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Sample records for extra terrestrial bodies

  1. The search for extra-terrestrial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Drake, Frank

    2011-02-13

    Modern history of the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence is reviewed. The history of radio searches is discussed, as well as the major advances that have occurred in radio searches and prospects for new instruments and search strategies. Recent recognition that searches for optical and infrared signals make sense, and the reasons for this are described, as well as the equipment and special detection methods used in optical searches. The long-range future of the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence (SETI) is discussed in the context of the history of rapid change, on the cosmic and even the human time scale, of the paradigms guiding SETI searches. This suggests that SETI searches be conducted with a very open mind. PMID:21220287

  2. Radio communications with extra-terrestrial civilizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotelnikov, V. A.

    1974-01-01

    Communications between civilizations within our galaxy at the present level of radio engineering is possible, although civilizations must begin to search for each other to achieve this. If an extra-terrestrial civilization possessing a technology at our level wishes to make itself known and will transmit special radio signals to do this, then it can be picked up by us at a distance of several hundreds of light years using already existing radio telescopes and specially built radio receivers. If it wishes, this civilization can also send us information without awaiting our answer.

  3. Quarantine provisions for unmanned extra-terrestrial missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    This document sets forth requirements applicable to unmanned planetary flight programs which are necessary to enable the Associate Administrator for Space Science to fulfill those responsibilities pertaining to planetary quarantine as stated in NPD 8020.7 and NPD 8020.10A. This document is specifically directed to the control of terrestrial microbial contamination associated with unmanned space vehicles intended to encounter, orbit, flyby, or otherwise be in the vicinity of extra-terrestrial solar system bodies. The requirements of this document apply to all unmanned planetary flight programs. This includes solar system exploratory missions to the major planets as well as missions to planet satellites, or to other solar system objects that may be of scientific interest. This document is not applicable to terrestrial (including lunar) missions and manned missions. NASA officials having cognizance of applicable flight programs will invoke these requirements in such directives or contractual instruments as may be necessary to assure their implementation.

  4. Energy use, entropy and extra-terrestrial civilizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetesi, Zsolt

    2010-03-01

    The possible number of extra-terrestrial civilizations is estimated by the Drake-equation. Many articles pointed out that there are missing factors and over-estimations in the original equation. In this article we will point out that assuming some axioms there might be several limits for a technical civilization. The key role of the energy use and the problem of the centres and periphery strongly influence the value of the Llifetime of a civilization. Our development have several edifications of the investigations of the growth of an alien civilization.

  5. Migration & Extra-solar Terrestrial Planets: Watering the Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter-Bond, Jade C.; O'Brien, David P.; Raymond, Sean N.

    2014-04-01

    A diverse range of terrestrial planet compositions is believed to exist within known extrasolar planetary systems, ranging from those that are relatively Earth-like to those that are highly unusual, dominated by species such as refractory elements (Al and Ca) or C (as pure C, TiC and SiC)(Bond et al. 2010b). However, all prior simulations have ignored the impact that giant planet migration during planetary accretion may have on the final terrestrial planetary composition. Here, we combined chemical equilibrium models of the disk around five known planetary host stars (Solar, HD4203, HD19994, HD213240 and Gl777) with dynamical models of terrestrial planet formation incorporating various degrees of giant planet migration. Giant planet migration is found to drastically impact terrestrial planet composition by 1) increasing the amount of Mg-silicate species present in the final body; and 2) dramatically increasing the efficiency and amount of water delivered to the terrestrial bodies during their formation process.

  6. A Review of Extra-Terrestrial Mining Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. P.; van Susante, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Outer space contains a vast amount of resources that offer virtually unlimited wealth to the humans that can access and use them for commercial purposes. One of the key technologies for harvesting these resources is robotic mining of regolith, minerals, ices and metals. The harsh environment and vast distances create challenges that are handled best by robotic machines working in collaboration with human explorers. Humans will benefit from the resources that will be mined by robots. They will visit outposts and mining camps as required for exploration, commerce and scientific research, but a continuous presence is most likely to be provided by robotic mining machines that are remotely controlled by humans. There have been a variety of extra-terrestrial robotic mining concepts proposed over the last 40 years and this paper will attempt to summarize and review concepts in the public domain (government, industry and academia) to serve as an informational resource for future mining robot developers and operators. The challenges associated with these concepts will be discussed and feasibility will be assessed. Future needs associated with commercial efforts will also be investigated.

  7. A Review of Extra-Terrestrial Mining Robot Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Van Susante, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Outer space contains a vast amount of resources that offer virtually unlimited wealth to the humans that can access and use them for commercial purposes. One of the key technologies for harvesting these resources is robotic mining of regolith, minerals, ices and metals. The harsh environment and vast distances create challenges that are handled best by robotic machines working in collaboration with human explorers. Humans will benefit from the resources that will be mined by robots. They will visit outposts and mining camps as required for exploration, commerce and scientific research, but a continuous presence is most likely to be provided by robotic mining machines that are remotely controlled by humans. There have been a variety of extra-terrestrial robotic mining concepts proposed over the last 100 years and this paper will attempt to summarize and review concepts in the public domain (government, industry and academia) to serve as an informational resource for future mining robot developers and operators. The challenges associated with these concepts will be discussed and feasibility will be assessed. Future needs associated with commercial efforts will also be investigated.

  8. Applying Biomimetic Algorithms for Extra-Terrestrial Habitat Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birge, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The objective is to simulate and optimize distributed cooperation among a network of robots tasked with cooperative excavation on an extra-terrestrial surface. Additionally to examine the concept of directed Emergence among a group of limited artificially intelligent agents. Emergence is the concept of achieving complex results from very simple rules or interactions. For example, in a termite mound each individual termite does not carry a blueprint of how to make their home in a global sense, but their interactions based strictly on local desires create a complex superstructure. Leveraging this Emergence concept applied to a simulation of cooperative agents (robots) will allow an examination of the success of non-directed group strategy achieving specific results. Specifically the simulation will be a testbed to evaluate population based robotic exploration and cooperative strategies while leveraging the evolutionary teamwork approach in the face of uncertainty about the environment and partial loss of sensors. Checking against a cost function and 'social' constraints will optimize cooperation when excavating a simulated tunnel. Agents will act locally with non-local results. The rules by which the simulated robots interact will be optimized to the simplest possible for the desired result, leveraging Emergence. Sensor malfunction and line of sight issues will be incorporated into the simulation. This approach falls under Swarm Robotics, a subset of robot control concerned with finding ways to control large groups of robots. Swarm Robotics often contains biologically inspired approaches, research comes from social insect observation but also data from among groups of herding, schooling, and flocking animals. Biomimetic algorithms applied to manned space exploration is the method under consideration for further study.

  9. Towards polarimetry as a tool for the detection of extra-terrestrial life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnulo, Stefano; Sterzik, Michael F.; Cellino, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Linear broadband polarimetry is used to characterize the objects of our solar system, and has also been proposed as a diagnostic tool for the atmospheres of exo-solar planets. Homochirality characterizes life as we know it and induces circular polarization in the diffuse reflectance spectra of biotic material. Hence it has been suggested that circular polarimetry may be used as a remote sensing tool for the search of extra-terrestrial life. With this motivation in mind we have decided to explore the potential of both linear and circular spectropolarimetry as a diagnostic tool for remote sensing of biotic material. We have used the calibration unit of the EFOSC2 instrument of the La Silla Observatory to obtain low resolution, but high signal to noise circular and linear spectropolarimetric measurements of a number of inorganic and organic materials. We then compare our "laboratory data" with spectropolarimetric observations of atmosphere-less bodies of our solar system and of Earthshine obtained with instruments very similar to that one used for our laboratory samples. We conclude that linear polarization measurements are more suitable than circular polarization measurements for the characterization of planetary surfaces and atmospheres, and for the search of extra-terrestrial life.

  10. Reducing Extra-Terrestrial Excavation Forces with Percussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, Jason; Mueller, Robert; Smith, Drew; Nick, Andrew; Lippitt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    reduction of as much as 72%. This paper will examine the effects of impact energy, frequency, scaling and their effect on excavation forces in a dry granular material such as lunar regolith. The past several years have shown an increasing interest in mining space resources both for exploration and commercial enterprises. This work studied the benefits and risks of percussive excavation and preliminry results indicate that this technique may become an enabling technology for extra-terrestrial excavation of regolith and ice.

  11. The design of lunar and Mars transportation systems utilizing extra-terrestrial resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubrin, Robert M.

    This paper investigates means for optimizing the design of a space transportation architecture which incorporates the use of extra-terrestrial materials for propellant production. In has been shown by many authors that the use of in situ propellant production (ISPP) at a destination planetary body may offer large benefits for missions, when compared with the same missions carried out using propellants or terrestrial origin. However, it has generally been the case that such mission trade studies do not seek to optimize the transportation architecture to the use of ISPP. Instead, such studies have employed transportation architectures whose designs were based upon the assumption of all-terrestrial propellants, and ISPP is thrown in as an afterthought. This method of analysis is defective because the introduction of ISPP completely changes the optimum form of the space transportation system itself. For example, it has been accepted since the Apollo missions that lunar orbit rendezvous (LOR), while having operational disadvantages compared to a direct return (DR) from the surface stategy, is far more efficient on a mass basis and therefore is the proper way to carry out a manned lunar mission. However, once lunar LOX is available, this is no longer true, and DR becomes more mass efficient than LOR. Furthermore, the required size and capability of the booster and all the stages required to perform a lunar mission under condition of availability of lunar LOX is radically different than if only terrestrial propellants are used. Thus Lunar LOX changes both the form and the required scale of a lunar transportation architecture. The alterations of the form, scale and even the technological basis of manned Mars missions under conditions of optimized utilization of ISPP are even more dramatic. As the non-availability of ISPP can be made a transitory condition applying only to a small (or non-existent) set of initial missions, designing a space transportation architecture

  12. The implications of the discovery of extra-terrestrial life for religion.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ted

    2011-02-13

    This paper asks about the future of religion: (i) Will confirmation of extra-terrestrial intelligence (ETI) cause terrestrial religion to collapse? 'No' is the answer based upon a summary of the 'Peters ETI Religious Crisis Survey'. Then the paper examines four specific challenges to traditional doctrinal belief likely to be raised at the detection of ETI: (ii) What is the scope of God's creation? (iii) What can we expect regarding the moral character of ETI? (iv) Is one earthly incarnation in Jesus Christ enough for the entire cosmos, or should we expect multiple incarnations on multiple planets? (v) Will contact with more advanced ETI diminish human dignity? More than probable contact with extra-terrestrial intelligence will expand the Bible's vision so that all of creation--including the 13.7 billion year history of the universe replete with all of God's creatures--will be seen as the gift of a loving and gracious God. PMID:21220288

  13. Discovery of extra-terrestrial life: assessment by scales of its importance and associated risks.

    PubMed

    Almár, Iván; Race, Margaret S

    2011-02-13

    The Rio Scale accepted by the SETI Committee of the International Academy of Astronautics in 2002 is intended for use in evaluating the impact on society of any announcement regarding the discovery of evidence of extra-terrestrial (ET) intelligence. The Rio Scale is mathematically defined using three parameters (class of phenomenon, type of discovery and distance) and a δ factor, the assumed credibility of a claim. This paper proposes a new scale applicable to announcements alleging evidence of ET life within or outside our Solar System. The London Scale for astrobiology has mathematical structure and logic similar to the Rio Scale, and uses four parameters (life form, nature of phenomenon, type of discovery and distance) as well as a credibility factor δ to calculate a London Scale index (LSI) with values ranging from 0 to 10. The level of risk or biohazard associated with a purported discovery is evaluated independently of the LSI value and may be ranked in four categories. The combined information is intended to provide a scalar assessment of the scientific importance, validity and potential risks associated with putative evidence of ET life discovered on Earth, on nearby bodies in the Solar System or in our Galaxy. PMID:21220291

  14. The search for extra-terrestrial intelligence: current status and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    The idea that credible searches for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (ETI) could be carried out were laid out in detail in a classic paper by Morrison and Cocconi (1959).1 They suggested using the radio band for these searches. Since then radio searches have been carried out by over sixty different groups. No signals from ETIs have been identified. In this paper I will discuss the argument for the existence of extra-terrestrial intelligence. I will provide a method to estimate the number of extragalactic civilizations that are capable of signaling us and consider the uncertainties inherent in this estimate. I will provide the rationale for searching for these signals in the radio band. Finally I will discuss the future prospects for this endeavor.

  15. The weak force and SETH: The search for Extra-Terrestrial Homochirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDermott, Alexandra J.

    1996-07-01

    We propose that a search for extra-terrestrial life can be approached as a Search for Extra-Terrestrial Homochirality-SETH. Homochirality is probably a pre-condition for life, so a chiral influence may be required to get life started. We explain how the weak force mediated by the Z0 boson gives rise to a small parity-violating energy difference (PVED) between enantiomers, and discuss how the resulting small excess of the more stable enantiomer may be amplified to homochirality. Titan and comets are good places to test for emerging pre-biotic homochirality, while on Mars there may be traces of homochirality as a relic of extinct life. Our calculations of the PVED show that the natural L-amino acids are indeed more stable than their enantiomers, as are several key D-sugars and right-hand helical DNA. Thiosubstituted DNA analogues show particularly large PVEDs. L-quartz is also more stable than D-quartz, and we believe that further crystal counts should be carried out to establish whether reported excesses of L quartz are real. Finding extra-terrestrial molecules of the same hand as on Earth would lend support to the universal chiral influence of the weak force. We describe a novel miniaturized space polarimeter, called the SETH Cigar, which we hope to use to detect optical rotation on other planets. Moving parts are avoided by replacing the normal rotating polarizer by multiple fixed polarizers at different angles as in the eye of the bee. Even if we do not find the same hand as on Earth, finding extra-terrestrial optical rotation would be of enormous importance as it would still be the homochiral signature of life.

  16. The detection of extra-terrestrial life and the consequences for science and society.

    PubMed

    Dominik, Martin; Zarnecki, John C

    2011-02-13

    Astronomers are now able to detect planets orbiting stars other than the Sun where life may exist, and living generations could see the signatures of extra-terrestrial life being detected. Should it turn out that we are not alone in the Universe, it will fundamentally affect how humanity understands itself--and we need to be prepared for the consequences. A Discussion Meeting held at the Royal Society in London, 6-9 Carlton House Terrace, on 25-26 January 2010, addressed not only the scientific but also the societal agenda, with presentations covering a large diversity of topics. PMID:21220276

  17. Chemical methods for searching for evidence of extra-terrestrial life.

    PubMed

    Pillinger, Colin

    2011-02-13

    This paper describes the chemical concepts used for the purpose of detecting life in extra-terrestrial situations. These methods, developed initially within the oil industry, have been used to determine when life began on Earth and for investigating the Moon and Mars via space missions. In the case of Mars, the Viking missions led to the realization that we had meteorites from Mars on Earth. The study of Martian meteorites in the laboratory provides tantalizing clues for life on Mars in both the ancient and recent past. Meteorite analyses led to the launch of the Beagle 2 spacecraft, which was designed to prove that life-detection results obtained on Earth were authentic and not confused by terrestrial contamination. Some suggestions are made for future work. PMID:21220284

  18. ORIGINS OF NON-MASS-DEPENDENT FRACTIONATION OF EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL OXYGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Barcena, Homar; Connolly, Harold C.

    2012-08-01

    The distribution of oxygen isotopes in meteorites and within the earliest solids that formed in the solar system hints that the precursors of these materials must have undergone a mass-independent process. The mass-independent process is specifically one that fractionates {sup 16}O from {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O. This chemical signature is indicative of non-equilibrium processing, which bear resemblance to some unusual terrestrial phenomenon such as fractionation of ozone in the upper Earth atmosphere. That the mass-independent fractionation of oxygen isotopes is preserved within petrological records presents planetary scientists interesting clues to the events that may have occurred during the formation of the solar system. Currently, there are several hypotheses on the origins of the oxygen isotope distribution within primitive planetary materials, which include both thermal and photochemical models. We present a new model based on a physico-chemical hypothesis for the origin of non-mass-dependent O-isotope distribution in oxygen-bearing extra-terrestrial materials, which originated from the disproportionation of CO in dark molecular clouds to create CO{sub 2} reservoirs. The disproportionation created a reservoir of heavy oxygen isotopes and could have occurred throughout the evolution of the disk. The CO{sub 2} was a carrier of the isotope anomaly in the solar nebula and we propose that non-steady-state mixing of these reservoirs with the early rock-forming materials during their formation corresponds with the birth and evolution of the solar system.

  19. The forthcoming EISCAT_3D as an extra-terrestrial matter monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellinen-Wannberg, Asta; Kero, Johan; Häggström, Ingemar; Mann, Ingrid; Tjulin, Anders

    2016-04-01

    It is important to monitor the extra-terrestrial dust flux in the Earth's environment and into the atmosphere. Meteoroids threaten the infrastructure in space as hypervelocity hits by micron-sized granules continuously degrade the solar panels and other satellite surfaces. Through their orbital elements meteoroids can be associated to the interplanetary dust cloud, comets, asteroids or the interstellar space. The ablation products of meteoroids participate in many physical and chemical processes at different layers in the atmosphere, many of them occurring in the polar regions. High-power large-aperture (HPLA) radars, such as the tristatic EISCAT UHF together with the EISCAT VHF, have been versatile instruments for studying many properties of the meteoroid population, even though they were not initially designed for this purpose. The future EISCAT_3D will comprise a phased-array transmitter and several phased-array receivers distributed in northern Scandinavia. These will work at 233 MHz centre frequency with power up to 10 MW and run advanced signal processing systems. The facility will in many aspects be superior to its predecessors as the first radar to combine volumetric-, aperture synthesis- and multistatic imaging as well as adaptive experiments. The technical design goals of the radar respond to the scientific requests from the user community. The VHF frequency and the volumetric imaging capacity will increase the collecting volume compared to the earlier UHF, the high transmitter power will increase the sensitivity of the radar, and the interferometry will improve the spatial resolution of the orbit estimates. The facility will be able to observe and define orbits to about 10% of the meteors from the established mass flux distribution that are large or fast enough to produce an ionization mantle around the impacting meteoroid within the collecting volume. The estimated annual mean of about 190 000 orbits per day with EISCAT_3D gives many orders of magnitude

  20. The game of active search for extra-terrestrial intelligence: breaking the `Great Silence'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vladar, Harold P.

    2013-01-01

    The search for extra-terrestrial intelligence (SETI) has been performed principally as a one-way survey, listening of radio frequencies across the Milky Way and other galaxies. However, scientists have engaged in an active messaging only rarely. This suggests the simple rationale that if other civilizations exist and take a similar approach to ours, namely listening but not broadcasting, the result is a silent universe. A simple game theoretical model, the prisoner's dilemma, explains this situation: each player (civilization) can passively search (defect), or actively search and broadcast (cooperate). In order to maximize the payoff (or, equivalently, minimize the risks) the best strategy is not to broadcast. In fact, the active search has been opposed on the basis that it might be dangerous to expose ourselves. However, most of these ideas have not been based on objective arguments, and ignore accounting of the possible gains and losses. Thus, the question stands: should we perform an active search? I develop a game-theoretical framework where civilizations can be of different types, and explicitly apply it to a situation where societies are either interested in establishing a two-way communication or belligerent and in urge to exploit ours. The framework gives a quantitative solution (a mixed-strategy), which is how frequent we should perform the active SETI. This frequency is roughly proportional to the inverse of the risk, and can be extremely small. However, given the immense amount of stars being scanned, it supports active SETI. The model is compared with simulations, and the possible actions are evaluated through the San Marino scale, measuring the risks of messaging.

  1. Molecular Physiology of an Extra-renal Cl(-) Uptake Mechanism for Body Fluid Cl(-) Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Fang; Yan, Jia-Jiun; Tseng, Yung-Che; Chen, Ruo-Dong; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    The development of an ion regulatory mechanism for body fluid homeostasis was an important trait for vertebrates during the evolution from aquatic to terrestrial life. The homeostatic mechanism of Cl(-) in aquatic fish appears to be similar to that of terrestrial vertebrates; however, the mechanism in non-mammalian vertebrates is poorly understood. Unlike in mammals, in which the kidney plays a central role, in most fish species, the gill is responsible for the maintenance of Cl(-) homeostasis via Cl(-) transport uptake mechanisms. Previous studies in zebrafish identified Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) 2b-expressing cells in the gills and skin as the major ionocytes responsible for Cl(-) uptake, similar to distal convoluted tubular cells in mammalian kidney. However, the mechanism by which basolateral ions exit from NCC cells is still unclear. Of the in situ hybridization signals of twelve members of the clc Cl(-) channel family, only that of clc-2c exhibited an ionocyte pattern in the gill and embryonic skin. Double in situ hybridization/immunocytochemistry confirmed colocalization of apical NCC2b with basolateral CLC-2c. Acclimation to a low Cl(-) environment increased mRNA expression of both clc-2c and ncc2b, and also the protein expression of CLC-2c in embryos and adult gills. Loss-of-function of clc-2c resulted in a significant decrease in whole body Cl(-) content in zebrafish embryos, a phenotype similar to that of ncc2b mutants; this finding suggests a role for CLC-2c in Cl(-) uptake. Translational knockdown of clc-2c stimulated ncc2b mRNA expression and vice versa, revealing cooperation between these two transporters in the context of zebrafish Cl(-) homeostasis. Further comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses revealed that zebrafish CLC-2c is a fish-specific isoform that diverged from a kidney-predominant homologue, in the same manner as NCC2b and its counterparts (NCCs). Several lines of molecular and cellular physiological evidences demonstrated

  2. Molecular Physiology of an Extra-renal Cl- Uptake Mechanism for Body Fluid Cl- Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Fang; Yan, Jia-Jiun; Tseng, Yung-Che; Chen, Ruo-Dong; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    The development of an ion regulatory mechanism for body fluid homeostasis was an important trait for vertebrates during the evolution from aquatic to terrestrial life. The homeostatic mechanism of Cl- in aquatic fish appears to be similar to that of terrestrial vertebrates; however, the mechanism in non-mammalian vertebrates is poorly understood. Unlike in mammals, in which the kidney plays a central role, in most fish species, the gill is responsible for the maintenance of Cl- homeostasis via Cl- transport uptake mechanisms. Previous studies in zebrafish identified Na+-Cl- cotransporter (NCC) 2b-expressing cells in the gills and skin as the major ionocytes responsible for Cl- uptake, similar to distal convoluted tubular cells in mammalian kidney. However, the mechanism by which basolateral ions exit from NCC cells is still unclear. Of the in situ hybridization signals of twelve members of the clc Cl- channel family, only that of clc-2c exhibited an ionocyte pattern in the gill and embryonic skin. Double in situ hybridization/immunocytochemistry confirmed colocalization of apical NCC2b with basolateral CLC-2c. Acclimation to a low Cl- environment increased mRNA expression of both clc-2c and ncc2b, and also the protein expression of CLC-2c in embryos and adult gills. Loss-of-function of clc-2c resulted in a significant decrease in whole body Cl- content in zebrafish embryos, a phenotype similar to that of ncc2b mutants; this finding suggests a role for CLC-2c in Cl- uptake. Translational knockdown of clc-2c stimulated ncc2b mRNA expression and vice versa, revealing cooperation between these two transporters in the context of zebrafish Cl- homeostasis. Further comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses revealed that zebrafish CLC-2c is a fish-specific isoform that diverged from a kidney-predominant homologue, in the same manner as NCC2b and its counterparts (NCCs). Several lines of molecular and cellular physiological evidences demonstrated the cofunctional role

  3. Exoskeletal chitin scales isometrically with body size in terrestrial insects.

    PubMed

    Lease, Hilary M; Wolf, Blair O

    2010-06-01

    The skeletal system of animals provides the support for a variety of activities and functions. For animals such as mammals, which have endoskeletons, research has shown that skeletal investment (mass) scales with body mass to the 1.1 power. In this study, we ask how exoskeletal investment in insects scales with body mass. We measured the body mass and mass of exoskeletal chitin of 551 adult terrestrial insects of 245 species, with dry masses ranging from 0.0001 to 2.41 g (0.0002-6.13 g wet mass) to assess the allometry of exoskeletal investment. Our results showed that exoskeletal chitin mass scales isometrically with dry body mass across the Insecta as M(chitin) = a M(dry) (b), where b = 1.03 +/- 0.04, indicating that both large and small terrestrial insects allocate a similar fraction of their body mass to chitin. This isometric chitin-scaling relationship was also evident at the taxonomic level of order, for all insect orders except Coleoptera. We additionally found that the relative exoskeletal chitin investment, indexed by the coefficient, a, varies with insect life history and phylogeny. Exoskeletal chitin mass tends to be proportionally less and to increase at a lower rate with mass in flying than in nonflying insects (M(flying insect chitin) = -0.56 x M(dry) (0.97); M(nonflying insect chitin) = -0.55 x M(dry) (1.03)), and to vary with insect order. Isometric scaling (b = 1) of insect exoskeletal chitin suggests that the exoskeleton in insects scales differently than support structures of most other organisms, which have a positive allometry (b > 1) (e.g., vertebrate endoskeleton, tree secondary tissue). The isometric pattern that we document here additionally suggests that exoskeletal investment may not be the primary limit on insect body size. PMID:20235123

  4. Examining predator-prey body size, trophic level and body mass across marine and terrestrial mammals.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Marlee A; Rogers, Tracey L

    2014-12-22

    Predator-prey relationships and trophic levels are indicators of community structure, and are important for monitoring ecosystem changes. Mammals colonized the marine environment on seven separate occasions, which resulted in differences in species' physiology, morphology and behaviour. It is likely that these changes have had a major effect upon predator-prey relationships and trophic position; however, the effect of environment is yet to be clarified. We compiled a dataset, based on the literature, to explore the relationship between body mass, trophic level and predator-prey ratio across terrestrial (n = 51) and marine (n = 56) mammals. We did not find the expected positive relationship between trophic level and body mass, but we did find that marine carnivores sit 1.3 trophic levels higher than terrestrial carnivores. Also, marine mammals are largely carnivorous and have significantly larger predator-prey ratios compared with their terrestrial counterparts. We propose that primary productivity, and its availability, is important for mammalian trophic structure and body size. Also, energy flow and community structure in the marine environment are influenced by differences in energy efficiency and increased food web stability. Enhancing our knowledge of feeding ecology in mammals has the potential to provide insights into the structure and functioning of marine and terrestrial communities. PMID:25377460

  5. Examining predator–prey body size, trophic level and body mass across marine and terrestrial mammals

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Marlee A.; Rogers, Tracey L.

    2014-01-01

    Predator–prey relationships and trophic levels are indicators of community structure, and are important for monitoring ecosystem changes. Mammals colonized the marine environment on seven separate occasions, which resulted in differences in species' physiology, morphology and behaviour. It is likely that these changes have had a major effect upon predator–prey relationships and trophic position; however, the effect of environment is yet to be clarified. We compiled a dataset, based on the literature, to explore the relationship between body mass, trophic level and predator–prey ratio across terrestrial (n = 51) and marine (n = 56) mammals. We did not find the expected positive relationship between trophic level and body mass, but we did find that marine carnivores sit 1.3 trophic levels higher than terrestrial carnivores. Also, marine mammals are largely carnivorous and have significantly larger predator–prey ratios compared with their terrestrial counterparts. We propose that primary productivity, and its availability, is important for mammalian trophic structure and body size. Also, energy flow and community structure in the marine environment are influenced by differences in energy efficiency and increased food web stability. Enhancing our knowledge of feeding ecology in mammals has the potential to provide insights into the structure and functioning of marine and terrestrial communities. PMID:25377460

  6. Chemical heterogeneities in the interior of terrestrial bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Maurice, Maxime; Tosi, Nicola; Breuer, Doris

    2016-04-01

    Mantle chemical heterogeneities that can strongly influence the interior dynamics have been inferred for all terrestrial bodies of the Solar System and range from local to global scale. Seismic data for the Earth, differences in surface mineral compositions observed in data sets from space missions, and isotopic variations identified in laboratory analyses of meteorites or samples indicate chemically heterogeneous systems. One way to generate large scale geochemical heterogeneities is through the fractional crystallization of a liquid magma ocean. The large amount of energy available in the early stages of planetary evolution can cause melting of a significant part or perhaps even the entire mantle of a terrestrial body resulting in a liquid magma ocean. Assuming fractional crystallization, magma ocean solidification proceeds from the core-mantle boundary to the surface where dense cumulates tend to form due to iron enrichment in the evolving liquid. This process leads to a gravitationally unstable mantle, which is prone to overturn. Following cumulate overturn, a stable stratification may be reached that prevents efficient material transport. As a consequence, mantle reservoirs may be kept separate, possibly for the entire thermo-chemical evolution of a terrestrial body. Scenarios assuming fractional crystallization of a liquid magma ocean have been suggested to explain lavas with distinct composition on Mercury's surface [1], the generation of the Moon's mare basalts by sampling a reservoir consisting of overturned ilmenite-bearing cumulates [2], and the preservation of Mars' geochemical reservoirs as inferred by isotopic analysis of the SNC meteorites [3]. However, recent studies have shown that the style of the overturn as well as the subsequent density stratification are of extreme importance for the subsequent thermo-chemical evolution of a planetary body and may have a major impact on the later surface tectonics and volcanic history. The rapid formation of a

  7. Earthsickness: circumnavigation and the terrestrial human body, 1520-1800.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Joyce E

    2012-01-01

    From their distinctive experience of going around the world, maritime circumnavigators concluded that their characteristic disease, sea scurvy, must result from their being away from land too long, much longer than any other sailors. They offered their scorbutic bodies as proof that humans were terrestrial creatures, physically suited to the earthly parts of a terraqueous globe. That arresting claim is at odds with the current literature on the cultural implications of European expansion, which has emphasized early modern colonists' and travelers' fear of alien places, and has concluded that they had a small and restricted geographic imagination that fell short of the planetary consciousness associated with the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. But circumnavigators did conceive of themselves as actors on a planetary scale, as creatures adapted to all of the land on Earth, not just their places of origin. PMID:23263345

  8. Strategic considerations in SETI, and a microwave approach. [Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seeger, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    Plausible options in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), and the need to reserve a suitable portion of the EM (microwave) spectrum for SETI research, are discussed. Reasons for selection of a portion of the spectrum, specifically the 'water hole' near 1.5 GHz in the terrestrial microwave window (1-25 GHz), are presented, and competition with various emitters for that band (existing satellite downlink transmissions) is discussed. SETI search policies and options are summarized in a table. Speculative considerations guiding initial phases of the SETI pursuit are discussed.

  9. Extra-terrestrial life in the European Space Agency's Cosmic Vision plan and beyond.

    PubMed

    Fridlund, Malcolm

    2011-02-13

    Our exciting time allows us to contemplate the moment in the not-too-distant future when we can detect the presence of life on worlds orbiting stars other than our Sun. It will not be easy and will require the development and use of the very latest technologies. It also very probably demands deployment in space of relevant instrumentation in order to carry out these investigations. The European Space Agency has been involved in the studies and development of the required technologies for more than a decade and is currently formulating a roadmap for how to achieve the ultimate detection of signs of life as we know it on terrestrial exoplanets. The major elements of the roadmap consist of the following. First, the search for and detection of terrestrial exoplanets. Here, some progress has been made recently and is reported in this paper. Second, the more and more detailed study of the physical characteristics of such exoplanets. Finally, the search for biomarkers--indicators of biological activity--that can be observed at interstellar distances. The last is probably one of the most difficult problems ever contemplated by observational astronomy. PMID:21220282

  10. First stage identification of syntactic elements in an extra-terrestrial signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, John

    2011-02-01

    By investigating the generic attributes of a representative set of terrestrial languages at varying levels of abstraction, it is our endeavour to try and isolate elements of the signal universe, which are computationally tractable for its detection and structural decipherment. Ultimately, our aim is to contribute in some way to the understanding of what 'languageness' actually is. This paper describes algorithms and software developed to characterise and detect generic intelligent language-like features in an input signal, using natural language learning techniques: looking for characteristic statistical "language-signatures" in test corpora. As a first step towards such species-independent language-detection, we present a suite of programs to analyse digital representations of a range of data, and use the results to extrapolate whether or not there are language-like structures which distinguish this data from other sources, such as music, images, and white noise.

  11. Estimating terrestrial amphibian pesticide body burden through dermal exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dermal exposure presents a potentially significant but understudied route for pesticide uptake in terrestrial amphibians. Our study measured dermal uptake of pesticides of varying hydrophobicity (logKow) in frogs. Amphibians were indirectly exposed to one of five pesticide active...

  12. Imprinted expression in cystic embryoid bodies shows an embryonic and not an extra-embryonic pattern

    PubMed Central

    Kulinski, Tomasz M.; Casari, M. Rita T.; Guenzl, Philipp M.; Wenzel, Daniel; Andergassen, Daniel; Hladik, Anastasiya; Datlinger, Paul; Farlik, Matthias; Theussl, H. -Christian; Penninger, Josef M.; Knapp, Sylvia; Bock, Christoph; Barlow, Denise P.; Hudson, Quanah J.

    2015-01-01

    A large subset of mammalian imprinted genes show extra-embryonic lineage (EXEL) specific imprinted expression that is restricted to placental trophectoderm lineages and to visceral yolk sac endoderm (ysE). Isolated ysE provides a homogenous in vivo model of a mid-gestation extra-embryonic tissue to examine the mechanism of EXEL-specific imprinted gene silencing, but an in vitro model of ysE to facilitate more rapid and cost-effective experiments is not available. Reports indicate that ES cells differentiated into cystic embryoid bodies (EBs) contain ysE, so here we investigate if cystic EBs model ysE imprinted expression. The imprinted expression pattern of cystic EBs is shown to resemble fetal liver and not ysE. To investigate the reason for this we characterized the methylome and transcriptome of cystic EBs in comparison to fetal liver and ysE, by whole genome bisulphite sequencing and RNA-seq. Cystic EBs show a fetal liver pattern of global hypermethylation and low expression of repeats, while ysE shows global hypomethylation and high expression of IAPEz retroviral repeats, as reported for placenta. Transcriptome analysis confirmed that cystic EBs are more similar to fetal liver than ysE and express markers of early embryonic endoderm. Genome-wide analysis shows that ysE shares epigenetic and repeat expression features with placenta. Contrary to previous reports, we show that cystic EBs do not contain ysE, but are more similar to the embryonic endoderm of fetal liver. This explains why cystic EBs reproduce the imprinted expression seen in the embryo but not that seen in the ysE. PMID:25912690

  13. Wet tropospheric delay spatial variability over terrestrial water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, E.; Moller, D.; Andreadis, K.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    Among the sources of uncertainty in radar altimetry measurements of inland water bodies is the signal delay associated with space-time variations in water vapor in the atmosphere. Over the ocean, zenith wet tropospheric path delays (PD) can be measured by satellite microwave radiometry; however, the high brightness temperature of land prevents the use of these techniques over inland waters. SAR-based Atmospheric Phase Screens can be estimated over land, but not over water bodies. Radiosonde- and GPS-based estimates of PD over land are available, yet these measurements occur at specific, sparse locations. Atmospheric models are therefore the best source of information about space-time variations in PD, where observations (e.g., from radiosonde and GPS) are incorporated via data assimilation. The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography mission (SWOT) will use Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) in Ka-band, at a high incidence angle, to measure temporal variations in water elevation, slope, and extent in rivers, lakes, and reservoirs. Images will be collected over a 120-km wide swath with <100 m spatial resolution and ~1 cm height precision when averaged over a 1 km2 area, with a 21-day repeat cycle. At present, the spatial and temporal variability of PD at spatial scales relevant to the mission's inland water objectives (e.g., measurement of variations in the storage of reservoirs and lakes with spatial extent order 1 sq. km and larger) is an open question. We report the results of simulations of PD based on simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical weather prediction model. We consider two domains within the continental U.S.: 1) the Pacific Northwest (at 4-km and 4/3-km spatial resolutions, via WRF results provided by the Northwest Modeling Consortium), and 2) sections of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas (at 2.33-km spatial resolution, via simulations performed for this study). We then investigate the spatial and temporal

  14. A universal scaling relationship between body mass and proximal limb bone dimensions in quadrupedal terrestrial tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Body size is intimately related to the physiology and ecology of an organism. Therefore, accurate and consistent body mass estimates are essential for inferring numerous aspects of paleobiology in extinct taxa, and investigating large-scale evolutionary and ecological patterns in the history of life. Scaling relationships between skeletal measurements and body mass in birds and mammals are commonly used to predict body mass in extinct members of these crown clades, but the applicability of these models for predicting mass in more distantly related stem taxa, such as non-avian dinosaurs and non-mammalian synapsids, has been criticized on biomechanical grounds. Here we test the major criticisms of scaling methods for estimating body mass using an extensive dataset of mammalian and non-avian reptilian species derived from individual skeletons with live weights. Results Significant differences in the limb scaling of mammals and reptiles are noted in comparisons of limb proportions and limb length to body mass. Remarkably, however, the relationship between proximal (stylopodial) limb bone circumference and body mass is highly conserved in extant terrestrial mammals and reptiles, in spite of their disparate limb postures, gaits, and phylogenetic histories. As a result, we are able to conclusively reject the main criticisms of scaling methods that question the applicability of a universal scaling equation for estimating body mass in distantly related taxa. Conclusions The conserved nature of the relationship between stylopodial circumference and body mass suggests that the minimum diaphyseal circumference of the major weight-bearing bones is only weakly influenced by the varied forces exerted on the limbs (that is, compression or torsion) and most strongly related to the mass of the animal. Our results, therefore, provide a much-needed, robust, phylogenetically corrected framework for accurate and consistent estimation of body mass in extinct terrestrial

  15. Terrestrial soft-bodied protists and other microorganisms in triassic amber.

    PubMed

    Poinar, G O; Waggoner, B M; Bauer, U C

    1993-01-01

    Protozoa, cyanobacteria, sheathed algae, sheathed fungi, germinating pollen or spores, and fungal spores have been found in amber 220 to 230 million years old. Many of these microorganisms can be assigned to present-day groups. This discovery of terrestrial, soft-bodied protists that can be referred to modern groups indicates that morphological evolution is very gradual in many protists and that both structural and probably functional stasis extend back at least to the Upper Triassic period. PMID:17790989

  16. Body shape in terrestrial isopods: A morphological mechanism to resist desiccation?

    PubMed

    Broly, Pierre; Devigne, Cédric; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis

    2015-11-01

    Woodlice are fully terrestrial crustaceans and are known to be sensitive to water loss. Their half-ellipsoidal shapes represent simple models in which to investigate theoretical assumptions about organism morphology and rates of exchange with the environment. We examine the influence of surface area and mass on the desiccation rates in three eco-morphologically different species of woodlice: Oniscus asellus, Porcellio scaber, and Armadillidium vulgare. Our analysis indicates that the rate of water loss of an individual depends on both the initial weight and the body surface area. Interspecific and intraspecific analyses show that the mass-specific water loss rate of a species decreases along with the ratio of surface area to volume. In particular, we show that body shape explains the difference in mass-specific water loss rates between A. vulgare and P. scaber. This observation also explains several known ecological patterns, for example, the distribution and survivorship of individuals. However, in addition to body size and shape, water loss in terrestrial isopods depends also on the coefficient of permeability (i.e., a measure of water loss rate per surface unit), which is high in O. asellus and lower (and at similar levels) in P. scaber and A. vulgare. We discuss morphological, physiological, and behavioral aspects of water loss avoidance in terrestrial isopods. PMID:26289755

  17. Myeloma bone and extra-medullary disease: Role of PET/CT and other whole-body imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Rubini, Giuseppe; Niccoli-Asabella, Artor; Ferrari, Cristina; Racanelli, Vito; Maggialetti, Nicola; Dammacco, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematological malignancy. Although it can affect different organs, the bone compartment stands out both in terms of prevalence and clinical impact. Despite the striking advances in MM therapy, bone disease can remarkably affect the patient's quality of life. The occurrence and extension of bone marrow and extra-medullary involvement should be carefully assessed to confirm the diagnosis, to locate and whenever possible prevent dreadful complications such as pathological fractures and spinal cord compression, and to establish suitable therapeutic measures. Many imaging techniques have been proposed for the detection of MM skeletal involvement. With the development of more sophisticated imaging tools, it is time to use the right technique at the right time. Based on the review of the literature and our own experience, this article discusses advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging methods in the work-up of MM patients, with particular emphasis on the role that PET/CT can play. It is emphasized that whole body low-dose computed tomography should be the preferred imaging technique at baseline. However, bone marrow infiltration and extra-medullary manifestations are better detected by whole body magnetic resonance imaging. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography, on the other hand, combines the benefits of the two mentioned imaging procedures and is particularly useful not only for the detection of osteolytic lesions unrevealed by conventional X-ray, but also in the assessment of prognosis and therapeutic response. PMID:26997302

  18. Phase diagram of the alternating-spin Heisenberg chain with extra isotropic three-body exchange interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Nedko B.; Ummethum, Jörg; Schnack, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    For the time being isotropic three-body exchange interactions are scarcely explored and mostly used as a tool for constructing various exactly solvable one-dimensional models, although, generally speaking, such competing terms in generic Heisenberg spin systems can be expected to support specific quantum effects and phases. The Heisenberg chain constructed from alternating S = 1 and σ = 1/2 site spins defines a realistic prototype model admitting extra three-body exchange terms. Based on numerical density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) and exact diagonalization (ED) calculations, we demonstrate that the additional isotropic three-body terms stabilize a variety of partially-polarized states as well as two specific non-magnetic states including a critical spin-liquid phase controlled by two Gaussinal conformal theories as well as a critical nematic-like phase characterized by dominant quadrupolar S-spin fluctuations. Most of the established effects are related to some specific features of the three-body interaction such as the promotion of local collinear spin configurations and the enhanced tendency towards nearest-neighbor clustering of the spins. It may be expected that most of the predicted effects of the isotropic three-body interaction persist in higher space dimensions.

  19. A refined method for the detection of baculovirus occlusion bodies in forest terrestrial and aquatic habitats.

    PubMed

    Ebling, Peter M; Holmes, Stephen B

    2002-12-01

    A sensitive and efficient method was developed for the detection of genetically modified and wild-type baculovirus occlusion bodies (OB) in forest terrestrial and aquatic habitats. The protocol facilitates the analysis of a large number of samples collected and frozen to maintain viral integrity. Lyophilization was used to standardize the size of both field-collected soil samples and test substrates inoculated with OBs for the determination of minimum detection threshold. To simulate natural conditions, terrestrial test substrates were inoculated at a standardized moisture content determined using a soil pressure plate apparatus. OBs, extracted from lyophilized test substrates by washing, sieving and centrifugation, were subjected to alkaline lysis and viral DNA isolated using a purchased DNA purification kit. PCR amplified DNA was visualized using agarose gel electrophoresis. Minimum detection thresholds in terrestrial substrates were 10(3), 10(2), 10(2) and 10(1) OBs from 0.5 g of lyophilized L, F-H and mineral soil horizons, and 1.0 ml of leachate, respectively. Detection thresholds in aquatic substrates were 10(0) and 10(3) OBs from 1.0 ml of pond water and 1.0 g of bottom sediment, respectively. PMID:12476994

  20. An improved method for quantification of extra domain A-containing cellular fibronectin (EDAcFN) in different body fluids.

    PubMed

    Ylätupa, S; Mertaniemi, P; Haglund, C; Partanen, P

    1995-01-31

    A quantitative direct enzyme immunoassay for the extra domain A-containing isoform of cellular fibronectin (EDAcFN) was established for screening of large series of blood samples and various body fluids of different pH and viscosity. The method is based on the monoclonal antibody DH1 recognizing the extra domain A in cellular fibronectin (EDAcFN). Studies on the effect of dilution of plasma and serum samples in this direct assay indicated that the measured concentration of cFN in the samples greatly depend on the ratio of sample dilution. The linearity of the assay was improved with sample dilution and the optimal dilution was 1:5. Stored diluted samples retained their cFN content at +4 degrees C, and -20 degrees C and -70 degrees C for months in contrast to samples stored undiluted. With this direct EIA the detection limit was 0.05 micrograms/ml and the linear portion of the standard curve could be extended above 30 micrograms/ml. Thus, the cFN concentration of blood samples could be measured reliably without inhibition also in samples with very high concentration of cFN. This is particularly important when measuring blood samples from cancer patients, since these samples may contain more than 20 micrograms/ml EDAcFN. The assay was standardized for blood samples but, due to the possibility of sample dilution, it also enabled reliable quantification of EDAcFN in various other body fluids. Undiluted some of the samples with non-neutral pH (urine, bile) or with high viscosity (seminal plasma) interfered with the assay. In addition to blood samples, the EDAcFN concentration was determined in samples of urine, bile, amniotic fluid, cervicovaginal secretions, seminal fluid, cerebrospinal fluid, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, pleural fluid and saliva. Thereby, this modified method was shown to be applicable to various body fluids. PMID:7758225

  1. Quantitative Trait Loci for Light Sensitivity, Body Weight, Body Size, and Morphological Eye Parameters in the Bumblebee, Bombus terrestris

    PubMed Central

    Maebe, Kevin; Meeus, Ivan; De Riek, Jan; Smagghe, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Bumblebees such as Bombus terrestris are essential pollinators in natural and managed ecosystems. In addition, this species is intensively used in agriculture for its pollination services, for instance in tomato and pepper greenhouses. Here we performed a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis on B. terrestris using 136 microsatellite DNA markers to identify genes linked with 20 traits including light sensitivity, body size and mass, and eye and hind leg measures. By composite interval mapping (IM), we found 83 and 34 suggestive QTLs for 19 of the 20 traits at the linkage group wide significance levels of p = 0.05 and 0.01, respectively. Furthermore, we also found five significant QTLs at the genome wide significant level of p = 0.05. Individual QTLs accounted for 7.5-53.3% of the phenotypic variation. For 15 traits, at least one QTL was confirmed with multiple QTL model mapping. Multivariate principal components analysis confirmed 11 univariate suggestive QTLs but revealed three suggestive QTLs not identified by the individual traits. We also identified several candidate genes linked with light sensitivity, in particular the Phosrestin-1-like gene is a primary candidate for its phototransduction function. In conclusion, we believe that the suggestive and significant QTLs, and markers identified here, can be of use in marker-assisted breeding to improve selection towards light sensitive bumblebees, and thus also the pollination service of bumblebees. PMID:25928544

  2. For Researchers on Obesity: Historical Review of Extra Body Weight Definitions

    PubMed Central

    Komaroff, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Rationale. The concept of obesity has been known since ancient world; however, the current standard definition of obesity was endorsed only about a decade ago. There is a need for researches to understand multiple approaches to defining obesity and how and why the standard definition was developed. The review will help to grasp the complexity of the problem and can lead to novel hypotheses in obesity research. Objective. This paper focuses on the objective to understand historical background on the development of “reference and standard tables” of weight as a platform for normal versus abnormal body weight definition. Methods. A systematic literature review was performed to chronologically summarize the definition of body weight from time of Hippocrates till the year of 2010. Conclusion. This paper presents the historical background on the development of “reference and standard tables” of weight as a platform for normal versus abnormal body weight definition. Knowledge of historical approaches to the concept of obesity can motivate researchers to find new hypotheses and utilize the appropriate obesity assessments to address their objectives. PMID:27313875

  3. Body mass estimation in xenarthra: a predictive equation suitable for all quadrupedal terrestrial placentals?

    PubMed

    De Esteban-Trivigno, Soledad; Mendoza, Manuel; De Renzi, Miquel

    2008-10-01

    The Magnorder Xenarthra includes strange extinct groups, like glyptodonts, similar to large armadillos, and ground sloths, terrestrial relatives of the extant tree sloths. They have created considerable paleobiological interest in the last decades; however, the ecology of most of these species is still controversial or unknown. The body mass estimation of extinct species has great importance for paleobiological reconstructions. The commonest way to estimate body mass from fossils is through linear regression. However, if the studied species does not have similar extant relatives, the allometric pattern described by the regression could differ from those shown by the extinct group. That is the case for glyptodonts and ground sloths. Thus, stepwise multiple regression were developed including extant xenarthrans (their taxonomic relatives) and ungulates (their size and ecological relatives). Cases were weighted to maximize the taxonomic evenness. Twenty-eight equations were obtained. The distribution of the percent of prediction error (%PE) was analyzed between taxonomic groups (Perissodactyla, Artiodactyla, and Xenarthra) and size groups (0-20 kg, 20-300 kg, and more than 300 kg). To assess the predictive power of the functions, equations were applied to species not included in the regression development [test set cross validation, (TSCV)]. Only five equations had a homogeneous %PE between the aforementioned groups. These were applied to five extinct species. A mean body mass of 80 kg was estimated for Propalaehoplophorus australis (Cingulata: Glyptodontidae), 594 kg for Scelidotherium leptocephalum (Phyllophaga: Mylodontidae), and 3,550.7 kg for Lestodon armatus (Phyllophaga: Mylodontidae). The high scatter of the body mass estimations obtained for Catonyx tarijensis (Phyllophaga: Mylodontidae) and Thalassocnus natans (Phyllophaga: Megatheriidae), probably due to different specializations, prevented us from predicting its body mass. Surprisingly, although obtained

  4. Speed of Sound in Aqueous Solutions at sub-GPa Pressures: a New Experiment to Unveil the Properties of Extra-Terrestrial Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollengier, O.; Brown, J. M.; Vance, S.; Shaw, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Geophysical data from the Galileo and Cassini-Huygens missions are consistent with the presence of aqueous subsurface oceans in Ganymede, Callisto and Titan, the largest icy satellites of the solar system. To understand the history and present state of these moons, the next generation of evolution models will require an accurate description of the properties of these liquid layers to predict the phase boundaries, heat transports and chemical exchanges within them. Sound speed measurements in pressure and temperature allow for the reconstruction of the Gibbs free energy surface of a phase, which in turn gives access to the desired properties (chemical potential, density, heat capacity...). However, such data are still scarce for aqueous solutions bearing Na+, Mg2+, Cl- and SO42- ions (major ions expected in extra-terrestrial oceans) at the high pressures and low temperatures expected for water inside these moons (up to 1.5 GPa for Ganymede, down to freezing temperatures). For pure water, IAPWS accuracy for sound speeds is given to 0.3% above 0.4 GPa. MgSO4aqueous solutions have been explored to 0.7 GPa with a precision limited to about 0.5%. Most other aqueous solutions bearing any combination of these four ions have not been explored at all above a few hundreds MPa. To acquire new high-precision sound speeds in aqueous solutions of various compositions, we set up a new experimental system working in the 0 - 0.7 GPa pressure range and 240 - 350 K temperature range. The device consists in an oil-pressurized steel vessel enclosing a titanium alloy rod supporting the sample and a sealing bellows. A transducer at the top end of the titanium rod generates ultrasonic waves and collects the series of subsequent reflections. Preliminary tests with pure water illustrate a precision of 0.02% and an accuracy within 0.1% of IAPWS on our whole pressure range. Revision of the properties of pure water and H2O-MgSO4 solutions up to 0.7 GPa along with the first data in the H2O-MgCl2

  5. N-body simulations of terrestrial planet formation under the influence of a hot Jupiter

    SciTech Connect

    Ogihara, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro E-mail: ogihara@nagoya-u.jp

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the formation of multiple-planet systems in the presence of a hot Jupiter (HJ) using extended N-body simulations that are performed simultaneously with semianalytic calculations. Our primary aims are to describe the planet formation process starting from planetesimals using high-resolution simulations, and to examine the dependences of the architecture of planetary systems on input parameters (e.g., disk mass, disk viscosity). We observe that protoplanets that arise from oligarchic growth and undergo type I migration stop migrating when they join a chain of resonant planets outside the orbit of an HJ. The formation of a resonant chain is almost independent of our model parameters, and is thus a robust process. At the end of our simulations, several terrestrial planets remain at around 0.1 AU. The formed planets are not equal mass; the largest planet constitutes more than 50% of the total mass in the close-in region, which is also less dependent on parameters. In the previous work of this paper, we have found a new physical mechanism of induced migration of the HJ, which is called a crowding-out. If the HJ opens up a wide gap in the disk (e.g., owing to low disk viscosity), crowding-out becomes less efficient and the HJ remains. We also discuss angular momentum transfer between the planets and disk.

  6. Gravitational N-body problem on the accretion process of terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, T.; Mizutani, H.

    1978-01-01

    Numerical integration of the gravitational N-body problem has been carried out for a variety of protoplanetary clusters in the range N = 100 to 200. Particles are assumed to coagulate at collisions irrespective of relative velocity and mass ratio of the particles. It is shown graphically how the dispersed N-bodies accumulate to a single planet through mutual collisions. The velocity distribution and size distribution of bodies are also investigated as functions of time in the accretion process. Accretion rates of planets are found to be dependent strongly on the initial number density distribution, the initial size distribution, and the initial velocity distribution of bodies. Formation of satellites of about 10% in the planet mass is common to most cases in the present study. A substantial mass of bodies also escapes from the cluster. Many satellites and escapers formed during the accretion process of planets may be source materials of heavy bombardment in the early history of planets.

  7. From planetesimals to terrestrial planets: N-body simulations including the effects of nebular gas and giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, Ryuji; Stadel, Joachim; Moore, Ben

    2010-06-01

    We present results from a suite of N-body simulations that follow the formation and accretion history of the terrestrial planets using a new parallel treecode that we have developed. We initially place 2000 equal size planetesimals between 0.5 and 4.0 AU and the collisional growth is followed until the completion of planetary accretion (>100 Myr). A total of 64 simulations were carried out to explore sensitivity to the key parameters and initial conditions. All the important effect of gas in laminar disks are taken into account: the aerodynamic gas drag, the disk-planet interaction including Type I migration, and the global disk potential which causes inward migration of secular resonances as the gas dissipates. We vary the initial total mass and spatial distribution of the planetesimals, the time scale of dissipation of nebular gas (which dissipates uniformly in space and exponentially in time), and orbits of Jupiter and Saturn. We end up with 1-5 planets in the terrestrial region. In order to maintain sufficient mass in this region in the presence of Type I migration, the time scale of gas dissipation needs to be 1-2 Myr. The final configurations and collisional histories strongly depend on the orbital eccentricity of Jupiter. If today's eccentricity of Jupiter is used, then most of bodies in the asteroidal region are swept up within the terrestrial region owing to the inward migration of the secular resonance, and giant impacts between protoplanets occur most commonly around 10 Myr. If the orbital eccentricity of Jupiter is close to zero, as suggested in the Nice model, the effect of the secular resonance is negligible and a large amount of mass stays for a long period of time in the asteroidal region. With a circular orbit for Jupiter, giant impacts usually occur around 100 Myr, consistent with the accretion time scale indicated from isotope records. However, we inevitably have an Earth size planet at around 2 AU in this case. It is very difficult to obtain

  8. Influences of limb proportions and body size on locomotor kinematics in terrestrial primates and fossil hominins.

    PubMed

    Polk, J D

    2004-10-01

    During locomotion, mammalian limb postures are influenced by many factors including the animal's limb length and body mass. Polk (2002) compared the gait of similar-sized cercopithecine monkeys that differed limb proportions and found that longer-limbed monkeys usually adopt more extended joint postures than shorter-limbed monkeys in order to moderate their joint moments. Studies of primates as well as non-primate mammals that vary in body mass have demonstrated that larger animals use more extended limb postures than smaller animals. Such extended postures in larger animals increase the extensor muscle mechanical advantage and allow postures to be maintained with relatively less muscular effort (Polk, 2002; Biewener 1989). The results of these previous studies are used here to address two anthropological questions. The first concerns the postural effects of body mass and limb proportion differences between australopithecines and members of the genus Homo. That is, H. erectus and later hominins all have larger body mass and longer legs than australopithecines, and these anatomical differences suggest that Homo probably used more extended postures and probably required relatively less muscular force to resist gravity than the smaller and shorter-limbed australopithecines. The second question investigates how animals with similar size but different limb proportions differ in locomotor performance. The effects of limb proportions on gait are relevant to inferring postural and locomotor differences between Neanderthals and modern Homo sapiens which differ in their crural indices and relative limb length. This study demonstrates that primates with relatively long limbs achieve higher walking speeds while using lower stride frequencies and lower angular excursions than shorter-limbed monkeys, and these kinematic differences may allow longer-limbed taxa to locomote more efficiently than shorter-limbed species of similar mass. Such differences may also have characterized

  9. Combining N-body accretion simulations with partitioning experiments in a statistical model of terrestrial planet accretion and core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R. A.; Ciesla, F.; Campbell, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The terrestrial planets accreted in a series of increasingly large and violent collisions. Simultaneously, metallic cores segregated from their silicate mantles, acquiring their modern compositions through high pressure (P), high temperature (T) partitioning reactions. Here we present a model that couples these aspects of early planetary evolution, building on recent accretion simulations and experimental results. We have run 100 N-body simulations of terrestrial planet accretion, with Jupiter and Saturn on either circular (CJS) or eccentric (EJS) orbits, to gain insight into the statistics of this highly stochastic process (Fischer and Ciesla, 2014). An Earth (Mars) analogue forms in 84-92% (2-10%) of our simulations. We draw on our recent high P-T metal-silicate partitioning experiments of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Si, and O in a diamond anvil cell to 100 GPa and 5500 K. In our model, N-body simulations describe the delivery, masses, and original locations of planetary building blocks. As planets accrete, their core and mantle compositions are modified by high P-T reactions with each collision (Rubie et al., 2011). By utilizing a large number of N-body simulations, we obtain a statistical view and observe a wide range of outcomes. We use this model to predict the core compositions of Earth-like planets. For partial equilibration of the mantle at 50% of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressure, we find that their cores contain 6.9 ± 1.8 wt% Si and 4.8 ± 2.3 wt% O (Figure), with this uncertainty due entirely to variations in accretion history in our 100 simulations. This composition is consistent with the seismologically-inferred density of Earth's core, based on comparisons to high P-T equations of state (Fischer et al., 2011, 2014). Earth analogues experience 0.7 ± 0.1 or 0.9 ± 0.2 log units of oxidation during accretion in EJS or CJS simulations respectively, which is due to both the effects of high P-T partitioning and the temporal evolution of the Earth analogue

  10. The effects of temperature, desiccation, and body mass on the locomotion of the terrestrial isopod, Porcellio laevis.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Tara M; Claussen, Dennis L; Ladd, Gregory B; Buckner, Shizuka T

    2009-06-01

    Locomotion in terrestrial isopods is strongly influenced by body size and by abiotic factors. We determined the speeds of isopods of differing masses within a linear racetrack at temperatures ranging from 15 to 35 degrees C. We also predicted maximum speeds based on the Froude number concept as originally applied to vertebrates. In addition we used a circular thermal gradient to examine the temperature preferences of isopods, and we measured the effects of desiccation on locomotion. Measured speeds of the isopods progressively increased with temperature with an overall Q(10) of 1.64 and scaling exponents ranging from 0.38 to 0.63. The predicted maximum speeds were remarkably close to the measured speeds at the highest test temperature although the scaling exponents were closer to 0.15. The isopods did not exhibit a strong thermal preference within the gradient; however, they did generally avoid temperatures above 25 degrees C. Moderate desiccation had no apparent effect on locomotor performance, but there was a progressive decrease in speed once animals had lost more than 10% of their initial body mass. Though largely restricted to moist habitats, P. laevis can easily withstand short exposures to desiccating conditions, and they are capable of effective locomotion over a wide range of temperatures. Since they are nonconglobating, active escape appears to be their primary defense when threatened under exposed conditions. Although their maximum speeds may be limited both by temperature and by their inability to change gait, these speeds are clearly adequate for survival. PMID:19535030

  11. Highest volcanoes on terrestrial planets and dwarf-planets adorn the deepest depressions of their respective bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2015-10-01

    Four highest volcanoes of the inner solar system tower above four largest and deepest hemispheric depressions of the Earth, Moon, Mars, and Vesta. Of course, this is not a mere coincidence; behind of this fundamental fact stays an equally fundamental planetary regulation. The wave planetology based on elliptical keplerian orbits of cosmic bodies evoking their wave warping shows that the fundamental wave 1 inevitably produces hemispheric tectonic dichotomy. One hemisphere rises, the opposite falls. The uprising half increases its planetary radius and space and thus is intensively cut by numerous faults and rifts. The antipodean subsiding half decreases its radius and space and thus is intensively compacted and affected by folds and faults. Forming extra material finds its way out in form of volcanic ridges and volcanoes. The strongest compaction caused by the wave 1 subsidence produces most voluminous eruptions. That is why the relation exists between the largest and deepest hemispheric basins and the highest basic volcanoes having mantle roots [1-4]. On the Earth's Pacific Ocean floor stay the Hawaiian volcanoes; on the lunar Procellarum Ocean occurs Crater Copernicus (erroneously taken as an impact feature); Martian Vastitas Borealis is adorned with Olympus Mons; Vestan Reasilvia Basin (obviously tectonic not impact feature) has the central mountain -the highest volcanic peak in the Solar system (Fig. 1-4). A regular row of increasing heights of these largest volcanoes extends in the outward direction. A study of the dwarf-planet Ceres only begins(DAWN project). Already the first distant images of this globe about 950 km in diameter have shown that it is, as was predicted [5], tectonically two-faced or dichotomous body (Fig. 5, 6). It seems that on its relatively even subsided hemisphere there are some elevated locations often bright white in color (Fig. 6). They could represent prominent "edifices" covered with frozen ices -degassing traces [6].

  12. Searching for extra-terrestrial civilizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gindilis, L. M.

    1974-01-01

    The probability of radio interchange with extraterrestrial civilizations is discussed. Difficulties constitute absorption, scattering, and dispersion of signals by the rarified interstellar medium as well as the deciphering of received signals and convergence of semantic concept. A cybernetic approach considers searching for signals that develop from astroengineering activities of extraterrestrial civilizations.

  13. The Combined Strength of Thermodynamics and Comparative Planetology: Application of Activity Models to Core Formation in Terrestrial Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K. M.; Danielson, L. R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent models for accretion of terrestrial bodies involve metal-silicate equilibrium as the metallic core formed during growth. Most elements considered are either refractory or well studied elements for which effects of pressure, temperature, oxygen fugacity, and metallic liquid composition are well known. There are a large number of elements that are both siderophile and volatile, whose fate in such models is unknown, largely due to a lack of data at comparable conditions and com-positions (FeNi core with light elements such as S, C, Si, and O). We have focused on Ge, In, As, Sb and determined the effect of Si and C on metal-silicate partitioning, and developed a thermo-dynamic model that allows application of these new data to a wide range of planetary bodies. New experiments: We have previously carried out experiments with FeSi metallic liquid at C-saturated conditions at 1600 and 1800 C [4]. In a new series of experiments we investigate the effect of Si in carbon-free systems at 1600 C for comparison. Experiments were carried out at 1 GPa in MgO capsules using the same basaltic starting composition as in previous studies. The MgO capsule reacts with the silicate melt to form more MgO-rich liquids that have 22-26 wt% MgO. Experimental met-als and silicates were analyzed using a combination of electron microprobe analysis and laser ablation ICP-MS. Results: The new results can be interpreted by considering Ge as an example, in the simple exchange equilibrium Fe + GeO = FeO + Ge, where the equilibrium constant Kd can be examined as a function of Si content of the metal. The slope of lnKd vs. (1-XSi) for this new series allows derivation of the epsilon interaction parameter for each of these four elements and Si (both C-saturated and C-free).All four elements have positive epsilon values, indicating that Si causes a decrease in the partition coefficients; values are 6.6, 6.5, 27.8 and 25.2 for In, Ge, As, and Sb, respectively, at 1 GPa and 1600 C. As an example of

  14. Late-stage accretion and habitability of terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Sean Neylon

    The final stage in the formation of terrestrial planets consists of the accumulation of ~1000 km "planetary embryos" and ~1 km planetesimals via collisional accretion., under the mutual gravity of other solid bodies and the gas giant planets (if any). Water is delivered to planets via collisions with volatile-rich bodies that condensed past the snow line, beyond about 2.5 AU. We present results of a large number of relatively low-resolution simulations, designed to assess the predictability of systems of terrestrial planets as a function of "observables" such as the orbit of gas giant planets. These show that a variety of terrestrial planets can form, from small, dry, Mars-like worlds to planets with similar properties to Earth, to >3 Earth mass "water worlds" with >=30 times as much water as the Earth. The terrestrial planets are largely shaped by the influence of the giant planets and the surface density of material. We have uncovered trends between the terrestrial planets and (i) the mass, (ii) the orbital distance and (iii) the orbital eccentricity of a giant planet, (iv) the surface density of the disk, and (v) the disk's density profile. Five simulations with 1000-2000 particles reveal new aspects of the accretion process Water is delivered to the terrestrial planets as a few large planetesimals in a "hit or miss" process, and as billions of planetesimals in a robust way. The water delivery process is therefore more robust than previously thought, implying that the range of water contents of extra-solar Earths is less stochastic than indicated in previous studies; most planets accrete water- rich bodies. We simulate terrestrial accretion in the presence of close-in giant planets (e.g., "hot jupiters"), assuming these form and migrate quickly. Potentially habitable planets can form in these systems, but are likely to be iron-poor. Asteroid belts may exist between the terrestrial planets and hot jupiters in these systems. We have also tested the accretion

  15. Enrichment of Non-Terrestrial L-Proteinogenic Amino Acids by Aqueous Alteration on the Tagish Lake Meteorite Parent Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Herd, Christopher D. K.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution and isotopic and enantiomeric compositions of amino acids found in three distinct fragments of the Tagish Lake C2-type carbonaceous chondrite were investigated via liquid chromatography fluorescence detection time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Large L-enantiomeric excesses (L(sub ee) approx. 43 to 59%) of the a-hydrogen aspartic and glutamic amino acids were measured in Tagish Lake, whereas alanine, another alpha-hydrogen protein amino acid, was found to be nearly racemic (D approx. L) using both techniques. Carbon isotope measurements of D- and L-aspartic acid and D- and L-alanine in Tagish Lake fall well outside of the terrestrial range and indicate that the measured aspartic acid enantioenrichment is indigenous to the meteorite. Alternate explanations for the Lexcesses of aspartic acid such as interference from other compounds present in the sample, analytical biases, or terrestrial amino acid contamination were investigated and rejected. These results can be explained by differences in the solid-solution phase behavior of aspartic acid, which can form conglomerate enantiopure solids during crystallization, and alanine, which can only form racemic crystals.

  16. ON THE EFFECT OF GIANT PLANETS ON THE SCATTERING OF PARENT BODIES OF IRON METEORITE FROM THE TERRESTRIAL PLANET REGION INTO THE ASTEROID BELT: A CONCEPT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighipour, Nader; Scott, Edward R. D.

    2012-04-20

    In their model for the origin of the parent bodies of iron meteorites, Bottke et al. proposed differentiated planetesimals, formed in 1-2 AU during the first 1.5 Myr, as the parent bodies, and suggested that these objects and their fragments were scattered into the asteroid belt as a result of interactions with planetary embryos. Although viable, this model does not include the effect of a giant planet that might have existed or been growing in the outer regions. We present the results of a concept study where we have examined the effect of a planetary body in the orbit of Jupiter on the early scattering of planetesimals from the terrestrial region into the asteroid belt. We integrated the orbits of a large battery of planetesimals in a disk of planetary embryos and studied their evolutions for different values of the mass of the planet. Results indicate that when the mass of the planet is smaller than 10 M{sub Circled-Plus }, its effects on the interactions among planetesimals and planetary embryos are negligible. However, when the planet mass is between 10 and 50 M{sub Circled-Plus }, simulations point to a transitional regime with {approx}50 M{sub Circled-Plus} being the value for which the perturbing effect of the planet can no longer be ignored. Simulations also show that further increase of the mass of the planet strongly reduces the efficiency of the scattering of planetesimals from the terrestrial planet region into the asteroid belt. We present the results of our simulations and discuss their possible implications for the time of giant planet formation.

  17. The granite-upper mantle connection in terrestrial planetary bodies: an anomaly to the current granite paradigm?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Bernard; Bébien, Jean

    2005-03-01

    Granite formed in the terrestrial planets very soon after their accretion. The oldest granite-forming minerals (4.4 Ga zircon) and granite (4.0 Ga granodiorite) indicate conditions resembling the present-day ones, with the presence of oceans and external processes related to liquid water. As a result, the current granite paradigm states that granite is not issued directly from the melting of the mantle. However, a granite-upper mantle connection is well established from several pieces of evidence. Tiny micrometre- to millimetre-sized enclaves of granite-like glassy and crystalline materials in Earth's mantle rocks are known in oceanic and continental areas. Earth's mantle-forming minerals, such as olivine, pyroxene, and chromite, can contain silicic materials, either as glass inclusions or as crystallised products (quartz or tridymite, sanidine, K-feldspar, and/or plagioclase close to albite end-member). Importantly, the same evidence is amply found in some types of meteorites, whether they are primitive, such as ordinary chondrites, or differentiated, such as IIE irons, howardite eucrite diogenite (HED), and Martian shergottite nakhlite chassignite (SNC) achondrites. Although constituting apparently an anomaly, the granite-upper mantle connection can be reconciled with the current granite paradigm by recognising that the conditions prevailing in the formation of granite are not only necessarily crustal but can occur also at depths in mantle rocks. Unresolved problems to be explored further include whether tiny amounts of granitic material within terrestrial mantles may be hints of greater abundances and more direct mantle involvement, and what role can be played by granite trapped within the upper mantle in lithosphere buoyancy.

  18. Super-long Anabiosis of Ancient Microorganisms in Ice and Terrestrial Models for Development of Methods to Search for Life on Mars, Europa and other Planetary Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abyzov, S. S.; Duxbury, N. S.; Bobin, N. E.; Fukuchi, M.; Hoover, R. B.; Kanda, H.; Mitskevich, I. N.; Mulyukin, A. L.; Naganuma, T.; Poglazova, M. N.; Ivanov, M. V.

    2007-01-01

    Successful missions to Mars, Europe and other bodies of the Solar system have created a prerequisite to search for extraterrestrial life. The first attempts of microbial life detection on the Martian surface by the Viking landed missions gave no biological results. Microbiological investigations of the Martian subsurface ground ice layers seem to be more promising. It is well substantiated to consider the Antarctic ice sheet and the Antarctic and Arctic permafrost as terrestrial analogues of Martian habitats. The results of our long-standing microbiological studies of the Antarctic ice would provide the basis for detection of viable microbial cells on Mars. Our microbiological investigations of the deepest and thus most ancient strata of the Antarctic ice sheet for the first time gave evidence for the natural phenomenon of long-term anabiosis (preservation of viability and vitality for millennia years). A combination of classical microbiological methods, epifluorescence microscopy, SEM, TEM, molecular diagnostics, radioisotope labeling and other techniques made it possible for us to obtain convincing proof of the presence of pro- and eukaryotes in the Antarctic ice sheet. In this communication, we will review and discuss some critical issues related to the detection of viable microorganisms in cold terrestrial environments with regard to future searches for microbial life and/or its biological signatures on extraterrestrial objects.

  19. Euclidean geometry explains why lengths allow precise body mass estimates in terrestrial invertebrates: the case of oribatid mites.

    PubMed

    Caruso, T; Migliorini, M

    2009-02-01

    Indirect measures of soil invertebrate body mass M based on equations relating the latter to body length (l) are becoming increasingly used due to the required painstaking laboratory work and the technical difficulties involved in obtaining some thousands of reliable weight estimates for animals that can be very small. The implicit assumption of such equations is that dM/dV=delta, where V is body volume and delta is a constant density value. Classical Euclidean scaling implies that V is proportional to l(3) proportional to M. One may thus derive M from l when the latter can provide a good estimate of V and the assumption of a constant delta is respected. In invertebrates, equations relating weight to length indicate that the power model always provides the best fit. However, authors only focused on the empirical estimation of slopes linking the body mass to the length measure variables, sometimes fitting exponential and linear models that are not theoretically grounded. This paper explicates how power laws derive from fundamental Euclidean scaling and describes the expected allometric exponents under the above assumptions. Based on the classical Euclidean scaling theory, an equivalent sphere is defined as a theoretical sphere with a volume equal to that of the organism whose body mass must be estimated. The illustrated application to a data set on soil oribatid mites helps clarify all these issues. Lastly, a general procedure for more precise estimation of M from V and delta is suggested. PMID:18977363

  20. Magnetic factor in solar-terrestrial relations and its impact on the human body: physical problems and prospects for research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breus, T. K.; Binhi, V. N.; Petrukovich, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    The body of current heliobiological evidence suggests that very weak variable magnetic fields due to solar- and geomagnetic-activities do have a biological effect. Geomagnetic disturbances can cause a nonspecific reaction in the human body – a kind of general adaptation syndrome which occurs due to any external stress factor. Also, specific reactions can develop. One of the reasons discussed for the similarity between biological and heliogeophysical rhythms is that geomagnetic variations have a direct influence on organisms, although exact magnetoreception mechanisms are not yet clear. The paper briefly reviews the current state of empirical and theoretical work on this fundamental multidisciplinary problem.

  1. Siderophile-element Anomalies in CK Carbonaceous Chondrites: Implications for Parent-body Aqueous Alteration and Terrestrial Weathering of Sulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Heinz; Rubin, Alan E.; Kallemeyn, Gregory W.; Wasson, John T.

    2006-01-01

    CK chondrites constitute the most oxidized anhydrous carbonaceous chondrite group; most of the Fe occurs in magnetite and in FeO-rich mafic silicates. The two observed CK falls (Karoonda and Kobe), along with thirteen relatively unweathered CK finds, have unfractionated siderophile-element abundance patterns. In contrast, a sizable fraction of CK finds (9 of 24 investigated) shows fractionated siderophile abundance patterns including low abundances of Ni, Co, Se and Au; the most extreme depletions are in Ni (0.24 of normal CK) and Au (0.14 of normal CK). This depletion pattern has not been found in other chondrite groups. Out of the 74 CK chondrites listed in the Meteoritical Bulletin Database (2006; excluded considerably paired specimens; see http://tin.er.usgs.gov/meteor/ metbull.php) we analyzed 24 and subclassified the CK chondrites in terms of their chemical composition and sulfide mineralogy: sL (siderophiles low; six samples) for large depletions in Ni, Co, Se and Au (>50% of sulfides lost); sM (siderophiles medium; two CKs) for moderately low Ni and Co abundances (sulfides are highly altered or partly lost); sH (siderophiles high; one specimen) for enrichments in Ni, Co, Se and Au; 'normal' for unfractionated samples (13 samples). The sole sH sample may have obtained additional sulfide from impact redistribution in the parent asteroid. We infer that these elements became incorporated into sulfides after asteroidal aqueous processes oxidized nebular metal; thermal metamorphism probably also played a role in their mineral siting. The siderophile losses in the SL and sM samples are mainly the result of oxidation of pentlandite, pyrite and violarite by terrestrial alteration followed by leaching of the resulting phases. Some Antarctic CK chondrites have lost most of their sulfides but retained Ni, Co, Se and Au, presumably as insoluble weathering products.

  2. The combination of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and extra virgin olive oil increases mitochondrial and body metabolism and prevents CLA-associated insulin resistance and liver hypertrophy in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Baraldi, Flávia G; Vicentini, Tatiane M; Teodoro, Bruno G; Dalalio, Felipe M; Dechandt, Carlos R P; Prado, Ieda M R; Curti, Carlos; Cardoso, Fernanda C; Uyemura, Sergio A; Alberici, Luciane C

    2016-02-01

    Clinical conditions associated with obesity can be improved by daily intake of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) or extra virgin olive oil (EVOO). Here we investigated whether dietary supplementation with CLA and EVOO, either alone or in combination, changes body metabolism associated with mitochondrial energetics. Male C57Bl/6 mice were divided into one of four groups: CLA (1:1 cis-9, trans-11:trans-10, cis-12; 18:2 isomers), EVOO, CLA plus EVOO or control (linoleic acid). Each mouse received 3 g/kg body weight of the stated oil by gavage on alternating days for 60 days. Dietary supplementation with CLA, alone or in combination with EVOO: (a) reduced the white adipose tissue gain; (b) increased body VO2 consumption, VCO2 production and energy expenditure; (c) elevated uncoupling protein (UCP)-2 expression and UCP activity in isolated liver mitochondria. This organelle, when energized with NAD(+)-linked substrates, produced high amounts of H2O2 without inducing oxidative damage. Dietary supplementation with EVOO alone did not change any metabolic parameter, but supplementation with CLA itself promoted insulin resistance and elevated weight, lipid content and acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 expression in liver. Interestingly, the in vivo antioxidant therapy with N-acetylcysteine abolished the CLA-induced rise of body metabolism and liver UCP expression and activity, while the in vitro antioxidant treatment with catalase mitigated the CLA-dependent UCP-2 expression in hepatocytes; these findings suggest the participation of an oxidative-dependent pathway. Therefore, this study clarifies the mechanisms by which CLA induces liver UCP expression and activity, and demonstrates for the first time the beneficial effects of combined CLA and EVOO supplementation. PMID:26878792

  3. Terrestrial sequestration

    ScienceCinema

    Charlie Byrer

    2010-01-08

    Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

  4. Terrestrial sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Charlie Byrer

    2008-03-10

    Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

  5. Introduction to Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2010-04-29

    Extra dimensions provide a very useful tool in addressing a number of the fundamental problems faced by the Standard Model. The following provides a very basic introduction to this very broad subject area as given at the VIII School of the Gravitational and Mathematical Physics Division of the Mexican Physical Society in December 2009. Some prospects for extra dimensional searches at the 7 TeV LHC with {approx}1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity are provided.

  6. Extra Dimensions and ``Branes''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundrum, Raman

    2011-04-01

    We do not yet know the nature of fundamental physics above the weak scale, but we are about to probe it this decade. It may come in the form of a few new weakly-coupled particles, captured by ordinary Feynman diagrams in standard spacetime, or alternatively in the form of large ``towers'' of new elementary or composite states, requiring a different set of concepts and analytic tools. Extra spatial dimensions provide the simplest, but very rich, class of such possibilities. I will explain how extra-dimensions can provide an elegant and intuitive geometrization of subtle physics, in particular flowing from the powerful AdS/CFT correspondence. This geometrization allows one to ``view'' central issues ranging from electroweak, grand unified, strongly-coupled, flavor, supersymmetry, or collider physics, in terms of the overlap of extra-dimensional wavefunctions, the curvature (``warping'') of the higher dimensional spacetime, and ``branes'' (3-dimensional defects). I will illustrate the kind of physics and experimental signals that flow from the most plausible extra-dimensional scenarios.

  7. Raman spectroscopic studies of carbon in extra-terrestrial materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macklin, John; Brownlee, Donald; Chang, Sherwood; Bunch, Ted

    1990-01-01

    The measurements obtained here indicate ways in which micro-Raman spectroscopy can be used to elucidate structural characteristics and distribution of carbon in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Existing information about structurally significant aspects of Raman measurements of graphite is combined with structurally relevant findings from the present micro-Raman studies of carbons prepared by carbonization of polyvinylidine chloride (PVDC) at various temperatures and natural material, as well as several acid residues from the Allende and Murchison meteorites in order to establish new spectra-structure relationships. Structural features of many of the materials in this study have been measured by x ray analysis and electron microscopy: thus, their structural differences can be directly correlated with differences in the Raman spectra. The spectral parameters consequently affirmed as indicators of structure are used as a measure of structure in materials that have unknown carbon structure, especially IDPs. The unique applicability of micro-Raman spectroscopy is realized not only in the ability to conveniently measure spectra of micron-size IDPs, but also micro-sized parts of an inhomogeneous material. Microcrystalline graphite is known to give Raman spectra that differ dependent on crystallite size (see e.g., Lespade, et. al., 1984, or Nemanich and Solin, 1979). The spectral changes that accompany decreasing particle size include increase in the ratio (R) of the intensity of the band near 1350 cm(-1) (D band) to that of the band near 1600 cm(-1) (G band) increase in the half width of the D band (wD) increase in the frequency maximum of the G band and increase in the half-width (wG) of the 2nd order band near 2700 cm(-1) (G) band.

  8. Problem of searching for extra-terrestrial civilizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambartsumyan, V. A.

    1974-01-01

    Possible criteria characterizing extraterrestrial civilizations and their detection are: (1) deduction of their existence by evaluating astronomical prerequisites for the development of life in remote planetary systems; (2) detection and communication with extraterrestrial civilizations; and (3) the problem of language and content of information in transmitted signals.

  9. Reducing extra-terrestrial excavation forces with percussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R.; Smith, J. D.; Lippitt, T.; Schuler, J.; Nick, A.

    High launch costs and mission requirements drive the need for low mass excavators with mobility platforms, which in turn have little traction and excavation reaction capacity in low gravity environments. This presents the need for precursor and long term future missions with low mass robotic mining technology to perform In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) tasks. This paper discusses a series of experiments that investigate the effectiveness of a percussive digging device to reduce excavation loads and thereby the mass of the excavator itself. A percussive mechanism and 30" wide pivoting bucket were attached to a test stand simulating a basic backhoe with a percussion direction tangent to the direction of movement. Impact energies from 13.6J to 30.5J and frequencies from 0 to 700 beats per minute (BPM) were investigated. A reduction in excavation force of as much as 50% was achieved in this experimental investigation.

  10. Reducing Extra-Terrestrial Excavation Forces with Percussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert; Schuler, Jason M.; Smith, Jonathan Drew; Nick, Andrew J.; Lippitt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    High launch costs and mission requirements drive the need for low mass excavators with mobility platforms, which in turn have little traction and excavation reaction capacity in low gravity environments. This presents the need for precursor and long term future missions with low mass robotic mining technology to perform In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) tasks. This paper discusses a series of experiments that investigate the effectiveness of a percussive digging device to reduce excavation loads and thereby the mass of the excavator itself. A percussive mechanism and 30" wide pivoting bucket were attached at the end of the arm simulating a basic backhoe with a percussion direction tangent to the direction of movement. Impact energies from 13.6J to 30.5J and frequencies from 0 BPM to 700 BPM were investigated. A reduction in excavation force of as much as 50% was achieved in this experimental investigation.

  11. A SETI experiment. [Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, W. I.

    1986-01-01

    In order to increase the probability of contact in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), it has been proposed to search more intensively in certain regions of the electromagnetic spectrum ('the water hole'). The present paper describes a similar narrowing of the search in the time domain. Application of this strategy results in the SETI experiments searching for signals from the Tau Ceti system late in 1986 and early in 1987, and from the Epsilon Eridani system in mid 1988.

  12. TERRESTRIAL ECOTOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Terrestrial ecotoxicology is the study of how environmental pollutants affect land-dependent organisms and their environment. It requires three elements: (1) a source, (2) a receptor, and (3) an exposure pathway. This article reviews the basic principles of each of each element...

  13. Isocurvature perturbations in extra radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Koichi; Nakayama, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu E-mail: miyamone@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: oyokazu.sekiguchi@nagoya-u.jp

    2012-02-01

    Recent cosmological observations, including measurements of the CMB anisotropy and the primordial helium abundance, indicate the existence of an extra radiation component in the Universe beyond the standard three neutrino species. In this paper we explore the possibility that the extra radiation has isocurvatrue fluctuations. A general formalism to evaluate isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation is provided in the mixed inflaton-curvaton system, where the extra radiation is produced by the decay of both scalar fields. We also derive constraints on the abundance of the extra radiation and the amount of its isocurvature perturbation. Current observational data favors the existence of an extra radiation component, but does not indicate its having isocurvature perturbation. These constraints are applied to some particle physics motivated models. If future observations detect isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation, it will give us a hint to the origin of the extra radiation.

  14. Phenomenology of Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.; /SLAC

    2006-11-07

    If the structure of spacetime is different than that readily observed, gravitational physics, particle physics and cosmology are all immediately affected. The physics of extra dimensions offers new insights and solutions to fundamental questions arising in these fields. Novel ideas and frameworks are continuously born and evolved. They make use of string theoretical features and tools and they may reveal if and how the 11-dimensional string theory is relevant to our four-dimensional world. We have outlined some of the experimental observations in particle and gravitational physics as well as astrophysical and cosmological considerations that can constrain or confirm these scenarios. These developing ideas and the wide interdisciplinary experimental program that is charted out to investigate them mark a renewed effort to describe the dynamics behind spacetime. We look forward to the discovery of a higher dimensional spacetime.

  15. The terrestrial impact cratering record.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, R. A. F.; Pesonen, L. J.

    1992-12-01

    Approximately 130 terrestrial hypervelocity impact craters are currently known. The rate of discovery of new craters is 3 - 5 craters per year. Although modified by erosion, terrestrial impact craters exhibit the range of morphologies observed for craters on other terrestrial planetary bodies. Due to erosion and its effects on form, terrestrial craters are recognized primarily by the occurrence of shock metamorphic effects. Terrestrial craters have a set of geophysical characteristics which are largely the result of the passage of a shock wave and impact-induced fracturing. Much current work is focused on the effects of impact on Earth evolution. Previous work on shock metamorphism and the contamination of impact melt rocks by meteoritic siderophile elements provides a basis for the interpretation of the physical and chemical evidence from Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary sites as resulting from a major impact. By analogy with the lunar record and modelling of the effects of very large impacts, it has been proposed that biological and atmospheric evolution of the Earth could not stabilize before the end of the late heavy bombardment ≡3.8 Ga ago. The present terrestrial cratering rate is 5.4±2.7×10-15 km-2a-1 for a diameter ≥20 km. On a gobal scale, a major impact sufficient to cripple human civilization severely will occur on time scales of ≡106a.

  16. Stability of a terrestrial planet in a planetary system with a Hot Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, Patrick

    With the discovery of over 200 Extra-solar planetary systems recently, it appears that the existence of a "Hot Jupiter" in a planetary system is a fairly common event. Jupiter size planets and larger have been found at the location of orbits of terrestrial planets in our own solar system. This raises the question, under what conditions could an Earth type planet have a stable orbit in the Habitable Zone of a planetary system if a Hot Jupiter is also a part of the system? In this study I will consider a systems with three and four bodies. The star will be one solar mass. The terrestrial planet will have one earth mass, placed at one AU from the star. The other two bodies will have masses on the order that of Jupiter. One "Jupiter" will be a Hot Jupiter, with an orbit closer to the star than that of the terrestrial planet. The other "Jupiter" will be put at an orbit further out than that of the terrestrial planet. Of particular interest are orbits where the terrestrial planet is in resonance with one or both of the Jupiter size planets, to determine whether certain resonances have an effect on the stability of the Earth type planet's orbit. The stability of the Earth size planet will be explored using a Fourier Analysis of its orbital parameters based on a previously developed method called the Frequency Map Analysis (FMA). Using the FMA, the goal is to determine what are the conditions for a "stable" Earth orbit, stability being one of the keys to the development of life on an Earth type planet.

  17. One universal extra dimension in PYTHIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElKacimi, M.; Goujdami, D.; Przysiezniak, H.; Skands, P.

    2010-01-01

    The Universal Extra Dimensions model has been implemented in the PYTHIA generator from version 6.4.18 onwards, in its minimal formulation with one TeV -1-sized extra dimension. The additional possibility of gravity-mediated decays, through a variable number of eV -1-sized extra dimensions into which only gravity extends, is also available. The implementation covers the lowest lying Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations of Standard Model particles, except for the excitations of the Higgs fields, with the mass spectrum calculated at one loop. 2→2 tree-level production cross sections and unpolarized KK number conserving 2-body decays are included. Mixing between iso-doublet and -singlet KK excitations is neglected thus far, and is expected to be negligible for all but the top sector. New version summaryProgram title: PYTHIA Version number: 6.420 Catalogue identifier: ACTU_v2_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ACTU_v2_1.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 79 362 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 590 900 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: CERN lxplus and any other machine with a Fortran 77 compiler Operating system: Linux Red Hat RAM: about 800 K words Word size: 32 bits Classification: 11.2 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ACTU_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 135 (2001) 238 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: At high energy collisions between elementary particles, physics beyond the Standard Model is searched for. Many models are being investigated, namely extra-dimensional models. Solution method: The Universal Extra Dimension model is implemented in the PYTHIA event generator. Reasons for new version

  18. Extra-axial brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Rapalino, Otto; Smirniotopoulos, James G

    2016-01-01

    Extra-axial brain tumors are the most common adult intracranial neoplasms and encompass a broad spectrum of pathologic subtypes. Meningiomas are the most common extra-axial brain tumor (approximately one-third of all intracranial neoplasms) and typically present as slowly growing dural-based masses. Benign meningiomas are very common, and may occasionally be difficult to differentiate from more aggressive subtypes (i.e., atypical or malignant varieties) or other dural-based masses with more aggressive biologic behavior (e.g., hemangiopericytoma or dural-based metastases). Many neoplasms that typically affect the brain parenchyma (intra-axial), such as gliomas, may also present with primary or secondary extra-axial involvement. This chapter provides a general and concise overview of the common types of extra-axial tumors and their typical imaging features. PMID:27432671

  19. Sex differences in gait utilization and energy metabolism during terrestrial locomotion in two varieties of chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) selected for different body size.

    PubMed

    Rose, Kayleigh A; Nudds, Robert L; Butler, Patrick J; Codd, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    In leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) of standard breed (large) and bantam (small) varieties, artificial selection has led to females being permanently gravid and sexual selection has led to male-biased size dimorphism. Using respirometry, videography and morphological measurements, sex and variety differences in metabolic cost of locomotion, gait utilisation and maximum sustainable speed (Umax) were investigated during treadmill locomotion. Males were capable of greater Umax than females and used a grounded running gait at high speeds, which was only observed in a few bantam females and no standard breed females. Body mass accounted for variation in the incremental increase in metabolic power with speed between the varieties, but not the sexes. For the first time in an avian species, a greater mass-specific incremental cost of locomotion, and minimum measured cost of transport (CoTmin) were found in males than in females. Furthermore, in both varieties, the female CoTmin was lower than predicted from interspecific allometry. Even when compared at equivalent speeds (using Froude number), CoT decreased more rapidly in females than in males. These trends were common to both varieties despite a more upright limb in females than in males in the standard breed, and a lack of dimorphism in posture in the bantam variety. Females may possess compensatory adaptations for metabolic efficiency during gravidity (e.g. in muscle specialization/posture/kinematics). Furthermore, the elevated power at faster speeds in males may be linked to their muscle properties being suited to inter-male aggressive combat. PMID:26405047

  20. Sex differences in gait utilization and energy metabolism during terrestrial locomotion in two varieties of chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) selected for different body size

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Kayleigh A.; Nudds, Robert L.; Butler, Patrick J.; Codd, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) of standard breed (large) and bantam (small) varieties, artificial selection has led to females being permanently gravid and sexual selection has led to male-biased size dimorphism. Using respirometry, videography and morphological measurements, sex and variety differences in metabolic cost of locomotion, gait utilisation and maximum sustainable speed (Umax) were investigated during treadmill locomotion. Males were capable of greater Umax than females and used a grounded running gait at high speeds, which was only observed in a few bantam females and no standard breed females. Body mass accounted for variation in the incremental increase in metabolic power with speed between the varieties, but not the sexes. For the first time in an avian species, a greater mass-specific incremental cost of locomotion, and minimum measured cost of transport (CoTmin) were found in males than in females. Furthermore, in both varieties, the female CoTmin was lower than predicted from interspecific allometry. Even when compared at equivalent speeds (using Froude number), CoT decreased more rapidly in females than in males. These trends were common to both varieties despite a more upright limb in females than in males in the standard breed, and a lack of dimorphism in posture in the bantam variety. Females may possess compensatory adaptations for metabolic efficiency during gravidity (e.g. in muscle specialization/posture/kinematics). Furthermore, the elevated power at faster speeds in males may be linked to their muscle properties being suited to inter-male aggressive combat. PMID:26405047

  1. Collider searches for extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberg, Greg; /Brown U.

    2004-12-01

    Searches for extra spatial dimensions remain among the most popular new directions in our quest for physics beyond the Standard Model. High-energy collider experiments of the current decade should be able to find an ultimate answer to the question of their existence in a variety of models. Until the start of the LHC in a few years, the Tevatron will remain the key player in this quest. In this paper, we review the most recent results from the Tevatron on searches for large, TeV{sup -1}-size, and Randall-Sundrum extra spatial dimensions, which have reached a new level of sensitivity and currently probe the parameter space beyond the existing constraints. While no evidence for the existence of extra dimensions has been found so far, an exciting discovery might be just steps away.

  2. Scientific Visualization of Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Don V.

    2010-10-01

    In the 21st Century, many theoretical physicists claim that higher dimensions may indeed exist. Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, & Dvali (ADD) and Randall-Sundrum (RS), in addition to Kaluza-Klein (KK) and M-string theorists, have introduced reasonable explanations for the existence of heretofore ``invisible'' higher dimensions. Whether or not these extra dimensions actually exist is irrelevant to their contributions to the visionary conceptualization associated with novel and improved mathematical and physical analysis. Envisioning extra dimensions beyond the three of common experience is a daunting challenge for three dimensional observers. Intuition relies on experience gained in a three dimensional environment. Gaining experience with virtual four dimensional objects and virtual three manifolds in four-space on a personal computer may provide the basis for an intuitive grasp of four dimensions. This presentation is a video ``outtake'' of the author's research into ``Visualizing Extra Spatial Dimensions'' at the University of California at Irvine.

  3. Extra Molting and Selection on Nymphal Growth in the Desert Locust

    PubMed Central

    Piou, Cyril; Jourdan-Pineau, Hélène; Pagès, Christine; Blondin, Laurence; Chapuis, Marie-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In insects, extra-molting has been viewed as a compensatory mechanism for nymphal growth that contributes to optimize body weight for successful reproduction. However, little is known on the capacity of extra-molting to evolve in natural populations, which limits our understanding of how selection acts on nymphal growth. We used a multi-generational pedigree, individual monitoring and quantitative genetics models to investigate the evolution of extra-molting and its impact on nymphal growth in a solitarious population of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria. Growth compensation via extra-molting was observed for 46% of the females, whose adult weight exceeded by 4% that of other females, at a cost of a 22% longer development time. We found a null heritability for body weight threshold only, and the highest and a strongly female-biased heritability for extra molting. Our genetic estimates show that (1) directional selection can act on growth rate, development time and extra-molting to optimize body weight threshold, the target of stabilizing selection, (2) extra-molting can evolve in natural populations, and (3) a genetic conflict, due to sexually antagonistic selection on extra-molting, might prevent its fixation. Finally, we discuss how antagonistic selection between solitarious and gregarious environments and/or genetic correlations between growth and phase traits might also impact the evolution of extra-molting in locusts. PMID:27227885

  4. Origin of the 'Extra Entropy'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    2008-01-01

    I will discuss how one can determine the origin of the 'extra entropy' in groups and clusters and the feedback needed in models of galaxy formation. I will stress the use of x-ray spectroscopy and imaging and the critical value that Con-X has in this regard.

  5. Continuously recording body temperature in terrestrial chelonians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nussear, K.E.; Esque, T.C.; Tracy, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    The degree of interaction between mercury and cholinesterase inhibiting pesticides was determined by comparing enzyme responses to sublethal dosages of parathion or carbofuran in quail fed 0.05, 0.5, or 5.0 ppm morsodren for 18 weeks. A statistically significant interaction was defined as greater brain cholinesterase inhibition in morsodren-fed than in clean-fed birds following pesticide dosage. The tissue residues of mercury that accumulated before significant mercury-parathion interactions occurred were higher than levels that might be expected in natural populations, but significant mercury-carbofuran interactions occurred in birds that had only accumulated 1.0 ppm liver mercury. The results indicate that indiscriminate usage of cholinesterase inhibiting pesticides are dangerous, since natural populations of fish-eating birds oftentimes contain this magnitude of mercury.

  6. Tidally Heated Terrestrial Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Wade Garrett

    This work models the surface and internal temperatures for hypothetical terrestrial planets in situations involving extreme tidal heating. The feasibility of such planets is evaluated in terms of the orbital perturbations that may give rise to them, their required proximity to a hoststar, and the potential for the input tidal heating to cause significant partial melting of the mantle. Trapping terrestrial planets into 2:1 resonances with migrating Hot Jupiters is considered as a reasonable way for Earth-like worlds to both maintain high eccentricities and to move to short enough orbital periods (1-20 days) for extreme tidal heating to occur. Secular resonance and secular orbital perturbations may support moderate tidal heating at a low equilibrium eccentricity. At orbital periods below 10-30 days, with eccentricities from 0.01 to 0.1, tidal heat may greatly exceed radiogenic heat production. It is unlikely to exceed insolation, except when orbiting very low luminosity hosts, and thus will have limited surface temperature expression. Observations of such bodies many not be able to detect tidal surface enhancements given a few percent uncertainty in albedo, except on the nightside of spin synchronous airless objects. Otherwise detection may occur via spectral detection of hotspots or high volcanic gas concentrations including sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide. The most extreme cases may be able to produce magma oceans, or magma slush mantles with up to 40-60% melt fractions. Tides may alter the habitable zones for smaller red dwarf stars, but are generally detrimental. Multiple viscoelastic models, including the Maxwell, Voigt-Kelvin, Standard Anelastic Solid, and Burgers rheologies are explored and applied to objects such as Io and the super-Earth planet GJ 876d. The complex valued Love number for the Burgers rheology is derived and found to be a useful improvement when modeling the low temperature behavior of tidal bodies, particularly during low eccentricity

  7. Extra-articular Synovial Chondromatosis Eroding and Penetrating the Acromion

    PubMed Central

    El Rassi, George; Matta, Jihad; Hijjawi, Ayman; Khair, Ousama Abou; Fahs, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder is an uncommon disorder. It usually affects the glenohumeral joint and is characterized by metaplasia of the synovium leading to the formation of osteochondral loose bodies. Few cases of extra-articular subacromial synovial chondromatosis involving the rotator cuff tendon have been reported in the literature. The treatment of previously reported cases consisted of open bursectomy and removal of loose bodies. We report a case of subacromial synovial chondromatosis without rotator cuff involvement but with severe erosion and fracture of the acromion. Treatment consisted of shoulder arthroscopy to remove all loose bodies, total bursectomy, and debridement of the acromion. Potential benefits of arthroscopy were also evaluated. PMID:26697302

  8. Extra-articular Synovial Chondromatosis Eroding and Penetrating the Acromion.

    PubMed

    El Rassi, George; Matta, Jihad; Hijjawi, Ayman; Khair, Ousama Abou; Fahs, Sara

    2015-10-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder is an uncommon disorder. It usually affects the glenohumeral joint and is characterized by metaplasia of the synovium leading to the formation of osteochondral loose bodies. Few cases of extra-articular subacromial synovial chondromatosis involving the rotator cuff tendon have been reported in the literature. The treatment of previously reported cases consisted of open bursectomy and removal of loose bodies. We report a case of subacromial synovial chondromatosis without rotator cuff involvement but with severe erosion and fracture of the acromion. Treatment consisted of shoulder arthroscopy to remove all loose bodies, total bursectomy, and debridement of the acromion. Potential benefits of arthroscopy were also evaluated. PMID:26697302

  9. A molecular palaeobiological exploration of arthropod terrestrialization.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Fernandez, Jesus; Carton, Robert; Tanner, Alastair R; Puttick, Mark N; Blaxter, Mark; Vinther, Jakob; Olesen, Jørgen; Giribet, Gonzalo; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Pisani, Davide

    2016-07-19

    Understanding animal terrestrialization, the process through which animals colonized the land, is crucial to clarify extant biodiversity and biological adaptation. Arthropoda (insects, spiders, centipedes and their allies) represent the largest majority of terrestrial biodiversity. Here we implemented a molecular palaeobiological approach, merging molecular and fossil evidence, to elucidate the deepest history of the terrestrial arthropods. We focused on the three independent, Palaeozoic arthropod terrestrialization events (those of Myriapoda, Hexapoda and Arachnida) and showed that a marine route to the colonization of land is the most likely scenario. Molecular clock analyses confirmed an origin for the three terrestrial lineages bracketed between the Cambrian and the Silurian. While molecular divergence times for Arachnida are consistent with the fossil record, Myriapoda are inferred to have colonized land earlier, substantially predating trace or body fossil evidence. An estimated origin of myriapods by the Early Cambrian precedes the appearance of embryophytes and perhaps even terrestrial fungi, raising the possibility that terrestrialization had independent origins in crown-group myriapod lineages, consistent with morphological arguments for convergence in tracheal systems.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'. PMID:27325830

  10. A molecular palaeobiological exploration of arthropod terrestrialization

    PubMed Central

    Carton, Robert; Edgecombe, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding animal terrestrialization, the process through which animals colonized the land, is crucial to clarify extant biodiversity and biological adaptation. Arthropoda (insects, spiders, centipedes and their allies) represent the largest majority of terrestrial biodiversity. Here we implemented a molecular palaeobiological approach, merging molecular and fossil evidence, to elucidate the deepest history of the terrestrial arthropods. We focused on the three independent, Palaeozoic arthropod terrestrialization events (those of Myriapoda, Hexapoda and Arachnida) and showed that a marine route to the colonization of land is the most likely scenario. Molecular clock analyses confirmed an origin for the three terrestrial lineages bracketed between the Cambrian and the Silurian. While molecular divergence times for Arachnida are consistent with the fossil record, Myriapoda are inferred to have colonized land earlier, substantially predating trace or body fossil evidence. An estimated origin of myriapods by the Early Cambrian precedes the appearance of embryophytes and perhaps even terrestrial fungi, raising the possibility that terrestrialization had independent origins in crown-group myriapod lineages, consistent with morphological arguments for convergence in tracheal systems. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325830

  11. Solar/terrestrial physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov-Kholodnyi, G. S.; Lotova, N. A.; Obridko, V. N.; Fel'Dshtein, Ia. I.; Fomichev, V. V.

    The history of the development of solar/terrestrial physics research at IZMIRAN (the Soviet Institute for the Study of Terrestrial Magnetism, the Ionosphere, and the Propagation of Radio Waves) is reviewed, and the activity of the Institute in organizing international solar/terrestrial physics research is examined. Particular attention is given to investigations of solar corpuscular radiation and its effect on the ionosphere; and to studies of auroras and the interplanetary medium.

  12. Terrestrial locomotion in arachnids.

    PubMed

    Spagna, Joseph C; Peattie, Anne M

    2012-05-01

    In this review, we assess the current state of knowledge on terrestrial locomotion in Arachnida. Arachnids represent a single diverse (>100,000 species) clade containing well-defined subgroups (at both the order and subordinal levels) that vary morphologically around a basic body plan, yet exhibit highly disparate limb usage, running performance, and tarsal attachment mechanisms. Spiders (Araneae), scorpions (Scorpiones), and harvestmen (Opiliones) have received the most attention in the literature, while some orders have never been subject to rigorous mechanical characterization. Most well-characterized taxa move with gaits analogous to the alternating tripod gaits that characterize fast-moving Insecta - alternating tetrapods or alternating tripods (when one pair of legs is lifted from the ground for some other function). However, between taxa, there is considerable variation in the regularity of phasing between legs. Both large and small spiders appear to show a large amount of variation in the distribution of foot-ground contact, even between consecutive step-cycles of a single run. Mechanisms for attachment to vertical surfaces also vary, and may depend on tufts of adhesive hairs, fluid adhesives, silks, or a combination of these. We conclude that Arachnida, particularly with improvements in microelectronic force sensing technology, can serve as a powerful study system for understanding the kinematics, dynamics, and ecological correlates of sprawled-posture locomotion. PMID:22326455

  13. Screening and validation of EXTraS data products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpano, Stefania; Haberl, F.; De Luca, A.; Tiengo, A.: Israel, G.; Rodriguez, G.; Belfiore, A.; Rosen, S.; Read, A.; Wilms, J.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Law-Green, D.

    2015-09-01

    The EXTraS project (Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky) is aimed at fullyexploring the serendipitous content of the XMM-Newton EPIC database in the timedomain. The project is funded within the EU/FP7-Cooperation Space framework and is carried out by a collaboration including INAF (Italy), IUSS (Italy), CNR/IMATI (Italy), University of Leicester (UK), MPE (Germany) and ECAP (Germany). The several tasks consist in characterise aperiodicvariability for all 3XMM sources, search for short-term periodic variability on hundreds of thousands sources, detect new transient sources that are missed by standard source detection and hence not belonging to the 3XMM catalogue, search for long term variability by measuring fluxes or upper limits for both pointed and slew observations, and finally perform multiwavelength characterisation andclassification. Screening and validation of the different products is essentially in order to reject flawed results, generated by the automatic pipelines. We present here the screening tool we developed in the form of a Graphical User Interface and our plans for a systematic screening of the different catalogues.

  14. Magnetic fields of the terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The four terrestrial planets, together with the Earth's Moon, provide a significant range of conditions under which dynamo action could occur. All five bodies have been visited by spacecraft, and from three of the five bodies (Earth, Moon and Mars) we have samples of planetary material upon which paleomagnetic studies have been undertaken. At the present time, only the Earth and Mercury appear to have a significant dipole magnetic field. However, the Moon, and possibly Mars, appear to have had ancient planetary dynamos. Venus does not now have a significant planetary magnetic field, and the high surface temperatures should have prevented the recording of evidence of any ancient magnetic field. Since the solidification of the solid inner core is thought to be the energy source for the terrestrial magnetic field, and since smaller bodies evolve thermally more rapidly than larger bodies, we conjecture that the terrestrial planets are today in three different phases of magnetic activity. Venus is in a predynamo phase, not having cooled to the point of core solidification. Mercury and the Earth are in the middle of their dynamo phase, with Mercury perhaps near the end of its activity. Mars and the Moon seem to be well past their dynamo phase. Much needs to be done in the study of the magnetism of the terrestrial planets. We need to characterize the multipole harmonic structure of the Mercury magnetic field plus its secular variation, and we need to analyze returned samples to attempt to unfold the long-term history of Mercury's dynamo. We need to more thoroughly map the magnetism of the lunar surface and to analyze samples obtained from a wider area of the lunar surface. We need a more complete survey of the present Martian magnetic field and samples from a range of different ages of Martian surface material. Finally, a better characterization of the secular variation of the terrestrial magnetic field is needed in order to unfold the workings of the terrestrial dynamo.

  15. Extra tactile stimulation of the premature infant.

    PubMed

    Kramer, M; Chamorro, I; Green, D; Knudtson, F

    1975-01-01

    To ascertain whether touch, in the form of extra tactile stimulation, would result in more rapid physical and social development and a greater degree of social development of the premature infant, 48 minutes of extra tactile stimulation, defines as a gentle, nonrhythmic stroking of the greatest possible area of skin surface of the infant's body by the nurse's hand, was given to eight experimental group premature infants daily for a minimum of two weeks while they were confined to an isolette. Six infants formed a control group. Regain of birth weight was used to assess physical development. Scores on the applicable portions of the Gesell Development Schedule and Bayley Scales of Infant Development and plasma cortisol levels were used to measure rate and degree of social development. Data were analyzed in terms of the total group and for pairs of infants matched for gestational age, birth weight, and Apgar score. No significant difference was found between control and experimental groups in rate of physical development as measured by regain of birth weight. Analysis of the relationship between weight gain and gestational age, sex, and Apgar scores indicated that none was a substantial indicator of the rate at which infants gained weight while in the hospital. There was no significant difference in the degree of social development between experimental and control infants, but, as hypothesized, there was significant difference in rate of social development. Plasma cortisol levels as an indication of the infant's adrenocorticol development as evidenced by his ability to respond to stressful situations, and hence indirectly his social development, revealed no significant difference between the two groups. PMID:1041616

  16. TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM SIMULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Terrestrial Habitats Project at the Western Ecology Division (Corvallis, OR) is developing tools and databases to meet the needs of Program Office clients for assessing risks to wildlife and terrestrial ecosystems. Because habitat is a dynamic condition in real-world environm...

  17. Terrestrial Planets: Comparative Planetology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Papers were presented at the 47th Annual Meteoritical Society Meeting on the Comparative planetology of Terrestrial Planets. Subject matter explored concerning terrestrial planets includes: interrelationships among planets; plaentary evolution; planetary structure; planetary composition; planetary Atmospheres; noble gases in meteorites; and planetary magnetic fields.

  18. Impact erosion of terrestrial planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    I review current ideas about the nature of the planetesimals - composition, size distribution, and the planetary encounter velocity. Previous papers on accretion and erosion of planetary atmospheres as a result of multiple impacts are reviewed. Finally, the effects of blowing off a substantial fraction of the atmosphere from a terrestrial planet due to a single giant body impact are discussed.

  19. Extra Chance Generalized Hybrid Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Cédric M.; Sanz-Serna, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    We study a method, Extra Chance Generalized Hybrid Monte Carlo, to avoid rejections in the Hybrid Monte Carlo method and related algorithms. In the spirit of delayed rejection, whenever a rejection would occur, extra work is done to find a fresh proposal that, hopefully, may be accepted. We present experiments that clearly indicate that the additional work per sample carried out in the extra chance approach clearly pays in terms of the quality of the samples generated.

  20. Terrestrial and exposure histories of Antarctic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, K.

    1986-01-01

    Records of cosmogenic effects were studied in a large suite of Antarctic meteorites. The cosmogenic nuclide measurements together with cosmic ray track measurements on Antartic meteorites provide information such as exposure age, terrestrial age, size and depth in meteoroid or parent body, influx rate in the past, and pairing. The terrestrail age is the time period between the fall of the meteorite on the Earth and the present. To define terrestrial age, two or more nuclides with different half-lives and possibly noble gases are required. The cosmogenic radionuclides used are C-14, Kr-81, Cl-36, Al-26, Be-10, Mn-53, and K-40.

  1. Origin of a peculiar extra U(1)

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.M.; Dorsner, I.

    2005-07-01

    The origin of a family-independent ''extra U(1)'', discovered by Barr, Bednarz, and Benesh and independently by Ma, and whose phenomenology has recently been studied by Ma and Roy, is discussed. Even though it satisfies anomaly constraints in a highly economical way, with just a single extra triplet of leptons per family, this extra U(1) cannot come from four-dimensional grand unification. However, it is shown here that it can come from a Pati-Salam scheme with an extra U(1), which explains the otherwise surprising cancellation of anomalies.

  2. Terrestrial photovoltaic measurements, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The following major topics are discussed; (1) Terrestrial solar irradiance; (2) Solar simulation and reference cell calibration; and (3) Cell and array measurement procedures. Numerous related subtopics are also discussed within each major topic area.

  3. A Delicate Balance: An Examination of Lehigh University's Athletic Culture and Athletic Extra-Curriculum, 1866-1998

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Courtney Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation examines the history of Lehigh University's athletic culture and extra-curriculum from 1866 to 1998 and argues that both of those institutions served as the basis for identity within the undergraduate student body. Additionally, this dissertation argues that the athletic culture and extra-curriculum established Lehigh's identity…

  4. Extra-solar Oort cloud encounters and planetary impact rates

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, A.

    1987-01-01

    Upper limits are estimated to the number density of extra-solar Oort clouds (ESOC) through which the solar system might pass and to the probable number of attendant planetary impacts by comets. All stars are assumed to have Oort clouds. The model is based on the observed stellar spatial density and the ratio of the total number density to the observed number density. It is estimated that 486 close stellar passages and 12,160 ESOC encounters may have occurred. Each encounter would have produced a shower of hyperbolic comets, with the results of 1-3 ESOC impacts with the earth. It is concluded that the great majority of terrestrial cratering events by comets have and will come from solar Oort cloud comets. 19 references.

  5. Extra-Territorial Siting of Nuclear Installations

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Thomas E.; Morris, Frederic A.

    2009-10-07

    Arrangements might be created for siting nuclear installations on land ceded by a host State for administration by an international or multinational organization. Such arrangements might prove useful in terms of resolving suspicions of proliferation in troubled areas of the world, or as a means to introduce nuclear activities into areas where political, financial or technical capabilities might otherwise make such activities unsound, or as a means to enable global solutions to be instituted for major nuclear concerns (e.g., spent fuel management). The paper examines practical matters associated with the legal and programmatic aspects of siting nuclear installations, including diplomatic/political frameworks, engaging competent industrial bodies, protection against seizure, regulation to ensure safety and security, waste management, and conditions related to the dissolution of the extra-territorial provisions as may be agreed as the host State(s) achieve the capabilities to own and operate the installations. The paper considers the potential for using such a mechanism across the spectrum of nuclear power activities, from mining to geological repositories for nuclear waste. The paper considers the non-proliferation dimensions associated with such arrangements, and the pros and cons affecting potential host States, technology vendor States, regional neighbors and the international community. It considers in brief potential applications in several locations today.

  6. Are extra-pair males different from cuckolded males? A case study and a meta-analytic examination.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Hsun; Schroeder, Julia; Winney, Isabel; Burke, Terry; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2015-04-01

    Traditional models for female extra-pair matings assume that females benefit indirectly from extra-pair mating behaviour. Under these so-called adaptive models, extra-pair males are hypothesized to have more compatible genotypes, larger body size, exaggerated ornaments or to be older than cuckolded males. Alternatively, ('nonadaptive') models that consider female extra-pair matings to be a by-product posit that female extra-pair mating can be maintained even if there is no benefit to females. This could happen if, for example, males gained fitness benefits from extra-pair mating, while female and male extra-pair mating behaviours were genetically correlated. Extra-pair males are also expected to be older and larger if this improves their ability to convince or coerce females to mate. We investigated whether a female's extra-pair mates differed from her cuckolded mate in both genetic and phenotypic traits by analysing data from an insular house sparrow population. We found that extra-pair males were older than cuckolded males, consistent with both models. However, in contrast to the expectations from from adaptive models, extra-pair and cuckolded males were of similar genetic relatedness, and hence expected compatibility, with the female, and had comparable body size and secondary sexual traits. We also updated previous meta-analyses examining differences between extra-pair and cuckolded males. The meta-analytic results matched results from our house sparrow case study. Although we cannot completely exclude indirect benefits for females, nonadaptive models may better explain female extra-pair matings. These neglected alternative models deserve more research attention, and this should improve our understanding of the evolution of mating systems. PMID:25706253

  7. Comparative Climatology of Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackwell, Stephen J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Harder, Jerald W.; Bullock, Mark A.

    to a future volume. Our authors have taken on the task to look at climate on the terrestrial planets in the broadest sense possible — by comparing the atmospheric processes at work on the four terrestrial bodies, Earth, Venus, Mars, and Titan (Titan is included because it hosts many of the common processes), and on terrestrial planets around other stars. These processes include the interactions of shortwave and thermal radiation with the atmosphere, condensation and vaporization of volatiles, atmospheric dynamics, chemistry and aerosol formation, and the role of the surface and interior in the long-term evolution of climate. Chapters herein compare the scientific questions, analysis methods, numerical models, and spacecraft remote sensing experiments of Earth and the other terrestrial planets, emphasizing the underlying commonality of physical processes. We look to the future by identifying objectives for ongoing research and new missions. Through these pages we challenge practicing planetary scientists, and most importantly new students of any age, to find pathways and synergies for advancing the field. In Part I, Foundations, we introduce the fundamental physics of climate on terrestrial planets. Starting with the best studied planet by far, Earth, the first chapters discuss what is known and what is not known about the atmospheres and climates of the terrestrial planets of the solar system and beyond. In Part II, Greenhouse Effect and Atmospheric Dynamics, we focus on the processes that govern atmospheric motion and the role that general circulation models play in our current understanding. In Part III, Clouds and Hazes, we provide an in-depth look at the many effects of clouds and aerosols on planetary climate. Although this is a vigorous area of research in the Earth sciences, and very strongly influences climate modeling, the important role that aerosols and clouds play in the climate of all planets is not yet well constrained. This section is intended to

  8. Physics of Extra Dimensions Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Csaba Csaki

    2007-12-19

    We provide the final report for Csaba Csaki's OJI project on "Physics of extra dimensions". It includes the summary of results of higgsless electroweak symmetry breaking, gauge-higgs unification, AdS/QCD and holographic technicolor, and chiral lattice theories from warped extra dimensions.

  9. Body Fluids Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siconolfi, Steven F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Method and apparatus are described for determining volumes of body fluids in a subject using bioelectrical response spectroscopy. The human body is represented using an electrical circuit. Intra-cellular water is represented by a resistor in series with a capacitor; extra-cellular water is represented by a resistor in series with two parallel inductors. The parallel inductors represent the resistance due to vascular fluids. An alternating, low amperage, multifrequency signal is applied to determine a subject's impedance and resistance. From these data, statistical regression is used to determine a 1% impedance where the subject's impedance changes by no more than 1% over a 25 kHz interval. Circuit component, of the human body circuit are determined based on the 1% impedance. Equations for calculating total body water, extra-cellular water, total blood volume, and plasma volume are developed based on the circuit components.

  10. Traumatic insemination in terrestrial arthropods.

    PubMed

    Tatarnic, Nikolai J; Cassis, Gerasimos; Siva-Jothy, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic insemination is a bizarre form of mating practiced by some invertebrates in which males use hypodermic genitalia to penetrate their partner's body wall during copulation, frequently bypassing the female genital tract and ejaculating into their blood system. The requirements for traumatic insemination to evolve are stringent, yet surprisingly it has arisen multiple times within invertebrates. In terrestrial arthropods traumatic insemination is most prevalent in the true bug infraorder Cimicomorpha, where it has evolved independently at least three times. Traumatic insemination is thought to occur in the Strepsiptera and has recently been recorded in fruit fly and spider lineages. We review the putative selective pressures that may have led to the evolution of traumatic insemination across these lineages, as well as the pressures that continue to drive divergence in male and female reproductive morphology and behavior. Traumatic insemination mechanisms and attributes are compared across independent lineages. PMID:24160423

  11. Contrasting coloration in terrestrial mammals

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Here I survey, collate and synthesize contrasting coloration in 5000 species of terrestrial mammals focusing on black and white pelage. After briefly reviewing alternative functional hypotheses for coloration in mammals, I examine nine colour patterns and combinations on different areas of the body and for each mammalian taxon to try to identify the most likely evolutionary drivers of contrasting coloration. Aposematism and perhaps conspecific signalling are the most consistent explanations for black and white pelage in mammals; background matching may explain white pelage. Evidence for contrasting coloration is being involved in crypsis through pattern blending, disruptive coloration or serving other functions, such as signalling dominance, lures, reducing eye glare or in temperature regulation has barely moved beyond anecdotal stages of investigation. Sexual dichromatism is limited in this taxon and its basis is unclear. Astonishingly, the functional significance of pelage coloration in most large charismatic black and white mammals that were new to science 150 years ago still remains a mystery. PMID:18990666

  12. Consumer Control of Terrestrial Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, D.

    2012-12-01

    More than half of the earth's terrestrial surface is grazed by large herbivores and their effects on plant and soil carbon and nitrogen processes are large and widespread. Yet the large effects of these animals on terrestrial processes have largely been ignored in global change models. This presentation will explore the many pathways that consumers affect short and long time-scale terrestrial nitrogen and carbon processes. Large herbivores influence the quality of soil organic matter and the size of the active (i.e., labile) pool of soil carbon and nitrogen in several ways. Herbivory leads to greater abundance of species producing low quality material in forest and dry grassland, via feeding preferentially on high quality forage, and high quality material in mesic grassland habitat, via the high quality of material that regrows after a plant is grazed. Defoliation stimulates the rate of root exudation that enhances rhizospheric processes and the availability of nitrogen in the plant rhizosphere. Herbivores also change the species composition of mycorrhizae fungal associates that influence plant growth and affect soil structure and the turnover rate of soil carbon. Recent radiocarbon measurements have revealed that herbivores also markedly affect the turnover dynamics of the large pool of old soil carbon. In Yellowstone Park, ungulates slow the mean turnover of the relatively old (i.e., slow and passive) 0 - 20 cm deep soil organic carbon by 350 years in upland, dry grassland and speed up that rate in slope-bottom, mesic grassland by 300 years. This represents a 650 year swing in the turnover period of old soil carbon across the Yellowstone landscape. By comparison, mean turnover time for the old pool of 0 - 10 cm deep soil organic carbon shifts by about 300 years across the steep climatic gradient that includes tropical, temperate, and northern hardwood forest, and tallgrass, shortgrass and desert grassland. This large body of evidence suggests consumers play a

  13. Effects of geophysical extra-terrestrial and terrestrial physical stimuli on living organisms - Effects of gravity fields on living organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. J. F.

    1972-01-01

    The biologic effects of greatly reduced gravity resulting from space flight are examined. Aspects of U.S. space biology during the period from 1960 to 1972 are discussed, giving attention to the Discoverer satellites, the Gemini series, the OV1-4 satellite, the biosatellite project, the orbiting frog otolith experiment, and the Apollo program. Other studies considered are related to the effects of galactic particles on nonproliferating cells, a recoverable tissue culture experiment, cell cycle maintenance in human lung cells, and effects of space flight on circadian rhythms. Viking will land on the planet Mars in 1975 in search for life forms.

  14. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^-23 Hz^-1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  15. Terrestrial-Imaging Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vane, Gregg A.; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1990-01-01

    Report reviews history and state of art of terrestrial imaging spectroscopy. Discusses history, design, and performance of Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS), which is pioneering sensor for terrestrial high-resolution remote sensing. Also discusses recent developments described in literature of imaging spectroscopy from three points of view: techniques for handling and analysis of spectral-image data, geological research, and botanical research. This field encompasses use of airborne and spaceborne imaging spectrometers to generate specialized maps for use in agriculture, geology, ecology, and related disciplines.

  16. Extra-articular Manifestations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Silosi, Isabela; Vrabie, Camelia Doina; Tanasescu, R

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease whose main characteristic is persistent joint inflammation that results in joint damage and loss of function. Although RA is more common in females, extra-articular manifestations of the disease are more common in males. The extra-articular manifestations of RA can occur at any age after onset. It is characterised by destructive polyarthritis and extra-articular organ involvement, including the skin, eye, heart, lung, renal, nervous and gastrointestinal systems. The frequence of extra-articular manifestations in RA differs from one country to another. Extra-articular organ involvement in RA is more frequently seen in patients with severe, active disease and is associated with increased mortality. Incidence and frequence figures for extra-articular RA vary according to study design. Extra-articular involvement is more likely in those who have RF and/or are HLA-DR4 positive. Occasionally, there are also systemic manifestations such as vasculitis, visceral nodules, Sjögren's syndrome, or pulmonary fibrosis present. Nodules are the most common extra-articular feature, and are present in up to 30%; many of the other classic features occur in 1% or less in normal clinic settings. Sjögren's syndrome, anaemia of chronic disease and pulmonary manifestations are relatively common – in 6-10%, are frequently present in early disease and are all related to worse outcomes measures of rheumatoid disease in particular functional impairment and mortality. The occurrence of these systemic manifestations is a major predictor of mortality in patients with RA. This paper focuses on extra-articular manifestations, defined as diseases and symptoms not directly related to the locomotor system. PMID:21977172

  17. The effect of type I migration on the formation of terrestrial planets in hot-Jupiter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogg, M. J.; Nelson, R. P.

    2007-09-01

    Context: Our previous models of a giant planet migrating through an inner protoplanet/planetesimal disk find that the giant shepherds a portion of the material it encounters into interior orbits, whilst scattering the rest into external orbits. Scattering tends to dominate, leaving behind abundant material that can accrete into terrestrial planets. Aims: We add to the possible realism of our model by simulating type I migration forces which cause an inward drift, and strong eccentricity and inclination damping of protoplanetary bodies. This extra dissipation might be expected to enhance shepherding at the expense of scattering, possibly modifying our previous conclusions. Methods: We employ an N-body code that is linked to a viscous gas disk algorithm capable of simulating: gas accretion onto the central star; gap formation in the vicinity of the giant planet; type II migration of the giant planet; type I migration of protoplanets; and the effect of gas drag on planetesimals. We use the code to re-run three scenarios from a previous work where type I migration was not included. Results: The additional dissipation introduced by type I migration enhances the inward shepherding of material but does not severely reduce scattering. We find that >50% of the solids disk material still survives the migration in scattered exterior orbits: most of it well placed to complete terrestrial planet formation at <3 AU. The shepherded portion of the disk accretes into hot-Earths, which survive in interior orbits for the duration of our simulations. Conclusions: Water-rich terrestrial planets can form in the habitable zones of hot-Jupiter systems and hot-Earths and hot-Neptunes may also be present. These systems should be targets of future planet search missions.

  18. Searching for extra-dimensions at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benucci, Leonardo

    2009-06-01

    A possible solution to the hierarchy problem is the presence of extra space dimensions beyond the three ones which are known from our everyday experience. The phenomenological ADD model of large extra-dimensions predicts a ETmiss +jet signature. Randall-Sundrum-type extra-dimensions predict di-lepton and di-jet resonances. This contribution addresses an overview of experimental issues and discovery potential for these new particles at the LHC, focusing on perspectives with the CMS detector during early data taking.

  19. Mars: destructive and constructive processes in its crust reflecting tendencies of leveling angular momenta of tropics and extra-tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2009-04-01

    Mars: destructive and constructive processes in its crust reflecting tendencies of leveling angular momenta of tropics and extra-tropics. G. Kochemasov IGEM of the Russian Academy of Sciences A globular shape of rotating celestial bodies means that their tropical and extra-tropical belts have significantly different angular momenta. But such unevenness in a single body is disturbing because it increases level of tectonic stresses and energetic state what is against natural trends for minimizing these characteristics. To level partly this inequality bodies tend to diminish radius and mass in tropics and increase them in extra-tropics. Traces of these destructive and constructive actions are fixed in planetary geospheres of different classes of celestial bodies: Sun, planets, satellites, and asteroids. The remote geologic mapping of Mars reveals these traces rather obviously. "Mysterious" contact zone of the martian lowlands and highlands with obvious traces of destruction expressed in widespread development of chaotic and fretted terrains is a good evidence that could be considered in comparison with the equatorial and tropical belts of some other planetary bodies [1]. At Earth the wide planetary long tropical zone is marked by its destruction. It is demonstrated by development of numerous islands of the Archipelago between the South-East Asia and Australia. In Africa and South America huge depressions of the Congo and Amazon Rivers develops where the Archean crust is subsided to depths of more than 2 km. In the Pacific along the equator numerous islands of Micronesia occur. Subsidence of the basaltic oceanic crust is followed by an intensive folding and faulting of basalt and sedimentary layers as a larger mass must be held by a smaller space (a planetary radius is diminished). Seismicity of the tropical zone is significantly higher than outside of it that means more intensive destruction in the crust and the upper mantle of tropics. Mantle derived diamonds are

  20. Metabolic assessments during extra-vehicular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Yu. Yu.; Spichkov, A. N.; Filipenkov, S. N.

    Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) has a significant role during extended space flights. It demonstrates that humans can survive and perform useful work outside the Orbital Space Stations (OSS) while wearing protective space suits (SS). When the International Space Station 'Alpha'(ISSA) is fully operational, EVA assembly, installation, maintenance and repair operations will become an everyday repetitive work activity in space. It needs new ergonomic evaluation of the work/rest schedule for an increasing of the labor amount per EVA hour. The metabolism assessment is a helpful method to control the productivity of the EVA astronaut and to optimize the work/rest regime. Three following methods were used in Russia to estimate real-time metabolic rates during EVA: 1. Oxygen consumption, computed from the pressure drop in a high pressure bottle per unit time (with actual thermodynamic oxygen properties under high pressure and oxygen leakage taken into account). 2. Carbon dioxide production, computed from CO 2 concentration at the contaminant control cartridge and gas flow rate in the life support subsystem closed loop (nominal mode) or gas leakage in the SS open loop (emergency mode). 3. Heat removal, computed from the difference between the temperatures of coolant water or gas and its flow rate in a unit of time (with assumed humidity and wet oxygen state taken into account). Comparison of heat removal values with metabolic rates enables us to determine the thermal balance during an operative medical control of EVA at "Salyut-6", "Salyut-7" and "Mir" OSS. Complex analysis of metabolism, body temperature and heat rate supports a differential diagnosis between emotional and thermal components of stress during EVA. It gives a prognosis of human homeostasis during EVA. Available information has been acquired into an EVA data base which is an effective tool for ergonomical optimization.

  1. Diterpenoids of terrestrial origin.

    PubMed

    Hanson, James R

    2015-12-19

    Covering January to December 2014. Previous review, Nat. Prod. Rep., 2015, 32, 76-87 This review covers the isolation and chemistry of diterpenoids from terrestrial as opposed to marine sources and includes, labdanes, clerodanes, abietanes, pimaranes, kauranes, cembranes and their cyclization products. There are 200 references. PMID:26514379

  2. INTRODUCED TERRESTRIAL SPECIES (FUTURE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    These data represent predicted future potential distributions of terrestrial plants, animals, and pathogens non-native to the Middle-Atlantic region. These data are available for 8-digit HUCs. The data are a weighted proportion of appropriate habitat overlapped by the potential...

  3. The terrestrial silica pump.

    PubMed

    Carey, Joanna C; Fulweiler, Robinson W

    2012-01-01

    Silicon (Si) cycling controls atmospheric CO(2) concentrations and thus, the global climate, through three well-recognized means: chemical weathering of mineral silicates, occlusion of carbon (C) to soil phytoliths, and the oceanic biological Si pump. In the latter, oceanic diatoms directly sequester 25.8 Gton C yr(-1), accounting for 43% of the total oceanic net primary production (NPP). However, another important link between C and Si cycling remains largely ignored, specifically the role of Si in terrestrial NPP. Here we show that 55% of terrestrial NPP (33 Gton C yr(-1)) is due to active Si-accumulating vegetation, on par with the amount of C sequestered annually via marine diatoms. Our results suggest that similar to oceanic diatoms, the biological Si cycle of land plants also controls atmospheric CO(2) levels. In addition, we provide the first estimates of Si fixed in terrestrial vegetation by major global biome type, highlighting the ecosystems of most dynamic Si fixation. Projected global land use change will convert forests to agricultural lands, increasing the fixation of Si by land plants, and the magnitude of the terrestrial Si pump. PMID:23300825

  4. Terrestrial planet formation

    PubMed Central

    Righter, K.; O’Brien, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (∼106 y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few × 106 y), and finally embryos to planets (107–108 y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids. PMID:21709256

  5. Batteries for terrestrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kulin, T.M.

    1998-07-01

    Extensive research has been conducted in the design and manufacture of very long life vented and sealed maintenance free nickel-cadmium aircraft batteries. These batteries have also been used in a number of terrestrial applications with good success. This study presents an overview of the Ni-Cd chemistry and technology as well as detailed analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of the Ni-Cd couple for terrestrial applications. The performance characteristics of both sealed and vented Ni-Cd's are presented. Various charge algorithms are examined and evaluated for effectiveness and ease of implementation. Hardware requirements for charging are also presented and evaluated. The discharge characteristics of vented and sealed Ni-Cd's are presented and compared to other battery chemistries. The performance of Ni-Cd's under extreme environmental conditions is also compared to other battery chemistries. The history of various terrestrial applications is reviewed and some of the lessons learned are presented. Applications discussed include the NASA Middeck Payload Battery, Raytheon Aegis Missile System Battery, THAAD Launcher battery, and the Titan IV battery. The suitability of the Ni-Cd chemistry for other terrestrial applications such as electric vehicles and Uninterruptible Power Supply is discussed.

  6. The Terrestrial Silica Pump

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Joanna C.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon (Si) cycling controls atmospheric CO2 concentrations and thus, the global climate, through three well-recognized means: chemical weathering of mineral silicates, occlusion of carbon (C) to soil phytoliths, and the oceanic biological Si pump. In the latter, oceanic diatoms directly sequester 25.8 Gton C yr−1, accounting for 43% of the total oceanic net primary production (NPP). However, another important link between C and Si cycling remains largely ignored, specifically the role of Si in terrestrial NPP. Here we show that 55% of terrestrial NPP (33 Gton C yr−1) is due to active Si-accumulating vegetation, on par with the amount of C sequestered annually via marine diatoms. Our results suggest that similar to oceanic diatoms, the biological Si cycle of land plants also controls atmospheric CO2 levels. In addition, we provide the first estimates of Si fixed in terrestrial vegetation by major global biome type, highlighting the ecosystems of most dynamic Si fixation. Projected global land use change will convert forests to agricultural lands, increasing the fixation of Si by land plants, and the magnitude of the terrestrial Si pump. PMID:23300825

  7. Terrestrial planet formation.

    PubMed

    Righter, K; O'Brien, D P

    2011-11-29

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (~10(6) y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few 10(6) y), and finally embryos to planets (10(7)-10(8) y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids. PMID:21709256

  8. Editorial: Focus on Extra Space Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Pomarol, Alex

    2010-07-01

    Experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have just started. In addition to verifying the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics, these experiments will probe a new energy frontier and test extensions of the SM. The existence of extra dimensions is one of the most attractive possibilities for physics beyond the SM. This focus issue contains a collection of articles addressing both theoretical and phenomenological aspects of extra-dimensional models. Focus on Extra Space Dimensions Contents Minimal universal extra dimensions in CalcHEP/CompHEP AseshKrishna Datta, Kyoungchul Kong and Konstantin T Matchev Disordered extra dimensions Karim Benakli Codimension-2 brane-bulk matching: examples from six and ten dimensions Allan Bayntun, C P Burgess and Leo van Nierop Gauge threshold corrections in warped geometry Kiwoon Choi, Ian-Woo Kim and Chang Sub Shin Holographic methods and gauge-Higgs unification in flat extra dimensions Marco Serone Soft-wall stabilization Joan A Cabrer, Gero von Gersdorff and Mariano Quirós Warped five-dimensional models: phenomenological status and experimental prospects Hooman Davoudiasl, Shrihari Gopalakrishna, Eduardo Pontón and José Santiago

  9. Volcanic ash - Terrestrial versus extraterrestrial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    A principal difference between terrestrial and extraterrestrial lavas may consist in the greater ability of terrestrial lavas to form thin films (like those of soap bubbles) and hence foams. It would follow that, in place of the pumice and spiny shards found in terrestrial volcanic ash, an extraterrestrial ash should contain minute spherules. This hypothesis may help to explain lunar microspherules.

  10. Extra glycosomal localization of Trypanosoma brucei hexokinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Joice, April C.; Lyda, Todd L.; Sayce, Andrew C.; Verplaetse, Emilie; Morris, Meredith T.; Michels, Paul A. M.; Robinson, Derrick R.; Morris, James C.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of the glycolytic enzymes in the African trypanosome are compartmentalized within peroxisome-like organelles, the glycosomes. Polypeptides harboring peroxisomal targeting sequences (PTS type 1 or 2) are targeted to these organelles. This targeting is essential to parasite viability, as compartmentalization of glycolytic enzymes prevents unregulated ATP-dependent phosphorylation of intermediatemetabolites. Here, we report the surprising extra-glycosomal localization of aPTS-2 bearing trypanosomal hexokinase, TbHK2. In bloodstream form parasites, the protein localizes to both glycosomes and to the flagellum. Evidence for this includes fractionation and immunofluorescence studies using antisera generated against the authentic protein as well as detection of epitope-tagged recombinant versions of the protein. In the insect stage parasite, distribution is different, with the polypeptide localized to glycosomes and proximal to the basal bodies. The function of the extra-glycosomal protein remains unclear. While its association with the basal body suggests that it may have a role in locomotion in the insect stage parasite, no detectable defect indirectional motility or velocity of cell movement were observed for TbHK2-deficient cells, suggesting that protein may have a different function in the cell. PMID:22619756

  11. Satellite-Terrestrial Network Interoperability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonDeak, Thomas C.

    1998-01-01

    The developing national and global information infrastructures (NII/GII) are being built upon the asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) telecommunications protocol and associated protocol standards. These protocols are themselves under development through the telecommunications standards process defined by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), which as a body is sanctioned by the United Nations. All telecommunications manufacturers use these standards to create products that can interoperate. The ITU has recognized the ATM Forum as the instrument for the development of ATM protocols. This forum is a consortium of industry, academia, and government entities formed to quickly develop standards for the ATM infrastructure. However, because the participants represent a predominately terrestrial network viewpoint, the use of satellites in the national and global information infrastructures could be severely compromised. Consequently, through an ongoing task order, the NASA Lewis Research Center asked Sterling Software, Inc., to communicate with the ATM Forum in support of the interoperability of satellite-terrestrial networks. This year, Dr. Raj Jain of the Ohio State University, under contract to Sterling, authored or coauthored 32 explanatory documents delivered to the ATM Forum in the areas of Guaranteed Frame Rate for Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), Available Bit Rate, performance testing, Variable Bit Rate voice over ATM, TCP over Unspecified Bit Rate+, Virtual Source/Virtual Destination, and network management. These contributions have had a significant impact on the content of the standards that the ATM Forum is developing. Some of the more significant accomplishments have been: (1) The adoption by the ATM Forum of a new definition for Message-In, Message-Out latency; and (2) Improved text (clearer wording and newly defined terms) for measurement procedures, foreground and background traffic, and scalable configuration in the

  12. Collisional Evolution of Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnor, C.; Asphaug, E.

    2004-12-01

    The terrestrial planets are generally thought to have formed via the collisional accumulation of rocky bodies. The characteristics of the planets produced by this process are, to a large degree, determined by their collisional evolution, and their associated differentiation and thermal evolution. Studies of planet formation and planetary collisional evolution have typically been conducted separately. Most works of late-stage planet formation use perfectly inelastic mergers to model collisions (e.g. Agnor, Canup & Levison 1999, Chambers 2001, Levison & Agnor 2003), with certain recognized inadequacies, notably prohibitively large spin angular momentum acquired as a planet grows. To date, studies of the collisional evolution of terrestrial planets has focused on determining the efficacy of single impacts to account for particular planetary characteristics and the formation of satellites (e.g. Benz et al. 1988, Canup & Asphaug 2001, Canup 2004). It has been recognized for some time (Wetherill 1985) that the final characteristics (e.g. spin state, bulk composition, isotopic age) of an accreting planet are determined not by the last or single largest collision but by all of the major collisional encounters in a planet's history (Agnor, Canup & Levison 1999). As demonstrated by our impact models, each major impact changes the silicate to metal ratio, the thermal state, and the spin state, and sets the stage for the subsequent collision. We are studying collisional dynamics and outcomes common to the late stage of terrestrial planet formation. We use smooth particle hydrodynamics model collisions in an effort to identify the range of impact dynamics that allow for accretion (i.e. mass growth instead of mass loss). In our initial study we found that for dynamical environments typical of most late stage accretion models, about half of all collisions between equal mass planetary embryos do not result in accumulation into a larger embryo (Agnor & Asphaug 2004). We will

  13. Time Scales: Terrestrial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, G.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Terrestrial time is at present derived from atomic clocks. The SI second, the unit of time of the international system of units, has been defined since 1967 in terms of a hyperfine transition of the cesium atom and the best primary frequency standards now realize it with a relative uncertainty of a few parts in 1015, which makes it the most accurately measurable physical quantity. INTERNATIONAL A...

  14. Comparative Climatology of Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackwell, Stephen J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Harder, Jerald W.; Bullock, Mark A.

    to a future volume. Our authors have taken on the task to look at climate on the terrestrial planets in the broadest sense possible — by comparing the atmospheric processes at work on the four terrestrial bodies, Earth, Venus, Mars, and Titan (Titan is included because it hosts many of the common processes), and on terrestrial planets around other stars. These processes include the interactions of shortwave and thermal radiation with the atmosphere, condensation and vaporization of volatiles, atmospheric dynamics, chemistry and aerosol formation, and the role of the surface and interior in the long-term evolution of climate. Chapters herein compare the scientific questions, analysis methods, numerical models, and spacecraft remote sensing experiments of Earth and the other terrestrial planets, emphasizing the underlying commonality of physical processes. We look to the future by identifying objectives for ongoing research and new missions. Through these pages we challenge practicing planetary scientists, and most importantly new students of any age, to find pathways and synergies for advancing the field. In Part I, Foundations, we introduce the fundamental physics of climate on terrestrial planets. Starting with the best studied planet by far, Earth, the first chapters discuss what is known and what is not known about the atmospheres and climates of the terrestrial planets of the solar system and beyond. In Part II, Greenhouse Effect and Atmospheric Dynamics, we focus on the processes that govern atmospheric motion and the role that general circulation models play in our current understanding. In Part III, Clouds and Hazes, we provide an in-depth look at the many effects of clouds and aerosols on planetary climate. Although this is a vigorous area of research in the Earth sciences, and very strongly influences climate modeling, the important role that aerosols and clouds play in the climate of all planets is not yet well constrained. This section is intended to

  15. Sliding GAIT Algorithm for the All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Julie; Biesiadecki, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The design of a surface robotic system typically involves a trade between the traverse speed of a wheeled rover and the terrain-negotiating capabilities of a multi-legged walker. The ATHLETE mobility system, with both articulated limbs and wheels, is uniquely capable of both driving and walking, and has the flexibility to employ additional hybrid mobility modes. This paper introduces the Sliding Gait, an intermediate mobility algorithm faster than walking with better terrain-handling capabilities than wheeled mobility.

  16. Making Friends with an Extra-Terrestrial: Conversation Skills and Friendship Formation in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Jeffrey G.; Gottman, John M.

    A novel paradigm was developed and two studies conducted to test the contribution of six conversational skills to children's friendship formation. In study 1, 4- and 5-year-olds individually played for 30 minutes with a 2-foot-tall talking doll. The doll contained a wireless hidden receiver/speaker enabling a concealed female assistant to converse…

  17. Combustion of Metals in Reduced-Gravity and Extra Terrestrial Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branch, M.C.; Abbud-Madrid, A.; Daily, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    The combustion of metals is a field with important practical applications in rocket propellants, high-temperature flames, and material synthesis. Also, the safe operation of metal containers in high-pressure oxygen systems and with cryogenic fuels and oxidizers remains an important concern in industry. The increasing use of metallic components in spacecraft and space structures has also raised concerns about their flammability properties and fire suppression mechanisms. In addition, recent efforts to embark on unmanned and manned planetary exploration, such as on Mars, have also renewed the interest in metal/carbon-dioxide combustion as an effective in situ resource utilization technology. In spite of these practical applications, the understanding of the combustion properties of metals remains far behind that of the most commonly used fuels such as hydrocarbons. The lack of understanding is due to the many problems unique to metal- oxidizer reactions such as: low-temperature surface oxidation prior to ignition, heterogeneous reactions, very high combustion temperatures, product condensation, high emissivity of products, and multi-phase interactions. Very few analytical models (all neglecting the influence of gravity) have been developed to predict the burning characteristics and the flame structure details. Several experimental studies attempting to validate these models have used small metal particles to recreate gravity-free conditions. The high emissivity of the flames, rapid reaction, and intermittent explosions experienced by these particles have made the gathering of any useful information on burning rates and flame structure very difficult. The use of a reduced gravity environment is needed to clarify some of the complex interactions among the phenomena described above. First, the elimination of the intrusive buoyant flows that plague all combustion phenomena is of paramount importance in metal reactions due to the much higher temperatures reached during combustion. Second, a low-gravity environment is absolutely essential to remove the destructive effect of gravity on the shape of a molten metal droplet in order to study a spherically symmetric condition with large bulk samples. The larger size of the spherical metal droplet and the longer burning times available in reduced gravity extend the spatial and temporal dimensions to permit careful probing of the flame structure and dynamics. Third, the influence of the radiative heat transfer from the solid oxides can be studied more carefully by generating a stagnant spherical shell of condensed products undisturbed by buoyancy.

  18. A summary of extremes of isotopic variations in extra-terrestrial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, M.

    1986-04-01

    In this comprehensive review of current research on isotopic variations of elements in extraterrestrial materials, the variations were classified in terms of the major process involved in the modification of the iostopic composition of the element concerned. Maximum isotopic variations of each element were retrieved from publications which were available in Tokyo up to December 1985, and are presented in tabular form.

  19. An instrument for elemental and isotopic abundance characterization of extra-terrestrial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veryovkin, I. V.; Calaway, W. F.; Moore, J. F.; Pellin, M. J.; Savina, M. R.; King, B. V.; Petravić, M.; Burnett, D. S.

    2002-12-01

    Samples returned from the Genesis and Stardust missions of NASA's Discovery Program require quantitative analysis at sensitivities unobtainable with present instruments. This has driven development of a new generation of instruments for laser-post-ionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry (laser-SNMS). Construction of a prototype time-of-flight (TOF) SNMS instrument has been completed recently at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and testing began in August 2002. This instrument is optimized for laser post-ionization of sputtered neutrals and is capable of locating and analyzing individual sub-micrometer interstellar particles on a sample stage for Stardust or determining elemental concentrations in shallow implants at ultra-trace levels for Genesis. Post-ionization can be accomplished with a variety of laser sources. These include high repetition rate tunable Ti-sapphire lasers for ultra-trace analysis of a single element and two vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light sources for simultaneous ionization of most atomic and molecular species in the sample. The two VUV lasers are an F2 laser with a fixed wavelength of 157 nm and the self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser (SASE FEL) capable of generating tunable VUV at wavelengths down to 60 nm. Fundamental physical theory of ion sputtering forms the scientific basis of the approach used to design the instrument. An ion optics design for the instrument was perfected through extensive three-dimensional computer simulations using SIMION software. Realistic sets of photo-ions were calculated using formalisms derived from sputtering theory. Their trajectories in various instrument designs were then traced by SIMION. Finally, results of the simulations were processed to estimate instrument capabilities including resolution and useful yield. This same approach proved accurate and quantitative during tests of an existing TOF SNMS instrument demonstrating the reliability of the simulation method. The completed prototype instrument and results of recent tests will be presented. This work is supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, BES-Materials Sciences, under Contract W-31-109-ENG-38 and in part by a contract from NASA's Office of Space Science's Cosmochemistry Program.

  20. Two systems analyses of SETI. [microwave Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machol, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of receiving and identifying a single microwave signal transmitted by extraterrestrial intelligent beings is analyzed in the cases where the signal is designed to catch our attention and the signal is designed for internal purposes of another civilization. Six variables which yield uncertainty as to the exact signal which should be searched for are described: polarization, modulation, flux level, direction, frequency (including bandwidth and drift rate), and time. It is shown that if all reasonable variations of these parameters are to be examined sequentially for 1000 seconds, the search would take over a million times longer than the age of the Universe. Ways to simplify the search are considered, including widening the frequency bin, selecting specific targets, cutting the observation time, using a Fourier transform device for data processing, and building larger antennas as well as better low-noise receivers.

  1. ELF and VLF observations of ionospheric disturbances caused by extra-terrestrial origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Hayakawa, M.; Hobara, Y.; Raulin, J.; Takahashi, Y.; Sato, M.; Terasawa, T.

    2013-05-01

    Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio wave propagates within the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, and hence measurement of the VLF amplitude and phase can be utilized to study physics of phenomena taking place in the lower ionosphere below about 100 km. Observation of Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) radio wave is also a powerful tool to investigate ionospheric phenomena such as lightning. Here we present ELF and VLF observations of ionospheric disturbances caused by extraterrestrial phenomena. Cosmological Gamma-ray bursts has already been known as the origin of ionospheric disturbances. In addition to this, "magnetar" flares has also been recognized to affect the Earth's ionosphere. Ordinary neutron stars possess magnetic fields of about 10^12 Gauss, while magnetars are considered to have extremely strong magnetic fields of about 10^15 G. Some of the magnetars emit short-duration (~0.1 s) gamma-ray bursts repeatedly in active phases, thereby they are named as "Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters (SGRs)". As rare events, SGRs emit exceptionally bright gamma-ray flares "giant flares", whose peak fluxes exceed those of X-class large solar flares by several order of magnitudes. Recent sensitive measurement of ELF and VLF radio waves can observe ionospheric disturbances caused by these short-repeated and giant flares. Namely, we have found that transient ELF radio wave and Schumann resonance were caused by SGR giant flares in 2004. The emission mechanism is still unclear, but similarity of nuclear detonation in 1960's might give some hints to unveil the emission mechanism. Interesting application of VLF measurement of magnetar flare is that we can deduce the gamma-ray spectrum from VLF data. Intensive astronomical X-ray and gamma-ray observations have been performed by satellites in space using very sensitive detectors. Since SGR giant flare emits huge X-ray/gamma-ray flux, such sensitive detectors are affected by severe saturation problems and precise measurement is very difficult. In my presentation, we present how we deduce the photon spectrum from the VLF data. Using Monte Carlo method, we modeled ionization of lower ionosphere, and obtained altitude profile of electron number density. We then utilized Finite-Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method to simulate VLF propagation. The altitude profile and simulated amplitude change differs depending on the energy spectrum. Therefore, by comparing simulation results with the observation, we can infer the source spectrum as an inverse problem.

  2. Energy Systems - Present, Future: Extra Terrestrials, Grades 7, 8, 9,/Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Teachers Association, Washington, DC.

    The 12 lessons presented in this guide are structured so that they may be integrated into science lessons in 7th-, 8th-, or 9th-grades. Suggestions are made for extension of study. Lessons are approached through classroom role-playing of outer space visitors who seek to understand energy conversion principles used on Earth. Major emphasis is…

  3. Theoretical Studies of the Extra-terrestrial Chemistry of Biogenic Elements and Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woon, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented on the following:(A) Ab initio quantum chemical studies of reactions in astrophysical ices.Theoretical electronic structure calculations were used to investigate reactions between formaldehyde (H2CO) and both hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and isocyanide (HNC) in search of other favorable reactions such as ammonia-formaldehyde addition, which was found in a recent theoretical study to be strongly enhanced when it occurs within cold ices.The present study examines further reactions between this product and H2CO in ices.(B) Heterogeneous hydrogenation of CO and H2CO on icy grain mantles.Formaldehyde (H2CO) and methanol (CH30H) are thought to be produced in the interstellar medium by the successive hydrogenation of carbon monoxide (CO) on grain surfaces. In the gas phase, the steps in which H adds to CO and H2CO possess modest barriers and are too inefficient to account for the observed abundances. Recent laboratory work has confirmed that formaldehyde and methanol are formed when H atoms are deposited on CO ice at 12 K. The present study employed ab initio quantum chemical calculations to investigate the impact of water ice on the sequential hydrogenation of CO.(C) Ice-bound condensed-phase reactions involving formic acid (HCOOH), methylenimine (CH2NH), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), and ammonia ( 3) were investigated in order to characterize possible pathways to larger organic species that are efficient at the cold temperatures prevalent in cometary nuclei and the interstellar medium. (D) Pathways to glycine and other amino acids in ultraviolet-irradiated ices determined via quantum chemical modeling.(E) Photoionization in ultraviolet processing of astrophysical ice analogs at cryogenic temperatures.

  4. Genetics Indicates Extra-terrestrial Origins for Life: The First Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Rhawn; Wickramasinghe, N. Chandra

    2011-10-01

    Some of the defining characteristics of life include its ability to replicate and reproduce itself and its genome whilst maintaining a capacity for evolution. Life, as we know it, requires genetic information and no fewer than 382 genes. Thus, the origins of life can be estimated by determining duplication rates beginning with the first gene. Conversely, an approximate date for the origin of the first gene can be estimated based on the time frame in which life appeared on Earth and then evolved. Data from genomics and molecular biology indicate that all modern organisms originated from an ensemble of prokaryotic genes dating back to the first appearance of life on Earth over 4.2 billion years ago (bya), which means life was present on Earth from almost the beginning. There are two main models for the origins of eukaryotes on Earth, "genetic merger" which postulates that eukaryotes evolved between 3 bya to 2 bya following the merger of two species of prokaryote, and "deep roots" which posits that eukaryotes and prokaryotes appeared on Earth at the same time. However, neither model can explain how or when the first genes evolved. To arrive at an estimate for the time frame in which the first gene was fashioned, genetic analysis based on the genetic merger and deep roots models and at different ages for the establishment of life on Earth, were carried out. The correspondence between total gene numbers of various organisms and time of their putative origin over the course of evolutionary history was analysed. Be it the merger or deep roots model, and within the experimental uncertainties in the relevant data, four separate analyses indicates that the origins of the first gene extends backwards in time by an estimated 10 to 14 billion years (10.5<14.5 bya) and thus during a time frame which overlaps and is consistent with estimated ages offered in support of the Big Bang model of the origin of this universe. This does not mean that life began 10-14 billion years ago, but rather that the first gene was fashioned billions of years before the creation of Earth.

  5. Extra-dimensional models on the lattice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Knechtli, Francesco; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2016-08-05

    In this paper we summarize the ongoing effort to study extra-dimensional gauge theories with lattice simulations. In these models the Higgs field is identified with extra-dimensional components of the gauge field. The Higgs potential is generated by quantum corrections and is protected from divergences by the higher dimensional gauge symmetry. Dimensional reduction to four dimensions can occur through compactification or localization. Gauge-Higgs unification models are often studied using perturbation theory. Numerical lattice simulations are used to go beyond these perturbative expectations and to include nonperturbative effects. We describe the known perturbative predictions and their fate in the strongly-coupled regime formore » various extra-dimensional models.« less

  6. Extra and Intra-articular Synovial Chondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, R K; Banskota, B; Rijal, S; Banskota, A K

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is not so rare intra-articular condition secondary to synovial metaplasia, that affects the knee joint. Extra-articular synovial chondromatosis however is an extremely rare condition that usually involves the synovial sheath or bursa of the foot or hand. We present two cases of synovial chondromatosis, one intra and one extra-articular. The first case was a 25 year old lady who presented with pain, swelling and restricted range of motion of left knee and was found to have an intra-articular synovial chondromatosis which was treated successfully by joint debridement. The second case was that of a 22 year old man who presented with right knee pain and was diagnosed to have an extra-articular synovial chondromatosis of his right medial hamstring tendon sheath, excision of which resulted in complete relief of symptoms. PMID:27549506

  7. Method for identifying anomalous terrestrial heat flows

    DOEpatents

    Del Grande, Nancy Kerr

    1977-01-25

    A method for locating and mapping the magnitude and extent of terrestrial heat-flow anomalies from 5 to 50 times average with a tenfold improved sensitivity over orthodox applications of aerial temperature-sensing surveys as used for geothermal reconnaissance. The method remotely senses surface temperature anomalies such as occur from geothermal resources or oxidizing ore bodies by: measuring the spectral, spatial, statistical, thermal, and temporal features characterizing infrared radiation emitted by natural terrestrial surfaces; deriving from these measurements the true surface temperature with uncertainties as small as 0.05 to 0.5 K; removing effects related to natural temperature variations of topographic, hydrologic, or meteoric origin, the surface composition, detector noise, and atmospheric conditions; factoring out the ambient normal-surface temperature for non-thermally enhanced areas surveyed under otherwise identical environmental conditions; distinguishing significant residual temperature enhancements characteristic of anomalous heat flows and mapping the extent and magnitude of anomalous heat flows where they occur.

  8. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; Quintana, E. V.; Adams, F. C.; Chambers, J. E.

    2006-01-01

    Most stars reside in binary/multiple star systems; however, previous models of planet formation have studied growth of bodies orbiting an isolated single star. Disk material has been observed around one or both components of various young close binary star systems. If planets form at the right places within such disks, they can remain dynamically stable for very long times. We have simulated the late stages of growth of terrestrial planets in both circumbinary disks around 'close' binary star systems with stellar separations ($a_B$) in the range 0.05 AU $\\le a_B \\le$ 0.4 AU and binary eccentricities in the range $0 \\le e \\le 0.8$ and circumstellar disks around individual stars with binary separations of tens of AU. The initial disk of planetary embryos is the same as that used for simulating the late stages of terrestrial planet growth within our Solar System and around individual stars in the Alpha Centauri system (Quintana et al. 2002, A.J., 576, 982); giant planets analogous to Jupiter and Saturn are included if their orbits are stable. The planetary systems formed around close binaries with stellar apastron distances less than or equal to 0.2 AU with small stellar eccentricities are very similar to those formed in the Sun-Jupiter-Saturn, whereas planetary systems formed around binaries with larger maximum separations tend to be sparser, with fewer planets, especially interior to 1 AU. Likewise, when the binary periastron exceeds 10 AU, terrestrial planets can form over essentially the entire range of orbits allowed for single stars with Jupiter-like planets, although fewer terrestrial planets tend to form within high eccentricity binary systems. As the binary periastron decreases, the radial extent of the terrestrial planet systems is reduced accordingly. When the periastron is 5 AU, the formation of Earth-like planets near 1 AU is compromised.

  9. Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, D.W.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

  10. The terrestrial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    The theory relating to the basic physics governing the behavior of the terrestrial ionosphere is reviewed. The review covers the coupling of the ionosphere to both the neutral atmosphere and magnetosphere, the creation and transport of ionization in the ionosphere, and the ionospheric thermal structure. The review also covers the variation of the ionosphere with altitude, latitude, longitude, universal time, season, solar cycle, and geomagnetic activity. In addition, some unique ionospheric features are discussed, such as the polar ionization hole, the main electron density trough, the ion temperature hot spots, the high-latitude ionization tongue, the equatorial fountain, Appleton's peaks, and the polar wind.

  11. Solar terrestrial observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Eight basic solar-terrestrial scientific objectives that benefit from the Shuttle/Platform approach and a program of measurements for each are discussed. The objectives are to understand: (1) solar variability, (2) wave-particle processes, (3) magnetosphere-ionosphere mass transport, (4) the global electric circuit, (5) upper atmospheric dynamics, (6) middle atmospheric chemistry and energetics, (7) lower atmospheric turbidity, and (8) planetary atmospheric waves. A two stage approach to a multidisciplinary payload is developed: an initial STO, that uses a single platform in a low-Earth orbit, and an advanced STO that uses two platforms in differing orbits.

  12. Progress in extra-solar planet detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Progress in extra-solar planet detection is reviewed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) the definition of a planet; (2) the weakness of planet signals; (3) direct techniques - imaging and spectral detection; and (4) indirect techniques - reflex motion and occultations.

  13. Extra virgin olive oil's polyphenols: biological activities.

    PubMed

    Visioli, Francesco; Bernardini, Elena

    2011-01-01

    In addition to its high proportion of oleic acid (which is considered as "neutral" in terms of cardioprotection), extra virgin olive oil is rich in phenolic compounds, which other vegetable oils do not contain. This review critically appraises the current scientific evidence of a healthful role of olive phenols, with particular emphasis on hydroxytyrosol and related molecules. PMID:21443485

  14. Circadian organization is governed by extra-SCN pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Pezuk, Pinar; Mohawk, Jennifer A; Yoshikawa, Tomoko; Sellix, Michael T; Menaker, Michael

    2010-12-01

    In mammals, a pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is thought to be required for behavioral, physiological, and molecular circadian rhythms. However, there is considerable evidence that temporal food restriction (restricted feedisng [RF]) and chronic methamphetamine (MA) can drive circadian rhythms of locomotor activity, body temperature, and endocrine function in the absence of SCN. This indicates the existence of extra-SCN pacemakers: the Food Entrainable Oscillator (FEO) and Methamphetamine Sensitive Circadian Oscillator (MASCO). Here, we show that these extra-SCN pacemakers control the phases of peripheral oscillators in intact as well as in SCN-ablated PER2::LUC mice. MA administration shifted the phases of SCN, cornea, pineal, pituitary, kidney, and salivary glands in intact animals. When the SCN was ablated, disrupted phase relationships among peripheral oscillators were reinstated by MA treatment. When intact animals were subjected to restricted feeding, the phases of cornea, pineal, kidney, salivary gland, lung, and liver were shifted. In SCN-lesioned restricted-fed mice, phases of all of the tissues shifted such that they aligned with the time of the meal. Taken together, these data show that FEO and MASCO are strong circadian pacemakers able to regulate the phases of peripheral oscillators. PMID:21135159

  15. Terrestrialization, miniaturization and rates of diversification in African frogs (Anura: Phrynobatrachidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Terrestrialization, the evolution of non-aquatic oviposition, and miniaturization, the evolution of tiny adult body size, have been identified as a key features in the evolution of modern amphibians. This study examines anuran terrestrialization and miniaturization in a phylogenetic context to deter...

  16. Terrestrial Planet Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    Terrestrial planet geophysics beyond our home sphere had its start arguably in the early 1960s, with Keith Runcorn contending that the second-degree shape of the Moon is due to convection and Mariner 2 flying past Venus and detecting no planetary magnetic field. Within a decade, in situ surface geophysical measurements were carried out on the Moon with the Apollo program, portions of the lunar magnetic and gravity fields were mapped, and Jack Lorell and his colleagues at JPL were producing spherical harmonic gravity field models for Mars using tracking data from Mariner 9, the first spacecraft to orbit another planet. Moreover, Mariner 10 discovered a planetary magnetic field at Mercury, and a young Sean Solomon was using geological evidence of surface contraction to constrain the thermal evolution of the innermost planet. In situ geophysical experiments (such as seismic networks) were essentially never carried out after Apollo, although they were sometimes planned just beyond the believability horizon in planetary mission queues. Over the last three decades, the discipline of terrestrial planet geophysics has matured, making the most out of orbital magnetic and gravity field data, altimetric measurements of surface topography, and the integration of geochemical information. Powerful constraints are provided by tectonic and volcanic information gleaned from surface images, and the engagement of geologists in geophysical exercises is actually quite useful. Accompanying these endeavors, modeling techniques, largely adopted from the Earth Science community, have become increasingly sophisticated and have been greatly enhanced by the dramatic increase in computing power over the last two decades. The future looks bright with exciting new data sets emerging from the MESSENGER mission to Mercury, the promise of the GRAIL gravity mission to the Moon, and the re-emergence of Venus as a worthy target for exploration. Who knows? With the unflagging optimism and persistence

  17. The EXTraS project: Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, A.; Tiengo, A.; D'Agostino, D.; Watson, M.; Haberl, F.; Wilms, J.

    2016-06-01

    The EXTraS project is extracting the hitherto unexplored temporal domain information buried in the serendipitous data collected by XMM-Newton/EPIC since its launch. This includes a search for fast transients, missed by standard image analysis, as well as a search and characterization of variability (both periodic and aperiodic) in hundreds of thousands of sources, spanning more than nine orders of magnitude in time scale and six orders of magnitude in flux. Phenomenological classification of variable sources will also be performed. All our results, together with new analysis tools, will be made available to the community in an easy-to-use form at the end of 2016, with prospects of extending the analysis to future data. EXTraS products will have a very broad range of applications, from the search for rare events to population studies, with a large impact in almost all fields of astrophysics. This will boost the scientific exploitation of XMM data and make EPIC the reference for time-domain astronomy in the soft X-rays. The EXTraS project (2014-2016), funded within the EU/FP7 framework, is carried out by a collaboration including INAF (Italy), IUSS (Italy), CNR/IMATI (Italy), University of Leicester (UK), MPE (Germany) and ECAP (Germany).

  18. Unveiling long-term variability in XMM-Newton surveys within the EXTraS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, S.; Read, A.; Law-Green, D.; Watson, M.; Pye, J.; O'Brien, P.

    2016-06-01

    The EXTraS project (Exploring the X-ray transient and variable sky) is an EU/FP7-Cooperation Space framework programme that aims to bring together a diverse set of time-domain analyses of XMM-Newton X-ray data and make them available to the public in a coherent manner. Through a combination of pointed observations and slew scans, XMM-Newton has repeatedly observed many regions of the sky, in a few cases up to ˜50 times, ˜70000 sources being observed more than once. While non-uniformly spaced and often sparse, these snapshots provide scientifically valuable information on the photometric behaviour of sources on longer term (hours to ˜ a decade) timescales. Here we describe the collation of XMM-Newton data for long-term variability from the 3XMM-DR5 catalogue, the slew survey and upper-limit information from the associated XMM-Newton products, and the analysis being performed on the ensuing light curves. We also present emerging examples of some newly identified long-term variable sources to highlight the value of this element of the EXTraS project. These longer baseline light curves can (i) unveil variable sources that appear stable in individual observations, (ii) reveal exotic and transient sources and (iii) complement short-term variability information from elsewhere in the EXTraS project by probing slower physical phenomena.

  19. Terrestrial Coordinate Systems and Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, C.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A terrestrial reference system (TRS) is a spatial reference system corotating with the Earth in its DIURNAL MOTION in space. In such a system, the positions of points anchored on the Earth's solid surface have coordinates which have only small variations with time, as a result of geophysical effects (tectonic or tidal deformations; see TECTONICS, EARTH'S INTERIOR, TIDES). A terrestrial reference ...

  20. Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity Apollo Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Kenneth Thomas will discuss the Apollo Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity (IEVA) spacesuits, which supported launch and reentry and extra-vehicular activity. This program was NASA's first attempt to develop a new suit design from requirements and concepts. Mr. Thomas will chronicle the challenges, developments, struggles, and solutions that culminated in the system that allowed the first human exploration of the Moon and deep space (outside low-Earth orbit). Apollo pressure suit designs allowed the heroic repair of the Skylab space station and supported the first U.S. and Russian spacecraft docking during the Apollo Soyuz Test Project. Mr. Thomas will also discuss the IEVA suits' successes and challenges associated with the IEVA developments of the 1960s.

  1. Brane modeling in warped extra-dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Aqeel; Grzadkowski, Bohdan

    2013-01-01

    Five-dimensional scenarios with infinitesimally thin branes replaced by appropriate configurations of a scalar field were considered. A possibility of periodic extra dimension was discussed in the presence on non-minimal scalar-gravity coupling and a generalized Gibbons-Kallosh-Linde sum rule was found. In order to avoid constraints imposed by periodicity, a non-compact spacial extra dimension was introduced. A five dimensional model with warped geometry and two thin branes mimicked by a scalar profile was constructed and discussed. In the thin brane limit the model corresponds to a set-up with two positive-tension branes. The presence of two branes allows to address the issue of the hierarchy problem which could be solved by the standard warping of the four dimensional metric provided the Higgs field is properly localized. Stability of the background solution was discussed and verified in the presence of the most general perturbations of the metric and the scalar field.

  2. Extra-pair paternity in waved albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Huyvaert, K P; Anderson, D J; Jones, T C; Duan, W; Parker, P G

    2000-09-01

    We estimated the rate of extra-pair fertilizations (EPFs) in waved albatrosses (Phoebastria irrorata) on Isla Española, Galápagos, Ecuador, using multilocus minisatellite DNA fingerprinting. Waved albatrosses are socially monogamous, long-lived seabirds whose main population is on Española. Aggressive extra-pair copulation (EPC) attempts have been observed in the breeding colony during the days preceding egg-laying. Our genetic analyses of 16 families (single chicks and their attending parents) revealed evidence of EPFs in four families. In all cases males were the excluded parent. These data suggest that waved albatrosses have an unusually high rate of EPF relative to taxa with similar life histories. Future behavioural observations will determine the extent to which forced vs. unforced EPCs contribute to this high EPF rate. PMID:10972780

  3. Dimensional reduction without continuous extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Chamseddine, Ali H.; Froehlich, J.; Schubnel, B.; Wyler, D.

    2013-01-15

    We describe a novel approach to dimensional reduction in classical field theory. Inspired by ideas from noncommutative geometry, we introduce extended algebras of differential forms over space-time, generalized exterior derivatives, and generalized connections associated with the 'geometry' of space-times with discrete extra dimensions. We apply our formalism to theories of gauge- and gravitational fields and find natural geometrical origins for an axion- and a dilaton field, as well as a Higgs field.

  4. Cystic lesions accompanying extra-axial tumours.

    PubMed

    Lohle, P N; Wurzer, H A; Seelen, P J; Kingma, L M; Go, K G

    1999-01-01

    We examined the mechanism of cyst formation in extra-axial tumours in the central nervous system (CNS). Cyst fluid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood plasma were analysed in eight patients with nine peritumoral cysts: four with meningiomas, two with intracranial and two spinal intradural schwannomas. Measuring concentrations of various proteins [albumin, immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgA, alpha 2-macroglobulin and IgM] in cyst fluid, CSF and blood plasma provides insight into the state of the semipermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. Peritumoral cysts accompanying intra-axial brain tumours are the end result of disruption of the BBB and oedema formation. Unlike intra-axial tumours which lie embedded within nervous tissue, extra-axial tumours tend to be separated from nervous tissue by arachnoid and pia mater. High concentrations of proteins were measured in the cyst fluid, approaching blood plasma levels, suggesting a local barrier disruption, and passage across the arachnoid, pia mater and cortical/medullary layer into the CNS parenchyma, leaving the protein concentrations of CSF practically unchanged. We confirmed that very high concentrations of protein are to be found in tumour cysts, plasma proteins forming almost 90% of the total protein in the cyst. We review current hypotheses on the pathogenesis of cysts accompanying neoplasms, particularly meningiomas and schwannomas, and conclude that the majority of proteins in cyst fluid in extra-axial, intradural meningiomas and schwannomas are plasma proteins. This provides a strong argument for pathogenesis of extra-axial intradural tumour cysts in favour of leakage of plasma proteins out of the tumour vessels into the nervous tissue. PMID:9987761

  5. Signals for Extra Dimensions at CLIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2001-08-28

    A brief overview is presented of the signatures for several different models with extra dimensions at CLIC, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider with a center of mass energy of 3-5 TeV and an integrated luminosity of order 1 ab{sup -1}. In all cases the search reach for the resulting new physic signatures is found to be in the range of {approx} 15-80 TeV.

  6. Kinks, extra dimensions, and gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Gregory, Ruth

    2011-03-01

    We investigate in detail the gravitational wave signal from kinks on cosmic (super)strings, including the kinematical effects from the internal extra dimensions. We find that the signal is suppressed, however, the effect is less significant that that for cusps. Combined with the greater incidence of kinks on (super)strings, it is likely that the kink signal offers the better chance for detection of cosmic (super)strings.

  7. Extra Large Temporal Tunnel Cataract Extraction [ETCE

    PubMed Central

    U., Vivekanand

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the outcomes of extra large temporal sclero-corneal tunnel incision Cataract Surgery. Materials and Methods: This consecutive case series of eyes undergoing temporal tunnel cataract extraction with tunnel length of 8 to 10 mm was identified retrospectively. Surgical procedure details, follow up, complications, visual and astigmatic outcomes at 6wks were recorded and analysed. Results: Ninety six eyes with extra large tunnel incision were identified for analysis from a dataset of 670 manual small incision cataract surgery cases. 58% eyes had NO5 or denser cataracts. Intraoperative complications included, tunnel related problems (1 eye, 1.04%), bleeding into Anterior Chamber (10 eyes, 10.4%), Posterior Capsular Rent (2 eyes, 2.1%). Early postoperative complications included striate keratopathy (7 eyes, 7.3%). The mean Best Corrected Visual Acuity was 6/7.5 (0.1 logMAR) and 98% cases had Best Corrected Visual Acuity of 6/12 (0.3 logMAR) or better at 6wk. The aggregate Surgically Induced Astigmatism was 0.32D at 850. Conclusion: Extra Large Tunnel of length 8 to 10 mm can be self sealing with low SIA. The complication rates and visual outcomes of ETCE are comparable to those of conventional MSICS. This method can be valuable in complicated cases and during learning period. PMID:25386505

  8. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  9. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  10. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  11. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  12. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  13. 46 CFR Sec. 8 - Extra work and changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Extra work and changes. Sec. 8 Section 8 Shipping... Sec. 8 Extra work and changes. (a) At any time after the award of an original job order and during the time the work thereunder is being performed, additional or extra work or changes in the work covered...

  14. 46 CFR Sec. 8 - Extra work and changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Extra work and changes. Sec. 8 Section 8 Shipping... Sec. 8 Extra work and changes. (a) At any time after the award of an original job order and during the time the work thereunder is being performed, additional or extra work or changes in the work covered...

  15. Utility terrestrial biodiversity issues

    SciTech Connect

    Breece, G.A.; Ward, B.J.

    1996-11-01

    Results from a survey of power utility biologists indicate that terrestrial biodiversity is considered a major issued by only a few utilities; however, a majority believe it may be a future issue. Over half of the respondents indicated that their company is involved in some management for biodiversity, and nearly all feel that it should be a goal for resource management. Only a few utilities are funding biodiversity research, but a majority felt more research was needed. Generally, larger utilities with extensive land holdings had greater opportunities and resources for biodiversity management. Biodiversity will most likely be a concern with transmission rights-of-way construction and maintenance, endangered species issues and general land resource management, including mining reclamation and hydro relicensing commitments. Over half of the companies surveyed have established voluntary partnerships with management groups, and biodiversity is a goal in nearly all the joint projects. Endangered species management and protection, prevention of forest fragmentation, wetland protection, and habitat creation and protection are the most common partnerships involving utility companies. Common management practices and unique approaches are presented, along with details of the survey. 4 refs.

  16. Space or terrestrial energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulet, L.

    Consideration is given to the possibility of generating sufficient energy at acceptable costs on earth to offset the need to build solar power satellite systems (SPS). Electricity usage, one of the basic driving forces of developed nations, grows with the population. Currently comprising 33 pct of the total world energy used, electricity is projected to grow to a 50-55 pct share in the 21st century. Future terrestrial electrical energy sources include carbon-based fuels, nuclear (fusion or fission), and the renewable solar technologies. Carbon-based fuel supplies can last until 2030 AD, about the same as fission plants with recycled fuel. Breeder reactors would stretch the nuclear fuels to the year 3000. Solar technologies offer more immediate solutions than fusion reactors and can produce 50 pct of the power available from the construction of the maximum number of nuclear power plants. The addition of SPS would further augment the total. Combinations of all the technologies are recommended, with local research for the most appropriate technology for each nation.

  17. Planetary habitability: lessons learned from terrestrial analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Louisa J.; Dartnell, Lewis R.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial analogue studies underpin almost all planetary missions and their use is essential in the exploration of our Solar system and in assessing the habitability of other worlds. Their value relies on the similarity of the analogue to its target, either in terms of their mineralogical or geochemical context, or current physical or chemical environmental conditions. Such analogue sites offer critical ground-truthing for astrobiological studies on the habitability of different environmental parameter sets, the biological mechanisms for survival in extreme environments and the preservation potential and detectability of biosignatures. The 33 analogue sites discussed in this review have been selected on the basis of their congruence to particular extraterrestrial locations. Terrestrial field sites that have been used most often in the literature, as well as some lesser known ones which require greater study, are incorporated to inform on the astrobiological potential of Venus, Mars, Europa, Enceladus and Titan. For example, the possibility of an aerial habitable zone on Venus has been hypothesized based on studies of life at high-altitudes in the terrestrial atmosphere. We also demonstrate why many different terrestrial analogue sites are required to satisfactorily assess the habitability of the changing environmental conditions throughout Martian history, and recommend particular sites for different epochs or potential niches. Finally, habitable zones within the aqueous environments of the icy moons of Europa and Enceladus and potentially in the hydrocarbon lakes of Titan are discussed and suitable analogue sites proposed. It is clear from this review that a number of terrestrial analogue sites can be applied to multiple planetary bodies, thereby increasing their value for astrobiological exploration. For each analogue site considered here, we summarize the pertinent physiochemical environmental features they offer and critically assess the fidelity with which

  18. Radiocarbon dating of terrestrial carbonates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial carbonates encompass a wide range of materials that potentially could be used for radiocarbon (14C) dating. Biogenic carbonates, including shells and tests of terrestrial and aquatic gastropods, bivalves, ostracodes, and foraminifera, are preserved in a variety of late Quaternary deposits and may be suitable for 14C dating. Primary calcareous deposits (marls, tufa, speleothems) and secondary carbonates (rhizoliths, fracture fill, soil carbonate) may also be targeted for dating when conditions are favorable. This chapter discusses issues that are commonly encountered in 14C dating of terrestrial carbonates, including isotopic disequilibrium and open-system behavior, as well as methods used to determine the reliability of ages derived from these materials. Recent methodological advancements that may improve the accuracy and precision of 14C ages of terrestrial carbonates are also highlighted.

  19. USING TERRESTRIAL PLANTS IN BIOMONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Terrestrial plants have been used as monitors of environmental pollutants since at least the beginning of this century & have recently received attention in response to the need for ecological assessments at hazardous waste sites & monitoring pesticide damage to nontarget plants....

  20. Contaminant Exposure in Terrestrial Vertebrates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manuscript is a critical review of the state of the science for quantifying exposures of terrestrial wildlife species to chemical contamination. It describes the unique aspects of birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians and threatened and endangered species. Fate and transport of ...

  1. Extra relativistic degrees of freedom without extra particles using Planck data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastache, Jorge; de la Macorra, Axel

    2013-08-01

    A recent number of analyses of cosmological data have shown indications for the presence of extra radiation beyond the standard model at the equality and nucleosynthesis epochs, which has been usually interpreted as an effective number of neutrinos, Neff>3.046. In this work we establish the theoretical basis for a particle physics-motivated model (bound dark matter, BDM) which explains the need for extra radiation. The BDM model describes dark matter particles which are relativistic at a scale below aac due to nonperturbative methods (as protons and neutrons do) and this process is described by a time-dependent equation of state, ωBDM(a). Owing to this behavior the amount of extra radiation changes as a function of the scale factor, and this implies that the extra relativistic degrees of freedom Nex may also vary as a function of the scale factor. This is favored by data on the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) epochs. We compute the range of values of the BDM model parameters, xc=acvc, that explain the values obtained for the He4 at BBN and Neff at equality. Combining different analyses, we compute the values xc=4.13((+3.65)/(-4.13))×10-5 and vc=0.37-0.17+0.18. We conclude that we can account for the apparent extra neutrino degrees of freedom Nex using a phase transition in the dark matter with a time-dependent equation of state without introducing extra relativistic particles.

  2. Large Extra Dimension and Dark Matter Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Bo; Starkman, Glenn D.; Silk, Joseph

    2008-01-03

    If our space has the large extra dimensions as proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali (ADD), then gravity would start to deviate from Newtonian gravity and be greatly enhanced in sub-millimeter scales. Here we show that in the ADD scenario, gravity could play an important role (compared to the weak interaction) in the interactions between dark matter particles and the electron. We find that for typical WIMP dark matter, such dark matter-electron 'gravitational' scattering cross section may be much larger than the dark matter-nucleon cross section constrained by current dark matter experiments.

  3. Direct imaging of extra-solar planets

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; Max, V.E.; Brase, J.M.; Caffano, C.J.; Gavel, D.T.; Macintosh, B.A.

    1997-03-01

    Direct imaging of extra-solar planets may be possible with the new generation of large ground-based telescopes equipped with state- of- the-art adaptive optics (AO) systems to compensate for the blurring effect of the Earth`s atmosphere. The first of these systems is scheduled to begin operation in 1998 on the 10 in Keck II telescope. In this paper, general formulas for high-contrast imaging with AO systems are presented and used to calculate the sensitivity of the Keck AO system. The results of these calculations show that the Keck AO system should achieve the sensitivity necessary to detect giant planets around several nearby bright stars.

  4. Laryngeal Leishmaniasis with Extra-pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Swati; Khatiwada, Saurav; Sehrawat, Priyanka; Nischal, Neeraj; Jorwal, Pankaj; Soneja, Manish; Sharma, M C; Sharma, S K; Verma, Pankaj; Singh, Anup

    2015-09-01

    Clinical presentations of Leishmania infection include visceral (most common form), cutaneous, mucocutaneous, mucosal and post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis. Mucosal form of leishmaniasis mostly involves oral and nasal mucosa. Rarely, laryngeal and pharyngeal mucosa may also be involved. Its concomitant presence with tuberculosis (TB), a disease rampant in India, is uncommon. Here we are reporting a case of isolated laryngeal leishmaniasis associated with extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB), with approach to diagnosis and treatment in a tropical resource-limited setting. PMID:27608871

  5. Large Extra Dimension and Dark Matter Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Bo; Starkman, Glenn D.; Silk, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    If our space has the large extra dimensions as proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali (ADD), then gravity would start to deviate from Newtonian gravity and be greatly enhanced in sub-millimeter scales. Here we show that in the ADD scenario, gravity could play an important role (compared to the weak interaction) in the interactions between dark matter particles and the electron. We find that for typical WIMP dark matter, such dark matter-electron ``gravitational'' scattering cross section may be much larger than the dark matter-nucleon cross section constrained by current dark matter experiments.

  6. Unraveling the chemical space of terrestrial and meteoritic organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Harir, Mourad; Hertkorn, Norbert; Kanawati, Basem; Ruf, Alexander; Quirico, Eric; Bonal, Lydie; Beck, Pierre; Gabelica, Zelimir

    2015-04-01

    In terrestrial environments natural organic matter (NOM) occurs in soils, freshwater and marine environments, in the atmosphere and represents an exceedingly complex mixture of organic compounds that collectively exhibits a nearly continuous range of properties (size-reactivity continuum). In these materials, the "classical" biogeosignatures of the (biogenic and geogenic) precursor molecules, like lipids, lignins, proteins and natural products have been attenuated, often beyond recognition, during a succession of biotic and abiotic (e.g. photo- and redox chemistry) reactions. Because of this loss of biochemical signature, these materials can be designated non-repetitive complex systems. The access to extra-terrestrial organic matter is given i.e. in the analysis of meteoritic materials. Numerous descriptions of organic molecules present in organic chondrites have improved our understanding of the early interstellar chemistry that operated at or just before the birth of our solar system. However, many molecular analyses are so far targeted toward selected classes of compounds with a particular emphasis on biologically active components in the context of prebiotic chemistry. Here we demonstrate that a non-targeted ultrahigh-resolution molecular analysis of the solvent-accessible organic fraction of meteorite extracted under mild conditions allows one to extend its indigenous chemical diversity to tens of thousands of different molecular compositions and likely millions of diverse structures. The description of the molecular complexity provides hints on heteroatoms chronological assembly, shock and thermal events and revealed recently new classes of thousands of novel organic, organometallic compounds uniquely found in extra-terrestrial materials and never described in terrestrial systems. This high polymolecularity suggests that the extraterrestrial chemodiversity is high compared to terrestrial relevant biological and biogeochemical-driven chemical space. (ultra

  7. The EXTraS project: Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Andrea; EXTraS Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    EXTraS (EU-FP7 framework) is the first systematic search for (and characterization of) all variable soft X-ray sources at all time scales in the whole archive of observations collected by the EPIC instrument on-board XMM-Newton since its launch in 1999, looking for transients, aperiodic, periodic and long-term variability. The project includes the phenomenological classification of all detected variable sources, extending and improving the 3XMM catalalogue. All results will be released in a public archive, together with new software tools.

  8. Practicality of Using Oxygen Atom Emissions to Evaluate the Habitability of Extra-Solar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanger, T. G.

    2005-12-01

    It has previously been proposed [Akasofu, 1999] that observation of the O(1S - 1D) green line from the atmospheres of extra-solar planets might be a marker for habitability. Guidance on this question is available within our own solar system. The green line is a dominant feature in the visible terrestrial nightglow, and the ultimate origin of its mesospheric emission is the three-body recombination of oxygen atoms. Until recently, it was believed that the green line was not a feature of the nightglows of the CO2 planets, Venus and Mars. It is now known that Venus at times shows green line emission with an intensity equal to terrestrial values [Slanger et al., 2001]. Furthermore, the intensity is quite variable, as is true for the much stronger O2( a-X) 1.27 μ emission. Recent observations of the Mars nightglow [Bertaux et al., 2005] give ambiguous results in the region of the O(1S-3P) line at 297.2 nm, but the same line in the dayglow is very strong, as evidenced in earlier Mariner results [Barth et al., 1971], and from the recent Mars Express data [F. Leblanc, private communication]. The O(1D-3P) 630 nm red line is a feature associated with Io, where dissociation of SO2 is a presumed source [Scherb et al., 1998]. Thus, observation of the oxygen green/red lines in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets provides insufficient information to reach conclusions about a habitable environment. Such detection would only indicate that there are oxygen-containing molecules present. Determination of an O2 column depth, by Fraunhofer A-band absorption, would be much more conclusive. Akasofu, S.-I., EOS, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union, 80, 397, 1999. Barth, C.A., C.W. Hord, J.B. Pearce, K.K. Kelly, G.P. Anderson, and A.I. Stewart, Mariner 6 and 7 Ultraviolet Spectrometer Experiment: Upper Atmosphere Data, Journal of Geophysical Research, 76, 2213-2227, 1971. Bertaux, J.-L., F. Leblanc, S. Perrier, E. Quemerais, O. Korablev, E. Dimarellis, A. Reberac, F. Forget, P

  9. Robust frameless stereotactic localization in extra-cranial radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Bassanini, Fabio; Tagaste, Barbara; Garibaldi, Cristina; Orecchia, Roberto; Pedotti, Antonio

    2006-04-15

    In the field of extra-cranial radiotherapy, several inaccuracies can make the application of frameless stereotactic localization techniques error-prone. When optical tracking systems based on surface fiducials are used, inter- and intra-fractional uncertainties in marker three-dimensional (3D) detection may lead to inexact tumor position estimation, resulting in erroneous patient setup. This is due to the fact that external fiducials misdetection results in deformation effects that are poorly handled in a rigid-body approach. In this work, the performance of two frameless stereotactic localization algorithms for 3D tumor position reconstruction in extra-cranial radiotherapy has been specifically tested. Two strategies, unweighted versus weighted, for stereotactic tumor localization were examined by exploiting data coming from 46 patients treated for extra-cranial lesions. Measured isocenter displacements and rotations were combined to define isocentric procedures, featuring 6 degrees of freedom, for correcting patient alignment (isocentric positioning correction). The sensitivity of the algorithms to uncertainties in the 3D localization of fiducials was investigated by means of 184 numerical simulations. The performance of the implemented isocentric positioning correction was compared to conventional point-based registration. The isocentric positioning correction algorithm was tested on a clinical dataset of inter-fractional and intra-fractional setup errors, which was collected by means of an optical tracker on the same group of patients. The weighted strategy exhibited a lower sensitivity to fiducial localization errors in simulated misalignments than those of the unweighted strategy. Isocenter 3D displacements provided by the weighted strategy were consistently smaller than those featured by the unweighted strategy. The peak decrease in median and quartile values of isocenter 3D displacements were 1.4 and 2.7 mm, respectively. Concerning clinical data, the

  10. Effect of extra dietary lysine in Ascaridia galli-infected grower layers.

    PubMed

    Daş, Gürbüz; Kaufmann, Falko; Abel, Hansjörg; Gauly, Matthias

    2010-06-24

    The hypothesis examined in this study was that extra dietary lysine (Lys) above the recommended standard exerts beneficial effects on the defence reactions, growth performance and nutrient utilization in Ascaridia galli-infected chickens. Therefore, 1-day-old female Lohmann Selected Leghorn chickens were at first fed standard Lys diet (8.5 g Lys/kg DM). At 4 weeks of age, the birds were allocated to groups 1 and 3, both being continued on standard Lys diet, whereas birds in groups 2 and 4 were switched to extra Lys diet (10.5 g Lys/kg DM). Birds in groups 3 and 4 were additionally infected at this age (4 weeks) with 250 embryonated eggs of A. galli. All the birds were slaughtered 7-week-post-infection (p.i.) at an age of 11 weeks. Infected birds on standard Lys diet consumed more feed and reached a similar level of Lys intake as birds on extra Lys diet 7-week-p.i. Utilization of feed, crude protein, and Lys for body weight (BW) gain was adversely affected in infected birds on standard Lys diet (P<0.001). Extra Lys diet reduced the incidence of infection (P<0.05), but worm counts, worm length, faecal egg counts and female worm fecundity were not different between the infected groups (P>0.05). Extra Lys diet led to higher final BW in uninfected and infected birds (P<0.05). It is concluded that extra Lys above the normal recommended standard supports the defence reactions and compensates the negative effect of infection on growth performance and nutrient utilization in A. galli-infected birds. PMID:20299150

  11. Flavor Structure of Warped Extra Dimension Models

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Perez, Gilad; Soni, Amarjit

    2004-08-10

    We recently showed, in hep-ph/0406101, that warped extra dimensional models with bulk custodial symmetry and few TeV KK masses lead to striking signals at B-factories. In this paper, using a spurion analysis, we systematically study the flavor structure of models that belong to the above class. In particular we find that the profiles of the zero modes, which are similar in all these models, essentially control the underlying flavor structure. This implies that our results are robust and model independent in this class of models. We discuss in detail the origin of the signals in B-physics. We also briefly study other NP signatures that arise in rare K decays (K {yields} {pi}{nu}{nu}), in rare top decays [t {yields} c{gamma}(Z, gluon)] and the possibility of CP asymmetries in D{sup 0} decays to CP eigenstates such as K{sub s}{pi}{sup 0} and others. Finally we demonstrate that with light KK masses, {approx} 3 TeV, the above class of models with anarchic 5D Yukawas has a ''CP problem'' since contributions to the neutron electric dipole moment are roughly 20 times larger than the current experimental bound. Using AdS/CFT correspondence, these extra-dimensional models are dual to a purely 4D strongly coupled conformal Higgs sector thus enhancing their appeal.

  12. The Extra-Zodiacal Explorer (EZE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Benson, S. W.; Fixsen, D. J.; Gardner, J. P.; Kruk, J. W.; Thronson, H. A.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a mission architecture study designed to substantially increase the potential science performance of the NASA SMD Astrophysics Explorer Program for all AO offerors working within the near-UV to far-infrared spectrum. We have demonstrated that augmentation of Falcon 9 Explorer launch services with a Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) stage can deliver a 700 kg science observatory payload to an extra-Zodiacal orbit. This new capability enables up to 10X increased photometric sensitivity and 150X increased observing speed relative to a Sun-Earth L2 or Earth-trailing orbit with no increase in telescope aperture. All enabling SEP stage technologies for this launch service augmentation have reached sufficient readiness (TRL-6) for Explorer Program application in conjunction with the Falcon 9. We demonstrate that enabling Astrophysics Explorers to reach extra-zodiacal orbit will allow this small payload program to rival the science performance of much larger long development time systems; thus, providing a means to realize major science objectives while increasing the SMD Astrophysics portfolio diversity and resiliency to external budget pressure. The SEP technology employed in this study has applicability to SMD Planetary competed missions and aligns with NASA in-space propulsion technology road map objectives and associated flight demonstration planning.

  13. Flavor structure of warped extra dimension models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Perez, Gilad; Soni, Amarjit

    2005-01-01

    We recently showed that warped extra-dimensional models with bulk custodial symmetry and few TeV Kaluza-Klein (KK) masses lead to striking signals at B factories. In this paper, using a spurion analysis, we systematically study the flavor structure of models that belong to the above class. In particular we find that the profiles of the zero modes, which are similar in all these models, essentially control the underlying flavor structure. This implies that our results are robust and model independent in this class of models. We discuss in detail the origin of the signals in B physics. We also briefly study other new physics signatures that arise in rare K decays (K→πνν), in rare top decays [t→cγ(Z,gluon)], and the possibility of CP asymmetries in D0 decays to CP eigenstates such as KSπ0 and others. Finally we demonstrate that with light KK masses, ˜3 TeV, the above class of models with anarchic 5D Yukawas has a “CP problem” since contributions to the neutron electric dipole moment are roughly 20 times larger than the current experimental bound. Using AdS/CFT correspondence, these extra-dimensional models are dual to a purely 4D strongly coupled conformal Higgs sector thus enhancing their appeal.

  14. KK parity in warped extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Falkowski, Adam; Low, Ian; Servant, Géraldine

    2008-04-01

    We construct models with a Kaluza-Klein (KK) parity in a five-dimensional warped geometry, in an attempt to address the little hierarchy problem present in setups with bulk Standard Model fields. The lightest KK particle (LKP) is stable and can play the role of dark matter. We consider the possibilities of gluing two identical slices of AdS5 in either the UV (IR-UV-IR model) or the IR region (UV-IR-UV model) and discuss the model-building issues as well as phenomenological properties in both cases. In particular, we find that the UV-IR-UV model is not gravitationally stable and that additional mechanisms might be required in the IR-UV-IR model to address flavor issues. Collider signals of the warped KK parity are different from either the conventional warped extra dimension without KK parity, in which the new particles are not necessarily pair-produced, or the KK parity in flat universal extra dimensions, where each KK level is nearly degenerate in mass. Dark matter and collider properties of a TeV mass KK Z gauge boson as the LKP are discussed.

  15. A numerical study on collisions of icy bodies using SPH method combined with GRAPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, M.; Genda, H.; Ida, S.

    2009-12-01

    We have worked on the collisions of icy bodies using Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics (SPH) method combined with Gravity PipE (GRAPE) in order to understand the basic behavior of icy bodies during impacts. Collisions of Mars-size rocky bodies have been investigated well, because those collisions are related to the origin of the moon and the formation of the terrestrial planets. On the other hand, collisions of icy bodies have not been studied yet, although these collisions would frequently occur in the solar and extra-solar systems, such as the formation of icy exoplanets. Through our research, we figure out the effect of ice during impact in detail. Our SPH code has two special features. First, GRAvity PipE computer (GRAPE) is used, which calculates the gravitational force of each particle up to 100 times faster than usual computers. Second, SESAME equation of state database is used to build a realistic model, taking into account the effect of phase change. In this research, we focused on differences and similarities between collisions of icy bodies and those of rocky ones, such as a merging criterion. Agnor & Asphaug (2004) have shown that a collision of rocky Mars-size protoplanets leads to an inelastic collision when its relative velocities are smaller than 1.4-1.5v, 1.1-1.2v, 1.1-1.2v when its impact angles are 30, 45, and 60 degrees, respectively. Here, v means escape velocity. The same calculations for icy bodies are performed in our numerical code. They have shown that the merging criterion of icy bodies is the same as that of rocky bodies. In addition to the merging criterion, we also clarify the relationship between impact parameters and the change of solid, liquid/vapor mass ratio due to impacts.

  16. Unveiling long-term variability in XMM-Newton surveys: the EXTraS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, S.; Read, A.; De Luca, A.; EXTraS Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The 3XMM-DR4 catalogue, the XMM-Newton Slew Survey (XSS) and the associated XMM-Newton EPIC data, are extensive resources for exploring high energy, time-domain astrophysics. Amongst these data are potential, hitherto unidentified variable sources, ranging from short duration (~seconds) transients through to objects varying on timescales of years. Variability signatures can be key to understanding the energetics and physical processes in a diverse range of astrophysical settings. The EU/FP7-Cooperation Space framework project, `Exploring the X-ray transient and variable sky' (EXTraS), aims to exploit these XMM-Newton resources to explore, as fully as possible, the range of X-ray variability present and provide the results to the community through a public database. Here we outline one of the project's core aims, i.e. identifying and characterising long-term (days to years) variability. The 3XMM-DR4 catalogue contains ˜67000 sources with multiple detections. 3XMM, in conjunction with the XSS, which has now covered almost 70% of the sky, often with multiple slews, offers excellent scope for identifying new variable objects by tracking their flux between XMM-Newton observations. We discuss the plans for the EXTraS long-term variability catalogue and highlight some examples of the detection of long-term variability in 3XMM-DR4/XSS data.

  17. Workshop on Oxygen in the Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Lunar Metal Grains: Solar, Lunar or Terrestrial Origin? 22) Isotopic Zoning in the Inner Solar System; 23) Redox Conditions on Small Bodies; 24) Determining the Oxygen Fugacity of Lunar Pyroclastic Glasses Using Vanadium Valence - An Update; 25) Mantle Redox Evolution and the Rise of Atmospheric O2; 26) Variation of Kd for Fe-Mg Exchange Between Olivine and Melt for Compositions Ranging from Alkaline Basalt to Rhyolite; 27) Determining the Partial Pressure of Oxygen (PO,) in Solutions on Mars; 28) The Influence of Oxygen Environment on Kinetic Properties of Silicate Rocks and Minerals; 29) Redox Evolution of Magmatic Systems; 30) The Constancy of Upper Mantlefo, Through Time Inferred from V/Sc Ratios in Basalts: Implications for the Rise in Atmospheric 0 2; 31) Nitrogen Solubility in Basaltic Melt. Effects of Oxygen Fugacity, Melt Composition and Gas Speciation; 32) Oxygen Isotope Anomalies in the Atmospheres of Earth and Mars; 33) The Effect of Oxygen Fugacity on Interdiffusion of Iron and Magnesium in Magnesiowiistite 34) The Calibration of the Pyroxene Eu-Oxybarometer for the Martian Meteorites; 35) The Europium Oxybarometer: Power and Pitfalls; 36) Oxygen Fugacity of the Martian Mantle from PigeoniteMelt Partitioning of Samarium, Europium and Gadolinium; 37) Oxidation-Reduction Processes on the Moon: Experimental Verification of Graphite Oxidation in the Apollo 17 Orange Glasses; 38) Oxygen and Core Formation in the Earth; 39) Geologic Record of the Atmospheric Sulfur Chemistry Before the Oxygenation of the Early Earth s Atmosphere; 40) Comparative Planetary Mineralogy: V/(CrCAl) Systematics in Chromite as an Indicator of Relative Oxygen Fugacity; 41) How Well do Sulfur Isotopes Constrain Oxygen Abundance in the Ancient Atmospheres? 42) Experimental Constraints on the Oxygen Isotope (O-18/ O-16) Fractionation in the Ice vapor and Adsorbant vapor Systems of CO2 at Conditions Relevant to the Surface of Mars; 43) Micro-XANES Measurements on Experimental Spinels andhe

  18. Body Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart failure, and kidney disease. Good nutrition and exercise can help in losing weight. Eating extra calories within a well-balanced diet and treating any underlying medical problems can help to add weight.

  19. Body Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... to medicines, thyroid problems, heart failure, and kidney disease. Good nutrition and exercise can help in losing weight. Eating extra calories within a well-balanced diet and treating any underlying medical problems can help to add weight.

  20. Grazers: biocatalysts of terrestrial silica cycling.

    PubMed

    Vandevenne, Floor Ina; Barão, Ana Lúcia; Schoelynck, Jonas; Smis, Adriaan; Ryken, Nick; Van Damme, Stefan; Meire, Patrick; Struyf, Eric

    2013-12-01

    Silica is well known for its role as inducible defence mechanism countering herbivore attack, mainly through precipitation of opaline, biogenic silica (BSi) bodies (phytoliths) in plant epidermal tissues. Even though grazing strongly interacts with other element cycles, its impact on terrestrial silica cycling has never been thoroughly considered. Here, BSi content of ingested grass, hay and faeces of large herbivores was quantified by performing multiple chemical extraction procedures for BSi, allowing the assessment of chemical reactivity. Dissolution experiments with grass and faeces were carried out to measure direct availability of BSi for dissolution. Average BSi and readily soluble silica numbers were higher in faeces as compared with grass or hay, and differences between herbivores could be related to distinct digestive strategies. Reactivity and dissolvability of BSi increases after digestion, mainly due to degradation of organic matrices, resulting in higher silica turnover rates and mobilization potential from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems in non-grazed versus grazed pasture systems (2 versus 20 kg Si ha(-1) y(-1)). Our results suggest a crucial yet currently unexplored role of herbivores in determining silica export from land to ocean, where its availability is linked to eutrophication events and carbon sequestration through C-Si diatom interactions. PMID:24107532

  1. Grazers: biocatalysts of terrestrial silica cycling

    PubMed Central

    Vandevenne, Floor Ina; Barão, Ana Lúcia; Schoelynck, Jonas; Smis, Adriaan; Ryken, Nick; Van Damme, Stefan; Meire, Patrick; Struyf, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Silica is well known for its role as inducible defence mechanism countering herbivore attack, mainly through precipitation of opaline, biogenic silica (BSi) bodies (phytoliths) in plant epidermal tissues. Even though grazing strongly interacts with other element cycles, its impact on terrestrial silica cycling has never been thoroughly considered. Here, BSi content of ingested grass, hay and faeces of large herbivores was quantified by performing multiple chemical extraction procedures for BSi, allowing the assessment of chemical reactivity. Dissolution experiments with grass and faeces were carried out to measure direct availability of BSi for dissolution. Average BSi and readily soluble silica numbers were higher in faeces as compared with grass or hay, and differences between herbivores could be related to distinct digestive strategies. Reactivity and dissolvability of BSi increases after digestion, mainly due to degradation of organic matrices, resulting in higher silica turnover rates and mobilization potential from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems in non-grazed versus grazed pasture systems (2 versus 20 kg Si ha−1 y−1). Our results suggest a crucial yet currently unexplored role of herbivores in determining silica export from land to ocean, where its availability is linked to eutrophication events and carbon sequestration through C–Si diatom interactions. PMID:24107532

  2. Mercury cycling in terrestrial watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, James B.; Bishop, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This chapter discusses mercury cycling in the terrestrial landscape, including inputs from the atmosphere, accumulation in soils and vegetation, outputs in streamflow and volatilization, and effects of land disturbance. Mercury mobility in the terrestrial landscape is strongly controlled by organic matter. About 90% of the atmospheric mercury input is retained in vegetation and organic matter in soils, causing a buildup of legacy mercury. Some mercury is volatilized back to the atmosphere, but most export of mercury from watersheds occurs by streamflow. Stream mercury export is episodic, in association with dissolved and particulate organic carbon, as stormflow and snowmelt flush organic-rich shallow soil horizons. The terrestrial landscape is thus a major source of mercury to downstream aquatic environments, where mercury is methylated and enters the aquatic food web. With ample organic matter and sulfur, methylmercury forms in uplands as well—in wetlands, riparian zones, and other anoxic sites. Watershed features (topography, land cover type, and soil drainage class) are often more important than atmospheric mercury deposition in controlling the amount of stream mercury and methylmercury export. While reductions in atmospheric mercury deposition may rapidly benefit lakes, the terrestrial landscape will respond only over decades, because of the large stock and slow turnover of legacy mercury. We conclude with a discussion of future scenarios and the challenge of managing terrestrial mercury.

  3. Higher in vitro resistance to oxidative stress in extra-pair offspring.

    PubMed

    Losdat, S; Helfenstein, F; Saladin, V; Richner, H

    2011-11-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to act as a universal physiological constraint in life-history evolution of animals. This should be of interest for extra-pair paternity behaviour, and we tested here the prediction that offspring arising from extra-pair matings of female great tits show higher resistance to oxidative stress than within-pair offspring. Resistance to oxidative stress, measured as the whole blood resistance to a controlled free-radical attack, was significantly higher for extra-pair offspring as predicted although these were not heavier or in better body condition than within-pair offspring. Since resistance to oxidative stress has been suggested to enhance survival and reproductive rates, extra-pair offspring with superior resistance to oxidative stress, be it through maternal effects or paternal inheritance, may achieve higher fitness and thus provide significant indirect fitness benefits to their mothers. In addition, because oxidative stress affects colour signals and sperm traits, females may also gain fitness benefits by producing sons that are more attractive (sexy-sons hypothesis) and have sperm of superior quality (sexy-sperm hypothesis). Heritability of resistance to oxidative stress as well as maternal effects may both act as proximate mechanisms for the observed result. Disentangling these two mechanisms would require an experimental approach. Future long-term studies should also aim at experimentally testing whether higher resistance to oxidative stress of EP nestlings indeed translates into fitness benefits to females. PMID:21899636

  4. Effects of Type I Migration on Terrestrial Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Douglas; Duncan, Martin; Levison, Harold F.

    2005-12-01

    Planetary embryos embedded in a gas disk suffer a decay in semimajor axis-type I migration-due to the asymmetric torques produced by the interior and exterior wakes raised by the body. This presents a challenge for standard oligarchic approaches to forming the terrestrial planets, as the timescale to grow the progenitor objects near 1 AU is longer than that for them to decay into the Sun. In this paper we investigate the middle and late stages of oligarchic growth using both semianalytic methods (based on Thommes and coworkers) and N-body integrations and vary gas properties such as dissipation timescale in different models of the protoplanetary disk. We conclude that even for near-nominal migration efficiencies and gas dissipation timescales of ~1 Myr, it is possible to maintain sufficient mass in the terrestrial region to form Earth and Venus if the disk mass is enhanced by factors of ~2-4 over the minimum-mass model. The resulting configurations differ in several ways from the initial conditions used in previous simulations of the final stages of terrestrial accretion, chiefly in (1) larger interembryo spacings, (2) larger embryo masses, and (3) up to ~0.4 M⊕ of material left in the form of planetesimals when the gas vanishes. The systems we produce are reasonably stable for ~100 Myr and therefore require an external source to stir up the embryos sufficiently to produce final systems resembling the terrestrial planets.

  5. Extra-glycaemic properties of empagliflozin.

    PubMed

    Solini, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a complex and multifaceted disease requiring an individualized approach. A special attention, in treating the patients, should be devoted to the presence of comorbidities like overweight or obesity and arterial hypertension. Among the available anti-hyperglycaemic agents, several are associated with side effects like hypoglycaemia and weight gain. An increasing interest is reported in sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors, a relatively novel class of glucose-lowering drugs that act independently of insulin, provide benefits beyond glucose-lowering actions and show a better tolerability compared with traditional medications for type 2 diabetes. This review tries to offer a balanced view on the main extra-glycaemic effects of empagliflozin, also mentioning clinical data obtained with other sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors; the role of the proximal tubule in the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy and the potential nehroprotection exerted by this compound are also briefly discussed. PMID:25994513

  6. Lepton flavor violation in extra dimension models

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, W.-F.; Ng, John N.

    2005-03-01

    Models involving large extra spatial dimension(s) have interesting predictions on lepton flavor violating processes. We consider some five-dimensional (5D) models which are related to neutrino mass generation or address the fermion masses hierarchy problem. We study the signatures in low energy experiments that can discriminate the different models. The focus is on muon-electron conversion in nuclei {mu}{yields}e{gamma} and {mu}{yields}3e processes and their {tau} counterparts. Their links with the active neutrino mass matrix are investigated. We show that in the models we discussed the branching ratio of {mu}{yields}e{gamma} like rare process is much smaller than the ones of {mu}{yields}3e like processes. This is in sharp contrast to most of the traditional wisdom based on four-dimensional (4D) gauge models. Moreover, some rare tau decays are more promising than the rare muon decays.

  7. Dark Energy as Extra-Dimensional Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, C. P.

    The nature of dark energy, which presently dominates the universal energy budget, remains a complete mystery. Models in which it is currently evolving tend to be overly sensitive to initial conditions, and necessarily involve a very light degree of freedom which is very difficult to obtain from realistic microscopic physics. This essay describes recent progress in understanding how the dark energy can arise as a residue of extra-dimensional gravitation, leading to new insights into how dark-energy cosmology might work. This picture produces dark energy dynamics within which couplings slowly run (or: 'walk') over cosmological times. It also has several unusual experimental predictions, including measurable modifications to Newton's Law on sub-millimeter scales and dramatic implications at next-generation collider experiments.

  8. Magnetic field generation in the cores of terrestrial bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runcorn, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    Efforts to find some scaling law for the dipole moments of planets seem illusory for, although dynamo theory is still in a rudimentary state, once the critical magnetic Reynolds Number is exceeded it appears that the field strength is determined by the energy source, it it is permissible to treat the core as a heat engine. For this reason the lunar magnetic field is of special significance as the paleomagnetic evidence strongly suggests that the surface field was about 1 G 3.9 by diminishing exponentially to about .02 G 3.2 by ago and completely disappearing some time later.

  9. Terrestrial ecosystems and climatic change

    SciTech Connect

    Emanuel, W.R. ); Schimel, D.S. . Natural Resources Ecology Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    The structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems depend on climate, and in turn, ecosystems influence atmospheric composition and climate. A comprehensive, global model of terrestrial ecosystem dynamics is needed. A hierarchical approach appears advisable given currently available concepts, data, and formalisms. The organization of models can be based on the temporal scales involved. A rapidly responding model describes the processes associated with photosynthesis, including carbon, moisture, and heat exchange with the atmosphere. An intermediate model handles subannual variations that are closely associated with allocation and seasonal changes in productivity and decomposition. A slow response model describes plant growth and succession with associated element cycling over decades and centuries. These three levels of terrestrial models are linked through common specifications of environmental conditions and constrain each other. 58 refs.

  10. Utilization of the terrestrial cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, Hiroshi; Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Furukawa, Jun; Kimura, Shunta; Yokoshima, Mika; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Takenaka, Hiroyuki

    The terrestrial, N _{2}-fixing cyanobacterium, Nostoc commune has expected to utilize for agriculture, food and terraforming cause of its extracellular polysaccharide, desiccation tolerance and nitrogen fixation. Previously, the first author indicated that desiccation related genes were analyzed and the suggested that the genes were related to nitrogen fixation and metabolisms. In this report, we suggest possibility of agriculture, using the cyanobacterium. Further, we also found radioactive compounds accumulated N. commune (cyanobacterium) in Fukushima, Japan after nuclear accident. Thus, it is investigated to decontaminate radioactive compounds from the surface soil by the cyanobacterium and showed to accumulate radioactive compounds using the cyanobacterium. We will discuss utilization of terrestrial cyanobacteria under closed environment. Keyword: Desiccation, terrestrial cyanobacteria, bioremediation, agriculture

  11. Chemical impurity produces extra compound eyes and heads in crickets

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, B.T.

    1981-04-03

    A chemical impurity isolated from commercially purchased acridine causes cricket embryos to develop extra compound eyes, branched antennae, extra antennae, and extra heads. Purified acridine does not produce similar duplications of cricket heads or head structures nor do the substituted acridines proflavine, acriflavine, or acridine orange. A dose-response relation exists such that the number and severity of abnormalities increase with increasing concentration of the teratogen.

  12. Solar system constraints on a Rindler-type extra-acceleration from modified gravity at large distances

    SciTech Connect

    Iorio, L.

    2011-05-01

    We analytically work out the orbital effects caused by a Rindler-type extra-acceleration A{sub Rin} which naturally arises in some recent models of modified gravity at large distances. In particular, we focus on the perturbations induced by it on the two-body range ρ and range-rate ρ-dot which are commonly used in satellite and planetary investigations as primary observable quantities. The constraints obtained for A{sub Rin} by comparing our calculations with the currently available range and range-rate residuals for some of the major bodies of the solar system, obtained without explicitly modeling A{sub Rin}, are 1–2 × 10{sup −13} m s{sup −2} (Mercury and Venus), 1 × 10{sup −14} m s{sup −2} (Saturn), 1 × 10{sup −15} m s{sup −2} (Mars), while for a terrestrial Rindler acceleration we have an upper bound of 5 × 10{sup −16} m s{sup −2} (Moon). The constraints inferred from the planets' range and range-rate residuals are confirmed also by the latest empirical determinations of the corrections Δdot varpi to the usual Newtonian/Einsteinian secular precessions of the planetary longitudes of perihelia varpi: moreover, the Earth yields A{sub Rin} ≤ 7 × 10{sup −16} m s{sup −2}. Another approach which could be followed consists of taking into account A{sub Rin} in re-processing all the available data sets with accordingly modified dynamical models, and estimating a dedicated solve-for parameter explicitly accounting for it. Anyway, such a method is time-consuming. A preliminary analysis likely performed in such a way by a different author yields A ≤ 8 × 10{sup −14} m s{sup −2} at Mars' distance and A ≤ 1 × 10{sup −14} m s{sup −2} at Saturn's distance. The method adopted here can be easily and straightforwardly extended to other long-range modified models of gravity as well.

  13. Priapism caused by 'Tribulus terrestris'.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, M; De Thomasis, R; Tenaglia, R L

    2016-01-01

    A 36-year-old Caucasian man was diagnosed with a 72-h-lasting priapism that occurred after the assumption of a Herbal supplement based on Tribulus terrestris, which is becoming increasingly popular for the treatment of sexual dysfunction. The patient underwent a cavernoglandular shunt (Ebbehoj shunt) in order to obtain complete detumescence, from which derived negative post-episode outcomes on sexual function. All patients consuming non-FDA-approved alternative supplements such as Tribulus terrestris should be warned about the possible serious side effects. PMID:26631925

  14. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Chambers, Don P.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater is a vital resource and also a dynamic component of the water cycle. Unconfined aquifer storage is less responsive to short term weather conditions than the near surface terrestrial water storage (TWS) components (soil moisture, surface water, and snow). However, save for the permanently frozen regions, it typically exhibits a larger range of variability over multi-annual periods than the other components. Groundwater is poorly monitored at the global scale, but terrestrial water storage (TWS) change data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission are a reasonable proxy for unconfined groundwater at climatic scales.

  15. Body Hair

    MedlinePlus

    ... girlshealth.gov/ Home Body Puberty Body hair Body hair Even before you get your first period , you ... removing pubic hair Ways to get rid of hair top Removing body hair can cause skin irritation, ...

  16. Science with the EXTraS Project: Exploring the X-Ray Transient and Variable Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, A.; Salvaterra, R.; Tiengo, A.; D'Agostino, D.; Watson, M. G.; Haberl, F.; Wilms, J.

    The EXTraS project ("Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky") will characterise the temporal behaviour of the largest ever sample of objects in the soft X-ray range (0.1-12 keV) with a complex, systematic and consistent analysis of all data collected by the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) instrument onboard the ESA XMM-Newton X-ray observatory since its launch. We will search for, and characterize variability (both periodic and aperiodic) in hundreds of thousands of sources spanning more than nine orders of magnitude in time scale and six orders of magnitude in flux. We will also search for fast transients, missed by standard image analysis. Our analysis will be completed by multiwavelength characterization of new discoveries and phenomenological classification of variable sources. All results and products will be made available to the community in a public archive, serving as a reference for a broad range of astrophysical investigations.

  17. Impact ejecta emplacement on terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, Gordon R.; Tornabene, Livio L.; Grieve, Richard A. F.

    2011-10-01

    Impact cratering is one of the most fundamental processes responsible for shaping the surfaces of solid planetary bodies. One of the principal characteristics of impact events is the formation and emplacement of ejecta deposits, an understanding of which is critical for planetary exploration. Current models of ejecta emplacement, however, do not account for several important observations of ejecta deposits on the terrestrial planets, in particular, the presence of more than one layer of ejecta. Furthermore, there is also no universal model for the origin and emplacement of ejecta on different planetary bodies. We present a unifying working hypothesis for the origin and emplacement of ejecta on the terrestrial planets, in which the ejecta are emplaced in a multi-stage process. The generation of the continuous ejecta blanket occurs during the excavation stage of cratering, via the conventional ballistic sedimentation and radial flow model. This is followed by the emplacement of more melt-rich, ground-hugging flows - the "surface melt flow" phase - during the terminal stages of crater excavation and the modification stage of crater formation. Minor fallback occurs during the final stages of crater formation. Several factors will affect the final morphology and character of ejecta deposits. The volatile content and cohesiveness of the uppermost target rocks will significantly affect the runout distance of the ballistically emplaced continuous ejecta blanket, with impact angle also influencing the overall geometry of the deposits (e.g., the production of the characteristic butterfly pattern seen in very oblique impacts). Ejecta deposited during the surface melt flow stage is influenced by several factors, most importantly planetary gravity, surface temperature, and the physical properties of the target rocks. Topography and angle of impact play important roles in determining the final distribution of surface melt flow ejecta deposits with respect to the source crater

  18. Gamma ray lines from a universal extra dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, G.; Jackson, C. B.; Shaughnessy, G.; Tait, T. M.P.; Vallinotto, A.

    2012-03-01

    Indirect Dark Matter searches are based on the observation of secondary particles produced by the annihilation or decay of Dark Matter. Among them, gamma-rays are perhaps the most promising messengers, as they do not suffer deflection or absorption on Galactic scales, so their observation would directly reveal the position and the energy spectrum of the emitting source. Here, we study the detailed gamma-ray energy spectrum of Kaluza--Klein Dark Matter in a theory with 5 Universal Extra Dimensions. We focus in particular on the two body annihilation of Dark Matter particles into a photon and another particle, which produces monochromatic photons, resulting in a line in the energy spectrum of gamma rays. Previous calculations in the context of the five dimensional UED model have computed the line signal from annihilations into \\gamma \\gamma, but we extend these results to include \\gamma Z and \\gamma H final states. We find that these spectral lines are subdominant compared to the predicted \\gamma \\gamma signal, but they would be important as follow-up signals in the event of the observation of the \\gamma \\gamma line, in order to distinguish the 5d UED model from other theoretical scenarios.

  19. Wolbachia in Neotropical terrestrial isopods.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Bianca L; Bouchon, Didier; Almerão, Maurício P; Araujo, Paula B

    2015-04-01

    Despite Wolbachia being widespread among terrestrial isopods, studies on this symbiotic relationship are still incipient in the Neotropical region. The aims of the present study were to investigate the presence and prevalence of Wolbachia in natural populations of terrestrial isopod species in South America, and to analyze the diversity and phylogenetic relationships of Wolbachia strains. A total of 1172 individuals representing 11 families and 35 species were analyzed. We observed distinct evolutionary scenarios according to the geographical origins of the species: strains harbored by most of the introduced species belong to the Oniclade in supergroup B and are identical to those found in their original ecozone (i.e. Palearctic). On the other hand, the strains found in native Neotropical terrestrial isopods showed low prevalence, high diversity and none of them belonged to the Oniclade, although most belonged to supergroup B. The dynamics of infection in Neotropical species seems to be the result of several events of loss and acquisition of the bacteria, which refutes the hypothesis of an ancestral acquisition of Wolbachia in Oniscidea. The presence of strains from supergroups A and F was also detected for the first time in terrestrial isopods, revealing a Wolbachia diversity previously unknown for this group of host. PMID:25764472

  20. Solar Variability and Terrestrial Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mörner, N.-A.

    The thermal conditions on Planet Earth are primarily the function of the energy in- put from the Sun. The variations in climate on Planet Earth is, however, primarily the function of the redistribution and reorganisation of the internal terrestrial heat balance. Solar variability may affect terrestrial climate (1) by direct changes in irradiance, a fac- tor, however, which is known to be very small, (2) by the solar wind interaction with the geomagnetic field increasing and decreasing the shielding capacity to infalling cosmic-ray, which is known to affect the formation of clouds thereby also affecting global terrestrial climat, and (3) by the solar wind interaction with the geomagnetic field leading to changes in the EarthSs rate of rotation which affect ocean and atmo- sphere circulation thereby also affecting global climate (and sea level). INTAS Project 97-301008 concerns the interaction between geomagnetic field changes and global climatic changes. No doubts, we see important links between externally and internally driven changes in the EarthSs geomagnetic field and changes in terrestrial climate.

  1. Error analysis of penetrator impacts on bodies without atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    Penetrators are missile shaped objects designed to implant electronic instrumentation in various of surface materials with a nominal impact speed around 150 m/sec. An interest in the application of this concept to in situ subsurface studies of extra terrestrial bodies and planetary satellites exists. Since many of these objects do not have atmospheres, the feasibility of successfully guiding penetrators to the required near-zero angle-of-attack impact conditions in the absence of an atmosphere was analyzed. Two potential targets were included, i.e., the moon and Mercury and several different penetrator deployment modes were involved. Impact errors arising from open-loop and closed-loop deployment control systems were given particular attention. Successful penetrator implacement requires: (1) that the impact speed be controlled, nominally to 150 m/sec, (2) that the angle of attack be in range 0 deg - 11 deg at impact, and (3) that the impact flight path angle be with 15 deg of vertical.

  2. Spatial patterns of extra-pair paternity: beyond paternity gains and losses.

    PubMed

    Schlicht, Lotte; Valcu, Mihai; Kempenaers, Bart

    2015-03-01

    Most studies on extra-pair paternity (EPP) focus either on a specific male's extra-pair gains or his extra-pair losses. For an individual bird however, mate choice or mate availability may underlie strong spatial restrictions. Disregarding this spatial aspect may underestimate or mask effects of parameters influencing observed EPP patterns. Here, we propose a spatially explicit model for investigating the probability of having extra-pair offspring (EPO) within local networks of breeding pairs. The data set includes all realized and unrealized potential extra-pair matings. This method is biologically meaningful because it allows (a) considering both members of an extra-pair mating and their social mates, and (b) direct modelling of the spatial context in which extra-pair behaviour occurs. The method has the advantage that it can provide inference about the relative contribution of spatial and non-spatial parameters, and about the relative importance of male and female neighbourhoods. We apply this method to parentage data from 1025 broods collected over 12 breeding seasons in two independent study populations of blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus). We investigate a set of predictions based on the EPP literature, namely that EPP depends on male age and body size, breeding density and breeding synchrony. In all analyses, we control for breeding distance, a parameter that is expected to influence EPP even under random mating. The results show that older and larger males were more likely to sire EPO, but both effects decreased with increasing breeding distance. Local breeding density but not synchrony predicted whether a particular male-female combination had EPO, at least in one of the study areas. Apart from breeding distance, male age had the strongest effect on EPP, followed by a measure of breeding density. The method thus allows a comprehensive assessment of the relative importance of different types of spatial and non-spatial parameters to explain variation in the

  3. 23 CFR 635.120 - Changes and extra work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Changes and extra work. 635.120 Section 635.120 Highways... CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE Contract Procedures § 635.120 Changes and extra work. (a) Following authorization... work shall have formal approval by the Division Administrator in advance of their effective...

  4. 23 CFR 635.120 - Changes and extra work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Changes and extra work. 635.120 Section 635.120 Highways... CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE Contract Procedures § 635.120 Changes and extra work. (a) Following authorization... work shall have formal approval by the Division Administrator in advance of their effective...

  5. 32 CFR 776.45 - Extra-tribunal statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES PROFESSIONAL... of Professional Conduct § 776.45 Extra-tribunal statements. (a) Extra-tribunal statements: (1) A... criminal record of a party, suspect in a criminal investigation, victim, or witness, or the identity of...

  6. 32 CFR 776.45 - Extra-tribunal statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES PROFESSIONAL... of Professional Conduct § 776.45 Extra-tribunal statements. (a) Extra-tribunal statements: (1) A... criminal record of a party, suspect in a criminal investigation, victim, or witness, or the identity of...

  7. 32 CFR 776.45 - Extra-tribunal statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES PROFESSIONAL... of Professional Conduct § 776.45 Extra-tribunal statements. (a) Extra-tribunal statements: (1) A... criminal record of a party, suspect in a criminal investigation, victim, or witness, or the identity of...

  8. 32 CFR 776.45 - Extra-tribunal statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES PROFESSIONAL... of Professional Conduct § 776.45 Extra-tribunal statements. (a) Extra-tribunal statements: (1) A... criminal record of a party, suspect in a criminal investigation, victim, or witness, or the identity of...

  9. 32 CFR 776.45 - Extra-tribunal statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES PROFESSIONAL... of Professional Conduct § 776.45 Extra-tribunal statements. (a) Extra-tribunal statements: (1) A... criminal record of a party, suspect in a criminal investigation, victim, or witness, or the identity of...

  10. 23 CFR 635.120 - Changes and extra work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Changes and extra work. 635.120 Section 635.120 Highways... CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE Contract Procedures § 635.120 Changes and extra work. (a) Following authorization... work shall have formal approval by the Division Administrator in advance of their effective...

  11. 23 CFR 635.120 - Changes and extra work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Changes and extra work. 635.120 Section 635.120 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE Contract Procedures § 635.120 Changes and extra work. (a) Following authorization to proceed with a project, all...

  12. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra Fancy. “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of..., scab, freezing injury, visible water core, and broken skins. The apples are also free from injury... rubs, hail, drought spots, scars, disease, insects, or other means. The apples are free from...

  13. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra Fancy. “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of one variety (except when more than one variety is printed on... apples are also free from injury caused by bruises, brown surface discoloration, smooth...

  14. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra Fancy. “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of one variety (except when more than one variety is printed on... apples are also free from injury caused by bruises, brown surface discoloration, smooth...

  15. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra Fancy. “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of..., scab, freezing injury, visible water core, and broken skins. The apples are also free from injury... rubs, hail, drought spots, scars, disease, insects, or other means. The apples are free from...

  16. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra Fancy. “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of..., scab, freezing injury, visible water core, and broken skins. The apples are also free from injury... rubs, hail, drought spots, scars, disease, insects, or other means. The apples are free from...

  17. 29 CFR 541.604 - Minimum guarantee plus extras.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum guarantee plus extras. 541.604 Section 541.604 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS... SALES EMPLOYEES Salary Requirements § 541.604 Minimum guarantee plus extras. (a) An employer may...

  18. 29 CFR 541.604 - Minimum guarantee plus extras.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Minimum guarantee plus extras. 541.604 Section 541.604 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS... SALES EMPLOYEES Salary Requirements § 541.604 Minimum guarantee plus extras. (a) An employer may...

  19. 29 CFR 541.604 - Minimum guarantee plus extras.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minimum guarantee plus extras. 541.604 Section 541.604 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS... SALES EMPLOYEES Salary Requirements § 541.604 Minimum guarantee plus extras. (a) An employer may...

  20. 29 CFR 541.604 - Minimum guarantee plus extras.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minimum guarantee plus extras. 541.604 Section 541.604 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS... SALES EMPLOYEES Salary Requirements § 541.604 Minimum guarantee plus extras. (a) An employer may...

  1. 29 CFR 541.604 - Minimum guarantee plus extras.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minimum guarantee plus extras. 541.604 Section 541.604 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS... SALES EMPLOYEES Salary Requirements § 541.604 Minimum guarantee plus extras. (a) An employer may...

  2. Quantifying inbreeding avoidance through extra-pair reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Jane M; Arcese, Peter; Keller, Lukas F; Germain, Ryan R; Duthie, A Bradley; Losdat, Sylvain; Wolak, Matthew E; Nietlisbach, Pirmin

    2015-01-01

    Extra-pair reproduction is widely hypothesized to allow females to avoid inbreeding with related socially paired males. Consequently, numerous field studies have tested the key predictions that extra-pair offspring are less inbred than females’ alternative within-pair offspring, and that the probability of extra-pair reproduction increases with a female's relatedness to her socially paired male. However, such studies rarely measure inbreeding or relatedness sufficiently precisely to detect subtle effects, or consider biases stemming from failure to observe inbred offspring that die during early development. Analyses of multigenerational song sparrow (Melospiza melodia) pedigree data showed that most females had opportunity to increase or decrease the coefficient of inbreeding of their offspring through extra-pair reproduction with neighboring males. In practice, observed extra-pair offspring had lower inbreeding coefficients than females’ within-pair offspring on average, while the probability of extra-pair reproduction increased substantially with the coefficient of kinship between a female and her socially paired male. However, simulations showed that such effects could simply reflect bias stemming from inbreeding depression in early offspring survival. The null hypothesis that extra-pair reproduction is random with respect to kinship therefore cannot be definitively rejected in song sparrows, and existing general evidence that females avoid inbreeding through extra-pair reproduction requires reevaluation given such biases. PMID:25346331

  3. STS-109 Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Inside the Space Shuttle Columbia's cabin, astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, controlled the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) on the crew cabin's aft flight deck to assist fellow astronauts during the STS-109 mission Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA). The RMS was used to capture the telescope and secure it into Columbia's cargo bay. The Space Shuttle Columbia STS-109 mission lifted off March 1, 2002 with goals of repairing and upgrading the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama had the responsibility for the design, development, and construction of the HST, which is the most powerful and sophisticated telescope ever built. STS-109 upgrades to the HST included: replacement of the solar array panels; replacement of the power control unit (PCU); replacement of the Faint Object Camera (FOC) with a new advanced camera for Surveys (ACS); and installation of the experimental cooling system for the Hubble's Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-object Spectrometer (NICMOS), which had been dormant since January 1999 when its original coolant ran out. Lasting 10 days, 22 hours, and 11 minutes, the STS-109 mission was the 108th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle Program.

  4. Diphoton resonance from a warped extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Martin; Hörner, Clara; Neubert, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    We argue that extensions of the Standard Model (SM) with a warped extra dimension, which successfully address the hierarchy and flavor problems of elementary particle physics, can provide an elegant explanation of the 750 GeV diphoton excess recently reported by ATLAS and CMS. A gauge-singlet bulk scalar with {O} (1) couplings to fermions is identified as the new resonance S, and the vector-like Kaluza-Klein excitations of the SM quarks and leptons mediate its loop-induced couplings to photons and gluons. The electroweak gauge symmetry almost unambiguously dictates the bulk matter content and hence the hierarchies of the Sto γ γ, W W,ZZ,Zγ, toverline{t} and dijet decay rates. We find that the S → Zγ decay mode is strongly suppressed, such that Br( S → Zγ) /Br( S → γγ) < 0 .1. The hierarchy problem for the new scalar boson is solved in analogy with the Higgs boson by localizing it near the infrared brane. The infinite sums over the Kaluza-Klein towers of fermion states converge and can be calculated in closed form with a remarkably simple result. Reproducing the observed pp → S → γγ signal requires Kaluza-Klein masses in the multi-TeV range, consistent with bounds from flavor physics and electroweak precision observables.

  5. CERN LHC signals from warped extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Belyaev, Alexander; Krupovnickas, Tadas; Perez, Gilad; Virzi, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    We study production of Kaluza-Klein (KK) gluons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the framework of a warped extra dimension with the standard model fields propagating in the bulk. We show that the detection of the KK gluon is challenging since its production is suppressed by small couplings to the proton’s constituents. Moreover, the KK gluon decays mostly to top pairs due to an enhanced coupling and hence is broad. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that for MKKG≲4TeV, 100fb-1 of data at the LHC can provide discovery of the KK gluon. We utilize a sizable left-right polarization asymmetry from the KK gluon resonance to maximize the signal significance, and we explore the novel feature of extremely highly energetic “top-jets.” We briefly discuss how the detection of electroweak gauge KK states (Z/W) faces a similar challenge since their leptonic decays (golden modes) are suppressed. Our analysis suggests that other frameworks, for example, little Higgs, which rely on UV completion via strong dynamics might face similar challenges, namely, (1) suppressed production rates for the new particles (such as Z'), due to their “light-fermion-phobic” nature, and (2) difficulties in detection since the new particles are broad and decay predominantly to third generation quarks and longitudinal gauge bosons.

  6. LHC Signals from Warped Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, K.; Belyaev, A.; Krupovnickas, T.; Perez, G.; Virzi, J.

    2006-12-06

    We study production of Kaluza-Klein gluons (KKG) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the framework of a warped extra dimension with the Standard Model (SM) fields propagating in the bulk. We show that the detection of KK gluon is challenging since its production is suppressed by small couplings to the proton's constituents. Moreover, the KK gluon decaysmostly to top pairs due to an enhanced coupling and hence is broad. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that for MKKG<~;; 4 TeV, 100 fb-1 of data at the LHC can provide discovery of the KK gluon. We utilize a sizeable left-right polarization asymmetry from the KK gluon resonance to maximize the signal significance, and we explore the novel feature of extremely highly energetic"top-jets." We briefly discuss how the detection of electroweak gauge KK states (Z/W) faces a similar challenge since their leptonic decays ("golden" modes) are suppressed. Our analysis suggests that other frameworks, for example little Higgs, which rely on UV completion via strong dynamics might face similar challenges, namely (1) Suppressed production rates for the new particles (such as Z'), due to their"lightfermion-phobic" nature, and (2) Difficulties in detection since the new particles are broad and decay predominantly to third generation quarks and longitudinal gauge bosons.

  7. Terrestrial Analogs for Planetary Wrinkle Ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, J. B.; Golombek, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    Wrinkle ridges are common physiographic features on the terrestrial planets. Their origin has remained enigmatic, although two different types of models, volcanic and tectonic, have been proposed. The major impediment to deciphering the origin of wrinkle ridges has been the lack of a terrestrial analog. Seven terrestrial analogs were discussed, two in detail. Their implications for the origin for planetary wrinkle ridges were considered. All of the terrestrial analogs were formed in compressional environments and are the surface breaks of thrust faults.

  8. Long-term solar-terrestrial observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The results of an 18-month study of the requirements for long-term monitoring and archiving of solar-terrestrial data is presented. The value of long-term solar-terrestrial observations is discussed together with parameters, associated measurements, and observational problem areas in each of the solar-terrestrial links (the sun, the interplanetary medium, the magnetosphere, and the thermosphere-ionosphere). Some recommendations are offered for coordinated planning for long-term solar-terrestrial observations.

  9. Mars: destruction of the tropical belt and building up extra tropics is a physical requirement of angular momentum equilibration between zones with different distances to the rotation axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2012-09-01

    Often observed a sensible difference in appearance and structure between tropical and extra-t ropical zones of various heavenly bodies including rocky and gas planets, satellites and Sun (Fig. 6) compels to look for a common reason of such phenomenon [1-3]. All bodies rotate and their spherical shape makes zones at different lat itudes to have differing angular momenta as a distance to the rotation axis diminishes gradually from the equator to the poles (Fig. 1) (this is felt particularly when one launches rockets into space -preferable cheaper launches are from the equatorial regions - Kourou in the French Guyana is better than Baikonur in Kazakhstan). One of remarkable changes occurs at tropics. As a total rotating planetary body tends to have angular momenta of its tectonic blocks equilibrated it starts mechanisms leveling this basic physical property. At tropical zones (bulged also due to the rotation ellipsoid) the outer shell - crust as a consequence tends to be destroyed, sunk, subsided and shrunk; a density of crust material changes; the atmosphere reacts changing chemistry and structure; in terrestrial anthroposphere man looses its mass and stature (well known pygmioidness process). Ext ratropical belts, on the contrary, tend to add material and increase radius. Thus, a body tends to be like a cucumber but mighty gravity always makes it globular. According to the Le Chatelier rule mechanisms with opposing tendencies also begin to act. However, traces of this cosmic "struggle" very often are seen on surfaces of heavenly bodies as structurally distinguished tropical and extra-t ropical zones (Fig. 1, 6) [1-3]. At Mars the widespread "enigmatic" chaotic and fretted terrains at the highland-lowland boundary could be considered as traces of the crust destruction along the wide tropical belt (Fig. 2-4). A system of hillocks and their relics, mesas, ridges, cliffs and separating them depressions or plains (deep up to 1-2 km) is controlled by a crosscutting

  10. Gigantism, temperature and metabolic rate in terrestrial poikilotherms.

    PubMed

    Makarieva, Anastassia M; Gorshkov, Victor G; Li, Bai-Lian

    2005-11-01

    The mechanisms dictating upper limits to animal body size are not well understood. We have analysed body length data for the largest representatives of 24 taxa of terrestrial poikilotherms from tropical, temperate and polar environments. We find that poikilothermic giants on land become two-three times shorter per each 10 degrees of decrease in ambient temperature. We quantify that this diminution of maximum body size accurately compensates the drop of metabolic rate dictated by lower temperature. This supports the idea that the upper limit to body size within each taxon can be set by a temperature-independent critical minimum value of mass-specific metabolic rate, a fall below which is not compatible with successful biological performance. PMID:16191647