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Sample records for external carotid artery

  1. Anomalous course of the external carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Katsushi

    2016-09-01

    The course and the branching patterns of the external carotid artery were investigated macroscopically in a total of 550 bodies or 1100 head sides of Japanese subjects, donated for student dissection at Kumamoto University from 1994 to 2014. With the exception of 14 head sides, the external carotid arteries running between the posterior belly of the digastric and stylohyoid muscles were found in 42 (3.87 %) out of 1086 head sides. Strictly speaking, they passed between the stylohyoid muscle and the stylohyoid branch of the facial nerve in 23 out of these 42 head sides. In the remaining 19 instances, the stylohyoid branch of the facial nerve was cut and its relationship to the external carotid artery was not clear. The external carotid artery running lateral to the intact stylohyoid branch of the facial nerve, medial to the digastric muscle was not found. The external carotid arteries running lateral to the digastric muscle were found in 4 (0.37 %) out of 1086 head sides. As a result, it is proposed that plural, potential courses of the external carotid artery originally exist and that some parts of such potential courses remain as branches of the external carotid artery in the usual instance, while the anomalous courses of the external carotid artery are induced mainly by anastomosis between the muscular branches supplying the wall of the head and neck in contrast to the usual external carotid artery induced mainly by the branches originally supplying the pharynx. PMID:26439732

  2. Successful Reconstruction of Asymptomatic Bilateral External Carotid Artery Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Loja, Melissa N; Pevec, William C

    2016-04-01

    True aneurysms of the external carotid artery (ECA) are extremely rare with an unknown incidence and natural history. We present the successful operative management of an asymptomatic 65-year-old man found to have bilateral internal carotid artery stenosis and bilateral ECA aneurysms. His bilateral carotid arteries were reconstructed with bifurcated interposition grafts in a staged fashion. The patient recovered without sequelae and continues to be asymptomatic 1 year after reconstruction. We present the operative management of this rare case. PMID:26802292

  3. Carotid artery disease following external cervical irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Elerding, S.C.; Fernandez, R.N.; Grotta, J.C.; Lindberg, R.D.; Causay, L.C.; McMurtrey, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    A retrospective study of 910 patients surviving at least five years after cervical irradiation for Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, or primary head an neck neoplasms showed the incidence of stroke following cervical irradiation was 63 of 910 patients (6.3%) during a mean period of observation of nine years. This represents a trend toward an increased risk for this population observed over the same period of time (p . 0.39). A prospective study of 118 similar patients currently living five years after cervical radiotherapy was performed to determine the incidence of carotid artery disease occurring as a consequence of neck irradiation. Abnormal carotid phonangiograms (CPA) were found in 25% of the patients and abnormal oculoplethysmographs (OPG) were found in 17%. These studies represent significant carotid lesions that are not expected in such a population. It is concluded that the carotid stenoses demonstrated are most likely a consequence of prior irradiation. Patients that are five-year survivors of cervical irradiation should have noninvasive vascular laboratory studies performed as part of their routine follow-up examinations in order to detect these carotid lesions while they are occult.

  4. Carotid artery anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    There are four carotid arteries, two on each side of the neck: right and left internal carotid arteries, and right and left external carotid arteries. The carotid arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the head and brain.

  5. Endovascular exclusion of an external carotid artery pseudoaneurysm using a covered stent.

    PubMed

    Riesenman, Paul J; Mendes, Robert R; Mauro, Matthew A; Farber, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    Aneurysmal lesions of the external carotid artery are extremely rare. A case is presented of a 3.8 cm right external carotid artery pseudoaneurysm treated by transluminal exclusion using an endovascular stent-graft. Following stent-graft placement, complete occlusion of the aneurysmal sac and main vessel lumen patency was successfully demonstrated. This report demonstrates the technical feasibility of utilizing stent-grafts to treat aneurysmal lesions involving the external carotid artery. PMID:17497068

  6. Internal and external carotid artery embolism following facial injection of autologous fat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Wei; Yin, Yi-Mei; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Autologous fat injection is a common aesthetic procedure for soft-tissue augmentation of the face. Although this procedure is generally regarded as safe, several patients have experienced acute visual loss or cerebral infarction after these injections. We describe a case of internal and external carotid artery fat embolism that occurred following injection of autologous fat into the face. It appeared that the injected fat entered a branch of the left external carotid artery and that the embolus likely migrated into the left internal carotid artery and distally into the left ophthalmic artery, left anterior artery, and middle cerebral artery. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 5: PMID:24936097

  7. Persistent primitive trigeminal artery associated with monocular blindness and external carotid-vertebral artery anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Suo; Zhang, Hong T.; Zhang, Dao P.; Zhang, Shu L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present 2 rare cases of persistent embryonic anastomoses. In one case, the patient presented with persistent trigeminal artery along with multiple foci of cerebral infarction as well as central retinal artery thrombosis. In the other case, the patient had direct anastomosis of the vertebral artery with ipsilateral external carotid artery as well as pontine infarction, aneurysm, and unilateral hypoplasia of the vertebral artery. The findings in these cases may shed light on the clinical presentation of such persistent anastomoses and aid their detection in clinical settings. PMID:25935186

  8. Persistent primitive trigeminal artery associated with monocular blindness and external carotid-vertebral artery anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Suo; Zhang, Hong T; Zhang, Dao P; Zhang, Shu L

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present 2 rare cases of persistent embryonic anastomoses. In one case, the patient presented with persistent trigeminal artery along with multiple foci of cerebral infarction as well as central retinal artery thrombosis. In the other case, the patient had direct anastomosis of the vertebral artery with ipsilateral external carotid artery as well as pontine infarction, aneurysm, and unilateral hypoplasia of the vertebral artery. The findings in these cases may shed light on the clinical presentation of such persistent anastomoses and aid their detection in clinical settings. PMID:25935186

  9. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  10. Bilateral external carotid artery ligation: A life saving procedure in severe maxillofacial trauma

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Mohamed Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bilateral external carotid arteries ligation is a rare practice in cases of extensive maxilla-facial injuries. Defining indication criteria in the management of such cases is highly demanded in emergency surgery. Case presentation Reported case presents a male patient 67 years old man with a gunshot to the face. The whole face was macerated. Patient was operated surgically performing bilateral external carotid artery ligation, tracheostomy, pharyngostomy, gastrostomy and pressure dressing to face and head. Conclusion The procedure of bilateral external carotid artery ligation has no defined role in the management of maxillofacial trauma. The current status of such procedure in maxillofacial trauma needs revision. PMID:25644554

  11. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease is a disease in ... blood to your face, scalp, and neck. Carotid Arteries Figure A shows the location of the right ...

  12. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  13. Carotid artery surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000238.htm Carotid artery surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had carotid artery surgery to restore proper blood flow to your ...

  14. Carotid artery surgery - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100124.htm Carotid artery surgery - series To use the sharing features on ... 4 Normal anatomy Overview There are four carotid arteries, with a pair located on each side of ...

  15. Carotid artery disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have had a stroke or TIA, a nervous system (neurological) exam will show other problems. You may also have the following tests: Blood cholesterol and triglycerides test Blood sugar (glucose) test Ultrasound of the carotid arteries ( carotid ...

  16. Living with Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Carotid Artery Disease If you have carotid artery disease, you can take steps to manage the ... treatment plan, and getting ongoing care. Having carotid artery disease raises your risk of having a stroke . ...

  17. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... small balloon on its tip. They inflate the balloon at the blockage site in the carotid artery to flatten or compress the plaque against the artery wall. Carotid angioplasty is often combined with the placement of a small, metal, mesh-like device called a stent. When a stent is placed inside of a ...

  18. External Carotid Artery Ligation in Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Oral Cavity and Oropharynx: an Oncological Emergency.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Tarun; Yadav, Vijay; Ravi, K; Ramaswamy, Kartikeyan; Patel, Mahesh H; Kothari, Kiran

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes of emergency external carotid artery ligation in head and neck cancer patients. It is a retrospective observational study of 11 patients with oral cavity and oropharynx cancers who underwent external carotid ligation as an emergency procedure. Prior tracheostomy was done in all the patients as part of the procedure. Parameters studied were the efficacy and safety of the procedure in the form of control of haemorrhage, any postoperative neurological deficit, morbidity and mortality. The study evaluates the efficacy of the intervention purely as an emergency procedure, and oncological outcomes have not been reported. Analysis was done using simple frequencies and proportions. The oropharynx is the most common site of tumour bleeding in head and neck malignancies. Bleeding following external carotid ligation stopped in all the patients immediately without any postoperative mortality or morbidity. No patient had any neurologic deficits postoperatively. There was one case of rebleeding. Emergency external carotid ligation in tumours of the oral cavity and oropharynx is a life-saving and simple procedure with limited morbidity. Prior tracheostomy is recommended in all the patients. PMID:27011469

  19. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and efficacy continues to be studied in several medical centers. This procedure involves the placement of a small flexible tube (catheter) into an artery from the groin. The catheter is then directed to the neck to reach the carotid artery blockage. A balloon pushes open the artery wall and a stent ( ...

  20. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspirin and heart disease Butter, margarine, and cooking oils Carotid artery surgery - discharge Cholesterol and ... by: Daniel Kantor, MD, Kantor Neurology, Coconut Creek, FL and Immediate Past President of the ...

  1. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of screening for carotid artery stenosis: Health professionals ... blood flow through the arteries. Potential Benefits and Harms of Carotid Artery Stenosis Screening and Treatment The ...

  2. Training a Sophisticated Microsurgical Technique: Interposition of External Jugular Vein Graft in the Common Carotid Artery in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schleimer, Karina; Grommes, Jochen; Greiner, Andreas; Jalaie, Houman; Kalder, Johannes; Langer, Stephan; Koeppel, Thomas A.; Jacobs, Michael; Kokozidou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Neointimal hyperplasia is one the primary causes of stenosis in arterialized veins that are of great importance in arterial coronary bypass surgery, in peripheral arterial bypass surgery as well as in arteriovenous fistulas.1-5 The experimental procedure of vein graft interposition in the common carotid artery by using the cuff-technique has been applied in several research projects to examine the aetiology of neointimal hyperplasia and therapeutic options to address it. 6-8 The cuff prevents vessel anastomotic remodeling and induces turbulence within the graft and thereby the development of neointimal hyperplasia. Using the superior caval vein graft is an established small-animal model for venous arterialization experiment.9-11 This current protocol refers to an established jugular vein graft interposition technique first described by Zou et al., 9 as well as others.12-14 Nevertheless, these cited small animal protocols are complicated. To simplify the procedure and to minimize the number of experimental animals needed, a detailed operation protocol by video training is presented. This video should help the novice surgeon to learn both the cuff-technique and the vein graft interposition. Hereby, the right external jugular vein was grafted in cuff-technique in the common carotid artery of 21 female Sprague Dawley rats categorized in three equal groups that were sacrificed on day 21, 42 and 84, respectively. Notably, no donor animals were needed, because auto-transplantations were performed. The survival rate was 100 % at the time point of sacrifice. In addition, the graft patency rate was 60 % for the first 10 operated animals and 82 % for the remaining 11 animals. The blood flow at the time of sacrifice was 8±3 ml/min. In conclusion, this surgical protocol considerably simplifies, optimizes and standardizes this complicated procedure. It gives novice surgeons easy, step-by-step instruction, explaining possible pitfalls, thereby helping them to gain expertise fast

  3. Training a sophisticated microsurgical technique: interposition of external jugular vein graft in the common carotid artery in rats.

    PubMed

    Schleimer, Karina; Grommes, Jochen; Greiner, Andreas; Jalaie, Houman; Kalder, Johannes; Langer, Stephan; Koeppel, Thomas A; Jacobs, Michael; Kokozidou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Neointimal hyperplasia is one the primary causes of stenosis in arterialized veins that are of great importance in arterial coronary bypass surgery, in peripheral arterial bypass surgery as well as in arteriovenous fistulas.(1-5) The experimental procedure of vein graft interposition in the common carotid artery by using the cuff-technique has been applied in several research projects to examine the aetiology of neointimal hyperplasia and therapeutic options to address it. (6-8) The cuff prevents vessel anastomotic remodeling and induces turbulence within the graft and thereby the development of neointimal hyperplasia. Using the superior caval vein graft is an established small-animal model for venous arterialization experiment.(9-11) This current protocol refers to an established jugular vein graft interposition technique first described by Zou et al., (9) as well as others.(12-14) Nevertheless, these cited small animal protocols are complicated. To simplify the procedure and to minimize the number of experimental animals needed, a detailed operation protocol by video training is presented. This video should help the novice surgeon to learn both the cuff-technique and the vein graft interposition. Hereby, the right external jugular vein was grafted in cuff-technique in the common carotid artery of 21 female Sprague Dawley rats categorized in three equal groups that were sacrificed on day 21, 42 and 84, respectively. Notably, no donor animals were needed, because auto-transplantations were performed. The survival rate was 100 % at the time point of sacrifice. In addition, the graft patency rate was 60 % for the first 10 operated animals and 82 % for the remaining 11 animals. The blood flow at the time of sacrifice was 8±3 ml/min. In conclusion, this surgical protocol considerably simplifies, optimizes and standardizes this complicated procedure. It gives novice surgeons easy, step-by-step instruction, explaining possible pitfalls, thereby helping them to gain

  4. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting; CAS; Angioplasty - carotid artery; Carotid artery stenosis - angioplasty; ... Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is done using a small surgical cut. Your surgeon will make a surgical cut in your groin after using some ...

  5. How Can Carotid Artery Disease Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Carotid Artery Disease Be Prevented? Taking action to control your risk factors can help prevent or delay carotid artery disease and stroke . Your risk for carotid artery ...

  6. Stroke from an External Carotid: Lesion Pattern and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Kagan; Hubert, Lathelyse; Leclère, Franck Marie; Etienne, Marchand; Robert, Martinez

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, patients with symptomatic external carotid stenosis present with neck or face pain, retinal ischemic symptoms or jaw claudication and rarely as ipsilateral cerebrovascular events. In this present case, our patient suffered a stroke from a paradoxical embolism from the external carotid, without involvement of the internal carotid artery. A plaque ulceration of the external carotid's origin was the cause of this cerebral emboli. Duplex ultrasound showed a pathologic left external carotid, with a floating thrombus in the internal carotid. The diagnostic was confirmed by a computerized tomography scan. An external carotid thromboendarterectomy was performed 6 days after symptom onset, and intraoperative findings confirmed the plaque rupture with an extensive clot in the carotid bifurcation. PMID:26802301

  7. Photoacoustic imaging of carotid artery atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruizinga, Pieter; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; de Jong, Nico; Springeling, Geert; Robertus, Jan Lukas; van der Lugt, Aad; van Soest, Gijs

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a method for photoacoustic imaging of the carotid artery, tailored toward detection of lipid-rich atherosclerotic lesions. A common human carotid artery was obtained at autopsy, embedded in a neck mimicking phantom and imaged with a multimodality imaging system using interstitial illumination. Light was delivered through a 1.25-mm-diameter optical probe that can be placed in the pharynx, allowing the carotid artery to be illuminated from within the body. Ultrasound imaging and photoacoustic signal detection is achieved by an external 8-MHz linear array coupled to an ultrasound imaging system. Spectroscopic analysis of photoacoustic images obtained in the wavelength range from 1130 to 1250 nm revealed plaque-specific lipid accumulation in the collagen structure of the artery wall. These spectroscopic findings were confirmed by histology.

  8. Management of Carotid Artery Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Thomas S.; Ducic, Yadranko; Gordin, Eli; Stroman, David

    2014-01-01

    With increased awareness and liberal screening of trauma patients with identified risk factors, recent case series demonstrate improved early diagnosis of carotid artery trauma before they become problematio. There remains a need for unified screening criteria for both intracranial and extracranial carotid trauma. In the absence of contraindications, antithrombotic agents should be considered in blunt carotid artery injuries, as there is a significant risk of progression of vessel injury with observation alone. Despite CTA being used as a common screening modality, it appears to lack sufficient sensitivity. DSA remains to be the gold standard in screening. Endovascular techniques are becoming more widely accepted as the primary surgical modality in the treatment of blunt extracranial carotid injuries and penetrating/blunt intracranial carotid lessions. Nonetheless, open surgical approaches are still needed for the treatment of penetrating extracranial carotid injuries and in patients with unfavorable lesions for endovascular intervention. PMID:25136406

  9. Management of carotid artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Louridas, George; Junaid, Asad

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To clarify the definition of carotid artery diseases, the appropriateness of screening for disease, investigation and management of patients presenting with transient ischemic attacks, and management of asymptomatic carotid bruits. SOURCES OF INFORMATION MEDLINE was searched using the terms carotid endarterectomy, carotid disease, and carotid stenosis. Most studies offer level II or III evidence. Consensus statements and guidelines from various neurovascular societies were also consulted. MAIN MESSAGE Patients with symptoms of hemispheric transient ischemic attacks associated with >70% stenosis of the internal carotid artery are at highest risk of major stroke or death. Risk is greatest within 48 hours of symptom onset; patients should have urgent evaluation by a vascular surgeon for consideration of carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Patients with 50% to 69% stenosis might benefit from urgent surgical intervention depending on clinical features and associated comorbidity. Patients with <50% stenosis do not benefit from surgery. Asymptomatic patients with >60% stenosis should be considered for elective CEA. CONCLUSION Symptomatic carotid artery syndromes need urgent carotid duplex evaluation to determine the need for urgent surgery. Those with the greatest degree of stenosis derive the greatest benefit from timely CEA. PMID:16060177

  10. New Bone Formation after Ligation of the External Carotid Artery and Resection of a Large Aneurysmal Bone Cyst of the Mandible with Reconstruction: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Colin; Mohamed, Ashraf; Singh, Avin

    2011-01-01

    The aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a benign cystic and expanding osteolytic lesion consisting of bone-filled spaces of variable size, separated by connective tissue containing trabeculae of bone or osteoid tissue and osteoclast giant cells. Radiographic findings may vary from unicystic or moth-eaten radiolucencies to extensive multilocular lesions with bilateral expansion and destruction of mandibular cortices. Treatment modalities include curettage (with reported recurrences) and resection with immediate reconstruction. The main arterial and feeder vessels may be embolized to prevent profuse intraoperative blood loss and achieve a bloodless surgical field. Failed embolization may necessitate ligation of the external carotid artery of the affected side. PMID:23450035

  11. Carotid Artery Stenting versus Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gahremanpour, Amir; Perin, Emerson C.; Silva, Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    For about 2 decades, investigators have been comparing carotid endarterectomy with carotid artery stenting in regard to their effectiveness and safety in treating carotid artery stenosis. We conducted a systematic review to summarize and appraise the available evidence provided by randomized trials, meta-analyses, and registries comparing the clinical outcomes of the 2 procedures. We searched the MEDLINE, SciVerse Scopus, and Cochrane databases and the bibliographies of pertinent textbooks and articles to identify these studies. The results of clinical trials and, consequently, the meta-analyses of those trials produced conflicting results regarding the comparative effectiveness and safety of carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. These conflicting results arose because of differences in patient population, trial design, outcome measures, and variability among centers in the endovascular devices used and in operator skills. Careful appraisal of the trials and meta-analyses, particularly the most recent and largest National Institutes of Healthsponsored trial (the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs Stenting Trial [CREST]), showed that carotid stenting and endarterectomy were associated with similar rates of death and disabling stroke. Within the 30-day periprocedural period, carotid stenting was associated with higher risks of stroke, especially for patients aged >70 years, whereas carotid endarterectomy was associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction. The slightly higher cost of stenting compared with endarterectomy was within an acceptable range by cost-effectiveness standards. We conclude that carotid artery stenting is an equivalent alternative to carotid endarterectomy when patient age and anatomy, surgical risk, and operator experience are considered in the choice of treatment approach. PMID:22949763

  12. Carotid Artery Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... or radiologist then places the transducer on the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling the sound beam from a different location to better see an area of concern. Doppler sonography and Carotid IMT US are performed using the ...

  13. [Clinical study of multiple traumas with severe facial injury undergoing emergency endovascular treatment: significance of emergency embolization of the external carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Naoto; Hirohata, Masaru; Miyagi, Tomoya; Fujimura, Naoko; Karukaya, Takashi; Tokutomi, Takashi; Shigemori, Minoru

    2005-07-01

    The outcome of multiple injures freqently depends on the priority of treatments, and the decision as to the procedures and timing of primary care is extremely important. We studied the patients with multiple trauma whounderwent emergency endovascular treatment for facial hemorrhage related to external carotid arterial injury. The subjects are 5 patients who underwent embolization of the external carotid artery by an endovascular approach among patients with multiple traumas who were brought to our hospital by ambulance. In these patients, the vital signs on arrival, interval between injury and intravascular surgery, type of brain injury, type and grade of concurrent injury and outcome were studied. Three patients showed hemorrhagic shock on arrival, and 1 patient showed hemorrhagic shock immediately after arrival. The mean interval between injury and endovascular surgery was 3.9 hours. All patients had skull base fracture, and abnormal intracranial lesions on initial CT including 4 focal injuries and 1 diffuse injury. Moderate to severe thoracic/abdominal injuries were noted in 3 patients. In the remaining 2 patients, there was no trauma in the thoracic or abdominal regions. Intraperitoneal hemorrhage with splenic injury was observed in 3 patients. In 3 of 4 patients died by hemorrhagic shock because of the delay of endvascular treatments. In trauma patients with persistent hemorrhage, emergency endovascular treatment should be considered as a primary survey for initial treatment without delay under intensive conservative treatment. PMID:16001808

  14. How Is Carotid Artery Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Carotid Endarterectomy Carotid Ultrasound Stents Stroke Send a link to NHLBI to someone ... outward against the wall of the artery. A stent (a small mesh tube) is then put in ...

  15. Lessons learnt from carotid artery trials.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, H; Limet, R

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the authors is to assess the natural history of carotid artery disease and the role of carotid intervention in preventing ipsilateral stroke. The development of endovascular techniques for correction of carotid artery stenoses made this less invasive technique very popular, with an inherent risk of unregulated overuse by a variety of medical specialists, who are not always well informed on the natural history of carotid artery disease. It re-opened the discussion on the value of carotid endarterectomy for stroke prophylaxis. This ongoing debate offers the opportunity to distil evidence-based guidelines for the management of extracranial carotid artery stenoses. In recent papers, some authors expressed doubts on the validity and general applicability of the results of the pivotal randomised trials of carotid endarterectomy. The excellent results in terms of operative outcome and long term stroke prevention would, according to certain comments, not be attainable in routine practice. Another criticism of carotid endarterectomy is its higher operative morbidity in terms of cranial nerve lesions and myocardial infarctions, compared to endovascular procedures. This consideration is, for some authors, the main reason to espouse carotid artery stenting as a better alternative to carotid endarterectomy. Any evidence supporting this point of view is missing. The supposed equivalence or non-inferiority of carotid artery stenting is purely speculative. The aim of this review paper is to summarize the crude data of carotid surgery trials. The authors aim to answer four questions. For which lesions is carotid endarterectomy most beneficial ? Are the results of randomised carotid surgery trials biased by the selection of patients ? Is operative morbidity, other than stroke, under-estimated ? Is carotid artery stenting safe and efficacious ? An in-depth review with a critical analysis is made of recently published and on-going trials, comparing carotid surgery

  16. [A Novel, Less Invasive Protection Method for Carotid Artery Stenting].

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Tomotaka; Goto, Shunsaku; Yamamoto, Taiki; Imai, Tasuku; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Shimato, Shinji; Kato, Kyozo

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: We present a novel, less invasive protection method for carotid artery stenting. Case presentation: A 67-year-old man presented with symptomatic severe left carotid artery stenosis. A transfemoral approach was dangerous because of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. A 6Fr Axcelguide Simmonds catheter was inserted into the right brachial artery, and advanced into the left common carotid artery. Next, a 6Fr Optimo 100-cm catheter was coaxially navigated into the left common carotid artery. A PercuSurge GuardWire 300-cm was coaxially navigated into the left external carotid artery. Under flow reversal with the 2 balloons, another PercuSurge GuardWire 300-cm was navigated into the distal left internal carotid artery through the lesion. After both PercuSurge GuardWire balloons were inflated, the 6Fr Optimo was deflated and retrieved using a catheter exchange technique. Then, under distal double-balloon protection, routine stenting was performed. Conclusions: This technique is safer and less invasive than previous methods, especially in cases with difficult femoral access and vulnerable carotid plaque. PMID:27384116

  17. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Carotid Artery Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease may not cause signs or symptoms until it severely narrows or blocks a carotid artery. Signs and symptoms may include a bruit, a ...

  18. Cervical carotid pseudoaneurysm: A carotid artery stenting complication

    PubMed Central

    Raso, Jair; Darwich, Rogerio; Ornellas, Carlos; Cariri, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    Background: As carotid artery stenting becomes increasingly used, more complications are likely to occur. We present a case of Staphylococcus septicemia and pseudoaneurysm arising in the neck portion of the carotid artery after stenting. Case Description: A 51-year-old man was admitted with mild left hemiparesis. CT and MRI showed right hemisphere ischemia. Duplex Scan and MRA showed bilateral severe stenosis of the carotid arteries in the neck. A percutaneous angioplasty with stenting of the left carotid artery was performed. Two weeks after the procedure, he developed fever and swelling in the right leg and shoulder. An abscess, near where the groin had been punctured for the angioplasty was surgically drained. Blood samples were positive for S. aureus. After treatment the patient complained of a painful bulky pulsatile left cervical mass. Duplex scan and MRA showed a pseudoaneurysm of the left carotid artery. We excised the pseudoaneurysm and rebuilt the carotid artery with a saphenous vein graft. The postoperative period was uneventful, and the MRA revealed a patent saphenous graft. Conclusion: Mycotic pseudoaneurysm of the carotid artery is a rare complication of percutaneous angioplasty and stenting. Surgical treatment with saphenous vein graft is the treatment of choice. PMID:21748038

  19. A method for recording effects of anti-epileptic drugs on interictal discharge in the cat's cerebral cortex. Factors determining the distribution of external carotid artery infusions.

    PubMed

    Landgren, S; Selstam, G; Aasly, J; Danielsson, E

    1986-11-01

    The method utilizes infusion via the external carotid (ECA), the internal maxillary arteries and their anastomoses to the cerebral circulation. It takes into account the ipsilateral distribution of the carotid blood supply. A regular interictal epileptiform spiking from foci on both hemispheres was provided by local application to the cortical surface of small pieces of filter paper soaked in sodium benzylpenicillin, 100,000 IE ml-1. The infused drug affects the ipsilateral foci, and the contralateral one functions as a simultaneous untreated control. The stability of the interictal frequency and the effect of non-oxygen carrying solvents are described. The effect of changes in blood pressure, temperature and PCO2 are considered as well as the coupling between activity in ipsi- and contralateral foci. Experiments with infused radioactive microspheres were performed to determine the strictness of the ipsilateral distribution and the conditions under which it was upheld. With mean arterial blood pressures between 70 mm Hg and 170 mm Hg and infusion speeds between 1.0 ml min-1 and 6.3 ml min-1 the distribution to the contralateral cerebral hemisphere was 0.3% (SD 0.2, SEM 0.1). Infusions of [125I]albumin were used to determine the blood flow in ECA. The flow varied between 20 ml min-1 and 68 ml min-1. The higher values were seen when the extracerebral shunting was high. Conditions influencing the dilution of the infusion and its distribution within the brain were investigated. Important factors were carotid and cerebral blood flow, arterial blood pressure, speed and duration of the infusion, recirculation and cerebral temperature. Arterial PCO2, pH and PO2 should be carefully controlled. Computer-supported treatment of interictal spike frequency and amplitude, as well as of circulatory and respiratory parameters, was utilized. The method was tested in experiments with infusions of 5 alpha-pregnanolone. It was shown that infusions, shorter than the estimated

  20. External artery heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor); Ernst, Donald M. (Inventor); Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved heat pipe with an external artery. The longitudinal slot in the heat pipe wall which interconnects the heat pipe vapor space with the external artery is completely filled with sintered wick material and the wall of the external artery is also covered with sintered wick material. This added wick structure assures that the external artery will continue to feed liquid to the heat pipe evaporator even if a vapor bubble forms within and would otherwise block the liquid transport function of the external artery.

  1. Availability of end-to-side arterial anastomosis to the external carotid artery using short-thread double-needle microsuture in free-flap transfer for head and neck reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Mutsumi; Asato, Hirotaka; Sarukawa, Shunji; Takushima, Akihiko; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Harii, Kiyonori

    2006-02-01

    We seldom have difficulties in the selection of appropriate recipient arteries for microvascular free flap transfer in the head and neck region because many sizable branches (branch artery) of the external carotid artery (ECA) or subclavian artery are available. However, we occasionally encountered the lack of an appropriate recipient artery, especially in secondary reconstruction or reconstruction following the extensive ablation of recurrent cancer. For these challenging cases, we have used end-to-side arterial anastomosis directly to the ECA. Between July 1997 and December 2004, end-to-side anastomosis of the flap artery to the ECA was employed in 16 cases. The reason for its use included the marked size discrepancy between the jejunal artery and branch artery in 4 jejunal transfer cases, the lack of 2 appropriate recipient arteries for double free flap transfers in 1 case, and the lack of an available branch artery as a recipient due to poor regional conditions in 11 cases. Fifteen of 16 flaps underwent an uneventful postoperative course, except 1 whose flap artery was pressed by the submandibular gland and sustained thrombosis 3 days postoperatively. In this case, however, the flap survived perfectly after prompt thrombectomy and reanastomosis. Eventually, all 16 flaps survived completely. We reconfirmed the availability of end-to-side anastomosis to the ECA when a suitable branch artery is not available. Although end-to-side anastomosis to the ECA is laborious compared with end-to-end anastomosis, our newly developed short-thread double-needle microsuture combined with the back-wall-first technique helps to ensure easier anastomosis. Using this device, because all stitches are carried from inside the vessel to outside, the surgeon can place the first stitch at any point on the posterior wall and advance the next suture to the preferred site of the previous suture, and suturing can be performed more safely even in cases where the tunica intima is separated

  2. Carotid artery stenting: current and emerging options

    PubMed Central

    Morr, Simon; Lin, Ning; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2014-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting technologies are rapidly evolving. Options for endovascular surgeons and interventionists who treat occlusive carotid disease continue to expand. We here present an update and overview of carotid stenting devices. Evidence supporting carotid stenting includes randomized controlled trials that compare endovascular stenting to open surgical endarterectomy. Carotid technologies addressed include the carotid stents themselves as well as adjunct neuroprotective devices. Aspects of stent technology include bare-metal versus covered stents, stent tapering, and free-cell area. Drug-eluting and cutting balloon indications are described. Embolization protection options and new direct carotid access strategies are reviewed. Adjunct technologies, such as intravascular ultrasound imaging and risk stratification algorithms, are discussed. Bare-metal and covered stents provide unique advantages and disadvantages. Stent tapering may allow for a more fitted contour to the caliber decrement between the common carotid and internal carotid arteries but also introduces new technical challenges. Studies regarding free-cell area are conflicting with respect to benefits and associated risk; clinical relevance of associated adverse effects associated with either type is unclear. Embolization protection strategies include distal filter protection and flow reversal. Though flow reversal was initially met with some skepticism, it has gained wider acceptance and may provide the advantage of not crossing the carotid lesion before protection is established. New direct carotid access techniques address difficult anatomy and incorporate sophisticated flow-reversal embolization protection techniques. Carotid stenting is a new and exciting field with rapidly advancing technologies. Embolization protection, low-risk deployment, and lesion assessment and stratification are active areas of research. Ample room remains for further innovations and developments. PMID:25349483

  3. Obesity and carotid artery remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kozakova, M; Palombo, C; Morizzo, C; Højlund, K; Hatunic, M; Balkau, B; Nilsson, P M; Ferrannini, E

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective: The present study tested the hypothesis that obesity-related changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) might represent not only preclinical atherosclerosis but an adaptive remodeling meant to preserve circumferential wall stress (CWS) in altered hemodynamic conditions characterized by body size-dependent increase in stroke volume (SV) and blood pressure (BP). Subjects/Methods: Common carotid artery (CCA) luminal diameter (LD), IMT and CWS were measured in three different populations in order to study: (A) cross-sectional associations between SV, BP, anthropometric parameters and CCA LD (266 healthy subjects with wide range of body weight (24–159 kg)); (B) longitudinal associations between CCA LD and 3-year IMT progression rate (ΔIMT; 571 healthy non-obese subjects without increased cardiovascular (CV) risk); (C) the impact of obesity on CCA geometry and CWS (88 obese subjects without CV complications and 88 non-obese subjects matched for gender and age). Results: CCA LD was independently associated with SV that was determined by body size. In the longitudinal study, baseline LD was an independent determinant of ΔIMT, and ΔIMT of subjects in the highest LD quartile was significantly higher (28±3 μm) as compared with those in the lower quartiles (8±3, 16±4 and 16±3 μm, P=0.001, P<0.05 and P=0.01, respectively). In addition, CCA CWS decreased during the observational period in the highest LD quartile (from 54.2±8.6 to 51.6±7.4 kPa, P<0.0001). As compared with gender- and age-matched lean individuals, obese subjects had highly increased CCA LD and BP (P<0.0001 for both), but only slightly higher CWS (P=0.05) due to a significant increase in IMT (P=0.005 after adjustment for confounders). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that in obese subjects, the CCA wall thickens to compensate the luminal enlargement caused by body size-induced increase in SV, and therefore, to normalize the wall stress. CCA diameter in obesity could

  4. Retained subintimal pellet in a carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Manousi, Maria; Sarantitis, Ioannis; Papadoulas, Spyros; Diamantopoulos, Athanasios; Kakkos, Stavros K; Lampropoulos, George; Tsolakis, Ioannis A

    2011-06-01

    A shotgun pellet is depicted in the present image in a carotid artery under the intima, which remained intact without local complications for up to six months. There is lack of data regarding the natural history of such a carotid pellet, but the experience from the myocardium is that, in the absence of infection, completely embedded missiles are usually asymptomatic, tolerated well and may be left in place. PMID:21860728

  5. Carotid artery stenting in recently symptomatic patients.

    PubMed

    Setacci, C; de Donato, G; Setacci, F; Sirignano, P; Galzerano, G; Borrelli, M P; Cappelli, A

    2013-02-01

    Treatment of acute stroke is time-dependent, with the best outcomes resulting from the earliest interventions. However, for patients with acute ischemic stroke due to a high-grade stenosis of the internal carotid artery, despite maximal medical treatment, an effective intervention to improve their neurologic symptoms and clinical outcome has not yet been established. There are two major concerns: first, cerebral revascularization in the acute stage remains challenging because of the possibility that hemorrhagic infarction or hyperperfusion syndrome will occur after revascularization; second, alarms about carotid artery stenting in patients with acute symptoms are related to the fact that, while with carotid endarterectomy the plaque is completely removed, after stenting it is only remodelled and its stabilization is essential to avoid embolic events during the procedure and in the post-operative period. Although level 1 evidence seems clearly in favor of carotid endarterectomy in symptomatic patients, carotid stenting has been proposed as a possible alternative in selected cases if the procedure is performed in high-volume center with documented low perioperative stroke and death rates. This review summarizes indications and results for carotid artery stenting in recently symptomatic patients. PMID:23296417

  6. [CHANGES OF CAROTID AND VERTEBRAL ARTERIES IN PATENTS WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION AND HEPATOBILIARY PATHOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Polyakov, V Ya; Nikolaev, Yu A; Pegova, S V; Matsievskaya, T R; Obukhov, I V

    2016-01-01

    The study included 1172 patients (410 men and 762 women) at the mean age of 60.3 ± 10.4 years with grade I-II (stage I-II) arterial hypertension (AH) admitted to the clinic of Institute of Experimental Medicine. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on the results of clinical and laboratory diagnostics. Group 1 (n = 525) included patients with AH and hepatobiliary system (HBS) diseases, group 2 (n = 647) patients with AH without HBS diseases. The patients group 1 had a thicker intima-media complex of carotid arteries, higher peak systolic bloodflow rate in the internal and vertebral carotid arteries, more pronounced coiling of internal carotid arteries than patients of group 2. Patients with AH and HBS diseases exhibited correlation between bloodflow rate in external carotid arteries and atherogenicity coefficient. Duplex scanning of neck vessels of in patients with AH without HBS diseases revealed peculiar changes of the intima-media thickness and hemodynamically significant changes of the blood flow in the internal carotid arteries that may be of prognostic value in this nosological syntropy and require the personified approach to diagnostics, treatment, and prevention of these conditions. PMID:27172721

  7. Arterial function of carotid and brachial arteries in postmenopausal vegetarians

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ta-Chen; Torng, Pao-Ling; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chen, Ming-Fong; Liau, Chiau-Suong

    2011-01-01

    Background: Vegetarianism is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, studies of arterial function in vegetarians are limited. Methods: This study investigated arterial function in vegetarianism by comparing 49 healthy postmenopausal vegetarians with 41 age-matched omnivores. The arterial function of the common carotid artery was assessed by carotid duplex, while the pulse dynamics method was used to measure brachial artery distensibility (BAD), compliance (BAC), and resistance (BAR). Fasting blood levels of glucose, lipids, lipoprotein (a), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and vitamin B12 were also measured. Results: Vegetarians had significantly lower serum cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, and glucose compared with omnivores. They also had lower vitamin B12 but higher homocysteine levels. Serum levels of lipoprotein (a) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were no different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD between the two groups even after adjustment for associated covariates. However, BAR was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and pulse pressure were two important determinants of carotid beta stiffness index and BAD. Vegetarianism is not associated with better arterial elasticity. Conclusion: Apparently healthy postmenopausal vegetarians are not significantly better in terms of carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD, but have significantly decreased BAR than omnivores. Prevention of vitamin B12 deficiency might be beneficial for cardiovascular health in vegetarians. PMID:21915169

  8. Congenital absence of internal carotid artery with intercavernous anastomosis: Case report and systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Oz, Ibrahim Ilker; Serifoglu, Ismail; Yazgan, Omer; Erdem, Zuhal

    2016-08-01

    The absence of an internal carotid artery is a rare congenital anomaly. In the absence of the internal carotid artery, collateral circulations develop through the circle of Willis, persistent embryonic arteries or transcranial collaterals of the external carotid artery. Six pathways of collateral circulation have been described. Intercavernous anastomosis is between cavernous segments of the bilateral internal carotid arteries and is rarely seen. Patients with an absence of the internal carotid artery can be completely asymptomatic. However, these patients can present with subarachnoid hemorrhage or stroke accompanying cerebral aneurysm or abnormal collateral. We combined our case with 33 previous publications to form a retrospective series including 35 cases of unilateral internal carotid artery agenesis with intercavernous anastomosis. PMID:27091873

  9. Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm Mimicking Peritonsillar Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Brzost, Jacek; Waniewska, Martyna; Szczepanski, Miroslaw J.

    2015-01-01

    The extracranial internal carotid artery aneurysm (EICAA) is an uncommon arterial lesion. Patients typically present with neurologic symptoms resulting from impaired cerebral perfusion and compression symptoms of cranial nerves. Often EICAA presents as a pulsatile neck mass, which is otherwise asymptomatic. We present a case of an 84-year-old female, who was initially referred to the Emergency Department for Otolaryngology with suspected peritonsillar abscess. The patient had a history of recent upper airway infection and cardiovascular comorbidities, including hypertension and ischaemic stroke complicated by extensive neurologic deficits. Physical examination revealed a compact, nonpulsatile mass in the lateral parapharyngeal space and local erythema of the mucosa. Duplex Doppler Ultrasonography and Computed Tomography revealed an atherosclerotic aneurysm of the right internal carotid artery, measuring 63 × 55 × 88 mm, stretching from the skull base to the angle of the mandible. PMID:26124973

  10. Automated carotid artery intima layer regional segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiburger, Kristen M.; Molinari, Filippo; Rajendra Acharya, U.; Saba, Luca; Rodrigues, Paulo; Liboni, William; Nicolaides, Andrew; Suri, Jasjit S.

    2011-07-01

    Evaluation of the carotid artery wall is essential for the assessment of a patient's cardiovascular risk or for the diagnosis of cardiovascular pathologies. This paper presents a new, completely user-independent algorithm called carotid artery intima layer regional segmentation (CAILRS, a class of AtheroEdge™ systems), which automatically segments the intima layer of the far wall of the carotid ultrasound artery based on mean shift classification applied to the far wall. Further, the system extracts the lumen-intima and media-adventitia borders in the far wall of the carotid artery. Our new system is characterized and validated by comparing CAILRS borders with the manual tracings carried out by experts. The new technique is also benchmarked with a semi-automatic technique based on a first-order absolute moment edge operator (FOAM) and compared to our previous edge-based automated methods such as CALEX (Molinari et al 2010 J. Ultrasound Med. 29 399-418, 2010 IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57 1112-24), CULEX (Delsanto et al 2007 IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 56 1265-74, Molinari et al 2010 IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57 1112-24), CALSFOAM (Molinari et al Int. Angiol. (at press)), and CAUDLES-EF (Molinari et al J. Digit. Imaging (at press)). Our multi-institutional database consisted of 300 longitudinal B-mode carotid images. In comparison to semi-automated FOAM, CAILRS showed the IMT bias of -0.035 ± 0.186 mm while FOAM showed -0.016 ± 0.258 mm. Our IMT was slightly underestimated with respect to the ground truth IMT, but showed uniform behavior over the entire database. CAILRS outperformed all the four previous automated methods. The system's figure of merit was 95.6%, which was lower than that of the semi-automated method (98%), but higher than that of the other automated techniques.

  11. Internal carotid artery rupture caused by carotid shunt insertion

    PubMed Central

    Illuminati, Giulio; Caliò, Francesco G.; Pizzardi, Giulia; Vietri, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Shunting is a well-accepted method of maintaining cerebral perfusion during carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Nonetheless, shunt insertion may lead to complications including arterial dissection, embolization, and thrombosis. We present a complication of shunt insertion consisting of arterial wall rupture, not reported previously. Presentation of case A 78-year-old woman underwent CEA combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). At the time of shunt insertion an arterial rupture at the distal tip of the shunt was detected and was repaired via a small saphenous vein patch. Eversion CEA and subsequent CABG completed the procedure whose postoperative course was uneventful. Discussion Shunting during combined CEA-CABG may be advisable to assure cerebral protection from possible hypoperfusion due to potential hemodynamic instability of patients with severe coronary artery disease. Awareness and prompt management of possible shunt-related complications, including the newly reported one, may contribute to limiting their harmful effect. Conclusion Arterial wall rupture is a possible, previously not reported, shunt-related complication to be aware of when performing CEA. PMID:26255001

  12. Concurrence of the tortuosity of bilateral common and left internal carotid arteries in a case with common origin of the innominate trunk and left common carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Sema; Cece, Hasan; Karayol, Sibel; Ziylan, Zeki

    2010-10-01

    Anatomical variations of carotid arterial system, which are not infrequently encountered, have great impact on the surgical approaches of the neck. Although few reports on common carotid artery tortuosity have been published, no case of symptomatic concurrent common carotid and internal carotid artery tortuosity has been reported. Herein, we report the first case with concurrent common origin of the innominate trunk and left common carotid artery and common and internal carotid artery tortuosity presenting with an oropharyngeal mass. PMID:20407773

  13. Carotid artery rupture and cervicofacial actinomycosis.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Anne; Lhermitte, Benoît; Ödman, Micaela; Grabherr, Silke; Mangin, Patrice; Palmiere, Cristian

    2012-11-01

    Cervicofacial actinomycosis is an uncommon, progressive infection caused by bacilli of the Actinomyces genus. Actinomyces are common commensal saprophytes in the oral cavity which may have medical importance as facultative pathogens. Subsequent to local injuries to the oral mucosa, they may penetrate the deep tissues and be responsible for suppurative or granulomatous infections. We herein report a case of a 65-year-old man who underwent surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy for a tonsillar carcinoma. An ulcerous lesion in the base of the tongue developed and spread to the carotid artery wall. The man died of a massive hemorrhage due to left carotid artery rupture. Postmortem computed tomography angiography performed prior to autopsy allowed the precise localization of the source of bleeding to be detected. Postmortem biochemical investigations confirmed the presence of inflammation associated with local bacterial infection. Histological investigations revealed the rupture of the left carotid artery surrounded by numerous colonies of Actinomyces. Acute and chronic inflammation with tissue necrosis as well as post-actinic, fibrotic changes were also found in the tissues surrounding the ruptured artery wall. PMID:22819527

  14. External Carotid-Internal Jugular Fistula as a Late Complication After Carotid Endarterectomy: A Rare Case

    SciTech Connect

    Bakar, Bulent; Cekirge, Saruhan; Tekkok, Ismail Hakki

    2011-02-15

    A 66-year-old man presented with mild amnesia, progressive fatigue, ataxia, visual hallucinations, and debility. His past medical history included right-sided carotid endarterectomy performed elsewhere 6 years previously. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed left parieto-occipital arteriovenous malformation-like tortous vessels, venous congestion, and ischemic areas. Cerebral angiography showed right-sided compound external carotid artery-internal jugular vein (IJV) fistula, and distal occlusion of the right IJV. Transvenous embolization via contralateral IJV was performed, and the fistula, together with fistulous portion of the distal IJV, was sealed using coils. Two years later, patient is well with normal neurologic examination findings. The presence of an arteriovenous communication after vascular surgery is a serious complication with potential long-term effects and therefore should be diagnosed and treated as promptly as possible.

  15. Carotid artery aneurysm: last among equals.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Ajit Kaur; Rowlands, Timothy; McMahon, Greg

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old man presented initially with a swelling in the left side of the neck, which was confirmed to be a carotid artery aneurysm on ultrasonography. He was subsequently admitted reporting intermittent episodes of visual loss in the left eye and right arm weakness. Further imaging confirmed multiple, small acute infarcts in the left cerebral hemisphere. The patient underwent open repair of the aneurysm and made an uncomplicated recovery with no persisting neurological deficit. PMID:27190119

  16. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Vilela, P; Goulão, A

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. PMID:15657789

  17. [Traumatic dissection of the internal carotid artery by a safety belt: a report of two cases].

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, M; Ballesteros-Sanz, M A; Pérez-Ceballos, A; González-Fernández, C; López-Espadas, F

    2009-10-01

    Traumatic internal carotid artery dissection secondary to blunt trauma is a rare event accounting for 0.08 to 0.4% of all traumatic lesions. The spectrum of traumatic lesions that can affect the internal carotid artery includes minor lesions like spasm, intimal tears, or mural contusions and serious lesions like pseudoaneurysms and complete occlusion. Delayed clinical presentation is typical and can include headache, hemiparesis, partial Horner's syndrome, and cranial nerve palsy. Embolization secondary to the dissection can have devastating effects because it may cause ischemic stroke. Traumatic internal carotid artery dissection after safety belt trauma is very rare; it is usually due to direct cervical trauma on the side of the shoulder fixation point, which causes external bruising along the pathway of the safety belt. We present two cases of traumatic internal carotid artery dissection with concomitant cerebral infarcts caused by safety belts; we discuss the clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of this lesion. PMID:19828398

  18. Proposition of an outflow boundary approach for carotid artery stenosis CFD simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Furusawa, Toyoki; Sia, Sheau Fung; Umezu, Mitsuo; Qian, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose an innovative approach of setting outlet boundary conditions for the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of human common carotid arteries (CCAs) bifurcation based on the concept of energy loss minimisation at flow bifurcation. Comparisons between this new approach and previously reported boundary conditions were also made. The results showed that CFD simulation based on the proposed boundary conditions gave an accurate prediction of the critical stenosis ratio of carotid arteries (at around 65%). Other boundary conditions, such as the constant external pressure (P = 0) and constant outflow ratio, either overestimated or underestimated the critical stenosis ratio of carotid arteries. The patient-specific simulation results furthermore indicated that the calculated internal carotid artery flow ratio at CCA bifurcation (61%) coincided with the result obtained by clinical measurements through the use of Colour Doppler ultrasound. PMID:22288780

  19. Missed Total Occlusion Due to the Occipital Artery Arising from the Internal Carotid Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Ustunsoz, Bahri Gumus, Burcak; Koksal, Ali; Koroglu, Mert; Akhan, Okan

    2007-02-15

    A 56-year-old man was referred for digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with an ultrasound diagnosis of right proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis for possible carotid artery stenting. DSA revealed total occlusion of the ICA and an occipital artery arising from the stump and simulating continuation of the ICA. An ascending pharyngeal artery also arose from the same occipital artery. This case is of interest because this is a rare variation besides being a cause of misdiagnosis at carotid ultrasound.

  20. [An integrated segmentation method for 3D ultrasound carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Wu, Huihui; Liu, Yang; Xu, Hongwei; Liang, Huageng; Cai, Wenjuan; Fang, Mengjie; Wang, Yujie

    2013-07-01

    An integrated segmentation method for 3D ultrasound carotid artery was proposed. 3D ultrasound image was sliced into transverse, coronal and sagittal 2D images on the carotid bifurcation point. Then, the three images were processed respectively, and the carotid artery contours and thickness were obtained finally. This paper tries to overcome the disadvantages of current computer aided diagnosis method, such as high computational complexity, easily introduced subjective errors et al. The proposed method could get the carotid artery overall information rapidly, accurately and completely. It could be transplanted into clinical usage for atherosclerosis diagnosis and prevention. PMID:24195385

  1. LDV arterial pulse signal: Evidence for local generation in the carotid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casaccia, Sara; Sirevaag, Erik J.; Richter, Edward J.; Casacanditella, Luigi; Scalise, Lorenzo; Rohrbaugh, John W.

    2016-06-01

    The external blood pressure pulse, recorded on a non-contact basis using the method of laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV), has been shown to be a rich source of information regarding cardiac and vascular dynamics. Considerable attention has been directed specifically to the pulse from the neck, overlying the carotid artery, which is of special interest because the carotid pulse is highly similar to the central aortic pressure pulse. The findings presented here are consistent with an interpretation of the signal at the neck as originating in the carotid artery. A detailed mapping study involving a 35 point matrix over the right neck disclosed a focal zone of maximal signal amplitude, with a course consistent with the tract of the underlying carotid. Appreciable individual differences in the 22 examinees were disclosed, particularly at lower sites. In addition to confirming a local source for the LDV carotid pulse, the data highlight the importance of accurate targeting considerations.

  2. Congenital Absence of the Internal Carotid Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Florio, Francesco; Balzano, Silverio; Nardella, Michele; Strizzi, Vincenzo; Cammisa, Mario; Bozzini, Vincenzo; Catapano, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Vincenzo

    1999-01-15

    We report three cases of congenital absence of an internal carotid artery (ICA), diagnosed incidentally by digital subtraction angiography. The analysis of the cases is based on the classification of segmental ICA agenesis proposed by Lasjaunias and Berenstein. Usually the patients with this rare vascular anomaly are asymptomatic; some may have symptoms related to cerebrovascular insufficiency, compression by enlarged intracranial collateral vessels, or complications associated with cerebral aneurysms. Diagnosis of congenital absence of ICA is made by skull base computed tomography (CT) scan, CT and magnetic resonance angiography, and conventional or digital subtraction angiography.

  3. Management of Extracranial Carotid Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Yinn Cher

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in developed nations. Up to 88% of strokes are ischemic in nature. Extracranial carotid artery atherosclerotic disease is the third leading cause of ischemic stroke in the general population and the second most common non-traumatic cause among adults <45 years of age. The aim of this paper is to provide comprehensive, evidence-based recommendations for the management of extracranial atherosclerotic disease, including imaging for screening and diagnosis, medical management and interventional management. PMID:25439328

  4. Carotid stent infection: a rare but potentially fatal complication of carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Son, Seungnam; Choi, Nack-Cheon; Choi, Dae Seob; Cho, Oh Hyun

    2015-04-01

    Infections involving endovascular devices are rare and, to our knowledge, only three cases of infection with an inserted carotid stent have ever been reported. A 68-year-old man underwent carotid artery stenting (CAS) of the left proximal internal carotid artery. Two days after CAS the patient developed a high fever and investigation showed that the inserted carotid stent was infected. The infection could not be controlled despite adequate antibiotic therapy. Eventually a rupture of the carotid artery occurred and the patient underwent emergency resection of the left carotid bifurcation in addition to stent removal and reconstruction with a saphenous vein interposition graft. The patient recovered fully without any neurological sequelae. PMID:24688061

  5. Concomitant Carotid and Coronary Artery Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Craver, Joseph M.; Murphy, Douglas A.; Jones, Ellis L.; Curling, Patrick E.; Bone, David K.; Smith, Robert B.; Perdue, Garland D.; Hatcher, Charles R.; Kandrach, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Data are presented on 68 patients who underwent concomitant carotid endarterectomy (CE) and coronary artery bypass surgery (CAB) at Emory University Hospital from January 1974 to February 1981. This group is then compared with a randomly selected, matched population without known carotid disease who underwent CAB alone. Asymptomatic bruit was the reason for investigation in 40 patients (59%); another 23 patients (34%) experienced transient cerebral ischemic attacks (TIAs); and five patients (7%) had TIA and prior stroke. Carotid stenoses (>75% luminal narrowing) were demonstrated as follows: isolated left, 24 patients; isolated right, 27 patients; and bilateral lesions, 16 patients. One patient had innominate artery stenosis. Associated total occlusion of one or both vertebral arteries was demonstrated in six patients. Ninety-seven per cent of patients had disabling angina pectoris prior to operation; the angina was unstable in 57%, 15% had congestive heart failure, and 54% had had at least one prior myocardial infarction (MI). Single-vessel coronary disease was present in 12.5% of patients, double in 37.5%, triple in 41.1%, and left main stenosis in 9%; 43% of patients had abnormal ventricular contractility. CE was performed on 67 patients (36 left and 31 right); aortocarotid bypass was performed on one. The CE procedures were performed immediately prior to the sternotomy for CAB under the same anesthesia. CAB consisted of single bypass in eight patients (11.8%); double in 16 patients (23.5%); triple in 22 patients (32.4%); and quadruple or more in 22 patients (32.4%) (mean = 2.9 grafts per patient). There was no hospital mortality. Perioperative MI occurred in 2.0% and stroke with residual deficit in 1.3%. Cumulative survival is 98.5% at two years. Sixty-three patients (92%) reported improvement or elimination of anginal symptoms after operation. Rehospitalization for stroke was necessary in 3.7% patients. Postoperative activity levels are; self-care only, 3

  6. Tasting arterial blood: what do the carotid chemoreceptors sense?

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakhar, Nanduri R.; Joyner, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The carotid bodies are sensory organs that detect the chemical composition of the arterial blood. The carotid body sensory activity increases in response to arterial hypoxemia and the ensuing chemoreflex regulates vital homeostatic functions. Recent studies suggest that the carotid bodies might also sense arterial blood glucose and circulating insulin levels. This review focuses on how the carotid bodies sense O2, glucose, and insulin and some potential implications of these sensory functions on physiological regulation and in pathophysiological conditions. Emerging evidence suggests that carbon monoxide (CO)-regulated hydrogen sulfide (H2S), stemming from hypoxia, depolarizes type I cells by inhibiting certain K+ channels, facilitates voltage-gated Ca2+ influx leading to sensory excitation of the carotid body. Elevated CO and decreased H2S renders the carotid bodies insensitive to hypoxia resulting in attenuated ventilatory adaptations to high altitude hypoxia, whereas reduced CO and high H2S result in hypersensitivity of the carotid bodies to hypoxia and hypertension. Acute hypoglycemia augments the carotid body responses to hypoxia but that a prolonged lack of glucose in the carotid bodies can lead to a failure to sense hypoxia. Emerging evidence also indicates that carotid bodies might sense insulin directly independent of its effect on glucose, linking the carotid bodies to the pathophysiological consequences of the metabolic syndrome. How glucose and insulin interact with the CO-H2S signaling is an area of ongoing study. PMID:25642193

  7. Morphometric and hemodynamic analysis of atherosclerotic progression in human carotid artery bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu; Yin, Xiaoping; Xu, Yingjin; Jia, Xinwei; Li, Jianhui; Niu, Pei; Shen, Wenzeng; Kassab, Ghassan S; Tan, Wenchang; Huo, Yunlong

    2016-03-01

    Although atherosclerosis has been widely investigated at carotid artery bifurcation, there is a lack of morphometric and hemodynamic data at different stages of the disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the lesion difference in patients with carotid artery disease compared with healthy control subjects. The three-dimensional (3D) geometry of carotid artery bifurcation was reconstructed from computed tomography angiography (CTA) images of Chinese control subjects (n = 30) and patients with carotid artery disease (n = 30). We defined two novel vector angles (i.e., angles 1 and 2) that were tangential to the reconstructed contour of the 3D vessel. The best-fit diameter was computed along the internal carotid artery (ICA) center line. Hemodynamic analysis was performed at various bifurcations. Patients with stenotic vessels have larger angles 1 and 2 (151 ± 11° and 42 ± 20°) and smaller diameters of the external carotid artery (ECA) (4.6 ± 0.85 mm) compared with control subjects (144 ± 13° and 36 ± 16°, 5.2 ± 0.57 mm) although there is no significant difference in the common carotid artery (CCA) (7.1 ± 1.2 vs. 7.5 ± 1.0 mm, P = 0.18). In particular, all patients with carotid artery disease have a stenosis at the proximal ICA (including both sinus and carina regions), while 20% of patients have stenosis at the middle ICA and 20% have stenosis expansion to the entire cervical ICA. Morphometric and hemodynamic analyses suggest that atherosclerotic plaques initiate at both sinus and carina regions of ICA and progress downstream. PMID:26747497

  8. Stenting of Extracranial Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Koshimae, N.; Morimoto, T.; Nagata, K.

    2003-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study is to evaluate our cases of cervical internal carotid artery stenosis for safty stenting. We investigate the preoperative internal carotid artery stenosis using by integrated backscatter (IBS) method of ultra sonography, comparing with the thirty five surgical specimens as to their nature, histological structure, thickness of fibrous cap. We choose the protection method according to plaque structure, and placed Easy-Wall stent or Smart stent after prePTA. We added post PTA according to the extent of expansion and IVUS findings. Calibrated IBS = IBS value (ROI) /intinal IBS value of ‘bleeding’, ‘lipiď, ‘thrombus’, fiber, ‘hyalinization’ were -27.5, -22.5, -15.2, -11.1, +2.1. That of the thin fibrous cap were -10.9*, that of thic fibrous cap were -2.4 (*p < 0.001). There was a good coleration between the extent of expansion and expected histological findings. All conplications were two cases of small cerebral infarction and a case of bleeding from the complicated lung cancer. The protection at prePTA lead to no complications in case of acute cerebral infarctions. It is very important to check the histological specimen carefully for safty stenting. PMID:20591243

  9. Successful Endovascular Treatment of a Left Common Carotid Artery Aneurysm Following Failed Surgery of a Right Common Carotid Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Cil, Barbaros E. Ucar, Ibrahim; Ozsoy, Fatma; Arat, Anil; Yorgancioglu, Cem; Boeke, Erkmen

    2005-04-15

    Aneurysm of the common carotid artery is a rare and serious disease requiring prompt treatment in order to avoid neurologic complications. A 39-year-old man presented with voice impairment and a pulsatile mass at the right side of his neck and was found by color Doppler examination to have bilateral common carotid artery aneurysms of unknown origin. The right-sided large aneurysm was treated with placement of an 8 mm interposition Gore-Tex graft between the right common and internal carotid arteries. The surgical graft thrombosed 7 days after the surgery but the left-sided aneurysm was successfully treated by a Jostent peripheral stent-graft. Color Doppler examination showed a patent stent and no filling of the aneurysm on his first and sixth-month follow-up. Bilateral common carotid artery aneurysm is an exceptionally unusual condition and endovascular treatment of carotid artery aneurysms with covered stents may become an effective treatment alternative for these lesions.

  10. Rat Carotid Artery Balloon Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Tulis, David Anthony

    2010-01-01

    i. Summary Numerous and diverse experimental animal models have been used over the years to examine reactions to various forms of blood vessel disease and/or injury across species and in multiple vascular beds in a cumulative effort to relate these findings to the human condition. In this context, the rat carotid artery balloon injury model is highly characterized and commonly used for investigating gross morphological, cellular, biochemical, and molecular components of the response to experimentally-induced arterial injury. The mechanical damage caused by the balloon catheter completely removes the intimal endothelial lining and creates a distending mural injury in the operated vessel. This elicits a reproducible remodeling response characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) mitogenesis and migration (via phenotypic switching), SMC apoptosis, partial vascular endothelial cell regeneration, enhanced matrix synthesis, and establishment of an invasive neointima in time-dependent fashion. This multi-factorial process allows for investigation of these many important pathophysiological processes and can serve as a valuable “proof-of-concept” tool to verify and substantiate in vitro results; however, inherent anatomical and adaptive constraints of this in vivo model ration comparison to the diseased human system (see Note 1). In this chapter, brief overview of the materials needed and the methodologies commonly employed for successful routine performance of this important experimental animal model will be provided. Individual sub-sections will cover animal care and handling, pre- and post-operative procedures, and the surgery proper. Protocols for histopathology and morphometry and procedures for data management and interpretation pertinent to the rat carotid artery balloon injury model will be discussed in Chapter __ of this series. Notes will conclude with important caveats, limitations, and considerations for practical use of this technique. PMID:18287662

  11. Improving imaging to optimize screening strategies for carotid artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Ankur; Gupta, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Carotid stenosis is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. Recently, the United States Preventive Services Task Force issued a recommendation against screening for carotid stenosis in the general population. There is the potential for efficient risk-stratifying or staged screening approaches that identify individuals at highest risk for carotid stenosis and stroke, but these tools have yet to be proven effective in external validation studies. In this paper, we review how medical imaging can be used to detect carotid stenosis and highlight several areas that could be improved to identify potentially efficient screening strategies for carotid stenosis. PMID:26275846

  12. Access to the carotid artery bifurcation: Cadaveric study with application to nasotracheal intubation as a technique to improve access to a high carotid artery bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Paul M; Harrigan, Mark R; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2015-12-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is a common and efficacious surgical procedure for the prevention of ischemic stroke due to atherosclerosis of the internal carotid artery (ICA). A high common carotid artery bifurcation can make CEA technically difficult due to limited carotid artery exposure. A cadaveric study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of nasotracheal intubation for improving access to a high carotid artery bifurcation. Based on this study, nasotracheal intubation does not improve access to a high carotid artery bifurcation as compared with orotracheal intubation. PMID:26312946

  13. Mixing in the human carotid artery during carotid drug infusion studied with PET.

    PubMed

    Junck, L; Koeppe, R A; Greenberg, H S

    1989-10-01

    The safety and efficacy of drug infusion into the carotid artery require adequate mixing of the infused solution with carotid blood. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we studied the mixing of solutions infused into the human carotid artery in seven patients by analyzing the distribution of [15O]H2O infused into the carotid artery and by vein. At four infusion rates ranging from 0.5 to 10 ml/min, the variability in distribution averaged 16.5-17.8% among the pixels in a large volume of interest, without dependence on the infusion rate. The overall correlation between [15O]H2O influx with arterial infusion and [15O]H2O influx with venous injection was 0.78-0.82 at the four infusion rates, with no trend toward higher correlations at the faster infusion rates. The distribution into the anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral artery territories differed from distribution throughout the entire carotid territory by an average of 6.2-9.6% at the four infusion rates, with no trend toward smaller differences at the faster infusion rates. Infusions performed into a vinyl tube simulating the carotid artery indicated that at 0.5 ml/min, the velocity of fluid exiting the catheter makes no apparent contribution to mixing. We conclude that with infusions at the carotid bifurcation, mixing in the human carotid artery is complete or nearly complete over a wide range of infusion rates. The mixing appears to result from the patterns of blood flow within the artery, and not from jet effects at the catheter tip. PMID:2789230

  14. Mycotic pseudo-aneurysm of the extracranial carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Desimpelaere, J; Seynaeve, P; Kockx, M; Appel, B; Gyselinck, J; Mortelmans, L

    1997-08-01

    A rare case of mycotic pseudo-aneurysm of the common carotid artery as a complication in an immunosuppressed paediatric patient is presented. Treatment of pseudo-aneurysms of the common carotid artery is generally considered to be an emergency, necessitating quick and accurate diagnosis. In patients with septicemia, angiography has to be avoided. We were able to provide the surgeon with the exact diagnosis and accurate topographical information with helical CT with 3D reformation. PMID:9351308

  15. Is Acute Carotid Artery Stent Thrombosis an Avoidable Complication?

    PubMed

    Köklü, Erkan; Yüksel, İsa Öner; Bayar, Nermin; Arslan, Şakir

    2015-10-01

    The most serious complication of carotid artery stenting (CAS) is acute carotid artery stent thrombosis (ACAST). ACAST is a very rare complication, but it may lead to dramatic and catastrophic consequences. The most important cause is inadequate or ineffective antiaggregant therapy. It is very important to identify, before CAS, those patients who might be candidates for ACAST and to start antiplatelet therapy for them. Testing patients who are candidates for CAS for acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel resistance may prevent this complication. PMID:26303788

  16. A case of congenital agenesis of the common carotid artery associated with an ectopic parathyroid adenoma mimicking a carotid body tumor.

    PubMed

    Malm, Ian-James; Olcott, Clara M; Chan, Jason Y K; Loyo, Myriam; Kim, Young J

    2013-01-01

    Ectopic parathyroid adenomas can be encountered during four gland explorations, but nearly 80% of adenomas are localized with ultrasound and sestamibi imaging. Ectopic adenomas are thought to arise from abnormal migration during development. As a cervical congenital anomaly, common carotid artery agenesis is an extremely rare anomaly characterized by separate origins of the internal and external carotid arteries directly from the aortic arch. Here we present a case of a 75 year old man with primary hyperparathyroidism who was found to have congenital agenesis of the common carotid artery associated with an ectopic parathyroid adenoma within the parapharyngeal space, which mimicked a carotid body tumor based on location and imaging. The successful identification and resection of the ectopic parathyroid adenoma presented here demonstrate the importance of preoperative imaging studies to allow appropriate operative planning as well as the utility of intraoperative parathyroid hormone assay in predicting cure during surgery. PMID:23993711

  17. Computational solution of the velocity and wall shear stress distribution inside a left carotid artery under pulsatile flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Nurullah; Turmuş, Hakan

    2014-08-01

    Stroke is still one of the leading causes for death after heart diseases and cancer in all over the world. Strokes happen because an artery that carries blood uphill from the heart to the head is clogged. Most of the time, as with heart attacks, the problem is atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries, calcified buildup of fatty deposits on the vessel wall. In this study, the fluid dynamic simulations were done in a left carotid bifurcation under the pulsatile flow conditions computationally. Pulsatile flow waveform is given in the paper. In vivo geometry and boundary conditions were obtained from a patient who has stenosis located at external carotid artery (ECA) and internal carotid artery (ICA) of his common carotid artery (CCA). The location of critical flow fields such as low wall shear stress (WSS), stagnation regions and separation regions were detected near the highly stenosed region and at branching region.

  18. Carotid Stump Syndrome: Pathophysiology and Endovascular Treatment Options

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayan, Raghuram; Scott, Paul M.; Robinson, Graham J.; Ettles, Duncan F.

    2011-02-15

    Carotid stump syndrome is one of the recognised causes of recurrent ipsilateral cerebrovascular events after occlusion of the internal carotid artery. It is believed that microemboli arising from the stump of the occluded internal carotid artery or the ipsilateral external carotid artery can pass into the middle cerebral artery circulation as a result of patent external carotid-internal carotid anastomotic channels. Different pathophysiologic causes of this syndrome and endovascular options for treatment are discussed.

  19. Carotid artery stenting versus endarterectomy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gahremanpour, Amir; Perin, Emerson C; Silva, Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    For about 2 decades, investigators have been comparing carotid endarterectomy with carotid artery stenting in regard to their effectiveness and safety in treating carotid artery stenosis. We conducted a systematic review to summarize and appraise the available evidence provided by randomized trials, meta-analyses, and registries comparing the clinical outcomes of the 2 procedures. We searched the MEDLINE, SciVerse Scopus, and Cochrane databases and the bibliographies of pertinent textbooks and articles to identify these studies. The results of clinical trials and, consequently, the meta-analyses of those trials produced conflicting results regarding the comparative effectiveness and safety of carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. These conflicting results arose because of differences in patient population, trial design, outcome measures, and variability among centers in the endovascular devices used and in operator skills. Careful appraisal of the trials and meta-analyses, particularly the most recent and largest National Institutes of Health-sponsored trial (the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs Stenting Trial [CREST]), showed that carotid stenting and endarterectomy were associated with similar rates of death and disabling stroke. Within the 30-day periprocedural period, carotid stenting was associated with higher risks of stroke, especially for patients aged >70 years, whereas carotid endarterectomy was associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction. The slightly higher cost of stenting compared with endarterectomy was within an acceptable range by cost-effectiveness standards. We conclude that carotid artery stenting is an equivalent alternative to carotid endarterectomy when patient age and anatomy, surgical risk, and operator experience are considered in the choice of treatment approach. PMID:22949763

  20. A surgical case of paraclinoid carotid aneurysm associated with ipsilateral cervical internal carotid artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Wada, Kojiro; Sakakibara, Fumihiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a 60-year-old with a large paraclinoid carotid aneurysm associated with cervical interal carotid artery (ICA) dissection (CICAD). She had a fall while riding a bicycle and hit her head on the ground. Computed tomography scan done at another facility showed a round mass lesion near the sella. Her medical history revealed gradual decrease in left eye vision since two years. Left carotid artery digital subtraction angiography demonstrated a CICAD with an intimal flap and a large paraclinoid aneurysm (15.5 mm in size). She underwent a high-flow bypass with a so-called double-insurance bypass and proximal ligation of the cervical ICA and the postoperative course was uneventful. She was discharged without any new neurological deficits. We suggest that the possible nature of carotid artery dissection (CAD)-related hemodynamic changes should be taken into consideration in cases of intracranial aneurysm associated with CAD. PMID:23135031

  1. An Experimental and Computational Study of Blunt Carotid Artery Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gayzik, F. Scott; Bostrom, Ola; Örtenwall, Per; Duma, Stefan M.; Stitzel, Joel D.

    2006-01-01

    A carotid artery dissection begins as a tear or defect of the intimal lining of the artery, and can lead to luminal occlusion and ultimately cerebral ischemia. Our aim is to conduct an organ level validation of a finite element model of the carotid artery using an experiment designed to elicit internal layer failure within fluid-filled carotid artery samples. A 2.4-kg beveled guillotine is dropped from three heights (0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 m) onto fluid-filled porcine carotid arteries and resulting damage is recorded. These events are modeled using finite element analysis. Stress, strain and strain rate are correlated to experimental outcome. Internal layer damage is reported in half of the experiments, with damage occurring with 100% frequency at a drop height of 0.7 m. Simulations of this experiment result in maximum principal stress and strain values of 1.43 MPa and 46.2% respectively. The strain level predicted by the model for this impact scenario approaches the strain to intimal failure level for porcine arteries found in the literature. The results of this study represent an important step in validating this finite element carotid artery model at the organ level. PMID:16968627

  2. Proposed clinical internal carotid artery classification system

    PubMed Central

    Abdulrauf, Saleem I; Ashour, Ahmed M; Marvin, Eric; Coppens, Jeroen; Kang, Brian; Hsieh, Tze Yu Yeh; Nery, Breno; Penanes, Juan R; Alsahlawi, Aysha K; Moore, Shawn; Al-Shaar, Hussam Abou; Kemp, Joanna; Chawla, Kanika; Sujijantarat, Nanthiya; Najeeb, Alaa; Parkar, Nadeem; Shetty, Vilaas; Vafaie, Tina; Antisdel, Jastin; Mikulec, Tony A; Edgell, Randall; Lebovitz, Jonathan; Pierson, Matt; Pires de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Buchanan, Paula; Di Cosola, Angela; Stevens, George

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Numerical classification systems for the internal carotid artery (ICA) are available, but modifications have added confusion to the numerical systems. Furthermore, previous classifications may not be applicable uniformly to microsurgical and endoscopic procedures. The purpose of this study was to develop a clinically useful classification system. Materials and Methods: We performed cadaver dissections of the ICA in 5 heads (10 sides) and evaluated 648 internal carotid arteries with computed tomography angiography. We identified specific anatomic landmarks to define the beginning and end of each ICA segment. Results: The ICA was classified into eight segments based on the cadaver and imaging findings: (1) Cervical segment; (2) cochlear segment (ascending segment of the ICA in the temporal bone) (relation of the start of this segment to the base of the styloid process: Above, 425 sides [80%]; below, 2 sides [0.4%]; at same level, 107 sides [20%]; P < 0.0001) (relation of cochlea to ICA: Posterior, 501 sides [85%]; posteromedial, 84 sides [14%]; P < 0.0001); (3) petrous segment (horizontal segment of ICA in the temporal bone) starting at the crossing of the eustachian tube superolateral to the ICA turn in all 10 samples; (4) Gasserian-Clival segment (ascending segment of ICA in the cavernous sinus) starting at the petrolingual ligament (PLL) (relation to vidian canal on imaging: At same level, 360 sides [63%]; below, 154 sides [27%]; above, 53 sides [9%]; P < 0.0001); in this segment, the ICA projected medially toward the clivus in 275 sides (52%) or parallel to the clivus with no deviation in 256 sides (48%; P < 0.0001); (5) sellar segment (medial loop of ICA in the cavernous sinus) starting at the takeoff of the meningeal hypophyseal trunk (ICA was medial into the sella in 271 cases [46%], lateral without touching the sella in 127 cases [23%], and abutting the sella in 182 cases [31%]; P < 0.0001); (6) sphenoid segment (lateral loop of ICA within the

  3. Urgent Intracranial Carotid Artery Decompression after Penetrating Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Joon

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of intracranial carotid artery occlusion due to penetrating craniofacial injury by high velocity foreign body that was relieved by decompressive surgery. A 46-year-old man presented with a penetrating wound to his face. A piece of an electric angular grinder disc became lodged in the anterior skull base. Computed tomography revealed that the disc had penetrated the unilateral paraclinoid and suprasellar areas without flow of the intracranial carotid artery on the lesion side. The cavernous sinus was also compromised. Removal of the anterior clinoid process reopened the carotid blood flow, and the injection of glue into the cavernous sinus restored complete hemostasis during extraction of the fragment from the face. Digital subtraction angiography revealed complete recanalization of the carotid artery without any evidence of dissection. Accurate diagnosis regarding the extent of the compromised structures and urgent decompressive surgery with adequate hemostasis minimized the severity of penetrating damage in our patient. PMID:23634269

  4. The association of central retinal artery occlusion and extracranial carotid artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, D J; Schuler, J J; Buchbinder, D; Dillon, B C; Flanigan, D P

    1988-01-01

    To determine the incidence of associated carotid artery disease and the effect of carotid endarterectomy on subsequent neurologic sequelae, a retrospective study of 66 patients with central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) was undertaken. Ipsilateral extracranial carotid artery disease was present in 23 of 33 patients (70%) who had carotid arteriography. Sixteen patients had carotid endarterectomy following their CRAO (Group I) and 50 did not (Group II). Seven of the 40 patients available for follow-up in Group II had a subsequent stroke (mean follow-up: 54 months). Of the seven Group II patients shown to have associated carotid disease (Group IIs), three (43%) had a subsequent stroke during follow-up (mean: 28.3 months) compared to zero in Group I (p = 0.033; mean follow-up: 18.7 months). Because of the strong association between CRAO and ipsilateral carotid artery disease and because of the significantly higher incidence of subsequent ipsilateral stroke in CRAO patients with carotid disease who did not undergo endarterectomy, thorough evaluation of the carotid arteries followed by carotid endarterectomy, if indicated, is warranted in CRAO patients who have no other obvious etiology for the occlusion. PMID:3389947

  5. Experimental determination of circumferential properties of fresh carotid artery plaques.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Michael G; O'Donnell, Michael R; O'Connell, Barry M; Walsh, Michael T

    2011-06-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is currently accepted as the gold standard for interventional revascularisation of diseased arteries belonging to the carotid bifurcation. Despite the proven efficacy of CEA, great interest has been generated in carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) as an alternative to open surgical therapy. CAS is less invasive compared with CEA, and has the potential to successfully treat lesions close to the aortic arch or distal internal carotid artery (ICA). Following promising results from two recent trials (CREST; Carotid revascularisation endarterectomy versus stenting trial, and ICSS; International carotid stenting study) it is envisaged that there will be a greater uptake in carotid stenting, especially amongst the group who do not qualify for open surgical repair, thus creating pressure to develop computational models that describe a multitude of plaque models in the carotid arteries and their reaction to the deployment of such interventional devices. Pertinent analyses will require fresh human atherosclerotic plaque material characteristics for different disease types. This study analysed atherosclerotic plaque characteristics from 18 patients tested on site, post-surgical revascularisation through endarterectomy, with 4 tissue samples being excluded from tensile testing based on large width-length ratios. According to their mechanical behaviour, atherosclerotic plaques were separated into 3 grades of stiffness. Individual and group material coefficients were then generated analytically using the Yeoh strain energy function. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of each sample was also recorded, showing large variation across the 14 atherosclerotic samples tested. Experimental Green strains at rupture varied from 0.299 to 0.588 and the Cauchy stress observed in the experiments was between 0.131 and 0.779 MPa. It is expected that this data may be used in future design optimisation of next generation interventional medical devices for the

  6. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... (the principal artery in the neck that supplies blood to the brain) and has a removable...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... (the principal artery in the neck that supplies blood to the brain) and has a removable...

  8. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... (the principal artery in the neck that supplies blood to the brain) and has a removable...

  9. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... (the principal artery in the neck that supplies blood to the brain) and has a removable...

  10. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... (the principal artery in the neck that supplies blood to the brain) and has a removable...

  11. [Ruptured Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm Coiling in a Patient with Ipsilateral Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion via the Posterior Communicating Artery].

    PubMed

    Ashida, Noriaki; Saitoh, Minoru; Fujita, Atsushi; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-09-01

    Background:De novo aneurysms after internal carotid artery(ICA)occlusion occur in the contralateral ICA or anterior communicating artery. Hemodynamic changes with increased blood flow to the contralateral carotid circulation were considered the main factor for the formation of these aneurysms. We report a rare case of ruptured ICA aneurysm associated with ipsilateral ICA occlusion treated with coil embolization via the vertebrobasilar and posterior communicating arteries. Case Presentation:An 82-year-old woman presented with sudden-onset disturbance of consciousness at our outpatient clinic and went into cardiopulmonary arrest. Computed tomography(CT)performed after cardiopulmonary resuscitation revealed diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage. Three-dimensional CT angiography revealed a right ICA aneurysm associated with the ipsilateral ICA occlusion. Considering that the patient showed clinical improvement with the critical care for neurogenic pulmonary edema, the aneurysm was treated with endovascular coil embolization via the posterior communicating artery. With this technique, complete obliteration was attained without perioperative complication. Conclusion:Endovascular coil embolization via the posterior communicating artery was proven effective as a treatment method for ruptured ICA aneurysms with ipsilateral ICA occlusion. Hemodynamic stress due to increased blood flow in the posterior communicating artery may play an important role in the growth and rupture of ICA aneurysms. PMID:27605482

  12. The vasa vasorum of the rabbit carotid artery.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, S G; Causton, B E; Baskerville, P A; Gent, S; Martin, J F

    1992-01-01

    The anatomy of the vasa vasorum of the carotid arteries was assessed by light and electron microscopy in a series of 25 New Zealand White male rabbits. The low viscosity acrylic resin, LR White, was used to cast the microvasculature. The carotid artery was found to have an endothelial monolayer placed directly upon a broad fenestrated internal elastic lamina. The media consisted of 12-18 laminae comprised of smooth muscle cells, elastin, collagen and ground substance. Vasa vasorum were confined to the adventitial layer, with no penetration into the media. They arose directly from the lumen of the carotid artery in addition to the arterial branching points. The potential role of the vasa vasorum in the aetiology of atherosclerotic plaques is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:1506278

  13. Cannulation of the internal carotid artery in mice: a novel technique for intra-arterial delivery of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Santillan, Alejandro; Rubin, David G; Foley, Conor P; Sondhi, Dolan; Crystal, Ronald G; Gobin, Y Pierre; Ballon, Douglas J

    2014-01-30

    We have developed a novel minimally invasive technique for the intra-arterial delivery of therapeutics to the mouse brain. CD-1 mice were anesthetized and placed in a lateral decubitus position. A 10mm midline longitudinal incision was made over the thyroid bone. The omohyoid and sternomastoid muscles were retracted to expose the common carotid artery and external carotid artery (ECA). To maximize delivery of administered agents, the superior thyroid artery was ligated or coagulated, and the occipital artery and the pterygopalatine artery (PPA) were temporarily occluded with 6-0 prolene suture. The ECA was carefully dissected and a permanent ligature was placed on its distal segment while a temporary 6-0 prolene ligature was placed on the proximal segment in order to obtain a flow-free segment of vessel. A sterilized 169 μm outer diameter polyimide microcatheter was introduced into the ECA and advanced in retrograde fashion toward the carotid bifurcation. The catheter was then secured and manually rotated so that the microcatheter tip was oriented cephalad in the internal carotid artery (ICA). We were able to achieve reproducible results for selective ipsilateral hemispheric carotid injections of mannitol mediated therapeutics and/or gadolinium-based MRI contrast agent. Survival rates were dependent on the administered agent and ranged from 78 to 90%. This technique allows for reproducible delivery of agents to the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere by utilizing anterograde catheter placement and temporary ligation of the PPA. This method is cost-effective and associated with a low rate of morbimortality. PMID:24269174

  14. Assessment of Carotid Artery Stenosis and the Use of Statins

    PubMed Central

    Whayne, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    General thinking has previously centered on managing carotid artery stenosis (CAS) by carotid endarterectomy and subsequently, stenting for higher risk patients. However for CAS and other forms of vascular disease, especially when asymptomatic, there is new emphasis on defining underlying mechanisms. Knowledge of these mechanisms can lead to medical treatments that result in possible atherosclerotic plaque stabilization, and even plaque regression, including in the patient with CAS. For now, the key medication class for a medical approach are the statins. Their use is supported by good cardiovascular clinical trial evidence including some directed carotid artery studies, especially with a demonstrated decrease in carotid intima-media thickness. Procedural controversy still exists but the current era in medicine offers significant support for medical management of asymptomatic CAS while techniques to recognize the vulnerable plaque evolve. If CAS converts to a symptomatic status, early referral for endarterectomy or stenting is indicated. PMID:26417184

  15. Increased LDL susceptibility to oxidation accelerates future carotid artery atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We analyzed the causal relationship between LDL susceptibility to oxidation and the development of new carotid artery atherosclerosis over a period of 5 years. We previously described the determinants related to a risk of cardiovascular changes determined in a Japanese population participating in the Niigata Study, which is an ongoing epidemiological investigation of the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Methods We selected 394 individuals (169 males and 225 females) who underwent a second carotid artery ultrasonographic examination in 2001 - 2002 for the present study. The susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was determined as the photometric absorbance and electrophoretic mobility of samples that had been collected in 1996 - 1997. The measurements were compared with ultrasonographic findings obtained in 2001 - 2002. Results The multivariate-adjusted model showed that age (odds ratio (OR), 1.034; 95% confidence interval (95%CI), 1.010 - 1.059), HbA1c (OR, 1.477; 95%CI, 0.980 - 2.225), and photometric O/N (OR, 2.012; 95%CI, 1.000 - 4.051) were significant variables that could independently predict the risk of new carotid artery atherosclerosis. Conclusion The susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was a significant parameter that could predict new carotid artery atherosclerosis over a 5-year period, and higher susceptibility was associated with a higher incidence of new carotid artery atherosclerosis. PMID:22230558

  16. Evolution of Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion in Non-Traumatic Carotid Dissection

    PubMed Central

    RUSU, Octavia; VASILE, Mihai; BAJENARU, Ovidiu; ANTOCHI, Florina

    2014-01-01

    Cervical artery dissection is becoming a more frequently identified cause of ischemic stroke among the young and middleaged patients. The pathogenesis of non-traumatic dissection has not been yet entirely elucidated, but certain risk factors have been reported. We present the case of a young patient with ischemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory secondary to internal carotid artery dissection and occlusion, in whom we identified two rarely incriminated risk factors: migraine and recent infection (pneumonia). PMID:25705278

  17. Endovascular Treatment of Iatrogenic and Traumatic Carotid Artery Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Stefan; Donas, Konstantinos P. Pitoulias, Georgios A.; Horsch, Svante

    2008-09-15

    This paper reports on the early and midterm results of endovascular treatment of acute carotid artery dissections, its specific problems, and its limitations. We encountered seven patients with symptomatic extracranial carotid artery dissection, three cases of which occurred after carotid endarterectomy, two after carotid angioplasty and stenting, and two after trauma. Balloon-expandable and self-expanding stents were placed using a transfemoral approach. Success in restoring the carotid lumen was achieved in all patients. No procedure-related complications occurred. All patients experienced significant clinical improvement while in the hospital and achieved complete long-term recovery. At follow-up (mean, 22.4 months), good luminal patency of the stented segments was observed. In conclusion, in this small series, primary stent-supported angioplasty seems to be a safe and effective strategy in the treatment of selected patients having acute traumatic extracranial carotid artery dissection, with excellent early and midterm results. Larger series and longer-term follow-up are required before definitive recommendations can be made.

  18. Persistent trigeminal artery arising from the arterial ring/fenestration of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Kurita, Hiroki; Ishihara, Shoichiro

    2012-09-01

    A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most common carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis, usually arising from the cavernous or precavernous segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and connecting to the distal basilar artery. There are two types of PTA, lateral and medial. We present the first case of a lateral-type PTA arising from the large arterial ring/fenestration of the cavernous segment of the left ICA with findings from both magnetic resonance angiography and selective catheter angiography. PMID:22215430

  19. Vessel Wall Imaging of the Intracranial and Cervical Carotid Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Jun; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, Deok Hee

    2015-01-01

    Vessel wall imaging can depict the morphologies of atherosclerotic plaques, arterial walls, and surrounding structures in the intracranial and cervical carotid arteries beyond the simple luminal changes that can be observed with traditional luminal evaluation. Differentiating vulnerable from stable plaques and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques are vital parts of the early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of stroke and the neurological adverse effects of atherosclerosis. Various techniques for vessel wall imaging have been developed and introduced to differentiate and analyze atherosclerotic plaques in the cervical carotid artery. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) is the most important and popular vessel wall imaging technique for directly evaluating the vascular wall and intracranial artery disease. Intracranial artery atherosclerosis, dissection, moyamoya disease, vasculitis, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome can also be diagnosed and differentiated by using HR-MRI. Here, we review the radiologic features of intracranial artery disease and cervical carotid artery atherosclerosis on HR-MRI and various other vessel wall imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography). PMID:26437991

  20. Vessel Wall Imaging of the Intracranial and Cervical Carotid Arteries.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Jun; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, Deok Hee

    2015-09-01

    Vessel wall imaging can depict the morphologies of atherosclerotic plaques, arterial walls, and surrounding structures in the intracranial and cervical carotid arteries beyond the simple luminal changes that can be observed with traditional luminal evaluation. Differentiating vulnerable from stable plaques and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques are vital parts of the early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of stroke and the neurological adverse effects of atherosclerosis. Various techniques for vessel wall imaging have been developed and introduced to differentiate and analyze atherosclerotic plaques in the cervical carotid artery. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) is the most important and popular vessel wall imaging technique for directly evaluating the vascular wall and intracranial artery disease. Intracranial artery atherosclerosis, dissection, moyamoya disease, vasculitis, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome can also be diagnosed and differentiated by using HR-MRI. Here, we review the radiologic features of intracranial artery disease and cervical carotid artery atherosclerosis on HR-MRI and various other vessel wall imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography). PMID:26437991

  1. Blunt carotid artery injury after minor facial trauma

    PubMed Central

    Murabit, Amera; Tredget, Edward E

    2012-01-01

    A healthy young man presented three days after suffering a punch to the face resulting in minimally displaced mandibular fractures. History revealed an episode of anterograde amnesia and a delayed episode of dysphonia. Apart from the fractured mandible, the physical examination was otherwise noncontributory. Imaging revealed severe luminal narrowing of the left cervical internal carotid artery distal to the carotid bifurcation, consistent with carotid dissection; and two focal hypodensities in the left frontal and parietal cortices, highly suggestive of acute secondary embolic infarcts. The patient was treated with systemic anticoagulation for three months and experienced no further neurological symptoms. His mandibular fractures, treated conservatively, healed without any complications. Blunt carotid artery injuries are uncommon and diverse. Neurological symptoms may develop in a delayed fashion, thus, a high index of suspicion based on knowledge of the injury mechanisms and patterns of associated injuries may enable earlier diagnosis and treatment. Angiographic imaging is essential for the diagnosis and classification of injury characteristics (eg, type, location, etc). Treatment must be considered on an individual patient basis depending on the presentation, grade and morphology of the lesion. Although no level I clinical trials exist on the topic, anticoagulation seems to be the treatment of choice in most cases and surgical intervention is not commonly indicated. Carotid artery dissection without complete thrombosis may be effectively treated with systemic anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy in the majority of cases. PMID:23997588

  2. Blunt carotid artery injury after minor facial trauma.

    PubMed

    Murabit, Amera; Tredget, Edward E

    2012-01-01

    A healthy young man presented three days after suffering a punch to the face resulting in minimally displaced mandibular fractures. History revealed an episode of anterograde amnesia and a delayed episode of dysphonia. Apart from the fractured mandible, the physical examination was otherwise noncontributory. Imaging revealed severe luminal narrowing of the left cervical internal carotid artery distal to the carotid bifurcation, consistent with carotid dissection; and two focal hypodensities in the left frontal and parietal cortices, highly suggestive of acute secondary embolic infarcts. The patient was treated with systemic anticoagulation for three months and experienced no further neurological symptoms. His mandibular fractures, treated conservatively, healed without any complications. Blunt carotid artery injuries are uncommon and diverse. Neurological symptoms may develop in a delayed fashion, thus, a high index of suspicion based on knowledge of the injury mechanisms and patterns of associated injuries may enable earlier diagnosis and treatment. Angiographic imaging is essential for the diagnosis and classification of injury characteristics (eg, type, location, etc). Treatment must be considered on an individual patient basis depending on the presentation, grade and morphology of the lesion. Although no level I clinical trials exist on the topic, anticoagulation seems to be the treatment of choice in most cases and surgical intervention is not commonly indicated. Carotid artery dissection without complete thrombosis may be effectively treated with systemic anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy in the majority of cases. PMID:23997588

  3. Successful Resuscitation of a Cardiac Arrest following Slit Neck and Carotid Artery Injury: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Sayyed Ehtesham Hussain; Ali, Eram; Beg, Mohammed Haneef; Varshney, Saurav

    2016-06-01

    Carotid artery injuries constitute a specific and relatively small group of vascular trauma among the traumatic injuries to neck. They have the potential of killing the patients within minutes to hours due to haemodynamic instability if not managed by the specialist team within time. Central Neurologic deficit from cerebral hypoxia either resulting primarily from trauma or secondarily from surgery is a major concern. We hereby present a case of a 22-year-old man who presented to emergency department with alleged assault and vascular trauma to neck in a state of cardiac arrest. On exploration patient had injuries to external and internal carotid arteries and external jugular vein. Combined effort of trauma team lead to successful resuscitation and saved the life of the patient. PMID:27504354

  4. Successful Resuscitation of a Cardiac Arrest following Slit Neck and Carotid Artery Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Eram; Beg, Mohammed Haneef; Varshney, Saurav

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery injuries constitute a specific and relatively small group of vascular trauma among the traumatic injuries to neck. They have the potential of killing the patients within minutes to hours due to haemodynamic instability if not managed by the specialist team within time. Central Neurologic deficit from cerebral hypoxia either resulting primarily from trauma or secondarily from surgery is a major concern. We hereby present a case of a 22-year-old man who presented to emergency department with alleged assault and vascular trauma to neck in a state of cardiac arrest. On exploration patient had injuries to external and internal carotid arteries and external jugular vein. Combined effort of trauma team lead to successful resuscitation and saved the life of the patient. PMID:27504354

  5. Surgical Exposure to Control the Distal Internal Carotid Artery at the Base of the Skull during Carotid Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Davis, Laura; Zeitouni, Anthony; Makhoul, Nicholas; Steinmetz, Oren K

    2016-07-01

    Extracranial carotid artery aneurysms are rare. Treatment options for these lesions include endovascular interventions, such as coiling and stenting, or surgical reconstruction, such as resection and primary reanastomosis, or interposition bypass grafting. In this report, we describe the surgical technique used to perform surgical repair of an internal carotid artery aneurysm extending up to the base of the skull. Anterior exposure of the infratemporal fossa and distal control of the carotid artery at the level of the carotid canal was achieved through a transcervical approach, performing double mandibular osteotomies with superior reflection of the middle mandibular section. PMID:26902936

  6. Carotid artery stenting and patient outcomes: The CABANA surveillance study

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, L Nelson; White, Christopher J; Foster, Malcolm T; Powell, Richard J; Zemel, Gerald; Diaz-Cartelle, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized CABANA study was to evaluate periprocedural clinical outcomes in high surgical risk patients with carotid artery stenosis treated with the Carotid WALLSTENT plus FilterWire EZ Embolic Protection System by a diverse group of clinicians. Background There is a need for additional evidence evaluating carotid artery stenting (CAS) performed by operators with various experience and training levels. Methods The study enrolled symptomatic (≥50% carotid artery stenosis) and asymptomatic (≥80% carotid stenosis) patients at high risk for carotid endarterectomy. Study centers were grouped into three tiers based on previous CAS experience while individual operators were grouped by their CAS training. The primary endpoint was the 30-day composite of major adverse events [MAEs; including stroke, death, and myocardial infarction (MI)]. Individual event rates were evaluated across the overall study, and by center experience and physician training tier. Results Of 1,097 enrolled patients, 1,025 were evaluable for 30-day MAE rate. The stroke rate (3.3%) was a major contributing factor in the overall MAE rate (4.6%). Mortality was 1.3% and the MI rate was 0.5%. There was no statistically significant association between MAE rates among the center experience tiers (P = 0.61) nor among the operator training categories (P = 0.26). Conclusions CAS with the Carotid WALLSTENT and FilterWire EZ yielded a low 30-day MAE rate that did not differ significantly across operator experience and training levels. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00741091. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24948033

  7. Vascular balloon injury and intraluminal administration in rat carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Trebak, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The carotid artery balloon injury model in rats has been well established for over two decades. It remains an important method to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in vascular smooth muscle dedifferentiation, neointima formation and vascular remodeling. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are the most frequently employed animals for this model. Female rats are not preferred as female hormones are protective against vascular diseases and thus introduce a variation into this procedure. The left carotid is typically injured with the right carotid serving as a negative control. Left carotid injury is caused by the inflated balloon that denudes the endothelium and distends the vessel wall. Following injury, potential therapeutic strategies such as the use of pharmacological compounds and either gene or shRNA transfer can be evaluated. Typically for gene or shRNA transfer, the injured section of the vessel lumen is locally transduced for 30 min with viral particles encoding either a protein or shRNA for delivery and expression in the injured vessel wall. Neointimal thickening representing proliferative vascular smooth muscle cells usually peaks at 2 weeks after injury. Vessels are mostly harvested at this time point for cellular and molecular analysis of cell signaling pathways as well as gene and protein expression. Vessels can also be harvested at earlier time points to determine the onset of expression and/or activation of a specific protein or pathway, depending on the experimental aims intended. Vessels can be characterized and evaluated using histological staining, immunohistochemistry, protein/mRNA assays, and activity assays. The intact right carotid artery from the same animal is an ideal internal control. Injury-induced changes in molecular and cellular parameters can be evaluated by comparing the injured artery to the internal right control artery. Likewise, therapeutic modalities can be evaluated by comparing the injured and treated artery to the

  8. Central retinal artery pressure and carotid artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    SUN, RAN; PENG, XIAO-YAN; YOU, QI-SHENG; JIAO, LI-QUN; JONAS, JOST B.

    2016-01-01

    The central retinal artery (CRA), which can be non-invasively examined with ophthalmoscopy, may be regarded as an extracranial part of the cerebrovascular system. Assessment of CRA pressure may be of help in assessing the impediment of the intracranial blood circulation in patients with a carotid artery stenosis (CAS). The aim of this study was to explore the potential associations between diastolic central retinal artery pressure (diastCRAP) and CAS. The prospective longitudinal clinical observational study included patients with CAS and a control group without CAS. diastCRAP was assessed using ophthalmodynamometry. The study group consisted of 95 patients with CAS (50 of whom had >75%CAS and underwent surgery; the surgical study group) and a control group of 64 individuals without CAS. In all study participants, a lower diastCRAP was significantly associated with a higher degree of CAS (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated that a higher CAS degree was significantly (correlation coefficient: r=0.75) associated with a higher brachial diastolic blood pressure (P<0.001) and lower diastCRAP (P<0.001). Within the surgical study group at the baseline of the study, diastCRAP was significantly lower at the surgical side than at the contralateral side (P=0.02). The diastCRAP on the surgical side increased significantly (P<0.001) after surgery. In the surgical study group at baseline, diastCRAP on the surgical side was not significantly associated with brachial diastolic blood pressure (P=0.22), whereas after surgery, diastCRAP was significantly associated with brachial diastolic blood pressure (P=0.001). DiastCRAP was found to be significantly and linearly correlated with the degree of CAS in intra-individual inter-eye, inter-individual and intra-individual follow-up comparisons. The strong and linear association between diastCRAP and the degree of CAS suggest that diastCRAP should be explored further for use as an indicator of cerebrovascular status. PMID:26998005

  9. Automated quantification of carotid artery stenosis on contrast-enhanced MRA data using a deformable vascular tube model.

    PubMed

    Suinesiaputra, Avan; de Koning, Patrick J H; Zudilova-Seinstra, Elena; Reiber, Johan H C; van der Geest, Rob J

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a method for automated segmentation of the carotid artery lumen from volumetric MR Angiographic (MRA) images using a deformable tubular 3D Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) model. A flexible 3D tubular NURBS model was designed to delineate the carotid arterial lumen. User interaction was allowed to guide the model by placement of forbidden areas. Contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA) from 21 patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease were included in this study. The validation was performed against expert drawn contours on multi-planar reformatted image slices perpendicular to the artery. Excellent linear correlations were found on cross-sectional area measurement (r = 0.98, P < 0.05) and on luminal diameter (r = 0.98, P < 0.05). Strong match in terms of the Dice similarity indices were achieved: 0.95 ± 0.02 (common carotid artery), 0.90 ± 0.07 (internal carotid artery), 0.87 ± 0.07 (external carotid artery), 0.88 ± 0.09 (carotid bifurcation) and 0.75 ± 0.20 (stenosed segments). Slight overestimation of stenosis grading by the automated method was observed. The mean differences was 7.20% (SD = 21.00%) and 5.2% (SD = 21.96%) when validated against two observers. Reproducibility in stenosis grade calculation by the automated method was high; the mean difference between two repeated analyses was 1.9 ± 7.3%. In conclusion, the automated method shows high potential for clinical application in the analysis of CE-MRA of carotid arteries. PMID:22160666

  10. Bilateral carotid and bilateral vertebral artery dissection following facial massage.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Andrea L; Zink, Walter; Zimmerman, Robert; Riina, Howard; Benitez, Ronald

    A 50-year-old woman underwent facial massage. After 13 days, she experienced left retro-orbital pain, ptosis, and miosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed stenotic dissection of bilateral cervical internal carotid and vertebral arteries. The intracranial vasculature was intact. She was treated conservatively with long-term oral anticoagulation and remains asymptomatic 18 months later. PMID:18388028

  11. Readmissions after Carotid Artery Revascularization in the Medicare Population

    PubMed Central

    Al-Damluji, Mohammed Salim; Dharmarajan, Kumar; Zhang, Weiwei; Geary, Lori; Stilp, Erik; Dardik, Alan; Mena-Hurtado, Carlos; Curtis, Jeptha P.

    2015-01-01

    Background In appropriately selected patients with severe carotid stenosis, carotid revascularization reduces ischemic stroke. Prior clinical research has focused on the efficacy and safety of carotid revascularization, but few investigators have considered readmission as a clinically important outcome. Objectives To examine frequency, timing, and diagnoses of 30-day readmission following carotid revascularization; to assess differences in 30-day readmission between patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid artery stenting (CAS); to describe hospital variation in risk-standardized readmission rates (RSRR); and to examine whether hospital variation in procedural choice (CEA vs. CAS) was associated with differences in RSRRs. Methods We used Medicare fee-for-service administrative claims data to identify acute care hospitalizations for CEA and CAS from 2009–2011. We calculated crude 30-day all-cause hospital readmissions following carotid revascularization. To assess differences in readmission after CAS compared with CEA, we used Kaplan-Meier survival curves and fitted mixed-effect logistic regression. We estimated hospital RSRRs using hierarchical generalized logistic regression. We stratified hospitals into 5 groups by their proportional CAS use and compared hospital group median RSRRs. Results Of 180,059 revascularizations from 2,287 hospitals, CEA and CAS were performed in 81.5% and 18.5% of cases, respectively. The unadjusted 30-day readmission rate following carotid revascularization was 9.6%. Readmission risk after CAS was higher than after CEA. There was modest hospital-level variation in 30-day RSRRs (Median: 9.5%, Range: 7.5%–12.5%). Variation in proportional use of CAS was not associated with differences in hospital RSRR (range of median RSRR across hospital quartiles: 9.49%–9.55%, P 0.771). Conclusions Almost 10% of Medicare patients undergoing carotid revascularization were readmitted within 30-days of discharge. Compared with CEA

  12. Wavelet-based neural network analysis of internal carotid arterial Doppler signals.

    PubMed

    Ubeyli, Elif Derya; Güler, Inan

    2006-06-01

    In this study, internal carotid arterial Doppler signals recorded from 130 subjects, where 45 of them suffered from internal carotid artery stenosis, 44 of them suffered from internal carotid artery occlusion and the rest of them were healthy subjects, were classified using wavelet-based neural network. Wavelet-based neural network model, employing the multilayer perceptron, was used for analysis of the internal carotid arterial Doppler signals. Multi-layer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) trained with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used to detect stenosis and occlusion in internal carotid arteries. In order to determine the MLPNN inputs, spectral analysis of the internal carotid arterial Doppler signals was performed using wavelet transform (WT). The MLPNN was trained, cross validated, and tested with training, cross validation, and testing sets, respectively. All these data sets were obtained from internal carotid arteries of healthy subjects, subjects suffering from internal carotid artery stenosis and occlusion. The correct classification rate was 96% for healthy subjects, 96.15% for subjects having internal carotid artery stenosis and 96.30% for subjects having internal carotid artery occlusion. The classification results showed that the MLPNN trained with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was effective to detect internal carotid artery stenosis and occlusion. PMID:16848135

  13. Stenting versus Endarterectomy for Treatment of Carotid-Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Brott, Thomas G.; Hobson, Robert W.; Howard, George; Roubin, Gary S.; Clark, Wayne M.; Brooks, William; Mackey, Ariane; Hill, Michael D.; Leimgruber, Pierre P.; Sheffet, Alice J.; Howard, Virginia J.; Moore, Wesley S.; Voeks, Jenifer H.; Hopkins, L. Nelson; Cutlip, Donald E.; Cohen, David J.; Popma, Jeffrey J.; Ferguson, Robert D.; Cohen, Stanley N.; Blackshear, Joseph L.; Silver, Frank L.; Mohr, J.P.; Lal, Brajesh K.; Meschia, James F.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Carotid-artery stenting and carotid endarterectomy are both options for treating carotid-artery stenosis, an important cause of stroke. METHODS We randomly assigned patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid stenosis to undergo carotid-artery stenting or carotid endarterectomy. The primary composite end point was stroke, myocardial infarction, or death from any cause during the periprocedural period or any ipsilateral stroke within 4 years after randomization. RESULTS For 2502 patients over a median follow-up period of 2.5 years, there was no significant difference in the estimated 4-year rates of the primary end point between the stenting group and the endarterectomy group (7.2% and 6.8%, respectively; hazard ratio with stenting, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.81 to 1.51; P = 0.51). There was no differential treatment effect with regard to the primary end point according to symptomatic status (P = 0.84) or sex (P = 0.34). The 4-year rate of stroke or death was 6.4% with stenting and 4.7% with endarterectomy (hazard ratio, 1.50; P = 0.03); the rates among symptomatic patients were 8.0% and 6.4% (hazard ratio, 1.37; P = 0.14), and the rates among asymptomatic patients were 4.5% and 2.7% (hazard ratio, 1.86; P = 0.07), respectively. Periprocedural rates of individual components of the end points differed between the stenting group and the endarterectomy group: for death (0.7% vs. 0.3%, P = 0.18), for stroke (4.1% vs. 2.3%, P = 0.01), and for myocardial infarction (1.1% vs. 2.3%, P = 0.03). After this period, the incidences of ipsilateral stroke with stenting and with endarterectomy were similarly low (2.0% and 2.4%, respectively; P = 0.85). CONCLUSIONS Among patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid stenosis, the risk of the composite primary outcome of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death did not differ significantly in the group undergoing carotid-artery stenting and the group undergoing carotid endarterectomy. During the

  14. METABOLIC SYNDROME INCREASES CAROTID ARTERY STIFFNESS: THE NORTHERN MANHATTAN STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Della-Morte, David; Gardener, Hannah; Denaro, Federica; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Paik, Myunghee C.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Rundek, Tatjana

    2010-01-01

    Background Arterial Stiffness, an intermediate pre-clinical marker of atherosclerosis, has been associated with an increased risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The metabolic syndrome and its components are established CVD risk factors and may also increase arterial stiffness, but data on this potential relationship is limited. The goal of this study was to determine the association between the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) and carotid artery stiffness (STIFF) in an elderly multi-ethnic cohort. Methods STIFF was assessed by carotid ultrasound as part of the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS), a prospective population-based cohort of stroke-free individuals. STIFF was calculated as [ln(systolicBP/diastolicBP)/Strain], where Strain was [(Systolic Diameter Diastolic Diameter)/Diastolic Diameter]. MetSyn was defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program: Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) criteria. LogSTIFF was analyzed as the dependent variable in linear regression models, adjusting for demographics, education, current smoking, presence of carotid plaque and intima-media thickness. Results STIFF was analyzed in 1133 NOMAS subjects (mean age 65±9 years; 61% women; 58% Hispanic, 22% Black, 20% White). The prevalence of MetSyn was 49%. The mean LogSTIFF was 2.01±0.61 among those with and 1.90±0.59 among those without MetSyn (p=0.003). MetSyn was significantly associated with increased logSTIFF in the final adjusted model (parameter estimate β=0.100, p=0.01). Among individual MetSyn components, waist circumference and elevated blood pressure were most significantly associated with a mean increase in logSTIFF (p<0.01). Conclusion MetSyn is significantly associated with increased carotid artery stiffness in a multiethnic population. Increased carotid artery stiffness may, in part, explain a high risk of stroke among individuals with the metabolic syndrome. PMID:20536608

  15. Effect of norepinephrine, epinephrine, and angiotensin on blood flow in the internal carotid artery of man

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Joseph C.; Tindall, George T.

    1968-01-01

    Internal carotid artery blood flow and arterial pressure were measured with a sine-wave electromagnetic flowmeter and a pressure transducer in 22 patients during control period and after the intravenous and intracarotid administration of norepinephrine, epinephrine, and angiotensin. Intravenous infusion of both norepinephrine and angiotensin was accompanied by an increase in cerebral vascular resistance. Administration of norepinephrine, epinephrine, and angiotensin into the internal carotid artery failed to alter blood flow immediately. However, when the systemic blood pressure increased, a concomitant passive rise in blood flow did not occur. Thus, at this time cerebral vascular resistance was significantly increased. It is concluded that these drugs do not have a direct action on the cerebral vessels, but that the increased cerebral vascular resistance after their administration is due to autoregulation or to a combination of autoregulation and reduced arterial carbon dioxide pressure (PCO2) secondary to hyperventilation. Similar studies were carried out in the external carotid artery of six patients. Within 10 sec after injection blood flow was markedly reduced, indicating a direct vasoconstricting action on this vascular bed. Images PMID:4298077

  16. A cohort study of duplex Doppler examinations of the carotid artery in primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Marmion, Vincent J; Aldoori, Munther I; Woodcock, John P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To explore the possibility of pathological change in the common carotid artery at the bifurcation and in the internal carotid artery beyond the bifurcation which could contribute to a reduced diastolic pressure as observed in primary open angle glaucoma. Design Duplex ultrasonic examinations of carotid bifurcations were conducted on 80 patients. Carotid artery defects were allocated into three types: no demonstrable flow defects, internal carotid artery abnormalities and disease in the carotid bulb. Setting Bristol Royal Infirmary Vascular Laboratory. Participants Eighty patients (mean age 69.6 years) providing a total of 160 sides to the analysis. Main outcome measures An estimated central retinal artery pressure, intraocular pressure and field loss were recorded for each side measured. Results Doppler investigations revealed significant levels of pathological change in the internal carotid distinct from changes at the carotid bulb. The disease revealed in the internal carotid artery was significantly associated with intraocular pressure (p = 0.032), with an effect small to medium in magnitude. The Q2 measure, derived from mean arterial pressure and intraocular pressure, was also substantively associated with disease in the internal carotid artery. Both intraocular pressure and the Q2 measure effectively discriminated between groups, with field loss providing rather less discriminating capability. There was a strong trend towards a higher intraocular pressures and a greater visual field loss with internal carotid artery disease. Conclusions Pathological changes in the extra cranial carotid artery in primary open angle glaucoma exceed those in the arteries classified as normal. The presence of disease specifically in the internal carotid artery emphasised the need for a mechanism for the evaluation of the internal carotid apart from the carotid bulb. A basis for clarifying the presence of an ischaemic zone is proposed. PMID:25289141

  17. Massive Hemorrhage from Internal Carotid Artery Pseudoaneurysm Successfully Treated by Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with Assessment of Regional Cerebral Oxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Kakizawa, Hideaki Toyota, Naoyuki; Hieda, Masashi; Hirai, Nobuhiko; Tachikake, Toshihiro; Horiguchi, Jun; Ito, Katsuhide

    2005-05-15

    A 54-year-old male presented with intermittent massive hemorrhage from recurrent oropharyngeal cancer. The angiogram showed the encasements at the main trunk of the left internal carotid artery (ICA) and external carotid artery (ECA). Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) of the ECA with gelatin sponge particles and microcoils was performed. However, hemorrhage recurred several hours after the initial TAE. The second angiogram showed a large pseudoaneurysm of the ICA developing at the encasement on the initial angiogram. As a simple neurologic test, regional cerebral oxygenation (rSO{sub 2}) was assessed with and without manual compression of the common carotid artery (CCA). With compression of the left CCA, the rSO{sub 2} did not change. We therefore performed isolation of the pseudoaneurysm. We embolized proximally and distally to the ICA pseudoaneurysm with microcoils and the pseudoaneurysm disappeared. No major complications occurred and no massive hemorrhage recurred until death from the cancer. TAE was an effective treatment for massive hemorrhage caused by tumor invasion to ICA. Assessment of rSO{sub 2} was a simple and useful neurologic test predicting the cerebral blood flow to prevent complications of TAE.

  18. CrossFit-related cervical internal carotid artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Albert; Shen, Peter; Lee, Paul; Dahlin, Brian; Waldau, Ben; Nidecker, Anna E; Nundkumar, Anoop; Bobinski, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    CrossFit is a high-intensity strength and conditioning program that has gained popularity over the past decade. Potential injuries associated with CrossFit training have been suggested in past reports. We report three cases of cervical carotid dissection that are associated with CrossFit workouts. Patient 1 suffered a distal cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection near the skull base and a small infarct in Wernicke's area. He was placed on anticoagulation and on follow-up has near complete recovery. Patient 2 suffered a proximal cervical ICA dissection that led to arterial occlusion and recurrent middle cerebral artery territory infarcts and significant neurological sequelae. Patient 3 had a skull base ICA dissection that led to a partial Horner's syndrome but no cerebral infarct. While direct causality cannot be proven, intense CrossFit workouts may have led to the ICA dissections in these patients. PMID:25917634

  19. [Revascularization of the carotid and vertebral arteries in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Bezzi, M; D'Urso, A; Giacobbi, D; Ceccanei, G; Vietri, F

    2004-01-01

    From January 1994 to July 2004, 323 patients underwent 348 revascularization of carotid bifurcation for atherosclerotic stenoses. Eighty eight patients (group A) were 75 year-old or older, whereas 235 (group B) were younger than 75 years. Postoperative mortality/neurologic morbidity rate was 1% in group A, and 1.4% in group B. At 5 years, patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were, respectively, 91% and 92% in group A, and 89% and 91% in group B. None of these differences was statistically significant. In the same time period, 26 internal carotid arteries were revascularized in 24 patients, 75 or more aged, for a symptomatic kinking. Postoperative mortality/morbidity rate was absent, whereas, at 5 years, patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were, respectively, 88% and 92%. Twelve vertebral arteries were revascularized in 12 patients, 75 or more aged, for invalidating symptoms of vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Postoperative mortality/neurologic morbidity rate was absent. In one case postoperative recurrence of symptoms occurred, despite a patent revascularization. Patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were 84% and 75%, at 5 years. Revascularization of carotid and vertebral arteries in the elderly can be accomplished with good results, superposable to those of standard revascularization of carotid bifurcation in a younger patients' population. PMID:15803810

  20. Transposition of great arteries is associated with increased carotid artery stiffness.

    PubMed

    Mersich, Beatrix; Studinger, Peter; Lenard, Zsuzsanna; Kadar, Krisztina; Kollai, Mark

    2006-06-01

    Transposition of great arteries is the consequence of abnormal aorticopulmonary septation. Animal embryonic data indicate that septation and elastogenesis are related events, but human and clinical data are not available. We tested the hypothesis that large artery elastic function was impaired in patients with transposition of great arteries. We studied 34 patients aged 9 to 19 years, 12+/-3 years after atrial switch operation; 14 patients aged 7 to 9 years, 8+/-1 years after arterial switch operation; and 108 healthy control subjects matched for age. Carotid artery diastolic diameter and pulsatile distension were determined by echo wall-tracking; carotid blood pressure was measured by tonometry. Systolic pressure was higher and diastolic pressure was lower in patients than in controls. Patients with atrial and arterial switch repair were compared with their respective controls by 2-factor ANOVA. For patients with atrial switch repair versus control, stiffness index beta was 4.9+/-1.5 versus 3.1+/-1.0 (P<0.001); for patients witch arterial switch versus control, stiffness index beta was 3.8+/-1.1 versus 2.1+/-0.6 (P<0.001). Similar differences were observed for carotid compliance, distensibility, and incremental elastic modulus as well. The interaction term was not significant for any of the elastic variables, indicating that carotid stiffening was a characteristic of the condition and not the consequence of different hemodynamics. Carotid artery is markedly stiffer in patients, suggesting that impaired elastogenesis may constitute part of the congenital abnormality. Since carotid artery stiffness has been established as an independent cardiovascular risk factor, this condition may have consequences in the clinical management of these patients. PMID:16618837

  1. The transclival artery: a variant persistent carotid-basilar arterial anastomosis not previously reported.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, Jared D; Dahlin, Brian C; O'Brien, William T

    2016-01-01

    During embryological development, primitive anastomoses exist between the carotid and vertebrobasilar arteries. These anastomoses typically regress or are incorporated into the developing vasculature. Persistence beyond fetal development, however, results in vascular anomalies that alter haemodynamic flow with a predisposition for aneurysm formation. The carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses mirror the primitive communications and include (from most to least common) the trigeminal, hypoglossal, proatlantal and otic arteries. The hypoglossal and proatlantal variants extend through the hypoglossal canal or foramen magnum, respectively. We present a previously undescribed variant of these persistent fetal anastomoses, the 'transclival artery', which courses through its own transclival skull base canal/foramen. PMID:27413022

  2. Ultrasound common carotid artery segmentation based on active shape model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Jin, Jiaoying; Xu, Mengling; Wu, Huihui; He, Wanji; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2013-01-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a major reason of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, a segmentation method based on Active Shape Model (ASM) is developed and evaluated to outline common carotid artery (CCA) for carotid atherosclerosis computer-aided evaluation and diagnosis. The proposed method is used to segment both media-adventitia-boundary (MAB) and lumen-intima-boundary (LIB) on transverse views slices from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) images. The data set consists of sixty-eight, 17 × 2 × 2, 3D US volume data acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of seventeen patients (eight treated with 80 mg atorvastatin and nine with placebo), who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more, at baseline and after three months of treatment. Manually outlined boundaries by expert are adopted as the ground truth for evaluation. For the MAB and LIB segmentations, respectively, the algorithm yielded Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 94.4% ± 3.2% and 92.8% ± 3.3%, mean absolute distances (MAD) of 0.26 ± 0.18 mm and 0.33 ± 0.21 mm, and maximum absolute distances (MAXD) of 0.75 ± 0.46 mm and 0.84 ± 0.39 mm. It took 4.3 ± 0.5 mins to segment single 3D US images, while it took 11.7 ± 1.2 mins for manual segmentation. The method would promote the translation of carotid 3D US to clinical care for the monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression. PMID:23533535

  3. Ultrasound Common Carotid Artery Segmentation Based on Active Shape Model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xin; Jin, Jiaoying; Xu, Mengling; Wu, Huihui; He, Wanji; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2013-01-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a major reason of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, a segmentation method based on Active Shape Model (ASM) is developed and evaluated to outline common carotid artery (CCA) for carotid atherosclerosis computer-aided evaluation and diagnosis. The proposed method is used to segment both media-adventitia-boundary (MAB) and lumen-intima-boundary (LIB) on transverse views slices from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) images. The data set consists of sixty-eight, 17 × 2 × 2, 3D US volume data acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of seventeen patients (eight treated with 80 mg atorvastatin and nine with placebo), who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more, at baseline and after three months of treatment. Manually outlined boundaries by expert are adopted as the ground truth for evaluation. For the MAB and LIB segmentations, respectively, the algorithm yielded Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 94.4% ± 3.2% and 92.8% ± 3.3%, mean absolute distances (MAD) of 0.26 ± 0.18 mm and 0.33 ± 0.21 mm, and maximum absolute distances (MAXD) of 0.75 ± 0.46 mm and 0.84 ± 0.39 mm. It took 4.3 ± 0.5 mins to segment single 3D US images, while it took 11.7 ± 1.2 mins for manual segmentation. The method would promote the translation of carotid 3D US to clinical care for the monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression. PMID:23533535

  4. Computational modeling of hypertensive growth in the human carotid artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez, Pablo; Peña, Estefania; Martínez, Miguel Angel; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-06-01

    Arterial hypertension is a chronic medical condition associated with an elevated blood pressure. Chronic arterial hypertension initiates a series of events, which are known to collectively initiate arterial wall thickening. However, the correlation between macrostructural mechanical loading, microstructural cellular changes, and macrostructural adaptation remains unclear. Here, we present a microstructurally motivated computational model for chronic arterial hypertension through smooth muscle cell growth. To model growth, we adopt a classical concept based on the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into an elastic part and a growth part. Motivated by clinical observations, we assume that the driving force for growth is the stretch sensed by the smooth muscle cells. We embed our model into a finite element framework, where growth is stored locally as an internal variable. First, to demonstrate the features of our model, we investigate the effects of hypertensive growth in a real human carotid artery. Our results agree nicely with experimental data reported in the literature both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  5. Carotid Artery Stenting Trials: Conduct, Results, Critique, and Current Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, Sumaira

    2012-02-15

    The carotid stenting trialists have demonstrated persistence and determination in comparing an evolving technique, carotid artery stenting (CAS), against a mature and exacting standard for carotid revascularisation, carotid endarterectomy (CEA). This review focuses on their endeavours. A total of 12 1-on-1 randomised trials comparing CAS and CEA have been reported; 6 of these can be considered major, and 5 of these reflect (in part) current CAS standards of practice and form the basis of this review. At least 18 meta-analyses seeking to compare CAS and CEA exist. These are limited by the quality and heterogeneity of the data informing them (e.g., five trials were stopped prematurely such that they collectively failed to reach recruitment target by >4000 patients). The Carotid Stenting Trialists' Collaboration Publication represents a prespecified meta-analysis of European trials that were sufficiently similar to allow valid conclusions to be drawn; these trials and conclusions will be explored. When the rate of myocardial infarction (MI) is rigorously assessed, CAS and CEA are equivalent for the composite end point of stroke/death and MI, with more minor strokes for CAS and more MIs for CEA. These outcomes have a discrepant impact on quality of life and subsequent mortality. The all-stroke death outcomes for patients <70 years old are equivalent, with more minor strokes occurring in the elderly during CAS than CEA. There are significantly more severe haematomas and cranial nerve injuries after CEA. The influence of experience on outcome cannot be underestimated.

  6. Outcome of Carotid Artery Stenting for Radiation-Induced Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dorresteijn, Lucille; Vogels, Oscar; Leeuw, Frank-Erik de; Vos, Jan-Albert; Christiaans, Marleen H.; Ackerstaff, Rob; Kappelle, Arnoud C.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Patients who have been irradiated at the neck have an increased risk of symptomatic stenosis of the carotid artery during follow-up. Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) can be a preferable alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy, which is associated with increased operative risks in these patients. Methods and Materials: We performed a prospective cohort study of 24 previously irradiated patients who underwent CAS for symptomatic carotid stenosis. We assessed periprocedural and nonprocedural events including transient ischemic attack (TIA), nondisabling stroke, disabling stoke, and death. Patency rates were evaluated on duplex ultrasound scans. Restenosis was defined as a stenosis of >50% at the stent location. Results: Periprocedural TIA rate was 8%, and periprocedural stroke (nondisabling) occurred in 4% of patients. After a mean follow-up of 3.3 years (range, 0.3-11.0 years), only one ipsilateral incident event (TIA) had occurred (4%). In 12% of patients, a contralateral incident event was present: one TIA (4%) and two strokes (12%, two disabling strokes). Restenosis was apparent in 17%, 33%, and 42% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively, although none of the patients with restenosed vessels became symptomatic. The length of the irradiation to CAS interval proved the only significant risk factor for restenosis. Conclusions: The results of CAS for radiation-induced carotid stenosis are favorable in terms of recurrence of cerebrovascular events at the CAS site.

  7. Acute Carotid Artery Stent Thrombosis Due to Dual Antiplatelet Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Köklü, Erkan Arslan, Şakir; Yüksel, İsa Öner; Bayar, Nermin; Koç, Pınar

    2015-08-15

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is a revascularization modality that is an alternative to carotid endarterectomy. The efficacy of CAS in primary and secondary prevention from ischemic stroke has been demonstrated in various trials. Acute thrombosis of CAS is a rare complication that can lead to dramatic and catastrophic consequences. We discuss a case of acute CAS thrombosis in a patient who had previously undergone successful CAS. CAS was performed in a 73-year-old man who had had dysarthria lasting 2 weeks with 95 % stenosis in his left internal carotid artery. An acute cerebrovascular event resulting in right-sided hemiplegia developed 24 h after the procedure. Computed tomographic carotid angiography revealed complete occlusion of the stent with thrombus. The cause of stent thrombosis was thought to be antiaggregant resistance to both acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel. The most important cause of acute CAS thrombosis is inadequate or ineffective antiaggregant therapy. Evaluating patients who are candidates for CAS for acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel resistance may preclude this complication.

  8. Percutaneous Injection of Lidocaine Within the Carotid Body Area in Carotid Artery Stenting: An 'Old-New' Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mourikis, Dimitrios; Chatoupis, Konstantinos; Katsenis, Konstantinos; Vlahos, Lampros; Chatziioannou, Achilles

    2008-07-15

    Severe bradycardia is a common untoward effect during balloon angioplasty when performing carotid artery stenting. Therefore atropine injection even before dilatation and the presence of an anesthesiologist are advocated in all patients. In the surgical literature, injection of a local anesthetic agent into the carotid sinus before carotid endarterectomy was performed in an attempt to ameliorate perioperative hemodynamic instability. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that percutaneous infiltration of the carotid sinus with local anesthetic immediately before balloon dilatation reduces bradycardia and ameliorates the need for atropine injection or the presence of an anesthesiologist. Infiltration of the carotid sinus with 5 ml of 1% lidocaine, 3 min before dilatation, was performed in 30 consecutive patients. No one exhibited any significant rhythm change that required atropine injection. The anesthesiologist did not face any hemodynamic instability during the carotid artery stenting procedure.

  9. Traumatic Carotid Artery Dissection: A Different Entity without Specific Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Galyfos, George; Filis, Konstantinos; Sigala, Fragiska; Sianou, Argiri

    2016-01-01

    According to literature data, there are no distinct guidelines regarding the proper diagnostic and therapeutic management of traumatic carotid artery dissection (TCAD). Although most of cases evaluated in research studies refer to spontaneous carotid artery dissection, traumatic cases demand special considerations as far as diagnosis and treatment are concerned. Although both types of dissection share some common characteristics, a patient with TCAD usually presents with several concomitant injuries as well as a higher bleeding risk, thus complicating decision making in such patients. Therefore, aim of this review is to present available data regarding epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostics and treatment strategy in cases with TCAD in order to produce useful conclusions for everyday clinical practice. PMID:27051653

  10. Carotid Anatomy Does Not Predict the Risk of New Ischaemic Brain Lesions on Diffusion-Weighted Imaging after Carotid Artery Stenting in the ICSS-MRI Substudy

    PubMed Central

    Doig, D.; Hobson, B.M.; Müller, M.; Jäger, H.R.; Featherstone, R.L.; Brown, M.M.; Bonati, L.H.; Richards, T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS, ISRCTN25337470) randomized patients with recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis > 50% to carotid artery stenting (CAS) or endarterectomy. CAS increased the risk of new brain lesions visible on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI-MRI) more than endarterectomy in the ICSS-MRI Substudy. The predictors of new post-stenting DWI lesions were assessed in these patients. Methods ICSS-MRI Substudy patients allocated to CAS were studied. Baseline or pre-stenting catheter angiograms were rated to determine carotid anatomy. Baseline patient demographics and the influence of plaque length, plaque morphology, internal carotid angulation, and external or common carotid atheroma were examined in negative binomial regression models. Results A total of 115 patients (70% male, average age 70.4) were included; 50.4% had at least one new DWI-MRI-positive lesion following CAS. Independent risk factors increasing the number of new lesions were a left-sided stenosis (incidence risk ratio [IRR] 1.59, 95% CI 1.04–2.44, p = .03), age (IRR 2.10 per 10-year increase in age, 95% CI 1.61–2.74, p < .01), male sex (IRR 2.83, 95% CI 1.72–4.67, p < .01), hypertension (IRR 2.04, 95% CI 1.25–3.33, p < .01) and absence of cardiac failure (IRR 6.58, 95% CI 1.23–35.07, p = .03). None of the carotid anatomical features significantly influenced the number of post-procedure lesions. Conclusion Carotid anatomy seen on pre-stenting catheter angiography did not predict of the number of ischaemic brain lesions following CAS. PMID:26481656

  11. Carotid Artery Stenting: Single-Center Experience Over 11 Years

    SciTech Connect

    Nolz, Richard Schernthaner, Ruediger Egbert; Cejna, Manfred; Schernthaner, Melanie Lammer, Johannes Schoder, Maria

    2010-04-15

    This article reports the results of carotid artery stenting during an 11-year period. Data from 168 carotid artery stenting procedures (symptomatic, n = 55; asymptomatic, n = 101; symptoms not accessible, n = 12) were retrospectively collected. Primary technical success rate, neurological events in-hospital, access-site complications, and contrast-induced nephropathy (n = 118) were evaluated. To evaluate the influence of experience in carotid artery stenting on intraprocedural neurologic complications, patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 included the first 80 treated patients, and group 2 the remainder of the patients (n = 88). In-stent restenoses at last-follow-up examinations (n = 89) were assessed. The overall primary technical success rate was 95.8%. The in-hospital stroke-death rate was 3.0% (n = 5; symptomatic, 5.4%; asymptomatic, 2.0%; p = 0.346). Neurologic complications were markedly higher in group 1 (4.2%; three major strokes; symptomatic, 2.8%, asymptomatic, 1.4%) compared to group 2 (2.4%; one major and one minor stroke-symptomatic, 1.2%, asymptomatic 1.2%), but this was not statistically significant. Further complications were access-site complications in 12 (7.1%), with surgical revision required in 1 (0.6%) and mild contrast-induced nephropathy in 1 (0.85%). Twenty-one (23.6%) patients had >50% in-stent restenosis during a mean follow-up of 28.2 months. In conclusion, advanced experience in carotid artery stenting leads to an acceptable periprocedural stroke-death rate. In-stent restenosis could be a critical factor during the follow-up course.

  12. [Ectopic internal carotid artery of the oropharynx: two cases report].

    PubMed

    Xie, Sanlin; Chen, Shiyan; Chen, Xianming

    2016-02-01

    Ectopic internal carotid artery (ICA) is a very rare congenital variation. Unless the diagnosis is made before neck or tonsil surgery, massive hemorrhage and even death may result from injury to the vessel. Therefore, knowledge of the presence of ectopic ICAs may be important. We report two cases suffering from dysphagia associated with ectopic ICA manifesting itself as a pulsative protruding of the right lateral wall of the oropharynx. PMID:27373046

  13. Coarctation of the aorta associated with agenesis of left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Ding, Shiao; Xu, Gaojun; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 10-year-old boy with coarctation of the aorta complicated by innominate artery stenosis and agenesis of left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery. The patient was treated with an interposition graft between the ascending and descending aorta. The right subclavian was revascularized with another graft from the interposition graft to the distal right subclavian. This is a rare case of the combination of coarctation of the aorta and other vascular malformations. PMID:27162694

  14. Coarctation of the aorta associated with agenesis of left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Ding, Shiao; Xu, Gaojun; Liu, Hao; Ding, Fangbao

    2016-05-01

    We describe the case of a 10-year-old boy with coarctation of the aorta complicated by innominate artery stenosis and agenesis of left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery. The patient was treated with an interposition graft between the ascending and descending aorta. The right subclavian was revascularized with another graft from the interposition graft to the distal right subclavian. This is a rare case of the combination of coarctation of the aorta and other vascular malformations. PMID:27162694

  15. Evaluation of Subfoveal Choroidal Thickness in Internal Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Akçay, Betül İlkay Sezgin; Kardeş, Esra; Maçin, Sultan; Ünlü, Cihan; Özgürhan, Engin Bilge; Maçin, Aydın; Bozkurt, Tahir Kansu; Ergin, Ahmet; Surmeli, Reyhan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the relationship between internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis and subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT) in the elderly population. Methods. A total of 42 eyes of 21 patients with more than 70% ICA stenosis (Group 1) on one side and less than 70% stenosis (Group 2) on the other side were recruited for this study. ICA stenosis was diagnosed using both the B-mode and Doppler ultrasound. The two groups were compared in terms of the percentage of stenosis, SFCT measurements, intraocular pressure, ocular perfusion pressure, refractive error, and peak systolic velocity. Eyes were examined with the RTVue-100 OCT device by the EDI-OCT technique. Results. The mean age of the patients was 71.9 ± 10.8 years. The mean percentage of ICA stenosis was 74 ± 4.9% in Group 1 and 47.5 ± 7.7% in Group 2. The mean SFCT was 231.9 ± 44.6 μm in Group 1 and 216.2 ± 46.8 μm in Group 2, which was significantly lower (P = 0.028). A statistically significant positive correlation was found between the percentage of internal carotid artery stenosis and SFCT (r = 0896, P = 0.001). Conclusions. Compensatory SFCT increase can be seen in ipsilateral internal carotid artery stenosis greater than 70%. PMID:26989500

  16. Use of Absorbable Sutures in Canine Carotid Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Alejandro R.; Carrillo-Farga, Joaquin; Velasco, Carlos O.; Valencia, Martin O.V.

    1990-01-01

    To study the functional and microstructural characteristics of polydioxanone sutures in vascular surgery, we created 48 vascular anastomoses in the right and left common carotid arteries of 24 mongrel dogs. In each animal, polydioxanone sutures were used in 1 carotid artery, and polypropylene sutures were used in the contralateral carotid artery. Twelve groups of 2 animals each were then formed. The 1st group was observed for 1 month, the 2nd for 2 months, the 3rd for 3 months, and so on until the 12th group, which was observed for 12 months. At the end of each observation period, reoperation was undertaken to evaluate the vascular anastomoses by means of angiography and microscopy. The polypropylene anastomoses showed a marked deformity, with tissue retraction and a foreign body reaction. In contrast, the polydioxanone anastomoses exhibited satisfactory healing, without deformity, and were well tolerated histologically. We believe that polydioxanone may be a useful, alternative vascular suture material. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:99-102) Images PMID:15227391

  17. Carotid Cavernous Fistula Associated with Persistent Trigeminal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Robert W.; Howard, Robert S.; Zager, Eric

    1998-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) associated with persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is a rare but important clinical entity. We present a case treated by microcoil embolization with preservation of internal carotid, PTA, and hasilar artery flow following embolization. A 62-year-old female developed pulsatile tinnitus followed by left eye proptosis and diplopia. Examination revealed a cranial nerve VI palsy and an objective bruit over the left orbit. Angiographic evaluation revealed a carotid cavernous fistula originating from a persistent trigeminal artery. Placement of a detachable balloon across the fistula site while preserving the PTA proved impossible, and the fistula was treated with microcoils following placement of a microcatheter across the fistula into the cavernous sinus. Complete closure of the fistula was followed by resolution of the patient's symptoms. Preservation of all major vessels including the PTA was accomplished through the use of coil embolization. Careful evaluation of the angiogram is necessary to identify PTA associated with a CCF. Previous reports have described treatment of CCF with PTA by surgical or balloon ocolusion, some involving sacrifice of the PTA. Examination of the relevant embryology and anatomy reveals, however, that occlusion of the PTA must be approached with caution due to potential supply to the posterior circulation. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:17171071

  18. Flow Velocities After Carotid Artery Stenting: Impact of Stent Design. A Fluid Dynamics Study in a Carotid Artery Model with Laser Doppler Anemometry

    SciTech Connect

    Greil, Oliver Kleinschmidt, Thomas; Weiss, Wolfgang; Wolf, Oliver; Heider, Peter; Schaffner, Silvio; Gianotti, Marc; Schmid, Thomas; Liepsch, Dieter; Berger, Hermann

    2005-01-15

    Purpose. To study the influence of a newly developed membrane stent design on flow patterns in a physiologic carotid artery model. Methods. Three different stents were positioned in silicone models of the carotid artery: a stainless steel stent (Wall-stent), a nitinol stent (SelfX), and a nitinol stent with a semipermeable membrane (MembraX). To increase the contact area of the membrane with the vessel wall, another MembranX model was modified at the outflow tract. The membrane consists of a biocompatible silicone-polyurethane copolymer (Elast-Eon) with a pore size of 100 {mu}m. All stents were deployed across the bifurcation and the external carotid artery origin. Flow velocity measurements were performed with laser Doppler anemometry (LDA), using pulsatile flow conditions (Re = 220; flow 0.39 l/min; flow rate ratio ICA:ECA = 70:30) in hemodynamically relevant cross-sections. The hemodynamic changes were analyzed by comparing velocity fluctuations of corresponding flow profiles. Results. The flow rate ratio ICA:ECA shifted significantly from 70/30 to 73.9/26.1 in the MembraX and remained nearly unchanged in the SelfX and Wallstent. There were no changes in the flow patterns at the inflow proximal to the stents. In the stent no relevant changes were found in the SelfX. In the Wallstent the separation zone shifted from the orifice of the ICA to the distal end of the stent. Four millimeters distal to the SelfX and the Wallstent the flow profile returned to normal. In the MembraX an increase in the central slipstreams was found with creation of a flow separation distal to the stent. With a modification of the membrane this flow separation vanished. In the ECA flow disturbances were seen at the inner wall distal to the stent struts in the SelfX and the Wallstent. With the MembraX a calming of flow could be observed in the ECA with a slight loss of flow volume. Conclusions. Stent placement across the carotid artery bifurcation induces alterations of the physiologic flow

  19. Wave transmission characteristics and anisotropy of canine carotid arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moritz, W. E.; Anliker, M.

    1974-01-01

    A method was developed to generate and record three types of small amplitude waves (pressure, torsion and axial) in the exposed carotid artery of anesthetized dogs. The pressure waves were studied with the aid of miniature pressure transducers; electro-optical tracking units monitored the axial and circumferential surface displacements. Results from 6 dogs are presented in the form of the phase velocities and attenuation of three types of waves. The data demonstrate incompatibility with an isotropic elastic model for the mechanical behavior of the artery. The measured damping appears to be primarily due to the viscoelastic properties of the vessel wall material.

  20. Carotid Artery Wall Segmentation in Multispectral MRI by Coupled Optimal Surface Graph Cuts.

    PubMed

    Arias-Lorza, Andres M; Petersen, Jens; van Engelen, Arna; Selwaness, Mariana; van der Lugt, Aad; Niessen, Wiro J; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2016-03-01

    We present a new three-dimensional coupled optimal surface graph-cut algorithm to segment the wall of the carotid artery bifurcation from Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. The method combines the search for both inner and outer borders into a single graph cut and uses cost functions that integrate information from multiple sequences. Our approach requires manual localization of only three seed points indicating the start and end points of the segmentation in the internal, external, and common carotid artery. We performed a quantitative validation using images of 57 carotid arteries. Dice overlap of 0.86 ± 0.06 for the complete vessel and 0.89 ± 0.05 for the lumen compared to manual annotation were obtained. Reproducibility tests were performed in 60 scans acquired with an interval of 15 ± 9 days, showing good agreement between baseline and follow-up segmentations with intraclass correlations of 0.96 and 0.74 for the lumen and complete vessel volumes respectively. PMID:26595912

  1. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 60. Silva MB Jr., Choi L, Cheng CC. Peripheral arterial occlusive disease. In: Townsend CM Jr., Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL. ...

  2. Pseudoaneurysm of the Common Carotid Artery in an Infant due to Swallowed Fish Bone

    PubMed Central

    Jean Roger, Moulion Tapouh; Marcus, Fokou; Emmanuel, Fongang; Boniface, Moifo; Alain Georges, Juimo

    2015-01-01

    Carotid artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare condition, particularly in the paediatric population. Only about 30 cases of carotid artery aneurysms in infants have been published until now. This paper reports the case of a giant pseudoaneurysm of the left common carotid artery due to swallowed fish bone by an 8-year-old boy. This pseudoaneurysm was 5.5 cm transverse-diameter and resulted in severe respiratory distress. It was treated by resection and end-to-end anastomosis with satisfactory outcome after one-year follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest carotid artery pseudoaneurysm ever described in children. PMID:26783485

  3. Life-threatening common carotid artery blowout: rescue treatment with a newly designed self-expanding covered nitinol stent.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Lee, D H; Kim, H J; Kim, S J; Kim, W; Kim, S Y; Suh, D C

    2006-03-01

    Carotid blowout is a devastating complication in patients with head and neck malignancy. A covered stent offers an alternative to treatment of a carotid blowout patient thought to be at high risk for surgery or carotid occlusion. Stent placement in the common carotid artery or carotid bulb is a technical challenge because of large luminal diameter and luminal calibre discrepancy between internal carotid artery and common carotid artery. We present four patients with common carotid rupture and massive bleeding who were treated with self-expanding covered stents, among them, two cases were treated with newly designed self-expanding polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered nitinol stents. PMID:16498035

  4. Identification of Atherosclerotic Plaques in Carotid Artery by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Rick; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin; Silveira, Landulfo; Costa, Maricília Silva; Alves, Leandro Procópio; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto; Brugnera, Aldo

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this work was to identify the presence of atherosclerotic plaques in carotid artery using the Fluorescence Spectroscopy. The most important pathogeny in the cardiovascular disorders is the atherosclerosis, which may affect even younger individuals. With approximately 1.2 million heart attacks and 750,000 strokes afflicting an aging American population each year, cardiovascular disease remains the number one cause of death. Carotid artery samples were obtained from the Autopsy Service at the University of São Paulo (São Paulo, SP, Brazil) taken from cadavers. After a histopathological analysis the 60 carotid artery samples were divided into two groups: normal (26) and atherosclerotic plaques (34). Samples were irradiated with the wavelength of 488 nm from an Argon laser. A 600 μm core optical fiber, coupled to the Argon laser, was used for excitation of the sample, whereas another 600 optical fiber, coupled to the spectrograph entrance slit, was used for collecting the fluorescence from the sample. Measurements were taken at different points on each sample and then averaged. Fluorescence spectra showed a single broad line centered at 549 nm. The fluorescence intensity for each sample was calculated by subtracting the intensity at the peak (550 nm) and at the bottom (510 nm) and then data were statistically analyzed, looking for differences between both groups of samples. ANOVA statistical test showed a significant difference (p<0,05) between both types of tissues, with regard to the fluorescence peak intensities. Our results indicate that this technique could be used to detect the presence of the atherosclerotic in carotid tissue.

  5. Internal carotid artery agenesis with stenosed intercavernous anastomosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Hongzhou; Li, Liang; Zhao, Guiping; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jiayong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report a rare case of internal carotid artery agenesis with stenosed intercavernous anastomosis. A 59-year-old male patient presented with a new infarction in the left basal ganglia. Magnetic resonance angiography and cerebral angiography showed that the right internal carotid artery disappeared from the origin to the foramen lacerum segment, and there was an anastomotic artery with severe stenosis passed through the floor of the sella and in front of the cavernous sinus. The right A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery was absent and A2 segment was supplied by the normal contralateral internal carotid artery via the anterior communicating artery. PMID:27231043

  6. Atherosclerosis and flow in carotid arteries with authentic geometries.

    PubMed

    Goubergrits, L; Affeld, K; Fernandez-Britto, J; Falcon, L

    2002-01-01

    The influence of blood flow on the depositions and development of atherosclerotic lesions have been observed and described since the 19th century. Observations have shown that depositions correlate with regions of low wall shear stress. However, the exact correlations between depositions, vessel geometry and flow parameters are not yet known. The purpose of this study was the quantification of atherosclerosis risk factors in carotid bifurcation. This artery has attracted particular interest because lesions are often found in this bifurcation. Post mortem, the arteries are excised and vessel casts are produced. Afterwards, the arteries are analyzed morphometrically. The vessel casts are used for the assessment of some geometrical parameters. 31 carotid bifurcations were analyzed in this study. Eight vessel casts were digitized and rendered three-dimensional mathematical models of the arteries. These data were imported by the computational fluid dynamics program FLUENT. Further, the blood flow was reconstructed in a computer model based on the individual vessel geometry. The flow parameters, such as velocity, pressure and wall shear stress were computed. At the same time the geometrical parameters and wall alterations are known. This permits the comparison of the anatomical shape and its flow with the distribution and level of the wall alterations. PMID:12122275

  7. Complications and Follow-up after Unprotected Carotid Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Hauth, Elke A.M. Drescher, Robert; Jansen, Christian; Gissler, H. Martin; Schwarz, Michael; Forsting, Michael; Jaeger, Horst J.; Mathias, Klaus D.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. This prospective study was undertaken to determine the success rate, complications, and outcome of carotid artery stenting (CAS) without the use of cerebral protection devices. Methods. During 12 months, 94 high-grade stenoses of the carotid artery in 91 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-six (70%) of the stenoses were symptomatic and 28 (30%) were asymptomatic. Results. In all 94 carotid stenoses CAS was successfully performed. During the procedure and within the 30 days afterwards, there were 2 deaths and 3 major strokes in the 66 symptomatic patients, resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 5 of 66 (7%). Only one of these complications, a major stroke, occurred during the procedure. In the 6-month follow-up, one additional major stroke occurred in a originally symptomatic patient resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 6 of 66 (10%) for symptomatic patients at 6 months. No major complications occurred in asymptomatic patients during the procedure or in the 6-month follow-up period. At 6 months angiographic follow-up the restenosis rate with a degree of >50% was 3 of 49 (6%) and the rate with a degree of {>=}70% was 1 of 49 (2%). Conclusions. Cerebral embolization during CAS is not the only cause of the stroke and death rate associated with the procedure. The use of cerebral protection devices during the procedure may therefore not prevent all major complications following CAS.

  8. Difference in carotid artery elasticity in subjects with different brachial artery kinetic of vasodilatation.

    PubMed

    Tripolino, C; Gnasso, A; Carallo, C; Scavelli, F B; Irace, C

    2016-08-01

    Increased carotid stiffness and impaired brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) associate with cardiovascular events. We have previously reported three FMD patterns based on the time of maximal dilatation. The aim of the present study was to verify whether different FMD patterns associate with carotid artery stiffness. In all, 133 subjects were enrolled. All participants underwent complete clinical examination, blood sampling and ultrasound study. FMD was used as a measure of endothelial function. Based on the maximal brachial artery FMD, subjects were divided into Early dilators (peak FMD at 50 s), Late dilators (peak FMD over 50 s) and No dilators. Echo-Doppler evaluation of carotid arteries was performed in order to calculate elastic indexes (strain, β-stiffness index and distensibility). In all, 64 subjects were classified as Early FMD, 36 as Late FMD and 33 as No dilators. Age, gender and cardiovascular risk factors were comparable among three groups. Early FMD had higher values of strain compared with both Late and no Dilators (P<0.001). Furthermore, Early dilators showed a significantly lower stiffness and higher distensibility compared with Late and No dilators. No significant differences between Late FMD and No Dilators were detected. Our results demonstrate that common carotid artery elasticity indexes significantly differ among Early, Late and No dilators. Subjects with delayed or absent brachial artery dilatation have stiffer common carotid arteries compared with subjects with early dilatation. In conclusion, our research suggests that the assessment of the kinetics of FMD in a clinical setting might represent a useful screening tool to improve the cardiovascular risk stratification. PMID:26467820

  9. Mechanical Testing of Mouse Carotid Arteries: from Newborn to Adult

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Mazyar; Le, Victoria P.; Wagenseil, Jessica E.

    2012-01-01

    The large conducting arteries in vertebrates are composed of a specialized extracellular matrix designed to provide pulse dampening and reduce the work performed by the heart. The mix of matrix proteins determines the passive mechanical properties of the arterial wall1. When the matrix proteins are altered in development, aging, disease or injury, the arterial wall remodels, changing the mechanical properties and leading to subsequent cardiac adaptation2. In normal development, the remodeling leads to a functional cardiac and cardiovascular system optimized for the needs of the adult organism. In disease, the remodeling often leads to a negative feedback cycle that can cause cardiac failure and death. By quantifying passive arterial mechanical properties in development and disease, we can begin to understand the normal remodeling process to recreate it in tissue engineering and the pathological remodeling process to test disease treatments. Mice are useful models for studying passive arterial mechanics in development and disease. They have a relatively short lifespan (mature adults by 3 months and aged adults by 2 years), so developmental3 and aging studies4 can be carried out over a limited time course. The advances in mouse genetics provide numerous genotypes and phenotypes to study changes in arterial mechanics with disease progression5 and disease treatment6. Mice can also be manipulated experimentally to study the effects of changes in hemodynamic parameters on the arterial remodeling process7. One drawback of the mouse model, especially for examining young ages, is the size of the arteries. We describe a method for passive mechanical testing of carotid arteries from mice aged 3 days to adult (approximately 90 days). We adapt a commercial myograph system to mount the arteries and perform multiple pressure or axial stretch protocols on each specimen. We discuss suitable protocols for each age, the necessary measurements and provide example data. We also include

  10. Pathophysiology and management of reperfusion injury and hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad U; Goshgarian, Christopher; Min, Jiangyong; Gorelick, Philip B

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hyperperfusion is a relatively rare syndrome with significant and potentially preventable clinical consequences. The pathophysiology of cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) may involve dysregulation of the cerebral vascular system and hypertension, in the setting of increase in cerebral blood flow. The early recognition of CHS is important to prevent complications such as intracerebral hemorrhage. This review will focus on CHS following carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting. We will discuss the typical clinical features of CHS, risk factors, pathophysiology, diagnostic modalities for detection, identification of patients at risk, and prevention and treatment. Although currently there are no specific guidelines for the management of CHS, identification of patients at risk for CHS and aggressive treatment of hypertension are recommended. PMID:27602202

  11. Statistics over features for internal carotid arterial disorders detection.

    PubMed

    Ubeyli, Elif Derya

    2008-03-01

    The objective of the present study is to extract the representative features of the internal carotid arterial (ICA) Doppler ultrasound signals and to present the accurate classification model. This paper presented the usage of statistics over the set of the extracted features (Lyapunov exponents and the power levels of the power spectral density estimates obtained by the eigenvector methods) in order to reduce the dimensionality of the extracted feature vectors. Since classification is more accurate when the pattern is simplified through representation by important features, feature extraction and selection play an important role in classifying systems such as neural networks. Mixture of experts (ME) and modified mixture of experts (MME) architectures were formulated and used as basis for detection of arterial disorders. Three types of ICA Doppler signals (Doppler signals recorded from healthy subjects, subjects having stenosis, and subjects having occlusion) were classified. The classification results confirmed that the proposed ME and MME has potential in detecting the arterial disorders. PMID:18179791

  12. Morphological variation of carotid artery bifurcation level in digital angiography.

    PubMed

    Kurkcuoglu, A; Aytekin, C; Oktem, H; Pelin, C

    2015-01-01

    Knowing of the level of carotid artery bifurcation (CB) is important for vascular surgery in the neck, radical neck dissections, carotid sinus baroreceptor stimulation, catheterisations, and aneurysms. The aim of this study was to determine the CB level in relation with the cervical vertebral levels, compare them on the right and the left sides, and investigate the relation of CB level with the length of neck. In this study, 100 conventional carotid angiographies were performed. The CB level was determined in relation with 10 different levels which were the levels of the cervical vertebrae and intervertebral disks, and the relation of CB level with the length of neck was investigated. The right and left CB levels of the patients were also determined, and compared. The highest level of CB was at the level of C2 vertebra, and the lowest level of CB was at the level of C6-C7 intervertebral disk in both male and female. When all patients were taken into consideration, CB level was most frequently seen at the level of C4-C5 (29%) on the right side, and at the level of C4 (26%) on the left side. The CB levels were not symmetrical in 10 female and 23 male. Knowing of the anatomical variations of CB level is important in surgical procedures. The anatomical differences must be taken into consideration since the neighbouring structures of CB change in case of variations. We believe that the results of this study will shed light to planning of all interventional methods concerning common carotid artery and its branches as well as surgery in the neck, and will help to minimise the complications. PMID:26050808

  13. External carotid stenting for symptomatic stenosis in a patient with patent EDAS for Moyamoya disease

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Eric; Parker, Lindsey; Fraser, Justin F

    2014-01-01

    Background Moyamoya disease is characterized by progressive narrowing of the internal carotid artery (ICA). Symptomatic patients typically undergo cerebrovascular intervention via extracranial–intracranial (EC–IC) bypass, most often with the use of the superficial temporal artery. This case of Moyamoya disease is of particular interest as the patient presented with a unilateral atherosclerotic external carotid artery (ECA) stenosis after EC–IC bypass that eliminated the benefit of his original surgery, resulting in a symptomatic presentation. Clinical presentation A 53-year-old man presenting with Moyamoya disease and known left ICA occlusion had received a bilateral encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis (EDAS) bypass 10 years previously. He re-presented complaining of right-sided tingling, weakness, and numbness radiating up the arm. CT angiography indicated significant stenosis of the left ECA. ECA angioplasty and stenting with a distal protection device resulted in resolution of his symptoms. Conclusions This case illustrates that a patient presenting with Moyamoya disease and concurrent symptomatic ECA stenosis post-EDAS can be effectively and safely treated with ECA stenting. PMID:25085947

  14. Lingual Artery-Retromandibular Vein Fistula Four Years after an Uncomplicated Carotid Endarterectomy: Case Report and Review of Possible Etiologies and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Manjila, Sunil; Kumar, Kunal; Kulhari, Ashish; Singh, Gagandeep; Jung, Richard S.; Tarr, Robert W.; Bambakidis, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    The external carotid artery’s lingual branch to retromandibular venous fistula following a carotid endarterectomy has not been reported earlier in literature. We report a unique case of an 87-year-old man who had a right-sided carotid endarterectomy in 2009 and presented four years later with complaints of fullness and discomfort in the area of right parotid gland with associated pulsatile tinnitus. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the neck revealed a deep portion of the right parotid gland having abnormal aneurysmal dilatation of a vascular structure, which appeared to be an arteriovenous fistula between branches of right external carotid artery and the retromandibular vein. Conventional catheter angiogram showed a complex arteriovenous fistula seen with the right retromandibular vein receiving multiple small arterial feeders from the right external carotid artery via its lingual artery branch. Slight reflux was noted into the right pterygoid plexus, right maxillary, and right submental veins as well. Surgical treatment was deferred due to high risk of inadvertent facial nerve injury from extensive parotid dissection involved in the procedure. Transarterial embolization of five discrete arterial branches from the right external carotid artery supplying the fistula was performed using particles with resultant remarkable slowing of the venous drainage into the retromandibular vein. After the procedure, his tinnitus and ear fullness resolved completely. The presence of arteriovenous fistula after carotid endarterectomy is a rare yet serious complication and therefore should be diagnosed early and treated promptly. The article highlights the relevant literature on arteriovenous fistula formation in the setting of arterial patch, intraoperative shunting, and surgical-site infections. PMID:27403218

  15. Brainstem infarction in a patient with internal carotid dissection and persistent trigeminal artery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most commonly described fetal anastomosis between the carotid and vertebrobasilar circulations. Case presentation We report a 42-year-old patient presenting with internal carotid dissection, and imaging features of brainstem infarction. Conclusion Based on the imaging studies we presume occlusive carotid dissection with extensive thrombosis within a persistent trigeminal artery as the cause of this brainstem ischemia. PMID:20598138

  16. Work in progress: common carotid artery contours reconstructed in three dimensions from parallel ultrasonic images.

    PubMed

    Blankenhorn, D H; Chin, H P; Strikwerda, S; Bamberger, J; Hestenes, J D

    1983-08-01

    Three-dimensional sonograms of the common carotid artery were obtained using a device which takes images in parallel planes. Tests in phantoms simulating atherosclerotic vessels the same size as the common carotid artery indicated that the coefficient of variation of a single luminal measurement was 2-5%. PMID:6867354

  17. A young pregnant woman with spontaneous carotid artery dissection––unknown mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Ishaq; Aaland, Maria; Khan, Nasrin; Crossley, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous carotid artery dissection in pregnancy has not been reported before. We present a case of a 31-year-old Caucasian woman who was 11 weeks pregnant and presented with neck pain, headache, vomiting and left side Horner's syndrome. Subsequent investigations with MR angiography confirmed spontaneous left internal carotid artery dissection. PMID:24879721

  18. Histological study of excimer laser on carotid artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavantes, Maria C.; Pasqualucci, C. A.; Zamorano, Lucia J.

    1992-06-01

    The employment of photoablative effect on coronary artery angioplasty has been a new exciting field as a treatment option. Guided by good results in the literature, our group decided to study the laser/tissue interaction on carotid arteries with the intent of a less invasive treatment of intracranial and extracranial obstructed disease in vascular neurosurgery. We studied human cartoid arteries from ten male autopsy specimens with an average age of 53 years (34 - 37 years old) which a total of 22 laser applications were performed. Using the same repetition rate and energy, 20 Hz and 30 mJ, we compared the effect of the laser energy on 'normal' and 'pathologic' areas of the carotid arteries. The pathologic specimens, presenting calcified and non-calcified plaques, the same as the macroscopical 'normal' specimens, were submitted to the energy of the Excimer Laser with 308 nm wavelength. The laser beam was delivered perpendicularly through continuous flushing of saline on the targeted artery wall varying from 200 to 400 pulses. Histological studies were done and statistical analysis was performed. The results showed that the depth of penetration varied from 113 micrometers to 1200 micrometers , with a width of the lesion ranging from 150 micrometers - 1500 micrometers . In our study we found that the range between non-effective and destructive effect caused by the laser was around 400 pulses. We encountered minimal degree of carbonization while lasering on calcified plaques. We concluded that Excimer laser is a feasible and secure tool to prevent thermical complications of laser treatment, which will allow neurosurgeons in the future athermic laser angioplasty. Progress in this field must rely on further in vitro and in vivo research, before it can be clinically applied as well as improvements in delivery systems.

  19. Comparison of Neurocognitive Outcomes after Carotid Endarterectomy and Carotid Artery Stenting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jerry J; Schwartz, Samuel; Wen, Johnny; deVirgilio, Christian; Lobue, Abeline; Walot, Irwin; Koopmann, Matthew; Donayre, Carlos; White, Rodney A

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive and emotional outcomes after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid artery stenting with embolic protection device (CAS + EPD) are not clear. Patients were entered prospectively into a United States Food and Drug Administration-approved single-center physician-sponsored investigational device exemption between 2004 and 2010 and received either CEA or CAS + EPD. Patients underwent cognitive testing preprocedure and at 6, 12, and 60 months postprocedure. Cognitive domains assessed included attention, memory, executive, motor function, visual spatial functioning, language, and processing speed. Beck Depression and anxiety scales were also compared. There were a total of 38 patients that met conventional indications for carotid surgery (symptomatic with ≥50% stenosis or asymptomatic with ≥70% stenosis)-12 patients underwent CEA, whereas 26 patients underwent CAS + EPD. Both CEA and CAS + EPD patients showed postprocedure improvement in memory and executive function. No differences were seen at follow-up in regards to emotional dysfunction (depression and anxiety), attention, visual spatial functioning, language, motor function, and processing speed. Only two patients underwent neuropsychiatric testing at 60 months-these CAS + EPD patients showed sustained improvement in memory, visual spatial, and executive functions. In conclusion, cognitive and emotional outcomes were similar between CEA and CAS + EPD patients. PMID:26463299

  20. PLASMA HOMOCYSTEINE AND CAROTID ARTERY INTIMA-MEDIA THICKNESS: SITE-SPECIFIC ASSOCIATIONS IN THE FRAMINGHAM OFFSPRING COHORT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHCY) is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT), a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, is typically measured at the internal carotid artery including the bulb (ICA), and the common carotid artery (CCA)...

  1. Genetic impact dominates over environmental effects in development of carotid artery stiffness: a twin study.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Tamás; Osztovits, János; Pintér, Alexandra; Littvay, Levente; Cseh, Domonkos; Tárnoki, Adám D; Tárnoki, Dávid L; Jermendy, Adám L; Steinbach, Rita; Métneki, Júlia; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Kollai, Márk; Jermendy, György

    2014-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and all-cause mortality. Quantifying the genetic influence on the stiff arterial phenotype allows us to better predict the development of arterial stiffness. In this study, we aimed to determine the heritability of carotid artery stiffness in healthy twins. We studied 98 twin pairs of both sexes. We determined carotid artery stiffness locally using echo tracking and applanation tonometry. We estimated the heritability of stiffness parameters using structural equation modeling. The carotid distensibility coefficient showed the highest heritability (64%, 95% confidence interval 45-77%). The incremental elastic modulus, compliance and stiffness index β also showed substantial heritability (62%, 61% and 58%, respectively). The remaining 36-42% phenotypic variance was attributed to unshared environmental effects. Genetic influence appears to dominate over environmental factors in the development of carotid artery stiffness. Environmental factors may have an important role in favorably influencing the genetic predisposition for accelerated arterial stiffening. PMID:24089266

  2. Intrathecal dihydroergotamine inhibits capsaicin-induced vasodilatation in the canine external carotid circulation via GR127935- and rauwolscine-sensitive receptors.

    PubMed

    Marichal-Cancino, Bruno A; González-Hernández, Abimael; Manrique-Maldonado, Guadalupe; Ruiz-Salinas, Inna I; Altamirano-Espinoza, Alain H; MaassenVanDenBrink, Antoinette; Villalón, Carlos M

    2012-10-01

    It has been suggested that during a migraine attack trigeminal nerves release calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), producing central nociception and vasodilatation of cranial arteries, including the extracranial branches of the external carotid artery. Since trigeminal inhibition may prevent this vasodilatation, the present study has investigated the effects of intrathecal dihydroergotamine on the external carotid vasodilatation to capsaicin, α-CGRP and acetylcholine. Anaesthetized vagosympathectomized dogs were prepared to measure blood pressure, heart rate and external carotid conductance. A catheter was inserted into the right common carotid artery for the continuous infusion of phenylephrine (to restore the carotid vascular tone), whereas the corresponding thyroid artery was cannulated for one-min intracarotid infusions of capsaicin, α-CGRP and acetylcholine (which dose-dependently increased the external carotid conductance). Another cannula was inserted intrathecally (C(1)-C(3)) for the administration of dihydroergotamine, the α(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine or the serotonin 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor antagonist GR127935 (N-[4-methoxy-3-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl) phenyl]-2'-methyl-4'-(5-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl)[1,1-biphenyl]-4-carboxamide hydrochloride monohydrate). Intrathecal dihydroergotamine (10, 31 and 100μg) inhibited the vasodilatation to capsaicin, but not that to α-CGRP or acetylcholine. This inhibition was: (i) unaffected by 10μg GR127935 or 100μg rauwolscine, but abolished by 31μg GR127935 or 310μg rauwolscine at 10μg dihydroergotamine; and (ii) abolished by the combination 10μg GR127935+100μg rauwolscine at 100μg dihydroergotamine. Thus, intrathecal (C(1)-C(3)) dihydroergotamine seems to inhibit the external carotid vasodilatation to capsaicin by spinal activation of serotonin 5-HT(1B/1D) (probably 5-HT(1B)) receptors and α(2) (probably α(2A/2C))-adrenoceptors. PMID:22841658

  3. Computational modeling of hypertensive growth in the human carotid artery

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, Pablo; Peña, Estefania; Martínez, Miguel Angel; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a chronic medical condition associated with an elevated blood pressure. Chronic arterial hypertension initiates a series of events, which are known to collectively initiate arterial wall thickening. However, the correlation between macrostructural mechanical loading, microstructural cellular changes, and macrostructural adaptation remains unclear. Here, we present a microstructurally motivated computational model for chronic arterial hypertension through smooth muscle cell growth. To model growth, we adopt a classical concept based on the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into an elastic part and a growth part. Motivated by clinical observations, we assume that the driving force for growth is the stretch sensed by the smooth muscle cells. We embed our model into a finite element framework, where growth is stored locally as an internal variable. First, to demonstrate the features of our model, we investigate the effects of hypertensive growth in a real human carotid artery. Our results agree nicely with experimental data reported in the literature both qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:25342868

  4. Carotid Artery Stenosis with Acute Ischemic Stroke: Stenting versus Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Villwock, Mark R.; Padalino, David J.; Deshaies, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Background When a patient with carotid artery stenosis presents emergently with acute ischemic stroke, the optimum treatment plan is not clearly defined. If intervention is warranted, and open surgery is prohibitive, endovascular revascularization may be performed. The use of stents places the patient at additional risk due to their thrombogenic potential. The intent of this study was to compare outcomes following endovascular approaches (angioplasty alone vs. stent) in the setting of acute stroke. Methods We extracted a population from the National Inpatient Sample (2012) and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2003–2011) composed of patients with carotid artery stenosis with infarction that were admitted nonelectively and received endovascular revascularization. Patients treated with mechanical thrombectomy or thrombolysis were excluded. Categorical variables were compared between treatment groups with Chi-squared tests. Binary logistic regression was performed to evaluate mortality and iatrogenic stroke while controlling for age, case severity, and comorbidity burden. Results About 6,333 admissions met our criteria. A majority were treated via stenting (89%, n = 5,608). The angioplasty-alone group had significantly higher mortality (9.0% vs. 3.8%, p < 0.001) and iatrogenic stroke rate (3.9% vs. 1.9%, p < 0.001) than the stent group. The adjusted odds ratios of mortality and iatrogenic stroke for patients treated with angioplasty alone were 1.953 (p < 0.001) and 1.451 (p = 0.105), respectively, in comparison to patients treated with carotid stenting. Conclusion Multivariate analysis found the risk of mortality to be elevated following angioplasty alone. This may represent selection bias, but it also may indicate that symptomatic patients with stroke suffer from severe stenosis and unstable plaques that would benefit from stent placement. These results would caution angioplasty alone as an arm of a future randomized trial involving this severely burdened patient

  5. Gangliocapsular Bleed with Ipsilateral Internal Carotid Artery Aplasia

    PubMed Central

    Mookan, Senthil Kumar; Sundaram, Senthilnathan; Rajagopalan, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Agenesis requires an extensive work-up as a number of associated other vascular and nonvascular anomalies can be expected. In this scenario, an associated ipsilateral basal ganglia bleeding with subarachnoid haemorrhage with no aetiology is uncommon. We present such a case of moderate ipsilateral ganglio-capsular bleed of unknown cause with associate aortic arch vessel anomaly. Case Report A 45-year-old diabetic man of Indian origin with complaints of a sudden onset of giddiness, left-sided weakness and slurring of speech. Motor system examination revealed power of grade 2. Computed tomography scan revealed a moderate bleeding in the basal ganglia and the right temporo-parietal lobe. Angiography revealed unilateral aplasia of the internal carotid artery. Patient improved symptomatically with a motor system power of grade 4 after hematoma evacuation and treatment with antibiotics, anti-edema measures and neuroprotective drugs. Conclusions Developmental anomalies of the carotid and aortic arch with intracranial bleeding is a rare occurrence and any arterial anomaly requires extensive evaluation. PMID:26379809

  6. VEGF receptors mediate hypoxic remodeling of adult ovine carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Adeoye, Olayemi O; Bouthors, Vincent; Hubbell, Margaret C; Williams, James M; Pearce, William J

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that VEGF contributes to hypoxic remodeling of arterial smooth muscle, although hypoxia produces only transient increases in VEGF that return to normoxic levels despite sustained changes in arterial structure and function. To explore how VEGF might contribute to long-term hypoxic vascular remodeling, this study explores the hypothesis that chronic hypoxia produces sustained increases in smooth muscle VEGF receptor density that mediate long-term vascular effects of hypoxia. Carotid arteries from adult sheep maintained at sea level or altitude (3,820 m) for 110 days were harvested and denuded of endothelium. VEGF levels were similar in chronically hypoxic and normoxic arteries, as determined by immunoblotting. In contrast, VEGF receptor levels were significantly increased by 107% (VEGF-R1) and 156% (VEGF-R2) in hypoxic compared with normoxic arteries. In arteries that were organ cultured 24 h with 3 nM VEGF, VEGF replicated effects of hypoxia on abundances of smooth muscle α actin (SMαA), myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), and MLC20 and the effects of hypoxia on colocalization of MLC20 with SMαA, as measured via confocal microscopy. VEGF did not replicate the effects of chronic hypoxia on colocalization of MLCK with SMαA or MLCK with MLC20, suggesting that VEGF's role in hypoxic remodeling is highly protein specific, particularly for contractile protein organization. VEGF effects in organ culture were inhibited by VEGF receptor blockers vatalinib (240 nM) and dasatinib (6.3 nM). These findings support the hypothesis that long-term upregulation of VEGF receptors help mediate sustained effects of hypoxia on the abundance and colocalization of contractile proteins in arterial smooth muscle. PMID:25038104

  7. Ultrasound screening for asymptomatic carotid stenosis in subjects with calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiographs: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Directed ultrasonic screening for carotid stenosis is cost-effective in populations with > 5% prevalence of the diagnosis. Occasionally, calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries are incidentally detected on odontological panoramic radiographs. We aimed to determine if directed screening for carotid stenosis with ultrasound is indicated in individuals with such calcifications. Methods This was a cross-sectional study. Carotid ultrasound examinations were performed on consecutive persons, with findings of calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiography that were otherwise eligible for asymptomatic carotid endarterectomy. Results Calcification in the area of the carotid arteries was seen in 176 of 1182 persons undergoing panoramic radiography. Of these, 117 fulfilled the inclusion criterion and were examined with carotid ultrasound. Eight persons (6.8%; 95% CI 2.2-11.5%) had a carotid stenosis - not significant over the 5% pre-specified threshold (p = 0.232, Binomial test). However, there was a significant sex difference (p = 0.008), as all stenoses were found in men. Among men, 12.5% (95%CI 4.2-20.8%) had carotid stenosis - significantly over the 5% pre-specified threshold (p = 0.014, Binomial test). Conclusions The incidental finding of calcification in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiographs should be followed up with carotid screening in men that are otherwise eligible for asymptomatic carotid endarterectomy. Trial Registration The study was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00514644 PMID:21752238

  8. Noninvasive evaluation of the extracranial carotid arteries in patients with cerebrovascular events and atrial fibrillations.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, J; Rothlauf, E; Materese, E; Halperin, J

    1988-08-01

    Noninvasive carotid artery testing was performed in 73 patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who were referred because of symptoms or signs of cerebrovascular disease. Thromboembolism related to atrial fibrillation without valvular heart disease was the probable source of cerebral ischemia in 25 (80%) of 31 patients with stroke and coexisting atherosclerotic disease at the carotid artery bifurcation in six (20%). Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation was the probable source of symptoms in nine (70%) of 13 of patients with transient cerebral ischemia, while coexisting carotid artery disease was present in four (30%). Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation accounted for the symptoms in four of five patients with amaurosis fugax, with atherosclerotic carotid artery disease present in one. The remaining 24 patients had nonhemispheric symptoms of cerebrovascular disease, including vertebrobasilar insufficiency, dizziness, and syncope, and only one had a carotid lesion. A significantly higher proportion of patients with focal hemispheric symptoms had coexisting carotid disease than patients with nonfocal symptoms had, suggesting that atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease contributes to stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Noninvasive carotid artery testing may be helpful in identifying atherosclerotic lesions at the carotid artery bifurcation in patients with atrial fibrillation and cerebrovascular disease, because different therapeutic modalities may be appropriate when two potential sources of cerebral ischemia are present. PMID:3041939

  9. [Neurology and carotid artery interventions. What has to be done first?].

    PubMed

    Reiff, T; Ringleb, P A

    2013-11-01

    Optimum therapy for patients with carotid stenosis requires the interdisciplinary cooperation of surgeons, neurologists and angiologists. Important diagnostic methods are ultrasound sonography, contrast-enhanced computed tomography, magnetic resonance tomography and digital subtraction angiography. Treatment of carotid artery stenosis depends on whether the stenosis is symptomatic or asymptomatic. The treatment of choice (medical therapy only vs. carotid artery stenting vs. carotid endarterectomy) depends on the characteristics of the stenosis, the presence of cerebral lesions and the general physical condition of the patient. After the intervention continuous monitoring and treatment of vascular risk factors are mandatory. PMID:24170021

  10. Carotid artery stenting using the proximal or dual protection method for near occlusion of the cervical internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Kajihara, Yosuke; Shibukawa, Masaaki; Okazaki, Takahito; Matsushige, Toshinori; Shinagawa, Katsuhiro; Mukada, Kazutoshi; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2013-10-01

    The treatment for patients with near occlusion of the cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) is controversial. The aim of this study was to examine the results of carotid artery stenting (CAS) as a surgical treatment for ICA near occlusion. Between April 2008 and September 2012, 14 patients (all men; mean age, 75.4 years) with ICA near occlusion were treated with CAS. This represents 5.2% of a total of 267 patients treated with CAS during the study period. All patients were treated with CAS using an embolic protection device. The proximal balloon protection method was performed in five patients, and the dual protection method using a proximal balloon and distal filter protection was used in nine patients. We examined the change of stenotic lesion, hyperintensity spot in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and perioperative complications after CAS. All near occlusions were successfully dilated. Among 2 of 14 patients, DWI showed 1 and 4 hyperintensity spots. Transient and persistent complications, including neurological deficits, did not occur in any patients. In this small number of cases, CAS using the proximal or dual embolic protection method seems to be a safe and beneficial treatment for ICA near occlusion. PMID:23793616

  11. Treatment of recurrent head and neck carcinoma involving the carotid artery: carotid reconstruction with ePTFE graft.

    PubMed

    He, Xiang-bo; Li, Jing-jia; Chen, Yue-hong; Shu, Chang; Tang, Qing-lai; Yang, Xin-ming

    2011-12-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate the feasibility of reconstructing the carotid artery using expanded polytetraflouroethylene (ePTFE) in patients with recurrent head and neck carcinoma involving the carotid artery. Ten patients, who had recurrent head and neck carcinoma involving the carotid artery, received carotid artery resection and reconstruction with ePTFE, tissue defects were repaired by pectoralis major myocutaneous flap. Results show that eight patients did not present any vascular and neurologic complications. One patient presented slight hemiparesis, another patient developed wound infection and pharyngocutaneous fistula. The mean follow-up period was 33.1 ± 16.0 months. The 2-year survival rate was 50% (5/10), and there was one patient who survived for 60 months without locoreginal recurrence or distant metastasis. En bloc resection of tumor and involved carotid-associated ePTFE reconstruction provide effective improvement in the locoregional control of the recurrent head and neck carcinoma. The pedicle pectoralis major myocutaneous flap can provide not only wound bed with affluent blood supply for the vascular grafts, but also reparation of skin or the tissue defects of oropharynx and hypopharynx. PMID:21400255

  12. Ultrasound-induced contraction of the carotid artery in vitro.

    PubMed

    Martin, Eleanor M; Duck, Francis A; Ellis, Richard E; Winlove, C Peter

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound is known to produce a range of nonlethal responses in cells and tissues. Frequencies in the kilohertz ultrasound range have been shown to produce relaxation in large arteries. The present work explores the effects of insonation at MHz frequencies, representative of those used diagnostically and therapeutically, in an in vitro preparation of the carotid artery. Fresh 12.7 mm wide rings of equine common carotid artery obtained from the abattoir were mounted in a purpose-made myograph. They were immersed in a bath of Krebs-Ringer buffer at 37 degrees C and were positioned at the focus of an ultrasound beam from a weakly focused 3.2 MHz source. Continuous wave insonation produced contraction. The tension increased rapidly over the first 2 min, followed by a slower increase for the duration of the exposure up to 15 min. At a power of 145 mW a maximum contractile stress of 0.04 +/- 0.03 mN/mm(2) (mean +/- SD, n = 77) was measured, which was approximately 4% of the maximum wall stress generated by noradrenaline (0.1 mM). The magnitude of the response was weakly dependent on power in the range 72-145 mW and was not significantly different for pulsed and continuous wave stimulation where time averaged power was constant. The response was unaffected by mechanical removal of the endothelium. The ultrasound beam generated insufficient radiation force to produce a measurable effect and streaming at the vessel surface was very small compared with flow rates known to produce physiologic effects. The temperature rise at the beam focus was approximately 0.3 degrees C and we hypothesise that this contributes to the observed response, probably through changes in ion channel activity in smooth muscle cell membranes. (E-mail: e.martin@exeter.ac.uk). PMID:19900746

  13. Emergency endovascular revascularization of tandem occlusions: Internal carotid artery dissection and intracranial large artery embolism.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Leker, Ronen R; Eichel, Roni; Gomori, Moshe; Itshayek, Eyal

    2016-06-01

    Internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) with concomitant occlusive intracranial large artery emboli is an infrequent cause of acute stroke, with poor response to intravenous thrombolysis. Reports on the management of this entity are limited. We present our recent experience in the endovascular management of occlusive ICAD and major intracranial occlusion. Consecutive anterior circulation acute stroke patients meeting Medical Center criteria for endovascular management of ICAD from June 2011 to June 2015 were included. Clinical, imaging, and procedure data were collected retrospectively under Institutional Review Board approval. The endovascular procedure for carotid artery revascularization and intracranial stent thrombectomy is described. Six patients met inclusion criteria (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score 12-24, time from symptom onset 2-8hours). Revascularization of the extracranial carotid dissection and stent thrombectomy were achieved in 5/6 patients, resulting in complete recanalization (Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction flow grade 3 in a mean 2.7hours), and modified Rankin Scale score 0-2 at 90 day follow-up. In one patient, attempts to microcatheterize the true arterial lumen failed and thrombectomy was therefore not feasible. No arterial dissection, arterial rupture or accidental stent detachment occurred, and there was no intracerebral hemorrhage or hemorrhagic transformation. Our preliminary data on this selected subgroup of patients suggest the presented approach is safe, feasible in a significant proportion of patients, and efficacious in achieving arterial recanalization and improving patient outcome. Crossing the dissected segment remains the most important limiting factor in achieving successful ICA recanalization. Further evaluation in larger series is warranted. PMID:26924182

  14. A historical prospective cohort study of carotid artery stenosis after radiotherapy for head and neck malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Paul D. . E-mail: brown.paul@mayo.edu; Foote, Robert L.; McLaughlin, Mark P.; Halyard, Michele Y.; Ballman, Karla V.; Collie, A. Craig; Miller, Robert C.; Flemming, Kelly D.; Hallett, John W.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To determine carotid artery stenosis incidence after radiotherapy for head-and-neck neoplasms. Methods and Materials: This historical prospective cohort study comprised 44 head-and-neck cancer survivors who received unilateral neck radiotherapy between 1974 and 1999. They underwent bilateral carotid duplex ultrasonography to detect carotid artery stenosis. Results: The incidence of significant carotid stenosis (8 of 44 [18%]) in the irradiated neck was higher than that in the contralateral unirradiated neck (3 of 44 [7%]), although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.13). The rate of significant carotid stenosis events increased as the time after radiotherapy increased. The risk of ipsilateral carotid artery stenosis was higher in patients who had undergone a neck dissection vs. those who had not. Patients with significant ipsilateral stenosis also tended to be older than those without significant stenosis. No other patient or treatment variables correlated with risk of carotid artery stenosis. Conclusions: For long-term survivors after neck dissection and irradiation, especially those who are symptomatic, ultrasonographic carotid artery screening should be considered.

  15. Intravascular streaming and variable delivery to brain following carotid artery infusions in the Sprague-Dawley rat

    SciTech Connect

    Saris, S.C.; Wright, D.C.; Oldfield, E.H.; Blasberg, R.G.

    1988-02-01

    Intracarotid artery infusions in animals are commonly performed in studies of the blood-brain barrier and in chemotherapy trials. Implicit in the analysis of these experiments is that the infusate will be distributed to the territory of the internal carotid artery in a manner that is proportional to blood flow. Fifteen Sprague-Dawley rats were studied to determine if poor infusate mixing with blood due to intravascular streaming occurred during intracarotid artery drug infusions and if it could be eliminated with fast retrograde infusion. In three experimental groups, a radiolabeled flow tracer--/sup 14/C-iodoantipyrine (IAP)--was infused retrograde through the external carotid artery into the common carotid artery at slow, medium, and fast rates (0.45, 1.5, and 5.0 ml/min). In a control group, IAP was injected intravenously (i.v.). Local isotope concentrations in the brain were determined by quantitative autoradiography, and the variability of isotope delivery was assessed in the frontoparietal cortex, temporal cortex, and caudate putamen of all animals. Streaming phenomena were manifest in all selected anatomic areas after the slow and medium rates of intraarterial infusion. After fast intracarotid infusion or i.v. injection, there was uniform distribution of isotope in the same brain regions.

  16. A virtual instrument for real time in vivo measurement of carotid artery compliance.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jayaraj; Jayashankar, V

    2008-01-01

    A new virtual instrument for real time, non invasive measurement of carotid artery compliance is proposed. The instrument is a reliable, compact and low cost alternative to the conventional ultrasound scanner and wall tracking system for carotid artery compliance measurement. The measurement system uses an ultrasound pulse echo method to probe the carotid artery. The reflected echoes are processed using Hilbert transform techniques. Peak detection and echo tracking are implemented in LabVIEW. A comparison is done between manual and automatic method of echo identification. The instrument gives a display of the variation of carotid diameter in real time and calculates the various estimates of arterial compliance from the analyzed data. The capability of the instrument to accurately determine arterial compliance measures is demonstrated by experiments performed on human subjects. PMID:19163155

  17. Cavernous carotid artery pseudo-aneurysm treated by stenting in acromegalic patient.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Jorge Marcondes; Domingues, Flavio S; Espinosa, Gaudencio; Gadelha, Monica

    2003-06-01

    We report on a case of endovascular management of pseudoaneurysm of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery with covered stent reconstruction. A 36 years-old woman with a history of previous transsphenoidal approach for pituitary macroadenoma and false aneurysma formation was studied in a protocol that included balloon test occlusion and cerebral blood flow evaluation. An endovascular covered stent deployment in the area of the carotid laceration was performed with isolation of the aneurysm from the circulation and maintenance of the carotid flow. Helical angio-CT and cerebral digital subtraction angiography showed the carotid preservation without stenosis in the stented area. In conclusion, endovascular stent reconstruction for post-transsphenoidal carotid artery laceration and false aneurysm is demonstrated as useful technical adjunct in the management strategy and with the potential for carotid sacrifice morbidity avoidance. PMID:12894285

  18. Interobserver agreement on the diagnosis of carotid artery calcifications on panoramic radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Suk-Ja; Shim, Sung-Kyun; Kang, Byung-Cheol; Lim, Hoi-Jeong; Kim, Min-Seok; Kim, Sun-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to investigate the interobserver agreement on the detection of carotid artery calcifications on panoramic radiographs. Materials and Methods This study consisted of panoramic radiographs acquired from 634 male patients of the age of 50 years or older. Having excluded carotids of no diagnostic quality, 1008 carotids from the panoramic radiographs of the patients were interpreted by two oral and maxillofacial radiologists independently for the presence of carotid artery calcifications. Statistical analysis was used to calculate the interobserver agreement. Results Interobserver agreement was obtained for 932 carotids (92.4%). Inconsistent interpretation of 76 carotids (7.5%) between the two observers was found. Cohen's kappa value was 0.688 (p<0.001). Conclusion The probability of a match between the two observers was substantially high. PMID:24944963

  19. [Prevention of ischemic stroke in patients with asymptomatic lesions of carotid arteries].

    PubMed

    Gavrilenko, A V; Guzenko, A S; Kuklin, A V; Kochetkov, V A

    2012-01-01

    Based on the data from both Russian and foreign literature, analysed herein are the methods of surgical and medicamentous prevention of ischaemic stroke in patients presenting with asymptomatic lesions of carotid arteries. This is followed by discussing haemodynamic parameters of the blood flow in the carotid arteries and their effect on cerebrovascular symptomatology. Also presented herein are the data concerning efficacy of different modalities of antithrombocytic therapy, followed by presenting own results regarding surgical management for stenoses and pathological kinking of carotid arteries in the patient cohort concerned. PMID:22929668

  20. Carotid artery elasticity decreases during pregnancy - the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aims were to evaluate the effect of pregnancy on carotid artery elasticity and determine the associations between maternal lipids, endothelial function and arterial elasticity during pregnancy. Methods We examined 99 pregnant and 99 matched non-pregnant control women as part of a population-based prospective cohort study. Carotid artery elasticity indexes; carotid artery distensibility (CAD), Young’s elastic modulus (YEM) and stiffness index (SI) as well as brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) were assessed using ultrasound; serum lipid levels were also determined. Results SI was 57% and YEM 75% higher and CAD 36% lower in the third trimester group than the corresponding values in the first trimester group. Serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly higher in women at the end of the pregnancy than at the beginning of pregnancy (P < 0.001) and in controls (P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, gestational age was the only independent correlate of arterial elasticity in pregnant women. In controls, age (P ≤ 0.001) and common carotid diameter (P = 0.001-0.029) were associated with SI, YEM and CAD. Conclusions The present study revealed that carotid artery elasticity declined towards the end of the pregnancy; this neither is straight correlating with maternal hyperlipidemia or the diameter of the carotid artery nor is it associated with changes in endothelial function. PMID:24602149

  1. Association between Carotid Artery Stenosis and Cognitive Impairment in Stroke Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Yue, Wei; Wang, Anxin; Zhu, Runxiu; Yan, Zhongrui; Zheng, Shouhuan; Wang, Jingwei; Huo, Jia; Liu, Yunlin; Li, Xin; Ji, Yong

    2016-01-01

    To investigate potential associations between carotid artery stenosis and cognitive impairment among patients with acute ischemic stroke and to provide important clinical implications. We measured the degree of carotid artery stenosis and recorded the Mini-Mental State Examination score (MMSE) at admission in 3116 acute ischemic stroke patients. The association between carotid stenosis and cognitive impairment assessed by MMSE was tested using multivariate regression analysis. Other clinical variables of interest were also studied. After adjusting for age, gender, education level, marriage, alcohol use, tobacco use, physical activity, hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction and NIHSS (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale) score, we found that participants with high-grade stenosis of the carotid artery had a higher likelihood of cognitive impairment compared to those without carotid artery stenosis (OR = 1.49, 95%CI: 1.05-2.11, p<0.001). Left common carotid artery stenosis was associated with cognitive impairment in the univariate analysis, although this effect did not persist after adjustment for the NIHSS score. Cognitive impairment was associated with high-grade stenosis of the right carotid artery. PMID:26751070

  2. Carotid Endothelial VCAM-1 Is an Early Marker of Carotid Atherosclerosis and Predicts Coronary Artery Disease in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Masseau, I.; Bowles, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim was to determine if endothelial VCAM-1 (eVCAM-1) expression in the common carotid artery (CCA) would correlate with predictive markers of atherosclerotic disease, would precede reduction of markers of endothelial cell function and would predict coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods and results Carotid arterial segments (bifurcation, proximal and distal CCA) were harvested from 14 and 24 month-old male castrated familial hypercholesterolemic (FH) swine, a model of spontaneous atherosclerosis. Quantification of local expression of eVCAM-1, intimal macrophage accumulation, oxidative stress, intima-media (I/M) ratio, intima-media thickness (IMT), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated eNOS (p-eNOS) in selected regions of the carotids revealed a relationship between local inflammation and atheroscle-rotic plaque progression. Importantly, inflammation was not uniform throughout the CCA. Endo-thelial VCAM-1 expression was the greatest at the bifurcation and increased with age. Finally, eV-CAM-1 best estimated the severity of CAD compared to blood levels of glucose, hypercholestero-lemia, carotid IMT, and p-eNOS. Conclusion Our data suggested that eVCAM-1 was closely associated with atherosclerotic plaque progression and preceded impairment of EDD. Thus, this study supported the use of carotid VCAM-1 targeting agents to estimate the severity of CAD. PMID:26702331

  3. Carotid Endarterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the carotid arteries. This limits or blocks the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your brain, which can lead to a stroke. Carotid Arteries Figure A shows ... normal carotid artery that has normal blood flow. Figure C show the inside of a carotid ...

  4. Therapeutic internal carotid or vertebral artery occlusion using the WEB device.

    PubMed

    van Rooij, Willem Jan; Sluzewski, Menno; Bechan, Ratna; Peluso, Jo Pp

    2016-06-01

    The WEB device was used to occlude the internal carotid artery or vertebral artery as treatment for large aneurysms. The WEB could be placed accurately at the desired position inside the vessel. Two WEBs were sufficient to occlude the parent artery. PMID:26861025

  5. Blood flow changes after unilateral carotid artery ligation monitored by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yushu; Liang, Chengbo; Suo, Yanyan; Zhao, Yuqian; Wang, Yi; Xu, Tao; Wang, Ruikang; Ma, Zhenhe

    2016-03-01

    Unilateral carotid artery ligation which could induce adaptive improvement is a classic model that has been widely used to study pathology of ischemic disease. In those studies, blood flow is an important parameter to characterize the ischemia. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful imaging modality which can provide depth resolved images in biological tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution. SPF rats was anesthetized with isoflurane and divided into two groups. In first group, bilateral carotid artery was surgically exposed, and then left carotid artery was ligated. Blood flow changes of the contralateral carotid artery was monitored using high speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography, including the absolute flow velocity and the flow volume. In the other group, skull window was opened at the ipsilateral cerebral cortex of ligation and blood supply of small artery was measured before and after the ligation. The measured results demonstrate the blood supply compensation process after unilateral carotid artery ligation. With the superiority of high resolution, OCT is an effective technology in monitoring results of carotid artery after ligation.

  6. [Evaluation of carotid stenosis by using carotid ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Seike, Nahoko; Ito, Michiko; Yasaka, Masahiro

    2010-12-01

    Carotid stenosis is observed in several diseases such as atherosclerosis, moyamoya disease, and aortitis. Carotid stenosis can be assessed using computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), ultrasonography, or cerebral angiography. Carotid ultrasonography is superior to other modalities because it is a noninvasive, repeatable, and easy method that does not involve much cost. The intima-media complex thickness (IMT) can be easily measured using carotid ultrasonography. The incidence of cerebral and cardiovascular events increases with increase in the thickness of the IMT. The percentage of stenosis was expressed using the NASCET, ECST, or area methods. The NASCET criterion of 70% stenosis for performing carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis corresponded to 85% ECST stenosis, 90% area stenosis, and 200 cm/sec of peak systolic velocity. Carotid ultrasonography provides information on not only carotid stenosis but also unstable plaques such as ulcer, hypoechoic plaque, thin fibrous cap, and mobile plaque. In patients with moyamoya disease, carotid ultrasonography often reveals that the diameter of the internal carotid artery (ICA) is greatly reduced at the proximal portion above the bulbus (resembling a champagne bottle neck) and is less than 50% that of the common carotid artery (champagne bottle neck sign); the diameter of the ICA is smaller than that of the external carotid artery (diameter reversal sign). In patients with aortitis, IMT thickness is frequently observed at the common carotid artery (Macaroni sign) but not at the ICA. PMID:21139180

  7. Catheterization of the Hepatic Artery Via the Left Common Carotid Artery in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiao; Wang Yixiang, J.; Zhou Xiangping Guan Yongsong; Tang Chengwei

    2006-12-15

    The commonly used approach for rat hepatic artery catheterization is via the gastroduodenal artery, which is ligated after the procedure. A new method of rat hepatic artery catheterization via the left common carotid artery (LCCA) is described. The LCCA is repaired after catheterization. The catheterization procedures included the following: (1) opening the rat's abdominal cavity and exposing the portion of abdominal aorta at the level of the celiac trunk; (2) separating and exposing the LCCA; inserting a microguidewire and microcatheter set into the LCCA via an incision; after placement into the descending aorta, the microguidewire and microcatheter are maneuvered into the hepatic artery under direct vision; (3) after transcatheter therapy, the catheter is withdrawn and the incision at the LCCA is repaired. This technique was employed on 60 male Sprague-Dawley rats with diethylnitrosamine-induced liver cancer, using a 3F microguidewire and microcatheter set. Selective hepatic artery catheterization was successfully performed in 57 rats. One rat died during the operation and five rats died within 7 days after the procedure. It is envisaged that as experience increases, the catheterization success rate will increase and the death rate will decrease. A new approach for selective hepatic artery catheterization via the LCCA in rats is introduced, which makes repeat catheterization of this artery possible and allows large embolization particles to be delivered by using a 3F catheter.

  8. Medical decision-making system of ultrasound carotid artery intima-media thickness using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Santhiyakumari, N; Rajendran, P; Madheswaran, M

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and implement a medical decision-making system for an automated diagnosis and classification of ultrasound carotid artery images. The proposed method categorizes the subjects into normal, cerebrovascular, and cardiovascular diseases. Two contours are extracted for each and every preprocessed ultrasound carotid artery image. Two types of contour extraction techniques and multilayer back propagation network (MBPN) system have been developed for classifying carotid artery categories. The results obtained show that MBPN system provides higher classification efficiency, with minimum training and testing time. The outputs of decision support system are validated with medical expert to measure the actual efficiency. MBPN system with contour extraction algorithms and preprocessing scheme helps in developing medical decision-making system for ultrasound carotid artery images. It can be used as secondary observer in clinical decision making. PMID:21181487

  9. Surgical management for retained distal embolic protection device and fractured guidewire after carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Li, Tongxun; Zha, Yuanting; Bo, Liyang; Wirthlin, Douglas J; Zhang, Qinyi

    2016-01-01

    Entrapment and fracture of carotid angioplasty and stenting hardware is a rare complication of percutaneous stenting procedures. We describe a case of a retained distal filter embolic protection device and guidewire in a 57-year-old male in Beijing, China. After unsuccessful attempts at removal via interventional methods, a second stent was deployed to secure the original hardware in situ, and the patient was discharged. He later experienced guidewire fragmentation in the carotid artery and aortic arch, with subsequent thrombus formation. We report partial removal of the guidewire and stent via carotid artery cutdown and open thoracotomy without complication. When efforts to retrieve stenting hardware are unsuccessful, it is never a suitable choice to leave them within the artery. We advocate for early surgical management of retained materials after unsuccessful carotid artery stenting. Furthermore, improved quality monitoring and assurance programs are needed to prevent such complications in the future. PMID:27316621

  10. Surgical management for retained distal embolic protection device and fractured guidewire after carotid artery stenting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongxun; Zha, Yuanting; Bo, Liyang; Wirthlin, Douglas J.; Zhang, Qinyi

    2016-01-01

    Entrapment and fracture of carotid angioplasty and stenting hardware is a rare complication of percutaneous stenting procedures. We describe a case of a retained distal filter embolic protection device and guidewire in a 57-year-old male in Beijing, China. After unsuccessful attempts at removal via interventional methods, a second stent was deployed to secure the original hardware in situ, and the patient was discharged. He later experienced guidewire fragmentation in the carotid artery and aortic arch, with subsequent thrombus formation. We report partial removal of the guidewire and stent via carotid artery cutdown and open thoracotomy without complication. When efforts to retrieve stenting hardware are unsuccessful, it is never a suitable choice to leave them within the artery. We advocate for early surgical management of retained materials after unsuccessful carotid artery stenting. Furthermore, improved quality monitoring and assurance programs are needed to prevent such complications in the future. PMID:27316621

  11. Vascular smooth cell proliferation in perfusion culture of porcine carotid arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Dan; Lin, Peter H.; Yao Qizhi; Chen Changyi

    2008-08-08

    Objective of this study was to develop a novel in vitro artery culture system to study vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation of porcine carotid arteries in response to injury, basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), and FGF2 conjugated with cytotoxin saporin (SAP). Perfusion-cultured porcine carotid arteries remained contractile in response to norepinephrine and relaxant to acetylcholine for up to 96 h. SMC proliferation of cultured arteries was detected by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in both non-injured and balloon-injured arteries. In the inner layer of the vessel wall near the lumen, SMC proliferation were less than 10% in uninjured vessels, 66% in injured vessels, 80% in injured vessels with FGF2 treatment, and 5% in injured vessels with treatment of FGF2-SAP. Thus, the cultured porcine carotid arteries were viable; and the injury stimulated SMC proliferation, which was significantly enhanced by FGF2 and inhibited by FGF2-SAP.

  12. Pathophysiology and Medical Treatment of Carotid Artery Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kailash

    2015-09-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of mortality. Approximately 80 to 85% strokes are ischemic due to carotid artery stenosis (CAS). The prevalence of significant CAS is 7% in women and 9% in men. Severe asymptomatic CAS varies from 0 to 3.1%. Prevalence of symptomatic CAS is high in patients with peripheral arterial disease. CAS is due to atherosclerosis, the major risk factors for which include dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, cigarette smoking, advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and its receptors (RAGE, soluble RAGE [sRAGE]), lack of exercise and C-reactive protein (CRP). This article discusses the basic mechanism of atherosclerosis and the mechanisms by which these risk factors induce atherosclerosis. The role of AGEs and its receptors in the development and progression of CAS has been discussed in detail. Lifestyle changes and medical treatment of CAS such as lifestyle changes, lipid-lowering agents, antihypertensive agents, antidiabetic drugs, anti-AGE therapy, measures to elevate soluble receptors of AGE (sRAGE, esRAGE). CRP-lowering agents have been discussed in detail. The drugs especially lipid-lowering agents, and antihypertensive and antidiabetic drugs suppress, regress, and slow the progression of CAS. The possible role of lowering the levels of AGEs and raising the levels of sRAGE in the treatment of CAS has been proposed. Lifestyle changes besides medical treatment have been stressed. Lifestyle changes and medical treatment not only would slow the progression of CAS but would also regress the CAS. PMID:26417183

  13. Stenting for Internal Carotid Artery Stenosis Associated with Persistent Primitive Hypoglossal Artery Using Proximal Flow Blockade and Distal Protection System: A Technical Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Murai, Satoshi; Kusaka, Noboru; Umakoshi, Michiari; Itami, Hisakazu; Otsuka, Shinji; Nishiura, Tsukasa; Ogihara, Kotaro

    2016-06-01

    We report a very rare case of internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis associated with persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) treated by stenting using a proximal flow blockade and distal filter protection system. A 77-year-old man with a medical history of repeated cerebral infarction was referred to our hospital for treatment of progressive ICA stenosis. Cerebral angiography revealed that the degree of stenosis was 50% and the PPHA branched just distal to the stenosis at the C2 vertebral level. Black-blood magnetic resonance imaging indicated vulnerable plaque. The stenosis was at a high location, so carotid artery stenting was employed. Under the proximal flow blockade system with occlusion of the external and common carotid artery, distal filter protection was placed in the ICA to prevent distal embolization. A self-expanding stent was successfully deployed and the patient was discharged without any neurological deficits. In stenting for the ICA stenosis associated with PPHA, the combination of a proximal flow blockade and distal protection system is reasonable and safe. PMID:27105567

  14. Who Is at Risk for Carotid Artery Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Carotid Endarterectomy Carotid Ultrasound Stents Stroke Send a ... who don’t have diabetes. Family history of atherosclerosis . People who have a family history of atherosclerosis ...

  15. Prevalence of Calcified Carotid Artery on Panoramic Radiographs in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Jamileh Beigom; Moshfeghi, Mahkameh

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of calcified carotid artery in 50 year-old and older postmenopausal dental outpatients for early diagnosis of individuals at risk of stroke. Materials and methods This is a descriptive study of 200 panoramic radiographs. These radiographs included post-menopausal women referring to the Department of Oral Medicine at Shahid Beheshti Faculty of Dentistry during 2006-2007. The x-ray machine, developer and film type were the same for all the radiographs. Statistical analysis included chi-square test and Fisher’s exact test. Results We found 22 calcified carotid arteries. The left and right carotid arteries were involved in 7 and 9 cases, respec-tively. In 6 cases both carotid arteries were calcified. Four individuals had no vascular risk factor excluding age and others had at least one risk factor. We found significant statistical correlation between hypertension, past history of myocardial infarction, and hypercholesterolemia with calcified carotid artery on panoramic radiographs. Conclusion Under the limitations of the present study, prevalence of calcified carotid arteries is 11.0 % in 50 year-old and older postmenopausal dental outpatients. PMID:23230481

  16. Restenosis after carotid artery stenting and endarterectomy: a secondary analysis of CREST, a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Brajesh K.; Beach, Kirk W.; Roubin, Gary S.; Lutsep, Helmi L.; Moore, Wesley S.; Malas, Mahmoud B.; Chiu, David; Gonzales, Nicole R.; Burke, J. Lee; Rinaldi, Michael; Elmore, James R.; Weaver, Fred A.; Narins, Craig R.; Foster, Malcolm; Hodgson, Kim J.; Shepard, Alexander D.; Meschia, James F.; Bergelin, Robert O.; Voeks, Jenifer H.; Howard, George; Brott, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Background In the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial (CREST), the composite primary endpoint of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death during the periprocedural period or ipsilateral stroke thereafter did not differ between carotid artery stenting and carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid stenosis. A secondary aim of this randomised trial was to compare the composite endpoint of restenosis or occlusion. Methods Patients with stenosis of the carotid artery who were asymptomatic or had had a transient ischaemic attack, amaurosis fugax, or a minor stroke were eligible for CREST and were enrolled at 117 clinical centres in the USA and Canada between Dec 21, 2000, and July 18, 2008. In this secondary analysis, the main endpoint was a composite of restenosis or occlusion at 2 years. Restenosis and occlusion were assessed by duplex ultrasonography at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 48 months and were defined as a reduction in diameter of the target artery of at least 70%, diagnosed by a peak systolic velocity of at least 3·0 m/s. Studies were done in CREST-certified laboratories and interpreted at the Ultrasound Core Laboratory (University of Washington). The frequency of restenosis was calculated by Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and was compared during a 2-year follow-up period. We used proportional hazards models to assess the association between baseline characteristics and risk of restenosis. Analyses were per protocol. CREST is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00004732. Findings 2191 patients received their assigned treatment within 30 days of randomisation and had eligible ultrasonography (1086 who had carotid artery stenting, 1105 who had carotid endarterectomy). In 2 years, 58 patients who underwent carotid artery stenting (Kaplan-Meier rate 6·0%) and 62 who had carotid endarterectomy (6·3%) had restenosis or occlusion (hazard ratio [HR] 0·90, 95% CI 0·63–1·29; p=0·58). Female sex (1·79, 1·25–2

  17. Intima-media thickness and arterial stiffness of carotid artery in Korean patients with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Moo-Yong; Chang, Hyun Kyu; Kim, Seong-Kyu

    2007-06-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a systemic vasculitis involving diverse sizes of arteries and veins. We performed this study to evaluate the vascular changes by assessment of the arterial stiffness and intima-media thickness (IMT) of carotid artery in Korean patients with BD. Forty-one patients with BD and age-, and sex-matched 53 healthy subjects were recruited in this study. Carotid arterial stiffness and IMT were assessed by using high-resolution B-mode ultrasonography. Arterial stiffness parameters such as carotid arterial distensibility coefficient, stiffness index, and incremental elastic modulus (E(inc)) were significantly increased in BD patients compared with those in healthy subjects, but not in IMT. Positive relationship was noted between age and IMT, whereas age of onset was significantly associated with arterial stiffness in BD. This finding suggests impaired endothelial function before visible structural changes of arterial wall in BD. Age and age of onset may be an independent risk factor for carotid IMT and arterial stiffness, respectively. Further studies in more large populations are required to confirm our results. PMID:17596642

  18. Substantial Reduction of Parenchymal Cerebral Blood Flow in Mice with Bilateral Common Carotid Artery Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yorito; Enmi, Jun-Ichiro; Iguchi, Satoshi; Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Iida, Hidehiro; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The bilateral common carotid artery stenosis (BCAS) mouse model, which replicates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and white matter ischemic lesions, is considered to model some aspects of vascular cognitive impairment. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in the brain surface post-BCAS have been demonstrated by laser speckle flowmetry, but CBF levels in the brain parenchyma remain unknown. Adult C57BL/6J male mice were subjected to BCAS using external microcoils. Brain magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was conducted to visualize the intracranial main arteries while arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to measure cortical and subcortical parenchymal CBF levels before and after BCAS. Brain MRA showed anterior circulation flow was substantially decreased until 14 days post-BCAS, which gradually but incompletely recovered over the following 14 days, with probable growth of collaterals from the posterior cerebral artery. ASL showed that cortical and subcortical parenchymal CBF remained decreased at approximately 50% of the baseline level during 1 and 14 days post-BCAS, recovering to approximately 70% at day 28. CBF levels in the parenchyma were lower than the cortical superficial region in the BCAS model and remained decreased without recovery during the first 2 weeks post-BCAS. These results suggest that the BCAS model reliably replicates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. PMID:27535801

  19. Substantial Reduction of Parenchymal Cerebral Blood Flow in Mice with Bilateral Common Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Yorito; Enmi, Jun-ichiro; Iguchi, Satoshi; Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Iida, Hidehiro; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The bilateral common carotid artery stenosis (BCAS) mouse model, which replicates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and white matter ischemic lesions, is considered to model some aspects of vascular cognitive impairment. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in the brain surface post-BCAS have been demonstrated by laser speckle flowmetry, but CBF levels in the brain parenchyma remain unknown. Adult C57BL/6J male mice were subjected to BCAS using external microcoils. Brain magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was conducted to visualize the intracranial main arteries while arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to measure cortical and subcortical parenchymal CBF levels before and after BCAS. Brain MRA showed anterior circulation flow was substantially decreased until 14 days post-BCAS, which gradually but incompletely recovered over the following 14 days, with probable growth of collaterals from the posterior cerebral artery. ASL showed that cortical and subcortical parenchymal CBF remained decreased at approximately 50% of the baseline level during 1 and 14 days post-BCAS, recovering to approximately 70% at day 28. CBF levels in the parenchyma were lower than the cortical superficial region in the BCAS model and remained decreased without recovery during the first 2 weeks post-BCAS. These results suggest that the BCAS model reliably replicates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. PMID:27535801

  20. Flow-Induced Changes in Dimensions and Mechanical Properties of Rabbit Common Carotid Arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Takeo; Okumura, Eijiro; Shirono, Takahiro; Sho, Eiketsu; Masuda, Hirotake; Sato, Masaaki

    Flow-induced changes in dimensions and mechanical properties of blood vessel wall were studied in the rabbit left common carotid arteries connected directly to the left external jugular vein via an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) to increase its blood flow by >10-fold for 4 weeks. Contralateral artery was used as control. We found significant increase not only in diameter, but also in thickness and length of unloaded artery exposed to increased flow, indicating the increase in wall volume. The increase in diameter and thickness but not in longitudinal length correlated significantly with the volumetric increase of the wall. Pressure-imposed test showed that the wall became less distensible in response to flow increase. Fluid shear stress estimated for physiological condition was significantly higher in AVF side than control, indicating that 10-fold increase in flow was not compensated in 4 weeks. Circumferential strain in a physiological pressure range was significantly lower in AVF side, while hoop stress was similar in both sides. These results may indicate that circumferential stress but not strain is maintained constant, and longitudinal change is not regulated in flow-imposed arteries.

  1. Variability in the Position of the Retropharyngeal Internal Carotid Artery: A Potential Surgical Hazard

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ajay; Shah, Akash D.; Zhang, Zhigang; Phillips, C. Douglas; Young, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The retropharyngeal internal carotid artery (ICA) is a well-described arterial anomaly with important implications for patients undergoing pharyngeal approach surgical procedures. Existing clinical and imaging classification schemes for a retropharyngeal ICA take into account arterial distance to the pharyngeal mucosal wall. We describe a case of mobility of a retropharyngeal ICA between short-interval imaging studies. The possibility of respiratory variability or other etiologies causing such changes in retropharyngeal carotid position have not been described previously. Our findings suggest that imaging findings from a single study alone may not be sufficient to confidently exclude this clinically significant arterial anomaly. PMID:22614949

  2. Aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis after internal carotid arterial occlusion in polycythaemia vera.

    PubMed Central

    Melamed, E; Rachmilewitz, E A; Reches, A; Lavy, S

    1976-01-01

    Two patients with untreated polycythaemia vera developed intracranial internal carotid arterial occlusion followed by monocular blindness and the characteristic features of ipsilateral cavernous sinus thrombosis. Primary septic source and signs of systemic infection were absent. It is suggested that the predisposing factors in this unusual syndrome were hyperviscosity and venous sludging induced by the basic haematological disorder and progression of the thrombotic process within the internal carotid artery towards its intracavernous portion with occlusion of the ophthalmic artery and of the arterial branches which supply the walls of the sinus. Images PMID:932749

  3. Pressure Drop in Tortuosity/Kinking of the Internal Carotid Artery: Simulation and Clinical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Feng; Wang, Daming; Hu, Shen; Liu, Jiachun; Zhou, Zhilun; Lu, Jun; Qi, Peng; Song, Shiying

    2016-01-01

    Background. Whether carotid tortuosity/kinking of the internal carotid artery leads to cerebral ischemia remains unclear. There is very little research about the hemodynamic variation induced by carotid tortuosity/kinking in the literature. The objective of this study was to research the blood pressure changes induced by carotid tortuosity/kinking. Methods. We first created a geometric model of carotid tortuosity/kinking. Based on hemodynamic boundary conditions, the hemodynamics of carotid tortuosity and kinking were studied via a finite element simulation. Then, an in vitro system was built to validate the numerical simulation results. The mean arterial pressure changes before and after carotid kinking were measured using pressure sensors in 12 patients with carotid kinking. Results. Numerical simulation revealed that the pressure drops increased with increases in the kinking angles. Clinical tests and in vitro experiments confirmed the numerical simulation results. Conclusions. Carotid kinking leads to blood pressure reduction. In certain conditions, kinking may affect the cerebral blood supply and be associated with cerebral ischemia. PMID:27195283

  4. Current status of revascularization surgery for Moyamoya disease: special consideration for its 'internal carotid-external carotid (IC-EC) conversion' as the physiological reorganization system.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Miki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a chronic cerebrovascular disease with unknown etiology, which is characterized by bilateral steno-occlusive changes at the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery and an abnormal vascular network formation at the base of the brain. Moyamoya disease is known to have unique and dynamic nature to convert the vascular supply for the brain from internal carotid (IC) system to the external carotid (EC) system, as indicated by Suzuki's angiographic staging established in 1969. Insufficiency of this 'IC-EC conversion system' may result in cerebral ischemia, as well as in intracranial hemorrhage from inadequate collateral vascular network, both of which represent the clinical presentation of moyamoya disease. Therefore, surgical revascularization by extracranial-intracranial bypass is the preferred procedure for moyamoya disease to complement 'IC-EC conversion' and thus to avoid cerebral infarction and/or intracranial hemorrhage. Long-term outcome of revascularization surgery for moyamoya disease is favorable, but rapid increase in cerebral blood flow on the affected hemisphere could temporarily cause unfavorable phenomenon such as cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome. We would review the current status of revascularization surgery for moyamoya disease based on its basic pathology, and sought to discuss the significance of measuring cerebral blood flow in the acute stage and intensive perioperative management. PMID:25971859

  5. Tips and tricks to avoid periprocedural neurological complications in carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Setacci, C; de Donato, G; Setacci, F; Sirignano, P; Galzerano, G; Kamargianni, V; Cappelli, A

    2013-02-01

    Execution of carotid artery stenting (CAS) requires not only excellent manual dexterity, and a high level of competence, but also in-depth knowledge of the carotid pathology, of the materials available on the market and of the different techniques to apply in given situations. Actually each individual moment of the procedure can be determining for the final result. This review describes each individual step of CAS, including arterial access, carotid engagement, pre-dilatation, the characteristics and use of cerebral protection devices, stent selection and deployment, and post-dilatation. Technical notes and some suggestions are provided on how to minimize the event of periprocedural neurological complications. PMID:23296411

  6. Extracranial internal carotid artery stenting in Moya-Moya syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Casana, R; Tolva, V; Guy Bianchi, P; Dalainas, I

    2012-12-01

    A 58-year-old Caucasian lady presented for severe left internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis. Two months before she was operated for right carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in another Institution, complicated with internal carotid artery thrombosis and development of transient hemiplegia and aphasia. Postoperative selective DSA showed the development of an abnormal basal meshwork of collateral vessels with typical evidence for moyamoya disease. Preoperative workup in our Institution included cerebral MRI witch showed two ischemic right frontal and parietal lesions. The patient underwent successful stenting of the left ICA. This is the first report of extracranial ICA stenting in a patient with moyamoya syndrome. PMID:23147441

  7. Establishment of an Animal Model of Vascular Restenosis with Bilateral Carotid Artery Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruixiong; Lan, Bin; Zhu, Tianxiang; Yang, Yanlong; Wang, Muting; Ma, Chensheng; Chen, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Background Vascular restenosis occurring after CABG is a major clinical problem that needs to be addressed. Vein grafts are associated with a higher degree of stenosis than artery grafts. However, the mechanism responsible for this effect has not been elucidated. We aimed to establish a rabbit model of vascular restenosis after bilateral carotid artery grafting, and to investigate the associated spatiotemporal changes of intimal hyperplasia in carotid artery and jugular vein grafts after surgery. Material/Methods Twenty adult New Zealand white rabbits (10 males; 10 females), weighing 2.0–2.5 kg, were obtained from the Experimental Animal Center of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China (License No.: scxk-Guangdong-2006-0015). We quantitatively analyzed intimal thickness, area, and degree of stenosis in carotid artery and jugular vein bridges. Results After 8 weeks of a high-fat diet, rabbit carotid arteries showed early atherosclerotic lesions. With increasing time after surgery, carotid artery and jugular vein grafts showed histopathological and morphological changes, including smooth muscle cell migration, lipid deposition, intimal hyperplasia, and vascular stenosis. The degree of vascular stenosis was significantly higher in vein grafts than in artery grafts at all time points – 35.1±6.7% vs. 16.1±2.6% at Week 12, 56.2±8.5% vs. 23.4±3.4% at Week 16, and 71.2±1.3% vs. 25.2±5.3% at Week 20. Conclusions Rabbit bilateral carotid arteries were grafted with carotid artery and jugular vein bridges to simulate pathophysiological processes that occur in people after CABG surgery. PMID:25549796

  8. Differential mechanical response and microstructural organization between non-human primate femoral and carotid arteries

    PubMed Central

    Raykin, Julia; Li, Haiyan; Gleason, Rudolph L.

    2014-01-01

    Unique anatomic locations and physiologic functions predispose different arteries to varying mechanical responses and pathologies. However, the underlying causes of these mechanical differences are not well understood. The objective of this study was to first identify structural differences in the arterial matrix that would account for the mechanical differences between healthy femoral and carotid arteries and second to utilize these structural observations to perform a microstructurally motivated constitutive analysis. Femoral and carotid arteries were subjected to cylindrical biaxial loading and their microstructure was quantified using two-photon microscopy. The femoral arteries were found to be less compliant than the carotid arteries at physiologic loads, consistent with previous studies, despite similar extracellular compositions of collagen and elastin (P > 0.05). The femoral arteries exhibited significantly less circumferential dispersion of collagen fibers (P < 0.05), despite a similar mean fiber alignment direction as the carotid arteries. Elastin transmural distribution, in vivo axial stretch, and opening angles were also found to be distinctly different between the arteries. Lastly, we modeled the arteries’ mechanical behaviors using a microstructural-based, distributed collagen fiber constitutive model. With this approach, the material parameters of the model were solved using the experimental microstructural observations. The findings of this study support an important role for microstructural organization in arterial stiffness. PMID:24532266

  9. Emergent surgical embolectomy for middle cerebral artery occlusion due to carotid plaque rupture followed by elective carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Kiyofuji, Satoshi; Inoue, Tomohiro; Hasegawa, Hirotaka; Tamura, Akira; Saito, Isamu

    2014-09-01

    Embolic intracranial large artery occlusion with severe neurological deficit is associated with an extremely poor prognosis. The safest and most effective treatment strategy has not yet been determined when such emboli are associated with unstable proximal carotid plaque. The authors performed emergent surgical embolectomy for left middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, and the patient experienced marked neurological recovery without focal deficit and regained premorbid activity. Postoperative investigation revealed "vulnerable plaque" of the left internal carotid artery without apparent evidence of cardiac embolism, such as would be seen with atrial fibrillation. Specimens from subsequent elective carotid endarterectomy (CEA) showed ruptured vulnerable plaque that was histologically consistent as a source of the intracranial embolic specimen. Surgical embolectomy for MCA occlusion due to carotid plaque rupture followed by CEA could be a safer and more effective alternative to endovascular treatment from the standpoint of obviating the risk of secondary embolism that could otherwise occur as a result of the manipulation of devices through an extremely unstable portion of plaque. Further, this strategy is associated with a high probability of complete recanalization with direct removal of hard and large, though fragile, emboli. PMID:24905562

  10. Treatment of a ballistic wound of the common carotid artery revealed by a spontaneous carotid-jugular fistula.

    PubMed

    Mlynski, Amélie; Mocellin, Nicolas; Imperato, Marc; Molimard, Benoît; Bordier, Emmanuel; Menguy, Paul; Baranger, Bernard

    2011-02-01

    The case reported is of a 30-year-old patient with a left internal carotid-jugular fistula secondary to the explosion of an improvised explosive device during the Afghan war. Carotid resection with arterial bypass using a venous allograft and internal jugular ligation were performed by left cervicotomy associated with sternotomy at a specialized center. The management of cervical arteriovenous fistulas that occur as a result of penetrating trauma faced during the war must be considered and it should be noted that, on battlefields, treatment is not always performed in specialized units. PMID:21183314

  11. Three dimensional level set based semiautomatic segmentation of atherosclerotic carotid artery wall volume using 3D ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Murad; AlMuhanna, Khalid; Zhao, Limin; Lal, Brajesh K.; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2014-03-01

    3D segmentation of carotid plaque from ultrasound (US) images is challenging due to image artifacts and poor boundary definition. Semiautomatic segmentation algorithms for calculating vessel wall volume (VWV) have been proposed for the common carotid artery (CCA) but they have not been applied on plaques in the internal carotid artery (ICA). In this work, we describe a 3D segmentation algorithm that is robust to shadowing and missing boundaries. Our algorithm uses distance regularized level set method with edge and region based energy to segment the adventitial wall boundary (AWB) and lumen-intima boundary (LIB) of plaques in the CCA, ICA and external carotid artery (ECA). The algorithm is initialized by manually placing points on the boundary of a subset of transverse slices with an interslice distance of 4mm. We propose a novel user defined stopping surface based energy to prevent leaking of evolving surface across poorly defined boundaries. Validation was performed against manual segmentation using 3D US volumes acquired from five asymptomatic patients with carotid stenosis using a linear 4D probe. A pseudo gold-standard boundary was formed from manual segmentation by three observers. The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), Hausdor distance (HD) and modified HD (MHD) were used to compare the algorithm results against the pseudo gold-standard on 1205 cross sectional slices of 5 3D US image sets. The algorithm showed good agreement with the pseudo gold standard boundary with mean DSC of 93.3% (AWB) and 89.82% (LIB); mean MHD of 0.34 mm (AWB) and 0.24 mm (LIB); mean HD of 1.27 mm (AWB) and 0.72 mm (LIB). The proposed 3D semiautomatic segmentation is the first step towards full characterization of 3D plaque progression and longitudinal monitoring.

  12. Effect of transient carotid artery compression during transcranial Doppler ultrasonography in dogs.

    PubMed

    Duque, F J; Barrera-Chacon, R; Ruiz, P; Casamian-Sorrosal, D; Zaragoza, C; Dominguez-Roldan, J M

    2010-09-25

    Changes in blood flow in the arteries of the canine skull base following compression of the ipsilateral carotid artery were evaluated. Forty healthy conscious dogs were evaluated during examination in lateral recumbency. Using the temporal window, the rostral, middle and caudal cerebral arteries were evaluated. The basilar artery was studied through the suboccipital window. Following compression, the pulse Doppler signal was reduced or inverted when interrogating the rostral or middle cerebral artery, and no change was observed when the caudal cerebral artery or basilar artery was evaluated. PMID:20871081

  13. A gene-centric study of common carotid artery remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Seamus C.; Zabaneh, Delilah; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Drenos, Fotios; Jones, Gregory T.; Shah, Sonia; Gertow, Karl; Sennblad, Bengt; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Gigante, Bruna; Holewijn, Suzanne; De Graaf, Jacqueline; Vermeulen, Sita; Folkersen, Lasse; van Rij, Andre M.; Baldassarre, Damiano; Veglia, Fabrizio; Talmud, Philippa J.; Deanfield, John E.; Agu, Obi; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Bown, Matthew J.; Nyyssönen, Kristiina; Rauramaa, Rainer; Smit, Andries J.; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Giral, Philippe; Mannarino, Elmo; Silveira, Angela; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; de Borst, Gert J.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; de Faire, Ulf; Baas, Annette F.; Blankensteijn, Jan D.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Fowkes, Gerry; Tzoulaki, Ionna; Price, Jacqueline F.; Tremoli, Elena; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Eriksson, Per; Hamsten, Anders; Humphries, Steve E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Expansive remodelling is the process of compensatory arterial enlargement in response to atherosclerotic stimuli. The genetic determinants of this process are poorly characterized. Methods Genetic association analyses of inter-adventitial common carotid artery diameter (ICCAD) in the IMPROVE study (n = 3427) using the Illumina 200k Metabochip was performed. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that met array-wide significance were taken forward for analysis in three further studies (n = 5704), and tested for association with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA). Results rs3768445 on Chromosome 1q24.3, in a cluster of protein coding genes (DNM3, PIGC, C1orf105) was associated with larger ICCAD in the IMPROVE study. For each copy of the rare allele carried, ICCAD was on average 0.13 mm greater (95% CI 0.08–0.18 mm, P = 8.2 × 10−8). A proxy SNP (rs4916251, R2 = 0.99) did not, however, show association with ICCAD in three follow-up studies (P for replication = 0.29). There was evidence of interaction between carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and rs4916251 on ICCAD in two of the cohorts studies suggesting that it plays a role in the remodelling response to atherosclerosis. In meta-analysis of 5 case–control studies pooling data from 5007 cases and 43,630 controls, rs4916251 was associated with presence of AAA 1.10, 95% CI 1.03–1.17, p = 2.8 × 10−3, I2 = 18.8, Q = 0.30). A proxy SNP, rs4916251 was also associated with increased expression of PIGC in aortic tissue, suggesting that this may the mechanism by which this locus affects vascular remodelling. Conclusions Common variation at 1q24.3 is associated with expansive vascular remodelling and risk of AAA. These findings support a hypothesis that pathways involved in systemic vascular remodelling play a role in AAA development. PMID:23246012

  14. Clinical impact of radiographic carotid artery involvement in neck metastases from head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Teymoortash, A; Rassow, S; Bohne, F; Wilhelm, T; Hoch, S

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of lymph node metastases involving the carotid artery is controversial. The aim of the present study was to determine the outcomes of head and neck cancer patients with radiographic carotid artery involvement in neck metastases. A total of 27 patients with head and neck cancer and radiologically diagnosed advanced metastases involving the common carotid artery or internal carotid artery were enrolled. All patients underwent a primary or salvage neck dissection and surgical carotid peeling. The oncological outcome and survival of all patients were analyzed. Loco-regional control was observed in 13 of the 27 patients (48.1%). During follow-up, five patients (18.5%) developed second primaries and 11 (40.7%) developed distant metastases. The survival time was poor independent of regional control. The median overall survival was 1.55 years and disease-free survival was 0.71 year. Radiographic carotid artery involvement in neck metastases in head and neck cancer appears to correlate with a poor long-term prognosis, with a high rate of distant metastases despite loco-regional control. PMID:26723499

  15. Acute effect of cycling intervention on carotid arterial hemodynamics: basketball athletes versus sedentary controls

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the acute effects of a cycling intervention on carotid arterial hemodynamics between basketball athletes and sedentary controls. Methods Ten young long-term trained male basketball athletes (BA) and nine age-matched male sedentary controls (SC) successively underwent four bouts of exercise on a bicycle ergometer at the same workload. Hemodynamic variables at right common carotid artery were determined at rest and immediately following each bout of exercise. An ANCOVA was used to compare differences between the BA and SC groups at rest and immediately following the cycling intervention. The repeated ANOVA was used to assess differences between baseline and each bout of exercise within the BA or SC group. Results In both groups, carotid hemodynamic variables showed significant differences at rest and immediately after the cycling intervention. At rest, carotid arterial stiffness was significantly decreased and carotid arterial diameter was significantly increased in the BA group as compared to the SC group. Immediately following the cycling intervention, carotid arterial stiffness showed no obvious changes in the BA group but significantly increased in the SC group. It is worth noting that while arterial stiffness was lower in the BA group than in the SC group, the oscillatory shear index (OSI) was significantly higher in the BA group than in the SC group both at rest and immediately following the cycling intervention. Conclusion Long-term basketball exercise had a significant impact on common carotid arterial hemodynamic variables not only at rest but also after a cycling intervention. The role of OSI in the remodeling of arterial structure and function in the BA group at rest and after cycling requires clarification. PMID:25602805

  16. Massive epistaxis resulting from an intracavernous internal carotid artery traumatic pseudoaneurysm: complete resolution with overlapping uncovered stents.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Juretschke, Fernando; Castro, Enrique; Mateo Sierra, Olga; Iza, Begoña; Manuel Garbizu, Jose; Fortea, Fernando; Villoria, Francisco

    2009-12-01

    Blunt traumatic injuries of the intracranial carotid arteries can result in pseudoaneurysm formation. A pseudoaneurysm of the intracavernous carotid artery may rupture into the cavernous sinus, causing life-threatening epistaxis. We report a case of intracavernous traumatic psedoaneurysm presenting with delayed massive epistaxis. The endovascular treatment with overlapping self-expanding stents achieved complete exclusion of the pseudoaneurysm with preservation of the intracavernous carotid artery. PMID:19350203

  17. Immediate surgery for acute internal carotid artery dissection and thrombosis during filter deployment prior to stenting: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tolva, V; Bertoni, G B; Bianchi, P G; Keller, G C; Casana, R

    2013-08-01

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is a validated option in the treatment of selected extracranial carotid artery stenosis. Carotid artery dissection during CAS is a rare but potentially devastating complication. We report a case of acute dissection and thrombosis of the left internal carotid artery during filter tip wire engaging maneuvers, complicated by intraoperative complete blindness of the left eye. Immediate conversion to carotid endarterectomy was performed under general anesthesia with electroencephalographic monitoring. The patient was discharged home symptomless and remains asymptomatic eight months after the operation, with normal left internal carotid patency and fully recovered eyesight. In conclusion, the management of acute carotid occlusion during CAS requires emergent evaluation and definitive endovascular or open surgical repair to minimize neurologic morbidity. We advocate that all endovascular procedures are carried out in a well-established surgical environment. PMID:23579380

  18. High Agatston Calcium Score of Intracranial Carotid Artery

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Liou, Michelle; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Liu, Hua-Shan; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chou, Ming-Chung; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The effect of intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) calcification on cognitive impairment is uncertain. Our objective was to investigate whether intracranial ICA calcification is a significant cognitive predictor for cognitive impairment. Global cognition and degrees of intracranial ICA calcification of 579 subjects were assessed with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Agatston calcium scoring method, respectively. Other risk factors for cognitive impairment, including age, education level, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, hyperlipidemia, and body mass index, were documented and analyzed for their associations with cognitive function. In univariate analyses, older age, lower education level, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and higher intracranial ICA Agatston scores were significantly associated with cognitive impairment. In ordinal logistic regression, only age and total intracranial ICA Agatston score were significant risk factors for cognitive impairment. After adjustment for the other documented risk factors, subjects were 7% (95% CI: 5–10; P < 0.001) and 6% (95% CI: 0–13; P = 0.04) more likely to have lower cognitive category with every year increment of age and every 100-point increment of the total intracranial ICA Agatston score respectively. These results suggest an important role of the intracranial ICA calcification on cognitive impairment. PMID:26426620

  19. Factors influencing acute thrombus formation on carotid artery vascular grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Torem, S.; Schneider, P.A.; Paxton, L.D.; Yasuda, H.; Hanson, S.R.

    1988-10-01

    Scintillation camera imaging of 111Indium-labeled platelets has been used to measure acute thrombus formation on modified expanded Teflon (ePTFE) vascular grafts placed in the carotid arteries of normal baboons. Platelet deposition plateaued over 2 hr postoperatively and occurred primarily at the graft-vessel anastomoses. A positive correlation was found between the circulating platelet count in individual animals and the extent of early platelet thrombus deposition. Unmodified ePTFE grafts accumulated 4.6 +/- 1.2 x 10(9) platelets per graft, or 2.3 +/- 0.71 x 10(9) platelets per anastomosis. Acutely, platelet accumulation was reduced versus control graft results by coating the graft lumenal surfaces with a smooth layer of silicone rubber polymer (0.60 +/- 0.19 x 10(9) platelets per anastomosis; P less than 0.02) but not by coating the grafts using a plasma polymer based on methane, which did not modify graft texture (8.2 +/- 1.7 x 10(9) platelets per graft; P greater than 0.10). The benefit of the silicone rubber coating persisted for at least 48 hr. However, longer term patency was not preserved because 10 of 12 grafts placed had failed within 1 to 2 months.

  20. Static and dynamic changes in carotid artery diameter in humans during and after strenuous exercise

    PubMed Central

    Studinger, Péter; Lénárd, Zsuzsanna; Kováts, Zsuzsanna; Kocsis, László; Kollai, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Arterial baroreflex function is altered by dynamic exercise, but it is not clear to what extent baroreflex changes are due to altered transduction of pressure into deformation of the barosensory vessel wall. In this study we measured changes in mean common carotid artery diameter and the pulsatile pressure: diameter ratio (PDR) during and after dynamic exercise. Ten young, healthy subjects performed a graded exercise protocol to exhaustion on a bicycle ergometer. Carotid dimensions were measured with an ultrasound wall-tracking system; central arterial pressure was measured with the use of radial tonometry and the generalized transfer function; baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was assessed in the post-exercise period by spectral analysis and the sequence method. Data are given as means ± s.e.m. Mean carotid artery diameter increased during exercise as compared with control levels, but carotid distension amplitude did not change. PDR was reduced from 27.3 ± 2.7 to 13.7 ± 1.0 μm mmHg−1. Immediately after stopping exercise, the carotid artery constricted and PDR remained reduced. At 60 min post-exercise, the carotid artery dilated and the PDR increased above control levels (33.9 ± 1.4 μm mmHg−1). The post-exercise changes in PDR were closely paralleled by those in BRS (0.74 ≤ r ≤ 0.83, P < 0.05). These changes in mean carotid diameter and PDR suggest that the mean baroreceptor activity level increases during exercise, with reduced dynamic sensitivity; at the end of exercise baroreceptors are suddenly unloaded, then at 1 h post-exercise, baroreceptor activity increases again with increasing dynamic sensitivity. The close correlation between PDR and BRS observed at post-exercise underlies the significance of mechanical factors in arterial baroreflex control. PMID:12766246

  1. Intraoperative radiation of canine carotid artery, internal jugular vein, and vagus nerve. Therapeutic applications in the management of advanced head and neck cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, B.B.; Pelzer, H.; Tsao, C.S.; Ward, W.F.; Johnson, P.; Friedman, C.; Sisson, G.A. Sr.; Kies, M. )

    1990-12-01

    As a step in the application of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for treating advanced head and neck cancers, preliminary information was obtained on the radiation tolerance of the canine common carotid artery, internal jugular vein, and vagus nerve to a single, high-dose electron beam. Both sides of the neck of eight mongrel dogs were operated on to expose an 8-cm segment of common carotid artery, internal jugular vein, and vagus nerve. One side of the neck was irradiated, using escalating doses of 2500, 3500, 4500, and 5500 cGy. The contralateral side of the neck served as the unirradiated control. At 3 and 6 months after IORT, one dog at each dose level was killed. None of the dogs developed carotid bleeding at any time after IORT. Light microscopic investigations using hematoxylin-eosin staining on the common carotid artery and internal jugular vein showed no consistent changes that suggested radiation damage; however, the Masson trichrome stain and hydroxyproline concentration of irradiated common carotid artery indicated an increase in the collagen content of the tunica media. Marked changes in the irradiated vagus nerve were seen, indicating severe demyelination and loss of nerve fibers, which appeared to be radiation-dose dependent. Four patients with advanced recurrent head and neck cancer were treated with surgical resection and IORT without any acute or subacute complications. The role of IORT as a supplement to surgery, external beam irradiation, and chemotherapy in selected patients with advanced head and neck cancer needs further exploration.

  2. A new radial strain and strain rate estimation method using autocorrelation for carotid artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jihui; Kim, Hoonmin; Park, Jongho; Yeo, Sunmi; Shim, Hwan; Lim, Hyungjoon; Yoo, Yangmo

    2014-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. The early diagnosis of atherosclerosis is of clinical interest since it can prevent any adverse effects of atherosclerotic vascular diseases. In this paper, a new carotid artery radial strain estimation method based on autocorrelation is presented. In the proposed method, the strain is first estimated by the autocorrelation of two complex signals from the consecutive frames. Then, the angular phase from autocorrelation is converted to strain and strain rate and they are analyzed over time. In addition, a 2D strain image over region of interest in a carotid artery can be displayed. To evaluate the feasibility of the proposed radial strain estimation method, radiofrequency (RF) data of 408 frames in the carotid artery of a volunteer were acquired by a commercial ultrasound system equipped with a research package (V10, Samsung Medison, Korea) by using a L5-13IS linear array transducer. From in vivo carotid artery data, the mean strain estimate was -0.1372 while its minimum and maximum values were -2.961 and 0.909, respectively. Moreover, the overall strain estimates are highly correlated with the reconstructed M-mode trace. Similar results were obtained from the estimation of the strain rate change over time. These results indicate that the proposed carotid artery radial strain estimation method is useful for assessing the arterial wall's stiffness noninvasively without increasing the computational complexity.

  3. Impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes of carotid artery stenting in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cheng-Sheng; Lin, Chih-Ming; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke patients with moderate-to-severe carotid artery stenosis. However, the midterm outcome for patients undergoing this procedure varies considerably with baseline characteristics. To determine the impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes following carotid artery stenting, data from 107 eligible patients with a first episode of ischemic stroke were collected by retrospective chart review. A modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was used to divide patients into two baseline groups, mRS ≤2 and mRS >2. A three-step decision-tree statistical analysis was conducted. After weighting the decision-tree parameters, the following impact hierarchy was obtained: admission low-density lipoprotein, gouty arthritis, chronic kidney disease, ipsilateral common carotid artery resistance index, contralateral ophthalmic artery resistance index, sex, and dyslipidemia. The finite-state machine model demonstrated that, in patients with baseline mRS ≤2, 46% had an improved mRS score at follow-up, whereas 54% had a stable mRS score. In patients with baseline mRS >2, a stable mRS score was observed in 75%, improved score in 23%, and a poorer score in 2%. Admission low-density lipoprotein was the strongest predictive factor influencing poststenting outcome. In addition, our study provides further evidence that carotid artery stenting can be of benefit in first-time ischemic stroke patients with baseline mRS scores >2. PMID:27099508

  4. Impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes of carotid artery stenting in acute ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-Sheng; Lin, Chih-Ming; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke patients with moderate-to-severe carotid artery stenosis. However, the midterm outcome for patients undergoing this procedure varies considerably with baseline characteristics. To determine the impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes following carotid artery stenting, data from 107 eligible patients with a first episode of ischemic stroke were collected by retrospective chart review. A modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was used to divide patients into two baseline groups, mRS ≤2 and mRS >2. A three-step decision-tree statistical analysis was conducted. After weighting the decision-tree parameters, the following impact hierarchy was obtained: admission low-density lipoprotein, gouty arthritis, chronic kidney disease, ipsilateral common carotid artery resistance index, contralateral ophthalmic artery resistance index, sex, and dyslipidemia. The finite-state machine model demonstrated that, in patients with baseline mRS ≤2, 46% had an improved mRS score at follow-up, whereas 54% had a stable mRS score. In patients with baseline mRS >2, a stable mRS score was observed in 75%, improved score in 23%, and a poorer score in 2%. Admission low-density lipoprotein was the strongest predictive factor influencing poststenting outcome. In addition, our study provides further evidence that carotid artery stenting can be of benefit in first-time ischemic stroke patients with baseline mRS scores >2. PMID:27099508

  5. Severe narrowing of left cavernous carotid artery associated with Fusobacterium necrophorum infection.

    PubMed

    DeGaffe, Guenet H; Murphy, James R; Butler, Ian J; Shelburne, Julia; Heresi, Gloria P

    2013-08-01

    Severe oropharyngeal infection can result in Lemierre's disease, a syndrome with high mortality secondary to inflammation and thrombosis of cervical and intracranial veins with involvement of contiguous structures; however arterial involvement is rare. We report a case of Lemierre's disease in a 12 year old boy with severe narrowing of the left cavernous carotid artery. PMID:23664903

  6. Decompressive craniectomy for massive internal carotid artery infarction after pediatric penetrating neck trauma.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Bruno Miguel Fernandes; Chamadoira, Clara; Figueiredo, Rita; Pereira, Josué; Gaspar, Luísa; Vaz, Rui

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric penetrating carotid arterial trauma is a rare unreported cause of malignant cerebral infarction. Despite increasing evidence of benefit of decompressive hemicraniectomy (DCH) in pediatric malignant stroke, indications and predictors of outcome remain controversial. We report a 4-year-old boy with penetrating zone II neck trauma with laceration of the right internal carotid artery who developed malignant cerebral infarction requiring DCH. Impressive neurological recovery and excellent functional outcome was observed with good psychomotor development and quality of life. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of pediatric malignant ICA infarction due to penetrating arterial trauma with good neurologic outcome after DCH. PMID:26482942

  7. [Neuroradiologic and surgical treatment of a recurrent angiofibroma supplied by the internal carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Zeumer, H; Elies, W; Brückmann, H; Buchner, H; Adelt, D

    1986-07-01

    If blood supply to the brain hemisphere is disturbed following closure of internal homolateral carotid artery tumors of the skull base with involvement of this artery should not be operated on radically. The authors describe the electrophysiological monitoring of cortical evoked somato-sensory potentials. If there is no alteration of the evoked potentials after preliminary reversible blockade of the internal carotid artery this vessel can be definitely closed using a detachable balloon. Thereafter the whole tumor including the carotid artery can be removed. The authors describe a case of juvenile angiofibroma operated on in this way. The combined interventional-neuroradiological and surgical management widens the range of skull base surgery. PMID:3018401

  8. Inconsistent Correlation Between Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness and Peripheral Arterial Tonometry

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Sara P.; Passos, Valéria Maria A.; Brant, Luisa C.C.; Bensenor, Isabela J.M.; Ribeiro, Antônio Luiz P.; Barreto, Sandhi Maria

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To estimate the association between 2 markers for atherosclerosis, measurements of carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and of peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT), and to evaluate the role of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in this association. We applied the 2 diagnostic tests to 588 participants from the ELSA-Brazil longitudinal study cohort. The PAT measurements, obtained with the EndoPAT2000, were the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), the Framingham RHI (F-RHI), and the mean basal pulse amplitude (BPA). We used the mean of the mean scores of carotid IMT of the distal layers of the left and right common carotids obtained by ultrasonography after 3 cardiac cycles. We used linear regression and the Spearman correlation coefficient to test the relationship between the 2 markers, and multiple linear regressions to exam the relationship between the RHI/F-RHI scores and the mean BPA and IMT scores after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors. In the multivariate analysis, RHI (but not F-RHI) was positively correlated with the mean of the means of the IMT values after adjusting for sex and risk factors connected with both measures (β = 0.05, P = 0.02). Mean BPA did not remain significantly associated with IMT after adjusting for common risk factors. We found that the higher the IMT (or the worse the IMT), the higher the RHI (or the better the endothelial function). F-RHI was not associated with IMT. These 2 results are against the direction that one would expect and may imply that digital endothelial function (RHI and F-RHI) and IMT correspond to distinct and independent stages of the complex atherosclerosis process and represent different pathways in the disease's progression. Therefore, IMT and PAT measures may be considered complementary and not interchangeable. PMID:26287431

  9. Arterial Wall Imaging in Symptomatic Carotid Stenosis: Delayed Enhancement on MDCT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Su Min; Seo, Woo-Keun; Seol, Hae Young

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate progressive enhancement in the carotid arterial wall overlying plaque in the symptomatic side for patients with cerebrovascular symptoms until delayed phase using MDCTA. Materials and Methods Twenty-one patients (all men; ages, 49-82 years; mean, 67.8 ± 8.4 years) with recent stroke and severe extracranial carotid stenosis were retrospectively analyzed. Pre-, early- and delayed phase images of MDCTA were obtained, and Hounsfield units (HU) of carotid walls were measured. We also measured HU of the asymptomatic contralateral carotid arterial wall for comparison. Friedman's test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to evaluate the differences between groups. Results The averaged HU of the carotid wall in the symptomatic side was higher on the delayed phase (65.8 ± 14.2 HU) compared to early arterial phase (54.2 ± 12.6 HU). The averaged HU difference of wall enhancement between pre-contrast and delayed phase (28.0 ± 14.8 HU) was significantly higher than the between pre-contrast and early arterial phase (16.4 ± 12.1 HU) with P < 0.05. In analysis of the contralateral asymptomatic side, the HU difference between pre-contrast and delayed phase (15.5 ± 12.0 HU) showed no significant higher value than between pre-contrast and early arterial phase (14.9 ± 10.9 HU). Conclusion The pronounced enhancement of the carotid wall in the delayed phase on MDCTA was demonstrated in symptomatic patients with severe internal carotid artery stenosis. In the future, we need more comparative studies to verify this finding as one of risk stratification. PMID:26958408

  10. Early carotid atherosclerosis in women: results of an ultrasonographic study measuring carotid artery intima-media thickness.

    PubMed

    Santo Signorelli, Salvatore; Pia Costa, Maria; Digrandi, Daniele; Di Pino, Luigi; Celotta, Gabriella; Pennisi, Giuseppe; Marchese, Giuseppe; Guardo, Paola; Virgilio, Vittorio; Torrisi, Benedetto

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is a useful diagnostic tool in detecting early vascular diseases in women and is particularly relevant in the elderly population. Increased carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) is a predictive marker of onset of atherosclerosis and is associated with vascular events. The objective of the present study was to determine carotid artery IMT in asymptomatic women of different age classes and to correlate the results with metabolic and coagulative parameters, age, and menopause. A total of 1200 women age 29-73 years selected from the electoral list of the city of Catania, Italy consented to participate in the US study to determine IMT. The percentage of IMT values exceeding an IMT cutoff value of < 1.3 mm observed in our study groups was significant. Correlations were observed between IMT and total cholesterol (r = .157), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (r = .87), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (r = .149), and fibrinogen (r = .140) values. Increased ultrasonographic markers showing onset of carotid artery remodeling can be observed in asymptomatic women of all ages. Some cardiovascular risk factors are linked to the initial stages of atherosclerosis. We recommend US screening in healthy populations to identify subjects who could develop vascular disease. PMID:17904019

  11. Dual Antiplatelet Regime Versus Acetyl-acetic Acid for Carotid Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Dalainas, Ilias Nano, Giovanni; Bianchi, Paolo; Stegher, Silvia; Malacrida, Giovanni; Tealdi, Domenico G.

    2006-08-15

    Carotid artery stenting has been proposed as an option treatment of carotid artery stenosis. The aim of this single-institution study is to compare the dual-antiplatelet treatment and heparin combined with acetyl-acetic acid, in patients who underwent carotid artery stenting. We compared 2 groups of 50 patents each who underwent carotid artery stenting for primary atherosclerotic disease. Group A received heparin for 24 h combined with 325 mg acetyl-acetic acid and group B received 250 mg ticlopidine twice a day combined with 325 mg acetyl-acetic acid. Outcome measurements included 30-day bleeding and neurological complications and 30-day thrombosis/occlusion rates. The neurological complications were 16% in group A and 2% in group B (p < 0.05). Bleeding complications occurred in 4% in group A and 2% in group B (p > 0.05). The 30-day thrombosis/occlusion rate was 2% in group A and 0% in group B (p > 0.05). Dual antiplatelet treatment is recommended in all patients undergoing carotid artery stenting.

  12. Associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness in adolescents: The European Youth Hearts Study.

    PubMed

    Ried-Larsen, M; Grøntved, A; Østergaard, L; Cooper, A R; Froberg, K; Andersen, L B; Møller, N C

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness, independent of objectively measured moderate-and-vigorous physical activity. This cross-sectional study included 375 adolescents (age 15.7 ± 0.4 years) from the Danish site of the European Youth Heart Study. Total frequency of bicycle usage was assessed by self-report, and carotid arterial stiffness was assessed using B-mode ultrasound. After adjusting for pubertal status, body height, and objectively measured physical activity and other personal lifestyle and demographic factors, boys using their bicycle every day of the week displayed a higher carotid arterial compliance {standard beta 0.47 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07-0.87]} and distension [standard beta 0.38 (95% CI -0.04 to 0.81)]. Boys using their bicycle every day of the week furthermore displayed a lower Young's elastic modulus [standard beta -0.48 (95% CI -0.91 to -0.06)]. Similar trends were observed when investigating the association between commuter bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness. These associations were not observed in girls. Our observations suggest that increasing bicycling in adolescence may be beneficial to carotid arterial health among boys. PMID:25156494

  13. Predictors of Symptom Development in Intermediate Carotid Artery Stenosis: Mean Platelet Volume and Platelet Distribution Width.

    PubMed

    Koklu, Erkan; Yuksel, Isa Oner; Arslan, Sakir; Cagirci, Goksel; Gencer, Elif Sarionder; Koc, Pinar; Cay, Serkan; Kizilirmak, Filiz; Esin, Murat

    2016-08-01

    Platelets play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherothrombosis. Platelet activation is associated with increased mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW). In this study, we investigated the relation of MPV and PDW with the risk of stroke in patients with intermediate (50%-70%) carotid artery stenosis. A total of 254 patients (115 symptomatic and 139 asymptomatic) with intermediate carotid artery stenosis were enrolled in this study. Symptomatic and asymptomatic patients were compared in regard to MPV and PDW. Mean platelet volume was significantly greater in the symptomatic group compared with the asymptomatic group (11.1 and 9.4 fL, respectively; P < .001). Platelet distribution width was significantly greater in the symptomatic group compared with the asymptomatic group (15.0% and 11.9%, respectively; P < .001). Multivariate regression analysis showed that an MPV ≥10.2 fL and a PDW ≥14.3% were independent predictors of developing symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. Mean platelet volume and PDW are increased in the presence of symptomatic intermediate carotid artery stenosis. Increased MPV and PDW may be independent predictors of developing symptomatic carotid artery plaque. PMID:26514416

  14. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. Methods The International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS) is a multicentre, international, randomised controlled trial with blinded adjudication of outcomes. Patients with recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive carotid artery stenting or carotid endarterectomy. Randomisation was by telephone call or fax to a central computerised service and was stratified by centre with minimisation for sex, age, contralateral occlusion, and side of the randomised artery. Patients and investigators were not masked to treatment assignment. Patients were followed up by independent clinicians not directly involved in delivering the randomised treatment. The primary outcome measure of the trial is the 3-year rate of fatal or disabling stroke in any territory, which has not been analysed yet. The main outcome measure for the interim safety analysis was the 120-day rate of stroke, death, or procedural myocardial infarction. Analysis was by intention to treat (ITT). This study is registered, number ISRCTN25337470. Findings The trial enrolled 1713 patients (stenting group, n=855; endarterectomy group, n=858). Two patients in the stenting group and one in the endarterectomy group withdrew immediately after randomisation, and were not included in the ITT analysis. Between randomisation and 120 days, there were 34 (Kaplan-Meier estimate 4·0%) events of disabling stroke or death in the stenting group compared with 27 (3·2%) events in the endarterectomy group (hazard ratio [HR] 1·28, 95% CI 0·77–2·11). The incidence of stroke, death, or procedural myocardial infarction was 8·5% in the stenting group compared with 5·2% in the endarterectomy group (72 vs 44 events

  15. The 10-year Trend of Periprocedural Complication Following Carotid Artery Stenting; Single Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Jeong-Ho; Kang, Jihoon; Yeo, Min-Ju; Kim, Beom Joon; Jang, Min Uk; Bae, Hee-Joon; Kwon, O-Ki; Hwang, Gyo Jun; Oh, Chang Wan; Jung, Cheolkyu; Lee, Ji Sung; Han, Moon-Ku

    2015-04-15

    PurposeCarotid endarterectomy and stenting are used to treat carotid stenosis, with the volume of carotid artery procedures increasing over the past decade. We investigated the 10-year trend of periprocedural complications with an increasing procedure volume of carotid stenting at a single tertiary hospital.MethodsWe collected 416 consecutive cases (384 patients) of carotid artery stenting performed for either symptomatic (231 cases, 55.5 %) or asymptomatic (185 cases, 44.5 %) internal carotid artery stenosis at a single center. Periprocedural complication was defined as any stroke, myocardial infarction, or death. Procedure-related outcome included any dissection, hemodynamic event, or periprocedural complication.ResultsThe mean age was 68.8 years (82.8 % males; range of 20–89 years); 23.9 % were older than 75 years. Before the procedure, 99.3 and 56.0 % of patients received antiplatelet and lipid-lowering medication, respectively. The overall periprocedural complication rate was 3.6 % (1.6 and 5.2 % in the asymptomatic and symptomatic group, respectively). The composite outcome of any stroke or death was 3.4 %. Periprocedural complication and procedure-related outcome showed a decremental trend with increasing procedure volume, and this trend remained after adjusting for confounders.ConclusionsOur study suggests that carotid stenting at an experienced center might reduce the periprocedural complications. Our periprocedural complication rate of carotid artery stenting may be comparable to, or somewhat lower than, that reported in other clinical trials.

  16. Treatment of acute cervical internal carotid artery dissection using the Solitaire FR revascularization device.

    PubMed

    To, Chiu Yuen; Badr, Yaser; Richards, Boyd

    2012-01-01

    During treatment of a right internal carotid artery terminus aneurysm, an acute iatrogenic flow limiting dissection was caused in the cervical internal carotid. The true lumen was catheterized using a Mirage 0.008 microwire over an Excelsior SL-10 microcatheter, which was exchanged for a Marksman microcatheter. A 6 mm×30 mm Solitaire FR revascularization device was then deployed across the dissection as a salvage technique. PMID:23257942

  17. Treatment of acute cervical internal carotid artery dissection using the Solitaire FR revascularization device.

    PubMed

    To, Chiu Yuen; Badr, Yaser; Richards, Boyd

    2013-11-01

    During treatment of a right internal carotid artery terminus aneurysm, an acute iatrogenic flow limiting dissection was caused in the cervical internal carotid. The true lumen was catheterized using a Mirage 0.008 microwire over an Excelsior SL-10 microcatheter, which was exchanged for a Marksman microcatheter. A 6 mm × 30 mm Solitaire FR revascularization device was then deployed across the dissection as a salvage technique. PMID:23299103

  18. Fatal Intraventricular Hemorrhage After the Extracranial Carotid Artery Angioplasty and Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Krajickova, Dagmar Krajina, Antonin; Nova, Marketa; Raupach, Jan

    2005-05-15

    We report on a 72-year-old female with an unusual intracranial bleeding complication after an extracranial carotid artery stenting procedure performed for a tight left ICA stenosis associated with contralateral carotid occlusion. Two hours after the procedure, the initial signs of intracranial bleeding appeared that led to the patient's demise 5 days later. A brain CT showed and autopsy proved massive intraventricular bleeding. To our knowledge, our case is only the second report of isolated reperfusion intraventricular hemorrhage post-CAS.

  19. Pipeline endovascular reconstruction of traumatic dissecting aneurysms of the intracranial internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vikram; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Jindal, Gaurav

    2014-12-01

    A 22-year-old woman was involved in a motor vehicle collision resulting in multiple facial fractures and extensive internal carotid artery (ICA) injury including a right carotid-cavernous fistula, complex dissection flap and dissecting aneurysms. Endovascular coil embolization was initially performed to treat the cavernous carotid fistula and then again on two separate occasions to treat expanding dissecting aneurysms. Parent vessel reconstruction of the right ICA was subsequently performed with the Pipeline embolization device, resulting in complete anatomical restoration of this vessel. PMID:24353328

  20. Mechanical and metallurgical properties of carotid artery clamps.

    PubMed

    Dujovny, M; Kossovsky, N; Kossowsky, R; Segal, R; Diaz, F G; Kaufman, H; Perlin, A; Cook, E E

    1985-11-01

    The mechanical and metallurgical properties of carotid artery clamps were evaluated. The pressure plate retreat propensity, metallurgical composition, surface morphology, magnetic properties, and corrosion resistance of the Crutchfield, Selverstone, Salibi, and Kindt clamps were tested. None of the clamps showed evidence of pressure plate retreat. The clamps differed significantly in their composition, surface cleanliness, magnetic properties, and corrosion resistance. The Crutchfield clamp was the only one manufactured from an ASTM-ANSI-approved implantable stainless steel (AISI 316) and the only clamp in which the surfaces were clean and free of debris. The Selverstone clamp was made principally from AISI 304 stainless steel, as was one Salibi clamp. The pressure plate on another Salibi clamp was made from a 1% chromium and 1% manganese steel. Machining and surface debris consisting principally of aluminum, silicon, and sulfur was abundant on the Selverstone and Salibi clamps. The Kindt clamp was manufactured from AISI 301 stainless steel with a silicate-aluminized outer coating. The Crutchfield and Selverstone clamps were essentially nonferromagnetic, whereas the Salibi and Kindt clamps were sensitive to magnetic flux. In the pitting potential corrosion test, the Crutchfield clamp demonstrated good corrosion resistance with a pitting potential of 310 mV and no surface corrosion or pitting by scanning electron microscopy examination. The Selverstone clamp had lower pitting potentials and showed various degrees of corrosion and surface pitting by scanning electron microscopy. The Salibi pressure plate had a very low pitting potential of -525 mV and showed severe corrosion. By metallurgical criteria, only the Crutchfield clamp is suitable for long term implantation. PMID:4069328

  1. Prevalence of carotid artery stenosis in neurologically asymptomatic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting for coronary artery disease: Role of anesthesiologist in preoperative assessment and intraoperative management

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Sameer; Chauhan, Sandeep; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Jagia, Priya; Bisoi, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): This study aimed to determine the prevalence of carotid artery stenosis (CAS) due to atherosclerosis in neurologically asymptomatic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for coronary artery disease (CAD). It contemplated a greater role for the cardiac anesthesiologist in the perioperative management of such patients with either previously undiagnosed carotid artery disease or towards re-assessment of severity of CAS. Design: Prospective, observational clinical study. Setting: Operation room of a cardiac surgery centre of a tertiary teaching hospital. Participants: A hundred adult patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification I to III presenting electively for CABG. Interventions: All patients included in this study were subjected to ultrasonic examination by means of acarotid doppler scan to access for presence of CAS just prior to induction of general anesthesia. Measurements and Main Results: Based on parameters measured using carotid doppler, the presence of CAS was defined using standard criteria. The prevalence of CAS was found to be as high as 38% amongst the patients included in our study. The risk factors for CAS were identified to be advanced age, history of smoking, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia and presence of a carotid bruit. Conclusion: This study points towards the relatively wide prevalence of carotid artery disease in neurologically asymptomatic patients undergoing CABG for CAD in the elective setting. It highlights the need to routinely incorporate carotid ultrasonography in the armamentarium of the cardiac anesthesiologist as standard of care for all patients presenting for CABG. PMID:26750678

  2. Resolution of Internal Carotid Arterial Thrombus by the Thrombolytic Action of Dabigatran: A first case report.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hisanao; Hoshino, Masashi; Shimizu, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been reported to cause resolution of intracardiac thrombus, but there have been no reported cases of internal carotid arterial thrombus resolution.We report a case of a 76-year-old man in whom an internal carotid arterial thrombus resolved after administration of the NOAC dabigatran at a dose of 110 mg twice daily.This is the first reported case of carotid arterial thrombus resolution after oral intake of NOAC (direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors), to the best of our knowledge.We conclude that this case had major clinical significance because it might represent one of the multiple effects of NOACs. PMID:27057852

  3. [Immediate improvement of ischemic oculopathy after stenting for internal carotid artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Arai, Naoyuki; Sasahara, Atsushi; Hagiwara, Shinji; Tani, Shigeru; Ohbuchi, Hidenori; Hirota, Kengo; Koseki, Hirokazu; Kuroi, Yasuhiro; Ohkuma, Hiroko; Matsubara, Masao; Hayashi, Morito; Iwabuchi, Satoshi; Kasuya, Hidetoshi

    2014-12-01

    Ocular ischemic syndrome occurs when ocular circulation becomes impaired owing to various causes, leading to disturbances in the visual function. It ultimately progresses to neovascular glaucoma and loss of sight. Therefore, the early diagnosis and treatment of patients with ocular ischemic syndrome has a major effect on their visual prognosis. Herein, we describe a patient who complained of decreased vision in one eye. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with internal carotid artery stenosis because of neovascularity (rubeosis iridis) around the iris in the anterior eye. The vision of the patient improved immediately after carotid artery stenting. A review of the literature indicated that the visual improvement could be attributed to the reversal of retrograde blood flow, caused by internal carotid artery stenosis, to normal levels; the resolution of rubeosis in the anterior eye; and improvement in the visual field constriction. PMID:25475037

  4. Pseudoaneurysm of the Internal Carotid Artery: Treatment with a Covered Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Scavee, Vincent; Wispelaere, Jean-Francois de; Mormont, Eric; Coulier, Bruno; Trigaux, Jean-Paul; Schoevaerdts, Jean-Claude

    2001-07-15

    Dissection of the cervical segment of the internal carotid artery may occur spontaneously or after trauma. We report the management of a 53-year-old right-handed man with progressive dizziness and neck pain 6 weeks after a motor vehicle collision. The clinical and neurologic examinations were normal. The CT scan led to the diagnosis of a pseudoaneurysm of the right internal carotid artery near the skull base. We successfully treated this post-traumatic lesion with a covered stent. The patient underwent the endovascular procedure under general anesthesia and transcranial Doppler monitoring. No neurologic event was observed. Obliteration of the pseudoaneurysm with preservation of the carotid artery was achieved. The patient was discharged from the hospital 72 hr later with no complications. Clinical and imaging follow-up at 6 months was unremarkable.

  5. Extracranial Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysms: Report of a Ruptured Case and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Siablis, Dimitrios Karnabatidis, Dimitrios; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Mastronikolis, Nikos; Zabakis, Peter; Kraniotis, Pantelis

    2004-08-15

    Aneurysms of the extracranial carotid arteries (ECAA) are extremely rare. Schechter et al. documented 835 cases in the literature up to 1977. One hundred and sixteen cases of ECAA have been documented in the Chinese literature since 1981, suggesting a higher prevalence of carotid aneurysmal disease in China than in the West. Four percent of all peripheral artery aneurysms are reported to be ECAA. Those arising from the internal carotid artery (EICAA) are even more rare. Two recent reviews reported 24 and 25 cases of EICAA during 21 and 17 years, respectively, the majority of them is treated surgically. Our literature review revealed only a few true EICAA managed endovascularly, but none of them with a covered stent. We describe a rare such case of ruptured atherosclerotic EICAA which was treated percutaneously.

  6. PET evaluation of cerebral blood flow reactivity in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, H.M.; Brass, L.; Rich, D.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to use acetazolamide (AZ) enhanced O-15 water PET to evaluate cerebral perfusion reserve in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. We hypothesized that impaired vasoreactivity would be associated with symptomatic disease and a higher likelihood of future ischemic events. Twenty-two patients with significant (>75%) carotid artery occlusion underwent cerebral blood flow imaging at baseline and following AZ infusion. Paired O-15 data sets were coregistered and globally normalized. Regions of interest were drawn on baseline blood flow images and superimposed upon (AZ - baseline) difference images to derive a % change in regional blood flow after AZ administration. The results showed a significant difference in cerebral perfusion reserve between symptomatic (n=19) and asymptomatic (n=3) carotid artery disease.

  7. Traumatic thrombosis of internal carotid artery sustained by transfer of kinetic energy.

    PubMed

    Kalcioglu, Mahmut Tayyar; Celbis, Osman; Mizrak, Bulent; Firat, Yezdan; Selimoglu, Erol

    2012-06-01

    A 31-year-old male patient with a fatal thrombosis of the internal carotid artery caused by gun shot injury was presented in this case report. The patient was referred to the hospital with a diffuse edema on his left cheek. On otolaryngologic examination, there was a bullet entrance hole at the left mandibular corpus. No exit hole could be found. The finding from his axial computed tomography of neck and paranasal sinuses was normal. On neurological examination, a dense right hemiparesis was observed. In his cerebral angiogram, left common carotid artery was totally obliterated. Diffuse ischemia was observed in the left cerebral hemisphere. Despite intensive interventions, the patient died 4 days after the accident. In the autopsy, a large thrombosis was obtained in the left common carotid artery. This case emphasizes a fatal kinetic energy effect in vascular structures. It is stressed that a gun shot injury could be fatal with its indirect kinetic energy effects at subacute phase. PMID:22543522

  8. The use of fibrin and gelatin fixation to repair a kinked internal carotid artery in carotid endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Hisashi; Sanada, Yasuhiro; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Kato, Amami

    2016-01-01

    Background: The kinking of the internal carotid artery (ICA) after final closure in carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is thought to be uncommon. When it occurs, it is mandatory to reconstruct ICA to preserve normal blood flow. We herein present a case in which a fixation technique was applied to repair an ICA that became kinked during CEA. Case Description: A 68-year-old man presented with cerebral infarction due to an artery-to-artery embolism from the right cervical ICA stenosis. CEA was performed 12 days after admission. After final closure, a distal portion of ICA was found to have been kinked following plaque resection in CEA procedure. Fixation with fibrin glue and gelatin was used to reinforce the arterial wall and repair the kink. Postoperative magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated the release of the kink in ICA. Conclusion: Fixation with fibrin and gelatin is a salvage armamentarium that can be considered in CEA for the repair of kinked or tortuous ICA. PMID:27308092

  9. Carotid thin fluttering bands: A new element of arterial wall remodelling? An ultrasound study.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Luca; Sole, Andrea; Tamburino, Corrado; Di Pino, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    Carotid artery ultrasound is a non-invasive and reproducible technique used for early atherosclerotic assessment. Intimal flap has been described in the presence of dissection or mobile plaque rupture, however presence of carotid thin fluttering bands (TFBs) have not been described yet. To investigate frequency, characteristics and impact of TFBs in carotid lumen of patients who underwent carotid ultrasound scan (CUS). 3341 patients were admitted from January 2009 to January 2014. Patients with history of cerebral ischemia (CI) were excluded. In the cases in which TFBs were observed, a 3-months clinical and CUS follow-up (FU) was performed. TFBs were found in 71 patients (2.1%). The mean age was 63.41 ± 11.20 years (range 42-89). All patients showed a mean increase in intima-media thickness. We identified two subgroups: in 22 patients the TFB was related to a carotid plaque while in 49 no carotid plaque was found. TFB mostly originated in the carotid bulb (88.7%) and was similarly located in carotid arteries (49.3% left-side and 50.7% right-side). CUS and clinical FU were available for all patients (mean duration 25.34 months, median 19). CI occurred in none of the patients. TFB disappeared in 13 patients (18.3%) with no sign or symptoms of CI. In 3 of 49 patients without carotid plaque (6.1%), progressive thickening beneath TFB was observed. TFB is a rare finding. Longer FU is needed to evaluate its prognosis. To date, the pathophysiology is unknown, however it could be related to vascular remodeling. PMID:26179862

  10. [Spontaneous dissection of the internal carotid artery: description of a case with lower cranial nerve palsy].

    PubMed

    Macarini, Luca; Zeppa, Pio; Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Scialpi, Michele; Raucci, Antonio

    2012-11-01

    Spontaneous dissection of the extracranial internal carotid artery is a well recognized cause of headache and juvenile stroke; lower cranial nerve palsy as a complication of dissection is rare. We report the case of a female patient with bilateral dissecting aneurysm of the internal carotid artery, associated with unilateral cranial nerve XII palsy and oculosympathetic palsy. Neuroradiological findings, in particular those obtained by Magnetic Resonance imaging, allow the identification of the dissecting pathology and the correlation of the aneurysmal formation with nerve palsy. PMID:23096747