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Sample records for extended phenotypes structure

  1. Allelic variants of the amylose extender mutation of maize demonstrate phenotypic variation in starch structure resulting from modified protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fushan; Ahmed, Zaheer; Lee, Elizabeth A.; Donner, Elizabeth; Liu, Qiang; Ahmed, Regina; Morell, Matthew K.; Emes, Michael J.; Tetlow, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    amylose extender (ae−) starches characteristically have modified starch granule morphology resulting from amylopectin with reduced branch frequency and longer glucan chains in clusters, caused by the loss of activity of the major starch branching enzyme (SBE), which in maize endosperm is SBEIIb. A recent study with ae− maize lacking the SBEIIb protein (termed ae1.1 herein) showed that novel protein–protein interactions between enzymes of starch biosynthesis in the amyloplast could explain the starch phenotype of the ae1.1 mutant. The present study examined an allelic variant of the ae− mutation, ae1.2, which expresses a catalytically inactive form of SBEIIb. The catalytically inactive SBEIIb in ae1.2 lacks a 28 amino acid peptide (Val272–Pro299) and is unable to bind to amylopectin. Analysis of starch from ae1.2 revealed altered granule morphology and physicochemical characteristics distinct from those of the ae1.1 mutant as well as the wild-type, including altered apparent amylose content and gelatinization properties. Starch from ae1.2 had fewer intermediate length glucan chains (degree of polymerization 16–20) than ae1.1. Biochemical analysis of ae1.2 showed that there were differences in the organization and assembly of protein complexes of starch biosynthetic enzymes in comparison with ae1.1 (and wild-type) amyloplasts, which were also reflected in the composition of starch granule-bound proteins. The formation of stromal protein complexes in the wild-type and ae1.2 was strongly enhanced by ATP, and broken by phosphatase treatment, indicating a role for protein phosphorylation in their assembly. Labelling experiments with [γ-32P]ATP showed that the inactive form of SBEIIb in ae1.2 was phosphorylated, both in the monomeric form and in association with starch synthase isoforms. Although the inactive SBEIIb was unable to bind starch directly, it was strongly associated with the starch granule, reinforcing the conclusion that its presence in the

  2. Could the Extended Phenotype Extend to the Cellular and Subcellular Levels in Insect-Induced Galls?

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Renê Gonçalves da Silva; Pacheco, Priscilla; Isaias, Rosy Mary dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Neo-ontogenesis of plant galls involves redifferentiation of host plant tissues to express new phenotypes, when new cell properties are established via structural-functional remodeling. Herein, Psidium cattleianum leaves and Nothotrioza cattleiani galls are analyzed by developmental anatomy, cytometry and immunocytochemistry of cell walls. We address hypothesis-driven questions concerning the organogenesis of globoid galls in the association of P. cattleianum - N. cattleianum, and P. myrtoides - N. myrtoidis. These double co-generic systems represent good models for comparing final gall shapes and cell lineages functionalities under the perspective of convergent plant-dependent or divergent insect-induced characteristics. Gall induction, and growth and development are similar in both galls, but homologous cell lineages exhibit divergent degrees of cell hypertrophy and directions of elongation. Median cortical cells in P. cattleianum galls hypertrophy the most, while in P. myrtoides galls there is a centrifugal gradient of cell hypertrophy. Cortical cells in P. cattleianum galls tend to anisotropy, while P. myrtoidis galls have isotropically hypertrophied cells. Immunocytochemistry evidences the chemical identity and functional traits of cell lineages: epidermal cells walls have homogalacturonans (HGAs) and galactans, which confer rigidity to sites of enhanced cell division; oil gland cell walls have arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) that help avoiding cell death; and parenchyma cell walls have HGAs, galactans and arabinans, which confer porosity. Variations in such chemical identities are related to specific sites of hypertrophy. Even though the double co-generic models have the same macroscopic phenotype, the globoid morphotype, current analyses indicate that the extended phenotype of N. cattleiani is substantiated by cellular and subcellular specificities. PMID:26053863

  3. The social and ecological costs of an ‘over-extended' phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Sean M.; Hofmann, Hans A.; Kohda, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Extended phenotypes offer a unique opportunity to experimentally manipulate and identify sources of selection acting on traits under natural conditions. The social cichlid fish Neolamprologus multifasciatus builds nests by digging up aquatic snail shells, creating an extended sexual phenotype that is highly amenable to experimental manipulation through addition of extra shells. Here, we find sources of both positive sexual selection and opposing natural selection acting on this trait; augmenting shell nests increases access to mates, but also increases social aggression and predation risk. Increasing the attractiveness of one male also changed social interactions throughout the social network and altered the entire community structure. Manipulated males produced and received more displays from neighbouring females, who also joined augmented male territories at higher rates than unmanipulated groups. However, males in more attractive territories received more aggression from neighbouring males, potentially as a form of social policing. We also detected a significant ecological cost of the ‘over-extended' phenotype; heterospecific predators usurped augmented nests at higher rates, using them as breeding sites and displacing residents. Using these natural experiments, we find that both social and ecological interactions generate clear sources of selection mediating the expression of an extended phenotype in the wild. PMID:26740619

  4. The social and ecological costs of an 'over-extended' phenotype.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Lyndon Alexander; Maguire, Sean M; Hofmann, Hans A; Kohda, Masanori

    2016-01-13

    Extended phenotypes offer a unique opportunity to experimentally manipulate and identify sources of selection acting on traits under natural conditions. The social cichlid fish Neolamprologus multifasciatus builds nests by digging up aquatic snail shells, creating an extended sexual phenotype that is highly amenable to experimental manipulation through addition of extra shells. Here, we find sources of both positive sexual selection and opposing natural selection acting on this trait; augmenting shell nests increases access to mates, but also increases social aggression and predation risk. Increasing the attractiveness of one male also changed social interactions throughout the social network and altered the entire community structure. Manipulated males produced and received more displays from neighbouring females, who also joined augmented male territories at higher rates than unmanipulated groups. However, males in more attractive territories received more aggression from neighbouring males, potentially as a form of social policing. We also detected a significant ecological cost of the 'over-extended' phenotype; heterospecific predators usurped augmented nests at higher rates, using them as breeding sites and displacing residents. Using these natural experiments, we find that both social and ecological interactions generate clear sources of selection mediating the expression of an extended phenotype in the wild. PMID:26740619

  5. Stellar structures in Extended Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, S.; De Laurentis, M.

    2016-09-01

    Stellar structures are investigated by considering the modified Lané-Emden equation coming out from Extended Gravity. In particular, this equation is obtained in the Newtonian limit of f ( R) -gravity by introducing a polytropic relation between the pressure and the density into the modified Poisson equation. The result is an integro-differential equation, which, in the limit f ( R) → R , becomes the standard Lané-Emden equation usually adopted in the stellar theory. We find the radial profiles of gravitational potential by solving for some values of the polytropic index. The solutions are compatible with those coming from General Relativity and could be physically relevant in order to address peculiar and extremely massive objects.

  6. The life of a dead ant: the expression of an adaptive extended phenotype.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Sandra B; Gerritsma, Sylvia; Yusah, Kalsum M; Mayntz, David; Hywel-Jones, Nigel L; Billen, Johan; Boomsma, Jacobus J; Hughes, David P

    2009-09-01

    Specialized parasites are expected to express complex adaptations to their hosts. Manipulation of host behavior is such an adaptation. We studied the fungus Ophiocordyceps unilateralis, a locally specialized parasite of arboreal Camponotus leonardi ants. Ant-infecting Ophiocordyceps are known to make hosts bite onto vegetation before killing them. We show that this represents a fine-tuned fungal adaptation: an extended phenotype. Dead ants were found under leaves, attached by their mandibles, on the northern side of saplings approximately 25 cm above the soil, where temperature and humidity conditions were optimal for fungal growth. Experimental relocation confirmed that parasite fitness was lower outside this manipulative zone. Host resources were rapidly colonized and further secured by extensive internal structuring. Nutritional composition analysis indicated that such structuring allows the parasite to produce a large fruiting body for spore production. Our findings suggest that the osmotrophic lifestyle of fungi may have facilitated novel exploitation strategies. PMID:19627240

  7. Pathophysiology of protein aggregation and extended phenotyping in filaminopathy.

    PubMed

    Kley, Rudolf A; Serdaroglu-Oflazer, Piraye; Leber, Yvonne; Odgerel, Zagaa; van der Ven, Peter F M; Olivé, Montse; Ferrer, Isidro; Onipe, Adekunle; Mihaylov, Mariya; Bilbao, Juan M; Lee, Hee S; Höhfeld, Jörg; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Kong, Kester; Tegenthoff, Martin; Peters, Sören A; Stenzel, Werner; Vorgerd, Matthias; Goldfarb, Lev G; Fürst, Dieter O

    2012-09-01

    Mutations in FLNC cause two distinct types of myopathy. Disease associated with mutations in filamin C rod domain leading to expression of a toxic protein presents with progressive proximal muscle weakness and shows focal destructive lesions of polymorphous aggregates containing desmin, myotilin and other proteins in the affected myofibres; these features correspond to the profile of myofibrillar myopathy. The second variant associated with mutations in the actin-binding domain of filamin C is characterized by weakness of distal muscles and morphologically by non-specific myopathic features. A frameshift mutation in the filamin C rod domain causing haploinsufficiency was also found responsible for distal myopathy with some myofibrillar changes but no protein aggregation typical of myofibrillar myopathies. Controversial data accumulating in the literature require re-evaluation and comparative analysis of phenotypes associated with the position of the FLNC mutation and investigation of the underlying disease mechanisms. This is relevant and necessary for the refinement of diagnostic criteria and developing therapeutic approaches. We identified a p.W2710X mutation in families originating from ethnically diverse populations and re-evaluated a family with a p.V930_T933del mutation. Analysis of the expanded database allows us to refine clinical and myopathological characteristics of myofibrillar myopathy caused by mutations in the rod domain of filamin C. Biophysical and biochemical studies indicate that certain pathogenic mutations in FLNC cause protein misfolding, which triggers aggregation of the mutant filamin C protein and subsequently involves several other proteins. Immunofluorescence analyses using markers for the ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy reveal that the affected muscle fibres react to protein aggregate formation with a highly increased expression of chaperones and proteins involved in proteasomal protein degradation and autophagy. However, there

  8. Pathophysiology of protein aggregation and extended phenotyping in filaminopathy

    PubMed Central

    Serdaroglu-Oflazer, Piraye; Leber, Yvonne; Odgerel, Zagaa; van der Ven, Peter F. M.; Olivé, Montse; Ferrer, Isidro; Onipe, Adekunle; Mihaylov, Mariya; Bilbao, Juan M.; Lee, Hee S.; Höhfeld, Jörg; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Kong, Kester; Tegenthoff, Martin; Peters, Sören A.; Stenzel, Werner; Vorgerd, Matthias; Goldfarb, Lev G.; Fürst, Dieter O.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in FLNC cause two distinct types of myopathy. Disease associated with mutations in filamin C rod domain leading to expression of a toxic protein presents with progressive proximal muscle weakness and shows focal destructive lesions of polymorphous aggregates containing desmin, myotilin and other proteins in the affected myofibres; these features correspond to the profile of myofibrillar myopathy. The second variant associated with mutations in the actin-binding domain of filamin C is characterized by weakness of distal muscles and morphologically by non-specific myopathic features. A frameshift mutation in the filamin C rod domain causing haploinsufficiency was also found responsible for distal myopathy with some myofibrillar changes but no protein aggregation typical of myofibrillar myopathies. Controversial data accumulating in the literature require re-evaluation and comparative analysis of phenotypes associated with the position of the FLNC mutation and investigation of the underlying disease mechanisms. This is relevant and necessary for the refinement of diagnostic criteria and developing therapeutic approaches. We identified a p.W2710X mutation in families originating from ethnically diverse populations and re-evaluated a family with a p.V930_T933del mutation. Analysis of the expanded database allows us to refine clinical and myopathological characteristics of myofibrillar myopathy caused by mutations in the rod domain of filamin C. Biophysical and biochemical studies indicate that certain pathogenic mutations in FLNC cause protein misfolding, which triggers aggregation of the mutant filamin C protein and subsequently involves several other proteins. Immunofluorescence analyses using markers for the ubiquitin–proteasome system and autophagy reveal that the affected muscle fibres react to protein aggregate formation with a highly increased expression of chaperones and proteins involved in proteasomal protein degradation and autophagy. However

  9. Extending the phenotypic spectrum of RBFOX1 deletions: Sporadic focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lal, Dennis; Pernhorst, Katharina; Klein, Karl Martin; Reif, Philipp; Tozzi, Rossana; Toliat, Mohammad R; Winterer, Georg; Neubauer, Bernd; Nürnberg, Peter; Rosenow, Felix; Becker, Felicitas; Lerche, Holger; Kunz, Wolfram S; Kurki, Mitja I; Hoffmann, Per; Becker, Albert J; Perucca, Emilio; Zara, Federico; Sander, Thomas; Weber, Yvonne G

    2015-09-01

    Partial deletions of the RBFOX1 gene encoding the neuronal splicing regulator have been reported in a range of neurodevelopmental diseases including idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsy (IGE/GGE), childhood focal epilepsy, and self-limited childhood benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS, rolandic epilepsy), and autism. The protein regulates alternative splicing of many neuronal transcripts involved in the homeostatic control of neuronal excitability. Herein, we examined whether structural deletions affecting RBFOX1 exons confer susceptibility to common forms of juvenile and adult focal epilepsy syndromes. We screened 807 unrelated patients with sporadic focal epilepsy, and we identified seven hemizygous exonic RBFOX1 deletions in patients with sporadic focal epilepsy (0.9%) in comparison to one deletion found in 1,502 controls. The phenotypes of the patients carrying RBFOX1 deletions comprise magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-negative epilepsy of unknown etiology with frontal and temporal origin (n = 5) and two patients with temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. The epilepsies were largely pharmacoresistant but not associated with intellectual disability. Our study extends the phenotypic spectrum of RBFOX1 deletions as a risk factor for focal epilepsy and suggests that exonic RBFOX1 deletions are involved in the broad spectrum of focal and generalized epilepsies. PMID:26174448

  10. Morphogenesis of an extended phenotype: four-dimensional ant nest architecture

    PubMed Central

    Minter, Nicholas J.; Franks, Nigel R.; Robson Brown, Katharine A.

    2012-01-01

    Animals produce a variety of structures to modify their environments adaptively. Such structures represent extended phenotypes whose development is rarely studied. To begin to rectify this, we used micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning and time-series experiments to obtain the first high-resolution dataset on the four-dimensional growth of ant nests. We show that extrinsic features within the environment, such as the presence of planes between layers of sediment, influence the architecture of Lasius flavus nests, with ants excavating horizontal tunnels along such planes. Intrinsically, the dimensions of the tunnels are associated with individual colonies, the dynamics of excavation can be explained by negative feedback and the angular distribution of tunnels is probably a result of local competition among tunnels for miners. The architecture and dynamics of ant nest excavation therefore result from local interactions of ants with one another and templates inherent in the environment. The influence of the environment on the form of structures has been documented across both biotic and abiotic domains. Our study opens up the utility of CT scanning as a technique for observing the morphogenesis of such structures. PMID:21849386

  11. Morphogenesis of an extended phenotype: four-dimensional ant nest architecture.

    PubMed

    Minter, Nicholas J; Franks, Nigel R; Brown, Katharine A Robson

    2012-03-01

    Animals produce a variety of structures to modify their environments adaptively. Such structures represent extended phenotypes whose development is rarely studied. To begin to rectify this, we used micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning and time-series experiments to obtain the first high-resolution dataset on the four-dimensional growth of ant nests. We show that extrinsic features within the environment, such as the presence of planes between layers of sediment, influence the architecture of Lasius flavus nests, with ants excavating horizontal tunnels along such planes. Intrinsically, the dimensions of the tunnels are associated with individual colonies, the dynamics of excavation can be explained by negative feedback and the angular distribution of tunnels is probably a result of local competition among tunnels for miners. The architecture and dynamics of ant nest excavation therefore result from local interactions of ants with one another and templates inherent in the environment. The influence of the environment on the form of structures has been documented across both biotic and abiotic domains. Our study opens up the utility of CT scanning as a technique for observing the morphogenesis of such structures. PMID:21849386

  12. Identifying Heritable Brain Phenotypes in an Extended Pedigree of Vervet Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Melega, William P.; Service, Susan K.; Lee, Chris; Chen, Kelly; Tu, Zhuowen; Jorgensen, Matthew J.; Fairbanks, Lynn A.; Cantor, Rita M.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Woods, Roger P.

    2009-01-01

    The area and volume of brain structural features, as assessed by high-resolution 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are among the most heritable measures relating to the human central nervous system. We have conducted MRI scanning of all available monkeys over 2 years of age (n=357) from the extended multigenerational pedigree of the Vervet Research Colony (VRC). Using a combination of automated and manual segmentation we have quantified several correlated but distinct brain structural phenotypes. The estimated heritabilities (h2) for these measures in the VRC are higher than those reported previously for such features in humans or in other non human primates (NHP): total brain volume (h2=0.99, standard error (se)=0.06), cerebral volume (h2=0.98, se=0.06), cerebellar volume (h2=0.86, se=0.09), hippocampal volume (h2=0.95, se=0.07) and corpus callosum cross-sectional areas (h2=0.87, se=0.07). These findings indicate that, in the controlled environment and with the inbreeding structure of the VRC, additive genetic factors account for almost all of the observed variance in brain structure, and suggest the potential of the VRC for genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying such variance. PMID:19261882

  13. Discovering phenotypic causal structure from nonexperimental data.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, J

    2016-06-01

    The evolutionary potential of organisms depends on how their parts are structured into a cohesive whole. A major obstacle for empirical studies of phenotypic organization is that observed associations among characters usually confound different causal pathways such as pleiotropic modules, interphenotypic causal relationships and environmental effects. The present article proposes causal search algorithms as a new tool to distinguish these different modes of phenotypic integration. Without assuming an a priori structure, the algorithms seek a class of causal hypotheses consistent with independence relationships holding in observational data. The technique can be applied to discover causal relationships among a set of measured traits and to distinguish genuine selection from spurious correlations. The former application is illustrated with a biological data set of rat morphological measurements previously analysed by Cheverud et al. (Evolution 1983, 37, 895). PMID:27007864

  14. Altering an extended phenotype reduces intraspecific male aggression and can maintain diversity in cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Guy E.; Joyce, Domino A.

    2013-01-01

    Reduced male aggression towards different phenotypes generating negative frequency-dependent intrasexual selection has been suggested as a mechanism to facilitate the invasion and maintenance of novel phenotypes in a population. To date, the best empirical evidence for the phenomenon has been provided by laboratory studies on cichlid fish with different colour polymorphisms. Here we experimentally tested the hypothesis in a natural population of Lake Malawi cichlid fish, in which males build sand-castles (bowers) to attract females during seasonal leks. We predicted that if bower shape plays an important role in male aggressive interactions, aggression among conspecific males should decrease when their bower shape is altered. Accordingly, we allocated randomly chosen bowers in a Nyassachromis cf. microcephalus lek into three treatments: control, manipulated to a different shape, and simulated manipulation. We then measured male behaviours and bower shape before and after these treatments. We found that once bower shape was altered, males were involved in significantly fewer aggressive interactions with conspecific males than before manipulation. Mating success was not affected. Our results support the idea that an extended phenotype, such as bower shape, can be important in maintaining polymorphic populations. Specifically, reduced male conspecific aggression towards males with different extended phenotypes (here, bower shapes) may cause negative frequency-dependent selection, allowing the invasion and establishment of a new phenotype (bower builder). This could help our understanding of mechanisms of diversification within populations, and in particular, the overall diversification of bower shapes within Lake Malawi cichlids. PMID:24349896

  15. A molecular genetic study of autism and related phenotypes in extended pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Efforts to uncover the risk genotypes associated with the familial nature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have had limited success. The study of extended pedigrees, incorporating additional ASD-related phenotypes into linkage analysis, offers an alternative approach to the search for inherited ASD susceptibility variants that complements traditional methods used to study the genetics of ASD. Methods We examined evidence for linkage in 19 extended pedigrees ascertained through ASD cases spread across at least two (and in most cases three) nuclear families. Both compound phenotypes (i.e., ASD and, in non-ASD individuals, the broad autism phenotype) and more narrowly defined components of these phenotypes, e.g., social and repetitive behavior, pragmatic language, and anxiety, were examined. The overarching goal was to maximize the aggregate information available on the maximum number of individuals and to disaggregate syndromic phenotypes in order to examine the genetic underpinnings of more narrowly defined aspects of ASD behavior. Results Results reveal substantial between-family locus heterogeneity and support the importance of previously reported ASD loci in inherited, familial, forms of ASD. Additional loci, not seen in the ASD analyses, show evidence for linkage to the broad autism phenotype (BAP). BAP peaks are well supported by multiple subphenotypes (including anxiety, pragmatic language, and social behavior) showing linkage to regions overlapping with the compound BAP phenotype. Whereas 'repetitive behavior’, showing the strongest evidence for linkage (Posterior Probability of Linkage = 62% at 6p25.2-24.3, and 69% at 19p13.3), appears to be linked to novel regions not detected with other compound or narrow phenotypes examined in this study. Conclusions These results provide support for the presence of key features underlying the complexity of the genetic architecture of ASD: substantial between-family locus heterogeneity, that the BAP appears

  16. Extending injury- and disease-resistant CNS phenotypes by repetitive epigenetic conditioning.

    PubMed

    Gidday, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Significant reductions in the extent of acute injury in the CNS can be achieved by exposure to different preconditioning stimuli, but the duration of the induced protective phenotype is typically short-lasting, and thus is deemed as limiting its clinical applicability. Extending the period over which such adaptive epigenetic changes persist - in effect, expanding conditioning's "therapeutic window" - would significantly broaden the potential applications of such a treatment approach in patients. The frequency of the conditioning stimulus may hold the key. While transient (1-3 days) protection against CNS ischemic injury is well established preclinically following a single preconditioning stimulus, repetitively presenting preconditioning stimuli extends the duration of ischemic tolerance by many weeks. Moreover, repetitive intermittent postconditioning enhances post-ischemic recovery metrics and improves long-term survival. Intermittent conditioning is also efficacious for preventing or delaying injury in preclinical models of chronic neurodegenerative disease, and for promoting long-lasting functional improvements in a number of other pathologies as well. Although the detailed mechanisms underlying these protracted kinds of neuroplasticity remain largely unstudied, accumulating empirical evidence supports the contention that all of these adaptive phenotypes are epigenetically mediated. Going forward, additional preclinical demonstrations of the ability to induce sustained beneficial phenotypes that reduce the burden of acute and chronic neurodegeneration, and experimental interrogations of the regulatory constructs responsible for these epigenetic responses, will accelerate the identification of not only efficacious but also practical, adaptive epigenetics-based treatments for individuals with neurological disease. PMID:25784897

  17. Extending Injury- and Disease-Resistant CNS Phenotypes by Repetitive Epigenetic Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Gidday, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Significant reductions in the extent of acute injury in the CNS can be achieved by exposure to different preconditioning stimuli, but the duration of the induced protective phenotype is typically short-lasting, and thus is deemed as limiting its clinical applicability. Extending the period over which such adaptive epigenetic changes persist – in effect, expanding conditioning’s “therapeutic window” – would significantly broaden the potential applications of such a treatment approach in patients. The frequency of the conditioning stimulus may hold the key. While transient (1–3 days) protection against CNS ischemic injury is well established preclinically following a single preconditioning stimulus, repetitively presenting preconditioning stimuli extends the duration of ischemic tolerance by many weeks. Moreover, repetitive intermittent postconditioning enhances post-ischemic recovery metrics and improves long-term survival. Intermittent conditioning is also efficacious for preventing or delaying injury in preclinical models of chronic neurodegenerative disease, and for promoting long-lasting functional improvements in a number of other pathologies as well. Although the detailed mechanisms underlying these protracted kinds of neuroplasticity remain largely unstudied, accumulating empirical evidence supports the contention that all of these adaptive phenotypes are epigenetically mediated. Going forward, additional preclinical demonstrations of the ability to induce sustained beneficial phenotypes that reduce the burden of acute and chronic neurodegeneration, and experimental interrogations of the regulatory constructs responsible for these epigenetic responses, will accelerate the identification of not only efficacious but also practical, adaptive epigenetics-based treatments for individuals with neurological disease. PMID:25784897

  18. Nanodosimetric track structure in homogeneous extended beams.

    PubMed

    Conte, V; Moro, D; Colautti, P; Grosswendt, B

    2015-09-01

    Physical aspects of particle track structure are important in determining the induction of clustered damage in relevant subcellular structures like the DNA and higher-order genomic structures. The direct measurement of track-structure properties of ionising radiation is feasible today by counting the number of ionisations produced inside a small gas volume. In particular, the so-called track-nanodosimeter, installed at the TANDEM-ALPI accelerator complex of LNL, measures ionisation cluster-size distributions in a simulated subcellular structure of dimensions 20 nm, corresponding approximately to the diameter of the chromatin fibre. The target volume is irradiated by pencil beams of primary particles passing at specified impact parameter. To directly relate these measured track-structure data to radiobiological measurements performed in broad homogeneous particle beams, these data can be integrated over the impact parameter. This procedure was successfully applied to 240 MeV carbon ions and compared with Monte Carlo simulations for extended fields. PMID:25848108

  19. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.J.

    1985-03-01

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Extended culture of macrophages from different sources and maturation results in a common M2 phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Lisa M; Holt-Casper, Dolly; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Grainger, David W

    2015-09-01

    Inflammatory responses to biomaterials heavily influence the environment surrounding implanted devices, often producing foreign-body reactions. The macrophage is a key immunomodulatory cell type consistently associated with implanted biomaterials and routinely used in short-term in vitro cell studies of biomaterials aiming to reproduce host responses. Inconsistencies within these studies, including differently sourced cells, different durations of culture, and assessment of different activation markers, lead to many conflicting results in vitro that confound consistency and conclusions. We hypothesize that different experimentally popular monocyte-macrophage cell types have intrinsic in vitro culture-specific differences that yield conflicting results. Recent studies demonstrate changes in cultured macrophage cytokine expression over time, leading to the hypothesis that changes in macrophage phenotype also occur in response to extended culture. Here, macrophage cells of different transformed and primary-derived origins were cultured for 21 days on model polymer biomaterials. Cell type-based differences in morphology and cytokine/chemokine expression as well as changes in cell surface biomarkers associated with differentiation stage, activation state, and adhesion were compared. Results reflect consistent macrophage development toward an M2 phenotype via up-regulation of the macrophage mannose receptor for all cell types following 21-day extended culture. Significantly, implanted biomaterials experiencing the foreign-body response and encapsulation in vivo often elicit a shift toward an analogous M2 macrophage phenotype. In vitro "default" of macrophage cultures, regardless of lineage, to this M2 state in the presence of biomaterials at long culture periods is not recognized, but has important implications to in vitro modeling of in vivo host response. PMID:25684281

  1. EXTENDED CULTURE OF MACROPHAGES FROM DIFFERENT SOURCES AND MATURATION RESULTS IN A COMMON M2 PHENOTYPE

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Lisa M.; Holt-Casper, Dolly; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Grainger, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory responses to biomaterials heavily influence the environment surrounding implanted devices, often producing foreign body reactions. The macrophage is a key immunomodulatory cell type consistently associated with implanted biomaterials and routinely employed in short term in vitro cell studies of biomaterials aiming to reproduce host responses. Inconsistencies within these studies, including differently sourced cells, different durations of culture, and assessment of different activation markers, lead to many conflicting results in vitro that confound consistency and conclusions. We hypothesize that different experimentally popular monocyte-macrophage cell types have intrinsic in vitro culture-specific differences that yield conflicting results. Recent studies demonstrate changes in cultured macrophage cytokine expression over time, leading to the hypothesis that changes in macrophage phenotype also occur in response to extended culture. Here, macrophage cells of different transformed and primary-derived origins were cultured for 21 days on model polymer biomaterials. Cell type-based differences in morphology and cytokine/chemokine expression as well as changes in cell surface biomarkers associated with differentiation stage, activation state, and adhesion were compared. Results reflect consistent macrophage development towards an M2 phenotype via up-regulation of the macrophage mannose receptor for all cell types following 21-day extended culture. Significantly, implanted biomaterials experiencing the foreign body response and encapsulation in vivo often elicit a shift towards an analogous M2 macrophage phenotype. In vitro “default” of macrophage cultures, regardless of lineage, to this M2 state in the presence of biomaterials at long culture periods is not recognized but has important implications to in vitro modeling of in vivo host response. PMID:25684281

  2. Extended Solar System Structures Observed by WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Mark V.; Masci, Frank; Cutri, Roc; Walker, Russell; Mainzer, Amy; Bauer, James; Stevenson, Rachel; Tricarico, Pasquale

    2014-11-01

    Extended structures associated with recent asteroid collisions and comets were detected by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite, which conducted the first survey of the thermal emission of the sky in 1983. Twenty-seven years later, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), conducted a more sensitive survey of the sky at wavelengths spanning the shorter IRAS bandpasses and detected many of these same structures. Initial identifications include asteroid dust bands associated with collisions giving rise to the Karin and Beagle clusters within the Koronis and Themis asteroid families, respectively. An additional pair of bands is associated with the collision giving rise to the Veritas asteroid family. Comet trails associated with short-period comets have also been observed. Type 2 trails, detected by IRAS and possibly associated with asteroid collisions within the past few thousand years, have yet to be identified. Because WISE is significantly more sensitive than IRAS in the mid-infrared, it has detected some trails extending much further over their orbits and will greatly expand the catalog of trails detected in addition to those observed by IRAS and Spitzer (the latter by targeted observations). WISE and the yet more sensitive NEOCAM survey telescope will provide important insights into the recent collisional history of the asteroid belt and the nature and evolution of comets.

  3. Detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamases in Klebsiella pneumoniae: comparison of phenotypic characterization methods

    PubMed Central

    Ejaz, Hasan; ul-Haq, Ikram; Mahmood, Saqib; Zafar, Aizza; Mohsin Javed, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing K. pneumoniae is a serious threat to the patients. This manuscript shows the comparison of phenotypic characterization methods used for ESBL K. pneumoniae and frequency distribution of these isolates in various clinical samples. Methodology: Eleven different types of pathological samples collected on various time intervals were analyzed. K. pneumoniae were identified with API 20E system (bioMerieux) and initial screening of ESBL K. pneumoniae was performed using the ceftazidime antimicrobial disc. Double-disc synergy test (DDST) and CLSI confirmatory test were compared for the phenotypic detection of ESBL K. pneumoniae. Results: A total number of 214 ESBL producing K. pneumoniae were isolated from various clinical samples. Frequency distribution of ESBL producing K. pneumoniae was found to be highest among blood 117 (54.7%) and urine 46 (21.5%) samples. Data regarding the use of various interventions among these patients showed most common presence of intravenous line 209 (97.7%) and urinary catheters 46 (21.5%). Comparison of DDST and CLSI confirmatory test showed that the DDST detected 145 (67.8%) isolates while 213 (99.5%) ESBL K. pneumoniae were characterized by CLSI confirmatory test. Conclusion: The use of CLSI confirmatory test is very efficient in the early detection of ESBL K. pneumoniae especially when the facilities for molecular characterization are not available. PMID:24353625

  4. Extended region of nodulation genes in Rhizobium meliloti 1021. I. Phenotypes of Tn5 insertion mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, J.A.; Tu, J.K.; Ogawa, J.; Sanga, R.; Fisher, R.F.; Long, S.R.

    1987-10-01

    Rhizobium meliloti Nod/sup -/ mutant WL131, a derivative of wild-type strain 102F51, was complemented by a clone bank of wild-type R. meliloti 1021 DNA, and clone pRmJT5 was recovered. Transfer of pRmJT5 conferred alfalfa nodulation on other Rhizobium species, indicating a role in host range determination for pRmJT5. Mutagenesis of pRmJT5 revealed several segments in which transposon insertion causes delay in nodulation, and/or marked reduction of the number of nodules formed on host alfalfa plants. The set of mutants indicated five regions in which nod genes are located; one mutant, nod-216, is located in a region not previously reported to encode a nodulation gene. Other mutant phenotypes correlated with the positions of open reading frames for nodH, nodF and nodE, and with a 2.2-kb EcoRI fragment. A mutant in nodG had no altered phenotype in this strain. One nodulation mutant was shown to be a large deletion of the common nod gene region. The authors present a discussion comparing the various studies made on this extended nod gene region.

  5. Next-generation Sequencing Extends the Phenotypic Spectrum for LCA5 Mutations: Novel LCA5 Mutations in Cone Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xue; Sheng, Xunlun; Sun, Xiantao; Zhang, Yuxin; Jiang, Chao; Li, Huiping; Ding, Sijia; Liu, Yani; Liu, Wenzhou; Li, Zili; Zhao, Chen

    2016-01-01

    We aim to characterize the clinical features and genetic causes for two affected siblings from a Chinese family with cone dystrophy (CD). Two patients and four unaffected family members were recruited and received complete ophthalmic examinations. Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood samples from all patients. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach followed by intrafamilal cosegregation and in silico analyses were employed to determine the genetic defects. Ophthalmic evaluations finalized the clinical diagnosis of CD for the two patients in this family, both of whom presented macular atrophy with no remarkable changes in the peripheral retina. Comprehensive genetic screening approach revealed biallelic missense mutations in the Leber congenital amaurosis 5 (LCA5) gene, p.[Ala212Pro];[Tyr441Cys], as disease causative for this family. Both mutations were novel. The first substitution was predicted to eliminate a hydrogen bond and alter the tertiary structure of lebercilin, protein encoded by LCA5. We for the first time report novel biallelic LCA5 mutations in causing CD. Our study extends the phenotypic and genotypic spectrums for LCA5-associated retinopathies and better illustrates its genotype-phenotype correlations, which would help with better genetic diagnosis, prognosis, and personalized treatment for CD patients. PMID:27067258

  6. Next-generation Sequencing Extends the Phenotypic Spectrum for LCA5 Mutations: Novel LCA5 Mutations in Cone Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xue; Sheng, Xunlun; Sun, Xiantao; Zhang, Yuxin; Jiang, Chao; Li, Huiping; Ding, Sijia; Liu, Yani; Liu, Wenzhou; Li, Zili; Zhao, Chen

    2016-01-01

    We aim to characterize the clinical features and genetic causes for two affected siblings from a Chinese family with cone dystrophy (CD). Two patients and four unaffected family members were recruited and received complete ophthalmic examinations. Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood samples from all patients. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach followed by intrafamilal cosegregation and in silico analyses were employed to determine the genetic defects. Ophthalmic evaluations finalized the clinical diagnosis of CD for the two patients in this family, both of whom presented macular atrophy with no remarkable changes in the peripheral retina. Comprehensive genetic screening approach revealed biallelic missense mutations in the Leber congenital amaurosis 5 (LCA5) gene, p.[Ala212Pro];[Tyr441Cys], as disease causative for this family. Both mutations were novel. The first substitution was predicted to eliminate a hydrogen bond and alter the tertiary structure of lebercilin, protein encoded by LCA5. We for the first time report novel biallelic LCA5 mutations in causing CD. Our study extends the phenotypic and genotypic spectrums for LCA5-associated retinopathies and better illustrates its genotype-phenotype correlations, which would help with better genetic diagnosis, prognosis, and personalized treatment for CD patients. PMID:27067258

  7. Think laterally: horizontal gene transfer from symbiotic microbes may extend the phenotype of marine sessile hosts

    PubMed Central

    Degnan, Sandie M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the origin of the animal kingdom, marine animals have lived in association with viruses, prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes, often as symbionts. This long and continuous interaction has provided ample opportunity not only for the evolution of intimate interactions such as sharing of metabolic pathways, but also for horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of non-metazoan genes into metazoan genomes. The number of demonstrated cases of inter-kingdom HGT is currently small, such that it is not yet widely appreciated as a significant player in animal evolution. Sessile marine invertebrates that vertically inherit bacterial symbionts, that have no dedicated germ line, or that bud or excise pluripotent somatic cells during their life history may be particularly receptive to HGT from their symbionts. Closer scrutiny of the growing number of genomes being accrued for these animals may thus reveal HGT as a regular source of novel variation that can function to extend the host phenotype metabolically, morphologically, or even behaviorally. Taxonomic identification of symbionts will help to address the intriguing question of whether past HGT events may constrain contemporary symbioses. PMID:25477875

  8. Targeted next-generation sequencing extends the phenotypic and mutational spectrums for EYS mutations

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shun; Tian, Yuanyuan; Chen, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aim to determine genetic lesions with a phenotypic correlation in four Chinese families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods Medical histories were carefully reviewed. All patients received comprehensive ophthalmic evaluations. The next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach targeting a panel of 205 retinal disease–relevant genes and 15 candidate genes was selectively performed on probands from the four recruited families for mutation detection. Online predictive software and crystal structure modeling were also applied to test the potential pathogenic effects of identified mutations. Results Of the four families, two were diagnosed with RP sino pigmento (RPSP). Patients with RPSP claimed to have earlier RP age of onset but slower disease progression. Five mutations in the eyes shut homolog (EYS) gene, involving two novel (c.7228+1G>A and c.9248G>A) and three recurrent mutations (c.4957dupA, c.6416G>A and c.6557G>A), were found as RP causative in the four families. The missense variant c.5093T>C was determined to be a variant of unknown significance (VUS) due to the variant’s colocalization in the same allele with the reported pathogenic mutation c.6416G>A. The two novel variants were further confirmed absent in 100 unrelated healthy controls. Online predictive software indicated potential pathogenicity of the three missense mutations. Further, crystal structural modeling suggested generation of two abnormal hydrogen bonds by the missense mutation p.G2186E (c.6557G>A) and elongation of its neighboring β-sheet induced by p.G3083D (c.9248G>A), which could alter the tertiary structure of the eys protein and thus interrupt its physicochemical properties. Conclusions Taken together, with the targeted NGS approach, we reveal novel EYS mutations and prove the efficiency of targeted NGS in the genetic diagnoses of RP. We also first report the correlation between EYS mutations and RPSP. The genotypic-phenotypic relationship in all

  9. The structure of phenotypic personality traits.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, L R

    1993-01-01

    This personal historical article traces the development of the Big-Five factor structure, whose growing acceptance by personality researchers has profoundly influenced the scientific study of individual differences. The roots of this taxonomy lie in the lexical hypothesis and the insights of Sir Francis Galton, the prescience of L. L. Thurstone, the legacy of Raymond B. Cattell, and the seminal analyses of Tupes and Christal. Paradoxically, the present popularity of this model owes much to its many critics, each of whom tried to replace it, but failed. In reaction, there have been a number of attempts to assimilate other models into the five-factor structure. Lately, some practical implications of the emerging consensus can be seen in such contexts as personnel selection and classification. PMID:8427480

  10. Extended phenotypes in a boy and his mother with oto-palato-digital-syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Kaissi, Ali Al; Kraschl, Raimund; Kaulfersch, Wilhelm; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2015-09-01

    We describe additional phenotypic features in a boy and his mother. Both manifested the phenotypic/genotypic correlation of oto-palato-digital syndrome type II. The mother's radiographs showed wormian bones of the skull, and paranasal bossing, her feet showed bilateral fusion of the cuboid with the lateral cuneiform bone with subsequent development of metatarsus varus associated with dysplastic distal phalanges. PMID:26401283

  11. Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy: Electrical and Structural Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Akdis, Deniz; Brunckhorst, Corinna; Duru, Firat

    2016-01-01

    This overview gives an update on the molecular mechanisms, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM). ACM is mostly hereditary and associated with mutations in genes encoding proteins of the intercalated disc. Three subtypes have been proposed: the classical right-dominant subtype generally referred to as ARVC/D, biventricular forms with early biventricular involvement and left-dominant subtypes with predominant LV involvement. Typical symptoms include palpitations, arrhythmic (pre)syncope and sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias, which typically occur in athletes. At later stages, heart failure may occur. Diagnosis is established with the 2010 Task Force Criteria (TFC). Modern imaging tools are crucial for ACM diagnosis, including both echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for detecting functional and structural alternations. Of note, structural findings often become visible after electrical alterations, such as premature ventricular beats, ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT). 12-lead ECG is important to assess for depolarisation and repolarisation abnormalities, including T-wave inversions as the most common ECG abnormality. Family history and the detection of causative mutations, mostly affecting the desmosome, have been incorporated in the TFC, and stress the importance of cascade family screening. Differential diagnoses include idiopathic right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) VT, sarcoidosis, congenital heart disease, myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, athlete’s heart, Brugada syndrome and RV infarction. Therapeutic strategies include restriction from endurance and competitive sports, β-blockers, antiarrhythmic drugs, heart failure medication, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and endocardial/epicardial catheter ablation. PMID:27617087

  12. Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy: Electrical and Structural Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Deniz; Brunckhorst, Corinna; Duru, Firat; Saguner, Ardan M

    2016-08-01

    This overview gives an update on the molecular mechanisms, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM). ACM is mostly hereditary and associated with mutations in genes encoding proteins of the intercalated disc. Three subtypes have been proposed: the classical right-dominant subtype generally referred to as ARVC/D, biventricular forms with early biventricular involvement and left-dominant subtypes with predominant LV involvement. Typical symptoms include palpitations, arrhythmic (pre)syncope and sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias, which typically occur in athletes. At later stages, heart failure may occur. Diagnosis is established with the 2010 Task Force Criteria (TFC). Modern imaging tools are crucial for ACM diagnosis, including both echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for detecting functional and structural alternations. Of note, structural findings often become visible after electrical alterations, such as premature ventricular beats, ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT). 12-lead ECG is important to assess for depolarisation and repolarisation abnormalities, including T-wave inversions as the most common ECG abnormality. Family history and the detection of causative mutations, mostly affecting the desmosome, have been incorporated in the TFC, and stress the importance of cascade family screening. Differential diagnoses include idiopathic right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) VT, sarcoidosis, congenital heart disease, myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, athlete's heart, Brugada syndrome and RV infarction. Therapeutic strategies include restriction from endurance and competitive sports, β-blockers, antiarrhythmic drugs, heart failure medication, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and endocardial/epicardial catheter ablation. PMID:27617087

  13. Extended phenotypes in a boy and his mother with oto-palato-digital-syndrome type II

    PubMed Central

    Kaissi, Ali Al; Kraschl, Raimund; Kaulfersch, Wilhelm; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We describe additional phenotypic features in a boy and his mother. Both manifested the phenotypic/genotypic correlation of oto-palato-digital syndrome type II. The mother′s radiographs showed wormian bones of the skull, and paranasal bossing, her feet showed bilateral fusion of the cuboid with the lateral cuneiform bone with subsequent development of metatarsus varus associated with dysplastic distal phalanges. PMID:26401283

  14. Structural Phenotyping of Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualini, Francesco Silvio; Sheehy, Sean Paul; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Aratyn-Schaus, Yvonne; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2015-01-01

    Summary Structural phenotyping based on classical image feature detection has been adopted to elucidate the molecular mechanisms behind genetically or pharmacologically induced changes in cell morphology. Here, we developed a set of 11 metrics to capture the increasing sarcomere organization that occurs intracellularly during striated muscle cell development. To test our metrics, we analyzed the localization of the contractile protein α-actinin in a variety of primary and stem-cell derived cardiomyocytes. Further, we combined these metrics with data mining algorithms to unbiasedly score the phenotypic maturity of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. PMID:25733020

  15. Introduction: Dissipative localized structures in extended systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlidi, Mustapha; Taki, Majid; Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    2007-09-01

    Localized structures belong to the class of dissipative structures found far from equilibrium. Contributions from the most representative groups working on a various fields of natural science such as biology, chemistry, plant ecology, mathematics, optics, and laser physics are presented. The aim of this issue is to gather specialists from these fields towards a cross-fertilization among these active areas of research and thereby to present an overview of the state of art in the formation and the characterization of dissipative localized structures. Nonlinear optics and laser physics have an important part in this issue because of potential applications in information technology. In particular, localized structures could be used as "bits" for parallel information storage and processing.

  16. HMG Nuclear Proteins: Linking Chromatin Structure to Cellular Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    I. Summary Although the three families of mammalian HMG proteins (HMGA, HMGB and HMGN) participate in many of the same nuclear processes, each family plays its own unique role in modulating chromatin structure and regulating genomic function. This review focuses on the similarities and differences in the mechanisms by which the different HMG families impact chromatin structure and influence cellular phenotype. The biological implications of having three architectural transcription factor families with complementary, but partially overlapping, nuclear functions are discussed. PMID:19748605

  17. A folding algorithm for extended RNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    zu Siederdissen, Christian Höner; Bernhart, Stephan H.; Stadler, Peter F.; Hofacker, Ivo L.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: RNA secondary structure contains many non-canonical base pairs of different pair families. Successful prediction of these structural features leads to improved secondary structures with applications in tertiary structure prediction and simultaneous folding and alignment. Results: We present a theoretical model capturing both RNA pair families and extended secondary structure motifs with shared nucleotides using 2-diagrams. We accompany this model with a number of programs for parameter optimization and structure prediction. Availability: All sources (optimization routines, RNA folding, RNA evaluation, extended secondary structure visualization) are published under the GPLv3 and available at www.tbi.univie.ac.at/software/rnawolf/. Contact: choener@tbi.univie.ac.at PMID:21685061

  18. Novel TTC37 Mutations in a Patient with Immunodeficiency without Diarrhea: Extending the Phenotype of Trichohepatoenteric Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rider, Nicholas L; Boisson, Bertrand; Jyonouchi, Soma; Hanson, Eric P; Rosenzweig, Sergio D; Cassanova, Jean-Laurent; Orange, Jordan S

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased genetic diagnosis has increasingly associated seemingly unrelated somatic and immunological phenotypes. We report a male infant who presented within the first year of life with physical growth impairment, feeding difficulties, hyperemesis without diarrhea, and abnormal hair findings suggestive of trichorrhexis nodosa. With advancing age, moderate global developmental delay, susceptibility to frequent viral illnesses, otitis media, and purulent conjunctivitis were identified. Because of the repeated infections, an immunological evaluation was pursued and identified impaired antibody memory responses following pneumococcal vaccine administration. Immunoglobulin replacement therapy and nutritional support were employed as mainstays of therapy. The child is now aged 12 years and still without diarrhea. Whole exome sequencing identified compound heterozygous mutations in the TTC37 gene, a known cause of the trichohepatoenteric syndrome (THES). This case extends the known phenotype of THES and defines a potential subset for inclusion as an immune overlap syndrome. PMID:25688341

  19. Novel TTC37 Mutations in a Patient with Immunodeficiency without Diarrhea: Extending the Phenotype of Trichohepatoenteric Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Nicholas L.; Boisson, Bertrand; Jyonouchi, Soma; Hanson, Eric P.; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Orange, Jordan S.

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased genetic diagnosis has increasingly associated seemingly unrelated somatic and immunological phenotypes. We report a male infant who presented within the first year of life with physical growth impairment, feeding difficulties, hyperemesis without diarrhea, and abnormal hair findings suggestive of trichorrhexis nodosa. With advancing age, moderate global developmental delay, susceptibility to frequent viral illnesses, otitis media, and purulent conjunctivitis were identified. Because of the repeated infections, an immunological evaluation was pursued and identified impaired antibody memory responses following pneumococcal vaccine administration. Immunoglobulin replacement therapy and nutritional support were employed as mainstays of therapy. The child is now aged 12 years and still without diarrhea. Whole exome sequencing identified compound heterozygous mutations in the TTC37 gene, a known cause of the trichohepatoenteric syndrome (THES). This case extends the known phenotype of THES and defines a potential subset for inclusion as an immune overlap syndrome. PMID:25688341

  20. Sexual and natural selection in the evolution of extended phenotypes: the use of green nesting material in starlings.

    PubMed

    Rubalcaba, J G; Polo, V; Maia, R; Rubenstein, D R; Veiga, J P

    2016-08-01

    Although sexual selection is typically considered the predominant force driving the evolution of ritualized sexual behaviours, natural selection may also play an important and often underappreciated role. The use of green aromatic plants among nesting birds has been interpreted as a component of extended phenotype that evolved either via natural selection due to potential sanitary functions or via sexual selection as a signal of male attractiveness. Here, we compared both hypotheses using comparative methods in starlings, a group where this behaviour is widespread. We found that the use of green plants was positively related to male-biased size dimorphism and that it was most likely to occur among cavity-nesting species. These results suggest that this behaviour is likely favoured by sexual selection, but also related to its sanitary use in response to higher parasite loads in cavities. We speculate that the use of green plants in starlings may be facilitated by cavity nesting and was subsequently co-opted as a sexual signal by males. Our results represent an example of how an extended phenotypic component of males becomes sexually selected by females. Thus, both natural selection and sexual selection are necessary to fully understand the evolution of ritualized behaviours involved in courtship. PMID:27168035

  1. Cosmetics as a feature of the extended human phenotype: modulation of the perception of biologically important facial signals.

    PubMed

    Etcoff, Nancy L; Stock, Shannon; Haley, Lauren E; Vickery, Sarah A; House, David M

    2011-01-01

    Research on the perception of faces has focused on the size, shape, and configuration of inherited features or the biological phenotype, and largely ignored the effects of adornment, or the extended phenotype. Research on the evolution of signaling has shown that animals frequently alter visual features, including color cues, to attract, intimidate or protect themselves from conspecifics. Humans engage in conscious manipulation of visual signals using cultural tools in real time rather than genetic changes over evolutionary time. Here, we investigate one tool, the use of color cosmetics. In two studies, we asked viewers to rate the same female faces with or without color cosmetics, and we varied the style of makeup from minimal (natural), to moderate (professional), to dramatic (glamorous). Each look provided increasing luminance contrast between the facial features and surrounding skin. Faces were shown for 250 ms or for unlimited inspection time, and subjects rated them for attractiveness, competence, likeability and trustworthiness. At 250 ms, cosmetics had significant positive effects on all outcomes. Length of inspection time did not change the effect for competence or attractiveness. However, with longer inspection time, the effect of cosmetics on likability and trust varied by specific makeup looks, indicating that cosmetics could impact automatic and deliberative judgments differently. The results suggest that cosmetics can create supernormal facial stimuli, and that one way they may do so is by exaggerating cues to sexual dimorphism. Our results provide evidence that judgments of facial trustworthiness and attractiveness are at least partially separable, that beauty has a significant positive effect on judgment of competence, a universal dimension of social cognition, but has a more nuanced effect on the other universal dimension of social warmth, and that the extended phenotype significantly influences perception of biologically important signals at first

  2. Cosmetics as a Feature of the Extended Human Phenotype: Modulation of the Perception of Biologically Important Facial Signals

    PubMed Central

    Etcoff, Nancy L.; Stock, Shannon; Haley, Lauren E.; Vickery, Sarah A.; House, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Research on the perception of faces has focused on the size, shape, and configuration of inherited features or the biological phenotype, and largely ignored the effects of adornment, or the extended phenotype. Research on the evolution of signaling has shown that animals frequently alter visual features, including color cues, to attract, intimidate or protect themselves from conspecifics. Humans engage in conscious manipulation of visual signals using cultural tools in real time rather than genetic changes over evolutionary time. Here, we investigate one tool, the use of color cosmetics. In two studies, we asked viewers to rate the same female faces with or without color cosmetics, and we varied the style of makeup from minimal (natural), to moderate (professional), to dramatic (glamorous). Each look provided increasing luminance contrast between the facial features and surrounding skin. Faces were shown for 250 ms or for unlimited inspection time, and subjects rated them for attractiveness, competence, likeability and trustworthiness. At 250 ms, cosmetics had significant positive effects on all outcomes. Length of inspection time did not change the effect for competence or attractiveness. However, with longer inspection time, the effect of cosmetics on likability and trust varied by specific makeup looks, indicating that cosmetics could impact automatic and deliberative judgments differently. The results suggest that cosmetics can create supernormal facial stimuli, and that one way they may do so is by exaggerating cues to sexual dimorphism. Our results provide evidence that judgments of facial trustworthiness and attractiveness are at least partially separable, that beauty has a significant positive effect on judgment of competence, a universal dimension of social cognition, but has a more nuanced effect on the other universal dimension of social warmth, and that the extended phenotype significantly influences perception of biologically important signals at first

  3. Phenotyping structural abnormalities in mouse embryos using high-resolution episcopic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Weninger, Wolfgang J.; Geyer, Stefan H.; Martineau, Alexandrine; Galli, Antonella; Adams, David J.; Wilson, Robert; Mohun, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    The arrival of simple and reliable methods for 3D imaging of mouse embryos has opened the possibility of analysing normal and abnormal development in a far more systematic and comprehensive manner than has hitherto been possible. This will not only help to extend our understanding of normal tissue and organ development but, by applying the same approach to embryos from genetically modified mouse lines, such imaging studies could also transform our knowledge of gene function in embryogenesis and the aetiology of developmental disorders. The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium is coordinating efforts to phenotype single gene knockouts covering the entire mouse genome, including characterising developmental defects for those knockout lines that prove to be embryonic lethal. Here, we present a pilot study of 34 such lines, utilising high-resolution episcopic microscopy (HREM) for comprehensive 2D and 3D imaging of homozygous null embryos and their wild-type littermates. We present a simple phenotyping protocol that has been developed to take advantage of the high-resolution images obtained by HREM and that can be used to score tissue and organ abnormalities in a reliable manner. Using this approach with embryos at embryonic day 14.5, we show the wide range of structural abnormalities that are likely to be detected in such studies and the variability in phenotypes between sibling homozygous null embryos. PMID:25256713

  4. Association between brain structure and phenotypic characteristics in pedophilia.

    PubMed

    Poeppl, Timm B; Nitschke, Joachim; Santtila, Pekka; Schecklmann, Martin; Langguth, Berthold; Greenlee, Mark W; Osterheider, Michael; Mokros, Andreas

    2013-05-01

    Studies applying structural neuroimaging to pedophiles are scarce and have shown conflicting results. Although first findings suggested reduced volume of the amygdala, pronounced gray matter decreases in frontal regions were observed in another group of pedophilic offenders. When compared to non-sexual offenders instead of community controls, pedophiles revealed deficiencies in white matter only. The present study sought to test the hypotheses of structurally compromised prefrontal and limbic networks and whether structural brain abnormalities are related to phenotypic characteristics in pedophiles. We compared gray matter volume of male pedophilic offenders and non-sexual offenders from high-security forensic hospitals using voxel-based morphometry in cross-sectional and correlational whole-brain analyses. The significance threshold was set to p < .05, corrected for multiple comparisons. Compared to controls, pedophiles exhibited a volume reduction of the right amygdala (small volume corrected). Within the pedophilic group, pedosexual interest and sexual recidivism were correlated with gray matter decrease in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (r = -.64) and insular cortex (r = -.45). Lower age of victims was strongly associated with gray matter reductions in the orbitofrontal cortex (r = .98) and angular gyri bilaterally (r = .70 and r = .93). Our findings of specifically impaired neural networks being related to certain phenotypic characteristics might account for the heterogeneous results in previous neuroimaging studies of pedophilia. The neuroanatomical abnormalities in pedophilia seem to be of a dimensional rather than a categorical nature, supporting the notion of a multifaceted disorder. PMID:23399486

  5. Comparison of nine phenotypic methods for detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase production by Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Garrec, Hélène; Drieux-Rouzet, Laurence; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Jarlier, Vincent; Robert, Jérôme

    2011-03-01

    The detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing (ESBL) bacteria is of importance for infection control and epidemiological surveillance. We aimed to compare phenotypic methods available in the routine laboratory and to evaluate two-step strategies using these methods for the detection of ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae. Two methods used for routine susceptibility testing (Vitek2 and disk diffusion methods) and seven methods designed for the detection of ESBL production (ESBL Etests, combination disks, double-disk synergy [DDS] methods on Mueller-Hinton [MH] agar and cloxacillin-containing MH agar, and the Cica-Beta test) were tested against 107 strains of Enterobacteriaceae not susceptible to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. All strains were screened for the presence of acquired ESBL-encoding genes by PCR, and the PCR result was considered the gold standard for evaluation of the other test methods. Among the 107 strains, 52 (49%) were ESBL positive. With Vitek2, sensitivities were the highest when using extended cards (73% to 79%), but 25% to 31% of the strains yielded indeterminate results. For the disk diffusion method, sensitivities were the highest (96%) when testing at least cefotaxime, cefepime, and a third compound (ceftazidime, cefpodoxime, or aztreonam). For the specific methods, specificities ranged from 62% (ceftazidime ESBL Etest) to 100% (DDS using a disk spacing of 20 mm). When a method designed for ESBL detection was used on strains considered ESBL negative or with an indeterminate result by a first routine susceptibility method, sensitivities reached 100% for a majority of combinations. In conclusion, two-step strategies using phenotypic methods available in most clinical laboratories may reach a sensitivity of 100% for ESBL detection among a large panel of species, including AmpC producers, providing a sensible choice of tests. PMID:21248086

  6. Structural genomic variation in childhood epilepsies with complex phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Helbig, Ingo; Swinkels, Marielle E M; Aten, Emmelien; Caliebe, Almuth; van 't Slot, Ruben; Boor, Rainer; von Spiczak, Sarah; Muhle, Hiltrud; Jähn, Johanna A; van Binsbergen, Ellen; van Nieuwenhuizen, Onno; Jansen, Floor E; Braun, Kees P J; de Haan, Gerrit-Jan; Tommerup, Niels; Stephani, Ulrich; Hjalgrim, Helle; Poot, Martin; Lindhout, Dick; Brilstra, Eva H; Møller, Rikke S; Koeleman, Bobby PC

    2014-01-01

    A genetic contribution to a broad range of epilepsies has been postulated, and particularly copy number variations (CNVs) have emerged as significant genetic risk factors. However, the role of CNVs in patients with epilepsies with complex phenotypes is not known. Therefore, we investigated the role of CNVs in patients with unclassified epilepsies and complex phenotypes. A total of 222 patients from three European countries, including patients with structural lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), dysmorphic features, and multiple congenital anomalies, were clinically evaluated and screened for CNVs. MRI findings including acquired or developmental lesions and patient characteristics were subdivided and analyzed in subgroups. MRI data were available for 88.3% of patients, of whom 41.6% had abnormal MRI findings. Eighty-eight rare CNVs were discovered in 71 out of 222 patients (31.9%). Segregation of all identified variants could be assessed in 42 patients, 11 of which were de novo. The frequency of all structural variants and de novo variants was not statistically different between patients with or without MRI abnormalities or MRI subcategories. Patients with dysmorphic features were more likely to carry a rare CNV. Genome-wide screening methods for rare CNVs may provide clues for the genetic etiology in patients with a broader range of epilepsies than previously anticipated, including in patients with various brain anomalies detectable by MRI. Performing genome-wide screens for rare CNVs can be a valuable contribution to the routine diagnostic workup in patients with a broad range of childhood epilepsies. PMID:24281369

  7. A novel GABRG2 mutation, p.R136*, in a family with GEFS+ and extended phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Ann J; Kang, Jing-Qiong; Shen, Wangzhen; Pickrell, William O; Cushion, Thomas D; Davies, Jeffrey S; Baer, Kristin; Mullins, Jonathan G L; Hammond, Carrie L; Chung, Seo-Kyung; Thomas, Rhys H; White, Cathy; Smith, Phil E M; Macdonald, Robert L; Rees, Mark I

    2014-04-01

    Genetic mutations in voltage-gated and ligand-gated ion channel genes have been identified in a small number of Mendelian families with genetic generalised epilepsies (GGEs). They are commonly associated with febrile seizures (FS), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and particularly with generalised or genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+). In clinical practice, despite efforts to categorise epilepsy and epilepsy families into syndromic diagnoses, many generalised epilepsies remain unclassified with a presumed genetic basis. During the systematic collection of epilepsy families, we assembled a cohort of families with evidence of GEFS+ and screened for variations in the γ2 subunit of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor gene (GABRG2). We detected a novel GABRG2(p.R136*) premature translation termination codon in one index-case from a two-generation nuclear family, presenting with an unclassified GGE, a borderline GEFS+ phenotype with learning difficulties and extended behavioural presentation. The GABRG2(p.R136*) mutation segregates with the febrile seizure component of this family's GGE and is absent in 190 healthy control samples. In vitro expression assays demonstrated that γ2(p.R136*) subunits were produced, but had reduced cell-surface and total expression. When γ2(p.R136*) subunits were co-expressed with α1 and β2 subunits in HEK 293T cells, GABA-evoked currents were reduced. Furthermore, γ2(p.R136*) subunits were highly-expressed in intracellular aggregations surrounding the nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), suggesting compromised receptor trafficking. A novel GABRG2(p.R136*) mutation extends the spectrum of GABRG2 mutations identified in GEFS+ and GGE phenotypes, causes GABAA receptor dysfunction, and represents a putative epilepsy mechanism. PMID:24407264

  8. Atomic Structure and Properties of Extended Defects in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Buczko, R.; Chisholm, M.F.; Kaplan, T.; Maiti, A.; Mostoller, M.; Pantelides, S.T.; Pennycook, S.J.

    1998-10-15

    The Z-contrast technique represents a new approach to high-resolution electron microscopy allowing for the first time incoherent imaging of materials on the atomic scale. The key advantages of the technique, an intrinsically higher resolution limit and directly interpretable, compositionally sensitive imaging, allow a new level of insight into the atomic configurations of extended defects in silicon. This experimental technique has been combined with theoretical calculations (a combination of first principles, tight binding, and classical methods) to extend this level of insight by obtaining the energetic and electronic structure of the defects.

  9. Structured light illumination for extended resolution in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosseev, R.; Belyaev, Y.; Frohn, J.; Stemmer, A.

    2005-03-01

    During the last two decades fluorescence microscopy has become a powerful experimental tool in modern biology. Resolution of optical microscopes is limited by the diffraction nature of light and amounts to approximately 200 nm for point objects imaged with green light and high-NA objectives. Recently, several successful attempts have been made to break the resolution limit of microscopes. One of them is the so-called harmonic excitation light microscopy. 2D structured illumination produced by four interfering laser beams improves the lateral resolution by a factor of 2 to reach 100 nm. Structured illumination extends optical resolution since spatial frequencies beyond the classical cut-off frequency are brought into the passband of the optical microscope by frequency mixing. The extended passband is reconstructed computationally from several images acquired with shifted illumination patterns. Here we discuss an extension towards high resolution imaging of thick specimens by combining 2D structured illumination with deconvolution techniques.

  10. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure of bimetallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Summary Electronic and magnetic properties strongly depend on the structure of the material, especially on the crystal symmetry and chemical environment. In nanoparticles, the break of symmetry at the surface may yield different physical properties with respect to the corresponding bulk material. A useful tool to investigate the electronic structure, magnetic behaviour and local crystallographic structure is X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this review, recent developments in the field of extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements and in the analysis methods for structural investigations of bimetallic nanoparticles are highlighted. The standard analysis based on Fourier transforms is compared to the relatively new field of wavelet transforms that have the potential to outperform traditional analysis, especially in bimetallic alloys. As an example, the lattice expansion and inhomogeneous alloying found in FePt nanoparticles is presented, and this is discussed below in terms of the influence of employed density functional theory calculations on the magnetic properties. PMID:21977436

  11. Extended structures and physicochemical properties of uranyl-organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Xue; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2011-07-19

    The ability of uranium to undergo nuclear fission has been exploited primarily to manufacture nuclear weapons and to generate nuclear power. Outside of its nuclear physics, uranium also exhibits rich chemistry, and it forms various compounds with other elements. Among the uranium-bearing compounds, those with a uranium oxidation state of +6 are most common and a particular structural unit, uranyl UO(2)(2+) is usually involved in these hexavalent uranium compounds. Apart from forming solids with inorganic ions, the uranyl unit also bonds to organic molecules to generate uranyl-organic coordination materials. If appropriate reaction conditions are employed, uranyl-organic extended structures (1-D chains, 2-D layers, and 3-D frameworks) can be obtained. Research on uranyl-organic compounds with extended structures allows for the exploration of their rich structural chemistry, and such studies also point to potential applications such as in materials that could facilitate nuclear waste disposal. In this Account, we describe the structural features of uranyl-organic compounds and efforts to synthesize uranyl-organic compounds with desired structures. We address strategies to construct 3-D uranyl-organic frameworks through rational selection of organic ligands and the incorporation of heteroatoms. The UO(2)(2+) species with inactive U═O double bonds usually form bipyramidal polyhedral structures with ligands coordinated at the equatorial positions, and these polyhedra act as primary building units (PBUs) for the construction of uranyl-organic compounds. The geometry of the uranyl ions and the steric arrangements and functionalities of organic ligands can be exploited in the the design of uranyl--organic extended structures, We also focus on the investigation of the promising physicochemical properties of uranyl-organic compounds. Uranyl-organic materials with an extended structure may exhibit attractive properties, such as photoluminescence, photocatalysis

  12. Baculovirus-induced tree-top disease: how extended is the role of egt as a gene for the extended phenotype?

    PubMed

    Ros, Vera I D; van Houte, Stineke; Hemerik, Lia; van Oers, Monique M

    2015-01-01

    Many parasites alter host behaviour to enhance their chance of transmission. Recently, the ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyl transferase (egt) gene from the baculovirus Lymantria dispar multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (LdMNPV) was identified to induce tree-top disease in L. dispar larvae. Infected gypsy moth larvae died at elevated positions (hence the term tree-top disease), which is thought to promote dissemination of the virus to lower foliage. It is, however, unknown whether egt has a conserved role among baculoviruses in inducing tree-top disease. Here, we studied tree-top disease induced by the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) in two different host insects, Trichoplusia ni and Spodoptera exigua, and we investigated the role of the viral egt gene therein. AcMNPV induced tree-top disease in both T. ni and S. exigua larvae, although in S. exigua a moulting-dependent effect was seen. Those S. exigua larvae undergoing a larval moult during the infection process died at elevated positions, while larvae that did not moult after infection died at low positions. For both T. ni and S. exigua, infection with a mutant AcMNPV lacking egt did not change the position where the larvae died. We conclude that egt has no highly conserved role in inducing tree-top disease in lepidopteran larvae. The conclusion that egt is a 'gene for an extended phenotype' is therefore not generally applicable for all baculovirus-host interactions. We hypothesize that in some baculovirus-host systems (including LdMNPV in L. dispar), an effect of egt on tree-top disease can be observed through indirect effects of egt on moulting-related climbing behaviour. PMID:25443568

  13. A Novel GABRG2 Mutation, p.R136*, in a family with GEFS+ and extended phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wangzhen; Pickrell, William O.; Cushion, Thomas D.; Davies, Jeffrey S.; Baer, Kristin; Mullins, Jonathan G.L.; Hammond, Carrie L.; Chung, Seo-Kyung; Thomas, Rhys H.; White, Cathy; Smith, Phil E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations in voltage-gated and ligand-gated ion channel genes have been identified in a small number of Mendelian families with genetic generalised epilepsies (GGEs). They are commonly associated with febrile seizures (FS), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and particularly with generalised or genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+). In clinical practice, despite efforts to categorise epilepsy and epilepsy families into syndromic diagnoses, many generalised epilepsies remain unclassified with a presumed genetic basis. During the systematic collection of epilepsy families, we assembled a cohort of families with evidence of GEFS+ and screened for variations in the γ2 subunit of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor gene (GABRG2). We detected a novel GABRG2(p.R136*) premature translation termination codon in one index-case from a two-generation nuclear family, presenting with an unclassified GGE, a borderline GEFS+ phenotype with learning difficulties and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The GABRG2(p.R136*) mutation segregates with the febrile seizure component of this family's GGE and is absent in 190 healthy control samples. In vitro expression assays demonstrated that γ2(p.R136*) subunits were produced, but had reduced cell-surface and total expression. When γ2(p.R136*) subunits were co-expressed with α1 and β2 subunits in HEK 293T cells, GABA–evoked currents were reduced. Furthermore, γ2(p.R136*) subunits were highly-expressed in intracellular aggregations surrounding the nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), suggesting compromised receptor trafficking. A novel GABRG2(p.R136*) mutation extends the spectrum of GABRG2 mutations identified in GEFS+ and GGE phenotypes, causes GABAA receptor dysfunction, and represents a putative epilepsy mechanism. PMID:24407264

  14. X , Y , and Z waves: Extended structures in nonlinear lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevrekidis, P. G.; Gagnon, J.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Malomed, B. A.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new type of waveforms in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) discrete media-multilegged extended nonlinear structures (ENSs), built as arrays of lattice solitons (tiles and stones, in the 2D and 3D cases, respectively). We study the stability of the tiles and stones analytically, and then extend them numerically to complete ENS forms for both 2D and 3D lattices, aiming to single out stable ENSs. The predicted patterns can be realized in Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in deep optical lattices, crystals built of microresonators, and 2D photonic crystals. In the latter case, the patterns provide for a technique for writing reconfigurable virtual partitions in multipurpose photonic devices.

  15. X , Y , and Z waves: extended structures in nonlinear lattices.

    PubMed

    Kevrekidis, P G; Gagnon, J; Frantzeskakis, D J; Malomed, B A

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new type of waveforms in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) discrete media-multilegged extended nonlinear structures (ENSs), built as arrays of lattice solitons (tiles and stones, in the 2D and 3D cases, respectively). We study the stability of the tiles and stones analytically, and then extend them numerically to complete ENS forms for both 2D and 3D lattices, aiming to single out stable ENSs. The predicted patterns can be realized in Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in deep optical lattices, crystals built of microresonators, and 2D photonic crystals. In the latter case, the patterns provide for a technique for writing reconfigurable virtual partitions in multipurpose photonic devices. PMID:17358275

  16. Concomitant Hamiltonian and topological structures of extended magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingam, Manasvi; Miloshevich, George; Morrison, Philip J.

    2016-07-01

    The paper describes the unique geometric properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), and demonstrates how such features are inherited by extended MHD, viz. models that incorporate two-fluid effects (the Hall term and electron inertia). The generalized helicities, and other geometric expressions for these models are presented in a topological context, emphasizing their universal facets. Some of the results presented include: the generalized Kelvin circulation theorems; the existence of two Lie-dragged 2-forms; and two concomitant helicities that can be studied via the Jones polynomial, which is widely utilized in Chern-Simons theory. The ensuing commonality is traced to the existence of an underlying Hamiltonian structure for all the extended MHD models, exemplified by the presence of a unique noncanonical Poisson bracket, and its associated energy.

  17. The extended phenotypes of marine symbioses: ecological and evolutionary consequences of intraspecific genetic diversity in coral–algal associations

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, John E.; Baums, Iliana B.

    2014-01-01

    Reef-building corals owe much of their success to a symbiosis with dinoflagellate microalgae in the genus Symbiodinium. In this association, the performance of each organism is tied to that of its partner, and together the partners form a holobiont that can be subject to selection. Climate change affects coral reefs, which are declining globally as a result. Yet the extent to which coral holobionts will be able to acclimate or evolve to handle climate change and other stressors remains unclear. Selection acts on individuals and evidence from terrestrial systems demonstrates that intraspecific genetic diversity plays a significant role in symbiosis ecology and evolution. However, we have a limited understanding of the effects of such diversity in corals. As molecular methods have advanced, so too has our recognition of the taxonomic and functional diversity of holobiont partners. Resolving the major components of the holobiont to the level of the individual will help us assess the importance of intraspecific diversity and partner interactions in coral–algal symbioses. Here, we hypothesize that unique combinations of coral and algal individuals yield functional diversity that affects not only the ecology and evolution of the coral holobiont, but associated communities as well. Our synthesis is derived from reviewing existing evidence and presenting novel data. By incorporating the effects of holobiont extended phenotypes into predictive models, we may refine our understanding of the evolutionary trajectory of corals and reef communities responding to climate change. PMID:25202306

  18. A tractable genotype–phenotype map modelling the self-assembly of protein quaternary structure

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, Sam F.; Johnston, Iain G.; Louis, Ard A.; Ahnert, Sebastian E.

    2014-01-01

    The mapping between biological genotypes and phenotypes is central to the study of biological evolution. Here, we introduce a rich, intuitive and biologically realistic genotype–phenotype (GP) map that serves as a model of self-assembling biological structures, such as protein complexes, and remains computationally and analytically tractable. Our GP map arises naturally from the self-assembly of polyomino structures on a two-dimensional lattice and exhibits a number of properties: redundancy (genotypes vastly outnumber phenotypes), phenotype bias (genotypic redundancy varies greatly between phenotypes), genotype component disconnectivity (phenotypes consist of disconnected mutational networks) and shape space covering (most phenotypes can be reached in a small number of mutations). We also show that the mutational robustness of phenotypes scales very roughly logarithmically with phenotype redundancy and is positively correlated with phenotypic evolvability. Although our GP map describes the assembly of disconnected objects, it shares many properties with other popular GP maps for connected units, such as models for RNA secondary structure or the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model for protein tertiary structure. The remarkable fact that these important properties similarly emerge from such different models suggests the possibility that universal features underlie a much wider class of biologically realistic GP maps. PMID:24718456

  19. Integrative phenomics reveals insight into the structure of phenotypic diversity in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Skelly, Daniel A.; Merrihew, Gennifer E.; Riffle, Michael; Connelly, Caitlin F.; Kerr, Emily O.; Johansson, Marnie; Jaschob, Daniel; Graczyk, Beth; Shulman, Nicholas J.; Wakefield, Jon; Cooper, Sara J.; Fields, Stanley; Noble, William S.; Muller, Eric G.D.; Davis, Trisha N.; Dunham, Maitreya J.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Akey, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the quantitative characteristics and structure of phenotypic diversity, we measured over 14,000 transcript, protein, metabolite, and morphological traits in 22 genetically diverse strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. More than 50% of all measured traits varied significantly across strains [false discovery rate (FDR) = 5%]. The structure of phenotypic correlations is complex, with 85% of all traits significantly correlated with at least one other phenotype (median = 6, maximum = 328). We show how high-dimensional molecular phenomics data sets can be leveraged to accurately predict phenotypic variation between strains, often with greater precision than afforded by DNA sequence information alone. These results provide new insights into the spectrum and structure of phenotypic diversity and the characteristics influencing the ability to accurately predict phenotypes. PMID:23720455

  20. Plasmon coupling in extended structures: Graphene superlattice nanoribbon arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, Daniel; Low, Tony; Farmer, Damon B.; Altug, Hatice; Avouris, Phaedon

    2016-03-01

    Interaction between localized plasmons in isolated proximal nanostructures is a well-studied phenomenon. Here we explore plasmon-plasmon interactions in connected extended systems. Such systems can now be easily produced experimentally using graphene. However, the mechanisms of plasmonic interactions in extended systems are not well understood. We employ finite-element methods to study these interactions in graphene superlattice nanoribbon arrays with a periodically modulated electrochemical potential or number of layers. We find a rich variation in the resulting plasmonic resonances depending on the dimensions, the electrochemical potentials (doping), and the separation of the nanoribbon segments, and we demonstrate the involvement of both transverse and longitudinal plasmon-plasmon interactions. For example, unlike predictions based on the well-known "orbital hybridization model," the energies of the resulting hybrid plasmonic resonances in the extended system can lie between the energies of the plasmons in the individual components. Our results demonstrate that the plasmonic spectra of graphene superlattice structures can be easily adjusted, continuously tuned, and used to enhance optical fields in the infrared and terahertz regions of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  1. Structure of the extended emission in the infrared celestial background

    SciTech Connect

    Price, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    The extended infrared celestial emission is due to three main sources: zodiacal dust, large discrete objects in the galaxy, and interstellar dust. As viewed from earth orbit, the thermal reradiation of sunlight absorbed by dust in the solar system produces a pervasive IR background that peaks roughly along the ecliptic plane, where the density of dust is highest. Much-smaller-scale structure was also observed in both the visual and infrared. Between 7 and 30 micrometers, H II regions are the brightest discrete objects in the galaxy. An additional emission mechanism is needed, however, to account for the shorter-wavelength observations. The galactic sources combine along the line of sight to produce an intense band of emission, centered on the galactic plane. Structure in all of these backgrounds creates a clutter problem for an orbiting IR telescope.

  2. Exploring the Extended Structure of the Sculptor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westfall, K. B.; Ostheimer, J. C.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Patterson, R. J.; Majewski, S. R.; Kunkel, W. E.

    2000-12-01

    We have undertaken a large area (>3 deg2) survey of the Sculptor dSph using the 1-m Swope telescope. The region surveyed includes roughly 1 deg2 centered on the Sculptor core, with the remaining survey area extending to the east and stretching to almost twice the tidal radius (rt=76.5m) to the northeast and southeast. We have imaged in the Washington M,T2 and DDO51 filters, a combination that allows us to discriminate dwarf and giant stars based on the gravity sensitivity of DDO51. The extended structure of Sculptor can be mapped via those stars selected both as giant stars and as having a combination of M and M-T2 consistent with the red giant branch of Sculptor. We also make use of the areal distribution of blue horizontal branch stars, which delineate the extended structure of Sculptor relatively well in this field at high Galactic latitude. Using the HYDRA spectrograph on the Blanco 4-m, we have obtained more than a dozen radial velocities for candidate Sculptor stars that we have identified well outside (1) the core radius, and (2) the radii explored by previous surveys. A preliminary conclusion from our work so far is that Sculptor does not show as extensive a population of extratidal stars as we have identified in similar work we have conducted around the Carina (Majewski et al. 2000, AJ, 119, 760) and Ursa Minor (Palma et al. 2000, BAAS) dwarf galaxies. Indeed, if a lack of significant extended material around Sculptor is borne out by further study over more area and other position angles, then an interesting correlation begins to emerge: Among four galaxies we have surveyed in this way (Car, UMi, Leo II, and Scl), the relative fraction of the dSph's found outside the nominal tidal radius appears to correlate with the published values of M/L. This may suggest that the derived masses for the dwarf spheroidals may be systematically overestimated to a degree set by the amount of dynamical non-equilibrium in the system. This work was supported by NSF, NASA, the

  3. Structural Modeling Insights into Human VKORC1 Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Czogalla, Katrin J.; Watzka, Matthias; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) catalyses the reduction of vitamin K and its 2,3-epoxide essential to sustain γ-carboxylation of vitamin K-dependent proteins. Two different phenotypes are associated with mutations in human VKORC1. The majority of mutations cause resistance to 4-hydroxycoumarin- and indandione-based vitamin K antagonists (VKA) used in the prevention and therapy of thromboembolism. Patients with these mutations require greater doses of VKA for stable anticoagulation than patients without mutations. The second phenotype, a very rare autosomal-recessive bleeding disorder caused by combined deficiency of vitamin K dependent clotting factors type 2 (VKCFD2) arises from a homozygous Arg98Trp mutation. The bleeding phenotype can be corrected by vitamin K administration. Here, we summarize published experimental data and in silico modeling results in order to rationalize the mechanisms of VKA resistance and VKCFD2. PMID:26287237

  4. The extended structure of the dwarf irregular galaxy Sagittarius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccari, G.; Bellazzini, M.; Fraternali, F.; Battaglia, G.; Perina, S.; Sollima, A.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Testa, V.; Galleti, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present a detailed study of the stellar and H i structure of the dwarf irregular galaxy Sagittarius. We use new deep and wide field photometry to trace the surface brightness profile of the galaxy out to ≃5.0' (corresponding to ≃1600 pc) and down to μV ≃ 30.0 mag/arcsec2, thus showing that the stellar body of the galaxy is much more extended than previously believed, and it is similarly (or more) extended than the overall H i distribution. The whole major-axis profile is consistent with a pure exponential, with a scale radius of ≃340 pc. The surface density maps reveal that the distribution of old and intermediate-age stars is smooth and remarkably flattened out to its edges, while the associated H i has a much rounder shape, is off-centred and presents multiple density maxima and a significant hole. No clear sign of systemic rotation is detectable in the complex H i velocity field. No metallicity gradient is detected in the old and intermediate age population of the galaxy, and we confirm that this population has a much more extended distribution than young stars (age ≲ 1 Gyr). Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, under the Program 089.D-0052(A).Table of stellar photometry (IN6) is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/570/A78

  5. FOURIER ANALYSIS OF EXTENDED FINE STRUCTURE WITH AUTOREGRESSIVE PREDICTION

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.; Shirley, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Autoregressive prediction is adapted to double the resolution of Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) Fourier transforms. Even with the optimal taper (weighting function), the commonly used taper-and-transform Fourier method has limited resolution: it assumes the signal is zero beyond the limits of the measurement. By seeking the Fourier spectrum of an infinite extent oscillation consistent with the measurements but otherwise having maximum entropy, the errors caused by finite data range can be reduced. Our procedure developed to implement this concept applies autoregressive prediction to extrapolate the signal to an extent controlled by a taper width. Difficulties encountered when processing actual ARPEFS data are discussed. A key feature of this approach is the ability to convert improved measurements (signal-to-noise or point density) into improved Fourier resolution.

  6. Coupled and extended quintessence: Theoretical differences and structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettorino, Valeria; Baccigalupi, Carlo

    2008-05-01

    The case of a coupling between dark energy and matter [coupled quintessence (CQ)] or gravity [extended quintessence (EQ)] has recently attracted a deep interest and has been widely investigated both in the Einstein and in the Jordan frames (EF, JF), within scalar-tensor theories. Focusing on the simplest models proposed so far, in this paper we study the relation existing between the two scenarios, isolating the Weyl scaling which allows one to express them in the EF and JF. Moreover, we perform a comparative study of the behavior of linear perturbations in both scenarios, which turn out to behave in a markedly different way. In particular, while the clustering is enhanced in the considered CQ models with respect to the corresponding quintessence ones where the coupling is absent and to the ordinary cosmologies with a cosmological constant and cold dark matter (ΛCDM), structures in EQ models may grow slower. This is likely to have direct consequences on the inner properties of nonlinear structures, like cluster concentration, as well as on the weak lensing shear on large scales. Finally, we specialize our study for interfacing linear dynamics and N-body simulations in these cosmologies, giving a recipe for the corrections to be included in N-body codes in order to take into account the modifications to the expansion rate, growth of structures, and strength of gravity.

  7. Structure of the extended emission in the infrared celestial background

    SciTech Connect

    Price, S.D.

    1986-09-30

    The extended emission in the infrared celestial background may be divided into three main components: the zodiacal background, the large discrete sources in the galaxy, and the interstellar dust. The zodiacal background is due to the thermal reradiation of sunlight absorbed by the dust in the solar system. An earth-orbiting infrared telescope will detect the diffuse emission from this dust in all directions with maximum intensity lying roughly along the ecliptic plane where the density of dust is highest. Structure with scale lengths of 10/sup 0/ was measured in both the visual and infrared; finer structure was detected in the infrared by the Infrared Astronomy Satellite. H II regions, areas of ionized gas mixed with and surrounded by dust, are the brightest discrete objects in the galaxy in the long wavelength infrared re-emitted in the infrared with a range of temperatures characteristic of the thermal equilibrium for the surroundings of the dust. The emission from the interstellar dust produces a filimentary structured background, the infrared cirrus. The observed far-infrared color temperature of about 20-35K for the cirrus is consistent with emission-form graphite and silicate grains which absorb the interstellar radiation field. The much-larger LWIR color temperature is likely due to a greater abundance of sub-micron particles in the interstellar medium and, perhaps, from band emission due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These galactic planes have full width at half maxima of about 2/sup 0/.

  8. The extended evolutionary synthesis: its structure, assumptions and predictions

    PubMed Central

    Laland, Kevin N.; Uller, Tobias; Feldman, Marcus W.; Sterelny, Kim; Müller, Gerd B.; Moczek, Armin; Jablonka, Eva; Odling-Smee, John

    2015-01-01

    Scientific activities take place within the structured sets of ideas and assumptions that define a field and its practices. The conceptual framework of evolutionary biology emerged with the Modern Synthesis in the early twentieth century and has since expanded into a highly successful research program to explore the processes of diversification and adaptation. Nonetheless, the ability of that framework satisfactorily to accommodate the rapid advances in developmental biology, genomics and ecology has been questioned. We review some of these arguments, focusing on literatures (evo-devo, developmental plasticity, inclusive inheritance and niche construction) whose implications for evolution can be interpreted in two ways—one that preserves the internal structure of contemporary evolutionary theory and one that points towards an alternative conceptual framework. The latter, which we label the ‘extended evolutionary synthesis' (EES), retains the fundaments of evolutionary theory, but differs in its emphasis on the role of constructive processes in development and evolution, and reciprocal portrayals of causation. In the EES, developmental processes, operating through developmental bias, inclusive inheritance and niche construction, share responsibility for the direction and rate of evolution, the origin of character variation and organism–environment complementarity. We spell out the structure, core assumptions and novel predictions of the EES, and show how it can be deployed to stimulate and advance research in those fields that study or use evolutionary biology. PMID:26246559

  9. The extended evolutionary synthesis: its structure, assumptions and predictions.

    PubMed

    Laland, Kevin N; Uller, Tobias; Feldman, Marcus W; Sterelny, Kim; Müller, Gerd B; Moczek, Armin; Jablonka, Eva; Odling-Smee, John

    2015-08-22

    Scientific activities take place within the structured sets of ideas and assumptions that define a field and its practices. The conceptual framework of evolutionary biology emerged with the Modern Synthesis in the early twentieth century and has since expanded into a highly successful research program to explore the processes of diversification and adaptation. Nonetheless, the ability of that framework satisfactorily to accommodate the rapid advances in developmental biology, genomics and ecology has been questioned. We review some of these arguments, focusing on literatures (evo-devo, developmental plasticity, inclusive inheritance and niche construction) whose implications for evolution can be interpreted in two ways—one that preserves the internal structure of contemporary evolutionary theory and one that points towards an alternative conceptual framework. The latter, which we label the 'extended evolutionary synthesis' (EES), retains the fundaments of evolutionary theory, but differs in its emphasis on the role of constructive processes in development and evolution, and reciprocal portrayals of causation. In the EES, developmental processes, operating through developmental bias, inclusive inheritance and niche construction, share responsibility for the direction and rate of evolution, the origin of character variation and organism-environment complementarity. We spell out the structure, core assumptions and novel predictions of the EES, and show how it can be deployed to stimulate and advance research in those fields that study or use evolutionary biology. PMID:26246559

  10. Population structure and genotype-phenotype associations in a collection of oat landraces and historic cultivars.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Population structure and genetic architecture of phenotypic traits in oat (Avena sativa L.) remain relatively under-researched compared to other small grain species. This study explores the historic context of current elite germplasm, including phenotypic and genetic characterization, with a partic...

  11. Understanding the Phenotypic Structure of Adult Retrospective ADHD Symptoms during Childhood in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranby, Krista W.; Boynton, Marcella H.; Kollins, Scott H.; McClernon, F. Joseph; Yang, Chongming; Fuemmeler, Bernard F.

    2012-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly heterogeneous disorder, and the phenotypic structure comprising inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive type symptoms has been the focus of a growing body of recent research. Methodological studies are needed to better characterize phenotypes to advance research as well as clinical…

  12. Visibility of Extended Coronal Structures and CMEs in the EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanche, Nicole; Golub, Leon

    2014-06-01

    Extended coronal structures around active regions and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have often been seen in the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) channels to the full extent of the AIA and SWAP field of views 1.3 and 1.7 Rsun). Using off-pointed comet data in AIA we sum a large number of frames to evaluate the off-limb distance to which streamers can be detected. For CMEs, we compared the events classified as halo CMEs in the white-light LASCO CACTus catalog from July-September 2013 to the AIA and SWAP data collected around those events. We discovered that roughly 80% of events could be seen in the EUV using both regular and running difference movies, with the most effective channels being the 193 and 304Å channels. By projecting out the signal strength of several of these events, we conclude that these EUV events can in many cases be detected to over 2.5 Rsun. A larger field-of-view telescope would make it possible to track the development of these structures and events from the disk out to several solar radii, complementing the traditional white-light methods.

  13. The extended interacting wind structure of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, T. R.; Nielsen, K. E.; Corcoran, M. F.; Madura, T. I.; Owocki, S. P.; Russell, C. M. P.; Hillier, D. J.; Hamaguchi, K.; Kober, G. V.; Weis, K.; Stahl, O.; Okazaki, A. T.

    2009-07-01

    The highly eccentric binary system, η Car, provides clues to the transition of massive stars from hydrogen-burning via the CNO cycle to a helium-burning evolutionary state. The fast-moving wind of η Car B creates a cavity in η Car A's slower, but more massive, stellar wind, providing an in situ probe. The Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS), with its high spatial and spectral resolutions, is well matched to follow temporal spatial and velocity variations of multiple wind features. We use observations obtained across 1998-2004 to produce a rudimentary three-dimensional model of the wind interaction in the η Car system. Broad (+/-500 km s-1) [FeII] emission line structures extend 0.7arcsec (~1600 au) from the stellar core. In contrast, [FeIII], [ArIII], [NeIII] and [SIII] lines extend only 0.3arcsec (700 au) from NE to SW and are blue shifted from -500 to +200 km s-1. All observed spectral features vary with the 5.54-year orbital period. The highly ionized, forbidden emission disappears during the low state, associated with periastron passage. The high-ionization emission originates in the outer wind interaction region that is directly excited by the far-ultraviolet radiation from η Car B. The HST/STIS spectra reveal a time-varying, distorted paraboloidal structure, caused by the interaction of the massive stellar winds. The model and observations are consistent with the orbital plane aligned with the skirt of the Homunculus. However, the axis of the distorted paraboloid, relative to the major axis of the binary orbit, is shifted in a prograde rotation along the plane, which projected on the sky is from NE to NW. Based on observations made with the National Aeronautics and Space Agency/European Space Agency (NASA/ESA) HST. Support for Programme numbers 7302, 8036, 8483, 8619, 9083, 9337, 9420, 9973, 10957 and 11273 was provided by NASA directly to the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph Science Team and through grants from the

  14. Leber Congenital Amaurosis: Genotypes and Retinal Structure Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Samuel G; Cideciyan, Artur V; Huang, Wei Chieh; Sumaroka, Alexander; Nam, Hyun Ju; Sheplock, Rebecca; Schwartz, Sharon B

    2016-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) patients of 10 known genotypes (n = 24; age range, 3-25 years) were studied clinically and by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Comparisons were made between OCT results across the horizontal meridian (central 60(o)) of the patients. Three patterns were identified. First, there were LCA genotypes with unusual and readily identifiable patterns, such as near normal outer nuclear layer (ONL) across the central retina or severely dysplastic retina. Second, there were genotypes with well-formed foveal architecture but only residual central islands of normal or reduced ONL thickness. Third, some genotypes showed central ONL losses or dysmorphology suggesting early macular disease or foveal maldevelopment. Objective in vivo morphological features could complement other phenotypic characteristics and help guide genetic testing of LCA patients or at least permit a differential diagnosis of genotypes to be made in the clinic. PMID:26427408

  15. The MARK-AGE phenotypic database: Structure and strategy.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Villanueva, María; Kötter, Tobias; Sindlinger, Thilo; Baur, Jennifer; Oehlke, Sebastian; Bürkle, Alexander; Berthold, Michael R

    2015-11-01

    In the context of the MARK-AGE study, anthropometric, clinical and social data as well as samples of venous blood, buccal mucosal cells and urine were systematically collected from 3337 volunteers. Information from about 500 standardised questions and about 500 analysed biomarkers needed to be documented per individual. On the one hand handling with such a vast amount of data necessitates the use of appropriate informatics tools and the establishment of a database. On the other hand personal information on subjects obtained as a result of such studies has, of course, to be kept confidential, and therefore the investigators must ensure that the subjects' anonymity will be maintained. Such secrecy obligation implies a well-designed and secure system for data storage. In order to fulfil the demands of the MARK-AGE study we established a phenotypic database for storing information on the study subjects by using a doubly coded system. PMID:25817205

  16. Extended Kalman filter based structural damage detection for MR damper controlled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chenhao; Jang, Shinae; Sun, Xiaorong; Jiang, Zhaoshuo; Christenson, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The Magneto-rheological (MR) dampers have been widely used in many building and bridge structures against earthquake and wind loadings due to its advantages including mechanical simplicity, high dynamic range, low power requirements, large force capacity, and robustness. However, research about structural damage detection methods for MR damper controlled structures is limited. This paper aims to develop a real-time structural damage detection method for MR damper controlled structures. A novel state space model of MR damper controlled structure is first built by combining the structure's equation of motion and MR damper's hyperbolic tangent model. In this way, the state parameters of both the structure and MR damper are added in the state vector of the state space model. Extended Kalman filter is then used to provide prediction for state variables from measurement data. The two techniques are synergistically combined to identify parameters and track the changes of both structure and MR damper in real time. The proposed method is tested using response data of a three-floor MR damper controlled linear building structure under earthquake excitation. The testing results show that the adaptive extended Kalman filter based approach is capable to estimate not only structural parameters such as stiffness and damping of each floor, but also the parameters of MR damper, so that more insights and understanding of the damage can be obtained. The developed method also demonstrates high damage detection accuracy and light computation, as well as the potential to implement in a structural health monitoring system.

  17. Combinatorial phenotypic screen uncovers unrecognized family of extended thiourea inhibitors with copper-dependent anti-staphylococcal activity.

    PubMed

    Dalecki, Alex G; Malalasekera, Aruni P; Schaaf, Kaitlyn; Kutsch, Olaf; Bossmann, Stefan H; Wolschendorf, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The continuous rise of multi-drug resistant pathogenic bacteria has become a significant challenge for the health care system. In particular, novel drugs to treat infections of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains (MRSA) are needed, but traditional drug discovery campaigns have largely failed to deliver clinically suitable antibiotics. More than simply new drugs, new drug discovery approaches are needed to combat bacterial resistance. The recently described phenomenon of copper-dependent inhibitors has galvanized research exploring the use of metal-coordinating molecules to harness copper's natural antibacterial properties for therapeutic purposes. Here, we describe the results of the first concerted screening effort to identify copper-dependent inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus. A standard library of 10 000 compounds was assayed for anti-staphylococcal activity, with hits defined as those compounds with a strict copper-dependent inhibitory activity. A total of 53 copper-dependent hit molecules were uncovered, similar to the copper independent hit rate of a traditionally executed campaign conducted in parallel on the same library. Most prominent was a hit family with an extended thiourea core structure, termed the NNSN motif. This motif resulted in copper-dependent and copper-specific S. aureus inhibition, while simultaneously being well tolerated by eukaryotic cells. Importantly, we could demonstrate that copper binding by the NNSN motif is highly unusual and likely responsible for the promising biological qualities of these compounds. A subsequent chemoinformatic meta-analysis of the ChEMBL chemical database confirmed the NNSNs as an unrecognized staphylococcal inhibitor, despite the family's presence in many chemical screening libraries. Thus, our copper-biased screen has proven able to discover inhibitors within previously screened libraries, offering a mechanism to reinvigorate exhausted molecular collections. PMID:26935206

  18. Population structure of deep-sea chemolithoautotrophs: identification of phenotypic and genotypic correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mino, S.; Nakagawa, S.; Sawabe, T.; Miyazaki, J.; Makita, H.; Nunoura, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Takai, K.

    2012-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal fields are areas on the seafloor of high biological productivity fueled primarily by microbial chemosynthesis. Chemolithoautotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria and Persephonella with an ability to utilize inorganic substrates such as elemental sulfur and hydrogen are important members in wide range of temperature conditions in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. However, little is known about their population genetic structure such as intraspecific genetic diversity, distribution pattern, and phenotypic characteristics. Previously, using genetic approach based on multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA), we clarified that Epsilonproteobacteria Group A, B, F, and Persephonella populations were geographically separated, and Epsilonproteobacteria appeared to diverge by mutation rather than recombination. Contrary to genetic evidence for allopatric segregation in deep-sea chemoautotrophs, however, phenotypic evidence has never been found. In addition, analyzing such a phenotypic characteristic may lead to a better understanding of the interactions microbes have with their environment. In this study, we present a metabolomic approach based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to reveal phenotypic biogeographical discrimination. We demonstrated the whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS method on Epsilonproteobacteria and Persephonella populations. These chemoautotrophic strains used in this study were isolated from chimney structures, vent fluids, and hydrothermal sediments. These hydrothermal samples were collected from geographically separated hydrothermal areas of the South Mariana Trough, Okinawa Trough and Central Indian Ridge. Based on mass peaks (signal/noise >10) within the m/z range of 2000-14000, phenotypic analysis was carried out by cluster analysis. The result of phenotypic analysis was compared with the genotypic clusters. The whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS revealed that Persephonella population was identified to

  19. Simple surface structure determination from Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y. |; Shirley, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    The authors show by Fourier analyses of experimental data, with no further treatment, that the positions of all the strong peaks in Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) from adsorbed surfaces can be explicitly predicted from a trial structure with an accuracy of about {+-} 0.3 {angstrom} based on a single-scattering cluster model together with the concept of a strong backscattering cone, and without any additional analysis. This characteristic of ARPEFS Fourier transforms can be developed as a simple method for determining the structures of adsorbed surfaces to an accuracy of about {+-} 0.1 {angstrom}.

  20. Evaluation of high temperature structural adhesives for extended service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. L.; Hill, S. G.

    1984-01-01

    High temperature stable adhesive systems were evaluated for potential Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) vehicle applications. The program was divided into two major phases: Phase I 'Adhesive Screening' evaluated eleven selected polyimide (PI) and polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) adhesive resins using eight different titanium (6Al-4V) adherend surface preparations; Phase II 'Adhesive Optimization and Characterization' extensively evaluated two adhesive systems, selected from Phase I studies, for chemical characterization and environmental durability. The adhesive systems which exhibited superior thermal and environmental bond properties were LARC-TPI polyimide and polyphenylquinoxaline both developed at NASA Langley. The latter adhesive system did develop bond failures at extended thermal aging due primarily to incompatibility between the surface preparation and the polymer. However, this study did demonstrate that suitable adhesive systems are available for extended supersonic cruise vehicle design applications.

  1. Can structural neuroimaging be used to define phenotypes and course of schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Kerns, John G; Lauriello, John

    2012-09-01

    This article examines whether structural neuroimaging measures have been found to predict outcome in schizophrenia and whether changes in neuroimaging measures have been found to correlate with poor outcome in the disorder. Overall, there is little compelling evidence that structural neuroimaging measures in either first-episode or chronic patients predict future outcome. Progressive brain changes might reflect a neuroimaging phenotype associated with a worse course of the disorder. At the same time, there are many fruitful avenues that future research could take in an attempt to better predict future outcome or to identify specific imaging phenotypes associated with outcome. PMID:22929870

  2. Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-related encephalopathy: a case which may extend the documented phenotype of this condition

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Janet T; Scally, Caroline; Peden, Norman; Macleod, Malcolm

    2012-01-01

    A 51-year-old man presented with a focal epileptic, fluctuating encephalopathy. Antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC-Abs) were detected in his serum. Several features of this case were different from those previously reported in VGKC-Ab-associated encephalitis, illustrating that it may have a broader phenotype than previously documented. These features were: excess hepatic iron deposits without cirrhosis, reduced consciousness and fluctuating neurological signs. Previous history included personality change, depression, type 2 diabetes mellitus, pupil sparing third nerve palsy and epilepsy secondary to a head injury. He had never drunk alcohol and had recovered from a similar episode 4 years previously. Both episodes resolved after approximately 2 months. The cerebrospinal fluid had a raised protein content but no organisms. The patient was heterozygous for C282Y and negative for H63D mutations excluding classical idiopathic haemochromatosis. He recovered with supportive care to his premorbid level of health. PMID:22693327

  3. Band structures extending to very high spin in Xe126

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rønn Hansen, C.; Sletten, G.; Hagemann, G. B.; Herskind, B.; Jensen, D. R.; Bringel, P.; Engelhardt, C.; Hübel, H.; Neußer-Neffgen, A.; Singh, A. K.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Bednarczyk, P.; Byrski, T.; Curien, D.; Benzoni, G.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Leoni, S.; Clark, R. M.; Fallon, P.; Korichi, A.; Roccaz, J.; Maj, A.; Wilson, J. N.; Lisle, J. C.; Steinhardt, T.; Thelen, O.; Ødegård, S. W.

    2007-09-01

    High-spin states in Xe126 have been populated in the Se82(Ca48,4n)Xe126 reaction in two experiments, one at the VIVITRON accelerator in Strasbourg using the Euroball detector array, and a subsequent one with ATLAS at Argonne using the Gammasphere Ge-detector array. Levels and assignments made previously for Xe126 up to I=20 have been confirmed and extended. Four regular bands extending to a spin of almost I=60, which are interpreted as two pairs of signature partners with opposite parity, are identified for the first time. The α = 0 partner of each pair is connected to the lower-lying levels, whereas the two α = 1 partners remain floating. A fractional Doppler shift analysis of transitions in the strongest populated (π,α)=(-,0) band provides a value of 5.20.50.4 b for the transition quadrupole moment, which can be related to a minimum in the potential-energy surface calculated by the ULTIMATE CRANKER cranked shell-model code at ɛ≈0.35 and γ≈5°. The four lowest bands calculated for this minimum compare well with the two signature pairs experimentally observed over a wide spin range. A sharp upbend at ℏω~1170 keV is interpreted as a crossing with a band involving the j15/2 neutron orbital, for which pairing correlations are expected to be totally quenched. The four long bands extend to within ˜5 spin units of a crossing with an yrast line defined by calculated hyperdeformed transitions and will serve as important stepping stones into the spin region beyond 60ħ for future experiments.

  4. Structural and functional genome analysis using extended chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Heaf, T.; Ward, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    Highly extended linear chromatin fibers (ECFs) produced by detergent and high-salt lysis and stretching of nuclear chromatin across the surface of a glass slide can by hybridized over physical distances of at least several Mb. This allows long-range FISH analysis of the human genome with excellent DNA resolution (<10 kb/{mu}m). The insertion of Alu elements which are more than 50-fold underrepresented in centromeres can be seen within and near long tandem arrays of alpha-satellite DNA. Long tracts of trinucleotide repeats, i.e. (CCA){sub n}, can be localized within larger genomic regions. The combined application of BrdU incorporation and ECFs allows one to study the spatio-temporal distribution of DNA replication sites in finer detail. DNA synthesis occurs at multiple discrete sites within Mb arrays of alpha-satellite. Replicating DNA is tightly associated with the nuclear matrix and highly resistant to stretching out, while ECFs containing newly replicated DNA are easily released. Asynchrony in replication timing is accompanied by differences in condensation of homologous DNA segments. Extended chromatin reveals differential packaging of active and inactive DNA. Upon transcriptional inactivation by AMD, the normally compact rRNA genes become much more susceptible to decondensation procedures. By extending the chromatin from pachytene spermatocytes, meiotic pairing and genetic exchange between homologs can be visualized directly. Histone depletion by high salt and detergent produces loop chromatin surrounding the nuclear matrix in a halo-like fashion. DNA halos can be used to map nuclear matrix attachment sites in somatic cells and in mature sperm. Alpha-satellite containing DNA loops appear to be attached to the sperm-cell matrix by CENP-B boxes, short 17 bp sequences found in a subset of alpha satellite monomers. Sperm telomeres almost always appear as hybridization doublets, suggesting the presence of already replicated chromosome ends.

  5. Structure and composition of the courtship phenotype in the bird of paradise Parotia lawesii (Aves: Paradisaeidae).

    PubMed

    Scholes, Edwin

    2008-01-01

    Ethology is rooted in the idea that behavior is composed of discrete units and sub-units that can be compared among taxa in a phylogenetic framework. This means that behavior, like morphology and genes, is inherently modular. Yet, the concept of modularity is not well integrated into how we envision the behavioral components of phenotype. Understanding ethological modularity, and its implications for animal phenotype organization and evolution, requires that we construct interpretive schemes that permit us to examine it. In this study, I describe the structure and composition of a complex part of the behavioral phenotype of Parotia lawesii Ramsay, 1885--a bird of paradise (Aves: Paradisaeidae) from the forests of eastern New Guinea. I use archived voucher video clips, photographic ethograms, and phenotype ontology diagrams to describe the modular units comprising courtship at various levels of integration. Results show P. lawesii to have 15 courtship and mating behaviors (11 males, 4 females) hierarchically arranged within a complex seven-level structure. At the finest level examined, male displays are comprised of 49 modular sub-units (elements) differentially employed to form more complex modular units (phases and versions) at higher-levels of integration. With its emphasis on hierarchical modularity, this study provides an important conceptual framework for understanding courtship-related phenotypic complexity and provides a solid basis for comparative study of the genus Parotia. PMID:18359213

  6. Multivariate genetic analysis of brain structure in an extended twin design.

    PubMed

    Posthuma, D; de Geus, E J; Neale, M C; Hulshoff Pol, H E; Baaré WEC; Kahn, R S; Boomsma, D

    2000-07-01

    The hunt for genes influencing behavior may be aided by the study of intermediate phenotypes for several reasons. First, intermediate phenotypes may be influenced by only a few genes, which facilitates their detection. Second, many intermediate phenotypes can be measured on a continuous quantitative scale and thus can be assessed in affected and unaffected individuals. Continuous measures increase the statistical power to detect genetic effects (Neale et al., 1994), and allow studies to be designed to collect data from informative subjects such as extreme concordant or discordant pairs. Intermediate phenotypes for discrete traits, such as psychiatric disorders, can be neurotransmitter levels, brain function, or structure. In this paper we conduct a multivariate analysis of data from 111 twin pairs and 34 additional siblings on cerebellar volume, intracranial space, and body height. The analysis is carried out on the raw data and specifies a model for the mean and the covariance structure. Results suggest that cerebellar volume and intracranial space vary with age and sex. Brain volumes tend to decrease slightly with age, and males generally have a larger brain volume than females. The remaining phenotypic variance of cerebellar volume is largely genetic (88%). These genetic factors partly overlap with the genetic factors that explain variance in intracranial space and body height. The applied method is presented as a general approach for the analysis of intermediate phenotypes in which the effects of correlated variables on the observed scores are modeled through multivariate analysis. PMID:11206086

  7. Correlates across the Structural, Functional, and Molecular Phenotypes of Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckel-Mitchener, Andrea; Greenough, William T.

    2004-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is characterized by a pattern of morphological, functional, and molecular characteristics with, in at least some cases, apparent relationships among phenotypic features at different levels. Gross morphology differences in the sizes of some human brain regions are accompanied by fine structural alterations in the shapes and…

  8. Extended B cell phenotype in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mensah, F; Bansal, A; Berkovitz, S; Sharma, A; Reddy, V; Leandro, M J; Cambridge, G

    2016-05-01

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a heterogeneous condition of unknown aetiology characterized by multiple symptoms including fatigue, post-exertional malaise and cognitive impairment, lasting for at least 6 months. Recently, two clinical trials of B cell depletion therapy with rituximab (anti-CD20) reported convincing improvement in symptoms. A possible but undefined role for B cells has therefore been proposed. Studies of the relative percentages of B cell subsets in patients with ME/CFS have not revealed any reproducible differences from healthy controls (HC). In order to explore whether more subtle alterations in B cell subsets related to B cell differentiation exist in ME/CFS patients we used flow cytometry to immunophenotype CD19(+) B cells. The panel utilized immunoglobulin (Ig)D, CD27 and CD38 (classical B cell subsets) together with additional markers. A total of 38 patients fulfilling Canadian, Centre for Disease Control and Fukuda ME/CFS criteria and 32 age- and sex-matched HC were included. We found no difference in percentages of classical subsets between ME/CFS patients and HC. However, we observed an increase in frequency (P < 0·01) and expression (MFI; P = 0·03) of CD24 on total B cells, confined to IgD(+) subsets. Within memory subsets, a higher frequency of CD21(+) CD38(-) B cells (>20%) was associated with the presence of ME/CFS [odds ratio: 3·47 (1·15-10·46); P = 0·03] compared with HC, and there was a negative correlation with disease duration. In conclusion, we identified possible changes in B cell phenotype in patients with ME/CFS. These may reflect altered B cell function and, if confirmed in other patient cohorts, could provide a platform for studies based on clinical course or responsiveness to rituximab therapy. PMID:26646713

  9. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome type 2: report of nine new cases that extend the phenotypic and genotypic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Mark J; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Yau, Shu; Lillis, Suzanne; Hurst, Jane A; Clement, Emma; Reardon, William; Joss, Shelagh; Hobson, Emma; Blyth, Moira; Al-Shehhi, Maryam; Lynch, Sally A; Suri, Mohnish

    2016-10-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is an autosomal dominant neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by growth deficiency, broad thumbs and great toes, intellectual disability and characteristic craniofacial appearance. Mutations in CREBBP account for around 55% of cases, with a further 8% attributed to the paralogous gene EP300. Comparatively few reports exist describing the phenotype of Rubinstein-Taybi because of EP300 mutations. Clinical and genetic data were obtained from nine patients from the UK and Ireland with pathogenic EP300 mutations, identified either by targeted testing or by exome sequencing. All patients had mild or moderate intellectual impairment. Behavioural or social difficulties were noted in eight patients, including three with autistic spectrum disorders. Typical dysmorphic features of Rubinstein-Taybi were only variably present. Additional observations include maternal pre-eclampsia (2/9), syndactyly (3/9), feeding or swallowing issues (3/9), delayed bone age (2/9) and scoliosis (2/9). Six patients had truncating mutations in EP300, with pathogenic missense mutations identified in the remaining three. The findings support previous observations that microcephaly, maternal pre-eclampsia, mild growth restriction and a mild to moderate intellectual disability are key pointers to the diagnosis of EP300-related RTS. Variability in the presence of typical facial features of Rubinstein-Taybi further highlights clinical heterogeneity, particularly among patients identified by exome sequencing. Features that overlap with Floating-Harbor syndrome, including craniofacial dysmorphism and delayed osseous maturation, were observed in three patients. Previous reports have only described mutations predicted to cause haploinsufficiency of EP300, whereas this cohort includes the first described pathogenic missense mutations in EP300. PMID:27465822

  10. Trade-Offs in Relative Limb Length among Peruvian Children: Extending the Thrifty Phenotype Hypothesis to Limb Proportions

    PubMed Central

    Pomeroy, Emma; Stock, Jay T.; Stanojevic, Sanja; Miranda, J. Jaime; Cole, Tim J.; Wells, Jonathan C. K.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Methods Both the concept of ‘brain-sparing’ growth and associations between relative lower limb length, childhood environment and adult disease risk are well established. Furthermore, tibia length is suggested to be particularly plastic under conditions of environmental stress. The mechanisms responsible are uncertain, but three hypotheses may be relevant. The ‘thrifty phenotype’ assumes that some components of growth are selectively sacrificed to preserve more critical outcomes, like the brain. The ‘distal blood flow’ hypothesis assumes that blood nutrients decline with distance from the heart, and hence may affect limbs in relation to basic body geometry. Temperature adaptation predicts a gradient of decreased size along the limbs reflecting decreasing tissue temperature/blood flow. We examined these questions by comparing the size of body segments among Peruvian children born and raised in differentially stressful environments. In a cross-sectional sample of children aged 6 months to 14 years (n = 447) we measured head circumference, head-trunk height, total upper and lower limb lengths, and zeugopod (ulna and tibia) and autopod (hand and foot) lengths. Results Highland children (exposed to greater stress) had significantly shorter limbs and zeugopod and autopod elements than lowland children, while differences in head-trunk height were smaller. Zeugopod elements appeared most sensitive to environmental conditions, as they were relatively shorter among highland children than their respective autopod elements. Discussion The results suggest that functional traits (hand, foot, and head) may be partially protected at the expense of the tibia and ulna. The results do not fit the predictions of the distal blood flow and temperature adaptation models as explanations for relative limb segment growth under stress conditions. Rather, our data support the extension of the thrifty phenotype hypothesis to limb growth, and suggest that certain

  11. Structural and Genetic Assessment of the ABCA4-Associated Optical Gap Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Nõupuu, Kalev; Lee, Winston; Zernant, Jana; Tsang, Stephen H.; Allikmets, Rando

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the developmental stages and genetic etiology of the optical gap phenotype in recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1). Methods. Single and longitudinal data points from 15 patients, including four sibling pairs, exhibiting an optical gap phenotype on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with confirmed disease-causing ABCA4 alleles were retrospectively analyzed. Fundus images with corresponding SD-OCT scans were collected with a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Structural phenotypes were assigned to three developmental stages according to SD-OCT. The ABCA4 gene was screened in all patients. Results. At least two disease-causing ABCA4 variants where identified in each patient; all except one (91%) were compound heterozygous for the p.G1961E mutation. All patients exhibited structural findings on SD-OCT that grouped into three progressive developmental stages over several years. Stage 1 was characterized by mild disruptions of the ellipsoid zone (EZ) band over the fovea. Stage 2 was a progressive expansion of the EZ band loss resulting in an empty lesion devoid of photoreceptors. Stage 3 observed a structural collapse of the inner retinal layers into the optical gap space leading to involvement and atrophy of the RPE thereafter. Conclusions. The optical gap phenotype in STGD1 can be structurally divided into three progressive stages spanning several years. This particular phenotype also appears to be highly associated with the p.G1961E mutation of ABCA4. Taken together, it appears that a focal loss of photoreceptors sequentially precedes RPE dysfunction in the early development of ABCA4-associated optical gap lesions. PMID:25301883

  12. The Extended Granin Family: Structure, Function, and Biomedical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Possenti, Roberta; Mahata, Sushil K.; Fischer-Colbrie, Reiner; Loh, Y. Peng

    2011-01-01

    The chromogranins (chromogranin A and chromogranin B), secretogranins (secretogranin II and secretogranin III), and additional related proteins (7B2, NESP55, proSAAS, and VGF) that together comprise the granin family subserve essential roles in the regulated secretory pathway that is responsible for controlled delivery of peptides, hormones, neurotransmitters, and growth factors. Here we review the structure and function of granins and granin-derived peptides and expansive new genetic evidence, including recent single-nucleotide polymorphism mapping, genomic sequence comparisons, and analysis of transgenic and knockout mice, which together support an important and evolutionarily conserved role for these proteins in large dense-core vesicle biogenesis and regulated secretion. Recent data further indicate that their processed peptides function prominently in metabolic and glucose homeostasis, emotional behavior, pain pathways, and blood pressure modulation, suggesting future utility of granins and granin-derived peptides as novel disease biomarkers. PMID:21862681

  13. Extending the lifespan of nuclear power plant structures

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.

    1995-04-01

    By the end of this decade, 63 of the 111 commercial nuclear power plants in the United States will be more than 20 years old, with some nearing the end of their 40-year operating license term. Faced with the prospect of having to replace lost generating capacity from other sources and substantial shutdown and decommissioning costs, many utilities are expected to apply to continue the service of their plants past the initial licensing period. In support of such applications, evidence should be provided that the capacity of the safety-related systems and structures to mitigate potential extreme events has not deteriorated unacceptably due to either aging or environmental stressor effects during the previous service history.

  14. Phosphorenes with Non-Honeycomb Structures: A Much Extended Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Menghao; Fu, Huahua; Zhou, Ling; Yao, Kailun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Huazhong University of Science; Technology Team; University of Nebraska-Lincoln Team

    We predict a new class of monolayer phosphorous allotropes, namely, ɛ-P, ζ-P, η-P and θ-P. Distinctly different from the monolayer α-P (black) and previously predicted β-P (Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 176802 (2014)), γ-P and δ-P (Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 046804 (2014)) with buckled honeycomb lattice, the new allotropes are composed of P4 square or P5 pentagon units that favor tricoordination for P atoms. The new four phases, together with 5 hybrid phases, are confirmed stable by first-principles calculations. In particularly, the θ-P is shown to be equally stable as the α-P (black) and more stable than all previously reported phosphorene allotropes. Prediction of nonvolatile ferroelastic switching and structural transformation among different phases under strains points out their potential applications via strain engineering. MHW was supported by start-up fund from Huazhong University of Science and Technology.

  15. Evaluation of high temperature structural adhesives for extended service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. G.; Peters, P. D.; Hendricks, C. L.

    1982-01-01

    The evaluation, selection, and demonstration of structural adhesive systems for supersonic cruise research applications, and establishment of environmental durability of selected systems for up to 20,000 hours is described. Ten candidate adhesives were initially evaluated. During screening and evaluation, these candidates were narrowed to three of the most promising for environmental durability testing. The three adhesives were LARC-13, PPQ, and NR056X. The LARC-13 was eliminated because of a lack of stability at 505 K. The NRO56X was removed from the market. The LARC-TPI was added after preliminary evaluation and an abbreviated screening test. Only PPQ and LARC-TPI remained as the reasonable candidates late into the durability testing. Large area bond panels were fabricated to demonstrate the processibility of the selected systems. Specifications were prepared to assure control over critical material and process parameters. Surface characterization concentrated primarily upon titanium surface treatments of 10 volt chronic acid anodize, 5 volt chromic acid anodize and PASA-JELL. Failure analysis was conducted on lap shear adhesive bond failures which occurred in PPQ and LARC-13 test specimens after 10,000 hours at 505 K.

  16. Divergent immune responses to house dust mite lead to distinct structural-functional phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jill R; Swirski, Filip K; Gajewska, Beata U; Wiley, Ryan E; Fattouh, Ramzi; Pacitto, Stephanie R; Wong, Jonathan K; Stämpfli, Martin R; Jordana, Manel

    2007-09-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory disease that encompasses three cardinal processes: T helper (Th) cell type 2 (Th2)-polarized inflammation, bronchial hyperreactivity, and airway wall remodeling. However, the link between the immune-inflammatory phenotype and the structural-functional phenotype remains to be fully defined. The objective of these studies was to evaluate the relationship between the immunologic nature of chronic airway inflammation and the development of abnormal airway structure and function in a mouse model of chronic asthma. Using IL-4-competent and IL-4-deficient mice, we created divergent immune-inflammatory responses to chronic aeroallergen challenge. Immune-inflammatory, structural, and physiological parameters of chronic allergic airway disease were evaluated in both strains of mice. Although both strains developed airway inflammation, the profiles of the immune-inflammatory responses were markedly different: IL-4-competent mice elicited a Th2-polarized response and IL-4-deficient mice developed a Th1-polarized response. Importantly, this chronic Th1-polarized immune response was not associated with airway remodeling or bronchial hyperresponsiveness. Transient reconstitution of IL-4 in IL-4-deficient mice via an airway gene transfer approach led to partial Th2 repolarization and increased bronchial hyperresponsiveness, along with full reconstitution of airway remodeling. These data show that distinct structural-functional phenotypes associated with chronic airway inflammation are strictly dependent on the nature of the immune-inflammatory response. PMID:17586699

  17. Phenotypic variation and water selection potential in the stem structure of invasive alligator weed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Leshan; Yang, Beifen; Guan, Wenbin; Li, Junmin

    2016-02-01

    The morphological and anatomical characteristics of stems have been found to be related to drought resistance in plants. Testing the phenotypic selection of water availability on stem anatomical traits would be useful for exploring the evolutionary potential of the stem in response to water availability. To test the phenotypic variation of the stem anatomical traits of an invasive plant in response to water availability, we collected a total of 320 individuals of Alternanthera philoxeroides from 16 populations from terrestrial and aquatic habitats in 8 plots in China and then analyzed the variation, differentiation, plasticity and selection potential of water availability on the stem anatomical traits. We found that except for the thickness of the cortex, all of the examined phenotypic parameters of the A. philoxeroides stem were significantly and positively correlated with soil water availability. The phenotypic differentiation coefficient for all of the anatomical structural parameters indicated that most of the variation existed between habitats within the same plot, whereas there was little variation among plots or among individuals within the same habitat except for variation in the thickness of the cortex. A significant phenotypic plasticity response to water availability was found for all of the anatomical traits of A. philoxeroides stem except for the thickness of the cortex. The associations between fitness and some of the anatomical traits, such as the stem diameter, the cortex area-to-stem area ratio, the pith cavity area-to-stem area ratio and the density of vascular bundles, differed with heterogeneous water availability. In both the aquatic and terrestrial habitats, no significant directional selection gradient was found for the stem diameter, the cortex area-to-stem area ratio or the density of vascular bundles. These results indicated that the anatomical structure of the A. philoxeroides stem may play an important role in the adaptation to changes

  18. Plant phenotyping using multi-view stereo vision with structured lights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thuy Tuong; Slaughter, David C.; Maloof, Julin N.; Sinha, Neelima

    2016-05-01

    A multi-view stereo vision system for true 3D reconstruction, modeling and phenotyping of plants was created that successfully resolves many of the shortcomings of traditional camera-based 3D plant phenotyping systems. This novel system incorporates several features including: computer algorithms, including camera calibration, excessive-green based plant segmentation, semi-global stereo block matching, disparity bilateral filtering, 3D point cloud processing, and 3D feature extraction, and hardware consisting of a hemispherical superstructure designed to hold five stereo pairs of cameras and a custom designed structured light pattern illumination system. This system is nondestructive and can extract 3D features of whole plants modeled from multiple pairs of stereo images taken at different view angles. The study characterizes the systems phenotyping performance for 3D plant features: plant height, total leaf area, and total leaf shading area. For plants having specified leaf spacing and size, the algorithms used in our system yielded satisfactory experimental results and demonstrated the ability to study plant development where the same plants were repeatedly imaged and phenotyped over the time.

  19. Effects of grazer presence on genetic structure of a phenotypically diverse diatom population.

    PubMed

    Sjöqvist, C; Kremp, A; Lindehoff, E; Båmstedt, U; Egardt, J; Gross, S; Jönsson, M; Larsson, H; Pohnert, G; Richter, H; Selander, E; Godhe, A

    2014-01-01

    Studies of predator-prey systems in both aquatic and terrestrial environments have shown that grazers structure the intraspecific diversity of prey species, given that the prey populations are phenotypically variable. Populations of phytoplankton have traditionally considered comprising only low intraspecific variation, hence selective grazing as a potentially structuring factor of both genetic and phenotypic diversity has not been comprehensively studied. In this study, we compared strain specific growth rates, production of polyunsaturated aldehydes, and chain length of the marine diatom Skeletonema marinoi in both grazer and non-grazer conditions by conducting monoclonal experiments. Additionally, a mesocosm experiment was performed with multiclonal experimental S. marinoi populations exposed to grazers at different levels of copepod concentration to test effects of grazer presence on diatom diversity in close to natural conditions. Our results show that distinct genotypes of a geographically restricted population exhibit variable phenotypic traits relevant to grazing interactions such as chain length and growth rates. Grazer presence affected clonal richness and evenness of multiclonal Skeletonema populations in the mesocosms, likely in conjunction with intrinsic interactions among the diatom strains. Only the production of polyunsaturated aldehydes was not affected by grazer presence. Our findings suggest that grazing can be an important factor structuring diatom population diversity in the sea and emphasize the importance of considering clonal differences when characterizing species and their role in nature. PMID:24272280

  20. Structural and Functional Aspects of Extended-Spectrum AmpC Cephalosporinases.

    PubMed

    Powers, Rachel A

    2016-01-01

    β-lactam antibiotics have revolutionized modern medicine, but resistance to these drugs is a major public health crisis. Traditionally, class C β-lactamases were referred to as cephalosporinases due to their substrate preference for this particular class of β-lactams. However, the emergence of AmpC enzymes with extended-spectrum activity (extended-spectrum cephalosporinases or ESACs) is particularly worrisome, especially given that most clinical β-lactamase inhibitors are ineffective against these enzymes. This review summarizes structures of several extended spectrum class C β-lactamases and analyzes the structure-function relationship observed among them. PMID:26073861

  1. Phenotypic detection of extended spectrum β-lactamase and Amp-C β-lactamase producing clinical isolates in a Tertiary Care Hospital: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Sageerabanoo, S.; Malini, A.; Mangaiyarkarasi, T.; Hemalatha, G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Production of β-lactamase enzymes by Gram-negative bacteria is the most common mechanism to acquire drug resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. Limitations in detecting extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) and Amp-C β-lactamases have contributed to the uncontrolled spread of bacterial resistance and are of significant clinical concern. Materials and Methods: A total of 148 samples was selected on the basis of resistance against third-generation cephalosporin for screening ESBLs and Amp-C β-lactamases production. These multidrug-resistant strains were phenotypically screened for ESBL production by phenotypic confirmatory disc diffusion test and double disc synergy test. Modified three-dimensional method was used for Amp-C β-lactamases detection. Result: Among the 148 isolates, 82 (55.40%) were ESBL producers, and 115 (77.70%) were Amp-C β-lactamases producers. Co-existence of ESBL and Amp-C was observed in 70 (47.29%) isolates. Escherichia coli was the most common ESBL and Amp-C β-lactamase producer. All ESBL producers were highly resistant to ciprofloxacin (83.10%), cotrimoxazole (95.27%), and gentamicin (89.18%). However, these bacterial strains were sensitive to imipenem 146 (98.64%) and piperacillin/tazobactam 143 (96.62%). Conclusion: Our study showed that ESBL producing organisms were not only resistant to cephalosporins but also to other group of drugs and also that multiple mechanisms play a role in drug resistance among Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26283835

  2. Structural Properties of Gene Promoters Highlight More than Two Phenotypes of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Guja, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) published in the last decade raised the number of loci associated with type 1 (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) to more than 50 for each of these diabetes phenotypes. The environmental factors seem to play an important role in the expression of these genes, acting through transcription factors that bind to promoters. Using the available databases we examined the promoters of various genes classically associated with the two main diabetes phenotypes. Our comparative analyses have revealed significant architectural differences between promoters of genes classically associated with T1D and T2D. Nevertheless, five gene promoters (about 16%) belonging to T1D and six gene promoters (over 19%) belonging to T2D have shown some intermediary structural properties, suggesting a direct relationship to either LADA (Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults) phenotype or to non-autoimmune type 1 phenotype. The distribution of these promoters in at least three separate classes seems to indicate specific pathogenic pathways. The image-based patterns (DNA patterns) generated by promoters of genes associated with these three phenotypes support the clinical observation of a smooth link between specific cases of typical T1D and T2D. In addition, a global distribution of these DNA patterns suggests that promoters of genes associated with T1D appear to be evolutionary more conserved than those associated with T2D. Though, the image based patterns obtained by our method might be a new useful parameter for understanding the pathogenetic mechanism and the diabetogenic gene networks. PMID:26379145

  3. Linking amphibian call structure to the environment: the interplay between phenotypic flexibility and individual attributes.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Lucía; Arim, Matías; Narins, Peter M

    2011-05-01

    The structure of the environment surrounding signal emission produces different patterns of degradation and attenuation. The expected adjustment of calls to ensure signal transmission in an environment was formalized in the acoustic adaptation hypothesis. Within this framework, most studies considered anuran calls as fixed attributes determined by local adaptations. However, variability in vocalizations as a product of phenotypic expression has also been reported. Empirical evidence supporting the association between environment and call structure has been inconsistent, particularly in anurans. Here, we identify a plausible causal structure connecting environment, individual attributes, and temporal and spectral adjustments as direct or indirect determinants of the observed variation in call attributes of the frog Hypsiboas pulchellus. For that purpose, we recorded the calls of 40 males in the field, together with vegetation density and other environmental descriptors of the calling site. Path analysis revealed a strong effect of habitat structure on the temporal parameters of the call, and an effect of site temperature conditioning the size of organisms calling at each site and thus indirectly affecting the dominant frequency of the call. Experimental habitat modification with a styrofoam enclosure yielded results consistent with field observations, highlighting the potential role of call flexibility on detected call patterns. Both, experimental and correlative results indicate the need to incorporate the so far poorly considered role of phenotypic plasticity in the complex connection between environmental structure and individual call attributes. PMID:22479134

  4. Population Structure and Genotype-Phenotype Associations in a Collection of Oat Landraces and Historic Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Louisa R; Michael Bonman, J; Chao, Shiaoman; Admassu Yimer, B; Bockelman, Harold; Esvelt Klos, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Population structure and genetic architecture of phenotypic traits in oat (Avena sativa L.) remain relatively under-researched compared to other small grain species. This study explores the historic context of current elite germplasm, including phenotypic and genetic characterization, with a particular focus on identifying under-utilized areas. A diverse panel of cultivated oat accessions was assembled from the USDA National Small Grains Collection to represent a gene pool relatively unaffected by twentieth century breeding activity and unlikely to have been included in recent molecular studies. The panel was genotyped using an oat iSelect 6K beadchip SNP array. The final dataset included 759 unique individuals and 2,715 polymorphic markers. Some population structure was apparent, with the first three principal components accounting for 38.8% of variation and 73% of individuals belonging to one of three clusters. One cluster with high genetic distinctness appears to have been largely overlooked in twentieth century breeding. Classification and phenotype data provided by the Germplasm Resources Information Network were evaluated for their relationship to population structure. Of the structuring variables evaluated, improvement status (cultivar or landrace) was relatively unimportant, indicating that landraces and cultivars included in the panel were all sampled from a similar underlying population. Instead, lemma color and region of origin showed the strongest explanatory power. An exploratory association mapping study of the panel using a subset of 2,588 mapped markers generated novel indications of genomic regions associated with awn frequency, kernels per spikelet, lemma color, and panicle type. Further results supported previous findings of loci associated with barley yellow dwarf virus tolerance, crown rust (caused by Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae) resistance, days to anthesis, and growth habit (winter/spring). In addition, two novel loci were identified for

  5. Population Structure and Genotype–Phenotype Associations in a Collection of Oat Landraces and Historic Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Louisa R.; Michael Bonman, J.; Chao, Shiaoman; Admassu Yimer, B.; Bockelman, Harold; Esvelt Klos, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Population structure and genetic architecture of phenotypic traits in oat (Avena sativa L.) remain relatively under-researched compared to other small grain species. This study explores the historic context of current elite germplasm, including phenotypic and genetic characterization, with a particular focus on identifying under-utilized areas. A diverse panel of cultivated oat accessions was assembled from the USDA National Small Grains Collection to represent a gene pool relatively unaffected by twentieth century breeding activity and unlikely to have been included in recent molecular studies. The panel was genotyped using an oat iSelect 6K beadchip SNP array. The final dataset included 759 unique individuals and 2,715 polymorphic markers. Some population structure was apparent, with the first three principal components accounting for 38.8% of variation and 73% of individuals belonging to one of three clusters. One cluster with high genetic distinctness appears to have been largely overlooked in twentieth century breeding. Classification and phenotype data provided by the Germplasm Resources Information Network were evaluated for their relationship to population structure. Of the structuring variables evaluated, improvement status (cultivar or landrace) was relatively unimportant, indicating that landraces and cultivars included in the panel were all sampled from a similar underlying population. Instead, lemma color and region of origin showed the strongest explanatory power. An exploratory association mapping study of the panel using a subset of 2,588 mapped markers generated novel indications of genomic regions associated with awn frequency, kernels per spikelet, lemma color, and panicle type. Further results supported previous findings of loci associated with barley yellow dwarf virus tolerance, crown rust (caused by Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae) resistance, days to anthesis, and growth habit (winter/spring). In addition, two novel loci were identified for

  6. Phenotype, Sex of Rearing, Gender Re-Assignment, and Response to Medical Treatment in Extended Family Members with a Novel Mutation in the SRD5A2 Gene.

    PubMed

    Deeb, Asma; Al Suwaidi, Hana; Ibukunoluwa, Fakunle; Attia, Salima

    2016-06-01

    Deficiency of steroid 5-alpha reductase-2 (5ARD2) is an inborn error of metabolism causing a disorder of sexual differentiation. It is caused by a mutation in the SRD5A2 gene in which various mutation types have been reported. Affected individuals have a broad spectrum of presentation ranging from normal female-appearing genitalia, cliteromegaly, microphallus, hypospadias, to completely male-appearing genitalia. We report an extended Emirati family with 11 affected members. The family displayed various phenotypes on presentation leading to different sex of rearing. Some family members were reassigned gender at various stages of life. The index case was born with severe undervirilization with bilaterally palpable gonads and was raised as male from birth. He had a 46,XY karyotype and a high testosterone/dihydrotestosterone ratio. Genetic investigation revealed a novel homozygous deletion of exon 2 of the SRD5A2 gene. Both parents were found to be carriers for the gene deletion. The patient had masculinizing surgery and a course of topical dihydrotestosterone. No beneficial effect of the hormone application was noted over 3 months and the treatment was discontinued. The findings on this kindred indicate that deletion of exon 2 in the SRD5A2 gene causes various degrees of genital ambiguity leading to different sex of rearing in affected family members. Gender reassignment may be done at various ages even in conservative communities like the Gulf region. PMID:27086719

  7. Mutations of the AMH type II receptor in two extended families with persistent Müllerian duct syndrome: lack of phenotype/genotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Mohammad; Taheini, Khalid; Picard, Jean-Yves; Cate, Richard L; Josso, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to compare phenotype and genotype in two extended Middle-Eastern families affected by persistent Müllerian duct syndrome due to mutations of the type II anti-Müllerian hormone receptor (AMHR-II). The first, consanguineous, family consisted of 6 boys and 2 girls, the second consisted of 4 girls and 2 boys. In family I, 4 boys and 1 girl were homozygous for a stop mutation in the 9th exon of AMHR-II, removing part of the intracellular domain of the protein. In family II, 1 girl and 1 boy were homozygous for a transversion changing conserved histidine 254 into a glutamine. Both homozygous girls were normal. In the homozygous males, the degree of development of Müllerian derivatives was variable. The uterus was well developed in 2 boys of family I and in the patient from family II; however, in 1 subject from family I, Müllerian derivatives were undetectable. Taken together, the diversity of clinical symptoms within the same sibship and the lack of correlation between the development of the Müllerian derivatives and the severity of the molecular defects suggest highly variable penetrance of the abnormal alleles and/or the existence of other genetic or epigenetic modifiers of gene expression. PMID:22584735

  8. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterisation of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Escherichia coli Obtained from Animal Fecal Samples in Ado Ekiti, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Olowe, Olugbenga Adekunle; Adewumi, Olufunmilayo; Odewale, Gbolabo; Ojurongbe, Olusola; Adefioye, Olusolabomi Jose

    2015-01-01

    Production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) producing E. coli in animals and different methods of identifications from Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria, were investigated. Three hundred and fifty fecal samples, collected from apparently healthy cattle and pigs, were cultured and identified following standard procedures. ESBL phenotypic detection was carried out using combination disc test, double disc synergism test, and ESBL brilliance agar screening. Molecular detection of TEM, SHV, and CTX-M genes was carried out using standard molecular method. One hundred and fourteen E. coli isolates were recovered from the 350 samples processed, out of which 72 (63.2%) isolates were positive for ESBLs with multiple resistance to the antibiotics used. Eighty-one (71%) isolates were positive for ESBL by combination disc test, 90 (78.9%) were positive for double disc synergism test, and 93 (81.6%) were positive for ESBL brilliance agar. TEM and CTX-M genes were detected in 48 (42.1%) and 51 (44.7%) isolates, respectively. SHV gene was not detected in any of the isolates while TEM and CTX-M were detected in 33 (28.9%) isolates. This study showed high resistance of E. coli to antibiotics, particularly to the third generation cephalosporins. Regular monitoring and regulated use of antibiotics in livestock should be encouraged. PMID:26417371

  9. Packaging and structural phenotype of brome mosaic virus capsid protein with altered N-terminal {beta}-hexamer structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wispelaere, Melissanne de; Chaturvedi, Sonali; Wilkens, Stephan; Rao, A.L.N.

    2011-10-10

    The first 45 amino acid region of brome mosaic virus (BMV) capsid protein (CP) contains RNA binding and structural domains that are implicated in the assembly of infectious virions. One such important structural domain encompassing amino acids {sup 28}QPVIV{sup 32}, highly conserved between BMV and cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), exhibits a {beta}-hexamer structure. In this study we report that alteration of the {beta}-hexamer structure by mutating {sup 28}QPVIV{sup 32} to {sup 28}AAAAA{sup 32} had no effect either on symptom phenotype, local and systemic movement in Chenopodium quinoa and RNA profile of in vivo assembled virions. However, sensitivity to RNase and assembly phenotypes distinguished virions assembled with CP subunits having {beta}-hexamer from those of wild type. A comparison of 3-D models obtained by cryo electron microscopy revealed overall similar structural features for wild type and mutant virions, with small but significant differences near the 3-fold axes of symmetry.

  10. Extended Structures in RNA Folding Intermediates Are Due to Nonnative Interactions Rather than Electrostatic Repulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Nathan J.; Gong, Haipeng; Zaheer, Syed S.; Freed, Karl F.; Pan, Tao; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2010-05-25

    RNA folding occurs via a series of transitions between metastable intermediate states for Mg{sup 2+} concentrations below those needed to fold the native structure. In general, these folding intermediates are considerably less compact than their respective native states. Our previous work demonstrates that the major equilibrium intermediate of the 154-residue specificity domain (S-domain) of the Bacillus subtilis RNase P RNA is more extended than its native structure. We now investigate two models with falsifiable predictions regarding the origins of the extended intermediate structures in the S-domains of the B. subtilis and the Escherichia coli RNase P RNA that belong to different classes of P RNA and have distinct native structures. The first model explores the contribution of electrostatic repulsion, while the second model probes specific interactions in the core of the folding intermediate. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and Langevin dynamics simulations, we show that electrostatics plays only a minor role, whereas specific interactions largely account for the extended nature of the intermediate. Structural contacts in the core, including a nonnative base pair, help to stabilize the intermediate conformation. We conclude that RNA folding intermediates adopt extended conformations due to short-range, nonnative interactions rather than generic electrostatic repulsion of helical domains. These principles apply to other ribozymes and riboswitches that undergo functionally relevant conformational changes.

  11. Neurocognition in the Extended Psychosis Phenotype: Performance of a Community Sample of Adolescents With Psychotic Symptoms on the MATRICS Neurocognitive Battery

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Neurocognitive dysfunction is well established in psychosis, but recent work suggests that processing speed deficits might represent a particularly important cognitive deficit. A number of significant confounds, however, such as disease chronicity and antipsychotic medication use, have been shown to affect processing speed, causing debate as to the core cognitive features of psychosis. We adopted a novel strategy of testing neurocognitive performance in the “extended psychosis phenotype,” involving community-based adolescents who are not clinically psychotic but who report psychotic symptoms and who are at increased risk of psychosis in adulthood. This allows investigation of the earliest cognitive factors associated with psychosis risk, while excluding potential confounds such as disease chronicity and antipsychotic use. A population sample of 212 school-going adolescents aged 11–13 years took part in this study. Psychotic symptoms were assessed using the psychosis section of the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia. Neurocognition was assessed using the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS) consensus neurocognitive battery. Adolescents with psychotic symptoms performed significantly more poorly on 3 processing speed tasks: Trail Making Test-A (F = 3.3, P < .05), Trail Making Test-B (F = 3.1, P < .05), and digit symbol coding task (F = 7.0, P < .001)—as well as on a nonverbal working memory (spatial span) task (F = 3.2, P < .05). Our findings support the idea that neurocognitive impairment, and processing speed impairment in particular, is a core feature of psychosis risk. This group likely demonstrates some of the earliest cognitive impairments associated with psychosis vulnerability.Key words: epidemiology/adolescents/cognition PMID:22927672

  12. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2{times}1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2{times}2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2{times}1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16{plus_minus}2{degree} from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94{plus_minus}0.02{Angstrom}. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27{plus_minus}0.04{Angstrom}, up from 1.10{Angstrom} for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25{Angstrom} Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20{Angstrom} and 15--23{degrees}) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16{Angstrom} and 19{degrees}. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95{Angstrom} for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals` radius {approximately} 1.5 {Angstrom} for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2{times}2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS {chi}(k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system.

  13. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2[times]1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2[times]2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2[times]1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16[plus minus]2[degree] from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94[plus minus]0.02[Angstrom]. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27[plus minus]0.04[Angstrom], up from 1.10[Angstrom] for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25[Angstrom] Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20[Angstrom] and 15--23[degrees]) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16[Angstrom] and 19[degrees]. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95[Angstrom] for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals' radius [approximately] 1.5 [Angstrom] for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2[times]2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS [chi](k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system.

  14. Novel Intronic RNA Structures Contribute to Maintenance of Phenotype in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hooks, Katarzyna B.; Naseeb, Samina; Parker, Steven; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Delneri, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome has undergone extensive intron loss during its evolutionary history. It has been suggested that the few remaining introns (in only 5% of protein-coding genes) are retained because of their impact on function under stress conditions. Here, we explore the possibility that novel noncoding RNA structures (ncRNAs) are embedded within intronic sequences and are contributing to phenotype and intron retention in yeast. We employed de novo RNA structure prediction tools to screen intronic sequences in S. cerevisiae and 36 other fungi. We identified and validated 19 new intronic RNAs via RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and RT-PCR. Contrary to the common belief that excised introns are rapidly degraded, we found that, in six cases, the excised introns were maintained intact in the cells. In another two cases we showed that the ncRNAs were further processed from their introns. RNA-seq analysis confirmed that introns in ribosomal protein genes are more highly expressed when they contain predicted RNA structures. We deleted the novel intronic RNA structure within the GLC7 intron and showed that this region, rather than the intron itself, is responsible for the cell’s ability to respond to salt stress. We also showed a direct association between the in cis presence of the intronic RNA and GLC7 expression. Overall, these data support the notion that some introns may have been maintained in the genome because they harbor functional RNA structures. PMID:27194751

  15. Phenotypic and Causal Structure of Conduct Disorder in the Broader Context of Prevalent Forms of Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Lahey, Benjamin B.; Waldman, Irwin D.

    2011-01-01

    Background A better understanding of the nature and etiology of conduct disorder (CD) can inform nosology and vice-versa. We posit that any prevalent form of psychopathology, including CD, can be best understood if it is studied in the context of other correlated forms of child and adolescent psychopathology using formal models to guide inquiry. Methods Review of both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of the place of CD in the phenotypic and causal structure of prevalent psychopathology, with an emphasis on similarities and differences between CD and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). Papers were located using Web of Science by topic searches with no restriction on year of publication. Results Although some important nosologic questions remain unanswered, the dimensional phenotype of CD is well defined. CD differs from other disorders in its correlates, associated impairment, and course. Nonetheless, it is robustly correlated with many other prevalent dimensions of psychopathology both concurrently and predictively, including both other “externalizing” disorders and some “internalizing” disorders. Based on emerging evidence, we hypothesize that these concurrent and predictive correlations result primarily from widespread genetic pleiotropy, with some genetic factors nonspecifically influencing risk for multiple correlated dimensions of psychopathology. In contrast, environmental influences mostly act to differentiate dimensions of psychopathology from one another both concurrently and over time. CD and ODD share half of their genetic influences, but their genetic etiologies are distinct in other ways. Unlike most other dimensions of psychopathology, half of the genetic influences on CD appear to be unique to CD. In contrast, ODD broadly shares nearly all of its genetic influences with other disorders and has little unique genetic variance. Conclusions CD is a relatively distinct syndrome at both phenotypic and etiologic levels, but much is revealed

  16. Individual fitness and phenotypic selection in age-structured populations with constant growth rates

    PubMed Central

    Moorad, Jacob A.

    2013-01-01

    Powerful multiple regression-based approaches are commonly used to measure the strength of phenotypic selection, which is the statistical association between individual fitness and trait values. Age structure and overlapping generations complicate determinations of individual fitness, contributing to the popularity of alternative methods for measuring natural selection that do not depend upon such measures. The application of regression-based techniques for measuring selection in these situations requires a demographically appropriate, conceptually sound, and observable measure of individual fitness. It has been suggested that Fisher’s reproductive value applied to an individual at its birth is such a definition. Here I offer support for this assertion by showing that multiple regression applied to this measure and vital rates (age-specific survival and fertility rates) yields the same selection gradients for vital rates as those inferred from Hamilton’s classical results. I discuss how multiple regressions, applied to individual reproductive value at birth, can be used efficiently to estimate measures of phenotypic selection that are problematic for sensitivity analyses. These include nonlinear selection, components of the opportunity for selection, and multi-level selection. PMID:24933826

  17. Thermal Expansion Behaviour of Silver Examined by Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dubiel, M.; Chasse, A.; Haug, J.; Schneider, R.; Kruth, H.

    2007-02-02

    EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) investigations are reported concerning the thermal expansion behaviour of silver in an extended range of temperature from 10 K to about 950 K measured in transmission mode. Both the ratio method and an EXAFS fitting procedure were applied to reveal the temperature dependence of EXAFS parameters. Models based on quantum and classical thermodynamic perturbation theory have been used to interpret experimental data and compared to XRD (X-ray diffraction) results of bulk silver material. The description of thermodynamic data of thermal expansion of silver in the complete range of temperature by EXAFS Spectroscopy was successful by first calculations using third order quantum perturbation theory.

  18. Where Is the Extended Phenotype in the Wild? The Community Composition of Arthropods on Mature Oak Trees Does Not Depend on the Oak Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Gossner, Martin M.; Brändle, Martin; Brandl, Roland; Bail, Johannes; Müller, Jörg; Opgenoorth, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Through a series of common garden experiments, it has been shown that heritable phenotypic differences between individual trees can affect arthropod communities. However, field studies under heterogeneous environmental conditions remain rare. In the present study, we investigated the genetic constitution of 121 mature oak host trees at different trophic levels from 10 sites across Bavaria, southern Germany and their associated insect communities. A total of 23,576 individuals representing 395 species of beetles and true bugs were evaluated. In particular, we determined whether the composition of arthropod communities is related to the oak genotype and whether the strength of the relationships decreases from lower to higher trophic levels, such as for phytophagous, xylophagous, zoophagous, and mycetophagous species. The genetic differentiation of oaks was assessed using eight microsatellite markers. We found no significant influence of the oak genotype on neither the full beetle and true bug community nor on any of the analyzed trophic guilds. In contrast, the community composition of the insects was highly related to the space and climate, such that the community similarity decreased with increases in spatial distance and climatic differences. The relationship with space and climate was much stronger in beetles than in true bugs, particularly in mycetophagous species. Our results suggest that spatial processes override the genetic effects of the host plant in structuring arthropod communities on oak trees. Because we used neutral markers, we cannot exclude the possibility that trait-specific markers may reveal a genetic imprint of the foundation tree species on the composition of the arthropod community. However, based on the strength of the spatial patterns in our data set, we assume that genetic differences among oaks are less important in the structuring of arthropod communities. Future whole-genome studies are required to draw a final conclusion. PMID:25635387

  19. On implementation of the extended interior penalty function. [optimum structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassis, J. H.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The extended interior penalty function formulation is implemented. A rational method for determining the transition between the interior and extended parts is set forth. The formulation includes a straightforward method for avoiding design points with some negative components, which are physically meaningless in structural analysis. The technique, when extended to problems involving parametric constraints, can facilitate closed form integration of the penalty terms over the most important parts of the parameter interval. The method lends itself well to the use of approximation concepts, such as design variable linking, constraint deletion and Taylor series expansions of response quantities in terms of design variables. Examples demonstrating the algorithm, in the context of planar orthogonal frames subjected to ground motion, are included.

  20. Optical coherence tomography for live phenotypic analysis of embryonic ocular structures in mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larina, Irina V.; Syed, Saba H.; Sudheendran, Narendran; Overbeek, Paul A.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2012-08-01

    Mouse models of ocular diseases provide a powerful resource for exploration of molecular regulation of eye development and pre-clinical studies. Availability of a live high-resolution imaging method for mouse embryonic eyes would significantly enhance longitudinal analyses and high-throughput morphological screening. We demonstrate that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used for live embryonic ocular imaging throughout gestation. At all studied stages, the whole eye is within the imaging distance of the system and there is a good optical contrast between the structures. We also performed OCT eye imaging in the embryonic retinoblastoma mouse model Pax6-SV40 T-antigen, which spontaneously forms lens and retinal lesions, and demonstrate that OCT allows us to clearly differentiate between the mutant and wild type phenotypes. These results demonstrate that OCTin utero imaging is a potentially useful tool to study embryonic ocular diseases in mouse models.

  1. Interacting Thin Film Systems Probed by Electron Induced Extended Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idzerda, Yves Ulrich

    In order to obtain information on the structure and dynamics of various systems including interacting thin films, it is necessary to be able to measure local structure information with surface sensitivity. Three techniques of Electron Induced Extended Fine Structure (EIEFS), the electron analog of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS), are described, compared, and applied to thin film systems. Surface Extended Electron Loss Fine Structure (SEELFS), Extended Appearence Potential Fine Structure (EAPFS) and Auger-Monitored Extended Fine Structure (AMEFS), are all local structure probes with varying degrees of surface sensitivity, and all yield similar information. Our results show that each technique can be measured by commercially available electron optics, SEELFS and AMEFS by either a cylindrical mirror analyzer (CMA) or by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) optics and EAPFS by the LEED optics. We have addressed questions concerning proper phase shifts for the analysis, short data ranges, required use of undifferentiated data, and experimental difficulties. Investigations of carbon, oxygen, sodium, potassium, cesium, and sulfur on Cu(111) and titanium on silicon demonstrate that SEELFS is applicable to single monolayer coverages of very low Z adsorbates and thin films. Many of the theoretical difficulties surrounding the analysis of SEELFS can be circumvented by the use of standards and the ratio technique analysis developed for EXAFS. We also find in our studies of silicon, titanium, and aluminum oxide that systems with plasmon losses in the region of interest cannot be analyzed, but systems with other characteristic losses which are very sharp or very broad can be. Examination of EAPFS shows that it is more surface sensitive and is applicable to single monolayer coverages (of a broader range of elements than SEELFS) and thin films. Unfortunately, EAPFS is not applicable to single crystal systems with low electron binding energies where diffraction

  2. CHANDRA EVIDENCE FOR EXTENDED X-RAY STRUCTURE IN RY Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Audard, Marc; Guedel, Manuel E-mail: marc.audard@unige.ch

    2011-08-10

    We report results of a sensitive Chandra ACIS-S observation of the classical T Tauri star RY Tau. Previous studies have shown that it drives a spectacular bipolar jet whose blueshifted component is traced optically along P.A. {approx} 295{sup 0} at separations of 1.''5-31'' from the star. Complex X-ray emission is revealed, including a very soft non-variable spectral component (some of which may originate in shocks), a superhot flaring component (T {approx}> 100 MK), and faint extended structure near the star. The structure is visible in deconvolved images and extends northwestward out to a separation of 1.''7, overlapping the inner part of the optical jet. Image analysis suggests that most of the extension is real, but some contamination by point-spread-function-induced structure within the central arcsecond may be present. The predicted temperature for a shock-heated jet based on jet speed and shock speed estimates from optical measurements is too low to explain the extended X-ray structure. Either higher speed material within the jet has escaped optical detection or other mechanisms besides shock heating are involved. Alternative mechanisms that could produce higher temperature plasma at small offsets to the northwest of RY Tau include magnetic heating in the jet, hot plasmoids ejected at high speeds, or X-ray emission from a putative close companion whose presence has been inferred from Hipparcos variations.

  3. DETERMINING THE NATURE OF THE EXTENDED H I STRUCTURE AROUND LITTLE THINGS DWARF GALAXY NGC 1569

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Megan

    2013-06-15

    This work presents an extended, neutral hydrogen emission map around Magellanic-type dwarf irregular galaxy (dIm) NGC 1569. In the spring of 2010, the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope was used to map a 9 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 2 Degree-Sign region in H I line emission that includes NGC 1569 and IC 342 as well as two other dwarf galaxies. The primary objective for these observations was to search for structures potentially connecting NGC 1569 with IC 342 group members in order to trace previous interactions and thus, provide an explanation for the starburst and peculiar kinematics prevalent in NGC 1569. A large, half-degree diameter H I cloud was detected that shares the same position and velocity as NGC 1569. Also, two long structures were discovered that are reminiscent of intergalactic filaments extending out in a V-shaped manner from NGC 1569 toward UGCA 92, a nearby dwarf galaxy. These filamentary structures extend for about 1. Degree-Sign 5, which is 77 kpc at NGC 1569. There is a continuous velocity succession with the 0. Degree-Sign 5 H I cloud, filaments, and main body of the galaxy. The 0. Degree-Sign 5 H I cloud and filamentary structures may be foreground Milky Way, but are suggestive as possible remnants of an interaction between NGC 1569 and UGCA 92. The data also show two tidal tails extending from UGCA 86 and IC 342, respectively. These structures may be part of a continuous H I bridge but more data are needed to determine if this is the case.

  4. Ultrasonic array imaging of multilayer structures using full matrix capture and extended phase shift migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haiteng; Chen, Jian; Yang, Keji; Hu, Xuxiao

    2016-04-01

    Multilayer structures have been widely used in industrial fields, and non-destructive evaluation of these structures is of great importance to assure their quality and performance. Recently, ultrasonic array imaging using full matrix capture, e.g. the total focusing method (TFM), has been shown to increase sensitivity to small defects and improve imaging resolution in homogeneous media. However, it cannot be applied to multilayer structures directly, due to the sound velocity variation in different layers and because refraction occurs at layer interfaces, which gives rise to difficulties in determining the propagation path and time. To overcome these problems, an extended phase shift migration (EPSM) is proposed for the full matrix imaging of multilayer structures in this paper. Based on the theory of phase shift migration for monostatic pulse-echo imaging, full matrix imaging using EPSM is derived by extrapolating the wavefields in both transmission and reception, and extended to the multilayer case. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated by full matrix imaging of a two-layer structure with side-drilled holes conducted both in the simulation and the experiment. The results verify that the proposed algorithm is capable of full matrix imaging of a layered structure with a high resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. For comparison, full matrix imaging using the TFM with root-mean-squared velocity is also performed, and the results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is superior to the TFM in improving both the image quality and resolution.

  5. Family Structure and Adolescent Alcohol Use Problems: Extending Popular Explanations to American Indiansc

    PubMed Central

    Eitle, Tamela McNulty; Johnson-Jennings, Michelle; Eitle, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Competing explanations of the relationship between family structure and alcohol use problems are examined using a sample of American Indian adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Living in a single-parent family is found to be a marker for the unequal distribution of stress exposure and parental alcohol use, but the effects of other family structures like non-parent families and the presence of under 21-year-old extended family or non-family members emerge or remain as risk or protective factors for alcohol use problems after a consideration of SES, family processes, peer socialization, and social stress. In particular, a non-parent family structure that has not been considered in prior research emerged as a protective family structure for American Indian adolescent alcohol use problems. PMID:24014896

  6. A testosterone-related structural brain phenotype predicts aggressive behavior from childhood to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; McCracken, James T; Albaugh, Matthew D; Botteron, Kelly N; Hudziak, James J; Ducharme, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Structural covariance, the examination of anatomic correlations between brain regions, has emerged recently as a valid and useful measure of developmental brain changes. Yet the exact biological processes leading to changes in covariance, and the relation between such covariance and behavior, remain largely unexplored. The steroid hormone testosterone represents a compelling mechanism through which this structural covariance may be developmentally regulated in humans. Although steroid hormone receptors can be found throughout the central nervous system, the amygdala represents a key target for testosterone-specific effects, given its high density of androgen receptors. In addition, testosterone has been found to impact cortical thickness (CTh) across the whole brain, suggesting that it may also regulate the structural relationship, or covariance, between the amygdala and CTh. Here, we examined testosterone-related covariance between amygdala volumes and whole-brain CTh, as well as its relationship to aggression levels, in a longitudinal sample of children, adolescents, and young adults 6-22 years old. We found: (1) testosterone-specific modulation of the covariance between the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); (2) a significant relationship between amygdala-mPFC covariance and levels of aggression; and (3) mediation effects of amygdala-mPFC covariance on the relationship between testosterone and aggression. These effects were independent of sex, age, pubertal stage, estradiol levels and anxious-depressed symptoms. These findings are consistent with prior evidence that testosterone targets the neural circuits regulating affect and impulse regulation, and show, for the first time in humans, how androgen-dependent organizational effects may regulate a very specific, aggression-related structural brain phenotype from childhood to young adulthood. PMID:26431805

  7. Drug Repositioning by Kernel-Based Integration of Molecular Structure, Molecular Activity, and Phenotype Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongcui; Chen, Shilong; Deng, Naiyang; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Computational inference of novel therapeutic values for existing drugs, i.e., drug repositioning, offers the great prospect for faster and low-risk drug development. Previous researches have indicated that chemical structures, target proteins, and side-effects could provide rich information in drug similarity assessment and further disease similarity. However, each single data source is important in its own way and data integration holds the great promise to reposition drug more accurately. Here, we propose a new method for drug repositioning, PreDR (Predict Drug Repositioning), to integrate molecular structure, molecular activity, and phenotype data. Specifically, we characterize drug by profiling in chemical structure, target protein, and side-effects space, and define a kernel function to correlate drugs with diseases. Then we train a support vector machine (SVM) to computationally predict novel drug-disease interactions. PreDR is validated on a well-established drug-disease network with 1,933 interactions among 593 drugs and 313 diseases. By cross-validation, we find that chemical structure, drug target, and side-effects information are all predictive for drug-disease relationships. More experimentally observed drug-disease interactions can be revealed by integrating these three data sources. Comparison with existing methods demonstrates that PreDR is competitive both in accuracy and coverage. Follow-up database search and pathway analysis indicate that our new predictions are worthy of further experimental validation. Particularly several novel predictions are supported by clinical trials databases and this shows the significant prospects of PreDR in future drug treatment. In conclusion, our new method, PreDR, can serve as a useful tool in drug discovery to efficiently identify novel drug-disease interactions. In addition, our heterogeneous data integration framework can be applied to other problems. PMID:24244318

  8. Allosteric and hyperekplexic mutant phenotypes investigated on an α1 glycine receptor transmembrane structure

    PubMed Central

    Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Sauguet, Ludovic; Huon, Christèle; Malherbe, Laurie; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Petres, Stéphane; Murail, Samuel; Taly, Antoine; Baaden, Marc; Delarue, Marc; Corringer, Pierre-Jean

    2015-01-01

    The glycine receptor (GlyR) is a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) mediating inhibitory transmission in the nervous system. Its transmembrane domain (TMD) is the target of allosteric modulators such as general anesthetics and ethanol and is a major locus for hyperekplexic congenital mutations altering the allosteric transitions of activation or desensitization. We previously showed that the TMD of the human α1GlyR could be fused to the extracellular domain of GLIC, a bacterial pLGIC, to form a functional chimera called Lily. Here, we overexpress Lily in Schneider 2 insect cells and solve its structure by X-ray crystallography at 3.5 Å resolution. The TMD of the α1GlyR adopts a closed-channel conformation involving a single ring of hydrophobic residues at the center of the pore. Electrophysiological recordings show that the phenotypes of key allosteric mutations of the α1GlyR, scattered all along the pore, are qualitatively preserved in this chimera, including those that confer decreased sensitivity to agonists, constitutive activity, decreased activation kinetics, or increased desensitization kinetics. Combined structural and functional data indicate a pore-opening mechanism for the α1GlyR, suggesting a structural explanation for the effect of some key hyperekplexic allosteric mutations. The first X-ray structure of the TMD of the α1GlyR solved here using GLIC as a scaffold paves the way for mechanistic investigation and design of allosteric modulators of a human receptor. PMID:25730860

  9. The red extended structure of IC 10, the nearest blue compact galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbrandt, Stephanie A. N.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Irwin, Mike

    2015-11-01

    The Local Group starburst galaxy IC 10 is the closest example of a blue compact galaxy. Here, we use optical gi imaging from Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/MegaCam and near infrared JHK imaging from United Kingdom Infrared Telescope/Wide Field Camera to conduct a comprehensive survey of the structure of IC 10. We examine the spatial distribution of its resolved young, intermediate and old stellar populations to large radius and low effective surface brightness levels. Akin to other dwarfs with multiple populations of different ages, stellar populations of decreasing average age are increasingly concentrated in this galaxy. We find that the young, starbursting population and the asymptotic giant branch population are both offset from the geometric centre of the older red giant branch (RGB) population by a few hundred parsecs, implying that the younger star formation occurred significantly away from the centre of the galaxy. The RGB population traces an extended structure that is typical of blue compact galaxies, with an effective radius of ˜5.75 arcmin (˜1.25 kpc). These measurements show that IC 10 is much more extended than has previously been realized, and this blue compact galaxy is one of the most extended dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. The outermost isophotes of this galaxy are very regular in shape and essentially circular in morphology. Based on this analysis, we do not find any evidence to suggest that IC 10 has undergone a recent, significant, interaction with an unknown companion.

  10. Structural and functional roles of the N- and C-terminal extended modules in channelrhodopsin-1.

    PubMed

    Doi, Satoko; Mori, Arisa; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Reissig, Louisa; Ihara, Kunio; Sudo, Yuki

    2015-09-26

    Channelrhodopsins have become a focus of interest because of their ability to control neural activity by light, used in a technology called optogenetics. The channelrhodopsin in the eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR-1) is a light-gated cation channel responsible for motility changes upon photo-illumination and a member of the membrane-embedded retinal protein family. Recent crystal structure analysis revealed that CrChR-1 has unique extended modules both at its N- and C-termini compared to other microbial retinal proteins. This study reports the first successful expression of a ChR-1 variant in Escherichia coli as a holoprotein: the ChR-1 variant lacking both the N- and C-termini (CrChR-1_82-308). However, compared to ChR-1 having the extended modules (CrChR-1_1-357), truncation of the termini greatly altered the absorption maximum and photochemical properties, including the pKa values of its charged residues around the chromophore, the reaction rates in the photocycle and the photo-induced ion channeling activity. The results of some experiments regarding ion transport activity suggest that CrChR-1_82-308 has a proton channeling activity even in the dark. On the basis of these results, we discuss the structural and functional roles of the N- and C-terminal extended modules in CrChR-1. PMID:26098533

  11. Split mandrel versus split sleeve coldworking: Dual methods for extending the fatigue life of metal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodman, Geoffrey A.; Creager, Matthew

    1994-09-01

    It is common practice to use split sleeve coldworking of fastener holes as a means of extending the fatigue life of metal structures. In search of lower manufacturing costs, the aerospace industry is examining the split mandrel (sleeveless) coldworking process as an alternative method of coldworking fastener holes in metal structures. The split mandrel process (SpM) significantly extends the fatigue life of metal structures through the introduction of a residual compressive stress in a manner that is very similar to the split sleeve system (SpSl). Since the split mandrel process is significantly less expensive than the split sleeve process and more adaptable to robotic automation, it will have a notable influence upon other new manufacture of metal structures which require coldworking a significant number of holes, provided the aerospace community recognizes that the resulting residual stress distributions and fatigue life improvement are the same for both processes. Considerable testing has validated the correctness of that conclusion. The findings presented in this paper represent the results of an extensive research and development program, comprising data collected from over 400 specimens fabricated from 2024-T3 and 7075-T651 aluminum alloys in varied configurations, which quantify the benefits (fatigue enhancement and cost savings) of automating a sleeveless coldworking system.

  12. Split mandrel versus split sleeve coldworking: Dual methods for extending the fatigue life of metal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodman, Geoffrey A.; Creager, Matthew

    1994-01-01

    It is common practice to use split sleeve coldworking of fastener holes as a means of extending the fatigue life of metal structures. In search of lower manufacturing costs, the aerospace industry is examining the split mandrel (sleeveless) coldworking process as an alternative method of coldworking fastener holes in metal structures. The split mandrel process (SpM) significantly extends the fatigue life of metal structures through the introduction of a residual compressive stress in a manner that is very similar to the split sleeve system (SpSl). Since the split mandrel process is significantly less expensive than the split sleeve process and more adaptable to robotic automation, it will have a notable influence upon other new manufacture of metal structures which require coldworking a significant number of holes, provided the aerospace community recognizes that the resulting residual stress distributions and fatigue life improvement are the same for both processes. Considerable testing has validated the correctness of that conclusion. The findings presented in this paper represent the results of an extensive research and development program, comprising data collected from over 400 specimens fabricated from 2024-T3 and 7075-T651 aluminum alloys in varied configurations, which quantify the benefits (fatigue enhancement and cost savings) of automating a sleeveless coldworking system.

  13. Novel Method for Measuring Structure and Semantic Similarity of XML Documents Based on Extended Adjacency Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue-Liang; Yang, Ting; Fan, Bao-Quan; Wang, Xu; Wei, Jin-Mao

    Similarity measurement of XML documents is crucial to meet various needs of approximate searches and document classifications in XML-oriented applications. Some methods have been proposed for this purpose. Nevertheless, few methods can be elegantly exploited to depict structure and semantic information and hence to effectively measure the similarity of XML documents. In this paper, we present a new method of computing the structure and semantic similarity of XML documents based on extended adjacency matrix(EAM). Different from a general adjacency matrix, in an EAM, the structure information of not only the adjacent layers but also the ancestor-descendant layers can be stored. For measuring the similarity of two XML documents, the proposed method firstly stores the structure and semantic information in two extended adjacency matrices(M1, M2). Then it computes similarity of the two documents through cos(M1, M2) Experimental results on bench-mark data show that the method holds high efficiency and accuracy.

  14. Metal-organic extended 2D structures: Fe-PTCDA on Au(111).

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Lucía; Peláez, Samuel; Caillard, Renaud; Serena, Pedro A; Martín-Gago, José A; Méndez, Javier

    2010-07-30

    In this work we combine organic molecules of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) with iron atoms on an Au (111) substrate in ultra-high vacuum conditions at different temperatures. By means of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) we study the formation of stable 2D metal-organic structures. We show that at certain growth conditions (temperature, time and coverage) stable 'ladder-like' nanostructures are obtained. These are the result of connecting together two metal-organic chains through PTCDA molecules placed perpendicularly, as rungs of a ladder. These structures, stable up to 450 K, can be extended in a 2D layer covering the entire surface and presenting different rotation domains. STM images at both polarities show a contrast reversal between the two molecules at the unit cell. By means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we confirm the stability of these structures and that their molecular orbitals are placed separately at the different molecules. PMID:20603531

  15. Structural damage detection using extended Kalman filter combined with statistical process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chenhao; Jang, Shinae; Sun, Xiaorong

    2015-04-01

    Traditional modal-based methods, which identify damage based upon changes in vibration characteristics of the structure on a global basis, have received considerable attention in the past decades. However, the effectiveness of the modalbased methods is dependent on the type of damage and the accuracy of the structural model, and these methods may also have difficulties when applied to complex structures. The extended Kalman filter (EKF) algorithm which has the capability to estimate parameters and catch abrupt changes, is currently used in continuous and automatic structural damage detection to overcome disadvantages of traditional methods. Structural parameters are typically slow-changing variables under effects of operational and environmental conditions, thus it would be difficult to observe the structural damage and quantify the damage in real-time with EKF only. In this paper, a Statistical Process Control (SPC) is combined with EFK method in order to overcome this difficulty. Based on historical measurements of damage-sensitive feathers involved in the state-space dynamic models, extended Kalman filter (EKF) algorithm is used to produce real-time estimations of these features as well as standard derivations, which can then be used to form control ranges for SPC to detect any abnormality of the selected features. Moreover, confidence levels of the detection can be adjusted by choosing different times of sigma and number of adjacent out-of-range points. The proposed method is tested using simulated data of a three floors linear building in different damage scenarios, and numerical results demonstrate high damage detection accuracy and light computation of this presented method.

  16. XPD Helicase Structures And Activities: Insights Into the Cancer And Aging Phenotypes From XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.; Fuss, J.O.; Cheng, Q.J.; Arvai, A.S.; Hammel, M.; Roberts, V.A.; Cooper, P.K.; Tainer, J.A.

    2009-05-18

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  17. XPD Helicase Structures and Activities: Insights into the Cancer and Aging Phenotypes from XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Tainer, John; Fan, Li; Fuss, Jill O.; Cheng, Quen J.; Arvai, Andrew S.; Hammel, Michal; Roberts, Victoria A.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Tainer, John A.

    2008-06-02

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  18. Gene duplication of type-B ARR transcription factors systematically extends transcriptional regulatory structures in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Hee; Hyeon, Do Young; Lee, ll Hwan; Park, Su Jin; Han, Seungmin; Lee, In Chul; Hwang, Daehee; Nam, Hong Gil

    2014-01-01

    Many of duplicated genes are enriched in signaling pathways. Recently, gene duplication of kinases has been shown to provide genetic buffering and functional diversification in cellular signaling. Transcription factors (TFs) are also often duplicated. However, how duplication of TFs affects their regulatory structures and functions of target genes has not been explored at the systems level. Here, we examined regulatory and functional roles of duplication of three major ARR TFs (ARR1, 10, and 12) in Arabidopsis cytokinin signaling using wild-type and single, double, and triple deletion mutants of the TFs. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles obtained from Arabidopsis roots in wild-type and these mutants showed that duplication of ARR TFs systematically extended their transcriptional regulatory structures, leading to enhanced robustness and diversification in functions of target genes, as well as in regulation of cellular networks of target genes. Therefore, our results suggest that duplication of TFs contributes to robustness and diversification in functions of target genes by extending transcriptional regulatory structures. PMID:25425016

  19. Structure Theory for Extended Kepler-Coulomb 3D Classical Superintegrable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnins, Ernie G.; Miller, Willard, Jr.

    2012-06-01

    The classical Kepler-Coulomb system in 3 dimensions is well known to be 2nd order superintegrable, with a symmetry algebra that closes polynomially under Poisson brackets. This polynomial closure is typical for 2nd order superintegrable systems in 2D and for 2nd order systems in 3D with nondegenerate (4-parameter) potentials. However the degenerate 3-parameter potential for the 3D extended Kepler-Coulomb system (also 2nd order superintegrable) is an exception, as its quadratic symmetry algebra doesn't close polynomially. The 3D 4-parameter potential for the extended Kepler-Coulomb system is not even 2nd order superintegrable. However, Verrier and Evans (2008) showed it was 4th order superintegrable, and Tanoudis and Daskaloyannis (2011) showed that in the quantum case, if a second 4th order symmetry is added to the generators, the double commutators in the symmetry algebra close polynomially. Here, based on the Tremblay, Turbiner and Winternitz construction, we consider a! n infinite class of classical extended Kepler-Coulomb 3- and 4-parameter systems indexed by a pair of rational numbers (k1,k2) and reducing to the usual systems when k1=k2=1. We show these systems to be superintegrable of arbitrarily high order and work out explicitly the structure of the symmetry algebras determined by the 5 basis generators we have constructed. We demonstrate that the symmetry algebras close rationally; only for systems admitting extra discrete symmetries is polynomial closure achieved. Underlying the structure theory is the existence of raising and lowering constants of the motion, not themselves polynomials in the momenta, that can be employed to construct the polynomial symmetries and their structure relations.

  20. Phenotypic covariance structure and its divergence for acoustic mate attraction signals among four cricket species

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, Susan M; Fitzsimmons, Lauren P; McAuley, Emily M; Rundle, Howard D; Gorelick, Root

    2012-01-01

    The phenotypic variance–covariance matrix (P) describes the multivariate distribution of a population in phenotypic space, providing direct insight into the appropriateness of measured traits within the context of multicollinearity (i.e., do they describe any significant variance that is independent of other traits), and whether trait covariances restrict the combinations of phenotypes available to selection. Given the importance of P, it is therefore surprising that phenotypic covariances are seldom jointly analyzed and that the dimensionality of P has rarely been investigated in a rigorous statistical framework. Here, we used a repeated measures approach to quantify P separately for populations of four cricket species using seven acoustic signaling traits thought to enhance mate attraction. P was of full or almost full dimensionality in all four species, indicating that all traits conveyed some information that was independent of the other traits, and that phenotypic trait covariances do not constrain the combinations of signaling traits available to selection. P also differed significantly among species, although the dominant axis of phenotypic variation (pmax) was largely shared among three of the species (Acheta domesticus, Gryllus assimilis, G. texensis), but different in the fourth (G. veletis). In G. veletis and A. domesticus, but not G. assimilis and G. texensis, pmax was correlated with body size, while pmax was not correlated with residual mass (a condition measure) in any of the species. This study reveals the importance of jointly analyzing phenotypic traits. PMID:22408735

  1. Local structure of NiAl compounds investigated by extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tian, J S; Han, G M; Wei, H; Jin, T; Dargusch, M S

    2012-07-01

    The local structures of pure NiAl and Ti-, Co-doped NiAl compounds have been obtained utilizing extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The results provide experimental evidence that Ni antisite defects exist in the Ni-rich NiAl compounds. The site preference of Ti and Co has been confirmed. Ti occupies the Al sublattice, while Co occupies the Ni sublattice. The structure parameters obtained by EXAFS were consistent with the X-ray diffraction results. Owing to the precipitation of α-Cr, the local structure of NiAl-Cr has not been obtained, making the site preference of Cr unclear. PMID:22713881

  2. Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure of low-Z absorbates using fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Stoehr, J.; Kollin, E.B.; Fischer, D.A.; Hastings, J.B.; Zaera, F.; Sette, F.

    1985-05-01

    Comparison of x-ray fluorescence yield (FY) and electron yield surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra above the S K-edge for c(2 x 2) S on Ni(100) reveals an order of magnitude higher sensitivity of the FY technique. Using FY detection, thiophene (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/S) chemisorption on Ni(100) is studied with S coverages down to 0.08 monolayer. The molecule dissociates at temperatures as low as 100K by interaction with fourfold hollow Ni sites. Blocking of these sites by oxygen leaves the molecule intact.

  3. Improved self-absorption correction for extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C.H.; Bridges, F.

    2003-06-04

    Extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) data collected in the fluorescence mode are susceptible to an apparent amplitude reduction due to the self-absorption of the fluorescing photon by the sample before it reaches a detector. Previous treatments have made the simplifying assumption that the effect of the EXAFS on the correction term is negligible, and that the samples are in the thick limit. We present a nearly exact treatment that can be applied for any sample thickness or concentration, and retains the EXAFS oscillations in the correction term.

  4. Structured Extended Finite Element Methods of Solids Defined by Implicit Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Belytschko, T; Mish, K; Moes, N; Parimi, C

    2002-11-17

    A paradigm is developed for generating structured finite element models from solid models by means of implicit surface definitions. The implicit surfaces are defined by radial basis functions. Internal features, such as material interfaces, sliding interfaces and cracks are treated by enrichment techniques developed in the extended finite element method (X-FEM). Methods for integrating the weak form for such models are proposed. These methods simplify the generation of finite element models. Results presented for several examples show that the accuracy of this method is comparable to standard unstructured finite element methods.

  5. A Phenotypic Structure and Neural Correlates of Compulsive Behaviors in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Montigny, Chantale; Castellanos-Ryan, Natalie; Whelan, Robert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Büchel, Christian; Gallinat, Jürgen; Flor, Herta; Mann, Karl; Paillère-Martinot, Marie-Laure; Nees, Frauke; Lathrop, Mark; Loth, Eva; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Schumann, Gunter; Smolka, Michael N.; Struve, Maren; Robbins, Trevor W.; Garavan, Hugh; Conrod, Patricia J.

    2013-01-01

    Background A compulsivity spectrum has been hypothesized to exist across Obsessive-Compulsive disorder (OCD), Eating Disorders (ED), substance abuse (SA) and binge-drinking (BD). The objective was to examine the validity of this compulsivity spectrum, and differentiate it from an externalizing behaviors dimension, but also to look at hypothesized personality and neural correlates. Method A community-sample of adolescents (N=1938; mean age 14.5 years), and their parents were recruited via high-schools in 8 European study sites. Data on adolescents’ psychiatric symptoms, DSM diagnoses (DAWBA) and substance use behaviors (AUDIT and ESPAD) were collected through adolescent- and parent-reported questionnaires and interviews. The phenotypic structure of compulsive behaviors was then tested using structural equation modeling. The model was validated using personality variables (NEO-FFI and TCI), and Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) analysis. Results Compulsivity symptoms best fit a higher-order two factor model, with ED and OCD loading onto a compulsivity factor, and BD and SA loading onto an externalizing factor, composed also of ADHD and conduct disorder symptoms. The compulsivity construct correlated with neuroticism (r=0.638; p≤0.001), conscientiousness (r=0.171; p≤0.001), and brain gray matter volume in left and right orbitofrontal cortex, right ventral striatum and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. The externalizing factor correlated with extraversion (r=0.201; p≤0.001), novelty-seeking (r=0.451; p≤0.001), and negatively with gray matter volume in the left inferior and middle frontal gyri. Conclusions Results suggest that a compulsivity spectrum exists in an adolescent, preclinical sample and accounts for variance in both OCD and ED, but not substance-related behaviors, and can be differentiated from an externalizing spectrum. PMID:24244633

  6. [POLYMORPHISM IN THE PHENOTYPIC STRUCTURE OF A POPULATION OF TAIGA TICK AND ITS EPIDEMIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE].

    PubMed

    Morozov, I M; Alekseev, A N; Dubinina, E V; Nikitin, A Ya; Melnikova, O V; Andaev, E I

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of 10-year (2005-2014) observations of an Ixodespersulcatus Schulze population. The purpose of this investigation was to trace long-term changes in the structure of the taiga tick population from the proportion of specimens with external skeletal anomalies and to assess a relationship between the pattern of imago phenotypic variation and the virus percentage of a carrier. There were a total of reports of the external skeletal structure of 1123 females gathered from plants to a flag in an area at 43 km from the Baikal Road connecting Irkutsk and the settlement of Listvyanka (Irkutsk Region). The proportion of specimens with anomalies averaged 37.8 +/- 1.88%. Four-to-seven varying anomalies were annually recorded. There was a preponderance of scutum impairment (an average of 17.0 +/- 3.08% of all females) that was a conglomerate of prominences and indentations along the entire clypeus surface and that was denoted P9. The nature of a change in the proportion of ticks with two anomalies (average monthly registration rate, 2.5 +/- 0.66%) is exhibited by three-year high-frequency oscillations whereas the specimens with P9 anomalies fail to show so clear cycling. The percentage of virus-containing taiga ticks was individually determined estimating the level of tick-borne encephalitis virus antigen by an enzyme immunoassay. A total of 4022 ticks were examined. The male and female data were pooled. There was a positive correlation between the change in the proportion of females with P9 anomaly and the infection of ticks in the examined population (Spearman's correlation coefficient, 0.88; P < 0.01). This supports the earlier observation of the greater epidemiological significance of the imago of a taiga tick with external skeletal anomalies particularly with considerably marked ones. PMID:26720971

  7. The CATH database: an extended protein family resource for structural and functional genomics

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, F. M. G.; Bennett, C. F.; Bray, J. E.; Harrison, A. P.; Martin, N.; Shepherd, A.; Sillitoe, I.; Thornton, J.; Orengo, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    The CATH database of protein domain structures (http://www.biochem.ucl.ac.uk/bsm/cath_new) currently contains 34 287 domain structures classified into 1383 superfamilies and 3285 sequence families. Each structural family is expanded with domain sequence relatives recruited from GenBank using a variety of efficient sequence search protocols and reliable thresholds. This extended resource, known as the CATH-protein family database (CATH-PFDB) contains a total of 310 000 domain sequences classified into 26 812 sequence families. New sequence search protocols have been designed, based on these intermediate sequence libraries, to allow more regular updating of the classification. Further developments include the adaptation of a recently developed method for rapid structure comparison, based on secondary structure matching, for domain boundary assignment. The philosophy behind CATHEDRAL is the recognition of recurrent folds already classified in CATH. Benchmarking of CATHEDRAL, using manually validated domain assignments, demonstrated that 43% of domains boundaries could be completely automatically assigned. This is an improvement on a previous consensus approach for which only 10–20% of domains could be reliably processed in a completely automated fashion. Since domain boundary assignment is a significant bottleneck in the classification of new structures, CATHEDRAL will also help to increase the frequency of CATH updates. PMID:12520050

  8. Local vibrational properties of GaAs studied by extended X-ray absorption fine structure.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S I; Aquilanti, G; Novello, N; Olivi, L; Grisenti, R; Fornasini, P

    2013-10-28

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been measured at both the K edges of gallium and arsenic in GaAs, from 14 to 300 K, to investigate the local vibrational and thermodynamic behaviour in terms of bond expansion, parallel, and perpendicular mean square relative displacements and third cumulant. The separate analysis of the two edges allows a self-consistent check of the results and suggests that a residual influence of Ga EXAFS at the As edge cannot be excluded. The relation between bond expansion, lattice expansion, and expansion due to anharmonicity of the effective potential is quantitatively clarified. The comparison with previous EXAFS results on other crystals with the diamond or zincblende structure shows that the values of a number of parameters determined from EXAFS are clearly correlated with the fractional ionicity and with the strength and temperature interval of the lattice negative expansion. PMID:24182054

  9. A 200 V silicon-on-sapphire LDMOS structure with a step oxide extended field plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, J.; Flores, D.; Rebollo, J.; Hidalgo, S.; Millan, J.

    2004-02-01

    Fabrication of power integrated circuits on silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) substrates has rarely been considered before. Hence, there is a lack of research in lateral power devices integrated on SOS. Self-heating effects in existing silicon-on-insulator (SOI) lateral power devices degrade the device performance and their reliability. Use of SOS substrates could alleviate these problems though they would require a different approach in lateral power device engineering. This paper purposes a new power SOS LDMOS structure with reduced transient self-heating effects and enhanced current capability compared to the conventional SOI counterpart. The proposed lateral power structure integrated on SOS substrates is analyzed by electro-thermal simulations. The field plate is enlarged (extended field plate (EFP)) along the drift region, reaching the drain region. The EFP includes an oxide step which improves the "on-state resistance-breakdown voltage" trade-off ( RONxS- Vbr).

  10. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies: Imaging and Source Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boboltz, David A.; Fey, Alan L.; Charlot, Patrick; Fomalont, Edward B.; Lanyi, Gabor E.; Zhang, Li-Wei

    2004-01-01

    We present imaging results and source structure analysis of extragalactic radio sources observed using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 24 GHz and 43 GHz as part of an ongoing NASA, USNO, NRAO and Bordeaux Observatory collaboration to extend the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to higher radio frequencies. The K/Q-band image database now includes images of 108 sources at 43 GHz (Q-braid) and images of 230 sources at 24 GHz (K-band). Preliminary analysis of the observations taken to date shows that the sources are generally more compact as one goes from the ICRF frequency of 8.4 GHz to 24 GHz. This result is consistent with the standard theory of compact extragalactic radio sources and suggests that reference frames defined at these higher radio frequencies will be less susceptible to the effects of intrinsic source structure than those defined at lower frequencies.

  11. An extended structure-based model based on a stochastic eddy-axis evolution equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassinos, S. C.; Reynolds, W. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have proposed and implemented an extension of the structure-based model for weak deformations. It was shown that the extended model will correctly reduce to the form of standard k-e models for the case of equilibrium under weak mean strain. The realizability of the extended model is guaranteed by the method of its construction. The predictions of the proposed model were very good for rotating homogeneous shear flows and for irrotational axisymmetric contraction, but were seriously deficient in the case of plane strain and axisymmetric expansion. We have concluded that the problem behind these difficulties lies in the algebraic constitutive equation relating the Reynolds stresses to the structure parameters rather than in the slow model developed here. In its present form, this equation assumes that under irrotational strain the principal axes of the Reynolds stresses remain locked onto those of the eddy-axis tensor. This is correct in the RDT limit, but inappropriate under weaker mean strains, when the non-linear eddy-eddy interactions tend to misalign the two sets of principal axes and create some non-zero theta and gamma.

  12. Structure of a lipid-bound extended synaptotagmin indicates a role in lipid transfer.

    PubMed

    Schauder, Curtis M; Wu, Xudong; Saheki, Yasunori; Narayanaswamy, Pradeep; Torta, Federico; Wenk, Markus R; De Camilli, Pietro; Reinisch, Karin M

    2014-06-26

    Growing evidence suggests that close appositions between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and other membranes, including appositions with the plasma membrane (PM), mediate exchange of lipids between these bilayers. The mechanisms of such exchange, which allows lipid transfer independently of vesicular transport, remain poorly understood. The presence of a synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial-lipid-binding protein (SMP) domain, a proposed lipid-binding module, in several proteins localized at membrane contact sites has raised the possibility that such domains may be implicated in lipid transport. SMP-containing proteins include components of the ERMES complex, an ER–mitochondrial tether, and the extended synaptotagmins (known as tricalbins in yeast), which are ER–PM tethers. Here we present at 2.44 Å resolution the crystal structure of a fragment of human extended synaptotagmin 2 (E-SYT2), including an SMP domain and two adjacent C2 domains. The SMP domain has a β-barrel structure like protein modules in the tubular-lipid-binding (TULIP) superfamily. It dimerizes to form an approximately 90-Å-long cylinder traversed by a channel lined entirely with hydrophobic residues, with the two C2A–C2B fragments forming arched structures flexibly linked to the SMP domain. Importantly, structural analysis complemented by mass spectrometry revealed the presence of glycerophospholipids in the E-SYT2 SMP channel, indicating a direct role for E-SYTs in lipid transport. These findings provide strong evidence for a role of SMP-domain-containing proteins in the control of lipid transfer at membrane contact sites and have broad implications beyond the field of ER-to-PM appositions. PMID:24847877

  13. Three-dimensional structure of the extended solar magnetic field and the sunspot cycle variation in cosmic ray intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    A principal cause for the eleven-year sunspot cycle variation in the primary cosmic ray intensity observed at earth may be a variation in the solid angle of the heliosphere occupied by the extended solar polar magnetic field. Galactic cosmic rays have relatively easy access to the inner solar system through the regular extended solar polar fields, and relatively difficult access through the irregular extended solar sector structure fields.

  14. The Relative Influence of Competition and Prey Defenses on the Phenotypic Structure of Insectivorous Bat Ensembles in Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Schoeman, M. Corrie; Jacobs, David S.

    2008-01-01

    Deterministic filters such as competition and prey defences should have a strong influence on the community structure of animals such as insectivorous bats that have life histories characterized by low fecundity, low predation risk, long life expectancy, and stable populations. We investigated the relative influence of these two deterministic filters on the phenotypic structure of insectivorous bat ensembles in southern Africa. We used null models to simulate the random phenotypic patterns expected in the absence of competition or prey defences and analysed the deviations of the observed phenotypic pattern from these expected random patterns. The phenotypic structure at local scales exhibited non-random patterns consistent with both competition and prey defense hypotheses. There was evidence that competition influenced body size distribution across ensembles. Competition also influenced wing and echolocation patterns in ensembles and in functional foraging groups with high species richness or abundance. At the same time, prey defense filters influenced echolocation patterns in two species-poor ensembles. Non-random patterns remained evident even after we removed the influence of body size from wing morphology and echolocation parameters taking phylogeny into account. However, abiotic filters such as geographic distribution ranges of small and large-bodied species, extinction risk, and the physics of flight and sound probably also interacted with biotic filters at local and/or regional scales to influence the community structure of sympatric bats in southern Africa. Future studies should investigate alternative parameters that define bat community structure such as diet and abundance to better determine the influence of competition and prey defences on the structure of insectivorous bat ensembles in southern Africa. PMID:19005563

  15. The structure of the genotype-phenotype map strongly constrains the evolution of non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Dingle, Kamaludin; Schaper, Steffen; Louis, Ard A

    2015-12-01

    The prevalence of neutral mutations implies that biological systems typically have many more genotypes than phenotypes. But, can the way that genotypes are distributed over phenotypes determine evolutionary outcomes? Answering such questions is difficult, in part because the number of genotypes can be hyper-astronomically large. By solving the genotype-phenotype (GP) map for RNA secondary structure (SS) for systems up to length L = 126 nucleotides (where the set of all possible RNA strands would weigh more than the mass of the visible universe), we show that the GP map strongly constrains the evolution of non-coding RNA (ncRNA). Simple random sampling over genotypes predicts the distribution of properties such as the mutational robustness or the number of stems per SS found in naturally occurring ncRNA with surprising accuracy. Because we ignore natural selection, this strikingly close correspondence with the mapping suggests that structures allowing for functionality are easily discovered, despite the enormous size of the genetic spaces. The mapping is extremely biased: the majority of genotypes map to an exponentially small portion of the morphospace of all biophysically possible structures. Such strong constraints provide a non-adaptive explanation for the convergent evolution of structures such as the hammerhead ribozyme. These results present a particularly clear example of bias in the arrival of variation strongly shaping evolutionary outcomes and may be relevant to Mayr's distinction between proximate and ultimate causes in evolutionary biology. PMID:26640651

  16. An Incompletely Penetrant Novel Mutation in COL7A1 Causes Epidermolysis Bullosa Pruriginosa and Dominant Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Phenotypes in an Extended Kindred

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Catherine S; Lu, Yin; Farhi, Anita; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Kashgarian, Michael; Glusac, Earl J; Lifton, Richard P; Antaya, Richard J; Choate, Keith A

    2012-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa (EBP) is a rare subtype of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) characterized by intense pruritus, nodular or lichenoid lesions, and violaceous linear scarring, most prominently on the extensor extremities. Remarkably, identical mutations in COL7A1, which encodes an anchoring fibril protein present at the dermal–epidermal junction, can cause both DEB and EBP with either autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance. We present one family with both dystrophic and pruriginosa phenotypes of epidermolysis bullosa. The proband is a 19-year-old Caucasian woman who initially presented in childhood with lichenoid papules affecting her extensor limbs and intense pruritus consistent with EBP. Her maternal grandmother saw a dermatologist for similar skin lesions that developed without any known triggers at age 47 and mostly resolved spontaneously after approximately 10 years. The proband’s younger brother developed a small crop of pruritic papules on his elbows, dorsal hands, knees, and ankles at age 13. Her second cousin once removed, however, reported a mild blistering disease without pruritus consistent with DEB. Genetic sequencing of the kindred revealed a single dominant novel intron 47 splice site donor G>A mutation, c.4668 + 1 G>A, which we predict leads to exon skipping. Incomplete penetrance is confirmed in her clinically unaffected mother, who carries the same dominant mutation. The wide diversity of clinical phenotypes with one underlying genotype demonstrates that COL7A1 mutations are incompletely penetrant and strongly suggests that other genetic and environmental factors influence clinical presentation. PMID:22515571

  17. Evolutionary Conservation and Network Structure Characterize Genes of Phenotypic Relevance for Mitosis in Human

    PubMed Central

    del Sol, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The impact of gene silencing on cellular phenotypes is difficult to establish due to the complexity of interactions in the associated biological processes and pathways. A recent genome-wide RNA knock-down study both identified and phenotypically characterized a set of important genes for the cell cycle in HeLa cells. Here, we combine a molecular interaction network analysis, based on physical and functional protein interactions, in conjunction with evolutionary information, to elucidate the common biological and topological properties of these key genes. Our results show that these genes tend to be conserved with their corresponding protein interactions across several species and are key constituents of the evolutionary conserved molecular interaction network. Moreover, a group of bistable network motifs is found to be conserved within this network, which are likely to influence the network stability and therefore the robustness of cellular functioning. They form a cluster, which displays functional homogeneity and is significantly enriched in genes phenotypically relevant for mitosis. Additional results reveal a relationship between specific cellular processes and the phenotypic outcomes induced by gene silencing. This study introduces new ideas regarding the relationship between genotype and phenotype in the context of the cell cycle. We show that the analysis of molecular interaction networks can result in the identification of genes relevant to cellular processes, which is a promising avenue for future research. PMID:22577488

  18. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure of NaBr and Ge at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ingalls, R.; Crozier, E.D.; Whitmore, J.E.; Seary, A.J.; Tranquada, J.M.

    1980-06-01

    The x-ray absorption spectra of Ge and of Br in NaBr have been measured to pressures of 52 and 21 kbars, respectively, in a boron carbide and diamond anvil cell in which pressure was measured via the ruby-fluorescence technique. Although Bragg peaks from the diamond anvil reduced the accuracy, atomic spacings in both materials could be determined by extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) analysis. Changes in the nearest-neighbor separations in NaBr, and Ge to at least 40 kbars, agreed with literature values, indicating that the EXAFS phase shifts are quite insensitive to such pressures. In addition the near-edge peak positions in the NaBr spectra appeared to readily shift with pressure, which suggests that NaBr may be quite suitable as a pressure standard in future work of this type.

  19. Extended-resolution structured illumination imaging of endocytic and cytoskeletal dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Shao, Lin; Chen, Bi-Chang; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Mingshu; Moses, Brian; Milkie, Daniel E.; Beach, Jordan R.; Hammer, John A.; Pasham, Mithun; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Baird, Michelle A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Xu, Pingyong; Betzig, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is distinct among nanoscale imaging tools in its ability to image protein dynamics in living cells. Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) stands out in this regard because of its high speed and low illumination intensities, but typically offers only a twofold resolution gain. We extended the resolution of live-cell SIM through two approaches: ultrahigh numerical aperture SIM at 84-nanometer lateral resolution for more than 100 multicolor frames, and nonlinear SIM with patterned activation at 45- to 62-nanometer resolution for approximately 20 to 40 frames. We applied these approaches to image dynamics near the plasma membrane of spatially resolved assemblies of clathrin and caveolin, Rab5a in early endosomes, and a-actinin, often in relationship to cortical actin. In addition, we examined mitochondria, actin, and the Golgi apparatus dynamics in three dimensions. PMID:26315442

  20. ADVANCED IMAGING. Extended-resolution structured illumination imaging of endocytic and cytoskeletal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Shao, Lin; Chen, Bi-Chang; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Mingshu; Moses, Brian; Milkie, Daniel E; Beach, Jordan R; Hammer, John A; Pasham, Mithun; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Xu, Pingyong; Betzig, Eric

    2015-08-28

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is distinct among nanoscale imaging tools in its ability to image protein dynamics in living cells. Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) stands out in this regard because of its high speed and low illumination intensities, but typically offers only a twofold resolution gain. We extended the resolution of live-cell SIM through two approaches: ultrahigh numerical aperture SIM at 84-nanometer lateral resolution for more than 100 multicolor frames, and nonlinear SIM with patterned activation at 45- to 62-nanometer resolution for approximately 20 to 40 frames. We applied these approaches to image dynamics near the plasma membrane of spatially resolved assemblies of clathrin and caveolin, Rab5a in early endosomes, and α-actinin, often in relationship to cortical actin. In addition, we examined mitochondria, actin, and the Golgi apparatus dynamics in three dimensions. PMID:26315442

  1. New classes of integrals inherent in the mathematical structure of extended equations describing superconducting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonczarek, Ryszard; Krzyzosiak, Mateusz; Gonczarek, Adam; Jacak, Lucjan

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we discuss the mathematical structure of the s-wave superconducting gap and other quantitative characteristics of superconducting systems. In particular, we evaluate and discuss integrals inherent in fundamental equations describing superconducting systems. The results presented here extend the approach formulated by Abrikosov and Maki, which was restricted to the first-order expansion. A few infinite families of integrals are derived and allow us to express the fundamental equations by means of analytic formulas. They can be then exploited in order to find some quantitative characteristics of superconducting systems by the method of successive approximations. We show that the results can be applied to some modern formalisms in order to study high-Tc superconductors and other superconducting materials of the new generation.

  2. Asymmetric Dust Jets and Extended Structure of 22P/Kopff Observed During 2009 Appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanayama, Hidekazu; Ishiguro, Masateru; Watanabe, Jun-Ichi; Sarugaku, Yuki; Fukushima, Hideo; Miyaji, Takeshi; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Kuroda, Daisuke; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Ohta, Kouji; Nobuyuki, Kawai

    2012-12-01

    22P/Kopff images were taken with Multicolor Imaging Telescopes for Survey and Monstrous Explosions (MITSuME) 3ch simultaneous CCD cameras on the Ishigakijima astronomical observatory 105-cm telescope and a 2kCCD camera on the Kiso 105-cm Schmidt telescope from 2009 August to December after the passage of its perihelion on 2009 May 25. We confirmed that the near-nuclear fan-shaped jet structure extended toward the south. Whereas we detected a dust trail structure on the project orbit of the parent nucleus, we could not confirm the obvious neck-line structure. We deduced a pole orientation of (αp1, δp1) = (302°±30°, 62°±10°) or (αp1, δp1) = (122°±30°, -62°±10°) in the case of prograde or retrograde rotation, based on the fan-shaped jet. In addition, we conducted a model simulation of the dust orbital evolution, and found that the observed dust morphology of the fan-shaped jet and dust trail can well explain the dust emission near the south polar region. Finally, we conclude that the surface of 22P/Kopff is becoming largely dormant, but the polar region is still active, as we saw in the Deep Space 1 image of 19P/Borrelly.

  3. Crystal Structure of a Super Leucine Zipper an Extended Two-Stranded Super Long Coiled Coil

    SciTech Connect

    J Diao

    2011-12-31

    Coiled coil is a ubiquitous structural motif in proteins, with two to seven alpha helices coiled together like the strands of a rope, and coiled coil folding and assembly is not completely understood. A GCN4 leucine zipper mutant with four mutations of K3A, D7A, Y17W, and H18N has been designed, and the crystal structure has been determined at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution. The peptide monomer shows a helix trunk with short curved N- and C-termini. In the crystal, two monomers cross in 35{sup o} and form an X-shaped dimer, and each X-shaped dimer is welded into the next one through sticky hydrophobic ends, thus forming an extended two-stranded, parallel, super long coiled coil rather than a discrete, two-helix coiled coil of the wild-type GCN4 leucine zipper. Leucine residues appear at every seventh position in the super long coiled coil, suggesting that it is an extended super leucine zipper. Compared to the wild-type leucine zipper, the N-terminus of the mutant has a dramatic conformational change and the C-terminus has one more residue Glu 32 determined. The mutant X-shaped dimer has a large crossing angle of 35{sup o} instead of 18{sup o} in the wild-type dimer. The results show a novel assembly mode and oligomeric state of coiled coil, and demonstrate that mutations may affect folding and assembly of the overall coiled coil. Analysis of the formation mechanism of the super long coiled coil may help understand and design self-assembling protein fibers.

  4. Quinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli O127a:K63 Serotype with an Extended-Spectrum-Beta-Lactamase Phenotype from a Food Poisoning Outbreak in China

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Rongzhang; Qiu, Shaofu; Yang, Guang; Su, Wenli; Song, Lixue; Zhang, Jia; Chen, Jiaxu; Jia, Leili; Wang, Ligui

    2012-01-01

    We report an atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O127a:K63 strain with resistance to quinolones and extended-spectrum cephalosporins isolated from a 2010 food poisoning outbreak involving 112 adults in China. Two resistance genes [blaCTX-M-15, aac(6′)-Ib-c] and five mutations (two in gyrA, two in parC, one in parE) coexisted in this enteropathogenic E. coli strain. PMID:22553233

  5. Structural characterization of alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreated grasses exhibiting diverse lignin phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background For cellulosic biofuels processes, suitable characterization of the lignin remaining within the cell wall and correlation of quantified properties of lignin to cell wall polysaccharide enzymatic deconstruction is underrepresented in the literature. This is particularly true for grasses which represent a number of promising bioenergy feedstocks where quantification of grass lignins is particularly problematic due to the high fraction of p-hydroxycinnamates. The main focus of this work is to use grasses with a diverse range of lignin properties, and applying multiple lignin characterization platforms, attempt to correlate the differences in these lignin properties to the susceptibility to alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic deconstruction. Results We were able to determine that the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose to to glucose (i.e. digestibility) of four grasses with relatively diverse lignin phenotypes could be correlated to total lignin content and the content of p-hydroxycinnamates, while S/G ratios did not appear to contribute to the enzymatic digestibility or delignification. The lignins of the brown midrib corn stovers tested were significantly more condensed than a typical commercial corn stover and a significant finding was that pretreatment with alkaline hydrogen peroxide increases the fraction of lignins involved in condensed linkages from 88–95% to ~99% for all the corn stovers tested, which is much more than has been reported in the literature for other pretreatments. This indicates significant scission of β-O-4 bonds by pretreatment and/or induction of lignin condensation reactions. The S/G ratios in grasses determined by analytical pyrolysis are significantly lower than values obtained using either thioacidolysis or 2DHSQC NMR due to presumed interference by ferulates. Conclusions It was found that grass cell wall polysaccharide hydrolysis by cellulolytic enzymes for grasses exhibiting a diversity of

  6. New insights into the phenotypic covariance structure of the anthropoid cranium.

    PubMed

    Makedonska, Jana

    2014-12-01

    In complex organisms, suites of non-random, highly intercorrelated phenotypic traits, organized according to their developmental history and forming semi-autonomous units (i.e. modules), have the potential to impose constraints on morphological diversification or to improve evolvability. Because of its structural, developmental and functional complexity, the cranium is arguably one of the best models for studying the interplay between developmental history and the need for various parts of a structure to specialize in different functions. This study evaluated the significance of two specific types of developmental imprints in the adult anthropoid cranium, those imposed by ossification pattern (i.e. ossification with and without a pre-existing cartilaginous phase) and those imposed by tissue origin (i.e. tissues derived principally from neural-crest vs. those derived from paraxial mesoderm). Specifically, this study tests the hypothesis that the face and the basicranium form two distinct modules with higher within-unit trait integration magnitudes compared with the cranium as a whole. Data on 12 anthropoid primate species were collected in the form of 20 three-dimensional landmarks digitized on cranial surface models that sample the basicranium as well as regions of functional importance during feeding [corrected]. The presence of a significant modularity imprint in the adult cranium was assessed using a between-region within-species comparison of multivariate correlations (RV coefficients) obtained with partial least-squares, using within-module within-species eigenvalue variance (EV), and using cluster analyses and non-metric multidimensional scaling. In addition to addressing the validity of the cranial modularity hypothesis in anthropoids, this study addressed methodological aspects of the interspecific comparison of morphological integration, namely the effect of sample size and the effect of landmark number on integration magnitudes. Two methodological

  7. A DEEPER LOOK AT LEO IV: STAR FORMATION HISTORY AND EXTENDED STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Sand, David J.; Seth, Anil; Olszewski, Edward W.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Willman, Beth; Kallivayalil, Nitya

    2010-07-20

    We present MMT/Megacam imaging of the Leo IV dwarf galaxy in order to investigate its structure and star formation history, and to search for signs of association with the recently discovered Leo V satellite. Based on parameterized fits, we find that Leo IV is round, with {epsilon} < 0.23 (at the 68% confidence limit) and a half-light radius of r{sub h} {approx_equal} 130 pc. Additionally, we perform a thorough search for extended structures in the plane of the sky and along the line of sight. We derive our surface brightness detection limit by implanting fake structures into our catalog with stellar populations identical to that of Leo IV. We show that we are sensitive to stream-like structures with surface brightness {mu}{sub r} {approx}< 29.6 mag arcsec{sup -2}, and at this limit we find no stellar bridge between Leo IV (out to a radius of {approx}0.5 kpc) and the recently discovered, nearby satellite Leo V. Using the color-magnitude fitting package StarFISH, we determine that Leo IV is consistent with a single age ({approx}14 Gyr), single metallicity ([Fe/H] {approx} -2.3) stellar population, although we cannot rule out a significant spread in these values. We derive a luminosity of M{sub V} = -5.5 {+-} 0.3. Studying both the spatial distribution and frequency of Leo IV's 'blue plume' stars reveals evidence for a young ({approx}2 Gyr) stellar population which makes up {approx}2% of its stellar mass. This sprinkling of star formation, only detectable in this deep study, highlights the need for further imaging of the new Milky Way satellites along with theoretical work on the expected, detailed properties of these possible 'reionization fossils'.

  8. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes having analogous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Abhijeet; Shrivastava, B. D.; Srivastava, Krishna; Prasad, J.

    2013-02-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure spectra have been studied at the Cu K-edge in five mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes, viz., [Cu(L-glu)(bipy)] 1, [Cu(L-glu)(phen) (H2O)].3H2O 2, [Cu(L-tyro)(bipy)(ClO4)].2H2O 3, [Cu(L-phen)(bipy)(H2O)] (ClO4) 4, and [Cu(L-tyro)(phen)(H2O)] (ClO4).1.5H2O 5 (where L-glu = L-glutamate dianion, L-tyro = L-tyrosinate anion, bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine, and phen =1,10-phenanthroline), having essentially the same structure. The crystallographic data are available for all the complexes using which five theoretical models have been generated. Firstly, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data of each complex has been analyzed using its own theoretical model and the results obtained are found to be comparable with the crystallographic results. Then, the EXAFS data of each complex has been analyzed using the theoretical models of the remaining four of these complexes. For each complex, the structural parameters obtained by fitting EXAFS data with theoretical models of the four remaining complexes have been found to be comparable with those obtained by fitting its own theoretical model. Thus, it has been found that if the crystal structure is not available for a complex, then the crystal structure of similar or analogous complex can be used satisfactorily for generating the theoretical model for the EXAFS data analysis of that complex, even if different ligands are attached to the central metal atom. On the basis of EXAFS data analysis, the coordination geometries around the central metal ions in these complexes have been depicted.

  9. Spatial phenotypic and genetic structure of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) in a heterogeneous natural system, Lake Mývatn, Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Antoine; Kristjánsson, Bjarni K; Einarsson, Árni; Räsänen, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Eco-evolutionary responses of natural populations to spatial environmental variation strongly depend on the relative strength of environmental differences/natural selection and dispersal/gene flow. In absence of geographic barriers, as often is the case in lake ecosystems, gene flow is expected to constrain adaptive divergence between environments – favoring phenotypic plasticity or high trait variability. However, if divergent natural selection is sufficiently strong, adaptive divergence can occur in face of gene flow. The extent of divergence is most often studied between two contrasting environments, whereas potential for multimodal divergence is little explored. We investigated phenotypic (body size, defensive structures, and feeding morphology) and genetic (microsatellites) structure in threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) across five habitat types and two basins (North and South) within the geologically young and highly heterogeneous Lake Mývatn, North East Iceland. We found that (1) North basin stickleback were, on average, larger and had relatively longer spines than South basin stickleback, whereas (2) feeding morphology (gill raker number and gill raker gap width) differed among three of five habitat types, and (3) there was only subtle genetic differentiation across the lake. Overall, our results indicate predator and prey mediated phenotypic divergence across multiple habitats in the lake, in face of gene flow. PMID:24223263

  10. Free-energy landscape of mechanically unfolded model proteins: Extended Jarzinsky versus inherent structure reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luccioli, Stefano; Imparato, Alberto; Torcini, Alessandro

    2008-09-01

    The equilibrium free-energy landscape of off-lattice model heteropolymers as a function of an internal coordinate, namely the end-to-end distance, is reconstructed from out-of-equilibrium steered molecular dynamics data. This task is accomplished via two independent methods: By employing an extended version of the Jarzynski equality and the inherent structure formalism. A comparison of the free energies estimated with these two schemes with equilibrium results obtained via the umbrella sampling technique reveals a good quantitative agreement among all the approaches in a range of temperatures around the “folding transition” for the two examined sequences. In particular, for the sequence with good foldability properties, the mechanically induced structural transitions can be related to thermodynamical aspects of folding. Moreover, for the same sequence the knowledge of the landscape profile allows for a good estimation of the lifetimes of the native configuration for temperatures ranging from the folding to the collapse temperature. For the random sequence, mechanical and thermal unfolding appear to follow different paths along the landscape.

  11. Ovarian structures and uterine environment are associated with phenotypic and genetic merit for performance in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, A M; Ryan, D P; Carthy, T R; Evans, R D; Berry, D P

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the association between detailed reproductive phenotypes for cows categorized as divergent for phenotypic and genetic performance. The hypothesis was that higher yielding animals, either phenotypically or genetically, would have compromised ovarian and uterine reproductive performance. Detailed reproductive traits including multiple ovulations, cystic ovarian structures, corpus luteum (CL) presence, and uterine environment were available on 9675 ultrasound records from 8174 dairy lactating cows, calved between 10 and 70 days. Cows were categorized, within parity, into low, average, or high for each of the performance traits. There was a greater likelihood of multiple ovulations in cows with greater phenotypic yields (odds ratio: 1.53-1.81) and greater genetic merit for yield (odds ratio: 1.31-1.59) relative to lower performing contemporaries. After adjustment for genetic merit, a similar trend of increased odds (odds ratio: 1.29-1.87) of multiple ovulations in higher yielding cows was observed compared with the lowest yielding category. There was no association between either phenotypic milk composition or genetic merit for milk composition with the likelihood of multiple ovulations. The likelihood of cystic ovarian structures was highest in cows with greatest phenotypic milk yields (odds ratio: 2.75-3.24), greater genetic merit for milk yield (odds ratio: 1.30-1.51), and even after adjustment for genetic merit there was a greater likelihood of cystic ovarian structures in cows with the highest milk yields (odds ratio: 2.71-2.95), compared with cows in the lowest category for each of the milk traits. Cows with average phenotypic milk yields were more likely to have a CL, compared with the lowest yielding category (odds ratio: 1.20-1.23), and these associations remained after adjustment for genetic merit of the trait. The likelihood of CL presence was highest in cows with the lowest genetic merit for milk. Lower fat

  12. Structural Analysis of Freshwater-Cultured Pearls with Different Lusters Using the Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monarumit, N.; Noirawee, N.; Phlayrahan, A.; Promdee, K.; Won-in, K.; Satitkune, S.

    2016-05-01

    The quality of freshwater-cultured pearls (Chamberlainia hainesiana) is determined by their luster, which is related to the content of the two CaCO3 mineral phases: aragonite and vaterite. The atomic structures of pearl samples were analyzed by the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique using synchrotron radiation to compare the atomic environment and atomic bonding around Ca atoms of high- and low-luster pearls. The Ca K-edge EXAFS spectra of the pearl samples were determined and interpreted in terms of the photoelectron wave number and the distance between Ca atoms and neighboring atoms. From the results, the wave oscillation of high-luster pearls is less than that of low-luster pearls. This indicates the presence of the aragonite phase in high-luster pearls and a combination of aragonite and vaterite phases in low-luster pearls, especially in the fi rst and second shells of Ca atoms. It can be concluded that the different lusters of freshwater-cultured pearls are related to the different CaCO3 phases in their structures.

  13. The local structure factor near an interface; beyond extended capillary-wave models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, A. O.; Rascón, C.; Evans, R.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the local structure factor S (zq) at a free liquid–gas interface in systems with short-ranged intermolecular forces and determine the corrections to the leading-order, capillary-wave-like, Goldstone mode divergence of S (zq) known to occur for parallel (i.e. measured along the interface) wavevectors q\\to 0 . We show from explicit solution of the inhomogeneous Ornstein–Zernike equation that for distances z far from the interface, where the profile decays exponentially, S (zq) splits unambiguously into bulk and interfacial contributions. On each side of the interface, the interfacial contributions can be characterised by distinct liquid and gas wavevector dependent surface tensions, {σ l}(q) and {σg}(q) , which are determined solely by the bulk two-body and three-body direct correlation functions. At high temperatures, the wavevector dependence simplifies and is determined almost entirely by the appropriate bulk structure factor, leading to positive rigidity coefficients. Our predictions are confirmed by explicit calculation of S (zq) within square-gradient theory and the Sullivan model. The results for the latter predict a striking temperature dependence for {σ l}(q) and {σg}(q) , and have implications for fluctuation effects. Our results account quantitatively for the findings of a recent very extensive simulation study by Höfling and Dietrich of the total structure factor in the interfacial region, in a system with a cut-off Lennard-Jones potential, in sharp contrast to extended capillary-wave models which failed completely to describe the simulation results.

  14. The local structure factor near an interface; beyond extended capillary-wave models.

    PubMed

    Parry, A O; Rascón, C; Evans, R

    2016-06-22

    We investigate the local structure factor S (z;q) at a free liquid-gas interface in systems with short-ranged intermolecular forces and determine the corrections to the leading-order, capillary-wave-like, Goldstone mode divergence of S (z;q) known to occur for parallel (i.e. measured along the interface) wavevectors [Formula: see text]. We show from explicit solution of the inhomogeneous Ornstein-Zernike equation that for distances z far from the interface, where the profile decays exponentially, S (z;q) splits unambiguously into bulk and interfacial contributions. On each side of the interface, the interfacial contributions can be characterised by distinct liquid and gas wavevector dependent surface tensions, [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], which are determined solely by the bulk two-body and three-body direct correlation functions. At high temperatures, the wavevector dependence simplifies and is determined almost entirely by the appropriate bulk structure factor, leading to positive rigidity coefficients. Our predictions are confirmed by explicit calculation of S (z;q) within square-gradient theory and the Sullivan model. The results for the latter predict a striking temperature dependence for [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], and have implications for fluctuation effects. Our results account quantitatively for the findings of a recent very extensive simulation study by Höfling and Dietrich of the total structure factor in the interfacial region, in a system with a cut-off Lennard-Jones potential, in sharp contrast to extended capillary-wave models which failed completely to describe the simulation results. PMID:27115774

  15. An extended structure-function model and its application to the analysis of solar wind intermittency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, C.-Y.; Marsch, E.; Rosenbauer, H.

    1995-01-01

    An extended structure-function model is developed by including the new effect in the p-model of Meneveau and Sreenivasan (1987a), i.e., that the averaged energy cascade rate changes with scale, a situation which has been found to prevail in non-fully-developed turbulence in the inner solar wind. This model is useful for the small-scale fluctuations in the inner heliosphere, where the turbulence is not fully developed and cannot be explained quantitatively by any of the previous intermittency turbulence models. With two model parameters, the intrinsic index of the energy spectrum, alpha and the fragmentation fraction p, the model can fit, for the first time, all the observed scaling exponents of the structure functions, which are calculated for time lags ranging from 81 seconds to 0.7 hours from the Helios solar wind data. From the cases we studied we can establish for p neither a clear radial evolution trend, nor a solar-wind-speed, or stream-structure dependence, or a systematic anisotropy for both the flow velocity and magnetic field component fluctuations. Generally, p has values between 0. 7 and 0.8. However, in some cases in low-speed wind p has somewhat higher values for the magnetic components, especially for the radial component. In high-speed wind, the inferred intrinsic spectral indices (alpha) of the velocity and magnetic field components are about equal, while the experimental spectral indices derived from the observed power spectra differ. The magnetic index is somewhat larger than the index of the velocity spectrum. For magnetic fluctuations in both high- and low-speed winds, the intrinsic exponent alpha has values which are near 1.5, while the observed spectral exponent has much higher values.

  16. Emulsification of partially miscible liquids using colloidal particles: nonspherical and extended domain structures.

    PubMed

    Clegg, Paul S; Herzig, Eva M; Schofield, Andrew B; Egelhaaf, Stefan U; Horozov, Tommy S; Binks, Bernard P; Cates, Michael E; Poon, Wilson C K

    2007-05-22

    We present microscopy studies of particle-stabilized emulsions with unconventional morphologies. The emulsions comprise pairs of partially miscible fluids and are stabilized by colloids. Alcohol-oil mixtures are employed; silica colloids are chemically modified so that they have partial wettability. We create our morphologies by two distinct routes: starting with a conventional colloid-stabilized emulsion or starting in the single-fluid phase with the colloids dispersed. In the first case temperature cycling leads to the creation of extended fluid domains built around some of the initial fluid droplets. In the second case quenching into the demixed region leads to the formation of domains which reflect the demixing kinetics. The structures are stable due to a jammed, semisolid, multilayer of colloids on the liquid-liquid interface. The differing morphologies reflect the roles in formation of the arrested state of heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation and spinodal decomposition. The latter results in metastable, bicontinuous emulsions with frozen interfaces, at least for the thin-slab samples, investigated here. PMID:17439257

  17. Computational extended magneto-hydrodynamical study of shock structure generated by flows past an obstacle

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xuan; Seyler, C. E.

    2015-07-15

    The magnetized shock problem is studied in the context where supersonic plasma flows past a solid obstacle. This problem exhibits interesting and important phenomena such as a bow shock, magnetotail formation, reconnection, and plasmoid formation. This study is carried out using a discontinuous Galerkin method to solve an extended magneto-hydrodynamic model (XMHD). The main goals of this paper are to present a reasonably complete picture of the properties of this interaction using the MHD model and then to compare the results to the XMHD model. The inflow parameters, such as the magnetosonic Mach number M{sub f} and the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure β, can significantly affect the physical structures of the flow-obstacle interaction. The Hall effect can also significantly influence the results in the regime in which the ion inertial length is numerically resolved. Most of the results presented are for the two-dimensional case; however, two three-dimensional simulations are presented to make a connection to the important case in which the solar wind interacts with a solid body and to explore the possibility of performing scaled laboratory experiments.

  18. Item-Level Psychometrics of the Glasgow Outcome Scale: Extended Structured Interviews.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ickpyo; Li, Chih-Ying; Velozo, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    The Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE) structured interview captures critical components of activities and participation, including home, shopping, work, leisure, and family/friend relationships. Eighty-nine community dwelling adults with mild-moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) were recruited (average = 2.7 year post injury). Nine items of the 19 items were used for the psychometrics analysis purpose. Factor analysis and item-level psychometrics were investigated using the Rasch partial-credit model. Although the principal components analysis of residuals suggests that a single measurement factor dominates the measure, the instrument did not meet the factor analysis criteria. Five items met the rating scale criteria. Eight items fit the Rasch model. The instrument demonstrated low person reliability (0.63), low person strata (2.07), and a slight ceiling effect. The GOSE demonstrated limitations in precisely measuring activities/participation for individuals after TBI. Future studies should examine the impact of the low precision of the GOSE on effect size. PMID:27504879

  19. Fine-structure constant constraints on dark energy. II. Extending the parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, C. J. A. P.; Pinho, A. M. M.; Carreira, P.; Gusart, A.; López, J.; Rocha, C. I. S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical tests of the stability of fundamental couplings, such as the fine-structure constant α , are a powerful probe of new physics. Recently these measurements, combined with local atomic clock tests and Type Ia supernova and Hubble parameter data, were used to constrain the simplest class of dynamical dark energy models where the same degree of freedom is assumed to provide both the dark energy and (through a dimensionless coupling, ζ , to the electromagnetic sector) the α variation. One caveat of these analyses was that it was based on fiducial models where the dark energy equation of state was described by a single parameter (effectively its present day value, w0). Here we relax this assumption and study broader dark energy model classes, including the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder and early dark energy parametrizations. Even in these extended cases we find that the current data constrains the coupling ζ at the 1 0-6 level and w0 to a few percent (marginalizing over other parameters), thus confirming the robustness of earlier analyses. On the other hand, the additional parameters are typically not well constrained. We also highlight the implications of our results for constraints on violations of the weak equivalence principle and improvements to be expected from forthcoming measurements with high-resolution ultrastable spectrographs.

  20. Consider neuromusculoskeletal redundancy and extended proprioception when designing smart structures to interface with humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, Jack M.

    1996-05-01

    Despite many well-intentioned attempts to utilize state-of-the-art advanced control systems technology to design contact devices such as powered orthoses, there have been more failures than successes. In part this is due to our limited understanding of neuromechanical function, and of how to optimally design human-technology interfaces. This paper develops a theoretical foundation for mechanical impedance and postural stability for large-scale human systems, and for the analysis and design of human-technology contact interfaces. We start with four basic presuppositions: redundancy is a fundamental feature of biosystem design, muscle actuators possess intrinsic nonlinear stiffness which can be modulated, mechanical interaction between the human and an environment is fundamentally bicausal, and objects with certain properties can become almost a natural extension of the human body. We then develop the key concepts of intimate contact and extended proprioception, and provide examples of how these principles can be applied to practical problems in orthotics, focusing on posture-assist technologies. Finally, suggestions are put forward for applying smart materials and structures to innovative orthotic design.

  1. Extended Kalman filtering for the detection of damage in linear mechanical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Escamilla-Ambrosio, P. J.; Lieven, N. A. J.

    2009-09-01

    This paper addresses the problem of assessing the location and extent of damage in a vibrating structure by means of vibration measurements. Frequency domain identification methods (e.g. finite element model updating) have been widely used in this area while time domain methods such as the extended Kalman filter (EKF) method, are more sparsely represented. The difficulty of applying EKF in mechanical system damage identification and localisation lies in: the high computational cost, the dependence of estimation results on the initial estimation error covariance matrix P(0), the initial value of parameters to be estimated, and on the statistics of measurement noise R and process noise Q. To resolve these problems in the EKF, a multiple model adaptive estimator consisting of a bank of EKF in modal domain was designed, each filter in the bank is based on different P(0). The algorithm was iterated by using the weighted global iteration method. A fuzzy logic model was incorporated in each filter to estimate the variance of the measurement noise R. The application of the method is illustrated by simulated and real examples.

  2. Enhanced traveling wave amplification of co-planar slow wave structure by extended phase-matching

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, Andrew; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar; Shin, Young-Min

    2015-09-15

    The electron beam co-propagating with slow waves in a staggered double grating array (SDGA) efficiently amplifies millimeter and sub-millimeter waves over a wide spectrum. Our theoretical and numerical analyses show that the power amplification in the fundamental passband is enhanced by the extended beam-wave phase-matching. Particle-in-cell simulations on the SDGA slow wave structure, designed with 10.4 keV and 50–100 mA sheet beam, indicate that maintaining beam-wave synchronization along the entire length of the circuit improves the gain by 7.3% leading to a total gain of 28 dB, corresponding to 62 W saturated power at the middle of operating band, and a 3-dB bandwidth of 7 GHz with 10.5% at V-band (73.5 GHz center frequency) with saturated peak power reaching 80 W and 28 dB at 71 GHz. These results also show a reasonably good agreement with analytic calculations based on Pierce small signal gain theory.

  3. A surface extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of tellurium adsorbed onto Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, S. R.; Cowie, B. C. C.; Wilks, S. P.; Dunstan, P. R.; Dunscombe, C. J.; Williams, R. H.

    1996-09-01

    The adsorption of tellurium on Si(100) has been studied using surface extended X-ray adsorption fine structure (SEXAFS) and X-ray standing wave spectroscopy (XSW). This particular system is of interest due to its potential applicability in the surfactant aided growth of CdHgTeCdTeSi(100) based infra-red detectors. The Te/Si(100) structure was generated by depositing a thick layer (˜ 100 Å) of CdTe onto a clean Si (2 × 1) double domain surface, and annealing the sample to 350°C. This resulted is a ˜ 1 ML Te terminated surface where the (2 × 1) reconstruction was lost in favour of a (1 × 1) symmetry. X-ray absorption of the Te L 3 edge ( E = 4341 eV), with a photon energy range of 4440-4700 eV, was probed using a total yield detection scheme. The SEXAFS results indicated that the Te atoms sat in 2-fold bridge sites directly above a fourth layer Si atom. The corresponding bond length was measured to be 2.52 ± 0.05 Å. The XSW measurements of the (400) reflection gave a coherent position of 1.63 ± 0.03 Å and a coherent fraction of 0.65. This is consistent with the breaking of the SiSi dimers and thus could be an example of the phenomena of adsorbate-induced dereconstruction of the surface. These results are compared with those of Bennet et al. who examined a similar system using soft X-ray photoemission (SXPS) and the STM study of Yoshikawa et al.

  4. Correlative nanoscale 3D imaging of structure and composition in extended objects.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Helfen, Lukas; Suhonen, Heikki; Elgrabli, Dan; Bayat, Sam; Reischig, Péter; Baumbach, Tilo; Cloetens, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Structure and composition at the nanoscale determine the behavior of biological systems and engineered materials. The drive to understand and control this behavior has placed strong demands on developing methods for high resolution imaging. In general, the improvement of three-dimensional (3D) resolution is accomplished by tightening constraints: reduced manageable specimen sizes, decreasing analyzable volumes, degrading contrasts, and increasing sample preparation efforts. Aiming to overcome these limitations, we present a non-destructive and multiple-contrast imaging technique, using principles of X-ray laminography, thus generalizing tomography towards laterally extended objects. We retain advantages that are usually restricted to 2D microscopic imaging, such as scanning of large areas and subsequent zooming-in towards a region of interest at the highest possible resolution. Our technique permits correlating the 3D structure and the elemental distribution yielding a high sensitivity to variations of the electron density via coherent imaging and to local trace element quantification through X-ray fluorescence. We demonstrate the method by imaging a lithographic nanostructure and an aluminum alloy. Analyzing a biological system, we visualize in lung tissue the subcellular response to toxic stress after exposure to nanotubes. We show that most of the nanotubes are trapped inside alveolar macrophages, while a small portion of the nanotubes has crossed the barrier to the cellular space of the alveolar wall. In general, our method is non-destructive and can be combined with different sample environmental or loading conditions. We therefore anticipate that correlative X-ray nano-laminography will enable a variety of in situ and in operando 3D studies. PMID:23185554

  5. Characterization of basin concrete in support of structural integrity demonstration for extended storage

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.

    2014-09-30

    Concrete core samples from C basin were characterized through material testing and analysis to verify the design inputs for structural analysis of the L Basin and to evaluate the type and extent of changes in the material condition of the concrete under extended service for fuel storage. To avoid the impact on operations, core samples were not collected from L area, but rather, several concrete core samples were taken from the C Basin prior to its closure. C basin was selected due to its similar environmental exposure and service history compared to L Basin. The microstructure and chemical composition of the concrete exposed to the water was profiled from the water surface into the wall to evaluate the impact and extent of exposure. No significant leaching of concrete components was observed. Ingress of carbonation or deleterious species was determined to be insignificant. No evidence of alkali-silica reactions (ASR) was observed. Ettringite was observed to form throughout the structure (in air voids or pores); however, the sulfur content was measured to be consistent with the initial concrete that was used to construct the facility. Similar ettringite trends were observed in the interior segments of the core samples. The compressive strength of the concrete at the mid-wall of the basin was measured, and similar microstructural analysis was conducted on these materials post compression testing. The microstructure was determined to be similar to near-surface segments of the core samples. The average strength was 4148 psi, which is well-above the design strength of 2500 psi. The analyses showed that phase alterations and minor cracking in a microstructure did not affect the design specification for the concrete.

  6. Correlative Nanoscale 3D Imaging of Structure and Composition in Extended Objects

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Helfen, Lukas; Suhonen, Heikki; Elgrabli, Dan; Bayat, Sam; Reischig, Péter; Baumbach, Tilo; Cloetens, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Structure and composition at the nanoscale determine the behavior of biological systems and engineered materials. The drive to understand and control this behavior has placed strong demands on developing methods for high resolution imaging. In general, the improvement of three-dimensional (3D) resolution is accomplished by tightening constraints: reduced manageable specimen sizes, decreasing analyzable volumes, degrading contrasts, and increasing sample preparation efforts. Aiming to overcome these limitations, we present a non-destructive and multiple-contrast imaging technique, using principles of X-ray laminography, thus generalizing tomography towards laterally extended objects. We retain advantages that are usually restricted to 2D microscopic imaging, such as scanning of large areas and subsequent zooming-in towards a region of interest at the highest possible resolution. Our technique permits correlating the 3D structure and the elemental distribution yielding a high sensitivity to variations of the electron density via coherent imaging and to local trace element quantification through X-ray fluorescence. We demonstrate the method by imaging a lithographic nanostructure and an aluminum alloy. Analyzing a biological system, we visualize in lung tissue the subcellular response to toxic stress after exposure to nanotubes. We show that most of the nanotubes are trapped inside alveolar macrophages, while a small portion of the nanotubes has crossed the barrier to the cellular space of the alveolar wall. In general, our method is non-destructive and can be combined with different sample environmental or loading conditions. We therefore anticipate that correlative X-ray nano-laminography will enable a variety of in situ and in operando 3D studies. PMID:23185554

  7. Extended-X-ray-absorption-fine-structure investigations of zinc in 5-aminolaevulinate dehydratase.

    PubMed Central

    Hasnain, S S; Wardell, E M; Garner, C D; Schlösser, M; Beyersmann, D

    1985-01-01

    The zinc co-ordination in 5-aminolaevulinate dehydratase (5-aminolaevulinate hydro-lyase, EC 4.2.1.24) was investigated by recording and interpreting the extended X-ray-absorption fine structure (e.x.a.f.s.) associated with the zinc K-edge. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 280 000 Da and consists of eight subunits of 35 000 Da each; the samples studied contained approx. 1 g-atom of zinc/mol of subunit. Four forms of the enzyme were investigated and details of the zinc environment were elucidated, as follows. In the native enzyme, zinc is considered to be co-ordinated to three sulphur atoms at 0.228(2)nm [2.28(2)A] and a lower-Z atom at 0.192(5)nm [1.92(5)A] (if nitrogen) or 0.189(5)nm [1.89(5)A] (if oxygen). Reaction of the enzyme with the inhibitor 2-bromo-3-(imidazol-5-yl)propionic acid produced significant changes in the e.x.a.f.s., the nature of which are consistent with co-ordination by about three sulphur atoms at 0.222(2)nm [2.22(2)A], a nitrogen atom at 0.193(5)nm [1.93(5)A] and a nitrogen atom from the inhibitor at 0.214(5)nm [2.14(5)A]. Inactivation of the enzyme by air-oxidation of essential thiol groups and binding of the substrate produce slight changes in the e.x.a.f.s. consistent with slight re-arrangement of ligands with additional lighter ligands (nitrogen or oxygen). These results, when combined with previous findings, are taken to indicate that zinc has a structural rather than a direct catalytic role in 5-aminolaevulinate dehydratase. PMID:4062868

  8. The electronic structure of Fe2+ in reaction centers from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. II. Extended x-ray fine structure studies.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberger, P; Okamura, M Y; Feher, G

    1982-01-01

    Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies were performed on reaction centers (RC) of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. RC containing two, one, and no quinones (2Q, 1Q, 0Q) samples were studied. The average ligand distance of the first coordination shell was determined to be 2.10 +/- 0.02 A with a more distant shell at 4.14 +/- 0.05 A. The Fe2+ site in RC was found to have a very large structural disorder parameter, from which a spread in ligand distance per iron site of approximately +/- 0.1 A was deduced. The most likely coordination number of the first shell is six, with a mixture of oxygens and nitrogens as ligands. The edge absorption results are consistent with the Fe2+ being in distorted octahedral environment. The EXAFS spectra of the 2Q and 1Q samples with and without O-phenanthroline were found to be the same. This indicates that either the secondary quinone and o-phenanthroline do not bind to Fe2+ or that they replace an equivalent ligand. The 0Q sample showed a 12% decrease in the EXAFS amplitude, which was restored upon addition of o-phenanthroline. These results can be explained by either a loss of a ligand or a severe conformational change when the primary quinone was removed. PMID:6977381

  9. Evolutionary dynamics of phenotype-structured populations: from individual-level mechanisms to population-level consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, Rebecca H.; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Desvillettes, Laurent; Hughes, Barry D.

    2016-08-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are increasingly recognised as integral to the adaptation of species that face environmental changes. In particular, empirical work has provided important insights into the contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to the persistence of clonal species, from which a number of verbal explanations have emerged that are suited to logical testing by proof-of-concept mathematical models. Here, we present a stochastic agent-based model and a related deterministic integrodifferential equation model for the evolution of a phenotype-structured population composed of asexually-reproducing and competing organisms which are exposed to novel environmental conditions. This setting has relevance to the study of biological systems where colonising asexual populations must survive and rapidly adapt to hostile environments, like pathogenesis, invasion and tumour metastasis. We explore how evolution might proceed when epigenetic variation in gene expression can change the reproductive capacity of individuals within the population in the new environment. Simulations and analyses of our models clarify the conditions under which certain evolutionary paths are possible and illustrate that while epigenetic mechanisms may facilitate adaptation in asexual species faced with environmental change, they can also lead to a type of "epigenetic load" and contribute to extinction. Moreover, our results offer a formal basis for the claim that constant environments favour individuals with low rates of stochastic phenotypic variation. Finally, our model provides a "proof of concept" of the verbal hypothesis that phenotypic stability is a key driver in rescuing the adaptive potential of an asexual lineage and supports the notion that intense selection pressure can, to an extent, offset the deleterious effects of high phenotypic instability and biased epimutations, and steer an asexual population back from the brink of an evolutionary dead end.

  10. The C9ORF72 expansion mutation: gene structure, phenotypic and diagnostic issues.

    PubMed

    Woollacott, Ione O C; Mead, Simon

    2014-03-01

    The discovery of the C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion in 2011 and the immediate realisation of a remarkably high prevalence in both familial and sporadic frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) triggered an explosion of interest in studies aiming to define the associated clinical and investigation phenotypes and attempts to develop technologies to measure more accurately the size of the repeat region. This article reviews progress in these areas over the subsequent 2 years, focussing on issues directly relevant to the practising physician. First, we summarise findings from studies regarding the global prevalence of the expansion, not only in FTLD and ALS cases, but also in other neurological diseases and its concurrence with other genetic mutations associated with FTLD and ALS. Second, we discuss the variability in normal repeat number in cases and controls and the theories regarding the relevance of intermediate and pathological repeat number for disease risk and clinical phenotype. Third, we discuss the usefulness of various features within the FTLD and ALS clinical phenotype in aiding differentiation between cases with and without the C9ORF72 expansion. Fourth, we review clinical investigations used to identify cases with the expansion, including neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid markers, and describe the mechanisms and limitations of the various diagnostic laboratory techniques used to quantify repeat number in cases and controls. Finally, we discuss the issues surrounding accurate clinical and technological diagnosis of patients with FTLD and/or ALS associated with the C9ORF72 expansion, and outline areas for future research that might aid better diagnosis and genetic counselling of patients with seemingly sporadic or familial FTLD or ALS and their relatives. PMID:24515836

  11. Structure and development of old-growth, unmanaged second-growth, and extended rotation Pinus resinosa forests in Minnesota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silver, Emily J.; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Fraver, Shawn; Palik, Brian J.; Bradford, John B.

    2013-01-01

    The structure and developmental dynamics of old-growth forests often serve as important baselines for restoration prescriptions aimed at promoting more complex structural conditions in managed forest landscapes. Nonetheless, long-term information on natural patterns of development is rare for many commercially important and ecologically widespread forest types. Moreover, the effectiveness of approaches recommended for restoring old-growth structural conditions to managed forests, such as the application of extended rotation forestry, has been little studied. This study uses several long-term datasets from old growth, extended rotation, and unmanaged second growth Pinus resinosa (red pine) forests in northern Minnesota, USA, to quantify the range of variation in structural conditions for this forest type and to evaluate the effectiveness of extended rotation forestry at promoting the development of late-successional structural conditions. Long-term tree population data from permanent plots for one of the old-growth stands and the extended rotation stands (87 and 61 years, respectively) also allowed for an examination of the long-term structural dynamics of these systems. Old-growth forests were more structurally complex than unmanaged second-growth and extended rotation red pine stands, due in large part to the significantly higher volumes of coarse woody debris (70.7 vs. 11.5 and 4.7 m3/ha, respectively) and higher snag basal area (6.9 vs. 2.9 and 0.5 m2/ha, respectively). In addition, old-growth forests, although red pine-dominated, contained a greater abundance of other species, including Pinus strobus, Abies balsamea, and Picea glauca relative to the other stand types examined. These differences between stand types largely reflect historic gap-scale disturbances within the old-growth systems and their corresponding structural and compositional legacies. Nonetheless, extended rotation thinning treatments, by accelerating advancement to larger tree diameter

  12. Detection of Healthcare-Related Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli Transmission Events Using Combined Genetic and Phenotypic Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Boers, Stefan A.; Jansen, Ruud; Hays, John P.; Goessens, Wil H. F.; Vos, Margreet C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Since the year 2000 there has been a sharp increase in the prevalence of healthcare-related infections caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli. However, the high community prevalence of ESBL-producing E. coli isolates means that many E. coli typing techniques may not be suitable for detecting E. coli transmission events. Therefore, we investigated if High-throughput MultiLocus Sequence Typing (HiMLST) and/or Raman spectroscopy were suitable techniques for detecting recent E. coli transmission events. Methods This study was conducted from January until December 2010 at Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Isolates were typed using HiMLST and Raman spectroscopy. A genetic cluster was defined as two or more patients carrying identical isolates. We used predefined definitions for epidemiological relatedness to assess healthcare-related transmission. Results We included 194 patients; strains of 112 patients were typed using HiMLST and strains of 194 patients were typed using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy identified 16 clusters while HiMLST identified 10 clusters. However, no healthcare-related transmission events were detected. When combining data from both typing techniques, we identified eight clusters (n = 34 patients), as well as 78 patients with a non-cluster isolate. However, we could not detect any healthcare-related transmission in these 8 clusters. Conclusions Although clusters were genetically detected using HiMLST and Raman spectroscopy, no definite epidemiological relationships could be demonstrated which makes the possibility of healthcare-related transmission events highly unlikely. Our results suggest that typing of ESBL-producing E. coli using HiMLST and/or Raman spectroscopy is not helpful in detecting E. coli healthcare-related transmission events. PMID:27463231

  13. Structural and functional concepts in current mouse phenotyping and archiving facilities.

    PubMed

    Kollmus, Heike; Post, Rainer; Brielmeier, Markus; Fernández, Julia; Fuchs, Helmut; McKerlie, Colin; Montoliu, Lluis; Otaegui, Pedro J; Rebelo, Manuel; Riedesel, Hermann; Ruberte, Jesús; Sedlacek, Radislav; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Schughart, Klaus

    2012-07-01

    Collecting and analyzing available information on the building plans, concepts, and workflow from existing animal facilities is an essential prerequisite for most centers that are planning and designing the construction of a new animal experimental research unit. Here, we have collected and analyzed such information in the context of the European project Infrafrontier, which aims to develop a common European infrastructure for high-throughput systemic phenotyping, archiving, and dissemination of mouse models. A team of experts visited 9 research facilities and 3 commercial breeders in Europe, Canada, the United States, and Singapore. During the visits, detailed data of each facility were collected and subsequently represented in standardized floor plans and descriptive tables. These data showed that because the local needs of scientists and their projects, property issues, and national and regional laws require very specific solutions, a common strategy for the construction of such facilities does not exist. However, several basic concepts were apparent that can be described by standardized floor plans showing the principle functional units and their interconnection. Here, we provide detailed information of how individual facilities addressed their specific needs by using different concepts of connecting the principle units. Our analysis likely will be valuable to research centers that are planning to design new mouse phenotyping and archiving facilities. PMID:23043807

  14. Structural and Functional Concepts in Current Mouse Phenotyping and Archiving Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Kollmus, Heike; Post, Rainer; Brielmeier, Markus; Fernández, Julia; Fuchs, Helmut; McKerlie, Colin; Montoliu, Lluis; Otaegui, Pedro J; Rebelo, Manuel; Riedesel, Hermann; Ruberte, Jesús; Sedlacek, Radislav; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Schughart, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Collecting and analyzing available information on the building plans, concepts, and workflow from existing animal facilities is an essential prerequisite for most centers that are planning and designing the construction of a new animal experimental research unit. Here, we have collected and analyzed such information in the context of the European project Infrafrontier, which aims to develop a common European infrastructure for high-throughput systemic phenotyping, archiving, and dissemination of mouse models. A team of experts visited 9 research facilities and 3 commercial breeders in Europe, Canada, the United States, and Singapore. During the visits, detailed data of each facility were collected and subsequently represented in standardized floor plans and descriptive tables. These data showed that because the local needs of scientists and their projects, property issues, and national and regional laws require very specific solutions, a common strategy for the construction of such facilities does not exist. However, several basic concepts were apparent that can be described by standardized floor plans showing the principle functional units and their interconnection. Here, we provide detailed information of how individual facilities addressed their specific needs by using different concepts of connecting the principle units. Our analysis likely will be valuable to research centers that are planning to design new mouse phenotyping and archiving facilities. PMID:23043807

  15. Structural and Theoretical Studies Indicate that the Cylindrical Protease ClpP Samples Extended and Compact Conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Kimber, Matthew S.; Yu, Angela Yeou Hsiung; Borg, Mikael; Leung, Elisa; Chan, Hue Sun; Houry, Walid A.

    2010-09-21

    The highly conserved ClpP protease consists of two heptameric rings that interact by the interdigitation of an {alpha}-helix {beta} strand handle domain motif to form a tetradecameric cylinder. We previously proposed that protease dynamics results in the temporary unstructuring of interacting pairs of handle domains, opening transient equatorial side pores that allow for peptide egress. Here, we report the structure of an Escherichia coli ClpP mutant in which each opposing pair of protomers is linked by a disulfide bond. This structure resembles the compact structures of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Plasmodium falciparum ClpPs, rather than the active, extended structures that have previously been determined for E. coli ClpPs. The structural data, along with normal mode analysis, support a model whereby the ClpP cylinder switches dynamically between an active extended state required for substrate degradation and an inactive compact state allowing peptide product release.

  16. The Mud Hills, Mojave Desert, California: Structure, stratigraphy and sedimentology of a rapidly extended terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, R.V.; Devaney, K.A.; Geslin, J.K.; Cavazza, W.; Diamond, D.S.; Jagiello, K.J.; Marsaglia, K.M.; Paylor, E.D. II; Short, P.F. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The Mud Hills exposes synorogenic breccia (Mud Hills Fm.) deposited during the final stages of crustal extension of the upper plate above the Waterman Hills detachment (20--18 Ma). Previous workers have misinterpreted fault contacts as stratigraphic contacts, and have developed intricate pseudostratigraphy to explain their observations. The authors' detailed mapping, combined with stratigraphic and sedimentologic data, documents that the volcaniclastic Pickhandle Fm. is conformably overlain by the plutoniclastic Mud Hills Fm., with no interfingering. Repetition of these south-dipping lithologic units is due to imbricate, north-dipping listric faults. These relations are demonstrated by the systematic northward v''ing of fault contacts and southward v''ing of stratigraphic contacts. Stratigraphic dip decreases upsection, which is consistent with incremental rotation of basinal strata simultaneously with deposition. Most of the Mud Hills Fm. consists of rock-avalanche breccia and megabreccia derived from granodiorite, which is identical to basement exposed beneath the Pickhandle and Jackhammer Fms. to the north. The Mud Hills Fm. was derived from now-buried granodiorite of a stranded upper-plate block to the south, as demonstrated by northward paleocurrents, facies relations and the presence of fine-grained units close to the presumed master fault (as is typical of half-graben sedimentation). Unconformably overlying the Mud Hills Fm. is the Owl Conglomerate (Barstow Fm.), which has mixed provenance with southward paleocurrents; the Owl Conglomerate was derived from residual highlands after extension ceased. Integration of structural, stratigraphic and sedimentologic information is essential for correct reconstruction of highly extended terranes.

  17. Effects of Highly Conserved Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Extended Haplotypes on Iron and Low CD8+ T Lymphocyte Phenotypes in HFE C282Y Homozygous Hemochromatosis Patients from Three Geographically Distant Areas

    PubMed Central

    Barton, James C.; Thorstensen, Ketil; Morais, Sandra; da Silva, Berta M.; Pinto, Jorge P.; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge; Acton, Ronald T.; Porto, Graça

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HH) is a recessively inherited disorder of iron overload occurring commonly in subjects homozygous for the C282Y mutation in HFE gene localized on chromosome 6p21.3 in linkage disequilibrium with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A locus. Although its genetic homogeneity, the phenotypic expression is variable suggesting the presence of modifying factors. One such genetic factor, a SNP microhaplotype named A-A-T, was recently found to be associated with a more severe phenotype and also with low CD8+T-lymphocyte numbers. The present study aimed to test whether the predictive value of the A-A-T microhaplotype remained in other population settings. In this study of 304 HH patients from 3 geographically distant populations (Porto, Portugal 65; Alabama, USA 57; Nord-Trøndelag, Norway 182), the extended haplotypes involving A-A-T were studied in 608 chromosomes and the CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers were determined in all subjects. Patients from Porto had a more severe phenotype than those from other settings. Patients with A-A-T seemed on average to have greater iron stores (p = 0.021), but significant differences were not confirmed in the 3 separate populations. Low CD8+ T-lymphocytes were associated with HLA-A*03-A-A-T in Porto and Alabama patients but not in the greater series from Nord-Trøndelag. Although A-A-T may signal a more severe iron phenotype, this study was unable to prove such an association in all population settings, precluding its use as a universal predictive marker of iron overload in HH. Interestingly, the association between A-A-T and CD8+ T-lymphocytes, which was confirmed in Porto and Alabama patients, was not observed in Nord-Trøndelag patients, showing that common HLA haplotypes like A*01–B*08 or A*03–B*07 segregating with HFE/C282Y in the three populations may carry different messages. These findings further strengthen the relevance of HH as a good disease model to search for novel candidate loci associated with

  18. Phenotypic, Ultra-Structural, and Functional Characterization of Bovine Peripheral Blood Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Sei, Janet J.; Ochoa, Amanda S.; Bishop, Elizabeth; Barlow, John W.; Golde, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are multi-functional cells that bridge the gap between innate and adaptive immune systems. In bovine, significant information is lacking on the precise identity and role of peripheral blood DC subsets. In this study, we identify and characterize bovine peripheral blood DC subsets directly ex vivo, without further in vitro manipulation. Multi-color flow cytometric analysis revealed that three DC subsets could be identified. Bovine plasmacytoid DC were phenotypically identified by a unique pattern of cell surface protein expression including CD4, exhibited an extensive endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, efficiently internalized and degraded exogenous antigen, and were the only peripheral blood cells specialized in the production of type I IFN following activation with Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. Conventional DC were identified by expression of a different pattern of cell surface proteins including CD11c, MHC class II, and CD80, among others, the display of extensive dendritic protrusions on their plasma membrane, expression of very high levels of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules, efficient internalization and degradation of exogenous antigen, and ready production of detectable levels of TNF-alpha in response to TLR activation. Our investigations also revealed a third novel DC subset that may be a precursor of conventional DC that were MHC class II+ and CD11c−. These cells exhibited a smooth plasma membrane with a rounded nucleus, produced TNF-alpha in response to TLR-activation (albeit lower than CD11c+ DC), and were the least efficient in internalization/degradation of exogenous antigen. These studies define three bovine blood DC subsets with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics which can be analyzed during immune responses to pathogens and vaccinations of cattle. PMID:25295753

  19. Specific domain structures control abscisic acid-, salicylic acid-, and stress-mediated SIZ1 phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Mi Sun; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Hong, Mi Ju; Lee, Jiyoung; Choi, Wonkyun; Jin, Jing Bo; Bohnert, Hans J; Lee, Sang Yeol; Bressan, Ray A; Yun, Dae-Jin

    2009-12-01

    SIZ1 (for yeast SAP and MIZ1) encodes the sole ortholog of mammalian PIAS (for protein inhibitor of activated STAT) and yeast SIZ SUMO (for small ubiquitin-related modifier) E3 ligases in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Four conserved motifs in SIZ1 include SAP (for scaffold attachment factor A/B/acinus/PIAS domain), PINIT (for proline-isoleucine-asparagine-isoleucine-threonine), SP-RING (for SIZ/PIAS-RING), and SXS (for serine-X-serine, where X is any amino acid) motifs. SIZ1 contains, in addition, a PHD (for plant homeodomain) typical of plant PIAS proteins. We determined phenotypes of siz1-2 knockout mutants transformed with SIZ1 alleles carrying point mutations in the predicted domains. Domain SP-RING is required for SUMO conjugation activity and nuclear localization of SIZ1. Salicylic acid (SA) accumulation and SA-dependent phenotypes of siz1-2, such as diminished plant size, heightened innate immunity, and abscisic acid inhibition of cotyledon greening, as well as SA-independent basal thermotolerance were not complemented by the altered SP-RING allele of SIZ1. The SXS domain also controlled SA accumulation and was involved in greening and expansion of cotyledons of seedlings germinated in the presence of abscisic acid. Mutations of the PHD zinc finger domain and the PINIT motif affected in vivo SUMOylation. Expression of the PHD and/or PINIT domain mutant alleles of SIZ1 in siz1-2 promoted hypocotyl elongation in response to sugar and light. The various domains of SIZ1 make unique contributions to the plant's ability to cope with its environment. PMID:19837819

  20. Decentralized identification of nonlinear structure under strong ground motion using the extended Kalman filter and unscented Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Dongwang; Li, Hui; Ma, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    Complete structure identification of complicate nonlinear system using extend Kalman filter (EKF) or unscented Kalman filter (UKF) may have the problems of divergence, huge computation and low estimation precision due to the large dimension of the extended state space for the system. In this article, a decentralized identification method of hysteretic system based on the joint EKF and UKF is proposed. The complete structure is divided into linear substructures and nonlinear substructures. The substructures are identified from the top to the bottom. For the linear substructure, EKF is used to identify the extended space including the displacements, velocities, stiffness and damping coefficients of the substructures, using the limited absolute accelerations and the identified interface force above the substructure. Similarly, for the nonlinear substructure, UKF is used to identify the extended space including the displacements, velocities, stiffness, damping coefficients and control parameters for the hysteretic Bouc-Wen model and the force at the interface of substructures. Finally a 10-story shear-type structure with multiple inter-story hysteresis is used for numerical simulation and is identified using the decentralized approach, and the identified results are compared with those using only EKF or UKF for the complete structure identification. The results show that the decentralized approach has the advantage of more stability, relative less computation and higher estimation precision.

  1. Devices with extended area structures for mass transfer processing of fluids

    DOEpatents

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Wegeng, Robert S.; Whyatt, Greg A.; King, David L.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.

    2009-04-21

    A microchannel device includes several mass transfer microchannels to receive a fluid media for processing at least one heat transfer microchannel in fluid communication with a heat transfer fluid defined by a thermally conductive wall, and at several thermally conductive fins each connected to the wall and extending therefrom to separate the mass transfer microchannels from one another. In one form, the device may optionally include another heat transfer microchannel and corresponding wall that is positioned opposite the first wall and has the fins and the mass transfer microchannels extending therebetween.

  2. The Matchmaker Exchange API: automating patient matching through the exchange of structured phenotypic and genotypic profiles.

    PubMed

    Buske, Orion J; Schiettecatte, François; Hutton, Benjamin; Dumitriu, Sergiu; Misyura, Andriy; Huang, Lijia; Hartley, Taila; Girdea, Marta; Sobreira, Nara; Mungall, Chris; Brudno, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of clinical sequencing, the difficulty of identifying additional affected families is a key obstacle to solving many rare diseases. There may only be a handful of similar patients worldwide, and their data may be stored in diverse clinical and research databases. Computational methods are necessary to enable finding similar patients across the growing number of patient repositories and registries. We present the Matchmaker Exchange Application Programming Interface (MME API), a protocol and data format for exchanging phenotype and genotype profiles to enable matchmaking among patient databases, facilitate the identification of additional cohorts, and increase the rate with which rare diseases can be researched and diagnosed. We designed the API to be straightforward and flexible in order to simplify its adoption on a large number of data types and workflows. We also provide a public test data set, curated from the literature, to facilitate implementation of the API and development of new matching algorithms. The initial version of the API has been successfully implemented by three members of the Matchmaker Exchange and was immediately able to reproduce previously identified matches and generate several new leads currently being validated. The API is available at https://github.com/ga4gh/mme-apis. PMID:26255989

  3. Tissue phenotype depends on reciprocal interactions between the extracellular matrix and the structural organization of the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Lelie'vre, S.A.; Weaver, V.M.; Nickerson, J.A.; Larabell, C.A.; Bhaumik, A.; Petersen, O.W.; Bissell, M.J.

    1998-08-14

    What determines the nuclear organization within a cell and whether this organization itself can impose cellular function within a tissue remains unknown. To explore the relationship between nuclear organization and tissue architecture and function, we used a model of human mammary epithelial cell acinar morphogenesis. When cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane (rBM), HMT-3522 cells form polarized and growth-arrested tissue-like acini with a central lumen and deposit an endogenous BM. We show that rBM-induced morphogenesis is accompanied by relocalization of the nuclear matrix proteins NuMA, splicing factor SRm160, and cell cycle regulator Rb. These proteins had distinct distribution patterns specific for proliferation, growth arrest, and acini formation, whereas the distribution of the nuclear lamina protein, lamin B, remained unchanged. NuMA relocalized to foci, which coalesced into larger assemblies as morphogenesis progressed. Perturbation of histone acetylation in the acini by trichostatin A treatment altered chromatin structure, disrupted NuMA foci, and induced cell proliferation. Moreover, treatment of transiently permeabilized acini with a NuMA antibody led to the disruption of NuMA foci, alteration of histone acetylation, activation of metalloproteases, and breakdown of the endogenous BM. These results experimentally demonstrate a dynamic interaction between the extracellular matrix, nuclear organization, and tissue phenotype. They further show that rather than passively ref lecting changes in gene expression, nuclear organization itself can modulate the cellular and tissue phenotype.

  4. SOS1 Mutations in Noonan Syndrome: Molecular Spectrum, Structural Insights on Pathogenic Effects, and Genotype–Phenotype Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Lepri, Francesca; De Luca, Alessandro; Stella, Lorenzo; Rossi, Cesare; Baldassarre, Giuseppina; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Cordeddu, Viviana; Williams, Bradley J; Dentici, Maria L; Caputo, Viviana; Venanzi, Serenella; Bonaguro, Michela; Kavamura, Ines; Faienza, Maria F; Pilotta, Alba; Stanzial, Franco; Faravelli, Francesca; Gabrielli, Orazio; Marino, Bruno; Neri, Giovanni; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Ferrero, Giovanni B; Torrrente, Isabella; Selicorni, Angelo; Mazzanti, Laura; Digilio, Maria C; Zampino, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gelb, Bruce D; Tartaglia, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is among the most common nonchromosomal disorders affecting development and growth. NS is caused by aberrant RAS-MAPK signaling and is genetically heterogeneous, which explains, in part, the marked clinical variability documented for this Mendelian trait. Recently, we and others identified SOS1 as a major gene underlying NS. Here, we explored further the spectrum of SOS1 mutations and their associated phenotypic features. Mutation scanning of the entire SOS1 coding sequence allowed the identification of 33 different variants deemed to be of pathological significance, including 16 novel missense changes and in-frame indels. Various mutation clusters destabilizing or altering orientation of regions of the protein predicted to contribute structurally to the maintenance of autoinhibition were identified. Two previously unappreciated clusters predicted to enhance SOS1's recruitment to the plasma membrane, thus promoting a spatial reorientation of domains contributing to inhibition, were also recognized. Genotype–phenotype analysis confirmed our previous observations, establishing a high frequency of ectodermal anomalies and a low prevalence of cognitive impairment and reduced growth. Finally, mutation analysis performed on cohorts of individuals with nonsyndromic pulmonic stenosis, atrial septal defects, and ventricular septal defects excluded a major contribution of germline SOS1 lesions to the isolated occurrence of these cardiac anomalies. Hum Mutat 32:760–772, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21387466

  5. Admixture in Latin America: Geographic Structure, Phenotypic Diversity and Self-Perception of Ancestry Based on 7,342 Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Adhikari, Kaustubh; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Fuentes, Macarena; Pizarro, María; Everardo, Paola; de Avila, Francisco; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; León-Mimila, Paola; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Burley, Mari-Wyn; Konca, Esra; de Oliveira, Marcelo Zagonel; Veronez, Mauricio Roberto; Rubio-Codina, Marta; Attanasio, Orazio; Gibbon, Sahra; Ray, Nicolas; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Rosique, Javier; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Balding, David; Gonzalez-José, Rolando

    2014-01-01

    The current genetic makeup of Latin America has been shaped by a history of extensive admixture between Africans, Europeans and Native Americans, a process taking place within the context of extensive geographic and social stratification. We estimated individual ancestry proportions in a sample of 7,342 subjects ascertained in five countries (Brazil, Chile, Colombia, México and Perú). These individuals were also characterized for a range of physical appearance traits and for self-perception of ancestry. The geographic distribution of admixture proportions in this sample reveals extensive population structure, illustrating the continuing impact of demographic history on the genetic diversity of Latin America. Significant ancestry effects were detected for most phenotypes studied. However, ancestry generally explains only a modest proportion of total phenotypic variation. Genetically estimated and self-perceived ancestry correlate significantly, but certain physical attributes have a strong impact on self-perception and bias self-perception of ancestry relative to genetically estimated ancestry. PMID:25254375

  6. Admixture in Latin America: geographic structure, phenotypic diversity and self-perception of ancestry based on 7,342 individuals.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Adhikari, Kaustubh; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Fuentes, Macarena; Pizarro, María; Everardo, Paola; de Avila, Francisco; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; León-Mimila, Paola; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Burley, Mari-Wyn; Konca, Esra; de Oliveira, Marcelo Zagonel; Veronez, Mauricio Roberto; Rubio-Codina, Marta; Attanasio, Orazio; Gibbon, Sahra; Ray, Nicolas; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Rosique, Javier; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Balding, David; Gonzalez-José, Rolando

    2014-09-01

    The current genetic makeup of Latin America has been shaped by a history of extensive admixture between Africans, Europeans and Native Americans, a process taking place within the context of extensive geographic and social stratification. We estimated individual ancestry proportions in a sample of 7,342 subjects ascertained in five countries (Brazil, Chile, Colombia, México and Perú). These individuals were also characterized for a range of physical appearance traits and for self-perception of ancestry. The geographic distribution of admixture proportions in this sample reveals extensive population structure, illustrating the continuing impact of demographic history on the genetic diversity of Latin America. Significant ancestry effects were detected for most phenotypes studied. However, ancestry generally explains only a modest proportion of total phenotypic variation. Genetically estimated and self-perceived ancestry correlate significantly, but certain physical attributes have a strong impact on self-perception and bias self-perception of ancestry relative to genetically estimated ancestry. PMID:25254375

  7. Viroids: From Genotype to Phenotype Just Relying on RNA Sequence and Structural Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Ricardo; Serra, Pedro; Minoia, Sofía; Di Serio, Francesco; Navarro, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    As a consequence of two unique physical properties, small size and circularity, viroid RNAs do not code for proteins and thus depend on RNA sequence/structural motifs for interacting with host proteins that mediate their invasion, replication, spread, and circumvention of defensive barriers. Viroid genomes fold up on themselves adopting collapsed secondary structures wherein stretches of nucleotides stabilized by Watson–Crick pairs are flanked by apparently unstructured loops. However, compelling data show that they are instead stabilized by alternative non-canonical pairs and that specific loops in the rod-like secondary structure, characteristic of Potato spindle tuber viroid and most other members of the family Pospiviroidae, are critical for replication and systemic trafficking. In contrast, rather than folding into a rod-like secondary structure, most members of the family Avsunviroidae adopt multibranched conformations occasionally stabilized by kissing-loop interactions critical for viroid viability in vivo. Besides these most stable secondary structures, viroid RNAs alternatively adopt during replication transient metastable conformations containing elements of local higher-order structure, prominent among which are the hammerhead ribozymes catalyzing a key replicative step in the family Avsunviroidae, and certain conserved hairpins that also mediate replication steps in the family Pospiviroidae. Therefore, different RNA structures – either global or local – determine different functions, thus highlighting the need for in-depth structural studies on viroid RNAs. PMID:22719735

  8. Pre-adsorbed type-I collagen structure-dependent changes in osteoblastic phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Hanagata, Nobutaka . E-mail: HANAGATA.Nobutaka@nims.go.jp; Takemura, Taro; Monkawa, Akira; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo

    2006-06-16

    Type-I collagen is the most abundant extracellular matrix in bones and modulates various functions of osteoblasts. We prepared two different structures of type-I collagen on tissue culture grade polystylene (TCPS) surfaces, one is feltwork structure of filamentous molecules from acid solutions (ACs) and the other is network structure of fibrils from neutral solutions (NCs), to examine effects of the structures on the maturation process of osteoblast-like cells. No significant differences of cell proliferation were observed between TCPS and ACs, but NCs delayed the proliferation. In initial cell attachment, the cells on ACs had tense lamellipodia with sharp tips, while those on NCs had loose lamellipodia. No detectable differences in levels of expressed integrin {alpha}{sub 2}- and {alpha}{sub 5}-subunits were observed between the structures. Although the matrix mineralization in NCs was also delayed in comparison with TCPS and ACs, fully mineralized levels in NCs were the same as those of TCPS and ACs. In addition, although we examined the effects of densities of pre-adsorbed collagen molecules on osteoblast maturation, the effects were less serious than those of the structures. This study suggests that the structures of collagen affect proliferation and mineralization of osteoblast-like cells.

  9. Effect of extended line defects on thermal conduction of carbon nanotubes: analyzing phonon structures by band unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huaqing

    2015-08-01

    We theoretically investigate the effect of extended line defects (ELDs) on thermal transport properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using nonequilibrium Green’s function method. Our study shows that the thermal conductance of CNTs with ELDs can be 25% lower than that of pristine CNTs. By extending the application of the recently developed unfolding method for electronic structures to phonon spectra, we find that the unfolded phonon bands of defected CNTs are split with obvious gap opening, leading to lower phonon transmissions. Further phonon local density of states analysis reveals that the change of bonding configuration near the ELD in defected CNTs can tail the degree of phonon localization. Our results indicate that introducing ELDs might be an efficient way to control thermal conduction of CNTs. The extended unfolding method for phonon systems, found to be efficient in this work, is expected to be applicable to other systems with densely folded phonon bands.

  10. Triplet excitons as sensitive spin probes for structure analysis of extended defects in microcrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Christoph; Teutloff, Christian; Behrends, Jan; Bittl, Robert; Astakhov, Oleksandr; Lips, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) spectroscopy is employed to study the influence of triplet excitons on the photocurrent in state-of-the-art microcrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells. These triplet excitons are used as sensitive spin probes for the investigation of their electronic and nuclear environment in this mixed-phase material. According to low-temperature EDMR results obtained from solar cells with different extended defects in the crystallites of microcrystalline silicon that give rise to shallow states in the silicon band gap. The excitons possess a rather delocalized wave function, couple to electron spins in conduction band tail states nearby, and take part in a spin-dependent recombination process. Our study shows that extended defects such as grain boundaries or stacking faults in the crystalline part of the material act as charge carrier traps that can influence the material conductivity.

  11. Superconducting extended objects and applications to the phase structure of quantum chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skagerstam, B.-S.; Stern, A.

    1982-03-01

    In a previous work the dynamics of relativistic extended objects (i.e., strings, shells, etc.) coupled to Abelian or non-Abelian gauge fields was developed. The extended objects possessed an electriclike current which was defined in the associated Lie algebra of the gauge group under consideration. In the present paper, the interaction between the extended objects and gauge fields is slightly modified so that the objects behave like superconductors. By this we mean (a) the electrical conductivity is infinite and (b) for objects other than strings, a magnetic shielding or Meissner effect (with zero penetration depth) is present. Both (a) and (b) are features which occur in the classical description of the system. We also develop the dynamics for a system which is dual to the one described above. That is, instead of possessing an electric current, the objects here carry a magnetic current (Abelian or non-Abelian). Furthermore, the magnetic conductivity is infinite, and for objects other than strings an electric shielding or "dual" Meissner effect is present. The systems developed here contain Dirac's extended electron model and the MIT bag model as special cases. The former coincides with the description of an electrically charged shell. In the latter, we verify that the dynamics of a cavity within a (magnetic) superconducting vacuum is identical to that of a glueball in the MIT bag. This agrees with the view that the true quantum-chromodynamic (QCD) vacuum may be in a magnetic superconducting phase, and that the "dual" Meissner effect may be relevant for the confinement question. We also examine the possibility of the QCD vacuum being in an electric (or conventional) superconducting phase and a mixed superconducting phase, and comment on the confinement question for these two cases.

  12. Phenotypes in phylogeography: Species’ traits, environmental variation, and vertebrate diversification

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Rayna C.; Mason, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Almost 30 y ago, the field of intraspecific phylogeography laid the foundation for spatially explicit and genealogically informed studies of population divergence. With new methods and markers, the focus in phylogeography shifted to previously unrecognized geographic genetic variation, thus reducing the attention paid to phenotypic variation in those same diverging lineages. Although phenotypic differences among lineages once provided the main data for studies of evolutionary change, the mechanisms shaping phenotypic differentiation and their integration with intraspecific genetic structure have been underexplored in phylogeographic studies. However, phenotypes are targets of selection and play important roles in species performance, recognition, and diversification. Here, we focus on three questions. First, how can phenotypes elucidate mechanisms underlying concordant or idiosyncratic responses of vertebrate species evolving in shared landscapes? Second, what mechanisms underlie the concordance or discordance of phenotypic and phylogeographic differentiation? Third, how can phylogeography contribute to our understanding of functional phenotypic evolution? We demonstrate that the integration of phenotypic data extends the reach of phylogeography to explain the origin and maintenance of biodiversity. Finally, we stress the importance of natural history collections as sources of high-quality phenotypic data that span temporal and spatial axes. PMID:27432983

  13. Phenotypes in phylogeography: Species' traits, environmental variation, and vertebrate diversification.

    PubMed

    Zamudio, Kelly R; Bell, Rayna C; Mason, Nicholas A

    2016-07-19

    Almost 30 y ago, the field of intraspecific phylogeography laid the foundation for spatially explicit and genealogically informed studies of population divergence. With new methods and markers, the focus in phylogeography shifted to previously unrecognized geographic genetic variation, thus reducing the attention paid to phenotypic variation in those same diverging lineages. Although phenotypic differences among lineages once provided the main data for studies of evolutionary change, the mechanisms shaping phenotypic differentiation and their integration with intraspecific genetic structure have been underexplored in phylogeographic studies. However, phenotypes are targets of selection and play important roles in species performance, recognition, and diversification. Here, we focus on three questions. First, how can phenotypes elucidate mechanisms underlying concordant or idiosyncratic responses of vertebrate species evolving in shared landscapes? Second, what mechanisms underlie the concordance or discordance of phenotypic and phylogeographic differentiation? Third, how can phylogeography contribute to our understanding of functional phenotypic evolution? We demonstrate that the integration of phenotypic data extends the reach of phylogeography to explain the origin and maintenance of biodiversity. Finally, we stress the importance of natural history collections as sources of high-quality phenotypic data that span temporal and spatial axes. PMID:27432983

  14. Structure of the ERM protein moesin reveals the FERM domain fold masked by an extended actin binding tail domain.

    PubMed

    Pearson, M A; Reczek, D; Bretscher, A; Karplus, P A

    2000-04-28

    The ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) protein family link actin filaments of cell surface structures to the plasma membrane, using a C-terminal F-actin binding segment and an N-terminal FERM domain, a common membrane binding module. ERM proteins are regulated by an intramolecular association of the FERM and C-terminal tail domains that masks their binding sites. The crystal structure of a dormant moesin FERM/tail complex reveals that the FERM domain has three compact lobes including an integrated PTB/PH/ EVH1 fold, with the C-terminal segment bound as an extended peptide masking a large surface of the FERM domain. This extended binding mode suggests a novel mechanism for how different signals could produce varying levels of activation. Sequence conservation suggests a similar regulation of the tumor suppressor merlin. PMID:10847681

  15. In situ mapping of the effect of additional mutations on starch granule structure in amylose-extender (ae) maize kernels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongli; Wellner, Nikolaus; Parker, Mary L; Morris, Victor J; Cheng, Fang

    2015-03-15

    Optical (KI/I2-staining, polarised) and FTIR microscopy has been used to monitor starch granule structure within wild-type (wt), GEMS-0067 and waxy-amylose-extender (wx-ae) maize mutant kernels. In the GEMS-0067 mutant containing the high amylose modifier (HAM) gene(s) plus the recessive ae gene, structural heterogeneity characteristic of the ae mutation was reduced markedly. However, enhanced variation in granule shape and size was observed distributed spatially within the kernel, which appears to be related to new heterogeneity in internal starch granule structure. In wx-ae starch mutants the ae gene led to heterogeneity of starch granule structure equivalent to that in single ae mutants, plus new structural heterogeneity coincident with novel induced variation in granule size and shape. PMID:25542125

  16. Abnormalities in the basement membrane structure promote basal keratinocytes in the epidermis of hypertrophic scars to adopt a proliferative phenotype

    PubMed Central

    YANG, SHAOWEI; SUN, YEXIAO; GENG, ZHIJUN; MA, KUI; SUN, XIAOYAN; FU, XIAOBING

    2016-01-01

    The majority of studies on scar formation have mainly focused on the dermis and little is known of the involvement of the epidermis. Previous research has demonstrated that the scar tissue-derived keratinocytes are different from normal cells at both the genetic and cell biological levels; however, the mechanisms responsible for the fundamental abnormalities in keratinocytes during scar development remain elusive. For this purpose, in this study, we used normal, wound edge and hypertrophic scar tissue to examine the morphological changes which occur during epidermal regeneration as part of the wound healing process and found that the histological structure of hypertrophic scar tissues differed from that of normal skin, with a significant increase in epidermal thickness. Notably, staining of the basement membrane (BM) appeared to be absent in the scar tissues. Moreover, immunofluorescence staining for cytokeratin (CK)10, CK14, CK5, CK19 and integrin-β1 indicated the differential expression of cell markers in the epidermal keratinocytes among the normal, wound edge and hypertrophic scar tissues, which corresponded with the altered BM structures. By using a panel of proteins associated with BM components, we validated our hypothesis that the BM plays a significant role in regulating the cell fate decision of epidermal keratinocytes during skin wound healing. Alterations in the structure of the BM promote basal keratinocytes to adopt a proliferative phenotype both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26986690

  17. Stereomicroscopic 3D-pattern profiling of murine and human intestinal inflammation reveals unique structural phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Palacios, Alex; Kodani, Tomohiro; Kaydo, Lindsey; Pietropaoli, Davide; Corridoni, Daniele; Howell, Scott; Katz, Jeffry; Xin, Wei; Pizarro, Theresa T.; Cominelli, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Histology is fundamental to assess two-dimensional intestinal inflammation; however, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are often indistinguishable microscopically on the basis of mucosal biopsies. Here, we use stereomicroscopy (SM) to rapidly profile the entire intestinal topography and assess inflammation. We examine the mucosal surface of >700 mice (encompassing >16 strains and various IBD-models), create a profiling catalogue of 3D-stereomicroscopic abnormalities and demonstrate that mice with comparable histological scores display unique sub-clusters of 3D-structure-patterns of IBD pathology, which we call 3D-stereoenterotypes, and which are otherwise indiscernible histologically. We show that two ileal IBD-stereoenterotypes (‘cobblestones' versus ‘villous mini-aggregation') cluster separately within two distinct mouse lines of spontaneous ileitis, suggesting that host genetics drive unique and divergent inflammatory 3D-structural patterns in the gut. In humans, stereomicroscopy reveals ‘liquefaction' lesions and hierarchical fistulous complexes, enriched with clostridia/segmented filamentous bacteria, running under healthy mucosa in Crohn's disease. We suggest that stereomicroscopic (3D-SMAPgut) profiling can be easily implemented and enable the comprehensive study of inflammatory 3D structures, genetics and flora in IBD. PMID:26154811

  18. Exploring Optically Compact Dwarf Galaxies for Kinematic Structures and Extended HI Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Most, Hans; Cannon, J. M.; Salzer, J. J.; Rosenberg, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    We present Very Large Array H I spectral line and optical imaging of eight optically compact (optical radii <1 kpc), star-forming dwarf galaxies. These galaxies were chosen because of their optically compact stellar distributions, faint blue magnitudes, ongoing star formation, and relative proximity. The sample includes ADBS 113845+2008, which was found to have an HI halo that extends nearly 40 optical scale lengths from the stellar body (Cannon et al. 2009). Using this larger sample, we are working to discern if the "giant gas disk" dwarf galaxy is common or rare. We are also exploring the kinematics and dark matter contents of each of the sample galaxies.

  19. Extended Bis(benzothia)quinodimethanes and Their Dications: From Singlet Diradicaloids to Isoelectronic Structures of Long Acenes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shaoqiang; Herng, Tun Seng; Gopalakrishna, Tullimilli Y; Phan, Hoa; Lim, Zheng Long; Hu, Pan; Webster, Richard D; Ding, Jun; Chi, Chunyan

    2016-08-01

    Extended bis(benzothia)quinodimethanes and their dications were synthesized as stable species. The neutral compounds mainly have a quinoidal structure in the ground state but show increased diradical character with extension of the central quinodimethane unit. The dications exhibit similar electronic absorption spectra, NMR spectra, NICS values, and diatropic ring currents to their aromatic all-carbon acene analogues and thus can be regarded as genuine isoelectronic structures of pentacene, hexacene, and heptacene, respectively. Our research gave some insights into the design and synthesis of stable longer acene analogues. PMID:27356244

  20. Extended line defects in BN, GaN, and AlN semiconductor materials: Graphene-like structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho-Mojica, Dulce C.; López-Urías, Florentino

    2016-05-01

    The extended line defect (ELD) mimicking grain boundaries in two-dimensional systems is theoretically investigated in BN, GaN, and AlN semiconductor materials with a single layer honeycomb structure. The ELD consists of octagonal-square membered rings. Density functional calculations of the electronic density of states, scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy image simulations are analyzed. Our results revealed that the ELDs are stable in all considered monolayers. In addition, electronic density of states calculations demonstrated that in gap states are emerged when ELD is incorporated into the honeycomb structures. Finally, results on armchair nanoribbons with bare-edges and hydrogenated edges are discussed.

  1. Displacive phase-transition of cuprite Ag2O revealed by extended x-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanson, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The low-temperature phase-transition of silver oxide (Ag2O) has been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy as a function of temperature. The thermal evolution of the local structure around Ag atoms has been determined. In particular, below the phase-transition temperature at ∼35 K, a progressive splitting of the Ag-Ag next-nearest-neighbor distances is observed. This definitely supports the idea that the phase-transition of Ag2O is due to displacive disorder of the Ag atoms.

  2. Developing Neuroimaging Phenotypes of the Default Mode Network in PTSD: Integrating the Resting State, Working Memory, and Structural Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Noah S.; Carpenter, S. Louisa; Sweet, Lawrence H.

    2014-01-01

    Complementary structural and functional neuroimaging techniques used to examine the Default Mode Network (DMN) could potentially improve assessments of psychiatric illness severity and provide added validity to the clinical diagnostic process. Recent neuroimaging research suggests that DMN processes may be disrupted in a number of stress-related psychiatric illnesses, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although specific DMN functions remain under investigation, it is generally thought to be involved in introspection and self-processing. In healthy individuals it exhibits greatest activity during periods of rest, with less activity, observed as deactivation, during cognitive tasks, e.g., working memory. This network consists of the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus, lateral parietal cortices and medial temporal regions. Multiple functional and structural imaging approaches have been developed to study the DMN. These have unprecedented potential to further the understanding of the function and dysfunction of this network. Functional approaches, such as the evaluation of resting state connectivity and task-induced deactivation, have excellent potential to identify targeted neurocognitive and neuroaffective (functional) diagnostic markers and may indicate illness severity and prognosis with increased accuracy or specificity. Structural approaches, such as evaluation of morphometry and connectivity, may provide unique markers of etiology and long-term outcomes. Combined, functional and structural methods provide strong multimodal, complementary and synergistic approaches to develop valid DMN-based imaging phenotypes in stress-related psychiatric conditions. This protocol aims to integrate these methods to investigate DMN structure and function in PTSD, relating findings to illness severity and relevant clinical factors. PMID:25046537

  3. Structural and biochemical changes underlying a keratoderma-like phenotype in mice lacking suprabasal AP1 transcription factor function.

    PubMed

    Rorke, E A; Adhikary, G; Young, C A; Rice, R H; Elias, P M; Crumrine, D; Meyer, J; Blumenberg, M; Eckert, R L

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal keratinocyte differentiation on the body surface is a carefully choreographed process that leads to assembly of a barrier that is essential for life. Perturbation of keratinocyte differentiation leads to disease. Activator protein 1 (AP1) transcription factors are key controllers of this process. We have shown that inhibiting AP1 transcription factor activity in the suprabasal murine epidermis, by expression of dominant-negative c-jun (TAM67), produces a phenotype type that resembles human keratoderma. However, little is understood regarding the structural and molecular changes that drive this phenotype. In the present study we show that TAM67-positive epidermis displays altered cornified envelope, filaggrin-type keratohyalin granule, keratin filament, desmosome formation and lamellar body secretion leading to reduced barrier integrity. To understand the molecular changes underlying this process, we performed proteomic and RNA array analysis. Proteomic study of the corneocyte cross-linked proteome reveals a reduction in incorporation of cutaneous keratins, filaggrin, filaggrin2, late cornified envelope precursor proteins, hair keratins and hair keratin-associated proteins. This is coupled with increased incorporation of desmosome linker, small proline-rich, S100, transglutaminase and inflammation-associated proteins. Incorporation of most cutaneous keratins (Krt1, Krt5 and Krt10) is reduced, but incorporation of hyperproliferation-associated epidermal keratins (Krt6a, Krt6b and Krt16) is increased. RNA array analysis reveals reduced expression of mRNA encoding differentiation-associated cutaneous keratins, hair keratins and associated proteins, late cornified envelope precursors and filaggrin-related proteins; and increased expression of mRNA encoding small proline-rich proteins, protease inhibitors (serpins), S100 proteins, defensins and hyperproliferation-associated keratins. These findings suggest that AP1 factor inactivation in the suprabasal

  4. Structural and biochemical changes underlying a keratoderma-like phenotype in mice lacking suprabasal AP1 transcription factor function

    PubMed Central

    Rorke, E A; Adhikary, G; Young, C A; Rice, R H; Elias, P M; Crumrine, D; Meyer, J; Blumenberg, M; Eckert, R L

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal keratinocyte differentiation on the body surface is a carefully choreographed process that leads to assembly of a barrier that is essential for life. Perturbation of keratinocyte differentiation leads to disease. Activator protein 1 (AP1) transcription factors are key controllers of this process. We have shown that inhibiting AP1 transcription factor activity in the suprabasal murine epidermis, by expression of dominant-negative c-jun (TAM67), produces a phenotype type that resembles human keratoderma. However, little is understood regarding the structural and molecular changes that drive this phenotype. In the present study we show that TAM67-positive epidermis displays altered cornified envelope, filaggrin-type keratohyalin granule, keratin filament, desmosome formation and lamellar body secretion leading to reduced barrier integrity. To understand the molecular changes underlying this process, we performed proteomic and RNA array analysis. Proteomic study of the corneocyte cross-linked proteome reveals a reduction in incorporation of cutaneous keratins, filaggrin, filaggrin2, late cornified envelope precursor proteins, hair keratins and hair keratin-associated proteins. This is coupled with increased incorporation of desmosome linker, small proline-rich, S100, transglutaminase and inflammation-associated proteins. Incorporation of most cutaneous keratins (Krt1, Krt5 and Krt10) is reduced, but incorporation of hyperproliferation-associated epidermal keratins (Krt6a, Krt6b and Krt16) is increased. RNA array analysis reveals reduced expression of mRNA encoding differentiation-associated cutaneous keratins, hair keratins and associated proteins, late cornified envelope precursors and filaggrin-related proteins; and increased expression of mRNA encoding small proline-rich proteins, protease inhibitors (serpins), S100 proteins, defensins and hyperproliferation-associated keratins. These findings suggest that AP1 factor inactivation in the suprabasal

  5. Expanding the SHOC2 Mutation Associated Phenotype of Noonan Syndrome with Loose Anagen Hair: Structural Brain Anomalies and Myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Gripp, Karen W.; Zand, Dina J.; Demmer, Laurie; Anderson, Carol E.; Dobyns, William B.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Denenberg, Elizabeth; Jenny, Kim; Stabley, Deborah L.; Sol-Church, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a heterogenous rasopathy typically presenting with short stature, characteristic facial features, cardiac abnormalities including pulmonic valve stenosis, ASD and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), cryptorchidism, ectodermal abnormalities and learning differences. The phenotype is variable, and limited genotype phenotype correlation exists with SOS1 mutations often associated with normal cognition and stature, RAF1 mutations entailing a high HCM risk, and certain PTPN11 mutations predisposing to juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. The recently identified SHOC2 mutation (p.Ser2Gly) causes Noonan syndrome with loose anagen hair. We report five patients with this mutation. All had skin hyperpigmentation, sparse light colored hair, increased fine wrinkles, ligamentous laxity, developmental delay and 4/4 had a structural cardiac anomaly. Hypotonia and macrocephaly occurred in 4/5 (80%); 3/5 (60%) had polyhydramnios, increased birth weight or required use of a feeding tube. Distinctive brain abnormalities included relative megalencephaly and enlarged subarachnoid spaces suggestive of benign external hydrocephalus, and a relatively small posterior fossa as indicated by a vertical tentorium. The combination of a large brain with a small posterior fossa likely resulted in the high rate of cerebellar tonsillar ectopia (3/4) (75%). Periventricular nodular heterotopia was seen in one patient with a thick and dysplastic corpus callosum. We report on the first hematologic neoplasm, myelofibrosis, in a 2-year-old patient with SHOC2 mutation. Myelofibrosis is exceedingly rare in children and young adults. The absence of a somatic JAK2 mutation, seen in the majority of patients with myelofibrosis, is noteworthy as it suggests that germline or somatic SHOC2 mutations are causally involved in myelofibrosis. PMID:23918763

  6. OpenMx: An Open Source Extended Structural Equation Modeling Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boker, Steven; Neale, Michael; Maes, Hermine; Wilde, Michael; Spiegel, Michael; Brick, Timothy; Spies, Jeffrey; Estabrook, Ryne; Kenny, Sarah; Bates, Timothy; Mehta, Paras; Fox, John

    2011-01-01

    OpenMx is free, full-featured, open source, structural equation modeling (SEM) software. OpenMx runs within the "R" statistical programming environment on Windows, Mac OS-X, and Linux computers. The rationale for developing OpenMx is discussed along with the philosophy behind the user interface. The OpenMx data structures are introduced--these…

  7. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure of the [Fe]-hydrogenase Hmd active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomone-Stagni, Marco; Vogt, Sonja; Shima, Seigo; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram

    2009-11-01

    Hydrogenases are enzymes that catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen. Although their structure and catalytic mechanism are of considerable applied interest as models for the development of efficient catalysts for hydrogen fueled processes, the understanding of how hydrogenases react with H2 is only in its infancy. Two of the three known types of hydrogenases are iron-sulfur proteins that contain a dinuclear metal center, either [NiFe] or [FeFe]. In contrast, [Fe]-hydrogenase is the only mononuclear hydrogenase and thus a perfect system for studying the structural and electronic determinants of these enzymes. Here we summarize recent improvements in modeling based on the EXAFS signal and the geometric structure of this metalloenzyme in its as isolated or reconstituted form. The individual contributions to the EXAFS resulting in two different structural models are presented and discussed. Inspired by the new crystal structure, we show an advanced EXAFS model for the enzyme from Methanothermobacter marburgensis.

  8. Extended Aging Theories for Predictions of Safe Operational Life of Critical Airborne Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Chen, Tony

    2006-01-01

    The previously developed Ko closed-form aging theory has been reformulated into a more compact mathematical form for easier application. A new equivalent loading theory and empirical loading theories have also been developed and incorporated into the revised Ko aging theory for the prediction of a safe operational life of airborne failure-critical structural components. The new set of aging and loading theories were applied to predict the safe number of flights for the B-52B aircraft to carry a launch vehicle, the structural life of critical components consumed by load excursion to proof load value, and the ground-sitting life of B-52B pylon failure-critical structural components. A special life prediction method was developed for the preflight predictions of operational life of failure-critical structural components of the B-52H pylon system, for which no flight data are available.

  9. Family Structure, Maternal Dating, and Sexual Debut: Extending the Conceptualization of Instability.

    PubMed

    Zito, Rena Cornell; De Coster, Stacy

    2016-05-01

    Family structure influences the risk of early onset of sexual intercourse. This study proposes that the family structures associated with risk-single-mother, step-parent, and cohabiting-influence early sexual debut due to family instability, including shifts in family structure and maternal dating, which can undermine parental control and transmit messages about the acceptability of nonmarital sex. Previous research has not considered maternal dating as a component of family instability, assuming single mothers who date and those who do not date experience comparable levels of family disruption and transmit similar messages about the acceptability of nonmarital sex. Hypotheses are assessed using logistic regression models predicting the odds of early onset of sexual intercourse among 9959 respondents (53 % female, 47 % male) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. Respondents were ages 12-17 at the first wave of data collection and 18-26 at the third wave, when respondents reported the age at which they first had sexual intercourse. Results show that maternal dating is a source of family instability with repercussions for early sexual debut. Parental control and permissive attitudes towards teenage sex and pregnancy link at-risk family structures and maternal dating to early sexual initiation among females, though these variables do not fully explain family structure and maternal dating effects. Among males, the influence of maternal dating on early sexual debut is fully explained by the learning of permissive sexual attitudes. PMID:26951507

  10. Synthesis, structure, characterization and fluorescent properties of Ag+ complexes with extended π⋯π interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ting-Hong; Yan, Jie; Yang, Hu; Qiang, Liu; Du, Huai-Ming

    2015-12-01

    Two mixed-ligand Ag (I) complexes, [Ag2(Phterpy)2(NO3)2(dppe)]·CH3CN (1) and [Ag4(Phterpy)2(NO3)2(dppp)2](NO3)2·6H2O (2) (dppe = 1, 2-bis (diphenylphosphino) ethane, dppp = 1, 3-bis (diphenylphosphino) propane, Phterpy = 4‧-phenyl-2, 2‧:6‧, 2″-terpyridine), have been synthesized and structurally characterized by IR, 1H-NMR, 31P-NMR, elemental analysis and X-ray crystal structure analysis. Structural analysis reveals that the change of bridging ligands from dppe to dppp lead to the formation of centrosymmetric cations [Ag2(Phterpy)2(NO3)2(dppe)] and [Ag4(Phterpy)2 (NO3)2(dppp)2]2+, especially complex 2 containing two independent centrosymmetric tetramers with the central (obligate) Ag2O2 planes. Complexes 1 and 2 consist of the 1D infinite chains, with different variations in π-stacking patterns. Crystal structure of 1 contains 1D infinite chains constructed by π⋯π interactions between Phterpy, while 2 is built by π⋯π interaction of phenylene rings from dppp. All these reveal that the change of phosphine ligands might be the key of construction of different types of polynuclear structures and 1D π-stacking chain. Moreover, the solid-state emission spectra of complexes 1 and 2 display broad emission bands at 420-600 nm.

  11. Damage Characterization Using the Extended Finite Element Method for Structural Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Thiagarajan; Gallegos, Adam M.

    2011-01-01

    The development of validated multidisciplinary Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) tools, technologies, and techniques to enable detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and mitigation in the presence of adverse conditions during flight will provide effective solutions to deal with safety related challenges facing next generation aircraft. The adverse conditions include loss of control caused by environmental factors, actuator and sensor faults or failures, and damage conditions. A major concern in these structures is the growth of undetected damage/cracks due to fatigue and low velocity foreign impact that can reach a critical size during flight, resulting in loss of control of the aircraft. Hence, development of efficient methodologies to determine the presence, location, and severity of damage/cracks in critical structural components is highly important in developing efficient structural health management systems.

  12. Phenotype characterization of embryoid body structures generated by a crystal comet effect tail in an intercellular cancer collision scenario

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Jairo A; Murillo, Mauricio F

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is, by definition, the uncontrolled growth of autonomous cells that eventually destroy adjacent tissues and generate architectural disorder. However, this concept cannot be totally true. In three well documented studies, we have demonstrated that cancer tissues produce order zones that evolve over time and generate embryoid body structures in a space-time interval. The authors decided to revise the macroscopic and microscopic material in well-developed malignant tumors in which embryoid bodies were identified to determine the phenotype characterization that serves as a guideline for easy recognition. The factors responsible for this morphogenesis are physical, bioelectric, and magnetic susceptibilities produced by crystals that act as molecular designers for the topographic gradients that guide the surrounding silhouette and establish tissue head-tail positional identities. The structures are located in amniotic-like cavities and show characteristic somite-like embryologic segmentation. Immunophenotypic study has demonstrated exclusion factor positional identity in relation to enolase-immunopositive expression of embryoid body and human chorionic gonadotropin immunopositivity exclusion factor expression in the surrounding tissues. The significance of these observations is that they can also be predicted by experimental image data collected by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in which two-beam subatomic collision particles in the resulting debris show hyperorder domains similar to those identified by us in intercellular cancer collisions. Our findings suggest that we are dealing with true reverse biologic system information in an activated collective cancer stem cell memory, in which physics participates in the elaboration of geometric complexes and chiral biomolecules that serve to build bodies with embryoid print as it develops during gestation. Reversal mechanisms in biology are intimately

  13. High Sensitivity Combined with Extended Structural Coverage of Labile Compounds via Nanoelectrospray Ionization at Subambient Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Jonathan T.; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Shukla, Anil K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi

    2014-10-07

    Subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN) has proven to be effective in producing ions with high efficiency and transmitting them to low pressures for high sensitivity mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Here we present evidence that not only does the SPIN source improve MS sensitivity but also allows for gentler ionization conditions. The gentleness of a conventional heated capillary electrospray ionization (ESI) source and the SPIN source was compared by the liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of colominic acid. Colominic acid is a mixture of sialic acid polymers of different lengths containing labile glycosidic linkages between monomer units necessitating a gentle ion source. By coupling the SPIN source with high resolution mass spectrometry and using advanced data processing tools, we demonstrate much extended coverage of sialic acid polymer chains as compared to using the conventional ESI source. Additionally we show that SPIN-LC-MS is effective in elucidating polymer features with high efficiency and high sensitivity previously unattainable by the conventional ESI-LC-MS methods.

  14. Extending the Multiple-Goal Perspective to Tertiary Classroom Goal Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Vennessa H.; Yates, Shirley M.

    2007-01-01

    The multiple-goal perspective has recently been applied to teacher behaviours in primary school classrooms through experimental intervention (Linnenbrink, 2005) and objective observation (Sideridis, 2005). However, there is evidence suggesting that rather than centered only on teacher behaviour, classroom goal structures are a whole class feature…

  15. Structural Equation Modelling of Multiple Facet Data: Extending Models for Multitrait-Multimethod Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bechger, Timo M.; Maris, Gunter

    2004-01-01

    This paper is about the structural equation modelling of quantitative measures that are obtained from a multiple facet design. A facet is simply a set consisting of a finite number of elements. It is assumed that measures are obtained by combining each element of each facet. Methods and traits are two such facets, and a multitrait-multimethod…

  16. First-principles simulations of extended phosphorus oxynitride structures in LiPON glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yaojun; Holzwarth, N. A. W.

    2009-03-01

    The thin film electrolyte LiPON, having the composition of Li3+xPO4-yNz with x=3z-2y, was developed at Oak Ridge National Lab in the 1990's for use in solid state batteries and related applications. In an effort to understand and to optimize properties of this electrolyte material, we expanded previous studies of isolated defects in crystalline Li3PO4 to focus on more complicated phosphate structures based on combinations of tetrahedral P-O bonds and bridging P-O-P bonds. For example, crystalline LiPO3 and P2O5 are composed of phosphate structures with linear and branched chains, respectively. Both these and related structures derived from substituting O with N and adjusting mobile Li ion concentrations approximate components found in LiPON films.^2 In the simulated structures, we find that N is energetically more stable at bridging bond sites than at tetrahedral sites by 2-3 eV and that the Li ion migration energies are 0.5-0.6 eV, similar to values measured in LiPON films.

  17. Evaluation of high temperature structural adhesives for extended service, phase 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. L.; Hill, S. G.; Hale, J. N.; Dumars, W. G.

    1987-01-01

    The evaluation of 3 experimental polymers from NASA-Langley and a commercially produced polymer from Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals as high temperature structural adhesives is presented. A polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ), polyimide (STPI/LaRC-2), and a polyarylene ether (PAE-SO2) were evaluated as metal-to-metal adhesives. Lap shear, crack extension, and climbing drum peel specimens were fabricated from all three polymers and tested after thermal, combined thermal/humidity, and stressed hydraulic fluid (Skydrol) exposure. The fourth polymer, LARC-TPI was evaluated as an adhesive for titanium honeycomb sandwich structure. All three experimental polymers performed well as metal-to-metal adhesives from 219 K (-65 F) to 505 K (450 F), including humidity exposure. Structural adhesive strength was also maintained at 505 K for a minimum of 3000 hours. LaRC-TPI was evaluated as a high temperature (505 K) adhesive for titanium honeycomb sandwich structure. The LaRC-TPI bonding process development concentrated on improving the honeycomb core-to-skin bond. The most promising approach of those evaluated combined a LaRC-TPI polymer solution with a semi-crystalline LaRC-TPI powder for adhesive film fabrication and fillet formation.

  18. EB1 regulates attachment of Ska1 with microtubules by forming extended structures on the microtubule lattice.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Geethu E; Bandopadhyay, K; Sutradhar, Sabyasachi; Renjith, M R; Singh, Puja; Gireesh, K K; Simon, Steny; Badarudeen, Binshad; Gupta, Hindol; Banerjee, Manidipa; Paul, Raja; Mitra, J; Manna, Tapas K

    2016-01-01

    Kinetochore couples chromosome movement to dynamic microtubules, a process that is fundamental to mitosis in all eukaryotes but poorly understood. In vertebrates, spindle-kinetochore-associated (Ska1-3) protein complex plays an important role in this process. However, the proteins that stabilize Ska-mediated kinetochore-microtubule attachment remain unknown. Here we show that microtubule plus-end tracking protein EB1 facilitates Ska localization on microtubules in vertebrate cells. EB1 depletion results in a significant reduction of Ska1 recruitment onto microtubules and defects in mitotic chromosome alignment, which is also reflected in computational modelling. Biochemical experiments reveal that EB1 interacts with Ska1, facilitates Ska1-microtubule attachment and together stabilizes microtubules. Structural studies reveal that EB1 either with Ska1 or Ska complex forms extended structures on microtubule lattice. Results indicate that EB1 promotes Ska association with K-fibres and facilitates kinetochore-microtubule attachment. They also implicate that in vertebrates, chromosome coupling to dynamic microtubules could be mediated through EB1-Ska extended structures. PMID:27225956

  19. EB1 regulates attachment of Ska1 with microtubules by forming extended structures on the microtubule lattice

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Geethu E.; Bandopadhyay, K.; Sutradhar, Sabyasachi; Renjith, M. R.; Singh, Puja; Gireesh, K. K.; Simon, Steny; Badarudeen, Binshad; Gupta, Hindol; Banerjee, Manidipa; Paul, Raja; Mitra, J.; Manna, Tapas K.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetochore couples chromosome movement to dynamic microtubules, a process that is fundamental to mitosis in all eukaryotes but poorly understood. In vertebrates, spindle-kinetochore-associated (Ska1–3) protein complex plays an important role in this process. However, the proteins that stabilize Ska-mediated kinetochore-microtubule attachment remain unknown. Here we show that microtubule plus-end tracking protein EB1 facilitates Ska localization on microtubules in vertebrate cells. EB1 depletion results in a significant reduction of Ska1 recruitment onto microtubules and defects in mitotic chromosome alignment, which is also reflected in computational modelling. Biochemical experiments reveal that EB1 interacts with Ska1, facilitates Ska1-microtubule attachment and together stabilizes microtubules. Structural studies reveal that EB1 either with Ska1 or Ska complex forms extended structures on microtubule lattice. Results indicate that EB1 promotes Ska association with K-fibres and facilitates kinetochore-microtubule attachment. They also implicate that in vertebrates, chromosome coupling to dynamic microtubules could be mediated through EB1-Ska extended structures. PMID:27225956

  20. Extended Functional Groups (EFG): An Efficient Set for Chemical Characterization and Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of Chemical Compounds.

    PubMed

    Salmina, Elena S; Haider, Norbert; Tetko, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    The article describes a classification system termed "extended functional groups" (EFG), which are an extension of a set previously used by the CheckMol software, that covers in addition heterocyclic compound classes and periodic table groups. The functional groups are defined as SMARTS patterns and are available as part of the ToxAlerts tool (http://ochem.eu/alerts) of the On-line CHEmical database and Modeling (OCHEM) environment platform. The article describes the motivation and the main ideas behind this extension and demonstrates that EFG can be efficiently used to develop and interpret structure-activity relationship models. PMID:26703557

  1. Different mutations at V363 MAPT codon are associated with atypical clinical phenotypes and show unusual structural and functional features.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Giacomina; Bastone, Antonio; Piccoli, Elena; Morbin, Michela; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Fugnanesi, Valeria; Beeg, Marten; Del Favero, Elena; Cantù, Laura; Motta, Simona; Salsano, Ettore; Pareyson, Davide; Erbetta, Alessandra; Elia, Antonio Emanuele; Del Sorbo, Francesca; Silani, Vincenzo; Morelli, Claudia; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2014-02-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) is one of the major genes linked to frontotemporal lobar degeneration, a group of neurodegenerative diseases clinically, pathologically, and genetically heterogeneous. In particular, MAPT mutations give rise to the subgroup of tauopathies. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying the MAPT mutations so far described are the decreased ability of tau protein to promote microtubule polymerization (missense mutations) or the altered ratio of tau isoforms (splicing mutations), both leading to accumulation of hyperphosphorylated filamentous tau protein. Following a genetic screening of patients affected by frontotemporal lobar degeneration, we identified 2 MAPT mutations, V363I and V363A, leading to atypical clinical phenotypes, such as posterior cortical atrophy. We investigated in vitro features of the recombinant mutated tau isoforms and revealed unusual functional and structural characteristics such as an increased ability to promote microtubule polymerization and a tendency to form oligomeric instead of filamentous aggregates. Thus, we disclosed a greater than expected complexity of abnormal features of mutated tau isoforms. Overall our findings suggest a high probability that these mutations are pathogenic. PMID:24018212

  2. Nine new phosphorene polymorphs with non-honeycomb structures: a much extended family.

    PubMed

    Wu, Menghao; Fu, Huahua; Zhou, Ling; Yao, Kailun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2015-05-13

    We predict a new class of monolayer phosphorus allotropes, namely, ε-P, ζ-P, η-P, and θ-P. Distinctly different from the monolayer α-P (black) and previously predicted β-P (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2014, 112, 176802), γ-P, and δ-P (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2014, 113, 046804) with buckled honeycomb lattice, the new allotropes are composed of P4 square or P5 pentagon units that favor tricoordination for P atoms. The new four polymorphs, together with five additional hybrid polymorphs, greatly enrich the phosphorene structures, and their stabilities are confirmed by first-principles calculations. In particular, the θ-P is shown to be equally stable as the α-P (black) and more stable than all previously reported phosphorene polymorphs. Prediction of nonvolatile ferroelastic switching and structural transformation among different polymorphs under strains points out their potential applications via strain engineering. PMID:25844524

  3. Surface structure of an invariant manifold of a Halo Orbit (extended abstract)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirani, Anil N.; Lo, Martin W.

    2005-01-01

    We extract the surface structure of the unstable invariant manifold tube projected into position space, of a halo orbit near L2. We do this by using transversal planes to intersect trajectories that approximate the tube. From these intersection points we construct spline-interpolated cross section curves which give a good idea of the structure of the tube. For example, we show that, for the value of (mu) we use, the tube pinches, develops a self-intersection, develops loop-inside-tube structure, pinches some more, and so on. We also construct surfaces made of quadrilaterals and triangles from these cross-sections. The transversal planes are obtained by taking planes orthogonal to a curve that follows the general shape of the tube. One such curve we use, is the unstable invariant manifold of the equilibrium point L2 itself. In another example, we take a circle that follows the tube, as the curve for finding planes transversal to the tube. Our method is complementary to the method of taking cross-sections of constant time (the isochronous method), as used by some other researchers. The isochronous method is good at revealing the temporal structure of trajectories on a tube. However, due to the unequal speeds of different trajectories, it is harder to use for long length surface extraction. In contrast, using our method, we show cross-sections of the tube through an angular extent of nearly (pi) during which the tube becomes extremely convoluted. We also show that tubes of different energies, that start out in certain ordering, do not obey the ordering after a while. Our work is motivated by applications to space mission design.

  4. Type IV Pilus Proteins Form an Integrated Structure Extending from the Cytoplasm to the Outer Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengyun; Wallace, Regina A.; Black, Wesley P.; Li, Yue-zhong; Yang, Zhaomin

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial type IV pilus (T4P) is the strongest biological motor known to date as its retraction can generate forces well over 100 pN. Myxococcus xanthus, a δ-proteobacterium, provides a good model for T4P investigations because its social (S) gliding motility is powered by T4P. In this study, the interactions among M. xanthus T4P proteins were investigated using genetics and the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system. Our genetic analysis suggests that there is an integrated T4P structure that crosses the inner membrane (IM), periplasm and the outer membrane (OM). Moreover, this structure exists in the absence of the pilus filament. A systematic Y2H survey provided evidence for direct interactions among IM and OM proteins exposed to the periplasm. For example, the IM lipoprotein PilP interacted with its cognate OM protein PilQ. In addition, interactions among T4P proteins from the thermophile Thermus thermophilus were investigated by Y2H. The results indicated similar protein-protein interactions in the T4P system of this non-proteobacterium despite significant sequence divergence between T4P proteins in T. thermophilus and M. xanthus. The observations here support the model of an integrated T4P structure in the absence of a pilus in diverse bacterial species. PMID:23922942

  5. Exciton Localization in Extended π-Electron Systems: Comparison of Linear and Cyclic Structures.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, Alexander; Würsch, Dominik; Jester, Stefan-S; Aggarwal, A Vikas; Idelson, Alissa; Bange, Sebastian; Vogelsang, Jan; Höger, Sigurd; Lupton, John M

    2015-07-30

    We employ five π-conjugated model materials of different molecular shape-oligomers and cyclic structures-to investigate the extent of exciton self-trapping and torsional motion of the molecular framework following optical excitation. Our studies combine steady state and transient fluorescence spectroscopy in the ensemble with measurements of polarization anisotropy on single molecules, supported by Monte Carlo simulations. The dimer exhibits a significant spectral red shift within ∼100 ps after photoexcitation which is attributed to torsional relaxation. This relaxation mechanism is inhibited in the structurally rigid macrocyclic analogue. However, both systems show a high degree of exciton localization but with very different consequences: while, in the macrocycle, the exciton localizes randomly on different parts of the ring, scrambling polarization memory, in the dimer, localization leads to a deterministic exciton position with luminescence characteristics of a dipole. Monte Carlo simulations allow us to quantify the structural difference between the emitting and absorbing units of the π-conjugated system in terms of disorder parameters. PMID:26035080

  6. Crystal Structures of Lys-63-linked tri- and di-ubiquitin Reveal a Highly Extended Chain Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, S.; Grasty, K; Hernandez-Cuebas, L; Loll, P

    2009-01-01

    The covalent attachment of different types of poly-ubiquitin chains signal different outcomes for the proteins so targeted. For example, a protein modified with Lys-48-linked poly-ubiquitin chains is targeted for proteasomal degradation, whereas Lys-63-linked chains encode nondegradative signals. The structural features that enable these different types of chains to encode different signals have not yet been fully elucidated. We report here the X-ray crystal structures of Lys-63-linked tri- and di-ubiquitin at resolutions of 2.3 and 1.9 {angstrom}, respectively. The tri- and di-ubiquitin species adopt essentially identical structures. In both instances, the ubiquitin chain assumes a highly extended conformation with a left-handed helical twist; the helical chain contains four ubiquitin monomers per turn and has a repeat length of {approx}110 {angstrom}. Interestingly, Lys-48 ubiquitin chains also adopt a left-handed helical structure with a similar repeat length. However, the Lys-63 architecture is much more open than that of Lys-48 chains and exposes much more of the ubiquitin surface for potential recognition events. These new crystal structures are consistent with the results of solution studies of Lys-63 chain conformation, and reveal the structural basis for differential recognition of Lys-63 versus Lys-48 chains.

  7. Analysis and design for inelastic structural response of extended pile shaft foundations in laterally spreading ground during earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravifar, Arash

    Experiences from past earthquakes have shown that lateral spreading associated with liquefaction of cohesionless soils can be a cause of severe damage to bridge foundations. Large diameter extended pile shafts can be an effective bridge foundation choice for areas subjected to lateral spreading because they offer greater stiffness and strength relative to the magnitude of lateral spreading loads that can develop against them. A limited degree of plastic hinging below the ground surface may be allowable in design of extended pile shafts. Issues for design for extended pile shafts include: (a) how to estimate the demands due to superstructure inertia and lateral spreading in liquefied soils, and (b) how to combine these two loads in estimating the local and global inelastic demands on the structure. Studies of the response of pile foundations and pile-supported structures in liquefiable soils using physical models, numerical models, and case studies have provided the basis for a number of design recommendations. The guidance is, however, quite varied regarding how lateral spreading and superstructure inertial loads should be combined in design. To answer the above questions a series of Nonlinear Dynamic Finite Element Analyses (NDA) have been performed to investigate inelastic response of extended pile shafts subjected to liquefaction-induced lateral spreading, covering a range of soil, pile, and ground motion conditions. The results of NDA were first used to show that combined effects of lateral spreading and superstructure inertia produce larger demands than are produced by either loading case alone, such that the combined demand cannot be enveloped by analyzing the two load cases separately. The results were then used to evaluate current equivalent static analysis (ESA) method (Caltrans, 2008), with the relatively poor agreement illustrating the limitations of methods that do not combine the two loads. The results of NDA parametric study were then used to develop

  8. Profiling functions of ectomycorrhizal diversity and root structuring in seedlings of Norway spruce (Picea abies) with fast- and slow-growing phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Velmala, Sannakajsa M; Rajala, Tiina; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Taylor, Andy F S; Pennanen, Taina

    2014-01-01

    We studied the role of taxonomical and functional ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal diversity in root formation and nutrient uptake by Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings with fast- and slow-growing phenotypes. Seedlings were grown with an increasing ECM fungal diversity gradient from one to four species and sampled before aboveground growth differences between the two phenotypes were apparent. ECM fungal colonization patterns were determined and functional diversity was assayed via measurements of potential enzyme activities of eight exoenzymes probably involved in nutrient mobilization. Phenotypes did not vary in their receptiveness to different ECM fungal species. However, seedlings of slow-growing phenotypes had higher fine-root density and thus more condensed root systems than fast-growing seedlings, but the potential enzyme activities of ectomycorrhizas did not differ qualitatively or quantitatively. ECM species richness increased host nutrient acquisition potential by diversifying the exoenzyme palette. Needle nitrogen content correlated positively with high chitinase activity of ectomycorrhizas. Rather than fast- and slow-growing phenotypes exhibiting differing receptiveness to ECM fungi, our results suggest that distinctions in fine-root structuring and in the belowground growth strategy already apparent at early stages of seedling development may explain later growth differences between fast- and slow-growing families. PMID:24117652

  9. Extending motifs in lithiocuprate chemistry: unexpected structural diversity in thiocyanate complexes.

    PubMed

    Peel, Andrew J; Hedidi, Madani; Bentabed-Ababsa, Ghenia; Roisnel, Thierry; Mongin, Florence; Wheatley, Andrew E H

    2016-04-14

    The new area of lithio(thiocyanato)cuprates has been developed. Using inexpensive, stable and safe CuSCN for their preparation, these complexes revealed Lipshutz-type dimeric motifs with solvent-dependent point group identities; planar, boat-shaped and chair shaped conformers are seen in the solid state. In solution, both Lipshutz-type and Gilman structures are clearly seen. Since the advent in 2007 of directed ortho cupration, effort has gone into understanding the structure-reactivity effects of amide ligand variation in and alkali metal salt abstraction from Lipshutz-type cuprates such as (TMP)2Cu(CN)Li2(THF) 1 (TMP = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidide). The replacement of CN(-) with SCN(-) is investigated presently as a means of improving the safety of lithium cuprates. The synthesis and solid state structural characterization of reference cuprate (TMP)2Cu(CN)Li2(THP) 8 (THP = tetrahydropyran) precedes that of the thiocyanate series (TMP)2Cu(SCN)Li2(L) (L = OEt29, THF 10, THP 11). For each of 9-11, preformed TMPLi was combined with CuSCN (2 : 1) in the presence of sub-stoichiometric Lewis base (0.5 eq. wrt Li). The avoidance of Lewis basic solvents incurs formation of the unsolvated Gilman cuprate (TMP)2CuLi 12, whilst multidimensional NMR spectroscopy has evidenced the abstraction of LiSCN from 9-11 in hydrocarbon solution and the in situ formation of Gilman reagents. The synthetic utility of 10 is established in the selective deprotometalation of chloropyridine substrates, including effecting transition metal-free homocoupling in 51-69% yield. PMID:26554572

  10. Quantifying seascape structure: Extending terrestrial spatial pattern metrics to the marine realm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedding, L.M.; Christopher, L.A.; Pittman, S.J.; Friedlander, A.M.; Jorgensen, S.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial pattern metrics have routinely been applied to characterize and quantify structural features of terrestrial landscapes and have demonstrated great utility in landscape ecology and conservation planning. The important role of spatial structure in ecology and management is now commonly recognized, and recent advances in marine remote sensing technology have facilitated the application of spatial pattern metrics to the marine environment. However, it is not yet clear whether concepts, metrics, and statistical techniques developed for terrestrial ecosystems are relevant for marine species and seascapes. To address this gap in our knowledge, we reviewed, synthesized, and evaluated the utility and application of spatial pattern metrics in the marine science literature over the past 30 yr (1980 to 2010). In total, 23 studies characterized seascape structure, of which 17 quantified spatial patterns using a 2-dimensional patch-mosaic model and 5 used a continuously varying 3-dimensional surface model. Most seascape studies followed terrestrial-based studies in their search for ecological patterns and applied or modified existing metrics. Only 1 truly unique metric was found (hydrodynamic aperture applied to Pacific atolls). While there are still relatively few studies using spatial pattern metrics in the marine environment, they have suffered from similar misuse as reported for terrestrial studies, such as the lack of a priori considerations or the problem of collinearity between metrics. Spatial pattern metrics offer great potential for ecological research and environmental management in marine systems, and future studies should focus on (1) the dynamic boundary between the land and sea; (2) quantifying 3-dimensional spatial patterns; and (3) assessing and monitoring seascape change. ?? Inter-Research 2011.