Science.gov

Sample records for extensive clinical experience

  1. Clinical experience of postage stamp autograft with porcine skin onlay dressing in extensive burns.

    PubMed

    Chang, L Y; Yang, J Y

    1998-05-01

    Fifteen patients with extensive burns (deep second-degree burn > 50%, or third-degree burn > 30% of total body surface area) were treated with postage stamp autograft and meshed porcine skin onlay dressing from 1992 to 1996. All patients received the procedure within 10 days of sustaining the burn, with an average of 6.3 days. The areas chosen for postage stamp autograft were the anterior chest, abdomen, back, buttocks and the proximal part of the extremities. The scalp was the donor site of choice when available. The harvested skin was cut into 0.5-1.0 cm postage-stamp-like squares and applied to the recipient sites separated by a distance of 0.5-2.0 cm. The expansion ratio was from 1:4 to 1:9. Meshed porcine skin was then used for onlay dressing. The average graft area was 26% of the total body surface area. The success rate of the skin grafts was nearly 100% in 14 patients. One patient had a 40% loss due to contamination from adjacent wounds. In conclusion, the postage stamp autograft with porcine skin overlay is an effective way to treat extensive burn wounds in the early stages. PMID:9677031

  2. Farmer Experience of Pluralistic Agricultural Extension, Malawi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chowa, Clodina; Garforth, Chris; Cardey, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Malawi's current extension policy supports pluralism and advocates responsiveness to farmer demand. We investigate whether smallholder farmers' experience supports the assumption that access to multiple service providers leads to extension and advisory services that respond to the needs of farmers. Design/methodology/approach: Within a…

  3. Promoting a positive clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Massarweh, L J

    1999-01-01

    Why are some clinical experiences better than others? Little has been written about strategies used in the clinical classroom, yet this setting continues to be a major educational component in nursing education. The author explores specific actions aimed at promoting a positive clinical experience. Motivational principles combined with critical-thinking strategies and total quality management techniques together provide a conceptualization of clinical teaching and learning. Recommendations are made to integrate the three techniques into the clinical classroom. PMID:10640094

  4. Telelearning for Extension Agents: The Virginia Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, William F., Jr.

    The creation of the Virginia Tech Teleport Facility and the installation of a nine-meter (diameter) C-Band satellite uplink antenna provided the initial impetus for the Virginia Cooperative Extension Service (VCES) to explore the use of satellite technology for information and program delivery. The $600,000 uplink became operational in September…

  5. Communication for extension: developing country experience.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A J

    1985-01-01

    This paper characterizes several major approaches to the use of communication in support of agricultural extension and suggests directions for change. The approaches discussed include: direct farmer contact, farmer forums, open broadcasting, advertising and social marketing, print media, multiple channel systems (campaigns and distance teaching), and comprehensive communication systems. Although all programs should be able to use media in interaction with training and the coordination of other inputs, this approach has not been comprehensively implemented in extension programs. There are few examples of cases where multiple methods have been brought together under a comprehensive communications strategy and institutionalized as part of an ongoing extension system. Lessons from social marketing in other sectors have not been exploited, while lessons from distance teaching have been underutilized. In addition, the networking and feedback functions of communication in extenson have not been given adequate attention. There is substantial potential for increasing the coverage and impact of agricultural extension through the more systematic and comprehensive use of communication. PMID:12268503

  6. Telelearning for Extension Agents: The Virginia Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, William F., Jr.

    The creation of the Virginia Tech Teleport Facility and the installation of a nine-meter (diameter) C-Band satellite uplink antenna provided the initial impetus for the Virginia Cooperative Extension Service (VCES) to explore the use of satellite technology for information and program delivery. The $600,000 uplink became operational in September…

  7. Semirigid Cantilever Extension System for Splinting Implants: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Raissa Micaella Marcello; Pinto, Luciana de Rezende; Chagas Júnior, Otacílio Luiz

    2014-01-01

    In mandibular edentulous patients, treatment based on immediate loading with rigid splinting in the mandible is well accepted; however, it is cost and time dependent, which sometimes limits this type of rehabilitation. To overcome these problems, the technique of immediate loading using a semirigid splinting extension system has been developed. Its advantages include low cost, technical feasibility, and reduced clinic time. This clinical report presents the applicability and the predictability of semirigid splinting of implants in the mandibular arch of an edentulous patient using a distal extension bar prosthesis system. PMID:25161775

  8. Clinical experience with bemiparin.

    PubMed

    Abad Rico, José Ignacio; Lozano Sánchez, Francisco S; Rocha, Eduardo

    2010-12-14

    Subcutaneous bemiparin has been evaluated for the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in moderate to high-risk patients undergoing surgery, and for the acute and long-term treatment of established VTE. General and orthopaedic surgery is associated with VTE incidence rates of 15-60% in the absence of thromboprophylaxis and this can be reduced by over 70% with appropriate thromboembolic prophylaxis. Bemiparin was as effective as unfractionated heparin (UFH) in the prevention of VTE, when both were initiated preoperatively, but was associated with significantly fewer bleeding episodes than UFH. Bemiparin prophylaxis initiated postoperatively was at least as effective as bemiparin initiated preoperatively and was associated with a lower incidence of bleeding complications than preoperative initiation. In terms of patients with cancer undergoing abdominal or pelvic surgery, preliminary results from a recent study with bemiparin showed that extended prophylaxis for 4 weeks significantly reduced the rate of major VTE, without increasing bleeding risk, compared with prophylaxis for one week. Bemiparin, initiated postoperatively, was as effective as enoxaparin, initiated preoperatively, in the prevention of VTE in patients undergoing total knee replacement. The incidence of bleeding complications was similar between groups, although the incidence of injection site haematoma was significantly higher with enoxaparin than with bemiparin. Postoperative initiation of bemiparin thromboprophylaxis minimized the risk of spinal haematoma in patients using neuraxial anaesthesia (approximately 93% of patients). In addition, postoperative initiation is likely to reduce the total costs, because patients do not need to be admitted to hospital the day before surgery. Bemiparin was more effective than intravenous UFH in the acute treatment of established deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and was as effective as oral warfarin in the subsequent secondary prevention of VTE over 3 months of therapy, while bleeding complications over 3 months of therapy were similarly low. In a European study, acute treatment of DVT with bemiparin for one week followed by 12 weeks' secondary prevention with bemiparin (i.e. bemiparin/bemiparin) was associated with a cost saving of &U20AC;908 per patient compared with UFH/warfarin. Similarly, bemiparin/warfarin produced a cost saving of &U20AC;769 compared with UFH/warfarin. The savings were predominantly the result of reduced hospital stays during acute treatment with bemiparin. Bemiparin was also associated with increased quality-adjusted life expectancy. Observational studies in routine clinical practice demonstrated that outpatient treatment of acute VTE was as effective as inpatient treatment, but with lower costs, and bemiparin was as effective as vitamin K antagonists over 3 months for secondary prevention, with VTE recurrence rates of 0% and 0.3% over 3 months in separate studies. Bemiparin is thus an effective, well tolerated agent for thromboprophylaxis in surgery, and for the acute and long-term treatment of established VTE, having advantages over UFH and particular benefits as a result of initiating therapy postoperatively. PMID:21162607

  9. Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Kenneth L.

    This book offers a systematic approach to teaching athletic training. Modules are separated into 10 content areas: direct clinical experience; policies and procedures; emergency procedures; modality operation; advanced modality operation; taping, wrapping, bracing, and padding; management of specific injuries; examination; supervision; and…

  10. Extension of nanoconfined DNA: Quantitative comparison between experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iarko, V.; Werner, E.; Nyberg, L. K.; Müller, V.; Fritzsche, J.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Beech, J. P.; Tegenfeldt, J. O.; Mehlig, K.; Westerlund, F.; Mehlig, B.

    2015-12-01

    The extension of DNA confined to nanochannels has been studied intensively and in detail. However, quantitative comparisons between experiments and model calculations are difficult because most theoretical predictions involve undetermined prefactors, and because the model parameters (contour length, Kuhn length, effective width) are difficult to compute reliably, leading to substantial uncertainties. Here we use a recent asymptotically exact theory for the DNA extension in the "extended de Gennes regime" that allows us to compare experimental results with theory. For this purpose, we performed experiments measuring the mean DNA extension and its standard deviation while varying the channel geometry, dye intercalation ratio, and ionic strength of the buffer. The experimental results agree very well with theory at high ionic strengths, indicating that the model parameters are reliable. At low ionic strengths, the agreement is less good. We discuss possible reasons. In principle, our approach allows us to measure the Kuhn length and the effective width of a single DNA molecule and more generally of semiflexible polymers in solution.

  11. Clinical experience with intravenous fenoldopam.

    PubMed

    Holcslaw, T L; Beck, T R

    1990-06-01

    Fenoldopam (Corlopam), a new dopaminergic agent in clinical development by SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals, is a dopamine-1 (DA1) agonist at post-synaptic dopamine receptors. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that it is a potent renal vasodilator as well as a peripheral vasodilator. In both normal volunteers and hypertensive patients intravenous fenoldopam causes dose-related decreases in blood pressure and important increases in renal hemodynamics and function including increased renal blood flow, diuresis and natriuresis. Fenoldopam does not alter glomerular filtration. Intravenous fenoldopam has been demonstrated to be efficacious in severe hypertensive patients in several multicenter, multinational trials. In severe hypertension efficacy trials fenoldopam was judged to be as effective as sodium nitroprusside and to produce less serious side effects. In patients with moderate to severe heart failure, fenoldopam has been demonstrated to produce dose-related acute increases in cardiac output, stroke volume and work index, decreased systemic vascular resistance but no important changes in pulmonary wedge pressure or right atrial pressure. In CHF patients fenoldopam has been demonstrated to be as efficacious as sodium nitroprusside. Fenoldopam, as a specific (DA1) agonist resulting in decreased peripheral and renal vascular resistance, diuresis, natriuresis and increases in cardiac hemodynamics on intravenous administration, appears to be an efficacious agent which offers a reasonable alternative in the treatment of severe hypertension and acute congestive heart failure. PMID:1974440

  12. [Continuous dopaminergic stimulation - clinical experience].

    PubMed

    Bogucki, Andrzej; S?awek, Jaros?aw

    2010-01-01

    Both disease progression and pulsatile stimulation of dopaminergic receptors are responsible for development of fluctuations and dyskinesia in about 50% of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) after 4-6 years of therapy with levodopa. In order to prevent motor complications, the ideal therapy should secure continuous dopaminergic stimulation (CDS). The concept of CDS is supported by the results of both experimental and clinical studies. Several treatment options are available to achieve CDS. Dopamine agonists have a longer half-life than levodopa and the development of dyskinesia is delayed when they are used as monotherapy in early PD. Continuous delivery of agonists can be improved with prolonged-release oral preparations, a transdermal delivery system or continuous subcutaneous infusion. Continuous enteral infusion of levodopa is another way to achieve CDS and it is very effective in reducing motor complications in advanced PD. PMID:20827612

  13. Clinical experience with CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Judd E.; Garry, John L.; Wilson, Lynn A.; Johnson, C. Daniel

    2000-04-01

    Since the introduction of Computed Tomographic Colonography (CTC) in 1995, many advances in computer equipment and software have become available. Despite these advances, the promise of colon cancer prevention has not been realized. A colorectal screening tool that performs at a high level, is acceptable to patients, and can be performed safely and at low cost holds promise of saving lives in the future. Our institution has performed over two hundred seventy five clinical CTC examinations. These scans, which each entail a supine and a prone acquisition, only differ from our research protocol in the necessity of an expeditious interpretation. Patients arrive for their CTC examination early in the morning following a period of fasting and bowel preparation. If a CTC examination has a positive finding, the patient is scheduled for colonoscopic polypectomy that same morning. To facilitate this, the patients are required to continue fasting until the CTC examination has been interpreted. It is therefore necessary to process the CTC examination very quickly to minimize patient discomfort. A positive CTC result occurred in fifteen percent of examinations. Among these positive results, the specificity has been in excess of ninety five percent. Additionally, life threatening extra-colonic lesions were discovered in two percent of the screened population.

  14. Clinical experience with nuclear pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Parsonnet, V; Myers, G H; Gilbert, L; Zucker, I R

    1975-12-01

    Approximately 1,400 nuclear pacemakers have been implanted in patients since April, 1970, without a single battery failure; 64 of these have been implanted at the Newark Beth Israel Medical Center. All except four of the 64 pulse generators were attached to transvenous electrodes, 39 to pacing wires already in place. Fifty-nine of the 64 units are in service and continue to function normally in a follow-up period of up to 2 years. In the total worldwide experience, 70 pacemakers are out of service, approximately half because of the patient's death, and the rest for infection or lead problems, and only three or four because of difficulties with components. The first 15 ARCO pacemakers implanted 2 years ago continue to function well. Of the 15 control pacemakers implanted at the same time, one unit has failed. We have concluded that a nuclear pacemaker should not be used in a patient with limited life expectancy or in an infant, but for the otherwise healthy young or middle-age individual, it should be the unit of choice. PMID:1188620

  15. Federated web-accessible clinical data management within an extensible neuroimaging database.

    PubMed

    Ozyurt, I Burak; Keator, David B; Wei, Dingying; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Pease, Karen R; Bockholt, Jeremy; Grethe, Jeffrey S

    2010-12-01

    Managing vast datasets collected throughout multiple clinical imaging communities has become critical with the ever increasing and diverse nature of datasets. Development of data management infrastructure is further complicated by technical and experimental advances that drive modifications to existing protocols and acquisition of new types of research data to be incorporated into existing data management systems. In this paper, an extensible data management system for clinical neuroimaging studies is introduced: The Human Clinical Imaging Database (HID) and Toolkit. The database schema is constructed to support the storage of new data types without changes to the underlying schema. The complex infrastructure allows management of experiment data, such as image protocol and behavioral task parameters, as well as subject-specific data, including demographics, clinical assessments, and behavioral task performance metrics. Of significant interest, embedded clinical data entry and management tools enhance both consistency of data reporting and automatic entry of data into the database. The Clinical Assessment Layout Manager (CALM) allows users to create on-line data entry forms for use within and across sites, through which data is pulled into the underlying database via the generic clinical assessment management engine (GAME). Importantly, the system is designed to operate in a distributed environment, serving both human users and client applications in a service-oriented manner. Querying capabilities use a built-in multi-database parallel query builder/result combiner, allowing web-accessible queries within and across multiple federated databases. The system along with its documentation is open-source and available from the Neuroimaging Informatics Tools and Resource Clearinghouse (NITRC) site. PMID:20567938

  16. Federated Web-accessible Clinical Data Management within an Extensible NeuroImaging Database

    PubMed Central

    Keator, David B.; Wei, Dingying; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Pease, Karen R.; Bockholt, Jeremy; Grethe, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Managing vast datasets collected throughout multiple clinical imaging communities has become critical with the ever increasing and diverse nature of datasets. Development of data management infrastructure is further complicated by technical and experimental advances that drive modifications to existing protocols and acquisition of new types of research data to be incorporated into existing data management systems. In this paper, an extensible data management system for clinical neuroimaging studies is introduced: The Human Clinical Imaging Database (HID) and Toolkit. The database schema is constructed to support the storage of new data types without changes to the underlying schema. The complex infrastructure allows management of experiment data, such as image protocol and behavioral task parameters, as well as subject-specific data, including demographics, clinical assessments, and behavioral task performance metrics. Of significant interest, embedded clinical data entry and management tools enhance both consistency of data reporting and automatic entry of data into the database. The Clinical Assessment Layout Manager (CALM) allows users to create on-line data entry forms for use within and across sites, through which data is pulled into the underlying database via the generic clinical assessment management engine (GAME). Importantly, the system is designed to operate in a distributed environment, serving both human users and client applications in a service-oriented manner. Querying capabilities use a built-in multi-database parallel query builder/result combiner, allowing web-accessible queries within and across multiple federated databases. The system along with its documentation is open-source and available from the Neuroimaging Informatics Tools and Resource Clearinghouse (NITRC) site. PMID:20567938

  17. Assessing clinical implications of spiritual experiences.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Almeida, Alexander

    2012-12-01

    Since spiritual experiences (SE) very often resemble dissociative and psychotic symptoms, there is a risk of misdiagnosis in both directions: labeling a healthy SE as a mental disorder or taking a mental disorder as an SE. There is a scarcity of well-controlled studies on this subject. The paper provides a brief overview of studies on dissociative and psychotic experiences in the non-clinical population, especially those occurring in spiritual populations. At the end, some guidelines are proposed to help clinical reasoning when making the differential diagnosis between healthy SE with psychotic and dissociative experiences and mental disorders that may resemble SE. PMID:23174443

  18. Obstetrical staff nurses experiences of clinical learning.

    PubMed

    Veltri, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    The clinical learning experience is used in nursing programs of study worldwide to prepare nurses for professional practice. This study's purpose was to use Naturalistic Inquiry to understand the experiences of staff nurses in an obstetrical unit with undergraduate nursing students present for clinical learning. A convenience sample of 12 staff nurses, employed on a Family Birth Center, participated in semi-structured interviews. The constant comparative method as modified by Lincoln and Guba was used to analyze data. Five themes related to staff nurses experiences of clinical learning were identified: Giving and Receiving; Advancing Professionally and Personally; Balancing Act; Getting to Know and Working with You; and Past and Present. This research highlights staff nurses' experiences of clinical learning in undergraduate nursing education. Staff nurses exert a powerful, long lasting influence on students. A need exists to prepare and judiciously select nurses to work with students. Clinical agencies and universities can take joint responsibility providing tangible incentives, financial compensation, and recognition to all nurses working with nursing students. PMID:25564334

  19. Shared-Learning Experience During a Clinical Pharmacy Practice Experience

    PubMed Central

    Awaisu, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Objective To implement a shared learning approach through fourth-year students’ mentorship of third-year students and to assess the perceptions of the mentored students on the value of their shared learning experience. Design We introduced the shared learning experience in clinical pharmacy and pharmacotherapeutic practice experiences involving 87 third-year and 51 fourth-year students. Both student groups undertook the practice experiences together, with third-year students working in smaller groups mentored by fourth-year students. Assessment A majority of the students (> 75%) believed that they learned to work as a team during their practice experiences and that the shared learning approach provided an opportunity to practice their communication skills. Similarly, most respondents (> 70%) agreed that the new approach would help them become effective members of the healthcare team and would facilitate their professional relationships in future practice. Almost two-thirds of the students believed that the shared learning enhanced their ability to understand clinical problems. However, about 31% of the pharmacy students felt that they could have learned clinical problem-solving skills equally well working only with peers from their own student group. Conclusions The pharmacy students in the current study generally believed that the shared-learning approach enhanced their ability to understand clinical problems and improved their communication and teamwork skills. Both groups of students were positive that they had acquired some skills through the shared-learning approach. PMID:21769151

  20. Implementing a Clinical Experience for Student Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Rod

    Clinical experiences offered to students preparing to become athletic trainers at East Carolina University (North Carolina) are diverse and multiple. The program acquaints students with actual medical practices in sports medicine by allowing them to observe experienced trainers and doctors at work as well as providing opportunities for practical…

  1. Long-term clinical experience with zofenopril.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Claudio; Bacchelli, Stefano; Degli Esposti, Daniela

    2012-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are extensively used to improve clinical outcome of patients with several cardiovascular diseases. Zofenopril proved to be very effective in patients with coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, thanks to its unique effective mechanism of action for improving blood pressure control, left ventricular function and myocardial ischemia burden, as well as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition. The SMILE project involved more than 3500 patients with coronary artery disease and demonstrated that zofenopril treatment may reduce mortality and morbidity in patients with myocardial infarction, also when combined with acetyl salicylic acid and to a greater extent than lisinopril and ramipril. In addition, the results of the SMILE-ISCHEMIA study have demonstrated an interesting anti-ischemic effect of zofenopril, and these properties largely contribute to the overall clinical benefit of the drug. The effects of zofenopril on blood pressure control and cardiovascular protection clearly support its primary role for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23030285

  2. First time rounding experiences for nonclinicians: the Cleveland Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Laura R; Nowacki, Amy S; Stoller, James K

    2015-01-01

    Clinical rounds serve several key objectives in academic medical centers: providing a forum for patient communication, clinical decision making, and teaching. Nonclinical colleagues ordinarily do not have the opportunity to round, and the idea of implementing a rounding program that includes nonclinical colleagues has received little attention to date. Reasoning that a rounding program with nonclinicians could enhance (1) understanding of the organization's clinical mission, (2) appreciation of caregivers' roles, and (3) engagement, the authors created such a program. From 2010 to 2013, 51 nonclinicians within the Cleveland Clinic Education Institute participated; 14 submitted written reflections, and 27 responded to a survey about their experience. Overall, 12 themes emerged that suggest an enhanced familiarity with the institution and increased engagement and alignment with its mission. Notably, the results align with a long-standing focus on organizational engagement and an observed increase in mean engagement scores since the program was implemented. PMID:24519444

  3. A nightmare for haematology clinics: extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Acinetobacter baumannnii.

    PubMed

    Metan, Gökhan; Pala, Çi?dem; Kaynar, Leylagül; Cevahir, Fatma; Alp, Emine

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to share experience on demographic characteristics and clinical outcome of the patients infected with extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDRAB) in haematology clinics, focusing on the period with a sudden increase in the number of XDRAB cases. A regular patient-based infection control programme was set up in haematology clinics and haematopoietic stem cell transplant centre starting from 2008. An infection control nurse visited all patients daily. A form including demographic data and laboratory results were recorded for all patients. The source of infections was identified according to the criteria proposed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While haematology ward-acquired XRDAB was rare before 2012, between January 2012 and July 2013, 29 A. baumannii infection episodes were detected in 28 patients. All but one isolate were MDR and 72.4% (21 out of 29) were XDR. Blood cultures revealed A. baumannii in 26 out of 29 episodes. While the haematological malignancy was relapsing or not under remission in 15 patients, four patients were under remission, and 10 patients were newly diagnosed. The mortality rate was 81.2%. All patients with a poor outcome died in the first week after the index blood culture was performed. In 16 out of 29 episodes, the patients died before the culture results became available. Colistin was initiated for the treatment in 11 out of 29 episodes. Three patients received colistin combined with sulbactam or sulbactam containing beta-lactams; the remaining eight patients who received colistin monotherapy were already under carbapenems. In conclusion, XDRAB infections can easily become nightmares for haematology clinics without any reliable treatment option. PMID:25551842

  4. First detection of extensive air showers with the EEE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, R.

    2011-03-01

    The Extreme Energy Events (EEE) Project is devoted to the study of extremely high energy cosmic rays by means of an array of particle detectors distributed all over the Italian territory. Each element of the array (called telescope in the following) is installed in a High School, with the further goal to introduce students to particle and astroparticle physics, and consists of three Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC), that have excellent time resolution and good tracking capability. In this paper the first results on the detection of extensive air showers by means of time coincidences between two telescopes are presented.

  5. Planning a study abroad clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Wright, Dolores J

    2010-05-01

    Not only is globalization expanding areas of human activity, it is also influencing the variety of educational offerings in universities. Therefore, globalization must be considered by nurse educators as they reevaluate ways of preparing nursing students to meet the health care needs of populations they currently serve and will care for in the future. Study abroad programs have been encouraged to be part of the college experience in the United States for more than 30 years; however, these programs have been relatively lacking in nursing education. Most of the study abroad programs described in the nursing literature are research-based or first-person accounts of an experience and provide little information about planning a study abroad program. This article describes a study abroad learning experience for senior nursing students and discusses the issues such as student selection, student safety, and available clinical experiences that need to be considered before undertaking such an endeavor. PMID:20143756

  6. Alleys on an extensive apparent frontoparallel plane: a second experiment.

    PubMed

    Indow, T; Watanabe, T

    1988-01-01

    Small light points were presented, in the dark, around a point in the center which was fixed at a distance of about 3 m from the subject. In experiment 1, the subject adjusted the positions of points so that all were frontoparallel and in three horizontal series, each consisting of five points, with the middle series level with the eyes, to satisfy the following conditions: (i) the three series must appear straight and horizontally parallel; (ii) the points of each of the five triplets must appear equally separated vertically; (iii) the three points of each triplet must appear to move horizontally along straight and parallel paths; (iv) the three points of each triplet must appear to move horizontally with a constant vertical separation. The most distant points were about 0.51 rad to the left and right of center, and about 0.22 rad above and below. In experiment 2, with the configuration of points obtained in experiment 1, the subject assessed ratios of all perceptual distances between points and also from the subject to all points. From experiment 1 (three subjects used), Gaussian curvature K and a constant related to depth perception (sigma) were estimated under the assumption that the frontoparallel plane is a Riemannian plane of constant curvature K and that Luneburg's mapping functions between visual space and physical space hold. The analysis was made according to equations different from those used previously. The results of experiment 2 (two subjects used) were analyzed by a new computer program in which no preassumed mapping functions are necessary for the estimation of K. From both analyses it is clear that there is no need to assume any other value of K than 0 (Euclidean) to describe the geometry of the frontoparallel plane. This presents a striking contrast to the results from experiments on parallel and equidistance alleys running toward the subject on the horizontal plane. PMID:3249672

  7. Nurses’ experiences of humour in clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid; Shali, Mahboubeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Providing holistic nursing care when there is a shortage of personnel and equipment exposes nurses to stress and a higher risk of occupational burnout. Humour can promote nurses’ health and influence nursing care. The aim of this study was to describe nurses’ experiences of humour in clinical settings and factors affecting it. Methods: This qualitative study investigated nurses’ experiences of humour. Five hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences provided the setting for this study. The participants comprised of 17 nurses with master’s and Baccalaureate degrees (BSN) in nursing. These nurses worked at educational hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences and had minimum work experience of 12 months in various clinical wards. Nurses from all wards were invited to participate in this study. The data were collected through semi structure interviews using guides comprising probing questions. Telephonic interviews were used to further supplement the data. The data were analysed using conventional content analysis. Results: The data were classified into five themes including the dynamics of humour, condition enforcement, Risk making probability, Instrumental use and Change: opportunities and threats. Conclusion: Understanding nurses’ perceptions and experiences of humour helps identify its contributing factors and provides valuable guidelines for enhancing nurses and patients’ mental, emotional and physical health. Spreading a culture of humour through teaching methods can improve workplace cheerfulness and highlights the importance of humour in patient care in nurses and nursing students. PMID:26034735

  8. Extension of drop experiments with the MIKROBA balloon drop facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, K.; Kretzschmar, K.; Dorn, C.

    1992-12-01

    The German balloon drop facility MIKROBA extends the worldwide available drop experiment opportunities to the presently highest usable experimentation time span of 55 s at microgravity conditions better than 0.001 g. The microgravity period is started with the typical quasi-deal step function from 1 to 0 g. MIKROBA allows flexible experiment design, short access time, and easy hands-on payload integration. The transport to the operational height is realized by soft energies and technologies compatible with the earth's environment. Balloon campaigns are not restricted to a certain test range, i.e., several suitable sites are available all over the world. MIKROBA combines negligible mechanical loads at the mission start, typical of all drop facilities, with extremely low drop deceleration loads (less than g), due to the implemented three-stage parachute and airbag recovery subsystem.

  9. [Perineo-ano-rectal injuries: clinical experience].

    PubMed

    La Greca, Gaetano; Gagliardo, Salvatrice; Sofia, Maria; Barbagallo, Francesco; Chisari, Andrea; Latteri, Saverio; Pontillo, Tindaro; Politi, Antonio; Russello, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic lesions involving the rectum, perineum and anus are infrequent but difficult to treat, requiring experience with trauma and colo-proctological surgery. The aim of the treatment is to repair the lesions and to minimise the early complications which are the main cause of failure and of late complications and disability. The most complicated lesions present problems concerning either the surgical strategy or the surgical timing, both of which are essential for a successful outcome. The Authors analyse their recent clinical experience with 7 patients with complex traumatic lesions involving the rectum, perineum and anus, excluding those of gynaecological/obstetric origin and those not involving the sphincter. They evaluated the clinical history, causes and types of lesions, as well as treatment, complications and outcomes. Five of the lesions were caused by impalement, one by an explosion and one by a motorboat propeller blade. Six of the patients (85.7%) were treated by direct primary repair and one (14.3%) by secondary repair after a previous colostomy. All 7 patients achieved complete recovery of the lesions. Only two cases (28.6%) of early complications and one case (14.3%) of persistent minimal sphincter dysfunction occurred. On the basis of these good results, the clinical experience and the literature, the Authors suggest that these perineo-ano-rectal lesions, though often complex, may often be cured by early surgery, confining colostomy only to particular cases. In addition to experience with trauma and the timing of colo-proctological surgery, a knowledge of all the available surgical options is mandatory to achieve the best results. PMID:18389752

  10. Dorsal midbrain syndrome associated with persistent neck extension: Clinical and diagnostic imaging findings in 2 dogs.

    PubMed

    Canal, Sara; Baroni, Massimo; Falzone, Cristian; De Benedictis, Giulia M; Bernardini, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Two young dogs were evaluated for an acute onset of abnormal head posture and eye movement. Neurological examination was characterized mostly by permanent neck extension, abnormalities of pupils, and eye movement. A mesencephalic mass lesion was detected on magnetic resonance imaging in both cases. Neurophysiological pathways likely responsible for this peculiar clinical presentation are discussed. PMID:26663922

  11. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy - early clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Junichi; Takeda, Masaaki; Itoh, Yasunobu; Matsuoka, Hidenori; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We report our early clinical experience with percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) for herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) in the lumbar spine. We introduced PELD to our clinical practice in June 2009. A total of 311 patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease were treated in our hospital up to August 2011. Thirty-seven patients with lumbar HNP were treated by PELD. PELD was carried out under local anesthesia, and the endoscope was continuously irrigated with saline. Twenty-eight patients were treated through the transforaminal approach, 5 were treated through the interlaminar approach, and 4 were treated through the extraforaminal approach. Surgery was discontinued due to uncontrollable intraoperative pain or anatomical inaccessibility in one case of the interlaminar approach and 2 cases of the extraforaminal approach. In the other 34 patients, the elapsed time of surgery was 34 to 103 minutes (mean 62.4 minutes). Extracorporeal blood loss was insignificant. Immediate symptom relief was achieved in all patients, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging revealed sufficient removal of the HNP. The length of the postoperative hospital stay was 1 or 2 days in all patients. The surgical method of PELD is completely different from percutaneous nucleotomy, and the aim is to directly remove the HNP with minimum damage to the musculoskeletal structure. Although this study is based on our early clinical outcomes, PELD seemed to be a promising minimally invasive surgery for HNP in the lumbar spine. PMID:23006872

  12. The CONSORT Patient-Reported Outcome (PRO) extension: implications for clinical trials and practice.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Melanie; Brundage, Michael; Jacobsen, Paul B; Schünemann, Holger J; Efficace, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    To inform clinical guidelines and patient care we need high quality evidence on the relative benefits and harms of intervention. Patient reported outcome (PRO) data from clinical trials can "empower patients to make decisions based on their values" and "level the playing field between physician and patient". While clinicians have a good understanding of the concept of health-related quality of life and other PROs, evidence suggests that many do not feel comfortable in using the data from trials to inform discussions with patients and clinical practice. This may in part reflect concerns over the integrity of the data and difficulties in interpreting the results arising from poor reporting.The new CONSORT PRO extension aims to improve the reporting of PROs in trials to facilitate the use of results to inform clinical practice and health policy. While the CONSORT PRO extension is an important first step in the process, we need broader engagement with the guidance to facilitate optimal reporting and maximize use of PRO data in a clinical setting. Endorsement by journal editors, authors and peer reviewers are crucial steps. Improved design, implementation and transparent reporting of PROs in clinical trials are necessary to provide high quality evidence to inform evidence synthesis and clinical practice guidelines. PMID:24168680

  13. Factors Influencing Career Experiences of Selected Chinese Faculty Employed at an American Research Extensive University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooksey, Yan Zhang; Cole, Bryan R.

    2012-01-01

    Whereas research related to the experience of faculty of color is increasing, few attentions have been focused on Chinese faculty's career experience in the US. This study examined career experiences of 16 Chinese faculty members across different disciplines, ranks and genders at a studied research extensive university in Texas, US. The study used…

  14. Clinicopathologic Analysis of Microscopic Extension in Lung Adenocarcinoma: Defining Clinical Target Volume for Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grills, Inga S.; Fitch, Dwight L.; Goldstein, Neal S.; Yan Di; Chmielewski, Gary W.; Welsh, Robert J.; Kestin, Larry L.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the gross tumor volume (GTV) to clinical target volume margin for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment planning. Methods: A total of 35 patients with Stage T1N0 adenocarcinoma underwent wedge resection plus immediate lobectomy. The gross tumor size and microscopic extension distance beyond the gross tumor were measured. The nuclear grade and percentage of bronchoalveolar features were analyzed for association with microscopic extension. The gross tumor dimensions were measured on a computed tomography (CT) scan (lung and mediastinal windows) and compared with the pathologic dimensions. The potential coverage of microscopic extension for two different lung stereotactic radiotherapy regimens was evaluated. Results: The mean microscopic extension distance beyond the gross tumor was 7.2 mm and varied according to grade (10.1, 7.0, and 3.5 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively, p < 0.01). The 90th percentile for microscopic extension was 12.0 mm (13.0, 9.7, and 4.4 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively). The CT lung windows correlated better with the pathologic size than did the mediastinal windows (gross pathologic size overestimated by a mean of 5.8 mm; composite size [gross plus microscopic extension] underestimated by a mean of 1.2 mm). For a GTV contoured on the CT lung windows, the margin required to cover microscopic extension for 90% of the cases would be 9 mm (9, 7, and 4 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively). The potential microscopic extension dosimetric coverage (55 Gy) varied substantially between the stereotactic radiotherapy schedules. Conclusion: For lung adenocarcinomas, the GTV should be contoured using CT lung windows. Although a GTV based on the CT lung windows would underestimate the gross tumor size plus microscopic extension by only 1.2 mm for the average case, the clinical target volume expansion required to cover the microscopic extension in 90% of cases could be as large as 9 mm, although considerably smaller for high-grade tumors. Fractionation significantly affects the dosimetric coverage of microscopic extension.

  15. A Curriculum Model for an Integrated Senior Year Clinical Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wukasch, Ruth N.; Blue, Carolyn L.; Overbay, Jane

    2000-01-01

    A flexible clinical experience for nursing seniors integrates pediatrics, public health, and nursing leadership. Experiences in hospital units, schools, nurse-directed clinics, and home visits expose students to a wide range of settings and issues. (SK)

  16. Clinical experience with ureteral metal stents

    PubMed Central

    Al Aown, Abdulrahman; Iason, Kyriazis; Panagiotis, Kallidonis; Liatsikos, Evangelos N.

    2010-01-01

    Ureteral metal stents (MSs) present a minimally invasive tool to preserve the drainage of renal pelvis whenever ureteral patency is at risk to be obstructed due to extrinsic or intrinsic etiologies. Clinical experience with these stents demonstrates that they impose a promising alternative treatment option in ureteral pathologies that are difficult to be treated via common polymeric stents. Current application of MSs in the treatment of both benign and malignant ureteral obstruction reveals quite promising results. Nevertheless, the ideal MS that would provide uncomplicated long-term effectiveness is still lucking and current MS usage is facing several adverse effects between which stent obstruction, encrustation, infection, migration, and patient discomfort. Ongoing attempts to create more inert stent with sophisticated novel designs are expected to improve current MS efficiency. MSs will play a major role in the future as a routine management of a variety of ureteral pathologies. PMID:21369375

  17. Johnson Space Center Flight Medicine Clinic Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landry, Trela

    2006-01-01

    Being a member of the Flight Medicine Clinic (FMC) Staff is a great experience. I joined the FMC staff 2 years ago when I became part of the Kelsey-Seybold team. The FMC staff consists of Flight Surgeons, Family Clinic Physician, Nursing staff, Wellness Coordinator and Support staff. We serve as the Primary Care Physicians for the astronauts and their families and provide annual physicals for the retired astronauts. We have approximately 800 patients in the FMC. As the Family Clinic Physician, I care for the astronaut spouses and children and provide annual physicals for the retired astronauts. Since we have a small patient population, we have the opportunity to spend increased personal time with our patients, which I enjoy. We have a pretty healthy patient population, who are very interested in their overall health and preventive care. In preparation for a shuttle launch, our nursing staff assists the flight surgeons with the astronaut physical exams, which occur 10 days prior to launch and again 3 days after their return. We also provide Primary Contact physicals for the families and guests, who will be in close contact with shuttle crew members. During these physicals, we provide education, emphasizing the importance of preventing the spread of communicable diseases to shuttle crew members. Being a part of the Space Medicine Program is an honor. To know that you contribute in some way to our nation s Space Program is very special. (This article was prepared by Dr. Trela Landry, M.D. for inclusion in a Kelsey-Seybold newsletter on 25 OCT 2006.)

  18. Describing depression: Congruence between patient experiences and clinical assessments

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Morgen A. R.; Morse, Jennifer Q.; Stover, Angela; Hofkens, Tara; Huisman, Emily; Shulman, Stuart; Eisen, Susan V.; Becker, Sara J.; Weinfurt, Kevin; Boland, Elaine; Pilkonis, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Efforts to describe depression have relied on top-down methods in which theory and clinical experience define depression but may not reflect the individuals’ experiences with depression. We assessed the degree of overlap between academic descriptions of depression and patient-reported symptoms as conceptualized in the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System® (PROMIS®). By extension, this work assesses the degree of overlap between current clinical descriptions of depression and patient-reported symptoms. Design In this content analysis study, four focus groups were conducted across two sites to elicit symptoms and the experience of depression from depressed and medically ill patients. Methods Depressed and medically ill patients were asked to describe symptoms that characterize depression. Data were transcribed and then coded using an a priori list of 43 facets of depression derived from extant depression measures. Results Participants described 93% of the symptoms from the a priori list, supporting the validity of current depression measures. Interpersonal difficulties were underscored as was anger. In general, results from the focus groups did not require the generation of new items for depression and supported the content validity of the PROMIS hierarchical framework and item pool created originally. Conclusions This work supports the validity of current depression assessment, but suggests further investigation of interpersonal functioning and anger may add to the depth and breadth of depression assessment. PMID:21332520

  19. Diagnosis and management of extensive vascular malformations of the lower limb: part I. Clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Pedro; Aguado, Leyre; Martínez-Cuesta, Antonio

    2011-11-01

    There is significant confusion in the literature when describing vascular anomalies, and vascular malformations are often misnamed or incorrectly classified. Part I of this two-part series on the diagnosis and management of extensive vascular malformations of the lower limbs will discuss the dermatologist's role in the diagnosis of these lesions. At least nine types of vascular malformations with specific clinical and radiologic characteristics must be distinguished in the lower limbs: Klippel-Trénaunay syndrome, port-wine stain with or without hypertrophy, cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, macrocephaly-capillary malformation, Parkes Weber syndrome, Stewart-Bluefarb syndrome, venous malformation, glomuvenous malformation, and lymphatic malformation. This article highlights the differences in clinical appearance and discusses the differential diagnosis of extensive vascular malformations in an attempt to ensure earlier diagnosis and better outcomes for these patients. PMID:22000870

  20. Modulith SL20--development and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Köhrmann, K U; Henkel, T O; Potempa, D; Rassweiler, J; Heine, G; Alken, P

    1993-01-01

    A third generation lithotripter was developed incorporating the advantages of high disintegrative efficacy, anaesthesia-free treatment, combined sonographic and fluoroscopic localization system as well as a multifunctional table for interdisciplinary use. The shock wave generator consists of a cylindrical-shaped electromagnetic coil with a paraboloid reflector. The waves are coupled by means of a water cushion and an impedance adapted foil in which the patient is comfortably positioned. Stones are localized by an in-line ultrasound probe or fluoroscopically by the integrated C-arm. Preclinical trials using the in-vitro stone model demonstrated the superior disintegrative capacity. The in-vivo animal studies evaluated the dose-dependent and reversible kidney trauma, which was comparable to that induced by other lithotripters. The clinical evaluation of the Modulith SL since 1988 was divided into three phases with different technical equipment. It was indicated that sonographic stone localization enables treatment of nearly all kidney stones and 12% of the ureteric calculi. As preference was given to in situ disintegration of all ureteral stones, X-ray targeting became necessary. By increasing the generator voltage in the third phase together with advanced experience, the disintegration rate (94%) was improved. The number of auxiliary measures after ESWL (11%) and treatment time (average 39 min) was decreased. Eighty-eight percent of our patients were stone-free at follow-up. The experience demonstrated that this lithotripter is also easy to handle for gallbladder stones and highly effective (82%) in treatment of endoscopically non-extractable bile duct stones. PMID:8476331

  1. Nomenclature of the veins of the lower limb: extensions, refinements, and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Caggiati, Alberto; Bergan, John J; Gloviczki, Peter; Eklof, Bo; Allegra, Claudio; Partsch, Hugo

    2005-04-01

    The relative deficiency of the official Terminologia Anatomica with regard to the veins of the lower limbs was responsible for a nonuniform anatomic nomenclature in the clinical literature. In 2001, an International Interdisciplinary Committee updated and refined the official Terminologia Anatomica regarding the veins of the lower limbs. Recommendations for terminology were included in an updating document that appeared in the Journal of Vascular Surgery (2002;36:416-22). To enhance further the use of a common scientific language, the committee worked on the present document, which includes (1) extensions and refinements regarding the veins of the lower limbs; (2) the nomenclature of the venous system of the pelvis; (3) the use of eponyms; and (4) the use of terms and adjectives of particular importance in clinical vascular anatomy. PMID:15874941

  2. Minimally invasive thymectomy: the Mayo Clinic experience

    PubMed Central

    Rowse, Phillip G.; Roden, Anja C.; Corl, Frank M.; Allen, Mark S.; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Nichols, Francis C.; Shen, K. Robert; Wigle, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of minimally invasive thymectomy (MIT) is increasing and may have significant benefit to patients in terms of morbidity and post-operative recovery. Our aim was to review the Mayo Clinic experience of MIT. Methods We reviewed data from all MIT cases collected in a prospectively maintained database from January 1995 to February 2015. Data were collected regarding patient demographics, perioperative management and patient outcomes. Results A total of 510 thymectomies were performed in 20 years. Fifty-six patients underwent MIT (45 video-assisted thoracoscopy, 11 robotic-assisted). The median age was 55 years (range, 23-87 years) with male to female ratio of 25:31. Thymoma was the main pathologic diagnosis in 27/56 patients (48%), with 11/27 (41%) associated with myasthenia gravis (MG), and 16/27 (59%) non-MG. Other pathologies included 1/56 (2%) of each teratoma, lymphoma, lymphangioma, carcinoma and thymolipoma. There were 3/56 (5%) atrophic glands, 4/56 (7%) cysts, 6/56 (11%) benign glands and 11/56 (20%) hyperplastic. Mean blood loss (mL) and operative time (min) were significantly lower in the video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) group compared to robotic (65±41 vs. 160±205 mL, P=0.04 and 102±39 vs. 178±53 min, P=0.001, respectively). There was no 30-day mortality. Post-operative morbidity occurred in 7/45 (16%) VATS patients (phrenic nerve palsy 7%, pericarditis 4%, atrial fibrillation 2%, pleural effusion 2%) and 1/11 (9%) robotic (urinary retention requiring self-catheterization). Reoperation was required in 1/3 of VATS patients with phrenic nerve palsy. There was no significant difference in length of hospital stay [VATS 1.5 days (range, 1-4 days) and robotic 2 days (range, 1-5 days) VATS; P=0.05]. Mean follow-up was 18.4 months (range, 1-50.4 months) with no tumor recurrences. Conclusions MIT can be performed with low morbidity and mortality. VATS is associated with reduced blood loss, operative times and earlier hospital discharge compared to robotic MIT. PMID:26693147

  3. The Importance of Early Experiences: Clinical, Research, and Policy Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeanah, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    The degree to which early adverse experiences exert long term effects on development and how much early adversity may be overcome through subsequent experiences are important mental health questions. The clinical, research and policy perspectives on these questions lead to different answers. From a clinical perspective, change is always possible,…

  4. Interventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Clinic: The Emory University Experience.

    PubMed

    Nour, Sherif G; Powell, Tracy E; Eberhardt, Joy; Bowen, Michael A; Pennington, Greg; Meltzer, Carolyn Cidis

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we share our experience in establishing a clinic-based practice for MR imaging-guided interventions. Clinic resources and operational logistics are described and our institutional cost analysis for supporting the clinic activity is provided. We highlight the overall value of the clinic model in transitioning the field of interventional MR imaging from the "proof-of-concept" to the "working model" era and engage in a detailed discussion of our experience with the positive impact of the clinic on streamlining the procedural workflow, increasing awareness of the technology, expanding referral bases, and boosting the satisfaction of both patients and referring services. PMID:26499284

  5. Extensive chromatin fragmentation improves enrichment of protein binding sites in chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaochun; Lamarre-Vincent, Nathan; Wang, Qian; Struhl, Kevin

    2008-11-01

    Extensive sonication of formaldehyde-crosslinked chromatin can generate DNA fragments averaging 200 bp in length (range 75-300 bp). Fragmentation is largely random with respect to genomic region and nucleosome position. ChIP experiments employing such extensively fragmented samples show 2- to 4-fold increased enrichment of protein binding sites over control genomic regions, when compared to samples sonicated to a more conventional size range (300-500 bp). The basis of improved fold enrichments is that immunoprecipitation of protein-bound regions is unaffected by fragment size, whereas immunoprecipitation of control genomic regions decreases progressively along with reduced fragment size due to fewer nonspecific binding sites. The use of extensively sonicated samples improves mapping of protein binding sites, and it extends the dynamic range for quantitative measurements of histone density. We show that many yeast promoter regions are virtually devoid of histones. PMID:18765474

  6. Clinical Engineering: Experiences of assisted professional practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langone, Luis; Vanetta, Marcos; Vazquez, Marcelo; Rotger, Viviana; Olivera, Juan Manuel

    2007-11-01

    In the curricula of the Biomedical Engineering career of the Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología of the Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, Argenitna, there are the Assisted Professional Practices. Within this framework, the students have the possibility of performing practices in the clinic Sanatorio 9 de Julio. One of the objectives of these practices is to apply the concepts, methods and procedures studied along the career in the field work under real work conditions. From the point of view of the host institution, the objective is to improve the performance of the different services and areas applying the tools of Biomedical Engineering. The present work shows an example of such practices where an equipment preliminary analysis was made, its use and maintenance corresponding to the surgical unit of the clinic.

  7. Tocilizumab in pediatric rheumatology: the clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Gurion, Reut; Singer, Nora G

    2013-07-01

    During the last two decades, clinical use of novel biological therapy has led to increased mechanistic understanding of complex rheumatological diseases. Conversely, basic and translational studies have led to development of new and varied therapeutic agents. These new medications which "target" specific steps in one or more immune pathways have the potential to control disease symptoms, improve quality of life and long-term prognosis, and perhaps in some, restore immunological tolerance. Use of these agents in clinical trials, combined with post-marketing surveillance, has revealed both the benefits and the undesirable side-effects of biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). In this review we focus on the use of tocilizumab, a monoclonal antibody directed against the IL6 receptor (IL6R), which potently inhibits IL-6/IL6R signaling. PMID:23715975

  8. Clinical-Echocardiographic Correlation of Myocardial Infarction with Extension to Right Chambers.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Barrón, Jesús; Espinola-Zavaleta, Nilda; Romero-Cárdenas, Angel; Simon-Ruiz, Silvino; Keirns, Candace; Peña-Duque, Marco; Rijlaarsdam, María; Lupi-Herrera, Eulo

    1998-02-01

    In order to determine the transesophageal echocardiographic characteristics in patients with acute myocardial infarction of right ventricle and establish the relationship between these findings, the clinical condition, and their prognostic value, 38 patients consecutively admitted to the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología with a diagnosis of acute left ventricular myocardial infarction with extension to right ventricle and/or atrium were retrospectively studied. Of the left ventricular infarctions, 37 were posteroinferior and one anterior. Significant elevations of CPK and DHL were found in 35. In 30 patients (78%) electrocardiographic evidence of extension of infarction to the right ventricle was found, and in 3, evidence of right atrial infarction. Twenty-one patients presented clinical data compatible with right ventricular infarction. In 19, cardiac rhythm and atrioventricular conduction disturbances were documented. Coronary angiograms practiced on 34 patients demonstrated single-vessel (right coronary) disease in 12, affection of two vessels in 14, and lesions in three or more in 6. Coronary arteries presented no significant lesions in two cases. With TEE, alterations of right ventricular segmental mobility were demonstrated in all patients, and in 6, alterations of right atrial mobility as well. As respects the ventricular wall movement index, 68.5% had total scores (RV + LV) of <5. The other 31.5% had scores >/= 5. In 26%, the right ventricular wall movement index was >/=4. The RVDD/LVDD ratio was 1 or less in 30 patients (78%) and >1 in only 8 (22%). The conclusions from these findings are that: (1) TEE is an excellent diagnostic means of identifying right ventricular and/or atrial infarction; and (2) a relationship exists between the magnitude of right ventricular damage and a wall movement index of 5 or more or an RV/LV diastolic diameter ratio > 1:postinfarction hemodynamic deterioration is significantly greater and the incidence of intrahospitalary complications higher. PMID:11175028

  9. Korean Supervisors' Experiences in Clinical Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bang, Keeyeon; Park, Jeeseon

    2009-01-01

    The demand for mental health services in Korea is increasing, and a corresponding rise in the number of trainees in counseling psychology results in a need for effective supervision. Using a grounded theory approach, this study explored Korean supervisors' experiences in supervision to better understand the current status of supervision practice…

  10. Adult Autoimmune Enteropathy: Mayo Clinic Rochester Experience

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Salma; Murray, Joseph A.; Pardi, Darrell S.; Alexander, Glenn L.; Schaffner, John A.; Russo, Pierre A.; Abraham, Susan C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Autoimmune enteropathy is a rare cause of intractable diarrhea associated with circulating gut autoantibodies and a predisposition to autoimmunity. It is rarely observed in adults with only eleven cases reported to date. Methods Fifteen adults with autoimmune enteropathy were identified at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, from May 2001 to June 2006. The demographic, clinical and treatment data were abstracted from their records. Results The study population was 87% Caucasian, 47% females, with median age of 55 years (interquartile range: 42 to 67 years). All patients had diarrhea, weight loss and malnutrition. Celiac disease was excluded by lack of response to gluten free diet or absence of the celiac disease susceptibility HLA genotypes. Fourteen patients were tested for gut epithelial cell antibodies and 93% were positive for anti-enterocyte and/or anti-goblet cell antibodies. Predisposition to autoimmune diseases was noted in 80%, as indicated by a variety of circulating autoantibodies. Small intestinal histopathologic findings included subtotal villous atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the lamina propria with relatively few surface intraepithelial lymphocytes. T-cell receptor gene rearrangement studies were negative in all cases. Immunosuppressive therapy was required in 93% cases. Clinical improvement was noted in 60% after 1–8 weeks of steroid therapy. Conclusion Autoimmune enteropathy is a heterogeneous disease and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of malabsorption and small bowel villous atrophy. The presence of gut epithelial cell antibodies can help confirm the diagnosis. No single agent is unequivocally effective in inducing remission, and immunosuppressive therapy is required in most cases. PMID:17683994

  11. Clinical nurse specialist regulation: the Maryland experience.

    PubMed

    Thurman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    High-quality care will continue to be a driver in the evolution of today's health care environment. Ensuring effective, cost-conscious, quality care is the core of clinical nurse specialist (CNS) practice. The CNS practice varies by state, depending on each state's Nurse Practice Act. Some states have separate scopes of practice for CNSs, including prescriptive authority, whereas some states do not recognize CNS practice as different from the practice of the registered nurse. The journey to state recognition and title protection for the CNS role in the state of Maryland is described. PMID:25594481

  12. Paranasal sinus mucoceles: our clinical experiments

    PubMed Central

    Topdag, Murat; Iseri, Mete; Sari, Fatih; Erdogan, Selvet; Keskin, I Gurkan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We present the clinical and radiological features, treatment protocols, and medium-long-term results of our patients following surgery for paranasal sinus mucocele, along with a review of the relevant literature. Materials and methods: A total of 18 patients (11 women and 7 men) who underwent surgery for paranasal sinus mucocele at Kocaeli University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, between 2006 and 2013 were examined retrospectively. The mean patient age was 41 (range 4-73). Demographic and radiological features, symptoms, treatment protocols, and postoperative outcomes were recorded. Results: The most frequently affected sinus was the maxillary sinus (n=9, 50%) followed by the frontal sinus (n=6, 33%) and sphenoidal sinus (n=3, 16%). The main symptom was headache. Endoscopic marsupialization of the mucocele was applied in all 18 patients, while frontal sinus exploration with the osteoplastic flap procedure was performed in one patient and the Caldwell-Luc operation was performed in another patient. The Caldwell-Luc procedure was subsequently required in one patient (6%) and endoscopic revision surgery was required in another patient (6%). Conclusion: Sinus mucocele that enlarges, eroding the surrounding bone tissue, and induces various clinical symptoms due to the impression of the expansile mass, is treated surgically, and must be planned carefully to prevent serious complications. PMID:26770462

  13. Surgical management of Wilms tumor with intravascular extension: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Aspiazu, Diego; Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Cabello, Rosa; Ramirez, Gema; Alvarez-Madrid, Antonio; De Agustin, Juan Carlos

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze the clinical presentation, treatment, and outcomes of children with Wilms tumor (WT) and intravascular extension who were treated at a single institution. A retrospective review was conducted of medical records of all children with Wilms tumor and intravascular extension treated at Virgen del Rocio Children's Hospital between 1992 and 2010. Seven patients (median age 3.4 years, range 2-8.1 years) were identified. At diagnosis, 6 of the 7 patients (85.7%) presented with tumor thrombus that reached the right atrium (RA) and 1 patient with infrahepatic inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombus. All patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (SIOP 2001 protocol) with vincristine, doxorubicin, and actinomycin D. Regression of the intravascular extension of the tumor was documented in all patients. Postchemotherapy level of extension was suprahepatic IVC in 1 patient, infrahepatic IVC in 2 patients, renal vein (RV) in 1 patient, and RA in 3 patients. Nephrectomy and thrombectomy were performed in all cases, requiring cardiopulmonary bypass for the 4 patients who presented with suprahepatic IVC and RA thrombus. The other 3 patients with infrahepatic IVC and RV involvement underwent cavotomy and thrombus extraction. Computed tomography, ultrasonography, and echocardiography were used for diagnosis and follow-up. All patients remain disease-free with a median follow-up of 6.3 years (range, 2-19 years). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for WT with intravascular extension may facilitate the resection by decreasing the extent of the tumor thrombus. Cardiopulmonary bypass is indicated for suprahepatic IVC and RA involvement. Accurate diagnostic imaging is necessary. PMID:22304010

  14. Clinical experience with Angiojet: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, A M; Xhepa, G; Piffaretti, G; Bacuzzi, A; Tozzi, M; Carbone, M; Barile, A; Squillaci, E; Fonio, P; Brunese, L; Carrafiello, G

    2015-12-01

    The development of various sophisticated mechanical thrombectomy devices and the amassed experience of physicians in minimal invasive therapy produced a paradigm shift in vascular access management toward percutaneous declotting procedures, using pharmaceutical thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy, balloon thrombectomy, and a combination of the above techniques. In this setting, in the last years, AngioJet™ (Possis, Minneapolis, MN, USA) rheolytic thrombectomy (RT) showed an increasing use in emergency and election patients. The purpose of this review is to present the current status of percutaneous rheolytic thrombectomy in different fields of applications. PMID:26498886

  15. Educational Preparation and Experiences in the Clinical Setting: Entry-Level Clinical Athletic Trainers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Context: The clinical job setting: (Outpatient/Ambulatory/Rehabilitation Clinic) should no longer be referred to as a nontraditional setting as it employs the greatest percentage of certified members. Understanding the experiences, knowledge, and skills necessary to be successful in the clinical setting as entry-level certified athletic trainers…

  16. Educational Preparation and Experiences in the Clinical Setting: Entry-Level Clinical Athletic Trainers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Context: The clinical job setting: (Outpatient/Ambulatory/Rehabilitation Clinic) should no longer be referred to as a nontraditional setting as it employs the greatest percentage of certified members. Understanding the experiences, knowledge, and skills necessary to be successful in the clinical setting as entry-level certified athletic trainers…

  17. Clinical experience in appendiceal neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Ozcelik, Caglar K.; Bozdogan, Nazan; Dibekoglu, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study To analyse the incidence of appendiceal neuroendocrine neoplasms in appendectomy specimens and establish the epidemiological and histopathological features, treatment, and clinical course. Material and methods Between 2004 and 2013, 975 patients who underwent appendectomy in Ankara Oncology Education and Research Hospital were retrospectively analysed. Results Neuroendocrine neoplasm was detected in the nine of 975 (0.9%) patients. Neuroendocrine neoplasms were diagnosed in eight patients by appendectomy, which was performed because of the prediagnosis of acute appendicitis, and in one patient by the suspicious mass detection during surgical procedures that were done in the appendix for a different reason. Eight of the patients’ tumours were in the tip of the appendix, and one of the patients’ tumours was at the base of appendix. Tumour size in 77.8% of patients was equal or less than 1 cm, in 22.2% patients it was 1–2 cm. There was tumour invasion in the muscularis propria layer in four patients, in the serosa layer in three patients, and in the deep mesoappendix in two patients. Patients were followed for a median of 78 months. In the follow-up of patients who were operated because of colon cancer, metachronous colon tumour evolved. This patient died due to progressive disease. Other patients are still disease-free. Conclusions The diagnosis of neuroendocrine neoplasm is often incidentally done after appendectomy. Tumour size is important in determining the extent of disease and in the selection of the surgical method during operation. PMID:26793027

  18. Clinical experience with a stereoscopic image workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Christopher J.; Collins, D. Louis; Pike, Gordon; Olivier, A.; Peters, Terence M.

    1991-05-01

    Stereoscopic radiography has been used routinely at the Montreal Neurological Institute for many years. Recently, with the advent of stereoscopic acquisition and display techniques for digital angiography, together with the increased use of 3-D display techniques for medical images, we have developed and implemented a stereoscopic display workstation for use in a clinical context. The system is based on standard AT-bus computer hardware and includes a high performance monitor equipped with a liquid-crystal polarizing shutter to display the stereoscopic images. The most significant application of this system has been planning for the stereotactic implantation of EEG recording electrodes. Here the surgeon has the ability not only to view the imaged anatomy in three-dimensions, but he is also able to interact with the images and to plan surgical procedures in a more realistic manner than traditional 2-D approaches. Display modes include vascular anatomy (from stereoscopic digital subtraction or MR angiography), or a combination of DSA images and 3-D volume-rendered MR or CT reconstructions.

  19. Metastatic Tumor Volume and Extranodal Tumor Extension: Clinical Significance in Patients With Stage II Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Drinka, Eva; Allen, Pamela; McBride, Andrew; Buchholz, Thomas; Sahin, Aysegul

    2015-10-01

    Context .- Lymph node status and the number of lymph node (LN) positive for cancer cells are the most important prognostic factors in breast cancer. Extranodal tumor extension (ENTE) has been used as a histopathologic feature to classify patients into high risk versus low risk for local recurrence. However, in the current era of early detection and systemic therapy, the prognostic significance of ENTE is not as well defined in patients with 1 to 3 LNs positive for cancer. Objective .- To determine whether the amount of tumor burden in an axillary dissection or the presence of ENTE provides any additional information regarding patient outcome in patents with 1 to 3 positive LN results. Design .- Clinical and pathologic factors were identified for 456 patients with breast cancer at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, who had pT1 tumors and 1 to 3 LNs positive for cancer and were treated by mastectomy, with or without postmastectomy radiotherapy, between 1978 and 2007. Results .- Of the 456 patients, 257 (56.4%), 141 (31.6%), and 58 (12.7%) patients had 1, 2, or 3 positive LN results, respectively. Extranodal tumor extension was present in 99 patients (21.7%) and was absent in the remaining 357 cases (78.3%). Seventy-six patients (16.7%) received radiation therapy. Patients had both worse overall survival time and disease-free survival when ENTE was present, regardless of the amount, as long as the treatment era was not included in the multivariate analysis (pre-2000 versus post-2000). However, ENTE was no longer significant on multivariate analysis when the year of treatment was taken into account. Conclusions .- The number of positive LNs remains an important predictor of survival in patients with 1 to 3 positive LN results, but the prognostic significance of ENTE in this cohort of patients has diminished over time. PMID:25768237

  20. Proximal forearm fractures: our clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Concari, Galeazzo; Pedrazzini, Alessio; Vaienti, Enrico; Pogliacomi, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Forearm traumas are frequent and sometimes complex; soft tissue damages associated with bone lesions could be underestimated and so compromise the final result, in spite of a good reduction and osteosynthesis. Articular and iuxta-articular proximal radius and ulna fractures, which can be associated to radio-humeral dislocations in Monteggia lesions, are less frequent compared to diaphyseal fractures and can present a lot of therapeutical difficulties and a high rate of complications. These complications are avoided and reduced if the treatment is quick and focused on stable osteosynthesis and anatomical reduction of the fragments of the fracture and followed, as soon as possible, by rehabilitation. The authors present the 10 years experience of Parma Orthopaedics Institute with a follow-up of at least 12 months. PMID:12643076

  1. Pre-clinical experience with daptomycin.

    PubMed

    Hawkey, P M

    2008-11-01

    Daptomycin is a broad-spectrum, bactericidal agent active against Gram-positive bacteria, acting largely and unusually through membrane depolarization. Activity is markedly affected in vitro by the availability of calcium ions, and its high molecular weight with associated poor diffusion means that conventional disc diffusion testing is not reliable (and as a consequence not available). In order to allow susceptibility categorization, it is recommended that the MIC be determined in the presence of a defined calcium concentration. The activity of daptomycin is concentration-dependent with a prolonged post-antibiotic effect. It has linear pharmacokinetics, with a half-life of 8-9 h, the primary route of excretion is renal, it exhibits serum protein binding of approximately 92% and there is no interaction with the P450 cytochrome. Daptomycin is inactivated by surfactant in the lung and, in consequence, is not recommended for the treatment of respiratory infections. Daptomycin is currently licensed for the treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections and for bacteraemia and right-sided endocarditis due to methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus. To date, daptomycin-resistant bacteria have rarely been isolated from patients, although increases in vancomycin MIC may be linked to reduced susceptibility to daptomycin. Close monitoring of resistance is essential to maintain the clinical utility of the drug. Using once-daily dosing, daptomycin has been generally well tolerated; however, weekly monitoring of creatinine phosphokinase is recommended, as myopathy in skeletal muscles has been seen, albeit rarely. The rapid bactericidal action of daptomycin makes it a useful addition to the therapeutic armamentarium for the treatment of Gram-positive infections, providing a valuable alternative to vancomycin when it is inappropriate or resistance is a problem. PMID:18829726

  2. Clinical, radiographic characteristics and immunomodulating changes in neuromyelitis optica with extensive brain lesions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) shows various brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities with recurrent central nervous system (CNS) attacks, although predominantly affecting the spinal cord and optic nerve. However, NMO with extensive involvement of the brain has infrequently been studied. We investigated the clinical, radiographic features and immunomodulating changes of NMO patients with extensive brain lesions (EBLs) in China. Methods NMO patients (including 16 NMO patients with EBLs and 53 NMO patients without EBLs) hospitalized during January 2006 and February 2010 were recruited and analyzed retrospectively. Data of clinical characteristics, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features, laboratory abnormalities, treatment details and outcomes were analyzed. All the patients received the follow-up visits for two years. Results EBLs in NMO were classified into four categories according to their respective MRI characteristics: 1) Tumefactive-like lesions (n=4, 25%); 2) Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM)-like lesions (n=6, 37.5%); 3) Multiple sclerosis (MS)-like lesions (n=5, 31.25%); 4) Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES)-like lesions (n=1, 6.25%). NMO patients with EBLs had higher rates of encephalopathy symptoms (37.5% vs. 5.6%, p = 0.004), homonymous hemianopia (18.8% vs. 0%, p = 0.011) and AQP4 seropositivity (100% vs. 69.8%, p = 0.008) than NMO patients without EBLs (NEBLs). Immunomodulating changes (including the levels of C3, C4, ESR and CRP) were significantly higher in patients with EBLs than those without EBLs. The relapse times in EBLs during the follow-up period were more frequent than those happened in NEBLs (1.88 ± 0.30 vs. 1.23 ± 0.14, p = 0.04). The EDSS scores in EBLs patients were also much higher than those in NEBLs throughout all the whole visits of follow-up. Conclusions The presence of EBLs in NMO may indicate a higher diseases activity and portend a worse prognosis. CRP is a useful marker in monitoring diseases activity. Systemic inflammation may be crucial to the formation of EBLs in NMO. PMID:23819854

  3. THREE YEARS CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH INTESTINAL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Elmagd, Kareem; Todo, Satoru; Tzakis, Andreas; Reyes, Jorge; Nour, Bakr; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Fung, John J.; Demetris, Anthony; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND After the successful evolution of hepatic transplantation during the last decade, small bowel and multivisceral transplantation remains the sole elusive achievement for the next era of transplant surgeons. Until recently, and for the last thirty years, the results of the sporadic attempts of intestinal transplantation worldwide were discouraging because of unsatisfactory graft and patient survival. The experimental and clinical demonstration of the superior therapeutic efficacy of FK 506, a new immunosuppressive drug, ushered in the current era of small bowel and multivisceral transplantation with initial promising results. STUDY DESIGN Forty-three consecutive patients with short bowel syndrome, intestinal insufficiency, or malignant tumors with or without associated liver disease, were given intestinal (n=15), hepatic and intestinal (n=21), or multivisceral allografts that contained four or more organs (n=7). Treatment was with FK 506 based immunosuppression. The ascending and right transverse colon were included with the small intestine in 13 of the 43 grafts, almost evenly distributed between the three groups. RESULTS After six to 39 months, 30 of the 43 patients are alive, 29 bearing grafts. The most rapid convalescence and resumption of diet, as well as the highest three month patient survival (100 percent) and graft survival (88 percent) were with the isolated intestinal procedure. However, this advantage was slowly eroded during the first two postoperative years, in part because the isolated intestine was more prone to rejection. By the end of this time, the best survival rate (86 percent) was with the multivisceral procedure. With all three operations, most of the patients were able to resume diet and discontinue parenteral alimentation, and in the best instances, the quality of life approached normal. However, the surveillance and intensity of care required for these patients for the first year, and in most instances thereafter, was very high, being far more than required for patients having transplants of the liver, kidney or heart. CONCLUSIONS Although intestinal transplantation has gone through the feasibility phase, strategies will be required to increase its practicality. One possibility is to combine intestinal transplantation with contemporaneous autologous bone marrow transplantation. PMID:7522850

  4. Initial clinical experience with ultrasound PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskowitz, Michael J.; Huang, H. K.; Gould, Robert G.; Callen, Peter W.; Filly, Roy A.; DeMund, Eric A.; Krevzer, Lloyd B.

    1995-05-01

    A second generation PACS provides an open architecture allowing a seamless connection to other picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) modules with industrial standards. The open architecture of the UCSF PACS provides the flexibility to use commercial `off-the- shelf' components when needed. This paper describes our experience interfacing a stand-alone commercial ultrasound (US) PACS module to our departmental PACS. US PACS module (Acuson Aegis) links 7 Acuson scanners in 2 buildings. This US PACS module features a network sever with 1.5 GB disk storage used for short-term archiving, with images stored in a compressed format (DICOM compatible). The images must be compressed due to the inherently large size of the full images (640 X 480 X 24 bit/image). The interface consists of a gateway which encodes and decodes US images and related patient data to DICOM standards permitting open communication between the module and the PACS infrastructure over ethernet. The first phase of the implementation is to transmit US images to the departmental PACS optical disk library for long term archiving automatically and to retrieve US images from this archive using workstations in the US module. The second phase is to retrieve selected images acquired by other modalities from the archive for display on the US workstation. The third phase is the integration of a pre-fetch mechanism, initiated by the HIS, that sends archived prior studies of patients with scheduled appointments to the US module. Phase 1 has been completed. US images and reports can be archived and retrieved between the departmental PACS and the US module. Retrieval times for cases are between 45 to 120 seconds depending on the time of day. Performance tests have been taken, and average times for study transfers, average study sizes, and general gateway performance issues have been measured. Phases 2 and 3 will be completed shortly. With open architecture design, the US module and the departmental PACS infrastructure function as an integral image information system.

  5. Lagged Syndesmotic Fixation: Our Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Kwaadu, Kwasi Yiadom; Fleming, Justin James; Salmon, Trudy

    2015-01-01

    Ankle fractures are very common, and although algorithms are in place for osseous management, consensus has not been reached regarding treatment of associated ligamentous injuries. Although tibiofibular syndesmotic stabilization can be done using different forms of fixation, the biomedical literature has long emphasized the risk of long-term restriction of ankle mobility with the use of lagged transfixation. However, when reduction cannot be maintained with positional fixation, we found that lagging the syndesmotic screw helped to maintain the reduction without causing functional restriction. In this report, we describe our experience with patients who had undergone lagged tibiofibular transfixation and were available for short- to intermediate-term follow-up to assess ankle function. A total of 31 patients (32.63% of 95 consecutive patients) were available at a mean of 34.87 (range 18 to 52) months to complete the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot questionnaire. The mean score was 88.38 (range 42 to 100) points at a mean follow-up interval of 34.87 (range 18 to 52) months. Of 31 patients, 19 had an AOFAS score of 90 points, 9 an AOFAS score of 80 to 89 points, 2 an AOFAS score of 60 to 69 points, and 1 an AOFAS score of <60 points. Because all syndesmotic screws were placed using the lag technique, unrestricted motion compared with the uninjured limb was used as the endpoint. All subjects had unrestricted motion compared with the uninjured limb, refuting the assertion that lagged syndesmotic screw fixation confers more restriction in ankle kinematics than positional syndesmotic fixation. PMID:25736445

  6. Consistency of softcopy and hardcopy: preliminary experiences with the new DICOM extensions for image display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberg, Marco; Riesmeier, Joerg; Kleber, Klaus; Holstein, Joerg; Oosterwijk, Herman J.; Jensch, Peter F.

    2000-05-01

    The DICOM standard defines in detail how medical images can be transmitted and stored. However, there have been no precise rules on how to interpret the parameters contained in a DICOM image which deal with the image presentation. As a result, the same image frequently looks different when displayed on different workstations or printed on a film from various printers. Three new DICOM extensions attempt to close this gap by defining a comprehensive model for the display of images on softcopy and hardcopy devices: Grayscale Standard Display Function, Grayscale Softcopy Presentation State and Presentation Look Up Table. A prototype implementation of these extensions has been shown at the 1999 annual tradeshow of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) as part of the scientific exhibit (infoRAD). This demonstrated a simulated radiological workflow in which images were created, interpreted at a diagnostic workstation and later reviewed on a clinical workstation. Images could also be printed using DICOM Print. The prototype shows a proof of concept, i.e. that image integrity and consistency over a variety of display and print devices can be achieved and in addition, that the new DICOM extensions can be implemented relatively easily, without a significant performance penalty. The extensions allow to store all parameters defining how an image is displayed or printed in a separate DICOM object that can be managed with the existing DICOM database services. In particular, this satisfies the user's need to view images at different locations in a consistent manner, and to document the image appearance on which a diagnosis is made in softcopy environments.

  7. Clinical and Applied Experience in Rehabilitation Counselor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschopp, Molly K.; Chronister, Julie A.

    2008-01-01

    Applied training of pre-practicum, practicum, and internship are important gateway experiences for rehabilitation counselors-in-training. Counselor educators and supervisors must be aware of requirements and expectations of counselor-in-training supervision and common ethical issues specific to these clinical experiences of rehabilitation…

  8. Pre-clinical medical student experience in a pediatric pulmonary clinic

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Thomas G.; Hershenson, Marc B.; Arteta, Manuel; Ramirez, Ixsy A.; Mullan, Patricia B.; Owens, Sonal T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to evaluate the educational value of introducing pre-clinical medical students to pediatric patients and their families in a subspecialty clinic setting. Methods First- and second-year medical students at the University of Michigan seeking clinical experience outside of the classroom attended an outpatient pediatric pulmonary clinic. Evaluation of the experience consisted of pre- and post-clinic student surveys and post-clinic parent surveys with statements employing a four-point Likert scale as well as open-ended questions. Results Twenty-eight first-year students, 6 second-year students, and 33 parents participated in the study. Post-clinic statement scores significantly increased for statements addressing empathic attitudes, confidence communicating with children and families, comfort in the clinical environment, and social awareness. Scores did not change for statements addressing motivation, a sense of team membership, or confidence with career goals. Students achieved their goals of gaining experience interacting with patients, learning about pulmonary diseases, and observing clinic workflow. Parents felt that they contributed to student education and were not inconvenienced. Conclusions Students identified several educational benefits of exposure to a single pediatric pulmonary clinic. Patients and families were not inconvenienced by the participation of a student. Additional studies are warranted to further investigate the value of this model of pre-clinical medical student exposure to subspecialty pediatrics. PMID:26547081

  9. Using Soil and Water Conservation Contests for Extension: Experiences from the Bolivian Mountain Valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Aad; de Graaff, Jan

    2007-12-01

    Soil and water conservation (SWC) contests among farmer groups were organized in five rural villages in the Bolivian mountain valleys. The contests were aimed at quickly achieving widespread sustainable results. This article analyzes the effectiveness of these contests as an extension tool. Mixed results were obtained. In three villages, participation rates in the SWC activities introduced in the contests were still high even 2 years after project withdrawal. These were all villages where a solid foundation for sustainable development had been laid before the contests were held. Two years later, most families were still involved in maintenance of the SWC practices introduced in the contests, and many farmers had started to experiment with different soil management practices. However, replications of these SWC practices were not widespread, Conservation Leaders did not continue with their training activities, and the quality of maintenance of the practices was often not satisfactory. In order to become a more effective extension tool and achieve widespread impact, SWC contests must receive continued support by a catalyst agency. Moreover, other SWC contests should also be organized in which practices are not predefined. Given that SWC contests are a low-budget extension tool, local municipalities could become more actively involved.

  10. Using Soil and Water Conservation Contests for Extension: Experiences from the Bolivian Mountain Valleys

    PubMed Central

    de Graaff, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Soil and water conservation (SWC) contests among farmer groups were organized in five rural villages in the Bolivian mountain valleys. The contests were aimed at quickly achieving widespread sustainable results. This article analyzes the effectiveness of these contests as an extension tool. Mixed results were obtained. In three villages, participation rates in the SWC activities introduced in the contests were still high even 2 years after project withdrawal. These were all villages where a solid foundation for sustainable development had been laid before the contests were held. Two years later, most families were still involved in maintenance of the SWC practices introduced in the contests, and many farmers had started to experiment with different soil management practices. However, replications of these SWC practices were not widespread, Conservation Leaders did not continue with their training activities, and the quality of maintenance of the practices was often not satisfactory. In order to become a more effective extension tool and achieve widespread impact, SWC contests must receive continued support by a catalyst agency. Moreover, other SWC contests should also be organized in which practices are not predefined. Given that SWC contests are a low-budget extension tool, local municipalities could become more actively involved. PMID:17846829

  11. Clinical Needs Finding: Developing the Virtual Experience, A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Vaishali; Thompson, Megan; Altman, Stuart M; Taylor, Peter; Summers, Alexander; Goodwin, Kelsey; Louie, Angelique Y

    2013-01-01

    We describe an innovative program at the University of California, Davis for students to engage in clinical needs finding. Using a team-based approach, students participated in clinical rotations to observe firsthand the needs of clinicians at the university affiliated medical center. The teams were asked to develop documentary-style videos to capture key experiences that would allow future viewers to use the videos as “virtual” clinical rotations. This was conceived as a strategy to allow students in prohibitively large classes, or students in programs at institutions without associated medical or veterinary school programs, to experience clinical rotations and perform needs assessments. The students' perspectives on the experience as well as instructor analysis of best practices for this type of activity are presented and discussed. We found that the internship experience was valuable to the students participating, by not only introducing the practice of needs finding but for increasing the students' confidence in the practice of engineering design and their ability to work independently. The videos produced were of such high quality that instructors from other institutions have requested copies for instructional use. Virtual clinical rotations through video experiences may provide a reasonable substitute for students who do not have the ability to participate in rotations in person. PMID:23483373

  12. Course Experiences and Perceptions of Farmers in Esfahan as a Basis for a Competency Profile of Extension Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karbasioun, Mostafa; Mulder, Martin; Biemans, Harm

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze farmers' experiences with and perceptions of agricultural extension courses and their instructors in Esfahan, Iran. This study is part of a larger project on the development of a competency profile of extension instructors. Many attempts have been made to develop competency profiles for professionals (Shim,…

  13. 42 CFR 482.80 - Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., clinical experience, and outcome requirements for initial approval of transplant centers. 482.80 Section... Hospitals Transplant Center Data Submission, Clinical Experience, and Outcome Requirements § 482.80 Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for...

  14. An R package for simulation experiments evaluating clinical trial designs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Day, Roger

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an open-source application for evaluating competing clinical trial (CT) designs using simulations. The S4 system of classes and methods is utilized. Using object-oriented programming provides extensibility through careful, clear interface specification; using R, an open-source widely-used statistical language, makes the application extendible by the people who design CTs: biostatisticians. Four key classes define the specifications of the population models, CT designs, outcome models and evaluation criteria. Five key methods define the interfaces for generating patient baseline characteristics, stopping rule, assigning treatment, generating patient outcomes and calculating the criteria. Documentation of their connections with the user input screens, with the central simulation loop, and with each other faciliates the extensibility. New subclasses and instances of existing classes meeting these interfaces can integrate immediately into the application. To illustrate the application, we evaluate the effect of patient pharmacokinetic heterogeneity on the performance of a common Phase I "3+3" design. PMID:21347151

  15. Dental Students' Clinical Expectations and Experiences Treating Persons with Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Perusini, Darsi J; Llacuachaqui, Marcia; Sigal, Michael J; Dempster, Laura J

    2016-03-01

    Persons with disabilities (PWDs) have a disproportionate level of dental disease relative to the general population. Access to care is a cause along with dentists' willingness to treat PWDs. The aim of this study was to investigate the expectations and experiences of dental students in providing treatment to these patients in a hospital-based dental clinic for PWDs. Senior dental students at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto (n=92) were surveyed prior to (Phase I) and at the end of (Phase II) mandatory clinical rotations at the Mount Sinai Hospital's Dentistry Clinic for Persons with Special Needs. Response rates were 88% for Phase I and 58% for Phase II. Before the rotations, 70% of the respondents reported little or no experience with PWDs, and 46% said they did not feel comfortable providing basic dental treatment to PWDs. However, in Phase II, significantly more students reported being comfortable than in Phase I (p=0.001). Overall, the majority of respondents (Phase I 95%; Phase II 98%) indicated they would at least attempt to provide basic dental care to PWDs after graduation. The majority also identified the opportunity to provide care and interact with PWDs as the most enjoyable aspect of their experience at the clinic. They reported that the experience helped reduce their concerns about treating PWDs including being more realistic about the time required and ideal quality of the treatment they could provide. These results suggest that their experience in the clinic significantly increased students' comfort in treating PWDs. The respondents expressed a willingness to treat PWDs once graduated and generally identified their experience as being more positive than their expectations. PMID:26933105

  16. Time Keeps on Ticking: The Experience of Clinical Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spengler, Paul M.; White, Michael J.; Aegisdottir, Stefania; Maugherman, Alan S.

    2009-01-01

    The reactions by Ridley and Shaw-Ridley (EJ832451) and Lichtenberg (EJ832452) to the authors' meta-analysis on the effects of experience on judgment accuracy add positively to what is hoped will become an ever more focused discourse on this most basic question: How can mental health clinical decision making be improved? In this rejoinder, the…

  17. Teachers' Clinical Experiences and Attitudes toward Technology Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paganelli, Andrea Lynch

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative multisite case study is to examine participants' attitudes toward technology, types of technology available for participant use, and the extent to which technology is used by preservice and mentor teachers during clinical experiences. Research supports the benefit of improved attitudes toward technology integration…

  18. Designing Nursing Simulation Clinical Experiences to Promote Critical Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beattie, Bev; Koroll, Donna; Price, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The use of high fidelity simulation (HFS) learning opportunities in nursing education has received increased attention in the literature. This article describes the design of a systematic framework used to promote critical inquiry and provide meaningful simulation clinical experiences for second year nursing students. Critical inquiry, as defined…

  19. [Cryodevitalization of the mandible. The initial clinical experience].

    PubMed

    Eckelt, U; Lerch, H; Franke, W G

    1990-01-01

    There is given a report about first clinical experiences in the partial cryodevitalization of the mandible. 3 tumor-bearing patients were treated. The resection of the mandible was not necessary. The process of revitalisation was observed by bone scanning. PMID:2150462

  20. Ambulance clinical placements – A pilot study of students' experience

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Malcolm J; Williams, Brett; Cooper, Jennifer; Adams, Bridget; Alford, Kassie

    2008-01-01

    Background Undergraduate paramedic students undertake clinical placements in a variety of locations. These placements are considered an essential element for paramedic pre-employment education. However, anecdotal evidence suggests some students have not had positive experiences on their emergency ambulance placements. The objective of this study was to identify the type of experiences had by students during ambulance clinical placements and to provide feedback to the ambulance services. Methods In this pilot study we employed a cross-sectional study methodology, using a convenience sample of undergraduate paramedic students available in semester one of 2007 to ascertain the students' views on their reception by on-road paramedics and their overall experience on emergency ambulance clinical placements. Ethics approval was granted. Results There were 77 students who participated in the survey, 64% were females, with 92% of students < 25 years of age and 55% < 65 Kg in weight. There was a statistically significant difference in average height between the genders (Male 179 cm vs Female 168 cm, p < 0.001). Clinical instructors were available to 44% of students with 30% of students excluded from patient management. Thirty percent of students felt there was a lot of unproductive down time during the placement. Paramedics remarked to 40% of students that they doubted their ability to perform the physical role of a paramedic, of this group 36% were advised this more than once. Conclusion This study demonstrates that for a small group of students, emergency ambulance clinical placements were not a positive experience clinically or educationally. Some qualified paramedics doubt if a number of female students can perform the physical role of a paramedic. PMID:18400111

  1. Challenging clinical learning environments: experiences of undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    O'Mara, Linda; McDonald, Jane; Gillespie, Mary; Brown, Helen; Miles, Lynn

    2014-03-01

    Clinical learning is an essential component of becoming a nurse. However at times, students report experiencing challenging clinical learning environments (CCLE), raising questions regarding the nature of a challenging clinical learning environment, its impact on students' learning and how students might respond within a CCLE. Using an Interpretive Descriptive study design, researchers held focus groups with 54 students from two Canadian sites, who self-identified as having experienced a CCLE. Students defined a CCLE as affected by relationships in the clinical area and by the context of their learning experiences. CCLE decreased students' learning opportunities and impacted on them as persons. As students determined which relationships were challenging, they tapped other resources and they used strategies to rebuilt, reframe, redirect and/or retreat relative to the specific challenge. Relationships also acted as buffers to unsupportive practice cultures. Implications for practice and research are addressed. PMID:24063792

  2. E-health stakeholders experiences with clinical modelling and standardizations.

    PubMed

    Gøeg, Kirstine Rosenbeck; Elberg, Pia Britt; Højen, Anne Randorff

    2015-01-01

    Stakeholders in e-health such as governance officials, health IT-implementers and vendors have to co-operate to achieve the goal of a future-proof interoperable e-health infrastructure. Co-operation requires knowledge on the responsibility and competences of stakeholder groups. To increase awareness on clinical modeling and standardization we conducted a workshop for Danish and a few Norwegian e-health stakeholders' and made them discuss their views on different aspects of clinical modeling using a theoretical model as a point of departure. Based on the model, we traced stakeholders' experiences. Our results showed there was a tendency that stakeholders were more familiar with e-health requirements than with design methods, clinical information models and clinical terminology as they are described in the scientific literature. The workshop made it possible for stakeholders to discuss their roles and expectations to each other. PMID:25991150

  3. Mapping students' clinical experiences to pediatric clerkship goals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aaron; Sharkey, Angela; McGann, Kathleen; Sumner, Walton

    2006-01-01

    In anticipation of new LCME accreditation requirements, our third year clerkship students began tracking pediatric clinical experiences using a hand-held Electronic Student Encounter Log (ESEL) in June 2005. ESEL was tailored to support rapid documentation of diseases seen at a pediatric tertiary care hospital, while retaining access to primary care diagnoses. We matched encounters that 37 students documented to experiences that fulfill the pediatric clerkship's 19 educational goals. We discovered omissions in both ESEL and the goal definitions. No student documented meeting all goals, and no goal was met by all students. Handheld encounter logs are useful for tracking clinical experiences. Logs, logging instructions, and goals require regular compatibility checks. PMID:17238622

  4. Mapping Students’ Clinical Experiences to Pediatric Clerkship Goals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Sharkey, Angela; McGann, Kathleen; Sumner, Walton

    2006-01-01

    In anticipation of new LCME accreditation requirements, our third year clerkship students began tracking pediatric clinical experiences using a hand-held Electronic Student Encounter Log (ESEL) in June 2005. ESEL was tailored to support rapid documentation of diseases seen at a pediatric tertiary care hospital, while retaining access to primary care diagnoses. We matched encounters that 37 students documented to experiences that fulfill the pediatric clerkship’s 19 educational goals. We discovered omissions in both ESEL and the goal definitions. No student documented meeting all goals, and no goal was met by all students. Handheld encounter logs are useful for tracking clinical experiences. Logs, logging instructions, and goals require regular compatibility checks. PMID:17238622

  5. Clinical experiences in using cognitive-behavior therapy to treat panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Abraham W; Goldfried, Marvin R

    2014-01-01

    Although there is a growing body of research to support the use of psychological treatments for specific disorders, there has been no way for practitioners to provide feedback to researchers on the barriers they encounter in implementing these treatments in their day-to-day clinical work. In order to provide practitioners a means to give researchers information about their clinical experience, the Society of Clinical Psychology and the Division of Psychotherapy of the American Psychological Association collaborated on an initiative to build a two-way bridge between practice and research. A questionnaire was developed on the therapist, patient, and contextual variables that undermine the effective use of CBT in reducing the symptoms of panic disorder, a clinical problem that occurs frequently in clinical practice and has an extensive research base. An Internet-based survey was advertised internationally in listservs and professional newsletters, asking clinicians to indicate all aspects of CBT that they used in treating panic disorder, and to respond to a series of questions with variables that presumably limited successful symptom reduction in clinical work using CBT to treat panic disorder. The final database included responses from 338 participants who varied in experience in applying CBT to the treatment of panic disorders. Participants identified a wide range of patient factors that were barriers to symptom reduction, including symptoms related to panic, motivation, social system, and the psychotherapy relationship, in addition to specific problems with implementing CBT for the treatment of panic disorder. PMID:24411112

  6. Whole-Genome Sequence of a Beijing Extensively Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolate from Buenaventura, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, N; Haft, D; Hurtado, U A; Robledo, J; Rouzaud, F

    2016-01-01

    Extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (XDR-TB) has been reported to the WHO by 100 countries, including Colombia. An estimated 9.0% of people with multidrug-resistant TB have XDR-TB. We report the genome sequence of a Beijing XDR-TB clinical isolate from Buenaventura, Colombia. The genome sequence is composed of 4,298,162 bp with 4,359 genes. PMID:26769935

  7. Whole-Genome Sequence of a Beijing Extensively Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolate from Buenaventura, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Haft, D.; Hurtado, U. A.; Robledo, J.; Rouzaud, F.

    2016-01-01

    Extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (XDR-TB) has been reported to the WHO by 100 countries, including Colombia. An estimated 9.0% of people with multidrug-resistant TB have XDR-TB. We report the genome sequence of a Beijing XDR-TB clinical isolate from Buenaventura, Colombia. The genome sequence is composed of 4,298,162 bp with 4,359 genes. PMID:26769935

  8. Oncolytic HSV-1 Virotherapy: Clinical Experience and Opportunities for Progress

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Balveen; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Cripe, Timothy P

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy with mutants derived from Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 exhibit significant antitumor effects in preclinical models. Several mutants have now been tested in clinical trials for a variety of cancer types, and all have been found to be safe. While there have been hints of antitumor efficacy with prolonged survival in some cases compared with historical controls, dramatic responses have been elusive. We review the clinical experience published to date and discuss some of the biologic factors that may be limiting for virus infection and spread, as well as new strategies currently under development to enhance antitumor efficacy. PMID:21740359

  9. Clinical Diagnostic Clues in Crohn's Disease: A 41-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, C.; Galleguillos, L.; Benavides, E.; Quintana, J. C.; Zúñiga, A.; Duarte, I.; Klaassen, J.; Kolbach, M.; Soto, R. M.; Iacobelli, S.; Álvarez, M.; O'Brien, A.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the diagnosis of Crohn's disease has been highly difficult mainly during the first years of this study carried out at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica (PUC) Clinical Hospital. For instance, it has been frequently confused with Irritable bowel syndrome and sometimes misdiagnosed as ulcerative colitis, infectious colitis or enterocolitis, intestinal lymphoma, or coeliac disease. Consequently, it seems advisable to characterize what the most relevant clinical features are, in order to establish a clear concept of Crohn's disease. This difficulty may still be a problem at other medical centers in developing countries. Thus, sharing this information may contribute to a better understanding of this disease. Based on the clinical experience gained between 1963 and 2004 and reported herein, the main clinical characteristics of the disease are long-lasting day and night abdominal pain, which becomes more intense after eating and diarrhoea, sometimes associated to a mass in the abdomen, anal lesions, and other additional digestive and nondigestive clinical features. Nevertheless, the main aim of this work has been the following: is it possible to make, in an early stage, the diagnosis of Crohn's disease with a high degree of certainty exclusively with clinical data? PMID:23213555

  10. Understanding Clinical Expertise: Nurse Education, Experience, and the Hospital Context

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Lake, Eileen T.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical nursing expertise is central to quality patient care. Research on factors that contribute to expertise has focused largely on individual nurse characteristics to the exclusion of contextual factors. To address this, we examined effects of hospital contextual factors and individual nurse education and experience on clinical nursing expertise in a cross-sectional analysis of data from 8,611 registered nurses. In a generalized ordered logistic regression analysis, the composition of the hospital staff, particularly the proportion of nurses with at least a bachelor of science in nursing degree, was associated with significantly greater odds of a nurse reporting a more advanced expertise level. Our findings suggest that, controlling for individual characteristics, the hospital context significantly influences clinical nursing expertise. PMID:20645420

  11. ?-thalassemia patients and gynecological approach: review and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Ambroggio, Simona; Peris, Clementina; Picardo, Elisa; Mitidieri, Marco; Minniti, Elena; Benedetto, Chiara; Gregori, Gianluca; Baù, Maria G

    2016-03-01

    Significant improvements in therapy and life expectancy of ?-thalassemia patients in last decades result in the need of commitment for gynecologists and obstetricians as the complexity of organ impairment needs a specific multidisciplinary approach. After a review of clinical manifestations of ?-thalassemia from a gynecologic point of view, we present the experience of a gynecologic center in treating ?-thalassemia patients from more than 20 years. PMID:26492849

  12. Hospice clinical experiences for nursing students: living to the fullest.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Sherri; Heller, Rebecca; Troth, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to provide appropriate care for patients and their families at the end of life can be a formidable challenge for nurse educators. Most nursing schools thread end-of-life concepts throughout the curriculum. Grand Canyon University includes a 40-hour hospice clinical as a component of a home healthcare practicum. Students' weekly written reflections reveal the depth of affective learning that occurs during this experience. Article includes hospice materials and resources. PMID:25585469

  13. Laboratory and clinical experience with neodymium:YAG laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabalin, John N.

    1996-05-01

    Since 1991, we have undertaken extensive laboratory and clinical studies of the Neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) laser for surgical treatment of bladder outlet obstruction due to prostatic enlargement or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Side-firing optical fibers which emit a divergent, relatively low energy density Nd:YAG laser beam produce coagulation necrosis of obstructing periurethral prostate tissue, followed by gradual dissolution and slough in the urinary stream. Laser-tissue interactions and Nd:YAG laser dosimetry for prostatectomy have been studied in canine and human prostate model systems, enhancing clinical application. Ongoing studies examine comparative Nd:YAG laser dosimetry for various beam configurations produced by available side-firing optical fibers and continue to refine operative technique. We have documented clinical outcomes of Nd:YAG laser prostatectomy in 230 consecutive patients treated with the UrolaseTM side-firing optical fiber. Nd:YAG laser coagulation the prostate produces a remarkably low acute morbidity profile, with no significant bleeding or fluid absorption. No postoperative incontinence has been produced. Serial assessments of voiding outcomes over more than 3 years of followup show objective and symptomatic improvement following Nd:YAG laser prostatectomy which is comparable to older but more morbid electrosurgical approaches. Nd:YAG laser prostatectomy is a safe, efficacious, durable and cost-effective treatment for BPH.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of a Clinically Isolated Extensively Drug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain.

    PubMed

    Manivannan, Bhavani; Mahalingam, Niranjana; Jadhao, Sudhir; Mishra, Amrita; Nilawe, Pravin; Pradeep, Bulagonda Eswarappa

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome assembly of an extensively drug-resistant (XDR)Pseudomonas aeruginosastrain isolated from a patient with a history of genito urinary tuberculosis. The draft genome is 7,022,546 bp with a G+C content of 65.48%. It carries 7 phage genomes, genes for quorum sensing, biofilm formation, virulence, and antibiotic resistance. PMID:27013045

  15. Fat emulsion for intravenous administration: clinical experience with intralipid 10%.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, L M; Hardie, B S; Hidalgo, J

    1976-01-01

    A 10% soybean oil emulsion (Intralipid 10%), used extensively in Europe for intravenous alimentation, has now been clinically evaluated in the United States. Controlled studies have shown that the soybean oil emulsion can be substituted for glucose to supply one-third to two-thirds of the total calories, and can be administered peripherally without significant vein irritation. Essential fatty acid deficiencies, frequently encountered in patients dependent on parenteral alimentation with fat-free solutions, are prevented and corrected by use of this preparation. Data on long-term tolerance to Intralipid 10% infusions are presented for 292 patients treated for more than 6,000 patient days. The soybean oil emulsion was usually well tolerated. Side effects were reported in two of 133 adults and 12 of 159 pediatric patients. PMID:820291

  16. Italian nurse students' and clinical preceptors' perceptions about clinical practice experiences: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Quattrin, Rosanna; Zanini, Antonietta; Bulfone, Giampiera; Farneti, Federico; Panariti, Matteo; Calligaris, Laura; Brusaferro, Silvio

    2010-01-01

    Aims of the study was to compare perception of both clinical preceptors and nursing students in relation to clinical nursing practice in Italy. The recent introduction of primary level nursing education to Italian University primed many changes in processes and required to think new methods and contents. Special attention was adopted on revaluation of clinical practice. The study was part of a large investigation conducted from 2005 until 2006 as prevalence survey throughout two questionnaire addressed to nurses student and to clinical guides. Participants were all students (tot. 172) from one School of Nursing and their clinical guides (tot.120) working in a high specialization hospital located in a large urban area in Northern Italy. Students' and nurses' perceptions differed in these fields: knowledge of students' learning objectives, explanation of students' competences and objectives already reached, prevalence execution of assistance activity, organization of briefing/debriefing meetings, planning of a learning programme with students at the beginning of tutorship, choosing occasions related to nursing subjects discussed in classroom, filling an intermediate evaluation of the student tutorship in addiction to the final. The perceptions of the students and preceptors were opposite on several factors. This means that students and clinical guides approach the clinical experience from individualized viewpoints. PMID:21358770

  17. Extensible Stylesheet Language Formatting Objects (XSL-FO): a tool to transform patient data into attractive clinical reports.

    PubMed

    Simonaitis, Linas; Belsito, Anne; Warvel, Jeff; Hui, Siu; McDonald, Clement J

    2006-01-01

    Clinicians at Wishard Hospital in Indianapolis print and carry clinical reports called "Pocket Rounds". This paper describes a new process we developed to improve these clinical reports. The heart of our new process is a World Wide Web Consortium standard: Extensible Stylesheet Language Formatting Objects (XSL-FO). Using XSL-FO stylesheets we generated Portable Document Format (PDF) and PostScript reports with complex formatting: columns, tables, borders, shading, indents, dividing lines. We observed patterns of clinical report printing during a eight month study period on three Medicine wards. Usage statistics indicated that clinicians accepted the new system enthusiastically: 78% of 26,418 reports were printed using the new system. We surveyed 67 clinical users. Respondents gave the new reports a rating of 4.2 (on a 5 point scale); they gave the old reports a rating of 3.4. The primary complaint was that it took longer to print the new reports. We believe that XSL-FO is a promising way to transform text data into functional and attractive clinical reports: relatively easy to implement and modify. PMID:17238435

  18. Plasmodium knowlesi Genome Sequences from Clinical Isolates Reveal Extensive Genomic Dimorphism

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Scott B.; Sanderson, Theo; Otto, Thomas D.; Lu, Woon Chan; Krishna, Sanjeev; Rayner, Julian C.; Cox-Singh, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a newly described zoonosis that causes malaria in the human population that can be severe and fatal. The study of P. knowlesi parasites from human clinical isolates is relatively new and, in order to obtain maximum information from patient sample collections, we explored the possibility of generating P. knowlesi genome sequences from archived clinical isolates. Our patient sample collection consisted of frozen whole blood samples that contained excessive human DNA contamination and, in that form, were not suitable for parasite genome sequencing. We developed a method to reduce the amount of human DNA in the thawed blood samples in preparation for high throughput parasite genome sequencing using Illumina HiSeq and MiSeq sequencing platforms. Seven of fifteen samples processed had sufficiently pure P. knowlesi DNA for whole genome sequencing. The reads were mapped to the P. knowlesi H strain reference genome and an average mapping of 90% was obtained. Genes with low coverage were removed leaving 4623 genes for subsequent analyses. Previously we identified a DNA sequence dimorphism on a small fragment of the P. knowlesi normocyte binding protein xa gene on chromosome 14. We used the genome data to assemble full-length Pknbpxa sequences and discovered that the dimorphism extended along the gene. An in-house algorithm was developed to detect SNP sites co-associating with the dimorphism. More than half of the P. knowlesi genome was dimorphic, involving genes on all chromosomes and suggesting that two distinct types of P. knowlesi infect the human population in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. We use P. knowlesi clinical samples to demonstrate that Plasmodium DNA from archived patient samples can produce high quality genome data. We show that analyses, of even small numbers of difficult clinical malaria isolates, can generate comprehensive genomic information that will improve our understanding of malaria parasite diversity and pathobiology. PMID:25830531

  19. The beneficial effects of preimplantation genetic diagnosis for aneuploidy support extensive clinical application.

    PubMed

    Gianaroli, Luca; Magli, M Cristina; Ferraretti, Anna P; Tabanelli, Carla; Trengia, Vincenzo; Farfalli, Valeria; Cavallini, Giorgio

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical impact of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for aneuploidy on 193 patients who subsequently achieved 208 clinical pregnancies, in relation to their reproductive history. The 208 clinical pregnancies included in the study resulted from 1029 assisted conception cycles in combination with PGD for aneuploidy in 740 couples with a history of poor reproductive performance. According to the reproductive history of the 193 patients, 61 had previously experienced 112 pregnancies with 105 abortions and seven deliveries, corresponding to 3.6% take-home baby rate and 10.9% implantation rate. During the PGD cycle, preimplantation embryos were analysed for 5-9 chromosomes. The transfer of euploid embryos was performed in 699 cycles (68% of oocyte retrievals), generating 171 term pregnancies with 210 infants born, whereas 34 aborted spontaneously and three were ectopic, giving a take-home baby rate per pregnant patient of 88.6% and an ongoing implantation rate per pregnant patient of 53.2%. According to these data, selection made in preimplantation embryos against chromosomal abnormalities is associated with a significantly higher (P < 0.001) take-home baby rate when compared with the previous reproductive history of the parents. PMID:15949222

  20. Exploring nursing students’ experience of peer learning in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Bahreini, Masoud; Ravanipour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peer learning is an educational process wherein someone of the same age or level of experience level interacts with other students interested in the same topic. There is limited evidence specifically focusing on the practical use of peer learning in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore nursing students’ experiences of peer learning in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis was conducted. Focus groups were used to find the students’ experiences about peerlearning. Twenty-eight baccalaureate nursing students at Bushehr University of Medical Sciences were selected purposively, and were arranged in four groups of seven students each. The focus group interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview schedule. All interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results: The analysis identified four themes: Paradoxical dualism, peer exploitation, first learning efficacy, and socialization practice. Gained advantages and perceived disadvantages created paradoxical dualism, and peer exploitation resulted from peer selection and peer training. Conclusion: Nursing students reported general satisfaction concerning peer learning due to much more in-depth learning with little stress than conventional learning methods. Peer learning is a useful method for nursing students for practicing educational leadership and learning the clinical skills before they get a job. PMID:26097860

  1. A motivational systems approach to the clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, J D; Kindler, A R

    1994-01-01

    A conception of the self and five motivational systems is applied to clinical psychoanalysis. Each motivational system develops in infancy from innate and learned patterns in response to a basic need, and each involves particular affects. Each motivational system contributes patterns from which important transferences evolve. At any given moment, motives derived from one or another system dominate a person's experience, motives from the other system being subsidiary or dormant. We describe the manner in which these concepts contribute to an explanation of foreground-background relations during analysis, and how analysts and analysands construct model scenes to give meaning to information acquired by empathic listening. We conclude with a clinical vignette illustrating the application of these concepts to the patient's transference and the analyst's response in the intersubjective realm of an analytic enactment and verbal exchange. PMID:8040549

  2. Clinical evaluation of music perception, appraisal and experience in cochlear implant users

    PubMed Central

    Drennan, Ward. R.; Oleson, Jacob J.; Gfeller, Kate; Crosson, Jillian; Driscoll, Virginia D.; Won, Jong Ho; Anderson, Elizabeth S.; Rubinstein, Jay T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The objectives were to evaluate the relationships among music perception, appraisal, and experience in cochlear implant users in multiple clinical settings and to examine the viability of two assessments designed for clinical use. Design Background questionnaires (IMBQ) were administered by audiologists in 14 clinics in the United States and Canada. The CAMP included tests of pitch-direction discrimination, and melody and timbre recognition. The IMBQ queried users on prior musical involvement, music listening habits pre and post implant, and music appraisals. Study sample One-hundred forty-five users of Advanced Bionics and Cochlear Ltd cochlear implants. Results Performance on pitch direction discrimination, melody recognition, and timbre recognition tests were consistent with previous studies with smaller cohorts, as well as with more extensive protocols conducted in other centers. Relationships between perceptual accuracy and music enjoyment were weak, suggesting that perception and appraisal are relatively independent for CI users. Conclusions Perceptual abilities as measured by the CAMP had little to no relationship with music appraisals and little relationship with musical experience. The CAMP and IMBQ are feasible for routine clinical use, providing results consistent with previous thorough laboratory-based investigations. PMID:25177899

  3. Eat, Grow, Lead 4-H: An Innovative Approach to Deliver Campus- Based Field Experiences to Pre-Entry Extension Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Penny Pennington; Weeks, William G.

    2012-01-01

    Eat, Grow, Lead 4-H Club was created as a pilot program for college students seeking to gain experience as non-formal youth educators, specifically serving pre-entry level Extension educators through a university-based 4-H club. Seventeen student volunteers contributed an estimated 630 hours of service to the club during spring 2011. The club…

  4. Eat, Grow, Lead 4-H: An Innovative Approach to Deliver Campus- Based Field Experiences to Pre-Entry Extension Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Penny Pennington; Weeks, William G.

    2012-01-01

    Eat, Grow, Lead 4-H Club was created as a pilot program for college students seeking to gain experience as non-formal youth educators, specifically serving pre-entry level Extension educators through a university-based 4-H club. Seventeen student volunteers contributed an estimated 630 hours of service to the club during spring 2011. The club…

  5. Incorporating professionalism into medical education: the Mayo Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Paul S

    2009-09-01

    Professionalism is a core competency of physicians. In this article, the statements of professional societies (e.g., the Charter on Medical Professionalism), the expectations of patients and society regarding professionalism, and a framework for defining medical professionalism are described. The framework's foundation consists of clinical competence, communication skills, and a sound understanding of the ethical and legal aspects of medicine. Rising from this foundation are attributes of professionalism: accountability, altruism, excellence, and humanism. The capstone of the framework is professionalism, or the complete physician. Reasons for teaching professionalism to and assessing professionalism among medical students, physicians in training, and physicians in practice are also described. These reasons include patient expectations; the association between professionalism and improved clinical outcomes (and the association between unprofessional behavior and adverse outcomes); accreditation organization requirements; and observations that professionalism can be taught, learned, and assessed. In addition, methods for teaching professionalism are described (e.g., didactic lectures, discussion groups, simulation, and role-modeling). To ensure that medical students, physicians in training, and physicians in practice are competent in professionalism, they should be assessed for professionalism. Thus, approaches to assessing professionalism are also described (e.g., multiple tools and observers). Professionalism assessments can be used for formative and summative feedback, evaluation of professionalism education programs, and generating hypotheses for professionalism research. Finally, the rich history and culture of clinical excellence and professionalism and specific programs for teaching and assessing professionalism at Mayo Clinic are described throughout this article. Indeed, the Mayo Clinic experience validates professionalism a s a core physician competency. PMID:19826207

  6. Zingiber officinale (ginger) compounds have tetracycline-resistance modifying effects against clinical extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Min; Chen, Chung-Yi; Chen, Hsi-An; Huang, Wan-Chun; Lin, Wei-Ru; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chien, Hsin-Ju; Lu, Po-Liang; Lin, Chiu-Mei; Chen, Yen-Hsu

    2010-12-01

    Extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDRAB) is a growing and serious nosocomial infection worldwide, such that developing new agents against it is critical. The antimicrobial activities of the rhizomes from Zingiber officinale, known as ginger, have not been proven in clinical bacterial isolates with extensive drug-resistance. This study aimed to investigate the effects of four known components of ginger, [6]-dehydrogingerdione, [10]-gingerol, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol, against clinical XDRAB. All these compounds showed antibacterial effects against XDRAB. Combined with tetracycline, they showed good resistance modifying effects to modulate tetracycline resistance. Using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging method, these four ginger compounds demonstrated antioxidant properties, which were inhibited by MnO?, an oxidant without antibacterial effects. After the antioxidant property was blocked, their antimicrobial effects were abolished significantly. These results indicate that ginger compounds have antioxidant effects that partially contribute to their antimicrobial activity and are candidates for use in the treatment of infections with XDRAB. PMID:20564496

  7. Trichomycosis (Trichobacteriosis): Clinical and Microbiological Experience with 56 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Váquez-González, Denisse; Fierro, Leonel; Araiza, Javier; Ponce, Rosa María

    2013-01-01

    Background: Trichomycosis is asymptomatic bacterial infection of the axillary hairs caused by Corynebacterium sp. Objective: to bring a series of cases of trichomycosis, its clinical and microbiological experience. Materials and Methods: This report consists in a linear and observational retrospective study of 15 years of cases of trichomycosis confirmed clinically and microbiologically. Results: Fifty six confirmed cases of trichomycosis were included in this report. The majority were men 53/56 (94.6%), mean age was 32.5 years. The most commonly affected area was the axilla (92%), trichomycosis flava was the principal variant 55/56 (98.2%) and signs and symptoms associated were hyperhidrosis (87.5%), hairs’ texture change (57.1%) and odor (35.7%). Bacterial concretions were observed in all cases, and the predominant causative agent in 89.3% of all cases was Corynebacterium sp. Thirty patients were included in therapeutic portion of the study, and 28 (93.3%) of them experienced a clinical and microbiological cure. Conclusion: Trichomycosis is asymptomatic, superficial infection, which primarily affects axillary hairs. PMID:23960390

  8. Fingolimod Real World Experience: Efficacy and Safety in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    Fingolimod is a multiple sclerosis treatment licensed in Europe since 2011. Its efficacy has been demonstrated in three large phase III trials, used in the regulatory submissions throughout the world. As usual, in these trials the inclusion and exclusion criteria were designed to obtain a homogeneous population, with interchangeable characteristics in the different treatment arms. Although this is the best strategy to achieve a robust answer to the investigation question, it does not guaranty the treatment efficacy in the clinical practice, since in the real world there are concomitant treatments, comorbidities, adherence, and persistence challenges. But, to make informed treatment decision for a real life patient, we need to have evidence of the treatment efficacy, what has been called treatment effectiveness. This work aims to review fingolimod effectiveness, using, as source of information, abstracts, posters, and manuscripts. This unorthodox strategy was developed because more than half of the published experience with fingolimod is still on abstracts and posters. Only a small part of the studies reviewed are already published in peer reviewed journals. Fingolimod seems to be, at least, as effective and safe as it was on clinical trials, and with its long-term experience no new safety signals were observed. PMID:26693475

  9. Mutuality: clinical and metapsychological potentials of a failed experiment.

    PubMed

    Castillo Mendoza, Carlos Alberto

    2012-03-01

    Ferenczi's experiments with mutual analysis are often dismissed, without acknowledging the results obtained from them and his own cautionary remarks about their limits. Though ultimately failed, Ferenczi's experiments with mutual analysis were a source of clinical and metapsychological knowledge, despite the fact that he was unable to elaborate them in his lifetime. In this paper I connect mutuality to the development of the psyche, especially to the constitutive core of the intrapsychic. To understand the latter, it is necessary to take into account, among others, issues such as the common attribute, the mutual flux between the unconsciouses, the dialogue of unconsciouses, the maternal profundity, the primal relationship with the mother, and, above all, the primal unity between mother and child, which are fundamental for the emergence and development of the primary psychic forces. Incidences of rupture, distortion of the core of mutuality in the psychic life, its loss and disadjustment, by means of external traumatizing forces, and some clinical implications are described. PMID:22398886

  10. Artificial Pancreas: Model Predictive Control Design from Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Toffanin, Chiara; Messori, Mirko; Palma, Federico Di; Nicolao, Giuseppe De; Cobelli, Claudio; Magni, Lalo

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this research is to develop a new artificial pancreas that takes into account the experience accumulated during more than 5000 h of closed-loop control in several clinical research centers. The main objective is to reduce the mean glucose value without exacerbating hypo phenomena. Controller design and in silico testing were performed on a new virtual population of the University of Virginia/Padova simulator. Methods A new sensor model was developed based on the Comparison of Two Artificial Pancreas Systems for Closed-Loop Blood Glucose Control versus Open-Loop Control in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes trial AP@home data. The Kalman filter incorporated in the controller has been tuned using plasma and pump insulin as well as plasma and continuous glucose monitoring measures collected in clinical research centers. New constraints describing clinical knowledge not incorporated in the simulator but very critical in real patients (e.g., pump shutoff) have been introduced. The proposed model predictive control (MPC) is characterized by a low computational burden and memory requirements, and it is ready for an embedded implementation. Results The new MPC was tested with an intensive simulation study on the University of Virginia/Padova simulator equipped with a new virtual population. It was also used in some preliminary outpatient pilot trials. The obtained results are very promising in terms of mean glucose and number of patients in the critical zone of the control variability grid analysis. Conclusions The proposed MPC improves on the performance of a previous controller already tested in several experiments in the AP@home and JDRF projects. This algorithm complemented with a safety supervision module is a significant step toward deploying artificial pancreases into outpatient environments for extended periods of time. J Diabetes Sci Technol 2013;7(6):1470-1483 PMID:24351173

  11. General Practitioners’ responses to global climate change - lessons from clinical experience and the clinical method

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Climate change is a global public health problem that will require complex thinking if meaningful and effective solutions are to be achieved. In this conceptual paper we argue that GPs have much to bring to the issue of climate change from their wide-ranging clinical experience and from the principles underpinning their clinical methods. This experience and thinking calls forth particular contributions GPs can and should make to debate and action. Discussion We contend that the privileged experience and GP way of thinking can make valuable contributions when applied to climate change solutions. These include a lifetime of experience, reflection and epistemological application to first doing no harm, managing uncertainty, the ability to make necessary decisions while possessing incomplete information, an appreciation of complex adaptive systems, maintenance of homeostasis, vigilance for unintended consequences, and an appreciation of the importance of transdisciplinarity and interprofessionalism. Summary General practitioners have a long history of public health advocacy and in the case of climate change may bring a way of approaching complex human problems that could be applied to the dilemmas of climate change. PMID:22873633

  12. Clinicians’ experiences of becoming a clinical manager: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been an increased interest in recruiting health professionals with a clinical background to management positions in health care. We know little about the factors that influence individuals’ decisions to engage in management. The aim of this study is to explore clinicians’ journeys towards management positions in hospitals, in order to identify potential drivers and barriers to management recruitment and development. Methods We did a qualitative study which included in-depth interviews with 30 clinicians in middle and first-line management positions in Norwegian hospitals. In addition, participant observation was conducted with 20 of the participants. The informants were recruited from medical and surgical departments, and most had professional backgrounds as medical doctors or nurses. Interviews were analyzed by systemic text condensation. Results We found that there were three phases in clinicians’ journey into management; the development of leadership awareness, taking on the manager role and the experience of entering management. Participants’ experiences suggest that there are different journeys into management, in which both external and internal pressure emerged as a recurrent theme. They had not anticipated a career in clinical management, and experienced that they had been persuaded to take the position. Being thrown into the position, without being sufficiently prepared for the task, was a common experience among participants. Being left to themselves, they had to learn management “on the fly”. Some were frustrated in their role due to increasing administrative workloads, without being able to delegate work effectively. Conclusions Path dependency and social pressure seems to influence clinicians’ decisions to enter into management positions. Hospital organizations should formalize pathways into management, in order to identify, attract, and retain the most qualified talents. Top managers should make sure that necessary support functions are available locally, especially for early stage clinician managers. PMID:23173953

  13. The Impact of Specific Prior Experiences on Infants' Extension of Animal Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furrer, Stephanie D.; Younger, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the influence of prior exposure to specific animal properties on 15-month-old infants' inductive generalization. Using picture books, 29 infants were trained on properties linked in a congruent or incongruent manner with four animal categories. A generalized imitation task was then administered to assess patterns of property extension…

  14. An extensive morphological and comparative study of clinically early and obvious squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Anani, P A; Gardiol, D; Savary, M; Monnier, P

    1991-03-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus appears mainly as an isolated tumor, frequently diagnosed in its latest stage. However, current advances in endoscopy, systematically used for high risk subjects, allow the detection of very early lesions such as epithelial dysplasia or in situ carcinoma. Twenty-eight squamous cell carcinomas were extensively studied: Group A contained 15 clinically "early cancers"; Group B 12 clinically obvious carcinomas and group C one clinically obvious bifocal carcinoma. All 15 "early cancers" were multicentric and composed of large fields of invasive, microinvasive or in situ carcinoma around which were found epithelial dysplasias of various degrees. Lymph node metastases at surgery were found in 26% of these cases. Obvious squamous cell carcinomas were contiguous with dysplastic areas in 16.6% and with in situ carcinomas in 33% of these cases. Half (50%) had lymph node metastases at surgery. There was no dysplasia or in situ carcinoma around the two main tumors of group C. A comparison between the different morphological features of the three groups leads us to question whether the solitary tumor of the esophagus really represents the final evolution of an early multifocal carcinoma. PMID:2068002

  15. The Meta-Analysis of Clinical Judgment Project: Effects of Experience on Judgment Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spengler, Paul M.; White, Michael J.; Aegisdottir, Stefania; Maugherman, Alan S.; Anderson, Linda A.; Cook, Robert S.; Nichols, Cassandra N.; Lampropoulos, Georgios K.; Walker, Blain S.; Cohen, Genna R.; Rush, Jeffrey D.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and educational experience is one of the most commonly studied variables in clinical judgment research. Contrary to clinicians' perceptions, clinical judgment researchers have generally concluded that accuracy does not improve with increased education, training, or clinical experience. In this meta-analysis, the authors synthesized…

  16. Prescribing exercise training in pulmonary rehabilitation: a clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Bernard, S; Ribeiro, F; Maltais, F; Saey, D

    2014-01-01

    Built around exercise training, pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is a multidisciplinary, evidence-based, comprehensive approach to working with the patient as a whole and not just the pulmonary component of the disease. Integrated into the individualized treatment, this intervention aims to reduce symptoms, optimize functional status, increase participation in daily life, and reduce health care costs through stabilizing or reversing systemic manifestations of the disease. Although there are many other components that should be considered to manage the impairment and symptom burden, supervised exercise training is considered the cornerstone of effective pulmonary rehabilitation. This paper addresses our clinical experience at Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec to assess and manage exercise training in line with the current recommendations and guidelines surrounding PR. PMID:24480488

  17. Conformal Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Advanced Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma With Intracranial Extension: An Institutional Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Santam; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Patil, Vijay Maruti; Oinam, Arun Singh; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To describe the results of conformal radiotherapy in advanced juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in a tertiary care institution. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart review was conducted for 8 patients treated with conformal radiotherapy between 2006 and 2009. The median follow-up was 17 months. All patients had Stage IIIB disease with intracranial extension. Radiotherapy was considered as treatment because patients were deemed inoperable owing to extensive intracranial/intraorbital extension or proximity to optic nerve. All but 1 patient were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy using seven coplanar fields. Median (range) dose prescribed was 39.6 (30-46) Gy. Actuarial analysis of local control and descriptive analysis of toxicity profile was conducted. Results: Despite the large and complex target volume (median planning target volume, 292 cm{sup 3}), intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved conformal dose distributions (median van't Reit index, 0.66). Significant sparing of the surrounding organs at risk was obtained. No significant Grade 3/4 toxicities were experienced during or after treatment. Actual local control at 2 years was 87.5%. One patient died 1 month after radiotherapy secondary to massive epistaxis. The remaining 7 patients had progressive resolution of disease and were symptom-free at last follow-up. Persistent rhinitis was the only significant toxicity, seen in 1 patient. Conclusions: Conformal radiotherapy results in good local control with minimal acute and late side effects in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas, even in the presence of advanced disease.

  18. Clinical experience of spontaneous pneumomediastinum: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Soo; Jeon, Hyun Woo; Moon, Youngkyu; Kim, Young Du; Ahn, Myeong Im; Park, Jae Kil

    2015-01-01

    Background Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) is a benign disease with a variety degree of severity but definite treatment modality is not clearly identified with its rarity. The purpose of this study was to review our experience and discuss the management of SPM according to the severity of disease. Methods From March 1996 to December 2012, total 64 patients were enrolled and classified as mild, moderate and severe groups and subsequent clinical courses were analyzed retrospectively. Results Fifty-one were males and 13 were females (M:F =3.9:1) with a mean age of 18 years old (range: 10-30 years old). Thirty-six patients were in mild, 22 in moderate and 6 in severe group. Chief complaints were chest pain (50 cases; 78.1%), neck pain (35 cases; 54.7%), dyspnea (18 cases; 28.1%), odynophagia (9 cases; 14.1%) and precipitating factors were coughing in 12 cases, feeding problems in 9 cases, and vomiting in 7 cases; however, 34 patients (53.1%) had no precipitating signs. All patients received oxygen therapy (100%), prophylactic antibiotics in 57 patients (89.1%), and pain medications in 47 patients (73.4%). The mean hospital stay was 4.6 days (range: 1-10 days). There was an increased linear trend according to time to visit (P=0.023) but clinical course demonstrated no significant trend between groups. Conclusions These data demonstrated that there was no difference in symptom, clinical course and SPM was adequately treated with conservative management regardless of the degree of severity of SPM. PMID:26623105

  19. Dasatinib first-line: Multicentric Italian experience outside clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Stagno, Fabio; Luciano, Luigiana; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Annunziata, Mario; D'Adda, Mariella; Maggi, Alessandro; Sgherza, Nicola; Russo-Rossi, Antonella; Pregno, Patrizia; Castagnetti, Fausto; Iurlo, Alessandra; Latagliata, Roberto; Cedrone, Michele; Di Renzo, Nicola; Sorà, Federica; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna; La Nasa, Giorgio; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Greco, Giovanna; Franceschini, Luca; Sica, Simona; Bocchia, Monica; Crugnola, Monica; Orlandi, Esther; Guarini, Attilio; Specchia, Giorgina; Rosti, Gianantonio; Saglio, Giuseppe; Alimena, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    Dasatinib was approved for the treatment of chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients in first line therapy based on the demonstration of efficacy and safety reported in patients enrolled in clinical trials. We describe a multicentric Italian "real-life" experience of dasatinib used as frontline treatment outside clinical trials. One hundred and nine patients (median age 54 years) were treated from January 2012 to December 2013. Increased incidence of high risk patients were detected according to stratification (26% according to Sokal score, 19% according to Euro score and 16% according to EUTOS) when compared to company sponsored studies. Median time from diagnosis to start of dasatinib was 18 days. Ten patients received unscheduled starting dose (6 patients 50mg and 4 patients 80mg QD), whereas 99 patients started with 100mg QD. At 3 months, 92% of patients achieved a BCR-ABL ratio less than 10%. At 6 months, the rate of CCyR was 91% and the rate of MR3 was 40%, with 8% of the patients reaching MR4.5. Ninety-three patients were evaluable at 12 months: the rate of MR3 was 62%, with MR4.5 being achieved by 19% of the patients. At a median follow-up of 12 months, 27 patients (24.7%) were receiving the drug at reduced dose. Two patients (1.8%) experienced a lymphoid blast crisis and the overall incidence of resistance was 8%. As regards safety, the major side effects recorded were thrombocytopenia, neutropenia and pleural effusions, which occurred in 22%, 10% and 8% of patients, respectively. Present results, achieved in a large cohort of patients treated outside clinical trials, further confirm the efficacy and safety of dasatinib as firstline treatment in CML. PMID:26643920

  20. One Thousand Patients With Primary Myelofibrosis: The Mayo Clinic Experience

    PubMed Central

    Tefferi, Ayalew; Lasho, Terra L.; Jimma, Thitina; Finke, Christy M.; Gangat, Naseema; Vaidya, Rakhee; Begna, Kebede H.; Al-Kali, Aref; Ketterling, Rhett P.; Hanson, Curtis A.; Pardanani, Animesh

    2012-01-01

    Objective To share our decades of experience with primary myelofibrosis and underscore the importance of outcomes research studies in designing clinical trials and interpreting their results. Patients and Methods One thousand consecutive patients with primary myelofibrosis seen at Mayo Clinic between November 4, 1977, and September 1, 2011, were considered. The International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS), dynamic IPSS (DIPSS), and DIPSS-plus were applied for risk stratification. Separate analyses were included for patients seen at time of referral (N=1000), at initial diagnosis (N=340), and within or after 1 year of diagnosis (N=660). Results To date, 592 deaths and 68 leukemic transformations have been documented. Parameters at initial diagnosis vs time of referral included median age (66 vs 65 years), male sex (61% vs 62%), red cell transfusion need (24% vs 38%), hemoglobin level less than 10 g/dL (38% vs 54%), platelet count less than 100 × 109/L (18% vs 26%), leukocyte count more than 25 × 109/L (13% vs 16%), marked splenomegaly (21% vs 31%), constitutional symptoms (29% vs 34%), and abnormal karyotype (31% vs 41%). Mutational frequencies were 61% for JAK2V617F, 8% for MPLW515, and 4% for IDH1/2. DIPSS-plus risk distributions at time of referral were 10% low, 15% intermediate-1, 37% intermediate-2, and 37% high. The corresponding median survivals were 17.5, 7.8, 3.6, and 1.8 years vs 20.0, 14.3, 5.3, and 1.7 years for patients younger than 60 years of age. Compared with both DIPSS and IPSS, DIPSS-plus showed better discrimination among risk groups. Five-year leukemic transformation rates were 6% and 21% in low- and high-risk patients, respectively. Conclusion The current document should serve as a valuable resource for patients and physicians and provides context for the design and interpretation of clinical trials. PMID:22212965

  1. Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Haghani, Fariba; Arabshahi, Seyed Kamran Soltani; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Alavi, Mousa; Omid, Athar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members’ experience on Ward Round Teaching content. Methods and Materials: This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9). Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation. Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability) were employed (Guba and Lincoln). Results: Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1) tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties) and (2) implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties). Conclusion: Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners. PMID:24627858

  2. The initial Trinidad experience with Cine MRI in clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C N; Maharaj, P; Bodapati, S; John, R; Rahaman, R; Henry, R; Brann, S

    2002-03-01

    We describe the initial Trinidad experience with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Cine MRI as a diagnostic tool in clinical cardiology. Six patients from the following categories were referred for Cine MRI evaluation: congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, aortic diseases, cardiomyopathy and intracardiac mass. All patients underwent echocardiography. MRI and Cine MRI were performed on all patients using a Siemens Magnetom 1.0 Tesla MR system at MRI Trinidad and Tobago Ltd. Selected patients underwent Angiography and/or computed tomography (CT) scanning. Clinical data and images of the six patients evaluated are described. MRI and Cine MRI provided excellent anatomical and functional details of the heart and aorta in five patients with dissection of the aorta, aneurysm of the ascending aorta, suspected left ventricular apical thrombus, infiltrative cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia. Technical difficulty was experienced with one patient who had a congenital defect (common atrium). In this study, Cine MRI provided excellent images in all but one patient. This new noninvasive technique enhanced diagnostic capabilities and facilitated management in patients with certain cardiovascular diseases. PMID:12089881

  3. Statistical Estimation of Some Irrational Numbers Using an Extension of Buffon's Needle Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velasco, S.; Roman, F. L.; Gonzalez, A.; White, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    In the nineteenth century many people tried to seek a value for the most famous irrational number, [pi], by means of an experiment known as Buffon's needle, consisting of throwing randomly a needle onto a surface ruled with straight parallel lines. Here we propose to extend this experiment in order to evaluate other irrational numbers, such as…

  4. How Clinical Instructors Can Enhance the Learning Experience of Physical Therapy Students in an Introductory Clinical Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Beverley; Wessel, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: There is little understanding of how physical therapy students are influenced by clinical instructors (CIs) particularly at the outset of their clinical learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate physical therapy students' perceptions of their learning experiences during an introductory clinical placement. Methods: Subjects were…

  5. Non-Invasive Prenatal Chromosomal Aneuploidy Testing - Clinical Experience: 100,000 Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Ron M.; Almasri, Eyad A.; Guan, Xiaojun; Geis, Jennifer A.; Hicks, Susan C.; Mazloom, Amin R.; Deciu, Cosmin; Oeth, Paul; Bombard, Allan T.; Paxton, Bill; Dharajiya, Nilesh; Saldivar, Juan-Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Objective As the first laboratory to offer massively parallel sequencing-based noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for fetal aneuploidies, Sequenom Laboratories has been able to collect the largest clinical population experience data to date, including >100,000 clinical samples from all 50 U.S. states and 13 other countries. The objective of this study is to give a robust clinical picture of the current laboratory performance of the MaterniT21 PLUS LDT. Study Design The study includes plasma samples collected from patients with high-risk pregnancies in our CLIA–licensed, CAP-accredited laboratory between August 2012 to June 2013. Samples were assessed for trisomies 13, 18, 21 and for the presence of chromosome Y-specific DNA. Sample data and ad hoc outcome information provided by the clinician was compiled and reviewed to determine the characteristics of this patient population, as well as estimate the assay performance in a clinical setting. Results NIPT patients most commonly undergo testing at an average of 15 weeks, 3 days gestation; and average 35.1 years of age. The average turnaround time is 4.54 business days and an overall 1.3% not reportable rate. The positivity rate for Trisomy 21 was 1.51%, followed by 0.45% and 0.21% rate for Trisomies 18 and 13, respectively. NIPT positivity rates are similar to previous large clinical studies of aneuploidy in women of maternal age ?35 undergoing amniocentesis. In this population 3519 patients had multifetal gestations (3.5%) with 2.61% yielding a positive NIPT result. Conclusion NIPT has been commercially offered for just over 2 years and the clinical use by patients and clinicians has increased significantly. The risks associated with invasive testing have been substantially reduced by providing another assessment of aneuploidy status in high-risk patients. The accuracy and NIPT assay positivity rate are as predicted by clinical validations and the test demonstrates improvement in the current standard of care. PMID:25289665

  6. XGAP: a uniform and extensible data model and software platform for genotype and phenotype experiments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We present an extensible software model for the genotype and phenotype community, XGAP. Readers can download a standard XGAP (http://www.xgap.org) or auto-generate a custom version using MOLGENIS with programming interfaces to R-software and web-services or user interfaces for biologists. XGAP has simple load formats for any type of genotype, epigenotype, transcript, protein, metabolite or other phenotype data. Current functionality includes tools ranging from eQTL analysis in mouse to genome-wide association studies in humans. PMID:20214801

  7. Clinical Experiences in Teacher Education Prior to Student Teaching at Southeast Missouri State University. Report of the Task Force on Alternatives for Clinical Laboratory Experiences in Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeast Missouri State Univ., Cape Girardeau.

    A study was made of the clinical experiences, offered by Southeast Missouri State University, for students preparing to be teachers. The study was conducted to determine if modifications in the current system would make possible reallocation of resources, while at the same time preserving the quality of clinical experiences for the students. The…

  8. Sequencing of Simulation and Clinic Experiences in an Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience

    PubMed Central

    Hajjar, Emily; DeSevo Bellottie, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine how the intrasemester sequencing of a simulation component, delivered during an ambulatory care introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE), affects student performance on a series of 3 assessments delivered during the second professional (P2) year. Design. At the Jefferson College of Pharmacy (JCP), P2 student pharmacists were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of simulation activities, followed by 6 weeks on site at an ambulatory care clinic or vice versa during either the fall or spring semesters. At the end of each semester, these students completed 3 skills-based assessments: answering a series of drug information (DI) questions; conducting medication adherence counseling; and conducting a medication history. The 2 groups’ raw scores on assessment rubrics were compared. Assessment. During academic years 2011-2012 and 2012-2013, 180 P2 student pharmacists participated in the required ambulatory care IPPE. Ninety experienced simulation first, while the other 90 experienced the clinic first. Students assessed over a 2-year time span performed similarly on each of 3 skills-based assessments, regardless of how simulation experiences were sequenced within the IPPE. Conclusion. The lack of significant difference in student performance suggests that schools of pharmacy may have flexibility with regard to how they choose to incorporate simulation into clinical ambulatory care IPPEs. PMID:26688585

  9. Sequencing of Simulation and Clinic Experiences in an Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience.

    PubMed

    Leon, Nicholas; Hajjar, Emily; DeSevo Bellottie, Gina

    2015-10-25

    Objective. To examine how the intrasemester sequencing of a simulation component, delivered during an ambulatory care introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE), affects student performance on a series of 3 assessments delivered during the second professional (P2) year. Design. At the Jefferson College of Pharmacy (JCP), P2 student pharmacists were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of simulation activities, followed by 6 weeks on site at an ambulatory care clinic or vice versa during either the fall or spring semesters. At the end of each semester, these students completed 3 skills-based assessments: answering a series of drug information (DI) questions; conducting medication adherence counseling; and conducting a medication history. The 2 groups' raw scores on assessment rubrics were compared. Assessment. During academic years 2011-2012 and 2012-2013, 180 P2 student pharmacists participated in the required ambulatory care IPPE. Ninety experienced simulation first, while the other 90 experienced the clinic first. Students assessed over a 2-year time span performed similarly on each of 3 skills-based assessments, regardless of how simulation experiences were sequenced within the IPPE. Conclusion. The lack of significant difference in student performance suggests that schools of pharmacy may have flexibility with regard to how they choose to incorporate simulation into clinical ambulatory care IPPEs. PMID:26688585

  10. Ketamine: an update on the first twenty-five years of clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Reich, D L; Silvay, G

    1989-03-01

    In nearly 25 years of clinical experience, the benefits and limitations of ketamine analgesia and anaesthesia have generally been well-defined. The extensive review of White et al. and the cardiovascular review of Reves et al. are broad in their scope and have advanced the understanding of dissociative anaesthesia. Nevertheless, recent research continues to illuminate different aspects of ketamine pharmacology, and suggests new clinical uses for this drug. The identification of the N-methylaspartate receptor gives further support to the concept that ketamine's analgesic and anaesthetic effects are mediated by separate mechanisms. The stereospecific binding of (+)ketamine to opiate receptors in vitro, more rapid emergence from anaesthesia, and the lower incidence of emergence sequelae, make (+)ketamine a promising drug for future research. Clinical applications of ketamine that have emerged recently, and are likely to increase in the future, are the use of oral, rectal, and intranasal preparations for the purposes of analgesia, sedation, and anaesthetic induction. Ketamine is now considered a reasonable option for anaesthetic induction in the hypotensive preterm neonate. The initial experience with epidural and intrathecal ketamine administration has not been very promising but the data are only preliminary in this area. The use of ketamine in military and catastrophic settings is likely to become more common. The clinical availability of midazolam will complement ketamine anaesthesia in several ways. This rapidly metabolized benzodiazepine reduces ketamine's cardiovascular stimulation and emergence phenomena, and does not have active metabolites. It is dispensed in an aqueous medium, which is usually non-irritating on intravenous injection, unlike diazepam. The combination of ketamine and midazolam is expected to achieve high patient acceptance, which never occurred with ketamine as a sole agent. Finally, it is necessary to point out the potential for abuse of ketamine. While ketamine is not a controlled substance (in the United States), the prudent physician should take appropriate precautions against the unauthorized use of this drug. PMID:2650898

  11. Students' experiences of learning manual clinical skills through simulation.

    PubMed

    Johannesson, Eva; Silén, Charlotte; Kvist, Joanna; Hult, Håkan

    2013-03-01

    Learning manual skills is a fundamental part of health care education, and motor, sensory and cognitive learning processes are essential aspects of professional development. Simulator training has been shown to enhance factors that facilitate motor and cognitive learning. The present study aimed to investigate the students' experiences and thoughts about their learning through simulation skills training. The study was designed for an educational setting at a clinical skills centre. Ten third-year undergraduate nursing students performed urethral catheterisation, using the virtual reality simulator UrecathVision™, which has haptic properties. The students practised in pairs. Each session was videotaped and the video was used to stimulate recall in subsequent interviews. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis from interviews resulted in three themes: what the students learn, how the students learn, and the simulator's contribution to the students' learning. Students learned manual skills, how to perform the procedure, and professional behaviour. They learned by preparing, watching, practising and reflecting. The simulator contributed by providing opportunities for students to prepare for the skills training, to see anatomical structures, to feel resistance, and to become aware of their own performance ability. The findings show that the students related the task to previous experiences, used sensory information, tested themselves and practised techniques in a hands-on fashion, and reflected in and on action. The simulator was seen as a facilitator to learning the manual skills. The study design, with students working in pairs combined with video recording, was found to enhance opportunities for reflection. PMID:22395307

  12. Classroom Experiences in an Engineering Design Graphics Course with a CAD/CAM Extension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Ronald E.; Juricic, Davor

    1997-01-01

    Reports on the development of a new CAD/CAM laboratory experience for an Engineering Design Graphics (EDG) course. The EDG curriculum included freehand sketching, introduction to Computer-Aided Design and Drafting (CADD), and emphasized 3-D solid modeling. Reviews the project and reports on the testing of the new laboratory components which were…

  13. Management of laryngeal radionecrosis: Animal and clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, R.W.; Krespi, Y.P.; Einhorn, R.K.

    1989-05-01

    Radiation necrosis of the laryngeal cartilages is an uncommon complication of radiotherapy for laryngeal carcinoma. It is a devastating process for which there is no one acceptable treatment. Medical management offers only temporary, symptomatic relief, which further necessitates surgical treatment. Surgical management may start with a tracheotomy; however, it often ends with a total laryngectomy. Physiologically, the necrotic cartilages are the source of the problem. It is a general surgical principle that nonviable tissue must be excised to promote healing. Therefore, if the affected laryngeal cartilages were removed, the larynx should heal. Total or near total removal of the thyroid and cricoid cartilages with preservation of the endolaryngeal soft tissues has not been reported in the literature. Theoretically, if the entire cartilaginous framework is removed, there would be no structural support for the airway. We have found using animal models, that submucosal resection of the laryngeal cartilages, leaving the perichondrium and endolaryngeal soft tissues intact can result in a competent airway. Animal and clinical experience will be presented.

  14. Animal experiments and clinical application of CT during percutaneous splenoportography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue-Lin; Qiu, Shi-Jun; Chang, Ren-Min; Zou, Chang-Jing

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To introduce computed tomography during percutaneous splenoportography (CTSP), a new method for determining hepatic diseases. METHODS: Ten hybrid dogs and 20 patients with primary hepatic cancer (PHC) were included in the study. Each dog was examined by CT, CTAP (computed tomography during arterial portography) and CTSP to compare the enhanced degrees of the liver. The 20 PHC patients were examined by CTSP and the appearance of PHC was compared with their pathological results to evaluate the diagnostic significance of CTSP. RESULTS: The animal experiments showed that both CTAP and CTSP could obviously enhance the liver (P < 0.01), but there was no significant difference in the enhanced results between the two methods (P > 0.05). On the CTSP images in the 20 patients, the density of the livers was increased to 168-192 Hu, whereas the density of the cancers remained as low as that on the images of CT scans (< 58 Hu). The CTSP findings were consistent with the surgical ones from spaceoccupying lesions. Its diagnostic value was obviously superior to that of general enhanced CT and ultrasonic examination. However, it was difficult for CTSP to show nodules less than 1 cm in size located on the surface of the liver or the hepatic portal zone. CONCLUSIONS: Like CTAP, CTSP is also a sensitive method for showing occupants in the liver. But the equipments and the procedures for CTSP are simpler than for CTAP. Therefore, it is an alternative procedure in clinical practice. PMID:11819278

  15. Monitoring clinical research: report of one hospital's experience

    PubMed Central

    McCusker, Jane; Kruszewski, Zita; Lacey, Belaine; Schiff, Benjamin

    2001-01-01

    MONITORING OF RESEARCH BY RESEARCH ETHICS BOARDS HAS BEEN RECOMMENDED by various organizations that fund clinical studies and by other groups. However, little evidence has been reported on the processes, costs and outcomes of these activities, information that would be helpful to guide the boards in their current work and future policies. We report here 3 years of monitoring experience by the research ethics board of a 313-bed university-affiliated community hospital. Activities newly implemented at the beginning of the study period included the use of recruitment logs, audits of completed consent forms and interviews with research subjects. Over the study period, we monitored 33 protocols, through 188 consent form audits and interviews with 17 research subjects. In addition, 26 of 34 research investigators and collaborators responded to a survey about the monitoring. In general, the investigators were supportive of monitoring activities, but most were not willing to contribute financially. The types of monitoring we conducted are feasible and may be suitable (or could be adapted) for use in other institutions. PMID:11341145

  16. Fournier's Gangrene: A Summary of 10 Years of Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Oguz, Abdullah; Gümü?, Metehan; Turkoglu, Ahmet; Bozda?, Zübeyir; Ülger, Burak Veli; Agaçayak, Elif; Böyük, Abdullah

    2015-05-01

    We aimed to present our clinical experience with FG treatment. Fournier's gangrene (FG) is a rare but serious disease characterized by progressive necrosis in the genitourinary and perineal region. The retrospective study included 43 patients. Patients were divided into 2 groups as survivors and nonsurvivors. Included in the analysis were data pertaining to demographics, predisposing factors, comorbidities, results of bacteriologic analyses, number of debridements, duration of treatment, FG Severity Index (FGSI) score, fecal diversion methods (trephine ostomy or Flexi-Seal Fecal Management System-FMS), and dressing methods (wet or negative aspiration system). In the nonsurvivor group, urea, WBC, and age were significantly higher, whereas albumin, hematocrit, platelet count, and length of hospital stay (LOHS) were significantly lower compared to the survivor group. Mean FGSI was lower in survivors in comparison with nonsurvivors (5.00 ± 1.86 and 10.00 ± 1.27, respectively; P < 0.001). We conclude that FGSI is an important predictor in the prognosis of FG. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) should be performed in compliant patients in order to enhance patient comfort by reducing pain and the number of dressings. Fecal diversion should be performed as needed, preferably by using FMS. The trephine ostomy should be the method of choice in cases where an ostomy is necessary. PMID:25859652

  17. Clinical utility of noninvasive fetal trisomy (NIFTY) test – early experience

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Tze Kin; Chan, Mei Ki; Lo, Pui Shan Salome; Chan, Hon Yee Connie; Chan, Wai Sze Kim; Koo, Tik Yee; Ng, Hoi Yan Joyce; Pooh, Ritsuko K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To report the initial experience of noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of fetal Down syndrome (The NIFTY test) in a clinical setting. Methods: The NIFTY test was offered as a screening test for fetal Down syndrome to pregnant women with a singleton pregnancy at 12 weeks of gestation or beyond. A satisfaction questionnaire was sent to the first 400 patients. Results: During a 6-month period, 567 NIFTY tests were performed. Over 90% of those studied were ethnic Chinese, and the mean age of the women studied was 36 years. The test was performed at 12–13 weeks of gestation in 49.21%. The median reporting time was 9 days. The test was positive for trisomy 21 in eight cases, and for trisomy 18 in 1 case; all were confirmed by fetal karyotyping. There was no false-positive result. Of the questionnaires, 182 completed responses were received. Over 95% had complete or almost complete resolution of anxiety. Except for one, all were satisfied with the NIFTY test, and all indicated that they would recommend the test to their friends. Conclusion: The NIFTY test was a highly specific test. Unnecessary invasive tests and associated fetal losses could be avoided in almost all women who have a normal fetus. PMID:22471583

  18. Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation: Mexican clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Pardo, M. E.; Ley-Chávez, E.; Reyes-Frías, M. L.; Rodríguez-Ferreyra, P.; Vázquez-Maya, L.; Salazar, M. A.

    2007-11-01

    Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation, such as amnion and pig skin, are a reality in Mexico. These tissues are currently processed in the tissue bank and sterilized in the Gamma Industrial Irradiation Plant; both facilities belong to the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) (National Institute of Nuclear Research). With the strong support of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the bank was established at the ININ and the Mexican Ministry of Health issued its sanitary license on July 7, 1999. The Quality Management System of the bank was certified by ISO 9001:2000 on August 1, 2003; the scope of the system is "Research, Development and Processing of Biological Tissues Sterilized with Gamma Radiation". At present, more than 150 patients from 16 hospitals have been successfully treated with these tissues. This paper presents a brief description of the tissue processing, as well as the present Mexican clinical experience with children and adult patients who underwent medical treatment with radiosterilized amnion and pig skin, used as biological wound dressings on burns and ocular surface disorders.

  19. Shelf-life extension program (SLEP) as a significant contributor to Strategic National Stockpile Maintenance: the Israeli experience with ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Bodas, Moran; Yuval, Landschaft; Zadok, Ron; Hess, Zippora; Haran, Batya; Kaplan, Mimi; Eisenkraft, Arik

    2012-06-01

    In the past decade, the 2001 anthrax incident in the U.S. and the 2003 SARS epidemic have highlighted the biological threat to civilian populations. The risk posed by the natural or manmade spread of biological agents among the population dictates a need for better national preparedness. One key component of this preparation is the establishment of a Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) of pharmaceuticals that would provide appropriate medical countermeasures in case of an outbreak. However, to reduce the expense of such a stockpile and to make it worthwhile, there is also a need for a shelf-life extension program (SLEP) through which pharmaceuticals could be extended beyond manufacturer-ascribed shelf life, as long as they meet regulation standards. In this article, we review the Israeli experience with the national ciprofloxacin stockpile procurement and shelf-life extension program. PMID:22578017

  20. Clinical experience of MEK inhibitors in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ding; Boerner, Scott A; Winkler, James D; LoRusso, Patricia M

    2007-08-01

    Finding new therapies to assist in the treatment of cancer is a major challenge of clinical research. Small molecules that inhibit different molecular targets at the different levels of the MAPK pathway have been developed. Several MEK inhibitors have been examined in early-phase clinical trials and the current state of clinical results using these therapies is presented here. PMID:17194493

  1. Comparison of Efficacy of Regional and Extensive Clinical Target Volumes in Postoperative Radiotherapy for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao Xueying; Wang Wei; Zhou Zhiguo; Gao Xianshu; Chang, Joe Y.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To compare and analyze the effect of different clinical target volumes (CTVs) on survival rate after postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: We studied 102 patients who underwent postoperative RT after radical resection for esophageal SCC (T3/4 or N1). The radiation dose was {>=}50 Gy. In the extensive portal group (E group, 43 patients), the CTV encompassed the bilateral supraclavicular region, all mediastinal lymph nodes, the anastomosis site, and the left gastric and pericardial lymphatic. In the regional portal group (R group, 59 patients), the CTV was confined to tumor bed and the lymph nodes in the immediate region of the primary lesion. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were compared between the groups, and multivariate/univariate analysis for factors predicting survival was studied. Results: For the entire group, the 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates were 76.3%, 50.5%, and 42.9%, respectively (median survival, 30 months). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 76.5%, 52.1%, and 41.3%, respectively, in the E group and 76.2%, 49.2%, and 44.6%, respectively, in the R group (not significant). According to the multivariate analysis, N stage, number of lymph nodes with metastatic disease, and tumor length were the independent prognostic factors for survival. Conclusions: Using a regional portal in postoperative RT for esophageal SCC is not associated with compromised survival compared with extensive portal RT and therefore should be considered. N stage, number of affected lymph nodes, and tumor length predict poor survival.

  2. Encouraging choice, serendipity and experimentation: experiences from Griffith University library (G11) extension and Gumurrii Centre.

    PubMed

    Legerton, Graham

    2013-09-01

    The refurbishment and extension of existing university buildings is a critical consideration for many universities. This article details an architect's perspective of an innovative and collaborative design approach to transforming an existing library into a futuristic and student-centric interactive learning environment. The design is responsive to people, place, the community and the environment, due, in part, to the enhanced physical permeability of the building. Associated user-group forums comprised the end user client, the university's facilities body, the builder, lead architectural consultants, the Centre for Indigenous Students (Gumurrii Centre) and architectural sub-consultants. This article discusses five key design moves--"triangulate", "unique geometries and spaces", "learning aviary", "sky lounge" and "understanding flexibility". It goes on to discuss these elements in relation to designing spaces to enhance interprofessional education and collaboration. In summary, this article identifies how it is possible to maximise the value and characteristics of an existing library whilst creating a series of innovative spaces that offer choice, encourage serendipity and embrace experimentation. PMID:23930689

  3. Cultural awareness: Enhancing clinical experiences in rural Appalachia.

    PubMed

    Presley, Chaundel

    2013-01-01

    Students often work with clients from a cultural group different than their own. This is especially true for students completing clinical practica in Appalachia, where there is a culture unique to that geographic area. To prepare for this unique setting, common cultural scenarios experienced in the clinical setting must be addressed to help provide culturally appropriate patient care while developing required clinical competencies. Although applicable to most nursing students, the author discusses culturally specific approaches to clinical care of clients from Appalachia, specifically applied to nurse practitioner students, preceptors, and clinical faculty. PMID:23969755

  4. Evaluation of pyrosequencing for detecting extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis among clinical isolates from four high-burden countries.

    PubMed

    Ajbani, Kanchan; Lin, Shou-Yean Grace; Rodrigues, Camilla; Nguyen, Duylinh; Arroyo, Francine; Kaping, Janice; Jackson, Lynn; Garfein, Richard S; Catanzaro, Donald; Eisenach, Kathleen; Victor, Thomas C; Crudu, Valeru; Gler, Maria Tarcela; Ismail, Nazir; Desmond, Edward; Catanzaro, Antonino; Rodwell, Timothy C

    2015-01-01

    Reliable molecular diagnostics, which detect specific mutations associated with drug resistance, are promising technologies for the rapid identification and monitoring of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates. Pyrosequencing (PSQ) has the ability to detect mutations associated with first- and second-line anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs, with the additional advantage of being rapidly adaptable for the identification of new mutations. The aim of this project was to evaluate the performance of PSQ in predicting phenotypic drug resistance in multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR-TB) clinical isolates from India, South Africa, Moldova, and the Philippines. A total of 187 archived isolates were run through a PSQ assay in order to identify M. tuberculosis (via the IS6110 marker), and to detect mutations associated with M/XDR-TB within small stretches of nucleotides in selected loci. The molecular targets included katG, the inhA promoter and the ahpC-oxyR intergenic region for isoniazid (INH) resistance; the rpoB core region for rifampin (RIF) resistance; gyrA for fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance; and rrs for amikacin (AMK), capreomycin (CAP), and kanamycin (KAN) resistance. PSQ data were compared to phenotypic mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) 960 drug susceptibility testing results for performance analysis. The PSQ assay illustrated good sensitivity for the detection of resistance to INH (94%), RIF (96%), FQ (93%), AMK (84%), CAP (88%), and KAN (68%). The specificities of the assay were 96% for INH, 100% for RIF, FQ, AMK, and KAN, and 97% for CAP. PSQ is a highly efficient diagnostic tool that reveals specific nucleotide changes associated with resistance to the first- and second-line anti-TB drug medications. This methodology has the potential to be linked to mutation-specific clinical interpretation algorithms for rapid treatment decisions. PMID:25367911

  5. Clinical Experience With A Portable 3-D Reconstruction Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holshouser, Barbara A.; Christiansen, Edwin L.; Thompson, Joseph R.; Reynolds, R. Anthony; Goldwasser, Samuel M.

    1988-06-01

    Clinical experience with a computer program for reconstructing and visualizing three-dimensional (3-D) structures is reported. Applications to the study of soft-tissue and skeletal structures, such as the temporomandibular joint and craniofacial anatomy, using computed tomography (CT) data are described. Several features specific to the computer algorithm are demonstrated and evaluated. These include: (1) manipulation of density windows to selectively visualize bone or soft tissue structures; (2) the efficacy of gradient shading algorithms in revealing fine surface detail; and (3) the rapid generation of cut-away views revealing details of internal structures. Also demonstrated is the importance of high resolution data as input to the 3-D program. The implementation of the program (VoxelView-32) described here, is on a MASSCOMP computer running UNIX. Data were collected with General Electric or Siemens CT scanners and transferred to the MASSCOMP for off-line 3-D recon-struction, via magnetic tape or Ethernet. An interactive graphics facility on the MASSCOMP allows viewing of 2-D slices, subregioning, and selection of lower and upper density thresholds for segmentation. The software then enters a pre-processing phase during which a volume representation of the segmented object (soft tissue or bone) is automatically created. This is followed by a rendering phase during which multiple views of the segmented object are automatically generated. The pre-processing phase typically takes 4 to 8 minutes (although very large datasets may require as much as 30 minutes) and the rendering phase typically takes 1 to 2 minutes for each 3-D view. Volume representation and rendering techniques are used at all stages of the processing, and gradient shading is used for enhanced surface detail.

  6. Extension of Local Disease in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Improvement of Clinical Target Volume Delineation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Shaobo; Sun Ying; Liu Lizhi; Chen Yong; Chen Lei; Mao Yanping; Tang Linglong; Tian Li; Lin Aihua; Liu Mengzhong; Li Li; Ma Jun

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To define by MRI the local extension patterns in patients presenting with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and to improve clinical target volume delineation. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients (N = 943) with newly diagnosed and untreated NPC were included in this study. All patients underwent MRI of the nasopharynx and neck, which was reviewed by two radiologists. Results: According to the incidence rates of tumor invasion, the anatomic sites surrounding the nasopharynx were initially classified into three risk grades: high risk (>= 35%), medium risk (>= 5-35%), and low risk (< 5%). Incidence rates of tumor invasion into anatomic sites at medium risk were increased, reaching 55.2%, when adjacent high-risk anatomic sites were involved. However, the rates were substantially lower, mostly < 10%, when adjacent high-risk sites were not involved. The incidence rates of concurrent tumor invasion into bilateral sites were < 10%, except in the case of prevertebral muscle involvement (13.1%). Among the 178 incidences of cavernous sinus invasion, there were often two or more simultaneous infiltration routes (60.6%); when only one route was involved, the foramen ovale was the most common (26.4%). Conclusions: In patients presenting with NPC, local disease spreads stepwise from proximal sites to more distal sites. Tumors extend quickly through privileged pathways such as neural foramina. The anatomic sites surrounding the nasopharynx are at low risk of concurrent bilateral tumor invasion. Selective radiotherapy of the local disease in NPC may be feasible.

  7. Femtosecond laser eye surgery: the first clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, Tibor; Kurtz, Ron M.; Horvath, Christopher; Suarez, Carlos G.; Nordan, Lee; Slade, Steven

    2002-04-01

    A brief review of commercial applications of femtosecond lasers in a clinical setting with emphasis on applications to corneal surgery is presented. The first clinical results of 208 procedures conducted from June to November 2000 is reported. The results show that femtosecond lasers may be safely used as keratome for use in LASIK procedures.

  8. Differences in Clinical Experiences of ADN and BSN Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oermann, Marilyn H.

    1998-01-01

    In a study of 211 associate degree (AD) and 204 baccalaureate nursing students, AD students reported significantly higher stress in clinical practice. Stress for both groups increased as they progressed. Instructors were the predominant source of stress. Students had the most difficulty coping with the demands of patient care and the clinical…

  9. The muon component in extensive air showers and new p+C data in fixed target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Meurer, C.; Bluemer, J.; Engel, R.; Haungs, A.; Roth, M.

    2007-03-19

    One of the most promising approaches to determine the energy spectrum and composition of the cosmic rays with energies above 1015 eV is the measurement of the number of electrons and muons produced in extensive air showers (EAS). Therefore simulation of air showers using electromagnetic and hadronic interaction models are necessary. These simulations show uncertainties which come mainly from hadronic interaction models. One aim of this work is to specify the low energy hadronic interactions which are important for the muon production in EAS. Therefore we simulate extensive air showers with a modified version of the simulation package CORSIKA. In particular we investigate in detail the energy and the phase space regions of secondary particle production, which are most important for muon production. This phase space region is covered by fixed target experiments at CERN. In the second part of this work we present preliminary momentum spectra of secondary {pi}+ and {pi}- in p+C collisions at 12 GeV/c measured with the HARP spectrometer at the PS accelerator at CERN. In addition we use the new p+C NA49 data at 158 GeV/c to check the reliability of hadronic interaction models for muon production in EAS. Finally, possibilities to measure relevant quantities of hadron production in existing and planned accelerator experiments are discussed.

  10. A dedicated undergraduate gynaecology teaching clinic: The Keele experience.

    PubMed

    Katali, Hamza Mahamadu; Parry-Smith, William Rhys; Eliot, Rees L; O'Mahony, Fidelma

    2016-02-01

    Much discussion in the literature centres on how best to teach medical students the intricacies of gynaecological assessment and the subsequent formulation of a management plan. At Keele University skills are initially developed in a simulated setting and then transferred to the workplace where students continue to develop their skills. A dedicated undergraduate gynaecology teaching clinic has been developed and comprises of 2-3 students and a tutor. All 38 students rotating through the department between January and June 2013 were invited to complete an anonymous questionnaire to evaluate this clinic and 36 (95%) of them responded. Respondents felt significantly more comfortable taking a gynaecology history, ensuring privacy during examination and formulating a management plan post-clinic (all p < 0.001), with female students feeling significantly more comfortable than their male counterparts (p = 0.04). The use of this clinic shows great promise to help students learn an unfamiliar and challenging skill. PMID:26492580

  11. Antimicrobial potentials of Helicteres isora silver nanoparticles against extensively drug-resistant (XDR) clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Mapara, Nikunj; Sharma, Mansi; Shriram, Varsha; Bharadwaj, Renu; Mohite, K C; Kumar, Vinay

    2015-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading opportunistic pathogen and its expanding drug resistance is a growing menace to public health. Its ubiquitous nature and multiple resistance mechanisms make it a difficult target for antimicrobial chemotherapy and require a fresh approach for developing new antimicrobial agents against it. The broad-spectrum antibacterial effects of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) make them an excellent candidate for use in the medical field. However, attempts made to check their potency against extensively drug-resistant (XDR) microbes are meager. This study describes the biosynthesis and biostabilization of SNPs by Helicteres isora aqueous fruit extract and their characterization by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Majority of SNPs synthesized were of 8--20-nm size. SNPs exhibited dose-dependent antibacterial activities against four XDR P. aeruginosa (XDR-PA) clinical isolates as revealed by growth curves, with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 300 μg/ml. The SNPs exhibited antimicrobial activity against all strains, with maximum zone of inhibition (16.4 mm) in XRD-PA-2 at 1000 μg/ml. Amongst four strains, their susceptibilities to SNPs were in the following order: XDR-PA-2 > XDR-PA-4 > XDR-PA-3 > XDR-PA-1. The exposure of bacterial cells to 300 μg/ml SNPs resulted into a substantial leakage of reducing sugars and proteins, inactivation of respiratory chain dehydrogenases, and eventual cell death. SNPs also induced lipid peroxidation, a possible underlying factor to membrane porosity. The effects were more pronounced in XDR-PA-2 which may be correlated with its higher susceptibility to SNPs. These results are indicative of SNP-induced turbulence of membranous permeability as an important causal factor in XDR-PA growth inhibition and death. PMID:26362684

  12. 78 FR 26638 - Non-Competitive One-Year Extension With Funds for Black Lung/Coal Miner Clinics Program (H37...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... published a notice in the Federal Register FR 2013-08482 (April 12, 2013), announcing the issuing of a non... extension project period. Correction In the Federal Register, FR 2013-08482 (April 12, 2013), please make... Funds for Black Lung/Coal Miner Clinics Program (H37) Current Grantee AGENCY: Health Resources...

  13. Preclinical and clinical experience with a viscoelastic total disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rischke, Burkhard; Ross, Raymond S.; Jollenbeck, Boris A.; Zimmers, Kari B.; Defibaugh, Neal D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to describe the mechanical durability and the clinical and radiographic outcomes of a viscoelastic total disc replacement (VTDR). The human intervertebral disc is a complex, viscoelastic structure, permitting and constraining motion in 3 axes, thus providing stability. The ideal disc replacement should be viscoelastic and deformable in all directions, and it should restore disc height and angle. Methods Mechanical testing was conducted to validate the durability of the VTDR, and a clinical study was conducted to evaluate safety and performance. Fifty patients with single-level, symptomatic lumbar degenerative disc disease at L4-5 or L5-S1 were enrolled in a clinical trial at 3 European sites. Patients were assessed clinically and radiographically for 2 years by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), a visual analog scale (VAS), and independent radiographic analyses. Results The VTDR showed a fatigue life in excess of 50 million cycles (50-year equivalent) and a physiologically appropriate level of stiffness, motion, geometry, and viscoelasticity. We enrolled 28 men and 22 women in the clinical study, with a mean age of 40 years. Independent quantitative radiographic assessment indicated that the VTDR restored and maintained disc height and lordosis while providing physiologic motion. Mean ODI scores decreased from 48% preoperatively to 23% at 2 years’ follow-up. Mean VAS low-back pain scores decreased from 7.1 cm to 2.9 cm. Median scores indicated that half of the patient population had ODI scores below 10% and VAS low-back pain scores below 0.95 cm at 2 years. Conclusions The VTDR has excellent durability and performs clinically and radiographically as intended for the treatment of symptomatic lumbar degenerative disc disease. Clinical Relevance The VTDR is intended to restore healthy anatomic properties and stability characteristics to the spinal segment. This study is the first to evaluate a VTDR in a 50-patient, multicenter European study. PMID:25802675

  14. How to Conduct Clinical Qualitative Research on the Patient's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenail, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    From a perspective of patient-centered healthcare, exploring patients' (a) preconceptions, (b) treatment experiences, (c) quality of life, (d) satisfaction, (e) illness understandings, and (f) design are all critical components in improving primary health care and research. Utilizing qualitative approaches to discover patients' experiences can…

  15. Clinical interdisciplinary health team care: an educational experiment.

    PubMed

    Mazur, H; Beeston, J J; Yerxa, E J

    1979-09-01

    With increasing concern for teamwork in clinical practice in health care settings, the need to identify the concepts, methods, and learning processes for improving interdisciplinary team skills is apparent. This paper describes patient-centered, clinical-research-demonstration programs for teams of students, preceptors, and faculty members from six disciplines who provided patient care in a long-term rehabilitation setting. The teams were involved in the theory and practice of team-building, including weekly sessions on leadership styles, communication, group decision-making, and team effectiveness assessment. Objective and subjective measurements were administered throughout the program. The results indicate that task-oriented patient care favors the learning of team skills, especially when all levels of administration support and participate in the processes. Question are raised concerning the effect of clinical teams on the quality of patient care, their cost-effectiveness, and the low priority given to teaching interdisciplinary team skills in professional education. PMID:158089

  16. Review of clinical experience with ion beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jensen, A D; Münter, M W; Debus, J

    2011-12-01

    The article describes both the early development of oncology as a core discipline at the University of Heidelberg Hospital and the first steps towards ion beam treatment, from the pilot project carried out in co-operation with the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt to the initial start-up of clinical service at the Heidelberg Heavy Ion Centre (HIT). We present an overview, based on data published in the literature, of the available clinical evidence relating the use of ion beam therapy to treat major indications in active particle centres. A rationale for the use of particle therapy in each of these indications is given. In view of the limited availability of data, we discuss the necessity to conduct clinical trials. We also look forward towards the next activities to be undertaken at the HIT. PMID:21427183

  17. Clinical Experience of the Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hyung Min; Lee, Seok Jong; Lee, Jong Min; Huh, Seung; Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Kang Young; Yang, Jung Dug; Cho, Byung Chae

    2015-01-01

    Background The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is characterized by three clinical features, namely cutaneous capillary malformations, venous malformations, and soft tissue and/or bony hypertrophy of the extremities. The varied manifestations are attributed to the unpredictable clinical nature and prognosis of the syndrome. To elucidate the clinical characteristics of this disease, we reviewed a relatively large number of KTS patients who presented to our vascular anomalies center. Methods We conducted a retrospective study with 19 patients who were diagnosed with KTS and treated in our vascular anomalies clinic between 2003 and 2014, and examined their demographic characteristics, their clinical features, and the treatments administered. Results The sex distribution was balanced, with 9 (47%) males and 10 (53%) females. The mean follow-up period was 4.1 years (range, 7 months-9 years). Most of the patients received conservative treatments such as medication or physiotherapy. Compression therapies such as wearing of elastic garments/bandages were also administered, and surgical interventions were considered only when the patients became excessively symptomatic. Other treatments included laser therapy and sclerotherapy, and all the treatments were adjusted according to each case, tailored to the conditions of the individual patients. Conclusions KTS is an extremely rare, multifactorial disorder that induces widely varied symptoms. Because of this unique feature, plastic surgeons, when not careful, tend to attach a one-sided importance to typical symptoms such as limb hypertrophy or capillary malformation and thus overlook other symptoms and clinical features. KTS can be suspected in all infants who show capillary malformations or limb hypertrophy and require a multi-disciplinary approach for comprehensive management. PMID:26430625

  18. Review of clinical and laboratory experiences with molindone hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Claghorn, J L

    1985-08-01

    The literature concerning the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, receptor physiology, and clinical use of molindone is reviewed. Unanswered questions about the drug are addressed. Although molindone is reputed to have a short half-life (1.5 hours), clinical observations report a prolonged effect from a once-daily dose. Early in treatment, some patients show intolerance due to akathisia or extrapyramidal symptoms. This may be withdrawal dyskinesia due to discontinuation of another drug or an early adverse effect of molindone. Different effects on dopamine receptors have been described, but the significance of these properties for the development of tardive dyskinesia remains unclear. PMID:3894340

  19. [Clinical ethics in psychiatry: the experience at Douglas Hospital].

    PubMed

    Zacchia, Camillo; Tremblay, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    The authors present a brief overview of the clinical ethics committee within their mental health university institute as well as its evolving mandates over the past few decades. The main functions include case consultation, input on elaboration of institutional policy, and staff education as well as public information on issues of ethics and mental illness. With examples and questions brought to the committee's attention, the authors demonstrate how these functions are intertwined. The authors conclude that ethical questioning helps examine clinical practices and serves ultimately in guiding towards best practices in mental health. PMID:17111061

  20. Our experience in a psychodermatology liaison clinic at manipal, India.

    PubMed

    Shenoi, Shrutakirthi D; Prabhu, Smitha; Nirmal, B; Petrolwala, Shailee

    2013-01-01

    Psychodermatology is an emerging specialty in dermatology which deals with the interactions between mind and skin. Psychocutaneous diseases can be either primary psychiatric or primary cutaneous, with various degrees of associations between psyche and skin. Unless the dermatologist cultivates a special interest in this field, many an invisible mental disorder may be missed leading to sub optimal treatment of the visible skin condition. Though Dermatology Psychiatry liaison clinics are common in Europe and other western countries, it is just an emerging concept in India. Here we describe the working pattern of psychodermatology liaison clinic established in Manipal in August 2010 and describe briefly the type of cases attended to. PMID:23372214

  1. Our Experience in a Psychodermatology Liaison Clinic at Manipal, India

    PubMed Central

    Shenoi, Shrutakirthi D; Prabhu, Smitha; Nirmal, B; Petrolwala, Shailee

    2013-01-01

    Psychodermatology is an emerging specialty in dermatology which deals with the interactions between mind and skin. Psychocutaneous diseases can be either primary psychiatric or primary cutaneous, with various degrees of associations between psyche and skin. Unless the dermatologist cultivates a special interest in this field, many an invisible mental disorder may be missed leading to sub optimal treatment of the visible skin condition. Though Dermatology Psychiatry liaison clinics are common in Europe and other western countries, it is just an emerging concept in India. Here we describe the working pattern of psychodermatology liaison clinic established in Manipal in August 2010 and describe briefly the type of cases attended to. PMID:23372214

  2. Integrating Clinical Experiences in a TESOL Teacher Education Program: Curriculum Mapping as Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baecher, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Across all certification areas, teacher education is being challenged to better integrate clinical experiences with coursework. This article describes the process of curriculum mapping and its impact on the organization of clinical experiences in a master's TESOL program over a 1-year redesign process. Although curriculum mapping has been…

  3. An Enzymatic Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Incorporating an Introduction to Mathematical Method Comparison Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duxbury, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An enzymatic laboratory experiment based on the analysis of serum is described that is suitable for students of clinical chemistry. The experiment incorporates an introduction to mathematical method-comparison techniques in which three different clinical glucose analysis methods are compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman difference…

  4. Integrating Clinical Experiences in a TESOL Teacher Education Program: Curriculum Mapping as Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baecher, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Across all certification areas, teacher education is being challenged to better integrate clinical experiences with coursework. This article describes the process of curriculum mapping and its impact on the organization of clinical experiences in a master's TESOL program over a 1-year redesign process. Although curriculum mapping has been…

  5. Characteristics of effective simulated clinical experience instructors: interviews with undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Parsh, Bridget

    2010-10-01

    Effective clinical nursing instructors are essential for maximizing nursing students' educational experience. Due to a shortage of clinical placement sites and advancements in technology, nursing students are increasingly learning clinical judgment and decision making in the simulated clinical experience (SCE) with human patient simulators. In this environment, SCE instructors help students acquire knowledge and skills in decision making in a controlled, risk-free, hospital-like clinical environment. Using informal student interviews, this study examined nursing student perceptions of the characteristics of an effective instructor in the simulated clinical experience. To capture information about the characteristics of effective SCE instructors, interviews were conducted with students (N = 8) from two universities in Northern California. All participants had experience working with human patient simulators in the simulation laboratory. Students identified six themes for SCE instructors: Personality, Teaching Ability, Evaluation, Nursing Competence, Interpersonal Relationships, and Realism. Further research on the similarities and differences of this new educational environment is recommended. PMID:20669874

  6. Cleveland Clinic experience with interstitial laser coagulation of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulchaker, James C.; Ng, Christopher S.; Palone, David; Angie, Michelle; Kursh, Elroy D.

    2000-05-01

    Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) has long been considered the gold standard therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The problems associated with the TURP, which have been extensively described, include significant bleeding, TUR syndrome, incontinence, stricture, bladder neck contracture, and sexual dysfunction. The desire for simpler, less morbid alternative therapies to TURP has led to an eruption of research and development in the last decade. This is fueled by the continued research for more economical alternatives in our current high cost health care system.

  7. Geriatric hip fracture clinical pathway: the Hong Kong experience

    PubMed Central

    Leung, F.; Siu, D.; Wong, G.; Luk, K. D. K.

    2010-01-01

    Geriatric hip fracture is one of the commonest fractures in orthopaedic trauma. There is a trend of further increase in its incidence in the coming decades. Besides the development of techniques and implants to overcome the difficulties in fixation of osteoporosis bone, the general management of the hip fracture is also very challenging in terms of the preparation of the generally poorer pre-morbid state and complicate social problems associated with this group of patients. In order to cope with the increasing demand, our hospital started a geriatric hip fracture clinical pathway in 2007. The aim of this pathway is to provide better care for this group of patients through multidisciplinary approach. From year 2007 to 2009, we had managed 964 hip fracture patients. After the implementation of the pathway, the pre-operative and the total length of stay in acute hospital were shortened by over 5 days. Other clinical outcomes including surgical site infection, 30 days mortality and also incidence of pressure sore improved when compared to the data before the pathway. The rate of surgical site infection was 0.98%, and the 30 days mortality was 1.67% in 2009. The active participation of physiotherapists, occupational therapists as well as medical social workers also helped to formulate the discharge plan as early as the patient is admitted. In conclusion, a well-planned and executed clinical pathway for hip fracture can improve the clinical outcomes of the geriatric hip fractures. PMID:19543764

  8. The Clinical/Practicum Experience in Professional Preparation: Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralph, Edwin George; Walker, Keith; Wimmer, Randy

    2008-01-01

    The authors synthesize preliminary findings from an interdisciplinary study of the practicum/clinical phase of undergraduate pre-service education in the professions. Early data analysis identified similarities and differences across disciplines in terms of: (a) the terminology describing each practicum program, (b) the programs' key…

  9. The drug discovery by nanomedicine and its clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2014-06-01

    It is expected that the incidence of various adverse effects of anticancer agents maybe decreased owing to the reduced drug distribution in normal tissue. Anticancer agent incorporating nanoparticles including micelles and liposomes can evade non-specific capture by the reticuloendothelial system because the outer shell of the nanoparticles is covered with polyethylene glycol. Consequently, the micellar and liposomal carrier can be delivered selectively to a tumor by utilizing the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Presently, several anticancer agent-incorporating nano-carrier systems are under preclinical and clinical evaluation. Several drug delivery system formulations have been approved worldwide. Regarding a pipeline of clinical development of anticancer agent incorporating micelle carrier system, several clinical trials are now underway not only in Japan but also in other countries. A Phase 3 trial of NK105, a paclitaxel incorporating micelle is now underway. In this paper, preclinical and clinical studies of NK105, NC-6004, cisplatin incorporating micelle, NC-6300, epirubicin incorporating micelle and the concept of cancer stromal targeting therapy using nanoparticles and monoclonal antibodies against cancer related stromal components are reviewed. PMID:24755547

  10. Manual Aspiration Thrombectomy in Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Pollack, Simcha; Chichra, Astha; Moustakakis, Emmanuel; Park, Chong; Kerwin, Todd

    2016-03-01

    Multiple clinical studies have failed to establish the role of routine use of thrombectomy in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients. There is a paucity of data on the impact of thrombectomy in unselected STEMI patients outside clinical trials. We sought to evaluate the clinical variables and outcomes associated with the performance of thrombectomy in STEMI patients. We retrospectively examined the clinical outcomes in all STEMI patients who underwent successful percutaneous intervention (PCI) at our center. Patients were divided into two groups, one with patients who underwent conventional PCI and another with patients who had thrombus aspiration in addition to conventional PCI. We compared the baseline clinical characteristics, laboratory investigations, re-infarction rates, and all-cause mortality. Total 477 consecutive STEMI patients were identified. Overall, 29% (139) of the patients underwent conventional PCI and 71% (338) of the patients were treated with aspiration thrombectomy and PCI. In addition to the presence of thrombus, patients with nonanterior infarction, and patients with hemodynamic instability requiring intra-aortic balloon pump support were more likely to undergo thrombectomy. Thrombectomy was associated with higher enzymatic infarction (creatine kinase: 2,796 [2,575] vs. 1,716 [1,662]; p < 0.0001; CK-MB: 210.6 [156.0] vs. 142.0 [121.9], p < 0.0001). However, thrombectomy was not associated with any difference in 30 day reinfarction rate (3.3 vs. 2.9%, p = 0.83), mortality (5.0 vs. 7.2%, p = 0.35), or composite of death and 30 day reinfarction (7.7 vs. 9.4%, p = 0.55). We observed that STEMI patients with anterior infarction and hemodynamic instability were more likely to undergo thrombectomy during primary PCI. PMID:26900308

  11. [Clinical experience with imipenem-cilastatin in intensive therapy].

    PubMed

    Verre, M; D'Antona, R; Macrina, E

    1991-02-28

    The authors describe their experience with imipenem-cilastatin in 36 patients in critical conditions due to multiresistant bacterial infections. The efficacy and tolerability of the antibiotic are stressed. PMID:1827390

  12. Clinical use of Insulin Degludec: Practical Experience and Pragmatic Suggestions

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep

    2015-01-01

    Insulin degludec (IDeg) is an ultralong acting basal insulin. IDeg has unique pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties which allow once a daily dosage, at any time of the day. Its use is associated with a significantly lower risk of hypoglycemia. This review discusses the pragmatic use of IDeg, based on available evidence. A complete search of all nine original research papers (BEGIN® clinical trial program) pertaining to IDeg, listed in PubMed, was made to prepare this article. PMID:25838998

  13. Clinical experience in cell-based therapeutics: intervention and outcome.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Hans Joerg; Ganey, Timothy; Hutton, William C; Libera, Jeanette; Minkus, Yvonne; Alasevic, Olivera

    2006-08-01

    Disc herniation treated by discectomy results in a significant loss of nucleus material and disc height. Biological restoration through the use of autologous disc chondrocyte transplantation (ADCT) offers a potential to achieve functional integration of disc metabolism and mechanics. Nucleus regeneration using autologous cultured disc-derived chondrocytes has been demonstrated in a canine model and in clinical pilot studies. In 2002 a prospective, controlled, randomized, multicentre study comparing safety and efficacy of ADCT plus discectomy, with discectomy alone was initiated. The clinical goals were to provide long-term pain relief, maintain disc height, and prevent adjacent segment disease. Interim analysis was performed after 2 years; Oswestry (Low Back Pain/disability), Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale, as well as Prolo and VAS Score were used for the evaluation. Disc height was assessed by MRI. A clinically significant reduction of low back pain in the ADCT-treated group was shown by all three pain score systems. The median total Oswestry Score was 2 in the ADCT group compared with 6 in the control group. Decreases in the Disability index in ADCT-treated patients correlated with the reduction of low back pain. Decreases in disc height over time were only found in the control group, and of potential significance, intervertebral discs in adjacent segments appeared to retain hydration when compared to those adjacent to levels that had undergone discectomy without cell intervention. PMID:16850291

  14. Exploring FROC paradigm: initial experience with clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokh, Lana; Liu, Chi; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2006-03-01

    Design of receiver-operating characteristic (ROC)-based paradigm and data analysis methods that capture and adequately address the complexity of clinical decision-making will facilitate the development and evaluation of new image acquisition, reconstruction and processing techniques. We compare the JAFROC (Jackknife free-response ROC) to traditional ROC paradigm and analysis in two image evaluation studies. The first study is designed to address advantages of "free response" features of JAFROC paradigm in a breast lesion detection task. We developed tools allowing the acquisition of FROC-type rating data and use them on a set of simulated scintimammography images. Four observers participated in a small preliminary study. Rating data are then analyzed using traditional ROC and JAFROC techniques. The second study is aimed at comparing the diagnostic quality of myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) images obtained with different quantitative image reconstruction and compensation methods in an ongoing clinical trial. The observer assesses status of each of the three main vascular territories for each patient. This experimental set-up uses standardized locations of vascular territories on myocardial polar plot images, and a fixed number of three rating scores per patient. We compare results from the newly available JAFROC versus the traditional ROC analysis technique previously applied in similar studies, using a set of data from an on-going clinical trial. Comparison of two analysis methodologies reveals generally consistent behavior, corresponding to theoretical predictions.

  15. An enzymatic clinical chemistry laboratory experiment incorporating an introduction to mathematical method comparison techniques.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, Mark

    2004-07-01

    An enzymatic laboratory experiment based on the analysis of serum is described that is suitable for students of clinical chemistry. The experiment incorporates an introduction to mathematical method-comparison techniques in which three different clinical glucose analysis methods are compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman difference plots. The experiment may also be undertaken using simple glucose solutions by general biochemistry students. PMID:21706732

  16. Support for Clinical Experiences in Educational Administration Preparation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.

    School administration is an applied field requiring synthesis of ideas from diverse sources and application of these ideas in skillful practice. Administrator preparation programs must include opportunities for new administrators to practice their craft in nonthreatening environments and share experiences with peers while being supervised by…

  17. Co-Learning: Maximizing Learning in Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merk, Hillary; Waggoner, Jacqueline; Carroll, James

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and teacher educators have given increased attention to co-teaching during the student teaching experience. Co-teaching facilitates an apprenticeship arrangement that encourages modeling of classroom practice for the candidate and a chance to implement directly what is being learned by the apprentice. The co-teaching model can be…

  18. Students' Experiences of Learning Manual Clinical Skills through Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannesson, Eva; Silen, Charlotte; Kvist, Joanna; Hult, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Learning manual skills is a fundamental part of health care education, and motor, sensory and cognitive learning processes are essential aspects of professional development. Simulator training has been shown to enhance factors that facilitate motor and cognitive learning. The present study aimed to investigate the students' experiences and…

  19. Clinical Notes regarding the Experience of 'Presences' in Mourning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Michael F.

    1980-01-01

    Cases are described in which 'presences' or 'energies' were experienced as part of relinquishing attachments to lost persons. The evidence does not support any ready 'scientific' account; and it is emphasized that such experiences should be recognized and not discounted for lack of a clear theoretical explanation. (Author)

  20. Perampanel for focal epilepsy: insights from early clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Trinka, E; Steinhoff, B J; Nikanorova, M; Brodie, M J

    2016-03-01

    Perampanel is approved for adjunctive therapy of focal epilepsy with or without secondarily generalized seizures in patients aged >12 years. This narrative review uses real-world and clinical trial data to elucidate perampanel's role in the clinic. Audit data show good tolerability with perampanel and higher freedom-from-seizure rates in elderly vs younger patients. When using perampanel in elderly patients, special attention should be given to comorbidities and co-medication to avoid potential interactions or adverse events. Slower titration is generally recommended, and seizure control should be reassessed at a dose of 4 mg before further dose increases. Perampanel efficacy is similar in adolescents and adults; however, somnolence, nasopharyngitis, and aggression are more frequent in adolescents vs the overall population. Individualized and slow-dose titration can minimize adverse events. Low serum concentrations of perampanel may occur in patients also receiving some enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drugs; a perampanel dose increase may be required. Adverse events of importance with perampanel include dizziness; anger, aggression, and hostile behavior (particularly in adolescents); and falls (particularly in patients >65 years). An individualized approach to dosing, including slower up-titration and bedtime dosing, reduces dizziness risk. Other drugs may cause or aggravate dizziness; reducing concomitant drugs may be necessary when up-titrating perampanel. It would seem clinically appropriate to give due consideration to avoiding use in patients with a history of anger or hostile/aggressive behavior. The possibility of such behaviors should be discussed with patients before starting perampanel, with monitoring during up-titration. Slower up-titration of perampanel in older patients helps reduce fall risk. PMID:26506904

  1. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery: Cleveland Clinic experience

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive surgery has become a routine approach for aortic valve disease over the last 18 years at the Cleveland Clinic. It is performed in isolation or in combination with other procedures. The objective of this study is to review trends and outcomes in these patients. Methods Cleveland Clinic Cardiovascular Information Registry (CVIR) was searched for aortic valve procedures from 1996 to 2013. All patients undergoing isolated or combined aortic valve operations were included for analysis. The incision type and procedure type were reviewed and trends were evaluated over time. Cleveland Clinic outcomes with minimally invasive approaches to the aortic valve are reviewed. Results A total of 22,766 aortic valve surgical procedures were performed in this 18-year timeframe. Of these, 3,385 (14.9%) were minimally invasive procedures (MIPs) and 2,379 (10.5%) were isolated minimally invasive aortic valves. MIPs increased from 12.4% to 29.6% of the total aortic valve volume over the period of the study. Combined procedures, including concomitant surgery on the aorta, mitral valve, tricuspid valve, and arrhythmia surgery increased over time as well. Overall mortality for primary and reoperative aortic valve operations continues to decline and has consistently been less than 1% for several years. Conclusions A programmed approach to minimally invasive aortic valve surgery (MIAVS) with careful patient selection, appropriate use of preoperative imaging, and selective conversion to sternotomy when necessary, allows for aortic valve replacement (AVR) and a wide range of concomitant procedures to be performed safely in a large number of patients. PMID:25870809

  2. Lesch-Nyhan disease: clinical experience with nineteen patients.

    PubMed

    Christie, R; Bay, C; Kaufman, I A; Bakay, B; Borden, M; Nyhan, W L

    1982-06-01

    The clinical phenotype in Lesch-Nyhan disease has been analyzed in 19 patients studied in hospital. In each case the diagnosis was made on the basis of inactivity of the enzyme hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase in erythrocyte lysates. All had hyperuricemia, and the presence of 'orange sand' in the diaper was a prominent early complaint. All had self-mutilative behavior, of which the most characteristic form was biting the fingers or lips. All had the neurological syndrome of spasticity and choreoathetoid involuntary movements. All but one had less-than-normal intelligence. PMID:7095300

  3. CT Lesion Model-Based Structural Allografts: Custom Fabrication and Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Brune, Jan Claas; Hesselbarth, Uwe; Seifert, Philipp; Nowack, Dimitri; von Versen, Rüdiger; Smith, Mark David; Seifert, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Patients requiring knee and hip revision arthroplasty often present with difficult anatomical situations that limit options for surgery. Customised mega-implants may be one of few remaining treatment options. However, extensive damage to residual bone stock may also be present, and in such cases even customised prosthetics may be difficult to implant. Small quantities of lost bone can be replaced with standard allografts or autologous bone. Larger defects may require structural macro-allografts, sometimes in combination with implants (allograft-prosthesis composites). Methods Herein, we describe a process for manufacturing lesion-specific large structural allografts according to a 3D, full-scale, lithographically generated defect model. These macro-allografts deliver the volume and the mechanical stability necessary for certain complex revisions. They are patient-and implant-matched, negate some requirements for additional implants and biomaterials and save time in the operating theatre by eliminating the requirement for intra-operative sizing and shaping of standard allografts. Conclusion While a robust data set from long-term follow-up of patients receiving customised macro-allografts is not yet available, initial clinical experience and results suggest that lesion-matched macro-allografts can be an important component of revision joint surgery. PMID:23800856

  4. Caring touch - patients' experiences in an anthroposophic clinical context.

    PubMed

    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte; Hörberg, Ulrica; Dahlberg, Karin

    2015-12-01

    This study describes the phenomenon of caring touch from the patients' perspective in an anthroposophic clinical context where caring touch is often used to promote health and alleviate suffering. The aim of the study was to explore and phenomenologically describe the phenomenon of caring touch from the patients' perspectives. The study has been carried out with a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach in order to understand and describe human existential phenomena. Ten female patients were interviewed in an anthroposophic clinic in Sweden. The findings show how caring touch has multifaceted meanings and makes the patients' feel present and anchored in a meaningful context. The patients' feel that they are seen, accepted and confirmed. Furthermore, touch creates a caring space where the patients become receptive for care and has the power to alleviate the patients' suffering, as well as to frighten and cause or worsen the suffering. In order to take advantage of the caring potential, the patient needs to be invited to a respectful and sensitive form of touch. An interpersonal flexible space is necessary where the touch can be effective, and where a dynamic interplay can develop. In conclusion, caring touch is an opportunity for carers to support well-being and health. The carers need to approach their patients in both a sensitive and reflective way. A caring science perspective can serve as a help to further understand touch as a unique caring act. PMID:26178972

  5. Clinical profile and outcomes in brainstem glioma: An institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Lachi, Pavan Kumar; Irrakula, Monica; Ahmed, Syed Fayaz; Joseph, Deepa; Pamidighantam, Suresh; Jagannath Rao Naidu, Kotiyala V.

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the Study: This study was to analyze the clinical outcomes of brain stem glioma treated with radiation therapy (RT) in our institution. Material and Methods: Records of 48 patients with brainstem glioma treated between January 2007 and January 2013 were reviewed. Demographic variables, clinical variables, radiological findings and treatment details with respect to age, sex, location of tumor ( pontine Vs non pontine ), signs and symptoms, RT dose, follow up period and outcomes were recorded. Patients were subdivided into two groups based on their age, age <15 years (Group I) and age >=15 yrs (Group II). Results: The median age at diagnosis was 10 years (range 4-50). Male to female ratio was 11:10. Of the 48 cases analyzed, 27 patients (56%) were in group I and 21 (44%) were in group II. Radiologically, 90.5% had involvement of pons. 10 (21%) patients received RT dose >60 Gy and 38 (79 %) patients received RT dose of 54-60 Gy. Median overall survival was 7months (range 3-44 months). Median overall survival in Group I and Group II was 4 months and 10 months respectively (P = 0.042). Conclusions: Brain stem glioma in pediatric age group is associated with worse outcomes than in adults. PMID:26425160

  6. Clinical experience with thalidomide and lenalidomide in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Moehler, T

    2012-05-01

    Thal has antiangiogenic and immunomodulatory activity. Clinical research provided clear evidence that Thal belongs to the most active drugs for the treatment of multiple myeloma e.g. leading to decrease of monoclonal protein of at least 50 % in 30 % of patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. Randomized trials that were designed based on a large body of evidence from phase II trials determined that Thal significantly increases total response rate, progression-free and in some studies overall survival in combination regimens (dexamethason and or chemotherapy) for relapsed as well as newly diagnosed patients and was therefore approved for first-line treatment of Multiple Myeloma. Strict guidelines apply due to the teratogenic effects of Thal and to monitor and prevent other potential adverse events as neuropathy and thrombosis has been recognized by leading organizations as part of the treatment concept for patients with relapsed or refractory disease. The success of Thal has sparked the development of Thal analogues with Lenalidomide (Len) the most advanced compound which was approved for relapsed multiple myeloma. As Len has a lower incidence of polyneuropathy, constipation and somnolence compared to Thalidomid but at least equal if not higher efficacy Len is meanwhile used more frequently in clinical routine and has advantages in combination therapies with Bortezomib. Additional randomized studies will now define the status of Thal and Len for maintenance therapy and their optimal integration in multi-agent treatment regimen. PMID:22229246

  7. Clinical and experimental experience with factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Viles-Gonzalez, Juan F; Gaztanaga, Juan; Zafar, Urooj M; Fuster, Valentin; Badimon, Juan J

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of mortality in the industrial world today. We are constantly moving towards new and better ways of fighting this epidemic. Advances have been made in various fields such as patient education, imaging techniques, interventional cardiology, and novel therapeutic agents. In particular, antithrombotics are being studied with great interest and hope. Amid this class of agents, factor Xa inhibitors have already begun to show promising results in trials involving patients with acute coronary syndromes. Whereas DX-9065a is in late stage clinical trials, fondaparinux sodium is available for clinical use. Promising results have been obtained with fondaparinux sodium in patients with coronary artery disease in the PENTUA (Pentasaccharide in Unstable Angina) and PENTALYSE (Pentasaccharide as an Adjunct to Fibrinolysis in ST-Elevation Acute Myocardial Infarction) trials. Besides having a direct effect on the coagulation cascade, they have shown properties that indirectly influence the remodeling of plaques in the coronary circulation. Available evidence on factor Xa inhibitors does not ensure a remedy to acute coronary syndromes but it gives hope of improving current treatments and reducing the morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular disease. The efficacy and tolerability of fondaparinux sodium in the prevention and treatment of deep vein thrombosis (with or without pulmonary embolism) has been established in several large trials such as PENTATHLON (Pentasaccharide in Total Hip Replacement Surgery), PENTAMAKS (Pentasaccharide in Major Knee Surgery), EPHESUS (European Pentasaccharide Hip Elective Surgery), PENTHIFRA (Pentasaccharide in Hip-Fracture Surgery), and PENTHIFRA-Plus. Whereas fondaparinux sodium offers benefits over low molecular weight heparins and unfractionated heparin, the incidence of bleeding complications was greater with fondaparinux sodium than with unfractionated heparin. Treatment with factor VIIa can reverse the anticoagulant effect of fondaparinux sodium and this may be particularly important in patients who need to undergo emergency surgical procedures. Fondaparinux sodium has been recently approved for use, in conjunction with warfarin, in patients with symptomatic deep vein thrombosis or acute pulmonary embolism based on the results of two large trials conducted by the Matisse investigators. In conclusion, these observations strongly suggest the clinical potential of this class of agents in preventing arterial and venous thrombosis. PMID:15554723

  8. Impact of Simulation and Clinical Experience on Self-efficacy in Nursing Students: Intervention Study.

    PubMed

    Kimhi, Einat; Reishtein, Judith L; Cohen, Miri; Friger, Michael; Hurvitz, Nancy; Avraham, Rinat

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effect of simulation and clinical experience timing on self-confidence/self-efficacy for the nursing process. Using a randomized, double-crossover design, self-efficacy was measured 3 times. Although self-efficacy was significantly higher at time 1 for students who had clinical experience, there was no difference between the groups at the end of the course (time 2). Thus, simulation increased self-confidence/self-efficacy equivalently if placed either before or after clinical experience. PMID:26218009

  9. Clinical events in mad honey poisoning: a single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Mehmet; Bostan, Habib; Kaya, Ali Osman; Bilir, Ozlem; Satiroglu, Omer; Kazdal, Hizir; Karadag, Zakir; Bozkurt, Engin

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the clinical findings of patients who admitted to the hospital with the diagnosis of grayanotoxin/mad honey poisoning. Thirty-three patients were included in this study. Three patients were female (9%) and the others male (91%). Median age of patients was 52 (42-68). The most frequently observed findings were sinus bradycardia (91%), nausea-vomiting (81.8%), and dizziness (78.8%). Average heart rate was 55.35 +/- 6.72 beats/min. Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures were 77.86 +/- 16.64 mmHg and 46.42 +/- 12.30 mmHg, respectively. Mad honey poisoning is an important problem that is life-threatening in the Black Sea region of Turkey. PMID:19937314

  10. A training programme for clinical photographers - theCardiff experience.

    PubMed

    Lake, Amy; Young, Stephen

    2007-09-01

    The formal training and education of trainee clinical photographers started in Cardiff in 1969. Between 1974 and 1995 the trainees' foundation knowledge and skills were taught in purpose built accommodation, but since then has been in the main department, the Media Resources Centre, at the University Hospital of Wales. Prior to 1990 the trainee intake undertook the British Institute of Professional Photographers (BIPP) Qualifying Examination in Medical Photography, and between 1990 and 2001 they undertook this together with the Master of Science (MSc) in Medical Illustration. In preparation for state registration the Postgraduate Certificate (PGC) in Medical Illustration was developed with content that was appropriate to new entrants into the profession, and trainees were registered for this rather than the MSc in Medical Illustration. Since 2003 the on-job training scheme has been developed to follow a more formal structure closely integrated with the PGC. The authors describe the rationale for and implementation of these changes. PMID:17968722

  11. Clinical experience with aurora kinase inhibitors: a review.

    PubMed

    Boss, David S; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M

    2009-08-01

    The aurora kinase family of serine/threonine kinases comprises three members, designated auroras A, B, and C. Auroras A and B are essential components of the mitotic pathway, ensuring proper chromosome assembly, formation of the mitotic spindle, and cytokinesis. The role of aurora C is less clear. Overexpression of aurora A and B has been observed in several tumor types, and has been linked with a poor prognosis of cancer patients. Several small molecules targeting aurora kinases A and B or both have been evaluated preclinically and in early phase I trials. In this review we aim to summarize the most recent advances in the development of aurora kinase inhibitors, with a focus on the clinical data. PMID:19684075

  12. Japanese experience with clinical trails of fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Arai, T.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, Y.; Takada, N.; Kamata, S.

    1982-12-01

    Between November, 1975 and November, 1981, 825 patients were treated with 30 MeV (d-Be) neutrons at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba. At the Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, 302 patients were referred to the Radiation Therapy department and were treated with 16 MeV (d-Be) neutrons. The emphasis of these clinical trials with fast neutrons was placed on the estimation of the effect of fast neutrons for locally advanced cancers or radioresistant cancers, and on evaluation of the rate of complication of normal tissues following irradiaton with fast neutrons. Results were evaluated for patients with previously untreated cancer; local control of the tumor was observed in 59.1%. Complications requiring medical care developed in only 32 patients. Patients who had received pre- or postoperative irradiation were excluded from this evaluation. Late reaction of soft tissue seemed to be more severe than that observed with photon beams. The results also suggest that for carcinoma of the larynx, esophagus, uterine cervix, Pancoasts's tumor of the lung and osteosarcoma, fast neutrons were considered to be effectively applied in this randomized clinical trial. For carcinoma of the larynx, a fast nuetron boost was effectively delivered, although an interstitial implant was necessarily combined with fast neutrons for carcinoma of the tongue. The cumulative survival rate of the patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with fast neutrons was 26% compared to the survival rate of 10.5% obtained using photons. This was supported by evidence from the pathological studies that showed that the tumor cells which had deeply invaded into the esophagus were effectively destroyed when fast neutrons were applied.

  13. Japanese experience with clinical trials of fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Arai, T.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, Y.; Takada, N.; Kamata, S.

    1982-12-01

    Between November, 1975 and November, 1981, 825 patients were treated with 30 MeV (d-Be) neutrons at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba. At the Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, 302 patients were referred to the Radiation Therapy department and were treated with 16 MeV (d-Be) neutrons. The emphasis of these clinical trials with fast neutrons was placed on the estimation of the effect of fast neutrons for locally advanced cancers or radioresistant cancers, and on evaluation of the rate of complication of normal tissues following irradiation with fast neutrons. Results were evaluated for patients with previously untreated cancer; local control of the tumor was observed in 59.1%. Complications requiring medical care developed in only 32 patients. Late reaction of soft tissue seemed to be more severe than that observed with photon beams. The results also suggest that for carcinoma of the larynx, esophagus, uterine cervix, Pancoast's tumor of the lung and osteosarcoma, fast neutrons were considered to be effectively applied in this randomized clinical trial. For carcinoma of the larynx, a fast neutron boost was effectively delivered, although an interstitial implant was necessarily combined with fast neutrons for carcinoma of the tongue. The cumulative survival rate of the patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with fast neutrons of 26% compared to the survival rate of 10.5% obtained using photons. The results also indicate that local control and relief of the symptom related to Pancoast's tumor of the lung seemed to be better with neutrons than with photons. For patients suffering from osteosarcoma, the surgical procedures preserving the function of the leg and arm were studied according to the better local control rate of the tumor following fast neutron beam therapy.

  14. Expertise in Clinical Psychology. The Effects of University Training and Practical Experience on Expertise in Clinical Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Vollmer, Sabine; Spada, Hans; Caspar, Franz; Burri, Salome

    2013-01-01

    How do university training and subsequent practical experience affect expertise in clinical psychology? To answer this question we developed methods to assess psychological knowledge and the competence to diagnose, construct case conceptualizations, and plan psychotherapeutic treatment: a knowledge test and short case studies in a first study, and a complex, dynamically evolving case study in the second study. In our cross-sectional studies, psychology students, trainees in a certified postgraduate psychotherapist curriculum, and behavior therapists with more than 10?years of experience were tested (100 in total: 20 each of novice, intermediate, and advanced university students, postgraduate trainees, and therapists). Clinical knowledge and competence increased up to the level of trainees but unexpectedly decreased at the level of experienced therapists. We discuss the results against the background of expertise research and the training of clinical psychologists (in Germany). Important factors for the continuing professional development of psychotherapists are proposed. PMID:23543213

  15. The treatment of extensive scalp lesions using coplanar and non-coplanar photon IMRT: a single institution experience

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This clinical study compared four different cases of extensive scalp malignancies treated by intensity-modulated radiation therapy. The merits of coplanar and non-coplanar Step-and-shoot total scalp irradiation techniques were evaluated against the background of the literature. Methods Four patients (angiosarcoma, n=2, cutaneous B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, B-NHL, n=1, mycosis fungoides, n=1) treated between 2008 and 2012 at our institution were retrospectively analyzed. For every patient with executed coplanar plan, a non-coplanar plan and vice versa has been calculated additionally for direct comparison. Three patients underwent limited surgery before radiotherapy. Individual adapted bolus material was used for every patient (helmet). Total scalp dose was 30 Gy (B-NHL, mycosis fungoides) and 50 Gy (angiosarcoma) with fractional doses of 2.0-2.5 Gy (without sequential local boost in three patients). Conformity and homogeneity indexes and dose volume histograms were used for treatment plan comparison. Results Dose hot spots were higher in coplanar plans (110-128% Dmax). Non-coplanar plans showed a more homogeneous dose distribution (HI = .12 - .17) and superior PTV coverage (88 - 96%). Target dose coverage was 81-117% in non-coplanar and 30-128% in coplanar plans. Coplanar plans yielded a stronger dose gradient across the target (.7-1.6 Gy/mm) compared to non-coplanar plans (.8-1.3 Gy/mm). The most conformal plan was a non-coplanar plan (CI = .7). Mean and maximum brain doses were comparable and showed an almost linear decrease between min. and max. dose. The optic chiasm and brain stem was spared most with non-coplanar plans, mean doses to the lenses ranged between 4 and 8 Gy and were higher in non-coplanar plans as were doses to the optic nerves. Radiotherapy tolerance was acceptable and acute side effects included erythema, scalp pain, alopecia and radiodermatitis which all spontaneously resolved. Two patients accomplished partial response, two patients showed complete response after radiotherapy. Three patients had locally controlled tumors without recurrence until their deaths or at last follow up, one patient had local progression shortly after radiotherapy. Conclusions Photon-IMRT is an effective and feasible approach to treat extensive scalp malignancies. Non-coplanar beams could increase dose homogeneity and PTV coverage and might reduce doses particularly to the optic chiasm. PMID:24656070

  16. [Organizational model and clinical evaluation in Day Surgery: our experience].

    PubMed

    Rossitto, M; Buonamonte, S; Panacea, D; Manfré, A; Ardizzone, A; Ciccolo, A

    2005-01-01

    Surgical treatments in Day Surgery (DS) are characterised by limited hospitalisation during daytime on the base of an organizational model established by appropriate protocols. According to it, the patient at low operational risk and the patient whose post-operative management is easy is admitted to the programme. The Authors report their experience of DS focusing on the surgical and anaesthesiological qualifications that help to control the risk factors reducing the complications and thus guaranteeing the safety and effectiveness of the service. PMID:15847097

  17. Assessing Research Participants’ Perceptions of their Clinical Research Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Rhonda G.; Lee, Laura M.; Yessis, Jennifer; Coller, Barry S.; Henderson, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Participants’ perceptions of their research experiences provide valuable measures of ethical treatment, yet no validated instruments exist to measure these experiences. We conducted focus groups of research participants and professionals as the initial step in developing a validated instrument. Methods Research participants enrolled in twelve focus groups, consisting of: 1) individuals with disorders undergoing interventions or 2) in natural history studies; or 3) healthy volunteers. Research professionals participated in six separate groups of 1) IRB members, ethicists, Research Subject Advocates, 2) research nurses/coordinators, or 3) investigators. Focus groups used standard methodologies. Results 85 participants and 29 professionals enrolled at 8 academic centers. Altruism and personal relevance of the research were commonly identified motivators; financial compensation was less commonly mentioned. Participants were satisfied with informed consent processes but disappointed if not provided test results, or study outcomes. Positive relationships with research teams were valued highly. Research professionals were concerned about risks, undue influence, and informed consent. Conclusions Participants join studies for varied, complex reasons, notably altruism and personal relevance. They value staff relationships, health gains, new knowledge, and compensation, and expect professionalism and good organization. Based on these insights, we propose specific actions to enhance participant recruitment, retention and satisfaction. PMID:22212221

  18. Extensive Frequency Comb Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy of ThF^+ for Use in the Jila Electron Edm Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresh, Dan; Cossel, Kevin; Ye, Jun; Cornell, Eric

    2014-06-01

    The metastable ^3?_1 state in trapped HfF^+ is being used for an ongoing measurement of the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) ThF^+, which has a larger effective electric field and a longer-lived ^3?_1 state, offers increased sensitivity for an eEDM measurement. Recently, the Heaven group has spectroscopically studied the low-lying states of ThF^+. However, to date there is no detailed information available about technically-accessible laser transitions in the near-infrared region of the spectrum, which are necessary for state preparation and detection in an eEDM experiment. By applying the technique of frequency comb velocity modulation spectroscopy (VMS) to ThF^+ we can acquire 150 cm-1 of continuous, ion-sensitive spectra with 150 MHz resolution in 25 minutes. Here, we report on extensive broadband, high-resolution survey spectroscopy of ThF^+ in the near-IR where we have observed and accurately fit several rovibronic transitions. In addition, we have observed and characterized numerous rovibronic transitions from an unknown thoriated species of molecular ions. H. Loh, K. C. Cossel, M. C. Grau, K.-K. Ni, E. R. Meyer, J. L. Bohn, J. Ye, E. A. Cornell, Science 342, 1220 (2013). B. J. Barker, I. O. Antonov, M. C. Heaven, K. A. Peterson, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 104305 (2012). L. C. Sinclair, K. C. Cossel, T. Coffey, J. Ye, E. A. Cornell, PRL 107, 093002 (2011).

  19. Experience in international clinical research: the HIV Prevention Trials Network

    PubMed Central

    Sista, Nirupama Deshmane; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Hinson, Kathy; Donnell, Deborah; Eshleman, Susan H; Vermund, Sten H

    2012-01-01

    The HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) is supported by the NIH to conduct randomized clinical trials to assess the efficacy of HIV prevention strategies and technologies to reduce HIV transmission between adults. A special focus of attention is on the use of antiretroviral drugs to prevent HIV transmission, both by reducing infectiousness among HIV-infected persons taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and also by reducing susceptibility among HIV-uninfected persons taking antiretrovirals for pre-exposure prophylaxis. Studies may be developmental in nature to assess novel ideas for interventions or for assessing trial feasibility. However, pivotal efficacy trials to test HIV-specific prevention strategies and technologies are the main HPTN priority. Examples include a major protocol investigating the impact of expanded testing and linkage to care on HIV surveillance indicators in the USA (HPTN 065). Another protocol is addressing similar issues while also investigating how combinations of prevention approaches are best deployed to make a community-level impact in southern Africa (HPTN 071). HPTN 068 is evaluating a novel conditional cash transfer structural intervention to increase school completion rates in young girls and thereby reduce their HIV risk. Studies outside the US address the epidemic in most at-risk populations and include an assessment of opiate agonist therapy to reduce risk of HIV seroconversion among injection drug users (HTPN 058), methods to increase HIV testing rates (HTPN 043), as well as methods for reducing high-risk behaviors, and increasing adherence to cART in HIV-infected individuals (HPTN 062 and HPTN 063, respectively). The recent HPTN 052 study demonstrated that a 96% reduction in HIV transmission could be achieved between serodiscordant sexual partners by providing the infected partners with cART at a CD4+ cell count (350–550/µl) above the level that would usually qualify them for therapy in low- and middle-income countries. The immediate relevance to public health policy showcased in these trials is a paradigm for the HPTN: design and conduct of clinical trials using available licensed tools that can be rapidly translated for implementation (‘Prevention NOW!’). PMID:22348195

  20. Clinical experience in treatment of diffuse unilateral subretinal neuroretinitis

    PubMed Central

    Relhan, Nidhi; Pathengay, Avinash; Raval, Vishal; Nayak, Sameera; Choudhury, Himadri; Flynn, Harry W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical features, management, and outcomes of patients with diffuse unilateral subacute neuroretinitis (DUSN). Methods A noncomparative, consecutive analysis of case series from two tertiary care campuses of LV Prasad Eye Institute, India, between January 2011 and April 2014 was performed. Medical records of the patients presenting with DUSN (early or late stage) were reviewed. Results The current study included 13 patients. The majority (10/13, 76.92%) of the patients were aged 20 years or less. All patients had unilateral eye involvement. Visual acuity at presentation was 20/200 or worse in 9/13 (69.23%) patients. A delay in diagnosis occurred in 6/13 patients, and initial diagnosis in these patients included retinitis pigmentosa (4 patients) and posterior uveitis (2 patients). Clinical features included early presentation (prominent vitritis, localized retinitis, and vasculitis) in 7/13 (53.85%) patients and late presentation (attenuation of vessels, retinal pigment epithelium atrophic changes, and optic atrophy) in 6/13 (46.15%) patients. Worm could not be identified in any of the cases. All the patients received laser photocoagulation of retina and oral albendazole treatment for a period of 30 days. With treatment, visual acuity improved in seven patients (six early stage, one late stage) and remained unchanged in six patients. Mean follow-up period was 8.69 months (range, 1–21 months). The mean central foveal thickness in the affected eye, done by optical coherence tomography, during the late stage of the disease was 188.20±40 µm (range, 111–242 µm), which was significantly thinner than the fellow eye, 238.70±36.90 µm (range, 186–319 µm), P=0.008. Conclusion DUSN is a serious vision threatening disease, which may progress to profound vision loss in the later stage of the disease. Visualization of subretinal worm is usually not possible. Treatment with high-dose albendazole therapy and laser photocoagulation may alter the blood–retinal barrier and may be useful in achieving visual recovery. PMID:26491239

  1. Clinical Experience of Patients Referred to a Multidisciplinary Cardiac Oncology Clinic: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Sulpher, Jeffrey; Mathur, Shrey; Graham, Nadine; Crawley, Freya; Turek, Michele; Johnson, Christopher; Stadnick, Ellamae; Law, Angeline; Wentzell, Jason; Dent, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity is the second leading cause of long-term morbidity and mortality among cancer survivors. The purpose of this retrospective observational study is to report on the clinical and cardiac outcomes in patients with early stage and advanced cancer who were referred to our multidisciplinary cardiac oncology clinic (COC). A total of 428 patients were referred to the COC between October 2008 and January 2013. The median age of patients at time of cancer diagnosis was 60. Almost half of patients who received cancer therapy received first-line chemotherapy alone (169, 41.7%), of which 84 (49.7%) were exposed to anthracyclines. The most common reasons for referral to the cardiac oncology clinic were decreased LVEF (34.6%), prechemotherapy assessment (11.9%), and arrhythmia (8.4%). A total of 175 (40.9%) patients referred to the COC were treated with cardiac medications. The majority (331, 77.3%) of patients were alive as of January 2013, and 93 (21.7%) patients were deceased. Through regular review of cardiac oncology clinic referral patterns, management plans, and patient outcomes, we aim to continuously improve delivery of cardiac care to our patient population and optimize cardiac health. PMID:26300917

  2. Clinical Experience of Patients Referred to a Multidisciplinary Cardiac Oncology Clinic: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Sulpher, Jeffrey; Mathur, Shrey; Graham, Nadine; Crawley, Freya; Turek, Michele; Johnson, Christopher; Stadnick, Ellamae; Law, Angeline; Wentzell, Jason; Dent, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity is the second leading cause of long-term morbidity and mortality among cancer survivors. The purpose of this retrospective observational study is to report on the clinical and cardiac outcomes in patients with early stage and advanced cancer who were referred to our multidisciplinary cardiac oncology clinic (COC). A total of 428 patients were referred to the COC between October 2008 and January 2013. The median age of patients at time of cancer diagnosis was 60. Almost half of patients who received cancer therapy received first-line chemotherapy alone (169, 41.7%), of which 84 (49.7%) were exposed to anthracyclines. The most common reasons for referral to the cardiac oncology clinic were decreased LVEF (34.6%), prechemotherapy assessment (11.9%), and arrhythmia (8.4%). A total of 175 (40.9%) patients referred to the COC were treated with cardiac medications. The majority (331, 77.3%) of patients were alive as of January 2013, and 93 (21.7%) patients were deceased. Through regular review of cardiac oncology clinic referral patterns, management plans, and patient outcomes, we aim to continuously improve delivery of cardiac care to our patient population and optimize cardiac health. PMID:26300917

  3. Transdermal buprenorphine in chronic pain: indications and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Kusnik, Stefan; Likar, Rudolf; Sittl, Reinhard

    2008-11-01

    Transdermal buprenorphine has been shown to be effective in managing moderate-to-severe cancer pain and severe pain that is unresponsive to nonopioid analgesics. In clinical trials, it provided better pain relief than placebo, despite a higher consumption of rescue analgesia by placebo patients. Analgesia was rated as satisfactory or better by 90% of patients in a long-term follow-up study and 94.6% considered the buprenorphine matrix patch to be user friendly. Transdermal buprenorphine is well tolerated; most adverse events are transient local reactions to the patch or systemic effects typical of treatment with opioids. Even in opioid-experienced volunteers, buprenorphine does not cause respiratory depression at doses up to 70-times higher than those used for analgesia. No problems have been encountered when switching from another opioid to transdermal buprenorphine, or in combining the buprenorphine patch with intravenous morphine or tramadol for breakthrough pain. There is a growing body of evidence that transdermal buprenorphine may be particularly useful for managing neuropathic pain. Most notably, it appears to be effective in treating hyperalgesic states and syndromes characterized by pronounced central sensitization. PMID:24410602

  4. [Percutaneous biliary endoprostheses. Clinical experience of 6 years].

    PubMed

    Fava, M; Cruz, F; Lastra, M; Aguilar, J; Loyola, S

    1993-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness and long term permeability of percutaneous biliary endoprostheses. Seventy three patients with biliary tract obstruction due to a primary malignant tumor (n = 60), lymph node metastases at the porta hepatis (n = 10) and benign stenosis of a biliary-enteric anastomosis (n = 3), were treated between 1985 and 1990. Plastic prostheses were installed in 63 patients and metallic in 10. The procedure had a 30% incidence of complications. Thirty three percent of the prostheses remained patent until patient's death. In 15 and 40% of patients, signs of prosthesis obstruction were observed three and six months after installation respectively, bearing in mind a mean survival of 24 weeks. In 90% of patients there was a clinical and laboratory improvement. Mortality was 30% at 30 days in the group of patients with malignant diseases. It is concluded that the installation of percutaneous biliary endoprostheses is a relatively safe and well tolerated procedure, with a low incidence of complications or mortality and that allows an effective biliary decompression. PMID:8296079

  5. Clinical experiences of NBI laryngoscope in diagnosis of laryngeal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xinmeng; Yu, Dan; Zhao, Xue; Jin, Chunshun; Sun, Changling; Liu, Xueshibojie; Cheng, Jinzhang; Zhang, Dejun

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopy is essential for the diagnosis and treatment of cancers derived from the larynx. However, a laryngoscope with conventional white light (CWL) has technical limitations in detecting small or superficial lesions on the mucosa. Narrow band imaging especially combined with magnifying endoscopy (ME) is useful for the detection of superficial squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) within the oropharynx, hypopharynx, and oral cavity. A total of 3675 patients who have come to the outpatient clinic and complained of inspiratory stridor, dyspnea, phonation problems or foreign body sensation, were enrolled in this study. We describe the glottic conditions of the patients. All 3675 patients underwent laryngoscopy equipped with conventional white light (CWL) and NBI system. 1149 patients received a biopsy process. And 1153 lesions were classified into different groups according to their histopathological results. Among all the 1149 patients, 346 patients (312 males, 34 females; mean age 62.2±10.5 years) were suspected of having a total of 347 precancerous or cancerous (T1 or T2 without lymphnode involvement) lesions of the larynx under the CWL. Thus, we expected to attain a complete vision of what laryngeal lesions look like under the NBI view of a laryngoscope. The aim was to develop a complete description list of each laryngeal conditions (e.g. polyps, papilloma, leukoplakia, etc.), which can serve as a criteria for further laryngoscopic examinations and diagnosis. PMID:25419362

  6. Initial Clinical Experience Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Tuite, David J.; Kessel, David O. Nicholson, Anthony A.; Patel, Jai V.; McPherson, Simon J.; Shaw, David R.

    2007-07-15

    Background and purpose. The Amplatzer Vascular Plug (AVP) is a self-expanding nitinol wire mesh vascular embolization device derived from the Amplatz septal occluder. We assessed the results of vascular embolization obtained using the AVP. Methods. A retrospective review was carried out of 23 consecutive cases of vascular embolization using the AVP in a variety of different clinical settings. The AVP was chosen to have a diameter approximately 30-50% greater than the target vessel. The device was delivered via an appropriately sized guide catheter and was released when satisfactorily positioned. Additional embolic agents were used in some cases. Results. All target vessels were successfully occluded with no device malpositioning or malfunction. In 14 (61%) patients the AVP was the sole embolic material. In the remaining patients additional agents were used, particularly in preoperative embolization of highly vascular renal tumors. The AVP does not cause instantaneous thrombosis and in high-flow situations thrombosis typically takes up to 15 min. Conclusion. The AVP is a safe, effective embolization device that provides a useful adjunct to the therapeutic armamentarium. It is particularly suited to the treatment of short high-flow vessels where coil migration and catheter dislodgment might occur. In the majority of cases no additional embolic agents are necessary but it may take up to 15 min for complete thrombosis to occur.

  7. The universal serial bus endoscope: design and initial clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Zendejas, Gregorio; Dobke, Marek K; Guerrerosantos, Jose

    2004-01-01

    Endoscopic forehead lift is a well-established procedure in aesthetic plastic surgery. Many agree that currently available video-endoscopic equipment is bulky, multipieced and sometimes cumbersome in the operating theater. A novel system, the Universal Serial Bus Endoscope (USBE) was designed to simplify and reduce the number of necessary equipment pieces in the endoscopic setup. The USBE is attached by a single cable to a Universal Serial Bus (USB) port of a laptop computer. A built-in miniaturized cold light source provides illumination. A built-in digital camera chip enables procedure recording. The real-time images and movies obtained with USBE are displayed on the computer's screen and recorded on the laptop's hard disk drive. In this study, 25 patients underwent endoscopic browlift using the USBE system to test its clinical usefulness, all with good results and without complications or need for revision. The USBE was found to be reliable and easier to use than current video-endoscope equipment. The operative time needed to complete the procedure by the authors was reduced approximately 50%. The design and main technical characteristics of the USBE are presented. PMID:15383889

  8. [Clinical experience in systemic lupus erythematosus (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lin, S C; Jeng, G S; Yang, I J; Liao, S T; Wei, C F; Siauw, C P; Chen, P H

    1982-05-01

    Thirty-four cases of SLE treated during the past seven years (1974-1981) in Taipei Municipal Jen-Ai Hospital are reported and analyzed. Diagnosis of SLE was based on ARA preliminary criteria and Hahn's preliminary criteria. There were 32 females (94.2%) and 2 males (5.8%). The mean age at diagnosis was 28.5 years (range 14-51). Clinical manifestations were as follows: facial erythema 24 cases (70.6%), Raynaud's phenomenon 4 cases (11.4%), oral or nasopharyngeal ulceration 7 cases (20.6%), arthritis without deformity 22 cases (64.7%), proteinuria 21 cases (61.8%), pleural or pericardial effusions 13 cases (38.2%), psychosis or convulsions 9 cases (26.5%), hematological abnormalities 25 cases (73.5%). Laboratory findings were as follows: positive ANA test 33/34 (97.0%), hypocomplementemia 10/13 (76.9%), direct Coombs' test 4/18 (22.2%), indirect Coombs' test 1/13 (7.6%), LE cell 19/34 (55.9%), RA Latex 7/17 (41.7%), polyclonal gammopathy 15/17 (88.2%), anemia 25/34 (73.5%), leukopenia 12/34 (35.3%), thrombocytopenia 10/34 (29.4%). Three cases were complicated by herpes zoster, one by hyperthyroidism, and one by autoimmune thyroiditis. Ten cases died, including 4 renal failure, 2 heart failure, 2 cases of committed suicide and 1 case of CNS involvement. PMID:7094684

  9. 42 CFR 482.80 - Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... center. (3) A pancreas transplant center is not required to comply with the clinical experience... pancreas transplants performed at the center. (4) A center that is requesting initial Medicare approval...

  10. Clinical Experience of a Diet Designed to Reduce Aging

    PubMed Central

    Rosedale, Ron; Westman, Eric C.; Konhilas, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Aging is associated with elevated levels of glucose, insulin, and triglycerides. Our objective was to assess the effect of a nutritional program designed to reduce these correlates of aging. Design: This is a retrospective chart review of patients attending an outpatient metabolic management program including a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet, nutritional supplementation and periodic individual visits. Outcomes measured at baseline and follow-up included body weight, fasting serum glucose, insulin, leptin, lipids, and thyroid hormone. Results: Thirty-one patients were identified with complete information. The mean age of patients was 57.6 ± 2.4 consisting of 53% female and 47% male patients. The average duration between follow up visits was 91.5 ± 8.5 days. Of the parameters measured at the follow-up visit, body weight, serum leptin, insulin, fasting glucose, triglyceride, and free T3 significantly decreased by 8.1 ± 0.8%, 48.2 ± 3.8%, 40.1 ± 4.7%, 7.6 ± 2.1%, 28.3 ± 5.7%, and 10.8 ± 1.8%, respectively. Furthermore, the triglyceride/high density lipoprotein ratio decreased from 5.1 ± 1.7 to 2.6 ± 0.5. Conclusions: In the context of an outpatient medical clinic, a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet with nutritional supplementation led to improvements in serum factors related to the aging process. Further research regarding this dietary approach and its relationship to aging is in order. PMID:20204146

  11. Clinical experiences of bixalomer usage at our hospital.

    PubMed

    Shima, Hideaki; Makino, Ryojiro; Hata, Kenichiro; Ban, Akihiko; Funao, Kiyoaki; Sugita, Syouzou; Furumitsu, Yutaka; Inoue, Keisuke; Yoshimoto, Mitsuru; Okamura, Mikio

    2014-06-01

    In 2012, bixalomer was launched as new non-calcium (Ca) containing phosphorus (P) binder, increasing the choices available for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia. In this study, among the maintenance dialysis patients at our hospital, we newly administered bixalomer to 21 patients who were not receiving any P binders, and switched to bixalomer for 13 patients who had been receiving sevelamer hydrochloride and 23 patients who had been receiving lanthanum carbonate. The initial dosage of bixalomer was set as 1500?mg/day for new administration patients and dosage equivalent to that of the previously-used P binder for patients who were switched to bixalomer. The dosage of bixalomer was increased if the effects were insufficient. The serum P, Ca and intact parathyroid hormone concentrations as well as serum pH, HCO3 concentration and base excess were evaluated prior to administering bixalomer, 3 months and 6 months after administering bixalomer. For the group who were newly administered bixalomer, significant reductions in serum P concentrations were seen (P<0.01) and no significant changes were seen in clinical test items that serve as indices for acidosis. For the group who were switched from sevelamer hydrochloride to bixalomer, significant reductions in serum P concentrations were seen (P<0.01) together with significant improvements in acidosis (P<0.01). For the group who were switched from lanthanum carbonate to bixalomer, by increasing the dosage of bixalomer to approximately three times the dosage of lanthanum carbonate, it was possible to maintain post-switch serum P concentrations at almost the same levels as before the switch. Furthermore, there were minor, yet significant improvements in acidosis (P<0.01). From these results, it was shown that bixalomer can be useful treatment alternative in dialysis patients for whom it is necessary to change the P binder due to insufficient management of serum P concentrations or development of acidosis. PMID:24975890

  12. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Children: Mayo Clinic Experience.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Janani; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Jacob, Eapen K; Kreuter, Justin D; Go, Ronald S

    2016-04-01

    We studied 35 pediatric patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia seen at Mayo Clinic from 1994 to 2014. The median age was 10.0 years and 65.7% were males. Most had warm antibodies (80.0%) and some secondary to viral (14.3%) or autoimmune disorders (31.4%). Seven (20.0%) patients presented with Evans syndrome, 3 of whom also had common variable immunodeficiency. The median hemoglobin at diagnosis was 6.1 g/dL and 62.8% patients required red cell transfusions. The severity of anemia was worse among children below 10 years (median 5.5 vs. 7.0 g/dL, P=0.01). Steroid was the initial treatment for 88.5% patients, with overall response rate of 82.7% (68.5% complete, 14.2% partial) and median response duration of 10.7 months (range, 0.2 to 129.7+ mo). After median follow-up of 26.6 months, 8 (22.8%) patients relapsed. Salvage treatments included splenectomy, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, and mycophenolate mofetil. Infectious complications occurred in 9 (25.7%) patients and 1 patient died of cytomegalovirus infection. Four patients had cold agglutinin disease and 3 (75.0%) responded to steroids. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder in pediatric population and most respond well to steroids regardless of the type of antibody. Infectious complications are common and screening for immunodeficiency is recommended among those with Evans syndrome. PMID:26925716

  13. Geriatric Medicine Fellows' Experiences and Attitudes toward an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagri, Anita S.; Zaw, Khin M.; Milanez, Marcos N.; Palacios, Juan J.; Qadri, Syeda S.; Bliss, Linda A.; Roos, Bernard A.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2009-01-01

    A total of 8 geriatric medicine fellows participated in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) assessing communication skills and clinical reasoning in common geriatric syndromes. To determine their perceptions about the experience, we conducted surveys and semistructured interviews. We analyzed the survey data using descriptive…

  14. Children's Views Matter Too! A Pilot Project Assessing Children's and Adolescents' Experiences of Clinical Psychology Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michael; Russo, Kate

    2009-01-01

    This pilot study explored the experiences and understanding of clinical psychology practices and services of children and adolescents attending clinical psychology outpatient appointments. Fifteen young participants took part in the study. A content analysis indicated that young children and adolescents have an appropriate understanding of the…

  15. Cooperating Teacher Evaluation of Candidates in Clinical Practice and Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, David W.; Zhou, Yunfang

    2009-01-01

    The Investigators hypothesized cooperating teachers' evaluations of candidates in clinical practice and field experiences would possess higher scores than those provided by clinical and education division faculty. However, the reasons for the higher scores proved to be much more complex than originally thought. While it was assumed that teachers…

  16. Geriatric Medicine Fellows' Experiences and Attitudes toward an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagri, Anita S.; Zaw, Khin M.; Milanez, Marcos N.; Palacios, Juan J.; Qadri, Syeda S.; Bliss, Linda A.; Roos, Bernard A.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2009-01-01

    A total of 8 geriatric medicine fellows participated in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) assessing communication skills and clinical reasoning in common geriatric syndromes. To determine their perceptions about the experience, we conducted surveys and semistructured interviews. We analyzed the survey data using descriptive…

  17. Authenticity in Learning--Nursing Students' Experiences at a Clinical Education Ward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silen, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students' experiences of learning at a clinical education ward. Design/methodology/approach: The setting is a clinical education ward for nursing students at a department of infectious diseases. A qualitative study was carried out exploring students' encounters with patients,…

  18. Experiences of Student Speech-Language Pathology Clinicians in the Initial Clinical Practicum: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Lori A.

    2011-01-01

    Speech-language pathology literature is limited in describing the clinical practicum process from the student perspective. Much of the supervision literature in this field focuses on quantitative research and/or the point of view of the supervisor. Understanding the student experience serves to enhance the quality of clinical supervision. Of…

  19. The Impact of Clinical Experiences from Athletic Training Student and Preceptor Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benes, Sarah S.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Clinical education is an integral part of athletic training programs. This is where students should develop their professional identities and become socialized into the profession. Understanding the student and preceptor perspectives of the impact that clinical experiences have on students can provide valuable insight into this aspect of…

  20. Using a Web-Based Database to Record and Monitor Athletic Training Students' Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kirk W.; Williams, Lisa; Janicki, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to introduce a documentation recording system employing the Microsoft Structured Query Language (MS-SQL) database used by the Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP) for recording and monitoring of athletic training student (ATS) clinical experiences and hours. Background: Monitoring ATSs clinical…

  1. Students' Experiences of Clinic-Based Learning during a Final Year Veterinary Internship Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthew, Susan M.; Taylor, Rosanne M.; Ellis, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated veterinary students' experiences of clinic-based learning (CBL) during a comprehensive final year internship programme. Open-ended surveys (n = 93) were used to gather qualitative data about students' conceptions of what is learned during CBL and their approaches to learning in clinics. Phenomenography was used for detailed…

  2. Authenticity in Learning--Nursing Students' Experiences at a Clinical Education Ward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silen, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students' experiences of learning at a clinical education ward. Design/methodology/approach: The setting is a clinical education ward for nursing students at a department of infectious diseases. A qualitative study was carried out exploring students' encounters with patients,…

  3. Students' Experiences of Clinic-Based Learning during a Final Year Veterinary Internship Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthew, Susan M.; Taylor, Rosanne M.; Ellis, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated veterinary students' experiences of clinic-based learning (CBL) during a comprehensive final year internship programme. Open-ended surveys (n = 93) were used to gather qualitative data about students' conceptions of what is learned during CBL and their approaches to learning in clinics. Phenomenography was used for detailed…

  4. The Impact of Clinical Experiences from Athletic Training Student and Preceptor Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benes, Sarah S.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Clinical education is an integral part of athletic training programs. This is where students should develop their professional identities and become socialized into the profession. Understanding the student and preceptor perspectives of the impact that clinical experiences have on students can provide valuable insight into this aspect of…

  5. Role of Clinical Education Experiences on Athletic Training Students' Development of Professional Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Context: Limited evidence exists on the role clinical education can play in the development of athletic training student commitment for the profession. Objective: Investigating the role clinical education experiences play on the development of passion for athletic training. Design: Exploratory qualitative study. Setting: Athletic training…

  6. Efficiency of Clinical Decision Support Systems Improves with Experience.

    PubMed

    Meulendijk, Michiel C; Spruit, Marco R; Willeboordse, Floor; Numans, Mattijs E; Brinkkemper, Sjaak; Knol, Wilma; Jansen, Paul A F; Askari, Marjan

    2016-04-01

    Efficiency, or the resources spent while performing a specific task, is widely regarded as one the determinants of usability. In this study, the authors hypothesize that having a group of users perform a similar task over a prolonged period of time will lead to improvements in efficiency of that task. This study was performed in the domain of decision-supported medication reviews. Data was gathered during a randomized controlled trial. Three expert teams consisting of an independent physician and an independent pharmacist conducted 150 computerized medication reviews on patients in 13 general practices located in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Results were analyzed with a linear mixed model. A fixed effects test on the linear mixed model showed a significant difference in the time required to conduct medication reviews over time; F(31.145)?=?14.043, p?experience over time. PMID:26791992

  7. Clinical review: The Israeli experience: conventional terrorism and critical care

    PubMed Central

    Aschkenasy-Steuer, Gabriella; Shamir, Micha; Rivkind, Avraham; Mosheiff, Rami; Shushan, Yigal; Rosenthal, Guy; Mintz, Yoav; Weissman, Charles; Sprung, Charles L; Weiss, Yoram G

    2005-01-01

    Over the past four years there have been 93 multiple-casualty terrorist attacks in Israel, 33 of them in Jerusalem. The Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center is the only Level I trauma center in Jerusalem and has therefore gained important experience in caring for critically injured patients. To do so we have developed a highly flexible operational system for managing the general intensive care unit (GICU). The focus of this review will be on the organizational steps needed to provide operational flexibility, emphasizing the importance of forward deployment of intensive care unit personnel to the trauma bay and emergency room and the existence of a chain of command to limit chaos. A retrospective review of the hospital's response to multiple-casualty terror incidents occurring between 1 October 2000 and 1 September 2004 was performed. Information was assembled from the medical center's trauma registry and from GICU patient admission and discharge records. Patients are described with regard to the severity and type of injury. The organizational work within intensive care is described. Finally, specific issues related to the diagnosis and management of lung, brain, orthopedic and abdominal injuries, caused by bomb blast events associated with shrapnel, are described. This review emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary team approach in caring for these patients. PMID:16277738

  8. [Application of portfolio in teaching dermatology clinic: an experience in teaching of medicine].

    PubMed

    de Cabalier, M E; Chalub, D M

    2009-01-01

    We present a learning experience conducted in the Chair of Dermatology Clinic of the Faculty of Medical Sciences, National University of Cordoba in the context of curriculum change. For comprehension,present a theoretical framework and practical from the conceptualization of the "portfolio" teaching and its role teaching and learning paradigms sustained constructivist medical education. The portfolio Teach-ing is not a collection of papers, but a coherent set of experiences led thoughtful learning between teachers and students. This resource allows to account for the "qualitative achievements" of students from their work produced, sorted and evaluated in a carefully planned sequence of experiences and case Dermatology Clinic. To introduce the teaching portfolio, the planned new student grouping shapes and a sequence of learning experiences for the construction of this resource, namely: "The development of theoretical material iconographic resources and working guidelines for students. "The clinical reasoning on a case or laboratory experience-Clinical case Discussion and bibliography. -The development of records to from observation of patients. "The study of clinical cases: diagnosis and evolution of clinical cases. Interconsultations-Registration and referrals. "The magazine room and sharing experiences. In each of these, production, tutorial feedback Team teaching and assessment tasks allowed assessment approach to learning and improving he achievements of the students to the approval of the subject. PMID:21138664

  9. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE AND IMPACT OF A COMMUNITY-LED VOLUNTEER ATMOSPHERIC HAZE CLINIC IN SINGAPORE.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Benson; Liew, Choon Fong; Oon, Hazel H

    2014-11-01

    The Pollutant Standards Index reached a life-threatening level of 401 in Singapore on 21 June 2013. Grassroot leaders in Ulu Pandan Constituency conducted the first community-led free atmospheric Haze Clinic from 25 June 2013 to 11 July 2013 to provide accessible medical assessment for affected community members. This provided insight into the common conditions afflicting that community during the haze period while allaying public anxiety. Seventy-two consultations were conducted over the 3 week period, of which 26 (36.1%) were haze related, 18 (25%) were possibly haze related and 28 (38.9%) were non-haze related. The majority of haze-related complaints were respiratory, eye and skin-related. During a haze crisis, such adhoc community-led clinics may help alleviate the surge in patients seen at emergency departments and public primary health clinics. Many of the patients seen were from low income families and a significant number (38.9%) sought help for non-haze related medical conditions. PMID:26466431

  10. Evidence That a Psychopathology Interactome Has Diagnostic Value, Predicting Clinical Needs: An Experience Sampling Study

    PubMed Central

    van Os, Jim; Lataster, Tineke; Delespaul, Philippe; Wichers, Marieke; Myin-Germeys, Inez

    2014-01-01

    Background For the purpose of diagnosis, psychopathology can be represented as categories of mental disorder, symptom dimensions or symptom networks. Also, psychopathology can be assessed at different levels of temporal resolution (monthly episodes, daily fluctuating symptoms, momentary fluctuating mental states). We tested the diagnostic value, in terms of prediction of treatment needs, of the combination of symptom networks and momentary assessment level. Method Fifty-seven patients with a psychotic disorder participated in an ESM study, capturing psychotic experiences, emotions and circumstances at 10 semi-random moments in the flow of daily life over a period of 6 days. Symptoms were assessed by interview with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS); treatment needs were assessed using the Camberwell Assessment of Need (CAN). Results Psychotic symptoms assessed with the PANSS (Clinical Psychotic Symptoms) were strongly associated with psychotic experiences assessed with ESM (Momentary Psychotic Experiences). However, the degree to which Momentary Psychotic Experiences manifested as Clinical Psychotic Symptoms was determined by level of momentary negative affect (higher levels increasing probability of Momentary Psychotic Experiences manifesting as Clinical Psychotic Symptoms), momentary positive affect (higher levels decreasing probability of Clinical Psychotic Symptoms), greater persistence of Momentary Psychotic Experiences (persistence predicting increased probability of Clinical Psychotic Symptoms) and momentary environmental stress associated with events and activities (higher levels increasing probability of Clinical Psychotic Symptoms). Similarly, the degree to which momentary visual or auditory hallucinations manifested as Clinical Psychotic Symptoms was strongly contingent on the level of accompanying momentary paranoid delusional ideation. Momentary Psychotic Experiences were associated with CAN unmet treatment needs, over and above PANSS measures of psychopathology, similarly moderated by momentary interactions with emotions and context. Conclusion The results suggest that psychopathology, represented as an interactome at the momentary level of temporal resolution, is informative in diagnosing clinical needs, over and above traditional symptom measures. PMID:24466189

  11. The Lived Experience and Training Needs of Librarians Serving at the Clinical Point-of-Care

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, Gretchen M.; Edwards, Mary E.; Butson, Linda C.; Auten, Beth

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the emotional experiences and perceptions of librarians embedded into clinical care teams and how those perceptions affect their training and preparation needs. Qualitative research methodologies were applied to textual data drawn from focus groups (n=21), interviews (n=2), and an online survey (n=167), supplemented by quantitative survey data. Phenomenological results show librarians experience strongly effective responses to clinical rounding. Important factors include personal confidence; relationships with team members, patients, and families; and the stressful environment. Analysis of librarians’ perceived educational needs indicates that training must address specialized subjects including medical knowledge, clinical culture, and institutional politics. PMID:26211792

  12. A systematic review of evidence on the links between patient experience and clinical safety and effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Cathal; Lennox, Laura; Bell, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore evidence on the links between patient experience and clinical safety and effectiveness outcomes. Design Systematic review. Setting A wide range of settings within primary and secondary care including hospitals and primary care centres. Participants A wide range of demographic groups and age groups. Primary and secondary outcome measures A broad range of patient safety and clinical effectiveness outcomes including mortality, physical symptoms, length of stay and adherence to treatment. Results This study, summarising evidence from 55 studies, indicates consistent positive associations between patient experience, patient safety and clinical effectiveness for a wide range of disease areas, settings, outcome measures and study designs. It demonstrates positive associations between patient experience and self-rated and objectively measured health outcomes; adherence to recommended clinical practice and medication; preventive care (such as health-promoting behaviour, use of screening services and immunisation); and resource use (such as hospitalisation, length of stay and primary-care visits). There is some evidence of positive associations between patient experience and measures of the technical quality of care and adverse events. Overall, it was more common to find positive associations between patient experience and patient safety and clinical effectiveness than no associations. Conclusions The data presented display that patient experience is positively associated with clinical effectiveness and patient safety, and support the case for the inclusion of patient experience as one of the central pillars of quality in healthcare. It supports the argument that the three dimensions of quality should be looked at as a group and not in isolation. Clinicians should resist sidelining patient experience as too subjective or mood-oriented, divorced from the ‘real’ clinical work of measuring safety and effectiveness. PMID:23293244

  13. Influence of an extensive inquiry-based field experience on pre-service elementary student teachers' science teaching beliefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sumita

    This study examined the effects of an extensive inquiry-based field experience on pre-service elementary teachers' personal agency beliefs (PAB) about teaching science and their ability to effectively implement science instruction. The research combined quantitative and qualitative approaches within an ethnographic research tradition. A comparison was made between the pre and posttest scores for two groups. The experimental group utilized the inquiry method; the control group did not. The experimental group had the stronger PAB pattern. The field experience caused no significant differences to the context beliefs of either groups, but did to the capability beliefs. The number of college science courses taken by pre-service elementary teachers' was positively related to their post capability belief (p = .0209). Qualitative information was collected through case studies which included observation of classrooms, assessment of lesson plans and open-ended, extended interviews of the participants about their beliefs in their teaching abilities (efficacy beliefs), and in teaching environments (context beliefs). The interview data were analyzed by the analytic induction method to look for themes. The emerging themes were then grouped under several attributes. Following a review of the attributes a number of hypotheses were formulated. Each hypothesis was then tested across all the cases by the constant comparative method. The pattern of relationship that emerged from the hypotheses testing clearly suggests a new hypothesis that there is a spiral relationship among the ability to establish communicative relationship with students, desire for personal growth and improvement, and greater content knowledge. The study concluded that inquiry based student teaching should be encouraged to train school science teachers. But the meaning and the practice of the inquiry method should be clearly delineated to ensure its correct implementation in the classroom. A survey should be undertaken to ascertain the extent to which what is currently being practiced, as the inquiry method is indeed the inquiry method. Practicing the inquiry method is greatly more demanding than traditional methods of teacher training. A widespread adoption of the method will require considerable changes in these factors.

  14. Comprehensive Experiment--Clinical Biochemistry: Determination of Blood Glucose and Triglycerides in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiao, Li; Xiujuan, Shi; Juan, Wang; Song, Jia; Lei, Xu; Guotong, Xu; Lixia, Lu

    2015-01-01

    For second year medical students, we redesigned an original laboratory experiment and developed a combined research-teaching clinical biochemistry experiment. Using an established diabetic rat model to detect blood glucose and triglycerides, the students participate in the entire experimental process, which is not normally experienced during a…

  15. Experience of Adjunct Novice Clinical Nursing Faculty: An Interpretive Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative interpretive case study was to describe the experience of adjunct novice clinical nursing faculty who has less than three years teaching experience or feels novice in this setting. The nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and is forecasted to have significant impacts on the health care delivery…

  16. Comprehensive Experiment--Clinical Biochemistry: Determination of Blood Glucose and Triglycerides in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiao, Li; Xiujuan, Shi; Juan, Wang; Song, Jia; Lei, Xu; Guotong, Xu; Lixia, Lu

    2015-01-01

    For second year medical students, we redesigned an original laboratory experiment and developed a combined research-teaching clinical biochemistry experiment. Using an established diabetic rat model to detect blood glucose and triglycerides, the students participate in the entire experimental process, which is not normally experienced during a…

  17. Experience of Adjunct Novice Clinical Nursing Faculty: An Interpretive Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative interpretive case study was to describe the experience of adjunct novice clinical nursing faculty who has less than three years teaching experience or feels novice in this setting. The nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and is forecasted to have significant impacts on the health care delivery…

  18. What Students Really Learn: Contrasting Medical and Nursing Students' Experiences of the Clinical Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liljedahl, Matilda; Boman, Lena Engqvist; Fält, Charlotte Porthén; Bolander Laksov, Klara

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores and contrasts undergraduate medical and nursing students' experiences of the clinical learning environment. Using a sociocultural perspective of learning and an interpretative approach, 15 in-depth interviews with medical and nursing students were analysed with content analysis. Students' experiences are described using a…

  19. Left atrial appendage isolation using percutaneous (endocardial/epicardial) devices: Pre-clinical and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Romero, Jorge; Natale, Andrea; Engstrom, Krysthel; Di Biase, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in the elderly population and it is associated with a four-fold to five-fold increased risk of thromboembolic events. It was not until the mid-1950s that the left atrial appendage (LAA) was identified as the main location of thrombus formation, particularly in patients with non-valvular AF. In this review, we explain at some extent its embryology, anatomy and physiology, and as well as the clinical and pre-clinical trials published to date testing the safety and efficacy of most LAA closure devices. Among those devices, the most studied include the PLAATO system (ev3 Endovascular, Plymouth, MN), the Amplatzer cardiac plug (St Jude, Golden Valley, MN; St. Jude Medical, Minneapolis, MN), the WATCHMAN device (Boston Scientific, Plymouth, MN; Atritech Inc., Plymouth, MN), and the LARIAT device (SentreHEART, Palo Alto, CA). Similarly, newer LAA closure devices currently under investigation such as the Transcatheter Patch (Custom Medical Devices, Athens, Greece), AEGIS, and the Coherex WaveCrest (Salt Lake City, UT) will also be discussed. Future perspectives and the need for well-designed prospective studies between devices and new oral anticoagulant drugs are also proposed. PMID:26141854

  20. Prehospital Emergency Nursing students' experiences of learning during prehospital clinical placements.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Kim; Fridlund, Bengt; Thorén, Ann-Britt

    2013-07-01

    Clinical placements play an important role in learning a new profession, but students report about poor placement experiences. Standards have been laid down for improvements within clinical training in Prehospital Emergency Nursing programmes in Sweden, but no studies have been carried out in this field in a Swedish context. The purpose of this study was thus to describe the experiences of Prehospital Emergency Nursing (PEN) students of their clinical placement and the effect on their learning process. Data were collected in 28 individual interviews and analyzed in accordance with Flanagan's Critical Incident Technique. Three main areas emerged: the professional clinical supervisor, the clinical placement setting and the learning strategy. All these areas played a significant role in the PEN students' learning progress and development into a new professional role. The choice of clinical supervisor (CS) and clinical placement is important if PEN students' learning is to be an effective and positive experience. The prehospital environment is unique and can have positive and negative effects on student learning depending on the support and structure given during their clinical placement. A learning strategy based on reflective dialogue, CS continuity and a learning structure based on the prehospital environment is presented. PMID:23140791

  1. 42 CFR 482.82 - Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for re...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., clinical experience, and outcome requirements for re-approval of transplant centers. 482.82 Section 482.82... Hospitals Transplant Center Data Submission, Clinical Experience, and Outcome Requirements § 482.82 Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for...

  2. Er:YAG laser: clinical experience based upon scientific evidence: clinical cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Pecora, Jesus D.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Souza-Campos, Dilma H.; Vieira de Medeiros, Urubatan

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this work was to demonstrate, based upon scientific evidence, the efficacy of dental treatment using the Er:YAG laser. The Er:YAG laser is able of quick cavitation of dental structure with minimal thermal effect. It is also well known that most treatment is carried out without the need of local anesthesia. It is also recognized that its work with no vibration and in a non-contact mode. This paper reports the clinical results of 590 dental procedures carried out with the Er:YAG laser on selected patients. The laser was used for composite removal, cavity enamel preparation, carious dentine removal and conditioning of both dentin and enamel. Dental treatment with the Er:YAG laser as a secure and efficient method of treatment with more comfort for the patients, high acceptance form patients and less need of using local anesthesia.

  3. Clinical-radiological improvement following low-tech surgical treatment of an extensive cervical-medullary idiopathic syringomyelia in a low-resource African neurosurgical practice.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, Amos O; Ogbole, Godwin I

    2015-07-01

    Surgical intervention is not so commonly deployed for idiopathic syringomyelia, even the symptomatic ones; is only undertaken, in the current era, after thorough clinical evaluation and extensive high-resolution neuroimaging; and is more assuredly performed, high-tech, in health facilities in the developed world with cutting edge logistic supports. In the practice environment of a low-resource African developing country, a 41-year-old young man recently presented in severe clinical-neurological deficit, Nurick grade 5, with an extensive cervical-medullary idiopathic syringomyelia. In spite of severe preoperative and intraoperative resource limitations, he successfully underwent spinal surgical decompression, fenestration of syrinx, and expansile duraplasty. He improved clinically postoperatively and achieved mobility, Nurick grade 3, before hospital discharge. He sustained this improvement, Nurick grade 3 to 2, 20 months post-op. He is now independent, needing only a walking stick to aid ambulation, and an MRI at this time showed only minimal focal post-op changes but total disappearance of the syrinx. PMID:25697142

  4. Uncertainty in the Translation of Preclinical Experiments to Clinical Trials. Why do Most Phase III Clinical Trials Fail?

    PubMed Central

    Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2009-01-01

    A large majority of Phase III, large scale, clinical trials will fail, including gene therapy trials. This paper attempts to address some of the causes that may have inadvertently led to such a high failure rate. After briefly reviewing the detailed and high quality work that goes both into the preparation and conduct of such large Phase III clinical trials, and the preclinical science that is used to support and originate such trials, this paper proposes a novel approach to translational medicine which would increase the predictability of success of Phase III clinical trials. We propose that a likely cause of such failures is the lack of “robustness” in the preclinical science underpinning the Phase I/II and III clinical trials. Robustness is defined as stability/reproducibility in the face of challenges. Many times preclinical experiments are tested in a very narrow set of experimental conditions. Thus, when such approaches are finally tested in the context of human disease, the challenge provided by the varied age of patients, the complex genetic makeup of human populations, and the complexities of the diseases to be treated provide challenges which were never tested or modeled. We believe that the introduction of revised approaches to preclinical science, including the use of the latest developments in statistical, scientific, mathematical, and biological models, ought to lead to more robust preclinical experimentation with its subsequent translation, to more robust Phase III clinical trials. PMID:19860651

  5. [Cardiologic application of a clinical database with graphic extension and its utilization in inter-hospital teleconsultation].

    PubMed

    Cervesato, E; Nicolosi, G L; Zanuttini, D

    1995-10-01

    A local area network of personal computers has been operative in our Cardiology Department for seven years, to collect and retrieve on-line character-based data. At present, the network is based on 2 servers and 21 workstations. DBF and DOS files are used by a Clipper 5.2d compiled program to handle demographic data, clinical reports (32,000/year) and diagnostic codes of more than 52,000 patients. In the last two years, we started entring ECG tracings using: RS232 connection, floppy disk transfer, and modem connection with commercially available machines as well as by image scanner. We integrated our clinical database with three dedicated subsystems, written in Assembly and C languages, to manage drawings, digital ECGs and complete reports. Mass storage is provided by a 10 Gbyte magneto-optical disk autochanger physically connected to a dedicated server running an original software manager to optimize routine access to the optical disks. Interhospital network connections were established with two different institutions to allow clinical information sharing, long distance consultation and ECG transfer. The system has been found to be fast, user-friendly and suitable for daily operation of a large cardiological database. Standardized versions of the system are running in seven other cardiology institutions in Italy. PMID:8682226

  6. [A clinical and experimental study on early diagnosis of myocardial infarct extension by measuring the activity of serum pyruvate kinase].

    PubMed

    Xing, Q

    1990-12-01

    To explore the early diagnostic effects of serum pyruvate kinase (PK) on myocardial infarct extension (MIE), the activity of serum PK, glutamate oxalacetate transaminase (GOT), creatine kinase (CK) and its isoenzyme (CK-MB) were measured in 102 cases of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The results showed that the dynamic changes of PK were similar to that of CK-MB, but serum PK was 9.2 hours earlier than CK-MB in the determination of the onset of MIE. Furthermore we introduced MIE and AMI model by ligating the branch of coronary arteries in conscious dogs. Compare the pathologic findings with the PK dynamic changes showed that the double peak and plateau types were brought about by MIE. We believe that serial measuring of serum PK was helpful in the early diagnosis of MIE. PMID:2093551

  7. Clinical Outcome and Safety of Multilevel Vertebroplasty: Clinical Experience and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mailli, Leto Filippiadis, Dimitrios K.; Brountzos, Elias N.; Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Kelekis, Alexios

    2013-02-15

    To compare safety and efficacy of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) when treating up to three vertebrae or more than three vertebrae per session. We prospectively compared two groups of patients with symptomatic vertebral fractures who had no significant response to conservative therapy. Pathologic substrate included osteoporosis (n = 77), metastasis (n = 24), multiple myeloma (n = 13), hemangioma (n = 15), and lymphoma (n = 1). Group A patients (n = 94) underwent PVP of up to three treated vertebrae (n = 188). Group B patients (n = 36) underwent PVP with more than three treated vertebrae per session (n = 220). Decreased pain and improved mobility were recorded the day after surgery and at 12 and 24 months after surgery per clinical evaluation and the use of numeric visual scales (NVS): the Greek Brief Pain Inventory, a linear analogue self-assessment questionnaire, and a World Health Organization questionnaire. Group A presented with a mean pain score of 7.9 {+-} 1.1 NVS units before PVP, which decreased to 2.1 {+-} 1.6, 2.0 {+-} 1.5 and 2.0 {+-} 1.5 NVS units the day after surgery and at 12 and 24 months after surgery, respectively. Group B presented with a mean pain score of 8.1 {+-} 1.3 NVS units before PVP, which decreased to 2.2 {+-} 1.3, 2.0 {+-} 1.5, and 2.1 {+-} 1.6 NVS units the day after surgery and at 12 and 24 months after surgery, respectively. Overall pain decrease and mobility improvement throughout the follow-up period presented no statistical significance neither between the two groups nor between different underlying aetiology. Reported cement leakages presented no statistical significance between the two groups (p = 0.365). PVP is an efficient and safe technique for symptomatic vertebral fractures independently of the vertebrae number treated per session.

  8. Laboratory diagnosis, clinical management and infection control of the infections caused by extensively drug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli: a Chinese consensus statement.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) are defined as bacterial isolates susceptible to two or fewer antimicrobial categories. XDR-GNB mainly occur in Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The prevalence of XDR-GNB is on the rise in China and in other countries, and it poses a major public health threat as a result of the lack of adequate therapeutic options. A group of Chinese clinical experts, microbiologists and pharmacologists came together to discuss and draft a consensus on the laboratory diagnosis, clinical management and infection control of XDR-GNB infections. Lists of antimicrobial categories proposed for antimicrobial susceptibility testing were created according to documents from the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Multiple risk factors of XDR-GNB infections are analyzed, with long-term exposure to extended-spectrum antimicrobials being the most important one. Combination therapeutic regimens are summarized for treatment of XDR-GNB infections caused by different bacteria based on limited clinical studies and/or laboratory data. Most frequently used antimicrobials used for the combination therapies include aminoglycosides, carbapenems, colistin, fosfomycin and tigecycline. Strict infection control measures including hand hygiene, contact isolation, active screening, environmental surface disinfections, decolonization and restrictive antibiotic stewardship are recommended to curb the XDR-GNB spread. PMID:26627340

  9. Global dissemination of extensively drug-resistant carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae: clinical perspectives on detection, treatment and infection control.

    PubMed

    Tängdén, T; Giske, C G

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacilli is on the rise worldwide, posing a major public health threat. Previously, this was mostly a problem in Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter, but during the last decade, carbapenem resistance has escalated in medically important species such as Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. In particular, the rising trend in E. coli is of concern, as this may lead to almost untreatable community-acquired infections. Resistance is conferred by carbapenemases, which are beta-lactamases that can breakdown essentially all beta-lactams. Moreover, bacteria carrying these resistance determinants are often resistant to other treatment options, due to the frequent co-acquisition of non-beta-lactam resistance genes located on the same mobile genetic elements. The detection of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) is a challenge, because some carbapenemases produce relatively discrete levels of carbapenem resistance. Current clinical evidence for treatment guidance is limited and based on retrospective observational studies and case reports. Existing data support the use of combination therapy for treatment of severe infections caused by CPE. Combination regimens including colistin, carbapenems, tigecycline, aminoglycosides and fosfomycin have been used. Randomized controlled studies of combination regimens are ongoing and may help to determine the optimal therapy. Novel beta-lactamase inhibitors may also have a role in future treatment of these infections. Strict infection control measures including isolation or cohort care of affected patients as well as contact tracing and active screening are needed to curb the spread of CPE. In this review, we provide a clinical perspective on the management of patients infected or colonized with CPE. PMID:25556628

  10. The role of technological progress vs. accidental discoveries and clinical experience in the evolution of dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wańkowicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    The 50th anniversary of dialysotherapy celebrated by nephrologists around the world in 2012 provided an opportunity for discussion on the role of clinical experience in relation to technological progress in the evolution of dialysis, especially of recently observed inadequate decrease in mortality/morbidity rates of patients on chronic dialysis. My report, based on almost 50 years of career in nephrology, refers the evolution of dialysis, from catharsis to modern dialysotherapy with special attention devoted to nowadays gravely underestimated role of clinical experience and personalized professional care for patients. PMID:24226207

  11. Lessons from New Experiences in Extension in West Africa: Management Advice for Family Farms and Farmers' Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faure, Guy; Kleene, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The emergence of Management Advice for Family Farms in West Africa is closely related to the increased integration of farmers into an open market economy. This is creating a strong demand from farmers for advisory support services, focusing on management of the farm. With the gradual withdrawal of the State from extension services delivery, a…

  12. Characterization of the Genetic Diversity of Extensively-Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates from Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, Omar; Rastogi, Nalin; Bartra, Carlos; Couvin, David; Galarza, Marco; Asencios, Luis; Mendoza-Ticona, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Background Peru holds the fourth highest burden of tuberculosis in the Americas. Despite an apparently well-functioning DOTS control program, the prevalence of multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) continues to increase. To worsen this situation, cases of extensively drug resistance tuberculosis (XDR-TB) have been detected. Little information exists about the genetic diversity of drug-susceptible vs. MDR-TB and XDR-TB. Methods Cryopreserved samples of XDR strains from 2007 to 2009 (second semester), were identified and collected. Starting from 227 frozen samples, a total of 142 XDR-TB strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC; 1 isolate per patient) were retained for this study. Each strain DNA was analyzed by spoligotyping and the 15-loci Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit (MIRU-15). Results Among the 142 isolates analyzed, only 2 samples (1.41%) could not be matched to any lineage. The most prevalent sublineage was Haarlem (43.66%), followed by T (27.46%), LAM (16.2%), Beijing (9.15%), and X clade (1.41%). Spoligotype analysis identified clustering for 128/142 (90.1%) isolates vs. 49/142 (34.5%) with MIRUs. Of the samples, 90.85% belonged to retreated patients. The drug resistant profile demonstrated that 62.67% showed resistance to injectable drugs capreomycin (CAP) and kanamycin (KAN) vs. 15.5% to CAP alone and 21.8% to KAN alone. The SIT219/T1 and SIT50/H3 were the most prevalent patterns in our study. The spoligoforest analysis showed that SIT53/T1 was at the origin of many of the T lineage strains as well as a big proportion of Haarlem lineage strains (SIT50/H3, followed by SIT47/H1, SIT49/H3, and SIT2375/H1), as opposed to the SIT1/Beijing strains that did not appear to evolve into minor Beijing sublineages among the XDR-TB strains. Conclusion In contrast with other Latin-American countries where LAM sublineage is the most predominant, we found the Haarlem to be the most common followed by T sublineage among the XDR-TB strains. PMID:25489950

  13. Asian Americans and Cancer Clinical Trials: A Mixed-Methods Approach to Understanding Awareness and Experience

    PubMed Central

    Paterniti, Debora A.; Chen, Moon S.; Chiechi, Christine; Beckett, Laurel A.; Horan, Nora; Turrell, Corinne; Smith, Ligaya; Morain, Claudia; Montell, Lisa; Gonzalez, Jose Luis; Davis, Sharon; Lara, Primo N.

    2006-01-01

    Cancer clinical trials have been based on low accrual rates. Barriers to recruitment of minority populations affect the generalizability and impact of trial findings for those populations. The authors undertook a mixed-methods approach to understanding levels of awareness and experiences with cancer clinical trials. A survey was administered to new cancer patients and their caretakers (family, close friends, or other social support) at outpatient oncology clinics. Field observations of the trial accrual process also were conducted by employing the grounded theory approach in qualitative methods. Comparison of survey results for Asian-American respondents and non-Asian respondents indicated that Asians were less likely to have heard the term “clinical trial” and were more likely to define a clinical trial as “an experiment” or “a test procedure in a clinic” than non-Asians. Asians were more likely to have employer-based insurance and to report understanding issues related to cost reimbursement. Asians were less likely to have been involved in or to know someone in a trial and reported less willingness than white respondents to consider trial participation. Qualitative observations suggested that Asians who presented for a potential trial were interested in the availability of a novel cancer therapy but were not eligible for available trials. Multiple strategies will be necessary to enhance awareness of and experience with accrual to cancer clinical trials for Asians, including richer understanding and increased involvement of Asians in cancer clinical trials and greater attention to the location and diversity of the Asian population in structuring study centers and evaluating trial results. PMID:16247795

  14. Women’s Management of Recurrent Bacterial Vaginosis and Experiences of Clinical Care: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bilardi, Jade; Walker, Sandra; McNair, Ruth; Mooney-Somers, Julie; Temple-Smith, Meredith; Bellhouse, Clare; Fairley, Christopher; Chen, Marcus; Bradshaw, Catriona

    2016-01-01

    Background Few data are available on how women manage recurring bacterial vaginosis (BV) and their experiences of the clinical care of this condition. This study aimed to explore women’s recurrent BV management approaches and clinical care experiences, with a view to informing and improving the clinical management of BV. Methods A descriptive, social constructionist approach was chosen as the framework for the study. Thirty-five women of varying sexual orientation who had experienced recurrent BV in the past 5 years took part in semi-structured interviews. Results The majority of women reported frustration and dissatisfaction with current treatment regimens and low levels of satisfaction with the clinical management of BV. Overall, women disliked taking antibiotics regularly, commonly experienced adverse side effects from treatment and felt frustrated at having symptoms recur quite quickly after treatment. Issues in clinical care included inconsistency in advice, misdiagnosis and inappropriate diagnostic approaches and insensitive or dismissive attitudes. Women were more inclined to report positive clinical experiences with sexual health physicians than primary care providers. Women’s frustrations led most to try their own self-help remedies and lifestyle modifications in an attempt to treat symptoms and prevent recurrences, including well-known risk practices such as douching. Conclusion In the face of considerable uncertainty about the cause of BV, high rates of recurrence, unacceptable treatment options and often insensitive and inconsistent clinical management, women are trying their own self-help remedies and lifestyle modifications to prevent recurrences, often with little effect. Clinical management of BV could be improved through the use of standardised diagnostic approaches, increased sensitivity and understanding of the impact of BV, and the provision of evidence based advice about known BV related risk factors. PMID:27010725

  15. Appraisals and Responses to Experimental Symptom Analogues in Clinical and Nonclinical Individuals With Psychotic Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Thomas A.; Gaynor, Keith J.; Hunter, Mike D.; Woodruff, Peter W. R.; Garety, Philippa A.; Peters, Emmanuelle R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Cognitive models of psychosis suggest that anomalous experiences alone do not always lead to clinical psychosis, with appraisals and responses to experiences being central to understanding the transition to “need for care”. Methods: The appraisals and response styles of Clinical (C; n = 28) and Nonclinical (NC; n = 34) individuals with psychotic experiences were compared following experimental analogues of thought interference (Cards Task) and auditory hallucinations (Virtual Acoustic Space Paradigm). Results: The groups were matched in terms of their psychotic experiences. As predicted, the C group scored higher than the NC group on maladaptive appraisals following both tasks, rated the experience as more personally significant, and was more likely to incorporate the experimental setup into their ongoing experiences. The C group also appraised the Cards Task as more salient, distressing, and threatening; this group scored higher on maladaptive—and lower on adaptive—response styles, than the NC group on both tasks. Conclusions: The findings are consistent with cognitive models of psychosis, with maladaptive appraisals and response styles characterizing the C group only. Clinical applications of both tasks are suggested to facilitate the identification and modification of maladaptive appraisals. PMID:23858493

  16. An Exploration of Dental Students' Assumptions About Community-Based Clinical Experiences.

    PubMed

    Major, Nicole; McQuistan, Michelle R

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain which assumptions dental students recalled feeling prior to beginning community-based clinical experiences and whether those assumptions were fulfilled or challenged. All fourth-year students at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry & Dental Clinics participate in community-based clinical experiences. At the completion of their rotations, they write a guided reflection paper detailing the assumptions they had prior to beginning their rotations and assessing the accuracy of their assumptions. For this qualitative descriptive study, the 218 papers from three classes (2011-13) were analyzed for common themes. The results showed that the students had a variety of assumptions about their rotations. They were apprehensive about working with challenging patients, performing procedures for which they had minimal experience, and working too slowly. In contrast, they looked forward to improving their clinical and patient management skills and knowledge. Other assumptions involved the site (e.g., the equipment/facility would be outdated; protocols/procedures would be similar to the dental school's). Upon reflection, students reported experiences that both fulfilled and challenged their assumptions. Some continued to feel apprehensive about treating certain patient populations, while others found it easier than anticipated. Students were able to treat multiple patients per day, which led to increased speed and patient management skills. However, some reported challenges with time management. Similarly, students were surprised to discover some clinics were new/updated although some had limited instruments and materials. Based on this study's findings about students' recalled assumptions and reflective experiences, educators should consider assessing and addressing their students' assumptions prior to beginning community-based dental education experiences. PMID:26933101

  17. Clinical placements in Australian general practice: (Part 1) the experiences of pre-registration nursing students.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Hardy, Jennifer; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    An international shift towards strengthening primary care services has stimulated the growth of nursing in general (family) practice. As learning in the clinical setting comprises a core component of pre-registration nursing education, it is logical that clinical placement opportunities would follow the workforce growth in this setting. Beyond simply offering placements in relevant clinical areas, it is vital to ensure high quality learning experiences that meet the educational needs of pre-registration nurses. Part 1 of a two part series reports on the qualitative study of a mixed methods project. Fifteen pre-registration nursing students participated in semi-structured interviews following a clinical placement in an Australian general practice. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and underwent a process of thematic analysis. Findings are presented in the following four themes; (1) Knowledge of the practice nurse role: I had very limited understanding, (2) Quality of the learning experience: It was a fantastic placement, (3) Support, belonging and mutual respect: I really felt part of the team, (4) Employment prospects: I would really, really love to go to a general practice but …… General practice placements exposed students to a diverse range of clinical skills which would equip them for future employment in primary care. Exposure to nursing in general practice also stimulated students to consider a future career in this clinical setting. PMID:25979152

  18. The Use of Student Time Task Measures in Pre Student Teaching Clinical Experiences: A Panel Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waimon, Morton D.; And Others

    Illinois State University's teacher education program's professional sequence is organized around separate teaching skills, each of which relates to student outcomes in classrooms. Initially, a group of University High (U-High) Laboratory School supervisors was formed to develop clinical experiences which would enable prospective teachers to…

  19. Management Development in Health Care: Exploring the Experiences of Clinical Nurse Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Laura; Milner, Brigid

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dramatic reforms in the health service in recent years. Design/methodology/approach--Examines management development in health care, and explores the experiences of clinical nurse managers. Findings--Duplication of agencies and multiplication of roles have led to tensions in terms of both…

  20. Why Clinical Experience and Mentoring Are Replacing Student Teaching on the Best Campuses. A White Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, James W.; Watson, Audra M.

    2014-01-01

    Woodrow Wilson Senior Fellow James W. Fraser and Audra Watson, the Foundation's Director of Mentoring and Induction Strategy, take a look at emerging trends in clinical preparation for new teachers. This new white paper is based on experience with the Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowships, and includes observations from some of the colleges and…

  1. The Use of Student Time Task Measures in Pre Student Teaching Clinical Experiences: A Panel Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waimon, Morton D.; And Others

    Illinois State University's teacher education program's professional sequence is organized around separate teaching skills, each of which relates to student outcomes in classrooms. Initially, a group of University High (U-High) Laboratory School supervisors was formed to develop clinical experiences which would enable prospective teachers to…

  2. The Experience of a Department of Medicine with a Clinical Medical Library Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Naomi; Kaye, Donald

    1985-01-01

    Five years of experience using the services of a clinical medical librarian at the Hospital of the Medical College of Pennsylvania are reviewed. There were increases in the use of the librarian for patient-related queries, research, and oral presentations. (Author/MLW)

  3. Preservice Teachers' Reflection on Clinical Experiences: A Comparison of Blog and Final Paper Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harland, Darci J.; Wondra, Joshua D.

    2011-01-01

    This study focused on the depth of reflection in the writing of preservice teachers who completed end-of-the-semester reflective papers or reflective blogs for undergraduate education courses associated with clinical experiences. Coders rated the depth of reflection as one of four categories: non-reflection, understanding, reflection, or critical…

  4. Second Year Associate Degree Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty Attitudes towards Clinical Educational Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFauci, Frances F.

    2009-01-01

    Professional registered nursing is an essential part of the health care system and student nurses need experimental learning with actual patients to learn to practice as a nurse. The health care system has changed dramatically and nursing schools have decreasing access to the health care agencies. The clinical educational experience develops…

  5. Second Year Associate Degree Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty Attitudes towards Clinical Educational Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFauci, Frances F.

    2009-01-01

    Professional registered nursing is an essential part of the health care system and student nurses need experimental learning with actual patients to learn to practice as a nurse. The health care system has changed dramatically and nursing schools have decreasing access to the health care agencies. The clinical educational experience develops…

  6. Management Development in Health Care: Exploring the Experiences of Clinical Nurse Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Laura; Milner, Brigid

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dramatic reforms in the health service in recent years. Design/methodology/approach--Examines management development in health care, and explores the experiences of clinical nurse managers. Findings--Duplication of agencies and multiplication of roles have led to tensions in terms of both…

  7. A Tool To Evaluate How to Learn from Experience in Clinical Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumas, Louise; Villeneuve, Jean; Chevrier, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    An evaluation tool for the process of learning from experience in a clinical practicum at baccalaureate nursing level was developed and validated. This reflective type of process evaluation helps students link theory to practice and think critically. (Contains 50 references.) (JOW)

  8. The Working Practices and Clinical Experiences of Paediatric Speech and Language Therapists: A National UK Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pring, Tim; Flood, Emma; Dodd, Barbara; Joffe, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Background: The majority of speech and language therapists (SLTs) work with children who have speech, language and communication needs. There is limited information about their working practices and clinical experience and their views of how changes to healthcare may impact upon their practice. Aims: To investigate the working practices and…

  9. The Working Practices and Clinical Experiences of Paediatric Speech and Language Therapists: A National UK Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pring, Tim; Flood, Emma; Dodd, Barbara; Joffe, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Background: The majority of speech and language therapists (SLTs) work with children who have speech, language and communication needs. There is limited information about their working practices and clinical experience and their views of how changes to healthcare may impact upon their practice. Aims: To investigate the working practices and…

  10. Constructing a nursing identity within the clinical environment: The student nurse experience.

    PubMed

    Walker, Sandra; Dwyer, Trudy; Broadbent, Marc; Moxham, Lorna; Sander, Teresa; Edwards, Kristin

    2014-11-28

    Abstract Background: Nursing identity is an important element of being a nurse. Student nurses begin the construction of their nursing identity during their clinical placements. Aim: The aim of this research was to examine how the student nurses of a regional Australian university construct their identity when on off-campus clinical placement. Methods/Design: Using a constructivist approach an online survey was used to elicit data in response to the question 'What elements are needed during the work integrated learning experience to enable undergraduate nursing students to construct their nursing identity?' Results/Findings: Findings reveal five key elements to the construction of students' nursing identity; positive role models, belonging, peer support, critical thinking abilities and confidence. Conclusion: Such findings are important as they provide information for student nurses, preceptors and educators in guiding clinical placement experiences that are able to facilitate the development of the nursing identity. PMID:25429770

  11. Comprehensive Experiment—Clinical Biochemistry: Determination of Blood Glucose and Triglycerides in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Li; Xiujuan, Shi; Juan, Wang; Song, Jia; Lei, Xu; Guotong, Xu; Lixia, Lu

    2015-01-01

    For second year medical students, we redesigned an original laboratory experiment and developed a combined research-teaching clinical biochemistry experiment. Using an established diabetic rat model to detect blood glucose and triglycerides, the students participate in the entire experimental process, which is not normally experienced during a standard clinical biochemistry exercise. The students are not only exposed to techniques and equipment but are also inspired to think more about the biochemical mechanisms of diseases. When linked with lecture topics about the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids, the students obtain a better understanding of the relevance of abnormal metabolism in relation to diseases. Such understanding provides a solid foundation for the medical students' future research and for other clinical applications. PMID:25521692

  12. [Zhu Lian's characteristics and experiences in clinical practice of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Wei, Li fu; Pan, Xiaoria; Liu, Bing; Yue, Jin; Zhang, Lijian

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at discussing the clinical characteristics and experiences of ZHU Lian, the renowned contemporary acupuncture master from the following three aspects: "characteristics of clinical manipulations and techniques", "thoughts on diagnosis and treatment" and "examples of clinical cases". The study has shown that ZHU Lian invented the slow insertion technique by rotating needle and the embedding needle technique, improved moxibustion technique with moxa roll and proposed the three keys on the treatment with acupuncture and moxibustion, as well as discovered new acupoints for treatment. The pioneering and distinguished achievements she con tributed play the great demonstrating and driving role in the development of clinical study and practice of acupuncture and moxibustion. PMID:25906582

  13. [Personal experiences with induced abortions in private clinics in Northeast Brazil].

    PubMed

    Silveira, Paloma; McCallum, Cecilia; Menezes, Greice

    2016-01-01

    Based on a qualitative study conducted in 2012, the article analyzes middle-class individuals' experiences with induced abortions performed in private clinics. Thirty-four stories of induced abortions were narrated by 19 women and five men living in two state capitals in Northeast Brazil. Thematic analysis revealed differences in types of clinics and care provided by the physicians. The article shows that abortion in private clinics fails to guarantee safe or humane care. The narratives furnish descriptions of diverse situations and practices, ranging from flaws such as lack of information on medicines to others involving severe abuses like procedures performed without anesthesia. The article concludes that criminalization of abortion in Brazil allows clinics to operate with no state regulation; it does not prevent women from having abortions, but exposes them to total vulnerability and violation of human rights. PMID:26958817

  14. The effect of clinical experience on cue trading for the /r-w/ contrast.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Virginia; Martin, David; Borton, Thomas; Youngblood, Heather Conner

    2003-05-01

    Although the ability of clinicians to perceptually process speech sound productions is a key ingredient in the evaluation and remediation of articulatory disorders, very little attention has been given to this important skill. This study explored the potential of a perceptual task, known as cue trading, to assess perceptual skill among students with varying clinical experience. A cue-trading paradigm for the /r-w/ contrast was used in which a temporal-spectral cue on F2 was balanced against a spectral cue on F3. Results indicated a trading relationship for all students. However, students without clinical experience demonstrated reduced sensitivity to the acoustic cues for /w/ and identification functions that were less clearly separated compared to students with clinical experience. Furthermore, the magnitude of the difference between functions (the trading relationship) was significantly smaller for students without practicum experience: They showed weaker phonetic percepts for /r/ and /w/ than did the students with practicum experience. Preliminary results suggest that a task based on cue trading could be useful in assessing perceptual sensitivity to the acoustic cues representative of misarticulated /r/. PMID:12828535

  15. Challenges of the ward round teaching based on the experiences of medical clinical teachers

    PubMed Central

    Arabshahi, Kamran Soltani; Haghani, Fariba; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Omid, Athar; Adibi, Peyman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Holding educational sessions in a clinical environment is a major concern for faculty members because of its special difficulties and restrictions. This study attempts to recognize the challenges of the ward round teaching through investigating the experiences of clinical teachers in 2011. Materials and Methods: This qualitative research is carried out through purposive sampling with maximum variation from among the clinical teachers of major departments in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (9 persons). The sampling continued until data saturation. Data were collected through semi-structured interview and analyzed through Collaizzi method. Data reliability and validity was confirmed through the four aspects of Lincoln and Guba method (credibility, conformability, transferability, and dependability). Results: Three major themes and their related sub-themes (minor themes) were found out including the factors related to the triad of clinical teaching (patient, learner, and clinical teacher) (concern about patient's welfare, poor preparation, lack of motivation, ethical problems), factors related to the educational environment (stressful environment, humiliating environment and poor communication) and the factors related to the educational system of the clinical environment (poor organizing and arrangement of resources, poor system's monitoring, bad planning and inadequate resource). Conclusion: Ward round teaching has many concerns for teachers, and this should be recognized and resolved by authorities and teachers. If these problems are not resolved, it would affect the quality of clinical teaching. PMID:26109975

  16. QIN. Early experiences in establishing a regional quantitative imaging network for PET/CT clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Doot, Robert K.; Thompson, Tove; Greer, Benjamin E.; Allberg, Keith C.; Linden, Hannah M.; Mankoff, David A.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    The Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) is a Pacific Northwest regional network that enables patients from community cancer centers to participate in multicenter oncology clinical trials where patients can receive some trial-related procedures at their local center. Results of positron emission tomography (PET) scans performed at community cancer centers are not currently used in SCCA Network trials since clinical trials customarily accept results from only trial-accredited PET imaging centers located at academic and large hospitals. Oncologists would prefer the option of using standard clinical PET scans from Network sites in multicenter clinical trials to increase accrual of patients for whom additional travel requirements for imaging is a barrier to recruitment. In an effort to increase accrual of rural and other underserved populations to Network trials, researchers and clinicians at the University of Washington, SCCA and its Network are assessing feasibility of using PET scans from all Network sites in their oncology clinical trials. A feasibility study is required because the reproducibility of multicenter PET measurements ranges from approximately 3% to 40% at national academic centers. Early experiences from both national and local PET phantom imaging trials are discussed and next steps are proposed for including patient PET scans from the emerging regional quantitative imaging network in clinical trials. There are feasible methods to determine and characterize PET quantitation errors and improve data quality by either prospective scanner calibration or retrospective post hoc corrections. These methods should be developed and implemented in multicenter clinical trials employing quantitative PET imaging of patients. PMID:22795929

  17. Multidimensional analysis of data obtained in experiments with X-ray emulsion chambers and extensive air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chilingaryan, A. A.; Galfayan, S. K.; Zazyan, M. Z.; Dunaevsky, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Nonparametric statistical methods are used to carry out the quantitative comparison of the model and the experimental data. The same methods enable one to select the events initiated by the heavy nuclei and to calculate the portion of the corresponding events. For this purpose it is necessary to have the data on artificial events describing the experiment sufficiently well established. At present, the model with the small scaling violation in the fragmentation region is the closest to the experiments. Therefore, the treatment of gamma families obtained in the Pamir' experiment is being carried out at present with the application of these models.

  18. Paralytic shellfish toxins in clinical matrices: Extension of AOAC official method 2005.06 to human urine and serum and application to a 2007 case study in Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGrasse, Stacey; Rivera, Victor; Roach, John; White, Kevin; Callahan, John; Couture, Darcie; Simone, Karen; Peredy, Tamas; Poli, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), a potentially fatal foodborne illness, is often diagnosed anecdotally based on symptoms and dietary history. The neurotoxins responsible for PSP, collectively referred to as the saxitoxins or paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), are natural toxins, produced by certain dinoflagellates, that may accumulate in seafood, particularly filter-feeding bivalves. Illnesses are rare because of effective monitoring programs, yet occasional poisonings occur. Rarely are contaminated food and human clinical samples (e.g., urine and serum) available for testing. There are currently few methods, none of which are validated, for determining PSTs in clinical matrices. This study evaluated AOAC (Association of Analytical Communities) Official Method of Analysis (OMA) 2005.06. [AOAC Official Method 2005.06 Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning Toxins in Shellfish: Prechormatographic Oxidation and Liquid Chromatography with Fluorescence Detection. In Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC International ], validated only for shellfish extracts, for its extension to human urine and serum samples. Initial assessment of control urine and serum matrices resulted in a sample cleanup modification when working with urine to remove hippuric acid, a natural urinary compound of environmental/dietary origin, which co-eluted with saxitoxin. Commercially available urine and serum matrices were then quantitatively spiked with PSTs that were available as certified reference materials (STX, dcSTX, B1, GTX2/3, C1/2, NEO, and GTX1/4) to assess method performance characteristics. The method was subsequently applied successfully to a PSP case study that occurred in July 2007 in Maine. Not only were PSTs identified in the patient urine and serum samples, the measured time series also led to the first report of human PST-specific urinary elimination rates. The LC-FD data generated from this case study compared remarkably well to results obtained using AOAC OMA 2011.27 [AOAC Official Method 2011.27 Paralytic Shellfish Toxins (PSTs) in Shellfish, Receptor Binding Assay. In Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC International ], further demonstrating successful extension of the LC-FD method to these clinical matrices. Moreover, data generated from this poisoning event reiterated that urine is a preferable clinical matrix, compared to serum, for diagnostic purposes due to higher accumulation and longer residence times in urine.

  19. Posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic thoracolumbar/lumbar scoliosis: clinical outcomes and predictive radiological factors for extension of fusion distal to caudal end vertebra.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S B; Tsirikos, A I; Subramanian, A S

    2014-08-01

    Clinical, radiological, and Scoliosis Research Society-22 questionnaire data were reviewed pre-operatively and two years post-operatively for patients with thoracolumbar/lumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated by posterior spinal fusion using a unilateral convex segmental pedicle screw technique. A total of 72 patients were included (67 female, 5 male; mean age at surgery 16.7 years (13 to 23)) and divided into groups: group 1 included 53 patients who underwent fusion between the vertebrae at the limit of the curve (proximal and distal end vertebrae); group 2 included 19 patients who underwent extension of the fusion distally beyond the caudal end vertebra. A mean scoliosis correction of 80% (45% to 100%) was achieved. The mean post-operative lowest instrumented vertebra angle, apical vertebra translation and trunk shift were less than in previous studies. A total of five pre-operative radiological parameters differed significantly between the groups and correlated with the extension of the fusion distally: the size of the thoracolumbar/lumbar curve, the lowest instrumented vertebra angle, apical vertebra translation, the Cobb angle on lumbar convex bending and the size of the compensatory thoracic curve. Regression analysis allowed an equation incorporating these parameters to be developed which had a positive predictive value of 81% in determining whether the lowest instrumented vertebra should be at the caudal end vertebra or one or two levels more distal. There were no differences in the Scoliosis Research Society-22 outcome scores between the two groups (p = 0.17). In conclusion, thoracolumbar/lumbar curves in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis may be effectively treated by posterior spinal fusion using a unilateral segmental pedicle screw technique. Five radiological parameters correlate with the need for distal extension of the fusion, and an equation incorporating these parameters reliably informs selection of the lowest instrumented vertebra. PMID:25086125

  20. Non-adherence to diet and exercise recommendations amongst patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus attending Extension II Clinic in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Mabuza, Langalibalele H.; Malete, Nomsa H.; Govender, Indiran; Ogunbanjo, Gboyega A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Extension II Clinic in Botswana have difficulty in adhering to the lifestyle modifications recommended by health care practitioners. Poor adherence to lifestyle recommendations leads to poor control of the condition and consequently to complications. Objectives The aim of the study was to determine reasons for poor adherence to lifestyle recommendations amongst the patients. The objectives were to determine: reasons for poor adherence to dietary requirements, exercise recommendations, the support they had in adhering to the recommendations, and their understanding of the role of dietary and exercise requirements in the management of their condition. Method This was a cross-sectional descriptive study. The sample comprised of 105 participants. Data on participants’ baseline characteristics and adherence to dietary and exercise habits were analysed using the SPSS 14.0 version. Results The sample of 104 participants comprised of 61 (58.7%) women. The rates of non-adherence to diet and exercise were 37% and 52% respectively. The main reasons for non-adherence to diet were: poor self-discipline (63.4%); lack of information (33.3%) and the tendency to eat out (31.7%). The main reasons for non-adherence to exercise were: lack of information (65.7%); the perception that exercise exacerbated their illness (57.6%) and lack of an exercise partner (24.0%). Conclusion There was a relatively high rate of non-adherence to both diet and exercise recommendations by patients suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus at Extension II Clinic, Botswana, with non-adherence to exercise recommendations more common.

  1. A web application for recording and analyzing the clinical experiences of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Linda; Sedlmeyer, Robert; Carlson, Cathy; Modlin, Susan

    2003-01-01

    A primary focus in nursing education is to provide students with a diverse range of clinical experiences. Historically, the collection and assessment of data from students' clinical experiences have been paper-and-pencil tasks that are arduous for both students and nursing faculty. The volume of collected information also has made it difficult to produce ad hoc statistical reports without additional intensive manual labor. To facilitate recording and analysis of these data, the Nursing and Computer Science Departments at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne have collaborated to create a Web application: Essential Clinical Behaviors. The use of the Web-accessible database represents a major change in nursing education by alteration of format used by students to record their clinical experiences in nursing courses. The application was designed to enhance nursing students' learning and to assist faculty in making student assignments, evaluating student progress, and supporting curriculum decisions. This report discusses the rationale for the development of the Web application, a description of its data entry and reporting mechanisms, an overview of the system architecture, its use in the nursing curriculum, and planned enhancements. PMID:12869872

  2. Perceived Experience of Fatigue in Clinical and General Population: Descriptors and Associated Reactivities.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Márquez, Sandra; Senín-Calderón, Cristina; Rodríguez-Testal, Juan F; Carrasco, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is the analysis of different descriptors and reactions related to the experience of fatigue. Two groups were compared: a clinical sample (n = 92, 31 males, mean age = 38.87) and a non-clinical (n = 225, 135 males, mean age = 32.45) sample. The total sample was composed of 317 participants (52% males), ranging in age from 18 to 76 years. Findings show the experience of fatigue was mainly related to somatic terms (76% of the total sample). Specific results were found only for the clinical group: (a) significant relationships between fatigue and anxiety, ?2(1) = 34.71, p < .01; tension, ?2(1) = 16.80, p < .01; and sadness, ?2(1) = 24.59, p < .01; (b) higher intensity of fatigue (F = 84.15, p = .001), and predominance of the cognitive components of fatigue. Results showed that fatigue in subjects with a clinical disorder (versus those without) was associated both, to negative emotional states, and to a higher intensity of fatigue, especially in its cognitive elements. Important clinical implications for its assessment and intervention are discussed. PMID:26055395

  3. The association between demographic factors, user reported experiences and user satisfaction: results from three casualty clinics in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background User reported experiences and satisfaction are increasingly used as basis for quality indicators in the health sector. However, there is limited understanding of factors associated with user reported experiences and satisfaction with casualty clinics. Methods A random sample of 542 patients that had contacted any of three casualty clinics from mid April to mid May 2008 was mailed a questionnaire. A reminder was sent to non-respondents after six weeks. Descriptive statistics for four user reported experiences scales and 20 single items are presented. Multivariate regression analysis was used to assess associations between background variables and user reported experiences, and between user reported experiences and user satisfaction. Results 225 (41.5%) patients, carers and guardians returned a completed questionnaire. Users reported most positive experiences with the doctor services and the nursing services at the casualty clinics; on a scale from 0 to 100, where 100 is the best possible experience the doctor scale was 82 and the nursing scale 81. Users reported least positive experiences with the organization of the casualty clinic, with a scale score of 65. Self perceived health was associated with user satisfaction, while self perceived health and age were associated with user reported experiences with organization of the clinics. A range of user reported experience domains were related to user satisfaction, after controlling for socio-demographic variables, including experiences with doctor services at the clinics, organization of the clinics, information and self perceived incorrect treatment. Conclusions Users report positive experiences with the three casualty clinics, with organization as the aspect with largest improvement potential. The importance of age and health status for users' experiences and satisfaction with casualty clinics was shown, but a range of user reported experiences with the clinics were the most important predictors for user satisfaction. PMID:20925930

  4. Worklists, preloading and archiving strategies; 3 years of clinical experience in the Barcelona PACS.

    PubMed

    Piqueras, J; Carreño, J C; Ovelleiro, M; Lucaya, J; Enriquez, G; Creixell, S

    1994-01-01

    We present data on 3 years of clinical experience using PACS involving developments on worklists, preloading and archiving strategies in a teaching paediatric hospital with all modalities connected to a commercial PACS. A method allowing generation of and handling of different worklists for computed radiography examinations has been developed in our centre. Worklists and archiving strategies are presented and discussed. We conclude that, with adequate worklists and efficient preloading implementation, current PACS could be used successfully in several clinical settings of a multimodality department. PMID:7799687

  5. Experimenting Clinical Pathways in General Practice: a Focus Group Investigation with Italian General Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Zannini, Lucia; Cattaneo, Cesarina; Peduzzi, Paolo; Lopiccoli, Silvia; Auxilia, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical governance is considered crucial in primary care. Since 2005, clinical pathways have been experimentally implemented at the Local Health Authority of Monza Brianza (ASLMB), Italy, to develop general practitioners’ (GPs) care of patients affected by some chronic diseases. The experimentation was aimed at introducing clinical governance in primary care, increasing GPs’ involvement in the care of their patients, and improving both patients’ and professionals’ satisfaction. In the period 2005-2006, 12% of the 763 employed GPs in the ASLMB were involved in the experiment, while this percentage increased to 15-20% in 2007-2008. Design and Methods Twenty-four GPs were purposively sampled, randomly divided into two groups and asked to participate in focus groups (FGs) held in 2008, aimed at evaluating their perception of the experiment. The FGs were audio-recorded, dialogues were typed out and undergone to a thematic analysis, according to the Interpretative Phenomenological Approach. Results Four major themes emerged: i) clinical pathways can result in GPs working in a more efficient and effective fashion; ii) they can assure higher levels of both patient and professional satisfaction, since they sustain a caring approach and strengthen the GPs’ role; iii) nevertheless, clinical pathways increase the bureaucratic workload and problems can arise in relationships among GPs and the LHA; iv) the implementation of clinical pathways can be improved, especially by reducing bureaucracy and by assuring their continuity. Conclusions Managerial aspects should be considered with care in order to experimentally introduce clinical pathways in general practice, and continuity of the experimentation should be guaranteed to improve GPs’ adherence and commitment. Acknowledgments the Authors thank Dr. AP. Cantù and Dr D. Cereda who participated in the two focus groups as observers. PMID:25181354

  6. Systematic reviews of animal experiments demonstrate poor human clinical and toxicological utility.

    PubMed

    Knight, Andrew

    2007-12-01

    The assumption that animal models are reasonably predictive of human outcomes provides the basis for their widespread use in toxicity testing and in biomedical research aimed at developing cures for human diseases. To investigate the validity of this assumption, the comprehensive Scopus biomedical bibliographic databases were searched for published systematic reviews of the human clinical or toxicological utility of animal experiments. In 20 reviews in which clinical utility was examined, the authors concluded that animal models were either significantly useful in contributing to the development of clinical interventions, or were substantially consistent with clinical outcomes, in only two cases, one of which was contentious. These included reviews of the clinical utility of experiments expected by ethics committees to lead to medical advances, of highly-cited experiments published in major journals, and of chimpanzee experiments--those involving the species considered most likely to be predictive of human outcomes. Seven additional reviews failed to clearly demonstrate utility in predicting human toxicological outcomes, such as carcinogenicity and teratogenicity. Consequently, animal data may not generally be assumed to be substantially useful for these purposes. Possible causes include interspecies differences, the distortion of outcomes arising from experimental environments and protocols, and the poor methodological quality of many animal experiments, which was evident in at least 11 reviews. No reviews existed in which the majority of animal experiments were of good methodological quality. Whilst the effects of some of these problems might be minimised with concerted effort (given their widespread prevalence), the limitations resulting from interspecies differences are likely to be technically and theoretically impossible to overcome. Non-animal models are generally required to pass formal scientific validation prior to their regulatory acceptance. In contrast, animal models are simply assumed to be predictive of human outcomes. These results demonstrate the invalidity of such assumptions. The consistent application of formal validation studies to all test models is clearly warranted, regardless of their animal, non-animal, historical, contemporary or possible future status. Likely benefits would include, the greater selection of models truly predictive of human outcomes, increased safety of people exposed to chemicals that have passed toxicity tests, increased efficiency during the development of human pharmaceuticals and other therapeutic interventions, and decreased wastage of animal, personnel and financial resources. The poor human clinical and toxicological utility of most animal models for which data exists, in conjunction with their generally substantial animal welfare and economic costs, justify a ban on animal models lacking scientific data clearly establishing their human predictivity or utility. PMID:18186670

  7. The first clinical experience on efficacy of topical flutamide on melasma compared with topical hydroquinone: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Adalatkhah, Hassan; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment of melasma is unsatisfactory most of the times. Hormonal role is shown to exist in pathogenesis of the melasma, and sex-hormone related drugs may have an effect on melasma. Aim To investigate efficacy of 1% flutamide cream versus 4% hydroquinone cream on melasma. Methods In a parallel randomized clinical trial, 74 women with melasma were allocated to receive a sunscreen along with 4% hydroquinone cream or 1% flutamide cream. Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI), mexameter melanin assay, and patient satisfaction were investigated. Results Mean age of the participants was 33.8 years. Mean length of time suffering from Melasma was 96.3 months. The subjects reported in average 1.1 hours per day of exposure to sunlight. Mean standardized total patient satisfaction score was 28.8 (standard deviation [SD] 17.2) in flutamide group patients versus 18 (SD 15.5) in control group (P<0.01). Regardless of treatment group, the skin darkness assessed upon MASI scales was reduced over the treatment course (P<0.001). Using mixed effects, longitudinal modeling showed better treatment efficacy based on MASI scale for flutamide group compared to the hydroquinone group (P<0.05). However, longitudinal analysis of mexameter scores did not reveal any significant difference in melanin measurements between flutamide and hydroquinone. Conclusion Topical flutamide appeared as effective as topical hydroquinone in treating melasma using mexameter assessment but with a better MASI improvement trend and higher patient satisfaction in flutamide treatment versus topical hydroquinone. As the present study is possibly the first clinical experience on efficacy of topical flutamide on melasma, it would be quite unreasonable to recommend clinical use of it before future studies replicate the results on its efficacy and safety. PMID:26345129

  8. An Eight-Year Clinic Experience with Clozapine Use in a Parkinson’s Disease Clinic Setting

    PubMed Central

    Hack, Nawaz; Fayad, Sarah M.; Monari, Erin H.; Akbar, Umer; Hardwick, Angela; Rodriguez, Ramon L.; Malaty, Irene A.; Romrell, Janet; Shukla, Aparna A. Wagle.; McFarland, Nikolaus; Ward, Herbert E.; Okun, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background To examine our eight year clinic-based experience in a Parkinson’s disease expert clinical care center using clozapine as a treatment for refractory psychosis in Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods The study was a retrospective chart review which covered eight years of clozapine registry use. Statistical T-tests, chi-square, correlations and regression analysis were used to analyze treatment response for potential associations of age, disease duration, and Hoehn & Yahr (H&Y) score, and degree of response to clozapine therapy. Results There were 36 participants included in the analysis (32 PD, 4 parkinsonism-plus). The characteristics included 30.6% female, age 45–87 years (mean 68.3±10.15), disease duration of 17–240 months (mean 108.14±51.13) and H&Y score of 2 to 4 (mean 2.51±0.51). The overall retention rate on clozapine was 41% and the most common reasons for discontinuation were frequent blood testing (28%), nursing home (NH) placement (11%) and leucopenia (8%). Responses to clozapine across the cohort were: complete (33%), partial (33%), absent (16%), and unknown (16%). Age (r?=??0.36, p<0.01) and H&Y score (r?=??0.41, p<0.01) were shown to be related to response to clozapine therapy, but disease duration was not an associated factor (r?=?0.21, p>0.05). Conclusions This single-center experience highlights the challenges associated with clozapine therapy in PD psychosis. Frequent blood testing remains a significant barrier for clozapine, even in patients with therapeutic benefit. Surprisingly, all patients admitted to a NH discontinued clozapine due to logistical issues of administration and monitoring within that setting. Consideration of the barriers to clozapine therapy will be important to its use and to its continued success in an outpatient setting. PMID:24646688

  9. Detection of reflected Cherenkov light from extensive air showers in the SPHERE experiment as a method of studying superhigh energy cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, R. A.; Aulova, T. V.; Bonvech, E. A.; Galkin, V. I.; Dzhatdoev, T. A.; Podgrudkov, D. A.; Roganova, T. M.; Chernov, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    Although a large number of experiments were carried out during the last few decades, the uncertainty in the spectrum of all nuclei of primary cosmic rays (PCRs) with superhigh energies is still high, and the results of many experiments on nuclear composition of PCRs are contradictory. An overview of the SPHERE experiment on detecting Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation from extensive air shower (EAS) reflected from a ground snow surface is given. A number of experimental studies implementing this method are presented and their results are analyzed. Some other popular methods of studying PCRs with superhigh energies ( E 0 > 1015 eV) and their main advantages and drawbacks are briefly considered. The detecting equipment of the SPHERE-2 experiment and the technique of its calibration are considered. The optical properties of snow, which are important for experiments on reflected Cherenkov light (CL) from EAS, are discussed and the history of observing reflected EAS CL is described. The algorithm of simulating the detector response and calculating the fiducial acceptance of shower detection is described. The procedure of processing the experimental data with a subsequent reconstruction of the spectrum of all PCR nuclei and analysis of the mass composition is shown. The first results of reconstructing the spectrum and separating groups of cosmic-ray nuclei with high energies in the SPHERE-2 experiment are presented. Main sources of systematic errors are considered. The prospects of developing the technique of observation of reflected EAS CL in future experiments are discussed.

  10. Taking the Pain out of Waiting: The Oral Health Counselling Experiences of Parents of Children with Extensive Dental Caries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashmore, Aaron W.; Noller, Jennifer; Johnson, Bronwyn; Ritchie, Jan; Blinkhorn, Anthony S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The Tooth Smart Programme is a hospital-based parent-counselling programme established to stabilize existing carious lesions and prevent new caries in children. The purpose of this qualitative study was to: explore participating parents' experiences of and views about parent counselling; identify and describe factors that influence the…

  11. Taking the Pain out of Waiting: The Oral Health Counselling Experiences of Parents of Children with Extensive Dental Caries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashmore, Aaron W.; Noller, Jennifer; Johnson, Bronwyn; Ritchie, Jan; Blinkhorn, Anthony S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The Tooth Smart Programme is a hospital-based parent-counselling programme established to stabilize existing carious lesions and prevent new caries in children. The purpose of this qualitative study was to: explore participating parents' experiences of and views about parent counselling; identify and describe factors that influence the…

  12. Emulating cognitive diagnostic skills without clinical experience: a report of medical students using Quick Medical Reference and Iliad in the diagnosis of difficult clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Gozum, M E

    1994-01-01

    Diagnosing complex internal medicine cases has traditionally been the domain and hallmark of clinical expertise. However, the creation of a differential diagnosis list using abstracted case information can be seen as a database query function and has been emulated by software such as QMR and Iliad. To test this premise, twenty two sophomore medical students were taught how to abstract clinical data, and use QMR and Iliad to diagnose complex clinical cases from the New England Journal of Medicine. Half of the students were able to provide correct diagnoses within a list of ten. These preliminary results supports a notion that clinical diagnosis may be a skill independent of clinical experience. PMID:7950096

  13. Clinical experiences with molecular targeted therapy in lung cancer in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Sun, Yan

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, a dramatic shift has been witnessed in cancer therapy in China. Although traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy still remains the treatment of choice for many malignancies, targeted therapies are now a component of treatment for many types of cancer, including lung cancer. As molecular target agents are widely used in clinical practice and relevant studies have been conducted, we have accumulated valuable experience in the treatment strategy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer. On this basis we have successfully developed our Class-I new drug through independent research, which significantly accelerates the clinical development of targeted therapy for lung cancer. This article summarizes the clinical practice and relevant studies of current targeted therapies for lung cancer in China. PMID:26273390

  14. Clinical Experience in Late Antiquity: Alexander of Tralles and the Therapy of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bouras-vallianatos, Petros

    2014-01-01

    Alexander of Tralles, writing in the late sixth century, combined his wide-ranging practical knowledge with earlier medical theories. This article shows how clinical experience is used in Alexander’s works by concentrating on his therapeutic advice on epilepsy and, in particular, on pharmacology and the group of so-called natural remedies. I argue that clinical testing is used not only for the introduction of new medicines but also as an instrument for checking the therapeutic effect of popular healing practices. On another level, this article discusses Alexander’s role as the author of a medical compendium; it suggests that by marking the cases of clinical testing with a set of recurrent expressions, Alexander leads his audience to reflect on his medical authority and personal contribution. PMID:25045178

  15. Experience with hyperphenylalaninemia in a developing country: unusual clinical manifestations and a novel gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Karam, Pascale E; Daher, Rose T; Moller, Lisbeth B; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2011-02-01

    We report our experience in a cohort of patients with hyperphenylalaninemia in a tertiary care referral center in Lebanon. Forty-one sequential patients were studied: 34 classical phenylketonuria (PKU), 3 hyperphenylalaninemia (non-PKU), and 4 biopterin metabolism defects. The majority of cases were clinically diagnosed at variable ages with variable neurological outcomes. Only 29.3% were detected by neonatal screening. Two unusual cases were observed in the context of inadequate treatment in 1 and delayed therapy in the other: a newborn with PKU developed severe keratomalacia; and a 5-year-old girl with dihydropteridine reductase deficiency due to a novel mutation identified in the quinoid dihydropteridine reductase gene developed Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and white matter changes with periventricular cysts. Part of our experience parallels that in the West. However, the clinical manifestations observed in our patients emphasize the importance of a national newborn screening program with efficient management of diagnosed cases. PMID:20823030

  16. Enhancing Prostate Cancer Care Through the Multidisciplinary Clinic Approach: A 15-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Gomella, Leonard G.; Lin, Jianqing; Hoffman-Censits, Jean; Dugan, Patricia; Guiles, Fran; Lallas, Costas D.; Singh, Jaspreet; McCue, Peter; Showalter, Timothy; Valicenti, Richard K.; Dicker, Adam; Trabulsi, Edouard J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report on the 15-year prostate cancer experience of our multidisciplinary genitourinary cancer clinic established in 1996 at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) –designated Jefferson Kimmel Cancer Center. Patients with genitourinary cancers were evaluated weekly by multiple specialists at a single site, and we focus on the 83% of patients with prostate cancer. To our knowledge, our multidisciplinary genitourinary cancer clinic is the longest continuously operating center of its kind at an NCI Cancer Center in the United States. Methods: Data from Jefferson's Oncology Data Services were compared to SEER prostate cancer outcomes. Data on treatment changes in localized disease, patient satisfaction, and related parameters were also assessed. Results: Ten-year survival data approach 100% in stage I and II prostate cancer. Ten-year data for stage III (T3 N0M0) and stage IV (T4 N0M0) disease show that our institutional survival rate exceeds SEER. There is a shift toward robotically assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and a slight decrease in brachytherapy relative to external beam radiation therapy in localized disease. Patient satisfaction is high as measured by survey instruments. Conclusion: Our long-term experience suggests a benefit of the multidisciplinary clinic approach to prostate cancer, most pronounced for high-risk, locally advanced disease. A high level of satisfaction with this patient-centered model is seen. The multidisciplinary clinic approach to prostate cancer may enhance outcomes and possibly reduce treatment regret through a coordinated presentation of all therapeutic options. This clinic model serves as an interdisciplinary educational tool for patients, their families, and our trainees and supports clinical trial participation. PMID:21358951

  17. Animal experiments scrutinised: systematic reviews demonstrate poor human clinical and toxicological utility.

    PubMed

    Knight, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The assumption that animal models are reasonably predictive of human outcomes provides the basis for their widespread use in toxicity testing and in biomedical research aimed at developing cures for human diseases. To investigate the validity of this assumption, the comprehensive "Scopus" biomedical bibliographic databases were searched for published systematic reviews of the human clinical or toxicological utility of animal experiments. Of 20 reviews examining clinical utility, authors concluded that the animal models were substantially consistent with or useful in advancing clinical outcomes in only two cases, and the conclusion in one case was contentious. Included were reviews of the clinical utility of experiments expected by ethics committees to lead to medical advances, of highly-cited experiments published in major journals, and of chimpanzee experiments - the species most likely to be predictive of human outcomes. Seven additional reviews failed to clearly demonstrate utility in predicting human toxicological outcomes such as carcinogenicity and teratogenicity. Consequently, animal data may not generally be assumed to be substantially useful for these purposes. Possible causes include interspecies differences, the distortion of experimental outcomes arising from experimental environments and protocols, and the poor methodological quality of many animal experiments evident in at least 11 reviews. No reviews existed in which a majority of animal experiments were of good quality. While the latter problems might be minimised with concerted effort, given their widespread nature, the interspecies limitations are likely to be technically and theoretically impossible to overcome. Yet, unlike non-animal models, animal models are not normally subjected to formal scientific validation. Instead of simply assuming they are predictive of human outcomes, the consistent application of formal validation studies to all test models is clearly warranted, regardless of their animal, non-animal, historical, contemporary or possible future status. Expected benefits would include greater selection of models truly predictive of human outcomes, increased safety of people exposed to chemicals that have passed toxicity tests, increased efficiency during the development of human pharmaceuticals, and decreased wastage of animal, personnel and financial resources. The poor human clinical and toxicological utility of most animal models for which data exists, in conjunction with their generally substantial animal welfare and economic costs, justify a ban on animal models lacking scientific data clearly establishing their human predictivity or utility. PMID:18288428

  18. The Air Microwave Yield (AMY) experiment - A laboratory measurement of the GHz emission from extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louedec, K.

    The AMY experiment aims to measure the microwave bremsstrahlung radiation (MBR) emitted by air-showers secondary electrons accelerating in collisions with neutral molecules of the atmosphere. The measurements are performed using a beam of 510 MeV electrons at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) of Frascati INFN National Laboratories. The goal of the AMY experiment is to measure in laboratory conditions the yield and the spectrum of the GHz emission in the frequency range between 1 and 20 GHz. The final purpose is to characterise the process to be used in a next generation detectors of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. A description of the experimental setup and the first results are presented.

  19. Steam piping monitoring system -- A key to power station life extension-experience at Anllares power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Barreiro, J.C.; Bertet, J.S.

    1998-07-01

    During inspections conducted in connection with a life-extension assessment, the hot reheat steam piping was observed to have a negative slope. Thirty weight transducers were placed in each piping support to obtain actual measurements under real operating conditions. Thereafter, further flexibility analyses were run, recording piping system performance under specific operating conditions such as turbine start-up, shutdown or tripping. Several options were proposed in pursuit of the most favorable approach: (A) Traumatic solutions including cutting the piping. (B) Non-traumatic solutions: reinforcing the piping support system. (C) Combined solutions: cutting piping and reinforcing the support system. Solution C was chosen and implemented in a major overhaul performed in 1996. Several supports were replaced, a new support was incorporated and three cuts were made in the piping in order to correct slopes and relieve stress. One cut was made in the horizontal stretch of the main piping prior to the bifurcation near the turbine inlets. The other two cuts were made in each piping downstream of the bifurcation. A subsequent flexibility analysis was conducted to verify that the solution implemented was effective. Piping monitoring made it possible to relieve stress, adjust slopes and prevent condensate stagnancy.

  20. Non-extensive statistical physics properties of acoustic and pressure-stimulated current emissions measured concurrently during triaxial deformation experiments on marble and limestone samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright-Taylor, A.; Vallianatos, F.; Sammonds, P.

    2012-04-01

    We present preliminary results from triaxial compression experiments on samples of marble and limestone, recording concurrently for the first time both acoustic and electric current signals emitted during the deformation process. The expression 'pressure-stimulated currents' describes the emission of a small (peak values of 10-12 - 10-9 A) transient, polarising electric current from a solid containing charged defects and undergoing a gradual change in pressure. Experiments to date on non-piezoelectric rocks such as marble, amphibolite and cement-based materials have shown that these currents accompany the process of crack formation and growth during rock deformation. Further understanding of the processes that generate these currents and how they relate to the cracking process is particularly important for the study of seismic precursors. Constant strain rate experiments were conducted in a triaxial deformation apparatus at room temperature with effective confining pressures of 30 MPa (c.f. 3 km depth) on both dry and saturated samples. Strain rates were varied from 10-6 - 10-4 s-1 in order to investigate the dependence of pressure-stimulated current emissions on strain rate and their non-extensive properties in comparison with those of the associated acoustic emissions. The non-extensive q-parameter was determined using the q-logarithm function from analysis of the cumulative distribution function, P(>x), of the energy distributions of the laboratory data. Results are discussed in the frame of non-extensive statistical physics. Non-extensive statistical physics has previously been used to study patterns of seismicity, since rock deformation involves complex non-equilibrium phenomena such as multi-fractal distributions, self-organized criticality, long range interaction and intermittency. The approach offers a consistent theoretical framework to analyse rock fracture populations, which exhibit power law behaviour. Electrical emissions occur during the non-linear region of mechanical behaviour related to slip or dislocation mechanisms at an atomic level and are associated with changes in acoustic emissions phenomena. The non-extensive evaluation of these data sheds new light on deformation mechanisms with respect to the cracking process. Selected

  1. Concepts in local treatment of extensive paediatric burns

    PubMed Central

    Ungureanu, M

    2014-01-01

    Abstract There is a wide variety of local therapeutical methods for extensive burns. This article aims to be a general overview of the most common methods used in the local treatment for extensive burns, both in our clinic and globally. Clinical examples are shown from our clinic; cases of the last 8 years. None of the less there is no such thing as the "perfect method of treatment" but a thin balance between the clinical experience of plastic surgeons, every case particularities and specified characteristics, meaning advantages, disadvantages and limited indications of local topics or methods of skin covering. PMID:25408723

  2. BLAST model: an innovative approach to prepare second-degree accelerated BSN students for inpatient psychiatric clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Lang, Carol S; Hahn, Joyce A

    2013-03-01

    This article describes the design, development, and implementation of an innovative teaching/learning model involving integration of classroom teaching, clinical simulation, and debriefing/critical thinking to prepare accelerated baccalaureate nursing students for clinical practice experiences in the inpatient psychiatric setting. Lessons learned and future directions for simulation experiences involving standardized patient scenarios in undergraduate psychiatric nursing education are shared. PMID:23394963

  3. A novel platform to simplify human observer performance experiments in clinical reading environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, J.; Zanca, F.; Bosmans, H.

    2011-03-01

    Human observer performance experiments (HOPE) are frequently carried out in controlled environments in order to maximize the influence of the performance parameter under study. As an example, the amount of ambient reading variables can be kept as low as possible during HOPE. This is contrasting with the dynamic nature of a clinical reading environment that may therefore be suboptimal for the majority of the experiments. The aim of current work was to extend our previously developed software platform Sara² to cope with the influences of the reading environment on HOPE experiments. Generic modules for ROC, LROC, FROC, MAFC and visual grading analysis/image quality criteria (VGA/IQC) experiments were developed for 2D and 3D input images. Additional modules were included in the platform for finding unexpected interruptions due to clinical emergencies by means of idle time and for mouse trajectory monitoring. Also a generic approach towards the inclusion of reading questionnaires and a RFID enabled secured login system was added. Next, we created a sensor network consisting of off-the-shelf components which continuously monitor ambient reading conditions like: temperature, ambient lighting, humidity, ambient noise levels and observer reading distance. These measured parameters can be synchronized with the reading findings. Finally we included a link to incorporate the use of specialized 3rd party PACS viewers in our software framework. Using the proposed software and hardware solution, we could simplify the setup and the performing of HOPE in clinical reading environments and we can now properly control our reading experiments.

  4. Nevirapine Exposure with WHO Pediatric Weight Band Dosing: Enhanced Therapeutic Concentrations Predicted Based on Extensive International Pharmacokinetic Experience

    PubMed Central

    Nikanjam, Mina; Kabamba, Desiré; Cressey, Tim R.; Burger, David; Aweeka, Francesca T.; Acosta, Edward P.; Spector, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    Nevirapine (NVP) is a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) used worldwide as part of combination antiretroviral therapy in infants and children to treat HIV infection. Dosing based on either weight or body surface area has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) but can be difficult to implement in resource-limited settings. The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed simplified weight band dosing for NVP, but it has not been critically evaluated. NVP pharmacokinetic data were combined from eight pediatric clinical trials (Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group [PACTG] studies 245, 356, 366, 377, 403, 1056, and 1069 and Children with HIV in Africa Pharmacokinetics and Adherence of Simple Antiretroviral Regimens [CHAPAS]) representing subjects from multiple continents and across the pediatric age continuum. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed to characterize developmental changes in NVP disposition, identify potential sources of NVP pharmacokinetic variability, and assess various pediatric dosing strategies and their impact on NVP exposure. Age, CYP2B6 genotype, and ritonavir were independent predictors of oral NVP clearance. The Triomune fixed-dose tablet was an independent predictor of bioavailability compared to the liquid and other tablet formulations. Monte Carlo simulations of the final model were used to assess WHO weight band dosing recommendations. The final pharmacokinetic model indicated that WHO weight band dosing is likely to result in a percentage of children with NVP exposure within the target range similar to that obtained with FDA dosing. Weight band dosing of NVP proposed by the WHO has the potential to provide a simple and effective dosing strategy for resource limited settings. PMID:22869579

  5. Determining optimal clinical target volume margins on the basis of microscopic extracapsular extension of metastatic nodes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Shuanghu; Meng Xue; Yu Jinming . E-mail: fishtigers@yahoo.com.cn; Mu Dianbin; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Zhang Jiandong; Zhong Weixia; Yu Yonghua; Wang Jialin; Sun Xindong; Yang Guoren; Wang Yongzheng

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimal clinical target volume (CTV) margins around the nodal gross tumor volume (GTV) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients by assessing microscopic tumor extension beyond regional lymph node capsules. Methods and Materials: The incidence of nodal extracapsular extension (ECE) and relationship with nodal size were reviewed in 243 patients. Histologic sections of dissected regional lymph nodes up to 30 mm in size were examined to measure the extent of microscopic ECE. We determined the distribution of cases according to extent of ECE and the relationships between ECE extent and lymph node size, regional nodal disease extent, histologic type, and degree of differentiation. Results: The nodal ECE was seen in 41.6% of patients (101/243) and 33.4% of lymph nodes (214/640), and the incidence correlated to larger lymph node size positively. The extent of ECE was 0.7 mm in mean (range, 0-12.0 mm) and {<=}3 mm in 95% of the nodes. Positive correlations were found between extent of ECE and larger lymph node size ({>=}20 mm vs. 10-19 mm or <10 mm, p = 0.005), advanced nodal stage (N2 vs. N1, p = 0.046), and moderate or poor (vs. good or unknown) nodal differentiation (p = 0.002). ECE did not differ significantly by histologic type or nodal station. Conclusions: The incidence of ECE related to lymph node size, and ECE extent related to lymph node size, stage, and differentiation. It may be reasonable to recommend 3-mm CTV margins for pathologic lymph nodes <20 mm and more generous margins for lymph nodes {>=}20 mm.

  6. Clinical Experience and Best Practices Using Epidermal Skin Grafts on Wounds.

    PubMed

    Kirsner, Robert S; Bernstein, Brent; Bhatia, Animesh; Lantis, John; Le, Lam; Lincoln, Katherine; Liu, Paul; Rodgers, Lee; Shaw, Mark; Young, David

    2015-11-01

    Over the years, autologous skin grafting has been used extensively to achieve wound closure, optimize a functional scar, and improve aesthetic outcomes for the patient. Although a vast majority of the literature is on the use of full-thickness and split-thickness skin grafts, epidermal skin grafts (ESGs) have emerged as a viable option in the reconstructive ladder when only the epidermal layer is needed. These grafts are distinct from other types of autologous skin grafts in that they can be harvested without anesthesia and leave minimal or no scarring at the donor site. In order to explore the use of ESGs in the continuum of primary wound closure, a multidisciplinary expert panel convened in October 2014, in Las Vegas, NV, to review the scientific basis and clinical uses of epidermal grafting. This publication provides an overview of epidermal grafting, recommendations for graft application, and potential roles for its use in wound care and closure. PMID:26574750

  7. AT-57LONG-TERM CLINICAL RESULTS OF EXTENSIVE TUMOR REMOVAL FOLLOWED BY ACNU-BASED CHEMORADIOTHERAPY FOR 147 ANAPLASTIC GLIOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Takayuki, Yasuda; Masayuki, Nitta; Takashi, Maruyama; Taichi, Saito; Satoko, Ikuta; Yoshikazu, Okada; Hiroshi, Iseki; Yoshihiro, Muragaki

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Recent randomized trials showed that highly extent of resection (EOR) and PCV chemoradiotherapy had therapeutic long-term efficacy to anaplastic glioma (AG). From 2000, we have consistently enforced extensive removal and ACNU-based chemoradiotherapy for AG. We report retrospective clinical results of a single institution. METHODS: We reviewed 147 cases of primary AG between 2000 and 2011 (Male : Female = 94:53, average age; 43.9 year-old). 69 were anaplastic astrocytoma (41%), 43 were anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (29%), and 44 were anaplastic oligodendroglioma (30%). The intraoperative MRI was performed in 133 cases (90%), and awake surgery was performed in 58 cases (39%). Gross-total removal was 46 (31%), partial removal was 89 (61%), and biopsy was 12 (8%) (average; 83%, median; 95%). After resection, 60 Gy radiotherapy and ACNU or PAV chemotherapy were performed. The average Mib-1 index was 15%. The mean observation periods were 57 months and 95% follow-up rate. RESULTS: Overall survival (OS) wasn't reached median. The 3y-OS was 82%, 5y-OSs was 72%, and 10y-OS was 66%. There was no statistical significance among AA, AOA, AO (5y-OS; 64%, 79%, 77%). The each 5 years survival rate of gross-total resection, partial resection, and biopsy were 83%, 70%, 39%, and there was statistical significance (P = 0.0024). Extent of resection (EOR) correlated OS in AA (P = 0.02) but not in oligodendroglial subtypes (P = 0.6). Statistical significant factors were EOR (P = 0.0024) and Mib-1 index (P = 0.013). The significant factors in multi variable analysis were EOR (more than 95% or not, HR 2.5) and Mib-1 index (more than 13% or not, HR 2.3). The median PFS was 8.3, and 5y-PFS was 59%,and 10y-PFS was 45%. CONCLUSION: Our long-term clinical results of AG treated with extensive resection and ACNU-based chemoradiotherapy were better than previous reports. The EOR contributed better prognosis especially for AA.

  8. Learning experience of Chinese nursing students in an online clinical English course: qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Anson C Y; Wong, Nick; Wong, Thomas K S

    2015-02-01

    The low English proficiency of Chinese nurse/nursing students affects their performance when they work in English-speaking countries. However, limited resources are available to help them improve their workplace English, i.e. English used in a clinical setting. To this end, it is essential to look for an appropriate and effective means to assist them in improving their clinical English. The objective of this study is to evaluate the learning experience of Chinese nursing students after they have completed an online clinical English course. Focus group interview was used to explore their learning experience. 100 students in nursing programs at Tung Wah College were recruited. The inclusion criteria were: (1) currently enrolled in a nursing program; and (2) having clinical experience. Eligible participants self-registered for the online English course, and were required to complete the course within 3 months. After that, semi-structured interviews were conducted on students whom completed the whole and less than half of the course. One of the researchers joined each of the interviews as a facilitator and an observer. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. Finally, 7 themes emerged from the interviews: technical issues, adequacy of support, time requirement, motivation, clarity of course instruction, course design, and relevancy of the course. Participants had varied opinions on the 2 themes: motivation and relevancy of the course. Overall, results of this study suggest that the online English course helped students improve their English. Factors which support their learning are interactive course design, no time constraint, and relevancy to their work/study. Factors which detracted from their learning are poor accessibility, poor technical and learning support and no peer support throughout the course. PMID:25497137

  9. The effect of the atmospheric condition on the extensive air shower analysis at the Telescope Array experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Y.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tokuno, H.; Kakimoto, F.; Tomida, T.

    2011-09-22

    The accuracies in determination of air shower parameters such as longitudinal profiles or primary energies with the fluorescence detection technique are strongly dependent on atmospheric conditions of the molecular and aerosol components. Moreover, air fluorescence photon yield depends on the atmospheric density, and the transparency of the air for fluorescence photons depends on the atmospheric conditions from EAS to FDs. In this paper, we describe the atmospheric monitoring system in the Telescope Array (TA experiment), and the impact of the atmospheric conditions in air shower reconstructions. The systematic uncertainties of the determination of the primary cosmic ray energies and of the measurement of depth of maximum development (X{sub max}) of EASs due to atmospheric variance are evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation.

  10. Clinical Relevance of Multiple Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia: Development of a Multiplex PCR-Single-Base-Extension Methodology?

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, F.; Gaspar, J.; De Sousa, B.; Antunes, F.; Mansinho, K.; Matos, O.

    2011-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PcP) is a major cause of respiratory illness in patients with AIDS. The identification of multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at three distinct P. jirovecii loci encoding dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), mitochondrial large-subunit rRNA (mtLSU rRNA), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was achieved using multiplex-PCR (MPCR) followed by direct sequencing and two single-base extension (SBE) techniques. Four SNPs (DHFR312, mt85, SOD215, and SOD110), correlated previously with parameters of disease, were amplified and genotyped simultaneously. The concordance of results between the standard sequencing technique (direct sequencing) and SBE analysis was 96.9% for the acrylamide gel electrophoresis and 98.4% for the capillary electrophoresis. The cross-genetic analysis established several statistical associations among the SNPs studied: mt85C-SOD110T, SOD110T-SOD215C, and SOD110C-SOD215T. These results were confirmed by cluster analysis. Data showed that among the isolates with low to moderate parasite burden, the highest percentages of DHFR312C, mt85C, SOD110T, and SOD215C were detected, whereas for high parasite burden cases the highest frequencies were observed among isolates with DHFR312T, mt85T, SOD110C, and SOD215T. The polymorphisms studied were shown to be suitable genetic targets potentially correlated with PcP clinical data that can be used as predictors of outcome in further studies to help clinical decision-making in the management of PcP. The MPCR/SBE protocol described for the first time in the present study was shown to be a rapid, highly accurate method for genotyping P. jirovecii SNPs encoded by different loci that could be used for epidemiological studies and as an additional procedure for the prognostic classification and diagnosis of PcP. PMID:21389160

  11. In patients with extensive subcutaneous emphysema, which technique achieves maximal clinical resolution: infraclavicular incisions, subcutaneous drain insertion or suction on in situ chest drain?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Charles H N; Lang, Sommer A; Bilal, Haris; Rammohan, Kandadai S

    2014-06-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: 'In patients with extensive subcutaneous emphysema, which technique achieves maximal clinical resolution: infraclavicular incisions, subcutaneous drain insertion or suction on in situ chest drain?'. Altogether more than 200 papers were found using the reported search, of which 14 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Subcutaneous emphysema is usually a benign, self-limiting condition only requiring conservative management. Interventions are useful in the context of severe patient discomfort, respiratory distress or persistent air leak. In the absence of any comparative study, it is not possible to choose definitively between infraclavicular incisions, drain insertion and increasing suction on an in situ drain as the best method for managing severe subcutaneous emphysema. All the three techniques described have been shown to provide effective relief. Increasing suction on a chest tube already in situ provided rapid relief in patients developing SE following pulmonary resection. A retrospective study showed resolution in 66%, increasing to 98% in those who underwent video-assisted thoracic surgery with identification and closure of the leak. Insertion of a drain into the subcutaneous tissue also provided rapid sustained relief. Several studies aided drainage by using regular compressive massage. Infraclavicular incisions were also shown to provide rapid relief, but were noted to be more invasive and carried the potential for cosmetic defect. No major complications were illustrated. PMID:24572767

  12. Haemophilia in a real-world setting: the value of clinical experience in data collection.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Gerry; Iorio, Alfonso; Jokela, Vuokko; Juusola, Kristian; Lassila, Riitta

    2016-02-01

    At the 8th Annual Congress of the European Association for Haemophilia and Allied Disorders (EAHAD) held in Helsinki, Finland, in February 2015, Pfizer sponsored a satellite symposium entitled: 'Haemophilia in a real-world setting: The value of clinical experience in data collection' Co-chaired by Riitta Lassila (Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland) and Gerry Dolan (Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK); the symposium provided an opportunity to explore the practical value of real-world data in informing clinical decision-making. Gerry Dolan provided an introduction to the symposium by describing what is meant by real-world data (RWD), stressing the role RWD can play in optimising patient outcomes in haemophilia and highlighting the responsibility of all stakeholders to collaborate in continuous data collection. Kristian Juusola (Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland) then provided personal experience as a haemophilia nurse around patient views on adherence to treatment regimes, and how collecting insights into real-world use of treatment can shape approaches to improving adherence. The importance of elucidating pharmacokinetic parameters in a real-world setting was then explored by Vuokko Jokela (Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland). Finally, Alfonso Iorio (McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) highlighted the importance of quality data collection in translating clinical reality into scientific advances. PMID:26809546

  13. What Factors Facilitate Good Learning Experiences in Clinical Studies in Nursing: Bachelor Students' Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Leland, Arne; Dale, Jan Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies constitute 50% of the bachelor program in nursing education in Norway, and the quality of these studies may be decisive for the students' opportunities to learn and develop their professional competences. The aim of this study was to explore what bachelor students' in nursing perceived to be important for having good learning experiences in clinical studies. Data was collected in a focus group interview with eight nursing students who were in the last year of the educational program. The interview was transcribed verbatim, and qualitative content analysis was used for exploring and interpreting the content of the interview text. One main theme emerged from the analysis: “being in a vulnerable and exposed position characterized by conflicting needs.” Four categories were found: “aspects related to the clinical setting”, “aspects related to the nurse supervisor,” “aspects related to the student,” and “aspects related to the student-supervisor relationship”. The findings revealed that the students' learning experiences and motivation were related to individual, relational, and organizational aspects. The students highlighted their own as well as their supervisors' attitudes and competences and the importance of positive relationships. In addition, feeling welcomed, included, and valued in the ward improved their motivation, self-confidence, and self-respect. PMID:24455300

  14. Vertigo in childhood: proposal for a diagnostic algorithm based upon clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Casani, A P; Dallan, I; Navari, E; Sellari Franceschini, S; Cerchiai, N

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse, after clinical experience with a series of patients with established diagnoses and review of the literature, all relevant anamnestic features in order to build a simple diagnostic algorithm for vertigo in childhood. This study is a retrospective chart review. A series of 37 children underwent complete clinical and instrumental vestibular examination. Only neurological disorders or genetic diseases represented exclusion criteria. All diagnoses were reviewed after applying the most recent diagnostic guidelines. In our experience, the most common aetiology for dizziness is vestibular migraine (38%), followed by acute labyrinthitis/neuritis (16%) and somatoform vertigo (16%). Benign paroxysmal vertigo was diagnosed in 4 patients (11%) and paroxysmal torticollis was diagnosed in a 1-year-old child. In 8% (3 patients) of cases, the dizziness had a post-traumatic origin: 1 canalolithiasis of the posterior semicircular canal and 2 labyrinthine concussions, respectively. Menière's disease was diagnosed in 2 cases. A bilateral vestibular failure of unknown origin caused chronic dizziness in 1 patient. In conclusion, this algorithm could represent a good tool for guiding clinical suspicion to correct diagnostic assessment in dizzy children where no neurological findings are detectable. The algorithm has just a few simple steps, based mainly on two aspects to be investigated early: temporal features of vertigo and presence of hearing impairment. A different algorithm has been proposed for cases in which a traumatic origin is suspected. PMID:26246662

  15. What factors facilitate good learning experiences in clinical studies in nursing: bachelor students' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Dale, Bjørg; Leland, Arne; Dale, Jan Gunnar

    2013-12-17

    Clinical studies constitute 50% of the bachelor program in nursing education in Norway, and the quality of these studies may be decisive for the students' opportunities to learn and develop their professional competences. The aim of this study was to explore what bachelor students' in nursing perceived to be important for having good learning experiences in clinical studies. Data was collected in a focus group interview with eight nursing students who were in the last year of the educational program. The interview was transcribed verbatim, and qualitative content analysis was used for exploring and interpreting the content of the interview text. One main theme emerged from the analysis: "being in a vulnerable and exposed position characterized by conflicting needs." Four categories were found: "aspects related to the clinical setting", "aspects related to the nurse supervisor," "aspects related to the student," and "aspects related to the student-supervisor relationship". The findings revealed that the students' learning experiences and motivation were related to individual, relational, and organizational aspects. The students highlighted their own as well as their supervisors' attitudes and competences and the importance of positive relationships. In addition, feeling welcomed, included, and valued in the ward improved their motivation, self-confidence, and self-respect. PMID:24455300

  16. Clinical experience and minority group students. A perspective from Harvard Medical School.

    PubMed

    Poussaint, A F

    1999-05-01

    Medical educators realize that there are no simple predictors for student performance in the clinical training years. College grades and Medical College Admission Test scores may suggest the strength of a student's achievement in the basic sciences but cannot be relied on to predict efficacy in patient care. There is no fool proof way of assessing noncognitive abilities critical to clinical competence. However, in admissions, extracurricular activities, community service, leadership abilities, recommendations, and interviews are examined to assess personal strengths. The author's observations suggest that noncognitive attributes are important in the success of disadvantaged students. Although some, but not all, with low Medical College Admission Test scores may not excel in the basic sciences, once they reach the clinical years, a leveling of the playing field gives them an opportunity to show their special competence with patients. Minority students, perhaps because of their own life experiences, often are alert to the needs and sensitivities of patients. As a group, they are respectful of the dignity of patients. Many embrace the dictum: treat every patient as you would want a family member to be treated. Most minority students, despite pressures of being a minority in predominantly white environments, perform at a very high level in the clinical years and thereafter. PMID:10335283

  17. Implementation Of A Digital Multiple Viewing Station And Early Clinical Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. K.; Mankovich, Nicholas J.; Taira, Ricky K.; Kangarloo, Hooshang

    1986-06-01

    The Clinical Radiology Imaging System (CRIS) developed in the UCLA Image Processing Laboratory (IPL) is designed to allow radiologists, clinicians, and technologists to review and manipulate radiological images in digital form on a multiple viewing station (MVS). The system is composed of a multiple viewing station located at a clinical site and a centralized computer system consisting of a VAX-11/750 minicomputer, a Gould/DeAnza IP8500 image processor, and optical and magnetic disk storage. A broadband network allows video and digital communication between the remote clinical site and the IPL research laboratory. The station allows the real-time presentation of six 512x512x8 bit images from any combination of CT, MRI, DF, ultrasound, and digitized radiographs. The user interacts with the system by way of menus, icons, and a trackball. The CRIS system has been implemented in the Pediatric Radiology Section of the UCLA Medical Center. This paper describes the hardware and software architecture of the system and some early clinical experience.

  18. Implementation of Electronic Checklists in an Oncology Medical Record: Initial Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Kevin V.; Miller, Alexis A.; Roeske, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of any medical treatment depends on the accurate processing of multiple complex components of information, with proper delivery to the patient. This is true for radiation oncology, in which treatment delivery is as complex as a surgical procedure but more dependent on hardware and software technology. Uncorrected errors, even if small or infrequent, can result in catastrophic consequences for the patient. We developed electronic checklists (ECLs) within the oncology electronic medical record (EMR) and evaluated their use and report on our initial clinical experience. Methods: Using the Mosaiq EMR, we developed checklists within the clinical assessment section. These checklists are based on the process flow of information from one group to another within the clinic and enable the processing, confirmation, and documentation of relevant patient information before the delivery of radiation therapy. The clinical use of the ECL was documented by means of a customized report. Results: Use of ECL has reduced the number of times that physicians were called to the treatment unit. In particular, the ECL has ensured that therapists have a better understanding of the treatment plan before the initiation of treatment. An evaluation of ECL compliance showed that, with additional staff training, > 94% of the records were completed. Conclusion: The ECL can be used to ensure standardization of procedures and documentation that the pretreatment checks have been performed before patient treatment. We believe that the implementation of ECLs will improve patient safety and reduce the likelihood of treatment errors. PMID:22043184

  19. Does experience in general practice influence the clinical thinking of foundation trainees?

    PubMed

    Kibble, Sharon; Scallan, Samantha; Wilson, Sally; Odbert, Reg; Lyon-Maris, Johnny; Leach, Camilla

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to capture and identify changes in clinical thinking amongst foundation trainees after a four-month attachment in general practice, and to develop a means of analysing the data collected to inform understanding about how clinical thinking develops and changes for a trainee - the learner - in the context of clinical experience. We use the term 'clinical thinking' consistently throughout our paper to refer to the trainees' general thinking about a case, and do so in the same way as other academics. Through the innovative use of Mind Maps, we have sought to demonstrate whether there was a significant change in the themes and key features contained in maps drawn by foundation year 2 trainees before and after an attachment in general practice, and to locate the nature of the change if present. Being able to identify such change is potentially valuable as it can assist in revealing a trainee's learning needs and shape future learning. PMID:25693153

  20. Results of extracorporeal life support implementation in routine clinical practice: single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Bio?ina, Bojan; Petri?evi?, Mate; Belina, Dražen; Gašparovi?, Hrvoje; Svetina, Lucija; Konosi?, Sanja; White, Alexandra; Ivan?an, Višnja; Kopjar, Tomislav; Mili?i?, Davor

    2014-01-01

    Aim To describe our experience in the clinical application of extracorporeal life support (ECLS) and analyze whether ECLS leads to acceptable clinical outcomes in patients with cardiac failure. Methods Data from clinical database of University Hospital Center Zagreb, Croatia, on 75 patients undergoing ECLS support from 2009 to 2014 due to cardiac failure were retrospectively analyzed. Outcomes were defined as procedural and clinical outcomes. ECLS as a primary procedure and ECLS as a postcardiotomy procedure due to inability to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass were analyzed. Results ECLS was used in 75 adult patients, and in 24 (32%) of those procedural success was noted. ECLS was implemented as a primary procedure in 36 patients and as a postcardiotomy procedure in 39 patients. Nine out of 39 (23.08%) patients had postcardiotomy ECLS after heart transplantation. Bleeding complications occurred in 30 (40%) patients, both in primary (11/36 patients) and postcardiotomy group (19/39 patients). ECLS was established by peripheral approach in 46 patients and by central cannulation in 27 patients. In 2 patients, combined cannulation was performed, with an inflow cannula placed into the right atrium and an outflow cannula placed into the femoral artery. Eleven patients treated with peripheral approach had ischemic complications. Conclusion ECLS is a useful tool in the treatment of patients with refractory cardiac failure and its results are encouraging in patients who otherwise have an unfavorable prognosis. PMID:25559831

  1. Supporting positive experiences and sustained participation in clinical trials: looking beyond information provision.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Kate; Entwistle, Vikki A

    2012-12-01

    Recruitment processes for clinical trials are governed by guidelines and regulatory systems intended to ensure participation is informed and voluntary. Although the guidelines and systems provide some protection to potential participants, current recruitment processes often result in limited understanding and experiences of inadequate decision support. Many trials also have high drop-out rates among participants, which are ethically troubling because they can be indicative of poor experiences and they limit the usefulness of the knowledge the trials were designed to generate. Drawing on recent social-psychological and philosophical-ethical research on trial recruitment and patient participation in treatment decision-making, this paper identifies possibilities for improving communicative support for both initial decisions and ongoing participation in clinical trials. It highlights the potential of a shift in thinking about 'voluntariness', underpinned by relational understandings of autonomy, to encourage more nuanced judgements about the ethics of communication between trial staff and (potential) participants. The paper suggests that the idea of responsively enabling people to consider invitations or requests to participate in particular trials could serve as a general guide to communication. This might help ensure decisions about trial participation are meaningfully informed and voluntary, and that relationships between trial staff and participants contribute to positive experiences of trial participation and ultimately to the generation of the robust knowledge. PMID:22875981

  2. Psychotic experiences as indicators of suicidal ideation in a non-clinical college sample.

    PubMed

    DeVylder, Jordan E; Thompson, Elizabeth; Reeves, Gloria; Schiffman, Jason

    2015-04-30

    Suicide is a leading cause of preventable death. Epidemiological studies have shown strong associations between sub-threshold psychotic experiences and risk for suicidal ideation and behavior. Screens designed to assess psychotic experiences may have clinical utility in improving suicide prevention efforts. In the current study, we hypothesized that the Prodromal Questionnaire-Brief (PQ-B) would reliably distinguish levels of suicidal ideation within a sample of college students (n=376). As predicted, PQ-B scores varied significantly across levels of suicidal ideation, both when treated as a raw count of sub-threshold psychotic experiences and when taking into account subjective distress associated with those symptoms. In addition, we explored the feasibility of developing a short screen based on the most discriminating items, finding that a six-item version of the PQ-B yielded higher accuracy for detecting elevated suicidal ideation over the full measure. The PQ-B has the potential for clinical utility in detecting groups that might be at increased risk for suicidal ideation. PMID:25746171

  3. Teaching Residents to Work with Torture Survivors: Experiences from the Bronx Human Rights Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Ramin G.; Cooperman, Nina; Smith, Clyde L.; Du, Evelyn; Modali, Laxmi; Sacajiu, Galit

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Despite the 1984 United Nations’s Convention Against Torture calling to train doctors to work with torture survivors, many physicians are unaware of their obligation and few are taught the requisite clinical skills. Aim To describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a curriculum to teach residents to work with torture survivors. Participants Medicine residents in New York City Program Description A 2-component curriculum consisting of a series of workshops and clinical experiences, which provide content, skills, and practices regarding the medical, psychological, ethical, and legal aspects of evaluating and caring for torture survivors. Curriculum Evaluation All 22 trainees received surveys before and after training. Surveys assessed residents’ relevant prior experience, beliefs, skills, and attitudes regarding working with torture survivors. At baseline, 23% of residents described previous human rights trainings and 17% had work experiences with torture survivors. Before the curriculum, 81% of residents reported doctors should know how to evaluate survivors, although only 5% routinely screened patients for torture. After the curriculum, residents reported significant improvements in 3 educational domains—general knowledge, sequelae, and self-efficacy to evaluate torture survivors. Discussion This curriculum addresses the disparity between doctors’ obligations, and training to work with torture survivors. It is likely to achieve its educational goals, and can potentially be adapted to other residencies. PMID:18612740

  4. Accuracy of Reporting the Hyperdense Middle Cerebral Artery Sign as a Function of Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Aouad, Patrick; Hughes, Andrew; Neeman, Terry; Lueck, Christian J.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim The hyperdense middle cerebral artery sign (HMCAS) is a useful clinical sign in the management of acute stroke and may alter time-critical decisions within an emergency setting. Though gold standards have been published, these are rarely used in clinical practice and scans tend to be reported subjectively. It is therefore possible that the level of experience of the doctor reporting the scan may impact on the accuracy of the reporting and hence patient management. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy in detecting HMCAS across doctors with varying levels of experience. Methods Forty doctors were recruited into four categories of experience. Each subject received a brief computer-based tutorial on how to identify an HMCAS and was then asked to report on the presence or absence of an HMCAS in 19 pre-prepared CT scans using a standardised viewing template. Results The mean (±SE) percentage correct scores increased with experience from 76.8 ± 3.69 among interns and residents to 90.1 ± 2.23 (neurologists and radiologists; p < 0.01). Sensitivity and specificity as well as positive and negative predictive values all increased with experience. In addition, more experienced clinicians were better able to distinguish scans which met the radiological criteria for HMCAS from those which only just failed to do so. Conclusions Experienced neurologists and radiologists consistently and accurately reported the presence or absence of HMCAS, whereas less experienced clinicians tended to over-report the presence of HMCAS. This may have implications for the acute management of thromboembolic stroke. PMID:25759709

  5. Clinical experience with In-Ceram Spinell crowns: 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fradeani, Mauro; Aquilano, Augusto; Corrado, Marcantonio

    2002-12-01

    Prompted by increased patient requests for esthetic treatment, restorative clinicians have evaluated a variety of new materials and procedures. This study reports on 5 years' experience with In-Ceram Spinell all-ceramic crowns. A total of 40 anterior crowns were positioned in 13 patients from October 1995 to December 1998. The clinical examination was made following modified California Dental Association/Ryge criteria. Final evaluation was carried out in October 2000, for an observation period of 22 to 60 months (mean 50 months). Only one failure was recorded, and the fractured crown needed to be replaced; according to Kaplan-Meier analysis, the estimated success rate was 97.5%. A thorough description of the clinical procedures through which anterior teeth can be successfully treated with all-ceramic Spinell crowns is described. PMID:12516824

  6. [Professor ZHENG Kuishan's experience in the clinical treatment of bi syndrome with acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Liu, Baohu; Zheng, Jiatai; Guo, Yongming

    2015-06-01

    Professor ZHENG Kuishan has been engaged in the education and clinical practice of acupuncture and moxibustion for over 60 years. Professor ZHENG is strict in scholarly research and exquisite in medical techniques and he is good at treatment of bi syndrome induced by invasion of wind, cold and damp with warming and, promoting therapy. He emphasizes on syndrome differentiation and acupoint combination and selects the accurate manipulations. Not only are the symptoms relieved apparently, but also the body state is improved. As a result, the primary and secondary are treated simultaneously. In the paper, professor ZHENG's experience is introduced in the treatment of bi syndrome in the aspects of theory, method, formula, acupoint and technique. And his clinical therapeutic approaches have been deeply analyzed. PMID:26480566

  7. Tracking Patient Encounters and Clinical Skills to Determine Competency in Ambulatory Care Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Chrystian R.; Harris, Ila M.; Moon, Jean Y.; Westberg, Sarah M.; Kolar, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine if the amount of exposure to patient encounters and clinical skills correlates to student clinical competency on ambulatory care advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Design. Students in ambulatory care APPEs tracked the number of patients encountered by medical condition and the number of patient care skills performed. At the end of the APPE, preceptors evaluated students’ competency for each medical condition and skill, referencing the Dreyfus model for skill acquisition. Assessment. Data was collected from September 2012 through August 2014. Forty-six responses from a student tracking tool were matched to preceptor ratings. Students rated as competent saw more patients and performed more skills overall. Preceptors noted minimal impact on workload. Conclusions. Increased exposure to patient encounters and skills performed had a positive association with higher Dreyfus stage, which may represent a starting point in the conversation for more thoughtful design of ambulatory care APPEs. PMID:26941440

  8. Clinical research for older adults in rural areas: the MINDED study experience.

    PubMed

    Fougère, Bertrand; Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylène; Vellas, Bruno; Andrieu, Sandrine; Demougeot, Laurent; Cluzan, Céline; Cesari, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    Due to the growing need to make clinical decisions based on valid and objective scientific evidence, the number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has increased over the last three decades. Nevertheless, evidence-based medicine has still limited applicability in older adults, because they are often excluded from clinical trials. Evidence-based medicine is even more challenging in rural areas, as its remote environment provides additional barriers. Nevertheless, given the high prevalence of older adults living in rural settings, research in this type of environment has become crucial. This can only be accomplished by considering the multiple additional challenges of these regions. In this paper, we examine potential environmental, procedural, and participants' barriers to the management of a RCT in a rural area. Possible solutions and suggestions are provided based on our experience-from the Multidomain Intervention to preveNt Disability in ElDers (MINDED) project. PMID:26891623

  9. Tracking Patient Encounters and Clinical Skills to Determine Competency in Ambulatory Care Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences.

    PubMed

    Lounsbery, Jody L; Pereira, Chrystian R; Harris, Ila M; Moon, Jean Y; Westberg, Sarah M; Kolar, Claire

    2016-02-25

    Objective. To determine if the amount of exposure to patient encounters and clinical skills correlates to student clinical competency on ambulatory care advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Design. Students in ambulatory care APPEs tracked the number of patients encountered by medical condition and the number of patient care skills performed. At the end of the APPE, preceptors evaluated students' competency for each medical condition and skill, referencing the Dreyfus model for skill acquisition. Assessment. Data was collected from September 2012 through August 2014. Forty-six responses from a student tracking tool were matched to preceptor ratings. Students rated as competent saw more patients and performed more skills overall. Preceptors noted minimal impact on workload. Conclusions. Increased exposure to patient encounters and skills performed had a positive association with higher Dreyfus stage, which may represent a starting point in the conversation for more thoughtful design of ambulatory care APPEs. PMID:26941440

  10. Practical guide for implementing hybrid PET/MR clinical service: lessons learned from our experience

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Nainesh; Friedman, Kent P.; Shah, Shetal N.; Chandarana, Hersh

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging, until recently, have been performed on separate PET and MR systems with varying temporal delay between the two acquisitions. The interpretation of these two separately acquired studies requires cognitive fusion by radiologists/nuclear medicine physicians or dedicated and challenging post-processing. Recent advances in hardware and software with introduction of hybrid PET/MR systems have made it possible to acquire the PET and MR images simultaneously or near simultaneously. This review article serves as a road-map for clinical implementation of hybrid PET/MR systems and briefly discusses hardware systems, the personnel needs, safety and quality issues, and reimbursement topics based on experience at NYU Langone Medical Center and Cleveland Clinic. PMID:25985966

  11. Amelioration of erectile dysfunction following a switch from carbamazepine to oxcarbazepine: recent clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Sachdeo, Rajesh; Sathyan, Revathi R

    2005-07-01

    Oxcarbazepine is an antiepileptic drug (AED) indicated for use as monotherapy and add-on therapy in adults and children 4 years of age and older. Despite being structurally related to carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine differs substantially in its pharmacokinetic and safety profile; oxcarbazepine has a much lower risk of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions than carbamazepine. Carbamazepine has also been shown to induce the hepatic synthesis of sex hormone-binding globulin, thus reducing free serum testosterone levels and possibly causing erectile dysfunction (ED) in some men; these effects have not been observed with oxcarbazepine. This paper provides a discussion of recent clinical experience with men who presented in private clinical practice with complaints of ED while being treated with carbamazepine for seizure disorders. The four illustrative case studies presented in this report suggest that switching AED treatment from carbamazepine to oxcarbazepine in men with epilepsy can reduce the ED side effects observed with carbamazepine. PMID:16004674

  12. Clinical evaluation of the antishock trouser: retrospective analysis of five years of experience.

    PubMed

    Wayne, M A; Macdonald, S C

    1983-06-01

    A retrospective study of five years of experience in using pneumatic antishock trousers was undertaken to provide data for analysis of clinical response and complications associated with use of the suit. Of 1,120 patients who received pneumatic antishock trousers, 821 (73.3%) survived more than 24 hours, and their response and clinical course were analyzed. Response was not uniform: most exhibited blood pressure response, and some showed changes in only pulse rate or evidence of improved tissue perfusion. Different responses were noted for different shock etiologies. Of all the potential complications theoretically possible, a prevalence of only 4% for ischemic skin changes (none requiring grafting) and 0.97% for renal perfusion failure were noted. The pneumatic antishock trouser is thought to be beneficial and safe. PMID:6859628

  13. The Usefulness of Systematic Reviews of Animal Experiments for the Design of Preclinical and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Rob B. M.; Wever, Kimberley E.; Avey, Marc T.; Stephens, Martin L.; Sena, Emily S.; Leenaars, Marlies

    2014-01-01

    The question of how animal studies should be designed, conducted, and analyzed remains underexposed in societal debates on animal experimentation. This is not only a scientific but also a moral question. After all, if animal experiments are not appropriately designed, conducted, and analyzed, the results produced are unlikely to be reliable and the animals have in effect been wasted. In this article, we focus on one particular method to address this moral question, namely systematic reviews of previously performed animal experiments. We discuss how the design, conduct, and analysis of future (animal and human) experiments may be optimized through such systematic reviews. In particular, we illustrate how these reviews can help improve the methodological quality of animal experiments, make the choice of an animal model and the translation of animal data to the clinic more evidence-based, and implement the 3Rs. Moreover, we discuss which measures are being taken and which need to be taken in the future to ensure that systematic reviews will actually contribute to optimizing experimental design and thereby to meeting a necessary condition for making the use of animals in these experiments justified. PMID:25541545

  14. Fingolimod in the treatment of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis: long-term experience and an update on the clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Bhupendra O.

    2016-01-01

    Since the approval in 2010 of fingolimod 0.5 mg (Gilenya; Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland) in the USA as an oral therapy for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis, long-term clinical experience with this therapy has been increasing. This review provides a summary of the cumulative dataset from clinical trials and their extensions, plus postmarketing studies that contribute to characterizing the efficacy and safety profile of fingolimod in patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. Data from the controlled, phase III, pivotal studies [FREEDOMS (FTY720 Research Evaluating Effects of Daily Oral therapy in Multiple Sclerosis), FREEDOMS II and TRANSFORMS (Trial Assessing Injectable Interferon versus FTY720 Oral in Relapsing–Remitting Multiple Sclerosis)] in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis have shown that fingolimod has a robust effect on clinical and magnetic resonance imaging outcomes. The respective study extensions show that effects on annualized relapse rates are sustained with continued fingolimod treatment. Consistent, significant reductions in magnetic resonance imaging lesion counts and brain volume loss have also been sustained with long-term treatment. The safety profile of fingolimod is also examined, particularly in light of its long-term use. A summary of the adverse events of interest that are associated with fingolimod treatment and associated label guidelines are also considered, which include cardiac effects following first-dose administration, infections, lymphopenia, macular edema and pregnancy. Historic hurdles to the prescription of fingolimod and how these challenges are being met are also discussed. PMID:27006700

  15. Vas deferens occlusion by percutaneous injection of polyurethane elastomer plugs: clinical experience and reversibility.

    PubMed

    Zhao, S C

    1990-05-01

    A non-incision method of vas occlusion based on the percutaneous injection of polyurethane elastomer solution to form plugs is described. The results are based on clinical experience in 12,000 men in which only 56 cases of minor complications were recorded. Follow-up of 500 men for up to 3 years demonstrated an azoospermia rate of 98%. Plugs have been removed from 86 men and, to date, 51 have made their wives pregnant. In those from which the plugs have been removed for more than 1 year (n = 31), the pregnancy rate is 100%. PMID:2347193

  16. Credentialing in carotid angiography and carotid angioplasty/stenting: experience of Mayo Clinic Rochester.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert D; Sullivan, Timothy M

    2005-06-01

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting is an evolving technique in the treatment of patients with carotid occlusive disease who are at increased risk for carotid endarterectomy. The literature has largely focused on the short and long-term results of this novel procedure. Due to the involvement of multiple disciplines, all of whom have legitimate claims to the carotid territory, credentialing has been a contentious issue at the local hospital level. This article describes the experience of Mayo Clinic Rochester in developing, in a multi-disciplinary manner, documents for credentialing in carotid angiography, carotid intervention, and guidelines for the use of this novel procedure. PMID:15986329

  17. Clinical experience with a high-performance ATM-connected DICOM archive for cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Harry P.

    1997-05-01

    A system to archive large image sets, such as cardiac cine runs, with near realtime response must address several functional and performance issues, including efficient use of a high performance network connection with standard protocols, an architecture which effectively integrates both short- and long-term mass storage devices, and a flexible data management policy which allows optimization of image distribution and retrieval strategies based on modality and site-specific operational use. Clinical experience with such as archive has allowed evaluation of these systems issues and refinement of a traffic model for cardiac angiography.

  18. [MA Shao-qun's clinical experience of warm moxibustion for the liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong-Qing; Liu, Ping; Zhao, Bai-Xiao

    2012-03-01

    To summarize MA Shao-qun's clinical experience of warm moxibustion for the liver diseases. The warm moxibustion was put to use by MA Shao-qun to treat many diseases, including hepatitis, cirrhosis and liver functional disorder. Under the human-oriented theory, he focuses on regulating the whole function of the body and tonifying the original qi to increase physical fitness and avoid illness. Besides, he is good at the combination of multi-acupoints for long-term and circulating moxibustion treatment, and also pays attention to nourishing the spleen-stomach, adjusting the fu-qi and resolving the dampness in the body. PMID:22471143

  19. Clinical experience with high power (140 mj.), large fiber (320 micron) pulsed dye laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Dretler, S P; Bhatta, K M

    1991-11-01

    The pulsed dye laser, at 504 nm. wavelength with a pulse duration of 1 microsecond, was used at 140 mj. per pulse via a 320 mu. (core) fiber for fragmentation of 72 ureteral calculi. The fragmentation efficiency and clinical results using the 140 mj./320 mu. fiber were compared to previous experience using the 60 mj./200 mu. (core) fiber. Fragmentation efficiency was significantly improved requiring many fewer laser pulses to fragment calculi of similar size and composition, and decreasing the need for auxiliary methods to complete stone fragmentation. The higher energy and larger fiber allowed for more efficient ureteroscopic ureteral stone fragmentation without compromising tissue safety. PMID:1682511

  20. The Subjective Experience of Youths at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ben-David, Shelly; Birnbaum, Michael; Eilenberg, Mara; DeVylder, Jordan; Gill, Kelly; Schienle, Jessica; Azimov, Neyra; Lukens, Ellen P.; Davidson, Larry; Corcoran, Cheryl Mary

    2015-01-01

    Objective Understanding the experience of individuals across stages of schizophrenia is important for development of services to promote recovery. As yet, little is known about the experience of individuals who exhibit prodromal symptoms of schizophrenia. Methods Audiotaped interviews were conducted with 27 participants at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis (15 males; 12 females; mean age 21; ethnically diverse). Phenomenological qualitative research techniques of coding, consensus, and comparison were used. Results Emergent themes differed by gender. Themes for males were feeling abnormal or “broken”; focus on going “crazy”; fantasy and escapism; and alienation and despair, with a desire for relationships. Themes for females were psychotic illness in family members; personal trauma; struggle with intimate relationships; and career and personal development. Conclusions The finding of relative social engagement and future-orientation of females identified as at risk for psychosis is novel, and has implications for outreach and treatment. PMID:25179420

  1. Participants' experiences of being debriefed to placebo allocation in a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Felicity L; Jacobson, Eric E; Shaw, Jessica; Kaptchuk, Ted J

    2012-08-01

    Participants in placebo-controlled clinical trials give informed consent to be randomized to verum or placebo. However, researchers rarely tell participants which treatment they actually received. We interviewed 4 participants in a trial of acupuncture for irritable bowel syndrome before, during, and after they received a course of placebo treatments over 6 weeks. During the final interview, we informed participants that they had received a course of placebo treatments. We used an idiographic phenomenological approach based on the Sheffield School to describe each participant's experiences of being blinded to and then debriefed to placebo allocation. The participants' experiences of blinding and debriefing were embodied, related to their goals in undertaking the study, and social (e.g., embedded in trusting and valued relationships with acupuncturists). We suggest ways in which debriefing to placebo allocation can be managed sensitively to facilitate positive outcomes for participants. PMID:22673094

  2. Getting Acquainted: An Induction Training Guide for First-Year Extension Agents. Suggestions for Completing Certain Learning Experiences Included in the Induction Training Guide; a Supplement to "Getting Acquainted."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collings, Mary Louise; Gassie, Edward W.

    An induction guide to help the extension agent get acquainted with his role and suggestions for completing learning experiences that are included in the guide comprise this two-part publication. The training guide learning experiences, a total of 25, are made up of: Objectives of the New Worker; When Completed; Learning Experiences; Person(s)…

  3. A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL COMPARING EXTENSIBLE AND INEXTENSIBLE LUMBOSACRAL ORTHOSES AND STANDARD CARE ALONE IN THE MANAGEMENT OF LOWER BACK PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Morrisette, David C.; Cholewicki, Jacek; Patenge, Walter F.; Logan, Sarah; Seif, Gretchen; McGowan, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Single blinded, randomized clinical trial for the evaluation of lumbosacral orthoses (LSOs) in the management of lower back pain (LBP). Objective To evaluate the effects of two types of LSO on self-rated disability in patients with lower back pain. Summary of Background Data LSOs are commonly used for the management of LBP, but their effectiveness may vary due to design. An inextensible LSO (iLSO) reduce trunk motion and increases trunk stiffness, whereas an extensible LSO (eLSO) does not. Methods 98 participants with LBP were randomized to three groups: 1) Standard care group (SC), which included medication and physical therapy (n=29), 2) SC with eLSO (eLSO group) (n=32), and 3) SC with iLSO (iLSO group) (n=37). Outcome measures were evaluated before and after 2 weeks of treatment: modified Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Patient Specific Activity Score (PSAS), pain ratings, and Fear and Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ). Results There were no statistically significant differences between groups at baseline. Compared to the SC alone, iLSO group showed greater improvement on the ODI scores (p=.01), but not the eLSO group. The ODI scores improved by a mean of 2.4 (95% CI ?2.2, 7.1), 8.1 (95% CI 2.8, 13.4), and 14.0 (95% CI 8.2, 19.8) points for SC, eLSO, and iLSO groups respectively. Individuals wearing the iLSO had 4.7 times higher odds of achieving 50% or greater improvement in the ODI scores compared to those assigned to SC (95% CI 1.2, 18.5, p=0.03). Both the eLSO and iLSO groups had a greater improvement in the PSAS scores compared to SC (p=.05 and p=.01, respectively), but the change did not meet the minimal clinically important difference. Pain ratings improved for all three groups, with no statistical difference between them. Finally, no significant differences across groups were found for the FABQ. Conclusions An iLSO led to greater improvement in ODI scores in comparison with SC and an eLSO. We surmise that the likely mechanism responsible for this difference in outcome was the added trunk stiffness and motion restriction by the iLSO. PMID:25054648

  4. Cobalt chromium-based biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting stent: rationale, evidence and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Pan, D R; Zhu, H; Hu, Z Y; Pang, S; Wu, W; Tian, N L; Xu, B; Iqbal, J; Zhang, Y J

    2015-10-01

    Metallic drug-eluting stents (DES) are the first choice for percutaneous coronary interventional treatment of coronary artery disease at present. Although they have overcome some disadvantages and limitations of plain balloon angioplasty and bare-metal stents, chronic local inflammatory reactions related to permanent polymer existence and poor vascular healing after first generation DES implantation may translate into the increased risk of late and very late stent thrombosis. There have been technological developments in stent design, materials and coatings, including more conformable platform designs, biocompatible or biodegradable polymers and improved kinetics of drug release. The newer generation DES have proven superior to previous DES technology in terms of both safety and efficacy. Accumulating evidence has suggested that DES with cobalt chromium stent platform, modified biodegradable polymer coatings, and rapamycin derivative drugs are associated with improved clinical outcomes. Currently, several new cobalt chromium biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents have been introduced to clinical practice. This review will describe basic concept and rationale behind the newer cobalt chromium biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents, systematically present the new clinical experiences with several representative devices. PMID:26173625

  5. Eight years' experience of regional audit: an assessment of its value as a clinical governance tool.

    PubMed

    John, H; Paskins, Z; Hassell, A; Rowe, I F

    2010-02-01

    Strengthening clinical audit is crucial for improving the quality of healthcare provision. The West Midlands Rheumatology Service and Training Committee coordinates an innovative programme of regional audits and the experience of rheumatology healthcare professionals involved was surveyed. This was a questionnaire-based study in which respondents rated statements relating to regional audit on Likert scales. Out of 105 staff, 70 replied. There was consensus that results of regional audit have been robust, valid and reliable; regional audits benefit patients and units; provide educational opportunities for specialist registrars (SpRs); and are more efficient than local audit by allowing comparison between units. Opinion was divided about how well informed respondents were and how effective they are at closing the audit loop. Many units reported changes in practice. Regional audit is widely perceived to be a valuable clinical governance tool supporting significant changes to clinical practice, and an excellent training opportunity for SpRs. Recommendations for a successful regional audit scheme are described in this article. PMID:20408300

  6. Clinical analysis on anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis cases: Chinese experience

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoqin; Fan, Chunqiu; Wu, Jian; Ye, Jing; Zhan, Shuqin; Song, Haiqing; Liu, Aihua; Su, Yingying; Jia, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    As a kind of autoimmune encephalitis which was just identified, the clinical manifestations of the anti-N methyl-D aspartate (anti-NMDA) receptor encephalitis are complex, diverse and in severe condition. The immunotherapy has shown good effect on the treatment but in generally, the diagnosis and treatment are still in the experience accumulation stage. More clinical research in different population is necessary, for example, in the Chinese population. This study was completed in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis patients who were diagnosed in Beijing Xuan Wu Hospital (China) during the time from 2011 to 2013. Total 33 patients were involved with the average age of 29.7 years old when the diseases were onset. With diverse clinical manifestations, most patients displayed positively by NMDAR antibody test and 63.6% of them were associated with elevated CSF-lgA. Patients also showed abnormal MRI and EEG. Only three patients had teratomas. With hormone therapy, gamma globulin treatment or plasma exchange, more than three quarters of patients fully recovered and the others had moderate symptoms. Based on our results, we suggest that NMDAR antibody test would be helpful to make a timely diagnosis and to administer immunotherapy. PMID:26770517

  7. Experiences of using the Theoretical Domains Framework across diverse clinical environments: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Cameron J; Marshall, Andrea P; Chaves, Nadia J; Jankelowitz, Stacey K; Lin, Ivan B; Loy, Clement T; Rees, Gwyneth; Sakzewski, Leanne; Thomas, Susie; To, The-Phung; Wilkinson, Shelley A; Michie, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Background The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) is an integrative framework developed from a synthesis of psychological theories as a vehicle to help apply theoretical approaches to interventions aimed at behavior change. Purpose This study explores experiences of TDF use by professionals from multiple disciplines across diverse clinical settings. Methods Mixed methods were used to examine experiences, attitudes, and perspectives of health professionals in using the TDF in health care implementation projects. Individual interviews were conducted with ten health care professionals from six disciplines who used the TDF in implementation projects. Deductive content and thematic analysis were used. Results Three main themes and associated subthemes were identified including: 1) reasons for use of the TDF (increased confidence, broader perspective, and theoretical underpinnings); 2) challenges using the TDF (time and resources, operationalization of the TDF) and; 3) future use of the TDF. Conclusion The TDF provided a useful, flexible framework for a diverse group of health professionals working across different clinical settings for the assessment of barriers and targeting resources to influence behavior change for implementation projects. The development of practical tools and training or support is likely to aid the utility of TDF. PMID:25834455

  8. Clinical experiences in treating PTSD patients by combining individual and group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bili?, Vedran; Nemci?-Moro, Iva; Karsi?, Vana; Grgi?, Vesna; Stojanovi?-Spehar, Stanislava; Marcinko, Darko

    2010-06-01

    PTSD is a complex psychobiological disorder that causes disfunctionality in many areas. In treating PTSD different models have been applied, however, no general consensus on the method of treatment has yet been achieved. At the Clinic for Psychological Medicine we have developed the model of combined treatment for PTSD patients that involves outpatient individual psychotherapy, psychopharmacotherapy and group psychotherapeutic techniques introduced within repeated day-hospital treatments. In this paper the efficiency of the above mentioned model has been explored. Three PTSD patients have been presented. We assessed changes in psychological functioning of our subjects on the basis of clinical observation and analysis of the session protocols. The model of combined and long-term treatment of PTSD in which the approach to traumatized patients has been mostly supportive, including supportive psychotherapeutic interventions and psychopharmacotherapy, has proved to be efficient in achieving integration of traumatic experiences and consolidation of the traumatised Self. Combination of individual and group approach facilitates the analysis of traumatic transference, whereas more mature defence patterns become stronger and integration of traumatic experiences improved. Consolidation of the Self leads to better socialization. PMID:20562742

  9. Three clinical experiences with SNP array results consistent with parental incest: a narrative with lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Helm, Benjamin M; Langley, Katherine; Spangler, Brooke; Vergano, Samantha

    2014-08-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays have the ability to reveal parental consanguinity which may or may not be known to healthcare providers. Consanguinity can have significant implications for the health of patients and for individual and family psychosocial well-being. These results often present ethical and legal dilemmas that can have important ramifications. Unexpected consanguinity can be confounding to healthcare professionals who may be unprepared to handle these results or to communicate them to families or other appropriate representatives. There are few published accounts of experiences with consanguinity and SNP arrays. In this paper we discuss three cases where molecular evidence of parental incest was identified by SNP microarray. We hope to further highlight consanguinity as a potential incidental finding, how the cases were handled by the clinical team, and what resources were found to be most helpful. This paper aims to contribute further to professional discourse on incidental findings with genomic technology and how they were addressed clinically. These experiences may provide some guidance on how others can prepare for these findings and help improve practice. As genetic and genomic testing is utilized more by non-genetics providers, we also hope to inform about the importance of engaging with geneticists and genetic counselors when addressing these findings. PMID:24222483

  10. Clinical experiences in conducting cognitive-behavioral therapy for social phobia.

    PubMed

    McAleavey, Andrew A; Castonguay, Louis G; Goldfried, Marvin R

    2014-01-01

    Several authors have identified a disconnect between psychotherapy research, including research on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and real-world psychotherapy practice. This disconnect has several negative consequences, potentially including less-than-optimal practice standards as well as a lack of input from practicing psychotherapists on how research can be improved and made more relevant in their day-to-day clinical work. As part of an ongoing effort to engage practicing psychotherapists in a feedback loop with psychotherapy researchers, this study reports the results of a survey of CBT therapists who have used CBT in the treatment of social phobia (SP). The survey was designed primarily to document how often certain potential problems, identified by expert researchers and CBT manuals, actually act as barriers to successful treatment when CBT is employed in nonresearch environments. The participants were 276 psychotherapists responding to email, online, and print advertisements completing the online survey. Participants varied considerably in psychotherapy experience, work environment, experience in using CBT for SP, and in some ways varied in their usual CBT techniques when treating SP. Among the most prominent barriers identified by many of the participants were patient motivation, comorbidity, logistical problems (especially with exposures), patient resistance, and severity and chronicity of SP symptoms. These findings may be useful for psychotherapy researchers as areas for potential study. The results may also suggest topics requiring clinical guidelines, innovations within CBT, and dissemination of successful techniques to address the barriers identified here. PMID:24411111

  11. Insights on GRACE (Gender, Race, And Clinical Experience) from the patient's perspective: GRACE participant survey.

    PubMed

    Squires, Kathleen; Feinberg, Judith; Bridge, Dawn Averitt; Currier, Judith; Ryan, Robert; Seyedkazemi, Setareh; Dayaram, Yaswant K; Mrus, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    The Gender, Race And Clinical Experience (GRACE) study was conducted between October 2006 and December 2008 to evaluate sex- and race-based differences in outcomes after treatment with a darunavir/ritonavir-based antiretroviral regimen. Between June 2010 and June 2011, former participants of the GRACE trial at participating sites were asked to complete a 40-item questionnaire as part of the GRACE Participant Survey study, with a primary objective of assessing patients' characteristics, experiences, and opinions about participation in GRACE. Of 243 potential survey respondents, 151 (62%) completed the survey. Respondents were representative of the overall GRACE population and were predominantly female (64%); fewer were black, and more reported recreational drug use compared with nonrespondents (55% vs. 62% and 17% vs. 10%, respectively). Access to treatment (41%) and too many blood draws (26%) were reported as the best and worst part of GRACE, respectively. Support from study site staff was reported as the most important factor in completing the study (47%). Factors associated with nonadherence, study discontinuation, and poor virologic response in univariate analyses were being the primary caregiver for children, unemployment, and transportation difficulties, respectively. Patients with these characteristics may be at risk of poor study outcomes and may benefit from additional adherence and retention strategies in future studies and routine clinical care. PMID:23701200

  12. Incidence of Small Lymph Node Metastases With Evidence of Extracapsular Extension: Clinical Implications in Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Simcock, Mathew; Schreiber-Facklam, Heide; Zimmer, Yitzhak; Graeter, Ruth; Evers, Christina; Arnold, Andreas; Wilkens, Ludwig; Aebersold, Daniel M.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Small lymph nodes (LN) show evidence of extracapsular extension (ECE) in a significant number of patients. This study was performed to determine the impact of ECE in LN {<=}7 mm as compared with ECE in larger LN. Methods and Materials: All tumor-positive LN of 74 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients with at least one ECE positive LN were analyzed retrospectively for the LN diameter and the extent of ECE. Clinical endpoints were regional relapse-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival. The median follow-up for the surviving patients was 2.1 years (range, 0.3-9.2 years). Results: Forty-four of 74 patients (60%) had at least one ECE positive LN {<=}10 mm. These small ECE positive LN had a median diameter of 7 mm, which was used as a cutoff. Thirty patients (41%) had at least one ECE positive LN {<=}7 mm. In both univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses, the incidence of at least one ECE positive LN {<=}7 mm was a statistically significant prognostic factor for decreased regional relapse-free survival (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 2.7, p = 0.03, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-6.4), distant metastasis-free survival (HR: 2.6, p = 0.04, 95% CI: 1.0-6.6), and overall survival (HR: 2.5, p = 0.03, 95% CI: 1.1-5.8). Conclusions: The incidence of small ECE positive LN metastases is a significant prognostic factor in HNSCC patients. Small ECE positive LN may represent more invasive tumor biology and could be used as prognostic markers.

  13. Critical periods after stroke study: translating animal stroke recovery experiments into a clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Dromerick, Alexander W.; Edwardson, Matthew A.; Edwards, Dorothy F.; Giannetti, Margot L.; Barth, Jessica; Brady, Kathaleen P.; Chan, Evan; Tan, Ming T.; Tamboli, Irfan; Chia, Ruth; Orquiza, Michael; Padilla, Robert M.; Cheema, Amrita K.; Mapstone, Mark E.; Fiandaca, Massimo S.; Federoff, Howard J.; Newport, Elissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Seven hundred ninety-five thousand Americans will have a stroke this year, and half will have a chronic hemiparesis. Substantial animal literature suggests that the mammalian brain has much potential to recover from acute injury using mechanisms of neuroplasticity, and that these mechanisms can be accessed using training paradigms and neurotransmitter manipulation. However, most of these findings have not been tested or confirmed in the rehabilitation setting, in large part because of the challenges in translating a conceptually straightforward laboratory experiment into a meaningful and rigorous clinical trial in humans. Through presentation of methods for a Phase II trial, we discuss these issues and describe our approach. Methods: In rodents there is compelling evidence for timing effects in rehabilitation; motor training delivered at certain times after stroke may be more effective than the same training delivered earlier or later, suggesting that there is a critical or sensitive period for strongest rehabilitation training effects. If analogous critical/sensitive periods can be identified after human stroke, then existing clinical resources can be better utilized to promote recovery. The Critical Periods after Stroke Study (CPASS) is a phase II randomized, controlled trial designed to explore whether such a sensitive period exists. We will randomize 64 persons to receive an additional 20 h of upper extremity therapy either immediately upon rehab admission, 2–3 months after stroke onset, 6 months after onset, or to an observation-only control group. The primary outcome measure will be the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) at 1 year. Blood will be drawn at up to 3 time points for later biomarker studies. Conclusion: CPASS is an example of the translation of rodent motor recovery experiments into the clinical setting; data obtained from this single site randomized controlled trial will be used to finalize the design of a Phase III trial. PMID:25972803

  14. Assessing decentering: validation, psychometric properties, and clinical usefulness of the Experiences Questionnaire in a Spanish sample.

    PubMed

    Soler, Joaquim; Franquesa, Alba; Feliu-Soler, Albert; Cebolla, Ausias; García-Campayo, Javier; Tejedor, Rosa; Demarzo, Marcelo; Baños, Rosa; Pascual, Juan Carlos; Portella, Maria J

    2014-11-01

    Decentering is defined as the ability to observe one's thoughts and feelings in a detached manner. The Experiences Questionnaire (EQ) is a self-report instrument that originally assessed decentering and rumination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of EQ-Decentering and to explore its clinical usefulness. The 11-item EQ-Decentering subscale was translated into Spanish and psychometric properties were examined in a sample of 921 adult individuals, 231 with psychiatric disorders and 690 without. The subsample of nonpsychiatric participants was also split according to their previous meditative experience (meditative participants, n=341; and nonmeditative participants, n=349). Additionally, differences among these three subgroups were explored to determine clinical validity of the scale. Finally, EQ-Decentering was administered twice in a group of borderline personality disorder, before and after a 10-week mindfulness intervention. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated acceptable model fit, sbχ(2)=243.8836 (p<.001), CFI=.939, GFI=.936, SRMR=.040, and RMSEA=.06 (.060-.077), and psychometric properties were found to be satisfactory (reliability: Cronbach's α=.893; convergent validity: r>.46; and divergent validity: r<-.35). The scale detected changes in decentering after a 10-session intervention in mindfulness (t=-4.692, p<.00001). Differences among groups were significant (F=134.8, p<.000001), where psychiatric participants showed the lowest scores compared to nonpsychiatric meditative and nonmeditative participants. The Spanish version of the EQ-Decentering is a valid and reliable instrument to assess decentering either in clinical and nonclinical samples. In addition, the findings show that EQ-Decentering seems an adequate outcome instrument to detect changes after mindfulness-based interventions. PMID:25311294

  15. Fetoscopic surgery: encouraged by clinical experience and boosted by instrument innovation.

    PubMed

    Deprest, Jan; Jani, Jacques; Lewi, Liesbeth; Ochsenbein-Kölble, Nicole; Cannie, Mieke; Doné, Elisa; Roubliova, Xenia; Van Mieghem, Tim; Debeer, Anne; Debuck, Frederik; Sbragia, Laurenço; Toelen, Jaan; Devlieger, Roland; Lewi, Paul; Van de Velde, Marc

    2006-12-01

    Today, modern ultrasound equipment and the wide implementation of screening programmes allow the timely diagnosis of many congenital anomalies. For some of these, fetal surgery may be a life-saving option. In Europe, open fetal surgery became poorly accepted because of its invasiveness and the high incidence of postoperative premature labour and rupture of the fetal membranes. In the 1990s, the merger of fetoscopy and advanced video-endoscopic surgery formed the basis for endoscopic fetal surgery. We review the current applications of fetal surgery via both methods of access. The first clinical fetoscopic surgeries were interventions on the umbilical cord and the placenta, often referred to as obstetrical endoscopy. The outcome of a randomized clinical trial demonstrating that fetoscopic laser coagulation of chorionic plate vessels is the most effective treatment for twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) has revived interest in endoscopic fetal therapy. Operating on the fetus is another more challenging enterprise. Clinical fetal surgery programmes were virtually non-existent in Europe until minimally invasive fetoscopic surgery made such operations clinically possible as well as maternally acceptable. At present, most experience has been gathered with fetal tracheal occlusion as a therapy for severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia. As in other fields, minimally invasive surgery has pushed back boundaries and now allows safe operations to be performed on the fetal patient. Whereas minimal access seems to solve the problem of preterm labour, all procedures remain invasive, and carry a risk to the mother and a substantial risk of preterm prelabour rupture of the membranes (PPROM). The latter problem may prove to be a bottleneck for further developments, although treatment modalities are currently being evaluated. PMID:17056307

  16. The need for oncogenetic counselling. Ten years' experience of a regional oncogenetic clinic.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Karin; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf

    2004-01-01

    A monogenic inheritance, mainly seen as a dominant pattern, accounts for 5-10% of all cancer cases. The increased knowledge and identification of high-risk genes have led to a need for specialized cancer family clinic was the expression used by Eeles and Murday. The Oncogenetic Clinic at the University Hospital in Lund was started in 1993 and the authors' 10-year experience is summarized in this paper. The clinic offers service to the South Swedish Health Care Region comprising a total of 1.6 million inhabitants. During these first 10 years a total of 1059 individuals from 789 families have been individually counselled. The most common reason for referral was a family history of breast cancer, followed by a family history of colorectal cancer. According to the commonly used criteria, 437 (55%) of the families were considered as autosomal dominantly inherited; 147 families (19%) did not fulfil these criteria but had a strong clustering of breast/ovarian or colorectal/endometrial cancer. The remaining 205 families (26%) were not recognized as any previously described hereditary cancer syndrome with early onset. However, most of these families had a family history of cancer. Mutation analysis was performed in 386/789 (49%) of the families. In families with breast and ovarian cancer a genetic aberration was identified in 45/76 (59%) and in breast-only families in 27/129 (21%). In MSI-positive colon cancer families 16/34 (47%) of the families had a germline mutation. Thus, the majority of the families referred to the clinic were in obvious need of genetic counselling concerning cancer and heredity and in a substantial number of the families a germline mutation could be identified. PMID:15545184

  17. Developing a new mid-level health worker: lessons from South Africa's experience with clinical associates

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Jane; Conco, Daphney; Couper, Ian; Fonn, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Background Mid-level medical workers play an important role in health systems and hold great potential for addressing the human resource shortage, especially in low- and middle-income countries. South Africa began the production of its first mid-level medical workers – known as clinical associates – in small numbers in 2008. Objective We describe the way in which scopes of practice and course design were negotiated and assess progress during the early years. We derive lessons for other countries wishing to introduce new types of mid-level worker. Methods We conducted a rapid assessment in 2010 consisting of a review of 19 documents and 11 semi-structured interviews with a variety of stakeholders. A thematic analysis was performed. Results Central to the success of the clinical associate training programme was a clear definition and understanding of the interests of various stakeholders. Stakeholder sensitivities were taken into account in the conceptualisation of the role and scope of practice of the clinical associate. This was achieved by dealing with quality of care concerns through service-based training and doctor supervision, and using a national curriculum framework to set uniform standards. Conclusions This new mid-level medical worker can contribute to the quality of district hospital care and address human resource shortages. However, a number of significant challenges lie ahead. To sustain and expand on early achievements, clinical associates must be produced in greater numbers and the required funding, training capacity, public sector posts, and supervision must be made available. Retaining the new cadre will depend on the public system becoming an employer of choice. Nonetheless, the South African experience yields positive lessons that could be of use to other countries contemplating similar initiatives. PMID:23364079

  18. SU-E-T-344: Validation and Clinical Experience of Eclipse Electron Monte Carlo Algorithm (EMC)

    SciTech Connect

    Pokharel, S; Rana, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to validate Eclipse Electron Monte Carlo (Algorithm for routine clinical uses. Methods: The PTW inhomogeneity phantom (T40037) with different combination of heterogeneous slabs has been CT-scanned with Philips Brilliance 16 slice scanner. The phantom contains blocks of Rando Alderson materials mimicking lung, Polystyrene (Tissue), PTFE (Bone) and PMAA. The phantom has 30×30×2.5 cm base plate with 2cm recesses to insert inhomogeneity. The detector systems used in this study are diode, tlds and Gafchromic EBT2 films. The diode and tlds were included in CT scans. The CT sets are transferred to Eclipse treatment planning system. Several plans have been created with Eclipse Monte Carlo (EMC) algorithm 11.0.21. Measurements have been carried out in Varian TrueBeam machine for energy from 6–22mev. Results: The measured and calculated doses agreed very well for tissue like media. The agreement was reasonably okay for the presence of lung inhomogeneity. The point dose agreement was within 3.5% and Gamma passing rate at 3%/3mm was greater than 93% except for 6Mev(85%). The disagreement can reach as high as 10% in the presence of bone inhomogeneity. This is due to eclipse reporting dose to the medium as opposed to the dose to the water as in conventional calculation engines. Conclusion: Care must be taken when using Varian Eclipse EMC algorithm for dose calculation for routine clinical uses. The algorithm dose not report dose to water in which most of the clinical experiences are based on rather it just reports dose to medium directly. In the presence of inhomogeneity such as bone, the dose discrepancy can be as high as 10% or even more depending on the location of normalization point or volume. As Radiation oncology as an empirical science, care must be taken before using EMC reported monitor units for clinical uses.

  19. 78 FR 21958 - Non-Competitive One-Year Extension With Funds for Black Lung/Coal Miner Clinics Program (H37...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Non-Competitive One-Year Extension With...: HRSA will be issuing a non-competitive one-year extension with funds for the Black Lung/Coal Miner... technical assistance and opportunity to ensure funding levels can adequately address target population...

  20. Experiences of women with a diagnosis of breast cancer: a clinical pathway approach.

    PubMed

    Lindop, E; Cannon, S

    2001-06-01

    The study presented in this paper formed the first part of a large survey of breast cancer patients in one health authority in England, UK looking at individual needs expressed by women with a diagnosis of breast cancer. The paper provides an account of the experiences of 12 women with a diagnosis of breast cancer. The women represent a wide age range and different stages of illness. The transcribed accounts of the women were analysed by means of Qualitative Solutions and Research, Non-Numerical Unstructured Data Indexing Searching and Theorising (QSR*NUDIST). The study examined the individual experiences of women with a diagnosis of breast cancer and its aftermath as they passed through different stages related to it. The women's experiences are presented within the conceptual framework of the clinical pathway and their accounts represent their journey along the pathway. Various significant points in this journey are portrayed representing the women's reactions to diagnosis, treatment, femininity and body image, support, family and friends, information and after care. PMID:12849036

  1. Clinical Audits in a Postgraduate General Practice Training Program: An Evaluation of 8 Years' Experience

    PubMed Central

    Al-Baho, Abeer; Serour, Maleka; Al-Weqayyn, Adnan; AlHilali, Mohammed; Sadek, Ali A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical audit can be of valuable assistance to any program which aims to improve the quality of health care and its delivery. Yet without a coherent strategy aimed at evaluating audits' effectiveness, valuable opportunities will be overlooked. Clinical audit projects are required as a part of the formative assessment of trainees in the Family Medicine Residency Program (FMRP) in Kuwait. This study was undertaken to draw a picture of trainees' understanding of the audit project with attention to the knowledge of audit theory and its educational significance and scrutinize the difficulties confronted during the experience. Methodology/Principal Findings The materials included the records of 133 audits carried out by trainees and 165 post course questionnaires carried out between 2004 and 2011. They were reviewed and analyzed. The majority of audit projects were performed on diabetic (44.4%) and hypertensive (38.3%) care. Regarding audits done on diabetic care, they were carried out to assess doctors' awareness about screening for smoking status (8.6%), microalbuminuria (19.3%), hemoglobin A1c (15.5%), retinopathy (10.3%), dyslipidemia (15.8%), peripheral neuropathy (8.8%), and other problems (21.7%). As for audits concerning hypertensive care, they were carried out to assess doctors' awareness about screening for smoking status (38.0%), obesity (26.0%), dyslipidemia (12.0%), microalbuminuria (10.0%) and other problems (14.0%). More than half the participants (68.48%) who attended the audit course stated that they ‘definitely agreed’ about understanding the meaning of clinical audit. Most of them (75.8%) ‘definitely agreed’ about realizing the importance of clinical audit in improving patients' care. About half (49.7%) of them ‘agreed’ that they can distinguish between ‘criteria’ and ‘standards’. Conclusion The eight years of experience were beneficial. Trainees showed a good understanding of the idea behind auditing the services provided. They demonstrated their ability to improve the care given in health centers in which these projects were undertaken. PMID:22970146

  2. Extension of the LOPLS-AA Force Field for Alcohols, Esters, and Monoolein Bilayers and its Validation by Neutron Scattering Experiments.

    PubMed

    Pluhackova, Kristyna; Morhenn, Humphrey; Lautner, Lisa; Lohstroh, Wiebke; Nemkovski, Kirill S; Unruh, Tobias; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2015-12-10

    The recently presented LOPLS-AA all-atom force field for long hydrocarbon chains, based on the OPLS-AA force field, was extended to alcohols, esters, and glyceryl monooleate (GMO) lipids as a model lipid. Dihedral angles were fitted against high level ab initio calculations, and ester charges were increased to improve their hydration properties. Additionally, the ester Lennard-Jones parameters were readjusted to reproduce experimental liquid bulk properties, densities, and heats of vaporization. This extension enabled the setup of LOPLS-AA parameters for GMO molecules. The properties of the lipid force field were tested for the liquid-crystalline phase of a GMO bilayer. The obtained area per lipid for GMO is in good agreement with experiment. Additionally, the lipid dynamics on the subpicosecond to the nanosecond time scale is in excellent agreement with results from time-of-flight (TOF) quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) experiments on a multilamellar monoolein system, enabling here for the first time the critical evaluation of the short-time dynamics obtained from a molecular dynamics simulation of a membrane system. PMID:26537654

  3. The impact of global warming on Kuroshio Extension and its southern recirculation using CMIP5 experiments with a high-resolution climate model MIROC4h

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing; Wang, Qiang; Mu, Mu

    2015-11-01

    Responses of the Kuroshio Extension (KE) and its southern recirculation gyre (SRG) to global warming are investigated using CMIP5 experiments with a high-resolution climate model MIROC4h. The results show that MIROC4h well reproduces the essential features of the KE system and its low-frequency variations. In three-member-ensemble future climate experiments (with a medium mitigation emissions scenario RCP4.5), the strengths of the KE and its SRG increase, relative to the prescribed historical run with natural and anthropogenic forcing. By investigating the mechanism resulting in these variations of the KE and its SRG, it turns out that wind stress changes and ocean stratification changes both contribute to the enhancement of the KE and its SRG. Specifically, the wind stress changes increase upper ocean momentum in the SRG region. Meanwhile, the increased stratifications hinder the transfer of momentum from the upper ocean to the deeper ocean. Besides, the strengthened ocean stratification could enhance the eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in the downstream KE region, which can feedback to intensify the SRG. As a result, the strength of the SRG increases under global warming condition. Then the intensification of the SRG leads to large acceleration of the KE. Eventually, both the KE and its SRG intensify.

  4. Clinical Experiences With Clients Who Are Low-Income: Mental Health Practitioners' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Mindi N; Nitzarim, Rachel S; Cole, Odessa D; Frost, Nickholas D; Ramirez Stege, Alyssa; Vue, Pa Tou

    2015-12-01

    The experiences of nine licensed mental health practitioners regarding their work with clients from low-income backgrounds were examined utilizing grounded theory methodology. Themes that emerged from the semi-structured interviews highlighted a rich narrative that portrayed the work as both deeply satisfying and inherently complex. Participants described the personal nature of this work, including countertransference elicited because of their own personal economic contexts and emotional reactions experienced within and outside the therapy room. Their stories acknowledged systematic challenges that act as barriers to treatment. Some participants noted that this has contributed to feelings of disillusionment toward the field as well as fears about the future of the mental health care. Based on these findings, we discuss implications for training, future research, and clinical practice. PMID:25583959

  5. A qualitative study of patients' experiences of a nurse-led memory clinic.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Christine; Campbell, Briony; Bentley, Michael; Bucher, Hazel; Morrissey, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about patients' decision-making to attend a nurse-led memory clinic (NLMC) or of their experiences in the months following attendance. This paper reports qualitative follow-up data from 13 participants who attended a NLMC run by a Nurse Practitioner, and who were interviewed later in their own homes. Participants attended the NLMC seeking 'benchmarking' against the broader population or confirmation of diagnosis, with the Nurse Practitioner perceived as having more time to talk. Although we anticipated that participants would have changed some behaviours to incorporate 'brain health material', we found that the focus was on maintaining current capacity and lifestyle with most participants delaying planning and decisions about future lifestyle changes until 'necessary'. Understanding why people contact a NLMC and how their participation influences future planning can help us better target health care messages with the aim of improving health literacy. PMID:24381213

  6. Gadolinium-DTPA as a contrast agent in MRI: initial clinical experience in 20 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.H.; Brown, J.; Bydder, G.M.; Steiner, R.E.; Weinmann, H.J.; Speck, U.; Hall, A.S.; Young, I.R.

    1984-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 20 patients before and after intravenous administration of gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Twelve of the patients had clinical and histologic diagnoses of cerebral tumor, six had hepatic tumors, one had hepatic cysts, and one had transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Contrast enhancement was seen with all tumors, but not with the hepatic cysts. The degree of enhancement was greater than that seen with computed tomography (CT) in 13 cases, equal to it in six, and less in one. No short-term side effects were encountered and no significant change was seen in urea, creatinine, electrolytes, liver function tests, blood coagulation, or urine testing after injection of Gd-DTPA. Although much more work will be required to evaluate this contrast agent, these initial experiences are very promising.

  7. [A new psycho-dermatology clinic in Israel: our first year experience].

    PubMed

    Orion, Edith; Ben-Avi, Orit

    2011-01-01

    Psychodermatology involves the interrelationships between the skin and the mind, especially when considering the formation and evolution of certain common skin conditions. It appears that 30-40% of dermatology patients suffer from certain psychological problems as defined by the ICD-10, in a way that influences their disease severity and progression, as well as their quality of Life. Treatment of such cases requires a multi-disciplinary approach and should involve both a dermatologist and a mental health specialist working together In this article, the authors summarize the preliminary experience of the first year of the only psychodermatology clinic in Israel in several decades, work methods and patients' characteristics and preliminary conclusions. PMID:21449148

  8. Migrating toward a Next-Generation Clinical Decision Support Application: The BJC HealthCare Experience

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Noirot, Laura A.; Heard, Kevin M.; Reichley, Richard M.; Dunagan, Wm. Claiborne; Bailey, Thomas C.

    2007-01-01

    The next-generation model outlined in the AMIA Roadmap for National Action on Clinical Decision Support (CDS) is aimed to optimize the effectiveness of CDS interventions, and to achieve widespread adoption. BJC HealthCare re-engineered its existing CDS system in alignment with the AMIA roadmap and plans to use it for guidance on further enhancements. We present our experience and discuss an incremental approach to migrate towards the next generation of CDS applications from the viewpoint of a healthcare institution. Specifically, a CDS rule engine service with a standards-based rule representation format was built to simplify maintenance and deployment. Rules were separated from execution code and made customizable for multi-facility deployment. Those changes resulted in system improvements in the short term while aligning with long-term strategic objectives. PMID:18693855

  9. [FlU Zhonghua's clinical experience of Fu's subcutaneous needling for cervical spondylosis].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Minying; Zhang, Xiyu

    2015-08-01

    Professor FU Zhonghua's unique clinical experience of Fu's subcutaneous needling (FSN) for cervical spondylosis (CS) is discussed in this paper, which is analyzed from the aspects of recognition of CS pathogenesis, treatment mechanism of FSN, advantage indications of FSN for CS and examples of medical cases. Professor FU introduced the theory of myofascial trigger points (MTrP) into the field of the management of CS. The site of neck MTrP should be carefully examined, and FSN needles for single use are used to sweep the affected area or subcutaneous layer of adjacent upper limb. This method can rapidly improve ischemia and hypoxia state of the relevant muscles and prompt the self-recovery of neck muscles. During FSN treatment, reperfusion approach is recommended to adopt to improve the qi and blood circulation and recovery of neck function. PMID:26571902

  10. Chromosomal microarray analysis as a first-tier clinical diagnostic test: Estonian experience

    PubMed Central

    Žilina, Olga; Teek, Rita; Tammur, Pille; Kuuse, Kati; Yakoreva, Maria; Vaidla, Eve; Mölter-Väär, Triin; Reimand, Tiia; Kurg, Ants; Õunap, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) is now established as the first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test for fast and accurate detection of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID), multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We present our experience with using CMA for postnatal and prenatal diagnosis in Estonian patients during 2009–2012. Since 2011, CMA is on the official service list of the Estonian Health Insurance Fund and is performed as the first-tier cytogenetic test for patients with DD/ID, MCA or ASD. A total of 1191 patients were analyzed, including postnatal (1072 [90%] patients and 59 [5%] family members) and prenatal referrals (60 [5%] fetuses). Abnormal results were reported in 298 (25%) patients, with a total of 351 findings (1–3 per individual): 147 (42%) deletions, 106 (30%) duplications, 89 (25%) long contiguous stretches of homozygosity (LCSH) events (>5 Mb), and nine (3%) aneuploidies. Of all findings, 143 (41%) were defined as pathogenic or likely pathogenic; for another 143 findings (41%), most of which were LCSH, the clinical significance remained unknown, while 61 (18%) reported findings can now be reclassified as benign or likely benign. Clinically relevant findings were detected in 126 (11%) patients. However, the proportion of variants of unknown clinical significance was quite high (41% of all findings). It seems that our ability to detect chromosomal abnormalities has far outpaced our ability to understand their role in disease. Thus, the interpretation of CMA findings remains a rather difficult task requiring a close collaboration between clinicians and cytogeneticists. PMID:24689080

  11. Chromosomal microarray analysis as a first-tier clinical diagnostic test: Estonian experience.

    PubMed

    Zilina, Olga; Teek, Rita; Tammur, Pille; Kuuse, Kati; Yakoreva, Maria; Vaidla, Eve; Mölter-Väär, Triin; Reimand, Tiia; Kurg, Ants; Ounap, Katrin

    2014-03-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) is now established as the first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test for fast and accurate detection of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID), multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We present our experience with using CMA for postnatal and prenatal diagnosis in Estonian patients during 2009-2012. Since 2011, CMA is on the official service list of the Estonian Health Insurance Fund and is performed as the first-tier cytogenetic test for patients with DD/ID, MCA or ASD. A total of 1191 patients were analyzed, including postnatal (1072 [90%] patients and 59 [5%] family members) and prenatal referrals (60 [5%] fetuses). Abnormal results were reported in 298 (25%) patients, with a total of 351 findings (1-3 per individual): 147 (42%) deletions, 106 (30%) duplications, 89 (25%) long contiguous stretches of homozygosity (LCSH) events (>5?Mb), and nine (3%) aneuploidies. Of all findings, 143 (41%) were defined as pathogenic or likely pathogenic; for another 143 findings (41%), most of which were LCSH, the clinical significance remained unknown, while 61 (18%) reported findings can now be reclassified as benign or likely benign. Clinically relevant findings were detected in 126 (11%) patients. However, the proportion of variants of unknown clinical significance was quite high (41% of all findings). It seems that our ability to detect chromosomal abnormalities has far outpaced our ability to understand their role in disease. Thus, the interpretation of CMA findings remains a rather difficult task requiring a close collaboration between clinicians and cytogeneticists. PMID:24689080

  12. Review of 10 years of clinical experience with Chinese domestic trivalent influenza vaccine Anflu®

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Wu, Jun-Yu; Wang, Xu; Chen, Jiang-Ting; Xia, Ming; Hu, Wei; Zou, Yong; Yin, Wei-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual winter epidemics globally and influenza vaccination is most effective way to prevent the disease or severe outcomes from the illness, especially in developing countries. However, the majority of the world’s total production capacity of influenza vaccine is concentrated in several large multinational manufacturers. A safe and effective preventive vaccine for the developing countries is urgent. Anflu®, a Chinese domestic preservative-free, split-virus trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV), was introduced by Sinovac Biotech Ltd. in 2006. Until now, 20.6 million doses worldwide of Anflu® were sold. Since 2003, 13 company-sponsored clinical studies investigating the immunogenicity and safety of Anflu® have been completed, in which 6642 subjects participated and were vaccinated by Anflu®. Anflu® was generally well tolerated in all age groups, and highly immunogenic in healthy adults and elderly and exceeded the licensure criteria in Europe. This review presents and discusses the experience with Anflu® during the past decade. A new Chinese domestic, preservative-free, unadjuvanted, inactivated split-virus trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV), Anflu®, was introduced into human clinical trials in 2003 and then licensed in China in 2006. The vaccine contains 15 µg /0.5 ml hemagglutinin from each of the 3 influenza virus strains (including an H1N1 influenza A virus subtype, an H3N2 influenza A virus subtype, and an influenza B virus) that are expected to be circulating in the up-coming influenza season. The clinical data pertaining to Anflu® will be reviewed and compared with other TIVs available at present. PMID:24104060

  13. Use of antidepressants in the treatment of depression in Asia: guidelines, clinical evidence, and experience revisited.

    PubMed

    Treuer, Tamás; Liu, Chia-Yih; Salazar, Gerardo; Kongsakon, Ronnachai; Jia, Fujun; Habil, Hussain; Lee, Min-Soo; Lowry, Amanda; Dueñas, Héctor

    2013-12-01

    Major depressive disorder is prevalent worldwide, and only about half of those affected will experience no further episodes or symptoms. Additionally, depressive symptoms can be challenging to identify, with many patients going undiagnosed despite a wide variety of available treatment options. Antidepressants are the cornerstone of depression treatment; however, a large number of factors must be considered in selecting the treatment best suited to the individual. To help support physicians in this process, international and national treatment guidelines have been developed. This review evaluates the current use of antidepressant treatment for major depressive disorder in six Asian countries (China, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Taiwan, and Thailand). No remarkable differences were noted between Asian and international treatment guidelines or among those from within Asia as these are adapted from western guidelines, although there were some local variations. Importantly, a shortage of evidence-based information at a country level is the primary problem in developing guidelines appropriate for Asia, so most of the guidelines are consensus opinions derived from western research data utilized in western guidelines. Treatment guidelines need to evolve from being consensus based to evidence based when evidence is available, taking into consideration cost/effectiveness or cost/benefit with an evidence-based approach that more accurately reflects clinical experience as well as the attributes of each antidepressant. In everyday practice, physicians must tailor their treatment to the patient's clinical needs while considering associated external factors; better tools are needed to help them reach the best possible prescribing decisions which are of maximum benefit to patients. PMID:23857712

  14. Bringing Buprenorphine-Naloxone Detoxification to Community Treatment Providers: The NIDA Clinical Trials Network Field Experience

    PubMed Central

    Amass, Leslie; Ling, Walter; Freese, Thomas E.; Reiber, Chris; Annon, Jeffrey J.; Cohen, Allan J.; M.F.T.; McCarty, Dennis; Reid, Malcolm S.; Brown, Lawrence S.; Clark, Cynthia; Ziedonis, Douglas M.; Krejci, Jonathan; Stine, Susan; Winhusen, Theresa; Brigham, Greg; Babcock, Dean; L.C.S.W.; Muir, Joan A.; Buchan, Betty J.; Horton, Terry

    2005-01-01

    In October 2002, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved buprenorphine-naloxone (Suboxone®) sublingual tablets as an opioid dependence treatment available for use outside traditionally licensed opioid treatment programs. The NIDA Center for Clinical Trials Network (CTN) sponsored two clinical trials assessing buprenorphine-naloxone for short-term opioid detoxification. These trials provided an unprecedented field test of its use in twelve diverse community-based treatment programs. Opioid-dependent men and women were randomized to a thirteen-day buprenorphine-naloxone taper regimen for short-term opioid detoxification. The 234 buprenorphine-naloxone patients averaged 37 years old and used mostly intravenous heroin. Direct and rapid induction onto buprenorphine-naloxone was safe and well tolerated. Most patients (83%) received 8 mg buprenorphine-2 mg naloxone on the first day and 90% successfully completed induction and reached a target dose of 16mg buprenorphine-4 mg naloxone in three days. Medication compliance and treatment engagement was high. An average of 81% of available doses was ingested, and 68% of patients completed the detoxification. Most (80.3%) patients received some ancillary medications with an average of 2.3 withdrawal symptoms treated. The safety profile of buprenorphine-naloxone was excellent. Of eighteen serious adverse events reported, only one was possibly related to buprenorphine-naloxone. All providers successfully integrated buprenorphine-naloxone into their existing treatment milieus. Overall, data from the CTN field experience suggest that buprenorphine-naloxone is practical and safe for use in diverse community treatment settings, including those with minimal experience providing opioid-based pharmacotherapy and/or medical detoxification for opioid dependence. PMID:15204675

  15. Results of 1 year of clinical experience with independent dose calculation software for VMAT fields

    PubMed Central

    Colodro, Juan Fernando Mata; Berna, Alfredo Serna; Puchades, Vicente Puchades; Amores, David Ramos; Baños, Miguel Alcaraz

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that a redundant independent dose calculation (RIDC) must be included in any treatment planning verification procedure. Specifically, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique implies a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program in which RIDC should be included. In this paper, the results obtained in 1 year of clinical experience are presented. Eclipse from Varian is the treatment planning system (TPS), here in use. RIDC were performed with the commercial software; Diamond® (PTW) which is capable of calculating VMAT fields. Once the plan is clinically accepted, it is exported via Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) to RIDC, together with the body contour, and then a point dose calculation is performed, usually at the isocenter. A total of 459 plans were evaluated. The total average deviation was -0.3 ± 1.8% (one standard deviation (1SD)). For higher clearance the plans were grouped by location in: Prostate, pelvis, abdomen, chest, head and neck, brain, stereotactic radiosurgery, lung stereotactic body radiation therapy, and miscellaneous. The highest absolute deviation was -0.8 ± 1.5% corresponding to the prostate. A linear fit between doses calculated by RIDC and by TPS produced a correlation coefficient of 0.9991 and a slope of 1.0023. These results are very close to those obtained in the validation process. This agreement led us to consider this RIDC software as a valuable tool for QA in VMAT plans. PMID:25525309

  16. Clinical Experience With A High Resolution Digital Imaging System For Gastro-Intestinal Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, E. W.; Rowlands, J. A.; Hynes, D. M.; Toth, B. D.; Porter, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    In our department, it is planned that the gastro-intestinal fluoroscopic area will be equipped entirely with digital imaging systems. The use of the 1024 X 1024 pixel frame store, backed by a hard disc for rapid image transfer, and the production of hard copy on a laser imager has reached the point where clinical efficacy and acceptance are assured. The further addition of facilities for annotation and the application of digital post-processing techniques are being explored both at the clinical site and at the research laboratorieS. The use of laser imaging has produced a further improvement in image quality and some of the practical problems related to this apparatus will be described. The availability of larger capacity laser disc image storage enables the local area network or "mini-PACS" system for fluoroscopy areas to become a concept worthy of investigation. We present our experience over a number of years with these systems, together with our latest investigations into potential applications of laser technology to the practice of radiology in a busy imaging centre.

  17. Clinical utility of endorectal MRI-guided prostate biopsy: Preliminary experience

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Adam J.; Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Wang, Zhen J.; Carroll, Peter R.; Simko, Jeffry P.; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the potential clinical utility of endorectal MRI-guided biopsy in patients with known or suspected prostate cancer. Methods We prospectively recruited 24 men with known or suspected prostate cancer in whom MRI-guided biopsy was clinically requested after multiparametric endorectal MRI showed one or more appropriate targets. One to six 18-gauge biopsy cores were obtained from each patient. Transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy results and post MRI-guided biopsy complications were also recorded. Results MRI-guided biopsy was positive in 5 of 7 patients with suspected prostate cancer (including 2 of 4 with prior negative ultrasound-guided biopsies), in 8 of 12 with known untreated prostate cancer (including 5 where MRI-guided biopsy demonstrated a higher Gleason score than ultrasound guided biopsy results), and in 3 of 5 with treated cancer. MRI-guided biopsies had a significantly higher maximum percentage of cancer in positive cores when compared to ultrasound guided biopsy (mean of 37 ± 8% versus 13 ± 4%; p = 0.01). No serious post-biopsy complications occurred. Conclusion Our preliminary experience suggests endorectal MRI-guided biopsy may safely contribute to the management of patients with known or suspected prostate cancer by making a new diagnosis of malignancy, upgrading previously diagnosed disease, or diagnosing local recurrence. PMID:24924999

  18. Isavuconazole: Pharmacology, Pharmacodynamics, and Current Clinical Experience with a New Triazole Antifungal Agent.

    PubMed

    Rybak, Jeffrey M; Marx, Kayleigh R; Nishimoto, Andrew T; Rogers, P David

    2015-11-01

    Coinciding with the continually increasing population of immunocompromised patients worldwide, the incidence of invasive fungal infections has grown over the past 4 decades. Unfortunately, infections caused by both yeasts such as Candida and molds such as Aspergillus or Mucorales remain associated with unacceptably high morbidity and mortality. In addition, the available antifungals with proven efficacy in the treatment of these infections remain severely limited. Although previously available second-generation triazole antifungals have significantly expanded the spectrum of the triazole antifungal class, these agents are laden with shortcomings in their safety profiles as well as formulation and pharmacokinetic challenges. Isavuconazole, administered as the prodrug isavuconazonium, is the latest second-generation triazole antifungal to receive U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval. Approved for the treatment of both invasive aspergillosis and invasive mucormycosis, and currently under investigation for the treatment of candidemia and invasive candidiasis, isavuconazole may have therapeutic advantages over its predecessors. With clinically relevant antifungal potency against a broad range of yeasts, dimorphic fungi, and molds, isavuconazole has a spectrum of activity reminiscent of the polyene amphotericin B. Moreover, clinical experience thus far has revealed isavuconazole to be associated with fewer toxicities than voriconazole, even when administered without therapeutic drug monitoring. These characteristics, in an agent available in both a highly bioavailable oral and a β-cyclodextrin-free intravenous formulation, will likely make isavuconazole a welcome addition to the triazole class of antifungals. PMID:26598096

  19. Intraoperative imaging during Mohs surgery with reflectance confocal microscopy: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Flores, Eileen S; Cordova, Miguel; Kose, Kivanc; Phillips, William; Rossi, Anthony; Nehal, Kishwer; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2015-06-01

    Mohs surgery for the removal of nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) is performed in stages, while being guided by the examination for residual tumor with frozen pathology. However, preparation of frozen pathology at each stage is time consuming and labor intensive. Real-time intraoperative reflectance confocal microscopy(RCM), combined with video mosaicking, may enable rapid detection of residual tumor directly in the surgical wounds on patients. We report our initial experience on 25 patients, using aluminum chloride for nuclear contrast. Imaging was performed in quadrants in the wound to simulate the Mohs surgeon’s examination of pathology. Images and videos of the epidermal and dermal margins were found to be of clinically acceptable quality. Bright nuclear morphology was identified at the epidermal margin and detectable in residual NMSC tumors. The presence of residual tumor and normal skin features could be detected in the peripheral and deep dermal margins. Intraoperative RCM imaging may enable detection of residual tumor directly on patients during Mohs surgery, and may serve as an adjunct for frozen pathology. Ultimately, for routine clinical utility, a stronger tumor-to-dermis contrast may be necessary, and also a smaller microscope with an automated approach for imaging in the entire wound in a rapid and controlled manner. PMID:25706821

  20. Designing clinical trials and experiments efficiently with the program package CADEMO.

    PubMed

    Rasch, Dieter; Kubinger, Klaus D

    2009-07-01

    This paper suggests the use of the program package CADEMO when designing clinical trials. Using this package a number of frequently incorrect or inefficient applications of statistical methods can be avoided. For instance, by determining the sample size for statistical tests in advance, the type-II-risk is guaranteed to be taken into account and, foremost, only relevant effects are likely to become significant. Although this is also true for some other program packages, CADEMO in addition exclusively analyzes data by sequential testing, specifically by sequential triangular tests according to Schneider [Schneider, B. 1992. An interactive computer program for design and monitoring of sequential clinical trials. In Proceedings of the XVIth international biometric conference (pp. 237-250). Hamilton, New Zealand.]; which on average lead to a lower sample size. Moreover CADEMO serves to determine the sample size for a confidence estimation of an unknown parameter and for the so-called selection procedures, which should be applied instead of using multiple comparisons of means, if the true objective of a study is to select only the best of all possibilities. Finally, CADEMO serves to factually randomize subjects into any more-way designed experiment. For each of the indicated applications an example is given and the respective handling of CADEMO is illustrated. PMID:19341821

  1. New Embolization Microcoil Consisting of Firm and Flexible Segments: Preliminary Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Irie, Toshiyuki

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. To describe the preliminary clinical experience with a new embolization microcoil. Methods. The microcoil was made of a platinum coil spring, and consisted of firm and flexible segments. The firm segment functioned as an anchor and the flexible segment was well compacted to occlude the arteries. No Dacron fiber was attached. Seventy-one new microcoils were placed via microcatheters in 28 visceral arteries of 17 patients. Two other types of microcoils with Dacron fibers were used together in 8 arteries. Results. Sixty-nine new microcoils were placed and compacted successfully. Two coils were misplaced; one was retrieved and the other was left in the migrated artery, which remained patent 5 months later. All 28 arteries were occluded, and the goals of intervention were achieved successfully in all 17 cases. Conclusion. The new microcoils anchored and compacted well in the arteries. The clinical feasibility of this coil design was confirmed. The additional use of other types of microcoils with Dacron fiber was necessary to obtain rapid occlusion in some cases.

  2. Results of 1 year of clinical experience with independent dose calculation software for VMAT fields.

    PubMed

    Colodro, Juan Fernando Mata; Berna, Alfredo Serna; Puchades, Vicente Puchades; Amores, David Ramos; Baños, Miguel Alcaraz

    2014-10-01

    It is widely accepted that a redundant independent dose calculation (RIDC) must be included in any treatment planning verification procedure. Specifically, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique implies a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program in which RIDC should be included. In this paper, the results obtained in 1 year of clinical experience are presented. Eclipse from Varian is the treatment planning system (TPS), here in use. RIDC were performed with the commercial software; Diamond(®) (PTW) which is capable of calculating VMAT fields. Once the plan is clinically accepted, it is exported via Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) to RIDC, together with the body contour, and then a point dose calculation is performed, usually at the isocenter. A total of 459 plans were evaluated. The total average deviation was -0.3 ± 1.8% (one standard deviation (1SD)). For higher clearance the plans were grouped by location in: Prostate, pelvis, abdomen, chest, head and neck, brain, stereotactic radiosurgery, lung stereotactic body radiation therapy, and miscellaneous. The highest absolute deviation was -0.8 ± 1.5% corresponding to the prostate. A linear fit between doses calculated by RIDC and by TPS produced a correlation coefficient of 0.9991 and a slope of 1.0023. These results are very close to those obtained in the validation process. This agreement led us to consider this RIDC software as a valuable tool for QA in VMAT plans. PMID:25525309

  3. Intraoperative imaging during Mohs surgery with reflectance confocal microscopy: initial clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Eileen S.; Cordova, Miguel; Kose, Kivanc; Phillips, William; Rossi, Anthony; Nehal, Kishwer; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2015-06-01

    Mohs surgery for the removal of nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) is performed in stages, while being guided by the examination for residual tumor with frozen pathology. However, preparation of frozen pathology at each stage is time consuming and labor intensive. Real-time intraoperative reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), combined with video mosaicking, may enable rapid detection of residual tumor directly in the surgical wounds on patients. We report our initial experience on 25 patients, using aluminum chloride for nuclear contrast. Imaging was performed in quadrants in the wound to simulate the Mohs surgeon's examination of pathology. Images and videos of the epidermal and dermal margins were found to be of clinically acceptable quality. Bright nuclear morphology was identified at the epidermal margin and detectable in residual NMSC tumors. The presence of residual tumor and normal skin features could be detected in the peripheral and deep dermal margins. Intraoperative RCM imaging may enable detection of residual tumor directly on patients during Mohs surgery, and may serve as an adjunct for frozen pathology. Ultimately, for routine clinical utility, a stronger tumor-to-dermis contrast may be necessary, and also a smaller microscope with an automated approach for imaging in the entire wound in a rapid and controlled manner.

  4. Developing clinical competency: Experiences and perceptions of Advanced Midwifery Practitioners in training.

    PubMed

    Gaskell, Lynne; Beaton, Susan

    2015-07-01

    This paper will describe the experiences and perception of a cohort of trainee Advanced Midwifery Practitioners (AMP's) during their training on an MSc in Advanced Practice. The educational philosophy underpinning the master's programme is interprofessional learning linked closely to work based learning and assessment. The focus group explored how the AMP's were developing core competencies within four domains: The links between the university and clinical assessments were instrumental in developing both midwifery and specialised skills required for extending their scope of practice. The changing demographics of their client group facilitated the need to provide safe assessment and management of ladies with complex health and social needs in pregnancy and childbirth; provide specialised clinics and the development of a robust staff training and assessment process. The generic competencies they gained improved collaborative working with their medical colleagues, raising the trainees profile and acceptance of their extended role. In addition to this, development of specialised midwifery skills promoted a high degree of decision making responsibilities within midwifery to facilitate service development and promote evidence based care. PMID:25892367

  5. SIADH-related hyponatremia in hospital day care units: clinical experience and management with tolvaptan.

    PubMed

    De Las Peñas, Ramón; Ponce, Santiago; Henao, Fernando; Camps Herrero, Carlos; Carcereny, Enric; Escobar Álvarez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, César A; Virizuela, Juan Antonio; López López, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia (Na ˂135 mmol/l) is the most frequent electrolyte disorder in clinical practice, and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) is the commonest cause of hyponatremia in cancer patients. Correcting hyponatremia in these patients can reduce morbidity and mortality, increase the response to anti-cancer agents, and help reduce hospital length of stay and costs. Tolvaptan is an oral medication used to treat SIADH-related hyponatremia patients that needs to be initiated at hospital so patients can have their serum sodium monitored. If tolvaptan could be initiated in hospital day care units (DCUs), performing the same tests, hospitalization could be avoided, quality of life improved, and costs reduced. This is the first publication where a panel of oncologists are sharing their experience and making some recommendations with the use of tolvaptan to treat SIADH-related hyponatremia in DCU after collecting and examining 35 clinical cases with these type of patients. The conclusion from this retrospective observational analysis is that the use of tolvaptan in DCU is safe and effective in the therapeutic management of SIADH-related hyponatremia. PMID:26431960

  6. FDDI information management system for centralizing interactive, computerized multimedia clinical experiences in pediatric rheumatology/Immunology.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, R; Cronenberger, H; Stein, L; Hannum, W; Reed, A M; Wilhelm, C; Hsiao, H

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the design, authoring, and development of interactive, computerized, multimedia clinical simulations in pediatric rheumatology/immunology and related musculoskeletal diseases, the development and implementation of a high speed information management system for their centralized storage and distribution, and analytical methods for evaluating the total system's educational impact on medical students and pediatric residents. An FDDI fiber optic network with client/server/host architecture is the core. The server houses digitized audio, still-image video clips and text files. A host station houses the DB2/2 database containing case-associated labels and information. Cases can be accessed from any workstation via a customized interface in AVA/2 written specifically for this application. OS/2 Presentation Manager controls, written in C, are incorporated into the interface. This interface allows SQL searches and retrievals of cases and case materials. In addition to providing user-directed clinical experiences, this centralized information management system provides designated faculty with the ability to add audio notes and visual pointers to image files. Users may browse through case materials, mark selected ones and download them for utilization in lectures or for editing and converting into 35mm slides. PMID:8591407

  7. The Depressive Experiences Questionnaire: validity and psychological correlates in a clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Riley, W T; McCranie, E W

    1990-01-01

    This study sought to compare the original and revised scoring systems of the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire (DEQ) and to assess the construct validity of the Dependent and Self-Critical subscales of the DEQ in a clinically depressed sample. Subjects were 103 depressed inpatients who completed the DEQ, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Hopelessness Scale, the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ), the Rathus Assertiveness Schedule (RAS), and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). The original and revised scoring systems of the DEQ evidenced good concurrent validity for each factor scale, but the revised system did not sufficiently discriminate dependent and self-critical dimensions. Using the original scoring system, self-criticism was significantly and positively related to severity of depression, whereas dependency was not, particularly for males. Factor analysis of the DEQ scales and the other scales used in this study supported the dependent and self-critical dimensions. For men, the correlation of the DEQ with the MMPI scales indicated that self-criticism was associated with psychotic symptoms, hostility/conflict, and a distress/exaggerated response set, whereas dependency did not correlate significantly with any MMPI scales. Females, however, did not exhibit a differential pattern of correlations between either the Dependency or the Self-Criticism scales and the MMPI. These findings suggest possible gender differences in the clinical characteristics of male and female dependent and self-critical depressive subtypes. PMID:2348339

  8. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas: The preliminary report of Cleveland Clinic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mackley, Heath B. . E-mail: hmackley@alumni.upenn.edu; Reddy, Chandana A. M.S.; Lee, S.-Y.; Harnisch, Gayle A.; Mayberg, Marc R.; Hamrahian, Amir H.; Suh, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of pituitary adenomas. However, there have been few published data on the short- and long-term outcomes of this treatment. This is the initial report of Cleveland Clinic's experience. Methods and Materials: Between February 1998 and December 2003, 34 patients with pituitary adenomas were treated with IMRT. A retrospective chart review was conducted for data analysis. Results: With a median follow-up of 42.5 months, the treatment has proven to be well tolerated, with performance status remaining stable in 90% of patients. Radiographic local control was 89%, and among patients with secretory tumors, 100% had a biochemical response. Only 1 patient required salvage surgery for progressive disease, giving a clinical progression free survival of 97%. The only patient who received more than 46 Gy experienced optic neuropathy 8 months after radiation. Smaller tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective improvements in nonvisual neurologic complaints (p = 0.03), and larger tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective worsening of visual symptoms (p = 0.05). New hormonal supplementation was required for 40% of patients. Younger patients were significantly more likely to require hormonal supplementation (p 0.03). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary adenomas over the short term. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine if IMRT confers any advantage with respect to either tumor control or toxicity over conventional radiation modalities.

  9. Formative Evaluation of Clinician Experience with Integrating Family History-Based Clinical Decision Support into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Megan; Edelman, Emily; Gabitzsch, Emily; Eng, Charis; Teng, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Family health history is a leading predictor of disease risk. Nonetheless, it is underutilized to guide care and, therefore, is ripe for health information technology intervention. To fill the family health history practice gap, Cleveland Clinic has developed a family health history collection and clinical decision support tool, MyFamily. This report describes the impact and process of implementing MyFamily into primary care, cancer survivorship and cancer genetics clinics. Ten providers participated in semi-structured interviews that were analyzed to identify opportunities for process improvement. Participants universally noted positive effects on patient care, including increases in quality, personalization of care and patient engagement. The impact on clinical workflow varied by practice setting, with differences observed in the ease of integration and the use of specific report elements. Tension between the length of the report and desired detail was appreciated. Barriers and facilitators to the process of implementation were noted, dominated by the theme of increased integration with the electronic medical record. These results fed real-time improvement cycles to reinforce clinician use. This model will be applied in future institutional efforts to integrate clinical genomic applications into practice and may be useful for other institutions considering the implementation of tools for personalizing medical management. PMID:25563219

  10. Turning an Extension Aide into an Extension Agent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seevers, Brenda; Dormody, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    For any organization to remain sustainable, a renewable source of faculty and staff needs to be available. The Extension Internship Program for Juniors and Seniors in High School is a new tool for recruiting and developing new Extension agents. Students get "hands on" experience working in an Extension office and earn college credit while in high…

  11. Turning an Extension Aide into an Extension Agent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seevers, Brenda; Dormody, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    For any organization to remain sustainable, a renewable source of faculty and staff needs to be available. The Extension Internship Program for Juniors and Seniors in High School is a new tool for recruiting and developing new Extension agents. Students get "hands on" experience working in an Extension office and earn college credit while in high…

  12. Unification and extension of the similarity scaling criteria and mixing transition for studying astrophysics using high energy density laboratory experiments or numerial simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y

    2006-08-21

    The Euler similarity criteria for laboratory experiments and time-dependent mixing transition are important concepts introduced recently for application to prediction and analysis of astrophysical phenomena. However Euler scaling by itself provides no information on the distinctive spectral range of high Reynolds number turbulent flows found in astrophysics situations. On the other hand, time-dependent mixing transition gives no indication on whether a flow that just passed the mixing transition is sufficient to capture all of the significant dynamics of the complete astrophysical spectral range. In this paper, a new approach, based on additional insight gained from review of Navier-Stokes turbulence theory, is developed. It allows for revelations about the distinctive spectral scale dynamics associated with high Reynolds number astrophysical flows. From this perspective, we caution that the energy containing range of the turbulent flow measured in a laboratory setting must not be unintentionally contaminated in such a way that the interactive influences of this spectral scale range in the corresponding astrophysical situation cannot be faithfully represented. In this paper we introduce the concept of a minimum state as the lowest Reynolds number turbulent flow that a time-dependent mixing transition must achieve to fulfill this objective. Later in the paper we show that the Reynolds number of the minimum state may be determined as 1.6 x 10{sup 5}. Our efforts here can be viewed as a unification and extension of the concepts of both similarity scaling and transient mixing transition concepts. At the last the implications of our approach in planning future intensive laser experiments or massively parallel numerical simulations are discussed. A systematic procedure is outlined so that as the capabilities of the laser interaction experiments and supporting results from detailed numerical simulations performed in recently advanced supercomputing facilities increase progressively, a strategy can be devised so that more and more spectral range dynamic structures and their statistical influences on evolving astrophysical flows can be progressively extended in laboratory investigations.

  13. Early Clinical Experiences for Second-Year Student Pharmacists at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Jacqueline E; Amerine, Lindsey B; Chen, Sheh-Li; Luter, David N; Arnall, Justin; Smith, Shayna; Roth, Mary T; Rodgers, Philip T; Williams, Dennis M; Pinelli, Nicole R

    2015-11-25

    Objective. To examine student outcomes associated with the Student Medication and Reconciliation Team (SMART) program, which was designed to provide second-year student pharmacists at the University of North Carolina (UNC) Eshelman School of Pharmacy direct patient care experience at UNC Medical Center. Design. Twenty-two second-year student pharmacists were randomly selected from volunteers, given program training, and scheduled for three 5-hour evening shifts in 2013-2014. Pre/post surveys and reflection statements were collected from 19 students. Data were analyzed with a mixed methods approach. Assessment. Survey results revealed an increase in student self-efficacy (p<0.05) and positive perceptions of SMART. Qualitative findings suggest the program provided opportunities for students to develop strategies for practice, promoted an appreciation for the various roles pharmacists play in health care, and fostered an appreciation for the complexity of real-world practice. Conclusion. Early clinical experiences can enhance student learning and development while fostering an appreciation for pharmacy practice. PMID:26839428

  14. Early Clinical Experiences for Second-Year Student Pharmacists at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Amerine, Lindsey B.; Chen, Sheh-Li; Luter, David N.; Arnall, Justin; Smith, Shayna; Roth, Mary T.; Rodgers, Philip T.; Williams, Dennis M.; Pinelli, Nicole R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine student outcomes associated with the Student Medication and Reconciliation Team (SMART) program, which was designed to provide second-year student pharmacists at the University of North Carolina (UNC) Eshelman School of Pharmacy direct patient care experience at UNC Medical Center. Design. Twenty-two second-year student pharmacists were randomly selected from volunteers, given program training, and scheduled for three 5-hour evening shifts in 2013-2014. Pre/post surveys and reflection statements were collected from 19 students. Data were analyzed with a mixed methods approach. Assessment. Survey results revealed an increase in student self-efficacy (p<0.05) and positive perceptions of SMART. Qualitative findings suggest the program provided opportunities for students to develop strategies for practice, promoted an appreciation for the various roles pharmacists play in health care, and fostered an appreciation for the complexity of real-world practice. Conclusion. Early clinical experiences can enhance student learning and development while fostering an appreciation for pharmacy practice. PMID:26839428

  15. Determination of Variation Parameters as a Crucial Step in Designing TMT-Based Clinical Proteomics Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Evelyne; Valkenborg, Dirk; Baggerman, Geert; Willems, Hanny; Landuyt, Bart; Schoofs, Liliane; Mertens, Inge

    2015-01-01

    In quantitative shotgun proteomic analyses by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, a rigid study design is necessary in order to obtain statistically relevant results. Hypothesis testing, sample size calculation and power estimation are fundamental concepts that require consideration upon designing an experiment. For this reason, the reproducibility and variability of the proteomic platform needs to be assessed. In this study, we evaluate the technical (sample preparation), labeling (isobaric labels), and total (biological + technical + labeling + experimental) variability and reproducibility of a workflow that employs a shotgun LC-MS/MS approach in combination with TMT peptide labeling for the quantification of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proteome. We illustrate that the variability induced by TMT labeling is small when compared to the technical variation. The latter is also responsible for a substantial part of the total variation. Prior knowledge about the experimental variability allows for a correct design, a prerequisite for the detection of biologically significant disease-specific differential proteins in clinical proteomics experiments. PMID:25775046

  16. Understanding women's experiences with medical abortion: In-depth interviews with women in two Indian clinics.

    PubMed

    Ganatra, B; Kalyanwala, S; Elul, B; Coyaji, K; Tewari, S

    2010-01-01

    We explored women's perspectives on using medical abortion, including their reasons for selecting the method, their experiences with it and their thoughts regarding demedicalisation of part or all of the process. Sixty-three women from two urban clinics in India were interviewed within four weeks of abortion completion using a semi-structured in-depth interview guide. While women appreciated the non-invasiveness of medical abortion, other factors influencing method selection were family support and distance from the facility. The degree of medicalisation that women wanted or felt was necessary also depended on the way expectations were set by their providers. Confirmation of abortion completion was a source of anxiety for many women and led to unnecessary interventions in a few cases. Ultimately, experiences depended more on women's expectations about the method, and on the level of emotional and logistic support they received rather than on inherent characteristics of the method. These findings emphasise the circumstances under which women make reproductive choices and underscore the need to tailor service delivery to meet women's needs. Women-centred counselling and care that takes into consideration individual circumstances are needed. PMID:19431005

  17. Advances in the management of multiple sclerosis spasticity: experiences from recent studies and everyday clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Pozzilli, Carlo

    2013-12-01

    Although spasticity of varying severity affects up to 80% of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) during the course of their disease, the symptom is often overlooked and undertreated. Despite the availability of oral antispasticity treatments (baclofen, tizanidine and others), approximately one-third of MS patients in Europe and the USA experience moderate or severe nonfocalized spasticity. At present, a thorough clinical evaluation of MS-related spasticity that takes into account the patient's own perception of spasms, spasticity-related pain and other associated symptoms is not common in daily neurological practice. Some of the usual spasticity scales, such as the Ashworth and modified Ashworth scales, reflect the observer's measurement of spasticity at a particular point in time. Herbal (smoked) cannabis has long been recognized as a possible option for relief of spasticity and neuropathic pain, but pertinent concerns about psychoactive effects and addiction risk have prevented its common use. An innovative method of benefiting from the mode of action of cannabinoids while limiting their drawbacks is to reduce peak plasma levels of 9-delta-tetrahydrocannabinol and counteract psychoactivity with higher than naturally occurring proportions of a second cannabinoid, cannabidiol. Sativex® oromucosal spray (1:1 ratio of 9-delta-tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol) has recently been approved in a number of EU countries and elsewhere for use in patients with MS-related spasticity who are resistant to treatment with other antispasticity medications. In clinical trials, Sativex provided initial relief of spasticity symptoms within the first 4 weeks of treatment (trial period) in up to about half of patients resistant to other available oral antispasticity medications and demonstrated clinically significant improvement in spasticity (30% or higher reduction from baseline) in three-quarters of the initial responders. Adverse events were limited mainly to mild or moderate cases of somnolence and dizziness. Under everyday clinical practice conditions, Sativex at a mean daily dose of <7 sprays/day, was shown to relieve spasticity in about 70% of patients previously resistant to treatment. Clear improvements were also noted in associated symptoms such as sleep disturbances, bladder problems, loss of mobility and cramps. In large observational studies, >80% of patients reported no adverse events with the use of Sativex and interim data from safety registries in the UK and Spain indicate a low risk for serious adverse drug reactions. Follow-up studies in Sativex responders support continued benefit without the need to increase doses for at least 1 year. Sativex appears to be a promising solution for a meaningful proportion of patients with MS-related spasticity who have inadequate response to current antispasticity medications. PMID:24289844

  18. Influenza A pandemics: clinical and organizational aspects: the experience in Chile.

    PubMed

    Ugarte, Sebastián; Arancibia, Francisco; Soto, Rodrigo

    2010-04-01

    Recently, the World Health Organization declared a pandemic mediated by the novel A H1N1 influenza virus. Soon after the first report from Mexico, the disease arrived in Chile, where it spread quickly from south to north, mimicking cold weather progression through the country. Between May and September 2009, 366,624 cases of H1N1 were reported; 12,248 were confirmed by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and 1562 were hospitalized. One hundred thirty-two deaths were attributable to the infection, creating a death rate of 0.78 per 100,000 inhabitants. Common comorbidities were present in 59%, including obesity, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, type II diabetes, and congestive heart failure. Nine percent were pregnant. Severe disease developed early; the median time to admittance was 5 days, and the most common clinical manifestations were cough, fever, dyspnea, and myalgia. Mean acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II and sequential organ failure assessment scores were 14 and 5, respectively. Highlighted laboratory data were lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase elevation, leukocytosis in 50%, elevated creatinine in a 25%, and thrombocytopenia in 20%. Severe respiratory failure requiring high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as sophisticated modes of respiratory support was seen in 17%. Acute renal failure occurred in 25% of the intensive care unit patients, with death rates near 50%. Health systems reinforced outpatient guards with extra staff and extension of the duty schedules. Antivirals were supplied free for medically diagnosed cases. Admissions for severe cases were prioritized, reconverting hospital beds into advanced care ones; a central coordination station rationed their assignment. Recommendations for small hospitals include adding ventilators, using videoconferences, providing tutorial activity from experts, developing guidelines for disease management, and outlining criteria for transport. PMID:19935412

  19. The pharmaceutical management system at Shade Tree Family Clinic: a medical student-run free clinic's experience.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Benjamin P; Patel, Sanjay G; Guyer, Dana L; Dunn, Sarah R; Herceg, Megan E; Knox, Caroline K; Miller, Robert F

    2008-09-01

    The Shade Tree Family Clinic (STFC) is a student-run free walk-in health clinic opened by Vanderbilt University medical students in October 2005 to address the acute and chronic health needs of the underinsured community in East Nashville. STFC founders decided that the clinic would provide complete medical care, including dispensing commonly prescribed medications at no charge to patients. After several months of managing the inventory in a log book, a medical student author created a Web-based pharmaceutical tracking system to manage the medication formulary. In the process, the authors found little literature available addressing the logistics of setting up an electronic pharmacy system. The system created uses the freely available RxNorm and US Department of Veterans Affairs National Drug File Reference Terminology databases for medication and classification data. Incorporation of these databases allows medical students to dispense and restock medications with ease. The system ensures accurate data entry, improves efficiency, and facilitates continuity of care at a clinic staffed by hundreds of different students and physicians. The STFC pharmaceutical tracking system has facilitated the acquisition and efficient management of medications and consequently has had a great impact on the success of STFC. PMID:18850398

  20. A Framework for Usable and Effective Clinical Decision Support: Experience from the iCPR Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kannry, Joseph; McCullagh, Lauren; Kushniruk, Andre; Mann, Devin; Edonyabo, Daniel; McGinn, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The promise of Clinical Decision Support (CDS) has always been to transform patient care and improve patient outcomes through the delivery of timely and appropriate recommendations that are patient specific and, more often than not, are appropriately actionable. However, the users of CDS—providers—are frequently bombarded with inappropriate and inapplicable CDS that often are not informational, not integrated into the workflow, not patient specific, and that may present out of date and irrelevant recommendations. Methods: The integrated clinical prediction rule (iCPR) project was a randomized clinical trial (RCT) conducted to determine if a novel form of CDS, i.e., clinical prediction rules (CPRs), could be efficiently integrated into workflow and result in changes in outcomes (e.g., antibiotic ordering) when embedded within a commercial electronic health record (EHR). We use the lessons learned from the iCPR project to illustrate a framework for constructing usable, useful, and effective actionable CDS while employing off-the-shelf functionality in a production system. Innovations that make up the framework combine the following: (1) active and actionable decision support, (2) multiple rounds of usability testing with iterative development for user acceptance, (3) numerous context sensitive triggers, (4) dedicated training and support for users of the CDS tool for user adoption, and (5) support from clinical and administrative leadership. We define “context sensitive triggers” as being workflow events (i.e., context) that result in a CDS intervention. Discussion: Success of the framework can be measured by CDS adoption (i.e., intervention is being used), acceptance (compliance with recommendations), and clinical outcomes (where appropriate). This framework may have broader implications for the deployment of Health Information Technology (HIT). Results and Conclusion: iCPR was well adopted(57.4% of users) and accepted (42.7% of users). Usability testing identified and fixed many issues before the iCPR RCT. The level of leadership support and clinical guidance for iCPR was key in establishing a culture of acceptance for both the tool and its recommendations contributing to adoption and acceptance. The dedicated training and support lead to the majority of the residents reporting a high level of comfort with both iCPR tools strep pharyngitis (64.4 percent) and pneumonia (62.7 percent) as well as a high likelihood of using the tools in the future. A surprising framework addition resulted from usability testing: context sensitive triggers. PMID:26290888

  1. Dental Students' Perceived Value of Peer-Mentoring Clinical Leadership Experiences.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Rachel A; Hammaker, Daniel J; de Peralta, Tracy L; Fitzgerald, Mark

    2016-03-01

    This pilot study compared second- and fourth-year dental students' perceived values of newly implemented clinical leadership experiences (CLEs) at one U.S. dental school during the 2012-13 academic year. In the CLEs, fourth-year (D4) students mentored second-year (D2) dental students during faculty-supervised patient treatment. The two cohorts' perceived value of the experiences was measured with questionnaires consisting of five-point Likert scale questions and open text responses. Out of a total of 114 D2 and 109 D4 students, 46 D2 students and 35 D4 students participated (response rates of 40.4% and 32.1%, respectively). While responses from both cohorts showed they highly valued the CLEs, the D2s perceived greater value: 4.07 (0.53) v. 3.51 (0.95), p<0.003. Both cohorts reported feeling that D4s were prepared to mentor D2s, that the CLEs had educational benefits, and that the CLEs increased their comfort with peer communication. Theme analysis of open text questions revealed that the respondents perceived the D4s were more accessible than faculty and provided guidance and individual attention; the CLEs increased student comfort; the CLEs reinforced D4 skills, knowledge, and confidence; and the CLEs provided management, leadership, and collaborative work experience. Theme analysis also highlighted student concerns about a lack of program structure. Overall, the majority of both groups valued CLEs in their dental education. Particular advantages they perceived were increased comfort, guidance, and attention. Further program development should address student concerns. These results suggest that similar programs should be considered and/or expanded in other dental schools' curricula. PMID:26933106

  2. Simulation-guided cardiac auscultation improves medical students' clinical skills: the Pavia pilot experience.

    PubMed

    Perlini, Stefano; Salinaro, Francesco; Santalucia, Paola; Musca, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    Clinical evaluation is the cornerstone of any cardiac diagnosis, although excessive over-specialisation often leads students to disregard the value of clinical skills, and to overemphasize the approach to instrumental cardiac diagnosis. Time restraints, low availability of "typical" cardiac patients on whom to perform effective bedside teaching, patients' respect and the underscoring of the value of clinical skills all lead to a progressive decay in teaching. Simulation-guided cardiac auscultation may improve clinical training in medical students and residents. Harvey(©) is a mannequin encompassing more than 50 cardiac diagnoses that was designed and developed at the University of Miami (Florida, USA). One of the advantages of Harvey(©) simulation resides in the possibility of listening, comparing and discussing "real" murmurs. To objectively assess its teaching performance, the capability to identify five different cardiac diagnoses (atrial septal defect, normal young subject, mitral stenosis with tricuspid regurgitation, chronic mitral regurgitation, and pericarditis) out of more than 50 diagnostic possibilities was assessed in 523 III-year medical students (i.e. at the very beginning of their clinical experience), in 92 VI-year students, and in 42 residents before and after a formal 10-h teaching session with Harvey(©). None of them had previously experienced simulation-based cardiac auscultation in addition to formal lecturing (all three groups) and bedside teaching (VI-year students and residents). In order to assess the "persistence" of the acquired knowledge over time, the test was repeated after 3 years in 85 students, who did not repeat the formal 10-h teaching session with Harvey(©) after the III year. As expected, the overall response was poor in the "beginners" who correctly identified 11.0 % of the administered cardiac murmurs. After simulation-guided training, the ability to recognise the correct cardiac diagnoses was much better (72.0 %; p < 0.001 vs. baseline). Rather unexpectedly, before the tutorial, the performance of VI-year students and of residents was not significantly different from their III-year colleagues, since the two groups correctly identified 14.2 and 16.2 % of the diagnoses, respectively. After the tutorial, the VI-year students and the residents also improved their overall performance (to 73.1 and 76.1 %, respectively; p < 0.001 for both when compared to before the tutorial). The persistence of this capability after 3 years was remarkable, since the 85 students who repeated the test without any further exposure to the 10-h teaching session with Harvey(©) correctly identified 68.4 % of the possible cardiac diagnoses (p < 0.001 vs. baseline). These data underscore the importance of clinical training in order to improve auscultation skills in our academic setting, prompting to redesign teaching curricula. Simulation-based cardiac auscultation should be considered as the "missing link" between formal lecturing and bedside teaching of heart sounds and murmurs. PMID:22767224

  3. Contents of supervision needed by physical and occupational therapists for ability development: focusing on their clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Hiroaki; Kanada, Yoshikiyo; Sugiura, Yoshito; Koyama, Soichiro; Tanabe, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the contents of supervision needed by novice therapists to develop clinical abilities, focusing on their clinical experience and using an original evaluation table. [Subjects and Methods] An evaluation of clinical abilities basic attitudes, therapeutic skills, and clinical practice-related thoughts was conducted in 29, 21, and 9 therapists with clinical experience of 0–1 (1 year group), 1–2 (2 years group), and 2–3 (3 years group) years, respectively. [Results] There were no significant differences among the 3 groups in basic attitudes. Therapeutic skills markedly varied between the 1 and 3 years groups. In clinical practice-related thoughts, significant differences were observed between the 1 and 3 years groups and between the 2 and 3 years groups. [Conclusion] It may be appropriate for educators to provide technical education regarding skills that are achievable for students in the early stages in consideration of applied movements. Also, education for novices should be provided with importance attached to abilities influenced by clinical experience. PMID:26957745

  4. Richter’s Hernia and Sir Frederick Treves: An Original Clinical Experience, Review, and Historical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, Wolfgang; Zellweger, René

    2000-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical recognition, pathology, and management of Richter’s hernia and to review the relevant literature of the past 400 years. Summary Background Data The earliest known reported case of Richter’s hernia occurred in 1598 and was described by Fabricius Hildanus. The first scientific description of this particular hernia was given by August Gottlob Richter in 1778, who presented it as “the small rupture.” In 1887, Sir Frederick Treves gave an excellent overview on the topic and proposed the title “Richter’s hernia.” To his work—a cornerstone to modern understanding—hardly any new aspects can be added today. Since then, only occasional case reports or small series of retrospectively collected Richter’s hernias have been published. Methods The authors draw on their experience with 18 prospectively collected cases treated in the ICRC Lopiding Hospital for War Surgery in northern Kenya between February and December 1998 and review the relevant literature of the past 400 years. Results The classic features of Richter’s hernia were confirmed in all case studies of patients: only part of the circumference of the bowel is entrapped and strangulated in the hernial orifice. The involved segment may rapidly pass into gangrene, yet signs of intestinal obstruction are often absent. The death rate in the authors’ collective was 17%. Conclusion Richter’s hernia is a deceptive entity whose high death rate can be reduced by accurate diagnosis and early surgery. Considering the increasing incidence at laparoscope insertion sites, awareness of this special type of hernia with its misleading clinical appearance is important and of general interest. PMID:11066144

  5. Preliminary Clinical Experience with a Bifurcated Y-Graft Fontan Procedure—A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Kanter, Kirk R.; Haggerty, Christopher M.; Restrepo, Maria; de Zelicourt, Diane A.; Rossignac, Jarek; Parks, W. James; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Optimizing flow and diminishing power loss in the Fontan circuit can improve hemodynamic efficiency potentially improving long-term outcomes. Computerized modeling has predicted improved energetics with a Y-graft Fontan. METHODS From August to December, 2010, six consecutive children had a completion Fontan (n=3) or a Fontan revision (n=3) using a bifurcated polytetrafluoroethylene Y-graft (18×9×9 mm in 2, 20×10×10 mm in 4) connecting the inferior vena cava (IVC) to the right and left pulmonary arteries (PAs) with separate graft limbs. Patents were imaged by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; n-5) or computerized tomography (n=1). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) assessed Fontan hemodynamics, power loss, and IVC flow splits to the branch PAs. Clinical parameters were compared with 12 patients immediately preceding this series who had a lateral Fontan procedure. RESULTS Despite longer crossclamp and bypass times (not statistically significant), the Y-graft Fontan patients had postoperative courses similar to the conventional Fontan patients. Other than two early readmissions for pleural effusions managed with diuretics, on 6–12 months follow-up (mean 8 months), all six patients have done well. Postoperative flow modeling demonstrated balanced distribution of IVC flow to both PAs with minimal flow disturbance. Improvements in hemodynamics and efficiency were noted when the Y-graft branches were anastomosed distally and aligned tangentially with the branch PAs. CONCLUSIONS This preliminary surgical experience demonstrates clinical feasibility of the bifurcated Y-graft Fontan. CFD shows acceptable hemodynamics with low calculated power losses and balanced distribution of IVC flow to the PAs as long as the branch grafts are anastomosed distally. PMID:22698555

  6. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Cardiomyopathy in Barth Syndrome: The UK Experience.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sok-Leng; Forsey, Jonathan; Dudley, Declan; Steward, Colin G; Tsai-Goodman, Beverly

    2016-01-01

    Barth syndrome (BTHS) is an X-linked disorder characterised by cardiomyopathy, neutropenia, skeletal myopathy and growth delay. This study describes the UK national clinical experience and outcome of cardiomyopathy in BTHS. The clinical course and echocardiographic changes of all patients with BTHS in the UK were reviewed from 2004 to 2014. In addition, strain analysis using 2D speckle tracking echocardiography was performed to further assess left ventricular function in the most recent follow-up. At last follow-up, 22 of 27 patients were alive with a median age of 12.6 (2.0-23.8) years; seven underwent cardiac transplantation at a median age of 2 (0.33-3.6) years, and five died (18.5 %) at a median age of 1.8 (0.02-4.22) years. All deaths were related to cardiomyopathy or its management. Left ventricular diastolic dimension and systolic function measured by fractional shortening tended to normalise and stabilise after the first 3 years of life in the majority of patients. However, patients with BTHS (n = 16) had statistically significant reduction in global longitudinal and circumferential strain compared to controls (n = 18), (p < 0.001), despite apparent normal conventional measures of function. There was also reduced or reversed apical rotation and reduced left ventricular twist. Sustained ventricular arrhythmia was not seen at follow-up. Cardiac phenotype in BTHS is variable; however, longer-term outcome in our cohort suggests good prognosis after the first 5 years of life. Most patients appeared to have recovered near normal cardiac function by conventional echocardiographic measures, but strain analysis showed abnormal myocardial deformation and rotational mechanics. PMID:26337810

  7. First clinical experience in carbon ion scanning beam therapy: retrospective analysis of patient positional accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shinichiro; Shibayama, Kouichi; Tanimoto, Katsuyuki; Kumagai, Motoki; Matsuzaki, Yuka; Furukawa, Takuji; Inaniwa, Taku; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Our institute has constructed a new treatment facility for carbon ion scanning beam therapy. The first clinical trials were successfully completed at the end of November 2011. To evaluate patient setup accuracy, positional errors between the reference Computed Tomography (CT) scan and final patient setup images were calculated using 2D-3D registration software. Eleven patients with tumors of the head and neck, prostate and pelvis receiving carbon ion scanning beam treatment participated. The patient setup process takes orthogonal X-ray flat panel detector (FPD) images and the therapists adjust the patient table position in six degrees of freedom to register the reference position by manual or auto- (or both) registration functions. We calculated residual positional errors with the 2D-3D auto-registration function using the final patient setup orthogonal FPD images and treatment planning CT data. Residual error averaged over all patients in each fraction decreased from the initial to the last treatment fraction [1.09 mm/0.76° (averaged in the 1st and 2nd fractions) to 0.77 mm/0.61° (averaged in the 15th and 16th fractions)]. 2D-3D registration calculation time was 8.0 s on average throughout the treatment course. Residual errors in translation and rotation averaged over all patients as a function of date decreased with the passage of time (1.6 mm/1.2° in May 2011 to 0.4 mm/0.2° in December 2011). This retrospective residual positional error analysis shows that the accuracy of patient setup during the first clinical trials of carbon ion beam scanning therapy was good and improved with increasing therapist experience. PMID:22927632

  8. SU-E-J-181: Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Workflow: Initial Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Green, O; Kashani, R; Santanam, L; Wooten, H; Li, H; Rodriguez, V; Hu, Y; Mutic, S; Hand, T; Victoria, J; Steele, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aims of this work are to describe the workflow and initial clinical experience treating patients with an MRI-guided radiotherapy (MRIGRT) system. Methods: Patient treatments with a novel MR-IGRT system started at our institution in mid-January. The system consists of an on-board 0.35-T MRI, with IMRT-capable delivery via doubly-focused MLCs on three {sup 60} Co heads. In addition to volumetric MR-imaging, real-time planar imaging is performed during treatment. So far, eleven patients started treatment (six finished), ranging from bladder to lung SBRT. While the system is capable of online adaptive radiotherapy and gating, a conventional workflow was used to start, consisting of volumetric imaging for patient setup using visible tumor, evaluation of tumor motion outside of PTV on cine images, and real-time imaging. Workflow times were collected and evaluated to increase efficiency and evaluate feasibility of adding the adaptive and gating features while maintaining a reasonable patient throughput. Results: For the first month, physicians attended every fraction to provide guidance on identifying the tumor and an acceptable level of positioning and anatomical deviation. Average total treatment times (including setup) were reduced from 55 to 45 min after physician presence was no longer required and the therapists had learned to align patients based on soft-tissue imaging. Presently, the source strengths were at half maximum (7.7K Ci each), therefore beam-on times will be reduced after source replacement. Current patient load is 10 per day, with increase to 25 anticipated in the near future. Conclusion: On-board, real-time MRI-guided RT has been incorporated into clinical use. Treatment times were kept to reasonable lengths while including volumetric imaging, previews of tumor movement, and physician evaluation. Workflow and timing is being continuously evaluated to increase efficiency. In near future, adaptive and gating capabilities of the system will be implemented.

  9. Initial clinical laboratory experience in noninvasive prenatal testing for fetal aneuploidy from maternal plasma DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    Futch, Tracy; Spinosa, John; Bhatt, Sucheta; de Feo, Eileen; Rava, Richard P; Sehnert, Amy J

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to report the experience of noninvasive prenatal DNA testing using massively parallel sequencing in an accredited clinical laboratory. Methods Laboratory information was examined for blood samples received for testing between February and November 2012 for chromosome 21 (Chr21), Chr18, and Chr13. Monosomy X (MX) testing was available from July 2012 for cystic hygroma indication. Outcomes were collected from providers on samples with positive results. Results There were 5974 samples tested, and results were issued within an average of 5.1 business days. Aneuploidy was detected in 284 (4.8%) samples (155 Chr21, 66 Chr18, 19 Chr13, 40 MX, and four double aneuploidy). Follow-ups are available for 245/284 (86%), and 77/284 (27.1%) are confirmed, including one double-aneuploidy case concordant with cytogenetics from maternal malignancy. Fourteen (0.2%) discordant (putative false-positive) results (one Chr21, six Chr18, three Chr13, three MX, and one Chr21/13) have been identified. Five (0.08%) false-negative cases are reported (two trisomy 21, two trisomy 18, and one MX). In 170 (2.8%) cases, the result for a single chromosome was indefinite. Conclusions This report suggests that clinical testing of maternal cell-free DNA for fetal aneuploidy operates within performance parameters established in validation studies. Noninvasive prenatal testing is sensitive to biological contributions from placental and maternal sources. ©2013 Verinata Health, Inc. Prenatal Diagnosis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23592485

  10. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation using proton beams: Initial clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Smith, Barbara L.; Adams, Judith C.; Kornmehl, Ellen; Katz, Angela; Gadd, Michele; Specht, Michelle; Hughes, Kevin; Gioioso, Valeria; Lu, H.-M.; Braaten, Kristina; Recht, Abram; Powell, Simon N.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Taghian, Alphonse G. . E-mail: ataghian@partners.org

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: We present our initial clinical experience with proton, three-dimensional, conformal, external beam, partial-breast irradiation (3D-CPBI). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with Stage I breast cancer were treated with proton 3D-CPBI in a Phase I/II clinical trial. Patients were followed at 3 to 4 weeks, 6 to 8 weeks, 6 months, and every 6 months thereafter for recurrent disease, cosmetic outcome, toxicity, and patient satisfaction. Results: With a median follow-up of 12 months (range, 8-22 months), no recurrent disease has been detected. Global breast cosmesis was judged by physicians to be good or excellent in 89% and 100% of cases at 6 months and 12 months, respectively. Patients rated global breast cosmesis as good or excellent in 100% of cases at both 6 and 12 months. Proton 3D-CPBI produced significant acute skin toxicity with moderate to severe skin color changes in 79% of patients at 3 to 4 weeks and moderate to severe moist desquamation in 22% of patients at 6 to 8 weeks. Telangiectasia was noted in 3 patients. Three patients reported rib tenderness in the treated area, and one rib fracture was documented. At last follow-up, 95% of patients reported total satisfaction with proton 3D-CPBI. Conclusions: Based on our study results, proton 3D-CPBI offers good-to-excellent cosmetic outcomes in 89% to 100% of patients at 6-month and 12-month follow-up and nearly universal patient satisfaction. However, proton 3D-CPBI, as used in this study, does result in significant acute skin toxicity and may potentially be associated with late skin (telangiectasia) and rib toxicity. Because of the dosimetric advantages of proton 3D-CPBI, technique modifications are being explored to improve acute skin tolerance.

  11. Odor information transfer in the stingless bee Melipona quadrifasciata: effect of in-hive experiences on classical conditioning of proboscis extension.

    PubMed

    Mc Cabe, Sofía I; Farina, Walter M

    2009-02-01

    A recent study showed that the stingless bee Melipona quadrifasciata could learn to discriminate odors in a classical conditioning of proboscis extension response (PER). Here we used this protocol to investigate the ability of these bees to use olfactory information obtained within the colony in an experimental context: the PER paradigm. We compared their success in solving a classical differential conditioning depending on the previous olfactory experiences received inside the nest. We found that M. quadrifasciata bees are capable of transferring the food-odor information acquired in the colony to a differential conditioning in the PER paradigm. Bees attained higher discrimination levels when they had previously encountered the rewarded odor associated to food inside the hive. The increase in the discrimination levels, however, was in some cases unspecific to the odor used indicating a certain degree of generalization. The influence of the food scent offered at a field feeder 24 h before the classical conditioning could also be seen in the discrimination attained by the foragers in the PER setup, detecting the presence of long-term memory. Moreover, the improved performance of recruited bees in the PER paradigm suggests the occurrence of social learning of nectar scents inside the stingless bees' hives. PMID:19018542

  12. Analysis of stress fractures in athletes based on our clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Jun; Sato, Yoshihiro; Takeda, Tsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To analyze stress fractures in athletes based on experience from our sports medicine clinic. METHODS: We investigated the association between stress fractures and age, sex, sports level, sports activity, and skeletal site in athletes seen at our sports medicine clinic between September 1991 and April 2009. Stress fractures of the pars interarticularis were excluded from this analysis. RESULTS: During this period (18 years and 8 mo), 14276 patients (9215 males and 5061 females) consulted our clinic because of sports-related injuries, and 263 patients (1.8%) [171 males (1.9%) and 92 females (1.8%)] sustained stress fractures. The average age of the patients with stress fractures was 20.2 years (range 10-46 years); 112 patients (42.6%) were 15-19 years of age and 90 (34.2%) were 20-24 years of age. Altogether, 90 patients (34.2%) were active at a high recreational level and 173 (65.8%) at a competitive level. The highest proportion of stress fractures was seen in basketball athletes (21.3%), followed by baseball (13.7%), track and field (11.4%), rowing (9.5%), soccer (8.4%), aerobics (5.3%), and classical ballet (4.9%). The most common sites of stress fractures in these patients were the tibia (44.1%), followed by the rib (14.1%), metatarsal bone (12.9%), ulnar olecranon (8.7%) and pelvis (8.4%). The sites of the stress fractures varied from sport to sport. The ulnar olecranon was the most common stress fracture site in baseball players, and the rib was the most common in rowers. Basketball and classical ballet athletes predominantly sustained stress fractures of the tibia and metatarsal bone. Track and field and soccer athletes predominantly sustained stress fractures of the tibia and pubic bone. Aerobics athletes predominantly sustained stress fractures of the tibia. Middle and long distance female runners who sustained multiple stress fractures had the female athlete triad. CONCLUSION: The results of this analysis showed that stress fractures were seen in high-level young athletes, with similar proportions for males and females, and that particular sports were associated with specific sites for stress fractures. Middle and long distance female runners who suffered from multiple stress fractures had the female athlete triad. PMID:22474626

  13. Clinical Outcome of Parotidectomy with Reconstruction: Experience of a Regional Head and Neck Cancer Unit

    PubMed Central

    Okoturo, Eyituoyo; Osasuyi, Anslem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Salivary gland pathologies represent a histologically diverse group of benign and malignant neoplasms. Currently, World Health Organization recognizes 13 benign and 24 malignant variants of all salivary gland neoplasms. Surgery continues to remain the main-stay for treatment of parotid gland neoplasms. The aim of this study was to document our experiences of the patients treated for parotid tumors and find out if any compelling variable predicted the relative clinical outcomes. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study, from records of parotidectomies performed at the operating theatre by the head and neck cancer division of the study institution between 2010 and 2013. Eligibility for study inclusion included cases with benign or malignant parotid neoplasms requiring surgical management with or without adjunct radiotherapy. The predictors of postoperative complications, overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were analyzed. Results: A total of 20 patients underwent parotidectomy. The mean age was 42 years. Tumors were located on the left parotid in 13 cases (65%) and the right parotid in 7 cases (35%). The surgical procedures comprised 16 superficial parotidectomies, 1 total parotidectomy, and 3 radical parotidectomy (inclusive of facial nerve sacrifice) and 2 neck dissections levels II–V. The reconstructive procedures were 2 facial nerve branch cable grafts, 1 end-to-end facial-facial nerve branch anastomoses, and 2 facial re-animation surgeries (temporalis muscle suspensions). A total of five cases (33.3%) had postoperative complications. 2 variables (length of surgery and neck dissection) were found to have an impact on postoperative complications that were statistically significant. Additionally, length of surgery was a significant predictor on the 2 years OS and DFS. Conclusion: The result of this study showed good clinical outcome, especially in the benign cases. The comprehensive clinical outcome of the malignant cases could not be objectively assessed, as the OS and DFS were 50% at 2-years follow-up. It is our submission that a larger sample size is utilized in subsequent studies and quality of life evaluation is included in the methodology. PMID:27013855

  14. Silent loss and the clinical encounter: Parents’ and physicians’ experiences of stillbirth–a qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the United States, an estimated 70 stillbirths occur each day, on average 25,000 each year. Research into the prevalence and causes of stillbirth is ongoing, but meanwhile, many parents suffer this devastating loss, largely in silence, due to persistent stigma and taboo; and many health providers report feeling ill equipped to support grieving parents. Interventions to address bereavement after neonatal death are increasingly common in U.S. hospitals, and there is growing data on the nature of parent bereavement after a stillbirth. However, further research is needed to evaluate supportive interventions and to investigate the parent-clinician encounter during hospitalization following a stillbirth. Qualitative inquiry offers opportunities to better understand the lived experience of parents against the backdrop of clinicians’ beliefs, intentions, and well-meaning efforts to support grieving parents. Methods We present a secondary qualitative analysis of transcript data from 3 semi-structured focus groups conducted with parents who had experienced a stillbirth and delivered in a hospital, and 2 focus groups with obstetrician-gynecologists. Participants were drawn from the greater Seattle region in Washington State. We examine parents’ and physicians’ experiences and beliefs surrounding stillbirth during the clinical encounter using iterative discourse analysis. Results Women reported that the cheery, bustling environment of the labor and delivery setting was a painful place for parents who had had a stillbirth, and that the well-meaning attempts of physicians to offer comfort often had the opposite effect. Parents also reported that their grief is deeply felt but not socially recognized. While physicians recognized patients’ grief, they did not grasp its depth or duration. Physicians viewed stillbirth as an unexpected clinical tragedy, though several considered stillbirth less traumatic than the death of a neonate. In the months and years following a stillbirth, these parents continue to memorialize their children as part of their family. Conclusions Hospitals need to examine the physical environment for deliveries and, wherever possible, offer designated private areas with staff trained in stillbirth care. Training programs in obstetrics need to better address the bereavement needs of parents following a stillbirth, and research is needed to evaluate effective bereavement interventions, accounting for cultural variation. Critical improvements are also needed for mental health support beyond hospitalization. Finally, medical professionals and parents can play an important role in reversing the stigma that surrounds stillbirth. PMID:23181615

  15. Clinical experience with titanium mesh in reconstruction of massive chest wall defects following oncological resection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haitang; Tantai, Jicheng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To present our experience of reconstructing wide defects with porously titanium mesh after radical resection of malignant chest wall tumors. Methods A retrospective review of surgical reconstruction for large chest wall resections with titanium mesh was conducted from January 2009 to August 2014 in Shanghai Chest Hospital. Results A total of 27 patients underwent major chest wall reconstructions with titanium mesh, following oncological resections. Chest wall sarcomas were the most frequent (63.0%). The mean tumor size was 72.4 (range, 36-140) cm2. The average size of the applied porously titanium mesh was 140.9 (range, 80-225) cm2. Mean postoperative length of stay was 7.1 (range, 4-14) days. There were no perioperative mortalities. Four (14.8%) patients experienced treatable complications. All had a resection of at least 3 ribs (median 3, mean 3.5 ribs). A total of 22 patients underwent ribs without sternal resections, and five patients underwent partial sternal resections with adjacent costal cartilage. Anterior chest wall resections were performed in 13 patients while lateral chest wall resections were performed in 9 patients. Three patients had extended resections beyond the chest wall in patients with primary chest wall malignancies, including two with wedge resections of lung and one with partial resection of pericardium. No patient was lost to follow-up. Mean follow-up was 30.7 months. Neither chest wall instability nor wound infection/necrosis was observed. Of these, 23 patients (85.2%) were alive at the last follow-up. Local recurrence was detected in three cases. The 5-year disease-free and overall survivals of primary chest tumors were 72.1% and 80.8%, respectively. Conclusions Our results showed that chest wall reconstruction utilizing synthetic titanium meshes following extensive resections of the chest wall malignant tumors allowed adequate resection size, with acceptable complications and survival benefits. PMID:26380739

  16. Expansive learning in the university setting: the case for simulated clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Jacquelyn

    2007-03-01

    This paper argues that simulated practice in the university setting is not just a second best to learning in the clinical area but one which offers the potential for deliberation and deep learning [Eraut, M., 2000. Non-formal learning, implicit learning and tacit knowledge in professional work. Journal of Educational Psychology, 70, 113-136]. The context of student learning in an undergraduate midwifery programme is analysed using human activity theory [Engeström, Y., 2001. Expansive learning at work: toward an activity theoretical reconceptualization. Journal of Education and Work, 14, 133-156]. The advantages of this approach to student learning as opposed to situated learning theory and the concept of legitimate peripheral participation [Lave, J., Wenger, E., 1991. Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge University Press, New York] are discussed. An activity system changes as a result of contradictions and tensions between what it purports to produce and the views of stakeholders (multi-voicedness) as well as its historical context (Historicity of activity). A focus group with students highlights their expressed need for more simulated practice experience. The views of midwifery lecturers are sought as an alternative voice on this tension in the current programme. Qualitative differences in types of simulated experience are explored and concerns about resources are raised in the analysis. Discussion considers the value of well planned simulations in encouraging the expression of tacit understanding through a group deliberative learning process [Eraut, M., 2000. Non-formal learning, implicit learning and tacit knowledge in professional work. Journal of Educational Psychology, 70, 113-136]. PMID:17689430

  17. Health-Related Quality of Life in the Gender, Race, And Clinical Experience Trial

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Judith; Saag, Michael; Squires, Kathleen; Currier, Judith; Ryan, Robert; Coate, Bruce; Mrus, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Background. We report health-related QoL (HRQoL) from GRACE (Gender, Race, And Clinical Experience) study by sex and race over 48 weeks. Methods. 429 treatment-experienced adults (HIV-1 RNA ≥ 1000 copies/mL) received darunavir/ritonavir 600/100 mg twice daily plus an appropriate background regimen. QoL was measured by the Functional Assessment of HIV Infection (FAHI) questionnaire. Results. 67% women and 77% men, including 67.4% black, 76.0% Hispanic, and 73.8% white patients, completed the trial. Baseline total FAHI scores were similar between sexes and races. Total FAHI of the entire population improved by Week 4 (P < .05); near-maximum changes obtained by Week 12 were maintained through Week 48. Women and black patients demonstrated larger improvements in total FAHI versus men, and Hispanic and white patients, respectively. Conclusion. HRQoL improved in all sex and racial/ethnic groups. Sex-based and race-based differences in improvements in FAHI subscales may provide insight into subtle differences of HIV-1 and treatment on HRQoL in different populations. PMID:21904672

  18. Clinical judgment and decision making in wound assessment and management: is experience enough?

    PubMed

    Logan, Gemma

    2015-03-01

    The assessment and management of wounds forms a large proportion of community nurses' workload, often requiring judgment and decision-making in complex, challenging and uncertain circumstances. The processes through which nurses form judgments and make decisions within this context are reviewed in this article against existing theories on these on these subjects. There is variability in wound assessment and management practice which may be attributed to uncertainties within the context, a lack of knowledge in appropriate treatment choices and the inability to correctly value the importance of the clinical information presented. Nurses may be required to draw on intuition to guide their judgments and decision-making by association with experience and expertise. In addition, a step-by-step analytical approach underpinned by an evidence base may be required to ensure accuracy in practice. Developing an understanding of the different theories of judgment and decision-making may facilitate nurses' abilities to reflect on their own decision tasks, thereby enhancing the care provided. PMID:25790510

  19. Clinical judgment and decision-making in wound assessment and management: is experience enough?

    PubMed

    Logan, Gemma

    2015-03-01

    The assessment and management of wounds forms a large proportion of community nurses' workload, often requiring judgment and decision-making in complex, challenging and uncertain circumstances. The processes through which nurses form judgments and make decisions within this context are reviewed in this article against existing theories on these subjects. There is variability in wound assessment and management practice which may be attributed to uncertainties within the context, a lack of knowledge in appropriate treatment choices and the inability to correctly value the importance of the clinical information presented. Nurses may be required to draw on intuition to guide their judgments and decision-making by association with experience and expertise. In addition, a step-by-step analytical approach underpinned by an evidence base may be required to ensure accuracy in practice. Developing an understanding of the different theories of judgment and decision-making may facilitate nurses' abilities to reflect on their own decision tasks, thereby enhancing the care provided. PMID:25882591

  20. Development of Facial Rejuvenation Procedures: Thirty Years of Clinical Experience with Face Lifts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Jun; Choi, Jun Ho; Lee, Yoonho

    2015-09-01

    Facial rejuvenation procedures can be roughly divided into face lift surgery and nonoperative, less invasive procedures, such as fat grafts, fillers, botulinum toxin injections, thread lifts, or laserbrasion. Face lift surgery or rhytidectomy is the procedure most directly associated with rejuvenation, due to its fundamental ability to restore the anatomical changes caused by aging. Various methods of face lift surgery have been developed over the last hundred years, thanks to advances in the understanding of facial anatomy and the mechanisms of aging, as well as the dedication of innovative surgeons. However, no generally applicable standard method exists, because the condition of each patient is different, and each operative method has advantages and disadvantages. Specific characteristics of the skin of Asians and their skeletal anatomy should be considered when determining the operative method to be used on Asian patients. Plastic surgeons should improve their ability to analyze the original aesthetic properties and problem areas of each patient, drawing on scientific knowledge about the aging process, and they should develop the skills necessary to perform various rejuvenative techniques. In the present article, we reviewed various face lift procedures and the current methods of modified double plane face lift, based on our clinical experience of over 30 years. PMID:26430622

  1. "Distally based dorsal hand flaps": clinical experience, cadaveric studies and an update.

    PubMed

    Vuppalapati, Gunasekar; Oberlin, C; Balakrishnan, G

    2004-10-01

    Many developments have taken place in the area of distally based dorsal hand flaps since 1988. This paper reported these developments as well as our clinical experience and cadaveric studies. Thirty-three reverse dorsal metacarpal artery (RDMA) flaps, 11 reverse dorsal digital artery (RDDA) flaps and five extended RDMA flaps done in the Institute for Research and Rehabilitation of Hand, Stanley Hospital, Chennai, India during the period between 1996 and 2002 are reviewed. In our series, we used simple, composite, fasciocutaneous and adipofascial flaps, encountered 4% total loss and 6% partial loss. A series of injected cadaveric hands were studied in the Institute D'Anatomie de Paris. An important anatomical finding in this cadaveric study is the dorsal metacarpal artery terminating at the confluence of common digital artery branching into digital arteries proper to the neighbouring digits in all the eight hands dissected. We undertake a critical review of the literature, highlighting the sequence of developments in the knowledge of relevant anatomy and various flap designs as distally based dorsal hand flaps since their first popular report in 1990. PMID:15380699

  2. Development of Facial Rejuvenation Procedures: Thirty Years of Clinical Experience with Face Lifts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Jun; Choi, Jun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Facial rejuvenation procedures can be roughly divided into face lift surgery and nonoperative, less invasive procedures, such as fat grafts, fillers, botulinum toxin injections, thread lifts, or laserbrasion. Face lift surgery or rhytidectomy is the procedure most directly associated with rejuvenation, due to its fundamental ability to restore the anatomical changes caused by aging. Various methods of face lift surgery have been developed over the last hundred years, thanks to advances in the understanding of facial anatomy and the mechanisms of aging, as well as the dedication of innovative surgeons. However, no generally applicable standard method exists, because the condition of each patient is different, and each operative method has advantages and disadvantages. Specific characteristics of the skin of Asians and their skeletal anatomy should be considered when determining the operative method to be used on Asian patients. Plastic surgeons should improve their ability to analyze the original aesthetic properties and problem areas of each patient, drawing on scientific knowledge about the aging process, and they should develop the skills necessary to perform various rejuvenative techniques. In the present article, we reviewed various face lift procedures and the current methods of modified double plane face lift, based on our clinical experience of over 30 years. PMID:26430622

  3. Initial clinical experience using the EchoNavigator®-system during structural heart disease interventions

    PubMed Central

    Balzer, Jan; Zeus, Tobias; Hellhammer, Katharina; Veulemans, Verena; Eschenhagen, Silke; Kehmeier, Eva; Meyer, Christian; Rassaf, Tienush; Kelm, Malte

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To present our initial clinical experience using this innovative software solution for guidance of percutaneous structural heart disease interventions. METHODS: Left atrial appendage, atrial septal defect and paravalvular leak closure, transaortic valve repair and MitraClip® procedures were performed in the catheter laboratory under fluoroscopic and echocardiographic guidance. The two-dimensional and three-dimensional images generated by the transesophageal echocardiography probe were interfaced with the fluoroscopic images in real-time using the EchoNavigator®-system. RESULTS: The application of the novel image fusion technology was safe and led to a better appreciation of multimodality imaging guidance due to improved visualization of the complex relationship between catheter devices and anatomical structures. CONCLUSION: The EchoNavigator®-system is a feasible and safe tool for guidance of interventional procedures in structural heart disease. This innovative technology may improve confidence of interventional cardiologists in targeting and positioning interventional devices in order to increase safety, accuracy, and efficacy of percutaneous interventions in the catheter laboratory. PMID:26413233

  4. Unsupervised biomedical named entity recognition: experiments with clinical and biological texts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaodian; Elhadad, Noémie

    2013-12-01

    Named entity recognition is a crucial component of biomedical natural language processing, enabling information extraction and ultimately reasoning over and knowledge discovery from text. Much progress has been made in the design of rule-based and supervised tools, but they are often genre and task dependent. As such, adapting them to different genres of text or identifying new types of entities requires major effort in re-annotation or rule development. In this paper, we propose an unsupervised approach to extracting named entities from biomedical text. We describe a stepwise solution to tackle the challenges of entity boundary detection and entity type classification without relying on any handcrafted rules, heuristics, or annotated data. A noun phrase chunker followed by a filter based on inverse document frequency extracts candidate entities from free text. Classification of candidate entities into categories of interest is carried out by leveraging principles from distributional semantics. Experiments show that our system, especially the entity classification step, yields competitive results on two popular biomedical datasets of clinical notes and biological literature, and outperforms a baseline dictionary match approach. Detailed error analysis provides a road map for future work. PMID:23954592

  5. Clinical and practical requirements of online software for anesthesia documentation an experience report.

    PubMed

    Benson, M; Junger, A; Quinzio, L; Fuchs, C; Sciuk, G; Michel, A; Marquardt, K; Hempelmann, G

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this paper is the presentation of a new version of the anesthesia documentation software, NarkoData, that has been used in routine clinical work in our department as part of an anesthesia information management system (AIMS) since 1995. The performance of this software is presented along with requirements for future development of such a system. The originally used version, NarkoData 3.0, is an online anesthesia documentation software established by the software company ProLogic GmbH. It was primarily developed as a disk-based system for the MacOS operating system (Apple Computer Inc.). Based on our routine experience with the system, a catalogue of requirements was developed that concentrated on improvement in the sequence of work, administration and data management. In 1996, the concepts developed in our department, in close co-operation with medical personnel and the software company, led to a considerable enlargement of the program functions and the subsequent release of a new version of NarkoData. Since 1997, more than 20 000 anesthesia procedures have been recorded annually with this new version at 115 decentralized work stations at our university hospital. PMID:10961571

  6. [Professor Li Shi-zhen's clinical experiences on compatibility application of hegu (LI 4)].

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan-qi

    2010-02-01

    The present paper introduces professor LI Shi-zhen's clinical experiences on compatibility application of Hegu (LI 4). Hegu (LI 4) is mostly used to treat acute pyreticosis, exterior syndrome of exogenous diseases, mind diseases and deficiency of vital energy. Acupuncture at this acupoint by using reducing method can dispel wind to relieve exterior syndrome, clear away heat to disperse lung. Powerful stimulation by needle can dredge stagnant meridian, open orifice to activate spirit. Acupuncture at this acupoint by using reinforcing method can invigorate qi to strengthen superficies and replenish qi to prevent collapse. Based on this method, reinforcing Zusanli (ST 36) and Baihui (GV 20) can strengthen middle energizer to nourish qi, which show the same benefits as Buzhong Yiqi Decoction; reinforcing Sanyinjiao (SP 6) can nourish both qi and blood, which show the same benefits as Decoction of Eight Ingredients; reducing Neiting (ST 44) can clear away evil heat of qifen in yangming meridians, which show the same benefits as Baihu Decoction. PMID:20214075

  7. Segmental composition of whole-body impedance cardiogram estimated by computer simulations and clinical experiments.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, P K; Kööbi, T; Hyttinen, J; Malmivuo, J

    2000-03-01

    Whole-body impedance cardiography (ICGWB) has been proposed as a feasible means of measuring cardiac output (CO). However, the source distribution of heart-related impedance variations in the whole body is not known. To establish how much of a signal originates in each segment of the body and what the contribution of each is to stroke volume (SV) in ICGWB, impedance in the extremities and trunk were investigated in 15 healthy volunteers. In addition, the theoretical measurement properties of ICGWB were studied using a computer model of the whole-body anatomy as a volume conductor. The model confirmed the expected result that most of the basal impedance originates from the extremities. Clinical experiments revealed that the heart-related amplitude variations in the ICGWB signal originate more evenly from various body segments, the trunk slightly more than the arms or legs. The heart-related ICGWB signal represents a weighted sum of segmental pulsatile events in the body yielding physiologically meaningful data on almost the whole circulatory system. PMID:10735977

  8. Recruitment of ethnic minorities into cancer clinical trials: experience from the front lines

    PubMed Central

    Symonds, R P; Lord, K; Mitchell, A J; Raghavan, D

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the world there are problems recruiting ethnic minority patients into cancer clinical trials. A major barrier to trial entry may be distrust of research and the medical system. This may be compounded by the regulatory framework governing research with an emphasis on written consent, closed questions and consent documentation, as well as fiscal issues. The Leicester UK experience is that trial accrual is better if British South Asian patients are approached by a senior doctor rather than someone of perceived lesser hierarchical status and a greater partnership between the hospital and General Practitioner may increase trial participation of this particular ethnic minority. In Los Angeles, USA, trial recruitment was improved by a greater utilisation of Hispanic staff and a Spanish language-based education programme. Involvement of community leaders is essential. While adhering to national, legal and ethnical standards, information sheets and consent, it helps if forms can be tailored towards the local ethnic minority population. Written translations are often of limited value in the recruitment of patients with no or limited knowledge of English. In some cultural settings, tape-recorded verbal consent (following approval presentations) may be an acceptable substitute for written consent, and appropriate legislative changes should be considered to facilitate this option. Approaches should be tailored to specific minority populations, taking consideration of their unique characteristics and with input from their community leadership. PMID:23011540

  9. Adult ADHD patient experiences of impairment, service provision and clinical management in England: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence of the unmet needs and experiences of adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in the published scientific literature. This study aimed to explore the experiences of adults in England with ADHD regarding access to diagnostic and treatment services, ADHD-related impairment and to compare experiences between patients diagnosed during adulthood and childhood. Methods In this qualitative study, 30 adults with ADHD were recruited through an ADHD charity (n = 17) and two hospital outpatient clinics for adults with ADHD in England (n = 13). Half of the participants were diagnosed with ADHD during childhood or adolescence and the remainder during adulthood. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and data was analysed using a thematic approach based on Grounded Theory principles. Results Analysis revealed five core themes: ‘An uphill struggle’: the challenge of accessing services, ‘Accumulated Psychosocial Burden and the Impact of ADHD’, ‘Weighing up Costs vs. Benefits of ADHD Pharmacological Treatment’, ‘Value of Non-pharmacological Treatment’ and ‘Barriers to Treatment Adherence’. Accessing services and the challenges associated with securing a definitive diagnosis of ADHD in adulthood was an ‘uphill struggle’, often due to sceptical and negative attitudes towards ADHD by healthcare professionals. ADHD-related impairment had an overwhelmingly chaotic impact on every aspect of patients’ lives and many felt ill equipped to cope. A persistent sense of failure and missed potential from living with the impact of ADHD impairment had led to an accumulated psychosocial burden, especially among those diagnosed from late adolescence onwards. In contrast, positive adjustment was facilitated by a younger age at diagnosis. Although medication was perceived as necessary in alleviating impairment, many felt strongly that by itself, it was inadequate. Additional support in the form of psychological therapies or psycho-education was strongly desired. However, few patients had access to non-pharmacological treatment. In some, medication use was often inadequately monitored with little or no follow-up by healthcare professionals, leading to poor adherence and a sense of abandonment from the healthcare system. Conclusion The findings suggest that the unmet needs of adults with ADHD are substantial and that there is a wide gap between policy and current practice in England. PMID:23692803

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): method and early clinical experiences in diseases of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Huk, W J; Gademann, G

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has undergone a rapid development which is still continuing. In this article a survey is given of the present status of this new diagnostic tool in the evaluation of diseases of the central nervous system. When atoms with uneven numbers of protons or neutrons in a homogeneous magnetic field are tilted against the main vector of this field by a radiofrequency pulse, nuclear magnetic resonance can be observed. During the relaxation of the little dipoles back to the direction of the underlying magnetic field, a resonance signal is generated. The superposition of variable field gradients enables the scanning of sectional images in the axial, frontal and sagittal plane. The variables of H+-magnetic resonance which can be utilized for imaging are: the proton density, the relaxation times T1 (spin-lattice) and T2 (spin-spin) and flow effects. While the proton density in organic tissue fluctuates only by some 10%, the relaxation times may vary by several hundred per cent. Tissue contrast, therefore, is mainly based on relaxation times differences. The image character can also be influenced by variations of imaging parameters (i.e. repetition rate, interpulse delay, read out or echo delay) in different imaging sequences, such as the spin-echo and the inversion recovery technique. Depending on these imaging parameters T1 and T2 will contribute to the signal to a varying degree. This fact is most important for the diagnostic information of MRI. In initial clinical experiences in the diagnosis of diseases of the central nervous system, MRI has demonstrated high sensitivity in the detection of lesions (such as oedema, neoplasms, demyelinating disease), but less significance in lesion discrimination. In spinal disease the direct sagittal imaging of MRI enables MRI-myelography without contrast medium, superior to conventional myelography in many cases. For detailed evaluation of disc disease, however, the spatial resolution still has to be improved. Promising results have been obtained from flow effects. Depending on the flow velocity of blood, vessels appear white with intensive signals (slow flow) or black due to low signal intensities (rapid flow). MRI-angiography including measurement of blood flow seems possible. MRI-contrast media are not yet available for routine clinical use. Promising results have been reported on the basis of rare-earth elements, such as gadolinium Gd3+. These substances decrease T1 and T2 with subsequent increase in signal intensity. Concerning harmful side-effects of MRI, three possible sources have to be considered: the static magnetic field, the changing magnetic field, and radiofrequency heating.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:6397697

  11. A meta-synthesis of behavioral outcomes from telemedicine clinical trials for type 2 diabetes and the Clinical User-Experience Evaluation (CUE).

    PubMed

    Jalil, Sakib; Myers, Trina; Atkinson, Ian

    2015-03-01

    A worldwide demographic shift is in progress and the aged population proportion is projected to more than double across the next four decades. Our current healthcare models may not be adequate to handle this shift in demography, which may have serious consequences for the ageing population who are more prone to chronic diseases. One proposed remediation is to provide in-home assisted healthcare with technology-intervened approaches. Telemedicine, telehealth, e-health are paradigms found in scientific literature that provide clinical treatment through a technology intervention. In evidence-based medical science, these technology interventions are evaluated through clinical trials, which are targeted to measure improvements in medical conditions and the treatment's cost effectiveness. However, effectiveness of a technology also depends on the interaction pattern between the technology and its' users, especially the patients. This paper presents (1) a meta-synthesis of clinical trials for technology-intervened treatments of type 2 diabetes and (2) the Clinical User-Experience Evaluation (CUE). CUE is a recommendation for future telemedicine clinical trials that focuses on the patient as the user from Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) perspective and was developed as part of this research. The clinical trials reviewed were interpreted from a technology perspective and the non-medical or non-biological improvements of the users (patients) rather than the medical outcome. Results show that technology-intervened treatments provide positive behavior changes among patients and are potentially highly beneficial for chronic illness management such as type 2 diabetes. The results from the CUE method show how it complements clinical trials to capture patients' interaction with a technology. PMID:25677954

  12. Diversity characteristics and the experiences of nursing students' during clinical placements: A qualitative study of students and supervisors views.

    PubMed

    Koch, Jane; Everett, Bronwyn; Phillips, Jane; Davidson, Patricia M

    2014-11-10

    Abstract Background: Little is known about which diversity characteristics if any, impact on nursing students' clinical placements or how these may affect the quality of their learning experiences. There is therefore a need to better understand these effects not only from the student's perspective but also from the perspective of the staff who supervise them, in order to ensure students obtain maximal benefit from their placements. Aim: To describe the clinical experiences of nursing students and the diversity characteristics that affect this learning experience. Methods: Data were collected from a series of open-ended questions embedded within a larger anonymous web-based survey, from August 2011 to March 2012. Participants included first, second and third year undergraduate Bachelor of Nursing students (N=704) and faculty members involved in the clinical learning environment (N = 165) from seven Australian universities. Findings: Qualitative findings were clustered into three main themes, differences, difficulty and discrimination, each with three subthemes. Conclusion: Findings suggest a need to offer appropriate support for nursing students who feel different because of diversity characteristics. Whilst some of the participant perceptions are confronting they provide valuable insights for universities developing curricula and the clinical placement facilities where students obtain their experience. PMID:25381798

  13. Events and Experiences Impacting the Development of Clinical Self Confidence: A Study of the First Year of Client Contact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bischoff, Richard J.; Barton, Marci; Thober, Jody; Hawley, Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Research was conducted to identify the events and experiences influencing the development of clinical self-confidence during the first year of client contact for beginning marriage and family therapists. Thirty-nine recent graduates of a master's degree training program participated in a semistructured interview in which they were asked to…

  14. Initial Image Quality and Clinical Experience with New CR Digital Mammography System: A Phantom and Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gaona, Enrique; Enriquez, Jesus Gabriel Franco; Alfonso, Beatriz Y. Alvarez; Castellanos, Gustavo Casian

    2008-08-11

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the first CR digital mammography system ( registered Konica-Minolta) in Mexico in clinical routine for cancer detection in a screening population and to determine if high resolution CR digital imaging is equivalent to state-of-the-art screen-film imaging. The mammograms were evaluated by two observers with cytological or histological confirmation for BIRADS 3, 4 and 5. Contrast, exposure and artifacts of the images were evaluated. Different details like skin, retromamillary space and parenchymal structures were judged. The detectability of microcalcifications and lesions were compared and correlated to histology. The difference in sensitivity of CR Mammography (CRM) and Screen Film Mammography (SFM) was not statistically significant. However, CRM had a significantly lower recall rate, and the lesion detection was equal or superior to conventional images. There is no significant difference in the number of microcalcifications and highly suspicious calcifications were equally detected on both film-screen and digital images. Different anatomical regions were better detectable in digital than in conventional mammography.

  15. Early initial clinical experience with intravitreal aflibercept for wet age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ferrone, Philip J; Anwar, Farihah; Naysan, Jonathan; Chaudhary, Khurram; Fastenberg, David; Graham, Kenneth; Deramo, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative process that leads to severe vision loss. Wet AMD is defined by choroidal neovascularisation, leading to the accumulation of subretinal fluid (SRF), macular oedema (ME), and pigment epithelium detachments (PED). Purpose To evaluate the initial clinical experience of conversion from bevacizumab or ranibizumab to aflibercept in wet AMD patients. Methods Records of 250 consecutive wet AMD patients were retrospectively reviewed. Of 250 patients, 29 were naive (with no previous treatment), and 221 were previously treated with bevacizumab (1/3) or ranibizumab (2/3). On average, converted patients received 14 injections every 6 weeks on a treat-and-extend regimen with Avastin or Lucentis before being converted to aflibercept every 7 weeks on average (no loading dose) for three doses. For the purposes of this study, we concentrated on the patients converted to aflibercept since the number of naive patients was too small to draw any conclusion from. Snellen (as logMar) visual acuities, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were compared predrug and postdrug conversion. Results Converted patients did not show a significant difference in visual acuity or average OCT thickness from preconversion values; however, small improvements in ME (p=0.0001), SRF (p=0.0001), and PED (p=0.008) grading were noted on average after conversion to aflibercept. Conclusions No significant difference in visual outcome or average OCT thickness was observed when switched from bevacizumab or ranibizumab q6 week to aflibercept 7-week dosing, on average. Mild anatomic improvements did occur in converted patients with regard to ME, SRF and PED improvement, on average, after conversion to aflibercept, and aflibercept was injected less frequently. No serious adverse reactions, including ocular infections or inflammation, as well as ocular and systemic effects were noted. PMID:24795335

  16. How can the research potential of the clinical quality databases be maximized? The Danish experience.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard, M; Johnsen, S P

    2016-02-01

    In Denmark, the need for monitoring of clinical quality and patient safety with feedback to the clinical, administrative and political systems has resulted in the establishment of a network of more than 60 publicly financed nationwide clinical quality databases. Although primarily devoted to monitoring and improving quality of care, the potential of these databases as data sources in clinical research is increasingly being recognized. In this review, we describe these databases focusing on their use as data sources for clinical research, including their strengths and weaknesses as well as future concerns and opportunities. The research potential of the clinical quality databases is substantial but has so far only been explored to a limited extent. Efforts related to technical, legal and financial challenges are needed in order to take full advantage of this potential. PMID:26785952

  17. Developing Regulatory-compliant Electronic Case Report Forms for Clinical Trials: Experience with The Demand Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ene-Iordache, Bogdan; Carminati, Sergio; Antiga, Luca; Rubis, Nadia; Ruggenenti, Piero; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Remuzzi, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The use of electronic case report forms (CRF) to gather data in randomized clinical trials has grown to progressively replace paper-based forms. Computerized form designs must ensure the same data quality expected of paper CRF, by following Good Clinical Practice rules. Electronic data capture (EDC) tools must also comply with applicable statutory and regulatory requirements. Here the authors focus on the development of computerized systems for clinical trials implementing FDA and EU recommendations and regulations, and describe a laptop-based electronic CRF used in a randomized, multicenter clinical trial. PMID:19261946

  18. Validation for clinical use of, and initial clinical experience with, a novel approach to population-based carrier screening using high-throughput, next-generation DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hallam, Stephanie; Nelson, Heather; Greger, Valerie; Perreault-Micale, Cynthia; Davie, Jocelyn; Faulkner, Nicole; Neitzel, Dana; Casey, Kristie; Umbarger, Mark A; Chennagiri, Niru; Kramer, Alexander C; Porreca, Gregory J; Kennedy, Caleb J

    2014-03-01

    Traditional carrier screening assays are designed to look for only the most common mutations within a gene owing to cost considerations. Although this can yield high detection rates in specific populations for specific genes (such as cystic fibrosis in Caucasians), they are suboptimal for other ethnicities or for patients of mixed or unknown ethnic background. Next-generation DNA sequencing provides an opportunity to provide carrier screening using more comprehensive mutation panels that are limited primarily by information about the clinical impact of detected sequence changes. We describe a next-generation DNA sequencing-based assay capable of reliably screening patient samples in a timely and comprehensive manner. The analytic accuracy in a research setting has been documented. Here, we describe the additional studies performed to ensure the accuracy (analytic validity) and robustness of our assay for use in clinical practice and provide data from our experience offering this testing. Our clinical experience using this approach to screen 11,691 in vitro fertilization patients has identified 449 mutant alleles: 447 in carriers and 2 in an affected individual. In total, we found 87 distinct mutations in 14 different genes. Approximately one quarter of the mutations found are not included in traditional, limited, mutation panels, including 16 known mutations unique to our panel, and novel truncating mutations in several genes. PMID:24374108

  19. Supportive relationship: Experiences of Iranian students and teachers concerning student-teacher relationship in clinical nursing education

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Abbas; Yaghoubinia, Fariba; Roudsari, Robab Latifnejad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Student-teacher relationship is a salient issue in nursing education and has long-lasting implication in professional development of nursing students. Nowadays, this relationship in clinical settings is different from the past due to changing in nursing education paradigm. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of students and teachers about student-teacher relationship in the context of clinical nursing education in Iran. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study that has been carried out adopting conventional qualitative content analysis approach, six bachelor nursing students and six clinical teachers in school of Nursing and Midwifery, were selected through purposive sampling. Semi-structured interview and participant observation were used for data collection. Interviews transcribed verbatim and analyzed using conventional content analysis through the process of data reduction and condensation, coding and also generating the categories and themes. Results: Results of the study showed the existence of a type of relationship in clinical education in which supportive actions of clinical teachers were prominent. These supportive actions appeared as three major categories including educational support, emotional support and social support which emerged from data. Conclusion: The results of this study explicit the ways that support could be provided for students in their relationship with clinical teachers. It also determines the teachers’ need to know more about the influence of their supportive relationship on students’ learning and the best possible outcomes of their education in clinical settings. PMID:24554945

  20. Addendum to material selection guidelines for geothermal energy-utilization systems. Part I. Extension of the field experience data base. Part II. Proceedings of the geothermal engineering and materials (GEM) program conference (San Diego, CA, 6-8 October 1982)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.S.; Ellis, P.F. II

    1983-05-01

    The extension of the field experience data base includes the following: key corrosive species, updated field experiences, corrosion of secondary loop components or geothermal binary power plants, and suitability of conventional water-source heat pump evaporator materials for geothermal heat pump service. Twenty-four conference papers are included. Three were abstracted previously for EDB. Separate abstracts were prepared for twenty-one. (MHR)

  1. Experiences of clinical tutors with English as an additional language (EAL) students.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongyan; Maithus, Caroline

    2012-11-01

    Clinical tutors, referred to in the international literature as clinical supervisors, facilitators, mentors or instructors, are responsible for providing and supervising workplace learning opportunities for groups of Bachelor of Nursing (BN) students. They also play a key role in assessing students. The role modeling and support provided by both clinical tutors and registered nurses (RN) or nurse preceptors helps students become familiar with the language in which nursing work is realised. As BN student cohorts in New Zealand have become more diverse in terms of cultures, ethnicities and language backgrounds, clinical tutors have to directly facilitate the development of context-specific and client-focused communication skills for students who speak English as an additional language. We undertook a study which looked at the perceptions of new nursing graduates with English as an additional language (EAL) on the development of spoken language skills for the clinical workplace. As well as interviewing graduates, we spoke to four clinical tutors in order to elicit their views on the language development of EAL students in previous cohorts. This article reports on the themes which emerged from the interviews with the tutors. These include goal setting for communication, integrating students into nursing work, making assessment less stressful, and endorsing independent learning strategies. Based on their observations and on other published research we make some suggestions about ways both clinical tutors and EAL students within their teaching groups could be supported in the development of communication skills for clinical practice. PMID:23421011

  2. Nursing Students' Perceptions of Satisfaction and Self-Confidence with Clinical Simulation Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omer, Tagwa

    2016-01-01

    Nursing and other health professionals are increasingly using simulation as a strategy and a tool for teaching and learning at all levels that need clinical training. Nursing education for decades used simulation as an integral part of nursing education. Recent studies indicated that simulation improves nursing knowledge, clinical practice,…

  3. Tendinopathies and platelet-rich plasma (PRP): from pre-clinical experiments to therapeutic use

    PubMed Central

    Kaux, Jean-François; Drion, Pierre; Croisier, Jean-Louis; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The restorative properties of platelets, through the local release of growth factors, are used in various medical areas. This article reviews fundamental and clinical research relating to platelet-rich plasma applied to tendinous lesions. Materials and method: Articles in French and English, published between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2014. dealing with PRP and tendons were searched for using the Medline and Scopus data bases. Results: Forty-seven articles were identified which addressed pre-clinical and clinical studies: 27 relating to in vitro and in vivo animal studies and 20 relating to human studies. Of these, five addressed lateral epicondylitis, two addressed rotator cuff tendinopathies, ten dealt with patellar tendinopathies and three looked at Achilles tendinopathies. Conclusions: The majority of pre-clinical studies show that PRP stimulates the tendon’s healing process. However, clinical series remain more controversial and level 1, controlled, randomised studies are still needed. PMID:26195890

  4. A methodology for mining clinical data: experiences from TRANSFoRm project.

    PubMed

    Danger, Roxana; Corrigan, Derek; Soler, Jean K; Kazienko, Przemyslaw; Kajdanowicz, Tomasz; Majeed, Azeem; Curcin, Vasa

    2015-01-01

    Data mining of electronic health records (eHRs) allows us to identify patterns of patient data that characterize diseases and their progress and learn best practices for treatment and diagnosis. Clinical Prediction Rules (CPRs) are a form of clinical evidence that quantifies the contribution of different clinical data to a particular clinical outcome and help clinicians to decide the diagnosis, prognosis or therapeutic conduct for any given patient. The TRANSFoRm diagnostic support system (DSS) is based on the construction of an ontological repository of CPRs for diagnosis prediction in which clinical evidence is expressed using a unified vocabulary. This paper explains the proposed methodology for constructing this CPR repository, addressing algorithms and quality measures for filtering relevant rules. Some preliminary application results are also presented. PMID:25991107

  5. Learning pathways during clinical placement of physiotherapy students: a Malaysian experience of using learning contracts and reflective diaries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Learning contracts and reflective diaries are educational tools that have been recently introduced to physiotherapy students from Malaysia during clinical education. It is unclear how students perceive the experience of using a learning contract and reflective diary. This study explores the learning pathways of the students after using a learning contract and a reflective diary for the first time in their clinical placement. Methods: A total of 26 final-year physiotherapy students completed a learning contract and a reflective diary during clinical placements. Two researchers explored the data qualitatively by the thematic content analysis method using NVivo. Results: A total of four and six main learning themes were identified from the data of the students through a learning contract and reflective diary. Conclusion: These learning themes reflected the views of the students about what they have considered to be important learning pathways during their clinical placements. They give valuable insights into the experiences and opinions of students during their clinical education process, which should be useful for enhancing teaching and learning methods in physiotherapy education. PMID:23997897

  6. A Comparison of Students' Clinical Experience in Family Medicine and Traditional Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkerson, George R., Jr.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Experience on the traditional internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, and psychiatry clerkships was compared with the experience on a family medicine clerkship. The family medicine clerkship offered the most experience with circulatory, respiratory, digestive, neurological, musculoskeletal, and skin problems and with…

  7. A Comparison of Students' Clinical Experience in Family Medicine and Traditional Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkerson, George R., Jr.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Experience on the traditional internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, and psychiatry clerkships was compared with the experience on a family medicine clerkship. The family medicine clerkship offered the most experience with circulatory, respiratory, digestive, neurological, musculoskeletal, and skin problems and with…

  8. Experience-Based Quality Control of Clinical Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Kevin L.; Brame, R. Scott; Low, Daniel A.; Mutic, Sasa

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To incorporate a quality control tool, according to previous planning experience and patient-specific anatomic information, into the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan generation process and to determine whether the tool improved treatment plan quality. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 42 IMRT plans demonstrated a correlation between the fraction of organs at risk (OARs) overlapping the planning target volume and the mean dose. This yielded a model, predicted dose = prescription dose (0.2 + 0.8 [1 - exp(-3 overlapping planning target volume/volume of OAR)]), that predicted the achievable mean doses according to the planning target volume overlap/volume of OAR and the prescription dose. The model was incorporated into the planning process by way of a user-executable script that reported the predicted dose for any OAR. The script was introduced to clinicians engaged in IMRT planning and deployed thereafter. The script's effect was evaluated by tracking {delta} = (mean dose-predicted dose)/predicted dose, the fraction by which the mean dose exceeded the model. Results: All OARs under investigation (rectum and bladder in prostate cancer; parotid glands, esophagus, and larynx in head-and-neck cancer) exhibited both smaller {delta} and reduced variability after script implementation. These effects were substantial for the parotid glands, for which the previous {delta} = 0.28 {+-} 0.24 was reduced to {delta} = 0.13 {+-} 0.10. The clinical relevance was most evident in the subset of cases in which the parotid glands were potentially salvageable (predicted dose <30 Gy). Before script implementation, an average of 30.1 Gy was delivered to the salvageable cases, with an average predicted dose of 20.3 Gy. After implementation, an average of 18.7 Gy was delivered to salvageable cases, with an average predicted dose of 17.2 Gy. In the prostate cases, the rectum model excess was reduced from {delta} = 0.28 {+-} 0.20 to {delta} = 0.07 {+-} 0.15. On surveying dosimetrists at the end of the study, most reported that the script both improved their IMRT planning (8 of 10) and increased their efficiency (6 of 10). Conclusions: This tool proved successful in increasing normal tissue sparing and reducing interclinician variability, providing effective quality control of the IMRT plan development process.

  9. Strategic infarcts in vascular dementia. A clinical and brain imaging experience.

    PubMed

    Tatemichi, T K; Desmond, D W; Prohovnik, I

    1995-03-01

    The mechanisms of dementia resulting from small deep infarctions are incompletely understood. The thesis underlying the concept of "multi-infarct dementia" is that multiple lesions have a synergistic effect on mental functions, resulting in dementia irrespective of specific location or volume. In this report, we summarize our experience with six patients reported previously along with additional patients examined subsequently, whose clinical features and brain imaging findings allow an alternative formulation for dementia resulting from lacunar stroke. The six initial patients presented with an abrupt change in behavior after acute infarction involving the inferior genu of the internal capsule documented by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The acute syndrome featured fluctuating alertness, inattention, memory loss, apathy, abulia, and psychomotor retardation suggesting frontal lobe dysfunction. Contralateral hemiparesis and dysarthria were generally mild, except when the infarct extended into the posterior limb. Neuropsychological testing in five patients with left-sided infarcts revealed severe verbal memory loss. Additional cognitive deficits consistent with dementia were evident in four patients. A right-sided infarct caused transient impairment in visuospatial memory. Functional brain imaging in three patients using 133xenon regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed focal reduction in hemispheric perfusion most prominent in the ipsilateral inferior and medial frontal cortex. Perfusion was also defective in the medial and laterial temporal cortex. Important pathways of the limbic system traverse the inferior capsule in the region of the genu. Corticothalamic and thalamocortical fibers form the thalamic peduncles which detach from the internal capsule and enter the thalamus at its rostral and caudal poles and along its dorsal surface. The anterior thalamic peduncle, conveys reciprocal connections between the dorsomedial nucleus and the cingulate gyrus, as well as the prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex. The inferior thalamic peduncle carries fibers which connect the thalamus with orbitofrontal, insular, and temporal cortex, as well as the amygdala via the ansa peduncularis to the ventral amygdalofugal pathway. Thus, damage to one or both white-matter tracts may occur with infarctions in the region of the inferior genu, causing striking frontal behavioral effects and memory loss in our patients associated with functional deactivation of the ipsilateral frontal and temporal cortex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7763329

  10. Initial clinical experience with a radiation oncology dedicated open 1.0T MR-simulation.

    PubMed

    Glide-Hurst, Carri K; Wen, Ning; Hearshen, David; Kim, Joshua; Pantelic, Milan; Zhao, Bo; Mancell, Tina; Levin, Kenneth; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J; Siddiqui, M Salim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe our experience with 1.0T MR-SIM including characterization, quality assurance (QA) program, and features necessary for treatment planning. Staffing, safety, and patient screening procedures were developed. Utilization of an external laser positioning system (ELPS) and MR-compatible couchtop were illustrated. Spatial and volumetric analyses were conducted between CT-SIM and MR-SIM using a stereotactic QA phantom with known landmarks and volumes. Magnetic field inhomogeneity was determined using phase difference analysis. System-related, in-plane distortion was evaluated and temporal changes were assessed. 3D distortion was characterized for regions of interest (ROIs) 5-20 cm away from isocenter. American College of Radiology (ACR) recommended tests and impact of ELPS on image quality were analyzed. Combined ultrashort echotime Dixon (UTE/Dixon) sequence was evaluated. Amplitude-triggered 4D MRI was implemented using a motion phantom (2-10 phases, ~ 2 cm excursion, 3-5 s periods) and a liver cancer patient. Duty cycle, acquisition time, and excursion were evaluated between maximum intensity projection (MIP) datasets. Less than 2% difference from expected was obtained between CT-SIM and MR-SIM volumes, with a mean distance of < 0.2 mm between landmarks. Magnetic field inhomogeneity was < 2 ppm. 2D distortion was < 2 mm over 28.6-33.6 mm of isocenter. Within 5 cm radius of isocenter, mean 3D geometric distortion was 0.59 ± 0.32 mm (maximum = 1.65 mm) and increased 10-15 cm from isocenter (mean = 1.57 ± 1.06 mm, maximum = 6.26 mm). ELPS interference was within the operating frequency of the scanner and was characterized by line patterns and a reduction in signal-to-noise ratio (4.6-12.6% for TE = 50-150 ms). Image quality checks were within ACR recommendations. UTE/Dixon sequences yielded detectability between bone and air. For 4D MRI, faster breathing periods had higher duty cycles than slow (50.4% (3 s) and 39.4% (5 s), p < 0.001) and ~fourfold acquisition time increase was measured for ten-phase versus two-phase. Superior-inferior object extent was underestimated 8% (6 mm) for two-phase as compared to ten-phase MIPs, although < 2% difference was obtained for ? 4 phases. 4D MRI for a patient demonstrated acceptable image quality in ~ 7 min. MR-SIM was integrated into our workflow and QA procedures were developed. Clinical applicability was demonstrated for 4D MRI and UTE imaging to support MR-SIM for single modality treatment planning. PMID:26103190

  11. The relationship between different types of dissociation and psychosis-like experiences in a non-clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Humpston, Clara S; Walsh, Eamonn; Oakley, David A; Mehta, Mitul A; Bell, Vaughan; Deeley, Quinton

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated whether detachment-type dissociation, compartmentalisation-type dissociation or absorption was most strongly associated with psychosis-like experiences in the general population. Healthy participants (N=215) were tested with the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES, for detachment-related dissociative experiences); the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility (HGSHS: A, for dissociative compartmentalisation); the Tellegen Absorption Scale (TAS, for non-clinical 'functional' dissociative experience); and two measures of psychotic-like experiences, the 21-item Peters et al. Delusions Inventory (PDI-21) and the Cardiff Anomalous Perceptions Scale (CAPS). In multiple regression analyses, DES and TAS but not HGSHS: A scores were found to be significantly associated with PDI-21 and CAPS overall scores. A post hoc hierarchical cluster analysis checking for cluster overlap between DES and CAPS items, and the TAS and CAPS items showed no overlap between items on the DES and CAPS and minimal overlap between TAS and CAPS items, suggesting the scales measure statistically distinct phenomena. These results show that detachment-type dissociation and absorption, but not compartmentalisation-type dissociation are significantly associated with psychosis-like experiences in a non-clinical population. PMID:26896781

  12. Quality assurance of research protocols conducted in the community: The National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network Experience

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Carmen; Campbell, Aimee; Kleppinger, Cynthia; Sampson, Royce; Tyson, Clare; Mamay-Gentilin, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Background: Quality assurance (QA) of clinical trials is essential to protect the welfare of trial participants and the integrity of the data collected. However, there is little detailed information available on specific procedures and outcomes of QA monitoring for clinical trials. Purpose: This article describes the experience of the National Institute on Drug Abuse's (NIDA) National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) in devising and implementing a three-tiered QA model for rigorous multi-site randomized clinical trials implemented in community-based substance abuse treatment programs. The CTN QA model combined local and national resources and was developed to address the unique needs of clinical trial sites with limited research experience. Methods: The authors reviewed internal records maintained by the sponsor, a coordinating site (Lead Nodes), and a local site detailing procedural development, training sessions, protocol violation monitoring, and site visit reporting. Results: Between January 2001 and September 2005, the CTN implemented 21 protocols, of which 18 were randomized clinical trials, one was a quality improvement study and two were surveys. Approximately 160 community-based treatment programs participated in the 19 studies that were monitored, with a total of 6560 participants randomized across the sites. During this time 1937 QA site visits were reported across the three tiers of monitoring and the cost depended on the location of the sites and the salaries of the staff involved. One study reported 109 protocol violations (M = 15.6). Examples are presented to highlight training, protocol violation monitoring, site visit frequency and intensity and cost considerations. Limitations: QA data from the entire network were not easily available for review as much of the data were not electronically accessible. The authors reviewed and discussed a representative sample of internal data from the studies and participating sites. Conclusions: The lessons learned from the CTN's experience include the need for balancing thoroughness with efficiency, monitoring early, assessing research staff abilities in order to judge the need for proactive, focused attention, providing targeted training sessions, and developing flexible tools. The CTN model can work for sponsors overseeing studies at sites with limited research experience that require more frequent, in-depth monitoring. We recommend that sponsors not develop a rigid monitoring approach, but work with the study principal investigators to determine the intensity of monitoring needed depending on trial complexity, the risks of the intervention(s), and the experience of the staff with clinical research. After careful evaluation, sponsors should then determine the best approach to site monitoring and what resources will be needed. PMID:19342468

  13. Sociodemographic, Socio-economic, Clinical and Behavioural Factors Modifying Experience and Prevalence of Dental Caries in the Permanent Dentition

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, MS; Medina-Solis, CE; Islas-Granillo, H; Lara-Carrillo, E; Scougall-Vilchis, RJ; Escoffié-Ramírez, M; la Rosa-Santillana, R De; Avila-Burgos, L

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To identify the sociodemographic, socio-economic, clinical and behavioural factors that modify the experience of decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) and caries prevalence in Nicaraguan children 9-12 years old. Subjects and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study in 800 school children 9-12 years old in the city of León, Nicaragua. The clinical oral examinations to identify caries experience were undertaken by two trained and certified examiners. Sociodemographic, socio-economic and behavioural data were collected using questionnaires. Negative binomial regression (NBR) and binary logistic regression (BLR) models were used to model caries experience and caries prevalence, respectively. Results: Mean DMFT index was 0.98 ± 1.74 and caries prevalence (DMFT > 0) was 37.9%. In the NBR model, the categories that increase the expected DMFT mean were: older age, female gender, presence of plaque, and if the school children received curative and curative/preventive dental care in the last year. In the BLR model, the odds of presenting with caries in the permanent dentition were increased in older children, those from large families, mothers with a positive dental attitude, and those school children who received curative and curative/preventive dental care in the last year. Conclusions: Using different models, we identified several sociodemographic, socio-economic, clinical and behavioural factors that modify the experience (NBR) and prevalence (BLR) of dental caries. PMID:25867561

  14. More Accurate Definition of Clinical Target Volume Based on the Measurement of Microscopic Extensions of the Primary Tumor Toward the Uterus Body in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Ib-IIa Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Wen-Jia; Wu, Xiao; Xue, Ren-Liang; Lin, Xiang-Ying; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; Yan, Shu-Mei; Zhang, Yao-Hong; Zhai, Tian-Tian; Lu, Jia-Yang; Wu, Li-Li; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Hai-Hua; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Li, De-Rui; Xie, Liang-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To more accurately define clinical target volume for cervical cancer radiation treatment planning by evaluating tumor microscopic extension toward the uterus body (METU) in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter study, surgical resection specimens from 318 cases of stage Ib-IIa SCCC that underwent radical hysterectomy were included. Patients who had undergone preoperative chemotherapy, radiation, or both were excluded from this study. Microscopic extension of primary tumor toward the uterus body was measured. The association between other pathologic factors and METU was analyzed. Results: Microscopic extension toward the uterus body was not common, with only 12.3% of patients (39 of 318) demonstrating METU. The mean (±SD) distance of METU was 0.32 ± 1.079 mm (range, 0-10 mm). Lymphovascular space invasion was associated with METU distance and occurrence rate. A margin of 5 mm added to gross tumor would adequately cover 99.4% and 99% of the METU in the whole group and in patients with lymphovascular space invasion, respectively. Conclusion: According to our analysis of 318 SCCC specimens for METU, using a 5-mm gross tumor volume to clinical target volume margin in the direction of the uterus should be adequate for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa SCCC. Considering the discrepancy between imaging and pathologic methods in determining gross tumor volume extent, we recommend a safer 10-mm margin in the uterine direction as the standard for clinical practice when using MRI for contouring tumor volume.

  15. Long-term safety and efficacy of dalfampridine for walking impairment in patients with multiple sclerosis: Results of open-label extensions of two Phase 3 clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Andrew D; Bethoux, Francois; Brown, Theodore R; Schapiro, Randall T; Cohen, Ron; Marinucci, Lawrence N; Henney, Herbert R

    2015-01-01

    Background: In Phase 3 double-blind trials (MS-F203 and MS-F204), dalfampridine extended release tablets 10 mg twice daily (dalfampridine-ER; prolonged-release fampridine in Europe; fampridine modified or sustained release elsewhere) improved walking speed relative to placebo in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Objectives: Evaluation of long-term safety and efficacy of dalfampridine-ER in open-label extensions (MS-F203EXT, MS-F204EXT). Methods: Patients received dalfampridine-ER 10 mg twice daily; and had Timed 25-Foot Walk (T25FW) assessments at 2, 14 and 26 weeks, and then every 6 months. Subjects were categorized as dalfampridine-ER responders or non-responders, based on their treatment response in the double-blind parent trials that assessed T25FW. Results: We had 269 patients enter MS-F203EXT and 154 patients complete it; for a maximum exposure of 5 years. We had 214 patients enter MS-F204EXT and 146 complete it; for a maximum exposure of 3.3 years. No new safety signals emerged and dalfampridine-ER tolerability was consistent with the double-blind phase. Improvements in walking speed were lost after dalfampridine-ER was discontinued in the parent trial, but returned by the 2-week assessment after re-initiation of the drug. Throughout the extensions, mean improvement in walking speed declined, but remained improved, among the double-blind responders as compared with non-responders. Conclusions: The dalfamipridine-ER safety profile was consistent with the parent trials. Although walking speed decreased over time, dalfampridine-ER responders continued to show improved walking speed, which was sustained compared with non-responders. PMID:25583832

  16. The use of a new hybrid stentgraft for the repair of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysms with the frozen elephant trunk method - first Polish experiences.

    PubMed

    Zembala, Micha?; Kraso?, Marcin; Hrapkowicz, Tomasz; Przybylski, Roman; Filipiak, Krzysztof; Borowicz, Marcin; Niklewski, Tomasz; G?owacki, Jan; Wolny, Tomasz; Nadziakiewicz, Pawe?; Walas, Ryszard; Zembala, Marian

    2014-09-01

    The frozen elephant trunk (FET) technique is a modification of the traditional elephant trunk method, which was introduced by Borst in 1983 in order to treat extensive thoracic aortic aneurysms. The crux of the new method is the different type of aortic prosthesis, consisting of a Dacron part (with or without branches leading to the arterial vessels which exit the aortic arch) and a port for extracorporeal circulation with a self-expanding nitinol stentgraft. This combination enables a complete one-stage treatment of the pathologies within the arch and the proximal segment of the descending aorta; moreover, it facilitates the performance of a two-stage hybrid treatment of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysms involving a significant part of the descending aorta. This article presents the cases of four patients with extensive aortic disease, who were implanted with Thoraflex prostheses (Vascutek, Scotland). PMID:26335241

  17. Skill Learning Through Early Clinical Exposure: An Experience of Indian Medical School

    PubMed Central

    Jagzape, Arunita; Srivastava, Tripti; Gotarkar, Shashank

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Indian Medical curriculum being discipline based, there is a line of demarcation between preclinical and clinical subjects. The challenges in medical education include the methods that would enhance the clinical education quality; one such method been Early Clinical Exposure (ECE). ECE can help to instill the skill component of medical education in the first year students helping to minimize the line of demarcation. Hence this study was undertaken to assess the skill learning of students through early clinical exposure and to collate the perception of them. Materials and Methods: In the present study, students of 1st MBBS were exposed to ECE as an adjunct teaching method with preset modules. They were evaluated by Objectively Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Feedback was obtained from 1st MBBS and also from the same students after passing the 1st MBBS in 4th semester. Results Significant differences in pre and post OSCE scores were noted (p<0.0001). Seventy six percent students rated ECE as an excellent tool. Second year students also perceived ECE held in 1st year was helpful to correlate topics and increasing confidence. Conclusion ECE had an effective influence on learning as manifested in skills gained by the students and their perceptions of ECE being helpful prospectively in their routine clinical posting. PMID:26894088

  18. Expectations and experiences of investigators and parents involved in a clinical trial for Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Peay, Holly L; Tibben, Aad; Fisher, Tyler; Brenna, Ethan; Biesecker, Barbara B

    2014-01-01

    Background The social context of rare disease research is changing, with increased community engagement around drug development and clinical trials. This engagement may benefit patients and families, but may also lead to heightened trial expectations and therapeutic misconception. Clinical investigators are also susceptible to harboring high expectations. Little is known about parental motivations and expectations for clinical trials for rare pediatric disorders. Purpose We describe the experience of parents and clinical investigators involved in a phase II clinical trial for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy: their expectations, hopes, motivations, and reactions to the termination of the trial. Methods This qualitative study was based on interviews with clinical investigators and parents of sons with DBMD who participated in the phase IIa or IIb ataluren clinical trial in the United States. Interviews were transcribed and coded for thematic analysis. Results Participants were twelve parents of affected boys receiving active drug and nine clinical investigators. High trial expectations of direct benefit were reported by parents and many clinicians. Investigators described monitoring and managing parents’ expectations; several worried about their own involvement in increasing parents’ expectations. Most parents were able to differentiate their expectations from their optimistic hopes for a cure. Parents’ expectations arose from other parents, advocacy organizations, and the sponsor. All parents reported some degree of clinical benefit to their children. Secondary benefits were hopefulness and powerful feelings associated with active efforts to affect the disease course. Parents and clinical investigators reported strong, close relationships that were mutually important. Parents and clinicians felt valued by the sponsor for the majority of the trial. When the trial abruptly stopped, they described loss of engagement, distress, and feeling unprepared for the possibility of trial termination. Limitations This was a retrospective study of one clinical trial. We were unable to recruit participants whose children received placebo. The interviews occurred during a time of significant uncertainty and distress for many of the participants. Conclusions This pilot study reflects complex outcomes of strong community engagement. The findings highlight a need for renewed education about, and support for, clinical trial termination and loss of drug access. The primary positive outcome was demonstration of strong relationships among committed parents and study teams. These relationships were highly valued by both parties, and may suggest an ideal intervention opportunity for efforts to improve psychological wellbeing. A negative outcome attributed, in part, to community engagement was inappropriately high trial expectations. More optimistically, high expectations were attributed, in part, to the importance of hope and powerful feelings associated with active efforts to affect the disease course. PMID:24311736

  19. Crossing over: The lived experiences of clinical laboratory science education teachers as they transition from traditional to online instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldkamp, Ruth B.

    A phenomenological study was undertaken to understand and describe the nature and meaning of the live experiences of faculty transition from traditional to teaching online clinical laboratory science courses. In order to gain insight into the lived experiences of faculty, in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 faculty members. The task of the researcher was to allow the participants to speak for themselves, and reveal the meaning of the experiences, rather than to discover causal connections or patterns of correlation. The key criterion in choosing purposeful sampling procedure was to obtain the deepest understanding possible of the lived experiences of faculty transitioning to online teaching, which were likely to be a rich source of the data of interest. Analyses of the interview text were based on three essential considerations. The three essential considerations were (a) the traditional role of the faculty, (b) factors affecting the changing role of the faculty, and (c) the effects of web-based technology on teaching role.

  20. Holmium:YAG laser coronary angioplasty: quantitative angiography and clinical results in a large experience of a single medical center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, On; Luxenberg, Michael; Schumacher, Audrey

    1994-07-01

    Clinical experience with the mid IR holmium:YAG laser in a single medical center (St. Paul Ramsey Medical Center, University of Minnesota Medical School, St. Paul, MN) includes 112 patients who underwent holmium laser coronary angioplasty. Utilizing a unique lasing technique; `pulse and retreat,' we applied this laser to thrombotic and nonthrombotic lesions in patients presenting with unstable angina, stable angina, and acute myocardial infarction. A very high clinical success and very low complication rates were achieved. Holmium:YAG laser is effective and safe therapy for patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease. Unlike excimer lasers, the clinical success, efficacy and safety of holmium laser angioplasty is not compromised when thrombus is present.

  1. Experience with DICOM for the clinical specialties in the healthcare enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmak, Peter M.; Dayhoff, Ruth E.

    2003-05-01

    DICOM is a success for radiology and cardiology and it is now beginning to be used for other clinical specialties. The US Department of Veterans Affairs has been instrumental in promoting this technological advancement. We have worked with a number of non-radiology imaging vendors over the past several years, encouraging them to support DICOM, providing requirement specifications, validating their implementations, installing their products, and integrating their systems with the VA healthcare enterprise. We require each new non-radiology vendor to support the DICOM Modality Worklist and Storage services, as specified in the IHE Technical Framework, and insist that they perform validation testing with us over the Internet before installing at a VA site. Three years ago we began working with commercial DICOM image acquisition applications in ophthalmology and endoscopy. Today we are interfacing with six vendors in ophthalmology, six in dental, and two in endoscopy. Getting imaging modality vendors to support DICOM is only part of the story, however. We have also developed the capabilities of the VistA hospital information system to properly handle DICOM interfaces to the different clinical specialties. The workflow in the clinical specialties is different than that of radiology, and is much more diverse. We designed the VistA DICOM image acquisition and display interface to use the generic order entry, result entry, result reporting, and appointment scheduling applications of our hospital information system, which are common to other hospital information systems, in order to maintain existing clinical workflow, minimize operational disruptions, simplify training, and win user acceptance. This software is now being field tested with dental and ophthalmology systems at a large number of VA medical centers. We have learned several things from this field test. The DICOM Modality Worklist and Storage services can be successfully used for image acquisition in the clinical specialties, although the specifications for some of the clinical specialty image types need to be enhanced. Special consideration needs to be given to the healthcare provider workflow in order to support DICOM requirements and to minimize change. The clinical specialties handle a large number of different kinds of requests, and imaging procedures may comprise only a small subset, which may need to be isolated out for efficient operation of DICOM Modality Worklist. The clinical specialties will acquire a large volume of images. Our goal is to incorporate all of the patient"s data into the electronic medical record and DICOM is making this easier for everyone. The work involved in extending DICOM to the clinical specialties and integrating them with the hospital information systems continues to be an ongoing and worthwhile challenge.

  2. Best Practice Irrigation Management and Extension in Peri-Urban Landscapes--Experiences and Insights from the Hawkesbury-Nepean Catchment, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maheshwari, B. L.; Plunkett, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this article to examine key irrigation management issues and their implications for future research and extension developments. Design/Methodology/Approach: Peri-urban landscapes are important as they supply fresh fruit, vegetables, turf, ornamental plants and other farm products to the cities. In this study, the…

  3. Best Practice Irrigation Management and Extension in Peri-Urban Landscapes--Experiences and Insights from the Hawkesbury-Nepean Catchment, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maheshwari, B. L.; Plunkett, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this article to examine key irrigation management issues and their implications for future research and extension developments. Design/Methodology/Approach: Peri-urban landscapes are important as they supply fresh fruit, vegetables, turf, ornamental plants and other farm products to the cities. In this study, the…

  4. Early diagnosis of breast cancer: experience in a consultant breast clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, L. J.; Bird, B. L.; Cooke, G. M.; Ball, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    Of 2839 women referred to a consultant breast clinic for clinical, mammographic and thermographic examination, 480 underwent biopsy and 126 were found to have cancer. Ten percent of the tumours were occult and were classified as very early biologic disease; they were identified by routine mammography in women whose breasts were clinically normal. Biopsy of solid mass lesions non-suspicious on mammography identified 20% of the cancers; half these lesions, classified as early biologic disease, were discovered by doctors at routine annual clinical breast examination, though the earliest cancers were detected by women who were confident and competent in monthly self-examination of the breasts. Biopsy of solid mass lesions suspicious on mammography identified 70% of the cancers; these were classified as late biologic disease. Skin or nipple dimpling or retraction was evident in two thirds of the patients; their lesions seemed to be later biologically than the lesions of the patients without clinical signs, and 75% had discovered the lesions themselves accidentally. PMID:861862

  5. Monitoring Students' Clinical Experiences during a Third-Year Family Medicine Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowlowitz, Vicki; And Others

    1996-01-01

    In a documentation system designed to monitor medical student progress in clerkships at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, students completed an optical scan card for each patient seen, eliciting information on the patient and the experience. Results highlight students' lack of certain experiences and allow comparison of student…

  6. The Effects of Early Clinical Teaching Experiences on Pre-Service Teachers' Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Androzzi, Jared

    2011-01-01

    In-service teachers are often lack sufficient teaching experience (Block et al., 2010) that leads to being psychologically unprepared to confront many challenges in teaching. Providing ample experiences for Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) students in a pedagogical setting parallel to that which they will one day teach (Kirk &…

  7. The experience of an objective, structured clinical examination at Kaohsiung Medical University.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kun-Tai; Liu, Wei-Ting; Yen, Jeng-Hsien; Liu, Ching-Kuan; Liu, Keh-Min; Lai, Chung-Sheng

    2008-12-01

    The objective, structured clinical examination (OSCE) is a method to assess clinical competency based on objective testing, through direct observation in a formal setting. The Kaohsiung Medical University (KMU) has pioneered OSCEs in Taiwan. In KMU, three groups of examinees---medical students in years 3 and 4, medical students in years 5 and 6, and medical students in year 7---were assessed using different OSCEs. Each OSCE was set up using the following five steps: (1) create cases; (2) decide on the items or clinical skills to be evaluated; (3) train standardized patients; (4) run the OSCE and (5) review videos to improve the curriculum. We expect that KMU will become the premier OSCE center in Taiwan. PMID:19251556

  8. Establishing a clinical trials network in nephrology: experience of the Australasian Kidney Trials Network

    PubMed Central

    Morrish, Alicia T; Hawley, Carmel M; Johnson, David W; Badve, Sunil V; Perkovic, Vlado; Reidlinger, Donna M; Cass, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major public health problem globally. Despite this, there are fewer high-quality, high-impact clinical trials in nephrology than other internal medicine specialties, which has led to large gaps in evidence. To address this deficiency, the Australasian Kidney Trials Network, a Collaborative Research Group, was formed in 2005. Since then, the Network has provided infrastructure and expertise to conduct patient-focused high-quality, investigator-initiated clinical trials in nephrology. The Network has not only been successful in engaging the nephrology community in Australia and New Zealand but also in forming collaborations with leading researchers from other countries. This article describes the establishment, development, and functions of the Network. The article also discusses the current and future funding strategies to ensure uninterrupted conduct of much needed clinical trials in nephrology to improve the outcomes of patients affected by kidney diseases with cost-effective interventions. PMID:24088955

  9. Hearing new voices: registered nurses and health technicians experience caring for chronic pain patients in primary care clinics.

    PubMed

    Pellico, Linda H; Gilliam, Wesley P; Lee, Allison W; Kerns, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Recent national estimates from the U.S. reveal that as many as one-third of all Americans experience chronic pain resulting in high prevalence rates of visits to primary care clinics (PCC). Indeed, chronic pain appears to be an emerging global health problem. Research has largely ignored the perspective of PCC staff other than physicians in providing care for patients with chronic pain. We wanted to gain insights from the experiences of Registered Nurses (RNs) and Health Technicians (HTs) who care for this patient population. Krippendorff's method for content analysis was used to analyze comments written in an open-ended survey from fifty-seven primary care clinic staff (RNs-N=27 and HTs-N=30) respondents. This represented an overall response rate of 75%. Five themes emerged related to the experience of RNs and HTs caring for patients with chronic pain: 1) Primacy of Medications and Accompanying Clinical Quandaries; 2) System Barriers; 3) Dealing with Failure; 4) Primacy of Patient Centered Care; and 5) Importance of Team Based Care. This study demonstrates that nursing staff provide patient-centered care, recognize the importance of their role within an interdisciplinary team and can offer valuable insight about the care of patients with chronic pain. This study provides insight into strategies that can mitigate barriers to chronic pain management while sustaining those aspects that RNs and HTs view as essential for improving patient care for this vulnerable population in PCCs. PMID:25246996

  10. Hearing New Voices: Registered Nurses and Health Technicians Experience Caring for Chronic Pain Patients in Primary Care Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Pellico, Linda H.; Gilliam, Wesley P.; Lee, Allison W.; Kerns, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent national estimates from the U.S. reveal that as many as one-third of all Americans experience chronic pain resulting in high prevalence rates of visits to primary care clinics (PCC). Indeed, chronic pain appears to be an emerging global health problem. Research has largely ignored the perspective of PCC staff other than physicians in providing care for patients with chronic pain. We wanted to gain insights from the experiences of Registered Nurses (RNs) and Health Technicians (HTs) who care for this patient population. Krippendorff’s method for content analysis was used to analyze comments written in an open-ended survey from fifty-seven primary care clinic staff (RNs-N=27 and HTs-N=30) respondents. This represented an overall response rate of 75%. Five themes emerged related to the experience of RNs and HTs caring for patients with chronic pain: 1) Primacy of Medications and Accompanying Clinical Quandaries; 2) System Barriers; 3) Dealing with Failure; 4) Primacy of Patient Centered Care; and 5) Importance of Team Based Care. This study demonstrates that nursing staff provide patient-centered care, recognize the importance of their role within an interdisciplinary team and can offer valuable insight about the care of patients with chronic pain. This study provides insight into strategies that can mitigate barriers to chronic pain management while sustaining those aspects that RNs and HTs view as essential for improving patient care for this vulnerable population in PCCs. PMID:25246996

  11. Experience and challenges from clinical trials with malaria vaccines in Africa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Malaria vaccines are considered amongst the most important modalities for potential elimination of malaria disease and transmission. Research and development in this field has been an area of intense effort by many groups over the last few decades. Despite this, there is currently no licensed malaria vaccine. Researchers, clinical trialists and vaccine developers have been working on many approached to make malaria vaccine available. African research institutions have developed and demonstrated a great capacity to undertake clinical trials in accordance to the International Conference on Harmonization-Good Clinical Practice (ICH-GCP) standards in the last decade; particularly in the field of malaria vaccines and anti-malarial drugs. This capacity is a result of networking among African scientists in collaboration with other partners; this has traversed both clinical trials and malaria control programmes as part of the Global Malaria Action Plan (GMAP). GMAP outlined and support global strategies toward the elimination and eradication of malaria in many areas, translating in reduction in public health burden, especially for African children. In the sub-Saharan region the capacity to undertake more clinical trials remains small in comparison to the actual need. However, sustainability of the already developed capacity is essential and crucial for the evaluation of different interventions and diagnostic tools/strategies for other diseases like TB, HIV, neglected tropical diseases and non-communicable diseases. There is urgent need for innovative mechanisms for the sustainability and expansion of the capacity in clinical trials in sub-Saharan Africa as the catalyst for health improvement and maintained. PMID:23496910

  12. Using Mobile Technologies to Access Evidence-Based Resources: A Rural Health Clinic Experience.

    PubMed

    Carter-Templeton, Heather D; Wu, Lin

    2015-09-01

    This study describes the feasibility and usability of a mobile device and selected electronic evidence-based information programs used to support clinical decision making in a rural health clinic. The study focused on nurses' perceptions on when they needed more information, where they sought information, what made them feel comfortable about the information they found, and rules and guidelines they used to determine if the information should be used in patient care. ATLAS.ti, the qualitative analysis software, was used to assist with qualitative data analysis and management. PMID:26333613

  13. Preclinical and Clinical Experience with Dasatinib in Philadelphia Chromosome-Negative Leukemias and Myeloid Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Verstovsek, Srdan

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the molecular characterization of Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph?) leukemias and related myeloid disorders have provided a clear rationale for investigating novel targeted therapies. Dasatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor with activity against BCR-ABL, platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGFRs), c- KIT, fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs), SRC family kinases (SFKs), and EPHA receptors, all of which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Ph? leukemias and myeloid disorders. This review presents emerging data on the preclinical and clinical activity of dasatinib in these diseases, which suggest that larger clinical studies are warranted. PMID:19013641

  14. Rheumatologic manifestations of human parvovirus B19 infection in adults. Initial two-year clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Naides, S J; Scharosch, L L; Foto, F; Howard, E J

    1990-09-01

    During 1987 and 1988, we identified 9 adults at the Medical and Rheumatology Services of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics who had a clinical diagnosis of fifth disease; 8 of the 9 had symptoms of joint involvement. Another 12 adults with serologic positivity for anti-parvovirus B19 IgM antibody presented with polyarthralgia/polyarthritis. Patients were usually found to be seronegative for rheumatoid factor, and none developed nodules or erosive disease. Many patients with chronic disease met criteria for a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. A diagnosis of parvovirus B19 infection should be considered during the initial visit of patients with polyarthralgia/polyarthritis. PMID:2169746

  15. Teachers' Perceptions of Their Mentoring Role in Three Different Clinical Settings: Student Teaching, Early Field Experiences, and Entry Year Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gut, Dianne M.; Beam, Pamela C.; Henning, John E.; Cochran, Deborah C.; Knight, Rhonda Talford

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the differences in mentoring across three different clinical settings: student teaching, early field experiences, and entry year teachers. Eighteen teachers with mentoring experience in all three clinical settings were selected and interviewed. The teachers' expectations for teacher development,…

  16. Robotic hand with modular extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Salisbury, Curt Michael; Quigley, Morgan

    2015-01-20

    A robotic device is described herein. The robotic device includes a frame that comprises a plurality of receiving regions that are configured to receive a respective plurality of modular robotic extensions. The modular robotic extensions are removably attachable to the frame at the respective receiving regions by way of respective mechanical fuses. Each mechanical fuse is configured to trip when a respective modular robotic extension experiences a predefined load condition, such that the respective modular robotic extension detaches from the frame when the load condition is met.

  17. Long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole in patients taking low-dose aspirin with a history of peptic ulcers: a phase 2/3, randomized, parallel-group, multicenter, extension clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Kato, Mototsugu; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Watanabe, Toshio; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Sugisaki, Nobuyuki; Okada, Yasushi; Ogawa, Hisao; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2015-05-01

    A 24-week, double-blind, clinical trial of rabeprazole for the prevention of recurrent peptic ulcers caused by low-dose aspirin (LDA) has been reported, but trials for longer than 24 weeks have not been reported. The aim of this study is to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole for preventing peptic ulcer recurrence on LDA therapy. Eligible patients had a history of peptic ulcers on long-term LDA (81 or 100 mg/day) therapy. Patients with no recurrence of peptic ulcers at the end of the 24-week double-blind phase with rabeprazole (10- or 5-mg once daily) or teprenone (50 mg three times daily) entered the extension phase. Rabeprazole doses were maintained for a maximum of 76 weeks, including the double-blind 24-week period and the extension phase period (long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). Teprenone was randomly switched to rabeprazole 10 or 5 mg for a maximum of 52 weeks in the extension phase (newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). The full analysis set consisted of 151 and 150 subjects in the long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups, respectively, and the cumulative recurrence rates of peptic ulcers were 2.2 and 3.7%, respectively. Recurrent peptic ulcers were not observed in the newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups. No bleeding ulcers were reported. No clinically significant safety findings, including cardiovascular events, emerged. The use of long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg once daily prevents the recurrence of peptic ulcers in subjects on low-dose aspirin therapy, and both were well-tolerated. PMID:26060354

  18. Long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole in patients taking low-dose aspirin with a history of peptic ulcers: a phase 2/3, randomized, parallel-group, multicenter, extension clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Kato, Mototsugu; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Watanabe, Toshio; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Sugisaki, Nobuyuki; Okada, Yasushi; Ogawa, Hisao; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2015-01-01

    A 24-week, double-blind, clinical trial of rabeprazole for the prevention of recurrent peptic ulcers caused by low-dose aspirin (LDA) has been reported, but trials for longer than 24 weeks have not been reported. The aim of this study is to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole for preventing peptic ulcer recurrence on LDA therapy. Eligible patients had a history of peptic ulcers on long-term LDA (81 or 100 mg/day) therapy. Patients with no recurrence of peptic ulcers at the end of the 24-week double-blind phase with rabeprazole (10- or 5-mg once daily) or teprenone (50 mg three times daily) entered the extension phase. Rabeprazole doses were maintained for a maximum of 76 weeks, including the double-blind 24-week period and the extension phase period (long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). Teprenone was randomly switched to rabeprazole 10 or 5 mg for a maximum of 52 weeks in the extension phase (newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). The full analysis set consisted of 151 and 150 subjects in the long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups, respectively, and the cumulative recurrence rates of peptic ulcers were 2.2 and 3.7%, respectively. Recurrent peptic ulcers were not observed in the newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups. No bleeding ulcers were reported. No clinically significant safety findings, including cardiovascular events, emerged. The use of long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg once daily prevents the recurrence of peptic ulcers in subjects on low-dose aspirin therapy, and both were well-tolerated. PMID:26060354

  19. Erythromelalgia? A Clinical Study of People Who Experience Red, Hot, Painful Feet in the Community

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, D.; Chen, T.; Tarr, G.; van Rij, A.

    2013-01-01

    We recruited a population of people who clinically suffer from the symptoms of erythromelalgia, red, hot, painful feet made worse by heat and improved by cooling, to better characterise this population and measure their quality of life (QOL). Ninety-two individuals completed the QOL surveys, and 56 individuals were clinically assessed. There was a 3?:?1 ratio of females to males with an average age of 61 years. The estimated prevalence of people who had clinical symptoms of erythromelalgia in the Dunedin community was 15/100,000. Only 27% of people had received a diagnosis for their symptoms despite seeking medical attention. People in the study population had worse quality of life than the general New Zealand population (P < 0.001). In the majority of participants symptoms had a mild-moderate effect on their quality of life. The results of this study indicate that the number of people who have clinical symptoms of erythromelalgia is much greater than is commonly accepted and that the majority of these individuals go unrecognised by the medical profession despite seeking help. They have significantly diminished QOL with the majority of people having mild-to-moderate symptoms. PMID:23762561

  20. University-School Partnerships for Clinical Experiences: Design, Implementation, Assessment, and Data Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sivakumaran, Thillainatarajan; Holland, Glenda; Clark, Leonard; Heyning, Katharina; Wishart, William; Flowers-Gibson, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    University teacher education programs establish partnerships with P-12 schools, in part to place their teacher education candidates in a learning environment that allows candidates to work with a diverse population of learners. The purpose of this study was to examine three universities in regard to the partnerships utilized for field and clinical…

  1. Live births following Karyomapping of human blastocysts: experience from clinical application of the method.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, Michalis; Prates, Renata; Goodall, N-Neka; Fischer, Jill; Tecson, Victoria; Lemma, Tsion; Chu, Bo; Jordan, Amy; Armenti, Erin; Wells, Dagan; Munné, Santiago

    2015-09-01

    The clinical application of a new, widely applicable method known as Karyomapping to carry out a total of 55 clinical cases of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for single gene disorders is reported. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing was carried out in parallel to the new method for all cases. Clinical application of Karyomapping in this study resulted in three live births and nine clinical pregnancies out of 20 cases with a transfer. All in all, results presented in this study indicate that Karyomapping is a highly efficient, accurate and robust method for PGD of single gene disorders. Karyomapping can offer a more comprehensive assessment of the region of interest than conventional PCR analysis, allowing for more embryos to receive diagnosis (99.6% versus 96.8%), whereas its wide applicability reduces substantially the time that patients have to wait before starting their in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle. Nonetheless, inclusion of elements of conventional PCR methodology, such as direct mutation detection, may be required in cases in which the gene of interest is in a region with reduced single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) coverage (e.g. telomeric regions), when offering PGD for consanguineous couples, or in cases where no samples from additional family members are available. PMID:26206283

  2. Experience report: a multivendor ultrasounds mini-PACs--engineering and clinical issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horii, Steven C.; Coleman, Beverly; Mezrich, Reuben S.; Feingold, Eric R.; Nisenbaum, Harvey; Arger, Peter H.; Langer, Jill; Rowling, Susan; Jacobs, Jill; Black, Mark H.; Daniels, James, II

    1997-05-01

    The authors have been operating an ultrasound miniPACS for approximately two years. In the last six months, the system was more than doubled in size with inclusion of a teleradiology component and connection to PACS hardware from other vendors. This paper presents the engineering, operational, and clinical challenges posed by this integration and the logistical and systems approaches to meeting those challenges.

  3. Ziprasidone: from pharmacology to the clinical practice. One year of experience.

    PubMed

    Baca, E; Azanza, J R; Giner, J; Saiz-Ruiz, J; Vallejo, J; Diez, T; Madrigal, M

    2005-01-01

    More than a year after the marketing of the atypical anti-psychotic ziprasidone, data from research studies and clinical practice have provided a fair amount of useful information for its practical use in the treatment of schizophrenia. Its pharmacodynamical characteristics and the results from clinical trials with a flexible dose seem to justify the need to administer doses in a range higher than what was initially foreseen, with an initial minimum of 120 mg per day and a fast titulation up to 160 mg per day. Such doses make it possible to achieve sufficient plasma concentrations to occupy at least 60 % of the D2 receptors from which the anti-psychotic effect derives. Moreover, its anti-depressive activity and its non-sedative profile have been confirmed, with a favorable effect on attention and other cognitive functions of the patient, according to its high affinity for 5HT1A and D1 receptors and the inhibition of serotonin and noradrenaline re-uptake. Finally, the low affinity of this drug for alpha-adrenergic, histaminergic and muscarinic receptors favors a good tolerability profile, with a neutral effect on weight, and a lack of anti-cholinergic effects. Results from different clinical trials show that the use of doses in the higher range is associated to a faster and more pronounced clinical improvement without adding a higher risk of adverse events. PMID:16155814

  4. Korean Speech-Language Pathologists' Attitudes toward Stuttering According to Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kyungjae

    2014-01-01

    Background: Negative attitudes toward stuttering and people who stutter (PWS) are found in various groups of people in many regions. However the results of previous studies examining the influence of fluency coursework and clinical certification on the attitudes of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) toward PWS are equivocal. Furthermore, there…

  5. The Process Approach to Clinical Pharmacy Orientation--Four Years' Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moleski, Ronald J.; Snodgrass, Gary L.

    1979-01-01

    The process approach is an effective method of teaching clinical pharmacy clerkship orientation, the major advantage of which is increased student participation based on improved early identification of predetermined learning outcomes. The primary disadvantage is the difficulty of implementation. A lesson plan is appended. (MLW)

  6. Dementia in Urban Black Outpatients: Initial Experience at the Emory Satellite Clinics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auchus, Alexander P.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the demographic features and clinical diagnoses in a sample of 58 demented urban black outpatients. Results indicate that probable Alzheimer's disease was the most common cause of dementia whereas probable vascular dementia was uncommon. A multiple etiology dementia was identified in more than one-third of the patients. (RJM)

  7. Experiences in Rural Mental Health. V: Creating Alternatives to Clinical Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollister, William G.; And Others

    Based on a North Carolina feasibility study (1967-73) which focused on development of a pattern for providing comprehensive mental health services to rural people, this guide deals with the process of creating alternatives to clinical care in Vance and Franklin counties. Specifically, this booklet details the chronological development of the…

  8. Experiences with developing and implementing a virtual clinic for glaucoma care in an NHS setting

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, Aachal; Baldwin, Alex; Brookes, John; Foster, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Background This article describes the development of a virtual glaucoma clinic, whereby technicians collect information for remote review by a consultant specialist. Design and Methods This was a hospital-based service evaluation study. Patients suitable for the stable monitoring service (SMS) were low-risk patients with “suspect”, “early”-to-“moderate” glaucoma who were deemed stable by their consultant care team. Three technicians and one health care assistant ran the service. Patients underwent tests in a streamlined manner in a dedicated clinical facility, with virtual review of data by a consultant specialist through an electronic patient record. Main outcome measure Feasibility of developing a novel service within a UK National Health Service setting and improvement of patient journey time within the service were studied. Results Challenges to implementation of virtual clinic include staffing issues and use of information technology. Patient journey time within the SMS averaged 51 minutes, compared with 92 minutes in the glaucoma outpatient department. Patient satisfaction with the new service was high. Conclusion Implementing innovation into existing services of the National Health Service is challenging. However, the virtual clinic showed an improved patient journey time compared with that experienced within the general glaucoma outpatient department. There exists a discrepancy between patient management decisions of reviewers, suggesting that some may be more risk averse than others when managing patients seen within this model. Future work will assess the ability to detect progression of disease in this model compared with the general outpatient model of care. PMID:26508830

  9. Experiences in Rural Mental Health. V: Creating Alternatives to Clinical Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollister, William G.; And Others

    Based on a North Carolina feasibility study (1967-73) which focused on development of a pattern for providing comprehensive mental health services to rural people, this guide deals with the process of creating alternatives to clinical care in Vance and Franklin counties. Specifically, this booklet details the chronological development of the…

  10. Clinical features and treatment of lactational mastitis: the experience from a binational study.

    PubMed

    Iatrakis, G; Zervoudis, S; Ceausu, I; Peitsidis, P; Tomara, I; Bakalianou, K; Hudita, D

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of 38 patients with mastitis are listed in this study, including nationality, age, parity, history of mastitis, clinical and laboratory findings, and medical treatment. Differential diagnosis was mainly correlated to breast engorgement. Mastitis was primarily related to staphylococcus aureus and it was more common in primiparous patients. PMID:23971258

  11. Teaching Advanced Psychopathology: A Method that Promotes Basic Undergraduate Clinical and Research Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balsis, Steve; Eaton, Nicholas R.; Zona, Denise Martin; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

    2006-01-01

    Students in advanced psychopathology courses can learn key concepts by administering semistructured interviews designed to identify specific mental disorders. Such an active learning approach potentially can help students gain fundamental knowledge about psychopathology and begin to develop clinical and research skills. To explore the value of…

  12. The Clinical Learning Environment: Improving the Education Experience and Patient Outcomes Within Magnet® Organizations.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Creating a safe and supportive clinical learning environment where students can learn collaboratively with each other and with practicing healthcare providers is the responsibility of Magnet® leaders. In this month's Magnet Perspectives, the Vice President of the ANCC Accreditation Program and Institute for Credentialing Research discusses the imperative for interprofessional learning environments. PMID:26641464

  13. Korean Speech-Language Pathologists' Attitudes toward Stuttering According to Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kyungjae

    2014-01-01

    Background: Negative attitudes toward stuttering and people who stutter (PWS) are found in various groups of people in many regions. However the results of previous studies examining the influence of fluency coursework and clinical certification on the attitudes of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) toward PWS are equivocal. Furthermore, there…

  14. Development of a new, completely implantable intraventricular pressure meter and preliminary report of its clinical experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osaka, K.; Murata, T.; Okamoto, S.; Ohta, T.; Ozaki, T.; Maeda, T.; Mori, K.; Handa, H.; Matsumoto, S.; Sakaguchi, I.

    1982-01-01

    A completely implantable intracranial pressure sensor designed for long-term measurement of intraventricular pressure in hydrocephalic patients is described. The measurement principal of the device is discussed along with the electronic and component structure and sources of instrument error. Clinical tests of this implanted pressure device involving both humans and animals showed it to be comparable to other methods of intracranial pressure measurement.

  15. Cardiac 123I-MIBG Imaging for Clinical Decision Making: 22-Year Experience in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Nakata, Tomoaki

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac neuroimaging with (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) has been officially used in clinical practice in Japan since 1992. The nuclear cardiology guidelines of the Japanese Circulation Society, revised in 2010, recommended cardiac (123)I-MIBG imaging for the management of heart failure (HF) patients, particularly for the assessment of HF severity and prognosis of HF patients. Consensus in North American and European countries regarding incorporation into clinical practice, however, has not been established yet. This article summarizes 22 y of clinical applications in Japan of (123)I-MIBG imaging in the field of cardiology; these applications are reflected in cardiology guidelines, including recent methodologic advances. A standardized cardiac (123)I-MIBG parameter, the heart-to-mediastinum ratio (HMR), is the basis for clinical decision making and enables common use of parameters beyond differences in institutions and studies. Several clinical studies unanimously demonstrated its potent independent roles in prognosis evaluation and risk stratification irrespective of HF etiologies. An HMR of less than 1.6-1.8 and an accelerated washout rate are recognized as high-risk indicators of pump failure death, sudden cardiac death, and fatal arrhythmias and have independent and incremental prognostic values together with known clinical variables, such as left ventricular ejection fraction and brain natriuretic peptide. Another possible use of this imaging technique is the selection of therapeutic strategy, such as pharmacologic treatment and nonpharmacologic treatment with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization device; however, this possibility remains to be investigated. Recent multiple-cohort database analyses definitively demonstrated that patients who were at low risk for lethal events and who were defined by an HMR of greater than 2.0 on (123)I-MIBG studies had a good long-term prognosis. Future investigations of cardiac (123)I-MIBG imaging will contribute to better risk stratification of low-risk and high-risk populations, to the establishment of cost-effective use of this imaging technique for the management of HF patients, and to worldwide acceptance of this imaging technique in clinical cardiology practice. PMID:26033897

  16. Clinical, socio-demographic and psychological characteristics in individuals with persistent psychotic experiences with and without a "need for care".

    PubMed

    Peters, Emmanuelle; Ward, Thomas; Jackson, Mike; Morgan, Craig; Charalambides, Monica; McGuire, Philip; Woodruff, Peter; Jacobsen, Pamela; Chadwick, Paul; Garety, Philippa A

    2016-02-01

    Individuals reporting persistent psychotic experiences (PEs) in the general population, but without a "need for care", are a unique group of particular importance in identifying risk and protective factors for psychosis. We compared people with persistent PEs and no "need for care" (non-clinical, N=92) with patients diagnosed with a psychotic disorder (clinical, N=84) and controls without PEs (N=83), in terms of their phenomenological, socio-demographic and psychological features. The 259 participants were recruited from one urban and one rural area in the UK, as part of the UNIQUE (Unusual Experiences Enquiry) study. Results showed that the non-clinical group experienced hallucinations in all modalities as well as first-rank symptoms, with an earlier age of onset than in the clinical group. Somatic/tactile hallucinations were more frequent than in the clinical group, while commenting and conversing voices were rare. Participants in the non-clinical group were differentiated from their clinical counterparts by being less paranoid and deluded, apart from ideas of reference, and having fewer cognitive difficulties and negative symptoms. Unlike the clinical group, they were characterized neither by low psychosocial functioning nor by social adversity. However, childhood trauma featured in both groups. They were similar to the controls in psychological characteristics: they did not report current emotional problems, had intact self-esteem, displayed healthy schemas about the self and others, showed high life satisfaction and well-being, and high mindfulness. These findings support biopsychosocial models postulating that environmental and psychological factors interact with biological processes in the aetiology of psychosis. While some PEs may be more malign than others, lower levels of social and environmental adversity, combined with protective factors such as intact IQ, spirituality, and psychological and emotional well-being, may reduce the likelihood of persistent PEs leading to pathological outcomes. Future research should focus on protective factors and determinants of well-being in the context of PEs, rather than exclusively on risk factors and biomarkers of disease states. PMID:26833608

  17. Determination of the unmetabolised (18)F-FDG fraction by using an extension of simplified kinetic analysis method: clinical evaluation in paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Barbolosi, Dominique; Hapdey, Sebastien; Battini, Stephanie; Faivre, Christian; Mancini, Julien; Pacak, Karel; Farman-Ara, Bardia; Taïeb, David

    2016-01-01

    Tumours with high (18)F-FDG uptake values on static late PET images do not always exhibit high proliferation indices. These discrepancies might be related to high proportion of unmetabolised (18)F-FDG components in the tissues. We propose a method that enables to calculate different (18)F-FDG kinetic parameters based on a new mathematical approach that integrates a measurement error model. Six patients with diagnosed non-metastatic paragangliomas (PGLs) and six control patients with different types of lesions were investigated in this pilot study using (18)F-FDG PET/CT. In all cases, a whole-body acquisition was followed by four static acquisitions centred over the target lesions, associated with venous blood samplings. We used an extension of the Hunter's method to calculate the net influx rate constant (K H). The exact net influx rate constant and vascular volume fraction (K i and V, respectively) were subsequently obtained by the method of least squares. Next, we calculated the mean percentages of metabolised (PM) and unmetabolised (PUM) (18)F-FDG components, and the times required to reach 80 % of the amount of metabolised (18)F-FDG (T80%). A test-retest evaluation indicated that the repeatability of our approach was accurate; the coefficients of variation were below 2 % regardless of the kinetic parameters considered. We observed that the PGLs were characterised by high dispersions of the maximum standardised uptake value SUVmax (9.7 ± 11, coefficient of variation CV = 114 %), K i (0.0137 ± 0.0119, CV = 87 %), and V (0.292 ± 0.306, CV = 105 %) values. The PGLs were associated with higher PUM (p = 0.02) and T80% (p = 0.02) values and lower k 3 (p = 0.02) values compared to the malignant lesions despite the similar SUVmax values (p = 0.55). The estimations of these new kinetic parameters are more accurate than SUVmax or K i for in vivo metabolic assessment of PGLs at the molecular level. PMID:26044552

  18. [Experiences and recommendations of the German Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) concerning clinical investigation of medical devices and the evaluation of serious adverse events (SAE)].

    PubMed

    Renisch, B; Lauer, W

    2014-12-01

    An integral part of the conformity assessment process for medical devices is a clinical evaluation based on clinical data. Particularly in the case of implantable devices and products of risk class III clinical trials must be performed. Since March 2010 applications for the authorization of clinical trials as well as for the waiver of the authorization requirement must be submitted centrally in Germany to the appropriate federal authority, the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) or the Paul Ehrlich Institute (PEI). In addition to authorization, approval by the responsible ethics committee is also required under law in order to begin clinical testing of medical devices in Germany. In this paper, the legal framework for the clinical testing of medical devices as well as those involved and possible procedures including evaluation criteria for the initial application of a trial and subsequent amendments are presented in detail. In addition, the reporting requirements for serious adverse events (SAEs) are explained and possible consequences of the evaluation are presented. Finally, a summary of application and registration numbers for all areas of extensive experience of the BfArM as well as requests and guidance for applicants are presented. PMID:25376539

  19. Clinical experience with OM-85 BV in upper and lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Derenne, J P; Delclaux, B

    1992-01-01

    The preventive effect of OM-85 BV on recurrent ENT and respiratory tract infections has been documented in a series of clinical trials. This article reviews the more significant controlled clinical trials investigating the efficacy and safety of OM-85 BV in airway infections. The literature reviewed covers all age groups. In summary, the administration of OM-85 BV was associated with a decrease in the number of acute exacerbations, with an increase in the number of patients remaining free from infections and with a decrease in antibiotic consumption. These results indicate the efficacy of oral immunostimulation with the bacterial extract OM-85 BV in all age groups and demonstrate its protective effect against recurrent airway infections. PMID:1439237

  20. [Clinically controlled experiment on frequency of secondary caries in amalgam and mold fillings].

    PubMed

    Jahn, K R; Hansche, C; Zuhrt, R

    1989-04-01

    The purpose of the present controlled clinical study was to assess and compare the secondary caries rate of amalgam fillings and castings, respectively. 154 pairs of fillings (class I and II) were included in the trial and the time of observation was two years. The fillings were made under equal clinical conditions particularly with regard of dentist's care. The secondary caries rate of the amalgam fillings was 20.1% and of the castings 18.2%, respectively. The difference was not significant (chi-square-test). The reason of that is probably the similar care of the manufacturing of fillings. Therefore the authors recommend amalgam fillings for the restoration of class I and II cavities. PMID:2696150