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Sample records for extra dimension due

  1. Introduction to Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2010-04-29

    Extra dimensions provide a very useful tool in addressing a number of the fundamental problems faced by the Standard Model. The following provides a very basic introduction to this very broad subject area as given at the VIII School of the Gravitational and Mathematical Physics Division of the Mexican Physical Society in December 2009. Some prospects for extra dimensional searches at the 7 TeV LHC with {approx}1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity are provided.

  2. Extra Dimensions and ``Branes''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundrum, Raman

    2011-04-01

    We do not yet know the nature of fundamental physics above the weak scale, but we are about to probe it this decade. It may come in the form of a few new weakly-coupled particles, captured by ordinary Feynman diagrams in standard spacetime, or alternatively in the form of large ``towers'' of new elementary or composite states, requiring a different set of concepts and analytic tools. Extra spatial dimensions provide the simplest, but very rich, class of such possibilities. I will explain how extra-dimensions can provide an elegant and intuitive geometrization of subtle physics, in particular flowing from the powerful AdS/CFT correspondence. This geometrization allows one to ``view'' central issues ranging from electroweak, grand unified, strongly-coupled, flavor, supersymmetry, or collider physics, in terms of the overlap of extra-dimensional wavefunctions, the curvature (``warping'') of the higher dimensional spacetime, and ``branes'' (3-dimensional defects). I will illustrate the kind of physics and experimental signals that flow from the most plausible extra-dimensional scenarios.

  3. Phenomenology of Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.; /SLAC

    2006-11-07

    If the structure of spacetime is different than that readily observed, gravitational physics, particle physics and cosmology are all immediately affected. The physics of extra dimensions offers new insights and solutions to fundamental questions arising in these fields. Novel ideas and frameworks are continuously born and evolved. They make use of string theoretical features and tools and they may reveal if and how the 11-dimensional string theory is relevant to our four-dimensional world. We have outlined some of the experimental observations in particle and gravitational physics as well as astrophysical and cosmological considerations that can constrain or confirm these scenarios. These developing ideas and the wide interdisciplinary experimental program that is charted out to investigate them mark a renewed effort to describe the dynamics behind spacetime. We look forward to the discovery of a higher dimensional spacetime.

  4. Scientific Visualization of Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Don V.

    2010-10-01

    In the 21st Century, many theoretical physicists claim that higher dimensions may indeed exist. Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, & Dvali (ADD) and Randall-Sundrum (RS), in addition to Kaluza-Klein (KK) and M-string theorists, have introduced reasonable explanations for the existence of heretofore ``invisible'' higher dimensions. Whether or not these extra dimensions actually exist is irrelevant to their contributions to the visionary conceptualization associated with novel and improved mathematical and physical analysis. Envisioning extra dimensions beyond the three of common experience is a daunting challenge for three dimensional observers. Intuition relies on experience gained in a three dimensional environment. Gaining experience with virtual four dimensional objects and virtual three manifolds in four-space on a personal computer may provide the basis for an intuitive grasp of four dimensions. This presentation is a video ``outtake'' of the author's research into ``Visualizing Extra Spatial Dimensions'' at the University of California at Irvine.

  5. Extra Dimensions of Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-01-01

    They say that there is no such thing as a stupid question. In a pedagogically pure sense, that's probably true. But some questions do seem to flirt dangerously close to being really quite ridiculous. One such question might well be, "How many dimensions of space are there?" I mean, it's pretty obvious that there are three:…

  6. Big Mysteries: Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-06-10

    The weakness of gravity compared to the other subatomic forces is a real mystery. While nobody knows the answer, one credible solution is that gravity has access to more spatial dimensions than the other three known forces. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln describes this idea, with the help of some very urbane characters.

  7. Big Mysteries: Extra Dimensions

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07

    The weakness of gravity compared to the other subatomic forces is a real mystery. While nobody knows the answer, one credible solution is that gravity has access to more spatial dimensions than the other three known forces. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln describes this idea, with the help of some very urbane characters.

  8. Collider searches for extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberg, Greg; /Brown U.

    2004-12-01

    Searches for extra spatial dimensions remain among the most popular new directions in our quest for physics beyond the Standard Model. High-energy collider experiments of the current decade should be able to find an ultimate answer to the question of their existence in a variety of models. Until the start of the LHC in a few years, the Tevatron will remain the key player in this quest. In this paper, we review the most recent results from the Tevatron on searches for large, TeV{sup -1}-size, and Randall-Sundrum extra spatial dimensions, which have reached a new level of sensitivity and currently probe the parameter space beyond the existing constraints. While no evidence for the existence of extra dimensions has been found so far, an exciting discovery might be just steps away.

  9. Physics of Extra Dimensions Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Csaba Csaki

    2007-12-19

    We provide the final report for Csaba Csaki's OJI project on "Physics of extra dimensions". It includes the summary of results of higgsless electroweak symmetry breaking, gauge-higgs unification, AdS/QCD and holographic technicolor, and chiral lattice theories from warped extra dimensions.

  10. Searching for extra-dimensions at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benucci, Leonardo

    2009-06-01

    A possible solution to the hierarchy problem is the presence of extra space dimensions beyond the three ones which are known from our everyday experience. The phenomenological ADD model of large extra-dimensions predicts a ETmiss +jet signature. Randall-Sundrum-type extra-dimensions predict di-lepton and di-jet resonances. This contribution addresses an overview of experimental issues and discovery potential for these new particles at the LHC, focusing on perspectives with the CMS detector during early data taking.

  11. Johannes Kepler and Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, Archibald W.

    2004-02-01

    How many dimensions are there? The answer used to be four — three spatial and one time dimension. Maybe it still is, though nowadays we hear that the answer may be more, perhaps many more. Many of our students have heard about this on television or read about it. They want to know more. Why do physicists think we need more than three spatial dimensions? What's the point of it all?

  12. Editorial: Focus on Extra Space Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Pomarol, Alex

    2010-07-01

    Experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have just started. In addition to verifying the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics, these experiments will probe a new energy frontier and test extensions of the SM. The existence of extra dimensions is one of the most attractive possibilities for physics beyond the SM. This focus issue contains a collection of articles addressing both theoretical and phenomenological aspects of extra-dimensional models. Focus on Extra Space Dimensions Contents Minimal universal extra dimensions in CalcHEP/CompHEP AseshKrishna Datta, Kyoungchul Kong and Konstantin T Matchev Disordered extra dimensions Karim Benakli Codimension-2 brane-bulk matching: examples from six and ten dimensions Allan Bayntun, C P Burgess and Leo van Nierop Gauge threshold corrections in warped geometry Kiwoon Choi, Ian-Woo Kim and Chang Sub Shin Holographic methods and gauge-Higgs unification in flat extra dimensions Marco Serone Soft-wall stabilization Joan A Cabrer, Gero von Gersdorff and Mariano Quirós Warped five-dimensional models: phenomenological status and experimental prospects Hooman Davoudiasl, Shrihari Gopalakrishna, Eduardo Pontón and José Santiago

  13. Supersymmetric unification requires extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Fallbacher, Maximilian; Ratz, Michael

    2013-05-23

    We discuss settings that predict precision gauge unification in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. We show that, if one requires anomaly freedom and fermion masses while demanding that unification is not an accident, only R symmetries can forbid the supersymmetric Higgs mass term {mu}. We then review the proof that R symmetries are not available in conventional grand unified theories (GUTs) and argue that this prevents natural solutions to the doublet-triplet splitting problem in four dimensions. On the other hand, higher-dimensional GUTs do not suffer from this problem. We briefly comment on an explicit string-derived model in which the {mu} and dimension five proton decay problems are solved by an order four discrete R symmetry, and comment on the higher-dimensional origin of this symmetry.

  14. CERN LHC signals from warped extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Belyaev, Alexander; Krupovnickas, Tadas; Perez, Gilad; Virzi, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    We study production of Kaluza-Klein (KK) gluons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the framework of a warped extra dimension with the standard model fields propagating in the bulk. We show that the detection of the KK gluon is challenging since its production is suppressed by small couplings to the proton’s constituents. Moreover, the KK gluon decays mostly to top pairs due to an enhanced coupling and hence is broad. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that for MKKG≲4TeV, 100fb-1 of data at the LHC can provide discovery of the KK gluon. We utilize a sizable left-right polarization asymmetry from the KK gluon resonance to maximize the signal significance, and we explore the novel feature of extremely highly energetic “top-jets.” We briefly discuss how the detection of electroweak gauge KK states (Z/W) faces a similar challenge since their leptonic decays (golden modes) are suppressed. Our analysis suggests that other frameworks, for example, little Higgs, which rely on UV completion via strong dynamics might face similar challenges, namely, (1) suppressed production rates for the new particles (such as Z'), due to their “light-fermion-phobic” nature, and (2) difficulties in detection since the new particles are broad and decay predominantly to third generation quarks and longitudinal gauge bosons.

  15. LHC Signals from Warped Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, K.; Belyaev, A.; Krupovnickas, T.; Perez, G.; Virzi, J.

    2006-12-06

    We study production of Kaluza-Klein gluons (KKG) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the framework of a warped extra dimension with the Standard Model (SM) fields propagating in the bulk. We show that the detection of KK gluon is challenging since its production is suppressed by small couplings to the proton's constituents. Moreover, the KK gluon decaysmostly to top pairs due to an enhanced coupling and hence is broad. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that for MKKG<~;; 4 TeV, 100 fb-1 of data at the LHC can provide discovery of the KK gluon. We utilize a sizeable left-right polarization asymmetry from the KK gluon resonance to maximize the signal significance, and we explore the novel feature of extremely highly energetic"top-jets." We briefly discuss how the detection of electroweak gauge KK states (Z/W) faces a similar challenge since their leptonic decays ("golden" modes) are suppressed. Our analysis suggests that other frameworks, for example little Higgs, which rely on UV completion via strong dynamics might face similar challenges, namely (1) Suppressed production rates for the new particles (such as Z'), due to their"lightfermion-phobic" nature, and (2) Difficulties in detection since the new particles are broad and decay predominantly to third generation quarks and longitudinal gauge bosons.

  16. Brane modeling in warped extra-dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Aqeel; Grzadkowski, Bohdan

    2013-01-01

    Five-dimensional scenarios with infinitesimally thin branes replaced by appropriate configurations of a scalar field were considered. A possibility of periodic extra dimension was discussed in the presence on non-minimal scalar-gravity coupling and a generalized Gibbons-Kallosh-Linde sum rule was found. In order to avoid constraints imposed by periodicity, a non-compact spacial extra dimension was introduced. A five dimensional model with warped geometry and two thin branes mimicked by a scalar profile was constructed and discussed. In the thin brane limit the model corresponds to a set-up with two positive-tension branes. The presence of two branes allows to address the issue of the hierarchy problem which could be solved by the standard warping of the four dimensional metric provided the Higgs field is properly localized. Stability of the background solution was discussed and verified in the presence of the most general perturbations of the metric and the scalar field.

  17. Dimensional reduction without continuous extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Chamseddine, Ali H.; Froehlich, J.; Schubnel, B.; Wyler, D.

    2013-01-15

    We describe a novel approach to dimensional reduction in classical field theory. Inspired by ideas from noncommutative geometry, we introduce extended algebras of differential forms over space-time, generalized exterior derivatives, and generalized connections associated with the 'geometry' of space-times with discrete extra dimensions. We apply our formalism to theories of gauge- and gravitational fields and find natural geometrical origins for an axion- and a dilaton field, as well as a Higgs field.

  18. Signals for Extra Dimensions at CLIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2001-08-28

    A brief overview is presented of the signatures for several different models with extra dimensions at CLIC, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider with a center of mass energy of 3-5 TeV and an integrated luminosity of order 1 ab{sup -1}. In all cases the search reach for the resulting new physic signatures is found to be in the range of {approx} 15-80 TeV.

  19. Kinks, extra dimensions, and gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Gregory, Ruth

    2011-03-01

    We investigate in detail the gravitational wave signal from kinks on cosmic (super)strings, including the kinematical effects from the internal extra dimensions. We find that the signal is suppressed, however, the effect is less significant that that for cusps. Combined with the greater incidence of kinks on (super)strings, it is likely that the kink signal offers the better chance for detection of cosmic (super)strings.

  20. One universal extra dimension in PYTHIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElKacimi, M.; Goujdami, D.; Przysiezniak, H.; Skands, P.

    2010-01-01

    The Universal Extra Dimensions model has been implemented in the PYTHIA generator from version 6.4.18 onwards, in its minimal formulation with one TeV -1-sized extra dimension. The additional possibility of gravity-mediated decays, through a variable number of eV -1-sized extra dimensions into which only gravity extends, is also available. The implementation covers the lowest lying Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations of Standard Model particles, except for the excitations of the Higgs fields, with the mass spectrum calculated at one loop. 2→2 tree-level production cross sections and unpolarized KK number conserving 2-body decays are included. Mixing between iso-doublet and -singlet KK excitations is neglected thus far, and is expected to be negligible for all but the top sector. New version summaryProgram title: PYTHIA Version number: 6.420 Catalogue identifier: ACTU_v2_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ACTU_v2_1.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 79 362 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 590 900 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: CERN lxplus and any other machine with a Fortran 77 compiler Operating system: Linux Red Hat RAM: about 800 K words Word size: 32 bits Classification: 11.2 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ACTU_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 135 (2001) 238 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: At high energy collisions between elementary particles, physics beyond the Standard Model is searched for. Many models are being investigated, namely extra-dimensional models. Solution method: The Universal Extra Dimension model is implemented in the PYTHIA event generator. Reasons for new version

  1. Large Extra Dimension and Dark Matter Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Bo; Starkman, Glenn D.; Silk, Joseph

    2008-01-03

    If our space has the large extra dimensions as proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali (ADD), then gravity would start to deviate from Newtonian gravity and be greatly enhanced in sub-millimeter scales. Here we show that in the ADD scenario, gravity could play an important role (compared to the weak interaction) in the interactions between dark matter particles and the electron. We find that for typical WIMP dark matter, such dark matter-electron 'gravitational' scattering cross section may be much larger than the dark matter-nucleon cross section constrained by current dark matter experiments.

  2. Large Extra Dimension and Dark Matter Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Bo; Starkman, Glenn D.; Silk, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    If our space has the large extra dimensions as proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali (ADD), then gravity would start to deviate from Newtonian gravity and be greatly enhanced in sub-millimeter scales. Here we show that in the ADD scenario, gravity could play an important role (compared to the weak interaction) in the interactions between dark matter particles and the electron. We find that for typical WIMP dark matter, such dark matter-electron ``gravitational'' scattering cross section may be much larger than the dark matter-nucleon cross section constrained by current dark matter experiments.

  3. Lepton flavor violation in extra dimension models

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, W.-F.; Ng, John N.

    2005-03-01

    Models involving large extra spatial dimension(s) have interesting predictions on lepton flavor violating processes. We consider some five-dimensional (5D) models which are related to neutrino mass generation or address the fermion masses hierarchy problem. We study the signatures in low energy experiments that can discriminate the different models. The focus is on muon-electron conversion in nuclei {mu}{yields}e{gamma} and {mu}{yields}3e processes and their {tau} counterparts. Their links with the active neutrino mass matrix are investigated. We show that in the models we discussed the branching ratio of {mu}{yields}e{gamma} like rare process is much smaller than the ones of {mu}{yields}3e like processes. This is in sharp contrast to most of the traditional wisdom based on four-dimensional (4D) gauge models. Moreover, some rare tau decays are more promising than the rare muon decays.

  4. KK parity in warped extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Falkowski, Adam; Low, Ian; Servant, Géraldine

    2008-04-01

    We construct models with a Kaluza-Klein (KK) parity in a five-dimensional warped geometry, in an attempt to address the little hierarchy problem present in setups with bulk Standard Model fields. The lightest KK particle (LKP) is stable and can play the role of dark matter. We consider the possibilities of gluing two identical slices of AdS5 in either the UV (IR-UV-IR model) or the IR region (UV-IR-UV model) and discuss the model-building issues as well as phenomenological properties in both cases. In particular, we find that the UV-IR-UV model is not gravitationally stable and that additional mechanisms might be required in the IR-UV-IR model to address flavor issues. Collider signals of the warped KK parity are different from either the conventional warped extra dimension without KK parity, in which the new particles are not necessarily pair-produced, or the KK parity in flat universal extra dimensions, where each KK level is nearly degenerate in mass. Dark matter and collider properties of a TeV mass KK Z gauge boson as the LKP are discussed.

  5. Dark energy, inflation, and extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhardt, Paul J.; Wesley, Daniel

    2009-05-15

    We consider how accelerated expansion, whether due to inflation or dark energy, imposes strong constraints on fundamental theories obtained by compactification from higher dimensions. For theories that obey the null energy condition (NEC), we find that inflationary cosmology is impossible for a wide range of compactifications; and a dark energy phase consistent with observations is only possible if both Newton's gravitational constant and the dark energy equation of state vary with time. If the theory violates the NEC, inflation and dark energy are only possible if the NEC-violating elements are inhomogeneously distributed in the compact dimensions and vary with time in precise synchrony with the matter and energy density in the noncompact dimensions. Although our proofs are derived assuming general relativity applies in both four and higher dimensions and certain forms of metrics, we argue that similar constraints must apply for more general compactifications.

  6. Diphoton resonance from a warped extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Martin; Hörner, Clara; Neubert, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    We argue that extensions of the Standard Model (SM) with a warped extra dimension, which successfully address the hierarchy and flavor problems of elementary particle physics, can provide an elegant explanation of the 750 GeV diphoton excess recently reported by ATLAS and CMS. A gauge-singlet bulk scalar with {O} (1) couplings to fermions is identified as the new resonance S, and the vector-like Kaluza-Klein excitations of the SM quarks and leptons mediate its loop-induced couplings to photons and gluons. The electroweak gauge symmetry almost unambiguously dictates the bulk matter content and hence the hierarchies of the Sto γ γ, W W,ZZ,Zγ, toverline{t} and dijet decay rates. We find that the S → Zγ decay mode is strongly suppressed, such that Br( S → Zγ) /Br( S → γγ) < 0 .1. The hierarchy problem for the new scalar boson is solved in analogy with the Higgs boson by localizing it near the infrared brane. The infinite sums over the Kaluza-Klein towers of fermion states converge and can be calculated in closed form with a remarkably simple result. Reproducing the observed pp → S → γγ signal requires Kaluza-Klein masses in the multi-TeV range, consistent with bounds from flavor physics and electroweak precision observables.

  7. BOOK REVIEW: Black Holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions Black Holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Valeri P.

    2013-10-01

    The book Black holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions written by Kirill A Bronnikov and Sergey G Rubin has been published recently by World Scientific Publishing Company. The authors are well known experts in gravity and cosmology. The book is a monograph, a considerable part of which is based on the original work of the authors. Their original point of view on some of the problems makes the book quite interesting, covering a variety of important topics of the modern theory of gravity, astrophysics and cosmology. It consists of 11 chapters which are organized in three parts. The book starts with an introduction, where the authors briefly discuss the main ideas of General Relativity, giving some historical remarks on its development and application to cosmology, and mentioning some more recent subjects such as brane worlds, f(R)-theories and gravity in higher dimensions. Part I of the book is called 'Gravity'. Chapters two and three are devoted to the Einstein equations and their spherical symmetric black hole solutions. This material is quite standard and can be found in practically any book on General Relativity. A brief summary of the Kerr metric and black hole thermodynamics are given in chapter four. The main part of this chapter is devoted to spherically symmetric black holes in non-Einstein gravity (with scalar and phantom fields), black holes with regular interior, and black holes in brane worlds. Chapters five and six are mainly dedicated to wormholes and the problem of their stability. Part II (Cosmology) starts with discussion of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker and de Sitter solutions of the Einstein equations and their properties. It follows by describing a `big picture' of the modern cosmology (inflation, post-inflationary reheating, the radiation-dominated and matter-dominated states, and modern stage of the (secondary) inflation). The authors explain how the inflation models allow one to solve many of the long-standing problems of cosmology, such as

  8. Lorentz Violation in Warped Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-11

    Higher dimensional theories which address some of the problematic issues of the Standard Model(SM) naturally involve some form of D = 4 + n-dimensional Lorentz invariance violation (LIV). In such models the fundamental physics which leads to, e.g., field localization, orbifolding, the existence of brane terms and the compactification process all can introduce LIV in the higher dimensional theory while still preserving 4-d Lorentz invariance. In this paper, attempting to capture some of this physics, we extend our previous analysis of LIV in 5-d UED-type models to those with 5- d warped extra dimensions. To be specific, we employ the 5-d analog of the SM Extension of Kostelecky et al. which incorporates a complete set of operators arising from spontaneous LIV. We show that while the response of the bulk scalar, fermion and gauge fields to the addition of LIV operators in warped models is qualitatively similar to what happens in the flat 5-d UED case, the gravity sector of these models reacts very differently than in flat space. Specifically, we show that LIV in this warped case leads to a non-zero bulk mass for the 5-d graviton and so the would-be zero mode, which we identify as the usual 4-d graviton, must necessarily become massive. The origin of this mass term is the simultaneous existence of the constant non-zero AdS{sub 5} curvature and the loss of general co-ordinate invariance via LIV in the 5-d theory. Thus warped 5-d models with LIV in the gravity sector are not phenomenologically viable.

  9. BOOK REVIEW: Black Holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions Black Holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Valeri P.

    2013-10-01

    The book Black holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions written by Kirill A Bronnikov and Sergey G Rubin has been published recently by World Scientific Publishing Company. The authors are well known experts in gravity and cosmology. The book is a monograph, a considerable part of which is based on the original work of the authors. Their original point of view on some of the problems makes the book quite interesting, covering a variety of important topics of the modern theory of gravity, astrophysics and cosmology. It consists of 11 chapters which are organized in three parts. The book starts with an introduction, where the authors briefly discuss the main ideas of General Relativity, giving some historical remarks on its development and application to cosmology, and mentioning some more recent subjects such as brane worlds, f(R)-theories and gravity in higher dimensions. Part I of the book is called 'Gravity'. Chapters two and three are devoted to the Einstein equations and their spherical symmetric black hole solutions. This material is quite standard and can be found in practically any book on General Relativity. A brief summary of the Kerr metric and black hole thermodynamics are given in chapter four. The main part of this chapter is devoted to spherically symmetric black holes in non-Einstein gravity (with scalar and phantom fields), black holes with regular interior, and black holes in brane worlds. Chapters five and six are mainly dedicated to wormholes and the problem of their stability. Part II (Cosmology) starts with discussion of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker and de Sitter solutions of the Einstein equations and their properties. It follows by describing a `big picture' of the modern cosmology (inflation, post-inflationary reheating, the radiation-dominated and matter-dominated states, and modern stage of the (secondary) inflation). The authors explain how the inflation models allow one to solve many of the long-standing problems of cosmology, such as

  10. Zero point energy on extra dimensions: Noncommutative torus

    SciTech Connect

    Fabi, S.; Harms, B.; Karatheodoris, G.

    2007-09-15

    In this paper we calculate the zero point energy density experienced by observers on M{sup 4} due to a massless scalar field defined throughout M{sup 4}xT{sub F}{sup 2}, where T{sub F}{sup 2} are fuzzy extra dimensions. Using the Green's function approach we calculate the energy density for the commutative torus and the fuzzy torus. We also calculate the energy density for the fuzzy torus using the Hamiltonian approach. Agreement is shown between the Green's function and Hamiltonian approaches.

  11. Search for large extra dimensions in dielectron and diphoton production.

    PubMed

    Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Abramov, V; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Alves, G A; Amos, N; Anderson, E W; Baarmand, M M; Babintsev, V V; Babukhadia, L; Baden, A; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Bantly, J; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bean, A; Begel, M; Belyaev, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bertram, I; Besson, A; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Bhattacharjee, M; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Boehnlein, A; Bojko, N I; Borcherding, F; Brandt, A; Breedon, R; Briskin, G; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burtovoi, V S; Butler, J M; Canelli, F; Carvalho, W; Casey, D; Casilum, Z; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chekulaev, S V; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Chopra, S; Christenson, J H; Chung, M; Claes, D; Clark, A R; Cochran, J; Coney, L; Connolly, B; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Cummings, M A; Cutts, D; Dahl, O I; Davis, G A; Davis, K; De, K; Del Signore, K; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Di Loreto, G; Doulas, S; Draper, P; Ducros, Y; Dudko, L V; Duensing, S; Dugad, S R; Dyshkant, A; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Engelmann, R; Eno, S; Eppley, G; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fahland, T; Feher, S; Fein, D; Ferbel, T; Fisk, H E; Fisyak, Y; Flattum, E; Fleuret, F; Fortner, M; Frame, K C; Fuess, S; Gallas, E; Galyaev, A N; Gartung, P; Gavrilov, V; Genik, R J; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gibbard, B; Gilmartin, R; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Gómez, G; Goncharov, P I; González Solís, J L; Gordon, H; Goss, L T; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Graf, N; Graham, G; Grannis, P D; Green, J A; Greenlee, H; Grinstein, S; Groer, L; Grudberg, P; Grünendahl, S; Gupta, A; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hadley, N J; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Hahn, K S; Hall, R E; Hanlet, P; Hansen, S; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Heuring, T; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoftun, J S; Hou, S; Huang, Y; Ito, A S; Jerger, S A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jones, M; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Karmgard, D; Kehoe, R; Kim, S K; Klima, B; Klopfenstein, C; Knuteson, B; Ko, W; Kohli, J M; Kostritskiy, A V; Kotcher, J; Kotwal, A V; Kozelov, A V; Kozlovsky, E A; Krane, J; Krishnaswamy, M R; Krzywdzinski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kuznetsov, V E; Landsberg, G; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipton, R; Lucotte, A; Lueking, L; Lundstedt, C; Maciel, A K; Madaras, R J; Manankov, V; Mao, H S; Marshall, T; Martin, M I; Martin, R D; Mauritz, K M; May, B; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McDonald, J; McMahon, T; Melanson, H L; Meng, X C; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Miao, C; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mincer, A; Mishra, C S; Mokhov, N; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Mostafa, M; da Motta, H; Nagy, E; Nang, F; Narain, M; Narasimham, V S; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Negroni, S; Norman, D; Oesch, L; Oguri, V; Olivier, B; Oshima, N; Padley, P; Pan, L J; Para, A; Parashar, N; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Paterno, M; Patwa, A; Pawlik, B; Perkins, J; Peters, M; Peters, O; Piegaia, R; Piekarz, H; Pope, B G; Popkov, E; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quintas, P Z; Raja, R; Rajagopalan, S; Ramberg, E; Rapidis, P A; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rha, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Rockwell, T; Roco, M; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rutherfoord, J; Santoro, A; Sawyer, L; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schwartzman, A; Sculli, J; Sen, N; Shabalina, E; Shankar, H C; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Shupe, M; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Singh, H; Singh, J B; Sirotenko, V; Slattery, P; Smith, E; Smith, R P; Snihur, R; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Solomon, J; Sorín, V; Sosebee, M; Sotnikova, N; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Stanton, N R; Steinbrück, G; Stephens, R W; Stevenson, M L; Stichelbaut, F; Stoker, D; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Streets, K; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sznajder, A; Taylor, W; Tentindo-Repond, S; Thompson, J; Toback, D; Tripathi, S M; Trippe, T G; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; van Gemmeren, P; Vaniev, V; Van Kooten, R; Varelas, N; Volkov, A A; Vorobiev, A P; Wahl, H D; Wang, H; Wang, Z; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weerts, H; White, A; White, J T; Whiteson, D; Wightman, J A; Wijngaarden, D A; Willis, S; Wimpenny, S J; Wirjawan, J V; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Yamada, R; Yamin, P; Yasuda, T; Yip, K; Youssef, S; Yu, J; Yu, Z; Zanabria, M; Zheng, H; Zhou, Z; Zhu, Z H; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2001-02-12

    We report a search for effects of large extra spatial dimensions in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV with the D0 detector, using events containing a pair of electrons or photons. The data are in good agreement with the expected background and do not exhibit evidence for large extra dimensions. We set the most restrictive lower limits to date, at the 95% C.L. on the effective Planck scale between 1.0 and 1.4 TeV for several formalisms and numbers of extra dimensions. PMID:11178033

  12. Cosmological constraints on theories with large extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Smith, David

    1999-04-23

    In theories with large extra dimensions, constraints from cosmology lead to non-trivial lower bounds on the gravitational scale M, corresponding to upper bounds on the radii of the compact extra dimensions. These constraints are especially relevant to the case of two extra dimensions, since only if M is 10 TeV or less do deviations from the standard gravitational force law become evident at distances accessible to planned sub-mm gravity experiments. By examining the graviton decay contribution to the cosmic diffuse gamma radiation, we derive, for the case of two extra dimensions, a conservative bound M > 110TeV, corresponding to r{sub 2} < 5.1 x 10{sup -5} mm, well beyond the reach of these experiments. We also consider the constraint coming from graviton overclosure of the universe and derive an independent bound M > 6.5/{radical}h TeV, or r{sub 2} < .015hmm.

  13. B-Factory Signals for a Warped Extra Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Perez, Gilad; Soni, Amarjit

    2004-11-01

    We study predictions for B physics in a class of warped extra dimension models recently introduced, where few (˜3) TeV Kaluza-Klein masses are consistent with electroweak data due to custodial symmetry. As in the standard model (SM), flavor violations arise due to the heavy top quark leading to striking signals: (i)New physics contributions to ΔF=2 transitions are comparable to the SM, so the success of the SM unitarity triangle fit is a “coincidence.” Thus, clean extractions of unitarity angles are likely to be affected, in addition to O(1) deviation from the SM prediction in Bs mixing. (ii)O(1) deviation from various SM predictions for B→Xsl+l-. (iii)Large mixing-induced CP asymmetry in radiative B decays. Also, the neutron electric dipole moment is roughly 20 times larger than the current bound so that this framework has a “CP problem.”

  14. Flavor Structure of Warped Extra Dimension Models

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Perez, Gilad; Soni, Amarjit

    2004-08-10

    We recently showed, in hep-ph/0406101, that warped extra dimensional models with bulk custodial symmetry and few TeV KK masses lead to striking signals at B-factories. In this paper, using a spurion analysis, we systematically study the flavor structure of models that belong to the above class. In particular we find that the profiles of the zero modes, which are similar in all these models, essentially control the underlying flavor structure. This implies that our results are robust and model independent in this class of models. We discuss in detail the origin of the signals in B-physics. We also briefly study other NP signatures that arise in rare K decays (K {yields} {pi}{nu}{nu}), in rare top decays [t {yields} c{gamma}(Z, gluon)] and the possibility of CP asymmetries in D{sup 0} decays to CP eigenstates such as K{sub s}{pi}{sup 0} and others. Finally we demonstrate that with light KK masses, {approx} 3 TeV, the above class of models with anarchic 5D Yukawas has a ''CP problem'' since contributions to the neutron electric dipole moment are roughly 20 times larger than the current experimental bound. Using AdS/CFT correspondence, these extra-dimensional models are dual to a purely 4D strongly coupled conformal Higgs sector thus enhancing their appeal.

  15. Flavor structure of warped extra dimension models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Perez, Gilad; Soni, Amarjit

    2005-01-01

    We recently showed that warped extra-dimensional models with bulk custodial symmetry and few TeV Kaluza-Klein (KK) masses lead to striking signals at B factories. In this paper, using a spurion analysis, we systematically study the flavor structure of models that belong to the above class. In particular we find that the profiles of the zero modes, which are similar in all these models, essentially control the underlying flavor structure. This implies that our results are robust and model independent in this class of models. We discuss in detail the origin of the signals in B physics. We also briefly study other new physics signatures that arise in rare K decays (K→πνν), in rare top decays [t→cγ(Z,gluon)], and the possibility of CP asymmetries in D0 decays to CP eigenstates such as KSπ0 and others. Finally we demonstrate that with light KK masses, ˜3 TeV, the above class of models with anarchic 5D Yukawas has a “CP problem” since contributions to the neutron electric dipole moment are roughly 20 times larger than the current experimental bound. Using AdS/CFT correspondence, these extra-dimensional models are dual to a purely 4D strongly coupled conformal Higgs sector thus enhancing their appeal.

  16. Effect of Extra Dimensions on Gravitational Waves from Cosmic Strings

    SciTech Connect

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Chadburn, Sarah; Geshnizjani, Ghazal; Gregory, Ruth; Zavala, Ivonne

    2010-08-20

    We show how the motion of cosmic superstrings in extra dimensions can modify the gravitational wave signal from cusps. Additional dimensions both round off cusps, as well as reducing the probability of their formation, and thus give a significant dimension dependent damping of the gravitational waves. We look at the implication of this effect for LIGO and LISA, as well as commenting on more general frequency bands.

  17. Effect of extra dimensions on gravitational waves from cosmic strings.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Chadburn, Sarah; Geshnizjani, Ghazal; Gregory, Ruth; Zavala, Ivonne

    2010-08-20

    We show how the motion of cosmic superstrings in extra dimensions can modify the gravitational wave signal from cusps. Additional dimensions both round off cusps, as well as reducing the probability of their formation, and thus give a significant dimension dependent damping of the gravitational waves. We look at the implication of this effect for LIGO and LISA, as well as commenting on more general frequency bands. PMID:20868089

  18. On the 5D Extra-Force according to Basini Capozziello Ponce De Leon Formalism and five important features: Kar Sinha Gravitational Bending of Light, Chung Freese Superluminal Behaviour, Maartens Clarkson Black Strings, experimental measures of Extra Dimensions on board International Space Station (ISS) and the existence of the Particle Z due to a higher dimensional spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loup, Fernando

    2006-10-01

    We use the Conformal Metric as described in Kar Sinha work on Gravitational Bending of Light in a 5 D Spacetime to recompute the equations of the 5 D Force in Basini Capozziello Ponce De Leon Formalism and we arrive at a result that possesses some advantages. The equations of the Extra Force as proposed by Ponce De Leon are now more elegant in Conformal Formalism and many algebraic terms can be simplified or even suppressed. Also we recompute the Kar Sinha Gravitational Bending of Light affected by the presence of the Extra Dimension and analyze the Superluminal Chung Freese Features of this Formalism describing the advantages of the Chung Freese BraneWorld when compared to other Superluminal spacetime metrics (e.g. Warp Drive) and we describe why the Extra Dimension is invisible and how the Extra Dimension could be made visible at least in theory. We also examine the Maartens Clarkson Black Holes in 5 D (Black Strings) coupled to massive Kaluza Klein graviton modes predicted by Extra Dimensions theories and we study experimental detection of Extra Dimensions on-board LIGO and LISA Space Telescopes. We also propose the use of International Space Station (ISS) to measure the additional terms (resulting from the presence of Extra Dimensions) in the Kar Sinha Gravitational Bending of Light in Outer Space to verify if we really lives in a Higher Dimensional Spacetime. Also we demonstrate that Particle Z can only exist if the 5 D spacetime exists.

  19. Universal extra dimensions and /b-->sγ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, K.; Deshpande, N. G.; Wu, G.-H.

    2001-08-01

    We analyze the effect of flat universal extra dimensions (i.e., extra dimensions accessible to all SM fields) on the process /b-->sγ. With one Higgs doublet, the dominant contribution at one-loop is from Kaluza-Klein (KK) states of the charged would-be-Goldstone boson (WGB) and of the top quark. The resulting constraint on the size of the extra dimension is comparable to the constraint from /T parameter. In two-Higgs-doublet model II, the contribution of zero-mode and KK states of physical charged Higgs can cancel the contribution from WGB KK states. Therefore, in this model, there is no constraint on the size of the extra dimensions from the process /b-->sγ and also the constraint on the mass of the charged Higgs from this process is weakened compared to /4D. In two-Higgs-doublet model I, the contribution of the zero-mode and KK states of physical charged Higgs and that of the KK states of WGB are of the same sign. Thus, in this model and for small /tanβ, the constraint on the size of the extra dimensions is stronger than in one-Higgs-doublet model and also the constraint on the mass of the charged Higgs is stronger than in /4D.

  20. Higher Curvature Gravity in TeV-Scale Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2006-03-31

    We begin a general exploration of the phenomenology of TeV-scale extra-dimensional models with gravitational actions that contain higher curvature terms. In particular, we examine how the classic collider signatures of the models of Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali (missing energy and new dimension-8 contact interactions) and of Randall and Sundrum (TeV-scale graviton Kaluza-Klein resonances) are altered by these modifications to the usual Einstein-Hilbert action. We find that not only are the detailed signatures for these gravitationally induced processes altered but new contributions are found to arise due to the existence of additional scalar Kaluza-Klein states in the spectrum.

  1. Remarks on Models with Singlet Neutrino in Large Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh

    2002-03-01

    In this talk, we discuss two non-minimal models with singlet neutrino in large extra dimensions: (1) singlet neutrino in a sub-space of the bulk and (2) Dirac mass for singlet with lepton number violating Yukawa couplings. The motivation is to obtain the mass scale relevant for atmospheric neutrino oscillations with a quantum gravity scale M* ~ a few TeV and with at most O(1) higher-dimensional couplings. In both non-minimal models, such a low M* can be consistent with the limit on BR(μ → eγ) (unlike in the minimal model). We also show that in this scenario, with 2 Higgs doublets, the decay of charged Higgs into left-handed τ can be significantly enhanced, with O(1) branching ratio, due to the large number of Kaluza-Klein states of the right-handed neutrino.

  2. Minimum length, extra dimensions, modified gravity and black hole remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziashvili, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We construct a Hilbert space representation of minimum-length deformed uncertainty relation in presence of extra dimensions. Following this construction, we study corrections to the gravitational potential (back reaction on gravity) with the use of correspondingly modified propagator in presence of two (spatial) extra dimensions. Interestingly enough, for r→0 the gravitational force approaches zero and the horizon for modified Schwarzschild-Tangherlini space-time disappears when the mass approaches quantum-gravity energy scale. This result points out to the existence of zero-temperature black hole remnants in ADD brane-world model.

  3. What does SN1987A say about extra dimensions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerahanumak, Satheeshkumar

    2010-02-01

    There has been a tremendous progress in the last decade in our efforts to confront the String-inspired ideas with experiments or observations. There are two approaches to this problem. One is to use the LHC data and other is to use astronomical data. Among the latter, using SN1987A data for placing the constraints on the models of extra dimensions is very popular. In this poster, we consider all the possible energy loss mechanisms of SN1987A and study the constraints they place on the number and size of extra dimensions and the higher dimensional Planck scale in the ADD scenario. )

  4. Search for Universal Extra Dimensions with the D0 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, Jason D.

    2011-10-01

    A search for signs of universal extra dimensions (UED) has been performed with the D0 experiment, using events with two same-sign muons. The considered minimal UED model includes one extra dimension, and has a stable lightest Kaluza-Klein particle (LKP) which is a dark matter candidate. In the search, 7.3 fb{sup -1} of D0 data, collected in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, have been used.

  5. Extra dimensions: 3D in PDF documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Norman A.

    2011-01-11

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. Furthermore, we demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.

  6. Extra dimensions: 3D in PDF documentation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Graf, Norman A.

    2011-01-11

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universalmore » 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. Furthermore, we demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.« less

  7. Extra Dimensions: 3D in PDF Documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Norman A.

    2012-12-01

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) and the ISO PRC file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. Until recently, Adobe's Acrobat software was also capable of incorporating 3D content into PDF files from a variety of 3D file formats, including proprietary CAD formats. However, this functionality is no longer available in Acrobat X, having been spun off to a separate company. Incorporating 3D content now requires the additional purchase of a separate plug-in. In this talk we present alternatives based on open source libraries which allow the programmatic creation of 3D content in PDF format. While not providing the same level of access to CAD files as the commercial software, it does provide physicists with an alternative path to incorporate 3D content into PDF files from such disparate applications as detector geometries from Geant4, 3D data sets, mathematical surfaces or tesselated volumes.

  8. Is the Higgs boson a sign of extra dimensions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Hiroto; Takenaga, Kazunori

    2013-07-01

    We introduce a four-dimensional cutoff in the scenario of gauge-Higgs unification to control the ultraviolet behavior. A one-loop effective potential for a Higgs field and the Higgs mass are obtained with the cutoff. We find an interrelation between the four-dimensional cutoff and the scale of extra dimensions, which is concretized through the Higgs mass. Combining this interrelation and the recently discovered Higgs boson at the LHC, we obtain an interesting constraint for the four-dimensional cutoff and the extra-dimensional scale.

  9. B-factory signals for a warped extra dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Perez, Gilad; Soni, Amarjit

    2004-08-24

    We study predictions for B-physics in a class of models, recently introduced, with a non-supersymmetric warped extra dimension. In these models few ({approx} 3) TeV Kaluza-Klein masses are consistent with electroweak data due to bulk custodial symmetry. Furthermore, there is an analog of GIM mechanism which is violated by the heavy top quark (just as in SM) leading to striking signals at B-factories: (1) New Physics (NP) contributions to {Delta}F = 2 transitions are comparable to SM. This implies that, within this NP framework, the success of the SM unitarity triangle fit is a ''coincidence''. Thus, clean extractions of unitarity angles via e.g. B {yields} {pi}{pi}, {rho}{pi}, {rho}{rho}, DK are likely to be affected, in addition to O(1) deviation from SM prediction in Bs mixing. (2) O(1) deviation from SM predictions for B {yields} X{sub s}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} in rate as well as in forward-backward and direct CP asymmetry. (3) Large mixing-induced CP asymmetry in radiative B decays, wherein the SM unambiguously predicts very small asymmetries. Also, with KK masses 3 TeV or less, and with anarchic Yukawa masses, contributions to electric dipole moments of the neutron are roughly 20 times larger than the current experimental bound so that this framework has a ''CP problem''.

  10. B-Factory Signals for a Warped Extra Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh

    2005-04-01

    I will discuss flavor physics in a warped (curved) extra dimension. In this model, the profiles of fermions in the extra dimension explain hierarchies in fermion masses. Moreover, there is an analog of GIM mechanism with first and second generations resulting in suppressed contributions to flavor changing neutral currents. Just as in the SM, the GIM mechanism is violated by inclusion of the heavy top quark, in turn, leading to striking signals at B-factories such as O(1) effects in semileptonic and radiative B decays and Bsmixing. Remarkably, this model can be interpreted as dual to a 4D composite Higgs model. Thus, the upshot is that a 4D strongly interacting Higgs sector can solve flavor puzzle with suppressed flavor-violation and be tested at B factories.

  11. Detecting extra dimensions by Hydrogen-like atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan-Ping, Zhou; Peng, Zhou; Hao-Xue, Qiao

    2015-01-01

    We reconsider the idea in spectroscopy of detecting extra dimensions by regarding the nucleus as a homogeneous sphere. In our results, it turns out that the gravitational potential inside the nucleus is much stronger than the potential induced by a particle in the same regime in ref. [16], and thus a more significant correction of the ground state energy of hydrogen-like atoms is obtained, which can be used to determine the existence of ADD's extra dimensions. In order to get a larger order of magnitude for the correction, it is better to apply our theory to high-Z atoms or muonic atoms, where the volume of the nucleus can't be ignored and the relativistic effect is important. Our work is based on the Dirac equation in aweak gravity field, and the result is more precise.

  12. Charged seven-dimensional spacetimes with spherically symmetric extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    De Felice, Antonio; Ringeval, Christophe

    2009-06-15

    We derive exact solutions of the seven-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell equations for a spacetime exhibiting Poincare invariance along four dimensions and spherical symmetry in the extra dimensions. Such topology generically arises in the context of braneworld models. Our solutions generalize previous results on Ricci-flat spacetimes admitting the two-sphere and are shown to include wormhole configurations. A regular coordinate system suitable to describe the whole spacetime is singled out, and we discuss the physical relevance of the derived solutions.

  13. Applying EFT to Higgs pair production in universal extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelhäuser, Lisa; Knochel, Alexander; Steeger, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    We investigate single Higgs and Higgs pair production at the LHC in models of Universal Extra Dimensions. After calculating the relevant cross sections, we use the UED model as a testing ground for the Effective Field Theory approach to physics beyond the Standard Model. We show how the UED contributions to Higgs production can be matched to a dimension-6 operator. We then discuss the range of validity of this approach, in particular for Higgs pair production, and determine the sensitivity to the number of KK modes in the loop.

  14. Extra Dimensions in Photon or Jet plus Missing Transverse Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cardaci, Marco

    2010-02-10

    Recent studies of the CMS collaboration are presented on the sensitivity to searches for large (ADD) extra dimensions in channels with missing transverse energy (MET), i.e. the channels jets plus MET and photon plus MET. These studies are based on detailed detector simulation, including all Standard Model backgrounds. Particular emphasis is given to possible early discoveries, i.e. with 100 pb{sup -1} or less. Projected 95% CL exclusion limits as function of luminosity are presented as well.

  15. Extra Dimensions in Photon or Jet plus Missing Transverse Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardaci, Marco

    2010-02-01

    Recent studies of the CMS collaboration are presented on the sensitivity to searches for large (ADD) extra dimensions in channels with missing transverse energy (MET), i.e. the channels jets plus MET and photon plus MET. These studies are based on detailed detector simulation, including all Standard Model backgrounds. Particular emphasis is given to possible early discoveries, i.e. with 100 pb-1 or less. Projected 95% CL exclusion limits as function of luminosity are presented as well.

  16. Survival of scalar zero modes in warped extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    George, Damien P.

    2011-05-15

    Models with an extra dimension generally contain background scalar fields in a nontrivial configuration, whose stability must be ensured. With gravity present, the extra dimension is warped by the scalars, and the spin-0 degrees of freedom in the metric mix with the scalar perturbations. Where possible, we formally solve the coupled Schroedinger equations for the zero modes of these spin-0 perturbations. When specializing to the case of two scalars with a potential generated by a superpotential, we are able to fully solve the system. We show how these zero modes can be used to construct a solution matrix, whose eigenvalues tell whether a normalizable zero mode exists, and how many negative mass modes exist. These facts are crucial in determining stability of the corresponding background configuration. We provide examples of the general analysis for domain-wall models of an infinite extra dimension and domain-wall soft-wall models. For five-dimensional models with two scalars constructed using a superpotential, we show that a normalizable zero mode survives, even in the presence of warped gravity. Such models, which are widely used in the literature, are therefore phenomenologically unacceptable.

  17. A modified holographic dark energy model with infrared infinite extra dimension(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yungui; Li, Tianjun

    2010-01-01

    We propose a modified holographic dark energy (MHDE) model with the Hubble scale as the infrared (IR) cutoff. Introducing the infinite extra dimension(s) at very large distance scale, we consider the black hole mass in higher dimensions as the ultraviolet cutoff. Thus, we can probe the effects of the IR infinite extra dimension(s). As a concrete example, we consider the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP) model and its generalization. We find that the DGP model is dual to the MHDE model in five dimensions, and the ΛCDM model is dual to the MHDE model in six dimensions. Fitting the MHDE model to the observational data, we obtain that Ωm0=0.269-0.027+0.030, Ωk0=0.003-0.012+0.011, and the number of the spatial dimensions is N=4.78-0.44+0.68. The best fit value of N implies that there might exist two IR infinite extra dimensions.

  18. Helical cosmological magnetic fields from extra-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmjeet, Kumar; Seshadri, T. R.; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2015-05-01

    We study the inflationary generation of helical cosmological magnetic fields in a higher-dimensional generalization of the electromagnetic theory. For this purpose, we also include a parity breaking piece to the electromagnetic action. The evolution of an extra-dimensional scale factor allows the breaking of conformal invariance of the effective electromagnetic action in 1 +3 dimensions required for such generation. Analytical solutions for the vector potential can be obtained in terms of Coulomb wave-functions for some special cases. We also present numerical solutions for the vector potential evolution in more general cases. In the presence of a higher-dimensional cosmological constant there exist solutions for the scale factors in which both normal and extra dimensional space either inflate or deflate simultaneously with the same rate. In such a scenario, with the number of extra dimensions D =4 , a scale invariant spectrum of helical magnetic field is obtained. The net helicity arises, as one helical mode comes to dominate over the other at the superhorizon scales. A magnetic field strength of the order of 10-9 G can be obtained for the inflationary scale H ≃1 0-3 Mpl . Weaker fields will be generated for lower scales of inflation. Magnetic fields generated in this model respects the bounds on magnetic fields by Planck and γ -ray observations (i.e., 10-16 G

  19. Extra dimensions and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gozdz, Marek; Kaminski, Wieslaw A.; Faessler, Amand

    2005-05-01

    The neutrinoless double beta decay is one of the few phenomena, belonging to the nonstandard physics, which is extensively being sought for in experiments. In the present paper the link between the half-life of the neutrinoless double beta decay and theories with large extra dimensions is explored. The use of the sensitivities of currently planned 0{nu}2{beta} experiments: DAMA, CANDLES, COBRA, DCBA, CAMEO, GENIUS, GEM, MAJORANA, MOON, CUORE, EXO, and XMASS, gives the possibility for a nondirect 'experimental' verification of various extra dimensional scenarios. We discuss also the results of the Heidelberg-Moscow Collaboration. The calculations are based on the Majorana neutrino mass generation mechanism in the Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Dvali model.

  20. Search for universal extra dimensions in pp collisions.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Aoki, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atkins, S; Atramentov, O; Augsten, K; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-Guerra, G A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goryachev, V N; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jamin, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kulikov, S; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mansour, J; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padilla, M; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Salcido, P; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tschann-Grimm, K; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2012-03-30

    We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb(-1), collected by the D0 detector at a pp center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R(-1)>260 GeV in a minimal UED model. PMID:22540694

  1. Radion stabilization from the vacuum on flat extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Eli; Perez-Lorenzana, A.; Pimentel, Luis O.

    2008-01-15

    Volume stabilization in models with flat extra dimensions could follow from vacuum energy residing in the bulk when translational invariance is spontaneously broken. We study a simple toy model that exemplifies this mechanism which considers a massive scalar field with nontrivial boundary conditions at the end points of the compact space, and includes contributions from brane and bulk cosmological constants. We perform our analysis in the conformal frame where the radion field, associated with volume variations, is defined, and present a general strategy for building stabilization potentials out of those ingredients. We also provide working examples for the interval and the T{sup n}/Z{sub 2} orbifold configuration.

  2. Search for universal extra dimensions in ppbar collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Aoki, Masato; Askew, Andrew Warren; /Florida State U. /Stockholm U.

    2011-12-01

    We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at a p{bar p} center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R{sup -1} > 260 GeV in a minimal UED model.

  3. Detecting Extra Dimension by Helium-Like Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Xiao; Zhang, Xin-Hui; Duan, Yi-Shi

    Considering that gravitational force might deviate from Newton's inverse-square law and become much stronger in small scale, we present a method to detect the possible existence of extra dimensions in the ADD model. By making use of an effective variational wave function, we obtain the nonrelativistic ground energy of a helium atom and its isoelectronic sequence. Based on these results, we calculate gravity correction of the ADD model. Our calculation may provide a rough estimation about the magnitude of the corresponding frequencies which could be measured in later experiments.

  4. Inert scalar dark matter in an extra dimension inspired model

    SciTech Connect

    Lineros, R.A.; Santos, F.A. Pereira dos E-mail: fabio.alex@fis.puc-rio.br

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we analyze a dark matter model inspired by theories with extra dimensions. The dark matter candidate corresponds to the first Kaluza–Klein mode of an real scalar added to the Standard Model. The tower of new particles enriches the calculation of the relic abundance. For large mass splitting, the model converges to the predictions of the inert singlet dark matter model. For nearly degenerate mass spectrum, coannihilations increase the cross-sections used for direct and indirect dark matter searches. Moreover, the Kaluza–Klein zero mode can mix with the SM higgs and further constraints can be applied.

  5. Remarks on models with singlet neutrino in large extra dimensions*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, K.; Wu, G.-H.

    2001-01-01

    Small Dirac masses for neutrinos are natural in models with singlet fermions in large extra dimensions with quantum gravity scale M*~1-100 TeV. We study two modifications of the minimal model in order to obtain the mass scale relevant for atmospheric neutrino oscillations with at most /O(1) higher-dimensional Yukawa couplings and with M*~ a few TeV. (1) In models with singlet fermions in smaller number of extra dimensions than gravity, we find that the effects on BR/(μ-->eγ) and on charged-current universality in π--->eν¯,μν¯ decays are suppressed as compared to that in the minimal model with neutrino and gravity in the same space. (2) If small Dirac masses for the singlets are added along with lepton number violating couplings, then the mass scales and mixing angles for neutrino oscillations can be different from those relevant for /μ-->eγ and π--->eν¯,μν¯. Thus, in both modified models the constraints on M* from BR/(μ-->eγ) and π--->eν¯,μν¯ decays can be significantly relaxed. Furthermore, constraints from supernova /1987a strongly disfavor oscillations of active neutrinos to sterile neutrinos in both the minimal and the modified models.

  6. Constraining extra space dimensions using precision molecular spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gato-Rivera, Beatriz

    2015-07-01

    Highly accurate measurements of quantum level energies in molecular systems provide a test ground for new physics, as such effects could manifest themselves as minute shifts in the quantum level structures of atoms and molecules. For the lightest molecular systems, neutral molecular hydrogen (H2, HD and D2) and the molecular hydrogen ions (H+2, HD+ and D+2), weak force effects are several orders weaker than current experimental and theoretical results, while contributions of Newtonian gravity and the strong force at the characteristic molecular distance scale of 1 Å can be safely neglected. Comparisons between experiment and QED calculations for these molecular systems can be interpreted in terms of probing large extra space dimensions, under which gravity could become much stronger than in ordinary 3-D space. Under this assumption, using the spectra of H2 we have derived constraints on the compactification scales for extra dimensions within the Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Dvali (ADD) framework, and constraints on the brane separation and bulk curvature within the Randall-Sundrum (RS-I and RS-II) frameworks.

  7. Supersymmetric large extra dimensions and the cosmological constant: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, C. P.

    2004-10-01

    This article critically reviews the proposal for addressing the cosmological constant problem within the framework of supersymmetric large extra dimensions (SLED), as recently proposed in hep-th/0304256. After a brief restatement of the cosmological constant problem, a short summary of the proposed mechanism is given. The emphasis is on the perspective of the low-energy effective theory in order to see how it addresses the problem of why low-energy particles like the electron do not contribute too large a vacuum energy. This is followed by a discussion of the main objections, which are grouped into the following five topics: (1) Weinberg's No-Go Theorem. (2) Are hidden tunings of the theory required, and are these stable under renormalization? (3) Why should the mechanism apply only now and not rule out possible earlier epochs of inflationary dynamics? (4) How big are quantum effects, and which are the most dangerous? and (5) Even if successful, can the mechanism be consistent with cosmological or current observational constraints? It is argued that there are plausible reasons why the mechanism can thread the potential objections, but that a definitive proof that it does depends on addressing well-defined technical points. These points include identifying what fixes the size of the extra dimensions, checking how topological obstructions renormalize and performing specific calculations of quantum corrections. More detailed studies of these issues, which are well within reach of our present understanding of extra-dimensional theories, are currently underway. As such, the jury remains out concerning the proposal, although the prospects for acquittal still seem good. (An abridged version of this article appears in the proceedings of SUSY 2003.)

  8. Extra dimensions, black holes and fireballs at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taliotis, Anastasios

    2013-05-01

    The collision of two gravitationally interacting, ultra-relativistic, extended sources is being examined. This investigation classifies the transverse distributions that are collided for fixed collision energy, according to whether one or two (a small and a large) apparent horizons may or may not be formed in a flat background in 4 dimensions. The study extends to the thermodynamical properties of the objects that are created, which exhibit a universal behavior in their entropy, and, suggests the elimination of the possibility in observing black holes (BHs) at the LHC in the absence of extra dimensions. On the other hand, including extra dimensions, and assuming that the matter is localized (dense) enough in those directions, opens new avenues in creating BHs at energies of the order of TeV. The investigation is carried further to AdS 5 backgrounds and makes connections with the implications for the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation in heavy ion collisions. In particular, classes of the geometries found suggest that a BH is formed if and only if the (central collision) energy is sufficiently large compared to the transverse scale of the corresponding gauge theory side stress-tensor. This implies that when the scattering in the gravity description is mapped onto a heavy ion collision problem yields a result, which is in accordance with the current intuition and data: QGP is formed only at high enough energies compared to ΛQCD, even for central processes. Incorporating weak coupling physics and in particular the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) model, a satisfactory fitting with the RHIC and the LHC data for multiplicities may be established.

  9. Universal extra dimension: Violation of Kaluza-Klein parity

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacherjee, Biplob

    2009-01-01

    The minimal universal extra dimension (mUED) model respects the Kaluza-Klein (KK) parity (-1){sup n}, where n is the KK number. However, it is possible to have interactions located at only one of the two fixed points of the S{sub 1}/Z{sub 2} orbifold. Such asymmetric interactions violate the KK parity. This kills the cold dark matter component of UED but also removes the upper bound on the inverse compactification radius, and thus nonobservation of the KK excitations even at the Large Hadron Collider does not necessarily invalidate the model. Apart from the decay of the lightest n=1 KK excitation, this leads to collider signals which are markedly different from those in the mUED scenario. The phenomenological consequences of such KK-parity violating terms are explored.

  10. ISLES: Probing Extra Dimensions Using a Superconducting Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Ho Jung; Moody, M. Vol; Prieto-Gortcheva, Violeta A.

    2003-01-01

    In string theories, extra dimensions must be compactified. The possibility that gravity can have large radii of compactification leads to a violation of the inverse square law at submillimeter distances. The objective of ISLES is to perform a null test of Newton s law in space with a resolution of one part in 10(exp 5) or better at 100 microns. The experiment will be cooled to less than or equal to 2 K, which permits superconducting magnetic levitation of the test masses. To minimize Newtonian errors, ISLES employs a near null source, a circular disk of large diameter-to-thickness ratio. Two test masses, also disk-shaped, are suspended on the two sides of the source mass at a nominal distance of 100 microns. The signal is detected by a superconducting differential accelerometer. A ground test apparatus is under construction.

  11. Signals of Warped Extra Dimensions at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Osland, P.; Pankov, A. A.; Tsytrinov, A. V.; Paver, N.

    2010-12-22

    We discuss the signatures of the spin-2 graviton excitations predicted by the Randall-Sundrum model with one warped extra dimension, in dilepton and diphoton production at LHC. By using a specific angular analysis, we assess the ranges in mass and coupling constant where such gravitons can be discriminated against competitor spin-1 and spin-0 objects, that potentially could manifest themselves in these processes with the same mass and rate of events. Depending on the value of the coupling constant to quarks and leptons, the numerical results indicate graviton identification mass ranges up to 1.1-2.4 TeV and 1.6-3.2 TeV for LHC nominal energy of 14 TeV and time-integrated luminosity of 10 and 100fb{sup -1}, respectively.

  12. Proton lifetime from SU(5) unification in extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alciati, Maria Laura; Feruglio, Ferruccio; Lin, Yin; Varagnolo, Alvise

    2005-03-01

    We provide detailed estimates of the proton lifetime in the context of simple supersymmetric SU(5) grand unified models with an extra compact spatial dimension, described by the orbifold S1/(Z2 × Z2') and by a large compactification scale Mc approx 1014÷1016 GeV. We focus on a class of models where the grand unified symmetry is broken by the compactification mechanism and where baryon violation proceeds mainly through gauge vector boson exchange so that the proton lifetime scales as Mc4. We carefully compute Mc from a next-to-leading analysis of gauge coupling unification and we find that Mc can only be predicted up to an overall factor 10+/-1. The simplest model, where the dominant decay mode is π0e+ and has no flavour suppression, is strongly constrained by existing data, but not totally ruled out. We also analyze models where some of the matter fields are localized in the extra space and proton decay is flavour suppressed. In models associated to anarchy in the neutrino sector the preferred decay channel is K+bar nu and the lifetime can be within the reach of the next generation of experiments.

  13. Relic abundance of dark matter in universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Shigeki; Sato, Joe; Yamanaka, Masato; Senami, Masato

    2009-04-17

    Relic abundance of dark matter is investigated in the framework of universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos. These models are free from the serious Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton problem that the original universal extra dimension model possesses. The first KK particle of the right-handed neutrino is a candidate for dark matter in this framework. When ordinary neutrino masses are large enough such as the degenerate mass spectrum case, the dark matter relic abundance can change significantly. The scale of the extra dimension consistent with cosmological observations can be 500 GeV in the minimal setup of universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos.

  14. Flavor ratios of extragalactic neutrinos and neutrino shortcuts in extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Aeikens, Elke; Päs, Heinrich; Pakvasa, Sandip; Sicking, Philipp

    2015-10-02

    The recent measurement of high energy extragalactic neutrinos by the IceCube Collaboration has opened a new window to probe non-standard neutrino properties. Among other effects, sterile neutrino altered dispersion relations (ADRs) due to shortcuts in an extra dimension can significantly affect astrophysical flavor ratios. We discuss two limiting cases of this effect, first active-sterile neutrino oscillations with a constant ADR potential and second an MSW-like resonant conversion arising from geodesics oscillating around the brane in an asymmetrically warped extra dimension. We demonstrate that the second case has the potential to suppress significantly the flux of specific flavors such as ν{sub μ} or ν{sub τ} at high energies.

  15. Charged Higgs decays in models with singlet neutrino in large extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, K.; Deshpande, N. G.; Wu, G.-H.

    2000-09-01

    In models with large extra dimensions and TeV scale quantum gravity, small (Dirac) neutrino masses can be obtained naturally if the right-handed neutrino propagates in the extra dimensions. In this scenario, with /2 Higgs doublets, we show that the decay of charged Higgs into left-handed charged lepton (say /τ) and right-handed neutrino can be significantly enhanced, with /O(1) branching ratio, due to the large number of Kaluza-Klein states of the right-handed neutrino. Since /τ's from the standard decay of charged Higgs are right-handed, the above novel charged Higgs decay can provide a distinctive signature of these models at hadron/lepton colliders. Similarly, top quark decays to bμ+ν, bτ+ν through virtual charged Higgs can be enhanced.

  16. Photon mass as a probe to extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alencar, G.; Muniz, C. R.; Landim, R. R.; Jardim, I. C.; Costa Filho, R. N.

    2016-08-01

    In this manuscript we show that the geometrical localization mechanism implies a four dimensional mass for the photon. The consistence of the model provides a mass given exactly by mγ =√{ R} / 4 where R is the Ricci scalar. As a consequence, the cosmological photon has a mass related to the vacuum solution of the Einstein equation. At the present age of the universe we have a dS vacuum with R = 4 Λ, where Lambda is a positive cosmological constant. With this we find that mγ ≈ 2 ×10-69 kg, which is below the present experimental upper bounds, and such correction may be observed in the next years with more precise measurements. By considering the value of R inside some astrophysical sources and environments we find that the bound is also satisfied. The experimental verification of this mass, beyond pointing to the existence of extra dimensions, would imply in a fundamental change in cosmology, astrophysics and in particle physics.

  17. Higgs phenomenology in warped extra dimensions with a fourth generation

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Mariana; Korutlu, Beste; Toharia, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    We study a warped extra-dimension scenario where the standard model fields lie in the bulk, with the addition of a fourth family of fermions. We concentrate on the flavor structure of the Higgs couplings with fermions in the flavor anarchy ansatz. Even without a fourth family, these couplings will be generically misaligned with respect to the standard model fermion mass matrices. The presence of the fourth family typically enhances the misalignment effects and we show that one should expect them to be highly nonsymmetrical in the (34) intergenerational mixing. The radiative corrections from the new fermions and their flavor-violating couplings to the Higgs affect negligibly known experimental precision measurements such as the oblique parameters and Z{yields}bb or Z{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. On the other hand, {Delta}F=1, 2 processes, mediated by tree-level Higgs exchange, as well as radiative corrections to b{yields}s{gamma} and {mu}{yields}e{gamma} put some generic pressure on the allowed size of the flavor-violating couplings. But more importantly, these couplings will alter the Higgs decay patterns as well as those of the new fermions, and produce very interesting new signals associated to Higgs phenomenology in high energy colliders. These signals might become very important indirect signals for these type of models as they would be present even when the KK mass scale is high and no heavy KK particle is discovered.

  18. Higgs phenomenology in warped extra dimensions with a fourth generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Mariana; Korutlu, Beste; Toharia, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    We study a warped extra-dimension scenario where the standard model fields lie in the bulk, with the addition of a fourth family of fermions. We concentrate on the flavor structure of the Higgs couplings with fermions in the flavor anarchy ansatz. Even without a fourth family, these couplings will be generically misaligned with respect to the standard model fermion mass matrices. The presence of the fourth family typically enhances the misalignment effects and we show that one should expect them to be highly nonsymmetrical in the (34) intergenerational mixing. The radiative corrections from the new fermions and their flavor-violating couplings to the Higgs affect negligibly known experimental precision measurements such as the oblique parameters and Z→bb¯ or Z→μ+μ-. On the other hand, ΔF=1, 2 processes, mediated by tree-level Higgs exchange, as well as radiative corrections to b→sγ and μ→eγ put some generic pressure on the allowed size of the flavor-violating couplings. But more importantly, these couplings will alter the Higgs decay patterns as well as those of the new fermions, and produce very interesting new signals associated to Higgs phenomenology in high energy colliders. These signals might become very important indirect signals for these type of models as they would be present even when the KK mass scale is high and no heavy KK particle is discovered.

  19. Global Fits of the Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions Scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, Gianfranco; Kong, Kyoungchul; de Austri, Roberto Ruiz; Trotta, Roberto; /Imperial Coll., London

    2012-06-22

    In theories with Universal Extra-Dimensions (UED), the {gamma}{sub 1} particle, first excited state of the hypercharge gauge boson, provides an excellent Dark Matter (DM) candidate. Here we use a modified version of the SuperBayeS code to perform a Bayesian analysis of the minimal UED scenario, in order to assess its detectability at accelerators and with DM experiments. We derive in particular the most probable range of mass and scattering cross sections off nucleons, keeping into account cosmological and electroweak precision constraints. The consequences for the detectability of the {gamma}{sub 1} with direct and indirect experiments are dramatic. The spin-independent cross section probability distribution peaks at {approx} 10{sup -11} pb, i.e. below the sensitivity of ton-scale experiments. The spin-dependent cross-section drives the predicted neutrino flux from the center of the Sun below the reach of present and upcoming experiments. The only strategy that remains open appears to be direct detection with ton-scale experiments sensitive to spin-dependent cross-sections. On the other hand, the LHC with 1 fb{sup -1} of data should be able to probe the current best-fit UED parameters.

  20. Searches for hyperbolic extra dimensions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melbéus, Henrik; Ohlsson, Tommy

    2008-08-01

    We investigate a model of large extra dimensions where the internal space has the geometry of a hyperbolic disc. Compared with the ADD model, this model provides a more satisfactory solution to the hierarchy problem between the electroweak scale and the Planck scale, and it also avoids constraints from astrophysics. In general, a novel feature of this model is that the physical results depend on the position of the brane in the internal space, and in particular, the signal almost disappears completely if the brane is positioned at the center of the disc. Since there is no known analytic form of the Kaluza-Klein spectrum for our choice of geometry, we obtain a spectrum based on a combination of approximations and numerical computations. We study the possible signatures of our model for hadron colliders, especially the LHC, where the most important processes are the production of a graviton together with a hadronic jet or a photon. We find that the signals are similar to those of the ADD model, regarding both qualitative behavior and strength. For the case of hadronic jet production, it is possible to obtain relatively strong signals, while for the case of photon production, this is much more difficult.

  1. Is the proton radius puzzle evidence of extra dimensions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahia, F.; Lemos, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The proton charge radius inferred from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy is not compatible with the previous value given by CODATA-2010, which, on its turn, essentially relies on measurements of the electron-proton interaction. The proton's new size was extracted from the 2S-2P Lamb shift in the muonic hydrogen, which showed an energy excess of 0.3 meV in comparison to the theoretical prediction, evaluated with the CODATA radius. Higher-dimensional gravity is a candidate to explain this discrepancy, since the muon-proton gravitational interaction is stronger than the electron-proton interaction and, in the context of braneworld models, the gravitational potential can be hugely amplified in short distances when compared to the Newtonian potential. Motivated by these ideas, we study a muonic hydrogen confined in a thick brane. We show that the muon-proton gravitational interaction modified by extra dimensions can provide the additional separation of 0.3 meV between the 2S and 2P states. In this scenario, the gravitational energy depends on the higher-dimensional Planck mass and indirectly on the brane thickness. Studying the behavior of the gravitational energy with respect to the brane thickness in a realistic range, we find constraints for the fundamental Planck mass that solve the proton radius puzzle and are consistent with previous experimental bounds.

  2. Gamma ray lines from a universal extra dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, G.; Jackson, C. B.; Shaughnessy, G.; Tait, T. M.P.; Vallinotto, A.

    2012-03-01

    Indirect Dark Matter searches are based on the observation of secondary particles produced by the annihilation or decay of Dark Matter. Among them, gamma-rays are perhaps the most promising messengers, as they do not suffer deflection or absorption on Galactic scales, so their observation would directly reveal the position and the energy spectrum of the emitting source. Here, we study the detailed gamma-ray energy spectrum of Kaluza--Klein Dark Matter in a theory with 5 Universal Extra Dimensions. We focus in particular on the two body annihilation of Dark Matter particles into a photon and another particle, which produces monochromatic photons, resulting in a line in the energy spectrum of gamma rays. Previous calculations in the context of the five dimensional UED model have computed the line signal from annihilations into \\gamma \\gamma, but we extend these results to include \\gamma Z and \\gamma H final states. We find that these spectral lines are subdominant compared to the predicted \\gamma \\gamma signal, but they would be important as follow-up signals in the event of the observation of the \\gamma \\gamma line, in order to distinguish the 5d UED model from other theoretical scenarios.

  3. Detecting extra dimensions with gravity-wave spectroscopy: the black-string brane world.

    PubMed

    Seahra, Sanjeev S; Clarkson, Chris; Maartens, Roy

    2005-04-01

    Using the black string between two branes as a model of a brane-world black hole, we compute the gravity-wave perturbations and identify the features arising from the additional polarizations of the graviton. The standard four-dimensional gravitational wave signal acquires late-time oscillations due to massive modes of the graviton. The Fourier transform of these oscillations shows a series of spikes associated with the masses of the Kaluza-Klein modes, providing in principle a spectroscopic signature of extra dimensions. PMID:15903904

  4. Transient pulses from exploding primordial black holes as a signature of an extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavic, Michael; Simonetti, John H.; Cutchin, Sean E.; Ellingson, Steven W.; Patterson, Cameron D.

    2008-11-01

    An evaporating black hole in the presence of an extra spatial dimension would undergo an explosive phase of evaporation. We show that such an event, involving a primordial black hole, can produce a detectable, distinguishable electromagnetic pulse, signaling the existence of an extra dimension of size L~10-18-10-20 m. We derive a generic relationship between the Lorentz factor of a pulse-producing 'fireball' and the TeV energy scale. For an ordinary toroidally compactified extra dimension, transient radio-pulse searches probe the electroweak energy scale (~0.1 TeV), enabling comparison with the Large Hadron Collider.

  5. On the time-dependent extra spatial dimensions in six dimensional space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Phan Hong; Hai, Do Thi Hong

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze the time-dependent extra spatial dimensions in six dimensional (6D) space-time. The 4-brane is assumed to be a de Sitter space. Based on the form of the brane-world energy-momentum tensor proposed by Shiromizu et al. and the five dimensions by Peter K. F. Kuhfittic, we extended the theory to the 2-codimension embedded in higher dimensions. The inflation scenario in 6D is investigated in two cases of cosmological constant: Ʌ > 0 and Ʌ < 0. The energy of two extra dimensions is calculated too.

  6. Extra dimensions of Space: Are They Going to be Found Soon?

    SciTech Connect

    Rubakov, Valery

    2010-04-27

    Our space may well have more than 3 dimensions. Indeed, theories that pretend to be most fundamental choose to live in higher dimensions: a natural area for superstring/Mtheory is 9- or 10-dimensional space. Extra dimensions have been hidden so far, but they would open up above a certain energy threshold. A fascinating possibility is that this happens within reach of particle colliders. This lecture will address the motivation for such a viewpoint and implications of accessible extra dimensions for our understanding of nature.

  7. Extra Dimensions of Space: Are They Going to be Found Soon?

    ScienceCinema

    Rubakov, Valery [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow, Russia

    2010-09-01

    Our space may well have more than 3 dimensions. Indeed, theories that pretend to be most fundamental choose to live in higher dimensions: a natural area for superstring/Mtheory is 9- or 10-dimensional space. Extra dimensions have been hidden so far, but they would open up above a certain energy threshold. A fascinating possibility is that this happens within reach of particle colliders. This lecture will address the motivation for such a viewpoint and implications of accessible extra dimensions for our understanding of nature.

  8. Extra Dimensions of Space: Are They Going to be Found Soon?

    SciTech Connect

    Rubakov, Valery

    2010-04-27

    Our space may well have more than 3 dimensions. Indeed, theories that pretend to be most fundamental choose to live in higher dimensions: a natural area for superstring/Mtheory is 9- or 10-dimensional space. Extra dimensions have been hidden so far, but they would open up above a certain energy threshold. A fascinating possibility is that this happens within reach of particle colliders. This lecture will address the motivation for such a viewpoint and implications of accessible extra dimensions for our understanding of nature.

  9. Neutral triple electroweak gauge boson production in the large extra-dimension model at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. C.; Mathews, Prakash; Ravindran, V.; Seth, Satyajit

    2012-05-01

    We study the prospects of probing large extra-dimension models at the LHC through neutral triple gauge boson production processes. In theories with extra dimensions these processes result from the exchange of a tower of massive graviton modes between the SM particles. We consider γγγ, γγZ, γZZ, and ZZZ production processes, and present our results for various kinematic distributions at the LHC for S=14TeV.

  10. Accelerating universe from nonminimal derivative coupling in 5D universal extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suroso, Agus; Zen, Freddy P.; Arianto; Gunara, Bobby E.

    2012-05-01

    We study a nonminimal derivative coupling of scalar field, where the scalar field is coupled to curvature tensor in the five dimensional bulk in the context of universal extra dimension model. We apply the Einstein equation in the bulk and show that the acelerated expanding solution for the four dimensional scale factor a(t) is exist. Then, we study four different cases of the solution which is correspond to four different types of evolution of the extra dimension scale factor b.

  11. Unitarity violation in sequential neutrino mixing in a model of extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Subhaditya; Dey, Paramita; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup

    2009-10-01

    We give the first demonstration of unitarity violation in the sequential neutrino mixing matrix in a scenario with extra compact spacelike dimensions. Gauge singlet neutrinos are assumed to propagate in one extra dimension, giving rise to an infinite tower of states in the effective four-dimensional theory. It is shown that this leads to small lepton-number violating entries in the neutrino mass matrix, which can violate unitarity on the order of 1%.

  12. Effective description of brane terms in extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    del Aguila, Francisco; Perez-Victoria, Manuel; Santiago, Jose; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    We study how theories defined in (extra-dimensional) spaces with localized defects can be described perturbatively by effective field theories in which the width of the defects vanishes. These effective theories must incorporate a ''classical'' renormalization, and we propose a renormalization prescription a la dimensional regularization for codimension 1, which can be easily used in phenomenological applications. As a check of the validity of this setting, we compare some general predictions of the renormalized effective theory with those obtained in a particular ultraviolet completion based on deconstruction.

  13. The effect of extra dimensions on gravity wave bursts from cosmic string cusps

    SciTech Connect

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Gregory, Ruth; Chadburn, Sarah; Geshnizjani, Ghazal; Zavala, Ivonne E-mail: ggeshnizjani@perimeterinstitute.ca E-mail: zavala@th.physik.uni-bonn.de

    2010-09-01

    We explore the kinematical effect of having extra dimensions on the gravitational wave emission from cosmic strings. Additional dimensions both round off cusps, and reduce the probability of their formation. We recompute the gravitational wave burst, taking into account these two factors, and find a potentially significant damping on the gravitational waves of the strings.

  14. Cosmology of one extra dimension with localized gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Csaki, Csaba; Graesser, Michael; Kolda, Christopher; Terning, John

    1999-06-01

    The authors examine the cosmology of the two recently proposed scenarios for a five dimensional universe with localized gravity. They find that the scenario with a non-compact fifth dimension is potentially viable, while the scenario which might solve the hierarchy problem predicts a contracting universe, leading to a variety of cosmological problems.

  15. Implications for Cognitive Quantum Computation and Decoherence Limits in the Presence of Large Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mureika, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    An interdisciplinary physical theory of emergent consciousness has previously been proposed, stemming from quantum computation-like behavior between 109 or more entangled molecular qubit states (microtubulin). This model relies on the Penrose-Diósi gravity-driven wavefunction collapse framework, and thus is subject to any secondary classical and quantum gravity effects. Specifically, if large extra spatial dimensions exist in the Universe, then the resulting corrections to Newtonian gravity cause this model to suffer serious difficulties. It is shown that if the extra dimensions are larger than 100 fm in size, then this model of consciousness is unphysical. If the dimensions are on the order of 10 fm in size, then a significantly smaller number of microtubulin than originally predicted are required to satisfy experimental constraints. Some speculation on evolution of consciousness is also offered, based on the possibility that the size of these extra dimensions may have been changing over the history of the Universe.

  16. Linear collider signals of an invisible Higgs boson in theories of large extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Anindya; Huitu, Katri; Laamanen, Jari; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup

    2004-10-01

    We discuss the possibility of detecting a Higgs boson in electron-positron collider experiments if large extra dimensions are realized in nature. In such a case, the Higgs boson can decay invisibly by oscillating into a graviscalar Kaluza-Klein tower. We show that the search for such a Higgs boson at an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider entails more complications than are usually thought of in relation to an invisibly decaying Higgs boson. The main sources of such complications are due to the simultaneous presence of a continuum graviton production and the broadening of the Higgs peak. We discuss possible ways of overcoming such difficulties and conclude that the detection of such a Higgs boson might still be a problem beyond the mass range of 250-300 GeV.

  17. Search for one large extra dimension with the DELPHI detector at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McNulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2009-03-01

    Single photons detected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP2 in the years 1997-2000 are reanalysed to investigate the existence of a single extra dimension in a modified ADD scenario with slightly warped large extra dimensions. The data collected at centre-of-mass energies between 180 and 209 GeV for an integrated luminosity of ˜650 pb-1 agree with the predictions of the Standard Model and allow a limit to be set on graviton emission in one large extra dimension. The limit obtained on the fundamental mass scale M D is 1.69 TeV/ c 2 at 95% CL, with an expected limit of 1.71 TeV/ c 2.

  18. Fermion creation in 5D space-time with a warped extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekireb, R.; Haouat, S.

    2015-05-01

    The phenomenon of fermion production in a 5D FRW space-time with a warped extra dimension is studied by considering the canonical method based on Bogoliubov transformation connecting the "in" with the "out" states. For an exactly solvable model, two sets of exact solution are expressed in terms of Bessel functions. Studying the semiclassical Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the "in" and "out" states are identified. The pair creation probability and the mean number of created particles are calculated from the Bogoliubov coefficients. It is shown that the particle creation probability and the number density of created particles depend on the ratio of the scale factors associated with the ordinary space {x} and the extra dimension. It is also shown that the contraction of the extra dimension induces particle creation like the ordinary space expansion.

  19. Does the force from an extra dimension contradict physics in 4D?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leon, J. Ponce

    2001-12-01

    We examine the question of whether violation of 4D physics is an inevitable consequence of existence of an extra non-compactified dimension. Recent investigations in membrane and Kaluza-Klein theory indicate that when the metric of the spacetime is allowed to depend on the extra coordinate, i.e., the cilindricity condition is dropped, the equation describing the trajectory of a particle in one lower dimension has an extra force with some abnormal properties. Among them, a force term parallel to the four-velocity of the particle and, what is perhaps more surprising, uμfμ≠uμfμ. These properties violate basic concepts in 4D physics. In this Letter we argue that these abnormal properties are not consequence of the extra dimension, but result from the formalism used. We propose a new definition for the force, from the extra dimension, which is free of any contradictions and consistent with usual 4D physics. We show, using warp metrics, that this new definition is also more consistent with our physical intuition. The effects of this force could be detected observing objects moving with high speed, near black holes and/or in cosmological situations.

  20. Search for Large Extra Dimensions in the Diphoton Final State at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2011-05-01

    A search for large extra spatial dimensions via virtual-graviton exchange in the diphoton channel has been carried out with the CMS detector at the LHC. No excess of events above the standard model expectations is found using a data sample collected in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. New lower limits on the effective Planck scale in the range of 1.6-2.3 TeV at the 95% confidence level are set, providing the most restrictive bounds to date on models with more than two large extra dimensions.

  1. Extra Dimensions: 3D and Time in PDF Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Norman A.; /SLAC

    2011-11-10

    High energy physics is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide audience. In this talk, we present examples of HEP applications which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input. Using this technique, higher dimensional data, such as LEGO plots or time-dependent information can be included in PDF files. In principle, a complete event display, with full interactivity, can be incorporated into a PDF file. This would allow the end user not only to customize the view and representation of the data, but to access the underlying data itself.

  2. Extra Dimensions: 3D and Time in PDF Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, N.A.; /SLAC

    2012-04-11

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.

  3. Extra dimensions: 3D and time in PDF documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, N. A.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.

  4. Extra dimensions: 3d and time in pdf documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, N. A.

    2008-07-01

    High energy physics is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide audience. In this talk, we present examples of HEP applications which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input. Using this technique, higher dimensional data, such as LEGO plots or time-dependent information can be included in PDF files. In principle, a complete event display, with full interactivity, can be incorporated into a PDF file. This would allow the end user not only to customize the view and representation of the data, but to access the underlying data itself.

  5. Anisotropic modulus stabilisation: strings at LHC scales with micron-sized extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicoli, M.; Burgess, C. P.; Quevedo, F.

    2011-10-01

    We construct flux-stabilised Type IIB string compactifications whose extra dimensions have very different sizes, and use these to describe several types of vacua with a TeV string scale. Because we can access regimes where two dimensions are hierarchically larger than the other four, we find examples where two dimensions are micron-sized while the other four are at the weak scale in addition to more standard examples with all six extra dimensions equally large. Besides providing ultraviolet completeness, the phenomenology of these models is richer than vanilla large-dimensional models in several generic ways: ( i) they are supersymmetric, with supersymmetry broken at sub-eV scales in the bulk but only nonlinearly realised in the Standard Model sector, leading to no MSSM superpartners for ordinary particles and many more bulk missing-energy channels, as in supersymmetric large extra dimensions (SLED); ( ii) small cycles in the more complicated extra-dimensional geometry allow some KK states to reside at TeV scales even if all six extra dimensions are nominally much larger; ( iii) a rich spectrum of string and KK states at TeV scales; and ( iv) an equally rich spectrum of very light moduli exist having unusually small (but technically natural) masses, with potentially interesting implications for cosmology and astrophysics that nonetheless evade new-force constraints. The hierarchy problem is solved in these models because the extra-dimensional volume is naturally stabilised at exponentially large values: the extra dimensions are Calabi-Yau geometries with a 4D K3 or T 4-fibration over a 2D base, with moduli stabilised within the well-established LARGE-Volume scenario. The new technical step is the use of poly-instanton corrections to the superpotential (which, unlike for simpler models, are likely to be present on K3 or T 4-fibered Calabi-Yau compactifications) to obtain a large hierarchy between the sizes of different dimensions. For several scenarios we identify

  6. Probing the size of extra dimensions with gravitational wave astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Kent; Tanahashi, Norihiro; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2011-04-15

    In the Randall-Sundrum II braneworld model, it has been conjectured, according to the AdS/CFT correspondence, that a brane-localized black hole (BH) larger than the bulk AdS curvature scale l cannot be static, and it is dual to a four-dimensional BH emitting Hawking radiation through some quantum fields. In this scenario, the number of the quantum field species is so large that this radiation changes the orbital evolution of a BH binary. We derived the correction to the gravitational waveform phase due to this effect and estimated the upper bounds on l by performing Fisher analyses. We found that the Deci-Hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory and the Big Bang Observatory (DECIGO/BBO) can give a stronger constraint than the current tabletop result by detecting gravitational waves from small mass BH/BH and BH/neutron star (NS) binaries. Furthermore, DECIGO/BBO is expected to detect 10{sup 5} BH/NS binaries per year. Taking this advantage, we find that DECIGO/BBO can actually measure l down to l=0.33 {mu}m for a 5 yr observation if we know that binaries are circular a priori. This is about 40 times smaller than the upper bound obtained from the tabletop experiment. On the other hand, when we take eccentricities into binary parameters, the detection limit weakens to l=1.5 {mu}m due to strong degeneracies between l and eccentricities. We also derived the upper bound on l from the expected detection number of extreme mass ratio inspirals with LISA and BH/NS binaries with DECIGO/BBO, extending the discussion made recently by McWilliams [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 141601 (2010)]. We found that these less robust constraints are weaker than the ones from phase differences.

  7. Estimate for the size of the compactification radius of a one extra dimension universe

    SciTech Connect

    Da Rosa, Felipe S; Pascoal, F; Oliveira, L F; Farina, C

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we use the Casimir effect to probe the existence of one extra dimension. We begin by evaluating the Casimir pressure between two plates in a M{sup 4} x S{sup 1} manifold, and then use an appropriate statistical analysis in order to compare the theoretical expression with a recent experimental data and set bounds for the compactification radius.

  8. Higgs production and decay in models of a warped extra dimension with a bulk Higgs

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Paul R.; Carena, Marcela; Carmona, Adrian; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-01-13

    Warped extra-dimension models in which the Higgs boson is allowed to propagate in the bulk of a compact AdS5 space are conjectured to be dual to models featuring a partially composite Higgs boson. They offer a framework with which to investigate the implications of changing the scaling dimension of the Higgs operator, which can be used to reduce the constraints from electroweak precision data. In the context of such models, we calculate the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion and the H → γγ decay rate and show that they are finite (at one-loop order) as a consequence of gauge invariance. The extended scalar sector comprising the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model scalars is constructed in detail. The largest effects are due to virtual KK fermions, whose contributions to the cross section and decay rate introduce a quadratic sensitivity to the maximum allowed value y* of the random complex entries of the 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. We find an enhancement of the gluon-fusion cross section and a reduction of the H → γγ rate as well as of the tree-level Higgs couplings to fermions and electroweak gauge bosons. As a result, we perform a detailed study of the correlated signal strengths for different production mechanisms and decay channels as functions of y*, the mass scale of Kaluza-Klein resonances and the scaling dimension of the composite Higgs operator.

  9. Higgs production and decay in models of a warped extra dimension with a bulk Higgs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Archer, Paul R.; Carena, Marcela; Carmona, Adrian; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-01-13

    Warped extra-dimension models in which the Higgs boson is allowed to propagate in the bulk of a compact AdS5 space are conjectured to be dual to models featuring a partially composite Higgs boson. They offer a framework with which to investigate the implications of changing the scaling dimension of the Higgs operator, which can be used to reduce the constraints from electroweak precision data. In the context of such models, we calculate the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion and the H → γγ decay rate and show that they are finite (at one-loop order) as a consequencemore » of gauge invariance. The extended scalar sector comprising the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model scalars is constructed in detail. The largest effects are due to virtual KK fermions, whose contributions to the cross section and decay rate introduce a quadratic sensitivity to the maximum allowed value y* of the random complex entries of the 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. We find an enhancement of the gluon-fusion cross section and a reduction of the H → γγ rate as well as of the tree-level Higgs couplings to fermions and electroweak gauge bosons. As a result, we perform a detailed study of the correlated signal strengths for different production mechanisms and decay channels as functions of y*, the mass scale of Kaluza-Klein resonances and the scaling dimension of the composite Higgs operator.« less

  10. Can extra dimensions accessible to the SM explain the recent measurement of anomalous magnetic moment of the muon?*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, K.; Deshpande, N. G.; Wu, G.-H.

    2001-06-01

    We investigate whether models with flat extra dimensions in which SM fields propagate can give a significant contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon (MMM). In models with only SM gauge and Higgs fields in the bulk, the contribution to the MMM from Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations of gauge bosons is very small. This is due to the constraint on the size of the extra dimensions from tree-level effects of KK excitations of gauge bosons on precision electroweak observables such as Fermi constant. If the quarks and leptons are also allowed to propagate in the (same) bulk (``universal'' extra dimensions), then there are no contributions to precision electroweak observables at tree-level. However, in this case, the constraint from one-loop contribution of KK excitations of (mainly) the top quark to /T parameter again implies that the contribution to the MMM is small. We show that in models with leptons, electroweak gauge and Higgs fields propagating in the (same) bulk, but with quarks and gluon propagating in a sub-space of this bulk, both the above constraints can be relaxed. However, with only one Higgs doublet, the constraint from the process /b-->sγ requires the contribution to the MMM to be smaller than the SM electroweak correction. This constraint can be relaxed in models with more than one Higgs doublet.

  11. Top quark spin correlations in theories with large extra dimensions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Masato; Okada, Nobuchika; Smolek, Karel; Simak, Vladislav

    2004-12-01

    In theories with large extra dimensions, we study the top-spin correlations at the Large Hadron Collider. The s-channel process mediated by graviton Kaluza-Klein modes contributes to the top-antitop pair production in addition to the standard model processes, and affects the resultant top-spin correlations. We calculated the full density matrix for the top-antitop pair production. With the fundamental scale of the extra dimensional theory below 2 TeV, we find a sizable deviation of the top-spin correlations from the standard model one.

  12. Ultrahigh-energy neutrino flux as a probe of large extra-dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lykken, Joseph; Mena, Olga; Razzaque, Soebur; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Penn State U.

    2007-05-01

    A suppression in the spectrum of ultrahigh-energy (UHE, {ge} 10{sup 18} eV) neutrinos will be present in extra-dimensional scenarios, due to enhanced neutrino-antineutrino annihilation processes with the supernova relic neutrinos. In this scenario, neutrinos can not be responsible for the highest energy events observed in the UHE cosmic ray spectrum. A direct implication of these extra-dimensional interactions would be the absence of UHE neutrinos in ongoing and future neutrino telescopes.

  13. Repulsive Casimir effect from extra dimensions and Robin boundary conditions: From branes to pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Saharian, A. A.

    2009-03-15

    We evaluate the Casimir energy and force for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter, subject to Robin boundary conditions on two codimension-one parallel plates, located on a (D+1)-dimensional background spacetime with an arbitrary internal space. The most general case of different Robin coefficients on the two separate plates is considered. With independence of the geometry of the internal space, the Casimir forces are seen to be attractive for special cases of Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on both plates and repulsive for Dirichlet boundary conditions on one plate and Neumann boundary conditions on the other. For Robin boundary conditions, the Casimir forces can be either attractive or repulsive, depending on the Robin coefficients and the separation between the plates, what is actually remarkable and useful. Indeed, we demonstrate the existence of an equilibrium point for the interplate distance, which is stabilized due to the Casimir force, and show that stability is enhanced by the presence of the extra dimensions. Applications of these properties in braneworld models are discussed. Finally, the corresponding results are generalized to the geometry of a piston of arbitrary cross section.

  14. Searches for extra spatial dimensions with the CMS detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsberg, Greg

    2015-05-01

    The success of the first three years of operations of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV radically changed the landscape of searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM) and our very way of thinking about its possible origin and its hiding place. Among the paradigms of new physics that have been probed quite extensively at the LHC, are various models that predict the existence of extra spatial dimensions. In this review, the current status of searches for extra dimensions with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector is presented, along with prospects for future searches at the full energy of the LHC, expected to be reached in the next few years.

  15. Search for large extra spatial dimensions in dimuon production with the d0 detector.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; da Motta, H; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kulik, Y; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lueking, L; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Smolek, K; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Titov, M; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; White, V; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2005-10-14

    We present the results of a search for the effects of large extra spatial dimensions in pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV in events containing a pair of energetic muons. The data correspond to 246 pb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Good agreement with the expected background was found, yielding no evidence for large extra dimensions. We set 95% C.L. lower limits on the fundamental Planck scale between 0.85 and 1.27 TeV within several formalisms. These are the most stringent limits achieved in the dimuon channel to date. PMID:16241783

  16. Search for extra dimensions in the diphoton final state with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buat, Quentin

    2012-06-01

    The large difference between the Planck scale and the electroweak scale, known as the hierarchy problem, has been addressed in some models through the existence of extra spatial dimensions. A search for evidence of extra spatial dimensions has been performed, through an analysis of the diphoton final state in data recorded in 2011 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The analysis uses a dataset of 2.12 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV. The diphoton invariant mass spectrum is observed to be in good agreement with the expected Standard Model (SM) background. We set 95% CL lower limits on the scale related to virtual graviton exchange process in the context of the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, Dvali model (ADD) and on the lightest Kaluza Klein excitation mass in the context of the Randall-Sundrum model (RS).

  17. Search for large extra spatial dimensions in dimuon production at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Arnoud, Y.; Askew, A.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble /Marseille, CPPM /Orsay, LAL /Paris U., VI-VII /DAPNIA, Saclay

    2005-06-01

    We present the results of a search for the e.ects of large extra spatial dimensions in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in events containing a pair of energetic muons. The data correspond to 246 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Good agreement with the expected background was found, yielding no evidence for large extra dimensions. We set 95% C.L. lower limits on the fundamental Planck scale between 0.85 TeV and 1.27 TeV within several formalisms. These are the most stringent limits achieved in the dimuon channel to date.

  18. Supersymmetric moose models: An extra dimension from a broken deformed conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlich, Joshua; Anly Tan, Jong

    2006-09-01

    We find a class of four dimensional deformed conformal field theories which appear extra dimensional when their gauge symmetries are spontaneously broken. The theories are supersymmetric moose models which flow to interacting conformal fixed points at low energies, deformed by superpotentials. Using a-maximization we give strong nonperturbative evidence that the hopping terms in the resulting latticized action are relevant deformations of the fixed-point theories. These theories have an intricate structure of RG flows between conformal fixed points. Our results suggest that at the stable fixed points each of the bulk gauge couplings and superpotential hopping terms is turned on, in favor of the extra-dimensional interpretation of the theory. However, we argue that the higher-dimensional gauge coupling is generically small compared to the size of the extra dimension. In the presence of a brane the topology of the extra dimension is determined dynamically and depends on the numbers of colors and bulk and brane flavors, which suggests phenomenological applications. The RG flows between fixed points in these theories provide a class of tests of Cardy’s conjectured a-theorem.

  19. Supersymmetric moose models: An extra dimension from a broken deformed conformal field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Erlich, Joshua; Anly Tan, Jong

    2006-09-15

    We find a class of four dimensional deformed conformal field theories which appear extra dimensional when their gauge symmetries are spontaneously broken. The theories are supersymmetric moose models which flow to interacting conformal fixed points at low energies, deformed by superpotentials. Using a-maximization we give strong nonperturbative evidence that the hopping terms in the resulting latticized action are relevant deformations of the fixed-point theories. These theories have an intricate structure of RG flows between conformal fixed points. Our results suggest that at the stable fixed points each of the bulk gauge couplings and superpotential hopping terms is turned on, in favor of the extra-dimensional interpretation of the theory. However, we argue that the higher-dimensional gauge coupling is generically small compared to the size of the extra dimension. In the presence of a brane the topology of the extra dimension is determined dynamically and depends on the numbers of colors and bulk and brane flavors, which suggests phenomenological applications. The RG flows between fixed points in these theories provide a class of tests of Cardy's conjectured a-theorem.

  20. Natural realization of a large extra dimension in 5D supersymmetric theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamura, Yutaka; Yamada, Yusuke

    2014-09-01

    An exponentially large extra dimension can be naturally realized by the Casimir energy and the gaugino condensation in 5D supersymmetric theory. The model does not require any hierarchies among the 5D parameters. The key ingredient is an additional modulus other than the radion, which generically exists in 5D supergravity. SUSY is broken at the vacuum, which can be regarded as the Scherk-Schwarz SUSY breaking. We also analyze the mass spectrum and discuss some phenomenological aspects.

  1. Evolution of the CKM matrix in the universal extra dimension model

    SciTech Connect

    Cornell, A. S.; Liu Luxin

    2011-02-01

    The evolution of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix and the quark Yukawa couplings is performed for the one-loop renormalization group equations in the universal extra dimension model. It is found that the evolution of mixing angles and the CP violation measure J may rapidly vary in the presence of the Kaluza-Klein modes, and this variation becomes dramatic as the energy approaches the unification scale.

  2. Constraints on extra dimensions from the ATLAS experiment at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne

    2015-04-01

    The quest for hints about the existence of extra dimensions has recently made tremendous progress with the analysis of the data registered during the first run of the LHC, at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV. While we are awaiting the LHC run at nominal energy, it is a good time to review the results and constraints already obtained in a large variety of scenarios and signatures.

  3. Probe of extra dimensions in lepton pair production at the LHC: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Pankov, A. A.; Serenkova, I. A.; Tsytrinov, A. V.

    2009-01-01

    Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulous, and Dvali have proposed a model (ADD) of low-scale quantum gravity featuring large extra dimensions. In this model, the exchange of Kaluza-Klein towers of gravitons can enhance the production rate of lepton pairs at high invariant mass in proton-proton collisions at the LHC. By considering the present and future LHC energy regimes, we reanalyse the potential of the LHC to discover the effects of large extra dimensions and to discriminate between various theoretical models. Specifically, in latter case we explore the capability of the LHC to distinguish spin-2 Kaluza-Klein towers of gravitons exchange from other new physics effects which might be conveniently parametrized by the four-fermion contact interactions. We find that the LHC with planned energy 14 TeV and luminosity 100 fb⁻¹ will be capable of discovering (and identifying) graviton exchange effects in the large extra dimensions with the cutoff parameter of order M{sub S} = 6.2 TeV (4.8 TeV) for d = 6 and M{sub S} = 8.8 TeV (6.8 TeV) for d = 3.

  4. Probe of extra dimensions in lepton pair production at the LHC: An update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankov, A. A.; Serenkova, I. A.; Tsytrinov, A. V.

    2014-07-01

    Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulous, and Dvali have proposed a model (ADD) of low-scale quantum gravity featuring large extra dimensions. In this model, the exchange of Kaluza-Klein towers of gravitons can enhance the production rate of lepton pairs at high invariant mass in proton-proton collisions at the LHC. By considering the present and future LHC energy regimes, we reanalyse the potential of the LHC to discover the effects of large extra dimensions and to discriminate between various theoretical models. Specifically, in latter case we explore the capability of the LHC to distinguish spin-2 Kaluza-Klein towers of gravitons exchange from other new physics effects which might be conveniently parametrized by the four-fermion contact interactions. We find that the LHC with planned energy 14 TeV and luminosity 100 fb-1 will be capable of discovering (and identifying) graviton exchange effects in the large extra dimensions with the cutoff parameter of order MS = 6.2 TeV (4.8 TeV) for d = 6 and MS = 8.8 TeV (6.8 TeV) for d = 3.

  5. Gauge unification in extra dimensions: power corrections vs. higher dimension operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebecker, A.; Westphal, A.

    2004-11-01

    Power-like loop corrections to gauge couplings are a generic feature of higher-dimensional field theories. In supersymmetric grand unified theories in d=5 dimensions, such corrections arise only in the presence of a vacuum expectation value of the adjoint scalar of the gauge multiplet. We show that, using the analysis of the exact quantum effective action by Intriligator, Morrison and Seiberg, these power corrections can be understood as the effect of higher dimension operators. Such operators, both classical and quantum, are highly constrained by gauge symmetry and supersymmetry. As a result, even non-perturbatively large contributions to gauge coupling unification can be unambiguously determined within 5d low-energy effective field theory. Since no massive hypermultiplet matter exists in 6 dimensions, the predictivity is further enhanced by embedding the 5d model in a 6d gauge theory relevant at smaller distances. Thus, large and quantitatively controlled power-law contributions to gauge couplings arise naturally and can, in the most extreme case, lead to calculable TeV-scale power law unification. We identify a simple 5d SU(5) model with one massless 10 in the bulk where the power-law effect is exactly MSSM-like.

  6. Bounds on the Number and Size of Extra Dimensions from Molecular Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salumbides, Edcel John; Schellekens, Bert; Gato-Rivera, Beatriz; Ubachs, Wim

    2015-06-01

    Modern string theories, which seek to produce a consistent description of physics beyond the Standard Model that also includes the gravitational interaction, appear to be most consistent if a large number of dimensions are postulated. For example the mysterious M-theory, which generalizes all consistent versions of superstring theories, require 11 dimensions. We demonstrate that investigations of quantum level energies in simple molecular systems provide a testing ground to constrain the size of compactified extra dimensions, for example those proposed in the ADD [1] and RS scenarios [2]. This is made possible by the recent progress in precision metrology with ultrastable lasers on energy levels in neutral molecular hydrogen (H_2, HD and D_2) [3] and the molecular hydrogen ions (H_2^+, HD^+ and D_2^+) [4]. Comparisons between experiment and quantum electrodynamics calculations for these molecular systems can be interpreted in terms of probing large extra dimensions, under which conditions gravity will become much stronger. Molecules are a probe of space-time geometry at typical distances where chemical bonds are effective, i.e. at length scales of an Å. [1] N. Arkani-Hamed, S. Dimopoulos and G. Dvali, Phys. Lett. B 429, 263 (1998) [2] L. Randall and R. Sundrum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 3370 (1999). [3] G. Dickenson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 193601 (2013). [4] J. C. J. Koelemeij et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 173002 (2007).

  7. Classical geometry to quantum behavior correspondence in a virtual extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolce, Donatello

    2012-09-01

    In the Lorentz invariant formalism of compact space-time dimensions the assumption of periodic boundary conditions represents a consistent semi-classical quantization condition for relativistic fields. In Dolce (2011) [18] we have shown, for instance, that the ordinary Feynman path integral is obtained from the interference between the classical paths with different winding numbers associated with the cyclic dynamics of the field solutions. By means of the boundary conditions, the kinematical information of interactions can be encoded on the relativistic geometrodynamics of the boundary, see Dolce (2012) [8]. Furthermore, such a purely four-dimensional theory is manifestly dual to an extra-dimensional field theory. The resulting correspondence between extra-dimensional geometrodynamics and ordinary quantum behavior can be interpreted in terms of AdS/CFT correspondence. By applying this approach to a simple Quark-Gluon-Plasma freeze-out model we obtain fundamental analogies with basic aspects of AdS/QCD phenomenology.

  8. Gravitational wave source counts at high redshift and in models with extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Bellido, Juan; Nesseris, Savvas; Trashorras, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) source counts have been recently shown to be able to test how gravitational radiation propagates with the distance from the source. Here, we extend this formalism to cosmological scales, i.e. the high redshift regime, and we discuss the complications of applying this methodology to high redshift sources. We also allow for models with compactified extra dimensions like in the Kaluza-Klein model. Furthermore, we also consider the case of intermediate redshifts, i.e. 0 < z lesssim 1, where we show it is possible to find an analytical approximation for the source counts dN/d(S/N). This can be done in terms of cosmological parameters, such as the matter density Ωm,0 of the cosmological constant model or the cosmographic parameters for a general dark energy model. Our analysis is as general as possible, but it depends on two important factors: a source model for the black hole binary mergers and the GW source to galaxy bias. This methodology also allows us to obtain the higher order corrections of the source counts in terms of the signal-to-noise S/N. We then forecast the sensitivity of future observations in constraining GW physics but also the underlying cosmology by simulating sources distributed over a finite range of signal-to-noise with a number of sources ranging from 10 to 500 sources as expected from future detectors. We find that with 500 events it will be possible to provide constraints on the matter density parameter at present Ωm,0 on the order of a few percent and with the precision growing fast with the number of events. In the case of extra dimensions we find that depending on the degeneracies of the model, with 500 events it may be possible to provide stringent limits on the existence of the extra dimensions if the aforementioned degeneracies can be broken.

  9. Search for large extra dimensions in the monojet+E(T) channel with the DØ detector.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abdesselam, A; Abolins, M; Abramov, V; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Ahmed, S N; Alexeev, G D; Alton, A; Alves, G A; Anderson, E W; Arnoud, Y; Avila, C; Babintsev, V V; Babukhadia, L; Bacon, T C; Baden, A; Baffioni, S; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beaudette, F; Begel, M; Belyaev, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bertram, I; Besson, A; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Bhattacharjee, M; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Boehnlein, A; Bojko, N I; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Breedon, R; Briskin, G; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burtovoi, V S; Butler, J M; Canelli, F; Carvalho, W; Casey, D; Casilum, Z; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chekulaev, S V; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Chopra, S; Christenson, J H; Claes, D; Clark, A R; Coney, L; Connolly, B; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; da Motta, H; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, S J; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doulas, S; Dudko, L V; Duensing, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyshkant, A; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Engelmann, R; Eno, S; Eppley, G; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fein, D; Ferbel, T; Filthaut, F; Fisk, H E; Fisyak, Y; Fleuret, F; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gallas, E; Galyaev, A N; Gao, M; Gavrilov, V; Genik, R J; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goncharov, P I; Gordon, H; Goss, L T; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Graf, N; Grannis, P D; Green, J A; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Grinstein, S; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hadley, N J; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Hall, R E; Han, C; Hansen, S; Hauptman, J M; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Huang, J; Huang, Y; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Karmanov, D; Karmgard, D; Kehoe, R; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Klima, B; Knuteson, B; Ko, W; Kohli, J M; Kostritskiy, A V; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Kozlovsky, E A; Krane, J; Krishnaswamy, M R; Krivkova, P; Krzywdzinski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kuznetsov, V E; Landsberg, G; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Leggett, C; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipton, R; Lucotte, A; Lueking, L; Lundstedt, C; Luo, C; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Malyshev, V L; Manankov, V; Mao, H S; Marshall, T; Martin, M I; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McMahon, T; Melanson, H L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Miao, C; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mishra, C S; Mokhov, N; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Nang, F; Narain, M; Narasimham, V S; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nomerotski, A; Nunnemann, T; O'Neil, D; Oguri, V; Olivier, B; Oshima, N; Padley, P; Papageorgiou, K; Parashar, N; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Peters, O; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Pope, B G; Popkov, E; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Raja, R; Rajagopalan, S; Rapidis, P A; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Ridel, M; Rijssenbeek, M; Rizatdinova, F; Rockwell, T; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rutherfoord, J; Sabirov, B M; Sajot, G; Santoro, A; Sawyer, L; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schwartzman, A; Shabalina, E; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Shupe, M; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Solomon, J; Song, Y; Sorín, V; Sosebee, M; Sotnikova, N; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Stanton, N R; Steinbrück, G; Stoker, D; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Taylor, W; Tentindo-Repond, S; Tripathi, S M; Trippe, T G; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Van Kooten, R; Vaniev, V; Varelas, N; Vertogradov, L S; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Volkov, A A; Vorobiev, A P; Wahl, H D; Wang, Z-M; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weerts, H; White, A; White, J T; Whiteson, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Willis, S; Wimpenny, S J; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Xu, Q; Yamada, R; Yamin, P; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Youssef, S; Yu, J; Zanabria, M; Zhang, X; Zheng, H; Zhou, B; Zhou, Z; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2003-06-27

    We present a search for large extra dimensions (ED) in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV using data collected by the DØ detector at the Fermilab Tevatron in 1994-1996. Data corresponding to 78.8+/-3.9 pb(-1) are examined for events with large missing transverse energy, one high-p(T) jet, and no isolated muons. There is no excess observed beyond expectation from the standard model, and we place lower limits on the fundamental Planck scale of 1.0 and 0.6 TeV for 2 and 7 ED, respectively. PMID:12857124

  10. Search for Universal Extra Dimensions in p(p)over-bar Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goryachev V. N.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Mansour J.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-03-30

    We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at a p{bar p} center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R{sup -1} > 260 GeV in a minimal UED model.

  11. Hamiltonian dynamics of 5D Kalb-Ramond theories with a compact extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalante, Alberto; López-Villanueva, A.

    2015-03-01

    A detailed Hamiltonian analysis for a 5D Kalb-Ramond, massive Kalb-Ramond and Stüeckelberg Kalb-Ramond theories with an extra compact dimension is performed. We develop a complete constraint program, then we quantize the theory by constructing the Dirac brackets. From the gauge transformations of the theories, we fix a particular gauge and we find pseudo-Goldstone bosons in Kalb-Ramond and Stüeckelberg Kalb-Ramond systems. Finally we discuss some remarks and prospects.

  12. Towards a Natural Theory of Dark Energy: Supersymmetric Large Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, C.P.

    2004-12-10

    The first part of this article summarizes the evidence for Dark Energy and Dark Matter, as well as the naturalness issues which plague current theories of Dark Energy. The main point of this part is to argue why these naturalness issues should provide the central theoretical guidance for the search for a successful theory. The second part of the article describes the present status of what I regard as being the best mechanism yet proposed for addressing this issue: Six-dimensional Supergravity with submillimetre-sized Extra Dimensions (Supersymmetric Large Extra Dimensions, or SLED for short). Besides summarizing the SLED proposal itself, this section also describes the tests which this model has passed, the main criticisms which have been raised, and the remaining challenges which remain to be checked. The bottom line is that the proposal survives the tests which have been completed to date, and predicts several distinctive experimental signatures for cosmology, tests of gravity and for accelerator-based particle physics.

  13. Towards a Natural Theory of Dark Energy: Supersymmetric Large Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, C. P.

    2004-12-01

    The first part of this article summarizes the evidence for Dark Energy and Dark Matter, as well as the naturalness issues which plague current theories of Dark Energy. The main point of this part is to argue why these naturalness issues should provide the central theoretical guidance for the search for a successful theory. The second part of the article describes the present status of what I regard as being the best mechanism yet proposed for addressing this issue: Six-dimensional Supergravity with submillimetre-sized Extra Dimensions (Supersymmetric Large Extra Dimensions, or SLED for short). Besides summarizing the SLED proposal itself, this section also describes the tests which this model has passed, the main criticisms which have been raised, and the remaining challenges which remain to be checked. The bottom line is that the proposal survives the tests which have been completed to date, and predicts several distinctive experimental signatures for cosmology, tests of gravity and for accelerator-based particle physics.

  14. Search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton mass spectrum at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Khachatryan, Vardan; Sirunyan, Albert M.; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; /Yerevan Phys. Inst. /Vienna, OAW /Minsk, High Energy Phys. Ctr. /Antwerp U., WISINF /Vrije U., Brussels /Brussels U. /Gent U. /Louvain U. /UMH, Mons /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U.

    2011-12-01

    A search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton invariant-mass spectrum has been performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. No excess of events above the standard model expectation is observed using a data sample collected in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb{sup -1}. In the context of the large-extra-dimensions model, lower limits are set on the effective Planck scale in the range of 2.3-3.8 TeV at the 95% confidence level. These limits are the most restrictive bounds on virtual-graviton exchange to date. The most restrictive lower limits to date are also set on the mass of the first graviton excitation in the Randall-Sundrum model in the range of 0.86-1.84 TeV, for values of the associated coupling parameter between 0.01 and 0.10.

  15. Search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton mass spectrum at the large hadron collider.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knapitsch, A; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Trauner, C; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Bansal, S; Benucci, L; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Luyckx, S; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; Mccartin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Walsh, S; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Ceard, L; De Favereau De Jeneret, J; Delaere, C; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; De Jesus Damiao, D; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá Júnior, W L; Carvalho, W; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Oguri, V; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Anjos, T S; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Tomei, T R Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Marinho, F; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Darmenov, N; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Karadzhinova, A; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Guo, S; Guo, Y; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Wang, S; Zhu, B; Zou, W; Cabrera, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Morovic, S; Attikis, A; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Ellithi Kamel, A; Khalil, S; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Azzolini, V; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Karjalainen, A; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Shreyber, I; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Broutin, C; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Daci, N; Dahms, T; Dobrzynski, L; Elgammal, S; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Veelken, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Cardaci, M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Ferro, C; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Greder, S; Juillot, P; Karim, M; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Fassi, F; Mercier, D; Baty, C; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Bedjidian, M; Bondu, O; Boudoul, G; Boumediene, D; Brun, H; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Falkiewicz, A; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sordini, V; Tosi, S; Tschudi, Y; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Lomidze, D; Anagnostou, G; Beranek, S; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Jussen, R; Klein, K; Merz, J; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Erdmann, M; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Klimkovich, T; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Lingemann, J; Magass, C; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Weber, M

    2012-03-16

    A search for signatures of extra spatial dimensions in the diphoton invariant-mass spectrum has been performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. No excess of events above the standard model expectation is observed using a data sample collected in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb(-1). In the context of the large-extra-dimensions model, lower limits are set on the effective Planck scale in the range of 2.3-3.8 TeV at the 95% confidence level. These limits are the most restrictive bounds on virtual-graviton exchange to date. The most restrictive lower limits to date are also set on the mass of the first graviton excitation in the Randall-Sundrum model in the range of 0.86-1.84 TeV, for values of the associated coupling parameter between 0.01 and 0.10. PMID:22540461

  16. Extra dimensions, SN1987a, and nucleon-nucleon scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Christoph Hanhart; Daniel R. Phillips; Sanjay Reddy; Martin J. Savage

    2001-02-01

    One of the strongest constraints on the existence of large, compact, ''gravity-only'' dimensions comes from SN1987a. If the rate of energy loss into these putative extra dimensions is too high, then the neutrino pulse from the supernova will differ from that actually seen. The dominant mechanism for the production of Kaluza-Klein gravitons and dilatons in the supernova is via gravistrahlung and dilastrahlung from the nucleon-nucleon system. In this paper we compute the rates for these processes in a model-independent way using low-energy theorems which relate the emissivities to the measured nucleon-nucleon cross section. This is possible because for soft gravitons and dilatons the leading contribution to the energy-loss rate is from graphs in which the gravitational radiation is produced from external nucleon legs. Previous calculations neglected these mechanisms. We re-evaluate the bounds on toroidally-compactified ''gravity-only'' dimensions (GODs), and find that consistency with the observed SN1987a neutrino signal requires that if there are two such dimensions then their radius must be less than 1 micron.

  17. Constraints on the size of the extra dimension from Kaluza-Klein gravitino decay

    SciTech Connect

    Gherson, David

    2007-08-15

    We study the consequences of the gravitino decay into dark matter. We suppose that the lightest neutralino is the main component of dark matter. In our framework the gravitino is heavy enough to decay before big bang nucleosynthesis starts. We consider a model coming from a five dimensional supergravity compactified on S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} with gravity in the bulk and matter localized on tensionless branes at the orbifold fixed points. We require that the dark matter, which is produced thermally and in the decay of Kaluza-Klein modes of the gravitino, has an abundance compatible with observation. We deduce from our model that there are curves of constraints between the size of the extra dimension and the reheating temperature of the Universe after inflation.

  18. Solution to the flavor problem of warped extra-dimension models.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Martin; Malm, Raoul; Neubert, Matthias

    2012-02-24

    A minimal solution to the flavor problem of warped extra-dimension models, i.e., the excessive mixed-chirality contribution to CP violation in K-K ¯ mixing arising from Kaluza-Klein (KK) gluon exchange, is proposed. Extending the strong-interaction gauge group in the bulk by an additional SU(3), and breaking this symmetry to QCD via boundary conditions, the constraints arising from the ε(K) parameter are significantly relaxed. As a result, KK scales M(KK)~2 TeV are consistent with all flavor observables without significant fine-tuning. The model predicts an extended Higgs sector featuring massive color-octet scalars and a tower of KK pseudoaxial gluon resonances, whose existence is not in conflict with recent LHC dijet bounds. PMID:22463516

  19. Neutral triple gauge boson production in the large extra dimensions model at linear colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Sun; Ya-Jin, Zhou

    2012-10-01

    We consider the neutral triple-gauge boson production process in the context of large extra dimensions (LED) models including the Kaluza-Klein (KK) excited gravitons at future linear colliders, say ILC(CLIC). We consider γγγ, γγZ, γZZ, and ZZZ production processes, and analyze their impacts on both the total cross section and some key distributions. These processes are important for new physics searches at linear colliders. Our results show that KK graviton exchange has the most significant effect on e-e+→γZZ among the four processes with relatively small MS, while it has the largest effect on e-e+→γγγ with larger MS. By using the neutral triple-gauge boson production we could set the discovery limit on the fundamental Plank scale MS up to around 6-9 TeV for δ=4 at the 3 TeV CLIC.

  20. Collider signals of top quark flavor violation from a warped extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Perez, Gilad; Soni, Amarjit

    2007-01-01

    We study top quark flavor violation in the framework of a warped extra dimension with the Standard Model (SM) fields propagating in the bulk. Such a scenario provides solutions to both the Planck-weak hierarchy problem and the flavor puzzle of the SM without inducing a flavor problem. We find that, generically, tcZ couplings receive a huge enhancement, in particular, the right-handed ones can be O(1%). This results in BR(t→cZ) at or above the sensitivity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At the International Linear Collider (ILC), single top production, via e+e-→tc¯, can be a striking signal for this scenario. In particular, it represents a physics topic of critical importance that can be explored even with a relatively low energy option, close to the tc threshold. At both the LHC and the ILC, angular distributions can probe the above prediction of dominance of right-handed couplings.

  1. Early Search for Extra Dimensions in the Diphoton Channel at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duong

    2010-02-01

    The existence of extra dimensions (EDs) is an exciting new proposed solution of the hierarchy problem of the Standard Model. The evidence can be revealed in the diphoton mass spectrum either as a broad enhancement (Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, Dvali, or ADD model) or as a narrow resonance (Randall-Sandrum, or RS model) over the continuum SM background. We present the search for these scenarios at CMS with early data. From simulation, we expect a 95% C.L. signal cross section limit of 0.053 pb assuming only the presence of SM processes with 100 pb-1 of pp collision data at √s = 10 TeV. This would translate in the most stringent limits on the ADD and RS model parameters to date. The discovery potential in the ADD and RS models is discussed in the expectation of rapidly increasing integrated luminosity. The status of this search using first LHC data is presented as well. )

  2. Distinguishing Supersymmetry From Universal Extra Dimensions or Little Higgs Models With Dark Matter Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Zaharijas, Gabrijela; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    There are compelling reasons to think that new physics will appear at or below the TeV-scale. It is not known what form this new physics will take, however. Although The Large Hadron collider is very likely to discover new particles associated with the TeV-scale, it may be difficult for it to determine the nature of those particles, whether superpartners, Kaluza-Klein modes or other states. In this article, we consider how direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments may provide information complementary to hadron colliders, which can be used to discriminate between supersymmetry, models with universal extra dimensions, and Little Higgs theories. We find that, in many scenarios, dark matter experiments can be effectively used to distinguish between these possibilities.

  3. Limits on Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, E. C.; Scargle, J. D.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.

  4. Limits on Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cameron, R.A.; Caraveo, P.A.; Casandjian, J.M.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; /more authors..

    2012-08-17

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to {gamma}{gamma} should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.

  5. Search for large extra dimensions in the exclusive photon + missing energy channel in p anti-p collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lazoflores, Jose A.; /Florida State U.

    2006-04-01

    A search was conducted for evidence of large extra dimensions (LED) at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory's Tevatron using the D0 detector. The Tevatron is a p{bar p} collider at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Events with particles escaping into extra dimensions will have large missing energy. The search was carried out using data from a total luminosity of 197 {+-} 13 pb{sup -1} with an observable high transverse momentum photon and a large transverse missing energy. The 70 observed events are consistent with photons produced by standard known reactions plus other background processes produced by cosmic muons. The mass limits on the fundamental mass scale at 95% confidence level for large extra dimensions of 2, 4, 6 and 8 are 500 GeV, 581 GeV, 630 GeV, and 668 GeV respectively.

  6. Extra dimensions at the CERN LHC via mini-black holes: Effective Kerr-Newman brane-world effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, R. da; Coimbra-Araujo, C. H.

    2006-09-01

    We solve Einstein equations on the brane to derive the exact form of the brane-world-corrected perturbations in Kerr-Newman singularities, using Randall-Sundrum and Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Dvali (ADD) models. It is a consequence of such models that Kerr-Newman mini-black holes can be produced in LHC. We use this approach to derive a normalized correction for the Schwarzschild Myers-Perry radius of a static (4+n)-dimensional mini-black hole, using more realistic approaches arising from Kerr-Newman mini-black hole analysis. Besides, we prove that there are four Kerr-Newman black hole horizons in the brane-world scenario we use, although only the outer horizon is relevant in the physical measurable processes. Parton cross sections in LHC and Hawking temperature are also investigated as functions of Planck mass (in the LHC range 1-10 TeV), mini-black hole mass, and the number of large extra dimensions in brane-world large extra-dimensional scenarios. In this case a more realistic brane-effect-corrected formalism can achieve more precisely the effective extra-dimensional Planck mass and the number of large extra dimensions--in the Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Dvali model--or the size of the warped extra dimension--in Randall-Sundrum formalism.

  7. Gauge-Higgs unification, neutrino masses, and dark matter in warped extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Medina, Anibal D.; Shah, Nausheen R.; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    2009-05-01

    Gauge-Higgs unification in warped extra dimensions provides an attractive solution to the hierarchy problem. The extension of the standard model gauge symmetry to SO(5)xU(1){sub X} allows the incorporation of the custodial symmetry SU(2){sub R} plus a Higgs boson doublet with the right quantum numbers under the gauge group. In the minimal model, the Higgs mass is in the range 110-150 GeV, while a light Kaluza-Klein excitation of the top quark appears in the spectrum, providing agreement with precision electroweak measurements and a possible test of the model at a high luminosity LHC. The extension of the model to the lepton sector has several interesting features. We discuss the conditions necessary to obtain realistic charged lepton and neutrino masses. After the addition of an exchange symmetry in the bulk, we show that the odd neutrino Kaluza-Klein modes provide a realistic dark-matter candidate, with a mass of the order of 1 TeV, which will be probed by direct dark-matter detection experiments in the near future.

  8. Extra dimensions in all aspects of life—the meaning of life with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rusner, Marie; Carlsson, Gunilla; Brunt, David; Nyström, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Living with Bipolar Disorder (BD) greatly affects the whole life; still the meaning of it is poorly explored from the perspective of the individuals actually living with it. The aim of this study is thus to explore the existential meaning of life with BD. Ten persons, six women and four men, (aged 30–61), diagnosed with BD were interviewed. A reflective lifeworld perspective based on phenomenological philosophy was used. The findings show that living with BD entails experiencing extra dimensions in all aspects of life, expressed in terms of a magnitude and complexity beyond that which is perceived as pertaining to normal life. The essential meaning of the phenomenon is further described by its constituents: “a specific intensity”, “a struggle to understand”, “an illness that is intertwined with one's whole being”. Living with BD means more for the individual than having episodes of depression and mania and must therefore be understood from a holistic perspective. Adequate care for persons with BD, therefore, includes places for safe and profound reflecting about existential issues, such as identity, trust and self-confidence. The present study recommends the caring services to change their ways to explain and talk about the BD illness. PMID:20523885

  9. Collider Signals Of Top Quark Flavor Violation From A Warped ExtraDimension

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Perez, Gilad; Soni, Amarjit

    2006-08-29

    We study top quark flavor violation in the framework of a warped extra dimension with the Standard Model (SM) fields propagating in the bulk. Such a scenario provides solutions to both the Planck-weak hierarchy problem and the flavor puzzle of the SM without inducing a flavor problem. We find that, generically, tcZ couplings receive a huge enhancement, in particular the right handed ones can be {Omicron}(1%). This results in BR (t {yields} cZ) at or above the sensitivity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At the International Linear Collider (ILC), single top production, via e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} t{bar c}, can be a striking signal for this scenario. In particular, it represents a physics topic of critical importance that can be explored even with a relatively low energy option, close to the tc threshold. At both the LHC and the ILC, angular distributions can probe the above prediction of dominance of right-handed couplings.

  10. An extra dimension in protein tagging by quantifying universal proteotypic peptides using targeted proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Vandemoortele, Giel; Staes, An; Gonnelli, Giulia; Samyn, Noortje; De Sutter, Delphine; Vandermarliere, Elien; Timmerman, Evy; Gevaert, Kris; Martens, Lennart; Eyckerman, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The use of protein tagging to facilitate detailed characterization of target proteins has not only revolutionized cell biology, but also enabled biochemical analysis through efficient recovery of the protein complexes wherein the tagged proteins reside. The endogenous use of these tags for detailed protein characterization is widespread in lower organisms that allow for efficient homologous recombination. With the recent advances in genome engineering, tagging of endogenous proteins is now within reach for most experimental systems, including mammalian cell lines cultures. In this work, we describe the selection of peptides with ideal mass spectrometry characteristics for use in quantification of tagged proteins using targeted proteomics. We mined the proteome of the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus to obtain two peptides that are unique in the proteomes of all known model organisms (proteotypic) and allow sensitive quantification of target proteins in a complex background. By combining these ’Proteotypic peptides for Quantification by SRM’ (PQS peptides) with epitope tags, we demonstrate their use in co-immunoprecipitation experiments upon transfection of protein pairs, or after introduction of these tags in the endogenous proteins through genome engineering. Endogenous protein tagging for absolute quantification provides a powerful extra dimension to protein analysis, allowing the detailed characterization of endogenous proteins. PMID:27264994

  11. Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Berenji, Bijan

    2012-09-19

    Large extra dimensions (LED) have been proposed to account for the apparent weakness of gravitation. These theories also indicate that the postulated massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravitons may be produced by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung in the course of core collapse of supernovae. Hannestad and Raffelt have predicted energy spectra of gamma ray emission from the decay of KK gravitons trapped by the gravity of the remnant neutron stars (NS). These and other authors have used EGRET data on NS to obtain stringent limits on LED. Fermi-LAT is observing radio pulsar positions obtained from radio and x-ray catalogs. NS with certain characteristics are unlikely emitter of gamma rays, and emit in radio and perhaps x-rays. This talk will focus on the blind analysis we plan to perform, which has been developed using the 1st 2 months of all sky data and Monte Carlo simulations, to obtain limits on LED based on about 1 year of Fermi-LAT data. Preliminary limits from this analysis using these first 2 months of data will be also be discussed.

  12. Search for Kaluza-Klein gravitons in extra dimension models via forward detectors at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Gi-Chol; Kono, Takanori; Mawatari, Kentarou; Yamashita, Kimiko

    2015-06-01

    We investigate contributions of Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton in extra dimension models to the process p p →p γ p →p γ j X , where a proton emits a quasireal photon and is detected by using the very forward detectors planned at the LHC. In addition to the γ q initial state as in the Compton scattering in the standard model, the γ g scattering contributes through the t -channel exchange of KK gravitons. Taking account of pileup contributions to the background and examining viable kinematical cuts, constraints on the parameter space of both the ADD (Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali) model and the RS (Randall and Sundrum) model are studied. With 200 fb-1 data at a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV, the expected lower bound on the cutoff scale for the ADD model is 6.3 TeV at 95% confidence level, while a lower limit of 2.0 (0.5) TeV is set on the mass of the first excited graviton with the coupling parameter k /M¯ Pl=0.1 (0.01 ) for the RS model.

  13. Computational techniques to enable visualizing shapes of objects of extra spatial dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Don Vaughn, II

    Envisioning extra dimensions beyond the three of common experience is a daunting challenge for three dimensional observers. Intuition relies on experience gained in a three dimensional environment. Gaining experience with virtual four dimensional objects and virtual three manifolds in four-space on a personal computer may provide the basis for an intuitive grasp of four dimensions. In order to enable such a capability for ourselves, it is first necessary to devise and implement a computationally tractable method to visualize, explore, and manipulate objects of dimension beyond three on the personal computer. A technology is described in this dissertation to convert a representation of higher dimensional models into a format that may be displayed in realtime on graphics cards available on many off-the-shelf personal computers. As a result, an opportunity has been created to experience the shape of four dimensional objects on the desktop computer. The ultimate goal has been to provide the user a tangible and memorable experience with mathematical models of four dimensional objects such that the user can see the model from any user selected vantage point. By use of a 4D GUI, an arbitrary convex hull or 3D silhouette of the 4D model can be rotated, panned, scrolled, and zoomed until a suitable dimensionally reduced view or Aspect is obtained. The 4D GUI then allows the user to manipulate a 3-flat hyperplane cutting tool to slice the model at an arbitrary orientation and position to extract or "pluck" an embedded 3D slice or "aspect" from the embedding four-space. This plucked 3D aspect can be viewed from all angles via a conventional 3D viewer using three multiple POV viewports, and optionally exported to a third party CAD viewer for further manipulation. Plucking and Manipulating the Aspect provides a tangible experience for the end-user in the same manner as any 3D Computer Aided Design viewing and manipulation tool does for the engineer or a 3D video game provides

  14. Extra-Pontine Myelinolysis in a Case of Pan-hypopituitarism Due to Empty Sella Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vishal Anand; Karnik, Niteen; Itolikar, Manish; Vekariya, Ketan

    2015-10-01

    Rapid correction of hyponatremia is known to cause central pontine myelinolysis (CPM). It may concurrently involve other areas of brain as well, referred as extra-pontine myelinolysis (EPM). Isolated EPM however is a very rare occurrence. We present a case of EPM where the hyponatremia was secondary to hypothyroidism due to empty sella syndrome. Chronic hyponatremia should always be corrected slowly to avoid such osmotic myelinolysis syndromes (OMS). PMID:27608705

  15. `Shut The Front Door!':. Obviating the Challenge of Large-Scale Extra Dimensions and Psychophysical Bridging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    Physics has been slowly and reluctantly beginning to address the role and fundamental basis of the `observer' which has until now also been considered metaphysical and beyond the mandate of empirical rigor. It is suggested that the fundamental premise of the currently dominant view of `Cognitive Theory' - "Mind Equals Brain" is erroneous; and the associated belief that the `Planck scale, `the so-called basement level of reality', as an appropriate arena from which to model psycho-physical bridging is also in error. In this paper we delineate a simple, inexpensive experimental design to `crack the so-called cosmic egg' thereby opening the door to largescale extra dimensions (LSXD) tantamount to the regime of the unified field and thus awareness. The methodology surmounts the quantum uncertainty principle in a manner violating Quantum Electrodynamics, (QED), a cornerstone of modern theoretical physics, by spectrographic analysis of newly theorized Tight-Bound State (TBS) Bohr orbits in `continuous-state' transition frequencies of atomic hydrogen. If one wonders why QED violation in the spectra of atomic hydrogen relates to solving the mind-body (observer) problem; consider this a 1st wrench in a forthcoming tool box of Unified Field Mechanics, UF that will soon enough in retrospect cause the current tools of Classical and Quantum Mechanics to appear as stone axes. Max Planck is credited as the founder of quantum mechanics with his 1900 quantum hypothesis that energy is radiated and absorbed discretely by the formulation, E = hv. Empirically implementing this next paradigm shift utilizing parameters of the long sought associated `new physics' of the 3rd regime (classicalquantum- unified) allows access to LSXD of space; thus pragmatically opening the domain of mental action for the 1st time in history. This rendering constitutes a massive paradigm shift to Unified Field Theory creating a challenge for both the writer and the reader!

  16. New origin for approximate symmetries from distant breaking in extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima

    1998-11-20

    The recently proposed theories with TeV-scale quantum gravity do not have the usual ultraviolet desert between {approximately} 10{sup 3}-10{sup 19} GeV where effective field theory ideas apply. Consequently, the success of the desert in explaining approximate symmetries is lost, and theories of flavor, neutrino masses, proton longevity or supersymmetry breaking, lose their usual habitat. In this paper we show that these ideas can find a new home in an infrared desert: the large space in the extra dimensions. The main idea is that symmetries are primordially exact on our brane, but are broken at O(1) on distant branes. This breaking is communicated to us in a distance-suppressed way by bulk messengers. We illustrate these ideas in a number of settings: (1) We construct theories for the fermion mass hierarchy which avoid problems with large flavor-changing neutral currents. (2) We re-iterate that proton stability can arise if baryon number is gauged in the bulk. (3) We study limits on light gauge fields and scalars in the bulk coming from rare decays, astrophysics and cosmology. (4) We remark that the same ideas can be used to explain small neutrino masses, as well as hierarchical supersymmetry breaking. (5) We construct a theory with bulk technicolor, avoiding the difficulties with extended technicolor. There are also a number of interesting experimental signals of these ideas: (1) Attractive or repulsive, isotope dependent sub-millimeter forces {approximately} 10{sup 6} times gravitational strength, from the exchange of light bulk particles. (2) Novel Higgs decays to light generation fermions plus bulk scalars. (3) Collider production of bulk vector and scalar fields, leading to {gamma} or jet+ missing energy signals as in the case of bulk graviton production, with comparable or larger rates.

  17. Search for large extra dimensions in dimuon and dielectron events in pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hoch, M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Teischinger, F.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Benucci, L.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hammad, G. H.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wickens, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, J.; Ceard, L.; De Favereau De Jeneret, J.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Grégoire, G.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Alves, G. A.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Silva Do Amaral, S. M.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Karadzhinova, A.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, S.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Cabrera, A.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Hektor, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Czellar, S.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Sillou, D.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Marionneau, M.; Millischer, L.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Elgammal, S.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Thiebaux, C.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Greder, S.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Baty, C.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bedjidian, M.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Boumediene, D.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Falkiewicz, A.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Le Grand, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Lomidze, D.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Erdmann, M.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Lanske, D.; Lingemann, J.; Magass, C.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Weber, M.; Bontenackels, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Davids, M.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Linn, A.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Rennefeld, J.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Tornier, D.; Zoeller, M. H.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Cakir, A.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Dammann, D.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flossdorf, A.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Hauk, J.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Olzem, J.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Rosin, M.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Spiridonov, A.; Stein, M.; Tomaszewska, J.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Autermann, C.; Blobel, V.; Bobrovskyi, S.; Draeger, J.; Enderle, H.; Erfle, J.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Hermanns, T.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Lange, J.; Mura, B.; Nowak, F.; Pietsch, N.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Barth, C.; Berger, J.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Dirkes, G.; Feindt, M.; Gruschke, J.; Guthoff, M.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Honc, S.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Kuhr, T.; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Oberst, O.; Oehler, A.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Ratnikova, N.; Renz, M.; Röcker, S.; Saout, C.; Scheurer, A.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmanau, M.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Ziebarth, E. B.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mavrommatis, C.; Ntomari, E.; Petrakou, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Triantis, F. A.; Aranyi, A.; Bencze, G.; Boldizsar, L.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Kapusi, A.; Krajczar, K.; Sikler, F.; Vesztergombi, G.; Beni, N.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Veszpremi, V.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Jindal, M.; Kaur, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, A. P.; Singh, J.; Singh, S. P.; Ahuja, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, S.; Jain, S.; Khurana, R.; Sarkar, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Aziz, T.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Maity, M.; Majumder, D.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Saha, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Mondal, N. K.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Hashemi, M.; Hesari, H.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi, A.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lusito, L.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Manna, N.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Romano, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Tupputi, S.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Malvezzi, S.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Sala, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Dogangun, O.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellan, P.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fanzago, F.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Mazzucato, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Nespolo, M.; Perrozzi, L.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Baesso, P.; Berzano, U.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Viviani, C.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Caponeri, B.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Lucaroni, A.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Santocchia, A.; Taroni, S.; Valdata, M.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Rizzi, A.; Segneri, G.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Fanelli, C.; Franci, D.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Pandolfi, F.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Sigamani, M.; Soffi, L.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Botta, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Castello, R.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Graziano, A.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Belforte, S.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Heo, S. G.; Nam, S. K.; Chang, S.; Chung, J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, J. E.; Kong, D. J.; Park, H.; Ro, S. R.; Son, D. C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Jo, H. Y.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Seo, E.; Sim, K. S.; Choi, M.; Kang, S.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Cho, Y.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Bilinskas, M. J.; Grigelionis, I.; Janulis, M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Krofcheck, D.; Bell, A. J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Reucroft, S.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Asghar, M. I.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Brona, G.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Gokieli, R.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Almeida, N.; Bargassa, P.; David, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Musella, P.; Nayak, A.; Pela, J.; Ribeiro, P. Q.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Belotelov, I.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, N.; Gramenitski, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Korenkov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Smirnov, V.; Tikhonenko, E.; Zarubin, A.; Evstyukhin, S.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Matveev, V.; Pashenkov, A.; Toropin, A.; Troitsky, S.; Epshteyn, V.; Erofeeva, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Kossov, M.; Krokhotin, A.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Markina, A.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Petrushanko, S.; Sarycheva, L.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Konstantinov, D.; Korablev, A.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Arce, P.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Diez Pardos, C.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; Codispoti, G.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chuang, S. H.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Felcini, M.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez Sanchez, J.; Jorda, C.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron Sanudo, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bernet, C.; Bialas, W.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Breuker, H.; Bunkowski, K.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Christiansen, T.; Coarasa Perez, J. A.; Curé, B.; D'Enterria, D.; De Roeck, A.; Di Guida, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Frisch, B.; Funk, W.; Gaddi, A.; Georgiou, G.; Gerwig, H.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R.; Govoni, P.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Guiducci, L.; Hansen, M.; Hartl, C.; Harvey, J.; Hegner, B.; Hinzmann, A.; Hoffmann, H. F.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kaadze, K.; Karavakis, E.; Kousouris, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lenzi, P.; Lourenço, C.; Mäki, T.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mozer, M. U.; Mulders, M.; Nesvold, E.; Nguyen, M.; Orimoto, T.; Orsini, L.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Perez, E.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Polese, G.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Rolandi, G.; Rommerskirchen, T.; Rovelli, C.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Spiropulu, M.; Stoye, M.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vichoudis, P.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Sibille, J.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Chen, Z.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Dünser, M.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Sawley, M.-C.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Wehrli, L.; Weng, J.; Aguilo, E.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Millan Mejias, B.; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Schmidt, A.; Snoek, H.; Verzetti, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Liu, Z. K.; Lu, Y. J.; Mekterovic, D.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R.-S.; Shi, X.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wan, X.; Wang, M.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Karapinar, G.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Uzun, D.; Vergili, L. N.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Yildirim, E.; Zeyrek, M.; Deliomeroglu, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Levchuk, L.; Bostock, F.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Basso, L.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. 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F.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Dinardo, M. E.; Drell, B. R.; Edelmaier, C. J.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Heyburn, B.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zang, S. L.; Agostino, L.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Puigh, D.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Biselli, A.; Cirino, G.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Atac, M.; Bakken, J. A.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bloch, I.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cooper, W.; Eartly, D. P.; Elvira, V. D.; Esen, S.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jensen, H.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Miao, T.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pivarski, J.; Pordes, R.; Prokofyev, O.; Schwarz, T.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Tan, P.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Goldberg, S.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Schmitt, M.; Scurlock, B.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Wang, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Sekmen, S.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dragoiu, C.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kunde, G. J.; Lacroix, F.; Malek, M.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Silvestre, C.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Lae, C. K.; McCliment, E.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Bonato, A.; Eskew, C.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Tran, N. V.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Kenny, R. P., Iii; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tinti, G.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Boutemeur, M.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Peterman, A.; Rossato, K.; Rumerio, P.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Alver, B.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Harris, P.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Lee, Y.-J.; Li, W.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Xie, S.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cooper, S. I.; Cushman, P.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Haupt, J.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rekovic, V.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Jindal, P.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Shipkowski, S. P.; Smith, K.; Wan, Z.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Ziegler, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Killewald, P.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Laird, E.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Borrello, L.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Boulahouache, C.; Cuplov, V.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Gotra, Y.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Petrillo, G.; Sakumoto, W.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Atramentov, O.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hits, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Richards, A.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Bardak, C.; Damgov, J.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Mane, P.; Roh, Y.; Sill, A.; Volobouev, I.; Wigmans, R.; Appelt, E.; Brownson, E.; Engh, D.; Florez, C.; Gabella, W.; Gurrola, A.; Issah, M.; Johns, W.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Conetti, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goadhouse, S.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Mattson, M.; Milstène, C.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Belknap, D.; Bellinger, J. N.; Bernardini, J.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Efron, J.; Friis, E.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.; CMS Collaboration

    2012-05-01

    Results are presented from a search for large, extra spatial dimensions in events with either two isolated muons or two isolated electrons. The data are from proton-proton interactions at √{ s} = 7 TeV collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The size of the data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of approximately 2fb-1. The observed dimuon and dielectron mass spectra are found to be consistent with standard-model expectations. Depending on the number of extra dimensions, the 95% confidence level limits from the combined μμ and ee channels range from Ms > 2.4 TeV to Ms > 3.8 TeV, where Ms characterizes the scale for the onset of quantum gravity.

  18. First order calculation of the inclusive cross section pp→ZZ by graviton exchange in large extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kober, Martin; Koch, Benjamin; Bleicher, Marcus

    2007-12-01

    We calculate the inclusive cross section of double Z-boson production within large extra dimensions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Using perturbatively quantized gravity in the ADD (Arkani-Hamed, Dvali, Dimopoulos) model we perform a first order calculation of the graviton mediated contribution to the pp→ZZ+x cross section. At low energies (e.g. Tevatron) this additional contribution is very small, making it virtually unobservable, for a fundamental mass scale above 2500 GeV. At LHC energies, however, the calculation indicates that the ZZ-production rate within the ADD model should differ significantly from the standard model if the new fundamental mass scale would be below 15000 GeV. A comparison with the observed production rate at the LHC might therefore provide direct hints on the number and structure of the extra dimensions.

  19. Equivariant fields in an S U (N ) gauge theory with new spontaneously generated fuzzy extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürkçüoǧlu, S.; Ünal, G.

    2016-05-01

    We find new spontaneously generated fuzzy extra dimensions emerging from a certain deformation of N =4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory with cubic soft supersymmetry breaking and mass deformation terms. First, we determine a particular four-dimensional fuzzy vacuum that may be expressed in terms of a direct sum of product of two fuzzy spheres, and denote it in short as SF2 Int×SF2 Int . The direct sum structure of the vacuum is clearly revealed by a suitable splitting of the scalar fields in the model in a manner that generalizes our approach in [Phys. Rev. D 92, 025022 (2015)]. Fluctuations around this vacuum have the structure of gauge fields over SF2 Int×SF2 Int, and this enables us to conjecture the spontaneous broken model as an effective U (n ) (n

  20. Z boson decay to photon plus Kaluza-Klein graviton in large extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, Benjamin C.; Skittrall, Jordan P.; Sridhar, K.

    2007-11-01

    In the large extra dimensional ADD scenario, Z bosons undergo a one-loop decay into a photon and Kaluza-Klein towers of gravitons/gravi-scalars. We calculate such a decay width, extending previous arguments about the general form of the four-dimensional on-shell amplitude. The amplitudes calculated are relevant to processes in other extra dimensional models where the Standard Model fields are confined to a 4-brane.

  1. Dirac neutrinos with S4 flavor symmetry in warped extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Gui-Jun; Zhou, Ye-Ling

    2013-11-01

    We present a warped extra dimension model with the custodial symmetry SU(2×SU(2×U(1×PLR based on the flavor symmetry S4×Z2×Z2', and the neutrinos are taken to be Dirac particles. At leading order, the democratic lepton mixing is derived exactly, and the high-dimensional operators introduce corrections of order λc to all the three lepton mixing angles such that agreement with the experimental data can be achieved. The neutrino mass spectrum is predicted to be of the inverted hierarchy and the second octant of θ23 is preferred. We suggest the modified democratic mixing, which is obtained by permuting the second and the third rows of the democratic mixing matrix, should be a good first order approximation to understanding sizable θ13 and the first octant of θ23. The constraints on the model from the electroweak precision measurements are discussed. Furthermore, we investigate the lepton mixing patterns for all the possible residual symmetries Gν and Gl in the neutrino and charged lepton sectors, respectively. For convenience, we work in the base in which m≡mlml† is diagonal, where ml is the charged lepton mass matrix. It is easy to see that the symmetry transformation matrix Gl, which is determined by the condition Gl†mGl=m, is a diagonal and non-degenerate 3×3 phase matrix. In the case that neutrinos are Majorana particles, the light neutrino mass matrix for DC mixing is of the form mνDC=UDC*diag(m1,m2,m3)UDC†. The symmetry transformations Gi, which satisfy GiTmνDCGi=mνDC, are determined to be G1=+u1u1†-u2u2†-u3u3†, G2=-u1u1†+u2u2†-u3u3† and G3=-u1u1†-u2u2†+u3u3† besides the identity transformation, where ui is the ith column of UDC. They satisfy Gi2=1, GiGj=GjGi=Gk(i≠j≠k). Consequently the symmetry group of the neutrino mass matrix mνDC is the Klein four group K4≅Z2×Z2. Denoting the underlying family symmetry group at high energies as G, then the symmetry transformations Gl and Gi should be the elements of G. In the

  2. Utiliser la Dimension Europeenne Pour Faire Sortir l'Ecole de ses Murs ou "Extra Muros."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champollion, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Five European institutions devoted to principal training developed the Comenius project "Extra Muros" between 1996-99. Its objectives were understanding the importance of educative action outside the school in order to provide equal opportunity to all students, as well as to promote the awareness of Europe among schools. The project facilitates…

  3. Higgs production and decay processes via loop diagrams in various 6D Universal Extra Dimension models at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiwaki, Kenji

    2012-05-01

    We calculate loop-induced Higgs production and decay processes which are relevant for the LHC in various six-dimensional Universal Extra Dimension models. More concretely, we focus on the Higgs production through gluon fusion and the Higgs decay into two photons induced by loop diagrams. They are one-loop leading processes and the contribution of Kaluza-Klein particles is considered to be significant. These processes are divergent in six dimensions. Therefore, we employ a momentum cutoff, whose size is fixed from the validity of perturbative calculation through naive dimensional analysis. In these six-dimensional Universal Extra Dimension models, the Higgs production cross section through gluon fusion is highly enhanced and the Higgs decay width into two photons is suppressed. In particular in the case of the compactification on Projective Sphere, these effects are remarkable. The deviation of the h (0) → 2γ signal from the prediction of the Standard model is much greater than that in the case of the five-dimensional minimal UED model. We also consider threshold corrections in the two processes and these effect are noteworthy even when we take a higher cutoff and/or a heavy KK scale. Comparing our calculation to the recent LHC results which were published at the Lepton-Photon 2011 and at the December of 2011 is performed briefly.

  4. Searches for and identification of effects of extra spatial dimensions in dilepton and diphoton production at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pankov, A. A. Serenkova, I. A. Tsytrinov, A. V. Bednyakov, V. A.

    2015-06-15

    Prospects of discovering and identifying effects of extra spatial dimensions in dilepton and diphoton production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are studied. Such effects may be revealed by the characteristic behavior of the invariant-mass distributions of dileptons and diphotons, and their identification can be performed on the basis of an analysis of their angular distributions. The discovery and identification reaches are estimated for the scale parameter M{sub S} of the Kaluza-Klein gravitational towers, which can be determined in experiments devoted to measuring the dilepton and diphoton channels at the LHC.

  5. Search for the minimal universal extra dimension model at the LHC with {radical}(s)=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacherjee, Biplob; Ghosh, Kirtiman

    2011-02-01

    The Universal Extra Dimension (UED) model is one of the popular extension of the standard model (SM) which offers interesting phenomenology. In the minimal UED (mUED) model, Kaluza-Klein (KK) parity conservation ensures that n=1 KK states can only be pair produced at colliders and the lightest KK particle is stable. In most of the parameter space, first KK excitation of SM hypercharge gauge boson is the lightest one and it can be a viable dark matter candidate. Thus, the decay of n=1 KK particles will always involve missing transverse energy.

  6. Contrasting Supersymmetry and Universal Extra Dimensions at the CLIC Multi-TeV e+e- Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Marco; Datta, AseshKrishna; De Roeck, Albert; Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2005-07-13

    Universal extra dimensions and supersymmetry have rather similar experimental signatures at hadron colliders. The proper interpretation of an LHC discovery in either case may therefore require further data from a lepton collider. In this paper we identify methods for discriminating between the two scenarios at the linear collider. We study the processes of Kaluza-Klein muon pair production in universal extra dimensions in parallel to smuon pair production in supersymmetry, accounting for the effects of detector resolution, beam-beam interactions and accelerator induced backgrounds. We find that the angular distributions of the final state muons, the energy spectrum of the radiative return photon and the total cross-section measurement are powerful discriminators between the two models. Accurate determination of the particle masses can be obtained both by a study of the momentum spectrum of the final state leptons and by a scan of the particle pair production thresholds. We also calculate the production rates of various Kaluza-Klein particles and discuss the associated signatures.

  7. Search for dark matter, extra dimensions, and unparticles in monojet events in proton-proton collisions at

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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S.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sibille, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; LobellePardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. 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A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Bargassa, P.; Da Cruz ESilva, C. Beir ao; Faccioli, P.; Parracho, P. G. Ferreira; Gallinaro, M.; Nguyen, F.; Antunes, J. Rodrigues; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Dordevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Maestre, J. Alcaraz; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Llatas, M. Chamizo; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Peris, A. Delgado; Vázquez, D. Domínguez; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Bedoya, C. Fernandez; Ramos, J. P. Fernández; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Lopez, O. Gonzalez; Lopez, S. Goy; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Yzquierdo, A. Pérez-Calero; Pelayo, J. Puerta; QuintarioOlmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Menendez, J. Fernandez; Folgueras, S.; GonzalezCaballero, I.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; DuarteCampderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; MunozSanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eugster, J.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sekmen, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz delArbol, P.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Kilminster, B.; MillanMejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; KayisTopaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Bahtiyar, H.; Barlas, E.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Yücel, M.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Tapper, A.; VazquezAcosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Jabeen, S.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; De La Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Searle, M.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Nguyen, H.; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Flowers, K.; Sevilla, M. Franco; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; LuiggiLopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Hopkins, W.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Kaufman, G. Nicolas; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Outschoorn, V. I. Martinez; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Cheng, T.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Gray, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Dutta, V.; Ceballos, G. Gomez; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Suarez, R. Gonzalez; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Vuosalo, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Berry, E.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zenz, S. C.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Mendez, H.; Vargas, J. E. Ramirez; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; deBarbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Miner, D. C.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Woods, N.; Collaboration, [Authorinst]CMS

    2015-05-01

    Results are presented from a search for particle dark matter (DM), extra dimensions, and unparticles using events containing a jet and an imbalance in transverse momentum. The data were collected by the CMS detector in proton-proton collisions at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7at a centre-of-mass energy of 8. The number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits are placed on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section as a function of the DM particle mass for spin-dependent and spin-independent interactions. Limits are also placed on the scale parameter in the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali (ADD) model of large extra dimensions, and on the unparticle model parameter . The constraints on ADD models and unparticles are the most stringent limits in this channel and those on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section are an improvement over previous collider results.

  8. Über-naturalness: unexpectedly light scalars from supersymmetric extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, C. P.; Maharana, Anshuman; Quevedo, F.

    2011-05-01

    Standard lore asserts that quantum effects generically forbid the occurrence of light (non-pseudo-Goldstone) scalars having masses smaller than the Kaluza Klein scale, M KK , in extra-dimensional models, or the gravitino mass, M 3/2, in supersymmetric situations. We argue that a hidden assumption underlies this lore: that the scale of gravitational physics, M g , ( e.g the string scale, M s , in string theory) is of order the Planck mass, {M_p} = sqrt {{8π G}} ˜eq {10^{18}} GeV. We explore sensitivity to this assumption using the spectrum of masses arising within the specific framework of large-volume string compactifications, for which the ultraviolet completion at the gravity scale is explicitly known to be a Type IIB string theory. In such models the separation between M g and M p is parameterized by the (large) size of the extra dimensional volume, {V} (in string units), according to M p : M g : M KK : M 3/2 ∝ 1: {{V}^{ - {{1} / {2} .}}}:{{V}^{ - {{2} / {3} .}}}:{{V}^{ - 1}} . We find that the generic size of quantum corrections to masses is of the order of M KK M 3/2 /M p ≃ {{{{M_p}}} / {{{{V}^{{{5} / {3} .}}}}} .} . The mass of the lighest modulus (corresponding to the extra-dimensional volume) which at the classical level is M V ≃ {{{{M_p}}} / {{{{V}^{{{3} / {2} .}}}}} .} ≪ M 3/2 ≪ M KK is thus stable against quantum corrections. This is possible because the couplings of this modulus to other forms of matter in the low-energy theory are generically weaker than gravitational strength (something that is also usually thought not to occur according to standard lore). We discuss some phenomenological and cosmological implications of this observation.

  9. Cosmic strings with twisted magnetic flux lines and wound-strings in extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, Matthew; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi E-mail: yokoyama@resceu.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-09-01

    We consider a generalization of the Nielsen-Olesen ansatz, in the abelian-Higgs model, which describes strings with twisted magnetic flux lines in the vortex core. The solution does not possess cylindrical symmetry, which leads to the existence of components of conserved momentum, both around the core-axis and along the length of the string. In addition, we consider a model of F-strings with rotating, geodesic windings in the compact space of the Klebanov-Strassler geometry and determine matching conditions which ensure energy and momentum conservation when loops chop off from the long-string network. We find that the expressions for the constants of motion, which determine the macroscopic string dynamics, can be made to coincide with those for the twisted flux line string, suggesting that extra-dimensional effects for F-strings may be mimicked by field-theoretic structure in topological defects.

  10. Higgs dark matter from a warped extra dimension — the truncated-inert-doublet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Aqeel; Grzadkowski, Bohdan; Gunion, John F.; Jiang, Yun

    2015-10-01

    We construct a 5D {{Z}}_2 -symmetric model with three D3-branes: two IR ones with negative tension located at the ends of an extra-dimensional interval and a UV-brane with positive tension placed in the middle of the interval — IR-UV-IR model. The background solutions for this geometric setup are found without and with taking into account the backreaction of the matter fields. A 5D SU(2) Higgs doublet is employed as the Goldberger-Wise stabilizing field in this geometry and solutions of the 5D coupled scalar-gravity equations are found by using the superpotential method. Within this setup we investigate the low-energy (zero-mode) effective theory for the bulk Standard Model (SM) bosonic sector. The {{Z}}_2 -even zero-modes correspond to known standard degrees of freedom, whereas the {{Z}}_2 -odd zero modes might serve as a dark sector. The effective low-energy scalar sector contains a scalar which mimics the SM Higgs boson and a second stable scalar particle (dark-Higgs) is a dark matter candidate; the latter is a component of the zero-mode of the {{Z}}_2 -odd Higgs doublet. The model that results from the {{Z}}_2 -symmetric background geometry resembles the Inert Two Higgs Doublet Model. The effective theory turns out to have an extra residual SU(2) × U(1) global symmetry that is reminiscent of an underlying 5D gauge transformation for the odd degrees of freedom. At tree level the SM Higgs and the dark-Higgs have the same mass; however, when leading radiative corrections are taken into account the dark-Higgs turns out to be heavier than the SM Higgs. Implications for dark matter are discussed; it is found that the dark-Higgs can provide only a small fraction of the observed dark matter abundance.

  11. Astrophysical Evidence for AN Extra Dimension: Phenomenology of a Kaluza-Klein Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, D.; Montani, G.

    2013-05-01

    In this brief review, we discuss the viability of a multi-dimensional geometrical theory with one compactified dimension. We discuss the case of a Kaluza-Klein (KK) fifth-dimensional theory, addressing the problem by an overview of the astrophysical phenomenology associated with this five-dimensional (5D) theory. By comparing the predictions of our model with the features of the ordinary (four-dimensional (4D)) Relativistic Astrophysics, we highlight some small but finite discrepancies, expectably detectible from the observations. We consider a class of static, vacuum solutions of free electromagnetic KK equations with three-dimensional (3D) spherical symmetry. We explore the stability of the particle dynamics in these spacetimes, the construction of self-gravitating stellar models and the emission spectrum generated by a charged particle falling on this stellar object. The matter dynamics in these geometries has been treated by a multipole approach adapted to the geometric theory with a compactified dimension.

  12. Dual Purpose Landscaping Tools: Small Extra Dimensions in AdS/CFT

    SciTech Connect

    Polchinski, Joseph; Silverstein, Eva; /Santa Barbara, KITP /UC, Santa Barbara /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-08-26

    We propose a class of AdS/CFT dual pairs which have small internal dimensions on the gravity side. Starting from known Freund-Rubin AdS/CFT dual pairs, we use 7-branes to nearly cancel the curvature energy of the internal dimensions while maintaining their stabilization. This leads to a new corner of the landscape - a class of AdS solutions with a hierarchically large AdS radius - with a dual field theory given (implicitly) by the infrared limit of a concrete brane construction involving D3-branes, 7-branes, and curvature. We first construct a class of hierarchical AdS5/CFT4 dual pairs with a simple formula for the number of degrees of freedom which we interpret in the dual QFT. We then generalize these to AdS4/CFT3 duals, and suggest extensions of the method to obtain de Sitter solutions.

  13. One-loop effects of extra dimensions on the WW{gamma} and WWZ vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Tlalpa, A.; Novales-Sanchez, H.; Toscano, J. J.; Montano, J.; Ramirez-Zavaleta, F.

    2011-01-01

    The one-loop contribution of the excited Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of the SU{sub L}(2) gauge group on the off-shell W{sup -}W{sup +}{gamma} and W{sup -}W{sup +}Z vertices is calculated in the context of a pure Yang-Mills theory in five dimensions and its phenomenological implications discussed. The use of a gauge-fixing procedure for the excited KK modes that is covariant under the standard gauge transformations of the SU{sub L}(2) group is stressed. A gauge-fixing term and the Faddeev-Popov ghost sector for the KK gauge modes that are separately invariant under the standard gauge transformations of SU{sub L}(2) are presented. It is shown that the one-loop contributions of the KK modes to the off-shell W{sup -}W{sup +}{gamma} and W{sup -}W{sup +}Z vertices are free of ultraviolet divergences and well-behaved at high energies. It is found that for a size of the fifth dimension of R{sup -1{approx}}1 TeV, the one-loop contribution of the KK modes to these vertices is about 1 order of magnitude lower than the corresponding standard model radiative correction. This contribution is similar to the one estimated for new gauge bosons contributions in other contexts. Tree-level effects on these vertices induced by operators of higher canonical dimension are also investigated. It is found that these effects are lower than those generated at the one-loop order by the KK gauge modes.

  14. Compact hyperbolic extra dimensions: branes, kaluza-klein modes, and cosmology

    PubMed

    Kaloper; March-Russell; Starkman; Trodden

    2000-07-31

    We reconsider theories with low gravitational (or string) scale M(*) where Newton's constant is generated via new large-volume spatial dimensions, while standard model states are localized to a 3-brane. Utilizing compact hyperbolic manifolds we show that the spectrum of Kaluza-Klein modes is radically altered. This allows the early Universe to evolve normally up to substantial temperatures, and completely negates the astrophysical constraints on M(*). Furthermore, an exponential hierarchy between the usual Planck scale and the true fundamental scale of physics can emerge with only O(1) coefficients. The linear size of the internal space remains small. The proposal has striking testable signatures. PMID:10991441

  15. Identification of indirect new physics effects at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders: The large extra dimensions case

    SciTech Connect

    Pankov, A.A.; Paver, N.

    2005-08-01

    We discuss indirect manifestations of graviton exchange, predicted by large extra dimensions, in fermion-pair production at a high-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. By means of specifically defined asymmetries among integrated angular distributions, the graviton exchange signal can be cleanly distinguished from the effects of either vector-vector contact interactions or heavy scalar exchanges. The role of initial electron and positron beams polarization is also discussed. The method is applied to a quantitative assessment of the sensitivity to the mass cutoff parameter M{sub H} of the KK graviton tower in the ADD scenario, and of the potential identification reach of this mechanism obtainable at the currently planned International Linear Collider.

  16. Impact of Z' and universal extra dimension parameters on different asymmetries in Bs→ϕℓ+ℓ- decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Aslam, M. Jamil; Paracha, M. Ali

    2013-07-01

    A comprehensive study of the impact of new physics on different observables for Bs→ϕℓ+ℓ- is carried out. We examine the new physics models, such as Z' and universal extra dimension models, where the effects of new physics come through the modification of Wilson coefficients. We analyze these effects through the theoretical prediction of the branching ratio, the forward-backward asymmetry, lepton polarization asymmetries, and the helicity fractions of the final-state meson. These observables will definitely be measured in present and future colliders with great precision. We also point out that hadronic uncertainties in various physical observables are small, which make them an ideal probe to establish new physics. Therefore, the measurements of these observables for the same decay would permit the detection of physics beyond the Standard Model and will also help us to distinguish between different new physics scenarios.

  17. The Proximity Force Approximation for the Casimir Energy of Plate-Sphere and Sphere-Sphere Systems in the Presence of One Extra Compactified Universal Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hongbo

    2015-08-01

    The Casimir energies for plate-sphere system and sphere-sphere systems under PFA in the presence of one extra compactified universal dimension are analyzed. We find that the Casimir energy between a plate and a sphere in the case of sphere-based PFA is divergent. The Casimir energy of plate-sphere system in the case of plate-based PFA is finite and keeps negative. The extra-dimension corrections to the Casimir energy will be more manifest if the sphere is larger or farther away from the plate. It is shown that the negative Casimir energy for two spheres is also associated with the sizes of spheres and extra space. The larger spheres and the longer distance between them make the influence from the additional dimension stronger.

  18. Search for large extra dimensions in the mono-photon final state at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Michigan U.

    2008-03-01

    The authors report on a search for large extra dimensions in a data sample of approximately 1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. They investigate Kaluza-Klein graviton production with a photon and missing transverse energy in the final state. At the 95% C.L. they set limits on the fundamental mass scale M{sub D} from 884 GeV to 778 GeV for 2 to 8 extra dimensions.

  19. Search for Large Extra Dimensions via Single Photons Plus Missing Energy Final States at √s = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Carrera, Edgar Fernando

    2008-12-01

    This dissertation presents a search for large extra dimensions in the single photon plus missing transverse energy final states. We use a data sample of approximately 2.7 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV (recorded with the D- detector) to investigate direct Kaluza Klein graviton production and set limits, at the 95% C.L., on the fundamental mass scale MD from 970 GeV to 816 GeV for two to eight extra dimensions.

  20. Muon anomalous magnetic moment and penguin loops in warped extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneke, M.; Moch, P.; Rohrwild, J.

    2014-08-01

    We describe the computation of the one-loop muon anomalous magnetic moment and radiative penguin transitions in the minimal and custodially protected Randall-Sundrum model. A fully five-dimensional (5D) framework is employed to match the 5D theory onto the Standard Model extended by dimension-six operators. The additional contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment from the gauge-boson exchange contributions is $Δ aμ ≈ 8.8 (27.2) ḑot 10-11 × (1 TeV/T)2 ,$ where the first (second) number refers to the minimal (custodially-protected) model. Here 1/T denotes the location of the TeV brane in conformal coordinates, and is related to the mass of the lowest gauge-boson KK excitation by MKK≈2.35T. We also determine the Higgs-exchange contribution, which depends on the 5D Yukawa structure and the precise interpretation of the localization of the Higgs field near or at the TeV brane.

  1. An Index of Extra Costs of Education Due to Sparsity of Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Roe L.

    1975-01-01

    Analyzes the use of different measures of sparsity of pupil population and discusses the relationship of pupil population density to the equality of educational programs. Describes in detail development of an index used in Florida to measure the extra cost of providing equal educational opportunity in sparsely settled school districts. (JG)

  2. Revealing the large extra dimension effective interaction at an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider with polarized beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pankov, A. A.; Tsytrinov, A. V.; Paver, N.

    2007-05-01

    Several types of new physics scenarios are represented by contactlike effective interactions. An example is the exchange of nonstandard quanta of very large mass scales, beyond the kinematical limit for direct production set by the available collider energy. This kind of interactions can be revealed only through deviations of observables from the standard model predictions. If such deviations were observed, the relevant source should be identified among the possible models that could explain them. Here, we assess the expected 'identification reach' on the ADD model of gravity in large compactified extra dimensions, against the compositeness-inspired four-fermion contact interaction. As basic observables we take the differential cross sections for fermion-pair production at a 0.5-1 TeV electron-positron linear collider with both beams longitudinally polarized. For the four-fermion contact interaction, we assume a general linear combination of the individual models with definite chiralities, with arbitrary coupling constants. In this sense, the estimated identification reach on the ADD model can be considered as 'model independent'. In the analysis, we give estimates also for the expected 'discovery reaches' on the various scenarios. We emphasize the substantial role of beams polarization in enhancing the sensitivity to the contactlike interactions under consideration.

  3. GIMPs from extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holthausen, Martin; Takahashi, Ryo

    2010-07-01

    We study a scalar field theory in a flat five-dimensional setup, where a scalar field lives in a bulk with a Dirichlet boundary condition, and give an implementation of this setup to the Froggatt-Nielsen (FN) mechanism. It is shown that all couplings of physical field of the scalar with the all brane localized standard model particles are vanishing while realizing the usual FN mechanism. This setup gives the scalar a role as an only Gravitationally Interacting Massive Particle (GIMP), which is a candidate for dark matter.

  4. Measurement of dijet angular distributions at sqrt{s}=1.96TeV and searches for quark compositeness and extra spatial dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, D0

    2009-06-01

    We present the first measurement of dijet angular distributions in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement is based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.7 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector. Dijet angular distributions have been measured over a range of dijet masses, from 0.25 TeV to above 1.1 TeV. The data are in good agreement with the predictions of perturbative QCD and are used to constrain new physics models including quark compositeness, large extra dimensions, and TeV{sup -1} scale extra dimensions. For all models considered, we set the most stringent direct limits to date.

  5. Constraining the Rate of Primordial Black Hole Explosions and Extra-Dimension Scale Using a Low-Frequency Radio Antenna Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutchin, Sean E.; Simonetti, John H.; Ellingson, Steven W.; Larracuente, Amanda S.; Kavic, Michael J.

    2015-12-01

    An exploding primordial black hole (PBH) may produce a single pulse of electromagnetic radiation detectable at the low-frequency end of the radio spectrum. Furthermore, a radio transient from an exploding PBH could be a signature of an extra spatial dimension. We describe here an approach for searching for PBH explosions using a low-frequency radio antenna array, and as a practical example, the results of such a search using the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA). No compelling astrophysical signal was detected in ≈4 hr of data, implying an observational upper limit on the rate of exploding PBHs is 2.3 × 10-7 pc-3 yr-1 for an exploding PBH with a fireball Lorentz factor of 104.3 for the standard scenario of Page and Hawking. This rate limit is the strongest constraint yet set for PBH explosions with this fireball Lorentz factor. Observations (~300 hr) using the Arecibo Observatory were used to set a stronger constraint on the rate of PBH explosions for a fireball Lorentz factor of 104.6, but the limit set by those observations for the fireball Lorentz factor considered here are less stringent by more than an order of magnitude. The limits considered here are applicable to exploding PBHs in the halo of the Galaxy. These observations also imply an upper limit of 2.3 × 10-4 pc-3 yr-1 on the rate of PBH explosions in the context of certain extra dimension models, as described by Kavic et al. This rate limit is for a fireball Lorentz factor of 104.3, which corresponds to an extra dimension compactification scale of 5.0 × 10-18 m.

  6. Search for Large Extra Dimensions in the Production of Jets and Missing Transverse Energy in ppbar Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-04-01

    The authors present the results of a search for new physics in the jets plus missing transverse energy data sample collected from 368 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. They compare the number of events observed in the data with a data-based estimate of the standard model backgrounds contributing to this signature. They observe no significant excess of events, and they interpret this null result in terms of lower limits on the fundamental Planck scale for a large extra dimensions scenario.

  7. Search for Large Extra Dimensions in the Production of Jets and Missing Transverse Energy in pp Collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Budd, S.; Chu, P. H.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Gerberich, H.; Grundler, U.; Junk, T. R.; Kraus, J.; Liss, T. M.; Marino, C.; Pitts, K.; Rogers, E.; Taffard, A.; Veramendi, G.; Zhang, X.; Acosta, D.; Cruz, A.; Field, R.

    2006-10-27

    We present the results of a search for new physics in the jets plus missing transverse energy data sample collected from 368 pb{sup -1} of pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We compare the number of events observed in the data with a data-based estimate of the standard model backgrounds contributing to this signature. We observe no significant excess of events, and we interpret this null result in terms of lower limits on the fundamental Planck scale for a large extra dimensions scenario.

  8. Search for dark matter, extra dimensions, and unparticles in monojet events in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-29

    Our results are presented from a search for particle dark matter (DM), extra dimensions, and unparticles using events containing a jet and an imbalance in transverse momentum. The data were collected by the CMS detector in proton–proton collisions at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb-1 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. The number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits are placed on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section as a function of the DM particle mass for spin-dependent and spin-independent interactions. Limits are also placed on the scale parameter MD in the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali (ADD) model of large extra dimensions, and on the unparticle model parameter ΛU. Finally, the constraints on ADD models and unparticles are the most stringent limits in this channel and those on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section are an improvement over previous collider results.

  9. Search for quark contact interactions and extra spatial dimensions using dijet angular distributions in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Novgorodova, O.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. 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M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Ortona, G.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. 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V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. 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I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Albayrak, E. A.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mathias, B.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Searle, M.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P., III; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Shrestha, S.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.

    2015-06-01

    A search is presented for quark contact interactions and extra spatial dimensions in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV using dijet angular distributions. The search is based on a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 collected by the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. Dijet angular distributions are found to be in agreement with the perturbative QCD predictions that include electroweak corrections. Limits on the contact interaction scale from a variety of models at next-to-leading order in QCD corrections are obtained. A benchmark model in which only left-handed quarks participate is excluded up to a scale of 9.0 (11.7) TeV for destructive (constructive) interference at 95% confidence level. Lower limits between 5.9 and 8.4 TeV on the scale of virtual graviton exchange are extracted for the Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Dvali model of extra spatial dimensions.

  10. Search for dark matter, extra dimensions, and unparticles in monojet events in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 8$$ TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-29

    Our results are presented from a search for particle dark matter (DM), extra dimensions, and unparticles using events containing a jet and an imbalance in transverse momentum. The data were collected by the CMS detector in proton–proton collisions at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb-1 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. The number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits are placed on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section as a function of the DM particle mass for spin-dependent and spin-independent interactions. Limits are also placed on the scale parametermore » MD in the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali (ADD) model of large extra dimensions, and on the unparticle model parameter ΛU. Finally, the constraints on ADD models and unparticles are the most stringent limits in this channel and those on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section are an improvement over previous collider results.« less

  11. W{sup +}W{sup -} production in large extra dimension model at next-to-leading order in QCD at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Neelima; Tiwari, Vivek Kumar; Ravindran, V.; Tripathi, Anurag

    2010-08-01

    We present next-to-leading order QCD corrections to production of two W bosons in hadronic collisions in the extra dimension Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali model. Invariant mass and rapidity distributions are obtained to order {alpha}{sub s} in QCD by taking into account all the parton level subprocesses. The computation is organized using the Monte Carlo based method of phase space slicing. We estimate the impact of the QCD corrections on various observables and find that they are significant. We present some results for a 10 TeV LHC, but most of the results presented here are for 14 TeV LHC. We also show the reduction in factorization scale uncertainty when O({alpha}{sub s}) effects are included.

  12. Next-to-leading order QCD predictions for graviton and photon associated production in the large extra dimensions model at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Xiangdong; Li Chongsheng; Gao Jun; Wang Jian; Oakes, Robert J.

    2010-02-01

    We present the calculations of the complete next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to the inclusive total cross sections for the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton and photon associated production process pp{yields}{gamma}G{sub KK}+X in the large extra dimensions model at the LHC. We show that the NLO QCD corrections in general enhance the total cross sections and reduce the dependence of the total cross sections on the factorization and renormalization scales. When jet veto is considered, the NLO corrections reduce the total cross sections. We also calculate some important differential cross sections for this process at NLO: the missing transverse momentum distribution, the transverse momentum distribution, and the pseudorapidity distribution of photon.

  13. AdS and stabilized extra dimensions in multi-dimensional gravitational models with nonlinear scalar curvature terms R-1 and R4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Uwe; Zhuk, Alexander; Bezerra, Valdir B.; Romero, Carlos

    2005-08-01

    We study multi-dimensional gravitational models with scalar curvature nonlinearities of types R-1 and R4. It is assumed that the corresponding higher dimensional spacetime manifolds undergo a spontaneous compactification to manifolds with a warped product structure. Special attention has been paid to the stability of the extra-dimensional factor spaces. It is shown that for certain parameter regions the systems allow for a freezing stabilization of these spaces. In particular, we find for the R-1 model that configurations with stabilized extra dimensions do not provide a late-time acceleration (they are AdS), whereas the solution branch which allows for accelerated expansion (the dS branch) is incompatible with stabilized factor spaces. In the case of the R4 model, we obtain that the stability region in parameter space depends on the total dimension D = dim(M) of the higher dimensional spacetime M. For D > 8 the stability region consists of a single (absolutely stable) sector which is shielded from a conformal singularity (and an antigravity sector beyond it) by a potential barrier of infinite height and width. This sector is smoothly connected with the stability region of a curvature-linear model. For D < 8 an additional (metastable) sector exists which is separated from the conformal singularity by a potential barrier of finite height and width so that systems in this sector are prone to collapse into the conformal singularity. This second sector is not smoothly connected with the first (absolutely stable) one. Several limiting cases and the possibility of inflation are discussed for the R4 model.

  14. Search for large extra dimensions in final states containing one photon or jet and large missing transverse energy produced in pp collisions at square root[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

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Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-10-31

    We present the results of searches for large extra dimensions in samples of events with large missing transverse energy E_{T} and either a photon or a jet produced in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab II. For gamma+E_{T} and jet+E_{T} candidate samples corresponding to 2.0 and 1.1 fb;{-1} of integrated luminosity, respectively, we observe good agreement with standard model expectations and obtain a combined lower limit on the fundamental parameter of the large extra dimensions model M_{D} as a function of the number of extra dimensions in the model. PMID:18999815

  15. Search for large extra dimensions in final states containing one photon or jet and large missing transverse energy produced in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab /Purdue U.

    2008-07-01

    The authors present the results of searches for large extra dimensions in samples of events with large missing transverse energy E{sub T} and either a photon or a jet produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. For {gamma} + E{sub T} and jet + E{sub T} candidate samples corresponding to 2.0 fb{sup -1} and 1.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity respectively, they observe good agreement with standard model expectations and obtain a combined lower limit on the fundamental parameter of the large extra dimensions model, M{sub D}, as a function of the number of extra dimensions in the model.

  16. Unusual pungency from extra-virgin olive oil is due to restricted spatial expression of oleocanthal’s receptor

    PubMed Central

    Peyrot des Gachons, Catherine; Uchida, Kunitoshi; Bryant, Bruce; Shima, Asako; Sperry, Jeffrey B.; Dankulich-Nagrudny, Luba; Tominaga, Makoto; Smith, Amos B.; Beauchamp, Gary K.; Breslin, Paul A.S.

    2010-01-01

    Oleocanthal, a major phenolic compound in extra-virgin olive oil with anti-inflammatory properties, elicits an unusual oral pungency sensed almost exclusively in the throat. This contrasts with most other common oral irritants, such as cinnamaldehyde, capsaicin, and alcohol, which irritate mucus membranes throughout the oral cavity. Here we show that this rare irritation pattern is a consequence of both the specificity of oleocanthal for a single sensory receptor and the anatomical restriction of this sensory receptor to the pharynx, within the oral cavity. We demonstrate, in vitro, that oleocanthal selectively activates the hTRPA1 channel in HEK 293 cells and that its ability to excite the trigeminal nervous system in rodents requires a functional TRPA1. Moreover, we similarly demonstrate that the over-the-counter analgesic, ibuprofen, which elicits the same restricted pharyngeal irritation as oleocanthal, also specifically excites rodent sensory neurons via TRPA1. Using human sensory psychophysical studies and immunohistochemical TRPA1 analyses of human oral and nasal tissues, we observe an overlap of the anatomical distribution of TRPA1 and the regions irritated by oleocanthal in humans. These results suggest that a TRPA1 (ANKTM1) gene product mediates the tissue sensitivity to oleocanthal within the oral cavity. Further, we demonstrate that, despite the fact that oleocanthal possesses the classic electrophilic reactivity of many TRPA1 agonists, it does not use the previously identified activation mechanism via covalent cysteine modification. These findings provide an anatomical and molecular explanation for a distinct oral sensation elicited by oleocanthal and ibuprofen and that is commonly experienced around the world when consuming many extra-virgin olive oils. PMID:21248124

  17. Extra dose due to extravehicular activity during the NASA4 mission measured by an on-board TLD system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deme, S.; Apathy, I.; Hejja, I.; Lang, E.; Feher, I.

    1999-01-01

    A microprocessor-controlled on-board TLD system, 'Pille'96', was used during the NASA4 (1997) mission to monitor the cosmic radiation dose inside the Mir Space Station and to measure the extra dose to two astronauts in the course of their extravehicular activity (EVA). For the EVA dose measurements, CaSO4:Dy bulb dosemeters were located in specially designed pockets of the ORLAN spacesuits. During an EVA lasting 6 h, the dose ratio inside and outside Mir was measured. During the EVA, Mir crossed the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) three times. Taking into account the influence of these three crossings the mean EVA/internal dose rate ratio was 3.2. Internal dose mapping using CaSO4:Dy dosemeters gave mean dose rates ranging from 9.3 to 18.3 microGy h-1 at locations where the shielding effect was not the same. Evaluation results of the high temperature region of LiF dosemeters are given to estimate the mean LET.

  18. Extra dose due to extravehicular activity during the NASA4 mission measured by an on-board TLD system.

    PubMed

    Deme, S; Apathy, I; Hejja, I; Lang, E; Feher, I

    1999-01-01

    A microprocessor-controlled on-board TLD system, 'Pille'96', was used during the NASA4 (1997) mission to monitor the cosmic radiation dose inside the Mir Space Station and to measure the extra dose to two astronauts in the course of their extravehicular activity (EVA). For the EVA dose measurements, CaSO4:Dy bulb dosemeters were located in specially designed pockets of the ORLAN spacesuits. During an EVA lasting 6 h, the dose ratio inside and outside Mir was measured. During the EVA, Mir crossed the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) three times. Taking into account the influence of these three crossings the mean EVA/internal dose rate ratio was 3.2. Internal dose mapping using CaSO4:Dy dosemeters gave mean dose rates ranging from 9.3 to 18.3 microGy h-1 at locations where the shielding effect was not the same. Evaluation results of the high temperature region of LiF dosemeters are given to estimate the mean LET. PMID:11542227

  19. Limits on extra dimensions and new particle production in the exclusive photon and missing energy signature in pp collisions at square root [s]=1.8 TeV.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Coca, M; Colijn, A P; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Dunietz, I; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Fan, Q; Fang, H-C; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Frisch, H J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Gerstein, E; Giannetti, P; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Grim, G; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Ivanov, A; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Karagoz Unel, M; Karr, K; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Le, Y; Lee, K; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, T; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N S; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Manca, G; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Matthews, J A J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Napora, R; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Nigmanov, T; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Onyisi, P U E; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Pratt, T; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Renton, P; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sato, H; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M

    2002-12-31

    The exclusive gammaE(T) signal has a small standard model cross section and is thus a channel sensitive to new physics. This signature is predicted by models with a superlight gravitino or with large extra spatial dimensions. We search for such signals at the Collider Detector at Fermilab, using 87 pb(-1) of data at square root [s]=1.8 TeV, and extract 95% C.L. limits on these processes. A limit of 221 GeV is set on the scale |F|(1/2) in supersymmetric models. For 4, 6, and 8 extra dimensions, model-dependent limits on the fundamental mass scale M(D) of 0.55, 0.58, and 0.60 TeV, respectively, are found. We also specify a "pseudo-model-independent" method of comparing the results to theoretical predictions. PMID:12513133

  20. Search for contact interactions and large extra dimensions in the dilepton channel using proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2014-12-11

    Research is conducted for non-resonant new phenomena in dielectron and dimuon final states, originating from either contact interactions or large extra spatial dimensions. The LHC 2012 proton–proton collision dataset recorded by the ATLAS detector is used, corresponding to 20 fb–1 at √s = 8 TeV. The dilepton invariant mass spectrum is a discriminating variable in both searches, with the contact interaction search additionally utilizing the dilepton forward-backward asymmetry. No significant deviations from the Standard Model expectation are observed. Lower limits are set on the ℓℓqq contact interaction scale Λ between 15.4 TeV and 26.3 TeV, at the 95% credibility level. For large extra spatial dimensions, lower limits are set on the string scale MS between 3.2 TeV to 5.0 TeV.

  1. Search for contact interactions and large extra dimensions in the dilepton channel using proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.

    2014-12-11

    Research is conducted for non-resonant new phenomena in dielectron and dimuon final states, originating from either contact interactions or large extra spatial dimensions. The LHC 2012 proton–proton collision dataset recorded by the ATLAS detector is used, corresponding to 20 fb–1 at √s = 8 TeV. The dilepton invariant mass spectrum is a discriminating variable in both searches, with the contact interaction search additionally utilizing the dilepton forward-backward asymmetry. No significant deviations from the Standard Model expectation are observed. Lower limits are set on the ℓℓqq contact interaction scale Λ between 15.4 TeV and 26.3 TeV, at the 95% credibility level.more » For large extra spatial dimensions, lower limits are set on the string scale MS between 3.2 TeV to 5.0 TeV.« less

  2. Esthetic and functional rehabilitation of mutilated dentition and loss of vertical dimension due to amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Shweta; Tewari, Sanjay; Goel, Rajat

    2014-04-01

    Cases of severe attrition are a common finding. Among the congenital anomalies, amelogenesis imperfecta and dentinogenesis imperfecta are important conditions that may cause accelerated wear of teeth. The following case report describes the complete oral rehabilitation of a patient diagnosed with amelogenesis imperfecta. A detailed treatment plan was chalked out which included proper oral hygiene measures, restoration of carious teeth and endodontic treatment followed by foundation restorations of teeth that were crucial for the final prostheses. Patient was given transitional restorations for about 6 weeks with the aim of regaining the lost vertical dimensions. Final rehabilitation was done by fixed dental prostheses. PMID:25565735

  3. Rare erroneous results on the Siemens Dimension Vista® platform due to urine carryover: A warning to current users.

    PubMed

    Karger, Amy B; Senn, Christine; Skogseth, Kathy; Floodman, Stacy

    2016-07-01

    In 2014, the West Bank Laboratory at the University of Minnesota, part of the non-profit Fairview Health Services system, went live with two Siemens Dimension Vista® 500 instruments. In the first few months after go-live, the lab began receiving reports of rare, erroneous results from clinicians. After further investigation it was noted that most of the errors being reported followed a consistent pattern with significantly elevated potassium, BUN and creatinine. After months of unsuccessful troubleshooting with Siemens, our lab and others within the Fairview Health Services system began hypothesizing that urine carryover was occurring due to the pattern of elevated analytes, and asked Siemens to investigate this hypothesis. In March 2016 Siemens confirmed a software defect which omits an aliquot probe rinse resulting in sample carryover in rare cases. Our objective is to alert current users of the Siemens Dimension Vista® instruments to this rare but alarming phenomenon, discuss the frequency and impact of the erroneous results at our institution, and detail recommended steps for users of Siemens Dimension Vista® instruments to help retrospectively determine whether they have experienced similar erroneous results. PMID:27174361

  4. Search for dark matter candidates and large extra dimensions in events with a photon and missing transverse momentum in pp collision data at sqrt[s]=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abajyan, T; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdel Khalek, S; Abdelalim, A A; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abouzeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Agustoni, M; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Akesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Alam, M S; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Allbrooke, B M M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Andrieux, M-L; Anduaga, X S; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aoun, S; Aperio Bella, L; Apolle, R; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J-F; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnal, V; Arnault, C; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Arutinov, D; Asai, S; Asfandiyarov, R; Ask, S; Asman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astbury, A; Atkinson, M; Aubert, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Avramidou, R; Axen, D; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baccaglioni, G; Bacci, C; Bach, A M; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Badescu, E; Bagnaia, P; Bahinipati, S; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, M D; Baker, S; Banas, E; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, Sw; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Baranov, S P; Barbaro Galtieri, A; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Barrillon, P; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartsch, V; Basye, A; Bates, R L; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beale, S; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, A K; Becker, S; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bedikian, S; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Begel, M; Behar Harpaz, S; Behera, P K; Beimforde, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellina, F; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Beloborodova, O; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez Garcia, J A; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bertella, C; Bertin, A; Bertolucci, F; Besana, M I; Besjes, G J; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieniek, S P; Bierwagen, K; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biscarat, C; Bittner, B; Black, K M; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V B; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Boddy, C R; Boehler, M; Boek, J; Boelaert, N; Bogaerts, J A; Bogdanchikov, A; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Bolnet, N M; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Bordoni, S; Borer, C; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borjanovic, I; Borri, M; Borroni, S; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boterenbrood, H; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Branchini, P; Brandenburg, G W; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; 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Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinek, E; Vinogradov, V B; Virchaux, M; Virzi, J; Vitells, O; Viti, M; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vogel, A; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; Volpini, G; von der Schmitt, H; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorwerk, V; Vos, M; Voss, R; Voss, T T; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Wagner, W; Wagner, P; Wahlen, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walch, S; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wall, R; Waller, P; Walsh, B; Wang, C; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Warsinsky, M; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watanabe, I; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, A T; Waugh, B M; Weber, M S; Weber, P; Weidberg, A R; Weigell, P; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wendland, D; Weng, Z; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Werth, M; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Weydert, C; Whalen, K; Wheeler-Ellis, S J; White, A; White, M J; White, S; Whitehead, S R; Whiteson, D; Whittington, D; Wicek, F; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wijeratne, P A; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilhelm, I; Wilkens, H G; Will, J Z; Williams, E; Williams, H H; Willis, W; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wilson, M G; Wilson, A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winkelmann, S; Winklmeier, F; Wittgen, M; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wong, W C; Wooden, G; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wraight, K; Wright, M; Wrona, B; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wulf, E; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xiao, M; Xie, S; Xu, C; Xu, D; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, H; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamanaka, T; Yamaoka, J; Yamazaki, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yanush, S; Yao, L; Yao, Y; Yasu, Y; Ybeles Smit, G V; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Young, C; Young, C J; Youssef, S; Yu, D; Yu, J; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zajacova, Z; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zaytsev, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zendler, C; Zenin, O; Zeniš, T; Zinonos, Z; Zenz, S; Zerwas, D; Zevi Della Porta, G; Zhan, Z; Zhang, D; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, L; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, N; Zhou, Y; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhuravlov, V; Zieminska, D; Zimin, N I; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Zivković, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    2013-01-01

    Results of a search for new phenomena in events with an energetic photon and large missing transverse momentum in proton-proton collisions at sqrt[s] = 7 TeV are reported. Data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb(-1) are used. Good agreement is observed between the data and the standard model predictions. The results are translated into exclusion limits on models with large extra spatial dimensions and on pair production of weakly interacting dark matter candidates. PMID:23383779

  5. Due Process Rights in Public Education: The Constitutional Dimensions of an Employee's 14th Amendment Liberty Interest in Good Name and Reputation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uerling, Donald F.; Strope, John L., Jr.

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the due-process rights of public employees. These particular rights are grounded in the constitutionally protected liberty interest in one's good name and reputation. Both employers and employees should be aware of what parameters case law provides with regard to the dimensions of this due-process right and…

  6. Extra Yq and partial monosomy 12p due to a Y;12 translocation in a boy with features of the 12p deletion syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Orye, E; Craen, M; Laureys, G; van Coster, R; van Mele, B

    1985-01-01

    A Y;12 translocation, resulting in extra Yq material and partial monosomy 12p, was found in a 7 1/2 year old boy. He showed growth and mental retardation and several of the congenital anomalies seen in the 12p deletion syndrome. LDHB activity, the gene for which is located at 12p12, was normal in serum, in accordance with the suspected 12p13 deletion in the patient. Images PMID:4009644

  7. Gravitational contributions to the running Yang-Mills coupling in large extra-dimensional brane worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Dietmar; Plefka, Jan; Rodigast, Andreas

    2009-02-01

    We study the question of a modification of the running gauge coupling of Yang-Mills theories due to quantum gravitational effects in a compact large extra dimensional brane world scenario with a low energy quantum gravity scale. The ADD scenario is applied for a D = d+δ dimensional space-time in which gravitons freely propagate, whereas the non-abelian gauge fields are confined to a d-dimensional brane. The extra dimensions are taken to be toroidal and the transverse fluctuation modes (branons) of the brane are taken into account. On this basis we have calculated the one-loop corrections due to virtual Kaluza-Klein graviton and branon modes for the gluon two- and three-point functions in an effective field theory treatment. Applying momentum cut-off regularization we find that for a d = 4 brane the leading gravitational divergencies cancel irrespective of the number of extra dimensions δ, generalizing previous results in the absence of extra-dimensions. Hence, again the Yang-Mills β-function receives no gravitational corrections at one-loop. This is no longer true in a `universal' extra dimensional scenario with a d > 4 dimensional brane. Moreover, the subleading power-law gravitational divergencies induce higher-dimensional counterterms, which we establish in our scheme. Interestingly, for d = 4 these gravitationally induced counterterms are of the form recently considered in non-abelian Lee-Wick extensions of the standard model—now with a possible mass scale in the TeV range due to the presence of large extra dimensions.

  8. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Uttam M; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H; Gullberg, Grant T

    2015-11-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. These results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images. PMID:26450115

  9. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-10-09

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. We find these results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images.

  10. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-10-09

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variationmore » of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. We find these results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images.« less

  11. Image Reconstruction in Higher Dimensions: Myocardial Perfusion Imaging of Tracer Dynamics with Cardiac Motion Due to Deformation and Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. These results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. However, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images. PMID:26450115

  12. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-11-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. These results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images.

  13. Extra Copies of der(21)t(12;21) plus Deletion of ETV6 Gene due to dic(12;18) in B-Cell Precursor ALL with Poor Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Hernandes, Marina Araújo Fonzar; Marques-Salles, Terezinha de Jesus; Mkrtchyan, Hasmik; Soares-Ventura, Eliane Maria; Leite, Edinalva Pereira; Muniz, Maria Tereza Cartaxo; Cornélio, Maria Teresa Marquim Nogueira; Liehr, Thomas; Santos, Neide; Silva, Maria Luiza Macedo

    2012-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), CD10+ B-cell precursor, represents the most frequent type of childhood ALL from 3 to 6 years of age. The t(12;21)(p13;q22) occurs in 25% of cases of B-cell precursor ALL, it is rare in children less than 24 months and have been related to good prognosis. Some relapse cases and unfavorable prognosis in ALL CD10+ are associated with t(12;21) bearing additional aberrations as extra copies of chromosome 21 and ETV6 gene loss. This report describes the case of a 15 month-year old girl, who displayed a karyotype with addition on chromosome 12p plus trisomy 10 and tetrasomy of chromosome 21. Molecular cytogenetic studies revealed two extra copies of the der(21) t(12;21), trisomy 10 and deletion of the second ETV6 gene due to the dic(12;18). These findings show the great importance of molecular cytogenetic studies to clarify complex karyotypes, to define prognostic, to carry out risk group stratification and to support correctly disease treatment in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:23074685

  14. Attitude Strength: An Extra-Content Aspect of Attitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwitt, Linda F.

    Attitude strength is considered as an extra-content aspect of attitude. A model of the relationship of attitude strength to attitude direction and behavior proposes that attitude strength is comprised of three dimensions that moderate the relationship between attitude direction and behavior. The dimensions are parallel to the tripartite dimensions…

  15. Extra-dimensional models on the lattice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Knechtli, Francesco; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2016-08-05

    In this paper we summarize the ongoing effort to study extra-dimensional gauge theories with lattice simulations. In these models the Higgs field is identified with extra-dimensional components of the gauge field. The Higgs potential is generated by quantum corrections and is protected from divergences by the higher dimensional gauge symmetry. Dimensional reduction to four dimensions can occur through compactification or localization. Gauge-Higgs unification models are often studied using perturbation theory. Numerical lattice simulations are used to go beyond these perturbative expectations and to include nonperturbative effects. We describe the known perturbative predictions and their fate in the strongly-coupled regime formore » various extra-dimensional models.« less

  16. Space: The Hunt for Hidden Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, JoAnne

    2006-04-25

    Extra dimensions of space may be present in our universe. Their discovery would dramatically change our view of the cosmos and would prompt many questions. How do they hide? What is their shape? How many are there? How big are they? Do particles and forces feel their presence? This lecture will explain the concept of dimensions and show that current theoretical models predict the existence of extra spatial dimensions which could be in the discovery reach of present and near-term experiments. The manner by which these additional dimensions reveal their existence will be described. Searches for modifications of the gravitational force, astrophysical effects, and collider signatures already constrain the size of extra dimensions and will be summarized. Once new dimensions are discovered, the technology by which the above questions can be answered will be discussed.

  17. Constructing gravitational dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Matthew

    2003-07-01

    It would be extremely useful to know whether a particular low energy effective theory might have come from a compactification of a higher dimensional space. Here, this problem is approached from the ground up by considering theories with multiple interacting massive gravitons. It is actually very difficult to construct discrete gravitational dimensions which have a local continuum limit. In fact, any model with only nearest neighbor interactions is doomed. If we could find a non-linear extension for the Fierz-Pauli Lagrangian for a graviton of mass mg, which does not break down until the scale Λ2=(mgMPl), this could be used to construct a large class of models whose continuum limit is local in the extra dimension. But this is shown to be impossible: a theory with a single graviton must break down by Λ3=(m2gMPl)1/3. Next, we look at how the discretization prescribed by the truncation of the Kaluza-Klein tower of an honest extra dimension raises the scale of strong coupling. It dictates an intricate set of interactions among various fields which conspire to soften the strongest scattering amplitudes and allow for a local continuum limit, at least at the tree level. A number of candidate symmetries associated with locality in the discretized dimension are also discussed.

  18. On the variability of near-bed floc size due to complex interactions between turbulence, SSC, settling velocity, effective density and the fractal dimension of flocs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Ya Ping; Li, Chunyan; Gao, Shu; Shi, Benwei; Zhou, Liang; Wang, Dandan; Li, Gaocong; Dai, Chen

    2016-04-01

    Interactions between turbulence, suspended sediment concentration (SSC), settling velocity, effective density, fractal dimension, and floc size were studied on the tide-dominated, muddy coastal shelf of the southwestern Yellow Sea, China. The measurements were carried out in July 2013 at two sites located in water depths of 21.2 and 22.1 m. Negative correlations were observed between shear rate, SSC, effective density, and mean floc size, which supports the results of previous numerical, experimental, and field studies. A significant positive correlation was observed between near-bed SSC and shear rate, an indication that SSC variations are controlled by turbulence and re-suspension. In addition, significant linear relationships were found between settling velocity and other parameters (floc size, turbulence, SSC, effective density, and fractal dimension) at the two sites, indicating that the controlling factors on settling velocity are spatially variable. Principal component analysis was applied to determine the relative importance of turbulence, flocculation ability, and SSC as controls on floc size in situ. The relative contributions of turbulence, flocculation ability, and SSC to floc size (at both sites) were ~33.0%, 30.3%, and 29.7%, respectively, this being a new field-based quantitative analysis of the controls on floc size. The findings demonstrate that, in nature, flocculation ability affects floc size to the same degree as turbulence and SSC. Therefore, predictions of floc size in coastal marine environments require constraints not only on turbulence and SSC, but also on flocculation ability.

  19. Infinitely Large New Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Dimopoulos, Savas; Dvali, Gia; Kaloper, Nemanja

    1999-07-29

    We construct intersecting brane configurations in Anti-de-Sitter space localizing gravity to the intersection region, with any number n of extra dimensions. This allows us to construct two kinds of theories with infinitely large new dimensions, TeV scale quantum gravity and sub-millimeter deviations from Newton's Law. The effective 4D Planck scale M{sub Pl} is determined in terms of the fundamental Planck scale M{sub *} and the AdS radius of curvature L via the familiar relation M{sub Pl}{sup 2} {approx} M{sub *}{sup 2+n} L{sup n}; L acts as an effective radius of compactification for gravity on the intersection. Taking M{sub *} {approx} TeV and L {approx} sub-mm reproduces the phenomenology of theories with large extra dimensions. Alternately, taking M{sub *} {approx} L{sup -1} {approx} M{sub Pl}, and placing our 3-brane a distance {approx} 100M{sub Pl}{sup -1} away from the intersection gives us a theory with an exponential determination of the Weak/Planck hierarchy.

  20. Isocurvature perturbations in extra radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Koichi; Nakayama, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu E-mail: miyamone@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: oyokazu.sekiguchi@nagoya-u.jp

    2012-02-01

    Recent cosmological observations, including measurements of the CMB anisotropy and the primordial helium abundance, indicate the existence of an extra radiation component in the Universe beyond the standard three neutrino species. In this paper we explore the possibility that the extra radiation has isocurvatrue fluctuations. A general formalism to evaluate isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation is provided in the mixed inflaton-curvaton system, where the extra radiation is produced by the decay of both scalar fields. We also derive constraints on the abundance of the extra radiation and the amount of its isocurvature perturbation. Current observational data favors the existence of an extra radiation component, but does not indicate its having isocurvature perturbation. These constraints are applied to some particle physics motivated models. If future observations detect isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation, it will give us a hint to the origin of the extra radiation.

  1. 47,XY,+der(X)t(X;18)(p11.4;p11.22): A Unique Aneuploidy Associated with Klinefelter Syndrome due to an Extra Derivative X Chromosome Inherited Maternally.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ji; Zhang, Yongsheng; Wang, Ruixue; Liang, Zuowen; Yue, Jiaming; Liu, Ruizhi

    2015-01-01

    A derivative X chromosome formed by translocation involving an X chromosome and a chromosome 18 in a Klinefelter syndrome (KS) patient with a 47,XXY karyotype has not been reported before. In this study, we present the clinical and molecular cytogenetic characteristics. The patient presented with small testes and azoospermia. G-banding analysis identified the karyotype as 47,XY,del(X)(p?11.4). Array CGH detected a 10.36-Mb duplication of chromosome region 18p11.22p11.32 (14,316-10,377,516) and a 111.18-Mb duplication of chromosome region Xp11.4q28 (61,931, 689-155,111,583), in addition to the normal chromosome 18 and an X chromosome. FISH results further revealed the extra 18p located at the end of the short arm of a deleted X chromosome, forming a derivative X chromosome. Finally, we identified the karyotype of the patient as 47,XY,+der(X)t(X;18)(p11.4;p11.22). The derivative X chromosome was maternally inherited. To our knowledge, this rare karyotype has not yet been reported in the literature. The present study may suggest a novel karyotype associated with KS. PMID:26430900

  2. New fuzzy extra dimensions from S U (N ) gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürkçüoǧlu, Seçkin

    2015-07-01

    We start with an S U (N ) Yang-Mills theory on a manifold M , suitably coupled to scalar fields in the adjoint representation of S U (N ) , which are forming a doublet and a triplet, respectively, under a global S U (2 ) symmetry. We show that a direct sum of fuzzy spheres SF2 Int≔SF2(ℓ)⊕SF2(ℓ)⊕SF2(ℓ+1/2 )⊕SF2(ℓ-1/2 ) emerges as the vacuum solution after the spontaneous breaking of the gauge symmetry and paves the way for us to interpret the spontaneously broken model as a U (n ) gauge theory over M ×SF2 Int . Focusing on a U (2 ) gauge theory, we present complete parametrizations of the S U (2 )-equivariant, scalar, spinor and vector fields characterizing the effective low energy features of this model. Next, we direct our attention to the monopole bundles SF2 ±≔SF2(ℓ)⊕SF2(ℓ±1/2 ) over SF2(ℓ) with winding numbers ±1 , which naturally come forth through certain projections of SF2 Int , and give the parametrizations of the S U (2 )-equivariant fields of the U (2 ) gauge theory over M ×SF2 ± as a projected subset of those of the parent model. Referring to our earlier work [1], we explain the essential features of the low energy effective action that ensues from this model after dimensional reduction. Replacing the doublet with a k -component multiplet of the global S U (2 ), we provide a detailed study of vacuum solutions that appear as direct sums of fuzzy spheres as a consequence of the spontaneous breaking of S U (N ) gauge symmetry in these models and obtain a class of winding number ±(k -1 )∈Z monopole bundles SF2 ,±(k -1 ) over SF2(ℓ) as certain projections of these vacuum solutions and briefly discuss their equivariant field content. We make the observation that SF2 Int is indeed the bosonic part of the N =2 fuzzy supersphere with O S P (2 ,2 ) supersymmetry and construct the generators of the o s p (2 ,2 ) Lie superalgebra in two of its irreducible representations using the matrix content of the vacuum solution SF2 Int . Finally, we show that our vacuum solutions are stable by demonstrating that they form mixed states with nonzero von Neumann entropy.

  3. Toward the stabilization of extra dimensions by brane dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Noriaki

    2015-04-01

    All the models of elementary particles and their interactions derived from String Theory involve a compact six-dimensional internal space. Its volume and shape should be fixed or stabilized, since otherwise massless scalar fields (moduli) reflecting their deformations appear in our four-dimensional space-time, with sizable effects on known particles and fields. We propose a strategy toward stabilizing the compact space without fluxes of three-form fields from closed strings. Our main motivation and goal is to proceed insofar as possible within conventional string worldsheet theory. As we shall see, D-branes with magnetic flux ("magnetized D-branes") and the forces between them can be used to this end. We investigate here some necessary ingredients: open string one-loop vacuum amplitudes between magnetized D-branes, magnetized D-branes fixed at orbifold singularities, and potential energies among such D-branes in the compact space that result from tree-level closed string exchanges.

  4. Predictions of Warped Extra Dimensions for Flavor Phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Gori, Stefania

    2010-02-10

    The aim of these proceedings is to present the main predictions of the Randall-Sundrum model with custodial protection for particle-antiparticle mixing and rare decays of K and B{sub s,d} mesons, putting particular attention on the testability of the resulting NP effects at future experiments. Before giving numerical results, we discuss theoretical expectations, residing in the flavor structure of the model. The high energy scale M{sub KK} is chosen in such a way that direct searches of new particles at the LHC are possible, still being consistent with electroweak precision observables.

  5. Anomaly driven signatures of extra U(1)'s

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Boyarsky, Alexey; Ruchayskiy, Oleg

    2010-02-10

    Anomaly cancellation between different sectors of a theory may mediate new interactions between gauge bosons. Such interactions lead to observable effects both at precision laboratory experiments and at accelerators. Such experiments may reveal the presence of hidden sectors or hidden extra dimensions.

  6. Particle creation by naked singularities in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Umpei; Nemoto, Hiroya; Shimano, Masahiro

    2011-04-15

    Recently, the possibility was pointed out by one of the present authors and his collaborators that an effective naked singularity referred to as ''a visible border of spacetime'' is generated by high-energy particle collision in the context of large extra dimensions or TeV-scale gravity. In this paper, we investigate the particle creation by a naked singularity in general dimensions, while adopting a model in which a marginally naked singularity forms in the collapse of a homothetic lightlike pressureless fluid. We find that the spectrum deviates from that of Hawking radiation due to scattering near the singularity but can be recast in quasithermal form. The temperature is always higher than that of Hawking radiation of a same-mass black hole, and can be arbitrarily high depending on a parameter in the model. This implies that, in principle, the naked singularity may be distinguished from a black hole in collider experiments.

  7. Cosmic string evolution in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Avgoustidis, A.; Shellard, E.P.S.

    2005-06-15

    We obtain the equations of motion for cosmic strings in extensions of the 3+1 Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) model with extra dimensions. From these we derive a generalization of the velocity-dependent one-scale model for cosmic string network evolution which we apply, first, to a higher-dimensional isotropic D+1 FRW model and, second, to a 3+1 FRW model with static flat extra dimensions. In the former case the string network does not achieve a scaling regime because of the diminishing rate of string intersections (D>3), but this can be avoided in the latter case by considering compact, small extra dimensions, for which there is a reduced but still appreciable string intercommuting probability. We note that the velocity components lying in the three expanding dimensions are Hubble damped, whereas those in the static extra dimensions are only very weakly damped. This leads to the pathological possibility, in principle, that string motion in the three infinite dimensions can come to a halt preventing the strings from intersecting, with the result that scaling is not achieved and the strings irreversibly dominate the early universe. We note criteria by which this can be avoided, notably if the spatial structure of the network becomes essentially three-dimensional, as is expected for string networks produced in brane inflation. Applying our model to a brane inflation setting, we find scaling solutions in which the effective 3D string motion does not necessarily stop, but it is slowed down because of the excitations trapped in the extra dimensions. These effects are likely to influence cosmic string network evolution for a long period after formation and we discuss their more general implications.

  8. Extra-axial brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Rapalino, Otto; Smirniotopoulos, James G

    2016-01-01

    Extra-axial brain tumors are the most common adult intracranial neoplasms and encompass a broad spectrum of pathologic subtypes. Meningiomas are the most common extra-axial brain tumor (approximately one-third of all intracranial neoplasms) and typically present as slowly growing dural-based masses. Benign meningiomas are very common, and may occasionally be difficult to differentiate from more aggressive subtypes (i.e., atypical or malignant varieties) or other dural-based masses with more aggressive biologic behavior (e.g., hemangiopericytoma or dural-based metastases). Many neoplasms that typically affect the brain parenchyma (intra-axial), such as gliomas, may also present with primary or secondary extra-axial involvement. This chapter provides a general and concise overview of the common types of extra-axial tumors and their typical imaging features. PMID:27432671

  9. Extra relativistic degrees of freedom without extra particles using Planck data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastache, Jorge; de la Macorra, Axel

    2013-08-01

    A recent number of analyses of cosmological data have shown indications for the presence of extra radiation beyond the standard model at the equality and nucleosynthesis epochs, which has been usually interpreted as an effective number of neutrinos, Neff>3.046. In this work we establish the theoretical basis for a particle physics-motivated model (bound dark matter, BDM) which explains the need for extra radiation. The BDM model describes dark matter particles which are relativistic at a scale below aac due to nonperturbative methods (as protons and neutrons do) and this process is described by a time-dependent equation of state, ωBDM(a). Owing to this behavior the amount of extra radiation changes as a function of the scale factor, and this implies that the extra relativistic degrees of freedom Nex may also vary as a function of the scale factor. This is favored by data on the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) epochs. We compute the range of values of the BDM model parameters, xc=acvc, that explain the values obtained for the He4 at BBN and Neff at equality. Combining different analyses, we compute the values xc=4.13((+3.65)/(-4.13))×10-5 and vc=0.37-0.17+0.18. We conclude that we can account for the apparent extra neutrino degrees of freedom Nex using a phase transition in the dark matter with a time-dependent equation of state without introducing extra relativistic particles.

  10. Physics in One Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertel, Erminald

    2013-01-01

    Due to progress in nanotechnology high-quality quantum wires can nowadays be fabricated. The behavior of particles in one dimension differs significantly from that in three-dimensional (3D) systems, yet the physics of such low-dimensional systems is generally not very well represented in standard undergraduate or graduate curricula. For instance,…

  11. Constraints on Universal Extra-Dimensional Dark Matter from Direct Detection Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torpin, Trevor; Duda, Gintaras

    2011-04-01

    Detection of dark matter is one of the most challenging and important problems in astro-particle physics. One theory that produces a viable particle dark matter candidate is Universal Extra Dimensions (UED), in which the existence of a 4th spatial dimension is theorized. The extra dimension is not seen because it is compactifed on a circular orbifold whose radius is too small to be observed with current technology. What separates this theory over other Kaluza-Klein-type theories is that UED allows all standard model particles and fields to propagate in the extra dimension. The dark matter candidate in UED theories is a stable particle known as the Lightest Kaluza-Klein Particle or LKP, and the LKP can exist with sufficient relic density to serve as the dark matter. This work will present bounds on UED model parameters from direct dark matter searches such as the CDMS II.

  12. Practitioners' Perceptions of the Soccer Extra-Time Period: Implications for Future Research.

    PubMed

    Harper, Liam D; Fothergill, Melissa; West, Daniel J; Stevenson, Emma; Russell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative research investigating soccer practitioners' perceptions can allow researchers to create practical research investigations. The extra-time period of soccer is understudied compared to other areas of soccer research. Using an open-ended online survey containing eleven main and nine sub questions, we gathered the perceptions of extra-time from 46 soccer practitioners, all working for different professional soccer clubs. Questions related to current practices, views on extra-time regulations, and ideas for future research. Using inductive content analysis, the following general dimensions were identified: 'importance of extra-time', 'rule changes', 'efficacy of extra-time hydro-nutritional provision', 'nutritional timing', 'future research directions', 'preparatory modulations' and 'recovery'. The majority of practitioners (63%) either agreed or strongly agreed that extra-time is an important period for determining success in knockout football match-play. When asked if a fourth substitution should be permitted in extra-time, 67% agreed. The use of hydro-nutritional strategies prior to extra-time was predominately considered important or very important. However; only 41% of practitioners felt that it was the most important time point for the use of nutritional products. A similar number of practitioners account (50%) and do not (50%) account for the potential of extra-time when training and preparing players and 89% of practitioners stated that extra-time influences recovery practices following matches. In the five minute break prior to extra-time, the following practices (in order of priority) were advocated to players: hydration, energy provision, massage, and tactical preparations. Additionally, 87% of practitioners advocate a particular nutritional supplementation strategy prior to extra-time. In order of importance, practitioners see the following as future research areas: nutritional interventions, fatigue responses, acute injury risk, recovery

  13. Origin of the 'Extra Entropy'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    2008-01-01

    I will discuss how one can determine the origin of the 'extra entropy' in groups and clusters and the feedback needed in models of galaxy formation. I will stress the use of x-ray spectroscopy and imaging and the critical value that Con-X has in this regard.

  14. Error bounds from extra precise iterative refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Demmel, James; Hida, Yozo; Kahan, William; Li, Xiaoye S.; Mukherjee, Soni; Riedy, E. Jason

    2005-02-07

    We present the design and testing of an algorithm for iterative refinement of the solution of linear equations, where the residual is computed with extra precision. This algorithm was originally proposed in the 1960s [6, 22] as a means to compute very accurate solutions to all but the most ill-conditioned linear systems of equations. However two obstacles have until now prevented its adoption in standard subroutine libraries like LAPACK: (1) There was no standard way to access the higher precision arithmetic needed to compute residuals, and (2) it was unclear how to compute a reliable error bound for the computed solution. The completion of the new BLAS Technical Forum Standard [5] has recently removed the first obstacle. To overcome the second obstacle, we show how a single application of iterative refinement can be used to compute an error bound in any norm at small cost, and use this to compute both an error bound in the usual infinity norm, and a componentwise relative error bound. We report extensive test results on over 6.2 million matrices of dimension 5, 10, 100, and 1000. As long as a normwise (resp. componentwise) condition number computed by the algorithm is less than 1/max{l_brace}10,{radical}n{r_brace} {var_epsilon}{sub w}, the computed normwise (resp. componentwise) error bound is at most 2 max{l_brace}10,{radical}n{r_brace} {center_dot} {var_epsilon}{sub w}, and indeed bounds the true error. Here, n is the matrix dimension and w is single precision roundoff error. For worse conditioned problems, we get similarly small correct error bounds in over 89.4% of cases.

  15. Extra-Territorial Siting of Nuclear Installations

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Thomas E.; Morris, Frederic A.

    2009-10-07

    Arrangements might be created for siting nuclear installations on land ceded by a host State for administration by an international or multinational organization. Such arrangements might prove useful in terms of resolving suspicions of proliferation in troubled areas of the world, or as a means to introduce nuclear activities into areas where political, financial or technical capabilities might otherwise make such activities unsound, or as a means to enable global solutions to be instituted for major nuclear concerns (e.g., spent fuel management). The paper examines practical matters associated with the legal and programmatic aspects of siting nuclear installations, including diplomatic/political frameworks, engaging competent industrial bodies, protection against seizure, regulation to ensure safety and security, waste management, and conditions related to the dissolution of the extra-territorial provisions as may be agreed as the host State(s) achieve the capabilities to own and operate the installations. The paper considers the potential for using such a mechanism across the spectrum of nuclear power activities, from mining to geological repositories for nuclear waste. The paper considers the non-proliferation dimensions associated with such arrangements, and the pros and cons affecting potential host States, technology vendor States, regional neighbors and the international community. It considers in brief potential applications in several locations today.

  16. Screening and validation of EXTraS data products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpano, Stefania; Haberl, F.; De Luca, A.; Tiengo, A.: Israel, G.; Rodriguez, G.; Belfiore, A.; Rosen, S.; Read, A.; Wilms, J.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Law-Green, D.

    2015-09-01

    The EXTraS project (Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky) is aimed at fullyexploring the serendipitous content of the XMM-Newton EPIC database in the timedomain. The project is funded within the EU/FP7-Cooperation Space framework and is carried out by a collaboration including INAF (Italy), IUSS (Italy), CNR/IMATI (Italy), University of Leicester (UK), MPE (Germany) and ECAP (Germany). The several tasks consist in characterise aperiodicvariability for all 3XMM sources, search for short-term periodic variability on hundreds of thousands sources, detect new transient sources that are missed by standard source detection and hence not belonging to the 3XMM catalogue, search for long term variability by measuring fluxes or upper limits for both pointed and slew observations, and finally perform multiwavelength characterisation andclassification. Screening and validation of the different products is essentially in order to reject flawed results, generated by the automatic pipelines. We present here the screening tool we developed in the form of a Graphical User Interface and our plans for a systematic screening of the different catalogues.

  17. Dynamics of particles near black hole with higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Iftikhar, Sehrish

    2016-07-01

    This paper explores the dynamics of particles in higher dimensions. For this purpose, we discuss some interesting features related to the motion of particles near a Myers-Perry black hole with arbitrary extra dimensions as well as a single non-zero spin parameter. Assuming it as a supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy, we calculate red-blue shifts in the equatorial plane for the far away observer as well as the corresponding black hole parameters of the photons. Next, we study the Penrose process and find that the energy gain of the particle depends on the variation of the black hole dimensions. Finally, we discuss the center of mass energy for 11 dimensions, which indicates a similar behavior to that of four dimensions but it is higher in four dimensions than five or more dimensions. We conclude that higher dimensions have a great impact on the particle dynamics.

  18. An Operant Intra-/Extra-dimensional Set-shift Task for Mice

    PubMed Central

    Scheggia, Diego; Papaleo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in executive control and cognitive flexibility, such as attentional set-shifting abilities, are core features of several neuropsychiatric diseases. The most widely used neuropsychological tests for the evaluation of attentional set-shifting in human subjects are the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and the CANTAB Intra-/Extra-dimensional set shift task (ID/ED). These tasks have proven clinical relevance and have been modified and successfully adapted for research in animal models. However, currently available tasks for rodents present several limitations, mainly due to their manual-based testing procedures, which are hampering translational advances in psychiatric medicine. To overcome these limitations and to better mimic the original version in primates, we present the development of a novel operant-based two-chamber ID/ED "Operon" task for rodents. We demonstrated the effectiveness of this novel task to measure different facets of cognitive flexibility in mice including attentional set formation and shifting, and reversal learning. Moreover, we show the high flexibility of this task in which three different perceptual dimensions can be manipulated with a high number of stimuli cues for each dimension. This novel ID/ED Operon task can be an effective preclinical tool for drug testing and/or large genetic screening relevant to the study of executive dysfunction and cognitive symptoms found in psychiatric disorders. PMID:26863331

  19. Extra Chance Generalized Hybrid Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Cédric M.; Sanz-Serna, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    We study a method, Extra Chance Generalized Hybrid Monte Carlo, to avoid rejections in the Hybrid Monte Carlo method and related algorithms. In the spirit of delayed rejection, whenever a rejection would occur, extra work is done to find a fresh proposal that, hopefully, may be accepted. We present experiments that clearly indicate that the additional work per sample carried out in the extra chance approach clearly pays in terms of the quality of the samples generated.

  20. Signatures from an extra-dimensional seesaw model

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Melbeus, Henrik; Ohlsson, Tommy; Zhang He

    2010-08-15

    We study the generation of small neutrino masses in an extra-dimensional model, where singlet fermions are allowed to propagate in the extra dimension, while the standard model particles are confined to a brane. Motivated by the fact that extra-dimensional models are nonrenormalizable, we truncate the Kaluza-Klein towers at a maximal Kaluza-Klein number. This truncation, together with the structure of the bulk Majorana mass term, motivated by the Sherk-Schwarz mechanism, implies that the Kaluza-Klein modes of the singlet fermions pair to form Dirac fermions, except for a number of unpaired Majorana fermions at the top of each tower. These heavy Majorana fermions are the only sources of lepton number breaking in the model, and similarly to the type-I seesaw mechanism, they naturally generate small masses for the left-handed neutrinos. The lower Kaluza-Klein modes mix with the light neutrinos, and the mixing effects are not suppressed with respect to the light-neutrino masses. Compared to conventional fermionic seesaw models, such mixing can be more significant. We study the signals of this model at the Large Hadron Collider, and find that the current low-energy bounds on the nonunitarity of the leptonic mixing matrix are strong enough to exclude an observation.

  1. Origin of a peculiar extra U(1)

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.M.; Dorsner, I.

    2005-07-01

    The origin of a family-independent ''extra U(1)'', discovered by Barr, Bednarz, and Benesh and independently by Ma, and whose phenomenology has recently been studied by Ma and Roy, is discussed. Even though it satisfies anomaly constraints in a highly economical way, with just a single extra triplet of leptons per family, this extra U(1) cannot come from four-dimensional grand unification. However, it is shown here that it can come from a Pati-Salam scheme with an extra U(1), which explains the otherwise surprising cancellation of anomalies.

  2. Extra Molting and Selection on Nymphal Growth in the Desert Locust

    PubMed Central

    Piou, Cyril; Jourdan-Pineau, Hélène; Pagès, Christine; Blondin, Laurence; Chapuis, Marie-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In insects, extra-molting has been viewed as a compensatory mechanism for nymphal growth that contributes to optimize body weight for successful reproduction. However, little is known on the capacity of extra-molting to evolve in natural populations, which limits our understanding of how selection acts on nymphal growth. We used a multi-generational pedigree, individual monitoring and quantitative genetics models to investigate the evolution of extra-molting and its impact on nymphal growth in a solitarious population of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria. Growth compensation via extra-molting was observed for 46% of the females, whose adult weight exceeded by 4% that of other females, at a cost of a 22% longer development time. We found a null heritability for body weight threshold only, and the highest and a strongly female-biased heritability for extra molting. Our genetic estimates show that (1) directional selection can act on growth rate, development time and extra-molting to optimize body weight threshold, the target of stabilizing selection, (2) extra-molting can evolve in natural populations, and (3) a genetic conflict, due to sexually antagonistic selection on extra-molting, might prevent its fixation. Finally, we discuss how antagonistic selection between solitarious and gregarious environments and/or genetic correlations between growth and phase traits might also impact the evolution of extra-molting in locusts. PMID:27227885

  3. Grandes nouvelles dimensions et gravité quantique au coin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Dimopoulos, Savas; Dvali, Gia

    2003-04-01

    The electroweak unification mass may be the only fundamental scale in nature. If so, the visible universe may lie on a membrane floating within a higher dimensional space; new dimensions, black holes, quantum gravity, and string theory may become experimentally accessible in this decade. The dark matter could reside on parallel universes inside the extra dimensions. To cite this article: N. Arkani-Hamed et al., C. R. Physique 4 (2003).

  4. Practitioners' Perceptions of the Soccer Extra-Time Period: Implications for Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Liam D.; Fothergill, Melissa; West, Daniel J.; Stevenson, Emma; Russell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative research investigating soccer practitioners’ perceptions can allow researchers to create practical research investigations. The extra-time period of soccer is understudied compared to other areas of soccer research. Using an open-ended online survey containing eleven main and nine sub questions, we gathered the perceptions of extra-time from 46 soccer practitioners, all working for different professional soccer clubs. Questions related to current practices, views on extra-time regulations, and ideas for future research. Using inductive content analysis, the following general dimensions were identified: ‘importance of extra-time’, ‘rule changes’, ‘efficacy of extra-time hydro-nutritional provision’, ‘nutritional timing’, ‘future research directions’, ‘preparatory modulations’ and ‘recovery’. The majority of practitioners (63%) either agreed or strongly agreed that extra-time is an important period for determining success in knockout football match-play. When asked if a fourth substitution should be permitted in extra-time, 67% agreed. The use of hydro-nutritional strategies prior to extra-time was predominately considered important or very important. However; only 41% of practitioners felt that it was the most important time point for the use of nutritional products. A similar number of practitioners account (50%) and do not (50%) account for the potential of extra-time when training and preparing players and 89% of practitioners stated that extra-time influences recovery practices following matches. In the five minute break prior to extra-time, the following practices (in order of priority) were advocated to players: hydration, energy provision, massage, and tactical preparations. Additionally, 87% of practitioners advocate a particular nutritional supplementation strategy prior to extra-time. In order of importance, practitioners see the following as future research areas: nutritional interventions, fatigue responses

  5. Bulk stabilization, the extra-dimensional Higgs portal and missing energy in Higgs events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Ross; Burgess, C. P.

    2013-05-01

    To solve the hierarchy problem, extra-dimensional models must explain why the new dimensions stabilize to the right size, and the known mechanisms for doing so require bulk scalars that couple to the branes. Because of these couplings the energetics of dimensional stabilization competes with the energetics of the Higgs vacuum, with potentially observable effects. These effects are particularly strong for one or two extra dimensions because the bulk-Higgs couplings can then be super-renormalizable or dimensionless. Experimental reach for such extra-dimensional Higgs `portals' are stronger than for gravitational couplings because they are less suppressed at low-energies. We compute how Higgs-bulk coupling through such a portal with two extra dimensions back-reacts onto properties of the Higgs boson. When the KK mass is smaller than the Higgs mass, mixing with KK modes results in an invisible Higgs decay width, missing-energy signals at high-energy colliders, and new mechanisms of energy loss in stars and supernovae. Astrophysical bounds turn out to be complementary to collider measurements, with observable LHC signals allowed by existing constraints. We comment on the changes to the Higgs mass-coupling relationship caused by Higgs-bulk mixing, and how the resulting modifications to the running of Higgs couplings alter vacuum-stability and triviality bounds.

  6. Extra-articular Manifestations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Silosi, Isabela; Vrabie, Camelia Doina; Tanasescu, R

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease whose main characteristic is persistent joint inflammation that results in joint damage and loss of function. Although RA is more common in females, extra-articular manifestations of the disease are more common in males. The extra-articular manifestations of RA can occur at any age after onset. It is characterised by destructive polyarthritis and extra-articular organ involvement, including the skin, eye, heart, lung, renal, nervous and gastrointestinal systems. The frequence of extra-articular manifestations in RA differs from one country to another. Extra-articular organ involvement in RA is more frequently seen in patients with severe, active disease and is associated with increased mortality. Incidence and frequence figures for extra-articular RA vary according to study design. Extra-articular involvement is more likely in those who have RF and/or are HLA-DR4 positive. Occasionally, there are also systemic manifestations such as vasculitis, visceral nodules, Sjögren's syndrome, or pulmonary fibrosis present. Nodules are the most common extra-articular feature, and are present in up to 30%; many of the other classic features occur in 1% or less in normal clinic settings. Sjögren's syndrome, anaemia of chronic disease and pulmonary manifestations are relatively common – in 6-10%, are frequently present in early disease and are all related to worse outcomes measures of rheumatoid disease in particular functional impairment and mortality. The occurrence of these systemic manifestations is a major predictor of mortality in patients with RA. This paper focuses on extra-articular manifestations, defined as diseases and symptoms not directly related to the locomotor system. PMID:21977172

  7. Dimension of chaotic attractors

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.D.; Ott, E.; Yorke, J.A.

    1982-09-01

    Dimension is perhaps the most basic property of an attractor. In this paper we discuss a variety of different definitions of dimension, compute their values for a typical example, and review previous work on the dimension of chaotic attractors. The relevant definitions of dimension are of two general types, those that depend only on metric properties, and those that depend on probabilistic properties (that is, they depend on the frequency with which a typical trajectory visits different regions of the attractor). Both our example and the previous work that we review support the conclusion that all of the probabilistic dimensions take on the same value, which we call the dimension of the natural measure, and all of the metric dimensions take on a common value, which we call the fractal dimension. Furthermore, the dimension of the natural measure is typically equal to the Lyapunov dimension, which is defined in terms of Lyapunov numbers, and thus is usually far easier to calculate than any other definition. Because it is computable and more physically relevant, we feel that the dimension of the natural measure is more important than the fractal dimension.

  8. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in quasi one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Satpathi, Urbashi Deo, P. Singha

    2015-06-24

    Electronic charge and spin separation leading to charge density wave and spin density wave is well established in one dimension in the presence and absence of Coulomb interaction. We start from quasi one dimension and show the possibility of such a transition in quasi one dimension as well as in two dimensions by going to a regime where it can be shown for electrons that just interact via Fermi statistics. Such density waves arise due to internal symmetry breaking in a many fermion quantum system. We can extend this result to very wide rings with infinitely many electrons including Coulomb interaction.

  9. Can extra dimensional effects allow wormholes without exotic matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Sayan; Lahiri, Sayantani; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2015-11-01

    We explore the existence of Lorentzian wormholes in the context of an effective on-brane, scalar-tensor theory of gravity. In such theories, the timelike convergence condition, which is always violated for wormholes, has contributions, via the field equations, from on-brane matter as well as from an effective geometric stress energy generated by a bulk-induced radion field. It is shown that, for a class of wormholes, the required on-brane matter, as seen by an on-brane observer in the Jordan frame, is not exotic and does not violate the Weak Energy Condition. The presence of the effective geometric stress energy in addition to on-brane matter is largely responsible for creating this intriguing possibility. Thus, if such wormholes are ever found to exist in the Universe, they would clearly provide pointers towards the existence of a warped extra dimension as proposed in the two-brane model of Randall and Sundrum.

  10. Ovulation and extra-ovarian origin of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang-Hartwich, Yang; Gurrea-Soteras, Marta; Sumi, Natalia; Joo, Won Duk; Holmberg, Jennie C; Craveiro, Vinicius; Alvero, Ayesha B; Mor, Gil

    2014-01-01

    The mortality rate of ovarian cancer remains high due to late diagnosis and recurrence. A fundamental step toward improving detection and treatment of this lethal disease is to understand its origin. A growing number of studies have revealed that ovarian cancer can develop from multiple extra-ovarian origins, including fallopian tube, gastrointestinal tract, cervix and endometriosis. However, the mechanism leading to their ovarian localization is not understood. We utilized in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models to recapitulate the process of extra-ovarian malignant cells migrating to the ovaries and forming tumors. We provided experimental evidence to support that ovulation, by disrupting the ovarian surface epithelium and releasing chemokines/cytokines, promotes the migration and adhesion of malignant cells to the ovary. We identified the granulosa cell-secreted SDF-1 as a main chemoattractant that recruits malignant cells towards the ovary. Our findings revealed a potential molecular mechanism of how the extra-ovarian cells can be attracted by the ovary, migrate to and form tumors in the ovary. Our data also supports the association between increased ovulation and the risk of ovarian cancer. Understanding this association will lead us to the development of more specific markers for early detection and better prevention strategies. PMID:25135607