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Sample records for extended graphene nanomaterials

  1. Assessment of the toxic potential of graphene family nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Mei, Nan

    2014-03-01

    Graphene, a single-atom-thick carbon nanosheet, has attracted great interest as a promising nanomaterial for a variety of bioapplications because of its extraordinary properties. However, the potential for widespread human exposure raises safety concerns about graphene and its derivatives, referred to as graphene-family nanomaterials. This review summarizes recent findings on the toxicological effects and the potential toxicity mechanisms of graphene-family nanomaterials in bacteria, mammalian cells, and animal models. Graphene, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide elicit toxic effects both in vitro and in vivo, whereas surface modifications can significantly reduce their toxic interactions with living systems. Standardization of terminology and the fabrication methods of graphene-family nanomaterials are warranted for further investigations designed to decrease their adverse effects and explore their biomedical applications. PMID:24673908

  2. Surface-engineered graphene-based nanomaterials for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haiqing; Dong, Chunyan; Ren, Tianbin; Li, Yongyong; Shi, Donglu

    2014-09-01

    Graphene, as a newly discovered carbon allotrope, has attracted broad interest and intense attention since its discovery for both fundamental research and a vast array of industrial and biomedical applications. Considerable efforts have been devoted to understanding the nano-bio-interfaces of graphene-based materials for exploring their potential biomedical applications, including drug delivery, biosensing, biomedical imaging, stem cell technology, and photothermal therapy. This review summarizes the current studies on the physiological stability, enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, active targeting and drug carrying capability of graphene-based nanomaterials, and it provides a basic understanding about the mechanisms of drug and gene delivery by these nanomaterials. Also reviewed is the recent progress on photosensitizers and theranostics using graphene-based nanomaterials. The biosafety of graphene at the cellular and animal levels is discussed. The challenges and perspectives of the field are addressed. PMID:25992450

  3. Surface Engineering of Graphene-Based Nanomaterials for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Graphene-based nanomaterials have attracted tremendous interest over the past decade due to their unique electronic, optical, mechanical, and chemical properties. However, the biomedical applications of these intriguing nanomaterials are still limited due to their suboptimal solubility/biocompatibility, potential toxicity, and difficulties in achieving active tumor targeting, just to name a few. In this Topical Review, we will discuss in detail the important role of surface engineering (i.e., bioconjugation) in improving the in vitro/in vivo stability and enriching the functionality of graphene-based nanomaterials, which can enable single/multimodality imaging (e.g., optical imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and therapy (e.g., photothermal therapy, photodynamic therapy, and drug/gene delivery) of cancer. Current challenges and future research directions are also discussed and we believe that graphene-based nanomaterials are attractive nanoplatforms for a broad array of future biomedical applications. PMID:25117569

  4. Deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in human upper airways.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei-Chung; Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod; Cheng, Yung Sung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene nanomaterials have attracted wide attention in recent years on their application to state-of-the-art technology due to their outstanding physical properties. On the other hand, the nanotoxicity of graphene materials also has rapidly become a serious concern especially in occupational health. Graphene naomaterials inevitably could become airborne in the workplace during manufacturing processes. The inhalation and subsequent deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in the human respiratory tract could potentially result in adverse health effects to exposed workers. Therefore, investigating the deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in the human airways is an indispensable component of an integral approach to graphene occupational health. For this reason, this study carried out a series of airway replica deposition experiments to obtain original experimental data for graphene aerosol airway deposition. In this study, graphene aerosols were generated, size classified, and delivered into human airway replicas (nasal and oral-to-lung airways). The deposition fraction and deposition efficiency of graphene aerosol in the airway replicas were obtained by a novel experimental approach. The experimental results acquired showed that the fractional deposition of graphene aerosols in airway sections studied were all less than 4%, and the deposition efficiency in each airway section was generally lower than 0.03. These results indicate that the majority of the graphene nanomaterial aerosols inhaled into the human respiratory tract could easily penetrate through the head airways as well as the upper part of the tracheobronchial airways and then transit down to the lower lung airways, where undesired biological responses might be induced. PMID:26317666

  5. Sunlight-induced Transformations of Graphene-based Nanomaterials in Aquatic Environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Graphene-based nanomaterials and other related carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) can be released from products during their life cycles. Upon entry into aquatic environments, they are potentially transformed by photochemical reactions, oxidation reactions and biological processes, all ...

  6. Environmental applications of graphene-based nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Perreault, François; Fonseca de Faria, Andreia; Elimelech, Menachem

    2015-08-21

    Graphene-based materials are gaining heightened attention as novel materials for environmental applications. The unique physicochemical properties of graphene, notably its exceptionally high surface area, electron mobility, thermal conductivity, and mechanical strength, can lead to novel or improved technologies to address the pressing global environmental challenges. This critical review assesses the recent developments in the use of graphene-based materials as sorbent or photocatalytic materials for environmental decontamination, as building blocks for next generation water treatment and desalination membranes, and as electrode materials for contaminant monitoring or removal. The most promising areas of research are highlighted, with a discussion of the main challenges that we need to overcome in order to fully realize the exceptional properties of graphene in environmental applications. PMID:25812036

  7. Graphene-based nanomaterials as molecular imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Garg, Bhaskar; Sung, Chu-Hsun; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging (MI) is a noninvasive, real-time visualization of biochemical events at the cellular and molecular level within tissues, living cells, and/or intact objects that can be advantageously applied in the areas of diagnostics, therapeutics, drug discovery, and development in understanding the nanoscale reactions including enzymatic conversions and protein-protein interactions. Consequently, over the years, great advancement has been made in the development of a variety of MI agents such as peptides, aptamers, antibodies, and various nanomaterials (NMs) including single-walled carbon nanotubes. Recently, graphene, a material popularized by Geim & Novoselov, has ignited considerable research efforts to rationally design and execute a wide range of graphene-based NMs making them an attractive platform for developing highly sensitive MI agents. Owing to their exceptional physicochemical and biological properties combined with desirable surface engineering, graphene-based NMs offer stable and tunable visible emission, small hydrodynamic size, low toxicity, and high biocompatibility and thus have been explored for in vitro and in vivo imaging applications as a promising alternative of traditional imaging agents. This review begins by describing the intrinsic properties of graphene and the key MI modalities. After which, we provide an overview on the recent advances in the design and development as well as physicochemical properties of the different classes of graphene-based NMs (graphene-dye conjugates, graphene-antibody conjugates, graphene-nanoparticle composites, and graphene quantum dots) being used as MI agents for potential applications including theranostics. Finally, the major challenges and future directions in the field will be discussed. PMID:25857851

  8. Aggregation, Deposition and Release of Graphene Oxide Nanomaterials in the Aquatic Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Graphene is an atomically thin two dimensional carbon-based nanomaterial that is composed of a single layer of sp2 – hybridized carbon atoms as found in graphite.1, 2 Usage of graphene-based nanomaterials is increasing rapidly and these materials are predicted to be the most abun...

  9. Applications and toxicity of graphene family nanomaterials and their composites

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Zorawar

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has attracted much attention of scientific community due to its enormous potential in different fields, including medical sciences, agriculture, food safety, cancer research, and tissue engineering. The potential for widespread human exposure raises safety concerns about graphene and its derivatives, referred to as graphene family nanomaterials (GFNs). Due to their unique chemical and physical properties, graphene and its derivatives have found important places in their respective application fields, yet they are being found to have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects too. Since the discovery of graphene, a number of researches are being conducted to find out the toxic potential of GFNs to different cell and animal models, finding their suitability for being used in new and varied innovative fields. This paper presents a systematic review of the research done on GFNs and gives an insight into the mode and action of these nanosized moieties. The paper also emphasizes on the recent and up-to-date developments in research on GFNs and their nanocomposites for their toxic effects. PMID:27051278

  10. Applications and toxicity of graphene family nanomaterials and their composites.

    PubMed

    Singh, Zorawar

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has attracted much attention of scientific community due to its enormous potential in different fields, including medical sciences, agriculture, food safety, cancer research, and tissue engineering. The potential for widespread human exposure raises safety concerns about graphene and its derivatives, referred to as graphene family nanomaterials (GFNs). Due to their unique chemical and physical properties, graphene and its derivatives have found important places in their respective application fields, yet they are being found to have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects too. Since the discovery of graphene, a number of researches are being conducted to find out the toxic potential of GFNs to different cell and animal models, finding their suitability for being used in new and varied innovative fields. This paper presents a systematic review of the research done on GFNs and gives an insight into the mode and action of these nanosized moieties. The paper also emphasizes on the recent and up-to-date developments in research on GFNs and their nanocomposites for their toxic effects. PMID:27051278

  11. Substrate-supported thermometry platform for nanomaterials like graphene, nanotubes, and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zuanyi; Bae, Myung-Ho; Pop, Eric

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a substrate-supported thermometry platform to measure thermal conduction in nanomaterials like graphene, with no need to suspend them. We use three-dimensional simulations and careful uncertainty analysis to optimize the platform geometry and to obtain the sample thermal conductivity. The lowest thermal sheet conductance that can be sensed with <50% error is ˜25 nWK-1 at room temperature, indicating applicability of this platform to graphene or polymer thin films, nanotube or nanowire arrays, even a single Si nanowire. The platform can also be extended to plastic substrates, and could find wide applicability in circumstances where fabrication challenges and low yield associated with suspended platforms must be avoided.

  12. Facile synthesis of two-dimensional graphene/SnO2/Pt ternary hybrid nanomaterials and their catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Wang, Ping; Wang, Li; Han, Lei; Dong, Shaojun

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we reported a simple, aqueous-phase route to the synthesis of two-dimensional graphene/SnO2 composite nanosheets (GSCN) hybrid nanostructures consisting of 5 nm Pt nanoparticles supported on the both sides of GSCN. Functional two-dimensional GSCN were obtained through the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using SnCl2 in the presence of polyelectrolyte poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA). The main advantages of this preparation are that the reduction of GO, the formation of SnO2 and the functionalization of GSCN were achieved simultaneously through one-pot reaction. GSCN/Pt ternary hybrid nanomaterials were generated by in situ reduction of negatively charged PtCl62- precursors adsorbed on the positively charged surface of GSCN through electrostatic attraction. The as-synthesized GSCN/Pt ternary hybrid nanomaterials exhibited high cycle stabilization during the catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol into p-aminophenol by NaBH4. Additionally, our approach is expected to extend to other hybrid nanomaterials. We believe that the obtained GSCN/Pt ternary hybrid nanomaterials have great potential for applications in other field, such as electrochemical energy storage, sensors, and so on.In this paper, we reported a simple, aqueous-phase route to the synthesis of two-dimensional graphene/SnO2 composite nanosheets (GSCN) hybrid nanostructures consisting of 5 nm Pt nanoparticles supported on the both sides of GSCN. Functional two-dimensional GSCN were obtained through the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using SnCl2 in the presence of polyelectrolyte poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA). The main advantages of this preparation are that the reduction of GO, the formation of SnO2 and the functionalization of GSCN were achieved simultaneously through one-pot reaction. GSCN/Pt ternary hybrid nanomaterials were generated by in situ reduction of negatively charged PtCl62- precursors adsorbed on the positively charged surface of GSCN through

  13. Colloidal Properties and Stability of Graphene Oxide Nanomaterials in the Aquatic Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    While graphene oxide (GO) has been found to be the most toxic graphene-based nanomaterial, its environmental fate is still unexplored. In this study, the aggregation kinetics and stability of GO were investigated using time-resolved dynamic light scattering over a wide range of a...

  14. Recent advances in electrochemical biosensors based on graphene two-dimensional nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Luo, Yanan; Zhu, Chengzhou; Li, He; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-02-15

    Graphene as a star among two-dimensional nanomaterials has attracted tremendous research interest in the field of electrochemistry due to their intrinsic properties, including the electronic, optical, and mechanical properties associated with their planar structure. The marriage of graphene and electrochemical biosensors has created many ingenious biosensing strategies for applications in the areas of clinical diagnosis and food safety. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the recent advances in the development of graphene based electrochemical biosensors. Special attention is paid to graphene-based enzyme biosensors, immunosensors, and DNA biosensors. Future perspectives on high-performance graphene-based electrochemical biosensors are also discussed. PMID:26187396

  15. Nanomaterial resistant microorganism mediated reduction of graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Raghuraj S; Pandey, Ashish; Qureshi, Anjum; Ozguz, Volkan; Niazi, Javed H

    2016-10-01

    In this study, soil bacteria were isolated from nanomaterials (NMs) contaminated pond soil and enriched in the presence of graphene oxide (GO) in mineral medium to obtain NMs resistant bacteria. The isolated resistant bacteria were biochemically and genetically identified as Fontibacillus aquaticus. The resistant bacteria were allowed to interact with engineered GO in order to study the biotransformation in GO structure. Raman spectra of GO extracted from culture medium revealed decreased intensity ratio of ID/IG with subsequent reduction of CO which was consistent with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) results. The structural changes and exfoliatied GO nanosheets were also evident from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, high resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) and current-voltage measurements confirmed the reduction of GO after the interaction with resistant bacteria. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of biotransformed GO revealed reduction of oxygen-containing species on the surface of nanosheets. Our results demonstrated that the presented method is an environment friendly, cost effective, simple and based on green approaches for the reduction of GO using NMs resistant bacteria. PMID:27248463

  16. Thinnest two-dimensional nanomaterial-graphene for solar energy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun Hang; Wang, Hui; Hu, Bo

    2010-07-19

    Graphene is a rapidly rising star in materials science. This two-dimensional material exhibits unique properties, such as low resistance, excellent optical transmittance, and high mechanical and chemical stabilities. These exceptional advantages possess great promise for its potential applications in photovoltaic devices. In this Review, we present the status of graphene research for solar energy with emphasis on solar cells. Firstly, the preparation and properties of graphene are described. Secondly, applications of graphene as transparent conductive electrodes and counter electrodes are presented. Thirdly, graphene-based electron- (or hole) accepting materials for solar energy conversion are evaluated. Fourthly, the promoting effect of graphene on photovoltaic devices and the photocatalytic property of graphene-semiconductor composites are discussed. Finally, the challenges to increase the power conversion efficiency of graphene-based solar cells are explored. PMID:20544792

  17. Extending the time scale in molecular dynamics simulations: Propagation of ripples in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewary, V. K.

    2009-10-01

    A technique using causal Green’s function is proposed for extending and bridging multiple time scales in molecular dynamics for modeling time-dependent processes at the atomistic level in nanomaterials and other physical, chemical, and biological systems. The technique is applied to model propagation of a pulse in a one-dimensional lattice of nonlinear oscillators and ripples in graphene from femtoseconds to microseconds. It is shown that, at least in the vibration problems, the technique can accelerate the convergence of molecular dynamics and extend the time scales by eight orders of magnitude.

  18. Investigating the Toxicity and Environmental Fate of Graphene Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Hersam Laboratory at Northwestern University works with the Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology and the United States Environmental Protection Agency to study the toxicity and environmental fate of emergent nanomaterials, specifically carbon-based nanomate...

  19. Graphene, carbon nanotubes, zinc oxide and gold as elite nanomaterials for fabrication of biosensors for healthcare.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Ahlawat, Wandit; Kumar, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj

    2015-08-15

    Technological advancements worldwide at rapid pace in the area of materials science and nanotechnology have made it possible to synthesize nanoparticles with desirable properties not exhibited by the bulk material. Among variety of available nanomaterials, graphene, carbon nanotubes, zinc oxide and gold nanopartilces proved to be elite and offered amazing electrochemical biosensing. This encourages us to write a review which highlights the recent achievements in the construction of genosensor, immunosensor and enzymatic biosensor based on the above nanomaterials. Carbon based nanomaterials offers a direct electron transfer between the functionalized nanomaterials and active site of bioreceptor without involvement of any mediator which not only amplifies the signal but also provide label free sensing. Gold shows affinity towards immunological molecules and is most routinely used for immunological sensing. Zinc oxide can easily immobilize proteins and hence offers a large group of enzyme based biosensor. Modification of the working electrode by introduction of these nanomaterials or combination of two/three of above nanomaterials together and forming a nanocomposite reflected the best results with excellent stability, reproducibility and enhanced sensitivity. Highly attractive electrochemical properties and electrocatalytic activity of these elite nanomaterials have facilitated achievement of enhanced signal amplification needed for the construction of ultrasensitive electrochemical affinity biosensors for detection of glucose, cholesterol, Escherichia coli, influenza virus, cancer, human papillomavirus, dopamine, glutamic acid, IgG, IgE, uric acid, ascorbic acid, acetlycholine, cortisol, cytosome, sequence specific DNA and amino acids. Recent researches for bedside biosensors are also discussed. PMID:25899923

  20. Graphene and Other Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Aptasensors

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Frank J.; Ozalp, Veli Cengiz

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical aptasensors, which are based on the specificity of aptamer-target recognition, with electrochemical transduction for analytical purposes have received particular attention due to their high sensitivity and selectivity, simple instrumentation, as well as low production cost. Aptamers are functional nucleic acids with specific and high affinity to their targets, similar to antibodies. However, they are completely selected in vitro in contrast to antibodies. Due to their stability, easy chemical modifications and proneness to nanostructured device construction, aptamer-based sensors have been incorporated in a variety of applications including electrochemical sensing devices. In recent years, the performance of aptasensors has been augmented by incorporating novel nanomaterials in the preparation of better electrochemical sensors. In this review, we summarize the recent trends in the use of nanomaterials for developing electrochemical aptasensors. PMID:25585628

  1. From graphene to carbon nanotube: The oxygen effect on the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials on nickel foil during CVD process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yu-Ching; Wu, Hsuan-Chung; Hsieh, Chien-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated an oxygen-assisted ultralow-pressure (20 mTorr) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including multilayer graphene (MLG), double-layer graphene (DLG), single-layer graphene (SLG), and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on a Ni foil substrate. Oxygen is typically considered undesirable to synthesize carbon nanomaterials during the CVD process. However, our study provided evidence demonstrating that the growth of MLG, DLG, SLG, and CNTs can be maintained by adjusting the oxygen concentration during the CVD process; it also provided an easy way in controlling the layer of graphene. It was observed that oxygen played an important role in controlling the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials.

  2. Click chemistry promoted by graphene supported copper nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Shaygan Nia, Ali; Rana, Sravendra; Döhler, Diana; Noirfalise, Xavier; Belfiore, Alice; Binder, Wolfgang H

    2014-12-18

    A facile and robust approach is provided for the synthesis of highly dispersed copper nanoparticles immobilized onto graphene nanosheets, useful as a recyclable and reusable heterogeneous catalyst with excellent catalytic activity to achieve Cu(I)-catalyzed [3+2] cycloaddition 'click' chemistry. PMID:25350638

  3. Safety and biocompatibility of graphene: A new generation nanomaterial for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Syama, S; Mohanan, P V

    2016-05-01

    Graphene, a material with great application potential is expected to revolutionize various fields in the near future particularly biomedical field with its inherent properties. However, significant increase in the research on graphene in the recent years has created anxiety about their safety/biocompatibility towards living organisms. Though there is increase in reports on graphene synthesis and application, in parallel reports on unwanted toxic effects of these materials is under scrutiny. Before exploiting their use, any engineered nanomaterials should undergo through investigation regarding the risk and health hazards imposed by them. Toxicity of nanomaterial depends on many factors like size, shape, surface chemistry, dose, duration and the biological milieu. In this account, we reviewed physico-chemical properties of graphene that plays a key role in toxicity prediction. We also detailed some examples of the in vitro and in vivo toxicity studies that have been published so far. The potential environmental risk associated with these carbon materials is also addressed, in order to avoid unintentional leaching of these materials into surface water. PMID:26851208

  4. Graphene-like two-dimensional layered nanomaterials: applications in biosensors and nanomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guohai; Zhu, Chengzhou; Du, Dan; Zhu, Junjie; Lin, Yuehe

    2015-08-01

    The development of nanotechnology provides promising opportunities for various important applications. The recent discovery of atomically-thick two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials can offer manifold perspectives to construct versatile devices with high-performance to satisfy multiple requirements. Many studies directed at graphene have stimulated renewed interest on graphene-like 2D layered nanomaterials (GLNs). GLNs including boron nitride nanosheets, graphitic-carbon nitride nanosheets and transition metal dichalcogenides (e.g. MoS2 and WS2) have attracted significant interest in numerous research fields from physics and chemistry to biology and engineering, which has led to numerous interdisciplinary advances in nano science. Benefiting from the unique physical and chemical properties (e.g. strong mechanical strength, high surface area, unparalleled thermal conductivity, remarkable biocompatibility and ease of functionalization), these 2D layered nanomaterials have shown great potential in biochemistry and biomedicine. This review summarizes recent advances of GLNs in applications of biosensors and nanomedicine, including electrochemical biosensors, optical biosensors, bioimaging, drug delivery and cancer therapy. Current challenges and future perspectives in these rapidly developing areas are also outlined. It is expected that they will have great practical foundation in biomedical applications with future efforts.

  5. Graphene-based nanomaterials as heterogeneous acid catalysts: a comprehensive perspective.

    PubMed

    Garg, Bhaskar; Bisht, Tanuja; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2014-01-01

    Acid catalysis is quite prevalent and probably one of the most routine operations in both industrial processes and research laboratories worldwide. Recently, "graphene", a two dimensional single-layer carbon sheet with hexagonal packed lattice structure, imitative of nanomaterials, has shown great potential as alternative and eco-friendly solid carbocatalyst for a variety of acid-catalyzed reactions. Owing to their exceptional physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, graphene-based nanomaterials (G-NMs) offer highly stable Brønsted acidic sites, high mass transfer, relatively large surface areas, water tolerant character, and convenient recoverability as well as recyclability, whilst retaining high activity in acid-catalyzed chemical reactions. This comprehensive review focuses on the chemistry of G-NMs, including their synthesis, characterization, properties, functionalization, and up-to-date applications in heterogeneous acid catalysis. In line with this, in certain instances readers may find herein some criticisms that should be taken as constructive and would be of value in understanding the scope and limitations of current approaches utilizing graphene and its derivatives for the same. PMID:25225721

  6. Multi-nanomaterial electrochemical biosensor based on label-free graphene for detecting cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Jin, Bing; Wang, Ping; Mao, Hongju; Hu, Bing; Zhang, Honglian; Cheng, Zule; Wu, Zhenhua; Bian, Xiaojun; Jia, Chunping; Jing, Fengxiang; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong

    2014-05-15

    Developing a rapid, accurate and sensitive electrochemical biosensor for detecting cancer biomarkers is important for early detection and diagnosis. This work reports an electrochemical biosensor based on a graphene (GR) platform which is made by CVD, combined with magnetic beads (MBs) and enzyme-labeled antibody-gold nanoparticle bioconjugate. MBs coated with capture antibodies (Ab1) were attached to GR sheets by an external magnetic field, to avoid reducing the conductivity of graphene. Sensitivity was also enhanced by modifying the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and the detection antibody (Ab2), to form the conjugate Ab2-AuNPs-HRP. Electron transport between the electrode and analyte target was accelerated by the multi-nanomaterial, and the limit of detection (LOD) for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) reached 5 ng mL(-1). The multi-nanomaterial electrode GR/MBs-Ab1/CEA/Ab2-AuNPs-HRP can be used to detect biomolecules such as CEA. The EC biosensor is sensitive and specific, and has potential in the detection of disease markers. PMID:24462797

  7. Low-toxic and safe nanomaterials by surface-chemical design, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, metallofullerenes, and graphenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YanEqual Contribution, Liang; Zhao, Feng; Li, Shoujian; Hu, Zhongbo; Zhao, Yuliang

    2011-02-01

    The toxicity grade for a bulk material can be approximately determined by three factors (chemical composition, dose, and exposure route). However, for a nanomaterial it depends on more than ten factors. Interestingly, some nano-factors (like huge surface adsorbability, small size, etc.) that endow nanomaterials with new biomedical functions are also potential causes leading to toxicity or damage to the living organism. Is it possible to create safe nanomaterials if such a number of complicated factors need to be regulated? We herein try to find answers to this important question. We first discuss chemical processes that are applicable for nanosurface modifications, in order to improve biocompatibility, regulate ADME, and reduce the toxicity of carbon nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, metallofullerenes, and graphenes). Then the biological/toxicological effects of surface-modified and unmodified carbon nanomaterials are comparatively discussed from two aspects: the lowered toxic responses or the enhanced biomedical functions. We summarize the eight biggest challenges in creating low-toxicity and safer nanomaterials and some significant topics of future research needs: to find out safer nanofactors; to establish controllable surface modifications and simpler chemistries for low-toxic nanomaterials; to explore the nanotoxicity mechanisms; to justify the validity of current toxicological theories in nanotoxicology; to create standardized nanomaterials for toxicity tests; to build theoretical models for cellular and molecular interactions of nanoparticles; and to establish systematical knowledge frameworks for nanotoxicology.

  8. Graphene valley pseudospin filter using an extended line defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunlycke, Daniel; White, Carter

    2011-03-01

    Although graphene exhibits excellent electron and thermal transport properties, it does not have an intrinsic band gap, required to use graphene as a replacement material for silicon and other semiconductors in conventional electronics. The band structure of graphene with its two cones near the Fermi level, however, offers opportunities to develop non-traditional applications. One such avenue is to exploit the valley degeneracy in graphene to develop valleytronics. A central component in valleytronics is the valley filter, just as the spin filter is central in spintronics. Herein, we present a two-dimensional valley filter based on scattering of electrons and holes off a recently observed extended line defect [Nat. Nanotech.5, 326 (2010)] within graphene. The transmission probability depends strongly on the valley pseudospin and the angle of incidence of the incident quasiparticles. Quasiparticles arriving at the line defect at a high angle of incidence lead to a valley polarization of the transmitted beam that is near 100 percent. This work was supported by ONR, directly and through NRL.

  9. Plasmon coupling in extended structures: Graphene superlattice nanoribbon arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, Daniel; Low, Tony; Farmer, Damon B.; Altug, Hatice; Avouris, Phaedon

    2016-03-01

    Interaction between localized plasmons in isolated proximal nanostructures is a well-studied phenomenon. Here we explore plasmon-plasmon interactions in connected extended systems. Such systems can now be easily produced experimentally using graphene. However, the mechanisms of plasmonic interactions in extended systems are not well understood. We employ finite-element methods to study these interactions in graphene superlattice nanoribbon arrays with a periodically modulated electrochemical potential or number of layers. We find a rich variation in the resulting plasmonic resonances depending on the dimensions, the electrochemical potentials (doping), and the separation of the nanoribbon segments, and we demonstrate the involvement of both transverse and longitudinal plasmon-plasmon interactions. For example, unlike predictions based on the well-known "orbital hybridization model," the energies of the resulting hybrid plasmonic resonances in the extended system can lie between the energies of the plasmons in the individual components. Our results demonstrate that the plasmonic spectra of graphene superlattice structures can be easily adjusted, continuously tuned, and used to enhance optical fields in the infrared and terahertz regions of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  10. Colloidal properties and stability of graphene oxide nanomaterials in the aquatic environment.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Indranil; Duch, Matthew C; Mansukhani, Nikhita D; Hersam, Mark C; Bouchard, Dermont

    2013-06-18

    While graphene oxide (GO) has been found to be the most toxic graphene-based nanomaterial, its environmental fate is still unexplored. In this study, the aggregation kinetics and stability of GO were investigated using time-resolved dynamic light scattering over a wide range of aquatic chemistries (pH, salt types (NaCl, MgCl2, CaCl2), ionic strength) relevant to natural and engineered systems. Although pH did not have a notable influence on GO stability from pH 4 to 10, salt type and ionic strength had significant effects on GO stability due to electrical double layer compression, similar to other colloidal particles. The critical coagulation concentration (CCC) values of GO were determined to be 44 mM NaCl, 0.9 mM CaCl2, and 1.3 mM MgCl2. Aggregation and stability of GO in the aquatic environment followed colloidal theory (DLVO and Schulze-Hardy rule), even though GO's shape is not spherical. CCC values of GO were lower than reported fullerene CCC values and higher than reported carbon nanotube CCC values. CaCl2 destabilized GO more aggressively than MgCl2 and NaCl due to the binding capacity of Ca(2+) ions with hydroxyl and carbonyl functional groups of GO. Natural organic matter significantly improved the stability of GO in water primarily due to steric repulsion. Long-term stability studies demonstrated that GO was highly stable in both natural and synthetic surface waters, although it settled quickly in synthetic groundwater. While GO remained stable in synthetic influent wastewater, effluent wastewater collected from a treatment plant rapidly destabilized GO, indicating GO will settle out during the wastewater treatment process and likely accumulate in biosolids and sludge. Overall, our findings indicate that GO nanomaterials will be stable in the natural aquatic environment and that significant aqueous transport of GO is possible. PMID:23668881

  11. RKKY interaction between extended magnetic defect lines in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, P. D.; Duffy, J. M.; Power, S. R.; Ferreira, M. S.

    2014-09-01

    Of fundamental interest in the field of spintronics is the mechanism of indirect exchange coupling between magnetic impurities embedded in metallic hosts. A range of physical features, such as magnetotransport and overall magnetic moment formation, are predicated upon this magnetic coupling, often referred to as the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction. Recent theoretical studies on the RKKY in graphene have been motivated by possible spintronic applications of magnetically doped graphene systems. In this paper a combination of analytic and numerical techniques are used to examine the effects of defect dimensionality on such an interaction. We show, in a mathematically transparent manner, that moving from single magnetic impurities to extended lines of impurities effectively reduces the dimensionality of the system and increases the range of the interaction. This has important consequences for the spintronic application of magnetically-doped systems, and we illustrate this with a simple magnetoresistance device.

  12. Magnetic nanomaterial derived from graphene oxide/layered double hydroxide hybrid for efficient removal of methyl orange from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhe; Ji, Shanshan; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Chao; Ren, Lulu; Tjiu, Weng Weei; Zhang, Zheng; Pan, Jisheng; Liu, Tianxi

    2013-10-15

    Magnetic hybrid nanomaterials composed of reduced graphene oxide, zero-valent nickel, and NiAl-mixed metal oxides (rGO/Ni/MMO) have been synthesized by calcining graphene oxide (GO)/layered double hydroxide (LDH) hybrid in nitrogen atmosphere. Structural characterizations demonstrate that with the presence of GO substrate, NiAl-LDHs can be reduced into zero-valent Ni and NiAl-MMOs during calcination. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to investigate the morphology of the as-prepared hybrid nanomaterials, demonstrating that the introduction of GO substrate prevents the aggregation of LDHs. Magnetism characterization proves the ferromagnetic property of rGO/Ni/MMO hybrid. This magnetic hybrid nanomaterial exhibits excellent adsorption ability toward methyl orange (MO) in aqueous solutions. The kinetics of the adsorption process and the adsorption isotherm are investigated. The MO removal process is found to obey the Redlich-Peterson isotherm model, and its kinetics follows pseudo-second-order rate equation. In addition, the magnetic hybrid also exhibits good recycle ability for MO removal. This novel magnetic hybrid nanomaterial derived from GO/LDH hybrid demonstrates great potential in the applications of water treatment. PMID:23928490

  13. Two dimension (2-D) graphene-based nanomaterials as signal amplification elements in electrochemical microfluidic immune-devices: Recent advances.

    PubMed

    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Shadjou, Nasrin; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    Graphene is a 2-D carbon nanomaterial with many distinctive properties that are electrochemically beneficial, such as large surface-to-volume ratio, lowered power usage, high conductivity and electron mobility. Graphene-based electrochemical immune-devices have recently gained much importance for detecting antigens and biomarkers responsible for cancer diagnosis. This review describes fabrication and chemical modification of the surfaces of graphene for immunesensing applications. We also present a comprehensive overview of current developments and key issues in the determination of some biological molecules with particular emphasis on evaluating the models. This review focuses mostly on new developments in the last 5years in development of chip architecture and integration, different sensing modes that can be used in conjunction with microfluidics, and new applications that have emerged or have been demonstrated; it also aims to point out where future research can be directed to in these areas. PMID:27524045

  14. Enhanced dehydrochlorination of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane by graphene-based nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuguang; Chen, Weifeng; Zhang, Chengdong; Li, Yao; Wang, Fanfan; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) materials contain a variety of surface O-functional groups that are chemically reactive. When released into the environment these materials may significantly affect the abiotic transformation of organic contaminants, and therefore, may alter their fate and risks. We found that two GO and five RGO materials that varied in C/O ratio, hydrophobicity, and type/distribution of surface O-functionality all had catalytic effects on the dehydrochlorination of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TeCA). Even though the catalytic effects of the materials originated from their deprotonated surface O-functional groups, which served as conjugated bases to catalyze the reaction, the catalytic efficiencies of the materials did not correlate strongly with their surface O contents. The spectroscopic evidence (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), surface charge data, and adsorption experiments demonstrated that the catalytic efficiencies of the GO/RGO materials were controlled by a complex interplay of the type and distribution of surface O-functionality, as well as adsorption affinity of the materials. Both Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) inhibited the catalytic efficiency of the materials by binding to the surface O-functional groups, and consequently, decreasing the basicity of the functional groups. At an environmentally relevant concentration of 10 mg/L, Suwannee River humic acid (used as a model dissolved organic matter) alone had little effect on the dehydrochlorination of TeCA. However, it could inhibit the catalytic efficiency of the GO/RGO materials by coating on their surface and thus, decreasing the adsorption affinity of these materials for TeCA. The findings further underline the potentially important impacts of nanomaterials on contaminant fate and effects in the environment. PMID:27107258

  15. Graphene-Based Nanomaterials as Efficient Peroxidase Mimetic Catalysts for Biosensing Applications: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Garg, Bhaskar; Bisht, Tanuja; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2015-01-01

    "Artificial enzymes", a term coined by Breslow for enzyme mimics is an exciting and promising branch of biomimetic chemistry aiming to imitate the general and essential principles of natural enzymes using a variety of alternative materials including heterogeneous catalysts. Peroxidase enzymes represent a large family of oxidoreductases that typically catalyze biological reactions with high substrate affinity and specificity under relatively mild conditions and thus offer a wide range of practical applications in many areas of science. The increasing understanding of general principles as well as intrinsic drawbacks such as low operational stability, high cost, difficulty in purification and storage, and sensitivity of catalytic activity towards atmospheric conditions of peroxidases has triggered a dynamic field in nanotechnology, biochemical, and material science that aims at joining the better of three worlds by combining the concept adapted from nature with the processability of catalytically active graphene-based nanomaterials (G-NMs) as excellent peroxidase mimetic catalysts. This comprehensive review discusses an up-to-date synthesis, kinetics, mechanisms, and biosensing applications of a variety of G-NMs that have been explored as promising catalysts to mimic natural peroxidases. PMID:26248071

  16. The extended growth of graphene oxide flakes using ethanol CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingfeng; Larisika, Melanie; Fam, W. H. Derrick; He, Qiyuan; Nimmo, Myra A.; Nowak, Christoph; Tok, I. Y. Alfred

    2013-03-01

    We report the extended growth of Graphene Oxide (GO) flakes using atmospheric pressure ethanol Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). GO was used to catalyze the deposition of carbon on a substrate in the ethanol CVD with Ar and H2 as carrier gases. Raman, SEM, XPS and AFM characterized the growth to be a reduced GO (RGO) of <5 layers. This newly grown RGO possesses lower defect density with larger and increased distribution of sp2 domains than chemically reduced RGO. Furthermore this method without optimization reduces the relative standard deviation of electrical conductivity between chips, from 80.5% to 16.5%, enabling RGO to be used in practical electronic devices.We report the extended growth of Graphene Oxide (GO) flakes using atmospheric pressure ethanol Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). GO was used to catalyze the deposition of carbon on a substrate in the ethanol CVD with Ar and H2 as carrier gases. Raman, SEM, XPS and AFM characterized the growth to be a reduced GO (RGO) of <5 layers. This newly grown RGO possesses lower defect density with larger and increased distribution of sp2 domains than chemically reduced RGO. Furthermore this method without optimization reduces the relative standard deviation of electrical conductivity between chips, from 80.5% to 16.5%, enabling RGO to be used in practical electronic devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The ethanol CVD setup, TEM of CVD treated RGO, graphite 2D Raman spectra, GO synthesis, transfer and reduction methods and details of characterization techniques are described in the document. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr33704a

  17. Envelopment-Internalization Synergistic Effects and Metabolic Mechanisms of Graphene Oxide on Single-Cell Chlorella vulgaris Are Dependent on the Nanomaterial Particle Size.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Shaohu; Hu, Xiangang; Zhou, Qixing

    2015-08-19

    The interactions between nanomaterials and cells are fundamental in biological responses to nanomaterials. However, the size-dependent synergistic effects of envelopment and internalization as well as the metabolic mechanisms of nanomaterials have remained unknown. The nanomaterials tested here were larger graphene oxide nanosheets (GONS) and small graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQD). GONS intensively entrapped single-celled Chlorella vulgaris, and envelopment by GONS reduced the cell permeability. In contrast, GOQD-induced remarkable shrinkage of the plasma membrane and then enhanced cell permeability through strong internalization effects such as plasmolysis, uptake of nanomaterials, an oxidative stress increase, and inhibition of cell division and chlorophyll biosynthesis. Metabolomics analysis showed that amino acid metabolism was sensitive to nanomaterial exposure. Shrinkage of the plasma membrane is proposed to be linked to increases in the isoleucine levels. The inhibition of cell division and chlorophyll a biosynthesis was associated with decreases in aspartic acid and serine, the precursors of chlorophyll a. The increases in mitochondrial membrane potential loss and oxidative stress were correlated with an increase in linolenic acid. The above metabolites can be used as indicators of the corresponding biological responses. These results enhance our systemic understanding of the size-dependent biological effects of nanomaterials. PMID:26221973

  18. Screening of toxic potential of graphene family nanomaterials using in vitro and alternative in vivo toxicity testing systems

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nivedita; Yang, Ji Su; Park, Kwangsik; Oh, Seung Min; Park, Jeonggue; Choi, Jinhee

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The widely promising applications of graphene nanomaterials raise considerable concerns regarding their environmental and human health risk assessment. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the toxicity profiling of graphene family nananomaterials (GFNs) in alternative in vitro and in vivo toxicity testing models. Methods The GFNs used in this study are graphene nanoplatelets ([GNPs]–pristine, carboxylate [COOH] and amide [NH2]) and graphene oxides (single layer [SLGO] and few layers [FLGO]). The human bronchial epithelial cells (Beas2B cells) as in vitro system and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as in vivo system were used to profile the toxicity response of GFNs. Cytotoxicity assays, colony formation assay for cellular toxicity and reproduction potentiality in C. elegans were used as end points to evaluate the GFNs’ toxicity. Results In general, GNPs exhibited higher toxicity than GOs in Beas2B cells, and among the GNPs the order of toxicity was pristine>NH2>COOH. Although the order of toxicity of the GNPs was maintained in C. elegans reproductive toxicity, but GOs were found to be more toxic in the worms than GNPs. In both systems, SLGO exhibited profoundly greater dose dependency than FLGO. The possible reason of their differential toxicity lay in their distinctive physicochemical characteristics and agglomeration behavior in the exposure media. Conclusions The present study revealed that the toxicity of GFNs is dependent on the graphene nanomaterial’s physical forms, surface functionalizations, number of layers, dose, time of exposure and obviously, on the alternative model systems used for toxicity assessment. PMID:26602558

  19. A Critical Review of Glucose Biosensors Based on Carbon Nanomaterials: Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhigang; Garcia-Gancedo, Luis; Flewitt, Andrew J.; Xie, Huaqing; Moussy, Francis; Milne, William I.

    2012-01-01

    There has been an explosion of research into the physical and chemical properties of carbon-based nanomaterials, since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by Iijima in 1991. Carbon nanomaterials offer unique advantages in several areas, like high surface-volume ratio, high electrical conductivity, chemical stability and strong mechanical strength, and are thus frequently being incorporated into sensing elements. Carbon nanomaterial-based sensors generally have higher sensitivities and a lower detection limit than conventional ones. In this review, a brief history of glucose biosensors is firstly presented. The carbon nanotube and grapheme-based biosensors, are introduced in Sections 3 and 4, respectively, which cover synthesis methods, up-to-date sensing approaches and nonenzymatic hybrid sensors. Finally, we briefly outline the current status and future direction for carbon nanomaterials to be used in the sensing area. PMID:22778628

  20. A critical review of glucose biosensors based on carbon nanomaterials: carbon nanotubes and graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhigang; Garcia-Gancedo, Luis; Flewitt, Andrew J; Xie, Huaqing; Moussy, Francis; Milne, William I

    2012-01-01

    There has been an explosion of research into the physical and chemical properties of carbon-based nanomaterials, since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by Iijima in 1991. Carbon nanomaterials offer unique advantages in several areas, like high surface-volume ratio, high electrical conductivity, chemical stability and strong mechanical strength, and are thus frequently being incorporated into sensing elements. Carbon nanomaterial-based sensors generally have higher sensitivities and a lower detection limit than conventional ones. In this review, a brief history of glucose biosensors is firstly presented. The carbon nanotube and grapheme-based biosensors, are introduced in Sections 3 and 4, respectively, which cover synthesis methods, up-to-date sensing approaches and nonenzymatic hybrid sensors. Finally, we briefly outline the current status and future direction for carbon nanomaterials to be used in the sensing area. PMID:22778628

  1. Functionalized graphene nanomaterials: new insight into direct exfoliation of graphite with supramolecular polymers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chih-Chia; Chang, Feng-Chih; Wang, Jui-Hsu; Chen, Jem-Kun; Yen, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-01-14

    A novel urea-cytosine end-capped polypropylene glycol (UrCy-PPG) can self-assemble into a long-range ordered lamellar microstructure on the surface of graphene, due to the strong specific interactions between UrCy-PPG and graphene. In addition, the graphene composite produced exhibits a high conductivity (∼1093 S m(-1)) with a dramatic thermo-responsive ON/OFF resistance-switching behavior (10 consecutive cycles). PMID:26660032

  2. Extended Simulations of Graphene Growth with Updated Rate Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Whitesides, R; You, X; Frenklach, M

    2010-03-18

    New simulations of graphene growth in flame environments are presented. The simulations employ a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm coupled to molecular mechanics (MM) geometry optimization to track individual graphenic species as they evolve. Focus is given to incorporation of five-member rings and resulting curvature and edge defects. The model code has been re-written to be more computationally efficient enabling a larger set of simulations to be run, decreasing stochastic fluctuations in the averaged results. The model also includes updated rate coefficients for graphene edge reactions recently published in the literature. The new simulations are compared to results from the previous model as well as to hydrogen to carbon ratios recorded in experiment and calculated with alternate models.

  3. Synthesis of Extended Atomically Perfect Zigzag Graphene - Boron Nitride Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Drost, Robert; Kezilebieke, Shawulienu; M. Ervasti, Mikko; Hämäläinen, Sampsa K.; Schulz, Fabian; Harju, Ari; Liljeroth, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The combination of several materials into heterostructures is a powerful method for controlling material properties. The integration of graphene (G) with hexagonal boron nitride (BN) in particular has been heralded as a way to engineer the graphene band structure and implement spin- and valleytronics in 2D materials. Despite recent efforts, fabrication methods for well-defined G-BN structures on a large scale are still lacking. We report on a new method for producing atomically well-defined G-BN structures on an unprecedented length scale by exploiting the interaction of G and BN edges with a Ni(111) surface as well as each other. PMID:26584674

  4. 3D graphene nanomaterials for binder-free supercapacitors: scientific design for enhanced performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shuijian; Chen, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Because of the excellent intrinsic properties, especially the strong mechanical strength, extraordinarily high surface area and extremely high conductivity, graphene is deemed as a versatile building block for fabricating functional materials for energy production and storage applications. In this article, the recent progress in the assembly of binder-free and self-standing graphene-based materials, as well as their application in supercapacitors are reviewed, including electrical double layer capacitors, pseudocapacitors, and asymmetric supercapacitors. Various fabrication strategies and the influence of structures on the capacitance performance of 3D graphene-based materials are discussed. We finally give concluding remarks and an outlook on the scientific design of binder-free and self-standing graphene materials for achieving better capacitance performance.

  5. Functionalized graphene nanomaterials: new insight into direct exfoliation of graphite with supramolecular polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chih-Chia; Chang, Feng-Chih; Wang, Jui-Hsu; Chen, Jem-Kun; Yen, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2015-12-01

    A novel urea-cytosine end-capped polypropylene glycol (UrCy-PPG) can self-assemble into a long-range ordered lamellar microstructure on the surface of graphene, due to the strong specific interactions between UrCy-PPG and graphene. In addition, the graphene composite produced exhibits a high conductivity (~1093 S m-1) with a dramatic thermo-responsive ON/OFF resistance-switching behavior (10 consecutive cycles).A novel urea-cytosine end-capped polypropylene glycol (UrCy-PPG) can self-assemble into a long-range ordered lamellar microstructure on the surface of graphene, due to the strong specific interactions between UrCy-PPG and graphene. In addition, the graphene composite produced exhibits a high conductivity (~1093 S m-1) with a dramatic thermo-responsive ON/OFF resistance-switching behavior (10 consecutive cycles). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07076g

  6. Pulmonary Responses of Sprague-Dawley Rats in Single Inhalation Exposure to Graphene Oxide Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sung Gu; Kim, Jin Kwon; Shin, Jae Hoon; Hwang, Joo Hwan; Lee, Jong Seong; Kim, Tae-Gyu; Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Gun Ho; Kim, Keun Soo; Lee, Heon Sang; Song, Nam Woong; Ahn, Kangho; Yu, Il Je

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is receiving increased attention due to its potential widespread applications in future. However, the health effects of graphene have not yet been well studied. Therefore, this study examined the pulmonary effects of graphene oxide using male Sprague-Dawley rats and a single 6-hour nose-only inhalation technique. Following the exposure, the rats were allowed to recover for 1 day, 7 days, or 14 days. A total of three groups were compared: control (fresh air), low concentration (0.46 ± 0.06 mg/m3), and high concentration (3.76 ± 0.24 mg/m3). The exposure to graphene oxide did not induce significant changes in the body weights, organ weights, and food consumption during the 14 days of recovery time. The microalbumin and lactate dehydrogenase levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were not significantly changed due to the exposure. Similarly, total cell count, macrophages, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and lymphocytes were not significantly altered in the BAL fluid. Plus, the histopathological examination of the rat lungs only showed an uptake of graphene oxide in the alveolar macrophages of the high-concentration group. Therefore, these results demonstrate that the single inhalation exposure to graphene oxide induce minimal toxic responses in rat lungs at the concentrations and time points used in the present study. PMID:26295037

  7. Potentiating effect of graphene nanomaterials on aromatic environmental pollutant-induced cytochrome P450 1A expression in the topminnow fish hepatoma cell line PLHC-1.

    PubMed

    Lammel, Tobias; Boisseaux, Paul; Navas, José M

    2015-09-01

    Graphene and its derivatives are an emerging class of carbon nanomaterial with great potential for a broad range of industrial and consumer applications. However, their increasing production and use is expected to result in release of nano-sized graphene platelets into the environment, where they may interact with chemical pollutants modifying their fate and toxic potential. The objective of this study was to assess whether graphene nanoplatelets can act as vector for aromatic environmental pollutants increasing their cellular uptake and associated hazardous effects in vitro. For this purpose, cell cultures of the topminnow fish (Poeciliopsis lucida) hepatoma cell line PLHC-1 were simultaneously (and successively) exposed to graphene nanoplatelets (graphene oxide (GO) or carboxyl graphene (CXYG)) and an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist (β-naphthoflavone (β-NF), benzo(k)fluoranthene (BkF) or 3,3',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB169)). Following exposure cytochrome P450 1A (Cyp1A) induction was assessed by measuring cyp1A mRNA expression levels using reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and Cyp1A-dependent ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity. It was observed that pre- and co-exposure of cells to GO and CXYG nanoplatelets had a potentiating effect on β-NF, BkF, and PCB169-dependent Cyp1A induction suggesting that graphene nanoplatelets increase the effective concentration of AhR agonists by facilitating their passive diffusion into the cells by damaging the cells' plasma membrane and/or by transporting them over the plasma membrane via a Trojan horse-like mechanism. The results demonstrate the existence of combination effects between nanomaterials and environmental pollutants and stress the importance of considering these effects when evaluating their respective hazard. PMID:24706484

  8. Thermal conductivity reduction in analogous 2D nanomaterials with isotope substitution: Graphene and silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Srilok; Ray, Upamanyu; Balasubramanian, Ganesh

    2016-04-01

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to understand how the presence of isotopes influences thermal transport across silicene, and compare the findings with that in structurally analogous graphene. The simulated structures are about 140 nm long and around 4 nm wide. The phonon spectra along with the variation of thermal conductivity reveal that out-of-plane modes are delocalized relative to the in-plane counterparts. The absolute thermal conductivity reductions are more pronounced in graphene than in silicene. Our computational findings agree with results of an analytical model based on mean-field approximation with appropriate corrections for the lattice anharmonicity.

  9. Interactions of Graphene Oxide Nanomaterials with Natural Organic Matter and Metal Oxide Surfaces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interactions of graphene oxide (GO) with silica surfaces were investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Both GO deposition and release were monitored on silica- and poly-l-lysine (PLL) coated surfaces as a function of GO concentration a...

  10. Biological Interactions of Graphene-Family Nanomaterials – An Interdisciplinary Review

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Vanesa C.; Jachak, Ashish; Hurt, Robert H.; Kane, Agnes B.

    2011-01-01

    Graphene is a single-atom thick, two-dimensional sheet of hexagonally arranged carbon atoms isolated from its three-dimensional parent material, graphite. Related materials include few-layer-graphene (FLG), ultrathin graphite, graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (rGO), and graphene nanosheets (GNS). This review proposes a systematic nomenclature for this set of “Graphene-Family Nanomaterials” (GFNs) and discusses specific materials properties relevant for biomolecular and cellular interactions. The article discusses several unique modes of interaction between GFNs and nucleic acids, lipid bilayers, and conjugated small molecule drugs and dyes. Some GFNs are produced as dry powders using thermal exfoliation, and in these cases inhalation is a likely route of human exposure. Some GFNs have aerodynamic sizes that can lead to inhalation and substantial deposition in the human respiratory tract, which may impair lung defense and clearance leading to formation of granulomas and lung fibrosis. The limited literature on in vitro toxicity suggests that GFNs can be either benign or toxic to cells, and it is hypothesized that the biological response will vary across the material family depending on layer number, lateral size, stiffness, hydrophobicity, surface functionalization, and dose. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in target cells is a potential mechanism for toxicity, although the extremely high hydrophobic surface area of some GFNs may also lead to significant interactions with membrane lipids leading to direct physical toxicity or adsorption of biological molecules leading to indirect toxicity. Limited in vivo studies demonstrate systemic biodistribution and biopersistence of GFNs following intravenous delivery. Similar to other smooth, continuous, biopersistent implants or foreign bodies, GFNs have the potential to induce foreign body tumors. Long-term adverse health impacts must be considered in design of GFNs for drug delivery, tissue

  11. Synthesis, Characterization, and Tribological Evaluation of TiO2-Reinforced Boron and Nitrogen co-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide Based Hybrid Nanomaterials as Efficient Antiwear Lubricant Additives.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Vinay; Kalyani; Umrao, Sima; Rastogi, Rashmi B; Kumar, Rajesh; Srivastava, Anchal

    2016-05-11

    The microwave-synthesized reduced graphene oxide (MRG), boron-doped reduced graphene oxide (B-MRG), nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-MRG), boron-nitrogen-co-doped reduced graphene oxide (B-N-MRG), and TiO2-reinforced B-N-MRG (TiO2-B-N-MRG) nanomaterials have been synthesized and characterized by various state-of-the-art techniques, like Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Furthermore, the tribological properties of prepared nanomaterials as antiwear additives in neutral paraffin oil have been evaluated using a four-ball machine at an optimized additive concentration (0.15% w/v). The tribological parameters, like mean wear scar diameter, coefficient of friction, and wear rates, revealed that these nanomaterials have potential to be developed as environmentally friendly sulfated-ash-, phosphorus-, and sulfur-free antiwear lubricant additives. The friction- and wear-reducing behavior of MRG increased upon successive doping of nitrogen, boron, and both nitrogen and boron. Among these additives, B-N-co-doped MRG shows superior tribological behavior in paraffin base oil. Besides this, the load-carrying properties of B-N-co-doped MRG have significantly improved after its reinforcement with TiO2 nanoparticles. A comparative study of the surface morphology of a lubricated track in the presence of various additives has been assessed by SEM and contact-mode atomic force microscopy. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies have proved that the excellent lubrication properties of TiO2-B-N-MRG are due to the in situ formation of a tribofilm composed of boron nitride, adsorbed graphene layers, and tribosintered TiO2 nanoparticles during the tribocontact. Being sulfur-, halogen-, and phosphorus-free, these graphene-based nanomaterials act as green antiwear additives, protecting interacting

  12. Cuprous Sulfide/Reduced Graphene Oxide Hybrid Nanomaterials: Solvothermal Synthesis and Enhanced Electrochemical Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhanjun; Zhu, Yabo; Xing, Zheng; Wang, Zhengyuan

    2016-01-01

    The cuprous sulfide nanoparticles (CuS NPs)-decorated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanocomposites have been successfully prepared via a facile and efficient solvothermal synthesis method. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images demonstrated that CuS micronspheres composed of nanosheets and distributed on the rGO layer in well-monodispersed form. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analyses and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that graphene oxide (GO) had been reduced to rGO. The electrochemical performances of CuS/rGO nanocomposites were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and charge/discharge techniques, which showed that the specific capacitance of CuS/rGO nanocomposites was enhanced because of the introduction of rGO.

  13. Photocatalytic degradation of commercially sourced naphthenic acids by TiO2-graphene composite nanomaterial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juncheng; Wang, Lin; Tang, Jingchun; Ma, Jianli

    2016-04-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a major contributor to the toxicity in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), which is produced by hot water extraction of bitumen. NAs are extremely difficult to be degraded due to its complex ring and side chain structure. Photocatalysis is recognized as a promising technology in the removal of refractory organic pollutants. In this work, TiO2-graphene (P25-GR) composites were synthesized by means of solvothermal method. The results showed that P25-GR composite exhibited better photocatalytic activity than pure P25. The removal efficiency of naphthenic acids in acid solution was higher than that in neutral and alkaline solutions. It was the first report ever known on the photodegradation of NAs based on graphene, and this process achieved a higher removal rate than other photocatalysis degradation of NAs in a shorter reaction time. LC/MS analysis showed that macromolecular NAs (carbon number 17-22, z value -2) were easy to be degraded than the micromolecular ones (carbon number 11-16, z value -2). Furthermore, the reactive oxygen species that play the main role in the photocatalysis system were studied. It was found that holes and ·OH were the main reactive species in the UV/P25-GR photocatalysis system. Given the high removal efficiency of refractory organic pollutants and the short degradation time, photodegradation based on composite catalysts has a broad and practical prospect. The study on the photodegradation of commercially sourced NAs may provide a guidance for the degradation of OSPW NAs by this method. PMID:26874061

  14. Synthesis of graphene nanomaterials and their application in electrochemical energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Guoping

    The need to store and use energy on diverse scales in a modern technological society necessitates the design of large and small energy systems, among which electrical energy storage systems such as batteries and capacitors have attracted much interest in the past several decades. Supercapacitors, also known as ultracapacitors, or electrochemical capacitors, with fast power delivery and long cycle life are complementing or even replacing batteries in many applications. The rapid development of miniaturized electronic devices has led to a growing need for rechargeable micro-power sources with high performance. Among different sources, electrochemical micro-capacitors or micro-supercapacitors provide higher power density than their counterparts and are gaining increased interest from the research and engineering communities. Rechargeable Li ion batteries with high energy and power density, long cycling life, high charge-discharge rate (1C - 3C) and safe operation are in high demand as power sources and power backup for hybrid electric vehicles and other applications. In the present work, graphene-based graphene materials have been designed and synthesized for electrochemical energy storage applications, e.g., conventional supercapacitors (macro-supercapacitors), microsupercapacitors and lithium ion batteries. Factors influencing the formation and structure of graphitic petals grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on oxidized silicon substrates were investigated through process variation and materials analysis. Insights gained into the growth mechanism of these graphitic petals suggest a simple scribing method can be used to control both the location and formation of petals on flat Si substrates. Transitional metal oxides and conducting polymers have been coated on the graphitic petal-based electrodes by facile chemical methods for multifunctional energy storage applications. Detailed electrochemical characterization (e.g., cyclic voltammetry and

  15. Tailored synthesis of various nanomaterials by using a graphene-oxide-based gel as a nanoreactor and nanohybrid-catalyzed C-C bond formation.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Abhijit; Banerjee, Arindam

    2014-12-01

    New graphene oxide (GO)-based hydrogels that contain vitamin B2/B12 and vitamin C (ascorbic acid) have been synthesized in water (at neutral pH value). These gel-based soft materials have been used to synthesize various metal nanoparticles, including Au, Ag, and Pd nanoparticles, as well as nanoparticle-containing reduced graphene oxide (RGO)-based nanohybrid systems. This result indicates that GO-based gels can be used as versatile reactors for the synthesis of different nanomaterials and hybrid systems on the nanoscale. Moreover, the RGO-based nanohybrid hydrogel with Pd nanoparticles was used as an efficient catalyst for C-C bond-formation reactions with good yields and showed high recyclability in Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reactions. PMID:25224859

  16. Deoxidation of graphene oxide nanosheets to extended graphenites by ``unzipping'' elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Lay-Lay; Wang, Shuai; Chia, Perq-Jon; Chen, Lan; Zhao, Li-Hong; Chen, Wei; Wee, Andrew T.-S.; Ho, Peter K.-H.

    2008-09-01

    Low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy on alkyl-surface-functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets reveals the formation of low-dimensional graphenite nanostructures with extended π-conjugation at deoxidation temperatures above 150°C. The elimination of these alkyl chains from the surface of the nanosheets does not occur uniformly, but in distinctive patterns that correspond to the formation of an underlying network of graphenite one-dimensional "tracks" and "dots." Atomic-resolution imaging of these graphenite regions reveals a defective honeycomb lattice characteristic of single-layer graphenes. These extended graphenite structures percolate the nanosheet even for moderate levels of deoxidation and regraphenization of the basal plane. The formation of extended conjugation indicates a regioselective rather than random elimination of the oxygen atoms and alkyl chains. The resultant network morphology allows bandlike transport of charge carriers across the sheets despite defects and disorder. The sub-meV apparent activation energies for the field-effect mobilities at low temperatures (70-30K ) for both electrons and holes rule out significant electron-phonon coupling. This suggests a remarkable potential for electronic applications of these solution-processable functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets.

  17. Aerosol synthesis and application of folded graphene-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yantao; Wang, Zhongying; Qiu, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Graphene oxide colloid has been widely used in the synthesis of various graphene-based materials. Graphene oxide sheets, with a low bending rigidity, can be folded when assembled in aqueous phase. A simple but industrial scalable way, aerosol processing, can be used to fabricate folded graphene-based materials. These folded materials can carry various cargo materials and be used in different applications such as time-controlled drug release, medical imaging enhancement, catalyst support and energy related areas. The aerosol synthesis of folded graphene-based materials can also be easily extended to fabricate hybrid nanomaterials without any complicated chemistries.

  18. Hybrid Nanomaterials Based on Graphene and Gold Nanoclusters for Efficient Electrocatalytic Reduction of Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhong; Li, Na; Wang, Qiannan; Tang, Zhenghua

    2016-12-01

    Nanocomposites based on gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with polyvinyl pyrrolidone as ligand and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) have been prepared and employed as efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). AuNCs were synthesized through a wet chemical approach and then loaded onto the RGO. The as-prepared hybrid materials were pyrolyzed to remove the organic ligands. The composites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as other techniques. Electrochemical tests demonstrated that the hybrid materials exhibited effective ORR activity in alkaline media. Among a series of samples tested, the pyrolyzed sample with 50 % AuNCs mass loading exhibited the best activity, superior than AuNCs alone, RGO alone, and the others, in terms of onset potential and kinetic current density as well as durability. The method here may provide a generic approach to prepare supported noble metal nanoclusters with excellent reactivity and robust stability for ORR. PMID:27431494

  19. Hybrid Nanomaterials Based on Graphene and Gold Nanoclusters for Efficient Electrocatalytic Reduction of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changhong; Li, Na; Wang, Qiannan; Tang, Zhenghua

    2016-07-01

    Nanocomposites based on gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with polyvinyl pyrrolidone as ligand and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) have been prepared and employed as efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). AuNCs were synthesized through a wet chemical approach and then loaded onto the RGO. The as-prepared hybrid materials were pyrolyzed to remove the organic ligands. The composites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as other techniques. Electrochemical tests demonstrated that the hybrid materials exhibited effective ORR activity in alkaline media. Among a series of samples tested, the pyrolyzed sample with 50 % AuNCs mass loading exhibited the best activity, superior than AuNCs alone, RGO alone, and the others, in terms of onset potential and kinetic current density as well as durability. The method here may provide a generic approach to prepare supported noble metal nanoclusters with excellent reactivity and robust stability for ORR.

  20. In Situ Fabrication of CoS and NiS Nanomaterials Anchored on Reduced Graphene Oxide for Reversible Lithium Storage.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yingbin; Liang, Ming; Lou, Peili; Cui, Zhonghui; Guo, Xiangxin; Sun, Weiwei; Yu, Xuebin

    2016-06-15

    CoS and NiS nanomaterials anchored on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets, synthesized via combination of hydrothermal with sulfidation process, are studied as high-capacity anode materials for the reversible lithium storage. The obtained CoS nanofibers and NiS nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed on rGO sheets without aggregation, forming the sheet-on-sheet composite structure. Such nanoarchitecture can not only facilitate ion/electron transport along the interfaces, but also effectively prevent metal-sulfide nanomaterials aggregation during the lithium reactions. Both the rGO-supported CoS nanofibers (NFs) and NiS nanoparticles (NPs) show superior lithium storage performance. In particular, the CoS NFs-rGO electrodes deliver the discharge capacity as high as 939 mA h g(-1) after the 100th cycle at 100 mA g(-1) with Coulombic efficiency above 98%. This strategy for construction of such composite structure can also synthesize other metal-sulfide-rGO nanomaterials for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries. PMID:27224962

  1. Ferromagnetically coupled local moments along an extended line defect in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Carter T.; Vasudevan, Smitha; Gunlycke, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Recently an extended line defect was observed composed of octagonal and pentagonal carbon rings embedded in a graphene sheet [Nat. Nanotech. 5, 326 (2010)]. We report results of studies we have made of this defect using both first-principles and semi-empirical methods. Two types of boundary-localized states arising from the defect are identified. The first (second) type has eigenstates with wavefunctions that are anti- symmetric (symmetric) with respect to a mirror plane that is perpendicular to the graphene sheet and passes through the line defect center line. The boundary-localized anti-symmetric states are shown to be intimately connected to the zigzag edge states of semi-infinite graphene. They exhibit little dispersion along the defect line and lie close to the Fermi level giving rise to a spontaneous spin polarization along the defect once electron-electron interactions are included at the level of a mean field approximation to a Hubbard Model. Within this approach, symmetry requires that the principal moments couple ferromagnetically both along and across the line defect leading to approximately 2/3 more up than down spin electrons per defect repeat unit. This work was supported by ONR, directly and through NRL.

  2. Conductive nanomaterials for printed electronics.

    PubMed

    Kamyshny, Alexander; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2014-09-10

    This is a review on recent developments in the field of conductive nanomaterials and their application in printed electronics, with particular emphasis on inkjet printing of ink formulations based on metal nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene sheets. The review describes the basic properties of conductive nanomaterials suitable for printed electronics (metal nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene), their stabilization in dispersions, formulations of conductive inks, and obtaining conductive patterns by using various sintering methods. Applications of conductive nanomaterials for electronic devices (transparent electrodes, metallization of solar cells, RFID antennas, TFTs, and light emitting devices) are also briefly reviewed. PMID:25340186

  3. Spectroscopic Studies of Abiotic and Biological Nanomaterials: Silver Nanoparticles, Rhodamine 6G Adsorbed on Graphene, and c-Type Cytochromes and Type IV Pili in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrall, Elizabeth S.

    This thesis describes spectroscopic studies of three different systems: silver nanoparticles, the dye molecule rhodamine 6G adsorbed on graphene, and the type IV pili and c-type cytochromes produced by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. Although these systems are quite different in some ways, they can all be considered examples of nanomaterials. A nanomaterial is generally defined as having at least one dimension below 100 nm in size. Silver nanoparticles, with sub-100 nm size in all dimensions, are examples of zero-dimensional nanomaterials. Graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon atoms, is the paradigmatic two-dimensional nanomaterial. And although bacterial cells are on the order of 1 μm in size, the type IV pili and multiheme c-type cytochromes produced by G. sulfurreducens can be considered to be one- and zero-dimensional nanomaterials respectively. A further connection between these systems is their strong interaction with visible light, allowing us to study them using similar spectroscopic tools. The first chapter of this thesis describes research on the plasmon-mediated photochemistry of silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles support coherent electron oscillations, known as localized surface plasmons, at resonance frequencies that depend on the particle size and shape and the local dielectric environment. Nanoparticle absorption and scattering cross-sections are maximized at surface plasmon resonance frequencies, and the electromagnetic field is amplified near the particle surface. Plasmonic effects can enhance the photochemistry of silver particles alone or in conjunction with semiconductors according to several mechanisms. We study the photooxidation of citrate by silver nanoparticles in a photoelectrochemical cell, focusing on the wavelength-dependence of the reaction rate and the role of the semiconductor substrate. We find that the citrate

  4. Purifying Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor); Hurst, Janet (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of purifying a nanomaterial and the resultant purified nanomaterial in which a salt, such as ferric chloride, at or near its liquid phase temperature, is used to penetrate and wet the internal surfaces of a nanomaterial to dissolve impurities that may be present, for example, from processes used in the manufacture of the nanomaterial.

  5. Probing the extended-state width of disorder-broadened Landau levels in epitaxial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takase, K.; Hibino, H.; Muraki, K.

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally investigate the width of extended states in disorder-broadened Landau levels (LLs) in top-gated epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide using two different methods: gated transport spectroscopy and activation gap measurements on integer quantum Hall states. The transport spectroscopy reveals that the widths of the extended states in the zero-energy (N =0 ) and first excited (N =1 ) LLs are of similar magnitude over the ranges of magnetic field (4-16 T) and temperature studied (1.6-150 K). Under certain assumptions we find that the extended-state width follows a power-law temperature dependence with the exponent η ˜0.3 in the N =0 (N =1 ) LL, with almost no (very weak) magnetic-field dependence. Activation gap measurements at the filling factors of ν =2 and 6 give results consistent with transport spectroscopy for the N =1 LL, but indicate a larger broadening for the N =0 LL than deduced from the spectroscopy.

  6. Fundamentals and applications of monodisperse carbon-based nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersam, Mark

    2011-03-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials have attracted significant attention due to their potential to enable and/or improve applications such as transistors, transparent conductors, solar cells, batteries, water purification systems, infrastructure materials, drug delivery, and biosensors. This talk will delineate chemical strategies for tuning and enhancing the properties of these promising nanomaterials. For example, we have developed and commercialized a scalable technique for sorting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by their physical and electronic structure using density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU). The resulting monodisperse SWCNTs possess unprecedented uniformity in their electronic and optical properties, which enables the fabrication of high performance thin film field-effect transistors, optoelectronic devices, and transparent conductors. The DGU technique also enables multi-walled carbon nanotubes to be sorted by the number of walls, and solution phase graphene to be sorted by thickness, thus expanding the suite of monodisperse carbon-based nanomaterials. By recently extending our DGU efforts to SWCNTs and graphene dispersed in biocompatible polymers (e.g., DNA, poloxamers, etc.), new opportunities have emerged in biomedical applications. Ultimately, the ability to control structure and surface chemistry with sub-nanometer precision enables optimized properties for a diverse range of technologies that employ carbon-based nanomaterials.

  7. Is Graphene a Promising Nano-Material for Promoting Surface Modification of Implants or Scaffold Materials in Bone Tissue Engineering?

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ming; Liu, Yunsong; Chen, Tong; Du, Feng; Zhao, Xianghui; Xiong, Chunyang

    2014-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering promises to restore bone defects that are caused by severe trauma, congenital malformations, tumors, and nonunion fractures. How to effectively promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or seed cells has become a hot topic in this field. Many researchers are studying the ways of conferring a pro-osteodifferentiation or osteoinductive capability on implants or scaffold materials, where osteogenesis of seed cells is promoted. Graphene (G) provides a new kind of coating material that may confer the pro-osteodifferentiation capability on implants and scaffold materials by surface modification. Here, we review recent studies on the effects of graphene on surface modifications of implants or scaffold materials. The ability of graphene to improve the mechanical and biological properties of implants or scaffold materials, such as nitinol and carbon nanotubes, and its ability to promote the adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs or osteoblasts have been demonstrated in several studies. Most previous studies were performed in vitro, but further studies will explore the mechanisms of graphene's effects on bone regeneration, its in vivo biocompatibility, its ability to promote osteodifferentiation, and its potential applications in bone tissue engineering. PMID:24447041

  8. Is graphene a promising nano-material for promoting surface modification of implants or scaffold materials in bone tissue engineering?

    PubMed

    Gu, Ming; Liu, Yunsong; Chen, Tong; Du, Feng; Zhao, Xianghui; Xiong, Chunyang; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2014-10-01

    Bone tissue engineering promises to restore bone defects that are caused by severe trauma, congenital malformations, tumors, and nonunion fractures. How to effectively promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or seed cells has become a hot topic in this field. Many researchers are studying the ways of conferring a pro-osteodifferentiation or osteoinductive capability on implants or scaffold materials, where osteogenesis of seed cells is promoted. Graphene (G) provides a new kind of coating material that may confer the pro-osteodifferentiation capability on implants and scaffold materials by surface modification. Here, we review recent studies on the effects of graphene on surface modifications of implants or scaffold materials. The ability of graphene to improve the mechanical and biological properties of implants or scaffold materials, such as nitinol and carbon nanotubes, and its ability to promote the adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs or osteoblasts have been demonstrated in several studies. Most previous studies were performed in vitro, but further studies will explore the mechanisms of graphene's effects on bone regeneration, its in vivo biocompatibility, its ability to promote osteodifferentiation, and its potential applications in bone tissue engineering. PMID:24447041

  9. Adsorption of toxic carbamate pesticide oxamyl from liquid phase by newly synthesized and characterized graphene quantum dots nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shilpi; Sadeghi, Nima; Tyagi, Inderjeet; Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Fakhri, Ali

    2016-09-15

    Graphene quantum dots have been synthesized using the microwave-assisted hydrothermal route. The surface textural and morphological structure of synthesized adsorbent i.e. graphene quantum dots was analyzed using various analytical techniques such as X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption instrumental techniques. The application of graphene quantum dots as an adsorbent for the removal of noxious pesticide compound i.e. oxamyl from aqueous solutions was well investigated and elucidated. The impact of several effective parameters such as effect of agitation speed, pH, adsorbent dose, contact time, temperature and initial concentration on sorption efficiency was studied and optimized using batch adsorption experiments. The optimized pH for maximum oxamyl adsorption was found to be 8.0 and for the maximum adsorption rates the adsorbent dose of 0.6g was found to be optimum to carry out the adsorption with in less than 25min of contact time. From the results obtained, it is clear that for all contact times, an increase in oxamyl concentration resulted in increase in the percent oxamyl removal. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data were well fitted and found to be in good agreement with the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic model. PMID:27362399

  10. Real-time electro-diffusion method to discriminate carbon nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Tamoghna; Chatterjee, Arumoy; Chatterjee, Budhaditya; Raja, Sufi O; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr

    2015-12-01

    We report both the experimental and theoretical insights of differential electro-diffusion behavior of carbon nanomaterials (e.g. single wall, multiwall carbon nanotubes, and graphene). We thus discriminate one from the other in a soft gel system. The differential mobility of such material depends on their intrinsic properties, both extend and rate of migration bearing the discriminatory signature. The mobility analysis is made by a real time monitoring of the respective bands. PMID:26395102

  11. Electrochemical sensor for Isoniazid based on the glassy carbon electrode modified with reduced graphene oxide-Au nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhuo; Wang, Ze-Yu; Wang, Hui-Hua; Huang, Guo-Qing; Li, Meng-Meng

    2015-12-01

    A sensitive electrochemical sensor has been fabricated to detect Isoniazid (INZ) using reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and Au nanocomposites (RGO-Au). RGO-Au nanocomposites were synthesized by a solution-based approach of chemical co-reduction of Au(III) and graphene oxide (GO), and were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR). The Au nanoparticles separate the RGO sheets in the precipitate and prevent RGO sheets from aggregation upon π-π stacking interactions. RGO-Au nanocomposites were used to modify the glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The electrochemical properties of RGO-Au/GCE were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and the RGO-Au/GCE exhibited remarkably strong electrocatalytic activities towards INZ. Under the optimized conditions, there was linear relationships between the peak currents and the concentrations in the range of 1.0×10(-7)M to 1.0×10(-3)M for INZ, with the limit of detection (LOD) (based on S/N=3) of 1.0×10(-8)M for INZ. PMID:26354255

  12. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  13. Planar graphene oxide-based magnetic ionic liquid nanomaterial for extraction of chlorophenols from environmental water samples coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mei-Qiang; Su, Jie; Hu, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Qian; Dong, Chun-Ying; Pan, Sheng-Dong; Jin, Mi-Cong

    2016-08-12

    A planar graphene oxide-based magnetic ionic liquid nanomaterial (PGO-MILN) was synthesized. The prepared PGO-MILN was characterized by transmission electronmicroscopy (TEM) and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). The results of adsorption experiments showed that the PGO-MILN had great adsorption capacity for 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol (2,3,4,6-TeCP) and pentachlorophenol (PCP). Based on the adsorption experimental data, a sensitive magnetic method for determination of the five CPs in environmental water samples was developed by an effective magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) procedure coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The effects of main MSPE parameters including the solution pH, extraction time, desorption time, and volume of desorption solution on the extraction efficiencies had been investigated in detail. The recoveries ranged from 85.3 to 99.3% with correlation coefficients (r) higher than 0.9994 and the linear ranges were between 10 and 500ngL(-1). The limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs) of the five CPs ranged from 0.2 to 2.6ngL(-1) and 0.6 to 8.7ngL(-1), respectively. The intra- and inter- day relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range from 0.6% to 7.4% and from 0.7% to 8.4%, respectively. It was confirmed that the PGO-MILN was a kind of highly effective MSPE materials used for enrichment of trace CPs in the environmental water. PMID:27425762

  14. Ice Nucleation Properties of Oxidized Carbon Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Whale, Thomas F; Rosillo-Lopez, Martin; Murray, Benjamin J; Salzmann, Christoph G

    2015-08-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in many fields, particularly atmospheric science, but is still poorly understood. All known inorganic ice nucleating particles are relatively large in size and tend to be hydrophilic. Hence it is not obvious that carbon nanomaterials should nucleate ice. However, in this paper we show that four different readily water-dispersible carbon nanomaterials are capable of nucleating ice. The tested materials were carboxylated graphene nanoflakes, graphene oxide, oxidized single walled carbon nanotubes and oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The carboxylated graphene nanoflakes have a diameter of ∼30 nm and are among the smallest entities observed so far to nucleate ice. Overall, carbon nanotubes were found to nucleate ice more efficiently than flat graphene species, and less oxidized materials nucleated ice more efficiently than more oxidized species. These well-defined carbon nanomaterials may pave the way to bridging the gap between experimental and computational studies of ice nucleation. PMID:26267196

  15. Ice Nucleation Properties of Oxidized Carbon Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in many fields, particularly atmospheric science, but is still poorly understood. All known inorganic ice nucleating particles are relatively large in size and tend to be hydrophilic. Hence it is not obvious that carbon nanomaterials should nucleate ice. However, in this paper we show that four different readily water-dispersible carbon nanomaterials are capable of nucleating ice. The tested materials were carboxylated graphene nanoflakes, graphene oxide, oxidized single walled carbon nanotubes and oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The carboxylated graphene nanoflakes have a diameter of ∼30 nm and are among the smallest entities observed so far to nucleate ice. Overall, carbon nanotubes were found to nucleate ice more efficiently than flat graphene species, and less oxidized materials nucleated ice more efficiently than more oxidized species. These well-defined carbon nanomaterials may pave the way to bridging the gap between experimental and computational studies of ice nucleation. PMID:26267196

  16. Impact of Carbon Nanomaterials on Actin Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Xu; Li, Xin; Zhao, Lina

    2016-03-01

    Many nanomaterials have entered people's daily lives and impact the normal process of biological entities consequently. As one kind of the important nanomaterials, carbon based nanomaterials have invoked a lot of concerns from scientific researches because of their unique physicochemical properties. In eukaryotes, actin is the most abundantly distributed protein in both cytoplasm and cell nucleus, and closely controls the cell proliferation and mobility. Recently, many investigations have found some carbon based nanomaterials can affect actin cytoskeleton remarkably, including fullerenes derivatives, carbon nanotubes, graphene and its derivatives. However, these interaction processes are complicated and the underlying mechanism is far from being understood clearly. In this review, we discussed the different mechanisms of carbon nanomaterials impact on actin polymerization into three pathways, as triggering the signaling pathways from carbon nanomaterials outside of cells, increasing the production of reactive oxygen species from carbon nanomaterials inside of cells and direct interaction from carbon nanomaterials inside of cells. As a result, the dimension and size of carbon nanomaterials play a key role in regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, we forecasted the possible investigation strategy for meeting the challenges of the future study on this topic. We hope the findings are helpful in understanding the molecular mechanism in carbon nanomaterials regulating actin polymerization, and provide new insight in novel nanomedicine development for inhibition tumor cell migration. PMID:27455649

  17. Transparent conductors composed of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Layani, Michael; Kamyshny, Alexander; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2014-06-01

    This is a review on recent developments in the field of transparent conductive coatings (TCCs) for ITO replacement. The review describes the basic properties of conductive nanomaterials suitable for fabrication of such TCCs (metallic nanoparticles and nanowires, carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets), various methods of patterning the metal nanoparticles with formation of conductive transparent metallic grids, honeycomb structures and 2D arrays of interconnected rings as well as fabrication of TCCs based on graphene and carbon nanotubes. Applications of TCCs in electronic and optoelectronic devices, such as solar cells, electroluminescent and electrochromic devices, touch screens and displays, and transparent EMI shielders, are discussed. PMID:24777332

  18. Application of Carbon Nanomaterials in Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaber-Ansari, Laila

    Carbon nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene have emerged as leading additives for high capacity nanocomposite lithium ion battery electrodes due to their ability to improve electrode conductivity, current collection efficiency, and charge/discharge rate for high power applications. In this work, the these nanomaterials have been developed and their properties have been fine-tuned to help solve fundamental issues in conventional lithium ion battery electrodes. Towards this end, the application of SWCNTs in lithium-ion anodes has been studied. As-grown SWCNTs possess a distribution of physical and electronic structures, and it is of high interest to determine which subpopulations of SWCNTs possess the highest lithiation capacity and to develop processing methods that can enhance the lithiation capacity of underperforming SWCNT species. Towards this end, SWCNT electronic type purity is controlled via density gradient ultracentrifugation, enabling a systematic study of the lithiation of SWCNTs as a function of metal versus semiconducting content. Experimentally, vacuum filtered freestanding films of metallic SWCNTs are found to accommodate lithium with an order of magnitude higher capacity than their semiconducting counterparts. In contrast, SWCNT film densification leads to the enhancement of the lithiation capacity of semiconducting SWCNTs to levels comparable to metallic SWCNTs, which is corroborated by theoretical calculations. To understand the interaction of the graphene with lithium ions and electrolyte species during electrochemical we use Raman spectroscopy in a model system of monolayer graphene transferred on a Si(111) substrate and density functional theory (DFT) to investigate defect formation as a function of lithiation. This model system enables the early stages of defect formation to be probed in a manner previously not possible with commonly-used reduced graphene oxide or multilayer graphene substrates. Using ex

  19. Isotropic Growth of Graphene toward Smoothing Stitching.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Mengqi; Tan, Lifang; Wang, Lingxiang; Mendes, Rafael G; Qin, Zhihui; Huang, Yaxin; Zhang, Tao; Fang, Liwen; Zhang, Yanfeng; Yue, Shuanglin; Rümmeli, Mark H; Peng, Lianmao; Liu, Zhongfan; Chen, Shengli; Fu, Lei

    2016-07-26

    The quality of graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition still has very great disparity with its theoretical property due to the inevitable formation of grain boundaries. The design of single-crystal substrate with an anisotropic twofold symmetry for the unidirectional alignment of graphene seeds would be a promising way for eliminating the grain boundaries at the wafer scale. However, such a delicate process will be easily terminated by the obstruction of defects or impurities. Here we investigated the isotropic growth behavior of graphene single crystals via melting the growth substrate to obtain an amorphous isotropic surface, which will not offer any specific grain orientation induction or preponderant growth rate toward a certain direction in the graphene growth process. The as-obtained graphene grains are isotropically round with mixed edges that exhibit high activity. The orientation of adjacent grains can be easily self-adjusted to smoothly match each other over a liquid catalyst with facile atom delocalization due to the low rotation steric hindrance of the isotropic grains, thus achieving the smoothing stitching of the adjacent graphene. Therefore, the adverse effects of grain boundaries will be eliminated and the excellent transport performance of graphene will be more guaranteed. What is more, such an isotropic growth mode can be extended to other types of layered nanomaterials such as hexagonal boron nitride and transition metal chalcogenides for obtaining large-size intrinsic film with low defect. PMID:27403842

  20. Reproductive toxicity of carbon nanomaterials: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyukova, I.; Gusev, A.; Tkachev, A.

    2015-11-01

    In the current review, we assembled the experimental evidences of an association between carbon nanomaterials including carbon black, graphite nanoplatelets, graphene, single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and fullerene exposure and adverse reproductive and developmental effects, in vitro and in vivo studies. It is shown that carbon nanomaterials reveal toxic effect on reproductive system and offspring development of the animals of various system groups to a certain degree depending on carbon crystal structure. Although this paper provides initial information about the potential male and female reproductive toxicity of carbon nanomaterials, further studies, using characterized nanoparticles, relevant routes of administration, and doses closely reflecting all the expected levels of exposure are needed.

  1. Nanomaterial Based Sensors for NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehne, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanofibers (CNFs), graphene and metal nanowires have shown interesting electronic properties and therefore have been pursued for a variety of space applications requiring ultrasensitive and light-weight sensor and electronic devices. We have been pursuing development of chemical and biosensors using carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers for the last several years and this talk will present the benefits of nanomaterials these applications. More recently, printing approaches to manufacturing these devices have been explored as a strategy that is compatible to a microgravity environment. Nanomaterials are either grown in house or purchased and processed as electrical inks. Chemical modification or coatings are added to the nanomaterials to tailor the nanomaterial to the exact application. The development of printed chemical sensors and biosensors will be discussed for applications ranging from crew life support to exploration missions.

  2. Dimensionality of carbon nanomaterials determines the binding and dynamics of amyloidogenic peptides: multiscale theoretical simulations.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Nevena; Makarucha, Adam J; Hine, Nicholas D M; Mostofi, Arash A; Yarovsky, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that nanoparticles can affect the rate of protein self-assembly, possibly interfering with the development of protein misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and prion disease caused by aggregation and fibril formation of amyloid-prone proteins. We employ classical molecular dynamics simulations and large-scale density functional theory calculations to investigate the effects of nanomaterials on the structure, dynamics and binding of an amyloidogenic peptide apoC-II(60-70). We show that the binding affinity of this peptide to carbonaceous nanomaterials such as C60, nanotubes and graphene decreases with increasing nanoparticle curvature. Strong binding is facilitated by the large contact area available for π-stacking between the aromatic residues of the peptide and the extended surfaces of graphene and the nanotube. The highly curved fullerene surface exhibits reduced efficiency for π-stacking but promotes increased peptide dynamics. We postulate that the increase in conformational dynamics of the amyloid peptide can be unfavorable for the formation of fibril competent structures. In contrast, extended fibril forming peptide conformations are promoted by the nanotube and graphene surfaces which can provide a template for fibril-growth. PMID:24339760

  3. Dimensionality of Carbon Nanomaterials Determines the Binding and Dynamics of Amyloidogenic Peptides: Multiscale Theoretical Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Hine, Nicholas D. M.; Mostofi, Arash A.; Yarovsky, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that nanoparticles can affect the rate of protein self-assembly, possibly interfering with the development of protein misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and prion disease caused by aggregation and fibril formation of amyloid-prone proteins. We employ classical molecular dynamics simulations and large-scale density functional theory calculations to investigate the effects of nanomaterials on the structure, dynamics and binding of an amyloidogenic peptide apoC-II(60-70). We show that the binding affinity of this peptide to carbonaceous nanomaterials such as C60, nanotubes and graphene decreases with increasing nanoparticle curvature. Strong binding is facilitated by the large contact area available for π-stacking between the aromatic residues of the peptide and the extended surfaces of graphene and the nanotube. The highly curved fullerene surface exhibits reduced efficiency for π-stacking but promotes increased peptide dynamics. We postulate that the increase in conformational dynamics of the amyloid peptide can be unfavorable for the formation of fibril competent structures. In contrast, extended fibril forming peptide conformations are promoted by the nanotube and graphene surfaces which can provide a template for fibril-growth. PMID:24339760

  4. A simple and controllable graphene-templated approach to synthesise 2D silica-based nanomaterials using water-in-oil microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yang; Ye, Yun-Sheng; Chen, Fang-Yan; Wang, Hao; Chen, Chao; Xue, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Xing-Ping; Xie, Xiao-Lin; Mai, Yiu-Wing

    2016-01-11

    Using the versatility of silica chemistry, we describe herein a simple and controllable approach to synthesise two-dimensional (2D) silica-based nanomaterials: the diversity and utility of the resulting structures offer excellent platforms for many potential applications. PMID:26549827

  5. Extending the potential of x-ray free-electron lasers to industrial applications—an initiatory attempt at coherent diffractive imaging on car-related nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Rikiya; Yamashige, Hisao; Miura, Masahide; Kimura, Takashi; Joti, Yasumasa; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Kuramoto, Mayumi; Yu, Jian; Khakurel, Krishna; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) open up new pathways for contributing to industrial research-and-development activities. In this article, we describe our initiatory attempt at using the SPring-8 Ångström compact free-electron laser (SACLA) for industrial applications. The attempt was conducted by the authors through the industry-academia partnership program initiated by RIKEN, aimed at examining the potential of XFELs for the analysis of car-related nanomaterials. Using the infrastructures developed at SACLA, we performed single-shot coherent diffractive imaging experiments on automotive exhaust catalysts and succeeded in obtaining the reconstructed images. This effort has paved the way for the future use of XFELs in the research-and-development activity of automotive exhaust catalysts.

  6. Graphene and Graphene Oxide: Biofunctionalization and Applications in Biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ying; Li, Zhaohui; Wang, Jun; Li, Jinghong; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-05-01

    Graphene is the basic building block of zero-dimensional fullerene, 1D carbon nanotubes, and 3D graphite. Graphene has a unique planar structure as well as novel electronic properties, which have attracted great interest from scientists. This review selectively analyzes current advances in the field of graphene bioapplications. In particular, the functionalization of graphene for biological applications, FRET-based biosensor development by using graphene-based nanomaterials, and the investigation of graphene for living cell studies have been summarized in more details. Future perspectives and possible challenges in this rapidly developing area are also discussed.

  7. Emerging Carbon and Post-Carbon Nanomaterial Inks for Printed Electronics.

    PubMed

    Secor, Ethan B; Hersam, Mark C

    2015-02-19

    Carbon and post-carbon nanomaterials present desirable electrical, optical, chemical, and mechanical attributes for printed electronics, offering low-cost, large-area functionality on flexible substrates. In this Perspective, recent developments in carbon nanomaterial inks are highlighted. Monodisperse semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes compatible with inkjet and aerosol jet printing are ideal channels for thin-film transistors, while inkjet, gravure, and screen-printable graphene-based inks are better-suited for electrodes and interconnects. Despite the high performance achieved in prototype devices, additional effort is required to address materials integration issues encountered in more complex systems. In this regard, post-carbon nanomaterial inks (e.g., electrically insulating boron nitride and optically active transition-metal dichalcogenides) present promising opportunities. Finally, emerging work to extend these nanomaterial inks to three-dimensional printing provides a path toward nonplanar devices. Overall, the superlative properties of these materials, coupled with versatile assembly by printing techniques, offer a powerful platform for next-generation printed electronics. PMID:26262476

  8. Application of Carbon Nanomaterials in Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaber-Ansari, Laila

    Carbon nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene have emerged as leading additives for high capacity nanocomposite lithium ion battery electrodes due to their ability to improve electrode conductivity, current collection efficiency, and charge/discharge rate for high power applications. In this work, the these nanomaterials have been developed and their properties have been fine-tuned to help solve fundamental issues in conventional lithium ion battery electrodes. Towards this end, the application of SWCNTs in lithium-ion anodes has been studied. As-grown SWCNTs possess a distribution of physical and electronic structures, and it is of high interest to determine which subpopulations of SWCNTs possess the highest lithiation capacity and to develop processing methods that can enhance the lithiation capacity of underperforming SWCNT species. Towards this end, SWCNT electronic type purity is controlled via density gradient ultracentrifugation, enabling a systematic study of the lithiation of SWCNTs as a function of metal versus semiconducting content. Experimentally, vacuum filtered freestanding films of metallic SWCNTs are found to accommodate lithium with an order of magnitude higher capacity than their semiconducting counterparts. In contrast, SWCNT film densification leads to the enhancement of the lithiation capacity of semiconducting SWCNTs to levels comparable to metallic SWCNTs, which is corroborated by theoretical calculations. To understand the interaction of the graphene with lithium ions and electrolyte species during electrochemical we use Raman spectroscopy in a model system of monolayer graphene transferred on a Si(111) substrate and density functional theory (DFT) to investigate defect formation as a function of lithiation. This model system enables the early stages of defect formation to be probed in a manner previously not possible with commonly-used reduced graphene oxide or multilayer graphene substrates. Using ex

  9. Impact of Graphene-Metal Interfaces on the Raman and Transport Properties of Graphene Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Allen; Hofmann, Mario; Fang, Wenjing; Kimg, Ki Kang; Kong, Jing; Palacios, Tomas

    2012-02-01

    Graphene is an amazing nano-material with many exciting properties and applications. However, due to its low dimensionality, the performance of this material is mainly limited by interfaces and surface properties. One of these interfaces, important for graphene field effect transistors and catalysts supported on graphene membranes, is that between the graphene and a metal layer. In this study, we experimentally examine the impact of various metals on graphene through Raman and Transmission Electron Microscopy. We find that strong graphene-metal interactions have significant impacts on the phonon structure in graphene. Furthermore, we observe changes in our Raman spectra relating to the crystallographic orientation between a metal and graphene.

  10. Heat-Initiated Chemical Functionalization of Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guodong; Liu, Dandan; Tang, Shangcheng; Huang, Can; He, Mengci; Guo, Yu; Sun, Xiudong; Gao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    A heat-initiated chemical reaction was developed to functionalize CVD-grown graphene at wafer scale and the reaction was universally extended to carbon nanotubes, and other precursors that could be thermally converted to active radicals. The chemical reaction can occur in absence of oxygen and water vapor when the temperature is above the decomposition temperature of the reactants. The chemical reaction was also found to be substrate-dependent due to surface doping and inhomogeneity. A large-scale graphene pattern was demonstrated by combing with microfluidic technique. This heat-initiated solid-phase chemical reaction provides a facile and environmentally friendly approach to functionalize carbon nanomaterials with various functional groups. PMID:26818231

  11. Heat-Initiated Chemical Functionalization of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guodong; Liu, Dandan; Tang, Shangcheng; Huang, Can; He, Mengci; Guo, Yu; Sun, Xiudong; Gao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    A heat-initiated chemical reaction was developed to functionalize CVD-grown graphene at wafer scale and the reaction was universally extended to carbon nanotubes, and other precursors that could be thermally converted to active radicals. The chemical reaction can occur in absence of oxygen and water vapor when the temperature is above the decomposition temperature of the reactants. The chemical reaction was also found to be substrate-dependent due to surface doping and inhomogeneity. A large-scale graphene pattern was demonstrated by combing with microfluidic technique. This heat-initiated solid-phase chemical reaction provides a facile and environmentally friendly approach to functionalize carbon nanomaterials with various functional groups.

  12. Heat-Initiated Chemical Functionalization of Graphene.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guodong; Liu, Dandan; Tang, Shangcheng; Huang, Can; He, Mengci; Guo, Yu; Sun, Xiudong; Gao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    A heat-initiated chemical reaction was developed to functionalize CVD-grown graphene at wafer scale and the reaction was universally extended to carbon nanotubes, and other precursors that could be thermally converted to active radicals. The chemical reaction can occur in absence of oxygen and water vapor when the temperature is above the decomposition temperature of the reactants. The chemical reaction was also found to be substrate-dependent due to surface doping and inhomogeneity. A large-scale graphene pattern was demonstrated by combing with microfluidic technique. This heat-initiated solid-phase chemical reaction provides a facile and environmentally friendly approach to functionalize carbon nanomaterials with various functional groups. PMID:26818231

  13. Nanomaterial-mediated Biosensors for Monitoring Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Masashige; Ptitsyn, Andre; McLamore, Eric S.

    2014-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of physiological glucose transport is crucial for gaining new understanding of diabetes. Many techniques and equipment currently exist for measuring glucose, but these techniques are limited by complexity of the measurement, requirement of bulky equipment, and low temporal/spatial resolution. The development of various types of biosensors (eg, electrochemical, optical sensors) for laboratory and/or clinical applications will provide new insights into the cause(s) and possible treatments of diabetes. State-of-the-art biosensors are improved by incorporating catalytic nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, electrospun nanofibers, and quantum dots. These nanomaterials greatly enhance biosensor performance, namely sensitivity, response time, and limit of detection. A wide range of new biosensors that incorporate nanomaterials such as lab-on-chip and nanosensor devices are currently being developed for in vivo and in vitro glucose sensing. These real-time monitoring tools represent a powerful diagnostic and monitoring tool for measuring glucose in diabetes research and point of care diagnostics. However, concerns over the possible toxicity of some nanomaterials limit the application of these devices for in vivo sensing. This review provides a general overview of the state of the art in nanomaterial-mediated biosensors for in vivo and in vitro glucose sensing, and discusses some of the challenges associated with nanomaterial toxicity. PMID:24876594

  14. Two-dimensional soft nanomaterials: a fascinating world of materials.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiaodong; Mai, Yiyong; Wu, Dongqing; Zhang, Fan; Feng, Xinliang

    2015-01-21

    The discovery of graphene has triggered great interest in two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials for scientists in chemistry, physics, materials science, and related areas. In the family of newly developed 2D nanostructured materials, 2D soft nanomaterials, including graphene, Bx Cy Nz nanosheets, 2D polymers, covalent organic frameworks (COFs), and 2D supramolecular organic nanostructures, possess great advantages in light-weight, structural control and flexibility, diversity of fabrication approaches, and so on. These merits offer 2D soft nanomaterials a wide range of potential applications, such as in optoelectronics, membranes, energy storage and conversion, catalysis, sensing, biotechnology, etc. This review article provides an overview of the development of 2D soft nanomaterials, with special highlights on the basic concepts, molecular design principles, and primary synthesis approaches in the context. PMID:25155302

  15. Synthesis and device applications of graphitic nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umair, Ahmad

    This thesis is focused on two topics: (i) synthesis and characterization of bilayer graphene and pyrolytic carbon by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition, and (ii) application of graphene in the fabrication of a buckyball memory device. Monolayer and bilayer graphene are semi-metal with zero bandgap. One can induce a bandgap in bilayer graphene by applying a gate voltage in the stacking direction. Thus, bandgap and Fermi level in bilayer graphene can be controlled simultaneously with a double-gate device, making it a useful material for future semiconducting applications. Controlled synthesis of bilayer graphene would be the first step to fabricate bilayer graphene based devices. In this context, we report a uniform and low-defect synthesis of bilayer graphene on evaporated nickel films. Ultra-fast cooling is employed to control the number of layers and sample uniformity. The process is self-limiting, which leads to bilayer graphene synthesis over a wide range of growth-time and precursor flow-rate. Pryolytic carbon is another important carbon nanomaterial, due to its diverse applications in electronic and biomedicalengineering. We employ chemical vapor deposition with ultra-fast cooling technique to synthesize pyrolytic carbon. Furthermore, we elucidate a method to calculate the in-plane crystal size by using Raman spectroscopy. Finally, the use of bilayer graphene in a write-once read-many memory device has been demonstrated. The device showed irreversible switching from low-resistance to high-resistance state, with hysteresis in the transport characteristics. The control sample showed random switching and hysteresis due to electromigration of metal atoms into the active material of the device. We attribute the reliability and performance of the reported device to the ultra-smooth graphene contacts, which additionally inhibits electromigration from the underlying metallic film. Moreover, the memory device showed excellent endurance and retention

  16. Terahertz science and technology of carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, R. R.; Kono, J.; Portnoi, M. E.

    2014-08-01

    The diverse applications of terahertz (THz) radiation and its importance to fundamental science makes finding ways to generate, manipulate and detect THz radiation one of the key areas of modern applied physics. One approach is to utilize carbon nanomaterials, in particular, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene. Their novel optical and electronic properties offer much promise to the field of THz science and technology. This article describes the past, current, and future of THz science and technology of carbon nanotubes and graphene. We will review fundamental studies such as THz dynamic conductivity, THz nonlinearities and ultrafast carrier dynamics as well as THz applications such as THz sources, detectors, modulators, antennas and polarizers.

  17. Evaluation of in vivo graphene oxide toxicity for Acheta domesticus in relation to nanomaterial purity and time passed from the exposure.

    PubMed

    Dziewięcka, Marta; Karpeta-Kaczmarek, Julia; Augustyniak, Maria; Majchrzycki, Łukasz; Augustyniak-Jabłokow, Maria A

    2016-03-15

    Graphene and its oxidized form-graphene oxide (GO) have become exceptionally popular in industry and medicine due to their unique properties. However, there are suspicions that GO can cause adverse effects. Therefore, comprehensive knowledge on its potential toxicity is essential. This research assesses the in vivo toxicity of pure and manganese ion contaminated GO, which were injected into the hemolymph of Acheta domesticus. The activity of catalase (CAT) and gluthiathione peroxidases (GSTPx) as well as heat shock protein (HSP 70) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels were measured at consecutive time points-1h, 24h, 48h and 72h after injection. Neither pure GO nor GO contaminated with manganese were neutral to the organism. The results proved the intensification of oxidative stress after GO injection, which was confirmed by increased enzyme activity. The organism seems to cope with this stress, especially in the first 24h after injection. In the following days, increasing HSP 70 levels were observed, which might suggest the synthesis of new proteins and the removal of old and damaged ones. With that in mind, the potential toxicity of the studied material, which could lead to serious and permanent damage to the organism, should still be taken into consideration. PMID:26642444

  18. Elastomeric composites based on carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araby, Sherif; Meng, Qingshi; Zhang, Liqun; Zaman, Izzuddin; Majewski, Peter; Ma, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanomaterials including carbon black (CB), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene have attracted increasingly more interest in academia due to their fascinating properties. These nanomaterials can significantly improve the mechanical, electrical, thermal, barrier, and flame retardant properties of elastomers. The improvements are dependent on the molecular nature of the matrix, the intrinsic property, geometry and dispersion of the fillers, and the interface between the matrix and the fillers. In this article, we briefly described the fabrication processes of elastomer composites, illuminated the importance of keeping fillers at nanoscale in matrices, and critically reviewed the recent development of the elastomeric composites by incorporating CB, CNTs, and graphene and its derivatives. Attention has been paid to the mechanical properties and electrical and thermal conductivity. Challenges and further research are discussed at the end of the article.

  19. Genotoxicity of Graphene in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ananya

    Rapid advances in nanotechnology necessitate assessment of the safety of nanomaterials in the resulting products and applications. One key nanomaterial attracting much interest in many areas of science and technology is graphene. Graphene is a one atom thick carbon allotrope arranged in a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice. In addition to being extremely thin, graphene has several extraordinary physical properties such as its exceptional mechanical strength, thermal stability, and high electrical conductivity. Graphene itself is relatively chemically inert and therefore pristine graphene must undergo a process called functionalization, which is combination of chemical and physical treatments that change the properties of graphene, to make it chemically active. Functionalization of graphene is of crucial importance as the end application of graphene depends on proper functionalization. In the field of medicine, graphene is currently a nanomaterial of high interest for building biosensors, DNA transistors, and probes for cancer detection. Despite the promising applications of graphene in several areas of biomedicine, there have been only few studies in recent years that focus on evaluating cytotoxicity of graphene on cells, and almost no studies that investigate how graphene exposure affects cellular genetic material. Therefore, in this study we used a novel approach to evaluate the genotoxicity, i.e., the effects of graphene on DNA, using Escherichia coli as a prokaryotic model organism.

  20. Graphene based biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürel, Hikmet Hakan; Salmankurt, Bahadır

    2016-03-01

    Nanometer-sized graphene as a 2D material has unique chemical and electronic properties. Because of its unique physical, chemical, and electronic properties, its interesting shape and size make it a promising nanomaterial in many biological applications. It is expected that biomaterials incorporating graphene will be developed for the graphene-based drug delivery systems and biomedical devices. The interactions of biomolecules and graphene are long-ranged and very weak. Development of new techniques is very desirable for design of bioelectronics sensors and devices. In this work, we present first-principles calculations within density functional theory to calculate effects of charging on nucleobases on graphene. It is shown that how modify structural and electronic properties of nucleobases on graphene by applied charging.

  1. ECOTOXICOLOGY OF NANOMATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview of issues associated with potential ecological toxicity of nanomaterials with research needs outlined, current literature reviewed and discussion of nanomaterial toxicity relative to concerns that EPA and state risk assessors might have.

  2. Parameterizing water quality analysis and simulation program (WASP) for carbon-based nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and graphenes are among the most popular carbon-based nanomaterials due to their unique electronic, mechanic and structural properties. Exposure modeling of these nanomaterials in the aquatic environment is necessary to predict the fate of these materials. ...

  3. EDITORIAL: Whither nanomaterials? Whither nanomaterials?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallouk, Thomas E.; Pinkerton, Fred; Stetson, Ned

    2009-10-01

    As the journal Nanotechnology enters its third decade it is interesting to look back on the field and to think about where it may be headed in the future. The growth of the journal over the past twenty years mirrors that of the field, with exponentially rising numbers of citations and a widening diversity of topics that we identify as nanotechnology. In the early 1990s, Nanotechnology was focused primarily on nanoscale electronics and on scanning probe tools for fabricating and characterizing nanostructures. The synthesis and assembly of nanomaterials was already an active area in chemical research; however, it did not yet intersect strongly with the activities of the physics community, which was interested primarily in new phenomena that emerged on the nanoscale and on the devices that derived from them. In the 1990s there were several key advances that began to bridge this gap. Techniques were developed for making nanocrystals of compound semiconductors, oxides, and metals with very fine control over shape and superstructure. Carbon nanotubes were discovered and their unique electronic properties were demonstrated. Research on the self-assembly of organic molecules on surfaces led to the development of soft lithography and layer-by- layer assembly of materials. The potential to use DNA and then proteins as building blocks of precise assemblies of nanoparticles was explored. These bottom-up structures could not be made by top-down techniques, and their unique properties as components of sensors, electronic devices, biological imaging agents, and drug delivery vehicles began to change the definition of the field. Ten years ago, Inelke Malsch published a study on the scientific trends and organizational dynamics of nanotechology in Europe (1999 Nanotechnology 10 1-7). Scientists from a variety of disciplines were asked which areas of research they would include in the definition of nanotechnology. Although the article concluded with forward-looking thoughts in the

  4. Water flattens graphene wrinkles: laser shock wrapping of graphene onto substrate-supported crystalline plasmonic nanoparticle arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yaowu; Lee, Seunghyun; Kumar, Prashant; Nian, Qiong; Wang, Wenqi; Irudayaraj, Joseph; Cheng, Gary J.

    2015-11-01

    Hot electron injection into an exceptionally high mobility material can be realized in graphene-plasmonic nanoantenna hybrid nanosystems, which can be exploited for several front-edge applications including photovoltaics, plasmonic waveguiding and molecular sensing at trace levels. Wrinkling instabilities of graphene on these plasmonic nanostructures, however, would cause reactive oxygen or sulfur species to diffuse and react with the materials, decrease charge transfer rates and block intense hot-spots. No ex situ graphene wrapping technique has been explored so far to control these wrinkles. Here, we present a method to generate seamless integration by using water as a flyer to transfer the laser shock pressure to wrap graphene onto plasmonic nanocrystals. This technique decreases the interfacial gap between graphene and the covered substrate-supported plasmonic nanoparticle arrays by exploiting a shock pressure generated by the laser ablation of graphite and the water impermeable nature of graphene. Graphene wrapping of chemically synthesized crystalline gold nanospheres, nanorods and bipyramids with different field confinement capabilities is investigated. A combined experimental and computational method, including SEM and AFM morphological investigation, molecular dynamics simulation, and Raman spectroscopy characterization, is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique. Graphene covered gold bipyramid exhibits the best result among the hybrid nanosystems studied. We have shown that the hybrid system fabricated by laser shock can be used for enhanced molecular sensing. The technique developed has the characteristics of tight integration, and chemical/thermal stability, is instantaneous in nature, possesses a large scale and room temperature processing capability, and can be further extended to integrate other 2D materials with various 0-3D nanomaterials.Hot electron injection into an exceptionally high mobility material can be realized in graphene

  5. Nanomaterials for Electronics and Optoelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehne, Jessica E.; Meyyappan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes(CNTs), graphene, and inorganic nanowires(INWs) have shown interesting electronic, mechanical, optical, thermal, and other properties and therefore have been pursued for a variety of applications by the nanotechnology community ranging from electronics to nanocomposites. While the first two are carbon-based materials, the INWs in the literature include silicon, germanium, III-V, II-VI, a variety of oxides, nitrides, antimonides and others. In this talk, first an overview of growth of these three classes of materials by CVD and PECVD will be presented along with results from characterization. Then applications in development of chemical sensors, biosensors, energy storage devices and novel memory architectures will be discussed.

  6. Nanomaterial disposal by incineration.

    PubMed

    Holder, Amara L; Vejerano, Eric P; Zhou, Xinzhe; Marr, Linsey C

    2013-09-01

    As nanotechnology-based products enter into widespread use, nanomaterials will end up in disposal waste streams that are ultimately discharged to the environment. One possible end-of-life scenario is incineration. This review attempts to ascertain the potential pathways by which nanomaterials may enter incinerator waste streams and the fate of these nanomaterials during the incineration process. Although the literature on incineration of nanomaterials is scarce, results from studies of their behavior at high temperature or in combustion environments for other applications can help predict their fate within an incinerator. Preliminary evidence suggests nanomaterials may catalyze the formation or destruction of combustion by-products. Depending on their composition, nanomaterials may undergo physical and chemical transformations within the incinerator, impacting their partitioning within the incineration system (e.g., bottom ash, fly ash) and the effectiveness of control technology for removing them. These transformations may also drastically affect nanomaterial transport and impacts in the environment. Current regulations on incinerator emissions do not specifically address nanomaterials, but limits on particle and metal emissions may prove somewhat effective at reducing the release of nanomaterials in incinerator effluent. Control technology used to meet these regulations, such as fabric filters, electrostatic precipitators, and wet electrostatic scrubbers, are expected to be at least partially effective at removing nanomaterials from incinerator flue gas. PMID:23880913

  7. Multi-functional carbon nanomaterials: Tailoring morphology for multidisciplinary applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dervishi, Enkeleda

    2015-05-14

    Carbon based nanomaterials are being developed to have many new properties and applications. Graphene, is a mono-layer 2D atomic thick structure formed from hexagons of carbon atoms bound together by sp^2hybrid bonds. A carbon nanotube (CNT) can be viewed as a sheet of graphene rolled up into a cylinder, usually 1-2 nanometers in diameter and a few microns thick. A few applications of graphene and carbon nanotubes include the development of Nanoelectronics, nanocomposite materials, Hydrogen storage and Li⁺ battery, etc.

  8. Nanomaterials in preventive dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannig, Matthias; Hannig, Christian

    2010-08-01

    The prevention of tooth decay and the treatment of lesions and cavities are ongoing challenges in dentistry. In recent years, biomimetic approaches have been used to develop nanomaterials for inclusion in a variety of oral health-care products. Examples include liquids and pastes that contain nano-apatites for biofilm management at the tooth surface, and products that contain nanomaterials for the remineralization of early submicrometre-sized enamel lesions. However, the treatment of larger visible cavities with nanomaterials is still at the research stage. Here, we review progress in the development of nanomaterials for different applications in preventive dentistry and research, including clinical trials.

  9. Recent progress in application of carbon nanomaterials in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Qian; Liang, Yong; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanomaterials have attracted great interest over past decades owing to their unique physical properties, versatile functionalization chemistry, and biological compatibility. In this article, we review recent progress in application of carbon nanomaterials in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS). Various types of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene, carbon nanodots, nanodiamond, nanofibers, nanohorns, and their derivative forms, are involved. The applications of these materials as new matrices or probes in matrix-assisted or surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI or SELDI MS) are discussed. Finally, we summarize current challenges and give our perspectives on the future of applications of carbon nanomaterials in LDI MS. Graphical Abstract Carbon nanomaterials (e.g., fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene, nanodiamond, etc.) can be used as novel matrices or probes in MALDI or SELDI MS. PMID:26753968

  10. Nanomaterial-based functional scaffolds for amperometric sensing of bioanalytes.

    PubMed

    Dey, Ramendra Sundar; Bera, Raj Kumar; Raj, C R

    2013-04-01

    Functional nanomaterials have emerged as promising candidates in the development of an amperometric sensing platform for the detection and quantification of bioanalytes. The remarkable characteristics of nanomaterials based on metal and metal oxide nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene ensure enhanced performance of the sensors in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, detection limit, response time, and multiplexing capability. The electrocatalytic properties of these functional materials can be combined with the biocatalytic activity of redox enzymes to develop integrated biosensing platforms. Highly sensitive and stable miniaturized amperometric sensors have been developed by integrating the nanomaterials and biocatalyst with the transducers. This review provides an update on recent progress in the development of amperometric sensors/biosensors using functional nanomaterials for the sensing of clinically important metabolites such as glucose, cholesterol, lactate, and glutamate, immunosensing of cancer biomarkers, and genosensing. PMID:23254456

  11. Electrodynamic Arrays Having Nanomaterial Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trigwell, Steven (Inventor); Biris, Alexandru S. (Inventor); Calle, Carlos I. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electrodynamic array of conductive nanomaterial electrodes and a method of making such an electrodynamic array. In one embodiment, a liquid solution containing nanomaterials is deposited as an array of conductive electrodes on a substrate, including rigid or flexible substrates such as fabrics, and opaque or transparent substrates. The nanomaterial electrodes may also be grown in situ. The nanomaterials may include carbon nanomaterials, other organic or inorganic nanomaterials or mixtures.

  12. Phototoxicity of Selected Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantification of exposure to nanomaterials is critical for assessing their environmental hazard and risk. This is an immediate issue for nano-TiO2 because it is one of more common nanomaterials now in commerce, and is difficult to analyze using common acid-digestion techniques. ...

  13. Nanoscale strain engineering of graphene and graphene-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, N.-C.; Hsu, C.-C.; Teague, M. L.; Wang, J.-Q.; Boyd, D. A.; Chen, C.-C.

    2016-02-01

    Structural distortions in nano-materials can induce dramatic changes in their electronic properties. This situation is well manifested in graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb structure of carbon atoms with only one atomic layer thickness. In particular, strained graphene can result in both charging effects and pseudo-magnetic fields, so that controlled strain on a perfect graphene lattice can be tailored to yield desirable electronic properties. Here, we describe the theoretical foundation for strain-engineering of the electronic properties of graphene, and then provide experimental evidence for strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields and charging effects in monolayer graphene. We further demonstrate the feasibility of nano-scale strain engineering for graphene-based devices by means of theoretical simulations and nano-fabrication technology.

  14. Nanoscale strain engineering of graphene and graphene-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, N.-C.; Hsu, C.-C.; Teague, M. L.; Wang, J.-Q.; Boyd, D. A.; Chen, C.-C.

    2016-06-01

    Structural distortions in nano-materials can induce dramatic changes in their electronic properties. This situation is well manifested in graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb structure of carbon atoms with only one atomic layer thickness. In particular, strained graphene can result in both charging effects and pseudo-magnetic fields, so that controlled strain on a perfect graphene lattice can be tailored to yield desirable electronic properties. Here, we describe the theoretical foundation for strain-engineering of the electronic properties of graphene, and then provide experimental evidence for strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields and charging effects in monolayer graphene. We further demonstrate the feasibility of nano-scale strain engineering for graphene-based devices by means of theoretical simulations and nano-fabrication technology.

  15. Terahertz science and technology of carbon nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, R R; Kono, J; Portnoi, M E

    2014-08-15

    The diverse applications of terahertz (THz) radiation and its importance to fundamental science makes finding ways to generate, manipulate and detect THz radiation one of the key areas of modern applied physics. One approach is to utilize carbon nanomaterials, in particular, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene. Their novel optical and electronic properties offer much promise to the field of THz science and technology. This article describes the past, current, and future of THz science and technology of carbon nanotubes and graphene. We will review fundamental studies such as THz dynamic conductivity, THz nonlinearities and ultrafast carrier dynamics as well as THz applications such as THz sources, detectors, modulators, antennas and polarizers. PMID:25051014

  16. The effect of pristine carbon-based nanomaterial on the growth of green gram sprouts and pH of water

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We examined the toxicity of four carbon-based nanomaterials (unmodified) by using carbon quantum dots (CQDs), graphene quantum dots (GQDs), graphene oxide (GO), and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to cultivate bean sprout. Results showed that the toxicity of these four carbon nanomaterials increases with the increasing of concentration and cultivating time. In addition, pH test was applied to study the effect of carbon-based nanomaterials on water. pH of culture solution displayed unconspicuous dose-dependent, but nanomaterials indeed have a considerable impact on the pH even at low concentration. PMID:25346649

  17. Enzyme-catalyzed degradation of carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotchey, Gregg P.

    Carbon nanotubes and graphene, the nanoscale sp 2 allotropes of carbon, have garnered widespread attention as a result of their remarkable electrical, mechanical, and optical properties and the promise of new technologies that harness these properties. Consequently, these carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) have been employed for diverse applications such as electronics, sensors, composite materials, energy conversion devices, and nanomedicine. The manufacture and eventual disposal of these products may result in the release of CNMs into the environment and subsequent exposure to humans, animals, and vegetation. Given the possible pro-inflammatory and toxic effects of CNMs, much attention has been focused on the distribution, toxicity, and persistence of CNMs both in living systems and the environment. This dissertation will guide the reader though recent studies aimed at elucidating fundamental insight into the persistence of CNMs such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene derivatives (i.e., graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide). In particular, in-testtube oxidation/degradation of CNMs catalyzed by peroxidase enzymes will be examined, and the current understanding of the mechanisms underlying these processes will be discussed. Finally, an outlook of the current field including in vitro and in vivo biodegradation experiments, which have benefits in terms of human health and environmental safety, and future directions that could have implications for nanomedical applications such as imaging and drug delivery will be presented. Armed with an understanding of how and why CNMs undergo enzyme-catalyzed oxidation/biodegradation, researchers can tailor the structure of CNMs to either promote or inhibit these processes. For example, in nanomedical applications such as drug delivery, the incorporation of carboxylate functional groups could facilitate biodegradation of the nanomaterial after delivery of the cargo. Also, the incorporation of CNMs with defect sites in consumer

  18. Rebar graphene.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zheng; Peng, Zhiwei; Casillas, Gilberto; Lin, Jian; Xiang, Changsheng; Zhou, Haiqing; Yang, Yang; Ruan, Gedeng; Raji, Abdul-Rahman O; Samuel, Errol L G; Hauge, Robert H; Yacaman, Miguel Jose; Tour, James M

    2014-05-27

    As the cylindrical sp(2)-bonded carbon allotrope, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely used to reinforce bulk materials such as polymers, ceramics, and metals. However, both the concept demonstration and the fundamental understanding on how 1D CNTs reinforce atomically thin 2D layered materials, such as graphene, are still absent. Here, we demonstrate the successful synthesis of CNT-toughened graphene by simply annealing functionalized CNTs on Cu foils without needing to introduce extraneous carbon sources. The CNTs act as reinforcing bar (rebar), toughening the graphene through both π-π stacking domains and covalent bonding where the CNTs partially unzip and form a seamless 2D conjoined hybrid as revealed by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis. This is termed rebar graphene. Rebar graphene can be free-standing on water and transferred onto target substrates without needing a polymer-coating due to the rebar effects of the CNTs. The utility of rebar graphene sheets as flexible all-carbon transparent electrodes is demonstrated. The in-plane marriage of 1D nanotubes and 2D layered materials might herald an electrical and mechanical union that extends beyond carbon chemistry. PMID:24694285

  19. Rebar Graphene

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    As the cylindrical sp2-bonded carbon allotrope, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely used to reinforce bulk materials such as polymers, ceramics, and metals. However, both the concept demonstration and the fundamental understanding on how 1D CNTs reinforce atomically thin 2D layered materials, such as graphene, are still absent. Here, we demonstrate the successful synthesis of CNT-toughened graphene by simply annealing functionalized CNTs on Cu foils without needing to introduce extraneous carbon sources. The CNTs act as reinforcing bar (rebar), toughening the graphene through both π–π stacking domains and covalent bonding where the CNTs partially unzip and form a seamless 2D conjoined hybrid as revealed by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis. This is termed rebar graphene. Rebar graphene can be free-standing on water and transferred onto target substrates without needing a polymer-coating due to the rebar effects of the CNTs. The utility of rebar graphene sheets as flexible all-carbon transparent electrodes is demonstrated. The in-plane marriage of 1D nanotubes and 2D layered materials might herald an electrical and mechanical union that extends beyond carbon chemistry. PMID:24694285

  20. Suppression of single-molecule conductance fluctuations using extended anchor groups on graphene and carbon-nanotube electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péterfalvi, Csaba G.; Lambert, Colin J.

    2012-08-01

    Devices formed from single molecules attached to noble-metal electrodes exhibit large conductance fluctuations, which inhibit their development as reproducible functional units. We demonstrate that single molecules with planar anchor groups attached to carbon-based electrodes are more resilient to atomic-scale variation in the contacts and exhibit significantly lower conductance fluctuations. We examine the conductance of a 2,6-dibenzylamino core-substituted naphthalenediimide chromophore attached to carbon electrodes by either phenanthrene anchors or more extended anchor groups, which include oligophenylene ethynylene spacers. We demonstrate that for the more spatially extended anchor groups conductance fluctuations are significantly reduced. The current-voltage characteristic arising from long-range tunneling is found to be strongly nonlinear with pronounced conductance suppression below a threshold voltage of approximately 2.5 V.

  1. Food decontamination using nanomaterials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The research indicates that nanomaterials including nanoemulsions are promising decontamination media for the reduction of food contaminating pathogens. The inhibitory effect of nanoparticles for pathogens could be due to deactivate cellular enzymes and DNA; disrupting of membrane permeability; and/...

  2. Applications of Nanomaterials in Food Packaging.

    PubMed

    Bumbudsanpharoke, Nattinee; Choi, Jungwook; Ko, Seonghyuk

    2015-09-01

    Nanomaterials have drawn great interest in recent years due to their extraordinary properties that make them advantageous in food packaging applications. Specifically, nanoparticles can impart significant barrier properties, as well as mechanical, optical, catalytic, and antimicrobial properties into packaging. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and nanoclay account for the majority of the nano-enabled food packaging on the market, while others, such as nano-zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium, share less of the current market. In current food packaging, these nanomaterials are primarily used to impart antimicrobial function and to improve barrier properties, thereby extending the shelf life and freshness of packaged food. On the other hand, there is growing concern about the migration of nanomaterials from food contact materials to foodstuffs and its associated potential risks. Indeed, insufficient data about environmental and human safety assessments of migration and exposure of nanomaterials are hindering their market growth. To overcome this barrier, the public believes that legislation from government agencies is critical. This review provides an overview of the characteristics and functions of major nanomaterials that are commonly applied to food packaging, including available and near- future products. Migration research, safety issues, and public concerns are also discussed. PMID:26716190

  3. Extended line defects in BN, GaN, and AlN semiconductor materials: Graphene-like structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho-Mojica, Dulce C.; López-Urías, Florentino

    2016-05-01

    The extended line defect (ELD) mimicking grain boundaries in two-dimensional systems is theoretically investigated in BN, GaN, and AlN semiconductor materials with a single layer honeycomb structure. The ELD consists of octagonal-square membered rings. Density functional calculations of the electronic density of states, scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy image simulations are analyzed. Our results revealed that the ELDs are stable in all considered monolayers. In addition, electronic density of states calculations demonstrated that in gap states are emerged when ELD is incorporated into the honeycomb structures. Finally, results on armchair nanoribbons with bare-edges and hydrogenated edges are discussed.

  4. Differential Permeability of Proton Isotopes through Graphene and Graphene Analogue Monolayer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuju; Ju, Minggang; Chen, Liang; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) monolayer nanomaterials can be exploited as the thinnest membrane with distinct differential sieving properties for proton isotopes. Motivated from the experimental evidence of differential sieving proton isotopes through graphene and hexagonal boron nitrate (h-BN) monolayer, we compute the kinetic barrier of isotope H(+) and D(+) permeation through model graphene and h-BN fragments at the MP2/6-31++G(d,p) level of theory. On the basis of the ratio of tunneling reaction rate constant, the isotope separation ratio of H(+)/D(+) and H(+)/T(+) is predicted to be ∼12 and 37, respectively. The tunneling reaction rate constant can be estimated from the zero-point-energy computed at the transition state for the proton isotope permeation though the 2D model systems. We show that the presence of Stone-Wales (55-77) defect in the model graphene fragment can significantly lower the proton permeation barrier by 0.55 eV. With the defect, the ratio of tunneling reaction rate constant of H(+)/D(+) is increased to ∼25. In addition to model graphene and h-BN, we have examined proton permeation capability of α-boron monolayer. We compute the tunneling reaction pathway for H(+) through α-boron monolayer using both the climbing nudged elastic band (c-NEB) method and the scanning-path method. Both methods suggest that α-boron monolayer entails a relatively low barrier of ∼0.20 eV for H(+) permeation, much lower than that of the model graphene and h-BN fragments. Our studies provide molecular-level insights into the differential permeation of proton isotopes through 2D materials. The methods can be extended to examine isotope separation capability of other 2D materials as well. PMID:27522866

  5. Recent progress in nanomaterials for gene delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Keles, Erhan; Song, Yang; Du, Dan; Dong, Wen-Ji; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-08-16

    Nanotechnology-based gene delivery is the division of nanomedicine concerned with the synthesis, characterization, and functionalization of nanomaterials to be used in targeted-gene delivery applications. Nanomaterial-based gene delivery systems hold great promise for curing fatal inherited and acquired diseases, including neurological disorders, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, their use in clinical applications is still controversial. To date, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved any gene delivery system because of the unknown long-term toxicity and the low gene transfection efficiency of nanomaterials in vivo. Compared to viral vectors, nonviral gene delivery vectors are characterized by a low preexisting immunogenicity, which is important for preventing a severe immune response. In addition, nonviral vectors provide higher loading capacity and ease of fabrication. For these reasons, this review article focuses on applications of nonviral gene delivery systems, including those based on lipids, polymers, graphene, and other inorganic nanoparticles, and discusses recent advances in nanomaterials for gene therapy. Methods of synthesizing these nanomaterials are briefly described from a materials science perspective. Also, challenges, critical issues, and concerns about the in vivo applications of nanomaterial-based gene delivery systems are discussed. It should be noted that this article is not a comprehensive review of the literature. PMID:27480033

  6. Tunable magnetism in nanomaterials and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wanlin; Zhang, Zhuhua

    2011-03-01

    Tunable magnetism in nanomaterials and systems are especially attractive and hold great promise for applications in nanoelectronics and spintronics. Here we show some of our recent findings along this direction. First, we present a novel magnetoelectric effect in graphene nanoribbons settled on silicon substrates whereby the ribbon edge magnetization can be tuned linearly by applied bias voltage (Phys.Rev.Lett, 103, 187204, 2009), and this effect is robust to material and geometry variations (Phys.Rev.B 81, 155428, 2010). We also realize an electrical control of magnetism in ZnO ribbons (ACS Nano 4, 2124, 2010 , and even a tunable magnetic ordering in sandwich nanowires by changing charge states (J.Am.Chem.Soc. 132, 10215, 2010). Contrast to the zero-gap graphene, both hexagon-BN sheets and nanotubes are generally insulating. We provide two efficient recipes to narrow the wide gap of BN: applying external electric fields for nanoribbons and increasing tube curvature for nanotubes. Of more interesting is that ferromagnetic ordering is obtained in BN nanotubes by fluorination and it can be remarkably modulated by applying radial pressure (J.Am.Chem.Soc. 131, 6874, 2009). Our revealed control of magnetism in a wide range of nanomaterials may open up new vistas towards spintronics.

  7. An introduction to the chemistry of graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiluan; Shi, Gaoquan

    2015-11-21

    Pristine graphene and chemically modified graphenes (CMGs, e.g., graphene oxide, reduced graphene oxide and their derivatives) can react with a variety of chemical substances. These reactions have been applied to modulate the structures and properties of graphene materials, and to extend their functions and practical applications. This perspective outlines the chemistry of graphene, including functionalization, doping, photochemistry, catalytic chemistry, and supramolecular chemistry. The mechanisms of graphene related reactions will be introduced, and the challenges in controlling the chemical reactions of graphene will be discussed. PMID:26465215

  8. Ab initio study on the noncovalent adsorption of camptothecin anticancer drug onto graphene, defect modified graphene and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Nabanita; Deka, Ramesh C

    2013-09-01

    The application of graphene and related nanomaterials like boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, BN-graphene hybrid nanomaterials, and graphene oxide (GO) for adsorption of anticancer chemotherapeutic camptothecin (CPT) along with the effect on electronic properties prior to functionalization and after functionalization has been reported using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The inclusion of dispersion correction to DFT is instrumental in accounting for van der Waals π-π stacking between CPT and the nanomaterial. The adsorption of CPT exhibits significant strain within the nanosheets and noncovalent adsorption of CPT is thermodynamically favoured onto the nanosheets. In case of GO, surface incorporation of functional groups result in significant crumpling along the basal plane and the interaction is basically mediated by H-bonding rather than π-π stacking. Docking studies predict the plausible binding of CPT, CPT functionalized graphene and GO with topoisomerase I (top 1) signifying that CPT interacts through π stacking with AT and GC base pairs of DNA and in presence of nano support, DNA bases preferentially gets bound to the basal plane of graphene and GO rather than the edges. At a theoretical level of understanding, our studies point out the noncovalent interaction of CPT with graphene based nanomaterials and GO for loading and delivery of anticancer chemotherapeutic along with active binding to Top1 protein. PMID:24132695

  9. Semiquantitative Performance and Mechanism Evaluation of Carbon Nanomaterials as Cathode Coatings for Microbial Fouling Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiaoying; Nghiem, Joanne; Silverberg, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examine bacterial attachment and survival on a titanium (Ti) cathode coated with various carbon nanomaterials (CNM): pristine carbon nanotubes (CNT), oxidized carbon nanotubes (O-CNT), oxidized-annealed carbon nanotubes (OA-CNT), carbon black (CB), and reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The carbon nanomaterials were dispersed in an isopropyl alcohol-Nafion solution and were then used to dip-coat a Ti substrate. Pseudomonas fluorescens was selected as the representative bacterium for environmental biofouling. Experiments in the absence of an electric potential indicate that increased nanoscale surface roughness and decreased hydrophobicity of the CNM coating decreased bacterial adhesion. The loss of bacterial viability on the noncharged CNM coatings ranged from 22% for CB to 67% for OA-CNT and was dependent on the CNM dimensions and surface chemistry. For electrochemical experiments, the total density and percentage of inactivation of the adherent bacteria were analyzed semiquantitatively as functions of electrode potential, current density, and hydrogen peroxide generation. Electrode potential and hydrogen peroxide generation were the dominant factors with regard to short-term (3-h) bacterial attachment and inactivation, respectively. Extended-time electrochemical experiments (12 h) indicated that in all cases, the density of total deposited bacteria increased almost linearly with time and that the rate of bacterial adhesion was decreased 8- to 10-fold when an electric potential was applied. In summary, this study provides a fundamental rationale for the selection of CNM as cathode coatings and electric potential to reduce microbial fouling. PMID:25956770

  10. Nanomaterials for biosensing applications: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzinger, Michael; Le Goff, Alan; Cosnier, Serge

    2014-08-01

    A biosensor device is defined by its biological, or bioinspired receptor unit with unique specificities towards corresponding analytes. These analytes are often of biological origin like DNAs or proteins from the immune system (antibodies, antigens) of diseases or infections. Such analytes can also be simple molecules like glucose or pollutants when a biological receptor unit with particular specificity is available. One of many other challenges in biosensor development is the efficient signal capture of the biological recognition event (transduction). Such transducers translate the interaction of the analyte with the biological element into electrochemical, electrochemiluminescent, magnetic, gravimetric, or optical signals. In order to increase sensitivities and to lower detection limits down to even individual molecules, nanomaterials are promising candidates due to the possibility to immobilize an enhanced quantity of bioreceptor units at reduced volumes and even to act itself as transduction element. Among such nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles, semi-conductor quantum dots, polymer nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and graphene are intensively studied. Due to the vast evolution of this research field, this review summarizes in a non-exhaustive way the advantages of nanomaterials by focusing on nano-objects which provide further beneficial properties than “just” an enhanced surface area.

  11. Nanomaterials for biosensing applications: a review.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Michael; Le Goff, Alan; Cosnier, Serge

    2014-01-01

    A biosensor device is defined by its biological, or bioinspired receptor unit with unique specificities toward corresponding analytes. These analytes are often of biological origin like DNAs of bacteria or viruses, or proteins which are generated from the immune system (antibodies, antigens) of infected or contaminated living organisms. Such analytes can also be simple molecules like glucose or pollutants when a biological receptor unit with particular specificity is available. One of many other challenges in biosensor development is the efficient signal capture of the biological recognition event (transduction). Such transducers translate the interaction of the analyte with the biological element into electrochemical, electrochemiluminescent, magnetic, gravimetric, or optical signals. In order to increase sensitivities and to lower detection limits down to even individual molecules, nanomaterials are promising candidates due to the possibility to immobilize an enhanced quantity of bioreceptor units at reduced volumes and even to act itself as transduction element. Among such nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles, semi-conductor quantum dots, polymer nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and graphene are intensively studied. Due to the vast evolution of this research field, this review summarizes in a non-exhaustive way the advantages of nanomaterials by focusing on nano-objects which provide further beneficial properties than "just" an enhanced surface area. PMID:25221775

  12. Nanomaterials for biosensing applications: a review

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Michael; Le Goff, Alan; Cosnier, Serge

    2014-01-01

    A biosensor device is defined by its biological, or bioinspired receptor unit with unique specificities toward corresponding analytes. These analytes are often of biological origin like DNAs of bacteria or viruses, or proteins which are generated from the immune system (antibodies, antigens) of infected or contaminated living organisms. Such analytes can also be simple molecules like glucose or pollutants when a biological receptor unit with particular specificity is available. One of many other challenges in biosensor development is the efficient signal capture of the biological recognition event (transduction). Such transducers translate the interaction of the analyte with the biological element into electrochemical, electrochemiluminescent, magnetic, gravimetric, or optical signals. In order to increase sensitivities and to lower detection limits down to even individual molecules, nanomaterials are promising candidates due to the possibility to immobilize an enhanced quantity of bioreceptor units at reduced volumes and even to act itself as transduction element. Among such nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles, semi-conductor quantum dots, polymer nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and graphene are intensively studied. Due to the vast evolution of this research field, this review summarizes in a non-exhaustive way the advantages of nanomaterials by focusing on nano-objects which provide further beneficial properties than “just” an enhanced surface area. PMID:25221775

  13. Biological applications of graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürel, Hikmet Hakan; Salmankurt, Bahadır

    2016-03-01

    Graphene as a 2D material has unique chemical and electronic properties. Because of its unique physical, chemical, and electronic properties, its interesting shape and size make it a promising nanomaterial in many biological applications. However, the lower water-solubility and the irreversible aggregation due to the strong π-π stacking hinder the wide application of graphene nanosheets in biomedical field. Thus, graphene oxide (GO), one derivative of graphene, has been used more frequently in the biological system owing to its relatively higher water solubility and biocompatibility. Recently, it has been demonstrated that nanomaterials with different functional groups on the surface can be used to bind the drug molecules with high affinity. GO has different functional groups such as H, OH and O on its surface; it can be a potential candidate as a drug carrier. The interactions of biomolecules and graphene like structures are long-ranged and very weak. Development of new techniques is very desirable for design of bioelectronics sensors and devices. In this work, we present first-principles spin polarized calculations within density functional theory to calculate effects of charging on DNA/RNA nucleobases on graphene oxide. It is shown that how modify structural and electronic properties of nucleobases on graphene oxide by applied charging.

  14. Graphene-templated directional growth of an inorganic nanowire.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Chul; Kim, Kwanpyo; Park, Jungwon; Koo, Jahyun; Jeong, Hu Young; Lee, Hoonkyung; Weitz, David A; Zettl, Alex; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-05-01

    Assembling inorganic nanomaterials on graphene is of interest in the development of nanodevices and nanocomposite materials, and the ability to align such inorganic nanomaterials on the graphene surface is expected to lead to improved functionalities, as has previously been demonstrated with organic nanomaterials epitaxially aligned on graphitic surfaces. However, because graphene is chemically inert, it is difficult to precisely assemble inorganic nanomaterials on pristine graphene. Previous techniques based on dangling bonds of damaged graphene, intermediate seed materials and vapour-phase deposition at high temperature(,) have only formed randomly oriented or poorly aligned inorganic nanostructures. Here, we show that inorganic nanowires of gold(I) cyanide can grow directly on pristine graphene, aligning themselves with the zigzag lattice directions of the graphene. The nanowires are synthesized through a self-organized growth process in aqueous solution at room temperature, which indicates that the inorganic material spontaneously binds to the pristine graphene surface. First-principles calculations suggest that this assembly originates from lattice matching and π interaction to gold atoms. Using the synthesized nanowires as templates, we also fabricate nanostructures with controlled crystal orientations such as graphene nanoribbons with zigzag-edged directions. PMID:25799519

  15. Graphene-templated directional growth of an inorganic nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Won Chul; Kim, Kwanpyo; Park, Jungwon; Koo, Jahyun; Jeong, Hu Young; Lee, Hoonkyung; Weitz, David A.; Zettl, Alex; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-05-01

    Assembling inorganic nanomaterials on graphene is of interest in the development of nanodevices and nanocomposite materials, and the ability to align such inorganic nanomaterials on the graphene surface is expected to lead to improved functionalities, as has previously been demonstrated with organic nanomaterials epitaxially aligned on graphitic surfaces. However, because graphene is chemically inert, it is difficult to precisely assemble inorganic nanomaterials on pristine graphene. Previous techniques based on dangling bonds of damaged graphene, intermediate seed materials and vapour-phase deposition at high temperature, have only formed randomly oriented or poorly aligned inorganic nanostructures. Here, we show that inorganic nanowires of gold(I) cyanide can grow directly on pristine graphene, aligning themselves with the zigzag lattice directions of the graphene. The nanowires are synthesized through a self-organized growth process in aqueous solution at room temperature, which indicates that the inorganic material spontaneously binds to the pristine graphene surface. First-principles calculations suggest that this assembly originates from lattice matching and π interaction to gold atoms. Using the synthesized nanowires as templates, we also fabricate nanostructures with controlled crystal orientations such as graphene nanoribbons with zigzag-edged directions.

  16. Nanomaterial-Enabled Dry Electrodes for Electrophysiological Sensing: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shanshan; Zhu, Yong

    2016-04-01

    Long-term, continuous, and unsupervised tracking of physiological data is becoming increasingly attractive for health/wellness monitoring and ailment treatment. Nanomaterials have recently attracted extensive attention as building blocks for flexible/stretchable conductors and are thus promising candidates for electrophysiological electrodes. Here we provide a review on nanomaterial-enabled dry electrodes for electrophysiological sensing, focusing on electrocardiography (ECG). The dry electrodes can be classified into contact surface electrodes, contact-penetrating electrodes, and noncontact capacitive electrodes. Different types of electrodes including their corresponding equivalent electrode-skin interface models and the sources of the noise are first introduced, followed by a review on recent developments of dry ECG electrodes based on various nanomaterials, including metallic nanowires, metallic nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene. Their fabrication processes and performances in terms of electrode-skin impedance, signal-to-noise ratio, resistance to motion artifacts, skin compatibility, and long-term stability are discussed.

  17. Graphene based enzymatic bioelectrodes and biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Anahita; Othman, Ali; Uzunoglu, Aytekin; Stanciu, Lia; Andreescu, Silvana

    2015-04-01

    The excellent electrical conductivity and ease of functionalization make graphene a promising material for use in enzymatic bioelectrodes and biofuel cells. Enzyme based biofuel cells have attracted substantial interest due to their potential to harvest energy from organic materials. This review provides an overview of the functional properties and applications of graphene in the construction of biofuel cells as alternative power sources. The review covers the current state-of-the-art research in graphene based nanomaterials (physicochemical properties and surface functionalities), the role of these parameters in enhancing electron transfer, the stability and activity of immobilized enzymes, and how enhanced power density can be achieved. Specific examples of enzyme immobilization methods, enzyme loading, stability and function on graphene, functionalized graphene and graphene based nanocomposite materials are discussed along with their advantages and limitations. Finally, a critical evaluation of the performance of graphene based enzymatic biofuel cells, the current status, challenges and future research needs are provided.

  18. Electrowetting on dielectric experiments using graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xuebin; Zhou, Zhixian; Ming-Cheng Cheng, Mark

    2012-09-01

    We report electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) experiments using graphene; a transparent, flexible and stretchable nanomaterial. Graphene sheets were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition, and transferred to various substrates (including glass slides and PET films). Reversible contact angle changes were observed on the Teflon-coated graphene electrode with both AC and DC voltages. Nyquist plots of the EWOD reveal that the graphene electrode has higher capacitive impedance than gold electrodes under otherwise identical conditions, suggesting a lower density of pin-holes and defects in the Teflon/graphene electrode than in the Teflon/gold electrode. Furthermore, we have observed reduced electrolysis of the electrolyte and smaller leakage current in the dielectric layer (Teflon) on graphene electrodes than on Au electrodes at the same Teflon thickness and applied voltage. We expect that the improved EWOD properties using graphene as an electrode material will open the door to various applications, including flexible displays and droplet manipulation in three-dimensional microfluidics.

  19. Graphene cardboard: From ripples to tunable metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, Pekka

    2014-03-01

    Recently, graphene was introduced with tunable ripple texturing, a nanofabric enabled by graphene's remarkable elastic properties. However, one can further envision sandwiching the ripples, thus constructing composite nanomaterial, graphene cardboard. Here, the basic mechanical properties of such structures are investigated computationally. It turns out that graphene cardboard is highly tunable material, for its elastic figures of merit vary orders of magnitude, with Poisson ratio tunable from 10 to -0.5 as one example. These trends set a foundation to guide the design and usage of metamaterials made of rippled van der Waals solids.

  20. Recent trends in carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors for biomolecules: A review

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cheng; Denno, Madelaine E.; Pyakurel, Poojan; Venton, B. Jill

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials are advantageous for electrochemical sensors because they increase the electroactive surface area, enhance electron transfer, and promote adsorption of molecules. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been incorporated into electrochemical sensors for biomolecules and strategies have included the traditional dip coating and drop casting methods, direct growth of CNTs on electrodes and the use of CNT fibers and yarns made exclusively of CNTs. Recent research has also focused on utilizing many new types of carbon nanomaterials beyond CNTs. Forms of graphene are now increasingly popular for sensors including reduced graphene oxide, carbon nanohorns, graphene nanofoams, graphene nanorods, and graphene nanoflowers. In this review, we compare different carbon nanomaterial strategies for creating electrochemical sensors for biomolecules. Analytes covered include neurotransmitters and neurochemicals, such as dopamine, ascorbic acid, and serotonin; hydrogen peroxide; proteins, such as biomarkers; and DNA. The review also addresses enzyme-based electrodes that are used to detect non-electroactive species such as glucose, alcohols, and proteins. Finally, we analyze some of the future directions for the field, pointing out gaps in fundamental understanding of electron transfer to carbon nanomaterials and the need for more practical implementation of sensors. PMID:26320782

  1. Recent trends in carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors for biomolecules: A review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Denno, Madelaine E; Pyakurel, Poojan; Venton, B Jill

    2015-08-01

    Carbon nanomaterials are advantageous for electrochemical sensors because they increase the electroactive surface area, enhance electron transfer, and promote adsorption of molecules. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been incorporated into electrochemical sensors for biomolecules and strategies have included the traditional dip coating and drop casting methods, direct growth of CNTs on electrodes and the use of CNT fibers and yarns made exclusively of CNTs. Recent research has also focused on utilizing many new types of carbon nanomaterials beyond CNTs. Forms of graphene are now increasingly popular for sensors including reduced graphene oxide, carbon nanohorns, graphene nanofoams, graphene nanorods, and graphene nanoflowers. In this review, we compare different carbon nanomaterial strategies for creating electrochemical sensors for biomolecules. Analytes covered include neurotransmitters and neurochemicals, such as dopamine, ascorbic acid, and serotonin; hydrogen peroxide; proteins, such as biomarkers; and DNA. The review also addresses enzyme-based electrodes that are used to detect non-electroactive species such as glucose, alcohols, and proteins. Finally, we analyze some of the future directions for the field, pointing out gaps in fundamental understanding of electron transfer to carbon nanomaterials and the need for more practical implementation of sensors. PMID:26320782

  2. NONEQUILIBRIUM LASER SYNTHESIS AND REAL-TIME DIAGNOSTICS OF CARBON NANOMATERIAL GROWTH

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, David B; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Regmi, Murari; Jackson, Jeremy Joseph; Readle, Jason D; More, Karren Leslie; Eres, Gyula; Duscher, Gerd J M

    2013-01-01

    Lasers provide unique growth conditions for the synthesis of novel nanomaterials. In addition, they can serve as remote spectroscopic probes of the growth environment. Ultimately, through the process understanding they provide, real-time laser diagnostics that can be used to control the nanomanufacturing of nanomaterials. Here, progress in the laser-based synthesis and investigations of carbon nanomaterial growth kinetics will be reviewed with an emphasis on single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWNHs), and graphene. Two synthesis methods will be compared. First, the unique high-temperature growth environment of a laser plasma will be examined using time-resolved imaging and laser spectroscopy to understand how pure carbon can self-assemble rapidly into a variety of forms including SWNHs and graphene flakes, and with catalyst-assistance, SWNTs. Atomic resolution images of SWNTs, SWNHs, and graphene reveals that graphene flakes are likely building blocks for the growth of these materials. Second, lower-temperature, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods suitable for mass production of nanomaterials will be examined. Pulsed-CVD and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) are described to investigate the catalyst-assisted growth kinetics of graphene and SWNTs. Time-resolved laser reflectivity and Raman spectroscopy studies show that autocatalytic kinetics imply the existence of intermediates crucial to the efficient nanomanufacturing of these materials for energy applications.

  3. Nanomaterials and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Liao, Jinfeng; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Shiyu; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of bone disorders and conditions has been increasing. Bone is a nanomaterials composed of organic (mainly collagen) and inorganic (mainly nano-hydroxyapatite) components, with a hierarchical structure ranging from nanoscale to macroscale. In consideration of the serious limitation in traditional therapies, nanomaterials provide some new strategy in bone regeneration. Nanostructured scaffolds provide a closer structural support approximation to native bone architecture for the cells and regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, which results in the formation of functional tissues. In this article, we focused on reviewing the classification and design of nanostructured materials and nanocarrier materials for bone regeneration, their cell interaction properties, and their application in bone tissue engineering and regeneration. Furthermore, some new challenges about the future research on the application of nanomaterials for bone regeneration are described in the conclusion and perspectives part. PMID:26558141

  4. Recent applications of carbon-based nanomaterials in analytical chemistry: critical review.

    PubMed

    Scida, Karen; Stege, Patricia W; Haby, Gabrielle; Messina, Germán A; García, Carlos D

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this review is to provide a broad overview of the advantages and limitations of carbon-based nanomaterials with respect to analytical chemistry. Aiming to illustrate the impact of nanomaterials on the development of novel analytical applications, developments reported in the 2005-2010 period have been included and divided into sample preparation, separation, and detection. Within each section, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and composite materials will be addressed specifically. Although only briefly discussed, included is a section highlighting nanomaterials with interesting catalytic properties that can be used in the design of future devices for analytical chemistry. PMID:21458626

  5. Recent Applications of Carbon-Based Nanomaterials in Analytical Chemistry: Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Scida, Karen; Stege, Patricia W.; Haby, Gabrielle; Messina, Germán A.; García, Carlos D.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this review is to provide a broad overview of the advantages and limitations of carbon-based nanomaterials with respect to analytical chemistry. Aiming to illustrate the impact of nanomaterials on the development of novel analytical applications, developments reported in the 2005–2010 period have been included and divided into sample preparation, separation, and detection. Within each section, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and composite materials will be addressed specifically. Although only briefly discussed, included is a section highlighting nanomaterials with interesting catalytic properties that can be used in the design of future devices for analytical chemistry. PMID:21458626

  6. The interplay between carbon nanomaterials and amyloid fibrils in bio-nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chaoxu; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-06-01

    Recent advances in bio-nanotechnology have not only rapidly broadened the applications and scope of hybrid nanomaterials in biological fields, but also greatly enriched the examples of ordered materials based on supramolecular self-assembly. Among eminent examples of functional nanostructured materials of undisputed impact in nanotechnology and biological environments, carbon nanomaterials (such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene) and amyloid fibrils have attracted great attention because of their unique architectures and exceptional physical properties. Nonetheless, combination of these two classes of nanomaterials into functional hybrids is far from trivial. For example, the presence of carbon nanomaterials can offer either an inhibitory effect or promotion of amyloid fibrillation, depending on the structural architectures of carbon nanomaterials and the starting amyloid proteins/peptides considered. To date, numerous studies have been devoted to evaluating both the biological toxicity of carbon nanomaterials and their use in developing therapies for amyloidosis. At the same time, hybridization of these two classes of nanomaterials offers new possibilities for combining some of their desirable properties into nanocomposites of possible use in electronics, actuators, sensing, biomedicine and structural materials. This review describes recent developments in the hybridization of carbon nanomaterials and amyloid fibrils and discusses the current state of the art on the application of carbon nanomaterial-amyloid fibril hybrids in bio-nanotechnology.

  7. Nanobiotechnology: protein-nanomaterial interactions.

    PubMed

    Kane, Ravi S; Stroock, Abraham D

    2007-01-01

    We review recent research that involves the interaction of nanomaterials such as nanoparticles, nanowires, and carbon nanotubes with proteins. We begin with a focus on the fundamentals of the structure and function of proteins on nanomaterials. We then review work in three areas that exploit these interactions: (1) sensing, (2) assembly of nanomaterials by proteins and proteins by nanomaterials, and (3) interactions with cells. We conclude with the identification of challenges and opportunities for the future. PMID:17335286

  8. Biological and Pharmaceutical Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Challa S. S. R.

    2006-01-01

    This first comprehensive yet concise overview of all important classes of biological and pharmaceutical nanomaterials presents in one volume the different kinds of natural biological compounds that form nanomaterials or that may be used to purposefully create them. This unique single source of information brings together the many articles published in specialized journals, which often remain unseen by members of other, related disciplines. Covering pharmaceutical, nucleic acid, peptide and DNA-Chitosan nanoparticles, the book focuses on those innovative materials and technologies needed for the continued growth of medicine, healthcare, pharmaceuticals and human wellness. For chemists, biochemists, cell biologists, materials scientists, biologists, and those working in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries.

  9. Nanomaterials for Defense Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turaga, Uday; Singh, Vinitkumar; Lalagiri, Muralidhar; Kiekens, Paul; Ramkumar, Seshadri S.

    Nanotechnology has found a number of applications in electronics and healthcare. Within the textile field, applications of nanotechnology have been limited to filters, protective liners for chemical and biological clothing and nanocoatings. This chapter presents an overview of the applications of nanomaterials such as nanofibers and nanoparticles that are of use to military and industrial sectors. An effort has been made to categorize nanofibers based on the method of production. This chapter particularly focuses on a few latest developments that have taken place with regard to the application of nanomaterials such as metal oxides in the defense arena.

  10. Graphene in turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D. K.; Swain, P. K.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-07-01

    Graphene, the two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, draws interest of several researchers due to its many superior properties. It has extensive applications in numerous fields. A turbine is a hydraulic machine which extracts energy from a fluid and converts it into useful work. Recently, Gudukeya and Madanhire have tried to increase the efficiency of Pelton turbine. Beucher et al. have also tried the same by reducing friction between fluid and turbine blades. In this paper, we study the advantages of using graphene as a coating on Pelton turbine blades. It is found that the efficiency of turbines increases, running and maintenance cost is reduced with more power output. By the application of graphene in pipes, cavitation will be reduced, durability of pipes will increase, operation and maintenance cost of water power plants will be less.

  11. Intracellular Signal Modulation by Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Salik; Garantziotis, Stavros; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Boland, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the interactions of nanomaterials with biological systems and the resulting activation of signal transduction pathways is essential for the development of safe and consumer friendly nanotechnology. Here we present an overview of signaling pathways induced by nanomaterial exposures and describe the possible correlation of their physicochemical characteristics with biological outcomes. In addition to the hierarchical oxidative stress model and a review of the intrinsic and cell-mediated mechanisms of reactive Oxygen species (ROS) generating capacities of nanomaterials, we also discuss other oxidative stress dependent and independent cellular signaling pathways. Induction of the inflammasome, calcium signaling, and endoplasmic reticulum stress are reviewed. Furthermore, the uptake mechanisms can crucially affect the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials and membrane-dependent signaling pathways can be responsible for cellular effects of nanomaterials. Epigenetic regulation by nanomaterials effects of nanoparticle-protein interactions on cell signaling pathways, and the induction of various cell death modalities by nanomaterials are described. We describe the common trigger mechanisms shared by various nanomaterials to induce cell death pathways and describe the interplay of different modalities in orchestrating the final outcome after nanomaterial exposures. A better understanding of signal modulations induced by nanomaterials is not only essential for the synthesis and design of safer nanomaterials but will also help to discover potential nanomedical applications of these materials. Several biomedical applications based on the different signaling pathways induced by nanomaterials are already proposed and will certainly gain a great deal of attraction in the near future. PMID:24683030

  12. DNA-incorporating nanomaterials in biotechnological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, A.; van der Lelie, D.; Chi, C.; Gang, O.

    2010-02-01

    The recently developed ability to controllably connect biological and inorganic objects on a molecular scale opens a new page in biomimetic methods with potential applications in biodetection, tissue engineering, targeted therapeutics and drug/gene delivery. Particularly in the biodetection arena, a rapid development of new platforms has largely been stimulated by a spectrum of novel nanomaterials with physical properties that offer efficient, sensitive and inexpensive molecular sensing. Recently, DNA-functionalized nano-objects have emerged as a new class of nanomaterials that can be controllably assembled in predesigned structures. Such DNA-based nanoscale structures might provide a new detection paradigm due to their regulated optical, electrical and magnetic responses, chemical heterogeneity and high local biomolecular concentration. The specific biorecognition DNA and its physical-chemical characteristics allows for an exploitation of DNA-functionalized nanomaterials for sensing of nucleic acids, while a broad tunability of DNA interactions permits extending their use for detection of proteins, small molecules and ions. We discuss the progress that was achieved in the last decade in the exploration of new detection methods based on DNA-incorporating nanomaterials as well as their applications to gene delivery. The comparison between various detection platforms, their sensitivity and selectivity, and specific applications are reviewed.

  13. Graphene and graphene-like 2D materials for optical biosensing and bioimaging: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2015-09-01

    The increasing demands of bioassay and biomedical applications have significantly promoted the rational design and fabrication of a wide range of functional nanomaterials. Coupling these advanced nanomaterials with biomolecule recognition events leads to novel sensing and diagnostic platforms. Because of their unique structures and multifunctionalities, two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene and graphene-like materials (e.g., graphitic carbon nitride, transition metal dichalcogenides, boron nitride, and transition metal oxides), have stimulated great interest in the field of optical biosensors and imaging because of their innovative mechanical, physicochemical and optical properties. Depending on the different applications, the graphene and graphene-like nanomaterials can be tailored to form either fluorescent emitters or efficient fluorescence quenchers, making them powerful platforms for fabricating a series of optical biosensors to sensitively detect various targets including ions, small biomolecules, DNA/RNA and proteins. This review highlights the recent progress in optical biosensors based on graphene and graphene-like 2D materials and their imaging applications. Finally, the opportunities and some critical challenges in this field are also addressed.

  14. Toxicity of nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Shahriar; Behzadi, Shahed; Laurent, Sophie; Forrest, M. Laird; Stroeve, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscience has matured significantly during the last decade as it has transitioned from bench top science to applied technology. Presently, nanomaterials are used in a wide variety of commercial products such as electronic components, sports equipment, sun creams and biomedical applications. There are few studies of the long-term consequences of nanoparticles on human health, but governmental agencies, including the United States National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and Japan’s Ministry of Health, have recently raised the question of whether seemingly innocuous materials such as carbon-based nanotubes should be treated with the same caution afforded known carcinogens such as asbestos. Since nanomaterials are increasing a part of everyday consumer products, manufacturing processes, and medical products, it is imperative that both workers and end-users be protected from inhalation of potentially toxic NPs. It also suggests that NPs may need to be sequestered into products so that the NPs are not released into the atmosphere during the product’s life or during recycling. Further, non-inhalation routes of NP absorption, including dermal and medical injectables, must be studied in order to understand possible toxic effects. Fewer studies to date have addressed whether the body can eventually eliminate nanomaterials to prevent particle build-up in tissues or organs. This critical review discusses the biophysicochemical properties of various nanomaterials with emphasis on currently available toxicology data and methodologies for evaluating nanoparticle toxicity. PMID:22170510

  15. Plasmonic nanomaterials for biodiagnostics.

    PubMed

    Howes, Philip D; Rana, Subinoy; Stevens, Molly M

    2014-06-01

    The application of nanomaterials to detect disease biomarkers is giving rise to ultrasensitive assays, with scientists exploiting the many advantageous physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials. The fundamental basis of such work is to link unique phenomena that arise at the nanoscale to the presence of a specific analyte biomolecule, and to modulate the intensity of such phenomena in a ratiometric fashion, in direct proportion with analyte concentration. Precise engineering of nanomaterial surfaces is of utmost importance here, as the interface between the material and the biological environment is where the key interactions occur. In this tutorial review, we discuss the use of plasmonic nanomaterials in the development of biodiagnostic tools for the detection of a large variety of biomolecular analytes, and how their plasmonic properties give rise to tunable optical characteristics and surface enhanced Raman signals. We put particular focus on studies that have explored the efficacy of the systems using physiological samples in an effort to highlight the clinical potential of such assays. PMID:24323079

  16. Nanomaterial disposal by incineration

    EPA Science Inventory

    As nanotechnology-based products enter into widespread use, nanomaterials will end up in disposal waste streams that are ultimately discharged to the environment. One possible end-of-life scenario is incineration. This review attempts to ascertain the potential pathways by which ...

  17. Nanomaterials in Consumer Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. Foss; Baun, A.; Michelson, E. S.; Kamper, A.; Borling, P.; Stuer-Lauridsen, F.

    Exposure assessment is crucial for risk assessment for nanomaterials. We propose a framework to aid exposure assessment in consumer products. We determined the location of the nanomaterials and the chemical identify of the 580 products listed in the inventory maintained by the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. It was found that in 19% of the products the nanomaterial were nanoparticles bound to the surfaces. Nanoparticles suspended in liquids were used in 37% of the products, whereas 13% used nanoparticles suspended in solids. One percent were powders containing free potentially airborne nanoparticles. Based on the location of the nanostructure we were able to further group the products into categories of: (1) Expected to cause exposure; (2) May cause exposure; and (3) No expected exposure to the consumer. Most products fall into the category of expected exposure, but we were not able to complete the quantitative exposure assessment mainly due to the lack of information on the concentration of the nanomaterial in the products — a problem that regulators and industry will have to address if we are to have realistic exposure assessment in the future. To illustrate the workability of our procedure, we applied it to a product scenario — the application of sun lotion — using best estimates available and/or worst case assumptions.

  18. Deformable devices with integrated functional nanomaterials for wearable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaemin; Lee, Jongsu; Son, Donghee; Choi, Moon Kee; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-03-01

    As the market and related industry for wearable electronics dramatically expands, there are continuous and strong demands for flexible and stretchable devices to be seamlessly integrated with soft and curvilinear human skin or clothes. However, the mechanical mismatch between the rigid conventional electronics and the soft human body causes many problems. Therefore, various prospective nanomaterials that possess a much lower flexural rigidity than their bulk counterparts have rapidly established themselves as promising electronic materials replacing rigid silicon and/or compound semiconductors in next-generation wearable devices. Many hybrid structures of multiple nanomaterials have been also developed to pursue both high performance and multifunctionality. Here, we provide an overview of state-of-the-art wearable devices based on one- or two-dimensional nanomaterials (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene, single-crystal silicon and oxide nanomembranes, organic nanomaterials and their hybrids) in combination with zero-dimensional functional nanomaterials (e.g., metal/oxide nanoparticles and quantum dots). Starting from an introduction of materials strategies, we describe device designs and the roles of individual ones in integrated systems. Detailed application examples of wearable sensors/actuators, memories, energy devices, and displays are also presented.

  19. Organic synthesis on graphene.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Fabian M; Stark, Wendelin J

    2013-10-15

    Graphene is a two-dimensional crystalline carbon allotrope that has fascinated researchers worldwide and has extended the interest in carbon structures such as fullerenes and nanotubes. In this Account, we use electrical characterization tools to study chemistry on supported graphene. These experiments elucidate the way covalently bound phenyl units can change graphene's physical properties. Can we use chemistry to control electronic properties of graphene? What can we learn from well-known carbon allotropes like fullerenes? The surfaces of fullerenes and graphene show distinct differences in reactivity because of the high strain of sp² carbon in fullerenes compared with the complete lack of strain in graphene. Diazonium chemistry provides a versatile tool for attaching phenyl units covalently to carbon to produce advanced materials and electronic components, but diazonium-based carbon chemistry is strongly influenced by strain. Although fullerenes are highly reactive, graphite (stacks of graphene) remains relatively inert. We chemically introduce n- and p-like doping patterns in two-dimensional graphene using photolithography and extend the ability to chemically control doping to the chemical design of conducting and insulating areas. Thereby we can shape graphene surfaces into functional electronic devices. This Account also describes multistep synthesis on graphene-coated nanoparticles and the introduction of various functional groups on graphene surfaces. Only few functional groups can be produced directly via diazonium chemistry. To overcome this issue, we used these functional groups as starting points for more demanding organic reactions. We covalently attached chelating agents, catalysts, or polymers on the carbon surface. These more complex reactions facilitate the design of electronic modifications, intergraphene connections, and anchors for polymer incorporation. Diazonium chemistry forms strong covalent bridges between graphene and other areas of

  20. Advanced Nanomaterials for High-Efficiency Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Junhong

    2013-11-29

    Energy supply has arguably become one of the most important problems facing humankind. The exponential demand for energy is evidenced by dwindling fossil fuel supplies and record-high oil and gas prices due to global population growth and economic development. This energy shortage has significant implications to the future of our society, in addition to the greenhouse gas emission burden due to consumption of fossil fuels. Solar energy seems to be the most viable choice to meet our clean energy demand given its large scale and clean/renewable nature. However, existing methods to convert sun light into electricity are not efficient enough to become a practical alternative to fossil fuels. This DOE project aims to develop advanced hybrid nanomaterials consisting of semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots or QDs) supported on graphene for cost-effective solar cells with improved conversion efficiency for harvesting abundant, renewable, clean solar energy to relieve our global energy challenge. Expected outcomes of the project include new methods for low-cost manufacturing of hybrid nanostructures, systematic understanding of their properties that can be tailored for desired applications, and novel photovoltaic cells. Through this project, we have successfully synthesized a number of novel nanomaterials, including vertically-oriented graphene (VG) sheets, three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanostructures comprising few-layer graphene (FLG) sheets inherently connected with CNTs through sp{sup 2} carbons, crumpled graphene (CG)-nanocrystal hybrids, CdSe nanoparticles (NPs), CdS NPs, nanohybrids of metal nitride decorated on nitrogen-doped graphene (NG), QD-carbon nanotube (CNT) and QD-VG-CNT structures, TiO{sub 2}-CdS NPs, and reduced graphene oxide (RGO)-SnO{sub 2} NPs. We further assembled CdSe NPs onto graphene sheets and investigated physical and electronic interactions between CdSe NPs and the graphene. Finally we have demonstrated various applications of these

  1. Wormlike micelle assisted rod coating: a general method for facile fabrication of large-area conductive nanomaterial thin layer onto flexible plastics.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingyi; Wang, Huan; Bai, Huadong; Yang, Peng; Shi, Mengxue; Guo, Peng; Wang, Chen; Yang, Wantai; Song, Huaihe

    2012-06-27

    Through combined application of wormlike-micelle and rod-coating technique, a general method was demonstrated for the facile reparation of thin transparent conductive films (TCF) of various nanomaterials and their hybrids on flexible plastics. The cetyltrimethylammonium hydroxide (CTAOH)/p-toluenesulfonic acid (CTAT) wormlike micelle system was selected for both the dispersion of different nanomaterials and the enhancement of viscosities of the coating fluids. With the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)/wormlike micelle aqueous dispersions as coating fluid, TCFs of SWNTs on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates made by rod-coating method were demonstrated. After doping by immersion into thionyl chloride solution, the sheet resistance of SWNTs thin films, which had a transmittance of about 78%, was as low as 480Ω/sq. This coating method was extended to the preparation of thin films or networks of other materials such as reduced graphene oxide and Ag nanowires. The obtained TCF from Ag nanowire networks has a low sheet resistance of 17Ω/sq, which is comparable to the value of best indium tin oxide (ITO) coating on plastic substrates. Finally, hybrid thin films of different nanomaterials were demonstrated by this method. PMID:22551382

  2. Synthesis, characterization, and biosensing application of novel hybrid nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Shun

    Hybrid nanomaterials consisting of nanoparticles (NPs) distributed on the surface of the carbon nanotube (CNT)/graphene represent a new class of materials. These materials could potentially display not only the unique properties of NPs and those of the CNT/graphene, but also additional novel properties due to the interaction between the NP and the CNT/graphene. This thesis entails the synthesis and characterization of NP-CNT/graphene hybrid nanomaterials and the demonstration of their use for biosensors. A simple method that combines an electrospray technique with electrostatic force directed assembly (ESFDA) was developed for successful functionalization of the CNT/thermally-reduced graphene oxide (TRGO) with NPs. Colloidal CdSe NPs, Au NPs, and Au NP-antibody conjugates were electrosprayed and assembled onto random CNTs, vertically-aligned CNT arrays, and TRGO sheets in a controlled manner. CNT and TRGO field-effect transistors (FETs) were fabricated; and novel electronic protein biosensors based on the CNTFET/TRGO FET and Au NP-antibody conjugates were demonstrated. The electrical detection of the protein binding was accomplished by the introduction of Au NP-antibody conjugates in the CNTFET/TRGO FET, in which the Au-coated CNT/TRGO serves as the electrical conducting channel. Antibody (anti-horseradish peroxidase/anti-Immunoglobulin G) and antigen (horseradish peroxidase/Immunoglobulin G) binding events led to the change in the CNT/TRGO conductivity, which was sensitively detected by FET and direct current (dc) measurements. The CNTFET biosensor had a detection limit of 0.2 mg/ml (˜4.5 microM, horseradish peroxidase) while the TRGO FET biosensor exhibited a detection limit of 2 ng/ml (˜13 pM, Immunoglobulin G), which is among the best of carbon nanomaterial (e.g., CNT, graphene, GO)-based protein sensors. The dependence of the sensor response on the TRGO resistance and the antibody areal density on the TRGO sheet was systematically studied, and the sensor

  3. Chemical modifications and bioconjugate reactions of nanomaterials for sensing, imaging, drug delivery and therapy.

    PubMed

    Biju, Vasudevanpillai

    2014-02-01

    As prepared nanomaterials of metals, semiconductors, polymers and carbon often need surface modifications such as ligand exchange, and chemical and bioconjugate reactions for various biosensor, bioanalytical, bioimaging, drug delivery and therapeutic applications. Such surface modifications help us to control the physico-chemical, toxicological and pharmacological properties of nanomaterials. Furthermore, introduction of various reactive functional groups on the surface of nanomaterials allows us to conjugate a spectrum of contrast agents, antibodies, peptides, ligands, drugs and genes, and construct multifunctional and hybrid nanomaterials for the targeted imaging and treatment of cancers. This tutorial review is intended to provide an introduction to newcomers about how chemical and bioconjugate reactions transform the surface of nanomaterials such as silica nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, gold quantum clusters, semiconductor quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, fullerene and graphene, and accordingly formulate them for applications such as biosensing, bioimaging, drug and gene delivery, chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy and photothermal therapy. Nonetheless, controversial reports and our growing concerns about toxicity and pharmacokinetics of nanomaterials suggest the need for not only rigorous in vivo experiments in animal models but also novel nanomaterials for practical applications in the clinical settings. Further reading of original and review articles cited herein is necessary to buildup in-depth knowledge about the chemistry, bioconjugate chemistry and biological applications of individual nanomaterials. PMID:24220322

  4. Modification of conductive polyaniline with carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedaghat, Sajjad; Alavijeh, Mahdi Soleimani

    2014-08-01

    The synthesis of polyaniline/single-wall nanotube, polyaniline/multi-wall nanotube and polyaniline/single-wall nanotube/graphen nanosheets nanocomposites by in situ polymerization are reported in this study. The substrates were treated with a mixture of concentrated sulfuric acid and concentrated nitric acid before usage to functionalize with carboxylic and hydroxyl groups. Aniline monomers are adsorbed and polymerized on the surface of these fillers. Structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy showed that nanomaterials dispersed into polymer matrix and made tubular structures with diameters several tens to hundreds nanometers depending on the polyaniline content. These nanocomposites can be used for production of excellent electrode materials applications in high-performance supercapacitors.

  5. Promising applications of graphene and graphene-based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha; Hieu Nguyen, Van

    2016-06-01

    densities; fabrication of anodes for lithium ion batteries from crumpled graphene-encapsulated Si nanoparticles; liquid-mediated dense integration of graphene materials for compact capacitive energy storage; scalable fabrication of high-power graphene micro-supercapacitors for flexible and on-chip energy storage; superior micro-supercapacitors based on graphene quantum dots; all-graphene core-sheat microfibres for all-solid-state, stretchable fibriform supercapacitors and wearable electronic textiles; micro-supercapacitors with high electrochemical performance based on three-dimensional graphene-carbon nanotube carpets; macroscopic nitrogen-doped graphene hydrogels for ultrafast capacitors; manufacture of scalable ultra-thin and high power density graphene electrochemical capacitor electrodes by aqueous exfoliation and spray deposition; scalable synthesis of hierarchically structured carbon nanotube-graphene fibers for capacitive energy storage; phosphorene-graphene hybrid material as a high-capacity anode material for sodium-ion batteries. Beside above-presented promising applications of graphene and graphene-based nanostructures, other less widespread, but perhaps not less important, applications of graphene and graphene-based nanomaterials, are also briefly discussed.

  6. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    BNL

    2008-08-12

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  7. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2009-09-01

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  8. Immobilization Techniques in the Fabrication of Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Biosensors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Putzbach, William; Ronkainen, Niina J.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of 1st to 3rd generation electrochemical biosensors reflects a simplification and enhancement of the transduction pathway. However, in recent years, modification of the transducer with nanomaterials has become increasingly studied and imparts many advantages. The sensitivity and overall performance of enzymatic biosensors has improved tremendously as a result of incorporating nanomaterials in their fabrication. Given the unique and favorable qualities of gold nanoparticles, graphene and carbon nanotubes as applied to electrochemical biosensors, a consolidated survey of the different methods of nanomaterial immobilization on transducer surfaces and enzyme immobilization on these species is beneficial and timely. This review encompasses modification of enzymatic biosensors with gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene. PMID:23580051

  9. Two- and Three-Dimensional All-Carbon Nanomaterial Assemblies for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Patel, Sunny C; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2016-06-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene have gained significant interest in the fields of materials science, electronics and biomedicine due to their interesting physiochemical properties. Typically these carbon nanomaterials have been dispersed in polymeric matrices at low concentrations to improve the functional properties of nanocomposites employed as two-dimensional (2D) substrates or three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. There has been a growing interest in the assembly of these nanomaterials into 2D and 3D architectures without the use of polymeric matrices, surfactants or binders. In this article, we review recent advances in the development of 2D or 3D all-carbon assemblies using carbon nanotubes or graphene as nanoscale building-block biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:27126776

  10. Imaging Local Heating and Thermal Diffusion of Nanomaterials with Plasmonic Thermal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zixuan; Shan, Xiaonan; Guan, Yan; Wang, Shaopeng; Zhu, Jun-Jie; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-12-22

    Measuring local heat generation and dissipation in nanomaterials is critical for understanding the basic properties and developing applications of nanomaterials, including photothermal therapy and joule heating of nanoelectronics. Several technologies have been developed to probe local temperature distributions in nanomaterials, but a sensitive thermal imaging technology with high temporal and spatial resolution is still lacking. Here, we describe plasmonic thermal microscopy (PTM) to image local heat generation and diffusion from nanostructures in biologically relevant aqueous solutions. We demonstrate that PTM can detect local temperature change as small as 6 mK with temporal resolution of 10 μs and spatial resolution of submicrons (diffraction limit). With PTM, we have successfully imaged photothermal generation from single nanoparticles and graphene pieces, studied spatiotemporal distribution of temperature surrounding a heated nanoparticle, and observed heating at defect sites in graphene. We further show that the PTM images are in quantitative agreement with theoretical simulations based on heat transport theories. PMID:26435320

  11. Engineered Carbon-Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Jitendra N; Vij, Varun; Kemp, K Christian; Kim, Kwang S

    2016-01-26

    The study of electrochemical behavior of bioactive molecules has become one of the most rapidly developing scientific fields. Biotechnology and biomedical engineering fields have a vested interest in constructing more precise and accurate voltammetric/amperometric biosensors. One rapidly growing area of biosensor design involves incorporation of carbon-based nanomaterials in working electrodes, such as one-dimensional carbon nanotubes, two-dimensional graphene, and graphene oxide. In this review article, we give a brief overview describing the voltammetric techniques and how these techniques are applied in biosensing, as well as the details surrounding important biosensing concepts of sensitivity and limits of detection. Building on these important concepts, we show how the sensitivity and limit of detection can be tuned by including carbon-based nanomaterials in the fabrication of biosensors. The sensing of biomolecules including glucose, dopamine, proteins, enzymes, uric acid, DNA, RNA, and H2O2 traditionally employs enzymes in detection; however, these enzymes denature easily, and as such, enzymeless methods are highly desired. Here we draw an important distinction between enzymeless and enzyme-containing carbon-nanomaterial-based biosensors. The review ends with an outlook of future concepts that can be employed in biosensor fabrication, as well as limitations of already proposed materials and how such sensing can be enhanced. As such, this review can act as a roadmap to guide researchers toward concepts that can be employed in the design of next generation biosensors, while also highlighting the current advancements in the field. PMID:26579616

  12. Metabolomic Analysis of Liver Cells Exposed to Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene Oxide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and other graphenic nanomaterials are being used extensively in industrial, consumer, and mechanical applications based in part on their unique structural, optical and electronic properties. Due to the widespread use of these nanoparticles (NPs), human and...

  13. Cytotoxicity of halogenated graphenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Wei Zhe; Khim Chng, Elaine Lay; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Graphene and its family of derivatives possess unique and remarkable physicochemical properties which make them valuable materials for applications in many areas like electronics, energy storage and biomedicine. In response to the possibility of its large-scale manufacturing as commercial products in the future, an investigation was conducted to determine the cytotoxicity of one particular family of graphene derivatives, the halogenated graphenes, for the first time. Halogenated graphenes were prepared through thermal exfoliation of graphite oxide in gaseous chlorine, bromine or iodine atmospheres to yield chlorine- (TRGO-Cl), bromine- (TRGO-Br) and iodine-doped graphene (TRGO-I) respectively. 24 h exposure of human lung carcinoma epithelial cells (A549) to the three halogenated graphenes and subsequent cell viability assessments using methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and water-soluble tetrazolium salt (WST-8) assays revealed that all the halogenated graphenes examined are rather cytotoxic at the concentrations tested (3.125 μg mL-1 to 200 μg mL-1) and the effects are dose-dependent, with TRGO-Cl reducing the cell viability to as low as 25.7% at the maximum concentration of 200 μg mL-1. Their levels of cytotoxicity can be arranged in the order of TRGO-Cl > TRGO-Br > TRGO-I, and it is suggested that the amount of halogen present in the graphene material is the determining factor for the observed trend. Control experiments were carried out to test for possible nanomaterial-induced interference as a consequence of reaction between the halogenated graphenes and the viability markers (MTT/WST-8 reagent) or binding of the formazan products under cell-free conditions. The data obtained eliminate the probability of significant influence by these interferents as the change in the normalized percentage of formazan formed is relatively small and thorough washings were performed prior to the viability assessments to reduce the amount of halogenated

  14. Towards application of one- and two-dimensional nanomaterials for reinforcement of polymeric nanocomposite bone grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrshid, Behzad

    One- and two-dimensional (1-D and 2-D) nanomaterials possess extraordinary physiochemical properties such as large surface area, excellent mechanical properties, high surface energy and good dispersivity in organic and biological solvents, therefore, they have been extensively used as reinforcing agents to improve the mechanical properties of polymeric scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. Carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene have been used as reinforcing agents for biodegradable polymeric scaffolds and composites, however, their short- and long-term in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo biocompatibility is an area of extensive debate. In this study, we have systematically investigated the effects of addition of low concentrations (0.01-0.2 wt. %) of 1-D and 2-D carbon nanomaterials (graphene oxide nanoplatelets, graphene oxide nanoribbons and carbon nanotubes) and inorganic nanomaterials (boron nitride nanotubes, boron nitride nanoplatelers, tungsten disulfide nanotubes and molybdenum disulfide nanoplatelets) on the mechanical properties, cytocompatibility, and bioactivity of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) nanocomposites towards their potential applications as porous and nonporous implants for bone tissue engineering. Addition of nanomaterials in the PPF matrix improved the compressive and flexural mechanical properties of non-porous crosslinked PPF nanocomposites and porous PPF scaffolds. Our results suggest that in addition to high surface roughness and surface area of the nanomaterials, the presence of functional groups on the surface of nanomaterials leads to an increased nanomaterial-polymer interaction and a uniform dispersion of nanomaterials in polymer matrix which may be the key factors responsible for an improved mechanical reinforcement. The in vitro studies showed an excellent cytocompatibility for both carbon and inorganic nanomaterial reinforced PPF nanocomposites and scaffolds. Protein adsorption studies and in vitro

  15. Tensile properties of a boron/nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube–graphene hybrid structure

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kang; Zhan, Haifei; Wei, Ye

    2014-01-01

    Summary Doping is an effective approach that allows for the intrinsic modification of the electrical and chemical properties of nanomaterials. Recently, a graphene and carbon nanotube hybrid structure (GNHS) has been reported, which extends the excellent properties of carbon-based materials to three dimensions. In this paper, we carried out a first-time investigation on the tensile properties of the hybrid structures with different dopants. It is found that with the presence of dopants, the hybrid structures usually exhibit lower yield strength, Young’s modulus, and earlier yielding compared to that of a pristine hybrid structure. For dopant concentrations below 2.5% no significant reduction of Young’s modulus or yield strength could be observed. For all considered samples, the failure is found to initiate at the region where the nanotubes and graphene sheets are connected. After failure, monatomic chains are normally observed around the failure region. Dangling graphene layers without the separation of a residual CNT wall are found to adhere to each other after failure with a distance of about 3.4 Å. This study provides a fundamental understanding of the tensile properties of the doped graphene–nanotube hybrid structures, which will benefit the design and also the applications of graphene-based hybrid materials. PMID:24778956

  16. Carbon nanomaterials-based electrochemical aptasensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zonghua; Yu, Jianbo; Gui, Rijun; Jin, Hui; Xia, Yanzhi

    2016-05-15

    Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) have attracted increasing attention due to their unique electrical, optical, thermal, mechanical and chemical properties. CNMs are extensively applied in electronic, optoelectronic, photovoltaic and sensing devices fields, especially in bioassay technology. These excellent properties significantly depend on not only the functional atomic structures of CNMs, but also the interactions with other materials, such as gold nanoparticles, SiO2, chitosan, etc. This review systematically summarizes applications of CNMs in electrochemical aptasensors (ECASs). Firstly, definition and development of ECASs are introduced. Secondly, different ways of ECASs about working principles, classification and construction of CNMs are illustrated. Thirdly, the applications of different CNMs used in ECASs are discussed. In this review, different types of CNMs are involved such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphene oxide, etc. Besides, the newly emerging CNMs and CNMs-based composites are also discoursed. Finally, we demonstrate the future prospects of CNMs-based ECASs, and some suggestions about the near future development of CNMs-based ECASs are highlighted. PMID:26703992

  17. Optical and optoelectronic properties of organic nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satapathi, Soumitra

    In this dissertation research, organic nanomaterials, such as semiconducting polymer nanoparticles, graphene nanosheets and organic small molecules were successfully utilized for fabrication of organic solar cells, optical sensors and for high contrast imaging of cancer cells. Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple miniemulsion technique. These size controllable polymeric nanoparticles were proven to be able to optimize the morphologies of the bulk heterojunction solar cells and to provide fundamental insight into the evolution of the nanostructures. Highly sensitive optical sensors were fabricated using these polymeric nanoparticles for efficient detection of nitroaromatic explosives, such as 2,4 dinitrotoluene (DNT) and 2,4,6 trinitrotoluene (TNT) in aqueous medium as well as in vapor the phase. Moreover, these water dispersible and fluorescent polymer nanodots were two-photon active and could be internalized by tumor cells as demonstrated by two-photon confocal imaging. In addition to the polymer nanoparticles, the role of the graphene nanosheets in the performance enhancement of dye sensitized solar cells was also investigated. The use of organic small molecules for optical sensing of different nerve gas agents and their potential use in multiphoton imaging of cancer cells were discussed. Controlling material properties at nanoscale for optoelectronics and imaging application as discussed in this dissertation would provide new dimensions in the areas of applied physics and materials science researches.

  18. Design and application of carbon nanomaterials for photoactive and charge transport layers in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sunghwan; Jun, Gwang Hoon; Jeon, Seokwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2016-04-01

    Commercialization of organic solar cell (OSC) has faltered due to their low power conversion efficiency (PCE) compared to inorganic solar cell. Low electrical conductivity, low charge mobility, and short-range light absorption of most organic materials limit the PCE of OSCs. Carbon nanomaterials, especially carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphenes, are of great interest for use in OSC applications due to their high electrical conductivity, mobility, and unique optical properties for enhancing the performance of OSCs. In this review, recent progress toward the integration of carbon nanomaterials into OSCs is described. The role of carbon nanomaterials and strategies for their integration into various layers of OSCs, including the photoactive layer and charge transport layer, are discussed. Based on these, we also discuss the prospects of carbon nanomaterials for specific OSC layers to maximize the PCE.

  19. Carbon nanomaterials for advanced energy conversion and storage.

    PubMed

    Dai, Liming; Chang, Dong Wook; Baek, Jong-Beom; Lu, Wen

    2012-04-23

    It is estimated that the world will need to double its energy supply by 2050. Nanotechnology has opened up new frontiers in materials science and engineering to meet this challenge by creating new materials, particularly carbon nanomaterials, for efficient energy conversion and storage. Comparing to conventional energy materials, carbon nanomaterials possess unique size-/surface-dependent (e.g., morphological, electrical, optical, and mechanical) properties useful for enhancing the energy-conversion and storage performances. During the past 25 years or so, therefore, considerable efforts have been made to utilize the unique properties of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene, as energy materials, and tremendous progress has been achieved in developing high-performance energy conversion (e.g., solar cells and fuel cells) and storage (e.g., supercapacitors and batteries) devices. This article reviews progress in the research and development of carbon nanomaterials during the past twenty years or so for advanced energy conversion and storage, along with some discussions on challenges and perspectives in this exciting field. PMID:22383334

  20. Recent advances in superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems.

    PubMed

    Nagappan, Saravanan; Park, Sung Soo; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2014-02-01

    This review describes the recent advances in the field of superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems. The term superhydrophobic is defined from the surface properties when the surface shows the contact angle (CA) higher than 150 degrees. This could be well known from the lotus effect due to the non-stick and self-cleaning properties of the lotus leaf (LL). We briefly introduced the methods of preparing superhydrophobic surfaces using top-down approaches, bottom-up approaches and a combination of top-down and bottom-up approaches and various ways to prepare superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems using the bio-inspired materials, polymer nanocomposites, metal nanoparticles graphene oxide (GO) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We also pointed out the recent applications of the superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems in oil-spill capture and separations, self-cleaning and self-healing systems, bio-medicals, anti-icing and anti-corrosive, electronics, catalysis, textile fabrics and papers etc. The review also highlights the visionary outlook for the future development and use of the superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems for a wide variety of applications. PMID:24749434

  1. Electrocatalysis at metal nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lin

    Direct liquid fuel cells, such as direct methanol fuel cells and direct formic acid fuel cells, have attracted much attention in the past decades due to the need of clean and efficient power sources. One of the most critical issues in the development of highly efficient fuel cells is to increase the rates of fuel-cell reactions as a commercial product. As a result, the topic of electrocatalysis plays a significant role in the investigations of fuel cell reactions. For methanol oxidation, platinum based nanomaterials are the most important catalysts. For formic acid oxidation, both platinum and palladium based nanomaterials are widely employed as the catalysts. Recently, shape-control of the nanoparticles has become an imperative task due to the fact that most of the reactions in fuel cells are sensitive to the surface structure of the catalysts. Though numerous studies have been conducted in past to elucidate the catalytic activity on the nanomaterials with different shapes, the results are inconclusive. Herein, systematic comparison of catalytic activity toward methanol and formic acid oxidation on shape-controlled cubic platinum-based alloy nanoparticles with different alloy element are reported in this dissertation. Methanol and formic acid oxidation reactions on spherical and cubic Pt-Cu nanoparticles are also studied. Cu-Pd nanoparticles are synthesized through galvanic redox reactions to provide significantly higher and much more stable formic acid oxidation activities. Interparticle distance effect is investigated on two dimensional nanoparticle array electrodes with controlled particle size, which is ideal model system for exploring the interparticle distance effects on the voltammetric behavior and reaction mechanisms.

  2. Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Biosensors and Bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Mao, Xun; Gurung, Anant; Baloda, Meenu; Lin, Yuehe; He, Yuqing

    2010-08-31

    This book chapter summarizes the recent advance in nanomaterials for electrochemical biosensors and bioassays. Biofunctionalization of nanomaterials for biosensors fabrication and their biomedical applications are discussed.

  3. Graphene hybrids: synthesis strategies and applications in sensors and sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Badhulika, Sushmee; Terse-Thakoor, Trupti; Villarreal, Claudia; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Graphene exhibits unique 2-D structural, chemical, and electronic properties that lead to its many potential applications. In order to expand the scope of its usage, graphene hybrids which combine the synergetic properties of graphene along with metals/metal oxides and other nanostructured materials have been synthesized and are a widely emerging field of research. This review presents an overview of the recent progress made in the field of graphene hybrid architectures with a focus on the synthesis of graphene-carbon nanotube (G-CNT), graphene-semiconductor nanomaterial (G-SNM), and graphene-metal nanomaterial (G-MNM) hybrids. It attempts to identify the bottlenecks involved and outlines future directions for development and comprehensively summarizes their applications in the field of sensing and sensitized solar cells. PMID:26176007

  4. Graphene hybrids: synthesis strategies and applications in sensors and sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Badhulika, Sushmee; Terse-Thakoor, Trupti; Villarreal, Claudia; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Graphene exhibits unique 2-D structural, chemical, and electronic properties that lead to its many potential applications. In order to expand the scope of its usage, graphene hybrids which combine the synergetic properties of graphene along with metals/metal oxides and other nanostructured materials have been synthesized and are a widely emerging field of research. This review presents an overview of the recent progress made in the field of graphene hybrid architectures with a focus on the synthesis of graphene-carbon nanotube (G-CNT), graphene-semiconductor nanomaterial (G-SNM), and graphene-metal nanomaterial (G-MNM) hybrids. It attempts to identify the bottlenecks involved and outlines future directions for development and comprehensively summarizes their applications in the field of sensing and sensitized solar cells. PMID:26176007

  5. Graphene hybrids: Synthesis strategies and applications in sensors and sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badhulika, Sushmee; Terse-Thakoor, Trupti; Chaves Villarreal, Claudia; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-06-01

    Graphene exhibits unique 2-D structural, chemical and electronic properties that lead to its many potential applications. In order to expand the scope of its usage, graphene hybrids which combine the synergetic properties of graphene along with metals/ metal oxides and other nanostructured materials have been synthesized and are a widely emerging field of research. This review presents an overview of the recent progress made in the field of graphene hybrid architectures with a focus on the synthesis of graphene-carbon nanotube (G-CNT), graphene-semiconductor nanomaterial (G-SNM) and graphene-metal nanomaterial (G-MNM) hybrids. It attempts to identify the bottlenecks involved and outlines future directions for development and comprehensively summarizes their applications in the field of sensing and sensitized solar cells.

  6. Synthesis and Modification of Carbon Nanomaterials utilizing Microwave Heating.

    PubMed

    Schwenke, Almut M; Hoeppener, Stephanie; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2015-07-22

    Microwave-assisted synthesis and processing represents a growing field in materials research and successfully entered the field of carbon nanomaterials during the last decade. Due to the strong interaction of carbon materials with microwave radiation, fast heating rates and localized heating can be achieved. These features enable the acceleration of reaction processes, as well as the formation of nanostructures with special morphologies. A comprehensive overview is provided here on the possibilities and achievements in the field of carbon-nanomaterial research when using microwave-based heating approaches. This includes the synthesis and processing of carbon nanotubes and fibers, graphene materials, carbon nanoparticles, and capsules, as well as porous carbon materials. Additionally, the principles of microwave-heating, in particular of carbon materials, are introduced and important issues, i.e., safety and reproducibility, are discussed. PMID:26087742

  7. Volatile-nanoparticle-assisted optical visualization of individual carbon nanotubes and other nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Jian, Muqiang; Xie, Huanhuan; Wang, Qi; Xia, Kailun; Yin, Zhe; Zhang, Mingyu; Deng, Ningqin; Wang, Luning; Ren, Tianling; Zhang, Yingying

    2016-07-21

    The development of nanomaterials has put forward high requirements for characterization techniques. Optical microscopy (OM), with easy accessibility and open operating spaces as compared to scanning electron microscopy, is a good choice to quickly locate materials and to be integrated with other equipment. However, OM is limited by its low resolution. Herein, we present a facile and non-destructive approach for optical observation of nanomaterials under conventional OMs with the aid of volatile nanoparticles (NPs), which can be deposited and removed in a controlled manner. The NPs deposited on the surface of nanomaterials render strong light scattering to enable the nanomaterials to become optically visible. For example, this approach enables the observation of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with OMs at low magnification or even with the naked eye. Both supported CNTs on various substrates and suspended CNTs can be observed with this approach. Most importantly, the NPs can be completely removed through moderate heat treatment or laser irradiation, avoiding potential influence on the properties or subsequent applications of nanomaterials. Furthermore, we systematically investigate the deposition of various volatile NPs (up to 14 kinds) for the optical observation of nanomaterials. We also demonstrated the application of this approach on other nanomaterials, including nanowires and graphene. We showed that this approach is facile, controllable, non-destructive, and contamination-free, indicating wide potential applications. PMID:27350415

  8. Nanomaterials, Inflammation and Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Jagannath

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials exhibit unique properties that are absent in the bulk material because decreasing material size leads to an exponential increase in surface area, surface area to volume ratio, and effective stiffness, resulting in altered physiochemical properties. Diverse categories of nanomaterials such as nanoparticles, nanoporous scaffolds, nanopatterned surfaces, nanofibers and carbon nanotubes can be generated using advanced fabrication and processing techniques. These materials are being increasingly incorporated in tissue engineering scaffolds to facilitate the development of biomimetic substitutes to replace damaged tissues and organs. Long term success of nanomaterials in tissue engineering is contingent upon the inflammatory responses they elicit in vivo. This review seeks to summarize the recent developments in our understanding of biochemical and biophysical attributes of nanomaterials and the inflammatory responses they elicit, with a focus on strategies for nanomaterial design in tissue engineering applications. PMID:25421333

  9. Experimental investigation of interactions between proteins and carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Bishwambhar

    The global market for nanomaterials based products is forecasted to reach $1 trillion per annum per annum for 2015. Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) exhibit unique physicochemical properties with potential to impact diverse aspects of society through applications in electronics, renewable energy, and medicine. While the research and proposed applications of ENMs continue to grow rapidly, the health and safety of ENMs still remains a major concern to the public as well as to policy makers and funding agencies. It is now widely accepted that focused efforts are needed for identifying the list of physicochemical descriptors of ENM before they can be evaluated for nanotoxicity and biological response. This task is surprisingly challenging, as many physicochemical properties of ENMs are closely inter related and cannot be varied independently (e.g. increasing the size of an ENM can introduce additional defects). For example, varying toxic response may ensue due to different methods of nanomaterial preparation, dissimilar impurities and defects. Furthermore, the inadvertent coating of proteins on ENM surface in any biological milieu results in the formation of the so-called "protein/bio-corona" which can in turn alter the fate of ENMs and their biological response. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide are widely used ENMs. It is now known that defects in CNMs play an important role not only in materials properties but also in the determination of how materials interact at the nano-bio interface. In this regard, this work investigates the influence of defect-induced hydrophilicity on the bio-corona formation using micro Raman, photoluminescence, infrared spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that the interaction of proteins (albumin and fibrinogen) with CNMs is strongly influenced by charge transfer between them, inducing protein unfolding which enhances conformational entropy and

  10. Engineering epitaxial graphene with oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimouche, Amina; Martin, Sylvain; Winkelmann, Clemens; Fruchart, Olivier; Courtois, Hervé; Coraux, Johann; Hybrid system at low dimension Team

    2013-03-01

    Almost free-standing graphene can be obtained on metals by decoupling graphene from its substrate, for instance by intercalation of atoms beneath graphene, as it was shown with oxygen atoms. We show that the interaction of oxygen with epitaxial graphene on iridium leads to the formation of an ultrathin crystalline oxide extending between graphene and the metallic substrate via the graphene wrinkles. Graphene studied in this work was prepared under ultra-high vacuum by CVD. The samples were studied by combining scanning probe microscopy (STM, AFM) and spatially resolved spectroscopy (Raman, STS). The ultrathin oxide forms a decoupling barrier layer between graphene and Ir, yielding truly free-standing graphene whose hybridization and charge transfers with the substrate have been quenched. Our work presents novel types of graphene-based nanostructures, and opens the route to the transfer-free preparation of graphene directly onto an insulating support contacted to the metallic substrate which could serve as a gate electrode. Work supported by the EU-NMP GRENADA project

  11. Terahertz Dynamics in Carbon Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Junichiro

    2012-02-01

    This NSF Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) project supports a unique interdisciplinary and international partnership investigating terahertz (THz) dynamics in nanostructures. The 0.1 to 10 THz frequency range of the electromagnetic spectrum is where electrical transport and optical transitions merge, offering exciting opportunities to study a variety of novel physical phenomena in condensed matter. By combining THz technology and nanotechnology, we can advance our understanding of THz physics while improving and developing THz devices. Specifically, this PIRE research explores THz dynamics of electrons in carbon nanomaterials, namely, nanotubes and graphene --- low-dimensional, sp^2-bonded carbon systems with unique finite-frequency properties. Japan and the U.S. are global leaders in both THz research and carbon research, and stimulating cooperation is critical to further advance THz science and to commercialize products developed in the lab. However, obstacles exist for international collaboration --- primarily linguistic and cultural barriers --- and this PIRE project aims to address these barriers through the integration of our research and education programs. Our strong educational portfolio endeavours to cultivate interest in nanotechnology amongst young U.S. undergraduate students and encourage them to pursue graduate study and academic research in the physical sciences, especially those from underrepresented groups. Our award-winning International Research Experience for Undergraduates Program, NanoJapan, provides structured research internships in Japanese university laboratories with Japanese mentors --- recognized as a model international education program for science and engineering students. The project builds the skill sets of nanoscience researchers and students by cultivating international and inter-cultural awareness, research expertise, and specific academic interests in nanotechnology. U.S. project partners include Rice

  12. Carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical biosensors: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaoyin; Dai, Zhihui

    2015-04-01

    Carbon materials on the nanoscale exhibit diverse outstanding properties, rendering them extremely suitable for the fabrication of electrochemical biosensors. Over the past two decades, advances in this area have continuously emerged. In this review, we attempt to survey the recent developments of electrochemical biosensors based on six types of carbon nanomaterials (CNs), i.e., graphene, carbon nanotubes, carbon dots, carbon nanofibers, nanodiamonds and buckminsterfullerene. For each material, representative samples are introduced to expound the different roles of the CNs in electrochemical bioanalytical strategies. In addition, remaining challenges and perspectives for future developments are also briefly discussed.

  13. The fast fabrication of flexible electronic devices of graphene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shihu; Wang, Wei; Yu, Lingke; Zhan, Zhan; Sun, Daoheng

    2016-08-01

    The rapid production and accurate deposition of graphene composites are first integrated into one process, due to the strong interaction between the polymer bond with sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) and graphene. It is demonstrated that tension-shear exfoliation in high viscosity fluid may get a higher graphene production rate than in N-methyl-pyrrolidone. In addition, the micro-scale patterns of graphene nanomaterials produced by this method show high electrical conductivity and superior sensitivity to pressure due to their porous structure.

  14. The fast fabrication of flexible electronic devices of graphene composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shihu; Wang, Wei; Yu, Lingke; Zhan, Zhan; Sun, Daoheng

    2016-08-01

    The rapid production and accurate deposition of graphene composites are first integrated into one process, due to the strong interaction between the polymer bond with sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) and graphene. It is demonstrated that tension-shear exfoliation in high viscosity fluid may get a higher graphene production rate than in N-methyl-pyrrolidone. In addition, the micro-scale patterns of graphene nanomaterials produced by this method show high electrical conductivity and superior sensitivity to pressure due to their porous structure. PMID:27324992

  15. Cytotoxicity of graphene oxide and graphene in human erythrocytes and skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ken-Hsuan; Lin, Yu-Shen; Macosko, Christopher W; Haynes, Christy L

    2011-07-01

    Two-dimensional carbon-based nanomaterials, including graphene oxide and graphene, are potential candidates for biomedical applications such as sensors, cell labeling, bacterial inhibition, and drug delivery. Herein, we explore the biocompatibility of graphene-related materials with controlled physical and chemical properties. The size and extent of exfoliation of graphene oxide sheets was varied by sonication intensity and time. Graphene sheets were obtained from graphene oxide by a simple (hydrazine-free) hydrothermal route. The particle size, morphology, exfoliation extent, oxygen content, and surface charge of graphene oxide and graphene were characterized by wide-angle powder X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and zeta-potential. One method of toxicity assessment was based on measurement of the efflux of hemoglobin from suspended red blood cells. At the smallest size, graphene oxide showed the greatest hemolytic activity, whereas aggregated graphene sheets exhibited the lowest hemolytic activity. Coating graphene oxide with chitosan nearly eliminated hemolytic activity. Together, these results demonstrate that particle size, particulate state, and oxygen content/surface charge of graphene have a strong impact on biological/toxicological responses to red blood cells. In addition, the cytotoxicity of graphene oxide and graphene sheets was investigated by measuring mitochondrial activity in adherent human skin fibroblasts using two assays. The methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, a typical nanotoxicity assay, fails to predict the toxicity of graphene oxide and graphene toxicity because of the spontaneous reduction of MTT by graphene and graphene oxide, resulting in a false positive signal. However, appropriate alternate assessments, using the water-soluble tetrazolium salt (WST-8), trypan blue exclusion, and reactive oxygen species assay reveal that the compacted graphene

  16. Biofunctionalization of Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Challa S. S. R.

    2005-11-01

    The new book series 'Nanotechnologies for the Life Sciences' is the first comprehensive source on the topics where materials science and life sciences meet on the nanoscale. Each volume provides a concise overview of the underlying nanotechnologies for the design, creation and characterization of biomedical applications, collating the many articles found in the relevant specialized journals but as yet unseen by those working in other disciplines. Written by international experts describing the various facets of nanofabrication, the ten volumes of this single source of information cover the complete range of synthetic methods, tools and techniques being developed towards medical, biological and cybernetic applications. This volume covers the synthetic and materials aspects of instilling biocompatibility into nanomaterials with properties desirable for advanced medical and biological applications. Essential reading for anyone working in the various related disciplines: from medicine and biology through chemistry, materials science and physics to engineering.

  17. Nanomaterials for renewable energy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Shimou; Li, Liang; Sun, Hanwen; Sun, Jian; Lu, Baowang

    2015-05-19

    With demand for sustainable energy, resource, and environment protection, new material technologies are constantly expanding during the last few couple of decades. An intensive attention has been given by the scientific communities. In particular, nanomaterials are increasingly playing an active role either by increasing the efficiency of the energy storage and conversion processes or by improving the device design and performance. This special issue presents recent research advances in various aspects of energy storage technologies, advanced batteries, fuel cells, solar cell, biofuels, and so on. Design and synthesis of novel materials have demonstrated great impact on the utilization of themore » sustainable energy, which need to solve the increasing shortage of resource and the issues of environmental pollution.« less

  18. Nanomaterials for renewable energy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shimou; Li, Liang; Sun, Hanwen; Sun, Jian; Lu, Baowang

    2015-05-19

    With demand for sustainable energy, resource, and environment protection, new material technologies are constantly expanding during the last few couple of decades. An intensive attention has been given by the scientific communities. In particular, nanomaterials are increasingly playing an active role either by increasing the efficiency of the energy storage and conversion processes or by improving the device design and performance. This special issue presents recent research advances in various aspects of energy storage technologies, advanced batteries, fuel cells, solar cell, biofuels, and so on. Design and synthesis of novel materials have demonstrated great impact on the utilization of the sustainable energy, which need to solve the increasing shortage of resource and the issues of environmental pollution.

  19. Characterization Challenges for Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Donald R.; Amonette, James E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Nurmi, James; Qiang, You; Sarathy, Vaishnavi; Seal, Sudipta; Sharma, Amit M.; Tratnyek, P. G.; Wang, Chong M.

    2008-03-10

    Nanostructured materials are increasingly subject to nearly every type of chemical and physical analysis possible. Because of their small feature size there is a significant focus on tools with high spatial resolution. Because of their high surface area, it is also natural to characterize nanomaterials using tools designed to analyze surfaces. Regardless of the approach, nanostructured materials present a variety of obstacles to adequate, useful and needed analysis. This paper provides short overviews to some of the issues and complications including: particle stability, environmental effects, specimen handling, surface coating, contamination and time. Some specific examples are provided from a our work focused on ceria nanoparticles and iron metal-core/oxide-shell nanoparticles in which we use a combination of tools for routine analysis including XPS, TEM, and XRD and apply other methods as needed to obtain essential information.

  20. Electrical Contacts to Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, P R; Faraby, H; DiBattista, M

    2015-12-01

    The efficient passage of electrical current from an external contact to a nanomaterial is necessary for harnessing characteristics unique to the nanoscale, such as those relevant to energy quantization. However, an intrinsic resistance pertinent to dimensionality crossover and the presence of impurities precludes optimal electrical contact formation. In this review, we first discuss the relevant principles and contact resistance measurement methodologies, with modifications necessary for the nanoscale. Aspects related to the deposition of the contact material are deemed to be crucial. Consequently, the use of focused ion beam (FIB) based deposition, which relies on the ion-induced decomposition of a metallorganic precursor, and which has been frequently utilized for nanoscale contacts is considered in detail. PMID:26682353

  1. Nanomaterials for Space Exploration Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moloney, Padraig G.

    2006-01-01

    Nano-engineered materials are multi-functional materials with superior mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Nanomaterials may be used for a variety of space exploration applications, including ultracapacitors, active/passive thermal management materials, and nanofiltration for water recovery. Additional applications include electrical power/energy storage systems, hybrid systems power generation, advanced proton exchange membrane fuel cells, and air revitalization. The need for nanomaterials and their growth, characterization, processing and space exploration applications is discussed. Data is presented for developing solid-supported amine adsorbents based on carbon nanotube materials and functionalization of nanomaterials is examined.

  2. Biotechnological synthesis of functional nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Jonathan R; Byrne, James M; Coker, Victoria S

    2011-08-01

    Biological systems, especially those using microorganisms, have the potential to offer cheap, scalable and highly tunable green synthetic routes for the production of the latest generation of nanomaterials. Recent advances in the biotechnological synthesis of functional nano-scale materials are described. These nanomaterials range from catalysts to novel inorganic antimicrobials, nanomagnets, remediation agents and quantum dots for electronic and optical devices. Where possible, the roles of key biological macromolecules in controlling production of the nanomaterials are highlighted, and also technological limitations that must be addressed for widespread implementation are discussed. PMID:21742483

  3. Nanomaterial-based biosensors using dual transducing elements for solution phase detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Su, Xiaodi; Lu, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Biosensors incorporating nanomaterials have demonstrated superior performance compared to their conventional counterparts. Most reported sensors use nanomaterials as a single transducer of signals, while biosensor designs using dual transducing elements have emerged as new approaches to further improve overall sensing performance. This review focuses on recent developments in nanomaterial-based biosensors using dual transducing elements for solution phase detection. The review begins with a brief introduction of the commonly used nanomaterial transducers suitable for designing dual element sensors, including quantum dots, metal nanoparticles, upconversion nanoparticles, graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and carbon nanodots. This is followed by the presentation of the four basic design principles, namely Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), Amplified Fluorescence Polarization (AFP), Bio-barcode Assay (BCA) and Chemiluminescence (CL), involving either two kinds of nanomaterials, or one nanomaterial and an organic luminescent agent (e.g. organic dyes, luminescent polymers) as dual transducers. Biomolecular and chemical analytes or biological interactions are detected by their control of the assembly and disassembly of the two transducing elements that change the distance between them, the size of the fluorophore-containing composite, or the catalytic properties of the nanomaterial transducers, among other property changes. Comparative discussions on their respective design rules and overall performances are presented afterwards. Compared with the single transducer biosensor design, such a dual-transducer configuration exhibits much enhanced flexibility and design versatility, allowing biosensors to be more specifically devised for various purposes. The review ends by highlighting some of the further development opportunities in this field. PMID:25763412

  4. Graphene-plasmon polaritons: From fundamental properties to potential applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Sanshui; Zhu, Xiaolong; Li, Bo-Hong; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-04-01

    With unique possibilities for controlling light in nanoscale devices, graphene plasmonics has opened new perspectives to the nanophotonics community with potential applications in metamaterials, modulators, photodetectors, and sensors. In this paper, we briefly review the recent exciting progress in graphene plasmonics. We begin with a general description of the optical properties of graphene, particularly focusing on the dispersion of graphene-plasmon polaritons. The dispersion relation of graphene-plasmon polaritons of spatially extended graphene is expressed in terms of the local response limit with an intraband contribution. With this theoretical foundation of graphene-plasmon polaritons, we then discuss recent exciting progress, paying specific attention to the following topics: excitation of graphene plasmon polaritons, electron-phonon interactions in graphene on polar substrates, and tunable graphene plasmonics with applications in modulators and sensors. Finally, we address some of the apparent challenges and promising perspectives of graphene plasmonics.

  5. Graphene nanoribbon heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinming; Pignedoli, Carlo A; Talirz, Leopold; Ruffieux, Pascal; Söde, Hajo; Liang, Liangbo; Meunier, Vincent; Berger, Reinhard; Li, Rongjin; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman

    2014-11-01

    Despite graphene's remarkable electronic properties, the lack of an electronic bandgap severely limits its potential for applications in digital electronics. In contrast to extended films, narrow strips of graphene (called graphene nanoribbons) are semiconductors through quantum confinement, with a bandgap that can be tuned as a function of the nanoribbon width and edge structure. Atomically precise graphene nanoribbons can be obtained via a bottom-up approach based on the surface-assisted assembly of molecular precursors. Here we report the fabrication of graphene nanoribbon heterojunctions and heterostructures by combining pristine hydrocarbon precursors with their nitrogen-substituted equivalents. Using scanning probe methods, we show that the resulting heterostructures consist of seamlessly assembled segments of pristine (undoped) graphene nanoribbons (p-GNRs) and deterministically nitrogen-doped graphene nanoribbons (N-GNRs), and behave similarly to traditional p-n junctions. With a band shift of 0.5 eV and an electric field of 2 × 10(8) V m(-1) at the heterojunction, these materials bear a high potential for applications in photovoltaics and electronics. PMID:25194948

  6. Environmental Risk Assessment of Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayramov, A. A.

    In this paper, various aspects of modern nanotechnologies and, as a result, risks of nanomaterials impact on an environment are considered. This very brief review of the First International Conference on Material and Information Sciences in High Technologies (2007, Baku, Azerbaijan) is given. The conference presented many reports that were devoted to nanotechnology in biology and business for the developing World, formation of charged nanoparticles for creation of functional nanostructures, nanoprocessing of carbon nanotubes, magnetic and optical properties of manganese-phosphorus nanowires, ultra-nanocrystalline diamond films, and nanophotonics communications in Azerbaijan. The mathematical methods of simulation of the group, individual and social risks are considered for the purpose of nanomaterials risk reduction and remediation. Lastly, we have conducted studies at a plant of polymeric materials (and nanomaterials), located near Baku. Assessments have been conducted on the individual risk of person affection and constructed the map of equal isolines and zones of individual risk for a plant of polymeric materials (and nanomaterials).

  7. Thermal oxidation of carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebova, N. V.; Nechitailov, A. A.; Kukushkina, Yu. A.; Sokolov, V. V.

    2011-05-01

    The process of the thermal oxidation of various carbon nanomaterials (multiwalled carbon nanotubes, carbon black, nanoporous carbon and graphite) used in the catalytic layers of electrochemical energy converters (electrolyzers, fuel cells) has been studied. The thermal stability of these materials has been determined. Relationships between the structural characteristics of carbon nanomaterials and the parameters of their thermal oxidation in air have determined using the methods of differential thermal analysis and adsorption-structure analysis.

  8. Radioactive Nanomaterials for Multimodality Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Daiqin; Dougherty, Casey A.; Yang, Dongzhi; Wu, Hongwei; Hong, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear imaging techniques, including primarily positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), can provide quantitative information for a biological event in vivo with ultra-high sensitivity, however, the comparatively low spatial resolution is their major limitation in clinical application. By convergence of nuclear imaging with other imaging modalities like computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging, the hybrid imaging platforms can overcome the limitations from each individual imaging technique. Possessing versatile chemical linking ability and good cargo-loading capacity, radioactive nanomaterials can serve as ideal imaging contrast agents. In this review, we provide a brief overview about current state-of-the-art applications of radioactive nanomaterials in the circumstances of multimodality imaging. We present strategies for incorporation of radioisotope(s) into nanomaterials along with applications of radioactive nanomaterials in multimodal imaging. Advantages and limitations of radioactive nanomaterials for multimodal imaging applications are discussed. Finally, a future perspective of possible radioactive nanomaterial utilization is presented for improving diagnosis and patient management in a variety of diseases. PMID:27227167

  9. Plasma nanofabrication and nanomaterials safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Z. J.; Levchenko, I.; Kumar, S.; Yajadda, M. M. A.; Yick, S.; Seo, D. H.; Martin, P. J.; Peel, S.; Kuncic, Z.; Ostrikov, K.

    2011-05-01

    The fast advances in nanotechnology have raised increasing concerns related to the safety of nanomaterials when exposed to humans, animals and the environment. However, despite several years of research, the nanomaterials safety field is still in its infancy owing to the complexities of structural and surface properties of these nanomaterials and organism-specific responses to them. Recently, plasma-based technology has been demonstrated as a versatile and effective way for nanofabrication, yet its health and environment-benign nature has not been widely recognized. Here we address the environmental and occupational health and safety effects of various zero- and one-dimensional nanomaterials and elaborate the advantages of using plasmas as a safe nanofabrication tool. These advantages include but are not limited to the production of substrate-bound nanomaterials, the isolation of humans from harmful nanomaterials, and the effective reforming of toxic and flammable gases. It is concluded that plasma nanofabrication can minimize the hazards in the workplace and represents a safe way for future nanofabrication technologies.

  10. Gold-based hybrid nanomaterials for biosensing and molecular diagnostic applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Eun; Choi, Ji Hye; Colas, Marion; Kim, Dong Ha; Lee, Hyukjin

    2016-06-15

    The properties of gold nanomaterials are particularly of interest to many researchers, since they show unique physiochemical properties such as optical adsorption of specific wavelength of light, high electrical conductance with rich surface electrons, and facile surface modification with sulfhydryl groups. These properties have facilitated the use of gold nanomaterials in the development of various hybrid systems for biosensors and molecular diagnostics. Combined with various synthetic materials such as fluorescence dyes, polymers, oligonucleotides, graphene oxides (GO), and quantum dots (QDs), the gold-based hybrid nanomaterials offer multi-functionalities in molecular detection with high specificity and sensitivity. These two aspects result in the increase of detection speed as well as the lower detection limits, having shown that this diagnosis method is more effective than other conventional ones. In this review, we have highlighted various examples of nanomaterials for biosensing and molecular diagnostics. The gold-based hybrid systems are categorized by three distinct detection approaches, in which include (1) optical, such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR), RAMAN, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), (2) fluorescence, such as förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and nanomaterial surface energy transfer (NSET), and (3) electrochemical, such as potentiometic, amperometric, and conductometric. Each example provides the detailed mechanism of molecular detection as well as the supporting experimental result with the limit of detection (LOD). Lastly, future perspective on novel development of gold-based hybrid nanomaterials is discussed as well as their challenges. PMID:26894985

  11. Terms of endearment: Bacteria meet graphene nanosurfaces.

    PubMed

    Tegou, Evangelia; Magana, Maria; Katsogridaki, Alexandra Eleni; Ioannidis, Anastasios; Raptis, Vasilios; Jordan, Sheldon; Chatzipanagiotou, Stylianos; Chatzandroulis, Stavros; Ornelas, Catia; Tegos, George P

    2016-05-01

    Microbial multidrug resistance poses serious risks in returning the human species into the pre-antibiotic era if it remains unsolved. While conventional research approaches to combat infectious diseases have been inadequate, nanomaterials are a promising alternative for the development of sound antimicrobial countermeasures. Graphene, a two-dimensional ultra-thin nanomaterial, possesses excellent electronic and biocompatibility properties, which position it in the biotechnology forefront for diverse applications in biosensing, therapeutics, diagnostics, drug delivery and device development. Yet, several questions remain unanswered. For instance, the way these nanosurfaces interact with the microbial entities is poorly understood. The mechanistic elucidation of this interface seems critical to determine the feasibility of applications under development. Are graphene derivatives appropriate materials to design potent antimicrobial agents, vehicles or effective diagnostic microsensors? Has the partition of major microbial resistance phenotypic determinants been sufficiently investigated? Can toxicity become a limiting factor? Are we getting closer to clinical implementation? To facilitate research conducive to answer such questions, this review describes the features of the graphene-bacterial interaction. An overview on paradigms of graphene-microbial interactions is expected to shed light on the range of materials available, and identify possible applications, serving the ultimate goal to develop deeper understanding and collective conscience for the true capabilities of this nanomaterial platform. PMID:26946404

  12. Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Activation as the Main Mechanisms Underlying Graphene Toxicity against Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jarosz, Anna; Skoda, Marta; Dudek, Ilona; Szukiewicz, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Due to the development of nanotechnology graphene and graphene-based nanomaterials have attracted the most attention owing to their unique physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. Graphene can be applied in many fields among which biomedical applications especially diagnostics, cancer therapy, and drug delivery have been arousing a lot of interest. Therefore it is essential to understand better the graphene-cell interactions, especially toxicity and underlying mechanisms for proper use and development. This review presents the recent knowledge concerning graphene cytotoxicity and influence on different cancer cell lines. PMID:26649139

  13. Highly energetic compositions based on functionalized carbon nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qi-Long; Gozin, Michael; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Cohen, Adva; Pang, Si-Ping

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, research in the field of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), such as fullerenes, expanded graphite (EG), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene, and graphene oxide (GO), has been widely used in energy storage, electronics, catalysts, and biomaterials, as well as medical applications. Regarding energy storage, one of the most important research directions is the development of CNMs as carriers of energetic components by coating or encapsulation, thus forming safer advanced nanostructures with better performances. Moreover, some CNMs can also be functionalized to become energetic additives. This review article covers updated preparation methods for the aforementioned CNMs, with a more specific orientation towards the use of these nanomaterials in energetic compositions. The effects of these functionalized CNMs on thermal decomposition, ignition, combustion and the reactivity properties of energetic compositions are significant and are discussed in detail. It has been shown that the use of functionalized CNMs in energetic compositions greatly improves their combustion performances, thermal stability and sensitivity. In particular, functionalized fullerenes, CNTs and GO are the most appropriate candidate components in nanothermites, solid propellants and gas generators, due to their superior catalytic properties as well as facile preparation methods. PMID:26880518

  14. Highly energetic compositions based on functionalized carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qi-Long; Gozin, Michael; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Cohen, Adva; Pang, Si-Ping

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, research in the field of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), such as fullerenes, expanded graphite (EG), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene, and graphene oxide (GO), has been widely used in energy storage, electronics, catalysts, and biomaterials, as well as medical applications. Regarding energy storage, one of the most important research directions is the development of CNMs as carriers of energetic components by coating or encapsulation, thus forming safer advanced nanostructures with better performances. Moreover, some CNMs can also be functionalized to become energetic additives. This review article covers updated preparation methods for the aforementioned CNMs, with a more specific orientation towards the use of these nanomaterials in energetic compositions. The effects of these functionalized CNMs on thermal decomposition, ignition, combustion and the reactivity properties of energetic compositions are significant and are discussed in detail. It has been shown that the use of functionalized CNMs in energetic compositions greatly improves their combustion performances, thermal stability and sensitivity. In particular, functionalized fullerenes, CNTs and GO are the most appropriate candidate components in nanothermites, solid propellants and gas generators, due to their superior catalytic properties as well as facile preparation methods.

  15. Vascular Distribution of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Once considered primarily occupational, novel nanotechnology innovation and application has led to widespread domestic use and intentional biomedical exposures. With these exciting advances, the breadth and depth of toxicological considerations must also be expanded. The vascular system interacts with every tissue in the body, striving to homeostasis. Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) have been reported to distribute in many different organs and tissues. However, these observations have tended to use approaches requiring tissue homogenization and/or gross organ analyses. These techniques, while effective in establishing presence, preclude an exact determination of where ENM are deposited within a tissue. It is necessary to identify this exact distribution and deposition of ENM throughout the cardiovascular system, with respect to vascular hemodynamics and in vivo/ in vitro ENM modifications taken into account if nanotechnology is to achieve its full potential. Distinct levels of the vasculature will first be described as individual compartments. Then the vasculature will be considered as a whole. These unique compartments and biophysical conditions will be discussed in terms of their propensity to favor ENM deposition. Understanding levels of the vasculature will also be discussed. Ultimately, future studies must verify the mechanisms speculated on and presented herein. PMID:24777845

  16. Nanomaterials - a Canadian Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutter, Peter

    2004-03-01

    I will review nanomaterials research in Canada with a particular emphasis on coordinated initiatives and some experimental highlights, starting with a summary of Canadian initiatives. These range from the National Science and Engineering Research Council's Nano Innovation Platform (www.physics.mcgill.ca/NSERCnanoIP/), provincial initiatives like NanoQuebec (www.NanoQuebec.ca), organizations such as the Canadian Institute of Advanced Research (www.ciar.ca) or the National Institute of Nanotechnology (www.nint.ca) - a joint initiatives between the University of Alberta, the National Research Council (NRC) and the Province of Alberta. University based materials centers such as the Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research in Hamilton, the Institute for Research in Materials in Halifax, the Pacific Center for Advanced Materials and Microstructures in Vancouver or the Strategic Regroupment of University Centers in Advanced Materials in Montreal have strong nano components as has the NRC at various institutes. The 2nd half of the talk will highlight some Canadian research strengths in nano materials, from photonics, energy storage, bio-med to molecular self assembly and paper coatings.

  17. Energetics of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandra Navrotsky; Brian Woodfield; Juliana Boerio-Goates; Frances Hellman

    2005-01-28

    This project, "Energetics of Nanomaterials," represents a three-year collaboration among Alexandra Navrotsky (UC Davis), Brian Woodfield and Juliana Boerio-Goates (BYU), and Frances Hellman (UC Berkeley). It's purpose has been to explore the differences between bulk materials, nanoparticles, and thin films in term of their thermodynamic properties, with an emphasis on heat capaacities and entropies, as well as enthalpies. the three groups have brought very different expertise and capabilities to the project. Navrotsky is a solid-state chemist and geochemist, with a unique Thermochemistry Facility emphasizing enthalpy of formation measurements by high temperature oxide melt and room temperatue acid solution calorimetry. Boerio-Goates and Woodfield are calorimetry. Hellman is a physicist with expertise in magnetism and heat capacity measurements using microscale "detector on a chip" calorimetric technology that she pioneered. The overarching question of our work is "How does the free energy play out in nanoparticles?", or "How do differences in free energy affect overall nanoparticle behavior?" Because the free energy represents the temperature-dependent balance between the enthalpy of a system and its entropy, there are two separate, but related, components to the experimental investigations: Solution calorimetric measurements provide the energetics and two types of heat capacity measurements the entropy. We use materials that are well characterized in other ways (structurally, magnetically, and chemically), and samples are shared across the collaboration.

  18. Probing mechanical principles of cell-nanomaterial interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Huajian

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, various types of nanoparticles, nanowires, nanofibers, nanotubes, and atomically thin plates and sheets have emerged as candidates for an ever increasing list of potential applications for next generation electronics, microchips, composites, barrier coatings, biosensors, drug delivery, and energy harvesting and conversion systems. There is now an urgent societal need to understand both beneficial and hazardous effects of nanotechnology which is projected to produce and release thousands of tons of nanomaterials into the environment in the coming decades. This paper aims to present an overview of some recent studies conducted at Brown University on the mechanics of cell-nanomaterial interactions, including the modeling of nanoparticles entering cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticles interacting with cell membranes. The discussions will be organized around the following questions: Why and how does cellular uptake of nanoparticles depend on particle size, shape, elasticity and surface structure? In particular, we will discuss the effect of nanoparticle size on receptor-mediated endocytosis, the effect of elastic stiffness on cell-particle interactions, how high aspect ratio nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and graphenes enter cells and how different geometrical patterns of ligands on a nanoparticle can be designed to control the rate of particle uptake.

  19. PREFACE: Ultrafast and nonlinear optics in carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Junichiro

    2013-02-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials—single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene, in particular—have emerged in the last decade as novel low-dimensional systems with extraordinary properties. Because they are direct-bandgap systems, SWCNTs are one of the leading candidates to unify electronic and optical functions in nanoscale circuitry; their diameter-dependent bandgaps can be utilized for multi-wavelength devices. Graphene's ultrahigh carrier mobilities are promising for high-frequency electronic devices, while, at the same time, it is predicted to have ideal properties for terahertz generation and detection due to its unique zero-gap, zero-mass band structure. There have been a large number of basic optical studies on these materials, but most of them were performed in the weak-excitation, quasi-equilibrium regime. In order to probe and assess their performance characteristics as optoelectronic materials under device-operating conditions, it is crucial to strongly drive them and examine their optical properties in highly non-equilibrium situations and with ultrashot time resolution. In this section, the reader will find the latest results in this rapidly growing field of research. We have assembled contributions from some of the leading experts in ultrafast and nonlinear optical spectroscopy of carbon-based nanomaterials. Specific topics featured include: thermalization, cooling, and recombination dynamics of photo-generated carriers; stimulated emission, gain, and amplification; ultrafast photoluminescence; coherent phonon dynamics; exciton-phonon and exciton-plasmon interactions; exciton-exciton annihilation and Auger processes; spontaneous and stimulated emission of terahertz radiation; four-wave mixing and harmonic generation; ultrafast photocurrents; the AC Stark and Franz-Keldysh effects; and non-perturbative light-mater coupling. We would like to express our sincere thanks to those who contributed their latest results to this special section, and the

  20. Graphene in therapeutics delivery: Problems, solutions and future opportunities.

    PubMed

    McCallion, Catriona; Burthem, John; Rees-Unwin, Karen; Golovanov, Alexander; Pluen, Alain

    2016-07-01

    Graphene based nanomaterials are being used experimentally to deliver therapeutic agents to cells or tissues both in vitro and in vivo. However, substantial challenges remain before moving to safe and effective use in humans. In particular, it is recognised that graphene molecules undergo complex interactions with solutes, proteins or cellular systems within the body, and that these interactions impact significantly on the behaviour or toxicity of the molecule. Approaches to overcome these problems include modification of the graphene or its combination with other molecules to accentuate favourable characteristics or modify adverse interactions. This has led to an emerging role for graphene as one part of highly-tailored multifunctional delivery vehicles. This review examines the knowledge that underpins present approaches to exploit graphene in therapeutics delivery, discussing both favourable and unfavourable aspects of graphene behaviour in biological systems and how these may be modified; then considers the present place of the molecule and the challenges for its further development. PMID:27113141

  1. The Molecular Influence of Graphene and Graphene Oxide on the Immune System Under In Vitro and In Vivo Conditions.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Ilona; Skoda, Marta; Jarosz, Anna; Szukiewicz, Dariusz

    2016-06-01

    Graphene and graphene oxide (GO), due to their physicochemical properties and biocompatibility, can be used as an innovative biomedical material in biodetection, drug distribution in the body, treating neoplasms, regenerative medicine, and in implant surgery. Research on the biomedical use of graphene and GO that has been carried out until now is very promising and shows that carbon nanomaterials present high biocompatibility. However, the intolerance of the immune system to graphene nanomaterials, however low, may in consequence make it impossible to use them in medicine. This paper shows the specific mechanism of the molecular influence of graphene and GO on macrophages and lymphocytes under in vitro and in vivo conditions and their practical application in medicine. Under in vitro conditions graphene and GO cause an increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, mainly IL-1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, as a result of the activation of Toll-like receptors in macrophages. Graphene activates apoptosis in macrophages through the TGFbr/Smad/Bcl-2 pathway and also through JNK kinases that are stimulated by an increase of ROS in the cell or through a signal received by Smad proteins. Under in vivo conditions, graphene nanomaterials induce the development of the local inflammatory reaction and the development of granulomas in parenchymal organs. However, there is a huge discrepancy between the results obtained by different research groups, which requires a detailed analysis. In this work we decided to collect and analyze existing research and tried to explain the discrepancies. Understanding the precise mechanism of how this nanomaterial influences immune system cells allows estimating the potential influence of grapheme and GO on the human body. PMID:26502273

  2. Carbon nanomaterials: Biologically active fullerene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bogdanović, Gordana; Djordjević, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene attract significant attention of researches in various scientific fields including biomedicine. Nano-scale size and a possibility for diverse surface modifications allow carbon nanoallotropes to become an indispensable nanostructured material in nanotechnologies, including nanomedicine. Manipulation of surface chemistry has created diverse populations of water-soluble derivatives of fullerenes, which exhibit different behaviors. Both non-derivatized and derivatized fullerenes show various biological activities. Cellular processes that underline their toxicity are oxidative, genotoxic, and cytotoxic responses.The antioxidant/cytoprotective properties of fullerenes and derivatives have been considered in the prevention of organ oxidative damage and treatment. The same unique physiochemical properties of nanomaterials may also be associated with potential health hazards. Non-biodegradability and toxicity of carbon nanoparticles still remain a great concern in the area of biomedical application. In this review, we report on basic physical and chemical properties of carbon nano-clusters--fullerenes, nanotubes, and grapheme--their specificities, activities, and potential application in biological systems. Special emphasis is given to our most important results obtained in vitro and in vivo using polyhydroxylated fullerene derivative C₆₀(OH)₂₄. PMID:27483572

  3. Mass spectrometry imaging reveals the sub-organ distribution of carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Suming; Xiong, Caiqiao; Liu, Huihui; Wan, Qiongqiong; Hou, Jian; He, Qing; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham; Nie, Zongxiu

    2015-02-01

    Label and label-free methods to image carbon-based nanomaterials exist. However, label-based approaches are limited by the risk of tag detachment over time, and label-free spectroscopic methods have slow imaging speeds, weak photoluminescence signals and strong backgrounds. Here, we present a label-free mass spectrometry imaging method to detect carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide and carbon nanodots in mice. The large molecular weights of nanoparticles are difficult to detect using conventional mass spectrometers, but our method overcomes this problem by using the intrinsic carbon cluster fingerprint signal of the nanomaterials. We mapped and quantified the sub-organ distribution of the nanomaterials in mice. Our results showed that most carbon nanotubes and nanodots were found in the outer parenchyma of the kidney, and all three materials were seen in the red pulp of the spleen. The highest concentrations of nanotubes in the spleen were found within the marginal zone.

  4. Photoinduced toxicity of engineered nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Philip Scott

    Engineered nanomaterials including metal, metal oxide and carbon based nanomaterials are extensively used in a wide variety of applications to the extent that their presence in the environment is expected to increase dramatically over the next century. These nanomaterials may be photodegraded by solar radiation and thereby release metal ions into the environment that can produce cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. Photoinduced toxicity experiments are performed exposing human lung epithelial carcinoma cells [H1650] to engineered semiconductor nanoparticles such as CdSe quantum dots and ZnO nanoparticles after exposure to 3, 6, and 9 hours of solar simulated radiation. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the metal ions are evaluated using ZnSO4 and CdCl2 solutions for the MTT assay and Comet assay respectively. The objective of the dissertation is to obtain quantitative information about the environmental transformation of engineered nanomaterials and their mechanism of toxicity. This information is critical for addressing the environmental health and safety risks of engineered nanomaterials to workers, consumers and the environment.

  5. Health hazards associated with nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Pattan, Gurulingappa; Kaul, Gautam

    2014-07-01

    Nanotechnology is a major scientific and economic growth area and presents a variety of hazards for human health and environment. It is widely believed that engineered nanomaterials will be increasingly used in biomedical applications (as therapeutics and as diagnostic tools). However, before these novel materials can be safely applied in a clinical setting, their toxicity needs to be carefully assessed. Nanoscale materials often behave different from the materials with a larger structure, even when the basic material is same. Many mammals get exposed to these nanomaterials, which can reach almost every cell of the mammalian body, causing the cells to respond against nanoparticles (NPs) resulting in cytotoxicity and/or genotoxicity. The important key to understand the toxicity of nanomaterials is that their minute size, smaller than cellular organelles, allows them to penetrate the basic biological structures, disrupting their normal function. There is a wealth of evidence for the noxious and harmful effects of engineered NPs as well as other nanomaterials. The rapid commercialization of nanotechnology field requires thoughtful, attentive environmental, animal and human health safety research and should be an open discussion for broader societal impacts and urgent toxicological oversight action. While 'nanotoxicity' is a relatively new concept to science, this comprehensive review focuses on the nanomaterials exposure through the skin, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract and their mechanism of toxicity and effect on various organs of the body. PMID:23012342

  6. Substrate-Sensitive Graphene Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuhua; Yin, Jun; Liu, Xiaofei; Li, Jidong; Zhang, Jiahuan; Guo, Wanlin

    2016-03-01

    The inertness of graphene toward reaction with ambient molecules is essential for realizing durable devices with stable performance. Many device applications require graphene to contact with substrates, but whose impact on the chemical property of graphene has been largely overlooked. Here, we combine comprehensive first-principles analyses with experiments to show that graphene oxidation is highly sensitive to substrates. Graphene remains inert on SiO2 and hexagonal boron nitride but becomes increasingly weak against oxidation on metal substrates because of enhanced charge transfer and chemical interaction between them. In particular, Ni and Co substrates lead to spontaneous oxidation of graphene, while a Cu substrate maximally promotes the oxygen diffusion on graphene, with an estimated diffusivity 13 orders of magnitude higher than that on freestanding graphene. Bilayer graphene is revealed to have high oxidation resistance independent of substrate and thus is a better choice for high-performance nanoelectronics. Our findings should be extendable to a wide spectrum of chemical functionalizations of two-dimensional materials mediated by substrates. PMID:26884318

  7. Editorial: Functional nanomaterials for energy applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Devan, Rupesh S.; Ma, Yuan -Ron; Kim, Jin -Hyeok; Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Ghosh, Kartik C.

    2015-02-16

    In order to leap forward from the energy crisis issues and improve lifestyle, we all are looking positively toward nanomaterials or nanostructures. Thus, the exploration of new features of both typical and novel materials at the nanoscale level is playing important role in the development of innovative and improved energy technologies that have the capability of conserve/convert energy at large extend. By tailoring the surface morphology of materials in its nanoforms, the functional properties can be significantly adapted and specifically combined to produce highly potent multifunctional materials for conversion, storage, and consumption of energy in various forms. The papers selectedmore » for this special issue represent a good panel for addressing various energy applications including solar cell, fuel cells, nanofluid twisters, and gas sensors. Of course, the selected topic and the papers are not an exhaustive representation of the utilization of functional nanomaterials for energy applications. Nevertheless, they represent the rich and many-facet knowledge, which we have the pleasure of sharing with the readers.« less

  8. NEIMiner: nanomaterial environmental impact data miner.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kaizhi; Liu, Xiong; Harper, Stacey L; Steevens, Jeffery A; Xu, Roger

    2013-01-01

    As more engineered nanomaterials (eNM) are developed for a wide range of applications, it is crucial to minimize any unintended environmental impacts resulting from the application of eNM. To realize this vision, industry and policymakers must base risk management decisions on sound scientific information about the environmental fate of eNM, their availability to receptor organisms (eg, uptake), and any resultant biological effects (eg, toxicity). To address this critical need, we developed a model-driven, data mining system called NEIMiner, to study nanomaterial environmental impact (NEI). NEIMiner consists of four components: NEI modeling framework, data integration, data management and access, and model building. The NEI modeling framework defines the scope of NEI modeling and the strategy of integrating NEI models to form a layered, comprehensive predictability. The data integration layer brings together heterogeneous data sources related to NEI via automatic web services and web scraping technologies. The data management and access layer reuses and extends a popular content management system (CMS), Drupal, and consists of modules that model the complex data structure for NEI-related bibliography and characterization data. The model building layer provides an advanced analysis capability for NEI data. Together, these components provide significant value to the process of aggregating and analyzing large-scale distributed NEI data. A prototype of the NEIMiner system is available at http://neiminer.i-a-i.com/. PMID:24098076

  9. NEIMiner: nanomaterial environmental impact data miner

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kaizhi; Liu, Xiong; Harper, Stacey L; Steevens, Jeffery A; Xu, Roger

    2013-01-01

    As more engineered nanomaterials (eNM) are developed for a wide range of applications, it is crucial to minimize any unintended environmental impacts resulting from the application of eNM. To realize this vision, industry and policymakers must base risk management decisions on sound scientific information about the environmental fate of eNM, their availability to receptor organisms (eg, uptake), and any resultant biological effects (eg, toxicity). To address this critical need, we developed a model-driven, data mining system called NEIMiner, to study nanomaterial environmental impact (NEI). NEIMiner consists of four components: NEI modeling framework, data integration, data management and access, and model building. The NEI modeling framework defines the scope of NEI modeling and the strategy of integrating NEI models to form a layered, comprehensive predictability. The data integration layer brings together heterogeneous data sources related to NEI via automatic web services and web scraping technologies. The data management and access layer reuses and extends a popular content management system (CMS), Drupal, and consists of modules that model the complex data structure for NEI-related bibliography and characterization data. The model building layer provides an advanced analysis capability for NEI data. Together, these components provide significant value to the process of aggregating and analyzing large-scale distributed NEI data. A prototype of the NEIMiner system is available at http://neiminer.i-a-i.com/. PMID:24098076

  10. Editorial: Functional nanomaterials for energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Devan, Rupesh S.; Ma, Yuan -Ron; Kim, Jin -Hyeok; Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Ghosh, Kartik C.

    2015-02-16

    In order to leap forward from the energy crisis issues and improve lifestyle, we all are looking positively toward nanomaterials or nanostructures. Thus, the exploration of new features of both typical and novel materials at the nanoscale level is playing important role in the development of innovative and improved energy technologies that have the capability of conserve/convert energy at large extend. By tailoring the surface morphology of materials in its nanoforms, the functional properties can be significantly adapted and specifically combined to produce highly potent multifunctional materials for conversion, storage, and consumption of energy in various forms. The papers selected for this special issue represent a good panel for addressing various energy applications including solar cell, fuel cells, nanofluid twisters, and gas sensors. Of course, the selected topic and the papers are not an exhaustive representation of the utilization of functional nanomaterials for energy applications. Nevertheless, they represent the rich and many-facet knowledge, which we have the pleasure of sharing with the readers.

  11. Carbon Nanomaterials Based Electrochemical Sensors/Biosensors for the Sensitive Detection of Pharmaceutical and Biological Compounds.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Bal-Ram; Govindhan, Maduraiveeran; Chen, Aicheng

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical sensors and biosensors have attracted considerable attention for the sensitive detection of a variety of biological and pharmaceutical compounds. Since the discovery of carbon-based nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes, C60 and graphene, they have garnered tremendous interest for their potential in the design of high-performance electrochemical sensor platforms due to their exceptional thermal, mechanical, electronic, and catalytic properties. Carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors have been employed for the detection of various analytes with rapid electron transfer kinetics. This feature article focuses on the recent design and use of carbon nanomaterials, primarily single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (rGO), SWCNTs-rGO, Au nanoparticle-rGO nanocomposites, and buckypaper as sensing materials for the electrochemical detection of some representative biological and pharmaceutical compounds such as methylglyoxal, acetaminophen, valacyclovir, β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrate (NADH), and glucose. Furthermore, the electrochemical performance of SWCNTs, rGO, and SWCNT-rGO for the detection of acetaminophen and valacyclovir was comparatively studied, revealing that SWCNT-rGO nanocomposites possess excellent electrocatalytic activity in comparison to individual SWCNT and rGO platforms. The sensitive, reliable and rapid analysis of critical disease biomarkers and globally emerging pharmaceutical compounds at carbon nanomaterials based electrochemical sensor platforms may enable an extensive range of applications in preemptive medical diagnostics. PMID:26404304

  12. Carbon Nanomaterials Based Electrochemical Sensors/Biosensors for the Sensitive Detection of Pharmaceutical and Biological Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Bal-Ram; Govindhan, Maduraiveeran; Chen, Aicheng

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical sensors and biosensors have attracted considerable attention for the sensitive detection of a variety of biological and pharmaceutical compounds. Since the discovery of carbon-based nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes, C60 and graphene, they have garnered tremendous interest for their potential in the design of high-performance electrochemical sensor platforms due to their exceptional thermal, mechanical, electronic, and catalytic properties. Carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors have been employed for the detection of various analytes with rapid electron transfer kinetics. This feature article focuses on the recent design and use of carbon nanomaterials, primarily single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (rGO), SWCNTs-rGO, Au nanoparticle-rGO nanocomposites, and buckypaper as sensing materials for the electrochemical detection of some representative biological and pharmaceutical compounds such as methylglyoxal, acetaminophen, valacyclovir, β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrate (NADH), and glucose. Furthermore, the electrochemical performance of SWCNTs, rGO, and SWCNT-rGO for the detection of acetaminophen and valacyclovir was comparatively studied, revealing that SWCNT-rGO nanocomposites possess excellent electrocatalytic activity in comparison to individual SWCNT and rGO platforms. The sensitive, reliable and rapid analysis of critical disease biomarkers and globally emerging pharmaceutical compounds at carbon nanomaterials based electrochemical sensor platforms may enable an extensive range of applications in preemptive medical diagnostics. PMID:26404304

  13. Chemically reduced graphene contains inherent metallic impurities present in parent natural and synthetic graphite

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Chua, Chun Kiang; Khezri, Bahareh; Sofer, Zdeněk; Webster, Richard D.; Pumera, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Graphene-related materials are in the forefront of nanomaterial research. One of the most common ways to prepare graphenes is to oxidize graphite (natural or synthetic) to graphite oxide and exfoliate it to graphene oxide with consequent chemical reduction to chemically reduced graphene. Here, we show that both natural and synthetic graphite contain a large amount of metallic impurities that persist in the samples of graphite oxide after the oxidative treatment, and chemically reduced graphene after the chemical reduction. We demonstrate that, despite a substantial elimination during the oxidative treatment of graphite samples, a significant amount of impurities associated to the chemically reduced graphene materials still remain and alter their electrochemical properties dramatically. We propose a method for the purification of graphenes based on thermal treatment at 1,000 °C in chlorine atmosphere to reduce the effect of such impurities on the electrochemical properties. Our findings have important implications on the whole field of graphene research. PMID:22826262

  14. Synthesis and cyto-genotoxicity evaluation of graphene on mice spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Ehsan; Akhavan, Omid; Shamsara, Mehdi; Daliri, Morteza; Dashtizad, Mojtaba; Farmany, Abbas

    2016-10-01

    The present study analyzed the dose-dependent cyto- and genotoxicity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide on spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) for the first time. The results showed that graphene oxide significantly increased oxidative stress at concentrations of 100 and 400μg/ml, while low concentrations did not have a significant effect. In addition, according to the MTT assay, the cell number decreased in high-concentration (100 and 400μg/ml) graphene oxide-treated samples compared to untreated cells. However, a reduced graphene-treated sample demonstrated a significant increase in cell number. Moreover, microscopic analysis found high concentrations of graphene nanosheets in cell culture medium that reduced the number of colonies and colony forming cells. We conclude that a high concentration of graphene can be toxic to SSCs. However, such toxicity can be reduced by the surface modification of graphene nanomaterials. PMID:27451364

  15. Nanomaterials for rechargeable lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Peter G; Scrosati, Bruno; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2008-01-01

    Energy storage is more important today than at any time in human history. Future generations of rechargeable lithium batteries are required to power portable electronic devices (cellphones, laptop computers etc.), store electricity from renewable sources, and as a vital component in new hybrid electric vehicles. To achieve the increase in energy and power density essential to meet the future challenges of energy storage, new materials chemistry, and especially new nanomaterials chemistry, is essential. We must find ways of synthesizing new nanomaterials with new properties or combinations of properties, for use as electrodes and electrolytes in lithium batteries. Herein we review some of the recent scientific advances in nanomaterials, and especially in nanostructured materials, for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. PMID:18338357

  16. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-08-19

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  17. NANOMATERIALS, NANOTECHNOLOGY: APPLICATIONS, CONSUMER PRODUCTS, AND BENEFITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanotechnology is a platform technology that is finding more and more applications daily. Today over 600 consumer products are available globally that utilize nanomaterials. This chapter explores the use of nanomaterials and nanotechnology in three areas, namely Medicine, Environ...

  18. Cellular Stress Responses Elicited by Engineered Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered nanomaterials are being incorporated continuously into consumer products, resulting in increased human exposures. The study of engineered nanomaterials has focused largely on oxidative stress and inflammation endpoints without further investigation of underlying pathwa...

  19. Toxicity of Graphene Shells, Graphene Oxide, and Graphene Oxide Paper Evaluated with Escherichia coli Biotests

    PubMed Central

    Efremova, Ludmila V.; Vasilchenko, Alexey S.; Rakov, Eduard G.; Deryabin, Dmitry G.

    2015-01-01

    The plate-like graphene shells (GS) produced by an original methane pyrolysis method and their derivatives graphene oxide (GO) and graphene oxide paper (GO-P) were evaluated with luminescent Escherichia coli biotests and additional bacterial-based assays which together revealed the graphene-family nanomaterials' toxicity and bioactivity mechanisms. Bioluminescence inhibition assay, fluorescent two-component staining to evaluate cell membrane permeability, and atomic force microscopy data showed GO expressed bioactivity in aqueous suspension, whereas GS suspensions and the GO-P surface were assessed as nontoxic materials. The mechanism of toxicity of GO was shown not to be associated with oxidative stress in the targeted soxS::lux and katG::lux reporter cells; also, GO did not lead to significant mechanical disruption of treated bacteria with the release of intracellular DNA contents into the environment. The well-coordinated time- and dose-dependent surface charge neutralization and transport and energetic disorders in the Escherichia coli cells suggest direct membrane interaction, internalization, and perturbation (i.e., “membrane stress”) as a clue to graphene oxide's mechanism of toxicity. PMID:26221608

  20. Toxicity of Graphene Shells, Graphene Oxide, and Graphene Oxide Paper Evaluated with Escherichia coli Biotests.

    PubMed

    Efremova, Ludmila V; Vasilchenko, Alexey S; Rakov, Eduard G; Deryabin, Dmitry G

    2015-01-01

    The plate-like graphene shells (GS) produced by an original methane pyrolysis method and their derivatives graphene oxide (GO) and graphene oxide paper (GO-P) were evaluated with luminescent Escherichia coli biotests and additional bacterial-based assays which together revealed the graphene-family nanomaterials' toxicity and bioactivity mechanisms. Bioluminescence inhibition assay, fluorescent two-component staining to evaluate cell membrane permeability, and atomic force microscopy data showed GO expressed bioactivity in aqueous suspension, whereas GS suspensions and the GO-P surface were assessed as nontoxic materials. The mechanism of toxicity of GO was shown not to be associated with oxidative stress in the targeted soxS::lux and katG::lux reporter cells; also, GO did not lead to significant mechanical disruption of treated bacteria with the release of intracellular DNA contents into the environment. The well-coordinated time- and dose-dependent surface charge neutralization and transport and energetic disorders in the Escherichia coli cells suggest direct membrane interaction, internalization, and perturbation (i.e., "membrane stress") as a clue to graphene oxide's mechanism of toxicity. PMID:26221608

  1. EDITORIAL: Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-08-01

    A little stress or strain has been known to improve the performance of athletes, actors and of course nanomaterials alike. In fact strain in silicon is now a major engineering tool for improving the performance of devices, and is ubiquitously used in device design and fabrication. Strain engineering alters a material's band structure, a model of electron behaviour that describes how as atoms come together in a solid, their discrete electron orbitals overlap to ultimately give rise to bands of allowed energy levels. In a strained crystal lattice of silicon or silicon germanium the distance between atoms in the lattice is greater than usual and the bands of allowed energy levels change. This July marks 100 years since Bohr submitted his paper 'On the constitution of atoms and molecules' [1] where he describes the structure of the atom in terms of discrete allowed energy levels. The paper was a seminal contribution to the development of quantum mechanics and laid the initial theoretical precepts for band gap engineering in devices. In this issue Nrauda and a collaboration of researchers in Europe and Australia study the growth of defect-free SiGe islands on pre-patterned silicon [2]. They analyse the strain in the islands and determine at what point lattice dislocations set in with a view to informing implementation of strain engineering in devices. The effects of strain on band structure in silicon and germanium were already studied and reported in the 1950s [3, 4]. Since then the increasing focus on nanoscale materials and the hunger for control of electronic properties has prompted further study of strain effects. The increased surface area to volume ratio in nanostructures changes the strain behaviour with respect to bulk materials, and this can also be exploited for handling and fine tuning strain to manipulate material properties. It is perhaps no surprise that graphene, one of the most high-profile materials in current nanotechnology research, has attracted

  2. Carbon Nanomaterials and DNA: from Molecular Recognition to Applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hanjun; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-03-15

    DNA is polymorphic. Increasing evidence has indicated that many biologically important processes are related to DNA's conformational transition and assembly states. In particular, noncanonical DNA structures, such as the right-handed A-form, the left-handed Z-form, the triplex, the G-quadruplex, the i-motif, and so forth, have been specific targets for the diagnosis and therapy of human diseases. Meanwhile, they have been widely used in the construction of smart DNA nanomaterials and nanoarchitectures. As rising stars in materials science, the family of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), including two-dimensional graphene, one-dimensional carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and zero-dimensional graphene or carbon quantum dots (GQDs or CQDs), interact with DNA and are able to regulate the conformational transitions of DNA. The interaction of DNA with CNMs not only opens new opportunities for specific molecular recognition, but it also expands the promising applications of CNMs from materials science to biotechnology and biomedicine. In this Account, we focus on our contributions to the field of interactions between CNMs and DNA in which we have explored their promising applications in nanodevices, sensing, materials synthesis, and biomedicine. For one-dimensional CNTs, two-dimensional graphene, and zero-dimensional GQDs and CQDs, the basic principles, binding modes, and applications of the interactions between CNMs and DNA are reviewed. We aim to give prominence to the important status of CNMs in the field of molecular recognition for DNA. First, we summarized our discovery of the interactions between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with duplex, triplex, and human telomeric i-motif DNA and their interesting applications. For example, SWNTs are the first chemical agents that can selectively stabilize human telomeric i-motif DNA and induce its formation under physiological conditions. On the basis of this principle, two types of nanodevices were designed. One was used for

  3. Exoelectron Emission of a Carbon Nanomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortov, V. S.; Slesarev, A. I.; Tkachev, A. G.

    2008-03-01

    The exoemission properties of a Taunite carbon nanomaterial consisting of nanosized multiwalled nanotubes and nanofibers were investigated by thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE). The TSEE spectra of the carbon nanomaterial differed from the spectra of pressed graphite. It was assumed that defect—adsorbate complexes were emission-active centers on the surface of the nanomaterial

  4. Graphene oxide assisted synthesis of GaN nanostructures for reducing cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rong; Zhang, Ying; Li, Jingying; Han, Qiusen; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Chao; Yang, Yanlian; Dong, Hongwei; Wang, Chen

    2013-10-01

    We report a general approach for the synthesis of large-scale gallium nitride (GaN) nanostructures by the graphene oxide (GO) assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. A modulation effect of GaN nanostructures on cell adhesion has been observed. The morphology of the GaN surface can be controlled by GO concentrations. This approach, which is based on the predictable choice of the ratio of GO to catalysts, can be readily extended to the synthesis of other materials with controllable nanostructures. Cell studies show that GaN nanostructures reduced cell adhesion significantly compared to GaN flat surfaces. The cell-repelling property is related to the nanostructure and surface wettability. These observations of the modulation effect on cell behaviors suggest new opportunities for novel GaN nanomaterial-based biomedical devices. We believe that potential applications will emerge in the biomedical and biotechnological fields.We report a general approach for the synthesis of large-scale gallium nitride (GaN) nanostructures by the graphene oxide (GO) assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. A modulation effect of GaN nanostructures on cell adhesion has been observed. The morphology of the GaN surface can be controlled by GO concentrations. This approach, which is based on the predictable choice of the ratio of GO to catalysts, can be readily extended to the synthesis of other materials with controllable nanostructures. Cell studies show that GaN nanostructures reduced cell adhesion significantly compared to GaN flat surfaces. The cell-repelling property is related to the nanostructure and surface wettability. These observations of the modulation effect on cell behaviors suggest new opportunities for novel GaN nanomaterial-based biomedical devices. We believe that potential applications will emerge in the biomedical and biotechnological fields. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02770h

  5. Graphene aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pauzauskie, Peter J; Worsley, Marcus A; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Biener, Juergen

    2015-03-31

    Graphene aerogels with high conductivity and surface areas including a method for making a graphene aerogel, including the following steps: (1) preparing a reaction mixture comprising a graphene oxide suspension and at least one catalyst; (2) curing the reaction mixture to produce a wet gel; (3) drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel; and (4) pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce a graphene aerogel. Applications include electrical energy storage including batteries and supercapacitors.

  6. Chiral Graphene Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nozomu; Wang, Yichun; Elvati, Paolo; Qu, Zhi-Bei; Kim, Kyoungwon; Jiang, Shuang; Baumeister, Elizabeth; Lee, Jaewook; Yeom, Bongjun; Bahng, Joong Hwan; Lee, Jaebeom; Violi, Angela; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2016-02-23

    Chiral nanostructures from metals and semiconductors attract wide interest as components for polarization-enabled optoelectronic devices. Similarly to other fields of nanotechnology, graphene-based materials can greatly enrich physical and chemical phenomena associated with optical and electronic properties of chiral nanostructures and facilitate their applications in biology as well as other areas. Here, we report that covalent attachment of l/d-cysteine moieties to the edges of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) leads to their helical buckling due to chiral interactions at the "crowded" edges. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra of the GQDs revealed bands at ca. 210-220 and 250-265 nm that changed their signs for different chirality of the cysteine edge ligands. The high-energy chiroptical peaks at 210-220 nm correspond to the hybridized molecular orbitals involving the chiral center of amino acids and atoms of graphene edges. Diverse experimental and modeling data, including density functional theory calculations of CD spectra with probabilistic distribution of GQD isomers, indicate that the band at 250-265 nm originates from the three-dimensional twisting of the graphene sheet and can be attributed to the chiral excitonic transitions. The positive and negative low-energy CD bands correspond to the left and right helicity of GQDs, respectively. Exposure of liver HepG2 cells to L/D-GQDs reveals their general biocompatibility and a noticeable difference in the toxicity of the stereoisomers. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that d-GQDs have a stronger tendency to accumulate within the cellular membrane than L-GQDs. Emergence of nanoscale chirality in GQDs decorated with biomolecules is expected to be a general stereochemical phenomenon for flexible sheets of nanomaterials. PMID:26743467

  7. Structure of graphene oxide dispersed with ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Rishikesh Pandey, Devendra K.; Khare, P. S.

    2014-10-15

    Graphene has been proposed as a promising two-dimensional nanomaterial with outstanding electronic, optical, thermal and mechanical properties for many applications. In present work a process of dispersion of graphene oxide with ZnO nanoparticles in ethanol solution with different pH values, have been studied. Samples have been characterized by XRD, SEM, PL, UV-visible spectroscopy and particles size measurement. The results analysis indicates overall improved emission spectrum. It has been observed that the average diameter of RGO (Reduced Graphene Oxide) decreases in presence of ZnO nanoparticles from 3.8μm to 0.41μm.

  8. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis of Two-Dimensional Nanomaterials Undergoes Flat Vesiculation and Occurs by Revolution and Self-Rotation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Chen, Pengyu; Liang, Junshi; Guo, Ruohai; Yan, Li-Tang

    2016-01-26

    Two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene and transitional metal dichalcogenide nanosheets, are promising materials for the development of antimicrobial surfaces and the nanocarriers for intracellular therapy. Understanding cell interaction with these emerging materials is an urgently important issue to promoting their wide applications. Experimental studies suggest that two-dimensional nanomaterials enter cells mainly through receptor-mediated endocytosis. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms and kinetic pathways of such processes remain unknown. Here, we combine computer simulations and theoretical derivation of the energy within the system to show that the receptor-mediated transport of two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene nanosheet across model lipid membrane, experiences a flat vesiculation event governed by the receptor density and membrane tension. The graphene nanosheet is found to undergo revolution relative to the membrane and, particularly, unique self-rotation around its normal during membrane wrapping. We derive explicit expressions for the formation of the flat vesiculation, which reveals that the flat vesiculation event can be fundamentally dominated by a dimensionless parameter and a defined relationship determined by complicated energy contributions. The mechanism offers an essential understanding on the cellular internalization and cytotoxicity of the emerging two-dimensional nanomaterials. PMID:26741298

  9. Volatile-nanoparticle-assisted optical visualization of individual carbon nanotubes and other nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Muqiang; Xie, Huanhuan; Wang, Qi; Xia, Kailun; Yin, Zhe; Zhang, Mingyu; Deng, Ningqin; Wang, Luning; Ren, Tianling; Zhang, Yingying

    2016-07-01

    The development of nanomaterials has put forward high requirements for characterization techniques. Optical microscopy (OM), with easy accessibility and open operating spaces as compared to scanning electron microscopy, is a good choice to quickly locate materials and to be integrated with other equipment. However, OM is limited by its low resolution. Herein, we present a facile and non-destructive approach for optical observation of nanomaterials under conventional OMs with the aid of volatile nanoparticles (NPs), which can be deposited and removed in a controlled manner. The NPs deposited on the surface of nanomaterials render strong light scattering to enable the nanomaterials to become optically visible. For example, this approach enables the observation of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with OMs at low magnification or even with the naked eye. Both supported CNTs on various substrates and suspended CNTs can be observed with this approach. Most importantly, the NPs can be completely removed through moderate heat treatment or laser irradiation, avoiding potential influence on the properties or subsequent applications of nanomaterials. Furthermore, we systematically investigate the deposition of various volatile NPs (up to 14 kinds) for the optical observation of nanomaterials. We also demonstrated the application of this approach on other nanomaterials, including nanowires and graphene. We showed that this approach is facile, controllable, non-destructive, and contamination-free, indicating wide potential applications.The development of nanomaterials has put forward high requirements for characterization techniques. Optical microscopy (OM), with easy accessibility and open operating spaces as compared to scanning electron microscopy, is a good choice to quickly locate materials and to be integrated with other equipment. However, OM is limited by its low resolution. Herein, we present a facile and non-destructive approach for optical observation of

  10. High-sensitivity extended-gate field-effect transistors as pH sensors with oxygen-modified reduced graphene oxide films coated on different reverse-pyramid silicon structures as sensing heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Ren; Chang, Shih-hsueh; Chang, Chia-Tsung; Tsai, Wan-Lin; Chiu, Yu-Kai; Yang, Po-Yu; Cheng, Huang-Chung

    2016-04-01

    A high-performance extended-gate field-effect transistor (EGFET) as pH sensor with its microstructured sensing head composed of an oxygen-modified reduced graphene oxide film (RGOF) on a reverse-pyramid (RP) Si structure was developed to achieve a high sensitivity of 57.5 mV/pH with an excellent linearity of 0.9929 in a wide pH sensing range of 1-13. These features were ascribed to the large amount of sensing sites and large sensing area. In contrast, the planar Si substrate with the oxygen-plasma-treated RGOF (OPT-RGOF) at the optimal bias power showed a sensitivity of 52.9 mV/pH compared with 45.0 mV/pH for that without plasma treatment. It reveals that oxygen plasma can produce oxygen-containing groups as sensing sites, enhancing proton sensing characteristics. However, oxygen plasma treatment at high bias powers would cause damage to the RGOFs, resulting in poor conducting and sensing properties. On the other hand, the use of the RP structures could increase the effective sensing area and further promote the sensing performance.