalcin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2011-01-01

    Regucalcin, which is discovered as a calcium-binding protein in 1978, has been shown to play a multifunctional role in many tissues and cell types; regucalcin has been proposed to play a pivotal role in keeping cell homeostasis and function for cell response. Regucalcin and its gene are identified in over 15 species consisting of regucalcin family. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of regucalcin from vertebrate species is highly conserved in their coding region with throughout evolution. The regucalcin gene is localized on the chromosome X in rat and human. The organization of rat regucalcin gene consists of seven exons and six introns and several consensus regulatory elements exist upstream of the 5'-flanking region. AP-1, NF1-A1, RGPR-p117, β-catenin, and other factors have been found to be a transcription factor in the enhancement of regucalcin gene promoter activity. The transcription activity of regucalcin gene is enhanced through intracellular signaling factors that are mediated through the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of nuclear protein in vitro. Regucalcin mRNA and its protein are markedly expressed in the liver and kidney cortex of rats. The expression of regucalcin mRNA in the liver and kidney cortex has been shown to stimulate by hormonal factors (including calcium, calcitonin, parathyroid hormone, insulin, estrogen, and dexamethasone) in vivo. Regucalcin mRNA expression is enhanced in the regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy of rats in vivo. The expression of regucalcin mRNA in the liver and kidney with pathophysiological state has been shown to suppress, suggesting an involvement of regucalcin in disease. Liver regucalcin expression is down-regulated in tumor cells, suggesting a suppressive role in the development of carcinogenesis. Liver regucalcin is markedly released into the serum of rats with chemically induced liver injury in vivo. Serum regucalcin has a potential sensitivity as a specific biochemical marker of chronic

  6. Expression profile of carp IFN correlate with the up-regulation of interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) in vivo and in vitro: the pivotal molecules in antiviral defense.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shijuan; Qi, Chenchen; Zhu, Yaoyao; Li, Hua; An, Liguo; Yang, Guiwen

    2016-05-01

    Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) are a family of transcription factors that mediate the transcriptional regulation of interferon (IFN) genes and IFN-inducible genes. In this study, IRF-1 gene is cloned from the common carp, Cyprinus carpio L., named CcIRF-1. The full-length cDNA of CcIRF-1 is 1427 bp, including an open reading frame of 861 bp encoding a protein of 286 amino acids. The putative CcIRF-1 is characterized by a conserved DNA-binding domain and includes a signature of six conserved tryptophan residues. The genomic sequence of CcIRF-1 is described, which consists of 9 exons and 8 introns. The sequence analysis shows that CcIRF-1 is clustered into IRF-1 subfamily, and has the closest relationship with the zebrafish IRF-1. CcIRF-1 is found constitutively expressed in different organs of healthy common carp. The main findings are that CcIRF-1 is up-regulated following stimulation with poly(I:C) in all tested tissues. Moreover, the downstream gene of IRF-1 - IFN is found to be correlated with the up-regulation of IRF-1 after injection with poly(I:C). Furthermore, we also isolate the peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) and find that there is a relevance between the expression profile of CcIRF-1 and IFN in poly(I:C) stimulated PBLs. PMID:26993613

  7. Test Review: Anger Regulation and Expression Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavlazoglu, Baki; Erdogan, Niyazi; Paine, Taylor; Jones, Meredith

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the Anger Regulation and Expression Scale (ARES) which was developed by DiGiuseppe and Tafrate (2011) and published by Multi-Health Systems Inc. The ARES was designed to be a self-report measure of anger expression and regulation in youth aged 10 to 17 years and was intended to be used in screening, individual assessment,…

  8. Adhesion Molecule Expression in Human Endothelial Cells under Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudimov, E. G.; Andreeva, E. R.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2013-02-01

    High gravisensitivity of endothelium is now well recognized. Therefore, the microgravity can be one of the main factors affecting the endothelium in space flight. In this work we studied the effects of gravity vector randomization (3D-clinorotation in RPM) on the viability of endothelial cells from human umbilical vein (HUVEC) and the expression of adhesion molecules on its surface. After RPM exposure, HUVEC conditioning medium was collected for cytokines evaluation, a part of vials was used for immunocytochemistry and other one - for cytofluorimetric analysis of ICAM-I, VCAM-I, PECAM-I, E-selectin, Endoglin, VE-cadherin expression. The viability of HUVEC and constitutive expression of EC marker molecules PECAM-I and Endoglin were similar in all experimental groups both after 6 and 24 hrs of exposure. There were no differences in ICAM-I and E-selectin expression on HUVEC in 3 groups after 6 hrs of exposure. 24 hrs incubation has provoked decrease in ICAM-I and E-selectin expression. Thus, gravity vector randomization can lead to the disruption of ECs monolayer.

  9. Kinesin regulation dynamics through cargo delivery, a single molecule investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, Anthony; Kessler, Jonathan; Lin, Huawen; Dutcher, Susan; Wang, Yan Mei

    2015-03-01

    Kinesins are microtubule-based motors that deliver cargo to their destinations in a highly regulated manner. Although in recent years numerous regulators of cargo delivery have been identified, the regulation mechanism of kinesin through the cargo delivery and recycling process is not known. By performing single molecule fluorescence imaging measurements in Chlamydomonas flagella, which are 200 nm in diameter, 10 microns in length, and contain 9 sets of microtubule doublets, we tracked the intraflagellar transport (IFT) trains, BBSome cargo, and kinesin-2 motors through the cargo delivery process and determined the aforementioned dynamics. Upon arrival at the microtubule plus end at the flagellar tip, (1) IFT trains and BBSome cargo remain intact, dissociate together from kinesins and microtubules, and diffuse along flagellar membrane for a mean of 2.3 sec before commencing retrograde travel. (2) Kinesin motors remain bound to and diffuse along microtubules for 1.3 sec before dissociating into the flagellar lumen for recycling.

  10. Evolutionary Roots of Arginase Expression and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Dzik, Jolanta Maria

    2014-01-01

    Two main types of macrophage functions are known: classical (M1), producing nitric oxide, NO, and M2, in which arginase activity is primarily expressed. Ornithine, the product of arginase, is a substrate for synthesis of polyamines and collagen, important for growth and ontogeny of animals. M2 macrophages, expressing high level of mitochondrial arginase, have been implicated in promoting cell division and deposition of collagen during ontogeny and wound repair. Arginase expression is the default mode of tissue macrophages, but can also be amplified by signals, such as IL-4/13 or transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) that accelerates wound healing and tissue repair. In worms, the induction of collagen gene is coupled with induction of immune response genes, both depending on the same TGF-β-like pathway. This suggests that the main function of M2 “heal” type macrophages is originally connected with the TGF-β superfamily of proteins, which are involved in regulation of tissue and organ differentiation in embryogenesis. Excretory–secretory products of metazoan parasites are able to induce M2-type of macrophage responses promoting wound healing without participation of Th2 cytokines IL-4/IL-13. The expression of arginase in lower animals can be induced by the presence of parasite antigens and TGF-β signals leading to collagen synthesis. This also means that the main proteins, which, in primitive metazoans, are involved in regulation of tissue and organ differentiation in embryogenesis are produced by innate immunity. The signaling function of NO is known already from the sponge stage of animal evolution. The cytotoxic role of NO molecule appeared later, as documented in immunity of marine mollusks and some insects. This implies that the M2-wound healing promoting function predates the defensive role of NO, a characteristic of M1 macrophages. Understanding when and how the M1 and M2 activities came to be in animals is useful for understanding how macrophage

  11. Small molecule screen for inhibitors of expression from canonical CREB response element-containing promoters

    PubMed Central

    Mitton, Bryan; Hsu, Katie; Dutta, Ritika; Tiu, Bruce C.; Cox, Nick; McLure, Kevin G.; Chae, Hee-Don; Smith, Mark; Eklund, Elizabeth A.; Solow-Cordero, David E.; Sakamoto, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor CREB (cAMP Response Element Binding Protein) is an important determinant in the growth of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) cells. CREB overexpression increases AML cell growth by driving the expression of key regulators of apoptosis and the cell cycle. Conversely, CREB knockdown inhibits proliferation and survival of AML cells but not normal hematopoietic cells. Thus, CREB represents a promising drug target for the treatment of AML, which carries a poor prognosis. In this study, we performed a high-throughput small molecule screen to identify compounds that disrupt CREB function in AML cells. We screened ∼114,000 candidate compounds from Stanford University's small molecule library, and identified 5 molecules that inhibit CREB function at micromolar concentrations, but are non-toxic to normal hematopoietic cells. This study suggests that targeting CREB function using small molecules could provide alternative approaches to treat AML. PMID:26840025

  12. Elafin in human endometrium: an antiprotease and antimicrobial molecule expressed during menstruation.

    PubMed

    King, Anne E; Critchley, Hilary O D; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Kelly, Rodney W

    2003-09-01

    Elafin is an antiproteinase and antimicrobial molecule that is expressed at epithelial sites (for example, cervix). This study details the expression and regulation of elafin in the human endometrium. Elafin mRNA and protein expression were examined in endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle and in first-trimester decidua. Real-time quantitative PCR showed that expression of elafin mRNA peaked during menstruation. Elafin protein was localized to leukocytes scattered in the endometrial stroma during the late secretory and menstrual phases. Faint immunostaining was also present in glandular epithelium at these cycle stages. Immunofluorescent colocalization of elafin with neutrophil elastase confirmed that elafin was expressed by endometrial neutrophils around the time of menstruation. This is consistent with the expression profile observed from immunohistochemical studies. Primary endometrial epithelial cells were treated with proinflammatory molecules, and elafin mRNA was studied. A combination of the proinflammatory mediators, IL-1 beta and TNFalpha, increased elafin mRNA levels by 4.6-fold. These results show that endometrium expresses elafin in a menstruation-dependent manner. This is attributable to the presence of infiltrating leukocytes and increased inflammatory signaling. Elafin will regulate proteolytic enzymes during menstruation and will contribute to the innate defense against uterine infection. PMID:12970320

  13. Methylobacterium-plant interaction genes regulated by plant exudate and quorum sensing molecules

    PubMed Central

    Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega; Bogas, Andrea Cristina; Pomini, Armando M.; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Marsaioli, Anita J.; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria from the genus Methylobacterium interact symbiotically (endophytically and epiphytically) with different plant species. These interactions can promote plant growth or induce systemic resistance, increasing plant fitness. The plant colonization is guided by molecular communication between bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-plants, where the bacteria recognize specific exuded compounds by other bacteria (e.g. homoserine molecules) and/or by the plant roots (e.g. flavonoids, ethanol and methanol), respectively. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of quorum sensing molecules (N-acyl-homoserine lactones) and plant exudates (including ethanol) in the expression of a series of bacterial genes involved in Methylobacterium-plant interaction. The selected genes are related to bacterial metabolism (mxaF), adaptation to stressful environment (crtI, phoU and sss), to interactions with plant metabolism compounds (acdS) and pathogenicity (patatin and phoU). Under in vitro conditions, our results showed the differential expression of some important genes related to metabolism, stress and pathogenesis, thereby AHL molecules up-regulate all tested genes, except phoU, while plant exudates induce only mxaF gene expression. In the presence of plant exudates there is a lower bacterial density (due the endophytic and epiphytic colonization), which produce less AHL, leading to down regulation of genes when compared to the control. Therefore, bacterial density, more than plant exudate, influences the expression of genes related to plant-bacteria interaction. PMID:24688531

  14. Methylobacterium-plant interaction genes regulated by plant exudate and quorum sensing molecules.

    PubMed

    Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega; Bogas, Andrea Cristina; Pomini, Armando M; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Marsaioli, Anita J; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2013-12-01

    Bacteria from the genus Methylobacterium interact symbiotically (endophytically and epiphytically) with different plant species. These interactions can promote plant growth or induce systemic resistance, increasing plant fitness. The plant colonization is guided by molecular communication between bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-plants, where the bacteria recognize specific exuded compounds by other bacteria (e.g. homoserine molecules) and/or by the plant roots (e.g. flavonoids, ethanol and methanol), respectively. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of quorum sensing molecules (N-acyl-homoserine lactones) and plant exudates (including ethanol) in the expression of a series of bacterial genes involved in Methylobacterium-plant interaction. The selected genes are related to bacterial metabolism (mxaF), adaptation to stressful environment (crtI, phoU and sss), to interactions with plant metabolism compounds (acdS) and pathogenicity (patatin and phoU). Under in vitro conditions, our results showed the differential expression of some important genes related to metabolism, stress and pathogenesis, thereby AHL molecules up-regulate all tested genes, except phoU, while plant exudates induce only mxaF gene expression. In the presence of plant exudates there is a lower bacterial density (due the endophytic and epiphytic colonization), which produce less AHL, leading to down regulation of genes when compared to the control. Therefore, bacterial density, more than plant exudate, influences the expression of genes related to plant-bacteria interaction. PMID:24688531

  15. Vascular activation of adhesion molecule mRNA and cell surface expression by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, M; Douwes, K; Peter, R; Degitz, K

    1998-01-10

    During cutaneous inflammatory reactions the recruitment of circulating leukocytes into the tissue critically depends on the regulated expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Various proinflammatory stimuli upregulate endothelial CAMs, including cytokines and UV irradiation. We have investigated the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) on endothelial CAM expression. Organ cultures of normal human skin as well as cultured human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) were exposed to IR. Expression of three major endothelial CAMs was studied in skin organ cultures by immunohistochemistry and in cell culture by Northern blot analysis and flow cytometry. In skin organ cultures vascular immunoreactivity for ICAM-1, E-selectin, and VCAM-1 was strongly induced 24 h after exposure to 5 or 10 Gy of IR, while immunoreactivity for CD31/PECAM-1, a constitutively expressed endothelial cell adhesion molecule, remained unchanged. In cultured HDMEC IR upregulated ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin mRNAs and cell surface expression in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Cellular morphology and viability remained unaltered by IR up to 24 h postirradiation. This study characterizes microvascular activation of adhesion molecule expression in response to ionizing radiation in a clinically relevant IR dose range. The findings also underscore the ability of endothelial cells to integrate environmental electromagnetic stimuli. PMID:9457067

  16. CD69 Is the Crucial Regulator of Intestinal Inflammation: A New Target Molecule for IBD Treatment?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    CD69 has been identified as an early activation marker of lymphocytes. However, recent work has indicated that CD69 plays an essential role for the regulation of inflammatory processes. Particularly, CD69 is highly expressed by lymphocytes at mucosal sites being constantly exposed to the intestinal microflora (one of the nature's most complex and most densely populated microbial habitats) and food antigens, while only a small number of circulating leukocytes express this molecule. In this review we will discuss the role of CD69 in mucosal tissue and consider CD69 as a potential target for the development of novel treatments of intestinal inflammation. PMID:25759842

  17. Phytochrome-regulated Gene Expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of all genes involved in the phytochrome (phy)-mediated responses of plants to their light environment is an important goal in providing an overall understanding of light-regulated growth and development. This article highlights and integrates the central findings of two recent compre...

  18. Structural basis of AMPK regulation by small molecule activators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bing; Sanders, Matthew J.; Carmena, David; Bright, Nicola J.; Haire, Lesley F.; Underwood, Elizabeth; Patel, Bhakti R.; Heath, Richard B.; Walker, Philip A.; Hallen, Stefan; Giordanetto, Fabrizio; Martin, Stephen R.; Carling, David; Gamblin, Steven J.

    2013-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a major role in regulating cellular energy balance by sensing and responding to increases in AMP/ADP concentration relative to ATP. Binding of AMP causes allosteric activation of the enzyme and binding of either AMP or ADP promotes and maintains the phosphorylation of threonine 172 within the activation loop of the kinase. AMPK has attracted widespread interest as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes and, more recently, cancer. A number of direct AMPK activators have been reported as having beneficial effects in treating metabolic diseases, but there has been no structural basis for activator binding to AMPK. Here we present the crystal structure of human AMPK in complex with a small molecule activator that binds at a site between the kinase domain and the carbohydrate-binding module, stabilising the interaction between these two components. The nature of the activator-binding pocket suggests the involvement of an additional, as yet unidentified, metabolite in the physiological regulation of AMPK. Importantly, the structure offers new opportunities for the design of small molecule activators of AMPK for treatment of metabolic disorders.

  19. Ferulic acid attenuates adhesion molecule expression in gamma-radiated human umbilical vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zeng-Chun; Hong, Qian; Wang, Yu-Guang; Tan, Hong-Ling; Xiao, Cheng-Rong; Liang, Qian-De; Cai, Shao-Hua; Gao, Yue

    2010-01-01

    Radiation induces an important inflammatory response in the irradiated organs, characterized by leukocyte infiltration and vascular changes. Since adhesion molecules play an important role in facilitating the immune response at the inflammation sites, interfering with the expression of these molecules may be an important therapeutic target of radiation induced inflammation. Many adhesion molecules such as intercellular cell adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) have been identified in radiation. Ferulic acid (FA), an effective radioprotector during radiotherapy, is widely used in endothelium protection. The present study examined the effect of FA on the induction of adhesion molecules by gamma-radiation and the mechanisms of its effect in gamma-irradiated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were pretreated for 18 h with FA and then exposed to 10 Gy radiation. The result of cell adhesion assay showed FA inhibited radiation-induced U937 adhesion to HUVECs. FA prevented induction of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in a concentration-dependent manner after stimulation with radiation at the level of mRNA and protein. Inhibitors of the extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways were used to determine which pathway was involved in FA action; the result showed that the inhibitory effect of FA on adhesion molecule expression was mediated by the blockade of JNK. FA appears to be a potential therapeutic agent for treating various inflammatory disorders including radiation induced inflammation. PMID:20460750

  20. [Allergens-induced sensitization alters airway epithelial adhesion molecules expression in mice].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dan; Tan, Mei-Ling; Xiang, Yang; Qin, Xiao-Qun; Zhu, Li-Ming; Dai, Ai-Guo

    2015-12-25

    To explore the relationship between the epithelial adhesion molecules and immune responses of airway epithelium, we observed the expression of integrin β4 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the mice airway epithelium after sensitization with allergens. BALB/c mice were sensitized with intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA) or house dust mite (HDM) and then developed airway hyper-responsiveness as determined by barometric whole-body plethysmography. Both OVA and HDM sensitization led to increases of the number of peripheral leukocytes as well as inflammatory cells infiltration in lungs. OVA sensitized mice showed more severe inflammatory cells infiltration than HDM sensitized mice. Immunohistochemistry analysis of mice lung tissues revealed that sensitization with both allergens also led to a decrease of integrin β4 expression and an increase of ICAM-1 expression in airway epithelia. OVA sensitized mice showed a more significant increase of ICAM-1 expression compared with HDM sensitized mice. siRNA mediated silencing of integrin β4 gene in 16HBE cells resulted in an up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression. Our results indicate a possible role of airway epithelial adhesion molecules in allergen-induced airway immune responses. PMID:26701635

  1. Circular RNA Expression: Its Potential Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Salzman, Julia

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, a new feature of eukaryotic gene expression emerged: ubiquitous expression of circular RNA (circRNA) from genes traditionally thought to express messenger or linear noncoding (nc)RNA only. CircRNAs are covalently closed, circular RNA molecules that typically comprise exonic sequences and are spliced at canonical splice sites. This feature of gene expression was first recognized in humans and mouse, but it quickly emerged that it was common across essentially all eukaryotes studied by molecular biologists. CircRNA abundance, and even which alternatively spliced circRNA isoforms are expressed, varies by cell type and can exceed the abundance of the traditional linear mRNA or ncRNA transcript. CircRNAs are enriched in the brain and increase in abundance during fetal development. Together, these features raise fundamental questions regarding the regulation of circRNA in cis and in trans, and its function. PMID:27050930

  2. Circular RNA Expression: Its Potential Regulation and Function.

    PubMed

    Salzman, Julia

    2016-05-01

    In 2012, a new feature of eukaryotic gene expression emerged: ubiquitous expression of circular RNA (circRNA) from genes traditionally thought to express messenger or linear noncoding (nc)RNA only. CircRNAs are covalently closed, circular RNA molecules that typically comprise exonic sequences and are spliced at canonical splice sites. This feature of gene expression was first recognized in humans and mouse, but it quickly emerged that it was common across essentially all eukaryotes studied by molecular biologists. CircRNA abundance, and even which alternatively spliced circRNA isoforms are expressed, varies by cell type and can exceed the abundance of the traditional linear mRNA or ncRNA transcript. CircRNAs are enriched in the brain and increase in abundance during fetal development. Together, these features raise fundamental questions regarding the regulation of circRNA in cis and in trans, and its function. PMID:27050930

  3. Rhipicephalus microplus salivary gland molecules induce differential CD86 expression in murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Tick parasitism is a major impediment for cattle production in many parts of the world. The southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, is an obligate hematophagous parasite of domestic and wild animals that serves as vector of infectious agents lethal to cattle. Tick saliva contains molecules evolved to modulate host innate and adaptive immune responses which facilitates blood feeding and pathogen transmission. Tick feeding promotes CD4 T cell polarization to a Th2 profile usually accompanied by down-regulation of Th1 cytokines through as yet undefined mechanisms. Co-stimulatory molecules on antigen presenting cells are central to development of T cell responses including Th1 and Th2 responses. Tick induced changes to antigen presenting cell signal transduction pathways are largely unknown. Here we document the ability of R. microplus salivary gland extracts (SGE) to effect differential CD86 expression. Results We examined changes in co-stimulatory molecule expression in murine RAW 264.7 cells in response to R. microplus SGE exposure in the presence of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligand, LPS. After 24 hrs, CD86, but not CD80, was preferentially up-regulated on mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells when treated with SGE and then LPS, but not SGE alone. CD80 and CD40 expression was increased with LPS, but the addition of SGE did not alter expression. Higher concentrations of SGE were less effective at increasing CD86 RNA expression. The addition of mitogen or extracellular kinase (MEK) inhibitor, PD98059, significantly reduced the ability for SGE to induce CD86 expression, indicating activation of MEK is necessary for SGE induced up-regulation. Conclusions Molecules in SGE of R. microplus have a concentration-dependent effect on differential up-regulation of CD86 in a macrophage cell line activated by the TLR4 ligand, LPS. This CD86 up-regulation is at least partially dependent on the ERK1/2 pathway and may serve to promote Th2 polarization

  4. Role of chrysin on expression of insulin signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    Satyanarayana, Kottireddy; Sravanthi, Koora; Shaker, Ivvala Anand; Ponnulakshmi, Rajagopal; Selvaraj, Jayaraman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Currently available drugs are unsuccessful for the treatment of tye-2 diabetes due to their adverseside-effects. Hence, a search for novel drugs, especially ofplant origin, continues. Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid, natural component of traditional medicinal herbs, present in honey, propolis and many plant extracts that hasbeen used in traditional medicine around the world to treat numerous ailments. Objective: The present study was aimed to identify the protective role of chrysin on the expression of insulin-signaling molecules in the skeletal muscle of high fat and sucrose-induced type-2 diabetic adult male rats. Materials and Methods: The oral effective dose of chrysin (100 mg/kg body weight) was given once a day until the end of the study (30 days post-induction of diabetes) to high fat diet-induced diabetic rats. At the end of the experimental period, fasting blood glucose, oral glucose tolerance, serum lipid profile, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and free radical generation, as well as the levels of insulin signaling molecules and tissue glycogen in the gastrocnemius muscle were assessed. Results: Diabetic rats showed impaired glucose tolerance and impairment in insulin signaling molecules (IR, IRS-1, p-IRS-1Tyr632, p- AktThr308), glucose transporter subtype 4 [GLUT4] proteins and glycogen concentration. Serum insulin, lipid profile, LPO and free radical generation were found to be increased in diabetic control rats. The treatment with chrysin normalized the altered levels of blood glucose, serum insulin, lipid profile, LPO and insulin signaling molecules as well as GLUT4 proteins. Conclusion: Our present findings indicate that chrysin improves glycemic control through activation of insulin signal transduction in the gastrocnemius muscle of high fat and sucrose-induced type-2 diabetic male rats. PMID:26834424

  5. Cocaine-induced expression changes of axon guidance molecules in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bahi, Amine; Dreyer, Jean-Luc

    2005-02-01

    Administration of drugs of abuse induces strong molecular adaptations and plasticity within the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system, a pathway essential for reward-seeking behavior. Little is known about the specific targets involved in this neuroadaptation process, but there are indications that cocaine and other drugs of abuse share the ability to alter the morphology of neuronal dendrites and spines, the primary site of excitatory synapses in the brain. Axon guidance molecules, the very molecular cues that regulate the formation of axon-target connections during development, may mediate these alterations. To test this hypothesis, we investigated mRNA expression changes of 39 axon guidance molecules, including 17 Semaphorins, 12 Ephs, 8 Ephrins, and 2 neuropilins in the mesolimbic dopamine system of cocaine-treated animals under different paradigms by mean of DNA-Microarray and quantitative real-time PCR. In all cases, strong changes in gene expression are observed, yielding to up or downregulation of these axon guidance molecules. Our data suggest that cocaine treatment induces activation of a complex program of synaptic rearrangements, which may partly recapitulate the plastic changes occurring during development, and may underlie the important neuroplastic adaptations that occur in the reward- and memory-related brain centers following drug action. We conclude that in some brain regions, exposure to psychomotor-stimulant drugs produce expression changes in axon guidance molecules, which may contribute to cognitive deficits associated with drug abuse. PMID:15691709

  6. Let there be light: Regulation of gene expression in plants

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Ezequiel; Godoy Herz, Micaela A; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression regulation relies on a variety of molecular mechanisms affecting different steps of a messenger RNA (mRNA) life: transcription, processing, splicing, alternative splicing, transport, translation, storage and decay. Light induces massive reprogramming of gene expression in plants. Differences in alternative splicing patterns in response to environmental stimuli suggest that alternative splicing plays an important role in plant adaptation to changing life conditions. In a recent publication, our laboratories showed that light regulates alternative splicing of a subset of Arabidopsis genes encoding proteins involved in RNA processing by chloroplast retrograde signals. The light effect on alternative splicing is also observed in roots when the communication with the photosynthetic tissues is not interrupted, suggesting that a signaling molecule travels through the plant. These results point at alternative splicing regulation by retrograde signals as an important mechanism for plant adaptation to their environment. PMID:25590224

  7. Regulation of BDNF expression by cocaine.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Deirdre M; Brown, Amber N; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2012-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors. It is expressed throughout the nervous system. A unique feature of the BDNF gene is the existence of multiple mRNA transcripts, all of which are translated into BDNF protein, suggesting a multilevel regulation of expression. In particular, the BDNF exon IV promoter region is a preferential target for epigenetic alterations, as it contains binding sites for CREB and MeCP2, two transcriptional regulators known to mediate epigenetic changes. Exposure to drugs of abuse is known to modulate epigenetic regulation of BDNF gene expression. This review will discuss how exposure to cocaine, one of the most addictive drugs known to mankind, can produce alterations in BDNF gene expression, especially in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system, which lead to alterations in the reward-mediated behaviors involved in addiction. PMID:23239946

  8. Identifying Novel Transcriptional Regulators with Circadian Expression

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Sandra; Thakurela, Sudhir; Fournier, David; Hampel, Mareike Hildegard

    2015-01-01

    Organisms adapt their physiology and behavior to the 24-h day-night cycle to which they are exposed. On a cellular level, this is regulated by intrinsic transcriptional-translational feedback loops that are important for maintaining the circadian rhythm. These loops are organized by members of the core clock network, which further regulate transcription of downstream genes, resulting in their circadian expression. Despite progress in understanding circadian gene expression, only a few players involved in circadian transcriptional regulation, including transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and long noncoding RNAs, are known. Aiming to discover such genes, we performed a high-coverage transcriptome analysis of a circadian time course in murine fibroblast cells. In combination with a newly developed algorithm, we identified many transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and long intergenic noncoding RNAs that are cyclically expressed. In addition, a number of these genes also showed circadian expression in mouse tissues. Furthermore, the knockdown of one such factor, Zfp28, influenced the core clock network. Mathematical modeling was able to predict putative regulator-effector interactions between the identified circadian genes and may help for investigations into the gene regulatory networks underlying circadian rhythms. PMID:26644408

  9. Synaptic adhesion molecule IgSF11 regulates synaptic transmission and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyewon; van Riesen, Christoph; Whitcomb, Daniel; Warburton, Julia M.; Jo, Jihoon; Kim, Doyoun; Kim, Sun Gyun; Um, Seung Min; Kwon, Seok-kyu; Kim, Myoung-Hwan; Roh, Junyeop Daniel; Woo, Jooyeon; Jun, Heejung; Lee, Dongmin; Mah, Won; Kim, Hyun; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Cho, Kwangwook; Rhee, Jeong-Seop; Choquet, Daniel; Kim, Eunjoon

    2016-01-01

    Summary Synaptic adhesion molecules regulate synapse development and plasticity through mechanisms including trans-synaptic adhesion and recruitment of diverse synaptic proteins. We report here that the immunoglobulin superfamily member 11 (IgSF11), a homophilic adhesion molecule preferentially expressed in the brain, is a novel and dual-binding partner of the postsynaptic scaffolding protein PSD-95 and AMPAR glutamate receptors (AMPARs). IgSF11 requires PSD-95 binding for its excitatory synaptic localization. In addition, IgSF11 stabilizes synaptic AMPARs, as shown by IgSF11 knockdown-induced suppression of AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission and increased surface mobility of AMPARs, measured by high-throughput, single-molecule tracking. IgSF11 deletion in mice leads to suppression of AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission in the dentate gyrus and long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. IgSF11 does not regulate the functional characteristics of AMPARs, including desensitization, deactivation, or recovery. These results suggest that IgSF11 regulates excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity through its tripartite interactions with PSD-95 and AMPARs. PMID:26595655

  10. Adaptive Control Model Reveals Systematic Feedback and Key Molecules in Metabolic Pathway Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Richard A.; Merrill, Alfred H.; Wang, May D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Robust behavior in metabolic pathways resembles stabilized performance in systems under autonomous control. This suggests we can apply control theory to study existing regulation in these cellular networks. Here, we use model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) to investigate the dynamics of de novo sphingolipid synthesis regulation in a combined theoretical and experimental case study. The effects of serine palmitoyltransferase over-expression on this pathway are studied in vitro using human embryonic kidney cells. We report two key results from comparing numerical simulations with observed data. First, MRAC simulations of pathway dynamics are comparable to simulations from a standard model using mass action kinetics. The root-sum-square (RSS) between data and simulations in both cases differ by less than 5%. Second, MRAC simulations suggest systematic pathway regulation in terms of adaptive feedback from individual molecules. In response to increased metabolite levels available for de novo sphingolipid synthesis, feedback from molecules along the main artery of the pathway is regulated more frequently and with greater amplitude than from other molecules along the branches. These biological insights are consistent with current knowledge while being new that they may guide future research in sphingolipid biology. In summary, we report a novel approach to study regulation in cellular networks by applying control theory in the context of robust metabolic pathways. We do this to uncover potential insight into the dynamics of regulation and the reverse engineering of cellular networks for systems biology. This new modeling approach and the implementation routines designed for this case study may be extended to other systems. Supplementary Material is available at www.liebertonline.com/cmb. PMID:21314456

  11. Molecular Regulation of Adipogenesis and Potential Anti-Adipogenic Bioactive Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Moseti, Dorothy; Regassa, Alemu; Kim, Woo-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Adipogenesis is the process by which precursor stem cells differentiate into lipid laden adipocytes. Adipogenesis is regulated by a complex and highly orchestrated gene expression program. In mammalian cells, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), and the CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs) such as C/EBPα, β and δ are considered the key early regulators of adipogenesis, while fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), adiponectin, and fatty acid synthase (FAS) are responsible for the formation of mature adipocytes. Excess accumulation of lipids in the adipose tissue leads to obesity, which is associated with cardiovascular diseases, type II diabetes and other pathologies. Thus, investigating adipose tissue development and the underlying molecular mechanisms is vital to develop therapeutic agents capable of curbing the increasing incidence of obesity and related pathologies. In this review, we address the process of adipogenic differentiation, key transcription factors and proteins involved, adipogenic regulators and potential anti-adipogenic bioactive molecules. PMID:26797605

  12. Epigenetic Mechanisms Regulate MHC and Antigen Processing Molecules in Human Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Álvarez, Beatriz; Rodriguez, Ramón M.; Calvanese, Vincenzo; Blanco-Gelaz, Miguel A.; Suhr, Steve T.; Ortega, Francisco; Otero, Jesus; Cibelli, Jose B.; Moore, Harry; Fraga, Mario F.; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Background Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are an attractive resource for new therapeutic approaches that involve tissue regeneration. hESCs have exhibited low immunogenicity due to low levels of Mayor Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class-I and absence of MHC class-II expression. Nevertheless, the mechanisms regulating MHC expression in hESCs had not been explored. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed the expression levels of classical and non-classical MHC class-I, MHC class-II molecules, antigen-processing machinery (APM) components and NKG2D ligands (NKG2D-L) in hESCs, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and NTera2 (NT2) teratocarcinoma cell line. Epigenetic mechanisms involved in the regulation of these genes were investigated by bisulfite sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. We showed that low levels of MHC class-I molecules were associated with absent or reduced expression of the transporter associated with antigen processing 1 (TAP-1) and tapasin (TPN) components in hESCs and iPSCs, which are involved in the transport and load of peptides. Furthermore, lack of β2-microglobulin (β2m) light chain in these cells limited the expression of MHC class I trimeric molecule on the cell surface. NKG2D ligands (MICA, MICB) were observed in all pluripotent stem cells lines. Epigenetic analysis showed that H3K9me3 repressed the TPN gene in undifferentiated cells whilst HLA-B and β2m acquired the H3K4me3 modification during the differentiation to embryoid bodies (EBs). Absence of HLA-DR and HLA-G expression was regulated by DNA methylation. Conclusions/Significance Our data provide fundamental evidence for the epigenetic control of MHC in hESCs and iPSCs. Reduced MHC class I and class II expression in hESCs and iPSCs can limit their recognition by the immune response against these cells. The knowledge of these mechanisms will further allow the development of strategies to induce tolerance and improve stem cell allograft acceptance

  13. Exenatide Alters Gene Expression of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM), Intercellular Cell Adhesion Molecule (ICAM), and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule (VCAM) in the Hippocampus of Type 2 Diabetic Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gumuslu, Esen; Cine, Naci; Gökbayrak, Merve Ertan; Mutlu, Oguz; Celikyurt, Ipek Komsuoglu; Ulak, Guner

    2016-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor, ameliorates the symptoms of diabetes through stimulation of insulin secretion. Exenatide is a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor. Cell adhesion molecules are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily and are involved in synaptic rearrangements in the mature brain. Material/Methods The present study demonstrated the effects of exenatide treatment (0.1 μg/kg, subcutaneously, twice daily for 2 weeks) on the gene expression levels of cell adhesion molecules, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), intercellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM), and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) in the brain tissue of diabetic BALB/c male mice by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin/nicotinamide (STZ-NA) injection to male mice. Results The results of this study revealed that hippocampal gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were found to be up-regulated in STZ-NA-induced diabetic mice compared to those of controls. A significant decrease in the gene expression levels of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were determined after 2 weeks of exenatide administration. Conclusions Cell adhesion molecules may be involved in the molecular mechanism of diabetes. Exenatide has a strong beneficial action in managing diabetes induced by STZ/NA by altering gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM. PMID:27465247

  14. Glucosyltransferases of Viridans Group Streptococci Modulate Interleukin-6 and Adhesion Molecule Expression in Endothelial Cells and Augment Monocytic Cell Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Chen, Jen-Yang; Chia, Jean-San

    2006-01-01

    Recruitment of monocytes plays important roles during vegetation formation and endocardial inflammation in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis (IE). Bacterial antigens or modulins can activate endothelial cells through the expression of cytokines or adhesion molecules and modulate the recruitment of leukocytes. We hypothesized that glucosyltransferases (GTFs), modulins of viridans group streptococci, may act directly to up-regulate the expression of adhesion molecules and also interleukin-6 (IL-6) to augment monocyte attachment to endothelial cells. Using primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as an in vitro model, we demonstrated that GTFs (in the cell-bound or free form) could specifically modulate the expression of IL-6, and also adhesion molecules, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Results of inhibition assays suggested that enhanced expression of adhesion molecules was dependent on the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase and that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways also contributed to the release of IL-6. Streptococcus-infected HUVECs or treatment with purified IL-6 plus soluble IL-6 receptor α enhanced the expression of ICAM-1 and the adherence of the monocytic cell line U937. These results suggest that streptococcal GTFs might play an important role in recruiting monocytic cells during inflammation in IE through induction of adhesion molecules and IL-6, a cytokine involved in transition from neutrophil to monocyte recruitment. PMID:16428777

  15. Drug-induced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on lesional keratinocytes in fixed drug eruption.

    PubMed Central

    Teraki, Y.; Moriya, N.; Shiohara, T.

    1994-01-01

    The mechanism(s) and the factor(s) that contribute to preferential localization of fixed drug eruption (FDE) lesions to certain skin sites remain speculative. Previous studies suggested that populations of T cells residing in the lesional epidermis may be involved in selective destruction of the epidermis in FDE. In this study, to define the earliest cellular and molecular events with potential relevance to activation of the epidermal T cells, expression of adhesion molecules on keratinocytes (KC) and vascular endothelium was examined sequentially in the lesional skin of FDE patients after challenge with the causative drug. Rapid and intense intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression was induced on the vascular endothelium and KC as early as 1.5 hours after challenge, at which time E-selectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) were not up-regulated. In vitro studies using skin organ culture showed that the lesional KC and endothelium responded more rapidly and intensely to express ICAM-1 to tumor necrosis factor-alpha or interferon-gamma compared with those in the nonlesional skin. Surprisingly, such selective induction of KC ICAM-1 restricted to the lesional skin was also observed after exposure to the causative drug alone in skin organ culture. Pretreatment of the lesional skin with anti-tumor necrosis factor completely abrogated in vitro induction of KC ICAM-1 expression by the drug. Drug-induced, TNF-alpha-dependent KC ICAM-1 expression in the lesional skin suggests that induction of ICAM-1 expression by the lesional KC after ingestion of the drug would probably provide a localized initiating stimulus for activation of the disease-associated epidermal T cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7915886

  16. Amino acid regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Fafournoux, P; Bruhat, A; Jousse, C

    2000-01-01

    The impact of nutrients on gene expression in mammals has become an important area of research. Nevertheless, the current understanding of the amino acid-dependent control of gene expression is limited. Because amino acids have multiple and important functions, their homoeostasis has to be finely maintained. However, amino-acidaemia can be affected by certain nutritional conditions or various forms of stress. It follows that mammals have to adjust several of their physiological functions involved in the adaptation to amino acid availability by regulating the expression of numerous genes. The aim of the present review is to examine the role of amino acids in regulating mammalian gene expression and protein turnover. It has been reported that some genes involved in the control of growth or amino acid metabolism are regulated by amino acid availability. For instance, limitation of several amino acids greatly increases the expression of the genes encoding insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein, where C/EBP is CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and asparagine synthetase. Elevated mRNA levels result from both an increase in the rate of transcription and an increase in mRNA stability. Several observations suggest that the amino acid regulation of gene expression observed in mammalian cells and the general control process described in yeast share common features. Moreover, amino acid response elements have been characterized in the promoters of the CHOP and asparagine synthetase genes. Taken together, the results discussed in the present review demonstrate that amino acids, by themselves, can, in concert with hormones, play an important role in the control of gene expression. PMID:10998343

  17. Single Molecule Analysis of Serotonin Transporter Regulation Using Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jerry; Tomlinson, Ian; Warnement, Michael; Ustione, Alessandro; Carneiro, Ana; Piston, David; Blakely, Randy; Rosenthal, Sandra

    2011-03-01

    For the first time, we implement a novel, single molecule approach to define the localization and mobility of the brain's major target of widely prescribed antidepressant medications, the serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT labeled with single quantum dot (Qdot) revealed unsuspected features of transporter mobility with cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains (often referred to as ``lipid rafts'') and cytoskeleton network linked to transporter activation. We document two pools of surface SERT proteins defined by their lateral mobility, one that exhibits relatively free diffusion in the plasma membrane and a second that displays significantly restricted mobility and localizes to cholesterol-enriched microdomains. Diffusion model prediction and instantaneous velocity analysis indicated that stimuli that act through p38 MAPK-dependent signaling pathways to activate SERT trigger rapid SERT movements within membrane microdomains. Cytoskeleton disruption showed that SERT lateral mobility behaves a membrane raft-constrained, cytoskeleton-associated manner. Our results identify an unsuspected aspect of neurotransmitter transporter regulation that we propose reflects the dissociation of inhibitory, SERT-associated cytoskeletal anchors.

  18. Signaling molecules and pathways regulating the fate of spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Zuping; Kokkinaki, Maria; Dym, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is the process that involves the division and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) into mature spermatozoa. SSCs are a subpopulation of type A spermatogonia resting on the basement membrane in the mammalian testis. Self-renewal and differentiation of SSCs are the foundation of normal spermatogenesis, and thus a better understanding of molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways in the SSCs is of paramount importance for the regulation of spermatogenesis and may eventually lead to novel targets for male contraception as well as for gene therapy of male infertility and testicular cancer. Uncovering the molecular mechanisms is also of great interest to a better understanding of SSC aging and for developing novel therapeutic strategies for degenerative diseases in view of the recent work demonstrating the pluripotent potential of the SSC. Progress has recently been made in elucidating the signaling molecules and pathways that determine cell fate decisions of SSCs. In this review, we first address the morphological features, phenotypic characteristics, and the potential of SSCs. And then we focus on the recent advances in defining the key signaling molecules and crucial signaling pathways regulating self-renewal and differentiation of SSCs. The association of aberrant expression of signaling molecules and cascades with abnormal spermatogenesis and testicular cancer are also discussed. Finally we point out potential future directions to pursue in research on signaling pathways of SSCs. PMID:19263492

  19. Ezrin Inhibition Up-regulates Stress Response Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Haydar; Bulut, Gülay; Han, Jenny; Graham, Garrett T; Minas, Tsion Z; Conn, Erin J; Hong, Sung-Hyeok; Pauly, Gary T; Hayran, Mutlu; Li, Xin; Özdemirli, Metin; Ayhan, Ayşe; Rudek, Michelle A; Toretsky, Jeffrey A; Üren, Aykut

    2016-06-17

    Ezrin is a member of the ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) family of proteins that links cortical cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane. High expression of ezrin correlates with poor prognosis and metastasis in osteosarcoma. In this study, to uncover specific cellular responses evoked by ezrin inhibition that can be used as a specific pharmacodynamic marker(s), we profiled global gene expression in osteosarcoma cells after treatment with small molecule ezrin inhibitors, NSC305787 and NSC668394. We identified and validated several up-regulated integrated stress response genes including PTGS2, ATF3, DDIT3, DDIT4, TRIB3, and ATF4 as novel ezrin-regulated transcripts. Analysis of transcriptional response in skin and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from NSC305787-treated mice compared with a control group revealed that, among those genes, the stress gene DDIT4/REDD1 may be used as a surrogate pharmacodynamic marker of ezrin inhibitor compound activity. In addition, we validated the anti-metastatic effects of NSC305787 in reducing the incidence of lung metastasis in a genetically engineered mouse model of osteosarcoma and evaluated the pharmacokinetics of NSC305787 and NSC668394 in mice. In conclusion, our findings suggest that cytoplasmic ezrin, previously considered a dormant and inactive protein, has important functions in regulating gene expression that may result in down-regulation of stress response genes. PMID:27137931

  20. The coffee diterpene kahweol inhibits tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced expression of cell adhesion molecules in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Kim, Ji Young; Hwang, Yong Pil; Lee, Kyung Jin; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Hye Gwang . E-mail: hgjeong@chosun.ac.kr

    2006-12-15

    Endothelial cells produce adhesion molecules after being stimulated with various inflammatory cytokines. These adhesion molecules play an important role in the development of atherogenesis. Recent studies have highlighted the chemoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of kahweol, a coffee-specific diterpene. This study examined the effects of kahweol on the cytokine-induced monocyte/human endothelial cell interaction, which is a crucial early event in atherogenesis. Kahweol inhibited the adhesion of TNF{alpha}-induced monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF{alpha}-induced protein and mRNA expression of the cell adhesion molecules, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. Furthermore, kahweol inhibited the TNF{alpha}-induced JAK2-PI3K/Akt-NF-{kappa}B activation pathway in these cells. Overall, kahweol has anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic activities, which occurs partly by down-regulating the pathway that affects the expression and interaction of the cell adhesion molecules on endothelial cells.

  1. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation. PMID:26734569

  2. p63 regulates glutaminase 2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbe, Arianna; Bongiorno-Borbone, Lucilla; Bernassola, Francesca; Terrinoni, Alessandro; Markert, Elke Katrin; Levine, Arnold J.; Feng, Zhaohui; Agostini, Massimilano; Zolla, Lello; Agrò, Alessandro Finazzi; Notterman, Daniel A.; Melino, Gerry; Peschiaroli, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 is critical for many biological processes, including development and maintenance of epidermal tissues and tumorigenesis. Here, we report that the TAp63 isoforms regulate cell metabolism through the induction of the mitochondrial glutaminase 2 (GLS2) gene both in primary cells and tumor cell lines. By ChIP analysis and luciferase assay, we confirmed that TAp63 binds directly to the p53/p63 consensus DNA binding sequence within the GLS2 promoter region. Given the critical role of p63 in epidermal differentiation, we have investigated the regulation of GLS2 expression during this process. GLS2 and TAp63 expression increases during the in vitro differentiation of primary human keratinocytes, and depletion of GLS2 inhibits skin differentiation both at molecular and cellular levels. We found that GLS2 and TAp63 expression are concomitantly induced in cancer cells exposed to oxidative stresses. siRNA-mediated depletion of GLS2 sensitizes cells to ROS-induced apoptosis, suggesting that the TAp63/GLS2 axis can be functionally important as a cellular antioxidant pathway in the absence of p53. Accordingly, we found that GLS2 is upregulated in colon adenocarcinoma. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that GLS2 is a bona fide TAp63 target gene, and that the TAp63-dependent regulation of GLS2 is important for both physiological and pathological processes. PMID:23574722

  3. HNRNPR Regulates the Expression of Classical and Nonclassical MHC Class I Proteins.

    PubMed

    Reches, Adi; Nachmani, Daphna; Berhani, Orit; Duev-Cohen, Alexandra; Shreibman, Dorin; Ophir, Yael; Seliger, Barbara; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2016-06-15

    MHC class I molecules, in addition to their role in specific activation of the CTL of adaptive immune system, function also as the main ligands for NK cell inhibitory receptors, which prevent NK cells from killing normal, healthy cells. MHC class I proteins are divided into classical and nonclassical proteins. The former group consists of hundreds of HLA-A, B, and C alleles, which are universally expressed, whereas several alleles of the latter group, such as HLA-G, manifest a restricted expression pattern. Despite the important role played by these molecules in innate and adaptive immune responses, their complex expression regulation is not fully known. In our study, we investigated the regulation processes controlling the expression of MHC class I molecules, with a particular focus on their 3' untranslated regions. We identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein R (HNRNPR) as an important positive regulator of classical and nonclassical MHC class I molecules. HNRNPR is a RNA-binding protein belonging to the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein family, which has a known role in processing of precursor mRNA. We demonstrated that HNRNPR binds MHC class I mRNAs in their 3' untranslated regions and enhances their stability and consequently their expression. Furthermore, regulation by HNRNPR modulates the cytotoxic activity of NK cells. In conclusion, we show that HNRNPR acts as a general positive regulator of MHC class I expression. PMID:27194785

  4. Regulation of Expressive Behavior as Reflecting Affect Socialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saarni, Carolyn

    Regulated expressiveness (the modification of expressive behavior) is a complex phenomenon. Accomplished basically in four ways, regulated expressiveness has developmental dimensions, motivational precursors, and cognitive antecedents, including perspective-taking ability and the growth of self-awareness. Ability to regulate expressiveness appears…

  5. Regulation and trafficking of the HLA-E molecules during monocyte-macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Camilli, Giorgio; Cassotta, Antonino; Battella, Simone; Palmieri, Gabriella; Santoni, Angela; Paladini, Fabiana; Fiorillo, Maria Teresa; Sorrentino, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    HLA-E is a nonclassical HLA-class I molecule whose best known role is to protect from the natural killer cells. More recently, an additional function more similar to that of classical HLA-class I molecules, i.e., antigen presentation to T cells, is emerging. However, much remains to be explored about the intracellular trafficking of the HLA-E molecules. With the use of 3 different cellular contexts, 2 monocytic cell lines, U937 and THP1, and peripheral blood monocytes, we show here a remarkable increase of HLA-E during monocyte-macrophage differentiation. This goes independently from the classical HLA-class I, the main source of HLA-E-specific peptides, which is found strongly up-regulated upon differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes but not at all in the case of U937 and THP1 cell lines. Although in all cases, there was a moderate increase of HLA-E expressed in the cell surface, lysis by natural killer cells is comparably restored by an anti-NKG2A antibody in untreated as well as in PMA-differentiated U937 cells. Instead, the great majority of the HLA-E is retained in the vesicles of the autophagy-lysosome network, where they colocalize with the microtubule-associated protein light chain 3, as well as with the lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1. We conclude that differently from the classical HLA-class I molecules, the primary destination of the newly synthesized HLA-E molecules in macrophages is, rather than the cell membrane, the intracellular autophagy-lysosomal vesicles where they are stored and where they can encounter the exogenous antigens. PMID:26310830

  6. Endoglin regulates cyclooxygenase-2 expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Jerkic, Mirjana; Rivas-Elena, Juan V; Santibanez, Juan F; Prieto, Marta; Rodríguez-Barbero, Alicia; Perez-Barriocanal, Fernando; Pericacho, Miguel; Arévalo, Miguel; Vary, Calvin P H; Letarte, Michelle; Bernabeu, Carmelo; López-Novoa, Jose M

    2006-08-01

    The endoglin heterozygous (Eng(+/-)) mouse, which serves as a model of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), was shown to express reduced levels of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) with impaired activity. Because of intricate changes in vasomotor function in the Eng(+/-) mice and the potential interactions between the NO- and prostaglandin-producing pathways, we assessed the expression and function of cyclooxygenase (COX) isoforms. A specific upregulation of COX-2 in the vascular endothelium and increased urinary excretion of prostaglandin E(2) were observed in the Eng(+/-) mice. Specific COX-2 inhibition with parecoxib transiently increased arterial pressure in Eng(+/-) but not in Eng(+/+) mice. Transfection of endoglin in L6E9 myoblasts, shown previously to stimulate eNOS expression, led to downregulation of COX-2 with no change in COX-1. In addition, COX-2 promoter activity and protein levels were inversely correlated with endoglin levels, in doxycyclin-inducible endothelial cells. Chronic NO synthesis inhibition with N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester induced a marked increase in COX-2 only in the normal Eng(+/+) mice. N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester also increased COX-2 expression and promoter activity in doxycyclin-inducible endoglin expressing endothelial cells, but not in control cells. The level of COX-2 expression following transforming growth factor-beta1 treatment was less in endoglin than in mock transfected L6E9 myoblasts and was higher in human endothelial cells silenced for endoglin expression. Our results indicate that endoglin is involved in the regulation of COX-2 activity. Furthermore, reduced endoglin levels and associated impaired NO production may be responsible, at least in part, for augmented COX-2 expression and activity in the Eng(+/-) mice. PMID:16840721

  7. MicroRNA-221 controls expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in epithelial cells in response to Cryptosporidium parvum infection

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ai-Yu; Hu, Guoku; Zhou, Rui; Liu, Jun; Feng, Yaoyu; Soukup, Garrett A.; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite that infects gastrointestinal epithelial cells and causes diarrheal disease in humans and animals globally. Pathological changes following C. parvum infection include crypt hyperplasia, a modest inflammatory reaction with increased infiltration of lymphocytes into intestinal mucosa. Expression of adhesion molecules such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), on infected epithelial cell surfaces may facilitate adhesion and recognition of lymphocytes at infection sites. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules of 23 nucleotides that negatively regulate protein-coding gene expression via translational suppression or mRNA degradation. We recently reported that microRNA-221 (miR-221) regulates ICAM-1 translation through targeting the ICAM-1 3′-untranslated region (UTR). In this study, we tested the role of miR-221 in regulating ICAM-1 expression in epithelial cells in response to C. parvum infection using an in vitro model of human biliary cryptosporidiosis. Up-regulation of ICAM-1 at both message and protein levels was detected in epithelial cells following C. parvum infection. Inhibition of ICAM-1 transcription with actinomycin D could only partially block C. parvum-induced ICAM-1 expression at the protein level. Cryptosporidium parvum infection decreased miR-221 expression in infected epithelial cells. When cells were transfected with a luciferase reporter construct covering the miR-221 binding site in the ICAM-1 3′-UTR and then exposed to C. parvum, an enhanced luciferase activity was detected. Transfection of miR-221 precursor abolished C. parvum-stimulated ICAM-1 protein expression. In addition, expression of ICAM-1 on infected epithelial cells facilitated epithelial adherence of co-cultured Jurkat cells. These results indicate that miR-221-mediated translational suppression controls ICAM-1 expression in epithelial cells in response to C. parvum infection. PMID:21236259

  8. Sox2: regulation of expression and contribution to brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Sheila; Nejad, Romina; Karabork, Merve; Ekinci, Can; Solaroglu, Ihsan; Aldape, Kenneth D; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2016-07-01

    Tumors of the CNS are composed of a complex mixture of neoplastic cells, in addition to vascular, inflammatory and stromal components. Similar to most other tumors, brain tumors contain a heterogeneous population of cells that are found at different stages of differentiation. The cancer stem cell hypothesis suggests that all tumors are composed of subpopulation of cells with stem-like properties, which are capable of self-renewal, display resistance to therapy and lead to tumor recurrence. One of the most important transcription factors that regulate cancer stem cell properties is SOX2. In this review, we focus on SOX2 and the complex network of signaling molecules and transcription factors that regulate its expression and function in brain tumor initiating cells. We also highlight important findings in the literature about the role of SOX2 in glioblastoma and medulloblastoma, where it has been more extensively studied. PMID:27230973

  9. Orthodenticle Is Required for the Expression of Principal Recognition Molecules That Control Axon Targeting in the Drosophila Retina.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Chiara; Pichaud, Franck

    2015-06-01

    Parallel processing of neuronal inputs relies on assembling neural circuits into distinct synaptic-columns and layers. This is orchestrated by matching recognition molecules between afferent growth cones and target areas. Controlling the expression of these molecules during development is crucial but not well understood. The developing Drosophila visual system is a powerful genetic model for addressing this question. In this model system, the achromatic R1-6 photoreceptors project their axons in the lamina while the R7 and R8 photoreceptors, which are involved in colour detection, project their axons to two distinct synaptic-layers in the medulla. Here we show that the conserved homeodomain transcription factor Orthodenticle (Otd), which in the eye is a main regulator of rhodopsin expression, is also required for R1-6 photoreceptor synaptic-column specific innervation of the lamina. Our data indicate that otd function in these photoreceptors is largely mediated by the recognition molecules flamingo (fmi) and golden goal (gogo). In addition, we find that otd regulates synaptic-layer targeting of R8. We demonstrate that during this process, otd and the R8-specific transcription factor senseless/Gfi1 (sens) function as independent transcriptional inputs that are required for the expression of fmi, gogo and the adhesion molecule capricious (caps), which govern R8 synaptic-layer targeting. Our work therefore demonstrates that otd is a main component of the gene regulatory network that regulates synaptic-column and layer targeting in the fly visual system. PMID:26114289

  10. Regulation of hyaluronan expression during cervical ripening.

    PubMed

    Straach, Kelly J; Shelton, John M; Richardson, James A; Hascall, Vincent C; Mahendroo, Mala S

    2005-01-01

    In preparation for birth, the uterine cervix undergoes a remarkable transformation from a closed, rigid structure to a distensible, remodeled configuration that stretches to allow passage of a fetus. Cervical ripening requires changes in the composition and structure of the extracellular matrix. These include an increase in the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) prior to parturition. We show that the increase in cervical HA with advancing gestation correlates with the temporal increase in transcription of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2) in the mouse. On gestation day 18, 1 day prior to birth, HAS2 transcripts are most abundant and begin to decline after birth. The steroid 5alpha-reductase type 1 deficient mouse, which fails to undergo cervical remodeling, has decreased expression of HAS2 mRNA and decreased tissue HA. HAS2 transcripts are expressed by cervical epithelium, and HA is localized to the matrix surrounding the stroma and to a lesser extent around the epithelium. HAS2 expression is suppressed in mice treated with progesterone. The mRNA expression levels of HA metabolizing enzymes hyaluronidase 1 and 2 were unchanged during pregnancy but increased after birth. Thus the net increase in HA content at term correlates with increased transcription of HAS2. Regulation of HA content is conserved in women because HAS2 transcripts are up-regulated in cervices of women in labor as compared to pregnant women not in labor. These results provide insights into the regulation of HA biosynthesis during cervical ripening and underscore the physiological role of HA in this essential process. PMID:15317739

  11. Arsenite enhances tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, T.-C. . E-mail: tctsou@nhri.org.tw; Yeh, Szu Ching; Tsai, E.-M.; Tsai, F.-Y.; Chao, H.-R.; Chang, Louis W.

    2005-11-15

    Epidemiological studies demonstrated a high association of vascular diseases with arsenite exposure. We hypothesize that arsenite potentiates the effect of proinflammatory cytokines on vascular endothelial cells, and hence contributes to atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of arsenite and its induction of glutathione (GSH) on vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) protein expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in response to tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), a typical proinflammatory cytokine. Our study demonstrated that arsenite pretreatment potentiated the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression with up-regulations of both activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). To elucidate the role of GSH in regulation of AP-1, NF-{kappa}B, and VCAM-1 expression, we employed L-buthionine (S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), a specific {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}-GCS) inhibitor, to block intracellular GSH synthesis. Our investigation revealed that, by depleting GSH, arsenite attenuated the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression as well as a potentiation of AP-1 and an attenuation of NF-{kappa}B activations by TNF-{alpha}. Moreover, we found that depletion of GSH would also attenuate the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression with a down-regulation of the TNF-{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activation and without significant effect on AP-1. On the other hand, the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression could be completely abolished by inhibition of AP-1 or NF-{kappa}B activity, suggesting that activation of both AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B was necessary for VCAM-1 expression. In summary, we demonstrate that arsenite enhances the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression in HUVECs via regulation of AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B activities in a GSH-sensitive manner. Our present study suggested a potential mechanism for arsenite in the induction of vascular inflammation and vascular diseases via modulating the actions

  12. A small-molecule inducer of PDX1 expression identified by high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yuan; Hartland, Kate; Boskovic, Zarko; Wang, Yikai; Walpita, Deepika; Lysy, Philippe A.; Zhong, Cheng; Young, Damian W.; Kim, Young-kwon; Tolliday, Nicola J; Sokal, Etienne M.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Wagner, Bridget K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1), a member of the homedomain-containing transcription factor family, is a key transcription factor important for both pancreas development and mature beta-cell function. The ectopic overexpression of Pdx1, Neurog3, and MafA in mice reprograms acinar cells to insulin-producing cells. We developed a qPCR-based gene-expression assay to screen >60,000 compounds for expression of each of these genes in the human PANC-1 ductal carcinoma cell line. We identified BRD7552, which up-regulated PDX expression in both primary human islets and ductal cells, and induced epigenetic changes in the PDX1 promoter consistent with transcriptional activation. Prolonged compound treatment induced insulin mRNA and protein, and enhanced insulin expression induced by the three-gene combination. These results provide a proof of principle for identifying small molecules that induce expression of transcription factors to control cellular reprogramming. PMID:24290880

  13. Glucocorticoid-regulated gene expression during cutaneous wound repair.

    PubMed

    Beer, H D; Fässler, R; Werner, S

    2000-01-01

    Glucocorticoids exert a deleterious effect on the wound healing process, which has been suggested to result from the anti-inflammatory action of these steroids. In addition, recent studies have demonstrated that glucocorticoids regulate the expression of various genes at the wound site which are likely to encode key players in the wound repair process. Using a murine full-thickness excisional wound healing model, we analyzed the effect of dexamethasone on the expression of various cytokines, growth factors, enzymes, and extracellular matrix molecules in normal and wounded skin. We demonstrate that the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 alpha and -beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, keratinocyte growth factor, transforming growth factors beta 1, beta 2, and beta 3 and their receptors, platelet-derived growth factors and their receptors, tenascin-C, stromelysin-2, macrophage metalloelastase, and enzymes involved in the generation of nitric oxide are targets of glucocorticoid action in wounded skin. These results indicate that anti-inflammatory steroids inhibit wound repair at least in part by influencing the expression of these key regulatory molecules. PMID:10714241

  14. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    SciTech Connect

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  15. Chemical materials and their regulation of the movement of molecules.

    PubMed

    Langer, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Materials chemistry has been fundamental to the enormous field that encompasses the delivery of molecules both to desired sites and/or at desired rates and durations. The field encompasses the delivery of molecules including fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, food ingredients, fragrances and biopharmaceuticals. A personal perspective is provided on our early work in this field that has enabled the controlled release of ionic substances and macromolecules. Also discussed are new paradigms in creating biomaterials for human use, the non-invasive delivery of molecules through the skin and lungs, the development of intelligent delivery systems and extensions to nanomedicine. With the advent of potentially newer biopharmaceutics such as siRNA, mRNA and gene editing approaches and their use being limited by delivery, future research in this field may be more critical than ever before. PMID:26537401

  16. Regulation of Aicda expression and AID activity.

    PubMed

    Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is expressed in a B cell differentiation stage-specific fashion and is essential for immunoglobulin (Ig) gene class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). CSR and SHM play a central role in the maturation of antibody and autoantibody responses. AID displays a mutagenic activity by catalyzing targeted deamination of deoxycytidine (dC) residues in DNA resulting in dU:dG mismatches, which are processed into point-mutations in SHM or double-strand breaks (DSBs) in CSR. Although AID specifically targets the Ig gene loci (IgH, Igκ and Igλ), it can also home into a wide array of non-Ig genes in B-and non-B-cell backgrounds. Aberrant expression of AID is associated with multiple diseases such as allergy, inflammation, autoimmunity and cancer. In autoimmune systemic lupus erythematosus, dysregulated AID expression underpins increased CSR, SHM and autoantibody production. As a potent mutator, AID is under stringent transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation. AID is also regulated in its targeting and enzymatic function. In resting naïve or memory B cells, AID transcripts and protein are undetectable. These, however, are readily and significantly up-regulated in B cells induced to undergo CSR and/or SHM. Transcription factors, such as HoxC4 and NF-κB, which are up-regulated in a B cell lineage-and/or differentiation stage-specific manner, regulate the induction of AID. HoxC4 induces AID expression by directly binding to the AID gene promoter through an evolutionarily conserved 5'-ATTT-3' motif. HoxC4 is induced by the same stimuli that induce AID and CSR. It is further up-regulated by estrogen through three estrogen responsive elements in its promoter region. The targeting of AID to switch (S) regions is mediated by 14-3-3 adaptor proteins, which specifically bind to 5'-AGCT-3' repeats that are exist at high frequency in S region cores. Like HoxC4, 14-3-3 adaptors are induced

  17. Effect of Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Expression on Intracellular Granule Movement in Pancreatic α Cells.

    PubMed

    Yokawa, Satoru; Furuno, Tadahide; Suzuki, Takahiro; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Ryo; Hirashima, Naohide

    2016-09-01

    Although glucagon secreted from pancreatic α cells plays a role in increasing glucose concentrations in serum, the mechanism regulating glucagon secretion from α cells remains unclear. Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), identified as an adhesion molecule in α cells, has been reported not only to communicate among α cells and between nerve fibers, but also to prevent excessive glucagon secretion from α cells. Here, we investigated the effect of CADM1 expression on the movement of intracellular secretory granules in α cells because the granule transport is an important step in secretion. Spinning disk microscopic analysis showed that granules moved at a mean velocity of 0.236 ± 0.010 μm/s in the mouse α cell line αTC6 that expressed CADM1 endogenously. The mean velocity was significantly decreased in CADM1-knockdown (KD) cells (mean velocity: 0.190 ± 0.016 μm/s). The velocity of granule movement decreased greatly in αTC6 cells treated with the microtubule-depolymerizing reagent nocodazole, but not in αTC6 cells treated with the actin-depolymerizing reagent cytochalasin D. No difference in the mean velocity was observed between αTC6 and CADM1-KD cells treated with nocodazole. These results suggest that intracellular granules in pancreatic α cells move along the microtubule network, and that CADM1 influences their velocity. PMID:27262873

  18. Design, expression and characterization of a novel coexpression system of two antiarthritic molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Fang; Yan, Jinqi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wang, Yu; Jiang, Yunbo; Wang, Lin; Xu, Yuanji; Yu, Jiyun

    2013-07-01

    The complexity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis makes combined blockade of multiple targets an attractive therapeutic strategy. The combination therapy with anti-TNF plus anti-T-cell has been mostly reported to provide greater efficacy than anti-TNF alone. TNFR (p75)-Fc fusion protein, which has been proven effective in clinics, is chosen as the TNF antagonist in this study. CTLA4-FasL fusion molecule, which has been well characterized in our previous studies for its suppressive effect in rat arthritis model, is chosen as the T-cell antagonist. In this study, furin cleavage site and 2A self-processing sequence were introduced to link upstream TNFR-Fc and downstream CTLA4-FasL and mediate separate coexpression of the two fusion proteins in a single recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector. Using this expression system, we generated two fusion proteins with same size as their individual counterparts in vitro and in vivo, and the proteins desirably retained their parent biological activities. In vivo results demonstrated that furin-2A technology is able to regulate separate coexpression of these proteins under arthritic inflammatory conditions. This study describes a single rAAV vector for production of two antiarthritic molecules antagonizing both TNF and T cells, which may serve as an attractive expression system for RA gene therapy. PMID:23463251

  19. Vitamin H-regulated transgene expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Weber, Wilfried; Bacchus, William; Daoud-El Baba, Marie; Fussenegger, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Although adjustable transgene expression systems are considered essential for future therapeutic and biopharmaceutical manufacturing applications, the currently available transcription control modalities all require side-effect-prone inducers such as immunosupressants, hormones and antibiotics for fine-tuning. We have designed a novel mammalian transcription-control system, which is reversibly fine-tuned by non-toxic vitamin H (also referred to as biotin). Ligation of vitamin H, by engineered Escherichia coli biotin ligase (BirA), to a synthetic biotinylation signal fused to the tetracycline-dependent transactivator (tTA), enables heterodimerization of tTA to a streptavidin-linked transrepressor domain (KRAB), thereby abolishing tTA-mediated transactivation of specific target promoters. As heterodimerization of tTA to KRAB is ultimately conditional upon the presence of vitamin H, the system is vitamin H responsive. Transgenic Chinese hamster ovary cells, engineered for vitamin H-responsive gene expression, showed high-level, adjustable and reversible production of a human model glycoprotein in bench-scale culture systems, bioreactor-based biopharmaceutical manufacturing scenarios, and after implantation into mice. The vitamin H-responsive expression systems showed unique band pass filter-like regulation features characterized by high-level expression at low (0-2 nM biotin), maximum repression at intermediate (100-1000 nM biotin), and high-level expression at increased (>100 000 nM biotin) biotin concentrations. Sequential ON-to-OFF-to-ON, ON-to-OFF and OFF-to-ON expression profiles with graded expression transitions can all be achieved by simply increasing the level of a single inducer molecule without exchanging the culture medium. These novel expression characteristics mediated by an FDA-licensed inducer may foster advances in therapeutic cell engineering and manufacturing of difficult-to-produce protein therapeutics. PMID:17827215

  20. EGR-1 regulates Ho-1 expression induced by cigarette smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huaqun; Wang, Lijuan; Gong, Tao; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Chunhua; Li, Fen; Wang, Li; Li, Chaojun

    2010-05-28

    As an anti-oxidant molecule, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been implicated in the protection of lung injury by cigarette smoke (CS). The mechanisms regulating its expression have not been defined. In this report, the role of early growth response 1 (EGR-1) in the regulation of Ho-1 expression was investigated. In C57BL/6 mice with CS exposure, HO-1 was greatly increased in bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar inflammatory cells. In primary cultured mouse lung fibroblasts and RAW264.7 cells exposed to cigarette smoke water extract (CSE), an increase in HO-1 protein level was detected. In addition, CSE induced HO-1 expression was decreased in Egr-1 deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (Egr-1{sup -/-} MEFs). Nuclear localization of EGR-1 was examined in mouse lung fibroblasts after exposure to CSE. Luciferase reporter activity assays showed that the enhancer region of the Ho-1 gene containing a proposed EGR-1 binding site was responsible for the induction of HO-1. A higher increase of alveolar mean linear intercept (Lm) was observed in lung tissues, and a larger increase in the number of total cells and monocytes/macrophages from bronchial alveolar lavage fluid was found in CS-exposed mice by loss of function of EGR-1 treatment. In summary, the present data demonstrate that EGR-1 plays a critical role in HO-1 production induced by CS.

  1. Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) regulates polarized neutrophil transendothelial cell migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Woodfin, Abigail; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Beyrau, Martina; Colom, Bartomeu; Caille, Dorothée; Diapouli, Frantzeska-Maria; Nash, Gerard B; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Albelda, Steven M.; Rainger, G Ed; Meda, Paolo; Imhof, Beat A.; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2011-01-01

    Neutrophil migration into inflamed tissues is a fundamental component of innate immunity. A decisive step in this process is the polarised migration of blood neutrophils through endothelial cells (ECs) lining the venular lumen (transendothelial cell migration; TEM) in a luminal to abluminal direction. Using real-time confocal imaging we report that neutrophils can exhibit disrupted polarised TEM (“hesitant” and “reverse”) in vivo. These events were noted in inflammation following ischemia-reperfusion injury, characterised by reduced expression of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) from EC junctions, and were enhanced by EC JAM-C blockade or genetic deletion. The results identify JAM-C as a key regulator of polarised neutrophil TEM in vivo and suggest that reverse TEM neutrophils can contribute to dissemination of systemic inflammation. PMID:21706006

  2. Effect of insoluble extracellular matrix molecules on Fas expression in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fine, A; Miranda, K; Farmer, S R; Anderson, N L

    1998-03-01

    Fas, which functions to initiate a signal causing apoptosis, is expressed in epithelia, thus, suggesting a role in controlling cell number during states of cell and matrix turnover. In view of this, we hypothesized that cell-matrix interactions may be an important determinant of Fas expression in epithelial cells. To investigate this, we examined the effect of insoluble extracellular matrix molecules on Fas expression in murine lung epithelial (MLE) cells, a transformed mouse lung epithelial cell line. We report that 1) insoluble extracellular matrices increased Fas mRNA in a time and concentration-dependent manner; 2) induced increases in Fas mRNA were associated with concomitantly increased Fas protein; and 3) nonspecific adherence to a polylysine substrate did not induce Fas mRNA. Consistent with these findings, Fas-induced apoptosis was significantly enhanced in cultures plated on type IV collagen. Employing rat hepatocytes, we confirmed that the insoluble extracellular matrix also increases Fas expression in primary epithelial cells. By amplifying Fas-mediated apoptosis, these data suggest a mechanism whereby the extracellular matrix regulates the fate of specific epithelial cell populations. PMID:9462690

  3. Abrogation of Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A Expression Induces Cell Apoptosis and Reduces Breast Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Masato; Giampietro, Costanza; Giannotta, Monica; Corada, Monica; Torselli, Ilaria; Orsenigo, Fabrizio; Cocito, Andrea; d'Ario, Giovanni; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Confalonieri, Stefano; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Dejana, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Intercellular junctions promote homotypic cell to cell adhesion and transfer intracellular signals which control cell growth and apoptosis. Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is a transmembrane immunoglobulin located at tight junctions of normal epithelial cells of mammary ducts and glands. In the present paper we show that JAM-A acts as a survival factor for mammary carcinoma cells. JAM-A null mice expressing Polyoma Middle T under MMTV promoter develop significantly smaller mammary tumors than JAM-A positive mice. Angiogenesis and inflammatory or immune infiltrate were not statistically modified in absence of JAM-A but tumor cell apoptosis was significantly increased. Tumor cells isolated from JAM-A null mice or 4T1 cells incubated with JAM-A blocking antibodies showed reduced growth and increased apoptosis which paralleled altered junctional architecture and adhesive function. In a breast cancer clinical data set, tissue microarray data show that JAM-A expression correlates with poor prognosis. Gene expression analysis of mouse tumor samples showed a correlation between genes enriched in human G3 tumors and genes over expressed in JAM-A +/+ mammary tumors. Conversely, genes enriched in G1 human tumors correlate with genes overexpressed in JAM-A−/− tumors. We conclude that down regulation of JAM-A reduces tumor aggressive behavior by increasing cell susceptibility to apoptosis. JAM-A may be considered a negative prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:21695058

  4. Expression of neural cell adhesion molecule in normal and neoplastic human neuroendocrine tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Hemperly, J. J.; Lloyd, R. V.

    1991-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) is a group of cell surface glycoproteins involved in direct cell--cell adhesion. N-CAM expression in normal and neoplastic tissues was examined with specific antibodies and oligonucleotide probes by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Most neuroendocrine cells and tumors with secretory granules expressed N-CAM protein and mRNA. Parathyroid adenomas (4) were somewhat unusual, because N-CAM mRNA, but not protein, was detected in some of these benign neoplasms. Most non-neuroendocrine cells and tumors did not express N-CAM, although uterine smooth muscle and an adrenal cortical carcinoma were both positive. Western blots disclosed proteins of 180, 140, and 120 kd in normal adult brain, whereas two pheochromocytomas, a null cell adenoma, and a gastrinoma had proteins of approximately 180 and 140 kd. These results indicate that N-CAM protein and mRNA are widely expressed in neuroendocrine cells and neoplasms. N-CAM oligonucleotide probes as well as antibodies against N-CAM can be used as broad-spectrum neuroendocrine markers. In addition, these molecular probes can be used to examine the role of N-CAM in the development and regulation of neuroendocrine tissues. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2012179

  5. Regulation of gene expression by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Millhorn, D E; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M; Bayliss, D A; Lawson, E E

    1993-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine if gene expression for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of catecholamines, is regulated in the carotid body, sympathetic ganglia and adrenal medulla by hypoxia. We found that a reduction in oxygen tension from 21% to 10% caused a substantial increase (200% at 1 hour and 500% at 6 hours exposure) in the concentration of TH mRNA in carotid body type I cells but not in either the sympathetic ganglia or adrenal gland. In addition, we found that hypercapnia, another natural stimulus of carotid body activity, failed to enhance TH mRNA in type I cells. Removal of the sensory and sympathetic innervation of the carotid body failed to prevent the induction of TH mRNA by hypoxia in type I cells. Our results show that TH gene expression is regulated by hypoxia in the carotid body but not in other peripheral catecholamine synthesizing tissue and that the regulatory mechanism is intrinsic to type I cells. PMID:7909954

  6. CD5 expression by B lymphocytes and its regulation upon Epstein–Barr virus transformation

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, David; Smith, Dawn; Meyerson, Howard; Pecora, Nicole; Lewandowska, Kristine

    2001-01-01

    Dim expression of CD5 on human B lymphocytes has been used to delineate B1 and B2 subsets. Nevertheless, others have suggested that the molecule is an activation marker and does not predicate a subset distinction. We have used enzymatic amplification staining, a technology that enhances the resolution of flow cytometric analysis of cell surface molecules by as much as 100-fold, to determine that essentially all human B cells express CD5. Furthermore, we show that this expression is regulated during Epstein–Barr virus transformation. PMID:11707593

  7. Organ-selective regulation of vascular adhesion protein-1 expression in man.

    PubMed

    Arvilommi, A M; Salmi, M; Jalkanen, S

    1997-07-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an endothelial molecule which mediates lymphocyte binding to endothelium in peripheral lymph nodes and at certain sites of inflammation. The expression of VAP-1 in vivo is strongly up-regulated in inflamed tissues, such as gut and skin. The purpose of this work was to examine the factors responsible for this induction of VAP-1. Since the expression of VAP-1 could not be induced in cultured endothelial cells with a large panel of mediators, we used an organ culture technique for the investigation of the regulation of VAP-1 expression in a more physiological micromilieu. Indeed, we found that the expression of endothelial VAP-1 could be up-regulated in human tonsillar tissue with interleukin (IL)-1, IL-4, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), interferon (IFN)-gamma and lipopolysaccharide, whereas histamine, thrombin, dibutyryl cAMP, N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) had no effect. The induced VAP-1 protein was similar in molecular weight to the non-induced VAP-1, suggesting that VAP-1 synthesized de novo carries appropriate carbohydrate moieties. In contrast to tonsil organ culture, similar inductions performed with human appendix showed no up-regulation of VAP-1 expression, indicating that the regulation of VAP-1 expression exhibits organ-selective characteristics. Furthermore, in these tissues the smooth muscle cells, which constitutively express VAP-1, could not be stimulated to alter their level of expression of this molecule. In conclusion, the expression of VAP-1 can be markedly up-regulated with several mediators in tonsil but not in appendix organ culture, whereas cultured endothelial cells cannot be induced to express VAP-1. These results indicate that the expression of VAP-1 is regulated in a tissue- and cell type-selective manner, and a correct micromilieu is required for the up-regulation to occur. PMID:9247594

  8. Regulation of Airway Mucin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Philip; Loukoianov, Artem; Wachi, Shinichiro; Wu, Reen

    2015-01-01

    Mucins are important components that exert a variety of functions in cell-cell interaction, epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, and airways protection. In the conducting airways of the lungs, mucins are the major contributor to the viscoelastic property of mucous secretion, which is the major barrier to trapping inhaled microbial organism, particulates, and oxidative pollutants. The homeostasis of mucin production is an important feature in conducting airways for the maintenance of mucociliary function. Aberrant mucin secretion and accumulation in airway lumen are clinical hallmarks associated with various lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, emphysema, and lung cancer. Among 20 known mucin genes identified, 11 of them have been verified at either the mRNA and/or protein level in airways. The regulation of mucin genes is complicated, as are the mediators and signaling pathways. This review summarizes the current view on the mediators, the signaling pathways, and the transcriptional units that are involved in the regulation of airway mucin gene expression. In addition, we also point out essential features of epigenetic mechanisms for the regulation of these genes. PMID:17961085

  9. Redox regulation of photosynthetic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Queval, Guillaume; Foyer, Christine H.

    2012-01-01

    Redox chemistry and redox regulation are central to the operation of photosynthesis and respiration. However, the roles of different oxidants and antioxidants in the regulation of photosynthetic or respiratory gene expression remain poorly understood. Leaf transcriptome profiles of a range of Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes that are deficient in either hydrogen peroxide processing enzymes or in low molecular weight antioxidant were therefore compared to determine how different antioxidant systems that process hydrogen peroxide influence transcripts encoding proteins targeted to the chloroplasts or mitochondria. Less than 10 per cent overlap was observed in the transcriptome patterns of leaves that are deficient in either photorespiratory (catalase (cat)2) or chloroplastic (thylakoid ascorbate peroxidase (tapx)) hydrogen peroxide processing. Transcripts encoding photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle components were lower in glutathione-deficient leaves, as were the thylakoid NAD(P)H (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate)) dehydrogenases (NDH) mRNAs. Some thylakoid NDH mRNAs were also less abundant in tAPX-deficient and ascorbate-deficient leaves. Transcripts encoding the external and internal respiratory NDHs were increased by low glutathione and low ascorbate. Regulation of transcripts encoding specific components of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains by hydrogen peroxide, ascorbate and glutathione may serve to balance non-cyclic and cyclic electron flow pathways in relation to oxidant production and reductant availability. PMID:23148274

  10. The Neuroplastin adhesion molecules: key regulators of neuronal plasticity and synaptic function.

    PubMed

    Beesley, Philip W; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Smalla, Karl-Heinz; Seidenbecher, Constanze

    2014-11-01

    The Neuroplastins Np65 and Np55 are neuronal and synapse-enriched immunoglobulin superfamily molecules that play important roles in a number of key neuronal and synaptic functions including, for Np65, cell adhesion. In this review we focus on the physiological roles of the Neuroplastins in promoting neurite outgrowth, regulating the structure and function of both inhibitory and excitatory synapses in brain, and in neuronal and synaptic plasticity. We discuss the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms by which the Neuroplastins exert their physiological effects and how these are dependent upon the structural features of Np65 and Np55, which enable them to bind to a diverse range of protein partners. In turn this enables the Neuroplastins to interact with a number of key neuronal signalling cascades. These include: binding to and activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor; Np65 trans-homophilic binding leading to activation of p38 MAPK and internalization of glutamate (GluR1) receptor subunits; acting as accessory proteins for monocarboxylate transporters, thus affecting neuronal energy supply, and binding to GABAA α1, 2 and 5 subunits, thus regulating the composition and localization of GABAA receptors. An emerging theme is the role of the Neuroplastins in regulating the trafficking and subcellular localization of specific binding partners. We also discuss the involvement of Neuroplastins in a number of pathophysiological conditions, including ischaemia, schizophrenia and breast cancer and the role of a single nucleotide polymorphism in the human Neuroplastin (NPTN) gene locus in impairment of cortical development and cognitive functions. Neuroplastins are neuronal cell adhesion molecules, which induce neurite outgrowth and play important roles in synaptic maturation and plasticity. This review summarizes the functional implications of Neuroplastins for correct synaptic membrane protein localization, neuronal energy supply, expression of LTP and LTD

  11. Members of the thrombospondin gene family bind stromal interaction molecule 1 and regulate calcium channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Duquette, Mark; Nadler, Monica; Okuhara, Dayne; Thompson, Jill; Shuttleworth, Trevor; Lawler, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The thrombospondins (TSPs) are a family of matricellular proteins that regulate cellular phenotype through interactions with a myriad of other proteins and proteoglycans. We have identified a novel interaction of the members of the TSP gene family with stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1). This association is robust since it is preserved in Triton X-100, can be detected with multiple anti-TSP-1 and anti-STIM1 antibodies, and is detected in a wide range of cell types. We have also found that STIM1 co-immunoprecipitates with TSP-4 and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), and that a recombinant version of the N-terminal domain of STIM1 binds to the signature domain of TSP-1 and COMP. The association of the TSPs with STIM1 is observed in both the presence and absence of calcium indicating that the calcium-dependent conformation of the signature domain of TSPs is not required for binding. Thus, this interaction could occur in the ER under conditions of normal or low calcium concentration. Furthermore, we observed that the expression of COMP in HEK 293 cells decreases STIM1-mediated calcium release activated calcium (CRAC) channel currents and increases arachidonic acid calcium (ARC) channel currents. These data indicate that the TSPs regulate STIM1 function and participate in the reciprocal regulation of two channels that mediate calcium entry into the cell. PMID:24845346

  12. Anti-interleukin-33 Reduces Ovalbumin-Induced Nephrotoxicity and Expression of Kidney Injury Molecule-1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of anti-interleukin-33 (anti-IL-33) on a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods: Twenty-four female BALB/c mice were assigned to 4 groups: group A (control, n=6) was administered sterile saline intraperitoneally (i.p.) and intranasally (i.n.); group B (allergic, n=6) was administered i.p./i.n. OVA challenge; group C (null treatment, n=6) was administered control IgG i.p. before OVA challenge; and group D (anti-IL-33, n=6) was pretreated with 3.6 µg of anti-IL-33 i.p. before every OVA challenge. The following were evaluated after sacrifice: serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels, Kidney injury molecule-1 gene (Kim-1) and protein (KIM-1) expression in renal parenchyma, and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), phosphorylated endothelial NOS (p-eNOS), and phosphorylated AMP kinase (p-AMPK) proteins in renal parenchyma. Results: After OVA injection and intranasal challenge, mice in groups B and C showed significant increases in the expression of Kim-1 at both the mRNA and protein levels. After anti-IL-33 treatment, mice in group D showed significant Kim-1 down-regulation at the mRNA and protein levels. Group D also showed significantly lower COX-2 protein expression, marginally lesser iNOS expression than groups B and C, and p-eNOS and p-AMPK expression at baseline levels. Conclusions: Kim-1 could be a useful marker for detecting early-stage renal injury in mouse models of OVA-induced AKI. Further, anti-IL-33 might have beneficial effects on these mouse models. PMID:27377943

  13. Biochemical and toxicological evaluation of nano-heparins in cell functional properties, proteasome activation and expression of key matrix molecules.

    PubMed

    Piperigkou, Zoi; Karamanou, Konstantina; Afratis, Nikolaos A; Bouris, Panagiotis; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Belmiro, Celso L R; Pavão, Mauro S G; Vynios, Dimitrios H; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2016-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycan heparin and its derivatives act strongly on blood coagulation, controlling the activity of serine protease inhibitors in plasma. Nonetheless, there is accumulating evidence highlighting different anticancer activities of these molecules in numerous types of cancer. Nano-heparins may have great biological significance since they can inhibit cell proliferation and invasion as well as inhibiting proteasome activation. Moreover, they can cause alterations in the expression of major modulators of the tumor microenvironment, regulating cancer cell behavior. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of two nano-heparin formulations: one isolated from porcine intestine and the other from the sea squirt Styela plicata, on a breast cancer cell model. We determined whether these nano-heparins are able to affect cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion, as well as proteasome activity and the expression of extracellular matrix molecules. Specifically, we observed that nano-Styela compared to nano-Mammalian analogue has higher inhibitory role on cell proliferation, invasion and proteasome activity. Moreover, nano-Styela regulates cell apoptosis, expression of inflammatory molecules, such as IL-6 and IL-8 and reduces the expression levels of extracellular matrix macromolecules, such as the proteolytic enzymes MT1-MMP, uPA and the cell surface proteoglycans syndecan-1 and -2, but not on syndecan-4. The observations reported in the present article indicate that nano-heparins and especially ascidian heparin are effective agents for heparin-induced effects in critical cancer cell functions, providing an important possibility in pharmacological targeting. PMID:26476401

  14. Up-regulation of Fas (CD95) and induction of apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells by nematode-derived molecules.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Akio; Uchikawa, Ryuichi; Matsuda, Shinji; Yamada, Minoru; Tegoshi, Tatsuya; Arizono, Naoki

    2002-08-01

    Infection by the intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis induces acceleration of apoptosis in the small intestinal villus epithelial cells in vivo. In the present study, we examined whether worm extract or excretory-secretory product induces apoptosis in the rat intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6 in vitro. In the presence of worm extract or excretory-secretory product (> or =6 microg/ml), IEC-6 cell growth was significantly suppressed, and there was a concomitant increase in the number of detached cells in culture dishes. Detached cells showed nuclear fragmentation, activation of caspase-3, and specific cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, suggesting that apoptosis was induced in these cells. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR showed that expression of Fas (CD95) mRNA was up-regulated as early as 6 h after addition of excretory-secretory product, while Fas ligand expression and p53 expression were not up-regulated. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analyses revealed a significant increase in Fas expression and a slight increase in FasL expression in IEC-6 cells cultured in the presence of excretory-secretory product, while control IEC-6 cells expressed neither Fas or FasL. These results indicated that N. brasiliensis worms produce and secrete biologically active molecules that trigger apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells together with up-regulation of Fas expression, although the mechanism of induction of apoptosis remains to be elucidated. PMID:12117905

  15. Regulation of interferon-gamma gene expression.

    PubMed

    Young, H A

    1996-08-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), also known as type II interferon, is an important immunoregulatory gene that has multiple effects on the development, maturation, and function of the immune system. IFN-gamma mRNA and protein are expressed predominantly by T cells and large granular lymphocytes. The IFN-gamma mRNA is induced/inhibited in these cell types by a wide variety of extracellular signals, thus implicating a number of diverse, yet convergent signal transduction pathways in its transcriptional control. In this review, I describe how DNA methylation and specific DNA binding proteins may regulate transcription of the IFN-gamma gene in response to extracellular signals. PMID:8877725

  16. Retrotransposons as regulators of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Elbarbary, Reyad A; Lucas, Bronwyn A; Maquat, Lynne E

    2016-02-12

    Transposable elements (TEs) are both a boon and a bane to eukaryotic organisms, depending on where they integrate into the genome and how their sequences function once integrated. We focus on two types of TEs: long interspersed elements (LINEs) and short interspersed elements (SINEs). LINEs and SINEs are retrotransposons; that is, they transpose via an RNA intermediate. We discuss how LINEs and SINEs have expanded in eukaryotic genomes and contribute to genome evolution. An emerging body of evidence indicates that LINEs and SINEs function to regulate gene expression by affecting chromatin structure, gene transcription, pre-mRNA processing, or aspects of mRNA metabolism. We also describe how adenosine-to-inosine editing influences SINE function and how ongoing retrotransposition is countered by the body's defense mechanisms. PMID:26912865

  17. Transglutaminase 2 expression in acute myeloid leukemia: Association with adhesion molecule expression and leukemic blast motility

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Stefan; Ravandi-Kashani, Farhad; Borthakur, Gautam; Coombes, Kevin R.; Zhang, Nianxiang; Kornblau, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogenous disease with differential oncogene association, outcome and treatment regimens. Treatment strategies for AML have improved outcome but despite increased molecular biological information AML is still associated with poor prognosis. Proteomic analysis on the effects of a range of leukemogenic oncogenes showed that the protein transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is expressed at greater levels as a consequence of oncogenic transformation. Further analysis of this observation was performed with 511 AML samples using reverse phase proteomic arrays, demonstrating that TG2 expression was higher at relapse than diagnosis in many cases. In addition elevated TG2 expression correlated with increased expression of numerous adhesion proteins and many apoptosis regulating proteins, two processes related to leukemogenesis. TG2 has previously been linked to drug resistance in cancer and given the negative correlation between TG2 levels and peripheral blasts observed increased TG2 levels may lead to the protection of the leukemic stem cell due to increased adhesion/reduced motility. TG2 may therefore form part of a network of proteins that define poor outcome in AML patients and potentially offer a target to sensitize AML stem cells to drug treatment. PMID:23576428

  18. Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis and Degradation of Murine Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule mEpCAM

    PubMed Central

    Hachmeister, Matthias; Bobowski, Karolina D.; Hogl, Sebastian; Dislich, Bastian; Fukumori, Akio; Eggert, Carola; Mack, Brigitte; Kremling, Heidi; Sarrach, Sannia; Coscia, Fabian; Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Steiner, Harald; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.; Gires, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule EpCAM is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is highly and frequently expressed in carcinomas and (cancer-)stem cells, and which plays an important role in the regulation of stem cell pluripotency. We show here that murine EpCAM (mEpCAM) is subject to regulated intramembrane proteolysis in various cells including embryonic stem cells and teratocarcinomas. As shown with ectopically expressed EpCAM variants, cleavages occur at α-, β-, γ-, and ε-sites to generate soluble ectodomains, soluble Aβ-like-, and intracellular fragments termed mEpEX, mEp-β, and mEpICD, respectively. Proteolytic sites in the extracellular part of mEpCAM were mapped using mass spectrometry and represent cleavages at the α- and β-sites by metalloproteases and the b-secretase BACE1, respectively. Resulting C-terminal fragments (CTF) are further processed to soluble Aβ-like fragments mEp-β and cytoplasmic mEpICD variants by the g-secretase complex. Noteworthy, cytoplasmic mEpICD fragments were subject to efficient degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner. In addition the γ-secretase complex dependent cleavage of EpCAM CTF liberates different EpICDs with different stabilities towards proteasomal degradation. Generation of CTF and EpICD fragments and the degradation of hEpICD via the proteasome were similarly demonstrated for the human EpCAM ortholog. Additional EpCAM orthologs have been unequivocally identified in silico in 52 species. Sequence comparisons across species disclosed highest homology of BACE1 cleavage sites and in presenilin-dependent γ-cleavage sites, whereas strongest heterogeneity was observed in metalloprotease cleavage sites. In summary, EpCAM is a highly conserved protein present in fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, marsupials, and placental mammals, and is subject to shedding, γ-secretase-dependent regulated intramembrane proteolysis, and proteasome-mediated degradation. PMID:24009667

  19. Unique expression, processing regulation, and regulatory network of peach (Prunus persica) miRNAs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous single-stranded small RNA molecules (sRNA) that are fundamental post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Many conserved plant miRNAs play important roles in plant growth and development, but more species-specific miRNAs remain to be identified and charact...

  20. Nitric oxide modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression via interleukin-10.

    PubMed

    Hebeda, C B; Teixeira, S A; Tamura, E K; Muscará, M N; de Mello, S B V; Markus, R P; Farsky, S H P

    2011-08-01

    We have shown previously that nitric oxide (NO) controls platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) expression on both neutrophils and endothelial cells under physiological conditions. Here, the molecular mechanism by which NO regulates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endothelial PECAM-1 expression and the role of interleukin (IL)-10 on this control was investigated. For this purpose, N-(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 20 mg/kg/day for 14 days dissolved in drinking water) was used to inhibit both constitutive (cNOS) and inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) synthase activities in LPS-stimulated Wistar rats (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). This treatment resulted in reduced levels of serum NO. Under this condition, circulating levels of IL-10 was enhanced, secreted mainly by circulating lymphocytes, dependent on transcriptional activation, and endothelial PECAM-1 expression was reduced independently on reduced gene synthesis. The connection between NO, IL-10 and PECAM-1 expression was examined by incubating LPS-stimulated (1 µg/ml) cultured endothelial cells obtained from naive rats with supernatant of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes, which were obtained from blood of control or L-NAME-treated rats. Supernatant of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes obtained from L-NAME-treated rats, which contained higher levels of IL-10, reduced LPS-induced PECAM-1 expression by endothelial cells, and this reduction was reversed by adding the anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody. Therefore, an association between NO, IL-10 and PECAM-1 was found and may represent a novel mechanism by which NO controls endothelial cell functions. PMID:21564091

  1. A single-molecule view of gene regulation in cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Single-cell analysis has revealed that transcription is dynamic and stochastic, but tools are lacking that can determine the mechanism operating at a single gene. Here we utilize single-molecule observations of RNA in fixed and living cells to develop a single-cell model of steroid-receptor mediated gene activation. Steroid receptors coordinate a diverse range of responses in higher eukaryotes and are involved in a wide range of human diseases, including cancer. Steroid receptor response elements are present throughout the human genome and modulate chromatin remodeling and transcription in both a local and long-range fashion. As such, steroid receptor-mediated transcription is a paradigm of genetic control in the metazoan nucleus. Moreover, the ligand-dependent nature of these transcription factors makes them appealing targets for therapeutic intervention, necessitating a quantitative understanding of how receptors control output from target genes. We determine that steroids drive mRNA synthesis by frequency modulation of transcription. This digital behavior in single cells gives rise to the well-known analog dose response across the population. To test this model, we developed a light-activation technology to turn on a single gene and follow dynamic synthesis of RNA from the activated locus. The response delay is a measure of time required for chromatin remodeling at a single gene.

  2. Small-molecule regulators that mimic transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, José A.; Peterson-Kaufman, Kimberly J.; Ansari, Aseem Z.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are responsible for decoding and expressing the information stored in the genome, which dictates cellular function. Creating artificial transcription factors (ATFs) that mimic endogenous TFs is a major goal at the interface of biology, chemistry, and molecular medicine. Such molecular tools will be essential for deciphering and manipulating transcriptional networks that lead to particular cellular states. In this minireview, the framework for the design of functional ATFs is presented and current challenges in the successful implementation of ATFs are discussed. PMID:20804876

  3. Reversible epigenetic down-regulation of MHC molecules by devil facial tumour disease illustrates immune escape by a contagious cancer.

    PubMed

    Siddle, Hannah V; Kreiss, Alexandre; Tovar, Cesar; Yuen, Chun Kit; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine; Swift, Kate; Pearse, Anne-Maree; Hamede, Rodrigo; Jones, Menna E; Skjødt, Karsten; Woods, Gregory M; Kaufman, Jim

    2013-03-26

    Contagious cancers that pass between individuals as an infectious cell line are highly unusual pathogens. Devil facial tumor disease (DFTD) is one such contagious cancer that emerged 16 y ago and is driving the Tasmanian devil to extinction. As both a pathogen and an allograft, DFTD cells should be rejected by the host-immune response, yet DFTD causes 100% mortality among infected devils with no apparent rejection of tumor cells. Why DFTD cells are not rejected has been a question of considerable confusion. Here, we show that DFTD cells do not express cell surface MHC molecules in vitro or in vivo, due to down-regulation of genes essential to the antigen-processing pathway, such as β2-microglobulin and transporters associated with antigen processing. Loss of gene expression is not due to structural mutations, but to regulatory changes including epigenetic deacetylation of histones. Consequently, MHC class I molecules can be restored to the surface of DFTD cells in vitro by using recombinant devil IFN-γ, which is associated with up-regulation of the MHC class II transactivator, a key transcription factor with deacetylase activity. Further, expression of MHC class I molecules by DFTD cells can occur in vivo during lymphocyte infiltration. These results explain why T cells do not target DFTD cells. We propose that MHC-positive or epigenetically modified DFTD cells may provide a vaccine to DFTD. In addition, we suggest that down-regulation of MHC molecules using regulatory mechanisms allows evolvability of transmissible cancers and could affect the evolutionary trajectory of DFTD. PMID:23479617

  4. Reversible epigenetic down-regulation of MHC molecules by devil facial tumour disease illustrates immune escape by a contagious cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siddle, Hannah V.; Kreiss, Alexandre; Tovar, Cesar; Yuen, Chun Kit; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine; Swift, Kate; Pearse, Anne-Maree; Hamede, Rodrigo; Jones, Menna E.; Skjødt, Karsten; Woods, Gregory M.; Kaufman, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Contagious cancers that pass between individuals as an infectious cell line are highly unusual pathogens. Devil facial tumor disease (DFTD) is one such contagious cancer that emerged 16 y ago and is driving the Tasmanian devil to extinction. As both a pathogen and an allograft, DFTD cells should be rejected by the host–immune response, yet DFTD causes 100% mortality among infected devils with no apparent rejection of tumor cells. Why DFTD cells are not rejected has been a question of considerable confusion. Here, we show that DFTD cells do not express cell surface MHC molecules in vitro or in vivo, due to down-regulation of genes essential to the antigen-processing pathway, such as β2-microglobulin and transporters associated with antigen processing. Loss of gene expression is not due to structural mutations, but to regulatory changes including epigenetic deacetylation of histones. Consequently, MHC class I molecules can be restored to the surface of DFTD cells in vitro by using recombinant devil IFN-γ, which is associated with up-regulation of the MHC class II transactivator, a key transcription factor with deacetylase activity. Further, expression of MHC class I molecules by DFTD cells can occur in vivo during lymphocyte infiltration. These results explain why T cells do not target DFTD cells. We propose that MHC-positive or epigenetically modified DFTD cells may provide a vaccine to DFTD. In addition, we suggest that down-regulation of MHC molecules using regulatory mechanisms allows evolvability of transmissible cancers and could affect the evolutionary trajectory of DFTD. PMID:23479617

  5. Ionizing radiation mediates expression of cell adhesion molecules in distinct histological patterns within the lung.

    PubMed

    Hallahan, D E; Virudachalam, S

    1997-06-01

    Inflammatory cell infiltration of the lung is a predominant histopathological change that occurs during radiation pneumonitis. Emigration of inflammatory cells from the circulation requires the interaction between cell adhesion molecules on the vascular endothelium and molecules on the surface of leukocytes. We studied the immunohistochemical pattern of expression of cell adhesion molecules in lungs from mice treated with thoracic irradiation. After X-irradiation, the endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 (ELAM-1; E-selectin) was primarily expressed in the pulmonary endothelium of larger vessels and minimally in the microvascular endothelium. Conversely, the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; CD54) was expressed in the pulmonary capillary endothelium and minimally in the endothelium of larger vessels. Radiation-mediated E-selectin expression was first observed at 6 h, whereas ICAM-1 expression initially increased at 24 h after irradiation. ICAM-1 and E-selectin expression persisted for several days. P-selectin is constitutively expressed in Weibel-Palade bodies in the endothelium, which moved to the vascular lumen within 30 min after irradiation. P-selectin was not detected in the pulmonary endothelium at 6 h after irradiation. The radiation dose required for increased cell adhesion molecule expression within the pulmonary vascular endothelium was 2 Gy, and expression increased in a dose-dependent manner. These data demonstrate that ICAM-1 and E-selectin expression is increased in the pulmonary endothelium following thoracic irradiation. The pattern of expression of E-selectin, P-selectin, and ICAM-1 is distinct from one another. PMID:9187101

  6. Expression and cell distribution of the intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule, endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule, and endothelial cell adhesion molecule (CD31) in reactive human lymph nodes and in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ruco, L. P.; Pomponi, D.; Pigott, R.; Gearing, A. J.; Baiocchini, A.; Baroni, C. D.

    1992-01-01

    The immunocytochemical expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1), endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule (ELAM-1), endothelial cell adhesion molecule (EndoCAM CD31), and HLA-DR antigens was investigated in sections of 24 reactive lymph nodes and in 15 cases of Hodgkin's disease. ICAM-1 was detected in sinus macrophages, follicular dendritic reticulum cells (FDRCs), interdigitating reticulum cells (IDRCs), epithelioid macrophages, Hodgkin's cells (HCs), and vascular endothelium. ICAM-1 expression was often associated with that of HLA-DR antigens. VCAM-1 was detected in FDRCs, in fibroblast reticulum cells (FRCs), in macrophages, and in rare blood vessels. EndoCAM (CD31) was constitutively expressed in all types of endothelial cells, sinus macrophages, and in epithelioid granulomas. ELAM-1 was selectively expressed by activated endothelial cells of high endothelium venules (HEVs). When expression of the inducible adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and ELAM-1 was comparatively evaluated in HEVs, it was found that ICAM-1 + HEVs were present in all reactive and HD nodes, whereas ELAM-1 and/or VCAM-1 were expressed only in those pathologic conditions characterized by high levels of interleukin-1/tumor necrosis factor (IL-1/TNF) production, such as granulomatosis and Hodgkin's disease. In Hodgkin's disease, the expression of ELAM-1/VCAM-1 was more pronounced in cases of nodular sclerosis and was associated with a significantly higher content of perivascular neutrophils. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1605306

  7. Up-regulation of the homophilic adhesion molecule sidekick-1 in podocytes contributes to glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Lewis; Potla, Uma; Coleman, Sarah; Dikiy, Stanislav; Hata, Yutaka; Kurihara, Hidetake; He, John C; D'Agati, Vivette D; Klotman, Paul E

    2010-08-13

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a leading cause of nephrotic syndrome and end-stage renal disease worldwide. Although the mechanisms underlying this important disease are poorly understood, the glomerular podocyte clearly plays a central role in disease pathogenesis. In the current work, we demonstrate that the homophilic adhesion molecule sidekick-1 (sdk-1) is up-regulated in podocytes in FSGS both in rodent models and in human kidney biopsy samples. Transgenic mice that have podocyte-specific overexpression of sdk-1 develop gradually progressive heavy proteinuria and severe FSGS. We also show that sdk-1 associates with the slit diaphragm linker protein MAGI-1, which is already known to interact with several critical podocyte proteins including synaptopodin, alpha-actinin-4, nephrin, JAM4, and beta-catenin. This interaction is mediated through a direct interaction between the carboxyl terminus of sdk-1 and specific PDZ domains of MAGI-1. In vitro expression of sdk-1 enables a dramatic recruitment of MAGI-1 to the cell membrane. Furthermore, a truncated version of sdk-1 that is unable to bind to MAGI-1 does not induce podocyte dysfunction when overexpressed. We conclude that the up-regulation of sdk-1 in podocytes is an important pathogenic factor in FSGS and that the mechanism involves disruption of the actin cytoskeleton possibly via alterations in MAGI-1 function. PMID:20562105

  8. Small Molecule Microarrays Enable the Identification of a Selective, Quadruplex-Binding Inhibitor of MYC Expression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor MYC plays a pivotal role in cancer initiation, progression, and maintenance. However, it has proven difficult to develop small molecule inhibitors of MYC. One attractive route to pharmacological inhibition of MYC has been the prevention of its expression through small molecule-mediated stabilization of the G-quadruplex (G4) present in its promoter. Although molecules that bind globally to quadruplex DNA and influence gene expression are well-known, the identification of new chemical scaffolds that selectively modulate G4-driven genes remains a challenge. Here, we report an approach for the identification of G4-binding small molecules using small molecule microarrays (SMMs). We use the SMM screening platform to identify a novel G4-binding small molecule that inhibits MYC expression in cell models, with minimal impact on the expression of other G4-associated genes. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and thermal melt assays demonstrated that this molecule binds reversibly to the MYC G4 with single digit micromolar affinity, and with weaker or no measurable binding to other G4s. Biochemical and cell-based assays demonstrated that the compound effectively silenced MYC transcription and translation via a G4-dependent mechanism of action. The compound induced G1 arrest and was selectively toxic to MYC-driven cancer cell lines containing the G4 in the promoter but had minimal effects in peripheral blood mononucleocytes or a cell line lacking the G4 in its MYC promoter. As a measure of selectivity, gene expression analysis and qPCR experiments demonstrated that MYC and several MYC target genes were downregulated upon treatment with this compound, while the expression of several other G4-driven genes was not affected. In addition to providing a novel chemical scaffold that modulates MYC expression through G4 binding, this work suggests that the SMM screening approach may be broadly useful as an approach for the identification of new G4-binding small

  9. [The expression level of adhesion molecules on neutrophils depending at segmentation of their nuclei].

    PubMed

    Kashutin, S L; Danilov, S I; Vereshchagina, E N; Kluchareva, S V

    2013-11-01

    The article deals with results of detection of expression level of adhesion molecules on neutrophils and segmentation of their nuclei. It is established that in conditions of absence of antigen stimulation neutrophils of circulating pool express molecules of L-selectin in 53.34%, LFA-1 molecules in 65.64%, ICAM-1 in 40.51%, LE4-3 in 58.72% and PECAM-1 in 59.74%. The full readiness to realization of phase of sliding, strong adhesion and immediately transmigration itselfis detected in neutrophils with five segments in nucleus. PMID:24640111

  10. Expression of signaling molecules in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wollebo, Hassen S.; Cotto, Bianca; Adiga, Radhika; Langford, Dianne; White, Martyn K.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a debilitating demyelinating disease of the CNS caused by the infection and destruction of glial cells by JC virus (JCV) and is an AIDS-defining disease. Infection with JCV is common and most people acquire antibodies early in life. After initial infection, JCV remains in an asymptomatic persistent state and can be detected by PCR in many tissues including brain. A major question in PML pathogenesis is how the virus reactivates from persistence in HIV-1/AIDS. Our studies with primary cultures of glial cells have implicated transcription factors NF-κB and NFAT4, which bind to a unique site in the JCV noncoding control region and stimulate viral gene expression. Furthermore, these transcription factors are controlled by pathways downstream of proinflammatory cytokines, e.g., TNF-α activates NF-κB and stimulates JCV transcription. Thus, we hypothesize that HIV-1/PML initiation may involve reactivation of JCV by cytokine disturbances in the brain such as occur in HIV-1/AIDS. In this study, we evaluated HIV-1/PML clinical samples and non-PML controls for expression of TNF-α and its receptors and subcellular localization of NF-κB p65 and NFAT4. Consistent with our hypothesis, HIV-1/PML tissue has high levels of TNF-α and TNFR1 expression and NF-κB and NFAT4 were preferentially localized to the nucleus. PMID:26531763

  11. Regulation of neuraminidase expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid; NeuNAc) is one of the most important carbohydrates for Streptococcus pneumoniae due of its role as a carbon and energy source, receptor for adhesion and invasion and molecular signal for promotion of biofilm formation, nasopharyngeal carriage and invasion of the lung. Results In this work, NeuNAc and its metabolic derivative N-acetyl mannosamine (ManNAc) were used to analyze regulatory mechanisms of the neuraminidase locus expression. Genomic and metabolic comparison to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis elucidates the metabolic association of the two amino sugars to different parts of the locus coding for the two main pneumococcal neuraminidases and confirms the substrate specificity of the respective ABC transporters. Quantitative gene expression analysis shows repression of the locus by glucose and induction of all predicted transcriptional units by ManNAc and NeuNAc, each inducing with higher efficiency the operon encoding for the transporter with higher specificity for the respective amino sugar. Cytofluorimetric analysis demonstrated enhanced surface exposure of NanA on pneumococci grown in NeuNAc and ManNAc and an activity assay allowed to quantify approximately twelve times as much neuraminidase activity on induced cells as opposed to glucose grown cells. Conclusions The present data increase the understanding of metabolic regulation of the nanAB locus and indicate that experiments aimed at the elucidation of the relevance of neuraminidases in pneumococcal virulence should possibly not be carried out on bacteria grown in glucose containing media. PMID:22963456

  12. Expression levels of MHC class I molecules are inversely correlated with promiscuity of peptide binding.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Paul; Meziane, El Kahina; Harrison, Michael; Magiera, Łukasz; Hermann, Clemens; Mears, Laura; Wrobel, Antony G; Durant, Charlotte; Nielsen, Lise Lotte; Buus, Søren; Ternette, Nicola; Mwangi, William; Butter, Colin; Nair, Venugopal; Ahyee, Trudy; Duggleby, Richard; Madrigal, Alejandro; Roversi, Pietro; Lea, Susan M; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are at the heart of adaptive immune responses, playing crucial roles in many kinds of disease and in vaccination. We report that breadth of peptide presentation and level of cell surface expression of class I molecules are inversely correlated in both chickens and humans. This relationship correlates with protective responses against infectious pathogens including Marek's disease virus leading to lethal tumours in chickens and human immunodeficiency virus infection progressing to AIDS in humans. We propose that differences in peptide binding repertoire define two groups of MHC class I molecules strategically evolved as generalists and specialists for different modes of pathogen resistance. We suggest that differences in cell surface expression level ensure the development of optimal peripheral T cell responses. The inverse relationship of peptide repertoire and expression is evidently a fundamental property of MHC molecules, with ramifications extending beyond immunology and medicine to evolutionary biology and conservation. PMID:25860507

  13. Expression and regulation of brain metallothionein.

    PubMed

    Ebadi, M; Iversen, P L; Hao, R; Cerutis, D R; Rojas, P; Happe, H K; Murrin, L C; Pfeiffer, R F

    1995-07-01

    Many, but not all, zinc-containing neurons in the brain are a subclass of the glutamatergic neurons, and they are found predominantly in the telencephalon. These neurons store zinc in their presynaptic terminals and release it by a calcium-dependent mechanism. These "vesicular" pools of zinc are viewed as endogenous modulators of ligand- and voltage-gated ion channels. Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight zinc-binding proteins consisting of 25-30% cysteine, with no aromatic amino acids or disulfide bonds. The areas of the brain containing high contents of zinc such as the retina, the pineal gland, and the hippocampus synthesize unique isoforms of MT on a continuous basis. The four MT isoforms are thought to provide the neurons and glial elements with mechanisms to distribute, donate, and sequester zinc at presynaptic terminals; or buffer the excess zinc at synaptic junctions. In this cause, glutathione disulfide may participate in releasing zinc from MT. A similar nucleotide and amino acid sequence has made it difficult to obtain cDNA probes and antibodies capable of distinguishing indisputably among MT isoforms. MT-I and MT-II isoforms are found in the brain and in the peripheral tissues; MT-III isoform, possessing an additional seven amino acids, is expressed mostly in the brain and to a very minute extent in the intestine and pancreas; whereas MT-IV isoform is found in tissues containing stratified squamous epithelial cells. Since MTs are expressed in neurons that sequester zinc in their synaptic vesicles, the regulation of the expression of MT isoforms is extremely important in terms of maintaining the steady-state level of zinc and controlling redox potentials. The concentration of zinc has been shown to be altered in an extensive number of disorders of the central nervous system, including alcoholism. Alzheimer-type dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Down's syndrome, epilepsy, Friedreich's ataxia, Guillaine-Barré syndrome, hepatic

  14. Imaging of CAIX-expressing xenografts in vivo using 99mTc-HEHEHE-ZCAIX:1 Affibody molecule

    PubMed Central

    HONARVAR, HADIS; GAROUSI, JAVAD; GUNNERIUSSON, ELIN; HÖIDÉN-GUTHENBERG, INGMARIE; ALTAI, MOHAMED; WIDSTRÖM, CHARLES; TOLMACHEV, VLADIMIR; FREJD, FREDRIK Y.

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a transmembrane enzyme involved in regulation of tissue pH balance. In cancer, CAIX expression is associated with tumor hypoxia. CAIX is also overexpressed in renal cell carcinoma and is a molecular target for the therapeutic antibody cG250 (girentuximab). Radionuclide imaging of CAIX expression might be used for identification of patients who may benefit from cG250 therapy and from treatment strategies for hypoxic tumors. Affibody molecules are small (7 kDa) scaffold proteins having a high potential as probes for radionuclide molecular imaging. The aim of the present study was to evaluate feasibility of in vivo imaging of CAIX-expression using radiolabeled Affibody molecules. A histidine-glutamate-histidine-glutamate-histidine-glutamate (HE)3-tag-containing CAIX-binding Affibody molecule (HE)3-ZCAIX:1 was labeled with [99mTc(CO)3]+. Its binding properties were evaluated in vitro using CAIX-expressing SK-RC-52 renal carcinoma cells. 99mTc-(HE)3-ZCAIX:1 was evaluated in NMRI nu/nu mice bearing SK-RC-52 xenografts. The in vivo specificity test confirmed CAIX-mediated tumor targeting. 99mTc-(HE)3-ZCAIX:1 cleared rapidly from blood and normal tissues except for kidneys. At optimal time-point (4 h p.i.), the tumor uptake was 9.7±0.7% ID/g, and tumor-to-blood ratio was 53±10. Experimental imaging of CAIX-expressing SK-RC-52 xenografts at 4 h p.i. provided high contrast images. The use of radioiodine label for ZCAIX:1 enabled the reduction of renal uptake, but resulted in significantly lower tumor uptake and tumor-to-blood ratio. Results of the present study suggest that radiolabeled Affibody molecules are promising probes for imaging of CAIX-expression in vivo. PMID:25434612

  15. Inefficient assembly limits transport and cell surface expression of HLA-Cw4 molecules in C1R.

    PubMed

    Zemmour, J

    1996-12-01

    HLA-C antigens are expressed to the cell surface at roughly 10% the level of HLA-B or -A, and their serological definition remains persistently difficult. To characterize the factors limiting surface expression, the processes of assembly and intracellular transport of HLA-Cw4 molecules were investigated in the C1R cell line. When appropriate peptides were added to cultured cells or in cell lysates significant amounts of conformed HLA-C molecules that associate with beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2 m) are detected, but are indeed not sufficient to restore expression to the level observed for HLA-A or -B molecules. Furthermore, a precursor/product relationship exists between the free class I heavy chain and the mature conformation of HLA-Cw4 molecules. Thus, HLA-C assembly promotes the conversion of HC-10-reactive molecules (weakly-beta 2m-associated non-ligand associated free HC form) into the beta 2m-associated class I molecules recognized by W6/32. To further investigate the factors that regulate cell surface expression, intracellular transport of HLA-Cw4 was studied in pulse chase analysis. In contrast to some HLA-A and B, maturation of HLA-Cw4 heavy chains and their export to the medial and trans-Golgi compartments are quite inefficient. After 4 h of chase period, roughly half of the pulse-labeled HLA-Cw4 molecules have transited to the medial-Golgi and acquired complex oligosaccharides characteristic of mature form. In addition, treatment with gamma-interferon does not appear to improve maturation of HLA-Cw4 heavy chains, suggesting that increased supply of peptides does not influence intracellular transport. Moreover, only a small fraction in the pool of HLA-Cw4 molecules was subsequently transported through the trans-Golgi network, as indicated by their acquisition of sialic acids. Taken together these studies show that HLA-Cw4 molecules are inefficiently transported through the Golgi apparatus and presumably retained in the endoplasmic reticulum or cis

  16. Lymphangiogenesis and expression of specific molecules as lymphatic endothelial cell markers.

    PubMed

    Kato, Seiji; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Ji, Rui-Cheng; Miura, Masahiro

    2006-06-01

    In recent years, several functional molecules specifically expressed and localized in lymphatic endothelial cells, such as 5'-nucleotidase, lymphatic vessel endothelial receptor-1, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3, podoplanin and Prox-1, have been identified. The discovery of the lymphatic endothelial cell markers facilitated detailed analysis of the nature and structural organization of the lymphatic vessels and their growth (lymphangiogenesis). As a result, over the past few years, advances have been made in understanding the cellular and molecular aspects of physiological lymphangiogenesis and tumor-induced lymphangiogenesis. The biology of lymphangiogenesis, particularly the mechanism of its regulation, is very important in understanding the formation of the lymphatic system as a biological regulation system transporting tissue fluid and wandering cells, including lymphocytes, and disease involving lymphangiogenesis. The understanding of the molecular mechanism of lymphangiogenesis and the elucidation of the development of normal and pathological tissues are expected to lead to the development of therapy for intractable diseases, such as malignant tumors and lymphedema. PMID:16800291

  17. Cell recognition molecule L1 promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation through the regulation of cell surface glycosylation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Huang, Xiaohua; An, Yue; Ren, Feng; Yang, Zara Zhuyun; Zhu, Hongmei; Zhou, Lei; He, Xiaowen; Schachner, Melitta; Xiao, Zhicheng; Ma, Keli; Li, Yali

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •Down-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression blocks L1-induced neuronal differentiation of ESCs. •Up-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression in L1-ESCs depends on the activation of PLCγ. •L1 promotes ESCs to differentiate into neuron through regulating cell surface glycosylation. -- Abstract: Cell recognition molecule L1 (CD171) plays an important role in neuronal survival, migration, differentiation, neurite outgrowth, myelination, synaptic plasticity and regeneration after injury. Our previous study has demonstrated that overexpressing L1 enhances cell survival and proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) through promoting the expression of FUT9 and ST3Gal4, which upregulates cell surface sialylation and fucosylation. In the present study, we examined whether sialylation and fucosylation are involved in ESC differentiation through L1 signaling. RNA interference analysis showed that L1 enhanced differentiation of ESCs into neurons through the upregulation of FUT9 and ST3Gal4. Furthermore, blocking the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) signaling pathway with either a specific PLCγ inhibitor or knockdown PLCγ reduced the expression levels of both FUT9 and ST3Gal4 mRNAs and inhibited L1-mediated neuronal differentiation. These results demonstrate that L1 promotes neuronal differentiation from ESCs through the L1-mediated enhancement of FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression.

  18. Regulation of cell-to-cell variability in divergent gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chao; Wu, Shuyang; Pocetti, Christopher; Bai, Lu

    2016-03-01

    Cell-to-cell variability (noise) is an important feature of gene expression that impacts cell fitness and development. The regulatory mechanism of this variability is not fully understood. Here we investigate the effect on gene expression noise in divergent gene pairs (DGPs). We generated reporters driven by divergent promoters, rearranged their gene order, and probed their expressions using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH). We show that two genes in a co-regulated DGP have higher expression covariance compared with the separate, tandem and convergent configurations, and this higher covariance is caused by more synchronized firing of the divergent transcriptions. For differentially regulated DGPs, the regulatory signal of one gene can stochastically `leak' to the other, causing increased gene expression noise. We propose that the DGPs' function in limiting or promoting gene expression noise may enhance or compromise cell fitness, providing an explanation for the conservation pattern of DGPs.

  19. Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule NrCAM Regulates Semaphorin 3F-Induced Dendritic Spine Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Demyanenko, Galina P.; Mohan, Vishwa; Zhang, Xuying; Brennaman, Leann H.; Dharbal, Katherine E.S.; Tran, Tracy S.; Manis, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-glial related cell adhesion molecule (NrCAM) is a regulator of axon growth and repellent guidance, and has been implicated in autism spectrum disorders. Here a novel postsynaptic role for NrCAM in Semaphorin3F (Sema3F)-induced dendritic spine remodeling was identified in pyramidal neurons of the primary visual cortex (V1). NrCAM localized to dendritic spines of star pyramidal cells in postnatal V1, where it was coexpressed with Sema3F. NrCAM deletion in mice resulted in elevated spine densities on apical dendrites of star pyramidal cells at both postnatal and adult stages, and electron microscopy revealed increased numbers of asymmetric synapses in layer 4 of V1. Whole-cell recordings in cortical slices from NrCAM-null mice revealed increased frequency of mEPSCs in star pyramidal neurons. Recombinant Sema3F-Fc protein induced spine retraction on apical dendrites of wild-type, but not NrCAM-null cortical neurons in culture, while re-expression of NrCAM rescued the spine retraction response. NrCAM formed a complex in brain with Sema3F receptor subunits Neuropilin-2 (Npn-2) and PlexinA3 (PlexA3) through an Npn-2-binding sequence (TARNER) in the extracellular Ig1 domain. A trans heterozygous genetic interaction test demonstrated that Sema3F and NrCAM pathways interacted in vivo to regulate spine density in star pyramidal neurons. These findings reveal NrCAM as a novel postnatal regulator of dendritic spine density in cortical pyramidal neurons, and an integral component of the Sema3F receptor complex. The results implicate NrCAM as a contributor to excitatory/inhibitory balance in neocortical circuits. PMID:25143608

  20. The role of photobiomodulation on gene expression of cell adhesion molecules in diabetic wounded fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ayuk, Sandra M; Abrahamse, Heidi; Houreld, Nicolette N

    2016-08-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are cell surface glycoproteins that facilitate cell-cell contacts and adhesion with the extracellular matrix (ECM). Cellular adhesion is affected by various disease conditions, such as diabetes mellitus (DM) and inflammation. Photobiomodulation (PBM) stimulates biological processes and expression of these cellular molecules. The aim of this experimental work was to demonstrate the role of PBM at 830nm on CAMs in diabetic wounded fibroblast cells. Isolated human skin fibroblast cells were used. Normal (N-) and diabetic wounded (DW-) cells were irradiated with a continuous wave diode laser at 830nm with an energy density of 5J/cm(2). Real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine the relative gene expression of 39 CAMs 48h post-irradiation. Normalized expression levels from irradiated cells were calculated relative to non-irradiated control cells according to the 2^(-ΔΔCt) method. Thirty-one genes were significantly regulated in N-cells (28 were genes up-regulated and three genes down-regulated), and 22 genes in DW-cells (five genes were up-regulated and 17 genes down-regulated). PBM induced a stimulatory effect on various CAMs namely cadherins, integrins, selectins and immunoglobulins, and hence may be used as a complementary therapy in advancing treatment of non-healing diabetic ulcers. The regulation of CAMs as well as evaluating the role of PBM on the molecular effects of these genes may expand knowledge and prompt further research into the cellular mechanisms in diabetic wound healing that may lead to valuable clinical outcomes. PMID:27295416

  1. Expression of adhesion molecules, chemokines and matrix metallo- proteinases (MMPs) in viable and degenerating stage of Taenia solium metacestode in swine neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyendra K; Singh, Aloukick K; Prasad, Kashi N; Singh, Amrita; Singh, Avinash; Rai, Ravi P; Tripathi, Mukesh; Gupta, Rakesh K; Husain, Nuzhat

    2015-11-30

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a parasitic infection of central nervous system (CNS). Expression of adhesion molecules, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were investigated on brain tissues surrounding viable (n=15) and degenerating cysticerci (n=15) of Taenia solium in swine by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. Gelatin gel zymography was performed for MMPs activity. ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), E-selectin, MIP-1α (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α), Eotaxin-1 and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) were associated with degenerating cysticerci (cysts). However, VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1), MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein-1), MMP-2 and MMP-9 were associated with both viable and degenerating cysts. In conclusion, viable and degenerating cysticerci have different immune molecule profiles and role of these molecules in disease pathogenesis needs to be investigated. PMID:26412140

  2. Neuronal MHC Class I Expression Is Regulated by Activity Driven Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yaqin; Liu, Jiane; Miao, Fengqin; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2015-01-01

    MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules are important components of the immune system. Recently MHC-I have been reported to also play important roles in brain development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism(s) underlying activity-dependent MHC-I expression using hippocampal neurons. Here we report that neuronal expression level of MHC-I is dynamically regulated during hippocampal development after birth in vivo. Kainic acid (KA) treatment significantly increases the expression of MHC-I in cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, suggesting that MHC-I expression is regulated by neuronal activity. In addition, KA stimulation decreased the expression of pre- and post-synaptic proteins. This down-regulation is prevented by addition of an MHC-I antibody to KA treated neurons. Further studies demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) is important in relaying KA simulation activation signals to up-regulated MHC-I expression. This signaling cascade relies on activation of the MAPK pathway, which leads to increased phosphorylation of CREB and NF-κB p65 while also enhancing the expression of IRF-1. Together, these results suggest that expression of MHC-I in hippocampal neurons is driven by Ca2+ regulated activation of the MAPK signaling transduction cascade. PMID:26263390

  3. Identification, molecular characterization, and gene expression analysis of a CD109 molecule in the Hawaiian bobtail squid Euprymna scolopes.

    PubMed

    Yazzie, Natasha; Salazar, Karla A; Castillo, Maria G

    2015-05-01

    All organisms have unique immune systems that help them identify and eliminate invading microorganisms. A group of evolutionary ancient molecules, the thioester-containing proteins (TEP) superfamily, are known to play an important immune role by aiding animal hosts in the recognition, destruction, and elimination of hazardous microorganisms and their products. Our laboratory focuses on studying the role of the immune system in the mutualistic relationship between the sepiolid squid, Euprymna scolopes and its bioluminescent symbiont Vibrio fischeri. In the present study, we report the identification of a novel TEP-like transcript expressed in the light organ of squid. Characterization of the full-length coding sequence showed a molecule of 4218 nucleotides, corresponding to 1406 amino acids. Further sequence analysis revealed it contained structural characteristics of A2M molecules, including the thioester and receptor-binding domains. Analysis using the predicted amino acid sequence suggested this transcript was a homologue of CD109 molecules, thus we named it E. scolopes-CD109 (Es-CD109). In addition to the light organ, we were able to detect and amplify Es-CD109 in 12 out of 14 adult squid tissues tested. Quantification experiments showed that Es-CD109 expression levels were significantly lower in the light organ of symbiotic compared to aposymbiotic juveniles, suggesting a possible down-regulation of the host immune response in the presence of the bacterial symbiont. PMID:25742727

  4. Surface expression, peptide repertoire, and thermostability of chicken class I molecules correlate with peptide transporter specificity.

    PubMed

    Tregaskes, Clive A; Harrison, Michael; Sowa, Anna K; van Hateren, Andy; Hunt, Lawrence G; Vainio, Olli; Kaufman, Jim

    2016-01-19

    The chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has strong genetic associations with resistance and susceptibility to certain infectious pathogens. The cell surface expression level of MHC class I molecules varies as much as 10-fold between chicken haplotypes and is inversely correlated with diversity of peptide repertoire and with resistance to Marek's disease caused by an oncogenic herpesvirus. Here we show that the average thermostability of class I molecules isolated from cells also varies, being higher for high-expressing MHC haplotypes. However, we find roughly the same amount of class I protein synthesized by high- and low-expressing MHC haplotypes, with movement to the cell surface responsible for the difference in expression. Previous data show that chicken TAP genes have high allelic polymorphism, with peptide translocation specific for each MHC haplotype. Here we use assembly assays with peptide libraries to show that high-expressing B15 class I molecules can bind a much wider variety of peptides than are found on the cell surface, with the B15 TAPs restricting the peptides available. In contrast, the translocation specificity of TAPs from the low-expressing B21 haplotype is even more permissive than the promiscuous binding shown by the dominantly expressed class I molecule. B15/B21 heterozygote cells show much greater expression of B15 class I molecules than B15/B15 homozygote cells, presumably as a result of receiving additional peptides from the B21 TAPs. Thus, chicken MHC haplotypes vary in several correlated attributes, with the most obvious candidate linking all these properties being molecular interactions within the peptide-loading complex (PLC). PMID:26699458

  5. Surface expression, peptide repertoire, and thermostability of chicken class I molecules correlate with peptide transporter specificity

    PubMed Central

    Tregaskes, Clive A.; Harrison, Michael; Sowa, Anna K.; van Hateren, Andy; Hunt, Lawrence G.; Vainio, Olli; Kaufman, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has strong genetic associations with resistance and susceptibility to certain infectious pathogens. The cell surface expression level of MHC class I molecules varies as much as 10-fold between chicken haplotypes and is inversely correlated with diversity of peptide repertoire and with resistance to Marek’s disease caused by an oncogenic herpesvirus. Here we show that the average thermostability of class I molecules isolated from cells also varies, being higher for high-expressing MHC haplotypes. However, we find roughly the same amount of class I protein synthesized by high- and low-expressing MHC haplotypes, with movement to the cell surface responsible for the difference in expression. Previous data show that chicken TAP genes have high allelic polymorphism, with peptide translocation specific for each MHC haplotype. Here we use assembly assays with peptide libraries to show that high-expressing B15 class I molecules can bind a much wider variety of peptides than are found on the cell surface, with the B15 TAPs restricting the peptides available. In contrast, the translocation specificity of TAPs from the low-expressing B21 haplotype is even more permissive than the promiscuous binding shown by the dominantly expressed class I molecule. B15/B21 heterozygote cells show much greater expression of B15 class I molecules than B15/B15 homozygote cells, presumably as a result of receiving additional peptides from the B21 TAPs. Thus, chicken MHC haplotypes vary in several correlated attributes, with the most obvious candidate linking all these properties being molecular interactions within the peptide-loading complex (PLC). PMID:26699458

  6. Junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs) are differentially expressed in fibroblasts and co-localize with ZO-1 to adherens-like junctions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Junctional Adhesion Molecules (JAMs) are components and regulators of the well-characterized epithelial and endothelial tight junction. Since the molecular components of native fibroblast adherens-like junctions remain poorly described we determined JAM expression profiles in fibroblasts. We found J...

  7. Regulation of immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and expression.

    PubMed

    Taussig, M J; Sims, M J; Krawinkel, U

    1989-05-01

    The molecular genetic events leading to Ig expression and their control formed the topic of a recent EMBO workshop. This report by Michael Taussig, Martin Sims and Ulrich Krawinkel discusses contributions dealing with genes expressed in early pre-B cells, the mechanism of rearrangement, aberrant rearrangements seen in B cells of SCID mice, the feedback control of rearrangement as studied in transgenic mice, the control of Ig expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, and class switching. PMID:2787158

  8. Proteasome Subtypes and Regulators in the Processing of Antigenic Peptides Presented by Class I Molecules of the Major Histocompatibility Complex

    PubMed Central

    Vigneron, Nathalie; Van den Eynde, Benoît J.

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome is responsible for the breakdown of cellular proteins. Proteins targeted for degradation are allowed inside the proteasome particle, where they are cleaved into small peptides and released in the cytosol to be degraded into amino acids. In vertebrates, some of these peptides escape degradation in the cytosol, are loaded onto class I molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and displayed at the cell surface for scrutiny by the immune system. The proteasome therefore plays a key role for the immune system: it provides a continued sampling of intracellular proteins, so that CD8-positive T-lymphocytes can kill cells expressing viral or tumoral proteins. Consequently, the repertoire of peptides displayed by MHC class I molecules at the cell surface depends on proteasome activity, which may vary according to the presence of proteasome subtypes and regulators. Besides standard proteasomes, cells may contain immunoproteasomes, intermediate proteasomes and thymoproteasomes. Cells may also contain regulators of proteasome activity, such as the 19S, PA28 and PA200 regulators. Here, we review the effects of these proteasome subtypes and regulators on the production of antigenic peptides. We also discuss an unexpected function of the proteasome discovered through the study of antigenic peptides: its ability to splice peptides. PMID:25412285

  9. Microarray Analyses of Gene Expression during Chondrocyte Differentiation Identifies Novel Regulators of Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    James, Claudine G.; Appleton, C. Thomas G.; Ulici, Veronica; Underhill, T. Michael; Beier, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Ordered chondrocyte differentiation and maturation is required for normal skeletal development, but the intracellular pathways regulating this process remain largely unclear. We used Affymetrix microarrays to examine temporal gene expression patterns during chondrogenic differentiation in a mouse micromass culture system. Robust normalization of the data identified 3300 differentially expressed probe sets, which corresponds to 1772, 481, and 249 probe sets exhibiting minimum 2-, 5-, and 10-fold changes over the time period, respectively. GeneOntology annotations for molecular function show changes in the expression of molecules involved in transcriptional regulation and signal transduction among others. The expression of identified markers was confirmed by RT-PCR, and cluster analysis revealed groups of coexpressed transcripts. One gene that was up-regulated at later stages of chondrocyte differentiation was Rgs2. Overexpression of Rgs2 in the chondrogenic cell line ATDC5 resulted in accelerated hypertrophic differentiation, thus providing functional validation of microarray data. Collectively, these analyses provide novel information on the temporal expression of molecules regulating endochondral bone development. PMID:16135533

  10. De Novo-Designed Enzymes as Small-Molecule-Regulated Fluorescence Imaging Tags and Fluorescent Reporters

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-based tags attached to a protein-of-interest (POI) that react with a small molecule, rendering the conjugate fluorescent, are very useful for studying the POI in living cells. These tags are typically based on endogenous enzymes, so protein engineering is required to ensure that the small-molecule probe does not react with the endogenous enzyme in the cell of interest. Here we demonstrate that de novo-designed enzymes can be used as tags to attach to POIs. The inherent bioorthogonality of the de novo-designed enzyme–small-molecule probe reaction circumvents the need for protein engineering, since these enzyme activities are not present in living organisms. Herein, we transform a family of de novo-designed retroaldolases into variable-molecular-weight tags exhibiting fluorescence imaging, reporter, and electrophoresis applications that are regulated by tailored, reactive small-molecule fluorophores. PMID:25209927

  11. Scrutinising the regulators of syncytialization and their expression in pregnancy-related conditions.

    PubMed

    Costa, M A

    2016-01-15

    The placenta is important for the success of gestation and foetal development. In fact, this specialized pregnancy organ is essential for foetal nourishment, support, and protection. In the placenta, there are different cell populations, including four subtypes of trophoblasts. Cytotrophoblasts fuse and differentiate into the multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast (syncytialization). Syncytialization is a hallmark of placentation and is highly regulated by numerous molecules with distinct roles. Placentas from pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction or trisomy 21 have been associated with a defective syncytialization and an altered expression of its modulators. This work proposes to review the molecules that promote or inhibit both fusion and biochemical differentiation of cytotrophoblasts. Moreover, it will also analyse the syncytialization modulators abnormally expressed in pathological placentas, highlighting the molecules that may contribute to the aetiology of these diseases. PMID:26586208

  12. Markedly diminished epidermal keratinocyte expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in Sezary syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Nickoloff, B.J.; Griffiths, E.M.; Baadsgaard, O.; Voorhees, J.J.; Hanson, C.A.; Cooper, K.D. )

    1989-04-21

    In mucosis fungoides the malignant T cells express lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, which allows them to bind to epidermal keratinocytes expressing the gamma interferon-inducible intercellular adhesion molecule-1. In this report, a patient with leukemic-stage mucosis fungoides (Sezary syndrome) had widespread erythematous dermal infiltrates containing malignant T cells, but without any epidermotropism. The authors discovered that the T cells expressed normal amounts of functional lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, but the keratinocytes did not express significant levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, which was probably due to the inability of the malignant T cells to produce gamma interferon. These results support the concept that the inability of malignant T cells to enter the epidermis may contribute to emergence of more clinically aggressive T-cell clones that are no longer confined to the skin, but infiltrate the blood, lymph nodes, and viscera, as is seen in Sezary syndrome.

  13. Soluble adhesion molecules correlate with surface expression in an in vitro model of endothelial activation.

    PubMed

    Kjaergaard, Anders G; Dige, Anders; Krog, Jan; Tønnesen, Else; Wogensen, Lise

    2013-10-01

    Endothelial activation is a pivotal event in the development and progression of inflammation. Central to endothelial activation is the up-regulation of cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) including E-selectin (CD62E), ICAM-1 (CD54), VCAM-1 (CD106) and PECAM-1 (CD31). These CAMs are also found in soluble forms (sCAMs). In this in vitro study of endothelial activation, we examined whether the levels of sCAMs correlate with the endothelial surface expression of CAMs in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Such a correlation would support the use of sCAMs as surrogate markers for endothelial activation in inflammatory conditions. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured with various concentrations of TNF-α for 8 hr and at a fixed concentration of TNF-α for various durations. The levels of soluble and surface-bound E-selectin, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and PECAM-1 were quantified by flow cytometry. TNF-α stimulation increased CAM and sCAM expression in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. There was a significant positive correlation between the levels of ICAM-1 and sICAM-1 and between the levels of VCAM and sVCAM-1 in both the dose-response and time-response experiments. A positive correlation between the levels of E-selectin and sE-selectin was observed in the time-response experiment. This study supports the use of sCAMs as potential biomarkers of endothelial activation. In particular, the use of sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and sE-selectin seems promising. PMID:23724832

  14. Omentin inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced expression of adhesion molecules in endothelial cells via ERK/NF-{kappa}B pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Xia; Li, Xiaonan; Liu, Fuli; Tan, Hui; Shang, Deya

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omentin inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omentin reduces expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 induced by TNF-{alpha} in HUVECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omentin inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced ERK and NF-{kappa}B activation in HUVECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omentin supreeses TNF-{alpha}-induced expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 via ERK/NF-{kappa}B pathway. -- Abstract: In the present study, we investigated whether omentin affected the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Our data showed that omentin decreased TNF-{alpha}-induced expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in HUVECs. In addition, omentin inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Further, we found that omentin inhibited TNF-{alpha}-activated signal pathway of nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) by preventing NF-{kappa}B inhibitory protein (I{kappa}B{alpha}) degradation and NF-{kappa}B/DNA binding activity. Omentin pretreatment significantly inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced ERK activity and ERK phosphorylation in HUVECs. Pretreatment with PD98059 suppressed TNF-{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activity. Omentin, NF-kB inhibitor (BAY11-7082) and ERK inhibitor (PD98059) reduced the up-regulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 induced by TNF-{alpha}. These results suggest that omentin may inhibit TNF-{alpha}-induced expression of adhesion molecules in endothelial cells via blocking ERK/NF-{kappa}B pathway.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of secretin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, J; Rindi, G; Lopez, M J; Upchurch, B H; Leiter, A B

    1995-01-01

    Expression of the gene encoding the hormone secretin is restricted to a specific enteroendocrine cell type and to beta-cells in developing pancreatic islets. To characterize regulatory elements in the secretin gene responsible for its expression in secretin-producing cells, we used a series of reporter genes for transient expression assays in transfection studies carried out in secretin-producing islet cell lines. Analysis of the transcriptional activity of deletion mutants identified a positive cis regulatory domain between 174 and 53 base pairs upstream from the transcriptional initiation site which was required for secretin gene expression in secretin-producing HIT insulinoma cells. Within this enhancer were sequences resembling two binding sites for the transcription factor Sp1, as well as a consensus sequence for binding to helix-loop-helix proteins. Analysis of these three elements by site-directed mutagenesis suggests that each is important for full transcriptional activity. The role of proximal enhancer sequences in directing secretin gene expression to appropriate tissues is further supported by studies in transgenic mice revealing that 1.6 kilobases of the secretin gene 5' flanking sequence were sufficient to direct the expression of either human growth hormone or simian virus 40 large T-antigen reporter genes to all major secretin-producing tissues. PMID:8774991

  16. Stochastic expression dynamics of a transcription factor revealed by single-molecule noise analysis.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Zach; Feng, Haidong; Han, Bo; Hatem, Christine; Wang, Jin; Xiao, Jie

    2012-08-01

    Gene expression is inherently stochastic; precise gene regulation by transcription factors is important for cell-fate determination. Many transcription factors regulate their own expression, suggesting that autoregulation counters intrinsic stochasticity in gene expression. Using a new strategy, cotranslational activation by cleavage (CoTrAC), we probed the stochastic expression dynamics of cI, which encodes the bacteriophage λ repressor CI, a fate-determining transcription factor. CI concentration fluctuations influence both lysogenic stability and induction of bacteriophage λ. We found that the intrinsic stochasticity in cI expression was largely determined by CI expression level irrespective of autoregulation. Furthermore, extrinsic, cell-to-cell variation was primarily responsible for CI concentration fluctuations, and negative autoregulation minimized CI concentration heterogeneity by counteracting extrinsic noise and introducing memory. This quantitative study of transcription factor expression dynamics sheds light on the mechanisms cells use to control noise in gene regulatory networks. PMID:22751020

  17. Cell stress-regulated human major histocompatibility complex class I gene expressed in gastrointestinal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Groh, V; Bahram, S; Bauer, S; Herman, A; Beauchamp, M; Spies, T

    1996-01-01

    Conventional major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes encode molecules that present intracellular peptide antigens to T cells. They are ubiquitously expressed and regulated by interferon gamma. Two highly divergent human MHC class I genes, MICA and MICB, are regulated by promoter heat shock elements similar to those of HSP70 genes. MICA encodes a cell surface glycoprotein, which is not associated with beta 2-microglobulin, is conformationally stable independent of conventional class I peptide ligands, and almost exclusively expressed in gastrointestinal epithelium. Thus, this MHC class I molecule may function as an indicator of cell stress and may be recognized by a subset of gut mucosal T cells in an unusual interaction. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8901601

  18. Wnt ligands regulate Tkv expression to constrain Dpp activity in the Drosophila ovarian stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Lichao; Wang, Huashan; Fan, Chao; Liu, Sen

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell self-renewal versus differentiation is regulated by the niche, which provides localized molecules that favor self-renewal. In the Drosophila melanogaster female germline stem cell (GSC) niche, Decapentaplegic (Dpp), a fly transforming growth factor β molecule and well-established long-range morphogen, acts over one cell diameter to maintain the GSCs. Here, we show that Thickveins (Tkv; a type I receptor of Dpp) is highly expressed in stromal cells next to Dpp-producing cells and functions to remove excess Dpp outside the niche, thereby spatially restricting its activity. Interestingly, Tkv expression in these stromal cells is regulated by multiple Wnt ligands that are produced by the niche. Our data demonstrate a self-restraining mechanism by which the Drosophila ovarian GSC niche acts to define its own boundary. PMID:26008746

  19. Invoking the Power of Thrombospondins: Regulation of Thrombospondins Expression

    PubMed Central

    Stenina-Adognravi, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests critical functions of thrombospondins (TSPs) in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. With the growing understanding of the importance of these matricellular proteins, the need to understand the mechanisms of regulation of their expression and potential approaches to modulate their levels is also increasing. The regulation of TSPs expression is multi-leveled, cell- and tissue-specific, and very precise. However, the knowledge of mechanisms modulating the levels of TSPs is fragmented and incomplete. This review discusses the known mechanisms of regulation of TSPs levels and the gaps in our knowledge that prevent us from developing strategies to modulate the expression of these physiologically important proteins. PMID:24582666

  20. Chlorella 11-Peptide Inhibits the Production of Macrophage-Induced Adhesion Molecules and Reduces Endothelin-1 Expression and Endothelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Mei Fen; Chen, Lih Chi; Cherng, Jong Yuh

    2013-01-01

    The inflammation process in large vessels involves the up-regulation of vascular adhesion molecules such as endothelial cell selectin (E-selectin), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) which are also known as the markers of atherosclerosis. We have reported that Chlorella 11-peptide exhibited effective anti-inflammatory effects. This peptide with an amino sequence Val-Glu-Cys-Tyr-Gly-Pro-Asn-Arg-Pro-Gln-Phe was further examined for its potential in preventing atherosclerosis in this study. In particular, the roles of Chlorella 11-peptide in lowering the production of vascular adhesion molecules, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) and expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1) from endothelia (SVEC4-10 cells) were studied. The production of E-selectin, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and MCP-1 in SVEC4-10 cells was measured with ELISA. The mRNA expression of ET-1 was analyzed by RT-PCR and agarose gel. Results showed that Chlorella 11-peptide significantly suppressed the levels of E-selectin, ICAM, VCAM, MCP-1 as well as ET-1 gene expression. The inhibition of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 production by Chlorella 11-peptide was reversed in the presence of protein kinase A inhibitor (H89) which suggests that the cAMP pathway was involved in the inhibitory cause of the peptide. In addition, this peptide was shown to reduce the extent of increased intercellular permeability induced by combination of 50% of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 cells medium and 50% normal SEVC cell culture medium (referred to as 50% RAW-conditioned medium). These data demonstrate that Chlorella 11-peptide is a promising biomolecule in preventing chronic inflammatory-related vascular diseases. PMID:24129228

  1. Macrophage function in alloxan diabetic mice: expression of adhesion molecules, generation of monokines and oxygen and NO radicals

    PubMed Central

    Ptak, W; Klimek, M; Bryniarski, K; Ptak, M; Majcher, P

    1998-01-01

    The increased incidence of bacterial and mycotic infections in poorly controlled diabetic patients or animals is frequently attributed to impaired activities of professional phagocytes (granulocytes, macrophages) in hypoinsulinaemic milieu. We measured production of monokines (IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)), active NO and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs), as well as expression of several cell surface adhesion molecules (Mac-1, -2 and -3, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and FcγRII), by thioglycollate medium-induced peritoneal macrophages of normoglycaemic and alloxan diabetic CBA/J mice (blood glucose level in the range 300 or 500 mg/dl). Macrophages of animals with moderate diabetes (300 mg/dl) produced significantly more IL-6 and TNF-α and ROIs than cells of control mice and showed an increased expression of all cell surface molecules, except Mac-3. NO/NO2 production was not affected. Administration of insulin restored enhanced values to normal levels, except for the production of ROIs which remained unusually high. We conclude that two separate mechanisms influence macrophage physiology in diabetes—lack of saturation of insulin receptors on macrophages and an indirect effect due to formation of advanced glycosylation endproducts (AGE) on their surfaces. The latter is possibly responsible for increased generation of ROIs, since it cannot be down-regulated by prolonged insulin treatment. How the increased activity of macrophages of moderately diabetic mice (enhanced production of proinflammatory monokines and oxygen radicals as well as expression of molecules) is related to their ability to kill bacteria is now under investigation. PMID:9764597

  2. Regulating emotion expression and regulating emotion experience: divergent associations with dimensions of attachment among older women.

    PubMed

    Consedine, Nathan S; Fiori, Katherine L; Magai, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Adult attachment research does not systematically distinguish between experiential and expressive forms of regulation. Drawing insights from developmental-functionalism - a lifespan theory of emotion and emotion regulation - the current report examined the relations among attachment, trait emotion, and expressive emotion regulation in a large (N = 1204) sample of older women. Although both preoccupation and fearful-avoidance predicted more anxiety and anger, preoccupation predicted greater fear withdrawal and less fear expression, while fearful-avoidance predicted greater fear expression and greater anger withdrawal; attachment security predicted less fear withdrawal and less anger expression. Importantly, results regarding expressive regulation held even when controlling for trait levels of the underlying emotion. Results are interpreted within the context of models of attachment and lifespan socioemotional functioning. It is suggested that attachment research may benefit from considering the distinct functions of experienced versus expressed emotion in developmentally diverse contexts. Limitations are discussed and directions for future research are given. PMID:22856619

  3. Expression of the cluster 1 antigen (neural cell adhesion molecule) in neuroectodermal tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, K.; Frost, G.; Kiely, F.; Phimister, E.; Coakham, H. B.; Kemshead, J. T.

    1991-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) in the human brain, primary brain tumours and neuroblastoma. Adult brain was found to express discrete isoforms of 180, 170, 140 and 120 kDa, which on neuraminidase treatment resolved into bands of 180, 170, 140, 120 and 95 kDa. Primary brain tumours such as Schwannoma and medulloblastoma expressed embryonic NCAM characterised by a high level of glycosylation, whereas other tumours, e.g. astrocytoma, meningioma, glioma and oligodendroglioma expressed adult NCAM. Post-neuraminidase treatment, differential expression of the 180, 170, 140, 120 and 95 kDa isoforms were noted in these various tumour types. On the other hand, neuroblastoma cell lines were found to express only embryonic NCAM, which after neuraminidase treatment resulted in differential presence of only 180, 140 and 120 kDa proteins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2039710

  4. Small Molecule Disruption of Quorum Sensing Cross-Regulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Causes Major and Unexpected Alterations to Virulence Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Michael A.; Eibergen, Nora R.; Moore, Joseph D.; Blackwell, Helen E.

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses three interwoven quorum-sensing (QS) circuits—Las, Rhl, and Pqs—to regulate the global expression of myriad virulence-associated genes. Interception of these signaling networks with small molecules represents an emerging strategy for the development of anti-infective agents against this bacterium. In the current study, we applied a chemical approach to investigate how the Las-Rhl-Pqs QS hierarchy coordinates key virulence phenotypes in wild-type P. aeruginosa. We screened a focused library of synthetic, non-native N-acyl l-homoserine lactones and identified compounds that can drastically alter production of two important virulence factors: pyocyanin and rhamnolipid. We demonstrate that these molecules act by targeting RhlR in P. aeruginosa, a QS receptor that has seen far less scrutiny to date relative to other circuitry. Unexpectedly, modulation of RhlR activity by a single compound induces inverse regulation of pyocyanin and rhamnolipid, a result that was not predicted using genetic approaches to interrogate QS in P. aeruginosa. Further, we show that certain RhlR agonists strongly repress Pqs signaling, revealing disruption of Rhl-Pqs cross-regulation as a novel mechanism for QS inhibition. These compounds significantly expand the known repertoire of chemical probes available to study RhlR in P. aeruginosa. Moreover, our results suggest that designing chemical agents to disrupt Rhl-Pqs crosstalk could be an effective antivirulence strategy to fight this common pathogen. PMID:25574853

  5. Expression of Flotilin-2 and Acrosome Biogenesis Are Regulated by MiR-124 during Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Haoyu; Jiang, Min; Xia, Zhengrong; Yu, Jinjin; Chen, Ling; Huang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short non-coding RNA molecules, which diversely regulate gene expression in organisms. Although the regulatory role of these small RNA molecules has been recently explored in animal spermatogenesis, the role of miR-124 in male germ cells is poorly defined. In our previous study, flotillin-2 was investigated as a novel Golgi-related protein involved in sperm acrosome biogenesis. The current study was designed to analyze the contribution of miR-124 in the regulation of flotillin-2 expression during mouse acrosome biogenesis. Luciferase assays revealed the target effects of miR-124 on flotillin-2 expression. Following intratesticular injection of miR-124 in 3-week-old male mice, quantitative real-time RT-PCR and western blot analysis were employed to confirm the function of miR-124 in regulating flotillin-2 after 48 hours. Sperm abnormalities were assessed 3 weeks later by ordinary optical microscopy, the acrosome abnormalities were also assessed by PNA staining and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed the proportion of sperm acrosome abnormalities was significantly higher than that of the control group. The expression of flotillin-2 and caveolin-1 was significantly downregulated during acrosome biogenesis. These results indicated that miR-124 could potentially play a role in caveolin-independent vesicle trafficking and modulation of flotillin-2 expression in mouse acrosome biogenesis. PMID:26313572

  6. Glutamate Receptor Interacting Protein 1 Regulates CD4(+) CTLA-4 Expression and Transplant Rejection.

    PubMed

    Modjeski, K L; Levy, S C; Ture, S K; Field, D J; Shi, G; Ko, K; Zhu, Q; Morrell, C N

    2016-05-01

    PDZ domains are common 80- to 90-amino-acid regions named after the first three proteins discovered to share these domains: postsynaptic density 95, discs large, and zonula occludens. PDZ domain-containing proteins typically interact with the C-terminus of membrane receptors. Glutamate receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1), a seven-PDZ domain protein scaffold, regulates glutamate receptor surface expression and trafficking in neurons. We have found that human and mouse T cells also express GRIP1. T cell-specific GRIP1(-/-) mice >11 weeks old had prolonged cardiac allograft survival. Compared with wild-type T cells, in vitro stimulated GRIP1(-/-) T cells had decreased expression of activation markers and increased apoptotic surface marker expression. Surface expression of the strong T cell inhibitory molecule cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) was increased on GRIP1(-/-) T cells from mice >11 weeks old. CTLA-4 increases with T cell stimulation and its surface expression on GRIP1(-/-) T cells remained high after stimulation was removed, indicating a possible internalization defect in GRIP1-deficient T cells. CTLA-4-blocking antibody treatment following heart transplantation led to complete rejection in T cell GRIP1(-/-) mice, indicating that increased CTLA-4 surface expression contributed to the extended graft survival. Our data indicate that GRIP1 regulates T cell activation by regulating CTLA-4 surface expression. PMID:26601915

  7. Murine bone marrow-derived mast cells express chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T-helper class 2 cells (CRTh2).

    PubMed

    Boehme, Stefen A; Franz-Bacon, Karin; Chen, Edward P; Ly, Tai Wei; Kawakami, Yuko; Bacon, Kevin B

    2009-06-01

    Mast cells are bone marrow-derived effector cells that can initiate inflammatory responses to infectious organisms or allergens by releasing a multitude of pro-inflammatory factors including prostaglandin (PG) D(2). We demonstrate that primary murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) express the PGD(2) receptor; chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T(h) class 2 cells (CRT(h)2). Activation of CRT(h)2 on BMMC by PGD(2) or the CRT(h)2-specific agonist, 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-prostaglandin D(2) (DK-PGD(2)), resulted in signaling response including Ca(2+) mobilization and phosphorylation of the p42/p44 extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) kinases. Phosphorylation of the ERKs could be blocked by pertussis toxin, as well as a small molecule antagonist of CRT(h)2, Compound A. Activation of CRT(h)2 on BMMC also resulted in the up-regulation of CD23 and CD30 on the cell surface, as well as CD62L shedding. Finally, PGD(2) and DK-PGD(2) induced the migration of BMMC in vitro and in vivo in response to an intra-dermal DK-PGD(2) injection. Both these processes were inhibited by the CRT(h)2 antagonist. These results raise the possibility that the functional consequences of the PGD(2)-CRT(h)2 interaction on mast cells may be relevant in allergic inflammation. PMID:19346259

  8. Expression of Epstein–Barr virus-induced gene 3 and other interleukin-12-related molecules by human intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Maaser, Christian; Egan, Laurence J; Birkenbach, Mark P; Eckmann, Lars; Kagnoff, Martin F

    2004-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells, including dendritic cells, monocytes and macrophages, produce members of the interleukin-12 (IL-12) family that are important in initiating and maintaining cell-mediated immune responses. These include IL-12p35 and p19 that dimerize with IL-12p40 to form IL-12 (also termed IL-12p75) and IL-23, respectively, and Epstein–Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) protein (a protein related to IL-12p40), that forms a dimer with p28, termed IL-27. Intestinal epithelial cells, which are the initial site of contact between the host and enteric pathogens, can act as antigen-presenting cells, and are known to express mediators important in inflammatory and immune responses. In the current studies, we hypothesized that intestinal epithelial cells express members of the IL-12 family, which can function as an early signalling system important in mucosal immunity. Using in vitro and in vivo model systems of human intestinal epithelium, we demonstrate the regulated expression of EBI3, IL-12p35 and p19 by human intestinal epithelial cells. However, intestinal epithelial cells do not coexpress IL-12p40 or p28 that are required to generate heterodimeric IL-12p75, IL-23 and IL-27. To the extent that IL-12p35, p19 and EBI3 cannot form IL-12p75, IL-23 or IL-27 heterodimers in intestinal epithelial cells, these data suggest that those cells may express other, currently unknown, molecules that can associate with EBI3, IL-12p35 and/or p19 or, alternatively, intestinal epithelial cells may release IL-12-related molecules that by themselves, or in combination with other molecules in the mucosal microenvironment, mediate biological activities. PMID:15196212

  9. Topographic Cue from Electrospun Scaffolds Regulate Myelin-Related Gene Expressions in Schwann Cells.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Janani; Kuppuswamy, Ashok Ayyappa; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2015-03-01

    Matured Schwann cells play a vital role in promoting regeneration and restoration of functional peripheral nervous tissue. In the present study, two dimensional film, three dimensional random and longitudinally aligned electrospun fibers of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) were used to evaluate the effect of topography on expressions of myelin related genes. The aligned nanofibrous scaffold demonstrated significant increase in Schwann cell adhesion using after 3, 6 and 12 hours of culture compared to the film and random fibers. Cell morphology, degree of orientation and elongation factor evaluated using a scanning electron microscope revealed that cells on aligned scaffold have spindle morphology, whereas cells on random and two dimensional films favor spherical morphology confirming the effect of topography. Significant increase in elongation factor was observed in aligned scaffold as compared to film and random fibers (p < 0.05). The gene expression analysis revealed that aligned scaffold significantly up-regulated the expression of early myelination markers: myelin-associated glycoprotein and myelin protein zero, cell adhesion molecule: neural cadherin, extracellular matrix molecule: neurocan, as well the down-regulation of non-myelinating Schwann cell marker: neural cell adhesion molecule when compared to random and film (p < 0.05). The gene expression patterns of aligned fibers favor myelination of Schwann cells when compared to film and random fibers. Thus, our results demonstrate that the aligned topography of the scaffold promotes maturation of Schwann cells and thereby its myelination to maintain its functionality. PMID:26307833

  10. Regulation of prokaryotic gene expression by eukaryotic-like enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Burnside, Kellie; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    Summary A growing body of evidence indicates that serine/threonine kinases (STK) and phosphatases (STP) regulate gene expression in prokaryotic organisms. As prokaryotic STKs and STPs are not DNA binding proteins, regulation of gene expression is accomplished through post-translational modification of their targets. These include two-component response regulators, DNA binding proteins and proteins that mediate transcription and translation. This review summarizes our current understanding of how STKs and STPs mediate gene expression in prokaryotes. Further studies to identify environmental signals that trigger the signaling cascade and elucidation of mechanisms that regulate cross-talk between eukaryotic-like signaling enzymes, two-component systems, and components of the transcriptional and translational machinery will facilitate a greater understanding of prokaryotic gene regulation. PMID:22221896

  11. Small molecule mediated inhibition of RORγ-dependent gene expression and autoimmune disease pathology in vivo.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Daliya; Zhao, Linlin; Wu, Lan; Palanichamy, Arumugam; Ergun, Ayla; Peng, Liaomin; Quigley, Catherine; Hamann, Stefan; Dunstan, Robert; Cullen, Patrick; Allaire, Norm; Guertin, Kevin; Wang, Tao; Chao, Jianhua; Loh, Christine; Fontenot, Jason D

    2016-04-01

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan nuclear receptor γ (RORγ) orchestrates a pro-inflammatory gene expression programme in multiple lymphocyte lineages including T helper type 17 (Th17) cells, γδ T cells, innate lymphoid cells and lymphoid tissue inducer cells. There is compelling evidence that RORγ-expressing cells are relevant targets for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Unlike Th17 cells, where RORγ expression is induced under specific pro-inflammatory conditions, γδ T cells and other innate-like immune cells express RORγ in the steady state. Small molecule mediated disruption of RORγ function in cells with pre-existing RORγ transcriptional complexes represents a significant and challenging pharmacological hurdle. We present data demonstrating that a novel, selective and potent small molecule RORγ inhibitor can block the RORγ-dependent gene expression programme in both Th17 cells and RORγ-expressing γδ T cells as well as a disease-relevant subset of human RORγ-expressing memory T cells. Importantly, systemic administration of this inhibitor in vivo limits pathology in an innate lymphocyte-driven mouse model of psoriasis. PMID:26694902

  12. Expression levels of MHC class I molecules are inversely correlated with promiscuity of peptide binding

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Paul E; Meziane, El Kahina; Harrison, Michael; Magiera, Łukasz; Hermann, Clemens; Mears, Laura; Wrobel, Antoni G; Durant, Charlotte; Nielsen, Lise Lotte; Buus, Søren; Ternette, Nicola; Mwangi, William; Butter, Colin; Nair, Venugopal; Ahyee, Trudy; Duggleby, Richard; Madrigal, Alejandro; Roversi, Pietro; Lea, Susan M; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are at the heart of adaptive immune responses, playing crucial roles in many kinds of disease and in vaccination. We report that breadth of peptide presentation and level of cell surface expression of class I molecules are inversely correlated in both chickens and humans. This relationship correlates with protective responses against infectious pathogens including Marek's disease virus leading to lethal tumours in chickens and human immunodeficiency virus infection progressing to AIDS in humans. We propose that differences in peptide binding repertoire define two groups of MHC class I molecules strategically evolved as generalists and specialists for different modes of pathogen resistance. We suggest that differences in cell surface expression level ensure the development of optimal peripheral T cell responses. The inverse relationship of peptide repertoire and expression is evidently a fundamental property of MHC molecules, with ramifications extending beyond immunology and medicine to evolutionary biology and conservation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05345.001 PMID:25860507

  13. Estradiol regulates MICA expression in human endometrial cells

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Satarupa; Pioli, Patricia A.; Conejo-Garcia, Jose; Wira, Charles R.; Sentman, Charles L.

    2008-01-01

    The human endometrium undergoes cyclical changes regulated by sex hormones. Evidence suggests sex hormones regulate NK cell recruitment into the uterus in large numbers. NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on human NK cells, γδ and CD8 T cells. NKG2D ligands are known to be sensors of cellular “stress”. In this study, we investigated whether sex hormones directly regulate expression of NKG2D ligands in the human uterus. Estradiol increased MICA expression on uterine epithelial cells; regulation was estrogen receptor-dependent. Real-time PCR analysis showed that NKG2D ligands MICA and MICB were expressed in the human endometrium. MICA protein was detected primarily on epithelial cells, and greater expression was observed in immunohistochemical analysis of tissues from patients in the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle. Thus, estrogens regulate expression of MICA. These data suggest hormonal regulation of innate immunity and NKG2D-mediated recognition in other tissues and diseases where estrogen may be involved. PMID:18728002

  14. The Connectivity Map: using gene-expression signatures to connect small molecules, genes, and disease.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Justin; Crawford, Emily D; Peck, David; Modell, Joshua W; Blat, Irene C; Wrobel, Matthew J; Lerner, Jim; Brunet, Jean-Philippe; Subramanian, Aravind; Ross, Kenneth N; Reich, Michael; Hieronymus, Haley; Wei, Guo; Armstrong, Scott A; Haggarty, Stephen J; Clemons, Paul A; Wei, Ru; Carr, Steven A; Lander, Eric S; Golub, Todd R

    2006-09-29

    To pursue a systematic approach to the discovery of functional connections among diseases, genetic perturbation, and drug action, we have created the first installment of a reference collection of gene-expression profiles from cultured human cells treated with bioactive small molecules, together with pattern-matching software to mine these data. We demonstrate that this "Connectivity Map" resource can be used to find connections among small molecules sharing a mechanism of action, chemicals and physiological processes, and diseases and drugs. These results indicate the feasibility of the approach and suggest the value of a large-scale community Connectivity Map project. PMID:17008526

  15. Stochastic models of gene expression and post-transcriptional regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendar, Hodjat; Kulkarni, Rahul; Jia, Tao

    2011-10-01

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression can give rise to phenotypic heterogeneity in a population of genetically identical cells. Correspondingly, there is considerable interest in understanding how different molecular mechanisms impact the 'noise' in gene expression. Of particular interest are post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms involving genes called small RNAs, which control important processes such as development and cancer. We propose and analyze general stochastic models of gene expression and derive exact analytical expressions quantifying the noise in protein distributions [1]. Focusing on specific regulatory mechanisms, we analyze a general model for post-transcriptional regulation of stochastic gene expression [2]. The results obtained provide new insights into the role of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling the noise in gene expression. [4pt] [1] T. Jia and R. V. Kulkarni, Phys. Rev. Lett.,106, 058102 (2011) [0pt] [2] T. Jia and R. V. Kulkarni, Phys. Rev. Lett., 105, 018101 (2010)

  16. Neuromuscular Development and Regulation of Myosin Expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodine, Sue

    1997-01-01

    The proposed experiments were designed to determine whether the absence of gravity during embryogenesis influences the postnatal development of the neuromuscular system. Further, we examined the effects of reduced gravity on hindlimb muscles of the pregnant rats. Microgravity may have short and long-term effects on the development of muscle fiber type differentiation and force producing capabilities. Microgravity will reduce muscle fiber size and cause a shift in myosin heavy chain expression from slow to fast in hindlimb muscles of the adult pregnant rats.

  17. Altered expression of adhesion molecules on peripheral blood leukocytes in feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Olyslaegers, Dominique A J; Dedeurwaerder, Annelike; Desmarets, Lowiese M B; Vermeulen, Ben L; Dewerchin, Hannah L; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2013-10-25

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal, coronavirus-induced systemic disease in domestic and wild felids. The pathology associated with FIP (multifocal granulomatous vasculitis) is considered to be elicited by exaggerated activation and subsequent extravasation of leukocytes. As changes in the expression of adhesion molecules on circulating leukocytes precede their margination and emigration, we reasoned that the expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules may be altered in FIP. In present study, the expression of principal adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte transmigration (CD15s, CD11a, CD11b, CD18, CD49d, and CD54) on peripheral blood leukocytes from cats with naturally occurring FIP (n=15) and controls (n=12) was quantified by flow cytometry using a formaldehyde-based rapid leukocyte preparation technique. T- and B-lymphocytes from FIP patients exhibit higher expression of both subunits (CD11a and CD18) composing the β2 integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1. In addition, the expression of the α4 subunit (CD49d) of the β1 integrin very late antigen (VLA)-4 was elevated on B-lymphocytes from FIP patients. The expression of CD11b and CD18, that combine to form the β2 integrin macrophage-1 antigen (Mac-1), was elevated on monocytes, whereas the density of CD49d was reduced on this population in FIP. Granulocytes of FIP cats displayed an increased expression of the α chain of Mac-1 (CD11b). These observations suggest that leukocytes from FIP patients show signs of systemic activation causing them to extravasate into surrounding tissues and ultimately contribute to pyogranuloma formation seen in FIP. PMID:23910523

  18. Characterization of the inflammatory infiltrate and expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in lupus erythematosus tumidus.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Annegret; Sonntag, Monika; Lehmann, Percy; Megahed, Mosaad; Vestweber, Dietmar; Ruzicka, Thomas

    2002-03-01

    Lupus erythematosus tumidus (LET) is a disease with characteristic clinical and histopathologic features that has not always been considered a subset of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE). Although LET was first mentioned in the literature in 1930, it has rarely been documented, and immunohistochemical studies have never been performed. The aim of the present study was to characterize the inflammatory infiltrate and to analyze the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in skin specimens from patients with LET and to compare the results with those from patients with other variants of CLE, such as discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE). Cryostat sections of lesional skin specimens from ten patients with LET demonstrated an infiltrate composed of more than 75% CD4+, CD8+, and HLA-DR+ cells. Interestingly, CD45RO+ cells, in contrast to CD45RA+ cells, were the prevailing inflammatory cell population. Compared with skin specimens from patients with DLE and SCLE, the mean expression of CD4+ and CD8+ cells was higher (but not significantly so) in LET, and no differences were observed with the other three antibodies. Furthermore, in contrast to controls, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular adhesion molecule-1, E-selectin, and P-selectin showed the same expression pattern in skin specimens from patients with DLE, SCLE, and LET. In conclusion, the inflammatory infiltrate of LET primarily consists of CD4+/CD8+ lymphocytes. Furthermore, expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules was equally upregulated in LET compared with the expression in DLE and SCLE, suggesting a similar immunopathomechanism of these subtypes of CLE. PMID:12071156

  19. Structure Based Discovery of Small Molecules to Regulate the Activity of Human Insulin Degrading Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Çakir, Bilal; Dağliyan, Onur; Dağyildiz, Ezgi; Bariş, İbrahim; Kavakli, Ibrahim Halil; Kizilel, Seda; Türkay, Metin

    2012-01-01

    Background Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is an allosteric Zn+2 metalloprotease involved in the degradation of many peptides including amyloid-β, and insulin that play key roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), respectively. Therefore, the use of therapeutic agents that regulate the activity of IDE would be a viable approach towards generating pharmaceutical treatments for these diseases. Crystal structure of IDE revealed that N-terminal has an exosite which is ∼30 Å away from the catalytic region and serves as a regulation site by orientation of the substrates of IDE to the catalytic site. It is possible to find small molecules that bind to the exosite of IDE and enhance its proteolytic activity towards different substrates. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we applied structure based drug design method combined with experimental methods to discover four novel molecules that enhance the activity of human IDE. The novel compounds, designated as D3, D4, D6, and D10 enhanced IDE mediated proteolysis of substrate V, insulin and amyloid-β, while enhanced degradation profiles were obtained towards substrate V and insulin in the presence of D10 only. Conclusion/Significance This paper describes the first examples of a computer-aided discovery of IDE regulators, showing that in vitro and in vivo activation of this important enzyme with small molecules is possible. PMID:22355395

  20. Expression noise facilitates the evolution of gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Luise; Silander, Olin K; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Although it is often tacitly assumed that gene regulatory interactions are finely tuned, how accurate gene regulation could evolve from a state without regulation is unclear. Moreover, gene expression noise would seem to impede the evolution of accurate gene regulation, and previous investigations have provided circumstantial evidence that natural selection has acted to lower noise levels. By evolving synthetic Escherichia coli promoters de novo, we here show that, contrary to expectations, promoters exhibit low noise by default. Instead, selection must have acted to increase the noise levels of highly regulated E. coli promoters. We present a general theory of the interplay between gene expression noise and gene regulation that explains these observations. The theory shows that propagation of expression noise from regulators to their targets is not an unwanted side-effect of regulation, but rather acts as a rudimentary form of regulation that facilitates the evolution of more accurate regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05856.001 PMID:26080931

  1. CCN4 induces vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human synovial fibroblasts and promotes monocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju-Fang; Hou, Sheng-Mou; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Huang, Chun-Yin; Hsu, Chin-Jung; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-05-01

    CCN4 is a cysteine-rich protein that belongs to the Cyr61, CTGF, Nov family of matricellular proteins. Here, we investigated the intracellular signaling pathways involved in CCN4-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human osteoarthritis synovial fibroblasts. Stimulation of OASFs with CCN4 induced VCAM-1 expression. CCN4-induced VCAM-1 expression was attenuated by αvβ5 or α6β1 integrin antibody, Syk inhibitor, PKCδ inhibitor (rottlerin), JNK inhibitor (SP600125), and AP-1 inhibitors (curcumin and tanshinone). Stimulation of cells with CCN4 increased Syk, PKCδ, and JNK activation. Treatment of OASFs with CCN4 also increased c-Jun phosphorylation, AP-1-luciferase activity, and c-Jun binding to the AP-1 element in the VCAM-1 promoter. Moreover, up-regulation of VCAM-1 increased the adhesion of monocytes to OASF monolayers, and this adhesion was attenuated by transfection with a VCAM-1 siRNA. Our results suggest that CCN4 increases VCAM-1 expression in human OASFs via the Syk, PKCδ, JNK, c-Jun, and AP-1 signaling pathways. The CCN4-induced VCAM-1 expression promoted monocyte adhesion to human OASFs. PMID:23313051

  2. Max Delbruck Biological Physics Prize Talk: The Biophysics of Gene Regulation, Studied One Molecule at a Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Steven

    2008-03-01

    Advances have led to a new field, dubbed single molecule biophysics. Prominent among the new technologies is the optical trap, or `optical tweezers.' Sensitive systems for measuring force and displacement in optical traps permit the nanomechanical properties of individual macromolecules to be explored with unprecedented precision, revealing behaviors heretofore obscured by ensemble-based approaches. This talk will focus on some of our current work with single-molecule systems, including transcription by RNA polymerase and structural transitions in nucleic acids. We developed high-resolution instrumentation that has broken the nanometer barrier and is thereby able to detect displacements down to the atomic level, in aqueous buffer at room temperature. Consequently, we can monitor the motions of RNA polymerase molecules in real time as these step from base to base along DNA. On the practical side, base-pair resolution makes it possible to sequence DNA in a new way, based on enzyme motions, and points to new directions in nanoscience. The improved stability afforded by the current generation of optical trapping apparatus has allowed us to reconstruct the complete energy landscapes for folding transitions in nucleic-acid hairpins. Recently, we have turned our attention to the problem of co-transcriptional folding, aptamers, and riboswitches formed in nascent mRNAs, and to the DNA or RNA sequence elements that regulate expression.

  3. Segment-specific regulation of epididymal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sipilä, Petra; Björkgren, Ida

    2016-09-01

    The epididymis is necessary for post-testicular sperm maturation. During their epididymal transit, spermatozoa gain ability for progressive movement and fertilization. The epididymis is composed of several segments that have distinct gene expression profiles that enable the establishment of the changing luminal environment required for sperm maturation. The epididymal gene expression is regulated by endocrine, lumicrine, and paracrine factors in a segment-specific manner. Thus, in addition to its importance for male fertility, the epididymis is a valuable model tissue for studying the regulation of gene expression. This review concentrates on recent advances in understanding the androgen, small RNA, and epigenetically mediated regulation of segment-specific gene expression in the epididymis. PMID:27222594

  4. Decorin gene expression and its regulation in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Velez-DelValle, Cristina; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Castro-Munozledo, Federico; Kuri-Harcuch, Walid

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} We showed that cultured human diploid epidermal keratinocytes express and synthesize decorin. {yields} Decorin is found intracytoplasmic in suprabasal cells of cultures and in human epidermis. {yields} Decorin mRNA expression in cHEK is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. {yields} Decorin immunostaining of psoriatic lesions showed a lower intensity and altered intracytoplasmic arrangements. -- Abstract: In various cell types, including cancer cells, decorin is involved in regulation of cell attachment, migration and proliferation. In skin, decorin is seen in dermis, but not in keratinocytes. We show that decorin gene (DCN) is expressed in the cultured keratinocytes, and the protein is found in the cytoplasm of differentiating keratinocytes and in suprabasal layers of human epidermis. RT-PCR experiments showed that DCN expression is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. Our data suggest that decorin should play a significant role in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, cutaneous homeostasis and dermatological diseases.

  5. Tumor necrosis factor beta and ultraviolet radiation are potent regulators of human keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Krutmann, J.; Koeck, A.S.; Schauer, E.; Parlow, F.; Moeller, A.K.; Kapp, A.; Foerster, E.S.; Schoepf, E.L.; Luger, T.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) functions as a ligand of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), as well as a receptor for human picorna virus, and its regulation thus affects various immunologic and inflammatory reactions. The weak, constitutive ICAM-1 expression on human keratinocytes (KC) can be up-regulated by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). In order to further examine the regulation of KC ICAM-1 expression, normal human KC or epidermoid carcinoma cells (KB) were incubated with different cytokines and/or exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Subsequently, ICAM-1 expression was monitored cytofluorometrically using a monoclonal anti-ICAM-1 antibody. Stimulation of cells with recombinant human (rh) interleukin (IL) 1 alpha, rhIL-4, rhIL-5, rhIL-6, rh granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), rh interferon alpha (rhIFN alpha), and rh transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) did not increase ICAM-1 surface expression. In contrast, rhTNF beta significantly up-regulated ICAM-1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the combination of rhTNF beta with rhIFN gamma increased the percentage of ICAM-1-positive KC synergistically. This stimulatory effect of rhTNF beta was further confirmed by the demonstration that rhTNF beta was capable of markedly enhancing ICAM-1 mRNA expression in KC. Finally, exposure of KC in vitro to sublethal doses of UV radiation (0-100 J/m2) prior to cytokine (rhIFN tau, rhTNF alpha, rhTNF beta) stimulation inhibited ICAM-1 up-regulation in a dose-dependent fashion. These studies identify TNF beta and UV light as potent regulators of KC ICAM-1 expression, which may influence both attachment and detachment of leukocytes and possibly viruses to KC.

  6. H-ferritin-regulated microRNAs modulate gene expression in K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Biamonte, Flavia; Zolea, Fabiana; Bisognin, Andrea; Di Sanzo, Maddalena; Saccoman, Claudia; Scumaci, Domenica; Aversa, Ilenia; Panebianco, Mariafranca; Faniello, Maria Concetta; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we showed that the silencing of the heavy subunit (FHC) offerritin, the central iron storage molecule in the cell, is accompanied by a modification in global gene expression. In this work, we explored whether different FHC amounts might modulate miRNA expression levels in K562 cells and studied the impact of miRNAs in gene expression profile modifications. To this aim, we performed a miRNA-mRNA integrative analysis in K562 silenced for FHC (K562shFHC) comparing it with K562 transduced with scrambled RNA (K562shRNA). Four miRNAs, namely hsa-let-7g, hsa-let-7f, hsa-let-7i and hsa-miR-125b, were significantly up-regulated in silenced cells. The remarkable down-regulation of these miRNAs, following FHC expression rescue, supports a specific relation between FHC silencing and miRNA-modulation. The integration of target predictions with miRNA and gene expression profiles led to the identification of a regulatory network which includes the miRNAs up-regulated by FHC silencing, as well as91 down-regulated putative target genes. These genes were further classified in 9 networks; the highest scoring network, "Cell Death and Survival, Hematological System Development and Function, Hematopoiesis", is composed by 18 focus molecules including RAF1 and ERK1/2. We confirmed that, following FHC silencing, ERK1/2 phosphorylation is severely impaired and that RAF1 mRNA is significantly down-regulated. Taken all together, our data indicate that, in our experimental model, FHC silencing may affect RAF1/pERK1/2 levels through the modulation of a specific set of miRNAs and add new insights in to the relationship among iron homeostasis and miRNAs. PMID:25815883

  7. H-Ferritin-Regulated MicroRNAs Modulate Gene Expression in K562 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Biamonte, Flavia; Zolea, Fabiana; Bisognin, Andrea; Di Sanzo, Maddalena; Saccoman, Claudia; Scumaci, Domenica; Aversa, Ilenia; Panebianco, Mariafranca; Faniello, Maria Concetta; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we showed that the silencing of the heavy subunit (FHC) offerritin, the central iron storage molecule in the cell, is accompanied by a modification in global gene expression. In this work, we explored whether different FHC amounts might modulate miRNA expression levels in K562 cells and studied the impact of miRNAs in gene expression profile modifications. To this aim, we performed a miRNA-mRNA integrative analysis in K562 silenced for FHC (K562shFHC) comparing it with K562 transduced with scrambled RNA (K562shRNA). Four miRNAs, namely hsa-let-7g, hsa-let-7f, hsa-let-7i and hsa-miR-125b, were significantly up-regulated in silenced cells. The remarkable down-regulation of these miRNAs, following FHC expression rescue, supports a specific relation between FHC silencing and miRNA-modulation. The integration of target predictions with miRNA and gene expression profiles led to the identification of a regulatory network which includes the miRNAs up-regulated by FHC silencing, as well as91 down-regulated putative target genes. These genes were further classified in 9 networks; the highest scoring network, “Cell Death and Survival, Hematological System Development and Function, Hematopoiesis”, is composed by 18 focus molecules including RAF1 and ERK1/2. We confirmed that, following FHC silencing, ERK1/2 phosphorylation is severely impaired and that RAF1 mRNA is significantly down-regulated. Taken all together, our data indicate that, in our experimental model, FHC silencing may affect RAF1/pERK1/2 levels through the modulation of a specific set of miRNAs and add new insights in to the relationship among iron homeostasis and miRNAs. PMID:25815883

  8. Expressed Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Horseradish Peroxidase Identifies Co-Clustering Molecules in Individual Lipid Raft Domains

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa-Yamaguchi, Arisa; Kotani, Norihiro; Honke, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Lipid rafts that are enriched in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins serve as a platform for important biological events. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of these events, identification of co-clustering molecules in individual raft domains is required. Here we describe an approach to this issue using the recently developed method termed enzyme-mediated activation of radical source (EMARS), by which molecules in the vicinity within 300 nm from horseradish peroxidase (HRP) set on the probed molecule are labeled. GPI-anchored HRP fusion proteins (HRP-GPIs), in which the GPI attachment signals derived from human decay accelerating factor and Thy-1 were separately connected to the C-terminus of HRP, were expressed in HeLa S3 cells, and the EMARS reaction was catalyzed by these expressed HRP-GPIs under a living condition. As a result, these different HRP-GPIs had differences in glycosylation and localization and formed distinct clusters. This novel approach distinguished molecular clusters associated with individual GPI-anchored proteins, suggesting that it can identify co-clustering molecules in individual raft domains. PMID:24671047

  9. Expression of the human nephron differentiation molecules in renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Droz, D.; Zachar, D.; Charbit, L.; Gogusev, J.; Chrétein, Y.; Iris, L.

    1990-01-01

    The authors tested frozen sections from 28 renal cell carcinomas (RCC)--21 clear, 1 eosinophilic, 4 basophilic, and 2 spindle-shaped cell type--with monoclonal antibodies (MAb) reacting against cytokeratin, vimentin, CD24, CALLA/CD10, villin, CD26, and HLA class I and class II molecules. These molecules are markers of specific segments of the mature kidney, and their loss or acquisition reflects the different steps of human nephrogenesis. KI67 MAb was used to evaluate cell-proliferating activity. All RCC cases expressed cytokeratin. Coexpression of vimentin was observed in 21 of 28 cases. Whether of clear or chromophilic type, all tumoral cells strongly expressed CD24 molecule, present on primitive blastema cells. All clear-type RCCs expressed CALLA/CD10 and 60% were also villin positive; some were faintly positive for CD26. CALLA, villin, and CD26 were not detected in basophilic cell type. HLA class I molecules were variably expressed in almost all cases, but HLA class II were never detected on tumoral cells. Except for the spindle-shaped population, cell-proliferating activity was low. These results favor the hypothesis that RCCs derive from cells that have 'recovered' the different options of metanephric differentiation. Clear cells show evidence of maturation toward proximal type, while basophilic cells do not. It would be of interest to evaluate the usefulness of serum measurements of villin and/or CALLA as markers in clear cell-type RCC. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:1699423

  10. Regulation of cadherin expression in nervous system development

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Alicia F; Prasad, Maneeshi S; Thuringer, Amanda Henke; Manzerra, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses our current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms for classical cadherin expression during development of the vertebrate nervous system. The complexity of the spatial and temporal expression patterns is linked to morphogenic and functional roles in the developing nervous system. While the regulatory networks controlling cadherin expression are not well understood, it is likely that the multiple signaling pathways active in the development of particular domains also regulate the specific cadherins expressed at that time and location. With the growing understanding of the broader roles of cadherins in cell–cell adhesion and non-adhesion processes, it is important to understand both the upstream regulation of cadherin expression and the downstream effects of specific cadherins within their cellular context. PMID:24526207

  11. Interference with virus and bacteria replication by the tissue specific expression of antibodies and interfering molecules.

    PubMed

    Enjuanes, L; Sola, I; Izeta, A; Sánchez-Morgado, J M; González, J M; Alonso, S; Escors, D; Sánchez, C M

    1999-01-01

    Historically, protection against virus infections has relied on the use of vaccines, but the induction of an immune response requires several days and in certain situations, like in newborn animals that may be infected at birth and die in a few days, there is not sufficient time to elicit a protective immune response. Immediate protection in new born could be provided either by vectors that express virus-interfering molecules in a tissue specific form, or by the production of animals expressing resistance to virus replication. The mucosal surface is the largest body surface susceptible to virus infection that can serve for virus entry. Then, it is of high interest to develop strategies to prevent infections of these areas. Virus growth can be interfered intracellularly, extracellularly or both. The antibodies neutralize virus intra- and extracellularly and their molecular biology is well known. In addition, antibodies efficiently neutralize viruses in the mucosal areas. The autonomy of antibody molecules in virus neutralization makes them functional in cells different from those that produce the antibodies and in the extracellular medium. These properties have identified antibodies as very useful molecules to be expressed by vectors or in transgenic animals to provide resistance to virus infection. A similar role could be played by antimicrobial peptides in the case of bacteria. Intracellular interference with virus growth (intracellular immunity) can be mediated by molecules of very different nature: (i) full length or single chain antibodies; (ii) mutant viral proteins that strongly interfere with the replication of the wild type virus (dominant-negative mutants); (iii) antisense RNA and ribozyme sequences; and (iv) the product of antiviral genes such as the Mx proteins. All these molecules inhibiting virus replication may be used to obtain transgenic animals with resistance to viral infection built in their genomes. We have developed two strategies to target

  12. Transporter Molecules influence the Gene Expression in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waldeck, Waldemar; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Korn, Bernhard; Mueller, Gabriele; Schick, Matthias; Tóth, Katalin; Wiessler, Manfred; Didinger, Bernd; Braun, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Progresses in biology and pharmacology led to highly specific bioactive substances, but their poor bioavailability at the site of action is a result of their physico-chemical properties. Various design approaches for transport carrier molecules facilitating the cellular entry of bioactive substances could help to reach their molecular target in cells and tissues. The transfer efficacy and the subsequent pharmacological effects of the cargo molecules are well investigated, but the investigations of effects of the carrier molecules themselves on the target cells or tissues remain necessary. A special attention should be paid to the differential gene expression, particularly in the interpretation of the data achieved by highly specific active pharmaceutical products. After application of transmembrane transport peptides, particularly the pAnt and also the HIV-1 Tat, cells respond with a conspicuous altered gene expression of at least three genes. The PKN1 gene was induced and two genes (ZCD1 and BSG) were slightly repressed. The genes and the chromosomes are described, the moderate differential gene expression graphed, and the ontology is listed. PMID:19214198

  13. AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC, the Beginning: Initial Cloning, Structure, Expression Profile, and Regulation of Expression

    PubMed Central

    DeSalle, Rob; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Since its initial identification as a HIV-1-inducible gene in 2002, astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1), subsequently cloned as metadherin (MTDH) and lysine-rich CEACAM1 coisolated (LYRIC), has emerged over the past 10 years as an important oncogene providing a valuable prognostic marker in patients with various cancers. Recent studies demonstrate that AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC is a pleiotropic protein that can localize in the cell membrane, cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), nucleus, and nucleolus, and contributes to diverse signaling pathways such as PI3K–AKT, NF-κB, MAPK, and Wnt. In addition to tumorigenesis, this multifunctional protein is implicated in various physiological and pathological processes including development, neurodegeneration, and inflammation. The present review focuses on the discovery of AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC and conceptualizes areas of future direction for this intriguing gene. We begin by describing how AEG-1, MTDH, and LYRIC were initially identified by different research groups and then discuss AEG-1 structure, functions, localization, and evolution. We conclude with a discussion of the expression profile of AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC in the context of cancer, neurological disorders, inflammation, and embryogenesis, and discuss how AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC is regulated. This introductory discussion of AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC will serve as the basis for the detailed discussions in other chapters of the unique properties of this intriguing molecule. PMID:23889986

  14. AGGRECAN IS EXPRESSED BY EMBRYONIC BRAIN GLIA AND REGULATES ASTROCYTE DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Domowicz, Miriam S.; Sanders, Timothy A.; Ragsdale, Clifton W.; Schwartz, Nancy B.

    2008-01-01

    Determination of the molecules that regulate astrocyte development has been hindered by the paucity of markers that identify astrocytic precursors in vivo. Here we report that the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan aggrecan both regulates astrocyte development and is expressed by embryonic glial precursors. During chick brain development, the onset of aggrecan expression precedes that of the astrocytic marker GFAP and is concomitant with detection of the early glial markers GLAST and glutamine synthetase. In co-expression studies, we established that aggrecan-rich cells contain the radial glial markers nestin, BLBP and GLAST and later in embryogenesis, the astroglial marker GFAP. Parallel in vitro studies showed that ventricular zone cultures, enriched in aggrecan-expressing cells, could be directed to a GFAP -positive fate in G5-supplemented differentiation media. Analysis of the chick aggrecan mutant nanomelia revealed marked increases in expression of the astrocyte differentiation genes GFAP, GLAST and GS in the absence of extracellular aggrecan. These increases in astrocytic marker gene expression could not be accounted for by changes in precursor proliferation or cell death, suggesting that aggrecan regulates the rate of astrocyte differentiation. Taken together, these results indicate a major role for aggrecan in the control of glial cell maturation during brain development. PMID:18207138

  15. Tumor necrosis factor alpha regulates in vivo intrapulmonary expression of ICAM-1.

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, M. S.; Vaporciyan, A. A.; Miyasaka, M.; Tamatani, T.; Ward, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Lung injury following deposition of IgG immune complexes is neutrophil-dependent and requires both tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) and CD18. In the current studies, we have evaluated the relationship between TNF alpha and expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in vitro and in vivo. In both rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, TNF alpha induced an early (within 60 minutes) increase in ICAM-1 expression, followed by a peak at 6 to 8 hours, with relatively stable expression at 24 hours. Expression of E-selectin did not show the early phase (within 60 minutes) of up-regulation, peaked at 4 hours, and then declined thereafter. Using a radioimmunochemical assay in vivo, it was demonstrated that intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes caused a progressive increase in ICAM-1 expression in lung over an 8-hour period. In animals pretreated with antibody to TNF alpha, the intrapulmonary expression of ICAM-1 was significantly reduced. These results were confirmed by immunoperoxidase analysis of lung tissue. It was also shown that airway instillation of TNF alpha caused up-regulation of ICAM-1 in lung. These data support the concept that deposition of IgG immune complexes in lung induces intrapulmonary up-regulation of ICAM-1 in a manner that is TNF alpha-dependent. Images Figure 2 Figure 7 PMID:7685152

  16. Multidrug Efflux Pumps in the Genus Erwinia: Physiology and Regulation of Efflux Pump Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Thekkiniath, J; Ravirala, R; San Francisco, M

    2016-01-01

    Plant pathogens belonging to the genus Erwinia cause diseases in several economically important plants. Plants respond to bacterial infection with a powerful chemical arsenal and signaling molecules to rid themselves of the microbes. Although our understanding of how Erwinia initiate infections in plants has become clear, a comprehensive understanding of how these bacteria rid themselves of noxious antimicrobial agents during the infection is important. Multidrug efflux pumps are key factors in bacterial resistance toward antibiotics by reducing the level of antimicrobial compounds in the bacterial cell. Erwinia induce the expression of efflux pump genes in response to plant-derived antimicrobials. The capability of Erwinia to co-opt plant defense signaling molecules such as salicylic acid to trigger multidrug efflux pumps might have developed to ensure bacterial survival in susceptible host plants. In this review, we discuss the developments in Erwinia efflux pumps, focusing in particular on efflux pump function and the regulation of efflux pump gene expression. PMID:27571694

  17. The effect of hyperglycaemia on permeability and the expression of junctional complex molecules in human retinal and choroidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Saker, S; Stewart, E A; Browning, A C; Allen, C L; Amoaku, W M

    2014-04-01

    endothelial cell permeability is likely caused by a decrease in selective tight junction protein expression, leading to increased paracellular permeability. This may indicate differences in junctional molecule regulation of permeability in retinal compared to choroidal endothelial cells. PMID:24594192

  18. Environmental regulation of expression of virulence determinants in Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Melton, A R; Weiss, A A

    1989-01-01

    The trans-activator vir is required for expression of all virulence-associated genes in Bordetella pertussis. The nature of the global regulation of these factors by vir and environmental signals was examined by Northern blot analysis and with beta-galactosidase transcriptional fusions in five vir-regulated genes. Northern blots suggested that vir regulates at the level of transcription since Vir- organisms did not exhibit detectable mRNA from vir-regulated loci. Environmental signals such as high levels of salts, nicotinic acid, and 6-chloronicotinic acid or growth at low temperatures were examined. Of all of the cations and anions examined, only SO4 ions eliminated transcription of vir-regulated genes and reduced transcription of vir itself, suggesting that global regulation is obtained by modifying expression of the essential component, vir. Organisms grown on 6-chloronicotinic acid or quinaldic acid did not have detectable transcription from vir-regulated loci. Modulation by nicotinic acid, on the other hand, was strain dependent, acting at the level of transcription in strain 18-323 but not in Tohama I derivatives. Growth at lower temperatures reduced, but did not eliminate, transcription from vir-regulated loci. At 28 degrees C the ratio of pertussis toxin mRNA to recA mRNA (a non-vir-regulated factor) was equivalent to that at 37 degrees C, suggesting that transcription at low temperatures is reduced in a proportional manner and need not involve vir. Images PMID:2478524

  19. Immunoregulatory molecules are master regulators of inflammation during the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory signalling is critical to maintain the immune homeostasis under physiological conditions as well as for the control of inflammation in different pathological settings. Recent progress in the signalling pathways that control this balance has led to the development of novel therapeutic agents for diseases characterized by alterations in the activation/suppression of the immune response. Different molecules have a key role in the regulation of the immune system, including the receptors PD-1 (Programmed cell Death 1), CTLA-4 (Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4) and galectins; or the intracellular enzyme IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase). In addition, other molecules as CD69, AhR (Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor), and GADD45 (Growth Arrest and DNA Damage-inducible 45) family members, have emerged as potential targets for the regulation of the activation/suppression balance of immune cells. This review offers a perspective on well-characterized as well as emergent negative immune regulatory molecules in the context of autoimmune inflammatory diseases. PMID:22819828

  20. Variable Expression of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Isoforms in Renal Tissue: Possible Role in Incipient Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Claudia A.; Tampe, Björn; Ćirović, Sanja; Vještica, Jelena; Tomanović, Nada; Zeisberg, Michael; Müller, Gerhard A.

    2015-01-01

    Rare neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) positive cells have been previously described within the normal human adult kidney interstitium, speculating that they could increase in the interstitium with incipient interstitial renal fibrosis (IRF). In the present study, among 93 biopsy samples of various kidney diseases, NCAM+ interstitial cells were detected in 62.4% cases. An increased number of NCAM+ cells was significantly observed only in incipient IRF compared to normal renal tissues and advanced IRF stages (p<0.001), independently of underlying diseases (p = 0.657). All three major NCAM isoforms’ RT-PCR bands were visible either in normal or in kidneys with incipient IRF, albeit their mRNA expression levels measured by qRT-PCR were different. Applying qRT-PCR on pure NCAM+ cells population, obtained by laser capture microdissection, significant mRNA over-expression of NCAM140kD isoform was found in NCAM+ cells within incipient IRF (p = 0.004), while NCAM120kD and NCAM180kD isoforms were not changed significantly (p = 0.750; p = 0.704; respectively). Simultaneously, qRT-PCR also showed significant αSMA (p = 0.014) and SLUG (p = 0.004) mRNAs up-regulation within the NCAM+ cells of incipient IRF, as well as highly decreased matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) -2 and -9 mRNAs (p = 0.028; p = 0.036; respectively). However, using double immunofluorescence MMP-9 could still be detectable on the protein level in rare NCAM+ cells within the incipient IRF. Further characterization of NCAM+ cells by double immunofluorescent labeling revealed their association with molecules involved in fibrosis. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and α5β1 integrin were extensively expressed on NCAM+ cells within the incipient IRF areas, whereas human epididymis protein-4 (HE4) was found to be present in few NCAM+ cells of both normal and interstitium with incipient fibrosis. Heterogeneity of NCAM+ interstitial cells in normal and incipient IRF, concerning molecules related to

  1. Expression of cytokines, chemokines and other effector molecules in two prototypic autoinflammatory skin diseases, pyoderma gangrenosum and Sweet's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Marzano, A V; Fanoni, D; Antiga, E; Quaglino, P; Caproni, M; Crosti, C; Meroni, P L; Cugno, M

    2014-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and Sweet's syndrome (SS) are two inflammatory skin diseases presenting with painful ulcers and erythematous plaques, respectively; both disorders have a debilitating clinical behaviour and PG is potentially life-threatening. Recently, PG and SS have been included among the autoinflammatory diseases, which are characterized by recurrent episodes of sterile inflammation, without circulating autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells. However, an autoinflammatory pattern clearly supporting this inclusion has never been demonstrated. We studied 16 patients with PG, six with SS and six controls, evaluating, using a sandwich-based protein antibody array method, the expression profile of inflammatory effector molecules in PG, SS and normal skin. The expressions of interleukin (IL)-1 beta and its receptor I were significantly higher in PG (P = 0·0001 for both) and SS (P = 0·004–0·040) than in controls. In PG, chemokines such as IL-8 (P = 0·0001), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL) 1/2/3 (P = 0·002), CXCL 16 (P = 0·003) and regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) (P = 0·005) were over-expressed. In SS, IL-8 (P = 0·018), CXCL 1/2/3 (P = 0·006) and CXCL 16 (P = 0·036) but not RANTES were over-expressed, suggesting that chemokine-mediated signals are lower than in PG. Fas/Fas ligand and CD40/CD40 ligand systems were over-expressed in PG (P = 0·0001 for Fas, P = 0·009 for Fas ligand, P = 0·012 for CD40, P = 0·0001 for CD40 ligand), contributing to tissue damage and inflammation, while their role seems to be less significant in SS. Over-expression of cytokines/chemokines and molecules amplifying the inflammatory network supports the view that PG and SS are autoinflammatory diseases. The differences in expression profile of inflammatory effectors between these two disorders may explain the stronger local aggressiveness in PG than SS. PMID:24903614

  2. Novel secreted isoform of adhesion molecule ICAM-4: Potential regulator of membrane-associated ICAM-4 interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gloria; Spring, Frances A.; Parons, Stephen F.; Mankelow, Tosti J.; Peters, Luanne L.; Koury, Mark J.; Mohandas, Narla; Anstee, David J.; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2003-02-18

    ICAM-4, a newly characterized adhesion molecule, is expressed early in human erythropoiesis and functions as a ligand for binding a4b1 and aV integrin-expressing cells. Within the bone marrow, erythroblasts surround central macrophages forming erythroblastic islands. Evidence suggests that these islands are highly specialized subcompartments where cell adhesion events, in concert with cytokines, play critical roles in regulating erythropoiesis and apoptosis. Since erythroblasts express a4b1 and ICAM-4 and macrophages exhibit aV, ICAM-4 is an attractive candidate for mediating cellular interactions within erythroblastic islands. To determine whether ICAM-4 binding properties are conserved across species, we first cloned and sequenced the murine homologue. The translated amino acid sequence showed 68 percent overall identity with human ICAM-4. Using recombinant murine ICAM-4 extracellular domains, we discovered that hematopoietic a4b1-expressing HEL cells and non-hematopoietic aV-expressing FLY cells adhered to mouse ICAM-4. Cell adhesion studies showed that FLY and HEL cells bound to mouse and human proteins with similar avidity. These data strongly suggest conservation of integrin-binding properties across species. Importantly, we characterized a novel second splice cDNA that would be predicted to encode an ICAM-4 isoform, lacking the membrane-spanning domain. Erythroblasts express both isoforms of ICAM-4. COS-7 cells transfected with GFP constructs of prototypic or novel ICAM-4 cDNA showed different cellular localization patterns. Moreover, analysis of tissue culture medium revealed that the novel ICAM-4 cDNA encodes a secreted protein. We postulate that secretion of this newly described isoform, ICAM-4S, may modulate binding of membrane-associated ICAM-4 and could thus play a critical regulatory role in erythroblast molecular attachments.

  3. The CO donor CORM-2 inhibits LPS-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression and leukocyte adhesion in human rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Pei-Ling; Chuang, Yu-Chen; Chen, Yu-Wen; Lin, Chih-Chung; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Infection with Gram-negative bacteria has been recognized as an initiator of rheumatoid arthritis, which is characterized by chronic inflammation and infiltration of immune cells. Carbon monoxide (CO) exhibits anti-inflammatory properties. Here we have investigated the detailed mechanisms of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression induced by LPS and if CO inhibited LPS-induced leukocyte adhesion to synovial fibroblasts by suppressing VCAM-1 expression. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASFs) were incubated with LPS and/or the CO-releasing compound CORM-2. Effects of LPS on VCAM-1 levels were determined by analysing mRNA expression, promoter activity, protein expression, and immunohistochemical staining. The molecular mechanisms were investigated by determining the expression, activation, and binding activity of transcriptional factors using target signal antagonists. KEY RESULTS CORM-2 significantly inhibited inflammatory responses in LPS-treated RASFs by down-regulating the expression of adhesion molecule VCAM-1 and leukocyte infiltration. The down-regulation of LPS-induced VCAM-1 expression involved inhibition of the expression of phosphorylated-NF-κB p65 and AP-1 (p-c-Jun, c-Jun and c-Fos mRNA levels). These results were confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay to detect NF-κB and AP-1 DNA binding activity. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS LPS-mediated formation of the TLR4/MyD88/TRAF6/c-Src complex regulated NF-κB and MAPKs/AP-1 activation leading to VCAM-1 expression and leukocyte adhesion. CORM-2, which liberates CO to elicit direct biological activities, attenuated LPS-induced VCAM-1 expression by interfering with NF-κB and AP-1 activation, and significantly reduced LPS-induced immune cell infiltration of the synovium. PMID:24628691

  4. Regulation of gbpC expression in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Indranil; Drake, Laura; Biswas, Saswati

    2007-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans, the principal causative agent of dental caries, produces four glucan-binding proteins (Gbp) that play major roles in bacterial adherence and pathogenesis. One of these proteins, GbpC, is an important cell surface protein involved in biofilm formation. GbpC is also important for cariogenesis, bacteremia, and infective endocarditis. In this study, we examined the regulation of gbpC expression in S. mutans strain UA159. We found that gbpC expression attains the maximum level at mid-exponential growth phase, and the half-life of the transcript is less than 2 min. Expression from PgbpC was measured using a PgbpC-gusA transcriptional fusion reporter and was analyzed under various stress conditions, including thermal, osmotic, and acid stresses. Expression of gbpC is induced under conditions of thermal stress but is repressed during growth at low pH, whereas osmotic stress had no effect on expression from PgbpC. The results from the expression analyses were further confirmed using semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis. Our results also reveal that CovR, a global response regulator in many Streptococcus spp., represses gbpC expression at the transcriptional level. We demonstrated that purified CovR protein binds directly to the promoter region of PgbpC to repress gbpC expression. Using a DNase I protection assay, we showed that CovR binds to DNA sequences surrounding PgbpC from bases -68 to 28 (where base 1 is the start of transcription). In summary, our results indicate that various stress conditions modulate the expression of gbpC and that CovR negatively regulates the expression of the gbpC gene by directly binding to the promoter region. PMID:17616585

  5. Cold stress regulation of gene expression in plants.

    PubMed

    Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Zhu, Jianhua; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2007-10-01

    Cold stress adversely affects plant growth and development. Most temperate plants acquire freezing tolerance by a process called cold acclimation. Here, we focus on recent progress in transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation of gene expression that is critical for cold acclimation. Transcriptional regulation is mediated by the inducer of C-repeat binding factor (CBF) expression 1 (ICE1), the CBF transcriptional cascade and CBF-independent regulons during cold acclimation. ICE1 is negatively regulated by ubiquitination-mediated proteolysis and positively regulated by SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) E3 ligase-catalyzed sumoylation. Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, such as pre-mRNA splicing, mRNA export and small RNA-directed mRNA degradation, also play important roles in cold stress responses. PMID:17855156

  6. Calcium regulates caveolin-1 expression at the transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Kan, Qi-Ming; Li, Yan; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Sato, Toshinori; Yamagata, Sadako; Yamagata, Tatsuya

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 expression is regulated by calcium signaling at the transcriptional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An inhibitor of or siRNA to L-type calcium channel suppressed caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclosporine A or an NFAT inhibitor markedly reduced caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 regulation by calcium signaling is observed in several mouse cell lines. -- Abstract: Caveolin-1, an indispensable component of caveolae serving as a transformation suppressor protein, is highly expressed in poorly metastatic mouse osteosarcoma FBJ-S1 cells while highly metastatic FBJ-LL cells express low levels of caveolin-1. Calcium concentration is higher in FBJ-S1 cells than in FBJ-LL cells; therefore, we investigated the possibility that calcium signaling positively regulates caveolin-1 in mouse FBJ-S1 cells. When cells were treated with the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, cyclosporin A (a calcineurin inhibitor), or INCA-6 (a nuclear factor of activated T-cells [NFAT] inhibitor), caveolin-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels decreased. RNA silencing of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel subunit alpha-1C resulted in suppression of caveolin-1 expression. This novel caveolin-1 regulation pathway was also identified in mouse NIH 3T3 cells and Lewis lung carcinoma cells. These results indicate that caveolin-1 is positively regulated at the transcriptional level through a novel calcium signaling pathway mediated by L-type calcium channel/Ca{sup 2+}/calcineurin/NFAT.

  7. Tropoelastin regulates chemokine expression in fibroblasts in Costello syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tatano, Yutaka; Fujinawa, Reiko; Kozutsumi, Yasunori; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Tsuji, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Naohiro; Tsuta, Kohji; Takada, Goro; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Itoh, Kohji

    2008-08-08

    Costello syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly associated with growth and mental retardation, cardiac and skeletal anomalies, and a predisposition to develop neoplasia. Comprehensive expression analysis revealed remarkable up-regulation of several cytokines and chemokines including Gro family proteins, interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), IL-8 and MCP-1 but down-regulation of extracellular matrix components including collagens and proteoglycans of skin fibroblasts derived from a Japanese Costello syndrome patient characterized by significantly reduced tropoelastin mRNA, impaired elastogenesis and enhanced cell proliferation. In contrast, decreases in these chemokines and IL-1{beta} expression were observed in Costello fibroblastic cell lines stably expressing the bovine tropoelastin (btEln) gene and in restored elastic fibers. These results strongly suggest that the human TE gene (ELN) transfer could be applicable for the gene therapy of a group of Costello syndrome patients with reduced ELN gene expression.

  8. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule regulation is associated with the maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tung-Ying; Lu, Ruei-Min; Liao, Mei-Ying; Yu, John; Chung, Chu-Hung; Kao, Cheng-Fu; Wu, Han-Chung

    2010-03-19

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are unique pluripotent cells capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all three germ layers. To date, more cell surface markers capable of reliably identifying hESCs are needed. The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein expressed in several progenitor cell populations and cancers. It has been used to enrich cells with tumor-initiating activity in xenograft transplantation studies. Here, we comprehensively profile the expression of EpCAM by immunofluorescence microscopy, Western blotting, and flow cytometry using an anti-EpCAM monoclonal antibody (mAb) OC98-1. We found EpCAM to be highly and selectively expressed by undifferentiated rather than differentiated hESCs. The protein and transcript level of EpCAM rapidly diminished as soon as hESC had differentiated. This silencing was closely and exclusively associated with the radical transformation of histone modification at the EpCAM promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that the dynamic pattern of lysine 27 trimethylation of histone 3 was conferred by the interplay of SUZ12 and JMJD3, both of which were involved in maintaining hESC pluripotency. In addition, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis to elucidate the direct regulation by EpCAM of several reprogramming genes, including c-MYC, OCT-4, NANOG, SOX2, and KLF4, to help maintain the undifferentiation of hESCs. Collectively, our results suggest that EpCAM might be used as a surface marker for hESC. The expression of EpCAM may be regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, and it is strongly associated with the maintenance of the undifferentiated state of hESCs. PMID:20064925

  9. Urea uptake enhances barrier function and antimicrobial defense in humans by regulating epidermal gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Grether-Beck, Susanne; Felsner, Ingo; Brenden, Heidi; Kohne, Zippora; Majora, Marc; Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Rodriguez-Martin, Marina; Trullas, Carles; Hupe, Melanie; Elias, Peter M.; Krutmann, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Urea is an endogenous metabolite, known to enhance stratum corneum hydration. Yet, topical urea anecdotally also improves permeability barrier function, and it appears to exhibit antimicrobial activity. Hence, we hypothesized that urea is not merely a passive metabolite, but a small-molecule regulator of epidermal structure and function. In 21 human volunteers, topical urea improved barrier function in parallel with enhanced antimicrobial peptide (LL-37 and β-defensin-2) expression. Urea both stimulates expression of, and is transported into keratinocytes by two urea transporters, UT-A1 and UT-A2, and by aquaporin 3, 7 and 9. Inhibitors of these urea transporters block the downstream biological effects of urea, which include increased mRNA and protein levels for: (i) transglutaminase-1, involucrin, loricrin and filaggrin; (ii) epidermal lipid synthetic enzymes, and (iii) cathelicidin/LL-37 and β-defensin-2. Finally, we explored the potential clinical utility of urea, showing that topical urea applications normalized both barrier function and antimicrobial peptide expression in a murine model of atopic dermatitis (AD). Together, these results show that urea is a small-molecule regulator of epidermal permeability barrier function and antimicrobial peptide expression after transporter uptake, followed by gene regulatory activity in normal epidermis, with potential therapeutic applications in diseased skin. PMID:22418868

  10. The small molecule ferristatin II induces hepatic hepcidin expression in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Alkhateeb, Ahmed A; Buckett, Peter D; Gardeck, Andrew M; Kim, Jonghan; Byrne, Shaina L; Fraenkel, Paula G; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2015-06-15

    Previous studies have shown that administration of ferristatin II to rats is associated with decreased serum iron, reduced transferrin saturation, and increased hepatic hepcidin expression. BMP and IL-6 signaling act via Smad and Stat3 transcription factors, respectively, to increase expression of hepcidin, the master regulator of iron metabolism. In this study, we aimed to explore the underlying mechanism of ferristatin II action on hepcidin production. We found that ferristatin II greatly increased hepcidin expression both in vivo and in vitro. In the rat liver, ferristatin II treatment decreased expression of Smad downstream targets Smad7 and Id1 and increased expression of Stat3 downstream targets α-2-macroglobulin, α-1-acid glycoprotein, and C-reactive peptide. Ferristatin II also increased Stat3 phosphorylation in the rat liver without affecting serum or hepatic IL-6 levels. It is unclear whether the Stat3 activation observed in vivo is a cause or a consequence to hepcidin induction. Reporter gene expression studies demonstrated that ferristatin II synergized with BMP6 and IL-6 to enhance hepcidin expression in vitro. However, this synergy was not due to activation of either Smad or Stat3 signaling, raising the possibility that ferristatin II may activate a novel pathway for hepcidin regulation. PMID:25907691

  11. The cell adhesion molecule Fasciclin2 regulates brush border length and organization in Drosophila renal tubules.

    PubMed

    Halberg, Kenneth A; Rainey, Stephanie M; Veland, Iben R; Neuert, Helen; Dornan, Anthony J; Klämbt, Christian; Davies, Shireen-Anne; Dow, Julian A T

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular organisms rely on cell adhesion molecules to coordinate cell-cell interactions, and to provide navigational cues during tissue formation. In Drosophila, Fasciclin 2 (Fas2) has been intensively studied due to its role in nervous system development and maintenance; yet, Fas2 is most abundantly expressed in the adult renal (Malpighian) tubule rather than in neuronal tissues. The role Fas2 serves in this epithelium is unknown. Here we show that Fas2 is essential to brush border maintenance in renal tubules of Drosophila. Fas2 is dynamically expressed during tubule morphogenesis, localizing to the brush border whenever the tissue is transport competent. Genetic manipulations of Fas2 expression levels impact on both microvilli length and organization, which in turn dramatically affect stimulated rates of fluid secretion by the tissue. Consequently, we demonstrate a radically different role for this well-known cell adhesion molecule, and propose that Fas2-mediated intermicrovillar homophilic adhesion complexes help stabilize the brush border. PMID:27072072

  12. The cell adhesion molecule Fasciclin2 regulates brush border length and organization in Drosophila renal tubules

    PubMed Central

    Halberg, Kenneth A.; Rainey, Stephanie M.; Veland, Iben R.; Neuert, Helen; Dornan, Anthony J.; Klämbt, Christian; Davies, Shireen-Anne; Dow, Julian A. T.

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular organisms rely on cell adhesion molecules to coordinate cell–cell interactions, and to provide navigational cues during tissue formation. In Drosophila, Fasciclin 2 (Fas2) has been intensively studied due to its role in nervous system development and maintenance; yet, Fas2 is most abundantly expressed in the adult renal (Malpighian) tubule rather than in neuronal tissues. The role Fas2 serves in this epithelium is unknown. Here we show that Fas2 is essential to brush border maintenance in renal tubules of Drosophila. Fas2 is dynamically expressed during tubule morphogenesis, localizing to the brush border whenever the tissue is transport competent. Genetic manipulations of Fas2 expression levels impact on both microvilli length and organization, which in turn dramatically affect stimulated rates of fluid secretion by the tissue. Consequently, we demonstrate a radically different role for this well-known cell adhesion molecule, and propose that Fas2-mediated intermicrovillar homophilic adhesion complexes help stabilize the brush border. PMID:27072072

  13. Transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Singha, Bipradeb; Gatla, Himavanth R; Vancurova, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    The increased expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic chemokines contributes to ovarian cancer progression through the induction of tumor cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis. The substantial potential of these chemokines to facilitate the progression and metastasis of ovarian cancer underscores the need for their stringent transcriptional regulation. In this Review, we highlight the key mechanisms that regulate the transcription of pro-inflammatory chemokines in ovarian cancer cells, and that have important roles in controlling ovarian cancer progression. We further discuss the potential mechanisms underlying the increased chemokine expression in drug resistance, along with our perspective for future studies. PMID:25790431

  14. Group A streptococcal growth phase-associated virulence factor regulation by a novel operon (Fas) with homologies to two-component-type regulators requires a small RNA molecule.

    PubMed

    Kreikemeyer, B; Boyle, M D; Buttaro, B A; Heinemann, M; Podbielski, A

    2001-01-01

    A novel growth phase-associated two-component-type regulator, Fas (fibronectin/fibrinogen binding/haemolytic activity/streptokinase regulator), of Streptococcus pyogenes was identified in the M1 genome sequence, based on homologies to the histidine protein kinase (HPK) and response regulator (RR) part of the Staphylococcus aureus Agr and Streptococcus pneumoniae Com quorum-sensing systems. The fas operon, present in all 12 tested M serotypes, was transcribed as polycystronic message (fasBCA) and contained genes encoding two potential HPKs (FasB and FasC) and one RR (FasA). Downstream of fasBCA, we identified a small 300 nucleotide monocistronic transcript, designated fasX, that did not appear to encode true peptide sequences. Measurements of luciferase promoter fusions revealed a growth phase-associated transcription of fasBCA and fasX, with peak activities during the late exponential phase. Insertional mutagenesis disrupting fasBCA and fasA led to a phenotype similar to agr-null mutations in S. aureus, with prolonged expression of extracellular matrix protein-binding adhesins and reduced expression of secreted virulence factors such as streptokinase and streptolysin S. In addition, fasX transcription was dependent on the RR FasA; however, deletion mutagenesis of fasX resulted in a similar phenotype to that of the fasBCA or fasA mutants. Complementation of the fasX deletion mutant, with the fasX gene expressed in trans from a plasmid, restored the wild-type fasBCA regulation pattern. This strongly suggested that fasX, a putative non-translated RNA, is the main effector molecule of the fas regulon. However, using spent culture supernatants from wild-type and fas mutant strains, we were not able to show an influence on the logarithmic growth phase expression of fas and dependent genes. Thus, despite structural and functional similarities between fas and agr, to date the fas operon appears not to be involved in group A streptococcal (GAS) quorum-sensing regulation

  15. NRF2 Regulates PINK1 Expression under Oxidative Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Hitoshi; Takamatsu, Hitoshi; Liu, Sulai; Kataoka, Ken; Huh, Nam-ho; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) gene are a cause of autosomal recessive forms of Parkinson’s disease. Recent studies have revealed that PINK1 is an essential factor for controlling mitochondrial quality, and that it protects cells from oxidative stresses. Although there has been considerable progress in the elucidation of various aspects of PINK1 protein regulation such as activation, stability and degradation, the transcriptional regulation of PINK1 mRNA under stress conditions remains unclear. In this study, we found that nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2), an antioxidant transcription factor, regulates PINK1 expression under oxidative stress conditions. Damaged mitochondria arising from stress conditions induced NRF2-dependent transcription of the PINK1 gene through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Either an ROS scavenger or forced expression of KEAP1, a potent inhibitory partner to NRF2, restricted PINK1 expression induced by activated NRF2. Transcriptionally up-regulated PINK1 diminished oxidative stress-associated cell death. The results indicate that PINK1 expression is positively regulated by NRF2 and that the NRF2-PINK1 signaling axis is deeply involved in cell survival. PMID:26555609

  16. Regulation of toxin gene expression in Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru

    2015-05-01

    The Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming, rod-shaped Clostridium perfringens is widely distributed in nature, especially in soil and the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals. C. perfringens causes clostridial myonecrosis (or gas gangrene), enteritis and enterotoxemia in humans and livestock by producing numerous extracellular toxins and enzymes. The toxin gene expression is regulated by a two-component regulatory system and regulatory RNA VirR/VirS-VR-RNA cascade. The VirR/VirS system was originally found in a type A strain, but a recent report showed that it is also important for the toxin gene regulation in other types of strains. Two types of cell-cell signaling, i.e., agr-system and AI-2 signaling, are also important for the regulation of toxin genes. Several regulatory systems independent from the VirR/VirS system, including virX, the orphan histidine kinase ReeS and orphan response regulator RevR, are also involved in the regulation of toxin genes. In addition, the expression of toxin genes is upregulated after contact with Caco-2 cells. C. perfringens has a complex regulatory network for toxin gene expression and thus the coordination of toxin gene expression is important for the process of infection. PMID:25303832

  17. Multidimensional regulation of gene expression in the C. elegans embryo

    PubMed Central

    Murray, John Isaac; Boyle, Thomas J.; Preston, Elicia; Vafeados, Dionne; Mericle, Barbara; Weisdepp, Peter; Zhao, Zhongying; Bao, Zhirong; Boeck, Max; Waterston, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    How cells adopt different expression patterns is a fundamental question of developmental biology. We quantitatively measured reporter expression of 127 genes, primarily transcription factors, in every cell and with high temporal resolution in C. elegans embryos. Embryonic cells are highly distinct in their gene expression; expression of the 127 genes studied here can distinguish nearly all pairs of cells, even between cells of the same tissue type. We observed recurrent lineage-regulated expression patterns for many genes in diverse contexts. These patterns are regulated in part by the TCF-LEF transcription factor POP-1. Other genes' reporters exhibited patterns correlated with tissue, position, and left–right asymmetry. Sequential patterns both within tissues and series of sublineages suggest regulatory pathways. Expression patterns often differ between embryonic and larval stages for the same genes, emphasizing the importance of profiling expression in different stages. This work greatly expands the number of genes in each of these categories and provides the first large-scale, digitally based, cellular resolution compendium of gene expression dynamics in live animals. The resulting data sets will be a useful resource for future research. PMID:22508763

  18. Chemoattraction of macrophages by secretory molecules derived from cells expressing the signal peptide of eosinophil cationic protein

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Eosinophil cationic protein is a clinical asthma biomarker that would be released into blood, especially gathered in bronchia. The signal peptide of eosinophil cationic protein (ECPsp) plays an important role in translocating ECP to the extracellular space. We previously reported that ECPsp inhibits microbial growth and regulates the expression of mammalian genes encoding tumor growth factor-α (TGF-α) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Results In the present study, we first generated a DNA microarray dataset, which showed that ECPsp upregulated proinflammatory molecules, including chemokines, interferon-induced molecules, and Toll-like receptors. The levels of mRNAs encoding CCL5, CXCL10, CXCL11, CXCL16, STAT1, and STAT2 were increased in the presence of ECPsp by 2.07-, 4.21-, 7.52-, 2.6-, 3.58-, and 1.67-fold, respectively. We then constructed a functional linkage network by integrating the microarray dataset with the pathway database of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Follow-up analysis revealed that STAT1 and STAT2, important transcriptional factors that regulate cytokine expression and release, served as hubs to connect the pathways of cytokine stimulation (TGF-α and EGFR pathways) and inflammatory responses. Furthermore, integrating TGF-α and EGFR with the functional linkage network indicated that STAT1 and STAT2 served as hubs that connect two functional clusters, including (1) cell proliferation and survival, and (2) inflammation. Finally, we found that conditioned medium in which cells that express ECPsp had been cultured could chemoattract macrophages. Experimentally, we also demonstrated that the migration of macrophage could be inhibited by the individual treatment of siRNAs of STAT1 or STAT2. Therefore, we hypothesize that ECPsp may function as a regulator for enhancing the migration of macrophages through the upregualtion of the transcriptional factors STAT1 and STAT2. Conclusion The increased expression and

  19. Single molecule fluorescence microscopy for ultra-sensitive RNA expression profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, Jan; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Regl, Gerhard; Eichberger, Thomas; Aberger, Fritz; Schlapak, Robert; Howorka, Stefan; Muresan, Leila; Frischauf, Anna-Maria; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2007-02-01

    We developed a microarray analysis platform for ultra-sensitive RNA expression profiling of minute samples. It utilizes a novel scanning system for single molecule fluorescence detection on cm2 size samples in combination with specialized biochips, optimized for low autofluorescence and weak unspecific adsorption. 20 μg total RNA was extracted from 10 6 cells of a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) and reversely transcribed in the presence of Alexa647-aha-dUTP. 1% of the resulting labeled cDNA was used for complex hybridization to a custom-made oligonucleotide microarray representing a set of 125 different genes. For low abundant genes, individual cDNA molecules hybridized to the microarray spots could be resolved. Single cDNA molecules hybridized to the chip surface appeared as diffraction limited features in the fluorescence images. The à trous wavelet method was utilized for localization and counting of the separated cDNA signals. Subsequently, the degree of labeling of the localized cDNA molecules was determined by brightness analysis for the different genes. Variations by factors up to 6 were found, which in conventional microarray analysis would result in a misrepresentation of the relative abundance of mRNAs.

  20. Stochastic Gene Expression in Networks of Post-transcriptional Regulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Charles; Jia, Tao; Pendar, Hodjat; Kulkarni, Rahul

    2012-02-01

    Post-transcriptional regulators, such as small RNAs and microRNAs, are critical elements of diverse cellular pathways. It has been postulated that, in several important cases, the role of these regulators is to to modulate the noise in gene expression for the regulated target. Correspondingly, general stochastic models have been developed, and results obtained, for the case in which a single sRNA regulates a single mRNA target. We generalize these results to networks containing a single mRNA regulated by multiple sRNAs and to networks containing multiple mRNAs regulated by a single sRNA. For these systems, we obtain exact expressions relating the mean levels of the sRNAs to the mean levels of the mRNAs. Additionally, we consider the convergence of the original model to an approximate model which considers sRNA concentrations to be high; for the latter model we derive an analytic form for the generating function of the protein distribution. Finally, we discuss potential experimental protocols which, in combination with the derived results, can be used to infer the underlying gene expression parameters.

  1. Regulation of gene expression in the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Camilla A; Breault, David T

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium is complex and controlled by various signaling pathways that regulate the balance between proliferation and differentiation. Proliferation is required both to grow and to replace cells lost through apoptosis and attrition, yet in all but a few cells, differentiation must take place to prevent uncontrolled growth (cancer) and to provide essential functions. In this chapter, we review the major signaling pathways underlying regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium, based primarily on data from mouse models, as well as specific morphogens and transcription factor families that have a major role in regulating intestinal gene expression, including the Hedgehog family, Forkhead Box (FOX) factors, Homeobox (HOX) genes, ParaHox genes, GATA transcription factors, canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling, EPH/Ephrins, Sox9, BMP signaling, PTEN/PI3K, LKB1, K-RAS, Notch pathway, HNF, and MATH1. We also briefly highlight important emerging areas of gene regulation, including microRNA (miRNA) and epigenetic regulation. PMID:21075346

  2. All-optical regulation of gene expression in targeted cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yisen; He, Hao; Li, Shiyang; Liu, Dayong; Lan, Bei; Hu, Minglie; Cao, Youjia; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-06-01

    Controllable gene expression is always a challenge and of great significance to biomedical research and clinical applications. Recently, various approaches based on extra-engineered light-sensitive proteins have been developed to provide optogenetic actuators for gene expression. Complicated biomedical techniques including exogenous genes engineering, transfection, and material delivery are needed. Here we present an all-optical method to regulate gene expression in targeted cells. Intrinsic or exogenous genes can be activated by a Ca2+-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) driven by a short flash of femtosecond-laser irradiation. When applied to mesenchymal stem cells, expression of a differentiation regulator Osterix can be activated by this method to potentially induce differentiation of them. A laser-induced ``Ca2+-comb'' (LiCCo) by multi-time laser exposure is further developed to enhance gene expression efficiency. This noninvasive method hence provides an encouraging advance of gene expression regulation, with promising potential of applying in cell biology and stem-cell science.

  3. The Late Endosomal Adaptor Molecule p14 (LAMTOR2) Regulates TGFβ1-Mediated Homeostasis of Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sparber, Florian; Tripp, Christoph H.; Komenda, Kerstin; Scheffler, Julia M.; Clausen, Björn E.; Huber, Lukas A.; Romani, Nikolaus; Stoitzner, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs), a sub-population of dendritic cells (DCs) in the skin, participate in the regulation of immunity and peripheral tolerance. The adaptor molecule p14 is part of the late endosomal/lysosomal adaptor and mitogen-activated protein kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activator/regulator (LAMTOR) complex, which mediates the activation of lysosome-associated extracellular signaling-regulated kinase (ERK) and the mTOR cascade. In previous work, we demonstrated that CD11c-specific deficiency of p14 disrupts LC homeostasis by affecting the LAMTOR-mediated ERK and mTOR signaling. In this study, we extended our analysis on p14 deficiency specifically in LCs. Langerin-specific ablation of p14 caused a complete loss of LCs, accompanied by an increased maturational phenotype of LCs. The absence of LCs in p14-deficient mice reduced contact hypersensitivity (CHS) responses to the contact sensitizer trinitrochlorobenzene. Analysis using bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) revealed that p14 deficiency in DCs/LCs interfered with the LC-relevant transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) pathway, by lowering TGFβ receptor II expression on BMDCs and LCs, as well as surface binding of TGFβ1 on BMDCs. We conclude that p14 deficiency affects TGFβ1 sensitivity of LCs, which is mandatory for their homeostasis and subsequently for their immunological function during CHS. PMID:25078666

  4. Regulation of platelet biology by platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1.

    PubMed

    Jones, Chris I; Moraes, Leonardo A; Gibbins, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif containing receptor, plays diverse and apparently contradictory roles in regulating the response of platelets to stimuli; inhibiting platelet response to immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif and G protein-coupled receptor signalling following stimulation with collagen, adenosine diphosphate, and thrombin, as well as enhancing integrin outside-in signalling. These dual, and opposing, roles suggest an important and complex role for PECAM-1 in orchestrating platelet response to vascular damage. Indeed, during thrombus formation, the influence of PECAM-1 on the multiple signalling pathways combines leading to a relatively large inhibitory effect on thrombus formation. PMID:22035359

  5. Characterization of signaling function and expression of HLA class I molecules in medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Courtney; Santi, Mariarita; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Cornelison, Robert; MacDonald, Tobey J.

    2011-01-01

    Although known for the important function in the immune system, MHC class I molecules are increasingly ascribed an alternative role in modifying signal transduction. In medulloblastoma, HLA class I molecules are associated with poor prognosis, and can induce ERK1/2 activation upon engagement with ligands that bind to incompletely assembled complexes (so called open conformers). We here demonstrate that ERK1/2 activation in medulloblastoma can occur in the absence of endogenously synthesized β2m, formally excluding involvement of closed HLA class conformation. In addition, several experimental observations suggest that heterogeneity of HLA class I expression may be a reflection of the status of original cells before transformation, rather than a consequence of immune-based selection of HLA-loss mutants. These results contribute to our understanding of an immune system-independent role of HLA class I in the pathology of medulloblastoma, and cancer in general. PMID:20811766

  6. Characterization of signaling function and expression of HLA class I molecules in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Smith, Courtney; Santi, Mariarita; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Cornelison, Robert; MacDonald, Tobey J; Vukmanovic, Stanislav

    2011-06-01

    Although known for the important function in the immune system, MHC class I molecules are increasingly ascribed an alternative role in modifying signal transduction. In medulloblastoma, HLA class I molecules are associated with poor prognosis, and can induce ERK1/2 activation upon engagement with ligands that bind to incompletely assembled complexes (so called open conformers). We here demonstrate that ERK1/2 activation in medulloblastoma can occur in the absence of endogenously synthesized β2m, formally excluding involvement of closed HLA class conformation. In addition, several experimental observations suggest that heterogeneity of HLA class I expression may be a reflection of the status of original cells before transformation, rather than a consequence of immune-based selection of HLA-loss mutants. These results contribute to our understanding of an immune system-independent role of HLA class I in the pathology of medulloblastoma, and cancer in general. PMID:20811766

  7. What have single-molecule studies taught us about gene expression?

    PubMed

    Chen, Huimin; Larson, Daniel R

    2016-08-15

    The production of a single mRNA is the result of many sequential steps, from docking of transcription factors to polymerase initiation, elongation, splicing, and, finally, termination. Much of our knowledge about the fundamentals of RNA synthesis and processing come from ensemble in vitro biochemical measurements. Single-molecule approaches are very much in this same reductionist tradition but offer exquisite sensitivity in space and time along with the ability to observe heterogeneous behavior and actually manipulate macromolecules. These techniques can also be applied in vivo, allowing one to address questions in living cells that were previously restricted to reconstituted systems. In this review, we examine the unique insights that single-molecule techniques have yielded on the mechanisms of gene expression. PMID:27601529

  8. MicroRNA-194 reciprocally stimulates osteogenesis and inhibits adipogenesis via regulating COUP-TFII expression

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, B-C; Kang, I-H; Hwang, Y-C; Kim, S-H; Koh, J-T

    2014-01-01

    Osteoblasts and adipocytes are differentiated from common mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in processes which are tightly controlled by various growth factors, signaling molecules, transcriptional factors and microRNAs. Recently, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) was identified as a critical regulator of MSC fate. In the present study, we aimed to identify some microRNAs (miR), which target COUP-TFII, and to determine the effects on MSCs fate. During osteoblastic or adipocytic differentiation from MSCs lineage cells, miR-194 expression was found to be reversal. In the cultures of mesenchymal C3H10T1/2 and primary bone marrow stromal cells, osteogenic stimuli increased miR-194 expression with accompanying decreases in COUP-TFII expression, whereas adipogenic stimuli reduced miR-194 expression with accompanying increases in COUP-TFII expression. A luciferase assay with COUP-TFII 3′-untranslated region (UTR) reporter plasmid, including the miR-194 binding sequences, showed that the introduction of miR-194 reduced the luciferase activity. However, it did not affect the activity of mutated COUP-TFII 3′-UTR reporter. Enforced expression of miR-194 significantly enhanced osteoblast differentiation, but inhibited adipocyte differentiation by decreasing COUP-TFII mRNA and protein levels. In contrast, inhibition of the endogenous miR-194 reduced matrix mineralization in the MSCs cultures, promoting the formation of lipid droplets by rescuing COUP-TFII expression. Furthermore, overexpression of COUP-TFII reversed the effects of miR-194 on the cell fates. Taken together, our results showed that miR-194 acts as a critical regulator of COUP-TFII, and can determinate the fate of MSCs to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes. This suggests that miR-194 and COUP-TFII may be good target molecules for controlling bone and metabolic diseases. PMID:25412310

  9. Regulation of hepatic bile acid transporters Ntcp and Bsep expression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xingguo; Buckley, David; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2007-12-01

    Sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp) and bile salt export pump (Bsep) are two key transporters for hepatic bile acid uptake and excretion. Alterations in Ntcp and Bsep expression have been reported in pathophysiological conditions. In the present study, the effects of age, gender, and various chemicals on the regulation of these two transporters were characterized in mice. Ntcp and Bsep mRNA levels in mouse liver were low in the fetus, but increased to its highest expression at parturition. After birth, mouse Ntcp and Bsep mRNA decreased by more than 50%, and then gradually increased to adult levels by day 30. Expression of mouse Ntcp mRNA and protein exhibit higher levels in female than male livers. No gender difference exists in BSEP/Bsep expression in human and mouse livers. Hormone replacements conducted in gonadectomized, hypophysectomized, and lit/lit mice indicate that female-predominant Ntcp expression in mouse liver is due to the inhibitory effect of male-pattern GH secretion, but not sex hormones. Ntcp and Bsep expression are in general resistant to induction by a large battery of microsomal enzyme inducers. Administration of cholestyramine increased Ntcp, whereas chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) increased Bsep mRNA expression. In conclusion, mouse Ntcp and Bsep are regulated by age, gender, cholestyramine, and bile acid, but resistant to induction by most microsomal enzyme inducers. PMID:17897632

  10. Regulated Expression of Adenoviral Vectors-Based Gene Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, James F.; Candolfi, Marianela; Puntel, Mariana; Xiong, Weidong; Muhammad, A. K. M.; Kroeger, Kurt; Mondkar, Sonali; Liu, Chunyan; Bondale, Niyati; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Regulatable promoter systems allow gene expression to be tightly controlled in vivo. This is highly desirable for the development of safe, efficacious adenoviral vectors that can be used to treat human diseases in the clinic. Ideally, regulatable cassettes should have minimal gene expression in the “OFF” state, and expression should quickly reach therapeutic levels in the “ON” state. In addition, the components of regulatable cassettes should be non-toxic at physiological concentrations and should not be immunogenic, especially when treating chronic illness that requires long-lasting gene expression. In this chapter, we will describe in detail protocols to develop and validate first generation (Ad) and high-capacity adenoviral (HC-Ad) vectors that express therapeutic genes under the control of the TetON regulatable system. Our laboratory has successfully used these protocols to regulate the expression of marker genes, immune stimulatory genes, and toxins for cancer gene therapeutics, i.e., glioma that is a deadly form of brain cancer. We have shown that this third generation TetON regulatable system, incorporating a doxycycline (DOX)-sensitive rtTA2S-M2 inducer and tTSKid silencer, is non-toxic, relatively non-immunogenic, and can tightly regulate reporter transgene expression downstream of a TRE promoter from adenoviral vectors in vitro and also in vivo. PMID:18470649

  11. Expression and structural studies of fasciclin I, an insect cell adhesion molecule.

    PubMed

    Wang, W C; Zinn, K; Bjorkman, P J

    1993-01-15

    Fasciclin I is a lipid-linked cell-surface glycoprotein that can act as a homophilic adhesion molecule in tissue culture cells. It is thought to be involved in growth cone guidance in the embryonic insect nervous system. To facilitate structure-function studies, we have generated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines expressing high levels of cell surface grasshopper and Drosophila fasciclin I. Grasshopper fasciclin I released by phospholipase C cleavage was purified on an immunoaffinity column and single crystals were obtained that diffracted to approximately 5-A resolution. We also generated CHO and Drosophila S2 cell lines that produce a secreted form of fasciclin I. Fasciclin I expressed in S2 cells contains significantly less carbohydrate than the protein expressed in CHO cells, and may therefore be more suitable for crystallization. Biochemical characterization of purified fasciclin I indicates that the extracellular portion exists as a monomer in solution. Circular dichroism studies suggest that fasciclin I is primarily alpha-helical. Its structure is therefore different from other known cell adhesion molecules, which are predicted to be elongated beta-sheet structures. This suggests that fasciclin I may define a new structural motif used to mediate adhesive interactions between cell surfaces. PMID:8419345

  12. Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 5 modulates the antioxidant response by transcriptionally controlling Sirtuin 1 expression in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Royuela, Nuria; Rathore, Moeez G; Allende-Vega, Nerea; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien; Fajas, Lluis; Ramachandran, Bindu; Gulick, Tod; Villalba, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Cancer cell metabolism differs from that of non-transformed cells in the same tissue. This specific metabolism gives tumor cells growing advantages besides the effect in increasing anabolism. One of these advantages is immune evasion mediated by a lower expression of the mayor histocompatibility complex class I molecules. The extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-5 regulates both mayor histocompatibility complex class I expression and metabolic activity. However, the mechanisms underlying are largely unknown. We show here that extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-5 regulates the transcription of the NADH(+)-dependent histone deacetylase silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Sirtuin 1) in leukemic Jurkat T cells. This involves the activation of the transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor-2 and its binding to the sirt1 promoter. In addition, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-5 is required for T cell receptor-induced and oxidative stress-induced full Sirtuin 1 expression. Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-5 induces the expression of promoters containing the antioxidant response elements through a Sirtuin 1-dependent pathway. On the other hand, down modulation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-5 expression impairs the anti-oxidant response. Notably, the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-5 inhibitor BIX02189 induces apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia tumor cells without affecting T cells from healthy donors. Our results unveil a new pathway that modulates metabolism in tumor cells. This pathway represents a promising therapeutic target in cancers with deep metabolic layouts such as acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:24880091

  13. An Autogenously Regulated Expression System for Gene Therapeutic Ocular Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sochor, Matthew A.; Vasireddy, Vidyullatha; Drivas, Theodore G.; Wojno, Adam; Doung, Thu; Shpylchak, Ivan; Bennicelli, Jeannette; Chung, Daniel; Bennett, Jean; Lewis, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    The future of treating inherited and acquired genetic diseases will be defined by our ability to introduce transgenes into cells and restore normal physiology. Here we describe an autogenous transgene regulatory system (ARES), based on the bacterial lac repressor, and demonstrate its utility for controlling the expression of a transgene in bacteria, eukaryotic cells, and in the retina of mice. This ARES system is inducible by the small non-pharmacologic molecule, Isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) that has no off-target effects in mammals. Following subretinal injection of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding ARES, luciferase expression can be reversibly controlled in the murine retina by oral delivery of IPTG over three induction-repression cycles. The ability to induce transgene expression repeatedly via administration of an oral inducer in vivo, suggests that this type of regulatory system holds great promise for applications in human gene therapy. PMID:26597678

  14. Sequential expression of germ-layer specific molecules in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Wessel, G M; McClay, D R

    1985-10-01

    Described are two germ-layer specific molecules that appear coincident with the formation of two germ layer cell lineages in the sea urchin embryo. Meso1 is a molecule of 380 kDa that is first detected at the time of primary mesenchyme cell delamination from the wall of the blastula. Endo1 is a molecule of 320 kDa that appears on endoderm cells at the time of archenteron formation a few hours after Meso1 appears. Both antigens are identified by monoclonal antibodies. The appearance of these antigens is described by immunofluorescence microscopy, and quantitative data on their localization has been obtained by ultrastructural immunoelectron microscopy. The synthesis of the molecules has been followed by pulse-chase immunoprecipitation. Meso1 is first expressed in trans Golgi-like saccules, is concentrated in peripheral low electron-dense vesicles, and is found throughout the plasma membrane of the mesenchymal cells and their filopodial extensions. Newly translated Meso1 can first be immunoprecipitated upon differentiation of the mesoderm cell lineage, and pulse-chase studies suggest that the determinant is the result of a post-translational modification. [35S]Methionine pulses early in development followed by a chase to the mesenchyme blastula or prism stage show that at least a portion of the molecule is translated well in advance of the mesenchyme blastula stage. Endo1, in contrast, does not appear to be translated until the onset of gastrulation, just preceding the post-translational expression of the Endo1 determinant. Endo1 is localized to the apical and basolateral cell surfaces of the midgut and hindgut. No label is detected in foregut cells, demonstrating a heterogeneity of cell populations within the endoderm cell lineage corresponding to a difference in morphology. In addition, Endo1 is shown to be the result of new transcription by the embryonic genome. Even though the function of neither molecule is known, together they show the spatial and temporal

  15. β3GnT2 Maintains Adenylyl Cyclase-3 Signaling and Axon Guidance Molecule Expression in the Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Faden, Ashley A.; Knott, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    In the olfactory epithelium (OE), odorant receptor stimulation generates cAMP signals that function in both odor detection and the regulation of axon guidance molecule expression. The enzyme that synthesizes cAMP, adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3), is coexpressed in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) with poly-N-acetyllactosamine (PLN) oligosaccharides determined by the glycosyltransferase β3GnT2. The loss of either enzyme results in similar defects in olfactory bulb (OB) innervation and OSN survival, suggesting that glycosylation may be important for AC3 function. We show here that AC3 is extensively modified with N-linked PLN, which is essential for AC3 activity and localization. On Western blots, AC3 from the wild-type OE migrates diffusely as a heavily glycosylated 200 kDa band that interacts with the PLN-binding lectin LEA. AC3 from the β3GnT2−/− OE loses these PLN modifications, migrating instead as a 140 kDa glycoprotein. Furthermore, basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP production is reduced 80–90% in the β3GnT2−/− OE. Although AC3 traffics normally to null OSN cilia, it is absent from axon projections that aberrantly target the OB. The cAMP-dependent guidance receptor neuropilin-1 is also lost from β3GnT2−/− OSNs and axons, while semaphorin-3A ligand expression is upregulated. In addition, kirrel2, a mosaically expressed adhesion molecule that functions in axon sorting, is absent from β3GnT2−/− OB projections. These results demonstrate that PLN glycans are essential in OSNs for proper AC3 localization and function. We propose that the loss of cAMP-dependent guidance cues is also a critical factor in the severe axon guidance defects observed in β3GnT2−/− mice. PMID:21525298

  16. Expression of osteopontin and CD44 molecule in papillary renal cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Matusan, Koviljka; Dordevic, Gordana; Mozetic, Vladimir; Lucin, Ksenija

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the expression of CD44 adhesion molecule and its ligand osteopontin in papillary renal cell tumors, and to assess the possible prognostic significance of CD44 and osteopontin expression in papillary renal cell carcinomas. The expression of the standard and v6 exon containing isoforms of CD44 molecule, as well as of its ligand osteopontin, was immunohistochemically evaluated in 43 papillary renal cell tumors, which included 5 adenomas and 38 carcinomas. In order to assess their prognostic significance, the results obtained in papillary renal cell carcinomas were compared to usual clinicopathological parameters such as tumor size, histological grade, pathological stage, and Ki-67 proliferation index. Normal renal tissue was negative for CD44s and v6 isoforms, while the expression of osteopontin was found in distal tubular epithelial cells in the form of cytoplasmic granular positivity. CD44s and v6 isoforms were upregulated in 22 (58%) and 12 (32%) out of 38 carcinomas, respectively. Among all clinicopathological parameters examined, we only found significant association of CD44s-positive carcinomas with lower pathological stage (p=0.026). Papillary renal cell adenomas were generally negative for CD44s, except for focal positivity found in one sample. The osteopontin protein was detected in all adenomas and all papillary renal cell carcinomas, except one. Our results show constitutive expression of osteopontin in papillary renal tumors, including papillary renal cell adenomas. The upregulation of CD44s and v6 isoforms, although found in a considerable number of papillary renal cell carcinomas, does not appear to have any prognostic value in this type of renal cancer. PMID:15999156

  17. Regulation of cell-to-cell variability in divergent gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chao; Wu, Shuyang; Pocetti, Christopher; Bai, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Cell-to-cell variability (noise) is an important feature of gene expression that impacts cell fitness and development. The regulatory mechanism of this variability is not fully understood. Here we investigate the effect on gene expression noise in divergent gene pairs (DGPs). We generated reporters driven by divergent promoters, rearranged their gene order, and probed their expressions using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH). We show that two genes in a co-regulated DGP have higher expression covariance compared with the separate, tandem and convergent configurations, and this higher covariance is caused by more synchronized firing of the divergent transcriptions. For differentially regulated DGPs, the regulatory signal of one gene can stochastically ‘leak' to the other, causing increased gene expression noise. We propose that the DGPs' function in limiting or promoting gene expression noise may enhance or compromise cell fitness, providing an explanation for the conservation pattern of DGPs. PMID:27010670

  18. Characterization and expression analysis of B Cell receptor accessory molecule CD79 gene in humphead snapper ( Lutjanus sanguineus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yucong; Yan, Xiuying; Cai, Shuanghu; Cai, Jia; Jian, Jichang; Lu, Yishan; Tang, Jufen; Wu, Zaohe

    2016-04-01

    CD79, a key component of the B cell antigen receptor complex, is composed of CD79α(Igα) and CD79β(Igβ) encoded by mb-1 and B29 respectively, and plays an important role in B cell signaling. In this study, we isolated and characterized mb-1 and B29 from humphead snapper ( Lutjanus sanguineus). Their tissue distribution and expression profiles after stimulations in vitro and in vivo were also investigated. The humphead snapper mb-1 and B29 contain open reading frames of 684 bp and 606 bp, encoding 227 amino acids and 201 amino acids, respectively. Both CD79α and CD79β possess signal peptide, extracellular Ig domain, transmembrane region and immunoreceptor tyrosine kinase activation motif (ITAM). Mb-1 is highly expressed in lymphoid organs (thymus, posterior kidney and spleen) and mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues (gill and intestine), while B29 is mainly detected in posterior kidney, spleen, gill and skin. Furthermore, transcription of mb-1 and B29 in head kidney leucocytes was up-regulated following lipopolysaccharide (LPS), pokeweed mitogen (PWM), and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C) stimulation, respectively, and their expression level in anterior kidney and spleen was also increased after challenged with formalin-inactived Vibrio harveyi. These results indicated that humphead snapper CD79 molecule might play an important role in immune response to pathogen infection.

  19. Discovery of novel phenolic antioxidants as inhibitors of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression for use in chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Meng, Charles Q; Somers, Patricia K; Hoong, Lee K; Zheng, X Sharon; Ye, Zhihong; Worsencroft, Kimberly J; Simpson, Jacob E; Hotema, Martha R; Weingarten, M David; MacDOnald, Mathew L; Hill, Russell R; Marino, Elaine M; Suen, Ki-Ling; Luchoomun, Jayraz; Kunsch, Charles; Landers, Laura K; Stefanopoulos, Dimitria; Howard, Randy B; Sundell, Cynthia L; Saxena, Uday; Wasserman, Martin A; Sikorski, James A

    2004-12-01

    Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) mediates recruitment of leukocytes to endothelial cells and is implicated in many inflammatory conditions. Since part of the signal transduction pathway that regulates the activation of VCAM-1 expression is redox-sensitive, compounds with antioxidant properties may have inhibitory effects on VCAM-1 expression. Novel phenolic compounds have been designed and synthesized starting from probucol (1). Many of these compounds demonstrated potent inhibitory effects on cytokine-induced VCAM-1 expression and displayed potent antioxidant effects in vitro. Some of these derivatives (4o, 4p, 4w, and 4x) inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), and IL-6 from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro and showed antiinflammatory effects in an animal model. Compounds 4ad and 4ae are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and prevention of chronic organ transplant rejection, respectively. PMID:15566311

  20. Glucose Regulates the Expression of the Apolipoprotein A5 Gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchart, Jamila; Nowak, Maxime; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Jakel, Heidelinde; Moitrot, Emmanuelle; Rommens, Corinne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2008-04-07

    The apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) is a key player in determining triglyceride concentrations in humans and mice. Since diabetes is often associated with hypertriglyceridemia, this study explores whether APOA5 gene expression is regulated by alteration in glucose homeostasis and the related pathways. D-glucose activates APOA5 gene expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner in hepatocytes, and the glycolytic pathway involved was determined using D-glucose analogs and metabolites. Together, transient transfections, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level through an increase of USF1/2 binding to an E-box in the APOA5 promoter. We show that this phenomenon is not due to an increase of mRNA or protein expression levels of USF. Using protein phosphatases 1 and 2A inhibitor, we demonstrate that D-glucose regulates APOA5 gene via a dephosphorylation mechanism, thereby resulting in an enhanced USF1/2-promoter binding. Last, subsequent suppressions of USF1/2 and phosphatases mRNA through siRNA gene silencing abolished the regulation. We demonstrate that APOA5 gene is up regulated by D-glucose and USF through phosphatase activation. These findings may provide a new cross talk between glucose and lipid metabolism.

  1. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Goh, Qingnian; Dearth, Christopher L.; Corbett, Jacob T.; Pierre, Philippe; Chadee, Deborah N.; Pizza, Francis X.

    2015-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by skeletal muscle cells after muscle overload contributes to ensuing regenerative and hypertrophic processes in skeletal muscle. The objective of the present study is to reveal mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augments regenerative and hypertrophic processes of myogenesis. This was accomplished by genetically engineering C2C12 myoblasts to stably express ICAM-1, and by inhibiting the adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 through the use of a neutralizing antibody or cell penetrating peptide, respectively. Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured skeletal muscle cells augmented myoblast–myoblast adhesion, myotube formation, myonuclear number, myotube alignment, myotube–myotube fusion, and myotube size without influencing the ability of myoblasts to proliferate or differentiate. ICAM-1 augmented myotube formation, myonuclear accretion, and myotube alignment through a mechanism involving adhesion-induced activation of ICAM-1 signaling, as these dependent measures were reduced via antibody and peptide inhibition of ICAM-1. The adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 also facilitated myotube hypertrophy through a mechanism involving myotube–myotube fusion, protein synthesis, and Akt/p70s6k signaling. Our findings demonstrate that ICAM-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis, and establish a novel mechanism through which the inflammatory response facilitates growth processes in skeletal muscle. - Highlights: • We examined mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 facilitates events of in vitro myogenesis. • Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured myoblasts did not influence their ability to proliferate or differentiate. • Skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augmented myoblast fusion, myotube alignment, myotube–myotube fusion, and myotube size. • ICAM-1 augmented myogenic processes through

  2. Regulation and misregulation of Eph/ephrin expression

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitis, Dina N.; Davy, Alice

    2012-01-01

    The erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular (Eph) receptors form the largest family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Upon interaction of the Eph receptors with their ligands the ephrins, signaling cascades are initiated downstream of both receptor and ligand, a feature known as bidirectional signaling. The Eph receptors and ephrin ligands mediate important roles in embryonic development, particularly in establishing tissue organization by mediating cell adhesion or cell repulsion. In several adult tissues, at least one Eph/ephrin pair is found to play critical roles in tissue physiology and homeostasis. In recent years numerous members of this family have gained considerable attention since changes in their expression levels are a typical feature in cancer cells. Despite the fact that Eph/ephrin developmental expression profiles are well documented, little is known on transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms that permits their highly specific, graded, complementary or overlapping expression patterns. Therefore understanding the transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms regulating Eph/ephrin expression has far-reaching significance in biology. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms regulating Eph/ephrin expression. We highlight important emerging mechanisms of Eph/ephrin regulation or misregulation such as epigenetics and miRNAs. PMID:22568953

  3. p53 Regulates Period2 Expression and the Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Takao; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Zhao, Zhaoyang; Lee, Cheng Chi

    2013-01-01

    The mechanistic interconnectivity between circadian regulation and the genotoxic stress response remains poorly understood. Here we show that the expression of Period 2 (Per2), a circadian regulator, is directly regulated by p53 binding to a response element in the Per2 promoter. This p53 response element is evolutionarily conserved and overlaps with the E-Box element critical for BMAL1/CLOCK binding and its transcriptional activation of Per2 expression. Our studies reveal that p53 blocks BMAL1/CLOCK binding to the Per2 promoter leading to repression of Per2 expression. In the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), p53 expression and its binding to the Per2 promoter are under circadian control. Per2 expression in the SCN is altered by p53 deficiency or stabilization of p53 by Nutlin-3. Behaviorally, p53−/− mice have a shorter period length that lacks stability and they exhibit impaired photo-entrainment to a light pulse under a free-running state. Our studies demonstrate that p53 modulates mouse circadian behavior. PMID:24051492

  4. Odor memories regulate olfactory receptor expression in the sensory periphery.

    PubMed

    Claudianos, Charles; Lim, Julianne; Young, Melanie; Yan, Shanzhi; Cristino, Alexandre S; Newcomb, Richard D; Gunasekaran, Nivetha; Reinhard, Judith

    2014-05-01

    Odor learning induces structural and functional modifications throughout the olfactory system, but it is currently unknown whether this plasticity extends to the olfactory receptors (Or) in the sensory periphery. Here, we demonstrate that odor learning induces plasticity in olfactory receptor expression in the honeybee, Apis mellifera. Using quantitative RT-PCR analysis, we show that six putative floral scent receptors were differentially expressed in the bee antennae depending on the scent environment that the bees experienced. Or151, which we characterized using an in vitro cell expression system as a broadly tuned receptor binding floral odorants such as linalool, and Or11, the specific receptor for the queen pheromone 9-oxo-decenoic acid, were significantly down-regulated after honeybees were conditioned with the respective odorants in an olfactory learning paradigm. Electroantennogram recordings showed that the neural response of the antenna was similarly reduced after odor learning. Long-term odor memory was essential for inducing these changes, suggesting that the molecular mechanisms involved in olfactory memory also regulate olfactory receptor expression. Our study demonstrates for the first time that olfactory receptor expression is experience-dependent and modulated by scent conditioning, providing novel insight into how molecular regulation at the periphery contributes to plasticity in the olfactory system. PMID:24628891

  5. Whole gene family expression and drought stress regulation of aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Alexandersson, Erik; Fraysse, Laure; Sjövall-Larsen, Sara; Gustavsson, Sofia; Fellert, Maria; Karlsson, Maria; Johanson, Urban; Kjellbom, Per

    2005-10-01

    Since many aquaporins (AQPs) act as water channels, they are thought to play an important role in plant water relations. It is therefore of interest to study the expression patterns of AQP isoforms in order to further elucidate their involvement in plant water transport. We have monitored the expression patterns of all 35 Arabidopsis AQPs in leaves, roots and flowers by cDNA microarrays, specially designed for AQPs, and by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (Q-RT-PCR). This showed that many AQPs are pre-dominantly expressed in either root or flower organs, whereas no AQP isoform seem to be leaf specific. Looking at the AQP subfamilies, most plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) and some tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) have a high level of expression, while NOD26-like proteins (NIPs) are present at a much lower level. In addition, we show that PIP transcripts are generally down-regulated upon gradual drought stress in leaves, with the exception of AtPIP1;4 and AtPIP2;5, which are up-regulated. AtPIP2;6 and AtSIP1;1 are constitutively expressed and not significantly affected by the drought stress. The transcriptional down-regulation of PIP genes upon drought stress could also be observed on the protein level. PMID:16235111

  6. Regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Helen H

    2007-09-01

    Reproductive function is influenced by several internal and external cues, which ultimately exert their effects on the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron. As the final common pathway in the brain for regulating reproduction, GnRH neurons receive signals from multiple cell types, and alterations in GnRH production impact reproductive competence. Historically, the paucity of GnRH neurons and their scattered distribution in the brain have limited the study of GnRH gene expression. With transgenic technology, newer model systems (such as immortalized GnRH-expressing cell lines and GnRH-reporter gene transgenic mice) have been developed, making molecular studies possible. This article provides an update on the molecular mechanisms responsible for the regulation of GnRH gene expression, focusing on tissue-specific expression and transcriptional regulation. After an overview of GnRH gene structure, synthesis, and secretion, the model systems for studying GnRH neurons are examined. The molecular mechanisms that translate physiologic stimuli, such as nutritional status or stress, into changes in GnRH expression will be reviewed, concentrating on the regulatory regions within the GnRH gene promoter and the critical transcription factors. PMID:17710727

  7. Transcriptional Regulation of Tlr11 Gene Expression in Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhenyu; Shi, Zhongcheng; Sanchez, Amir; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Mingyao; Yang, Jianghua; Wang, Fen; Zhang, Dekai

    2009-01-01

    As sensors of invading microorganisms, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed not only on macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) but also on epithelial cells. In the TLR family, Tlr11 appears to have the unique feature in that it is expressed primarily on epithelial cells, although it is also expressed on DCs and macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that transcription of the Tlr11 gene is regulated through two cis-acting elements, one Ets-binding site and one interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-binding site. The Ets element interacts with the epithelium-specific transcription factors, ESE-1 and ESE-3, and the IRF motif interacts with IRF-8. Thus, Tlr11 expression on epithelial cells is regulated by the transcription factors that are presumably distinct from transcription factors that regulate the expression of TLRs in innate immune cells such as macrophages and DCs. Our results imply that the distinctive transcription regulatory machinery for TLRs on epithelium may represent a promising new avenue for the development of epithelia-specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:19801549

  8. Tissue-specific expression and developmental regulation of the human fgr proto-oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, T.J. . Dept. of Medicine); Connolly, N.L.; Senior, R.M. ); Katamine, S.; Cheah, M.S.C.; Robbins

    1989-01-01

    In this study, the authors show that c-fgr proto-oncogene expression is limited to normal peripheral blood granulocytes, monocytes, and alveolar macrophages, all of which contain 50 to 100 copies of c-fgr mRNA per cell. The c-fgr RNA molecules in these cells consisted of partially spliced transcripts containing intron 7 and completely spliced molecules capable of encoding the predicted p55 c-fgr protein. The splicing of intron 7 appeared to occur after the splicing of most of the other introns; partially spliced molecules containing intron 7 did not appear to be transported into the cytoplasm. Very low levels of fgr transcripts were also present in U937 promonocytic cells and increased in abundance with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced differentiation. The level of fgr transcripts began to increase 2 to 4 after TPA addition peaked at 8 h, and subsequently declined. Since the authors found that the half-life of fgr mRNA was longer than 8 h, these changes are best explained by transient transcriptional activation of fgr during TPA-induced differentiation, although nuclear runoff experiments were not sensitive enough to detect this event. Their results demonstrate that the c-fgr gene is expressed in a tissue- and development-specific fashion and suggest that constitutive expression of c-fgr in U937 cells is regulated by a labile transcriptional repressor.

  9. Regulation Effects by Programmed Molecules for Transcription-Based Diagnostic Automata towards Therapeutic Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Miki; Ohashi, Hirotada; Kubo, Tai

    We have presented experimental analysis on the controllability of our transcription-based diagnostic biomolecular automata by programmed molecules. Focusing on the noninvasive transcriptome diagnosis by salivary mRNAs, we already proposed the novel concept of diagnostic device using DNA computation. This system consists of the main computational element which has a stem shaped promoter region and a pseudo-loop shaped read-only memory region for transcription regulation through the conformation change caused by the recognition of disease-related biomarkers. We utilize the transcription of malachite green aptamer sequence triggered by the target recognition for observation of detection. This algorithm makes it possible to release RNA-aptamer drugs multiply, different from the digestion-based systems by the restriction enzyme which was proposed previously, for the in-vivo use, however, the controllability of aptamer release is not enough at the previous stage. In this paper, we verified the regulation effect on aptamer transcription by programmed molecules in basic conditions towards the developm! ent of therapeutic automata. These results would bring us one step closer to the realization of new intelligent diagnostic and therapeutic automata based on molecular circuits.

  10. Measuring children's regulation of emotion-expressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Bar-Haim, Yair; Bar-Av, Gali; Sadeh, Avi

    2011-04-01

    Emotion regulation has become a pivotal concept in developmental and clinical research. However, the measurement of regulatory processes has proved extremely difficult, particularly in the context of within-subject designs. Here, we describe a formal conceptualization and a new experimental procedure, the Balloons Game, to measure a regulatory component of emotion-expressive behavior. We present the internal consistency and stability of the indices derived from the Balloons Game in a sample of 121 kindergarten children. External validation against measures that have been associated with emotion regulation processes is also provided. The findings suggest that the Balloons Game provides a reliable tool for the study of regulation of emotion expression in young children. PMID:21500890