Science.gov

Sample records for extra terrestrial bodies

  1. Extra Terrestrial Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes-Gautier, R.

    1993-01-01

    Volcanism has been one of the major processes shaping the surfaces of the terrestrial planets. Lava flows have been identified on the Moon, Mars, Venus, and on Juptier's moon Io. The study of extra-terrestrial lavas has largely relied on the interpretation of remotely acquired imaging, topographic and spectroscopic data. Models relating the final flow morpohology to eruption characteristics and magma chemistry have been important tools in the interpretation of these data.

  2. SETI: Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence

    E-print Network

    Walter, Frederick M.

    SETI: Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence I know perfectly well that at this moment the whole, The Madwoman of Chaillot #12;Search Strategies Suppose you find a civilization. You want to communicate. How? #12;Options Passive SETI: Listen Active SETI: Transmit #12;Search Strategies There are two issues: A

  3. The search for extra-terrestrial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Drake, Frank

    2011-02-13

    Modern history of the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence is reviewed. The history of radio searches is discussed, as well as the major advances that have occurred in radio searches and prospects for new instruments and search strategies. Recent recognition that searches for optical and infrared signals make sense, and the reasons for this are described, as well as the equipment and special detection methods used in optical searches. The long-range future of the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence (SETI) is discussed in the context of the history of rapid change, on the cosmic and even the human time scale, of the paradigms guiding SETI searches. This suggests that SETI searches be conducted with a very open mind. PMID:21220287

  4. Radio communications with extra-terrestrial civilizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotelnikov, V. A.

    1974-01-01

    Communications between civilizations within our galaxy at the present level of radio engineering is possible, although civilizations must begin to search for each other to achieve this. If an extra-terrestrial civilization possessing a technology at our level wishes to make itself known and will transmit special radio signals to do this, then it can be picked up by us at a distance of several hundreds of light years using already existing radio telescopes and specially built radio receivers. If it wishes, this civilization can also send us information without awaiting our answer.

  5. Quarantine provisions for unmanned extra-terrestrial missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    This document sets forth requirements applicable to unmanned planetary flight programs which are necessary to enable the Associate Administrator for Space Science to fulfill those responsibilities pertaining to planetary quarantine as stated in NPD 8020.7 and NPD 8020.10A. This document is specifically directed to the control of terrestrial microbial contamination associated with unmanned space vehicles intended to encounter, orbit, flyby, or otherwise be in the vicinity of extra-terrestrial solar system bodies. The requirements of this document apply to all unmanned planetary flight programs. This includes solar system exploratory missions to the major planets as well as missions to planet satellites, or to other solar system objects that may be of scientific interest. This document is not applicable to terrestrial (including lunar) missions and manned missions. NASA officials having cognizance of applicable flight programs will invoke these requirements in such directives or contractual instruments as may be necessary to assure their implementation.

  6. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    E-print Network

    Sean N. Raymond

    2008-01-16

    Terrestrial planets form in a series of dynamical steps from the solid component of circumstellar disks. First, km-sized planetesimals form likely via a combination of sticky collisions, turbulent concentration of solids, and gravitational collapse from micron-sized dust grains in the thin disk midplane. Second, planetesimals coalesce to form Moon- to Mars-sized protoplanets, also called "planetary embryos". Finally, full-sized terrestrial planets accrete from protoplanets and planetesimals. This final stage of accretion lasts about 10-100 Myr and is strongly affected by gravitational perturbations from any gas giant planets, which are constrained to form more quickly, during the 1-10 Myr lifetime of the gaseous component of the disk. It is during this final stage that the bulk compositions and volatile (e.g., water) contents of terrestrial planets are set, depending on their feeding zones and the amount of radial mixing that occurs. The main factors that influence terrestrial planet formation are the mass and surface density profile of the disk, and the perturbations from giant planets and binary companions if they exist. Simple accretion models predicts that low-mass stars should form small, dry planets in their habitable zones. The migration of a giant planet through a disk of rocky bodies does not completely impede terrestrial planet growth. Rather, "hot Jupiter" systems are likely to also contain exterior, very water-rich Earth-like planets, and also "hot Earths", very close-in rocky planets. Roughly one third of the known systems of extra-solar (giant) planets could allow a terrestrial planet to form in the habitable zone.

  7. Messaging to Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence

    E-print Network

    Alexander Zaitsev

    2006-10-05

    Throughout the entire history of terrestrial civilization, only four projects involving transmitting of interstellar radio messages (IRMs) have yet been fully developed and realized. Nevertheless, we should understand a simple thing -- if all civilizations in the Universe are only recipients, and not message-sending civilizations, than no SETI searches make any sense. We present the theory and methodology of composing and transmitting of future IRMs.

  8. Messaging to Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence

    E-print Network

    Zaitsev, A

    2006-01-01

    Throughout the entire history of terrestrial civilization, only four projects involving transmitting of interstellar radio messages (IRMs) have yet been fully developed and realized. Nevertheless, we should understand a simple thing -- if all civilizations in the Universe are only recipients, and not message-sending civilizations, than no SETI searches make any sense. We present the theory and methodology of composing and transmitting of future IRMs.

  9. Migration & Extra-solar Terrestrial Planets: Watering the Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter-Bond, Jade C.; O'Brien, David P.; Raymond, Sean N.

    2014-04-01

    A diverse range of terrestrial planet compositions is believed to exist within known extrasolar planetary systems, ranging from those that are relatively Earth-like to those that are highly unusual, dominated by species such as refractory elements (Al and Ca) or C (as pure C, TiC and SiC)(Bond et al. 2010b). However, all prior simulations have ignored the impact that giant planet migration during planetary accretion may have on the final terrestrial planetary composition. Here, we combined chemical equilibrium models of the disk around five known planetary host stars (Solar, HD4203, HD19994, HD213240 and Gl777) with dynamical models of terrestrial planet formation incorporating various degrees of giant planet migration. Giant planet migration is found to drastically impact terrestrial planet composition by 1) increasing the amount of Mg-silicate species present in the final body; and 2) dramatically increasing the efficiency and amount of water delivered to the terrestrial bodies during their formation process.

  10. The Terrestrial Planets Large Bodies

    E-print Network

    Gaudi, B. Scott

    : Greenhouse Effect: Solar heating & atmospheric cooling balance Helps determine if H2O is liquid, ice atmosphere. May have had early oceans that evaporated resulting in a Runaway Greenhouse Effect. Gravity elements. #12;The evolution of Terrestrial Planet atmospheres is driven by three primary effects

  11. A Review of Extra-Terrestrial Mining Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. P.; van Susante, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Outer space contains a vast amount of resources that offer virtually unlimited wealth to the humans that can access and use them for commercial purposes. One of the key technologies for harvesting these resources is robotic mining of regolith, minerals, ices and metals. The harsh environment and vast distances create challenges that are handled best by robotic machines working in collaboration with human explorers. Humans will benefit from the resources that will be mined by robots. They will visit outposts and mining camps as required for exploration, commerce and scientific research, but a continuous presence is most likely to be provided by robotic mining machines that are remotely controlled by humans. There have been a variety of extra-terrestrial robotic mining concepts proposed over the last 40 years and this paper will attempt to summarize and review concepts in the public domain (government, industry and academia) to serve as an informational resource for future mining robot developers and operators. The challenges associated with these concepts will be discussed and feasibility will be assessed. Future needs associated with commercial efforts will also be investigated.

  12. A Review of Extra-Terrestrial Mining Robot Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Van Susante, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Outer space contains a vast amount of resources that offer virtually unlimited wealth to the humans that can access and use them for commercial purposes. One of the key technologies for harvesting these resources is robotic mining of regolith, minerals, ices and metals. The harsh environment and vast distances create challenges that are handled best by robotic machines working in collaboration with human explorers. Humans will benefit from the resources that will be mined by robots. They will visit outposts and mining camps as required for exploration, commerce and scientific research, but a continuous presence is most likely to be provided by robotic mining machines that are remotely controlled by humans. There have been a variety of extra-terrestrial robotic mining concepts proposed over the last 100 years and this paper will attempt to summarize and review concepts in the public domain (government, industry and academia) to serve as an informational resource for future mining robot developers and operators. The challenges associated with these concepts will be discussed and feasibility will be assessed. Future needs associated with commercial efforts will also be investigated.

  13. Towards polarimetry as a tool for the detection of extra-terrestrial life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnulo, Stefano; Sterzik, Michael F.; Cellino, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Linear broadband polarimetry is used to characterize the objects of our solar system, and has also been proposed as a diagnostic tool for the atmospheres of exo-solar planets. Homochirality characterizes life as we know it and induces circular polarization in the diffuse reflectance spectra of biotic material. Hence it has been suggested that circular polarimetry may be used as a remote sensing tool for the search of extra-terrestrial life. With this motivation in mind we have decided to explore the potential of both linear and circular spectropolarimetry as a diagnostic tool for remote sensing of biotic material. We have used the calibration unit of the EFOSC2 instrument of the La Silla Observatory to obtain low resolution, but high signal to noise circular and linear spectropolarimetric measurements of a number of inorganic and organic materials. We then compare our "laboratory data" with spectropolarimetric observations of atmosphere-less bodies of our solar system and of Earthshine obtained with instruments very similar to that one used for our laboratory samples. We conclude that linear polarization measurements are more suitable than circular polarization measurements for the characterization of planetary surfaces and atmospheres, and for the search of extra-terrestrial life.

  14. Applying Biomimetic Algorithms for Extra-Terrestrial Habitat Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birge, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The objective is to simulate and optimize distributed cooperation among a network of robots tasked with cooperative excavation on an extra-terrestrial surface. Additionally to examine the concept of directed Emergence among a group of limited artificially intelligent agents. Emergence is the concept of achieving complex results from very simple rules or interactions. For example, in a termite mound each individual termite does not carry a blueprint of how to make their home in a global sense, but their interactions based strictly on local desires create a complex superstructure. Leveraging this Emergence concept applied to a simulation of cooperative agents (robots) will allow an examination of the success of non-directed group strategy achieving specific results. Specifically the simulation will be a testbed to evaluate population based robotic exploration and cooperative strategies while leveraging the evolutionary teamwork approach in the face of uncertainty about the environment and partial loss of sensors. Checking against a cost function and 'social' constraints will optimize cooperation when excavating a simulated tunnel. Agents will act locally with non-local results. The rules by which the simulated robots interact will be optimized to the simplest possible for the desired result, leveraging Emergence. Sensor malfunction and line of sight issues will be incorporated into the simulation. This approach falls under Swarm Robotics, a subset of robot control concerned with finding ways to control large groups of robots. Swarm Robotics often contains biologically inspired approaches, research comes from social insect observation but also data from among groups of herding, schooling, and flocking animals. Biomimetic algorithms applied to manned space exploration is the method under consideration for further study.

  15. (Astro)Physics 343 Lecture # 14: the Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence

    E-print Network

    Baker, Andrew J.

    (Astro)Physics 343 Lecture # 14: the Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence #12 about astrobiology guide our choice of search strategy. #12; What astrobiology encompasses astronomy and detection of extraterrestrial life. Location inspired by Drake's first SETI experiment. Participants

  16. Reducing Extra-Terrestrial Excavation Forces with Percussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, Jason; Mueller, Robert; Smith, Drew; Nick, Andrew; Lippitt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    High launch costs and mission requirements drive the need for low mass excavators with mobility platforms, which in turn have little traction and excavation reaction capacity in low gravity environments. This presents the need for precursor and long term future missions with low mass robotic mining technology to perform In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) tasks. This paper discusses a series of experiments that investigate the effectiveness of a percussive digging device to reduce excavation loads and thereby the mass of the excavator itself. The goal of percussive excavation is to fluidize dry regolith in front of the leading edge of the tool by mechanically separating the microscopic interlocking grains resulting in a reduced force needed to shear the soil. There are several variables involved with this technique; this experiment varied: Impact energy, frequency, and excavation speed and held constant: impact direction, depth of cut, angle of tool, and soil bulk density. The test apparatus consisted of an aluminum truss bridge with a central pivoting arm. Attached to the arm was a winch with a load cell in line that recorded the tension in the cable and therefore the excavation load. The arm could be adjusted for excavation depth which was recorded along with the arm angle relative to the bridge. A percussive mechanism and 30" wide pivoting bucket were attached at the end of the arm simulating a basic backhoe with a percussion direction tangent to the direction of . movement. Internally the mechanism used a set of die springs and barrel cam to produce the percussive blow. By changing the springs and the speed of the motor the impact energy and frequency of percussion could be varied independently. Impact energies from 11.2J to 30.5J and frequencies from 0 BPM to 700 BPM were investigated. A reduction in excavation force of as much as 51% was achieved in this experimental investigation. Smaller percussive digging implements, tested by others, have achieved a reduction of as much as 72%. This paper will examine the effects of impact energy, frequency, scaling and their effect on excavation forces in a dry granular material such as lunar regolith. The past several years have shown an increasing interest in mining space resources both for exploration and commercial enterprises. This work studied the benefits and risks of percussive excavation and preliminry results indicate that this technique may become an enabling technology for extra-terrestrial excavation of regolith and ice.

  17. Constraints on extra dimensions from cosmological and terrestrial measurements

    E-print Network

    Kimball A. Milton; Ronald Kantowski; Chung Kao; Yun Wang

    2001-07-20

    If quantum fields exist in extra compact dimensions, they will give rise to a quantum vacuum or Casimir energy. That vacuum energy will manifest itself as a cosmological constant. The fact that supernova and cosmic microwave background data indicate that the cosmological constant is of the same order as the critical mass density to close the universe supplies a lower bound on the size of the extra dimensions. Recent laboratory constraints on deviations from Newton's law place an upper limit. The allowed region is so small as to suggest that either extra compact dimensions do not exist, or their properties are about to be tightly constrained by experimental data.

  18. Constraints on Extra Dimensions from Cosmological and Terrestrial Measurements

    E-print Network

    Kimball A. Milton

    2001-07-27

    If quantum fields exist in extra compact dimensions, they will give rise to a quantum vacuum or Casimir energy. That vacuum energy will manifest itself as a cosmological constant. The fact that supernova and cosmic microwave background data indicate that the cosmological constant is of the same order as the critical mass density to close the universe supplies a lower bound on the size of the extra dimensions. Recent laboratory constraints on deviations from Newton's law place an upper limit. The allowed region is so small as to suggest that either extra compact dimensions do not exist, or their properties are about to be tightly constrained by experimental data.

  19. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    E-print Network

    Raymond, Sean N

    2008-01-01

    Terrestrial planets form in a series of dynamical steps from the solid component of circumstellar disks. First, km-sized planetesimals form likely via a combination of sticky collisions, turbulent concentration of solids, and gravitational collapse from micron-sized dust grains in the thin disk midplane. Second, planetesimals coalesce to form Moon- to Mars-sized protoplanets, also called "planetary embryos". Finally, full-sized terrestrial planets accrete from protoplanets and planetesimals. This final stage of accretion lasts about 10-100 Myr and is strongly affected by gravitational perturbations from any gas giant planets, which are constrained to form more quickly, during the 1-10 Myr lifetime of the gaseous component of the disk. It is during this final stage that the bulk compositions and volatile (e.g., water) contents of terrestrial planets are set, depending on their feeding zones and the amount of radial mixing that occurs. The main factors that influence terrestrial planet formation are the mass an...

  20. Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence The following is from The Sixth Book of Mathematical Games from Sci-

    E-print Network

    Lee, Carl

    Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence The following is from The Sixth Book of Mathematical Games from Sci- entific American by Martin Gardner. Suppose you want to send a message to extra-terrestrials, American Mathematical Monthly 105 (1998) 640­650.) The following proposed message to extraterrestrials

  1. Physics 343 Lecture # 14: the Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence

    E-print Network

    Baker, Andrew J.

    Physics 343 Lecture # 14: the Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence and galactic collisions about astrobiology guide our choice of search strategy. #12; Quantifying our ignorance... UC Santa scientists met in Green Bank, WV to discuss the prospect for existence and detection of extraterrestrial

  2. The implications of the discovery of extra-terrestrial life for religion.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ted

    2011-02-13

    This paper asks about the future of religion: (i) Will confirmation of extra-terrestrial intelligence (ETI) cause terrestrial religion to collapse? 'No' is the answer based upon a summary of the 'Peters ETI Religious Crisis Survey'. Then the paper examines four specific challenges to traditional doctrinal belief likely to be raised at the detection of ETI: (ii) What is the scope of God's creation? (iii) What can we expect regarding the moral character of ETI? (iv) Is one earthly incarnation in Jesus Christ enough for the entire cosmos, or should we expect multiple incarnations on multiple planets? (v) Will contact with more advanced ETI diminish human dignity? More than probable contact with extra-terrestrial intelligence will expand the Bible's vision so that all of creation--including the 13.7 billion year history of the universe replete with all of God's creatures--will be seen as the gift of a loving and gracious God. PMID:21220288

  3. Discovery of extra-terrestrial life: assessment by scales of its importance and associated risks.

    PubMed

    Almár, Iván; Race, Margaret S

    2011-02-13

    The Rio Scale accepted by the SETI Committee of the International Academy of Astronautics in 2002 is intended for use in evaluating the impact on society of any announcement regarding the discovery of evidence of extra-terrestrial (ET) intelligence. The Rio Scale is mathematically defined using three parameters (class of phenomenon, type of discovery and distance) and a ? factor, the assumed credibility of a claim. This paper proposes a new scale applicable to announcements alleging evidence of ET life within or outside our Solar System. The London Scale for astrobiology has mathematical structure and logic similar to the Rio Scale, and uses four parameters (life form, nature of phenomenon, type of discovery and distance) as well as a credibility factor ? to calculate a London Scale index (LSI) with values ranging from 0 to 10. The level of risk or biohazard associated with a purported discovery is evaluated independently of the LSI value and may be ranked in four categories. The combined information is intended to provide a scalar assessment of the scientific importance, validity and potential risks associated with putative evidence of ET life discovered on Earth, on nearby bodies in the Solar System or in our Galaxy. PMID:21220291

  4. Tidal Heating of Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets and Implications for their Habitability

    E-print Network

    Jackson, Brian; Greenberg, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The tidal heating of hypothetical rocky (or terrestrial) extra-solar planets spans a wide range of values depending on stellar masses and initial orbits. Tidal heating may be sufficiently large (in many cases, in excess of radiogenic heating) and long-lived to drive plate tectonics, similar to the Earth's, which may enhance the planet's habitability. In other cases, excessive tidal heating may result in Io-like planets with violent volcanism, probably rendering them unsuitable for life. On water-rich planets, tidal heating may generate sub-surface oceans analogous to Europa's with similar prospects for habitability. Tidal heating may enhance the outgassing of volatiles, contributing to the formation and replenishment of a planet's atmosphere. To address these issues, we model the tidal heating and evolution of hypothetical extra-solar terrestrial planets. The results presented here constrain the orbital and physical properties required for planets to be habitable.

  5. Tidal Heating of Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets and Implications for their Habitability

    E-print Network

    Brian Jackson; Rory Barnes; Richard Greenberg

    2008-08-20

    The tidal heating of hypothetical rocky (or terrestrial) extra-solar planets spans a wide range of values depending on stellar masses and initial orbits. Tidal heating may be sufficiently large (in many cases, in excess of radiogenic heating) and long-lived to drive plate tectonics, similar to the Earth's, which may enhance the planet's habitability. In other cases, excessive tidal heating may result in Io-like planets with violent volcanism, probably rendering them unsuitable for life. On water-rich planets, tidal heating may generate sub-surface oceans analogous to Europa's with similar prospects for habitability. Tidal heating may enhance the outgassing of volatiles, contributing to the formation and replenishment of a planet's atmosphere. To address these issues, we model the tidal heating and evolution of hypothetical extra-solar terrestrial planets. The results presented here constrain the orbital and physical properties required for planets to be habitable.

  6. The weak force and SETH: The search for Extra-Terrestrial Homochirality

    SciTech Connect

    MacDermott, A.J.

    1996-07-01

    We propose that a search for extra-terrestrial life can be approached as a Search for Extra-Terrestrial Homochirality{emdash}SETH. Homochirality is probably a pre-condition for life, so a chiral influence may be required to get life started. We explain how the weak force mediated by the {ital Z}{sup 0} boson gives rise to a small parity-violating energy difference (PVED) between enantiomers, and discuss how the resulting small excess of the more stable enantiomer may be amplified to homochirality. Titan and comets are good places to test for emerging pre-biotic homochirality, while on Mars there may be traces of homochirality as a relic of extinct life. Our calculations of the PVED show that the natural L-amino acids are indeed more stable than their enantiomers, as are several key D-sugars and right-hand helical DNA. Thiosubstituted DNA analogues show particularly large PVEDs. L-quartz is also more stable than D-quartz, and we believe that further crystal counts should be carried out to establish whether reported excesses of L quartz are real. Finding extra-terrestrial molecules of the same hand as on Earth would lend support to the universal chiral influence of the weak force. We describe a novel miniaturized space polarimeter, called the SETH Cigar, which we hope to use to detect optical rotation on other planets. Moving parts are avoided by replacing the normal rotating polarizer by multiple fixed polarizers at different angles as in the eye of the bee. Even if we do not find the same hand as on Earth, finding extra-terrestrial optical rotation would be of enormous importance as it would still be the homochiral signature of life. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Fear, pandemonium, equanimity and delight: human responses to extra-terrestrial life.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Albert A

    2011-02-13

    How will people respond to the discovery of extra-terrestrial life? Potentially useful resources for addressing this question include historical prototypes, disaster studies and survey research. Reactions will depend on the interplay of the characteristics of the newly found life, the unfolding of the discovery, the context and content of the message and human information processing as shaped by biology, culture and psychology. Pre-existing images of extra-terrestrials as god-like, demonic, or artificial will influence first impressions that may prove highly resistant to change. Most probably people will develop comprehensive images based on minimal information and assess extra-terrestrials in the same ways that they assess one another. Although it is easy to develop frightening scenarios, finding microbial life in our Solar System or intercepting a microwave transmission from many light years away are less likely to be met with adverse reactions such as fear and pandemonium than with positive reactions such as equanimity and delight. PMID:21220289

  8. Predicting what extra-terrestrials will be like: and preparing for the worst.

    PubMed

    Morris, Simon Conway

    2011-02-13

    It is difficult to imagine evolution in alien biospheres operating in any manner other than Darwinian. Yet, it is also widely assumed that alien life-forms will be just that: strange, un-nerving and probably repulsive. There are two reasons for this view. First, it is assumed that the range of habitable environments available to extra-terrestrial life is far wider than on Earth. I suggest, however, that terrestrial life is close to the physical and chemical limits of life anywhere. Second, it is a neo-Darwinian orthodoxy that evolution lacks predictability; imagining what extra-terrestrial life would look like in any detail is a futile exercise. To the contrary, I suggest that the outcomes of evolution are remarkably predictable. This, however, leads us to consider two opposites, both of which should make our blood run cold. The first, and actually extremely unlikely, is that alien biospheres will be strikingly similar to our terrestrial equivalent and that in such biospheres intelligence will inevitably emerge. The reasons for this revolve around the ubiquity of evolutionary convergence, the determinate structure of the Tree of Life and molecular inherency. But if something like a human is an inevitability, why do I also claim that the first possibility is 'extremely unlikely'? Simply because the other possibility is actually the correct answer. Paradoxically, we and our biosphere are completely alone. So which is worse? Meeting ourselves or meeting nobody? PMID:21220280

  9. The Evolution of Maximum Body Size of Terrestrial Mammals

    E-print Network

    Brown, James H.

    The Evolution of Maximum Body Size of Terrestrial Mammals Felisa A. Smith,1 * Alison G. Boyer,2 the primary driver for the evolution of giant mammals was diversification to fill ecological niches the largest mammal on a continent (fig. S1). The data show that the pattern of body size evolution was similar

  10. Montana Evidence for Extra-Terrestrial Impact Event That Caused Ice-Age Mammal Die- Off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. W.; Miranda, P. J.; Gibbs, K. E.

    2008-05-01

    Evidence has been found in Montana for an extra-terrestrial impact event previously documented in the States of AZ, NM, NC, and SC and in Alberta and Manitoba. A mammoth fossil site dated at 11.5 ka (C14) before present (BP) was described in 1969 as the last mammoth occurrence in Montana. The mammoth remains were found in an organic-rich layer--a black mat. The black mat contains abundant charcoal (evidence for forest fire), black carbon glass foam, plant material deposited in a pond, and unrusted iron micro-meteorites. SEM photos of iron micro-meteorites reveal fusion crusts, flow lines, and micro-impact craters--direct evidence for an extra- terrestrial origin. One 140 ?m long micro-meteorite is 96 wt.% Fe and 4% Mn. Another is 71% Fe and 29% Ti. Mammoth tusks contain rusty pits, consistent with iron micro-meteorites that were embedded and then rusted out. A sample of carbon glass in the black mat contains 62% C, 22% O, 6% Fe, 4% Ca, 4% Si, and 2% Al. At the Indian Creek Archeological Site near Townsend, MT below the cultural layers and below a 11.2 ka (C14) volcanic ash layer there are individual glass bubbles about 1 mm in diameter with micro-impact craters. The size distribution of these micro-craters resembles the size distribution of lunar craters, but at a vastly different scale. The glass contains 53% C, 33% O, 6% Ca, 4% Si, 2% Al, 1% Mg, and 0.6% K. The carbon glass and micro-meteorites suggest a comet rather a meteorite origin for the extra-terrestrial material.

  11. Chemical methods for searching for evidence of extra-terrestrial life.

    PubMed

    Pillinger, Colin

    2011-02-13

    This paper describes the chemical concepts used for the purpose of detecting life in extra-terrestrial situations. These methods, developed initially within the oil industry, have been used to determine when life began on Earth and for investigating the Moon and Mars via space missions. In the case of Mars, the Viking missions led to the realization that we had meteorites from Mars on Earth. The study of Martian meteorites in the laboratory provides tantalizing clues for life on Mars in both the ancient and recent past. Meteorite analyses led to the launch of the Beagle 2 spacecraft, which was designed to prove that life-detection results obtained on Earth were authentic and not confused by terrestrial contamination. Some suggestions are made for future work. PMID:21220284

  12. The detection of extra-terrestrial life and the consequences for science and society.

    PubMed

    Dominik, Martin; Zarnecki, John C

    2011-02-13

    Astronomers are now able to detect planets orbiting stars other than the Sun where life may exist, and living generations could see the signatures of extra-terrestrial life being detected. Should it turn out that we are not alone in the Universe, it will fundamentally affect how humanity understands itself--and we need to be prepared for the consequences. A Discussion Meeting held at the Royal Society in London, 6-9 Carlton House Terrace, on 25-26 January 2010, addressed not only the scientific but also the societal agenda, with presentations covering a large diversity of topics. PMID:21220276

  13. The use of extra-terrestrial oceans to test ocean acoustics students.

    PubMed

    Leighton, T G

    2012-03-01

    The existence of extra-terrestrial oceans offers the opportunities to set examination questions for which students in underwater acoustics do not already know the answers. The limited set of scenarios in Earth's oceans that can be presented to students as tractable examination questions means that, rather than properly assessing the individual scenario, students can rely on knowledge from previous examples in assessing, for example, which terms in equations are large and small, and what numerical values the answers are likely to take. The habit of adapting previous solutions with which the student is comfortable, to new scenarios, is not a safe approach to learn, as it ill equips the future scientist or engineer to identify and tackle problems which contain serious departures from their experience. PMID:22423807

  14. ORIGINS OF NON-MASS-DEPENDENT FRACTIONATION OF EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL OXYGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Barcena, Homar; Connolly, Harold C.

    2012-08-01

    The distribution of oxygen isotopes in meteorites and within the earliest solids that formed in the solar system hints that the precursors of these materials must have undergone a mass-independent process. The mass-independent process is specifically one that fractionates {sup 16}O from {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O. This chemical signature is indicative of non-equilibrium processing, which bear resemblance to some unusual terrestrial phenomenon such as fractionation of ozone in the upper Earth atmosphere. That the mass-independent fractionation of oxygen isotopes is preserved within petrological records presents planetary scientists interesting clues to the events that may have occurred during the formation of the solar system. Currently, there are several hypotheses on the origins of the oxygen isotope distribution within primitive planetary materials, which include both thermal and photochemical models. We present a new model based on a physico-chemical hypothesis for the origin of non-mass-dependent O-isotope distribution in oxygen-bearing extra-terrestrial materials, which originated from the disproportionation of CO in dark molecular clouds to create CO{sub 2} reservoirs. The disproportionation created a reservoir of heavy oxygen isotopes and could have occurred throughout the evolution of the disk. The CO{sub 2} was a carrier of the isotope anomaly in the solar nebula and we propose that non-steady-state mixing of these reservoirs with the early rock-forming materials during their formation corresponds with the birth and evolution of the solar system.

  15. Origins of Non-mass-dependent Fractionation of Extra-terrestrial Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcena, Homar; Connolly, Harold C.

    2012-08-01

    The distribution of oxygen isotopes in meteorites and within the earliest solids that formed in the solar system hints that the precursors of these materials must have undergone a mass-independent process. The mass-independent process is specifically one that fractionates 16O from 17O and 18O. This chemical signature is indicative of non-equilibrium processing, which bear resemblance to some unusual terrestrial phenomenon such as fractionation of ozone in the upper Earth atmosphere. That the mass-independent fractionation of oxygen isotopes is preserved within petrological records presents planetary scientists interesting clues to the events that may have occurred during the formation of the solar system. Currently, there are several hypotheses on the origins of the oxygen isotope distribution within primitive planetary materials, which include both thermal and photochemical models. We present a new model based on a physico-chemical hypothesis for the origin of non-mass-dependent O-isotope distribution in oxygen-bearing extra-terrestrial materials, which originated from the disproportionation of CO in dark molecular clouds to create CO2 reservoirs. The disproportionation created a reservoir of heavy oxygen isotopes and could have occurred throughout the evolution of the disk. The CO2 was a carrier of the isotope anomaly in the solar nebula and we propose that non-steady-state mixing of these reservoirs with the early rock-forming materials during their formation corresponds with the birth and evolution of the solar system.

  16. Simulation of a Space-Based Microlensing Survey for Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets

    E-print Network

    David P. Bennett; Sun Hong Rhie

    2002-02-01

    We show that a space-based gravitational microlensing survey for terrestrial extra-solar planets is feasible in the near future, and could provide a nearly complete picture of the properties of planetary systems in our Galaxy. We present simulations of such a survey using a 1-2m aperture space telescope with a ~2 square degree field-of-view which is used to continuously monitor ~10^8 Galactic bulge main sequence stars. The microlensing techniques allows the discovery of low mass planets with high signal-to-noise, and the space mission that we have studied are sensitive to planets with masses as low as that of Mars. By targeting main sequence source stars, which can only be resolved from space, the space-based microlensing survey is able to detect enough light from the lens stars to determine the spectral type of one third of the lens stars with detected planets, including virtually all of the F, G, and K stars which comprise one quarter of the event sample. This enables the determination of the planetary masses and separations in physical units, as well as the abundance of planets as a function of stellar type and distance from the Galactic center. We show that a space-based microlensing planet search program has its highest sensitivity to planets at orbital separations of 0.7-10 AU, but it will also have significant sensitivity at larger separations and will be able to detect free-floating planets in significant numbers. This complements the planned terrestrial planet transit missions which are sensitive to terrestrial planets at separations of =< 1 AU. Such a mission also detect ~50,000 giant planets via transits, and it is, therefore, the only proposed planet detection method that is sensitive to planets at all orbital radii.

  17. Examining predator–prey body size, trophic level and body mass across marine and terrestrial mammals

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Marlee A.; Rogers, Tracey L.

    2014-01-01

    Predator–prey relationships and trophic levels are indicators of community structure, and are important for monitoring ecosystem changes. Mammals colonized the marine environment on seven separate occasions, which resulted in differences in species' physiology, morphology and behaviour. It is likely that these changes have had a major effect upon predator–prey relationships and trophic position; however, the effect of environment is yet to be clarified. We compiled a dataset, based on the literature, to explore the relationship between body mass, trophic level and predator–prey ratio across terrestrial (n = 51) and marine (n = 56) mammals. We did not find the expected positive relationship between trophic level and body mass, but we did find that marine carnivores sit 1.3 trophic levels higher than terrestrial carnivores. Also, marine mammals are largely carnivorous and have significantly larger predator–prey ratios compared with their terrestrial counterparts. We propose that primary productivity, and its availability, is important for mammalian trophic structure and body size. Also, energy flow and community structure in the marine environment are influenced by differences in energy efficiency and increased food web stability. Enhancing our knowledge of feeding ecology in mammals has the potential to provide insights into the structure and functioning of marine and terrestrial communities. PMID:25377460

  18. Molecular Physiology of an Extra-renal Cl(-) Uptake Mechanism for Body Fluid Cl(-) Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Fang; Yan, Jia-Jiun; Tseng, Yung-Che; Chen, Ruo-Dong; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    The development of an ion regulatory mechanism for body fluid homeostasis was an important trait for vertebrates during the evolution from aquatic to terrestrial life. The homeostatic mechanism of Cl(-) in aquatic fish appears to be similar to that of terrestrial vertebrates; however, the mechanism in non-mammalian vertebrates is poorly understood. Unlike in mammals, in which the kidney plays a central role, in most fish species, the gill is responsible for the maintenance of Cl(-) homeostasis via Cl(-) transport uptake mechanisms. Previous studies in zebrafish identified Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) 2b-expressing cells in the gills and skin as the major ionocytes responsible for Cl(-) uptake, similar to distal convoluted tubular cells in mammalian kidney. However, the mechanism by which basolateral ions exit from NCC cells is still unclear. Of the in situ hybridization signals of twelve members of the clc Cl(-) channel family, only that of clc-2c exhibited an ionocyte pattern in the gill and embryonic skin. Double in situ hybridization/immunocytochemistry confirmed colocalization of apical NCC2b with basolateral CLC-2c. Acclimation to a low Cl(-) environment increased mRNA expression of both clc-2c and ncc2b, and also the protein expression of CLC-2c in embryos and adult gills. Loss-of-function of clc-2c resulted in a significant decrease in whole body Cl(-) content in zebrafish embryos, a phenotype similar to that of ncc2b mutants; this finding suggests a role for CLC-2c in Cl(-) uptake. Translational knockdown of clc-2c stimulated ncc2b mRNA expression and vice versa, revealing cooperation between these two transporters in the context of zebrafish Cl(-) homeostasis. Further comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses revealed that zebrafish CLC-2c is a fish-specific isoform that diverged from a kidney-predominant homologue, in the same manner as NCC2b and its counterparts (NCCs). Several lines of molecular and cellular physiological evidences demonstrated the cofunctional role of apical NCC2b and basolateral CLC-2c in the gill/skin Cl(-) uptake pathway. Taking the phylogenetic evidence into consideration, fish-specific NCC2b and CLC-2c may have coevolved to perform extra-renal Cl(-) uptake during the evolution of vertebrates in an aquatic environment. PMID:26327813

  19. Molecular Physiology of an Extra-renal Cl- Uptake Mechanism for Body Fluid Cl- Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Fang; Yan, Jia-Jiun; Tseng, Yung-Che; Chen, Ruo-Dong; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    The development of an ion regulatory mechanism for body fluid homeostasis was an important trait for vertebrates during the evolution from aquatic to terrestrial life. The homeostatic mechanism of Cl- in aquatic fish appears to be similar to that of terrestrial vertebrates; however, the mechanism in non-mammalian vertebrates is poorly understood. Unlike in mammals, in which the kidney plays a central role, in most fish species, the gill is responsible for the maintenance of Cl- homeostasis via Cl- transport uptake mechanisms. Previous studies in zebrafish identified Na+-Cl- cotransporter (NCC) 2b-expressing cells in the gills and skin as the major ionocytes responsible for Cl- uptake, similar to distal convoluted tubular cells in mammalian kidney. However, the mechanism by which basolateral ions exit from NCC cells is still unclear. Of the in situ hybridization signals of twelve members of the clc Cl- channel family, only that of clc-2c exhibited an ionocyte pattern in the gill and embryonic skin. Double in situ hybridization/immunocytochemistry confirmed colocalization of apical NCC2b with basolateral CLC-2c. Acclimation to a low Cl- environment increased mRNA expression of both clc-2c and ncc2b, and also the protein expression of CLC-2c in embryos and adult gills. Loss-of-function of clc-2c resulted in a significant decrease in whole body Cl- content in zebrafish embryos, a phenotype similar to that of ncc2b mutants; this finding suggests a role for CLC-2c in Cl- uptake. Translational knockdown of clc-2c stimulated ncc2b mRNA expression and vice versa, revealing cooperation between these two transporters in the context of zebrafish Cl- homeostasis. Further comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses revealed that zebrafish CLC-2c is a fish-specific isoform that diverged from a kidney-predominant homologue, in the same manner as NCC2b and its counterparts (NCCs). Several lines of molecular and cellular physiological evidences demonstrated the cofunctional role of apical NCC2b and basolateral CLC-2c in the gill/skin Cl- uptake pathway. Taking the phylogenetic evidence into consideration, fish-specific NCC2b and CLC-2c may have coevolved to perform extra-renal Cl- uptake during the evolution of vertebrates in an aquatic environment. PMID:26327813

  20. Predicting Planets in Known Extra-Solar Planetary Systems III: Forming Terrestrial Planets

    E-print Network

    Sean N. Raymond; Rory Barnes; Nathan A. Kaib

    2006-05-15

    Recent results have shown that many of the known extrasolar planetary systems contain regions which are stable for both Earth-mass and Saturn-mass planets. Here we simulate the formation of terrestrial planets in four planetary systems -- 55 Cancri, HD 38529, HD 37124, and HD 74156 -- under the assumption that these systems of giant planets are complete and that their orbits are well-determined. Assuming the giant planets formed and migrated quickly, then terrestrial planets may form from a second generation of planetesimals. In each case, Moon- to Mars-sized planetary embryos are placed in between the giant planets and evolved for 100 Myr. We find that planets form relatively easily in 55 Cnc, with masses up to 0.6 Earth masses and in some cases substantial water contents and orbits in the habitable zone. HD 38529 is likely to support an asteroid belt but no terrestrial planets of significant mass. No terrestrial planets form in HD 37124 and HD 74156, although in some cases 1-2 lone embryos survive for 100 Myr. If migration occurred later, depleting the planetesimal disk, then massive terrestrial planets are unlikely to form in any of these systems.

  1. Predicting Planets in Known Extra-Solar Planetary Systems III: Forming Terrestrial Planets

    E-print Network

    Raymond, S N

    2004-01-01

    Recent results have shown that many of the known extrasolar planetary systems contain regions which are stable for both massless and massive test particles. We simulate the formation of terrestrial planets in four planetary systems: HD37124, HD38529, 55Cnc, and HD74156. In each case, Moon- to Mars-sized planetary embryos are placed in between the giant planets and evolved for 100 Myr. We find that no terrestrial planets form in HD37124 and HD74156, although in some cases 1-2 lone embryos will survive for 100 Myr. Planets form relatively easily in 55Cnc, with masses up to 0.6 Earth masses and in some cases substantial water contents. HD38529 is likely to support an asteroid belt but no terrestrial planets of significant mass.

  2. Predicted dynamos for terrestrial extra-solar planets and their influence in habitability

    E-print Network

    Gomez-Perez, Natalia; Ruedas, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we find the internal stratification for terrestrial planets with given mass-radius pairs, and use the core size and density to estimate their maximum dipolar magnetic moment. We also comment on the temporal evolution, although more information (e.g., core composition, mantle rheology and history) is crucial in determining the state of the dynamo with planetary age.

  3. Estimating terrestrial amphibian pesticide body burden through dermal exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dermal exposure presents a potentially significant but understudied route for pesticide uptake in terrestrial amphibians. Our study measured dermal uptake of pesticides of varying hydrophobicity (logKow) in frogs. Amphibians were indirectly exposed to one of five pesticide active...

  4. An observational signature of evolved oceans on extra-solar terrestrial planets

    E-print Network

    M. Jura

    2004-02-25

    The increase in luminosity with time of a main sequence star eventually can lead to substantial evaporation of the oceans on an orbiting terrestrial planet. Subsequently, the gas phase water in the planet's upper atmosphere can be photodissociated by stellar ultraviolet and the resulting atomic hydrogen then may be lost in a wind. This gaseous envelope may pass in front of the host star and produce tansient, detectable ultraviolet absorption in the Lyman lines in systems older than 1 Gyr.

  5. An observational signature of evolved oceans on extra-solar terrestrial planets

    E-print Network

    Jura, M

    2004-01-01

    The increase in luminosity with time of a main sequence star eventually can lead to substantial evaporation of the oceans on an orbiting terrestrial planet. Subsequently, the gas phase water in the planet's upper atmosphere can be photodissociated by stellar ultraviolet and the resulting atomic hydrogen then may be lost in a wind. This gaseous envelope may pass in front of the host star and produce tansient, detectable ultraviolet absorption in the Lyman lines in systems older than 1 Gyr.

  6. Strategic considerations in SETI, and a microwave approach. [Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seeger, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    Plausible options in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), and the need to reserve a suitable portion of the EM (microwave) spectrum for SETI research, are discussed. Reasons for selection of a portion of the spectrum, specifically the 'water hole' near 1.5 GHz in the terrestrial microwave window (1-25 GHz), are presented, and competition with various emitters for that band (existing satellite downlink transmissions) is discussed. SETI search policies and options are summarized in a table. Speculative considerations guiding initial phases of the SETI pursuit are discussed.

  7. Simulation of a Space-Based Microlensing Survey for Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets

    E-print Network

    Bennett, D P; Bennett, David P.; Rhie, Sun Hong

    2000-01-01

    The gravitational microlensing technique can be used to carry out a sensitive survey of planets ranging in mass from giant planets down to Mars-mass planets. This requires photometric monitoring of a large number of stars ($\\sim 10^8$) with high angular and temporal resolution. The Galactic Exoplanet Survey Telescope (GEST) is a 1.5m space based telescope with a large field-of-view that has recently been submitted to NASA's Discovery competition to carry out such a extra-solar planet search survey. We present a simulation of the baseline GEST mission, and we use this simulation to determine GEST's extra-solar planet detection sensitivity. We find that GEST will be sensitive to planets down to the mass of Mars, and will detect 100 Earth-mass planets at 1 AU if every star has such a planet. GEST's highest sensitivity is at separations of 0.7-10 AU, but it will also have significant sensitivity at larger separations and will be able to detect free-floating planets in significant numbers. GEST will also be able t...

  8. Extra-terrestrial life in the European Space Agency's Cosmic Vision plan and beyond.

    PubMed

    Fridlund, Malcolm

    2011-02-13

    Our exciting time allows us to contemplate the moment in the not-too-distant future when we can detect the presence of life on worlds orbiting stars other than our Sun. It will not be easy and will require the development and use of the very latest technologies. It also very probably demands deployment in space of relevant instrumentation in order to carry out these investigations. The European Space Agency has been involved in the studies and development of the required technologies for more than a decade and is currently formulating a roadmap for how to achieve the ultimate detection of signs of life as we know it on terrestrial exoplanets. The major elements of the roadmap consist of the following. First, the search for and detection of terrestrial exoplanets. Here, some progress has been made recently and is reported in this paper. Second, the more and more detailed study of the physical characteristics of such exoplanets. Finally, the search for biomarkers--indicators of biological activity--that can be observed at interstellar distances. The last is probably one of the most difficult problems ever contemplated by observational astronomy. PMID:21220282

  9. Wet tropospheric delay spatial variability over terrestrial water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, E.; Moller, D.; Andreadis, K.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    Among the sources of uncertainty in radar altimetry measurements of inland water bodies is the signal delay associated with space-time variations in water vapor in the atmosphere. Over the ocean, zenith wet tropospheric path delays (PD) can be measured by satellite microwave radiometry; however, the high brightness temperature of land prevents the use of these techniques over inland waters. SAR-based Atmospheric Phase Screens can be estimated over land, but not over water bodies. Radiosonde- and GPS-based estimates of PD over land are available, yet these measurements occur at specific, sparse locations. Atmospheric models are therefore the best source of information about space-time variations in PD, where observations (e.g., from radiosonde and GPS) are incorporated via data assimilation. The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography mission (SWOT) will use Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) in Ka-band, at a high incidence angle, to measure temporal variations in water elevation, slope, and extent in rivers, lakes, and reservoirs. Images will be collected over a 120-km wide swath with <100 m spatial resolution and ~1 cm height precision when averaged over a 1 km2 area, with a 21-day repeat cycle. At present, the spatial and temporal variability of PD at spatial scales relevant to the mission's inland water objectives (e.g., measurement of variations in the storage of reservoirs and lakes with spatial extent order 1 sq. km and larger) is an open question. We report the results of simulations of PD based on simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical weather prediction model. We consider two domains within the continental U.S.: 1) the Pacific Northwest (at 4-km and 4/3-km spatial resolutions, via WRF results provided by the Northwest Modeling Consortium), and 2) sections of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas (at 2.33-km spatial resolution, via simulations performed for this study). We then investigate the spatial and temporal variability of these PD values over inland water bodies, with a focus on manmade reservoirs in the Western U.S., including Anderson Ranch, Ray Hubbard, Elephant Butte, Lake Mead, and Sam Rayburn. We also assess the degree of temporal correlation between PD and water level variations and spatial correlations between PD and water extent variations.

  10. A universal scaling relationship between body mass and proximal limb bone dimensions in quadrupedal terrestrial tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Body size is intimately related to the physiology and ecology of an organism. Therefore, accurate and consistent body mass estimates are essential for inferring numerous aspects of paleobiology in extinct taxa, and investigating large-scale evolutionary and ecological patterns in the history of life. Scaling relationships between skeletal measurements and body mass in birds and mammals are commonly used to predict body mass in extinct members of these crown clades, but the applicability of these models for predicting mass in more distantly related stem taxa, such as non-avian dinosaurs and non-mammalian synapsids, has been criticized on biomechanical grounds. Here we test the major criticisms of scaling methods for estimating body mass using an extensive dataset of mammalian and non-avian reptilian species derived from individual skeletons with live weights. Results Significant differences in the limb scaling of mammals and reptiles are noted in comparisons of limb proportions and limb length to body mass. Remarkably, however, the relationship between proximal (stylopodial) limb bone circumference and body mass is highly conserved in extant terrestrial mammals and reptiles, in spite of their disparate limb postures, gaits, and phylogenetic histories. As a result, we are able to conclusively reject the main criticisms of scaling methods that question the applicability of a universal scaling equation for estimating body mass in distantly related taxa. Conclusions The conserved nature of the relationship between stylopodial circumference and body mass suggests that the minimum diaphyseal circumference of the major weight-bearing bones is only weakly influenced by the varied forces exerted on the limbs (that is, compression or torsion) and most strongly related to the mass of the animal. Our results, therefore, provide a much-needed, robust, phylogenetically corrected framework for accurate and consistent estimation of body mass in extinct terrestrial quadrupeds, which is important for a wide range of paleobiological studies (including growth rates, metabolism, and energetics) and meta-analyses of body size evolution. PMID:22781121

  11. Terrestrial soft-bodied protists and other microorganisms in triassic amber.

    PubMed

    Poinar, G O; Waggoner, B M; Bauer, U C

    1993-01-01

    Protozoa, cyanobacteria, sheathed algae, sheathed fungi, germinating pollen or spores, and fungal spores have been found in amber 220 to 230 million years old. Many of these microorganisms can be assigned to present-day groups. This discovery of terrestrial, soft-bodied protists that can be referred to modern groups indicates that morphological evolution is very gradual in many protists and that both structural and probably functional stasis extend back at least to the Upper Triassic period. PMID:17790989

  12. Body shape in terrestrial isopods: A morphological mechanism to resist desiccation?

    PubMed

    Broly, Pierre; Devigne, Cédric; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis

    2015-11-01

    Woodlice are fully terrestrial crustaceans and are known to be sensitive to water loss. Their half-ellipsoidal shapes represent simple models in which to investigate theoretical assumptions about organism morphology and rates of exchange with the environment. We examine the influence of surface area and mass on the desiccation rates in three eco-morphologically different species of woodlice: Oniscus asellus, Porcellio scaber, and Armadillidium vulgare. Our analysis indicates that the rate of water loss of an individual depends on both the initial weight and the body surface area. Interspecific and intraspecific analyses show that the mass-specific water loss rate of a species decreases along with the ratio of surface area to volume. In particular, we show that body shape explains the difference in mass-specific water loss rates between A. vulgare and P. scaber. This observation also explains several known ecological patterns, for example, the distribution and survivorship of individuals. However, in addition to body size and shape, water loss in terrestrial isopods depends also on the coefficient of permeability (i.e., a measure of water loss rate per surface unit), which is high in O. asellus and lower (and at similar levels) in P. scaber and A. vulgare. We discuss morphological, physiological, and behavioral aspects of water loss avoidance in terrestrial isopods. J. Morphol. 276:1283-1289, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26289755

  13. Imprinted expression in cystic embryoid bodies shows an embryonic and not an extra-embryonic pattern

    PubMed Central

    Kulinski, Tomasz M.; Casari, M. Rita T.; Guenzl, Philipp M.; Wenzel, Daniel; Andergassen, Daniel; Hladik, Anastasiya; Datlinger, Paul; Farlik, Matthias; Theussl, H. -Christian; Penninger, Josef M.; Knapp, Sylvia; Bock, Christoph; Barlow, Denise P.; Hudson, Quanah J.

    2015-01-01

    A large subset of mammalian imprinted genes show extra-embryonic lineage (EXEL) specific imprinted expression that is restricted to placental trophectoderm lineages and to visceral yolk sac endoderm (ysE). Isolated ysE provides a homogenous in vivo model of a mid-gestation extra-embryonic tissue to examine the mechanism of EXEL-specific imprinted gene silencing, but an in vitro model of ysE to facilitate more rapid and cost-effective experiments is not available. Reports indicate that ES cells differentiated into cystic embryoid bodies (EBs) contain ysE, so here we investigate if cystic EBs model ysE imprinted expression. The imprinted expression pattern of cystic EBs is shown to resemble fetal liver and not ysE. To investigate the reason for this we characterized the methylome and transcriptome of cystic EBs in comparison to fetal liver and ysE, by whole genome bisulphite sequencing and RNA-seq. Cystic EBs show a fetal liver pattern of global hypermethylation and low expression of repeats, while ysE shows global hypomethylation and high expression of IAPEz retroviral repeats, as reported for placenta. Transcriptome analysis confirmed that cystic EBs are more similar to fetal liver than ysE and express markers of early embryonic endoderm. Genome-wide analysis shows that ysE shares epigenetic and repeat expression features with placenta. Contrary to previous reports, we show that cystic EBs do not contain ysE, but are more similar to the embryonic endoderm of fetal liver. This explains why cystic EBs reproduce the imprinted expression seen in the embryo but not that seen in the ysE. PMID:25912690

  14. The Combined Strength of Thermodynamics and Comparative Planetology: Application of Activity Models to Core Formation in Terrestrial Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K. M.; Danielson, L. R.

    2015-07-01

    We combine our new data on the effect of Si and C on metal-silicate partitioning of volatile elements Ge, In, As, and Sb with previous results to produce a model that can be applied to any terrestrial body.

  15. Quantitative Trait Loci for Light Sensitivity, Body Weight, Body Size, and Morphological Eye Parameters in the Bumblebee, Bombus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Maebe, Kevin; Meeus, Ivan; De Riek, Jan; Smagghe, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Bumblebees such as Bombus terrestris are essential pollinators in natural and managed ecosystems. In addition, this species is intensively used in agriculture for its pollination services, for instance in tomato and pepper greenhouses. Here we performed a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis on B. terrestris using 136 microsatellite DNA markers to identify genes linked with 20 traits including light sensitivity, body size and mass, and eye and hind leg measures. By composite interval mapping (IM), we found 83 and 34 suggestive QTLs for 19 of the 20 traits at the linkage group wide significance levels of p = 0.05 and 0.01, respectively. Furthermore, we also found five significant QTLs at the genome wide significant level of p = 0.05. Individual QTLs accounted for 7.5-53.3% of the phenotypic variation. For 15 traits, at least one QTL was confirmed with multiple QTL model mapping. Multivariate principal components analysis confirmed 11 univariate suggestive QTLs but revealed three suggestive QTLs not identified by the individual traits. We also identified several candidate genes linked with light sensitivity, in particular the Phosrestin-1-like gene is a primary candidate for its phototransduction function. In conclusion, we believe that the suggestive and significant QTLs, and markers identified here, can be of use in marker-assisted breeding to improve selection towards light sensitive bumblebees, and thus also the pollination service of bumblebees. PMID:25928544

  16. Quantitative Trait Loci for Light Sensitivity, Body Weight, Body Size, and Morphological Eye Parameters in the Bumblebee, Bombus terrestris

    PubMed Central

    Maebe, Kevin; Meeus, Ivan; De Riek, Jan; Smagghe, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Bumblebees such as Bombus terrestris are essential pollinators in natural and managed ecosystems. In addition, this species is intensively used in agriculture for its pollination services, for instance in tomato and pepper greenhouses. Here we performed a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis on B. terrestris using 136 microsatellite DNA markers to identify genes linked with 20 traits including light sensitivity, body size and mass, and eye and hind leg measures. By composite interval mapping (IM), we found 83 and 34 suggestive QTLs for 19 of the 20 traits at the linkage group wide significance levels of p = 0.05 and 0.01, respectively. Furthermore, we also found five significant QTLs at the genome wide significant level of p = 0.05. Individual QTLs accounted for 7.5-53.3% of the phenotypic variation. For 15 traits, at least one QTL was confirmed with multiple QTL model mapping. Multivariate principal components analysis confirmed 11 univariate suggestive QTLs but revealed three suggestive QTLs not identified by the individual traits. We also identified several candidate genes linked with light sensitivity, in particular the Phosrestin-1-like gene is a primary candidate for its phototransduction function. In conclusion, we believe that the suggestive and significant QTLs, and markers identified here, can be of use in marker-assisted breeding to improve selection towards light sensitive bumblebees, and thus also the pollination service of bumblebees. PMID:25928544

  17. Body mass estimation in xenarthra: a predictive equation suitable for all quadrupedal terrestrial placentals?

    PubMed

    De Esteban-Trivigno, Soledad; Mendoza, Manuel; De Renzi, Miquel

    2008-10-01

    The Magnorder Xenarthra includes strange extinct groups, like glyptodonts, similar to large armadillos, and ground sloths, terrestrial relatives of the extant tree sloths. They have created considerable paleobiological interest in the last decades; however, the ecology of most of these species is still controversial or unknown. The body mass estimation of extinct species has great importance for paleobiological reconstructions. The commonest way to estimate body mass from fossils is through linear regression. However, if the studied species does not have similar extant relatives, the allometric pattern described by the regression could differ from those shown by the extinct group. That is the case for glyptodonts and ground sloths. Thus, stepwise multiple regression were developed including extant xenarthrans (their taxonomic relatives) and ungulates (their size and ecological relatives). Cases were weighted to maximize the taxonomic evenness. Twenty-eight equations were obtained. The distribution of the percent of prediction error (%PE) was analyzed between taxonomic groups (Perissodactyla, Artiodactyla, and Xenarthra) and size groups (0-20 kg, 20-300 kg, and more than 300 kg). To assess the predictive power of the functions, equations were applied to species not included in the regression development [test set cross validation, (TSCV)]. Only five equations had a homogeneous %PE between the aforementioned groups. These were applied to five extinct species. A mean body mass of 80 kg was estimated for Propalaehoplophorus australis (Cingulata: Glyptodontidae), 594 kg for Scelidotherium leptocephalum (Phyllophaga: Mylodontidae), and 3,550.7 kg for Lestodon armatus (Phyllophaga: Mylodontidae). The high scatter of the body mass estimations obtained for Catonyx tarijensis (Phyllophaga: Mylodontidae) and Thalassocnus natans (Phyllophaga: Megatheriidae), probably due to different specializations, prevented us from predicting its body mass. Surprisingly, although obtained from ungulates and xenarthrans, these five selected equations were also able to predict the body mass of species from groups as different as rodents, carnivores, hyracoideans, or tubulidentates. This result suggests the presence of a complex common allometric pattern for all quadrupedal placentals. PMID:18655156

  18. Body mass explains characteristic scales of habitat selection in terrestrial mammals

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jason T; Anholt, Brad; Volpe, John P

    2011-01-01

    Niche theory in its various forms is based on those environmental factors that permit species persistence, but less work has focused on defining the extent, or size, of a species’ environment: the area that explains a species’ presence at a point in space. We proposed that this habitat extent is identifiable from a characteristic scale of habitat selection, the spatial scale at which habitat best explains species’ occurrence. We hypothesized that this scale is predicted by body size. We tested this hypothesis on 12 sympatric terrestrial mammal species in the Canadian Rocky Mountains. For each species, habitat models varied across the 20 spatial scales tested. For six species, we found a characteristic scale; this scale was explained by species’ body mass in a quadratic relationship. Habitat measured at large scales best-predicted habitat selection in both large and small species, and small scales predict habitat extent in medium-sized species. The relationship between body size and habitat selection scale implies evolutionary adaptation to landscape heterogeneity as the driver of scale-dependent habitat selection. PMID:22393519

  19. The Galactic Exoplanet Survey Telescope: A Proposed Space-Based Microlensing Survey for Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets

    E-print Network

    David P. Bennett; Sun Hong Rhie

    2000-03-08

    We present a conceptual design for a space based Galactic Exoplanet Survey Telescope (GEST) which will use the gravitational microlensing technique to detect extra solar planets with masses as low as that of Mars at all separations >~ 1 AU. The microlensing data would be collected by a diffraction limited, wide field imaging telescope of ~ 1.5m aperture equipped with a large array of red-optimized CCD detectors. Such a system would be able to monitor $\\sim 2\\times 10^8$ stars in $\\sim 6$ square degrees of the Galactic bulge at intervals of 20-30 minutes, and it would observe $\\sim 12000$ microlensing events in three bulge seasons. If planetary systems like our own are common, GEST should be able to detect $\\sim 5000$ planets over a 2.5 year lifetime. If gas giants like Jupiter and Saturn are rare, then GEST would detect $\\sim 1300$ planets in a 2.5 year mission if we assume that most planetary systems are dominated by planets of about Neptune's' mass. Such a mission would also discover $\\sim 100$ planets of an Earth mass or smaller if such planets are common. This is a factor of $\\sim 50$ better than the most ambitious ground based programs that have been proposed. GEST will also be sensitive to planets which have been separated from their parent stars.

  20. N-body simulations of terrestrial planet formation under the influence of a hot Jupiter

    SciTech Connect

    Ogihara, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro E-mail: ogihara@nagoya-u.jp

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the formation of multiple-planet systems in the presence of a hot Jupiter (HJ) using extended N-body simulations that are performed simultaneously with semianalytic calculations. Our primary aims are to describe the planet formation process starting from planetesimals using high-resolution simulations, and to examine the dependences of the architecture of planetary systems on input parameters (e.g., disk mass, disk viscosity). We observe that protoplanets that arise from oligarchic growth and undergo type I migration stop migrating when they join a chain of resonant planets outside the orbit of an HJ. The formation of a resonant chain is almost independent of our model parameters, and is thus a robust process. At the end of our simulations, several terrestrial planets remain at around 0.1 AU. The formed planets are not equal mass; the largest planet constitutes more than 50% of the total mass in the close-in region, which is also less dependent on parameters. In the previous work of this paper, we have found a new physical mechanism of induced migration of the HJ, which is called a crowding-out. If the HJ opens up a wide gap in the disk (e.g., owing to low disk viscosity), crowding-out becomes less efficient and the HJ remains. We also discuss angular momentum transfer between the planets and disk.

  1. Extra Terrestrial Environmental Chamber Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, David W.

    2008-01-01

    A vacuum chamber designed to simulate the dusty environment on the Moon or Mars has been built for Goddard Space Flight Center. The path from concept to delivery is reviewed, with lessons learned and pitfalls highlighted along the way.

  2. Surface exposure dating of non-terrestrial bodies using optically stimulated luminescence: A new method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohbati, Reza; Jain, Mayank; Murray, Andrew

    2012-09-01

    We propose a new method for in situ surface exposure dating of non-terrestrial geomorphological features using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL); our approach is based on the progressive emptying of trapped charge with exposure to light at depth into a mineral surface. A complete model of the resetting of OSL with depth and time is presented for the first time; this model includes the competing effects of both optical resetting and irradiation. We consider two extreme conditions at the time the resetting is initiated: (a) a negligibly small trapped charge population and (b) a saturated trapped charge population. The potential dating applications for (a) include dust accumulation, volcanic rocks and impact-related sediments, and for (b) fault scarps, rock-falls, landslides and ice-scoured bedrock. Using assumptions based on terrestrial observations we expect that this approach will be applicable over the last 100 ka. The method is ideally suited to in situ measurement using existing technology developed for space applications, and so offers for the first time the realistic possibility of direct determination of exposure ages of young non-terrestrial surfaces.

  3. The microbiome: the forgotten organ of the astronaut's body--probiotics beyond terrestrial limits.

    PubMed

    Saei, Amir Ata; Barzegari, Abolfazl

    2012-09-01

    Space medicine research has drawn immense attention toward provision of efficient life support systems during long-term missions into space. However, in extended missions, a wide range of diseases may affect astronauts. In space medicine research, the gastrointestinal microbiome and its role in maintaining astronauts' health has received little attention. We would like to draw researchers' attention to the significant role of microbiota. Because of the high number of microorganisms in the human body, man has been called a 'supra-organism' and gastrointestinal flora has been referred to as 'a virtual organ of the human body'. In space, the lifestyle, sterility of spaceship and environmental stresses can result in alterations in intestinal microbiota, which can lead to an impaired immunity and predispose astronauts to illness. This concern is heightened by increase in virulence of pathogens in microgravity. Thus, design of a personal probiotic kit is recommended to improve the health status of astronauts. PMID:22953705

  4. Combining N-body accretion simulations with partitioning experiments in a statistical model of terrestrial planet accretion and core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R. A.; Ciesla, F.; Campbell, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The terrestrial planets accreted in a series of increasingly large and violent collisions. Simultaneously, metallic cores segregated from their silicate mantles, acquiring their modern compositions through high pressure (P), high temperature (T) partitioning reactions. Here we present a model that couples these aspects of early planetary evolution, building on recent accretion simulations and experimental results. We have run 100 N-body simulations of terrestrial planet accretion, with Jupiter and Saturn on either circular (CJS) or eccentric (EJS) orbits, to gain insight into the statistics of this highly stochastic process (Fischer and Ciesla, 2014). An Earth (Mars) analogue forms in 84-92% (2-10%) of our simulations. We draw on our recent high P-T metal-silicate partitioning experiments of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Si, and O in a diamond anvil cell to 100 GPa and 5500 K. In our model, N-body simulations describe the delivery, masses, and original locations of planetary building blocks. As planets accrete, their core and mantle compositions are modified by high P-T reactions with each collision (Rubie et al., 2011). By utilizing a large number of N-body simulations, we obtain a statistical view and observe a wide range of outcomes. We use this model to predict the core compositions of Earth-like planets. For partial equilibration of the mantle at 50% of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressure, we find that their cores contain 6.9 ± 1.8 wt% Si and 4.8 ± 2.3 wt% O (Figure), with this uncertainty due entirely to variations in accretion history in our 100 simulations. This composition is consistent with the seismologically-inferred density of Earth's core, based on comparisons to high P-T equations of state (Fischer et al., 2011, 2014). Earth analogues experience 0.7 ± 0.1 or 0.9 ± 0.2 log units of oxidation during accretion in EJS or CJS simulations respectively, which is due to both the effects of high P-T partitioning and the temporal evolution of the Earth analogue's feeding zone. The model can reveal the relative importance of various accretionary processes, highlighting targets for future experimental and numerical studies. For example, changing the depth of partitioning to 70% of the CMB pressure leads to an increase of 1.7 ± 2.8 wt% Si and 2.2 ± 3.5 wt% O in Earth analogue cores, comparable to variations due to accretion history.

  5. Highest volcanoes on terrestrial planets and dwarf-planets adorn the deepest depressions of their respective bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2015-10-01

    Four highest volcanoes of the inner solar system tower above four largest and deepest hemispheric depressions of the Earth, Moon, Mars, and Vesta. Of course, this is not a mere coincidence; behind of this fundamental fact stays an equally fundamental planetary regulation. The wave planetology based on elliptical keplerian orbits of cosmic bodies evoking their wave warping shows that the fundamental wave 1 inevitably produces hemispheric tectonic dichotomy. One hemisphere rises, the opposite falls. The uprising half increases its planetary radius and space and thus is intensively cut by numerous faults and rifts. The antipodean subsiding half decreases its radius and space and thus is intensively compacted and affected by folds and faults. Forming extra material finds its way out in form of volcanic ridges and volcanoes. The strongest compaction caused by the wave 1 subsidence produces most voluminous eruptions. That is why the relation exists between the largest and deepest hemispheric basins and the highest basic volcanoes having mantle roots [1-4]. On the Earth's Pacific Ocean floor stay the Hawaiian volcanoes; on the lunar Procellarum Ocean occurs Crater Copernicus (erroneously taken as an impact feature); Martian Vastitas Borealis is adorned with Olympus Mons; Vestan Reasilvia Basin (obviously tectonic not impact feature) has the central mountain -the highest volcanic peak in the Solar system (Fig. 1-4). A regular row of increasing heights of these largest volcanoes extends in the outward direction. A study of the dwarf-planet Ceres only begins(DAWN project). Already the first distant images of this globe about 950 km in diameter have shown that it is, as was predicted [5], tectonically two-faced or dichotomous body (Fig. 5, 6). It seems that on its relatively even subsided hemisphere there are some elevated locations often bright white in color (Fig. 6). They could represent prominent "edifices" covered with frozen ices -degassing traces [6].

  6. Debris disks as signposts of terrestrial planet formation

    E-print Network

    Raymond, Sean N; Moro-Martín, Amaya; Booth, Mark; Wyatt, Mark C; Armstrong, John C; Mandell, Avi M; Selsis, Franck; West, Andrew A

    2011-01-01

    Circumstantial evidence suggests that most known extra-solar planetary systems are survivors of violent dynamical instabilities. Here we explore how giant planet instabilities affect the formation and survival of terrestrial planets. We simulate planetary system evolution around Sun-like stars from initial conditions that comprise: an inner disk of planetesimals and planetary embryos, three giant planets at Jupiter-Saturn distances, and a massive outer planetesimal disk. We then calculate dust production rates and debris disk SEDs assuming that each planetesimal particle represents an ensemble of smaller bodies in collisional equilibrium. We predict a strong correlation between the presence of terrestrial planets and debris disks, mediated by the giant planets. Strong giant planet instabilities destroy all rocky material - including fully-formed terrestrial planets if the instabilities occur late - along with the icy planetesimals. Stable or weakly unstable systems allow terrestrial planets to accrete and sig...

  7. The Combined Strength of Thermodynamics and Comparative Planetology: Application of Activity Models to Core Formation in Terrestrial Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K. M.; Danielson, L. R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent models for accretion of terrestrial bodies involve metal-silicate equilibrium as the metallic core formed during growth. Most elements considered are either refractory or well studied elements for which effects of pressure, temperature, oxygen fugacity, and metallic liquid composition are well known. There are a large number of elements that are both siderophile and volatile, whose fate in such models is unknown, largely due to a lack of data at comparable conditions and com-positions (FeNi core with light elements such as S, C, Si, and O). We have focused on Ge, In, As, Sb and determined the effect of Si and C on metal-silicate partitioning, and developed a thermo-dynamic model that allows application of these new data to a wide range of planetary bodies. New experiments: We have previously carried out experiments with FeSi metallic liquid at C-saturated conditions at 1600 and 1800 C [4]. In a new series of experiments we investigate the effect of Si in carbon-free systems at 1600 C for comparison. Experiments were carried out at 1 GPa in MgO capsules using the same basaltic starting composition as in previous studies. The MgO capsule reacts with the silicate melt to form more MgO-rich liquids that have 22-26 wt% MgO. Experimental met-als and silicates were analyzed using a combination of electron microprobe analysis and laser ablation ICP-MS. Results: The new results can be interpreted by considering Ge as an example, in the simple exchange equilibrium Fe + GeO = FeO + Ge, where the equilibrium constant Kd can be examined as a function of Si content of the metal. The slope of lnKd vs. (1-XSi) for this new series allows derivation of the epsilon interaction parameter for each of these four elements and Si (both C-saturated and C-free).All four elements have positive epsilon values, indicating that Si causes a decrease in the partition coefficients; values are 6.6, 6.5, 27.8 and 25.2 for In, Ge, As, and Sb, respectively, at 1 GPa and 1600 C. As an example of how large the effect of Si can be, these epsilon values correspond to activity coefficients (gamma) for As of 0.01 when XSi = 0, and up to gamma = 23 when XSi = 0.2. Combining these new results with previous determinations [5,6] of epsilon parameters for S and C for these elements allows us calculate activity of Ge, In, As, and Sb in Fe-Ni-Si-S-C-O metallic liquids. We apply this new model to sever-al terrestrial bodies such as Earth (Si-rich core), Mars (S-rich core), Moon (S-, C-, and Si-poor core), and Vesta, and examine the resulting core and mantle concentrations of these elements. Mantle concentrations of these four elements are well explained for Earth and Mars in models that call for mid-mantle equilibration between Si-bearing and S-bearing FeNi cores, respectively. Modeling results for the Moon and Vesta will also be presented.

  8. The evolution of semi-aquatic mammals from terrestrial ancestors has occurred several times in the mammalian

    E-print Network

    Fish, Frank

    locomotion and swimming were both high compared with those of specialists and that this extra cost may result limb structure for swimming that could negatively affect its terrestrial locomotion. Platypuses walked in moving between these two media. Adaptations for swimming by semi-aquatic mammals (e.g. increased body

  9. Dynamical Shakeup of Planetary Systems II. N-body simulations of Solar System terrestrial planet formation induced by secular resonance sweeping

    E-print Network

    E. W. Thommes; M. Nagasawa; D. N. C. Lin

    2008-02-05

    We revisit the "dynamical shakeup" model of Solar System terrestrial planet formation, wherein the whole process is driven by the sweeping of Jupiter's secular resonance as the gas disk is removed. Using a large number of 0.5 Gyr-long N-body simulations, we investigate the different outcomes produced by such a scenario. We confirm that in contrast to existing models, secular resonance sweeping combined with tidal damping by the disk gas can reproduce the low eccentricities and inclinations, and high radial mass concentration, of the Solar System terrestrial planets. At the same time, this also drives the final assemblage of the planets on a timescale of several tens of millions of years, an order of magnitude faster than inferred from previous numerical simulations which neglected these effects, but possibly in better agreement with timescales inferred from cosmochemical data. In addition, we find that significant delivery of water-rich material from the outer Asteroid Belt is a natural byproduct.

  10. Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Subin, Zachary Marc

    2012-01-01

    effects of other extra-tropical terrestrial surface forcingsExtra-Tropical Surface Properties 9 What Mechanisms Could Cause Large, Positive High-Latitude Terrestrialterrestrial rather than ocean cooling. One such difference is that extra-

  11. On the rise of turbulent plumes: Quantitative effects of variable entrainment for submarine hydrothermal vents, terrestrial

    E-print Network

    Kaminski, Edouard

    hydrothermal vents, terrestrial and extra terrestrial explosive volcanism G. Carazzo,1 E. Kaminski,1 and S: Quantitative effects of variable entrainment for submarine hydrothermal vents, terrestrial and extra terrestrial, paleo-Martian, and Venusian conditions and by submarine hydrothermal activity at mid-ocean ridges

  12. SETI: Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence

    E-print Network

    Walter, Frederick M.

    - Interpreted 1679 bits 23 x 73 image Arecibo telescope Solar System Human being (+height, population) DNA. Photons carry energy E=h = hc/ Cost per photon decreases with increasing wavelength At a cost of $0.20 per

  13. The Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarter, J.

    1998-12-01

    Aliens abound on the movie screens, but in reality we are still trying to find out if we share our universe with other sentient creatures. Intelligence is very difficult to define, and impossible to directly detect over interstellar distances. Therefore, SETI, the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, is actually an attempt to detect evidence of another distant technology. If we find such evidence, we will infer the existence of intelligent technologists. For the past 36 years, the SETI community has had a very pragmatic definition of intelligence - the ability to build radio telescopes! Radio signals are not the only possible way to detect a technology across the vast distances that separate the stars, but given our own current technological state, it remains the best way.

  14. Searching for extra-terrestrial civilizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gindilis, L. M.

    1974-01-01

    The probability of radio interchange with extraterrestrial civilizations is discussed. Difficulties constitute absorption, scattering, and dispersion of signals by the rarified interstellar medium as well as the deciphering of received signals and convergence of semantic concept. A cybernetic approach considers searching for signals that develop from astroengineering activities of extraterrestrial civilizations.

  15. ON THE EFFECT OF GIANT PLANETS ON THE SCATTERING OF PARENT BODIES OF IRON METEORITE FROM THE TERRESTRIAL PLANET REGION INTO THE ASTEROID BELT: A CONCEPT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighipour, Nader; Scott, Edward R. D.

    2012-04-20

    In their model for the origin of the parent bodies of iron meteorites, Bottke et al. proposed differentiated planetesimals, formed in 1-2 AU during the first 1.5 Myr, as the parent bodies, and suggested that these objects and their fragments were scattered into the asteroid belt as a result of interactions with planetary embryos. Although viable, this model does not include the effect of a giant planet that might have existed or been growing in the outer regions. We present the results of a concept study where we have examined the effect of a planetary body in the orbit of Jupiter on the early scattering of planetesimals from the terrestrial region into the asteroid belt. We integrated the orbits of a large battery of planetesimals in a disk of planetary embryos and studied their evolutions for different values of the mass of the planet. Results indicate that when the mass of the planet is smaller than 10 M{sub Circled-Plus }, its effects on the interactions among planetesimals and planetary embryos are negligible. However, when the planet mass is between 10 and 50 M{sub Circled-Plus }, simulations point to a transitional regime with {approx}50 M{sub Circled-Plus} being the value for which the perturbing effect of the planet can no longer be ignored. Simulations also show that further increase of the mass of the planet strongly reduces the efficiency of the scattering of planetesimals from the terrestrial planet region into the asteroid belt. We present the results of our simulations and discuss their possible implications for the time of giant planet formation.

  16. Enrichment of Non-Terrestrial L-Proteinogenic Amino Acids by Aqueous Alteration on the Tagish Lake Meteorite Parent Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Herd, Christopher D. K.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution and isotopic and enantiomeric compositions of amino acids found in three distinct fragments of the Tagish Lake C2-type carbonaceous chondrite were investigated via liquid chromatography fluorescence detection time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Large L-enantiomeric excesses (L(sub ee) approx. 43 to 59%) of the a-hydrogen aspartic and glutamic amino acids were measured in Tagish Lake, whereas alanine, another alpha-hydrogen protein amino acid, was found to be nearly racemic (D approx. L) using both techniques. Carbon isotope measurements of D- and L-aspartic acid and D- and L-alanine in Tagish Lake fall well outside of the terrestrial range and indicate that the measured aspartic acid enantioenrichment is indigenous to the meteorite. Alternate explanations for the Lexcesses of aspartic acid such as interference from other compounds present in the sample, analytical biases, or terrestrial amino acid contamination were investigated and rejected. These results can be explained by differences in the solid-solution phase behavior of aspartic acid, which can form conglomerate enantiopure solids during crystallization, and alanine, which can only form racemic crystals.

  17. Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.

    2004-10-05

    The large separation between the weak scale {approx} 10{sup 3} GeV and the traditional scale of gravity--the Planck scale with M{sub PI} {approx} 10{sup 19} GeV--is one of the most puzzling aspects of nature. The origin of this large ratio, as well as its stability under radiative corrections, demands explanation. This is known as the hierarchy problem. One theoretical means of solving this problem is to introduce Supersymmetry. Alternatively one may hope to address the hierarchy by exploiting the geometry of space time. Specifically, recent theories involve the idea that the 3-spatial dimensions in which we live could be a 3-spatial-dimensional ''membrane'' embedded in a much larger extra dimensional space, and that the hierarchy is generated by the geometry of the additional dimensions. Such ideas have led to extra dimensional theories which have verifiable consequences at the TeV scale. Our knowledge of the weak and strong forces extends down to scales of {approx} (100 GeV){sup -1} (or of order 10{sup -15} mm). On the other hand, we have almost no knowledge of gravity at distances less than roughly a millimeter, as direct tests of the gravitational force at the smallest distances are based on torsion-balance experiments, which are mechanically limited. It is thus conceivable that gravity may behave quite differently from the 3-dimensional Newtonian theory at small distances. This leads to the possibility that matter and non-gravitational forces are confined to our 3-dimensional subspace, whereas gravity may propagate throughout a higher dimensional volume. In this case, the gauge forces are trapped within our 3-dimensional space, unaware of the extra dimensions, and maintain their usual behavior. Gravity, on the other hand, would no longer follow the inverse-square force law at distances smaller than the size of the extra dimensions, as the gravitational equivalent of Gauss' Law mandates that the gravitational field spreads out into the full spatial volume. Since Newton's Law must be reproduced at large distances, gravity must behave as if there were only three spatial dimensions for r&1 mm. This is achievable either by compactifying all the extra dimensions on circles, where the geometry of these dimensions is thus flat and the topology is that of a torus, or by using strong curvature effects in the extra dimensions. In the first case, Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali (ADD) [1,2] used this picture to generate the hierarchy by postulating a large volume for the extra dimensional space, building on earlier ideas in Refs. 3,4. In the latter case, the hierarchy can be established by a large curvature of the extra dimensions as demonstrated by Randall and Sundrum (RS) [5,6]. It is the relation of these models to the hierarchy which yields testable predictions at the TeV scale.

  18. Super-long Anabiosis of Ancient Microorganisms in Ice and Terrestrial Models for Development of Methods to Search for Life on Mars, Europa and other Planetary Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abyzov, S. S.; Duxbury, N. S.; Bobin, N. E.; Fukuchi, M.; Hoover, R. B.; Kanda, H.; Mitskevich, I. N.; Mulyukin, A. L.; Naganuma, T.; Poglazova, M. N.; Ivanov, M. V.

    2007-01-01

    Successful missions to Mars, Europe and other bodies of the Solar system have created a prerequisite to search for extraterrestrial life. The first attempts of microbial life detection on the Martian surface by the Viking landed missions gave no biological results. Microbiological investigations of the Martian subsurface ground ice layers seem to be more promising. It is well substantiated to consider the Antarctic ice sheet and the Antarctic and Arctic permafrost as terrestrial analogues of Martian habitats. The results of our long-standing microbiological studies of the Antarctic ice would provide the basis for detection of viable microbial cells on Mars. Our microbiological investigations of the deepest and thus most ancient strata of the Antarctic ice sheet for the first time gave evidence for the natural phenomenon of long-term anabiosis (preservation of viability and vitality for millennia years). A combination of classical microbiological methods, epifluorescence microscopy, SEM, TEM, molecular diagnostics, radioisotope labeling and other techniques made it possible for us to obtain convincing proof of the presence of pro- and eukaryotes in the Antarctic ice sheet. In this communication, we will review and discuss some critical issues related to the detection of viable microorganisms in cold terrestrial environments with regard to future searches for microbial life and/or its biological signatures on extraterrestrial objects.

  19. Siderophile-element Anomalies in CK Carbonaceous Chondrites: Implications for Parent-body Aqueous Alteration and Terrestrial Weathering of Sulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Heinz; Rubin, Alan E.; Kallemeyn, Gregory W.; Wasson, John T.

    2006-01-01

    CK chondrites constitute the most oxidized anhydrous carbonaceous chondrite group; most of the Fe occurs in magnetite and in FeO-rich mafic silicates. The two observed CK falls (Karoonda and Kobe), along with thirteen relatively unweathered CK finds, have unfractionated siderophile-element abundance patterns. In contrast, a sizable fraction of CK finds (9 of 24 investigated) shows fractionated siderophile abundance patterns including low abundances of Ni, Co, Se and Au; the most extreme depletions are in Ni (0.24 of normal CK) and Au (0.14 of normal CK). This depletion pattern has not been found in other chondrite groups. Out of the 74 CK chondrites listed in the Meteoritical Bulletin Database (2006; excluded considerably paired specimens; see http://tin.er.usgs.gov/meteor/ metbull.php) we analyzed 24 and subclassified the CK chondrites in terms of their chemical composition and sulfide mineralogy: sL (siderophiles low; six samples) for large depletions in Ni, Co, Se and Au (>50% of sulfides lost); sM (siderophiles medium; two CKs) for moderately low Ni and Co abundances (sulfides are highly altered or partly lost); sH (siderophiles high; one specimen) for enrichments in Ni, Co, Se and Au; 'normal' for unfractionated samples (13 samples). The sole sH sample may have obtained additional sulfide from impact redistribution in the parent asteroid. We infer that these elements became incorporated into sulfides after asteroidal aqueous processes oxidized nebular metal; thermal metamorphism probably also played a role in their mineral siting. The siderophile losses in the SL and sM samples are mainly the result of oxidation of pentlandite, pyrite and violarite by terrestrial alteration followed by leaching of the resulting phases. Some Antarctic CK chondrites have lost most of their sulfides but retained Ni, Co, Se and Au, presumably as insoluble weathering products.

  20. Terrestrial sequestration

    ScienceCinema

    Charlie Byrer

    2010-01-08

    Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

  1. Terrestrial sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Charlie Byrer

    2008-03-10

    Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

  2. Climate and Habitability of Terrestrial Planets around other Stars

    E-print Network

    Forget, François

    extraterrestrial intelligent life directly by looking for radio signals. The ``Search for Extra­Terrestrial@lmd.jussieu.fr). Abstract. The recent discovery of extra­solar giant planets, the quest for extraterrestrial radio Intelligence'' (SETI) programs involve sev­ eral major radio­telescopes around the world. The main SETI project

  3. TERRESTRIAL ECOTOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Terrestrial ecotoxicology is the study of how environmental pollutants affect land-dependent organisms and their environment. It requires three elements: (1) a source, (2) a receptor, and (3) an exposure pathway. This article reviews the basic principles of each of each element...

  4. The Role of Giant Planets in Terrestrial Planet Formation Harold F. Levison1

    E-print Network

    Levison, Harold F.

    of terrestrial planets in extra-solar planetary systems. Our aim is not only to predict and understand what mayThe Role of Giant Planets in Terrestrial Planet Formation Harold F. Levison1 and Craig Agnor2 Space the results of simulations of the late stages of terrestrial planet formation under the gravitational

  5. Introduction to Extra Dimensions

    E-print Network

    Thomas G. Rizzo

    2010-03-08

    Extra dimensions provide a very useful tool in addressing a number of the fundamental problems faced by the Standard Model. The following provides a very basic introduction to this very broad subject area as given at the VIII School of the Gravitational and Mathematical Physics Division of the Mexican Physical Society in December 2009. Some prospects for extra dimensional searches at the 7 TeV LHC with $\\sim$1 $fb^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity are provided.

  6. Introduction to Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2010-07-12

    Extra dimensions provide a very useful tool in addressing a number of the fundamental problems faced by the Standard Model. The following provides a very basic introduction to this very broad subject area as given at the VIII School of the Gravitational and Mathematical Physics Division of the Mexican Physical Society in December 2009. Some prospects for extra dimensional searches at the 7 TeV LHC with {approx}1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity are provided.

  7. Introduction to Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2010-04-29

    Extra dimensions provide a very useful tool in addressing a number of the fundamental problems faced by the Standard Model. The following provides a very basic introduction to this very broad subject area as given at the VIII School of the Gravitational and Mathematical Physics Division of the Mexican Physical Society in December 2009. Some prospects for extra dimensional searches at the 7 TeV LHC with {approx}1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity are provided.

  8. Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph Observatory summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Virginia; Levine-Westa, Marie; Kissila, Andy; Kwacka, Eug; Hoa, Tim; Dumonta, Phil; Lismana, Doug; Fehera, Peter; Cafferty, Terry

    2005-01-01

    Creating an optical space telescope observatory capable of detecting and characterizing light from extra-solar terrestrial planets poses technical challenges related to extreme wavefront stability. The Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph design team has been developing an observatory based on trade studies, modeling and analysis that has guided us towards design choices to enable this challenging mission. This paper will describe the current flight baseline design of the observatory and the trade studies that have been performed. The modeling and analysis of this design will be described including predicted performance and the tasks yet to be done.

  9. A SETI experiment. [Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, W. I.

    1986-01-01

    In order to increase the probability of contact in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), it has been proposed to search more intensively in certain regions of the electromagnetic spectrum ('the water hole'). The present paper describes a similar narrowing of the search in the time domain. Application of this strategy results in the SETI experiments searching for signals from the Tau Ceti system late in 1986 and early in 1987, and from the Epsilon Eridani system in mid 1988.

  10. Reducing Extra-Terrestrial Excavation Forces with Percussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert; Schuler, Jason M.; Smith, Jonathan Drew; Nick, Andrew J.; Lippitt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    High launch costs and mission requirements drive the need for low mass excavators with mobility platforms, which in turn have little traction and excavation reaction capacity in low gravity environments. This presents the need for precursor and long term future missions with low mass robotic mining technology to perform In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) tasks. This paper discusses a series of experiments that investigate the effectiveness of a percussive digging device to reduce excavation loads and thereby the mass of the excavator itself. A percussive mechanism and 30" wide pivoting bucket were attached at the end of the arm simulating a basic backhoe with a percussion direction tangent to the direction of movement. Impact energies from 13.6J to 30.5J and frequencies from 0 BPM to 700 BPM were investigated. A reduction in excavation force of as much as 50% was achieved in this experimental investigation.

  11. Astronomers Reveal Extinct Extra-Terrestrial Fusion Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    An international team of astronomers, studying the left-over remnants of stars like our own Sun, have found a remarkable object where the nuclear reactor that once powered it has only just shut down. This star, the hottest known white dwarf, H1504+65, seems to have been stripped of its entire outer regions during its death throes leaving behind the core that formed its power plant. Scientists from the United Kingdom, Germany and the USA focused two of NASA's space telescopes, the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), onto H1504+65 to probe its composition and measure its temperature. The data revealed that the stellar surface is extremely hot, 200,000 degrees, and is virtually free of hydrogen and helium, something never before observed in any star. Instead, the surface is composed mainly of carbon and oxygen, the 'ashes' of the fusion of helium in a nuclear reactor. An important question we must answer is why has this unique star lost the hydrogen and helium, which usually hide the stellar interior from our view? Professor Martin Barstow (University of Leicester) said. 'Studying the nature of the ashes of dead stars give us important clues as to how stars like the Sun live their lives and eventually die. The nuclear waste of carbon and oxygen produced in the process are essential elements for life and are eventually recycled into interstellar space to form new stars, planets and, possibly, living beings.' Professor Klaus Werner (University of Tübingen) said. 'We realized that this star has, on astronomical time scales, only very recently shut down nuclear fusion (about a hundred years ago). We clearly see the bare, now extinct reactor that once powered a bright giant star.' Dr Jeffrey Kruk (Johns Hopkins University) said: 'Astronomers have long predicted that many stars would have carbon-oxygen cores near the end of their lives, but I never expected we would actually be able to see one. This is a wonderful opportunity to improve our understanding of the life-cycle of stars.' The Chandra X-ray data also reveal the signatures of neon, an expected by-product of helium fusion. However, a big surprise was the presence of magnesium in similar quantities. This result may provide a key to the unique composition of H1504+65 and validate theoretical predictions that, if massive enough, some stars can extend their lives by tapping yet another energy source: the fusion of carbon into magnesium. However, as magnesium can also be produced by helium fusion, proof of the theory is not yet ironclad. The final link in the puzzle would be the detection of sodium, which will require data from yet another observatory: the Hubble Space Telescope. The team has already been awarded time on the Hubble Space Telescope to search for sodium in H1504+65 next year, and will, hopefully, discover the final answer as to the origin of this unique star. This work will be published in July in the 'Astronomy & Astrophysics' journal. The Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) were both launched into orbit by NASA in 1999. Their instruments make use of a technique called spectroscopy, which spreads the light obtained from astronomical objects into its constituent X-ray and ultraviolet 'colours', in the same way visible light is dispersed into a rainbow naturally, by water droplets in the atmosphere, or artificially, by a prism. When studied in fine detail each spectrum is a unique 'fingerprint' which tells us what elements are present and reveals the physical conditions in the object being studied. Related Internet Address http://www.ras.org.uk/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=673&Itemid=2

  12. Satellite Radiotomography of Ionospheric Responces to Extra-Terrestrial Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunitsyn, Viacheslav; Padokhin, Artem; Andreeva, Elena; Tereshchenko, Evgeny; Nesterov, Ivan; Vorontsov, Artem

    Our work addresses the study of the response of the atmosphere and ionosphere to a variety of external forcing such as solar flares and particle precipitation. Particle precipitation plays important role in the system of magnetosphere-ionosphere- atmosphere coupling during geomagnetic storms. Using radio tomographic imaging of the ionosphere based on navigational satellite systems (Parus/Transit and GPS/GLONASS) we present and discuss the examples illustrating ionospheric effects caused by particle precipitations detected by DMSP satellites. It is shown that the spatial structure of corpuscular ionization in the tomographic images is qualitatively close to latitudinal distribution of the precipitating particles. The distributions of ionospheric plasma observed during strong geomagnetic disturbances and particle precipitations have multiple extrema and wave-like structures with a spatial scale ranging from a few dozens to a few hundreds of kilometers; the characteristic sizes of latitudinal variations in the corresponding corpuscular flows widely vary from a few degrees to a few dozens degrees latitude. The obtained experimental results are in good agreement with the results of the numeric modelling of the AGW generation by volumetric sources. We also present the comparison of the effects of ionization of the ionosphere by a series of intense X-class solar flares during the 23rd and 24th solar cycles based on the data of satellite navigation and augumentation systems (GPS/GLONASS and SBAS). The analysis shows that the intensity of the ionospheric effects estimated from the variations in total electron content is barely related to the intensity of the X-ray flare for the X-class events. The amplitude of variations in the ionization of the upper atmosphere is mainly controlled by the intensity of variations in solar EUV radiation, which is not always correlated to the X-Ray radiation during flares. The authors acknowledge the support of the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants ? 13-05-01122, 14-05-31445, 14-05-00855, 14-05-10069), grants of the President of Russian Federation (MK-2670.2014.5) and Lomonosov Moscow State University Program of Development.

  13. Problem of searching for extra-terrestrial civilizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambartsumyan, V. A.

    1974-01-01

    Possible criteria characterizing extraterrestrial civilizations and their detection are: (1) deduction of their existence by evaluating astronomical prerequisites for the development of life in remote planetary systems; (2) detection and communication with extraterrestrial civilizations; and (3) the problem of language and content of information in transmitted signals.

  14. Reducing extra-terrestrial excavation forces with percussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R.; Smith, J. D.; Lippitt, T.; Schuler, J.; Nick, A.

    High launch costs and mission requirements drive the need for low mass excavators with mobility platforms, which in turn have little traction and excavation reaction capacity in low gravity environments. This presents the need for precursor and long term future missions with low mass robotic mining technology to perform In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) tasks. This paper discusses a series of experiments that investigate the effectiveness of a percussive digging device to reduce excavation loads and thereby the mass of the excavator itself. A percussive mechanism and 30" wide pivoting bucket were attached to a test stand simulating a basic backhoe with a percussion direction tangent to the direction of movement. Impact energies from 13.6J to 30.5J and frequencies from 0 to 700 beats per minute (BPM) were investigated. A reduction in excavation force of as much as 50% was achieved in this experimental investigation.

  15. Raman spectroscopic studies of carbon in extra-terrestrial materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macklin, John; Brownlee, Donald; Chang, Sherwood; Bunch, Ted

    1990-01-01

    The measurements obtained here indicate ways in which micro-Raman spectroscopy can be used to elucidate structural characteristics and distribution of carbon in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Existing information about structurally significant aspects of Raman measurements of graphite is combined with structurally relevant findings from the present micro-Raman studies of carbons prepared by carbonization of polyvinylidine chloride (PVDC) at various temperatures and natural material, as well as several acid residues from the Allende and Murchison meteorites in order to establish new spectra-structure relationships. Structural features of many of the materials in this study have been measured by x ray analysis and electron microscopy: thus, their structural differences can be directly correlated with differences in the Raman spectra. The spectral parameters consequently affirmed as indicators of structure are used as a measure of structure in materials that have unknown carbon structure, especially IDPs. The unique applicability of micro-Raman spectroscopy is realized not only in the ability to conveniently measure spectra of micron-size IDPs, but also micro-sized parts of an inhomogeneous material. Microcrystalline graphite is known to give Raman spectra that differ dependent on crystallite size (see e.g., Lespade, et. al., 1984, or Nemanich and Solin, 1979). The spectral changes that accompany decreasing particle size include increase in the ratio (R) of the intensity of the band near 1350 cm(-1) (D band) to that of the band near 1600 cm(-1) (G band) increase in the half width of the D band (wD) increase in the frequency maximum of the G band and increase in the half-width (wG) of the 2nd order band near 2700 cm(-1) (G) band.

  16. Search for Extra-terrestrial Intelligence Donna M. Jurdy

    E-print Network

    Jurdy, Donna M.

    Thicker Atmosphere Life in the Solar System? #12;Needed for Habitability? Solid surface Atmosphere,000 light years away. #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Launch blog Mission Clock Launch videos Kepler Home > About EST. Media from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Press Conference Media Resources Full Press Kit (3 Mb pdf

  17. Extra-terrestrial nuclear power stations : transportation and operation

    E-print Network

    Kane, Susan Christine

    2005-01-01

    Many challenges exist when considering nuclear power to provide electricity for bases on the Moon or Mars, including launch safety, landing safety, deployment, control, and protecting the astronauts from radiation. Examples ...

  18. Extra-terrestrial Life in the Milky Way Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Neal J.

    2014-09-01

    Are we alone? Along with questions about black holes, this is one of the questions most commonly asked of astrophysicists. While the simple answer is that we don't know, logical and rational exploration of the question can be illuminating and a very good way to introduce non-scientists to the "scientific worldview." This short essay is based on a class for students not majoring in science, which I have taught for nearly forty years at the University of Texas at Austin.

  19. Accretion and differentiation of the terrestrial planets with implications for the compositions of early-formed Solar System bodies and accretion of water

    E-print Network

    Rubie, David C; Morbidelli, Alessandro; O'Brien, Dave P; Young, Ed D; de Vries, Jellie; Palme, Herbert; Frost, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    In order to test planetary accretion and differentiation scenarios, we integrated a multistage core-mantle differentiation model with N-body accretion simulations. Impacts between embryos and planetesimals result in magma ocean formation and episodes of core formation. The core formation model combines rigorous chemical mass balance with metal-silicate element partitioning data. The primary constraint on the combined model is the composition of the Earth's primitive mantle, the composition of the Martian mantle, and the mass fractions of the metallic cores of Earth and Mars. The model is refined by least squares minimization with up to five fitting parameters that consist of the metal-silicate equilibrium pressure and 1-4 parameters that define the starting compositions of primitive bodies. This integrated model has been applied to 6 Grand Tack simulations. Investigations of a broad parameter space indicate that: accretion of Earth was heterogeneous, metal-silicate equilibration pressures increase as accretio...

  20. Perceptual Grouping Extra Reading

    E-print Network

    Jacobs, David

    1 Perceptual Grouping · Extra Reading: Laws of Organization in Perceptual Forms, Max Wertheimer this arrangement and division of the total, and not, say, 127 and 100 and 100; or 150 and 177. Max Wertheimer, 1923 people impossible to see the whole series simultaneously in the latter grouping. Max Wertheimer Gestalt

  1. ExTrA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfils, X.; Almenara, J.-M.; ExTrA Team

    2014-04-01

    ExTrA is an ERC-funded project offering a novel method to dramatically improve on the precision of ground based photometry and more efficiently search for exo-Earths orbiting cool stars. The method makes use of a multi-object spectrograph to add the spectroscopic resolution to the traditional differential photometry method. We will discuss how this shall enable the fine correction of color-dependent systematics (atmospheric variations, instrument and detector errors) that would otherwise hinder ground-based observations. ExTrA aims to develop this method with a new facility composed of small telescopes (60cm in diameter) and a near-infrared spectrograph (R<500, lbda=0.8-1.6?m). Near-infrared observations will boost the efficiency of its cool-star observations, such that ExTrA might become the most sensitive survey for Earthsize planets transiting nearby planets. It shall yield dozens exo-Earths amenable to atmospheric characterization, including several habitable exo-Earths, which may provide our first peek into an exolife laboratory. In this talk, we shall discuss all aspects of ExTrA from its initial concept to the expected exoplanet yield, passing by its design and implementation.

  2. The Search for other Earths: limits on the giant planet orbits that allow habitable terrestrial planets to form

    E-print Network

    Sean N. Raymond

    2006-05-04

    Gas giant planets are far easier than terrestrial planets to detect around other stars, and are thought to form much more quickly than terrestrial planets. Thus, in systems with giant planets, the late stages of terrestrial planet formation are strongly affected by the giant planets' dynamical presence. Observations of giant planet orbits may therefore constrain the systems that can harbor potentially habitable, Earth-like planets. We present results of 460 N-body simulations of terrestrial accretion from a disk of Moon- to Mars-sized planetary embryos. We systematically vary the orbital semimajor axis of a Jupiter-mass giant planet between 1.6 and 6 AU, and eccentricity between 0 and 0.4. We find that for Sun-like stars, giant planets inside roughly 2.5 AU inhibit the growth of 0.3 Earth-mass planets in the habitable zone. If planets accrete water from volatile-rich embryos past 2-2.5 AU, then water-rich habitable planets can only form in systems with giant planets beyond 3.5 AU. Giant planets with significant orbital eccentricities inhibit both accretion and water delivery. The majority of the current sample of extra-solar giant planets appears unlikely to form habitable planets.

  3. Sex differences in gait utilization and energy metabolism during terrestrial locomotion in two varieties of chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) selected for different body size

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Kayleigh A.; Nudds, Robert L.; Butler, Patrick J.; Codd, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) of standard breed (large) and bantam (small) varieties, artificial selection has led to females being permanently gravid and sexual selection has led to male-biased size dimorphism. Using respirometry, videography and morphological measurements, sex and variety differences in metabolic cost of locomotion, gait utilisation and maximum sustainable speed (Umax) were investigated during treadmill locomotion. Males were capable of greater Umax than females and used a grounded running gait at high speeds, which was only observed in a few bantam females and no standard breed females. Body mass accounted for variation in the incremental increase in metabolic power with speed between the varieties, but not the sexes. For the first time in an avian species, a greater mass-specific incremental cost of locomotion, and minimum measured cost of transport (CoTmin) were found in males than in females. Furthermore, in both varieties, the female CoTmin was lower than predicted from interspecific allometry. Even when compared at equivalent speeds (using Froude number), CoT decreased more rapidly in females than in males. These trends were common to both varieties despite a more upright limb in females than in males in the standard breed, and a lack of dimorphism in posture in the bantam variety. Females may possess compensatory adaptations for metabolic efficiency during gravidity (e.g. in muscle specialization/posture/kinematics). Furthermore, the elevated power at faster speeds in males may be linked to their muscle properties being suited to inter-male aggressive combat. PMID:26405047

  4. Sex differences in gait utilization and energy metabolism during terrestrial locomotion in two varieties of chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) selected for different body size.

    PubMed

    Rose, Kayleigh A; Nudds, Robert L; Butler, Patrick J; Codd, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    In leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) of standard breed (large) and bantam (small) varieties, artificial selection has led to females being permanently gravid and sexual selection has led to male-biased size dimorphism. Using respirometry, videography and morphological measurements, sex and variety differences in metabolic cost of locomotion, gait utilisation and maximum sustainable speed (Umax) were investigated during treadmill locomotion. Males were capable of greater Umax than females and used a grounded running gait at high speeds, which was only observed in a few bantam females and no standard breed females. Body mass accounted for variation in the incremental increase in metabolic power with speed between the varieties, but not the sexes. For the first time in an avian species, a greater mass-specific incremental cost of locomotion, and minimum measured cost of transport (CoTmin) were found in males than in females. Furthermore, in both varieties, the female CoTmin was lower than predicted from interspecific allometry. Even when compared at equivalent speeds (using Froude number), CoT decreased more rapidly in females than in males. These trends were common to both varieties despite a more upright limb in females than in males in the standard breed, and a lack of dimorphism in posture in the bantam variety. Females may possess compensatory adaptations for metabolic efficiency during gravidity (e.g. in muscle specialization/posture/kinematics). Furthermore, the elevated power at faster speeds in males may be linked to their muscle properties being suited to inter-male aggressive combat. PMID:26405047

  5. The Compositional Diversity of Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets: II. Migration Simulations

    E-print Network

    Carter-Bond, Jade C; Raymond, Sean N

    2012-01-01

    Prior work has found that a variety of terrestrial planetary compositions are expected to occur within known extrasolar planetary systems. However, such studies ignored the effects of giant planet migration, which is thought to be very common in extra-solar systems. Here we present calculations of the compositions of terrestrial planets that formed in dynamical simulations incorporating varying degrees of giant planet migration. We used chemical equilibrium models of the solid material present in the disks of five known planetary host stars: the Sun, GJ 777, HD4203, HD19994 and HD213240. Giant planet migration has a strong effect on the compositions of simulated terrestrial planets as the migration results large-scale mixing between terrestrial planet building blocks that condensed at a range of temperatures. This mixing acts to 1) increase the typical abundance of Mg-rich silicates in the terrestrial planets feeding zones and thus increase the frequency of planets with Earth-like compositions compared with s...

  6. A theoretical investigation of isotopic anomalies of xenon in terrestrial and extra-terrestrial samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabu, D. D.

    1977-01-01

    The abundance and isotopic composition of noble gases in meteorites is discussed in relation to the composition of the early solar system. Carbonaceous chondrites contain a unique Xenon-X, which is rich in heavy and light isotopes. Variations in the occurrence of type-X and type-Y (the normal component) noble gases are of such magnitude that neither the injection of material from a nearby supernova nor presence of presolar grains can account for the anomalies in meteorites. Therefore, it is suggested that the entire solar system may have condensed from the debris of a single local supernova.

  7. Measurements of H2O in the terrestrial mesosphere and implications for extra-terrestrial sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olivero, John J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent measurements of mesospheric water vapor and their implications for the existence of extraterrestrial sources of water are discussed. This study was prompted by the work of L. Frank and others who, based on their interpretation of transient dark spots visible in ultraviolet images of the Earth's dayglow emission, have proposed that a large flux of small comets enters the Earth's upper atmosphere each day. To date, however, analysis does not conclusively refute or support the idea of an external source.

  8. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 69 (2007) 116128 Fluxon modeling of low-beta plasmas

    E-print Network

    DeForest, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 69 (2007) 116­128 Fluxon modeling of low that Eulerian grid size is typically chosen to oversample the physical structure. The extra resolution is used

  9. phytoplankton communities of oligotrophic ocean systems, and still less so for terrestrial plants. We have described phenotypes likely to

    E-print Network

    Eddy, Sean

    phytoplankton communities of oligotrophic ocean systems, and still less so for terrestrial plants. For the two evolved lines that often failed to grow at ambient CO2 concentrations, several extra acclimation

  10. Continuously recording body temperature in terrestrial chelonians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nussear, K.E.; Esque, T.C.; Tracy, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    The degree of interaction between mercury and cholinesterase inhibiting pesticides was determined by comparing enzyme responses to sublethal dosages of parathion or carbofuran in quail fed 0.05, 0.5, or 5.0 ppm morsodren for 18 weeks. A statistically significant interaction was defined as greater brain cholinesterase inhibition in morsodren-fed than in clean-fed birds following pesticide dosage. The tissue residues of mercury that accumulated before significant mercury-parathion interactions occurred were higher than levels that might be expected in natural populations, but significant mercury-carbofuran interactions occurred in birds that had only accumulated 1.0 ppm liver mercury. The results indicate that indiscriminate usage of cholinesterase inhibiting pesticides are dangerous, since natural populations of fish-eating birds oftentimes contain this magnitude of mercury.

  11. Phenomenology of Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.; /SLAC

    2006-11-07

    If the structure of spacetime is different than that readily observed, gravitational physics, particle physics and cosmology are all immediately affected. The physics of extra dimensions offers new insights and solutions to fundamental questions arising in these fields. Novel ideas and frameworks are continuously born and evolved. They make use of string theoretical features and tools and they may reveal if and how the 11-dimensional string theory is relevant to our four-dimensional world. We have outlined some of the experimental observations in particle and gravitational physics as well as astrophysical and cosmological considerations that can constrain or confirm these scenarios. These developing ideas and the wide interdisciplinary experimental program that is charted out to investigate them mark a renewed effort to describe the dynamics behind spacetime. We look forward to the discovery of a higher dimensional spacetime.

  12. Impact erosion of terrestrial planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    I review current ideas about the nature of the planetesimals - composition, size distribution, and the planetary encounter velocity. Previous papers on accretion and erosion of planetary atmospheres as a result of multiple impacts are reviewed. Finally, the effects of blowing off a substantial fraction of the atmosphere from a terrestrial planet due to a single giant body impact are discussed.

  13. Terrestrial Planets: Comparative Planetology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Papers were presented at the 47th Annual Meteoritical Society Meeting on the Comparative planetology of Terrestrial Planets. Subject matter explored concerning terrestrial planets includes: interrelationships among planets; plaentary evolution; planetary structure; planetary composition; planetary Atmospheres; noble gases in meteorites; and planetary magnetic fields.

  14. TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM SIMULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Terrestrial Habitats Project at the Western Ecology Division (Corvallis, OR) is developing tools and databases to meet the needs of Program Office clients for assessing risks to wildlife and terrestrial ecosystems. Because habitat is a dynamic condition in real-world environm...

  15. Extra-cutaneous melanin.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, A S

    1988-01-01

    Extra-cutaneous melanocytes derive from either the neural crest, the outer wall of the optic cup, or the cranial neural tube. Those of neural crest origin reach most bodily regions, and may give rise to primary melanoma in various tissues. The Kupffer cell produces a form of melanin, but is hardly a melanocyte. Melanocytes of the internal ear may be concerned with secretion of endolymph, trans-epithelial ion transport, and with protection against ototoxic drugs and high-intensity noise damage. There is evidence from albino animals that retinal pigment epithelium determines co-ordinates of the neural retina, and its decussation pattern during development. Neuromelanin derives from Dopamine, and is found in dopaminergic neurons widely distributed throughout the brain-stem and hypothalamus, and which project to the striatum and limbic system. Parkinsonism is due to degeneration of melanin-containing dopaminergic neurons of locus coeruleus and substantia nigra, and MPTP provides an investigative probe for studying the causes of Parkinsonism. Neuromelanin should not be regarded as a waste-product, but as something which can affect the firing properties of neurons with specific functional effect. PMID:3070524

  16. Hidden Photons in Extra Dimensions

    E-print Network

    Chris J. Wallace; Joerg Jaeckel; Sabyasachi Roy

    2013-11-25

    Additional U(1) gauge symmetries and corresponding vector bosons, called hidden photons, interacting with the regular photon via kinetic mixing are well motivated in extensions of the Standard Model. Such extensions often exhibit extra spatial dimensions. In this note we investigate the effects of hidden photons living in extra dimensions. In four dimensions such a hidden photon is only detectable if it has a mass or if there exists additional matter charged under it. We note that in extra dimensions suitable masses for hidden photons are automatically present in form of the Kaluza-Klein tower.

  17. Neutrino and Extra World

    E-print Network

    D. S. Baranov; G. G. Volkov

    2012-11-20

    The neutrino speed measurement experiments are the continuations of the classic light speed measurement experiments have been done in range of the solar planet system (Ole Roemer, 1676), in star system (James Braidely, 1728) and, at last, on the Earth (Lois Fizeau, 1849),.... The finite light speed measurement has led to the revolution in the humanity consciousness and eventually led to a new understanding of the visible universe. In 1998-2005, we had a lot of excited discussions at CERN about the possibilities to perform the neutrino experiments to test the superluminal neutrino hypothesis and to find new phenomena beyond the SM. From one hand the idea of such experiments was associated with the hope to understand the role of the V-A- weak interactions, the quark-lepton family symmetry, the neutrino space-time properties and to observe some indications on a new vacuum structure existence outside of the Weak Scale, i.e. in the region 1/R ~ (0.1-20) TeV. From another hand the general trends of this idea has been related to the possible existence some extra space-time noncompact dimensions of the universe. In this context it would be first serious encounter with the dual conception between the physical phenomena of microcosmos and of universe. One of the main goals is to find some new space-time peculiarities and structures that might explain the formation of our visible D=(3+1)-universe with all its space-time and internal symmetries which could be only a part of a vast Universe filled with other kinds of matter. The main difficulties of such experiments related to the possible relativity principle paradoxes have been discussed.

  18. Terrestrial photovoltaic measurements, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The following major topics are discussed; (1) Terrestrial solar irradiance; (2) Solar simulation and reference cell calibration; and (3) Cell and array measurement procedures. Numerous related subtopics are also discussed within each major topic area.

  19. Bounds on Universal Extra Dimensions

    E-print Network

    Thomas Appelquist; Hsin-Chia Cheng; Bogdan A. Dobrescu

    2001-06-29

    We show that the bound from the electroweak data on the size of extra dimensions accessible to all the standard model fields is rather loose. These "universal" extra dimensions could have a compactification scale as low as 300 GeV for one extra dimension. This is because the Kaluza-Klein number is conserved and thus the contributions to the electroweak observables arise only from loops. The main constraint comes from weak-isospin violation effects. We also compute the contributions to the S parameter and the $Zb\\bar{b}$ vertex. The direct bound on the compactification scale is set by CDF and D0 in the few hundred GeV range, and the Run II of the Tevatron will either discover extra dimensions or else it could significantly raise the bound on the compactification scale. In the case of two universal extra dimensions, the current lower bound on the compactification scale depends logarithmically on the ultra-violet cutoff of the higher dimensional theory, but can be estimated to lie between 400 and 800 GeV. With three or more extra dimensions, the cutoff dependence may be too strong to allow an estimate.

  20. Comparative Climatology of Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackwell, Stephen J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Harder, Jerald W.; Bullock, Mark A.

    Public awareness of climate change on Earth is currently very high, promoting significant interest in atmospheric processes. We are fortunate to live in an era where it is possible to study the climates of many planets, including our own, using spacecraft and groundbased observations as well as advanced computational power that allows detailed modeling. Planetary atmospheric dynamics and structure are all governed by the same basic physics. Thus differences in the input variables (such as composition, internal structure, and solar radiation) among the known planets provide a broad suite of natural laboratory settings for gaining new understanding of these physical processes and their outcomes. Diverse planetary settings provide insightful comparisons to atmospheric processes and feedbacks on Earth, allowing a greater understanding of the driving forces and external influences on our own planetary climate. They also inform us in our search for habitable environments on planets orbiting distant stars, a topic that was a focus of Exoplanets, the preceding book in the University of Arizona Press Space Sciences Series. Quite naturally, and perhaps inevitably, our fascination with climate is largely driven toward investigating the interplay between the early development of life and the presence of a suitable planetary climate. Our understanding of how habitable planets come to be begins with the worlds closest to home. Venus, Earth, and Mars differ only modestly in their mass and distance from the Sun, yet their current climates could scarcely be more divergent. Our purpose for this book is to set forth the foundations for this emerging science and to bring to the forefront our current understanding of atmospheric formation and climate evolution. Although there is significant comparison to be made to atmospheric processes on nonterrestrial planets in our solar system — the gas and ice giants — here we focus on the terrestrial planets, leaving even broader comparisons to a future volume. Our authors have taken on the task to look at climate on the terrestrial planets in the broadest sense possible — by comparing the atmospheric processes at work on the four terrestrial bodies, Earth, Venus, Mars, and Titan (Titan is included because it hosts many of the common processes), and on terrestrial planets around other stars. These processes include the interactions of shortwave and thermal radiation with the atmosphere, condensation and vaporization of volatiles, atmospheric dynamics, chemistry and aerosol formation, and the role of the surface and interior in the long-term evolution of climate. Chapters herein compare the scientific questions, analysis methods, numerical models, and spacecraft remote sensing experiments of Earth and the other terrestrial planets, emphasizing the underlying commonality of physical processes. We look to the future by identifying objectives for ongoing research and new missions. Through these pages we challenge practicing planetary scientists, and most importantly new students of any age, to find pathways and synergies for advancing the field. In Part I, Foundations, we introduce the fundamental physics of climate on terrestrial planets. Starting with the best studied planet by far, Earth, the first chapters discuss what is known and what is not known about the atmospheres and climates of the terrestrial planets of the solar system and beyond. In Part II, Greenhouse Effect and Atmospheric Dynamics, we focus on the processes that govern atmospheric motion and the role that general circulation models play in our current understanding. In Part III, Clouds and Hazes, we provide an in-depth look at the many effects of clouds and aerosols on planetary climate. Although this is a vigorous area of research in the Earth sciences, and very strongly influences climate modeling, the important role that aerosols and clouds play in the climate of all planets is not yet well constrained. This section is intended to stimulate further research on this critical subject. The study of climate involves much more than

  1. Contrasting coloration in terrestrial mammals

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Here I survey, collate and synthesize contrasting coloration in 5000 species of terrestrial mammals focusing on black and white pelage. After briefly reviewing alternative functional hypotheses for coloration in mammals, I examine nine colour patterns and combinations on different areas of the body and for each mammalian taxon to try to identify the most likely evolutionary drivers of contrasting coloration. Aposematism and perhaps conspecific signalling are the most consistent explanations for black and white pelage in mammals; background matching may explain white pelage. Evidence for contrasting coloration is being involved in crypsis through pattern blending, disruptive coloration or serving other functions, such as signalling dominance, lures, reducing eye glare or in temperature regulation has barely moved beyond anecdotal stages of investigation. Sexual dichromatism is limited in this taxon and its basis is unclear. Astonishingly, the functional significance of pelage coloration in most large charismatic black and white mammals that were new to science 150 years ago still remains a mystery. PMID:18990666

  2. Chaos in Terrestrial Planet Formation

    E-print Network

    Hoffmann, Volker; Moore, Ben; Stadel, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial planets are thought to be the result of a vast number of gravitational interactions and collisions between smaller bodies. We use numerical simulations to show that practically identical initial conditions result in a wide array of final planetary configurations. This highly chaotic behaviour questions the predictability of different scenarios for the formation and evolution of our solar system and planetary systems in general. However, multiple realisations of the same initial conditions can be used to predict certain global statistics. We present two sets of numerical experiments that quantify this behaviour. Firstly, we demonstrate that simulations with slightly displaced particles are completely divergent after ~500 years, irrespective of initial displacement, particle number, and code accuracy. If a single planetesimal is moved by less than one millimetre, then a different set of planets results -- this timescale for chaotic divergence decreases with increasing particle number. Secondly, we s...

  3. Consumer Control of Terrestrial Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, D.

    2012-12-01

    More than half of the earth's terrestrial surface is grazed by large herbivores and their effects on plant and soil carbon and nitrogen processes are large and widespread. Yet the large effects of these animals on terrestrial processes have largely been ignored in global change models. This presentation will explore the many pathways that consumers affect short and long time-scale terrestrial nitrogen and carbon processes. Large herbivores influence the quality of soil organic matter and the size of the active (i.e., labile) pool of soil carbon and nitrogen in several ways. Herbivory leads to greater abundance of species producing low quality material in forest and dry grassland, via feeding preferentially on high quality forage, and high quality material in mesic grassland habitat, via the high quality of material that regrows after a plant is grazed. Defoliation stimulates the rate of root exudation that enhances rhizospheric processes and the availability of nitrogen in the plant rhizosphere. Herbivores also change the species composition of mycorrhizae fungal associates that influence plant growth and affect soil structure and the turnover rate of soil carbon. Recent radiocarbon measurements have revealed that herbivores also markedly affect the turnover dynamics of the large pool of old soil carbon. In Yellowstone Park, ungulates slow the mean turnover of the relatively old (i.e., slow and passive) 0 - 20 cm deep soil organic carbon by 350 years in upland, dry grassland and speed up that rate in slope-bottom, mesic grassland by 300 years. This represents a 650 year swing in the turnover period of old soil carbon across the Yellowstone landscape. By comparison, mean turnover time for the old pool of 0 - 10 cm deep soil organic carbon shifts by about 300 years across the steep climatic gradient that includes tropical, temperate, and northern hardwood forest, and tallgrass, shortgrass and desert grassland. This large body of evidence suggests consumers play a major role in global carbon cycling and likely are important regulators of the terrestrial response to climate change.

  4. Extra-articular Synovial Chondromatosis Eroding and Penetrating the Acromion

    PubMed Central

    El Rassi, George; Matta, Jihad; Hijjawi, Ayman; Khair, Ousama Abou; Fahs, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder is an uncommon disorder. It usually affects the glenohumeral joint and is characterized by metaplasia of the synovium leading to the formation of osteochondral loose bodies. Few cases of extra-articular subacromial synovial chondromatosis involving the rotator cuff tendon have been reported in the literature. The treatment of previously reported cases consisted of open bursectomy and removal of loose bodies. We report a case of subacromial synovial chondromatosis without rotator cuff involvement but with severe erosion and fracture of the acromion. Treatment consisted of shoulder arthroscopy to remove all loose bodies, total bursectomy, and debridement of the acromion. Potential benefits of arthroscopy were also evaluated.

  5. Collider searches for extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberg, Greg; /Brown U.

    2004-12-01

    Searches for extra spatial dimensions remain among the most popular new directions in our quest for physics beyond the Standard Model. High-energy collider experiments of the current decade should be able to find an ultimate answer to the question of their existence in a variety of models. Until the start of the LHC in a few years, the Tevatron will remain the key player in this quest. In this paper, we review the most recent results from the Tevatron on searches for large, TeV{sup -1}-size, and Randall-Sundrum extra spatial dimensions, which have reached a new level of sensitivity and currently probe the parameter space beyond the existing constraints. While no evidence for the existence of extra dimensions has been found so far, an exciting discovery might be just steps away.

  6. Coreless Terrestrial Exoplanets

    E-print Network

    L. Elkins-Tanton; S. Seager

    2008-08-13

    Differentiation in terrestrial planets is expected to include the formation of a metallic iron core. We predict the existence of terrestrial planets that have differentiated but have no metallic core--planets that are effectively a giant silicate mantle. We discuss two paths to forming a coreless terrestrial planet, whereby the oxidation state during planetary accretion and solidification will determine the size or existence of any metallic core. Under this hypothesis, any metallic iron in the bulk accreting material is oxidized by water, binding the iron in the form of iron oxide into the silicate minerals of the planetary mantle. The existence of such silicate planets has consequences for interpreting the compositions and interior density structures of exoplanets based on their mass and radius measurements.

  7. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^-23 Hz^-1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of terrestrial gravity fluctuations will have great impact on the future development of GW detectors and high-precision gravimetry in general, and many open questions need to be answered still as emphasized in this article.

  8. Body Fluids Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siconolfi, Steven F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Method and apparatus are described for determining volumes of body fluids in a subject using bioelectrical response spectroscopy. The human body is represented using an electrical circuit. Intra-cellular water is represented by a resistor in series with a capacitor; extra-cellular water is represented by a resistor in series with two parallel inductors. The parallel inductors represent the resistance due to vascular fluids. An alternating, low amperage, multifrequency signal is applied to determine a subject's impedance and resistance. From these data, statistical regression is used to determine a 1% impedance where the subject's impedance changes by no more than 1% over a 25 kHz interval. Circuit component, of the human body circuit are determined based on the 1% impedance. Equations for calculating total body water, extra-cellular water, total blood volume, and plasma volume are developed based on the circuit components.

  9. J. Field Ornithol. 84(1):112, 2013 DOI: 10.1111/jofo.12000 Microhabitat associations of terrestrial insectivorous

    E-print Network

    Stouffer, Phil

    of terrestrial insectivorous birds in Amazonian rainforest and second-growth forests Jeffrey A. Stratford1. Across the Neotropics, small-bodied terrestrial insectivores are sensitive to forest fragmentation characterized habitat at sites where nine species of terrestrial insectivores were observed foraging, as well

  10. Pedagogical Introduction to Extra Dimensions

    E-print Network

    Thomas G. Rizzo

    2004-10-05

    Extra dimensions provide a new window on a number of problems faced by the Standard Model. The following provides an introduction to this very broad subject aimed at experimental graduate students and post-docs based on a lecture given at the 2004 SLAC Summer Institute.

  11. Origin of the 'Extra Entropy'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    2008-01-01

    I will discuss how one can determine the origin of the 'extra entropy' in groups and clusters and the feedback needed in models of galaxy formation. I will stress the use of x-ray spectroscopy and imaging and the critical value that Con-X has in this regard.

  12. Terrestrial planet formation

    PubMed Central

    Righter, K.; O’Brien, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (?106 y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few × 106 y), and finally embryos to planets (107–108 y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids. PMID:21709256

  13. Terrestrials Dwarf Planets

    E-print Network

    Gaudi, B. Scott

    Terrestrials Gas Giants Ice Giants Dwarf Planets The Solar System #12;Neptune Uranus Saturn Jupiter Density: 3900 ­ 5500 kg m-3 #12;Jupiter 318 ME 5.2 AU Uranus 15 ME 19.6 AUSaturn 95 ME 9.5 AU Neptune 17 3.88 RE Uranus Neptune Uranus and Neptune are Ice Giants made mostly of ices with thin Hydrogen

  14. GLOBAL TERRESTRIAL CARBON CYCLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is great uncertainty with regard to the future role of the terrestrial biosphere in the global carbon cycle, arising from both an inadequate understanding of current pools and fluxes as well as the potential effects of rising atmospheric concentrations of CO, on natural eco...

  15. Terrestrial planet formation.

    PubMed

    Righter, K; O'Brien, D P

    2011-11-29

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (~10(6) y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few 10(6) y), and finally embryos to planets (10(7)-10(8) y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids. PMID:21709256

  16. Diterpenoids of terrestrial origin.

    PubMed

    Hanson, James R

    2015-12-19

    Covering January to December 2014. Previous review, Nat. Prod. Rep., 2015, 32, 76-87This review covers the isolation and chemistry of diterpenoids from terrestrial as opposed to marine sources and includes, labdanes, clerodanes, abietanes, pimaranes, kauranes, cembranes and their cyclization products. There are 200 references. PMID:26514379

  17. Collider Phenomenology of Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lillie, Benjamin Huntington; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-03-10

    In recent years there has been much interest in the possibility that there exist more spacetime dimensions than the usual four. Models of particle physics beyond the Standard Model that incorporate these extra dimensions can solve the gauge hierarchy problem and explain why the fermion masses a spread over many orders of magnitude. In this thesis we explore several possibilities for models with extra dimensions. First we examine constraints on the proposal of Arkani-Hamed and Schmaltz that the Standard Model fermions are localized to different positions in an extra dimension, thereby generating the hierarchy in fermion masses. We find strong constraints on the compactification scale of such models arising from flavor-changing neutral currents. Next we investigate the phenomenology of the Randall-Sundrum model, where the hierarchy between the electroweak and Planck scales is generated by the warping in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space. In particular, we investigate the ''Higgsless'' model of electroweak symmetry breaking due to Csaki et. al., where the Higgs has been decoupled from the spectrum by taking its vacuum expectation value to infinity. We find that this model produces many distinctive features at the LHC. However, we also find that it is strongly constrained by precision electroweak observables and the requirement that gauge-boson scattering be perturbative. We then examine the model with a finite vacuum expectation value, and find that there are observable shifts to the Higgs scalar properties. Finally, in the original large extra dimension scenario of Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali, the hierarchy problem is solved by allowing gravity to propagate in a large extra dimensional volume, while the Standard Model fields are confined to 4 dimensions. We consider the case where there are a large number of extra dimensions (n {approx} 20). This model can solve the hierarchy problem without introducing a exponentially large radii for the extra dimensions, and represents a scenario that is difficult to obtain in string theory. We show that, if this scenario holds, the number of dimensions can be constrained to be larger than the number predicted by critical string theory. Searching for signals of many dimensions is then an important test of whether string theory is a good description of quantum gravity.

  18. Detection Probability of Terrestrial Radio Signals by a Hostile Super-civilization

    E-print Network

    Zaitsev, Alexander L

    2008-01-01

    Comparison of the total number of the radar astronomy transmissions with respect to that used for sending messages to extra-terrestrial civilizations reveals that the probability of detection of the radio signals to extraterrestrials (ETs) is one million times smaller than that of the radar signals used to study planets and asteroids in the Solar System.

  19. Detection Probability of Terrestrial Radio Signals by a Hostile Super-civilization

    E-print Network

    Alexander L. Zaitsev

    2008-04-17

    Comparison of the total number of the radar astronomy transmissions with respect to that used for sending messages to extra-terrestrial civilizations reveals that the probability of detection of the radio signals to extraterrestrials (ETs) is one million times smaller than that of the radar signals used to study planets and asteroids in the Solar System.

  20. Forming Terrestrial Planets and Delivering Their Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Kevin John

    2015-08-01

    Building models capable of successfully matching the Terrestrial Planet's basic physical and orbital properties has proven difficult. Meanwhile, improved estimates of the nature of water-rich material accreted by the Earth, along with the timing of its delivery, have added even more constraints to match. While the outer Asteroid Belt seemingly provides a source for water-rich planetesimals, models that delivered enough of them to the still-forming Terrestrial Planets typically failed on other basic constraints - such as the mass of Mars.Recent models of Terrestrial Planet Formation have explored how the gas-driven migration of the Giant Planets can solve long-standing issues with the Earth/Mars size ratio. This model is forced to reproduce the orbital and taxonomic distribution of bodies in the Asteroid Belt from a much wider range of semimajor axis then previously considered. In doing so, it also provides a mechanism to feed planetesimals from between and beyond the Giant Planet formation region to the still-forming Terrestrial Planets.

  1. Volcanic ash - Terrestrial versus extraterrestrial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    A principal difference between terrestrial and extraterrestrial lavas may consist in the greater ability of terrestrial lavas to form thin films (like those of soap bubbles) and hence foams. It would follow that, in place of the pumice and spiny shards found in terrestrial volcanic ash, an extraterrestrial ash should contain minute spherules. This hypothesis may help to explain lunar microspherules.

  2. The Terrestrial Planet Finder and Darwin Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchi, William C.

    2004-01-01

    Both in the United States and in Europe, teams of scientists and engineers are exploring the feasibility of the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and Darwin missions, which are designed to search for Earth-like planets in the habitable zone of nearby stars. In the US, the TPF Science Working Group is studying four options - small (4m by 6 m primary mirror) and large (4m by 10 m primary mirror) coronagraphs for planet detection at visible wavelengths, and structurally connected and free-flyer interferometers at thermal infrared wavelengths. The US TPF-SWG is charged with selecting an option for NASA by the end of 2006. In Europe the Darwin Terrestrial Exo-planet Advisory Team (TE- SAT) is exploring the free-flyer interferometer option only at this time. I will discuss the vurtures and difficulties of detecting and characterizing extra-solar planets in both wavelength regions as well as some of the technical challenges and progress in the past year.

  3. Hubble Extra Solar Planet Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a proposed third-generation Hubble instrument for extra-solar planet detection, the Hubble Extra-Solar Planet Interferometer (HESPI). This instrument would be able to achieve starlight cancellation at the 10 exp 6 to 10 exp 8 level, given a stellar wavefront with phase errors comparable to the present Hubble telescope wavefront. At 10 exp 6 starlight cancellation, HESPI would be able to detect a Jupiter-like planet next to a star at a distance of about 10 parsec, for which there are about 400 candidate stars. This paper describes a novel approach for starlight suppression, using a combination of active control and single-mode spatial filters, to achieve starlight suppression far below the classical limit set by scattering due to microsurface imperfections. In preliminary lab experiments, suppression by a factor of 40 below the classical scatter limit due to optical wavefront errors has been demonstrated.

  4. Extra Dimensional Signatures for CLIC

    E-print Network

    Thomas G. Rizzo

    2001-08-28

    A brief overview is presented of the signatures for several different models with extra dimensions at CLIC, an $e^+e^-$ linear collider with a center of mass energy of 3-5 TeV and an integrated luminosity of order 1 $ab^{-1}$. In all cases the search reach for the resulting new physics signatures is found to be in the range of $\\simeq$15-80 TeV.

  5. The Terrestrial Planet Finder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichman, Charles

    1997-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) missions has as its goal the detection and characterization of earth-like planets around nearby stars. NASA is currently funding a number of small studies to look at the trade-offs in the design of TPF. The possible trade-offs include orbit location (1 to 5 AU), aperture size (6 to 1.5m), physically connected baselines or separated spacecraft flying in close formation.

  6. Terrestrial Exoplanet Light Curves

    E-print Network

    Eric Gaidos; Nicholas Moskovitz; Darren M. Williams

    2005-11-23

    The phase or orbital light curves of extrasolar terrestrial planets in reflected or emitted light will contain information about their atmospheres and surfaces complementary to data obtained by other techniques such as spectrosopy. We show calculated light curves at optical and thermal infrared wavelengths for a variety of Earth-like and Earth-unlike planets. We also show that large satellites of Earth-sized planets are detectable, but may cause aliasing effects if the lightcurve is insufficiently sampled.

  7. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    E-print Network

    Jan Harms

    2015-07-21

    The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of terrestrial gravity fluctuations will have great impact on the future development of GW detectors and high-precision gravimetry in general, and many open questions need to be answered still as emphasized in this article.

  8. Warping the universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Kristian L.

    2009-07-15

    We develop the necessary ingredients for the construction of realistic models with warped universal extra dimensions. Our investigations are based on the seven-dimensional (7D) spacetime AdS{sub 5}xT{sup 2}/Z{sub 2} and we derive the Kaluza-Klein (KK) spectra for gravitons, bulk vectors, and the TeV brane localized Higgs boson. We show that, starting with a massive 7D fermion, one may obtain a single chiral massless mode whose profile is readily localized towards the Planck or TeV brane. This allows one to place the standard model fermions in the bulk and construct models of flavor as in Randall-Sundrum models. Our solution also admits the familiar KK parity of models with universal extra dimensions so that the lightest odd KK state is stable and may be a dark matter candidate. As an additional feature the AdS{sub 5} warping ensures that the excited modes on the torus, including the dark matter candidate, appear at TeV energies (as is usually assumed in models with universal extra dimensions) even though the Planck scale sets the dimensions for the torus.

  9. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; Quintana, E. V.; Adams, F. C.; Chambers, J. E.

    2006-01-01

    Most stars reside in binary/multiple star systems; however, previous models of planet formation have studied growth of bodies orbiting an isolated single star. Disk material has been observed around one or both components of various young close binary star systems. If planets form at the right places within such disks, they can remain dynamically stable for very long times. We have simulated the late stages of growth of terrestrial planets in both circumbinary disks around 'close' binary star systems with stellar separations ($a_B$) in the range 0.05 AU $\\le a_B \\le$ 0.4 AU and binary eccentricities in the range $0 \\le e \\le 0.8$ and circumstellar disks around individual stars with binary separations of tens of AU. The initial disk of planetary embryos is the same as that used for simulating the late stages of terrestrial planet growth within our Solar System and around individual stars in the Alpha Centauri system (Quintana et al. 2002, A.J., 576, 982); giant planets analogous to Jupiter and Saturn are included if their orbits are stable. The planetary systems formed around close binaries with stellar apastron distances less than or equal to 0.2 AU with small stellar eccentricities are very similar to those formed in the Sun-Jupiter-Saturn, whereas planetary systems formed around binaries with larger maximum separations tend to be sparser, with fewer planets, especially interior to 1 AU. Likewise, when the binary periastron exceeds 10 AU, terrestrial planets can form over essentially the entire range of orbits allowed for single stars with Jupiter-like planets, although fewer terrestrial planets tend to form within high eccentricity binary systems. As the binary periastron decreases, the radial extent of the terrestrial planet systems is reduced accordingly. When the periastron is 5 AU, the formation of Earth-like planets near 1 AU is compromised.

  10. A Delicate Balance: An Examination of Lehigh University's Athletic Culture and Athletic Extra-Curriculum, 1866-1998

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Courtney Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation examines the history of Lehigh University's athletic culture and extra-curriculum from 1866 to 1998 and argues that both of those institutions served as the basis for identity within the undergraduate student body. Additionally, this dissertation argues that the athletic culture and extra-curriculum established Lehigh's identity…

  11. Screening and validation of EXTraS data products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpano, Stefania; Haberl, F.; De Luca, A.; Tiengo, A.: Israel, G.; Rodriguez, G.; Belfiore, A.; Rosen, S.; Read, A.; Wilms, J.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Law-Green, D.

    2015-09-01

    The EXTraS project (Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky) is aimed at fullyexploring the serendipitous content of the XMM-Newton EPIC database in the timedomain. The project is funded within the EU/FP7-Cooperation Space framework and is carried out by a collaboration including INAF (Italy), IUSS (Italy), CNR/IMATI (Italy), University of Leicester (UK), MPE (Germany) and ECAP (Germany). The several tasks consist in characterise aperiodicvariability for all 3XMM sources, search for short-term periodic variability on hundreds of thousands sources, detect new transient sources that are missed by standard source detection and hence not belonging to the 3XMM catalogue, search for long term variability by measuring fluxes or upper limits for both pointed and slew observations, and finally perform multiwavelength characterisation andclassification. Screening and validation of the different products is essentially in order to reject flawed results, generated by the automatic pipelines. We present here the screening tool we developed in the form of a Graphical User Interface and our plans for a systematic screening of the different catalogues.

  12. Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal Combustion Waste

    E-print Network

    Hopkins, William A.

    Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal total body concentrations of 20 trace elements in adult southern toads, Bufo terrestris, inhabiting coal ash settling basins with toads that were not exposed to the combustion wastes (reference). In addition

  13. Terrestrialization, miniaturization and rates of diversification in African frogs (Anura: Phrynobatrachidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Terrestrialization, the evolution of non-aquatic oviposition, and miniaturization, the evolution of tiny adult body size, have been identified as a key features in the evolution of modern amphibians. This study examines anuran terrestrialization and miniaturization in a phylogenetic context to deter...

  14. Terrestrial Planet Growth in Circumbinary Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; Quintana, E. V.

    2006-01-01

    We examine the accuulation of terrestrial from circumbinary disks surrounding pairs of stars with masses of either 0.5 solar masses each or 0.8 and 0.2 solar masses and orbital separations of 0.05 AU to 0.4 AU by performing numerical simulations of the late stages of planetary growth. Initial disks contain about 2.6 Earth masses of lunar to Mars-sized bodies orbiting within 2 AU of the center of mass of the system, plus giant planets with masses and orbits analogous to those of Jupiter and Saturn. We also performed simulations using analogous disks orbiting single 1 solar mass stars. The dynamics of planetary growth is quite chaotic because the gravitational perturbations resulting from close approaches greatly amplify differences in orbits. Thus, several simulations of each configuration were run with very slightly different initial conditions to enable us to distinguish systematic effects resulting from differences in the binary orbit (or differences of the initial orbits of the bodies within the disk) from pseudo-random variability in outcomes resulting from chaos. Most runs simulated 200 million years of evolution. At least one terrestrial planet remained at the end of each run; one simulation produced 6 terrestrial planets in a configuration that appears to be quite stable. The systems that formed around stars with binary apastron separations of less than 0.2 AU contained on average slightly more planets than those that formed around single stars, with the outermost planet typically orbiting at a greater distance from the system barycenter. Greater stellar separations tended to result in fewer planets, with the inner planet orbiting farther from the stars. More eccentric binaries have a more pronounced effect for the same apastron distance. The statistical distribution of final systems is not sensitive to moderate differences in the initial eccentricities of the bodies in the disk.

  15. Extra-solar Oort cloud encounters and planetary impact rates

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, A.

    1987-01-01

    Upper limits are estimated to the number density of extra-solar Oort clouds (ESOC) through which the solar system might pass and to the probable number of attendant planetary impacts by comets. All stars are assumed to have Oort clouds. The model is based on the observed stellar spatial density and the ratio of the total number density to the observed number density. It is estimated that 486 close stellar passages and 12,160 ESOC encounters may have occurred. Each encounter would have produced a shower of hyperbolic comets, with the results of 1-3 ESOC impacts with the earth. It is concluded that the great majority of terrestrial cratering events by comets have and will come from solar Oort cloud comets. 19 references.

  16. Fibered nulling telescope for extra-solar coronagraphy.

    PubMed

    Hénault, François

    2009-04-01

    A family of fibered nulling telescopes is described, based on the joint use of several recent suggested or demonstrated techniques, namely, pupil densification, multiaxial recombination and single-mode fiber modal filtering, and the use of a fully symmetric beam splitter arrangement. The concept seems appropriate for the realization of a spaceborne nulling telescope, searching for Jupiter-like extra-solar planets and a precursor of future missions, such as Darwin or terrestrial planet finder interferometer (TPF-I). However, it is generally not possible to satisfy at the same time two major requirements, being the depth and size of the central nulling area, and the global throughput for the observed planet. PMID:19340231

  17. Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, D.W.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

  18. Chaos in Terrestrial Planet Formation

    E-print Network

    Volker Hoffmann; Simon L. Grimm; Ben Moore; Joachim Stadel

    2015-08-04

    Terrestrial planets are thought to be the result of a vast number of gravitational interactions and collisions between smaller bodies. We use numerical simulations to show that practically identical initial conditions result in a wide array of final planetary configurations. This highly chaotic behaviour questions the predictability of different scenarios for the formation and evolution of our solar system and planetary systems in general. However, multiple realisations of the same initial conditions can be used to predict certain global statistics. We present two sets of numerical experiments that quantify this behaviour. Firstly, we demonstrate that simulations with slightly displaced particles are completely divergent after ~500 years, irrespective of initial displacement, particle number, and code accuracy. If a single planetesimal is moved by less than one millimetre, then a different set of planets results -- this timescale for chaotic divergence decreases with increasing particle number. Secondly, we show final planetary configurations of initially similar simulations with and without giant planets after evolving them for ~148 Myr. We find that the same simulations including giant planets tend to generate higher mass planets at lower semi-major axes than simulations without gas giants. This prediction can be tested with forthcoming observational programs. By extracting outliers in the observations, we cautiously predict that Kepler-10, Kepler-9, 61 Vir, HD 134060, and HD 51608 may host as yet undetected giant planets.

  19. Solar structure and terrestrial weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility that solar activity has discernible effects on terrestrial weather is considered. Research involving correlation of weather conditions with solar and geomagnetic activity is discussed.

  20. Non-mass-dependent Isotopic Fractionation Processes: Mechanisms and Recent Observations in Terrestrial and Extra-terrestrial Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemens, M. H.

    2003-12-01

    There were several key observations, which were made almost around the same time, that led to studies in the fields of stable isotope geochemistry and cosmochemistry. First, it was the physicochemical formalism for isotope effects, particularly the determination of the position of equilibrium in isotopic exchange reactions. Urey (1947) and Bigeleisen and Mayer (1947) demonstrated that the position of isotope exchange in a chemical reaction may be calculated with high precision. The difference in chemical behavior for isotopically substituted molecules in this specific instance arises from quantum mechanical effects. The vibrating molecule is energetically represented as a harmonic oscillator. Thus, in the case of isotopic substituted molecules, the quantized energy levels vary with the heavier species possessing lower vibrational frequencies. As a result, the isotopically substituted molecules possess slightly stronger bond strengths, which can be calculated with high precision. These can also be measured spectroscopically. Furthermore, since vibrational frequencies are temperature dependent, the partitioning of isotopes between two molecules is temperature dependent and the observed isotopic differences may be used as a temperature index for the equilibrium process of interest.This phenomenon forms the basis for the formulations of Urey (1947) and Bigeleisen and Mayer (1947) for the temperature dependence of isotopic exchange between two molecules. With the nearly simultaneous development of the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer by Nier et al. (1947), the potential for application of stable isotopes was created. Other isotopic fractionation processes are observed in kinetics, diffusion, evaporation-condensation, crystallization, and biology (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration, nitrogen fixation, sulfate reduction, and transpiration). The concomitant isotopic fractionations can also be used to provide details of the relevant process.Although, the conventional isotope effects vary widely in the physicochemical basis for their origin, they all are dependent upon relative isotopic mass differences. The first quantitative discussion of the mass dependence of isotope effects was given by Hulston andThode (1965), who showed that conventional isotope effects alter the isotope ratios in a manner strictly dependent upon relative mass differences. Specifically, the changes in ?33S and ?34S are shown to be highly correlated such that the change in ?33S is half that of ?34S. The mass range in the ?33S is 1 amu (33-32 amu) and for ?34S is 2 amu (34-32 amu). Thus,?33S?0.5?34Sis observed and arises due to the magnitude of the relative isotopic mass differences. The focus of the paper of Hulston and Thode was to utilize meteoritic stable-isotope-ratio measurements as a mechanism to resolve nuclear (nucleosynthetic or spallogenic) processes from non-nuclear processes. The fundamental assumption in this work was, based upon the assumption that all conventional physicochemical processes produce correlated mass-dependent arrays, that any deviation from this relation must reflect a nuclear process. The core assumption for this assertion was that any physical or chemical process may not lead to a variance in stable isotope ratio that does not depend upon mass differences.Clayton et al. (1973) observed that the high-temperature calcium-aluminum inclusions (CAIs) present in the carbonaceous chondrite Allende possess an oxygen isotope composition of ?17O??18O, rather than the expected mass-dependent ?17O?0.5?18O. It was suggested that this anomalous isotopic composition must derive from a nuclear, rather than chemical process. In general, an equality ?17O=?18O may arise in two ways, either by alteration of 17O and 18O by equal amounts or, by addition/subtraction of pure 16O. Models for supernova processes had shown that for certain conditions, essentially pure 16O is produced. Clayton et al. argued that it is unlikely that 17O and 18O would be equally altered, thus the supernova event was deemed the most plausible mechanism to a

  1. Theoretical investigation of isotopic anomaly of xenon in carbonaceous chondrites and other terrestrial and extra-terrestrial samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabu, D. D.

    1974-01-01

    The composition of Xe released from carbonaceous chondrites between 600 and 1000 C, particularly its isotopic trapped forms, is analyzed. Data show trapped Xe to have the following forms: Xe-124, 126, 130, 131, 132, 134, and 136. Attempts were also made to explain the Xe anomaly by mass fractionation as well as determine the relationship between metoritic trapped Xe and solar Xe.

  2. Effects of geophysical extra-terrestrial and terrestrial physical stimuli on living organisms - Effects of gravity fields on living organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. J. F.

    1972-01-01

    The biologic effects of greatly reduced gravity resulting from space flight are examined. Aspects of U.S. space biology during the period from 1960 to 1972 are discussed, giving attention to the Discoverer satellites, the Gemini series, the OV1-4 satellite, the biosatellite project, the orbiting frog otolith experiment, and the Apollo program. Other studies considered are related to the effects of galactic particles on nonproliferating cells, a recoverable tissue culture experiment, cell cycle maintenance in human lung cells, and effects of space flight on circadian rhythms. Viking will land on the planet Mars in 1975 in search for life forms.

  3. Does Terrestrial Carbon Subsidize Production of Estuarine Fish Larvae?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study shows important connections between terrestrial, riverine and marine energy sources in supporting larval fish production across an estuarine ecosystem in Chesapeake Bay, VA. It adds to a growing body of evidence that across ecosystem energy-exchanges play an important ...

  4. 15. PALEOLIMNOLOGY OF EXTREME COLD TERRESTRIAL AND EXTRATERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS

    E-print Network

    Priscu, John C.

    understanding of life's origins on our planet and other extraterrestrial bodies. Liquid water is essential for all life on Earth, including life that exists in extreme environments. Therefore, the study of inland15. PALEOLIMNOLOGY OF EXTREME COLD TERRESTRIAL AND EXTRATERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS 475 R. Pienitz, M

  5. Higgs bosons in extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiros, Mariano

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, motivated by the recent discovery of a Higgs-like boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with a mass mH?125 GeV, we review different models where the hierarchy problem is solved by means of a warped extra dimension. In the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model electroweak observables provide very strong bounds on the mass of KK modes which motivates extensions to overcome this problem. Two extensions are briefly discussed. One particular extension is based on the deformation of the metric such that it strongly departs from the AdS5 structure in the IR region while it goes asymptotically to AdS5 in the UV brane. This model has the IR brane close to a naked metric singularity (which is outside the physical interval) characteristic of soft-walls constructions. The proximity of the singularity provides a strong wave function renormalization for the Higgs field which suppresses the T and S parameters. The second class of considered extensions are based on the introduction of an extra gauge group in the bulk such that the custodial SU(2)R symmetry is gauged and protects the T parameter. By further enlarging the bulk gauge symmetry one can find models where the Higgs is identified with the fifth component of gauge fields and for which the Higgs potential along with the Higgs mass can be dynamically determined by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism.

  6. Lorentz Violation in Extra Dimensions

    E-print Network

    Thomas G. Rizzo

    2005-07-25

    In theories with extra dimensions it is well known that the Lorentz invariance of the $D=4+n$-dimensional spacetime is lost due to the compactified nature of the $n$ dimensions leaving invariance only in 4d. In such theories other sources of Lorentz violation may exist associated with the physics that initiated the compactification process at high scales. Here we consider the possibility of capturing some of this physics by analyzing the higher dimensional analog of the model of Colladay and Kostelecky. In that scenario a complete set of Lorentz violating operators arising from spontaneous Lorentz violation, that are not obviously Planck-scale suppressed, are added to the Standard Model action. Here we consider the influence of the analogous set of operators which break Lorentz invariance in 5d within the Universal Extra Dimensions picture. We show that such operators can greatly alter the anticipated Kaluza-Klein(KK) spectra, induce electroweak symmetry breaking at a scale related to the inverse compactification radius, yield sources of parity violation in, e.g., 4d QED/QCD and result in significant violations of KK-parity conservation produced by fermion Yukawa couplings, thus destabilizing the lightest KK particle. LV in 6d is briefly discussed.

  7. SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS Solar-Terrestrial Interactions

    E-print Network

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS Chapter 4 Chapter 4 Solar-Terrestrial Interactions from the charged particles that reach the planet steadily as part of the solar wind and the much it will be deflected into a circular or spiral path by the Lorentz Force. Most charged particles in the solar wind

  8. Space Science: Atmospheres Out-Gassing Bodies

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Composition Solar, Giant Planets, Terrestrial Planets Vertical Structure Hydrostatic (scale height) Diffusion Radioactive Material Tidal Interactions Initial Species Solar abundance Solar wind composition? Carbonaceous ka) Ice coverage, etc. Condensing Gravitationally Bound Body #12;Atmospheric Sources Volcanoes

  9. Extra-Territorial Siting of Nuclear Installations

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Thomas E.; Morris, Frederic A.

    2009-10-07

    Arrangements might be created for siting nuclear installations on land ceded by a host State for administration by an international or multinational organization. Such arrangements might prove useful in terms of resolving suspicions of proliferation in troubled areas of the world, or as a means to introduce nuclear activities into areas where political, financial or technical capabilities might otherwise make such activities unsound, or as a means to enable global solutions to be instituted for major nuclear concerns (e.g., spent fuel management). The paper examines practical matters associated with the legal and programmatic aspects of siting nuclear installations, including diplomatic/political frameworks, engaging competent industrial bodies, protection against seizure, regulation to ensure safety and security, waste management, and conditions related to the dissolution of the extra-territorial provisions as may be agreed as the host State(s) achieve the capabilities to own and operate the installations. The paper considers the potential for using such a mechanism across the spectrum of nuclear power activities, from mining to geological repositories for nuclear waste. The paper considers the non-proliferation dimensions associated with such arrangements, and the pros and cons affecting potential host States, technology vendor States, regional neighbors and the international community. It considers in brief potential applications in several locations today.

  10. Reconsidering extra time-like dimensions

    E-print Network

    Recai Erdem; Cem S. Un

    2006-07-03

    In this study we reconsider the phenomenological problems related to tachyonic modes in the context of extra time-like dimensions. First we reconsider a lower bound on the size of extra time-like dimensions. Next we discuss the issues of spontaneous decay of stable fermions through tachyonic decays and disappearance of fermions due to tachyonic contributions to their self-energies. We find that the tachyonic modes due to extra time-like dimensions are less problematic than the tachyonic modes in the usual 4-dimensional setting because the most troublesome Feynman diagrams are forbidden once the conservation of momentum in the extra time-like dimensions is imposed.

  11. Origin of a peculiar extra U(1)

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.M.; Dorsner, I.

    2005-07-01

    The origin of a family-independent ''extra U(1)'', discovered by Barr, Bednarz, and Benesh and independently by Ma, and whose phenomenology has recently been studied by Ma and Roy, is discussed. Even though it satisfies anomaly constraints in a highly economical way, with just a single extra triplet of leptons per family, this extra U(1) cannot come from four-dimensional grand unification. However, it is shown here that it can come from a Pati-Salam scheme with an extra U(1), which explains the otherwise surprising cancellation of anomalies.

  12. Extra-solar planet detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Extra-solar planet detection has been a goal of astronomers for many decades. This paper describes current efforts in planet detection using interferometric techniques. At present, the Mark III long baseline interferometer has been operational for a number of years. The Mark III has achieved significant improvement in astrometric accuracy in two areas, wide angle astrometry and double star astrometry. Two new interferometers are being developed. The first is a direct combination IR interferometer, an upgrade of the UCB IR heterodyne interferometer. The second is the Keck Interferometer Array. This instrument, to be operational at the end of the decade will be a major interferometric facility, with the capability to combine coherently the light from the two 10-meter Keck telescopes as well as four 1.5-meter movable outrigger telescopes. The last project directed at planet detection is OSI, a space-based long-baseline interferometer with a planned astrometric accuracy of 1-10 microarcsec.

  13. Terrestrial Planet Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    Terrestrial planet geophysics beyond our home sphere had its start arguably in the early 1960s, with Keith Runcorn contending that the second-degree shape of the Moon is due to convection and Mariner 2 flying past Venus and detecting no planetary magnetic field. Within a decade, in situ surface geophysical measurements were carried out on the Moon with the Apollo program, portions of the lunar magnetic and gravity fields were mapped, and Jack Lorell and his colleagues at JPL were producing spherical harmonic gravity field models for Mars using tracking data from Mariner 9, the first spacecraft to orbit another planet. Moreover, Mariner 10 discovered a planetary magnetic field at Mercury, and a young Sean Solomon was using geological evidence of surface contraction to constrain the thermal evolution of the innermost planet. In situ geophysical experiments (such as seismic networks) were essentially never carried out after Apollo, although they were sometimes planned just beyond the believability horizon in planetary mission queues. Over the last three decades, the discipline of terrestrial planet geophysics has matured, making the most out of orbital magnetic and gravity field data, altimetric measurements of surface topography, and the integration of geochemical information. Powerful constraints are provided by tectonic and volcanic information gleaned from surface images, and the engagement of geologists in geophysical exercises is actually quite useful. Accompanying these endeavors, modeling techniques, largely adopted from the Earth Science community, have become increasingly sophisticated and have been greatly enhanced by the dramatic increase in computing power over the last two decades. The future looks bright with exciting new data sets emerging from the MESSENGER mission to Mercury, the promise of the GRAIL gravity mission to the Moon, and the re-emergence of Venus as a worthy target for exploration. Who knows? With the unflagging optimism and persistence of a few diehards, we may eventually have a seismic and heat flow network on Mars.

  14. Solar system constraints on a Rindler-type extra-acceleration from modified gravity at large distances

    SciTech Connect

    Iorio, L.

    2011-05-01

    We analytically work out the orbital effects caused by a Rindler-type extra-acceleration A{sub Rin} which naturally arises in some recent models of modified gravity at large distances. In particular, we focus on the perturbations induced by it on the two-body range ? and range-rate ?-dot which are commonly used in satellite and planetary investigations as primary observable quantities. The constraints obtained for A{sub Rin} by comparing our calculations with the currently available range and range-rate residuals for some of the major bodies of the solar system, obtained without explicitly modeling A{sub Rin}, are 1–2 × 10{sup ?13} m s{sup ?2} (Mercury and Venus), 1 × 10{sup ?14} m s{sup ?2} (Saturn), 1 × 10{sup ?15} m s{sup ?2} (Mars), while for a terrestrial Rindler acceleration we have an upper bound of 5 × 10{sup ?16} m s{sup ?2} (Moon). The constraints inferred from the planets' range and range-rate residuals are confirmed also by the latest empirical determinations of the corrections ?dot varpi to the usual Newtonian/Einsteinian secular precessions of the planetary longitudes of perihelia varpi: moreover, the Earth yields A{sub Rin} ? 7 × 10{sup ?16} m s{sup ?2}. Another approach which could be followed consists of taking into account A{sub Rin} in re-processing all the available data sets with accordingly modified dynamical models, and estimating a dedicated solve-for parameter explicitly accounting for it. Anyway, such a method is time-consuming. A preliminary analysis likely performed in such a way by a different author yields A ? 8 × 10{sup ?14} m s{sup ?2} at Mars' distance and A ? 1 × 10{sup ?14} m s{sup ?2} at Saturn's distance. The method adopted here can be easily and straightforwardly extended to other long-range modified models of gravity as well.

  15. Planetary habitability: lessons learned from terrestrial analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Louisa J.; Dartnell, Lewis R.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial analogue studies underpin almost all planetary missions and their use is essential in the exploration of our Solar system and in assessing the habitability of other worlds. Their value relies on the similarity of the analogue to its target, either in terms of their mineralogical or geochemical context, or current physical or chemical environmental conditions. Such analogue sites offer critical ground-truthing for astrobiological studies on the habitability of different environmental parameter sets, the biological mechanisms for survival in extreme environments and the preservation potential and detectability of biosignatures. The 33 analogue sites discussed in this review have been selected on the basis of their congruence to particular extraterrestrial locations. Terrestrial field sites that have been used most often in the literature, as well as some lesser known ones which require greater study, are incorporated to inform on the astrobiological potential of Venus, Mars, Europa, Enceladus and Titan. For example, the possibility of an aerial habitable zone on Venus has been hypothesized based on studies of life at high-altitudes in the terrestrial atmosphere. We also demonstrate why many different terrestrial analogue sites are required to satisfactorily assess the habitability of the changing environmental conditions throughout Martian history, and recommend particular sites for different epochs or potential niches. Finally, habitable zones within the aqueous environments of the icy moons of Europa and Enceladus and potentially in the hydrocarbon lakes of Titan are discussed and suitable analogue sites proposed. It is clear from this review that a number of terrestrial analogue sites can be applied to multiple planetary bodies, thereby increasing their value for astrobiological exploration. For each analogue site considered here, we summarize the pertinent physiochemical environmental features they offer and critically assess the fidelity with which they emulate their intended target locale. We also outline key issues associated with the existing documentation of analogue research and the constraints this has on the efficiency of discoveries in this field. This review thus highlights the need for a global open access database for planetary analogues.

  16. Utility terrestrial biodiversity issues

    SciTech Connect

    Breece, G.A.; Ward, B.J.

    1996-11-01

    Results from a survey of power utility biologists indicate that terrestrial biodiversity is considered a major issued by only a few utilities; however, a majority believe it may be a future issue. Over half of the respondents indicated that their company is involved in some management for biodiversity, and nearly all feel that it should be a goal for resource management. Only a few utilities are funding biodiversity research, but a majority felt more research was needed. Generally, larger utilities with extensive land holdings had greater opportunities and resources for biodiversity management. Biodiversity will most likely be a concern with transmission rights-of-way construction and maintenance, endangered species issues and general land resource management, including mining reclamation and hydro relicensing commitments. Over half of the companies surveyed have established voluntary partnerships with management groups, and biodiversity is a goal in nearly all the joint projects. Endangered species management and protection, prevention of forest fragmentation, wetland protection, and habitat creation and protection are the most common partnerships involving utility companies. Common management practices and unique approaches are presented, along with details of the survey. 4 refs.

  17. USING TERRESTRIAL PLANTS IN BIOMONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Terrestrial plants have been used as monitors of environmental pollutants since at least the beginning of this century & have recently received attention in response to the need for ecological assessments at hazardous waste sites & monitoring pesticide damage to nontarget plants....

  18. Radiocarbon dating of terrestrial carbonates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial carbonates encompass a wide range of materials that potentially could be used for radiocarbon (14C) dating. Biogenic carbonates, including shells and tests of terrestrial and aquatic gastropods, bivalves, ostracodes, and foraminifera, are preserved in a variety of late Quaternary deposits and may be suitable for 14C dating. Primary calcareous deposits (marls, tufa, speleothems) and secondary carbonates (rhizoliths, fracture fill, soil carbonate) may also be targeted for dating when conditions are favorable. This chapter discusses issues that are commonly encountered in 14C dating of terrestrial carbonates, including isotopic disequilibrium and open-system behavior, as well as methods used to determine the reliability of ages derived from these materials. Recent methodological advancements that may improve the accuracy and precision of 14C ages of terrestrial carbonates are also highlighted.

  19. huntergatherers subsisted on terrestrial plantsandanimalsalmosttotheexclusionof

    E-print Network

    Read, Andrew

    hunter­gatherers subsisted on terrestrial plantsandanimalsalmosttotheexclusionof fish and aquatic mammals. Comparison of the two hypothetical samples thus provides clues about changes in the hunter­gatherer­gathererpopulationshad reachedacriticalpointandneededtointensify, butlackedthewildresourcestodoso. In the remaining chapters, Binford pursues hunter­gatherer

  20. Contaminant Exposure in Terrestrial Vertebrates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manuscript is a critical review of the state of the science for quantifying exposures of terrestrial wildlife species to chemical contamination. It describes the unique aspects of birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians and threatened and endangered species. Fate and transport of ...

  1. Metabolic assessments during extra-vehicular activity.

    PubMed

    Osipov YuYu; Spichkov, A N; Filipenkov, S N

    1998-01-01

    Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) has a significant role during extended space flights. It demonstrates that humans can survive and perform useful work outside the Orbital Space Stations (OSS) while wearing protective space suits (SS). When the International Space Station 'Alpha' (ISSA) is fully operational, EVA assembly, installation, maintenance and repair operations will become an everyday repetitive work activity in space. It needs new ergonomic evaluation of the work/rest schedule for an increasing of the labor amount per EVA hour. The metabolism assessment is a helpful method to control the productivity of the EVA astronaut and to optimize the work/rest regime. Three following methods were used in Russia to estimate real-time metabolic rates during EVA: 1. Oxygen consumption, computed from the pressure drop in a high pressure bottle per unit time (with actual thermodynamic oxygen properties under high pressure and oxygen leakage taken into account). 2. Carbon dioxide production, computed from CO2 concentration at the contaminant control cartridge and gas flow rate in the life support subsystem closed loop (nominal mode) or gas leakage in the SS open loop (emergency mode). 3. Heat removal, computed from the difference between the temperatures of coolant water or gas and its flow rate in a unit of time (with assumed humidity and wet oxygen state taken into account). Comparison of heat removal values with metabolic rates enables us to determine the thermal balance during an operative medical control of EVA at "Salyut-6", "Salyut-7" and "Mir" OSS. Complex analysis of metabolism, body temperature and heat rate supports a differential diagnosis between emotional and thermal components of stress during EVA. It gives a prognosis of human homeostasis during EVA. Available information has been acquired into an EVA data base which is an effective tool for ergonomical optimization. PMID:11541598

  2. Unraveling the chemical space of terrestrial and meteoritic organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Harir, Mourad; Hertkorn, Norbert; Kanawati, Basem; Ruf, Alexander; Quirico, Eric; Bonal, Lydie; Beck, Pierre; Gabelica, Zelimir

    2015-04-01

    In terrestrial environments natural organic matter (NOM) occurs in soils, freshwater and marine environments, in the atmosphere and represents an exceedingly complex mixture of organic compounds that collectively exhibits a nearly continuous range of properties (size-reactivity continuum). In these materials, the "classical" biogeosignatures of the (biogenic and geogenic) precursor molecules, like lipids, lignins, proteins and natural products have been attenuated, often beyond recognition, during a succession of biotic and abiotic (e.g. photo- and redox chemistry) reactions. Because of this loss of biochemical signature, these materials can be designated non-repetitive complex systems. The access to extra-terrestrial organic matter is given i.e. in the analysis of meteoritic materials. Numerous descriptions of organic molecules present in organic chondrites have improved our understanding of the early interstellar chemistry that operated at or just before the birth of our solar system. However, many molecular analyses are so far targeted toward selected classes of compounds with a particular emphasis on biologically active components in the context of prebiotic chemistry. Here we demonstrate that a non-targeted ultrahigh-resolution molecular analysis of the solvent-accessible organic fraction of meteorite extracted under mild conditions allows one to extend its indigenous chemical diversity to tens of thousands of different molecular compositions and likely millions of diverse structures. The description of the molecular complexity provides hints on heteroatoms chronological assembly, shock and thermal events and revealed recently new classes of thousands of novel organic, organometallic compounds uniquely found in extra-terrestrial materials and never described in terrestrial systems. This high polymolecularity suggests that the extraterrestrial chemodiversity is high compared to terrestrial relevant biological and biogeochemical-driven chemical space. (ultra)High resolution analytical approaches will be presented in their application to unravel the chemical nature and organic signatures in bio-geosystems and especially in selected chondritic (organic and ordinary) and achondritic meteorites. We will focus on thermal effects in CM types of materials and describe the effect of shock events on the changes in chemodiversity and the formation of unique novel organic compounds using high magnetic field ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (12 Tesla ion cyclotron resonance Fourier transform mass spectrometry - ICR-FT/MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (Cryo 800MHz NMR).

  3. The SixthFinger: a Modular Extra-Finger to Enhance Human Hand Capabilities

    E-print Network

    Siena, Università di

    The Sixth­Finger: a Modular Extra-Finger to Enhance Human Hand Capabilities Domenico Prattichizzo1 is then to integrate the human hand with an additional robotic finger: the Sixth­Finger (Fig. 1). The human hand intended as arti- ficial device extensions replacing a missing part of a human body. A new approach

  4. Energy Systems - Present, Future: Extra Terrestrials, Grades 7, 8, 9,/Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Teachers Association, Washington, DC.

    The 12 lessons presented in this guide are structured so that they may be integrated into science lessons in 7th-, 8th-, or 9th-grades. Suggestions are made for extension of study. Lessons are approached through classroom role-playing of outer space visitors who seek to understand energy conversion principles used on Earth. Major emphasis is…

  5. Theoretical Studies of the Extra-terrestrial Chemistry of Biogenic Elements and Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woon, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented on the following:(A) Ab initio quantum chemical studies of reactions in astrophysical ices.Theoretical electronic structure calculations were used to investigate reactions between formaldehyde (H2CO) and both hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and isocyanide (HNC) in search of other favorable reactions such as ammonia-formaldehyde addition, which was found in a recent theoretical study to be strongly enhanced when it occurs within cold ices.The present study examines further reactions between this product and H2CO in ices.(B) Heterogeneous hydrogenation of CO and H2CO on icy grain mantles.Formaldehyde (H2CO) and methanol (CH30H) are thought to be produced in the interstellar medium by the successive hydrogenation of carbon monoxide (CO) on grain surfaces. In the gas phase, the steps in which H adds to CO and H2CO possess modest barriers and are too inefficient to account for the observed abundances. Recent laboratory work has confirmed that formaldehyde and methanol are formed when H atoms are deposited on CO ice at 12 K. The present study employed ab initio quantum chemical calculations to investigate the impact of water ice on the sequential hydrogenation of CO.(C) Ice-bound condensed-phase reactions involving formic acid (HCOOH), methylenimine (CH2NH), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), and ammonia ( 3) were investigated in order to characterize possible pathways to larger organic species that are efficient at the cold temperatures prevalent in cometary nuclei and the interstellar medium. (D) Pathways to glycine and other amino acids in ultraviolet-irradiated ices determined via quantum chemical modeling.(E) Photoionization in ultraviolet processing of astrophysical ice analogs at cryogenic temperatures.

  6. Search for Extra-Terrestrial planets: The DARWIN mission - Target Stars and Array Architectures

    E-print Network

    Lisa Kaltenegger

    2005-04-22

    The DARWIN mission is an Infrared free flying interferometer mission based on the new technique of nulling interferometry. Its main objective is to detect and characterize other Earth-like planets, analyze the composition of their atmospheres and their capability to sustain life, as we know it. DARWIN is currently in definition phase. This PhD work that has been undertaken within the DARWIN team at the European Space Agency (ESA) addresses two crucial aspects of the mission. Firstly, a DARWIN target star list has been established that includes characteristics of the target star sample that will be critical for final mission design, such as, luminosity, distance, spectral classification, stellar variability, multiplicity, location and radius of the star. Constrains were applied as set by planet evolution theory and mission architecture. Secondly, a number of alternative mission architectures have been evaluated on the basis of interferometer response as a function of wavelength, achievable modulation efficiency, number of telescopes and starlight rejection capabilities. The study has shown that the core mission goals should be achievable with a lower level of complexity as compared to the current baseline configuration.

  7. The search for extra-terrestrial sources of high energy neutrinos

    E-print Network

    Hill, Gary C

    2009-01-01

    The field of high-energy neutrino astronomy has seen rapid progress over the last 15 years, with the development and operation of the first large-volume detectors. Here, we review the motivation for construction of these large instruments and discuss what construction and physics progress has been made.

  8. Sliding GAIT Algorithm for the All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Julie; Biesiadecki, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The design of a surface robotic system typically involves a trade between the traverse speed of a wheeled rover and the terrain-negotiating capabilities of a multi-legged walker. The ATHLETE mobility system, with both articulated limbs and wheels, is uniquely capable of both driving and walking, and has the flexibility to employ additional hybrid mobility modes. This paper introduces the Sliding Gait, an intermediate mobility algorithm faster than walking with better terrain-handling capabilities than wheeled mobility.

  9. Two systems analyses of SETI. [microwave Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machol, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of receiving and identifying a single microwave signal transmitted by extraterrestrial intelligent beings is analyzed in the cases where the signal is designed to catch our attention and the signal is designed for internal purposes of another civilization. Six variables which yield uncertainty as to the exact signal which should be searched for are described: polarization, modulation, flux level, direction, frequency (including bandwidth and drift rate), and time. It is shown that if all reasonable variations of these parameters are to be examined sequentially for 1000 seconds, the search would take over a million times longer than the age of the Universe. Ways to simplify the search are considered, including widening the frequency bin, selecting specific targets, cutting the observation time, using a Fourier transform device for data processing, and building larger antennas as well as better low-noise receivers.

  10. Search for Extra-Terrestrial planets: The DARWIN mission - Target Stars and Array Architectures

    E-print Network

    Kaltenegger, L

    2005-01-01

    The DARWIN mission is an Infrared free flying interferometer mission based on the new technique of nulling interferometry. Its main objective is to detect and characterize other Earth-like planets, analyze the composition of their atmospheres and their capability to sustain life, as we know it. DARWIN is currently in definition phase. This PhD work that has been undertaken within the DARWIN team at the European Space Agency (ESA) addresses two crucial aspects of the mission. Firstly, a DARWIN target star list has been established that includes characteristics of the target star sample that will be critical for final mission design, such as, luminosity, distance, spectral classification, stellar variability, multiplicity, location and radius of the star. Constrains were applied as set by planet evolution theory and mission architecture. Secondly, a number of alternative mission architectures have been evaluated on the basis of interferometer response as a function of wavelength, achievable modulation efficienc...

  11. Making Friends with an Extra-Terrestrial: Conversation Skills and Friendship Formation in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Jeffrey G.; Gottman, John M.

    A novel paradigm was developed and two studies conducted to test the contribution of six conversational skills to children's friendship formation. In study 1, 4- and 5-year-olds individually played for 30 minutes with a 2-foot-tall talking doll. The doll contained a wireless hidden receiver/speaker enabling a concealed female assistant to converse…

  12. Symphony of Space OP.20 An extra-terrestrial symphony for large wind orchestra and chorus

    E-print Network

    Dintrans, Boris

    'effets (extrait audio de Neil Armstrong et son fameux « That's one small step for man... »)... Puis, notre système-bip » du Spoutnik, Neil Armstrong sur la Lune,... La création est prévue en Midi-Pyrénées à la Grotte de

  13. HYDROTHERMAL VENT COMPLEXES AND THE SEARCH FOR EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL WATER. H. Svensen1

    E-print Network

    Mazzini, Adriano

    . They comprise up to 7 km deep pipe structures filled with brecciated sedimentary rocks (Fig. 1). Some also con is generally inferred from particular sedimentary structures using an Earth analogy. We present the ex- tra's) are identified in major sedimentary basins in Europe and Africa, directly linked to the presence of water

  14. An instrument for elemental and isotopic abundance characterization of extra-terrestrial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veryovkin, I. V.; Calaway, W. F.; Moore, J. F.; Pellin, M. J.; Savina, M. R.; King, B. V.; Petravi?, M.; Burnett, D. S.

    2002-12-01

    Samples returned from the Genesis and Stardust missions of NASA's Discovery Program require quantitative analysis at sensitivities unobtainable with present instruments. This has driven development of a new generation of instruments for laser-post-ionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry (laser-SNMS). Construction of a prototype time-of-flight (TOF) SNMS instrument has been completed recently at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and testing began in August 2002. This instrument is optimized for laser post-ionization of sputtered neutrals and is capable of locating and analyzing individual sub-micrometer interstellar particles on a sample stage for Stardust or determining elemental concentrations in shallow implants at ultra-trace levels for Genesis. Post-ionization can be accomplished with a variety of laser sources. These include high repetition rate tunable Ti-sapphire lasers for ultra-trace analysis of a single element and two vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light sources for simultaneous ionization of most atomic and molecular species in the sample. The two VUV lasers are an F2 laser with a fixed wavelength of 157 nm and the self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser (SASE FEL) capable of generating tunable VUV at wavelengths down to 60 nm. Fundamental physical theory of ion sputtering forms the scientific basis of the approach used to design the instrument. An ion optics design for the instrument was perfected through extensive three-dimensional computer simulations using SIMION software. Realistic sets of photo-ions were calculated using formalisms derived from sputtering theory. Their trajectories in various instrument designs were then traced by SIMION. Finally, results of the simulations were processed to estimate instrument capabilities including resolution and useful yield. This same approach proved accurate and quantitative during tests of an existing TOF SNMS instrument demonstrating the reliability of the simulation method. The completed prototype instrument and results of recent tests will be presented. This work is supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, BES-Materials Sciences, under Contract W-31-109-ENG-38 and in part by a contract from NASA's Office of Space Science's Cosmochemistry Program.

  15. Combustion of Metals in Reduced-Gravity and Extra Terrestrial Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branch, M.C.; Abbud-Madrid, A.; Daily, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    The combustion of metals is a field with important practical applications in rocket propellants, high-temperature flames, and material synthesis. Also, the safe operation of metal containers in high-pressure oxygen systems and with cryogenic fuels and oxidizers remains an important concern in industry. The increasing use of metallic components in spacecraft and space structures has also raised concerns about their flammability properties and fire suppression mechanisms. In addition, recent efforts to embark on unmanned and manned planetary exploration, such as on Mars, have also renewed the interest in metal/carbon-dioxide combustion as an effective in situ resource utilization technology. In spite of these practical applications, the understanding of the combustion properties of metals remains far behind that of the most commonly used fuels such as hydrocarbons. The lack of understanding is due to the many problems unique to metal- oxidizer reactions such as: low-temperature surface oxidation prior to ignition, heterogeneous reactions, very high combustion temperatures, product condensation, high emissivity of products, and multi-phase interactions. Very few analytical models (all neglecting the influence of gravity) have been developed to predict the burning characteristics and the flame structure details. Several experimental studies attempting to validate these models have used small metal particles to recreate gravity-free conditions. The high emissivity of the flames, rapid reaction, and intermittent explosions experienced by these particles have made the gathering of any useful information on burning rates and flame structure very difficult. The use of a reduced gravity environment is needed to clarify some of the complex interactions among the phenomena described above. First, the elimination of the intrusive buoyant flows that plague all combustion phenomena is of paramount importance in metal reactions due to the much higher temperatures reached during combustion. Second, a low-gravity environment is absolutely essential to remove the destructive effect of gravity on the shape of a molten metal droplet in order to study a spherically symmetric condition with large bulk samples. The larger size of the spherical metal droplet and the longer burning times available in reduced gravity extend the spatial and temporal dimensions to permit careful probing of the flame structure and dynamics. Third, the influence of the radiative heat transfer from the solid oxides can be studied more carefully by generating a stagnant spherical shell of condensed products undisturbed by buoyancy.

  16. Workshop on Oxygen in the Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the Workshop on Oxygen in the Terrestrial Planets, July 20-23,2004, Santa Fe, New Mexico. The contents include: 1) Experimental Constraints on Oxygen and Other Light Element Partitioning During Planetary Core Formation; 2) In Situ Determination of Fe(3+)/SigmaFe of Spinels by Electron Microprobe: An Evaluation of the Flank Method; 3) The Effect of Oxygen Fugacity on Large-Strain Deformation and Recrystallization of Olivine; 4) Plagioclase-Liquid Trace Element Oxygen Barometry and Oxygen Behaviour in Closed and Open System Magmatic Processes; 5) Core Formation in the Earth: Constraints from Ni and Co; 6) Oxygen Isotopic Compositions of the Terrestrial Planets; 7) The Effect of Oxygen Fugacity on Electrical Conduction of Olivine and Implications for Earth s Mantle; 8) Redox Chemical Diffusion in Silicate Melts: The Impact of the Semiconductor Condition; 9) Ultra-High Temperature Effects in Earth s Magma Ocean: Pt and W Partitioning; 10) Terrestrial Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotope Variations: Primordial Values, Systematics, Subsolidus Effects, Planetary Comparisons, and the Role of Water; 11) Redox State of the Moon s Interior; 12) How did the Terrestrial Planets Acquire Their Water?; 13) Molecular Oxygen Mixing Ratio and Its Seasonal Variability in the Martian Atmosphere; 14) Exchange Between the Atmosphere and the Regolith of Mars: Discussion of Oxygen and Sulfur Isotope Evidence; 15) Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotope Systematics of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Meteoric Waters: Evidence from North Texas; 16) Implications of Isotopic and Redox Heterogeneities in Silicate Reservoirs on Mars; 17) Oxygen Isotopic Variation of the Terrestrial Planets; 18) Redox Exchanges in Hydrous Magma; 19) Hydrothermal Systems on Terrestrial Planets: Lessons from Earth; 20) Oxygen in Martian Meteorites: A Review of Results from Mineral Equilibria Oxybarometers; 21) Non-Linear Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes Implanted in Lunar Metal Grains: Solar, Lunar or Terrestrial Origin? 22) Isotopic Zoning in the Inner Solar System; 23) Redox Conditions on Small Bodies; 24) Determining the Oxygen Fugacity of Lunar Pyroclastic Glasses Using Vanadium Valence - An Update; 25) Mantle Redox Evolution and the Rise of Atmospheric O2; 26) Variation of Kd for Fe-Mg Exchange Between Olivine and Melt for Compositions Ranging from Alkaline Basalt to Rhyolite; 27) Determining the Partial Pressure of Oxygen (PO,) in Solutions on Mars; 28) The Influence of Oxygen Environment on Kinetic Properties of Silicate Rocks and Minerals; 29) Redox Evolution of Magmatic Systems; 30) The Constancy of Upper Mantlefo, Through Time Inferred from V/Sc Ratios in Basalts: Implications for the Rise in Atmospheric 0 2; 31) Nitrogen Solubility in Basaltic Melt. Effects of Oxygen Fugacity, Melt Composition and Gas Speciation; 32) Oxygen Isotope Anomalies in the Atmospheres of Earth and Mars; 33) The Effect of Oxygen Fugacity on Interdiffusion of Iron and Magnesium in Magnesiowiistite 34) The Calibration of the Pyroxene Eu-Oxybarometer for the Martian Meteorites; 35) The Europium Oxybarometer: Power and Pitfalls; 36) Oxygen Fugacity of the Martian Mantle from PigeoniteMelt Partitioning of Samarium, Europium and Gadolinium; 37) Oxidation-Reduction Processes on the Moon: Experimental Verification of Graphite Oxidation in the Apollo 17 Orange Glasses; 38) Oxygen and Core Formation in the Earth; 39) Geologic Record of the Atmospheric Sulfur Chemistry Before the Oxygenation of the Early Earth s Atmosphere; 40) Comparative Planetary Mineralogy: V/(CrCAl) Systematics in Chromite as an Indicator of Relative Oxygen Fugacity; 41) How Well do Sulfur Isotopes Constrain Oxygen Abundance in the Ancient Atmospheres? 42) Experimental Constraints on the Oxygen Isotope (O-18/ O-16) Fractionation in the Ice vapor and Adsorbant vapor Systems of CO2 at Conditions Relevant to the Surface of Mars; 43) Micro-XANES Measurements on Experimental Spinels andhe Oxidation State of Vanadium in Spinel-Melt Pairs; 44) Testing the Magma Ocean Hypothesis Using

  17. Terrestrial tidal variations in the selenopotential coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.; Ferrándiz, J. M.; Navarro, Juan F.

    2005-06-01

    The variations in the coefficients of the harmonics of second degree of the selenopotential caused by the terrestrial tides have been studied. In the paper we use analytical expressions for the tidal variations in the Stokes coefficients obtained for a model of the elastic celestial body with a concentric distribution of mass using the fundamental elastic parameter k2 of the Moon. Taking into account the resonant properties of the Moon’s motion, the variations in the selenopotential coefficients are presented in the form of Fourier series in the arguments of the theory of lunar orbital motion: lM, lS, F and D. The variations in the polar moment of inertia of the Moon due to the terrestrial tides lead to marked variations in the Moon’s axial rotation, which also have been determined and tabulated. From the results obtained, it follows that the tide periodic variations in the gravitational coefficients of the Moon are an order larger than the corresponding tide variations in the geopotential coefficients.

  18. Higgs boson decay constraints on a model with a universal extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Anindya; Patra, Ayon; Raychaudhuri, Sreerup

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the impact of the latest data on Higgs boson branching ratios on the minimal model with a universal extra dimension. Combining constraints from vacuum stability requirements with these branching ratio measurements we are able to make realistic predictions for the signal strengths in this model. We use these to find a lower bound of 1.3 TeV on the size parameter R-1 of the model at 95% confidence level, which is far more stringent than any other terrestrial bound obtained till now and is compatible with the dark matter constraints from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data.

  19. Mercury cycling in terrestrial watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, James B.; Bishop, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This chapter discusses mercury cycling in the terrestrial landscape, including inputs from the atmosphere, accumulation in soils and vegetation, outputs in streamflow and volatilization, and effects of land disturbance. Mercury mobility in the terrestrial landscape is strongly controlled by organic matter. About 90% of the atmospheric mercury input is retained in vegetation and organic matter in soils, causing a buildup of legacy mercury. Some mercury is volatilized back to the atmosphere, but most export of mercury from watersheds occurs by streamflow. Stream mercury export is episodic, in association with dissolved and particulate organic carbon, as stormflow and snowmelt flush organic-rich shallow soil horizons. The terrestrial landscape is thus a major source of mercury to downstream aquatic environments, where mercury is methylated and enters the aquatic food web. With ample organic matter and sulfur, methylmercury forms in uplands as well—in wetlands, riparian zones, and other anoxic sites. Watershed features (topography, land cover type, and soil drainage class) are often more important than atmospheric mercury deposition in controlling the amount of stream mercury and methylmercury export. While reductions in atmospheric mercury deposition may rapidly benefit lakes, the terrestrial landscape will respond only over decades, because of the large stock and slow turnover of legacy mercury. We conclude with a discussion of future scenarios and the challenge of managing terrestrial mercury.

  20. Investigation of the extra-extra-push by pre-scission neutron measurements with DEMON

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf, Gerard

    1998-02-15

    The objective of this talk is to present a simple method to calculate pre- and post-scission neutron multiplicities in the frame of the Bass model. This method is of particular interest for very heavy systems for which an extra-extra-push is supposed to hinder fusion. The multiplicities calculated by the model are compared to published data covering a broad range of projectile and target masses, and to more recent ones obtained with the help of the Demon detector and addressing specifically the existence of the extra-extra-push.

  1. Utilization of the terrestrial cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, Hiroshi; Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Furukawa, Jun; Kimura, Shunta; Yokoshima, Mika; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Takenaka, Hiroyuki

    The terrestrial, N _{2}-fixing cyanobacterium, Nostoc commune has expected to utilize for agriculture, food and terraforming cause of its extracellular polysaccharide, desiccation tolerance and nitrogen fixation. Previously, the first author indicated that desiccation related genes were analyzed and the suggested that the genes were related to nitrogen fixation and metabolisms. In this report, we suggest possibility of agriculture, using the cyanobacterium. Further, we also found radioactive compounds accumulated N. commune (cyanobacterium) in Fukushima, Japan after nuclear accident. Thus, it is investigated to decontaminate radioactive compounds from the surface soil by the cyanobacterium and showed to accumulate radioactive compounds using the cyanobacterium. We will discuss utilization of terrestrial cyanobacteria under closed environment. Keyword: Desiccation, terrestrial cyanobacteria, bioremediation, agriculture

  2. Terrestrial ecosystems and climatic change

    SciTech Connect

    Emanuel, W.R. ); Schimel, D.S. . Natural Resources Ecology Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    The structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems depend on climate, and in turn, ecosystems influence atmospheric composition and climate. A comprehensive, global model of terrestrial ecosystem dynamics is needed. A hierarchical approach appears advisable given currently available concepts, data, and formalisms. The organization of models can be based on the temporal scales involved. A rapidly responding model describes the processes associated with photosynthesis, including carbon, moisture, and heat exchange with the atmosphere. An intermediate model handles subannual variations that are closely associated with allocation and seasonal changes in productivity and decomposition. A slow response model describes plant growth and succession with associated element cycling over decades and centuries. These three levels of terrestrial models are linked through common specifications of environmental conditions and constrain each other. 58 refs.

  3. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Chambers, Don P.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater is a vital resource and also a dynamic component of the water cycle. Unconfined aquifer storage is less responsive to short term weather conditions than the near surface terrestrial water storage (TWS) components (soil moisture, surface water, and snow). However, save for the permanently frozen regions, it typically exhibits a larger range of variability over multi-annual periods than the other components. Groundwater is poorly monitored at the global scale, but terrestrial water storage (TWS) change data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission are a reasonable proxy for unconfined groundwater at climatic scales.

  4. Body Image

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Us Contact Us Text size | Print | Body Image Developing a positive body image and a healthy mental attitude is crucial to ... on for tips to have a healthy body image. Topics About body image When you look in ...

  5. Body Hair

    MedlinePLUS

    ... girlshealth.gov/ Home Body Puberty Body hair Body hair Even before you get your first period , you ... removing pubic hair Ways to get rid of hair top Removing body hair can cause skin irritation, ...

  6. Beyond Earth: Using Google Earth to Visualize Other Planetary Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancher, M.; Beyer, R.; Broxton, M.; Gorelick, N.; Kolb, E.; Weiss-Malik, M.

    2008-12-01

    Virtual globes have revolutionized the way we visualize and understand the Earth, but there are other planetary bodies that can be visualized as well. We will demonstrate the use of Google Earth, KML, and other modern mapping tools for visualizing data that's literally out of this world. Extra-terrestrial virtual globes are poised to revolutionize planetary science, bring an exciting new dimension to science education, and allow users to explore the increasingly breathtaking imagery being sent back to Earth by modern planetary science satellites. We will demonstrate several uses of the latest Google Earth and KML features to visualize planetary data. Global maps of planetary bodies---not just visible imagery maps, but also terrain maps, infra-red maps, minerological maps, and more---can be overlaid on the Google Earth globe using KML, and a number of sources are already making many such maps available. Coverage maps show the polygons that have been imaged by various satellite sensors, with links to the imagery and science data. High-resolution regionated ground overlays allow you to explore the most breathtaking imagery at full resolution, in its geological context, just as we have become accustomed to doing with Earth imagery. Panoramas from landed missions to the Moon and Mars can even be embedded, giving users a first-hand experience of other worlds. We will take you on a guided tour of how these features can best be used to visualize places other than the Earth, and provide pointers to KML from many sources---ourselves and others---that users can build on in constructing their own KML content of other planetary bodies. Using this paradigm for sharing geospatial data will not only enable planetary scientists to more easily build and share data within the scientific community, but will also provide an easy platform for public outreach and education efforts, and will easily allow anyone to layer geospatial information on top of planetary data.

  7. Scientist Using Terrestrial Lidar Equipment

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Chris Soulard using the Terrestrial Lidar to scan study area in the Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument, AZ.  Note the bag of ice on the equipment.  High temperates can cause equipment to overheat, requiring scientists to be creative in protecting equipment....

  8. PROPULSION AND ENERGY Terrestrial energy

    E-print Network

    Aggarwal, Suresh K.

    , nuclear, solar, and geothermal energy. New initiatives by the Dept. of Energy are focusingPROPULSION AND ENERGY Terrestrial energy On the morning of Monday, August 29, Hurri- cane Katrina dependence we all have on power and energy systems. Nine major oil re- fineries in Louisiana and Mississippi

  9. The Oldest Caseid Synapsid from the Late Pennsylvanian of Kansas, and the Evolution of Herbivory in Terrestrial Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Reisz, Robert R.; Fröbisch, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The origin and early evolution of amniotes (fully terrestrial vertebrates) led to major changes in the structure and hierarchy of terrestrial ecosystems. The first appearance of herbivores played a pivotal role in this transformation. After an early bifurcation into Reptilia and Synapsida (including mammals) 315 Ma, synapsids dominated Paleozoic terrestrial vertebrate communities, with the herbivorous caseids representing the largest vertebrates on land. Eocasea martini gen. et sp. nov., a small carnivorous caseid from the Late Carboniferous, extends significantly the fossil record of Caseidae, and permits the first clade-based study of the origin and initial evolution of herbivory in terrestrial tetrapods. Our results demonstrate for the first time that large caseid herbivores evolved from small, non-herbivorous caseids. This pattern is mirrored by three other clades, documenting multiple, independent, but temporally staggered origins of herbivory and increase in body size among early terrestrial tetrapods, leading to patterns consistent with modern terrestrial ecosystem. PMID:24739998

  10. CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The terrestrial biosphere plays a prominent role in the global carbon (C) cycle. errestrial ecosystems are currently accumulating C and it appears feasible to manage existing terrestrial (forest, agronomic, desert) ecosystems to maintain or increase C storage. orest ecosystems ca...

  11. Cambridge Lectures on Supersymmetry and Extra Dimensions

    E-print Network

    Sven Krippendorf; Fernando Quevedo; Oliver Schlotterer

    2010-11-05

    These lectures on supersymmetry and extra dimensions are aimed at finishing undergraduate and beginning postgraduate students with a background in quantum field theory and group theory. Basic knowledge in general relativity might be advantageous for the discussion of extra dimensions. This course was taught as a 24+1 lecture course in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos in recent years. The first six chapters give an introduction to supersymmetry in four spacetime dimensions, they fill about two thirds of the lecture notes and are in principle self-contained. The remaining two chapters are devoted to extra spacetime dimensions which are in the end combined with the concept of supersymmetry. Videos from the course lectured in 2006 can be found online at http://www.sms.cam.ac.uk/collection/659537 .

  12. Long-term solar-terrestrial observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The results of an 18-month study of the requirements for long-term monitoring and archiving of solar-terrestrial data is presented. The value of long-term solar-terrestrial observations is discussed together with parameters, associated measurements, and observational problem areas in each of the solar-terrestrial links (the sun, the interplanetary medium, the magnetosphere, and the thermosphere-ionosphere). Some recommendations are offered for coordinated planning for long-term solar-terrestrial observations.

  13. Origin and Evolution of the Terrestrial Planets: Chapter 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieters, C.

    2004-11-01

    The rocky terrestrial planets of our solar system exhibit enormous diversity. We now know some of the constraints that created this diversity and can focus our exploration efforts to explore dimensions related to each. The Moon, asteroids, and perhaps Mercury represent Chapter 1 of the story. These bodies carry the history of the formative first 600 My, but have remained relatively inactive as planets since. Mars, on the other hand, continued to evolve actively for a few billion years and represents Chapter 2, the middle years when fluvial and large-scale volcanic processes were active but then dissipated. The current recycling Martian deserts record this former heyday of long long ago. Chapter 3 is our Goldilocks group, Venus and Earth, which have the right balance of materials to continue to evolve as an active planet for over 4 billion years, although clearly in different directions. Other solar systems may have a 4th chapter of terrestrial planet evolution, or no terrestrial planets at all, so we would do well to extract all the information we can from the terrestrial planets to which we have access. I will examine the important Chapter 1 in more detail and leave the remaining Chapters to others. Chapter 1 represents the beginning. After all, if there were no Chapter 1, what is there?

  14. The Effect of Giant Planets on Terrestrial Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, Thomas; Quintana, Elisa

    2015-12-01

    The giant planets in the Solar System likely played a defining role in shaping the properties of the Earth and other terrestrial planets during their formation. Observations from the Kepler spacecraft indicate that terrestrial planets are highly abundant. However, there are hints that giant planets a few AU from their stars are relatively uncommon based on long baseline radial velocity searches. It therefore seems reasonable to assume that many terrestrial planets lack a Jupiter-like companion. We use a recently developed, state-of-the-art N-body model that allows for collisional fragmentation to perform hundreds of numerical simulations of the final stages of terrestrial planet formation around a Sun-like star -- with and without giant outer planets. We quantify the effects that outer giant planet companions have on collisions and the planet accretion process. We focus on Earth-analogs that form in each system and explore how giant planets influence the relative frequency of giant impacts occurring at late times.

  15. How Giant Planets Shape the Characteristics of Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, Thomas; Quintana, Elisa V.

    2016-01-01

    The giant planets in the Solar System likely played a defining role in shaping the properties of the Earth and other terrestrial planets during their formation. Observations from the Kepler spacecraft indicate that terrestrial planets are highly abundant. However, there are hints that giant planets a few AU from their stars are not ubiquitous. It therefore seems reasonable to assume that many terrestrial planets lack a Jupiter-like companion. We use a recently developed, state-of-the-art N-body model that allows for collisional fragmentation to perform hundreds of numerical simulations of the final stages of terrestrial planet formation around a Sun-like star -- with and without giant outer planets. We quantify the effects that outer giant planet companions have on collisions and the planet accretion process. We focus on Earth-analogs that form in each system and explore how giant planets influence the relative frequency of giant impacts occurring at late times and the delivery of volitiles. This work has important implications for determining the frequency of habitable planets.

  16. Amino acid compositional shifts during streptophyte transitions to terrestrial habitats.

    PubMed

    Jobson, Richard W; Qiu, Yin-Long

    2011-02-01

    Across the streptophyte lineage, which includes charophycean algae and embryophytic plants, there have been at least four independent transitions to the terrestrial habitat. One of these involved the evolution of embryophytes (bryophytes and tracheophytes) from a charophycean ancestor, while others involved the earliest branching lineages, containing the monotypic genera Mesostigma and Chlorokybus, and within the Klebsormidiales and Zygnematales lineages. To overcome heat, water stress, and increased exposure to ultraviolet radiation, which must have accompanied these transitions, adaptive mechanisms would have been required. During periods of dehydration and/or desiccation, proteomes struggle to maintain adequate cytoplasmic solute concentrations. The increased usage of charged amino acids (DEHKR) may be one way of maintaining protein hydration, while increased use of aromatic residues (FHWY) protects proteins and nucleic acids by absorbing damaging UV, with both groups of residues thought to be important for the stabilization of protein structures. To test these hypotheses we examined amino acid sequences of orthologous proteins representing both mitochondrion- and plastid-encoded proteomes across streptophytic lineages. We compared relative differences within categories of amino acid residues and found consistent patterns of amino acid compositional fluxuation in extra-membranous regions that correspond with episodes of terrestrialization: positive change in usage frequency for residues with charged side-chains, and aromatic residues of the light-capturing chloroplast proteomes. We also found a general decrease in the usage frequency of hydrophobic, aliphatic, and small residues. These results suggest that amino acid compositional shifts in extra-membrane regions of plastid and mitochondrial proteins may represent biochemical adaptations that allowed green plants to colonize the land. PMID:21153633

  17. Signatures of extra dimensional sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodejohann, Werner; Zhang, He

    2014-10-01

    We study a large extra dimension model with active and sterile Dirac neutrinos. The sterile neutrino masses stem from compactification of an extra dimension with radius R and are chosen to have masses around eV or keV, in order to explain short-baseline anomalies or act as warm dark matter candidates. We study the effect of the sterile neutrino Kaluza-Klein tower in short-baseline oscillation experiments and in the beta spectrum as measurable by KATRIN-like experiments.

  18. Supersymmetry and Vector-like Extra Generation

    E-print Network

    Chun Liu

    2009-07-17

    Within the framework of supersymmetry, the particle content is extended in a way that each Higgs doublet is in a full generation. Namely in addition to ordinary three generations, there is an extra vector-like generation, and it is the extra slepton SU(2)_L doublets that are taken to be the two Higgs doublets. R-parity violating interactions contain ordinary Yukawa interactions. Breaking of supersymmetry and gauge symmetry are analyzed. Fermion and boson spectra are calculated. Phenomenological constraints and relevant new physics at Large Hadron Collider are discussed.

  19. Microscopic primordial black holes and extra dimensions

    E-print Network

    John A. Conley; Tommer Wizansky

    2007-01-31

    We examine the production and evolution of microscopic black holes in the early universe in the large extra dimensions scenario. We demonstrate that, unlike in the standard four-dimensional cosmology, in large extra dimensions absorption of matter from the primordial plasma by the black holes is significant and can lead to rapid growth of the black hole mass density. This effect can be used to constrain the conditions present in the very early universe. We demonstrate that this constraint is applicable in regions of parameter space not excluded by existing bounds.

  20. Microscopic Primordial Black Holes and Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, John A.; Wizansky, Tommer

    2006-11-15

    We examine the production and evolution of microscopic black holes in the early universe in the large extra dimensions scenario. We demonstrate that, unlike in the standard four-dimensional cosmology, in large extra dimensions absorption of matter from the primordial plasma by the black holes is significant and can lead to rapid growth of the black hole mass density. This effect can be used to constrain the conditions present in the very early universe. We demonstrate that this constraint is applicable in regions of parameter space not excluded by existing bounds.

  1. Global Climate Models of the Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, F.; Lebonnois, S.

    On the basis of the global climate models (GCMs) originally developed for Earth, several teams around the world have been able to develop GCMs for the atmospheres of the other terrestrial bodies in our solar system: Venus, Mars, Titan, Triton, and Pluto. In spite of the apparent complexity of climate systems and meteorology, GCMs are based on a limited number of equations. In practice, relatively complete climate simulators can be developed by combining a few components such as a dynamical core, a radiative transfer solver, a parameterization of turbulence and convection, a thermal ground model, and a volatile phase change code, possibly completed by a few specific schemes. It can be shown that many of these GCM components are "universal" so that we can envisage building realistic climate models for any kind of terrestrial planets and atmospheres that we can imagine. Such a tool is useful for conducting scientific investigations on the possible climates of terrestrial extrasolar planets, or to study past environments in the solar system. The ambition behind the development of GCMs is high: The ultimate goal is to build numerical simulators based only on universal physical or chemical equations, yet able to reproduce or predict all the available observations on a given planet, without any ad hoc forcing. In other words, we aim to virtually create in our computers planets that "behave" exactly like the actual planets themselves. In reality, of course, nature is always more complex than expected, but we learn a lot in the process. In this chapter we detail some lessons learned in the solar system: In many cases, GCMs work. They have been able to simulate many aspects of planetary climates without difficulty. In some cases, however, problems have been encountered, sometimes simply because a key process has been forgotten in the model or is not yet correctly parameterized, but also because sometimes the climate regime seems to be result of a subtle balance between processes that remain highly model sensitive, or are the subject of positive feedback and unstability. In any case, building virtual planets with GCMs, in light of the observations obtained by spacecraft or from Earth, is a true scientific endeavor that can teach us a lot about the complex nature of climate systems.

  2. Signals For Extra Dimensions at the VLHC

    E-print Network

    Thomas G. Rizzo

    2001-08-28

    A brief overview of the signatures for several different models with extra dimensions at the stage II, $\\sqrt s=175-200$ TeV VLHC is presented. In all cases the search reaches for these models in the Drell-Yan channel are found to be in the range of 15-80 TeV.

  3. Search for Extra Dimensions at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzi, Alessio

    2005-10-12

    In recent years it has been realized that the attempt to solve the problem of the huge difference between the gravity scale (MPl) and the electroweak scale can lead to extra dimensions scenarios with sizeable effects at the TeV scale. In this paper the prospects of the search at the LHC experiments for some of these models are reviewed.

  4. Progress in extra-solar planet detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Progress in extra-solar planet detection is reviewed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) the definition of a planet; (2) the weakness of planet signals; (3) direct techniques - imaging and spectral detection; and (4) indirect techniques - reflex motion and occultations.

  5. Exploring Warped Compactifications of Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabholkar, Sujan

    In 1920s, the concept of extra dimensions was considered for the first time to unify gravity and electromagnetism. Since then there have been many developments to understand the unification of fundamental forces using extra dimensions. In this thesis, we study this idea of extra dimensions in higher dimensional gravity theories such as String Theory or Supergravity to make connections with cosmology. We construct a family of non-singular time-dependent solutions of a six-dimensional gravity with a warped geometry. The warp factor is time-dependent and breaks the translation invariance along one of the extra directions. Our solutions have the desired property of homogeneity and isotropy along the non-compact space. These geometries are supported by matter that does not violate the null energy condition. These 6D solutions do not have a closed trapped surface and hence the Hawking-Penrose singularity theorems do not apply to these solutions. These solutions are constructed from 7D locally flat solution by performing Kaluza-Klein reduction. We also study warped compactifications of string/M theory with the help of effective potentials for the construction of de Sitter vacua. The dynamics of the conformal factor of the internal metric is explored to investigate instabilities. The results works the best mainly in the case of a slowly varying warp factor. We also present interesting ideas to find AdS vacua of N=1 flux compactifications using smooth, compact toric manifolds as internal space.

  6. Precision Constraints on Extra Fermion Generations

    SciTech Connect

    Erler, Jens; Langacker, Paul

    2010-07-16

    There has been recent renewed interest in the possibility of additional fermion generations. At the same time there have been significant changes in the relevant electroweak precision constraints, in particular, in the interpretation of several of the low energy experiments. We summarize the various motivations for extra families and analyze them in view of the latest electroweak precision data.

  7. A comparative analysis of dispersal syndromes in terrestrial and semi-terrestrial animals.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Virginie M; Whitmee, Sarah; Le Galliard, Jean-François; Clobert, Jean; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Bonte, Dries; Brändle, Martin; Matthias Dehling, D; Hof, Christian; Trochet, Audrey; Baguette, Michel

    2014-08-01

    Dispersal, the behaviour ensuring gene flow, tends to covary with a number of morphological, ecological and behavioural traits. While species-specific dispersal behaviours are the product of each species' unique evolutionary history, there may be distinct interspecific patterns of covariation between dispersal and other traits ('dispersal syndromes') due to their shared evolutionary history or shared environments. Using dispersal, phylogeny and trait data for 15 terrestrial and semi-terrestrial animal Orders (> 700 species), we tested for the existence and consistency of dispersal syndromes across species. At this taxonomic scale, dispersal increased linearly with body size in omnivores, but decreased above a critical length in herbivores and carnivores. Species life history and ecology significantly influenced patterns of covariation, with higher phylogenetic signal of dispersal in aerial dispersers compared with ground dwellers and stronger evidence for dispersal syndromes in aerial dispersers and ectotherms, compared with ground dwellers and endotherms. Our results highlight the complex role of dispersal in the evolution of species life-history strategies: good dispersal ability was consistently associated with high fecundity and survival, and in aerial dispersers it was associated with early maturation. We discuss the consequences of these findings for species evolution and range shifts in response to future climate change. PMID:24915998

  8. NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, Daniel R.

    2004-01-01

    NASA has decided to move forward with two complementary Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) missions, a visible coronagraph and an infrared formation flying interferometer. These missions are major missions in the NASA Office of Space Science Origins Theme. The primary science objectives of the TPF missions are to search for, detect, and characterize planets and planetary systems beyond our own Solar System, including specifically Earth-like planets.

  9. Natural organobromine in terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leri, Alessandra C.; Myneni, Satish C. B.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that bromine undergoes biogeochemical cycling involving natural formation and degradation of organobromine compounds in marine systems. In the terrestrial environment, where background bromine levels tend to be low, the biogeochemistry of this element remains largely unexamined. We traced the path of bromine through plant growth, senescence, and decay of leaf litter on the forest floor. Using sensitive X-ray spectroscopic techniques, we show that all bromine in humified plant material, organic-rich surface soils, and isolated humic substances is bonded to carbon. Analysis of bromide-enriched plants suggests that bromide absorbed by the growing plants ultimately converts to organobromine when the plant litter decays. Application of isolated chloroperoxidase, a halogenating enzyme, to healthy plant material results in extensive bromination, with organobromine formed preferentially over organochlorine. The relative ease of bromide oxidation appears to promote biogeochemical transformations of Br from inorganic to organic forms, leading to its incorporation into soil organic matter through enzymatic processes related to plant litter decomposition. In combination with low concentration and susceptibility to leaching and plant uptake, natural bromination processes lead to the exhaustion of inorganic bromide in surface soils, making organic matter a reservoir of bromine in the terrestrial environment. This study provides the first detailed look into the terrestrial bromine cycle and lays the foundation for future studies of natural organobromine degradation, which may shed light on the fate of anthropogenic organobromine pollutants in the soil environment.

  10. Arsenic Speciation of Terrestrial Invertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, M.M.; Koch, I.; Gordon, R.A.; Reimer, K.J. ); )

    2009-07-01

    The distribution and chemical form (speciation) of arsenic in terrestrial food chains determines both the amount of arsenic available to higher organisms, and the toxicity of this metalloid in affected ecosystems. Invertebrates are part of complex terrestrial food webs. This paper provides arsenic concentrations and arsenic speciation profiles for eight orders of terrestrial invertebrates collected at three historical gold mine sites and one background site in Nova Scotia, Canada. Total arsenic concentrations, determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), were dependent upon the classification of invertebrate. Arsenic species were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) ICP-MS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Invertebrates were found by HPLC ICP-MS to contain predominantly arsenite and arsenate in methanol/water extracts, while XAS revealed that most arsenic is bound to sulfur in vivo. Examination of the spatial distribution of arsenic within an ant tissue highlighted the differences between exogenous and endogenous arsenic, as well as the extent to which arsenic is transformed upon ingestion. Similar arsenic speciation patterns for invertebrate groups were observed across sites. Trace amounts of arsenobetaine and arsenocholine were identified in slugs, ants, and spiders.

  11. FORMATION OF THE TERRESTRIAL PLANETS FROM A NARROW ANNULUS

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Brad M. S.

    2009-09-20

    We show that the assembly of the solar system terrestrial planets can be successfully modeled with all of the mass initially confined to a narrow annulus between 0.7 and 1.0 AU. With this configuration, analogs of Mercury and Mars often form from the collisional evolution of material diffusing out of the annulus under the scattering of the forming Earth and Venus analogs. The final systems also possess eccentricities and inclinations that match the observations, without recourse to dynamical friction from remnant small body populations. Finally, the characteristic assembly timescale for Earth analogs is rapid in this model and consistent with cosmochemical models based on the {sup 182}Hf-{sup 182}W isotopes. The agreement between this model and the observations suggests that terrestrial planet systems may also be formed in 'planet traps', as has been proposed recently for the cores of giant planets in our solar system and others.

  12. Accretion of Terrestrial Planets and the Earth-Moon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canup, R. M.; Agnor, C.

    1998-01-01

    The leading paradigm for the origin of the terrestrial planets is the planetesimal hypothesis, which proposes that mutual collisions between objects in the protoplanetary disk resulted in the accretional growth of increasingly massive bodies, ending with the formation of planets in the 0.5 - 1.5-AU region. Two decades of analytical modeling and numerical simulation have revealed three general stages in the terrestrial accretion process: an early stage that commences with dust grains in a gas-rich nebula and ends with the formation of kilometer-sized "planetesimals"; an intermediate stage in which planetestimals experience runaway growth and form lunar sized "planetary embryos" in -105-106 yr; and a final stage dominated by mutual gravitational perturbations between planetary embryos, resulting in large, stochastic impact events and the formation of the final terrestrial planets after -108 yr. The prediction of a final impact-dominated phase coincides nicely with observed features in our solar system that are believed to be the result of giant impact events, including the Earth-Moon system. The first stage of plnetesimals is perhaps still the least understood phase of planetary accretion. Early models suggested that gravitational instability played a dominant role, while recentwork has suggested that low-velocity collisions and nongravitational sticking mechanisms may be required. Geochemical evidence suggest there was widespread melting and differentiation of planetesimals in the terrestrial region by the ned of this stage, perhaps a result of some event associated with solar activity. The intermediat stage opf collisional growth of roughly lunar sized embryos has been extensively studied using statistical methods. Recent work has modeled the accretional evolution of initially kilometer-sized bodies throughout the entire terrestrial region. Results from this work suggest that a few tens of planetary embryos with masses <1026 g (a lunar mass = 7.35 X 10 23 g) form after about a million years and contain nearly all of the total mass in the system. The final stage of terrestrial planet formation thus likely commences with a few tens of lunar-sized bodies on fairly circular orbits,which must then experience mutual pertubations and collisions to yield the final planets. Until recently, modeling of this stage had been limited to staitstical methods, as the timescales involved preculdued simulation using direct n-body orbit integrations. Multiple works by Wetherill using a Monte Carlo approach found on average about one impact between a body of nearly Earth size and an impactor with at least a Mars mas per simulation. This is the approximate type of impact tha tappears to be required to yield the Earth-moon system in the giant impact scenario. Estimates of the thermal effects of accretion suggest that melting and differentiation of bodies due to impact heating would have occurred by the time bodies were Mars sized (or 10% of Earth's mass.)

  13. 23 CFR 635.120 - Changes and extra work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...and adequately document a cost analysis of each negotiated contract change or negotiated extra work order. The method and degree of the cost analysis shall be subject to the approval...Proposed changes and extra work involved in...

  14. 23 CFR 635.120 - Changes and extra work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...and adequately document a cost analysis of each negotiated contract change or negotiated extra work order. The method and degree of the cost analysis shall be subject to the approval...Proposed changes and extra work involved in...

  15. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  16. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  17. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  18. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  19. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  20. Moon and Terrestrial Planets: Unresolved Questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, H. H.

    2002-12-01

    Human exploration during Apollo began the documentation of the evolution of the Moon and of its importance in understanding the origin and evolution of the terrestrial planets. This revolution in planetary geology continues as a vigorous and vibrant arena for discovery and debate for new generations of geoscientists. Although much has been learned and, indeed, resolved in lunar science, we are left with major questions unresolved. One fundamental question is that of the origin of the Moon. A large consensus has developed in the planetary science community that the Moon was created by the "giant impact" of a Mars-sized asteroid on the Earth after the accretion of the Earth was largely complete and differentiation had begun. A minority, however, questions this consensus hypothesis because of increasing indications that the lower mantle of the Moon may be largely undifferentiated. If the issue of the high angular momentum of the Earth-Moon system can be resolved through new modeling studies, then capture of a co-orbiting planetesimal may be an important alternative to a "giant impact". Another important question, particularly in consideration of the terrestrial and Martian surface environments during the first 0.8 billion years of Earth history, is the impact record of that period as recorded on the Moon. Again, a large consensus has developed that the 50 or so large and very large impact basins identified on the Moon were created over a very short "cataclysm" between about 3.9 and 3.8 billion years ago. Here also, a minority suggests that this period of large basin formation, although distinct in lunar history, took place over several hundred million years and that the apparent cataclysm is an artifact of sampling the effects of the last few basin-forming impacts. Either way, a previously unavailable source of impactors appeared somewhere in the solar system and greatly affected terrestrial environments at the time the precursors to life were appearing on Earth. Additional unresolved questions raised by lunar exploration and study include 1) the effect of chondritic proto-cores on the timing of core formation in the terrestrial planets, 2) the number of extremely large basin-forming events (lunar diameters >2000 km) and the potential for proto-continents being formed by the differentiation of their melt sheets on water-rich planets, 3) effect of clays produced by the weathering of the debris and glass produced by pervasive asteroid and cometary impacts, 4) the many details of the differentiation of magma oceans, and 5) the processes governing the evolution of the lunar regolith. Finally, there is the question of when humans shall return to the Moon. On the one hand, the use of this unique and accessible planetary body as a scientific resource has barely begun. On the other hand, the Helium-3 fusion energy resources and deep space travel consumables that remain untapped in the lunar regolith hardly can be ignored in the face of human and environmental challenges on Earth and the species' desire to go to Mars. On both hands, it is time we took another walk on the Moon. 30 years going on 40 is long enough to think about what once was possible.

  1. Neutrinos in Extra Dimensions and Supernovae

    E-print Network

    Cirelli, M

    2003-01-01

    Models with extra space dimensions naturally provide for the existence of fermions that propagate in them. These are seen in 4D as an infinite tower of sterile neutrinos possibly mixed with the Standard Model ones. We consider the effect of such a mixing in the context of core collapse supernova physics. We show that the potentially dramatic modifications to the supernova evolution (commonly believed to set very strong bounds on the parameters of the extra dimensions) are prevented by a mechanism of feedback, so that much weaker bounds need to be imposed. Nevertheless, the supernova core evolution is significantly modified. We discuss the compatibility with the SN1987a signal and we analyse the distinctive signatures of the neutrino signal on Earth.

  2. Stellar evolution and large extra dimensions

    E-print Network

    S. Cassisi; V. Castellani; S. Degl'Innocenti G. Fiorentini; B. Ricci

    2000-02-08

    We discuss in detail the information on large extra dimensions which can be derived in the framework of stellar evolution theory and observation. The main effect of large extra dimensions arises from the production of the Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations of the graviton. The KK-graviton and matter interactions are of gravitational strength, so the KK states never become thermalized and always freely escape. In this paper we first pay attention to the sun. Production of KK gravitons is incompatible with helioseismic constraints unless the 4+n dimensional Planck mass M_s exceeds 300 Gev/c^2. Next we show that stellar structures in their advanced phase of H burning evolution put much more severe constraints, M_s > 3-4 TeV/c^2, improving on current laboratory lower limits.

  3. Deformed brane with finite extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Xiao; Fu, Chun-E.; Guo, Heng; Li, Hai-Tao

    2012-04-01

    We construct a deformed brane solution generated by a double-kink scalar field and a dilaton scalar field. In this brane scenario the extra dimension is finite, which is due to the introduction of the dilaton field with a special form. The finity of the extra dimension will result in the localization of the zero mode for the vector fields, while the localization of the Kalb-Ramond fields depends on the coupling to the dilaton. For the fermion fields, with different values of the dilaton-fermion coupling constant, there are three types of the effective potential for the fermion Kaluza-Klein modes. Moreover, we investigate the effect of the deformation of the brane on the localization, and find that the number of the resonances will increase with the distances of the two sub-branes.

  4. About Tagish Lake as a Potential Parent Body for Polar Micrometeorites; Clues from their Hydrogen Isotopic Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engrand, C.; Gounelle, M.; Zolensky, M. E.; Duprat, J.

    2003-01-01

    The origin of the Antarctic micrometeorites (AMMs) is still a matter of debate. Their closest meteoritic counterparts are the C2 chondrites, but the match is not perfect, and the parent body(ies) of the AMMs is(are) still to be identified. Tagish Lake is a new meteorite fall which bears similarity with CI1 and CM2 chondrites, but is distinct from both. Based on the mineralogy of phyllosilicates, Noguchi et al. proposed that the phyllosilicate-rich AMMs and the Tagish Lake meteorites could derive from similar asteroids. The hydrogen isotopic compositions of extra-terrestrial samples can be used to get some insight on their origin. The D/H ratios of AMMs and of Tagish Lake have been measured, but using different analytical techniques. They are therefore not directly comparable. We performed additional hydrogen isotopic analyses of fragments of Tagish Lake using the same experimental setup previously used for the measurement of the hydrogen isotopic composition of AMMs. In this work, we could also analyze separately both lithologies of Tagish Lake (carbonate-poor and -rich). The distributions of delta D values measured in the two lithologies of Tagish Lake are very similar, indicating that fluids with similar hydrogen isotopic compositions altered the meteorite on the parent body for the two lithologies. Yet, the hydrogen isotopic composition of Tagish Lake is different from that of AMMs, suggesting that they do not derive from the same parent body.

  5. 46 CFR Sec. 8 - Extra work and changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Extra work and changes. Sec. 8 Section 8 Shipping... Sec. 8 Extra work and changes. (a) At any time after the award of an original job order and during the time the work thereunder is being performed, additional or extra work or changes in the work covered...

  6. 46 CFR Sec. 8 - Extra work and changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Extra work and changes. Sec. 8 Section 8 Shipping... Sec. 8 Extra work and changes. (a) At any time after the award of an original job order and during the time the work thereunder is being performed, additional or extra work or changes in the work covered...

  7. ExtraSolar Planets How did we find the planets?

    E-print Network

    Walter, Frederick M.

    ExtraSolar Planets #12;How did we find the planets? · Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn: orbital motions · KBOs: motions #12;How do we find ExtraSolar Planets? #12;How do we find ExtraSolar Planets? · Back to Astronomy... #12;Finding Extrasolar Planets. I Direct Searches Direct searches

  8. Kinks, extra dimensions, and gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Gregory, Ruth

    2011-03-01

    We investigate in detail the gravitational wave signal from kinks on cosmic (super)strings, including the kinematical effects from the internal extra dimensions. We find that the signal is suppressed, however, the effect is less significant that that for cusps. Combined with the greater incidence of kinks on (super)strings, it is likely that the kink signal offers the better chance for detection of cosmic (super)strings.

  9. Noncommutative Inspired Black Holes in Extra Dimensions

    E-print Network

    Thomas G. Rizzo

    2006-06-09

    In a recent string theory motivated paper, Nicolini, Smailagic and Spallucci (NSS) presented an interesting model for a noncommutative inspired, Schwarzschild-like black hole solution in 4-dimensions. The essential effect of having noncommutative co-ordinates in this approach is to smear out matter distributions on a scale associated with the turn-on of noncommutativity which was taken to be near the 4-d Planck mass. In particular, NSS took this smearing to be essentially Gaussian. This energy scale is sufficiently large that in 4-d such effects may remain invisible indefinitely. Extra dimensional models which attempt to address the gauge hierarchy problem, however, allow for the possibility that the effective fundamental scale may not be far from $\\sim$ 1 TeV, an energy regime that will soon be probed by experiments at both the LHC and ILC. In this paper we generalize the NSS model to the case where flat, toroidally compactified extra dimensions are accessible at the Terascale and examine the resulting modifications in black hole properties due to the existence of noncommutativity. We show that while many of the noncommutativity-induced black hole features found in 4-d by NSS persist, in some cases there can be significant modifications due the presence of extra dimensions. We also demonstrate that the essential features of this approach are not particularly sensitive to the Gaussian nature of the smearing employed by NSS.

  10. Features of terrestrial plasma transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Chappell, C. R.; Pollock, C. J.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Research concerning the transport and distribution of ionospheric plasma in the magnetosphere are reviewed, stressing the dichotomy in explanations given for the low plasma densities outside the plasmasphere. The convection/hot solar plasma model and the convection/loss model are considered. Observations of global ionospheric outflows are compared with theoretical studies. It is suggested that there is a need for a hybrid model of magnetospheric plasma in which terrestrial plasma is both lost into the solar wind and energized and trapped within the magnetosphere, inflating the geomagnetic field and excluding cold plasma from conjugate regions.

  11. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Chambers, Don P.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial water storage (TWS) comprises groundwater, soil moisture, surface water, snow,and ice. Groundwater typically varies more slowly than the other TWS components because itis not in direct contact with the atmosphere, but often it has a larger range of variability onmultiannual timescales (Rodell and Famiglietti, 2001; Alley et al., 2002). In situ groundwaterdata are only archived and made available by a few countries. However, monthly TWSvariations observed by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE; Tapley et al.,2004) satellite mission, which launched in 2002, are a reasonable proxy for unconfinedgroundwater at climatic scales.

  12. Terrestrial eco-risk -- Toxicity assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Applehans, F.; Jones, M.; Tate, D.J.; Cothern, K.A.; Pavlou, S.; Toll, J.E.; Armstrong, J.P.

    1994-12-31

    One objective of the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) ecological risk assessment was to characterize the magnitude and spatial extent of potential risks to terrestrial biota from existing contamination on post. The basis of the risk characterization was the calculation of hazard quotients (HQs) for each biota target receptor and chemical of concern (COC). The HQs represented the ratio of a measured or predicted tissue concentration for bioaccumulative COCs to a derived maximum acceptable tissue concentration (MATC) or the ratio of a calculated intake to a toxicity reference value (TRV). The MATCs and TRVs were termed ``toxicological threshold values.`` The MATCs represent maximum whole-body concentrations of bioaccumulative chemicals that are unlikely to cause harmful effects to specific receptors. The TRVs represent estimates of daily dose that are likely to be without an appreciable risk of harmful effects to target receptors. Both and MATCs and TRVs were derived from literature and may have uncertainty factors spanning an order of magnitude or more to account for uncertainty associated with extrapolating toxic effects observed in field or laboratory studies to target receptors at RMA. This presentation will focus on the derivation and implementation of these toxicological threshold values -processes which involved the integration of science, policy, law, and perception.

  13. Perpetual long libration of terrestrial planets in tidal resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Valeri

    2015-11-01

    On the example of Mercury, I show that firm planets of terrestrial composition, locked in the 3:2 or higher spin-orbit resonances, undergo long-period perpetual libration in longitude without any influence of third bodies. This non-damped libration at the natural frequency is driven by a secular tidal torque, which is increasing with frequency within a narrow interval around the resonance. The spectrum of regular forced, eccentricity-driven, libration defines the conditions for the perpetual long libration. The possibility of validating the tidal theory from the observable amplitude of perpetual libration is discussed.

  14. Review of existing terrestrial bioaccumulation models and terrestrial bioaccumulation modeling needs for organic chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protocols for terrestrial bioaccumulation assessments are far less-developed than for aquatic systems. This manuscript reviews modeling approaches that can be used to assess the terrestrial bioaccumulation potential of commercial organic chemicals. Models exist for plant, inver...

  15. Robust frameless stereotactic localization in extra-cranial radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Bassanini, Fabio; Tagaste, Barbara; Garibaldi, Cristina; Orecchia, Roberto; Pedotti, Antonio

    2006-04-15

    In the field of extra-cranial radiotherapy, several inaccuracies can make the application of frameless stereotactic localization techniques error-prone. When optical tracking systems based on surface fiducials are used, inter- and intra-fractional uncertainties in marker three-dimensional (3D) detection may lead to inexact tumor position estimation, resulting in erroneous patient setup. This is due to the fact that external fiducials misdetection results in deformation effects that are poorly handled in a rigid-body approach. In this work, the performance of two frameless stereotactic localization algorithms for 3D tumor position reconstruction in extra-cranial radiotherapy has been specifically tested. Two strategies, unweighted versus weighted, for stereotactic tumor localization were examined by exploiting data coming from 46 patients treated for extra-cranial lesions. Measured isocenter displacements and rotations were combined to define isocentric procedures, featuring 6 degrees of freedom, for correcting patient alignment (isocentric positioning correction). The sensitivity of the algorithms to uncertainties in the 3D localization of fiducials was investigated by means of 184 numerical simulations. The performance of the implemented isocentric positioning correction was compared to conventional point-based registration. The isocentric positioning correction algorithm was tested on a clinical dataset of inter-fractional and intra-fractional setup errors, which was collected by means of an optical tracker on the same group of patients. The weighted strategy exhibited a lower sensitivity to fiducial localization errors in simulated misalignments than those of the unweighted strategy. Isocenter 3D displacements provided by the weighted strategy were consistently smaller than those featured by the unweighted strategy. The peak decrease in median and quartile values of isocenter 3D displacements were 1.4 and 2.7 mm, respectively. Concerning clinical data, the weighted strategy isocentric positioning correction provided the reduction of fiducial registration errors, featuring up to 61.7% decrease in median values (versus 46.8% for the unweighted strategy) of initial displacements. The weighted strategy proved high performance in minimizing the effects of fiducial localization errors, showing a great potential in improving patient setup. The clinical data analysis revealed that the application of a robust reconstruction algorithm may provide high-quality results in patient setup verification, by properly managing external fiducials localization errors.

  16. Simple Non-Coriolis Treatments for Explaining Terrestrial East-West Deflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, John F.

    1973-01-01

    Presents two simple methods of calculating the respective terrestrial westward and eastward displacements of a vertically projected and a perpendicularly dropped body which give due emphasis to physical principles, including Kepler's law, conservation of angular momentum, and nonrotating coordinate system with origin at the earth's center. (CC)

  17. Internal Representation and Memory Formation of Odor Preference Based on Oscillatory Activities in a Terrestrial Slug

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekiguchi, Tatsuhiko; Furudate, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    The terrestrial slug "Limax" exhibits a highly developed ability to learn odors with a small nervous system. When a fluorescent dye, Lucifer Yellow (LY), is injected into the slug's body cavity after odor-taste associative conditioning, a group of neurons in the procerebral (PC) lobe, an olfactory center of the slug, is labeled by LY. We examined…

  18. Electromagnetic Wave Power Observed Near the Moon during Terrestrial Bow Shock Crossings

    E-print Network

    Fillingim, Matthew

    provide MT source signals. On airless bodies such as the Moon, solar wind turbulence, shocks, and plasmaElectromagnetic Wave Power Observed Near the Moon during Terrestrial Bow Shock Crossings and Its-band whistlers ~ 1 Hz in the solar wind measurements of the horizontal electric and magnetic fields are used

  19. Collisional erosion and the non-chondritic composition of the terrestrial planets

    E-print Network

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Collisional erosion and the non-chondritic composition of the terrestrial planets BY HUGH ST. C. O¨lpicherstrasse 49b, 50674 Ko¨ln, Germany The compositional variations among the chondrites inform us about in oxidation state. Moon- to Mars-sized planetary bodies, formed by rapid accretion of chondrite

  20. Tectonic evolution of terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, J. W.; Solomon, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    The tectonic style of each terrestrial planet, referring to the thickness and division of its lithosphere, can be inferred from surface features and compared to models of planetary thermal history. Factors governing planetary tectonic evolution are planet diameter, chemistry, and external and internal heat sources, all of which determine how a planet generates and rids itself of heat. The earth is distinguished by its distinct, mobile plates, which are recycled into the mantle and show large-scale lateral movements, whereas the moon, Mars, and Mercury are single spherical shells, showing no evidence of destruction and renewal of the lithospheric plates over the latter 80% of their history. Their smaller volume to surface area results in a more rapid cooling, formation, and thickening of the lithosphere. Vertical tectonics, due to lithospheric loading, is controlled by the local thickness and rheology of the lithosphere. Further studies of Venus, which displays both the craterlike surface features of the one-plate planets, and the rifts and plateaus of earth, may indicate which factors are most important in controlling the tectonic evolution of terrestrial planets.

  1. Cadaver decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, David O.; Yellowlees, David; Tibbett, Mark

    2007-01-01

    A dead mammal (i.e. cadaver) is a high quality resource (narrow carbon:nitrogen ratio, high water content) that releases an intense, localised pulse of carbon and nutrients into the soil upon decomposition. Despite the fact that as much as 5,000 kg of cadaver can be introduced to a square kilometre of terrestrial ecosystem each year, cadaver decomposition remains a neglected microsere. Here we review the processes associated with the introduction of cadaver-derived carbon and nutrients into soil from forensic and ecological settings to show that cadaver decomposition can have a greater, albeit localised, effect on belowground ecology than plant and faecal resources. Cadaveric materials are rapidly introduced to belowground floral and faunal communities, which results in the formation of a highly concentrated island of fertility, or cadaver decomposition island (CDI). CDIs are associated with increased soil microbial biomass, microbial activity (C mineralisation) and nematode abundance. Each CDI is an ephemeral natural disturbance that, in addition to releasing energy and nutrients to the wider ecosystem, acts as a hub by receiving these materials in the form of dead insects, exuvia and puparia, faecal matter (from scavengers, grazers and predators) and feathers (from avian scavengers and predators). As such, CDIs contribute to landscape heterogeneity. Furthermore, CDIs are a specialised habitat for a number of flies, beetles and pioneer vegetation, which enhances biodiversity in terrestrial ecosystems.

  2. The Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics is dedicated to the advancement of knowledge in Earth and planetary science, by conducting innovative research using space technology. The Laboratory's mission and activities support the work and new initiatives at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The Laboratory's success contributes to the Earth Science Directorate as a national resource for studies of Earth from Space. The Laboratory is part of the Earth Science Directorate based at the GSFC in Greenbelt, MD. The Directorate itself is comprised of the Global Change Data Center (GCDC), the Space Data and Computing Division (SDCD), and four science Laboratories, including Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics, Laboratory for Atmospheres, and Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes all in Greenbelt, MD. The fourth research organization, Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), is in New York, NY. Relevant to NASA's Strategic Plan, the Laboratory ensures that all work undertaken and completed is within the vision of GSFC. The philosophy of the Laboratory is to balance the completion of near term goals, while building on the Laboratory's achievements as a foundation for the scientific challenges in the future.

  3. Peatland geoengineering: an alternative approach to terrestrial carbon sequestration.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Christopher; Fenner, Nathalie; Shirsat, Anil H

    2012-09-13

    Terrestrial and oceanic ecosystems contribute almost equally to the sequestration of ca 50 per cent of anthropogenic CO(2) emissions, and already play a role in minimizing our impact on Earth's climate. On land, the majority of the sequestered carbon enters soil carbon stores. Almost one-third of that soil carbon can be found in peatlands, an area covering just 2-3% of the Earth's landmass. Peatlands are thus well established as powerful agents of carbon capture and storage; the preservation of archaeological artefacts, such as ancient bog bodies, further attest to their exceptional preservative properties. Peatlands have higher carbon storage densities per unit ecosystem area than either the oceans or dry terrestrial systems. However, despite attempts over a number of years at enhancing carbon capture in the oceans or in land-based afforestation schemes, no attempt has yet been made to optimize peatland carbon storage capacity or even to harness peatlands to store externally captured carbon. Recent studies suggest that peatland carbon sequestration is due to the inhibitory effects of phenolic compounds that create an 'enzymic latch' on decomposition. Here, we propose to harness that mechanism in a series of peatland geoengineering strategies whereby molecular, biogeochemical, agronomical and afforestation approaches increase carbon capture and long-term sequestration in peat-forming terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:22869805

  4. Higher in vitro resistance to oxidative stress in extra-pair offspring.

    PubMed

    Losdat, S; Helfenstein, F; Saladin, V; Richner, H

    2011-11-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to act as a universal physiological constraint in life-history evolution of animals. This should be of interest for extra-pair paternity behaviour, and we tested here the prediction that offspring arising from extra-pair matings of female great tits show higher resistance to oxidative stress than within-pair offspring. Resistance to oxidative stress, measured as the whole blood resistance to a controlled free-radical attack, was significantly higher for extra-pair offspring as predicted although these were not heavier or in better body condition than within-pair offspring. Since resistance to oxidative stress has been suggested to enhance survival and reproductive rates, extra-pair offspring with superior resistance to oxidative stress, be it through maternal effects or paternal inheritance, may achieve higher fitness and thus provide significant indirect fitness benefits to their mothers. In addition, because oxidative stress affects colour signals and sperm traits, females may also gain fitness benefits by producing sons that are more attractive (sexy-sons hypothesis) and have sperm of superior quality (sexy-sperm hypothesis). Heritability of resistance to oxidative stress as well as maternal effects may both act as proximate mechanisms for the observed result. Disentangling these two mechanisms would require an experimental approach. Future long-term studies should also aim at experimentally testing whether higher resistance to oxidative stress of EP nestlings indeed translates into fitness benefits to females. PMID:21899636

  5. Widespread Wolbachia infection in terrestrial isopods and other crustaceans 123 Widespread Wolbachia infection in terrestrial isopods

    E-print Network

    Richard, Cordaux,

    Widespread Wolbachia infection in terrestrial isopods and other crustaceans 123 Widespread Wolbachia infection in terrestrial isopods and other crustaceans Richard Cordaux1 , Samuel Pichon1,3 , Houda Wolbachia infection in terrestrial isopods and other crustaceans. In: Strus J, Taiti S, Sfenthourakis S (Eds

  6. Variable Extra Dimensional Spacetime and Solution to Initial Singularity Paradox of Our Universe From Extra Dimensions

    E-print Network

    Yong-Chang Huang; LiuJi Li

    2015-01-18

    Considering a n-dimensional general spacetime, we deduce its 4-dimensional Einstein equation and Friedman equations, and discover a general dual relation between the scale factor $a(t)$ of our universe and the scale factor $B(t)$ of extra dimensions. Based on the dual relation equation, predictions of shrinking of extra dimensions and free of singularity problem of our universe are given. Therefore, solution to initial singularity paradox of our universe is achieved. Because the dual relation is general, this Letter discovers that it is just the extra dimensional shrinking contribution that results in our universe's expanding in terms of the dual relation in the bulk space, and actually the dual relation is deduced doesn't depend on the 4-dimensional matter concrete Lagrangian, these are key important for a lot of future relative investigations.

  7. Confirmation and Distribution of Tetrodotoxin for the First Time in Terrestrial Invertebrates: Two Terrestrial Flatworm Species (Bipalium adventitium and Bipalium kewense)

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Amber N.; Ducey, Peter K.; Neuman-Lee, Lorin; Hanifin, Charles T.; French, Susannah S.; Pfrender, Michael E.; Brodie, Edmund D.; Brodie Jr, Edmund D.

    2014-01-01

    The potent neurotoxin tetrodotoxin (TTX) is known from a diverse array of taxa, but is unknown in terrestrial invertebrates. Tetrodotoxin is a low molecular weight compound that acts by blocking voltage-gated sodium channels, inducing paralysis. However, the origins and ecological functions of TTX in most taxa remain mysterious. Here, we show that TTX is present in two species of terrestrial flatworm (Bipalium adventitium and Bipalium kewense) using a competitive inhibition enzymatic immunoassay to quantify the toxin and high phase liquid chromatography to confirm the presence. We also investigated the distribution of TTX throughout the bodies of the flatworms and provide evidence suggesting that TTX is used during predation to subdue large prey items. We also show that the egg capsules of B. adventitium have TTX, indicating a further role in defense. These data suggest a potential route for TTX bioaccumulation in terrestrial systems. PMID:24963791

  8. The 2700 BP solar-terrestrial signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mörner, N.-A.

    2003-04-01

    The atmospheric 14C variations may provide a good approximation of past changes in Solar activity beyond the last 400 years, or so, of instrumental and observational documentation. It is quite difficult, however, to discriminate between signals from sunspot activity, terrestrial geomagnetic field variations and oceanic ventilation/ /storing events. At around 2600-2700 C14-years BP, there is a distinct “C14-anomaly”. In reasonable time-association to this event, Earth experienced significant changes in climate (in Europe known as the Subboreal/Subatlantic transition). A solar-terrestrial signal-response mechanism has, therefore, been proposed (van Geel et al.). At about the same time, however, there are records of a geomagnetic anomaly (known as the Stärnö Excursion). Therefore, a geomagnetic origin of observed changes in climate has been proposed (Raspopov et al.). In almost all cases, there are problems in the precision of dating. From Lake Kassjön in northern Sweden, there is a detailed paleomagnetic record dated both by annual varves and radiocarbon. It covers the last 6300 varev years. Between varve 2825 and 2676 BP, there is a shift in declination of 117o. It represents a “trans-polar VGP-shift” (i.e. the displacement of the symmetry axes of two rotating bodies). The shift is recorded by 10 samples, each of which has been dated by AMS-radiocarbon ranging between 2600 and 2800 C14-years BP or 2700-3000 cal-years BP. This allows a reconstruction of the sequence of events; (1) a trans-polar VGP-shift takes place (commencing 2750 C14-years BP or 2800-2900 cal-years BP), (2) the dipole moment decreases, (3) Earth’s shielding capacity is lowered, (4) this leads to increased 14C production (dated 2500-2700 C14 years BP or 2500-2800 cal-years BP), and (5) a major change in climate occurs at around 2500 C14-years BP. Consequently, the primary signal leads its origin in the Earth’s own geomagnetic field changes, and there is a phase-lag with respect to the atmospheric 14C anomaly and the general paleoclimatic change. In Scandinavia, the Subboreal/Subatlantic shift in climate, is recorded by a warm period with high sea level (ca. 2700-2600 C14 years BP) followed by a short period of intense draught (2600-2500 C14-years BP) and then a general cooling with increased precipitation (beginning around 2500 C14-years BP).

  9. Mars: destruction of the tropical belt and building up extra tropics is a physical requirement of angular momentum equilibration between zones with different distances to the rotation axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2012-09-01

    Often observed a sensible difference in appearance and structure between tropical and extra-t ropical zones of various heavenly bodies including rocky and gas planets, satellites and Sun (Fig. 6) compels to look for a common reason of such phenomenon [1-3]. All bodies rotate and their spherical shape makes zones at different lat itudes to have differing angular momenta as a distance to the rotation axis diminishes gradually from the equator to the poles (Fig. 1) (this is felt particularly when one launches rockets into space -preferable cheaper launches are from the equatorial regions - Kourou in the French Guyana is better than Baikonur in Kazakhstan). One of remarkable changes occurs at tropics. As a total rotating planetary body tends to have angular momenta of its tectonic blocks equilibrated it starts mechanisms leveling this basic physical property. At tropical zones (bulged also due to the rotation ellipsoid) the outer shell - crust as a consequence tends to be destroyed, sunk, subsided and shrunk; a density of crust material changes; the atmosphere reacts changing chemistry and structure; in terrestrial anthroposphere man looses its mass and stature (well known pygmioidness process). Ext ratropical belts, on the contrary, tend to add material and increase radius. Thus, a body tends to be like a cucumber but mighty gravity always makes it globular. According to the Le Chatelier rule mechanisms with opposing tendencies also begin to act. However, traces of this cosmic "struggle" very often are seen on surfaces of heavenly bodies as structurally distinguished tropical and extra-t ropical zones (Fig. 1, 6) [1-3]. At Mars the widespread "enigmatic" chaotic and fretted terrains at the highland-lowland boundary could be considered as traces of the crust destruction along the wide tropical belt (Fig. 2-4). A system of hillocks and their relics, mesas, ridges, cliffs and separating them depressions or plains (deep up to 1-2 km) is controlled by a crosscutting tectonics or makes a complicated mix (Fig. 3, 4). Prevailing subsidence here is characteristic. The depressions were used and additionally sculptured by moving ices and flowing waters in the past of martian geologic history. On the contrary, wide extra -tropical belts of pedestal craters with broad effusions of fluid-rich material (Fig. 5) obviously help to mend defective momentum. A comparison with Earth is to the point. There also the wide planetary long tropical zone is marked by destruction of the crust. It is demonstrated by development of numerous islands of the Malay Archipelago (the Sunda Isls., Maluku Isls., Philippines) between the Southeastern Asia and Australia. In Africa and South America huge depressions of the Congo and Amazon Rivers develop where the Archean crust is subsided to depths of more than 2 km. In the Pacific along the equator numerous islands of Micronesia occur (massive corals mark subsiding basaltic summits). Subsidence of the basaltic oceanic crust is followed by an intensive folding and faulting of basalt and sedimentary layers as a larger mass must be held by a smaller space (a planetary radius is diminishing). The central Atlantic is very demonstrative in this sense suffering huge transform fault zones being replaced by more quite tectonics to the north and south where basaltic effusions (plateau-basalts) form large provinces. This addition of dense basalts to the upper crust level helps to increase angular momentum of the extra-t ropical blocks. Recent results from the DAWN mission show that the mini-planet Vesta also has the same structurally deformed equatorial belt. But at Vesta the equatorial belt is subsided and faulted (broken by tight series of parallel grabens) having been squeezed into smaller space because of diminishing planetary radius (Fig. 6) Thus, Mars, as other planetary bodies, suffers a fundamental re-building of its wide topical zone (supertectonics) as a necessary natural response to the angular momentum adjustment (equilibrat ion) of its different latitude belts (tropics and extra-tropics). Th

  10. Large Extra Dimension and Dark Matter Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Bo; Starkman, Glenn D.; Silk, Joseph

    2008-01-03

    If our space has the large extra dimensions as proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali (ADD), then gravity would start to deviate from Newtonian gravity and be greatly enhanced in sub-millimeter scales. Here we show that in the ADD scenario, gravity could play an important role (compared to the weak interaction) in the interactions between dark matter particles and the electron. We find that for typical WIMP dark matter, such dark matter-electron 'gravitational' scattering cross section may be much larger than the dark matter-nucleon cross section constrained by current dark matter experiments.

  11. Direct imaging of extra-solar planets

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; Max, V.E.; Brase, J.M.; Caffano, C.J.; Gavel, D.T.; Macintosh, B.A.

    1997-03-01

    Direct imaging of extra-solar planets may be possible with the new generation of large ground-based telescopes equipped with state- of- the-art adaptive optics (AO) systems to compensate for the blurring effect of the Earth`s atmosphere. The first of these systems is scheduled to begin operation in 1998 on the 10 in Keck II telescope. In this paper, general formulas for high-contrast imaging with AO systems are presented and used to calculate the sensitivity of the Keck AO system. The results of these calculations show that the Keck AO system should achieve the sensitivity necessary to detect giant planets around several nearby bright stars.

  12. Can polar bears use terrestrial foods to offset lost ice-based hunting opportunities?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rode, Karyn D.; Robbins, Charles T.; Nelson, Lynne; Amstrup, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Increased land use by polar bears (Ursus maritimus) due to climate-change-induced reduction of their sea-ice habitat illustrates the impact of climate change on species distributions and the difficulty of conserving a large, highly specialized carnivore in the face of this global threat. Some authors have suggested that terrestrial food consumption by polar bears will help them withstand sea-ice loss as they are forced to spend increasing amounts of time on land. Here, we evaluate the nutritional needs of polar bears as well as the physiological and environmental constraints that shape their use of terrestrial ecosystems. Only small numbers of polar bears have been documented consuming terrestrial foods even in modest quantities. Over much of the polar bear's range, limited terrestrial food availability supports only low densities of much smaller, resident brown bears (Ursus arctos), which use low-quality resources more efficiently and may compete with polar bears in these areas. Where consumption of terrestrial foods has been documented, polar bear body condition and survival rates have declined even as land use has increased. Thus far, observed consumption of terrestrial food by polar bears has been insufficient to offset lost ice-based hunting opportunities but can have ecological consequences for other species. Warming-induced loss of sea ice remains the primary threat faced by polar bears.

  13. The influence of load carrying on the energetics and kinematics of terrestrial locomotion in a diving bird.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Peter G; Lean, Samantha C; Rose, Kayleigh A R; Wadugodapitiya, Avanti P; Codd, Jonathan R

    2013-01-01

    The application of artificial loads to mammals and birds has been used to provide insight into the mechanics and energetic cost of terrestrial locomotion. However, only two species of bird have previously been used in loading experiments, the cursorial guinea fowl (Numida meleagris) and the locomotor-generalist barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis). Here, using respirometry and treadmill locomotion, we investigate the energetic cost of carrying trunk loads in a diving bird, the tufted duck (Aythya fuligula). Attachment of back loads equivalent to 10% and 20% of body mass increased the metabolic rate during locomotion (7.94% and 15.92%, respectively) while sternal loads of 5% and 10% had a greater proportional effect than the back loads (metabolic rate increased by 7.19% and 13.99%, respectively). No effect on locomotor kinematics was detected during any load carrying experiments. These results concur with previous reports of load carrying economy in birds, in that there is a less than proportional relationship between increasing load and metabolic rate (found previously in guinea fowl), while application of sternal loads causes an approximate doubling of metabolic rate compared to back loads (reported in an earlier study of barnacle geese). The increase in cost when carrying sternal loads may result from having to move this extra mass dorso-ventrally during respiration. Disparity in load carrying economy between species may arise from anatomical and physiological adaptations to different forms of locomotion, such as the varying uncinate process morphology and hindlimb tendon development in goose, guinea fowl and duck. PMID:24244861

  14. Aerospace Power Technology for Potential Terrestrial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Valerie J.

    2012-01-01

    Aerospace technology that is being developed for space and aeronautical applications has great potential for providing technical advances for terrestrial power systems. Some recent accomplishments arising from activities being pursued at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Centers is described in this paper. Possible terrestrial applications of the new aerospace technology are also discussed.

  15. Extensive local seabed disturbance, erosion and mass wasting on Alpha Ridge, Central Arctic Ocean

    E-print Network

    Kristoffersen, Yngve

    Ocean: possible evidence for an extra-terrestrial impact? Yngve Kristoffersen, John K. Hall, Kenneth evidence for an extra-terrestrial impact? Norwegian Journal of Geology, Vol 88, pp. 313-320. Trondheim 2008 changes are compatible with the effect of a shock wave from the impact of an extra-terrestrial body

  16. Application of bleach method in diagnosis of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Khubnani, Harish; Munjal, Kavita

    2005-10-01

    Extra pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) comprises 15% of the total tuberculosis cases. Bleach concentration method for demonstration of Acid fast bacilli (AFB) has been recently described for sputum. The aim of this study is to apply this method for demonstration of AFB in material obtained from extra-pulmonary sites and to correlate with cytology and conventional Ziehl Neelsen (Z N) staining. A total of 55 samples were studied from clinically suspected cases of extrapulmonary TB which included, FNA lymph nodes (17), abscesses drained from various body parts (18), body fluids (18) and skin scrapping (2). All the samples were processed for routine cytology, conventional ZN staining and bleach method followed by ZN staining. Out of 55 samples, 24(43.40%) were indicative of tuberculosis on cytology, 12(21.8%) were positive for AFB on conventional ZN staining, while the positivity increased to 39(70.90%) by Bleach method. Bleach solution is inexpensive and readily available in hospitals and its application has been proved in pulmonary tuberculosis. However to the best of our knowledge this is a pioneer study applied to the extra-pulmonary samples and the results of the present study shows improved detection of AFB. PMID:16366123

  17. Terrestrial Ages of Antarctic Meteorites- Update 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, Kunihiko; Welten, K. C.; Caffee, Marc W.

    1999-01-01

    We are continuing our ongoing study of cosmogenic nuclides in Antarctic meteorites. In addition to the studies of exposure histories of meteorites, we study terrestrial ages and pairing of Antarctic meteorites and desert meteorites. Terrestrial ages of Antarctic meteorites provide information on meteorite accumulation mechanisms, mean weathering lifetimes, and influx rates. The determination of Cl-36(half-life=3.01 x 10(exp 5) y) terrestrial ages is one of our long-term on-going projects, however, in many instances neither Cl-36 or C-14 (5,730 y) yields an accurate terrestrial age. Using Ca-14 (1.04 x 10(exp 5) y) for terrestrial age determinations solves this problem by filling the c,ap in half-life between 14-C and Cl-36 ages. We are now applying the new Ca-41- Cl-36 terrestrial age method as well as the Cl-36-Be-10 method to Antarctic meteorites. Our measurements and C-14 terrestrial age determinations by the University of Arizona group are always complementary. We have measured Cl-36 in over 270 Antarctic meteorites since our previous compilation of terrestrial ages. Since a large number of meteorites have been recovered from many different icefields in Antarctica, we continue to survey the trends of terrestrial ages for different icefields. We have also measured detailed terrestrial ages vs. sample locations for Allan Hills, Elephant Moraine, and Lewis Cliff Icefields, where meteorites have been found with very long ages. The updated histograms of terrestrial ages of meteorites from the Allan Hills Main Icefield and Lewis Cliff Icefield are shown. These figures include C-14 ages obtained by the University of Arizona group. Pairs of meteorites are shown as one object for which the age is the average of all members of the same fall. The width of the bars represents 70,000 years, which was a typical uncertainty for Cl-36 ages. We reduced the uncertainty of terrestrial age determinations to approx. 40,000 years by using pairs of nuclides such as Ca-41-Cl-36 or Cl-36-Be-10. Meteorites found at the Allan Hills Icefields are much older than any other meteorites. The terrestrial ages cover a wide range and are as old as 2 My. Many of the Lewis Cliff meteorites are as old as the Allan Hills meteorites. So far, no clear correlation has been found between the terrestrial ages and the locations of the Lewis Cliff meteorites.

  18. Methane production in terrestrial arthropods

    SciTech Connect

    Hackstein, J.H.P.; Stumm, C.K. )

    1994-06-07

    The authors have screened more than 110 representatives of the different taxa of terrestrial arthropods for methane production in order to obtain additional information about the origins of biogenic methane. Methanogenic bacteria occur in the hindguts of nearly all tropical representatives of millipedes (Diplopoda), cockroaches (Blattaria), termites (Isoptera), and scarab beetles (Scarabaeidae), while such methanogens are absent from 66 other arthropod species investigated. Three types of symbiosis were found: in the first type, the arthropod's hindgut is colonized by free methanogenic bacteria; in the second type, methanogens are closely associated with chitinous structures formed by the host's hindgut; the third type is mediated by intestinal anaerobic protists with intracellular methanogens. Such symbiotic associations are likely to be a characteristic property of the particular taxon. Since these taxa represent many families with thousands of species, the world populations of methane-producing arthropods constitute an enormous biomass. The authors show that arthropod symbionts can contribute substantially to atmospheric methane.

  19. Line following terrestrial insect biobots.

    PubMed

    Latif, Tahmid; Bozkurt, Alper

    2012-01-01

    The present day technology falls short in offering centimeter scale mobile robots that can function effectively under unknown and dynamic environmental conditions. Insects, on the other hand, exhibit an unmatched ability to navigate through a wide variety of environments and overcome perturbations by successfully maintaining control and stability. In this study, we use neural stimulation systems to wirelessly navigate cockroaches to follow lines to enable terrestrial insect biobots. We also propose a system-on-chip based ZigBee enabled wireless neurostimulation backpack system with on-board tissue-electrode bioelectrical coupling verification. Such a capability ensures an electrochemically safe stimulation and avoids irreversible damage to the interface which is often misinterpreted as habituation of the insect to the applied stimulation. PMID:23366056

  20. Methane production in terrestrial arthropods.

    PubMed Central

    Hackstein, J H; Stumm, C K

    1994-01-01

    We have screened more than 110 representatives of the different taxa of terrestrial arthropods for methane production in order to obtain additional information about the origins of biogenic methane. Methanogenic bacteria occur in the hindguts of nearly all tropical representatives of millipedes (Diplopoda), cockroaches (Blattaria), termites (Isoptera), and scarab beetles (Scarabaeidae), while such methanogens are absent from 66 other arthropod species investigated. Three types of symbiosis were found: in the first type, the arthropod's hindgut is colonized by free methanogenic bacteria; in the second type, methanogens are closely associated with chitinous structures formed by the host's hindgut; the third type is mediated by intestinal anaerobic protists with intracellular methanogens. Such symbiotic associations are likely to be a characteristic property of the particular taxon. Since these taxa represent many families with thousands of species, the world populations of methane-producing arthropods constitute an enormous biomass. We show that arthropod symbionts can contribute substantially to atmospheric methane. Images PMID:8202505

  1. Phytopharmacological overview of Tribulus terrestris

    PubMed Central

    Chhatre, Saurabh; Nesari, Tanuja; Somani, Gauresh; Kanchan, Divya; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2014-01-01

    Tribulus terrestris (family Zygophyllaceae), commonly known as Gokshur or Gokharu or puncture vine, has been used for a long time in both the Indian and Chinese systems of medicine for treatment of various kinds of diseases. Its various parts contain a variety of chemical constituents which are medicinally important, such as flavonoids, flavonol glycosides, steroidal saponins, and alkaloids. It has diuretic, aphrodisiac, antiurolithic, immunomodulatory, antidiabetic, absorption enhancing, hypolipidemic, cardiotonic, central nervous system, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antispasmodic, anticancer, antibacterial, anthelmintic, larvicidal, and anticariogenic activities. For the last few decades or so, extensive research work has been done to prove its biological activities and the pharmacology of its extracts. The aim of this review is to create a database for further investigations of the discovered phytochemical and pharmacological properties of this plant to promote research. This will help in confirmation of its traditional use along with its value-added utility, eventually leading to higher revenues from the plant. PMID:24600195

  2. Phytopharmacological overview of Tribulus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Chhatre, Saurabh; Nesari, Tanuja; Somani, Gauresh; Kanchan, Divya; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2014-01-01

    Tribulus terrestris (family Zygophyllaceae), commonly known as Gokshur or Gokharu or puncture vine, has been used for a long time in both the Indian and Chinese systems of medicine for treatment of various kinds of diseases. Its various parts contain a variety of chemical constituents which are medicinally important, such as flavonoids, flavonol glycosides, steroidal saponins, and alkaloids. It has diuretic, aphrodisiac, antiurolithic, immunomodulatory, antidiabetic, absorption enhancing, hypolipidemic, cardiotonic, central nervous system, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antispasmodic, anticancer, antibacterial, anthelmintic, larvicidal, and anticariogenic activities. For the last few decades or so, extensive research work has been done to prove its biological activities and the pharmacology of its extracts. The aim of this review is to create a database for further investigations of the discovered phytochemical and pharmacological properties of this plant to promote research. This will help in confirmation of its traditional use along with its value-added utility, eventually leading to higher revenues from the plant. PMID:24600195

  3. Insignificant solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Thomas, Jeremy N.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the claim that solar-terrestrial interaction, as measured by sunspots, solar wind velocity, and geomagnetic activity, might play a role in triggering earthquakes. We count the number of earthquakes having magnitudes that exceed chosen thresholds in calendar years, months, and days, and we order these counts by the corresponding rank of annual, monthly, and daily averages of the solar-terrestrial variables. We measure the statistical significance of the difference between the earthquake-number distributions below and above the median of the solar-terrestrial averages by ?2 and Student's t tests. Across a range of earthquake magnitude thresholds, we find no consistent and statistically significant distributional differences. We also introduce time lags between the solar-terrestrial variables and the number of earthquakes, but again no statistically significant distributional difference is found. We cannot reject the null hypothesis of no solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes.

  4. Terrestrial Planet Formation at Home and Abroad

    E-print Network

    Raymond, Sean N; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Morishima, Ryuji; Walsh, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    We review the state of the field of terrestrial planet formation with the goal of understanding the formation of the inner Solar System and low-mass exoplanets. We review the dynamics and timescales of accretion from planetesimals to planetary embryos and from embryos to terrestrial planets. We discuss radial mixing and water delivery, planetary spins and the importance of parameters regarding the disk and embryo properties. Next, we connect accretion models to exoplanets. We first explain why the observed hot Super Earths probably formed by in situ accretion or inward migration. We show how terrestrial planet formation is altered in systems with gas giants by the mechanisms of giant planet migration and dynamical instabilities. Standard models of terrestrial accretion fail to reproduce the inner Solar System. The "Grand Tack" model solves this problem using ideas first developed to explain the giant exoplanets. Finally, we discuss whether most terrestrial planet systems form in the same way as ours, and high...

  5. A Spherical Aerial Terrestrial Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Christopher J.

    This thesis focuses on the design of a novel, ultra-lightweight spherical aerial terrestrial robot (ATR). The ATR has the ability to fly through the air or roll on the ground, for applications that include search and rescue, mapping, surveillance, environmental sensing, and entertainment. The design centers around a micro-quadcopter encased in a lightweight spherical exoskeleton that can rotate about the quadcopter. The spherical exoskeleton offers agile ground locomotion while maintaining characteristics of a basic aerial robot in flying mode. A model of the system dynamics for both modes of locomotion is presented and utilized in simulations to generate potential trajectories for aerial and terrestrial locomotion. Details of the quadcopter and exoskeleton design and fabrication are discussed, including the robot's turning characteristic over ground and the spring-steel exoskeleton with carbon fiber axle. The capabilities of the ATR are experimentally tested and are in good agreement with model-simulated performance. An energy analysis is presented to validate the overall efficiency of the robot in both modes of locomotion. Experimentally-supported estimates show that the ATR can roll along the ground for over 12 minutes and cover the distance of 1.7 km, or it can fly for 4.82 minutes and travel 469 m, on a single 350 mAh battery. Compared to a traditional flying-only robot, the ATR traveling over the same distance in rolling mode is 2.63-times more efficient, and in flying mode the system is only 39 percent less efficient. Experimental results also demonstrate the ATR's transition from rolling to flying mode.

  6. The EXTraS project: Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreikenbohm, A.; Oertel, M.; Wilms, J.; DeLuca, A.; Haberl, F.; Greiner, J.; Delvaux, C.; Carpano, S.; Law-Green, D.; Rosen, S.

    2015-07-01

    Modern X-ray observatories can yield unique insights into time domain astrophysics. Indeed, a huge amount of information is already stored - and largely unexploited - in data archives. The EXTraS project harvests the hitherto unexplored temporal domain information buried in the serendipitous data collected by the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) instrument onboard the ESA XMM-Newton mission since its launch. This includes a search for fast transients, missed by standard image analysis, and a search and characterization of variability (both periodic and aperiodic) in hundreds of thousands of sources spanning more than nine orders of magnitude in time scale (from less than 1 s to 10 yr) and six orders of magnitude in flux (from 10(-9) to more than 10(-15) erg cm(-2) s(-1) in 0.2-12 keV). X-ray results are to be complemented by multiwavelength characterization of new discoveries. Phenomenological classification of variable sources will also be performed. Our final catalogue and results will be made available to the community, together with new analysis tools, at the end of the project (late 2016). EXTraS is funded within the EU/FP7-Cooperation Space framework and is carried out by a collaboration including INAF (Italy), IUSS (Italy), CNR/IMATI (Italy), University of Leicester (UK), MPE (Germany) and ECAP (Germany).

  7. The Extra-Zodiacal Explorer (EZE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Benson, S. W.; Fixsen, D. J.; Gardner, J. P.; Kruk, J. W.; Thronson, H. A.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a mission architecture study designed to substantially increase the potential science performance of the NASA SMD Astrophysics Explorer Program for all AO offerors working within the near-UV to far-infrared spectrum. We have demonstrated that augmentation of Falcon 9 Explorer launch services with a Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) stage can deliver a 700 kg science observatory payload to an extra-Zodiacal orbit. This new capability enables up to 10X increased photometric sensitivity and 150X increased observing speed relative to a Sun-Earth L2 or Earth-trailing orbit with no increase in telescope aperture. All enabling SEP stage technologies for this launch service augmentation have reached sufficient readiness (TRL-6) for Explorer Program application in conjunction with the Falcon 9. We demonstrate that enabling Astrophysics Explorers to reach extra-zodiacal orbit will allow this small payload program to rival the science performance of much larger long development time systems; thus, providing a means to realize major science objectives while increasing the SMD Astrophysics portfolio diversity and resiliency to external budget pressure. The SEP technology employed in this study has applicability to SMD Planetary competed missions and aligns with NASA in-space propulsion technology road map objectives and associated flight demonstration planning.

  8. Tidal Heating of Extra-Solar Planets

    E-print Network

    Brian Jackson; Richard Greenberg; Rory Barnes

    2008-02-29

    Extra-solar planets close to their host stars have likely undergone significant tidal evolution since the time of their formation. Tides probably dominated their orbital evolution once the dust and gas had cleared away, and as the orbits evolved there was substantial tidal heating within the planets. The tidal heating history of each planet may have contributed significantly to the thermal budget that governed the planet's physical properties, including its radius, which in many cases may be measured by observing transit events. Typically, tidal heating increases as a planet moves inward toward its star and then decreases as its orbit circularizes. Here we compute the plausible heating histories for several planets with measured radii, using the same tidal parameters for the star and planet that had been shown to reconcile the eccentricity distribution of close-in planets with other extra-solar planets. Several planets are discussed, including for example HD 209458 b, which may have undergone substantial tidal heating during the past billion years, perhaps enough to explain its large measured radius. Our models also show that GJ 876 d may have experienced tremendous heating and is probably not a solid, rocky planet. Theoretical models should include the role of tidal heating, which is large, but time-varying.

  9. Various approaches for vegetation filtering of terrestrial laser scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derron, M.-H.; Metzger, R.; Carrea, D.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2012-04-01

    Rock cliffs analysis from terrestrial Lidar data requires frequently to merge multiple scans or to compare successive scans to detect cm changes or displacements. This processing step is known by the name of alignment. The presence of vegetation in between the sensor and the rock face may strongly impair the accuracy of alignment. It is then recommended to remove the points backscattered by the vegetation from the original point cloud before to proceed to the alignment. This procedure, also known as scan cleaning, can be very tedious and time consuming (and may stupidly increase the overall processing cost). We propose here to compare preliminary semi-automatic methods to remove vegetation points in terrestrial Lidar dataset. Two types of methods were tested: 1) spatial methods based on the geometrical arrangement of points in the lidar point cloud, 2) spectral methods using information collected by an extra sensor coupled to the Lidar. For the spatial methods, vegetation and non-vegetation points are classified through a curvature index. Points on vegetation show a high curvature index, as the points captured by foliage do not show a clear structure. Curvature is computed by means of eigen values analysis of the local covariance matrix. Segmentation of the dataset based on Gaussian Mixture Modeling of eigenvectors distribution is also investigated. For the spectral methods, various camera were tested. A mixed visible-near infrared (600-900 nm) camera with a three bands sensor appeared to be the most efficient, chlorophyll reflectivity having a very specific signature in this range of wavelength. Moreover a standard SLR camera can be quite easily transformed for this purpose. As the type of vegetation and/or the light condition may vary a lot between datasets, semi-automatic methods (with user defined thresholds) appears to be the most efficient. Further works will include the coupling of both spatial and spectral information.

  10. FORMATION OF TERRESTRIAL PLANETS FROM PROTOPLANETS UNDER A REALISTIC ACCRETION CONDITION

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Eiichiro; Genda, Hidenori E-mail: genda@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2010-05-01

    The final stage of terrestrial planet formation is known as the giant impact stage where protoplanets collide with one another to form planets. So far this stage has been mainly investigated by N-body simulations with an assumption of perfect accretion in which all collisions lead to accretion. However, this assumption breaks for collisions with high velocity and/or a large impact parameter. We derive an accretion condition for protoplanet collisions in terms of impact velocity and angle and masses of colliding bodies, from the results of numerical collision experiments. For the first time, we adopt this realistic accretion condition in N-body simulations of terrestrial planet formation from protoplanets. We compare the results with those with perfect accretion and show how the accretion condition affects terrestrial planet formation. We find that in the realistic accretion model about half of collisions do not lead to accretion. However, the final number, mass, orbital elements, and even growth timescale of planets are barely affected by the accretion condition. For the standard protoplanetary disk model, typically two Earth-sized planets form in the terrestrial planet region over about 10{sup 8} yr in both realistic and perfect accretion models. We also find that for the realistic accretion model, the spin angular velocity is about 30% smaller than that for the perfect accretion model, which is as large as the critical spin angular velocity for rotational instability. The spin angular velocity and obliquity obey Gaussian and isotropic distributions, respectively, independently of the accretion condition.

  11. DECONVOLVING TERRESTRIAL ALTERATION MINERAL SPECTRAL SIGNATURES FROM METEORITE REFLECTANCE MEASUREMENTS

    E-print Network

    Hiroi, Takahiro

    shown terrestrial evaporitic carbonate and sulphate in Antartic me- teorites, the sources being of silicates, breakdown of glass, hydration, solution and car- bonation. The evaporites' terrestrial elements

  12. Analysis of reference gene stability after Israeli acute paralysis virus infection in bumblebees Bombus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jinzhi; Cappelle, Kaat; de Miranda, Joachim R; Smagghe, Guy; Meeus, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    To date, there are no validated internal reference genes for the normalization of RT-qPCR data from virus infection experiments with pollinating insects. In this study we evaluated the stability of five candidate internal reference genes: elongation factor-1-alpha (ELF1?), peptidylprolyl isomerase A (PPIA), 60S ribosomal protein L23 (RPL23), TATA-binding protein (TBP) and polyubiquitin (UBI), in relation to Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) infection of Bombus terrestris. We investigated the stability of these genes: in whole bodies and individual body parts, as well as in whole bodies collected at different time intervals after infection with IAPV. Our data identified PPIA as the single, most-optimal internal reference gene and the combination of PPAI-RPL23-UBI as a fully-sufficient multiple internal reference genes set for IAPV infection experiments in B. terrestris. PMID:24184950

  13. Cosmologically safe QCD axion as a present from extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yamada, Masaki; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a QCD axion model where the origin of PQ symmetry and suppression of axion isocurvature perturbations are explained by introducing an extra dimension. Each extra quark-antiquark pair lives on branes separately to suppress PQ breaking operators. The size of the extra dimension changes after inflation due to an interaction between inflaton and a bulk scalar field, which implies that the PQ symmetry can be drastically broken during inflation to suppress undesirable axion isocurvature fluctuations.

  14. Integrated Estimates of Global Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Allison M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

    2008-02-01

    Assessing the contribution of terrestrial carbon sequestration to international climate change mitigation requires integration across scientific and disciplinary boundaries. As part of a scenario analysis for the US Climate Change Technology Program, measurements and geographic data were used to develop terrestrial carbon sequestration estimates for agricultural soil carbon, reforestation and pasture management. These estimates were then applied in the MiniCAM integrated assessment model to evaluate mitigation strategies within policy and technology scenarios aimed at achieving atmospheric CO2 stabilization by 2100. Adoption of terrestrial sequestration practices is based on competition for land and economic markets for carbon. Terrestrial sequestration reach a peak combined rate of 0.5 to 0.7 Gt carbon yr-1 in mid-century with contributions from agricultural soil (0.21 Gt carbon yr-1), reforestation (0.31 Gt carbon yr-1) and pasture (0.15 Gt carbon yr-1). Sequestration rates vary over time period and with different technology and policy scenarios. The combined contribution of terrestrial sequestration over the next century ranges from 31 to 41 GtC. The contribution of terrestrial sequestration to mitigation is highest early in the century, reaching up to 20% of total carbon mitigation. This analysis provides insight into the behavior of terrestrial carbon mitigation options in the presence and absence of climate change mitigation policies.

  15. Spatial patterns of extra-pair paternity: beyond paternity gains and losses.

    PubMed

    Schlicht, Lotte; Valcu, Mihai; Kempenaers, Bart

    2015-03-01

    Most studies on extra-pair paternity (EPP) focus either on a specific male's extra-pair gains or his extra-pair losses. For an individual bird however, mate choice or mate availability may underlie strong spatial restrictions. Disregarding this spatial aspect may underestimate or mask effects of parameters influencing observed EPP patterns. Here, we propose a spatially explicit model for investigating the probability of having extra-pair offspring (EPO) within local networks of breeding pairs. The data set includes all realized and unrealized potential extra-pair matings. This method is biologically meaningful because it allows (a) considering both members of an extra-pair mating and their social mates, and (b) direct modelling of the spatial context in which extra-pair behaviour occurs. The method has the advantage that it can provide inference about the relative contribution of spatial and non-spatial parameters, and about the relative importance of male and female neighbourhoods. We apply this method to parentage data from 1025 broods collected over 12 breeding seasons in two independent study populations of blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus). We investigate a set of predictions based on the EPP literature, namely that EPP depends on male age and body size, breeding density and breeding synchrony. In all analyses, we control for breeding distance, a parameter that is expected to influence EPP even under random mating. The results show that older and larger males were more likely to sire EPO, but both effects decreased with increasing breeding distance. Local breeding density but not synchrony predicted whether a particular male-female combination had EPO, at least in one of the study areas. Apart from breeding distance, male age had the strongest effect on EPP, followed by a measure of breeding density. The method thus allows a comprehensive assessment of the relative importance of different types of spatial and non-spatial parameters to explain variation in the occurrence of EPP, while controlling for the fact that individuals that breed further apart are less likely to have EPO. The proposed approach is not limited to investigate EPP, but can be applied to other behavioural interactions between two individuals, such as dominance, competition and (social) mating. PMID:25266005

  16. Providing robotic assistance during extra-vehicular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burridge, Robert; Graham, Jeffrey

    2002-02-01

    Manned missions to other planetary bodies will rely heavily on robotics and automation to enhance the operational safety and capabilities of the crew. In particular, the movement and sensing capabilities of humans in spacesuits are severely constrained. Thus, an important class of robot will be those that accompany humans during extra-vehicular activity (EVA) and provide assistance -- tool transport, video documentation, sample collection, etc. In 1999, NASA engaged in a set of field tests in California called ASRO (AStronaut-ROver), in which a space-suited test subject collaborated with the tele-operated Marsokhod mobile robot, controlled by scientist at a remote location. From the lessons learned in the ASRO tests, the EVA Robotic Assistant project was started at NASA's Johnson Space Center to provide a testbed for continued research in astronaut-robot interaction and cooperation. In September 2000, NASA conducted two weeks of field tests in Arizona at three planetary surface analog sites. Three scenarios were tested requiring cooperation between a space-suited astronaut and the autonomous EVA Robotic Assistant: Power Cable Deployment, Solar Panel Deployment, and Geologist's Assistant. In this paper, we describe the ERA project in detail, and report on results from the Arizona field tests.

  17. Gamma ray lines from a universal extra dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, G.; Jackson, C. B.; Shaughnessy, G.; Tait, T. M.P.; Vallinotto, A.

    2012-03-01

    Indirect Dark Matter searches are based on the observation of secondary particles produced by the annihilation or decay of Dark Matter. Among them, gamma-rays are perhaps the most promising messengers, as they do not suffer deflection or absorption on Galactic scales, so their observation would directly reveal the position and the energy spectrum of the emitting source. Here, we study the detailed gamma-ray energy spectrum of Kaluza--Klein Dark Matter in a theory with 5 Universal Extra Dimensions. We focus in particular on the two body annihilation of Dark Matter particles into a photon and another particle, which produces monochromatic photons, resulting in a line in the energy spectrum of gamma rays. Previous calculations in the context of the five dimensional UED model have computed the line signal from annihilations into \\gamma \\gamma, but we extend these results to include \\gamma Z and \\gamma H final states. We find that these spectral lines are subdominant compared to the predicted \\gamma \\gamma signal, but they would be important as follow-up signals in the event of the observation of the \\gamma \\gamma line, in order to distinguish the 5d UED model from other theoretical scenarios.

  18. Gamma ray lines from a universal extra dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, Gianfranco; Jackson, C. B.; Shaughnessy, Gabe; Tait, Tim M.P.; Vallinotto, Alberto E-mail: cbjackson@uta.edu E-mail: ttait@uci.edu

    2012-03-01

    Indirect Dark Matter searches are based on the observation of secondary particles produced by the annihilation or decay of Dark Matter. Among them, gamma-rays are perhaps the most promising messengers, as they do not suffer deflection or absorption on Galactic scales, so their observation would directly reveal the position and the energy spectrum of the emitting source. Here, we study the detailed gamma-ray energy spectrum of Kaluza-Klein Dark Matter in a theory with 5 Universal Extra Dimensions. We focus in particular on the two body annihilation of Dark Matter particles into a photon and another particle, which produces monochromatic photons, resulting in a line in the energy spectrum of gamma rays. Previous calculations in the context of the five dimensional UED model have computed the line signal from annihilations into ??, but we extend these results to include ?Z and ?H final states. We find that these spectral lines are subdominant compared to the predicted ?? signal, but they would be important as follow-up signals in the event of the observation of the ?? line, in order to distinguish the 5d UED model from other theoretical scenarios.

  19. New aspects of physics with extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marfatia, Danny Mukund

    Several contemporary problems of fundamental physics including the gauge-hierarchy and cosmological constant problems can be addressed within the so-called ``brane world'' theories. Our primary focus is the investigation of the low energy consequences of such theories. We first consider the Kaluza-Klein scenario in which gravity propagates in the 4 + n dimensional bulk of spacetime and the Standard Model particles are confined to a 3-brane. We calculate the gauge boson self-energy corrections arising from the exchange of virtual gravitons and present our results in the STU-formalism. We find that the new physics contributions to S, T and U decouple in the limit that the string scale MS goes to infinity. The oblique parameters constrain the lower limit on MS. Taking the quantum gravity cutoff to be M S, S-parameter constraints impose MS > 1.55 TeV for n = 2 at the 1? level. T-parameter constraints impose MS > 1.25 (0.75) TeV for n = 3 (6). Next, we examine the cosmology and hierarchy of scales in models with branes immersed in a five-dimensional curved spacetime subject to radion stabilization. When the radion field is time-independent and the inter-brane spacing is stabilized, the universe can naturally find itself in the radiation-dominated epoch. This feature is independent of the form of the stabilizing potential. We recover the standard Friedmann equations without assuming a specific form for the bulk energy-momentum tensor. In the models considered, if the observable brane has positive tension, a solution to the hierarchy problem requires the presence of a negative tension brane somewhere in the bulk. We find that the string scale can be as low as the electroweak scale. Finally, we present static solutions to Einstein's equations corresponding to the most general network of N orthogonal families of (2 + N)-branes in (4 + N)- dimensional AdS spacetimes. The bulk cosmological constant can take a different value in each cell enclosed by intersecting branes and the extra dimensions can be compact or noncompact. In each family of branes the inter-brane spacing is arbitrary. The extra dimensions may be any or all of the manifolds, R1 R1Z2, S1 and S1Z 2. Only when the extra dimensions are R1 or/and R1Z2, can networks consisting solely of positive tension branes be constructed.

  20. Testing Extra Dimensions with Boundaries Using Newton's Law Modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, V. K.; Kleidis, K.

    Extra dimensions with boundaries are often used in the literature to provide phenomenological models that mimic the standard model. In this context, we explore possible modifications to Newton's law due to the existence of an extra-dimensional space, at the boundary of which the gravitational field obeys Dirichlet, Neumann or mixed boundary conditions. We focus on two types of extra space, namely, the disk and the interval. As we prove, in order to have a consistent Newton's law modification (i.e. of the Yukawa-type), some of the extra-dimensional spaces that have been used in the literature, must be ruled out.

  1. Behavioral correlates of extra-pair copulation in Indri indri.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, Giovanna; Torti, Valeria; Randrianarison, Rose Marie; Martinet, Nicole; Gamba, Marco; Giacoma, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Active pursuit of extra-pair mating has been reported for Indri indri, the socially monogamous largest living lemur. This study, conducted in a mountain rainforest in eastern Madagascar, presents the first evidence for extra-pair mating of indri and discusses the alternative mating strategy and alteration of the social, territorial, spatial, and vocal behavior of the adult female of a group of wild indris. Further studies may investigate whether extra-pair copulation is an attempt to breed with a partner of superior quality and thus lead to extra-pair paternity. If so, it could potentially play a role in maintaining genetic variability within a population. PMID:23921557

  2. Extra-Axial Medulloblastoma in the Cerebellar Hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eui Jin

    2014-01-01

    Extra-axial medulloblastoma is a rare phenomenon. We report a case in a 5-year-old boy who presented with nausea, vomiting, and gait disturbance. He was treated with total removal of the tumor. This is the first case of an extra-axially located medulloblastoma occurring in the cerebellar hemisphere posteriolateral to the cerebellopontine angle in Korea. Although the extra-axial occurrence of medulloblastoma is rare, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of extra-axial lesions of the posterior fossa in children. PMID:25237434

  3. Testing extra dimensions with boundaries using Newton's law modifications

    E-print Network

    V. K. Oikonomou; K. Kleidis

    2011-11-20

    Extra dimensions with boundaries are often used in the literature, to provide phenomenological models that mimic the standard model. In this context, we explore possible modifications to Newton's law due to the existence of an extra-dimensional space, at the boundary of which the gravitational field obeys Dirichlet, Neumann or mixed boundary conditions. We focus on two types of extra space, namely, the disk and the interval. As we prove, in order to have a consistent Newton's law modification (i.e., of the Yukawa-type), some of the extra-dimensional spaces that have been used in the literature, must be ruled out.

  4. Solar Terrestrial Physics: Present and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, D. M. (editor); Papadopoulos, K. (editor)

    1984-01-01

    The following topics relating to solar-terrestrial interactions are considered: (1) reconnection of magnetic fields; (2) particle acceleration; (3) solar magnetic flux; (4) magnetohydrodynamic waves and turbulence in the Sun and interplanetary medium; (5) coupling of the solar wind to the magnetosphere; (6) coronal transients; (7) the connection between the magnetosphere and ionosphere; (8) substorms in the magnetosphere; (9) solar flares and the solar terrestrial environment; (10) shock waves in the solar terrestrial environment; (11) plasma transport and convection at high latitudes; and (12) high latitude ionospheric structure.

  5. [Dark respiration of terrestrial vegetations: a review].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin-Wei; Yuan, Feng-Hui; Guan, De-Xin; Wu, Jia-Bing

    2013-06-01

    The source and sink effect of terrestrial plants is one of the hotspots in terrestrial ecosystem research under the background of global change. Dark respiration of terrestrial plants accounts for a large fraction of total net carbon balance, playing an important role in the research of carbon cycle under global climate change. However, there is little study on plant dark respiration. This paper summarized the physiological processes of plant dark respiration, measurement methods of the dark respiration, and the effects of plant biology and environmental factors on the dark respiration. The uncertainty of the dark respiration estimation was analyzed, and the future hotspots of related researches were pointed out. PMID:24066565

  6. Solar-terrestrial models and application software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, Dieter

    1990-01-01

    The empirical models related to solar-terrestrial sciences are listed and described which are available in the form of computer programs. Also included are programs that use one or more of these models for application specific purposes. The entries are grouped according to the region of the solar-terrestrial environment to which they belong and according to the parameter which they describe. Regions considered include the ionosphere, atmosphere, magnetosphere, planets, interplanetary space, and heliosphere. Also provided is the information on the accessibility for solar-terrestrial models to specify the magnetic and solar activity conditions.

  7. Probes Of Universal Extra Dimensions at Colliders

    E-print Network

    Thomas G. Rizzo

    2001-06-28

    In the Universal Extra Dimensions model of Appelquist, Cheng and Dobrescu, all of the Standard Model fields are placed in the bulk and thus have Kaluza-Klein(KK) excitations. These KK states can only be pair produced at colliders due to the tree-level conservation of KK number, with the lightest of them being stable and possibly having a mass as low as $\\simeq 350-400$ GeV. After calculating the contribution to $g-2$ in this model we investigate the production cross sections and signatures for these particles at both hadron and lepton colliders. We demonstrate that these signatures critically depend upon whether the lightest KK states remain stable or are allowed to decay by any of a number of new physics mechanisms. These mechanisms which induce KK decays are studied in detail.

  8. Proton radius puzzle and large extra dimensions

    E-print Network

    Li-Bang Wang; Wei-Tou Ni

    2013-05-23

    We propose a theoretical scenario to solve the proton radius puzzle which recently arises from the muonic hydrogen experiment. In this framework, 4 + n dimensional theory is incorporated with modified gravity. The extra gravitational interaction between the proton and muon at very short range provides an energy shift which accounts for the discrepancy between spectroscopic results from muonic and electronic hydrogen experiments. Assuming the modified gravity is a small perturbation to the existing electromagnetic interaction, we find the puzzle can be solved with stringent constraint on the range of the new force. Our result not only provides a possible solution to the proton radius puzzle but also suggest a direction to test new physics at very small length scale.

  9. [Extra-digestive manifestations of food allergy].

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, Y; Loeb, H

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal manifestations are the predominant symptoms of food allergy. Nevertheless, it is generally accepted that dietary proteins can also induce intestinal manifestations such as systemic reactions or symptoms related to the skin, the respiratory tract, the central nervous system, the urinary tract, the vascular system, the joints. The cause-effect relationships between the contact with the dietary protein (e.g. it is unclear if direct skin contact is more relevant in patients with cutaneous manifestations than ingestion) and the symptoms if often difficult to prove. As a consequence, the number of "extra-intestinal" manifestations that are suggested to be related to food proteins is probably greater than the number of manifestations that are generally accepted as such. PMID:8087223

  10. Brane Stabilization and Regionality of Extra Dimensions

    E-print Network

    David M. Jacobs; Glenn D. Starkman; Andrew J. Tolley

    2014-10-19

    Extra dimensions are a common feature of beyond the Standard Model physics. In a braneworld scenario, local physics on the brane can depend strongly on the brane's location within the bulk. Generically, the relevant properties of the bulk manifold for the physics on/of the brane are neither local nor global, but depend on the structure of finite regions of the bulk, even for locally homogeneous and isotropic bulk geometries. In a recent work, various mechanisms (in a braneworld context) were considered to stabilize the location of a brane within bulk spaces of non-trivial topology. In this work we elaborate on and generalize that work by considering additional bulk and brane dimensionalities as well as different boundary conditions on the bulk scalar field that provides a Casimir force on the brane, providing further insight on this effect. In D=2+1 (D=5+1) we consider both local and global contributions to the effective potential of a 1-brane (4-brane) wrapped around both the 2-dimensional hyperbolic horn and Euclidean cone, which are used as toy models of an extra-dimensional manifold. We calculate the total energy due to brane tension and elastic energy (extrinsic curvature) as well as that due to the Casimir energy of a bulk scalar satisfying both Dirchlet and Neumann boundary conditions on the brane. In some cases stable minima of the potential are found that result from the competition of at least two of the contributions. Generically, any one of these effects may be sufficient when the bulk space has less symmetry than the manifolds considered here. We highlight the importance of the Casimir effect for the purpose of brane stabilization.

  11. Terrestrial Energy Storage SPS Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Terrestrial energy storage systems for the SSP system were evaluated that could maintain the 1.2 GW power level during periods of brief outages from the solar powered satellite (SPS). Short-term outages of ten minutes and long-term outages up to four hours have been identified as "typical" cases where the ground-based energy storage system would be required to supply power to the grid. These brief interruptions in transmission could result from performing maintenance on the solar power satellite or from safety considerations necessitating the power beam be turned off. For example, one situation would be to allow for the safe passage of airplanes through the space occupied by the beam. Under these conditions, the energy storage system needs to be capable of storing 200 MW-hrs and 4.8 GW-hrs, respectively. The types of energy storage systems to be considered include compressed air energy storage, inertial energy storage, electrochemical energy storage, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and pumped hydro energy storage. For each of these technologies, the state-of-the-art in terms of energy and power densities were identified as well as the potential for scaling to the size systems required by the SSP system. Other issues addressed included the performance, life expectancy, cost, and necessary infrastructure and site locations for the various storage technologies.

  12. Terrestrial cooling and solar variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agee, E. M.

    1982-01-01

    Observational evidence from surface temperature records is presented and discussed which suggests a significant cooling trend over the Northern Hemisphere from 1940 to the present. This cooling trend is associated with an increase of the latitudinal gradient of temperature and the lapse rate, as predicted by climate models with decreased solar input and feedback mechanisms. Evidence suggests that four of these 80- to 100-year cycles of global surface temperature fluctuation may have occurred, and in succession, from 1600 to the present. Interpretation of sunspot activity were used to infer a direct thermal response of terrestrial temperature to solar variability on the time scale of the Gleissberg cycle (90 years, an amplitude of the 11-year cycles). A physical link between the sunspot activity and the solar parameter is hypothesized. Observations of sensible heat flux by stationary planetary waves and transient eddies, as well as general circulation modeling results of these processes, were examined from the viewpoint of the hypothesis of cooling due to reduced insolation.

  13. Emissions From the Terrestrial Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedinmyer, C.; Guenther, A.; Belote, A.; Klos, K.

    2004-12-01

    The terrestrial biosphere plays a critical role in the functioning of the earth system. Vegetation emits significant amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and aerosols to the atmosphere through several pathways that include physiological and biochemical processes and disturbances such as wildfire and herbivory. Biogenic VOC emissions can affect chemical processes that determine air quality and control the lifetimes of longer lived chemical species. Direct aerosol emissions from vegetation and wildfires and secondary aerosols formed by biogenic VOC can impact public health, change cloud properties, and control climate processes. Biogenic emissions play a critical role in many atmospheric and biogeochemical processes. Therefore, to realistically simulate the earth system, including air quality and climate, reasonable estimates of biogenic emissions must be included in those simulations. This paper presents an overview of biogenic emissions from undisturbed vegetation and from wildfire. Models that simulate these emissions have been developed to create inputs for regional and global chemical transport models and for climate models. Despite the success in biogenic emission model development, technical challenges for such modeling still exist. Biogenic emission models use a variety of input information, including satellite data, field observations, and output from other models (e.g. NCEP, MM5, WRF). These inputs have a variety of spatial and temporal resolutions and are available in many different formats. Several of the challenges encountered when modeling biogenic emissions will be addressed, including difficulties in applying different input datasets due to format, size, and spatial resolution and limitations in software that hinder the processing of emission estimates.

  14. Terrestrial Planet Finder: science overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; Beichman, C. A.

    2004-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) seeks to revolutionize our understanding of humanity's place in the universe - by searching for Earth-like planets using reflected light, or thermal emission in the mid-infrared. Direct detection implies that TPF must separate planet light from glare of the nearby star, a technical challenge which has only in recent years been recognized as surmountable. TPF will obtain a low-resolution spectra of each planets it detects, providing some of its basic physical characteristics and its main atmospheric constituents, thereby allowing us to assess the likelihood that habitable conditions exist there. NASA has decided the scientific importance of this research is so high that TPF will be pursued as two complementary space observatories: a visible-light coronagraph and a mid-infrared formation flying interferometer. The combination of spectra from both wavebands is much more valuable than either taken separately, and it will allow a much fuller understanding of the wide diversity of planetary atmospheres that may be expected to exist. Measurements across a broad wavelength range will yield not only physical properties such as size and albedo, but will also serve as the foundations of a reliable and robust assessment of habitability and the presence of life.

  15. Bibliography of terrestrial impact structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grolier, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    This bibliography lists 105 terrestrial impact structures, of which 12 are proven structures, that is, structures associated with meteorites, and 93 are probable. Of the 93 probable structures, 18 are known to contain rocks with meteoritic components or to be enriched in meteoritic signature-elements, both of which enhance their probability of having originated by impact. Many of the structures investigated in the USSR to date are subsurface features that are completely or partly buried by sedimentary rocks. At least 16 buried impact structures have already been identified in North America and Europe. No proven nor probable submarine impact structure rising above the ocean floor is presently known; none has been found in Antarctica or Greenland. An attempt has been made to cite for each impact structure all literature published prior to mid-1983. The structures are presented in alphabetical order by continent, and their geographic distribution is indicated on a sketch map of each continent in which they occur. They are also listed tables in: (1) alphabetical order, (2) order of increasing latitude, (3) order of decreasing diameter, and (4) order of increasing geologic age.

  16. Steroidal saponins from Tribulus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Kang, Li-Ping; Wu, Ke-Lei; Yu, He-Shui; Pang, Xu; Liu, Jie; Han, Li-Feng; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yang; Xiong, Cheng-Qi; Song, Xin-Bo; Liu, Chao; Cong, Yu-Wen; Ma, Bai-Ping

    2014-11-01

    Sixteen steroidal saponins, including seven previously unreported compounds, were isolated from Tribulus terrestris. The structures of the saponins were established using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and chemical methods. They were identified as: 26-O-?-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-furost-4-en-2?,3?,22?,26-tetrol-12-one (terrestrinin C), 26-O-?-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-furost-4-en-22?,26-diol-3,12-dione (terrestrinin D), 26-O-?-d-glucopyranosyl-(25S)-furost-4-en-22?,26-diol-3,6,12-trione (terrestrinin E), 26-O-?-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-5?-furostan-3?,22?,26-triol-12-one (terrestrinin F), 26-O-?-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-furost-4-en-12?,22?,26-triol-3-one (terrestrinin G), 26-O-?-d-glucopyranosyl-(1?6)-?-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-furost-4-en-22?,26-diol-3,12-dione (terrestrinin H), and 24-O-?-d-glucopyranosyl-(25S)-5?-spirostan-3?,24?-diol-12-one-3-O-?-d-glucopyranosyl-(1?4)-?-d-galactopyranoside (terrestrinin I). The isolated compounds were evaluated for their platelet aggregation activities. Three of the known saponins exhibited strong effects on the induction of platelet aggregation. PMID:25172515

  17. Evolutionary Model of Species Body Mass Diversification A. Clauset 1, # and S. Redner 2, 1, +

    E-print Network

    Redner, Sidney

    for the biological evolution of species body masses within large groups of related species, e.g., terrestrial mammals our focus is on terrestrial mammal evolution, this model can, in principle, be applied to any group#usion, and an extinction probability that increases logarith­ mically with mass. We describe this evolution in terms

  18. Extra Solar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph and Science Requirements for the James Webb Telescope Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark

    2004-01-01

    1) Extra solar planetary imaging coronagraph. Direct detection and characterization of Jovian planets, and other gas giants, in orbit around nearby stars is a necessary precursor to Terrestrial Planet Finder 0 in order to estimate the probability of Terrestrial planets in our stellar neighborhood. Ground based indirect methods are biased towards large close in Jovian planets in solar systems unlikely io harbor Earthlike planets. Thus to estimate the relative abundances of terrestrial planets and to determine optimal observing strategies for TPF a pathfinder mission would be desired. The Extra-Solar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is such a pathfinder mission. Upto 83 stellar systems are accessible with a 1.5 meter unobscured telescope and coronagraph combination located at the Earth-Sun L2 point. Incorporating radiometric and angular resolution considerations show that Jovians could be directly detected (5 sigma) in the 0.5 - 1.0 micron band outside of an inner working distance of 5/D with integration times of -10 - 100 hours per observation. The primary considerations for a planet imager are optical wavefront quality due to manufacturing, alignment, structural and thermal considerations. pointing stability and control, and manufacturability of coronagraphic masks and stops to increase the planetary-to- stellar contrast and mitigate against straylight. Previously proposed coronagraphic concepts are driven to extreme tolerances. however. we have developed and studied a mission, telescope and coronagraphic detection concept, which is achievable in the time frame of a Discovery class NASA mission. 2) Science requirements for the James Webb Space Telescope observatory. The James Webb Space Observatory (JWST) is an infrared observatory, which will be launched in 201 1 to an orbit at L2. JWST is a segmented, 18 mirror segment telescope with a diameter of 6.5 meters, and a clear aperture of 25 mA2. The telescope is designed to conduct imaging and spectroscopic observations from 0.6-27 microns. The primary mirror find and understand predicted first light objects, observe galaxies back to their earliest precursors so that we can understand their growth and evolution, unravel the birth and early evolution of stars and planetary systems, and study planetary systems and the origins of life. In this paper we discuss the science goals for JWST in the context of the performance requirements they levy on the observatory.

  19. Imaging exo-solar planetary systems with Terrestrial Planet Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eatchel, Andrew Lynn

    The concept of building a space based telescope capable of directly imaging extra-solar planetary systems has been in existence for more than a decade. While the basic ideas of how such an instrument might work have already been discussed in the literature, specific details of the design have not been addressed that will enable a telescope of this class to be functionally realized. A straw man configuration of the instrument is examined here for its ability to acquire data of sufficient informational content and quality to produce images and spectra of distant planetary systems and to find what technical problems arise from analyzing the interferograms it delivers. Computer programs that simulate the signals expected to be produced by a structurally connected instrument (SCI) version of Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and reconstruct images from those signals will be presented along with programs that extract planetary parameters. An abbreviated radiometric performance analysis will also be provided that will assist astronomers in designing an appropriate mission.

  20. Science with the EXTraS Project: Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky

    E-print Network

    De Luca, A; Tiengo, A; D'Agostino, D; Watson, M G; Haberl, F

    2015-01-01

    The EXTraS project (Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky) will characterise the temporal behaviour of the largest ever sample of objects in the soft X-ray range (0.1-12 keV) with a complex, systematic and consistent analysis of all data collected by the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) instrument onboard the ESA XMM-Newton X-ray observatory since its launch. We will search for, and characterize variability (both periodic and aperiodic) in hundreds of thousands of sources spanning more than nine orders of magnitude in time scale and six orders of magnitude in flux. We will also search for fast transients, missed by standard image analysis. Our analysis will be completed by multiwavelength characterization of new discoveries and phenomenological classification of variable sources. All results and products will be made available to the community in a public archive, serving as a reference for a broad range of astrophysical investigations.

  1. The Geology of the Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H. (editor); Saunders, R. S.; Strom, R. G.; Wilhelms, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    The geologic history of the terrestrial planets is outlined in light of recent exploration and the revolution in geologic thinking. Among the topics considered are planet formation; planetary craters, basins, and general surface characteristics; tectonics; planetary atmospheres; and volcanism.

  2. Space Vehicle Terrestrial Environment Design Requirements Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dale L.; Keller, Vernon W.; Vaughan, William W.

    2006-01-01

    The terrestrial environment is an important driver of space vehicle structural, control, and thermal system design. NASA is currently in the process of producing an update to an earlier Terrestrial Environment Guidelines for Aerospace Vehicle Design and Development Handbook. This paper addresses the contents of this updated handbook, with special emphasis on new material being included in the areas of atmospheric thermodynamic models, wind dynamics, atmospheric composition, atmospheric electricity, cloud phenomena, atmospheric extremes, and sea state. In addition, the respective engineering design elements are discussed relative to terrestrial environment inputs that require consideration. Specific lessons learned that have contributed to the advancements made in the application and awareness of terrestrial environment inputs for aerospace engineering applications are presented.

  3. AIR POLLUTION EFFECTS ON TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents information on the effects of ozone, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, particulate matter, and acidic disposition on terrestrial ecosystems. A brief explanation of ecosystem dynamics is presented to provide a framework for discussion of air pollutant effects. D...

  4. Update on terrestrial ages of Antarctic meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Elmore, D.; Kubik, P. W.

    1989-07-01

    Cosmic-ray produced Cl-36 (half-life = 3.01 x 10 to the 5th years) has been measured in 90 Antarctic meteorites by accelerator mass spectrometry. The terrestrial ages of the meteorites were calculated from the results. After excluding possible paired objects, 138 terrestrial ages from 18 different locations are available from C-14, Kr-81, and Cl-36 measurements for application to Antarctic meteorite and glaciological studies. The terrestrial ages of Allan Hills meteorites vary from 2000 years to 1 million years and are clearly longer than those of Yamato meteorites and other Antarctic meteorites. The oldest Allan Hills meteorites were found close to the eastern edge and in the southeast of the main icefield. Among all Antarctic meteorites measured to date, only L and LL chondrites have terrestrial ages older than 370,000 years.

  5. Global Change and the Terrestrial Biosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Alistair

    2009-04-22

    Terrestrial ecosystems sustain life on Earth through the production of food, fuel, fiber, clean air, and naturally purified water. But how will agriculture and ecosystems be affected by global change? Rogers describes the impact of projected climate change on the terrestrial biosphere and explains why plants are not just passive respondents to global change, but play an important role in determining the rate of change.

  6. The NASA-Lewis terrestrial photovoltaics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, D. T.

    1974-01-01

    Those parts of the present NASA-Lewis research and technology effort on solar cells and arrays having relevance to terrestrial uses are outlined. These include raising cell efficiency, developing the FEP-covered module concept, and exploring low-cost cell concepts. Solar cell-battery power systems for remote weather stations have been built to demonstrate the capabilities of solar cells for terrestrial applications.

  7. Body Basics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... more about how the body works, what basic human anatomy is, and what happens when parts of the body don't function properly. Blood Bones, Muscles, and Joints Brain and Nervous System Digestive System Endocrine System Eyes Female Reproductive System Heart and Circulatory System Immune ...

  8. Update on terrestrial ages of Antarctic meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Welten, K C; Nishiizumi, K; Caffee, M W

    2000-01-14

    Terrestrial ages of Antarctic meteorites are one of the few parameters that will help us to understand the meteorite concentration mechanism on blue-ice fields. Traditionally, terrestrial ages were determined on the basis of {sup 36}Cl in the metal phase, which has an uncertainty of about 70 ky. For young meteorites (< 40 ky), the terrestrial age is usually and most accurately determined using {sup 14}C in the stone phase. In recent years two methods have been developed which are independent of shielding effects, the {sup 10}Be-{sup 36}Cl/{sup 10}Be method and the {sup 41}Ca/{sup 36}Cl method. These methods have reduced the typical uncertainties in terrestrial ages by a factor of 2, to about 30 ky. The {sup 10}Be-{sup 36}Cl/{sup 10}Be method is quite dependent on the exposure age, which is unknown for most Antarctic meteorites. The authors therefore also attempt to use the relation between {sup 26}Al and {sup 36}Cl/{sup 26}Al to derive a terrestrial age less dependent on the exposure age. The authors have measured the concentrations of cosmogenic {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 36}Cl in the metal phase of {approximately} 70 Antarctic meteorites, from more than 10 different ice-fields, including many new ones. They then discuss the trends in terrestrial ages of meteorites from different ice-fields.

  9. Microbarom Sources from Tropical and Extra-tropical Cyclones

    E-print Network

    Microbarom Sources from Tropical and Extra-tropical Cyclones Justin E. Stopa Co with similar frequencies most commonly generated in the lee of extra-tropical and tropical cyclones. The generation of microbaroms from within a tropical cyclone is demonstrated by the use of a parametric wind

  10. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate per clean kilogram shall be filed in...

  11. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate per clean kilogram shall be filed in...

  12. 23 CFR 635.120 - Changes and extra work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Changes and extra work. 635.120 Section 635.120 Highways... CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE Contract Procedures § 635.120 Changes and extra work. (a) Following authorization... work shall have formal approval by the Division Administrator in advance of their effective...

  13. 23 CFR 635.120 - Changes and extra work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Changes and extra work. 635.120 Section 635.120 Highways... CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE Contract Procedures § 635.120 Changes and extra work. (a) Following authorization... work shall have formal approval by the Division Administrator in advance of their effective...

  14. 23 CFR 635.120 - Changes and extra work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Changes and extra work. 635.120 Section 635.120 Highways... CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE Contract Procedures § 635.120 Changes and extra work. (a) Following authorization... work shall have formal approval by the Division Administrator in advance of their effective...

  15. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... United States Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra... “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of one variety (except when more...visible water core, and broken skins. The apples are also free from injury caused...

  16. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... United States Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra... “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of one variety (except when more...visible water core, and broken skins. The apples are also free from injury caused...

  17. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... United States Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra... “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of one variety (except when more...visible water core, and broken skins. The apples are also free from injury caused...

  18. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... United States Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra... “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of one variety (except when more...visible water core, and broken skins. The apples are also free from injury caused...

  19. 46 CFR Sec. 8 - Extra work and changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Extra work and changes. Sec. 8 Section 8 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 8 Extra work and changes. (a) At any time...

  20. 46 CFR Sec. 8 - Extra work and changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Extra work and changes. Sec. 8 Section 8 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 8 Extra work and changes. (a) At any time...

  1. Quantifying inbreeding avoidance through extra-pair reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Jane M; Arcese, Peter; Keller, Lukas F; Germain, Ryan R; Duthie, A Bradley; Losdat, Sylvain; Wolak, Matthew E; Nietlisbach, Pirmin

    2015-01-01

    Extra-pair reproduction is widely hypothesized to allow females to avoid inbreeding with related socially paired males. Consequently, numerous field studies have tested the key predictions that extra-pair offspring are less inbred than females’ alternative within-pair offspring, and that the probability of extra-pair reproduction increases with a female's relatedness to her socially paired male. However, such studies rarely measure inbreeding or relatedness sufficiently precisely to detect subtle effects, or consider biases stemming from failure to observe inbred offspring that die during early development. Analyses of multigenerational song sparrow (Melospiza melodia) pedigree data showed that most females had opportunity to increase or decrease the coefficient of inbreeding of their offspring through extra-pair reproduction with neighboring males. In practice, observed extra-pair offspring had lower inbreeding coefficients than females’ within-pair offspring on average, while the probability of extra-pair reproduction increased substantially with the coefficient of kinship between a female and her socially paired male. However, simulations showed that such effects could simply reflect bias stemming from inbreeding depression in early offspring survival. The null hypothesis that extra-pair reproduction is random with respect to kinship therefore cannot be definitively rejected in song sparrows, and existing general evidence that females avoid inbreeding through extra-pair reproduction requires reevaluation given such biases. PMID:25346331

  2. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate per clean kilogram shall be filed in...

  3. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate per clean kilogram shall be filed in...

  4. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate per clean kilogram shall be filed in...

  5. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra Fancy. “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of..., scab, freezing injury, visible water core, and broken skins. The apples are also free from injury... rubs, hail, drought spots, scars, disease, insects, or other means. The apples are free from...

  6. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra Fancy. “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of one variety (except when more than one variety is printed on... apples are also free from injury caused by bruises, brown surface discoloration, smooth...

  7. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra Fancy. “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of one variety (except when more than one variety is printed on... apples are also free from injury caused by bruises, brown surface discoloration, smooth...

  8. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra Fancy. “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of..., scab, freezing injury, visible water core, and broken skins. The apples are also free from injury... rubs, hail, drought spots, scars, disease, insects, or other means. The apples are free from...

  9. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra Fancy. “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of..., scab, freezing injury, visible water core, and broken skins. The apples are also free from injury... rubs, hail, drought spots, scars, disease, insects, or other means. The apples are free from...

  10. Interrupted extra-ovular infusion may not be reversible.

    PubMed

    Blickstein, I; Goldchmit, R; Ben-Hur, H

    1992-12-01

    Late abortion ensued 9 days after discontinuation of extra-ovular PGE2 infusion for mid-trimester termination of pregnancy in a 15-year-old unmarried primigravida. This observation, which has no precedent in the literature, may suggest that once extra-ovular PG infusion has been started, its discontinuation may not be considered reversible. PMID:1290336

  11. Phosphatidylcholine composition of pulmonary surfactant from terrestrial and marine diving mammals.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Danielle B; Fahlman, Andreas; Gardner, Manuela; Kleinhenz, Danielle; Piscitelli, Marina; Raverty, Stephen; Haulena, Martin; Zimba, Paul V

    2015-06-01

    Marine mammals are repeatedly exposed to elevated extra-thoracic pressure and alveolar collapse during diving and readily experience alveolar expansion upon inhalation - a unique capability as compared to terrestrial mammals. How marine mammal lungs overcome the challenges of frequent alveolar collapse and recruitment remains unknown. Recent studies indicate that pinniped lung surfactant has more anti-adhesive components compared to terrestrial mammals, which would aid in alveolar opening. However, pulmonary surfactant composition has not yet been investigated in odontocetes, whose physiology and diving behavior differ from pinnipeds. The aim of this study was to investigate the phosphatidylcholine (PC) composition of lung surfactants from various marine mammals and compare these to a terrestrial mammal. We found an increase in anti-adhesive PC species in harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) compared to dog (Canus lupus familiaris), as well as an increase in the fluidizing PCs 16:0/14:0 and 16:0/16:1 in pinnipeds compared to odontocetes. The harbor porpoise (a representative of the odontocetes) did not have higher levels of fluidizing PCs compared to dog. Our preliminary results support previous findings that pinnipeds may have adapted unique surfactant compositions that allow them to dive at high pressures for extended periods without adverse effects. Future studies will need to investigate the differences in other surfactant components to fully assess the surfactant composition in odontocetes. PMID:25812797

  12. Possible climates on terrestrial exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Forget, F; Leconte, J

    2014-04-28

    What kind of environment may exist on terrestrial planets around other stars? In spite of the lack of direct observations, it may not be premature to speculate on exoplanetary climates, for instance, to optimize future telescopic observations or to assess the probability of habitable worlds. To begin with, climate primarily depends on (i) the atmospheric composition and the volatile inventory; (ii) the incident stellar flux; and (iii) the tidal evolution of the planetary spin, which can notably lock a planet with a permanent night side. The atmospheric composition and mass depends on complex processes, which are difficult to model: origins of volatiles, atmospheric escape, geochemistry, photochemistry, etc. We discuss physical constraints, which can help us to speculate on the possible type of atmosphere, depending on the planet size, its final distance for its star and the star type. Assuming that the atmosphere is known, the possible climates can be explored using global climate models analogous to the ones developed to simulate the Earth as well as the other telluric atmospheres in the solar system. Our experience with Mars, Titan and Venus suggests that realistic climate simulators can be developed by combining components, such as a 'dynamical core', a radiative transfer solver, a parametrization of subgrid-scale turbulence and convection, a thermal ground model and a volatile phase change code. On this basis, we can aspire to build reliable climate predictors for exoplanets. However, whatever the accuracy of the models, predicting the actual climate regime on a specific planet will remain challenging because climate systems are affected by strong positive feedbacks. They can drive planets with very similar forcing and volatile inventory to completely different states. For instance, the coupling among temperature, volatile phase changes and radiative properties results in instabilities, such as runaway glaciations and runaway greenhouse effect. PMID:24664919

  13. Influence of Tribulus terrestris on testicular enzyme in fresh water ornamental fish Poecilia latipinna.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, P; Subramanian, P

    2011-12-01

    The influence of Tribulus terrestris on the activities of testicular enzyme in Poecilia latipinna was assessed in lieu of reproductive manipulation. Different concentrations of (100, 150, 200, 250, and 300 mg) Tribulus terrestris extract and of a control were tested for testicular activity of enzymes in Poecilia latipinna for 2 months. The testis and liver were homogenized separately in 0.1 mol/l potassium phosphate buffer (0.1 mol/l, pH 7.2). The crude homogenate was centrifuged, and supernatant obtained was used as an enzyme extract for determination of activities. The activities of testicular functional enzyme ALP, ACP, SDH, LDH, and G6PDH levels were changed to different extent in treated groups compared with that of the control. The total body weight and testis weight were increased with the Tribulus terrestris-treated fish (Poecilia latipinna). These results suggest that Tribulus terrestris induced the testicular enzyme activity that may aid in the male reproductive functions. It is discernible from the present study that Tribulus terrestris has the inducing effect on reproductive system of Poecilia latipinna. PMID:21424528

  14. Core Shadow Zones of Terrestrial Planets and Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohl, F.; Knapmeyer, M.; Gassner, L.; Lange, C.; Wagner, F. W.

    2011-12-01

    The internal dynamics of a planetary core is strongly dependent on its total radius. The volume/surface ratio of a planetary core is linked directly to the outgoing heat flux, which is also an indicator for the element partition between the surrounding mantle and the core. The determination of the core radius is thus an elementary step to better understand the origin and evolution of a planetary body. An observable that has been shown to serve as indicator for core size is the extent of the seismological (P-wave-) core shadow. It appears that the variation of seismic velocities with depth is dominated by quadratic terms, if not an essentially depth independent velocity can be assumed. The observed and predicted core shadow extents of many terrestrial planet models, computed as function of the relative core radius, thus align closely to the analytically derived function for objects with constant velocity profiles. The heavier solar system terrestrial planets, especially Venus and Earth, show the largest deviation from the relation between core radius and shadow width that holds for small bodies. For terrestrial planets more massive than Earth, as found for several exoplanets, the increasing internal pressure would cause increased curvature of tentative seismic rays and thus a more pronounced excursion from the relation for bodies with depth-independent elastic parameters. For Titan, a geophysical network has been suggested as a follow up to the highly successful Cassini-Huygens mission that is currently orbiting Saturn. Titan belongs to the class of weakly differentiated icy moons, which consist of an icy crust, underlain by a deep internal ocean and a central ice-rock body. Unlike any other moon in the solar system, Titan has a thick atmosphere that gives rise to surface processes resembling those on Earth. The goal of the proposed network is an improved understanding of the interactions between atmosphere, surficial ice and a putative subsurface water ocean. Key parameters for these processes are the thickness of the ice shell and the depth of the subsurface ocean. Due to the proximity of its massive parent body, Saturn, Titan is subject to significant tidal stresses that most likely cause tidally driven seismicity. Moreover, cryovolcanic activity may also be accompanied by seismic stress release. Technically, a subsurface water ocean has the same shadowing effect for elastic waves as a liquid iron core. It is thus possible to infer the ice shell thickness from the extent of this shadow zone. Also, the shadowing effect should be considered as a limiting factor for the planning of seismic network geometry. With a radius of 2575 km and the observed incomplete differentiation, the interior of Titan is likely not dominated by pressure effects and can be modeled adequately using layers of constant seismic properties. Thus the relation between outer ice shell thickness and the extent of the resulting P wave shadow fits nicely into the pattern that emerged for the terrestrial planet models.

  15. Lunar and terrestrial planet formation in the Grand Tack scenario

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, S. A.; Morbidelli, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present conclusions from a large number of N-body simulations of the giant impact phase of terrestrial planet formation. We focus on new results obtained from the recently proposed Grand Tack model, which couples the gas-driven migration of giant planets to the accretion of the terrestrial planets. The giant impact phase follows the oligarchic growth phase, which builds a bi-modal mass distribution within the disc of embryos and planetesimals. By varying the ratio of the total mass in the embryo population to the total mass in the planetesimal population and the mass of the individual embryos, we explore how different disc conditions control the final planets. The total mass ratio of embryos to planetesimals controls the timing of the last giant (Moon-forming) impact and its violence. The initial embryo mass sets the size of the lunar impactor and the growth rate of Mars. After comparing our simulated outcomes with the actual orbits of the terrestrial planets (angular momentum deficit, mass concentration) and taking into account independent geochemical constraints on the mass accreted by the Earth after the Moon-forming event and on the time scale for the growth of Mars, we conclude that the protoplanetary disc at the beginning of the giant impact phase must have had most of its mass in Mars-sized embryos and only a small fraction of the total disc mass in the planetesimal population. From this, we infer that the Moon-forming event occurred between approximately 60 and approximately 130?Myr after the formation of the first solids and was caused most likely by an object with a mass similar to that of Mars. PMID:25114304

  16. Lunar and terrestrial planet formation in the Grand Tack scenario.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, S A; Morbidelli, A

    2014-09-13

    We present conclusions from a large number of N-body simulations of the giant impact phase of terrestrial planet formation. We focus on new results obtained from the recently proposed Grand Tack model, which couples the gas-driven migration of giant planets to the accretion of the terrestrial planets. The giant impact phase follows the oligarchic growth phase, which builds a bi-modal mass distribution within the disc of embryos and planetesimals. By varying the ratio of the total mass in the embryo population to the total mass in the planetesimal population and the mass of the individual embryos, we explore how different disc conditions control the final planets. The total mass ratio of embryos to planetesimals controls the timing of the last giant (Moon-forming) impact and its violence. The initial embryo mass sets the size of the lunar impactor and the growth rate of Mars. After comparing our simulated outcomes with the actual orbits of the terrestrial planets (angular momentum deficit, mass concentration) and taking into account independent geochemical constraints on the mass accreted by the Earth after the Moon-forming event and on the time scale for the growth of Mars, we conclude that the protoplanetary disc at the beginning of the giant impact phase must have had most of its mass in Mars-sized embryos and only a small fraction of the total disc mass in the planetesimal population. From this, we infer that the Moon-forming event occurred between approximately 60 and approximately 130?Myr after the formation of the first solids and was caused most likely by an object with a mass similar to that of Mars. PMID:25114304

  17. Terrestrial Water Relations & Climate ChangeTerrestrial Water Relations & Climate Change Jeffrey M Warren, Ph.D.

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    species interactions #12;6 Terrestrial Water Relations & Climate Change Soil ­ Root Terrestrial Water Physiology #12;8 Impacts of Climate Change on SPA Atmosphere Plant CO2 Temperature Precipitation Soil1 Terrestrial Water Relations & Climate ChangeTerrestrial Water Relations & Climate Change Jeffrey

  18. Taking the trophic bypass: aquatic-terrestrial linkage reduces methylmercury in a terrestrial food web.

    PubMed

    Bartrons, Mireia; Gratton, Claudio; Spiesman, Brian J; Vander Zanden, M Jake

    2015-01-01

    Ecosystems can be linked by the movement of matter and nutrients across habitat boundaries via aquatic insect emergence. Aquatic organisms tend to have higher concentrations of certain toxic contaminants such as methylmercury (MeHg) compared to their terrestrial counterparts. If aquatic organisms come to land, terrestrial organisms that consume them are expected to have elevated MeHg concentrations. But emergent aquatic insects could have other impacts as well, such as altering consumer trophic position or increasing ecosystem productivity as a result of nutrient inputs from insect carcasses. We measure MeHg in terrestrial arthropods at two lakes in northeastern Iceland and use carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes to quantify aquatic reliance and trophic position. Across all terrestrial focal arthropod taxa (Lycosidae, Linyphiidae, Acari, Opiliones), aquatic reliance had significant direct and indirect (via changes in trophic position) effects on terrestrial consumer MeHg. However, contrary to our expectations, terrestrial consumers that consumed aquatic prey had lower MeHg concentrations than consumers that ate mostly terrestrial prey. We hypothesize that this is due to the lower trophic position of consumers feeding directly on midges relative to those that fed mostly on terrestrial prey and that had, on average, higher trophic positions. Thus, direct consumption of aquatic inputs results in a trophic bypass that creates a shorter terrestrial food web and reduced biomagnification of MeHg across the food web. Our finding that MeHg was lower at terrestrial sites with aquatic inputs runs counter to the conventional wisdom that aquatic systems are a source of MeHg contamination to surrounding terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:26255364

  19. Extra charmonium states as bag-quarkonia

    E-print Network

    V. V. Kiselev

    2008-06-06

    Exotic states in the charmonium family are systematically treated in the framework of simplest model with an effective coulomb-like interaction of heavy quark and antiquark in the presence of static excitation of quark-gluon modes responsible for a nonperturbative term of potential, which provides with the confinement of quarks, in terms of bag over the threshold in the excitation spectrum of vacuum fields. Once the spectrum has got quite a wide mass gap, it allows us to approximate the bag contribution into the potential by a constant value of bag mass at low distances less than the bag size. The bag mass can be evaluated in a constituent model. The analysis is given for the bag contribution into the distribution over the invariant mass of two pions in the hadronic transition between the S-wave states of bag-quarkonium and heavy quarkonium, that leads to the anomaly violating the chiral limit in the region of low invariant masses, which agrees with the observational data. Leptonic constants of vector states are investigated in the presence of exotic states in the framework of quasilocal sum rules. The extra states allow us to improve the consistency of describing the measured widths of leptonic decays for the complete set of vector states in the charmonium family.

  20. Atmospheric Escape from Solar System Terrestrial Planets and Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Feng

    2015-05-01

    It has been known for decades that atmospheric escape is important for the evolution of terrestrial planets in the Solar System, although exactly how atmospheric escape changes the atmospheres of these bodies is still hotly debated. Rapidly increasing numbers of exoplanet observations provide new targets against which atmospheric escape models are tested. In this review we summarize recent studies related to atmospheric escape from exoplanets. The most important conclusions are that (a) escape can significantly influence the volatile contents of low-mass exoplanets (with mass lower than those of Uranus and Neptune) and the atmosphere and climate evolution histories of Solar System terrestrial planets; (b) models including detailed physics and chemistry in planetary upper atmospheres will be important for the interpretation of existing and future observations of exoplanets; and (c) fluid models considering 2D or 3D planetary upper atmospheres and particle models for planetary exospheres will be important not only for comparisons with observations but also for order of magnitude estimates of atmospheric escape rates. Our understanding of how escape shapes planetary atmospheres and influences the climate of low-mass planets can be expected to advance substantially in the coming decade.

  1. MODIS-Derived Terrestrial Primary Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Maosheng; Running, Steven; Heinsch, Faith Ann; Nemani, Ramakrishna

    Temporal and spatial changes in terrestrial biological productivity have a large impact on humankind because terrestrial ecosystems not only create environments suitable for human habitation, but also provide materials essential for survival, such as food, fiber and fuel. A recent study estimated that consumption of terrestrial net primary production (NPP; a list of all the acronyms is available in the appendix at the end of the chapter) by the human population accounts for about 14-26% of global NPP (Imhoff et al. 2004). Rapid global climate change is induced by increased atmospheric greenhouse gas concentration, especially CO2, which results from human activities such as fossil fuel combustion and deforestation. This directly impacts terrestrial NPP, which continues to change in both space and time (Melillo et al. 1993; Prentice et al. 2001; Nemani et al. 2003), and ultimately impacts the well-being of human society (Milesi et al. 2005). Additionally, substantial evidence show that the oceans and the biosphere, especially terrestrial ecosystems, currently play a major role in reducing the rate of the atmospheric CO2 increase (Prentice et al. 2001; Schimel et al. 2001). NPP is the first step needed to quantify the amount of atmospheric carbon fixed by plants and accumulated as biomass. Continuous and accurate measurements of terrestrial NPP at the global scale are possible using satellite data. Since early 2000, for the first time, the MODIS sensors onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites, have operationally provided scientists with near real-time global terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) and net photosynthesis (PsnNet) data. These data are provided at 1 km spatial resolution and an 8-day interval, and annual NPP covers 109,782,756 km2 of vegetated land. These GPP, PsnNet and NPP products are collectively known as MOD17 and are part of a larger suite of MODIS land products (Justice et al. 2002), one of the core Earth System or Climate Data Records (ESDR or CDR).

  2. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Chambers, Don P.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2011-01-01

    Most people think of groundwater as a resource, but it is also a useful indicator of climate variability and human impacts on the environment. Groundwater storage varies slowly relative to other non-frozen components of the water cycle, encapsulating long period variations and trends in surface meteorology. On seasonal to interannual timescales, groundwater is as dynamic as soil moisture, and it has been shown that groundwater storage changes have contributed to sea level variations. Groundwater monitoring well measurements are too sporadic and poorly assembled outside of the United States and a few other nations to permit direct global assessment of groundwater variability. However, observational estimates of terrestrial water storage (TWS) variations from the GRACE satellites largely represent groundwater storage variations on an interannual basis, save for high latitude/altitude (dominated by snow and ice) and wet tropical (surface water) regions. A figure maps changes in mean annual TWS from 2009 to 2010, based on GRACE, reflecting hydroclimatic conditions in 2010. Severe droughts impacted Russia and the Amazon, and drier than normal weather also affected the Indochinese peninsula, parts of central and southern Africa, and western Australia. Groundwater depletion continued in northern India, while heavy rains in California helped to replenish aquifers that have been depleted by drought and withdrawals for irrigation, though they are still below normal levels. Droughts in northern Argentina and western China similarly abated. Wet weather raised aquifer levels broadly across western Europe. Rains in eastern Australia caused flooding to the north and helped to mitigate a decade long drought in the south. Significant reductions in TWS seen in the coast of Alaska and the Patagonian Andes represent ongoing glacier melt, not groundwater depletion. Figures plot time series of zonal mean and global GRACE derived non-seasonal TWS anomalies (deviation from the mean of each month of the year) excluding Greenland and Antarctica. The two figures show that 2010 was the driest year since 2003. The drought in the Amazon was largely responsible, but an excess of water in 2009 seems to have buffered that drought to some extent. The drying trend in the 25-55 deg S zone is a combination of Patagonian glacier melt and drought in parts of Australia.

  3. Pathological Bodies

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Corinna

    2013-01-01

    The body holds the secrets to human nature, and the way toejaculate “into secret places that make Nature blush. ” 47secret thoughts, bodily compulsions, and monstrous behaviors were part of female nature,

  4. CT -- Body

    MedlinePLUS

    ... being studied. top of page How is the CAT scan performed? The technologist begins by positioning you ... feedback You are providing feedback about: Body CT (CAT Scan) Did you find the information you were ...

  5. Trace element and isotope geochemistry of Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary sediments: identification of extra-terrestrial and volcanic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, S. V.; Doehne, E. F.

    1988-01-01

    Trace element and stable isotope analyses were performed on a series of sediment samples crossing the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary from critical sections at Aumaya and Sopelano, Spain. The aim is to possibly distinguish extraterrestrial vs. volcanic or authigenic concentration of platinum group and other elements in K-T boundary transitional sediments. These sediments also have been shown to contain evidence for step-wise extinction of several groups of marine invertebrates, associated with negative oxygen and carbon isotope excursions occurring during the last million years of the Cretaceous. These isotope excursions have been interpreted to indicate major changes in ocean thermal regime, circulation, and ecosystems that may be related to multiple events during latest Cretaceous time. Results to date on the petrographic and geochemical analyses of the Late Cretaceous and Early Paleocene sediments indicate that diagenesis has obviously affected the trace element geochemistry and stable isotope compositions at Zumaya. Mineralogical and geochemical analysis of K-T boundary sediments at Zumaya suggest that a substantial fraction of anomalous trace elements in the boundary marl are present in specific mineral phases. Platinum and nickel grains perhaps represent the first direct evidence of siderophile-rich minerals at the boundary. The presence of spinels and Ni-rich particles as inclusions in aluminosilicate spherules from Zumaya suggests an original, non-diagenetic origin for the spherules. Similar spherules from southern Spain (Caravaca), show a strong marine authigenic overprint. This research represents a new approach in trying to directly identify the sedimentary mineral components that are responsible for the trace element concentrations associated with the K-T boundary.

  6. Pemberton et al: ALIEN TERRESTRIAL ORCHID, EULOPHIA GRAMINEA, INVADES MIAMI ALIEN TERRESTRIAL ORCHID, EULOPHIA GRAMINEA,

    E-print Network

    Koptur, Suzanne

    Pemberton et al: ALIEN TERRESTRIAL ORCHID, EULOPHIA GRAMINEA, INVADES MIAMI 183 ALIEN TERRESTRIAL ORCHID, EULOPHIA GRAMINEA, INVADES MIAMI Bob Pemberton, PhD, Suzanne Koptur, PhD & Timothy Collins, PhD We first encountered an Asian orchid, Eulophia graminea, in South Miami during the autumn of 2007

  7. Confirmation and Distribution of Tetrodotoxin for the First Time in Terrestrial Invertebrates: Two Terrestrial

    E-print Network

    Brodie III, Edmund D.

    Terrestrial Flatworm Species (Bipalium adventitium and Bipalium kewense) Amber N. Stokes1 *, Peter K. Ducey2 show that TTX is present in two species of terrestrial flatworm (Bipalium adventitium and Bipalium of the flatworms and provide evidence suggesting that TTX is used during predation to subdue large prey items. We

  8. From Canonical to Enhanced Extra Mixing in Low-Mass Red Giants: Tidally Locked Binaries

    E-print Network

    Pavel Denissenkov; Brian Chaboyer; Ke Li

    2006-01-05

    Stellar models which incorporate simple diffusion or shear induced mixing are used to describe canonical extra mixing in low mass red giants of low and solar metallicity. These models are able to simultaneously explain the observed Li and CN abundance changes along upper red giant branch (RGB) in field low-metallicity stars and match photometry, rotation and carbon isotopic ratios for stars in the old open cluster M67. The shear mixing model requires that main sequence (MS) progenitors of upper RGB stars possessed rapidly rotating radiative cores and that specific angular momentum was conserved in each of their mass shells during their evolution. We surmise that solar-type stars will not experience canonical extra mixing on the RGB because their more efficient MS spin-down resulted in solid-body rotation, as revealed by helioseismological data for the Sun. Thus, RGB stars in the old, high metallicity cluster NGC 6791 should show no evidence for mixing in their carbon isotopic ratios. We develop the idea that canonical extra mixing in a giant component of a binary system may be switched to its enhanced mode with much faster and somewhat deeper mixing as a result of the giant's tidal spin-up. This scenario can explain photometric and composition peculiarities of RS CVn binaries. The tidally enforced enhanced extra mixing might contribute to the star-to-star abundance variations of O, Na and Al in globular clusters. This idea may be tested with observations of carbon isotopic ratios and CN abundances in RS CVn binaries.

  9. Planetary Protection: Two Relevant Terrestrial Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyba, C.

    2002-09-01

    Concerns about potential pathogens in returned samples from Mars ("Mars Sample Return: Issues and Recommendations", National Research Council, 1997) or planetary satellites ("Evaluating the Biological Potential in Samples Returned from Planetary Satellites and Small Solar System Bodies", National Research Council, 1998) focus on two potential types of pathogenesis, toxic and infectious. The National Research Council reports cited above state that the chances of extraterrestrial organisms proving either toxic or infectious to humans are extremely low, but cannot be entirely ruled out. Here I discuss recently discovered terrestrial examples relevant to each possibility, in order to make these concerns concrete. The first example concerns the production of hepatotoxins (toxins affecting the liver) and neurotoxins by cyanobacteria in glacial lakes on alpine pastures in Switzerland. In this example, mat-forming benthic cyanobacteria are implicated in a hundred cattle poisonings that have been reported from alpine pasteurs in southeastern Switzerland over the past twenty-five years (e.g. K. Mez et al, Hydrobiologia 368, 1-15 (1998)). It is unlikely that these cyanobacteria evolved the toxins in response to dairy cows; rather the susceptibility of cattle to these toxins seems simply to be an unfortunate coincidence of a toxin working across a large evolutionary distance. The second example concerns the recent demonstration that the decimation of shallow-water Caribbean elkhorn coral is due to infection by a common fecal enterobacterium associated with the human gut (K. L. Patterson et al., PNAS 99, 8725-8730 (2002)). The bacterium, Serratia marcenscens, is also a free-living microbe in water and soil, as well as an opportunistic pathogen in a variety of animal species. The distance between humans and corals emphasizes the possibility that certain organisms may prove pathogenic across a wide evolutionary divide. Of course, in neither of these cases are the evolutionary distances crossed as large as those that would likely exist between any martian organisms and human beings. The possibility that life on the two worlds might share a common ancestor suggests that these distances may not be altogether incomparable, but this remains speculation pending further exploration. This work is supported in part by the NASA Exobiology Program and a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

  10. Bog bodies.

    PubMed

    Lynnerup, Niels

    2015-06-01

    In northern Europe during the Iron Age, many corpses were deposited in bogs. The cold, wet and anaerobic environment leads in many cases to the preservation of soft tissues, so that the bodies, when found and excavated several thousand years later, are remarkably intact. Since the 19th century the bog bodies have been studied using medical and natural scientific methods, and recently many bog bodies have been re-examined using especially modern, medical imaging techniques. Because of the preservation of soft tissue, especially the skin, it has been possible to determine lesions and trauma. Conversely, the preservation of bones is less good, as the mineral component has been leached out by the acidic bog. Together with water-logging of collagenous tissue, this means that if the bog body is simply left to dry out when found, as was the case pre-19th century, the bones may literally warp and shrink, leading to potential pitfalls in paleopathological diagnostics. Bog bodies have in several instances been crucial in determining the last meal, as gut contents may be preserved, and thus augment our knowledge on pre-historic diet by adding to, for example, stable isotope analyses. This article presents an overview of our knowledge about the taphomic processes as well as the methods used in bog body research. PMID:25998635

  11. Transcriptome analysis of primary bovine extra-embryonic cultured cells

    PubMed Central

    Degrelle, Séverine A.

    2015-01-01

    The dataset described in this article pertains to the article by Hue et al. (2015) entitled “Primary bovine extra-embryonic cultured cells: A new resource for the study of in vivo peri-implanting phenotypes and mesoderm formation” [1]. In mammals, extra-embryonic tissues are essential to support not only embryo patterning but also embryo survival, especially in late implanting species. These tissues are composed of three cell types: trophoblast (bTCs), endoderm (bXECs) and mesoderm (bXMCs). Until now, it is unclear how these cells interact. In this study, we have established primary cell cultures of extra-embryonic tissues from bovine embryos collected at day-18 after artificial insemination. We used our homemade bovine 10K array (GPL7417) to analyze the gene expression profiles of these primary extra-embryonic cultured cells compared to the corresponding cells from in vivo micro-dissected embryos. Here, we described the experimental design, the isolation of bovine extra-embryonic cell types as well as the microarray expression analysis. The dataset has been deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (accession number GSE52967). Finally, these primary cell cultures were a powerful tool to start studying their cellular properties, and will further allow in vitro studies on cellular interactions among extra-embryonic tissues, and potentially between extra-embryonic vs embryonic tissues. PMID:26697347

  12. Transcriptome analysis of primary bovine extra-embryonic cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Degrelle, Séverine A

    2015-12-01

    The dataset described in this article pertains to the article by Hue et al. (2015) entitled "Primary bovine extra-embryonic cultured cells: A new resource for the study of in vivo peri-implanting phenotypes and mesoderm formation" [1]. In mammals, extra-embryonic tissues are essential to support not only embryo patterning but also embryo survival, especially in late implanting species. These tissues are composed of three cell types: trophoblast (bTCs), endoderm (bXECs) and mesoderm (bXMCs). Until now, it is unclear how these cells interact. In this study, we have established primary cell cultures of extra-embryonic tissues from bovine embryos collected at day-18 after artificial insemination. We used our homemade bovine 10K array (GPL7417) to analyze the gene expression profiles of these primary extra-embryonic cultured cells compared to the corresponding cells from in vivo micro-dissected embryos. Here, we described the experimental design, the isolation of bovine extra-embryonic cell types as well as the microarray expression analysis. The dataset has been deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (accession number GSE52967). Finally, these primary cell cultures were a powerful tool to start studying their cellular properties, and will further allow in vitro studies on cellular interactions among extra-embryonic tissues, and potentially between extra-embryonic vs embryonic tissues. PMID:26697347

  13. Deconvolving Terrestrial Alteration Mineral Spectral Signatures from Meteorite Reflectance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sweta; Clark, Beth Ellen; Hiroi, Takahiro; Zolensky, Michael

    2004-01-01

    When a meteorite enters into the earth's atmosphere, it is immediately subjected to various chemical reactions between its minerals and the elements in our thick atmosphere. These reactions alter the mineralogy of the meteorites. Some examples of the altered minerals in some meteorites are summarized. If meteorites can be linked to their corresponding parent body asteroid in space, we can improve our understanding of the solar system. Spectroscopy has been used in determining the links between asteroids and meteorites. However, meteorite weathering in the Earth s atmosphere also has an effect on meteorite spectra, and altered spectra can easily confuse asteroid connections. The goal of this project is to study the mineral and spectral changes due to Earth's environment and to design a computer simulation to correct meteorite spectra for the effects of terrestrial weathering.

  14. 78 FR 70485 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Extra Long Staple Cotton Crop Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ...Insurance Regulations; Extra Long Staple Cotton Crop Provisions AGENCY: Federal Crop...Insurance Regulations, Extra Long Staple Cotton Crop Insurance Provisions to make the Extra Long Staple (ELS) Cotton Crop Insurance Provisions...

  15. 7 CFR 457.105 - Extra long staple cotton crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Extra long staple cotton crop insurance provisions. 457.105...REGULATIONS § 457.105 Extra long staple cotton crop insurance provisions. The extra long staple cotton crop insurance provisions for the...

  16. 7 CFR 457.105 - Extra long staple cotton crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Extra long staple cotton crop insurance provisions. 457.105...REGULATIONS § 457.105 Extra long staple cotton crop insurance provisions. The extra long staple cotton crop insurance provisions for the...

  17. 7 CFR 457.105 - Extra long staple cotton crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Extra long staple cotton crop insurance provisions. 457.105...REGULATIONS § 457.105 Extra long staple cotton crop insurance provisions. The extra long staple cotton crop insurance provisions for the...

  18. Predictability of the terrestrial carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yiqi; Keenan, Trevor F; Smith, Matthew

    2015-05-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems sequester roughly 30% of anthropogenic carbon emission. However this estimate has not been directly deduced from studies of terrestrial ecosystems themselves, but inferred from atmospheric and oceanic data. This raises a question: to what extent is the terrestrial carbon cycle intrinsically predictable? In this paper, we investigated fundamental properties of the terrestrial carbon cycle, examined its intrinsic predictability, and proposed a suite of future research directions to improve empirical understanding and model predictive ability. Specifically, we isolated endogenous internal processes of the terrestrial carbon cycle from exogenous forcing variables. The internal processes share five fundamental properties (i.e., compartmentalization, carbon input through photosynthesis, partitioning among pools, donor pool-dominant transfers, and the first-order decay) among all types of ecosystems on the Earth. The five properties together result in an emergent constraint on predictability of various carbon cycle components in response to five classes of exogenous forcing. Future observational and experimental research should be focused on those less predictive components while modeling research needs to improve model predictive ability for those highly predictive components. We argue that an understanding of predictability should provide guidance on future observational, experimental and modeling research. PMID:25327167

  19. Terrestrial Planet Formation at Home and Abroad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, S. N.; Kokubo, E.; Morbidelli, A.; Morishima, R.; Walsh, K. J.

    We review the state of the field of terrestrial planet formation with the goal of understanding the formation of the inner solar system and low-mass exoplanets. We then review the dynamics and timescales of accretion from planetesimals to planetary embryos and from embryos to terrestrial planets. We discuss radial mixing and water delivery, planetary spins, and the importance of parameters regarding the disk and embryo properties. Next, we connect accretion models to exoplanets. We first explain why the observed hot super-Earths probably formed by in situ accretion or inward migration. We show how terrestrial planet formation is altered in systems with gas giants by the mechanisms of giant planet migration and dynamical instabilities. Standard models of terrestrial accretion fail to reproduce the inner solar system. The "Grand Tack" model solves this problem using ideas first developed to explain the giant exoplanets. Finally, we discuss whether most terrestrial planet systems form in the same way as ours, and highlight the key ingredients missing in the current generation of simulations.

  20. Terrestrial Planet Formation Around Close Binary Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Quintana, Elisa V.

    2003-01-01

    Most stars reside in multiple star systems; however, virtually all models of planetary growth have assumed an isolated single star. Numerical simulations of the collapse of molecular cloud cores to form binary stars suggest that disks will form within such systems. Observations indirectly suggest disk material around one or both components within young binary star systems. If planets form at the right places within such circumstellar disks, they can remain in stable orbits within the binary star systems for eons. We are simulating the late stages of growth of terrestrial planets around close binary stars, using a new, ultrafast, symplectic integrator that we have developed for this purpose. The sum of the masses of the two stars is one solar mass, and the initial disk of planetary embryos is the same as that used for simulating the late stages of terrestrial planet growth within our Solar System and in the Alpha Centauri wide binary star system. Giant planets &are included in the simulations, as they are in most simulations of the late stages of terrestrial planet accumulation in our Solar System. When the stars travel on a circular orbit with semimajor axis of up to 0.1 AU about their mutual center of mass, the planetary embryos grow into a system of terrestrial planets that is statistically identical to those formed about single stars, but a larger semimajor axis and/or a significantly eccentric binary orbit can lead to significantly more dynamically hot terrestrial planet systems.

  1. Lorentz Violation in Warped Extra Dimensions

    E-print Network

    Thomas G. Rizzo

    2010-11-15

    Higher dimensional theories which address some of the problematic issues of the Standard Model(SM) naturally involve some form of $D=4+n$-dimensional Lorentz invariance violation (LIV). In such models the fundamental physics which leads to, e.g., field localization, orbifolding, the existence of brane terms and the compactification process all can introduce LIV in the higher dimensional theory while still preserving 4-d Lorentz invariance. In this paper, attempting to capture some of this physics, we extend our previous analysis of LIV in 5-d UED-type models to those with 5-d warped extra dimensions. To be specific, we employ the 5-d analog of the SM Extension of Kostelecky et. al. ~which incorporates a complete set of operators arising from spontaneous LIV. We show that while the response of the bulk scalar, fermion and gauge fields to the addition of LIV operators in warped models is qualitatively similar to what happens in the flat 5-d UED case, the gravity sector of these models reacts very differently than in flat space. Specifically, we show that LIV in this warped case leads to a non-zero bulk mass for the 5-d graviton and so the would-be zero mode, which we identify as the usual 4-d graviton, must necessarily become massive. The origin of this mass term is the simultaneous existence of the constant non-zero $AdS_5$ curvature and the loss of general co-ordinate invariance via LIV in the 5-d theory. Thus warped 5-d models with LIV in the gravity sector are not phenomenologically viable.

  2. Lorentz Violation in Warped Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-11

    Higher dimensional theories which address some of the problematic issues of the Standard Model(SM) naturally involve some form of D = 4 + n-dimensional Lorentz invariance violation (LIV). In such models the fundamental physics which leads to, e.g., field localization, orbifolding, the existence of brane terms and the compactification process all can introduce LIV in the higher dimensional theory while still preserving 4-d Lorentz invariance. In this paper, attempting to capture some of this physics, we extend our previous analysis of LIV in 5-d UED-type models to those with 5- d warped extra dimensions. To be specific, we employ the 5-d analog of the SM Extension of Kostelecky et al. which incorporates a complete set of operators arising from spontaneous LIV. We show that while the response of the bulk scalar, fermion and gauge fields to the addition of LIV operators in warped models is qualitatively similar to what happens in the flat 5-d UED case, the gravity sector of these models reacts very differently than in flat space. Specifically, we show that LIV in this warped case leads to a non-zero bulk mass for the 5-d graviton and so the would-be zero mode, which we identify as the usual 4-d graviton, must necessarily become massive. The origin of this mass term is the simultaneous existence of the constant non-zero AdS{sub 5} curvature and the loss of general co-ordinate invariance via LIV in the 5-d theory. Thus warped 5-d models with LIV in the gravity sector are not phenomenologically viable.

  3. Girls and war: an extra vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Black, M

    1998-01-01

    It is no longer possible to consider the raping of girls as an isolated atrocity of war. In Uganda, guerrilla forces have kidnapped 6000-10,000 children and have forced the "most desirable" girls to become "wives" of warlords. Girls who manage to escape are deeply traumatized and suffer ill health as well as possible social ostracism. In refugee camps, recognition that adolescent girls face special risks of rape and of engaging in the informal prostitution that may expose them to HIV/AIDS has led to the introduction of new measures to increase female security. Families in refugee camps in Burundi and Somalia protect female honor by submitting their daughters to very early marriage, which also abuses the girls' rights. Girls conscripted to military groups are forced to transport materials, cook, or help loot villages. In conditions of war, even girls who remain at home protected by their families must assume extra responsibilities, especially if men go off to fight leaving women with the agricultural and livestock burdens. Girls will be the first children withdrawn from school to help keep the household afloat. Girls and women are also expected to tend those wounded by the very war that destroys the health care services that are vital to meet women's reproductive needs. Efforts are being made to identify rape as a specific war crime, and these efforts should be extended to the kidnapping and forced recruitment of children into combat roles. Moral codes must be reestablished, even if they are only nominal at present. PMID:12321764

  4. Terrestrial impact melt rocks and glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressler, B. O.; Reimold, W. U.

    2001-12-01

    The effects of meteorite and comet impact on Earth are rock brecciation, the formation of shock metamorphic features, rock melting, and the formation of impact structures, i.e. simple craters, complex craters, and multi-ring basins. Large events, such as the 65-Ma Chicxulub impact, are believed to have had catastrophic environmental effects that profoundly influenced the development of life on Earth. In this review, an attempt is made to summarize some of the voluminous literature on impact melting, one important aspect of planetary impact, provide some comments on this process, and to make suggestions for future research. The products of impact melting are glasses, impact melt rocks, and pseudotachylites. Our treatise deals mainly with the geological setting, petrography, and major-element chemistry of melt rocks and glasses. Impact glasses, in several petrographic aspects, are similar to volcanic glasses, but they are associated with shock metamorphosed mineral and rock fragments and, in places, with siderophile element anomalies suggestive of meteoritic contamination. They are found in allogenic breccia deposits within (fall-back 'suevite') and outside (fall-out 'suevite') impact craters and, as spherules, in distal ejecta. Large events, such as the K/T boundary Chicxulub impact, are responsible for the formation of worldwide ejecta horizons which are associated with siderophile element anomalies and shock metamorphosed mineral and rock debris. Impact glasses have a bulk chemical composition that is homogeneous but exemptions to this rule are common. On a microscopic scale, however, impact glasses are commonly strikingly heterogeneous. Tektites are glasses ejected from craters over large distances. They are characterized by very low water and volatile contents and element abundances and ratios that are evidence that tektites formed by melting of upper crustal, sedimentary rocks. Four tektite strewn-fields are known, three of which can be tied to specific impact craters. Impact melt rocks form sheets, lenses, and dike-like bodies within or beneath allogenic fallback breccia deposits in the impact crater and possibly on crater terraces and flanks. Dikes of impact melt rocks also intrude the rocks of the crater floor. They commonly contain shock metamorphosed target rock and mineral fragments in various stages of assimilation and are glassy or fine- to coarse-grained. Chemically, they are strikingly homogeneous, but as with impact glasses, exemptions to this rule do exist. Large and thick melt bodies, such as the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC), are differentiated or may represent a combination of impact melt rocks sensu-strictu and impact-triggered, deep-crustal melts. A concerted, multidisciplinary approach to future research on impact melting and on other aspects of meteorite and comet impact is advocated. Impact models are models only and uncritical reliance on their validity will not lead to a better understanding of impact processes—especially of melting, excavation, and deposition of allogenic breccias and the spatial position of breccias in relation to sheets and lenses of melt rocks within the crater. Impact-triggered pressure-release melting of target rocks beneath the excavation cavity may be responsible for the existence of melt rocks beneath the impact melt rocks sensu-strictu. This controversial idea needs to be tested by a re-evaluation of existing data and models, be they based on field or laboratory research. Only a relatively small number of terrestrial impact structures has been investigated in sufficient detail as it relates to geological and geophysical mapping. In this review, we summarize observations made on impact melt rocks and impact glasses in a number of North American (Brent, Haughton, Manicouagan, New Quebec, Sudbury, Wanapitei, all in Canada), Asian (Popigai, Russia; Zhamanshin, Kazakhstan), two South African structures (Morokweng and Vredefort), the Henbury crater field of Australia, and one European crater (Ries, Germany). Our tables listing major-element chemical compositions of impact

  5. Comparative planetology: Significance for terrestrial geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H. V.; Lowman, P. D., R.

    1978-01-01

    The crustal evolution of the terrestrial planets increase in complexity and duration with increasing size and mass of the planet. The lunar and mercurian surfaces are largely the result of intense, post-differentiation impact bombardment and subsequent volcanic filling of major impact basins. Mars, being larger, has evolved further: crustal uplifts, rifting, and shield volcanoes have begun to modify its largely Moon-like surface. The Earth is the large end-number of this sequence, where modern plate tectonic processes have erased the earlier lunar and martian type of surfaces. Fundamental problems of the origin of terrestrial continents, ocean basins, and plate tectonics are now addressed within the context of the evolutionary pattern of the terrestrial planets.

  6. A Possible Aeronomy of Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets

    E-print Network

    W. A. Traub; K. W. Jucks

    2002-05-22

    Terrestrial planetary systems may exist around nearby stars as the Earth-sized counterparts to the many giant planets already discovered within the solar neighborhood. In this chapter we first discuss the numerous techniques which have been suggested to search for extrasolar terrestrial planets. We then focus on the expected results from that technique in which an orbiting telescope or interferometer is used to obtain a visible or infrared spectrum of a planet, without contamination from the parent star. We show examples of such spectra for selected cases: the present Earth, the Neoproterozoic (snowball) Earth, a methane-rich Earth, and the present Mars and Venus. We conclude by discussing the implications of such spectra for the detection of life on an extrasolar terrestrial planet.

  7. BOOK REVIEW: Black Holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions Black Holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Valeri P.

    2013-10-01

    The book Black holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions written by Kirill A Bronnikov and Sergey G Rubin has been published recently by World Scientific Publishing Company. The authors are well known experts in gravity and cosmology. The book is a monograph, a considerable part of which is based on the original work of the authors. Their original point of view on some of the problems makes the book quite interesting, covering a variety of important topics of the modern theory of gravity, astrophysics and cosmology. It consists of 11 chapters which are organized in three parts. The book starts with an introduction, where the authors briefly discuss the main ideas of General Relativity, giving some historical remarks on its development and application to cosmology, and mentioning some more recent subjects such as brane worlds, f(R)-theories and gravity in higher dimensions. Part I of the book is called 'Gravity'. Chapters two and three are devoted to the Einstein equations and their spherical symmetric black hole solutions. This material is quite standard and can be found in practically any book on General Relativity. A brief summary of the Kerr metric and black hole thermodynamics are given in chapter four. The main part of this chapter is devoted to spherically symmetric black holes in non-Einstein gravity (with scalar and phantom fields), black holes with regular interior, and black holes in brane worlds. Chapters five and six are mainly dedicated to wormholes and the problem of their stability. Part II (Cosmology) starts with discussion of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker and de Sitter solutions of the Einstein equations and their properties. It follows by describing a `big picture' of the modern cosmology (inflation, post-inflationary reheating, the radiation-dominated and matter-dominated states, and modern stage of the (secondary) inflation). The authors explain how the inflation models allow one to solve many of the long-standing problems of cosmology, such as flatness of the Universe, the horizon problem and isotropy of cosmological microwave background. All this material is covered in chapter seven. Chapter eight contains brief discussion of several popular inflation models. Chapter nine is devoted to the problem of the large-scale structure formation from initial quantum vacuum fluctuation during the inflation and the spectrum of the density fluctuations. It also contains remarks on the baryonic asymmetry of the Universe, baryogenesis and primordial black holes. Part III covers the material on extra dimensions. It describes how Einstein gravity is modified in the presence of one or more additional spatial dimensions and how these extra dimensions are compactified in the Kaluza-Klein scheme. The authors also discuss how extra dimensions may affect low energy physics. They present examples of higher-dimensional generalizations of the gravity with higher-in-curvature corrections and discuss a possible mechanism of self-stabilization of an extra space. A considerable part of the chapter 10 is devoted to cosmological models with extra dimensions. In particular, the authors discuss how extra dimensions can modify 'standard' inflation models. At the end of this chapter they make several remarks on a possible relation of the value of fundamental constants in our universe with the existence of extra dimensions. Finally, in chapter 11 they demonstrate that several observable properties of the Universe are closely related with the special value of the fundamental physical constants and their fine tuning. They give interesting examples of such fine tuning and summarize many other cases. The book ends with discussion of a so-called 'cascade birth of universes in multidimensional spaces' model, proposed by one of the authors. As is evident from this brief summary of topics presented in the book, many interesting areas of modern gravity and cosmology are covered. However, since the subject is so wide, this inevitably implies that the selection of the topics and level of their presentation in many cases reflects the authors' own pre

  8. Body Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The high-tech art of digital signal processing (DSP) was pioneered at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the mid-1960s for use in the Apollo Lunar Landing Program. Designed to computer enhance pictures of the Moon, this technology became the basis for the Landsat Earth resources satellites and subsequently has been incorporated into a broad range of Earthbound medical and diagnostic tools. DSP is employed in advanced body imaging techniques including Computer-Aided Tomography, also known as CT and CATScan, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). CT images are collected by irradiating a thin slice of the body with a fan-shaped x-ray beam from a number of directions around the body's perimeter. A tomographic (slice-like) picture is reconstructed from these multiple views by a computer. MRI employs a magnetic field and radio waves, rather than x-rays, to create images. In this photograph, a patient undergoes an open MRI.

  9. Body Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The high-tech art of digital signal processing (DSP) was pioneered at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the mid-1960s for use in the Apollo Lunar Landing Program. Designed to computer enhance pictures of the Moon, this technology became the basis for the Landsat Earth resources satellites and subsequently has been incorporated into a broad range of Earthbound medical and diagnostic tools. DSP is employed in advanced body imaging techniques including Computer-Aided Tomography, also known as CT and CATScan, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). CT images are collected by irradiating a thin slice of the body with a fan-shaped x-ray beam from a number of directions around the body's perimeter. A tomographic (slice-like) picture is reconstructed from these multiple views by a computer. MRI employs a magnetic field and radio waves, rather than x-rays, to create images.

  10. Tectonic Evolution of the Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Senski, David G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program supported a wide range of work on the geophysical evolution of the terrestrial planets during the period 1 April 1997 - 30 September 2001. We here provide highlights of the research carried out under this grant over the final year of the award, and we include a full listing of publications and scientific meeting presentations supported by this project. Throughout the grant period, our group consisted of the Principal Investigator and several Postdoctoral Associates, all at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (DTM) of the Carnegie Institution of Washington.

  11. Solar-Terrestrial Science Strategy Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Peter M. (editor); Roberts, William T. (editor); Kropp, Jack (editor)

    1989-01-01

    The conclusions and recommendations reached at the Solar Terrestrial Science Strategy Workshop are summarized. The charter given to this diverse group was: (1) to establish the level of scientific understanding to be accomplished with the completion of the current and near term worldwide programs; (2) identify the significant scientific questions to be answered by future solar terrestrial programs, and the programs required to answer these questions; and (3) map out a program strategy, taking into consideration currently perceived space capabilities and constraints, to accomplish the identified program.

  12. Solar and Terrestrial Neutrino Results from Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calaprice, Frank; Borexino Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    Borexino is a low background liquid scintillation detector currently acquiring solar and terrestrial neutrino data at the LNGS underground laboratory in Italy. In the three years since the start of operations in 2007, Borexino has produced measurements of 7Be and 8B solar neutrinos, as well as measurements of terrestrial and long-baseline reactor anti-neutrinos. The measurements of sub-MeV neutrinos were possible owing to a breakthrough in low background methods. Current results and prospects for future measurements with lower background and higher accuracy are discussed in the context of exploring the transition from vacuum to matter enhanced neutrino oscillations.

  13. The centenary of solar-terrestrial physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rishbeth, H.

    2001-12-01

    The years 1900-1902 saw important scientific landmarks, namely Marconi's transatlantic radio experiment and theoretical ideas of Lodge and Fitzgerald about what are now known as the solar wind, magnetosphere and ionosphere. These advances built on previous ideas put forward by several European scientists. Taking the discovery of the electron in 1897 as a prerequisite for real physical understanding of solar-terrestrial phenomena, the present time is the centenary of solar-terrestrial physics. Concentrating on the years around 1900, this paper also selects landmarks from 1600 onwards that led up to that time, and some from subsequent decades.

  14. Were early pterosaurs inept terrestrial locomotors?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Pterodactyloid pterosaurs are widely interpreted as terrestrially competent, erect-limbed quadrupeds, but the terrestrial capabilities of non-pterodactyloids are largely thought to have been poor. This is commonly justified by the absence of a non-pterodactyloid footprint record, suggestions that the expansive uropatagia common to early pterosaurs would restrict hindlimb motion in walking or running, and the presence of sprawling forelimbs in some species. Here, these arguments are re-visited and mostly found problematic. Restriction of limb mobility is not a problem faced by extant animals with extensive fight membranes, including species which routinely utilise terrestrial locomotion. The absence of non-pterodactyloid footprints is not necessarily tied to functional or biomechanical constraints. As with other fully terrestrial clades with poor ichnological records, biases in behaviour, preservation, sampling and interpretation likely contribute to the deficit of early pterosaur ichnites. Suggestions that non-pterodactyloids have slender, mechanically weak limbs are demonstrably countered by the proportionally long and robust limbs of many Triassic and Jurassic species. Novel assessments of pterosaur forelimb anatomies conflict with notions that all non-pterodactyloids were obligated to sprawling forelimb postures. Sprawling forelimbs seem appropriate for species with ventrally-restricted glenoid articulations (seemingly occurring in rhamphorhynchines and campylognathoidids). However, some early pterosaurs, such as Dimorphodon macronyx and wukongopterids, have glenoid arthrologies which are not ventrally restricted, and their distal humeri resemble those of pterodactyloids. It seems fully erect forelimb stances were possible in these pterosaurs, and may be probable given proposed correlation between pterodactyloid-like distal humeral morphology and forces incurred through erect forelimb postures. Further indications of terrestrial habits include antungual sesamoids, which occur in the manus and pes anatomy of many early pterosaur species, and only occur elsewhere in terrestrial reptiles, possibly developing through frequent interactions of large claws with firm substrates. It is argued that characteristics possibly associated with terrestriality are deeply nested within Pterosauria and not restricted to Pterodactyloidea as previously thought, and that pterodactyloid-like levels of terrestrial competency may have been possible in at least some early pterosaurs. PMID:26157605

  15. ExTrA: Exoplanets in Transit and their Atmospheres

    E-print Network

    Bonfils, X; Jocou, L; Wunsche, A; Kern, P; Delboulbé, A; Delfosse, X; Feautrier, P; Forveille, T; Gluck, L; Lafrasse, S; Magnard, Y; Maurel, D; Moulin, T; Murgas, F; Rabou, P; Rochat, S; Roux, A; Stadler, E

    2015-01-01

    The ExTrA facility, located at La Silla observatory, will consist of a near-infrared multi-object spectrograph fed by three 60-cm telescopes. ExTrA will add the spectroscopic resolution to the traditional differential photometry method. This shall enable the fine correction of color-dependent systematics that would otherwise hinder ground-based observations. With both this novel method and an infrared-enabled efficiency, ExTrA aims to find transiting telluric planets orbiting in the habitable zone of bright nearby M dwarfs. It shall have the versatility to do so by running its own independent survey and also by concurrently following-up on the space candidates unveiled by K2 and TESS. The exoplanets detected by ExTrA will be amenable to atmospheric characterisation with VLTs, JWST, and ELTs and could give our first peek into an exo-life laboratory.

  16. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Extra Fancy” consists of apples of one variety (except when more than one variety is printed on the container) which are mature but not overripe, clean, fairly well formed, free from decay, internal browning, internal breakdown, soft...

  17. Constraints on large extra dimensions from neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoudiasl, H.; Langacker, P.; Perelstein, M.

    2002-05-01

    The existence of bulk sterile neutrinos in theories with large extra dimensions can naturally explain small 4-dimensional Dirac masses for the active neutrinos. We study a model with 3 bulk neutrinos and derive various constraints on the size of the extra dimensions from neutrino oscillation experiments. Our analysis includes recent solar and atmospheric data from SNO and Super-Kamiokande, respectively, as well as various reactor and accelerator experiments. In addition, we comment on possible extensions of the model that could accommodate the LSND results, using natural parameters only. Our most conservative bound, obtained from the atmospheric data in the hierarchical mass scheme, constrains the largest extra dimension to have a radius R<0.82 ?m. Thus, in the context of the model studied here, future gravitational experiments are unlikely to observe the effects of extra dimensions.

  18. 7. LESLIE WICKMAN, EVA (EXTRA VEHICULAR ACTIVITIES) SPECIALIST, IN SPACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. LESLIE WICKMAN, EVA (EXTRA VEHICULAR ACTIVITIES) SPECIALIST, IN SPACE SUIT AFTER TESTING IN NEUTRAL BUOYANCY TANK. AVERAGE COST OF SUIT IS $1,000,000. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  19. Probing large extra dimensions with IceCube

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaili, Arman; Peres, O.L.G.; Tabrizi, Zahra E-mail: orlando@ifi.unicamp.br

    2014-12-01

    In models with Large Extra Dimensions the smallness of neutrino masses can be naturally explained by introducing gauge singlet fermions which propagate in the bulk. The Kaluza-Klein modes of these fermions appear as towers of sterile neutrino states on the brane. We study the phenomenological consequences of this picture for the high energy atmospheric neutrinos. For this purpose we construct a detailed equivalence between a model with large extra dimensions and a (3+n) scenario consisting of three active and n extra sterile neutrino states, which provides a clear intuitive understanding of Kaluza-Klein modes. Finally, we analyze the collected data of high energy atmospheric neutrinos by IceCube experiment and obtain bounds on the radius of extra dimensions.

  20. Body parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayiter, Elif

    2010-01-01

    In this project, the artist wishes to examine corporeality in the virtual realm, through the usage of the (non)-physical body of the avatar. An art installation created in the virtual world of Second Life, which is meant to be accessed with site specific avatars, will provide the creative platform whereby this investigation is undertaken. Thus, "body parts" seeks to challenge the residents of virtual environments into connecting with the virtual manifestations, i.e., avatars of others in an emotionally expressive/intimate manner.

  1. Body Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computer-aided Tomography (CT) images are often complementary. In most cases, MRI is good for viewing soft tissue but not bone, while CT images are good for bone but not always good for soft tissue discrimination. Physicians and engineers in the Department of Radiology at the University of Michigan Hospitals are developing a technique for combining the best features of MRI and CT scans to increase the accuracy of discriminating one type of body tissue from another. One of their research tools is a computer program called HICAP. The program can be used to distinguish between healthy and diseased tissue in body images.

  2. Formation of terrestrial planets in disks evolving via disk winds and implications for the origin of the solar system's terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogihara, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Suzuki, Takeru K.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Recent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations have identified a disk wind by which gas materials are lost from the surface of a protoplanetary disk, which can significantly alter the evolution of the inner disk and the formation of terrestrial planets. A simultaneous description of the realistic evolution of the gaseous and solid components in a disk may provide a clue for solving the problem of the mass concentration of the terrestrial planets in the solar system. Aims: We simulate the formation of terrestrial planets from planetary embryos in a disk that evolves via magnetorotational instability and a disk wind. The aim is to examine the effects of a disk wind on the orbital evolution and final configuration of planetary systems. Methods: We perform N-body simulations of sixty 0.1 Earth-mass embryos in an evolving disk. The evolution of the gas surface density of the disk is tracked by solving a one-dimensional diffusion equation with a sink term that accounts for the disk wind. Results: We find that even in the case of a weak disk wind, the radial slope of the gas surface density of the inner disk becomes shallower, which slows or halts the Type I migration of embryos. If the effect of the disk wind is strong, the disk profile is significantly altered (e.g., positive surface density gradient, inside-out evacuation), leading to outward migration of embryos inside ~1 AU. Conclusions: Disk winds play an essential role in terrestrial planet formation inside a few AU by changing the disk profile. In addition, embryos can undergo convergent migration to ~1 AU in certainly probable conditions. In such a case, the characteristic features of the solar system's terrestrial planets (e.g., mass concentration around 1 AU, late giant impact) may be reproduced.

  3. Extra-Abdominal Desmoid Tumors Associated with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Calvert, George T.; Monument, Michael J.; Burt, Randall W.; Jones, Kevin B.; Randall, R. Lor

    2012-01-01

    Extra-abdominal desmoid tumors are a significant cause of morbidity in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome. Understanding of the basic biology and natural history of these tumors has increased substantially over the past decade. Accordingly, medical and surgical management of desmoid tumors has also evolved. This paper analyzes recent evidence pertaining to the epidemiology, molecular biology, histopathology, screening, and treatment of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors associated with familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome. PMID:22701333

  4. Low Scale Unification, Newton's Law and Extra Dimensions

    E-print Network

    E. G. Floratos; G. K. Leontaris

    1999-06-03

    Motivated by recent work on low energy unification, in this short note we derive corrections on Newton's inverse square law due to the existence of extra decompactified dimensions. In the four-dimensional macroscopic limit we find that the corrections are of Yukawa type. Inside the compactified space of n-extra dimensions the sub-leading term is proportional to the (n+1)- power of the distance over the compactification radius ratio. Some physical implications of these modifications are briefly discussed.

  5. Evolution of the terrestrial planets (geological and petrological data)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, Evgenii

    How the terrestrial solid planetary bodies were developed? What major stages of their irreversible evolution took place before they turned into "dead" stone balls? We discuss these problems on examples of the Earth and the Moon, which evolution studied the best. According to modern views, after accretion of these bodies, magma oceans of some hundreds km deep appeared on their surface. According to Jeffries (1929), solidification of large molted bodies, because of the difference between adiabatic gradient in silicate melts (0.3oC/km) and gradient of their melting points (3oC/km), could be going only upwards, from the bottom to the surface. As a result a powerful crystallizing differentiation of the oceans' magmas took place with accumulation of the most low-melting components to the surface. Due to different deep of the oceans on the Moon and the Earth, the primordial crusts on these bodies were rather different: mafic on the Moon and sialic on the Earth. Geological evolution of the Earth began 4 Ga ago from appearance of Archean granite-greenstone terranes (GGT) and divided them granulite belts. Mantle-derived magmatism of high-Mg komatiite-basaltic series was located in greenstone belts, which formed irregular network within GGTs and composed 10-15 The sharp change of the magmatic activity with appearance in global scale of geochemical-enriched Fe-Ti picrites and basalts occurred in interval 2.3-2.0 Ga ago. Such melts was typical for Phanerozoic within-plate magmatism and linked with thermochemical mantle plumes of the second generation, which ascended from the liquid core-mantle boundary (CMB). It was followed by plate tectonic appearance 2 Ga ago and from this particular time such tectonic regime has existed till now. From this particular time, ancient Earth's continental crust began to involved in subduction processes and interchange by secondary oceanic crust which forms about 70Where this geochemical-enriched material was conserved and how it was activated? We suggest that such situation could be possible only in case when (1) accretion of the Earth was heterogeneous, and (2) warming of the Earth occurred downwards, from surface to core. It was, probably, a result of moving inwards a wave of deformations, accompanied by emission of heat. At the first stage the wave went through depleted (in result of directed solidification of magma ocean) mantle and led to appearance of mantle superplumes of the first generation. At the second stage it reached iron core, melted it, which led to appearance of mantle supeplumes of the second generation (thermochemical), enriched in fluids, Fe, Ti, alcalies, incompatible elements, etc. Material of such superplumes could rich more shallow levels and led to active interactions of their extended heads with solid lithosphere, which caused changing of tectonic activity character. We suggest that terrestrial planets were developed at the same, but shortened scenario, and more quick. At the Moon the earliest magmatism of highlands were close to terrestrial early Paleoproterozoic SHMS and at the boundary 3.9-3.8 Ga ago was changed by maria magmatism, close in composition to MORB and OIB. By analogy with the Earth, we suggest that maria magmatism was linked with ascending of thermochemical superplumes, generated at the lunar CMB, when it's liquid iron core was yet existed. Ancient planums on Mars and tesseras at the Venus among vast planides, composed by basaltic flows can also evidence about two stages of their development. Judging on absence of magnetic field, their liquid cores ("energetic hearts") are of no consequence and they are dead bodies now. Work was supported by grant RFBR 07-05-00496

  6. Extra-Pair Mating and Evolution of Cooperative Neighbourhoods

    PubMed Central

    Eliassen, Sigrunn; Jørgensen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    A striking but unexplained pattern in biology is the promiscuous mating behaviour in socially monogamous species. Although females commonly solicit extra-pair copulations, the adaptive reason has remained elusive. We use evolutionary modelling of breeding ecology to show that females benefit because extra-pair paternity incentivizes males to shift focus from a single brood towards the entire neighbourhood, as they are likely to have offspring there. Male-male cooperation towards public goods and dear enemy effects of reduced territorial aggression evolve from selfish interests, and lead to safer and more productive neighbourhoods. The mechanism provides adaptive explanations for the common empirical observations that females engage in extra-pair copulations, that neighbours dominate as extra-pair sires, and that extra-pair mating correlates with predation mortality and breeding density. The models predict cooperative behaviours at breeding sites where males cooperate more towards public goods than females. Where maternity certainty makes females care for offspring at home, paternity uncertainty and a potential for offspring in several broods make males invest in communal benefits and public goods. The models further predict that benefits of extra-pair mating affect whole nests or neighbourhoods, and that cuckolding males are often cuckolded themselves. Derived from ecological mechanisms, these new perspectives point towards the evolution of sociality in birds, with relevance also for mammals and primates including humans. PMID:24987839

  7. Body Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, David E.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses how the use of body language in Chinese fiction strikes most Westerners as unusual, if not strange. Considers that, although this may be the result of differences in gestures or different conventions in fiction, it is a problem for translators, who handle the differences by various strategies, e.g., omission or expansion. (NKA)

  8. Body Piercing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... has healed If the studio uses a piercing “gun” to do body piercings, LEAVE! Piercing guns cannot be sterilized and should NOT be used ... a little bit more than usual. Remember, piercing guns should NEVER be used since they can damage ...

  9. Evolution of the structure of iron meteorites under terrestrial climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, G.; Grokhovsky, V.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Meteoritic iron is affected by many factors in terrestrial conditions. First of all, abundance of water induces an oxidization process. Despite rather high nickel concentration in meteoritic iron, rust is forming on a surface of extraterrestrial matter. But also transformation processes occur inside meteorites at rather low climatic temperatures (0.15 of the melting temperature). Such reaction has been observed for the first time in the Bilibino meteorite [1]. Experiments: Structural changes in kamacite were investigated in ancient iron meteorite falls (Aliskerovo IIIAB, Bilibino IIAB). All of them demonstrate uncompleted recrystallization. Polished sections were analyzed using inverted optical microscope Axiovert 40 MAT and SEM SIGMA VP with EDS and EBSD units. Results: Different percentage of recrystallization was found in Aliskerovo and Bilibino meteorites. 4 % of the section surface in Aliskerovo is occupied by recrystallization products. This value for Bilibino is equal to 80 %. It was noticed that recrystallization started from the kamacite-rhabdite boundaries in the Bilibino meteorite and from the kamacite-schreibersite boundaries in the Aliskerovo meteorite. There are strongly-etched sites in the recrystallized zones. One can suggest that these sites are traces of former boundaries. It is possible to think that the boundaries were moving with jumps because of the position of these sites in the recrystallized zone. Also it was noticed that there is a net of cracks before the recrystallization reaction front. A possible reason for this phenomenon is a wedge of extra material which generates an elastic stress field in the vicinity of the grain boundary [2]. All these phenomena can be explained using the Kirkendall effect on the grain boundary: the boundary shift is the result of the different concentrations of vacancies between the boundary sides.

  10. One common structural peculiarity of the Solar system bodies including the star, planets, satellites and resulting from their globes rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, , G. G.

    2008-09-01

    Often observed a sensible difference in appearance and structure between tropical and extra-tropical zones of various heavenly bodies including rocky and gas planets, satellites and Sun compels to look for a common reason of such phenomenon. All bodies rotate and their spherical shape makes zones at different latitudes to have differing angular momenta as a distance to the rotation axis diminishes gradually from the equator to the poles (this is felt particularly when one launches rockets into space -preferable more cheap launches are from the equatorial regions - Kourou is better than Baikonur). One of remarkable changes occurs at tropics. As a single rotating planetary body tends to have angular momenta of its tectonic blocks equilibrated it starts mechanisms leveling this basic physical property. At tropical zones (bulged also due to the rotation ellipsoid) the outer shell - crust as a consequence tends to be destroyed, sunk, subsided and shrunk; a density of crust material changes; the atmosphere reacts changing chemistry and structure; in terrestrial anthroposphere man looses its mass and stature. But according to the Le Chatelier rule mechanisms with an opposing tendency also begin to act. At Earth the wide planetary long tropical zone is marked by destruction of the crust. It is demonstrated by development of numerous islands of the Malay Archipelago (the Sunda Isls., Maluku Isls, Philippines) between the Southeastern Asia and Australia. In Africa and South America huge depressions of the Congo and Amazon Rivers develops where the Archean crust is subsided to depths of more than 2 km. In the Pacific along the equator numerous islands of Micronesia occur. Subsidence of the basaltic oceanic crust is followed by an intensive folding and faulting of basalt and sedimentary layers (Fig. 1) as a larger mass must be held by a smaller space (a planetary radius is diminished). The central Atlantic is very demonstrative in this sense suffering huge transform fault zones changing to more quite tectonics to the north and south where basaltic effusions form large provinces. This addition of dense basalts to the crust plays to increasing angular momentum of the extra-tropical blocks. At Mars the widespread enigmatic chaotic and fretted terrains at the highland-lowland boundary could be considered as traces of the crust destruction along the wide tropical belt. A system of hillocks and their relics and separating them depressions is controlled by a crosscutting tectonics. Prevailing subsidence here is characteristic. At Saturn a wide tropical zone usually has higher albedo than extra-tropical ones. Relatively heavier methane clouds in the H-He atmosphere are absent around the equator and concentrated on the higher latitudes (Fig. 2). In the tropical zone of Titan the darker methane lowlands (Fig. 3) are normally rippled in at least two directions with spacing a few km to 20 km (such forms erroneously are taken as dunes) (Fig. 4). This subsidence rippling gradually is replaced by smooth surfaces of dark basins (possibly liquid methane) at the higher northern and at lesser degree southern latitudes. This planetary pattern (Fig. 3, 4) is comparable with a behavior of the basalt floor of terrestrial oceans. On Iapetus the wide equatorial zone of the bright trailing hemisphere is distinguished by relatively numerous craters with darkened floors (Fig. 5). This terrain connects both flanks of the dark leading hemisphere and is a continuation of its equatorial bulge (a squeezed out feature as a result of the dark hemisphere subsidence). Thus looks tending subside and disintegrate tropical terrain on the uplifted bright hemisphere. Around the Tethys' equator there is a band of slightly darker surface material (Fig. 6). It may be an area of less contaminated ice and ice with a different structure than ice at higher latitudes as think Cassini scientists. If it is coarser-grained (more loosely packed) and purer then the equatorial region tends to be less dense diminishing its angular momentum. A crosscutting wave rippling producing chains of

  11. Temperatures of the Terrestrial Sphere Interplanetary Space

    E-print Network

    Noone, David

    On the Temperatures of the Terrestrial Sphere and Interplanetary Space Jean-Baptiste Joseph Fourier 1 #12;Translator's note. This is a translation of Jean-Baptiste Joseph Fourier's "M´emoire sur les de France (search catalogue.bnf.fr for author "Fourier, Jean-Baptiste-Joseph"). In the version

  12. Components of the Earth system Terrestrial biosphere

    E-print Network

    Folkins, Ian

    in fossils (ambient CO2) · Carbon-13 in air (biospheric sources) · Carbon 14 in fossils (radiocarbon dating Dryas, Holocene) · past 1,000 years (MWP, "Little Ice Age" #12;Early history of Earth · accreted fromComponents of the Earth system Atmosphere Oceans Cryosphere Terrestrial biosphere Crust and mantle

  13. UV-B EFFECTS ON TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dpeletion of stratospheric O3 layer should result in enhanced levels of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation at the earth's surface compared to present, with potentially damaging effects on biological systems. his paper briefly summarizes some key findings for UV-B effects on terrestri...

  14. Widespread genetic exchange among terrestrial bacteriophages

    E-print Network

    Turner, Paul

    Widespread genetic exchange among terrestrial bacteriophages Olin K. Silander*§ , Daniel M October 27, 2005 (received for review April 15, 2005) Bacteriophages are the most numerous entities Microbes are the most numerous entities in the biosphere, and viruses that infect bacteria (bacteriophages

  15. High efficiency, long life terrestrial solar panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, T.; Khemthong, S.; Ling, R.; Olah, S.

    1977-01-01

    The design of a high efficiency, long life terrestrial module was completed. It utilized 256 rectangular, high efficiency solar cells to achieve high packing density and electrical output. Tooling for the fabrication of solar cells was in house and evaluation of the cell performance was begun. Based on the power output analysis, the goal of a 13% efficiency module was achievable.

  16. Dinosaurs and the Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution

    E-print Network

    Benton, Michael

    Dinosaurs and the Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution Graeme T. Lloyd1,*, Katie E. Davis2 , Davide of dinosaurs reached its highest peak during the mid- and Late Cretaceous, the 50 Myr that preceded their extinction, and yet this explosion of dinosaur diversity may be explained largely by sampling bias. It has

  17. Terrestrial Mammals Hypothesis: Birds and Mammals were

    E-print Network

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Terrestrial Mammals and Birds Hypothesis: Birds and Mammals were predominantly introduced, via agents of biocontrol Gluzberg, Yekaterina 15 Oct. 2001 #12;Mammals: intentional introductions primary are they going? #12;Accidental Pathways and Future Research Stowaway o Birds 2 o Mammals 3 Unaided o Birds 4 o

  18. Extraterrestrial amino acids and terrestrial life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyba, Christopher F.

    1996-07-01

    Since the Swedish chemist Baron Jöns Jacob Berzelius first analysed the Alais meteorite for organic molecules' in 1834, attempts to forge a link between extraterrestrial organic materials and terrestrial life have remained alluring, but often deceptive. New studies reported in this and last week's issues hold the promise of important advances in both endeavours. (AIP)

  19. Nucleosynthesis in the terrestrial and solar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C.; Zhou, R.; Zhan, S.

    1985-01-01

    Variations of Delta D, delta C-13, Delta C-14 and Delta O-18 with time were measured by a lot of experiments. Many abnormalities of isotope abundances in cosmic rays were found by balloons and satellites. It is suggested that these abnormalities are related to nuclearsynthesis in the terrestrial and solar atmospheres and are closely related to solar activities.

  20. Aerodynamic Analysis of Tektites and Their Parent Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, E. W.; Huffaker, R. M.

    1962-01-01

    Experiment and analysis indicate that the button-type australites were derived from glassy spheres which entered or re-entered the atmosphere as cold solid bodies; in case of average-size specimens, the entry direction was nearly horizontal and the entry speed between 6.5 and 11.2 km/sec. Terrestrial origin of such spheres is impossible because of extremely high deceleration rates at low altitudes. The limited extension of the strewn fields rules out extraterrestrial origin of clusters of such spheres because of stability considerations for clusters in space. However, tektites may have been released as liquid droplets from glassy parent bodies ablating in the atmosphere of the earth. The australites then have skipped together with the parent body in order to re-enter as cold spheres. Terrestrial origin of a parent body would require an extremely violent natural event. Ablation analysis shows that fusion of opaque siliceous stone into glass by aerodynamic heating is impossible.

  1. Demographic mechanisms of inbreeding adjustment through extra-pair reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Jane M; Duthie, A Bradley; Wolak, Matthew E; Arcese, Peter; van de Pol, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    One hypothesis explaining extra-pair reproduction is that socially monogamous females mate with extra-pair males to adjust the coefficient of inbreeding (f) of extra-pair offspring (EPO) relative to that of within-pair offspring (WPO) they would produce with their socially paired male. Such adjustment of offspring f requires non-random extra-pair reproduction with respect to relatedness, which is in turn often assumed to require some mechanism of explicit pre-copulatory or post-copulatory kin discrimination. We propose three demographic processes that could potentially cause mean f to differ between individual females’ EPO and WPO given random extra-pair reproduction with available males without necessarily requiring explicit kin discrimination. Specifically, such a difference could arise if social pairings formed non-randomly with respect to relatedness or persisted non-randomly with respect to relatedness, or if the distribution of relatedness between females and their sets of potential mates changed during the period through which social pairings persisted. We used comprehensive pedigree and pairing data from free-living song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) to quantify these three processes and hence investigate how individual females could adjust mean offspring f through instantaneously random extra-pair reproduction. Female song sparrows tended to form social pairings with unrelated or distantly related males slightly less frequently than expected given random pairing within the defined set of available males. Furthermore, social pairings between more closely related mates tended to be more likely to persist across years than social pairings between less closely related mates. However, these effects were small and the mean relatedness between females and their sets of potential extra-pair males did not change substantially across the years through which social pairings persisted. Our framework and analyses illustrate how demographic and social structuring within populations might allow females to adjust mean f of offspring through random extra-pair reproduction without necessarily requiring explicit kin discrimination, implying that adjustment of offspring f might be an inevitable consequence of extra-pair reproduction. New theoretical and empirical studies are required to explore the general magnitude of such effects and quantify the degree to which they could facilitate or constrain long-term evolution of extra-pair reproduction. PMID:25645743

  2. Regional terrestrial water storage change and evapotranspiration from terrestrial and atmospheric water balance computations

    E-print Network

    Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Famiglietti, J. S

    2008-01-01

    Long-Term Drift in the Estimated Terrestrial Water Storage [STORAGE AND EVAPOTRANSPIRATION to check the accuracy of atmospheric water balance com- putations is through the comparison between the long-term

  3. A Statistical Examination of the Change in Body Size of Mammalian Communities Across the Eocene-Oligocene Boundary

    E-print Network

    Schmerge, Joshua David

    2011-04-19

    , affects the mass of mammals. In such ectothermic groups of 7 terrestrial animals as insects, amphibians, and reptiles, temperature has a direct effect on body mass. Ectothermic animals, reptiles in particular, benefit from larger sizes as a way...

  4. The Role of Extra-Credit Assignments in the Teaching of World Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alley, David

    2011-01-01

    The granting of extra credit is a hotly debated topic in all fields of education. Teachers are reluctant to offer extra credit for fear of inflating grades, but students are persistent in their demands for extra-credit points to which they have become accustomed. This article considers extra-credit assignments in the teaching of world languages.…

  5. Abiogenic synthesis on terrestrial orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, Michael B.; Kuzicheva, Evgenia; Gontareva, Natalia

    Meteorites probably played a central role in the evolution of life. Due to the structure, they tend to adsorb organic compounds and catalyze a variety of organic reactions critical to scenarios of life’s origins. We have shown experimentally that extraterrestrial minerals can catalyze the formation of peptides and nucleotides. The present study was performed onboard different Russian space stations (BION, COSMOS, and MIR) with various duration, altitude, and radiation conditions. Irradiation of solid samples, free or admixed with certain minerals, was the major task of future space flight experiments, planned for performing onboard Russian space satellite Bion-M. The «simulated space ice conditions» experiments have shown the synthesis of simple biochemical compounds in the form of amino acid’s precursors and pyrimidine bases (uracil, cyrosine and thymine) of the nucleic acids. Our investigation dealt with further reaction of nucleic acid components to nucleotides - main components of RNA and DNA, and single aminoacids to oligopeptides. We investigated two types of reactions: (1) abiogenic synthesis of nucleotides from mixtures of nucleoside + inorganic phosphate; (2) abiogenic synthesis of dipeptides from mixtures of simple amino acids. The reaction mixture in the form of a solid film contains (1) nucleoside and dihydrogen phosphate; (2) two different amino acids. Seven different nucleosides (thymidine, cytidine, uracil, adenosine or deoxyadenosine, guanosine or deoxyguanosine) and four mixtures of aromatic (tyrosine or triptophan) and aliphatic (glycine or alanine) amino acids were investigated. Mixtures were irradiated as solid films with different sources of energy: (1) VUV-light of 145 nm; (2) high energy protons (2-6 MeV); and (3) were installed on the surface of biosputnik in outstanding container when they were exposed to the action of all spectra of the open space energy sources during the entire time of flight. We have shown experimentally that the solid mixtures of amino acids produce more complex compounds when they are exposed to open space energy sources. Both irradiation and photolysis may destroy molecules as well as allow the synthesis of new and more complex ones. In space flight experiments onboard of «BION»-type satellites the solid films from mixtures of different nucleosides and inorganic phosphate or mixtures of amino acids were exposed to space conditions. The abiogenic synthesis of the full set of the natural nucleotides and oligopeptides is observed. Thus we can suppose the chemical evolution of complex biological compounds would take place on early stage of the star system evolution, inside the protoplanetary nebula and reached the stage of polymerization before the end of planet accretion. The compound synthesized in these conditions could have survived inside comets, the last witnesses of the formation of our Solar system. The aim of our work was also to study the in influence of mineral substrates on the reaction of oligomerization of amino acids under the action of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation with wavelengths less than 200 nm, one of the main energy sources of the Sun. Simple oligopeptides can be formed on solid material not only by VUV-light but also by proton radiation, heat, and gamma-radiation. Thus, it can be assumed that the chemical evolution would have taken place during the early stage of the Solar system origin and reached the stage of polymerization before the end of planet accretion on the surface of small bodies.

  6. Linkages between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bretherton, Francis; Dickinson, Robert E.; Fung, Inez; Moore, Berrien, III; Prather, Michael; Running, Steven W.; Tiessen, Holm

    1992-01-01

    The primary research issue in understanding the role of terrestrial ecosystems in global change is analyzing the coupling between processes with vastly differing rates of change, from photosynthesis to community change. Representing this coupling in models is the central challenge to modeling the terrestrial biosphere as part of the earth system. Terrestrial ecosystems participate in climate and in the biogeochemical cycles on several temporal scales. Some of the carbon fixed by photosynthesis is incorporated into plant tissue and is delayed from returning to the atmosphere until it is oxidized by decomposition or fire. This slower (i.e., days to months) carbon loop through the terrestrial component of the carbon cycle, which is matched by cycles of nutrients required by plants and decomposers, affects the increasing trend in atmospheric CO2 concentration and imposes a seasonal cycle on that trend. Moreover, this cycle includes key controls over biogenic trace gas production. The structure of terrestrial ecosystems, which responds on even longer time scales (annual to century), is the integrated response to the biogeochemical and environmental constraints that develop over the intermediate time scale. The loop is closed back to the climate system since it is the structure of ecosystems, including species composition, that sets the terrestrial boundary condition in the climate system through modification of surface roughness, albedo, and, to a great extent, latent heat exchange. These separate temporal scales contain explicit feedback loops which may modify ecosystem dynamics and linkages between ecosystems and the atmosphere. The long-term change in climate, resulting from increased atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (e.g., CO2, CH4, and nitrous oxide (N2O)) will further modify the global environment and potentially induce further ecosystem change. Modeling these interactions requires coupling successional models to biogeochemical models to physiological models that describe the exchange of water, energy, and biogenic trace gases between the vegetation and the atmosphere at fine time scales. There does not appear to be any obvious way to allow direct reciprocal coupling of atmospheric general circulation models (GCM's), which inherently run with fine time steps, to ecosystem or successional models, which have coarse temporal resolution, without the interposition of physiological canopy models. This is equally true for biogeochemical models of the exchange of carbon dioxide and trace gases. This coupling across time scales is nontrivial and sets the focus for the modeling strategy.

  7. Space and Terrestrial Photovoltaics: Synergy and Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Raffaelle, Ryne; Emery, Keith

    2002-10-01

    A historical view of the research and development in photovoltaics from the perspective of both the terrestrial and the space communities is presented from the early days through the '70s and '80s and the '90s and beyond. The synergy of both communities in the beginning and once again in the present and hopefully future are highlighted, with examples of the important features in each program. The space community which was impressed by the light-weight and reliability of photovoltaics drove much of the early development. Even up to today, nearly every satellites and other scientific space probe that has been launched has included some solar power. However, since the cost of these power systems were only a small fraction of the satellite and launch cost, the use of much of this technology for the terrestrial marketplace was not feasible. It was clear that the focus of the terrestrial community would be best served by reducing costs. This would include addressing a variety of manufacturing issues and raising the rate of production. Success in these programs and a resulting globalization of effort resulted in major strides in the reduction of PV module costs and increased production. Although, the space community derived benefit from some of these advancements, its focus was on pushing the envelope with regard to cell efficiency. The gap between theoretical efficiencies and experimental efficiencies for silicon, gallium arsenide and indium phosphide became almost non-existent. Recent work by both communities have focused on the development thin film cells of amorphous silicon, CuInSe2 and CdTe. These cells hold the promise of lower costs for the terrestrial community as well as possible flexible substrates, better radiation resistance, and higher specific power for the space community. It is predicted that future trends in both communities will be directed toward advances through the application of nanotechnology. A picture is emerging in which the space and terrestrial solar cell communities shall once again share many common goals and, in fact, companies may manufacture both space and terrestrial solar cells in III-V materials and thin film materials. Basic photovoltaics research including these current trends in nanotechnology provides a valuable service for both worlds in that fundamental understanding of cell processes is still vitally important, particularly with new materials or new cell structures. It is entirely possible that one day we might have one solar array design that will meet the criteria for success in both space and on the Earth or perhaps the Moon or Mars.

  8. Planetary System Evolution in the Terrestrial Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George

    We propose to characterize the role of major collisional episodes in the terrestrial zones of other planetary systems, using data from WISE (and Spitzer). We will: 1.) identify old stars whose terrestrial zones have recently been shaken up dynamically (e.g., activity similar to the Late Heavy Bombardment); and 2.) look for young stars where major collisions are occurring, signaling a phase analogous to the one when our Moon was formed. These two phases represent critical periods in the evolution of the Solar System. The Late Heavy Bombardment resulted from a destabilization of the Solar System by a mean-motion resonance between Jupiter and Saturn, leading to ejection of most of the planetesimals and an intense period of impacts onto the terrestrial planets. The formation of the Moon occurred in a younger violent phase, extending roughly from 30 to 130 Myr, when dynamical models predict that giant impacts will still occur even though most of the terrestrial planet formation is complete. Both of these phases would have produced copious dust in the terrestrial zone. Similar activity around other stars is detectable through the mid-infrared excesses emitted by such dust when it is warmed by the star (creating warm debris disks). However, previous infrared surveys have lacked the sensitivity, accuracy, or sky coverage to study this process systematically. For the first time, the WISE all-sky survey at 22 microns combines: 1.) a sufficiently large number of stars that these rare events should be seen in reasonable numbers; and 2.) mid-infrared photometry with sufficient accuracy to detect the excesses, even to within < 10% of the stellar photospheres. After extracting candidates from the WISE data, we will weed out false positives due to chance superpositions of sources or stellar mass loss. This will require acquiring ancillary data through a combination of information from the literature and new targeted observations using groundbased facilities. We will determine ages for the stars that survive this screening, using indicators such as chromospheric activity, spectral type (giant vs. main sequence), and position on a metallicity-adjusted HR diagram. The result will be a listing of stars with well-estimated ages and accurately- measured excesses signaling likely violent collisional episodes, providing a broad perspective on the frequency and intensity of the violent phases of planetary system evolution. We will put this work into context by comparison with the results of our theoretical models of debris disk collisional cascades and evolution. Our proposed work will allow comparison of critical events in the evolution of the Solar System and the Earth with the evolution of other planetary systems in their terrestrial zones.

  9. Space and Terrestrial Photovoltaics: Synergy and Diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Raffaelle, Ryne; Emery, Keith

    2002-01-01

    A historical view of the research and development in photovoltaics from the perspective of both the terrestrial and the space communities is presented from the early days through the '70s and '80s and the '90s and beyond. The synergy of both communities in the beginning and once again in the present and hopefully future are highlighted, with examples of the important features in each program. The space community which was impressed by the light-weight and reliability of photovoltaics drove much of the early development. Even up to today, nearly every satellites and other scientific space probe that has been launched has included some solar power. However, since the cost of these power systems were only a small fraction of the satellite and launch cost, the use of much of this technology for the terrestrial marketplace was not feasible. It was clear that the focus of the terrestrial community would be best served by reducing costs. This would include addressing a variety of manufacturing issues and raising the rate of production. Success in these programs and a resulting globalization of effort resulted in major strides in the reduction of PV module costs and increased production. Although, the space community derived benefit from some of these advancements, its focus was on pushing the envelope with regard to cell efficiency. The gap between theoretical efficiencies and experimental efficiencies for silicon, gallium arsenide and indium phosphide became almost non-existent. Recent work by both communities have focused on the development thin film cells of amorphous silicon, CuInSe2 and CdTe. These cells hold the promise of lower costs for the terrestrial community as well as possible flexible substrates, better radiation resistance, and higher specific power for the space community. It is predicted that future trends in both communities will be directed toward advances through the application of nanotechnology. A picture is emerging in which the space and terrestrial solar cell communities shall once again share many common goals and, in fact, companies may manufacture both space and terrestrial solar cells in III-V materials and thin film materials. Basic photovoltaics research including these current trends in nanotechnology provides a valuable service for both worlds in that fundamental understanding of cell processes is still vitally important, particularly with new materials or new cell structures. It is entirely possible that one day we might have one solar array design that will meet the criteria for success in both space and on the Earth or perhaps the Moon or Mars.

  10. Exposure and Terrestrial Histories of New Lunar and Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Hillegonds, D. J.; McHargue, L. R.; Jull, A. J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Cosmogenic nuclide studies of lunar and Martian meteorites have contributed significantly to our understanding of these objects. By measuring a combination of cosmogenic stable- and radionuclides, we can determine a number of important properties of those meteorites. Most lunar meteorites have complex cosmic ray exposure histories, having been exposed both at some depth on the lunar surface (2 irradiation) before their ejection and as small bodies in space (4 irradiation) during transport from the Moon to the Earth. On the other hand, we have not observed evidence of complex exposure history for any Martian meteorites, so far. These exposures were then followed by residence on Earth s surface, a time commonly referred to as the terrestrial age. In addition to their complement of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) produced nuclides some lunar and Martian meteorites contain nuclides produced by solar cosmic rays (SCR). Unraveling the complex history of these objects requires the measurement of at least four cosmogenic nuclides. The specific goals of these measurements are to constrain or set limits on the following shielding or exposure parameters: (1) the depth of the sample at the time of ejection from the Moon or Mars; (2) the transit time (4 exposure age) from ejection off the lunar or Martian surface to the time of capture by the Earth and (3) the terrestrial residence time. The sum of the transit time and residence time yield an ejection age. The ejection age, in conjunction with the sample depth on the Moon or Mars, can then be used to model impact and ejection mechanisms.

  11. Constraints on extra dimensions from precision molecular spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    E. J. Salumbides; A. N. Schellekens; B. Gato-Rivera; W. Ubachs

    2015-02-10

    Accurate investigations of quantum level energies in molecular systems are shown to provide a test ground to constrain the size of compactified extra dimensions. This is made possible by the recent progress in precision metrology with ultrastable lasers on energy levels in neutral molecular hydrogen (H$_2$, HD and D$_2$) and the molecular hydrogen ions (H$_2^+$, HD$^+$ and D$_2^+$). Comparisons between experiment and quantum electrodynamics calculations for these molecular systems can be interpreted in terms of probing large extra dimensions, under which conditions gravity will become much stronger. Molecules are a probe of space-time geometry at typical distances where chemical bonds are effective, i.e. at length scales of an \\AA. Constraints on compactification radii for extra dimensions are derived within the Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Dvali framework, while constraints for curvature or brane separation are derived within the Randall-Sundrum framework. Based on the molecular spectroscopy of D$_2$ molecules and HD$^+$ ions, the compactification size for seven extra dimensions (in connection to M-theory defined in 11 dimensions) of equal size is shown to be limited to $R_7 < 0.6 \\mu$m. While limits on compactification sizes of extra dimensions based on other branches of physics are compared, the prospect of further tightening constraints from the molecular method is discussed.

  12. Particle creation in the presence of a warped extra dimension

    E-print Network

    Suman Ghosh; Sayan Kar

    2008-07-15

    Particle creation in spacetimes with a warped extra dimension is studied. In particular, we investigate the dynamics of a conformally coupled, massless scalar field in a five dimensional warped geometry where the induced metric on the 3--branes is that of a spatially flat cosmological model. We look at situations where the scale of the extra dimension is assumed (i) to be time independent or (ii) to have specific functional forms for time dependence. The warp factor is chosen to be that of the Randall--Sundrum model. With particular choices for the functional form of the scale factor (and also the function characterising the time evolution of the extra dimension) we obtain the ${| \\beta_k|}^2$, the particle number and energy densities after solving (wherever possible, analytically but, otherwise, numerically) the conformal scalar field equations. The behaviour of these quantities for the massless and massive Kaluza--Klein modes are examined. Our results show the effect of a warped extra dimension on particle creation and illustrate how the nature of particle production on the brane depends on the nature of warping, type of cosmological evolution as well as the temporal evolution of the extra dimension.

  13. Probing Terrestrial Planet Formation by Witnessing Large Collisions in Extreme Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Kate

    2015-12-01

    The Kepler results indicate that many young planetary systems build terrestrial planets. The most dramatic phases of this process are thought to be oligarchic and chaotic growth, roughly up to ages of 200 million years, when violent collisions occur between bodies of sizes up to proto-planets. Such events should be marked by the production of huge amounts of debris, including clouds of dust, as has been observed in some of the extreme debris disks (young stars with high fractional dust luminosity and prominent solid-state features in the mid-infrared). The newly discovered variable emission from extreme debris disks provides a unique opportunity to learn about asteroid-sized bodies in young exoplanetary systems and to explore planetesimal collisions and their aftermaths during the era of terrestrial- planet-building.We have a on-going Spitzer program to monitor a dozen of young, dusty debris systems to investigate the incidence, nature, and evolution of these impacts through time-domain observations. I will highlight recent results from time-series monitoring of a 35 Myr-old disk around ID8 in NGC 2547, and discuss future directions for the study of the detailed process of large impacts in the era of terrestrial planet formation using space facilities.

  14. Evidence for allelism of the recessive insertional mutation add and the dominant mouse mutation extra-toes (Xt).

    PubMed

    Pohl, T M; Mattei, M G; Rüther, U

    1990-12-01

    A recessive mutant caused by insertional mutagenesis in transgenic mice has been detected in which the anterior part of the forelimb is disorganized. The morphology of the thumb is always altered and sometimes the adjacent finger has an extra phalanx. This phenotype suggests that a body plan gene is affected. We have named the mutation add (anterior digit-pattern deformity). Using the cloned DNA from the flanking region of the integrated transgene, add has been mapped close to the centromere of chromosome 13. This position links add to a genetically mapped locus called extra-toes (Xt). The phenotype of the double-mutant add/Xt as well as the molecular analysis suggest that add and Xt are allelic. PMID:1983115

  15. Connecting the dots II: Phase changes in the climate dynamics of tidally locked terrestrial exoplanets

    E-print Network

    Carone, Ludmila; Decin, Leen

    2015-01-01

    We investigate 3D atmosphere dynamics for tidally locked terrestrial planets with an Earth-like atmosphere and irradiation for different rotation periods ($P_{rot}=1-100$ days) and planet sizes ($R_P=1-2 R_{Earth}$) with unprecedented fine detail. We could precisely identify three climate state transition regions that are associated with phase transitions in standing tropical and extra tropical Rossby waves. We confirm that the climate on fast rotating planets may assume multiple states ($P_{rot}\\leq 12$ days for $R_P=2 R_{Earth}$). Our study is, however, the first to identify the type of planetary wave associated with different climate states: The first state is dominated by standing tropical Rossby waves with fast equatorial superrotation. The second state is dominated by standing extra tropical Rossby waves with high latitude westerly jets with slower wind speeds. For very fast rotations ($P_{rot}\\leq 5$~days for $R_P=2 R_{Earth}$), we find another climate state transition, where the standing tropical and ...

  16. Extra-Solar Planetary Imager (ESPI) for Space Based Jovian Planetary Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Rick G.; Melnick, Gary J.; Nisenson, Peter; Papaliolios, Costa; Ridgeway, Steve; Friedman, Edward; Gezari, Dan Y.; Harwit, Martin; Graf, Paul

    2002-01-01

    We report on out Extra-Solar Planetary Imager (ESPI) study for a recent Midex (NASA Medium Class Explorer Mission) proposal. Proposed for ESPI was a 1.5 x 1.5 square meter Jacquinot apodized square aperture telescope. The combination of apodization and a square aperture telescope significantly reduces the diffracted light from a bright central source over much of the telescope focal plane. As a result, observations of very faint astronomical objects next to bright sources with angular separations as small as 0.32 arcseconds become possible. This permits a sensitive search for exo-planets in reflected light. The system is capable of detecting a Jupiter-like planet in a relatively long-period orbit around as many as 160 to 175 stars with a signal-to-noise ratio greater than 5 in observations lasting maximally 100 hours per star. We discuss the effects of wavefront error, mirror speckle, pointing error and signal-to-noise issues, as well as the scalability of our ESPI study with respect to NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder mission.

  17. Extra-solar planetary imager (ESPI) for space-based Jovian planetary detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Gezari, Daniel Y.; Melnick, Gary J.; Nisenson, Peter; Papaliolios, Costas D.; Ridgway, Stephen T.; Friedman, Edward J.; Harwit, Martin; Graf, Paul

    2003-02-01

    The Extra-Solar Planetary Imager (ESPI) is envisioned as a space based, high dynamic range, visible imager capable of detecting Jovian like planets. Initially proposed as a NASA Midex (NASA/Medium Class Explorer) mission (PI:Gary Melnick), as a space-based 1.5 x 1.5 m2 Jacquinot apodized square aperture telescope. The combination of apodization and a square aperture telescope reduces the diffracted light from a bright central source increasing the planetary to stellar contrast over much of the telescope focal plane. As a result, observations of very faint astronomical objects next to bright sources with angular separations as small as 0.32 arcseconds become possible. This permits a sensitive search for exo-planets in reflected light. ESPI is capable of detecting a Jupiter-like planet in a relatively long-period orbit around as many as 160 to 175 stars with a signal-to-noise ratio > 5 in observations lasting maximally 100 hours per star out to ~16 parsecs. We discuss the scientific ramifications, an overview of the system design including apodizing a square aperture, signal to noise issues and the effect of wavefront errors and the scalability of ESPI with respect to NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder mission.

  18. Use of terrestrial laser scanning data to drive decimetric resolution urban inundation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, Christopher C.; Fewtrell, Timothy J.; Duncan, Alastair; Shaad, Kashif; Horritt, Matthew S.; Bates, Paul D.

    2012-06-01

    The advent of airborne LIDAR sparked a renewed research drive in two-dimensional hydraulic modelling at the turn of the millennium due to its ability to rapidly generate accurate DEMs over wide areas. Terrestrial LIDAR applies the same principle but uses a mobile ground-based platform, allowing rapid collection of terrain data in urban areas at decimetric scale. Here we apply two computationally efficient hydraulic models to DEMs of a small urban test site in Alcester, UK, derived from terrestrial and airborne LIDAR data at 10 cm and 1 m scales. The first model, LISFLOOD-FP, is a 2D raster-based model employing a simplified formulation of the de St. Venant equations, whilst the second model, ISIS-FAST, employs a proprietary rapid flood spreading algorithm. The response of the models to changes in DEM resolution and data source are analysed and compared across two event scales. For the first time we show that a flood wave propagating across an urban domain responds to small scale topographic features, such as street kerbs and road surface camber, which are not represented in airborne data but which are resolved by the terrestrial laser scanner. Importantly these features are preserved even if the 10 cm terrestrial data are degraded to the 1 m scale of the airborne DEM. The results indicate that inclusion of these features improves the representation of hydraulic connectivity over the DEM, and hence flood risk estimation. LISFLOOD-FP is shown to be more robust to changes in DEM resolution than ISIS-FAST due to the momentum conservation inherent to the simplified shallow water formulation, but the reduced computational requirements of ISIS-FAST at 10 cm scale allow it to be used for ensemble simulations. The extra detail inherent in terrestrial laser scanning data is advantageous where accurate representation of surface features is required, with potential benefit to high asset-value flood risk analysis and future studies into coupled surface/sewer and pluvial urban inundation models.

  19. Biochemical nature of Russell Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Francesca Mossuto, Maria; Ami, Diletta; Anelli, Tiziana; Fagioli, Claudio; Maria Doglia, Silvia; Sitia, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Professional secretory cells produce and release abundant proteins. Particularly in case of mutations and/or insufficient chaperoning, these can aggregate and become toxic within or amongst cells. Immunoglobulins (Ig) are no exception. In the extracellular space, certain Ig-L chains form fibrils causing systemic amyloidosis. On the other hand, Ig variants lacking the first constant domain condense in dilated cisternae of the early secretory compartment, called Russell Bodies (RB), frequently observed in plasma cell dyscrasias, autoimmune diseases and chronic infections. RB biogenesis can be recapitulated in lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells by expressing mutant Ig-?, providing powerful models to investigate the pathophysiology of endoplasmic reticulum storage disorders. Here we analyze the aggregation propensity and the biochemical features of the intra- and extra-cellular Ig deposits in human cells, revealing ?-aggregated features for RB. PMID:26223695

  20. Nitrogen inputs accelerate phosphorus cycling rates across a wide variety of terrestrial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Marklein, Alison R; Houlton, Benjamin Z

    2012-02-01

    • Biologically essential elements--especially nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)--constrain plant growth and microbial functioning; however, human activities are drastically altering the magnitude and pattern of such nutrient limitations on land. Here we examine interactions between N and P cycles of P mineralizing enzyme activities (phosphatase enzymes) across a wide variety of terrestrial biomes. • We synthesized results from 34 separate studies and used meta-analysis to evaluate phosphatase activity with N, P, or N×P fertilization. • Our results show that N fertilization enhances phosphatase activity, from the tropics to the extra-tropics, both on plant roots and in bulk soils. By contrast, P fertilization strongly suppresses rates of phosphatase activity. • These results imply that phosphatase enzymes are strongly responsive to changes in local nutrient cycle conditions. We also show that plant phosphatases respond more strongly to fertilization than soil phosphatases. The tight coupling between N and P provides a mechanism for recent observations of N and P co-limitation on land. Moreover, our results suggest that terrestrial plants and microbes can allocate excess N to phosphatase enzymes, thus delaying the onset of single P limitation to plant productivity as can occur via human modifications to the global N cycle. PMID:22122515

  1. Examining the Prey Mass of Terrestrial and Aquatic Carnivorous Mammals: Minimum, Maximum and Range

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Marlee A.; Rogers, Tracey L.

    2014-01-01

    Predator-prey body mass relationships are a vital part of food webs across ecosystems and provide key information for predicting the susceptibility of carnivore populations to extinction. Despite this, there has been limited research on the minimum and maximum prey size of mammalian carnivores. Without information on large-scale patterns of prey mass, we limit our understanding of predation pressure, trophic cascades and susceptibility of carnivores to decreasing prey populations. The majority of studies that examine predator-prey body mass relationships focus on either a single or a subset of mammalian species, which limits the strength of our models as well as their broader application. We examine the relationship between predator body mass and the minimum, maximum and range of their prey's body mass across 108 mammalian carnivores, from weasels to baleen whales (Carnivora and Cetacea). We test whether mammals show a positive relationship between prey and predator body mass, as in reptiles and birds, as well as examine how environment (aquatic and terrestrial) and phylogenetic relatedness play a role in this relationship. We found that phylogenetic relatedness is a strong driver of predator-prey mass patterns in carnivorous mammals and accounts for a higher proportion of variance compared with the biological drivers of body mass and environment. We show a positive predator-prey body mass pattern for terrestrial mammals as found in reptiles and birds, but no relationship for aquatic mammals. Our results will benefit our understanding of trophic interactions, the susceptibility of carnivores to population declines and the role of carnivores within ecosystems. PMID:25162695

  2. Detection of Terrestrial Planets Using Transit Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David; Witteborn, Fred; Jenkins, Jon; Dunham, Edward; Boruci, William; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Transit photometry detection of planets offers many advantages: an ability to detect terrestrial size planets, direct determination of the planet's size, applicability to all main-sequence stars, and a differential brightness change of the periodic signature being independent of stellar distance or planetary orbital semi-major axis. Ground and space based photometry have already been successful in detecting transits of the giant planet HD209458b. However, photometry 100 times better is required to detect terrestrial planets. We present results of laboratory measurements of an end-to-end photometric system incorporating all of the important confounding noise features of both the sky and a space based photometer including spacecraft jitter. In addition to demonstrating an instrumental noise of less than 10 ppm (an Earth transit of a solar-like star is 80 ppm), the brightnesses of individual stars were dimmed to simulate Earth-size transit signals. These 'transits' were reliably detected as part of the tests.

  3. Application of Terrestrial Environments in Orion Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Terrestrial and Planetary Environments (TPE) Team support to the NASA Orion space vehicle. The TPE utilizes meteorological data to assess the sensitivities of the vehicle due to the terrestrial environment. The Orion vehicle, part of the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Program, is designed to carry astronauts beyond low-earth orbit and is currently undergoing a series of tests including Exploration Test Flight (EFT) - 1. The presentation describes examples of TPE support for vehicle design and several tests, as well as support for EFT-1 and planning for upcoming Exploration Missions while emphasizing the importance of accounting for the natural environment's impact to the vehicle early in the vehicle's program.

  4. Toward "optimal" integration of terrestrial biosphere models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalm, Christopher R.; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Fisher, Joshua B.; Michalak, Anna M.; Bowman, Kevin; Ciais, Philippe; Cook, Robert; El-Masri, Bassil; Hayes, Daniel; Huang, Maoyi; Ito, Akihiko; Jain, Atul; King, Anthony W.; Lei, Huimin; Liu, Junjie; Lu, Chaoqun; Mao, Jiafu; Peng, Shushi; Poulter, Benjamin; Ricciuto, Daniel; Schaefer, Kevin; Shi, Xiaoying; Tao, Bo; Tian, Hanqin; Wang, Weile; Wei, Yaxing; Yang, Jia; Zeng, Ning

    2015-06-01

    Multimodel ensembles (MME) are commonplace in Earth system modeling. Here we perform MME integration using a 10-member ensemble of terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) from the Multiscale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP). We contrast optimal (skill based for present-day carbon cycling) versus naïve ("one model-one vote") integration. MsTMIP optimal and naïve mean land sink strength estimates (-1.16 versus -1.15 Pg C per annum respectively) are statistically indistinguishable. This holds also for grid cell values and extends to gross uptake, biomass, and net ecosystem productivity. TBM skill is similarly indistinguishable. The added complexity of skill-based integration does not materially change MME values. This suggests that carbon metabolism has predictability limits and/or that all models and references are misspecified. Resolving this issue requires addressing specific uncertainty types (initial conditions, structure, and references) and a change in model development paradigms currently dominant in the TBM community.

  5. Deviations From Newton's Law in Supersymmetric Large Extra Dimensions

    E-print Network

    Callin, P

    2006-01-01

    Deviations from Newton's Inverse-Squared Law at the micron length scale are smoking-gun signals for models containing Supersymmetric Large Extra Dimensions (SLEDs), which have been proposed as approaches for resolving the Cosmological Constant Problem. Just like their non-supersymmetric counterparts, SLED models predict gravity to deviate from the inverse-square law because of the advent of new dimensions at sub-millimeter scales. However SLED models differ from their non-supersymmetric counterparts in three important ways: (i) the size of the extra dimensions is fixed by the observed value of the Dark Energy density, making it impossible to shorten the range over which new deviations from Newton's law must be seen; (ii) supersymmetry predicts there to be more fields in the extra dimensions than just gravity, implying different types of couplings to matter and the possibility of repulsive as well as attractive interactions; and (iii) the same mechanism which is purported to keep the cosmological constant natu...

  6. Dark Energy from Casimir Energy on Noncommutative Extra Dimensions

    E-print Network

    S. Fabi; B. Harms; G. Karatheodoris

    2006-07-20

    We study the possibility that dark energy is a manifestation of the Casimir energy on extra dimensions with the topology of $S^2$. We consider our universe to be $M^4 \\times S^2$ and modify the geometry by introducing noncommutativity on the extra dimensions only, i.e. replacing $S^2$ with the fuzzy version $S_{F}^2$. We find the energy density as a function of the size of the representation $M+1$ of the algebra of $S_{F}^2$, and we calculate its value for the $M+1=2$ case. The value of the energy density turns out to be positive, i.e. provides dark energy, and the size of the extra dimensions agrees with the experimental limit. We also recover the correct commutative limit as the noncommutative parameter goes to zero.

  7. Sidestepping the Cosmological Constant with Football-Shaped Extra Dimensions

    E-print Network

    Sean M. Carroll; Monica M. Guica

    2003-02-11

    We present an exact solution for a factorizable brane-world spacetime with two extra dimensions and explicit brane sources. The compactification manifold has the topology of a two-sphere, and is stabilized by a bulk cosmological constant and magnetic flux. The geometry of the sphere is locally round except for conical singularities at the locations of two antipodal branes, deforming the sphere into an American-style football. The bulk magnetic flux needs to be fine-tuned to obtain flat geometry on the branes. Once this is done, the brane geometry is insensitive to the brane vacuum energy, which only affects the conical deficit angle of the extra dimensions. Solutions of this form provide a new arena in which to explore brane-world phenomenology and the effects of extra dimensions on the cosmological constant problem.

  8. Sidestepping the Cosmological Constant with Football-Shaped Extra Dimensions

    E-print Network

    Carroll, S M; Carroll, Sean M.; Guica, Monica M.

    2003-01-01

    We present an exact solution for a factorizable brane-world spacetime with two extra dimensions and explicit brane sources. The compactification manifold has the topology of a two-sphere, and is stabilized by a bulk cosmological constant and magnetic flux. The geometry of the sphere is locally round except for conical singularities at the locations of two antipodal branes, deforming the sphere into an American-style football. The bulk magnetic flux needs to be fine-tuned to obtain flat geometry on the branes. Once this is done, the brane geometry is insensitive to the brane vacuum energy, which only affects the conical deficit angle of the extra dimensions. Solutions of this form provide a new arena in which to explore brane-world phenomenology and the effects of extra dimensions on the cosmological constant problem.

  9. Fermion Generations from "Apple-Shaped" Extra Dimensions

    E-print Network

    Merab Gogberashvili; Pavle Midodashvili; Douglas Singleton

    2007-08-13

    We examine the behavior of fermions in the presence of an internal compact 2-manifold which in one of the spherical angles exhibits a conical character with an obtuse angle. The extra manifold can be pictured as an apple-like surface i.e. a sphere with an extra "wedge" insert. Such a surface has conical singularities at north and south poles. It is shown that for this setup one can obtain, in four dimensions, three trapped massless fermion modes which differ from each other by having different values of angular momentum with respect to the internal 2-manifold. The extra angular momentum acts as the family label and these three massless modes are interpreted as the three generations of fundamental fermions.

  10. Cosmogenic helium in a terrestrial igneous rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurz, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    New helium isotopic measurements on samples from the Kula formation of Haleakala volcano of Hawaii are presented that are best explained by an in situ cosmogenic origin for a significant fraction of the He-3. Results from crushing and stepwise heating experiments, and consideration of the exposure age of the sample at the surface and the cosmic ray fluxes strongly support this hypothesis. Although crustal cosmogenic helium has been proposed previously, this represents its first unambiguous identification in a terrestrial sample.

  11. A toy terrestrial carbon flow model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parton, William J.; Running, Steven W.; Walker, Brian

    1992-01-01

    A generalized carbon flow model for the major terrestrial ecosystems of the world is reported. The model is a simplification of the Century model and the Forest-Biogeochemical model. Topics covered include plant production, decomposition and nutrient cycling, biomes, the utility of the carbon flow model for predicting carbon dynamics under global change, and possible applications to state-and-transition models and environmentally driven global vegetation models.

  12. Global change and terrestrial hydrology - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of terrestrial hydrology in determining the coupling between the surface and atmosphere. Present experience with interactive numerical simulation is discussed and approaches to the inclusion of land hydrology in global climate models ae considered. At present, a wide range of answers as to expected changes in surface hydrology is given by nominally similar models. Studies of the effects of tropical deforestation and global warming illustrate this point.

  13. Terrestrial and extraterrestrial landslide size statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, M. T.; Xiao, Z.; Komatsu, G.; Peruccacci, S.; Guzzetti, F.

    2015-10-01

    We present the size statistics of landslides on Earth, Mars, the Moon and Mercury. We used two existing landslide inventories for New Mexico(USA)and for Valles Marineris, Mars, and two new inventories of lunar and Mercurian landslides. Failures on the Moon and Mercury were detected and mapped along the internal walls of impact craters. The statistical distributions of the extraterrestrial landslide area were exploited to compare the results with similar distributions obtained for terrestrial landslides.

  14. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Terrestrial Planets: included:Lunar Soils May Tell Us When the Geomagnetic Field First Appeared; Metal-Silicate Segregation in Deforming Dunitic Rocks: Applications to Core Formation in Europa and Ganymede; Diamond Formation in Core Segregation Experiments; The Effect of Pressure on Potassium Partitioning Between Metallic Liquid and Silicate Melt; Reduction of W, Mn, and Fe, During High-Temperature Vaporization; Micrometeoritic Neon in the Earth s Mantle ; and New Analyses of Diverse Hadean Zircon Inclusions from Jack Hills.

  15. Interferometer Designs for the Terrestrial Planet Finder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, P. R.; Dumont, P. J.; Colavita, M. M.

    1999-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) is a space-based infrared interferometer that will combine high sensitivity and spatial resolution to detect and characterize planetary systems within 15 pc of our sun. TPF is a key element in NASA's Origins Program and is currently under study in its Pre-Project Phase. We review some of the interferometer designs that have been considered for starlight nulling, with particular attention to the architecture and subsystems of the central beam-combiner.

  16. Interferometer Designs for the Terrestrial Planet Finder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, P. R.; Dumont, P. J.; Colavita, M. M.

    2000-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) is a space-based infrared interferometer that will combine high sensitivity and spatial resolution to detect and characterize planetary systems within 15 pc of our sun. TPF is a key element in NASA's Origins Program and is currently un- der study in its Pre-Project Phase. We review some of the interferometer designs that have been considered for starlight nulling, with particular attention to the architecture and subsystems of the central beam-combiner.

  17. Solar Terrestrial Observatory Space Station Workshop Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. T. (editor)

    1986-01-01

    In response to a need to develop and document requirements of the Solar Terrestrial Observatory at an early time, a mini-workshop was organized and held on June 6, 1985. The participants at this workshop set as their goal the preliminary definition of the following areas: (1) instrument descriptions; (2) placement of instrumentation on the IOC Space Station; (3) servicing and repair assessment; and (4) operational scenarios. This report provides a synopsis of the results of that workshop.

  18. Long-period solar-terrestrial variability

    SciTech Connect

    Sonett, C.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies aimed at extending the record of solar-terrestrial variability to longer periods are discussed in a critical review of US research from the period 1987--1990. Sections are devoted to the sunspot index, radioactive carbon studies, a potential climate connection between radiocarbon changes and the solar irradiance cycle, Be-10 studies, geological laminae, solar neutrino counts, and the construction of data sets. Also included is a selective bibliography. 66 refs.

  19. Tectonic History of the Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: patterns of deformation and volcanic flows associated with lithospheric loading by large volcanoes on Venus; aspects of modeling the tectonics of large volcanoes on the terrestrial planets; state of stress, faulting, and eruption characteristics of large volcanoes on Mars; origin and thermal evolution of Mars; geoid-to-topography ratios on Venus; a tectonic resurfacing model for Venus; the resurfacing controversy for Venus; and the deformation belts of Lavinia Planitia.

  20. Terrestrial contamination in Apollo lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flory, D. A.; Simoneit, B. R.

    1972-01-01

    The contamination prevention procedures adopted for controlling the collection, processing, and analysis of the Apollo lunar samples in order to keep them free of significant levels of terrestrial organic matter are described. The organic contaminants actually found in the samples by the various investigators are summarized. It is shown that the program succeeded in providing investigators with samples containing less than 0.1 ppm total contamination.

  1. Extraterrestrial amino acids and terrestrial life

    SciTech Connect

    Chyba, C.F.

    1996-07-01

    Since the Swedish chemist Baron J{umlt o}ns Jacob Berzelius first analysed the Alais meteorite for organic molecules{close_quote} in 1834, attempts to forge a link between extraterrestrial organic materials and terrestrial life have remained alluring, but often deceptive. New studies reported in this and last week{close_quote}s issues hold the promise of important advances in both endeavours. (AIP)

  2. Functional morphology and kinematics of terrestrial feeding in the largescale foureyes (Anableps anableps).

    PubMed

    Michel, Krijn B; Aerts, Peter; Gibb, Alice C; Van Wassenbergh, Sam

    2015-09-01

    A major challenge for aquatic vertebrates that invade land is feeding in the terrestrial realm. The capacity of the gape to become parallel with the ground has been shown to be a key factor to allow fishes to feed on prey lying on a terrestrial surface. To do so, two strategies have been identified that involve a nose-down tilting of the head: (1) by pivoting on the pectoral fins as observed in mudskippers, and (2) curling of the anterior part of the body supported by a long and flexible eel-like body as shown in eel-catfish. Although Anableps anableps successfully feeds on land, it does not possess an eel-like body or pectoral fins to support or lift the anterior part of the body. We identified the mechanism of terrestrial prey capture in A. anableps by studying kinematics and functional morphology of the cranial structures, using high-speed video and graphical 3D reconstructions from computed tomography scans. In contrast to the previously described mechanisms, A. anableps relies solely on upper and lower jaw movement for re-orientation of the gape towards the ground. The premaxilla is protruded anteroventrally, and the lower jaw is depressed to a right angle with the substrate. Both the lower and upper jaws are selectively positioned onto the prey. Anableps anableps thereby uses the jaw protrusion mechanism previously described for other cyprinodontiforms to allow a continued protrusion of the premaxilla even while closing the jaws. Several structural adaptations appear to allow more controlled movements and increased amplitude of anterior and ventral protrusion of the upper jaw compared with other cyprinodontiforms. PMID:26400981

  3. Solar-terrestrial relationships in atmospheric electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Roble, R.G.

    1985-06-30

    There are many suggested solar-terrestrial relationships in global atmospheric electricity. Of the various relationships, the downward mapping of ionospheric and magnetospheric electric fields, associated with the solar wind/magnetosphere and the ionosphere wind dynamos, is best understood theoretically and appears to be supported by the few available data. The solar cycle variations of ionospheric potential and air-earth current appear to be related to variations in galactic cosmic rays and perhaps to their effect on the current output from thunderstorms. The solar flare and solar magnetic sector boundary variations are not well understood but may be related to Forbush decreases in cosmic ray flux and/or effects resulting from energetic particle precipitation. The available data on auroral effects on atmospheric electricity are confusing and not understood at all. There is a clear need for further research to better define the physical mechanisms responsible for all of these solar-terrestrial relationships. The observed solar-terrestrial variations and the need for current closure in the global circuit suggest that the function of the equalization layer in the ''classical picture'' of atmospheric electricity should be revised to be consistent with our current knowledge of upper-atmospheric electrical processes.

  4. Sensitivity of the terrestrial planet finder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichman, Charles

    1998-01-01

    A key long-term goal of NASA's Origins program is the detection and characterization of habitable planets orbiting stars within the solar neighborhood. A cold, space-borne interferometer operating in the mid-infrared with a approx. 75 m baseline can null the light of a parent star and detect the million-times fainter radiation from an Earth-like planet located in the "habitable zone" around stars as far as 15 pc away. Such an interferometer, designated the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) by NASA, could even detect atmospheric signatures of species such as CO2, O3, and H2O indicative of either the possibility or presence of primitive life. This talk highlights some of the sensitivity issues affecting the detectability of terrestrial planets. Sensitivity calculations show that a system consisting of 2 m apertures operating at 5 AU or 4 m apertures operating at 1 AU can detect terrestrial planets in reasonable integration times for levels of exo-zodiacal emission up to 10 times that seen in our solar system (hereafter denoted as 10xSS). Additionally, simulations show that confusion noise from structures in the exo-zodiacal cloud should not impede planet detection until the exo-zodiacal emission reaches the 10xSS level.

  5. Oxygen isotopic composition of opaline phytoliths: Potential for terrestrial climatic reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Shahack-Gross, R.; Weiner, S.; Shemesh, A.; Yakir, D.

    1996-10-01

    Opaline mineralized bodies are produced by many terrestrial plants and accumulate in certain soils and archaeological sites. Analyses of the oxygen isotopic compositions of these so-called phytoliths from stems and leaves of wheat plants grown in a greenhouse showed a linear relationship with stem and leaf water isotopic compositions and hence, indirectly, rain water isotopic composition. Analyses of wheat plants grown in fields showed that stem phytoliths isotopic composition directly reflects the seasonal air temperature change, whereas leaf phytoliths isotopic composition reflects both temperature and relative humidity. Temperature and the oxygen isotopic composition of stem phytoliths were related by an equation similar to that proposed for marine opal. Oxygen isotopic compositions of fossil phytoliths, and in particular those from stems, could be valuable for reconstructing past terrestrial climate change.

  6. Evidence supporting the importance of terrestrial carbon in a large-river food web.

    PubMed

    Zeug, Steven C; Winemiller, Kirk O

    2008-06-01

    Algal carbon has been increasingly recognized as the primary carbon source supporting large-river food webs; however, many of the studies that support this contention have focused on lotic main channels during low-flow periods. The flow variability and habitat-heterogeneity characteristic of these systems has the potential to significantly influence food web structure and must be integrated into models of large-river webs. We used stable-isotope analysis and IsoSource software to model terrestrial and algal sources of organic carbon supporting consumer taxa in the main channel and oxbow lakes of the Brazos River, Texas, USA, during a period of frequent hydrologic connectivity between these habitat types. Standardized sampling was conducted monthly to collect production sources and consumer species used in isotopic analysis. Predictability of hydrologic connections between habitat types was based on the previous 30 years of flow data. IsoSource mixing models identified terrestrial C3 macrophytes (riparian origin) as the primary carbon source supporting virtually all consumers in the main channel and most consumers in oxbow lakes. Small-bodied consumers (<100 mm) in oxbow lakes assimilated large fractions of algal carbon whereas this pattern was not apparent in the main channel. Estimates of detritivore trophic positions based on delta15N values indicated that terrestrial material was likely assimilated via invertebrates rather than directly from detritus. High flows in the river channel influenced algal standing stock, and differences in the importance of terrestrial and algal production sources among consumers in channel vs. oxbow habitats were associated with patterns of flooding. The importance of terrestrial material contradicts the findings of recent studies of large-river food webs that have emphasized the importance of algal carbon and indicates that there can be significant spatial, temporal, and taxonomic variation in carbon sources supporting consumers in large rivers. PMID:18589537

  7. Formation of Close-in Terrestrial Planets by Giant Impacts: The Basic Scaling Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokubo, Eiichiro

    2015-12-01

    The recent exoplanet surveys have shown that small close-in planets are more common than hot Jupiters. Most of them are considered as terrestrial (rocky) planets. Thus it becomes increasingly important to generally understand the formation of terrestrial planets. In the standard scenario of terrestrial planet formation, the final stage is the giant impact stage after the dispersal of a gas disk where protoplanets or planetary embryos collide with one another to complete planets. In the present paper, we investigate the in-situ formation of close-in terrestrial planets including super-Earths by giant impacts using N-body simulations. The goal of this project is to obtain the basic scaling laws of close-in terrestrial planet formation as a function of properties of protoplanet systems. We systematically change the system parameters of initial protoplanet systems and investigate their effects on the final planets. We find that in general non-resonant dynamically cold compact systems are formed. The orbits of planets are less eccentric and inclined and the orbital separations of adjacent planets are smaller, compared with those formed in the outer disk. The masses of all planets are almost comparable. These properties are natural outcomes of giant impacts in the inner disk. In the inner disk the ratio of the physical radius to the Hill radius is large, in other words, gravitational scattering is relatively less effective compared with that in the outer disk. Thus protoplanets are less mobile and accretion proceeds relatively locally, which leads to formation of dynamically cold compact systems. The typical mass of the largest planet increases almost linearly with the total mass of protoplanets, while the number of planets per radial width decreases. On average the system angular momentum deficit increases with the total system mass, while the mean orbital separation of adjacent planets decreases.

  8. Minimum length, extra dimensions, modified gravity and black hole remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Maziashvili, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We construct a Hilbert space representation of minimum-length deformed uncertainty relation in presence of extra dimensions. Following this construction, we study corrections to the gravitational potential (back reaction on gravity) with the use of correspondingly modified propagator in presence of two (spatial) extra dimensions. Interestingly enough, for r?0 the gravitational force approaches zero and the horizon for modified Schwarzschild-Tangherlini space-time disappears when the mass approaches quantum-gravity energy scale. This result points out to the existence of zero-temperature black hole remnants in ADD brane-world model.

  9. Almost-Goldstone Bosons from Extra-Dimensional Gauge Theories

    E-print Network

    Neil Turok

    1995-12-04

    A mechanism is presented through which very light scalar degrees of freedom obeying the nonlinear sigma model equation can emerge in spontaneously broken gauge theories. The mechanism operates in extra dimensional theories in which a) there are massless gauge fields present in the theory prior to compactification, and b) the extra dimensions are inhomogeneous in such a way that symmetry breaking Higgs fields aquire vevs only at very localised points on the manifold. These conditions are naturally fulfilled in orbifold compactifications of string theory. Possible applications include cosmic texture, axions and family symmetry.

  10. Hydrolytic microbial communities in terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manucharova, Natalia; Chernov, Timofey; Kolcova, Ekaterina; Zelezova, Alena; Lukacheva, Euhenia; Zenova, Galina

    2014-05-01

    Hydrolytic microbial communities in terrestrial ecosystems Manucharova N.A., Chernov T.I., Kolcova E.M., Zelezova A.D., Lukacheva E.G. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia Vertical differentiation of terrestrial biogeocenoses is conditioned by the formation of vertical tiers that differ considerably in the composition and structure of microbial communities. All the three tiers, phylloplane, litter and soil, are united by a single flow of organic matter, and are spatially separated successional stages of decomposition of organic substances. Decomposition of organic matter is mainly due to the activity of microorganisms producing enzymes - hydrolase and lyase - which destroy complex organic compounds. Application of molecular biological techniques (FISH) in environmental studies provides a more complete information concerning the taxonomic diversity and potential hydrolytic activity of microbial complexes of terrestrial ecosystems that exist in a wide range of environmental factors (moisture, temperature, redox potential, organic matter). The combination of two molecular biological techniques (FISH and DGGE-analysis of fragments of gene 16S rRNA total amplificate) enables an informative assessment of the differences in the structure of dominant and minor components of hydrolytic complexes formed in different tiers of terrestrial ecosystems. The functional activity of hydrolytic microbial complexes of terrestrial ecosystems is determined by the activity of dominant and minor components, which also have a high gross enzymatic activity. Degradation of biopolymers in the phylloplane is mainly due to the representatives of the Proteobacteria phylogenetic group (classes alpha and beta). In mineral soil horizons, the role of hydrolytic representatives of Firmicutes and Actinobacteria increases. Among the key environmental parameters that determine the functional activity of the hydrolytic (chitinolytic) complex of soil layer (moisture, nutrient supply, successional time), the most significant one is moisture. Moisture levels providing maximum activity of a hydrolytic microbial complex depend on the soil type. Development of a hydrolytic microbial complex occurs in a very wide moisture range - from values close to field capacity to those close to the wilting moisture point. The functional role of mycelial actinobacteria in the metabolism of chitin consists, on the one hand, in active decomposition of this biopolymer, and on the other hand, in the regulation of microbial hydrolytic complex activity through the production of biologically active regulatory metabolites, which occurs in a wide range of environmental parameters (moisture, temperature, organic matter, successional time). Experimental design is applicable to identify in situ optimal values of environmental factors that considerably affect the functional parameters of hydrolytic microbial complexes.

  11. Global Lunar Geochemistry and Its Significant Parallel With Terrestrial One

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    Planetary geochemistry reflects planetary tectonic pattern. The most global tectonic feature is the ubiquitous dichotomy (Theorem 1, [1]) with one hemisphere of a di- minished radius (concave) opposed by the convex hemisphere with an increased ra- dius. The terrestrial case is well known: the pressed in Pacific hemisphere is opposed by the bulging out continental one. This tectonics finds its demonstration in global geochemistry: the concave part is filled with denser basalts, rich in Fe, Ti, and the convex part is built of more acidic less dense lithologies, on average of andesitic composition. Much smaller Moon (almost 100 times less massive) reveals the same tectonic-geochemical construction. The near concave side is occupied by Procellarum basin and large marea filled with dense basalts rich in Fe, Ti. The far convex side is built of less dense anarthosites. On both planetary bodies the convex hemispheres are complicated by large subsided sectors (Theorem 2, [1]) filled with, as required by Theorem 4 [1], denser basalts. At Earth it is the Indoceanic sector, on the Moon the South Pole-Aitken basin. Genetically they are similar and constitute regular parts of global tectono-geochemistry (here there is no place for random impact or plate tec- tonic origin of these deep global depressions, they are components of "wave1-wave2" produced structures). The Lunar Prospector global geochemical coverage [2] allows to make lunar - terrestrial parallels not only in dichotomic distribution of iron and ti- tanium but also in distribution of potassium and thorium marking a contact between two dichotomic hemispheres. At Earth the seismically active contact is famous by its andesitic volcanism. Andesites comparative to basalts are richer in K and Th. On the Moon this transitional zone between the dichotomic halves is enriched with Th and K as well [2]. The transition to highlands requires less dense than mare basalts lithologies and they appear as feldspar-rich KREEP basalts enriched with K and Th. The geochemical parallel between two planetary bodies is not occasional and is a con- sequence of the wave planetary tectonics. References: [1] Kochemasov G.G. (1999) Theorems of wave planetary tectonics //Geophys. Res. Abstr., v.1, #3, 700; [2]Chevrel 1 S.D., Pinet P.C., Daydou Y. et al (2001) Global scale multielement analysis of the lunar surface using iron, titanium and thorium abundances // 34th Vernadsky-Brown microsymposium. Topics in comparative planetology. Moscow, Vernadsky Inst., Oct. 8-9, 2001,Abstracts, (CD-ROM).

  12. Lewy bodies

    PubMed Central

    Shults, Clifford W.

    2006-01-01

    Lewy bodies (LB) in the substantia nigra are a cardinal pathological feature of Parkinson's disease, but they occur in a number of neurodegenerative diseases and can be widespread in the nervous system. The characteristics, locations, and composition of LB are reviewed, with particular attention to ?-synuclein (?-SYN), which appears to be the major component of LB. The propensity for ?-SYN, a presynaptic protein widely expressed in the brain, to aggregate is because of an amyloidogenic central region. The factors that favor the aggregation of ?-SYN and mechanisms of toxicity are examined, and a mechanism through which aggregates of ?-SYN could induce mitochondrial dysfunction and/or release of proapoptotic molecules is proposed. PMID:16449387

  13. Hydrogeological and landscape controls on terrestrial diatoms input to the stream network during rainfall-runoff events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, Carlos Eduardo; Klaus, Julian; Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Ector, Luc; Pfister, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    We explore the dynamics of terrestrial diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) in streamflow during rainfall-runoff events collected in seven nested catchments in the Attert River basin (Luxembourg, Europe). Our main objective is to provide a sound basis for the use of these microscopic algae for the identification and understanding of spatial patterns in runoff sources. Water samples (n=150) were simultaneously collected during precipitation events using automatic samplers. Diatom assemblages were identified and quantified (ca. 400 valves per sample). The fine-grained taxonomic treatment of the samples allowed the identification of 421 diatom species, among which 85 were considered terrestrial and/or aerophytic. Their occurrence is related to moisture content and associated to the respective hydrological category (i.e. Cat. 4: mainly occurring on wet and moist or temporarily dry places and Cat. 5: nearly exclusively occurring outside water bodies; Categories 1, 2 and 3 representing aquatic and/or very wet environments). In all seven sub-catchments terrestrial diatom abundance systematically increased during all sampled events as a response to increasing discharge and precipitation. Thus, the flushing of terrestrial diatoms mobilized during these events suggests a rapid connectivity between the soil surface and the stream water, despite the distinct richness and abundance of terrestrial diatoms in the different catchments. In event samples taken at peak discharge, terrestrial diatoms were more abundant in small forested streams reaching up to 40.8% and 70.0% of the diatom assemblages, respectively. In lowland reaches we found the lowest amount of terrestrial diatom valves (mean=0.91, min=0, max=4.2, n=15). We have also explored the effects of catchment complexity in terms of physiography, land use patterns, and lithology. The tested linear correlations between environmental factors and diatom distribution were primarily explained by land use (forest R2=0.70, grassland R2=0.59, urban area R2=0.44 and agriculture R2=0.44) and lithology categories (schists R2=0.89 and sandstones R2=0.48). Forest cover was the main landscape descriptor positively related to the highest abundances of terrestrial diatoms (r =0.75), while agriculture (r = -0.92), urban areas (r = -0.79) and grassland cover (r = -0.50) were negatively related to the maximum input of terrestrial diatoms. Although small forested areas located in the headwater streams do account for the overall richness of terrestrial diatom species, a 'dilution' effect (e.g. high turnover of assemblages) probably masks the presence of these species further downstream.

  14. Dinosaurs, dragons, and dwarfs: The evolution of maximal body size

    PubMed Central

    Burness, Gary P.; Diamond, Jared; Flannery, Timothy

    2001-01-01

    Among local faunas, the maximum body size and taxonomic affiliation of the top terrestrial vertebrate vary greatly. Does this variation reflect how food requirements differ between trophic levels (herbivores vs. carnivores) and with taxonomic affiliation (mammals and birds vs. reptiles)? We gathered data on the body size and food requirements of the top terrestrial herbivores and carnivores, over the past 65,000 years, from oceanic islands and continents. The body mass of the top species was found to increase with increasing land area, with a slope similar to that of the relation between body mass and home range area, suggesting that maximum body size is determined by the number of home ranges that can fit into a given land area. For a given land area, the body size of the top species decreased in the sequence: ectothermic herbivore > endothermic herbivore > ectothermic carnivore > endothermic carnivore. When we converted body mass to food requirements, the food consumption of a top herbivore was about 8 times that of a top carnivore, in accord with the factor expected from the trophic pyramid. Although top ectotherms were heavier than top endotherms at a given trophic level, lower metabolic rates per gram of body mass in ectotherms resulted in endotherms and ectotherms having the same food consumption. These patterns explain the size of the largest-ever extinct mammal, but the size of the largest dinosaurs exceeds that predicted from land areas and remains unexplained. PMID:11724953

  15. Photometric stellar variation due to extra-solar comets

    E-print Network

    A. Lecavelier des Etangs; A. Vidal-Madjar; R. Ferlet

    1998-12-21

    We performed numerical simulations of stellar occultations by extra-solar cometary tails. We find that extra-solar comets can be detected by the apparent photometric variations of the central stars. In most cases, the light curve shows a very peculiar ``rounded triangular'' shape. However, in some other cases, the curve can mimic a planetary occultation. Photometric variations due to comet occultations are mainly achromatic. Nevertheless, if comets with small periastrons have smaller particles, these occultations could be chromatic with a larger extinction in the blue by few percents. We also estimate the number of detections expected in a large photometric survey at high accuracy. By the observation of several tens of thousand of stars, it should be possible to detect several hundreds of occultation per year. We thus conclude that a spatial photometric survey would detect a large number of extra-solar comets. This would allow to explore the time evolution of cometary activity, and consequently would probe structure and evolution of extra-solar planetary systems.

  16. Extra-Curricular Inequality. Research Brief. Edition 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton Trust, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This Research Briefing analyses Office for National Statistics data and finds children from the most advantaged households benefit from significantly more spending on extra-curricular activities and private tutoring than their poorer peers. The brief also includes the Trust's annual polling on private tuition and new polling on parents and…

  17. Extra-heating mechanism in Doppler cooling experiments

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Robin

    Extra-heating mechanism in Doppler cooling experiments Thierry Chanelière, Jean-Louis Meunier, Robin Kaiser, Christian Miniatura, and David Wilkowski Institut non linéaire de Nice, Unité Mixte de are thus able to test quantitatively the predictions of the Doppler cooling theory. We have found

  18. Attitude Strength: An Extra-Content Aspect of Attitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwitt, Linda F.

    Attitude strength is considered as an extra-content aspect of attitude. A model of the relationship of attitude strength to attitude direction and behavior proposes that attitude strength is comprised of three dimensions that moderate the relationship between attitude direction and behavior. The dimensions are parallel to the tripartite dimensions…

  19. The Extra Strand of the Maori Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Georgina

    2011-01-01

    This paper comments on the process of re-development of the Maori-medium Science (Putaiao) curriculum, as part of overall curriculum development in Aotearoa New Zealand. A significant difference from the English Science curriculum was the addition of an "extra strand" covering the history and philosophy of science. It is recommended that this…

  20. CANAL EMERGES FROM EAST SIDE OF MTR BUILDING. "EXTRA" LENGTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CANAL EMERGES FROM EAST SIDE OF MTR BUILDING. "EXTRA" LENGTH WAS TO STORE SPENT FUEL THAT WOULD ACCUMULATE BEFORE THE CHEMICAL PROCESSING PLANT WAS READY TO PROCESS IT. INL NEGATIVE NO. 1659. Unknown Photographer, 3/9/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. Extra-pyramidal symptoms in Alzheimer's disease: a hypothesis

    E-print Network

    Ruppin, Eytan

    Extra-pyramidal symptoms in Alzheimer's disease: a hypothesis { to appear in Medical Hypotheses D the neurodegenerative changes un- derlining Alzheimer's disease (AD), much like their well known role in Parkinson increase of synaptic e cacy at the initial stages of the disease 3, 2, 4]. The combined outcome

  2. Extra-lobar Pulmonary Sequestration Requiring Intrauterine Thoracentesis

    PubMed Central

    Kahvecioglu, Dilek; Alan, Serdar; Yildiz, Duran; Akduman, Hasan; Erdeve, Omer; Bahadir, Gulnur Gollu; Kologlu, Meltem; Atasay, Begum; Arsan, Saadet

    2015-01-01

    Congenital lung malformations can result in significant morbidity and mortality in children. Pulmonary sequestration is an uncommon congenital malformation of the lung that can cause complications even in fetal life. We herein present a newborn with extra-lobar sequestration (ELS) that lead to hydrops fetalis necessitating fetal intervention. PMID:25628992

  3. Extra-lobar Pulmonary Sequestration Requiring Intrauterine Thoracentesis.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Ufuk; Kahvecioglu, Dilek; Alan, Serdar; Yildiz, Duran; Akduman, Hasan; Erdeve, Omer; Bahadir, Gulnur Gollu; Kologlu, Meltem; Atasay, Begum; Arsan, Saadet

    2015-01-01

    Congenital lung malformations can result in significant morbidity and mortality in children. Pulmonary sequestration is an uncommon congenital malformation of the lung that can cause complications even in fetal life. We herein present a newborn with extra-lobar sequestration (ELS) that lead to hydrops fetalis necessitating fetal intervention. PMID:25628992

  4. Are Extra Classes the Success behind High Performance and Marks?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santhi, N.

    2011-01-01

    Extra classes have been a fixture in the educational system in India. They pre-date all existing educational programmes and examinations. Yet more recently the justification and reasons for the maintenance of these classes have been called into question. There have been unsubstantiated claims that in some cases the classes have been "organized" in…

  5. Extra-team Connections for Knowledge Transfer between Staff Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Wiecha, Jean L.; Emmons, Karen M.; Gortmaker, Steven L.; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2009-01-01

    As organizations implement novel health promotion programs across multiple sites, they face great challenges related to knowledge management. Staff social networks may be a useful medium for transferring program-related knowledge in multi-site implementation efforts. To study this potential, we focused on the role of extra-team connections (ties…

  6. Signatures from an extra-dimensional seesaw model

    E-print Network

    Mattias Blennow; Henrik Melbeus; Tommy Ohlsson; He Zhang

    2010-09-13

    We study the generation of small neutrino masses in an extra-dimensional model, where right-handed neutrinos are allowed to propagate in the extra dimension, while the Standard Model particles are confined to a brane. Motivated by the fact that extra-dimensional models are non-renormalizable, we truncate the Kaluza-Klein towers at a maximal extra-dimensional momentum. The structure of the bulk Majorana mass term, motivated by the Sherk-Schwarz mechanism, implies that the right-handed Kaluza-Klein neutrinos pair to form Dirac neutrinos, except for a number of unpaired Majorana neutrinos at the top of each tower. These heavy Majorana neutrinos are the only sources of lepton number breaking in the model, and similarly to the type-I seesaw mechanism, they naturally generate small masses for the left-handed neutrinos. The lower Kaluza-Klein modes mix with the light neutrinos, and the mixing effects are not suppressed with respect to the light-neutrino masses. Compared to conventional fermionic seesaw models, such mixing can be more significant. We study the signals of this model at the Large Hadron Collider, and find that the current low-energy bounds on the non-unitarity of the leptonic mixing matrix are strong enough to exclude an observation.

  7. University Extra-Mural Studies and Extension Outreach: Incompatibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The argument of this paper is that--within a wide range of university responses to the challenge of outreach--there grew up in the extra-mural or adult education departments of many UK universities an alternative epistemological paradigm to the older and more traditional extension programmes. This paradigm threatened the extension approach and has…

  8. Charged current unitarity and extra neutral gauge bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.; Sirling, A.

    1987-03-01

    The experimental status of the Kobayashi-Maskawa-Cabibbo (KMC) matrix is surveyed and shown to provide a precision test of the standard model at the level of its O(..cap alpha..) radiative corrections. Implications for new physics and constraints of extra neutral gauge bosons are described. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Deviations From Newton's Law in Supersymmetric Large Extra Dimensions

    E-print Network

    P. Callin; C. P. Burgess

    2005-11-17

    Deviations from Newton's Inverse-Squared Law at the micron length scale are smoking-gun signals for models containing Supersymmetric Large Extra Dimensions (SLEDs), which have been proposed as approaches for resolving the Cosmological Constant Problem. Just like their non-supersymmetric counterparts, SLED models predict gravity to deviate from the inverse-square law because of the advent of new dimensions at sub-millimeter scales. However SLED models differ from their non-supersymmetric counterparts in three important ways: (i) the size of the extra dimensions is fixed by the observed value of the Dark Energy density, making it impossible to shorten the range over which new deviations from Newton's law must be seen; (ii) supersymmetry predicts there to be more fields in the extra dimensions than just gravity, implying different types of couplings to matter and the possibility of repulsive as well as attractive interactions; and (iii) the same mechanism which is purported to keep the cosmological constant naturally small also keeps the extra-dimensional moduli effectively massless, leading to deviations from General Relativity in the far infrared of the scalar-tensor form. We here explore the deviations from Newton's Law which are predicted over micron distances, and show the ways in which they differ and resemble those in the non-supersymmetric case.

  10. Detecting Extra-Solar Planets via Microlensing at High Magnification

    E-print Network

    Rattenbury, N J; Skuljan, J; Yock, P C M; Rattenbury, Nicholas J.; Bond, Ian A.; Skuljan, Jovan; Yock, Phil

    2002-01-01

    Extra-solar planets can be efficiently detected in gravitational microlensing events of high magnification. High accuracy photometry is required over a short, well-defined time interval only, of order 10-30 hours. Most planets orbiting the lens star are evidenced by perturbations of the microlensing light curve in this time.

  11. OKHEP0208 Dark Energy as Evidence for Extra

    E-print Network

    Milton, Kim

    OKHEP­02­08 Dark Energy as Evidence for Extra Dimensions Kimball A. Milton Department of Physics that fluctuations of quantum fields in four-dimensional space do not give rise to dark energy, but are rather pressure and energy density is p = 1 3 u, while dark energy is characterized by p = -u. A possible source

  12. Extra-Curricular Activities and Academic Performance in Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriana, Juan Antonio; Alos, Francisco; Alcala, Rocio; Pino, Maria-Jose; Herruzo, Javier; Ruiz, Rosario

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: In this paper we study the possible influence of extra-curricular activities (study-related and/or sports) on academic performance of first- and second-year pupils in "Educacion Secundaria Obligatoria (ESO)" [N.T. seventh- and eighth-graders]. Method: We randomly selected 12 schools in the city (9 public and 3 private), and randomly…

  13. 8. LESLIE WICKMAN, EVA (EXTRA VEHICULAR ACTIVITIES) SPECIALIST, GETTING OUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. LESLIE WICKMAN, EVA (EXTRA VEHICULAR ACTIVITIES) SPECIALIST, GETTING OUT OF SPACE SUIT AFTER TESTING IN NEUTRAL BUOYANCY TANK. AVERAGE COST OF SUIT $1,000,000. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  14. ExtraSolar Planets Finding Extrasolar Planets. I

    E-print Network

    Walter, Frederick M.

    ExtraSolar Planets #12;Finding Extrasolar Planets. I Direct Searches Direct searches are difficult #12;Finding Extrasolar Planets. II Transits #12;Transits Transits requires an edge-on orbit. ·Jupiter;How Transits Work #12;Finding Extrasolar Planets. III Astrometric Wobble #12;Finding Extrasolar

  15. Specialist Review How to get extra performance from

    E-print Network

    Meller, Victoria

    is distinct (Figure 1). To equal- ize expression between C. elegans males (XO; one X chromosome but no Y males have a single X chromosome and no Y chromosome (left). Association of the repressive DCC complexSpecialist Review How to get extra performance from a chromosome: recognition and modification

  16. Textual, Contextual, and Extra-Contextual Knowledge in ESL Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Heping

    Victor Raskin's taxonomy of knowledge, based on semantics theory, is adapted and applied to composition in English as a Second Language (ESL). Raskin's classification of knowledge as linguistic and encyclopedic is converted to a continuum from textual to extra-contextual, with contextual knowledge situated between the two. Textual knowledge is…

  17. Self-sterilization of bodies during outer planet entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, A. R.; Jaworski, W.; Taylor, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    A body encountering the atmosphere of an outer planet is subjected to heat loads which could result in high temperature conditions that render terrestrial organisms on or within the body nonviable. To determine whether an irregularly shaped entering body, consisting of several different materials, would be sterilized during inadvertent entry at high velocity, the thermal response of a typical outer planet spacecraft instrument was studied. The results indicate that the Teflon insulated cable and electronic circuit boards may not experience sterilizing temperatures during a Jupiter, Saturn, or Titan entry. Another conclusion of the study is that small plastic particles entering Saturn from outer space have wider survival corridors than do those at Jupiter.

  18. Search for large extra dimensions in diphoton events at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, Simona

    In spite of its undisputed success, the Standard Model is not a theory of everything as it does not incorporate gravity. Gravity is the weakest of all forces and its strength becomes comparable to the remaining forces at energies of the order of the Planck scale, at approximately 10 19 GeV and the Standard Model is viewed as an effective theory at energies below this scale. Recently, a model of large extra dimensions has been formulated by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulous, and Dvali that claims that the electroweak scale (approximately 1 TeV) is the only fundamental scale in nature and the fact that the Planck scale appears so large is an artifact of the existence of extra dimensions in which only gravity propagates. This theory can be tested at existing collider experiments, where energies sufficiently high to probe the extra dimensions can be achieved. In particular, the existence of extra dimensions can manifest itself with production of Standard Model particles through graviton mediated processes and thus it predicts an enhancement of production cross sections at high invariant mass. The goal of this work is to search for an excess in the 100 pb-1 of diphoton data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab at s = 1.8 TeV during the 1992--1996 run. No excess is observed and thus we place a 95% confidence level limit on the Planck scale in the bulk extra dimensions MS of 899 GeV for constructive interference and of 797 GeV for destructive interference (Hewett convention).

  19. Body Composition Tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Body Composition Tests WHAT ARE BODY COMPOSITION TESTS? ANTHROPOMETRY BIOELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE ANALYSIS (BIA) BODY MASS INDEX (BMI) ... technician if you are tracking changes over time. Anthropometry This word just means measuring the body. Anthropometry ...

  20. Lewy Body Digest

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Help End Lewy body dementia now! Donate Lewy Body Digest eNewsletter Click here to subscribe today to ... latest developments in treatment and research in Lewy body dementia. Archival issues of the Lewy Body Digest ...