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Sample records for expression signatures diagnose

  1. Gene Expression Signatures Diagnose Influenza and Other Symptomatic Respiratory Viral Infection in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Zaas, Aimee K.; Chen, Minhua; Varkey, Jay; Veldman, Timothy; Hero, Alfred O.; Lucas, Joseph; Huang, Yongsheng; Turner, Ronald; Gilbert, Anthony; Lambkin-Williams, Robert; Øien, N. Christine; Nicholson, Bradly; Kingsmore, Stephen; Carin, Lawrence; Woods, Christopher W.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are a common reason for seeking medical attention and the threat of pandemic influenza will likely add to these numbers. Using human viral challenge studies with live rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza A, we developed peripheral blood gene expression signatures that distinguish individuals with symptomatic ARI from uninfected individuals with > 95% accuracy. We validated this “acute respiratory viral” signature - encompassing genes with a known role in host defense against viral infections - across each viral challenge. We also validated the signature in an independently acquired dataset for influenza A and classified infected individuals from healthy controls with 100% accuracy. In the same dataset, we could also distinguish viral from bacterial ARIs (93% accuracy). These results demonstrate that ARIs induce changes in human peripheral blood gene expression that can be used to diagnose a viral etiology of respiratory infection and triage symptomatic individuals. PMID:19664979

  2. Motor current signature analysis method for diagnosing motor operated devices

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Howard D.; Eissenberg, David M.

    1990-01-01

    A motor current noise signature analysis method and apparatus for remotely monitoring the operating characteristics of an electric motor-operated device such as a motor-operated valve. Frequency domain signal analysis techniques are applied to a conditioned motor current signal to distinctly identify various operating parameters of the motor driven device from the motor current signature. The signature may be recorded and compared with subsequent signatures to detect operating abnormalities and degradation of the device. This diagnostic method does not require special equipment to be installed on the motor-operated device, and the current sensing may be performed at remote control locations, e.g., where the motor-operated devices are used in accessible or hostile environments.

  3. Digital gene expression signatures for maize development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide expression signatures detect specific perturbations in developmental programs and contribute to functional resolution of key regulatory networks. In maize (Zea mays) inflorescences, mutations in the RAMOSA (RA) genes affect determinacy of axillary meristems and thus alter branching patt...

  4. Three plasma metabolite signatures for diagnosing high altitude pulmonary edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Tan, Guangguo; Liu, Ping; Li, Huijie; Tang, Lulu; Huang, Lan; Ren, Qian

    2015-10-01

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a potentially fatal condition, occurring at altitudes greater than 3,000 m and affecting rapidly ascending, non-acclimatized healthy individuals. However, the lack of biomarkers for this disease still constitutes a bottleneck in the clinical diagnosis. Here, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q-TOF mass spectrometry was applied to study plasma metabolite profiling from 57 HAPE and 57 control subjects. 14 differential plasma metabolites responsible for the discrimination between the two groups from discovery set (35 HAPE subjects and 35 healthy controls) were identified. Furthermore, 3 of the 14 metabolites (C8-ceramide, sphingosine and glutamine) were selected as candidate diagnostic biomarkers for HAPE using metabolic pathway impact analysis. The feasibility of using the combination of these three biomarkers for HAPE was evaluated, where the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.981 and 0.942 in the discovery set and the validation set (22 HAPE subjects and 22 healthy controls), respectively. Taken together, these results suggested that this composite plasma metabolite signature may be used in HAPE diagnosis, especially after further investigation and verification with larger samples.

  5. Three plasma metabolite signatures for diagnosing high altitude pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Tan, Guangguo; Liu, Ping; Li, Huijie; Tang, Lulu; Huang, Lan; Ren, Qian

    2015-01-01

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a potentially fatal condition, occurring at altitudes greater than 3,000 m and affecting rapidly ascending, non-acclimatized healthy individuals. However, the lack of biomarkers for this disease still constitutes a bottleneck in the clinical diagnosis. Here, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q-TOF mass spectrometry was applied to study plasma metabolite profiling from 57 HAPE and 57 control subjects. 14 differential plasma metabolites responsible for the discrimination between the two groups from discovery set (35 HAPE subjects and 35 healthy controls) were identified. Furthermore, 3 of the 14 metabolites (C8-ceramide, sphingosine and glutamine) were selected as candidate diagnostic biomarkers for HAPE using metabolic pathway impact analysis. The feasibility of using the combination of these three biomarkers for HAPE was evaluated, where the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.981 and 0.942 in the discovery set and the validation set (22 HAPE subjects and 22 healthy controls), respectively. Taken together, these results suggested that this composite plasma metabolite signature may be used in HAPE diagnosis, especially after further investigation and verification with larger samples. PMID:26459926

  6. Hereditary family signature of facial expression

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, Gili; Katzir, Gadi; Peleg, Ofer; Kamara, Michal; Brodsky, Leonid; Hel-Or, Hagit; Keren, Daniel; Nevo, Eviatar

    2006-01-01

    Although facial expressions of emotion are universal, individual differences create a facial expression “signature” for each person; but, is there a unique family facial expression signature? Only a few family studies on the heredity of facial expressions have been performed, none of which compared the gestalt of movements in various emotional states; they compared only a few movements in one or two emotional states. No studies, to our knowledge, have compared movements of congenitally blind subjects with their relatives to our knowledge. Using two types of analyses, we show a correlation between movements of congenitally blind subjects with those of their relatives in think-concentrate, sadness, anger, disgust, joy, and surprise and provide evidence for a unique family facial expression signature. In the analysis “in-out family test,” a particular movement was compared each time across subjects. Results show that the frequency of occurrence of a movement of a congenitally blind subject in his family is significantly higher than that outside of his family in think-concentrate, sadness, and anger. In the analysis “the classification test,” in which congenitally blind subjects were classified to their families according to the gestalt of movements, results show 80% correct classification over the entire interview and 75% in anger. Analysis of the movements' frequencies in anger revealed a correlation between the movements' frequencies of congenitally blind individuals and those of their relatives. This study anticipates discovering genes that influence facial expressions, understanding their evolutionary significance, and elucidating repair mechanisms for syndromes lacking facial expression, such as autism. PMID:17043232

  7. A gene expression signature for insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Konstantopoulos, Nicky; Foletta, Victoria C; Segal, David H; Shields, Katherine A; Sanigorski, Andrew; Windmill, Kelly; Swinton, Courtney; Connor, Tim; Wanyonyi, Stephen; Dyer, Thomas D; Fahey, Richard P; Watt, Rose A; Curran, Joanne E; Molero, Juan-Carlos; Krippner, Guy; Collier, Greg R; James, David E; Blangero, John; Jowett, Jeremy B; Walder, Ken R

    2011-02-11

    Insulin resistance is a heterogeneous disorder caused by a range of genetic and environmental factors, and we hypothesize that its etiology varies considerably between individuals. This heterogeneity provides significant challenges to the development of effective therapeutic regimes for long-term management of type 2 diabetes. We describe a novel strategy, using large-scale gene expression profiling, to develop a gene expression signature (GES) that reflects the overall state of insulin resistance in cells and patients. The GES was developed from 3T3-L1 adipocytes that were made "insulin resistant" by treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and then reversed with aspirin and troglitazone ("resensitized"). The GES consisted of five genes whose expression levels best discriminated between the insulin-resistant and insulin-resensitized states. We then used this GES to screen a compound library for agents that affected the GES genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a way that most closely resembled the changes seen when insulin resistance was successfully reversed with aspirin and troglitazone. This screen identified both known and new insulin-sensitizing compounds including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, β-adrenergic antagonists, β-lactams, and sodium channel blockers. We tested the biological relevance of this GES in participants in the San Antonio Family Heart Study (n = 1,240) and showed that patients with the lowest GES scores were more insulin resistant (according to HOMA_IR and fasting plasma insulin levels; P < 0.001). These findings show that GES technology can be used for both the discovery of insulin-sensitizing compounds and the characterization of patients into subtypes of insulin resistance according to GES scores, opening the possibility of developing a personalized medicine approach to type 2 diabetes. PMID:21081660

  8. Web-based interrogation of gene expression signatures using EXALT

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Widespread use of high-throughput techniques such as microarrays to monitor gene expression levels has resulted in an explosive growth of data sets in public domains. Integration and exploration of these complex and heterogeneous data have become a major challenge. Results The EXALT (EXpression signature AnaLysis Tool) online program enables meta-analysis of gene expression profiles derived from publically accessible sources. Searches can be executed online against two large databases currently containing more than 28,000 gene expression signatures derived from GEO (Gene Expression Omnibus) and published expression profiles of human cancer. Comparisons among gene expression signatures can be performed with homology analysis and co-expression analysis. Results can be visualized instantly in a plot or a heat map. Three typical use cases are illustrated. Conclusions The EXALT online program is uniquely suited for discovering relationships among transcriptional profiles and searching gene expression patterns derived from diverse physiological and pathological settings. The EXALT online program is freely available for non-commercial users from http://seq.mc.vanderbilt.edu/exalt/. PMID:20003458

  9. Gene Expression Signature in Endemic Osteoarthritis by Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi; Ning, Yujie; Zhang, Feng; Yu, Fangfang; Tan, Wuhong; Lei, Yanxia; Wu, Cuiyan; Zheng, Jingjing; Wang, Sen; Yu, Hanjie; Li, Zheng; Lammi, Mikko J.; Guo, Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Kashin-Beck Disease (KBD) is an endemic osteochondropathy with an unknown pathogenesis. Diagnosis of KBD is effective only in advanced cases, which eliminates the possibility of early treatment and leads to an inevitable exacerbation of symptoms. Therefore, we aim to identify an accurate blood-based gene signature for the detection of KBD. Previously published gene expression profile data on cartilage and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from adults with KBD were compared to select potential target genes. Microarray analysis was conducted to evaluate the expression of the target genes in a cohort of 100 KBD patients and 100 healthy controls. A gene expression signature was identified using a training set, which was subsequently validated using an independent test set with a minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR) algorithm and support vector machine (SVM) algorithm. Fifty unique genes were differentially expressed between KBD patients and healthy controls. A 20-gene signature was identified that distinguished between KBD patients and controls with 90% accuracy, 85% sensitivity, and 95% specificity. This study identified a 20-gene signature that accurately distinguishes between patients with KBD and controls using peripheral blood samples. These results promote the further development of blood-based genetic biomarkers for detection of KBD. PMID:25997002

  10. Gene-expression signatures of Atlantic salmon's plastic life cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aubin-Horth, N.; Letcher, B.H.; Hofmann, H.A.

    2009-01-01

    How genomic expression differs as a function of life history variation is largely unknown. Atlantic salmon exhibits extreme alternative life histories. We defined the gene-expression signatures of wild-caught salmon at two different life stages by comparing the brain expression profiles of mature sneaker males and immature males, and early migrants and late migrants. In addition to life-stage-specific signatures, we discovered a surprisingly large gene set that was differentially regulated-at similar magnitudes, yet in opposite direction-in both life history transitions. We suggest that this co-variation is not a consequence of many independent cellular and molecular switches in the same direction but rather represents the molecular equivalent of a physiological shift orchestrated by one or very few master regulators. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A prognostic gene expression signature in infratentorial ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Khalida; Armstrong, Terri; Vera-Bolanos, Elizabeth; Raghunathan, Aditya; Ellison, David; Gilbertson, Richard; Vaillant, Brian; Goldman, Stewart; Packer, Roger J.; Fouladi, Maryam; Pollack, Ian; Mikkelsen, Tom; Prados, Michael; Omuro, Antonio; Soffietti, Riccardo; Ledoux, Alicia; Wilson, Charmaine; Long, Lihong; Gilbert, Mark; Aldape, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Patients with ependymoma exhibit a wide range of clinical outcomes that is currently unexplained by clinical or histological factors. Little is known regarding molecular biomarkers that could predict clinical behavior. Since recent data suggests that these tumors display biological characteristics according to their location (cerebral vs. infratentorial vs. spinal cord), rather than explore a broad spectrum of ependymoma, we focused on molecular alterations in ependymomas arising in the infratentorial compartment. Unsupervised clustering of available gene expression microarray data revealed two major subgroups of infratentorial ependymoma. Group 1 tumors over expressed genes that were associated with mesenchyme, Group 2 tumors showed no distinct gene ontologies. To assess the prognostic significance of these gene expression subgroups, real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays were performed on genes defining the subgroups in a training set. This resulted in a 10-gene prognostic signature. Multivariate analysis showed that the 10-gene signature was an independent predictor of recurrence-free survival after adjusting for clinical factors. Evaluation of an external dataset describing subgroups of infratentorial ependymomas showed concordance of subgroup definition, including validation of the mesenchymal subclass. Importantly, the 10-gene signature was validated as a predictor of recurrence-free survival in this dataset. Taken together, the results indicate a link between clinical outcome and biologically-identified subsets of infratentorial ependymoma and offer the potential for prognostic testing to estimate clinical aggressiveness in these tumors. PMID:22322993

  12. Conserved Expression Signatures between Medaka and Human Pigment Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, Manfred; Kneitz, Susanne; Wilde, Brigitta; Wagner, Toni; Henkel, Christiaan V.; Spaink, Herman P.; Meierjohann, Svenja

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations in gene expression are a hallmark of cancer cells. Differential tumor-specific transcript levels of single genes or whole sets of genes may be critical for the neoplastic phenotype and important for therapeutic considerations or useful as biomarkers. As an approach to filter out such relevant expression differences from the plethora of changes noted in global expression profiling studies, we searched for changes of gene expression levels that are conserved. Transcriptomes from massive parallel sequencing of different types of melanoma from medaka were generated and compared to microarray datasets from zebrafish and human melanoma. This revealed molecular conservation at various levels between fish models and human tumors providing a useful strategy for identifying expression signatures strongly associated with disease phenotypes and uncovering new melanoma molecules. PMID:22693581

  13. Differentially Expressed Genes and Signature Pathways of Human Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jennifer S.; von Lersner, Ariana K.; Robbins, Charles J.; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2015-01-01

    Genomic technologies including microarrays and next-generation sequencing have enabled the generation of molecular signatures of prostate cancer. Lists of differentially expressed genes between malignant and non-malignant states are thought to be fertile sources of putative prostate cancer biomarkers. However such lists of differentially expressed genes can be highly variable for multiple reasons. As such, looking at differential expression in the context of gene sets and pathways has been more robust. Using next-generation genome sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, differential gene expression between age- and stage- matched human prostate tumors and non-malignant samples was assessed and used to craft a pathway signature of prostate cancer. Up- and down-regulated genes were assigned to pathways composed of curated groups of related genes from multiple databases. The significance of these pathways was then evaluated according to the number of differentially expressed genes found in the pathway and their position within the pathway using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis and Signaling Pathway Impact Analysis. The “transforming growth factor-beta signaling” and “Ran regulation of mitotic spindle formation” pathways were strongly associated with prostate cancer. Several other significant pathways confirm reported findings from microarray data that suggest actin cytoskeleton regulation, cell cycle, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, and calcium signaling are also altered in prostate cancer. Thus we have demonstrated feasibility of pathway analysis and identified an underexplored area (Ran) for investigation in prostate cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26683658

  14. Cilengitide in newly diagnosed glioblastoma: biomarker expression and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Michael; Nabors, Louis Burt; Gorlia, Thierry; Leske, Henning; Rushing, Elisabeth; Bady, Pierre; Hicking, Christine; Perry, James; Hong, Yong-Kil; Roth, Patrick; Wick, Wolfgang; Goodman, Simon L.; Hegi, Monika E.; Picard, Martin; Moch, Holger; Straub, Josef; Stupp, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Integrins αvβ3 and αvβ5 regulate angiogenesis and invasiveness in cancer, potentially by modulating activation of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β pathway. The randomized phase III CENTRIC and phase II CORE trials explored the integrin inhibitor cilengitide in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma with versus without O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation. These trials failed to meet their primary endpoints. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the levels of the target integrins of cilengitide, αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins, of αvβ8 and of their putative target, phosphorylation of SMAD2, in tumor tissues from CENTRIC (n=274) and CORE (n=224). αvβ3 and αvβ5 expression correlated well in tumor and endothelial cells, but showed little association with αvβ8 or pSMAD2 levels. In CENTRIC, there was no interaction between the biomarkers and treatment for prediction of outcome. In CORE, higher αvβ3 levels in tumor cells were associated with improved progression-free survival by central review and with improved overall survival in patients treated with cilengitide. Integrins αvβ3, αvβ5 and αvβ8 are differentially expressed in glioblastoma. Integrin levels do not correlate with the activation level of the canonical TGF-β pathway. αvβ3 integrin expression may predict benefit from integrin inhibition in patients with glioblastoma lacking MGMT promoter methylation. PMID:26918452

  15. Gene Expression Signature in Adipose Tissue of Acromegaly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hochberg, Irit; Tran, Quynh T.; Barkan, Ariel L.; Saltiel, Alan R.; Chandler, William F.; Bridges, Dave

    2015-01-01

    To study the effect of chronic excess growth hormone on adipose tissue, we performed RNA sequencing in adipose tissue biopsies from patients with acromegaly (n = 7) or non-functioning pituitary adenomas (n = 11). The patients underwent clinical and metabolic profiling including assessment of HOMA-IR. Explants of adipose tissue were assayed ex vivo for lipolysis and ceramide levels. Patients with acromegaly had higher glucose, higher insulin levels and higher HOMA-IR score. We observed several previously reported transcriptional changes (IGF1, IGFBP3, CISH, SOCS2) that are known to be induced by GH/IGF-1 in liver but are also induced in adipose tissue. We also identified several novel transcriptional changes, some of which may be important for GH/IGF responses (PTPN3 and PTPN4) and the effects of acromegaly on growth and proliferation. Several differentially expressed transcripts may be important in GH/IGF-1-induced metabolic changes. Specifically, induction of LPL, ABHD5, and NRIP1 can contribute to enhanced lipolysis and may explain the elevated adipose tissue lipolysis in acromegalic patients. Higher expression of TCF7L2 and the fatty acid desaturases FADS1, FADS2 and SCD could contribute to insulin resistance. Ceramides were not different between the two groups. In summary, we have identified the acromegaly gene expression signature in human adipose tissue. The significance of altered expression of specific transcripts will enhance our understanding of the metabolic and proliferative changes associated with acromegaly. PMID:26087292

  16. MicroRNA Expression Signature in Degenerative Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis, characterized by narrowing of the exit of the left ventricle of the heart, has become the most common valvular heart disease in the elderly. The aim of this study was to investigate the microRNA (miRNA) signature in degenerative AS. Through microarray analysis, we identified the miRNA expression signature in the tissue samples from healthy individuals (n = 4) and patients with degenerative AS (n = 4). Six miRNAs (hsa-miR-193a-3p, hsa-miR-29b-1-5p, hsa-miR-505-5p, hsa-miR-194-5p, hsa-miR-99b-3p, and hsa-miR-200b-3p) were overexpressed and 14 (hsa-miR-3663-3p, hsa-miR-513a-5p, hsa-miR-146b-5p, hsa-miR-1972, hsa-miR-718, hsa-miR-3138, hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-630, hsa-miR-575, hsa-miR-301a-3p, hsa-miR-636, hsa-miR-34a-3p, hsa-miR-21-3p, and hsa-miR-516a-5p) were downregulated in aortic tissue from AS patients. GeneSpring 13.1 was used to identify potential human miRNA target genes by comparing a 3-way comparison of predictions from TargetScan, PITA, and microRNAorg databases. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis were performed to identify potential pathways and functional annotations associated with AS. Twenty miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed between patients with AS samples and normal controls and identified potential miRNA targets and molecular pathways associated with this morbidity. This study describes the miRNA expression signature in degenerative AS and provides an improved understanding of the molecular pathobiology of this disease. PMID:27579316

  17. MicroRNA Expression Signature in Degenerative Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Liu, Hui; Wang, Hui; Kong, Xiangqing

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis, characterized by narrowing of the exit of the left ventricle of the heart, has become the most common valvular heart disease in the elderly. The aim of this study was to investigate the microRNA (miRNA) signature in degenerative AS. Through microarray analysis, we identified the miRNA expression signature in the tissue samples from healthy individuals (n = 4) and patients with degenerative AS (n = 4). Six miRNAs (hsa-miR-193a-3p, hsa-miR-29b-1-5p, hsa-miR-505-5p, hsa-miR-194-5p, hsa-miR-99b-3p, and hsa-miR-200b-3p) were overexpressed and 14 (hsa-miR-3663-3p, hsa-miR-513a-5p, hsa-miR-146b-5p, hsa-miR-1972, hsa-miR-718, hsa-miR-3138, hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-630, hsa-miR-575, hsa-miR-301a-3p, hsa-miR-636, hsa-miR-34a-3p, hsa-miR-21-3p, and hsa-miR-516a-5p) were downregulated in aortic tissue from AS patients. GeneSpring 13.1 was used to identify potential human miRNA target genes by comparing a 3-way comparison of predictions from TargetScan, PITA, and microRNAorg databases. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis were performed to identify potential pathways and functional annotations associated with AS. Twenty miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed between patients with AS samples and normal controls and identified potential miRNA targets and molecular pathways associated with this morbidity. This study describes the miRNA expression signature in degenerative AS and provides an improved understanding of the molecular pathobiology of this disease. PMID:27579316

  18. Common and specific signatures of gene expression and protein-protein interactions in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Tuller, T; Atar, S; Ruppin, E; Gurevich, M; Achiron, A

    2013-03-01

    different subsignaling pathways. Analyses of the expression levels of dozens of genes and the protein-protein interactions among them demonstrated that CD and UC have relatively similar gene expression signatures, whereas the gene expression signatures of T1D and JRA relatively differ from the signatures of the other autoimmune diseases. These diseases are the only ones activated via the Fcɛ pathway. The relevant genes and pathways reported in this study are discussed at length, and may be helpful in the diagnoses and understanding of autoimmunity and/or specific autoimmune diseases. PMID:23190644

  19. Multiclass cancer diagnosis using tumor gene expression signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramaswamy, S.; Tamayo, P.; Rifkin, R.; Mukherjee, S.; Yeang, C. -H.; Angelo, M.; Ladd, C.; Reich, M.; Latulippe, E.; Mesirov, J. P.; Poggio, T.; Gerald, W.; Loda, M.; Lander, E. S.; Golub, T. R.

    2001-12-11

    The optimal treatment of patients with cancer depends on establishing accurate diagnoses by using a complex combination of clinical and histopathological data. In some instances, this task is difficult or impossible because of atypical clinical presentation or histopathology. To determine whether the diagnosis of multiple common adult malignancies could be achieved purely by molecular classification, we subjected 218 tumor samples, spanning 14 common tumor types, and 90 normal tissue samples to oligonucleotide microarray gene expression analysis. The expression levels of 16,063 genes and expressed sequence tags were used to evaluate the accuracy of a multiclass classifier based on a support vector machine algorithm. Overall classification accuracy was 78%, far exceeding the accuracy of random classification (9%). Poorly differentiated cancers resulted in low-confidence predictions and could not be accurately classified according to their tissue of origin, indicating that they are molecularly distinct entities with dramatically different gene expression patterns compared with their well differentiated counterparts. Taken together, these results demonstrate the feasibility of accurate, multiclass molecular cancer classification and suggest a strategy for future clinical implementation of molecular cancer diagnostics.

  20. Multiclass cancer diagnosis using tumor gene expression signatures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ramaswamy, S.; Tamayo, P.; Rifkin, R.; Mukherjee, S.; Yeang, C. -H.; Angelo, M.; Ladd, C.; Reich, M.; Latulippe, E.; Mesirov, J. P.; et al

    2001-12-11

    The optimal treatment of patients with cancer depends on establishing accurate diagnoses by using a complex combination of clinical and histopathological data. In some instances, this task is difficult or impossible because of atypical clinical presentation or histopathology. To determine whether the diagnosis of multiple common adult malignancies could be achieved purely by molecular classification, we subjected 218 tumor samples, spanning 14 common tumor types, and 90 normal tissue samples to oligonucleotide microarray gene expression analysis. The expression levels of 16,063 genes and expressed sequence tags were used to evaluate the accuracy of a multiclass classifier based on a supportmore » vector machine algorithm. Overall classification accuracy was 78%, far exceeding the accuracy of random classification (9%). Poorly differentiated cancers resulted in low-confidence predictions and could not be accurately classified according to their tissue of origin, indicating that they are molecularly distinct entities with dramatically different gene expression patterns compared with their well differentiated counterparts. Taken together, these results demonstrate the feasibility of accurate, multiclass molecular cancer classification and suggest a strategy for future clinical implementation of molecular cancer diagnostics.« less

  1. A gene expression signature associated with metastatic cells in effusions of breast carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Virginie N; Gentien, David; Oberkampf, Marine; De Rycke, Yann; Blin, Nathalie

    2007-09-01

    Malignant effusion in invasive breast carcinoma is associated with poor prognosis. To decipher molecular events leading to metastasis and to identify reliable markers for targeted therapies are of crucial need. Therefore, we have used cDNA microarrays to delineate molecular signatures associated with metastasis and relapse in breast carcinoma effusions. Taking advantage of an immunomagnetic method, we have purified to homogeneity EpCAM-positive cells from 34 malignant effusions. Immunopurified cells represented as much as 10% of the whole cell fraction and their epithelial and carcinoma features were confirmed by immunofluorescence labeling. Gene expression profiles of 19 immunopurified effusion samples, were analyzed using human pan-genomic microarrays, and compared with those of 4 corresponding primary tumors, 8 breast carcinoma effusion-derived cell lines, and 4 healthy mammary tissues. Principal component and multiple clustering analyses of microarray data, clearly identified distinctive molecular portraits corresponding to the 4 categories of specimens. Of uppermost interest, effusion samples were arranged in 2 subsets on the basis of their gene expression patterns. The first subset partly shares a gene expression signature with the different cell lines, and overexpresses CD24, CD44 and epithelial cytokeratins 8,18,19. The second subset overexpresses markers related to aggressive invasive carcinoma (uPA receptor, S100A4, vimentin, CXCR4). These findings demonstrate the importance of using pure cell fractions to accurately decipher in silico gene expression of clinical specimens. Further studies will lead to the identification of genes of oustanding importance to diagnose malignant effusion, predict survival and tailor appropriate therapies to the metastatic effusion disease in breast carcinoma patients. PMID:17450528

  2. A Gene Expression Signature for Chemoradiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Spitzner, Melanie; Emons, Georg; Kramer, Frank; Gaedcke, Jochen; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Scharf, Jens-Gerd; Burfeind, Peter; Becker, Heinz; Beissbarth, Tim; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Ried, Thomas; Grade, Marian

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The standard treatment of patients with locally advanced rectal cancers comprises preoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy followed by standardized surgery. However, tumor response to multimodal treatment has varied greatly, ranging from complete resistance to complete pathologic regression. The prediction of the response is, therefore, an important clinical need. Methods and Materials: To establish in vitro models for studying the molecular basis of this heterogeneous tumor response, we exposed 12 colorectal cancer cell lines to 3 {mu}M of 5-fluorouracil and 2 Gy of radiation. The differences in treatment sensitivity were then correlated with the pretherapeutic gene expression profiles of these cell lines. Results: We observed a heterogeneous response, with surviving fractions ranging from 0.28 to 0.81, closely recapitulating clinical reality. Using a linear model analysis, we identified 4,796 features whose expression levels correlated significantly with the sensitivity to chemoradiotherapy (Q <.05), including many genes involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway or cell cycle genes. These data have suggested a potential relevance of the insulin and Wnt signaling pathways for treatment response, and we identified STAT3, RASSF1, DOK3, and ERBB2 as potential therapeutic targets. The microarray measurements were independently validated for a subset of these genes using real-time polymerase chain reactions. Conclusion: We are the first to report a gene expression signature for the in vitro chemoradiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells. We anticipate that this analysis will unveil molecular biomarkers predictive of the response of rectal cancers to chemoradiotherapy and enable the identification of genes that could serve as targets to sensitize a priori resistant primary tumors.

  3. Brain Gene Expression Signatures From Cerebrospinal Fluid Exosome RNA Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, S. B.; Stevens, B.; Calvillo, E.; Tang, R.; Gutierrez Flores, B.; Hu, L.; Skog, J.; Bershad, E.

    2016-01-01

    While the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome observations have focused on ocular symptoms, spaceflight has been also associated with a number of other performance and neurologic signs, such as headaches, cognitive changes, vertigo, nausea, sleep/circadian disruption and mood alterations, which, albeit likely multifactorial, can also result from elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP). We therefore hypothesize that these various symptoms are caused by disturbances in the neurophysiology of the brain structures and are correlated with molecular markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as indicators of neurophysiological changes. Exosomes are 30-200 nm microvesicles shed into all biofluids, including blood, urine, and CSF, carrying a highly rich source of intact protein and RNA cargo. Exosomes have been identified in human CSF, and their proteome and RNA pool is a potential new reservoir for biomarker discovery in neurological disorders. The purpose of this study is to investigate changes in brain gene expression via exosome analysis in patients suffering from ICP elevation of varied severity (idiopathic intracranial hypertension -IIH), a condition which shares some of the neuroophthalmological features of VIIP, as a first step toward obtaining evidence suggesting that cognitive function and ICP levels can be correlated with biomarkers in the CSF. Our preliminary work, reported last year, validated the exosomal technology applicable to CSF analysis and demonstrated that it was possible to obtain gene expression evidence of inflammation processes in traumatic brain injury patients. We are now recruiting patients with suspected IIH requiring lumbar puncture at Baylor College of Medicine. Both CSF (5 ml) and human plasma (10 ml) are being collected in order to compare the pattern of differentially expressed genes observed in CSF and in blood. Since blood is much more accessible than CSF, we would like to determine whether plasma biomarkers for

  4. Bladder Cancer Associated Gene Expression Signatures Identified by Profiling of Exfoliated Urothelia

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, Charles J.; Liu, Li; Sun, Yijun; Villicana, Patrick; McCullers, Molly; Porvasnik, Stacy; Young, Paul R.; Parker, Alexander S.; Goodison, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fifth most commonly diagnosed malignancy in the United States and one of the most prevalent worldwide. It harbors a probability of recurrence of >50%, thus rigorous, long-term surveillance of patients is advocated. Flexible cystoscopy coupled with voided urine cytology (VUC) is the primary diagnostic approach, but cystoscopy is an uncomfortable, invasive procedure and the sensitivity of VUC is poor in all but high-grade tumors. Thus, improvements in non-invasive urinalysis assessment strategies would benefit patients. We applied gene expression microarray analysis to exfoliated urothelia recovered from bladder washes obtained prospectively from 46 patients with subsequently confirmed presence or absence of bladder cancer. Data from microarrays containing 56,000 targets was subjected to a panel of statistical analyses to identify bladder cancer-associated gene signatures. Hierarchical clustering and supervised learning algorithms were used to classify samples on the basis of tumor burden. A differentially expressed geneset of 319 gene probes was associated with the presence of bladder cancer (P<0.01), and visualization of protein interaction networks revealed VEGF and AGT as pivotal factors in tumor cells. Supervised machine learning and a cross-validation approach were used to build a 14-gene molecular classifier that was able to classify patients with and without bladder cancer with an overall accuracy of 76%. Our results show that it is possible to achieve the detection of bladder cancer using molecular signatures present in exfoliated tumor urothelia. Further investigation and validation of the cancer-associated profiles may reveal important biomarkers for the non-invasive detection and surveillance of bladder cancer. PMID:19190164

  5. An endometrial gene expression signature accurately predicts recurrent implantation failure after IVF

    PubMed Central

    Koot, Yvonne E. M.; van Hooff, Sander R.; Boomsma, Carolien M.; van Leenen, Dik; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J. A.; Goddijn, Mariëtte; Eijkemans, Marinus J. C.; Fauser, Bart C. J. M.; Holstege, Frank C. P.; Macklon, Nick S.

    2016-01-01

    The primary limiting factor for effective IVF treatment is successful embryo implantation. Recurrent implantation failure (RIF) is a condition whereby couples fail to achieve pregnancy despite consecutive embryo transfers. Here we describe the collection of gene expression profiles from mid-luteal phase endometrial biopsies (n = 115) from women experiencing RIF and healthy controls. Using a signature discovery set (n = 81) we identify a signature containing 303 genes predictive of RIF. Independent validation in 34 samples shows that the gene signature predicts RIF with 100% positive predictive value (PPV). The strength of the RIF associated expression signature also stratifies RIF patients into distinct groups with different subsequent implantation success rates. Exploration of the expression changes suggests that RIF is primarily associated with reduced cellular proliferation. The gene signature will be of value in counselling and guiding further treatment of women who fail to conceive upon IVF and suggests new avenues for developing intervention. PMID:26797113

  6. Extracting reliable gene expression signatures through Stable Bootstrap Validation.

    PubMed

    Chlis, N K; Bei, E S; Moirogiorgou, K; Zervakis, M

    2015-08-01

    Identification of candidate genes responsible for specific phenotypes, such as cancer, has been a major challenge in the field of bioinformatics. Given a DNA Microarray dataset, traditional feature selection methods produce lists of candidate genes which vary significantly under variations of the training data. That instability hinders the validity of research findings and raises doubts about the reliability of such methods. In this study, we propose a framework for the extraction of stable genomic signatures. The proposed methodology enforces stability at the validation step, independent of the feature selection and classification methods used. The statistical significance of the selected gene set is also assessed. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of stability issues in genomic signatures, beyond their prediction capabilities. PMID:26737284

  7. Peripheral Blood Cell Gene Expression Diagnostic for Identifying Symptomatic Transthyretin Amyloidosis Patients: Male and Female Specific Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Kurian, Sunil M.; Novais, Marta; Whisenant, Thomas; Gelbart, Terri; Buxbaum, Joel N.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Coelho, Teresa; Salomon, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early diagnosis of familial transthyretin (TTR) amyloid diseases remains challenging because of variable disease penetrance. Currently, patients must have an amyloid positive tissue biopsy to be eligible for disease-modifying therapies. Endomyocardial biopsies are typically amyloid positive when cardiomyopathy is suspected, but this disease manifestation is generally diagnosed late. Early diagnosis is often difficult because patients exhibit apparent symptoms of polyneuropathy, but have a negative amyloid biopsy. Thus, there is a pressing need for an additional early diagnostic strategy for TTR-aggregation-associated polyneuropathy and cardiomyopathy. Methods and Findings: Global peripheral blood cell mRNA expression profiles from 263 tafamidis-treated and untreated V30M Familiar Amyloid Neuropathy patients, asymptomatic V30M carriers, and healthy, age- and sex-matched controls without TTR mutations were used to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic patients. We demonstrate that blood cell gene expression patterns reveal sex-independent, as well as male- and female-specific inflammatory signatures in symptomatic FAP patients, but not in asymptomatic carriers. These signatures differentiated symptomatic patients from asymptomatic V30M carriers with >80% accuracy. There was a global downregulation of the eIF2 pathway and its associated genes in all symptomatic FAP patients. We also demonstrated that the molecular scores based on these signatures significantly trended toward normalized values in an independent cohort of 46 FAP patients after only 3 months of tafamidis treatment. Conclusions: This study identifies novel molecular signatures that differentiate symptomatic FAP patients from asymptomatic V30M carriers as well as affected males and females. We envision using this approach, initially in parallel with amyloid biopsies, to identify individuals who are asymptomatic gene carriers that may convert to FAP patients. Upon further validation

  8. Germline genes hypomethylation and expression define a molecular signature in peripheral blood of ICF patients: implications for diagnosis and etiology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunodeficiency Centromeric Instability and Facial anomalies (ICF) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by reduction in serum immunoglobulins with severe recurrent infections, facial dysmorphism, and more variable symptoms including mental retardation. ICF is directly related to a genomic methylation defect that mainly affects juxtacentromeric heterochromatin regions of certain chromosomes, leading to chromosomal rearrangements that constitute a hallmark of this syndrome upon cytogenetic testing. Mutations in the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B, the protein ZBTB24 of unknown function, or loci that remain to be identified, lie at its origin. Despite unifying features, common or distinguishing molecular signatures are still missing for this disease. Method We used the molecular signature that we identified in a mouse model for ICF1 to establish transcriptional biomarkers to facilitate diagnosis and understanding of etiology of the disease. We assayed the expression and methylation status of a set of genes whose expression is normally restricted to germ cells, directly in whole blood samples and epithelial cells of ICF patients. Results We report that DNA hypomethylation and expression of MAEL and SYCE1 represent robust biomarkers, easily testable directly from uncultured cells to diagnose the most prevalent sub-type of the syndrome. In addition, we identified the first unifying molecular signatures for ICF patients. Of importance, we validated the use of our biomarkers to diagnose a baby born to a family with a sick child. Finally, our analysis revealed unsuspected complex molecular signatures in two ICF patients suggestive of a novel genetic etiology for the disease. Conclusions Early diagnosis of ICF syndrome is crucial since early immunoglobulin supplementation can improve the course of disease. However, ICF is probably underdiagnosed, especially in patients that present with incomplete phenotype or born to families with no affected

  9. Gene Expression Deconvolution for Uncovering Molecular Signatures in Response to Therapy in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Alan M.; Yeung, Rae S. M.; Morris, Quaid

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression-based signatures help identify pathways relevant to diseases and treatments, but are challenging to construct when there is a diversity of disease mechanisms and treatments in patients with complex diseases. To overcome this challenge, we present a new application of an in silico gene expression deconvolution method, ISOpure-S1, and apply it to identify a common gene expression signature corresponding to response to treatment in 33 juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Using pre- and post-treatment gene expression profiles only, we found a gene expression signature that significantly correlated with a reduction in the number of joints with active arthritis, a measure of clinical outcome (Spearman rho = 0.44, p = 0.040, Bonferroni correction). This signature may be associated with a decrease in T-cells, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets. The products of most differentially expressed genes include known biomarkers for JIA such as major histocompatibility complexes and interleukins, as well as novel biomarkers including α-defensins. This method is readily applicable to expression datasets of other complex diseases to uncover shared mechanistic patterns in heterogeneous samples. PMID:27244050

  10. Development of Multigene Expression Signature Maps at the Protein Level from Digitized Immunohistochemistry Slides

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Gregory J.; Dankbar, Stephen C.; Henriksen, Jonathan; Rizzardi, Anthony E.; Rosener, Nikolaus K.; Schmechel, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular classification of diseases based on multigene expression signatures is increasingly used for diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of response to therapy. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is an optimal method for validating expression signatures obtained using high-throughput genomics techniques since IHC allows a pathologist to examine gene expression at the protein level within the context of histologically interpretable tissue sections. Additionally, validated IHC assays may be readily implemented as clinical tests since IHC is performed on routinely processed clinical tissue samples. However, methods have not been available for automated n-gene expression profiling at the protein level using IHC data. We have developed methods to compute expression level maps (signature maps) of multiple genes from IHC data digitized on a commercial whole slide imaging system. Areas of cancer for these expression level maps are defined by a pathologist on adjacent, co-registered H&E slides, allowing assessment of IHC statistics and heterogeneity within the diseased tissue. This novel way of representing multiple IHC assays as signature maps will allow the development of n-gene expression profiling databases in three dimensions throughout virtual whole organ reconstructions. PMID:22438942

  11. Oxidative stress/reactive metabolite gene expression signature in rat liver detects idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, Angelique; Nie, Alex; Brandon Parker, J.; Sawant, Sharmilee; Piechta, Leigh-Anne; Kelley, Michael F. Mark Kao, L.; Jim Proctor, S.; Verheyen, Geert; Johnson, Mark D.; Lord, Peter G.; McMillian, Michael K.

    2014-03-15

    Previously we reported a gene expression signature in rat liver for detecting a specific type of oxidative stress (OS) related to reactive metabolites (RM). High doses of the drugs disulfiram, ethinyl estradiol and nimesulide were used with another dozen paradigm OS/RM compounds, and three other drugs flutamide, phenacetin and sulindac were identified by this signature. In a second study, antiepileptic drugs were compared for covalent binding and their effects on OS/RM; felbamate, carbamazepine, and phenobarbital produced robust OS/RM gene expression. In the present study, liver RNA samples from drug-treated rats from more recent experiments were examined for statistical fit to the OS/RM signature. Of all 97 drugs examined, in addition to the nine drugs noted above, 19 more were identified as OS/RM-producing compounds—chlorpromazine, clozapine, cyproterone acetate, dantrolene, dipyridamole, glibenclamide, isoniazid, ketoconazole, methapyrilene, naltrexone, nifedipine, sulfamethoxazole, tamoxifen, coumarin, ritonavir, amitriptyline, valproic acid, enalapril, and chloramphenicol. Importantly, all of the OS/RM drugs listed above have been linked to idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity, excepting chloramphenicol, which does not have a package label for hepatotoxicity, but does have a black box warning for idiosyncratic bone marrow suppression. Most of these drugs are not acutely toxic in the rat. The OS/RM signature should be useful to avoid idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of drug candidates. - Highlights: • 28 of 97 drugs gave a positive OS/RM gene expression signature in rat liver. • The specificity of the signature for human idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants was 98%. • The sensitivity of the signature for human idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants was 75%. • The signature can help eliminate hepatotoxicants from drug development.

  12. Expression Signatures of Long Noncoding RNAs in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Yang; Wang, Liang; Yu, Bin; Zhuang, Qian-yu; Wang, Yi-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), the most common pediatric spinal deformity, is considered a complex genetic disease. Causing genes and pathogenesis of AIS are still unclear. This study was designed to identify differentially expressed long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) involving the pathogenesis of AIS. Methods. We first performed comprehensive screening of lncRNA and mRNA in AIS patients and healthy children using Agilent human lncRNA + mRNA Array V3.0 microarray. LncRNAs expression in different AIS patients was further evaluated using quantitative PCR. Results. A total of 139 lncRNAs and 546 mRNAs were differentially expressed between AIS patients and healthy control. GO and Pathway analysis showed that these mRNAs might be involved in bone mineralization, neuromuscular junction, skeletal system morphogenesis, nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolism, and regulation of signal pathway. Four lncRNAs (ENST00000440778.1, ENST00000602322.1, ENST00000414894.1, and TCONS_00028768) were differentially expressed between different patients when grouped according to age, height, classification, severity of scoliosis, and Risser grade. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the abnormal expression of lncRNAs and mRNAs in AIS, and the expression of some lncRNAs was related to clinical features. This study is helpful for further understanding of lncRNAs in pathogenesis, treatment, and prognosis of AIS. PMID:26421281

  13. Pulmonary arteriole gene expression signature in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nina M; Kawut, Steven M; Jelic, Sanja; Arcasoy, Selim M; Lederer, David J; Borczuk, Alain C

    2013-06-01

    A third of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) develop pulmonary hypertension (PH-IPF), which is associated with increased mortality. Whether an altered gene expression profile in the pulmonary vasculature precedes the clinical onset of PH-IPF is unknown. We compared gene expression in the pulmonary vasculature of IPF patients with and without PH with controls. Pulmonary arterioles were isolated using laser capture microdissection from 16 IPF patients: eight with PH (PH-IPF) and eight with no PH (NPH-IPF), and seven controls. Probe was prepared from extracted RNA, and hybridised to Affymetrix Hu133 2.0 Plus genechips. Biometric Research Branch array tools and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software were used for analysis of the microarray data. Univariate analysis revealed 255 genes that distinguished IPF arterioles from controls (p<0.001). Mediators of vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cell proliferation, Wnt signalling and apoptosis were differentially expressed in IPF arterioles. Unsupervised and supervised clustering analyses revealed similar gene expression in PH-IPF and NPH-IPF arterioles. The pulmonary arteriolar gene expression profile is similar in IPF patients with and without coexistent PH. Pathways involved in vascular proliferation and aberrant apoptosis, which may contribute to pulmonary vascular remodelling, are activated in IPF patients. PMID:23728404

  14. Polycomb repressive complex 2 epigenomic signature defines age-associated hypermethylation and gene expression changes

    PubMed Central

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G

    2015-01-01

    Although age-associated gene expression and methylation changes have been reported throughout the literature, the unifying epigenomic principles of aging remain poorly understood. Recent explosion in availability and resolution of functional/regulatory genome annotation data (epigenomic data), such as that provided by the ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics projects, provides an opportunity for the identification of epigenomic mechanisms potentially altered by age-associated differentially methylated regions (aDMRs) and regulatory signatures in the promoters of age-associated genes (aGENs). In this study we found that aDMRs and aGENs identified in multiple independent studies share a common Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 signature marked by EZH2, SUZ12, CTCF binding sites, repressive H3K27me3, and activating H3K4me1 histone modification marks, and a “poised promoter” chromatin state. This signature is depleted in RNA Polymerase II-associated transcription factor binding sites, activating H3K79me2, H3K36me3, H3K27ac marks, and an “active promoter” chromatin state. The PRC2 signature was shown to be generally stable across cell types. When considering the directionality of methylation changes, we found the PRC2 signature to be associated with aDMRs hypermethylated with age, while hypomethylated aDMRs were associated with enhancers. In contrast, aGENs were associated with the PRC2 signature independently of the directionality of gene expression changes. In this study we demonstrate that the PRC2 signature is the common epigenomic context of genomic regions associated with hypermethylation and gene expression changes in aging. PMID:25880792

  15. Identification of gene expression signature for cigarette smoke exposure response--from man to mouse.

    PubMed

    Martin, F; Talikka, M; Hoeng, J; Peitsch, M C

    2015-12-01

    Gene expression profiling data can be used in toxicology to assess both the level and impact of toxicant exposure, aligned with a vision of 21st century toxicology. Here, we present a whole blood-derived gene signature that can distinguish current smokers from either nonsmokers or former smokers with high specificity and sensitivity. Such a signature that can be measured in a surrogate tissue (whole blood) may help in monitoring smoking exposure as well as discontinuation of exposure when the primarily impacted tissue (e.g., lung) is not readily accessible. The signature consisted of LRRN3, SASH1, PALLD, RGL1, TNFRSF17, CDKN1C, IGJ, RRM2, ID3, SERPING1, and FUCA1. Several members of this signature have been previously described in the context of smoking. The signature translated well across species and could distinguish mice that were exposed to cigarette smoke from ones exposed to air only or had been withdrawn from cigarette smoke exposure. Finally, the small signature of only 11 genes could be converted into a polymerase chain reaction-based assay that could serve as a marker to monitor compliance with a smoking abstinence protocol. PMID:26614807

  16. mRNA Expression Signature of Gleason Grade Predicts Lethal Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Penney, Kathryn L.; Sinnott, Jennifer A.; Fall, Katja; Pawitan, Yudi; Hoshida, Yujin; Kraft, Peter; Stark, Jennifer R.; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Perner, Sven; Finn, Stephen; Calza, Stefano; Flavin, Richard; Freedman, Matthew L.; Setlur, Sunita; Sesso, Howard D.; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Martin, Neil; Kantoff, Philip W.; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Rubin, Mark A.; Loda, Massimo; Golub, Todd R.; Andrén, Ove; Stampfer, Meir J.; Mucci, Lorelei A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Prostate-specific antigen screening has led to enormous overtreatment of prostate cancer because of the inability to distinguish potentially lethal disease at diagnosis. We reasoned that by identifying an mRNA signature of Gleason grade, the best predictor of prognosis, we could improve prediction of lethal disease among men with moderate Gleason 7 tumors, the most common grade, and the most indeterminate in terms of prognosis. Patients and Methods Using the complementary DNA–mediated annealing, selection, extension, and ligation assay, we measured the mRNA expression of 6,100 genes in prostate tumor tissue in the Swedish Watchful Waiting cohort (n = 358) and Physicians' Health Study (PHS; n = 109). We developed an mRNA signature of Gleason grade comparing individuals with Gleason ≤ 6 to those with Gleason ≥ 8 tumors and applied the model among patients with Gleason 7 to discriminate lethal cases. Results We built a 157-gene signature using the Swedish data that predicted Gleason with low misclassification (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.91); when this signature was tested in the PHS, the discriminatory ability remained high (AUC = 0.94). In men with Gleason 7 tumors, who were excluded from the model building, the signature significantly improved the prediction of lethal disease beyond knowing whether the Gleason score was 4 + 3 or 3 + 4 (P = .006). Conclusion Our expression signature and the genes identified may improve our understanding of the de-differentiation process of prostate tumors. Additionally, the signature may have clinical applications among men with Gleason 7, by further estimating their risk of lethal prostate cancer and thereby guiding therapy decisions to improve outcomes and reduce overtreatment. PMID:21537050

  17. Subtype-specific micro-RNA expression signatures in breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Haakensen, Vilde D; Nygaard, Vegard; Greger, Liliana; Aure, Miriam R; Fromm, Bastian; Bukholm, Ida R K; Lüders, Torben; Chin, Suet-Feung; Git, Anna; Caldas, Carlos; Kristensen, Vessela N; Brazma, Alvis; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hovig, Eivind; Helland, Åslaug

    2016-09-01

    Robust markers of invasiveness may help reduce the overtreatment of in situ carcinomas. Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and biological mechanisms for carcinogenesis vary between subtypes. Stratification by subtype is therefore necessary to identify relevant and robust signatures of invasive disease. We have identified microRNA (miRNA) alterations during breast cancer progression in two separate datasets and used stratification and external validation to strengthen the findings. We analyzed two separate datasets (METABRIC and AHUS) consisting of a total of 186 normal breast tissue samples, 18 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and 1,338 invasive breast carcinomas. Validation in a separate dataset and stratification by molecular subtypes based on immunohistochemistry, PAM50 and integrated cluster classifications were performed. We propose subtype-specific miRNA signatures of invasive carcinoma and a validated signature of DCIS. miRNAs included in the invasive signatures include downregulation of miR-139-5p in aggressive subtypes and upregulation of miR-29c-5p expression in the luminal subtypes. No miRNAs were differentially expressed in the transition from DCIS to invasive carcinomas on the whole, indicating the need for subtype stratification. A total of 27 miRNAs were included in our proposed DCIS signature. Significant alterations of expression included upregulation of miR-21-5p and the miR-200 family and downregulation of let-7 family members in DCIS samples. The signatures proposed here can form the basis for studies exploring DCIS samples with increased invasive potential and serum biomarkers for in situ and invasive breast cancer. PMID:27082076

  18. Low Concordance between Gene Expression Signatures in ER Positive HER2 Negative Breast Carcinoma Could Impair Their Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Laas, Enora; Mallon, Peter; Duhoux, Francois P.; Hamidouche, Amina; Rouzier, Roman; Reyal, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous prognostic gene expression signatures have been recently described. Among the signatures there is variation in the constituent genes that are utilized. We aim to evaluate prognostic concordance among eight gene expression signatures, on a large dataset of ER positive HER2 negative breast cancers. Methods We analysed the performance of eight gene expression signatures on six different datasets of ER+ HER2- breast cancers. Survival analyses were performed using the Kaplan–Meier estimate of survival function. We assessed discrimination and concordance between the 8 signatures on survival and recurrence rates The Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) was used to to stratify the risk of recurrence/death. Results The discrimination ability of the whole signatures, showed fair discrimination performances, with AUC ranging from 0.64 (95%CI 0.55–0.73 for the 76-genes signatures, to 0.72 (95%CI 0.64–0.8) for the Molecular Prognosis Index T17. Low concordance was found in predicting events in the intermediate and high-risk group, as defined by the NPI. Low risk group was the only subgroup with a good signatures concordance. Conclusion Genomic signatures may be a good option to predict prognosis as most of them perform well at the population level. They exhibit, however, a high degree of discordance in the intermediate and high-risk groups. The major benefit that we could expect from gene expression signatures is the standardization of proliferation assessment. PMID:26895349

  19. Genetically diverse CC-founder mouse strains replicate the human influenza gene expression signature

    PubMed Central

    Elbahesh, Husni; Schughart, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) are zoonotic pathogens that pose a major threat to human and animal health. Influenza virus disease severity is influenced by viral virulence factors as well as individual differences in host response. We analyzed gene expression changes in the blood of infected mice using a previously defined set of signature genes that was derived from changes in the blood transcriptome of IAV-infected human volunteers. We found that the human signature was reproduced well in the founder strains of the Collaborative Cross (CC) mice, thus demonstrating the relevance and importance of mouse experimental model systems for studying human influenza disease. PMID:27193691

  20. Genetically diverse CC-founder mouse strains replicate the human influenza gene expression signature.

    PubMed

    Elbahesh, Husni; Schughart, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) are zoonotic pathogens that pose a major threat to human and animal health. Influenza virus disease severity is influenced by viral virulence factors as well as individual differences in host response. We analyzed gene expression changes in the blood of infected mice using a previously defined set of signature genes that was derived from changes in the blood transcriptome of IAV-infected human volunteers. We found that the human signature was reproduced well in the founder strains of the Collaborative Cross (CC) mice, thus demonstrating the relevance and importance of mouse experimental model systems for studying human influenza disease. PMID:27193691

  1. Assessing the Biological Significance of Gene Expression Signatures and Co-Expression Modules by Studying Their Network Properties

    PubMed Central

    Minguez, Pablo; Dopazo, Joaquin

    2011-01-01

    Microarray experiments have been extensively used to define signatures, which are sets of genes that can be considered markers of experimental conditions (typically diseases). Paradoxically, in spite of the apparent functional role that might be attributed to such gene sets, signatures do not seem to be reproducible across experiments. Given the close relationship between function and protein interaction, network properties can be used to study to what extent signatures are composed of genes whose resulting proteins show a considerable level of interaction (and consequently a putative common functional role). We have analysed 618 signatures and 507 modules of co-expression in cancer looking for significant values of four main protein-protein interaction (PPI) network parameters: connection degree, cluster coefficient, betweenness and number of components. A total of 3904 gene ontology (GO) modules, 146 KEGG pathways, and 263 Biocarta pathways have been used as functional modules of reference. Co-expression modules found in microarray experiments display a high level of connectivity, similar to the one shown by conventional modules based on functional definitions (GO, KEGG and Biocarta). A general observation for all the classes studied is that the networks formed by the modules improve their topological parameters when an external protein is allowed to be introduced within the paths (up to the 70% of GO modules show network parameters beyond the random expectation). This fact suggests that functional definitions are incomplete and some genes might still be missing. Conversely, signatures are clearly not capturing the altered functions in the corresponding studies. This is probably because the way in which the genes have been selected in the signatures is too conservative. These results suggest that gene selection methods which take into account relationships among genes should be superior to methods that assume independence among genes outside their functional

  2. Identification of Gene-Expression Signatures and Protein Markers for Breast Cancer Grading and Staging.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fang; Zhang, Chi; Du, Wei; Liu, Chao; Xu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The grade of a cancer is a measure of the cancer's malignancy level, and the stage of a cancer refers to the size and the extent that the cancer has spread. Here we present a computational method for prediction of gene signatures and blood/urine protein markers for breast cancer grades and stages based on RNA-seq data, which are retrieved from the TCGA breast cancer dataset and cover 111 pairs of disease and matching adjacent noncancerous tissues with pathologists-assigned stages and grades. By applying a differential expression and an SVM-based classification approach, we found that 324 and 227 genes in cancer have their expression levels consistently up-regulated vs. their matching controls in a grade- and stage-dependent manner, respectively. By using these genes, we predicted a 9-gene panel as a gene signature for distinguishing poorly differentiated from moderately and well differentiated breast cancers, and a 19-gene panel as a gene signature for discriminating between the moderately and well differentiated breast cancers. Similarly, a 30-gene panel and a 21-gene panel are predicted as gene signatures for distinguishing advanced stage (stages III-IV) from early stage (stages I-II) cancer samples and for distinguishing stage II from stage I samples, respectively. We expect these gene panels can be used as gene-expression signatures for cancer grade and stage classification. In addition, of the 324 grade-dependent genes, 188 and 66 encode proteins that are predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively; and of the 227 stage-dependent genes, 123 and 51 encode proteins predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively. We anticipate that some combinations of these blood and urine proteins could serve as markers for monitoring breast cancer at specific grades and stages through blood and urine tests. PMID:26375396

  3. Identification of Gene-Expression Signatures and Protein Markers for Breast Cancer Grading and Staging

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Fang; Zhang, Chi; Du, Wei; Liu, Chao; Xu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The grade of a cancer is a measure of the cancer's malignancy level, and the stage of a cancer refers to the size and the extent that the cancer has spread. Here we present a computational method for prediction of gene signatures and blood/urine protein markers for breast cancer grades and stages based on RNA-seq data, which are retrieved from the TCGA breast cancer dataset and cover 111 pairs of disease and matching adjacent noncancerous tissues with pathologists-assigned stages and grades. By applying a differential expression and an SVM-based classification approach, we found that 324 and 227 genes in cancer have their expression levels consistently up-regulated vs. their matching controls in a grade- and stage-dependent manner, respectively. By using these genes, we predicted a 9-gene panel as a gene signature for distinguishing poorly differentiated from moderately and well differentiated breast cancers, and a 19-gene panel as a gene signature for discriminating between the moderately and well differentiated breast cancers. Similarly, a 30-gene panel and a 21-gene panel are predicted as gene signatures for distinguishing advanced stage (stages III-IV) from early stage (stages I-II) cancer samples and for distinguishing stage II from stage I samples, respectively. We expect these gene panels can be used as gene-expression signatures for cancer grade and stage classification. In addition, of the 324 grade-dependent genes, 188 and 66 encode proteins that are predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively; and of the 227 stage-dependent genes, 123 and 51 encode proteins predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively. We anticipate that some combinations of these blood and urine proteins could serve as markers for monitoring breast cancer at specific grades and stages through blood and urine tests. PMID:26375396

  4. Oxidative stress/reactive metabolite gene expression signature in rat liver detects idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants.

    PubMed

    Leone, Angelique; Nie, Alex; Brandon Parker, J; Sawant, Sharmilee; Piechta, Leigh-Anne; Kelley, Michael F; Mark Kao, L; Jim Proctor, S; Verheyen, Geert; Johnson, Mark D; Lord, Peter G; McMillian, Michael K

    2014-03-15

    Previously we reported a gene expression signature in rat liver for detecting a specific type of oxidative stress (OS) related to reactive metabolites (RM). High doses of the drugs disulfiram, ethinyl estradiol and nimesulide were used with another dozen paradigm OS/RM compounds, and three other drugs flutamide, phenacetin and sulindac were identified by this signature. In a second study, antiepileptic drugs were compared for covalent binding and their effects on OS/RM; felbamate, carbamazepine, and phenobarbital produced robust OS/RM gene expression. In the present study, liver RNA samples from drug-treated rats from more recent experiments were examined for statistical fit to the OS/RM signature. Of all 97 drugs examined, in addition to the nine drugs noted above, 19 more were identified as OS/RM-producing compounds-chlorpromazine, clozapine, cyproterone acetate, dantrolene, dipyridamole, glibenclamide, isoniazid, ketoconazole, methapyrilene, naltrexone, nifedipine, sulfamethoxazole, tamoxifen, coumarin, ritonavir, amitriptyline, valproic acid, enalapril, and chloramphenicol. Importantly, all of the OS/RM drugs listed above have been linked to idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity, excepting chloramphenicol, which does not have a package label for hepatotoxicity, but does have a black box warning for idiosyncratic bone marrow suppression. Most of these drugs are not acutely toxic in the rat. The OS/RM signature should be useful to avoid idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of drug candidates. PMID:24486436

  5. Gene expression signatures and outcome prediction in mature B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Dave, Sandeep S

    2006-07-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas comprise a diverse group of diseases that are subclassified by the state of differentiation of the malignant B cells, presence of specific cytogenetic abnormalities, and characteristic morphology. Gene expression profiling has revealed that within each category of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, there exists a significant molecular heterogeneity that can be reflected in differences in tumor behavior and patient outcome. Appreciation of gene expression signatures that are associated with patient outcome will allow better prognostication of disease course and aid the application of molecularly selective patients to improve patient outcome. PMID:16916486

  6. Immune signatures and disorder-specific patterns in a cross-disorder gene expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Simone; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Patel, Hamel; Lee, Sanghyuck; Dempster, David; Curtis, Charles; Paya-Cano, Jose; Murphy, Declan; Wilson, C. Ellie; Horder, Jamie; Mendez, M. Andreina; Asherson, Philip; Rivera, Margarita; Costello, Helen; Maltezos, Stefanos; Whitwell, Susannah; Pitts, Mark; Tye, Charlotte; Ashwood, Karen L.; Bolton, Patrick; Curran, Sarah; McGuffin, Peter; Dobson, Richard; Breen, Gerome

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies point to overlap between neuropsychiatric disorders in symptomatology and genetic aetiology. Aims To systematically investigate genomics overlap between childhood and adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). Method Analysis of whole-genome blood gene expression and genetic risk scores of 318 individuals. Participants included individuals affected with adult ADHD (n = 93), childhood ADHD (n = 17), MDD (n = 63), ASD (n = 51), childhood dual diagnosis of ADHD–ASD (n = 16) and healthy controls (n = 78). Results Weighted gene co-expression analysis results reveal disorder-specific signatures for childhood ADHD and MDD, and also highlight two immune-related gene co-expression modules correlating inversely with MDD and adult ADHD disease status. We find no significant relationship between polygenic risk scores and gene expression signatures. Conclusions Our results reveal disorder overlap and specificity at the genetic and gene expression level. They suggest new pathways contributing to distinct pathophysiology in psychiatric disorders and shed light on potential shared genomic risk factors. PMID:27151072

  7. Signature gene expression reveals novel clues to the molecular mechanisms of dimorphic transition in Penicillium marneffei.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ence; Chow, Wang-Ngai; Wang, Gang; Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lin, Xiaorong; Cai, James J

    2014-10-01

    Systemic dimorphic fungi cause more than one million new infections each year, ranking them among the significant public health challenges currently encountered. Penicillium marneffei is a systemic dimorphic fungus endemic to Southeast Asia. The temperature-dependent dimorphic phase transition between mycelium and yeast is considered crucial for the pathogenicity and transmission of P. marneffei, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we re-sequenced P. marneffei strain PM1 using multiple sequencing platforms and assembled the genome using hybrid genome assembly. We determined gene expression levels using RNA sequencing at the mycelial and yeast phases of P. marneffei, as well as during phase transition. We classified 2,718 genes with variable expression across conditions into 14 distinct groups, each marked by a signature expression pattern implicated at a certain stage in the dimorphic life cycle. Genes with the same expression patterns tend to be clustered together on the genome, suggesting orchestrated regulations of the transcriptional activities of neighboring genes. Using qRT-PCR, we validated expression levels of all genes in one of clusters highly expressed during the yeast-to-mycelium transition. These included madsA, a gene encoding MADS-box transcription factor whose gene family is exclusively expanded in P. marneffei. Over-expression of madsA drove P. marneffei to undergo mycelial growth at 37°C, a condition that restricts the wild-type in the yeast phase. Furthermore, analyses of signature expression patterns suggested diverse roles of secreted proteins at different developmental stages and the potential importance of non-coding RNAs in mycelium-to-yeast transition. We also showed that RNA structural transition in response to temperature changes may be related to the control of thermal dimorphism. Together, our findings have revealed multiple molecular mechanisms that may underlie the dimorphic transition in P. marneffei

  8. Graph-based identification of cancer signaling pathways from published gene expression signatures using PubLiME.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, Giacomo; Mancuso, Francesco Mattia; Cittaro, Davide; Muller, Heiko

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression technology has become a routine application in many laboratories and has provided large amounts of gene expression signatures that have been identified in a variety of cancer types. Interpretation of gene expression signatures would profit from the availability of a procedure capable of assigning differentially regulated genes or entire gene signatures to defined cancer signaling pathways. Here we describe a graph-based approach that identifies cancer signaling pathways from published gene expression signatures. Published gene expression signatures are collected in a database (PubLiME: Published Lists of Microarray Experiments) enabled for cross-platform gene annotation. Significant co-occurrence modules composed of up to 10 genes in different gene expression signatures are identified. Significantly co-occurring genes are linked by an edge in an undirected graph. Edge-betweenness and k-clique clustering combined with graph modularity as a quality measure are used to identify communities in the resulting graph. The identified communities consist of cell cycle, apoptosis, phosphorylation cascade, extra cellular matrix, interferon and immune response regulators as well as communities of unknown function. The genes constituting different communities are characterized by common genomic features and strongly enriched cis-regulatory modules in their upstream regulatory regions that are consistent with pathway assignment of those genes. PMID:17389643

  9. An Orthologous Epigenetic Gene Expression Signature Derived from Differentiating Embryonic Stem Cells Identifies Regulators of Cardiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Busser, Brian W.; Lin, Yongshun; Yang, Yanqin; Zhu, Jun; Chen, Guokai; Michelson, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Here we used predictive gene expression signatures within a multi-species framework to identify the genes that underlie cardiac cell fate decisions in differentiating embryonic stem cells. We show that the overlapping orthologous mouse and human genes are the most accurate candidate cardiogenic genes as these genes identified the most conserved developmental pathways that characterize the cardiac lineage. An RNAi-based screen of the candidate genes in Drosophila uncovered numerous novel cardiogenic genes. shRNA knockdown combined with transcriptome profiling of the newly-identified transcription factors zinc finger protein 503 and zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 and the well-known cardiac regulatory factor NK2 homeobox 5 revealed that zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 activates terminal differentiation genes required for cardiomyocyte structure and function whereas zinc finger protein 503 and NK2 homeobox 5 are required for specification of the cardiac lineage. We further demonstrated that an essential role of NK2 homeobox 5 and zinc finger protein 503 in specification of the cardiac lineage is the repression of gene expression programs characteristic of alternative cell fates. Collectively, these results show that orthologous gene expression signatures can be used to identify conserved cardiogenic pathways. PMID:26485529

  10. An Immune-Inflammation Gene Expression Signature in Prostate Tumors of Smokers.

    PubMed

    Prueitt, Robyn L; Wallace, Tiffany A; Glynn, Sharon A; Yi, Ming; Tang, Wei; Luo, Jun; Dorsey, Tiffany H; Stagliano, Katherine E; Gillespie, John W; Hudson, Robert S; Terunuma, Atsushi; Shoe, Jennifer L; Haines, Diana C; Yfantis, Harris G; Han, Misop; Martin, Damali N; Jordan, Symone V; Borin, James F; Naslund, Michael J; Alexander, Richard B; Stephens, Robert M; Loffredo, Christopher A; Lee, Dong H; Putluri, Nagireddy; Sreekumar, Arun; Hurwitz, Arthur A; Ambs, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Smokers develop metastatic prostate cancer more frequently than nonsmokers, suggesting that a tobacco-derived factor is driving metastatic progression. To identify smoking-induced alterations in human prostate cancer, we analyzed gene and protein expression patterns in tumors collected from current, past, and never smokers. By this route, we elucidated a distinct pattern of molecular alterations characterized by an immune and inflammation signature in tumors from current smokers that were either attenuated or absent in past and never smokers. Specifically, this signature included elevated immunoglobulin expression by tumor-infiltrating B cells, NF-κB activation, and increased chemokine expression. In an alternate approach to characterize smoking-induced oncogenic alterations, we also explored the effects of nicotine in human prostate cancer cells and prostate cancer-prone TRAMP mice. These investigations showed that nicotine increased glutamine consumption and invasiveness of cancer cells in vitro and accelerated metastatic progression in tumor-bearing TRAMP mice. Overall, our findings suggest that nicotine is sufficient to induce a phenotype resembling the epidemiology of smoking-associated prostate cancer progression, illuminating a novel candidate driver underlying metastatic prostate cancer in current smokers. Cancer Res; 76(5); 1055-65. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26719530

  11. Semantic Signature: Comparative Interpretation of Gene Expression on a Semantic Space.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihun; Kim, Keewon; Kim, Ju Han

    2016-01-01

    Background. Interpretation of microarray data remains challenging because biological meaning should be extracted from enormous numeric matrices and be presented explicitly. Moreover, huge public repositories of microarray dataset are ready to be exploited for comparative analysis. This study aimed to provide a platform where essential implication of a microarray experiment could be visually expressed and various microarray datasets could be intuitively compared. Results. On the semantic space, gene sets from Molecular Signature Database (MSigDB) were plotted as landmarks and their relative distances were calculated by Lin's semantic similarity measure. By formal concept analysis, a microarray dataset was transformed into a concept lattice with gene clusters as objects and Gene Ontology terms as attributes. Concepts of a lattice were located on the semantic space reflecting semantic distance from landmarks and edges between concepts were drawn; consequently, a specific geographic pattern could be observed from a microarray dataset. We termed a distinctive geography shared by microarray datasets of the same category as "semantic signature." Conclusions. "Semantic space," a map of biological entities, could serve as a universal platform for comparative microarray analysis. When microarray data were displayed on the semantic space as concept lattices, "semantic signature," characteristic geography for a microarray experiment, could be discovered. PMID:27242916

  12. Semantic Signature: Comparative Interpretation of Gene Expression on a Semantic Space

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Interpretation of microarray data remains challenging because biological meaning should be extracted from enormous numeric matrices and be presented explicitly. Moreover, huge public repositories of microarray dataset are ready to be exploited for comparative analysis. This study aimed to provide a platform where essential implication of a microarray experiment could be visually expressed and various microarray datasets could be intuitively compared. Results. On the semantic space, gene sets from Molecular Signature Database (MSigDB) were plotted as landmarks and their relative distances were calculated by Lin's semantic similarity measure. By formal concept analysis, a microarray dataset was transformed into a concept lattice with gene clusters as objects and Gene Ontology terms as attributes. Concepts of a lattice were located on the semantic space reflecting semantic distance from landmarks and edges between concepts were drawn; consequently, a specific geographic pattern could be observed from a microarray dataset. We termed a distinctive geography shared by microarray datasets of the same category as “semantic signature.” Conclusions. “Semantic space,” a map of biological entities, could serve as a universal platform for comparative microarray analysis. When microarray data were displayed on the semantic space as concept lattices, “semantic signature,” characteristic geography for a microarray experiment, could be discovered. PMID:27242916

  13. A serum microRNA signature as a prognostic factor for patients with advanced NSCLC and its association with tissue microRNA expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    GUO, JING; MENG, RUI; YIN, ZHONGYUAN; LI, PENGCHENG; ZHOU, RUI; ZHANG, SHENG; DONG, XIAORONG; LIU, LI; WU, GANG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to detect microRNA (miRNA) signatures in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and to study the association between miRNA expression levels in serum and tissue. A cohort of patients who had previously been diagnosed with advanced NSCLC was enrolled in the present study. miRNAs associated with prognosis, which had previously been detected in early stage NSCLC samples, were measured in the serum of the patient groups using a cross-validation method. In addition, serum miRNAs associated with progression-free survival (PFS) were detected in paired fresh tissue samples, in order to analyze the correlation between serum and tissue expression levels. A risk-score analysis was used to develop a four-miRNA signature to predict PFS. miR-1, miR-30d, miR-221 and miR-486 were identified as having a significant correlation with PFS in advanced NSCLC. miR-221 and miR-486 exhibited significant positive correlations between serum and tissue expression. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-221 and reduced expression of miR-486 increased cell proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro. In conclusion, the miRNA signature identified in the present study may be considered an independent prognostic factor of PFS in advanced NSCLC. In addition, the expression levels of miR-221 and miR-486 were significantly correlated between serum and tissue. miR-221 was identified as an oncogenic risk factor, whereas miR-486 exerted protective effects against cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. PMID:27081922

  14. MicroRNA Expression Signature Is Altered in the Cardiac Remodeling Induced by High Fat Diets.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Elaine Castilho; França, Gustavo Starvaggi; Lino, Caroline Antunes; Koyama, Fernanda Christtanini; Moreira, Luana do Nascimento; Alexandre, Juliana Gomes; Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza M; Galante, Pedro Alexandre Favoretto; Diniz, Gabriela Placoná

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have revealed the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the control of cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial function. In addition, several reports have demonstrated that high fat (HF) diet induces cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling. In the current study, we investigated the effect of diets containing different percentages of fat on the cardiac miRNA expression signature. To address this question, male C57Bl/6 mice were fed with a low fat (LF) diet or two HF diets, containing 45 kcal% fat (HF45%) and 60 kcal% fat (HF60%) for 10 and 20 weeks. HF60% diet promoted an increase on body weight, fasting glycemia, insulin, leptin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and induced glucose intolerance. HF feeding promoted cardiac remodeling, as evidenced by increased cardiomyocyte transverse diameter and interstitial fibrosis. RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that HF feeding induced distinct miRNA expression patterns in the heart. HF45% diet for 10 and 20 weeks changed the abundance of 64 and 26 miRNAs in the heart, respectively. On the other hand, HF60% diet for 10 and 20 weeks altered the abundance of 27 and 88 miRNAs in the heart, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that insulin signaling pathway was overrepresented in response to HF diet. An inverse correlation was observed between cardiac levels of GLUT4 and miRNA-29c. Similarly, we found an inverse correlation between expression of GSK3β and the expression of miRNA-21a-3p, miRNA-29c-3p, miRNA-144-3p, and miRNA-195a-3p. In addition, miRNA-1 overexpression prevented cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Taken together, our results revealed differentially expressed miRNA signatures in the heart in response to different HF diets. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1771-1783, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26638879

  15. microRNA expression profiling identifies molecular signatures associated with anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cuiling; Iqbal, Javeed; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Shen, Yulei; Dabrowska, Magdalena Julia; Dybkaer, Karen; Lim, Megan S.; Piva, Roberto; Barreca, Antonella; Pellegrino, Elisa; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Lachel, Cynthia M.; Kucuk, Can; Jiang, Chun-Sun; Hu, Xiaozhou; Bhagavathi, Sharathkumar; Greiner, Timothy C.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Aoun, Patricia; Perkins, Sherrie L.; McKeithan, Timothy W.; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs) encompass at least 2 systemic diseases distinguished by the presence or absence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) expression. We performed genome-wide microRNA (miRNA) profiling on 33 ALK-positive (ALK[+]) ALCLs, 25 ALK-negative (ALK[−]) ALCLs, 9 angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas, 11 peripheral T-cell lymphomas not otherwise specified (PTCLNOS), and normal T cells, and demonstrated that ALCLs express many of the miRNAs that are highly expressed in normal T cells with the prominent exception of miR-146a. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering demonstrated distinct clustering of ALCL, PTCL-NOS, and the AITL subtype of PTCL. Cases of ALK(+) ALCL and ALK(–) ALCL were interspersed in unsupervised analysis, suggesting a close relationship at the molecular level. We identified an miRNA signature of 7 miRNAs (5 upregulated: miR-512-3p, miR-886-5p, miR-886-3p, miR-708, miR-135b; 2 downregulated: miR-146a, miR-155) significantly associated with ALK(+) ALCL cases. In addition, we derived an 11-miRNA signature (4 upregulated: miR-210, miR-197, miR-191, miR-512-3p; 7 downregulated: miR-451, miR-146a, miR-22, miR-455-3p, miR-455-5p, miR-143, miR-494) that differentiates ALK(–) ALCL from other PTCLs. Our in vitro studies identified a set of 32 miRNAs associated with ALK expression. Of these, the miR-17∼92 cluster and its paralogues were also highly expressed in ALK(+) ALCL and may represent important downstream effectors of the ALK oncogenic pathway. PMID:23801630

  16. Embryonic stem cell gene expression signatures in the canine mammary tumor: a bioinformatics approach.

    PubMed

    Zamani-Ahmadmahmudi, Mohamad

    2016-08-01

    Canine breast cancer was considered as an ideal model of comparative oncology for the human breast cancer, as there is significant overlap between biological and clinical characteristics of the human and canine breast cancer. We attempt to clarify expression profile of the embryonic stem cell (ES) gene signatures in canine breast cancer. Using microarray datasets (GSE22516 and GSE20718), expression of the three major ES gene signatures (modules or gene-sets), including Myc, ESC-like, and PRC modules, was primarily analyzed through Gene-Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) method in tumor and healthy datasets. For confirmation of the primary results, an additional 13 ES gene-sets which were categorized into four groups including ES expressed (ES exp1 and ES exp2), NOS targets (Nanog targets, Oct4 targets, Sox2 targets, NOS targets, and NOS TFs), Polycomb targets (Suz12 targets, Eed targets, H3K27 bound, and PRC2 targets), and Myc targets (Myc targets1, and Myc targets2) were tested in the tumor and healthy datasets. Our results revealed that there is a valuable overlap between canine and human breast cancer ES gene-sets expression profile, where Myc and ESC-like modules were up-regulated and PRC module was down-regulated in metastatic canine mammary gland tumors. Further analysis of the secondary gene-sets indicated overexpression of the ES expressed, NOS targets (Nanog targets, Oct4 targets, Sox2 targets, and NOS targets), and Myc targets and underexpression of the Polycomb targets in metastatic canine breast cancer. PMID:27307036

  17. Genome-wide analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression signatures in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-hui; Fu, Sheng-bo; Xiao, Hua-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is an extremely diverse and complex disease that results from various genetic and epigenetic changes such as DNA copy-number variations, mutations, and aberrant mRNA and/or protein expression caused by abnormal transcriptional regulation. The expression profiles of certain microRNAs (miRNAs) and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are closely related to cancer progression stages. In the past few decades, DNA microarray and next-generation sequencing techniques have been widely applied to identify miRNA and mRNA signatures for cancers on a genome-wide scale and have provided meaningful insights into cancer diagnosis, prognosis and personalized medicine. In this review, we summarize the progress in genome-wide analysis of miRNAs and mRNAs as cancer biomarkers, highlighting their diagnostic and prognostic roles. PMID:26299954

  18. Visualization and analysis for multidimensional gene expressions signature of cigarette smoking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changbo; Xiao, Zhao; Zhang, Tianlun; Cui, Jin; Pang, Chenming

    2011-11-01

    Biologists often use gene chip to get massive experimental data in the field of bioscience and chemical sciences. Facing a large amount of experimental data, researchers often need to find out a few interesting data or simple regulations. This paper presents a set of methods to visualize and analyze the data for gene expression signatures of people who smoke. We use the latest research data from National Center for Biotechnology Information. Totally, there are more than 400 thousand expressions data. Using these data, we can use parallel coordinates method to visualize the different gene expressions between smokers and nonsmokers and we can distinguish non-smokers, former smokers and current smokers by using the different colors. It can be easy to find out which gene is more important during the lung cancer angiogenesis in the smoking people. In another way, we can use a hierarchical model to visualize the inner relation of different genes. The location of the nodes shows different expression moment and the distance to the root shows the sequence of the expression. We can use the ring layout to represent all the nodes, and connect the different nodes which are related with color lines. Combined with the parallel coordinates method, the visualization result show the important genes and some inner relation obviously, which is useful for examination and prevention of lung cancer.

  19. Gene Expression Signatures in Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Demonstrate Disease Heterogeneity and Offer a Molecular Classification of Disease Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Thomas A.; Barnes, Michael G.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Olson, Judyann C.; Sherry, David D.; Gottlieb, Beth S.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Pavlidis, Paul; Hinze, Claas; Thornton, Sherry; Thompson, Susan D.; Grom, Alexei A.; Colbert, Robert A.; Glass, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Microarray analysis was used to determine whether children with recent onset polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) exhibit biologically or clinically informative gene expression signatures in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Methods Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 59 healthy children and 61 children with polyarticular JIA prior to treatment with second-line medications, such as methotrexate or biological agents. RNA was extracted from Ficoll-isolated mononuclear cells, fluorescently labeled and hybridized to Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 GeneChips. Data were analyzed using ANOVA at a 5% false discovery rate threshold after Robust Multi-Array Average pre-processing and Distance Weighted Discrimination normalization. Results Initial analysis revealed 873 probe sets for genes that were differentially expressed between polyarticular JIA and controls. Hierarchical clustering of these probe sets distinguished three subgroups within polyarticular JIA. Prototypical subjects within each subgroup were identified and used to define subgroup-specific gene expression signatures. One of these signatures was associated with monocyte markers, another with transforming growth factor β-inducible genes, and a third with immediate-early genes. Correlation of gene expression signatures with clinical and biological features of JIA subgroups suggests relevance to aspects of disease activity and supports the division of polyarticular JIA into distinct subsets. Conclusions PBMC gene expression signatures in recent onset polyarticular JIA reflect discrete disease processes and offer a molecular classification of disease. PMID:19565504

  20. Detection of Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected and -Uninfected African Adults Using Whole Blood RNA Expression Signatures: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Suzanne T.; Bangani, Nonzwakazi; Banwell, Claire M.; Brent, Andrew J.; Crampin, Amelia C.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Eley, Brian; Heyderman, Robert S.; Hibberd, Martin L.; Kern, Florian; Langford, Paul R.; Ling, Ling; Mendelson, Marc; Ottenhoff, Tom H.; Zgambo, Femia; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Coin, Lachlan J.; Levin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background A major impediment to tuberculosis control in Africa is the difficulty in diagnosing active tuberculosis (TB), particularly in the context of HIV infection. We hypothesized that a unique host blood RNA transcriptional signature would distinguish TB from other diseases (OD) in HIV-infected and -uninfected patients, and that this could be the basis of a simple diagnostic test. Methods and Findings Adult case-control cohorts were established in South Africa and Malawi of HIV-infected or -uninfected individuals consisting of 584 patients with either TB (confirmed by culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis [M.TB] from sputum or tissue sample in a patient under investigation for TB), OD (i.e., TB was considered in the differential diagnosis but then excluded), or healthy individuals with latent TB infection (LTBI). Individuals were randomized into training (80%) and test (20%) cohorts. Blood transcriptional profiles were assessed and minimal sets of significantly differentially expressed transcripts distinguishing TB from LTBI and OD were identified in the training cohort. A 27 transcript signature distinguished TB from LTBI and a 44 transcript signature distinguished TB from OD. To evaluate our signatures, we used a novel computational method to calculate a disease risk score (DRS) for each patient. The classification based on this score was first evaluated in the test cohort, and then validated in an independent publically available dataset (GSE19491). In our test cohort, the DRS classified TB from LTBI (sensitivity 95%, 95% CI [87–100]; specificity 90%, 95% CI [80–97]) and TB from OD (sensitivity 93%, 95% CI [83–100]; specificity 88%, 95% CI [74–97]). In the independent validation cohort, TB patients were distinguished both from LTBI individuals (sensitivity 95%, 95% CI [85–100]; specificity 94%, 95% CI [84–100]) and OD patients (sensitivity 100%, 95% CI [100–100]; specificity 96%, 95% CI [93–100]). Limitations of our study include the use of

  1. Reprogramming LCLs to iPSCs Results in Recovery of Donor-Specific Gene Expression Signature

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Samantha M.; Kagan, Courtney; Pavlovic, Bryan J.; Burnett, Jonathan; Patterson, Kristen; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    Renewable in vitro cell cultures, such as lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), have facilitated studies that contributed to our understanding of genetic influence on human traits. However, the degree to which cell lines faithfully maintain differences in donor-specific phenotypes is still debated. We have previously reported that standard cell line maintenance practice results in a loss of donor-specific gene expression signatures in LCLs. An alternative to the LCL model is the induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) system, which carries the potential to model tissue-specific physiology through the use of differentiation protocols. Still, existing LCL banks represent an important source of starting material for iPSC generation, and it is possible that the disruptions in gene regulation associated with long-term LCL maintenance could persist through the reprogramming process. To address this concern, we studied the effect of reprogramming mature LCL cultures from six unrelated donors to iPSCs on the ensuing gene expression patterns within and between individuals. We show that the reprogramming process results in a recovery of donor-specific gene regulatory signatures, increasing the number of genes with a detectable donor effect by an order of magnitude. The proportion of variation in gene expression statistically attributed to donor increases from 6.9% in LCLs to 24.5% in iPSCs (P < 10-15). Since environmental contributions are unlikely to be a source of individual variation in our system of highly passaged cultured cell lines, our observations suggest that the effect of genotype on gene regulation is more pronounced in iPSCs than in LCLs. Our findings indicate that iPSCs can be a powerful model system for studies of phenotypic variation across individuals in general, and the genetic association with variation in gene regulation in particular. We further conclude that LCLs are an appropriate starting material for iPSC generation. PMID:25950834

  2. Gene Expression Profiling Specifies Chemokine, Mitochondrial and Lipid Metabolism Signatures in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Luana Tatiana Albuquerque; Robottom-Ferreira, Anna Beatriz; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Toledo-Pinto, Thiago Gomes; Rosa Brito, Tiana; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Sandoval, Felipe Galvan; Jardim, Márcia Rodrigues; Antunes, Sérgio Gomes; Shannon, Edward J.; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Williams, Diana Lynn; Moraes, Milton Ozório

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we performed microarray experiments in Schwann cells infected with live M. leprae and identified novel differentially expressed genes (DEG) in M. leprae infected cells. Also, we selected candidate genes associated or implicated with leprosy in genetic studies and biological experiments. Forty-seven genes were selected for validation in two independent types of samples by multiplex qPCR. First, an in vitro model using THP-1 cells was infected with live Mycobacterium leprae and M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). In a second situation, mRNA obtained from nerve biopsies from patients with leprosy or other peripheral neuropathies was tested. We detected DEGs that discriminate M. bovis BCG from M. leprae infection. Specific signatures of susceptible responses after M. leprae infection when compared to BCG lead to repression of genes, including CCL2, CCL3, IL8 and SOD2. The same 47-gene set was screened in nerve biopsies, which corroborated the down-regulation of CCL2 and CCL3 in leprosy, but also evidenced the down-regulation of genes involved in mitochondrial metabolism, and the up-regulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism and ubiquitination. Finally, a gene expression signature from DEG was identified in patients confirmed of having leprosy. A classification tree was able to ascertain 80% of the cases as leprosy or non-leprous peripheral neuropathy based on the expression of only LDLR and CCL4. A general immune and mitochondrial hypo-responsive state occurs in response to M. leprae infection. Also, the most important genes and pathways have been highlighted providing new tools for early diagnosis and treatment of leprosy. PMID:23798993

  3. MicroRNA GENE EXPRESSION SIGNATURES IN THE DEVELOPING NEURAL TUBE

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Brock, Guy; Appana, Savitri; Webb, Cynthia; Greene, Robert M.; Pisano, M. Michele

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neurulation requires precise, spatio-temporal expression of numerous genes and coordinated interaction of signal transduction and gene regulatory networks, disruption of which may contribute to the etiology of neural tube (NT) defects. MicroRNAs are key modulators of cell and tissue differentiation. In order to define potential roles of miRNAs in development of the murine NT, miRNA microarray analysis was conducted to establish expression profiles, and identify miRNA target genes and functional gene networks. METHODS miRNA expression profiles in murine embryonic NTs derived from gestational days 8.5, 9.0 and 9.5 were defined and compared utilizing miRXplore™ microarrays from Miltenyi Biotech GmbH. Gene expression changes were verified by TaqMan™ quantitative Real-Time PCR. clValid R package and the UPGMA (hierarchical) clustering method were utilized for cluster analysis of the microarray data. Functional associations among selected miRNAs were examined via Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. RESULTS miRXplore™ chips enabled examination of 609 murine miRNAs. Expression of approximately 12% of these was detected in murine embryonic NTs. Clustering analysis revealed several developmentally regulated expression clusters among these expressed genes. Target analysis of differentially expressed miRNAs enabled identification of numerous target genes associated with cellular processes essential for normal NT development. Utilization of Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed interactive biological networks which connected differentially expressed miRNAs with their target genes, and highlighted functional relationships. CONCLUSIONS The present study defined unique gene expression signatures of a range of miRNAs in the developing NT during the critical period of NT morphogenesis. Analysis of miRNA target genes and gene interaction pathways revealed that specific miRNAs may direct expression of numerous genes encoding proteins which have been shown to be indispensable

  4. The mucosal expression signatures of g-type lysozyme in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) following bacterial challenge.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chengbin; Fu, Qiang; Zhou, Shun; Song, Lin; Ren, Yichao; Dong, Xiaoyu; Su, Baofeng; Li, Chao

    2016-07-01

    The mucosal surfaces constitute the first line of host defense against infection, and also serve as the dynamic interfaces that simultaneously mediate a diverse array of critical physiological processes, while in constantly contact with a wide range of pathogens. The lysozymes are considered as key components for innate immune response to pathogen infection with their strong antibacterial activities. But their activities in mucosal immune responses were always overlooked, especially for g-type lysozymes, whose expression patterns in mucosal tissues following bacterial challenge are still limited. Towards to this end, here, we characterized the g-type lysozymes, Lyg1 and Lyg2 in turbot, and determined their expression patterns in mucosal barriers following different bacterial infection. The phylogenetic analysis revealed the turbot g-type lysozyme genes showed the closest relationship to Cynoglossus semilaevis. The two lysozyme genes showed different expression patterns following challenge. Lyg2 was significantly up-regulated in mucosal tissues following Vibrio anguillarum and Streptococcus iniae challenge, while Lyg1 showed a general trend of down-regulation. The significant mucosal expression signatures of g-type lysozyme genes indicated their key roles to prevent pathogen attachment and entry in the first line of host defense system. Further functional studies should be carried out to better characterize the availability of utilization of g-type lysozyme to increase the disease resistance in the mucosal surfaces and facilitate the disease resistant breeding selection. PMID:27189917

  5. Gene Expression Music Algorithm-Based Characterization of the Ewing Sarcoma Stem Cell Signature

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Gene Expression Music Algorithm (GEMusicA) is a method for the transformation of DNA microarray data into melodies that can be used for the characterization of differentially expressed genes. Using this method we compared gene expression profiles from endothelial cells (EC), hematopoietic stem cells, neuronal stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC), and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and defined a set of genes that can discriminate between the different stem cell types. We analyzed the behavior of public microarray data sets from Ewing sarcoma (“Ewing family tumors,” EFT) cell lines and biopsies in GEMusicA after prefiltering DNA microarray data for the probe sets from the stem cell signature. Our results demonstrate that individual Ewing sarcoma cell lines have a high similarity to ESC or EC. Ewing sarcoma cell lines with inhibited Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1-Friend leukemia virus integration 1 (EWSR1-FLI1) oncogene retained the similarity to ESC and EC. However, correlation coefficients between GEMusicA-processed expression data between EFT and ESC decreased whereas correlation coefficients between EFT and EC as well as between EFT and MSC increased after knockdown of EWSR1-FLI1. Our data support the concept of EFT being derived from cells with features of embryonic and endothelial cells. PMID:27446218

  6. Airway basal cells of healthy smokers express an embryonic stem cell signature relevant to lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaykhiev, Renat; Wang, Rui; Zwick, Rachel K; Hackett, Neil R; Leung, Roland; Moore, Malcolm A S; Sima, Camelia S; Chao, Ion Wa; Downey, Robert J; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Salit, Jacqueline; Crystal, Ronald G

    2013-09-01

    Activation of the human embryonic stem cell (hESC) signature genes has been observed in various epithelial cancers. In this study, we found that the hESC signature is selectively induced in the airway basal stem/progenitor cell population of healthy smokers (BC-S), with a pattern similar to that activated in all major types of human lung cancer. We further identified a subset of 6 BC-S hESC genes, whose coherent overexpression in lung adenocarcinoma (AdCa) was associated with reduced lung function, poorer differentiation grade, more advanced tumor stage, remarkably shorter survival, and higher frequency of TP53 mutations. BC-S shared with hESC and a considerable subset of lung carcinomas a common TP53 inactivation molecular pattern which strongly correlated with the BC-S hESC gene expression. These data provide transcriptome-based evidence that smoking-induced reprogramming of airway BC toward the hESC-like phenotype might represent a common early molecular event in the development of aggressive lung carcinomas in humans. PMID:23857717

  7. A Meta-analysis of Gene Expression Signatures of Blood Pressure and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Brian H.; Liu, Chunyu; Joehanes, Roby; Johnson, Andrew D.; Yao, Chen; Ying, Sai-xia; Courchesne, Paul; Milani, Lili; Raghavachari, Nalini; Wang, Richard; Liu, Poching; Reinmaa, Eva; Dehghan, Abbas; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Singleton, Andrew; Melzer, David; Metspalu, Andres; Carstensen, Maren; Grallert, Harald; Herder, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Roden, Michael; Waldenberger, Melanie; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan B.; Zeller, Tanja; Vasan, Ramachandran; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Munson, Peter J.; Yang, Xia; Prokisch, Holger; Völker, Uwe; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Levy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have uncovered numerous genetic variants (SNPs) that are associated with blood pressure (BP). Genetic variants may lead to BP changes by acting on intermediate molecular phenotypes such as coded protein sequence or gene expression, which in turn affect BP variability. Therefore, characterizing genes whose expression is associated with BP may reveal cellular processes involved in BP regulation and uncover how transcripts mediate genetic and environmental effects on BP variability. A meta-analysis of results from six studies of global gene expression profiles of BP and hypertension in whole blood was performed in 7017 individuals who were not receiving antihypertensive drug treatment. We identified 34 genes that were differentially expressed in relation to BP (Bonferroni-corrected p<0.05). Among these genes, FOS and PTGS2 have been previously reported to be involved in BP-related processes; the others are novel. The top BP signature genes in aggregate explain 5%–9% of inter-individual variance in BP. Of note, rs3184504 in SH2B3, which was also reported in GWAS to be associated with BP, was found to be a trans regulator of the expression of 6 of the transcripts we found to be associated with BP (FOS, MYADM, PP1R15A, TAGAP, S100A10, and FGBP2). Gene set enrichment analysis suggested that the BP-related global gene expression changes include genes involved in inflammatory response and apoptosis pathways. Our study provides new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying BP regulation, and suggests novel transcriptomic markers for the treatment and prevention of hypertension. PMID:25785607

  8. A meta-analysis of gene expression signatures of blood pressure and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Huan, Tianxiao; Esko, Tõnu; Peters, Marjolein J; Pilling, Luke C; Schramm, Katharina; Schurmann, Claudia; Chen, Brian H; Liu, Chunyu; Joehanes, Roby; Johnson, Andrew D; Yao, Chen; Ying, Sai-Xia; Courchesne, Paul; Milani, Lili; Raghavachari, Nalini; Wang, Richard; Liu, Poching; Reinmaa, Eva; Dehghan, Abbas; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Hernandez, Dena G; Bandinelli, Stefania; Singleton, Andrew; Melzer, David; Metspalu, Andres; Carstensen, Maren; Grallert, Harald; Herder, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Roden, Michael; Waldenberger, Melanie; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan B; Zeller, Tanja; Vasan, Ramachandran; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Munson, Peter J; Yang, Xia; Prokisch, Holger; Völker, Uwe; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Levy, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have uncovered numerous genetic variants (SNPs) that are associated with blood pressure (BP). Genetic variants may lead to BP changes by acting on intermediate molecular phenotypes such as coded protein sequence or gene expression, which in turn affect BP variability. Therefore, characterizing genes whose expression is associated with BP may reveal cellular processes involved in BP regulation and uncover how transcripts mediate genetic and environmental effects on BP variability. A meta-analysis of results from six studies of global gene expression profiles of BP and hypertension in whole blood was performed in 7017 individuals who were not receiving antihypertensive drug treatment. We identified 34 genes that were differentially expressed in relation to BP (Bonferroni-corrected p<0.05). Among these genes, FOS and PTGS2 have been previously reported to be involved in BP-related processes; the others are novel. The top BP signature genes in aggregate explain 5%-9% of inter-individual variance in BP. Of note, rs3184504 in SH2B3, which was also reported in GWAS to be associated with BP, was found to be a trans regulator of the expression of 6 of the transcripts we found to be associated with BP (FOS, MYADM, PP1R15A, TAGAP, S100A10, and FGBP2). Gene set enrichment analysis suggested that the BP-related global gene expression changes include genes involved in inflammatory response and apoptosis pathways. Our study provides new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying BP regulation, and suggests novel transcriptomic markers for the treatment and prevention of hypertension. PMID:25785607

  9. Network-based biomarkers enhance classical approaches to prognostic gene expression signatures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Classical approaches to predicting patient clinical outcome via gene expression information are primarily based on differential expression of unrelated genes (single-gene approaches) or genes related by, for example, biologic pathway or function (gene-sets). Recently, network-based approaches utilising interaction information between genes have emerged. An open problem is whether such approaches add value to the more traditional methods of signature modelling. We explored this question via comparison of the most widely employed single-gene, gene-set, and network-based methods, using gene expression microarray data from two different cancers: melanoma and ovarian. We considered two kinds of network approaches. The first of these identifies informative genes using gene expression and network connectivity information combined, the latter drawn from prior knowledge of protein-protein interactions. The second approach focuses on identification of informative sub-networks (small networks of interacting proteins, again from prior knowledge networks). For all methods we performed 100 rounds of 5-fold cross-validation under 3 different classifiers. For network-based approaches, we considered two different protein-protein interaction networks. We quantified resulting patterns of misclassification and discussed the relative value of each relative to ongoing development of prognostic biomarkers. Results We found that single-gene, gene-set and network methods yielded similar error rates in melanoma and ovarian cancer data. Crucially, however, our novel and detailed patient-level analyses revealed that the different methods were correctly classifying alternate subsets of patients in each cohort. We also found that the network-based NetRank feature selection method was the most stable. Conclusions Next-generation methods of gene expression signature modelling harness data from external networks and are foreshadowed as a standard mode of analysis. But what do they add

  10. Meta-Analysis of Gene Expression Signatures Defining the Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition during Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Gröger, Christian J.; Grubinger, Markus; Waldhör, Thomas; Vierlinger, Klemens; Mikulits, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) represents a crucial event during cancer progression and dissemination. EMT is the conversion of carcinoma cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype that associates with a higher cell motility as well as enhanced chemoresistance and cancer stemness. Notably, EMT has been increasingly recognized as an early event of metastasis. Numerous gene expression studies (GES) have been conducted to obtain transcriptome signatures and marker genes to understand the regulatory mechanisms underlying EMT. Yet, no meta-analysis considering the multitude of GES of EMT has been performed to comprehensively elaborate the core genes in this process. Here we report the meta-analysis of 18 independent and published GES of EMT which focused on different cell types and treatment modalities. Computational analysis revealed clustering of GES according to the type of treatment rather than to cell type. GES of EMT induced via transforming growth factor-β and tumor necrosis factor-α treatment yielded uniformly defined clusters while GES of models with alternative EMT induction clustered in a more complex fashion. In addition, we identified those up- and downregulated genes which were shared between the multitude of GES. This core gene list includes well known EMT markers as well as novel genes so far not described in this process. Furthermore, several genes of the EMT-core gene list significantly correlated with impaired pathological complete response in breast cancer patients. In conclusion, this meta-analysis provides a comprehensive survey of available EMT expression signatures and shows fundamental insights into the mechanisms that are governing carcinoma progression. PMID:23251436

  11. Lung tumor microenvironment induces specific gene expression signature in intratumoral NK cells.

    PubMed

    Gillard-Bocquet, Mélanie; Caer, Charles; Cagnard, Nicolas; Crozet, Lucile; Perez, Mikael; Fridman, Wolf Herman; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Cremer, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are able to recognize and kill tumor cells, however whether they contribute to tumor immunosurveillance is still debated. Our previous studies demonstrated the presence of NK cells in human lung tumors. Their comparison with NK cells from non-tumoral lung tissues and with blood NK cells from the same individuals revealed a decreased expression of some NK receptors and impaired ex vivo cytotoxic functions occurring specifically in NK cells isolated from the tumor microenvironment. The aim of the present study was to characterize the transcriptional profile of such intratumoral NK cells, by comparative microarray analysis of sorted NK cells isolated from non-tumoral (Non-Tum-NK) and tumoral (Tum-NK) lung tissues of 12 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer patients. Our results reveal a specific gene expression signature of Tum-NK cells particularly in activation processes and cytotoxicity, confirming that tumor environment induces modifications in NK cells biology. Indeed, intratumoral NK cells display higher expression levels of NKp44, NKG2A, Granzymes A and K, and Fas mRNA. A particular pattern of receptors involved in chemotaxis was also observed, with an overexpression of CXCR5 and CXCR6, and a lower expression of CX3CR1 and S1PR1 genes in Tum-NK as compared to Non-Tum-NK cells. The precise identification of the molecular pathways modulated in the tumor environment will help to decipher the role of NK cells in tumor immunosurveillance and will open future investigations to manipulate their antitumoral functions. PMID:23382731

  12. A signature microRNA expression profile for the cellular response to thermal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmink, Gerald J.; Roth, Caleb C.; Ketchum, Norma; Ibey, Bennett L.; Waterworth, Angela; Suarez, Maria; Roach, William P.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, an extensive layer of intra-cellular signals was discovered that was previously undetected by genetic radar. It is now known that this layer consists primarily of a class of short noncoding RNA species that are referred to as microRNAs (miRNAs). MiRNAs regulate protein synthesis at the post-transcriptional level, and studies have shown that they are involved in many fundamental cellular processes. In this study, we hypothesized that miRNAs may be involved in cellular stress response mechanisms, and that cells exposed to thermal stress may exhibit a signature miRNA expression profile indicative of their functional involvement in such mechanisms. To test our hypothesis, human dermal fibroblasts were exposed to an established hyperthermic protocol, and the ensuing miRNA expression levels were evaluated 4 hr post-exposure using microRNA microarray gene chips. The microarray data shows that 123 miRNAs were differentially expressed in cells exposed to thermal stress. We collectively refer to these miRNAs as thermalregulated microRNAs (TRMs). Since miRNA research is in its infancy, it is interesting to note that only 27 of the 123 TRMs are currently annotated in the Sanger miRNA registry. Prior to publication, we plan to submit the remaining novel 96 miRNA gene sequences for proper naming. Computational and thermodynamic modeling algorithms were employed to identify putative mRNA targets for the TRMs, and these studies predict that TRMs regulate the mRNA expression of various proteins that are involved in the cellular stress response. Future empirical studies will be conducted to validate these theoretical predictions, and to further examine the specific role that TRMs play in the cellular stress response.

  13. Colon Cancer Cells Gene Expression Signature As Response to 5- Fluorouracil, Oxaliplatin, and Folinic Acid Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Negrei, Carolina; Hudita, Ariana; Ginghina, Octav; Galateanu, Bianca; Voicu, Sorina Nicoleta; Stan, Miriana; Costache, Marieta; Fenga, Concettina; Drakoulis, Nikolaos; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M.

    2016-01-01

    5-FU cytotoxicity mechanism has been assigned both to the miss-incorporation of fluoronucleotides into RNA and DNA and to the inhibition of thymidylate synthase. 5-FU is one of the most widely used chemotherapeutic drugs, although it has severe side effects that may vary between patients. Pharmacogenetic studies related to 5-FU have been traditionally focused on the rate-limiting catabolic enzyme, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase that breaks 80–85% of 5-FU into its inactive metabolite. Choosing the right dosing scheme and chemotherapy strategy for each individual patient remains challenging for personalized chemotherapy management. In the general effort toward reduction of colorectal cancer mortality, in vitro screening studies play a very important role. To accelerate translation research, increasing interest has been focused on using in vivo-like models such as three-dimensional spheroids. The development of higher throughput assays to quantify phenotypic changes in spheroids is an active research area. Consequently, in this study we used the microarray technology to reveal the HT-29 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells gene expression signature as response to 5-FU/OXP/FA treatment in a state of the art 3D culture system. We report here an increased reactive oxygen species production under treatment, correlated with a decrease in cell viability and proliferation potential. With respect to the HT-29 cells gene expression under the treatment with 5-FU/OXP/FA, we found 15.247 genes that were significantly differentially expressed (p < 0.05) with a fold change higher that two-fold. Among these, 7136 genes were upregulated and 8111 genes were downregulated under experimental conditions as compared to untreated cells. The most relevant and statistic significant (p < 0.01) pathways in the experiment are associated with the genes that displayed significant differential expression and are related to intracellular signaling, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and cancer. PMID

  14. Age gene expression and coexpression progressive signatures in peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Irizar, Haritz; Goñi, Joaquín; Alzualde, Ainhoa; Castillo-Triviño, Tamara; Olascoaga, Javier; Lopez de Munain, Adolfo; Otaegui, David

    2015-12-01

    Both cellular senescence and organismic aging are known to be dynamic processes that start early in life and progress constantly during the whole life of the individual. In this work, with the objective of identifying signatures of age-related progressive change at the transcriptomic level, we have performed a whole-genome gene expression analysis of peripheral blood leukocytes in a group of healthy individuals with ages ranging from 14 to 93 years. A set of genes with progressively changing gene expression (either increase or decrease with age) has been identified and contextualized in a coexpression network. A modularity analysis has been performed on this network and biological-term and pathway enrichment analyses have been used for biological interpretation of each module. In summary, the results of the present work reveal the existence of a transcriptomic component that shows progressive expression changes associated to age in peripheral blood leukocytes, highlighting both the dynamic nature of the process and the need to complement young vs. elder studies with longitudinal studies that include middle aged individuals. From the transcriptional point of view, immunosenescence seems to be occurring from a relatively early age, at least from the late 20s/early 30s, and the 49-56 year old age-range appears to be critical. In general, the genes that, according to our results, show progressive expression changes with aging are involved in pathogenic/cellular processes that have classically been linked to aging in humans: cancer, immune processes and cellular growth vs. maintenance. PMID:26362218

  15. Gene expression signature of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch carcinomas: modulation by chlorophyllin and ellagic acid.

    PubMed

    Vidya Priyadarsini, Ramamurthi; Kumar, Neeraj; Khan, Imran; Thiyagarajan, Paranthaman; Kondaiah, Paturu; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2012-01-01

    Chlorophyllin (CHL), a water-soluble, semi-synthetic derivative of chlorophyll and ellagic acid (EA), a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound in berries, grapes, and nuts have been reported to exert anticancer effects in various human cancer cell lines and in animal tumour models. The present study was undertaken to examine the mechanism underlying chemoprevention and changes in gene expression pattern induced by dietary supplementation of chlorophyllin and ellagic acid in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model by whole genome profiling using pangenomic microarrays. In hamsters painted with DMBA, the expression of 1,700 genes was found to be altered significantly relative to control. Dietary supplementation of chlorophyllin and ellagic acid modulated the expression profiles of 104 and 37 genes respectively. Microarray analysis also revealed changes in the expression of TGFβ receptors, NF-κB, cyclin D1, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that may play a crucial role in the transformation of the normal buccal pouch to a malignant phenotype. This gene expression signature was altered on treatment with chlorophyllin and ellagic acid. Our study has also revealed patterns of gene expression signature specific for chlorophyllin and ellagic acid exposure. Thus dietary chlorophyllin and ellagic acid that can reverse gene expression signature associated with carcinogenesis are novel candidates for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:22485181

  16. Gene Expression Signature of DMBA-Induced Hamster Buccal Pouch Carcinomas: Modulation by Chlorophyllin and Ellagic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Vidya Priyadarsini, Ramamurthi; Kumar, Neeraj; Khan, Imran; Thiyagarajan, Paranthaman; Kondaiah, Paturu; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2012-01-01

    Chlorophyllin (CHL), a water-soluble, semi-synthetic derivative of chlorophyll and ellagic acid (EA), a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound in berries, grapes, and nuts have been reported to exert anticancer effects in various human cancer cell lines and in animal tumour models. The present study was undertaken to examine the mechanism underlying chemoprevention and changes in gene expression pattern induced by dietary supplementation of chlorophyllin and ellagic acid in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model by whole genome profiling using pangenomic microarrays. In hamsters painted with DMBA, the expression of 1,700 genes was found to be altered significantly relative to control. Dietary supplementation of chlorophyllin and ellagic acid modulated the expression profiles of 104 and 37 genes respectively. Microarray analysis also revealed changes in the expression of TGFβ receptors, NF-κB, cyclin D1, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that may play a crucial role in the transformation of the normal buccal pouch to a malignant phenotype. This gene expression signature was altered on treatment with chlorophyllin and ellagic acid. Our study has also revealed patterns of gene expression signature specific for chlorophyllin and ellagic acid exposure. Thus dietary chlorophyllin and ellagic acid that can reverse gene expression signature associated with carcinogenesis are novel candidates for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:22485181

  17. Lupus anti-ribosomal P autoantibody proteomes express convergent biclonal signatures.

    PubMed

    Al Kindi, M A; Colella, A D; Beroukas, D; Chataway, T K; Gordon, T P

    2016-04-01

    Lupus-specific anti-ribosomal P (anti-Rib-P) autoantibodies have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurological complications in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aim of the present study was to determine variable (V)-region signatures of secreted autoantibody proteomes specific for the Rib-P heterocomplex and investigate the molecular basis of the reported cross-reactivity with Sm autoantigen. Anti-Rib-P immunoglobulins (IgGs) were purified from six anti-Rib-P-positive sera by elution from enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) plates coated with either native Rib-P proteins or an 11-amino acid peptide (11-C peptide) representing the conserved COOH-terminal P epitope. Rib-P- and 11-C peptide-specific IgGs were analysed for heavy (H) and light (L) chain clonality and V-region expression using an electrophoretic and de-novo and database-driven mass spectrometric sequencing workflow. Purified anti-Rib-P and anti-SmD IgGs were tested for cross-reactivity on ELISA and their proteome data sets analysed for shared clonotypes. Anti-Rib-P autoantibody proteomes were IgG1 kappa-restricted and comprised two public clonotypes defined by unique H/L chain pairings. The major clonotypic population was specific for the common COOH-terminal epitope, while the second shared the same pairing signature as a recently reported anti-SmD clonotype, accounting for two-way immunoassay cross-reactivity between these lupus autoantibodies. Sequence convergence of anti-Rib-P proteomes suggests common molecular pathways of autoantibody production and identifies stereotyped clonal populations that are thought to play a pathogenic role in neuropsychiatric lupus. Shared clonotypic structures for anti-Rib-P and anti-Sm responses suggest a common B cell clonal origin for subsets of these lupus-specific autoantibodies. PMID:26646815

  18. Stem cells and germ cells: microRNA and gene expression signatures.

    PubMed

    Dyce, Paul William; Toms, Derek; Li, Julang

    2010-04-01

    The study of primordial germ cell development in vivo is hampered by their low numbers and inaccessibility. Recent research has shown the ability of embryonic and adult stem cells to differentiate into primordial germ cells and more mature gametes and this generation of germ cells in vitro may be an attractive model for their study. One of the biggest challenges facing in vitro differentiation of stem cells into primordial germ cells is the lack of markers to clearly distinguish the two. As both cell types originate early in embryonic development they share many pluripotent markers such as OCT4, VASA, FRAGILIS, and NANOG. Genome wide microarray profiling has been used to identify transcriptome patterns unique to primordial germ cells. A more thorough analysis of the temporal and quantitative expression of a panel of genes may be more robust in distinguishing these two cell populations. MicroRNAs, short RNA molecules that have been shown to regulate translation through interactions with mRNA transcripts, have also recently come under investigation for the role they may play in pluripotency. Attempts to elucidate key microRNAs responsible for both stem cell and primordial germ cell characteristics have recently been undertaken. Unique microRNAs, either individually or as global profiles, may also help to distinguish differentiated primordial germ cells from stem cells in vitro. This review will examine gene expression and microRNA signatures in stem cells and germ cells as ways to distinguish these closely related cell types. PMID:20183803

  19. Gene Expression and Methylation Signatures of MAN2C1 are Associated with PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Monica; Galea, Sandro; Chang, Shun-Chiao; Aiello, Allison E.; Wildman, Derek E.; de los Santos, Regina; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2011-01-01

    As potential regulators of DNA accessibility and activity, epigenetic modifications offer a mechanism by which the environment can moderate the effects of genes. To date, however, there have been relatively few studies assessing epigenetic modifications associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Here we investigate PTSD-associated methylation differences in 33 genes previously shown to differ in whole blood-derived gene expression levels between those with vs. without the disorder. Drawing on DNA samples similarly obtained from whole blood in 100 individuals, 23 with and 77 without lifetime PTSD, we used methylation microarray data to assess whether these 33 candidate genes showed epigenetic signatures indicative of increased risk for, or resilience to, PTSD. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the main and interacting effects of candidate genes’ methylation values and number of potentially traumatic events (PTEs), adjusting for age and other covariates. Results revealed that only one candidate gene–MAN2C1–showed a significant methylation x PTE interaction, such that those with both higher MAN2C1 methylation and greater exposure to PTEs showed a marked increase in risk of lifetime PTSD (OR 4.35, 95% CI: 1.07, 17.77, p = 0.04). These results indicate that MAN2C1 methylation levels modify cumulative traumatic burden on risk of PTSD, and suggest that both gene expression and epigenetic changes at specific loci are associated with this disorder. PMID:21508515

  20. Holding Back Sharing Concerns, Dispositional Emotional Expressivity, Perceived Unsupportive Responses, and Distress Among Women Newly-Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Sharon; Myers, Shannon; Ozga, Melissa; Kissane, David; Kashy, Debby; Rubin, Stephen; Heckman, Carolyn; Rosenblum, Norm

    2013-01-01

    Objective Little attention has been paid to the role of holding back sharing concerns in the psychological adaptation of women newly diagnosed with gynecological cancers. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the role of holding back concerns in psychosocial adjustment and quality of life, as well as a possible moderating role for emotional expressivity and perceived unsupportive responses from family and friends. Method Two hundred forty four women diagnosed with gynecological cancer in the past eight months completed measures of holding back, dispositional emotional expressivity, perceived unsupportive responses from family and friends, cancer-specific distress, depressive symptoms, and quality of life. Results Emotional expressivity moderated the association between holding back and cancer- specific distress and quality of life, but not depressive symptoms. Greater holding back was more strongly associated with higher levels of cancer-related distress among women who were more emotionally expressive than among women who were less expressive. Perceived unsupportive responses did not moderate the associations between holding back and psychosocial outcomes. Conclusion Holding back sharing concerns was more common in this patient population than other cancer populations. Dispositional expressivity played a role in how harmful holding back concerns was for women, while unsupportive responses from family and friends did not. PMID:24211156

  1. A Five-Gene Expression Signature Predicts Clinical Outcome of Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenna

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma is a common malignant tumor of female genital organs. Treatment is generally less effective as patients are usually diagnosed in the late stage. Therefore, a well-designed prognostic marker provides valuable data for optimizing therapy. In this study, we analyzed 303 samples of ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma and the corresponding RNA-seq data. We observed the correlation between gene expression and patients' survival and eventually established a risk assessment model of five factors using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. We found that the survival time in high-risk patients was significantly shorter than in low-risk patients in both training and testing sets after Kaplan-Meier analysis. The AUROC value was 0.67 when predicting the survival time in testing set, which indicates a relatively high specificity and sensitivity. The results suggest diagnostic and therapeutic applications of our five-gene model for ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma. PMID:27478834

  2. Ontology based molecular signatures for immune cell types via gene expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background New technologies are focusing on characterizing cell types to better understand their heterogeneity. With large volumes of cellular data being generated, innovative methods are needed to structure the resulting data analyses. Here, we describe an ‘Ontologically BAsed Molecular Signature’ (OBAMS) method that identifies novel cellular biomarkers and infers biological functions as characteristics of particular cell types. This method finds molecular signatures for immune cell types based on mapping biological samples to the Cell Ontology (CL) and navigating the space of all possible pairwise comparisons between cell types to find genes whose expression is core to a particular cell type’s identity. Results We illustrate this ontological approach by evaluating expression data available from the Immunological Genome project (IGP) to identify unique biomarkers of mature B cell subtypes. We find that using OBAMS, candidate biomarkers can be identified at every strata of cellular identity from broad classifications to very granular. Furthermore, we show that Gene Ontology can be used to cluster cell types by shared biological processes in order to find candidate genes responsible for somatic hypermutation in germinal center B cells. Moreover, through in silico experiments based on this approach, we have identified genes sets that represent genes overexpressed in germinal center B cells and identify genes uniquely expressed in these B cells compared to other B cell types. Conclusions This work demonstrates the utility of incorporating structured ontological knowledge into biological data analysis – providing a new method for defining novel biomarkers and providing an opportunity for new biological insights. PMID:24004649

  3. Baseline Gene Expression Signatures in Monocytes from Multiple Sclerosis Patients Treated with Interferon-beta

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Marta F.; Nurtdinov, Ramil N.; Río, Jordi; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background A relatively large proportion of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients do not respond to interferon-beta (IFNb) treatment. In previous studies with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we identified a subgroup of IFNb non-responders that was characterized by a baseline over-expression of type I IFN inducible genes. Additional mechanistic experiments carried out in IFNb non-responders suggested a selective alteration of the type I IFN signaling pathway in the population of blood monocytes. Here, we aimed (i) to investigate whether the type I IFN signaling pathway is up-regulated in isolated monocytes from IFNb non-responders at baseline; and (ii) to search for additional biological pathways in this cell population that may be implicated in the response to IFNb treatment. Methods Twenty RRMS patients classified according to their clinical response to IFNb treatment and 10 healthy controls were included in the study. Monocytes were purified from PBMC obtained before treatment by cell sorting and the gene expression profiling was determined with oligonucleotide microarrays. Results and discussion Purified monocytes from IFNb non-responders were characterized by an over-expression of type I IFN responsive genes, which confirms the type I IFN signature in monocytes suggested from previous studies. Other relevant signaling pathways that were up-regulated in IFNb non-responders were related with the mitochondrial function and processes such as protein synthesis and antigen presentation, and together with the type I IFN signaling pathway, may also be playing roles in the response to IFNb. PMID:23637780

  4. Type 3 iodothyronine deiodinase in neonatal goats: molecular cloning, expression, localization, and methylation signature.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Tao; Jin, Peng-Fei; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Lin-Jie; Li, Li; Zhang, Hong-Ping

    2016-07-01

    Type 3 iodothyronine deiodinase (DIO3) is an important enzyme in the metabolism of thyroid hormones. It plays critical roles in fetal development and neonatal growth and is especially important for brain development in mammals. In the present study, we profiled the expression pattern and methylation signature of the DIO3 gene in goats. The complete coding sequence of caprine DIO3 encoded a protein of 301 amino acids and harbored an internal selenocysteine-encoding TGA codon. The DIO3 messenger RNA (mRNA) was predominantly expressed in the neonatal goat liver (P < 0.01), while expression in other tissues was quite low, with the lowest levels in the lung. In in situ hybridization, the DIO3 mRNA was predominantly localized in the liver and the lowest content was detected in the lung. The DIO3 transcript was widely localized in neurons and the neuropil. Methylation profiling of the DIO3 CpG island showed a significant difference between the 5' region (CpGs_1∼24) and the 3' region (CpG_25∼51) of the coding region. Furthermore, no significant difference in methylation status was observed among the six tested tissues with levels in the range of 29.11-33.12 %. The CpG islands in the intergenic-differentially methylated region (IG-DMR) showed significantly different methylated levels among tissues, and the highest methylated level was observed in lung (CpG island 1, 69.34 %) and longissimus dorsi (LD) (CpG island 2, 52.62 %) tissues. Our study lays a foundation for understanding DIO3 function and the diseases caused by altered methylation profiles of the DIO3 gene. PMID:27108114

  5. Long non-coding RNAs as novel expression signatures modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiheng; Liu, Haibai; Wang, Caixia; Lu, Qian; Huang, Qinhai; Zheng, Chanjiao; Lei, Yixiong

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Our study was to investigate whether lncRNAs as novel expression signatures are able to modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium(Cd) toxicity. There were aberrant expression profiles of lncRNAs in 35th Cd-induced cells as compared to untreated 16HBE cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ENST00000414355 inhibited the growth of DNA-damaged cells and decreased the expressions of DNA-damage related genes (ATM, ATR and ATRIP), while increased the expressions of DNA-repair related genes (DDB1, DDB2, OGG1, ERCC1, MSH2, RAD50, XRCC1 and BARD1). Cadmium increased ENST00000414355 expression in the lung of Cd-exposed rats in a dose-dependent manner. A significant positive correlation was observed between blood ENST00000414355 expression and urinary/blood Cd concentrations, and there were significant correlations of lncRNA-ENST00000414355 expression with the expressions of target genes in the lung of Cd-exposed rats and the blood of Cd exposed workers. These results indicate that some lncRNAs are aberrantly expressed in Cd-treated 16HBE cells. lncRNA-ENST00000414355 may serve as a signature for DNA damage and repair related to the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the cadmium toxicity and become a novel biomarker of cadmium toxicity. PMID:26472689

  6. Long non-coding RNAs as novel expression signatures modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium toxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiheng; Liu, Haibai; Wang, Caixia; Lu, Qian; Huang, Qinhai; Zheng, Chanjiao; Lei, Yixiong

    2015-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Our study was to investigate whether lncRNAs as novel expression signatures are able to modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium(Cd) toxicity. There were aberrant expression profiles of lncRNAs in 35th Cd-induced cells as compared to untreated 16HBE cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ENST00000414355 inhibited the growth of DNA-damaged cells and decreased the expressions of DNA-damage related genes (ATM, ATR and ATRIP), while increased the expressions of DNA-repair related genes (DDB1, DDB2, OGG1, ERCC1, MSH2, RAD50, XRCC1 and BARD1). Cadmium increased ENST00000414355 expression in the lung of Cd-exposed rats in a dose-dependent manner. A significant positive correlation was observed between blood ENST00000414355 expression and urinary/blood Cd concentrations, and there were significant correlations of lncRNA-ENST00000414355 expression with the expressions of target genes in the lung of Cd-exposed rats and the blood of Cd exposed workers. These results indicate that some lncRNAs are aberrantly expressed in Cd-treated 16HBE cells. lncRNA-ENST00000414355 may serve as a signature for DNA damage and repair related to the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the cadmium toxicity and become a novel biomarker of cadmium toxicity.

  7. Expression of p53 in endometrial polyps with special reference to the p53 signature.

    PubMed

    Sho, Tomoko; Hachisuga, Toru; Kawagoe, Toshinori; Urabe, Rie; Kurita, Tomoko; Kagami, Seiji; Shimajiri, Shohei; Fujino, Yoshihisa

    2016-07-01

    We herein examined the significance of the p53 expression in endometrial polyps (EMPs). A total of 133 EMPs, including 62 premenopausal and 71 postmenopausal women with EMP, were immunohistochemically studied for the expression of estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha, Ki-67 and p53. Apoptotic cells were identified using a TUNEL assay. A DNA sequence analysis of TP53 exons 5 to 9 was performed. Among the premenopausal EMPs, a multivariate analysis showed the labeling index (LI) for Ki-67 to correlate significantly with that for p53 (P<0.001), but not that for apoptosis. On the contrary, among the postmenopausal EMPs, the LI for Ki-67 correlated significantly with that for apoptosis (P<0.001). The p53 signature (p53S) was defined by endometrial epithelial cells, which are morphologically benign in appearance but display 12 or more consecutive epithelial cell nuclei with strong p53 immunostaining. The p53S was found in nine (12.7%) postmenopausal EMPs (mean age: 70.2 years). The median Ki-67 index for the p53S was 7%, with no significant difference from that of the glands of the postmenopausal EMPs without the p53S (P=0.058). The median apoptotic index for the p53S was 0%, which was significantly lower than that of the postmenopausal EMPs without the p53S (P=0.002). Two of four p53Ss showed TP53 mutations according to the DNA sequence analysis. The presence of the p53S is not rare in postmenopausal EMPs with an advanced age. Among postmenopausal EMPs, the LI of Ki-67 significantly correlates with that of apoptosis. However, such a positive correlation between the LI of Ki-67 and apoptosis is not observed in p53S. PMID:26727623

  8. Identification of a neuronal gene expression signature: role of cell cycle arrest in murine neuronal differentiation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Felfly, Hady; Xue, Jin; Zambon, Alexander C.; Muotri, Alysson; Zhou, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells are a potential key strategy for treating neurodegenerative diseases in which the generation of new neurons is critical. A better understanding of the characteristics and molecular properties of neural stem cells (NSCs) and differentiated neurons can help with assessing neuronal maturity and, possibly, in devising better therapeutic strategies. We have performed an in-depth gene expression profiling study of murine NSCs and primary neurons derived from embryonic mouse brains. Microarray analysis revealed a neuron-specific gene expression signature that distinguishes primary neurons from NSCs, with elevated levels of transcripts involved in neuronal functions, such as neurite development and axon guidance in primary neurons and decreased levels of multiple cytokine transcripts. Among the differentially expressed genes, we found a statistically significant enrichment of genes in the ephrin, neurotrophin, CDK5, and actin pathways, which control multiple neuronal-specific functions. We then artificially blocked the cell cycle of NSCs with mitomycin C (MMC) and examined cellular morphology and gene expression signatures. Although these MMC-treated NSCs displayed a neuronal morphology and expressed some neuronal differentiation marker genes, their gene expression patterns were very different from primary neurons. We conclude that 1) fully differentiated mouse primary neurons display a specific neuronal gene expression signature; 2) cell cycle block at the S phase in NSCs with MMC does not induce the formation of fully differentiated neurons; 3) cytokines change their expression pattern during differentiation of NSCs into neurons; and 4) signaling pathways of ephrin, neurotrophin, CDK5, and actin, related to major neuronal features, are dynamically enriched in genes showing changes in expression level. PMID:21677276

  9. MicroRNA Expression Signatures Associated With BRAF-Mutated Versus KRAS-Mutated Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong Won; Song, Young Soo; Lee, Hyunwoo; Yi, Kijong; Kim, Young-Bae; Suh, Kwang Wook; Lee, Dakeun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract BRAF and KRAS genes are known to play a similar role in the activation of RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway in colorectal tumorigenesis. However, BRAF-mutated colorectal cancers (CRCs) have distinct clinicopathologic characteristics different from those of the KRAS mutated ones as in comparison the BRAF-mutated CRCs are associated with a much worse prognosis for the afflicted patients. This study aimed to determine the different miRNA expression signatures associated with BRAF-mutated CRCs in comparison to KRAS-mutated ones, and to identify the specific miRNAs possibly mediating the aggressive phenotype of the BRAF-mutated CRCs. We screened 535 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded CRC tissue samples for the BRAF V600E mutation, and selected 7 BRAF-mutated and 7 KRAS-mutated CRCs that were tumor size, stage, and microsatellite status-matched. Affymetrix GeneChip® miRNA 4.0 Array was used for detection of miRNA expression differences in the selected samples. We validated the array results by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) for selected miRNAs. A total of 10 differentially expressed (DE) miRNAs associated with BRAF-mutated CRCs were obtained, including miR-31-5p, miR-877-5p, miR-362-5p, and miR-425-3p. miR-31-5p showed the highest fold change (8.3-fold) among all of the miRNAs analyzed. From the analyses of GO biological processes, the DE-miRNAs were functionally relevant to cellular proliferation such as positive regulation of gene expression (P = 1.26 × 10−10), transcription (P = 9.70 × 10−10), and RNA metabolic process (P = 1.97 × 10−9). Bioinformatics analysis showed that the DE-miRNAs were significantly enriched in cancer-associated pathways including neutrophin signaling (P = 6.84 × 10−5), pathways in cancer (P = 0.0016), Wnt signaling (P = 0.0027), and MAPK signaling pathway (P = 0.0036). Our results suggest that the DE-miRNAs in BRAF-mutated CRCs in comparison

  10. Identification of Gene Expression Signatures in the Chicken Intestinal Intraepithelial Lymphocytes in Response to Herb Additive Supplementations.

    PubMed

    Won, Kyeong-Hye; Song, Ki-Duk; Park, Jong-Eun; Kim, Duk-Kyung; Na, Chong-Sam

    2016-10-01

    Anethole and garlic have an immune modulatory effects on avian coccidiosis, and these effects are correlated with gene expression changes in intestinal epithelial lymphocytes (IELs). In this study, we integrated gene expression datasets from two independent experiments and investigated gene expression profile changes by anethole and garlic respectively, and identified gene expression signatures, which are common targets of these herbs as they might be used for the evaluation of the effect of plant herbs on immunity toward avian coccidiosis. We identified 4,382 and 371 genes, which were differentially expressed in IELs of chickens supplemented with garlic and anethole respectively. The gene ontology (GO) term of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) from garlic treatment resulted in the biological processes (BPs) related to proteolysis, e.g., "modification-dependent protein catabolic process", "proteolysis involved in cellular protein catabolic process", "cellular protein catabolic process", "protein catabolic process", and "ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolic process". In GO analysis, one BP term, "Proteolysis", was obtained. Among DEGs, 300 genes were differentially regulated in response to both garlic and anethole, and 234 and 59 genes were either up- or down-regulated in supplementation with both herbs. Pathway analysis resulted in enrichment of the pathways related to digestion such as "Starch and sucrose metabolism" and "Insulin signaling pathway". Taken together, the results obtained in the present study could contribute to the effective development of evaluation system of plant herbs based on molecular signatures related with their immunological functions in chicken IELs. PMID:26954117

  11. An mRNA expression signature for prognostication in de novo acute myeloid leukemia patients with normal karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Wen-Chien; Hou, Hsin-An; Tseng, Mei-Hsuan; Kuo, Yi-Yi; Chen, Yidong; Chuang, Eric Y.; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Although clinical features, cytogenetics, and mutations are widely used to predict prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), further refinement of risk stratification is necessary for optimal treatment, especially in cytogenetically normal (CN) patients. We sought to generate a simple gene expression signature as a predictor of clinical outcome through analyzing the mRNA arrays of 158 de novo CN AML patients. We compared the gene expression profiles of patients with poor response to induction chemotherapy with those who responded well. Forty-six genes expressed differentially between the two groups. Among them, expression of 11 genes was significantly associated with overall survival (OS) in univariate Cox regression analysis in 104 patients who received standard intensive chemotherapy. We integrated the z-transformed expression levels of these 11 genes to generate a risk scoring system. Higher risk scores were significantly associated with shorter OS (median 17.0 months vs. not reached, P < 0.001) in ours and another 3 validation cohorts. In addition, it was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor by multivariate analysis (HR 1.116, 95% CI 1.035~1.204, P = 0.004). In conclusion, we developed a simple mRNA expression signature for prognostication in CN-AML patients. This prognostic biomarker will help refine the treatment strategies for this group of patients. PMID:26517675

  12. CRC-113 gene expression signature for predicting prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Dinh Truong; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Jo, Yong Hwa; Shahid, Muhammad; Akter, Salima; Aryal, Saurav Nath; Yoo, Ji Youn; Ahn, Yong-Joo; Cho, Kyoung Min; Lee, Ju-Seog; Choe, Wonchae; Kang, Insug; Ha, Joohun; Kim, Sung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of global cancer mortality. Recent studies have proposed several gene signatures to predict CRC prognosis, but none of those have proven reliable for predicting prognosis in clinical practice yet due to poor reproducibility and molecular heterogeneity. Here, we have established a prognostic signature of 113 probe sets (CRC-113) that include potential biomarkers and reflect the biological and clinical characteristics. Robustness and accuracy were significantly validated in external data sets from 19 centers in five countries. In multivariate analysis, CRC-113 gene signature showed a stronger prognostic value for survival and disease recurrence in CRC patients than current clinicopathological risk factors and molecular alterations. We also demonstrated that the CRC-113 gene signature reflected both genetic and epigenetic molecular heterogeneity in CRC patients. Furthermore, incorporation of the CRC-113 gene signature into a clinical context and molecular markers further refined the selection of the CRC patients who might benefit from postoperative chemotherapy. Conclusively, CRC-113 gene signature provides new possibilities for improving prognostic models and personalized therapeutic strategies. PMID:26397224

  13. Outcome Prediction of Children with Neuroblastoma using a Multigene Expression Signature, a Retrospective SIOPEN/COG/GPOH Study

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Joëlle; De Preter, Katleen; Naranjo, Arlene; Vercruysse, Liesbeth; Roy, Nadine Van; Hellemans, Jan; Swerts, Katrien; Bravo, Sophie; Scaruffi, Paola; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Noguera, Rosa; Piqueras, Marta; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Delattre, Olivier; Combaret, Valérie; Fischer, Matthias; Oberthuer, André; Ambros, Peter F.; Beiske, Klaus; Bénard, Jean; Marques, Barbara; Michon, Jean; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Bernardi, Bruno De; Rubie, Hervé; Cañete, Adela; Castel, Victoria; Kohler, Janice; Pötschger, Ulrike; Ladenstein, Ruth; Hogarty, Michael D.; McGrady, Patrick; London, Wendy B.; Laureys, Geneviève; Speleman, Frank; Vandesompele, Jo

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND More accurate prognostic assessment of patients with neuroblastoma is required to improve the choice of risk-related therapy. The aim of this study is to develop and validate a gene expression signature for improved outcome prediction. METHODS Fifty-nine genes were carefully selected based on an innovative data-mining strategy and profiled in the largest neuroblastoma patient series (n=579) to date using RT-qPCR starting from only 20 ng of RNA. A multigene expression signature was built using 30 training samples, tested on 313 test samples and subsequently validated in a blind study on an independent set of 236 additional tumours. FINDINGS The signature accurately classifies patients with respect to overall and progression-free survival (p<0·0001). The signature has a performance, sensitivity, and specificity of 85·4% (95%CI: 77·7–93·2), 84·4% (95%CI: 66·5–94·1), and 86·5% (95%CI: 81·1–90·6), respectively to predict patient outcome. Multivariate analysis indicates that the signature is a significant independent predictor after controlling for currently used riskfactors. Patients with high molecular risk have a higher risk to die from disease and for relapse/progression than patients with low molecular risk (odds ratio of 19·32 (95%CI: 6·50–57·43) and 3·96 (95%CI: 1·97–7·97) for OS and PFS, respectively). Patients with increased risk for adverse outcome can also be identified within the current treatment groups demonstrating the potential of this signature for improved clinical management. These results were confirmed in the validation study in which the signature was also independently statistically significant in a model adjusted for MYCN status, age, INSS stage, ploidy, INPC grade of differentiation, and MKI. The high patient/gene ratio (579/59) underlies the observed statistical power and robustness. INTERPRETATION A 59-gene expression signature predicts outcome of neuroblastoma patients with high accuracy. The signature is

  14. Molecular classification of melanomas and nevi using gene expression microarray signatures and formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Koh, Stephen S; Opel, Michael L; Wei, Jia-Perng J; Yau, Kenneth; Shah, Rashmi; Gorre, Mercedes E; Whitman, Eric; Shitabata, Paul K; Tao, Yong; Cochran, Alistair J; Abrishami, Payam; Binder, Scott W

    2009-04-01

    Melanoma may be difficult to identify histologically and relatively high rates of misdiagnosis leads to many malpractice claims. Currently separation of melanomas from nevi is based primarily on light microscopic interpretation of hematoxylin and eosin stained sections with limited assistance from immunohistology. To increase the accuracy of discrimination of benign and malignant melanocytic lesions we identified DNA microarray-derived gene expression profiles of different melanocytic lesions and evaluated the performance of these gene signatures as molecular diagnostic tools in the molecular classification and separation of melanomas and nevi. Melanocyte-derived cells were isolated by laser capture microdissection from 165 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded melanocytic nevi and melanoma tissue sections. RNA was isolated, amplified, labeled, and hybridized to a custom DNA microarray. In all 120 samples were used to identify differentially expressed genes and generate a gene expression classifier capable of distinguishing between melanomas and nevi. These classifiers were tested by the leave-one-out method and in a blinded study. RT-PCR verified the results. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified two distinct lesional groups that closely correlated with the histopathologically identified melanomas and nevi. Analysis of gene expression levels identified 36 significant differentially expressed genes. In comparison with nevi, melanomas expressed higher levels of genes promoting signal transduction, transcription, and cell growth. In contrast, expression of L1CAM (homolog) was reduced in melanomas relative to nevi. Genes differentially expressed in melanomas and nevi, on the basis of molecular signal, sub classified a group of unknown melanocytic lesions as melanomas or nevi and had high concordance rates with histopathology. Gene signatures established using DNA microarray gene expression profiling can distinguish melanomas from nevi, indicating the

  15. An 86-probe-set gene-expression signature predicts survival in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Metzeler, Klaus H.; Hummel, Manuela; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Spiekermann, Karsten; Braess, Jan; Sauerland, Maria-Cristina; Heinecke, Achim; Radmacher, Michael; Marcucci, Guido; Whitman, Susan P.; Maharry, Kati; Paschka, Peter; Larson, Richard A.; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Büchner, Thomas; Wörmann, Bernhard; Mansmann, Ulrich; Hiddemann, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Patients with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) show heterogeneous treatment outcomes. We used gene-expression profiling to develop a gene signature that predicts overall survival (OS) in CN-AML. Based on data from 163 patients treated in the German AMLCG 1999 trial and analyzed on oligonucleotide microarrays, we used supervised principal component analysis to identify 86 probe sets (representing 66 different genes), which correlated with OS, and defined a prognostic score based on this signature. When applied to an independent cohort of 79 CN-AML patients, this continuous score remained a significant predictor for OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.85; P = .002), event-free survival (HR = 1.73; P = .001), and relapse-free survival (HR = 1.76; P = .025). It kept its prognostic value in multivariate analyses adjusting for age, FLT3 ITD, and NPM1 status. In a validation cohort of 64 CN-AML patients treated on CALGB study 9621, the score also predicted OS (HR = 4.11; P < .001), event-free survival (HR = 2.90; P < .001), and relapse-free survival (HR = 3.14, P < .001) and retained its significance in a multivariate model for OS. In summary, we present a novel gene-expression signature that offers additional prognostic information for patients with CN-AML. PMID:18716133

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of four Bacillus clausii strains: proteomic expression signature distinguishes protein profile of the strains.

    PubMed

    Lippolis, Rosa; Gnoni, Antonio; Abbrescia, Anna; Panelli, Damiano; Maiorano, Stefania; Paternoster, Maria Stefania; Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Papa, Sergio; Gaballo, Antonio

    2011-11-18

    A comparative proteomic approach, using two dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, has been developed to compare and elucidate the differences among the cellular proteomes of four closely related isogenic O/C, SIN, N/R and T, B. clausii strains during both exponential and stationary phases of growth. Image analysis of the electropherograms reveals a high degree of concordance among the four proteomes, some proteins result, however, differently expressed. The proteins spots exhibiting high different expression level were identified, by mass-spectrometry analysis, as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHA, EC1.2.1.3; ABC0046 isoform) aldehyde dehydrogenase (DHAS, EC 1.2.1.3; ABC0047 isoform) and flagellin-protein of B. clausii KSM-k16. The different expression levels of the two dehydrogenases were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR and dehydrogenases enzymatic activity. The different patterns of protein expression can be considered as cell proteome signatures of the different strains. PMID:21810490

  17. Diagnostic value of a plasma microRNA signature in gastric cancer: a microRNA expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Hai; Wen, Wei; Cheng, Wenfang; Wang, Fang; Wu, Yinxia; Qi, Lianwen; Fan, Yong; Chen, Yan; Ding, Yin; Xu, Jing; Qian, Jiaqi; Huang, Zebo; Wang, Tongshan; Zhu, Danxia; Shu, Yongqian; Liu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The differential expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in plasma of gastric cancer (GC) patients may serve as a diagnostic biomarker. A total of 33 miRNAs were identified through the initial screening phase (3 GC pools vs. 1 normal control (NC) pool) using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) based Exiqon panel (miRCURY-Ready-to-Use-PCR-Human-panel-I + II-V1.M). By qRT-PCR, these miRNAs were further assessed in training (30 GC VS. 30 NCs) and testing stages (71 GC VS. 61 NCs). We discovered a plasma miRNA signature including five up-regulated miRNAs (miR-185, miR-20a, miR-210, miR-25 and miR-92b), and this signature was evaluated to be a potential diagnostic marker of GC. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the signature were 0.86, 0.74 and 0.87 for the training, testing and the external validation stages (32 GC VS. 18 NCs), respectively. The five miRNAs were consistently dysregulated in GC tissues (n = 30). Moreover, miR-185 was decreased while miR-20a, miR-210 and miR-92b were increased in arterial plasma (n = 38). However, none of the miRNAs in the exosomes showed different expression between 10 GC patients and 10 NCs. In conclusion, we identified a five-miRNA signature in the peripheral plasma which could serve as a non-invasive biomarker in detection of GC. PMID:26059512

  18. FLT3-ITD-associated gene-expression signatures in NPM1-mutated cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang; Zhou, Kuangguo; Yang, Yunfan; Shang, Zhen; Wang, Jue; Wang, Di; Wang, Na; Xu, Danmei; Zhou, Jianfeng

    2012-08-01

    Concomitance of the FLT3-ITD mutation is associated with poor prognosis in NPM1-mutated cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients, and precise studies on its role in leukemogenesis are needed; these may be elucidated at the molecular level by gene express profiling. In the present study, we built a gene-expression-based classifier using prediction analysis of microarray to characterize the FLT3-ITD signature in NPM1-mutated CN-AML patients, which comprised 10 annotated genes, and demonstrated an overall accuracy of 83.8 % in cross-validation. To characterize the signature in another way, differential expression was revealed for 34 genes by class comparison, and the up-regulation of LAPTM4B and MIR155HG was validated by quantitative RT-PCR in our small cohort of NPM1-mutated CN-AML samples, which appeared to be associated with this specific subtype. The 10-gene classifier and differentially expressed genes identified in this study indicate a potential utility for risk-assessed treatment stratification, and suggest new therapeutic targets for these high-risk AML patients. PMID:22688855

  19. LINCS Canvas Browser: interactive web app to query, browse and interrogate LINCS L1000 gene expression signatures.

    PubMed

    Duan, Qiaonan; Flynn, Corey; Niepel, Mario; Hafner, Marc; Muhlich, Jeremy L; Fernandez, Nicolas F; Rouillard, Andrew D; Tan, Christopher M; Chen, Edward Y; Golub, Todd R; Sorger, Peter K; Subramanian, Aravind; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2014-07-01

    For the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) project many gene expression signatures using the L1000 technology have been produced. The L1000 technology is a cost-effective method to profile gene expression in large scale. LINCS Canvas Browser (LCB) is an interactive HTML5 web-based software application that facilitates querying, browsing and interrogating many of the currently available LINCS L1000 data. LCB implements two compacted layered canvases, one to visualize clustered L1000 expression data, and the other to display enrichment analysis results using 30 different gene set libraries. Clicking on an experimental condition highlights gene-sets enriched for the differentially expressed genes from the selected experiment. A search interface allows users to input gene lists and query them against over 100 000 conditions to find the top matching experiments. The tool integrates many resources for an unprecedented potential for new discoveries in systems biology and systems pharmacology. The LCB application is available at http://www.maayanlab.net/LINCS/LCB. Customized versions will be made part of the http://lincscloud.org and http://lincs.hms.harvard.edu websites. PMID:24906883

  20. Longitudinal Transcriptome Analysis Reveals a Sustained Differential Gene Expression Signature in Patients Treated for Acute Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bouquet, Jerome; Soloski, Mark J.; Swei, Andrea; Cheadle, Chris; Federman, Scot; Billaud, Jean-Noel; Rebman, Alison W.; Kabre, Beniwende; Halpert, Richard; Boorgula, Meher

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, and approximately 10 to 20% of patients report persistent symptoms lasting months to years despite appropriate treatment with antibiotics. To gain insights into the molecular basis of acute Lyme disease and the ensuing development of post-treatment symptoms, we conducted a longitudinal transcriptome study of 29 Lyme disease patients (and 13 matched controls) enrolled at the time of diagnosis and followed for up to 6 months. The differential gene expression signature of Lyme disease following the acute phase of infection persisted for at least 3 weeks and had fewer than 44% differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in common with other infectious or noninfectious syndromes. Early Lyme disease prior to antibiotic therapy was characterized by marked upregulation of Toll-like receptor signaling but lack of activation of the inflammatory T-cell apoptotic and B-cell developmental pathways seen in other acute infectious syndromes. Six months after completion of therapy, Lyme disease patients were found to have 31 to 60% of their pathways in common with three different immune-mediated chronic diseases. No differential gene expression signature was observed between Lyme disease patients with resolved illness to those with persistent symptoms at 6 months post-treatment. The identification of a sustained differential gene expression signature in Lyme disease suggests that a panel of selected human host-based biomarkers may address the need for sensitive clinical diagnostics during the “window period” of infection prior to the appearance of a detectable antibody response and may also inform the development of new therapeutic targets. PMID:26873097

  1. High IFIT1 expression predicts improved clinical outcome, and IFIT1 along with MGMT more accurately predicts prognosis in newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Feng; Chen, Yao; Lin, Guo-Shi; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Tang, Wen-Long; Huang, Jian-Huang; Chen, Jin-Shou; Wang, Xing-Fu; Lin, Zhi-Xiong

    2016-06-01

    Interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeat 1 (IFIT1) plays a key role in growth suppression and apoptosis promotion in cancer cells. Interferon was reported to induce the expression of IFIT1 and inhibit the expression of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT).This study aimed to investigate the expression of IFIT1, the correlation between IFIT1 and MGMT, and their impact on the clinical outcome in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. The expression of IFIT1 and MGMT and their correlation were investigated in the tumor tissues from 70 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. The effects on progression-free survival and overall survival were evaluated. Of 70 cases, 57 (81.4%) tissue samples showed high expression of IFIT1 by immunostaining. The χ(2) test indicated that the expression of IFIT1 and MGMT was negatively correlated (r = -0.288, P = .016). Univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed high IFIT1 expression as a favorable prognostic indicator for progression-free survival (P = .005 and .017) and overall survival (P = .001 and .001), respectively. Patients with 2 favorable factors (high IFIT1 and low MGMT) had an improved prognosis as compared with others. The results demonstrated significantly increased expression of IFIT1 in newly diagnosed glioblastoma tissue. The negative correlation between IFIT1 and MGMT expression may be triggered by interferon. High IFIT1 can be a predictive biomarker of favorable clinical outcome, and IFIT1 along with MGMT more accurately predicts prognosis in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. PMID:26980050

  2. Signature changes in ubiquilin expression in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Safren, Nathaniel; Chang, Lydia; Dziki, Kristina M.; Monteiro, Mervyn J.

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquilin proteins have been implicated in the cause and the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. In the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington’s disease (HD), ubiquilin levels decline during disease progression. Restoration of their levels by transgenic expression of ubiquilin-1 extends survival. Here we provide a comprehensive assessment of the expression and localization of all four ubiquilin proteins in both normal and R6/2-affected mice brains, using antibodies specific for each protein. Ubiquilin-1, 2 and 4 proteins were detected throughout the brain, with increased expression seen in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Ubiquilin-3 expression was not detected. All three ubiquilins expressed in the brain were found in Htt inclusions. Their expression changed during development and disease. Ubiquilin-1 and ubiquilin-2 protein levels decreased from 6 to 18 weeks of mouse development, independent of disease. Ubiquilin-1 and ubiquilin-4 protein levels also changed during HD disease progression. Ubiquilin-4 proteins that are normally expressed in the brain were lost and instead replaced by a novel 115 kDa higher molecular weight immunoreactive band. Taken together, our results demonstrate that all ubiquilin proteins are involved in HD pathology and that distinct changes in the signature of ubiquilin-4 expression could be useful for monitoring end-stage of HD disease. PMID:25511991

  3. Papillary Renal Carcinoma Presenting as a Cancer of Unknown Primary (CUP) and Diagnosed through Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Sorscher, Steven M.; Greco, Frank Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Cancer of unknown primary (CUP) is a clinical syndrome representing many types of cancers and diagnoses are typically made after review of clinical presentation, pathology (including immunohistochemical staining) and imaging studies. Treatment with systemic chemotherapy has been shown to result in fairly reproducible objective response rates. Herein, a case of a patient who was initially diagnosed with a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of unknown origin is reported. After mRNA gene expression profiling (commercially available CancerTYPE ID), a specific diagnosis of papillary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) was made and then confirmed with additional immunohistochemical staining. The patient was treated with targeted therapy and an objective radiographic response was seen. A literature review suggests this to be the first patient with papillary RCC, identified by molecular profiling, and benefitting from a targeted agent that otherwise would not have been considered in the setting of CUP. This case underscores the importance of considering the use of newer testing technologies in the interest of offering patients more specific, targeted therapy in order to improve efficacy and spare patients toxicities of less specific, empiric chemotherapeutic regimens. PMID:22679428

  4. A gene expression signature of emphysema-related lung destruction and its reversal by the tripeptide GHK

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease consisting of emphysema, small airway obstruction, and/or chronic bronchitis that results in significant loss of lung function over time. Methods In order to gain insights into the molecular pathways underlying progression of emphysema and explore computational strategies for identifying COPD therapeutics, we profiled gene expression in lung tissue samples obtained from regions within the same lung with varying amounts of emphysematous destruction from smokers with COPD (8 regions × 8 lungs = 64 samples). Regional emphysema severity was quantified in each tissue sample using the mean linear intercept (Lm) between alveolar walls from micro-CT scans. Results We identified 127 genes whose expression levels were significantly associated with regional emphysema severity while controlling for gene expression differences between individuals. Genes increasing in expression with increasing emphysematous destruction included those involved in inflammation, such as the B-cell receptor signaling pathway, while genes decreasing in expression were enriched in tissue repair processes, including the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) pathway, actin organization, and integrin signaling. We found concordant differential expression of these emphysema severity-associated genes in four cross-sectional studies of COPD. Using the Connectivity Map, we identified GHK as a compound that can reverse the gene-expression signature associated with emphysematous destruction and induce expression patterns consistent with TGFβ pathway activation. Treatment of human fibroblasts with GHK recapitulated TGFβ-induced gene-expression patterns, led to the organization of the actin cytoskeleton, and elevated the expression of integrin β1. Furthermore, addition of GHK or TGFβ restored collagen I contraction and remodeling by fibroblasts derived from COPD lungs compared to fibroblasts from former smokers without

  5. Transcriptome profiling reveals novel gene expression signatures and regulating transcription factors of TGFβ-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Du, Liutao; Yamamoto, Shota; Burnette, Barry L; Huang, Danshang; Gao, Kun; Jamshidi, Neema; Kuo, Michael D

    2016-08-01

    Dysregulated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer cells endows invasive and metastatic properties upon cancer cells that favor successful colonization of distal target organs and therefore play a critical role in transforming early-stage carcinomas into invasive malignancies. EMT has also been associated with tumor recurrence and drug resistance and cancer stem cell initiation. Therefore, better understanding of the mechanisms behind EMT could ultimately contribute to the development of novel prognostic approaches and individualized therapies that specifically target EMT processes. As an effort to characterize the central transcriptome changes during EMT, we have developed a Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta-based in vitro EMT model and used it to profile EMT-related gene transcriptional changes in two different cell lines, a non-small cell lung cancer cell line H358, and a breast cell line MCF10a. After 7 days of TGF-beta/Oncostatin M (OSM) treatment, changes in cell morphology to a mesenchymal phenotype were observed as well as concordant EMT-associated changes in mRNA and protein expression. Further, increased motility was noted and flow cytometry confirmed enrichment in cancer stem cell-like populations. Microarray-based differential expression analysis identified an EMT-associated gene expression signature which was confirmed by RT-qPCR and which significantly overlapped with a previously published EMT core signature. Finally, two novel EMT-regulating transcription factors, IRF5 and LMCD1, were identified and independently validated. PMID:27318801

  6. A Gene Expression and Pre-mRNA Splicing Signature That Marks the Adenoma-Adenocarcinoma Progression in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pesson, Marine; Volant, Alain; Uguen, Arnaud; Trillet, Kilian; De La Grange, Pierre; Aubry, Marc; Daoulas, Mélanie; Robaszkiewicz, Michel; Le Gac, Gérald; Morel, Alain; Simon, Brigitte; Corcos, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that most colorectal cancers (CRCs) arise from colorectal adenomas (CRAs), but transcriptomic data characterizing the progression from colorectal normal mucosa to adenoma, and then to adenocarcinoma are scarce. These transition steps were investigated using microarrays, both at the level of gene expression and alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Many genes and exons were abnormally expressed in CRAs, even more than in CRCs, as compared to normal mucosae. Known biological pathways involved in CRC were altered in CRA, but several new enriched pathways were also recognized, such as the complement and coagulation cascades. We also identified four intersectional transcriptional signatures that could distinguish CRAs from normal mucosae or CRCs, including a signature of 40 genes differentially deregulated in both CRA and CRC samples. A majority of these genes had been described in different cancers, including FBLN1 or INHBA, but only a few in CRC. Several of these changes were also observed at the protein level. In addition, 20% of these genes (i.e. CFH, CRYAB, DPT, FBLN1, ITIH5, NR3C2, SLIT3 and TIMP1) showed altered pre-mRNA splicing in CRAs. As a global variation occurring since the CRA stage, and maintained in CRC, the expression and splicing changes of this 40-gene set may mark the risk of cancer occurrence from analysis of CRA biopsies. PMID:24516561

  7. Identification of Single- and Multiple-Class Specific Signature Genes from Gene Expression Profiles by Group Marker Index

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yu-Shuen; Aguan, Kripamoy; Pal, Nikhil R.; Chung, I-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Informative genes from microarray data can be used to construct prediction model and investigate biological mechanisms. Differentially expressed genes, the main targets of most gene selection methods, can be classified as single- and multiple-class specific signature genes. Here, we present a novel gene selection algorithm based on a Group Marker Index (GMI), which is intuitive, of low-computational complexity, and efficient in identification of both types of genes. Most gene selection methods identify only single-class specific signature genes and cannot identify multiple-class specific signature genes easily. Our algorithm can detect de novo certain conditions of multiple-class specificity of a gene and makes use of a novel non-parametric indicator to assess the discrimination ability between classes. Our method is effective even when the sample size is small as well as when the class sizes are significantly different. To compare the effectiveness and robustness we formulate an intuitive template-based method and use four well-known datasets. We demonstrate that our algorithm outperforms the template-based method in difficult cases with unbalanced distribution. Moreover, the multiple-class specific genes are good biomarkers and play important roles in biological pathways. Our literature survey supports that the proposed method identifies unique multiple-class specific marker genes (not reported earlier to be related to cancer) in the Central Nervous System data. It also discovers unique biomarkers indicating the intrinsic difference between subtypes of lung cancer. We also associate the pathway information with the multiple-class specific signature genes and cross-reference to published studies. We find that the identified genes participate in the pathways directly involved in cancer development in leukemia data. Our method gives a promising way to find genes that can involve in pathways of multiple diseases and hence opens up the possibility of using an existing

  8. Expression of Cell Competition Markers at the Interface between p53 Signature and Normal Epithelium in the Human Fallopian Tube

    PubMed Central

    Kito, Masahiko; Maeda, Daichi; Kudo-Asabe, Yukitsugu; Sato, Naoki; Shih, Ie-Ming; Wang, Tian-Li; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Terada, Yukihiro; Goto, Akiteru

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence regarding cell competition between normal and mutant mammalian cells, which suggest that it may play a defensive role in the early phase of carcinogenesis. In vitro study in the past has shown that overexpression of vimentin in normal epithelial cells at the contact surface with transformed cells is essential for the cell competition involved in epithelial defense against cancer. In this study, we attempted to examine cell competition in human tissue in vivo by investigating surgically resected human fallopian tubes that contain p53 signatures and serous tubal intraepithelial lesions (STILs), a linear expansion of p53-immunopositive/TP53 mutant tubal epithelial cells that are considered as precursors of pelvic high grade serous carcinoma. Immunofluorescence double staining for p53 and the cell competition marker vimentin was performed in 21 sections of human fallopian tube tissue containing 17 p53 signatures and 4 STILs. The intensities of vimentin expression at the interface between p53-positive cells at the end of the p53 signature/STIL and adjacent p53-negative normal tubal epithelial cells were compared with the background tubal epithelium. As a result, the average vimentin intensity at the interfaces relative to the background intensity was 1.076 (95% CI, 0.9412 – 1.211 for p53 signature and 0.9790 (95% CI, 0.7206 – 1.237) for STIL. Thus, it can be concluded that overexpression of the cell competition marker vimentin are not observed in human tissue with TP53 alterations. PMID:27258067

  9. Correlation of Notch1/Hes1 Genes Expression Levels in Egyptian Paediatric Patients with Newly Diagnosed and Persistent Primary Immune(Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Gawdat, Rania Mohsen; Hammam, Amira Ahmed; Ezzat, Dina Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    Notch signalling is involved in the development of several autoimmune diseases, one of such diseases is ITP. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the expression levels of Notch1 receptor and its target Hes1 gene in Egyptian paediatric ITP patients. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was used to analyse the expression levels of Notch1 and Hes1 in 42 children with primary ITP (22 newly diagnosed and 20 persistent) cases. Twenty age and sex matched non-ITP controls were included. The expression levels of Notch1 were higher in newly diagnosed and persistent cases than controls with high statistical significant difference (P value < 0.001, P < 0.001) respectively, similarly as regards the expression levels of HES1 (P value < 0.001, P < 0.007) respectively. A significant positive correlation was found between Notch1 and Hes1 expression levels in newly diagnosed cases (r = 0.587, P value = 0.004). There was an association between levels of both genes in most of ITP patients but Hes1 was markedly elevated than Notch1 in few cases. High expression levels of Notch1/Hes1 indicated the important role of Notch signalling in both newly diagnosed and persistent ITP. High expression levels of Hes1 than Notch1 may shed light on its value as a therapeutic target for future research in ITP. PMID:27429531

  10. Quantitative proteomics reveals the novel co-expression signatures in early brain development for prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuexin; Feng, Lin; Liu, Dianming; Zhang, Lianfeng; Wu, Bo; Jiang, Wei; Han, Zujing; Cheng, Shujun

    2016-01-01

    Although several researches have explored the similarity across development and tumorigenesis in cellular behavior and underlying molecular mechanisms, not many have investigated the developmental characteristics at proteomic level and further extended to cancer clinical outcome. In this study, we used iTRAQ to quantify the protein expression changes during macaque rhesus brain development from fetuses at gestation 70 days to after born 5 years. Then, we performed weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) on protein expression data of brain development to identify co-expressed modules that highly expressed on distinct development stages, including early stage, middle stage and late stage. Moreover, we used the univariate cox regression model to evaluate the prognostic potentials of these genes in two independent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) datasets. The results showed that the modules highly expressed on early stage contained more reproducible prognostic genes, including ILF2, CCT7, CCT4, RPL10A, MSN, PRPS1, TFRC and APEX1. These genes were not only associated with clinical outcome, but also tended to influence chemoresponse. These signatures identified from embryonic brain development might contribute to precise prediction of GBM prognosis and identification of novel drug targets in GBM therapies. Thus, the development could become a viable reference model for researching cancers, including identifying novel prognostic markers and promoting new therapies. PMID:26895104

  11. Quantitative proteomics reveals the novel co-expression signatures in early brain development for prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuexin; Feng, Lin; Liu, Dianming; Zhang, Lianfeng; Wu, Bo; Jiang, Wei; Han, Zujing; Cheng, Shujun

    2016-03-22

    Although several researches have explored the similarity across development and tumorigenesis in cellular behavior and underlying molecular mechanisms, not many have investigated the developmental characteristics at proteomic level and further extended to cancer clinical outcome. In this study, we used iTRAQ to quantify the protein expression changes during macaque rhesus brain development from fetuses at gestation 70 days to after born 5 years. Then, we performed weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) on protein expression data of brain development to identify co-expressed modules that highly expressed on distinct development stages, including early stage, middle stage and late stage. Moreover, we used the univariate cox regression model to evaluate the prognostic potentials of these genes in two independent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) datasets. The results showed that the modules highly expressed on early stage contained more reproducible prognostic genes, including ILF2, CCT7, CCT4, RPL10A, MSN, PRPS1, TFRC and APEX1. These genes were not only associated with clinical outcome, but also tended to influence chemoresponse. These signatures identified from embryonic brain development might contribute to precise prediction of GBM prognosis and identification of novel drug targets in GBM therapies. Thus, the development could become a viable reference model for researching cancers, including identifying novel prognostic markers and promoting new therapies. PMID:26895104

  12. Signature MicroRNA expression patterns identified in humans with 22q11.2 deletion/DiGeorge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de la Morena, M. Teresa; Eitson, Jennifer L.; Dozmorov, Igor M.; Belkaya, Serkan; Hoover, Ashley R.; Anguiano, Esperanza; Pascual, M. Virginia; van Oers, Nicolai S.C.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have heterogeneous clinical presentations including immunodeficiency, cardiac anomalies, and hypocalcemia. The syndrome arises from hemizygous deletions of up to 3 Mb on chromosome 22q11.2, a region that contains 60 genes and 4 microRNAs. MicroRNAs are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, with mutations in several microRNAs causal to specific human diseases. We characterized the microRNA expression patterns in the peripheral blood of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (n=31) compared to normal controls (n=22). Eighteen microRNAs had a statistically significant differential expression (p<0.05), with miR-185 expressed at 0.4× normal levels. The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome cohort exhibited microRNA expression hyper-variability and group dysregulation. Selected microRNAs distinguished patients with cardiac anomalies, hypocalcemia, and/or low circulating T cell counts. In summary, microRNA profiling of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome/DiGeorge patients revealed a signature microRNA expression pattern distinct from normal controls with clinical relevance. PMID:23454892

  13. Pharmacologic inhibition of RORγt regulates Th17 signature gene expression and suppresses cutaneous inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Skepner, Jill; Ramesh, Radha; Trocha, Mark; Schmidt, Darby; Baloglu, Erkan; Lobera, Mercedes; Carlson, Thaddeus; Hill, Jonathan; Orband-Miller, Lisa A; Barnes, Ashley; Boudjelal, Mohamed; Sundrud, Mark; Ghosh, Shomir; Yang, Jianfei

    2014-03-15

    IL-17-producing CD4(+)Th17 cells, CD8(+)Tc17 cells, and γδ T cells play critical roles in the pathogenesis of autoimmune psoriasis. RORγt is required for the differentiation of Th17 cells and expression of IL-17. In this article, we describe a novel, potent, and selective RORγt inverse agonist (TMP778), and its inactive diastereomer (TMP776). This chemistry, for the first time to our knowledge, provides a unique and powerful set of tools to probe RORγt-dependent functions. TMP778, but not TMP776, blocked human Th17 and Tc17 cell differentiation and also acutely modulated IL-17A production and inflammatory Th17-signature gene expression (Il17a, Il17f, Il22, Il26, Ccr6, and Il23) in mature human Th17 effector/memory T cells. In addition, TMP778, but not TMP776, inhibited IL-17A production in both human and mouse γδ T cells. IL-23-induced IL-17A production was also blocked by TMP778 treatment. In vivo targeting of RORγt in mice via TMP778 administration reduced imiquimod-induced psoriasis-like cutaneous inflammation. Further, TMP778 selectively regulated Th17-signature gene expression in mononuclear cells isolated from both the blood and affected skin of psoriasis patients. In summary, to our knowledge, we are the first to demonstrate that RORγt inverse agonists: 1) inhibit Tc17 cell differentiation, as well as IL-17 production by γδ T cells and CD8(+) Tc17 cells; 2) block imiquimod-induced cutaneous inflammation; 3) inhibit Th17 signature gene expression by cells isolated from psoriatic patient samples; and 4) block IL-23-induced IL-17A expression. Thus, RORγt is a tractable drug target for the treatment of cutaneous inflammatory disorders, which may afford additional therapeutic benefit over existing modalities that target only IL-17A. PMID:24516202

  14. Dual RNA Sequencing Reveals the Expression of Unique Transcriptomic Signatures in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced BV-2 Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Hwa; Park, Kyoung Sun; Lee, Young Seek; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Microglial cells become rapidly activated through interactions with pathogens, and the persistent activation of these cells is associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. Previous studies have investigated the transcriptomic signatures in microglia or macrophages using microarray technologies. However, this method has numerous restrictions, such as spatial biases, uneven probe properties, low sensitivity, and dependency on the probes spotted. To overcome this limitation and identify novel transcribed genes in response to LPS, we used RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) to determine the novel transcriptomic signatures in BV-2 microglial cells. Sequencing assessment and quality evaluation showed that approximately 263 and 319 genes (≥ 1.5 log2-fold), such as cytokines and chemokines, were strongly induced after 2 and 4 h, respectively, and the induction of several genes with unknown immunological functions was also observed. Importantly, we observed that previously unidentified transcription factors (TFs) (irf1, irf7, and irf9), histone demethylases (kdm4a) and DNA methyltransferases (dnmt3l) were significantly and selectively expressed in BV-2 microglial cells. The gene expression levels, transcription start sites (TSS), isoforms, and differential promoter usage revealed a complex pattern of transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation upon infection with LPS. In addition, gene ontology, molecular networks and pathway analyses identified the top significantly regulated functional classification, canonical pathways and network functions at each activation status. Moreover, we further analyzed differentially expressed genes to identify transcription factor (TF) motifs (−950 to +50 bp of the 5’ upstream promoters) and epigenetic mechanisms. Furthermore, we confirmed that the expressions of key inflammatory genes as well as pro-inflammatory mediators in the supernatants were significantly induced in LPS treated primary microglial cells. This

  15. Keratinocyte Growth Factor Induces Gene Expression Signature Associated with Suppression of Malignant Phenotype of Cutaneous Squamous Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toriseva, Mervi; Ala-aho, Risto; Peltonen, Sirkku; Peltonen, Juha; Grénman, Reidar; Kähäri, Veli-Matti

    2012-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF, fibroblast growth factor-7) is a fibroblast-derived mitogen, which stimulates proliferation of epithelial cells. The expression of KGF by dermal fibroblasts is induced following injury and it promotes wound repair. However, the role of KGF in cutaneous carcinogenesis and cancer progression is not known. We have examined the role of KGF in progression of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. The expression of KGF receptor (KGFR) mRNA was lower in cutaneous SCCs (n = 6) than in normal skin samples (n = 6). Expression of KGFR mRNA was detected in 6 out of 8 cutaneous SCC cell lines and the levels were downregulated by 24-h treatment with KGF. KGF did not stimulate SCC cell proliferation, but it reduced invasion of SCC cells through collagen. Gene expression profiling of three cutaneous SCC cell lines treated with KGF for 24 h revealed a specific gene expression signature characterized by upregulation of a set of genes specifically downregulated in SCC cells compared to normal epidermal keratinocytes, including genes with tumor suppressing properties (SPRY4, DUSP4, DUSP6, LRIG1, PHLDA1). KGF also induced downregulation of a set of genes specifically upregulated in SCC cells compared to normal keratinocytes, including genes associated with tumor progression (MMP13, MATN2, CXCL10, and IGFBP3). Downregulation of MMP-13 and KGFR expression in SCC cells and HaCaT cells was mediated via ERK1/2. Activation of ERK1/2 in HaCaT cells and tumorigenic Ha-ras-transformed HaCaT cells resulted in downregulation of MMP-13 and KGFR expression. These results provide evidence, that KGF does not promote progression of cutaneous SCC, but rather suppresses the malignant phenotype of cutaneous SCC cells by regulating the expression of several genes differentially expressed in SCC cells, as compared to normal keratinocytes. PMID:22427941

  16. A Gene Expression Signature Associated with Overall Survival in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma Suggests a New Treatment Strategy.

    PubMed

    Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Andersen, Jesper B; Madigan, James P; Varma, Sudhir; Bagni, Rachel K; Powell, Katie; Burgan, William E; Wu, Chung-Pu; Calcagno, Anna Maria; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Gottesman, Michael M

    2016-02-01

    Despite improvements in the management of liver cancer, the survival rate for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains dismal. The survival benefit of systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of liver cancer is only marginal. Although the reasons for treatment failure are multifactorial, intrinsic resistance to chemotherapy plays a primary role. Here, we analyzed the expression of 377 multidrug resistance (MDR)-associated genes in two independent cohorts of patients with advanced HCC, with the aim of finding ways to improve survival in this poor-prognosis cancer. Taqman-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed a 45-gene signature that predicts overall survival (OS) in patients with HCC. Using the Connectivity Map Tool, we were able to identify drugs that converted the gene expression profiles of HCC cell lines from ones matching patients with poor OS to profiles associated with good OS. We found three compounds that convert the gene expression profiles of three HCC cell lines to gene expression profiles associated with good OS. These compounds increase histone acetylation, which correlates with the synergistic sensitization of those MDR tumor cells to conventional chemotherapeutic agents, including cisplatin, sorafenib, and 5-fluorouracil. Our results indicate that it is possible to modulate gene expression profiles in HCC cell lines to those associated with better outcome. This approach also increases sensitization of HCC cells toward conventional chemotherapeutic agents. This work suggests new treatment strategies for a disease for which few therapeutic options exist. PMID:26668215

  17. Long non-coding RNA SOX2OT: expression signature, splicing patterns, and emerging roles in pluripotency and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shahryari, Alireza; Jazi, Marie Saghaeian; Samaei, Nader M.; Mowla, Seyed J.

    2015-01-01

    SOX2 overlapping transcript (SOX2OT) is a long non-coding RNA which harbors one of the major regulators of pluripotency, SOX2 gene, in its intronic region. SOX2OT gene is mapped to human chromosome 3q26.3 (Chr3q26.3) locus and is extended in a high conserved region of over 700 kb. Little is known about the exact role of SOX2OT; however, recent studies have demonstrated a positive role for it in transcription regulation of SOX2 gene. Similar to SOX2, SOX2OT is highly expressed in embryonic stem cells and down-regulated upon the induction of differentiation. SOX2OT is dynamically regulated during the embryogenesis of vertebrates, and delimited to the brain in adult mice and human. Recently, the disregulation of SOX2OT expression and its concomitant expression with SOX2 have become highlighted in some somatic cancers including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, lung squamous cell carcinoma, and breast cancer. Interestingly, SOX2OT is differentially spliced into multiple mRNA-like transcripts in stem and cancer cells. In this review, we are describing the structural and functional features of SOX2OT, with an emphasis on its expression signature, its splicing patterns and its critical function in the regulation of SOX2 expression during development and tumorigenesis. PMID:26136768

  18. A Gene Expression Signature Associated with Overall Survival in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma Suggests a New Treatment Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Andersen, Jesper B.; Madigan, James P.; Varma, Sudhir; Bagni, Rachel K.; Powell, Katie; Burgan, William E.; Wu, Chung-Pu; Calcagno, Anna Maria; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.

    2016-01-01

    Despite improvements in the management of liver cancer, the survival rate for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains dismal. The survival benefit of systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of liver cancer is only marginal. Although the reasons for treatment failure are multifactorial, intrinsic resistance to chemotherapy plays a primary role. Here, we analyzed the expression of 377 multidrug resistance (MDR)-associated genes in two independent cohorts of patients with advanced HCC, with the aim of finding ways to improve survival in this poor-prognosis cancer. Taqman-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed a 45-gene signature that predicts overall survival (OS) in patients with HCC. Using the Connectivity Map Tool, we were able to identify drugs that converted the gene expression profiles of HCC cell lines from ones matching patients with poor OS to profiles associated with good OS. We found three compounds that convert the gene expression profiles of three HCC cell lines to gene expression profiles associated with good OS. These compounds increase histone acetylation, which correlates with the synergistic sensitization of those MDR tumor cells to conventional chemotherapeutic agents, including cisplatin, sorafenib, and 5-fluorouracil. Our results indicate that it is possible to modulate gene expression profiles in HCC cell lines to those associated with better outcome. This approach also increases sensitization of HCC cells toward conventional chemotherapeutic agents. This work suggests new treatment strategies for a disease for which few therapeutic options exist. PMID:26668215

  19. Monocyte Gene Expression Signature of Patients with Early Onset Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Basart, Hanneke; Watkins, Nicholas A.; Maiwald, Stepanie; Rendon, Augusto; Krishnan, Unni; Sondermeijer, Brigitte M.; Creemers, Esther E.; Pinto-Sietsma, Sara J.; Hovingh, Kees; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Goodall, Alison H.; Trip, Mieke D.

    2012-01-01

    The burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) cannot be fully addressed by therapy targeting known pathophysiological pathways. Even with stringent control of all risk factors CVD events are only diminished by half. A number of additional pathways probably play a role in the development of CVD and might serve as novel therapeutic targets. Genome wide expression studies represent a powerful tool to identify such novel pathways. We compared the expression profiles in monocytes from twenty two young male patients with premature familial CAD with those from controls matched for age, sex and smoking status, without a family history of CVD. Since all patients were on statins and aspirin treatment, potentially affecting the expression of genes in monocytes, twelve controls were subsequently treated with simvastatin and aspirin for 6 and 2 weeks, respectively. By whole genome expression arrays six genes were identified to have differential expression in the monocytes of patients versus controls; ABCA1, ABCG1 and RGS1 were downregulated in patients, whereas ADRB2, FOLR3 and GSTM1 were upregulated. Differential expression of all genes, apart from GSTM1, was confirmed by qPCR. Aspirin and statins altered gene expression of ABCG1 and ADBR2. All finding were validated in a second group of twenty four patients and controls. Differential expression of ABCA1, RSG1 and ADBR2 was replicated. In conclusion, we identified these 3 genes to be expressed differently in CAD cases which might play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:22363809

  20. Transcriptome profiling of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci reveals stage-specific gene expression signatures for thiamethoxam resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, N; Xie, W; Jones, CM; Bass, C; Jiao, X; Yang, X; Liu, B; Li, R; Zhang, Y

    2013-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci has developed high levels of resistance to many insecticides including the neonicotinoids and there is strong evidence that for some compounds resistance is stage-specific. To investigate the molecular basis of B. tabaci resistance to the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam we used a custom whitefly microarray to compare gene expression in the egg, nymph and adult stages of a thiamethoxam-resistant strain (TH-R) with a susceptible strain (TH-S). Gene ontology and bioinformatic analyses revealed that in all life stages many of the differentially expressed transcripts encoded enzymes involved in metabolic processes and/or metabolism of xenobiotics. Several of these are candidate resistance genes and include the cytochrome P450 CYP6CM1, which has been shown to confer resistance to several neonicotinoids previously, a P450 belonging to the Cytochrome P450s 4 family and a glutathione S-transferase (GST) belonging to the sigma class. Finally several ATP-binding cassette transporters of the ABCG subfamily were highly over-expressed in the adult stage of the TH-R strain and may play a role in resistance by active efflux. Here, we evaluated both common and stage-specific gene expression signatures and identified several candidate resistance genes that may underlie B. tabaci resistance to thiamethoxam. PMID:23889345

  1. A six gene expression signature defines aggressive subtypes and predicts outcome in childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Mi, Jian-Qing; Debernardi, Alexandra; Vitte, Anne-Laure; Emadali, Anouk; Meyer, Julia A.; Charmpi, Konstantina; Ycart, Bernard; Callanan, Mary B.; Carroll, William L.; Khochbin, Saadi; Rousseaux, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal gene expression in cancer represents an under-explored source of cancer markers and therapeutic targets. In order to identify gene expression signatures associated with survival in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a strategy was designed to search for aberrant gene activity, which consists of applying several filters to transcriptomic datasets from two pediatric ALL studies. Six genes whose expression in leukemic blasts was associated with prognosis were identified:three genes predicting poor prognosis (AK022211, FASTKD1 and STARD4) and three genes associated with a favorable outcome (CAMSAP1, PCGF6 and SH3RF3). Combining the expression of these 6 genes could successfully predict prognosis not only in the two discovery pediatric ALL studies, but also in two independent validation cohorts of adult patients, one from a publicly available study and one consisting of 62 newly recruited Chinese patients. Moreover, our data demonstrate that our six gene based test is particularly efficient in stratifying MLL or BCR.ABL negative patients. Finally, common biological traits characterizing aggressive forms of ALL in both children and adults were found, including features of dormant hematopoietic stem cells, suggesting new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26001296

  2. MiRNA expression signatures induced by Marek disease virus infection in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MMicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Emerging evidence suggests that differential miRNA expression is associated with viral infection and cancer. Marek's disease virus infection induces lymphoma in chickens. However, the host...

  3. Long Noncoding RNA Expression Signatures of Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma and Their Prognostic Value

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Fang; Zou, Ruhai; Xie, Changqing; Guo, Qiannan; Hu, Qian; Chen, Jianing; Yang, Xing; Yao, Herui; Song, Erwei; Xiang, Yanqun

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently been found to play important roles in various cancer types. The elucidation of genome-wide lncRNA expression patterns in metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) could reveal novel mechanisms underlying NPC carcinogenesis and progression. In this study, lncRNA expression profiling was performed on metastatic and primary NPC tumors, and the differentially expressed lncRNAs between these samples were identified. A total of 33,045 lncRNA probes were generated for our microarray based on authoritative data sources, including RefSeq, UCSC Knowngenes, Ensembl, and related literature. Using these probes, 8,088 lncRNAs were found to be significantly differentially expressed (≥2-fold). To identify the prognostic value of these differentially expressed lncRNAs, four lncRNAs (LOC84740, ENST00000498296, AL359062, and ENST00000438550) were selected; their expression levels were measured in an independent panel of 106 primary NPC samples via QPCR. Among these lncRNAs, ENST00000438550 expression was demonstrated to be significantly correlated with NPC disease progression. A survival analysis showed that a high expression level of ENST00000438550 was an independent indicator of disease progression in NPC patients (P = 0.01). In summary, this study may provide novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for NPC, as well as a novel understanding of the mechanism underlying NPC metastasis and potential targets for future treatment. PMID:26448942

  4. A transgenic zebrafish liver tumor model with inducible Myc expression reveals conserved Myc signatures with mammalian liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Zheng, Weiling; Wang, Zhengyuan; Zeng, Zhiqiang; Zhan, Huiqing; Li, Caixia; Zhou, Li; Yan, Chuan; Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Myc is a pleiotropic transcription factor that is involved in many cellular activities relevant to carcinogenesis, including hepatocarcinogenesis. The zebrafish has been increasingly used to model human diseases and it is particularly valuable in helping to identify common and conserved molecular mechanisms in vertebrates. Here we generated a liver tumor model in transgenic zebrafish by liver-specific expression of mouse Myc using a Tet-On system. Dosage-dependent induction of Myc expression specifically in the liver was observed in our Myc transgenic zebrafish, TO(Myc), and the elevated Myc expression caused liver hyperplasia, which progressed to hepatocellular adenoma and carcinoma with prolonged induction. Next generation sequencing-based transcriptomic analyses indicated that ribosome proteins were overwhelmingly upregulated in the Myc-induced liver tumors. Cross-species analyses showed that the zebrafish Myc model correlated well with Myc transgenic mouse models for liver cancers. The Myc-induced zebrafish liver tumors also possessed molecular signatures highly similar to human those of hepatocellular carcinoma. Finally, we found that a small Myc target gene set of 16 genes could be used to identify liver tumors due to Myc upregulation. Thus, our zebrafish model demonstrated the conserved role of Myc in promoting hepatocarcinogenesis in all vertebrate species. PMID:23038063

  5. Long noncoding RNA expression profiles in gut tissues constitute molecular signatures that reflect the types of microbes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lunxi; Ai, Luoyan; Qian, Jin; Fang, Jing-Yuan; Xu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota is commonly referred to as a hidden organ due to its pivotal effects on host physiology, metabolism, nutrition and immunity. The gut microbes may be shaped by environmental and host genetic factors, and previous studies have focused on the roles of protein-coding genes. Here we show a link between long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) expression and gut microbes. By repurposing exon microarrays and comparing the lncRNA expression profiles between germ-free, conventional and different gnotobiotic mice, we revealed subgroups of lncRNAs that were specifically enriched in each condition. A nearest shrunken centroid methodology was applied to obtain lncRNA-based signatures to identify mice in different conditions. The lncRNA-based prediction model successfully identified different gnotobiotic mice from conventional and germ-free mice, and also discriminated mice harboring transplanted microbes from fecal samples of mice or zebra fishes. To achieve optimal prediction accuracy, fewer lncRNAs were required in the prediction model than protein-coding genes. Taken together, our study demonstrated the effecacy of lncRNA expression profiles in discriminating the types of microbes in the gut. These results also provide a resource of gut microbe-associated lncRNAs for the development of lncRNA biomarkers and the identification of functional lncRNAs in host-microbes interactions. PMID:26123364

  6. MicroRNA gene expression signatures in long-surviving malignant pleural mesothelioma patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ruby C Y; Kirschner, Michaela B; Cheng, Yuen Yee; van Zandwijk, Nico; Reid, Glen

    2016-09-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a tumor originating in the mesothelium, the membrane lining the thoracic cavities, and is induced by exposure to asbestos. Australia suffers one of the world's highest rates of MPM and the incidence is yet to peak. The prognosis for patients with MPM is poor and median survival following diagnosis is 4-18 months. Currently, no or few effective therapies exist for MPM. Trials of targeted agents such as antiangiogenic agents (VEGF, EGFR) or ribonuclease inhibitors (ranpirnase) largely failed to show efficacy in MPM Tsao et al. (2009) [1]. A recent study, however, showed that cisplatin/pemetrexed + bevacizumab (a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that inhibit VEGF) treatment has a survival benefit of 2.7 months Zalcman et al. (2016) [2]. It remains to be seen if this targeted therapy will be accepted as a new standard for MPM. Thus the unmet needs of MPM patients remain very pronounced and almost every patient will be confronted with drug resistance and recurrence of disease. We have identified unique gene signatures associated with prolonged survival in mesothelioma patients undergoing radical surgery (EPP, extrapleural pneumonectomy), as well as patients who underwent palliative surgery (pleurectomy/decortication). In addition to data published in Molecular Oncology, 2015;9:715-26 (GSE59180) Kirschner et al. (2015) , we describe here additional data using a system-based approach that support our previous observations. This data provides a resource to further explore microRNA dynamics in MPM. PMID:27408810

  7. Getting Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... also for those with related disorders. How is Marfan syndrome diagnosed? getting_diagnosed.jpg A Marfan diagnosis ... spinal column). Is there a genetic test for Marfan syndrome? Genetic testing can provide helpful information in ...

  8. Obesity and prostate cancer: gene expression signature of human periprostatic adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Periprostatic (PP) adipose tissue surrounds the prostate, an organ with a high predisposition to become malignant. Frequently, growing prostatic tumor cells extend beyond the prostatic organ towards this fat depot. This study aimed to determine the genome-wide expression of genes in PP adipose tissue in obesity/overweight (OB/OW) and prostate cancer patients. Methods Differentially expressed genes in human PP adipose tissue were identified using microarrays. Analyses were conducted according to the donors' body mass index characteristics (OB/OW versus lean) and prostate disease (extra prostatic cancer versus organ confined prostate cancer versus benign prostatic hyperplasia). Selected genes with altered expression were validated by real-time PCR. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was used to investigate gene ontology, canonical pathways and functional networks. Results In the PP adipose tissue of OB/OW subjects, we found altered expression of genes encoding molecules involved in adipogenic/anti-lipolytic, proliferative/anti-apoptotic, and mild immunoinflammatory processes (for example, FADS1, down-regulated, and LEP and ANGPT1, both up-regulated). Conversely, in the PP adipose tissue of subjects with prostate cancer, altered genes were related to adipose tissue cellular activity (increased cell proliferation/differentiation, cell cycle activation and anti-apoptosis), whereas a downward impact on immunity and inflammation was also observed, mostly related to the complement (down-regulation of CFH). Interestingly, we found that the microRNA MIRLET7A2 was overexpressed in the PP adipose tissue of prostate cancer patients. Conclusions Obesity and excess adiposity modified the expression of PP adipose tissue genes to ultimately foster fat mass growth. In patients with prostate cancer the expression profile of PP adipose tissue accounted for hypercellularity and reduced immunosurveillance. Both findings may be liable to promote a favorable environment for

  9. A gene expression signature that distinguishes desmoid tumours from nodular fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Bacac, M; Migliavacca, E; Stehle, J-C; McKee, T; Delorenzi, M; Coindre, J-M; Guillou, L; Stamenkovic, I

    2006-03-01

    Nodular fasciitis (NF) is a rapidly growing cellular mass composed of fibroblasts/myofibroblasts, usually localized in subcutaneous tissues, that typically undergoes fibrosis and almost never recurs. Desmoid tumours (DTs) are rare forms of fibroblastic/myofibroblastic growth that arise in deep soft tissues, display a propensity for local infiltration and recurrence, but fail to metastasize. Given that both entities are primarily fibroblastic/myofibroblastic lesions with overlapping histological features, their gene expression profiles were compared to identify differentially expressed genes that may provide not only potential diagnostic markers, but also clues as to the pathogenesis of each disorder. Differentially expressed transcripts (89 clones displaying increased expression in DTs and 246 clones displaying increased expression in NF) included genes encoding several receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (EPHB3, PTPRF, GNAZ, SYK, LYN, EPHA4, BIRC3), transcription factors (TWIST1, PITX2, EYA2, OAS1, MITF, TCF20), and members of the Wnt signalling pathway (AXIN2, WISP1, SFRP). Remarkably, almost one-quarter of the differentially expressed genes encode proteins associated with inflammation and tissue remodelling, including members of the interferon (IFN), tumour necrosis factor (TNF), and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) signalling pathways as well as metalloproteinases (MMP1, 9, 13, 23), urokinase plasminogen activator (PLAU), and cathepsins. The observations provide the first comparative molecular characterization of desmoid tumours and nodular fasciitis and suggest that selected tyrosine kinases, transcription factors, and members of the Wnt, TGF-beta, IFN, and TNF signalling pathways may be implicated in influencing and distinguishing their fate. PMID:16440290

  10. 76 FR 75461 - Express Mail Domestic Postage Refund Policy and Waiver of Signature

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ... Service, Domestic Mail Manual (DMM ) throughout various sections to modify the policy for filing claims... published a Federal Register proposed rule (76 FR 62000-62002) inviting comments on revisions to the... Service is revising the DMM to align the refund policy for domestic Express Mail with the...

  11. Mucosal expression signatures of two Cathepsin L in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) following bacterial challenge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Renjie; Song, Lin; Su, Baofeng; Zhao, Honggang; Zhang, Dongdong; Peatman, Eric; Li, Chao

    2015-11-01

    The mucosal surfaces of fish are the first line of host defense against various pathogens. The mucosal immune responses are the most critical events to prevent pathogen attachment and invasion. Cathepsins are a group of peptidases that involved in different levels of immune responses, but the knowledge of the roles of Cathepsin in mucosal immune responses against bacterial infection are still lacking. Therefore, in the present study we characterized the Cathepsin L gene family in channel catfish, and profiled their expression levels after challenging with two different Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Here, two Cathepsin L genes were identified from channel catfish and were designated CTSL1a and CTSL.1. Comparing to other fish species, the catfish CTSL genes are highly conserved in their structural features. Phylogenetic analysis was conducted to confirm the identification of CTSL genes. Expression analysis revealed that the CTSL genes were ubiquitously expressed in all tested tissues. Following infection, the CTSL genes were significantly induced at most timepoints in mucosal tissues. But the expression patterns varied depending on both pathogen and tissue types, suggesting that CTSL genes may exert disparate functions or exhibit distinct tissue-selective roles in mucosal immune responses. Our findings here, clearly revealed the key roles of CTSL in catfish mucosal immunity; however, further studies are needed to expand functional characterization and examine whether CTSL may also play additional physiological roles in catfish mucosal tissues. PMID:26434716

  12. Gene expression signature in organized and growth arrested mammaryacini predicts good outcome in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, Marcia V.; Martin, Katherine J.; Kenny, Paraic A.; Xhaja, Kris; Bosch, Irene; Yaswen, Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-02-08

    To understand how non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) transit from a disorganized proliferating to an organized growth arrested state, and to relate this process to the changes that occur in breast cancer, we studied gene expression changes in non-malignant HMEC grown in three-dimensional cultures, and in a previously published panel of microarray data for 295 breast cancer samples. We hypothesized that the gene expression pattern of organized and growth arrested mammary acini would share similarities with breast tumors with good prognoses. Using Affymetrix HG-U133A microarrays, we analyzed the expression of 22,283 gene transcripts in two HMEC cell lines, 184 (finite life span) and HMT3522 S1 (immortal non-malignant), on successive days post-seeding in a laminin-rich extracellular matrix assay. Both HMECs underwent growth arrest in G0/G1 and differentiated into polarized acini between days 5 and 7. We identified gene expression changes with the same temporal pattern in both lines. We show that genes that are significantly lower in the organized, growth arrested HMEC than in their proliferating counterparts can be used to classify breast cancer patients into poor and good prognosis groups with high accuracy. This study represents a novel unsupervised approach to identifying breast cancer markers that may be of use clinically.

  13. Blood-Based Gene Expression Signatures of Infants and Toddlers with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glatt, Stephen J.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Winn, Mary; Chandler, Sharon D.; Collins, Melanie; Lopez, Linda; Weinfeld, Melanie; Carter, Cindy; Schork, Nicholas; Pierce, Karen; Courchesne, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorders that onset clinically during the first years of life. ASD risk biomarkers expressed early in life could significantly impact diagnosis and treatment, but no transcriptome-wide biomarker classifiers derived from fresh blood samples from children with…

  14. Different Gene Expression Signatures in Children and Adults with Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Pascual, V; Medrano, L M; López-Palacios, N; Bodas, A; Dema, B; Fernández-Arquero, M; González-Pérez, B; Salazar, I; Núñez, C

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is developed after gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals. It can appear at any time in life, but some differences are commonly observed between individuals with onset early in life or in adulthood. We aimed to investigate the molecular basis underlying those differences. We collected 19 duodenal biopsies of children and adults with CD and compared the expression of 38 selected genes between each other and with the observed in 13 non-CD controls matched by age. A Bayesian methodology was used to analyze the differences of gene expression between groups. We found seven genes with a similarly altered expression in children and adults with CD when compared to controls (C2orf74, CCR6, FASLG, JAK2, IL23A, TAGAP and UBE2L3). Differences were observed in 13 genes: six genes being altered only in adults (IL1RL1, CD28, STAT3, TMEM187, VAMP3 and ZFP36L1) and two only in children (TNFSF18 and ICOSLG); and four genes showing a significantly higher alteration in adults (CCR4, IL6, IL18RAP and PLEK) and one in children (C1orf106). This is the first extensive study comparing gene expression in children and adults with CD. Differences in the expression level of several genes were found between groups, being notorious the higher alteration observed in adults. Further research is needed to evaluate the possible genetic influence underlying these changes and the specific functional consequences of the reported differences. PMID:26859134

  15. Gene expression profiles of small-cell lung cancers: molecular signatures of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Taniwaki, Masaya; Daigo, Yataro; Ishikawa, Nobuhisa; Takano, Atsushi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Yasui, Wataru; Inai, Kouki; Kohno, Nobuoki; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2006-09-01

    To characterize the molecular mechanisms involved in the carcinogenesis and progression of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and identify molecules to be applied as novel diagnostic markers and/or for development of molecular-targeted drugs, we applied cDNA microarray profile analysis coupled with purification of cancer cells by laser-microbeam microdissection (LMM). Expression profiles of 32,256 genes in 15 SCLCs identified 252 genes that were commonly up-regulated and 851 transcripts that were down-regulated in SCLC cells compared with non-cancerous lung tissue cells. An unsupervised clustering algorithm applied to the expression data easily distinguished SCLC from the other major histological type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and identified 475 genes that may represent distinct molecular features of each of the two histological types. In particular, SCLC was characterized by altered expression of genes related to neuroendocrine cell differentiation and/or growth such as ASCL1, NRCAM, and INSM1. We also identified 68 genes that were abundantly expressed both in advanced SCLCs and advanced adenocarcinomas (ADCs), both of which had been obtained from patients with extensive chemotherapy treatment. Some of them are known to be transcription factors and/or gene expression regulators such as TAF5L, TFCP2L4, PHF20, LMO4, TCF20, RFX2, and DKFZp547I048 as well as those encoding nucleotide-binding proteins such as C9orf76, EHD3, and GIMAP4. Our data provide valuable information for better understanding of lung carcinogenesis and chemoresistance. PMID:16865272

  16. Different Gene Expression Signatures in Children and Adults with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    López-Palacios, N.; Bodas, A.; Dema, B.; Fernández-Arquero, M.; González-Pérez, B.; Salazar, I.; Núñez, C.

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is developed after gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals. It can appear at any time in life, but some differences are commonly observed between individuals with onset early in life or in adulthood. We aimed to investigate the molecular basis underlying those differences. We collected 19 duodenal biopsies of children and adults with CD and compared the expression of 38 selected genes between each other and with the observed in 13 non-CD controls matched by age. A Bayesian methodology was used to analyze the differences of gene expression between groups. We found seven genes with a similarly altered expression in children and adults with CD when compared to controls (C2orf74, CCR6, FASLG, JAK2, IL23A, TAGAP and UBE2L3). Differences were observed in 13 genes: six genes being altered only in adults (IL1RL1, CD28, STAT3, TMEM187, VAMP3 and ZFP36L1) and two only in children (TNFSF18 and ICOSLG); and four genes showing a significantly higher alteration in adults (CCR4, IL6, IL18RAP and PLEK) and one in children (C1orf106). This is the first extensive study comparing gene expression in children and adults with CD. Differences in the expression level of several genes were found between groups, being notorious the higher alteration observed in adults. Further research is needed to evaluate the possible genetic influence underlying these changes and the specific functional consequences of the reported differences. PMID:26859134

  17. microRNA expression signatures of gastrointestinal stromal tumours: associations with imatinib resistance and patient outcome

    PubMed Central

    Akçakaya, P; Caramuta, S; Åhlen, J; Ghaderi, M; Berglund, E; Östman, A; Bränström, R; Larsson, C; Lui, W-O

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is mainly initialised by receptor tyrosine kinase gene mutations. Although the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate considerably improved the outcome of patients, imatinib resistance still remains a major therapeutic challenge in GIST therapy. Herein we evaluated the clinical impact of microRNAs in imatinib-treated GISTs. Methods: The expression levels of microRNAs were quantified using microarray and RT–qPCR in GIST specimens from patients treated with neoadjuvant imatinib. The functional roles of miR-125a-5p and PTPN18 were evaluated in GIST cells. PTPN18 expression was quantified by western blotting in GIST samples. Results: We showed that overexpression levels of miR-125a-5p and miR-107 were associated with imatinib resistance in GIST specimens. Functionally, miR-125a-5p expression modulated imatinib sensitivity in GIST882 cells with a homozygous KIT mutation but not in GIST48 cells with double KIT mutations. Overexpression of miR-125a-5p suppressed PTPN18 expression, and silencing of PTPN18 expression increased cell viability in GIST882 cells upon imatinib treatment. PTPN18 protein levels were significantly lower in the imatinib-resistant GISTs and inversely correlated with miR-125a-5p. Furthermore, several microRNAs were significantly associated with metastasis, KIT mutational status and survival. Conclusions: Our findings highlight a novel functional role of miR-125a-5p on imatinib response through PTPN18 regulation in GIST. PMID:25349971

  18. Gene expression signature of cerebellar hypoplasia in a mouse model of Down syndrome during postnatal development

    PubMed Central

    Laffaire, Julien; Rivals, Isabelle; Dauphinot, Luce; Pasteau, Fabien; Wehrle, Rosine; Larrat, Benoit; Vitalis, Tania; Moldrich, Randal X; Rossier, Jean; Sinkus, Ralph; Herault, Yann; Dusart, Isabelle; Potier, Marie-Claude

    2009-01-01

    Background Down syndrome is a chromosomal disorder caused by the presence of three copies of chromosome 21. The mechanisms by which this aneuploidy produces the complex and variable phenotype observed in people with Down syndrome are still under discussion. Recent studies have demonstrated an increased transcript level of the three-copy genes with some dosage compensation or amplification for a subset of them. The impact of this gene dosage effect on the whole transcriptome is still debated and longitudinal studies assessing the variability among samples, tissues and developmental stages are needed. Results We thus designed a large scale gene expression study in mice (the Ts1Cje Down syndrome mouse model) in which we could measure the effects of trisomy 21 on a large number of samples (74 in total) in a tissue that is affected in Down syndrome (the cerebellum) and where we could quantify the defect during postnatal development in order to correlate gene expression changes to the phenotype observed. Statistical analysis of microarray data revealed a major gene dosage effect: for the three-copy genes as well as for a 2 Mb segment from mouse chromosome 12 that we show for the first time as being deleted in the Ts1Cje mice. This gene dosage effect impacts moderately on the expression of euploid genes (2.4 to 7.5% differentially expressed). Only 13 genes were significantly dysregulated in Ts1Cje mice at all four postnatal development stages studied from birth to 10 days after birth, and among them are 6 three-copy genes. The decrease in granule cell proliferation demonstrated in newborn Ts1Cje cerebellum was correlated with a major gene dosage effect on the transcriptome in dissected cerebellar external granule cell layer. Conclusion High throughput gene expression analysis in the cerebellum of a large number of samples of Ts1Cje and euploid mice has revealed a prevailing gene dosage effect on triplicated genes. Moreover using an enriched cell population that is thought

  19. Protein Sialylation Regulates a Gene Expression Signature that Promotes Breast Cancer Cell Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many mechanisms have been proposed for how heightened aerobic glycolytic metabolism fuels cancer pathogenicity, but there are still many unexplored pathways. Here, we have performed metabolomic profiling to map glucose incorporation into metabolic pathways upon transformation of mammary epithelial cells by 11 commonly mutated human oncogenes. We show that transformation of mammary epithelial cells by oncogenic stimuli commonly shunts glucose-derived carbons into synthesis of sialic acid, a hexosamine pathway metabolite that is converted to CMP-sialic acid by cytidine monophosphate N-acetylneuraminic acid synthase (CMAS) as a precursor to glycoprotein and glycolipid sialylation. We show that CMAS knockdown leads to elevations in intracellular sialic acid levels, a depletion of cellular sialylation, and alterations in the expression of many cancer-relevant genes to impair breast cancer pathogenicity. Our study reveals the heretofore unrecognized role of sialic acid metabolism and protein sialylation in regulating the expression of genes that maintain breast cancer pathogenicity. PMID:27380425

  20. Protein Sialylation Regulates a Gene Expression Signature that Promotes Breast Cancer Cell Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Kohnz, Rebecca A; Roberts, Lindsay S; DeTomaso, David; Bideyan, Lara; Yan, Peter; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Goga, Andrei; Yosef, Nir; Nomura, Daniel K

    2016-08-19

    Many mechanisms have been proposed for how heightened aerobic glycolytic metabolism fuels cancer pathogenicity, but there are still many unexplored pathways. Here, we have performed metabolomic profiling to map glucose incorporation into metabolic pathways upon transformation of mammary epithelial cells by 11 commonly mutated human oncogenes. We show that transformation of mammary epithelial cells by oncogenic stimuli commonly shunts glucose-derived carbons into synthesis of sialic acid, a hexosamine pathway metabolite that is converted to CMP-sialic acid by cytidine monophosphate N-acetylneuraminic acid synthase (CMAS) as a precursor to glycoprotein and glycolipid sialylation. We show that CMAS knockdown leads to elevations in intracellular sialic acid levels, a depletion of cellular sialylation, and alterations in the expression of many cancer-relevant genes to impair breast cancer pathogenicity. Our study reveals the heretofore unrecognized role of sialic acid metabolism and protein sialylation in regulating the expression of genes that maintain breast cancer pathogenicity. PMID:27380425

  1. Proteomic Analysis of MG132-Treated Germinating Pollen Reveals Expression Signatures Associated with Proteasome Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Candida; Bracale, Marcella; Crinelli, Rita; Marconi, Valerio; Campomenosi, Paola; Marsoni, Milena; Scoccianti, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Chemical inhibition of the proteasome has been previously found to effectively impair pollen germination and tube growth in vitro. However, the mediators of these effects at the molecular level are unknown. By performing 2DE proteomic analysis, 24 differentially expressed protein spots, representing 14 unique candidate proteins, were identified in the pollen of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) germinated in the presence of the MG132 proteasome inhibitor. qPCR analysis revealed that 11 of these proteins are not up-regulated at the mRNA level, but are most likely stabilized by proteasome inhibition. These differentially expressed proteins are predicted to function in various pathways including energy and lipid metabolism, cell wall synthesis, protein synthesis/degradation and stress responses. In line with this evidence, the MG132-induced changes in the proteome were accompanied by an increase in ATP and ROS content and by an alteration in fatty acid composition. PMID:25265451

  2. Heme-related gene expression signatures of meat intakes in lung cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tram Kim; Rotunno, Melissa; Ryan, Brid M; Pesatori, Angela C; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Spitz, Margaret; Caporaso, Neil E; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Lung cancer causes more deaths worldwide than any other cancer. In addition to cigarette smoking, dietary factors may contribute to lung carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic studies, including the environment and genetics in lung cancer etiology (EAGLE), have reported increased consumption of red/processed meats to be associated with higher risk of lung cancer. Heme-iron toxicity may link meat intake with cancer. We investigated this hypothesis in meat-related lung carcinogenesis using whole genome expression. We measured genome-wide expression (HG-U133A) in 49 tumor and 42 non-involved fresh frozen lung tissues of 64 adenocarcinoma EAGLE patients. We studied gene expression profiles by high-versus-low meat consumption, with and without adjustment by sex, age, and smoking. Threshold for significance was a false discovery rate (FDR) ≤ 0.15. We studied whether the identified genes played a role in heme-iron related processes by means of manually curated literature search and gene ontology-based pathway analysis. We found that gene expression of 232 annotated genes in tumor tissue significantly distinguished lung adenocarcinoma cases who consumed above/below the median intake of fresh red meats (FDR = 0.12). Sixty-three (∼ 28%) of the 232 identified genes (12 expected by chance, P-value < 0.001) were involved in heme binding, absorption, transport, and Wnt signaling pathway (e.g., CYPs, TPO, HPX, HFE, SLCs, and WNTs). We also identified several genes involved in lipid metabolism (e.g., NCR1, TNF, and UCP3) and oxidative stress (e.g., TPO, SGK2, and MTHFR) that may be indirectly related to heme-toxicity. The study's results provide preliminary evidence that heme-iron toxicity might be one underlying mechanism linking fresh red meat intake and lung cancer. PMID:23681825

  3. Heme-related gene expression signatures of meat intakes in lung cancer tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tram Kim; Rotunno, Melissa; Ryan, Brid M.; Pesatori, Angela C.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Spitz, Margaret; Caporaso, Neil E.; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer causes more deaths worldwide than any other cancer. In addition to cigarette smoking, dietary factors may contribute to lung carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic studies, including the Environment and Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE), have reported increased consumption of red/processed meats to be associated with higher risk of lung cancer. Heme-iron toxicity may link meat intake with cancer. We investigated this hypothesis in meat-related lung carcinogenesis using whole genome expression. We measured genome-wide expression (HG-U133A) in 49 tumor and 42 non-involved fresh frozen lung tissues of 64 adenocarcinoma EAGLE patients. We studied gene expression profiles by high-versus-low meat consumption, with and without adjustment by sex, age, and smoking. Threshold for significance was a False Discovery Rate (FDR) ≤0.15. We studied whether the identified genes played a role in heme-iron related processes by means of manually curated literature search and gene ontology-based pathway analysis. We found that gene expression of 232 annotated genes in tumor tissue significantly distinguished lung adenocarcinoma cases who consumed above/below the median intake of fresh red meats (FDR=0.12). Sixty-three (~28%) of the 232 identified genes (12 expected by chance, p-value<0.001) were involved in heme binding, absorption, transport, and Wnt signaling pathway (e.g., CYPs, TPO, HPX, HFE, SLCs, WNTs). We also identified several genes involved in lipid metabolism (e.g., NCR1, TNF, UCP3) and oxidative stress (e.g., TPO, SGK2, MTHFR) that may be indirectly related to heme-toxicity. The study’s results provide preliminary evidence that heme-iron toxicity might be one underlying mechanism linking fresh red meat intake and lung cancer. PMID:23681825

  4. Molecular subtypes of serous borderline ovarian tumor show distinct expression patterns of benign tumor and malignant tumor-associated signatures.

    PubMed

    Curry, Edward W J; Stronach, Euan A; Rama, Nona R; Wang, Yuepeng Y P; Gabra, Hani; El-Bahrawy, Mona A

    2014-03-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors show heterogeneity in clinical behavior. Most have excellent prognosis, although a small percentage show recurrence or progressive disease, usually to low-grade serous carcinoma. The aim of this study was to understand the molecular relationship between these entities and identify potential markers of tumor progression and therapeutic targets. We studied gene expression using Affymetrix HGU133plus2 GeneChip microarrays in 3 low-grade serous carcinomas, 13 serous borderline tumors and 8 serous cystadenomas. An independent data set of 18 serous borderline tumors and 3 low-grade serous carcinomas was used for validation. Unsupervised clustering revealed clear separation of benign and malignant tumors, whereas borderline tumors showed two distinct groups, one clustering with benign and the other with malignant tumors. The segregation into benign- and malignant-like borderline molecular subtypes was reproducible on applying the same analysis to an independent publicly available data set. We identified 50 genes that separate borderline tumors into their subgroups. Functional enrichment analysis of genes that separate borderline tumors to the two subgroups highlights a cell adhesion signature for the malignant-like subset, with Claudins particularly prominent. This is the first report of molecular subtypes of borderline tumors based on gene expression profiling. Our results provide the basis for identification of biomarkers for the malignant potential of borderline ovarian tumor and potential therapeutic targets for low-grade serous carcinoma. PMID:23948749

  5. The Connectivity Map: using gene-expression signatures to connect small molecules, genes, and disease.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Justin; Crawford, Emily D; Peck, David; Modell, Joshua W; Blat, Irene C; Wrobel, Matthew J; Lerner, Jim; Brunet, Jean-Philippe; Subramanian, Aravind; Ross, Kenneth N; Reich, Michael; Hieronymus, Haley; Wei, Guo; Armstrong, Scott A; Haggarty, Stephen J; Clemons, Paul A; Wei, Ru; Carr, Steven A; Lander, Eric S; Golub, Todd R

    2006-09-29

    To pursue a systematic approach to the discovery of functional connections among diseases, genetic perturbation, and drug action, we have created the first installment of a reference collection of gene-expression profiles from cultured human cells treated with bioactive small molecules, together with pattern-matching software to mine these data. We demonstrate that this "Connectivity Map" resource can be used to find connections among small molecules sharing a mechanism of action, chemicals and physiological processes, and diseases and drugs. These results indicate the feasibility of the approach and suggest the value of a large-scale community Connectivity Map project. PMID:17008526

  6. Towards a tolerance toolkit: Gene expression signatures enabling the emergence of resistant bacterial strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Keesha; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    Microbial pathogens are able to rapidly acquire tolerance to chemical toxins. Developing next-generation antibiotics that impede the emergence of resistance will help avoid a world-wide health crisis. Conversely, the ability to induce rapid tolerance gains could lead to high-yielding strains for sustainable production of biofuels and commodity chemicals. Achieving these goals requires an understanding of the general mechanisms allowing microbes to become resistant to diverse toxins. We apply top-down and bottom-up methodologies to identify biological network changes leading to adaptation and tolerance. Using a top-down approach, we perform evolution experiments to isolate resistant strains, collect samples for transcriptomic and proteomic analysis, and use the omics data to inform mathematical gene regulatory models. Using a bottom-up approach, we build and test synthetic genetic devices that enable increased or decreased expression of selected genes. Unique patterns in gene expression are identified in cultures actively gaining resistance, especially in pathways known to be involved with stress response, efflux, and mutagenesis. Genes correlated with tolerance could potentially allow the design of resistance-free antibiotics or robust chemical production strains.

  7. A Core MYC Gene Expression Signature Is Prominent in Basal-Like Breast Cancer but Only Partially Overlaps the Core Serum Response

    PubMed Central

    Chandriani, Sanjay; Frengen, Eirik; Cowling, Victoria H.; Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Perou, Charles M.; Whitfield, Michael L.; Cole, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Background The MYC oncogene contributes to induction and growth of many cancers but the full spectrum of the MYC transcriptional response remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Using microarrays, we conducted a detailed kinetic study of genes that respond to MYCN or MYCNΔMBII induction in primary human fibroblasts. In parallel, we determined the response to steady state overexpression of MYCN and MYCNΔMBII in the same cell type. An overlapping set of 398 genes from the two protocols was designated a ‘Core MYC Signature’ and used for further analysis. Comparison of the Core MYC Signature to a published study of the genes induced by serum stimulation revealed that only 7.4% of the Core MYC Signature genes are in the Core Serum Response and display similar expression changes to both MYC and serum. Furthermore, more than 50% of the Core MYC Signature genes were not influenced by serum stimulation. In contrast, comparison to a panel of breast cancers revealed a strong concordance in gene expression between the Core MYC Signature and the basal-like breast tumor subtype, which is a subtype with poor prognosis. This concordance was supported by the higher average level of MYC expression in the same tumor samples. Conclusions/Significance The Core MYC Signature has clinical relevance as this profile can be used to deduce an underlying genetic program that is likely to contribute to a clinical phenotype. Therefore, the presence of the Core MYC Signature may predict clinical responsiveness to therapeutics that are designed to disrupt MYC-mediated phenotypes. PMID:19690609

  8. Identification of a 251 Gene Expression Signature That Can Accurately Detect M. tuberculosis in Patients with and without HIV Co-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dawany, Noor; Showe, Louise C.; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Chang, Celia; Ive, Prudence; Conradie, Francesca; Stevens, Wendy; Sanne, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Background Co-infection with tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death in HIV-infected individuals. However, diagnosis of TB, especially in the presence of an HIV co-infection, can be limiting due to the high inaccuracy associated with the use of conventional diagnostic methods. Here we report a gene signature that can identify a tuberculosis infection in patients co-infected with HIV as well as in the absence of HIV. Methods We analyzed global gene expression data from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples of patients that were either mono-infected with HIV or co-infected with HIV/TB and used support vector machines to identify a gene signature that can distinguish between the two classes. We then validated our results using publically available gene expression data from patients mono-infected with TB. Results Our analysis successfully identified a 251-gene signature that accurately distinguishes patients co-infected with HIV/TB from those infected with HIV only, with an overall accuracy of 81.4% (sensitivity = 76.2%, specificity = 86.4%). Furthermore, we show that our 251-gene signature can also accurately distinguish patients with active TB in the absence of an HIV infection from both patients with a latent TB infection and healthy controls (88.9–94.7% accuracy; 69.2–90% sensitivity and 90.3–100% specificity). We also demonstrate that the expression levels of the 251-gene signature diminish as a correlate of the length of TB treatment. Conclusions A 251-gene signature is described to (a) detect TB in the presence or absence of an HIV co-infection, and (b) assess response to treatment following anti-TB therapy. PMID:24587128

  9. Transcriptomic Signature of the SHATTERPROOF2 Expression Domain Reveals the Meristematic Nature of Arabidopsis Gynoecial Medial Domain.

    PubMed

    Villarino, Gonzalo H; Hu, Qiwen; Manrique, Silvia; Flores-Vergara, Miguel; Sehra, Bhupinder; Robles, Linda; Brumos, Javier; Stepanova, Anna N; Colombo, Lucia; Sundberg, Eva; Heber, Steffen; Franks, Robert G

    2016-05-01

    Plant meristems, like animal stem cell niches, maintain a pool of multipotent, undifferentiated cells that divide and differentiate to give rise to organs. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the carpel margin meristem is a vital meristematic structure that generates ovules from the medial domain of the gynoecium, the female floral reproductive structure. The molecular mechanisms that specify this meristematic region and regulate its organogenic potential are poorly understood. Here, we present a novel approach to analyze the transcriptional signature of the medial domain of the Arabidopsis gynoecium, highlighting the developmental stages that immediately proceed ovule initiation, the earliest stages of seed development. Using a floral synchronization system and a SHATTERPROOF2 (SHP2) domain-specific reporter, paired with FACS and RNA sequencing, we assayed the transcriptome of the gynoecial medial domain with temporal and spatial precision. This analysis reveals a set of genes that are differentially expressed within the SHP2 expression domain, including genes that have been shown previously to function during the development of medial domain-derived structures, including the ovules, thus validating our approach. Global analyses of the transcriptomic data set indicate a similarity of the pSHP2-expressing cell population to previously characterized meristematic domains, further supporting the meristematic nature of this gynoecial tissue. Our method identifies additional genes including novel isoforms, cis-natural antisense transcripts, and a previously unrecognized member of the REPRODUCTIVE MERISTEM family of transcriptional regulators that are potential novel regulators of medial domain development. This data set provides genome-wide transcriptional insight into the development of the carpel margin meristem in Arabidopsis. PMID:26983993

  10. Transcriptomic Signature of the SHATTERPROOF2 Expression Domain Reveals the Meristematic Nature of Arabidopsis Gynoecial Medial Domain1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Villarino, Gonzalo H.; Hu, Qiwen; Flores-Vergara, Miguel; Sehra, Bhupinder; Brumos, Javier; Stepanova, Anna N.; Sundberg, Eva; Heber, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Plant meristems, like animal stem cell niches, maintain a pool of multipotent, undifferentiated cells that divide and differentiate to give rise to organs. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the carpel margin meristem is a vital meristematic structure that generates ovules from the medial domain of the gynoecium, the female floral reproductive structure. The molecular mechanisms that specify this meristematic region and regulate its organogenic potential are poorly understood. Here, we present a novel approach to analyze the transcriptional signature of the medial domain of the Arabidopsis gynoecium, highlighting the developmental stages that immediately proceed ovule initiation, the earliest stages of seed development. Using a floral synchronization system and a SHATTERPROOF2 (SHP2) domain-specific reporter, paired with FACS and RNA sequencing, we assayed the transcriptome of the gynoecial medial domain with temporal and spatial precision. This analysis reveals a set of genes that are differentially expressed within the SHP2 expression domain, including genes that have been shown previously to function during the development of medial domain-derived structures, including the ovules, thus validating our approach. Global analyses of the transcriptomic data set indicate a similarity of the pSHP2-expressing cell population to previously characterized meristematic domains, further supporting the meristematic nature of this gynoecial tissue. Our method identifies additional genes including novel isoforms, cis-natural antisense transcripts, and a previously unrecognized member of the REPRODUCTIVE MERISTEM family of transcriptional regulators that are potential novel regulators of medial domain development. This data set provides genome-wide transcriptional insight into the development of the carpel margin meristem in Arabidopsis. PMID:26983993

  11. Molecular signature of disease onset in granulin mutation carriers: a gene expression analysis study.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Elena; Bonvicini, Cristian; Alberici, Antonella; Pilotto, Andrea; Cattane, Nadia; Premi, Enrico; Gazzina, Stefano; Archetti, Silvana; Gasparotti, Roberto; Cancelli, Vanessa; Gennarelli, Massimo; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara

    2013-07-01

    Mutations within Granulin (GRN) gene are causative of autosomal dominant frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Though GRN mutations are inherited at birth, the disease onset usually occurs in the sixth decade of life. The objective of this study was to identify new genetic pathways linked to inherited GRN disease and involved in the shift from asymptomatic to symptomatic stages. Microarray gene expression analysis on leukocytes was carried out on 15 patients carrying GRN T272SfsX10 mutation, and their asymptomatic siblings with (n = 14) or without (n = 11) GRN mutation. The results were then validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and compared with those obtained in a cohort of FTLD without GRN mutation (n = 16). The association between candidate genes and damage of specific brain areas was investigated by voxel-based morphometry on magnetic resonance imaging scans (family-wise error-corrected). Leukocytes mRNA levels of TMEM40 and LY6G6F and other genes mainly involved in inflammation were significantly higher in patients carrying GRN mutations compared with asymptomatic carriers and other FTLD. The higher the levels of TMEM40 the greater is the damage of parietal lobule; the higher the LY6G6F gene expression the greater is the atrophy in superior frontal gyrus. Enhanced inflammation associated with the onset of GRN disease might be either related to disease pathogenetic mechanism leading to neurodegeneration or to a compensatory pathway that counteracts disease progression. The identification of specific molecular targets of GRN-FTLD disease is essential when considering future disease-modifying therapies. PMID:23419701

  12. Identification of Novel Cholesteatoma-Related Gene Expression Signatures Using Full-Genome Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Klenke, Christin; Janowski, Sebastian; Borck, Daniela; Widera, Darius; Ebmeyer, Jörg; Kalinowski, Jörn; Leichtle, Anke; Hofestädt, Ralf; Upile, Tahwinder; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Sudhoff, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Background Cholesteatoma is a gradually expanding destructive epithelial lesion within the middle ear. It can cause extensive local tissue destruction in the temporal bone and can initially lead to the development of conductive hearing loss via ossicular erosion. As the disease progresses, sensorineural hearing loss, vertigo or facial palsy may occur. Cholesteatoma may promote the spread of infection through the tegmen of the middle ear and cause meningitis or intracranial infections with abscess formation. It must, therefore, be considered as a potentially life-threatening middle ear disease. Methods and Findings In this study, we investigated differentially expressed genes in human cholesteatomas in comparison to regular auditory canal skin using Whole Human Genome Microarrays containing 19,596 human genes. In addition to already described up-regulated mRNAs in cholesteatoma, such as MMP9, DEFB2 and KRT19, we identified 3558 new cholesteatoma-related transcripts. 811 genes appear to be significantly differentially up-regulated in cholesteatoma. 334 genes were down-regulated more than 2-fold. Significantly regulated genes with protein metabolism activity include matrix metalloproteinases as well as PI3, SERPINB3 and SERPINB4. Genes like SPP1, KRT6B, PRPH, SPRR1B and LAMC2 are known as genes with cell growth and/or maintenance activity. Transport activity genes and signal transduction genes are LCN2, GJB2 and CEACAM6. Three cell communication genes were identified; one CDH19 and two from the S100 family. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the expression profile of cholesteatoma is similar to a metastatic tumour and chronically inflamed tissue. Based on the investigated profiles we present novel protein-protein interaction and signal transduction networks, which include cholesteatoma-regulated transcripts and may be of great value for drug targeting and therapy development. PMID:23285167

  13. Signature gene expression profiles discriminate between isoniazid-, thiolactomycin-, and triclosan-treated Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Betts, Joanna C; McLaren, Alistair; Lennon, Mark G; Kelly, Fiona M; Lukey, Pauline T; Blakemore, Steve J; Duncan, Ken

    2003-09-01

    Genomic technologies have the potential to greatly increase the efficiency of the drug development process. As part of our tuberculosis drug discovery program, we used DNA microarray technology to profile drug-induced effects in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Expression profiles of M. tuberculosis treated with compounds that inhibit key metabolic pathways are required as references for the assessment of novel antimycobacterial agents. We have studied the response of M. tuberculosis to treatment with the mycolic acid biosynthesis inhibitors isoniazid, thiolactomycin, and triclosan. Thiolactomycin targets the beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthases KasA and KasB, while triclosan inhibits the enoyl-ACP reductase InhA. However, controversy surrounds the precise mode of action of isoniazid, with both InhA and KasA having been proposed as the primary target. We have shown that although the global response profiles of isoniazid and thiolactomycin are more closely related to each other than to that of triclosan, there are differences that distinguish the mode of action of these two drugs. In addition, we have identified two groups of genes, possibly forming efflux and detoxification systems, through which M. tuberculosis may limit the effects of triclosan. We have developed a mathematical model, based on the expression of 21 genes, which is able to perfectly discriminate between isoniazid-, thiolactomycin-, or triclosan-treated M. tuberculosis. This model is likely to prove invaluable as a tool to improve the efficiency of our drug development programs by providing a means to rapidly confirm the mode of action of thiolactomycin analogues or novel InhA inhibitors as well as helping to translate enzyme activity into whole-cell activity. PMID:12936993

  14. Comprehensive analysis of miRNA expression in T-cell subsets of rheumatoid arthritis patients reveals defined signatures of naive and memory Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Smigielska-Czepiel, K; van den Berg, A; Jellema, P; van der Lei, R J; Bijzet, J; Kluiver, J; Boots, A M H; Brouwer, E; Kroesen, B-J

    2014-01-01

    Disturbed expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulatory T cells (Tregs) leads to development of autoimmunity in experimental mouse models. However, the miRNA expression signature characterizing Tregs of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not been determined yet. In this study, we have used a microarray approach to comprehensively analyze miRNA expression signatures of both naive Tregs (CD4+CD45RO-CD25++) and memory Tregs (CD4+CD45RO+CD25+++), as well as conventional naive (CD4+CD45RO−CD25−) and memory (CD4+CD45RO+CD25−) T cells (Tconvs) derived from peripheral blood of RA patients and matched healthy controls. Differential expression of selected miRNAs was validated by TaqMan-based quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. We found a positive correlation between increased expression of miR-451 in T cells of RA patients and disease activity score (DAS28), erythrocyte sedimentation rate levels and serum levels of interleukin-6. Moreover, we found characteristic, disease- and treatment-independent, global miRNA expression signatures defining naive Tregs, memory Tregs, naive Tconvs and memory Tconvs. The analysis allowed us to define miRNAs characteristic for a general naive phenotype (for example, miR-92a) and a general memory phenotype (for example, miR-21, miR-155). Importantly, the analysis allowed us to define miRNAs that are specifically expressed in both naive and memory Tregs, defining as such miRNA signature characterizing the Treg phenotype (that is, miR-146a, miR-3162, miR-1202, miR-1246 and miR-4281). PMID:24401767

  15. Expression signature distinguishing two tumour transcriptome classes associated with progression-free survival among rare histological types of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Winterhoff, Boris J; Kalli, Kimberly R; Block, Matthew S; Armasu, Sebastian M; Larson, Melissa C; Chen, Hsiao-Wang; Keeney, Gary L; Hartmann, Lynn C; Shridhar, Viji; Konecny, Gottfried E; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L

    2016-01-01

    Background: The mechanisms of recurrence have been under-studied in rare histologies of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) (endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous, and low-grade serous). We hypothesised the existence of an expression signature predictive of outcome in the rarer histologies. Methods: In split discovery and validation analysis of 131 Mayo Clinic EOC cases, we used clustering to determine clinically relevant transcriptome classes using microarray gene expression measurements. The signature was validated in 967 EOC tumours (91 rare histological subtypes) with recurrence information. Results: We found two validated transcriptome classes associated with progression-free survival (PFS) in the Mayo Clinic EOC cases (P=8.24 × 10−3). This signature was further validated in the public expression data sets involving the rare EOC histologies, where these two classes were also predictive of PFS (P=1.43 × 10−3). In contrast, the signatures were not predictive of PFS in the high-grade serous EOC cases. Moreover, genes upregulated in Class-1 (with better outcome) were showed enrichment in steroid hormone biosynthesis (false discovery rate, FDR=0.005%) and WNT signalling pathway (FDR=1.46%); genes upregulated in Class-2 were enriched in cell cycle (FDR=0.86%) and toll-like receptor pathways (FDR=2.37%). Conclusions: These findings provide important biological insights into the rarer EOC histologies that may aid in the development of targeted treatment options for the rarer histologies. PMID:27253175

  16. Expression signature of lncRNAs and their potential roles in cardiac fibrosis of post-infarct mice.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xuefeng; Song, Xiaotong; Yuan, Wei; Shu, You; Wang, Yuying; Zhao, Xuyun; Gao, Ming; Lu, Renzhong; Luo, Shenjian; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Yue; Sun, Lihua; Lu, Yanjie

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in cardiac fibrogenesis induced by myocardial infarction (MI). The differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNAs in peri-infarct region of mice 4 weeks after MI were selected for bioinformatic analysis including gene ontology (GO) enrichment, pathway and network analysis. Left ventricular tissue levels of lncRNAs and mRNAs were compared between MI and sham control mice, using a false discovery rate (FDR) of <5%. Out of 55000 lncRNAs detected, 263 were significantly up-regulated and 282 down-regulated. Out of 23000 mRNAs detected, 142 were significantly up-regulated and 67 down-regulated. Among the differentially expressed lncRNAs, 53 were up-regulated by ≥2.0-fold change and 37 down-regulated by ≤0.5-fold change. Nine up-regulated and five down-regulated lncRNAs were randomly selected for quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) verification. GO and pathway analyses revealed 173 correlated lncRNA-mRNA pairs for 57 differentially expressed lncRNAs and 20 differentially expressed genes which are related to the development of cardiac fibrosis. We identified TGF-β3 as the top-ranked gene, a critical component of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathways in cardiac fibrosis. NONMMUT022554 was identified as the top-ranked lncRNA, positively correlated with six up-regulated genes, which are involved in the extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interactions and the phosphoinositid-3 kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K-Akt) signalling pathway. Our study has identified the expression signature of lncRNAs in cardiac fibrosis induced by MI and unravelled the possible involvement of the deregulated lncRNAs in cardiac fibrosis and the associated pathological processes. PMID:27129287

  17. Gene expression signature for angiogenic and nonangiogenic non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiangting; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Ferguson, Mary; Cesario, Alfredo; Margaritora, Stefano; Granone, Pierluigi; Goldstraw, Peter; Tetlow, Michelle; Ratcliffe, Cathy; Nicholson, Andrew G; Harris, Adrian; Gatter, Kevin; Pezzella, Francesco

    2005-02-10

    Angiogenesis is regarded as essential for tumour growth. However, we have demonstrated that some other aggressive non-small-cell lung carcinomas (n-SCLC) do not have angiogenesis. In this study, using cDNA microarray analysis, we demonstrate that angiogenic and nonangiogenic tumour types can be distinguished by their gene expression profiles. Tissue samples from 42 n-SCLC patients were obtained with consent. In all, 12 tumours were nonangiogenic and 30 angiogenic. The two groups were matched by age, sex, smoking and tumour stage. Total RNAs were extracted followed by microarray hybridization and image scan procedure. Data were analysed using GeneSpring 5.1 software. A total of 62 genes were found to be able to separate angiogenic from nonangiogenic tumours. Nonangiogenic tumours have higher levels of genes concerned with mitochondrial metabolism, mRNA transcription, protein synthesis and the cell cycle. Angiogenic tumours have higher levels of genes coding for membrane vesicles, integrins, remodelling, angiogenesis and apoptosis. These results further support our first finding that nonangiogenic lung tumours are fast-growing tumours filling the alveoli in the absence of vascular remodelling. We raise the hypothesis that in nonangiogenic tumours, hypoxia leads to a higher activation of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which allows tumour growth without triggering angiogenesis. PMID:15592519

  18. Dynamic classification using case-specific training cohorts outperforms static gene expression signatures in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Győrffy, Balázs; Karn, Thomas; Sztupinszki, Zsófia; Weltz, Boglárka; Müller, Volkmar; Pusztai, Lajos

    2015-01-01

    The molecular diversity of breast cancer makes it impossible to identify prognostic markers that are applicable to all breast cancers. To overcome limitations of previous multigene prognostic classifiers, we propose a new dynamic predictor: instead of using a single universal training cohort and an identical list of informative genes to predict the prognosis of new cases, a case-specific predictor is developed for each test case. Gene expression data from 3,534 breast cancers with clinical annotation including relapse-free survival is analyzed. For each test case, we select a case-specific training subset including only molecularly similar cases and a case-specific predictor is generated. This method yields different training sets and different predictors for each new patient. The model performance was assessed in leave-one-out validation and also in 325 independent cases. Prognostic discrimination was high for all cases (n = 3,534, HR = 3.68, p = 1.67 E−56). The dynamic predictor showed higher overall accuracy (0.68) than genomic surrogates for Oncotype DX (0.64), Genomic Grade Index (0.61) or MammaPrint (0.47). The dynamic predictor was also effective in triple-negative cancers (n = 427, HR = 3.08, p = 0.0093) where the above classifiers all failed. Validation in independent patients yielded similar classification power (HR = 3.57). The dynamic classifier is available online at http://www.recurrenceonline.com/?q=Re_training. In summary, we developed a new method to make personalized prognostic prediction using case-specific training cohorts. The dynamic predictors outperform static models developed from single historical training cohorts and they also predict well in triple-negative cancers. PMID:25274406

  19. High Expression of Three-Gene Signature Improves Prediction of Relapse-Free Survival in Estrogen Receptor-Positive and Node-Positive Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Arvind; Raj, Hemanth; Ravishankar; Muthuvelan, Bhaskaran; Balakrishnan, Arun; Padigaru, Muralidhara

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to validate prognostic gene signature for estrogen receptor alpha-positive (ER03B1+) and lymph node (+) breast cancer for improved selection of patients for adjuvant therapy. In our previous study, we identified a group of seven genes (GATA3, NTN4, SLC7A8, ENPP1, MLPH, LAMB2, and PLAT) that show elevated messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels in ERα (+) breast cancer patient samples. The prognostic values of these genes were evaluated using gene expression data from three public data sets of breast cancer patients (n = 395). Analysis of ERα (+) breast cancer cohort (n = 195) showed high expression of GATA3, NTN4, and MLPH genes significantly associated with longer relapse-free survival (RFS). Next cohort of ERα (+) and node (+) samples (n = 109) revealed high mRNA expression of GATA3, SLC7A8, and MLPH significantly associated with longer RFS. Multivariate analysis of combined three-gene signature for ERα (+) cohort, and ERα (+) and node (+) cohorts showed better hazard ratio than individual genes. The validated three-gene signature sets for ERα (+) cohort, and ERα (+) and node (+) cohort may have potential clinical utility since they demonstrated predictive and prognostic ability in three independent public data sets. PMID:26648682

  20. High Expression of Three-Gene Signature Improves Prediction of Relapse-Free Survival in Estrogen Receptor-Positive and Node-Positive Breast Tumors.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Arvind; Raj, Hemanth; Ravishankar; Muthuvelan, Bhaskaran; Balakrishnan, Arun; Padigaru, Muralidhara

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to validate prognostic gene signature for estrogen receptor alpha-positive (ER03B1+) and lymph node (+) breast cancer for improved selection of patients for adjuvant therapy. In our previous study, we identified a group of seven genes (GATA3, NTN4, SLC7A8, ENPP1, MLPH, LAMB2, and PLAT) that show elevated messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels in ERα (+) breast cancer patient samples. The prognostic values of these genes were evaluated using gene expression data from three public data sets of breast cancer patients (n = 395). Analysis of ERα (+) breast cancer cohort (n = 195) showed high expression of GATA3, NTN4, and MLPH genes significantly associated with longer relapse-free survival (RFS). Next cohort of ERα (+) and node (+) samples (n = 109) revealed high mRNA expression of GATA3, SLC7A8, and MLPH significantly associated with longer RFS. Multivariate analysis of combined three-gene signature for ERα (+) cohort, and ERα (+) and node (+) cohorts showed better hazard ratio than individual genes. The validated three-gene signature sets for ERα (+) cohort, and ERα (+) and node (+) cohort may have potential clinical utility since they demonstrated predictive and prognostic ability in three independent public data sets. PMID:26648682

  1. Distinct MicroRNA Expression Signatures of Porcine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells under Mouse and Human ESC Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Han, Jianyong

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that microRNAs play a very important role in regulating reprogramming, pluripotency and cell fate decisions. Porcine induced pluripotent stem cells (piPSCs) are now available for studying the pluripotent regulation network in pigs. Two types of piPSCs have been derived from human and mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) culture conditions: hpiPSCs and mpiPSCs, respectively. The hpiPSCs were morphologically similar to human ESCs, and the mpiPSCs resembled mouse ESCs. However, our current understanding of the role of microRNAs in the development of piPSCs is still very limited. Here, we performed small RNA sequencing to profile the miRNA expression in porcine fibroblasts (pEFs), hpiPSCs and mpiPSCs. There were 22 differential expressed (DE) miRNAs down-regulated in both types of piPSCs compared with pEFs, such as ssc-miR-145-5p and ssc-miR-98. There were 27 DE miRNAs up-regulated in both types of piPSCs compared with pEFs. Among these up-regulated DE miRNAs in piPSCs, ssc-miR-217, ssc-miR-216, ssc-miR-142-5p, ssc-miR-182, ssc-miR-183 and ssc-miR-96-5p have much higher expression levels in mpiPSCs, while ssc-miR-106a, ssc-miR-363, ssc-miR-146b, ssc-miR-195, ssc-miR-497, ssc-miR-935 and ssc-miR-20b highly expressed in hpiPSCs. Quantitative stem-loop RT-PCR was performed to confirm selected DE miRNAs expression levels. The results were consistent with small RNA sequencing. Different expression patterns were observed for key miRNA clusters, such as the miR-17-92 cluster, the let-7 family, the miR-106a-363 cluster and the miR-182-183 cluster, in the mpiPSCs and hpiPSCs. Novel miRNAs were also predicted in this study, including a putative porcine miR-302 cluster: ssc_38503, ssc_38503 and ssc_38501 (which resemble human miR-302a and miR-302b) found in both types of piPSCs. The miR-106a-363 cluster and putative miR-302 cluster increased the reprogramming efficiency of pEFs. The study revealed significant differences in the miRNA signatures of hpiPSCs and mpi

  2. Newly Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ... start this journey: Get a copy of your pathology report. We can help you understand the report ...

  3. Gene Expression Signatures Predictive of Early Response and Outcome in High-Risk Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Children's Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Kang, Huining; Menezes, Renee X.; Yang, Wenjian; Sather, Harland; Moskowitz, Naomi P.; Min, Dong-Joon; Potter, Jeffrey W.; Harvey, Richard; Hunger, Stephen P.; Seibel, Nita; Raetz, Elizabeth A.; Pieters, Rob; Horstmann, Martin A.; Relling, Mary V.; den Boer, Monique L.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Carroll, William L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To identify children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at initial diagnosis who are at risk for inferior response to therapy by using molecular signatures. Patients and Methods Gene expression profiles were generated from bone marrow blasts at initial diagnosis from a cohort of 99 children with National Cancer Institute–defined high-risk ALL who were treated uniformly on the Children's Oncology Group (COG) 1961 study. For prediction of early response, genes that correlated to marrow status on day 7 were identified on a training set and were validated on a test set. An additional signature was correlated with long-term outcome, and the predictive models were validated on three large, independent patient cohorts. Results We identified a 24–probe set signature that was highly predictive of day 7 marrow status on the test set (P = .0061). Pathways were identified that may play a role in early blast regression. We have also identified a 47–probe set signature (which represents 41 unique genes) that was predictive of long-term outcome in our data set as well as three large independent data sets of patients with childhood ALL who were treated on different protocols. However, we did not find sufficient evidence for the added significance of these genes and the derived predictive models when other known prognostic features, such as age, WBC, and karyotype, were included in a multivariate analysis. Conclusion Genes and pathways that play a role in early blast regression may identify patients who may be at risk for inferior responses to treatment. A fully validated predictive gene expression signature was defined for high-risk ALL that provided insight into the biologic mechanisms of treatment failure. PMID:18802149

  4. Factors Associated with Expressive and Receptive Language in French-Speaking Toddlers Clinically Diagnosed with Language Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvestre, Audette; Desmarais, Chantal; Meyer, Francois; Bairati, Isabelle; Rouleau, Nancie; Merette, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine child and environmental factors known to be associated to language development and how they relate to results in expressive vocabulary, expressive language, and receptive language in language-delayed toddlers. The cross-sectional data on 96 French-speaking children aged 18-36 months were…

  5. Changes in the Peripheral Blood Gene Expression Profile Induced by 3 Months of Valproate Treatment in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rakitin, Aleksei; Kõks, Sulev; Reimann, Ene; Prans, Ele; Haldre, Sulev

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a widely used antiepileptic drug with a broad range of effects and broad clinical efficacy. As a well-known histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, VPA regulates epigenetic programming by altering the expression of many genes. The aim of study was to analyze differences in gene expression profiles before and after the start of VPA treatment in patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy. RNA sequencing was used to compare whole-genome gene expression patterns of peripheral blood from nine patients with epilepsy before and 3 months after the start of treatment with VPA. Of the 23,099 analyzed genes, only 11 showed statistically significant differential expression with false discovery rate-adjusted p-values below 0.1. Functional annotation and network analyses showed activation of only one genetic network (enrichment score = 30), which included genes for cardiovascular system development and function, cell morphology, and hematological system development and function. The finding of such a small number of differently expressed genes between before and after the start of treatment suggests a lack of HDAC inhibition in these patients, which could be explained by the relatively low doses of VPA that were used. In conclusion, VPA at standard therapeutic dosages modulates the expression of a small number of genes. Therefore, to minimize the potential side effects of HDAC inhibition, it is recommended that the lowest effective dose of VPA be used for treating epilepsy. PMID:26379622

  6. Diagnosing Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... your symptoms and their clinical judgment. Will my health care provider test me for flu if I have flu-like ... flu symptoms do not require testing because the test results usually do not change how you are treated. Your health care provider may diagnose you with flu based on ...

  7. Tissue microarrays characterise the clinical significance of a VEGF-A protein expression signature in gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Salto-Tellez, M; Nga, M E; Han, H C; Wong, A S-C; Lee, C K; Anuar, D; Ng, S S; Ho, M; Wee, A; Chan, Y H; Soong, R

    2007-01-01

    A tissue microarray analysis of 22 proteins in gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST), followed by an unsupervised, hierarchical monothetic cluster statistical analysis of the results, allowed us to detect a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein overexpression signature discriminator of prognosis in GIST, and discover novel VEGF-A DNA variants that may have functional significance. PMID:17299397

  8. Subclassification of Newly Diagnosed Glioblastomas through an Immunohistochemical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, Siobhan; Kruyt, Frank A. E.; Joseph, Justin V.; Balasubramaniyan, Veerakumar; Bhat, Krishna P.; Wagemakers, Michiel; Enting, Roelien H.; Walenkamp, Annemiek M. E.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular signatures in Glioblastoma (GBM) have been described that correlate with clinical outcome and response to therapy. The Proneural (PN) and Mesenchymal (MES) signatures have been identified most consistently, but others including Classical (CLAS) have also been reported. The molecular signatures have been detected by array techniques at RNA and DNA level, but these methods are costly and cannot take into account individual contributions of different cells within a tumor. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether subclasses of newly diagnosed GBMs could be assessed and assigned by application of standard pathology laboratory procedures. 123 newly diagnosed GBMs were analyzed for the tumor cell expression of 23 pre-identified proteins and EGFR amplification, together allowing for the subclassification of 65% of the tumors. Immunohistochemistry (IHC)-based profiling was found to be analogous to transcription-based profiling using a 9-gene transcriptional signature for PN and MES subclasses. Based on these data a novel, minimal IHC-based scheme for subclass assignment for GBMs is proposed. Positive staining for IDH1R132H can be used for PN subclass assignment, high EGFR expression for the CLAS subtype and a combined high expression of PTEN, VIM and/or YKL40 for the MES subclass. The application of the proposed scheme was evaluated in an independent tumor set, which resulted in similar subclass assignment rates as those observed in the training set. The IHC-based subclassification scheme proposed in this study therefore could provide very useful in future studies for stratification of individual patient samples. PMID:25546404

  9. Blood-based gene expression signatures of medication-free outpatients with major depressive disorder: integrative genome-wide and candidate gene analyses

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hiroaki; Sasayama, Daimei; Teraishi, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Noriko; Nakamura, Seiji; Ota, Miho; Hattori, Kotaro; Kim, Yoshiharu; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Several microarray-based studies have investigated gene expression profiles in major depressive disorder (MDD), yet with highly variable findings. We examined blood-based genome-wide expression signatures of MDD, focusing on molecular pathways and networks underlying differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and behaviours of hypothesis-driven, evidence-based candidate genes for depression. Agilent human whole-genome arrays were used to measure gene expression in 14 medication-free outpatients with MDD who were at least moderately ill and 14 healthy controls matched pairwise for age and sex. After filtering, we compared expression of entire probes between patients and controls and identified DEGs. The DEGs were evaluated by pathway and network analyses. For the candidate gene analysis, we utilized 169 previously prioritized genes and examined their case-control separation efficiency and correlational co-expression network in patients relative to controls. The 317 screened DEGs mapped to a significantly over-represented pathway, the “synaptic transmission” pathway. The protein-protein interaction network was also significantly enriched, in which a number of key molecules for depression were included. The co-expression network of candidate genes was markedly disrupted in patients. This study provided evidence for an altered molecular network along with several key molecules in MDD and confirmed that the candidate genes are worthwhile targets for depression research. PMID:26728011

  10. Conditional entropy in variation-adjusted windows detects selection signatures associated with expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Over the past 50,000 years, shifts in human-environmental or human-human interactions shaped genetic differences within and among human populations, including variants under positive selection. Shaped by environmental factors, such variants influence the genetics of modern health, disease, and treatment outcome. Because evolutionary processes tend to act on gene regulation, we test whether regulatory variants are under positive selection. We introduce a new approach to enhance detection of genetic markers undergoing positive selection, using conditional entropy to capture recent local selection signals. Results We use conditional logistic regression to compare our Adjusted Haplotype Conditional Entropy (H|H) measure of positive selection to existing positive selection measures. H|H and existing measures were applied to published regulatory variants acting in cis (cis-eQTLs), with conditional logistic regression testing whether regulatory variants undergo stronger positive selection than the surrounding gene. These cis-eQTLs were drawn from six independent studies of genotype and RNA expression. The conditional logistic regression shows that, overall, H|H is substantially more powerful than existing positive-selection methods in identifying cis-eQTLs against other Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the same genes. When broken down by Gene Ontology, H|H predictions are particularly strong in some biological process categories, where regulatory variants are under strong positive selection compared to the bulk of the gene, distinct from those GO categories under overall positive selection. . However, cis-eQTLs in a second group of genes lack positive selection signatures detectable by H|H, consistent with ancient short haplotypes compared to the surrounding gene (for example, in innate immunity GO:0042742); under such other modes of selection, H|H would not be expected to be a strong predictor.. These conditional logistic regression models are

  11. Signature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyati, Vittal P.

    The reduction of vehicle radar signature is accomplished by means of vehicle shaping, the use of microwave frequencies-absorbent materials, and either passive or active cancellation techniques; such techniques are also useful in the reduction of propulsion system-associated IR emissions. In some anticipated scenarios, the objective is not signature-reduction but signature control, for deception, via decoy vehicles that mimic the signature characteristics of actual weapons systems. As the stealthiness of airframes and missiles increases, their propulsion systems' exhaust plumes assume a more important role in detection by an adversary.

  12. Expression analysis of mitotic spindle checkpoint genes in breast carcinoma: role of NDC80/HEC1 in early breast tumorigenicity, and a two-gene signature for aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Aneuploidy and chromosomal instability (CIN) are common abnormalities in human cancer. Alterations of the mitotic spindle checkpoint are likely to contribute to these phenotypes, but little is known about somatic alterations of mitotic spindle checkpoint genes in breast cancer. Methods To obtain further insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying aneuploidy in breast cancer, we used real-time quantitative RT-PCR to quantify the mRNA expression of 76 selected mitotic spindle checkpoint genes in a large panel of breast tumor samples. Results The expression of 49 (64.5%) of the 76 genes was significantly dysregulated in breast tumors compared to normal breast tissues: 40 genes were upregulated and 9 were downregulated. Most of these changes in gene expression during malignant transformation were observed in epithelial cells. Alterations of nine of these genes, and particularly NDC80, were also detected in benign breast tumors, indicating that they may be involved in pre-neoplastic processes. We also identified a two-gene expression signature (PLK1 + AURKA) which discriminated between DNA aneuploid and DNA diploid breast tumor samples. Interestingly, some DNA tetraploid tumor samples failed to cluster with DNA aneuploid breast tumors. Conclusion This study confirms the importance of previously characterized genes and identifies novel candidate genes that could be activated for aneuploidy to occur. Further functional analyses are required to clearly confirm the role of these new identified genes in the molecular mechanisms involved in breast cancer aneuploidy. The novel genes identified here, and/or the two-gene expression signature, might serve as diagnostic or prognostic markers and form the basis for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:21352579

  13. Correlated miR-mRNA Expression Signatures of Mouse Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Subsets Predict “Stemness” and “Myeloid” Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Heiser, Diane; Tan, Yee Sun; Kaplan, Ian; Godsey, Brian; Morisot, Sebastien; Cheng, Wen-Chih; Small, Donald; Civin, Curt I.

    2014-01-01

    Several individual miRNAs (miRs) have been implicated as potent regulators of important processes during normal and malignant hematopoiesis. In addition, many miRs have been shown to fine-tune intricate molecular networks, in concert with other regulatory elements. In order to study hematopoietic networks as a whole, we first created a map of global miR expression during early murine hematopoiesis. Next, we determined the copy number per cell for each miR in each of the examined stem and progenitor cell types. As data is emerging indicating that miRs function robustly mainly when they are expressed above a certain threshold (∼100 copies per cell), our database provides a resource for determining which miRs are expressed at a potentially functional level in each cell type. Finally, we combine our miR expression map with matched mRNA expression data and external prediction algorithms, using a Bayesian modeling approach to create a global landscape of predicted miR-mRNA interactions within each of these hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell subsets. This approach implicates several interaction networks comprising a “stemness” signature in the most primitive hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) populations, as well as “myeloid” patterns associated with two branches of myeloid development. PMID:24747944

  14. Decreased Pattern Recognition Receptor Signaling, Interferon-Signature, and Bactericidal/Permeability-Increasing Protein Gene Expression in Cord Blood of Term Low Birth Weight Human Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vikas Vikram; Chauhan, Sudhir Kumar; Rai, Richa; Kumar, Ashok; Singh, Shiva M.; Rai, Geeta

    2013-01-01

    Background Morbidity and mortality rates of low birth weight (LBW) newborns at term are higher than rates in normal birth weight (NBW) newborns. LBW newborns are at greater risk to acquire recurrent bacterial and viral infections during their first few weeks of life possibly as an outcome of compromised innate immune functions. As adaptive immunity is in a naive state, increased risk of infection of LBW as compared to NBW newborns may reflect impairments in innate immunity. Methodology To characterize the increased susceptibility to infections in LBW newborns we used microarray technology to identify differences in gene expression in LBW newborns (n = 8) compared to NBW newborns (n = 4) using cord blood. The results obtained from the microarray study were validated on a larger number of samples using real time RT-PCR (LBW = 22, NBW = 18) and western blotting (LBW = 12, NBW = 12). The Interferome database was used to identify interferon (IFN) signature genes and ingenuity pathway analysis identified canonical pathways and biological functions associated with the differentially expressed genes in LBW newborns. ELISAs for IFNs and bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein were performed in both LBW and NBW newborns and in adults (LBW = 18, NBW = 18, Adults  = 8). Principal Findings Upon microarray analysis, we identified 1,391 differentially expressed genes, of which, 1,065 genes were down-regulated and 326 genes were up-regulated in the LBW compared to NBW newborns. Of note, 70 IFN-signature genes were found to be significantly down-regulated in LBW compared to NBW newborns. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed pattern recognition receptors signaling including Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs) -1, -5, and -8 genes and IFN signaling as the most significantly impacted pathways. Respiratory infectious diseases were the most significantly affected bio-functions in LBW newborns. Conclusion and Significance Diminished PRRs, IFN-signature, and

  15. Diagnosing hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gelfer, Mark; Dawes, Martin; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Padwal, Raj; Cloutier, Lyne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To highlight the 2015 Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of hypertension. Quality of evidence A systematic search was performed current to August 2014 by a Cochrane Collaboration librarian using the MEDLINE and PubMed databases. The search results were critically appraised by the CHEP subcommittee on blood pressure (BP) measurement and diagnosis, and evidence-based recommendations were presented to the CHEP Central Review Committee for independent review and grading. Finally, the findings and recommendations were presented to the Recommendations Task Force for discussion, debate, approval, and voting. The main recommendations are based on level II evidence. Main message Based on the most recent evidence, CHEP has made 4 recommendations in 2 broad categories for 2015 to improve BP measurement and the way hypertension is diagnosed. A strong recommendation is made to use electronic BP measurement in the office setting to replace auscultatory BP measurement. For patients with elevated office readings, CHEP is recommending early use of out-of-office BP measurement, preferably ambulatory BP measurement, in order to identify early in the process those patients with white-coat hypertension. Conclusion Improvements in diagnostic accuracy are critical to optimizing hypertension management in Canada. The annual updates provided by CHEP ensure that practitioners have up-to-date evidence-based information to inform practice. PMID:26564654

  16. Distinct microRNA expression signatures are associated with melanoma subtypes and are regulated by HIF1A

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hun-Way; Baxter, Laura L.; Loftus, Stacie K.; Cronin, Julia C.; Trivedi, Niraj S.; Borate, Bhavesh; Pavan, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The complex genetic changes underlying metastatic melanoma need to be deciphered to develop new and effective therapeutics. Previously, genome-wide microarray analyses of human melanoma identified two reciprocal gene expression programs, including transcripts regulated by either transforming growth factor, beta 1 (TGFβ1) pathways or microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF)/SRY-box containing gene 10 (SOX10) pathways. We extended this knowledge by discovering that melanoma cell lines with these two expression programs exhibit distinctive microRNA (miRNA) expression patterns. We also demonstrated that hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A) is increased in TGFβ1 pathway-expressing melanoma cells and that HIF1A upregulates miR-210, miR-218, miR-224, and miR-452. Reduced expression of these four miRNAs in TGFβ1 pathway-expressing melanoma cells arrests the cell cycle, while their overexpression in mouse melanoma cells increases the expression of the hypoxic response gene Bnip3. Taken together, these data suggest that HIF1A may regulate some of the gene expression and biological behavior of TGFβ1 pathway-expressing melanoma cells, in part via alterations in these four miRNAs. PMID:24767210

  17. Discriminating the molecular basis of hepatotoxicity using the large-scale characteristic molecular signatures of toxicants by expression profiling analysis.

    PubMed

    Eun, Jung Woo; Ryu, So Yeon; Noh, Ji Heon; Lee, Min-Jae; Jang, Ja-Jun; Ryu, Jae Chun; Jung, Kwang Hwa; Kim, Jeong Kyu; Bae, Hyun Jin; Xie, Hongjian; Kim, Su Young; Lee, Sug Hyung; Park, Won Sang; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Jung Young; Nam, Suk Woo

    2008-07-30

    Predicting the potential human health risk posed by chemical stressors has long been a major challenge for toxicologists, and the use of microarrays to measure responses to toxicologically relevant genes, and to identify selective, sensitive biomarkers of toxicity is a major application of predictive and discovery toxicology. To investigate this possibility, we investigated whether carcinogens (at doses known to induce liver tumors in chronic exposure bioassays) deregulate characteristic sets of genes in mice. Male C3H/He mice were dosed with two hepatocarcinogens (vinyl chloride (VC, 50-25 mg/kg), aldrin (AD, 0.8-0.4 mg/kg)), or two non-hepatocarcinogens (copper sulfate (CS, 150-60 mg/kg), 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T, 150-60 mg/kg)). Large-scale molecular changes elicited by these four hepatotoxicants in liver tissues were analyzed using DNA microarray. Three days after administration, no significant phenotypic changes were induced by these four different hepatotoxicants in terms of histological examination or blood biochemical assay. However, unsupervised hierarchical analysis of gene expressional changes induced by hepatotoxicants resulted in two major gene subclusters on dendrogram, i.e., a carcinogen (VN, AD) and non-carcinogen group (CS, 2,4,5-T), and also revealed that distinct molecular signatures exist. These signatures were founded on well-defined functional gene categories and may differentiate genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Furthermore, Venn diagram analysis allowed us to identify carcinogen and non-carcinogen-associated molecular signatures. Using statistical methods, we analyzed outlier genes for four different classes (genotoxic-, non-genotoxic-carcinogen, genotoxic-, non-genotoxic non-carcinogen) in terms of their potential to predict different modes-of-action. In conclusion, the identification of large-scale molecular changes in different hepatocarcinogen exposure models revealed that different types of hepatotoxicants are

  18. MicroRNA expression signature of oral squamous cell carcinoma: functional role of microRNA-26a/b in the modulation of novel cancer pathways

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, I; Hanazawa, T; Kinoshita, T; Kikkawa, N; Koshizuka, K; Goto, Y; Nishikawa, R; Chiyomaru, T; Enokida, H; Nakagawa, M; Okamoto, Y; Seki, N

    2015-01-01

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to play major roles in carcinogenesis in a variety of cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the miRNA expression signature of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and to investigate the functional roles of miR-26a and miR-26b in OSCC cells. Methods: An OSCC miRNA signature was constructed by PCR-based array methods. Functional studies of differentially expressed miRNAs were performed to investigate cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in OSCC cells. In silico database and genome-wide gene expression analyses were performed to identify molecular targets and pathways mediated by miR-26a/b. Results: miR-26a and miR-26b were significantly downregulated in OSCC. Restoration of both miR-26a and miR-26b in cancer cell lines revealed that these miRNAs significantly inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. Our data demonstrated that the novel transmembrane TMEM184B gene was a direct target of miR-26a/b regulation. Silencing of TMEM184B inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion, and regulated the actin cytoskeleton-pathway related genes. Conclusions: Loss of tumour-suppressive miR-26a/b enhanced cancer cell migration and invasion in OSCC through direct regulation of TMEM184B. Our data describing pathways regulated by tumour-suppressive miR-26a/b provide new insights into the potential mechanisms of OSCC oncogenesis and metastasis. PMID:25668004

  19. Prognostic value of blood mRNA expression signatures in castration-resistant prostate cancer: a prospective, two-stage study

    PubMed Central

    Olmos, David; Brewer, Daniel; Clark, Jeremy; Danila, Daniel C; Parker, Chris; Attard, Gerhardt; Fleisher, Martin; Reid, Alison H M; Castro, Elena; Sandhu, Shahneen K; Barwell, Lorraine; Oommen, Nikhil Babu; Carreira, Suzanne; Drake, Charles G; Jones, Robert; Cooper, Colin S; Scher, Howard I; de Bono, Johann S

    2016-01-01

    -resistant prostate cancer in other LPD subgroups (LPD1 overall survival 10.7 months [95% CI 4.1–17.2] vs non-LPD1 25.6 months [18.0–33.4]; p<0.0001). A nine-gene signature verified by qRT-PCR classified patients into this LPD1 subgroup with a very low percentage of misclassification (1.2%). The ten patients who were initially unclassifiable by the LPD analyses were subclassified by this signature. We confirmed the prognostic utility of this nine-gene signature in the validation castration-resistant prostate cancer cohort, where LPD1 membership was also associated with worse overall survival (LPD1 9.2 months [95% CI 2.1–16.4] vs non-LPD1 21.6 months [7.5–35.6]; p=0.001), and remained an independent prognostic factor in multivariable analyses for both cohorts. Interpretation Our results suggest that whole-blood gene profiling could identify gene-expression signatures that stratify patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer into distinct prognostic groups. Funding AstraZeneca, Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre, Prostate Cancer Charity, Prostate Cancer Foundation. PMID:23059046

  20. Mining the Dynamic Genome: A Method for Identifying Multiple Disease Signatures Using Quantitative RNA Expression Analysis of a Single Blood Sample

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Samuel; Cheng, Changming; Liew, Choong-Chin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blood has advantages over tissue samples as a diagnostic tool, and blood mRNA transcriptomics is an exciting research field. To realize the full potential of blood transcriptomic investigations requires improved methods for gene expression measurement and data interpretation able to detect biological signatures within the “noisy” variability of whole blood. Methods: We demonstrate collection tube bias compensation during the process of identifying a liver cancer-specific gene signature. The candidate probe set list of liver cancer was filtered, based on previous repeatability performance obtained from technical replicates. We built a prediction model using differential pairs to reduce the impact of confounding factors. We compared prediction performance on an independent test set against prediction on an alternative model derived by Weka. The method was applied to an independent set of 157 blood samples collected in PAXgene tubes. Results: The model discriminated liver cancer equally well in both EDTA and PAXgene collected samples, whereas the Weka-derived model (using default settings) was not able to compensate for collection tube bias. Cross-validation results show our procedure predicted membership of each sample within the disease groups and healthy controls. Conclusion: Our versatile method for blood transcriptomic investigation overcomes several limitations hampering research in blood-based gene tests.

  1. FOXP1 suppresses immune response signatures and MHC class II expression in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Brown, P J; Wong, K K; Felce, S L; Lyne, L; Spearman, H; Soilleux, E J; Pedersen, L M; Møller, M B; Green, T M; Gascoyne, D M; Banham, A H

    2016-03-01

    The FOXP1 (forkhead box P1) transcription factor is a marker of poor prognosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Here microarray analysis of FOXP1-silenced DLBCL cell lines identified differential regulation of immune response signatures and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) genes as some of the most significant differences between germinal center B-cell (GCB)-like DLBCL with full-length FOXP1 protein expression versus activated B-cell (ABC)-like DLBCL expressing predominantly short FOXP1 isoforms. In an independent primary DLBCL microarray data set, multiple MHC II genes, including human leukocyte antigen DR alpha chain (HLA-DRA), were inversely correlated with FOXP1 transcript expression (P<0.05). FOXP1 knockdown in ABC-DLBCL cells led to increased cell-surface expression of HLA-DRA and CD74. In R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone)-treated DLBCL patients (n=150), reduced HLA-DRA (<90% frequency) expression correlated with inferior overall survival (P=0.0003) and progression-free survival (P=0.0012) and with non-GCB subtype stratified by the Hans, Choi or Visco-Young algorithms (all P<0.01). In non-GCB DLBCL cases with <90% HLA-DRA, there was an inverse correlation with the frequency (P=0.0456) and intensity (P=0.0349) of FOXP1 expression. We propose that FOXP1 represents a novel regulator of genes targeted by the class II MHC transactivator CIITA (MHC II and CD74) and therapeutically targeting the FOXP1 pathway may improve antigen presentation and immune surveillance in high-risk DLBCL patients. PMID:26500140

  2. FOXP1 suppresses immune response signatures and MHC class II expression in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Brown, P J; Wong, K K; Felce, S L; Lyne, L; Spearman, H; Soilleux, E J; Pedersen, L M; Møller, M B; Green, T M; Gascoyne, D M; Banham, A H

    2016-01-01

    The FOXP1 (forkhead box P1) transcription factor is a marker of poor prognosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Here microarray analysis of FOXP1-silenced DLBCL cell lines identified differential regulation of immune response signatures and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) genes as some of the most significant differences between germinal center B-cell (GCB)-like DLBCL with full-length FOXP1 protein expression versus activated B-cell (ABC)-like DLBCL expressing predominantly short FOXP1 isoforms. In an independent primary DLBCL microarray data set, multiple MHC II genes, including human leukocyte antigen DR alpha chain (HLA-DRA), were inversely correlated with FOXP1 transcript expression (P<0.05). FOXP1 knockdown in ABC-DLBCL cells led to increased cell-surface expression of HLA-DRA and CD74. In R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone)-treated DLBCL patients (n=150), reduced HLA-DRA (<90% frequency) expression correlated with inferior overall survival (P=0.0003) and progression-free survival (P=0.0012) and with non-GCB subtype stratified by the Hans, Choi or Visco–Young algorithms (all P<0.01). In non-GCB DLBCL cases with <90% HLA-DRA, there was an inverse correlation with the frequency (P=0.0456) and intensity (P=0.0349) of FOXP1 expression. We propose that FOXP1 represents a novel regulator of genes targeted by the class II MHC transactivator CIITA (MHC II and CD74) and therapeutically targeting the FOXP1 pathway may improve antigen presentation and immune surveillance in high-risk DLBCL patients. PMID:26500140

  3. Current smoking-specific gene expression signature in normal bronchial epithelium is enhanced in squamous cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Boelens, Mirjam C; van den Berg, Anke; Fehrmann, Rudolf S N; Geerlings, Marie; de Jong, Wouter K; te Meerman, Gerard J; Sietsma, Hannie; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S; Groen, Harry J M

    2009-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor for the development of squamous cell lung carcinoma (SCC). However, the smoking-related molecular changes in SCC have not been studied. Gene expression studies in both histologically normal bronchial epithelium and SCC epithelial samples identified genes differentially expressed between current and ex-smokers. Subsequently, expression levels of the smoking-related genes in normal bronchial epithelium were compared with those in SCC cells, since we hypothesized that the smoking-induced changes would be also deregulated in SCC. Gene expression profiles were generated using Agilent whole human genome microarrays on laser-microdissected normal bronchial epithelium and SCC samples. Expression levels of 246 genes, mainly related to oxidative stress response, were significantly different between normal bronchial epithelium of current and ex-smokers. Such a differential gene expression profile did not exist in SCC cells of smokers and ex-smokers. Interestingly, when comparing SCC and normal bronchial epithelium from ex-smokers, the vast majority of these 246 genes were also deregulated in SCC. When comparing SCC with normal epithelium from smokers, 22% of the up-regulated genes showed a similar high expression in SCC whereas 79% of the down-regulated genes were even further reduced in SCC as compared to current smokers. The down-regulated genes included several tumour suppressor genes, such as C9orf9, INHBB, LRIG1, SCGB3A1, SERPINI2, STEAP3 and ZMYND10. Thus, our study shows that the majority of genes up-regulated in normal bronchial epithelium of current smokers show similar high expression levels in SCC, while down-regulated genes are even further repressed in SCC. Our data indicate that smoking-related changes in normal bronchial epithelial cells persist in malignant transformed squamous cells. PMID:19334046

  4. MicroRNA Gene Expression Signature Driven by miR-9 Overexpression in Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yanaihara, Nozomu; Noguchi, Yukiko; Saito, Misato; Takenaka, Masataka; Takakura, Satoshi; Yamada, Kyosuke; Okamoto, Aikou

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have identified microRNA (miRNA) involvement in human cancers. This study aimed to elucidate potential clinical and biological associations of ovarian cancer-related miRNA gene expression profiles in high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) and ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC). Accordingly, we investigated 27 patients with ovarian cancer (12 HGSC and 15 OCCC cases) using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the cancer-related miRNA expressions. Gene Cluster 3.0 was used for hierarchical clustering analysis, and differentially expressed miRNAs between HGSC and OCCC were identified by the class comparison analysis using BRB-ArrayTools. An unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis identified two distinct miRNA expression clusters, with histological subtype-related significant differences in the associations between clusters and clinicopathological features. A comparison of miRNA expression in HGSCs and OCCCs identified five miRNAs (miR-132, miR-9, miR-126, miR-34a, and miR-21), with OCCCs demonstrating a statistically higher expression. Further investigation of the biological significance of miR-9 overexpression in OCCC revealed that miR-9 inhibition reduced the cell invasion ability and upregulated E-cadherin expression. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we further demonstrated the direct binding of miR-9 to E-cadherin. Global cancer-related miRNA expression analysis identified statistically unique profiles that could discriminate ovarian cancer histotypes. In OCCC, miR-9 overexpression may affect pathogenesis by targeting E-cadherin, thereby inducing an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Therefore, miR-9 may be a promising therapeutic target strategy for OCCC. PMID:27612152

  5. Advanced colorectal adenoma related gene expression signature may predict prognostic for colorectal cancer patients with adenoma-carcinoma sequence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Shi, Xiao-Yu; Liao, Dai-Xiang; Cao, Bang-Rong; Luo, Cheng-Hua; Cheng, Shu-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are still no absolute parameters predicting progression of adenoma into cancer. The present study aimed to characterize functional differences on the multistep carcinogenetic process from the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Methods: All samples were collected and mRNA expression profiling was performed by using Agilent Microarray high-throughput gene-chip technology. Then, the characteristics of mRNA expression profiles of adenoma-carcinoma sequence were described with bioinformatics software, and we analyzed the relationship between gene expression profiles of adenoma-adenocarcinoma sequence and clinical prognosis of colorectal cancer. Results: The mRNA expressions of adenoma-carcinoma sequence were significantly different between high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia group and adenocarcinoma group. The biological process of gene ontology function enrichment analysis on differentially expressed genes between high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia group and adenocarcinoma group showed that genes enriched in the extracellular structure organization, skeletal system development, biological adhesion and itself regulated growth regulation, with the P value after FDR correction of less than 0.05. In addition, IPR-related protein mainly focused on the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. Conclusion: The variable trends of gene expression profiles for adenoma-carcinoma sequence were mainly concentrated in high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and adenocarcinoma. The differentially expressed genes are significantly correlated between high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia group and adenocarcinoma group. Bioinformatics analysis is an effective way to study the gene expression profiles in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, and may provide an effective tool to involve colorectal cancer research strategy into colorectal adenoma or advanced adenoma. PMID:26131062

  6. Development of the first oligonucleotide microarray for global gene expression profiling in guinea pigs: defining the transcription signature of infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) is one of the most extensively used animal models to study infectious diseases. However, despite its tremendous contribution towards understanding the establishment, progression and control of a number of diseases in general and tuberculosis in particular, the lack of fully annotated guinea pig genome sequence as well as appropriate molecular reagents has severely hampered detailed genetic and immunological analysis in this animal model. Results By employing the cross-species hybridization technique, we have developed an oligonucleotide microarray with 44,000 features assembled from different mammalian species, which to the best of our knowledge is the first attempt to employ microarray to study the global gene expression profile in guinea pigs. To validate and demonstrate the merit of this microarray, we have studied, as an example, the expression profile of guinea pig lungs during the advanced phase of M. tuberculosis infection. A significant upregulation of 1344 genes and a marked down regulation of 1856 genes in the lungs identified a disease signature of pulmonary tuberculosis infection. Conclusion We report the development of first comprehensive microarray for studying the global gene expression profile in guinea pigs and validation of its usefulness with tuberculosis as a case study. An important gap in the area of infectious diseases has been addressed and a valuable molecular tool is provided to optimally harness the potential of guinea pig model to develop better vaccines and therapies against human diseases. PMID:23031549

  7. Gene expression signatures in motor neurone disease fibroblasts reveal dysregulation of metabolism, hypoxia-response and RNA processing functions

    PubMed Central

    Raman, R; Allen, S P; Goodall, E F; Kramer, S; Ponger, L-L; Heath, P R; Milo, M; Hollinger, H C; Walsh, T; Highley, J R; Olpin, S; McDermott, C J; Shaw, P J; Kirby, J

    2015-01-01

    Aims Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) are two syndromic variants within the motor neurone disease spectrum. As PLS and most ALS cases are sporadic (SALS), this limits the availability of cellular models for investigating pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic targets. The aim of this study was to use gene expression profiling to evaluate fibroblasts as cellular models for SALS and PLS, to establish whether dysregulated biological processes recapitulate those seen in the central nervous system and to elucidate pathways that distinguish the clinically defined variants of SALS and PLS. Methods Microarray analysis was performed on fibroblast RNA and differentially expressed genes identified. Genes in enriched biological pathways were validated by quantitative PCR and functional assays performed to establish the effect of altered RNA levels on the cellular processes. Results Gene expression profiling demonstrated that whilst there were many differentially expressed genes in common between SALS and PLS fibroblasts, there were many more expressed specifically in the SALS fibroblasts, including those involved in RNA processing and the stress response. Functional analysis of the fibroblasts confirmed a significant decrease in miRNA production and a reduced response to hypoxia in SALS fibroblasts. Furthermore, metabolic gene changes seen in SALS, many of which were also evident in PLS fibroblasts, resulted in dysfunctional cellular respiration. Conclusions The data demonstrate that fibroblasts can act as cellular models for ALS and PLS, by establishing the transcriptional changes in known pathogenic pathways that confer subsequent functional effects and potentially highlight targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24750211

  8. The Bimodality Index: A Criterion for Discovering and Ranking Bimodal Signatures from Cancer Gene Expression Profiling Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Wen, Sijin; Symmans, W. Fraser; Pusztai, Lajos; Coombes, Kevin R.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation Identifying genes with bimodal expression patterns from large-scale expression profiling data is an important analytical task. Model-based clustering is popular for this purpose. That technique commonly uses the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) for model selection. In practice, however, BIC appears to be overly sensitive and may lead to the identification of bimodally expressed genes that are unreliable or not clinically useful. We propose using a novel criterion, the bimodality index, not only to identify but also to rank meaningful and reliable bimodal patterns. The bimodality index can be computed using either a mixture model-based algorithm or Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. Results We carried out simulation studies and applied the method to real data from a cancer gene expression profiling study. Our findings suggest that BIC behaves like a lax cutoff based on the bimodality index, and that the bimodality index provides an objective measure to identify and rank meaningful and reliable bimodal patterns from large-scale gene expression datasets. R code to compute the bimodality index is included in the ClassDiscovery package of the Object-Oriented Microarray and Proteomic Analysis (OOMPA) suite available at the web site http;//bioinformatics.mdanderson.org/Software/OOMPA. PMID:19718451

  9. Clinical value of integrated-signature miRNAs in colorectal cancer: miRNA expression profiling analysis and experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, YuQun; Song, Mei; Zhou, Wu; Tu, HongXiang; Lin, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) expression profiling of colorectal cancer (CRC) are often inconsistent among different studies. To determine candidate miRNA biomarkers for CRC, we performed an integrative analysis of miRNA expression profiling compared CRC tissues and paired neighboring noncancerous colorectal tissues. Using robust rank aggregation method, we identified a miRNA set of 10 integrated-signature miRNAs. In addition, the qRT-PCR validation demonstrated that 9 miRNAs were consistent dysregulated with the integrative analysis in CRC tissues, 4 miRNAs (miR-21-5p, miR-183-5p, miR-17-5p and miR-20a-5p) were up-regulated expression, and 5 miRNAs (miR-145-5p, miR-195-5p, miR-139-5p, miR-378a-5p and miR-143-3p) were down-regulated expression (all p < 0.05). Consistent with the initial analysis, 7 miRNAs were found to be significantly dysregulated in CRC tissues in TCGA data base, 4 miRNAs (miR-21-5p, miR-183-5p, miR-17-5p and miR-20a-5p) were significantly up-regulated expression, and 3 miRNAs (miR-145-5p, miR-139-5p and miR-378a-5p) were significantly down-regulated expression in CRC tissues (all p < 0.001). Furthermore, miR-17-5p (p = 0.011) and miR-20a-5p (p = 0.003) were up-regulated expression in the III/IV tumor stage, miR-145-5p (p = 0.028) and miR-195-5p (p = 0.001) were significantly increased expression with microscopic vascular invasion in CRC tissues, miR-17-5p (p = 0.037) and miR-145-5p (p = 0.023) were significantly increased expression with lymphovascular invasion. Moreover, Cox regression analysis of CRC patients in TCGA data base showed miR-20a-5p was correlated with survival (hazard ratio: 1.875, 95%CI: 1.088–3.232, p = 0.024). Hence, the finding of current study provides a basic implication of these miRNAs for further clinical application in CRC. PMID:26462034

  10. A unique gene expression signature associated with serotonin 2C receptor RNA editing in the prefrontal cortex and altered in suicide

    PubMed Central

    Di Narzo, Antonio Fabio; Kozlenkov, Alexey; Roussos, Panos; Hao, Ke; Hurd, Yasmin; Lewis, David A.; Sibille, Etienne; Siever, Larry J.; Koonin, Eugene; Dracheva, Stella

    2014-01-01

    Editing of the pre-mRNA for the serotonin receptor 2C (5-HT2CR) by site-specific adenosine deamination (A-to-I pre-mRNA editing) substantially increases the functional plasticity of this key neurotransmitter receptor and is thought to contribute to homeostatic mechanisms in neurons. 5-HT2CR mRNA editing generates up to 24 different receptor isoforms. The extent of editing correlates with 5-HT2CR functional activity: more highly edited isoforms exhibit the least function. Altered 5-HT2CR editing has been reported in postmortem brains of suicide victims. We report a comparative analysis of the connections among 5-HT2CR editing, genome-wide gene expression and DNA methylation in suicide victims, individuals with major depressive disorder and non-psychiatric controls. The results confirm previous findings of an overrepresentation of highly edited mRNA variants (which encode hypoactive 5-HT2CR receptors) in the brains of suicide victims. A large set of genes for which the expression level is associated with editing was detected. This signature set of editing-associated genes is significantly enriched for genes that are involved in synaptic transmission, genes that are preferentially expressed in neurons, and genes whose expression is correlated with the level of DNA methylation. Notably, we report that the link between 5-HT2CR editing and gene expression is disrupted in suicide victims. The results suggest that the postulated homeostatic function of 5-HT2CR editing is dysregulated in individuals who committed suicide. PMID:24781207

  11. Identification of co-expressed gene signatures in mouse B1, marginal zone and B2 B-cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Mabbott, Neil A; Gray, David

    2014-01-01

    In mice, three major B-cell subsets have been identified with distinct functionalities: B1 B cells, marginal zone B cells and follicular B2 B cells. Here, we used the growing body of publicly available transcriptomics data to create an expression atlas of 84 gene expression microarray data sets of distinct mouse B-cell subsets. These data were subjected to network-based cluster analysis using BioLayout Express3D. Using this analysis tool, genes with related functions clustered together in discrete regions of the network graph and enabled the identification of transcriptional networks that underpinned the functional activity of distinct cell populations. Some gene clusters were expressed highly by most of the cell populations included in this analysis (such as those with activity related to house-keeping functions). Others contained genes with expression patterns specific to distinct B-cell subsets. While these clusters contained many genes typically associated with the activity of the cells they were specifically expressed in, many novel B-cell-subset-specific candidate genes were identified. A large number of uncharacterized genes were also represented in these B-cell lineage-specific clusters. Further analysis of the activities of these uncharacterized candidate genes will lead to the identification of novel B-cell lineage-specific transcription factors and regulators of B-cell function. We also analysed 36 microarray data sets from distinct human B-cell populations. These data showed that mouse and human germinal centre B cells shared similar transcriptional features, whereas mouse B1 B cells were distinct from proposed human B1 B cells. PMID:24032749

  12. Mammary gland morphology and gene expression signature of weanling male and female rats following exposure to exogenous estradiol.

    PubMed

    Miousse, Isabelle R; Gomez-Acevedo, Horacio; Sharma, Neha; Vantrease, Jamie; Hennings, Leah; Shankar, Kartik; Cleves, Mario A; Badger, Thomas M; Ronis, Martin Jj

    2013-09-01

    In order to characterize the actions of xenoestrogens, it is essential to possess a solid portrait of the physiological effects of exogenous estradiol. We assessed effects of three doses of exogenous estradiol (E2) (0.1, 1.0 and 10 µg/kg/day) given between postnatal days 21 and 33 on the mammary gland morphology and gene expression profiles of male and female rats compared to vehicle-treated controls. The male mammary gland was more responsive to E2 treatment than in females, with 509 genes regulated >2-fold in a dose-dependent manner in males and only 174 in females. In males, E2 treatment significantly (P < 0.01) increased the number of terminal end buds (TEBs) and the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein (P < 0.05), both of which are indicators of proliferation. This change was linked to a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the expression of the gene encoding amphiregulin, which is known to induce TEB formation. There was also a dose-dependent increase (P < 0.001) in the estrogen-regulated gene encoding the progesterone receptor. In intact females, despite lack of changes in mammary morphology, we observed a dose-dependent increase (P < 0.05) in the expression of genes encoding three milk proteins: whey acidic protein, casein beta and casein kappa. There was a significant (P < 0.05) downregulation of both estrogen receptors in response to E2 treatment. These results suggest that mammary glands of male rats are very sensitive to exogenous E2 during development post-weaning. The dose-dependent increase observed in amphiregulin and progesterone receptor gene expression was linked to morphological changes and represents a reliable and sensitive tool to evaluate estrogenicity. In contrast, intact weanling female rats were less responsive. PMID:23925648

  13. Behaviorally Activated mRNA Expression Profiles Produce Signatures of Learning and Enhanced Inhibition in Aged Rats with Preserved Memory

    PubMed Central

    Haberman, Rebecca P.; Colantuoni, Carlo; Koh, Ming Teng; Gallagher, Michela

    2013-01-01

    Aging is often associated with cognitive decline, but many elderly individuals maintain a high level of function throughout life. Here we studied outbred rats, which also exhibit individual differences across a spectrum of outcomes that includes both preserved and impaired spatial memory. Previous work in this model identified the CA3 subfield of the hippocampus as a region critically affected by age and integral to differing cognitive outcomes. Earlier microarray profiling revealed distinct gene expression profiles in the CA3 region, under basal conditions, for aged rats with intact memory and those with impairment. Because prominent age-related deficits within the CA3 occur during neural encoding of new information, here we used microarray analysis to gain a broad perspective of the aged CA3 transcriptome under activated conditions. Behaviorally-induced CA3 expression profiles differentiated aged rats with intact memory from those with impaired memory. In the activated profile, we observed substantial numbers of genes (greater than 1000) exhibiting increased expression in aged unimpaired rats relative to aged impaired, including many involved in synaptic plasticity and memory mechanisms. This unimpaired aged profile also overlapped significantly with a learning induced gene profile previously acquired in young adults. Alongside the increased transcripts common to both young learning and aged rats with preserved memory, many transcripts behaviorally-activated in the current study had previously been identified as repressed in the aged unimpaired phenotype in basal expression. A further distinct feature of the activated profile of aged rats with intact memory is the increased expression of an ensemble of genes involved in inhibitory synapse function, which could control the phenotype of neural hyperexcitability found in the CA3 region of aged impaired rats. These data support the conclusion that aged subjects with preserved memory recruit adaptive mechanisms to

  14. Behaviorally activated mRNA expression profiles produce signatures of learning and enhanced inhibition in aged rats with preserved memory.

    PubMed

    Haberman, Rebecca P; Colantuoni, Carlo; Koh, Ming Teng; Gallagher, Michela

    2013-01-01

    Aging is often associated with cognitive decline, but many elderly individuals maintain a high level of function throughout life. Here we studied outbred rats, which also exhibit individual differences across a spectrum of outcomes that includes both preserved and impaired spatial memory. Previous work in this model identified the CA3 subfield of the hippocampus as a region critically affected by age and integral to differing cognitive outcomes. Earlier microarray profiling revealed distinct gene expression profiles in the CA3 region, under basal conditions, for aged rats with intact memory and those with impairment. Because prominent age-related deficits within the CA3 occur during neural encoding of new information, here we used microarray analysis to gain a broad perspective of the aged CA3 transcriptome under activated conditions. Behaviorally-induced CA3 expression profiles differentiated aged rats with intact memory from those with impaired memory. In the activated profile, we observed substantial numbers of genes (greater than 1000) exhibiting increased expression in aged unimpaired rats relative to aged impaired, including many involved in synaptic plasticity and memory mechanisms. This unimpaired aged profile also overlapped significantly with a learning induced gene profile previously acquired in young adults. Alongside the increased transcripts common to both young learning and aged rats with preserved memory, many transcripts behaviorally-activated in the current study had previously been identified as repressed in the aged unimpaired phenotype in basal expression. A further distinct feature of the activated profile of aged rats with intact memory is the increased expression of an ensemble of genes involved in inhibitory synapse function, which could control the phenotype of neural hyperexcitability found in the CA3 region of aged impaired rats. These data support the conclusion that aged subjects with preserved memory recruit adaptive mechanisms to

  15. WDR5 Supports an N-Myc Transcriptional Complex That Drives a Protumorigenic Gene Expression Signature in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuting; Bell, Jessica L; Carter, Daniel; Gherardi, Samuele; Poulos, Rebecca C; Milazzo, Giorgio; Wong, Jason W H; Al-Awar, Rima; Tee, Andrew E; Liu, Pei Y; Liu, Bing; Atmadibrata, Bernard; Wong, Matthew; Trahair, Toby; Zhao, Quan; Shohet, Jason M; Haupt, Ygal; Schulte, Johannes H; Brown, Peter J; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Vedadi, Masoud; MacKenzie, Karen L; Hüttelmaier, Stefan; Perini, Giovanni; Marshall, Glenn M; Braithwaite, Antony; Liu, Tao

    2015-12-01

    MYCN gene amplification in neuroblastoma drives a gene expression program that correlates strongly with aggressive disease. Mechanistically, trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) at target gene promoters is a strict prerequisite for this transcriptional program to be enacted. WDR5 is a histone H3K4 presenter that has been found to have an essential role in H3K4 trimethylation. For this reason, in this study, we investigated the relationship between WDR5-mediated H3K4 trimethylation and N-Myc transcriptional programs in neuroblastoma cells. N-Myc upregulated WDR5 expression in neuroblastoma cells. Gene expression analysis revealed that WDR5 target genes included those with MYC-binding elements at promoters such as MDM2. We showed that WDR5 could form a protein complex at the MDM2 promoter with N-Myc, but not p53, leading to histone H3K4 trimethylation and activation of MDM2 transcription. RNAi-mediated attenuation of WDR5 upregulated expression of wild-type but not mutant p53, an effect associated with growth inhibition and apoptosis. Similarly, a small-molecule antagonist of WDR5 reduced N-Myc/WDR5 complex formation, N-Myc target gene expression, and cell growth in neuroblastoma cells. In MYCN-transgenic mice, WDR5 was overexpressed in precancerous ganglion and neuroblastoma cells compared with normal ganglion cells. Clinically, elevated levels of WDR5 in neuroblastoma specimens were an independent predictor of poor overall survival. Overall, our results identify WDR5 as a key cofactor for N-Myc-regulated transcriptional activation and tumorigenesis and as a novel therapeutic target for MYCN-amplified neuroblastomas. PMID:26471359

  16. Residual expression of reprogramming factors affects the transcriptional program and epigenetic signatures of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Cesar A; Christodoulou, Constantina; Gianotti-Sommer, Andreia; Shen, Steven S; Sailaja, Badi Sri; Hezroni, Hadas; Spira, Avrum; Meshorer, Eran; Kotton, Darrell N; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Delivery of the transcription factors Oct4, Klf4, Sox2 and c-Myc via integrating viral vectors has been widely employed to generate induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from both normal and disease-specific somatic tissues, providing an invaluable resource for medical research and drug development. Residual reprogramming transgene expression from integrated viruses nevertheless alters the biological properties of iPSCs and has been associated with a reduced developmental competence both in vivo and in vitro. We performed transcriptional profiling of mouse iPSC lines before and after excision of a polycistronic lentiviral reprogramming vector to systematically define the overall impact of persistent transgene expression on the molecular features of iPSCs. We demonstrate that residual expression of the Yamanaka factors prevents iPSCs from acquiring the transcriptional program exhibited by embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and that the expression profiles of iPSCs generated with and without c-Myc are indistinguishable. After vector excision, we find 36% of iPSC clones show normal methylation of the Gtl2 region, an imprinted locus that marks ESC-equivalent iPSC lines. Furthermore, we show that the reprogramming factor Klf4 binds to the promoter region of Gtl2. Regardless of Gtl2 methylation status, we find similar endodermal and hepatocyte differentiation potential comparing syngeneic Gtl2(ON) vs Gtl2(OFF) iPSC clones. Our findings provide new insights into the reprogramming process and emphasize the importance of generating iPSCs free of any residual transgene expression. PMID:23272148

  17. Hormonally defined pancreatic and duodenal neuroendocrine tumors differ in their transcription factor signatures: expression of ISL1, PDX1, NGN3, and CDX2.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Gratiana; Konukiewitz, Björn; Schmitt, Anja; Perren, Aurel; Klöppel, Günter

    2011-08-01

    We recently identified the transcription factor (TF) islet 1 gene product (ISL1) as a marker for well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (P-NETs). In order to better understand the expression of the four TFs, ISL1, pancreatico-duodenal homeobox 1 gene product (PDX1), neurogenin 3 gene product (NGN3), and CDX-2 homeobox gene product (CDX2), that mainly govern the development and differentiation of the pancreas and duodenum, we studied their expression in hormonally defined P-NETs and duodenal (D-) NETs. Thirty-six P-NETs and 14 D-NETs were immunostained with antibodies against the four pancreatic hormones, gastrin, serotonin, calcitonin, ISL1, PDX1, NGN3, and CDX2. The TF expression pattern of each case was correlated with the tumor's hormonal profile. Insulin-positive NETs expressed only ISL1 (10/10) and PDX1 (9/10). Glucagon-positive tumors expressed ISL1 (7/7) and were almost negative for the other TFs. Gastrin-positive NETs, whether of duodenal or pancreatic origin, frequently expressed PDX1 (17/18), ISL1 (14/18), and NGN3 (14/18). CDX2 was mainly found in the gastrin-positive P-NETs (5/8) and rarely in the D-NETs (1/10). Somatostatin-positive NETs, whether duodenal or pancreatic in origin, expressed ISL1 (9/9), PDX1 (3/9), and NGN3 (3/9). The remaining tumors showed labeling for ISL1 in addition to NGN3. There was no association between a particular TF pattern and NET features such as grade, size, location, presence of metastases, and functional activity. We conclude from our data that there is a correlation between TF expression patterns and certain hormonally defined P-NET and D-NET types, suggesting that most of the tumor types originate from embryologically determined precursor cells. The observed TF signatures do not allow us to distinguish P-NETs from D-NETs. PMID:21739268

  18. Gene expression profiling in Daphnia magna, part II: validation of a copper specific gene expression signature with effluent from two copper mines in California.

    PubMed

    Poynton, Helen C; Zuzow, Rick; Loguinov, Alexandre V; Perkins, Edward J; Vulpe, Chris D

    2008-08-15

    Genomic technologies show great potential for classifying disease states and toxicological impacts from exposure to chemicals into functional categories. In environmental monitoring, the ability to classify field samples and predict the pollutants present in these samples could contribute to monitoring efforts and the diagnosis of contaminated sites. Using gene expression analysis, we challenged our custom Daphnia magna cDNA microarray to determine the presence of a specific metal toxicant in blinded field samples collected from two copper mines in California. We compared the gene expression profiles from our field samples to previously established expression profiles for Cu, Cd, and Zn. The expression profiles from the Cu-containing field samples clustered with the laboratory-exposed Cu-specific gene expression profiles and included genes previously identified as copper biomarkers, verifying that gene expression analysis can predict environmental exposure to a specific pollutant. In addition, our study revealed that upstream field samples containing undetectable levels of Cu caused the differential expression of only a few genes, lending support for the concept of a no observed transcriptional effect level (NOTEL). If confirmed by further studies, the NOTEL may play an important role in discriminating polluted and nonpolluted sites in future monitoring efforts. PMID:18767696

  19. Gene expression signature-based chemical genomic prediction identifies a novel class of HSP90 pathway modulators.

    PubMed

    Hieronymus, Haley; Lamb, Justin; Ross, Kenneth N; Peng, Xiao P; Clement, Cristina; Rodina, Anna; Nieto, Maria; Du, Jinyan; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Raj, Srilakshmi M; Maloney, Katherine N; Clardy, Jon; Hahn, William C; Chiosis, Gabriela; Golub, Todd R

    2006-10-01

    Although androgen receptor (AR)-mediated signaling is central to prostate cancer, the ability to modulate AR signaling states is limited. Here we establish a chemical genomic approach for discovery and target prediction of modulators of cancer phenotypes, as exemplified by AR signaling. We first identify AR activation inhibitors, including a group of structurally related compounds comprising celastrol, gedunin, and derivatives. To develop an in silico approach for target pathway identification, we apply a gene expression-based analysis that classifies HSP90 inhibitors as having similar activity to celastrol and gedunin. Validating this prediction, we demonstrate that celastrol and gedunin inhibit HSP90 activity and HSP90 clients, including AR. Broadly, this work identifies new modes of HSP90 modulation through a gene expression-based strategy. PMID:17010675

  20. An Integrative Model of miRNA and mRNA Expression Signature for Patients of Breast Invasive Carcinoma with Radiotherapy Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Bing, Zhitong; Tian, Jinhui; Zhang, Jingyun; Li, Xiuxia; Wang, Xiaohu; Yang, Kehu

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy is widely used in breast cancer treatment. The radiotherapy for breast invasive carcinoma (BRCA) presents challenges with the complex clinical factors, and too many genes have been found to be associated with BRCA radiotherapy prognosis. The aim of this study was to construct an integrative model to combine the clinical data and RNA expression data (including microRNA and mRNA) to predict the survival durations of BRCA patients with radiotherapy. Also, the authors try to find the key regulation pairs between mRNA and miRNA from prediction. They collected mRNA and microRNA expression profiles and gathered the corresponding clinical data of 73 BRCA patients with radiotherapy from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). According to an integrative model from univariate Cox regression between RNA expression and patient survival, they classified the patients with radiotherapy into low-risk and high-risk groups. The results showed that nine mRNAs were considered as protective genes and five miRNAs and eight mRNAs were considered as high-risk genes. Moreover, the high-risk group has a significantly shorter survival time in comparison with the low-risk group by the log-rank test (p = 0.0039). The reliability of the gene signature was validated by an independent data set from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). Furthermore, three pairs of miRNA-mRNA, closely associated to survival, were identified. These findings and method may prove valuable for improving the clinical management of BRCA patients with radiotherapy. PMID:27610468

  1. Gene expression profiling of MYC-driven tumor signatures in porcine liver stem cells by transcriptome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Aravalli, Rajagopal N; Talbot, Neil C; Steer, Clifford J

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To identify the genes induced and regulated by the MYC protein in generating tumors from liver stem cells. METHODS: In this study, we have used an immortal porcine liver stem cell line, PICM-19, to study the role of c-MYC in hepatocarcinogenesis. PICM-19 cells were converted into cancer cells (PICM-19-CSCs) by overexpressing human MYC. To identify MYC-driven differential gene expression, transcriptome sequencing was carried out by RNA sequencing, and genes identified by this method were validated using real-time PCR. In vivo tumorigenicity studies were then conducted by injecting PICM-19-CSCs into the flanks of immunodeficient mice. RESULTS: Our results showed that MYC-overexpressing PICM-19 stem cells formed tumors in immunodeficient mice demonstrating that a single oncogene was sufficient to convert them into cancer cells (PICM-19-CSCs). By using comparative bioinformatics analyses, we have determined that > 1000 genes were differentially expressed between PICM-19 and PICM-19-CSCs. Gene ontology analysis further showed that the MYC-induced, altered gene expression was primarily associated with various cellular processes, such as metabolism, cell adhesion, growth and proliferation, cell cycle, inflammation and tumorigenesis. Interestingly, six genes expressed by PICM-19 cells (CDO1, C22orf39, DKK2, ENPEP, GPX6, SRPX2) were completely silenced after MYC-induction in PICM-19-CSCs, suggesting that the absence of these genes may be critical for inducing tumorigenesis. CONCLUSION: MYC-driven genes may serve as promising candidates for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma therapeutics that would not have deleterious effects on other cell types in the liver. PMID:25717234

  2. Gene Expression Signatures from Three Genetically Separable Resistance Gene Signaling Pathways for Downy Mildew Resistance1[w

    PubMed Central

    Eulgem, Thomas; Weigman, Victor J.; Chang, Hur-Song; McDowell, John M.; Holub, Eric B.; Glazebrook, Jane; Zhu, Tong; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2004-01-01

    Resistance gene-dependent disease resistance to pathogenic microorganisms is mediated by genetically separable regulatory pathways. Using the GeneChip Arabidopsis genome array, we compared the expression profiles of approximately 8,000 Arabidopsis genes following activation of three RPP genes directed against the pathogenic oomycete Peronospora parasitica. Judicious choice of P. parasitica isolates and loss of resistance plant mutants allowed us to compare the responses controlled by three genetically distinct resistance gene-mediated signaling pathways. We found that all three pathways can converge, leading to up-regulation of common sets of target genes. At least two temporal patterns of gene activation are triggered by two of the pathways examined. Many genes defined by their early and transient increases in expression encode proteins that execute defense biochemistry, while genes exhibiting a sustained or delayed expression increase predominantly encode putative signaling proteins. Previously defined and novel sequence motifs were found to be enriched in the promoters of genes coregulated by the local defense-signaling network. These putative promoter elements may operate downstream from signal convergence points. PMID:15181204

  3. Gene expression in human lupus: bone marrow differentiates active from inactive patients and displays apoptosis and granulopoiesis signatures

    PubMed Central

    Nakou, Magdalene; Knowlton, Nicholas; Frank, Mark B.; Bertsias, George; Osban, Jeanette; Sandel, Clayton E.; Papadaki, Eleni; Raptopoulou, Amalia; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos; Kritikos, Heraklis; Tassiulas, Ioannis; Centola, Michael; Boumpas, Dimitrios T.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The cells of the immune system originate from the bone marrow (BM), where many of them also mature. To better understand the aberrant immune response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we examined the BM in lupus patients using DNA microarrays and compared it to the peripheral blood (PB). Patients and Methods Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) from 20 SLE patients (11 with active disease and 9 with inactive disease) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 27 patients (16 active/ 11 inactive); BMMCs and PBMCs from 7 healthy individuals and 3 osteoarthritis patients served as controls. Samples were analyzed on genome-scale microarrays with 21,329 genes represented. Results We found 102 differentially expressed genes between patients’ and controls’ BMMCs (unpaired student t-test), involved in various biologic processes; 53 of them are involved in major networks including cell death, growth, signaling and proliferation. Comparative analysis between BM and PB of patients identified 88 genes differentially expressed; 61 out of 88 participate in cell growth and differentiation, cellular movement and morphology, immune response and other hematopoietic cell functions. Unsupervised clustering of highly expressed genes revealed two major SLE patient clusters (active and inactive) in BM, but not in PB. The upregulated genes in the bone marrow of active patients included genes involved in cell death and granulopoiesis. Conclusion Microarray analysis of the bone marrow differentiates active from inactive lupus patients and provides further evidence for the role of apoptosis and granulocytes in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:18975309

  4. Temporal Anomalies in Immunological Gene Expression in a Time Series of Wild Mice: Signature of an Epidemic?

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, Ida M.; Lowe, Ann; Ralli, Catriona; Bradley, Janette E.; Jackson, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Although the ecological importance of coinfection is increasingly recognized, analyses of microbial pathogen dynamics in wildlife usually focus on an ad hoc subset of the species present due to technological limitations on detection. Here we demonstrate the use of expression profiles for immunological genes (pattern recognition receptors, cytokines and transcription factors) as a means to identify, without preconception, the likelihood of important acute microbial infections in wildlife. Using a wood mouse population in the UK as a model we identified significant temporal clusters of individuals with extreme expression of immunological mediators across multiple loci, typical of an acute microbial infection. These clusters were circumstantially associated with demographic perturbation in the summertime wood mouse population. Animals in one cluster also had significantly higher individual macroparasite burdens than contemporaries with “normal” expression patterns. If the extreme transcriptional profiles observed are induced by an infectious agent then this implicates macroparasites as a possible player in mediating individual susceptibility or resilience to infection. The form of survey described here, combined with next generation nucleic acids sequencing methods for the broad detection of microbial infectious agents in individuals with anomalous immunological transcriptional profiles, could be a powerful tool for revealing unrecognized, ecologically important infectious agents circulating in wildlife populations. PMID:21629775

  5. Expression profiling of selected microRNA signatures in plasma and tissues of Saudi colorectal cancer patients by qPCR

    PubMed Central

    AL-SHEIKH, YAZEED A.; GHNEIM, HAZEM K.; SOFTA, KHALIL I.; AL-JOBRAN, ABDULRAHMAN A.; AL-OBEED, OMAR; MOHAMED, MANSOOR A.V.; ABDULLA, MAHA; ABOUL-SOUD, MOURAD A.M.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) have been advocated as potentially robust and highly stable biomarkers of diverse disease conditions including cancer. The primary aim of this study was two-fold: i) to profile the expression levels of selected mature miRNA signature genes, such as miR-145, miR-195, miR-29 and miR-92, in a paired-study design of 20 colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues from patients versus adjacent neoplasm-free mucosal tissues employing reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction; and ii) to examine their expression level in the plasma of the same CRC patients in relation to the age-matched plasma of healthy controls. Statistically significant (P<0.01) increases in miR-29 (2.5) and miR-92 (2.6) were observed in CRC tissues compared with adjacent neoplasm-free mucosal tissues. Profiling of CRC plasma samples showed that the expression levels of circulating miR-29 and miR-92 were significantly higher (P<0.01) than in the age-matched normal plasma. By contrast, miR-145 and miR-195 exhibited significant (P<0.05) decreases in their mean expression levels in CRC tissue samples in relation to the normal tissues. The mean expression levels of miR-145 and miR-195 were significantly lower (P<0.05) in CRC plasma than the healthy controls. Distinct stage-dependent changes in the expression level of the four miRNA gene profiles were observed between stages II and IV plasma of CRC patients relative to the control plasma. Taken together, the results clearly reflect a similar trend for the four miRNA expression levels in tissue and plasma as well as the positive correlation in the levels of miRNAs in tissues and plasma. These findings may be useful to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying colorectal carcinogenesis and to underscore the potential of the investigated miRNAs as novel early diagnostic biomarkers of CRC. PMID:26893751

  6. Integrated microRNA, gene expression and transcription factors signature in papillary thyroid cancer with lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Othman, Sri Noraima; Mohamad Yusof, Azliana; Abdullah Suhaimi, Shahrun Niza; Muhammad, Rohaizak; Jamal, Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Background. Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the commonest thyroid malignancy originating from the follicle cells in the thyroid. Despite a good overall prognosis, certain high-risk cases as in those with lymph node metastasis (LNM) have progressive disease and poorer prognosis. MicroRNAs are a class of non-protein-coding, 19-24 nucleotides single-stranded RNAs which regulate gene expression and these molecules have been shown to play a role in LNM. The integrated analysis of miRNAs and gene expression profiles together with transcription factors (TFs) has been shown to improve the identification of functional miRNA-target gene-TF relationships, providing a more complete view of molecular events underlying metastasis process. Objectives. We reanalyzed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) datasets on PTC to identify differentially expressed miRNAs/genes in PTC patients with LNM-positive (LNM-P) versus lymph node negative (LNN) PTC patients and to investigate the miRNA-gene-TF regulatory circuit that regulate LNM in PTC. Results. PTC patients with LNM (PTC LNM-P) have a significantly shorter disease-free survival rate compared to PTC patients without LNM (PTC LNN) (Log-rank Mantel Cox test, p = 0.0049). We identified 181 significantly differentially expressed miRNAs in PTC LNM-P versus PTC LNN; 110 were upregulated and 71 were downregulated. The five topmost deregulated miRNAs were hsa-miR-146b, hsa-miR-375, hsa-miR-31, hsa-miR-7-2 and hsa-miR-204. In addition, 395 miRNAs were differentially expressed between PTC LNM-P and normal thyroid while 400 miRNAs were differentially expressed between PTC LNN and normal thyroid. We found four significant enrichment pathways potentially involved in metastasis to the lymph nodes, namely oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos), cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), leukocyte transendothelial migration and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction. OxPhos was the most significantly perturbed pathway (p = 4.70E-06) involving downregulation of 90

  7. Integrated microRNA, gene expression and transcription factors signature in papillary thyroid cancer with lymph node metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad Yusof, Azliana; Abdullah Suhaimi, Shahrun Niza; Muhammad, Rohaizak; Jamal, Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Background. Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the commonest thyroid malignancy originating from the follicle cells in the thyroid. Despite a good overall prognosis, certain high-risk cases as in those with lymph node metastasis (LNM) have progressive disease and poorer prognosis. MicroRNAs are a class of non-protein-coding, 19–24 nucleotides single-stranded RNAs which regulate gene expression and these molecules have been shown to play a role in LNM. The integrated analysis of miRNAs and gene expression profiles together with transcription factors (TFs) has been shown to improve the identification of functional miRNA-target gene-TF relationships, providing a more complete view of molecular events underlying metastasis process. Objectives. We reanalyzed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) datasets on PTC to identify differentially expressed miRNAs/genes in PTC patients with LNM-positive (LNM-P) versus lymph node negative (LNN) PTC patients and to investigate the miRNA-gene-TF regulatory circuit that regulate LNM in PTC. Results. PTC patients with LNM (PTC LNM-P) have a significantly shorter disease-free survival rate compared to PTC patients without LNM (PTC LNN) (Log-rank Mantel Cox test, p = 0.0049). We identified 181 significantly differentially expressed miRNAs in PTC LNM-P versus PTC LNN; 110 were upregulated and 71 were downregulated. The five topmost deregulated miRNAs were hsa-miR-146b, hsa-miR-375, hsa-miR-31, hsa-miR-7-2 and hsa-miR-204. In addition, 395 miRNAs were differentially expressed between PTC LNM-P and normal thyroid while 400 miRNAs were differentially expressed between PTC LNN and normal thyroid. We found four significant enrichment pathways potentially involved in metastasis to the lymph nodes, namely oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos), cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), leukocyte transendothelial migration and cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction. OxPhos was the most significantly perturbed pathway (p = 4.70E−06) involving downregulation

  8. Gene expression signature-based approach identifies a pro-resolving mechanism of action for histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Melendez, T; Dalli, J; Perretti, M

    2013-01-01

    Despite several therapies being currently available to treat inflammatory diseases, new drugs to treat chronic conditions with less side effects and lower production costs are still needed. An innovative approach to drug discovery, the Connectivity Map (CMap), shows how integrating genome-wide gene expression data of drugs and diseases can accelerate this process. Comparison of genome-wide gene expression data generated with annexin A1 (AnxA1) with the CMap revealed significant alignment with gene profiles elicited by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs), what made us to hypothesize that AnxA1 might mediate the anti-inflammatory actions of HDACIs. Addition of HDACIs (valproic acid, sodium butyrate and thricostatin A) to mouse macrophages caused externalization of AnxA1 with concomitant inhibition of cytokine gene expression and release, events that occurred independently as this inhibition was retained in AnxA1 null macrophages. In contrast, novel AnxA1-mediated functions for HDACIs could be unveiled, including promotion of neutrophil apoptosis and macrophage phagocytosis, both steps crucial for effective resolution of inflammation. In a model of acute resolving inflammation, administration of valproic acid and sodium butyrate to mice at the peak of disease accelerated resolution processes in wild type, but much more modestly in AnxA1 null mice. Deeper analyses revealed a role for endogenous AnxA1 in the induction of neutrophil death in vivo by HDACIs. In summary, interrogation of the CMap revealed an unexpected association between HDACIs and AnxA1 that translated in mechanistic findings with particular impact on the processes that regulate the resolution of inflammation. We propose non-genomic modulation of AnxA1 in immune cells as a novel mechanism of action for HDACIs, which may underlie their reported efficacy in models of chronic inflammatory pathologies. PMID:23222458

  9. Avian Resistance to Campylobacter jejuni Colonization Is Associated with an Intestinal Immunogene Expression Signature Identified by mRNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Sarah; Meade, Kieran G.; Allan, Brenda; Lloyd, Andrew T.; Kenny, Elaine; Cormican, Paul; Morris, Derek W.; Bradley, Daniel G.; O'Farrelly, Cliona

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis and is associated with several post-infectious manifestations, including onset of the autoimmune neuropathy Guillain-Barré syndrome, causing significant morbidity and mortality. Poorly-cooked chicken meat is the most frequent source of infection as C. jejuni colonizes the avian intestine in a commensal relationship. However, not all chickens are equally colonized and resistance seems to be genetically determined. We hypothesize that differences in immune response may contribute to variation in colonization levels between susceptible and resistant birds. Using high-throughput sequencing in an avian infection model, we investigate gene expression associated with resistance or susceptibility to colonization of the gastrointestinal tract with C. jejuni and find that gut related immune mechanisms are critical for regulating colonization. Amongst a single population of 300 4-week old chickens, there was clear segregation in levels of C. jejuni colonization 48 hours post-exposure. RNAseq analysis of caecal tissue from 14 C. jejuni-susceptible and 14 C. jejuni-resistant birds generated over 363 million short mRNA sequences which were investigated to identify 219 differentially expressed genes. Significantly higher expression of genes involved in the innate immune response, cytokine signaling, B cell and T cell activation and immunoglobulin production, as well as the renin-angiotensin system was observed in resistant birds, suggesting an early active immune response to C. jejuni. Lower expression of these genes in colonized birds suggests suppression or inhibition of a clearing immune response thus facilitating commensal colonization and generating vectors for zoonotic transmission. This study describes biological processes regulating C. jejuni colonization of the avian intestine and gives insight into the differential immune mechanisms incited in response to commensal bacteria in general

  10. Gene expression signatures in CD34+-progenitor-derived dendritic cells exposed to the chemical contact allergen nickel sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeters, Elke . E-mail: elke.schoeters@vito.be; Nuijten, Jean-Marie; Heuvel, Rosette L. van den; Nelissen, Inge; Witters, Hilda; Schoeters, Greet E.R.; Tendeloo, Vigor F.I. van; Berneman, Zwi N.; Verheyen, Geert R.

    2006-10-01

    The detection of the sensitizing potential of chemicals is of great importance to industry. A promising in vitro alternative to the currently applied animal assays for sensitization testing makes use of dendritic cells (DCs) that have the capability to process and present antigens to naive T cells and induce their proliferation. Here, we studied changes in gene expression profiles after exposing DCs to the contact allergen nickel sulfate. CD34+-progenitor-derived DCs, initiated from 3 different donors, were exposed to 60 {mu}M nickel sulfate, during 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h. cDNA microarrays were used to assess the transcriptional activity of about 11,000 genes. Significant changes in the expression of 283 genes were observed; 178 genes were up-regulated and 93 down-regulated. These genes were involved in metabolism, cell structure, immune response, transcription, signal transduction, transport, and apoptosis. No functional information was found for 74 genes. Real-time RT-PCR was used to confirm the microarray results of 12 genes. In addition, 3 DC maturation markers not present on the microarrays (DEC205, DC LAMP and CCR7) were analyzed using real-time RT-PCR and found to be up-regulated at several time points. Our data indicate that a broad range of biological processes is influenced by nickel. Some processes are clearly linked to the immune response and DC maturation, others may indicate a toxic effect of nickel.

  11. First Generation Gene Expression Signature for Early Prediction of Late Occurring Hematological Acute Radiation Syndrome in Baboons.

    PubMed

    Port, M; Herodin, F; Valente, M; Drouet, M; Lamkowski, A; Majewski, M; Abend, M

    2016-07-01

    We implemented a two-stage study to predict late occurring hematologic acute radiation syndrome (HARS) in a baboon model based on gene expression changes measured in peripheral blood within the first two days after irradiation. Eighteen baboons were irradiated to simulate different patterns of partial-body and total-body exposure, which corresponded to an equivalent dose of 2.5 or 5 Gy. According to changes in blood cell counts the surviving baboons (n = 17) exhibited mild (H1-2, n = 4) or more severe (H2-3, n = 13) HARS. Blood samples taken before irradiation served as unexposed control (H0, n = 17). For stage I of this study, a whole genome screen (mRNA microarrays) was performed using a portion of the samples (H0, n = 5; H1-2, n = 4; H2-3, n = 5). For stage II, using the remaining samples and the more sensitive methodology, qRT-PCR, validation was performed on candidate genes that were differentially up- or down-regulated during the first two days after irradiation. Differential gene expression was defined as significant (P < 0.05) and greater than or equal to a twofold difference above a H0 classification. From approximately 20,000 genes, on average 46% appeared to be expressed. On day 1 postirradiation for H2-3, approximately 2-3 times more genes appeared up-regulated (1,418 vs. 550) or down-regulated (1,603 vs. 735) compared to H1-2. This pattern became more pronounced at day 2 while the number of differentially expressed genes decreased. The specific genes showed an enrichment of biological processes coding for immune system processes, natural killer cell activation and immune response (P = 1 × E-06 up to 9 × E-14). Based on the P values, magnitude and sustained differential gene expression over time, we selected 89 candidate genes for validation using qRT-PCR. Ultimately, 22 genes were confirmed for identification of H1-3 classifications and seven genes for identification of H2-3 classifications using qRT-PCR. For H1-3 classifications, most genes were

  12. Diagnostic marker signature for esophageal cancer from transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Warnecke-Eberz, Ute; Metzger, Ralf; Hölscher, Arnulf H; Drebber, Uta; Bollschweiler, Elfriede

    2016-05-01

    Esophageal cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage. Diagnostic markers are needed for achieving a cure in esophageal cancer detecting and treating tumor cells earlier. In patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus (ESCC), we profiled the gene expression of ESCC compared to corresponding normal biopsies for diagnostic markers by genome microarrays. Profiling of gene expression identified 4844 genes differentially expressed, 2122 upregulated and 2722 downregulated in ESCC. Twenty-three overexpressed candidates with best scores from significance analysis have been selected for further analysis by TaqMan low-density array-technique using a validation cohort of 40 patients. The verification rate was 100 % for ESCC. Twenty-two markers were additionally overexpressed in adenocarcinoma of the esophagus (EAC). The markers significantly overexpressed already in earlier tumor stages (pT1-2) of both histological subtypes (n = 19) have been clustered in a "diagnostic signature": PLA2G7, PRAME, MMP1, MMP3, MMP12, LIlRB2, TREM2, CHST2, IGFBP2, IGFBP7, KCNJ8, EMILIN2, CTHRC1, EMR2, WDR72, LPCAT1, COL4A2, CCL4, and SNX10. The marker signature will be translated to clinical practice to prove its diagnostic impact. This diagnostic signature may contribute to the earlier detection of tumor cells, with the aim to complement clinical techniques resulting in the development of better detection of concepts of esophageal cancer for earlier therapy and more favorite prognosis. PMID:26631031

  13. Analysis of Post-Traumatic Brain Injury Gene Expression Signature Reveals Tubulins, Nfe2l2, Nfkb, Cd44, and S100a4 as Treatment Targets

    PubMed Central

    Lipponen, Anssi; Paananen, Jussi; Puhakka, Noora; Pitkänen, Asla

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to define the chronically altered gene expression signature of traumatic brain injury (TBI-sig) to discover novel treatments to reverse pathologic gene expression or reinforce the expression of recovery-related genes. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing was performed at 3 months post-TBI induced by lateral fluid-percussion injury in rats. We found 4964 regulated genes in the perilesional cortex and 1966 in the thalamus (FDR < 0.05). TBI-sig was used for a LINCS analysis which identified 11 compounds that showed a strong connectivity with the TBI-sig in neuronal cell lines. Of these, celecoxib and sirolimus were recently reported to have a disease-modifying effect in in vivo animal models of epilepsy. Other compounds revealed by the analysis were BRD-K91844626, BRD-A11009626, NO-ASA, BRD-K55260239, SDZ-NKT-343, STK-661558, BRD-K75971499, ionomycin, and desmethylclomipramine. Network analysis of overlapping genes revealed the effects on tubulins (Tubb2a, Tubb3, Tubb4b), Nfe2l2, S100a4, Cd44, and Nfkb2, all of which are linked to TBI-relevant outcomes, including epileptogenesis and tissue repair. Desmethylclomipramine modulated most of the gene targets considered favorable for TBI outcome. Our data demonstrate long-lasting transcriptomics changes after TBI. LINCS analysis predicted that these changes could be modulated by various compounds, some of which are already in clinical use but never tested in TBI. PMID:27530814

  14. Analysis of Post-Traumatic Brain Injury Gene Expression Signature Reveals Tubulins, Nfe2l2, Nfkb, Cd44, and S100a4 as Treatment Targets.

    PubMed

    Lipponen, Anssi; Paananen, Jussi; Puhakka, Noora; Pitkänen, Asla

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to define the chronically altered gene expression signature of traumatic brain injury (TBI-sig) to discover novel treatments to reverse pathologic gene expression or reinforce the expression of recovery-related genes. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing was performed at 3 months post-TBI induced by lateral fluid-percussion injury in rats. We found 4964 regulated genes in the perilesional cortex and 1966 in the thalamus (FDR < 0.05). TBI-sig was used for a LINCS analysis which identified 11 compounds that showed a strong connectivity with the TBI-sig in neuronal cell lines. Of these, celecoxib and sirolimus were recently reported to have a disease-modifying effect in in vivo animal models of epilepsy. Other compounds revealed by the analysis were BRD-K91844626, BRD-A11009626, NO-ASA, BRD-K55260239, SDZ-NKT-343, STK-661558, BRD-K75971499, ionomycin, and desmethylclomipramine. Network analysis of overlapping genes revealed the effects on tubulins (Tubb2a, Tubb3, Tubb4b), Nfe2l2, S100a4, Cd44, and Nfkb2, all of which are linked to TBI-relevant outcomes, including epileptogenesis and tissue repair. Desmethylclomipramine modulated most of the gene targets considered favorable for TBI outcome. Our data demonstrate long-lasting transcriptomics changes after TBI. LINCS analysis predicted that these changes could be modulated by various compounds, some of which are already in clinical use but never tested in TBI. PMID:27530814

  15. An Integrated Analysis of MicroRNA and mRNA Expression Profiles to Identify RNA Expression Signatures in Lambskin Hair Follicles in Hu Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xiaoyang; Sun, Wei; Yin, Jinfeng; Ni, Rong; Su, Rui; Wang, Qingzeng; Gao, Wen; Bao, Jianjun; Yu, Jiarui; Wang, Lihong; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Wave patterns in lambskin hair follicles are an important factor determining the quality of sheep’s wool. Hair follicles in lambskin from Hu sheep, a breed unique to China, have 3 types of waves, designated as large, medium, and small. The quality of wool from small wave follicles is excellent, while the quality of large waves is considered poor. Because no molecular and biological studies on hair follicles of these sheep have been conducted to date, the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of different wave patterns is currently unknown. The aim of this article was to screen the candidate microRNAs (miRNA) and genes for the development of hair follicles in Hu sheep. Two-day-old Hu lambs were selected from full-sib individuals that showed large, medium, and small waves. Integrated analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression profiles employed high-throughout sequencing technology. Approximately 13, 24, and 18 differentially expressed miRNAs were found between small and large waves, small and medium waves, and medium and large waves, respectively. A total of 54, 190, and 81 differentially expressed genes were found between small and large waves, small and medium waves, and medium and large waves, respectively, by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. Differentially expressed genes were classified using gene ontology and pathway analyses. They were found to be mainly involved in cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, growth, immune response, and ion transport, and were associated with MAPK and the Notch signaling pathway. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses of differentially-expressed miRNA and genes were consistent with sequencing results. Integrated analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression indicated that, compared to small waves, large waves included 4 downregulated miRNAs that had regulatory effects on 8 upregulated genes and 3 upregulated miRNAs, which in turn influenced 13 downregulated genes. Compared to small waves

  16. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed? Pneumonia can be hard to diagnose because it may ... than these other conditions. Your doctor will diagnose pneumonia based on your medical history, a physical exam, ...

  17. Spatio-Temporal Gene Expression Profiling during In Vivo Early Ovarian Folliculogenesis: Integrated Transcriptomic Study and Molecular Signature of Early Follicular Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Agnes; Servin, Bertrand; Mulsant, Philippe; Mandon-Pepin, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    Background The successful achievement of early ovarian folliculogenesis is important for fertility and reproductive life span. This complex biological process requires the appropriate expression of numerous genes at each developmental stage, in each follicular compartment. Relatively little is known at present about the molecular mechanisms that drive this process, and most gene expression studies have been performed in rodents and without considering the different follicular compartments. Results We used RNA-seq technology to explore the sheep transcriptome during early ovarian follicular development in the two main compartments: oocytes and granulosa cells. We documented the differential expression of 3,015 genes during this phase and described the gene expression dynamic specific to these compartments. We showed that important steps occurred during primary/secondary transition in sheep. We also described the in vivo molecular course of a number of pathways. In oocytes, these pathways documented the chronology of the acquisition of meiotic competence, migration and cellular organization, while in granulosa cells they concerned adhesion, the formation of cytoplasmic projections and steroid synthesis. This study proposes the involvement in this process of several members of the integrin and BMP families. The expression of genes such as Kruppel-like factor 9 (KLF9) and BMP binding endothelial regulator (BMPER) was highlighted for the first time during early follicular development, and their proteins were also predicted to be involved in gene regulation. Finally, we selected a data set of 24 biomarkers that enabled the discrimination of early follicular stages and thus offer a molecular signature of early follicular growth. This set of biomarkers includes known genes such as SPO11 meiotic protein covalently bound to DSB (SPO11), bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) and WEE1 homolog 2 (S. pombe)(WEE2) which play critical roles in follicular development but other

  18. Osteopontin modulates inflammation, mucin production, and gene expression signatures after inhalation of asbestos in a murine model of fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Ramos-Nino, Maria E; Eugenia-Ariza, Maria; Macpherson, Maximilian B; Butnor, Kelly J; Vacek, Pamela C; McGee, Sean P; Clark, Jessica C; Steele, Chad; Mossman, Brooke T

    2011-05-01

    Inflammation and lung remodeling are hallmarks of asbestos-induced fibrosis, but the molecular mechanisms that control these events are unclear. Using laser capture microdissection (LCM) of distal bronchioles in a murine asbestos inhalation model, we show that osteopontin (OPN) is up-regulated by bronchiolar epithelial cells after chrysotile asbestos exposures. In contrast to OPN wild-type mice (OPN(+/+)) inhaling asbestos, OPN null mice (OPN(-/-)) exposed to asbestos showed less eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, diminished lung inflammation, and decreased mucin production. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid concentrations of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12 subunit p40, MIP1α, MIP1β, and eotaxin) also were significantly less in asbestos-exposed OPN(-/-) mice. Microarrays performed on lung tissues from asbestos-exposed OPN(+/+) and OPN(-/-) mice showed that OPN modulated the expression of a number of genes (Col1a2, Timp1, Tnc, Eln, and Col3a1) linked to fibrosis via initiation and cross talk between IL-1β and epidermal growth factor receptor-related signaling pathways. Novel targets of OPN identified include genes involved in cell signaling, immune system/defense, extracellular matrix remodeling, and cell cycle regulation. Although it is unclear whether the present findings are specific to chrysotile asbestos or would be observed after inhalation of other fibers in general, these results highlight new potential mechanisms and therapeutic targets for asbestosis and other diseases (asthma, smoking-related interstitial lung diseases) linked to OPN overexpression. PMID:21514415

  19. Prolonged expression of the BX1 signature enzyme is associated with a recombination hotspot in the benzoxazinoid gene cluster in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Linlin; McMullen, Michael D; Bauer, Eva; Schön, Chris-Carolin; Gierl, Alfons; Frey, Monika

    2015-07-01

    Benzoxazinoids represent preformed protective and allelopathic compounds. The main benzoxazinoid in maize (Zea mays L.) is 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIMBOA). DIMBOA confers resistance to herbivores and microbes. Protective concentrations are found predominantly in young plantlets. We made use of the genetic diversity present in the maize nested association mapping (NAM) panel to identify lines with significant benzoxazinoid concentrations at later developmental stages. At 24 d after imbibition (dai), only three lines, including Mo17, showed effective DIMBOA concentrations of 1.5mM or more; B73, by contrast, had low a DIMBOA content. Mapping studies based on Mo17 and B73 were performed to reveal mechanisms that influence the DIMBOA level in 24 dai plants. A major quantitative trait locus mapped to the Bx gene cluster located on the short arm of chromosome 4, which encodes the DIMBOA biosynthetic genes. Mo17 was distinguished from all other NAM lines by high transcriptional expression of the Bx1 gene at later developmental stages. Bx1 encodes the signature enzyme of the pathway. In Mo17×B73 hybrids at 24 dai, only the Mo17 Bx1 allele transcript was detected. A 3.9kb cis-element, termed DICE (distal cis-element), that is located in the Bx gene cluster approximately 140 kb upstream of Bx1, was required for high Bx1 transcript levels during later developmental stages in Mo17. The DICE region was a hotspot of meiotic recombination. Genetic analysis revealed that high 24 dai DIMBOA concentrations were not strictly dependent on high Bx1 transcript levels. However, constitutive expression of Bx1 in transgenics increased DIMBOA levels at 24 dai, corroborating a correlation between DIMBOA content and Bx1 transcription. PMID:25969552

  20. Identification of Stage-Specific Gene Expression Signatures in Response to Retinoic Acid during the Neural Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Akanuma, Hiromi; Qin, Xian-Yang; Nagano, Reiko; Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Imanishi, Satoshi; Zaha, Hiroko; Yoshinaga, Jun; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Ohsako, Seiichiroh; Sone, Hideko

    2012-01-01

    We have previously established a protocol for the neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) as an efficient tool to evaluate the neurodevelopmental toxicity of environmental chemicals. Here, we described a multivariate bioinformatic approach to identify the stage-specific gene sets associated with neural differentiation of mESCs. We exposed mESCs (B6G-2 cells) to 10−8 or 10−7 M of retinoic acid (RA) for 4 days during embryoid body formation and then performed morphological analysis on day of differentiation (DoD) 8 and 36, or genomic microarray analysis on DoD 0, 2, 8, and 36. Three gene sets, namely a literature-based gene set (set 1), an analysis-based gene set (set 2) using self-organizing map and principal component analysis, and an enrichment gene set (set 3), were selected by the combined use of knowledge from literatures and gene information selected from the microarray data. A gene network analysis for each gene set was then performed using Bayesian statistics to identify stage-specific gene expression signatures in response to RA during mESC neural differentiation. Our results showed that RA significantly increased the size of neurosphere, neuronal cells, and glial cells on DoD 36. In addition, the gene network analysis showed that glial fibrillary acidic protein, a neural marker, remarkably up-regulates the other genes in gene set 1 and 3, and Gbx2, a neural development marker, significantly up-regulates the other genes in gene set 2 on DoD 36 in the presence of RA. These findings suggest that our protocol for identification of developmental stage-specific gene expression and interaction is a useful method for the screening of environmental chemical toxicity during neurodevelopmental periods. PMID:22891073

  1. Prolonged expression of the BX1 signature enzyme is associated with a recombination hotspot in the benzoxazinoid gene cluster in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Linlin; McMullen, Michael D.; Bauer, Eva; Schön, Chris-Carolin; Gierl, Alfons; Frey, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Benzoxazinoids represent preformed protective and allelopathic compounds. The main benzoxazinoid in maize (Zea mays L.) is 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIMBOA). DIMBOA confers resistance to herbivores and microbes. Protective concentrations are found predominantly in young plantlets. We made use of the genetic diversity present in the maize nested association mapping (NAM) panel to identify lines with significant benzoxazinoid concentrations at later developmental stages. At 24 d after imbibition (dai), only three lines, including Mo17, showed effective DIMBOA concentrations of 1.5mM or more; B73, by contrast, had low a DIMBOA content. Mapping studies based on Mo17 and B73 were performed to reveal mechanisms that influence the DIMBOA level in 24 dai plants. A major quantitative trait locus mapped to the Bx gene cluster located on the short arm of chromosome 4, which encodes the DIMBOA biosynthetic genes. Mo17 was distinguished from all other NAM lines by high transcriptional expression of the Bx1 gene at later developmental stages. Bx1 encodes the signature enzyme of the pathway. In Mo17×B73 hybrids at 24 dai, only the Mo17 Bx1 allele transcript was detected. A 3.9kb cis-element, termed DICE (distal cis-element), that is located in the Bx gene cluster approximately 140kb upstream of Bx1, was required for high Bx1 transcript levels during later developmental stages in Mo17. The DICE region was a hotspot of meiotic recombination. Genetic analysis revealed that high 24 dai DIMBOA concentrations were not strictly dependent on high Bx1 transcript levels. However, constitutive expression of Bx1 in transgenics increased DIMBOA levels at 24 dai, corroborating a correlation between DIMBOA content and Bx1 transcription. PMID:25969552

  2. Cross-platform meta-analysis of multiple gene expression profiles identifies novel expression signatures in acquired anthracycline-resistant breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Seok; Ryu, Seung Won; Bae, Se Jong; Park, Tae Hwan; Kwon, Kang; Noh, Yun Hee; Kim, Sung Young

    2015-04-01

    Anthracyclines are among the most effective and commonly used chemotherapeutic agents. However, the development of acquired anthracycline resistance is a major limitation to their clinical application. The aim of the present study was to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and biological processes associated with the acquisition of anthracycline resistance in human breast cancer cells. We performed a meta-analysis of publically available microarray datasets containing data on stepwise-selected, anthracycline‑resistant breast cancer cell lines using the RankProd package in R. Additionally, the gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases were used to analyze GO term enrichment and pathways, respectively. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was also generated using Cytoscape software. The meta-analysis yielded 413 DEGs related to anthracycline resistance in human breast cancer cells, and 374 of these were not involved in individual DEGs. GO analyses showed the 413 genes were enriched with terms such as 'response to steroid metabolic process', 'chemical stimulus', 'external stimulus', 'hormone stimulus', 'multicellular organismal process', and 'system development'. Pathway analysis revealed significant pathways including steroid hormone biosynthesis, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, drug metabolism-cytochrome P450, metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450, and arachidonic acid metabolism. The PPI network indicated that proteins encoded by TRIM29, VTN, CCNA1, and karyopherin α 5 (KPNA5) participated in a significant number of interactions. In conclusion, our meta-analysis provides a comprehensive view of gene expression patterns associated with acquired resistance to anthracycline in breast cancer cells, and constitutes the basis for additional functional studies. PMID:25695524

  3. A Molecular Signature Predictive of Indolent Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Irshad, Shazia; Bansal, Mukesh; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Zheng, Tian; Aytes, Alvaro; Wenske, Sven; Le Magnen, Clémentine; Guarnieri, Paolo; Sumazin, Pavel; Benson, Mitchell C.; Shen, Michael M.; Califano, Andrea; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2014-01-01

    Many newly diagnosed prostate cancers present as low Gleason score tumors that require no treatment intervention. Distinguishing the many indolent tumors from the minority of lethal ones remains a major clinical challenge. We now show that low Gleason score prostate tumors can be distinguished as indolent and aggressive subgroups on the basis of their expression of genes associated with aging and senescence. Using gene set enrichment analysis, we identified a 19-gene signature enriched in indolent prostate tumors. We then further classified this signature with a decision tree learning model to identify three genes—FGFR1, PMP22, and CDKN1A—that together accurately predicted outcome of low Gleason score tumors. Validation of this three-gene panel on independent cohorts confirmed its independent prognostic value as well as its ability to improve prognosis with currently used clinical nomograms. Furthermore, protein expression of this three-gene panel in biopsy samples distinguished Gleason 6 patients who failed surveillance over a 10-year period. We propose that this signature may be incorporated into prognostic assays for monitoring patients on active surveillance to facilitate appropriate courses of treatment. PMID:24027026

  4. Gene Expression Profiles of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Reveal Transcriptional Signatures as Novel Biomarkers for Cardiac Remodeling in Rats with Aldosteronism and Hypertensive Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerling, Ivan C.; Ahokas, Robert A.; Kamalov, German; Zhao, Wenyuan; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Sun, Yao; Weber, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives In searching for a noninvasive surrogate tissue having mimicry with the prooxidant/-proinflammatory hypertensive heart disease (HHD) phenotype, we turned to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We tested whether iterations in [Ca2+]i, [Zn2+]i and oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes and PBMC would complement each other eliciting similar shifts in gene expression profiles in these tissues demonstrable during preclinical (wk 1) and pathologic (wk 4) stages of aldosterone/salt treatment (ALDOST). Background Inappropriate neurohormonal activation contributes to pathologic remodeling of myocardium in HHD associated with aldosteronism. In rats receiving chronic ALDOST, evidence of reparative fibrosis replacing necrotic cardiomyocytes and coronary vasculopathy appears at wk 4 associated with the induction of oxidative stress by mitochondria that overwhelms endogenous, largely Zn2+-based, antioxidant defenses. Biomarker-guided prediction of risk prior to the appearance of cardiac pathology would prove invaluable. Methods In PBMC and cardiomyocytes, quantitation of cytoplasmic free Ca2+ and Zn2+, H2O2 and 8-iosprostane levels, as well as isolation of RNA and gene expression, together with statistical and clustering analyses, and confirmation of genes by in situ hybridization and RT-PCR, were performed. Results Compared to controls, at wk 1 and 4 ALDOST, we found comparable: increments in [Ca2+]i, [Zn2+]i and 8-isoprotane coupled to increased H2O2 production in cardiac mitochondria and PBMC, together with the common networks of expression profiles dominated by genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation and repair. These included three central Ingenuity pathway-linked genes: p38MAPK, a stress-responsive protein; NFκB, a redox-sensitive transcription factor and a proinflammatory cascade it regulates; and TGF-β1, a fibrogenic cytokine involved in tissue repair. Conclusions Significant overlapping demonstrated in the molecular mimicry of PBMC and

  5. Operator Dependent Choice of Prostate Cancer Biopsy Has Limited Impact on a Gene Signature Analysis for the Highly Expressed Genes IGFBP3 and F3 in Prostate Cancer Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhuochun; Andersson, Karl; Lindholm, Johan; Bodin, Inger; Pramana, Setia; Pawitan, Yudi; Nistér, Monica; Nilsson, Sten; Li, Chunde

    2014-01-01

    Background Predicting the prognosis of prostate cancer disease through gene expression analysis is receiving increasing interest. In many cases, such analyses are based on formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) core needle biopsy material on which Gleason grading for diagnosis has been conducted. Since each patient typically has multiple biopsy samples, and since Gleason grading is an operator dependent procedure known to be difficult, the impact of the operator's choice of biopsy was evaluated. Methods Multiple biopsy samples from 43 patients were evaluated using a previously reported gene signature of IGFBP3, F3 and VGLL3 with potential prognostic value in estimating overall survival at diagnosis of prostate cancer. A four multiplex one-step qRT-PCR test kit, designed and optimized for measuring the signature in FFPE core needle biopsy samples was used. Concordance of gene expression levels between primary and secondary Gleason tumor patterns, as well as benign tissue specimens, was analyzed. Results The gene expression levels of IGFBP3 and F3 in prostate cancer epithelial cell-containing tissue representing the primary and secondary Gleason patterns were high and consistent, while the low expressed VGLL3 showed more variation in its expression levels. Conclusion The assessment of IGFBP3 and F3 gene expression levels in prostate cancer tissue is independent of Gleason patterns, meaning that the impact of operator's choice of biopsy is low. PMID:25296164

  6. How Is Sarcoidosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Sarcoidosis Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose sarcoidosis based on ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  7. Diagnosing Tic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Websites Information For... Media Policy Makers Diagnosing Tic Disorders Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... or postviral encephalitis). Persistent (Chronic) Motor or Vocal Tic Disorder For a person to be diagnosed with ...

  8. Research In Diagnosing Bearing Defects From Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, T.; Earhart, E.; Fiorucci, T.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes research in bearing-defect signature analysis - use of vibration-signal analysis to diagnose defects in roller and ball bearings. Experiments performed on bearings in good condition and other bearings in which various parts scratched to provide known defects correlated with vibration signals. Experiments performed on highly instrumented motor-driven rotor assembly at speeds up to 10,050 r/min, using accelerometers, velocity probes, and proximity sensors mounted at various locations on assembly to measure vibrations.

  9. Evaluation of a Minimally Invasive Cell Sampling Device Coupled with Assessment of Trefoil Factor 3 Expression for Diagnosing Barrett's Esophagus: A Multi-Center Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ross-Innes, Caryn S.; Debiram-Beecham, Irene; O'Donovan, Maria; Walker, Elaine; Varghese, Sibu; Lao-Sirieix, Pierre; Lovat, Laurence; Griffin, Michael; Ragunath, Krish; Haidry, Rehan; Sami, Sarmed S.; Kaye, Philip; Novelli, Marco; Disep, Babett; Ostler, Richard; Aigret, Benoit; North, Bernard V.; Bhandari, Pradeep; Haycock, Adam; Morris, Danielle; Attwood, Stephen; Dhar, Anjan; Rees, Colin; Rutter, Matthew D. D.; Sasieni, Peter D.; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a commonly undiagnosed condition that predisposes to esophageal adenocarcinoma. Routine endoscopic screening for BE is not recommended because of the burden this would impose on the health care system. The objective of this study was to determine whether a novel approach using a minimally invasive cell sampling device, the Cytosponge, coupled with immunohistochemical staining for the biomarker Trefoil Factor 3 (TFF3), could be used to identify patients who warrant endoscopy to diagnose BE. Methods and Findings A case–control study was performed across 11 UK hospitals between July 2011 and December 2013. In total, 1,110 individuals comprising 463 controls with dyspepsia and reflux symptoms and 647 BE cases swallowed a Cytosponge prior to endoscopy. The primary outcome measures were to evaluate the safety, acceptability, and accuracy of the Cytosponge-TFF3 test compared with endoscopy and biopsy. In all, 1,042 (93.9%) patients successfully swallowed the Cytosponge, and no serious adverse events were attributed to the device. The Cytosponge was rated favorably, using a visual analogue scale, compared with endoscopy (p < 0.001), and patients who were not sedated for endoscopy were more likely to rate the Cytosponge higher than endoscopy (Mann-Whitney test, p < 0.001). The overall sensitivity of the test was 79.9% (95% CI 76.4%–83.0%), increasing to 87.2% (95% CI 83.0%–90.6%) for patients with ≥3 cm of circumferential BE, known to confer a higher cancer risk. The sensitivity increased to 89.7% (95% CI 82.3%–94.8%) in 107 patients who swallowed the device twice during the study course. There was no loss of sensitivity in patients with dysplasia. The specificity for diagnosing BE was 92.4% (95% CI 89.5%–94.7%). The case–control design of the study means that the results are not generalizable to a primary care population. Another limitation is that the acceptability data were limited to a single measure. Conclusions The

  10. Developing composite signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, Chadwick T.; Carpenter, Tom; Cappelaere, Patrice G.; Frye, Stu; Lemoigne-Stewart, Jacqueline J.; Mandle, Dan; Montgomery, Sarah; Williams-Bess, Autumn

    2011-06-01

    A composite signature is a group of signatures that are related in such a way to more completely or further define a target or operational endeavor at a higher fidelity. This paper explores the merits of using composite signatures, in lieu of waiting for opportunities for the more elusive diagnostic signatures, to satisfy key essential elements of information Keywords: signature, composite signature, civil disaster (EEI) associated with civil disaster-related problems. It discusses efforts to refine composite signature development methodology and quantify the relative value of composite vs. diagnostic signatures. The objectives are to: 1) investigate and develop innovative composite signatures associated with civil disasters, including physical, chemical and pattern/behavioral; 2) explore the feasibility of collecting representative composite signatures using current and emerging intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) collection architectures leveraging civilian and commercial architectures; and 3) collaborate extensively with scientists and engineers from U.S. government organizations and laboratories, the defense industry, and academic institutions.

  11. Improving Multiple Fault Diagnosability using Possible Conflicts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew J.; Bregon, Anibal; Biswas, Gautam; Koutsoukos, Xenofon; Pulido, Belarmino

    2012-01-01

    Multiple fault diagnosis is a difficult problem for dynamic systems. Due to fault masking, compensation, and relative time of fault occurrence, multiple faults can manifest in many different ways as observable fault signature sequences. This decreases diagnosability of multiple faults, and therefore leads to a loss in effectiveness of the fault isolation step. We develop a qualitative, event-based, multiple fault isolation framework, and derive several notions of multiple fault diagnosability. We show that using Possible Conflicts, a model decomposition technique that decouples faults from residuals, we can significantly improve the diagnosability of multiple faults compared to an approach using a single global model. We demonstrate these concepts and provide results using a multi-tank system as a case study.

  12. Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral and Supportive-Expressive Group Therapy for Women Diagnosed with Breast Cancer: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boutin, Daniel L.

    2007-01-01

    A review of the literature revealed 20 studies that examined the extent to which cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), supportive-expressive group therapy (SEGT), and a combination of these two treatments impact women with breast cancer. Based on this review, it is determined that CBT and SEGT have repeated experimental support for positively…

  13. Brush cytology with immunocytochemical evaluation of VEGF expression versus biopsy in clinically precancerous laryngeal lesions: can we diagnose laryngeal cancer only with brush cytology?

    PubMed

    Chatziavramidis, Angelos; Tsinaslanidou, Zinovia; Valeri, Rozalia; Konstantinidis, Iordanis; Constantinidis, Jannis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is the most common SCC of the head and neck. The high incidence of this malignancy and the low survival rate necessitate the development of novel diagnostic approaches. Aim of this study is to compare the diagnostic value of laryngeal brush cytology combined with VEGF immunocytochemistry versus histopathology of clinically precancerous lesions of the larynx. Material and Methods. Thirty patients with precancerous or suspected malignant laryngeal lesions underwent microlaryngoscopy, during which samples were taken for cytological, immunocytochemical, and histological analysis. Cytology and histology results were classified as follows: benign lesions, atypia/moderate dysplasia, and malignancy, whereas the expression of VEGF was evaluated as strong, moderate, weak, and zero expression, based on the percentage of cells stained. Results. The cytology results were in accordance with the histology results in 86.7% of the patients. The exfoliative cytology's sensitivity was estimated at 85% and its specificity at 90%. Its positive prognostic value was 94%, while its negative prognostic value was 75%. The additional immunocytochemical evaluation of VEGF expression increased all the noted parameters. Discussion. Exfoliative cytology of laryngeal lesions is a minimal-invasive, easily applicable procedure during microlaryngoscopy and reliable in terms of diagnostic value. Under certain conditions it could be held also in local anesthesia. Concurrent immunocytochemical analysis of VEGF expression further enhances its diagnostic value. PMID:26457244

  14. Differences in B7 and CD28 family gene expression in the peripheral blood between newly diagnosed young-onset and adult-onset type 1 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Pruul, K; Kisand, K; Alnek, K; Metsküla, K; Reimand, K; Heilman, K; Peet, A; Varik, K; Peetsalu, M; Einberg, Ü; Tillmann, V; Uibo, R

    2015-09-01

    Type-1 diabetes (T1D) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease, and there are pathogenetic differences between young- and adult-onset T1D patients. We hypothesized that the expressions of genes involved in costimulatory immune system pathways in peripheral blood are differently regulated in young- and adult-onset T1D. Study group I consisted of 80 children, adolescents, and young adults (age range 1.4-21.4 y; 31 controls and 49 T1D patients). Study group II consisted of 48 adults (age range 22.0-78.4 y; 30 controls and 18 T1D patients). The mRNA expression levels of CD86, CD28, CD25, CD226, CD40, BTLA, GITR, PDCD1, FoxP3, TGF-β, ICOS, sCTLA4, flCTLA4, and CD80 were measured in peripheral blood. Genetic polymorphisms (HLA haplotypes; rs231806, rs231775, and rs3087243 in CTLA4; rs763361 in CD226; and rs706778 in CD25) and T1D-associated autoantibodies were analyzed. In group I, there was significantly lower expression of CD226 in T1D patients than in the controls. In group II, there were significantly higher expression levels of CD86 and TGF-β in T1D patients than in the controls. In the T1D patients in group I, the upregulated CD80 expression correlated with the expression of both CTLA4 splice variants (sCTLA4 and flCTLA4). In contrast, in group II, upregulated CD86 correlated with TGF-β and CD25. In group I, the inhibitory CD80-CTLA4 pathway was activated, whereas, in group II, the activation CD86-CD28 pathway and TGF-β production were activated. These results emphasize the differences between young-onset and adult-onset T1D in the regulation of costimulatory pathways. These differences should be considered when developing novel treatments for T1D. PMID:25980680

  15. Infrasound Rocket Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, J.

    2012-09-01

    This presentation reviews the work performed by our research group at the Geophysical Institute as we have applied the tools of infrasound research to rocket studies. This report represents one aspect of the effort associated with work done for the National Consortium for MASINT Research (NCMR) program operated by the National MASINT Office (NMO) of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA). Infrasound, the study of acoustic signals and their propagation in a frequency band below 15 Hz, enables an investigator to collect and diagnose acoustic signals from distant sources. Absorption of acoustic energy in the atmosphere decreases as the frequency is reduced. In the infrasound band signals can propagate hundreds and thousands of kilometers with little degradation. We will present an overview of signatures from rockets ranging from small sounding rockets such as the Black Brandt and Orion series to larger rockets such as Delta 2,4 and Atlas V. Analysis of the ignition transients provides information that can uniquely identify the motor type. After the rocket ascends infrasound signals can be used to characterize the rocket and identify the various events that take place along a trajectory such as staging and maneuvering. We have also collected information on atmospheric shocks and sonic booms from the passage of supersonic vehicles such as the shuttle. This review is intended to show the richness of the unique signal set that occurs in the low-frequency infrasound band.

  16. Signatures of Reputation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethencourt, John; Shi, Elaine; Song, Dawn

    Reputation systems have become an increasingly important tool for highlighting quality information and filtering spam within online forums. However, the dependence of a user's reputation on their history of activities seems to preclude any possibility of anonymity. We show that useful reputation information can, in fact, coexist with strong privacy guarantees. We introduce and formalize a novel cryptographic primitive we call signatures of reputation which supports monotonic measures of reputation in a completely anonymous setting. In our system, a user can express trust in others by voting for them, collect votes to build up her own reputation, and attach a proof of her reputation to any data she publishes, all while maintaining the unlinkability of her actions.

  17. Anonymous Signatures Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswat, Vishal; Yun, Aaram

    We revisit the notion of the anonymous signature, first formalized by Yang, Wong, Deng and Wang [10], and then further developed by Fischlin [4] and Zhang and Imai [11]. We present a new formalism of anonymous signature, where instead of the message, a part of the signature is withheld to maintain anonymity. We introduce the notion unpretendability to guarantee infeasibility for someone other than the correct signer to pretend authorship of the message and signature. Our definition retains applicability for all previous applications of the anonymous signature, provides stronger security, and is conceptually simpler. We give a generic construction from any ordinary signature scheme, and also show that the short signature scheme by Boneh and Boyen [2] can be naturally regarded as such a secure anonymous signature scheme according to our formalism.

  18. Signatures support program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, Chadwick T.

    2009-05-01

    The Signatures Support Program (SSP) leverages the full spectrum of signature-related activities (collections, processing, development, storage, maintenance, and dissemination) within the Department of Defense (DOD), the intelligence community (IC), other Federal agencies, and civil institutions. The Enterprise encompasses acoustic, seismic, radio frequency, infrared, radar, nuclear radiation, and electro-optical signatures. The SSP serves the war fighter, the IC, and civil institutions by supporting military operations, intelligence operations, homeland defense, disaster relief, acquisitions, and research and development. Data centers host and maintain signature holdings, collectively forming the national signatures pool. The geographically distributed organizations are the authoritative sources and repositories for signature data; the centers are responsible for data content and quality. The SSP proactively engages DOD, IC, other Federal entities, academia, and industry to locate signatures for inclusion in the distributed national signatures pool and provides world-wide 24/7 access via the SSP application.

  19. How Is Lymphocytopenia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of lymphocytes—T cells, B cells, and natural killer cells. The test can help diagnose the underlying ... cause low levels of B cells or natural killer cells. Tests for Underlying Conditions Many diseases and ...

  20. How Is Endocarditis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can get detailed pictures of the heart's structures. EKG An EKG is a simple, painless test that detects your ... signals as they pass through your heart. An EKG typically isn't used to diagnose IE. However, ...

  1. How Is Hemophilia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Hemophilia Diagnosed? If you or your child appears to ... have bleeding problems. However, some people who have hemophilia have no recent family history of the disease. ...

  2. The lincRNA HOTAIRM1, located in the HOXA genomic region, is expressed in acute myeloid leukemia, impacts prognosis in patients in the intermediate-risk cytogenetic category, and is associated with a distinctive microRNA signature.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Beyá, Marina; Brunet, Salut; Nomdedéu, Josep; Pratcorona, Marta; Cordeiro, Anna; Gallardo, David; Escoda, Lourdes; Tormo, Mar; Heras, Inmaculada; Ribera, Josep Maria; Duarte, Rafael; de Llano, María Paz Queipo; Bargay, Joan; Sampol, Antonia; Nomdedeu, Meritxell; Risueño, Ruth M; Hoyos, Montserrat; Sierra, Jorge; Monzo, Mariano; Navarro, Alfons; Esteve, Jordi

    2015-10-13

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are deregulated in several tumors, although their role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is mostly unknown.We have examined the expression of the lncRNA HOX antisense intergenic RNA myeloid 1 (HOTAIRM1) in 241 AML patients. We have correlated HOTAIRM1 expression with a miRNA expression profile. We have also analyzed the prognostic value of HOTAIRM1 expression in 215 intermediate-risk AML (IR-AML) patients.The lowest expression level was observed in acute promyelocytic leukemia (P < 0.001) and the highest in t(6;9) AML (P = 0.005). In 215 IR-AML patients, high HOTAIRM1 expression was independently associated with shorter overall survival (OR:2.04;P = 0.001), shorter leukemia-free survival (OR:2.56; P < 0.001) and a higher cumulative incidence of relapse (OR:1.67; P = 0.046). Moreover, HOTAIRM1 maintained its independent prognostic value within the favorable molecular subgroup (OR: 3.43; P = 0.009). Interestingly, HOTAIRM1 was overexpressed in NPM1-mutated AML (P < 0.001) and within this group retained its prognostic value (OR: 2.21; P = 0.01). Moreover, HOTAIRM1 expression was associated with a specific 33-microRNA signature that included miR-196b (P < 0.001). miR-196b is located in the HOX genomic region and has previously been reported to have an independent prognostic value in AML. miR-196b and HOTAIRM1 in combination as a prognostic factor can classify patients as high-, intermediate-, or low-risk (5-year OS: 24% vs 42% vs 70%; P = 0.004).Determination of HOTAIRM1 level at diagnosis provided relevant prognostic information in IR-AML and allowed refinement of risk stratification based on common molecular markers. The prognostic information provided by HOTAIRM1 was strengthened when combined with miR-196b expression. Furthermore, HOTAIRM1 correlated with a 33-miRNA signature. PMID:26436590

  3. The lincRNA HOTAIRM1, located in the HOXA genomic region, is expressed in acute myeloid leukemia, impacts prognosis in patients in the intermediate-risk cytogenetic category, and is associated with a distinctive microRNA signature

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Beyá, Marina; Brunet, Salut; Nomdedéu, Josep; Pratcorona, Marta; Cordeiro, Anna; Gallardo, David; Escoda, Lourdes; Tormo, Mar; Heras, Inmaculada; Ribera, Josep Maria; Duarte, Rafael; de Llano, María Paz Queipo; Bargay, Joan; Sampol, Antonia; Nomdedeu, Mertixell; Risueño, Ruth M.; Hoyos, Montserrat; Sierra, Jorge; Monzo, Mariano; Navarro, Alfons; Esteve, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are deregulated in several tumors, although their role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is mostly unknown. We have examined the expression of the lncRNA HOX antisense intergenic RNA myeloid 1 (HOTAIRM1) in 241 AML patients. We have correlated HOTAIRM1 expression with a miRNA expression profile. We have also analyzed the prognostic value of HOTAIRM1 expression in 215 intermediate-risk AML (IR-AML) patients. The lowest expression level was observed in acute promyelocytic leukemia (P < 0.001) and the highest in t(6;9) AML (P = 0.005). In 215 IR-AML patients, high HOTAIRM1 expression was independently associated with shorter overall survival (OR:2.04;P = 0.001), shorter leukemia-free survival (OR:2.56; P < 0.001) and a higher cumulative incidence of relapse (OR:1.67; P = 0.046). Moreover, HOTAIRM1 maintained its independent prognostic value within the favorable molecular subgroup (OR: 3.43; P = 0.009). Interestingly, HOTAIRM1 was overexpressed in NPM1-mutated AML (P < 0.001) and within this group retained its prognostic value (OR: 2.21; P = 0.01). Moreover, HOTAIRM1 expression was associated with a specific 33- microRNA signature that included miR-196b (P < 0.001). miR-196b is located in the HOX genomic region and has previously been reported to have an independent prognostic value in AML. miR-196b and HOTAIRM1 in combination as a prognostic factor can classify patients as high-, intermediate-, or low-risk (5-year OS: 24% vs 42% vs 70%; P = 0.004). Determination of HOTAIRM1 level at diagnosis provided relevant prognostic information in IR-AML and allowed refinement of risk stratification based on common molecular markers. The prognostic information provided by HOTAIRM1 was strengthened when combined with miR-196b expression. Furthermore, HOTAIRM1 correlated with a 33-miRNA signature. PMID:26436590

  4. Multidrug Resistance-Linked Gene Signature Predicts Overall Survival of Patients With Primary Ovarian Serous Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Calcagno, Anna Maria; Varma, Sudhir; Davidson, Ben; Bunkholt Elstrand, Mari; Ganapathi, Ram; Kamat, Aparna A.; Sood, Anil K.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Seiden, Michael V.; Rueda, Bo R.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study assesses the ability of multidrug resistance (MDR)-associated gene expression patterns to predict survival in patients with newly diagnosed carcinoma of the ovary. The scope of this research differs substantially from that of previous reports, as a very large set of genes was evaluated whose expression has been shown to affect response to chemotherapy. Experimental Design We applied a customized TaqMan Low Density Array, a highly sensitive and specific assay, to study the expression profiles of 380 MDR-linked genes in 80 tumor specimens collected at initial surgery to debulk primary serous carcinoma. The RNA expression profiles of these drug resistance genes were correlated with clinical outcomes. Results Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to estimate the ability of MDR gene expression to predict survival. Although gene expression alone does not predict overall survival (P=0.06), four covariates (age, stage, CA125 level and surgical debulking) do (P=0.03). When gene expression was added to the covariates, we found an 11-gene signature that provides a major improvement in overall survival prediction (log-rank statistic P<0.003). The predictive power of this 11-gene signature was confirmed by dividing high and low risk patient groups, as defined by their clinical covariates, into four specific risk groups based on expression levels. Conclusion This study reveals an 11-gene signature that allows a more precise prognosis for patients with serous cancer of the ovary treated with carboplatin- and paclitaxel-based therapy. These 11 new targets offer opportunities for new therapies to improve clinical outcome in ovarian cancer. PMID:22492981

  5. Peripheral basophil reactivity, CD203c expression by Cryj1 stimulation, is useful for diagnosing seasonal allergic rhinitis by Japanese cedar pollen

    PubMed Central

    Imoto, Yoshimasa; Takabayashi, Tetsuji; Sakashita, Masafumi; Tokunaga, Takahiro; Ninomiya, Takahiro; Ito, Yumi; Narita, Norihiko; Yamada, Takechiyo; Fujieda, Shigeharu

    2015-01-01

    Measuring specific IgE can yield direct, accurate, and objective data. Nevertheless, clinical symptoms of allergy are often inconsistent with these data. Recently, the expression of CD203c, a surface marker of basophils, has been reported as capable of distinguishing allergic patients. This study compared specific IgE in serum and skin tests against antigen to assess CD203c as a biomarker correlated with allergic rhinitis (AR). We asked 3,453 subjects whether they experienced any AR related symptom. All subjects were assessed for six specific IgEs for common aeroallergens. Skin tests were also conducted for six aeroallergens. We observed the reactivity of peripheral basophil by measuring the levels of CD203c by Cryj1 stimulation using flow cytometry. Of the 3,453 participants, 1,987 (57.5%) possessed Japanese cedar pollen (JCP) specific IgE in their serum. Among those 1,987 JCP specific IgE positive participants, 552 (27.8%) had not experienced any allergic symptom during the JCP season. The levels of CD203c in the peripheral basophil by Cryj1 stimulation were significantly higher in SAR-JCP subjects than in non-SAR-JCP subjects (Cryj1 0.5 ng/ml: 2.25 ± 0.90% vs. 60.2 ± 27.4%, p < 0.01, Cryj1 50 ng/ml: 1.89 ± 0.90% vs. 68.0 ± 21.2%, p < 0.01). Our results indicate that the levels of CD203c in peripheral basophils by Cryj1 stimulation is a more objective and reliable marker that better reflects the allergic reaction by SAR-JCP in vivo than measuring specific IgE in serum or skin tests. PMID:26417444

  6. Expression and purification of Suid Herpesvirus-1 glycoprotein E in the baculovirus system and its use to diagnose Aujeszky's disease in infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Serena, María Soledad; Geisler, Christoph; Metz, Germán Ernesto; Corva, Santiago Gerardo; Mórtola, Eduardo Carlos; Larsen, Alejandra; Jarvis, Donald L; Echeverría, María Gabriela

    2013-07-01

    Suid Herpesvirus 1 (SHV-1) is the etiological agent of Aujeszky's disease (AD), which affects swine herds worldwide and causes substantial economic losses due to animal mortality and lost productivity. In order to eradicate SHV-1, vaccination programs using viruses lacking the gene encoding glycoprotein E (gE) are ongoing in several countries. These eradication programs have generated a currently unmet demand for affordable and sensitive tests that can detect SHV-1 infection, yet distinguish between infected and vaccinated pigs. To meet this demand, we used the baculovirus-insect cell system to produce immunologically authentic full-length recombinant gE protein for use in a serum ELISA assay. As previous efforts to clone the gE gene had failed due to its extremely high GC-content (75% average), we used betaine as a PCR enhancer to facilitate amplification of the entire gE gene from the Argentinian CL15 strain of SHV-1. The cloned gE gene was expressed at high levels in recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cells and reacted strongly with sera from SHV-1 infected pigs. We used the recombinant gE protein to develop a local indirect ELISA test with sensitivity and specificity comparable to currently available commercial tests. Thus, recombinant gE produced in baculovirus-infected insect cells is a viable source of antigen for the detection of SHV-1 in ELISA tests. We also provide evidence supporting a potential application of this recombinant form of gE as a SHV-1 subunit vaccine. PMID:23631926

  7. Cardiac expression of deiodinase type 3 (Dio3) following myocardial infarction is associated with the induction of a pluripotency microRNA signature from the Dlk1-Dio3 genomic region.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Rob; Zuidwijk, Marian; Muller, Alice; Mulders, Joyce; Oudejans, Cees B M; Simonides, Warner S

    2013-06-01

    The adult heart has almost completely lost the proliferative potential of the fetal heart. Instead, loss of cardiomyocytes due to myocardial infarction (MI) leads to a limited, and often insufficient, hypertrophic response of cardiomyocytes in the spared myocardium. This response is still characterized by a partial reexpression of the fetal gene program. Because of the suggested involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) in cardiac remodeling, we examined the miRNA expression profile of the spared left ventricular myocardium using a MI mouse model. C57Bl/6J mice of either sex were randomly assigned to the sham-operated group or MI group. MI was induced by ligation of the left coronary artery. One week after surgery RNA was isolated from the left ventricle. MiRNA analysis was performed using the Taqman Megaplex rodent array. Unexpectedly, we found a set of 29 up-regulated miRNAs originating from the Dlk1-Dio3 genomic imprinted region, which has been identified as a hallmark of pluripotency and proliferation. This miRNA signature was associated with a 6-fold increase in expression of the deiodinase type 3 gene (Dio3) located in this region. Dio3 is a fetally expressed thyroid hormone-inactivating enzyme associated with cell proliferation, which was shown to be up-regulated in cardiomyocytes creating a local hypothyroid condition in the spared myocardium in this model. These data suggest that a regenerative process is initiated, but not completed, in adult cardiomyocytes after MI. The identified miRNA signature could provide new ways to manipulate the in vivo response of adult cardiomyocytes to stress and to increase the regenerative capacity of the injured myocardium. PMID:23554452

  8. How Are Genetic Conditions Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consultation How are genetic conditions diagnosed? How are genetic conditions diagnosed? A doctor may suspect a diagnosis ... and advocacy resources. For more information about diagnosing genetic conditions: Genetics Home Reference provides information about genetic ...

  9. Understanding Prostate Cancer: Newly Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wellness PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Understanding Prostate Cancer Newly Diagnosed Newly Diagnosed Staging the Disease Issues ... you care about has recently been diagnosed with prostate cancer, this section will help guide you through the ...

  10. Uncertainty in hydrological signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerberg, I. K.; McMillan, H. K.

    2015-09-01

    Information about rainfall-runoff processes is essential for hydrological analyses, modelling and water-management applications. A hydrological, or diagnostic, signature quantifies such information from observed data as an index value. Signatures are widely used, e.g. for catchment classification, model calibration and change detection. Uncertainties in the observed data - including measurement inaccuracy and representativeness as well as errors relating to data management - propagate to the signature values and reduce their information content. Subjective choices in the calculation method are a further source of uncertainty. We review the uncertainties relevant to different signatures based on rainfall and flow data. We propose a generally applicable method to calculate these uncertainties based on Monte Carlo sampling and demonstrate it in two catchments for common signatures including rainfall-runoff thresholds, recession analysis and basic descriptive signatures of flow distribution and dynamics. Our intention is to contribute to awareness and knowledge of signature uncertainty, including typical sources, magnitude and methods for its assessment. We found that the uncertainties were often large (i.e. typical intervals of ±10-40 % relative uncertainty) and highly variable between signatures. There was greater uncertainty in signatures that use high-frequency responses, small data subsets, or subsets prone to measurement errors. There was lower uncertainty in signatures that use spatial or temporal averages. Some signatures were sensitive to particular uncertainty types such as rating-curve form. We found that signatures can be designed to be robust to some uncertainty sources. Signature uncertainties of the magnitudes we found have the potential to change the conclusions of hydrological and ecohydrological analyses, such as cross-catchment comparisons or inferences about dominant processes.