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Sample records for extensive protein fractionation

  1. Whey protein fractionation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrated whey protein products from cheese whey, such as whey protein concentrate (WPC) and whey protein isolate (WPI), contain more than seven different types of proteins: alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA), beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), bovine serum albumin (BSA), immunoglobulins (Igs), lactoferrin ...

  2. Two endogenous proteins that induce cell wall extension in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQueen-Mason, S.; Durachko, D. M.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Plant cell enlargement is regulated by wall relaxation and yielding, which is thought to be catalyzed by elusive "wall-loosening" enzymes. By employing a reconstitution approach, we found that a crude protein extract from the cell walls of growing cucumber seedlings possessed the ability to induce the extension of isolated cell walls. This activity was restricted to the growing region of the stem and could induce the extension of isolated cell walls from various dicot stems and the leaves of amaryllidaceous monocots, but was less effective on grass coleoptile walls. Endogenous and reconstituted wall extension activities showed similar sensitivities to pH, metal ions, thiol reducing agents, proteases, and boiling in methanol or water. Sequential HPLC fractionation of the active wall extract revealed two proteins with molecular masses of 29 and 30 kD associated with the activity. Each protein, by itself, could induce wall extension without detectable hydrolytic breakdown of the wall. These proteins appear to mediate "acid growth" responses of isolated walls and may catalyze plant cell wall extension by a novel biochemical mechanism.

  3. An Extensive Analysis of Preservice Elementary Teachers' Knowledge of Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Kristie Jones

    2008-01-01

    The study of preservice elementary teachers' knowledge of fractions is important because fractions are notoriously difficult to learn and teach. Unfortunately, studies of preservice teachers' fraction knowledge are limited and have focused primarily on division. The present study included all four operations to provide a more comprehensive…

  4. 21 CFR 862.1630 - Protein (fractionation) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Protein (fractionation) test system. 862.1630... Systems § 862.1630 Protein (fractionation) test system. (a) Identification. A protein (fractionation) test system is a device intended to measure protein fractions in blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and...

  5. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section 640...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  6. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  7. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  8. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  9. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  10. Contribution of protein fractionation to depth of analysis of the serum and plasma proteomes.

    PubMed

    Faca, Vitor; Pitteri, Sharon J; Newcomb, Lisa; Glukhova, Veronika; Phanstiel, Doug; Krasnoselsky, Alexei; Zhang, Qing; Struthers, Jason; Wang, Hong; Eng, Jimmy; Fitzgibbon, Matt; McIntosh, Martin; Hanash, Samir

    2007-09-01

    In-depth analysis of the serum and plasma proteomes by mass spectrometry is challenged by the vast dynamic range of protein abundance and substantial complexity. There is merit in reducing complexity through fractionation to facilitate mass spectrometry analysis of low-abundance proteins. However, fractionation reduces throughput and has the potential of diluting individual proteins or inducing their loss. Here, we have investigated the contribution of extensive fractionation of intact proteins to depth of analysis. Pooled serum depleted of abundant proteins was fractionated by an orthogonal two-dimensional system consisting of anion-exchange and reversed-phase chromatography. The resulting protein fractions were aliquotted; one aliquot was analyzed by shotgun LC-MS/MS, and another was further resolved into protein bands in a third dimension using SDS-PAGE. Individual gel bands were excised and subjected to in situ digestion and mass spectrometry. We demonstrate that increased fractionation results in increased depth of analysis based on total number of proteins identified in serum and based on representation in individual fractions of specific proteins identified in gel bands following a third-dimension SDS gel analysis. An intact protein analysis system (IPAS) based on a two-dimensional plasma fractionation schema was implemented that resulted in identification of 1662 proteins with high confidence with representation of protein isoforms that differed in their chromatographic mobility. Further increase in depth of analysis was accomplished by repeat analysis of aliquots from the same set of two-dimensional fractions resulting in overall identification of 2254 proteins. We conclude that substantial depth of analysis of proteins from milliliter quantities of serum or plasma and detection of isoforms are achieved with depletion of abundant proteins followed by two-dimensional protein fractionation and MS analysis of individual fractions. PMID:17696519

  11. Facilitating protein solubility by use of peptide extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Freimuth, Paul I; Zhang, Yian-Biao; Howitt, Jason

    2013-09-17

    Expression vectors for expression of a protein or polypeptide of interest as a fusion product composed of the protein or polypeptide of interest fused at one terminus to a solubility enhancing peptide extension are provided. Sequences encoding the peptide extensions are provided. The invention further comprises antibodies which bind specifically to one or more of the solubility enhancing peptide extensions.

  12. 21 CFR 862.1630 - Protein (fractionation) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Protein (fractionation) test system. 862.1630 Section 862.1630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... body fluids. Protein fractionations are used as an aid in recognizing abnormal proteins in body...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1630 - Protein (fractionation) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Protein (fractionation) test system. 862.1630 Section 862.1630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... body fluids. Protein fractionations are used as an aid in recognizing abnormal proteins in body...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1630 - Protein (fractionation) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Protein (fractionation) test system. 862.1630 Section 862.1630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... body fluids. Protein fractionations are used as an aid in recognizing abnormal proteins in body...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1630 - Protein (fractionation) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Protein (fractionation) test system. 862.1630 Section 862.1630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... body fluids. Protein fractionations are used as an aid in recognizing abnormal proteins in body...

  16. Method for voltage-gated protein fractionation

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, Anson; Singh, Anup K.

    2012-04-24

    We report unique findings on the voltage dependence of protein exclusion from the pores of nanoporous polymer exclusion membranes. The pores are small enough that proteins are excluded from passage with low applied electric fields, but increasing the field enables proteins to pass through. The requisite field necessary for a change in exclusion is protein-specific with a correlation to protein size. The field-dependence of exclusion is important to consider for preconcentration applications. The ability to selectively gate proteins at exclusion membranes is also a promising means for manipulating and characterizing proteins. We show that field-gated exclusion can be used to selectively remove proteins from a mixture, or to selectively trap protein at one exclusion membrane in a series.

  17. Comparison of dry fractionation methods to produce barley fractions enriched in proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    At USDA-ARS, we initiated a trout-grains project to develop plant-based diets. Dry fractionation has been a primary means to enrich protein in cereal grains. Previous reports have not compared different methods, nor included analysis of mass balance for enriched fractions of cereal grains, which is ...

  18. Whey protein fractionation using supercritical carbon dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweet whey, a coproduct of the cheesemaking process, can be concentrated using ultrafiltration and ion-exchange to produce whey protein isolates (WPI). WPI contains approximately 32% alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) and 61% beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), plus a small amount of minor whey proteins. Whil...

  19. Whey protein fractionation using supercritical carbon dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweet whey, the watery product of the cheesemaking process, is usually concentrated using ultrafiltration or ion-exchange to produce whey protein concentrates (WPC) and whey protein isolates (WPI), respectively. WPC are comprised mainly of beta-lactoglobulin (LG), alpha-lactalbumin (LA), proteose - ...

  20. Developing new fluorescent proteins with stagger extension process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Lu, Jinling; Luo, Haiming; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhihong

    2009-02-01

    The Stagger Extension Process (StEP), a recombination of DNA technique, has been used as a rapid molecular mutagenesis strategy. In this study, for obtaining the fluorescence proteins with new properties, six fluorescence proteins (EYFP, EGFP, ECFP, mCitrine, mCerulean and Venus) were used as the templates to recombine the mutation library by the Stagger Extension Process (StEP) technique. Through screening this mutation library, we have obtained some useful new FPs which are different fluorescent properties with ancestor. These protein will extend fluorescent proteins application.

  1. Antioxidant activity of cod (Gadus morhua) protein hydrolysates: Fractionation and characterisation of peptide fractions.

    PubMed

    Sabeena Farvin, K H; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk; Otte, Jeanette; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch; Jessen, Flemming; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to characterise peptide fractions (>5kDa, 3-5kDa and <3kDa) with antioxidative activity obtained from a cod protein hydrolysate. The free amino acids in all fractions were dominated by Ala, Gly, Glu and Ser. The total amino acid composition had high proportions of Lys, Ala and Glu. The 3-5kDa and <3kDa fractions were further fractionated by size exclusion chromatography. All sub-fractions showed high Fe(2+) chelating activity. The DPPH radical-scavenging activity of the 3-5kDa fraction was exerted mainly by one sub-fraction dominated by peptides with masses below 600Da. The DPPH radical-scavenging activity of the <3kDa fraction was exerted by sub-fractions with low molecular weight. The highest reducing power was found in a sub-fraction containing peptides rich in Arg, Tyr and Phe. Both free amino acids and low molecular weight peptides thus seemed to contribute to the antioxidative activity of the peptide fractions, and Tyr seemed to play a major role in the antioxidant activity. PMID:26988519

  2. Structure characterization of protein fractions from lotus ( Nelumbo nucifera) seed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hong-Yan; Cai, Lian-Hui; Cai, Xi-Ling; Wang, Ya-Ju; Li, Yu-Qin

    2011-08-01

    Protein fractionation of lotus seed was carried out and the structures of the protein fractions were studied. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) as well as ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) was used to investigate changes in molecular structures of the protein fractions. FTIR and UV-vis spectra showed the protein fractions had different protein molecular structures. FTIR spectra showed β-sheets and β-turns as the major secondary structures in the individual protein fractions, while the amounts of α-helix and random coil structures among the different fractions did not significantly change. The amounts of β-sheet structures of albumin and globulin were significantly higher than ones of prolamin and glutelin, implying albumin and globulin had high stabilities because of the high content in β-sheet structures. The observed similarity in the amounts of α-helix, random coil, β-sheet and β-turn structures shared by albumin and globulin indicated that their interior conformations were similar.

  3. Fractionation and characterization of brewers' spent grain protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Celus, Inge; Brijs, Kristof; Delcour, Jan A

    2009-06-24

    Protein hydrolysates with a low and high degree of hydrolysis were enzymatically produced from brewers' spent grain (BSG), the insoluble residue of barley malt resulting from the manufacture of wort in the production of beer. To that end, BSG protein concentrate (BPC), prepared by alkaline extraction of BSG and subsequent acid precipitation, was enzymatically hydrolyzed with Alcalase during both 1.7 and 120 min. Because these hydrolysates contained many different peptides, fractionation of the hydrolysates with graded ammonium sulfate or ethanol precipitation was performed to obtain fractions homogeneous in terms of molecular weight (MW) and hydrophobicity. The emulsifying and foaming capacities of the resultant fractions were determined. MW distributions and surface hydrophobicities of fractions with protein contents exceeding 75% were investigated to determine relationships between technofunctional and physicochemical properties. It was found that the emulsifying and foaming properties are determined by different physicochemical properties of the proteins or peptides. Neither MW nor hydrophobicity alone determines the emulsifying and foaming properties of protein hydrolysates. BSG protein hydrolysates with good emulsifying properties contained less than 40% of fragments with MW exceeding 14 500. Moreover, these hydrolysates had a high surface hydrophobicity. BSG protein hydrolysates with good foaming properties contained less than 10% of material with MW lower than 1700. Hydrolysates with good foaming properties showed low surface hydrophobicities, except for protein hydrolysates with higher levels of protein fragments with MW exceeding 14 500 than of such fragments with MW in a 1700-14 500 range. PMID:19456139

  4. [Protein fraction distribution in milling and screened physical fractions of grain amaranth].

    PubMed

    Búcaro Segura, María Ester; Bressani, Ricardo

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish the protein distribution based on solubility in physical fractions of amaranth flour, in particular between the flour from the germ and that from the perisperm. The protein distribution was obtained applying a series of solvents sequentially utilized in the classical methodology of Osborne & Mendel. The sample of A. cruentus weighing 2000 g was divided into 4 subsamples of 500 g each. One was left as the control while the other 3 were ground individually with a mill. Each flour was screened through 18, 20, 30 and 40 mesh screens, so that 5 fractions were obtained from each of the whole grain flours. Samples of each screened fractions were observed by stereoscopy and analyzed for moisture, fat and protein. This characterization suggested that the fraction above the 30 mesh screen and the flour which passed the 40 mesh screen probably were the perisperm and germ respectively. The 30 mesh sample contained 2.34 fat and 9.05% protein while the 40 mesh contained 16.18% fat and 26.46% protein. The extraction and partitioning of the proteins indicated that the most important fractions in germ and perisperm were the water soluble and glutelins measured by Kjeldahl. The relationship of the water soluble + globulin to glutelins ratio was 2.1 to 1 in the whole grain, 1.9 to 1 in the perisperm and 1.7 to 1 in the germ. The distribution of proteins was very much alike between germ and perisperm. The levels of prolamines were quite low. The protein extraction of the perisperm proteins retained on the 30 mesh screen was low (71.1%) measured by Kjeldahl and 47.4% with the Bradford method to measure protein. PMID:12184151

  5. Annotation extension through protein family annotation coherence metrics

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Hugo P.; Clarke, Luka A.; Couto, Francisco M.

    2013-01-01

    Protein functional annotation consists in associating proteins with textual descriptors elucidating their biological roles. The bulk of annotation is done via automated procedures that ultimately rely on annotation transfer. Despite a large number of existing protein annotation procedures the ever growing protein space is never completely annotated. One of the facets of annotation incompleteness derives from annotation uncertainty. Often when protein function cannot be predicted with enough specificity it is instead conservatively annotated with more generic terms. In a scenario of protein families or functionally related (or even dissimilar) sets this leads to a more difficult task of using annotations to compare the extent of functional relatedness among all family or set members. However, we postulate that identifying sub-sets of functionally coherent proteins annotated at a very specific level, can help the annotation extension of other incompletely annotated proteins within the same family or functionally related set. As an example we analyse the status of annotation of a set of CAZy families belonging to the Polysaccharide Lyase class. We show that through the use of visualization methods and semantic similarity based metrics it is possible to identify families and respective annotation terms within them that are suitable for possible annotation extension. Based on our analysis we then propose a semi-automatic methodology leading to the extension of single annotation terms within these partially annotated protein sets or families. PMID:24130572

  6. Antiproliferative and immunostimulatory protein fraction from edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Swatilekha; Bhutia, Sujit K; Mallick, Sanjaya K; Kumar, Alok; Khadgi, Niyati; Maiti, Tapas K

    2008-09-01

    Fruit bodies and mycelia of various higher Basidiomycetes were studied in search of biological effector molecules. In this study, we evaluated the antiproliferative and immunomodulatory properties of a protein fraction designated as Cibacron blue affinity eluted protein (CBAEP) isolated from five different species of edible mushrooms (Termitomyces clypeatus, Pleurotus florida, Calocybe indica, Astraeus hygrometricus, and Volvariella volvacea). This protein fraction (10-100μg/ml) mediated antiproliferative activity on several tumor cell lines through the induction of apoptosis. Also the isolated protein fraction from all five mushrooms had a stimulatory effect on splenocytes, thymocytes and bone marrow cells. Further it enhanced mouse natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity and stimulated macrophages to produce nitric oxide (NO). The highest immunostimulatory activity was determined in the CBAEP from T. clypeatus and the highest antiproliferative activity from C. indica. PMID:21783909

  7. Isolation of amaranth flour proteins by fractionation procedures and sonication.

    PubMed

    Paredes-Lopez, O; Mendoza, V; Mora, R

    1993-01-01

    The use of whole and defatted amaranth flour for protein isolation of Osborne fractions is described. Extractability of prolamins, the minor fraction, increased from 2.8 to 5% by adding a reducing agent. Glutelins proved to be poorly solubilized (3.3%) in dilute acetic acid, but they reached a high solubility value (40.8%) using a borate buffer in the presence of a reducing agent and a detergent; solubility remarkably declined without the latter two chemicals. Sonication (a fast and simple technique) in the presence of a detergent proved to be more efficient, compared with stirring, for extractability of total unreduced proteins. PMID:8464843

  8. Protein composition of seminal plasma in fractionated stallion ejaculates.

    PubMed

    Kareskoski, A M; del Alamo, M M Rivera; Güvenc, K; Reilas, T; Calvete, J J; Rodriguez-Martinez, H; Andersson, M; Katila, T

    2011-02-01

    Seminal plasma (SP) contains several types of compounds derived from the epididymides and accessory glands. The aim of this study was to examine the protein composition of different ejaculate fractions. Trial I: fractionated ejaculates were collected from two normal and two subfertile stallions. Samples containing pre-sperm fluid and the first sperm-rich jets (HIGH-1), the main sperm-rich portion (HIGH-2), the jets with low sperm concentrations (LOW), and a combined whole-ejaculate (WE) sample was centrifuged, and the SP was filtered and frozen. A part of each SP sample was stored (5°C, 24 h) with spermatozoa from HIGH-2 and skim milk extender. Sperm motility was evaluated after storage in extender mixed with the stallion's own SP or SP from one of the other stallions (sperm from a normal stallion stored in SP from a subfertile stallion and vice versa). Protein composition was analysed using reverse-phase liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry. The area-under-the-curve (AUC) was used for quantitative comparison of proteins within fractions. Trial II: semen samples were collected from seven stallions. Fractions with the highest (HIGH) and lowest (LOW) sperm concentrations and WE samples were examined using SDS-PAGE and densitometry. No significant differences emerged between fractions in the AUC-values of the Horse Seminal Protein-1 (HSP-1) and HSP-2 peaks, or the peak containing HSP-3 and HSP-4 (HSP-3/4). Levels of HSP-1, HSP-2 and HSP-3/4 were not significantly correlated with total sperm motility, progressive sperm motility or average path velocity after storage. Significant differences between ejaculate fractions in the amount of different protein groups present in SP were not found in Trial I; but in Trial II, the proteins in the 60-70 kDa range were more abundant in LOW than in HIGH and WE, indicating that this band contained proteins derived mainly from the seminal vesicles, which produce most of the SP in LOW. PMID

  9. Extraction and characterisation of protein fractions from five insect species.

    PubMed

    Yi, Liya; Lakemond, Catriona M M; Sagis, Leonard M C; Eisner-Schadler, Verena; van Huis, Arnold; van Boekel, Martinus A J S

    2013-12-15

    Tenebrio molitor, Zophobas morio, Alphitobius diaperinus, Acheta domesticus and Blaptica dubia were evaluated for their potential as a future protein source. Crude protein content ranged from 19% to 22% (Dumas analysis). Essential amino acid levels in all insect species were comparable with soybean proteins, but lower than for casein. After aqueous extraction, next to a fat fraction, a supernatant, pellet, and residue were obtained, containing 17-23%, 33-39%, 31-47% of total protein, respectively. At 3% (w/v), supernatant fractions did not form stable foams and gels at pH 3, 5, 7, and 10, except for gelation for A. domesticus at pH 7. At 30% w/v, gels at pH 7 and pH 10 were formed, but not at pH 3 and pH 5. In conclusion, the insect species studied have potential to be used in foods due to: (1) absolute protein levels; (2) protein quality; (3) ability to form gels. PMID:23993491

  10. Storage of Fractional Flow Reserve Hemodynamic Waveforms Using Semantic Extension of the DICOM Standard.

    PubMed

    Kakouros, Nikolaos

    2016-06-01

    Visual assessment of coronary stenoses by coronary angiography remains widely used but correlates poorly with ischemia, particularly for moderate lesions. Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a cardiac catheterization procedure that aims to provide objective measures of coronary lesion hemodynamic significance and involves the acquisition of phasic pressure and electrocardiographic waveforms. The dataset from these procedures currently remains in proprietary systems with restricted data access, inability for data exchange, and often inadequate archiving. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) includes a waveform information object definition. We describe the method of encapsulating FFR procedural information into a DICOM waveform file. We define private data elements to capture modality-specific data that is not represented by standard DICOM data elements. We propose the adoption of this semantic extension of the DICOM waveform information object for exchange and archiving of data from studies of pressure-derived indices of coronary stenoses. PMID:26527469

  11. Evaluation of antioxidant activities of zein protein fractions.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ning; Zhuang, Hong

    2014-11-01

    Zein protein was extracted from the by-product corn gluten meal. The obtained zein protein was 1st hydrolyzed by 4 different proteases. The antioxidant activities of the hydrolysates or peptides were evaluated by free radical scavenging activity, metal ion chelating activity, and lipid peroxidation inhibitory capacity. Among hydrolysates produced, alkaline protease hydrolysates exhibited the highest antioxidant activity. A regression model was established by uniform design to optimize the alkaline protease hydrolysis conditions. The hydrolysates with molecular weight < 3 kDa obtained from ultrafiltration showed the highest antioxidant activities in all relevant assays. The hydrolysates with molecular weight <3 kDa were subsequently purified by gel filtration chromatography, and fraction F3 exhibited the highest antioxidant activities. Two peptides were identified from fraction F3 using LC-ESI-Q-TOF MS/MS as Pro-Phe (263.13 Da) and Leu-Pro-Phe (375.46 Da). These peptides exhibited good free radical scavenging activity and lipid peroxidation inhibitory effect. The results clearly indicated that zein protein fractions are good sources for the development of natural antioxidants for the food industry. PMID:25350353

  12. Integrin-like proteins are localized to plasma membrane fractions, not plastids, in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swatzell, L. J.; Edelmann, R. E.; Makaroff, C. A.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1999-01-01

    Integrins are a large family of integral membrane proteins that function in signal transduction in animal systems. These proteins are conserved in vertebrates, invertebrates, and fungi. Evidence from previous research suggests that integrin-like proteins may be present in plants as well, and that these proteins may function in signal transduction during gravitropism. In past studies, researchers have used monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to localize beta 1 integrin-like proteins in plants. However, there is a disparity between data collected from these studies, especially since molecular weights obtained from these investigations range from 55-120 kDa for integrin-like proteins. To date, a complete investigation which employs all three basic immunolabeling procedures, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, and immunogold labeling, in addition to extensive fractionation and exhaustive controls, has been lacking. In this paper, we demonstrate that use of a polyclonal antibody against the cytoplasmic domain of avian beta 1-integrin can produce potential artifacts in immunolocalization studies. However, these problems can be eliminated through use of starchless mutants or proper specimen preparation prior to electrophoresis. We also show that this antibody, when applied within the described parameters and with careful controls, identifies a large (100 kDa) integrin-like protein that is localized to plasma membrane fractions in Arabidopsis.

  13. Oxidatively Responsive Chain Extension to Entangle Engineered Protein Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shengchang; Glassman, Matthew J.; Li, Shuaili; Socrate, Simona; Olsen, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    Engineering artificial protein hydrogels for medical applications requires precise control over their mechanical properties, including stiffness, toughness, extensibility and stability in the physiological environment. Here we demonstrate topological entanglement as an effective strategy to robustly increase the mechanical tunability of a transient hydrogel network based on coiled-coil interactions. Chain extension and entanglement are achieved by coupling the cysteine residues near the N- and C- termini, and the resulting chain distribution is found to agree with the Jacobson-Stockmayer theory. By exploiting the reversible nature of the disulfide bonds, the entanglement effect can be switched on and off by redox stimuli. With the presence of entanglements, hydrogels exhibit a 7.2-fold enhanced creep resistance and a suppressed erosion rate by a factor of 5.8, making the gels more mechanically stable in a physiologically relevant open system. While hardly affecting material stiffness (only resulting in a 1.5-fold increase in the plateau modulus), the entanglements remarkably lead to hydrogels with a toughness of 65,000 J m-3 and extensibility to approximately 3,000% engineering strain, which enables the preparation of tough yet soft tissue simulants. This improvement in mechanical properties resembles that from double-network hydrogels, but is achieved with the use of a single associating network and topological entanglement. Therefore, redox-triggered chain entanglement offers an effective approach for constructing mechanically enhanced and responsive injectable hydrogels. PMID:24910474

  14. The amino acid sequence of protein SCMK-B2A from the high-sulphur fraction of wool keratin

    PubMed Central

    Elleman, T. C.

    1972-01-01

    1. The amino acid sequence of protein SCMK-B2A, a reduced and S-carboxymethylated protein from the high-sulphur fraction of wool, has been determined. 2. This protein of 171 amino acid residues displays both a high degree of internal homology and extensive external homology with other members of the SCMK-B2 group of proteins. 3. Evidence is presented which suggests that the SCMK-B2 group of proteins are produced by separate non-allelic genes. ImagesPLATE 1 PMID:4679226

  15. An Extension of the Hirshfeld Method to Open Shell Systems Using Fractional Occupations.

    PubMed

    Geldof, D; Krishtal, A; Blockhuys, F; Van Alsenoy, C

    2011-05-10

    In this work, a new partitioning method is presented which allows one to calculate properties of radicals, in particular, atomic spin populations. The method can be seen as an extension of the Hirshfeld-I method [ Bultinck , P. et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2007 , 126 , 144111 ], in which the atomic weight functions, defining the atoms-in-molecules, are constructed by means of an iterative scheme in which the charges of the atoms-in-molecules are altered but the spin remains fixed. The Hirshfeld-I method is therefore not suitable for the calculation of atomic spin populations of open-shell systems. The new fractional occupation Hirshfeld-I (FOHI) uses an iterative scheme in which both the atomic charge and spin are optimized, resulting in a self-consistent method for the calculation of atomic spin populations. The results obtained with the FOHI method are compared with experimental results obtained using polarized neutron diffraction, thus serving as a validation of the FOHI method as well as the Hirshfeld definition of atoms-in-molecules in general. PMID:26610127

  16. Generation, Fractionation, and Characterization of Iron-Chelating Protein Hydrolysate from Palm Kernel Cake Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Mohammad; Ghanbari, Rahele; Tajabadi, Naser; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Bakar, Fatimah Abu; Saari, Nazamid

    2016-02-01

    Palm kernel cake protein was hydrolyzed with different proteases namely papain, bromelain, subtilisin, flavourzyme, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and pepsin to generate different protein hydrolysates. Peptide content and iron-chelating activity of each hydrolysate were evaluated using O-phthaldialdehyde-based spectrophotometric method and ferrozine-based colorimetric assay, respectively. The results revealed a positive correlation between peptide contents and iron-chelating activities of the protein hydrolysates. Protein hydrolysate generated by papain exhibited the highest peptide content of 10.5 mM and highest iron-chelating activity of 64.8% compared with the other hydrolysates. Profiling of the papain-generated hydrolysate by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography fractionation indicated a direct association between peptide content and iron-chelating activity in most of the fractions. Further fractionation using isoelectric focusing also revealed that protein hydrolysate with basic and neutral isoelectric point (pI) had the highest iron-chelating activity, although a few fractions in the acidic range also exhibited good metal chelating potential. After identification and synthesis of papain-generated peptides, GGIF and YLLLK showed among the highest iron-chelating activities of 56% and 53%, whereas their IC50 were 1.4 and 0.2 μM, respectively. PMID:26720491

  17. Dietary protein intake impacts human skeletal muscle protein fractional synthetic rates after endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Bolster, Douglas R; Pikosky, Matthew A; Gaine, P Courtney; Martin, William; Wolfe, Robert R; Tipton, Kevin D; Maclean, David; Maresh, Carl M; Rodriguez, Nancy R

    2005-10-01

    This investigation evaluated the physiological impact of different dietary protein intakes on skeletal muscle protein synthesis postexercise in endurance runners. Five endurance-trained, male runners participated in a randomized, crossover design diet intervention, where they consumed either a low (0.8 g/kg; LP)-, moderate (1.8 g/kg; MP)-, or high (3.6 g/kg; HP)-protein diet for 4 wk. Diets were designed to be eucaloric with carbohydrate, fat, and protein approximating 60, 30, and 10%; 55, 30, and 15%; and 40, 30, and 30% for LP, MP, and HP, respectively. Substrate oxidation was assessed via indirect calorimetry at 3 wk of the dietary interventions. Mixed-muscle protein fractional synthetic rate (FSR) was measured after an endurance run (75 min at 70% V(O2 peak)) using a primed, continuous infusion of [(2)H(5)]phenylalanine. Protein oxidation increased with increasing protein intake, with each trial being significantly different from the other (P < 0.01). FSR after exercise was significantly greater for LP (0.083%/h) and MP (0.078%/h) than for HP (0.052%/h; P < 0.05). There was no difference in FSR between LP and MP. This is the first investigation to establish that habitual dietary protein intake in humans modulates skeletal muscle protein synthesis after an endurance exercise bout. Future studies directed at mechanisms by which level of protein intake influences skeletal muscle turnover are needed. PMID:15914508

  18. Fractionation of Plasmodium-infected human red blood cells to study protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Külzer, Simone; Bittl, Verena; Przyborski, Jude M

    2015-01-01

    Subcellular fractionation is a valuable tool to follow protein traffic between cellular compartments. Here we detail a procedure for fractionating erythrocytes infected with the human malaria parasite P. falciparum using the bacterial pore-forming protein Streptolysin O (SLO). Additionally we describe an experimental protocol to determine protein topology by carrying out a protease protection assay on SLO-lysed infected erythrocytes. PMID:25702109

  19. Protein-protein interactions prediction based on iterative clique extension with gene ontology filtering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Tang, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Cliques (maximal complete subnets) in protein-protein interaction (PPI) network are an important resource used to analyze protein complexes and functional modules. Clique-based methods of predicting PPI complement the data defection from biological experiments. However, clique-based predicting methods only depend on the topology of network. The false-positive and false-negative interactions in a network usually interfere with prediction. Therefore, we propose a method combining clique-based method of prediction and gene ontology (GO) annotations to overcome the shortcoming and improve the accuracy of predictions. According to different GO correcting rules, we generate two predicted interaction sets which guarantee the quality and quantity of predicted protein interactions. The proposed method is applied to the PPI network from the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP) and most of the predicted interactions are verified by another biological database, BioGRID. The predicted protein interactions are appended to the original protein network, which leads to clique extension and shows the significance of biological meaning. PMID:24578640

  20. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  1. Protein synthesis of muscle fractions from the small intestine in alcohol fed rats.

    PubMed Central

    Preedy, V R; Peters, T J

    1990-01-01

    The effects of chronic ethanol feeding on the amounts and synthesis rates of cytoplasmic, contractile, and stromal protein fractions were investigated in the small intestine of eight pairs of immature and seven pairs of mature rats. Treated rats were fed ethanol as 36% of total energy in a nutritionally adequate liquid diet. Paired controls were fed isovolumetric amounts of the same diet in which ethanol was substituted by isocaloric glucose. After six weeks the total cytoplasmic and contractile protein content in immature rats was reduced by 18% and 31%, respectively (p less than or equal to 0.007). The decline in the stromal protein content (26%) was not statistically significant (p = 0.130). In mature rats the protein contents were also reduced in the cytoplasmic (25%, p = 0.035) and contractile (27%, p = 0.005) protein fractions, though the stromal protein fraction was unaltered (p = 0.913). In immature rats fractional rates of protein synthesis in cytoplasmic and contractile protein fractions of the small intestine were unaltered by chronic ethanol feeding (p less than or equal to 0.853). In mature rats, the synthesis rates of corresponding fractions declined, by 18% and 31%, respectively, but were also not statistically significant (p less than or equal to 0.369). Absolute rates of protein synthesis in immature rats fell by 6% (p = 0.549) in the cytoplasmic and 31% in the contractile protein fraction (p = 0.045). In mature rats, the corresponding reductions were 38% (p = 0.106) and 48% (p = 0.033), respectively. Virtually no radioactivity could be detected in the stromal fraction, signifying very low synthesis rates. Chronic ethanol feeding reduces the amount of protein in the small intestine of the immature and mature rat with the contractile protein fraction showing the greatest decrease. In the absence of statistically significant reductions in fractional synthesis rates a partial adaptation in turnover rates may have occurred. PMID:2323594

  2. Protein fractions in forage legumes containing protein-binding polyphenols: Freeze-drying vs. conservation as hay or silage.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We compared protein fractions in freeze-dried herbage to hay or silage of forage legumes containing about 200 g/kg of crude protein. Protein was partitioned with buffer and detergents into rapidly (A and B1), moderately (B2), and slowly (B3) degraded and undegradable acid-detergent insoluble protein...

  3. Eukaryote-specific extensions in ribosomal proteins of the small subunit: Structure and function.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arnab; Komar, Anton A

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structures of yeast ribosomes have improved our understanding of the architecture and organization of eukaryotic rRNA and proteins, as well as eukaryote-specific extensions present in some conserved ribosomal proteins. Despite this progress, assignment of specific functions to individual proteins and/or eukaryote-specific protein extensions remains challenging. It has been suggested that eukaryote-specific extensions of conserved proteins from the small ribosomal subunit may facilitate eukaryote-specific reactions in the initiation phase of protein synthesis. This review summarizes emerging data describing the structural and functional significance of eukaryote-specific extensions of conserved small ribosomal subunit proteins, particularly their possible roles in recruitment and spatial organization of eukaryote-specific initiation factors. PMID:26779416

  4. Pilot-scale fractionation of whey proteins with supercritical CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new pilot-scale process is being developed and optimized for the separation of whey proteins into two enriched, highly functional fractions that are free of contaminants. The fractionation of whey protein isolate (WPI), which contains approximately 32% alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) and 61% beta-lac...

  5. Fractionation of whey protein isolate with supercritical carbon dioxide – process modeling and cost estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An economical and environmentally friendly whey protein fractionation process was developed using supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) as an acid to produce enriched fractions of alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-La) and beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) from a commercial whey protein isolate (WPI) containing 55% ...

  6. An extensive library of surrogate peptides for all human proteins.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Yassene; Borchers, Christoph H

    2015-11-01

    Selecting the most appropriate surrogate peptides to represent a target protein is a major component of experimental design in Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM). Our software PeptidePicker with its v-score remains distinctive in its approach of integrating information about the proteins, their tryptic peptides, and the suitability of these peptides for MRM that is available online in UniProtKB, NCBI's dbSNP, ExPASy, PeptideAtlas, PRIDE, and GPMDB. The scoring algorithm reflects our "best knowledge" for selecting candidate peptides for MRM, based on the uniqueness of the peptide in the targeted proteome, its physiochemical properties, and whether it has previously been observed. Here we present an updated approach where we have already compiled a list of all possible surrogate peptides of the human proteome. Using our stringent selection criteria, the list includes 165k suitable MRM peptides covering 17k proteins of the human reviewed proteins in UniProtKB. Compared to average of 2-4min per protein for retrieving and integrating the information, the precompiled list includes all peptides available instantly. This allows a more cohesive and faster design of a multiplexed MRM experiment and provides insights into evidence for a protein's existence. We will keep this list up-to-date as proteomics data repositories continue to grow. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics. PMID:26232110

  7. Amino acid composition and antioxidant properties of pea seed ( Pisum sativum L.) enzymatic protein hydrolysate fractions.

    PubMed

    Pownall, Trisha L; Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2010-04-28

    The amino acid composition and antioxidant activities of peptide fractions obtained from HPLC separation of a pea protein hydrolysate (PPH) were studied. Thermolysin hydrolysis of pea protein isolate and ultrafiltration (3 kDa molecular weight cutoff membrane) yielded a PPH that was separated into five fractions (F1-F5) on a C(18) reverse phase HPLC column. The fractions that eluted later from the column (F3-F5) contained higher contents hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids when compared to fractions that eluted early or the original PPH. Fractions F3-F5 also exhibited the strongest radical scavenging and metal chelating activities; however, hydrophobic character did not seem to contribute to reducing power of the peptides. In comparison to glutathione, the peptide fractions had significantly higher (p < 0.05) ability to inhibit linoleic acid oxidation and chelate metals. In contrast, glutathione had significantly higher (p < 0.05) free radical scavenging properties than the peptide fractions. PMID:20359226

  8. Utilization of supercritical carbon dioxide to produce milk protein fractions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nutritional, functional and bioactive properties of the individual whey proteins are appreciated by health-conscious consumers, yet few methods have been developed to produce these proteins to satisfy demand. The methods that are available are relatively new technologies that have not been prove...

  9. Polyphenol, Conditioning, and Conservation Effects on Protein Fractions and Degradability in Forage Legumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forage legume proteins were fractionated by the Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System or ruminally incubated to assess how conditioning and conservation methods interact with polyphenols (condensed tannins or o-quinones) to alter protein degradability. The presence of polyphenols, conditioning...

  10. Supercritical carbon dioxide fractionation of whey protein isolate for new food-grade ingredients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new, environmentally benign whey protein fractionation process was developed using supercritical CO2 (SCO2) as an acid aggregating agent to separate a-lactalbumin (a-LA) aggregates from soluble beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) protein in concentrated whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions. The process e...

  11. Comparative Analysis of Apicoplast-Targeted Protein Extension Lengths in Apicomplexan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Seliverstov, Alexandr V.; Zverkov, Oleg A.; Istomina, Svetlana N.; Pirogov, Sergey A.; Kitsis, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    In general, the mechanism of protein translocation through the apicoplast membrane requires a specific extension of a functionally important region of the apicoplast-targeted proteins. The corresponding signal peptides were detected in many apicomplexans but not in the majority of apicoplast-targeted proteins in Toxoplasma gondii. In T. gondii signal peptides are either much diverged or their extension region is processed, which in either case makes the situation different from other studied apicomplexans. We propose a statistic method to compare extensions of the functionally important regions of apicoplast-targeted proteins. More specifically, we provide a comparison of extension lengths of orthologous apicoplast-targeted proteins in apicomplexan parasites. We focus on results obtained for the model species T. gondii, Neospora caninum, and Plasmodium falciparum. With our method, cross species comparisons demonstrate that, in average, apicoplast-targeted protein extensions in T. gondii are 1.5-fold longer than in N. caninum and 2-fold longer than in P. falciparum. Extensions in P. falciparum less than 87 residues in size are longer than the corresponding extensions in N. caninum and, reversely, are shorter if they exceed 88 residues. PMID:26114107

  12. Heating and reduction affect the reaction with tannins of wine protein fractions differing in hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Marangon, Matteo; Vincenzi, Simone; Lucchetta, Marco; Curioni, Andrea

    2010-02-15

    During the storage, bottled white wines can manifest haziness due to the insolubilisation of the grape proteins that may 'survive' in the fermentation process. Although the exact mechanism of this occurrence is not fully understood, proteins and tannins are considered two of the key factors involved in wine hazing, since their aggregation leads to the formation of insoluble particles. To better understand this complex interaction, proteins and tannins from the same unfined Pinot grigio wine were separated. Wine proteins were then fractionated by hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). A significant correlation between hydrophobicity of the wine protein fractions and the haze formed after reacting with wine tannins was found, with the most reactive fractions revealing (by SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC analyses) the predominant presence of thaumatin-like proteins. Moreover, the effects of both protein heating and disulfide bonds reduction (with dithiotreithol) on haze formation in the presence of tannins were assessed. These treatments generally resulted in an improved reactivity with tannins, and this phenomenon was related to both the surface hydrophobicity and composition of the protein fractions. Therefore, haze formation in wines seems to be related to hydrophobic interactions occurring among proteins and tannins. These interactions should occur on hydrophobic tannin-binding sites, whose exposition on the proteins can depend on both protein heating and reduction. PMID:20103151

  13. Fractionation of oats into products enriched with protein, beta-glucan, starch, or other carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A modified wet method was developed to fractionate ground oat groats into 4 fractions enriched with beta-glucan (BG), protein, starch, and other carbohydrates (CHO), respectively. Effects of defatting oats and centrifuge force for separation were also investigated. Results show that, depending on ...

  14. Fractionation of oats into value-added ingredients enriched with protein, beta-Glucan or starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oats contain several valuable nutrients, including protein, beta-glucan (BG, soluble fiber), starch, etc. A key strategy in increasing the value-added utilization of oats is to produce fractions enriched with each key nutrient. Among the reported studies on oat fractionation (dry or wet), most focus...

  15. Fractionation of barley into value-added ingredients enriched with protein, beta-glucan or starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley contains several valuable nutrients, including protein, beta-glucan (BG) and starch. Each has additional value when concentrated. Among reported studies on barley fractionation (dry or wet), most focused enriching one or two components in term of concentrations in resulting fractions but negl...

  16. [Protein fractions and their enzyme activity in the rat myocardium in a Kosmos-936 biosatellite experiment].

    PubMed

    Tigranian, R A; Nosova, E A; Kolchina, E V; Veresotskaia, N A; Kurkina, L M

    1981-01-01

    The effect of artificial gravity on protein fractions and their enzyme activity in the myocardium of rats flown on board Cosmos-936 was studied. In weightless rats the content of sarcoplasmic proteins increased at R + O and that of T fraction proteins decreased at R + 25. In centrifuged rats such changes were not seen. In centrifuged rats the enzyme activity of sarcoplasmic proteins did not alter. In weightless rats ATPase activity of myosin decreased significantly, and in centrifuged rats it remained almost unchanged. PMID:6457219

  17. Solubilization, fractionation, and electrophoretic characterization of Inca peanut (Plukenetia volubilis L.) proteins.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Shridhar K; Kshirsagar, Harshal H; Sharma, Girdhari M

    2012-09-01

    Effects of different solvents, ionic strength, and pH on Inca peanut seed protein solubility were assessed by quantitatively analyzing solubilized proteins using Lowry and Bradford methods. Soluble proteins were fractionated using Osborne procedure and the polypeptide composition of solubilized proteins was determined by one dimensional 25 % monomer acrylamide linear gradient SDS-PAGE. Osborne protein fractions were analyzed by the 2D gel electrophoresis. Total seed proteins were efficiently solubilized by 2 M NaCl among the tested solvents. The soluble seed proteins registered a minimum solubility at pH ~4.0. Osborne protein fractions, albumins, globulins, prolamins, and glutelins accounted for 43.7, 27.3, 3.0, and 31.9 %, respectively, of the total aqueous soluble proteins. Soluble seed flour proteins are mainly composed of polypeptides in the MW range of 6-70 kDa of which the predominant polypeptides were in the 20-40 kDa range. Prolamin fraction was mainly composed of four polypeptides (MW < 15 kDa). Glycoprotein staining indicated 32-35 and <14 kDa peptides to be positive. PMID:22886084

  18. Composition and Molecular Weight Distribution of Carob Germ Proteins Fractions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochemical properties of carob germ proteins were analyzed using a combination of selective extraction, reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), size exclusion chromatography coupled with multi-angle laser light scattering (SEC-MALS) and electrophoretic analysis. Using a mo...

  19. Antioxidant activities and functional properties of protein and peptide fractions isolated from salted herring brine.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Ali; Sabeena Farvin, K H; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Baron, Caroline P

    2014-01-01

    In the present study proteins isolated from herring brine, which is a by-product of marinated herring production were evaluated for their functional properties and antioxidant activity. Herring brine was collected from the local herring industry and proteins were precipitated by adjusting the pH to 4.5 and the obtained supernatant was further fractionated by using ultrafiltration membranes with molecular weight cut offs of 50, 10 and 1kDa. The obtained >50kDa, 50-10kDa, 10-1kDa fractions and pH precipitated fraction were studied for their functional properties and antioxidant activity. Functional properties revealed that >50kDa polypeptides showed good emulsion activity index when compared to the other fractions. However all fractions had low emulsion stability index. The pH precipitated fraction showed the highest foaming capacity and stability at pH 10. The 50-10kDa and 10-1kDa peptide fractions showed good radical scavenging activity and reducing power at a concentration of 0.5mg protein/ml. All the fractions demonstrated low iron chelating activity and did not inhibit oxidation in a soybean phosphatidylcholine liposome model system. However all the fractions were to some extent able to delay iron catalyzed lipid oxidation in 5% fish oil in water emulsions and the 10-50kDa fraction was the best. These results show the potential of proteins and peptide fractions recovered from waste water from the herring industry as source of natural antioxidants for use in food products. PMID:24001848

  20. Protein synthesis rates in rat brain regions and subcellular fractions during aging

    SciTech Connect

    Avola, R.; Condorelli, D.F.; Ragusa, N.; Renis, M.; Alberghina, M.; Giuffrida Stella, A.M.; Lajtha, A.

    1988-04-01

    In vivo protein synthesis rates in various brain regions (cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and striatum) of 4-, 12-, and 24-month-old rats were examined after injection of a flooding dose of labeled valine. The incorporation of labeled valine into proteins of mitochondrial, microsomal, and cytosolic fractions from cerebral cortex and cerebellum was also measured. At all ages examined, the incorporation rate was 0.5% per hour in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus and 0.4% per hour in striatum. Of the subcellular fractions examined, the microsomal proteins were synthesized at the highest rate, followed by cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins. The results obtained indicate that the average synthesis rate of proteins in the various brain regions and subcellular fractions examined is fairly constant and is not significantly altered in the 4 to 24-month period of life of rats.

  1. Qualitative characterization of the protein fraction of exopolymeric substances (EPS) extracted with EDTA from sludge.

    PubMed

    Bourven, Isabelle; Costa, Guy; Guibaud, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Exopolymeric substances (EPS) were extracted by EDTA from activated and anaerobic granular sludge. Due to the presence of EDTA in EPS extract, interferences were pointed out for the characterization of EPS by means of the colorimetric methods and fluorescence spectroscopy. Other methods have been investigated to characterize the EPS protein fraction. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC), performed at a fluorescence excitation-emission matrix of 221/360 nm (tryptophan protein-like substances) for detection, was suitable and allowed obtaining a fingerprint of the protein-like substance fractions and determining apparent molecular weight (MW). Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was performed under either native or denaturing conditions. Various staining applications after EPS migration are effective in obtaining a protein (silver staining) or glycoprotein (PAS staining) fingerprint or MW distribution. SEC and PAGE are both appropriate techniques for the qualitative characterization of protein fractions from EPS extracted by EDTA and moreover differentiate EPS according to sludge origin and type. PMID:22154750

  2. [The behavior of serum total protein and protein fractions during the use of various hormonal contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Klinger, G; Scheler, R; Tarnick, M; Krause, G; Hesse, A; Carol, W

    1977-01-01

    Total protein fractions in the serum were measured in 213 women who used various contraceptive preparations (53 used Gravistat, 56 Non-Ovlon, 37 Ovosiston, 67 Deposiston). Blood samples were taken before the 1st, 3rd, 6th, 12th, and 24th cycles of use and 4 weeks after discontinuing preparation use. Serum protein concentrations decreased through the first 18 cycles of contraceptive use, after which a continual increase was observed. Serum albumin concentrations deceased during the first 3 cycles of use, after which increases were observed, which in the case of Non-Ovlon and Gravistat exceeded original values. Serum alpha 1 and alpha 2 globulin concentrations showed relative increases during the first 3 cycles, after which a decrease was observed. Serum beta globulin increased in the first 3 cycles of use; a decrease was observed between the 12th and 18 cycles, followed by another increase. Serum gamma globulin levels increased during the first 6 cycles, followed by a marked decrease, which extended partially into the post-treatment period. The changes are comparable to those observed during an undisturbed pregnancy. Deposiston caused the most marked changes in the parameters; this is attributed to the estrogenic nature of the preparation. PMID:73442

  3. Antioxidant and metal chelating activities of peptide fractions from phaseolin and bean protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Castilla, Janet; Hernández-Álvarez, Alan Javier; Jiménez-Martínez, Cristian; Jacinto-Hernández, Carmen; Alaiz, Manuel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Vioque, Javier; Dávila-Ortiz, Gloria

    2012-12-01

    Bean protein isolate and phaseolin were hydrolysed using pepsin and pancreatin, and the resulting hydrolysates were filtered through a 1kDa cut-off membrane and fractionated by size exclusion chromatography. Three fractions corresponding to MW 0.7-1.0kDa, 0.43-0.7kDa and <0.43kDa (A1, A2, and A3 for protein isolate fractions, and B1, B2, and B3 for phaseolin fractions) were assayed for antioxidant and metal chelating activity and they were also subjected to amino acid and SDS-PAGE analysis. Fractions A1 and B1 had the highest copper chelating activity (78% and 82%, respectively), while iron chelating activity was the highest in fractions A1 and B3 (36% and 16%, respectively). Fractions A2 and B3 had the highest antioxidant activity as determined by inhibition of reducing power and β-carotene bleaching, while the highest ABTS radical scavenging activity was found in A3 and B3. Thus, fractions coming from the isolate and phaseolin had similar activities except for iron chelation, suggesting that phaseolin is the major contributor to the antioxidant and copper chelating activities of the hydrolysed protein isolate. PMID:22953924

  4. Photoaffinity labeling of regulatory subunits of protein kinase A in cardiac cell fractions of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mednieks, M. I.; Popova, I.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling in heart tissue of rats flown on Cosmos 2044 was used to measure the regulatory (R) subunits of adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase. A significant decrease of RII subunits in the particulate cell fraction extract (S2; P less than 0.05 in all cases) was observed when extracts of tissue samples from vivarium controls were compared with those from flight animals. Photoaffinity labeling of the soluble fraction (S1) was observed to be unaffected by spaceflight or any of the simulation conditions. Proteins of the S2 fraction constitute a minor (less than 10 percent) component of the total, whereas the S1 fraction contained most of the cell proteins. Changes in a relatively minor aspect of adenosine monophosphate-mediated reactions are considered to be representative of a metabolic effect.

  5. Dissecting the Subcellular Compartmentation of Proteins and Metabolites in Arabidopsis Leaves Using Non-aqueous Fractionation *

    PubMed Central

    Arrivault, Stéphanie; Guenther, Manuela; Florian, Alexandra; Encke, Beatrice; Feil, Regina; Vosloh, Daniel; Lunn, John E.; Sulpice, Ronan; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Stitt, Mark; Schulze, Waltraud X.

    2014-01-01

    Non-aqueous fractionation is a technique for the enrichment of different subcellular compartments derived from lyophilized material. It was developed to study the subcellular distribution of metabolites. Here we analyzed the distribution of about 1,000 proteins and 70 metabolites, including 22 phosphorylated intermediates in wild-type Arabidopsis rosette leaves, using non-aqueous gradients divided into 12 fractions. Good separation of plastidial, cytosolic, and vacuolar metabolites and proteins was achieved, but cytosolic, mitochondrial, and peroxisomal proteins clustered together. There was considerable heterogeneity in the fractional distribution of transcription factors, ribosomal proteins, and subunits of the vacuolar-ATPase, indicating diverse compartmental location. Within the plastid, sub-organellar separation of thylakoids and stromal proteins was observed. Metabolites from the Calvin–Benson cycle, photorespiration, starch and sucrose synthesis, glycolysis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle grouped with their associated proteins of the respective compartment. Non-aqueous fractionation thus proved to be a powerful method for the study of the organellar, and in some cases sub-organellar, distribution of proteins and their association with metabolites. It remains the technique of choice for the assignment of subcellular location to metabolites in intact plant tissues, and thus the technique of choice for doing combined metabolite–protein analysis on a single tissue sample. PMID:24866124

  6. The effect of whey acidic protein fractions on bone loss in the ovariectomised rat.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Marlena C; Plimmer, Gabrielle G; Schollum, Linda M; Haggarty, Neill; Ram, Satyendra; Palmano, Kate

    2005-08-01

    Bovine milk has been shown to contain bioactive components with bone-protective properties. Earlier studies on bovine milk whey protein showed that it suppressed bone resorption in the female ovariectomised rat. A new osteotropic component was subsequently identified in the whey basic protein fraction, but bone bioactivity may also be associated with other whey fractions. In the present study, we investigated whether acidic protein fractions isolated from bovine milk whey could prevent bone loss in mature ovariectomised female rats. Six-month-old female rats were ovariectomised (OVX) or left intact (sham). The OVX rats were randomised into four groups. One group remained the control (OVX), whereas three groups were fed various whey acidic protein fractions from milk whey as 3 g/kg diet for 4 months. Outcomes were bone mineral density, bone biomechanics and markers of bone turnover. Bone mineral density of the femurs indicated that one of the whey AF over time caused a recovery of bone lost from OVX. Plasma C-telopeptide of type I collagen decreased significantly in all groups except OVX control over time, indicating an anti-resorptive effect of whey acidic protein. Biomechanical data showed that the AF may affect bone architecture as elasticity was increased by one of the whey AF. The femurs of AF-supplemented rats all showed an increase in organic matter. This is the first report of an acidic whey protein fraction isolated from milk whey that may support the recovery of bone loss in vivo. PMID:16115359

  7. Safety of protein hydrolysates, fractions thereof and bioactive peptides in human nutrition.

    PubMed

    Schaafsma, G

    2009-10-01

    This paper evaluates the safety for humans with regard to consumption of protein hydrolysates and fractions thereof, including bioactive peptides. The available literature on the safety of protein, protein hydrolysates, fractions thereof and free amino acids on relevant food legislation is reviewed and evaluated. A new concept for the safety assessment of protein hydrolysates and fractions thereof is developed. Benchmarks for the evaluation are safety of total protein intake, safety of free amino acid intake, documented history of safe use, outcome of questionnaires in efficacy studies and safety studies. Similar to the intake of intact proteins with a history of safe use, the intake of hydrolysates made from them, does not raise concern about safety, provided the applied proteolytic enzymes are food grade and thus of suitable quality. The safety of hydrolysates and of fractions thereof, including the so-called bioactive peptides, should always be assessed by the company before market introduction (company safety assessment). Only when a novel protein source is used or a novel production process is applied, which results in significant changes in nutritional value, metabolic effect or increased level of undesirable substances, that products might fall under novel food regulations. This means that company safety assessment should be reviewed and approved by external independent experts (external safety evaluation) and the novel protein hydrolysate (fraction) is authorized by competent authorities before market introduction. It is argued that good judgement on the safety of hydrolysates and the fractions thereof can be obtained by comparing the anticipated intake of amino acids by these products with those levels to be reasonably expected to be ingested under normal conditions of consumption of a balanced and varied diet. The paper shows a decision tree that can be used for safety assessment. PMID:19623200

  8. Antioxidant activities of bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) protein hydrolysates and their membrane ultrafiltration fractions.

    PubMed

    Arise, Abimbola K; Alashi, Adeola M; Nwachukwu, Ifeanyi D; Ijabadeniyi, Oluwatosin A; Aluko, Rotimi E; Amonsou, Eric O

    2016-05-18

    In this study, the bambara protein isolate (BPI) was digested with three proteases (alcalase, trypsin and pepsin), to produce bambara protein hydrolysates (BPHs). These hydrolysates were passed through ultrafiltration membranes to obtain peptide fractions of different sizes (<1, 1-3, 3-5 and 5-10 kDa). The hydrolysates and their peptide fractions were investigated for antioxidant activities. The membrane fractions showed that peptides with sizes <3 kDa had significantly (p < 0.05) reduced surface hydrophobicity when compared with peptides >3 kDa. This is in agreement with the result obtained for the ferric reducing power, metal chelating and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities where higher molecular weight peptides exhibited better activity (p < 0.05) when compared to low molecular weight peptide fractions. However, for all the hydrolysates, the low molecular weight peptides were more effective diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavengers but not superoxide radicals when compared to the bigger peptides. In comparison with glutathione (GSH), BPHs and their membrane fractions had better (p < 0.05) reducing power and ability to chelate metal ions except for the pepsin hydrolysate and its membrane fractions that did not show any metal chelating activity. However, the 5-10 kDa pepsin hydrolysate peptide fractions had greater (88%) hydroxyl scavenging activity than GSH, alcalase and trypsin hydrolysates (82%). These findings show the potential use of BPHs and their peptide fraction as antioxidants in reducing food spoilage or management of oxidative stress-related metabolic disorders. PMID:27156453

  9. In vitro ruminal degradation and synthesis of protein on fractions extracted from alfalfa hay and silage.

    PubMed

    Peltekova, V D; Broderick, G A

    1996-04-01

    Net release of degraded N as NH3 and total AA plus microbial protein synthesis, quantified from incorporation of 15NH3 into microbial protein, was used to estimate the rate and extent of in vitro degradation of protein fractions isolated from alfalfa hay and silage. Seven proteins (casein, alfalfa hay, alfalfa silage, extracts from alfalfa hay and silage, and residues from alfalfa hay and silage) were studied. Results from (NH4)2SO4 and SDS-PAGE fractionations suggested that soluble proteins in alfalfa hay and silage differed in susceptibility to proteolytic attack. Although the net release of NH3 plus total AA N from alfalfa silage and alfalfa silage extract was twofold greater than that from alfalfa hay and alfalfa hay extract, net microbial protein synthesis on alfalfa hay and alfalfa hay extract was 33 and 43% greater. Despite greater NPN content in alfalfa silage, protein degradation rate and estimated escape were similar for intact alfalfa hay (0.103/h and 43%) and silage (0.067/h and 43%). This result might be explained by the less efficient microbial utilization of silage NPN, greater protozoal numbers on hay, greater soluble true protein in hay, or differences in molecular mass and stability of soluble proteins in hay versus silage. Use of a two-compartment model, based on water-soluble and insoluble CP fractions assumed to pass with the liquid and solid phases, respectively, yielded RUP estimates for alfalfa hay and silage that were similar to NRC estimates. PMID:8744226

  10. Proteomic Analysis of a Fraction with Intact Eyespots of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Assignment of Protein Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Eitzinger, Nicole; Wagner, Volker; Weisheit, Wolfram; Geimer, Stefan; Boness, David; Kreimer, Georg; Mittag, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Flagellate green algae possess a visual system, the eyespot. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii it is situated at the edge of the chloroplast and consists of two carotenoid rich lipid globule layers subtended by thylakoid membranes (TM) that are attached to both chloroplast envelope membranes and a specialized area of the plasma membrane (PM). A former analysis of an eyespot fraction identified 203 proteins. To increase the understanding of eyespot related processes, knowledge of the protein composition of the membranes in its close vicinity is desirable. Here, we present a purification procedure that allows isolation of intact eyespots. This gain in intactness goes, however, hand in hand with an increase of contaminants from other organelles. Proteomic analysis identified 742 proteins. Novel candidates include proteins for eyespot development, retina-related proteins, ion pumps, and membrane-associated proteins, calcium sensing proteins as well as kinases, phosphatases and 14-3-3 proteins. Methylation of proteins at Arg or Lys is known as an important posttranslational modification involved in, e.g., signal transduction. Here, we identify several proteins from eyespot fractions that are methylated at Arg and/or Lys. Among them is the eyespot specific SOUL3 protein that influences the size and position of the eyespot and EYE2, a protein important for its development. PMID:26697039

  11. Fractionation of Whey Protein Isolate with Supercritical Carbon Dioxide—Process Modeling and Cost Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Yver, Alexandra L.; Bonnaillie, Laetitia M.; Yee, Winnie; McAloon, Andrew; Tomasula, Peggy M.

    2012-01-01

    An economical and environmentally friendly whey protein fractionation process was developed using supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) as an acid to produce enriched fractions of α-lactalbumin (α-LA) and β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) from a commercial whey protein isolate (WPI) containing 20% α-LA and 55% β-LG, through selective precipitation of α-LA. Pilot-scale experiments were performed around the optimal parameter range (T = 60 to 65 °C, P = 8 to 31 MPa, C = 5 to 15% (w/w) WPI) to quantify the recovery rates of the individual proteins and the compositions of both fractions as a function of processing conditions. Mass balances were calculated in a process flow-sheet to design a large-scale, semi-continuous process model using SuperproDesigner® software. Total startup and production costs were estimated as a function of processing parameters, product yield and purity. Temperature, T, pressure, P, and concentration, C, showed conflicting effects on equipment costs and the individual precipitation rates of the two proteins, affecting the quantity, quality, and production cost of the fractions considerably. The highest α-LA purity, 61%, with 80% α-LA recovery in the solid fraction, was obtained at T = 60 °C, C = 5% WPI, P = 8.3 MPa, with a production cost of $8.65 per kilogram of WPI treated. The most profitable conditions resulted in 57%-pure α-LA, with 71% α-LA recovery in the solid fraction and 89% β-LG recovery in the soluble fraction, and production cost of $5.43 per kilogram of WPI treated at T = 62 °C, C = 10% WPI and P = 5.5 MPa. The two fractions are ready-to-use, new food ingredients with a pH of 6.7 and contain no residual acid or chemical contaminants. PMID:22312250

  12. A novel protein complex identification algorithm based on Connected Affinity Clique Extension (CACE).

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; He, Tingting; Hu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Junmin; Shen, Xianjun; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Yan

    2014-06-01

    A novel algorithm based on Connected Affinity Clique Extension (CACE) for mining overlapping functional modules in protein interaction network is proposed in this paper. In this approach, the value of protein connected affinity which is inferred from protein complexes is interpreted as the reliability and possibility of interaction. The protein interaction network is constructed as a weighted graph, and the weight is dependent on the connected affinity coefficient. The experimental results of our CACE in two test data sets show that the CACE can detect the functional modules much more effectively and accurately when compared with other state-of-art algorithms CPM and IPC-MCE. PMID:24803142

  13. The impact of Fusarium culmorum infection on the protein fractions of raw barley and malted grains.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro M; Waters, Deborah M; Arendt, Elke K

    2013-03-01

    Contaminating fungi, such as Fusarium species, produce metabolites that may interfere with normal barley grain proteolysis pattern and consequently, affect malt and beer quality. Protein compositional changes of an initial mixture of 20 % Fusarium culmorum infected and 80 % noninfected mature barley grains and respective malt are reported here. Proteolytic activity of infected barley grains (IBG) and respective malt, with controls (uninfected grains), were characterized using protease inhibitors from each class of this enzyme, including metallo-, cysteine, serine, and aspartic proteases, as well as uninhibited protease fractions. The proteins were extracted according to the Osborne fractionation and separated by size exclusion chromatography. Additionally, two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis (GE) was used to analyze hydrophobic storage proteins isolated from the control and IBG. Analyses revealed that F. culmorum IBG had a twofold increase of proteolytic activity compared to the control sample, which showed an increase in all protease classes with aspartic proteases dominating. Infected and control malt grains were comparable with cysteine proteases representing almost 50 % of all proteolytic enzymes detected. Protein extractability was 31 % higher in IBG compared to the control barley. The albumin fraction showed that several metabolic proteins decreased and increased at different rates during infection and malting, thus showing a complex F. culmorum infection interdependence. Prolamin storage proteins were more hydrophobic during barley fungal infection. F. culmorum interfered with the grain hydrolytic protein profile, thereby altering the grain's protein content and quality. PMID:23371295

  14. Extensible byssus of Pinctada fucata: Ca2+-stabilized nanocavities and a thrombospondin-1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chuang; Li, Shiguo; Huang, Jingliang; Liu, Yangjia; Jia, Ganchu; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-01-01

    The extensible byssus is produced by the foot of bivalve animals, including the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata, and enables them to attach to hard underwater surfaces. However, the mechanism of their extensibility is not well understood. To understand this mechanism, we analyzed the ultrastructure, composition and mechanical properties of the P. fucata byssus using electron microscopy, elemental analysis, proteomics and mechanical testing. In contrast to the microstructures of Mytilus sp. byssus, the P. fucata byssus has an exterior cuticle without granules and an inner core with nanocavities. The removal of Ca2+ by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) treatment expands the nanocavities and reduces the extensibility of the byssus, which is accompanied by a decrease in the β-sheet conformation of byssal proteins. Through proteomic methods, several proteins with antioxidant and anti-corrosive properties were identified as the main components of the distal byssus regions. Specifically, a protein containing thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), which is highly expressed in the foot, is hypothesized to be responsible for byssus extensibility. Together, our findings demonstrate the importance of inorganic ions and multiple proteins for bivalve byssus extension, which could guide the future design of biomaterials for use in seawater. PMID:26446436

  15. Extensible byssus of Pinctada fucata: Ca2+-stabilized nanocavities and a thrombospondin-1 protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuang; Li, Shiguo; Huang, Jingliang; Liu, Yangjia; Jia, Ganchu; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-10-01

    The extensible byssus is produced by the foot of bivalve animals, including the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata, and enables them to attach to hard underwater surfaces. However, the mechanism of their extensibility is not well understood. To understand this mechanism, we analyzed the ultrastructure, composition and mechanical properties of the P. fucata byssus using electron microscopy, elemental analysis, proteomics and mechanical testing. In contrast to the microstructures of Mytilus sp. byssus, the P. fucata byssus has an exterior cuticle without granules and an inner core with nanocavities. The removal of Ca2+ by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) treatment expands the nanocavities and reduces the extensibility of the byssus, which is accompanied by a decrease in the β-sheet conformation of byssal proteins. Through proteomic methods, several proteins with antioxidant and anti-corrosive properties were identified as the main components of the distal byssus regions. Specifically, a protein containing thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), which is highly expressed in the foot, is hypothesized to be responsible for byssus extensibility. Together, our findings demonstrate the importance of inorganic ions and multiple proteins for bivalve byssus extension, which could guide the future design of biomaterials for use in seawater.

  16. Arginine Depletion by Arginine Deiminase Does Not Affect Whole Protein Metabolism or Muscle Fractional Protein Synthesis Rate in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Juan C.; Didelija, Inka Cajo

    2015-01-01

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depletion can potentially exacerbate the progressive loss of body weight, and especially lean body mass, in cancer patients we determined the effect of arginine depletion by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) on whole body protein synthesis and fractional protein synthesis rate in multiple tissues of mice. ADI-PEG 20 successfully depleted circulating arginine (<1 μmol/L), and increased citrulline concentration more than tenfold. Body weight and body composition, however, were not affected by ADI-PEG 20. Despite the depletion of arginine, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown were maintained in the ADI-PEG 20 treated mice. The fractional protein synthesis rate of muscle was also not affected by arginine depletion. Most tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lungs, stomach, small and large intestine, pancreas) were able to maintain their fractional protein synthesis rate; however, the fractional protein synthesis rate of brain, thymus and testicles was reduced due to the ADI-PEG 20 treatment. Furthermore, these results were confirmed by the incorporation of ureido [14C]citrulline, which indicate the local conversion into arginine, into protein. In conclusion, the intracellular recycling pathway of citrulline is able to provide enough arginine to maintain protein synthesis rate and prevent the loss of lean body mass and body weight. PMID:25775142

  17. Hydrolysis of whey protein isolate with Bacillus licheniformis protease: aggregating capacities of peptide fractions.

    PubMed

    Creusot, Nathalie; Gruppen, Harry

    2008-11-12

    In a previous study, peptides aggregating at pH 7.0 derived from a whey protein hydrolysate made with Bacillus licheniformis protease were fractionated and identified. The objective of the present work was to investigate the solubility of the fractionated aggregating peptides, as a function of concentration, and their aggregating capacities toward added intact proteins. The amount of aggregated material and the composition of the aggregates obtained were measured by nitrogen concentration and size exclusion chromatography, respectively. The results showed that of the four fractions obtained from the aggregating peptides, two were insoluble, while the other two consisted of 1:1 mixture of low and high solubility peptides. Therefore, insoluble peptides coaggregated, assumedly via hydrophobic interactions, other relatively more soluble peptides. It was also shown that aggregating peptides could aggregate intact protein nonspecifically since the same peptides were involved in the aggregation of whey proteins, beta-casein, and bovine serum albumin. Both insoluble and partly insoluble peptides were required for the aggregation of intact protein. These results are of interest for the applications of protein hydrolysates, as mixtures of intact protein and peptides are often present in these applications. PMID:18922012

  18. Sequential fractionation and isolation of subcellular proteins from tissue or cultured cells

    PubMed Central

    Baghirova, Sabina; Hughes, Bryan G.; Hendzel, Michael J.; Schulz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Many types of studies require the localization of a protein to, or isolation of enriched protein from a specific cellular compartment. Many protocols in the literature and from commercially available kits claim to yield pure cellular fractions. However, in our hands, the former often do not work effectively and the latter may be prohibitively expensive if a large number of fractionations are required. Furthermore, the largely proprietary composition of reagents in commercial kits means that the user is not able to make adjustments if, for example, a particular component affects the activity of a protein of interest. The method described here allows the isolation of purified proteins from three cellular fractions: the cytosol, membrane-bound organelles, and the nucleus. It uses gentle buffers with increasing detergent strength that sequentially lyse the cell membrane, organelle membranes and finally the nuclear membrane.•Quick, simple to replicate or adjust; this method does not require expensive reagents or use of commercial kits•The protocol can be applied to tissue samples or cultured cells without changing buffer components•Yields purified fractions of cytosolic, membrane bound and nuclear proteins, with the proper distribution of the appropriate subcellular markers: GAPDH, VDAC, SERCA2 and lamin A/C PMID:26740924

  19. Fractionation of sheep cheese whey by a scalable method to sequentially isolate bioactive proteins.

    PubMed

    Pilbrow, Jodi; Bekhit, Alaa El-din A; Carne, Alan

    2016-07-15

    This study reports a procedure for the simultaneous purification of glyco(caseino)macropeptide, immunoglobulin, lactoperoxidase, lactoferrin, α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin from sheep cheese sweet whey, an under-utilized by-product of cheese manufacture generated by an emerging sheep dairy industry in New Zealand. These proteins have recognized value in the nutrition, biomedical and health-promoting supplements industries. A sequential fractionation procedure using economical anion and cation exchange chromatography on HiTrap resins was evaluated. The whey protein fractionation is performed under mild conditions, requires only the adjustment of pH between ion exchange chromatography steps, does not require buffer exchange and uses minimal amounts of chemicals. The purity of the whey protein fractions generated were analyzed by reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography and the identity of the proteins was confirmed by mass spectrometry. This scalable procedure demonstrates that several proteins of recognized value can be fractionated in reasonable yield and purity from sheep cheese whey in one streamlined process. PMID:26948602

  20. Anticancer and antioxidant activities of the peptide fraction from algae protein waste.

    PubMed

    Sheih, I-Chuan; Fang, Tony J; Wu, Tung-Kung; Lin, Peng-Hsiang

    2010-01-27

    Algae protein waste is a byproduct during production of algae essence from Chlorella vulgaris. There is no known report on the anticancer peptides derived from the microalgae protein waste. In this paper, the peptide fraction isolated from pepsin hydrolysate of algae protein waste had strong dose-dependent antiproliferation and induced a post-G1 cell cycle arrest in AGS cells; however, no cytotoxicity was observed in WI-38 lung fibroblasts cells in vitro. The peptide fraction also revealed much better antioxidant activity toward peroxyl radicals and LDL than those of Trolox. Among these peptides, a potent antiproliferative, antioxidant, and NO-production-inhibiting hendecapeptide was isolated, and its amino acid sequence was VECYGPNRPQF. These results demonstrate that inexpensive algae protein waste could be a new alternative to produce anticancer peptides. PMID:19916544

  1. Specific Binding of the Syringolide Elicitors to a Soluble Protein Fraction from Soybean Leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Ji, C.; Okinaka, Y.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tsurushima, T.; Buzzell, R. I.; Sims, J. J.; Midland, S. L.; Slaymaker, D.; Yoshikawa, M.; Yamaoka, N.; Keen, N. T.

    1997-01-01

    Syringolides are glycolipid elicitors produced by Gram-negative bacteria expressing Pseudomonas syringae avirulence gene D. The syringolides mediate gene-for-gene complementarity, inducing the hypersensitive response only in soybean plants carrying the Rpg4 disease resistance gene. A site(s) for 125I-syringolide 1 was detected in the soluble protein fraction from soybean leaves, but no evidence for ligand-specific binding to the microsomal fraction was obtained. The Kd value for syringolide 1 binding with the soluble fraction was 8.7 nM, and binding was greatly reduced by prior protease treatment or heating. A native gel assay was also used to demonstrate ligand-specific binding of labeled syringolide 1 with a soluble protein(s). Competition studies with 125I-syringolide 1 and several structural derivatives demonstrated a direct correlation between binding affinity to the soluble fraction and elicitor activity. However, differential competition binding studies disclosed no differences in syringolide binding to soluble fractions from Rpg4/Rpg4 or rpg4/rpg4 soybean leaves. Thus, the observed binding site fulfills several criteria expected of an intracellular receptor for the syringolides, but it is most likely not encoded by the Rpg4 gene. Instead, the Rpg4 gene product may function subsequent to elicitor binding, possibly in intracellular signal transduction. PMID:12237390

  2. Coil fraction-dependent phase behaviour of a model globular protein-polymer diblock copolymer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Carla S; Olsen, Bradley D

    2014-05-01

    The self-assembly of the model globular protein-polymer block copolymer mCherry-b-poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) is explored across a range of polymer coil fractions from 0.21 to 0.82 to produce a phase diagram for these materials as a function of molecular composition. Overall, four types of morphologies were observed: hexagonally packed cylinders, perforated lamellae, lamellae, and disordered nanostructures. Across all coil fractions and morphologies, a lyotropic re-entrant order-disorder transition in water was observed, with disordered structures below 30 wt% and above 70 wt% and well-ordered morphologies at intermediate concentrations. Solid state samples prepared by solvent evaporation show moderately ordered structures similar to those observed in 60 wt% solutions, suggesting that bulk structures result from kinetic trapping of morphologies which appear at lower concentrations. While highly ordered cylindrical nanostructures are observed around a bioconjugate polymer volume fraction of 0.3 and well-ordered lamellae are seen near a volume fraction of 0.6, materials at lower or higher coil fractions become increasingly disordered. Notable differences between the phase behaviour of globular protein-polymer block copolymers and coil-coil diblock copolymers include the lack of spherical nanostructures at either high or low polymer coil fractions as well as shifted phase boundaries between morphologies which result in an asymmetric phase diagram. PMID:24695642

  3. Compositional characteristics of a chloroform/methanol soluble protein fraction from spinach chloroplast membranes.

    PubMed

    Henriques, F; Park, R B

    1976-05-14

    Extraction of an aqueous suspension of spinach chloroplast lamellae with a chloroform/methanol mixture leads to solubilization of about 1/3 of the total membrane protein. Amino acid analysis of the chloroform/methanol-soluble protein shows that this fraction is largely enriched in the hydrophobic residues proline, leucine, alanine and phenylalanine and considerably depleted in polar amino acids, namely lysine and arginine. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the solubilized material reveals the presence of a variety of low molecular weight polypeptides (molecular weight less than or equal to 25 000), with more than 50% of the total fraction being contributed by a 25 000 dalton band. This band, which accounts for about 25% of the total chloroplast lamellar protein, has recently been identified as the main component of the light-harvesting chlorophyll-protein complex. The physiological role of most of the chloroform/methanol-soluble protein fraction is not known at present. From its chemical properties and apparent biological inertness, we propose that it plays mainly a structural role in situ, interacting with the lipid moiety of the chloroplast membrane. The material insoluble in the aqueous chloroform/methanol mixture is largely enriched in manganese, iron, cytochrome and water-soluble proteins, such as chloroplast coupling factor and ribulose diphosphate carboxylase. PMID:179588

  4. The non-histone proteins of the rat liver nucleus and their distribution amongst chromatin fractions as produced by nuclease digestion.

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, J E; Igo-Kemenes, T; Zachau, H G

    1979-01-01

    The search for proteins involved in maintaining higher order chromatin structures has led to a systematic examination of the non-histone proteins (NHP) of rat liver nuclei in the context of nuclease digestion studies. 40-45% of the 3H-tryptophan labelled NHP originally present could be removed by extensive washing in a "physiological" buffer, incubation at 37 degrees C with or without nuclease and a further wash step. Nuclei at this stage had a remarkably constant NHP content (ca. 0.73 micrograms/micrograms DNA), independent of the degree of digestion with micrococcal nuclease or HaeIII. The solubilized chromatin produced by limited digestion with either nuclease contained 0.3-0.5 microgram NHP/microgram DNA, this value falling to ca. 0.16 after more extensive cleavage. Insoluble chromatin fractions were between 2-fold (very limited digestion) and 16-fold (extensive digestion) richer in NHP than the corresponding soluble fractions. Gel electrophoresis revealed about 12 NHP bands in soluble fractions, the most prominent of M.Wt. 41.400, while the insoluble material had at least 50 components. These properties were independent of whether lysis of nuclei occurred in 0.2 or 50 mM ionic strength. The large disparity in NHP content between complementary soluble and insoluble chromatin fractions is considered in terms of chromatin organization in vivo and the possible role of NHP migration. Images PMID:493143

  5. Partition of E1A proteins between soluble and structural fractions of adenovirus-infected and -transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, P K; Flint, S J

    1986-01-01

    The partition of E1A proteins between soluble and structural framework fractions of human cells infected or transformed by subgroup C adenoviruses was investigated by using gentle cell fractionation conditions. A polyclonal antibody raised against a trpE-E1A fusion protein (K.R. Spindler, D.S.E. Rosser, and A. J. Berk, J. Virol. 132-141, 1984) synthesized in Escherichia coli was used to measure the steady-state levels of E1A proteins recovered in the various fractions by immunoblotting. The relative concentration of E1A proteins recovered in the soluble fraction of adenovirus type 2-infected cells was at least fivefold greater than the relative concentration in the corresponding fraction of transformed 293 cells. The observed distribution of E1A proteins was not altered by the sulfhydryl-blocking reagent N-ethylmaleimide. E1A proteins were recovered in nuclear matrix, chromatin, and cytoskeleton fractions after further fractionation of the structural framework fraction. However, the E1A protein species that could be identified by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis were not uniformly distributed among the subcellular fractions examined. The results obtained when fractionation was performed in the presence of the oxidation catalysts Cu2+ or (ortho-phenanthroline)2 Cu2+ indicate that E1A proteins can be efficiently cross-linked, via disulfide bonds, to the structural framework of both adenovirus-infected and adenovirus-transformed cells. Images PMID:3023654

  6. Hollow-Fiber Flow Field-Flow Fractionation for Mass Spectrometry: From Proteins to Whole Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Rambaldi, Diana Cristina; Roda, Aldo; Hee Moon, Myeong

    Mass spectrometry (MS) provides analyte identification over a wide molar-mass range. However, particularly in the case of complex matrices, this ability is often enhanced by the use of pre-MS separation steps. A separation, prototype technique for the "gentle" fractionation of large/ultralarge analytes, from proteins to whole cells, is here described to reduce complexity and maintain native characteristics of the sample before MS analysis. It is based on flow field-flow fractionation, and it employs a micro-volume fractionation channel made of a ca. 20 cm hollow-fiber membrane of sub-millimeter section. The key advantages of this technique lie in the low volume and low-cost of the channel, which makes it suitable to a disposable usage. Fractionation performance and instrumental simplicity make it an interesting methodology for in-batch or on-line pre-MS treatment of such samples.

  7. Mapping the Subcellular Proteome of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 using Sarkosyl-based fractionation and LC-MS/MS protein identification

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Roslyn N.; Romine, Margaret F.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-07-19

    A simple and effective subcellular proteomic method for fractionation and analysis of gram-negative bacterial cytoplasm, periplasm, inner, and outer membranes was applied to Shewanella oneidensis to gain insight into its subcellular architecture. A combination of differential centrifugation, Sarkosyl solubilization, and osmotic lysis was used to prepare subcellular fractions. Global differences in protein fractions were observed by SDS PAGE and heme staining, and tryptic peptides were analyzed using high-resolution LC-MS/MS. Compared to crude cell lysates, the fractionation method achieved a significant enrichment (average ~2-fold) in proteins predicted to be localized to each subcellular fraction. Compared to other detergent, organic solvent, and density-based methods previously reported, Sarkosyl most effectively facilitated separation of the inner and outer membranes and was amenable to mass spectrometry, making this procedure ideal for probing the subcellular proteome of gram-negative bacteria via LC-MS/MS. With 40% of the observable proteome represented, this study has provided extensive information on both subcellular architecture and relative abundance of proteins in S. oneidensis and provides a foundation for future work on subcellular organization and protein-membrane interactions in other gram-negative bacteria.

  8. The Switch Regulating Transcription of the Escherichia coli Biotin Operon Does Not Require Extensive Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Solbiati, José; Cronan, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Transcription of the Escherichia coli biotin (bio) operon is regulated by BirA, a protein that is not only the repressor that regulates bio operon expression by DNA binding but also the enzyme that covalently attaches biotin to its cognate acceptor proteins. Binding of BirA to the bio operator requires dimerization of the protein that is triggered by BirA-catalyzed synthesis of biotinoyl-adenylate (bio-AMP), the obligatory intermediate of the attachment reaction. The current model postulates that the unmodified acceptor protein binds the monomeric BirA:bio-AMP complex and thereby blocks assembly (dimerization) of the form of BirA that binds DNA. We report that expression of fusion proteins that carry synthetic biotin accepting peptide sequences was as effective as the natural acceptor protein in derepression of bio operon transcription. These peptide sequences have sequences that are remarkably dissimilar to that of the natural acceptor protein and thus our data argue that the regulatory switch does not require the extensive protein-protein interactions postulated in the current model. PMID:20142036

  9. Effectiveness of esterified whey proteins fractions against Egyptian Lethal Avian Influenza A (H5N1)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Avian influenza A (H5N1) virus is one of the most important public health concerns worldwide. The antiviral activity of native and esterified whey proteins fractions (α- lactalbumin, β- lactoglobulin, and lactoferrin) was evaluated against A/chicken/Egypt/086Q-NLQP/2008 HPAI (H5N1) strain of clade 2.2.1 (for multiplicity of infection (1 MOI) after 72 h of incubation at 37°C in the presence of 5% CO2) using MDCK cell lines. Result Both the native and esterified lactoferrin seem to be the most active antiviral protein among the tested samples, followed by β- lactoglobulin. α-Lactalbumin had less antiviral activity even after esterification. Conclusion Esterification of whey proteins fractions especially lactoferrin and β-lactoglobulin enhanced their antiviral activity against H5N1 in a concentration dependent manner. PMID:21092081

  10. Improved Feed Protein Fractional Schemes for Formulating Rations With the Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate predictions of rumen-degradable protein (RDP) and rumen-undegradable protein (RUP) supplies are necessary to optimize performance while minimizing losses of excess nitrogen (N). The objectives of this study were to evaluate the original Cornell Net Carbohydrate Protein System (CNCPS) protei...

  11. Size-selective fractionation and visual mapping of allergen protein chemistry in Arachis hypogaea.

    PubMed

    Hebling, Christine M; Ross, Mark M; Callahan, John H; McFarland, Melinda A

    2012-11-01

    Peanuts (Arachis hypogaea) in addition to milk, eggs, fish, crustaceans, wheat, tree nuts, and soybean are commonly referred to as the "big eight" foods that contribute to the majority of food allergies worldwide. Despite the severity of allergic reactions and growing prevalence in children and adults, there is no cure for peanut allergy, leaving avoidance as the primary mode of treatment. To improve analytical methods for peanut allergen detection, researchers must overcome obstacles involved in handling complex food matrices while attempting to decipher the chemistry that underlies allergen protein interactions. To address such challenges, we conducted a global proteome characterization of raw peanuts using a sophisticated GELFrEE-PAGE-LC-MS/MS platform consisting of gel-based protein fractionation followed by mass spectrometric identification. The in-solution mass-selective protein fractionation: (1) enhances the number of unique peptide identifications, (2) provides a visual map of protein isoforms, and (3) aids in the identification of disulfide-linked protein complexes. GELFrEE-PAGE-LC-MS/MS not only overcomes many of the challenges involved in the study of plant proteomics, but enriches the understanding of peanut protein chemistry, which is typically unattainable in a traditional bottom-up proteomic analysis. A global understanding of protein chemistry in Arachis hypogaea ultimately will aid the development of improved methods for allergen detection in food. PMID:23020697

  12. Top Down Proteomics of Human Membrane Proteins from Enriched Mitochondrial Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Catherman, Adam D.; Li, Mingxi; Tran, John C.; Durbin, Kenneth R.; Compton, Philip D.; Early, Bryan P.; Thomas, Paul M.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2013-01-01

    The interrogation of intact integral membrane proteins has long been a challenge for biological mass spectrometry. Here, we demonstrate the application of Top Down mass spectrometry to whole membrane proteins below 60 kDa with up to 8 transmembrane helices. Analysis of enriched mitochondrial membrane preparations from human cells yielded identification of 83 integral membrane proteins, along with 163 membrane-associated or soluble proteins, with a median q value of 3 × 10−10. An analysis of matching fragment ions demonstrated that significantly more fragment ions were found within transmembrane domains than would be expected based upon the observed protein sequence. Forty-six proteins from the complexes of oxidative phosphorylation were identified which exemplifies the increasing ability of Top Down Proteomics to provide extensive coverage in a biological network. PMID:23305238

  13. Analysis of 953 Human Proteins from a Mitochondrial HEK293 Fraction by Complexome Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Wessels, Hans J. C. T.; Vogel, Rutger O.; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Rodenburg, Richard J.; van den Heuvel, Lambert P.; van Gool, Alain J.; Gloerich, Jolein; Smeitink, Jan A. M.; Nijtmans, Leo G.

    2013-01-01

    Complexome profiling is a novel technique which uses shotgun proteomics to establish protein migration profiles from fractionated blue native electrophoresis gels. Here we present a dataset of blue native electrophoresis migration profiles for 953 proteins by complexome profiling. By analysis of mitochondrial ribosomal complexes we demonstrate its potential to verify putative protein-protein interactions identified by affinity purification – mass spectrometry studies. Protein complexes were extracted in their native state from a HEK293 mitochondrial fraction and separated by blue native gel electrophoresis. Gel lanes were cut into gel slices of even size and analyzed by shotgun proteomics. Subsequently, the acquired protein migration profiles were analyzed for co-migration via hierarchical cluster analysis. This dataset holds great promise as a comprehensive resource for de novo identification of protein-protein interactions or to underpin and prioritize candidate protein interactions from other studies. To demonstrate the potential use of our dataset we focussed on the mitochondrial translation machinery. Our results show that mitoribosomal complexes can be analyzed by blue native gel electrophoresis, as at least four distinct complexes. Analysis of these complexes confirmed that 24 proteins that had previously been reported to co-purify with mitoribosomes indeed co-migrated with subunits of the mitochondrial ribosome. Co-migration of several proteins involved in biogenesis of inner mitochondrial membrane complexes together with mitoribosomal complexes suggested the possibility of co-translational assembly in human cells. Our data also highlighted a putative ribonucleotide complex that potentially contains MRPL10, MRPL12 and MRPL53 together with LRPPRC and SLIRP. PMID:23935861

  14. Serodiagnosis of fasciolosis by fast protein liquid chromatography-fractionated excretory/secretory antigens.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarian, Kobra; Akhlaghi, Lame; Meamar, Ahmad Reza; Razmjou, Elham; Manouchehri Naeini, Kourosh; Gholami, Samaneh; Najafi Samei, Masoomeh; Falak, Reza

    2016-08-01

    In several studies, different antigenic preparations and diverse immunological tests were applied for serodiagnosis of Fasciola hepatica infections. Most of these preparations showed cross-reactivity with proteins of other parasites. Application of purified antigens might reduce these cross-reactivities. Here, we used fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC)-fractionated extracts of F. hepatica excretory/secretory antigens (E/S Ags) for serodiagnosis of human and sheep fasciolosis. To develop an improved diagnostic method, we fractionated F. hepatica E/S Ags by anion exchange chromatography on a Sepharose CL-6B column and then tested the serodiagnostic values of the fractions. We used sera from F. hepatica-infected human and sheep as positive controls. Sera from patients with hydatidosis and strongyloidiasis were used for cross-reactivity studies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) of the second FPLC peak, containing 20, 25, and 70 kDa proteins, discriminated between F. hepatica-infected and uninfected human and sheep samples. Fractionation of F. hepatica E/S Ags by FPLC is a fast and reproducible way of obtaining antigens useful for serodiagnosis of human and sheep fasciolosis with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. Graphical abstract ᅟ. PMID:27130320

  15. Nutrient digestibility and evaluation of protein and carbohydrate fractionation of citrus by-products.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, S; Taghizadeh, A

    2013-08-01

    The protein and carbohydrate fractionation and nutrient digestibility of citrus by-products were determined. Ruminal, intestinal and total tract CP disappearance values were measured by a modified three-step (MTSP) method and in vitro CP disappearance method (IVCP). Test feeds were orange pulp (OP), lime pulp (LP), lemon pulp (LEP), grapefruit pulp (GP), sweet lemon pulp (SLP), bitter lemon pulp (BLP), bergamot orange pulp (BP) and tangerine pulp (TP). The rumen undegradable protein (RUP) fractions of the feedstuffs were obtained by ruminal incubation in three cannulated wethers and incubation in protease solution (protease type xiv, Streptomyces griseus). The data were analysed using completely randomized design. There were significant differences between the tested feeds in protein fractions and acid detergent insoluble nitrogen (ADIN; C fraction) was highest in GP (14.56%) (p<0.001). For carbohydrate fraction, the highest C fraction was also observed in GP (2.67%) and in relation to the other citrus pulps (p<0.001). Ruminal CP disappearance was highest in OP (71.89%) (p<0.001). The level of post-ruminal CP disappearance, measured by MTSP, was highest for BP (34.94%) (p<0.001). The highest in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD) was found for TP (80.44%) followed by that estimated for BP (78.38%) (p<0.001). The estimated metabolizable energy (MJ/kg DM) varied from 9.77 for LP to 12.91 for BP. Tangerine pulp had the highest true rumen digestibility (TRD) (p<0.001). According to the results, it could be concluded that citrus by-products have high nutritive value and also, the in vitro techniques can be easily used to determine of the nutritive value of citrus by-products. PMID:22703299

  16. A 115 kDa calmodulin-binding protein is located in rat liver endosome fractions.

    PubMed Central

    Enrich, C; Bachs, O; Evans, W H

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of calmodulin-binding polypeptides in various rat liver subcellular fractions was investigated. Plasma-membrane, endosome, Golgi and lysosome fractions were prepared by established procedures. The calmodulin-binding polypeptides present in the subcellular fractions were identified by using an overlay technique after transfer from gels to nitrocellulose sheets. Distinctive populations of calmodulin-binding polypeptides were present in all the fractions examined except lysosomes. A major 115 kDa calmodulin-binding polypeptide of pI 4.3 was located to the endosome subfractions, and it emerges as a candidate endosome-specific protein. Partitioning of endosome fractions between aqueous and Triton X-114 phases indicated that the calmodulin-binding polypeptide was hydrophobic. Major calmodulin-binding polypeptides of 140 and 240 kDa and minor polypeptides of 40-60 kDa were present in plasma membranes. The distribution of calmodulin in the various endosome and plasma-membrane fractions was also analysed, and the results indicated that the amounts were high compared with those in the cytosol. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3214436

  17. Fractionation of different PEGylated forms of a protein by chromatography using environment-responsive membranes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Deqiang; Shang, Xiaojiao; Ghosh, Raja

    2010-08-27

    PEGylation of therapeutic proteins can enhance their efficacy as biopharmaceuticals through increased stability and hydrophilicity, and decreased immunogenicity. A site-specific PEGylated protein (e.g. mono-PEGylated at N-terminus) is frequently desirable as a product. However, multiple-PEGylated forms are frequently produced as byproducts. In this paper we discuss the fractionation of the different PEGylated forms of a protein by hydrophobic interaction chromatography using a stack of hydrophilized PVDF membrane, which has been shown to be environment responsive, as stationary phase. With the model protein examined in this study (i.e. lysozyme), the apparent hydrophobicity in the presence of a lyotropic salt increased with the degree of PEGylation. Based on this, unmodified lysozyme and its mono-, di- and tri-PEGylated forms could each be resolved into separate chromatographic peaks. Such fractionation was not feasible using conventional hydrophobic interaction chromatography using a butyl column. The use of membrane chromatography also ensured that the fractionation was fast and hence suitable for analytical applications such as product purity determination and monitoring of the extent of PEGylation reactions. PMID:20638664

  18. Distinct effects of boar seminal plasma fractions exhibiting different protein profiles on the functionality of highly diluted boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    García, E M; Calvete, J J; Sanz, L; Roca, J; Martínez, E A; Vázquez, J M

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate how different protein profiles of seminal plasma (SP) fractions affect sperm functionality in vitro. Ejaculates from three boars were separated into six fractions. The fractions differed from each other in their sperm content, in their total SP protein content, and their spermadhesin PSP-I/PSP-II and heparin-binding protein (HBP) concentrations. Spermatozoa were mainly recovered in fraction 2 (sperm-rich fraction, >1800 x 10(6) spermatozoa/ml), whereas the pre-sperm fraction 1 and the post-sperm fractions 4-6 contained low numbers of spermatozoa (<500 x 10(6)/ml). Except in fraction 2, the total SP protein concentration and the concentration of both, spermadhesin PSP-I/PSP-II and the HBPs increased with fraction order. Distinct time-dependent effects were observed on motility characteristics and membrane integrity of highly diluted boar spermatozoa upon incubation with a 10% dilution of the SP from each fraction. The highest sperm viability was recorded after exposure for 5 h to fraction 2, followed by fractions 1 and 3. The percentages of motile spermatozoa also differed significantly among fractions after 5 h of incubation. Spermatozoa incubated with SP of fractions 1-3 showed the highest percentage motility. We conclude that different SP fractions exert distinct effects on the functionality of highly diluted boar spermatozoa. Fractions 1-3 appear to promote sperm survival, whereas fractions 4-6 seem to be harmful for preserving the physiological functions of highly diluted boar spermatozoa. PMID:19323794

  19. Fractionation and evaluation of proteins in roots of Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench.

    PubMed

    Balciunaite, Gabriele; Juodsnukyte, Jovita; Savickas, Arunas; Ragazinskiene, Ona; Siatkute, Luka; Zvirblyte, Gitana; Mistiniene, Edita; Savickiene, Nijole

    2015-12-01

    Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench, a member of the Asteraceae family, is a plant rich in flavonoids, essential oils, phenolic compounds, saponins, polysaccharides and glycoproteins. The aim of the study was to evaluate the protein content in dried roots of Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench after homogenization of roots with liquid nitrogen, extraction in 0.01 mol L-1 phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and purification followed by fractionation of proteins using gel filtration chromatography. Total concentration of proteins was measured using the Bradford method, and evaluation of the molecular mass of proteins was accomplished by applying the SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis. The Bradford assay revealed that the highest concentration of proteins in fractions collected after gel filtration chomatography was 4.66-6.07 mg mL-1. Glycoproteins, alkamides and polysaccharides in roots of Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench are chemical compounds that are responsible for their immunomodulatory properties. However, information about the difference of protein contents in fresh and dried roots of E. purpurea is insufficient. PMID:26677903

  20. The Plasmodium berghei translocon of exported proteins reveals spatiotemporal dynamics of tubular extensions.

    PubMed

    Matz, Joachim M; Goosmann, Christian; Brinkmann, Volker; Grützke, Josephine; Ingmundson, Alyssa; Matuschewski, Kai; Kooij, Taco W A

    2015-01-01

    The erythrocyte is an extraordinary host cell for intracellular pathogens and requires extensive remodelling to become permissive for infection. Malaria parasites modify their host red blood cells through protein export to acquire nutrients and evade immune responses. Endogenous fluorescent tagging of three signature proteins of the Plasmodium berghei translocon of exported proteins (PTEX), heat shock protein 101, exported protein 2 (EXP2), and PTEX88, revealed motile, tubular extensions of the parasitophorous vacuole that protrude from the parasite far into the red blood cell. EXP2 displays a more prominent presence at the periphery of the parasite, consistent with its proposed role in pore formation. The tubular compartment is most prominent during trophozoite growth. Distinct spatiotemporal expression of individual PTEX components during sporogony and liver-stage development indicates additional functions and tight regulation of the PTEX translocon during parasite life cycle progression. Together, live cell imaging and correlative light and electron microscopy permitted previously unrecognized spatiotemporal and subcellular resolution of PTEX-containing tubules in murine malaria parasites. These findings further refine current models for Plasmodium-induced erythrocyte makeover. PMID:26219962

  1. The Plasmodium berghei translocon of exported proteins reveals spatiotemporal dynamics of tubular extensions

    PubMed Central

    Matz, Joachim M.; Goosmann, Christian; Brinkmann, Volker; Grützke, Josephine; Ingmundson, Alyssa; Matuschewski, Kai; Kooij, Taco W. A.

    2015-01-01

    The erythrocyte is an extraordinary host cell for intracellular pathogens and requires extensive remodelling to become permissive for infection. Malaria parasites modify their host red blood cells through protein export to acquire nutrients and evade immune responses. Endogenous fluorescent tagging of three signature proteins of the Plasmodium berghei translocon of exported proteins (PTEX), heat shock protein 101, exported protein 2 (EXP2), and PTEX88, revealed motile, tubular extensions of the parasitophorous vacuole that protrude from the parasite far into the red blood cell. EXP2 displays a more prominent presence at the periphery of the parasite, consistent with its proposed role in pore formation. The tubular compartment is most prominent during trophozoite growth. Distinct spatiotemporal expression of individual PTEX components during sporogony and liver-stage development indicates additional functions and tight regulation of the PTEX translocon during parasite life cycle progression. Together, live cell imaging and correlative light and electron microscopy permitted previously unrecognized spatiotemporal and subcellular resolution of PTEX-containing tubules in murine malaria parasites. These findings further refine current models for Plasmodium-induced erythrocyte makeover. PMID:26219962

  2. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John Je; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. PMID:27115346

  3. Protein composition of wheat gluten polymer fractions determined by quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flour proteins from the US bread wheat Butte 86 were extracted in 0.5% SDS using a two-step procedure with and without sonication and further separated by size exclusion chromatography into monomeric and polymeric fractions. Proteins in each fraction were analyzed by quantitative two-dimensional gel...

  4. Effect of summer season on milk protein fractions in Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Bernabucci, U; Basiricò, L; Morera, P; Dipasquale, D; Vitali, A; Piccioli Cappelli, F; Calamari, L

    2015-03-01

    Milk characteristics are affected by heat stress, but very little information is available on changes of milk protein fractions and their relationship with cheesemaking properties of milk. The main objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of hot season on milk protein fractions and cheesemaking properties of milk for Grana Padano cheese production. The study was carried out in a dairy farm with a cheese factory for transforming the milk to Grana Padano cheese. The study was carried out from June 2012 to May 2013. Temperature and relative humidity of the inside barn were recorded daily during the study period using 8 electronic data loggers programmed to record every 30 min. Constant managerial conditions were maintained during the experimental periods. During the experimental period, feed and diet characteristics, milk yield, and milk characteristics were recorded in summer (from June 29 to July 27, 2012), winter (from January 25 to March 8, 2013), and spring (from May 17 to May 31, 2013). Milk yield was recorded and individual milk samples were taken from 25 cows selected in each season during the p.m. milking. Content of fat, proteins, caseins (CN), lactose and somatic cell count (SCC), titratable acidity, and milk rennet coagulation properties were determined on fresh samples. Milk protein fraction concentrations were determined by the sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. Data were tested for nonnormality by the Shapiro-Wilk test. In case of nonnormality, parameters were normalized by log or exponential transformation. The data were analyzed with repeated measures ANOVA using a mixed model procedure. For all the main milk components (fat, protein, total solids, and solids-not-fat), the lowest values were observed in the summer and the greatest values were observed in the winter. Casein fractions, with the exception of γ-CN, showed the lowest values in the summer and the greatest values in the winter. The content of IgG and serum albumin was greater in summer

  5. Protein Fractions from Korean Mistletoe (Viscum Album coloratum) Extract Induce Insulin Secretion from Pancreatic Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Bae

    2014-01-01

    Mistletoe (Viscum Album coloratum) has been known as a medicinal plant in European and Asian countries. Recent data show that biological activity of mistletoe alleviates hypertension, heart disease, renal failure, and cancer development. In this study, we report the antidiabetic effect of Korean mistletoe extract (KME). KME treatments enhanced the insulin secretion from the pancreatic β-cell without any effects of cytotoxicity. PDX-1 and beta2/neuroD known as transcription factors that regulate the expression of insulin gene were upregulated by treatment of the KME protein fractions isolated by ion-exchange chromatography after ammonium sulfate precipitation. Furthermore, these KME protein fractions significantly lowered the blood glucose level and the volume of drinking water in alloxan induced hyperglycemic mice. Taken together with the findings, it provides new insight that KME might be served as a useful source for the development of medicinal reagent to reduce blood glucose level of type I diabetic patients. PMID:24959189

  6. The protein fraction from wheat-based dried distiller's grain with solubles (DDGS): extraction and valorization

    PubMed Central

    Villegas-Torres, M.F.; Ward, J.M.; Lye, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays there is worldwide interest in developing a sustainable economy where biobased chemicals are the lead actors. Various potential feedstocks are available including glycerol, rapeseed meal and municipal solid waste (MSW). For biorefinery applications the byproduct streams from distilleries and bioethanol plants, such as wheat-based dried distiller's grain with solubles (DDGS), are particularly attractive, as they do not compete for land use. Wheat DDGS is rich in polymeric sugars, proteins and oils, making it ideal as a current animal feed, but also a future substrate for the synthesis of fine and commodity chemicals. This review focuses on the extraction and valorization of the protein fraction of wheat DDGS as this has received comparatively little attention to date. Since wheat DDGS production is expected to increase greatly in the near future, as a consequence of expansion of the bioethanol industry in the UK, strategies to valorize the component fractions of DDGS are urgently needed. PMID:25644639

  7. The protein fraction from wheat-based dried distiller's grain with solubles (DDGS): extraction and valorization.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Torres, M F; Ward, J M; Lye, G J

    2015-12-25

    Nowadays there is worldwide interest in developing a sustainable economy where biobased chemicals are the lead actors. Various potential feedstocks are available including glycerol, rapeseed meal and municipal solid waste (MSW). For biorefinery applications the byproduct streams from distilleries and bioethanol plants, such as wheat-based dried distiller's grain with solubles (DDGS), are particularly attractive, as they do not compete for land use. Wheat DDGS is rich in polymeric sugars, proteins and oils, making it ideal as a current animal feed, but also a future substrate for the synthesis of fine and commodity chemicals. This review focuses on the extraction and valorization of the protein fraction of wheat DDGS as this has received comparatively little attention to date. Since wheat DDGS production is expected to increase greatly in the near future, as a consequence of expansion of the bioethanol industry in the UK, strategies to valorize the component fractions of DDGS are urgently needed. PMID:25644639

  8. [The virological safety and bacterial sterility of a method for fractionating blood plasma proteins with rivanol].

    PubMed

    Zhurina, N A; Shatskaia, T L; Katushkina, N V

    1993-01-01

    The bacterial and virological safety of the method of rivanol fractionation of blood plasma proteins has been evaluated in experiments with samples of donor blood plasma mixed with the suspension of viruses and Escherichia coli used as models. The bacteriostatic action of rivanol and the elimination of bacteriophage and influenza virus from the end product at the stages of rivanol precipitation and adsorption on carbon have been established. PMID:8067072

  9. Pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) seed proteins: sequential extraction processing and fraction characterization.

    PubMed

    Rezig, Leila; Chibani, Farhat; Chouaibi, Moncef; Dalgalarrondo, Michèle; Hessini, Kamel; Guéguen, Jacques; Hamdi, Salem

    2013-08-14

    Seed proteins extracted from Tunisian pumpkin seeds ( Cucurbita maxima ) were investigated for their solubility properties and sequentially extracted according to the Osborne procedure. The solubility of pumpkin proteins from seed flour was greatly influenced by pH changes and ionic strength, with higher values in the alkaline pH regions. It also depends on the seed defatting solvent. Protein solubility was decreased by using chloroform/methanol (CM) for lipid extraction instead of pentane (P). On the basis of differential solubility fractionation and depending on the defatting method, the alkali extract (AE) was the major fraction (42.1 (P), 22.3% (CM)) compared to the salt extract (8.6 (P), 7.5% (CM)). In salt, alkali, and isopropanol extracts, all essential amino acids with the exceptions of threonine and lysine met the minimum requirements for preschool children (FAO/WHO/UNU). The denaturation temperatures were 96.6 and 93.4 °C for salt and alkali extracts, respectively. Pumpkin protein extracts with unique protein profiles and higher denaturation temperatures could impart novel characteristics when used as food ingredients. PMID:23869935

  10. Combining proteomic tools to characterize the protein fraction of llama (Lama glama) milk.

    PubMed

    Saadaoui, Besma; Bianchi, Leonardo; Henry, Céline; Miranda, Guy; Martin, Patrice; Cebo, Christelle

    2014-05-01

    Llamas belong to the Camelidae family along with camels. While dromedary camel milk has been broadly characterized, data on llama milk proteins are scarce. The objective of this study was thus to investigate the protein composition of llama milk. Skimmed llama milk proteins were first characterized by a 2D separation technique coupling RP-HPLC in the first dimension with SDS-PAGE in the second dimension (RP-HPLC/SDS-PAGE). Llama milk proteins, namely caseins (αs1 -, αs2 -, β-, and κ-caseins), α-lactalbumin, lactoferrin, and serum albumin, were identified using PMF. Llama milk proteins were also characterized by online LC-ESI-MS analysis. This approach allowed attributing precise molecular masses for most of the previously MS-identified llama milk proteins. Interestingly, α-lactalbumin exhibits distinct chromatographic behaviors between llama and dromedary camel milk. De novo sequencing of the llama α-lactalbumin protein by LC coupled with MS/MS (LC-MS/MS) showed the occurrence of two amino acid substitutions (R62L/I and K89L/I) that partly explained the higher hydrophobicity of llama α-lactalbumin compared with its dromedary counterpart. Taken together, these results provide for the first time a thorough description of the protein fraction of Lama glama milk. PMID:24519815

  11. Extraction, fractionation and functional properties of proteins from the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Ursu, Alina-Violeta; Marcati, Alain; Sayd, Thierry; Sante-Lhoutellier, Véronique; Djelveh, Gholamreza; Michaud, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    This paper deals with the extraction and emulsifying properties of proteins from Chlorella vulgaris. Solubilisation of proteins has been achieved using high pressure cell disrupter under pH=7 or pH=12. The higher solubilisation yield (52±3%w/w) was obtained using a combination of alkaline conditions and mechanical treatments (2.7kbar). After solubilisation, proteins were recovered by two procedures: precipitation in acid media and concentration/fractionation by tangential ultrafiltration. Proteins were analysed for their molecular weights, isoelectric points and amino acids compositions and their emulsifying properties were quantified and compared to those of commercial ingredients. In spite of lower yield, better emulsifying capacity was obtained when protein solubilisation takes place at pH=7 and when using proteins from permeate of tangential ultrafiltration. In all cases, emulsifying capacity (1780±20 and 3090±50mLoil/g protein) and stability (72±1% and 79±1%) of microalgae proteins remained comparable or higher than the commercial ingredients such as sodium caseinate. PMID:24534795

  12. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John JE; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14530.001 PMID:27115346

  13. Vitamin D binding protein isoforms as candidate predictors of disease extension in childhood arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, David S.; Newell, Keri; Evans, Alexandra N.; Finnegan, Sorcha; Manning, Gwen; Scaife, Caitriona; McAllister, Catherine; Pennington, Stephen R.; Duncan, Mark W.; Moore, Terry L.; Rooney, Madeleine E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) comprises a poorly understood group of chronic autoimmune diseases with variable clinical outcomes. We investigated whether the synovial fluid (SF) proteome could distinguish a subset of patients in whom disease extends to affect a large number of joints. Methods. SF samples from 57 patients were obtained around time of initial diagnosis of JIA, labeled with Cy dyes and separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Multivariate analyses were used to isolate a panel of proteins which distinguish patient subgroups. Proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry with expression verified by immunochemical methods. Protein glycosylation status was confirmed by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. Results. A truncated isoform of vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) is present at significantly reduced levels in the SF of oligoarticular patients at risk of disease extension, relative to other subgroups (p < 0.05). Furthermore, sialylated forms of immunopurified synovial VDBP were significantly reduced in extended oligoarticular patients (p < 0.005). Conclusion. Reduced conversion of VDBP to a macrophage activation factor may be used to stratify patients to determine risk of disease extension in JIA patients. PMID:22771520

  14. Fluorescent Protein Aided Insights on Plastids and their Extensions: A Critical Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Kathleen; Wozny, Michael R.; Jaipargas, Erica-Ashley; Barton, Kiah A.; Anderson, Cole; Mathur, Jaideep

    2016-01-01

    Multi-colored fluorescent proteins targeted to plastids have provided new insights on the dynamic behavior of these organelles and their interactions with other cytoplasmic components and compartments. Sub-plastidic components such as thylakoids, stroma, the inner and outer membranes of the plastid envelope, nucleoids, plastoglobuli, and starch grains have been efficiently highlighted in living plant cells. In addition, stroma filled membrane extensions called stromules have drawn attention to the dynamic nature of the plastid and its interactions with the rest of the cell. Use of dual and triple fluorescent protein combinations has begun to reveal plastid interactions with mitochondria, the nucleus, the endoplasmic reticulum and F-actin and suggests integral roles of plastids in retrograde signaling, cell to cell communication as well as plant-pathogen interactions. While the rapid advances and insights achieved through fluorescent protein based research on plastids are commendable it is necessary to endorse meaningful observations but subject others to closer scrutiny. Here, in order to develop a better and more comprehensive understanding of plastids and their extensions we provide a critical appraisal of recent information that has been acquired using targeted fluorescent protein probes. PMID:26834765

  15. Rho-associated protein kinase modulates neurite extension by regulating microtubule remodeling and vinculin distribution

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke’en; Zhang, Wenbin; Chen, Jing; Li, Sumei; Guo, Guoqing

    2013-01-01

    Rho-associated protein kinase is an essential regulator of cytoskeletal dynamics during the process of neurite extension. However, whether Rho kinase regulates microtubule remodeling or the distribution of adhesive proteins to mediate neurite outgrowth remains unclear. By specifically modulating Rho kinase activity with pharmacological agents, we studied the morpho-dynamics of neurite outgrowth. We found that lysophosphatidic acid, an activator of Rho kinase, inhibited neurite outgrowth, which could be reversed by Y-27632, an inhibitor of Rho kinase. Meanwhile, reorganization of microtubules was noticed during these processes, as indicated by their significant changes in the soma and growth cone. In addition, exposure to lysophosphatidic acid led to a decreased membrane distribution of vinculin, a focal adhesion protein in neurons, whereas Y-27632 recruited vinculin to the membrane. Taken together, our data suggest that Rho kinase regulates rat hippocampal neurite growth and microtubule formation via a mechanism associated with the redistribution of vinculin. PMID:25206623

  16. Extensive dataset of boar seminal plasma proteome displaying putative reproductive functions of identified proteins.

    PubMed

    Perez-Patiño, Cristina; Barranco, Isabel; Parrilla, Inmaculada; Martinez, Emilio A; Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto; Roca, Jordi

    2016-09-01

    A complete proteomic profile of seminal plasma (SP) remains challenging, particularly in porcine. The data reports on the analysis of boar SP-proteins by using a combination of SEC, 1-D SDS PAGE and NanoLC-ESI-MS/MS from 33 pooled SP-samples (11 boars, 3 ejaculates/boar). A complete dataset of the 536 SP-proteins identified and validated with confidence ≥95% (Unused Score >1.3) and a false discovery rate (FDR) ≤1%, is provided. In addition, the relative abundance of 432 of them is also shown. Gene ontology annotation of the complete SP-proteome complemented by an extensive description of the putative reproductive role of SP-proteins, providing a valuable source for a better understanding of SP role in the reproductive success. This data article refers to the article entitled "Characterization of the porcine seminal plasma proteome comparing ejaculate portions" (Perez-Patiño et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27583342

  17. Immunoblot observation of antigenic protein fractions in Paragonimus westermani reacting with human patients sera.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hwan; Kong, Yoon; Kim, Suk Il; Kang, Shin Yong; Cho, Seung Yull

    1988-12-01

    In order to observe the antigenic fractions in saline extract of adult Paragonimus westermani, proteins in the crude extract were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) in reducing conditions. The separated protein fractions were transferred to nitrocellulose paper on which 20 sera from human paragonimiasis were reacted and immunoblotted. Out of 15 stained protein bands in SDS-PAGE, 7 reacted with the sera. Of 14 reacted bands, 30 kilodalton(kDa) band was the most frequently reacted (95%) and was a strong antigen. Protein bands of 23 and 46 kDa were also strong antigens. Bands of over 150 kDa, 120 kDa, 92 kDa, 86 kDa, 74 kDa, 62 kDa, 51 kDa, 32 kDa, 28 kDa, 16.5 kDa and 15.5 kDa were also reactive but their frequencies of the reaction were variable. PMID:12811037

  18. Effect of dietary protein and iron on the fractional turnover rate of rat liver xanthine oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, D.M.; Amy, N.K.

    1987-12-01

    Rat liver xanthine oxidase activity is regulated in response to dietary protein and iron. To investigate whether the change in activity was mediated by a change in the rate of protein degradation, we measured the fractional turnover rate using the double-isotope technique with (/sup 3/H)- and (/sup 14/C)leucine and calculated the apparent half-life of xanthine oxidase in rats fed diets containing either 20 or 5% casein with either 35 or 5 mg iron/kg diet. Under control conditions, xanthine oxidase had an apparent half-life of 4.8 d and approximately 65% of the enzyme subunits were active. Rats fed diets with low dietary protein had lower xanthine oxidase activity, but the enzyme had a slower fractional turnover rate, resulting in an apparent half-life of 6.4 d, and only 15-20% of the enzyme was active. The apparent half-life of xanthine oxidase increased to 7.5 d in rats fed diets with low dietary iron, but dietary iron did not affect the specific activity of the enzyme or the percentage of active subunits. These results suggest that the loss of enzyme activity is not due to loss of enzyme protein by increased degradation, but rather to inactivation of the enzyme.

  19. Rubisco is a small fraction of total protein in marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Losh, Jenna L; Young, Jodi N; Morel, François M M

    2013-04-01

    Ribulose 1,5 bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) concentrations were quantified as a proportion of total protein in eight species of microalgae. This enzyme has been assumed to be a major fraction of total protein in phytoplankton, as has been demonstrated in plants, potentially constituting a large sink for cellular nitrogen. Representative microalgae were grown in batch and continuous cultures under nutrient-replete, nitrogen (N)-limited, or phosphorus (P)-limited conditions with varying CO(2). Quantitative Western blots were performed using commercially available global antibodies and protein standards. Field incubations with natural populations of organisms from the coast of California were conducted under both nutrient-replete and N-limited conditions with varying CO(2). In all experiments, Rubisco represented < 6% of total protein. In nutrient-replete exponentially growing batch cultures, concentrations ranged from 2% to 6%, while in nutrient-limited laboratory and field cultures, concentrations were < 2.5%. Rubisco generally decreased with increasing CO(2) and with decreasing growth rates. Based on a calculation of maximum Rubisco activity, these results suggest that phytoplankton contain the minimum concentration of enzyme necessary to support observed growth rates. Unlike in plants, Rubisco does not account for a major fraction of cellular N in phytoplankton. PMID:23343368

  20. Theory of force-extension curves for modular proteins and DNA hairpins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, L. L.; Carpio, A.; Prados, A.

    2015-05-01

    We study a model describing the force-extension curves of modular proteins, nucleic acids, and other biomolecules made out of several single units or modules. At a mesoscopic level of description, the configuration of the system is given by the elongations of each of the units. The system free energy includes a double-well potential for each unit and an elastic nearest-neighbor interaction between them. Minimizing the free energy yields the system equilibrium properties whereas its dynamics is given by (overdamped) Langevin equations for the elongations, in which friction and noise amplitude are related by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Our results, both for the equilibrium and the dynamical situations, include analytical and numerical descriptions of the system force-extension curves under force or length control and agree very well with actual experiments in biomolecules. Our conclusions also apply to other physical systems comprising a number of metastable units, such as storage systems or semiconductor superlattices.

  1. Theory of force-extension curves for modular proteins and DNA hairpins.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, L L; Carpio, A; Prados, A

    2015-05-01

    We study a model describing the force-extension curves of modular proteins, nucleic acids, and other biomolecules made out of several single units or modules. At a mesoscopic level of description, the configuration of the system is given by the elongations of each of the units. The system free energy includes a double-well potential for each unit and an elastic nearest-neighbor interaction between them. Minimizing the free energy yields the system equilibrium properties whereas its dynamics is given by (overdamped) Langevin equations for the elongations, in which friction and noise amplitude are related by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Our results, both for the equilibrium and the dynamical situations, include analytical and numerical descriptions of the system force-extension curves under force or length control and agree very well with actual experiments in biomolecules. Our conclusions also apply to other physical systems comprising a number of metastable units, such as storage systems or semiconductor superlattices. PMID:26066204

  2. Proteomic characterization of a triton-insoluble fraction from chloroplasts defines a novel group of proteins associated with macromolecular structures.

    PubMed

    Phinney, Brett S; Thelen, Jay J

    2005-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of a Triton X-100 insoluble, 30,000 x g pellet from purified pea chloroplasts resulted in the identification of 179 nonredundant proteins. This chloroplast fraction was mostly depleted of chloroplast membranes since only 23% and 9% of the identified proteins were also observed in envelope and thylakoid membranes, respectively. One of the most abundant proteins in this fraction was sulfite reductase, a dual function protein previously shown to act as a plastid DNA condensing protein. Approximately 35 other proteins known (or predicted) to be associated with high-density protein-nucleic acid particles (nucleoids) were also identified including a family of DNA gyrases, as well as proteins involved in plastid transcription and translation. Although nucleoids appeared to be the predominant component of 30k x g Triton-insoluble chloroplast preparations, multi-enzyme protein complexes were also present including each subunit to the pyruvate dehydrogenase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase multi-enzyme complexes, as well as a proposed assembly of the first three enzymes of the Calvin cycle. Approximately 18% of the proteins identified were annonated as unknown or hypothetical proteins and another 20% contained "putative" or "like" in the identifier tag. This is the first proteomic characterization of a membrane-depleted, high-density fraction from plastids and demonstrates the utility of this simple procedure to isolate intact macromolecular structures from purified organelles for analysis of protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions. PMID:15822927

  3. Chemical characteristics and fractionation of proteins from Moringa oleifera Lam. leaves.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Estelamar Maria Borges; Carvalho, Maria Regina Barbieri; Neves, Valdir Augusto; Silva, Maraíza Apareci; Arantes-Pereira, Lucas

    2014-03-15

    Moringa oleifera Lam. is a leguminous plant, originally from Asia, which is cultivated in Brazil because of its low production cost. Although some people have used this plant as food, there is little information about its chemical and nutritional characteristics. The objective of this study was to characterise the leaves of M. oleifera in terms of their chemical composition, protein fractions obtained by solubility in different systems and also to assess their nutritional quality and presence of bioactive substances. The whole leaf flour contained 28.7% crude protein, 7.1% fat, 10.9% ashes, 44.4% carbohydrate and 3.0mg 100g(-1) calcium and 103.1mg 100g(-1) iron. The protein profile revealed levels of 3.1% albumin, 0.3% globulins, 2.2% prolamin, 3.5% glutelin and 70.1% insoluble proteins. The hydrolysis of the protein from leaf flour employing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) resulted in 39.5% and 29.5%, respectively. The total protein showed low in vitro digestibility (31.8%). The antinutritional substances tested were tannins (20.7 mg g(-1)), trypsin inhibitor (1.45TIU mg g(-1)), nitrate (17 mg g(-1)) and oxalic acid (10.5 mg g(-1)), besides the absence of cyanogenic compounds. β-Carotene and lutein stood out as major carotenoids, with concentrations of 161.0 and 47.0 μg g(-1) leaf, respectively. Although M. oleifera leaves contain considerable amount of crude protein, this is mostly insoluble and has low in vitro digestibility, even after heat treatment and chemical attack. In vivo studies are needed to better assess the use of this leaf as a protein source in human feed. PMID:24206684

  4. Isolation, purification and characterization of antioxidant peptidic fractions from a bovine liver sarcoplasmic protein thermolysin hydrolyzate.

    PubMed

    Di Bernardini, Roberta; Rai, Dilip K; Bolton, Declan; Kerry, Joseph; O'Neill, Eileen; Mullen, Anne Maria; Harnedy, Pádraigín; Hayes, Maria

    2011-02-01

    Sarcoplasmic proteins isolated from bovine livers were hydrolyzed using the enzyme thermolysin at 37°C for 2h. The hydrolyzates were filtered through molecular weight cut off membranes (MWCO) and filtrates were obtained. The water activity (a(w)) of unhydrolysed sarcoplasmic protein, full hydrolyzates, 10-kDa and 3-kDa filtrates were below the limit necessary for microbial growth. The antioxidant activities of both filtrates and fractions were assessed using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity assay, the ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay and the Fe(2+) chelating ability assay. RP-HPLC was used for purification of the full hydrolyzates, the 10-kDa and the 3-kDa filtrates. The peptidic content of the full hydrolyzates, the 10-kDa and the 3-kDa filtrates were assessed using the Dumas method and peptide contents of each fraction were characterized using electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight (ESI-Q-TOF) mass spectrometry with the resultant spectrum analysed using the software programmes Protein Lynx Global Server 2.4. and TurboSEQUEST. Similarities between the amino acid composition of characterized peptides from each fraction and previously reported antioxidant peptides were found. This study demonstrates that meat by-product such as liver can be utilised as raw material for the generation of bioactive peptides with demonstrated antioxidant activities in vitro using the enzyme thermolysin. It is significant as it presents a potential opportunity for meat processors to use their waste streams for the generation of bioactive peptides for potential functional food use. PMID:21129427

  5. Fractional synthesis rates of DNA and protein in rabbit skin are not correlated.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-jun; Chinkes, David L; Wu, Zhanpin; Martini, Wenjun Z; Wolfe, Robert R

    2004-09-01

    We developed a method for measurement of skin DNA synthesis, reflecting cell division, in conscious rabbits by infusing D-[U-(13)C(6)]glucose and L-[(15)N]glycine. Cutaneous protein synthesis was simultaneously measured by infusion of L-[ring-(2)H(5)]phenylalanine. Rabbits were fitted with jugular venous and carotid arterial catheters, and were studied during the infusion of an amino acid solution (10% Travasol). The fractional synthetic rate (FSR) of DNA from the de novo nucleotide synthesis pathway, a reflection of total cell division, was 3.26 +/- 0.59%/d in whole skin and 3.08 +/- 1.86%/d in dermis (P = 0.38). The de novo base synthesis pathway accounted for 76 and 60% of the total DNA FSR in whole skin and dermis, respectively; the contribution from the base salvage pathway was 24% in whole skin and 40% in dermis. The FSR of protein in whole skin was 5.35 +/- 4.42%/d, which was greater (P < 0.05) than that in dermis (2.91 +/- 2.52%/d). The FSRs of DNA and protein were not correlated (P = 0.33), indicating that cell division and protein synthesis are likely regulated by different mechanisms. This new approach enables investigations of metabolic disorders of skin diseases and regulation of skin wound healing by distinguishing the 2 principal components of skin metabolism, which are cell division and protein synthesis. PMID:15333735

  6. Coupling detergent lysis/clean-up methodology with intact protein fractionation for enhanced proteome characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Ritin; Dill, Brian; Chourey, Karuna; Shah, Manesh B; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2012-01-01

    The expanding use of surfactants for proteome sample preparations has prompted the need to systematically optimize the application and removal of these MS-deleterious agents prior to proteome measurements. Here we compare four different detergent clean-up methods (Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation, Chloroform/Methanol/Water (CMW) extraction, commercial detergent removal spin column method (DRS) and filter-aided sample preparation(FASP)) with respect to varying amounts of protein biomass in the samples, and provide efficiency benchmarks with respect to protein, peptide, and spectral identifications for each method. Our results show that for protein limited samples, FASP outperforms the other three clean-up methods, while at high protein amount all the methods are comparable. This information was used in a dual strategy of comparing molecular weight based fractionated and unfractionated lysates from three increasingly complex samples (Escherichia coli, a five microbial isolate mixture, and a natural microbial community groundwater sample), which were all lysed with SDS and cleaned up using FASP. The two approaches complemented each other by enhancing the number of protein identifications by 8%-25% across the three samples and provided broad pathway coverage.

  7. Physicochemical characterization of a navy bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) protein fraction produced using a solvent-free method.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mousa; Rajabzadeh, Amin Reza; Tabtabaei, Solmaz; Marsolais, Frédéric; Legge, Raymond L

    2016-10-01

    A solvent-free electrostatic separation method was employed to separate navy bean flour (NBF) into protein-rich (PR) and starch-rich (SR) fractions. The physicochemical properties of NBF and separated fractions were compared to proteins (navy bean isolate (NBI) and 7S globulin) prepared using a wet process. Gel electrophoresis confirmed that the protein distribution in the isolated fractions was similar to that of NBF. The protein profile of NBI and 7S globulin was found to be devoid of certain proteins that were found in the NBF and PR fraction. Amino acid analysis revealed that the NBI and 7S globulin had a lower content of sulfur-containing amino acids compared to NBF and the electrostatically isolated fractions. CD and fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that denaturation of the proteins during the acid precipitation is likely. This novel solvent-free electrostatic separation process preserves the native protein structure found in NBF and improves the recovery of some of the smaller MW proteins. PMID:27132821

  8. RubisCO is not a major fraction of total protein in marine phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losh, J.; Young, J. N.; Morel, F. M.

    2012-12-01

    Ribulose 1,5 bisphosphate carboxylase oxygnenase (Rubisco) concentrations were quantified as a proportion of total protein in diatoms to determine whether Rubisco is as abundant in phytoplankton as previously thought. This enzyme has been assumed to be a major fraction of total protein in phytoplankton, as has been demonstrated in plants, potentially constituting a large sink for cellular nitrogen (N). Marine diatoms were grown in batch cultures, and in N-limited continuous cultures at various carbon dioxide (CO2) levels. Quantitative western blots were performed using commercially available global antibodies and protein standards. Field incubations with natural populations of organisms from the coast of California were conducted under both N-limited and N-replete incubations with varying CO2. In all experiments, Rubisco represented less than 5% of total protein. Within exponentially growing batch cultures, concentrations ranged from 2-4%, while in N-limited laboratory and field cultures, concentrations were less than 1%. In some experiments under N-limiting conditions, Rubisco concentrations decreased with decreasing growth rates or with increasing CO2. These results were used as a basis of a theoretical calculation of maximum Rubisco activity and suggest that phytoplankton contain the minimum amount of Rubisco necessary to operate. Unlike plants, Rubisco is not a major sink of cellular N in phytoplankton. This has implications for phytoplankton's response to increasing CO2 under N-limitation.

  9. A Compendium of Caenorhabditis elegans RNA Binding Proteins Predicts Extensive Regulation at Multiple Levels

    PubMed Central

    Tamburino, Alex M.; Ryder, Sean P.; Walhout, Albertha J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated at multiple levels, including transcription and translation, as well as mRNA and protein stability. Although systems-level functions of transcription factors and microRNAs are rapidly being characterized, few studies have focused on the posttranscriptional gene regulation by RNA binding proteins (RBPs). RBPs are important to many aspects of gene regulation. Thus, it is essential to know which genes encode RBPs, which RBPs regulate which gene(s), and how RBP genes are themselves regulated. Here we provide a comprehensive compendium of RBPs from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (wRBP1.0). We predict that as many as 887 (4.4%) of C. elegans genes may encode RBPs ~250 of which likely function in a gene-specific manner. In addition, we find that RBPs, and most notably gene-specific RBPs, are themselves enriched for binding and modification by regulatory proteins, indicating the potential for extensive regulation of RBPs at many different levels. wRBP1.0 will provide a significant contribution toward the comprehensive delineation of posttranscriptional regulatory networks and will provide a resource for further studies regulation by RBPs. PMID:23390605

  10. Effects of Adiponectin on Calcium Handling Proteins in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Komei; Wilson, Richard M.; Essick, Eric E.; Duffen, Jennifer L.; Scherer, Philipp E.; Ouchi, Noriyuki; Sam, Flora

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the increasing prevalence of heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) in humans, there remains no therapeutic options for HFpEF. Adiponectin (APN), an adipocyte-derived cytokine exerts cardioprotective actions and its deficiency is implicated in the development of hypertension and HF with reduced ejection fraction. Similarly APN deficiency in HFpEF exacerbates left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), diastolic dysfunction and HF. However, the therapeutic effects of APN in HFpEF remain unknown. We sought to test the hypothesis that chronic APN overexpression protects against the progression of HF in a murine model of HFpEF. Methods and Results APN transgenic (APNTG) and wild-type (WT) mice underwent uninephrectomy, a continuous saline or d-aldosterone infusion and given 1.0% sodium chloride drinking water for 4-weeks. Aldosterone-infused WT mice developed HFpEF with hypertension, LVH and diastolic dysfunction. Aldosterone infusion increased myocardial oxidative stress and decreased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a) protein expression in HFpEF. Although total phospholamban (PLN) protein expression was unchanged, there was decreased expression of PKA-dependent PLN phosphorylation at Ser16 and CaMKII-dependent PLN phosphorylation at Thr17. APN overexpression in aldosterone-infused mice ameliorated LVH, diastolic dysfunction, lung congestion and myocardial oxidative stress without affecting blood pressure (BP) and LVEF. This improvement in diastolic function parameters in aldosterone-infused APNTG mice was accompanied by preserved protein expression of PKA-dependent phosphorylation of PLN at Ser16. APN replacement prevented the progression of aldosterone-induced HFpEF, independent of BP, by improving diastolic dysfunction and modulating cardiac hypertrophy. Conclusions These findings suggest that APN may have therapeutic effects in patients with HFpEF. PMID:25149095

  11. Isolation and characterization of oil palm constitutive promoter derived from ubiquitin extension protein (uep1) gene.

    PubMed

    Masura, Subhi Siti; Parveez, Ghulam Kadir Ahmad; Ismail, Ismanizan

    2010-09-30

    The ubiquitin extension protein (uep1) gene was identified as a constitutively expressed gene in oil palm. We have isolated and characterized the 5' region of the oil palm uep1 gene, which contains an 828 bp sequence upstream of the uep1 translational start site. Construction of a pUEP1 transformation vector, which contains gusA reporter gene under the control of uep1 promoter, was carried out for functional analysis of the promoter through transient expression studies. It was found that the 5' region of uep1 functions as a constitutive promoter in oil palm and could drive GUS expression in all tissues tested, including embryogenic calli, embryoid, immature embryo, young leaflet from mature palm, green leaf, mesocarp and meristematic tissues (shoot tip). This promoter could also be used in dicot systems as it was demonstrated to be capable of driving gusA gene expression in tobacco. PMID:20123048

  12. Kinesin superfamily protein 2A (KIF2A) functions in suppression of collateral branch extension.

    PubMed

    Homma, Noriko; Takei, Yosuke; Tanaka, Yosuke; Nakata, Takao; Terada, Sumio; Kikkawa, Masahide; Noda, Yasuko; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2003-07-25

    Through interactions with microtubules, the kinesin superfamily of proteins (KIFs) could have multiple roles in neuronal function and development. During neuronal development, postmitotic neurons develop primary axons extending toward targets, while other collateral branches remain short. Although the process of collateral branching is important for correct wiring of the brain, the mechanisms involved are not well understood. In this study, we analyzed kif2a(-/-) mice, whose brains showed multiple phenotypes, including aberrant axonal branching due to overextension of collateral branches. In kif2a(-/-) growth cones, microtubule-depolymerizing activity decreased. Moreover, many individual microtubules showed abnormal behavior at the kif2a(-/-) cell edge. Based on these results, we propose that KIF2A regulates microtubule dynamics at the growth cone edge by depolymerizing microtubules and that it plays an important role in the suppression of collateral branch extension. PMID:12887924

  13. Milk from different species: Relationship between protein fractions and inflammatory response in infants affected by generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Albenzio, M; Santillo, A; Ciliberti, M G; Figliola, L; Caroprese, M; Marino, R; Polito, A N

    2016-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of protein fractions from bovine, caprine, and ovine milk on production of cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) by cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBC) from infants with generalized epilepsy. Bovine, caprine, and ovine bulk milks were pasteurized and analyzed for chemical composition. Then, PBMC were isolated from 10 patients with generalized epilepsy (5 males; mean age 33.6±5.4mo). Production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-10, IL-6, and IL-1β was studied in cultured PBMC (from infants with epilepsy and controls) stimulated by bovine, caprine, and ovine milk and casein and whey protein fractions, and levels of ROS and RNS were measured in the culture supernatant. The ability of PBMC to secrete cytokines in response to milk and protein fraction stimulation may predict the secretion of soluble factor TNF-α in the bloodstream of challenged patients. Bovine, caprine, and ovine bulk milks induced low-level production of IL-10 by cultured PBMC in at least 50% of cases; the same behavior was observed in both casein and whey protein fractions for all species studied. Bovine and ovine milk and their casein fractions induced production of lower levels of IL-1β in 80% of patients, whereas caprine milk and its casein fraction induced the highest levels in 80% of patients. The amount of IL-6 detected after stimulation of PBMC by milk and its fractions for all species was lower than that of other proinflammatory cytokines. In the bovine, total free radicals were higher in bulk milk and lower in the casein fraction, whereas the whey protein fraction showed an intermediate level; in caprine, ROS/RNS levels were not different among milk fractions, whereas ovine had higher levels for bulk milk and casein than the whey protein fraction. Lower levels of ROS/RNS detected in PBMC cultured with caprine milk fraction could be responsible for the lower levels of

  14. ASSESSING GLYCININ (11S) AND BETA-CONGLYCININ (7S) FRACTIONS OF SOYBEAN STORAGE PROTEIN BY NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean breeding programs underway today are addressing the goal of improving the protein profile to benefit the human diet as well as that of livestock. Glycinin, a globulin storage protein of the meal and designated as the 11S size fraction by ultracentrifugation, is desirable because of its rela...

  15. Simvastatin Ameliorates Radiation Enteropathy Development After Localized, Fractionated Irradiation by a Protein C-Independent Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Boerma, Marjan; Fu Qiang; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Fink, Louis M.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin . E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: Microvascular injury plays a key role in normal tissue radiation responses. Statins, in addition to their lipid-lowering effects, have vasculoprotective properties that may counteract some effects of radiation on normal tissues. We examined whether administration of simvastatin ameliorates intestinal radiation injury, and whether the effect depends on protein C activation. Methods and Materials: Rats received localized, fractionated small bowel irradiation. The animals were fed either regular chow or chow containing simvastatin from 2 weeks before irradiation until termination of the experiment. Groups of rats were euthanized at 2 weeks and 26 weeks for assessment of early and delayed radiation injury by quantitative histology, morphometry, and quantitative immunohistochemistry. Dependency on protein C activation was examined in thrombomodulin (TM) mutant mice with deficient ability to activate protein C. Results: Simvastatin administration was associated with lower radiation injury scores (p < 0.0001), improved mucosal preservation (p = 0.0009), and reduced thickening of the intestinal wall and subserosa (p = 0.008 and p = 0.004), neutrophil infiltration (p = 0.04), and accumulation of collagen I (p = 0.0003). The effect of simvastatin was consistently more pronounced for delayed than for early injury. Surprisingly, simvastatin reduced intestinal radiation injury in TM mutant mice, indicating that the enteroprotective effect of simvastatin after localized irradiation is unrelated to protein C activation. Conclusions: Simvastatin ameliorates the intestinal radiation response. The radioprotective effect of simvastatin after localized small bowel irradiation does not appear to be related to protein C activation. Statins should undergo clinical testing as a strategy to minimize side effects of radiation on the intestine and other normal tissues.

  16. Separation and identification of the light harvesting proteins contained in grana and stroma thylakoid membrane fractions.

    PubMed

    Timperio, Anna Maria; Huber, Christian G; Zolla, Lello

    2004-06-18

    This paper presents the results of a study performed to develop a rapid and straightforward method to resolve and simultaneously identify the light-harvesting proteins of photosystem I (LHCI) and photosystem II (LHCII) present in the grana and stroma of the thylakoid membranes of higher plants. These hydrophobic proteins are embedded in the phospholipid membrane, and their extraction usually requires detergent and time consuming manipulations that may introduce artifacts. The method presented here makes use of digitonin, a detergent which causes rapid (within less than 3 min) cleavage of the thylakoid membrane into two subfractions: appressed (grana) and non-appressed (stroma) membranes, the former enriched in photosystem II and the latter containing mainly photosystem I. From these two fractions identification of the protein components was performed by separating them by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and determining the intact molecular mass by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). By this strategy the ion suppression during ESI-MS that normally occurs in the presence of membrane phospholipids was avoided, since RP-HPLC removed most phospholipids from the analytes. Consequently, high quality mass spectra were extracted from the reconstructed ion chromatograms. The specific cleavage of thylakoid membranes by digitonin, as well as the rapid identification and quantification of the antenna composition of the two complexes facilitate future studies of the lateral migration of the chlorophyll-protein complexes along thylakoid membranes, which is well known to be induced by high intensity light or other environmental stresses. Such investigations could not be performed by sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis because of insufficient resolution of the proteins having molecular masses between 22,000 and 25,000. PMID:15248427

  17. A multi-channel gel electrophoresis and continuous fraction collection apparatus for high throughput protein separation and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Megan; Nordmeyer, Robert A.; Cornell, Earl; Dong, Ming; Biggin, Mark D.; Jin, Jian

    2009-10-02

    To facilitate a direct interface between protein separation by PAGE and protein identification by mass spectrometry, we developed a multichannel system that continuously collects fractions as protein bands migrate off the bottom of gel electrophoresis columns. The device was constructed using several short linear gel columns, each of a different percent acrylamide, to achieve a separation power similar to that of a long gradient gel. A Counter Free-Flow elution technique then allows continuous and simultaneous fraction collection from multiple channels at low cost. We demonstrate that rapid, high-resolution separation of a complex protein mixture can be achieved on this system using SDS-PAGE. In a 2.5 h electrophoresis run, for example, each sample was separated and eluted into 48-96 fractions over a mass range of 10-150 kDa; sample recovery rates were 50percent or higher; each channel was loaded with up to 0.3 mg of protein in 0.4 mL; and a purified band was eluted in two to three fractions (200 L/fraction). Similar results were obtained when running native gel electrophoresis, but protein aggregation limited the loading capacity to about 50 g per channel and reduced resolution.

  18. Mapping the Hydrogen Bond Networks in the Catalytic Subunit of Protein Kinase A Using H/D Fractionation Factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Geoffrey C; Srivastava, Atul K; Kim, Jonggul; Taylor, Susan S; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-07-01

    Protein kinase A is a prototypical phosphoryl transferase, sharing its catalytic core (PKA-C) with the entire kinase family. PKA-C substrate recognition, active site organization, and product release depend on the enzyme's conformational transitions from the open to the closed state, which regulate its allosteric cooperativity. Here, we used equilibrium nuclear magnetic resonance hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) fractionation factors (φ) to probe the changes in the strength of hydrogen bonds within the kinase upon binding the nucleotide and a pseudosubstrate peptide (PKI5-24). We found that the φ values decrease upon binding both ligands, suggesting that the overall hydrogen bond networks in both the small and large lobes of PKA-C become stronger. However, we observed several important exceptions, with residues displaying higher φ values upon ligand binding. Notably, the changes in φ values are not localized near the ligand binding pockets; rather, they are radiated throughout the entire enzyme. We conclude that, upon ligand and pseudosubstrate binding, the hydrogen bond networks undergo extensive reorganization, revealing that the open-to-closed transitions require global rearrangements of the internal forces that stabilize the enzyme's fold. PMID:26030372

  19. Shape of tropoelastin, the highly extensible protein that controls human tissue elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Baldock, Clair; Oberhauser, Andres F.; Ma, Liang; Lammie, Donna; Siegler, Veronique; Mithieux, Suzanne M.; Tu, Yidong; Chow, John Yuen Ho; Suleman, Farhana; Malfois, Marc; Rogers, Sarah; Guo, Liang; Irving, Thomas C.; Wess, Tim J.; Weiss, Anthony S.

    2011-01-01

    Elastin enables the reversible deformation of elastic tissues and can withstand decades of repetitive forces. Tropoelastin is the soluble precursor to elastin, the main elastic protein found in mammals. Little is known of the shape and mechanism of assembly of tropoelastin as its unique composition and propensity to self-associate has hampered structural studies. In this study, we solve the nanostructure of full-length and corresponding overlapping fragments of tropoelastin using small angle X-ray and neutron scattering, allowing us to identify discrete regions of the molecule. Tropoelastin is an asymmetric coil, with a protruding foot that encompasses the C-terminal cell interaction motif. We show that individual tropoelastin molecules are highly extensible yet elastic without hysteresis to perform as highly efficient molecular nanosprings. Our findings shed light on how biology uses this single protein to build durable elastic structures that allow for cell attachment to an appended foot. We present a unique model for head-to-tail assembly which allows for the propagation of the molecule’s asymmetric coil through a stacked spring design. PMID:21368178

  20. Extensive, clustered parental imprinting of protein-coding and noncoding RNAs in developing maize endosperm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Zhao, Hainan; Xie, Shaojun; Chen, Jian; Xu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Keke; Zhao, Haiming; Guan, Haiying; Hu, Xiaojiao; Jiao, Yinping; Song, Weibin; Lai, Jinsheng

    2011-12-13

    Although genetic imprinting was discovered in maize 40 years ago, its exact extent in the triploid endosperm remains unknown. Here, we have analyzed global patterns of allelic gene expression in developing maize endosperms from reciprocal crosses between inbreds B73 and Mo17. We have defined an imprinted gene as one in which the relative expression of the maternal and paternal alleles differ at least fivefold in both hybrids of the reciprocal crosses. We found that at least 179 genes (1.6% of protein-coding genes) expressed in the endosperm are imprinted, with 68 of them showing maternal preferential expression and 111 paternal preferential expression. Additionally, 38 long noncoding RNAs were imprinted. The latter are transcribed in either sense or antisense orientation from intronic regions of normal protein-coding genes or from intergenic regions. Imprinted genes show a clear pattern of clustering around the genome, with a number of imprinted genes being adjacent to each other. Analysis of allele-specific methylation patterns of imprinted loci in the hybrid endosperm identified 21 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of several hundred base pairs in length, corresponding to both imprinted genes and noncoding transcripts. All DMRs identified are uniformly hypomethylated in maternal alleles and hypermethylated in paternal alleles, regardless of the imprinting direction of their corresponding loci. Our study indicates highly extensive and complex regulation of genetic imprinting in maize endosperm, a mechanism that can potentially function in the balancing of the gene dosage of this triploid tissue. PMID:22114195

  1. Role of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK) in the expansion of glioma-initiating cells by fractionated radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Rae-Kwon; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Hyun, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Hyejin; An, Sungkwan; Park, Myung-Jin; Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Su-Jae

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} Activation of Lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK) is involved in the fractionated radiation-induced expansion of glioma stem-like cells. {yields} Inhibition of LCK prevents acquisition of fractionated radiation-induced resistance to chemotherapeutic treatment. {yields} LCK activity is critical for the maintenance of self-renewal in glioma stem-like cells. -- Abstract: Brain cancers frequently recur or progress as focal masses after treatment with ionizing radiation. Radiation used to target gliomas may expand the cancer stem cell population and enhance the aggressiveness of tumors; however, the mechanisms underlying the expansion of cancer stem cell population after radiation have remained unclear. In this study, we show that LCK (lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase) is involved in the fractionated radiation-induced expansion of the glioma-initiating cell population and acquisition of resistance to anticancer treatments. Fractionated radiation caused a selective increase in the activity of LCK, a Src family non-receptor tyrosine kinase. The activities of other Src family kinases Src, Fyn, and Lyn were not significantly increased. Moreover, knockdown of LCK expression with a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) effectively blocked fractionated radiation-induced expansion of the CD133{sup +} cell population. siRNA targeting of LCK also suppressed fractionated radiation-induced expression of the glioma stem cell marker proteins CD133, Nestin, and Musashi. Expression of the known self-renewal-related proteins Notch2 and Sox2 in glioma cells treated with fractionated radiation was also downregulated by LCK inhibition. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of LCK effectively restored the sensitivity of glioma cells to cisplatin and etoposide. These results indicate that the non-receptor tyrosine kinase LCK is critically involved in fractionated radiation-induced expansion of the glioma-initiating cell population and

  2. Effect of Peptide Size on Antioxidant Properties of African Yam Bean Seed (Sphenostylis stenocarpa) Protein Hydrolysate Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Ajibola, Comfort F.; Fashakin, Joseph B.; Fagbemi, Tayo N.; Aluko, Rotimi E.

    2011-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysate of African yam bean seed protein isolate was prepared by treatment with alcalase. The hydrolysate was further fractionated into peptide sizes of <1, 1–3, 3–5 and 5–10 kDa using membrane ultrafiltration. The protein hydrolysate (APH) and its membrane ultrafiltration fractions were assayed for in vitro antioxidant activities. The <1 kDa peptides exhibited significantly better (p < 0.05) ferric reducing power, diphenyl-1-picryhydradzyl (DPPH) and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities when compared to peptide fractions of higher molecular weights. The high activity of <1 kDa peptides in these antioxidant assay systems may be related to the high levels of total hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids. In comparison to glutathione (GSH), the APH and its membrane fractions had significantly higher (p < 0.05) ability to chelate metal ions. In contrast, GSH had significantly greater (p < 0.05) ferric reducing power and free radical scavenging activities than APH and its membrane fractions. The APH and its membrane fractions effectively inhibited lipid peroxidation, results that were concentration dependent. The activity of APH and its membrane fractions against linoleic acid oxidation was higher when compared to that of GSH but lower than that of butylated hydroxyl toluene (BHT). The results show potential use of APH and its membrane fractions as antioxidants in the management of oxidative stress-related metabolic disorders and in the prevention of lipid oxidation in food products. PMID:22072912

  3. Fractionation of whey protein isolate with supercritical carbon dioxide to produce enriched alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin food ingredients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A potentially economical and environmentally friendly whey protein fractionation process was developed using supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO2) as an acid to produce enriched fractions of alpha-lactalbumin (a-LA) and beta-lactoglobulin (b-LG) from whey protein isolate. To prepare the fractions, so...

  4. Bioactive protein fraction DLBS1033 containing lumbrokinase isolated from Lumbricus rubellus: ex vivo, in vivo, and pharmaceutic studies.

    PubMed

    Tjandrawinata, Raymond R; Trisina, Jessica; Rahayu, Puji; Prasetya, Lorentius Agung; Hanafiah, Aang; Rachmawati, Heni

    2014-01-01

    DLBS1033 is a bioactive protein fraction isolated from Lumbricus rubellus that tends to be unstable when exposed to the gastrointestinal environment. Accordingly, appropriate pharmaceutical development is needed to maximize absorption of the protein fraction in the gastrointestinal tract. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo stability assays were performed to study the stability of the bioactive protein fraction in gastric conditions. The bioactive protein fraction DLBS1033 was found to be unstable at low pH and in gastric fluid. The "enteric coating" formulation showed no leakage in gastric fluid-like medium and possessed a good release profile in simulated intestinal medium. DLBS1033 was absorbed through the small intestine in an intact protein form, confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) analysis. This result confirmed that an enteric coating formula using methacrylic acid copolymer could protect DLBS1033 from the acidic condition of the stomach by preventing the release of DLBS1033 in the stomach, while promoting its release when reaching the intestine. From the blood concentration-versus-time curve, (99m)Tc-DLBS1033 showed a circulation half-life of 70 minutes. This relatively long biological half-life supports its function as a thrombolytic protein. Thus, an enteric delivery system is considered the best approach for DLBS1033 as an oral thrombolytic agent. PMID:25284988

  5. Bioactive protein fraction DLBS1033 containing lumbrokinase isolated from Lumbricus rubellus: ex vivo, in vivo, and pharmaceutic studies

    PubMed Central

    Tjandrawinata, Raymond R; Trisina, Jessica; Rahayu, Puji; Prasetya, Lorentius Agung; Hanafiah, Aang; Rachmawati, Heni

    2014-01-01

    DLBS1033 is a bioactive protein fraction isolated from Lumbricus rubellus that tends to be unstable when exposed to the gastrointestinal environment. Accordingly, appropriate pharmaceutical development is needed to maximize absorption of the protein fraction in the gastrointestinal tract. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo stability assays were performed to study the stability of the bioactive protein fraction in gastric conditions. The bioactive protein fraction DLBS1033 was found to be unstable at low pH and in gastric fluid. The “enteric coating” formulation showed no leakage in gastric fluid–like medium and possessed a good release profile in simulated intestinal medium. DLBS1033 was absorbed through the small intestine in an intact protein form, confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) analysis. This result confirmed that an enteric coating formula using methacrylic acid copolymer could protect DLBS1033 from the acidic condition of the stomach by preventing the release of DLBS1033 in the stomach, while promoting its release when reaching the intestine. From the blood concentration–versus-time curve, 99mTc-DLBS1033 showed a circulation half-life of 70 minutes. This relatively long biological half-life supports its function as a thrombolytic protein. Thus, an enteric delivery system is considered the best approach for DLBS1033 as an oral thrombolytic agent. PMID:25284988

  6. Comparative Composition and Antioxidant Activity of Peptide Fractions Obtained by Ultrafiltration of Egg Yolk Protein Enzymatic Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Chay Pak Ting, Bertrand P.; Mine, Yoshinori; Juneja, Lekh R.; Okubo, Tsutomu; Gauthier, Sylvie F.; Pouliot, Yves

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the antioxidant activity of two distinct hydrolysates and their peptide fractions prepared by ultrafiltration (UF) using membranes with molecular weight cut-off of 5 and 1 kDa. The hydrolysates were a delipidated egg yolk protein concentrate (EYP) intensively hydrolyzed with a combination of two bacterial proteases, and a phosphoproteins (PPP) extract partially hydrolyzed with trypsin. Antioxidant activity, as determined by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay, was low for EYP and PPP hydrolysates with values of 613.1 and 489.2 μM TE·g−1 protein, respectively. UF-fractionation of EYP hydrolysate increased slightly the antioxidant activity in permeate fractions (720.5–867.8 μM TE·g−1 protein). However, ORAC values were increased by more than 3-fold in UF-fractions prepared from PPP hydrolysate, which were enriched in peptides with molecular weight lower than 5 kDa. These UF-fractions were characterized by their lower N/P atomic ratio and higher phosphorus content compared to the same UF-fractions obtained from EYP-TH. They also contained high amounts of His, Met, Leu, and Phe, which are recognized as antioxidant amino acids, but also high content in Lys and Arg which both represent target amino acids of trypsin used for the hydrolysis of PPP. PMID:24957729

  7. Stipe wall extension of Flammulina velutipes could be induced by an expansin-like protein from Helix aspersa.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hejian; Zhang, Wenming; Niu, Xin; Liu, Zhonghua; Lu, Changmei; Wei, Hua; Yuan, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Expansin proteins extend plant cell walls by a hydrolysis-free process that disrupts hydrogen bonding between cell wall polysaccharides. However, it is unknown if this mechanism is operative in mushrooms. Herein we report that the native wall extension activity was located exclusively in the 10 mm apical region of 30 mm Flammulina velutipes stipes. The elongation growth was restricted also to the 9 mm apical region of the stipes where the elongation growth of the 1st millimetre was 40-fold greater than that of the 5th millimetre. Therefore, the wall extension activity represents elongation growth of the stipe. The low concentration of expansin-like protein in F. velutipes stipes prevented its isolation. However, we purified an expansin-like protein from snail stomach juice which reconstituted heat-inactivated stipe wall extension without hydrolytic activity. So the previous hypotheses that stipe wall extension was resulted from hydrolysis of wall polymers by enzymes or disruption of hydrogen bonding of wall polymers exclusively by turgor pressure are challenged. We suggest that stipe wall extension may be mediated by endogenous expansin-like proteins that facilitate cell wall polymer slippage by disrupting noncovalent bonding between glucan chains or chitin chains. PMID:24433673

  8. Complexation of bovine beta-lactoglobulin with 11S protein fractions of soybean (Glycine max) and sesame (Sesamum indicum).

    PubMed

    Anuradha, S N; Prakash, V

    2009-01-01

    Beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) comprises 50% of the whey component of bovine milk. Protein-protein interactions between bovine beta-Lg and 11S protein fractions of soybean and sesame were investigated by turbidity, solubility behaviour and by evaluation of functional properties in the mixed systems. In this work, the aggregation behaviour of soybean and the whey protein (beta-Lg) showed the formation of soluble complexes. Turbidity and solubility studies showed that the proteins interacted at temperatures between 60 and 90+/-5 degrees C. Heating a mixture of beta-Lg and 11S proteins of soybean at higher temperatures formed soluble complexes with beta-Lg. It also reduced the self aggregation behaviour, especially that of 11S protein fraction of soybean. This reduced the precipitation of soybean proteins at higher temperature. The complex formed was resolved by gel filtration using high-performance liquid chromatography. Upon heating beta-Lg at neutral pH, native dimer starts to dissociate into monomers leading to the exposure of previously buried hydrophobic amino acids and the free thiol group. The soluble complex is formed by the exposed thiol groups. But interaction of beta-Lg with sesame 11S protein fractions did not form any soluble complexes. The mechanism of interaction indicates that hydrophobic interactions were preferred over disulfide linkages at the high salt concentrations of the buffer used. During thermal treatment the molecules are unfolded, leading to an exposure of the hydrophobic groups that further enhance the protein-protein interactions that are entropically driven hydrophobic interactions. PMID:19330636

  9. Recombinant proteins incorporating short non-native extensions may display increased aggregation propensity as detected by high resolution NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zanzoni, Serena; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Assfalg, Michael

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acid binding proteins from different constructs retain structural integrity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR {sup 15}N-T{sub 1} relaxation data of BABPs show differences if LVPR extension is present. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deviations from a {sup 15}N-T{sub 1}/molecular-weight calibration curve indicate aggregation. -- Abstract: The use of a recombinant protein to investigate the function of the native molecule requires that the former be obtained with the same amino acid sequence as the template. However, in many cases few additional residues are artificially introduced for cloning or purification purposes, possibly resulting in altered physico-chemical properties that may escape routine characterization. For example, increased aggregation propensity without visible protein precipitation is hardly detected by most analytical techniques but its investigation may be of great importance for optimizing the yield of recombinant protein production in biotechnological and structural biology applications. In this work we show that bile acid binding proteins incorporating the common C-terminal LeuValProArg extension display different hydrodynamic properties from those of the corresponding molecules without such additional amino acids. The proteins were produced enriched in nitrogen-15 for analysis via heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Residue-specific spin relaxation rates were measured and related to rotational tumbling time and molecular size. While the native-like recombinant proteins show spin-relaxation rates in agreement with those expected for monomeric globular proteins of their mass, our data indicate the presence of larger adducts for samples of proteins with very short amino acid extensions. The used approach is proposed as a further screening method for the quality assessment of biotechnological protein products.

  10. Characterization of a cellular immunostimulating peptide from a soybean protein fraction digested with peptidase R.

    PubMed

    Egusa, Shintaro; Otani, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    An immunostimulating glutamine-rich peptide was purified from a soybean protein fraction digested with Peptidase R produced by Rhizopus oryzae (Ro-digest) by a combination of SP-Sepharose column chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The purified peptide was supposed to be located at or near the glutamine-rich region 202 to 222 of the glycinin G4 subunit. The peptide significantly increased the number of CD8(+), CD11b(+), and CD49b(+) cells in C3H/HeN mouse spleen cell cultures, while 2 chemically synthesized glutamine-rich peptides corresponding to residues 202 to 213 (QQQQQQKSHGGR) and residues 214 to 225 (KQGQHQQEEEEE) of the glycinin G4 subunit increased the number of interleukin (IL)-12(+)CD11b(+) cells. The peptide 202-213 also significantly increased the number of CD49b(+), IL-2(+)CD4(+), and interferon-gamma(+)CD4(+) cells and stimulated the cytotoxic activity of spleen cells toward the human erythroleukemia cell line K562. These results indicate that the glutamine-rich region of the soybean glycinin G4 subunit stimulates the cellular immune system in mouse spleen cell cultures. PMID:19926930

  11. Potential of liquid-isoelectric-focusing protein fractionation to improve phosphoprotein characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14.

    PubMed

    Ouidir, Tassadit; Jarnier, Frédérique; Cosette, Pascal; Jouenne, Thierry; Hardouin, Julie

    2014-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation on serine, threonine, and tyrosine is known to be involved in a wide variety of cellular processes and signal transduction in bacteria. Bacterial-proteome analysis is required to determine which proteins have been conditionally expressed and whether any post-translational modifications are present. One of the greatest challenges of proteome analysis is the fractionation of these complex protein mixtures to detect low-abundance phosphoproteins. Liquid-phase isoelectric focusing (IEF) is a promising analytical tool in proteomics, but as far as we are aware no work has studied the reproducibility of this approach. In this study, we investigated the phosphoproteome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14. We first tested in-solution IEF protein fractionation, and then used this technique to fractionate the proteins in the complex mixture. Next, phosphopeptides were enriched with titanium dioxide and analyzed by high-resolution, high-accuracy liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. With this approach, we succeeded in characterizing 73 unique phosphorylated peptides belonging to 63 proteins. Interestingly, we observed a higher percentage of modified tyrosine, revealing the importance of this phosphorylated residue in bacteria. PMID:25096199

  12. The influence of protein fractions from bovine colostrum digested in vivo and in vitro on human intestinal epithelial cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Alison J; Riley, Lisa G; Sheehy, Paul A; Wynn, Peter C

    2014-02-01

    Colostrum consists of a number of biologically active proteins and peptides that influence physiological function and development of a neonate. The present study investigated the biological activity of peptides released from first day bovine colostrum through in vitro and in vivo enzymatic digestion. This was assessed for proliferative activity using a human intestinal epithelial cell line, T84. Digestion of the protein fraction of bovine colostrum in vitro was conducted with the enzymes pepsin, chymosin and trypsin. Pepsin and chymosin digests yielded protein fractions with proliferative activity similar to that observed with undigested colostrum and the positive control foetal calf serum (FCS). In contrast trypsin digestion significantly (P<0·05) decreased colostral proliferative activity when co-cultured with cells when compared with undigested colostrum. The proliferative activity of undigested colostrum protein and abomasal whey protein digesta significantly increased (P<0·05) epithelial cell proliferation in comparison to a synthetic peptide mix. Bovine colostrum protein digested in vivo was collected from different regions of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) in newborn calves fed either once (n=3 calves) or three times at 12-h intervals (n=3 calves). Digesta collected from the distal duodenum, jejunum and colon of calves fed once, significantly (P<0·05) stimulated cell proliferation in comparison with comparable samples collected from calves fed multiple times. These peptide enriched fractions are likely to yield candidate peptides with potential application for gastrointestinal repair in mammalian species. PMID:24433585

  13. Emulsifying and Foaming Properties of Different Protein Fractions Obtained from a Novel Lupin Variety AluProt-CGNA(®) (Lupinus luteus).

    PubMed

    Burgos-Díaz, César; Piornos, José A; Wandersleben, Traudy; Ogura, Takahiro; Hernández, Xaviera; Rubilar, Mónica

    2016-07-01

    The use of vegetable proteins as food ingredient is becoming increasingly important due to their high versatility and environmental acceptability. This work describes a chemical characterization and techno-functional properties (emulsifying and foaming properties) of 3 protein fractions obtained from a protein-rich novel lupin variety, AluProt-CGNA(®) . This nongenetically modified variety have a great protein content in dehulled seeds (60.6 g protein/100 g, dry matter), which is higher than soybean and other lupin varieties. A simple procedure was utilized to obtain 3 different fractions by using alkali solubilization and isoelectric precipitation. Fractions 1 and 3 were mainly composed of protein and polysaccharides (NNE), whereas fraction 2 was mainly composed by protein (97%, w/w). Fraction 3 presented interesting and potential foaming properties in comparison to the other fractions evaluated in the study. Besides, its solubility, foaming and emulsifying capacity were practically not affected by pH variations. The 3 fractions also presented good emulsion stability, reaching values above a 95%. SDS-PAGE showed that fractions 1 and 2 contained mainly conglutin α, β, and δ, but in different ratios, whereas fraction 3 contained mainly conglutin γ and albumins. The results of this work will provide better understanding for the utilization of each protein fractions as potential ingredients in food industry. PMID:27232549

  14. [THE SCREENING OF DIAGNOSTIC POTENTIAL OF NATIVE PROTEIN FRACTIONS OF MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS USING TECHNIQUE OF IMMUNE BLOTTING].

    PubMed

    Tsibulkin, A P; Khaertinova, I M; Urazov, N G; Khaertinov, K S

    2016-02-01

    The technique of immune blotting was used to analyze surface proteins obtained from cells M Tuberculosis exposed to partialmode of delipidization. At that, there were applied serums of patients with tuberculosis of lungs; HIV agents and patients with concomitant infection tuberculosis-AIDS and also HIV-negative patients without clinical signs of disease of lungs and with chronic diseases of lungs of other etiology The fractions oflow-molecular antigens with molecular mass 6.5-30 kilodaltons became diagnostically significant. To this fraction of antigens reacted serums of all patients with tuberculosis of lungs and serums of 91% of patients with concomitant tuberculosis-AIDS infection. The antigens of protein fractions with high (70-100 kilodaltons) and interim (30-69 kilodaltons) molecular mass became diagnostically insignificant. PMID:27455562

  15. Protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture cooperatively enable the fastest stress wave decay in load-bearing biological materials.

    PubMed

    Qwamizadeh, Mahan; Zhang, Zuoqi; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Yong Wei

    2016-07-01

    One of the key functions of load-bearing biological materials, such as bone, dentin and sea shell, is to protect their inside fragile organs by effectively damping dynamic impact. How those materials achieve this remarkable function remains largely unknown. Using systematic finite element analyses, we study the stress wave propagation and attenuation in cortical bone at the nanoscale as a model material to examine the effects of protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture on the elastic wave decay. It is found that the staggered arrangement, protein viscosity and mineral fraction work cooperatively to effectively attenuate the stress wave. For a typical mineral volume fraction and protein viscosity, an optimal staggered nanostructure with specific feature sizes and layouts is able to give rise to the fastest stress wave decay, and the optimal aspect ratio and thickness of mineral platelets are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. In contrary, as the mineral volume fraction or the protein viscosity goes much higher, the structural arrangement is seen having trivial effect on the stress wave decay, suggesting that the damping properties of the composites go into the structure-insensitive regime from the structure-sensitive regime. These findings not only significantly add to our understanding of the structure-function relationship of load-bearing biological materials, and but also provide useful guidelines for the design of bio-inspired materials with superior resistance to impact loading. PMID:26925698

  16. Phosphorylation of synthetic peptides by a tyrosine protein kinase from the particulate fraction of a lymphoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Casnellie, J E; Harrison, M L; Pike, L J; Hellström, K E; Krebs, E G

    1982-01-01

    The particulate fraction from a lymphoma cell line, LSTRA, was found to contain an apparent high level of tyrosine protein kinase activity. When this fraction was incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP in the presence of 10 mM MnCl2, hydrolyzed, and assayed, 70--80% of the radioactivity recovered in phosphoamino acids was in phosphotyrosine. Gel electrophoresis of the proteins showed that a large portion of the 32P was in a single protein with a molecular weight of approximately 58,000. The phosphorylated residue in this protein was identified as phosphotyrosine. Detergent extracts of the particulate fraction from LSTRA cells contained both the Mr 58,000 protein and the enzyme responsible for its phosphorylation. These extracts were found to catalyze the phosphorylation of the tyrosine residue in the synthetic peptide, Ile-Glu-Asp-Asn-Glu-Tyr-Thr-Ala-Arg-Gln-Gly, corresponding to the sequence around the tyrosine that is phosphorylated in pp60src; the Km for the peptide in this reaction was 5 mM. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to assay for this phosphorylation. A second peptide was synthesized that contained two additional arginine residues whose presence permitted the phosphorylation of the peptide to be measured by a simple assay using phosphocellulose paper. The Km for this peptide was 3--4 mM, indicating that the presence of the additional arginine residues did not alter the apparent affinity of the kinase for the peptide. Images PMID:6804939

  17. The Dysferlin Domain-Only Protein, Spo73, Is Required for Prospore Membrane Extension in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Yuuya; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi S; Tanaka, Takayuki; Inoue, Ichiro; Suda, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Nakanishi, Hideki; Nakamura, Shugo; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sporulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a developmental process in which an ascus containing four haploid spores forms from a diploid cell. During this process, newly formed membrane structures called prospore membranes extend along the nuclear envelope and engulf and package daughter nuclei along with cytosol and organelles to form precursors of spores. Proteins involved in prospore membrane extension, Vps13 and Spo71, have recently been reported; however, the overall mechanism of membrane extension remains unclear. Here, we identified Spo73 as an additional factor involved in prospore membrane extension. Analysis of a spo73∆ mutant revealed that it shows defects similar to those of a spo71∆ mutant during prospore membrane formation. Spo73 localizes to the prospore membrane, and this localization is independent of Spo71 and Vps13. In contrast, a Spo73 protein carrying mutations in a surface basic patch mislocalizes to the cytoplasm and overexpression of Spo71 can partially rescue localization to the prospore membrane. Similar to spo71∆ mutants, spo73∆ mutants display genetic interactions with the mutations in the SMA2 and SPO1 genes involved in prospore membrane bending. Further, our bioinformatic analysis revealed that Spo73 is a dysferlin domain-only protein. Thus, these results suggest that a dysferlin domain-only protein, Spo73, functions with a dual pleckstrin homology domain protein, Spo71, in prospore membrane extension. Analysis of Spo73 will provide insights into the conserved function of dysferlin domains, which is related to dysferlinopathy. IMPORTANCE Prospore membrane formation consists of de novo double-membrane formation, which occurs during the developmental process of sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Membranes are formed into their proper size and shape, and thus, prospore membrane formation has been studied as a general model of membrane formation. We identified SPO73, previously shown to be required for spore wall formation

  18. The Dysferlin Domain-Only Protein, Spo73, Is Required for Prospore Membrane Extension in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Yuuya; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi S.; Tanaka, Takayuki; Inoue, Ichiro; Suda, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Nakanishi, Hideki; Nakamura, Shugo; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sporulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a developmental process in which an ascus containing four haploid spores forms from a diploid cell. During this process, newly formed membrane structures called prospore membranes extend along the nuclear envelope and engulf and package daughter nuclei along with cytosol and organelles to form precursors of spores. Proteins involved in prospore membrane extension, Vps13 and Spo71, have recently been reported; however, the overall mechanism of membrane extension remains unclear. Here, we identified Spo73 as an additional factor involved in prospore membrane extension. Analysis of a spo73∆ mutant revealed that it shows defects similar to those of a spo71∆ mutant during prospore membrane formation. Spo73 localizes to the prospore membrane, and this localization is independent of Spo71 and Vps13. In contrast, a Spo73 protein carrying mutations in a surface basic patch mislocalizes to the cytoplasm and overexpression of Spo71 can partially rescue localization to the prospore membrane. Similar to spo71∆ mutants, spo73∆ mutants display genetic interactions with the mutations in the SMA2 and SPO1 genes involved in prospore membrane bending. Further, our bioinformatic analysis revealed that Spo73 is a dysferlin domain-only protein. Thus, these results suggest that a dysferlin domain-only protein, Spo73, functions with a dual pleckstrin homology domain protein, Spo71, in prospore membrane extension. Analysis of Spo73 will provide insights into the conserved function of dysferlin domains, which is related to dysferlinopathy. IMPORTANCE Prospore membrane formation consists of de novo double-membrane formation, which occurs during the developmental process of sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Membranes are formed into their proper size and shape, and thus, prospore membrane formation has been studied as a general model of membrane formation. We identified SPO73, previously shown to be required for spore wall

  19. Antinutritional factors and functionality of protein-rich fractions of industrial guar meal as affected by heat processing.

    PubMed

    Nidhina, N; Muthukumar, S P

    2015-04-15

    Proximate composition analysis and antinutritional factor composition of different fractions of industrial guar meal: raw churi (IRC), heated churi (IHC), final churi (IFC) and guar korma (IGK) were studied and compared. Protein content was found to be very high in IGK (52.7%) when compared to the churi fractions (32-33%) and the trypsin inhibitor activities were found to be negligible in all the fractions (0.58-1.8 mg/g). Single fraction (IGK) was selected for further studies, based on the protein content. The antinutritional factors of selected fractions were significantly reduced by different heat treatments. Heat treatments significantly increased the water absorbing capacity of IGK, but reduced the nitrogen solubility, emulsifying and foaming capacity. Highest L(∗) value was observed for boiled IGK, highest a(∗) and b(∗) values for roasted IGK, during colour measurement. FTIR spectral analysis revealed the presence several aromatic groups in IGK and slight modifications in the molecular structure during heat treatments. PMID:25466107

  20. Re-fraction: a machine learning approach for deterministic identification of protein homologues and splice variants in large-scale MS-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengyi; Humphrey, Sean J; Fazakerley, Daniel J; Prior, Matthew J; Yang, Guang; James, David E; Yang, Jean Yee-Hwa

    2012-05-01

    A key step in the analysis of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics data is the inference of proteins from identified peptide sequences. Here we describe Re-Fraction, a novel machine learning algorithm that enhances deterministic protein identification. Re-Fraction utilizes several protein physical properties to assign proteins to expected protein fractions that comprise large-scale MS-based proteomics data. This information is then used to appropriately assign peptides to specific proteins. This approach is sensitive, highly specific, and computationally efficient. We provide algorithms and source code for the current version of Re-Fraction, which accepts output tables from the MaxQuant environment. Nevertheless, the principles behind Re-Fraction can be applied to other protein identification pipelines where data are generated from samples fractionated at the protein level. We demonstrate the utility of this approach through reanalysis of data from a previously published study and generate lists of proteins deterministically identified by Re-Fraction that were previously only identified as members of a protein group. We find that this approach is particularly useful in resolving protein groups composed of splice variants and homologues, which are frequently expressed in a cell- or tissue-specific manner and may have important biological consequences. PMID:22428558

  1. Extension of the NCAT phantom for the investigation of intra-fraction respiratory motion in IMRT using 4D Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGurk, Ross; Seco, Joao; Riboldi, Marco; Wolfgang, John; Segars, Paul; Paganetti, Harald

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to create a computational platform for studying motion in intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Specifically, the non-uniform rational B-spline (NURB) cardiac and torso (NCAT) phantom was modified for use in a four-dimensional Monte Carlo (4D-MC) simulation system to investigate the effect of respiratory-induced intra-fraction organ motion on IMRT dose distributions as a function of diaphragm motion, lesion size and lung density. Treatment plans for four clinical scenarios were designed: diaphragm peak-to-peak amplitude of 1 cm and 3 cm, and two lesion sizes—2 cm and 4 cm diameter placed in the lower lobe of the right lung. Lung density was changed for each phase using a conservation of mass calculation. Further, a new heterogeneous lung model was implemented and tested. Each lesion had an internal target volume (ITV) subsequently expanded by 15 mm isotropically to give the planning target volume (PTV). The PTV was prescribed to receive 72 Gy in 40 fractions. The MLC leaf sequence defined by the planning system for each patient was exported and used as input into the MC system. MC simulations using the dose planning method (DPM) code together with deformable image registration based on the NCAT deformation field were used to find a composite dose distribution for each phantom. These composite distributions were subsequently analyzed using information from the dose volume histograms (DVH). Lesion motion amplitude has the largest effect on the dose distribution. Tumor size was found to have a smaller effect and can be mitigated by ensuring the planning constraints are optimized for the tumor size. The use of a dynamic or heterogeneous lung density model over a respiratory cycle does not appear to be an important factor with a <= 0.6% change in the mean dose received by the ITV, PTV and right lung. The heterogeneous model increases the realism of the NCAT phantom and may provide more accurate simulations in radiation therapy

  2. Sonicated Protein Fractions of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Induce Inflammatory Responses and Differential Gene Expression in a Murine Alveolar Macrophage Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Damte, Dereje; Lee, Seung-Jin; Birhanu, Biruk Tesfaye; Suh, Joo-Won; Park, Seung-Chun

    2015-12-28

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is known to cause porcine enzootic pneumonia (EP), an important disease in swine production. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of sonicated protein fractions of M. hyopneumoniae on inflammatory response and gene expression in the murine alveolar macrophage MH-S cell line. The effects of sonicated protein fractions and intact M. hyopneumoniae on the gene expression of cytokines and iNOS were assessed using RT-PCR. The Annealing Control Primer (ACP)-based PCR method was used to screen differentially expressed genes. Increased transcription of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, COX-2, and iNOS mRNA was observed after exposure to the supernatant (SPT), precipitant (PPT), and intact M. hyopneumoniae protein. A time-dependent analysis of the mRNA expression revealed an upregulation after 4 h for IL-6 and iNOS and after 12 h for IL-1β and TNF-α, for both SPT and PPT; the fold change in COX-2 expression was less. A dose- and time-dependent correlation was observed in nitrite (NO) production for both protein fractions; however, there was no significant difference between the effects of the two protein fractions. In a differential gene analysis, PCR revealed differential expression for nine gene bands after 3 h of stimulation - only one gene was downregulated, while the remaining eight were upregulated. The results of this study provide insights that help improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of and macrophage defenses against M. hyopneumoniae assault, and suggest targets for future studies on therapeutic interventions for M. hyopneumoniae infections. PMID:26370797

  3. POLYPHENOLS AND MECHANICAL MACERATION SHIFT PROTEIN FRACTIONS IN LEGUME HAYS FROM RAPIDLY TO SLOWLY DEGRADED FORMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid proteolysis of forage protein during rumen fermentation can impair protein use by dairy cattle. The severity of conditioning at harvest may influence protein degradability in forages, particularly if protein-binding polyphenols are present. In 2002 and 2003, first and second cuttings of alfalf...

  4. Physical, Chemical and Biochemical Modifications of Protein-Based Films and Coatings: An Extensive Review.

    PubMed

    Zink, Joël; Wyrobnik, Tom; Prinz, Tobias; Schmid, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Protein-based films and coatings are an interesting alternative to traditional petroleum-based materials. However, their mechanical and barrier properties need to be enhanced in order to match those of the latter. Physical, chemical, and biochemical methods can be used for this purpose. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the effects of various treatments on whey, soy, and wheat gluten protein-based films and coatings. These three protein sources have been chosen since they are among the most abundantly used and are well described in the literature. Similar behavior might be expected for other protein sources. Most of the modifications are still not fully understood at a fundamental level, but all the methods discussed change the properties of the proteins and resulting products. Mastering these modifications is an important step towards the industrial implementation of protein-based films. PMID:27563881

  5. Combinatorial activity of Flamingo proteins directs convergence and extension within the early zebrafish embryo via the planar cell polarity pathway.

    PubMed

    Formstone, Caroline J; Mason, Ivor

    2005-06-15

    The seven-transmembrane protocadherin, Flamingo, functions in a number of processes during Drosophila development, including planar cell polarity (PCP). To assess the role(s) of Flamingo1/Celsr1 (Fmi1) during vertebrate embryogenesis we have exploited the zebrafish system, identifying two Fmi1 orthologues (zFmi1a and zFmi1b) and employing morpholinos to induce mis-splicing of zebrafish fmi1 mRNAs, to both imitate mutations identified in Drosophila flamingo and generate novel aberrant Flamingo proteins. We demonstrate that in the zebrafish gastrula, Fmi1 proteins function in concert with each other and with the vertebrate PCP proteins, Wnt11 and Strabismus, to mediate convergence and extension during gastrulation, without altering early dorso-ventral patterning. We show that zebrafish Fmi1a promotes extension of the entire antero-posterior axis of the zebrafish gastrula including prechordal plate and ventral diencephalic precursors. However, while we show that control over axial extension is autonomous, we find that Fmi1a is not required within lateral cells undergoing dorsal convergence. PMID:15882862

  6. Forage Management Effects on Protein and Fiber Fractions, Protein Degradability, and Dry Matter Yield of Red Clover Conserved as Silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the action of o-quinones formed via polyphenol oxidase, conserved red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) contains abundant rumen undegradable protein (RUP), but inadequate rumen degradable protein (RDP) for dairy cattle. This study examined how forage management influences RDP, RUP, crude protein...

  7. Identification of major proteins in the lipid droplet-enriched fraction isolated from the human hepatocyte cell line HuH7.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yasuyuki; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Jun; Makita, Minoru; Noda, Junich; Mori, Masahiro; Higashi, Yusuke; Kojima, Shinichi; Takano, Tatsuya

    2004-02-01

    Recent studies have revealed the presence of intracellular lipid droplets in wide variety of species. In mammalian cells, there exist proteins specifically localize in lipid droplets. However, the protein profile in the droplet remains yet to be clarified. In this study, a fraction enriched with lipid droplets was isolated from a human hepatocyte cell line HuH7 using sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and 17 major proteins in the fraction were identified using nano LC-MS/MS techniques. Adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) was the most abundant protein in the fraction. The secondary abundant proteins were identified to be acyl-CoA synthetase 3 (ACS3) and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 11 (17betaHSD11). Included in the identified proteins were five lipid-metabolizing enzymes as well as two lipid droplet-specific proteins. When HuH7 cell lysate was fractionated by a density gradient, most of 17betaHSD11 was found in the droplet-enriched fraction. In immunocytochemical analysis, 17betaHSD11 showed ring-shaped images which overlapped with those for ADRP. These results suggest that a specific set of proteins is enriched in the lipid droplet-enriched fraction and that 17betaHSD11 localizes specifically in the fraction. PMID:14741744

  8. Antitumor activity of the protein and small molecule component fractions from Agrocybe aegerita through enhancement of cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yi; Liu, Hong-Hong; Chen, Yi-Jie; Sun, Hui

    2014-04-01

    A water soluble extract from the medicinal mushroom Agrocybe aegerita has been shown to stimulate splenocyte proliferation, cytotoxic activity, and tumor rejection effect in tumor-bearing mouse models. In the present study, the crude extract was separated into a protein component fraction (Yp), mainly containing lectins and serine proteinase, and a small molecule component fraction (Ys), mainly containing triethylene glycol, α-bisabolol, n-hexadecanoic acid, and so on. The antitumor activity of the fractions was investigated in a tumor-bearing BALB/c mouse model. Repeat administration of Yp and Ys significantly inhibited tumor growth (P<.001), but little toxicity was observed. Moreover, the protein fraction Yp performed better than Ys in both antitumor and lifespan-prolonging activity. The cytokine expression levels in serum and splenocytes from extract-treated mice were selectively screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and the results showed that Yp upregulated the mRNA level of Th2 cytokine interleukin-10 (P<.01), and Ys increased the mRNA level of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (P<.01) and anti-inflammatory cytokine transforming growth factor-β (P<.01). All these data suggest that Yp and Ys can inhibit tumor growth via different mechanisms, which promotes the understanding of antitumor properties of medicinal fungi. PMID:24593676

  9. Variability in the fractionation of Cu, Ag, and Zn among cytosolic proteins in the bivalve Macoma balthica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johansson, C.; Cain, Daniel J.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    1986-01-01

    Gel filtration chromatographs of cytosols from the clam Macorna balthica analysed from both field and laboratory treated specimens showed that uptake of Cu, Ag, and Zn in the metallothionein-like protein (MLP) pool follows exposure both in nature and in the laboratory. Specimens collected from San Francisco Bay over 18 mo showed strong temporal variability in the fractionation of the metals among cytosolic proteins. A marked increase in Cu, Ag, and Zn in a very low molecular weight pool occurred when concentrations were highest In the MLP pool. The correlation between total cytosollc metal and MLP-metal also appeared to approach a hyperbolic character at the highest concentrations.

  10. [Effect of prolonged cold storage and subsequent heat treatment on the fractional composition of fish muscle proteins].

    PubMed

    Aman, M E; Efimov, A D

    1977-01-01

    The effect of prolonged preservation at -18 degrees C and subsequent culinary heat treatment of the fractional composition of sarcoplasmatic and myofibrillar proteins in the muscles of mirror carp, pike and sheat-fish were studied by the method of gel-filtration on Sephadex G-100. Cold storage of the dish at -18 degrees C for 9 months was found to produce market changes in the qualitative and quantitative composition of muscle proteins. After culinary heat treatment the finished products have lost much of their original quality. PMID:883223

  11. [Comparative studies into effects of synthetic oestrogens and gestagens on certain serum protein fractions under standardised conditions (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Klinger, G; Stelzner, A; Krause, G; Tarnick, M; Scheler, R; Schubert, H; Börner, A; Carol, W

    1980-01-01

    Initial effects of the following hormonal contraceptives on certain serum proteins in 29 women were checked under standardised conditions through the first three cycles on the pill: Deposiston (ethinyloestradiol-sulphonate/norethisterone-acetate), Gravistat (ethinyloestradiol/norgestrel), Non-Ovlon (ethinyloestradiol/norethisterone-actate).--Effects were found to differ strongly by fractions. Differences were recorded also from action over time. Changes and deviations were confirmed to depend on oestrogen levels. PMID:6164183

  12. Comparison of three methods for fractionation and enrichment of low molecular weight proteins for SELDI-TOF-MS differential analysis.

    PubMed

    De Bock, Muriel; de Seny, Dominique; Meuwis, Marie-Alice; Servais, Anne-Catherine; Minh, Tran Quang; Closset, Jean; Chapelle, Jean-Paul; Louis, Edouard; Malaise, Michel; Merville, Marie-Paule; Fillet, Marianne

    2010-06-30

    In most diseases, the clinical need for serum/plasma markers has never been so crucial, not only for diagnosis, but also for the selection of the most efficient therapies, as well as exclusion of ineffective or toxic treatment. Due to the high sample complexity, prefractionation is essential for exploring the deep proteome and finding specific markers. In this study, three different sample preparation methods (i.e., highly abundant protein precipitation, restricted access materials (RAM) combined with IMAC chromatography and peptide ligand affinity beads) were investigated in order to select the best fractionation step for further differential proteomic experiments focusing on the LMW proteome (MW inferior to 40,000 Da). Indeed, the aim was not to cover the entire plasma/serum proteome, but to enrich potentially interesting tissue leakage proteins. These three methods were evaluated on their reproducibility, on the SELDI-TOF-MS peptide/protein peaks generated after fractionation and on the information supplied. The studied methods appeared to give complementary information and presented good reproducibility (below 20%). Peptide ligand affinity beads were found to provide efficient depletion of HMW proteins and peak enrichment in protein/peptide profiles. PMID:20685463

  13. [Kinetics of the biosynthesis and distribution of labelled actin-like proteins in rat liver submitochondrial fractions].

    PubMed

    Stozharov, A N

    1985-02-01

    Affinity adsorption on immobilized DNAase I and the measurements of the protein mobility upon SDS-PAGE electrophoresis were used for the identification of the actin-like protein as well as for the study of its biosynthesis is liver mitochondria of hepatectomized rats. The kinetics of biosynthesis showed a maximum on the 10th min after intraperitoneal injection of the label. Fractionation of mitochondria demonstrated that more than 50% of the whole amount of the "de novo" synthesized protein is localized in the intermembrane space, approximately 30%--in the mitochondrial matrix. The purity of the fractions was controlled by analyzing the polypeptide content of the samples and by measuring the marker enzyme activity. Besides, additional identification of the actin-like protein was carried out directly in the mitochondrial matrix and intermembrane space by two-dimensional electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel performed by the O'Farrell method. The subsequent staining of the gels with silver revealed the presence of two basic isoforms of non-muscle action (beta- and gamma-actins). The presence of the actin-like protein in the inner mitochondrial compartments characterized by a high rate of metabolism may be regarded as compelling evidence of its mitochondrial localization. PMID:3986245

  14. Assessing the reproducibility of fractional rates of protein synthesis in muscle tissue measured using the flooding dose technique.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Ian D; Brown, James

    2016-07-01

    The flooding dose technique of Garlick et al. (1980) has become the main method for measuring tissue and whole-animal rates of protein synthesis in ectotherms. However, single tissue samples are used to determine rates of protein synthesis and no studies have examined the pattern of flooding in large tissues such as the white muscle in fishes, which can comprise up to 55% of the wet body mass of a fish and which is poorly perfused. The present study has examined, for the first time, the patterns of flooding and measured rates of protein synthesis in five different regions of the white muscle in the Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus ranging in size from 25g to 1.6kg following a flooding dose injection of L-[(3)H]-phenylalanine. The results indicate that the degree of flooding (i.e. free pool specific radioactivity relative to that of the injection solution) and elevation in free phenylalanine concentrations can vary between regions but the calculated fractional rates of protein synthesis were similar in four of the five regions studied. The variability in rates of protein synthesis increased with body size with greater variability observed between regions for fish >1kg in body mass. For consistency between studies, it is recommended that samples are taken from the epaxial muscle in the region below the dorsal fin when measuring fractional rates of white muscle synthesis in fishes. PMID:26970581

  15. Synthetic beta-solenoid proteins with the fragment-free computational design of a beta-hairpin extension.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, James T; Kabasakal, Burak V; Godding, David; Kraatz, Sebastian; Henderson, Louie; Barber, James; Freemont, Paul S; Murray, James W

    2016-09-13

    The ability to design and construct structures with atomic level precision is one of the key goals of nanotechnology. Proteins offer an attractive target for atomic design because they can be synthesized chemically or biologically and can self-assemble. However, the generalized protein folding and design problem is unsolved. One approach to simplifying the problem is to use a repetitive protein as a scaffold. Repeat proteins are intrinsically modular, and their folding and structures are better understood than large globular domains. Here, we have developed a class of synthetic repeat proteins based on the pentapeptide repeat family of beta-solenoid proteins. We have constructed length variants of the basic scaffold and computationally designed de novo loops projecting from the scaffold core. The experimentally solved 3.56-Å resolution crystal structure of one designed loop matches closely the designed hairpin structure, showing the computational design of a backbone extension onto a synthetic protein core without the use of backbone fragments from known structures. Two other loop designs were not clearly resolved in the crystal structures, and one loop appeared to be in an incorrect conformation. We have also shown that the repeat unit can accommodate whole-domain insertions by inserting a domain into one of the designed loops. PMID:27573845

  16. Polyphenol, Conditioning, and Conservation Effects on Protein Fractions and Degradability in Forage Legumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa herbage contains excessive levels of proteins that are highly susceptible to proteolysis during ensiling and rumen fermentation. As a result, only 10 to 30% of the protein in alfalfa, principally membrane proteins of inferior nutritional value, undergoes direct gastrointestinal digestion and...

  17. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test this strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.

  18. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test thismore » strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.« less

  19. A Fab-Selective Immunoglobulin-Binding Domain from Streptococcal Protein G with Improved Half-Life Extension Properties

    PubMed Central

    Unverdorben, Felix; Hutt, Meike; Seifert, Oliver; Kontermann, Roland E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Half-life extension strategies have gained increasing interest to improve the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of protein therapeutics. Recently, we established an immunoglobulin-binding domain (IgBD) from streptococcal protein G (SpGC3) as module for half-life extension. SpGC3 is capable of binding to the Fc region as well as the CH1 domain of Fab arms under neutral and acidic conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings Using site-directed mutagenesis, we generated a Fab-selective mutant (SpGC3Fab) to avoid possible interference with the FcRn-mediated recycling process and improved its affinity for mouse and human IgG by site-directed mutagenesis and phage display selections. In mice, this affinity-improved mutant (SpGC3FabRR) conferred prolonged plasma half-lives compared with SpGC3Fab when fused to small recombinant antibody fragments, such as single-chain Fv (scFv) and bispecific single-chain diabody (scDb). Hence, the SpGC3FabRR domain seems to be a suitable fusion partner for the half-life extension of small recombinant therapeutics. Conclusions/Significance The half-life extension properties of SpGC3 can be retained by restricting binding to the Fab fragment of serum immunoglobulins and can be improved by increasing binding activity. The modified SpGC3 module should be suitable to extend the half-life of therapeutic proteins and, thus to improve therapeutic activity. PMID:26430884

  20. Extension of in vivo half-life of biologically active peptides via chemical conjugation to XTEN protein polymer.

    PubMed

    Podust, Vladimir N; Sim, Bee-Cheng; Kothari, Dharti; Henthorn, Lana; Gu, Chen; Wang, Chia-wei; McLaughlin, Bryant; Schellenberger, Volker

    2013-11-01

    XTEN, unstructured biodegradable proteins, have been used to extend the in vivo half-life of genetically fused therapeutic proteins and peptides. To expand the applications of XTEN technology to half-life extension of other classes of molecules, XTEN protein polymers and methods for chemical XTENylation were developed. Two XTEN precursors were engineered to contain enzymatically removable purification tags. The proteins were readily expressed in bacteria and purified to homogeneity by chromatography techniques. As proof-of-principle, GLP2-2G peptide was chemically conjugated to each of the two XTEN protein polymers using maleimide-thiol chemistry. The monodisperse nature of XTEN protein polymer enabled reaction monitoring as well as the detection of peptide modifications in the conjugated state using reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The resulting GLP2-2G-XTEN conjugates were purified by preparative RP-HPLC to homogeneity. In comparison with recombinantly fused GLP2-2G-XTEN, chemically conjugated GLP2-2G-XTEN molecules exhibited comparable in vitro activity, in vitro plasma stability and pharmacokinetics in rats. These data suggest that chemical XTENylation could effectively extend the half-life of a wide spectrum of biologically active molecules, therefore broadening its applicability. PMID:24133142

  1. Thermal and physicochemical properties and nutritional value of the protein fraction of Mexican chia seed (Salvia hispanica L.).

    PubMed

    Olivos-Lugo, B L; Valdivia-López, M Á; Tecante, A

    2010-02-01

    Thermal, functional and nutritional properties of the main protein fractions and a protein isolate of chia seed from the state of Jalisco, Mexico, were studied by differential scanning calorimetry, gelling, foaming, water-holding capacity (WHC) and oil-holding capacity, amino acid profile, chemical score and in vitro digestibility tests. The protein isolate showed good WHC (4.06 g/g) and excellent oil-retention capacities (4.04 g/g), making it attractive as an additive in bakery products and food emulsions. It also contained high amounts of glutamic acid (123 g/kg raw protein), arginine (80.6 g/kg raw protein) and aspartic acid (61.3 g/kg raw protein). However, its essential amino acid profile showed deficiencies with respect to the 1985 standard of the FAO/WHO/UNU for pre-school children. Therefore, its use as a sole protein source is not recommended; supplementation with a lysine-rich source would be necessary, as this was the limiting amino acid. PMID:21339125

  2. Amino acid sequences of peptides from a tryptic digest of a urea-soluble protein fraction (U.S.3) from oxidized wool

    PubMed Central

    Corfield, M. C.; Fletcher, J. C.; Robson, A.

    1967-01-01

    1. A tryptic digest of the protein fraction U.S.3 from oxidized wool has been separated into 32 peptide fractions by cation-exchange resin chromatography. 2. Most of these fractions have been resolved into their component peptides by a combination of the techniques of cation-exchange resin chromatography, paper chromatography and paper electrophoresis. 3. The amino acid compositions of 58 of the peptides in the digest present in the largest amounts have been determined. 4. The amino acid sequences of 38 of these have been completely elucidated and those of six others partially derived. 5. These findings indicate that the parent protein in wool from which the protein fraction U.S.3 is derived has a minimum molecular weight of 74000. 6. The structures of wool proteins are discussed in the light of the peptide sequences determined, and, in particular, of those sequences in fraction U.S.3 that could not be elucidated. PMID:16742497

  3. Protein fraction isolated from epididymal fluid re-associates sperm in vitro: possible role of serpins in rat rosettes assembly.

    PubMed

    Monclus, María A; Andreina, Cesari; Cabrillana, María E; Lancellotti, Tania E Saez; Rensetti, Daniel E; Clementi, Marisa A; Boarelli, Paola V; Vincenti, Amanda E; Fornés, Miguel W

    2010-05-01

    In many mammalian species, sperm associate as a consequence of the epididymal transit. From the classic Rouleaux in guinea pig to the most recent work in mouse and echidna, authors have focused mainly on a detailed morphological description of this phenomenon. Some of these articles have also begun to describe the nature of the material present between sperm heads. Here, we try to better understand the factor/s involved in rat sperm association (Rosette). Based on previous work describing the appearance of Rosettes in the distal segments of the rat epididymis, we consider that sperm during their transit must be in contact with factor/s present in the caudal lumen in order to associate with each other. By an in vitro sperm re-associating assay, we try to determine the in vivo phenomenon observed in the lumen. The assay consists of co-incubating non-associated sperm with several protein fractions obtained from epididymal caudal fluid. After establishing the most active fraction, the proteins were characterized by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Among the proteins we found two members of the serine protease inhibitors family; an alpha-1 antitrypsin and a new protein with an alpha-1 antitrypsin like domain which includes a sequence compatible with the serpins' reactive center loop. These serpins may play a role in the assembly/disassembly process of Rosettes by modulating lumenal protease activity. Finally, a biochemical-morphological model which explains the sperm-proteases interaction was proposed. PMID:20143401

  4. Determination of the unmetabolised (18)F-FDG fraction by using an extension of simplified kinetic analysis method: clinical evaluation in paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Barbolosi, Dominique; Hapdey, Sebastien; Battini, Stephanie; Faivre, Christian; Mancini, Julien; Pacak, Karel; Farman-Ara, Bardia; Taïeb, David

    2016-01-01

    Tumours with high (18)F-FDG uptake values on static late PET images do not always exhibit high proliferation indices. These discrepancies might be related to high proportion of unmetabolised (18)F-FDG components in the tissues. We propose a method that enables to calculate different (18)F-FDG kinetic parameters based on a new mathematical approach that integrates a measurement error model. Six patients with diagnosed non-metastatic paragangliomas (PGLs) and six control patients with different types of lesions were investigated in this pilot study using (18)F-FDG PET/CT. In all cases, a whole-body acquisition was followed by four static acquisitions centred over the target lesions, associated with venous blood samplings. We used an extension of the Hunter's method to calculate the net influx rate constant (K H). The exact net influx rate constant and vascular volume fraction (K i and V, respectively) were subsequently obtained by the method of least squares. Next, we calculated the mean percentages of metabolised (PM) and unmetabolised (PUM) (18)F-FDG components, and the times required to reach 80 % of the amount of metabolised (18)F-FDG (T80%). A test-retest evaluation indicated that the repeatability of our approach was accurate; the coefficients of variation were below 2 % regardless of the kinetic parameters considered. We observed that the PGLs were characterised by high dispersions of the maximum standardised uptake value SUVmax (9.7 ± 11, coefficient of variation CV = 114 %), K i (0.0137 ± 0.0119, CV = 87 %), and V (0.292 ± 0.306, CV = 105 %) values. The PGLs were associated with higher PUM (p = 0.02) and T80% (p = 0.02) values and lower k 3 (p = 0.02) values compared to the malignant lesions despite the similar SUVmax values (p = 0.55). The estimations of these new kinetic parameters are more accurate than SUVmax or K i for in vivo metabolic assessment of PGLs at the molecular level. PMID:26044552

  5. Determination of the unmetabolized 18F-FDG fraction by using an extension of simplified kinetic analysis method: clinical evaluation in paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Barbolosi, Dominique; Hapdey, Sebastien; Battini, Stephanie; Faivre, Christian; Mancini, Julien; Pacak, Karel; Farman-Ara, Bardia; Taïeb, David

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tumours with high 18F-FDG uptake values on static late PET images do not always exhibit high proliferation indices. These discrepancies might be related to high proportion of unmetabolised 18F-FDG components in the tissues. We propose a method that enables to calculate different 18F-FDG kinetic parameters based on a new mathematical approach that integrates a measurement error model. Six patients with diagnosed non-metastatic paragangliomas (PGLs) and six control patients with different types of lesions were investigated in this pilot study using 18F-FDG PET/CT. In all cases, a whole-body acquisition was followed by four static acquisitions centred over the target lesions, associated with venous blood samplings. We used an extension of the Hunter’s method to calculate the net influx rate constant (KH). The exact net influx rate constant and vascular volume fraction (Ki and V respectively) were subsequently obtained by the method of least squares. Next, we calculated the mean percentages of metabolised (PM) and unmetabolised (PUM) 18F-FDG components, and the times required to reach 80% of the amount of metabolised 18F-FDG (T80%). A test-retest evaluation indicated that the repeatability of our approach was accurate; the coefficients of variation were below 2% regardless of the kinetic parameters considered. We observed that the PGLs were characterised by high dispersions of the maximum standardized uptake value SUVmax (9.7 ± 11, coefficient of variation CV=114%), Ki (0.0137 ±0.0119, CV=87%), and V (0.292 ± 0.306, CV=105%) values. The PGLs were associated with higher PUM (p=0.02) and T80% (p=0.02) values and lower k3 (p=0.02) values compared to the malignant lesions despite the similar SUVmax values (p=0.55). The estimations of these new kinetic parameters are more accurate than SUVmax or Ki for in vivo metabolic assessment of PGLs at the molecular level. PMID:26044552

  6. Haematococcus pluvialis soluble proteins: Extraction, characterization, concentration/fractionation and emulsifying properties.

    PubMed

    Ba, Fatou; Ursu, Alina Violeta; Laroche, Céline; Djelveh, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    A water-soluble matrix was extracted from green vegetative Haematococcus pluvialis through high-pressure cell disruption either at native pH (5.7) or with pH shifting to neutral (7). The resulting supernatant is mainly composed of carbohydrates and proteins, with the highest yield of proteins obtained at neutral pH (73±2% of total biomass proteins). The key emulsification properties of the proteins isolated in neutral supernatant (emulsification capacity (EC): 534±41mLoilg(-1) protein, emulsification stability (ES): 94±3% and emulsification activity index (EAI): 80±1m(2)g(-1)) were comparable to the native supernatant values (EC: 589±21mLoilg(-1) protein, ES: 84±3% and EAI: 75±1m(2)g(-1)). Confronted to sodium caseinate (EC: 664±30mLoilg(-1) protein, ES: 63±4%, and EAI: 56±4m(2)g(-1)) these results highlighted the strong potential of proteins isolated from H. pluvialis as emulsifier agent. Moreover, experiments have shown that the stability of emulsions obtained from supernatants is due to the proteins rather than the carbohydrates. PMID:26476616

  7. A chemical study of the protein fraction of Mediterranean sweet almond varieties (Prunus amygdalus).

    PubMed

    Calixto, F S; Cañellas, J; Martinez de Toda, F

    1982-01-01

    The protein contents and amino-acid compositions of five Mediterranean almond varieties were determined. The protein contents were between 18 and 24 g/100 g of almond, according to variety. The content of each amino-acid, expressed in g/100 g of protein, was similar in all varieties. The essential amino-acid composition was compared with the FAO pattern of amino-acid requirements and to the protein of milk and eggs. Percentages of albumins, globulins, glutelins and prolamines were also determined. PMID:7124119

  8. Kinetics, aggregation behavior and optimization of the fractionation of whey protein isolate with hydrochloric acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrated WPI solutions (10% (w/w)) containing approximately 30% alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) and 60% beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) were fractionated with HCl at acidic pH and moderate temperatures to denature alpha-LA and recover the alpha-LA aggregates via centrifugation. Aggregation behavior an...

  9. Evaluation of the in vitro antioxidant properties of a cod (Gadus morhua) protein hydrolysate and peptide fractions.

    PubMed

    Girgih, Abraham T; He, Rong; Hasan, Fida M; Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Gill, Tom A; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2015-04-15

    Mechanically-deboned cod muscle proteins were sequentially hydrolysed using pepsin and a trypsin+chymotrypsin combination, which was followed by passing the digest through a 1 kDa equipped tangential flow filtration system; the permeate (<1 kDa peptides) was collected as the cod protein hydrolysate (CPH). Reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) was used to separate the CPH into four peptide fractions (CF1-CF4) and their in vitro antioxidant properties investigated. Results showed that most of the peptide fractions (CF2-CF4) displayed significantly higher (p<0.05) oxygen radical absorbance capacity values (698-942 μM Trolox equivalents, TE/g) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl scavenging activities (17-32%) than those of CPH (613 μM TE/g and 19%, respectively). However, the unfractionated CPH displayed improved capability to scavenge superoxide and hydroxyl radicals as well as significantly higher (p<0.05) ferric iron reduction and chelation of iron than the RP-HPLC peptides. The CPH and peptide fractions displayed a dose-dependent inhibition of linoleic acid oxidation. PMID:25466072

  10. A novel protein fraction from Sesbania grandiflora shows potential anticancer and chemopreventive efficacy, in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Laladhas, Krishna P; Cheriyan, Vino T; Puliappadamba, Vineshkumar T; Bava, Smitha V; Unnithan, Rajesh G; Vijayammal, Parvathy L; Anto, Ruby John

    2010-03-01

    We report mechanism-based evidence for the anticancer efficacy of a protein fraction, SF2 (Sesbania fraction 2) isolated from the flower of the medicinal plant, Sesbania grandiflora (S. grandiflora). The fraction was evaluated in two murine ascites tumour cell lines and human cancer cell lines of different origin for its anticancer effect. SF2 inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis as demonstrated by DNA fragmentation and externalization of phosphatidyl serine in Daltons lymphoma ascites (DLA) and colon cancer cells (SW-480). Sensitivity to SF2 in these cells was associated with activation of caspases 3, 8 and 9, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and cytochrome C release which attests apoptosis induced cell death. Mechanistically, SF2 down-regulated phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) induced NF-kappaB, a transcription factor which controls the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in cell regulation and growth control. Additionally, SF2 also down-regulated anti-apoptotic factors such as Bcl-2, p-Akt and cyclooxygenase-2 induced by the tumour promoter PMA suggestive of a possible explanation for its anticancer effect. In vivo studies using ascites and solid tumour models strongly support in vitro findings as SF2 administration increased the life span and decreased the tumour volume in mice bearing tumour. In vivo toxicological evaluation revealed the pharmacological safety of SF2 and may serve as a potential anticancer drug candidate. PMID:19183244

  11. Detection on immunoblot of new proteins from the microsomal fraction recognized by anti-liver-kidney microsome antibodies type 1.

    PubMed

    Ballot, E; Desbos, A; Auger, C; Monier, J C

    1996-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that sera from patients with autoimmune hepatitis type 1 contain antibodies which react with proteins other than the endoplasmic reticulum integral membrane protein of apparent Mr 50,000, now known to be a cytochrome P450 of the IID subfamily. Sera from 141 patients found by immunofluorescence to be positive for anti-liver-kidney microsome antibodies type 1, and sera from 50 blood donors used as controls, were analyzed by immunoblotting experiments on rat liver microsomes, microsomal subfractions, and also microsomes subjected to various treatments, as described in the text. These fractions were characterized morphologically by electronic microscopy and biochemically by different enzymatic activities. Five bands were found to be stained more often by the patients' sera than by the controls' and with a statistically significant difference in frequency. These antigenic proteins were located at apparent Mr 62,000, 58,000, 50,000, 40,000, and 35,000. The 50,000 protein was of course more often stained than the others. Antibodies against these antigens belonged essentially to the IgG1 subclass. For some of them, subcellular localization and membrane topography are discussed. Interestingly, the 58,000 protein is not an integral membrane protein. PMID:8811045

  12. Extensive differential protein phosphorylation as intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum schizonts develop into extracellular invasive merozoites.

    PubMed

    Lasonder, Edwin; Green, Judith L; Grainger, Munira; Langsley, Gordon; Holder, Anthony A

    2015-08-01

    Pathology of the most lethal form of malaria is caused by Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood stages and initiated by merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. We present a phosphoproteome analysis of extracellular merozoites revealing 1765 unique phosphorylation sites including 785 sites not previously detected in schizonts. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001684 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001684). The observed differential phosphorylation between extra and intraerythrocytic life-cycle stages was confirmed using both phospho-site and phospho-motif specific antibodies and is consistent with the core motif [K/R]xx[pS/pT] being highly represented in merozoite phosphoproteins. Comparative bioinformatic analyses highlighted protein sets and pathways with established roles in invasion. Within the merozoite phosphoprotein interaction network a subnetwork of 119 proteins with potential roles in cellular movement and invasion was identified and suggested that it is coregulated by a further small subnetwork of protein kinase A (PKA), two calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), a phosphatidyl inositol kinase (PI3K), and a GCN2-like elF2-kinase with a predicted role in translational arrest and associated changes in the ubquitinome. To test this notion experimentally, we examined the overall ubiquitination level in intracellular schizonts versus extracellular merozoites and found it highly upregulated in merozoites. We propose that alterations in the phosphoproteome and ubiquitinome reflect a starvation-induced translational arrest as intracellular schizonts transform into extracellular merozoites. PMID:25886026

  13. Characteristics of an Extensive Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis Recombinant Protein Set

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the first step of a comprehensive large-scale antigen discovery project, 651 Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis proteins were produced in Escherichia coli. All of these were purified by affinity chromatography, dialyzed in phosphate buffered saline, and analyzed on SDS-PAGE gels. C...

  14. Six Subgroups and Extensive Recent Duplications Characterize the Evolution of the Eukaryotic Tubulin Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Findeisen, Peggy; Mühlhausen, Stefanie; Dempewolf, Silke; Hertzog, Jonny; Zietlow, Alexander; Carlomagno, Teresa; Kollmar, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Tubulins belong to the most abundant proteins in eukaryotes providing the backbone for many cellular substructures like the mitotic and meiotic spindles, the intracellular cytoskeletal network, and the axonemes of cilia and flagella. Homologs have even been reported for archaea and bacteria. However, a taxonomically broad and whole-genome-based analysis of the tubulin protein family has never been performed, and thus, the number of subfamilies, their taxonomic distribution, and the exact grouping of the supposed archaeal and bacterial homologs are unknown. Here, we present the analysis of 3,524 tubulins from 504 species. The tubulins formed six major subfamilies, α to ζ. Species of all major kingdoms of the eukaryotes encode members of these subfamilies implying that they must have already been present in the last common eukaryotic ancestor. The proposed archaeal homologs grouped together with the bacterial TubZ proteins as sister clade to the FtsZ proteins indicating that tubulins are unique to eukaryotes. Most species contained α- and/or β-tubulin gene duplicates resulting from recent branch- and species-specific duplication events. This shows that tubulins cannot be used for constructing species phylogenies without resolving their ortholog–paralog relationships. The many gene duplicates and also the independent loss of the δ-, ε-, or ζ-tubulins, which have been shown to be part of the triplet microtubules in basal bodies, suggest that tubulins can functionally substitute each other. PMID:25169981

  15. Heat induced protein denaturation in the particulate fraction of HeLa S3 cells: effect of thermotolerance.

    PubMed

    Burgman, P W; Konings, A W

    1992-10-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of heat on the proteins of the particulate fraction (PF) of HeLa S3 cells using electron spin resonance (ESR) and thermal gel analysis (TGA). ESR detects overall conformational changes in proteins, while TGA detects denaturation (aggregation due to formation of disulfide bonds) in specific proteins. For ESR measurements the -SH groups of the proteins were labelled with a maleimido bound spin label (4-maleimido-tempo). The sample was heated inside the ESR spectrometer at a rate of 1 degree C/min. ESR spectra were made every 2-3 degrees C between 20 degrees C and 70 degrees C. In the PF of untreated cells conformational changes in proteins were observed in three temperature stretches: between 38 and 44 degrees C (transition A, TA); between 47 and 53 degrees C (transition B, TB); and above 58 degrees C (transition C, TC). With TGA, using the same heating rate, we identified three proteins (55, 70, and 90 kD) which denatured during TB. No protein denaturation was observed during TA, while during TC denaturation of all remaining proteins in the PF occurred. When the ESR and TGA measurements were done with the PF of (heat-induced) thermotolerant cells, TA was unchanged while TB and TC started at higher temperatures. The temperature shift for the onset of these transitions correlated with the degree of thermotolerance that was induced in the cells. These results suggest that protection against heat-induced denaturation of proteins in the PF is involved in heat induced thermotolerance. PMID:1325981

  16. MCCE2: Improving Protein pKa Calculations with Extensive Side Chain Rotamer Sampling

    PubMed Central

    SONG, YIFAN; MAO, JUNJUN; GUNNER, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    Multiconformation continuum electrostatics (MCCE) explores different conformational degrees of freedom in Monte Carlo calculations of protein residue and ligand pKas. Explicit changes in side chain conformations throughout a titration create a position dependent, heterogeneous dielectric response giving a more accurate picture of coupled ionization and position changes. The MCCE2 methods for choosing a group of input heavy atom and proton positions are described. The pKas calculated with different isosteric conformers, heavy atom rotamers and proton positions, with different degrees of optimization are tested against a curated group of 305 experimental pKas in 33 proteins. QUICK calculations, with rotation around Asn and Gln termini, sampling His tautomers and torsion minimum hydroxyls yield an RMSD of 1.34 with 84% of the errors being <1.5 pH units. FULL calculations adding heavy atom rotamers and side chain optimization yield an RMSD of 0.90 with 90% of the errors <1.5 pH unit. Good results are also found for pKas in the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. The inclusion of extra side chain positions distorts the dielectric boundary and also biases the calculated pKas by creating more neutral than ionized conformers. Methods for correcting these errors are introduced. Calculations are compared with multiple X-ray and NMR derived structures in 36 soluble proteins. Calculations with X-ray structures give significantly better pKas. Results with the default protein dielectric constant of 4 are as good as those using a value of 8. PMID:19274707

  17. Protective Effect of High Molecular Weight Protein Sub-fraction of Calotropis procera Latex in Monoarthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Priyanka; Ramos, Marcio V.; Vasconcelos, Mirele da Silveira; Kumar, Vijay L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Proteins present in the latex of Calotropis procera have been shown to produce anti-inflammatory effect and to afford protection in various disease models. Objectives: To determine the efficacy of high molecular weight protein sub-fraction (LPPI) of latex of C. procera in ameliorating joint inflammation and hyperalgesia in a preclinical model of arthritis. Materials and Methods: Monoarthritis was induced in rats by intra-articular injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) and the effect of two doses of LPPI (5 and 25 mg/kg) and diclofenac (5 mg/kg) was evaluated on joint swelling, stair climbing ability, motility, and dorsal flexion pain on day 3. The rats were sacrificed on day 3 to measure tissue levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Evaluation of joint histology was also made. Results: Intra-articular injection of FCA produced joint swelling and difficulty in stair climbing ability, motility, and pain on flexion of the joint as revealed by scores obtained for these functional parameters. LPPI produced a dose-dependent decrease in joint swelling and improved joint functions. Arthritic rats also revealed altered oxidative homeostasis where joint tissue GSH levels were decreased and TBARS levels were increased as compared to normal rats. The levels of these oxidative stress markers were near normal in arthritic rats treated with LPPI. Moreover, treatment with LPPI also maintained the structural integrity of the joint. The protective effect of LPPI was comparable to the standard anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac. Conclusion: The findings of the present study show that LPPI fraction comprising high molecular weight proteins could be used for the alleviation of arthritic symptoms. SUMMARY High molecular weight protein sub-fraction of latex of Calotropis procera (LPPI) reduced joint swelling and hyperalgesia in arthritic ratsLPPI produced a significant improvement in stair climbing ability and motility

  18. Protein Molecular Structures and Protein Fraction Profiles of New Co-Products of BioEthanol Production: A Novel Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, P.; Niu, Z; Damiran, D

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the protein molecular structures of the new coproducts from bioethanol production, quantify protein structure amide I to II and {alpha}-helix to {beta}-sheet spectral peak intensity ratio, and illustrate multivariate molecular spectral analyses as a novel research tool for rapid characterization of protein molecular structures in bioethonal bioproducts. The study demonstrated that the grains had a significantly higher ratio of {alpha}-helix to {beta}-sheet in the protein structure than their coproducts produced from bioethanol processing (1.38 vs 1.03, P < 0.05). There were significant differences between wheat and corn (1.47 vs 1.29, P < 0.05) but no difference between wheat dried distiller grains with solubles (DDGS) and corn DDGS (1.04 vs 1.03, P > 0.05). The grains had a significantly higher ratio of protein amide I to II in the protein structure than their coproducts produced from bioethanol processing (4.58 vs 2.84, P < 0.05). There were no significant differences between wheat and corn (4.61 vs 4.56, P > 0.05), but there were significant differences between wheat DDGS and corn DDGS (3.08 vs 2.21, P < 0.05). This preliminary study indicated that bioethanol processing changes protein molecular structures, compared with original grains. Further study is needed with a large set of the new bioethanol coproducts to quantify protein molecular structures ({alpha}-helix to {beta}-sheet ratio; amide I to II ratio) of the bioethanol coproducts in relation to nutrient supply and availability in animals.

  19. C-terminal extension of calmodulin-like 3 protein from Oryza sativa L.: interaction with a high mobility group target protein.

    PubMed

    Chinpongpanich, Aumnart; Phean-O-Pas, Srivilai; Thongchuang, Mayura; Qu, Li-Jia; Buaboocha, Teerapong

    2015-11-01

    A large number of calmodulin-like (CML) proteins are present in plants, but there is little detailed information on the functions of these proteins in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Here, the CML3 protein from rice (OsCML3) and its truncated form lacking the C-terminal extension (OsCML3m) were found to exhibit a Ca2+-binding property and subsequent conformational change, but the ability to bind the CaM kinase II peptide was only observed for OsCML3m. Changes in their secondary structure upon Ca2+-binding measured by circular dichroism revealed that OsCML3m had a higher helical content than OsCML3. Moreover, OsCML3 was mainly localized in the plasma membrane, whereas OsCML3m was found in the nucleus. The rice high mobility group B1 (OsHMGB1) protein was identified as one of the putative OsCML3 target proteins. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis revealed that OsHMGB1 bound OsCML3, OsCML3m or OsCML3s (cysteine to serine mutation at the prenylation site) in the nucleus presumably through the methionine and phenylalanine-rich hydrophobic patches, confirming that OsHMGB1 is a target protein in planta. The effect of OsCML3 or OsCML3m on the DNA-binding ability of OsHMGB1 was measured using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. OsCML3m decreased the level of OsHMGB1 binding to pUC19 double-stranded DNA whereas OsCML3 did not. Taken together, OsCML3 probably provides a mechanism for manipulating the DNA-binding ability of OsHMGB1 in the nucleus and its C-terminal extension provides an intracellular Ca2+ regulatory switch. PMID:26423116

  20. Extensive Citrullination Promotes Immunogenicity of HSP90 through Protein Unfolding and Exposure of Cryptic Epitopes.

    PubMed

    Travers, Timothy S; Harlow, Lisa; Rosas, Ivan O; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Mikuls, Ted R; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K; Camacho, Carlos J; Ascherman, Dana P

    2016-09-01

    Post-translational protein modifications such as citrullination have been linked to the breach of immune tolerance and clinical autoimmunity. Previous studies from our laboratory support this concept, demonstrating that autoantibodies targeting citrullinated isoforms of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) are associated with rheumatoid arthritis complicated by interstitial lung disease. To further explore the relationship between citrullination and structural determinants of HSP90 immunogenicity, we employed a combination of ELISA-based epitope profiling, computational modeling, and mass-spectrometric sequencing of peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD)-modified protein. Remarkably, ELISAs involving selected citrullinated HSP90β/α peptides identified a key epitope corresponding to an internal Arg residue (R502 [HSP90β]/R510 [HSP90α]) that is normally buried within the crystal structure of native/unmodified HSP90. In vitro time/dose-response experiments reveal an ordered pattern of PAD-mediated deimination events culminating in citrullination of R502/R510. Conventional as well as scaled molecular dynamics simulations further demonstrate that citrullination of selected Arg residues leads to progressive disruption of HSP90 tertiary structure, promoting exposure of R502/R510 to PAD modification and subsequent autoantibody binding. Consistent with this process, ELISAs incorporating variably deiminated HSP90 as substrate Ag indicate a direct relationship between the degree of citrullination and the level of ex vivo Ab recognition. Overall, these data support a novel structural paradigm whereby citrullination-induced shifts in protein structure generate cryptic epitopes capable of bypassing B cell tolerance in the appropriate genetic context. PMID:27448590

  1. Diverse RNA-Binding Proteins Interact with Functionally Related Sets of RNAs, Suggesting an Extensive Regulatory System

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Daniel J; Riordan, Daniel P; Gerber, André P; Herschlag, Daniel; Brown, Patrick O

    2008-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have roles in the regulation of many post-transcriptional steps in gene expression, but relatively few RBPs have been systematically studied. We searched for the RNA targets of 40 proteins in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a selective sample of the approximately 600 annotated and predicted RBPs, as well as several proteins not annotated as RBPs. At least 33 of these 40 proteins, including three of the four proteins that were not previously known or predicted to be RBPs, were reproducibly associated with specific sets of a few to several hundred RNAs. Remarkably, many of the RBPs we studied bound mRNAs whose protein products share identifiable functional or cytotopic features. We identified specific sequences or predicted structures significantly enriched in target mRNAs of 16 RBPs. These potential RNA-recognition elements were diverse in sequence, structure, and location: some were found predominantly in 3′-untranslated regions, others in 5′-untranslated regions, some in coding sequences, and many in two or more of these features. Although this study only examined a small fraction of the universe of yeast RBPs, 70% of the mRNA transcriptome had significant associations with at least one of these RBPs, and on average, each distinct yeast mRNA interacted with three of the RBPs, suggesting the potential for a rich, multidimensional network of regulation. These results strongly suggest that combinatorial binding of RBPs to specific recognition elements in mRNAs is a pervasive mechanism for multi-dimensional regulation of their post-transcriptional fate. PMID:18959479

  2. Optimization of protein fractionation by skim milk microfiltration: Choice of ceramic membrane pore size and filtration temperature.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Camilla Elise; Abrahamsen, Roger K; Rukke, Elling-Olav; Johansen, Anne-Grethe; Schüller, Reidar B; Skeie, Siv B

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how ceramic membrane pore size and filtration temperature influence the protein fractionation of skim milk by cross flow microfiltration (MF). Microfiltration was performed at a uniform transmembrane pressure with constant permeate flux to a volume concentration factor of 2.5. Three different membrane pore sizes, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20µm, were used at a filtration temperature of 50°C. Furthermore, at pore size 0.10µm, 2 different filtration temperatures were investigated: 50 and 60°C. The transmission of proteins increased with increasing pore size, giving the permeate from MF with the 0.20-µm membrane a significantly higher concentration of native whey proteins compared with the permeates from the 0.05- and 0.10-µm membranes (0.50, 0.24, and 0.39%, respectively). Significant amounts of caseins permeated the 0.20-µm membrane (1.4%), giving a permeate with a whitish appearance and a casein distribution (αS2-CN: αS1-CN: κ-CN: β-CN) similar to that of skim milk. The 0.05- and 0.10-µm membranes were able to retain all caseins (only negligible amounts were detected). A permeate free from casein is beneficial in the production of native whey protein concentrates and in applications where transparency is an important functional characteristic. Microfiltration of skim milk at 50°C with the 0.10-µm membrane resulted in a permeate containing significantly more native whey proteins than the permeate from MF at 60°C. The more rapid increase in transmembrane pressure and the significantly lower concentration of caseins in the retentate at 60°C indicated that a higher concentration of caseins deposited on the membrane, and consequently reduced the native whey protein transmission. Optimal protein fractionation of skim milk into a casein-rich retentate and a permeate with native whey proteins were obtained by 0.10-µm MF at 50°C. PMID:27265169

  3. A relational extension of the notion of motifs: application to the common 3D protein substructures searching problem.

    PubMed

    Pisanti, Nadia; Soldano, Henry; Carpentier, Mathilde; Pothier, Joel

    2009-12-01

    The geometrical configurations of atoms in protein structures can be viewed as approximate relations among them. Then, finding similar common substructures within a set of protein structures belongs to a new class of problems that generalizes that of finding repeated motifs. The novelty lies in the addition of constraints on the motifs in terms of relations that must hold between pairs of positions of the motifs. We will hence denote them as relational motifs. For this class of problems, we present an algorithm that is a suitable extension of the KMR paradigm and, in particular, of the KMRC as it uses a degenerate alphabet. Our algorithm contains several improvements that become especially useful when-as it is required for relational motifs-the inference is made by partially overlapping shorter motifs, rather than concatenating them. The efficiency, correctness and completeness of the algorithm is ensured by several non-trivial properties that are proven in this paper. The algorithm has been applied in the important field of protein common 3D substructure searching. The methods implemented have been tested on several examples of protein families such as serine proteases, globins and cytochromes P450 additionally. The detected motifs have been compared to those found by multiple structural alignments methods. PMID:20047489

  4. A peptide fraction from germinated soybean protein down-regulates PTTG1 and TOP2A mRNA expression, inducing apoptosis in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Robles-Ramírez, María del Carmen; Ramón-Gallegos, Eva; Mora-Escobedo, Rosalva; Torres-Torres, Nimbe

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a peptide fraction, obtained from a germinated soybean protein hydrolysate, on the viability, apoptosis and cancer related gene expression in HeLa cells. Soybean was germinated for 0-6 days and proteins were isolated from the seeds. Protein isolates, without ethanol-soluble phytochemicals, were hydrolyzed with digestive enzymes and their effect on growth in HeLa cells was evaluated. The most active hydrolysate was separated by ultrafiltration into five peptide fractions. A >10 kDa fraction was the most active against cancer cells. This fraction down-regulated PTTG1 and TOP2A mRNA expression (two genes considered as therapeutic targets) and induced apoptosis in cancer cells activating the caspase cascade and causing DNA fragmentation. Germinated soy protein isolates could be a bioactive ingredient of functional food. PMID:22545419

  5. An extensively hydrolysed rice protein-based formula in the management of infants with cow's milk protein allergy: preliminary results after 1 month

    PubMed Central

    Vandenplas, Yvan; De Greef, Elisabeth; Hauser, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Background Guidelines recommend extensively hydrolysed cow's milk protein formulas (eHF) in the treatment of infants diagnosed with cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA). Extensively hydrolysed rice protein infant formulas (eRHFs) have recently become available, and could offer a valid alternative. Methods A prospective trial was performed to evaluate the clinical tolerance of a new eRHF in infants with a confirmed CMPA. Patients were followed for 1 month. Clinical tolerance of the eRHF was evaluated with a symptom-based score (SBS) and growth (weight and length) was monitored. Results Thirty-nine infants (mean age 3.4 months, range 0.5–6 months) diagnosed with CMPA were enrolled. All infants tolerated the eRHF and experienced a normal growth. Conclusions In accordance with current guidelines, this eRHF is tolerated by more than 90% of children with proven CMPA with a 95% CI, and is an adequate alternative to cow's milk-based eHF. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01998074. PMID:24914098

  6. Arginine depletion by arginine deiminase does not affect whole protein metabolism or muscle fractional protein synthesis rate in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depl...

  7. Linkage Groups of Protein-Coding Genes in Western Palearctic Water Frogs Reveal Extensive Evolutionary Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Hotz, H.; Uzzell, T.; Berger, L.

    1997-01-01

    Among progeny of a hybrid (Rana shqiperica X R. lessonae) X R. lessonae, 14 of 22 loci form four linkage groups (LGs): (1) mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, carbonate dehydratase-2, esterase 4, peptidase D; (2) mannosephosphate isomerase, lactate dehydrogenase-B, sex, hexokinase-1, peptidase B; (3) albumin, fructose-biphosphatase-1, guanine deaminase; (4) mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, cytosolic malic enzyme, xanthine oxidase. Fructose-biphosphate aldolase-2 and cytosolic aspartate aminotransferase possibly form a fifth LG. Mitochondrial aconitate hydratase, α-glucosidase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and phosphoglucomutase-2 are unlinked to other loci. All testable linkages (among eight loci of LGs 1, 2, 3, and 4) are shared with eastern Palearctic water frogs. Including published data, 44 protein loci can be assigned to 10 of the 13 chromosomes in Holarctic Rana. Of testable pairs among 18 protein loci, agreement between Palearctic and Nearctic Rana is complete (125 unlinked, 14 linked pairs among 14 loci of five syntenies), and Holarctic Rana and Xenopus laevis are highly concordant (125 shared nonlinkages, 13 shared linkages, three differences). Several Rana syntenies occur in mammals and fish. Many syntenies apparently have persisted for 60-140 X 10(6) years (frogs), some even for 350-400 X 10(6) years (mammals and teleosts). PMID:9286685

  8. Performing Isoelectric Focusing and Simultaneous Fractionation of Proteins on A Rotary Valve Followed by Sodium Dodecyl – Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Lu, Joann J.; Gu, Congying; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Shaorong

    2013-01-01

    In this technical note, we design and fabricate a novel rotary valve and demonstrate its feasibility for performing isoelectric focusing and simultaneous fractionation of proteins, followed by sodium dodecyl – polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The valve has two positions. In one position, the valve routes a series of capillary loops together into a single capillary tube where capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) is performed. By switching the valve to another position, the CIEF-resolved proteins in all capillary loops are isolated simultaneously, and samples in the loops are removed and collected in vials. After the collected samples are briefly processed, they are separated via sodium dodecyl – polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, the 2nd-D separation) on either a capillary gel electrophoresis instrument or a slab-gel system. The detailed valve configuration is illustrated, and the experimental conditions and operation protocols are discussed. PMID:23819755

  9. [Reversibility of alterations induced by sexual steroids in various serum protein fractions, following application of hormonal contraceptives (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Klinger, G; Stelzner, A; Börner, A; Schubert, H; Krause, G; Scheler, R; Tarnick, M; Carol, W

    1980-01-01

    Reversibility of changes induced by sexual steroids was studied in 19 different serum protein fractions of 20 women. The following preparations were available for testing: Gravistat (ethinyl-oestradiol/norgestrel), Non-Ovlon (ethinyloestradiol/norethisterone-acetate), Ovosiston (mestranol/chlormadinone-acetate), and Deposiston (ethinyloestradiol-sulphonate/norethisterone-acetate). The tests were made towards the end of the 24th cycle on the pill and in the first cycle thereafter.--The proteins tested were found to be affected in a differentiated way and, throughout, depending on oestrogen levels. Reversal was rapid, but the phase of restitution usually was longer than the period of testing and follow-up. The long-lasting action of Deposiston was visualised also in its "reversal effect". PMID:6164184

  10. Fractionation of protein hydrolysates of fish and chicken using membrane ultrafiltration: investigation of antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Centenaro, Graciela Salete; Salas-Mellado, Myriam; Pires, Carla; Batista, Irineu; Nunes, Maria L; Prentice, Carlos

    2014-03-01

    In this work, chicken and fish peptides were obtained using the proteolytic enzymes α-Chymotrypsin and Flavourzyme. The muscle was hydrolyzed for 4 h, and the resulting peptides were evaluated. Hydrolysates were produced from Argentine croaker (Umbrina canosai) with a degree of hydrolysis (DH) of 25.9 and 27.6% and from chicken (Gallus domesticus) with DH of 17.8 and 20.6% for Flavourzyme and α-Chymotrypsin, respectively. Membrane ultrafiltration was used to separate fish and chicken hydrolysates from Flavourzyme and α-Chymotrypsin based on molecular weight cutoff of >1,000, <1,000 and >500, and <500 Da, to produce fractions (F1,000, F1,000-500, and F500) with antioxidant activity. Fish hydrolysates produced with Flavourzyme (FHF) and α-Chymotrypsin showed 60.8 and 50.9% of peptides with a molecular weight of <3 kDa in its composition, respectively. To chicken hydrolysates produced with Flavourzyme and α-Chymotrypsin (CHC) was observed 83 and 92.4% of peptides with a molecular weight of <3 kDa. The fraction that showed, in general, higher antioxidant potential was F1,000 from FHF. When added 40 mg/mL of FHF and CHC, 93 and 80% of lipid oxidation in ground beef homogenates was inhibited, respectively. The composition of amino acids indicated higher amino acids hydrophobic content and amino acids containing sulfuric residues for FHF, which showed antioxidant potential. PMID:24449375

  11. Alterations in the sarcoplasmic protein fraction of beef muscle with postmortem aging and hydrodynamic pressure processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) analysis were utilized to detect differences in the sarcoplasmic protein profiles of beef strip loins subjected to aging and hydrodynamic pressure processing (HDP) treatments. At 48 h postmortem, stri...

  12. Molecular spectroscopic investigation on fractionation-induced changes on biomacromolecule of co-products from bioethanol processing to explore protein metabolism in ruminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuewei; Yan, Xiaogang; Beltranena, Eduardo; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-03-01

    Fractionation processing is an efficient technology which is capable to redesign/redevelop a new food or feed product with a specified chemical and nutrient profile. This processing technique was able to produce four different fractions (called "A", "B", "C", "D" fractions/treatments) with different nutrient profile form a co-product of bioethanol processing [wheat dried distillers grains with soluble (DDGS)]. To date, there is no study on the effect of fractionation processing on inherent molecular structure of different fractions and how the processing-induced structural change affect the metabolic characteristics of protein and nutrient availability. The objectives of this experiment were to: (1) investigate the effect of fractionation processing on changes of protein functional groups (amide I, amide II, and their ratio) and molecular structure (modeled α-helix, β-sheet, and their ratio), and (2) study the relationship between the fractionation processing-induced changes of protein molecular structure and nutrients availability as well as the metabolic characteristics of protein. The hypothesis of this study was that the fractionation processing changes the molecular structure and such changes affect the metabolic characteristics of protein. The protein molecular structure spectral profile of the fractions A, B, C and D were identified by Fourier-transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FT/IR-ATR). The results showed that the fractionation processing significantly affected the protein molecular spectral profiles. The differences in amide I to amide II peak area and height ratios were strongly significant (P < 0.01) among the treatment fractions, ranging from 4.98 to 6.33 and 3.28 to 4.00, respectively. The difference in the modeled protein α-helix to β-sheet ratio was also strongly significant (P < 0.01) among the treatment fractions. Multivariate molecular spectral analysis with cluster (CLA) and principal component analyses (PCA

  13. Evidence of protein-free homology recognition in magnetic bead force–extension experiments

    PubMed Central

    (O’) Lee, D. J.; Danilowicz, C.; Rochester, C.; Prentiss, M.

    2016-01-01

    Earlier theoretical studies have proposed that the homology-dependent pairing of large tracts of dsDNA may be due to physical interactions between homologous regions. Such interactions could contribute to the sequence-dependent pairing of chromosome regions that may occur in the presence or the absence of double-strand breaks. Several experiments have indicated the recognition of homologous sequences in pure electrolytic solutions without proteins. Here, we report single-molecule force experiments with a designed 60 kb long dsDNA construct; one end attached to a solid surface and the other end to a magnetic bead. The 60 kb constructs contain two 10 kb long homologous tracts oriented head to head, so that their sequences match if the two tracts fold on each other. The distance between the bead and the surface is measured as a function of the force applied to the bead. At low forces, the construct molecules extend substantially less than normal, control dsDNA, indicating the existence of preferential interaction between the homologous regions. The force increase causes no abrupt but continuous unfolding of the paired homologous regions. Simple semi-phenomenological models of the unfolding mechanics are proposed, and their predictions are compared with the data. PMID:27493568

  14. Identification of immunoreactive antigens in membrane proteins enriched fraction from Francisella tularensis LVS.

    PubMed

    Janovská, Sylva; Pávková, Ivona; Hubálek, Martin; Lenco, Juraj; Macela, Ales; Stulík, Jirí

    2007-02-15

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterium causing disease in many mammalian species. The low infectious dose of F. tularensis and the ease of air-borne transmission are the main features responsible for the classification of this bacterium as a potential biological weapon. The live attenuated strain of F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) is currently only effective vaccine against tularemia, however, this type of vaccine has not been approved for human use. In the presented study, sub-immunoproteome analysis was performed to search for new immunogenic proteins of Francisella tularensis LVS grown under different conditions. By this approach 35 immunoreactive antigens were identified, 19 of them showed to be novel immunogens. In conclusion, sub-immunoproteome analysis resulted in successful identification of novel immunoreactive proteins. PMID:17241671

  15. A novel mass spectrometric strategy "BEMAP" reveals Extensive O-linked protein glycosylation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Anders; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Duggin, Iain G; Larsen, Martin R; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of sugars to proteins via side-chain oxygen atoms (O-linked glycosylation) is seen in all three domains of life. However, a lack of widely-applicable analytical tools has restricted the study of this process, particularly in bacteria. In E. coli, only four O-linked glycoproteins have previously been characterized. Here we present a glycoproteomics technique, termed BEMAP, which is based on the beta-elimination of O-linked glycans followed by Michael-addition of a phosphonic acid derivative, and subsequent titanium dioxide enrichment. This strategy allows site-specific mass-spectrometric identification of proteins with O-linked glycan modifications in a complex biological sample. Using BEMAP we identified cell surface-associated and membrane vesicle glycoproteins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and non-pathogenic E. coli K-12. We identified 618 glycosylated Serine and Threonine residues mapping to 140 proteins in ETEC, including several known virulence factors, and 34 in E. coli K-12. The two strains had 32 glycoproteins in common. Remarkably, the majority of the ETEC glycoproteins were conserved in both strains but nevertheless were only glycosylated in the pathogen. Therefore, bacterial O-linked glycosylation is much more extensive than previously thought, and is especially important to the pathogen. PMID:27562176

  16. Few Residues within an Extensive Binding Interface Drive Receptor Interaction and Determine the Specificity of Arrestin Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Gimenez, Luis E.; Francis, Derek J.; Hanson, Susan M.; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Klug, Candice S.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2011-01-01

    Arrestins bind active phosphorylated forms of G protein-coupled receptors, terminating G protein activation, orchestrating receptor trafficking, and redirecting signaling to alternative pathways. Visual arrestin-1 preferentially binds rhodopsin, whereas the two non-visual arrestins interact with hundreds of G protein-coupled receptor subtypes. Here we show that an extensive surface on the concave side of both arrestin-2 domains is involved in receptor binding. We also identified a small number of residues on the receptor binding surface of the N- and C-domains that largely determine the receptor specificity of arrestins. We show that alanine substitution of these residues blocks the binding of arrestin-1 to rhodopsin in vitro and of arrestin-2 and -3 to β2-adrenergic, M2 muscarinic cholinergic, and D2 dopamine receptors in intact cells, suggesting that these elements critically contribute to the energy of the interaction. Thus, in contrast to arrestin-1, where direct phosphate binding is crucial, the interaction of non-visual arrestins with their cognate receptors depends to a lesser extent on phosphate binding and more on the binding to non-phosphorylated receptor elements. PMID:21471193

  17. A novel mass spectrometric strategy “BEMAP” reveals Extensive O-linked protein glycosylation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, Anders; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Duggin, Iain G.; Larsen, Martin R.; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of sugars to proteins via side-chain oxygen atoms (O-linked glycosylation) is seen in all three domains of life. However, a lack of widely-applicable analytical tools has restricted the study of this process, particularly in bacteria. In E. coli, only four O-linked glycoproteins have previously been characterized. Here we present a glycoproteomics technique, termed BEMAP, which is based on the beta-elimination of O-linked glycans followed by Michael-addition of a phosphonic acid derivative, and subsequent titanium dioxide enrichment. This strategy allows site-specific mass-spectrometric identification of proteins with O-linked glycan modifications in a complex biological sample. Using BEMAP we identified cell surface-associated and membrane vesicle glycoproteins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and non-pathogenic E. coli K-12. We identified 618 glycosylated Serine and Threonine residues mapping to 140 proteins in ETEC, including several known virulence factors, and 34 in E. coli K-12. The two strains had 32 glycoproteins in common. Remarkably, the majority of the ETEC glycoproteins were conserved in both strains but nevertheless were only glycosylated in the pathogen. Therefore, bacterial O-linked glycosylation is much more extensive than previously thought, and is especially important to the pathogen. PMID:27562176

  18. Study of the protein-bound fraction of calcium, iron, magnesium and zinc in bovine milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Fernando V.; Lopes, Gisele S.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Souza, Gilberto B.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.

    2001-10-01

    Two approaches were used to study the interaction of Ca, Fe, Mg and Zn with bovine milk proteins by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICPOES). Selective separations in bovine milk samples were accomplished employing an acid protein precipitation using 100 g l -1 trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and an enzymatic protein hydrolysis using 50 g l -1 pepsin (PEP) solution, respectively. The results were compared with total mineral contents determined after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The results obtained by enzymatic and acid precipitation evidenced the different interaction forms of Ca, Fe, Mg and Zn in the system formed by milk components. Iron was not solubilized by the TCA treatment, but was recovered completely after the enzymatic treatment. Quantitative recoveries of Ca, Mg and Zn were obtained using both approaches, showing that these analytes were bound to milk compounds affected by either treatment. Calcium, Mg and Zn are mainly associated with colloidal calcium phosphate and Fe is bound to the backbone of the casein polypeptide chain, cleaved by pepsin enzyme. The proposed approaches could be used to assess the complexity of these chemical interactions.

  19. Multidimensional Separation Using HILIC and SCX Pre-fractionation for RP LC-MS/MS Platform with Automated Exclusion List-based MS Data Acquisition with Increased Protein Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Meng, Zhen; Edman-Woolcott, Maria; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F; Zandi, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomics is one of the most widely used analytical platforms for global protein discovery and quantification. One of the challenges is the difficulty of identifying low abundance biomarker proteins from limited biological samples. Extensive fractionation could expand proteomics dynamic range, however, at the cost of high sample and time consumption. Extensive fractionation would increase the sample need and the labeling cost. Also quantitative proteomics depending on high resolution MS have the limitation of spectral acquisition speed. Those practical problems hinder the in-depth quantitative proteomics analysis such as tandem mass tag (TMT) experiments. We found the joint use of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and strong cation exchange Chromatography (SCX) prefractionation at medium level could improve MS/MS efficiency, increase proteome coverage, shorten analysis time and save valuable samples. In addition, we scripted a program, Exclusion List Convertor (ELC), which automates and streamlines data acquisition workflow using the precursor ion exclusion (PIE) method. PIE reduces redundancy of high abundance MS/MS analyses by running replicates of the sample. The precursor ions detected in the initial run(s) are excluded for MS/MS in the subsequent run. We compared PIE methods with standard data dependent acquisition (DDA) methods running replicates without PIE for their effectiveness in quantifying TMT-tagged peptides and proteins in mouse tears. We quantified a total of 845 proteins and 1401 peptides using the PIE workflow, while the DDA method only resulted in 347 proteins and 731 peptides. This represents a 144% increase of protein identifications as a result of PIE analysis. PMID:26807013

  20. PSI/TM-Coffee: a web server for fast and accurate multiple sequence alignments of regular and transmembrane proteins using homology extension on reduced databases.

    PubMed

    Floden, Evan W; Tommaso, Paolo D; Chatzou, Maria; Magis, Cedrik; Notredame, Cedric; Chang, Jia-Ming

    2016-07-01

    The PSI/TM-Coffee web server performs multiple sequence alignment (MSA) of proteins by combining homology extension with a consistency based alignment approach. Homology extension is performed with Position Specific Iterative (PSI) BLAST searches against a choice of redundant and non-redundant databases. The main novelty of this server is to allow databases of reduced complexity to rapidly perform homology extension. This server also gives the possibility to use transmembrane proteins (TMPs) reference databases to allow even faster homology extension on this important category of proteins. Aside from an MSA, the server also outputs topological prediction of TMPs using the HMMTOP algorithm. Previous benchmarking of the method has shown this approach outperforms the most accurate alignment methods such as MSAProbs, Kalign, PROMALS, MAFFT, ProbCons and PRALINE™. The web server is available at http://tcoffee.crg.cat/tmcoffee. PMID:27106060

  1. Isotopic fractionation in proteins as a measure of hydrogen bond length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Ross H.; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2015-07-01

    If a deuterated molecule containing strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds is placed in a hydrogenated solvent, it may preferentially exchange deuterium for hydrogen. This preference is due to the difference between the vibrational zero-point energy for hydrogen and deuterium. It is found that the associated fractionation factor Φ is correlated with the strength of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds. This correlation has been used to determine the length of the H-bonds (donor-acceptor separation) in a diverse range of enzymes and has been argued to support the existence of short low-barrier H-bonds. Starting with a potential energy surface based on a simple diabatic state model for H-bonds, we calculate Φ as a function of the proton donor-acceptor distance R. For numerical results, we use a parameterization of the model for symmetric O-H⋯O bonds [R. H. McKenzie, Chem. Phys. Lett. 535, 196 (2012)]. We consider the relative contributions of the O-H stretch vibration, O-H bend vibrations (both in plane and out of plane), tunneling splitting effects at finite temperature, and the secondary geometric isotope effect. We compare our total Φ as a function of R with NMR experimental results for enzymes, and in particular with an earlier model parametrization Φ(R), used previously to determine bond lengths.

  2. Isotopic fractionation in proteins as a measure of hydrogen bond length.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Ross H; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G

    2015-07-28

    If a deuterated molecule containing strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds is placed in a hydrogenated solvent, it may preferentially exchange deuterium for hydrogen. This preference is due to the difference between the vibrational zero-point energy for hydrogen and deuterium. It is found that the associated fractionation factor Φ is correlated with the strength of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds. This correlation has been used to determine the length of the H-bonds (donor-acceptor separation) in a diverse range of enzymes and has been argued to support the existence of short low-barrier H-bonds. Starting with a potential energy surface based on a simple diabatic state model for H-bonds, we calculate Φ as a function of the proton donor-acceptor distance R. For numerical results, we use a parameterization of the model for symmetric O-H⋯O bonds [R. H. McKenzie, Chem. Phys. Lett. 535, 196 (2012)]. We consider the relative contributions of the O-H stretch vibration, O-H bend vibrations (both in plane and out of plane), tunneling splitting effects at finite temperature, and the secondary geometric isotope effect. We compare our total Φ as a function of R with NMR experimental results for enzymes, and in particular with an earlier model parametrization Φ(R), used previously to determine bond lengths. PMID:26233131

  3. Isotopic fractionation in proteins as a measure of hydrogen bond length

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, Ross H.; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2015-07-28

    If a deuterated molecule containing strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds is placed in a hydrogenated solvent, it may preferentially exchange deuterium for hydrogen. This preference is due to the difference between the vibrational zero-point energy for hydrogen and deuterium. It is found that the associated fractionation factor Φ is correlated with the strength of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds. This correlation has been used to determine the length of the H-bonds (donor-acceptor separation) in a diverse range of enzymes and has been argued to support the existence of short low-barrier H-bonds. Starting with a potential energy surface based on a simple diabatic state model for H-bonds, we calculate Φ as a function of the proton donor-acceptor distance R. For numerical results, we use a parameterization of the model for symmetric O–H⋯O bonds [R. H. McKenzie, Chem. Phys. Lett. 535, 196 (2012)]. We consider the relative contributions of the O–H stretch vibration, O–H bend vibrations (both in plane and out of plane), tunneling splitting effects at finite temperature, and the secondary geometric isotope effect. We compare our total Φ as a function of R with NMR experimental results for enzymes, and in particular with an earlier model parametrization Φ(R), used previously to determine bond lengths.

  4. The N-terminal extension of yeast ribosomal protein L8 is involved in two major remodeling events during late nuclear stages of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Wu, Shan; Gao, Ning; Woolford, John L

    2016-09-01

    Assaying effects on pre-rRNA processing and ribosome assembly upon depleting individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) provided an initial paradigm for assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo-that each structural domain of ribosomal subunits assembles in a hierarchical fashion. However, two features suggest that a more complex pathway may exist: (i) Some r-proteins contain extensions that reach long distances across ribosomes to interact with multiple rRNA domains as well as with other r-proteins. (ii) Individual r-proteins may assemble in a stepwise fashion. For example, the globular domain of an r-protein might assemble separately from its extensions. Thus, these extensions might play roles in assembly that could not be revealed by depleting the entire protein. Here, we show that deleting or mutating extensions of r-proteins L7 (uL30) and L35 (uL29) from yeast reveal important roles in early and middle steps during 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Detailed analysis of the N-terminal terminal extension of L8 (eL8) showed that it is necessary for late nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly involving two major remodeling events: removal of the ITS2 spacer; and reorganization of the central protuberance (CP) containing 5S rRNA and r-proteins L5 (uL18) and L11 (uL5). Mutations in the L8 extension block processing of 7S pre-rRNA, prevent release of assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 from pre-ribosomes, which is required for rotation of the CP, and block association of Sda1, the Rix1 complex, and the Rea1 ATPase involved in late steps of remodeling. PMID:27390266

  5. Improvement of surface functionalities, including allergenicity attenuation, of whole buckwheat protein fraction by maillard-type glycation with dextran.

    PubMed

    Tazawa, Shigeru; Katayama, Shigeru; Hirabayashi, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Nakamura, Soichiro

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the effects of the introduction of polysaccharide chains onto the molecular surface of buckwheat proteins on buckwheat protein surface functionality. The whole buckwheat protein fraction (WBP) was prepared using 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.5) containing 0.5 M NaCl and covalently linked with 6 kDa, 17.5 kDa, 40 kDa, 70 kDa, or 200 kDa dextran by Maillard-type glycation through controlled dry-heating at 60°C and 79% relative humidity for two weeks. Conjugation with 40 kDa dextran improved the water solubility and emulsifying properties of WBP without causing a serious loss of available lysine; 84.9% of the free amino groups were conserved. In addition, we found that the introduction of dextran chains onto the molecular surfaces of WBP attenuated the antigenicity of WBP. PMID:25580398

  6. Conditional Tat protein brain expression in the GT-tg bigenic mouse induces cerebral fractional anisotropy abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Amanda N.; Liu, Xiaoxu; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Paris, Jason J.; McLaughlin, Jay P.; Kaufman, Marc J.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral white matter changes including tissue water diffusion abnormalities detected with diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) are commonly found in humans with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, as well as in animal models of the disorder. The severities of some of these abnormalities have been reported to correlate with measures of disease progression or severity, or with the degree of cognitive dysfunction. Accordingly, DTI may be a useful translational biomarker. HIV-Tat protein appears to be an important factor in the viral pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurotoxicity. We previously reported cerebral gray matter density reductions in the GT-tg bigenic mouse treated with doxycycline (Dox) to conditionally induce Tat protein expression. Presently, we administered intraperitoneal (i.p.) Dox (100 mg/kg/day) for 7 days to GT-tg mice to determine whether induction of conditional Tat expression led to the development of cerebral DTI abnormalities. Perfused and fixed brains from eight GT-tg mice administered Dox and eight control mice administered saline i.p. were extracted and underwent DTI scans on a 9.4 Tesla scanner. A whole brain analysis detected fractional anisotropy (FA) reductions in several areas including insular and endopiriform regions, as well as within the dorsal striatum. These findings suggest that exposure to Tat protein is sufficient to induce FA abnormalities, and further support the use of the GT-tg mouse to model some effects of HIV. PMID:25619988

  7. Retrovirus Restriction by TRIM5 Proteins Requires Recognition of Only a Small Fraction of Viral Capsid Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jiong; Friedman, David B.

    2013-01-01

    The host restriction factors TRIM5α and TRIMCyp potently inhibit retrovirus infection by binding to the incoming retrovirus capsid. TRIM5 proteins are dimeric, and their association with the viral capsid appears to be enhanced by avidity effects owing to formation of higher-order oligomeric complexes. We examined the stoichiometric requirement for TRIM5 functional recognition by quantifying the efficiencies of restriction of HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus (MLV) particles containing various proportions of restriction-sensitive and -insensitive CA subunits. Both TRIMCyp and TRIM5α inhibited infection of retrovirus particles containing as little as 25% of the restriction-sensitive CA protein. Accordingly, we also observed efficient binding of TRIMCyp in vitro to capsid assemblies containing as little as one-fourth wild-type CA protein. Paradoxically, the ability of HIV-1 particles to abrogate TRIMCyp restriction in trans was more strongly dependent on the fraction of wild-type CA than was restriction of infection. Collectively, our results indicate that TRIM5 restriction factors bind to retroviral capsids in a highly cooperative manner and suggest that TRIM5 can engage a capsid lattice containing a minimum of three or fewer recognizable subunits per hexamer. Our study supports a model in which localized binding of TRIM5 to the viral capsid nucleates rapid polymerization of a TRIM5 lattice on the capsid surface. PMID:23785198

  8. Effects of motor patterns on water-soluble and membrane proteins and cholinesterase activity in subcellular fractions of rat brain tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pevzner, L. Z.; Venkov, L.; Cheresharov, L.

    1980-01-01

    Albino rats were kept for a year under conditions of daily motor load or constant hypokinesia. An increase in motor activity results in a rise in the acetylcholinesterase activity determined in the synaptosomal and purified mitochondrial fractions while hypokinesia induces a pronounced decrease in this enzyme activity. The butyrylcholinesterase activity somewhat decreases in the synaptosomal fraction after hypokinesia but does not change under the motor load pattern. Motor load causes an increase in the amount of synaptosomal water-soluble proteins possessing an intermediate electrophoretic mobility and seem to correspond to the brain-specific protein 14-3-2. In the synaptosomal fraction the amount of membrane proteins with a low electrophoretic mobility and with the cholinesterase activity rises. Hypokinesia, on the contrary, decreases the amount of these membrane proteins.

  9. Short communication: Potential of Fresco-style cheese whey as a source of protein fractions with antioxidant and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Tarango-Hernández, S; Alarcón-Rojo, A D; Robles-Sánchez, M; Gutiérrez-Méndez, N; Rodríguez-Figueroa, J C

    2015-11-01

    Recently, traditional Mexican Fresco-style cheese production has been increasing, and the volume of cheese whey generated represents a problem. In this study, we investigated the chemical composition of Fresco-style cheese wheys and their potential as a source of protein fractions with antioxidant and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activities. Three samples from Fresco, Panela, and Ranchero cheeses whey were physicochemically characterized. Water-soluble extracts were fractionated to obtain whey fractions with different molecular weights: 10-5, 5-3, 3-1 and <1 kDa. The results indicated differences in the lactose, protein, ash, and dry matter contents (% wt/wt) in the different Fresco-style cheese wheys. All whey fractions had antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities. The 10-5 kDa whey fraction of Ranchero cheese had the highest Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (0.62 ± 0.00 mM), and the 3-1 kDa Panela and Fresco cheese whey fractions showed the highest ACE-inhibitory activity (0.57 ± 0.02 and 0.59 ± 0.04 μg/mL 50%-inhibitory concentration values, respectively). These results suggest that Fresco-style cheese wheys may be a source of protein fractions with bioactivity, and thus could be useful ingredients in the manufacture of functional foods with increased nutritional value. PMID:26364114

  10. Amino acid composition, antinutrients and allergens in the peanut protein fraction obtained by an aqueous enzymatic process.

    PubMed

    Latif, S; Pfannstiel, J; Makkar, H P S; Becker, K

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme-assisted aqueous extraction (EAE) of peanut kernel was used to extract oil and protein. The aqueous fraction (AF) obtained by EAE had a better essential amino acid profile than the residues obtained by solvent extraction (Rs) and cold pressing (Rc). No major difference in the trypsin inhibitor activity among AF, Rs and Rc was observed; however, the trypsin inhibitor activity was drastically reduced in the residue obtained after EAE. AF was subjected to MALDI-TOF/MS, revealing it to be rich in peptides (107) with molecular masses from m/z 700 to 2369Da. AF had an extremely low phytate content and was rich in peptides, which could be used as a food supplement. ESI-MS/MS data were used for the identification of major peanut allergens, viz., Ara h1, h3, h6-8. Their allergenic potential needs to be established. PMID:23017415

  11. Annealing prion protein amyloid fibrils at high temperature results in extension of a proteinase K-resistant core.

    PubMed

    Bocharova, Olga V; Makarava, Natallia; Breydo, Leonid; Anderson, Maighdlin; Salnikov, Vadim V; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2006-01-27

    Amyloids are highly ordered, rigid beta-sheet-rich structures that appear to have minimal dynamic flexibility in individual polypeptide chains. Here, we demonstrate that substantial conformational rearrangements occur within mature amyloid fibrils produced from full-length mammalian prion protein. The rearrangement results in a substantial extension of a proteinase K-resistant core and is accompanied by an increase in the beta-sheet-rich conformation. The conformational rearrangement was induced in the presence of low concentrations of Triton X-100 either by brief exposure to 80 degrees C or, with less efficacy, by prolonged incubation at 37 degrees C at pH 7.5 and is referred to here as "annealing." Upon annealing, amyloid fibrils acquired a proteinase K-resistant core identical to that found in bovine spongiform encephalopathy-specific scrapie-associated prion protein. Annealing was also observed when amyloid fibrils were exposed to high temperatures in the absence of detergent but in the presence of brain homogenate. These findings suggest that the amyloid fibrils exist in two conformationally distinct states that are separated by a high energy barrier and that yet unknown cellular cofactors may facilitate transition of the fibrils into thermodynamically more stable state. Our studies provide new insight into the complex behavior of prion polymerization and highlight the annealing process, a previously unknown step in the evolution of amyloid structures. PMID:16314415

  12. Protein Secondary Structures (alpha-helix and beta-sheet) at a Cellular Levle and Protein Fractions in Relation to Rumen Degradation Behaviours of Protein: A New Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    Studying the secondary structure of proteins leads to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein, and such an understanding of the structure of the whole protein is often vital to understanding its digestive behaviour and nutritive value in animals. The main protein secondary structures are the {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet. The percentage of these two structures in protein secondary structures influences protein nutritive value, quality and digestive behaviour. A high percentage of {beta}-sheet structure may partly cause a low access to gastrointestinal digestive enzymes, which results in a low protein value. The objectives of the present study were to use advanced synchrotron-based Fourier transform IR (S-FTIR) microspectroscopy as a new approach to reveal the molecular chemistry of the protein secondary structures of feed tissues affected by heat-processing within intact tissue at a cellular level, and to quantify protein secondary structures using multicomponent peak modelling Gaussian and Lorentzian methods, in relation to protein digestive behaviours and nutritive value in the rumen, which was determined using the Cornell Net Carbohydrate Protein System. The synchrotron-based molecular chemistry research experiment was performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, US Department of Energy. The results showed that, with S-FTIR microspectroscopy, the molecular chemistry, ultrastructural chemical make-up and nutritive characteristics could be revealed at a high ultraspatial resolution ({approx}10 {mu}m). S-FTIR microspectroscopy revealed that the secondary structure of protein differed between raw and roasted golden flaxseeds in terms of the percentages and ratio of {alpha}-helixes and {beta}-sheets in the mid-IR range at the cellular level. By using multicomponent peak modelling, the results show that the roasting reduced (P <0.05) the percentage of {alpha}-helixes (from 47.1% to 36.1%: S

  13. Characterization of a Novel Hemolytic Activity of Human IgG Fractions Arising from Diversity in Protein and Oligosaccharide Components

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yueling; Ye, Xiangqun; Zhong, Mingqi; Cao, Jinsong; Zou, Haiying; Chen, Jiehui

    2014-01-01

    Human IgG is a well-established multifunctional antigen specific immunoglobulin molecule of the adaptive immune system. However, an antigen nonspecific immunological function of human IgG has never been reported. In this study, human IgG was isolated using ammonium sulfate fractional precipitation and diethylaminoethanol (DEAE) cellulose 52 ion exchange chromatography, from which h-IgG and hs-IgG fractions were purified on the basis of their differential binding to rabbit anti-shrimp hemocyanin antibody (h) and rabbit anti-shrimp hemocyanin's small subunit antibody (hs), respectively. We found that h-IgG had a higher hemolytic activity than hs-IgG against erythrocytes from humans, rabbits, mice and chickens, whereas the control IgG showed negligible activity. h-IgG could interact directly with erythrocyte membranes, and this interaction was suppressed by high molecular weight osmoprotectants, showing that it may follow a colloid-osmotic mechanism. In comparative proteomics and glycomics studies, h-IgG and hs-IgG yielded 20 and 5 significantly altered protein spots, respectively, on a 2-D gel. The mean carbohydrate content of h-IgG and hs-IgG was approximately 3.6- and 2-fold higher than that of IgG, respectively, and the α-d-mannose/α-d-glucose content was in the order of h-IgG>hs-IgG>IgG. In this study, a novel antigen nonspecific immune property of human IgG was investigated, and the diversity in the protein constituents and glycosylation levels may have functional signficance. PMID:24465658

  14. A Major Fraction of Glycosphingolipids in Model and Cellular Cholesterol-containing Membranes Is Undetectable by Their Binding Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Mahfoud, Radhia; Manis, Adam; Binnington, Beth; Ackerley, Cameron; Lingwood, Clifford A.

    2010-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) accumulate in cholesterol-enriched cell membrane domains and provide receptors for protein ligands. Lipid-based “aglycone” interactions can influence GSL carbohydrate epitope presentation. To evaluate this relationship, Verotoxin binding its receptor GSL, globotriaosyl ceramide (Gb3), was analyzed in simple GSL/cholesterol, detergent-resistant membrane vesicles by equilibrium density gradient centrifugation. Vesicles separated into two Gb3/cholesterol-containing populations. The lighter, minor fraction (<5% total GSL), bound VT1, VT2, IgG/IgM mAb anti-Gb3, HIVgp120 or Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin. Only IgM anti-Gb3, more tolerant of carbohydrate modification, bound both vesicle fractions. Post-embedding cryo-immuno-EM confirmed these results. This appears to be a general GSL-cholesterol property, because similar receptor-inactive vesicles were separated for other GSL-protein ligand systems; cholera toxin (CTx)-GM1, HIVgp120-galactosyl ceramide/sulfatide. Inclusion of galactosyl or glucosyl ceramide (GalCer and GlcCer) rendered VT1-unreactive Gb3/cholesterol vesicles, VT1-reactive. We found GalCer and GlcCer bind Gb3, suggesting GSL-GSL interaction can counter cholesterol masking of Gb3. The similar separation of Vero cell membrane-derived vesicles into minor “binding,” and major “non-binding” fractions when probed with VT1, CTx, or anti-SSEA4 (a human GSL stem cell marker), demonstrates potential physiological relevance. Cell membrane GSL masking was cholesterol- and actin-dependent. Cholesterol depletion of Vero and HeLa cells enabled differential VT1B subunit labeling of “available” and “cholesterol-masked” plasma membrane Gb3 pools by fluorescence microscopy. Thus, the model GSL/cholesterol vesicle studies predicted two distinct membrane GSL formats, which were demonstrated within the plasma membrane of cultured cells. Cholesterol masking of most cell membrane GSLs may impinge many GSL receptor functions. PMID

  15. Carbon isotope fractionation of amino acids in fish muscle reflects biosynthesis and isotopic routing from dietary protein.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Kelton W; Fogel, Marilyn L; Elsdon, Travis S; Thorrold, Simon R

    2010-09-01

    1. Analysis of stable carbon isotopes is a valuable tool for studies of diet, habitat use and migration. However, significant variability in the degree of trophic fractionation (Delta(13)C(C-D)) between consumer (C) and diet (D) has highlighted our lack of understanding of the biochemical and physiological underpinnings of stable isotope ratios in tissues. 2. An opportunity now exists to increase the specificity of dietary studies by analyzing the delta(13)C values of amino acids (AAs). Common mummichogs (Fundulus heteroclitus, Linnaeus 1766) were reared on four isotopically distinct diets to examine individual AA Delta(13)C(C-D) variability in fish muscle. 3. Modest bulk tissue Delta(13)C(C-D) values reflected relatively large trophic fractionation for many non-essential AAs and little to no fractionation for all essential AAs. 4. Essential AA delta(13)C values were not significantly different between diet and consumer (Delta(13)C(C-D) = 0.0 +/- 0.4 per thousand), making them ideal tracers of carbon sources at the base of the food web. Stable isotope analysis of muscle essential AAs provides a promising tool for dietary reconstruction and identifying baseline delta(13)C values to track animal movement through isotopically distinct food webs. 5. Non-essential AA Delta(13)C(C-D) values showed evidence of both de novo biosynthesis and direct isotopic routing from dietary protein. We attributed patterns in Delta(13)C(C-D) to variability in protein content and AA composition of the diet as well as differential utilization of dietary constituents contributing to the bulk carbon pool. This variability illustrates the complicated nature of metabolism and suggests caution must be taken with the assumptions used to interpret bulk stable isotope data in dietary studies. 6. Our study is the first to investigate the expression of AA Delta(13)C(C-D) values for a marine vertebrate and should provide for significant refinements in studies of diet, habitat use and migration using

  16. The amino acid sequence of protein SCMK-B2C from the high-sulphur fraction of wool keratin

    PubMed Central

    Elleman, T. C.

    1972-01-01

    1. The amino acid sequence of a protein from the reduced and carboxymethylated high-sulphur fraction of wool has been determined. 2. The sequence of this S-carboxymethylkerateine (SCMK-B2C) of 151 amino acid residues displays much internal homology and an unusual residue distribution. Thus a ten-residue sequence occurs four times near the N-terminus and five times near the C-terminus with few changes. These regions contain much of the molecule's half-cystine, whereas between them there is a region of 19 residues that are mainly small and devoid of cystine and proline. 3. Certain models of the wool fibre based on its mechanical and physical properties propose a matrix of small compact globular units linked together to form beaded chains. The unusual distribution of the component residues of protein SCMK-B2C suggests structures in the wool-fibre matrix compatible with certain features of the proposed models. PMID:4678578

  17. Subcellular fractionation and localization studies reveal a direct interaction of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) with nucleolin.

    PubMed

    Taha, Mohamed S; Nouri, Kazem; Milroy, Lech G; Moll, Jens M; Herrmann, Christian; Brunsveld, Luc; Piekorz, Roland P; Ahmadian, Mohammad R

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) is a well-known regulator of local translation of its mRNA targets in neurons. However, despite its ubiquitous expression, the role of FMRP remains ill-defined in other cell types. In this study we investigated the subcellular distribution of FMRP and its protein complexes in HeLa cells using confocal imaging as well as detergent-free fractionation and size exclusion protocols. We found FMRP localized exclusively to solid compartments, including cytosolic heavy and light membranes, mitochondria, nuclear membrane and nucleoli. Interestingly, FMRP was associated with nucleolin in both a high molecular weight ribosomal and translation-associated complex (≥6 MDa) in the cytosol, and a low molecular weight complex (∼200 kDa) in the nucleoli. Consistently, we identified two functional nucleolar localization signals (NoLSs) in FMRP that are responsible for a strong nucleolar colocalization of the C-terminus of FMRP with nucleolin, and a direct interaction of the N-terminus of FMRP with the arginine-glycine-glycine (RGG) domain of nucleolin. Taken together, we propose a novel mechanism by which a transient nucleolar localization of FMRP underlies a strong nucleocytoplasmic translocation, most likely in a complex with nucleolin and possibly ribosomes, in order to regulate translation of its target mRNAs. PMID:24658146

  18. Distribution of carbon isotopes in amino acids of protein fraction of micro-organisms as a means of studying the mechanisms of their biosynthesis in the cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ivlev, A.A.

    1986-04-10

    The intramolecular distribution of carbon isotopes in the amino acids of the protein fraction of a number of photosynthesizing microorganisms was analyzed using the previously proposed model of carbon isotope fractionation in the cell. A correlation was found between the distributions of the isotopes in the amino acids and the pathways and sequence of their synthesis in the cell cycle. The feasibility of using the isotopic distributions of metabolites for a study of the temporal organization of metabolism in the cell is illustrated.

  19. Effect of storage time and temperature on the total protein concentration and electrophoretic fractions in equine serum

    PubMed Central

    Alberghina, Daniela; Casella, Stefania; Giannetto, Claudia; Marafioti, Simona; Piccione, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Serum protein electrophoresis (SPE) is a technique that could be considered one of the most useful diagnostic aids available to the clinician. The effect of storage time and temperature on the total proteins and electrophoretic fractions (albumin, α1-, α2-, β1-, β2-, and γ-globulins) was assessed in 24 healthy horses. All samples, collected by jugular vein puncture, were centrifuged and divided into 4 aliquots. The 1st aliquot was analyzed within 3 h from collection (time 0), the 2nd was refrigerated at +4°C for 24 h, the 3rd was refrigerated at +4°C for 48 h, and the last was frozen at −20°C for 48 h. One-way repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant effect (P < 0.05) of the different storage conditions on the concentrations of all the parameters studied and significant variations in the percentages of albumin, α1-globulins, α2-globulins, and γ-globulins. Compared with time 0 the total protein concentration increased significantly after 48 h at −20°C, the albumin percentage decreased after 48 h at −20°C, the α1-globulin percentage increased after 24 h at +4°C, the α2-globulin percentage increased after 48 h at +4°C and at −20°C, and the γ-globulin percentage increased after 48 h at −20°C. The results should help veterinary practitioners handle and store equine serum samples appropriately. Further investigations at different storage times and temperatures could be useful. PMID:24124272

  20. Chip-type asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation channel coupled with mass spectrometry for top-down protein identification.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Hun; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2011-11-15

    A chip-type design asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) channel has been developed for high-speed separation of proteins and top-down proteomic analysis using online coupled electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The new miniaturized AF4 channel was assembled by stacking multilayer thin stainless steel (SS, 1.5 mm each) plates embedded with an SS frit in such a way that the total thickness of the channel assembly was about 6 mm. The efficiency of the miniaturized AF4 channel at different channel lengths was examined with the separation of protein standards by adjusting flow rates in which an identical effective channel flow rate or an identical void time can be maintained at different channels. Detection limit, overloading effect, reproducibility, and influence of channel membrane materials on separation efficiency were investigated. Desalting and purification of proteins achieved during the AF4 operation by the action of an exiting crossflow and the use of aqueous mass-spectrometry-compatible (MS-compatible) buffer were advantageous for online coupling of the chip-type AF4 with ESI-MS. The direct coupling of AF4 and ESI-MS capabilities was demonstrated for the high-speed separation and identification of carbonic anhydrase (29 kDa) and transferrin (78 kDa) by full scan MS and for the first top-down identification of proteins with AF4-ESI-MS-MS using collision-induced fragmentation (CID). The presence of intact dimers (156 kDa) of transferrin was confirmed by AF4-ESI-MS via size separation of the dimers from monomers, followed by multiply charged ion spectral analysis of the dimers and molecular mass determinations. It was also found from these experiments that AF4-ESI-MS analysis of transferrin exhibited an increased signal-to-noise ratio compared to that of direct ESI-MS analysis due to online purification of the protein sample and size separation of dimers with AF4. PMID:21981549

  1. Distribution of chromium species in a Cr-polluted soil: presence of Cr(III) in glomalin related protein fraction.

    PubMed

    Gil-Cardeza, María L; Ferri, Alejandro; Cornejo, Pablo; Gomez, Elena

    2014-09-15

    The accumulation of Cr in soil could be highly toxic to human health; therefore Cr soil distribution was studied in rhizosphere soils from Ricinus communis and Conium maculatum and bare soil (BS) from an industrial and urban area in Argentina. Total Cr, Cr(VI) and Cr(III) concentrations were determined in 3 soil fractions: total, extractable and associated to total-glomalin-related protein (T-GRSP). BS had the highest total Cr and total Cr(VI) concentrations. Total Cr(VI) concentration from both rhizosphere soils did not differ from the allowed value for residential area in Argentina (8 μg Cr(VI) g(-1) soil), while total Cr(VI) in BS was 1.8 times higher. Total Cr concentration in all the soils was higher than the allowed value (250 μg Cr g(-1) soil). Extractable and associated to T-GRSP Cr(VI) concentrations were below the detection limit. Cr(III) bound to T-GRSP was the highest in the BS. These findings are in agreement with a long term effect of glomalin in sequestrating Cr. In both plant species, total Cr was higher in root than in shoot and both species presented arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). As far as we know, this is the first study that reports the presence of Cr in T-GRSP fraction of soil organic matter. These findings suggest that Cr mycorrhizostabilization could be a predominant mechanism used by R. communis and C. maculatum to diminish Cr soil concentration. Nevertheless, further research is needed to clarify the contribution of native AMF isolated from R. communis and C. maculatum rhizosphere to the Cr phytoremediation process. PMID:25000578

  2. Storage stability of keratinocyte growth factor-2 in lyophilized formulations: effects of formulation physical properties and protein fraction at the solid-air interface.

    PubMed

    Devineni, Dilip; Gonschorek, Christoph; Cicerone, Marcus T; Xu, Yemin; Carpenter, John F; Randolph, Theodore W

    2014-10-01

    Lyophilized formulations of keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2) were prepared with a range of disaccharide (sucrose or trehalose) and hydroxyethyl starch (HES) mass ratios. Protein degradation was assessed as a function of time of storage of the dried formulations at 40, 50 and 60°C. Lyophilized and stored samples were rehydrated, and protein degradation was quantified by measuring loss of monomeric protein with size exclusion chromatography and by determining chemical degradation in the soluble fraction with reverse-phase chromatography. The secondary structure of the protein in the lyophilized formulations was studied with infrared spectroscopy. The magnitudes of degradation were compared the key physical properties of the formulations including retention of protein native secondary structure, glass transition temperature (Tg), inverse mean square displacements 〈u(2)〉(-1) for hydrogen atoms (fast β relaxation), and the relaxation time τ(β), which correlates with relaxation due to fast Johari-Goldstein motions in the glass (Xu et al., 2013) [1]. In addition, specific surface areas of the lyophilized formulations were determined by Brunauer-Emmet-Teller analysis of krypton adsorption isotherms and used to estimate the fraction of the KGF-2 molecules residing at the solid-air interface. KGF-2 degradation rates were highest in formulations wherein the protein's structure was most perturbed, and wherein β relaxations were fastest, but the dominant factor governing KGF-2 degradation in freeze-dried formulations was the fraction of the protein found at the glass solid-air interface. PMID:24859390

  3. A nuclear fraction of turnip crinkle virus capsid protein is important for elicitation of the host resistance response.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Hwan; Qu, Feng; Morris, T Jack

    2015-12-01

    The N-terminal 25 amino acids (AAs) of turnip crinkle virus (TCV) capsid protein (CP) are recognized by the resistance protein HRT to trigger a hypersensitive response (HR) and systemic resistance to TCV infection. This same region of TCV CP also contains a motif that interacts with the transcription factor TIP, as well as a nuclear localization signal (NLS). However, it is not yet known whether nuclear localization of TCV CP is needed for the induction of HRT-mediated HR and resistance. Here we present new evidence suggesting a tight correlation between nuclear inclusions formed by CP and the manifestation of HR. We show that a fraction of TCV CP localized to cell nuclei to form discrete inclusion-like structures, and a mutated CP (R6A) known to abolish HR failed to form nuclear inclusions. Notably, TIP-CP interaction augments the inclusion-forming activity of CP by tethering inclusions to the nuclear membrane. This TIP-mediated augmentation is also critical for HR resistance, as another CP mutant (R8A) known to elicit a less restrictive HR, though still self-associated into nuclear inclusions, failed to direct inclusions to the nuclear membrane due to its inability to interact with TIP. Finally, exclusion of CP from cell nuclei abolished induction of HR. Together, these results uncovered a strong correlation between nuclear localization and nuclear inclusion formation by TCV CP and induction of HR, and suggest that CP nuclear inclusions could be the key trigger of the HRT-dependent, yet TIP-reinforced, resistance to TCV. PMID:26299399

  4. Storage Stability of Keratinocyte Growth Factor-2 in Lyophilized Formulations: Effects of Formulation Physical Properties and Protein Fraction at the Solid-Air Interface

    PubMed Central

    Devineni, Dilip; Gonschorek, Christoph; Cicerone, Marcus T; Xu, Yemin; Carpenter, John F.; Randolph, Theodore W.

    2014-01-01

    Lyophilized formulations of keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2) were prepared with a range of disaccharide (sucrose or trehalose) and hydroxyethyl starch (HES) mass ratios. Protein degradation was assessed as a function of time of storage of the dried formulations at 40, 50 and 60 °C. Lyophilized and stored samples were rehydrated, and protein degradation was quantified by measuring loss of monomeric protein with size exclusion chromatography and by determining chemical degradation in the soluble fraction with reverse-phase chromatography. The secondary structure of the protein in the lyophilized formulations was studied with infrared spectroscopy. The magnitudes of degradation were compared the key physical properties of the formulations including retention of protein native secondary structure, glass transition temperature (Tg), inverse mean square displacements −1 for hydrogen atoms (fast β relaxation), and the relaxation time τβ, which correlates with relaxation due to fast Johari-Goldstein motions in the glass[1]. In addition, specific surface areas of the lyophilized formulations were determined by Brunauer-Emmet-Teller analysis of krypton adsorption isotherms and used to estimate the fraction of the KGF-2 molecules residing at the solid-air interface. KGF-2 degradation rates were highest in formulations wherein the protein’s structure was most perturbed, and wherein β relaxations were fastest, but the dominant factor governing KGF-2 degradation in freeze-dried formulations was the fraction of the protein found at the glass solid-air interface. PMID:24859390

  5. Stimulation of Ca2+ uptake by cyclic AMP and protein kinase in sarcoplasmic reticulum-rich and sarcolemma-rich microsomal fractions from rabbit heart.

    PubMed

    Will, H; Schirpke, B; Wollenberger, A

    1976-01-01

    The effect of cyclic AMP on Ca2+ uptake by rabbit heart microsomal vesicular fractions representing mainly fragments of either sarcoplasmic reticulum or sarcolemma was investigated in the presence and absence of soluble cardiac protein kinase and with microsomes prephosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. The acceleration of oxalate-promoted Ca2+ uptake by fragmented sarcoplasmic reticulum following cyclic AMP-dependent membrane protein phosphorylation, observed by other authors, was confirmed. In addition it was found that the acceleration was greatest at pH 7.2 and almost negligible at pH 6.0 and pH 7.8. A very marked increase in Ca2+ uptake by cyclic AMP-dependent membrane protein phosphorylation was observed in the presence of boric acid, a reversible inhibitor of Ca2+ uptake. In addition to the microsomal fraction thought to represent mainly fragments of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, the effect of protein kinase and cyclic AMP on Ca2+ uptake was investigated in a cardiac sarcolemma-enriched membrane fraction. Ca2+ uptake by sarcolemmal vesicles, unlike Ca2+ uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, was inhibited by low doses of digitoxin. The acceleration of oxalate-promoted Ca2+ uptake by cyclic AMP and soluble cardiac protein kinase, however, was quite similar to what was seen in preparations of fragmented sarcoplasmic reticulum, which suggests that it may reflect an acceleration of active Ca2+ transport across the myocardial cell surface membrane. PMID:185862

  6. Isoform analysis of LC-MS/MS data from multidimensional fractionation of the serum proteome.

    PubMed

    Krasnoselsky, Alexei L; Faca, Vitor M; Pitteri, Sharon J; Zhang, Qing; Hanash, Samir M

    2008-06-01

    We developed a visualization approach for the identification of protein isoforms, precursor/mature protein combinations, and fragments from LC-MS/MS analysis of multidimensional fractionation of serum and plasma proteins. We also describe a pattern recognition algorithm to automatically detect and flag potentially heterogeneous species of proteins in proteomic experiments that involve extensive fractionation and result in a large number of identified serum or plasma proteins in an experiment. Examples are given of proteins with known isoforms that validate our approach and present a subset of precursor/mature protein pairs that were detected with this approach. Potential applications include identification of differentially expressed isoforms in disease states. PMID:18419151

  7. Contribution of the starch, protein, and lipid fractions to the physical, thermal, and structural properties of amaranth (Amaranthus caudatus) flour films.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Blácido, D; Mauri, A N; Menegalli, F C; Sobral, P J A; Añón, M C

    2007-06-01

    Amaranth protein-lipid (PL) and protein (P) films were elaborated and compared with amaranth flour films in order to determine the contribution of the interactions between the biopolymer (starch and protein) and the lipids to the film properties. The films were made by the casting method, using the same glycerol concentration (0.9 g glycerol/100 g solution). A separation of the lipid fraction in the PL films and a polymorphic transformation of the corresponding fatty acids were observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and verified by an analysis of the microstructure by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The flour films showed no separation of the lipid fraction, evidence that the lipids were strongly associated with the proteins and homogenously distributed throughout the starch network, contributing to the good mechanical properties when compared to the PL films and to the excellent barrier properties when compared to both the PL and P films. The protein-protein interactions also contributed to the mechanical properties of the flour films. The presence of proteins and lipids in the flour films had an important effect on film solubility, and also on the color and opacity of the films. This study showed that the flour film properties depended on the interactions formed by their polymers (starches and proteins) and by the lipid, on the distribution of these interactions within the film matrix and on the concentrations of each component in the film. PMID:17995729

  8. Isolation of CA1 nuclear enriched fractions from hippocampal slices to study activity-dependent nuclear import of synapto-nuclear messenger proteins.

    PubMed

    Yuanxiang, Pingan; Bera, Sujoy; Karpova, Anna; Kreutz, Michael R; Mikhaylova, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Studying activity dependent protein expression, subcellular translocation, or phosphorylation is essential to understand the underlying cellular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. Long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) induced in acute hippocampal slices are widely accepted as cellular models of learning and memory. There are numerous studies that use live cell imaging or immunohistochemistry approaches to visualize activity dependent protein dynamics. However these methods rely on the suitability of antibodies for immunocytochemistry or overexpression of fluorescence-tagged proteins in single neurons. Immunoblotting of proteins is an alternative method providing independent confirmation of the findings. The first limiting factor in preparation of subcellular fractions from individual tetanized hippocampal slices is the low amount of material. Second, the handling procedure is crucial because even very short and minor manipulations of living slices might induce activation of certain signaling cascades. Here we describe an optimized workflow in order to obtain sufficient quantity of nuclear enriched fraction of sufficient purity from the CA1 region of acute hippocampal slices from rat brain. As a representative example we show that the ERK1/2 phosphorylated form of the synapto-nuclear protein messenger Jacob actively translocates to the nucleus upon induction of LTP and can be detected in a nuclear enriched fraction from CA1 neurons. PMID:25145907

  9. Extensive modifications for methionine enhancement in the beta-barrels do not alter the structural stability of the bean seed storage protein phaseolin.

    PubMed

    Dyer, J M; Nelson, J W; Murai, N

    1995-11-01

    Common beans are widely utilized as a food source, yet are low in the essential amino acid methionine. As an initial step to overcome this defect the methionine content of the primary bean seed storage protein phaseolin was increased by replacing 20 evolutionarily variant hydrophobic residues with methionine and inserting short, methionine-rich sequences into turn and loop regions of the protein structure. Methionine enhancement ranged from 5 to 30 residues. An Escherichia coli expression system was developed to characterize the structural stability of the mutant proteins. Proteins of expected sizes were obtained for all constructs except for negative controls, which were rapidly degraded in E. coli. Thermal denaturation of the purified proteins demonstrated that both wild-type and mutant phaseolin proteins denatured reversibly at approximately 61 degrees C. In addition, urea denaturation experiments of the wild-type and a mutant protein (with 30 additional methionines) confirmed that the structural stability of the proteins was very similar. Remarkably, these results indicate that the phaseolin protein tolerates extensive modifications, including 20 substitutions and two loop inserts for methionine enhancement in the beta-barrel and loop structures, with extremely small effects on protein stability. PMID:8747427

  10. Analysis of PEG-fractionated high-molecular-mass proteins in human plasma by non-denaturing micro 2-DE and MALDI-MS PMF.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ya; Manabe, Takashi

    2009-10-01

    The process of 0-4% PEG precipitation of high-molecular-mass proteins (around and above 1x10(3) kDa) in human plasma was analyzed by non-denaturing micro 2-DE employing agarose IEF gels in the first dimension, and by MALDI-MS PMF. The PEG 0-2% precipitate could be mostly re-dissolved (fraction PS2%), but some part remained as precipitate (fraction PP2%). Non-denaturing 2-DE followed by MALDI-MS PMF showed that PS2% contained fibrinogen (Fb), fibronectin (FN), and their oligomers as the major components, and von Willebrand factor and coagulation factor XIII as the minor components. PP2% was directly subjected to MALDI-MS PMF and FN and Fb were assigned, suggesting it was formed by co-precipitation of the two proteins. The PEG 2-4% precipitate could be totally dissolved, but after freezing and thawing the solution, a small amount of precipitate appeared. MALDI-MS PMF analysis of the precipitate (PP4%) suggested that its major constituent is complement C1. The soluble fraction of the PEG 2-4% precipitate (PS4%), analyzed by non-denaturing 2-DE and MALDI-MS PMF, contained C4b-binding protein and its complex with complement C4, low-density lipoproteins, IgM, and complement C1 subcomponent q, together with Fb, FN, and their oligomers. When the PS4% fraction was analyzed by a Type-II 2-DE technique (non-denaturing IEF followed by SDS-PAGE, no reducing agent being used), several proteins in molecular mass range from 7x10(1) to 2x10(2) kDa appeared, suggesting that these proteins interacted with the high-molecular-mass proteins, then dissociated in the presence of SDS. PMID:19798675

  11. Thermoase-Derived Flaxseed Protein Hydrolysates and Membrane Ultrafiltration Peptide Fractions Have Systolic Blood Pressure-Lowering Effects in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nwachukwu, Ifeanyi D.; Girgih, Abraham T.; Malomo, Sunday A.; Onuh, John O.; Aluko, Rotimi E.

    2014-01-01

    Thermoase-digested flaxseed protein hydrolysate (FPH) samples and ultrafiltration membrane-separated peptide fractions were initially evaluated for in vitro inhibition of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and renin activities. The two most active FPH samples and their corresponding peptide fractions were subsequently tested for in vivo antihypertensive activity in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The FPH produced with 3% thermoase digestion showed the highest ACE- and renin-inhibitory activities. Whereas membrane ultrafiltration resulted in significant (p < 0.05) increases in ACE inhibition by the <1 and 1–3 kDa peptides, only a marginal improvement in renin-inhibitory activity was observed for virtually all the samples after membrane ultrafiltration. The FPH samples and membrane fractions were also effective in lowering systolic blood pressure (SBP) in SHR with the largest effect occurring after oral administration (200 mg/kg body weight) of the 1–3 kDa peptide fraction of the 2.5% FPH and the 3–5 kDa fraction of the 3% FPH. Such potent SBP-lowering capacity indicates the potential of flaxseed protein-derived bioactive peptides as ingredients for the formulation of antihypertensive functional foods and nutraceuticals. PMID:25302619

  12. Thermoase-derived flaxseed protein hydrolysates and membrane ultrafiltration peptide fractions have systolic blood pressure-lowering effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Nwachukwu, Ifeanyi D; Girgih, Abraham T; Malomo, Sunday A; Onuh, John O; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2014-01-01

    Thermoase-digested flaxseed protein hydrolysate (FPH) samples and ultrafiltration membrane-separated peptide fractions were initially evaluated for in vitro inhibition of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and renin activities. The two most active FPH samples and their corresponding peptide fractions were subsequently tested for in vivo antihypertensive activity in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The FPH produced with 3% thermoase digestion showed the highest ACE- and renin-inhibitory activities. Whereas membrane ultrafiltration resulted in significant (p < 0.05) increases in ACE inhibition by the <1 and 1-3 kDa peptides, only a marginal improvement in renin-inhibitory activity was observed for virtually all the samples after membrane ultrafiltration. The FPH samples and membrane fractions were also effective in lowering systolic blood pressure (SBP) in SHR with the largest effect occurring after oral administration (200 mg/kg body weight) of the 1-3 kDa peptide fraction of the 2.5% FPH and the 3-5 kDa fraction of the 3% FPH. Such potent SBP-lowering capacity indicates the potential of flaxseed protein-derived bioactive peptides as ingredients for the formulation of antihypertensive functional foods and nutraceuticals. PMID:25302619

  13. Selective fermentation of carbohydrate and protein fractions of Scenedesmus, and biohydrogenation of its lipid fraction for enhanced recovery of saturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Lai, YenJung Sean; Parameswaran, Prathap; Li, Ang; Aguinaga, Alyssa; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2016-02-01

    Biofuels derived from microalgae have promise as carbon-neutral replacements for petroleum. However, difficulty extracting microalgae-derived lipids and the co-extraction of non-lipid components add major costs that detract from the benefits of microalgae-based biofuel. Selective fermentation could alleviate these problems by managing microbial degradation so that carbohydrates and proteins are hydrolyzed and fermented, but lipids remain intact. We evaluated selective fermentation of Scenedesmus biomass in batch experiments buffered at pH 5.5, 7, or 9. Carbohydrates were fermented up to 45% within the first 6 days, protein fermentation followed after about 20 days, and lipids (measured as fatty acid methyl esters, FAME) were conserved. Fermentation of the non-lipid components generated volatile fatty acids, with acetate, butyrate, and propionate being the dominant products. Selective fermentation of Scenedesmus biomass increased the amount of extractable FAME and the ratio of FAME to crude lipids. It also led to biohydrogenation of unsaturated FAME to more desirable saturated FAME (especially to C16:0 and C18:0), and the degree of saturation was inversely related to the accumulation of hydrogen gas after fermentation. Moreover, the microbial communities after selective fermentation were enriched in bacteria from families known to perform biohydrogenation, i.e., Porphyromonadaceae and Ruminococcaceae. Thus, this study provides proof-of-concept that selective fermentation can improve the quantity and quality of lipids that can be extracted from Scenedesmus. PMID:26222672

  14. Dry-milling and Fractionation of Transgenic Maize Seed Tissues with Green Fluorescent Protein as a Tissue Marker

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficiency of fractionating cereal grains (e.g., dry corn milling) can be evaluated and monitored by quantifying the proportions of seed tissues in each of the recovered fractions. The quantities of individual tissues are typically estimated using indirect methods such as quantifying fiber or a...

  15. The N-Terminal Extension Domain of the C. elegans Half-Molecule ABC Transporter, HMT-1, Is Required for Protein-Protein Interactions and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungjin; Selote, Devarshi S.; Vatamaniuk, Olena K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Members of the HMT-1 (heavy metal tolerance factor 1) subfamily of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily detoxify heavy metals and have unique topology: they are half-molecule ABC transporters that, in addition to a single transmembrane domain (TMD1) and a single nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), possess a hydrophobic NH2-terminal extension (NTE). These structural features distinguish HMTs from other ABC transporters in different species including Drosophila and humans. Functional ABC transporters, however, are comprised of at least four-domains (two TMDs and two NDBs) formed from either a single polypeptide or by the association of two or four separate subunits. Whether HMTs act as oligomers and what role the NTE domain plays in their function have not been determined. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we examined the oligomeric status of Caenorhabditis elegans HMT-1 and the functional significance of its NTE using gel-filtration chromatography in combination with the mating-based split-ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid system (mbSUS) and functional in vivo assays. We found that HMT-1 exists in a protein complex in C. elegans. Studies in S. cerevisiae showed that HMT-1 at a minimum homodimerizes and that oligomerization is essential for HMT-1 to confer cadmium tolerance. We also established that the NTE domain plays an important structural and functional role: it is essential for HMT-1 oligomerization and Cd-detoxification function. However, the NTE itself was not sufficient for oligomerization suggesting that multiple structural features of HMT-1 must associate to form a functional transporter. Conclusions The prominence of heavy metals as environmental toxins and the remarkable conservation of HMT-1 structural architecture and function in different species reinforce the value of continued studies of HMT-1 in model systems for identifying functional domains in HMT1 of humans. PMID:20886084

  16. Increased cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CSE1L/CAS) protein expression promotes protrusion extension and enhances migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Liao, Ching-Fong; Deng, Win-Ping; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Hsieh, Cheng-I; Tung, Jai-Nien; Chen, Ching-Shyang; Chiou, Jeng-Fong; Li, Li-Tzu; Lin, Chuang-Yu; Hsu, Chung-Huei; Jiang, Ming-Chung

    2010-10-15

    Microtubules are part of cell structures that play a role in regulating the migration of cancer cells. The cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CSE1L/CAS) protein is a microtubule-associated protein that is highly expressed in cancer. We report here that CSE1L regulates the association of {alpha}-tubulin with {beta}-tubulin and promotes the migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. CSE1L was associated with {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin in GST (glutathione S-transferase) pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays. CSE1L-GFP (green fluorescence protein) fusion protein experiments showed that the N-terminal of CSE1L interacted with microtubules. Increased CSE1L expression resulted in decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin, increased {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin association, and enhanced assembly of microtubules. Cell protrusions or pseudopodia are temporary extensions of the plasma membrane and are implicated in cancer cell migration and invasion. Increased CSE1L expression increased the extension of MCF-7 cell protrusions. In vitro migration assay showed that enhanced CSE1L expression increased the migration of MCF-7 cells. Our results indicate that CSE1L plays a role in regulating the extension of cell protrusions and promotes the migration of cancer cells.

  17. Assessing the fractions of tautomeric forms of the imidazole ring of histidine in proteins as a function of pH

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Jorge A.; Arnautova, Yelena A.; Vorobjev, Yury; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2011-01-01

    A method is proposed to determine the fraction of the tautomeric forms of the imidazole ring of histidine in proteins as a function of pH, provided that the observed and chemical shifts and the protein structure, or the fraction of H+ form, are known. This method is based on the use of quantum chemical methods to compute the 13C NMR shieldings of all the imidazole ring carbons (13Cγ, , and ) for each of the two tautomers, Nδ1-H and Nϵ2-H, and the protonated form, H+, of histidine. This methodology enabled us (i) to determine the fraction of all the tautomeric forms of histidine for eight proteins for which the and chemical shifts had been determined in solution in the pH range of 3.2 to 7.5 and (ii) to estimate the fraction of tautomeric forms of eight histidine-containing dipeptide crystals for which the chemical shifts had been determined by solid-state 13C NMR. Our results for proteins indicate that the protonated form is the most populated one, whereas the distribution of the tautomeric forms for the imidazole ring varies significantly among different histidines in the same protein, reflecting the importance of the environment of the histidines in determining the tautomeric forms. In addition, for ∼70% of the neutral histidine-containing dipeptides, the method leads to fairly good agreement between the calculated and the experimental tautomeric form. Coexistence of different tautomeric forms in the same crystal structure may explain the remaining 30% of disagreement. PMID:21422292

  18. Determination of the Mercury Fraction Linked to Protein of Muscle and Liver Tissue of Tucunaré (Cichla spp.) from the Amazon Region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vieira, José C S; Cavecci, Bruna; Queiroz, João V; Braga, Camila P; Padilha, Cilene C F; Leite, Aline L; Figueiredo, Wllyane S; Buzalaf, Marília A R; Zara, Luiz F; Padilha, Pedro M

    2015-11-01

    This study used metalloproteomic techniques to characterize mercury (Hg)-bound proteins in the muscle and liver tissue of Tucunaré (Cichla spp.) collected at the Jirau Hydroelectric Power Plant in Madeira River Basin, Brazil. The proteome of the muscle and liver tissue was obtained after two steps of fractional precipitation and separating the proteins by 2-D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Hg was identified and quantified in the protein spots by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after acid mineralization in an ultrasound bath. Hg with a molecular weight <20 kDa and a concentration between 13.30 and 33.40 mg g(-1) was found in the protein spots. These protein spots were characterized by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry after trypsin digestion. From a total of 12 analyzed spots, seven proteins showing Hg biomarker characteristics were identified: parvalbumin and its isoforms, ubiquitin-40S ribosomal protein S27a, zinc (Zn) finger and BTB domain-containing protein 24, and dual-specificity protein phosphatase 22-B. PMID:25981407

  19. A modified rinsing method for the determination of the S, W-S and D + U fraction of protein and starch in feedstuff within the in situ technique.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, L H; van Laar, H; Hendriks, W H; Dijkstra, J

    2013-08-01

    A modified rinsing method for the in situ technique was developed to separate, isolate and characterise the soluble (S), the insoluble washout (W-S) and the non-washout fractions (D + U) within one procedure. For non-incubated bags (t = 0 h), this method was compared with the conventional, Combined Fractionation (CF) method that measures the D + U and S fractions in separate steps and subsequently calculates the W-S fraction. The modified method was based on rinsing of nylon bags in a closed vessel containing a buffer solution (pH 6.2) during 1 h, where shaking speeds of 40, 100, and 160 strokes per minutes (spm) were evaluated, and tested for six feed ingredients (faba beans, maize, oats, peas, soya beans and wheat) and four forages (two ryegrass silages and two maize silages). The average recoveries as the sum of all fractions were 0.972 ± 0.041 for N and 0.990 ± 0.050 for starch (mean ± s.d.). The mean W-S fraction increased with increasing shaking speed and varied between 0.017 (N) and 0.083 (starch) at 40 spm and 0.078 (N) and 0.303 (starch) at 160 spm, respectively. For ryegrass silages, the W-S fraction was absent at all shaking speeds, but was present in the CF method. The modified method, in particular at 40 and 100 spm, reduced the loss of small particles during rinsing, resulting in lower W-S and higher D + U fractions for N and starch compared with the CF method. For soya beans and ryegrass silage, the modified method reduced the S fraction of N compared with the CF method. The results obtained at 160 spm showed the best comparison with those from the CF method. The W-S fraction of the feedstuff obtained at 160 spm contained mainly particles smaller than 40 μm (0.908 ± 0.086). In most feedstuff, starch was the most abundant chemical component in the W-S fraction and its content (726 ± 75 g/kg DM) was higher than in the D + U fraction (405 ± 177 g/kg DM). Alkaline-soluble proteins were the dominant N-containing components in the W-S fraction of

  20. A novel regulatory mechanism for trimeric GTP-binding proteins in the membrane and secretory granule fractions of human and rodent beta cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kowluru, A; Seavey, S E; Rhodes, C J; Metz, S A

    1996-01-01

    Recently we described roles for heterotrimeric and low-molecular-mass GTP-binding proteins in insulin release from normal rat islets. During these studies, we observed that a protein with an apparent molecular mass (37 kDa) similar to that of the beta subunit of trimeric GTP-binding proteins underwent phosphorylation in each of five classes of insulin-secreting cells. Incubation of the beta cell total membrane fraction or the isolated secretory granule fraction (but not the cytosolic fraction) with [gamma-32P]ATP or [gamma-32P]GTP resulted in the phosphorylation of this protein, which was selectively immunoprecipitated by an anti-serum directed against the common beta subunit of trimeric G-proteins. Disruption of the alpha beta gamma trimer (by pretreatment with either fluoroaluminate or guanosine 5'(-)[gamma-thio]triphosphate) prevented beta subunit phosphorylation. Based on differential sensitivities to pH, heat and the histidine-selective reagent diethyl pyrocarbonate (and reversal of the latter by hydroxylamine), the phosphorylated amino acid was presumptively identified as histidine. Incubation of pure beta subunit alone or in combination with the exogenous purified alpha subunit of transducin did not result in the phosphorylation of the beta subunit, but addition of the islet cell membrane fraction did support this event, suggesting that membrane localization (or a membrane-associated factor) is required for beta subunit phosphorylation. Incubation of phosphorylated beta subunit with G alpha.GDP accelerated the dephosphorylation of the beta subunit, accompanied by the formation of G alpha-GTP. Immunoblotting detected multiple alpha subunits (of Gi, G(o) and Gq) and at least one beta subunit in the secretory granule fraction of normal rat islets and insulinoma cells. These data describe a potential alternative mechanism for the activation of GTP-binding proteins in beta cells which contrasts with the classical receptor-agonist mechanism: G beta undergoes

  1. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of expansins--a highly conserved, multigene family of proteins that mediate cell wall extension in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Shcherban, T Y; Shi, J; Durachko, D M; Guiltinan, M J; McQueen-Mason, S J; Shieh, M; Cosgrove, D J

    1995-01-01

    Expansins are unusual proteins discovered by virtue of their ability to mediate cell wall extension in plants. We identified cDNA clones for two cucumber expansins on the basis of peptide sequences of proteins purified from cucumber hypocotyls. The expansin cDNAs encode related proteins with signal peptides predicted to direct protein secretion to the cell wall. Northern blot analysis showed moderate transcript abundance in the growing region of the hypocotyl and no detectable transcripts in the nongrowing region. Rice and Arabidopsis expansin cDNAs were identified from collections of anonymous cDNAs (expressed sequence tags). Sequence comparisons indicate at least four distinct expansin cDNAs in rice and at least six in Arabidopsis. Expansins are highly conserved in size and sequence (60-87% amino acid sequence identity and 75-95% similarity between any pairwise comparison), and phylogenetic trees indicate that this multigene family formed before the evolutionary divergence of monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Sequence and motif analyses show no similarities to known functional domains that might account for expansin action on wall extension. A series of highly conserved tryptophans may function in expansin binding to cellulose or other glycans. The high conservation of this multigene family indicates that the mechanism by which expansins promote wall extensin tolerates little variation in protein structure. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7568110

  2. Comparison of fractionation strategies for offline two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis of proteins from mouse adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Sajic, Tatjana; Varesio, Emmanuel; Szanto, Ildiko; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2015-09-01

    In the frame of protein identification from mouse adipose tissue, two strategies were compared for the offline elution of peptides from a strong cation exchange (SCX) column in two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) analyses. First, the salt gradient (using K(+) as displacing agent) was evaluated from 25 to 500mM KCl. Then, a less investigated elution mode using a pH gradient (using citric acid and ammonium hydroxide) was carried out from pH 2.5 to 9.0. Equal amounts of peptide digest derived from mouse adipose tissue were loaded onto the SCX column and fractionated according to the two approaches. A total of 15 fractions were collected in two independent experiments for each SCX elution strategy. Then, each fraction was analyzed on a nanoLC-MS/MS platform equipped with a column-switching unit for desalting and enrichment. No substantial differences in peptide quality characteristics (molecular weight, isoelectric point, or GRAVY [grand average of hydropathicity] index distributions) were observed between the two datasets. The pH gradient approach was found to be superior, with 27.5% more unique peptide identifications and 10% more distinct protein identifications compared with the salt-based elution method. In conclusion, our data imply that the pH gradient SCX fractionation is more desirable for proteomics analysis of entire adipose tissue. PMID:26036199

  3. p75, a polypeptide component of karyoskeletal protein-enriched fractions associated with transcriptionally active loci of Drosophila melanogaster polytene chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Benton, B M; Berrios, S; Fisher, P A

    1988-01-01

    A 75-kilodalton polypeptide has been identified which copurifies with karyoskeletal protein-enriched fractions prepared from Drosophila melanogaster embryos. Results of indirect immunofluorescence experiments suggest that this protein, here designated p75, is primarily associated with puffed regions of larval salivary gland polytene chromosomes. In nonpolytenized Schneider 2 tissue culture cells, p75 appeared to be localized throughout the nuclear interior during interphase. In mitotic cells, p75 was redistributed diffusely. A possible role for karyoskeletal elements in transcriptional regulation is discussed. Images PMID:3133549

  4. Fractionation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA in centrifugal precipitation chromatography using cationic surfactant CTAB containing inorganic salts NaCl and NH(4)Cl.

    PubMed

    Tomanee, Panarat; Hsu, James T; Ito, Yoichiro

    2004-10-01

    Centrifugal precipitation chromatography (CPC) is a separation system that mainly employs a moving concentration gradient of precipitating agent along a channel and solutes of interest undergo repetitive precipitation-dissolution, fractionate at different locations, and elute out from the channel according to their solubility in the precipitating agent solution. We report here for the first time the use of a CPC system for fractionation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA in clarified lysate produced from bacterial culture. The cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was initially used as a precipitating agent; however, all biomolecules showed no differential solubility in the moving concentration gradient of this surfactant and, as a result, no separation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA occurred. To overcome this problem, inorganic salts such as NaCl and NH(4)Cl were introduced into solution of CTAB. The protein and RNA were found to have higher solubility with the addition of these salts and separated from the plasmid DNA. Decreasing surface charge density of CTAB upon addition of NaCl and NH(4)Cl was believed to lead to lower surfactant complexation, and therefore caused differential solubility and fractionation of these biomolecules. Addition of CaCl(2) did not improve solubility and separation of RNA from plasmid DNA. PMID:15384057

  5. A role for complexes of survival of motor neurons (SMN) protein with gemins and profilin in neurite-like cytoplasmic extensions of cultured nerve cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Aarti; Lambrechts, Anja; Le thi Hao; Le, Thanh T.; Sewry, Caroline A.; Ampe, Christophe; Burghes, Arthur H.M.; Morris, Glenn E. . E-mail: glenn.morris@rjah.nhs.uk

    2005-09-10

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by reduced levels of SMN (survival of motor neurons protein) and consequent loss of motor neurons. SMN is involved in snRNP transport and nuclear RNA splicing, but axonal transport of SMN has also been shown to occur in motor neurons. SMN also binds to the small actin-binding protein, profilin. We now show that SMN and profilin II co-localise in the cytoplasm of differentiating rat PC12 cells and in neurite-like extensions, especially at their growth cones. Many components of known SMN complexes were also found in these extensions, including gemin2 (SIP-1), gemin6, gemin7 and unrip (unr-interacting protein). Coilin p80 and Sm core protein immunoreactivity, however, were seen only in the nucleus. SMN is known to associate with {beta}-actin mRNA and specific hnRNPs in axons and in neurite extensions of cultured nerve cells, and SMN also stimulates neurite outgrowth in cultures. Our results are therefore consistent with SMN complexes, rather than SMN alone, being involved in the transport of actin mRNPs along the axon as in the transport of snRNPs into the nucleus by similar SMN complexes. Antisense knockdown of profilin I and II isoforms inhibited neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells and caused accumulation of SMN and its associated proteins in cytoplasmic aggregates. BIAcore studies demonstrated a high affinity interaction of SMN with profilin IIa, the isoform present in developing neurons. Pathogenic missense mutations in SMN, or deletion of exons 5 and 7, prevented this interaction. The interaction is functional in that SMN can modulate actin polymerisation in vitro by reducing the inhibitory effect of profilin IIa. This suggests that reduced SMN in SMA might cause axonal pathfinding defects by disturbing the normal regulation of microfilament growth by profilins.

  6. Even with nonnative interactions, the updated folding transition states of the homologs Proteins G & L are extensive and similar

    PubMed Central

    Baxa, Michael C.; Yu, Wookyung; Adhikari, Aashish N.; Ge, Liang; Xia, Zhen; Zhou, Ruhong; Freed, Karl F.; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and computational folding studies of Proteins L & G and NuG2 typically find that sequence differences determine which of the two hairpins is formed in the transition state ensemble (TSE). However, our recent work on Protein L finds that its TSE contains both hairpins, compelling a reassessment of the influence of sequence on the folding behavior of the other two homologs. We characterize the TSEs for Protein G and NuG2b, a triple mutant of NuG2, using ψ analysis, a method for identifying contacts in the TSE. All three homologs are found to share a common and near-native TSE topology with interactions between all four strands. However, the helical content varies in the TSE, being largely absent in Proteins G & L but partially present in NuG2b. The variability likely arises from competing propensities for the formation of nonnative β turns in the naturally occurring proteins, as observed in our TerItFix folding algorithm. All-atom folding simulations of NuG2b recapitulate the observed TSEs with four strands for 5 of 27 transition paths [Lindorff-Larsen K, Piana S, Dror RO, Shaw DE (2011) Science 334(6055):517–520]. Our data support the view that homologous proteins have similar folding mechanisms, even when nonnative interactions are present in the transition state. These findings emphasize the ongoing challenge of accurately characterizing and predicting TSEs, even for relatively simple proteins. PMID:26100906

  7. A Profile of an Endosymbiont-enriched Fraction of the Coral Stylophora pistillata Reveals Proteins Relevant to Microbial-Host Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Andrew J.; Dunlap, Walter C.; Shick, J. Malcolm; Klueter, Anke; Iglic, Katrina; Vukelic, Ana; Starcevic, Antonio; Ward, Malcolm; Wells, Mark L.; Trick, Charles G.; Long, Paul F.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the response of Symbiodinium sp. endosymbionts from the coral Stylophora pistillata to moderate levels of thermal “bleaching” stress, with and without trace metal limitation. Using quantitative high throughput proteomics, we identified 8098 MS/MS events relating to individual peptides from the endosymbiont-enriched fraction, including 109 peptides meeting stringent criteria for quantification, of which only 26 showed significant change in our experimental treatments; 12 of 26 increased expression in response to thermal stress with little difference affected by iron limitation. Surprisingly, there were no significant increases in antioxidant or heat stress proteins; those induced to higher expression were generally involved in protein biosynthesis. An outstanding exception was a massive 114-fold increase of a viral replication protein indicating that thermal stress may substantially increase viral load and thereby contribute to the etiology of coral bleaching and disease. In the absence of a sequenced genome for Symbiodinium or other photosymbiotic dinoflagellate, this proteome reveals a plethora of proteins potentially involved in microbial-host interactions. This includes photosystem proteins, DNA repair enzymes, antioxidant enzymes, metabolic redox enzymes, heat shock proteins, globin hemoproteins, proteins of nitrogen metabolism, and a wide range of viral proteins associated with these endosymbiont-enriched samples. Also present were 21 unusual peptide/protein toxins thought to originate from either microbial consorts or from contamination by coral nematocysts. Of particular interest are the proteins of apoptosis, vesicular transport, and endo/exocytosis, which are discussed in context of the cellular processes of coral bleaching. Notably, the protein complement provides evidence that, rather than being expelled by the host, stressed endosymbionts may mediate their own departure. PMID:22351649

  8. DNA cleavage by CgII and NgoAVII requires interaction between N- and R-proteins and extensive nucleotide hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zaremba, Mindaugas; Toliusis, Paulius; Grigaitis, Rokas; Manakova, Elena; Silanskas, Arunas; Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Szczelkun, Mark D; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-12-16

    The stress-sensitive restriction-modification (RM) system CglI from Corynebacterium glutamicum and the homologous NgoAVII RM system from Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 are composed of three genes: a DNA methyltransferase (M.CglI and M.NgoAVII), a putative restriction endonuclease (R.CglI and R.NgoAVII, or R-proteins) and a predicted DEAD-family helicase/ATPase (N.CglI and N.NgoAVII or N-proteins). Here we report a biochemical characterization of the R- and N-proteins. Size-exclusion chromatography and SAXS experiments reveal that the isolated R.CglI, R.NgoAVII and N.CglI proteins form homodimers, while N.NgoAVII is a monomer in solution. Moreover, the R.CglI and N.CglI proteins assemble in a complex with R2N2 stoichiometry. Next, we show that N-proteins have ATPase activity that is dependent on double-stranded DNA and is stimulated by the R-proteins. Functional ATPase activity and extensive ATP hydrolysis (∼170 ATP/s/monomer) are required for site-specific DNA cleavage by R-proteins. We show that ATP-dependent DNA cleavage by R-proteins occurs at fixed positions (6-7 nucleotides) downstream of the asymmetric recognition sequence 5'-GCCGC-3'. Despite similarities to both Type I and II restriction endonucleases, the CglI and NgoAVII enzymes may employ a unique catalytic mechanism for DNA cleavage. PMID:25429977

  9. Analyzing the Effects of Climate Factors on Soybean Protein, Oil Contents, and Composition by Extensive and High-Density Sampling in China.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenwen; Yang, Ruping; Wu, Tingting; Wu, Cunxiang; Sun, Shi; Zhang, Shouwei; Jiang, Bingjun; Tian, Shiyan; Liu, Xiaobing; Han, Tianfu

    2016-05-25

    From 2010 to 2013, 763 soybean samples were collected from an extensive area of China. The correlations between seed compositions and climate data were analyzed. The contents of crude protein and water-soluble protein, total amount of protein plus oil, and most of the amino acids were positively correlated with an accumulated temperature ≥15 °C (AT15) and the mean daily temperature (MDT) but were negatively correlated with hours of sunshine (HS) and diurnal temperature range (DTR). The correlations of crude oil and most fatty acids with climate factors were opposite to those of crude protein. Crude oil content had a quadratic regression relationship with MDT, and a positive correlation between oil content and MDT was found when the daily temperature was <19.7 °C. A path analysis indicated that DTR was the main factor that directly affected soybean protein and oil contents. The study illustrated the effects of climate factors on soybean protein and oil contents and proposed agronomic practices for improving soybean quality in different regions of China. The results provide a foundation for the regionalization of high-quality soybean production in China and similar regions in the world. PMID:27022763

  10. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition by low pH is associated with less extensive membrane protein thiol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, B M; Kowaltowski, A J; Castilho, R F; Vercesi, A E

    1999-12-01

    Ca2+ and inorganic phosphate-induced mitochondrial swelling and membrane protein thiol oxidation, which are associated with mitochondrial permeability transition, are inhibited by progressively decreasing the incubation medium pH between 7.2 and 6.0. Nevertheless, the detection of mitochondrial H2O2 production under these conditions is increased. Permeability transition induced by phenylarsine oxide, which promotes membrane protein thiol cross-linkage in a process independent of Ca2+ or reactive oxygen species, is also strongly inhibited in acidic incubation media. In addition, we observed that the decreased protein thiol reactivity with phenylarsine oxide or phenylarsine oxide-induced swelling at pH 6.0 is reversed by diethyl pyrocarbonate, in a hydroxylamine-sensitive manner. These results provide evidence that the inhibition of mitrochondrial permeability transition observed at lower incubation medium pH is mediated by a decrease in membrane protein thiol reactivity, related to the protonation of protein histidyl residues. PMID:10841269

  11. Characterization of the protein fraction of the temporary adhesive secreted by the tube feet of the sea star Asterias rubens.

    PubMed

    Hennebert, Elise; Wattiez, Ruddy; Waite, J Herbert; Flammang, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Sea stars are able to make firm but temporary attachments to various substrata by secretions released by their tube feet. After tube foot detachment, the adhesive secretions remain on the substratum as a footprint. Proteins presumably play a key role in sea star adhesion, as evidenced by the removal of footprints from surfaces after a treatment with trypsin. However, until now, characterisation was hampered by their high insolubility. In this study, a non-hydrolytic method was used to render most of the proteins constituting the adhesive footprints soluble. After analysis by SDS-PAGE, the proteins separated into about 25 bands, which ranged from 25 to 450 kDa in apparent molecular weight. Using mass spectrometry and a homology-database search, it was shown that several of the proteins are known intracellular proteins, presumably resulting from contamination of footprint material with tube foot epidermal cells. However, 11 protein bands, comprising the most abundant proteins, were not identified and might correspond to novel adhesive proteins. They were named 'Sea star footprint proteins' (Sfps). Tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the protein bands yielded 43 de novo-generated peptide sequences. Most of them were shared by several, if not all, Sfps. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against one of the peptides (HEASGEYYR from Sfp-115) and were used in immunoblotting. They specifically labelled Sfp-115 and other bands with lower apparent molecular weights. The different results suggest that all Sfps might belong to a single family of related proteins sharing similar motifs or, alternatively, they are the products of polymerization and/or degradation processes. PMID:22439774

  12. Anti-diabetic and antihypertensive activities of two flaxseed protein hydrolysate fractions revealed following their simultaneous separation by electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Doyen, Alain; Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Mitchell, Patricia L; Marette, André; Aluko, Rotimi E; Bazinet, Laurent

    2014-02-15

    Flaxseed protein hydrolysate has been fractionated by electrodialysis with two ultrafiltration membranes (20 and 50 kDa) stacked in the system for the recovery of two specific cationic peptide fractions (KCl-F1 and KCl-F2). After 360 min of treatment, peptide migration increased as a function of time in KCl compartments. Moreover, the use of two different ultrafiltration membrane allowed concentration of the 300-400 and 400-500 Da molecular weight range peptides in the KCl-F1 and KCl-F2 fractions, respectively, compared to the initial hydrolysate. After mass spectrometry analysis, higher amounts of low molecular weight peptides were recovered in the KCl-F2 compartment while relatively higher molecular weight peptides were more detected in the KCl-F1 compartment. Amino acid analysis showed that His, Lys and Arg were especially concentrated in the KCl compartments. Finally, glucose-transport assay demonstrated that the KCl-F2 fraction increased glucose uptake while oral administration of KCl-F1 and final FPH decreased systolic blood pressure. PMID:24128450

  13. Monoclonal antibodies specific for adenovirus early region 1A proteins: extensive heterogeneity in early region 1A products.

    PubMed Central

    Harlow, E; Franza, B R; Schley, C

    1985-01-01

    Hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies specific for the adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) proteins were prepared from BALB/c mice immunized with a bacterial trpE-E1A fusion protein. This protein is encoded by a hybrid gene that joins a portion of the Escherichia coli trpE gene and a cDNA copy of the E1A 13S mRNA (Spindler et al., J. Virol. 49:132-141, 1984). Eighty-three hybridomas that secrete antibodies which recognize the immunogen were isolated and single cell cloned. Twenty-nine of these antibodies are specific for the E1A portion of the fusion protein. Only 12 of the monoclonal antibodies can efficiently immunoprecipitate E1A polypeptides from detergent lysates of infected cells. E1A polypeptides were analyzed on one-dimensional, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and two-dimensional, isoelectric focusing polyacrylamide gels. The E1A proteins that are specifically immunoprecipitated by the monoclonal antibodies are heterogeneous in size and charge and can be resolved into approximately 60 polypeptide species. This heterogeneity is due not only to synthesis from multiple E1A mRNAs, but also at least in part to post-translational modification. Several of the monoclonal antibodies divide the E1A polypeptides into immunological subclasses based on the ability of the antibodies to bind to the antigen. In particular, two of the monoclonal antibodies bind to the polypeptides synthesized from the 13S E1A mRNA, but not to other E1A proteins. Images PMID:3894685

  14. Characterization of integral membrane proteins of Leishmania major by Triton X-114 fractionation and analysis of vaccination effects in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, P J; Spithill, T W; Handman, E

    1989-01-01

    The total integral membrane proteins of promastigotes of Leishmania major were extracted by using the Triton X-114 phase separation technique and were characterized by immunoprecipitation, Western blotting (immunoblotting), and lectin chromatography. Of the 40 or more proteins which partitioned into the detergent phase, only about 10 proteins could be surface radioiodinated on live promastigotes, suggesting their surface orientation. The abundance of the gp58-63 antigen varied markedly between two strains of L. major. Sera from patients with visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania donovani chagasi recognized the gp58-63 complex and an additional Mr-42,000 polypeptide shared between L. major and L. donovani chagasi. A subpopulation of six surface proteins, including the abundant gp58-63 antigen and a group of proteins of Mr 81,000 to 105,000, were glycoproteins recognized by antiserum to wheat germ agglutinin- or concanavalin A-binding proteins. The membrane proteins of the LRC-L119 isolate of L. major could successfully vaccinate genetically susceptible mice, thus opening the way for a molecularly defined subunit vaccine composed of glycolipid and membrane protein antigens. Images PMID:2731987

  15. Composition and protein fractions of different meat by-products used for petfood compared with mechanically separated chicken (MSC).

    PubMed

    Rivera, J A; Sebranek, J G; Rust, R E; Tabatabai, L B

    2000-05-01

    Pork by-products (lung lobes, kidneys), chicken viscera (head, feet and viscera) and mechanically separated chicken (MSC) were evaluated for proximate composition, protein distribution and connective tissue. Proximate composition varied among meat by-products and MSC. Pork by-products contained the most crude protein (p<0.05). Low levels of high ionic strength soluble (HIS) proteins were obtained from meat by-products. Pork lungs and chicken viscera contained the greatest amounts of insoluble (IN) proteins (p<0.05). Total collagen values were positively correlated to IN proteins, intramuscular collagen (IMC) and elastin. Types I and III collagen could not be detected by SDS-PAGE for the different meat by-products though collagen solubility appeared to be significant. These results suggest functional property differences between specific by-products are likely when used in petfood product formulations. PMID:22060904

  16. Extensive surface protein profiles of extracellular vesicles from cancer cells may provide diagnostic signatures from blood samples

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Larissa; Matic, Kieran J.; Hallal, Susannah; Best, O. Giles; Mulligan, Stephen P.; Christopherson, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are membranous particles (30–1,000 nm in diameter) secreted by cells. Important biological functions have been attributed to 2 subsets of EV, the exosomes (bud from endosomal membranes) and the microvesicles (MV; bud from plasma membranes). Since both types of particles contain surface proteins derived from their cell of origin, their detection in blood may enable diagnosis and prognosis of disease. We have used an antibody microarray (DotScan) to compare the surface protein profiles of live cancer cells with those of their EV, based on their binding patterns to immobilized antibodies. Initially, EV derived from the cancer cell lines, LIM1215 (colorectal cancer) and MEC1 (B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia; CLL), were used for assay optimization. Biotinylated antibodies specific for EpCAM (CD326) and CD19, respectively, were used to detect captured particles by enhanced chemiluminescence. Subsequently, this approach was used to profile CD19+ EV from the plasma of CLL patients. These EV expressed a subset (~40%) of the proteins detected on CLL cells from the same patients: moderate or high levels of CD5, CD19, CD31, CD44, CD55, CD62L, CD82, HLA-A,B,C, HLA-DR; low levels of CD21, CD49c, CD63. None of these proteins was detected on EV from the plasma of age- and gender-matched healthy individuals. PMID:27086589

  17. Extensive surface protein profiles of extracellular vesicles from cancer cells may provide diagnostic signatures from blood samples.

    PubMed

    Belov, Larissa; Matic, Kieran J; Hallal, Susannah; Best, O Giles; Mulligan, Stephen P; Christopherson, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are membranous particles (30-1,000 nm in diameter) secreted by cells. Important biological functions have been attributed to 2 subsets of EV, the exosomes (bud from endosomal membranes) and the microvesicles (MV; bud from plasma membranes). Since both types of particles contain surface proteins derived from their cell of origin, their detection in blood may enable diagnosis and prognosis of disease. We have used an antibody microarray (DotScan) to compare the surface protein profiles of live cancer cells with those of their EV, based on their binding patterns to immobilized antibodies. Initially, EV derived from the cancer cell lines, LIM1215 (colorectal cancer) and MEC1 (B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia; CLL), were used for assay optimization. Biotinylated antibodies specific for EpCAM (CD326) and CD19, respectively, were used to detect captured particles by enhanced chemiluminescence. Subsequently, this approach was used to profile CD19(+) EV from the plasma of CLL patients. These EV expressed a subset (~40%) of the proteins detected on CLL cells from the same patients: moderate or high levels of CD5, CD19, CD31, CD44, CD55, CD62L, CD82, HLA-A,B,C, HLA-DR; low levels of CD21, CD49c, CD63. None of these proteins was detected on EV from the plasma of age- and gender-matched healthy individuals. PMID:27086589

  18. Organellar RNA editing and plant-specific extensions of pentatricopeptide repeat proteins in jungermanniid but not in marchantiid liverworts.

    PubMed

    Rüdinger, Mareike; Polsakiewicz, Monika; Knoop, Volker

    2008-07-01

    The pyrimidine exchange type of RNA editing in land plant (embryophyte) organelles has largely remained an enigma with respect to its biochemical mechanisms, the underlying specificities, and its raison d'être. Apparently arising with the earliest embryophytes, RNA editing is conspicuously absent in one clade of liverworts, the complex thalloid Marchantiidae. Several lines of evidence suggest that the large gene family of organelle-targeted RNA-binding pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins plays a fundamental role in the sequence-specific editing of organelle transcripts. We here describe the identification of PPR protein genes with plant-specific carboxyterminal (C-terminal) sequence signatures (E, E+, and DYW domains) in ferns, lycopodiophytes, mosses, hornworts, and jungermanniid liverworts, one subclass of the basal most clade of embryophytes, on DNA and cDNA level. In contrast, we were unable to identify these genes in a wide sampling of marchantiid liverworts (including the phylogenetic basal genus Blasia)--taxa for which no RNA editing is observed in the organelle transcripts. On the other hand, we found significant diversity of this type of PPR proteins also in Haplomitrium, a genus with an extremely high rate of RNA editing and a phylogenetic placement basal to all other liverworts. Although the presence of modularly extended PPR proteins correlates well with organelle RNA editing, the now apparent complete loss of an entire gene family from one clade of embryophytes, the marchantiid liverworts, remains puzzling. PMID:18400790

  19. Mutation of FdC2 gene encoding a ferredoxin-like protein with C-terminal extension causes yellow-green leaf phenotype in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunmei; Hu, Yan; Huang, Rui; Ma, Xiaozhi; Wang, Yang; Liao, Tingting; Zhong, Ping; Xiao, Fuliang; Sun, Changhui; Xu, Zhengjun; Deng, Xiaojian; Wang, Pingrong

    2015-09-01

    Ferredoxins (Fds) are small iron-sulfur proteins that mediate electron transfer in a wide range of metabolic reactions. Besides Fds, there is a type of Fd-like proteins designated as FdC, which have conserved elements of Fds, but contain a significant C-terminal extension. So far, only two FdC genes of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have been identified in higher plants and thus the functions of FdC proteins remain largely unknown. In this study, we isolated a yellow-green leaf mutant, 501ys, in rice (Oryza sativa). The mutant exhibited yellow-green leaf phenotype and reduced chlorophyll level. The phenotype of 501ys was caused by mutation of a gene on rice chromosome 3. Map-based cloning of this mutant resulted in identification of OsFdC2 gene (LOC_Os03g48040) showing high identity with Arabidopsis FdC2 gene (AT1G32550). OsFdC2 was expressed most abundantly in leaves and its encoded protein was targeted to the chloroplast. In 501ys mutant, a missense mutation was detected in DNA sequence of the gene, resulting in an amino acid change in the encoded protein. The mutant phenotype was rescued by introduction of the wild-type gene. Therefore, we successfully identified FdC2 gene via map-based cloning approach, and demonstrated that mutation of this gene caused yellow-green leaf phenotype in rice. PMID:26259181

  20. The N-end rule pathway catalyzes a major fraction of the protein degradation in skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, V.; Lecker, S. H.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, overall protein degradation involves the ubiquitin-proteasome system. One property of a protein that leads to rapid ubiquitin-dependent degradation is the presence of a basic, acidic, or bulky hydrophobic residue at its N terminus. However, in normal cells, substrates for this N-end rule pathway, which involves ubiquitin carrier protein (E2) E214k and ubiquitin-protein ligase (E3) E3alpha, have remained unclear. Surprisingly, in soluble extracts of rabbit muscle, we found that competitive inhibitors of E3alpha markedly inhibited the 125I-ubiquitin conjugation and ATP-dependent degradation of endogenous proteins. These inhibitors appear to selectively inhibit E3alpha, since they blocked degradation of 125I-lysozyme, a model N-end rule substrate, but did not affect the degradation of proteins whose ubiquitination involved other E3s. The addition of several E2s or E3alpha to the muscle extracts stimulated overall proteolysis and ubiquitination, but only the stimulation by E3alpha or E214k was sensitive to these inhibitors. A similar general inhibition of ubiquitin conjugation to endogenous proteins was observed with a dominant negative inhibitor of E214k. Certain substrates of the N-end rule pathway are degraded after their tRNA-dependent arginylation. We found that adding RNase A to muscle extracts reduced the ATP-dependent proteolysis of endogenous proteins, and supplying tRNA partially restored this process. Finally, although in muscle extracts the N-end rule pathway catalyzes most ubiquitin conjugation, it makes only a minor contribution to overall protein ubiquitination in HeLa cell extracts.

  1. Proteome rearrangements after auditory learning: high-resolution profiling of synapse-enriched protein fractions from mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Kähne, Thilo; Richter, Sandra; Kolodziej, Angela; Smalla, Karl-Heinz; Pielot, Rainer; Engler, Alexander; Ohl, Frank W; Dieterich, Daniela C; Seidenbecher, Constanze; Tischmeyer, Wolfgang; Naumann, Michael; Gundelfinger, Eckart D

    2016-07-01

    Learning and memory processes are accompanied by rearrangements of synaptic protein networks. While various studies have demonstrated the regulation of individual synaptic proteins during these processes, much less is known about the complex regulation of synaptic proteomes. Recently, we reported that auditory discrimination learning in mice is associated with a relative down-regulation of proteins involved in the structural organization of synapses in various brain regions. Aiming at the identification of biological processes and signaling pathways involved in auditory memory formation, here, a label-free quantification approach was utilized to identify regulated synaptic junctional proteins and phosphoproteins in the auditory cortex, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of mice 24 h after the learning experiment. Twenty proteins, including postsynaptic scaffolds, actin-remodeling proteins, and RNA-binding proteins, were regulated in at least three brain regions pointing to common, cross-regional mechanisms. Most of the detected synaptic proteome changes were, however, restricted to individual brain regions. For example, several members of the Septin family of cytoskeletal proteins were up-regulated only in the hippocampus, while Septin-9 was down-regulated in the hippocampus, the frontal cortex, and the striatum. Meta analyses utilizing several databases were employed to identify underlying cellular functions and biological pathways. Data are available via ProteomeExchange with identifier PXD003089. How does the protein composition of synapses change in different brain areas upon auditory learning? We unravel discrete proteome changes in mouse auditory cortex, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum functionally implicated in the learning process. We identify not only common but also area-specific biological pathways and cellular processes modulated 24 h after training, indicating individual contributions of the regions to memory processing. PMID

  2. Combining Isoelectric Point-Based Fractionation, Liquid Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry to Improve Peptide Detection and Protein Identification

    PubMed Central

    Cologna, Stephanie M.; Russell, William K.; Lim, Peniel J.; Vigh, Gyula; Russell, David H.

    2010-01-01

    The off-line coupling of an isoelectric trapping device termed membrane separated wells for isoelectric focusing and trapping (MSWIFT) to mass spectrometry-based proteomic studies is described. The MSWIFT is a high capacity, high-throughput, mass spectrometry compatible, isoelectric trapping device that provides isoelectric point (pI) based separations of complex mixtures of peptides. In MSWIFT, separation and analyte trapping are achieved by migrating the peptide ions through membranes having fixed pH values until the peptide pI is bracketed by the pH values of adjacent membranes. The pH values of the membranes can be tuned, thus affording a high degree of experimental flexibility. Specific advantages of using MSWIFT for sample pre-fractionation include: (i) small sample volumes (~200 μl), (ii) customized membranes over a large pH range, (iii) flexibility in the number of desired fractions, (iv) membrane compatibility with a variety of solvents systems and (v) resulting fractions do not require sample cleanup prior to MS analysis. Here, we demonstrate the utility of MSWIFT for mass spectrometry-based detection of peptides in improving dynamic range and the reduction of ion suppression effects for high-throughput separations of tryptic peptides. PMID:20537905

  3. Comparative Analysis of mRNA Targets for Human PUF-Family Proteins Suggests Extensive Interaction with the miRNA Regulatory System

    PubMed Central

    Galgano, Alessia; Forrer, Michael; Jaskiewicz, Lukasz; Kanitz, Alexander; Zavolan, Mihaela; Gerber, André P.

    2008-01-01

    Genome-wide identification of mRNAs regulated by RNA-binding proteins is crucial to uncover post-transcriptional gene regulatory systems. The conserved PUF family RNA-binding proteins repress gene expression post-transcriptionally by binding to sequence elements in 3′-UTRs of mRNAs. Despite their well-studied implications for development and neurogenesis in metazoa, the mammalian PUF family members are only poorly characterized and mRNA targets are largely unknown. We have systematically identified the mRNAs associated with the two human PUF proteins, PUM1 and PUM2, by the recovery of endogenously formed ribonucleoprotein complexes and the analysis of associated RNAs with DNA microarrays. A largely overlapping set comprised of hundreds of mRNAs were reproducibly associated with the paralogous PUM proteins, many of them encoding functionally related proteins. A characteristic PUF-binding motif was highly enriched among PUM bound messages and validated with RNA pull-down experiments. Moreover, PUF motifs as well as surrounding sequences exhibit higher conservation in PUM bound messages as opposed to transcripts that were not found to be associated, suggesting that PUM function may be modulated by other factors that bind conserved elements. Strikingly, we found that PUF motifs are enriched around predicted miRNA binding sites and that high-confidence miRNA binding sites are significantly enriched in the 3′-UTRs of experimentally determined PUM1 and PUM2 targets, strongly suggesting an interaction of human PUM proteins with the miRNA regulatory system. Our work suggests extensive connections between the RBP and miRNA post-transcriptional regulatory systems and provides a framework for deciphering the molecular mechanism by which PUF proteins regulate their target mRNAs. PMID:18776931

  4. Validation of the flooding dose technique to determine fractional rates of protein synthesis in a model bivalve species, the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis L.).

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Ian D; Nicholls, Ruth; Malham, Shelagh K; Whiteley, Nia M

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, use of the flooding dose technique using (3)H-Phenylalanine is validated for measuring whole-animal and tissue-specific rates of protein synthesis in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis (61mm shell length; 4.0g fresh body mass). Following injection, the phenylalanine-specific radioactivities in the gill, mantle and whole-animal free pools were elevated within one hour and remained elevated and stable for up to 6h following injection of (3)H-phenylalanine into the posterior adductor muscle. Incorporation of (3)H-phenylalanine into body protein was linear over time following injection and the non-significant intercepts for the regressions suggested incorporation into body protein occurred rapidly after injection. These results validate the technique for measuring rates of protein synthesis in mussels. There were no differences in the calculated rates following 1-6h incubation in gill, mantle or whole-animal and fractional rates of protein synthesis from the combined time course data were 9.5±0.8%d(-1) for the gill, 2.5±0.3%d(-1) for the mantle and 2.6±0.3%d(-1) for the whole-animal, respectively (mean values±SEM). The whole-animal absolute rate of protein synthesis was calculated as 18.9±0.6mg protein day(-1). The use of this technique in measuring one of the major components of maintenance metabolism and growth will provide a valuable and convenient tool in furthering our understanding of the protein metabolism and energetics of this keystone marine invertebrate and its ability to adjust and respond to fluctuations, such as that expected as a result of climate change. PMID:26497279

  5. Proteome-wide muscle protein fractional synthesis rates predict muscle mass gain in response to a selective androgen receptor modulator in rats.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; Shearer, Todd W; Stimpson, Stephen A; Turner, Scott M; King, Chelsea; Wong, Po-Yin Anne; Shen, Ying; Turnbull, Philip S; Kramer, Fritz; Clifton, Lisa; Russell, Alan; Hellerstein, Marc K; Evans, William J

    2016-03-15

    Biomarkers of muscle protein synthesis rate could provide early data demonstrating anabolic efficacy for treating muscle-wasting conditions. Androgenic therapies have been shown to increase muscle mass primarily by increasing the rate of muscle protein synthesis. We hypothesized that the synthesis rate of large numbers of individual muscle proteins could serve as early response biomarkers and potentially treatment-specific signaling for predicting the effect of anabolic treatments on muscle mass. Utilizing selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) treatment in the ovariectomized (OVX) rat, we applied an unbiased, dynamic proteomics approach to measure the fractional synthesis rates (FSR) of 167-201 individual skeletal muscle proteins in triceps, EDL, and soleus. OVX rats treated with a SARM molecule (GSK212A at 0.1, 0.3, or 1 mg/kg) for 10 or 28 days showed significant, dose-related increases in body weight, lean body mass, and individual triceps but not EDL or soleus weights. Thirty-four out of the 94 proteins measured from the triceps of all rats exhibited a significant, dose-related increase in FSR after 10 days of SARM treatment. For several cytoplasmic proteins, including carbonic anhydrase 3, creatine kinase M-type (CK-M), pyruvate kinase, and aldolase-A, a change in 10-day FSR was strongly correlated (r(2) = 0.90-0.99) to the 28-day change in lean body mass and triceps weight gains, suggesting a noninvasive measurement of SARM effects. In summary, FSR of multiple muscle proteins measured by dynamics of moderate- to high-abundance proteins provides early biomarkers of the anabolic response of skeletal muscle to SARM. PMID:26714847

  6. A protein extract and a cysteine protease inhibitor enriched fraction from Jatropha curcas seed cake have in vitro anti-Toxoplasma gondii activity.

    PubMed

    Soares, A M S; Carvalho, L P; Melo, E J T; Costa, H P S; Vasconcelos, I M; Oliveira, J T A

    2015-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a parasite of great medical and veterinary importance that has worldwide distribution and causes toxoplasmosis. There are few treatments available for toxoplasmosis and the search for plant extracts and compounds with anti-Toxoplasma activity is of utmost importance for the discovery of new active drugs. The objective of this study was to investigate the action of a protein extract and a protease inhibitor enriched fraction from J. curcas seed cake on developing tachyzoites of T. gondii-infected Vero cells. The protein extract (JcCE) was obtained after solubilization of the J. curcas seed cake with 100 mM sodium borate buffer, pH 10, centrifugation and dialysis of the resulting supernatant with the extracting buffer. JcCE was used for the in vitro assays of anti-Toxoplasma activity at 0.01, 0.1, 0.5, 1.5, 3.0 and 5.0 mg/ml concentration for 24 h. The results showed that JcCE reduced the percentage of infection and the number of intracellular parasites, but had no effect on the morphology of Vero cells up to 3.0 mg/mL. The cysteine protease inhibitor enriched fraction, which was obtained after chromatography of JcCE on Sephadex G-75 and presented a unique protein band following SDS-PAGE, reduced both the number of T. gondii infected cells and intracellular parasites. These results suggest that both JcCE and the cysteine protease inhibitor enriched fraction interfere with the intracellular growth of T. gondii. PMID:25816973

  7. Not all transmembrane helices are born equal: Towards the extension of the sequence homology concept to membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sequence homology considerations widely used to transfer functional annotation to uncharacterized protein sequences require special precautions in the case of non-globular sequence segments including membrane-spanning stretches composed of non-polar residues. Simple, quantitative criteria are desirable for identifying transmembrane helices (TMs) that must be included into or should be excluded from start sequence segments in similarity searches aimed at finding distant homologues. Results We found that there are two types of TMs in membrane-associated proteins. On the one hand, there are so-called simple TMs with elevated hydrophobicity, low sequence complexity and extraordinary enrichment in long aliphatic residues. They merely serve as membrane-anchoring device. In contrast, so-called complex TMs have lower hydrophobicity, higher sequence complexity and some functional residues. These TMs have additional roles besides membrane anchoring such as intra-membrane complex formation, ligand binding or a catalytic role. Simple and complex TMs can occur both in single- and multi-membrane-spanning proteins essentially in any type of topology. Whereas simple TMs have the potential to confuse searches for sequence homologues and to generate unrelated hits with seemingly convincing statistical significance, complex TMs contain essential evolutionary information. Conclusion For extending the homology concept onto membrane proteins, we provide a necessary quantitative criterion to distinguish simple TMs (and a sufficient criterion for complex TMs) in query sequences prior to their usage in homology searches based on assessment of hydrophobicity and sequence complexity of the TM sequence segments. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Shamil Sunyaev, L. Aravind and Arcady Mushegian. PMID:22024092

  8. Extension of microwave-accelerated residue-specific acid cleavage to proteins with carbohydrate side chains and disulfide linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinxi; Shefcheck, Kevin; Callahan, John; Fenselau, Catherine

    2008-12-01

    This laboratory has introduced a chemical method for residue-specific protein cleavage and has provided a preliminary assessment of the suitability of microwave-accelerated acid cleavage as a proteomic tool. This report is a continuing assessment of the fate of common protein modifications in microwave-accelerated acid cleavage. We have examined the cleavage of ribonuclease A and the related N-linked glycoprotein ribonuclease B, and the O-linked glycoprotein alpha crystallin A chain, using MALDI-TOF and LC-ESI-MS to identify the peptide products. RNase A and B each contains four disulfide bonds, and the addition of a reducing reagent, such as dithiothreitol, was found to be required to achieve efficient acidic proteolysis. The linkage of the glycosidic group to the asparagine side chain in ribonuclease B was found not to be cleaved by brief microwave treatment in 12.5% acetic acid. The distribution of the heterogeneous carbohydrate side chain in the glycopeptide products of acid cleavage was compared to that of the glycopeptide products of tryptic digestion. Hydrolysis within the carbohydrate chain itself is minimal under the conditions used. The O-linked side chain on alpha crystalline A was found to be cleaved during acid cleavage of the protein.

  9. A ubiquitin carboxyl extension protein secreted from a plant-parasitic nematode Globodera rostochiensis is cleaved in planta to promote plant parasitism.

    PubMed

    Chronis, Demosthenis; Chen, Shiyan; Lu, Shunwen; Hewezi, Tarek; Carpenter, Sara C D; Loria, Rosemary; Baum, Thomas J; Wang, Xiaohong

    2013-04-01

    Nematode effector proteins originating from esophageal gland cells play central roles in suppressing plant defenses and in formation of the plant feeding cells that are required for growth and development of cyst nematodes. A gene (GrUBCEP12) encoding a unique ubiquitin carboxyl extension protein (UBCEP) that consists of a signal peptide for secretion, a mono-ubiquitin domain, and a 12 amino acid carboxyl extension protein (CEP12) domain was cloned from the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis. This GrUBCEP12 gene was expressed exclusively within the nematode's dorsal esophageal gland cell, and was up-regulated in the parasitic second-stage juvenile, correlating with the time when feeding cell formation is initiated. We showed that specific GrUBCEP12 knockdown via RNA interference reduced nematode parasitic success, and that over-expression of the secreted Gr(Δ) (SP) UBCEP12 protein in potato resulted in increased nematode susceptibility, providing direct evidence that this secreted effector is involved in plant parasitism. Using transient expression assays in Nicotiana benthamiana, we found that Gr(Δ) (SP) UBCEP12 is processed into free ubiquitin and a CEP12 peptide (GrCEP12) in planta, and that GrCEP12 suppresses resistance gene-mediated cell death. A target search showed that expression of RPN2a, a gene encoding a subunit of the 26S proteasome, was dramatically suppressed in Gr(Δ) (SP) UBCEP12 but not GrCEP12 over-expression plants when compared with control plants. Together, these results suggest that, when delivered into host plant cells, Gr(Δ) (SP) UBCEP12 becomes two functional units, one acting to suppress plant immunity and the other potentially affecting the host 26S proteasome, to promote feeding cell formation. PMID:23346875

  10. Evolution of cyclin B3 shows an abrupt three-fold size increase, due to the extension of a single exon in placental mammals, allowing for new protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Jean-Claude; Vergé, Valérie; Schatt, Philippe; Juengel, Jennifer L; Peaucellier, Gérard

    2012-12-01

    Cyclin B3 evolution has the unique peculiarity of an abrupt 3-fold increase of the protein size in the mammalian lineage due to the extension of a single exon. We have analyzed the evolution of the gene to define the modalities of this event and the possible consequences on the function of the protein. Database searches can trace the appearance of the gene to the origin of metazoans. Most introns were already present in early metazoans, and the intron-exon structure as well as the protein size were fairly conserved in invertebrates and nonmammalian vertebrates. Although intron gains are considered as rare events, we identified two cases, one at the prochordate-chordate transition and one in murids, resulting from different mechanisms. At the emergence of mammals, the gene was relocated from chromosome 6 of platypus to the X chromosome in marsupials, but the exon extension occurred only in placental mammals. A repetitive structure of 18 amino acids, of uncertain origin, is detectable in the 3,000-nt mammalian exon-encoded sequence, suggesting an extension by multiple internal duplications, some of which are still detectable in the primate lineage. Structure prediction programs suggest that the repetitive structure has no associated three-dimensional structure but rather a tendency for disorder. Splice variant isoforms were detected in several mammalian species but without conserved pattern, notably excluding the constant coexistence of premammalian-like transcripts, without the extension. The yeast two-hybrid method revealed that, in human, the extension allowed new interactions with ten unrelated proteins, most of them with specific three-dimensional structures involved in protein-protein interactions, and some highly expressed in testis, as is cyclin B3. The interactions with activator of cAMP-responsive element modulator in testis (ACT), germ cell-less homolog 1, and chromosome 1 open reading frame 14 remain to be verified in vivo since they may not be expressed

  11. The N-terminal extension of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L20 is important for ribosome assembly, but dispensable for translational feedback control

    PubMed Central

    GUILLIER, MAUDE; ALLEMAND, FRÉDÉRIC; GRAFFE, MONIQUE; RAIBAUD, SOPHIE; DARDEL, FRÉDÉRIC; SPRINGER, MATHIAS; CHIARUTTINI, CLAUDE

    2005-01-01

    The Escherichia coli autoregulatory ribosomal protein L20 consists of two structurally distinct domains. The C-terminal domain is globular and sits on the surface of the large ribosomal subunit whereas the N-terminal domain has an extended shape and penetrates deep into the RNA-rich core of the subunit. Many other ribosomal proteins have analogous internal or terminal extensions. However, the biological functions of these extended domains remain obscure. Here we show that the N-terminal tail of L20 is important for ribosome assembly in vivo. Indeed, a truncated version of L20 without its N-terminal tail is unable to complement the deletion of rplT, the gene encoding L20. In addition, this L20 truncation confers a lethal-dominant phenotype, suggesting that the N-terminal domain is essential for cell growth because it could be required for ribosome assembly. Supporting this hypothesis, partial deletions of the N-terminal tail of the protein are shown to cause a slow-growth phenotype due to altered ribosome assembly in vivo as large amounts of intermediate 40S ribosomal particles accumulate. In addition to being a ribosomal protein, L20 also acts as an autogenous repressor. Using L20 truncations, we also show that the N-terminal tail of L20 is dispensable for autogenous control. PMID:15840820

  12. Extensive amino acid polymorphism at the pgm locus is consistent with adaptive protein evolution in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Verrelli, B C; Eanes, W F

    2000-01-01

    PGM plays a central role in the glycolytic pathway at the branch point leading to glycogen metabolism and is highly polymorphic in allozyme studies of many species. We have characterized the nucleotide diversity across the Pgm gene in Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans to investigate the role that protein polymorphism plays at this crucial metabolic branch point shared with several other enzymes. Although D. melanogaster and D. simulans share common allozyme mobility alleles, we find these allozymes are the result of many different amino acid changes at the nucleotide level. In addition, specific allozyme classes within species contain several amino acid changes, which may explain the absence of latitudinal clines for PGM allozyme alleles, the lack of association of PGM allozymes with the cosmopolitan In(3L)P inversion, and the failure to detect differences between PGM allozymes in functional studies. We find a significant excess of amino acid polymorphisms within D. melanogaster when compared to the complete absence of fixed replacements with D. simulans. There is also strong linkage disequilibrium across the 2354 bp of the Pgm locus, which may be explained by a specific amino acid haplotype that is high in frequency yet contains an excess of singleton polymorphisms. Like G6pd, Pgm shows strong evidence for a branch point enzyme that exhibits adaptive protein evolution. PMID:11102370

  13. Identification of novel autophagic Radix Polygalae fraction by cell membrane chromatography and UHPLC-(Q)TOF-MS for degradation of neurodegenerative disease proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wu, An-Guo; Kam-Wai Wong, Vincent; Zeng, Wu; Liu, Liang; Yuen-Kwan Law, Betty

    2015-01-01

    With its traditional use in relieving insomnia and anxiety, our previous study has identified onjisaponin B from Radix Polygalae (RP), as a novel autophagic enhancer with potential neuroprotective effects. In current study, we have further identified a novel active fraction from RP, contains 17 major triterpenoid saponins including the onjisaponin B, by the combinational use of cell membrane chromatography (CMC) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to (quadrupole) time-of-flight mass spectrometry {UHPLC-(Q)TOF-MS}. By exhibiting more potent autophagic effect in cells, the active fraction enhances the clearance of mutant huntingtin, and reduces protein level and aggregation of α-synuclein in a higher extent when compared with onjisaponin B. Here, we have reported for the first time the new application of cell-based CMC and UHPLC-(Q)TOF-MS analysis in identifying new autophagy inducers with neuroprotective effects from Chinese medicinal herb. This result has provided novel insights into the possible pharmacological actions of the active components present in the newly identified active fraction of RP, which may help to improve the efficacy of the traditional way of prescribing RP, and also provide new standard for the quality control of decoction of RP or its medicinal products in the future. PMID:26598009

  14. Identification of novel autophagic Radix Polygalae fraction by cell membrane chromatography and UHPLC-(Q)TOF-MS for degradation of neurodegenerative disease proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, An-Guo; Wong, Vincent Kam-Wai; Zeng, Wu; Liu, Liang; Law, Betty Yuen-Kwan

    2015-01-01

    With its traditional use in relieving insomnia and anxiety, our previous study has identified onjisaponin B from Radix Polygalae (RP), as a novel autophagic enhancer with potential neuroprotective effects. In current study, we have further identified a novel active fraction from RP, contains 17 major triterpenoid saponins including the onjisaponin B, by the combinational use of cell membrane chromatography (CMC) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to (quadrupole) time-of-flight mass spectrometry {UHPLC-(Q)TOF-MS}. By exhibiting more potent autophagic effect in cells, the active fraction enhances the clearance of mutant huntingtin, and reduces protein level and aggregation of α-synuclein in a higher extent when compared with onjisaponin B. Here, we have reported for the first time the new application of cell-based CMC and UHPLC-(Q)TOF-MS analysis in identifying new autophagy inducers with neuroprotective effects from Chinese medicinal herb. This result has provided novel insights into the possible pharmacological actions of the active components present in the newly identified active fraction of RP, which may help to improve the efficacy of the traditional way of prescribing RP, and also provide new standard for the quality control of decoction of RP or its medicinal products in the future. PMID:26598009

  15. Seasonal changes in blood serum protein fractions and in activity of AspAT and AlAT in Arabian brood mares and their foals.

    PubMed

    Gill, J; Jakubów, K; Kompanowska-Jezierska, E; Kott, A; Szumska, D

    1985-01-01

    In 34 pure breed Arabian horses divided into four groups (Gr. I--10 pregnant mares, Gr. II--7 barren mares, Gr. III--10 foals born in 1981, Gr. IV--7 foals born in 1982) seasonal changes in total blood serum protein, its electrophoretic fractions and the activity of AspAT and AlAT were studied. Seasonal cyclicity was found in all groups in the amount of total serum proteins, and alpha 2- and beta 1-globulin fractions. Cyclicity was found in the level of albumin and activity of AspAT in three groups, not Gr. II, and in gamma-globulin, not Gr. IV. beta 2-globulin and AlAT cyclicity was found in two groups and alpha 1-globulin cyclicity was found only in Gr. II. Out of nine indices studied, cyclicity was found in eight of them in pregnant mares, Gr. I; in seven in older foals, Gr. III; in six in the young foals, Gr. IV; and in five in barren mares, Gr. II. PMID:2864198

  16. 2,2,4-Trimethylpentane-induced nephrotoxicity. II. The reversible binding of a TMP metabolite to a renal protein fraction containing alpha 2u-globulin.

    PubMed

    Lock, E A; Charbonneau, M; Strasser, J; Swenberg, J A; Bus, J S

    1987-11-01

    Trimethylpentane (TMP) produces nephrotoxicity in male but not in female rats. The toxicity is characterized by an increase in protein droplets in proximal convoluted tubular cells and an increase in the renal concentration of the male-rat-specific protein alpha 2u-globulin. Subcellular fractionation of the kidneys from male rats 24 hr after [3H]TMP administration showed that about 60% of the radiolabeled material was localized in the 116,000g supernatant. Column chromatography of this supernatant resolved the radioactivity into two components; one, which contained about 26% of the radiolabel, coeluted with alpha 2u-globulin and cross-reacted with an antibody specific for alpha 2u-globulin. The remaining component eluted in the low-molecular-weight range (less than 1000 Da) and was assumed to be TMP metabolites. Radiolabel from [3H]TMP in male rat urine also resolved into two components with about 0.1% of the radiolabel in urine coeluting with the alpha 2u-globulin-containing fraction. Radiolabel from TMP in male rat liver 116,000g supernatant and plasma and in female rat kidney 116,000g supernatant eluted as a single component in the low-molecular-weight range. Dialysis (1000-Da cutoff) of male kidney 116,000g supernatant led to a loss of the low-molecular-weight components, but nondialyzable radiolabel (about 20%) still coeluted with the alpha 2u-globulin after gel chromatography. Dialysis against 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate led to a loss of both the low- and high-molecular-weight radioactive material. These results suggested that the high-molecular-weight radioactive material was formed by the reversible binding of a radioactive component of TMP to a male-rat-specific protein. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of an ethyl acetate extract of the alpha 2u-globulin-containing fractions of TMP-treated male rat kidney 116,000g supernatant identified 2,4,4-trimethyl-2-pentanol as the only bound metabolite to alpha 2u-globulin. These studies provide the first

  17. A critical assessment of the topomer search model of protein folding using a continuum explicit-chain model with extensive conformational sampling

    PubMed Central

    Wallin, Stefan; Chan, Hue Sun

    2005-01-01

    Recently, a series of closely related theoretical constructs termed the “topomer search model” (TSM) has been proposed for the folding mechanism of small, single-domain proteins. A basic assumption of the proposed scenarios is that the rate-limiting step in folding is an essentially unbiased, diffusive search for a conformational state called the native topomer defined by an overall native-like topological pattern. Successes in correlating TSM-predicted folding rates with that of real proteins have been interpreted as experimental support for the model. To better delineate the physics entailed, key TSM concepts are examined here using extensive Langevin dynamics simulations of continuum Cα chain models. The theoretical native topomers of four experimentally well-studied two-state proteins are characterized. Consistent with the TSM perspective, we found that the sizes of the native topomers increase with experimental folding rate. However, a careful determination of the corresponding probabilities that the native topomers are populated during a random search fails to reproduce the previously predicted folding rates. Instead, our results indicate that an unbiased TSM search for the native topomer amounts to a Levinthal-like process that would take an impossibly long average time to complete. Furthermore, intraprotein contacts in all four native topomers considered exhibit no apparent correlation with the experimental φ-values determined from the folding kinetics of these proteins. Thus, the present findings suggest that certain basic, generic yet essential energetic features in protein folding are not accounted for by TSM scenarios to date. PMID:15930009

  18. Identification, cloning, and nucleotide sequence of a silent S-layer protein gene of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 which has extensive similarity with the S-layer protein gene of this species.

    PubMed Central

    Boot, H J; Kolen, C P; Pouwels, P H

    1995-01-01

    The bacterial S-layer forms a regular structure, composed of a monolayer of one (glyco)protein, on the surfaces of many prokaryotic species. S-layers are reported to fulfil different functions, such as attachment structures for extracellular enzymes and major virulence determinants for pathogenic species. Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356, which originates from the human pharynx, possesses such an S-layer. No function has yet been assigned to the S-layer of this species. Besides the structural gene (slpA) for the S-layer protein (S-protein) which constitutes this S-layer, we have identified a silent gene (slpB), which is almost identical to slpA in two regions. From the deduced amino acid sequence, it appears that the mature SB-protein (44,884 Da) is 53% similar to the SA-protein (43,636 Da) in the N-terminal and middle parts of the proteins. The C-terminal parts of the two proteins are identical except for one amino acid residue. The physical properties of the deduced S-proteins are virtually the same. Northern (RNA) blot analysis shows that only the slpA gene is expressed in wild-type cells, in line with the results from sequencing and primer extension analyses, which reveal that only the slpA gene harbors a promoter, which is located immediately upstream of the region where the two genes are identical. The occurrence of in vivo chromosomal recombination between the two S-protein-encoding genes will be described elsewhere. PMID:8522531

  19. Stressed Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Helianthus tuberosus L.) excrete a protein fraction with specific cytotoxicity on plant and animal tumour cell.

    PubMed

    Griffaut, B; Debiton, E; Madelmont, J C; Maurizis, J C; Ledoigt, G

    2007-09-01

    Wounds from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tubers excrete bioactive metabolites from a variety of structural classes, including proteins. Here we describe a protein specifically active against tumour cells arising either from human, animal or plant tissues. The non-tumour animal cells or the plant callus cells are not sensitive to these excreta. The active product was only obtained after a wound-drought stress of plant tubers. The cytotoxicity varies according to the tumour cell type. For instance, some human tumour cell lines and especially the human mammary tumour cells MDA-MB-231 were shown to be very susceptible to the active product. The active agent is shown to contain an 18-kDa polypeptide with homology to a superoxide dismutase (SOD). A 28-kDa polypeptide, related to an alkaline phosphatase (AP), was shown to be tightly linked to this 18-kDa polypeptide. The excreted 28-kDa polypeptide also displayed a consensus sequence similar to the group of DING proteins, but with a smaller molecular weight. The superoxide dismutase polypeptide was shown to be involved in the antitumour activity, but the presence of smaller factors (MW<10 kDa), such as salicylic acid, can enhance this activity. PMID:17662535

  20. The nuclear fraction of protein kinase CK2 binds to the upstream stimulatory factors (USFs) in the absence of DNA.

    PubMed

    Spohrer, Sarah; Dimova, Elitsa Y; Kietzmann, Thomas; Montenarh, Mathias; Götz, Claudia

    2016-02-01

    The functions of the upstream stimulatory factors USF1 and USF2 are, like those of other transcription factors, regulated by reversible phosphorylation. Besides many other kinases also protein kinase CK2 phosphorylates USF1 but not USF2. In a yeast-two-hybrid screen, however, the non-catalytic CK2β subunit of CK2 was identified as a binding partner of USF2. This surprising observation prompted us to investigate the CK2/USF interaction in more detail in the present study. By using immunofluorescence analyses as well as co-immunoprecipitations we found that USF1 and USF2 bound to CK2α and CK2β exclusively in the nucleus, though CK2β and to a minor amount CK2α were also present in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we found that unlike other substrates the phosphorylation of USF1 required the presence of the regulatory CK2β subunit; the catalytic α-subunit of CK2 alone was not able to phosphorylate USF1. Thus, the correct phosphorylation of USF1 is only guaranteed and strictly controlled in particular by nuclear CK2β. Although the data indicated that a nuclear subfraction of CK2 subunits associated with USF proteins, DNA pull down experiments revealed that the CK2 subunits did not co-localize with DNA bound USF proteins indicating that the USF/CK2 interaction has a pre- or post DNA binding function. PMID:26577526

  1. Human type II receptor for bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs): extension of the two-kinase receptor model to the BMPs.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, F; Ventura, F; Doody, J; Massagué, J

    1995-01-01

    Bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) are universal regulators of animal development. We report the identification and cloning of the BMP type II receptor (BMPR-II), a missing component of this receptor system in vertebrates. BMPR-II is a transmembrane serine/threonine kinase that binds BMP-2 and BMP-7 in association with multiple type I receptors, including BMPR-IA/Brk1, BMPR-IB, and ActR-I, which is also an activin type I receptor. Cloning of BMPR-II resulted from a strong interaction of its cytoplasmic domain with diverse transforming growth factor beta family type I receptor cytoplasmic domains in a yeast two-hybrid system. In mammalian cells, however, the interaction of BMPR-II is restricted to BMP type I receptors and is ligand dependent. BMPR-II binds BMP-2 and -7 on its own, but binding is enhanced by coexpression of type I BMP receptors. BMP-2 and BMP-7 can induce a transcriptional response when added to cells coexpressing ActR-I and BMPR-II but not to cells expressing either receptor alone. The kinase activity of both receptors is essential for signaling. Thus, despite their ability to bind to type I and II receptors receptors separately, BMPs appear to require the cooperation of these two receptors for optimal binding and for signal transduction. The combinatorial nature of these receptors and their capacity to crosstalk with the activin receptor system may underlie the multifunctional nature of their ligands. PMID:7791754

  2. Milk digesta and milk protein fractions influence the adherence of Lactobacillus gasseri R and Lactobacillus casei FMP to human cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Volstatova, Tereza; Havlik, Jaroslav; Potuckova, Miroslava; Geigerova, Martina

    2016-08-10

    Adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is considered an important feature of probiotic bacteria, which may increase their persistence in the intestine, allowing them to exert their beneficial health effect or promote the colonisation process. However, this feature might be largely dependent on the host specificity or diet. In the present study, we investigated the effect of selected milks and milk protein fractions on the ability of selected lactobacilli to adhere to the cells of an intestinal model based on co-culture Caco-2/HT29-MTX cell lines. Most milk digesta did not significantly affect bacterial adhesion except for UHT-treated milk and sheep milk. The presence of UHT-treated milk digesta reduced the adhesion of Lactobacillus gasseri R by 61% but not that of Lactobacillus casei FMP. However, sheep milk significantly increased the adherence of L. casei FMP (P < 0.05) but not of L. gasseri R. Among the protein fractions, rennet casein (RCN) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) showed reproducible patterns and strain-specific effects on bacterial adherence. While RCN reduced the adherence of L. gasseri R to <50% compared to the control, it did not have a significant effect on L. casei FMP. In contrast, BSA reduced L. casei FMP adherence to a higher extent than that of L. gasseri R. Whey protein (WH) tended to increase the adherence of both strains by 130%-180%. Recently, interactions between the host diet and its microbiota have attracted considerable interest. Our results may explain one of the aspects of the role of milk in the development of microbiota or support of probiotic supplements. Based on our data, we conclude that the persistence of probiotic strains supplemented as part of dairy food or constitutional microbiota in the gut might be affected negatively or positively by the food matrix through complex strain or concentration dependent effects. PMID:27435508

  3. ON-COLUMN ENRICHMENT OF HYDROPHOBIC CYP450 PROTEINS IN HPLC FRACTIONATION OF MOUSE MICROSOMES PRIOR TO PROTEIN DIGESTION AND NANOSPRAY-LC/MSMS ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction

    Membrane proteins play crucial role in many cellular processes and are promising candidates for biomarker discovery but are under-represented in the field of proteomics due to their hydrophobic nature. Although standard reversed-phase LC methods often exhibit ...

  4. Effects of Spontaneous Heating on Forage Protein Fractions and In Situ Disappearance Kinetics of Crude Protein for Alfalfa-Orchardgrass Hays Packaged in Large-Round Bales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During 2006 and 2007, forages from 3 individual hay harvests were utilized to assess the effects of spontaneous heating on concentrations of crude protein (CP), neutral-detergent insoluble CP (NDICP), acid-detergent insoluble CP (ADICP), and in situ disappearance kinetics of CP and NDICP for large-r...

  5. Antihepatitis B virus activity of a protein-enriched fraction from housefly (Musca domestica) in a stable HBV-producing cell line.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuemei; Jin, Xiaobao; Wang, Jie; Chu, Fujiang; Zhu, Jiayong

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major public health problem. Although several vaccines and therapeutic strategies are currently being implemented to combat HBV virus, effective antiviral therapy against HBV infection has not been fully developed. Alternative strategies and new drugs to combat this disease are urged. Insects and insect derivatives are a large and unexploited source of potentially useful compounds for modern medicine. In the present study, we investigated the first anti-HBV activity of a protein-enriched fraction (PE) from the larvae of the housefly (Musca domestica) in a stable HBV-producing cell line. HBsAg and HBeAg in the culture medium were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HBV-DNA was quantified by fluorescent quantification PCR. HBV core protein was assayed by immunofluorescent staining. Results indicate PE treatment inhibited both HBsAg, HBeAg secretion, and HBV-DNA replication. Furthermore, PE could also suppress HBV core protein expression. PE could be a potential candidate for the development of a novel and effective drug for the treatment of HBV infection. PMID:25050391

  6. Antihepatitis B Virus Activity of a Protein-Enriched Fraction from Housefly (Musca domestica) in a Stable HBV-Producing Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Fujiang; Zhu, Jiayong

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major public health problem. Although several vaccines and therapeutic strategies are currently being implemented to combat HBV virus, effective antiviral therapy against HBV infection has not been fully developed. Alternative strategies and new drugs to combat this disease are urged. Insects and insect derivatives are a large and unexploited source of potentially useful compounds for modern medicine. In the present study, we investigated the first anti-HBV activity of a protein-enriched fraction (PE) from the larvae of the housefly (Musca domestica) in a stable HBV-producing cell line. HBsAg and HBeAg in the culture medium were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HBV-DNA was quantified by fluorescent quantification PCR. HBV core protein was assayed by immunofluorescent staining. Results indicate PE treatment inhibited both HBsAg, HBeAg secretion, and HBV-DNA replication. Furthermore, PE could also suppress HBV core protein expression. PE could be a potential candidate for the development of a novel and effective drug for the treatment of HBV infection. PMID:25050391

  7. Crystallization and X-ray analysis of the T = 4 particle of hepatitis B capsid protein with an N-terminal extension

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Wen Siang; McNae, Iain W.; Ho, Kok Lian; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D.

    2007-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus capsids have significant potential as carriers for immunogenic peptides. The crystal structure of the T = 4 particle of hepatitis B core protein containing an N-terminal extension reveals that the fusion peptide is exposed on the exterior of the particle. Hepatitis B core (HBc) particles have been extensively exploited as carriers for foreign immunological epitopes in the development of multicomponent vaccines and diagnostic reagents. Crystals of the T = 4 HBc particle were grown in PEG 20 000, ammonium sulfate and various types of alcohols. A temperature jump from 277 or 283 to 290 K was found to enhance crystal growth. A crystal grown using MPD as a cryoprotectant diffracted X-rays to 7.7 Å resolution and data were collected to 99.6% completeness at 8.9 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 352.3, b = 465.5, c = 645.0 Å. The electron-density map reveals a protrusion that is consistent with the N-terminus extending out from the surface of the capsid. The structure presented here supports the idea that N-terminal insertions can be exploited in the development of diagnostic reagents, multicomponent vaccines and delivery vehicles into mammalian cells.

  8. Extensive protein hydrolysate formula effectively reduces regurgitation in infants with positive and negative challenge tests for cow’s milk allergy

    PubMed Central

    Vandenplas, Y; De Greef, E

    2014-01-01

    Aim Cow’s milk protein allergy (CMPA) is treated using an elimination diet with an extensive protein hydrolysate. We explored whether a thickened or nonthickened version was best for infants with suspected CMPA, which commonly causes regurgitation/vomiting. Methods Diagnosis of CMPA was based on a positive challenge test. We compared the efficacy of two casein extensive hydrolysates (eCH), a nonthickened version (NT-eCH) and a thickened version (T-eCH), using a symptom-based score covering regurgitation, crying, stool consistency, eczema, urticarial and respiratory symptoms. Results A challenge was performed in 52/72 infants with suspected CMPA and was positive in 65.4%. All confirmed CMPA cases tolerated eCH. The symptom-based score decreased significantly in all infants within a month, and the highest reduction was in those with confirmed CMPA. Regurgitation was reduced in all infants (6.4 ± 3.2–2.8 ± 2.9, p < 0.001), but fell more with the T-eCH (−4.2 ± 3.2 regurgitations/day vs. −3.0 ± 4.5, ns), especially in infants with a negative challenge (−3.9 ± 4.0 vs. −1.9 ± 3.4, ns). Conclusion eCH fulfilled the criteria for a hypoallergenic formula, and the NT-eCH and T-eCH formulas both reduced CMPA symptoms. The symptom-based score is useful for evaluating how effective dietary treatments are for CMPA. PMID:24575806

  9. Identification of a Novel Small Cysteine-Rich Protein in the Fraction from the Biocontrol Fusarium oxysporum Strain CS-20 that Mitigates Fusarium Wilt Symptoms and Triggers Defense Responses in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakova, Larisa A.; Odintsova, Tatyana I.; Stakheev, Alexander A.; Fravel, Deborah R.; Zavriev, Sergey K.

    2016-01-01

    The biocontrol effect of the non-pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum strain CS-20 against the tomato wilt pathogen F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (FOL) has been previously reported to be primarily plant-mediated. This study shows that CS-20 produces proteins, which elicit defense responses in tomato plants. Three protein-containing fractions were isolated from CS-20 biomass using size exclusion chromatography. Exposure of seedling roots to one of these fractions prior to inoculation with pathogenic FOL strains significantly reduced wilt severity. This fraction initiated an ion exchange response in cultured tomato cells resulting in a reversible alteration of extracellular pH; increased tomato chitinase activity, and induced systemic resistance by enhancing PR-1 expression in tomato leaves. Two other protein fractions were inactive in seedling protection. The main polypeptide (designated CS20EP), which was specifically present in the defense-inducing fraction and was not detected in inactive protein fractions, was identified. The nucleotide sequence encoding this protein was determined, and its complete amino acid sequence was deduced from direct Edman degradation (25 N-terminal amino acid residues) and DNA sequencing. The CS20EP was found to be a small basic cysteine-rich protein with a pI of 9.87 and 23.43% of hydrophobic amino acid residues. BLAST search in the NCBI database showed that the protein is new; however, it displays 48% sequence similarity with a hypothetical protein FGSG_10784 from F. graminearum strain PH-1. The contribution of CS20EP to elicitation of tomato defense responses resulting in wilt mitigating is discussed. PMID:26779237

  10. Endothelial Cell Sensitization by Death Receptor Fractions of an Anti-Dengue Nonstructural Protein 1 Antibody Induced Plasma Leakage, Coagulopathy, and Mortality in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Der-Shan; Chang, Ying-Chen; Lien, Te-Sheng; King, Chwan-Chuen; Shih, Yung-Luen; Huang, Hsuan-Shun; Wang, Teng-Yi; Li, Chen-Ru; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Hsu, Ping-Ning; Chang, Hsin-Hou

    2015-09-15

    The mechanisms leading to the life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) remain elusive. DHF preferentially occurs during secondary dengue infections, suggesting that aberrant immune responses are involved in its development. We previously demonstrated that the autoantibodies elicited by dengue virus (DENV) nonstructural protein 1 (NS1; anti-NS1 Igs) induce plasma leakage and mortality in mice with warfarinized anticoagulant suppression. However, the involved pathogenic Ig fractions of anti-NS1 Igs remain unclear. In this study, the autoreactive Igs in patients with DHF and in NS1-immunized rabbits crossreacted with TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor 1 (death receptor [DR]4). Challenges with the DENV in a subcytotoxic dose sensitized endothelial cells to apoptosis. Treatments with the autoantibodies induced proapoptotic activities and suppressed the surface expression of endothelial anticoagulant thrombomodulin. Combined treatments comprising the DENV and DR4 affinity-purified fractions of anti-NS1 IgGs (anti-NS1-DR4 Ig), but not preimmune control IgGs, in subcytotoxic doses led to apoptosis in endothelial cells. Treatments with the anti-NS1-DR4 Ig led to plasma leakage, coagulopathy, and morality in mice with warfarinized anticoagulant suppression. These results suggest that DR4-induced endothelial cell sensitization through NS1-elicited autoantibodies exacerbates anticoagulant suppression, vascular injury, and plasma leakage. Detecting and blocking anti-DR Igs in patients may be novel strategies for managing severe DENV infection. PMID:26259584

  11. T-Coffee: a web server for the multiple sequence alignment of protein and RNA sequences using structural information and homology extension

    PubMed Central

    Di Tommaso, Paolo; Moretti, Sebastien; Xenarios, Ioannis; Orobitg, Miquel; Montanyola, Alberto; Chang, Jia-Ming; Taly, Jean-François; Notredame, Cedric

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a new interface for T-Coffee, a consistency-based multiple sequence alignment program. This interface provides an easy and intuitive access to the most popular functionality of the package. These include the default T-Coffee mode for protein and nucleic acid sequences, the M-Coffee mode that allows combining the output of any other aligners, and template-based modes of T-Coffee that deliver high accuracy alignments while using structural or homology derived templates. These three available template modes are Expresso for the alignment of protein with a known 3D-Structure, R-Coffee to align RNA sequences with conserved secondary structures and PSI-Coffee to accurately align distantly related sequences using homology extension. The new server benefits from recent improvements of the T-Coffee algorithm and can align up to 150 sequences as long as 10 000 residues and is available from both http://www.tcoffee.org and its main mirror http://tcoffee.crg.cat. PMID:21558174

  12. Safety evaluation of a whey protein fraction containing a concentrated amount of naturally occurring TGF-β2.

    PubMed

    Forster, Roy; Bourtourault, Michel; Chung, Yong Joo; Silvano, Jérémy; Sire, Guillaume; Spezia, François; Puel, Caroline; Descotes, Jacques; Mikogami, Takashi

    2014-08-01

    TM0601p is a whey protein isolate derived from cow milk, containing a concentrated amount of transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2), and is intended for nutritional use in infants and adults. In vivo and in vitro studies have been performed to evaluate the safety of this product. In a 13-week toxicity study, treatment of adult Sprague-Dawley rats by gavage at up to 2000mg/kg/day did not result in any significant findings other than minor non-adverse changes in urinary parameters in females. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) was established as 2000mg/kg/day. In a juvenile toxicity study, rat pups received 600mg/kg/day by gavage from postnatal day (PND) 7 to PND 49. Transient lower bodyweight gain in the pre-weaning period was attributed to gastrointestinal effects of the viscous test material; following weaning, bodyweight gain was comparable to the vehicle controls. Reduced eosinophil counts and changes in urinary parameters (females) were recorded in treated pups at PND 49, and higher thymus weights were recorded in males only at the end of the recovery period (Day 77). None of the findings were considered adverse. There were no other significant findings and the NOAEL was established as 600mg/kg/day. No evidence of genotoxicity was seen in the bacterial reverse mutation test or the in vitro micronucleus test. Overall the results obtained present a reassuring safety profile for TM0601p. PMID:24842704

  13. Herbal adaptogens combined with protein fractions from bovine colostrum and hen egg yolk reduce liver TNF-α expression and protein carbonylation in Western diet feeding in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We examined if a purported anti-inflammatory supplement (AF) abrogated Western-diet (WD)-induced liver pathology in rats. AF contained: 1) protein concentrates from bovine colostrum and avian egg yolk; 2) herbal adaptogens and antioxidants; and 3) acetyl-L-carnitine. Methods Nine month-old male Brown Norway rats were allowed ad libitum access to WD for 41–43 days and randomly assigned to WD + AF feeding twice daily for the last 31–33 days (n = 8), or WD and water-placebo feeding twice daily for the last 31–33 days (n = 8). Rats fed a low-fat/low-sucrose diet (CTL, n = 6) for 41–43 days and administered a water-placebo twice daily for the last 31–33 days were also studied. Twenty-four hours following the last gavage-feed, liver samples were analyzed for: a) select mRNAs (via RT-PCR) as well as genome-wide mRNA expression patterns (via RNA-seq); b) lipid deposition; and, c) protein carbonyl and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Serum was also examined for TAC, 8-isoprostane and clinical chemistry markers. Results WD + AF rats experienced a reduction in liver Tnf-α mRNA (-2.8-fold, p < 0.01). Serum and liver TAC was lower in WD + AF versus WD and CTL rats (p < 0.05), likely due to exogenous antioxidant ingredients provided through AF as evidenced by a tendency for mitochondrial SOD2 mRNA to increase in WD + AF versus CTL rats (p = 0.07). Liver fat deposition nor liver protein carbonyl content differed between WD + AF versus WD rats, although liver protein carbonyls tended to be lower in WD + AF versus CTL rats (p = 0.08). RNA-seq revealed that 19 liver mRNAs differed between WD + AF versus WD when both groups were compared with CTL rats (+/- 1.5-fold, p < 0.01). Bioinformatics suggest that AF prevented WD-induced alterations in select genes related to the transport and metabolism of carbohydrates in favor of select genes related to lipid transport and metabolism. Finally, serum clinical

  14. Fractionation of Thylakoid Membranes with the Nonionic Detergent Octyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside: RESOLUTION OF CHLOROPHYLL-PROTEIN COMPLEX II INTO TWO CHLOROPHYLL-PROTEIN COMPLEXES.

    PubMed

    Camm, E L; Green, B R

    1980-09-01

    The detergent octyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside (30 millimolar in 2 millimolar Tris-maleate, pH 7.0) preferentially extracts complexes containing protein and chlorophylls a plus b (CP) from spinach, leaving a residue highly enriched in CP I (P700-chlorophyll a protein). Use of the detergent results in a relatively gentle extraction since little free chlorophyll is formed and since sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis (on 10% acrylamide) of the extract also reveals the presence of two minor chlorophyll a complexes (apparent molecular weight, 47,000 and 43,000) instead of the usual single complex. The major complex preserved is CP 64, a chlorophyll a/b complex (apparent molecular weight, 64,000) which is an oligomer of another chlorophyll a/b complex, CP 27, the light-harvesting complex (apparent molecular weight, 27,000). Dissociation of each complex reveals two polypeptides (molecular weight, 32,000 and 28,000) and limited proteolysis confirms that those of CP 64 have the same structure as those of CP 27. An additional chlorophyll a/b complex (apparent molecular weight, 29,000) is clearly separable from CP 27, and differs from it and CP 64 in having a higher chlorophyll a/b ratio and a single polypeptide (molecular weight, 29,000) which differs structurally from those of the other complexes. PMID:16661449

  15. Role of the C-terminal Extension of Formin 2 in Its Activation by Spire Protein and Processive Assembly of Actin Filaments.

    PubMed

    Montaville, Pierre; Kühn, Sonja; Compper, Christel; Carlier, Marie-France

    2016-02-12

    Formin 2 (Fmn2), a member of the FMN family of formins, plays an important role in early development. This formin cooperates with profilin and Spire, a WASP homology domain 2 (WH2) repeat protein, to stimulate assembly of a dynamic cytoplasmic actin meshwork that facilitates translocation of the meiotic spindle in asymmetric division of mouse oocytes. The kinase-like non-catalytic domain (KIND) of Spire directly interacts with the C-terminal extension of the formin homology domain 2 (FH2) domain of Fmn2, called FSI. This direct interaction is required for the synergy between the two proteins in actin assembly. We have recently demonstrated how Spire, which caps barbed ends via its WH2 domains, activates Fmn2. Fmn2 by itself associates very poorly to filament barbed ends but is rapidly recruited to Spire-capped barbed ends via the KIND domain, and it subsequently displaces Spire from the barbed end to elicit rapid processive assembly from profilin·actin. Here, we address the mechanism by which Spire and Fmn2 compete at barbed ends and the role of FSI in orchestrating this competition as well as in the processivity of Fmn2. We have combined microcalorimetric, fluorescence, and hydrodynamic binding assays, as well as bulk solution and single filament measurements of actin assembly, to show that removal of FSI converts Fmn2 into a Capping Protein. This activity is mimicked by association of KIND to Fmn2. In addition, FSI binds actin at filament barbed ends as a weak capper and plays a role in displacing the WH2 domains of Spire from actin, thus allowing the association of actin-binding regions of FH2 to the barbed end. PMID:26668326

  16. Variations in protein and fat contents and their fractions in milk from two species fed different forages.

    PubMed

    Kholif, S M; El-Shewy, A A; Morsy, T A; Abd El-Rahman, H H

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed at determining the variations in milk constituents which could be varied by feed and animal species. To achieve this goal, two groups of homoparity Baladi cows and Egyptian buffaloes (n = 20 per species) were used. Each group was divided into two subgroups (n = 10): subgroup I received legume forage (Egyptian clover) and subgroup II received grass forage (sorghum forage). All experimental animals were fed the diet consisting of concentrate, forage and rice straw as 50, 25 and 25% of dry matter intake respectively. Milk samples were taken for analysis. The trial lasted until the 3rd month of parturition. The main results indicated that lactating cattle fed legume forage significantly (p ≤ 0.01) had more content of casein nitrogen (513 mg/100 ml milk), lower content of glutamic acid (23.56 g/100 g milk protein) and more content of cis-9, trans-11 18:2 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) (0.77 g/100 g milk fat) compared with 433, 26.67 and 0.53, respectively, for cattle fed grass forage. With regard to the species effect, results showed that buffalo milk appeared to contain significantly higher (p ≤ 0.01) contents of casein nitrogen, phenylalanine, glutamic and arachidonic acid compared with cow's milk. However, the latter was significantly (p ≤ 0.01) more in the cis-9, trans-11CLA (0.59 g/100 g milk fat) than that in buffalo milk (0.47 g/100 g milk fat). The results revealed that not only forage type played a critical role in determining the variations of milk nitrogen distribution, milk amino acids and fatty acids but also animal species had a significant effect on these parameters. PMID:25040448

  17. Modern plasma fractionation.

    PubMed

    Burnouf, Thierry

    2007-04-01

    Protein products fractionated from human plasma are an essential class of therapeutics used, often as the only available option, in the prevention, management, and treatment of life-threatening conditions resulting from trauma, congenital deficiencies, immunologic disorders, or infections. Modern plasma product production technology remains largely based on the ethanol fractionation process, but much has evolved in the last few years to improve product purity, to enhance the recovery of immunoglobulin G, and to isolate new plasma proteins, such as alpha1-protease inhibitor, von Willebrand factor, and protein C. Because of the human origin of the starting material and the pooling of 10,000 to 50,000 donations required for industrial processing, the major risk associated to plasma products is the transmission of blood-borne infectious agents. A complete set of measures--and, most particularly, the use of dedicated viral inactivation and removal treatments--has been implemented throughout the production chain of fractionated plasma products over the last 20 years to ensure optimal safety, in particular, and not exclusively, against HIV, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus. In this review, we summarize the practices of the modern plasma fractionation industry from the collection of the raw plasma material to the industrial manufacture of fractionated products. We describe the quality requirements of plasma for fractionation and the various treatments applied for the inactivation and removal of blood-borne infectious agents and provide examples of methods used for the purification of the various classes of plasma protein therapies. We also highlight aspects of the good manufacturing practices and the regulatory environment that govern the whole chain of production. In a regulated and professional environment, fractionated plasma products manufactured by modern processes are certainly among the lowest-risk therapeutic biological products in use today. PMID:17397761

  18. Fractional oscillator.

    PubMed

    Stanislavsky, A A

    2004-11-01

    We consider a fractional oscillator which is a generalization of the conventional linear oscillator in the framework of fractional calculus. It is interpreted as an ensemble average of ordinary harmonic oscillators governed by a stochastic time arrow. The intrinsic absorption of the fractional oscillator results from the full contribution of the harmonic oscillator ensemble: these oscillators differ a little from each other in frequency so that each response is compensated by an antiphase response of another harmonic oscillator. This allows one to draw a parallel in the dispersion analysis for media described by a fractional oscillator and an ensemble of ordinary harmonic oscillators with damping. The features of this analysis are discussed. PMID:15600586

  19. AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FARQUHAR, R.N.

    AUSTRALIAN AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION HAS LONG EMPHASIZED TECHNICAL ADVISORY SERVICE AT THE EXPENSE OF THE SOCIOECONOMIC ASPECTS OF FARM PRODUCTION AND FARM LIFE. ONLY IN TASMANIA HAS FARM MANAGEMENT BEEN STRESSED. DEMANDS FOR THE WHOLE-FARM APPROACH HAVE PRODUCED A TREND TOWARD GENERALISM FOR DISTRICT OFFICERS IN MOST STATES. THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT,…

  20. Beef Species Symposium: an assessment of the 1996 Beef NRC: metabolizable protein supply and demand and effectiveness of model performance prediction of beef females within extensive grazing systems.

    PubMed

    Waterman, R C; Caton, J S; Löest, C A; Petersen, M K; Roberts, A J

    2014-07-01

    Interannual variation of forage quantity and quality driven by precipitation events influence beef livestock production systems within the Southern and Northern Plains and Pacific West, which combined represent 60% (approximately 17.5 million) of the total beef cows in the United States. The beef cattle requirements published by the NRC are an important tool and excellent resource for both professionals and producers to use when implementing feeding practices and nutritional programs within the various production systems. The objectives of this paper include evaluation of the 1996 Beef NRC model in terms of effectiveness in predicting extensive range beef cow performance within arid and semiarid environments using available data sets, identifying model inefficiencies that could be refined to improve the precision of predicting protein supply and demand for range beef cows, and last, providing recommendations for future areas of research. An important addition to the current Beef NRC model would be to allow users to provide region-specific forage characteristics and the ability to describe supplement composition, amount, and delivery frequency. Beef NRC models would then need to be modified to account for the N recycling that occurs throughout a supplementation interval and the impact that this would have on microbial efficiency and microbial protein supply. The Beef NRC should also consider the role of ruminal and postruminal supply and demand of specific limiting AA. Additional considerations should include the partitioning effects of nitrogenous compounds under different physiological production stages (e.g., lactation, pregnancy, and periods of BW loss). The intent of information provided is to aid revision of the Beef NRC by providing supporting material for changes and identifying gaps in existing scientific literature where future research is needed to enhance the predictive precision and application of the Beef NRC models. PMID:24398839

  1. Radiating subdispersive fractional optical solitons.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, J; Espinosa, A; Rodríguez, R F; Malomed, B A

    2014-09-01

    It was recently found [Fujioka et al., Phys. Lett. A 374, 1126 (2010)] that the propagation of solitary waves can be described by a fractional extension of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation which involves a temporal fractional derivative (TFD) of order α > 2. In the present paper, we show that there is also another fractional extension of the NLS equation which contains a TFD with α < 2, and in this case, the new equation describes the propagation of radiating solitons. We show that the emission of the radiation (when α < 2) is explained by resonances at various frequencies between the pulses and the linear modes of the system. It is found that the new fractional NLS equation can be derived from a suitable Lagrangian density, and a fractional Noether's theorem can be applied to it, thus predicting the conservation of the Hamiltonian, momentum and energy. PMID:25273201

  2. Radiating subdispersive fractional optical solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, J.; Espinosa, A.; Rodríguez, R. F.; Malomed, B. A.

    2014-09-01

    It was recently found [Fujioka et al., Phys. Lett. A 374, 1126 (2010)] that the propagation of solitary waves can be described by a fractional extension of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation which involves a temporal fractional derivative (TFD) of order α > 2. In the present paper, we show that there is also another fractional extension of the NLS equation which contains a TFD with α < 2, and in this case, the new equation describes the propagation of radiating solitons. We show that the emission of the radiation (when α < 2) is explained by resonances at various frequencies between the pulses and the linear modes of the system. It is found that the new fractional NLS equation can be derived from a suitable Lagrangian density, and a fractional Noether's theorem can be applied to it, thus predicting the conservation of the Hamiltonian, momentum and energy.

  3. Radiating subdispersive fractional optical solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Fujioka, J. Espinosa, A.; Rodríguez, R. F.; Malomed, B. A.

    2014-09-01

    It was recently found [Fujioka et al., Phys. Lett. A 374, 1126 (2010)] that the propagation of solitary waves can be described by a fractional extension of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation which involves a temporal fractional derivative (TFD) of order α > 2. In the present paper, we show that there is also another fractional extension of the NLS equation which contains a TFD with α < 2, and in this case, the new equation describes the propagation of radiating solitons. We show that the emission of the radiation (when α < 2) is explained by resonances at various frequencies between the pulses and the linear modes of the system. It is found that the new fractional NLS equation can be derived from a suitable Lagrangian density, and a fractional Noether's theorem can be applied to it, thus predicting the conservation of the Hamiltonian, momentum and energy.

  4. Antiviral, immunomodulatory, and free radical scavenging activities of a protein-enriched fraction from the larvae of the housefly, Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hui; Wang, Furong; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Lingyao; Lei, Chaoliang

    2013-01-01

    In our previous study, protein-enriched fraction (PEF) that was isolated from the larvae of the housefly, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae), showed excellent hepatoprotective activity as well as the potential for clinical application in therapy for liver diseases. In this study, antiviral, immunomodulatory, and free radical scavenging activities of PEF were evaluated. The antiviral results demonstrated that PEF inhibited the infection of avian influenza virus H9N2 and had a virucidal effect against the multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus of the alfalfa looper, Autographa californica Speyer (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in vitro. The mortality of silkworm larve in a PEF treatment group decreased significantly compared with a negative control. PEF showed excellent scavenging activity for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and superoxide anion radicals, which were similar to those of ascorbic acid. The imunomodulatory results suggested that PEF could effectively improve immune function in experimental mice. Our results indicated that PEF could possibly be used for the prophylaxis and treatment of diseases caused by avian influenza virus infection. In addition, PEF with virucidal activity against insect viruses might provide useful for the development of antimicrobial breeding technology for economically important insects. As a natural product from insects, PEF could be a potential source for the discovery of potent antioxidant and immunomodulatory agents. PMID:24735244

  5. Antiviral, Immunomodulatory, and Free Radical Scavenging Activities of a Protein-Enriched Fraction from the Larvae of the Housefly, Musca domestica

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Hui; Wang, Furong; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Lingyao; Lei, Chaoliang

    2013-01-01

    In our previous study, protein-enriched fraction (PEF) that was isolated from the larvae of the housefly, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae), showed excellent hepatoprotective activity as well as the potential for clinical application in therapy for liver diseases. In this study, antiviral, immunomodulatory, and free radical scavenging activities of PEF were evaluated. The antiviral results demonstrated that PEF inhibited the infection of avian influenza virus H9N2 and had a virucidal effect against the multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus of the alfalfa looper, Autographa californica Speyer (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in vitro. The mortality of silkworm larve in a PEF treatment group decreased significantly compared with a negative control. PEF showed excellent scavenging activity for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and superoxide anion radicals, which were similar to those of ascorbic acid. The imunomodulatory results suggested that PEF could effectively improve immune function in experimental mice. Our results indicated that PEF could possibly be used for the prophylaxis and treatment of diseases caused by avian influenza virus infection. In addition, PEF with virucidal activity against insect viruses might provide useful for the development of antimicrobial breeding technology for economically important insects. As a natural product from insects, PEF could be a potential source for the discovery of potent antioxidant and immunomodulatory agents. PMID:24735244

  6. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  7. Prion Protein and Stage Specific Embryo Antigen 1 as Selection Markers to Enrich the Fraction of Murine Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Nobuhito; Nakayama, Yuji; Nakazawa, Natsumi; Yoshida, Akio; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Shirayoshi, Yasuaki

    2016-01-01

    Background The prion protein (PrP) might be useful as a tool to collect cardiac progenitor cells derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells. It is also possible that PrP+ cells include undifferentiated cells with a capacity to develop into tumors. Methods PrP+ cells isolated from embryoid bodies (EB) formed by mouse AB1 ES cells were examined using RT–PCR analysis and clonogeneic cell assay. To assess their potential to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, Nkx2.5GFP/+ (hcgp7) cells, another ES cell line that carries the GFP reporter gene in the Nkx2.5 loci, were used. Results PrP+ cells isolated from EB of day 7 and 14 did not express pluripotency markers, but expressed cardiac cell markers, while PrP+ cells isolated from EB of day 21 expressed pluripotency markers. Cultured PrP+ cells isolated from EB of day 21 expressed pluripotency markers to form colonies, whereas those isolated from EB of day 7 and 14 did not. To exclude proliferating cells from PrP+ cells, stage specific embryo antigen 1 (SSEA1) was employed as a second marker. PrP+/SSEA1– cells did not proliferate and expressed cardiac cell markers, while PrP+/SSEA1+ did proliferate. Conclusion PrP+ cells isolated from EB included undifferentiated cells in day 21. PrP+/SSEA1– cells included cardiomyoctes, suggesting PrP and SSEA1 may be useful as markers to enrich the fraction of cardiomyocytes. PMID:27493483

  8. Levels and Age Dependency of Neurofilament Light and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein in Healthy Individuals and Their Relation to the Brain Parenchymal Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Vågberg, Mattias; Norgren, Niklas; Dring, Ann; Lindqvist, Thomas; Birgander, Richard; Zetterberg, Henrik; Svenningsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Background Neurofilament light (NFL) and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) are integral parts of the axonal and astrocytal cytoskeletons respectively and are released into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in cases of cellular damage. In order to interpret the levels of these biomarkers in disease states, knowledge on normal levels in the healthy is required. Another biomarker for neurodegeneration is brain atrophy, commonly measured as brain parenchymal fraction (BPF) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Potential correlations between levels of NFL, GFAP and BPF in healthy individuals have not been investigated. Objectives To present levels of NFL and GFAP in healthy individuals stratified for age, and investigate the correlation between them as well as their correlation with BPF. Methods The CSF was analysed in 53 healthy volunteers aged 21 to 70 (1 sample missing for GFAP analysis) and 48 of the volunteers underwent determination of BPF using MRI. Results Mean (±SD) NFL was 355 ng/L (±214), mean GFAP was 421 ng/L (±129) and mean BPF was 0.867 (±0.035). All three biomarkers correlated with age. NFL also correlated with both GFAP and BPF. When controlled for age, only the correlation between NFL and GFAP retained statistical significance. Conclusions This study presents data on age-stratified levels of NFL and GFAP in the CSF of healthy individuals. There is a correlation between levels of NFL and GFAP and both increase with age. A correlation between NFL and BPF was also found, but did not retain statistical significance if controlled for age. PMID:26317831

  9. Francisella tularensis IglG Belongs to a Novel Family of PAAR-Like T6SS Proteins and Harbors a Unique N-terminal Extension Required for Virulence.

    PubMed

    Rigard, Mélanie; Bröms, Jeanette E; Mosnier, Amandine; Hologne, Maggy; Martin, Amandine; Lindgren, Lena; Punginelli, Claire; Lays, Claire; Walker, Olivier; Charbit, Alain; Telouk, Philippe; Conlan, Wayne; Terradot, Laurent; Sjöstedt, Anders; Henry, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The virulence of Francisella tularensis, the etiological agent of tularemia, relies on an atypical type VI secretion system (T6SS) encoded by a genomic island termed the Francisella Pathogenicity Island (FPI). While the importance of the FPI in F. tularensis virulence is clearly established, the precise role of most of the FPI-encoded proteins remains to be deciphered. In this study, using highly virulent F. tularensis strains and the closely related species F. novicida, IglG was characterized as a protein featuring a unique α-helical N-terminal extension and a domain of unknown function (DUF4280), present in more than 250 bacterial species. Three dimensional modeling of IglG and of the DUF4280 consensus protein sequence indicates that these proteins adopt a PAAR-like fold, suggesting they could cap the T6SS in a similar way as the recently described PAAR proteins. The newly identified PAAR-like motif is characterized by four conserved cysteine residues, also present in IglG, which may bind a metal atom. We demonstrate that IglG binds metal ions and that each individual cysteine is required for T6SS-dependent secretion of IglG and of the Hcp homologue, IglC and for the F. novicida intracellular life cycle. In contrast, the Francisella-specific N-terminal α-helical extension is not required for IglG secretion, but is critical for F. novicida virulence and for the interaction of IglG with another FPI-encoded protein, IglF. Altogether, our data suggest that IglG is a PAAR-like protein acting as a bi-modal protein that may connect the tip of the Francisella T6SS with a putative T6SS effector, IglF. PMID:27602570

  10. Non-extensive radiobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Sotolongo-Grau, O.; Rodriguez-Perez, D.; Antoranz, J. C.; Sotolongo-Costa, O.

    2011-03-14

    The expression of survival factors for radiation damaged cells is based on probabilistic assumptions and experimentally fitted for each tumor, radiation and conditions. Here we show how the simplest of these radiobiological models can be derived from the maximum entropy principle of the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs expression. We extend this derivation using the Tsallis entropy and a cutoff hypothesis, motivated by clinical observations. A generalization of the exponential, the logarithm and the product to a non-extensive framework, provides a simple formula for the survival fraction corresponding to the application of several radiation doses on a living tissue. The obtained expression shows a remarkable agreement with the experimental data found in the literature, also providing a new interpretation of some of the parameters introduced anew. It is also shown how the presented formalism may have direct application in radiotherapy treatment optimization through the definition of the potential effect difference, simply calculated between the tumour and the surrounding tissue.

  11. Non-extensive radiobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotolongo-Grau, O.; Rodriguez-Perez, D.; Antoranz, J. C.; Sotolongo-Costa, O.

    2011-03-01

    The expression of survival factors for radiation damaged cells is based on probabilistic assumptions and experimentally fitted for each tumor, radiation and conditions. Here we show how the simplest of these radiobiological models can be derived from the maximum entropy principle of the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs expression. We extend this derivation using the Tsallis entropy and a cutoff hypothesis, motivated by clinical observations. A generalization of the exponential, the logarithm and the product to a non-extensive framework, provides a simple formula for the survival fraction corresponding to the application of several radiation doses on a living tissue. The obtained expression shows a remarkable agreement with the experimental data found in the literature, also providing a new interpretation of some of the parameters introduced anew. It is also shown how the presented formalism may have direct application in radiotherapy treatment optimization through the definition of the potential effect difference, simply calculated between the tumour and the surrounding tissue.

  12. Human gut flora-fermented nondigestible fraction from cooked bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) modifies protein expression associated with apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and proliferation in human adenocarcinoma colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Campos-Vega, Rocio; García-Gasca, Teresa; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramón; Ramos-Gomez, Minerva; Oomah, B Dave; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2012-12-26

    Metabolism of the nondigested fraction (NDF) from common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) by the human gut flora (hgf) produces short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that may benefit cancer by reducing colorectal tumor risks. This paper reports the effect of fermentation products (FP) by hgf (FP-hgf) from NDF of cooked beans on survival and protein expression associated with apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and proliferation in human adenocarcinoma colon cancer cells. FP-hgf was the only inoculum eliciting butyrate production after 24 h of NDF fermentation using different bacterial sources. FP-hgf inhibited HT-29 cell growth and modulated protein expression associated with apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and proliferation, as well as morphological changes linked to apoptosis evaluated by TUNEL and hematoxylin and eosin stains, confirming previous results on gene expression. The current results suggest that fermentation of NDF from common beans can elicit beneficial chemoprotective effects in colon cancer by modulating protein expression in HT-29 cells. PMID:23194196

  13. Evaluation of adjuvant activity of fractions derived from Agaricus blazei, when in association with the recombinant LiHyp1 protein, to protect against visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    de Jesus Pereira, Nathália Cristina; Régis, Wiliam César Bento; Costa, Lourena Emanuele; de Oliveira, Jamil Silvano; da Silva, Alanna Gomes; Martins, Vivian Tamietti; Duarte, Mariana Costa; de Souza, José Roberto Rodrigues; Lage, Paula Sousa; Schneider, Mônica Santos; Melo, Maria Norma; Soto, Manuel; Soares, Sandra Aguiar; Tavares, Carlos Alberto Pereira; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel Angel; Coelho, Eduardo Antonio Ferraz

    2015-06-01

    The development of effective prophylactic strategies to prevent leishmaniasis has become a high priority. No less important than the choice of an antigen, the association of an appropriate adjuvant is necessary to achieve a successful vaccination, as the majority of the tested antigens contain limited immunogenic properties, and need to be supplemented with immune response adjuvants in order to boost their immunogenicity. However, few effective adjuvants that can be used against leishmaniasis exist on the market today; therefore, it is possible to speculate that the research aiming to identify new adjuvants could be considered relevant. Recently, Agaricus blazei extracts have proved to be useful in enhancing the immune response to DNA vaccines against some diseases. This was based on the Th1 adjuvant activity of the polysaccharide-rich fractions from this mushroom. In this context, the present study evaluated purified fractions derived from Agaricus blazei as Th1 adjuvants through in vitro assays of their immune stimulation of spleen cells derived from naive BALB/c mice. Two of the tested six fractions (namely F2 and F4) were characterized as polysaccharide-rich fractions, and were able to induce high levels of IFN-γ, and low levels of IL-4 and IL-10 in the spleen cells. The efficacy of adjuvant action against L. infantum was evaluated in BALB/c mice, with these fractions being administered together with a recombinant antigen, LiHyp1, which was previously evaluated as a vaccine candidate, associated with saponin, against visceral leishmaniasis (VL). The associations between LiHyp1/F2 and LiHyp1/F4 were able to induce an in vivo Th1 response, which was primed by high levels of IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF, by low levels of IL-4 and IL-10; as well as by a predominance of IgG2a antibodies in the vaccinated animals. After infection, the immune profile was maintained, and the vaccines proved to be effective against L. infantum. The immune stimulatory effects in the

  14. The use of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and 18F-FDG PET/CT in the evaluation of duodenal neuroendocrine tumor with atypical and extensive metastasis responding dramatically to a single fraction of PRRT with 177Lu-DOTATATE.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Abhyankar, Amit

    2014-12-01

    This report describes a case of extensive diffuse bone marrow involvement with bilateral breast metastases from duodenal neuroendocrine tumor giving rise to a superscan-like appearance on somatostatin receptor-targeted (99m)Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide-TOC scintigraphy. The metastatic lesions demonstrated partial concordance with (18)F-FDG PET/CT findings, signifying varying tumor biology and heterogeneity among metastatic lesions in the same individual, as illustrated with a dual-tracer approach. There was a dramatic symptomatic and biochemical response and better health-related quality of life with a single fraction of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with (177)Lu-DOTATATE, and radiologically there was stable disease at that point. PMID:25190735

  15. Distribution of selected essential (Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Se, and Zn) and nonessential (Cd, Pb) trace elements among protein fractions from hepatic cytosol of European chub (Squalius cephalus L.).

    PubMed

    Krasnići, Nesrete; Dragun, Zrinka; Erk, Marijana; Raspor, Biserka

    2013-04-01

    Association of selected essential (Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Se, and Zn) and nonessential (Cd, Pb) trace elements with cytosolic proteins of different molecular masses was described for the liver of European chub (Squalius cephalus) from weakly contaminated Sutla River in Croatia. The principal aim was to establish basic trace element distributions among protein fractions characteristic for the fish living in the conditions of low metal exposure in the water. The fractionation of chub hepatic cytosols was carried out by size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC; Superdex™ 200 10/300 GL column), and measurements were performed by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR ICP-MS). Elution profiles of essential elements were mostly characterized by broad peaks covering wide range of molecular masses, as a sign of incorporation of essential elements in various proteins within hepatic cytosol. Exceptions were Cu and Fe, with elution profiles characterized by sharp, narrow peaks indicating their probable association with specific proteins, metallothionein (MT), and ferritin, respectively. The main feature of the elution profile of nonessential metal Cd was also single sharp, narrow peak, coinciding with MT elution time, and indicating almost complete Cd detoxification by MT under the conditions of weak metal exposure in the water (dissolved Cd concentration ≤0.3 μg L(-1)). Contrary, nonessential metal Pb was observed to bind to wide spectrum of proteins, mostly of medium molecular masses (30-100 kDa), after exposure to dissolved Pb concentration of ~1 μg L(-1). The obtained information within this study presents the starting point for identification and characterization of specific metal/metalloid-binding proteins in chub hepatic cytosol, which could be further used as markers of metal/metalloid exposure or effect on fish. PMID:22886752

  16. Serologically defined Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus larval antigens in BmLF3, a partially pure Sephacryl S-300 fraction of crude larval proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is the second in a series providing a database of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus larval proteins that elicit a humoral immune response in cattle as a result of natural ectoparasite infestation. Larval proteins of R. microplus are complex and the profile is not dominated by any majo...

  17. [Analysis of the connection between the level of protein fractions and immunoglobulins in blood serum with irradiation in nuclear power enterprise workers].

    PubMed

    Tel'nov, V I

    1996-01-01

    989 workers of atomic industry at the age from 35 to 78 years old subjected to the general external gamma radiation and incorporation of plutonium 239 in a wide range of doses about 17-40 years ago have been examined for the protein indices with the radiation effect bearing in mind nine non-radiation factors. The step-by-step regression analysis revealed a positive linear link for the total protein level, absolute content of alpha-I-globulins with the total dose of external gamma radiation. Increasing of serum proteins entropy, correlated with external radiation by protein shifts effect, had not coincided with its age increasing. The influence of plutonium-239 incorporation on the examined protein parameters was not found. PMID:9254521

  18. The Ebola Virus matrix protein, VP40, requires phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) for extensive oligomerization at the plasma membrane and viral egress

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kristen A.; Taghon, Geoffrey J. F.; Scott, Jordan L.; Stahelin, Robert V.

    2016-01-01

    VP40 is one of eight proteins encoded by the Ebola Virus (EBOV) and serves as the primary matrix protein, forming virus like particles (VLPs) from mammalian cells without the need for other EBOV proteins. While VP40 is required for viral assembly and budding from host cells during infection, the mechanisms that target VP40 to the plasma membrane are not well understood. Phosphatidylserine is required for VP40 plasma membrane binding, VP40 hexamer formation, and VLP egress, However, PS also becomes exposed on the outer membrane leaflet at sites of VP40 budding, raising the question of how VP40 maintains an interaction with the plasma membrane inner leaflet when PS is flipped to the opposite side. To address this question, cellular and in vitro assays were employed to determine if phosphoinositides are important for efficient VP40 localization to the plasma membrane. Cellular studies demonstrated that PI(4,5)P2 was an important component of VP40 assembly at the plasma membrane and subsequent virus like particle formation. Additionally, PI(4,5)P2 was required for formation of extensive oligomers of VP40, suggesting PS and PI(4,5)P2 have different roles in VP40 assembly where PS regulates formation of hexamers from VP40 dimers and PI(4,5)P2 stabilizes and/or induces extensive VP40 oligomerization at the plasma membrane. PMID:26753796

  19. Proteomic analysis of lettuce seed germination and thermoinhibition by sampling of individual seeds at germination and removal of storage proteins by polyethylene glycol fractionation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Qing; Song, Bin-Yan; Deng, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Yue; Liu, Shu-Jun; Møller, Ian Max; Song, Song-Quan

    2015-04-01

    Germination and thermoinhibition in lettuce (Lactuca sativa 'Jianyexianfeng No. 1') seeds were investigated by a proteomic comparison among dry seeds, germinated seeds at 15°C, at 15°C after imbibition at 25°C for 48 h, or at 25°C in KNO3 (all sampled individually at germination), and ungerminated seeds at 25°C, a thermoinhibitory temperature. Before two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis, storage proteins (greater than 50% of total extractable protein) were removed by polyethylene glycol precipitation, which significantly improved the detection of less abundant proteins on two-dimensional gels. A total of 108 protein spots were identified to change more than 2-fold (P<0.05) in abundance in at least one germination treatment. Nineteen proteins increasing and one protein decreasing in abundance during germination had higher abundance in germinated 15°C, 15°C after imbibition at 25°C for 48 h, and 25°C in KNO3 seeds than in ungerminated 25°C seeds. Gene expression of 12 of those proteins correlated well with the protein accumulation. Methionine metabolism, ethylene production, lipid mobilization, cell elongation, and detoxification of aldehydes were revealed to be potentially related to lettuce seed germination and thermoinhibition. Accumulation of three proteins and expression of five genes participating in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis correlated positively with seed germinability. Inhibition of this pathway by lovastatin delayed seed germination and increased the sensitivity of germination to abscisic acid. MVA pathway-derived products, cytokinins, partially reversed the lovastatin inhibition of germination and released seed thermoinhibition at 25°C. We conclude that the MVA pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis is involved in lettuce seed germination and thermoinhibition. PMID:25736209

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Lettuce Seed Germination and Thermoinhibition by Sampling of Individual Seeds at Germination and Removal of Storage Proteins by Polyethylene Glycol Fractionation1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bin-Yan; Deng, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Yue; Liu, Shu-Jun; Møller, Ian Max; Song, Song-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Germination and thermoinhibition in lettuce (Lactuca sativa ‘Jianyexianfeng No. 1’) seeds were investigated by a proteomic comparison among dry seeds, germinated seeds at 15°C, at 15°C after imbibition at 25°C for 48 h, or at 25°C in KNO3 (all sampled individually at germination), and ungerminated seeds at 25°C, a thermoinhibitory temperature. Before two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis, storage proteins (greater than 50% of total extractable protein) were removed by polyethylene glycol precipitation, which significantly improved the detection of less abundant proteins on two-dimensional gels. A total of 108 protein spots were identified to change more than 2-fold (P < 0.05) in abundance in at least one germination treatment. Nineteen proteins increasing and one protein decreasing in abundance during germination had higher abundance in germinated 15°C, 15°C after imbibition at 25°C for 48 h, and 25°C in KNO3 seeds than in ungerminated 25°C seeds. Gene expression of 12 of those proteins correlated well with the protein accumulation. Methionine metabolism, ethylene production, lipid mobilization, cell elongation, and detoxification of aldehydes were revealed to be potentially related to lettuce seed germination and thermoinhibition. Accumulation of three proteins and expression of five genes participating in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis correlated positively with seed germinability. Inhibition of this pathway by lovastatin delayed seed germination and increased the sensitivity of germination to abscisic acid. MVA pathway-derived products, cytokinins, partially reversed the lovastatin inhibition of germination and released seed thermoinhibition at 25°C. We conclude that the MVA pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis is involved in lettuce seed germination and thermoinhibition. PMID:25736209

  1. Specific synthesis of 5,5'-dicapsaicin by cell suspension cultures of capsicum annuum var. annuum (chili Jalapeño chigol) and their soluble and NaCl-extracted cell wall protein fractions.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Juárez, Víctor M; Ochoa-Alejo, Neftali; Lozoya-Gloria, Edmundo; Villarreal-Ortega, María L; Ariza-Castolo, Armando; Esparza-García, Fernando J; Calva-Calva, Graciano

    2004-02-25

    HPLC-UV, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and (1)H-(1)H COSY analyses revealed that exogenous capsaicin was specifically converted into 5,5'-dicapsaicin by both cell suspension cultures of Capsicum annuum var. annuum (chili Jalapeño chigol) and their soluble and NaCl-extracted cell wall protein fractions under oxidative conditions. In cell suspension cultures 5,5'-dicapsaicin was found only in biomass of capsaicin-fed cultures. This compound has not been detected before either in fresh fruits or in in vitro cultures of Capsicum. The transformation of capsaicin by different protein fractions revealed that most of the enzymatic activity was located in the NaCl-extracted, or ionic cell wall bound, protein, and that it was strictly dependent on H(2)O(2). These results might in part explain some previously described features of capsaicin production by in vitro cultures of Capsicum. The implications of the results regarding the catabolism of capsaicinoids are discussed. PMID:14969559

  2. ACUTE POSTNATAL EXPOSURE TO TRIETHYLTIN IN THE RAT: EFFECTS ON SPECIFIC PROTEIN COMPOSITION OF SUBCELLULAR FRACTIONS FROM DEVELOPING AND ADULT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The morphological maturation of the central nervous system is characterized by onto-genetic changes in protein associated with specific developmental processes. In this investigation the authors examined the effects of acute postnatal administration of triethyltin (TET) on the on...

  3. Comparison of an extender containing defined milk protein fractions with a skim milk-based extender for storage of equine semen at 5 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Pagl, Roland; Aurich, Jörg E; Müller-Schlösser, Frank; Kankofer, Marta; Aurich, Christine

    2006-09-15

    A problem of semen extenders based on milk or egg yolk is the fact that these biological products consist of a variety of substances. Extenders containing only components with clearly protective effects on spermatozoa would thus be an advantage. In this study, we have compared the effects of an extender containing defined caseinates and whey proteins only (EquiPro, defined milk protein extender) with skim milk extender on equine spermatozoa during cooled storage. The defined milk protein extender was used with and without the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). In a second experiment, semen was diluted with PBS or defined milk protein extender and was either stored directly or 90% of seminal plasma was removed by centrifugation and replaced by defined milk protein extender before storage. In both experiments, eight stallions were available for semen collections. Motility, velocity and membrane integrity of spermatozoa were determined by CASA immediately after semen processing and after 24, 48 and 72 h of storage at 5 degrees C. Total motility after 24 h of storage was lowest in semen diluted with PBS (p<0.05 versus all extenders). At 48 and 72 h, motility of spermatozoa in defined milk protein extender was significantly (p<0.05) higher than in PBS or skim milk extender. Velocity of spermatozoa after storage was highest in defined milk protein extender. Membrane integrity after storage was significantly (p<0.05) lower in semen diluted with PBS than in semen diluted with both extenders. Addition of NAC was without effect on the examined parameters. Centrifugation further increased the percentage of motile and membrane-intact spermatozoa in the defined milk protein extender (p<0.05). Velocity of spermatozoa in this extender was not negatively affected by centrifugation. PMID:16620943

  4. Novel β-Propeller of the BTB-Kelch Protein Krp1 Provides a Binding Site for Lasp-1 That Is Necessary for Pseudopodial Extension*♦

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Christopher H.; McGarry, Lynn C.; Spence, Heather J.; Riboldi-Tunnicliffe, Alan; Ozanne, Bradford W.

    2009-01-01

    Kelch-related protein 1 (Krp1) is up-regulated in oncogene-transformed fibroblasts. The Kelch repeats interact directly with the actin-binding protein Lasp-1 in membrane ruffles at the tips of pseudopodia, where both proteins are necessary for pseudopodial elongation. Herein, we investigate the molecular basis for this interaction. Probing an array of overlapping decapeptides of Rattus norvegicus (Rat) Krp1 with recombinant Lasp-1 revealed two binding sites; one (317YDPMENECYLT327) precedes the first of five Kelch repeats, and the other (563TEVNDIWKYEDD574) is in the last of the five Kelch repeats. Mutational analysis established that both binding sites are necessary for Krp1-Lasp-1 interaction in vitro and function in vivo. The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of rat Krp1 (amino acids 289–606) reveals that both binding sites are brought into close proximity by the formation of a novel six-bladed β-propeller, where the first blade is not formed by a Kelch repeat. PMID:19726686

  5. Testing the dependence of stabilizing effect of osmolytes on the fractional increase in the accessible surface area on thermal and chemical denaturations of proteins.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Safikur; Ali, Syed Ausaf; Islam, Asimul; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan

    2016-02-01

    Here we have generated two different denatured states using heat- and guanidinium chloride (GdmCl)-induced denaturations of three disulfide bond free proteins (barstar, cytochrome-c and myoglobin). We have observed that these two denatured states of barstar and myoglobin are structurally and energetically different, for, heat-induced denatured state contains many un-melted residual structure that has a significant amount of secondary and tertiary interactions. We show that structural properties of the denatured state determine the magnitude of the protein stabilization in terms of Gibbs free energy change (ΔGD°) induced by an osmolyte, i.e., the greater the exposed surface area, the greater is the stabilization. Furthermore, we predicted the m-values (ability of osmolyte to fold or unfold proteins) using Tanford's transfer-free energy model for the transfer of proteins to osmolyte solutions. We observed that, for each protein, m-value is comparable with our experimental data in cases of TMAO (trimethylamine-N-oxide) and sarcosine. However, a significant discrepancy between predicted and experimental m-values were observed in the case of glycine-betaine. PMID:26686265

  6. Influence of protein formulation and carrier solution on asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation: a case study of the plant-produced recombinant anthrax protective antigen pp-PA83.

    PubMed

    Palais, Caroline; Chichester, Jessica A; Manceva, Slobodanka; Yusibov, Vidadi; Arvinte, Tudor

    2015-02-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (afFFF) was used to investigate the properties of a plant-produced anthrax toxin protective antigen, pp-PA83. The afFFF fractogram consisted of two main peaks with molar masses similar to the molecular mass of pp-PA83 monomer. afFFF carrier solutions strongly influenced the ratio and the intensity of the two main peaks. These differences indicate that conformation changes in the pp-PA83 molecule occurred during the afFFF analysis. Similar fractograms were obtained for different pp-PA83 formulations when the afFFF carrier solution and the protein formulation were the same (or very similar). The data show that in specific cases, afFFF could be used to study protein conformation and document the importance of studying the influence of the carrier solution on afFFF. PMID:25417936

  7. Overlap extension PCR cloning.

    PubMed

    Bryksin, Anton; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Rising demand for recombinant proteins has motivated the development of efficient and reliable cloning methods. Here we show how a beginner can clone virtually any DNA insert into a plasmid of choice without the use of restriction endonucleases or T4 DNA ligase. Chimeric primers encoding plasmid sequence at the 5' ends and insert sequence at the 3' ends are designed and synthesized. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is utilized to amplify the desired insert by PCR. The double-stranded product is subsequently employed as a pair of mega-primers in a PCR-like reaction with circular plasmids. The original plasmids are then destroyed in restriction digests with Dpn I. The product of the overlap extension PCR is used to transform competent Escherichia coli cells. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is used for both the amplification and fusion reactions, so both steps can be monitored and optimized in the same way. PMID:23996437

  8. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Orbital Frontal Cortex in Rats Following Extended Exposure to Caffeine Reveals Extensive Changes to Protein Expression: Implications for Neurological Disease.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Jane L; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Wearne, Travis A; Homewood, Judi; Goodchild, Ann K; Haynes, Paul A; Cornish, Jennifer L

    2016-05-01

    Caffeine is a plant-derived psychostimulant and a common additive found in a wide range of foods and pharmaceuticals. The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is rapidly activated by flavours, integrates gustatory and olfactory information, and plays a critical role in decision-making, with dysfunction contributing to psychopathologies and neurodegenerative conditions. This study investigated whether long-term consumption of caffeine causes changes to behavior and protein expression in the OFC. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8 per group) were treated for 26 days with either water or a 0.6 g/L caffeine solution. Locomotor behavior was measured on the first and last day of treatment, then again after 9 days treatment free following exposure to a mild stressor. When tested drug free, caffeine-treated animals were hyperactive compared to controls. Two hours following final behavioral testing, brains were rapidly removed and prepared for proteomic analysis of the OFC. Label free shotgun proteomics found 157 proteins differentially expressed in the caffeine-drinking rats compared to control. Major proteomic effects were seen for cell-to-cell communication, cytoskeletal regulation, and mitochondrial function. Similar changes have been observed in neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia. PMID:26941107

  9. X-ray crystal structures of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase with switch region binding inhibitors enable rational design of squaramides with an improved fraction unbound to human plasma protein

    PubMed Central

    Molodtsov, Vadim; Fleming, Paul R.; Eyermann, Charles J.; Ferguson, Andrew D.; Foulk, Melinda A.; McKinney, David C.; Masse, Craig E.; Buurman, Ed T.; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.

    2015-01-01

    Squaramides constitute a novel class of RNA polymerase inhibitors of which genetic evidence and computational modeling previously have suggested an inhibitory mechanism mediated by binding to the RNA polymerase switch region. An iterative chemistry program increased the fraction unbound to human plasma protein from below minimum detection levels, i.e. <1%, to 4~6%, while retaining biochemical potency. Since in vitro antimicrobial activity against an efflux-negative strain of Haemophilus influenzae was 4~8-fold higher, the combined improvement was at least 20~60-fold. Co-crystal structures of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase with two key squaramides showed displacement of the switch 2, predicted to interfere with the conformational change of clamp domain and/or with binding of non-template DNA, a mechanism akin to that of natural product myxopyronin. Furthermore, the structures confirmed the chemical features required for biochemical potency. The terminal isoxazole and benzyl rings bind into distinct relatively narrow, hydrophobic pockets and both are required for biochemical potency. In contrast, the linker composed of squarate and piperidine accesses different conformations in their respective co-crystal structures with RNA polymerase, reflecting its main role of proper orientation of the aforementioned terminal rings. These observations further explain the tolerance of hydrophilic substitutions in the linker region that was exploited to improve the fraction unbound to human plasma protein while retaining biochemical potency. PMID:25798859

  10. Extensive Charge Reduction and Dissociation of Intact Protein Complexes Following Electron Transfer on a Quadrupole-Ion Mobility-Time-of-Flight MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lermyte, Frederik; Williams, Jonathan P.; Brown, Jeffery M.; Martin, Esther M.; Sobott, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Non-dissociative charge reduction, typically considered to be an unwanted side reaction in electron transfer dissociation (ETD) experiments, can be enhanced significantly in order to reduce the charge state of intact protein complexes to as low as 1+ on a commercially available Q-IM-TOF instrument. This allows for the detection of large complexes beyond 100,000 m/z, while at the same time generating top-down ETD fragments, which provide sequence information from surface-exposed parts of the folded structure. Optimization of the supplemental activation has proven to be crucial in these experiments and the charge-reduced species are most likely the product of both proton transfer (PTR) and non-dissociative electron transfer (ETnoD) reactions that occur prior to the ion mobility cell. Applications of this approach range from deconvolution of complex spectra to the manipulation of charge states of gas-phase ions.

  11. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  12. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  13. Structural stability of beta-globulin, the low molecular weight protein fraction from sesame seed (Sesamum indicum L.) in alkaline solution.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, S; Prakash, V

    1993-02-01

    Beta-globulin, a single polypeptide chain of molecular weight 15,000 +/- 1,000, undergoes denaturation in alkaline pH (7.0-13.0), thereby affecting the hydrodynamic properties of the protein, viz. a decrease in sedimentation coefficient from a value of 2.0s to 1.4s at pH 11.3, an increase in reduced viscosity from 0.042 dl/g to 0.158 dl/g at pH 12.6 and a decrease in partial specific volume resulting in a volume change of 6.3 +/- 1.0 ml/mole residue at pH 11.7. The perturbation of tryptophanyl residues and ionization of tyrosyl residues are preceded by alteration in conformational status of the protein. The fluorescence emission measurements indicate initial unfolding of the protein molecule which exposes the tryptophan and tyrosyl residues to the solvent. The tyrosyl phenolic group ionization is anomalous having a pKint value of 11.2. The reduced viscosity value reaches a plateau region at pH 12.5. PMID:8509122

  14. Generation of Soluble Advanced Glycation End Products Receptor (sRAGE)-Binding Ligands during Extensive Heat Treatment of Whey Protein/Lactose Mixtures Is Dependent on Glycation and Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fahui; Teodorowicz, Małgorzata; Wichers, Harry J; van Boekel, Martinus A J S; Hettinga, Kasper A

    2016-08-24

    Heating of protein- and sugar-containing materials is considered the primary factor affecting the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). This study aimed to investigate the influence of heating conditions, digestion, and aggregation on the binding capacity of AGEs to the soluble AGE receptor (sRAGE). Samples consisting of mixtures of whey protein and lactose were heated at 130 °C. An in vitro infant digestion model was used to study the influence of heat treatment on the digestibility of whey proteins. The amount of sRAGE-binding ligands before and after digestion was measured by an ELISA-based sRAGE-binding assay. Water activity did not significantly affect the extent of digestibility of whey proteins dry heated at pH 5 (ranging from 3.3 ± 0.2 to 3.6 ± 0.1% for gastric digestion and from 53.5 ± 1.5 to 64.7 ± 1.1% for duodenal digestion), but there were differences in cleavage patterns of peptides among the samples heated at different pH values. Formation of sRAGE-binding ligands depended on the formation of aggregates and was limited in the samples heated at pH 5. Moreover, the sRAGE-binding activity of digested sample was changed by protease degradation and correlated with the digestibility of samples. In conclusion, generation of sRAGE-binding ligands during extensive heat treatment of whey protein/lactose mixtures is limited in acidic heating condition and dependent on glycation and aggregation. PMID:27460534

  15. Fractional vector calculus and fractional Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2008-11-15

    The theory of derivatives and integrals of non-integer order goes back to Leibniz, Liouville, Grunwald, Letnikov and Riemann. The history of fractional vector calculus (FVC) has only 10 years. The main approaches to formulate a FVC, which are used in the physics during the past few years, will be briefly described in this paper. We solve some problems of consistent formulations of FVC by using a fractional generalization of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We define the differential and integral vector operations. The fractional Green's, Stokes' and Gauss's theorems are formulated. The proofs of these theorems are realized for simplest regions. A fractional generalization of exterior differential calculus of differential forms is discussed. Fractional nonlocal Maxwell's equations and the corresponding fractional wave equations are considered.

  16. The proline-rich P65 protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a component of the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction and exhibits size polymorphism in the strains M129 and FH.

    PubMed Central

    Proft, T; Hilbert, H; Layh-Schmitt, G; Herrmann, R

    1995-01-01

    Previously, we described the identification of a novel Mycoplasma pneumoniae M129 protein, named P65 because of its apparent molecular mass of 65 kDa estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (T. Proft and R. Herrmann, Mol. Microbiol. 13:337-348, 1994). DNA sequence analysis of the P65 open reading frame (orfp65), however, revealed an ORF encoding a protein with a molecular weight of 47,034. This discrepancy can be explained by the unusual amino acid composition of this protein. According to the deduced amino acid sequence, the N-terminal half of P65 contains several penta- and hexapeptides (DPNAY and DPNQAY) forming a proline-rich acidic domain. Secondary-structure predictions indicated beta-sheets and turns within that region, suggesting an extended and rigid conformation. Near the C terminus of P65 the tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) was found. This motif is known to play an important role in binding of extracellular matrix proteins to integrins. P65 could be located exclusively to the Triton X-100-insoluble cell fraction. The results of immunofluorescence microscopy and of immunoadsorption experiments indicated that P65 carries surface-exposed regions. Mild treatment of whole cells with proteases resulted in cleavage of a limited amount of P65 molecules, suggesting either that only a small percentage of P65 molecules are exposed on the surface or that protease cleavage is hampered by a compact protein conformation or by binding of an unknown component to P65. P65 exhibits size polymorphism in M. pneumoniae M129 and FH. This is caused by an intragenetic duplication of a 54-bp sequence within the FH orfp65. As a consequence, the number of DPNAY pentapeptides increased from 9 to 12 repeats in the FH strain. PMID:7768845

  17. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  18. Charged states of proteins. Reactions of doubly protonated alkyldiamines with NH(3): solvation or deprotonation. Extension of two proton cases to multiply protonated globular proteins observed in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Peschke, Michael; Blades, Arthur; Kebarle, Paul

    2002-09-25

    The apparent gas-phase basicities (GB(app)'s) of basic sites in multiply protonated molecules, such as proteins, can be approximately predicted. An approach used by Williams and co-workers was to develop an equation for a diprotonated system, NH(3)(CH(2))(7)NH(3)(2+), and then extend it with a summation of pairwise interactions to multiply protonated systems. Experimental determinations of the rates of deprotonation of NH(3)(CH(2))(7)NH(3)(2+) by a variety of bases B, in the present work, showed that GB(app) = GB(NH(3)) = 196 kcal/mol. This result is supported also by determinations of the equilibria: NH(3)(CH(2))(p)NH(3)(2+) + NH(3) = NH(3)(CH(2))(p)NH(3) x NH(3)(2+), for p = 7, 8, 10, 12. The described experimental GB(app) is 14 kcal/mol higher than the value predicted by the equation used by Williams and co-workers but in agreement with an ab initio result by Gronert. Equations based on electrostatics are developed for the two proton and multiproton systems which allow the evaluation of GB(app) of the basic sites on proteins. These are applied for the evaluation of GB(app) of the basic sites and of N(SB), the maximum number of protons that the nondenatured proteins, carbonic anhydrase (CAII), cytochrome c (CYC), and pepsin, can hold. The N(SB) values are compared with the observed charges, Z(obs)'s, when the nondenatured proteins are produced by electrospray and found in agreement with the proposal by de la Mora that Z(obs) is determined by the number of charges provided by the droplet that contains the protein, according to the charge residue model (CRM). The GB(app) values of proteins have many other applications. They can be compared with experimental measurements and are also needed for the understanding of the thermal denaturing of charged proteins and the thermal dissociation of charged protein complexes. PMID:12236767

  19. Tempered fractional calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  20. Tempered fractional calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-15

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  1. Instrument and method to determine the electrophoretic mobility of nanoparticles and proteins by combining electrical and flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Johann, Christoph; Elsenberg, Stephan; Schuch, Horst; Rösch, Ulrich

    2015-04-21

    A new FFF method is presented which combines asymmetrical flow-FFF (AF4) and electrical FFF (ElFFF) in one channel to electrical asymmetrical flow-FFF (EAF4) to overcome the restrictions of pure ElFFF. It allows for measuring electrophoretic mobility (μ) as a function of size. The method provides an absolute value and does not require calibration. Results of μ for two particle standards are in good agreement with values determined by phase analysis light scattering (PALS). There is no requirement for low ionic strength carriers with EAF4. This overcomes one of the main limitations of ElFFF, making it feasible to measure proteins under physiological conditions. EAF4 has the capability to determine μ for individual populations which are resolved into separate peaks. This is demonstrated for a mixture of three polystyrene latex particles with different sizes as well as for the monomer and dimer of BSA and an antibody. The experimental setup consists of an AF4 channel with added electrodes; one is placed beneath the frit at the bottom wall and the other covers the inside of the upper channel plate. This design minimizes contamination from the electrolysis reactions by keeping the particles distant from the electrodes. In addition the applied voltage range is low (1.5-5 V), which reduces the quantity of gaseous electrolysis products below a threshold that interferes with the laminar flow profile or detector signals. Besides measuring μ, the method can be useful to improve the separation between sample components compared to pure flow-FFF. For two proteins (BSA and a monoclonal antibody), enhanced resolution of the monomer and dimer is achieved by applying an electric field. PMID:25789885

  2. Inflammatory mediators and modulators released in organ culture from rabbit skin lesions produced in vivo by sulfur mustard. III. Electrophoretic protein fractions, trypsin-inhibitory capacity, alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor, and alpha 1- and alpha 2-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors of culture fluids and serum.

    PubMed Central

    Harada, S.; Dannenberg, A. M.; Vogt, R. F.; Myrick, J. E.; Tanaka, F.; Redding, L. C.; Merkhofer, R. M.; Pula, P. J.; Scott, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    This is the third report in a series on the inflammatory mediators and modulators released in organ culture from skin lesions of various ages, which were produced in vivo in rabbits by the military vesicant, sulfur mustard (SM). It describes the electrophoretic protein fractions and trypsin-inhibitory capacities of the various culture fluids and the amounts of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors in these fluids. With one-dimensional electrophoresis, the albumin and beta-globulin fractions of protein in culture fluids varied little with the development and healing of the SM lesions. These fractions proportionally resembled the corresponding fractions found in serum. The alpha 1-globulin fraction was proportionally smaller than the corresponding fractions of serum as the lesions healed. The alpha 2-globulin fraction was proportionally smaller than the corresponding fractions of serum at all stages of lesion development and healing. The gamma-globulin fraction was proportionally larger as the lesions healed. With two-dimensional electrophoresis, about 68%, 46%, and 35% of the protein spots in culture fluids from representative 1-day and 6-day SM lesions and normal skin, respectively, matched those from serum. In each case, the large, diffuse, serum albumin spot represented about two-thirds of the protein present. Thus, gravimetrically, in normal skin and in both developing and healing lesions, the extracellular proteins were 80-90% of serum origin. The trypsin-inhibitory capacity (TIC) per milligram protein in the culture fluids of healing lesions was markedly less than the TIC per milligram protein in the fluids of peak lesions. This decrease correlates well with the decrease found in the alpha 1-globulin fraction, which contains alpha 1-antiproteinase (alpha 1-PI) (and alpha 1-macroglobulin [alpha 1M] in rabbits). The alpha 1PI and the alpha 1M-alpha 2M proteinase inhibitors were identified in the culture fluids by means of

  3. TEMPERED FRACTIONAL CALCULUS

    PubMed Central

    MEERSCHAERT, MARK M.; SABZIKAR, FARZAD; CHEN, JINGHUA

    2014-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series. PMID:26085690

  4. Extensive quantities in thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannaerts, Sebastiaan H.

    2014-05-01

    A literature survey shows little consistency in the definitions of the term ‘extensive quantity’ (a.k.a. extensive property) as used in thermodynamics. A majority assumes that extensive quantities are those that are proportional to mass. Taking the mathematical meaning of proportional and taking the ‘mass’ to be that of the system or subsystem, it is shown that the proportionality assumption is only correct for a few extensive quantities under condition of constant composition. A large subset of extensive quantities are completely independent of mass; for most systems extensive quantities are not proportional to mass, but mass is the (extensive) constant of proportionality. The definition by IUPAC, based on the additivity of extensive quantities, is the preferred baseline for discussing this subject. It is noted however, that two types of additivity need to be distinguished and that a few intensive quantities are also additive. This paper leaves several interesting questions open to further scrutiny.

  5. Extensive interactions of PRP8 protein with the 5' and 3' splice sites during splicing suggest a role in stabilization of exon alignment by U5 snRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Teigelkamp, S; Newman, A J; Beggs, J D

    1995-01-01

    Precursor RNAs containing 4-thiouridine at specific sites were used with UV-crosslinking to map the binding sites of the yeast protein splicing factor PRP8. PRP8 protein interacts with a region of at least eight exon nucleotides at the 5' splice site and a minimum of 13 exon nucleotides and part of the polypyrimidine tract in the 3' splice site region. Crosslinking of PRP8 to mutant and duplicated 3' splice sites indicated that the interaction is not sequence specific, nor does it depend on the splice site being functional. Binding of PRP8 to the 5' exon was established before step 1 and to the 3' splice site region after step 1 of splicing. These interactions place PRP8 close to the proposed catalytic core of the spliceosome during both transesterification reactions. To date, this represents the most extensive mapping of the binding site(s) of a splicing factor on the substrate RNA. We propose that the large binding sites of PRP8 stabilize the intrinsically weaker interactions of U5 snRNA with both exons at the splice sites for exon alignment by the U5 snRNP. Images PMID:7781612

  6. FRACTIONAL INTEGRATION TOOLBOX

    PubMed Central

    Marinov, Toma M.; Ramirez, Nelson; Santamaria, Fidel

    2014-01-01

    The problems formulated in the fractional calculus framework often require numerical fractional integration/differentiation of large data sets. Several existing fractional control toolboxes are capable of performing fractional calculus operations, however, none of them can efficiently perform numerical integration on multiple large data sequences. We developed a Fractional Integration Toolbox (FIT), which efficiently performs fractional numerical integration/differentiation of the Riemann-Liouville type on large data sequences. The toolbox allows parallelization and is designed to be deployed on both CPU and GPU platforms. PMID:24812536

  7. The Cooperative Extension Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, H. C., Ed.

    Designed to stimulate and support training for Extension work and to orient new employees, this book covers the Cooperative Extension Service (CES) and its methods of operation. It begins by describing the status of rural extension in the United States and abroad; the history of the CES and its antecendents; the legal basis, scope, functions, and…

  8. A dot-ELISA using a partially purified cathepsin-L-like protein fraction from Taenia solium cysticerci, for the diagnosis of human neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Piña, R; Gutiérrez, A H; Gilman, R H; Rueda, D; Sifuentes, C; Flores, M; Sheen, P; Rodriguez, S; GarcÍa, H H; Zimic, M

    2011-01-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NCC), caused by the cestode Taenia solium, is responsible for a significant amount of neurological morbidity and epilepsy in developing countries. The disease remains highly endemic in many areas, despite several efforts and interventions to control it. A simple, cheap and fast diagnostic assay that is suitable for use in field conditions is highly desired. In immunodiagnostics based on western immunoblots or standard ELISA, a cathepsin-L-like protein purified from the cysticercus fluid has previously performed well as an antigen. In a recent study in Peru, the same 53/25-kDa antigen was therefore used in the development of a dot-ELISA that could be employed for mass screenings under field conditions. The assay was standardized and tested not only against sera from a large group of NCC cases but also against sera from patients with other common parasitic infections, so that sensitivity and specificity could be assessed. For NCC, the assay gave better sensitivity in the detection of individuals with extraparenchymal cysts (94·4%–100%) or multiple parenchymal cysts (74·6%–80·0%) than in the detection of individuals with single parenchymal cysts (29·4%–45·1%). The assay also showed a high specificity for NCC (99·0%–100%), with a very low level of cross-reactivity with other parasitic infections. The dot-ELISA developed in this study is a highly specific, simple, cheap and rapid test for NCC that could be used under field conditions, even in the low-resource settings that are common in developing countries. PMID:21871167

  9. Cooled artery extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artery vapor trap. A heat pipe artery is constructed with an extension protruding from the evaporator end of the heat pipe beyond the active area of the evaporator. The vapor migrates into the artery extension because of gravity or liquid displacement, and cooling the extension condenses the vapor to liquid, thus preventing vapor lock in the working portion of the artery by removing vapor from within the active artery. The condensed liquid is then transported back to the evaporator by the capillary action of the artery extension itself or by wick located within the extension.

  10. Protein and lipid binding parameters in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) blood and liver fractions to extrapolate from an in vitro metabolic degradation assay to in vivo bioaccumulation potential of hydrophobic organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Escher, Beate I; Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E; Dyer, Scott; Embry, Michelle R; Erhardt, Susan; Halder, Marlies; Kwon, Jung-Hwan; Johanning, Karla; Oosterwijk, Mattheus T T; Rutishauser, Sibylle; Segner, Helmut; Nichols, John

    2011-07-18

    Binding of hydrophobic chemicals to colloids such as proteins or lipids is difficult to measure using classical microdialysis methods due to low aqueous concentrations, adsorption to dialysis membranes and test vessels, and slow kinetics of equilibration. Here, we employed a three-phase partitioning system where silicone (polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS) serves as a third phase to determine partitioning between water and colloids and acts at the same time as a dosing device for hydrophobic chemicals. The applicability of this method was demonstrated with bovine serum albumin (BSA). Measured binding constants (K(BSAw)) for chlorpyrifos, methoxychlor, nonylphenol, and pyrene were in good agreement with an established quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR). A fifth compound, fluoxypyr-methyl-heptyl ester, was excluded from the analysis because of apparent abiotic degradation. The PDMS depletion method was then used to determine partition coefficients for test chemicals in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver S9 fractions (K(S9w)) and blood plasma (K(bloodw)). Measured K(S9w) and K(bloodw) values were consistent with predictions obtained using a mass-balance model that employs the octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)) as a surrogate for lipid partitioning and K(BSAw) to represent protein binding. For each compound, K(bloodw) was substantially greater than K(S9w), primarily because blood contains more lipid than liver S9 fractions (1.84% of wet weight vs 0.051%). Measured liver S9 and blood plasma binding parameters were subsequently implemented in an in vitro to in vivo extrapolation model to link the in vitro liver S9 metabolic degradation assay to in vivo metabolism in fish. Apparent volumes of distribution (V(d)) calculated from the experimental data were similar to literature estimates. However, the calculated binding ratios (f(u)) used to relate in vitro metabolic clearance to clearance by the intact liver were 10 to 100 times lower than values

  11. DIY Fraction Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Alan; Graham, Louise

    2003-01-01

    Describes a very successful attempt to teach fractions to year 5 pupils based on pupils making their own fraction pack. Children decided for themselves how to make the fractional slices used in the activity using colored cardboard sheets and templates of a paper circle consisting of 24 equal slices. (Author/NB)

  12. Control of Polarized Growth by the Rho Family GTPase Rho4 in Budding Yeast: Requirement of the N-Terminal Extension of Rho4 and Regulation by the Rho GTPase-Activating Protein Bem2

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ting; Liao, Yuan; He, Fei; Yang, Yang; Yang, Dan-Dan; Chen, Xiang-Dong

    2013-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rho4 GTPase partially plays a redundant role with Rho3 in the control of polarized growth, as deletion of RHO4 and RHO3 together, but not RHO4 alone, caused lethality and a loss of cell polarity at 30°C. Here, we show that overexpression of the constitutively active rho4Q131L mutant in an rdi1Δ strain caused a severe growth defect and generated large, round, unbudded cells, suggesting that an excess of Rho4 activity could block bud emergence. We also generated four temperature-sensitive rho4-Ts alleles in a rho3Δ rho4Δ strain. These mutants showed growth and morphological defects at 37°C. Interestingly, two rho4-Ts alleles contain mutations that cause amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal region of Rho4. Rho4 possesses a long N-terminal extension that is unique among the six Rho GTPases in the budding yeast but is common in Rho4 homologs in other yeasts and filamentous fungi. We show that the N-terminal extension plays an important role in Rho4 function since rho3Δ rho4Δ61 cells expressing truncated Rho4 lacking amino acids (aa) 1 to 61 exhibited morphological defects at 24°C and a growth defect at 37°C. Furthermore, we show that Rho4 interacts with Bem2, a Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP) for Cdc42 and Rho1, by yeast two-hybrid, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assays. Bem2 specifically interacts with the GTP-bound form of Rho4, and the interaction is mediated by its RhoGAP domain. Overexpression of BEM2 aggravates the defects of rho3Δ rho4 mutants. These results suggest that Bem2 might be a novel GAP for Rho4. PMID:23264647

  13. Subcellular fractionation of human liver reveals limits in global proteomic quantification from isolated fractions.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Wegler, Christine; Artursson, Per

    2016-09-15

    The liver plays an important role in metabolism and elimination of xenobiotics, including drugs. Determination of concentrations of proteins involved in uptake, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of xenobiotics is required to understand and predict elimination mechanisms in this tissue. In this work, we have fractionated homogenates of snap-frozen human liver by differential centrifugation and performed quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of each fraction. Concentrations of proteins were calculated by the "total protein approach". A total of 4586 proteins were identified by at least five peptides and were quantified in all fractions. We found that the xenobiotics transporters of the canalicular and basolateral membranes were differentially enriched in the subcellular fractions and that phase I and II metabolizing enzymes, the cytochrome P450s and the UDP-glucuronyl transferases, have complex subcellular distributions. These findings show that there is no simple way to scale the data from measurements in arbitrarily selected membrane fractions using a single scaling factor for all the proteins of interest. This study also provides the first absolute quantitative subcellular catalog of human liver proteins obtained from frozen tissue specimens. Our data provide quantitative insights into the subcellular distribution of proteins and can be used as a guide for development of fractionation procedures. PMID:27311553

  14. Functional fractionation-ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griess, G. A.; Serwer, P.

    2002-08-01

    Electrophoretic ratchets have been developed for both analytical and preparative electrophoresis. These ratchets use a new type of pulsed field. The quality of the fractionations meets the usual standards for biochemistry-based electrophoresis. The supporting medium is either an agarose gel or a capillary-contained polymer solution. The electrophoretic ratchets are effective with a particle that has an electrophoretic mobility (μ=velocity/electrical field) that varies as the electrical field varies. A ratchet developed for DNA molecules is effective because μ increases in magnitude as the electrical field increases in magnitude. Ratchets developed for both DNA-protein complexes and spheres are effective because of the opposite dependence of μ on the electrical field. Ratchet-based gel electrophoresis can be performed in a continuous, preparative mode. Ratchet-based capillary electrophoresis provides a necessary component for cyclic capillary electrophoresis. Cyclic capillary electrophoresis of DNA is a procedure for analyzing a DNA profile in several segments. These segments are separated by electrophoretic enhancements of the DNA profile. Cyclic capillary electrophoresis is being developed for increasing both the length and the accuracy of the analysis of a DNA-sequencing ladder.

  15. Fractional calculus in hydrologic modeling: A numerical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Benson, David A.; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Revielle, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Fractional derivatives can be viewed either as handy extensions of classical calculus or, more deeply, as mathematical operators defined by natural phenomena. This follows the view that the diffusion equation is defined as the governing equation of a Brownian motion. In this paper, we emphasize that fractional derivatives come from the governing equations of stable Lévy motion, and that fractional integration is the corresponding inverse operator. Fractional integration, and its multi-dimensional extensions derived in this way, are intimately tied to fractional Brownian (and Lévy) motions and noises. By following these general principles, we discuss the Eulerian and Lagrangian numerical solutions to fractional partial differential equations, and Eulerian methods for stochastic integrals. These numerical approximations illuminate the essential nature of the fractional calculus. PMID:23524449

  16. Fractional calculus in hydrologic modeling: A numerical perspective.

    PubMed

    Benson, David A; Meerschaert, Mark M; Revielle, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Fractional derivatives can be viewed either as handy extensions of classical calculus or, more deeply, as mathematical operators defined by natural phenomena. This follows the view that the diffusion equation is defined as the governing equation of a Brownian motion. In this paper, we emphasize that fractional derivatives come from the governing equations of stable Lévy motion, and that fractional integration is the corresponding inverse operator. Fractional integration, and its multi-dimensional extensions derived in this way, are intimately tied to fractional Brownian (and Lévy) motions and noises. By following these general principles, we discuss the Eulerian and Lagrangian numerical solutions to fractional partial differential equations, and Eulerian methods for stochastic integrals. These numerical approximations illuminate the essential nature of the fractional calculus. PMID:23524449

  17. Fractional Calculus in Hydrologic Modeling: A Numerical Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Benson; Mark M. Meerschaert; Jordan Revielle

    2012-01-01

    Fractional derivatives can be viewed either as a handy extension of classical calculus or, more deeply, as mathematical operators defined by natural phenomena. This follows the view that the diffusion equation is defined as the governing equation of a Brownian motion. In this paper, we emphasize that fractional derivatives come from the governing equations of stable Levy motion, and that fractional integration is the corresponding inverse operator. Fractional integration, and its multi-dimensional extensions derived in this way, are intimately tied to fractional Brownian (and Levy) motions and noises. By following these general principles, we discuss the Eulerian and Lagrangian numerical solutions to fractional partial differential equations, and Eulerian methods for stochastic integrals. These numerical approximations illuminate the essential nature of the fractional calculus.

  18. University of Wisconsin - Extension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Continuing and Online Education About Degree Programs Independent Learning School for Workers UW HELP UW System eCampus Cooperative Extension About Agriculture & Natural Resources Community, Natural Resource & ...

  19. Type Safe Extensible Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Wonseok

    2009-10-01

    Software products evolve over time. Sometimes they evolve by adding new features, and sometimes by either fixing bugs or replacing outdated implementations with new ones. When software engineers fail to anticipate such evolution during development, they will eventually be forced to re-architect or re-build from scratch. Therefore, it has been common practice to prepare for changes so that software products are extensible over their lifetimes. However, making software extensible is challenging because it is difficult to anticipate successive changes and to provide adequate abstraction mechanisms over potential changes. Such extensibility mechanisms, furthermore, should not compromise any existing functionality during extension. Software engineers would benefit from a tool that provides a way to add extensions in a reliable way. It is natural to expect programming languages to serve this role. Extensible programming is one effort to address these issues. In this thesis, we present type safe extensible programming using the MLPolyR language. MLPolyR is an ML-like functional language whose type system provides type-safe extensibility mechanisms at several levels. After presenting the language, we will show how these extensibility mechanisms can be put to good use in the context of product line engineering. Product line engineering is an emerging software engineering paradigm that aims to manage variations, which originate from successive changes in software.

  20. Differential Gene Expression Profiles of Radioresistant Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines Established by Fractionated Irradiation: Tumor Protein p53-Inducible Protein 3 Confers Sensitivity to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Sook; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Yoon, Seokjoo; Kwon, Myung-Sang

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Despite the widespread use of radiotherapy as a local and regional modality for the treatment of cancer, some non-small-cell lung cancers commonly develop resistance to radiation. We thus sought to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to radiation. Methods and Materials: We established the radioresistant cell line H460R from radiosensitive parental H460 cells. To identify the radioresistance-related genes, we performed microarray analysis and selected several candidate genes. Results: Clonogenic and MTT assays showed that H460R was 10-fold more resistant to radiation than H460. Microarray analysis indicated that the expression levels of 1,463 genes were altered more than 1.5-fold in H460R compared with parental H460. To evaluate the putative functional role, we selected one interesting gene tumor protein p53-inducible protein 3 (TP53I3), because that this gene was significantly downregulated in radioresistant H460R cells and that it was predicted to link p53-dependent cell death signaling. Interestingly, messenger ribonucleic acid expression of TP53I3 differed in X-ray-irradiated H460 and H460R cells, and overexpression of TP53I3 significantly affected the cellular radiosensitivity of H460R cells. Conclusions: These results show that H460R may be useful in searching for candidate genes that are responsible for radioresistance and elucidating the molecular mechanism of radioresistance.

  1. Identification and characterization of specific hydatid antigen fraction(s).

    PubMed

    Maher, K M; Kaddah, M A; Hassanein, H I; Shaker, Z A; Khalafallah, A M

    1992-08-01

    A specific hydatid antigen was prepared in this study from Echinococcus granulosus cyst in livers and lungs of camels. Elimination of host "camel" protein from crude hydatid fluid was achieved by two methods: Salting out using ammonium sulfate precipitation method and immunoaffinity purification using coupled anticamel antibody to cyanogenbromide activated sepharose 4B gel. Testing the prepared hydatid antigen against anticamel serum, using immunodiffusion method, indicated that the affinity purified hydatid antigen was almost completely purified from camel protein. Characterization of the affinity purified hydatid antigen, using immunoelectrophoresis, showed positive arc 5 precipitation when tested against known positive antihydatid sera. Further characterization with gradient gel electrophoresis, showed with silver stain that the dominant and most consistently demonstrable proteins occurred as a complex in the 52/62 KDa region. Strong reaction with the 52/62 KDa complex was consistently observed when the affinity purified hydatid antigen was probed with known positive reference antihydatid sera. The identified hydatid antigen fraction(s) with 52/62 KDa complex can provide promising non-invasive parameter for diagnosis of Hydatidosis. PMID:1500792

  2. Dividing Fractions: A Pedagogical Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert

    2016-01-01

    When dividing one fraction by a second fraction, invert, that is, flip the second fraction, then multiply it by the first fraction. To multiply fractions, simply multiply across the denominators, and multiply across the numerators to get the resultant fraction. So by inverting the division of fractions it is turned into an easy multiplication of…

  3. Transcriptional response of four C1q domain containing protein (C1qDC) genes from Venerupis philippinarum exposed to the water soluble fraction of No.0 diesel oil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linbao; Sun, Wei; Cai, Wengui; Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Haigang; Ma, Shengwei; Jia, Xiaoping

    2016-10-01

    As pattern recognitionreceptors, the C1q-domain-containing (C1qDC) proteins play an important role in the pathogen recognition and complement pathway activation. In the present study, four novel C1q domain containing proteins (designated as VpC1qDC1, VpC1qDC2, VpC1qDC3 and VpC1qDC4) were cloned and characterized from clam Venerupis philippinarum. The four VpC1qDCs all possessed the conserved features critical for the fundamental structure and function of the C1q family. The four VpC1qDCs genes showed differential response profiles after exposure to the water soluble fraction of No.0 diesel oil (WSFD). More notably, VpC1qDC1 and VpC1qDC3 were more sensitive to low concentration of WSFD, as their mRNA level changed by higher magnitudes. In addition, VpC1qDC2 and VpC1qDC4 displayed notable increases with larger amplitude to high concentration of WSFD. All these results suggested that the transcriptional response of VpC1qDCs genes were probably a protective mechanism of the cell to oils pollution. The diverse expression patterns of VpC1qDCs demonstrated that VpC1qDC1 and VpC1qDC3 were sensitive responders to environmental stress in V. philippinarum. PMID:27261881

  4. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  5. Asymmetric Flow-Field Flow Fractionation Hyphenated ICP-MS as an Alternative to Cloud Point Extraction for Quantification of Silver Nanoparticles and Silver Speciation: Application for Nanoparticles with a Protein Corona.

    PubMed

    Mudalige, Thilak K; Qu, Haiou; Linder, Sean W

    2015-07-21

    Production and application of nanoparticles in consumer products is at an all-time high due to the emerging field of nanotechnology. Direct detection and quantification of trace levels of nanoparticles within consumer products is very challenging and problematic. Although multiple methodologies are available for this purpose, each method has its own set of limitations. Herein, we developed an analytical platform consisting of asymmetric flow-field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) for the speciation and quantification of silver ions and silver nanoparticles at the ng/kg level (ppt). AF4 is utilized to concentrate the nanoparticles, and ICP-MS acts as the detector. The protein corona that forms upon exposure of nanoparticles to bovine serum albumin was utilized as a nanoparticle stabilization and AF4 recovery enhancement mechanism. Speciation of silver ions and nanoparticles was achieved with the assistance of penicillamine as a complexation ligand. The effect of nanoparticle size, surface coating, and ionization state toward the detection and quantification of the developed methodology was evaluated. The detection limit was found to be 4 ng/kg with the application of a 5 mL sample loop. Further application of this developed methodology on environmentally relevant samples was demonstrated by the analysis of Arkansas River water spiked with silver nanoparticles and nanoparticle spiked into humic acid solution (50 mg/L) at an environmentally relevant level. PMID:26095720

  6. Transformations between Extensive and Intensive Versions of Thermodynamic Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberhart, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Most thermodynamic properties are either extensive (e.g., volume, energy, entropy, amount, etc.) or intensive (e.g., temperature, pressure, chemical potential, mole fraction, etc.). By the same token most of the mathematical relationships in thermodynamics can be written in extensive or intensive form. The basic laws of thermodynamics are usually…

  7. Exact solution to fractional logistic equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.

    2015-07-01

    The logistic equation is one of the most familiar nonlinear differential equations in the biological and social sciences. Herein we provide an exact solution to an extension of this equation to incorporate memory through the use of fractional derivatives in time. The solution to the fractional logistic equation (FLE) is obtained using the Carleman embedding technique that allows the nonlinear equation to be replaced by an infinite-order set of linear equations, which we then solve exactly. The formal series expansion for the initial value solution of the FLE is shown to be expressed in terms of a series of weighted Mittag-Leffler functions that reduces to the well known analytic solution in the limit where the fractional index for the derivative approaches unity. The numerical integration to the FLE provides an excellent fit to the analytic solution. We propose this approach as a general technique for solving a class of nonlinear fractional differential equations.

  8. Signature extension studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. K.; Thomas, G. S.; Nalepka, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    The importance of specific spectral regions to signature extension is explored. In the recent past, the signature extension task was focused on the development of new techniques. Tested techniques are now used to investigate this spectral aspect of the large area survey. Sets of channels were sought which, for a given technique, were the least affected by several sources of variation over four data sets and yet provided good object class separation on each individual data set. Using sets of channels determined as part of this study, signature extension was accomplished between data sets collected over a six-day period and over a range of about 400 kilometers.

  9. An Appetite for Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Trena L.; Bryan, Tommy; Curry, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how using candy bars as models gives sixth-grade students a taste for learning to represent fractions whose denominators are factors of twelve. Using paper models of the candy bars, students explored and compared fractions. They noticed fewer different representations for one-third than for one-half. The authors conclude…

  10. Can Kindergartners Do Fractions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwikla, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics professor Julie Cwikla decided that she needed to investigate young children's understandings and see what precurricular partitioning notions young minds bring to the fraction table. Cwikla realized that only a handful of studies have examined how preschool-age and early elementary school-age students solve fraction problems…

  11. The Future of Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usiskin, Zalman P.

    2007-01-01

    In the 1970s, the movement to the metric system (which has still not completely occurred in the United States) and the advent of hand-held calculators led some to speculate that decimal representation of numbers would render fractions obsolete. This provocative proposition stimulated Zalman Usiskin to write "The Future of Fractions" in 1979. He…

  12. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  13. Atomic force microscopic and theoretical studies of poly-ubiquitin proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Y. L.; Chang, C. H.; Liang, K.-K.; Shiu, Y.-J.; Su, Charlene; Hayashi, M.; Chyan, C. L.; Yang, G.; Mo, Yan; Yan, YiJing; Lin, S. H.

    2004-12-01

    In this Letter, a theoretical model for the force-extension experiment applied to protein folding-unfolding is presented. This model explicitly takes into account the interplay between the mechanical energy and chemical energy. It can treat the effect of denaturing agents (like pH, GdnHCl, urea, etc.) and temperature on the force-extension experiment of protein folding-unfolding. We further apply the model to analyze our own force-extension experiment on ubiquitin tetramers and to the experimental data of other protein systems reported in literature. The current model can predict the quantities like the values of equilibrium constant, chemical potential and mole fraction of unfolded state involved in protein folding-unfolding and we have found that the proteins adsorbed on gold surfaces are partially unfolded in comparison with the bulk state.

  14. The active fraction of psyllium seed husk.

    PubMed

    Marlett, Judith A; Fischer, Milton H

    2003-02-01

    A series of experiments and evaluations of fractions isolated from psyllium seed husk (PSH) were used to test the overall hypothesis that a gel-forming component of PSH is not fermented and that it is this component that is responsible for the laxative and cholesterol-lowering properties of PSH. A gel is isolated from human stools collected during a controlled diet study when PSH is consumed but not when the control diet only is consumed. Evaluations of three fractions isolated from PSH suggest that gel-forming fraction B, which is about 55% of PSH, is poorly fermented and is the component that increases stool moisture and faecal bile acid excretion, the latter leading to lower blood cholesterol levels. Fraction C, representing < 15% of PSH, is viscous, but is rapidly fermented. Fraction A is alkali-insoluble material that is not fermented. In concentrations comparable with their presence in PSH, fractions A and C do not alter moisture and bile acid output. The active fraction of PSH is a highly-branched arabinoxylan consisting of a xylose backbone and arabinose- and xylose-containing side chains. In contrast to arabinoxylans in cereal grains that are extensively fermented, PSH possesses a structural feature, as yet unidentified, that hinders its fermentation by typical colonic microflora. PMID:12749348

  15. Acetylation in vitro of constituent polypeptides by smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) and Golgi membrane fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Sambasivam, H.; Murray, R.K.

    1986-05-01

    Many polypeptides of the membranes of the ER are phosphorylated. To determine if any such polypeptides are acetylated, microsomal and other classical subcellular fractions were incubated with (/sup 3/H) acetyl-CoA; the specific activity of the microsomal fraction (MF) was the greatest. SDS-PAGE revealed that some 20 polypeptides of the MF were acetylated; 2-D electrophoretograms extended this number to approximately 60. Separation of the MF into smooth (S) and rough (R) fractions showed that the great majority of the labelled polypeptides belonged to the former. Isolation of a Golgi fraction revealed that its acetylation activity was approximately 3-fold greater than the SER fraction. Extensive proteolytic digestion of the MF followed by radiochromatography disclosed some 9 components whose precise nature (acetylated amino acids and/or sialic acids, etc.) is under study. Assuming that the majority of the radioactivity is in the former components and that a similar process occurs in vivo, the authors suggest that the Golgi apparatus may be a major site of acetylation of membrane and possibly other proteins.

  16. Fractional calculus in bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub

  17. Multiple daily fractionation schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Peschel, R.E.; Fischer, J.J.

    1982-10-01

    Although conventional fractionation schedules have been satisfactory for the treatment of some tumors, there is reason to believe that the results of radiation therapy could be improved in some cases by appropriate alterations in treatment schedules. The pharmacological characteristics of some of the electron affinic radiation sensitizers have provided added incentive to investigate newer fractionation schemes, particularly ones which deliver the majority of the radiation dose in short periods of time. This editorial discusses three papers describing preliminary clinical studies using multi-daily fractionated (MDF) radiation therapy. Two of these studies also make use of the radiation sensitizer misonidazole. (KRM)

  18. Differential Association of the Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor (NHERF) Family of Adaptor Proteins with the Raft-and the Non-Raft Brush Border Membrane Fractions of NHE3

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Ayesha; Luo, Min; Yu, Qin; Riederer, Brigitte; Xia, Weiliang; Chen, Mingmin; Lissner, Simone; Gessner, Johannes E.; Donowitz, Mark; Yun, C. Chris; deJonge, Hugo; Lamprecht, Georg; Seidler, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Trafficking, brush border membrane (BBM) retention, and signal-specific regulation of the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE3 is regulated by the Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor (NHERF) family of PDZ-adaptor proteins, which enable the formation of multiprotein complexes. It is unclear, however, what determines signal specificity of these NHERFs. Thus, we studied the association of NHE3, NHERF1 (EBP50), NHERF2 (E3KARP), and NHERF3 (PDZK1) with lipid rafts in murine small intestinal BBM. Methods Detergent resistant membranes (“lipid rafts”) were isolated by floatation of Triton X-incubated small intestinal BBM from a variety of knockout mouse strains in an Optiprep step gradient. Acid-activated NHE3 activity was measured fluorometrically in BCECF-loaded microdissected villi, or by assessment of CO2/HCO3− mediated increase in fluid absorption in perfused jejunal loops of anethetized mice. Results NHE3 was found to partially associate with lipid rafts in the native BBM, and NHE3 raft association had an impact on NHE3 transport activity and regulation in vivo. NHERF1, 2 and 3 were differentially distributed to rafts and non-rafts, with NHERF2 being most raft-associated and NHERF3 entirely non-raft associated. NHERF2 expression enhanced the localization of NHE3 to membrane rafts. The use of acid sphingomyelinase-deficient mice, which have altered membrane lipid as well as lipid raft composition, allowed us to test the validity of the lipid raft concept in vivo. Conclusions The differential association of the NHERFs with the raft-associated and the non-raft fraction of NHE3 in the brush border membrane is one component of the differential and signal-specific NHE3 regulation by the different NHERFs. PMID:24297041

  19. FCC main fractionator revamps

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, S.W.; Martin, G.R.; Sloley, A.W. )

    1993-03-01

    Structured packing use in fluid catalytic cracker (FCC) main fractionators significantly impacts unit pressure profile. Unit pressure balance links the FCC main fractionator, reactor, regenerator, air compressor and wet gas compressor. Unit pressure balance should be viewed as a design variable when evaluating FCC unit revamps. Depending upon limitations of the particular FCC unit, capacity increases of 12.5% to 22.5% have been achieved without modifications to major rotating equipment, by revamping FCC main fractionators with structured packing. An examination of three FCC main fractionator revamps show improvements to pressure profiles and unit capacity. The three revamps described included a wet gas compressor volume limit; an air blower limitation; and a wet gas compressor motor limitation.

  20. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  1. Symmetric continued fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Panprasitwech, Oranit; Laohakosol, Vichian; Chaichana, Tuangrat

    2010-11-11

    Explicit formulae for continued fractions with symmetric patterns in their partial quotients are constructed in the field of formal power series. Similar to the work of Cohn in 1996, which generalized the so-called folding lemma to {kappa}-fold symmetry, the notion of {kappa}-duplicating symmetric continued fractions is investigated using a modification of the 1995 technique due to Clemens, Merrill and Roeder.

  2. Plasma Biomarker Discovery Using 3D Protein Profiling Coupled with Label-Free Quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Lynn A.; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Barnhart, Kurt T.; Speicher, David W.

    2011-01-01

    In-depth quantitative profiling of human plasma samples for biomarker discovery remains quite challenging. One promising alternative to chemical derivatization with stable isotope labels for quantitative comparisons is direct, label-free, quantitative comparison of raw LC–MS data. But, in order to achieve high-sensitivity detection of low-abundance proteins, plasma proteins must be extensively pre-fractionated, and results from LC–MS runs of all fractions must be integrated efficiently in order to avoid misidentification of variations in fractionation from sample to sample as “apparent” biomarkers. This protocol describes a powerful 3D protein profiling method for comprehensive analysis of human serum or plasma proteomes, which combines abundant protein depletion and high-sensitivity GeLC–MS/MS with label-free quantitation of candidate biomarkers. PMID:21468938

  3. Mobile Applications for Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drill, Sabrina L.

    2012-01-01

    Mobile computing devices (smart phones, tablets, etc.) are rapidly becoming the dominant means of communication worldwide and are increasingly being used for scientific investigation. This technology can further our Extension mission by increasing our power for data collection, information dissemination, and informed decision-making. Mobile…

  4. Extensions of Natural Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastelli, G.

    2014-03-01

    Given an n-dimensional natural Hamiltonian L on a Riemannian or pseudo-Riemannian manifold, we call "extension" of L the n+1 dimensional Hamiltonian H = ½p2u + α(u)L + β(u) with new canonically conjugated coordinates (u,pu). For suitable L, the functions α and β can be chosen depending on any natural number m such that H admits an extra polynomial first integral in the momenta of degree m, explicitly determined in the form of the m-th power of a differential operator applied to a certain function of coordinates and momenta. In particular, if L is maximally superintegrable (MS) then H is MS also. Therefore, the extension procedure allows the creation of new superintegrable systems from old ones. For m=2, the extra first integral generated by the extension procedure determines a second-order symmetry operator of a Laplace-Beltrami quantization of H, modified by taking in account the curvature of the configuration manifold. The extension procedure can be applied to several Hamiltonian systems, including the three-body Calogero and Wolfes systems (without harmonic term), the Tremblay-Turbiner-Winternitz system and n-dimensional anisotropic harmonic oscillators. We propose here a short review of the known results of the theory and some previews of new ones.

  5. Job Enrichment in Extension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fourman, Louis S.; Jones, Jo

    1997-01-01

    Interviews with 10 participants in Ohio State University's job enrichment program for midcareer extension agents found that 5 returned to their same jobs after the experience but only 2 felt challenged/renewed. Part-time participation while working made it difficult to balance responsibilities. More information and a structured orientation were…

  6. Identifying High Extension Communicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lionberger, Herbert F.; Pope, LaVern

    1978-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of social science faculty at the University of Missouri-Columbia to find the extent to which they engaged in communicating information to the public through university extension, with implications for changes in the university rewards system. (MF)

  7. Vocabulary Extension through Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surajlal, K. C.

    1986-01-01

    Based on the notion that teaching vocabulary extension in isolation makes little impact on students, a three-part exercise, designed to develop students' vocabulary through poetry while providing meaningful enjoyment, uses the poem "The Hawk" by A. C. Benson. In the first class period, students are introduced to both the exercise and the poem and…

  8. Extensive Reading in Japanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitosugi, Claire Ikumi; Day, Richard R.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses how we incorporated an extensive reading (ER) program into a second semester Japanese course at the University of Hawai'i using Japanese children's literature. After summarizing the ten principles of ER, we describe how we addressed six critical issues faced while introducing ER into the course. We also discuss the outcomes…

  9. Extending Extensive Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Richard R.

    2015-01-01

    The April 2015 issue of "Reading in a Foreign Language" featured a discussion forum on extensive reading (ER). Most of the authors, recognized authorities on ER, discussed their views of the principles of ER, particularly in establishing and conducting ER programs. The purpose of this discussion is to review developments in the practice…

  10. soil organic matter fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osat, Maryam; Heidari, Ahmad

    2010-05-01

    Carbon is essential for plant growth, due to its effects on other soil properties like aggregation. Knowledge of dynamics of organic matter in different locations in the soil matrix can provide valuable information which affects carbon sequestration and soil the other soil properties. Extraction of soil organic matter (SOM) fractions has been a long standing approach to elucidating the roles of soil organic matter in soil processes. Several kind fractionation methods are used and all provide information on soil organic matter function. Physical fractionation capture the effects on SOM dynamics of the spatial arrangement of primary and secondary organomineral particles in soil while chemical fractionation can not consider the spatial arrangement but their organic fractions are suitable for advanced chemical characterization. Three method of physical separation of soil have been used, sieving, sedimentation and densitometry. The distribution of organic matter within physical fractions of the soil can be assessed by sieving. Sieving separates soil particles based strictly on size. The study area is located on north central Iran, between 35° 41'- 36° 01' N and 50° 42'- 51° 14' E. Mean annual precipitation about 243.8 mm and mean annual air temperature is about 14.95 °C. The soil moisture and temperature regime vary between aridic-thermic in lower altitudes to xeric-mesic in upper altitudes. More than 36 surface soil samples (0-20 cm) were collected according to land-use map units. After preliminary analyzing of samples 10 samples were selected for further analyses in five size fractions and three different time intervals in September, January and April 2008. Fractionation carried out by dry sieving in five classes, 1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm, 270 μm-0.5mm, 53-270 μm and <53 μm. Organic matter and C/N ratio were determined for all fractions at different time intervals. Chemical fractionation of organic matter also carried out according to Tan (2003), also Mineralogical

  11. A discrete fractional random transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengjun; Zhao, Haifa; Liu, Shutian

    2005-11-01

    We propose a discrete fractional random transform based on a generalization of the discrete fractional Fourier transform with an intrinsic randomness. Such discrete fractional random transform inheres excellent mathematical properties of the fractional Fourier transform along with some fantastic features of its own. As a primary application, the discrete fractional random transform has been used for image encryption and decryption.

  12. Biochemical characterization of three mycobacterial ribosomal fractions.

    PubMed

    Portelance, V; Beaudet, R

    1983-02-01

    The induction of antituberculous immunity by crude ribosomal fractions isolated from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Ra, M. bovis strain BCG, and M. smegmatis was studied in CF-1 mice. Levels of antituberculous immunity similar to that induced by live BCG were induced by the BCG and H37Ra ribosomal fractions whereas that isolated from M. smegmatis was found to be inactive. Electrophoresis of the three ribosomal fractions in sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacylamide gels followed by differential staining showed the two active ribosomal fractions to be similar in their proteins, carbohydrate-containing substances, and lipid profiles. The inactive smegmatis ribosomal fraction differed mainly from the active ones on the basis of its carbohydrate-containing substances profile and by the absence of lipids. The polysaccharides and the ribosomes present in the H37Ra ribosomal fractions were purified by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A - Sepharose 4B. Each purified preparation showed no or only low antituberculous activity when injected separately, but when mixed together a high protection was observed. The formation of complexes between the ribosomes and the polysaccharide fraction was suggested and appears to be necessary for the induction of antituberculous immunity. PMID:6189570

  13. Volatile fractionation and tektite source material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, L. S.

    1989-09-01

    The arguments used by Love and Woronow (1988) to assess the role played in the origin of bediasites by extensive volatile fractionation are critically examined. Using the ratios of 'refractory' oxides, CaO, Al2O3, and MgO, to the 'volatile' oxides, Na2O and K2O, these authors concluded that vapor fractionation did not play a significant role. In this paper, experimental evidence is presented that shows that the assumption of volatility for the alkali elements (as least with respect to silica) to be not valid under the conditions under which tektites formed. It is shown that the results of vapor fractionation in experiments on glasses of tektite composition are approximately parallel the trends seen in bediasite analysis.

  14. Volatile fractionation and tektite source material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Louis S.

    1989-01-01

    The arguments used by Love and Woronow (1988) to assess the role played in the origin of bediasites by extensive volatile fractionation are critically examined. Using the ratios of 'refractory' oxides, CaO, Al2O3, and MgO, to the 'volatile' oxides, Na2O and K2O, these authors concluded that vapor fractionation did not play a significant role. In this paper, experimental evidence is presented that shows that the assumption of volatility for the alkali elements (as least with respect to silica) to be not valid under the conditions under which tektites formed. It is shown that the results of vapor fractionation in experiments on glasses of tektite composition are approximately parallel the trends seen in bediasite analysis.

  15. On the singular perturbations for fractional differential equation.

    PubMed

    Atangana, Abdon

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to examine the possible extension of the singular perturbation differential equation to the concept of fractional order derivative. To achieve this, we presented a review of the concept of fractional calculus. We make use of the Laplace transform operator to derive exact solution of singular perturbation fractional linear differential equations. We make use of the methodology of three analytical methods to present exact and approximate solution of the singular perturbation fractional, nonlinear, nonhomogeneous differential equation. These methods are including the regular perturbation method, the new development of the variational iteration method, and the homotopy decomposition method. PMID:24683357

  16. Double image encryption based on iterative fractional Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengjun; Liu, Shutian

    2007-07-01

    We present an image encryption algorithm to simultaneously encrypt two images into a single one as the amplitudes of fractional Fourier transform with different orders. From the encrypted image we can get two original images independently by fractional Fourier transforms with two different fractional orders. This algorithm can be independent of additional random phases as the encryption/decryption keys. Numerical results are given to analyze the capability of this proposed method. A possible extension to multi-image encryption with a fractional order multiplexing scheme has also been given.

  17. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FEED ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING DL

    2008-03-19

    Laboratory work was completed on a set of evaporation tests designed to establish a feed envelope for the fractional crystallization process. The feed envelope defines chemical concentration limits within which the process can be operated successfully. All 38 runs in the half-factorial design matrix were completed successfully, based on the qualitative definition of success. There is no feed composition likely to be derived from saltcake dissolution that would cause the fractional crystallization process to not meet acceptable performance requirements. However, some compositions clearly would provide more successful operation than other compositions.

  18. Multipartite Fully Entangled Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianwei

    2016-06-01

    Fully entangled fraction is a definition for bipartite states, which is tightly related to bipartite maximally entangled states, and has clear experimental and theoretical significance. In this work, we generalize it to multipartite case, we call the generalized version multipartite fully entangled fraction (MFEF). MFEF measures the closeness of a state to GHZ states. The analytical expressions of MFEF are very difficult to obtain except for very special states, however, we show that, the MFEF of any state is determined by a system of finite-order polynomial equations. Therefore, the MFEF can be efficiently numerically computed.

  19. Release Fraction Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2004-01-01

    This document presents results of experiments conducted to measure release fractions during certain tank retrieval processes. The tests were performed in a 1/4 scale model of a waste storage tank. The retrieval processes simulated were: (1) Discharging liquid or slurry from the mouth of a vertically oriented two-in. Schedule 40 pipe. The discharging material was in free-fall from the mouth of the pipe near the top of the tank into a liquid or slurry pool at the bottom of the tank. (2) The jet from a 9/16-in.-diameter nozzle transferring liquid or slurry waste from one side of the tank to the other. The discharging liquid was aimed at the opposite side of the tank from the nozzle and either impacted the tank wall or fell into a liquid or slurry pool in the bottom of the tank. (3) A high pressure fan jet of liquid striking a steel plate or simulated waste from a stand-off distance of a few inches. For each process, a water-soluble fluorescent dye was added to the liquid fraction as a tracer. Kaolin clay was used to represent the solids. The tank was covered and there was no forced ventilation in the tank during the tests. Six air samples were collected during each test. The air samples were collected at fixed positions in the tank. The air sample filters were dried and weighed to determine the solids collection. The fluorescent dye was then leached from each filter and quantified with a fluorometer to determine the collection of liquid. Samples of the slurry and liquid simulants were also collected to determine the quantities of simulant used in each test. To calculate the release fraction, the quantity collected on each air sample was adjusted for the fraction of the tank volume sampled and divided by the quantity of material exposed in the simulation. The method was not as sensitive for the solids content as it was for the liquid content, but in those instances where a solids release fraction was determined, it was in relatively good agreement with that of the

  20. ComplexQuant: high-throughput computational pipeline for the global quantitative analysis of endogenous soluble protein complexes using high resolution protein HPLC and precision label-free LC/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Wan, Cuihong; Liu, Jian; Fong, Vincent; Lugowski, Andrew; Stoilova, Snejana; Bethune-Waddell, Dylan; Borgeson, Blake; Havugimana, Pierre C; Marcotte, Edward M; Emili, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    The experimental isolation and characterization of stable multi-protein complexes are essential to understanding the molecular systems biology of a cell. To this end, we have developed a high-throughput proteomic platform for the systematic identification of native protein complexes based on extensive fractionation of soluble protein extracts by multi-bed ion exchange high performance liquid chromatography (IEX-HPLC) combined with exhaustive label-free LC/MS/MS shotgun profiling. To support these studies, we have built a companion data analysis software pipeline, termed ComplexQuant. Proteins present in the hundreds of fractions typically collected per experiment are first identified by exhaustively interrogating MS/MS spectra using multiple database search engines within an integrative probabilistic framework, while accounting for possible post-translation modifications. Protein abundance is then measured across the fractions based on normalized total spectral counts and precursor ion intensities using a dedicated tool, PepQuant. This analysis allows co-complex membership to be inferred based on the similarity of extracted protein co-elution profiles. Each computational step has been optimized for processing large-scale biochemical fractionation datasets, and the reliability of the integrated pipeline has been benchmarked extensively. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: From protein structures to clinical applications. PMID:23063720

  1. Human telomeric proteins occupy selective interstitial sites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dong; Xiong, Yuanyan; Kim, Hyeung; He, Quanyuan; Li, Yumei; Chen, Rui; Songyang, Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Human telomeres are bound and protected by protein complexes assembled around the six core telomeric proteins RAP1, TRF1, TRF2, TIN2, TPP1, and POT1. The function of these proteins on telomeres has been studied extensively. Recently, increasing evidence has suggested possible roles for these proteins outside of telomeres. However, the non-canonical (extra-telomeric) function of human telomeric proteins remains poorly understood. To this end, we systematically investigated the binding sites of telomeric proteins along human chromosomes, by performing whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) for RAP1 and TRF2. ChIP sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed that RAP1 and TRF2 could be found on a small number of interstitial sites, including regions that are proximal to genes. Some of these binding sites contain short telomere repeats, suggesting that telomeric proteins could directly bind to interstitial sites. Interestingly, only a small fraction of the available interstitial telomere repeat-containing regions were occupied by RAP1 and TRF2. Ectopically expressed TRF2 was able to occupy additional interstitial telomere repeat sites, suggesting that protein concentration may dictate the selective targeting of telomeric proteins to interstitial sites. Reducing RAP1 and TRF2 expression by RNA interference led to altered transcription of RAP1- and TRF2-targeted genes. Our results indicate that human telomeric proteins could occupy a limited number of interstitial sites and regulate gene transcription. PMID:21423278

  2. Sweet Work with Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinogradova, Natalya; Blaine, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Almost everyone loves chocolate. However, the same cannot be said about fractions, which are loved by markedly fewer. Middle school students tend to view them with wary respect, but little affection. The authors attempt to sweeten the subject by describing a type of game involving division of chocolate bars. The activity they describe provides a…

  3. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-01

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in high-degree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifold singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.

  4. Fraction collector for electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.

    1977-01-01

    Rotating-tube electrophoresis apparatus employs rotating jet of eluting buffer to reduce effects of convection during separation. Designed for separation of microorganisms and biological species, system combines gravity/gradient compensating of lumen with buffer flush at fraction outlet to increase separation efficiency.

  5. Fractionation of Soil Phosphorus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An understanding of the qualitative and quantitative information provided by soil phosphorus (P) fractionation methods is important for addressing agronomic and water quality problems, as well as evaluating P biogeochemistry in extreme environments. This chapter provides a schematic overview of and ...

  6. Field-Flow Fractionation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Karin D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a technique for separating samples that range over 15 orders of magnitude in molecular weight. Discusses theory, apparatus, and sample preparation techniques. Lists several types of field-flow fractionation (FFF) and their uses: sedimentation FFF, thermal FFF, flow FFF, electrical FFF, and steric FFF. (ML)

  7. Fractional statistics and confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaete, P.; Wotzasek, C.

    2005-02-01

    It is shown that a pointlike composite having charge and magnetic moment displays a confining potential for the static interaction while simultaneously obeying fractional statistics in a pure gauge theory in three dimensions, without a Chern-Simons term. This result is distinct from the Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory that shows a screening nature for the potential.

  8. Agricultural Extension: Who Uses It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Michael; Lasley, Paul

    1979-01-01

    A Missouri study conducted to determine agricultural extension usage patterns found that heavy users of extension publications tended to be younger farmers, those with a relatively large amount of land, and pork producers. Extension meetings were a less frequent source of information than either publications or county extension office visits. (LRA)

  9. Evidence against the involvement of ionically bound cell wall proteins in pea epicotyl growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melan, M. A.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    Ionically bound cell wall proteins were extracted from 7 day old etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) epicotyls with 3 molar LiCl. Polyclonal antiserum was raised in rabbits against the cell wall proteins. Growth assays showed that treatment of growing region segments (5-7 millimeters) of peas with either dialyzed serum, serum globulin fraction, affinity purified immunoglobulin, or papain-cleaved antibody fragments had no effect on growth. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed antibody binding to cell walls and penetration of the antibodies into the tissues. Western blot analysis, immunoassay results, and affinity chromatography utilizing Sepharose-bound antibodies confirmed recognition of the protein preparation by the antibodies. Experiments employing in vitro extension as a screening measure indicated no effect upon extension by antibodies, by 50 millimolar LiCl perfusion of the apoplast or by 3 molar LiCl extraction. Addition of cell wall protein to protease pretreated segments did not restore extension nor did addition of cell wall protein to untreated segments increase extension. It is concluded that, although evidence suggests that protein is responsible for the process of extension, the class(es) of proteins which are extracted from pea cell walls with 3 molar LiCl are probably not involved in this process.

  10. Fractional Klein-Gordon Equations and Related Stochastic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garra, Roberto; Orsingher, Enzo; Polito, Federico

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents finite-velocity random motions driven by fractional Klein-Gordon equations of order α in (0,1] . A key tool in the analysis is played by the McBride's theory which converts fractional hyper-Bessel operators into Erdélyi-Kober integral operators. Special attention is payed to the fractional telegraph process whose space-dependent distribution solves a non-homogeneous fractional Klein-Gordon equation. The distribution of the fractional telegraph process for α = 1 coincides with that of the classical telegraph process and its driving equation converts into the homogeneous Klein-Gordon equation. Fractional planar random motions at finite velocity are also investigated, the corresponding distributions obtained as well as the explicit form of the governing equations. Fractionality is reflected into the underlying random motion because in each time interval a binomial number of deviations B(n,α ) (with uniformly-distributed orientation) are considered. The parameter n of B(n,α ) is itself a random variable with fractional Poisson distribution, so that fractionality acts as a subsampling of the changes of direction. Finally the behaviour of each coordinate of the planar motion is examined and the corresponding densities obtained. Extensions to N -dimensional fractional random flights are envisaged as well as the fractional counterpart of the Euler-Poisson-Darboux equation to which our theory applies.

  11. LIMB demonstration project extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-21

    The purpose of the DOE limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension is to extend the data base on LIMB technology and to expand DOE's list of Clean Coal Technologies by demonstrating the Coolside process as part of the project. The main objectives of this project are: to demonstrate the general applicability of LIMB technology by testing 3 coals and 4 sorbents (total of 12 coal/sorbent combinations) at the Ohio Edison Edgewater plant; and to demonstrate that Coolside is a viable technology for improving precipitator performance and reducing sulfur dioxide emissions while acceptable operability is maintained. Progress is reported. 3 figs.

  12. Portable Extensible Viewer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, Jay G.

    1997-01-01

    The use of Nonuniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) to represent geometry and data offers a standard way to facilitate the multidisciplinary analysis and design of aeropropulsion products. Using standard geometry defined by NURBS throughout design, analysis, part definition, manufacture, and test processes saves money and time. The Portable Extensible Viewer (PEV) offers engineers of different disciplines a means to view and manipulate NURBS geometry and associated data. Under the guidance of a team of Lewis, Boeing Company, and Navy personnel, PEV was developed by NASA Lewis Research Center's Computer Services Division for Lewis' Interdisciplinary Technology Office. The aeropropulsion industry provided input to the design requirements.

  13. Enzymes and other agents that enhance cell wall extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Polysaccharides and proteins are secreted to the inner surface of the growing cell wall, where they assemble into a network that is mechanically strong, yet remains extensible until the cells cease growth. This review focuses on the agents that directly or indirectly enhance the extensibility properties of growing walls. The properties of expansins, endoglucanases, and xyloglucan transglycosylases are reviewed and their postulated roles in modulating wall extensibility are evaluated. A summary model for wall extension is presented, in which expansin is a primary agent of wall extension, whereas endoglucanases, xyloglucan endotransglycosylase, and other enzymes that alter wall structure act secondarily to modulate expansin action.

  14. Thermal-mechanical response to simple shear extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlong, K. P.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism of extension in the continental crust is apparently much more complex than that acting in the oceanic lithosphere. Recently, Wernicke has proposed that a significant fraction of extension in the continental lithosphere may occur by a simple shear mechanism along discrete fault/shear zones which cut the crust, and perhaps extend into the uppermost mantle. Clearly much of the surface evidence for extension supports this concept, but the depth extent of simple shear extension in the continental crust is unclear. Using numerical simulations, the thermal and associated mechanical behavior of the continental lithosphere in response to lithosphere extension along a low-angle simple shear zone which cuts through the lithospheric plate was determined in order to evaluate the resolving ability of thermal (heat flow and metamorphic P-T-time paths) and elevation observations in constraining the mode of continental extension.

  15. An Introduction to Continued Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Charles G.

    Provided is an introduction to the properties of continued fractions for the intellectually curious high school student. Among the topics included are (1) Expansion of Rational Numbers into Simple Continued Fractions, (2) Convergents, (3) Continued Fractions and Linear Diophantine Equations of the Type am + bn = c, (4) Continued Fractions and…

  16. Goal Sketches in Fraction Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sophian, Catherine; Madrid, Samara

    2003-01-01

    To examine how conceptual knowledge about fraction magnitudes changes as students' learning progresses, 5th and 7th-grade students were asked to solve fraction magnitude problems that entailed finding a fraction between two given fractions and then to evaluate solutions for similar problems that were modeled for them. When the given fractions…

  17. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-15

    The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full- scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

  18. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-15

    The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Mitigation Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full- scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

  19. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-15

    The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full- scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

  20. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-15

    The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full- scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

  1. Testing fractional action cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchigolev, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    The present work deals with a combined test of the so-called Fractional Action Cosmology (FAC) on the example of a specific model obtained by the author earlier. In this model, the effective cosmological term is proportional to the Hubble parameter squared through the so-called kinematic induction. The reason of studying this cosmological model could be explained by its ability to describe two periods of accelerated expansion, that is in agreement with the recent observations and the cosmological inflation paradigm. First of all, we put our model through the theoretical tests, which gives a general conception of the influence of the model parameters on its behavior. Then, we obtain some restrictions on the principal parameters of the model, including the fractional index, by means of the observational data. Finally, the cosmography parameters and the observational data compared to the theoretical predictions are presented both analytically and graphically.

  2. New Dry Fractionation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Cooper, Bonnie L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation describes new fractionation methods that are used to create dust that is respirable for testing the effects of inhalation of lunar dust in preparation for future manned lunar exploration. Because lunar dust is a very limited commodity, a method that does not result in loss of the material had to be developed. The dust separation system that is described incorporates some traditional methods, while preventing the dust from being contaminated or changed in reactivity properties while also limiting losses.

  3. Fractional Galilean symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseiny, Ali; Rouhani, Shahin

    2016-09-01

    We generalize the differential representation of the operators of the Galilean algebras to include fractional derivatives. As a result a whole new class of scale invariant Galilean algebras are obtained. The first member of this class has dynamical index z = 2 similar to the Schrödinger algebra. The second member of the class has dynamical index z = 3 / 2, which happens to be the dynamical index Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation.

  4. Model Fractional Chern Insulators.

    PubMed

    Behrmann, Jörg; Liu, Zhao; Bergholtz, Emil J

    2016-05-27

    We devise local lattice models whose ground states are model fractional Chern insulators-Abelian and non-Abelian topologically ordered states characterized by exact ground state degeneracies at any finite size and infinite entanglement gaps. Most saliently, we construct exact parent Hamiltonians for two distinct families of bosonic lattice generalizations of the Z_{k} parafermion quantum Hall states: (i) color-entangled fractional Chern insulators at band filling fractions ν=k/(C+1) and (ii) nematic states at ν=k/2, where C is the Chern number of the lowest band. In spite of a fluctuating Berry curvature, our construction is partially frustration free: the ground states reside entirely within the lowest band and exactly minimize a local (k+1) body repulsion term by term. In addition to providing the first known models hosting intriguing states such as higher Chern number generalizations of the Fibonacci anyon quantum Hall states, the remarkable stability and finite-size properties make our models particularly well suited for the study of novel phenomena involving, e.g., twist defects and proximity induced superconductivity, as well as being a guide for designing experiments. PMID:27284668

  5. Model Fractional Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrmann, Jörg; Liu, Zhao; Bergholtz, Emil J.

    2016-05-01

    We devise local lattice models whose ground states are model fractional Chern insulators—Abelian and non-Abelian topologically ordered states characterized by exact ground state degeneracies at any finite size and infinite entanglement gaps. Most saliently, we construct exact parent Hamiltonians for two distinct families of bosonic lattice generalizations of the Zk parafermion quantum Hall states: (i) color-entangled fractional Chern insulators at band filling fractions ν =k /(C +1 ) and (ii) nematic states at ν =k /2 , where C is the Chern number of the lowest band. In spite of a fluctuating Berry curvature, our construction is partially frustration free: the ground states reside entirely within the lowest band and exactly minimize a local (k +1 ) body repulsion term by term. In addition to providing the first known models hosting intriguing states such as higher Chern number generalizations of the Fibonacci anyon quantum Hall states, the remarkable stability and finite-size properties make our models particularly well suited for the study of novel phenomena involving, e.g., twist defects and proximity induced superconductivity, as well as being a guide for designing experiments.

  6. Repair of hair bundles in sea anemones by secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Watson, G M; Mire, P; Hudson, R R

    1998-01-01

    Sea anemones are sessile invertebrates that detect movements of prey using numerous hair bundles located on tentacles surrounding their mouth. Previously we found that hair bundles of anemones are structurally and functionally similar to those of vertebrates. After 10-15 min exposure to calcium depleted buffers, hair bundles in chickens suffer moderate damage from which they recover in 12 h without requiring new protein synthesis [Zhao, Yamoah and Gillespie, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94 (1996) 15469-15474]. We find that after 1 h exposure to calcium free seawater, hair bundles of anemones suffer extensive damage from which they recover in 4 h, apparently because of newly synthesized, secretory proteins called 'repair proteins'. Recovery is delayed in a dose dependent fashion by cycloheximide. In the presence of exogenously added repair proteins, recovery occurs within 8 min and is cycloheximide insensitive. Recovery is ascertained by a bioassay performed on intact specimens, by electrophysiology, and by timelapse video microscopy. Fraction beta, a chromatographic fraction with bioactivity comparable to the complete mixture of repair proteins, consists of complexes having an estimated mass of 2000 kDa. Avidin based cytochemistry suggests that biotinylated fraction beta binds to damaged hair bundles. SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis demonstrates that fraction beta contains 8-10 polypeptides of 90 kDa or smaller. At least four of these polypeptides apparently are consumed during the repair process. Negatively stained samples of fraction beta are shown by transmission electron microscopy to include filamentous structures similar in length (150 nm) and width (6 nm) to linkages between stereocilia. The filamentous structures can be associated with globular structures (20 nm in diameter). A model is presented wherein repair proteins comprise replacement linkages and enzymes that attach linkages to appropriate membrane proteins. PMID:9472741

  7. Turning an Extension Aide into an Extension Agent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seevers, Brenda; Dormody, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    For any organization to remain sustainable, a renewable source of faculty and staff needs to be available. The Extension Internship Program for Juniors and Seniors in High School is a new tool for recruiting and developing new Extension agents. Students get "hands on" experience working in an Extension office and earn college credit while in high…

  8. Solvent Fractionation of Lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. The major issues for the commercial production of value added high performance lignin products are lignin s physical and chemical heterogenities. To overcome these problems, a variety of procedures have been developed to produce pure lignin suitable for high performace applications such as lignin-derived carbon materials. However, most of the isolation procedures affect lignin s properties and structure. In this chapter, a short review of the effect of solvent fractionation on lignin s properties and structure is presented.

  9. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Anderson, G.A.

    1994-08-23

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynchronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board. 9 figs.

  10. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynscronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board.

  11. Proteomic Screening for Amyloid Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nizhnikov, Anton A.; Alexandrov, Alexander I.; Ryzhova, Tatyana A.; Mitkevich, Olga V.; Dergalev, Alexander A.; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael D.; Galkin, Alexey P.

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive study, progress in elucidation of biological functions of amyloids and their role in pathology is largely restrained due to the lack of universal and reliable biochemical methods for their discovery. All biochemical methods developed so far allowed only identification of glutamine/asparagine-rich amyloid-forming proteins or proteins comprising amyloids that form large deposits. In this article we present a proteomic approach which may enable identification of a broad range of amyloid-forming proteins independently of specific features of their sequences or levels of expression. This approach is based on the isolation of protein fractions enriched with amyloid aggregates via sedimentation by ultracentrifugation in the presence of strong ionic detergents, such as sarkosyl or SDS. Sedimented proteins are then separated either by 2D difference gel electrophoresis or by SDS-PAGE, if they are insoluble in the buffer used for 2D difference gel electrophoresis, after which they are identified by mass-spectrometry. We validated this approach by detection of known yeast prions and mammalian proteins with established capacity for amyloid formation and also revealed yeast proteins forming detergent-insoluble aggregates in the presence of human huntingtin with expanded polyglutamine domain. Notably, with one exception, all these proteins contained glutamine/asparagine-rich stretches suggesting that their aggregates arose due to polymerization cross-seeding by human huntingtin. Importantly, though the approach was developed in a yeast model, it can easily be applied to any organism thus representing an efficient and universal tool for screening for amyloid proteins. PMID:25549323

  12. Proteome-wide identification of predominant subcellular protein localizations in a bacterial model organism

    SciTech Connect

    Stekhoven, Daniel J.; Omasits, Ulrich; Quebatte, Maxime; Dehio, Christoph; Ahrens, Christian H.

    2014-03-01

    Proteomics data provide unique insights into biological systems, including the predominant subcellular localization (SCL) of proteins, which can reveal important clues about their functions. Here we analyzed data of a complete prokaryotic proteome expressed under two conditions mimicking interaction of the emerging pathogen Bartonella henselae with its mammalian host. Normalized spectral count data from cytoplasmic, total membrane, inner and outer membrane fractions allowed us to identify the predominant SCL for 82% of the identified proteins. The spectral count proportion of total membrane versus cytoplasmic fractions indicated the propensity of cytoplasmic proteins to co-fractionate with the inner membrane, and enabled us to distinguish cytoplasmic, peripheral innermembrane and bona fide inner membrane proteins. Principal component analysis and k-nearest neighbor classification training on selected marker proteins or predominantly localized proteins, allowed us to determine an extensive catalog of at least 74 expressed outer membrane proteins, and to extend the SCL assignment to 94% of the identified proteins, including 18% where in silico methods gave no prediction. Suitable experimental proteomics data combined with straightforward computational approaches can thus identify the predominant SCL on a proteome-wide scale. Finally, we present a conceptual approach to identify proteins potentially changing their SCL in a condition-dependent fashion.

  13. Field-flow fractionation of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.C.

    1993-04-01

    The first topic of this project involved the preparation, fractionation by sedimentation/steric Field Flow Fractionation (FFF), and modeling of metaphase chromosomes. After numerous unsuccessful attempts to prepare chromosomes, we have implemented a procedure (in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory) to prepare metaphase chromosomes from Chinese hamster cells. Extensive experimentation was necessary to identify a suitable FFF channel surface to minimize chromosome adsorption and a carrier liquid to stabilize and disperse the chromosomes. Under suitable operating conditions, the Chinese hamster chromosomes were purified from cell debris and partially fractionated. The purified, preenriched chromosomes that can be prepared by sedimentation/steric FFF or produced continuously by continuous SPLITT fractionation provide an enriched feed material for subsequent flow cytometry. In the second project component, flow FFF permitted successful separations of single- from double-stranded circular DNA, double-stranded circular DNAs of various sizes, and linear double-stranded DNA fragments of various lengths. Diffusion coefficients extracted from retention data agreed well with literature data as well as predictions of major polymer theories. The capacity of FFF separations was evaluated to examine potential applications to long DNA chains.

  14. Introducing the fractional order robotic Darwinian PSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couceiro, Micael S.; Martins, Fernando M. L.; Rocha, Rui P.; Ferreira, Nuno M. F.

    2012-11-01

    The Darwinian Particle Swarm Optimization (DPSO) is an evolutionary algorithm that extends the Particle Swarm Optimization using natural selection to enhance the ability to escape from sub-optimal solutions. An extension of the DPSO to multi-robot applications has been recently proposed and denoted as Robotic Darwinian PSO (RDPSO), benefiting from the dynamical partitioning of the whole population of robots, hence decreasing the amount of required information exchange among robots. This paper further extends the previously proposed algorithm using fractional calculus concepts to control the convergence rate, while considering the robot dynamical characteristics. Moreover, to improve the convergence analysis of the RDPSO, an adjustment of the fractional coefficient based on mobile robot constraints is presented and experimentally assessed with 2 real platforms. Afterwards, this novel fractional-order RDPSO is evaluated in 12 physical robots being further explored using a larger population of 100 simulated mobile robots within a larger scenario. Experimental results show that changing the fractional coefficient does not significantly improve the final solution but presents a significant influence in the convergence time because of its inherent memory property.

  15. A Statistical Treatment of Bioassay Pour Fractions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barengoltz, Jack; Hughes, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The binomial probability distribution is used to treat the statistics of a microbiological sample that is split into two parts, with only one part evaluated for spore count. One wishes to estimate the total number of spores in the sample based on the counts obtained from the part that is evaluated (pour fraction). Formally, the binomial distribution is recharacterized as a function of the observed counts (successes), with the total number (trials) an unknown. The pour fraction is the probability of success per spore (trial). This distribution must be renormalized in terms of the total number. Finally, the new renormalized distribution is integrated and mathematically inverted to yield the maximum estimate of the total number as a function of a desired level of confidence ( P(fraction. The extension to recovery efficiency corrections is also presented. Now the product of recovery efficiency and pour fraction may be small enough that the likely value may be much larger than the usual calculation: the number of spores divided by that product. The use of this analysis would not be limited to microbiological data.

  16. The BGAN extension programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Juan J.; Trachtman, Eyal; Richharia, Madhavendra

    2005-11-01

    Mobile satellite telecommunications systems have undergone an enormous evolution in the last decades, with the interest in having advanced telecommunications services available on demand, anywhere and at any time, leading to incredible advances. The demand for braodband data is therefore rapidly gathering pace, but current solutions are finding it increasingly difficult to combine large bandwidth with ubiquitous coverage, reliability and portability. The BGAN (Broadband Global Area Network) system, designed to operate with the Inmarsat-4 satellites, provides breakthrough services that meet all of these requirements. It will enable broadband connection on the move, delivering all the key tools of the modern office. Recognising the great impact that Inmarsat's BGAN system will have on the European satellite communications industry, and the benefits that it will bring to a wide range of European industries, in 2003 ESA initiated the "BGAN Extension" project. Its primary goals are to provide the full range of BGAN services to truly mobile platforms, operating in aeronautical, vehicular and maritime environments, and to introduce a multicast service capability. The project is supported by the ARTES Programme which establishes a collaboration agreement between ESA, Inmarsat and a group of key industrial and academic institutions which includes EMS, Logica, Nera and the University of Surrey (UK).

  17. Extensible Wind Towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinagra, Marco; Tucciarelli, Tullio

    The diffusion of wind energy generators is restricted by their strong landscape impact. The PERIMA project is about the development of an extensible wind tower able to support a wind machine for several hundred kW at its optimal working height, up to more than 50 m. The wind tower has a telescopic structure, made by several tubes located inside each other with their axis in vertical direction. The lifting force is given by a jack-up system confined inside a shaft, drilled below the ground level. In the retracted tower configuration, at rest, tower tubes are hidden in the foundation of the telescopic structure, located below the ground surface, and the wind machine is the only emerging part of the system. The lifting system is based on a couple of oleodynamic cylinders that jack-up a central tube connected to the top of the tower by a spring, with a diameter smaller than the minimum tower diameter and with a length a bit greater than the length of the extended telescopic structure. The central tube works as plunger and lifts all telescopic elements. The constraint between the telescopic elements is ensured by special parts, which are kept in traction by the force of the spring and provide the resisting moment. The most evident benefit of the proposed system is attained with the use of a two-blade propeller, which can be kept horizontal in the retracted tower configuration.

  18. Quark matter induced extensive air showers

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Kyle

    2011-05-15

    If the dark matter of our Galaxy is composed of nuggets of quarks or antiquarks in a color superconducting phase there will be a small but nonzero flux of these objects through the Earth's atmosphere. A nugget of quark matter will deposit only a small fraction of its kinetic energy in the atmosphere and is likely to be undetectable. If however the impacting object is composed of antiquarks, the energy deposited can be quite large. In this case nuclear annihilations within the nugget will trigger an extensive air shower the particle content of which is similar to that produced by an ultrahigh energy cosmic ray. This paper gives a qualitative description of the basic properties of such a shower. Several distinctions from an air shower initiated by a single ultrahigh energy nucleus will be described, allowing these events to be distinguished from the cosmic ray background. The subtlety of these features may mean that some fraction of the high energy cosmic ray spectrum may in fact be due to this type of dark matter interaction. The estimated flux of dark matter nuggets and the energy deposited in the atmosphere are such that the Pierre Auger Observatory may prove an ideal facility to place constraints on the flux of heavy quark matter objects. This paper attempts to highlight the best techniques to search for a quark matter signature through an extensive air shower signal.

  19. Clean fractionation of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The US DOE Alternative Feedstocks (AF) program is forging new links between the agricultural community and the chemicals industry through support of research and development (R&D) that uses green feedstocks to produce chemicals. The program promotes cost-effective industrial use of renewable biomass as feedstocks to manufacture high-volume chemical building blocks. Industrial commercialization of such processes would stimulate the agricultural sector by increasing the demand of agricultural and forestry commodities. A consortium of five DOE national laboratories has been formed with the objectives of providing industry with a broad range of expertise and helping to lower the risk of new process development through federal cost sharing. The AF program is conducting ongoing research on a clean fractionation process, designed to convert biomass into materials that can be used for chemical processes and products. The focus of the clean fractionation research is to demonstrate to industry that one technology can successfully separate all types of feedstocks into predictable types of chemical intermediates.

  20. Autolysis and extension of isolated walls from growing cucumber hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.; Durachko, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    Walls isolated from cucumber hypocotyls retain autolytic activities and the ability to extend when placed under the appropriate conditions. To test whether autolysis and extension are related, we treated the walls in various ways to enhance or inhibit long-term wall extension ('creep') and measured autolysis as release of various saccharides from the wall. Except for some non-specific inhibitors of enzymatic activity, we found no correlation between wall extension and wall autolysis. Most notably, autolysis and extension differed strongly in their pH dependence. We also found that exogenous cellulases and pectinases enhanced extension in native walls, but when applied to walls previously inactivated with heat or protease these enzymes caused breakage without sustained extension. In contrast, pretreatment of walls with pectinase or cellulase, followed by boiling in methanol to inactivate the enzymes, resulted in walls with much stronger expansin-mediated extension responses. Crude protein preparations from the digestive tracts of snails enhanced extension of both native and inactivated walls, and these preparations contained expansin-like proteins (assessed by Western blotting). Our results indicate that the extension of isolated cucumber walls does not depend directly on the activity of endogenous wall-bound autolytic enzymes. The results with exogenous enzymes suggest that the hydrolysis of matrix polysaccharides may not induce wall creep by itself, but may act synergistically with expansins to enhance wall extension.

  1. Proteomic analysis of human aqueous humor using multidimensional protein identification technology

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Matthew R.; Price, Marianne O.; Price, Francis W.; Pardo, Jennifer C.; Grandin, Juan C.; You, Jinsam; Wang, Mu

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous humor (AH) supports avascular tissues in the anterior segment of the eye, maintains intraocular pressure, and potentially influences the pathogenesis of ocular diseases. Nevertheless, the AH proteome is still poorly defined despite several previous efforts, which were hindered by interfering high abundance proteins, inadequate animal models, and limited proteomic technologies. To facilitate future investigations into AH function, the AH proteome was extensively characterized using an advanced proteomic approach. Samples from patients undergoing cataract surgery were pooled and depleted of interfering abundant proteins and thereby divided into two fractions: albumin-bound and albumin-depleted. Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) was utilized for each fraction; this incorporates strong cation exchange chromatography to reduce sample complexity before reversed-phase liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometric analysis. Twelve proteins had multi-peptide, high confidence identifications in the albumin-bound fraction and 50 proteins had multi-peptide, high confidence identifications in the albumin-depleted fraction. Gene ontological analyses were performed to determine which cellular components and functions were enriched. Many proteins were previously identified in the AH and for several their potential role in the AH has been investigated; however, the majority of identified proteins were novel and only speculative roles can be suggested. The AH was abundant in anti-oxidant and immunoregulatory proteins as well as anti-angiogenic proteins, which may be involved in maintaining the avascular tissues. This is the first known report to extensively characterize and describe the human AH proteome and lays the foundation for future work regarding its function in homeostatic and pathologic states. PMID:20019884

  2. Expressing and purifying membrane transport proteins in high yield.

    PubMed

    Hale, Calvin C; Hill, Chananada K; Price, Elmer M; Bossuyt, Julie

    2002-01-01

    Structural analysis of native or recombinant membrane transport proteins has been hampered by the lack of effective methodologies to purify sufficient quantities of active protein. We addressed this problem by expressing a polyhistidine tagged construct of the cardiac sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX1) in Trichoplusia ni larvae (caterpillars) from which membrane vesicles were prepared. Larvae vesicles containing recombinant NCX1-his protein supported NCX1 transport activity that was mechanistically not different from activity in native cardiac sarcolemmal vesicles although the specific activity was reduced. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis demonstrated the presence of both the 120 and 70 kDa forms of the NCX1 protein. Larvae vesicle proteins were solubilized in sodium cholate detergent and fractionated on a chelated Ni(2+) affinity chromatography column. After extensive washing, eluted fractions were mixed with soybean phospholipids and reconstituted. The resulting proteoliposomes contained NCX1 activity suggesting the protein retained native conformation. SDS-PAGE revealed two major bands at 120 and 70 kDa. Purification of large amounts of active NCX1 via this methodology should facilitate biophysical analysis of the protein. The larva expression system has broad-based application for membrane proteins where expression and purification of quantities required for physical analyses is problematic. PMID:11741710

  3. Root Hair Deformations Associated with Fractionated Extracts from Rhizobium trifolii†

    PubMed Central

    Ervin, Sean E.; Hubbell, David H.

    1985-01-01

    Components from culture fluid and whole cells of Rhizobium trifolii were examined for effects on root hair morphology of white clover seedlings (Trifolium repens var. Ladino). Cell-free culture fluid, exopolysaccharides, supernatant fluid from the precipitation of the exopolysaccharides, capsular polysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, and a protein fraction from culture fluids were assayed for morphogenetic effects on the root hairs of axenically grown clover seedlings. Crude fractions were chromatographed on Bio Gel A-5m (Bio-Rad Laboratories), and fractions collected were similarly assayed. Hexose, uronic acid, and protein concentrations were determined for all fractions assayed. Gel chromatography indicated the materials with deforming ability to be of high molecular weight (>10,000). For all fractions except exopolysaccharide, deforming ability was associated with a protein component. This suggested that two components were associated with deformation; both contained polysaccharides and one contained protein. Crude fractions differed in their ability to cause deformations and indicated the following relative ability (in decreasing order) to deform root hairs: cell-free culture fluid, capsular polysaccharides, protein from culture fluids, exopolysaccharide, and cell envelope. Lipopolysaccharides had no effect. Images PMID:16346709

  4. Platelet cytosolic 44-kDa protein is a substrate of cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation and is not recognized by antisera against the. alpha. subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Molina Y Vedia, L.M.; Reep, B.R.; Lapetina, E.G. )

    1988-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation induced by cholera toxin and pertussis toxin was studied in particulate and cytosolic fractions of human platelets. Platelets were disrupted by a cycle of freezing and thawing in the presence of a hyposmotic buffer containing protease inhibitors. In both fractions, the A subunit of cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates two proteins with molecular masses of 42 and 44 kDa, whereas pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylates a 41-kDa polypeptide. Two antisera against the {alpha} subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein recognize only the 42-kDa polypeptide. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of the 42- and 44-kDa proteins is reduced by pretreatment of platelets with iloprost, a prostacyclin analog. The 44-kDa protein, which is substrate of cholera toxin, could be extracted completely from the membrane and recovered in the cytosolic fraction when the cells were disrupted by Dounce homogenization and the pellet was extensively washed. A 44-kDa protein can also be labeled with 8-azidoguanosine 5{prime}-({alpha}-{sup 32}P)triphosphate in the cytosol and membranes. These finding indicate that cholera and pertussis toxins produced covalent modifications of proteins present in particulate and cytosolic platelet fractions. Moreover, the 44-kDa protein might be an {alpha} subunit of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein that is not recognized by available antisera.

  5. The Logical Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The same software controlling autonomous and crew-assisted operations for the International Space Station (ISS) is enabling commercial enterprises to integrate and automate manual operations, also known as decision logic, in real time across complex and disparate networked applications, databases, servers, and other devices, all with quantifiable business benefits. Auspice Corporation, of Framingham, Massachusetts, developed the Auspice TLX (The Logical Extension) software platform to effectively mimic the human decision-making process. Auspice TLX automates operations across extended enterprise systems, where any given infrastructure can include thousands of computers, servers, switches, and modems that are connected, and therefore, dependent upon each other. The concept behind the Auspice software spawned from a computer program originally developed in 1981 by Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Draper Laboratory for simulating tasks performed by astronauts aboard the Space Shuttle. At the time, the Space Shuttle Program was dependent upon paper-based procedures for its manned space missions, which typically averaged 2 weeks in duration. As the Shuttle Program progressed, NASA began increasing the length of manned missions in preparation for a more permanent space habitat. Acknowledging the need to relinquish paper-based procedures in favor of an electronic processing format to properly monitor and manage the complexities of these longer missions, NASA realized that Draper's task simulation software could be applied to its vision of year-round space occupancy. In 1992, Draper was awarded a NASA contract to build User Interface Language software to enable autonomous operations of a multitude of functions on Space Station Freedom (the station was redesigned in 1993 and converted into the international venture known today as the ISS)

  6. Regional differences in in vivo myocardial protein synthesis in the neonatal rabbit heart.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M E; Samarel, A M

    1990-05-01

    Left ventricular free wall (LV) myofibrillar proteins accumulate at a rate approximately 2.5 times faster than the rate of right ventricular free wall (RV) proteins during postnatal cardiac development of the rabbit heart. In this study, the contribution of regional differences in in vivo protein synthesis to the differential rates of growth of the RV and LV myocardium was assessed in 4-d, 3-wk, and 9-wk old rabbits. In vivo total protein fractional synthetic rates were measured by a modification of the flooding infusion method, with calculations based upon the rate of equilibration of plasma leucine and cardiac leucyl-tRNA specific radioactivities following intravenous administration of a large dose of labeled amino acid. This method was also applied to the analysis of the fractional synthetic rate of a contractile protein subunit (myosin heavy chain) in the RV and LV of 4-d and 9-wk old rabbits. Accelerated growth of the LV during the first week of postnatal cardiac development was associated with increased total protein fractional synthetic rates (35.3 +/- 3.6 vs. 45.5 +/- 4.7%/day for RV and LV total protein of 4-d old rabbits, respectively). In addition, RV and LV fractional synthetic rates for myosin heavy chain in the same 4-d old rabbits were considerably greater than those values observed for total protein (84.0 +/- 13.1 and 98.4 +/- 16.9%/day for RV and LV myosin heavy chain, respectively. However, the fractional synthetic rates of both total protein and myosin heavy chain in both the RV and LV rapidly declined during the transition from fetal to adult hemodynamics. Thus, regional and developmental differences in myocyte-specific protein synthesis both contribute to the extensive restructuring of ventricular muscle during this period of extremely rapid growth. These differences may be in response to regional and developmental changes in hemodynamic load. PMID:2388284

  7. What is a fractional derivative?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortigueira, Manuel D.; Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    This paper discusses the concepts underlying the formulation of operators capable of being interpreted as fractional derivatives or fractional integrals. Two criteria for required by a fractional operator are formulated. The Grünwald-Letnikov, Riemann-Liouville and Caputo fractional derivatives and the Riesz potential are accessed in the light of the proposed criteria. A Leibniz rule is also obtained for the Riesz potential.

  8. Analysis of the Protein Phosphotome of Entamoeba histolytica Reveals an Intricate Phosphorylation Network

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Tamanna; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the most common mechanism for the propagation of intracellular signals. Protein phosphatases and protein kinases play a dynamic antagonistic role in protein phosphorylation. Protein phosphatases make up a significant fraction of eukaryotic proteome. In this article, we report the identification and analysis of protein phosphatases in the intracellular parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Based on an in silico analysis, we classified 250 non-redundant protein phosphatases in E. histolytica. The phosphotome of E. histolytica is 3.1% of its proteome and 1.3 times of the human phosphotome. In this extensive study, we identified 42 new putative phosphatases (39 hypothetical proteins and 3 pseudophosphatases). The presence of pseudophosphatases may have an important role in virulence of E. histolytica. A comprehensive phosphotome analysis of E. histolytica shows spectacular low similarity to human phosphatases, making them potent candidates for drug target. PMID:24236039

  9. The other prey-capture silk: Fibres made by glow-worms (Diptera: Keroplatidae) comprise cross-β-sheet crystallites in an abundant amorphous fraction.

    PubMed

    Walker, Andrew A; Weisman, Sarah; Trueman, Holly E; Merritt, David J; Sutherland, Tara D

    2015-09-01

    Glow-worms (larvae of dipteran genus Arachnocampa) are restricted to moist habitats where they capture flying prey using snares composed of highly extensible silk fibres and sticky mucus droplets. Little is known about the composition or structure of glow-worm snares, or the extent of possible convergence between glow-worm and arachnid capture silks. We characterised Arachnocampa richardsae silk and mucus using X-ray scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and amino acid analysis. Silk but not mucus contained crystallites of the cross-β-sheet type, which occur in unrelated insect silks but have not been reported previously in fibres used for prey capture. Mucus proteins were rich in Gly (28.5%) and existed in predominantly a random coil structure, typical of many adhesive proteins. In contrast, the silk fibres were unusually rich in charged and polar residues, particularly Lys (18.1%), which we propose is related to their use in a highly hydrated state. Comparison of X-ray scattering, infrared spectroscopy and amino acid analysis data suggests that silk fibres contain a high fraction of disordered protein. We suggest that in the native hydrated state, silk fibres are capable of extension via deformation of both disordered regions and cross-β-sheet crystallites, and that high extensibility is an adaptation promoting successful prey capture. This study illustrates the rich variety of protein motifs that are available for recruitment into biopolymers, and how convergently evolved materials can nevertheless be based on fundamentally different protein structures. PMID:26006749

  10. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; Gunzburger, Max Donald; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  11. Using Steffe's Advanced Fraction Schemes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Andrea V.; Norton, Anderson H.

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing schemes, which are different from strategies, can help teachers understand their students' thinking about fractions. Using Steffe's advanced fraction schemes, the authors describe a progression of development that upper elementary and middle school students might follow in understanding fractions. Each scheme can be viewed as a…

  12. How Weird Are Weird Fractions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuffelbeam, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    A positive rational is a weird fraction if its value is unchanged by an illegitimate, digit-based reduction. In this article, we prove that each weird fraction is uniquely weird and initiate a discussion of the prevalence of weird fractions.

  13. Fractions--Concepts before Symbols.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Albert B., Jr.

    The learning difficulties that students experience with fractions begin immediately when they are shown fraction symbols with one numeral written above the other and told that the "top number" is called the numerator and the "bottom number" is called the denominator. This introduction to fractions will usually include a few visual diagrams to help…

  14. Fractional M2-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharony, Ofer; Bergman, Oren; Jafferis, Daniel Louis

    2008-11-01

    We consider two generalizations of the Script N = 6 superconformal Chern-Simons-matter theories with gauge group U(N) × U(N). The first generalization is to Script N = 6 superconformal U(M) × U(N) theories, and the second to Script N = 5 superconformal O(2M) × USp(2N) and O(2M+1) × USp(2N) theories. These theories are conjectured to describe M2-branes probing C4/Zk in the unitary case, and C4/{\\widehat{D}}k in the orthogonal/symplectic case, together with a discrete flux, which can be interpreted as |M-N| fractional M2-branes localized at the orbifold singularity. The classical theories with these gauge groups have been constructed before; in this paper we focus on some quantum aspects of these theories, and on a detailed description of their M theory and type IIA string theory duals.

  15. Fractionation of Subcellular Organelles.

    PubMed

    Graham, John M

    2015-01-01

    This unit provides both a theoretical and a practical background to all the techniques associated with the application of differential and density gradient centrifugation for the analysis of subcellular membranes. The density gradient information focuses on the use of the modern gradient solute iodixanol, chosen for its ease of use, versatility, and compatibility with biological particles. Its use in both pre-formed discontinuous and continuous gradients and in self-generated gradients is discussed. Considerable emphasis is given to selection of the appropriate centrifuge rotors and tubes and their influence on the methods used for creation, fractionation, and analysis of density gradients. Without proper consideration of these critical ancillary procedures, the resolving power of the gradient can be easily compromised. PMID:26621372

  16. Soot Volume Fraction Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique is described for the full-field determination of soot volume fractions via laser extinction measurements. This technique differs from previously reported point-wise methods in that a two-dimensional array (i.e., image) of data is acquired simultaneously. In this fashion, the net data rate is increased, allowing the study of time-dependent phenomena and the investigation of spatial and temporal correlations. A telecentric imaging configuration is employed to provide depth-invariant magnification and to permit the specification of the collection angle for scattered light. To improve the threshold measurement sensitivity, a method is employed to suppress undesirable coherent imaging effects. A discussion of the tomographic inversion process is provided, including the results obtained from numerical simulation. Results obtained with this method from an ethylene diffusion flame are shown to be in close agreement with those previously obtained by sequential point-wise interrogation.

  17. Bioassay, isolation and studies on the mechanism of action of neurite extension factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kligman, D.

    1984-01-01

    The identification and purification of molecules active in promoting neurite outgrowth requires a sensitive reproducible bioassay. A quantitative bioassay was utilized to purify a neurite extension factor (NEF) based on counting the number of phase bright neurons with processes at least equal to one cell body diameter after 20 hrs. in culture is defined, serum free medium. Using a combination of heat treatment DEAE cellulose chromatography and gel filtration, an acidic protein of M sub r = 75,000 was highly purified. Upon reduction, it yields subunits of M sub r = 37,000. Purified fractions are active half maximally at 100 ng/ml in inducing neurite outgrowth in this bioassay. Currently, monoclonal antibodies to NEF are being produced. Female Balb C mice were immunized with the antigen and fusions with mouse myeloma cells will be performed to yield hybridoma cells.

  18. Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard-Blum, S.

    Proteins are key actors in the life of the cell, involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Since variations in the expression of messenger RNA are not systematically correlated with variations in the protein levels, the latter better reflect the way a cell functions. Protein microarrays thus supply complementary information to DNA chips. They are used in particular to analyse protein expression profiles, to detect proteins within complex biological media, and to study protein-protein interactions, which give information about the functions of those proteins [3-9]. They have the same advantages as DNA microarrays for high-throughput analysis, miniaturisation, and the possibility of automation. Section 18.1 gives a brief overview of proteins. Following this, Sect. 18.2 describes how protein microarrays can be made on flat supports, explaining how proteins can be produced and immobilised on a solid support, and discussing the different kinds of substrate and detection method. Section 18.3 discusses the particular format of protein microarrays in suspension. The diversity of protein microarrays and their applications are then reported in Sect. 18.4, with applications to therapeutics (protein-drug interactions) and diagnostics. The prospects for future developments of protein microarrays are then outlined in the conclusion. The bibliography provides an extensive list of reviews and detailed references for those readers who wish to go further in this area. Indeed, the aim of the present chapter is not to give an exhaustive or detailed analysis of the state of the art, but rather to provide the reader with the basic elements needed to understand how proteins are designed and used.

  19. Fraction reduction in membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ping; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Haizhu; Liu, Ran

    2014-01-01

    Fraction reduction is a basic computation for rational numbers. P system is a new computing model, while the current methods for fraction reductions are not available in these systems. In this paper, we propose a method of fraction reduction and discuss how to carry it out in cell-like P systems with the membrane structure and the rules with priority designed. During the application of fraction reduction rules, synchronization is guaranteed by arranging some special objects in these rules. Our work contributes to performing the rational computation in P systems since the rational operands can be given in the form of fraction. PMID:24772037

  20. Rescuing Those Left Behind: Recovering and Characterizing Underdigested Membrane and Hydrophobic Proteins To Enhance Proteome Measurement Depth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Giannone, Richard J.; Wurch, Louie L.; Podar, Mircea; Hettich, Robert L.

    2015-06-25

    The marine archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. It is thought that this interaction is membrane-associated, involving a myriad of membrane-anchored proteins; proteomic efforts to better characterize this difficult to analyze interface are paramount to uncovering the mechanism of their association. By extending multienzyme digestion strategies that use sample filtration to recover underdigested proteins for reprocessing/consecutive proteolytic digestion, we applied chymotrypsin to redigest the proteinaceous material left over after initial proteolysis with trypsin of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extracted I. hospitalis-N. equitansproteins. We show that proteins with increased hydrophobic character, includingmore » membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane helices, are enriched and recovered in the underdigested fraction. Chymotryptic reprocessing provided significant sequence coverage gains in both soluble and hydrophobic proteins alike, with the latter benefiting more so in terms of membrane protein representation. Moreover, these gains were despite a large proportion of high-quality peptide spectra remaining unassigned in the underdigested fraction suggesting high levels of protein modification on these often surface-exposed proteins. Importantly, these gains were achieved without applying extensive fractionation strategies usually required for thorough characterization of membrane-associated proteins and were facilitated by the generation of a distinct, complementary set of peptides that aid in both the identification and quantitation of this important, under-represented class of proteins.« less

  1. Rescuing Those Left Behind: Recovering and Characterizing Underdigested Membrane and Hydrophobic Proteins To Enhance Proteome Measurement Depth

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J.; Wurch, Louie L.; Podar, Mircea; Hettich, Robert L.

    2015-06-25

    The marine archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. It is thought that this interaction is membrane-associated, involving a myriad of membrane-anchored proteins; proteomic efforts to better characterize this difficult to analyze interface are paramount to uncovering the mechanism of their association. By extending multienzyme digestion strategies that use sample filtration to recover underdigested proteins for reprocessing/consecutive proteolytic digestion, we applied chymotrypsin to redigest the proteinaceous material left over after initial proteolysis with trypsin of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extracted I. hospitalis-N. equitansproteins. We show that proteins with increased hydrophobic character, including membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane helices, are enriched and recovered in the underdigested fraction. Chymotryptic reprocessing provided significant sequence coverage gains in both soluble and hydrophobic proteins alike, with the latter benefiting more so in terms of membrane protein representation. Moreover, these gains were despite a large proportion of high-quality peptide spectra remaining unassigned in the underdigested fraction suggesting high levels of protein modification on these often surface-exposed proteins. Importantly, these gains were achieved without applying extensive fractionation strategies usually required for thorough characterization of membrane-associated proteins and were facilitated by the generation of a distinct, complementary set of peptides that aid in both the identification and quantitation of this important, under-represented class of proteins.

  2. Purification and cDNA cloning of HeLa cell p54nrb, a nuclear protein with two RNA recognition motifs and extensive homology to human splicing factor PSF and Drosophila NONA/BJ6.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, B; Horowitz, D S; Kobayashi, R; Krainer, A R

    1993-01-01

    While searching for a human homolog of the S.cerevisiae splicing factor PRP18, we found a polypeptide that reacted strongly with antibodies against PRP18. We purified this polypeptide from HeLa cells using a Western blot assay, and named it p54nrb (for nuclear RNA-binding protein, 54 kDa). cDNAs encoding p54nrb were cloned with probes derived from partial sequence of the purified protein. These cDNAs have identical coding sequences but differ as a result of alternative splicing in the 5' untranslated region. The cDNAs encode a 471 aa polypeptide that contains two RNA recognition motifs (RRMs). Human p54nrb has no homology to yeast PRP18, except for a common epitope, but is instead 71% identical to human splicing factor PSF within a 320 aa region that includes both RRMs. In addition, both p54nrb and PSF are rich in Pro and Gln residues outside the main homology region. The Drosophila puff-specific protein BJ6, one of three products encoded by the alternatively spliced no-on-transient A gene (nonA), which is required for normal vision and courtship song, is 42% identical to p54nrb in the same 320 aa region. The striking homology between p54nrb, PSF, and NONA/BJ6 defines a novel phylogenetically conserved protein segment, termed DBHS domain (for Drosophila behavior, human splicing), which may be involved in regulating diverse pathways at the level of pre-mRNA splicing. Images PMID:8371983

  3. Shelf-life extension of refrigerated sea bass slices wrapped with fish protein isolate/fish skin gelatin-ZnO nanocomposite film incorporated with basil leaf essential oil.

    PubMed

    Arfat, Yasir Ali; Benjakul, Soottawat; Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Sumpavapol, Punnanee; Yarnpakdee, Suthasinee

    2015-10-01

    Microbiological, chemical and sensory changes of sea bass slices wrapped with fish protein isolate (FPI)/fish skin gelatin (FSG) films incorporated with 3 % ZnO nanoparticles (ZnONP) (w/w, based on protein content) and 100 % basil leaf essential oil (BEO) (w/w, based on protein content) during storage of 12 days at 4 °C were investigated. Sea bass slices wrapped with FPI/FSG-ZnONP-BEO film had the lowest growth of psychrophilic bacteria, lactic acid bacteria and spoilage microorganisms including Pseudomonas , H2S-producing bacteria and Enterobacteriaceae throughout storage of 12 days in comparison with those wrapped with FPI/FSG-BEO, FPI/FSG-ZnONP, FPI/FSG film, polypropylene film (PP film) and the control (without wrapping), respectively (P < 0.05). Lowered increases in pH, total volatile base, peroxide value and TBARS value were found in FPI/FSG-ZnO-BEO film wrapped samples, compared with others (P < 0.05). Sensory evaluation revealed that shelf-life of sea bass slices was longest for samples wrapped with FPI/FSG-ZnONP-BEO film (12 days), as compared to the control (6 days) (P < 0.05). PMID:26396365

  4. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2014-09-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity.

  5. Detection on immunoblot of new proteins from the soluble fraction of the cell recognized either by anti-liver-kidney microsome antibodies type 1 or by anti-liver cytosol antibodies type 1--relationship with hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ballot, E; Desbos, A; Monier, J C

    1996-09-01

    Antibodies directed against liver cytosol protein, called anti-liver cytosol type 1 (LC1 Ab), have been described by both immunofluorescence (IF) and immunodiffusion techniques in sera from patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). They have never been found in association with antibodies directed against the hepatitis C virus (HCV), unlike the anti-liver-kidney microsome antibodies type 1 (LKM1 Ab), the serological marker of AIH type 2. This suggests that there are two subgroups of AIH type 2, i.e., HCV-related and non-HCV-related. In this study, immunoblotting experiments were performed using proteins from the soluble phase of the rat liver cell; 141 sera which tested positive for LKM1 Ab by IF, 24 identified as having LC1 Ab by IF, and 50 from blood donors as controls were analyzed. Three bands were stained by LC1 Ab sera more often than by the control sera, and with a statistically significant frequency. These 3 proteins were located at apparent Mr 50,000, 55,000, and 60,000. The LKM1 Ab-positive sera as defined by IF stained six bands with a statistically significant frequency compared to the controls. Their apparent Mr were 35,000, 39,000, 47,000, 50,000, 55,000, and 60,000. LKM1 Ab-positive sera which were anti-HCV negative recognized a 60,000 protein belonging to the soluble phase of the cell, with a statistically significant frequency compared to LKM1 Ab-positive sera which were anti-HCV positive. This 60,000 protein was also recognized by LC1 Ab-positive sera, which were almost always anti-HCV negative. The presence of antibodies against a 60,000 protein from the soluble phase of the cell is discussed in terms of the anti-HCV serological markers found in the sera from patients with AIH. PMID:8811044

  6. Toxic Membrane Fractions from Mycoplasma fermentans1

    PubMed Central

    Gabridge, Michael G.; Murphy, William H.

    1971-01-01

    A recent isolate of Mycoplasma fermentans (strain K10, from human leukemic bone marrow) induced a lethal toxicity syndrome in mice. High doses of both viable and inactivated cells were toxic when injected intraperitoneally. Whole lysates and membranes from osmotically shocked cells killed mice, but cytoplasm did not. When membranes were dissolved in detergents and reaggregated by dialysis in the presence of Mg2+, the lipid-protein complex thus formed was toxic. Lipids extracted from membranes with chloroform-methanol did not kill mice. Protein-rich fractions (obtained by reaggregation plus acetone washes or ammonium sulfate precipitation of dissolved membranes) were also not toxic. No qualitative differences in proteins from three toxic isolates and three nontoxic laboratory strains of M. fermentans were detectable by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The toxic factor contained in reaggregated membranes was heat-stable but sensitive to Pronase, trypsin, and lipase. Images PMID:5154902

  7. Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in Seibert fractions by immunoblotting.

    PubMed Central

    Coates, S R; Hansen, D; Schecter, G; Slutkin, G; Hopewell, P; Affronti, L; Echenberg, D F

    1986-01-01

    Seibert fractions prepared from Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrates were evaluated by immunoblotting with a serum pool from patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Antibody activity was observed primarily with antigens in the polysaccharide II and A protein fractions; these fractions were further evaluated by immunoblotting with sera from individual patients with tuberculosis, from individuals without tuberculosis and positive for the purified protein derivative antigen skin test, and from individuals negative for the purified protein derivative antigen skin test. The antigens identified in the protein A fraction, a 32,000-molecular-weight antigen and a heterogeneous high-molecular-weight antigen, reacted with antibody found in sera from all patients with tuberculosis and with antibody from over 25% of the control individuals. A 10,000-molecular-weight antigen, a 30,000- to 44,000-molecular-weight antigen, and a heterogeneous high-molecular-weight antigen were observed in the polysaccharide II fraction; these antigens reacted with serum antibody from 70% or more of the patients with tuberculosis and with antibody from 20 to 70% of the control individuals. One of the antigens, with a molecular weight ranging from 17,000 to 28,000 in the polysaccharide II fraction, reacted with antibody in 64% of the sera from patients with tuberculosis but with only 1 of 15 control normal sera. This antigen may elicit an antibody response specifically associated with tuberculosis. Images PMID:3088029

  8. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Balram, Ajit C; Wurstbauer, U; Wójs, A; Pinczuk, A; Jain, J K

    2015-01-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region. PMID:26608906

  9. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  10. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    PubMed Central

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-01-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region. PMID:26608906

  11. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  12. 34. PLAN, PROPOSED EXTENSION OF COAL HOUSE, EXTENSIONS OF ENGINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. PLAN, PROPOSED EXTENSION OF COAL HOUSE, EXTENSIONS OF ENGINE AND COAL HOUSES, DEER ISLAND PUMPING STATION, METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD, METROPOLITAN SEWARAGE WORKS, JANUARY 1909, SHEET NO. 11. Aperture card 6498-11. - Deer Island Pumping Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  13. 35. WEST END ELEVATION, PROPOSED EXTENSION OF COAL HOUSE, EXTENSIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. WEST END ELEVATION, PROPOSED EXTENSION OF COAL HOUSE, EXTENSIONS OF ENGINE AND COAL HOUSES, DEER ISLAND PUMPING STATION, METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD, METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE WORKS, JANUARY 1908, SHEET NO. 7. Aperture card 6498-7. - Deer Island Pumping Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  14. Dynamical fractional chaotic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Ibe, Masahiro; Schmitz, Kai; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2014-12-01

    Chaotic inflation based on a simple monomial scalar potential, V (ϕ )∝ϕp, is an attractive large-field model of inflation capable of generating a sizable tensor-to-scalar ratio r . Therefore, assuming that future cosmic microwave background observations will confirm the large r value reported by BICEP2, it is important to determine what kind of dynamical mechanism could possibly endow the inflaton field with such a simple effective potential. In this paper, we answer this question in the context of field theory, i.e. in the framework of dynamical chaotic inflation, where strongly interacting supersymmetric gauge dynamics around the scale of grand unification dynamically generate a fractional power-law potential via the quantum effect of dimensional transmutation. In constructing explicit models, we significantly extend our previous work, as we now consider a large variety of possible underlying gauge dynamics and relax our conditions on the field content of the model. This allows us to realize almost arbitrary rational values for the power p in the inflaton potential. The present paper may hence be regarded as a first step toward a more complete theory of dynamical chaotic inflation.

  15. Welding torch gas cup extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The invention relates to a gas shielded electric arc welding torch having a detachable gas cup extension which may be of any desired configuration or length. The gas cup extension assembly is mounted on a standard electric welding torch gas cup to enable welding in areas with limited access. The gas cup assembly has an upper tubular insert that fits within the gas cup such that its lower portion protrudes thereform and has a lower tubular extension that is screwed into the lower portion. The extension has a rim to define the outer perimeter of the seat edge about its entrance opening so a gasket may be placed to effect an airtight seal between the gas cup and extension. The tubular extension may be made of metal or cermaic material that can be machined. The novelty lies in the use of an extension assembly for a standard gas cup of an electric arc welding torch which extension assembly is detachable permitting the use of a number of extensions which may be of different configurations and materials and yet fit the standard gas cup.

  16. Robotic hand with modular extensions

    DOEpatents

    Salisbury, Curt Michael; Quigley, Morgan

    2015-01-20

    A robotic device is described herein. The robotic device includes a frame that comprises a plurality of receiving regions that are configured to receive a respective plurality of modular robotic extensions. The modular robotic extensions are removably attachable to the frame at the respective receiving regions by way of respective mechanical fuses. Each mechanical fuse is configured to trip when a respective modular robotic extension experiences a predefined load condition, such that the respective modular robotic extension detaches from the frame when the load condition is met.

  17. A diet high in meat protein and potential renal acid load increases fractional Ca absorption and urinary Ca excretion, without affecting markers of bone resorption or formation in postmenopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The objective was to determine the effects of high dietary protein (mostly meat) and high potential renal acid load (PRAL) on calcium (Ca) balance and markers of bone metabolism. Methods: In a randomized crossover design, sixteen healthy postmenopausal women consumed two diets: one with l...

  18. Fractional telegrapher's equation from fractional persistent random walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoliver, Jaume

    2016-05-01

    We generalize the telegrapher's equation to allow for anomalous transport. We derive the space-time fractional telegrapher's equation using the formalism of the persistent random walk in continuous time. We also obtain the characteristic function of the space-time fractional process and study some particular cases and asymptotic approximations. Similarly to the ordinary telegrapher's equation, the time-fractional equation also presents distinct behaviors for different time scales. Specifically, transitions between different subdiffusive regimes or from superdiffusion to subdiffusion are shown by the fractional equation as time progresses.

  19. Fractional telegrapher's equation from fractional persistent random walks.

    PubMed

    Masoliver, Jaume

    2016-05-01

    We generalize the telegrapher's equation to allow for anomalous transport. We derive the space-time fractional telegrapher's equation using the formalism of the persistent random walk in continuous time. We also obtain the characteristic function of the space-time fractional process and study some particular cases and asymptotic approximations. Similarly to the ordinary telegrapher's equation, the time-fractional equation also presents distinct behaviors for different time scales. Specifically, transitions between different subdiffusive regimes or from superdiffusion to subdiffusion are shown by the fractional equation as time progresses. PMID:27300830

  20. Borderless regulates glial extension and axon ensheathment.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Scott; Chen, Yixu; Rao, Yong

    2016-06-15

    Ensheathment of axons by glial processes is essential for normal brain function. While considerable progress has been made to define molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the maintenance of axon ensheathment, less is known about molecular details of early events for the wrapping of axons by glial processes in the developing nervous system. In this study, we investigate the role of the transmembrane protein Borderless (Bdl) in the developing Drosophila visual system. Bdl belongs to the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily, and its in vivo function is unknown. We show that Bdl is expressed in wrapping glia (WG) in the developing eye disc. Cell-type-specific transgene rescue and knockdown indicate that Bdl is specifically required in WG for the extension of glial processes along photoreceptor axons in the optic lobe, and axon ensheathment. Our results identify Bdl as a novel glia-specific cell-surface recognition molecule in regulating glial extension and axon ensheathment. PMID:27131624