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Sample records for extracellular matrix glycoprotein

  1. Putative functions of extracellular matrix glycoproteins in secondary palate morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    d'Amaro, Rocca; Scheidegger, Rolf; Blumer, Susan; Pazera, Pawel; Katsaros, Christos; Graf, Daniel; Chiquet, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Cleft palate is a common birth defect in humans. Elevation and fusion of paired palatal shelves are coordinated by growth and transcription factors, and mutations in these can cause malformations. Among the effector genes for growth factor signaling are extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins. These provide substrates for cell adhesion (e.g., fibronectin, tenascins), but also regulate growth factor availability (e.g., fibrillins). Cleft palate in Bmp7 null mouse embryos is caused by a delay in palatal shelf elevation. In contrast, palatal shelves of Tgf-β3 knockout mice elevate normally, but a cleft develops due to their failure to fuse. However, nothing is known about a possible functional interaction between specific ECM proteins and Tgf-β/Bmp family members in palatogenesis. To start addressing this question, we studied the mRNA and protein distribution of relevant ECM components during secondary palate development, and compared it to growth factor expression in wildtypewild type and mutant mice. We found that fibrillin-2 (but not fibrillin-1) mRNA appeared in the mesenchyme of elevated palatal shelves adjacent to the midline epithelial cells, which were positive for Tgf-β3 mRNA. Moreover, midline epithelial cells started expressing fibronectin upon contact of the two palatal shelves. These findings support the hypothesis that fibrillin-2 and fibronectin are involved in regulating the activity of Tgf-β3 at the fusing midline. In addition, we observed that tenascin-W (but not tenascin-C) was misexpressed in palatal shelves of Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. In contrast to tenascin-C, tenascin-W secretion was strongly induced by Bmp7 in embryonic cranial fibroblasts in vitro. These results are consistent with a putative function for tenascin-W as a target of Bmp7 signaling during palate elevation. Our results indicate that distinct ECM proteins are important for morphogenesis of the secondary palate, both as downstream effectors and as regulators of Tgf

  2. Putative functions of extracellular matrix glycoproteins in secondary palate morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    d'Amaro, Rocca; Scheidegger, Rolf; Blumer, Susan; Pazera, Pawel; Katsaros, Christos; Graf, Daniel; Chiquet, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Cleft palate is a common birth defect in humans. Elevation and fusion of paired palatal shelves are coordinated by growth and transcription factors, and mutations in these can cause malformations. Among the effector genes for growth factor signaling are extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins. These provide substrates for cell adhesion (e.g., fibronectin, tenascins), but also regulate growth factor availability (e.g., fibrillins). Cleft palate in Bmp7 null mouse embryos is caused by a delay in palatal shelf elevation. In contrast, palatal shelves of Tgf-β3 knockout mice elevate normally, but a cleft develops due to their failure to fuse. However, nothing is known about a possible functional interaction between specific ECM proteins and Tgf-β/Bmp family members in palatogenesis. To start addressing this question, we studied the mRNA and protein distribution of relevant ECM components during secondary palate development, and compared it to growth factor expression in wildtypewild type and mutant mice. We found that fibrillin-2 (but not fibrillin-1) mRNA appeared in the mesenchyme of elevated palatal shelves adjacent to the midline epithelial cells, which were positive for Tgf-β3 mRNA. Moreover, midline epithelial cells started expressing fibronectin upon contact of the two palatal shelves. These findings support the hypothesis that fibrillin-2 and fibronectin are involved in regulating the activity of Tgf-β3 at the fusing midline. In addition, we observed that tenascin-W (but not tenascin-C) was misexpressed in palatal shelves of Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. In contrast to tenascin-C, tenascin-W secretion was strongly induced by Bmp7 in embryonic cranial fibroblasts in vitro. These results are consistent with a putative function for tenascin-W as a target of Bmp7 signaling during palate elevation. Our results indicate that distinct ECM proteins are important for morphogenesis of the secondary palate, both as downstream effectors and as regulators of Tgf

  3. Development-dependent modification of the extracellular matrix by a sulphated glycoprotein in Volvox carteri

    PubMed Central

    Wenzl, Stephan; Thym, Detlef; Sumper, Manfred

    1984-01-01

    We report the chemical characterization of the highly sulphated glycoprotein SSG 185 from Volvox carteri. SSG 185 is a hydroxyproline-containing, extracellular glycoprotein. The sulphate residues are clustered within the parent saccharide structure of SSG 185, since on mercaptolysis all the sulphate residues are recovered in a small saccharide fragment containing mannose, arabinose and sulphate (in a molar ratio of 1̇1̇2). SSG 185 is a short-lived molecule, serving as a precursor for a high mol. wt. component of the extracellular matrix. Synthesis of SSG 185 is developmentally controlled. Different SSG 185 variants, with unknown modifications in the sulphated saccharide fragment, are synthesized at different developmental stages or under the influence of the sexual inducer. These modifications remain conserved in the aggregated state of SSG 185, indicating the development-dependent modification of the extracellular matrix. ImagesFig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 6.Fig. 7. PMID:16453512

  4. Extracellular matrix and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Maquart, F X; Monboisse, J C

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular matrix has been known for a long time as an architectural support for the tissues. Many recent data, however, have shown that extracellular matrix macromolecules (collagens, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and connective tissue glycoproteins) are able to regulate many important cell functions, such as proliferation, migration, protein synthesis or degradation, apoptosis, etc., making them able to play an important role in the wound repair process. Not only the intact macromolecules but some of their specific domains, that we called "Matrikines", are also able to regulate many cell activities. In this article, we will summarize main findings showing the effects of extracellular matrix macromolecules and matrikines on connective tissue and epithelial cells, particularly in skin, and their potential implication in the wound healing process. These examples show that extracellular matrix macromolecules or some of their specific domains may play a major role in wound healing. Better knowledge of these interactions may suggest new therapeutic targets in wound healing defects. PMID:24650524

  5. Tendon Functional Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Screen, H.R.C.; Birk, D.E.; Kadler, K.E.; Ramirez, F; Young, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    This article is one of a series, summarising views expressed at the Orthopaedic Research Society New Frontiers in Tendon Research Conference. This particular article reviews the three workshops held under the “Functional Extracellular Matrix” stream. The workshops focused on the roles of the tendon extracellular matrix, such as performing the mechanical functions of tendon, creating the local cell environment and providing cellular cues. Tendon is a complex network of matrix and cells, and its biological functions are influenced by widely-varying extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as age, nutrition, exercise levels and biomechanics. Consequently, tendon adapts dynamically during development, ageing and injury. The workshop discussions identified research directions associated with understanding cell-matrix interactions to be of prime importance for developing novel strategies to target tendon healing or repair. PMID:25640030

  6. Extracellular Matrix Abnormalities in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Sabina

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence points to the involvement of the brain extracellular matrix (ECM) in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (SZ). Abnormalities affecting several ECM components, including Reelin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), have been described in subjects with this disease. Solid evidence supports the involvement of Reelin, an ECM glycoprotein involved in corticogenesis, synaptic functions and glutamate NMDA receptor regulation, expressed prevalently in distinct populations of GABAergic neurons, which secrete it into the ECM. Marked changes of Reelin expression in SZ have typically been reported in association with GABA-related abnormalities in subjects with SZ and bipolar disorder. Recent findings from our group point to substantial abnormalities affecting CSPGs, a main ECM component, in the amygdala and entorhinal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia, but not bipolar disorder. Striking increases of glial cells expressing CSPGs were accompanied by reductions of perineuronal nets, CSPG- and Reelin-enriched ECM aggregates enveloping distinct neuronal populations. CSPGs developmental and adult functions, including neuronal migration, axon guidance, synaptic and neurotransmission regulation are highly relevant to the pathophysiology of SZ. Together with reports of anomalies affecting several other ECM components, these findings point to the ECM as a key component of the pathology of SZ. We propose that ECM abnormalities may contribute to several aspects of the pathophysiology of this disease, including disrupted connectivity and neuronal migration, synaptic anomalies and altered GABAergic, glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission. PMID:21856318

  7. Extracellular matrix component signaling in cancer.

    PubMed

    Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Leitinger, Birgit; Gullberg, Donald; Couchman, John R

    2016-02-01

    Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization and motility but also provides survival and proliferation cues. The major classes of cell surface receptors for matrix macromolecules are the integrins, discoidin domain receptors, and transmembrane proteoglycans such as syndecans and CD44. Cells respond not only to specific ligands, such as collagen, fibronectin, or basement membrane glycoproteins, but also in terms of matrix rigidity. This can regulate the release and subsequent biological activity of matrix-bound growth factors, for example, transforming growth factor-β. In the environment of tumors, there may be changes in cell populations and their receptor profiles as well as matrix constitution and protein cross-linking. Here we summarize roles of the three major matrix receptor types, with emphasis on how they function in tumor progression. PMID:26519775

  8. The extracellular matrix of plants: Molecular, cellular and developmental biology

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    A symposium entitled ``The Extracellular Matrix of Plants: Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology was held in Tamarron, Colorado, March 15--21, 1996. The following topics were explored in addresses by 43 speakers: structure and biochemistry of cell walls; biochemistry, molecular biology and biosynthesis of lignin; secretory pathway and synthesis of glycoproteins; biosynthesis of matrix polysaccharides, callose and cellulose; role of the extracellular matrix in plant growth and development; plant cell walls in symbiosis and pathogenesis.

  9. Biochemistry of the extracellular matrix of Volvox.

    PubMed

    Sumper, M; Hallmann, A

    1998-01-01

    The volvocine algae range in complexity from unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular organisms in the genus Volvox. The transition from unicellularity to multicellularity in the Volvocales is a recent event in evolution. Thus, these organisms provide a unique opportunity for exploring the development of a complex extracellular matrix (ECM) from the cell wall of a unicellular ancestor. The ECM of Volvox is divided into four main zones: The flagellar, boundary, cellular, and deep zones. Each zone is defined by ultrastructure and by characteristic ECM glycoproteins. Volvox ECM is modified under developmental control or in response to external stimuli, like the sex-inducing pheromone or stress factors. The structures of more than 10 ECM glycoproteins from a single species of Volvox are now known in molecular detail and are compared to other algal and plant cell wall/ECM glycoproteins. Although usually classified as hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, the striking feature of all algal ECM glycoproteins is a modular composition. Rod-shaped hydroxyproline-rich modules are combined with hydroxyproline-free domains that meet the multiple functional requirements of a complex ECM. The algal ECM provides another example of the combinatorial advantage of shuffling modules that is so evident in the evolution of the metazoan ECMs. PMID:9496634

  10. Mechanotransduction and extracellular matrix homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Jay D.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Soft connective tissues at steady state are yet dynamic; resident cells continually read environmental cues and respond to promote homeostasis, including maintenance of the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix that are fundamental to cellular and tissue health. The mechanosensing process involves assessment of the mechanics of the matrix by the cells through integrins and the actomyosin cytoskeleton, and is followed by a mechano-regulation process that includes the deposition, rearrangement, or removal of matrix to maintain overall form and function. Progress toward understanding the molecular, cellular, and tissue scale effects that promote mechanical homeostasis has helped identify key questions for future research. PMID:25355505

  11. Extracellular matrix in ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, R J; Irving-Rodgers, H F; van Wezel, I L

    2000-05-25

    A lot is known about the control of the development of ovarian follicles by growth factors and hormones, but less is known about the roles of extracellular matrix in the control of follicular growth and development. In this review we focus on the specialized extracellular matrix of the basal laminas that are present in ovarian follicles. These include the follicular basal lamina itself, the Call-Exner bodies of the membrana granulosa, the subendothelial and arteriole smooth muscle basal laminas in the theca, and the basal lamina-like material of the thecal matrix. We discuss the evidence that during follicle development the follicular basal lamina changes in composition, that many of its components are produced by the granulosa cells, and that the follicular basal laminas of different follicles have different ultrastructural appearances, linked to the shape of the aligning granulosa cells. All these studies suggest that the follicular basal lamina is extremely dynamic during follicular development. PMID:10963877

  12. Extracellular Matrix Revisited: Roles in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a heterogeneous, connective network composed of fibrous glycoproteins that coordinate in vivo to provide the physical scaffolding, mechanical stability, and biochemical cues necessary for tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. This review highlights some of the recently raised aspects of the roles of the ECM as related to the fields of biophysics and biomedical engineering. Fundamental aspects of focus include the role of the ECM as a basic cellular structure, for novel spontaneous network formation, as an ideal scaffold in tissue engineering, and its essential contribution to cell sheet technology. As these technologies move from the laboratory to clinical practice, they are bound to shape the vast field of tissue engineering for medical transplantations. PMID:27230457

  13. Brain Extracellular Matrix in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bonneh-Barkay, Dafna; Wiley, Clayton A.

    2009-01-01

    The role of extracellular matrix (ECM) in neurological development, function and degeneration has evolved from a simplistic physical adhesion to a system of intricate cellular signaling. While most cells require ECM adhesion to survive, it is now clear that differentiated function is intimately dependent upon cellular interaction with the ECM. Therefore, it is not surprising that the ECM is increasingly found to be involved in the enigmatic process of neurodegeneration. Descriptive studies of human neurodegenerative disorders and experimental studies of animal models of neurodegeneration have begun to define potential mechanisms of ECM disruption that can lead to synaptic and neuronal loss. PMID:18662234

  14. The Evolution of Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Özbek, Suat; Balasubramanian, Prakash G.; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Tucker, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    We present a perspective on the molecular evolution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in metazoa that draws on research publications and data from sequenced genomes and expressed sequence tag libraries. ECM components do not function in isolation, and the biological ECM system or “adhesome” also depends on posttranslational processing enzymes, cell surface receptors, and extracellular proteases. We focus principally on the adhesome of internal tissues and discuss its origins at the dawn of the metazoa and the expansion of complexity that occurred in the chordate lineage. The analyses demonstrate very high conservation of a core adhesome that apparently evolved in a major wave of innovation in conjunction with the origin of metazoa. Integrin, CD36, and certain domains predate the metazoa, and some ECM-related proteins are identified in choanoflagellates as predicted sequences. Modern deuterostomes and vertebrates have many novelties and elaborations of ECM as a result of domain shuffling, domain innovations and gene family expansions. Knowledge of the evolution of metazoan ECM is important for understanding how it is built as a system, its roles in normal tissues and disease processes, and has relevance for tissue engineering, the development of artificial organs, and the goals of synthetic biology. PMID:21160071

  15. Tumorigenic potential of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer.

    PubMed

    Zucker, S; Hymowitz, M; Rollo, E E; Mann, R; Conner, C E; Cao, J; Foda, H D; Tompkins, D C; Toole, B P

    2001-06-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), a glycoprotein present on the cancer cell plasma membrane, enhances fibroblast synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The demonstration that peritumoral fibroblasts synthesize most of the MMPs in human tumors rather than the cancer cells themselves has ignited interest in the role of EMMPRIN in tumor dissemination. In this report we have demonstrated a role for EMMPRIN in cancer progression. Human MDA-MB-436 breast cancer cells, which are tumorigenic but slow growing in vivo, were transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA and injected orthotopically into mammary tissue of female NCr nu/nu mice. Green fluorescent protein was used to visualize metastases. In three experiments, breast cancer cell clones transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA were considerably more tumorigenic and invasive than plasmid-transfected cancer cells. Increased gelatinase A and gelatinase B expression (demonstrated by in situ hybridization and gelatin substrate zymography) was demonstrated in EMMPRIN-enhanced tumors. In contrast to de novo breast cancers in humans, human tumors transplanted into mice elicited minimal stromal or inflammatory cell reactions. Based on these experimental studies and our previous demonstration that EMMPRIN is prominently displayed in human cancer tissue, we propose that EMMPRIN plays an important role in cancer progression by increasing synthesis of MMPs. PMID:11395366

  16. Extracellular Matrix Molecules: Potential Targets in Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Järveläinen, Hannu; Sainio, Annele; Koulu, Markku; Wight, Thomas N.; Penttinen, Risto

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of numerous macromolecules classified traditionally into collagens, elastin, and microfibrillar proteins, proteoglycans including hyaluronan, and noncollagenous glycoproteins. In addition to being necessary structural components, ECM molecules exhibit important functional roles in the control of key cellular events such as adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Any structural inherited or acquired defect and/or metabolic disturbance in the ECM may cause cellular and tissue alterations that can lead to the development or progression of disease. Consequently, ECM molecules are important targets for pharmacotherapy. Specific agents that prevent theexcess accumulation of ECM molecules in the vascular system, liver, kidney, skin, and lung; alternatively, agents that inhibit the degradation of the ECM in degenerative diseases such as osteoarthritis would be clinically beneficial. Unfortunately, until recently, the ECM in drug discovery has been largely ignored. However, several of today's drugs that act on various primary targets affect the ECM as a byproduct of the drugs' actions, and this activity may in part be beneficial to the drugs' disease-modifying properties. In the future, agents and compounds targeting directly the ECM will significantly advance the treatment of various human diseases, even those for which efficient therapies are not yet available. PMID:19549927

  17. Contact guidance induced organization of extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Manwaring, Michael E; Walsh, Jennifer F; Tresco, Patrick A

    2004-08-01

    The scarring response following injury to the central nervous system disrupts the anatomical organization of nervous tissue posing a barrier to the regeneration of axons. In the present study, using materials with nanometer level surface features we examined whether matrix organization could be controlled by engineering meningeal cell asymmetry. Following 5 days in culture, the organization of meningeal cells along with their cytoskeletal elements and extracellular matrix proteins was evaluated. Meningeal cell morphology was markedly affected by nanometer level substrate topography. Cell alignment increased with increasing surface roughness. In addition, linear arrays of extracellular matrix were expressed that appeared related to cellular orientation. When cultured on substrates with topographical features of less than 10 nm neither cells nor their extracellular matrix showed organizational asymmetry. However, as oriented surface roughness increased, cellular and matrix asymmetrical organization became more pronounced reaching a threshold at 345 nm. These results suggest that biomaterial surface topography or other methods of altering the orientation of cells may be used to engineer orientation into the secreted extracellular matrix and as such may be a potential strategy for developing organized cell-derived matrix as a bridging material for nerve repair or other regenerative applications. PMID:15020137

  18. Proteases decode the extracellular matrix cryptome.

    PubMed

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Vallet, Sylvain D

    2016-03-01

    The extracellular matrix is comprised of 1100 core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins and of glycosaminoglycans. This structural scaffold contributes to the organization and mechanical properties of tissues and modulates cell behavior. The extracellular matrix is dynamic and undergoes constant remodeling, which leads to diseases if uncontrolled. Bioactive fragments, called matricryptins, are released from the extracellular proteins by limited proteolysis and have biological activities on their own. They regulate numerous physiological and pathological processes such as angiogenesis, cancer, diabetes, wound healing, fibrosis and infectious diseases and either improve or worsen the course of diseases depending on the matricryptins and on the molecular and biological contexts. Several protease families release matricryptins from core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins both in vitro and in vivo. The major proteases, which decrypt the extracellular matrix, are zinc metalloproteinases of the metzincin superfamily (matrixins, adamalysins and astacins), cysteine proteinases and serine proteases. Some matricryptins act as enzyme inhibitors, further connecting protease and matricryptin fates and providing intricate regulation of major physiopathological processes such as angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. They strengthen the role of the extracellular matrix as a key player in tissue failure and core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins as important therapeutic targets. PMID:26382969

  19. Nanomechanics of the Cartilage Extracellular Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lin; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Ortiz, Christine

    2011-08-01

    Cartilage is a hydrated biomacromolecular fiber composite located at the ends of long bones that enables proper joint lubrication, articulation, loading, and energy dissipation. Degradation of extracellular matrix molecular components and changes in their nanoscale structure greatly influence the macroscale behavior of the tissue and result in dysfunction with age, injury, and diseases such as osteoarthritis. Here, the application of the field of nanomechanics to cartilage is reviewed. Nanomechanics involves the measurement and prediction of nanoscale forces and displacements, intra- and intermolecular interactions, spatially varying mechanical properties, and other mechanical phenomena existing at small length scales. Experimental nanomechanics and theoretical nanomechanics have been applied to cartilage at varying levels of material complexity, e.g., nanoscale properties of intact tissue, the matrix associated with single cells, biomimetic molecular assemblies, and individual extracellular matrix biomolecules (such as aggrecan, collagen, and hyaluronan). These studies have contributed to establishing a fundamental mechanism-based understanding of native and engineered cartilage tissue function, quality, and pathology.

  20. Instructive Roles of Extracellular Matrix on Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Neill, Thomas; Schaefer, Liliana; Iozzo, Renato V.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy plays an essential role in maintaining an intricate balance between nutrient demands and energetic requirements during normal homeostasis. Autophagy recycles metabolic substrates from nonspecific bulk degradation of proteins and excess or damaged organelles. Recent work posits an active and dynamic signaling role for extracellular matrix-evoked autophagic regulation, that is, allosteric and independent of prevailing nutrient conditions. Several candidates, representing a diverse repertoire of matrix constituents (decorin, collagen VI, laminin α2, endostatin, endorepellin, and kringle V), can modulate autophagic signaling pathways. Importantly, a novel principle indicates that matrix constituents can differentially modulate autophagic induction and repression via interaction with specific receptors. Most of the matrix-derived factors described here appear to control autophagy in a canonical manner but independent of nutrient deprivation. Because the molecular composition and structure of the extracellular matrix are dynamically remodeled during various physiological and pathological conditions, we propose that matrix-regulated autophagy is key for maintaining proper tissue homeostasis and disease prevention, such as cancer progression and muscular dystrophies. PMID:24976620

  1. Involvement of extracellular matrix constituents in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-06-01

    It has recently been established that the extracellular matrix is required for normal functional differentiation of mammary epithelia not only in culture, but also in vivo. The mechanisms by which extracellular matrix affects differentiation, as well as the nature of extracellular matrix constituents which have major impacts on mammary gland function, have only now begun to be dissected. The intricate variety of extracellular matrix-mediated events and the remarkable degree of plasticity of extracellular matrix structure and composition at virtually all times during ontogeny, make such studies difficult. Similarly, during carcinogenesis, the extracellular matrix undergoes gross alterations, the consequences of which are not yet precisely understood. Nevertheless, an increasing amount of data suggests that the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-receptors might participate in the control of most, if not all, of the successive stages of breast tumors, from appearance to progression and metastasis.

  2. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD. PMID:26696894

  3. Extracellular matrix of the developing ovarian follicle.

    PubMed

    Irving-Rodgers, Helen F; Rodgers, Raymond J

    2006-09-01

    There are many different types of extracellular matrices in the different follicle compartments. These have different roles in follicle development and atresia, and they change in composition during these processes. This review focuses on basal lamina matrix in particular, and considers follicular fluid, the newly identified focimatrix, and thecal matrices. When follicles commence growing, the follicular basal lamina changes in its composition from containing all six alpha chains of type IV collagen to only alpha1 and alpha2. Perlecan and nidogen-1 and -2 subsequently become components of the follicular basal lamina, and there is an increase in the amount of laminin chains alpha1, beta2, and gamma1, in the bovine at least. Late in follicular development and on atresia some follicles contain laminin alpha2. On atresia the follicular basal lamina is not degraded, as occurs in ovulation, but can be breached by cells from the thecal layer when it is not aligned by granulosa cells. A novel type of basal lamina-like matrix, called focimatrix (abbreviated from focal intraepithelial matrix), develops between the cells of the membrana granulosa as aggregates of basal lamina material. It does not envelop cells and so cannot perform functions of basal lamina as currently understood. It is hypothesized that focimatrix assists or initiates depolarization of the membrana granulosa necessary for the transformation into luteal cells. The largest osmotically active molecules in follicular fluid are hyaluronan and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, including versican and inter-alpha trypsin inhibitor. It has been suggested that these might be responsible for the formation of follicular fluid by creating an osmotic gradient across the follicular wall. The formation, development, and then either ovulation or regression of follicles requires considerable tissue remodeling, cellular replication, and specialization. The expectation of researchers is that extracellular matrix will be

  4. Regulation of Corneal Stroma Extracellular Matrix Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shoujun; Mienaltowski, Michael J.; Birk, David E.

    2014-01-01

    The transparent cornea is the major refractive element of the eye. A finely controlled assembly of the stromal extracellular matrix is critical to corneal function, as well as in establishing the appropriate mechanical stability required to maintain corneal shape and curvature. In the stroma, homogeneous, small diameter collagen fibrils, regularly packed with a highly ordered hierarchical organization, are essential for function. This review focuses on corneal stroma assembly and the regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis. Corneal collagen fibrillogenesis involves multiple molecules interacting in sequential steps, as well as interactions between keratocytes and stroma matrix components. The stroma has the highest collagen V:I ratio in the body. Collagen V regulates the nucleation of protofibril assembly, thus controlling the number of fibrils and assembly of smaller diameter fibrils in the stroma. The corneal stroma is also enriched in small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) that cooperate in a temporal and spatial manner to regulate linear and lateral collagen fibril growth. In addition, the fibril-associated collagens (FACITs) such as collagen XII and collagen XIV have roles in the regulation of fibril packing and inter-lamellar interactions. A communicating keratocyte network contributes to the overall and long-range regulation of stromal extracellular matrix assembly, by creating micro-domains where the sequential steps in stromal matrix assembly are controlled. Keratocytes control the synthesis of extracellular matrix components, which interact with the keratocytes dynamically to coordinate the regulatory steps into a cohesive process. Mutations or deficiencies in stromal regulatory molecules result in altered interactions and deficiencies in both transparency and refraction, leading to corneal stroma pathobiology such as stromal dystrophies, cornea plana and keratoconus. PMID:25819456

  5. Achondrogenesis type II, abnormalities of extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Horton, W A; Machado, M A; Chou, J W; Campbell, D

    1987-09-01

    Immune and lectin histochemical and microchemical methods were employed to study growth cartilage from seven cases of achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino). The normal architecture of the epiphyseal and growth plate cartilage was replaced by a morphologically heterogeneous tissue. Some areas were comprised of vascular canals surrounded by extensive fibrous tissue and enlarged cells that had the appearance and histochemical characteristics of hypertrophic chondrocytes. Other areas contained a mixture of cells ranging from small to the enlarged chondrocytes. The extracellular matrix in the latter areas was more abundant and had characteristics of both precartilage mesenchymal matrix and typical cartilage matrix; it contained types I and II collagen, cartilage proteoglycan, fibronectin, and peanut agglutinin binding glycoconjugate(s). Peptide mapping of cyanogen bromide cartilage collagen peptides revealed the presence of types I and II collagen. These observations could be explained by a defect in the biosynthesis of type II collagen or in chondrocyte differentiation. PMID:3309860

  6. Nanomechanics of the Cartilage Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lin; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Ortiz, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Cartilage is a hydrated biomacromolecular fiber composite located at the ends of long bones that enables proper joint lubrication, articulation, loading, and energy dissipation. Degradation of extracellular matrix molecular components and changes in their nanoscale structure greatly influence the macroscale behavior of the tissue and result in dysfunction with age, injury, and diseases such as osteoarthritis. Here, the application of the field of nanomechanics to cartilage is reviewed. Nanomechanics involves the measurement and prediction of nanoscale forces and displacements, intra- and intermolecular interactions, spatially varying mechanical properties, and other mechanical phenomena existing at small length scales. Experimental nanomechanics and theoretical nanomechanics have been applied to cartilage at varying levels of material complexity, e.g., nanoscale properties of intact tissue, the matrix associated with single cells, biomimetic molecular assemblies, and individual extracellular matrix biomolecules (such as aggrecan, collagen, and hyaluronan). These studies have contributed to establishing a fundamental mechanism-based understanding of native and engineered cartilage tissue function, quality, and pathology. PMID:22792042

  7. Bidirectional extracellular matrix signaling during tissue morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gjorevski, Nikolce; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2009-01-01

    Normal tissue development and function are regulated by the interplay between cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM provides biochemical and mechanical contextual information that is conveyed from the cell membrane through the cytoskeleton to the nucleus to direct cell phenotype. Cells, in turn, remodel the ECM and thereby sculpt their local microenvironment. Here we review the mechanisms by which cells interact with, respond to, and influence the ECM, with particular emphasis placed on the role of this bidirectional communication during tissue morphogenesis. We also discuss the implications for successful engineering of functional tissues ex vivo. PMID:19896886

  8. Chick myotendinous antigen. II. A novel extracellular glycoprotein complex consisting of large disulfide-linked subunits.

    PubMed

    Chiquet, M; Fambrough, D M

    1984-06-01

    This report describes the biochemical characterization of a novel extracellular matrix component, " myotendinous antigen," which appears early in chick limb morphogenesis at sites connecting developing muscle fibers, tendons, and bone ( Chiquet , M., and D. Fambrough , 1984; J. Cell Biol., 98:1926-1936). This extracellular matrix antigen is a major component of the secretory proteins released into the medium by fibroblast and muscle cultures; the soluble form is characterized here. This form of myotendinous antigen is a large glycoprotein complex consisting of several disulfide linked subunits (Mr approximately 150,000-240,000). The differently sized antigen subunits are related, since they yielded very similar proteolytic cleavage patterns. M1 antibody can bind to the denatured subunits. The antigen subunits, as well as a Mr approximately 80,000 pepsin-resistant antigenic domain derived from them, are resistant to bacterial collagenase. Despite possessing subunits similar in size to fibronectin, myotendinous antigen appears to be both structurally and antigenically unrelated to fibronectin or to other known extracellular matrix components. About seven times more M1 antigen per cell nucleus was released into the medium in fibroblast as compared to muscle cultures. In muscle conditioned medium, myotendinous antigen is noncovalently complexed to very high molecular weight material that could be heavily labeled by [3H]glucosamine and [35S]sulfate. This material is sensitive to chondroitinase ABC and hence appears to contain sulfated glycosaminoglycans. We speculate that myotendinous antigen might interact with proteoglycans on the surface of muscle fibers, thereby acting as a link to tendons. PMID:6202699

  9. Extracellular Matrix Roles During Cardiac Repair

    PubMed Central

    Jourdan-LeSaux, Claude; Zhang, Jianhua; Lindsey, Merry L.

    2010-01-01

    The cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) provides a platform for cells to maintain structure and function, which in turn maintains tissue function. In response to injury, the ECM undergoes remodeling that involves synthesis, incorporation, and degradation of matrix proteins, with the net outcome determined by the balance of these processes. The major goals of this review are a) to serve as an initial resource for students and investigators new to the cardiac ECM remodeling field, and b) to highlight a few of the key exciting avenues and methodologies that have recently been explored. While we focus on cardiac injury and responses of the left ventricle (LV), the mechanisms reviewed here have pathways in common with other wound healing models. PMID:20670633

  10. Extracellular matrix as target for antitumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Harisi, Revekka; Jeney, Andras

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to survey the accumulated knowledge on the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tumors referring to its putative utility as therapeutic target. Following the traditional observation on the extensive morphological alteration in the tumor-affected tissue, the well-documented aberrant cellular regulation indicated that ECM components have an active role in tumor progression. However, due to the diverse functions and variable expression of proteoglycans, matrix proteins, and integrins, it is rather difficult to identify a comprehensive therapeutic target among ECM components. At present, the elevated level of heparanase and the prominent expression of αvβ5 integrin are considered as promising therapeutic targets. The inhibition of glycosaminoglycan offers another promising approach in the treatment of those tumors which are stimulated by proteoglycans. It can be ascertained that a selective ECM inhibitor would be a great asset to control metastasis driven by ECM-mediated signaling. PMID:26089687

  11. Extracellular matrix and pathogenic mechanisms in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hardingham, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a heterogeneous condition of joint degeneration characterized by structural changes in extracellular matrices such as subchondral bone and cartilage. Research has identified many diverse ways of initiating OA, varying from mechanical disruption to gene mutations in structural proteins. A frequent end point is cartilage loss, which can occur irrespective of the initiating mechanism. Of the mechanisms responsible for cartilage matrix damage, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS)-5 was identified as of key importance in knockout mice, but work with human cartilage has suggested that ADAMTS-4 was also involved. A transgenic mouse expressing aggrecan lacking a key aggrecanase site clearly showed that loss of aggrecan from cartilage was an important step in both inflammatory and trauma-induced joint degeneration. In OA, cartilage chondrocytes show changes in gene expression, and it remains to be resolved if this reflects adaptive responses to changes in biological, physical, and mechanical signaling rather than any form of differentiation. PMID:18457609

  12. Extracellular matrix motion and early morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Rajprasad; Rongish, Brenda J; Smith, Christopher M; Filla, Michael B; Czirok, Andras; Bénazéraf, Bertrand; Little, Charles D

    2016-06-15

    For over a century, embryologists who studied cellular motion in early amniotes generally assumed that morphogenetic movement reflected migration relative to a static extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold. However, as we discuss in this Review, recent investigations reveal that the ECM is also moving during morphogenesis. Time-lapse studies show how convective tissue displacement patterns, as visualized by ECM markers, contribute to morphogenesis and organogenesis. Computational image analysis distinguishes between cell-autonomous (active) displacements and convection caused by large-scale (composite) tissue movements. Modern quantification of large-scale 'total' cellular motion and the accompanying ECM motion in the embryo demonstrates that a dynamic ECM is required for generation of the emergent motion patterns that drive amniote morphogenesis. PMID:27302396

  13. The Extracellular Matrix and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ashley S.; Kang, Li; Wasserman, David H.

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a highly dynamic compartment that undergoes remodeling as a result of injury and repair. Over the past decade, mounting evidence in humans and rodents suggest that ECM remodeling is associated with diet-induced insulin resistance in several metabolic tissues. Additionally, integrin receptors for the ECM have also been implicated in the regulation of insulin action. This review will address what is currently known about the ECM, integrins and insulin action in the muscle, liver and adipose tissue. Understanding how ECM remodeling and integrin signaling regulates insulin action may aid in the development of new therapeutic targets for the treatment of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26059707

  14. Stretching the boundaries of extracellular matrix research.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Richard O

    2014-12-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins constitute >1% of the proteome and interact with many modifiers and growth factors to affect most aspects of cellular behaviour during development and normal physiology, as well as in diseases such as fibroses, cancer and many genetic disorders. In addition to biochemical signals provided to cells by ECM proteins, important cell–ECM interactions involve bidirectional mechanotransduction influences, which are dependent on the physical structure and organization of the ECM. These are beginning to be understood using twenty-first-century approaches, including biophysics, nanotechnology, biological engineering and modern microscopy. Articles in this issue of Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology review progress in our understanding of the ECM. PMID:25574535

  15. [Hematopoietic microenvironment: cellular and extracellular matrix elements].

    PubMed

    Minguell, J J; Fernández, M; Tetas, M; Martínez, J; Bruzzone, M; Rodríguez, J P

    1988-06-01

    In bone marrow, cellular stroma together with extracellular matrix (EM) provide an adequate microenvironment for the proliferation and differentiation of hemopoietic progenitor cells. In this article we describe studies on the cell characteristics of a main stromal phenotype, a fibroblast-like cell and its ability to produce in vitro EM components. Comparative studies were performed in fibroblast cultures derived from normal and acute lymphoblastic leukemic (ALL) bone marrow. The grow characteristics of fibroblasts from ALL marrow as well as its capacity to synthetize collagen, fibronectin and GAGs are impaired when compared to fibroblast from normal marrow. Thus, in ALL the impaired production of EM biomolecules by a transient damaged population of stromal cells, may contribute to the development of a defective microenvironment for hemopoiesis. PMID:3154858

  16. Extracellular matrix fluctuations during early embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, A; Rupp, P A; Rongish, B J; Little, C D; Czirók, A

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) movements and rearrangements were studied in avian embryos during early stages of development. We show that the ECM moves as a composite material, whereby distinct molecular components as well as spatially separated layers exhibit similar displacements. Using scanning wide field and confocal microscopy we show that the velocity field of ECM displacement is smooth in space and that ECM movements are correlated even at locations separated by several hundred micrometers. Velocity vectors, however, strongly fluctuate in time. The autocorrelation time of the velocity fluctuations is less than a minute. Suppression of the fluctuations yields a persistent movement pattern that is shared among embryos at equivalent stages of development. The high resolution of the velocity fields allows a detailed spatio-temporal characterization of important morphogenetic processes, especially tissue dynamics surrounding the embryonic organizer (Hensen’s node). PMID:21750366

  17. Defining the extracellular matrix using proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Humphries, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    The cell microenvironment has a profound influence on the behaviour, growth and survival of cells. The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides not only mechanical and structural support to cells and tissues but also binds soluble ligands and transmembrane receptors to provide spatial coordination of signalling processes. The ability of cells to sense the chemical, mechanical and topographical features of the ECM enables them to integrate complex, multiparametric information into a coherent response to the surrounding microenvironment. Consequently, dysregulation or mutation of ECM components results in a broad range of pathological conditions. Characterization of the composition of ECM derived from various cells has begun to reveal insights into ECM structure and function, and mechanisms of disease. Proteomic methodologies permit the global analysis of subcellular systems, but extracellular and transmembrane proteins present analytical difficulties to proteomic strategies owing to the particular biochemical properties of these molecules. Here, we review advances in proteomic approaches that have been applied to furthering our understanding of the ECM microenvironment. We survey recent studies that have addressed challenges in the analysis of ECM and discuss major outcomes in the context of health and disease. In addition, we summarize efforts to progress towards a systems-level understanding of ECM biology. PMID:23419153

  18. Extracellular matrix dynamics and fetal membrane rupture.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Jerome F

    2013-02-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in determining cell and organ function: (1) it is an organizing substrate that provides tissue tensile strength; (2) it anchors cells and influences cell morphology and function via interaction with cell surface receptors; and (3) it is a reservoir for growth factors. Alterations in the content and the composition of the ECM determine its physical and biological properties, including strength and susceptibility to degradation. The ECM components themselves also harbor cryptic matrikines, which when exposed by conformational change or proteolysis have potent effects on cell function, including stimulating the production of cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Collectively, these properties of the ECM reflect a dynamic tissue component that influences both tissue form and function. This review illustrates how defects in ECM synthesis and metabolism and the physiological process of ECM turnover contribute to changes in the fetal membranes that precede normal parturition and contribute to the pathological events leading to preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). PMID:22267536

  19. Molecular Adhesion between Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the molecular adhesion between the major constituents of cartilage extracellular matrix, namely, the highly negatively charged proteoglycan aggrecan and the type II/IX/XI fibrillar collagen network, in simulated physiological conditions. Colloidal force spectroscopy was applied to measure the maximum adhesion force and total adhesion energy between aggrecan end-attached spherical tips (end radius R ≈ 2.5 μm) and trypsin-treated cartilage disks with undamaged collagen networks. Studies were carried out in various aqueous solutions to reveal the physical factors that govern aggrecan–collagen adhesion. Increasing both ionic strength and [Ca2+] significantly increased adhesion, highlighting the importance of electrostatic repulsion and Ca2+-mediated ion bridging effects. In addition, we probed how partial enzymatic degradation of the collagen network, which simulates osteoarthritic conditions, affects the aggrecan–collagen interactions. Interestingly, we found a significant increase in aggrecan–collagen adhesion even when there were no detectable changes at the macro- or microscales. It is hypothesized that the aggrecan–collagen adhesion, together with aggrecan–aggrecan self-adhesion, works synergistically to determine the local molecular deformability and energy dissipation of the cartilage matrix, in turn, affecting its macroscopic tissue properties. PMID:24491174

  20. Extracellular Matrix Dynamics and Fetal Membrane Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Strauss,, Jerome F.

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in determining cell and organ function: (1) it is an organizing substrate that provides tissue tensile strength; (2) it anchors cells and influences cell morphology and function via interaction with cell surface receptors; and (3) it is a reservoir for growth factors. Alterations in the content and the composition of the ECM determine its physical and biological properties, including strength and susceptibility to degradation. The ECM components themselves also harbor cryptic matrikines, which when exposed by conformational change or proteolysis have potent effects on cell function, including stimulating the production of cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Collectively, these properties of the ECM reflect a dynamic tissue component that influences both tissue form and function. This review illustrates how defects in ECM synthesis and metabolism and the physiological process of ECM turnover contribute to changes in the fetal membranes that precede normal parturition and contribute to the pathological events leading to preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). PMID:22267536

  1. Roles of extracellular matrix in follicular development.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, R J; van Wezel, I L; Irving-Rodgers, H F; Lavranos, T C; Irvine, C M; Krupa, M

    1999-01-01

    The cellular biology and changes in the extracellular matrix of ovarian follicles during their development are reviewed. During growth of the bovine ovarian follicle the follicular basal lamina doubles 19 times in surface area. It changes in composition, having collagen IV alpha 1-26 and laminin alpha 1, beta 2 and gamma 1 at the primordial stage, and collagen IV alpha 1 and alpha 2, reduced amounts of alpha 3-alpha 5, and a higher content of laminin alpha 1, beta 2 and gamma 1 at the antral stage. In atretic antral follicles laminin alpha 2 was also detected. The follicular epithelium also changes from one layer to many layers during follicular growth. It is clear that not all granulosal cells have equal potential to divide, and we have evidence that the granulosal cells arise from a population of stem cells. This finding has important ramifications and supports the concept that different follicular growth factors can act on different subsets of granulosal cells. In antral follicles, the replication of cells occurs in the middle layers of the membrana granulosa, with older granulosal cells towards the antrum and towards the basal lamina. The basal cells in the membrana granulosa have also been observed to vary in shape between follicies. In smaller antral follicles, they were either columnar or rounded, and in follicles > 5 mm the cells were all rounded. The reasons for these changes in matrix and cell shapes are discussed in relation to follicular development. PMID:10692866

  2. Binding of the extracellular matrix component entactin to Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    López-Ribot, J L; Chaffin, W L

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction between Candida albicans and entactin, a recently characterized glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix, especially in the basement membrane. Organisms of both the yeast and the hyphal morphologies of the fungus had the ability to bind recombinant entactin, as detected by an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Material present in the 2-mercaptoethanol cell wall extracts from both C. albicans growth forms was capable of binding to immobilized recombinant entactin in a dose-dependent manner. Binding to entactin was approximately twice that observed for laminin. Binding of an extract component(s) to entactin was partially inhibited by an Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide. A polyclonal antientactin antiserum, as well as a pooled antiserum preparation raised against components present in different C. albicans cell wall extracts, completely or almost completely abolished binding. The existence of morphology-specific receptor-like molecules which bind to different domains of the entactin molecule was ruled out in a competition binding assay. The entactin-binding material(s) in the cell wall also displayed some ability to bind laminin and fibronectin, since preadsorption in the presence of these extracellular matrix components resulted in reduction of binding to entactin. Moieties with a molecular mass of approximately 25, 44, and 65 kDa present in the 2-mercaptoethanol cell wall extracts from both blastoconidia and germ tubes were detected in a ligand affinity blotting experiment as having the ability to bind entactin. Interactions between C. albicans and entactin could be important in mediating adhesion of the fungus to the host tissues and may play a role in the establishment of the disseminated form of the disease. Images PMID:7927722

  3. Cells involved in extracellular matrix remodeling after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Larissa Ferraz; Mataveli, Fábio D’Aguiar; Mader, Ana Maria Amaral Antônio; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Justo, Giselle Zenker; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the effects of VEGF165 gene transfer in the process of remodeling of the extracellular matrix after an acute myocardial infarct. Methods Wistar rats were submitted to myocardial infarction, after the ligation of the left descending artery, and the left ventricle ejection fraction was used to classify the infarcts into large and small. The animals were divided into groups of ten, according to the size of infarcted area (large or small), and received or not VEGF165 treatment. Evaluation of different markers was performed using immunohistochemistry and digital quantification. The primary antibodies used in the analysis were anti-fibronectin, anti-vimentin, anti-CD44, anti-E-cadherin, anti-CD24, anti-alpha-1-actin, and anti-PCNA. The results were expressed as mean and standard error, and analyzed by ANOVA, considering statistically significant if p≤0.05. Results There was a significant increase in the expression of undifferentiated cell markers, such as fibronectin (protein present in the extracellular matrix) and CD44 (glycoprotein present in the endothelial cells). However, there was decreased expression of vimentin and PCNA, indicating a possible decrease in the process of cell proliferation after treatment with VEGF165. Markers of differentiated cells, E-cadherin (adhesion protein between myocardial cells), CD24 (protein present in the blood vessels), and alpha-1-actin (specific myocyte marker), showed higher expression in the groups submitted to gene therapy, compared to non-treated group. The value obtained by the relation between alpha-1-actin and vimentin was approximately three times higher in the groups treated with VEGF165, suggesting greater tissue differentiation. Conclusion The results demonstrated the important role of myocytes in the process of tissue remodeling, confirming that VEGF165 seems to provide a protective effect in the treatment of acute myocardial infarct. PMID:25993074

  4. A phosphodiester bridge between two arabinose residues as a structural element of an extracellular glycoprotein of Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Holst, O; Christoffel, V; Fründ, R; Moll, H; Sumper, M

    1989-05-01

    The sulphated glycoprotein SSG 185 is the monomeric precursor of a highly aggregated structural element in the extracellular matrix of the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri. A phosphodiester of arabinose was isolated from a saccharide fragment of SSG 185. The structure of this phosphodiester was investigated by methylation analysis, 13C-NMR, photometric methods and enzymatic assays and identified as D-Araiota-5-phospho-5-D-Araiota. The function of this phosphodiester bridge as a crosslink of different carbohydrate chains in SSG 185 is discussed. PMID:2714288

  5. Fibulin's organization into the extracellular matrix of fetal lung fibroblasts is dependent on fibronectin matrix assembly.

    PubMed

    Roman, J; McDonald, J A

    1993-05-01

    Fibulin is a newly described extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoprotein whose function has not been elucidated. We have observed that cultured fetal lung fibroblasts produce fibulin and have postulated that its expression may be important during lung development. To begin to understand the potential function of fibulin in lung development, we examined its expression and distribution in cultured fetal lung fibroblasts. Immunofluorescence staining of cultured fibroblasts revealed that fibulin was distributed upon their surface in a fibrillar array resembling fibronectin (FN), another ECM glycoprotein expressed by fetal lung fibroblasts and implicated in lung and heart development. Detection of fibulin by immunofluorescence staining of nonpermeabilized cells, its immunoprecipitation from 125I-cell surface-labeled fibroblasts, pulse-chase analysis, and temperature-induced phase separation studies revealed that fibulin is an ECM peripheral membrane protein that is synthesized and secreted by cultured fetal lung fibroblasts shortly after plating and incorporated into their matrix in a divalent cation-dependent manner. Because fibulin co-distributes with both FN and the FN receptor, the integrin alpha 5 beta 1, we examined the possibility that fibulin was interacting with both components. Dissociation of FN receptors from FN fibers with anti-FN receptor antibodies did not affect fibulin's distribution, suggesting that fibulin binds FN and that this interaction is not affected by the state of FN receptor binding. Finally, inhibition of FN matrix assembly prevented the deposition of fibulin, providing further support for FN-fibulin interactions and suggesting that fibulin deposition is dependent on FN matrix assembly. PMID:8481235

  6. Surface Characterization of Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Bryan N.; Barnes, Christopher A.; Kasick, Rena T.; Michel, Roger; Gilbert, Thomas W.; Beer-Stolz, Donna; Castner, David G.; Ratner, Buddy D.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds prepared from different tissue sources or using different methods have been demonstrated to have distinctive effects upon cell adhesion patterns and the ability to support and maintain differentiated phenotypes. It is unknown whether the molecular composition or the ultrastructure of the ECM plays a greater role in determining the phenotype of the cells with which it comes into contact. However, when implanted, the topology and ligand landscape of the material will determine the host molecules that bind and the type and behavior of cells that mediate the host response. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of surface characteristics is essential in the design of scaffolds for specific clinical applications. The surface characteristics of ECM scaffolds derived from porcine urinary bladder, small intestine, and liver as well as the effects of two commonly used methods of chemical cross-linking upon UBM were investigated. Electron microscopy and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy were used to examine the surface characteristics of the scaffolds. The results show that ECM scaffolds have unique morphologic and structural properties which are dependant on the organ or tissue from which the scaffold is harvested. Furthermore, the results show that the surface characteristics of an ECM scaffold are changed through chemical cross-linking. PMID:19828192

  7. Interactions of Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Horkay, Ferenc

    2012-12-15

    Articular cartilage is a low-friction, load-bearing tissue located at joint surfaces. The extracellular matrix (ECM) of cartilage consists of a fibrous collagen network, which is pre-stressed by the osmotic swelling pressure exerted by negatively charged proteoglycan aggregates embedded in the collagen network. The major proteoglycan is the bottlebrush shaped aggrecan, which forms complexes with linear hyaluronic acid chains. We quantify microscopic and macroscopic changes resulting from self-assembly between aggrecan and hyaluronic acid using a complementary set of physical measurements to determine structure and interactions by combining scattering techniques, including small-angle X-ray scattering, small-angle neutron scattering, and dynamic light scattering with macroscopic osmotic pressure measurements. It is demonstrated that the osmotic pressure that defines the load bearing ability of cartilage is primarily governed by the main macromolecular components (aggrecan and collagen) of the ECM. Knowledge of the interactions between the macromolecular components of cartilage ECM is essential to understand biological function and to develop successful tissue engineering strategies for cartilage repair. PMID:23997426

  8. Vascular Extracellular Matrix and Arterial Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    WAGENSEIL, JESSICA E.; MECHAM, ROBERT P.

    2009-01-01

    An important factor in the transition from an open to a closed circulatory system was a change in vessel wall structure and composition that enabled the large arteries to store and release energy during the cardiac cycle. The component of the arterial wall in vertebrates that accounts for these properties is the elastic fiber network organized by medial smooth muscle. Beginning with the onset of pulsatile blood flow in the developing aorta, smooth muscle cells in the vessel wall produce a complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that will ultimately define the mechanical properties that are critical for proper function of the adult vascular system. This review discusses the structural ECM proteins in the vertebrate aortic wall and will explore how the choice of ECM components has changed through evolution as the cardiovascular system became more advanced and pulse pressure increased. By correlating vessel mechanics with physiological blood pressure across animal species and in mice with altered vessel compliance, we show that cardiac and vascular development are physiologically coupled, and we provide evidence for a universal elastic modulus that controls the parameters of ECM deposition in vessel wall development. We also discuss mechanical models that can be used to design better tissue-engineered vessels and to test the efficacy of clinical treatments. PMID:19584318

  9. Extracellular matrix mechanics in lung parenchymal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Suki, Béla; Bates, Jason H.T.

    2008-01-01

    In this review, we examine how the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the lung contributes to the overall mechanical properties of the parenchyma, and how these properties change in disease. The connective tissues of the lung are composed of cells and ECM, which includes a variety of biological macromolecules and water. The macromolecules that are most important in determining the mechanical properties of the ECM are collagen, elastin, and proteoglycans. We first discuss the various components of the ECM and how their architectural organization gives rise to the mechanical properties of the parenchyma. Next, we examine how mechanical forces can affect the physiological functioning of the lung parenchyma. Collagen plays an especially important role in determining the homeostasis and cellular responses to injury because it is the most important load-bearing component of the parenchyma. We then demonstrate how the concept of percolation can be used to link microscopic pathologic alterations in the parenchyma to clinically measurable lung function during the progression of emphysema and fibrosis. Finally, we speculate about the possibility of using targeted tissue engineering to optimize treatment of these two major lung diseases. PMID:18485836

  10. Lung Extracellular Matrix and Fibroblast Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a tissue-specific macromolecular structure that provides physical support to tissues and is essential for normal organ function. In the lung, ECM plays an active role in shaping cell behavior both in health and disease by virtue of the contextual clues it imparts to cells. Qualities including dimensionality, molecular composition, and intrinsic stiffness all promote normal function of the lung ECM. Alterations in composition and/or modulation of stiffness of the focally injured or diseased lung ECM microenvironment plays a part in reparative processes performed by fibroblasts. Under conditions of remodeling or in disease states, inhomogeneous stiffening (or softening) of the pathologic ECM may both precede modifications in cell behavior and be a result of disease progression. The ability of ECM to stimulate further ECM production by fibroblasts and drive disease progression has potentially significant implications for mesenchymal stromal cell–based therapies; in the setting of pathologic ECM stiffness or composition, the therapeutic intent of progenitor cells may be subverted. Taken together, current data suggest that lung ECM actively contributes to health and disease; thus, mediators of cell–ECM signaling or factors that influence ECM stiffness may represent viable therapeutic targets in many lung disorders. PMID:25830832

  11. Engineering hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics

    PubMed Central

    Geckil, Hikmet; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Moon, SangJun

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex cellular environment consisting of proteins, proteoglycans, and other soluble molecules. ECM provides structural support to mammalian cells and a regulatory milieu with a variety of important cell functions, including assembling cells into various tissues and organs, regulating growth and cell–cell communication. Developing a tailored in vitro cell culture environment that mimics the intricate and organized nanoscale meshwork of native ECM is desirable. Recent studies have shown the potential of hydrogels to mimic native ECM. Such an engineered native-like ECM is more likely to provide cells with rational cues for diagnostic and therapeutic studies. The research for novel biomaterials has led to an extension of the scope and techniques used to fabricate biomimetic hydrogel scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. In this article, we detail the progress of the current state-of-the-art engineering methods to create cell-encapsulating hydrogel tissue constructs as well as their applications in in vitro models in biomedicine. PMID:20394538

  12. Expression of extracellular matrix proteins in adenomatoid odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Modolo, Filipe; Biz, Michelle Tillmann; Martins, Marília Trierveiller; Machado de Sousa, Suzana Orsini; de Araújo, Ney Soares

    2010-03-01

    Altered expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) components has been reported in several pathologies; however, few ECM proteins have been evaluated in adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT). The aim of this study was to analyze the expression and distribution of the ECM proteoglycans: biglycan and decorin; and glycoproteins: osteonectin, osteopontin, bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin in the AOT. Three-micrometer sections from paraffin-embedded specimens were evaluated employing a streptavidin-biotin immunohistochemical method with the antibodies against the proteins previously cited. Only the osteonectin was expressed in the epithelial cells. The eosinophilic amorphous material and the connective tissue showed expression of all components studied. The calcification foci expressed only osteopontin. In conclusion, the low expression of the components studied in neoplastic epithelial cells suggests that the epithelial cells act probably as stimulators of the expression by the stroma, which in turn can act as agonist or antagonist of the tumor growth. These results suggest that the components studied probably have a key role in the biological behavior of the AOT. PMID:20070486

  13. Degradation of connective tissue matrices by macrophages. II. Influence of matrix composition on proteolysis of glycoproteins, elastin, and collagen by macrophages in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.A.; Werb, Z.

    1980-12-01

    Thioglycollate-elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages were cultured in contact with the mixture of extracellular matrix proteins produced by rat smooth muscle cells in culture. Both live macrophages and their conditioned media hydrolyzed glycoproteins, elastin, and collagen. Live macrophages also degraded extracellular connective tissue proteins secreted by endothelial cells and fibroblasts. The glycoproteins in the matrix markedly inhibited the rate of digestion of the other macromolecules, particularly elastin. When plasminogen was added to the matrix, activation of plasminogen to plasmin resulted in the hydrolysis of the glycoprotein components, which then allowed the macrophage elastase easier access to its substrate, elastin. Thus, although plasmin has no direct elastinolytic activity, its presence accelerated the rate of hydrolysis of elastin and therefore the rate of matrix degradation. These findings may be important in an understanding of disease states, such as emphysema and atherosclerosis, that are characterized by the destruction of connective tissue.

  14. The extracellular matrix in hepatic regeneration.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Hernandez, A; Amenta, P S

    1995-11-01

    After partial hepatectomy, as a consequence of hepatocyte proliferation, cell clusters containing 10-14 hepatocytes are formed. These clusters are devoid of sinusoids and extracellular matrix; therefore, many hepatocytes are two to three cells removed from the vascular spaces. Four days after hepatectomy, Ito cells send delicate cell processes between the hepatocytes in the clusters. This "invasion" of the clusters coincides with the activation in Ito cells of genes encoding for several laminin chains. The penetration of Ito cells into the clusters is followed by fenestrated endothelial cells, and in this manner the normal hepatocyte vascular relationship is restored. As soon as the normal vascular structure is reestablished, the laminin genes are turned off. This chain of events is similar to the one taking place during hepatogenesis when continuous capillaries are converted into sinusoids. This similarity in hepatogenesis and regeneration suggests that the secreted laminin chains may be signals for the vascularization of the clusters by fenestrated sinusoids. During this process neither entactin nor laminin alpha chains are secreted. The vascularization of the regenerating clusters contrasts sharply to the vascularization of cirrhotic nodules. In the latter case, entactin and perhaps laminin alpha 1 chains are secreted, and the final result is the formation of basement membranes and continuous capillaries rather than fenestrated sinusoids. We suggest that entactin and specific laminin chains play a crucial role in determining the outcome of hepatic injury. Definition of the roles of entactin and laminin chains in vascularization and modulation of the endothelial phenotype will not only elucidate important aspects of regeneration, but may provide a better understanding of cirrhosis and even suggest therapeutic approaches. PMID:7589981

  15. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Walter H.; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D.; Roman, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an ‘end-stage’ process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation–reduction (redox) reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This review is not meant to

  16. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Watson, Walter H; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roman, Jesse

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an 'end-stage' process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This review is not meant to

  17. Extracellular Matrix and Its Role in Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Michelle K.Y.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    In adult mammalian testes, such as rats, Sertoli and germ cells at different stages of their development in the seminiferous epithelium are in close contact with the basement membrane, a modified form of extracellular matrix (ECM). In essence, Sertoli and germ cells in particular spermatogonia are “resting” on the basement membrane at different stages of the seminiferous epithelial cycle, relying on its structural and hormonal supports. Thus, it is not entirely unexpected that ECM plays a significant role in regulating spermatogenesis, particularly spermatogonia and Sertoli cells, and the blood-testis barrier (BTB) constituted by Sertoli cells since these cells are in physical contact with the basement membrane. Additionally, the basement membrane is also in close contact with the underlying collagen network and the myoid cell layers, which together with the lymphatic network, constitute the tunica propria. The seminiferous epithelium and the tunica propria, in turn, constitute the seminiferous tubule, which is the functional unit that produces spermatozoa via its interaction with Leydig cells in the interstitium. In short, the basement membrane and the underlying collagen network that create the acellular zone of the tunica propria may even facilitate cross-talk between the seminiferous epithelium, the myoid cells and cells in the interstitium. Recent studies in the field have illustrated the crucial role of ECM in supporting Sertoli and germ cell function in the seminiferous epithelium, including the BTB dynamics. In this chapter, we summarize some of the latest findings in the field regarding the functional role of ECM in spermatogenesis using the adult rat testis as a model. We also highlight specific areas of research that deserve attention for investigators in the field. PMID:19856163

  18. Effects of ionizing radiation on extracellular matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, F.; Bradley, D. A.; Winlove, C. P.

    2007-09-01

    The extracellular matrix is a ubiquitous and important component of tissues. We investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of its principal macromolecular components, pericardial collagen, ligament elastin and hyaluronan, a representative glycosaminoglycan. Samples were exposed to X-rays from an electron linear accelerator in the range of 10-100 Gy to cover the range of irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. A uniaxial mechanical testing protocol was used to characterize the fibrous proteins. For pericardial tissue the major change was an increase in the elastic modulus in the toe region of the curve (⩽20% strain), from 23±18 kPa for controls to 57±22 kPa at a dose of 10 Gy ( p=0.01, α=0.05). At larger strain (⩾20% strain), the elastic modulus in the linear region decreased from 1.92±0.70 MPa for control pericardium tissue to 1.31±0.56 MPa ( p=0.01, α=0.05) for 10 Gy X-irradiated sample. Similar observations have been made previously on tendon collagen at larger strains. For elastin, the stress-strain relationship was linear up to 30% strain, but the elastic modulus decreased significantly with irradiation (controls 626±65 kPa, irradiated 474±121 kPa ( p=0.02, α=0.05), at 10 Gy X-irradiation). The results suggest that for collagen the primary effect of irradiation is generation of additional cross-links, while for elastin chain scissions are important. The viscosity of HA (at 1.25% w/v and 0.125% w/v) was measured by both cone and plate and capillary viscometry, the former providing measurement at uniform shear rate and the latter providing a more sensitive indication of changes at low viscosity. Both techniques revealed a dose-dependent reduction in viscosity (from 3400±194 cP for controls to 1500±88 cP at a shear rate of 2 s -1 and dose of 75 Gy), again suggesting depolymerization.

  19. The cytoprotective capacity of processed human cardiac extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Kappler, Benjamin; Anic, Petra; Becker, Matthias; Bader, Andreas; Klose, Kristin; Klein, Oliver; Oberwallner, Barbara; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Falk, Volkmar; Stamm, Christof

    2016-07-01

    Freshly isolated human cardiac extracellular matrix sheets (cECM) have been shown to support stem cell proliferation and tissue-specific lineage commitment. We now developed a protocol for standardized production of durable, bio-functional hcECM microparticles and corresponding hydrogel, and tested its cytoprotective effects on contractile cells subjected to ischemia-like conditions. Human ventricular myocardium was decellularized by a 3-step protocol, including Tris/EDTA, SDS and serum incubation (cECM). Following snap-freezing and lyophilization, microparticles were created and characterized by laser diffraction, dynamic image analysis (DIA), and mass spectrometry. Moreover, cECM hydrogel was produced by pepsin digestion. Baseline cell-support characteristics were determined using murine HL-1 cardiomyocytes, and the cytoprotective effects of ECM products were tested under hypoxia and glucose/serum deprivation. In cECM, glycoproteins (thrombospondin 1, fibronectin, collagens and nidogen-1) and proteoglycans (dermatopontin, lumican and mimecan) were preserved, but residual intracellular and blood-borne proteins were also detected. The median particle feret diameter was 66 μm (15-157 μm) by laser diffraction, and 57 μm (20-182 μm) by DIA with crystal violet staining. HL-1 cells displayed enhanced metabolic activity (39 ± 12 %, P < 0.05) and proliferation (16 ± 3 %, P < 0.05) when grown on cECM microparticles in normoxia. During simulated ischemia, cECM microparticles exerted distinct cytoprotective effects (MTS conversion, 240 ± 32 %; BrdU uptake, 45 ± 14 %; LDH release, -72 ± 7 %; P < 0.01, each). When cECM microparticles were solubilized to form a hydrogel, the cytoprotective effect was initially abolished. However, modifying the preparation process (pepsin digestion at pH 2 and 25 °C, 1 mg/ml final cECM concentration) restored the cytoprotective cECM activity. Extracellular matrix from human myocardium can be processed to

  20. The extracellular matrix modulates the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Pickup, Michael W; Mouw, Janna K; Weaver, Valerie M

    2014-12-01

    The extracellular matrix regulates tissue development and homeostasis, and its dysregulation contributes to neoplastic progression. The extracellular matrix serves not only as the scaffold upon which tissues are organized but provides critical biochemical and biomechanical cues that direct cell growth, survival, migration and differentiation and modulate vascular development and immune function. Thus, while genetic modifications in tumor cells undoubtedly initiate and drive malignancy, cancer progresses within a dynamically evolving extracellular matrix that modulates virtually every behavioral facet of the tumor cells and cancer-associated stromal cells. Hanahan and Weinberg defined the hallmarks of cancer to encompass key biological capabilities that are acquired and essential for the development, growth and dissemination of all human cancers. These capabilities include sustained proliferation, evasion of growth suppression, death resistance, replicative immortality, induced angiogenesis, initiation of invasion, dysregulation of cellular energetics, avoidance of immune destruction and chronic inflammation. Here, we argue that biophysical and biochemical cues from the tumor-associated extracellular matrix influence each of these cancer hallmarks and are therefore critical for malignancy. We suggest that the success of cancer prevention and therapy programs requires an intimate understanding of the reciprocal feedback between the evolving extracellular matrix, the tumor cells and its cancer-associated cellular stroma. PMID:25381661

  1. The extracellular matrix modulates the hallmarks of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pickup, Michael W; Mouw, Janna K; Weaver, Valerie M

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix regulates tissue development and homeostasis, and its dysregulation contributes to neoplastic progression. The extracellular matrix serves not only as the scaffold upon which tissues are organized but provides critical biochemical and biomechanical cues that direct cell growth, survival, migration and differentiation and modulate vascular development and immune function. Thus, while genetic modifications in tumor cells undoubtedly initiate and drive malignancy, cancer progresses within a dynamically evolving extracellular matrix that modulates virtually every behavioral facet of the tumor cells and cancer-associated stromal cells. Hanahan and Weinberg defined the hallmarks of cancer to encompass key biological capabilities that are acquired and essential for the development, growth and dissemination of all human cancers. These capabilities include sustained proliferation, evasion of growth suppression, death resistance, replicative immortality, induced angiogenesis, initiation of invasion, dysregulation of cellular energetics, avoidance of immune destruction and chronic inflammation. Here, we argue that biophysical and biochemical cues from the tumor-associated extracellular matrix influence each of these cancer hallmarks and are therefore critical for malignancy. We suggest that the success of cancer prevention and therapy programs requires an intimate understanding of the reciprocal feedback between the evolving extracellular matrix, the tumor cells and its cancer-associated cellular stroma. PMID:25381661

  2. Monitoring of Extracellular Matrix Formation using Nanosecond Pulsed Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Miya; Sato, Masato; Mitani, Genya; Nagai, Toshihiro; Kutsuna, Toshiharu; Mochida, Joji; Kikuchi, Makoto

    There is a new demand in the field of tissue engineering for evaluation technology of extracellular matrix because the extracellular matrix plays an important role in the function of skeletal tissue such as articular cartilage. We previously proposed a noninvasive method of viscoelastic characterization of tissue phantom, based on the photoacoustic measurement. The purpose of this study was to verify the applicability of the photoacoustic measurement method for monitoring of the development of extracellular matrix using tissue engineering technology. The decay times measured by the photoacoustic method were varied with culture periods when tissue-engineered articular cartilages with various culture periods (-12 weeks) were used as samples. Tissue-engineered cartilage cultured for a long period showed shorter decay times, indicating that the samples approached an elastic solid from a rheological viewpoint. By comparison between biochemical analyses and biomechanical studies, we proved that the photoacoustic signal was a good indicator for evaluating extracellular matrix formation because the change of the photoacoustic decay times would reflect the production of an extracellular matrix.

  3. Strategic Endothelial Cell Tube Formation Assay: Comparing Extracellular Matrix and Growth Factor Reduced Extracellular Matrix.

    PubMed

    Xie, Daniel; Ju, Donghong; Speyer, Cecilia; Gorski, David; Kosir, Mary A

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumors require a blood supply in order to survive and spread. These tumors obtain their needed blood from the patient's blood stream by hijacking the process of angiogenesis, in which new blood vessels are formed from existing blood vessels. The CXCR2 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2) receptor is a transmembrane G-protein-linked molecule found in many cells that is closely associated with angiogenesis(1). Specific blockade of the CXCR2 receptor inhibits angiogenesis, as measured by several assays such as the endothelial tube formation assay. The tube formation assay is useful for studying angiogenesis because it is an excellent method of studying the effects that any given compound or environmental condition may have on angiogenesis. It is a simple and quick in vitro assay that generates quantifiable data and requires relatively few components. Unlike in vivo assays, it does not require animals and can be carried out in less than two days. This protocol describes a variation of the extracellular matrix supporting endothelial tube formation assay, which tests the CXCR2 receptor. PMID:27585062

  4. Interactions between Skeletal Muscle Myoblasts and their Extracellular Matrix Revealed by a Serum Free Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Vishal; Dye, Danielle E.; Kinnear, Beverley F.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Grounds, Miranda D.; Coombe, Deirdre R.

    2015-01-01

    Decellularisation of skeletal muscle provides a system to study the interactions of myoblasts with muscle extracellular matrix (ECM). This study describes the efficient decellularisation of quadriceps muscle with the retention of matrix components and the use of this matrix for myoblast proliferation and differentiation under serum free culture conditions. Three decellularisation approaches were examined; the most effective was phospholipase A2 treatment, which removed cellular material while maximizing the retention of ECM components. Decellularised muscle matrices were then solubilized and used as substrates for C2C12 mouse myoblast serum free cultures. The muscle matrix supported myoblast proliferation and differentiation equally as well as collagen and fibronectin. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that myoblasts seeded on muscle matrix and fibronectin differentiated to form long, well-aligned myotubes, while myoblasts seeded on collagen were less organized. qPCR analyses showed a time dependent increase in genes involved in skeletal muscle differentiation and suggested that muscle-derived matrix may stimulate an increased rate of differentiation compared to collagen and fibronectin. Decellularized whole muscle three-dimensional scaffolds also supported cell adhesion and spreading, with myoblasts aligning along specific tracts of matrix proteins within the scaffolds. Thus, under serum free conditions, intact acellular muscle matrices provided cues to direct myoblast adhesion and migration. In addition, myoblasts were shown to rapidly secrete and organise their own matrix glycoproteins to create a localized ECM microenvironment. This serum free culture system has revealed that the correct muscle ECM facilitates more rapid cell organisation and differentiation than single matrix glycoprotein substrates. PMID:26030912

  5. The interaction of Tamm-Horsfall protein with the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, C; Brealey, R; Steele, J; Rook, G A

    1993-01-01

    Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP) is the major glycoprotein component of urine, yet its biological role remains obscure. Recent reports have suggested that a concanavalin A (Con A)-binding fraction of THP from pregnancy urine can bind the cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 (IL-1). In order to investigate this claim in relation to THP from normal adult urine we raised monoclonal antibodies to THP and sought THP/TNF-alpha interactions in three separate assay systems. We found no evidence that THP binds to TNF-alpha under physiological conditions, but we observed that it exerts a weak, probably not physiologically relevant, but reproducible inhibitory effect on the toxicity of TNF-alpha for monolayers of L929 cells, even when the cells are pretreated with the THP, and washed before addition of the cytokine. Since our preparations of THP do not interact directly with TNF-alpha we postulated an interaction with the cells themselves, or with their extracellular matrix. The THP was found by ELISA, immunoblotting and immunohistology, to bind to as yet unidentified components of the extracellular matrix in a manner dependent on cations, pH and carbohydrates. These data, considered in the light of the published amino acid sequence and biochemical properties, suggest that THP is a member of a structural glycoprotein family known to modulate cell adhesion. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8344699

  6. Extracellular Matrix Assembly in Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Wustman, Brandon A.; Lind, Jan; Wetherbee, Richard; Gretz, Michael R.

    1998-01-01

    Achnanthes longipes is a marine, biofouling diatom that adheres to surfaces via adhesive polymers extruded during motility or organized into structures called stalks that contain three distinct regions: the pad, shaft, and collar. Four monoclonal antibodies (AL.C1–AL.C4) and antibodies from two uncloned hybridomas (AL.E1 and AL.E2) were raised against the extracellular adhesives of A. longipes. Antibodies were screened against a hot-water-insoluble/hot-bicarbonate-soluble-fraction. The hot-water-insoluble/hot-bicarbonate-soluble fraction was fractionated to yield polymers in three size ranges: F1, ≥ 20,000,000 Mr; F2, ≅100,000 Mr; and F3, <10,000 Mr relative to dextran standards. The ≅100,000-Mr fraction consisted of highly sulfated (approximately 11%) fucoglucuronogalactans (FGGs) and low-sulfate (approximately 2%) FGGs, whereas F1 was composed of O-linked FGG (F2)-polypeptide (F3) complexes. AL.C1, AL.C2, AL.C4, AL.E1, and AL.E2 recognized carbohydrate complementary regions on FGGs, with antigenicity dependent on fucosyl-containing side chains. AL.C3 was unique in that it had a lower affinity for FGGs and did not label any portion of the shaft. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunocytochemistry indicated that low-sulfate FGGs are expelled from pores surrounding the raphe terminus, creating the cylindrical outer layers of the shaft, and that highly sulfated FGGs are extruded from the raphe, forming the central core. Antibody-labeling patterns and other evidence indicated that the shaft central-core region is related to material exuded from the raphe during cell motility. PMID:9536061

  7. Streptococcus mutans-derived extracellular matrix in cariogenic oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Klein, Marlise I; Hwang, Geelsu; Santos, Paulo H S; Campanella, Osvaldo H; Koo, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are highly structured microbial communities that are enmeshed in a self-produced extracellular matrix. Within the complex oral microbiome, Streptococcus mutans is a major producer of extracellular polymeric substances including exopolysaccharides (EPS), eDNA, and lipoteichoic acid (LTA). EPS produced by S. mutans-derived exoenzymes promote local accumulation of microbes on the teeth, while forming a spatially heterogeneous and diffusion-limiting matrix that protects embedded bacteria. The EPS-rich matrix provides mechanical stability/cohesiveness and facilitates the creation of highly acidic microenvironments, which are critical for the pathogenesis of dental caries. In parallel, S. mutans also releases eDNA and LTA, which can contribute with matrix development. eDNA enhances EPS (glucan) synthesis locally, increasing the adhesion of S. mutans to saliva-coated apatitic surfaces and the assembly of highly cohesive biofilms. eDNA and other extracellular substances, acting in concert with EPS, may impact the functional properties of the matrix and the virulence of cariogenic biofilms. Enhanced understanding about the assembly principles of the matrix may lead to efficacious approaches to control biofilm-related diseases. PMID:25763359

  8. Streptococcus mutans-derived extracellular matrix in cariogenic oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Marlise I.; Hwang, Geelsu; Santos, Paulo H. S.; Campanella, Osvaldo H.; Koo, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are highly structured microbial communities that are enmeshed in a self-produced extracellular matrix. Within the complex oral microbiome, Streptococcus mutans is a major producer of extracellular polymeric substances including exopolysaccharides (EPS), eDNA, and lipoteichoic acid (LTA). EPS produced by S. mutans-derived exoenzymes promote local accumulation of microbes on the teeth, while forming a spatially heterogeneous and diffusion-limiting matrix that protects embedded bacteria. The EPS-rich matrix provides mechanical stability/cohesiveness and facilitates the creation of highly acidic microenvironments, which are critical for the pathogenesis of dental caries. In parallel, S. mutans also releases eDNA and LTA, which can contribute with matrix development. eDNA enhances EPS (glucan) synthesis locally, increasing the adhesion of S. mutans to saliva-coated apatitic surfaces and the assembly of highly cohesive biofilms. eDNA and other extracellular substances, acting in concert with EPS, may impact the functional properties of the matrix and the virulence of cariogenic biofilms. Enhanced understanding about the assembly principles of the matrix may lead to efficacious approaches to control biofilm-related diseases. PMID:25763359

  9. Regulation of Osteoblast Survival by the Extracellular Matrix and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus. Ruth K.; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.; Searby, Nancy D.; Bowley, Susan M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Spaceflight adversely affects the skeleton, posing a substantial risk to astronaut's health during long duration missions. The reduced bone mass observed in growing animals following spaceflight is due at least in part to inadequate bone formation by osteoblasts. Thus, it is of central importance to identify basic cellular mechanisms underlying normal bone formation. The fundamental ideas underlying our research are that interactions between extracellular matrix proteins, integrin adhesion receptors, cytoplasmic signaling and cytoskeletal proteins are key ingredients for the proper functioning of osteoblasts, and that gravity impacts these interactions. As an in vitro model system we used primary fetal rat calvarial cells which faithfully recapitulate osteoblast differentiation characteristically observed in vivo. We showed that specific integrin receptors ((alpha)3(beta)1), ((alpha)5(beta)1), ((alpha)8(betal)1) and extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin, laminin) were needed for the differentiation of immature osteoblasts. In the course of maturation, cultured osteoblasts switched from depending on fibronectin and laminin for differentiation to depending on these proteins for their very survival. Furthermore, we found that manipulating the gravity vector using ground-based models resulted in activation of key intracellular survival signals generated by integrin/extracellular matrix interactions. We are currently testing the in vivo relevance of some of these observations using targeted transgenic technology. In conclusion, mechanical factors including gravity may participate in regulating survival via cellular interactions with the extracellular matrix. This leads us to speculate that microgravity adversely affects the survival of osteoblasts and contributes to spaceflight-induced osteoporosis.

  10. Rho GEFs and GAPs: Emerging integrators of extracellular matrix signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kutys, Matthew L; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    Investigating cell migration in 3D settings has revealed that specific extracellular matrix environments require differential activities of the Rho GTPases for efficient migration. However, it is largely unknown how the activities of specific Rho GTPases are modulated to direct cell migration in response to different extracellular matrix cues. We have recently reported that extracellular matrix-dependent regulation of a specific Rho GEF is a fundamental mechanism governing cell migration in different microenvironments, providing a direct mechanism for extracellular matrix-specific regulation of Rho GTPase activity directing cell motility. We discovered that the Rho GEF βPix has a unique function during cell migration in fibrillar collagen environments by restraining RhoA signaling through a conserved signaling axis involving Cdc42 and the Rho GAP srGAP1. In this Commentary, we expand upon this new pathway and discuss potential mechanotransductive and therapeutic applications. Additionally, we speculate on a generalized role for Rho GEFs and GAPs in providing localized, context-dependent responses to the cellular microenvironment during cell migration and other cellular processes. PMID:25862162

  11. Specialisation of extracellular matrix for function in tendons and ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Helen L.; Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Rumian, Adam P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tendons and ligaments are similar structures in terms of their composition, organisation and mechanical properties. The distinction between them stems from their anatomical location; tendons form a link between muscle and bone while ligaments link bones to bones. A range of overlapping functions can be assigned to tendon and ligaments and each structure has specific mechanical properties which appear to be suited for particular in vivo function. The extracellular matrix in tendon and ligament varies in accordance with function, providing appropriate mechanical properties. The most useful framework in which to consider extracellular matrix differences therefore is that of function rather than anatomical location. In this review we discuss what is known about the relationship between functional requirements, structural properties from molecular to gross level, cellular gene expression and matrix turnover. The relevance of this information is considered by reviewing clinical aspects of tendon and ligament repair and reconstructive procedures. PMID:23885341

  12. The Extracellular Matrix of Candida albicans Biofilms Impairs Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Chad J; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Kernien, John F; Wang, Steven X; Beebe, David J; Huttenlocher, Anna; Ansari, Hamayail; Nett, Jeniel E

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils release extracellular traps (NETs) in response to planktonic C. albicans. These complexes composed of DNA, histones, and proteins inhibit Candida growth and dissemination. Considering the resilience of Candida biofilms to host defenses, we examined the neutrophil response to C. albicans during biofilm growth. In contrast to planktonic C. albicans, biofilms triggered negligible release of NETs. Time lapse imaging confirmed the impairment in NET release and revealed neutrophils adhering to hyphae and migrating on the biofilm. NET inhibition depended on an intact extracellular biofilm matrix as physical or genetic disruption of this component resulted in NET release. Biofilm inhibition of NETosis could not be overcome by protein kinase C activation via phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and was associated with suppression of neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The degree of impaired NET release correlated with resistance to neutrophil attack. The clinical relevance of the role for extracellular matrix in diminishing NET production was corroborated in vivo using a rat catheter model. The C. albicans pmr1Δ/Δ, defective in production of matrix mannan, appeared to elicit a greater abundance of NETs by scanning electron microscopy imaging, which correlated with a decreased fungal burden. Together, these findings show that C. albicans biofilms impair neutrophil response through an inhibitory pathway induced by the extracellular matrix. PMID:27622514

  13. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Haagsman, Henk P.; Roelen, Bernard A.J.

    2010-02-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  14. The Extracellular Matrix Regulates Granuloma Necrosis in Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Al Shammari, Basim; Shiomi, Takayuki; Tezera, Liku; Bielecka, Magdalena K; Workman, Victoria; Sathyamoorthy, Tarangini; Mauri, Francesco; Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Robertson, Brian D; D'Armiento, Jeanine; Friedland, Jon S; Elkington, Paul T

    2015-08-01

    A central tenet of tuberculosis pathogenesis is that caseous necrosis leads to extracellular matrix destruction and bacterial transmission. We reconsider the underlying mechanism of tuberculosis pathology and demonstrate that collagen destruction may be a critical initial event, causing caseous necrosis as opposed to resulting from it. In human tuberculosis granulomas, regions of extracellular matrix destruction map to areas of caseous necrosis. In mice, transgenic expression of human matrix metalloproteinase 1 causes caseous necrosis, the pathological hallmark of human tuberculosis. Collagen destruction is the principal pathological difference between humanised mice and wild-type mice with tuberculosis, whereas the release of proinflammatory cytokines does not differ, demonstrating that collagen breakdown may lead to cell death and caseation. To investigate this hypothesis, we developed a 3-dimensional cell culture model of tuberculosis granuloma formation, using bioelectrospray technology. Collagen improved survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells analyzed on the basis of a lactate dehydrogenase release assay, propidium iodide staining, and measurement of the total number of viable cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that collagen destruction is an initial event in tuberculosis immunopathology, leading to caseous necrosis and compromising the immune response, revealing a previously unappreciated role for the extracellular matrix in regulating the host-pathogen interaction. PMID:25676469

  15. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  16. Gene evolution and functions of extracellular matrix proteins in teeth.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Keigo; Yamada, Yoshihiko

    2013-03-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) not only provides physical support for tissues, but it is also critical for tissue development, homeostasis and disease. Over 300 ECM molecules have been defined as comprising the "core matrisome" in mammals through the analysis of whole genome sequences. During tooth development, the structure and functions of the ECM dynamically change. In the early stages, basement membranes (BMs) separate two cell layers of the dental epithelium and the mesenchyme. Later in the differentiation stages, the BM layer is replaced with the enamel matrix and the dentin matrix, which are secreted by ameloblasts and odontoblasts, respectively. The enamel matrix genes and the dentin matrix genes are each clustered in two closed regions located on human chromosome 4 (mouse chromosome 5), except for the gene coded for amelogenin, the major enamel matrix protein, which is located on the sex chromosomes. These genes for enamel and dentin matrix proteins are derived from a common ancestral gene, but as a result of evolution, they diverged in terms of their specific functions. These matrix proteins play important roles in cell adhesion, polarity, and differentiation and mineralization of enamel and dentin matrices. Mutations of these genes cause diseases such as odontogenesis imperfect (OI) and amelogenesis imperfect (AI). In this review, we discuss the recently defined terms matrisome and matrixome for ECMs, as well as focus on genes and functions of enamel and dentin matrix proteins. PMID:23539364

  17. [The corneal wound healing and the extracellular matrix].

    PubMed

    Varkoly, Gréta; Bencze, János; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Módis, László

    2016-06-19

    The cornea is the first refractive element of the eye. The transparency of the cornea results from the regularly arranged collagen fibrils, forming lamellar structure and the leucin rich proteoglycans, which make interactions between the fibrils. The adult cornea consists mainly of fibril-forming collagens. The cornea has less amount of fibril associated and non-fibrillar collagens. The main proteoglycans of the cornea are keratan-sulfate proteoglycans and it also contains dermatan-sulfate proteoglycans. Disorders of the proteoglycan synthesis lead to the disruption of the unique pattern and result in thicker collagen fibrils. The abnormal structure of the extracellular matrix can generate corneal disorders and the loss of corneal transparency. Furthermore, proteoglycans and collagens have an important role in wound healing. In injury the keratocytes produce higher amounts of collagens and proteoglycans mediated by growth factors. Depending on the ratio of the cells and growth factors the extracellular matrix returns to normal or corneal scar tissue develops. PMID:27287839

  18. Conformal Nanopatterning of Extracellular Matrix Proteins onto Topographically Complex Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Jallerat, Quentin; Szymanski, John M.

    2015-01-01

    We report a method for conformal nanopatterning of extracellular matrix proteins onto engineered surfaces independent of underlying microtopography. This enables fibronectin, laminin, and other proteins to be applied to biomaterial surfaces in complex geometries inaccessible using traditional soft lithography techniques. Engineering combinatorial surfaces that integrate topographical and biochemical micropatterns enhances control of the biotic-abiotic interface, used here to understand cardiomyocyte response to competing physical and chemical cues in the microenvironment. PMID:25506720

  19. Tendon Extracellular Matrix Alterations in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sardone, Francesca; Traina, Francesco; Bondi, Alice; Merlini, Luciano; Santi, Spartaco; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Faldini, Cesare; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI (COLVI) is a non-fibrillar collagen expressed in skeletal muscle and most connective tissues. Mutations in COLVI genes cause two major clinical forms, Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). In addition to congenital muscle weakness, patients affected by COLVI myopathies show axial and proximal joint contractures and distal joint hypermobility, which suggest the involvement of the tendon function. We examined a peroneal tendon biopsy and tenocyte culture of a 15-year-old patient affected by UCMD with compound heterozygous COL6A2 mutations. In patient’s tendon biopsy, we found striking morphological alterations of tendon fibrils, consisting in irregular profiles and reduced mean diameter. The organization of the pericellular matrix of tenocytes, the primary site of collagen fibril assembly, was severely affected, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy, which showed an abnormal accumulation of COLVI and altered distribution of collagen I (COLI) and fibronectin (FBN). In patient’s tenocyte culture, COLVI web formation and cell surface association were severely impaired; large aggregates of COLVI, which matched with COLI labeling, were frequently detected in the extracellular matrix. In addition, metalloproteinase MMP-2, an extracellular matrix-regulating enzyme, was increased in the conditioned medium of patient’s tenocytes, as determined by gelatin zymography and western blot. Altogether, these data indicate that COLVI deficiency may influence the organization of UCMD tendon matrix, resulting in dysfunctional fibrillogenesis. The alterations of tendon matrix may contribute to the complex pathogenesis of COLVI related myopathies. PMID:27375477

  20. Tendon Extracellular Matrix Alterations in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sardone, Francesca; Traina, Francesco; Bondi, Alice; Merlini, Luciano; Santi, Spartaco; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Faldini, Cesare; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI (COLVI) is a non-fibrillar collagen expressed in skeletal muscle and most connective tissues. Mutations in COLVI genes cause two major clinical forms, Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). In addition to congenital muscle weakness, patients affected by COLVI myopathies show axial and proximal joint contractures and distal joint hypermobility, which suggest the involvement of the tendon function. We examined a peroneal tendon biopsy and tenocyte culture of a 15-year-old patient affected by UCMD with compound heterozygous COL6A2 mutations. In patient's tendon biopsy, we found striking morphological alterations of tendon fibrils, consisting in irregular profiles and reduced mean diameter. The organization of the pericellular matrix of tenocytes, the primary site of collagen fibril assembly, was severely affected, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy, which showed an abnormal accumulation of COLVI and altered distribution of collagen I (COLI) and fibronectin (FBN). In patient's tenocyte culture, COLVI web formation and cell surface association were severely impaired; large aggregates of COLVI, which matched with COLI labeling, were frequently detected in the extracellular matrix. In addition, metalloproteinase MMP-2, an extracellular matrix-regulating enzyme, was increased in the conditioned medium of patient's tenocytes, as determined by gelatin zymography and western blot. Altogether, these data indicate that COLVI deficiency may influence the organization of UCMD tendon matrix, resulting in dysfunctional fibrillogenesis. The alterations of tendon matrix may contribute to the complex pathogenesis of COLVI related myopathies. PMID:27375477

  1. Fibronectin Deposition Participates in Extracellular Matrix Assembly and Vascular Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hielscher, Abigail; Ellis, Kim; Qiu, Connie; Porterfield, Josh; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) has been demonstrated to facilitate angiogenesis. In particular, fibronectin has been documented to activate endothelial cells, resulting in their transition from a quiescent state to an active state in which the cells exhibit enhanced migration and proliferation. The goal of this study is to examine the role of polymerized fibronectin during vascular tubulogenesis using a 3 dimensional (3D) cell-derived de-cellularized matrix. A fibronectin-rich 3D de-cellularized ECM was used as a scaffold to study vascular morphogenesis of endothelial cells (ECs). Confocal analyses of several matrix proteins reveal high intra- and extra-cellular deposition of fibronectin in formed vascular structures. Using a small peptide inhibitor of fibronectin polymerization, we demonstrate that inhibition of fibronectin fibrillogenesis in ECs cultured atop de-cellularized ECM resulted in decreased vascular morphogenesis. Further, immunofluorescence and ultrastructural analyses reveal decreased expression of stromal matrix proteins in the absence of polymerized fibronectin with high co-localization of matrix proteins found in association with polymerized fibronectin. Evaluating vascular kinetics, live cell imaging showed that migration, migration velocity, and mean square displacement, are disrupted in structures grown in the absence of polymerized fibronectin. Additionally, vascular organization failed to occur in the absence of a polymerized fibronectin matrix. Consistent with these observations, we tested vascular morphogenesis following the disruption of EC adhesion to polymerized fibronectin, demonstrating that block of integrins α5β1 and αvβ3, abrogated vascular morphogenesis. Overall, fibronectin deposition in a 3D cell-derived de-cellularized ECM appears to be imperative for matrix assembly and vascular morphogenesis. PMID:26811931

  2. Degradation of extracellular matrix and its components by hypobromous acid

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Martin D.; McNiven, Tane N.; Davies, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    EPO (eosinophil peroxidase) and MPO (myeloperoxidase) are highly basic haem enzymes that can catalyse the production of HOBr (hypobromous acid). They are released extracellularly by activated leucocytes and their binding to the polyanionic glycosa-minoglycan components of extracellular matrix (proteoglycans and hyaluronan) may localize the production of HOBr to these materials. It is shown in the present paper that the reaction of HOBr with glycosaminoglycans (heparan sulfate, heparin, chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronan) generates polymer-derived N-bromo derivatives (bromamines, dibromamines, N-bromosulfon-amides and bromamides). Decomposition of these species, which can occur spontaneously and/or via one-electron reduction by low-valent transition metal ions (Cu+ and Fe2+), results in polymer fragmentation and modification. One-electron reduction of the N-bromo derivatives generates radicals that have been detected by EPR spin trapping. The species detected are consistent with metal ion-dependent polymer fragmentation and modification being initiated by the formation of nitrogen-centred (aminyl, N-bromoaminyl, sulfonamidyl and amidyl) radicals. Previous studies have shown that the reaction of HOBr with proteins generates N-bromo derivatives and results in fragmentation of the polypeptide backbone. The reaction of HOBr with extracellular matrix synthesized by smooth muscle cells in vitro induces the release of carbohydrate and protein components in a time-dependent manner, which is consistent with fragmentation of these materials via the formation of N-bromo derivatives. The degradation of extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycans and proteins by HOBr may contribute to tissue damage associated with inflammatory diseases such as asthma. PMID:17014424

  3. The extracellular matrix of Volvox carteri: molecular structure of the cellular compartment.

    PubMed

    Ertl, H; Mengele, R; Wenzl, S; Engel, J; Sumper, M

    1989-12-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of Volvox contains insoluble fibrous layers that surround individual cells at a distance to form contiguous cellular compartments. Using immunological techniques, we identified a sulfated surface glycoprotein (SSG 185) as the monomeric precursor of this substructure within the ECM. The primary structure of the SSG 185 poly-peptide chain has been derived from cDNA and genomic DNA. A central domain of the protein, 80 amino acid residues long, consists almost exclusively of hydroxyproline residues. The chemical structure of the highly sulfated polysaccharide covalently attached to SSG 185 has been determined by permethylation analysis. As revealed by EM, SSG 185 is a rod-shaped molecule with a 21-nm-long polysaccharide strand protruding from its central region. The chemical nature of the cross-links between SSG 185 monomers is discussed. PMID:2689458

  4. Extracellular matrix of secondary lymphoid organs impacts on B-cell fate and survival

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Nathalie; Ruegg, Markus A.; Sonnenberg, Arnoud; Georges-Labouesse, Elisabeth; Winkler, Thomas H.; Kearney, John F.; Cardell, Susanna; Sorokin, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    We describe a unique extracellular matrix (ECM) niche in the spleen, the marginal zone (MZ), characterized by the basement membrane glycoproteins, laminin α5 and agrin, that promotes formation of a specialized population of MZ B lymphocytes that respond rapidly to blood-borne antigens. Mice with reduced laminin α5 expression show reduced MZ B cells and increased numbers of newly formed (NF) transitional B cells that migrate from the bone marrow, without changes in other immune or stromal cell compartments. Transient integrin α6β1-mediated interaction of NF B cells with laminin α5 in the MZ supports the MZ B-cell population, their long-term survival, and antibody response. Data suggest that the unique 3D structure and biochemical composition of the ECM of lymphoid organs impacts on immune cell fate. PMID:23847204

  5. Astrocytes and extracellular matrix in extrasynaptic volume transmission

    PubMed Central

    Vargová, Lýdia; Syková, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Volume transmission is a form of intercellular communication that does not require synapses; it is based on the diffusion of neuroactive substances across the brain extracellular space (ECS) and their binding to extrasynaptic high-affinity receptors on neurons or glia. Extracellular diffusion is restricted by the limited volume of the ECS, which is described by the ECS volume fraction α, and the presence of diffusion barriers, reflected by tortuosity λ, that are created, for example, by fine astrocytic processes or extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. Organized astrocytic processes, ECM scaffolds or myelin sheets channel the extracellular diffusion so that it is facilitated in a certain direction, i.e. anisotropic. The diffusion properties of the ECS are profoundly influenced by various processes such as the swelling and morphological rebuilding of astrocytes during either transient or persisting physiological or pathological states, or the remodelling of the ECM in tumorous or epileptogenic tissue, during Alzheimer's disease, after enzymatic treatment or in transgenic animals. The changing diffusion properties of the ECM influence neuron–glia interaction, learning abilities, the extent of neuronal damage and even cell migration. From a clinical point of view, diffusion parameter changes occurring during pathological states could be important for diagnosis, drug delivery and treatment. PMID:25225101

  6. Structure and Function of the Skeletal Muscle Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Allison R.; Lieber, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The skeletal muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in muscle fiber force transmission, maintenance, and repair. In both injured and diseased states, ECM adapts dramatically, a property thathas clinical manifestations and alters muscle function. Here, we review the structure, composition, and mechanical properties of skeletal muscle ECM, describe the cells that contribute to the maintenance of the ECM and, finally, overview changes that occur with pathology. New scanning electron micrographs of ECM structure are also presented with hypotheses about ECM structure-function relationships. Detailed structure-function relationships of the ECM have yet to be defined and, as a result, we propose areas for future studies. PMID:21949456

  7. Identification of distinctive interdomain interactions among ZP-N, ZP-C and other domains of zona pellucida glycoproteins underlying association of chicken egg-coat matrix.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Hiroki; Sato, Takahiro; Sakuma, Rio; Fukushima, Hideaki; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Ujita, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate egg coat, including mammalian zona pellucida, is an oocyte-specific extracellular matrix comprising two to six zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins. The egg coat plays important roles in fertilization, especially in species-specific interactions with sperm to induce the sperm acrosome reaction and to form the block to polyspermy. It is suggested that the physiological functions of the egg coat are mediated and/or regulated coordinately by peptide and carbohydrate moieties of the ZP glycoproteins that are spatially arranged in the egg coat, whereas a comprehensive understanding of the architecture of vertebrate egg-coat matrix remains elusive. Here, we deduced the orientations and/or distributions of chicken ZP glycoproteins, ZP1, ZP3 and ZPD, in the egg-coat matrix by confocal immunofluorescent microscopy, and in the ZP1-ZP3 complexes generated in vitro by co-immunoprecipitation assays. We further confirmed interdomain interactions of the ZP glycoproteins by far-Western blot analyses of the egg-coat proteins and pull-down assays of ZP1 in the serum, using recombinant domains of ZP glycoproteins as probes. Our results suggest that the ZP1 and ZP3 bind through their ZP-C domains to form the ZP1-ZP3 complexes and fibrils, which are assembled into bundles through interactions between the repeat domains of ZP1 to form the ZP1-ZP3 matrix, and that the ZPD molecules self-associate and bind to the ZP1-ZP3 matrix through its ZP-N and ZP-C domains to form the egg-coat matrix. Based on these results, we propose a tentative model for the architecture of the chicken egg-coat matrix that might be applicable to other vertebrate ones. PMID:26106520

  8. Identification of distinctive interdomain interactions among ZP-N, ZP-C and other domains of zona pellucida glycoproteins underlying association of chicken egg-coat matrix

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Hiroki; Sato, Takahiro; Sakuma, Rio; Fukushima, Hideaki; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Ujita, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate egg coat, including mammalian zona pellucida, is an oocyte-specific extracellular matrix comprising two to six zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins. The egg coat plays important roles in fertilization, especially in species-specific interactions with sperm to induce the sperm acrosome reaction and to form the block to polyspermy. It is suggested that the physiological functions of the egg coat are mediated and/or regulated coordinately by peptide and carbohydrate moieties of the ZP glycoproteins that are spatially arranged in the egg coat, whereas a comprehensive understanding of the architecture of vertebrate egg-coat matrix remains elusive. Here, we deduced the orientations and/or distributions of chicken ZP glycoproteins, ZP1, ZP3 and ZPD, in the egg-coat matrix by confocal immunofluorescent microscopy, and in the ZP1–ZP3 complexes generated in vitro by co-immunoprecipitation assays. We further confirmed interdomain interactions of the ZP glycoproteins by far-Western blot analyses of the egg-coat proteins and pull-down assays of ZP1 in the serum, using recombinant domains of ZP glycoproteins as probes. Our results suggest that the ZP1 and ZP3 bind through their ZP-C domains to form the ZP1–ZP3 complexes and fibrils, which are assembled into bundles through interactions between the repeat domains of ZP1 to form the ZP1–ZP3 matrix, and that the ZPD molecules self-associate and bind to the ZP1–ZP3 matrix through its ZP-N and ZP-C domains to form the egg-coat matrix. Based on these results, we propose a tentative model for the architecture of the chicken egg-coat matrix that might be applicable to other vertebrate ones. PMID:26106520

  9. The design of reversible hydrogels to capture extracellular matrix dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales, Adrianne M.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2016-02-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic environment that constantly provides physical and chemical cues to embedded cells. Much progress has been made in engineering hydrogels that can mimic the ECM, but hydrogel properties are, in general, static. To recapitulate the dynamic nature of the ECM, many reversible chemistries have been incorporated into hydrogels to regulate cell spreading, biochemical ligand presentation and matrix mechanics. For example, emerging trends include the use of molecular photoswitches or biomolecule hybridization to control polymer chain conformation, thereby enabling the modulation of the hydrogel between two states on demand. In addition, many non-covalent, dynamic chemical bonds have found increasing use as hydrogel crosslinkers or tethers for cell signalling molecules. These reversible chemistries will provide greater temporal control of adhered cell behaviour, and they allow for more advanced in vitro models and tissue-engineering scaffolds to direct cell fate.

  10. Streptococcus pyogenes degrades extracellular matrix in chondrocytes via MMP-13

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Atsuo; Okahashi, Nobuo; Maruyama, Fumito; Ooshima, Takashi; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2008-08-29

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) causes a wide range of human diseases, including bacterial arthritis. The pathogenesis of arthritis is characterized by synovial proliferation and the destruction of cartilage and subchondral bone in joints. We report here that GAS strain JRS4 invaded a chondrogenic cell line ATDC5 and induced the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM), whereas an isogenic mutant of JRS4 lacking a fibronectin-binding protein, SAM1, failed to invade the chondrocytes or degrade the ECM. Reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 was strongly elevated during the infection with GAS. A reporter assay revealed that the activation of the AP-1 transcription factor and the phosphorylation of c-Jun terminal kinase participated in MMP-13 expression. These results suggest that MMP-13 plays an important role in the destruction of infected joints during the development of septic arthritis.

  11. Extracellular matrix and its receptors in Drosophila neural development

    PubMed Central

    Broadie, Kendal; Baumgartner, Stefan; Prokop, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) and matrix receptors are intimately involved in most biological processes. The ECM plays fundamental developmental and physiological roles in health and disease, including processes underlying the development, maintenance and regeneration of the nervous system. To understand the principles of ECM-mediated functions in the nervous system, genetic model organisms like Drosophila provide simple, malleable and powerful experimental platforms. This article provides an overview of ECM proteins and receptors in Drosophila. It then focuses on their roles during three progressive phases of neural development: 1) neural progenitor proliferation, 2) axonal growth and pathfinding and 3) synapse formation and function. Each section highlights known ECM and ECM-receptor components and recent studies done in mutant conditions to reveal their in vivo functions, all illustrating the enormous opportunities provided when merging work on the nervous system with systematic research into ECM-related gene functions. PMID:21688401

  12. The Extracellular Matrix In Development and Morphogenesis: A Dynamic View

    PubMed Central

    Rozario, Tania; DeSimone, Douglas W.

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is synthesized and secreted by embryonic cells beginning at the earliest stages of development. Our understanding of ECM composition, structure and function has grown considerably in the last several decades and this knowledge has revealed that the extracellular microenvironment is critically important for cell growth, survival, differentiation and morphogenesis. ECM and the cellular receptors that interact with it mediate both physical linkages with the cytoskeleton and the bidirectional flow of information between the extracellular and intracellular compartments. This review considers the range of cell and tissue functions attributed to ECM molecules and summarizes recent findings specific to key developmental processes. The importance of ECM as a dynamic repository for growth factors is highlighted along with more recent studies implicating the 3-dimensional organization and physical properties of the ECM as it relates to cell signaling and the regulation of morphogenetic cell behaviors. Embryonic cell and tissue generated forces and mechanical signals arising from ECM adhesion represent emerging areas of interest in this field. PMID:19854168

  13. Intermolecular interactions of thrombospondins drive their accumulation in extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Joong; Christofidou, Elena D.; Keene, Douglas R.; Hassan Milde, Marwah; Adams, Josephine C.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombospondins participate in many aspects of tissue organization in adult tissue homeostasis, and their dysregulation contributes to pathological processes such as fibrosis and tumor progression. The incorporation of thrombospondins into extracellular matrix (ECM) as discrete puncta has been documented in various tissue and cell biological contexts, yet the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We find that collagen fibrils are disorganized in multiple tissues of Thbs1−/− mice. In investigating how thrombospondins become retained within ECM and thereby affect ECM organization, we find that accumulation of thrombospondin-1 or thrombospondin-5 puncta within cell-derived ECM is controlled by a novel, conserved, surface-exposed site on the thrombospondin L-type lectin domain. This site acts to recruit thrombospondin molecules into ECM by intermolecular interactions in trans. This mechanism is fibronectin independent, can take place extracellularly, and is demonstrated to be direct in vitro. The trans intermolecular interactions can also be heterotypic—for example, between thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-5. These data identify a novel concept of concentration-dependent, intermolecular “matrix trapping” as a conserved mechanism that controls the accumulation and thereby the functionality of thrombospondins in ECM. PMID:25995382

  14. Extracellular matrix of the bovine ovarian membrana granulosa.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, R J; Irving Rodgers, H F

    2002-05-31

    Much is known about the control of the development of ovarian follicles by growth factors and hormones. The study of extracellular matrix in the ovary, though, is a relatively new area. To date much research has focused on identifying the matrix components present, and more recently, its production and the physiological roles. In this review we focus on the changes that occur in the follicular basal lamina from primordial follicles through to ovulation and formation of the corpus luteum, the changes that occur during follicular atresia, and we discuss our observations of a novel matrix which forms in the membrana granulosa. The follicular basal lamina changes considerably during follicular development in its expression pattern of type IV collagens. Of the laminin chains examined, there appears only to be an increase in amount, except for laminin alpha2. It is expressed only in a small proportion of healthy antral follicles and in the majority of atretic antral follicles. Call-Exner bodies have the same composition as the basal lamina, except they do not contain laminin alpha2, even when the follicular basal lamina does. The novel matrix that develops within the membrana granulosa is similar in composition to Call-Exner bodies which occur predominantly in preantral follicles, except that it is far more common in large antral follicles, does not induce polarization of the surrounding granulosa cells, and does not contain follicular fluid-like material as the Call-Exner bodies of some species do. The expression of this matrix occurs prior to and during the time when granulosa cells express steroidogenic enzymes. It does not exist in corpora lutea. In addition large luteal cells, derived from granulosa cells, do not appear to have a basal lamina. These findings suggest that the maturational changes in the membrana granulosa are accompanied by changes in the matrix. PMID:12044919

  15. Production of secretory and extracellular N-linked glycoproteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Adam C; Haitjema, Charles H; Guarino, Cassandra; Çelik, Eda; Endicott, Christine E; Reading, Craig A; Merritt, Judith H; Ptak, A Celeste; Zhang, Sheng; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2011-02-01

    The Campylobacter jejuni pgl gene cluster encodes a complete N-linked protein glycosylation pathway that can be functionally transferred into Escherichia coli. In this system, we analyzed the interplay between N-linked glycosylation, membrane translocation and folding of acceptor proteins in bacteria. We developed a recombinant N-glycan acceptor peptide tag that permits N-linked glycosylation of diverse recombinant proteins expressed in the periplasm of glycosylation-competent E. coli cells. With this "glycosylation tag," a clear difference was observed in the glycosylation patterns found on periplasmic proteins depending on their mode of inner membrane translocation (i.e., Sec, signal recognition particle [SRP], or twin-arginine translocation [Tat] export), indicating that the mode of protein export can influence N-glycosylation efficiency. We also established that engineered substrate proteins targeted to environments beyond the periplasm, such as the outer membrane, the membrane vesicles, and the extracellular medium, could serve as substrates for N-linked glycosylation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the C. jejuni N-glycosylation machinery is compatible with distinct secretory mechanisms in E. coli, effectively expanding the N-linked glycome of recombinant E. coli. Moreover, this simple glycosylation tag strategy expands the glycoengineering toolbox and opens the door to bacterial synthesis of a wide array of recombinant glycoprotein conjugates. PMID:21131519

  16. The Extracellular Matrix in Photosynthetic Mats: A Cyanobacterial Gingerbread House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, R.; Stannard, W.; Bebout, B.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Mayali, X.; Weber, P. K.; Lipton, M. S.; Lee, J.; Everroad, R. C.; Thelen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Hypersaline laminated cyanobacterial mats are excellent model systems for investigating photoautotrophic contributions to biogeochemical cycling on a millimeter scale. These self-sustaining ecosystems are characterized by steep physiochemical gradients that fluctuate dramatically on hour timescales, providing a dynamic environment to study microbial response. However, elucidating the distribution of energy from light absorption into biomass requires a complete understanding of the various constituents of the mat. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which can be composed of proteins, polysaccharides, lipids and DNA are a major component of these mats and may function in the redistribution of nutrients and metabolites within the community. To test this notion, we established a model mat-building culture for comparison with the phylogenetically diverse natural mat communities. In these two systems we determined how proteins and glycans in the matrix changed as a function of light and tracked nutrient flow from the matrix. Using mass spectrometry metaproteomics analysis, we found homologous proteins in both field and culture extracellular matrix that point to cyanobacterial turnover of amino acids, inorganic nutrients, carbohydrates and nucleic acids from the EPS. Other abundant functions identified included oxidative stress response from both the cyanobacteria and heterotrophs and cyanobacterial structural proteins that may play a role in mat cohesion. Several degradative enzymes also varied in abundance in the EPS in response to light availability, suggesting active secretion. To further test cyanobacterial EPS turnover, we generated isotopically-labeled EPS and used NanoSIMS to trace uptake of this labeled EPS. Our findings suggest Cyanobacteria may facilitate nutrient transfer to other groups, as well as uptake of their own products through degradation of EPS components. This work provides evidence for the essential roles of EPS for storage, structural

  17. Growth-inhibiting extracellular matrix proteins also inhibit electrical activity by reducing calcium and increasing potassium conductances.

    PubMed

    Vargas, J; De-Miguel, F F

    2009-01-23

    Inhibitionof neurite sprouting and electrical activity by extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins was studied during neurite regeneration by using anterior pagoda (AP) neurons of the leech. Adult isolated neurons were plated in culture inside ganglion capsules, which among many ECM proteins, contain a group of inhibitory peanut lectin- (PNA) binding glycoproteins. These proteins inhibit neurite production and contribute to the formation of a bipolar outgrowth pattern by AP neurons. Addition of PNA lectin to the culture medium to block the inhibitory effects of ECM glycoproteins induced an increase of neurite sprouting, the loss of the bipolar pattern, and also an increase in the amplitude and duration of action potentials evoked by intracellular current injection. PNA lectin had independent effects on neurite sprouting and electrical activity, since there was no correlation between the total neurite length and the amplitude of the action potentials. Moreover, action potentials were increased by the presence of PNA lectin even in neurons that did not grow. The changes induced by PNA lectin on the active conductances underlying the action potentials were estimated by quantitative model simulations. We predict that the increases in the amplitude and duration of the action potential induced by PNA lectin were due to an increase in a calcium conductance and a reduction in the delayed rectifier potassium conductance. Our results suggest that inhibitory ECM glycoproteins may use independent signaling pathways to inhibit neurite sprouting and electrical activity. These proteins affect the action potential by changing the proportion of inward and outward active conductances. PMID:18976697

  18. Degradation of extracellular matrix by larvae of Schistosoma mansoni. II. Degradation by newly transformed and developing schistosomula

    SciTech Connect

    Keene, W.E.; Jeong, K.H.; McKerrow, J.H.; Werb, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The ability of schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni to degrade an extracellular connective tissue matrix synthesized by rat vascular smooth muscle cells in culture was investigated. Six to 12% of the total matrix was degraded by schistosomula from the time of transformation from cercariae to adult development in vitro. Most matrix degradation occurred during the first 24 hours of incubation and was dependent on the number of schistosomula and the type of medium in which they were incubated. The use of proteinase inhibitors indicated that schistosomula activity was distinctly different from that of cercariae. Newly transformed schistosomula expressed one activity that was similar in inhibition characteristics to that of cercarial preacetabular gland secretions and another activity that was unique to schistosomula. From 1 day after transformation to adulthood, the schistosomula-derived activity was the predominant activity detected. Schistosomula degraded a smaller percentage of the total matrix than did cercariae and showed a different substrate profile. Schistosomula degraded glycoprotein components of extracellular matrix but showed little or no activity against elastin or collagen. Matrix-degrading activity was also detected in schistosomula-conditioned medium. Sedimentation of the activity and lack of permeability through filter barriers suggest that the enzyme may be initially associated with membrane and then sloughed with membrane fragments. Since the schistosomula-derived activity initially overlaps with cercarial preacetabular gland proteolytic activity, the two activities may act in concert to facilitate skin penetration by newly transformed schistosomula. However, schistosomula activity probably serves some, as yet undetermined, function later in development.

  19. Synthetic osteogenic extracellular matrix formed by coated silicon dioxide nanosprings

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The design of biomimetic materials that parallel the morphology and biology of extracellular matrixes is key to the ability to grow functional tissues in vitro and to enhance the integration of biomaterial implants into existing tissues in vivo. Special attention has been put into mimicking the nanostructures of the extracellular matrix of bone, as there is a need to find biomaterials that can enhance the bonding between orthopedic devices and this tissue. Methods We have tested the ability of normal human osteoblasts to propagate and differentiate on silicon dioxide nanosprings, which can be easily grown on practically any surface. In addition, we tested different metals and metal alloys as coats for the nanosprings in tissue culture experiments with bone cells. Results Normal human osteoblasts grown on coated nanosprings exhibited an enhanced rate of propagation, differentiation into bone forming cells and mineralization. While osteoblasts did not attach effectively to bare nanowires grown on glass, these cells propagated successfully on nanosprings coated with titanium oxide and gold. We observed a 270 fold increase in the division rate of osteoblasts when grow on titanium/gold coated nanosprings. This effect was shown to be dependent on the nanosprings, as the coating by themselves did not alter the growth rate of osteoblast. We also observed that titanium/zinc/gold coated nanosprings increased the levels of osteoblast production of alkaline phosphatase seven folds. This result indicates that osteoblasts grown on this metal alloy coated nanosprings are differentiating to mature bone making cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, we showed that osteoblasts grown on the same metal alloy coated nanosprings have an enhanced ability to deposit calcium salt. Conclusion We have established that metal/metal alloy coated silicon dioxide nanosprings can be used as a biomimetic material paralleling the morphology and biology of osteogenic extracellular matrix

  20. Extracellular Matrix Modulation: Optimizing Skin Care and Rejuvenation Procedures.

    PubMed

    Widgerow, Alan D; Fabi, Sabrina G; Palestine, Roberta F; Rivkin, Alexander; Ortiz, Arisa; Bucay, Vivian W; Chiu, Annie; Naga, Lina; Emer, Jason; Chasan, Paul E

    2016-04-01

    Normal aging and photoaging of the skin are chronic processes that progress gradually. The extracellular matrix (ECM), constituting over 70% of the skin, is the central hub for repair and regeneration of the skin. As such, the ECM is the area where changes related to photodamage are most evident. Degradation of the ECM with fragmentation of proteins significantly affects cross talk and signaling between cells, the matrix, and its constituents. The accumulation of collagen fragments, amorphous elastin agglutinations, and abnormal cross-linkages between the collagen fragments impedes the ECM from its normal repair and regenerative capacity, which manifests as wrinkled, non-elastic skin. Similar to how the chronic wound healing process requires wound bed preparation before therapeutic intervention, treatment of chronic aging of the skin would likely benefit from a "skin bed preparation" to optimize the outcome of rejuvenation procedures and skin maintenance programs. This involves introducing agents that can combat stress-induced oxidation, proteasome dysfunction, and non-enzymatic cross linkages involved in glycation end products, to collectively modulate this damaged ECM, and upregulate neocollagenesis and elastin production. Agents of particular interest are matrikines, peptides originating from the fragmentation of matrix proteins that exhibit a wide range of biological activities. Peptides of this type (tripeptide and hexapeptide) are incorporated in ALASTIN™ Skin Nectar with TriHex™ technology (ALASTIN Skincare, Inc., Carlsbad, CA), which is designed to target ECM modulation with a goal of optimizing results following invasive and non-invasive dermal rejuvenating procedures. PMID:27050707

  1. Extracellular matrix bioscaffolds in tissue remodeling and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Swinehart, Ilea T; Badylak, Stephen F

    2016-03-01

    During normal morphogenesis the extracellular matrix (ECM) influences cell motility, proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. Tissue engineers have attempted to harness the cell signaling potential of ECM to promote the functional reconstruction, if not regeneration, of injured or missing adult tissues that otherwise heal by the formation of scar tissue. ECM bioscaffolds, derived from decellularized tissues, have been used to promote the formation of site appropriate, functional tissues in many clinical applications including skeletal muscle, fibrocartilage, lower urinary tract, and esophageal reconstruction, among others. These scaffolds function by the release or exposure of growth factors and cryptic peptides, modulation of the immune response, and recruitment of progenitor cells. Herein, we describe this process of ECM induced constructive remodeling and examine similarities to normal tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26699796

  2. Cardiac extracellular matrix proteomics: Challenges, techniques, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia Wei; Dalgliesh, Ailsa J; López, Javier E; Griffiths, Leigh G

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) has emerged as a dynamic tissue component, providing not only structural support, but also functionally participating in a wide range of signaling events during development, injury, and disease remodeling. Investigation of dynamic changes in cardiac ECM proteome is challenging due to the relative insolubility of ECM proteins, which results from their macromolecular nature, extensive post-translational modification (PTM), and tendency to form protein complexes. Finally, the relative abundance of cellular and mitochondrial proteins in cardiac tissue further complicates cardiac ECM proteomic approaches. Recent developments of various techniques to enrich and analyze ECM proteins are playing a major role in overcoming these challenges. Application of cardiac ECM proteomics in disease tissues can further provide spatial and temporal information relevant to disease diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and engineering of therapeutic candidates for cardiac repair and regeneration. PMID:26200932

  3. Insight On Colorectal Carcinoma Infiltration by Studying Perilesional Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Nebuloni, Manuela; Albarello, Luca; Andolfo, Annapaola; Magagnotti, Cinzia; Genovese, Luca; Locatelli, Irene; Tonon, Giovanni; Longhi, Erika; Zerbi, Pietro; Allevi, Raffaele; Podestà, Alessandro; Puricelli, Luca; Milani, Paolo; Soldarini, Armando; Salonia, Andrea; Alfano, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) from perilesional and colorectal carcinoma (CRC), but not healthy colon, sustains proliferation and invasion of tumor cells. We investigated the biochemical and physical diversity of ECM in pair-wised comparisons of healthy, perilesional and CRC specimens. Progressive linearization and degree of organization of fibrils was observed from healthy to perilesional and CRC ECM, and was associated with a steady increase of stiffness and collagen crosslinking. In the perilesional ECM these modifications coincided with increased vascularization, whereas in the neoplastic ECM they were associated with altered modulation of matrisome proteins, increased content of hydroxylated lysine and lysyl oxidase. This study identifies the increased stiffness and crosslinking of the perilesional ECM predisposing an environment suitable for CRC invasion as a phenomenon associated with vascularization. The increased stiffness of colon areas may represent a new predictive marker of desmoplastic region predisposing to invasion, thus offering new potential application for monitoring adenoma with invasive potential. PMID:26940881

  4. BIOMECHANICAL and BIOCHEMICAL REMODELING of STROMAL EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ruchi; Lelkes, Peter I; Cukierman, Edna

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural and biochemical signals that regulate cell function. A well-controlled balance between cells and surroundings (i.e., Dynamic Reciprocity) is crucial for regulating ECM architecture. During cancer progression, epithelial cells undergo genetic alterations, which together with stromal changes, including ECM remodeling, disturb the homeostatic dynamics of the epithelium. A parallel organization of stromal ECM fibrils is associated with tumorigenic responses. In an emerging paradigm, continuous and progressive regulation via mechanical forces and aberrant signaling are believed to be responsible for tumor-associated ECM remodeling. In this review, we discuss the discrete biomechanical and biochemical mechanisms that underlie these architectural changes and highlight their particular relevance to the regulation of the alignment of ECM in the mesenchymal stroma. PMID:25708906

  5. Biomechanical and biochemical remodeling of stromal extracellular matrix in cancer.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ruchi; Lelkes, Peter I; Cukierman, Edna

    2015-04-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural and biochemical signals that regulate cell function. A well-controlled balance between cells and surroundings (i.e., dynamic reciprocity) is crucial for regulating ECM architecture. During cancer progression, epithelial cells undergo genetic alterations which, together with stromal changes including ECM remodeling, disturb the homeostatic dynamics of the epithelium. A parallel organization of stromal ECM fibrils is associated with tumorigenic responses. In an emerging paradigm, continuous and progressive regulation via mechanical forces and aberrant signaling are believed to be responsible for tumor-associated ECM remodeling. In this review we discuss the discrete biomechanical and biochemical mechanisms that underlie these architectural changes and highlight their particular relevance to the regulation of the alignment of ECM in the mesenchymal stroma. PMID:25708906

  6. Cell stiffness, contractile stress and the role of extracellular matrix

    SciTech Connect

    An, Steven S.; Kim, Jina; Ahn, Kwangmi; Trepat, Xavier; Drake, Kenneth J.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Ling, Guoyu; Purington, Carolyn; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Kensler, Thomas W.; Mitzner, Wayne; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Biswal, Shyam

    2009-05-15

    Here we have assessed the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and rigidity on mechanical properties of the human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. Cell stiffness and contractile stress showed appreciable changes from the most relaxed state to the most contracted state: we refer to the maximal range of these changes as the cell contractile scope. The contractile scope was least when the cell was adherent upon collagen V, followed by collagen IV, laminin, and collagen I, and greatest for fibronectin. Regardless of ECM composition, upon adherence to increasingly rigid substrates, the ASM cell positively regulated expression of antioxidant genes in the glutathione pathway and heme oxygenase, and disruption of a redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor (Nrf2), culminated in greater contractile scope. These findings provide biophysical evidence that ECM differentially modulates muscle contractility and, for the first time, demonstrate a link between muscle contractility and Nrf2-directed responses.

  7. Constructive remodeling of a synthetic endothelial extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sewoon; Shin, Yoojin; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Jeon, Jessie S.; Kamm, Roger D.; Huh, Dongeun; Sohn, Lydia L.; Chung, Seok

    2015-01-01

    The construction of well-controllable in vitro models of physiological and pathological vascular endothelium remains a fundamental challenge in tissue engineering and drug development. Here, we present an approach for forming a synthetic endothelial extracellular matrix (ECM) that closely resembles that of the native structure by locally depositing basement membrane materials onto type 1 collagen nanofibers only in a region adjacent to the endothelial cell (EC) monolayer. Culturing the EC monolayer on this synthetic endothelial ECM remarkably enhanced its physiological properties, reducing its vascular permeability, and promoting a stabilized, quiescent phenotype. We demonstrated that the EC monolayer on the synthetic endothelial ECM neither creates non-physiological barriers to cell-cell or cell-ECM interactions, nor hinders molecular diffusion of growth factors and other molecules. The synthetic endothelial ECM and vascular endothelium on it may help us enter in a new phase of research in which various models of the biological barrier behavior can be tested experimentally. PMID:26687334

  8. Bioactive extracellular matrix fragments in lung health and disease.

    PubMed

    Gaggar, Amit; Weathington, Nathaniel

    2016-09-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the noncellular component critical in the maintenance of organ structure and the regulation of tissue development, organ structure, and cellular signaling. The ECM is a dynamic entity that undergoes continuous degradation and resynthesis. In addition to compromising structure, degradation of the ECM can liberate bioactive fragments that cause cellular activation and chemotaxis of a variety of cells. These fragments are termed matrikines, and their cellular activities are sentinel in the development and progression of tissue injury seen in chronic lung disease. Here, we discuss the matrikines that are known to be active in lung biology and their roles in lung disease. We also consider the use of matrikines as disease markers and potential therapeutic targets in lung disease. PMID:27584731

  9. Extracellular matrix production in vitro in cartilage tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is arising as a technique for the repair of cartilage lesions in clinical applications. However, fibrocartilage formation weakened the mechanical functions of the articular, which compromises the clinical outcomes. Due to the low proliferation ability, dedifferentiation property and low production of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) of the chondrocytes, the cartilage synthesis in vitro has been one of the major limitations for obtaining high-quality engineered cartilage constructs. This review discusses cells, biomaterial scaffolds and stimulating factors that can facilitate the cartilage-specific ECM production and accumulation in the in vitro culture system. Special emphasis has been put on the factors that affect the production of ECM macromolecules such as collagen type II and proteoglycans in the review, aiming at providing new strategies to improve the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage. PMID:24708713

  10. Extracellular matrix synthesis in vascular disease: hypertension, and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ponticos, Markella; Smith, Barbara D.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) within the vascular network provides both a structural and regulatory role. The ECM is a dynamic composite of multiple proteins that form structures connecting cells within the network. Blood vessels are distended by blood pressure and, therefore, require ECM components with elasticity yet with enough tensile strength to resist rupture. The ECM is involved in conducting mechanical signals to cells. Most importantly, ECM regulates cellular function through chemical signaling by controlling activation and bioavailability of the growth factors. Cells respond to ECM by remodeling their microenvironment which becomes dysregulated in vascular diseases such hypertension, restenosis and atherosclerosis. This review examines the cellular and ECM components of vessels, with specific emphasis on the regulation of collagen type I and implications in vascular disease. PMID:24474961

  11. Characteristic adaptations of the extracellular matrix in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Louzao-Martinez, Laura; Vink, Aryan; Harakalova, Magdalena; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Verhaar, Marianne C; Cheng, Caroline

    2016-10-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a relatively common heart muscle disease characterized by the dilation and thinning of the left ventricle accompanied with left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Myocardial fibrosis is a major feature in DCM and therefore it is inevitable that corresponding extracellular matrix (ECM) changes are involved in DCM onset and progression. Increasing our understanding of how ECM adaptations are involved in DCM could be important for the development of future interventions. This review article discusses the molecular adaptations in ECM composition and structure that have been reported in both animal and human studies of DCM. Furthermore, we provide a transcriptome-based catalogue of ECM genes that are associated with DCM, generated by using NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database sets for DCM. Based on this in silico analysis, many novel ECM components involved in DCM are identified and discussed in this review. With the information gathered, we propose putative pathways of ECM adaptations in onset and progression of DCM. PMID:27391006

  12. Remodelling the extracellular matrix in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonnans, Caroline; Chou, Jonathan; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a highly dynamic structure that is present in all tissues and continuously undergoes controlled remodelling. This process involves quantitative and qualitative changes in the ECM, mediated by specific enzymes that are responsible for ECM degradation, such as metalloproteinases. The ECM interacts with cells to regulate diverse functions, including proliferation, migration and differentiation. ECM remodelling is crucial for regulating the morphogenesis of the intestine and lungs, as well as of the mammary and submandibular glands. Dysregulation of ECM composition, structure, stiffness and abundance contributes to several pathological conditions, such as fibrosis and invasive cancer. A better understanding of how the ECM regulates organ structure and function and of how ECM remodelling affects disease progression will contribute to the development of new therapeutics. PMID:25415508

  13. Hypoxia and the extracellular matrix: drivers of tumour metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gilkes, Daniele M.; Semenza, Gregg L.; Wirtz, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Of the deaths attributed to cancer, 90% are due to metastasis, and treatments that prevent or cure metastasis remain elusive. Emerging data indicate that hypoxia and the extracellular matrix (ECM) might have crucial roles in metastasis. During tumour evolution, changes in the composition and the overall content of the ECM reflect both its biophysical and biological properties and these strongly influence tumour and stromal cell properties, such as proliferation and motility. Originally thought of as independent contributors to metastatic spread, recent studies have established a direct link between hypoxia and the composition and the organization of the ECM, which suggests a new model in which multiple microenvironmental signals might converge to synergistically influence metastatic outcome. PMID:24827502

  14. ADAMTS: a novel family of extracellular matrix proteases.

    PubMed

    Tang, B L

    2001-01-01

    ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs) is a novel family of extracellular proteases found in both mammals and invertebrates. Members of the family may be distinguished from the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family members based on the multiple copies of thrombospondin 1-like repeats they carry. With at least nine members in mammals alone, the ADAMTS family members are predicted by their structural domains to be extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins with a wide range of activities and functions distinct from members of the ADAM family that are largely anchored on the cell surface. ADAMTS2 is a procollagen N-proteinase, and the mutations of its gene are responsible for Human Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VII C and bovine dermatosparaxis. ADAMTS4 and ADAMTS5 are aggrecanases implicated in the degradation of cartilage aggrecan in arthritic diseases. Other members of the ADAMTS family have also been implicated in roles during embryonic development and angiogenesis. Current and future studies on this emerging group of ECM proteases may provide important insights into developmental or pathological processes involving ECM remodeling. PMID:11167130

  15. SPARC mediates early extracellular matrix remodeling following myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    McCurdy, Sarah M.; Dai, Qiuxia; Zhang, Jianhua; Zamilpa, Rogelio; Ramirez, Trevi A.; Dayah, Tariq; Nguyen, Nguyen; Jin, Yu-Fang; Bradshaw, Amy D.

    2011-01-01

    Secreted protein, acidic, and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is a matricellular protein that functions in the extracellular processing of newly synthesized collagen. Collagen deposition to form a scar is a key event following a myocardial infarction (MI). Because the roles of SPARC in the early post-MI setting have not been defined, we examined age-matched wild-type (WT; n=22) and SPARC-deficient (null; n=25) mice at day 3 post-MI. Day 0 WT (n=28) and null (n=20) mice served as controls. Infarct size was 52 ± 2% for WT and 47 ± 2% for SPARC null (P=NS), indicating that the MI injury was comparable in the two groups. By echocardiography, WT mice increased end-diastolic volumes from 45 ± 2 to 83 ± 5 μl (P < 0.05). SPARC null mice also increased end-diastolic volumes but to a lesser extent than WT (39 ± 3 to 63 ± 5 μl; P < 0.05 vs. day 0 controls and vs. WT day 3 MI). Ejection fraction fell post-MI in WT mice from 57 ± 2 to 19 ± 1%. The decrease in ejection fraction was attenuated in the absence of SPARC (65 ± 2 to 28 ± 2%). Fibroblasts isolated from SPARC null left ventricle (LV) showed differences in the expression of 22 genes encoding extracellular matrix and adhesion molecule genes, including fibronectin, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF; CCN2), matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2). The change in fibroblast gene expression levels was mirrored in tissue protein extracts for fibronectin, CTGF, and MMP-3 but not TIMP-2. Combined, the results of this study indicate that SPARC deletion preserves LV function at day 3 post-MI but may be detrimental for the long-term response due to impaired fibroblast activation. PMID:21602472

  16. Functions of the conserved thrombospondin carboxy-terminal cassette in cell-extracellular matrix interactions and signaling.

    PubMed

    Adams, Josephine C

    2004-06-01

    Thrombospondins (TSPs) are extracellular, multidomain, calcium-binding glycoproteins that function at cell surfaces, in extracellular matrix (ECM) and as bridging molecules in cell-cell interactions. TSPs are multifunctional and modulate cell behavior during development, wound-healing, immune response, tumor growth and in the homeostasis of adult tissues. TSPs are assembled as oligomers that are composed of homologous polypeptides. In all the TSP polypeptides, the most highly-conserved region is the carboxyl-region, which contains a characteristic set of domains comprising EGF domains, TSP type 3 repeats and a globular carboxy-terminal domain. This large region is termed here the thrombospondin carboxy-terminal cassette (TSP-CTC). The strong conservation of the TSP-CTC suggests that it may mediate ancestral functions that are shared by all TSPs. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the TSP-CTC and areas of future interest. PMID:15094125

  17. The pherophorins: common, versatile building blocks in the evolution of extracellular matrix architecture in Volvocales.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, Armin

    2006-01-01

    Green algae of the order Volvocales provide an unrivalled opportunity for exploring the transition from unicellularity to multicellularity. They range from unicells, like Chlamydomonas, through homocytic colonial forms with increasing cooperation of individual cells, like Gonium or Pandorina, to heterocytic multicellular forms with different cell types and a complete division of labour, like Volvox. A fundamental requirement for the evolution of multicellularity is the development of a complex, multifunctional extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM has many functions, which can change under developmental control or as a result of environmental factors. Here molecular data from 15 novel proteins are presented. These proteins have been identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Gonium pectorale, Pandorina morum and Volvox carteri, and all belong to a single protein family, the pherophorins. Pherophorin-V1 is shown to be a glycoprotein localized to the 'cellular zone' of the V. carteri ECM. Pherophorin-V1 and -V2 mRNAs are strongly induced not only by the sex inducer, which triggers sexual development at extremely low concentrations, but also by mechanical wounding. Like the extensins of higher plants, which are also developmentally controlled or sometimes inducible by wounding, the pherophorins contain a (hydroxy-)proline-rich (HR) rod-like domain and are abundant within the extracellular compartment. In contrast to most extensins, pherophorins have additional globular A and B domains on both ends of the HR domains. Therefore pherophorins most closely resemble a particular class of higher plant extensin, the solanaceous lectins (e.g. potato lectin), suggesting multivalent carbohydrate-binding functions are present within the A and B domains and are responsible for cross-linking. Our results suggest that pherophorins are used as the building blocks for the extracellular scaffold throughout the Volvocales, with the characteristic mesh sizes in different ECM structures being

  18. Targeting of EMILIN-1 and EMILIN-2 to Fibrillin Microfibrils Facilitates their Incorporation into the Extracellular Matrix.

    PubMed

    Schiavinato, Alvise; Keene, Douglas R; Wohl, Alexander P; Corallo, Diana; Colombatti, Alfonso; Wagener, Raimund; Paulsson, Mats; Bonaldo, Paolo; Sengle, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    Elastin microfibril interface-located proteins (EMILINs) 1 and 2 belong to a family of structurally related extracellular glycoproteins with unique functions in the extracellular space, such as modulation of pro-transforming growth factor-β processing, activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway, and regulation of Hedgehog and Wnt ligand bioavailability. However, little is known about how EMILINs may exert their extracellular functions. We therefore investigated the spatiotemporal localization and deposition of EMILIN-1 and -2 within the extracellular space. By using immunoelectron and immunofluorescence microscopy together with biochemical extraction, we showed that EMILIN-1 and -2 are targeted to fibrillin microfibrils in the skin. In addition, during skin wound healing and in vitro matrix fiber assembly by primary dermal fibroblasts, EMILIN-1 and -2 are deposited on and coregulated with fibrillin. Analysis of wounds and mouse embryonic fibroblast cultures showed that EMILIN-1 and -2 network formation also requires the presence of fibronectin. Disruption of microfibrils in fibrillin-1-deficient mice leads to fragmentation of the EMILIN-1 and -2 networks, suggesting an involvement of EMILINs in fibrillin-related skin disorders. The addition of EMILINs to the ligand repertoire of fibrillin strengthens the concept of fibrillin microfibrils as extracellular scaffolds integrating cellular force transmission and growth factor bioactivity. PMID:26945878

  19. Extracellular matrix-mediated chemotaxis can impede cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Perumpanani, A. J.; Simmons, D. L.; Gearing, A. J. H.; Miller, K. M.; Ward, G.; Norbury, J.; Schneemann, M.; Sherratt, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Cells use a combination of changes in adhesion, proteolysis and motility (directed and random) during the process of migration. Proteolysis of the extracellular matrix (ECM) results in thecreation of haptotactic gradients which cells use to move in a directed fashion. The proteolytic creation of these gradients also results in the production of digested fragments of ECM. In this study we show that in the human fibrosarcoma cell line HT1080, matrix metalloproteinase-2(MMP-2)-digested fragments of fibronectin exert a chemotactic pull stronger than that of undigested fibronectin. During invasion, this gradient of ECM fragments is established in the wake of an invading cell, running counter to the direction of invasion. The resultant chemotactic pull is anti-invasive, contrary to the traditional view of the role of chemotaxis in invasion. Uncontrolled ECM degradation by high concentrations of MMP can thus result in steep gradients of ECM fragments, which run against the direction of invasion. Consequently, the invasive potential of a cell depends on MMP production in a biphasic mannerimplying that MMP inhibitors will upregulate invasion in high-MMPexpressing cells. Hence the therapeutic use of protease inhibitors against tumours expressing high levels of MMP could produce an augmentation of invasion.

  20. Hydrogels derived from demineralized and decellularized bone extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Sawkins, M.J.; Bowen, W.; Dhadda, P.; Markides, H.; Sidney, L.E.; Taylor, A.J.; Rose, F.R.A.J.; Badylak, S.F.; Shakesheff, K.M.; White, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of mammalian tissues has been isolated, decellularized and utilized as a scaffold to facilitate the repair and reconstruction of numerous tissues. Recent studies have suggested that superior function and complex tissue formation occurred when ECM scaffolds were derived from site-specific homologous tissues compared with heterologous tissues. The objectives of the present study were to apply a stringent decellularization process to demineralized bone matrix (DBM), prepared from bovine bone, and to characterize the structure and composition of the resulting ECM materials and DBM itself. Additionally, we sought to produce a soluble form of DBM and ECM which could be induced to form a hydrogel. Current clinical delivery of DBM particles for treatment of bone defects requires incorporation of the particles within a carrier liquid. Differences in osteogenic activity, inflammation and nephrotoxicity have been reported with various carrier liquids. The use of hydrogel forms of DBM or ECM may reduce the need for carrier liquids. DBM and ECM hydrogels exhibited sigmoidal gelation kinetics consistent with a nucleation and growth mechanism, with ECM hydrogels characterized by lower storage moduli than the DBM hydrogels. Enhanced proliferation of mouse primary calvarial cells was achieved on ECM hydrogels, compared with collagen type I and DBM hydrogels. These results show that DBM and ECM hydrogels have distinct structural, mechanical and biological properties and have the potential for clinical delivery without the need for carrier liquids. PMID:23624219

  1. Tailoring material properties of a nanofibrous extracellular matrix derived hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Todd D.; Lin, Stephen Y.; Christman, Karen L.

    2011-12-01

    In the native tissue, the interaction between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, mechanical stability, and signaling. It has been shown that decellularized ECMs can be processed into injectable formulations, thereby allowing for minimally invasive delivery. Upon injection and increase in temperature, these materials self-assemble into porous gels forming a complex network of fibers with nanoscale structure. In this study we aimed to examine and tailor the material properties of a self-assembling ECM hydrogel derived from porcine myocardial tissue, which was developed as a tissue specific injectable scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering. The impact of gelation parameters on ECM hydrogels has not previously been explored. We examined how modulating pH, temperature, ionic strength, and concentration affected the nanoscale architecture, mechanical properties, and gelation kinetics. These material characteristics were assessed using scanning electron microscopy, rheometry, and spectrophotometry, respectively. Since the main component of the myocardial matrix is collagen, many similarities between the ECM hydrogel and collagen gels were observed in terms of the nanofibrous structure and modulation of properties by altering ionic strength. However, variation from collagen gels was noted for the gelation temperature along with varied times and rates of gelation. These discrepancies when compared to collagen are likely due to the presence of other ECM components in the decellularized ECM based hydrogel. These results demonstrate how the material properties of ECM hydrogels could be tailored for future in vitro and in vivo applications.

  2. Dynamic Interactions of Epidermal Collagen XVII with the Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Nishie, Wataru; Kiritsi, Dimitra; Nyström, Alexander; Hofmann, Silke C.; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2011-01-01

    Transmembrane collagen XVII, a major component of the hemidesmosomes, is crucial for stable adhesion of the epidermis and dermis in the skin, and its dysfunction results in blistering diseases. The ectodomain of collagen XVII (Ecto-ColXVII) is constitutively shed from the cell surface, but its binding partner(s) in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the physiologic roles of the ligand interactions remain elusive. Herein, we used a new cleavage site–specific antibody to address the dynamics of collagen XVII shedding and the interactions of Ecto-ColXVII with the ECM. Ecto-ColXVII was present in the migration tracks of primary human keratinocytes and co-localized with laminin 332. The presence of this laminin, but also of collagen IV and Matrigel, in the ECM enhanced shedding and incorporation of Ecto-ColXVII into the matrix. Laminin 332 is a major, but not exclusive, interaction partner in vivo because Ecto-ColXVII deposited in the ECM of laminin 332–deficient keratinocytes was drastically reduced, but Ecto-ColXVII was present in laminin 332–negative human skin. Expression of collagen XVII deletion mutants in HEK 293 cells identified the C-terminal ectodomain stretch Ser978-Pro1497 as necessary for ECM binding. Taken together, migrating keratinocytes shed the Ecto-ColXVII, and this dynamically binds via its C-terminal domain to distinct partners in the ECM. PMID:21801871

  3. Expression of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer and enhancement of the production of matrix metalloproteinase-1 in tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cao, Z; Xiang, J; Li, C

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies have found that in addition to promoting cellular invasion, overexpression of metalloproteinase -1 (MMP-1) is associated with the initial stages of cancer development. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), a transmembrane glycoprotein, has been reported to be highly expressed in tumor cells and induce production of MMPs from peritumor fibroblasts (PTFs) adjacent to the tumor cells. The expression of EMMPRIN in tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was investigated in this study. It was found that EMMPRIN was expressed at the cell membrane throughout the entire lesion in tongue SCC. Immunofluorescence staining localized EMMPRIN to the cell membrane in a highly invasive tongue SCC cell line (Tca 8113). EMMPRIN mRNA was expressed at a high level in Tca 8113, whereas MMP-1 mRNA was expressed in PTF but harder to be detected in Tca 8113. Co-culture of Tca 8113 with PTF stimulated production of MMP-1. EMMPRIN was highly expressed in tongue SCC, and could induce local production of MMP-1. These data indicate that EMMPRIN might play an important role in tongue SCC progression and invasion. PMID:19372030

  4. A gastrolith protein serving a dual role in the formation of an amorphous mineral containing extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Shechter, Assaf; Glazer, Lilah; Cheled, Shira; Mor, Eyal; Weil, Simy; Berman, Amir; Bentov, Shmuel; Aflalo, Eliahu D.; Khalaila, Isam; Sagi, Amir

    2008-01-01

    Despite the proclamation of Lowenstam and Weiner that crustaceans are the “champions of mineral mobilization and deposition of the animal kingdom,” relatively few proteins from the two main calcification sites in these animals, i.e., the exoskeleton and the transient calcium storage organs, have been identified, sequenced, and their roles elucidated. Here, a 65-kDa protein (GAP 65) from the gastrolith of the crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus, is fully characterized and its function in the mineralization of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) of the extracellular matrix is demonstrated. GAP 65 is a negatively charged glycoprotein that possesses three predicted domains: a chitin-binding domain 2, a low-density lipoprotein receptor class A domain, and a polysaccharide deacetylase domain. Expression of GAP 65 was localized to columnar epithelial cells of the gastrolith disk during premolt. In vivo administration of GAP 65 dsRNA resulted in a significant reduction of GAP 65 transcript levels in the gastrolith disk. Such gene silencing also caused dramatic structural and morphological deformities in the chitinous-ACC extracellular matrix structure. ACC deposited in these gastroliths appeared to be sparsely packed with large elongated cavities compared with the normal gastrolith, where ACC is densely compacted. ACC spherules deposited in these gastroliths are significantly larger than normal. GAP 65, moreover, inhibited calcium carbonate crystallization in vitro and stabilized synthetic ACC. Thus, GAP 65 is the first protein shown to have dual function, involved both in extracellular matrix formation and in mineral deposition during biomineralization. PMID:18480260

  5. Simultaneous Enrichment of Plasma Soluble and Extracellular Vesicular Glycoproteins Using Prolonged Ultracentrifugation-Electrostatic Repulsion-hydrophilic Interaction Chromatography (PUC-ERLIC) Approach*

    PubMed Central

    Sok Hwee Cheow, Esther; Hwan Sim, Kae; de Kleijn, Dominique; Neng Lee, Chuen; Sorokin, Vitaly; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Plasma glycoproteins and extracellular vesicles represent excellent sources of disease biomarkers, but laboratory detection of these circulating structures are limited by their relatively low abundance in complex biological fluids. Although intensive research has led to the development of effective methods for the enrichment and isolation of either plasma glycoproteins or extracellular vesicles from clinical materials, at present it is not possible to enrich both structures simultaneously from individual patient sample, a method that affords the identification of biomarker combinations from both entities for the prediction of clinical outcomes will be clinically useful. We have therefore developed an enrichment method for use in mass spectrometry-based proteomic profiling that couples prolonged ultracentrifugation with electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography, to facilitate the recovery of both glycoproteins and extracellular vesicles from nondepleted human plasma. Following prolonged ultracentrifugation, plasma glycoproteins and extracellular vesicles were concentrated as a yellow suspension, and simultaneous analyses of low abundant secretory and vesicular glycoproteins was achieved in a single LC-MS/MS run. Using this systematic prolonged ultracentrifugation-electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography approach, we identified a total of 127 plasma glycoproteins at a high level of confidence (FDR ≤ 1%), including 48 glycoproteins with concentrations ranging from pg to ng/ml. The novel enrichment method we report should facilitate future human plasma-based proteome and glycoproteome that will identify novel biomarkers, or combinations of secreted and vesicle-derived biomarkers, that can be used to predict clinical outcomes in human patients. PMID:25862729

  6. The tetrapartite synapse: Extracellular matrix remodeling contributes to corticoaccumbens plasticity underlying drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexander C W; Scofield, Michael D; Kalivas, Peter W

    2015-12-01

    Synaptic plasticity has long been known to involve three key elements of neuropil, the presynapse, the postsynapse and adjacent glia. Here we review the role of the extracellular matrix in synaptic plasticity as a necessary component forming the tetrapartite synapse. We describe the role of matrix metalloproteinases as enzymes sculpting extracellular proteins and thereby creating an extracellular signaling domain required for synaptic plasticity. Specifically we focus on the role of the tetrapartite synapse in mediating the effects of addictive drugs at cortico-striatal synapses, and conclude that the extracellular signaling domain and its regulation by matrix metalloproteinases is critical for developing and expressing drug seeking behaviors. PMID:25838241

  7. Degradation of extracellular matrix by larvae of Schistosoma mansoni. I. Degradation by cercariae as a model for initial parasite invasion of host

    SciTech Connect

    McKerrow, J.H.; Keene, W.E.; Jeong, K.H.; Werb, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The ability of cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni to degrade a model extracellular connective tissue matrix produced by rat vascular smooth muscle cells in culture was investigated. In this model, connective tissue macromolecules are present in the interactive framework that characterizes their structure in vivo. Cercariae were stimulated to degrade the matrix by skin lipid or linoleic acid. At the maximally stimulating concentration of linoleic acid (25 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/), 68% of the total matrix was degraded, including 57% of the glycoprotein, 79% of the elastin, and 8% of the collagen. Degradation of matrix was inhibited by ..cap alpha../sub 1/-proteinase inhibitor and soybean trypsin inhibitor. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid inhibited degradation by unstimulated but not linoleic acid-stimulated cercariae. Preacetabular gland secretions collected from cercariae also degraded the matrix with an activity 86% of that of live cercariae. Preacetabular gland proteolytic activity was also inhibited by ..cap alpha../sub 1/-proteinase inhibitor, soybean trypsin inhibitor, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. The similar characteristics of matrix degradation by both live cercariae and cercarial preacetabular gland secretions support the idea that a proteinase secreted from cercarial preacetabular glands facilitates invasion of skin and connective tissue by these larvae. Degradation of elastin and glycoprotein constituentes of extracellular matrix is probably essential for skin penetration.

  8. Small intestinal submucosa extracellular matrix (CorMatrix®) in cardiovascular surgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mosala Nezhad, Zahra; Poncelet, Alain; de Kerchove, Laurent; Gianello, Pierre; Fervaille, Caroline; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2016-06-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) derived from small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is widely used in clinical applications as a scaffold for tissue repair. Recently, CorMatrix® porcine SIS-ECM (CorMatrix Cardiovascular, Inc., Roswell, GA, USA) has gained popularity for 'next-generation' cardiovascular tissue engineering due to its ease of use, remodelling properties, lack of immunogenicity, absorbability and potential to promote native tissue growth. Here, we provide an overview of the biology of porcine SIS-ECM and systematically review the preclinical and clinical literature on its use in cardiovascular surgery. CorMatrix® has been used in a variety of cardiovascular surgical applications, and since it is the most widely used SIS-ECM, this material is the focus of this review. Since CorMatrix® is a relatively new product for cardiovascular surgery, some clinical and preclinical studies published lack systematic reporting of functional and pathological findings in sufficient numbers of subjects. There are also emerging reports to suggest that, contrary to expectations, an undesirable inflammatory response may occur in CorMatrix® implants in humans and longer-term outcomes at particular sites, such as the heart valves, may be suboptimal. Large-scale clinical studies are needed driven by robust protocols that aim to quantify the pathological process of tissue repair. PMID:26912574

  9. Astrocytes as a Source for Extracellular Matrix Molecules and Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Stefan; Karus, Michael; Faissner, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Research of the past 25 years has shown that astrocytes do more than participating and building up the blood-brain barrier and detoxify the active synapse by reuptake of neurotransmitters and ions. Indeed, astrocytes express neurotransmitter receptors and, as a consequence, respond to stimuli. Within the tripartite synapse, the astrocytes owe more and more importance. Besides the functional aspects the differentiation of astrocytes has gained a more intensive focus. Deeper knowledge of the differentiation processes during development of the central nervous system might help explaining and even help treating neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinsons disease, and psychiatric disorders in which astrocytes have been shown to play a role. Specific differentiation of neural stem cells toward the astroglial lineage is performed as a multi-step process. Astrocytes and oligodendrocytes develop from a multipotent stem cell that prior to this has produced primarily neuronal precursor cells. This switch toward the more astroglial differentiation is regulated by a change in receptor composition on the cell surface and responsiveness to Fibroblast growth factor and Epidermal growth factor (EGF). The glial precursor cell is driven into the astroglial direction by signaling molecules like Ciliary neurotrophic factor, Bone Morphogenetic Proteins, and EGF. However, the early astrocytes influence their environment not only by releasing and responding to diverse soluble factors but also express a wide range of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, in particular proteoglycans of the lectican family and tenascins. Lately these ECM molecules have been shown to participate in glial development. In this regard, especially the matrix protein Tenascin C (Tnc) proved to be an important regulator of astrocyte precursor cell proliferation and migration during spinal cord development. Nevertheless, ECM molecules expressed by reactive astrocytes

  10. Extracellular matrix turnover in coronary artery ectasia patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruifeng; Chen, Lianfeng; Wu, Wei; Chen, Houzao; Zhang, Shuyang

    2016-03-01

    Dysregulation of the metabolism of the extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to coronary artery ectasia (CAE). This study evaluated the turnover of main ECM components and related proteolytic enzymes activities. In this study, thirty patients with CAE, 30 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and 30 subjects with normal coronary arteries (Control) were selected. The following circulating ECM metabolism markers were measured: soluble elastin (sElastin), collagen type I cross-linked telopeptides (ICTP), procollagen type I carboxy terminal peptide (PICP), protocollagen III N-terminal propeptide (PIIINP), and procollagen a1(III) C-terminal propeptide (PIIICP). Serum total elastase activity and total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity were also determined. The level of sElastin was higher in the CAE group than in the CAD and Control groups (P1 = 0.009, P2 = 0.000). There was no difference in ICTP (P = 0.168) or PIIICP (P = 0.079) among the three groups. PICP was significantly elevated in CAE (P1 = 0.001, P2 = 0.002). PIIINP was also significantly increased in CAE (P1 = 0.002, P2 = 0.007). Total elastase activity was higher in the CAE group than in the other two groups (P1 = 0.006, P2 = 0.022). Total MMP activity was significantly higher in the CAE group than the Control group (P2 = 0.013) but not higher than the CAD group (P1 = 0.477). In conclusion, within CAE patients the main changes in ECM metabolism were increased degradation of elastin fibres and the transition of collagen from type III to type I. Elastase and MMPs appear to be associated with this kind of ECM turnover. PMID:25576491

  11. Extracellular matrix protein expression is brain region dependent.

    PubMed

    Dauth, Stephanie; Grevesse, Thomas; Pantazopoulos, Harry; Campbell, Patrick H; Maoz, Ben M; Berretta, Sabina; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-05-01

    In the brain, extracellular matrix (ECM) components form networks that contribute to structural and functional diversity. Maladaptive remodeling of ECM networks has been reported in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders, suggesting that the brain microenvironment is a dynamic structure. A lack of quantitative information about ECM distribution in the brain hinders an understanding of region-specific ECM functions and the role of ECM in health and disease. We hypothesized that each ECM protein as well as specific ECM structures, such as perineuronal nets (PNNs) and interstitial matrix, are differentially distributed throughout the brain, contributing to the unique structure and function in the various regions of the brain. To test our hypothesis, we quantitatively analyzed the distribution, colocalization, and protein expression of aggrecan, brevican, and tenascin-R throughout the rat brain utilizing immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry analysis and assessed the effect of aggrecan, brevican, and/or tenascin-R on neurite outgrowth in vitro. We focused on aggrecan, brevican, and tenascin-R as they are especially expressed in the mature brain, and have established roles in brain development, plasticity, and neurite outgrowth. The results revealed a differentiated distribution of all three proteins throughout the brain and indicated that their presence significantly reduces neurite outgrowth in a 3D in vitro environment. These results underline the importance of a unique and complex ECM distribution for brain physiology and suggest that encoding the distribution of distinct ECM proteins throughout the brain will aid in understanding their function in physiology and in turn assist in identifying their role in disease. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1309-1336, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26780384

  12. The shell matrix of the freshwater mussel Unio pictorum (Paleoheterodonta, Unionoida). Involvement of acidic polysaccharides from glycoproteins in nacre mineralization.

    PubMed

    Marie, Benjamin; Luquet, Gilles; Pais De Barros, Jean-Paul; Guichard, Nathalie; Morel, Sylvain; Alcaraz, Gérard; Bollache, Loïc; Marin, Frédéric

    2007-06-01

    Among molluscs, the shell biomineralization process is controlled by a set of extracellular macromolecular components secreted by the calcifying mantle. In spite of several studies, these components are mainly known in bivalves from only few members of pteriomorph groups. In the present case, we investigated the biochemical properties of the aragonitic shell of the freshwater bivalve Unio pictorum (Paleoheterodonta, Unionoida). Analysis of the amino acid composition reveals a high amount of glycine, aspartate and alanine in the acid-soluble extract, whereas the acid-insoluble one is rich in alanine and glycine. Monosaccharidic analysis indicates that the insoluble matrix comprises a high amount of glucosamine. Furthermore, a high ratio of the carbohydrates of the soluble matrix is sulfated. Electrophoretic analysis of the acid-soluble matrix revealed discrete bands. Stains-All, Alcian Blue, periodic acid/Schiff and autoradiography with (45)Ca after electrophoretic separation revealed three major polyanionic calcium-binding glycoproteins, which exhibit an apparent molecular mass of 95, 50 and 29 kDa, respectively. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis shows that these bands, provisionally named P95, P50 and P29, are composed of numerous isoforms, the majority of which have acidic isoelectric points. Chemical deglycosylation of the matrix with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid induces a drastic shift of both the apparent molecular mass and the isoelectric point of these matrix components. This treatment induces also a modification of the shape of CaCO(3) crystals grown in vitro and a loss of the calcium-binding ability of two of the main matrix proteins (P95 and P50). Our findings strongly suggest that post-translational modifications display important functions in mollusc shell calcification. PMID:17488282

  13. Identification of a fibronectin interaction site in the extracellular matrix protein ameloblastin.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, Michael; Schild, Christof; Lutz, Roman; Chiquet, Matthias; Trueb, Beat

    2010-04-15

    Mammalian teeth are composed of hydroxyapatite crystals that are embedded in a rich extracellular matrix. This matrix is produced by only two cell types, the mesenchymal odontoblasts and the ectodermal ameloblasts. Ameloblasts secrete the enamel proteins amelogenin, ameloblastin, enamelin and amelotin. Odontoblasts secrete collagen type I and several calcium-binding phosphoproteins including dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein, bone sialoprotein and osteopontin. The latter four proteins have recently been grouped in the family of the SIBLINGs (small integrin-binding ligand, N-linked glycoproteins) because they display similar gene structures and because they contain an RGD tripeptide sequence that binds to integrin receptors and thus mediates cell adhesion. We have prepared all the other tooth-specific proteins in recombinant form and examined whether they might also promote cell adhesion similar to the SIBLINGs. We found that only ameloblastin consistently mediated adhesion of osteoblastic and fibroblastic cells to plastic or titanium surfaces. The activity was dependent on the intact three-dimensional structure of ameloblastin and required de novo protein synthesis of the adhering cells. By deletion analysis and in vitro mutagenesis, the active site could be narrowed down to a sequence of 13 amino acid residues (VPIMDFADPQFPT) derived from exon 7 of the rat ameloblastin gene or exons 7-9 of the human gene. Kinetic studies and RNA interference experiments further demonstrated that this sequence does not directly bind to a cell surface receptor but that it interacts with cellular fibronectin, which in turn binds to integrin receptors. The identification of a fibronectin-binding domain in ameloblastin might permit interesting applications for dental implantology. Implants could be coated with peptides containing the active sequence, which in turn would recruit fibronectin from the patient's blood. The recruited fibronectin should then promote cell

  14. Modulation of Leukocyte Behavior by an Inflamed Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Schor, Hagai; Vaday, Gayle G.

    2000-01-01

    Inflammation is a response of the immune system to foreign insult or physical damage. Various cellular and humoral components of the immune system are recruited from the vascular system and are translocated through endothelium, and into extracellular matrix (ECM) compartments of inflamed tissues. This translocation is orchestrated by various types of accessory signals, in the form of soluble or complexed molecules, which evoke remarkable transitions in leukocyte activities. Recruited inflammatory cells give rise to mechanisms of migration, including the secretion of enzymes and other pro-inflammatory mediators and the alteration of their adhesive contacts with the ECM. Hence, migrating cells secrete enzymes, chemokines, and cytokines which interact with the ECM, and thereby, provide the cells with intrinsic signals for coordinating their responses. Resultant products of enzymatic modifications to the ECM microenvironment, such as cytokine- and ECM-derived molecules, may be also part of a cell-signaling mechanism that provides leukocytes with information about the nature of their inflammatory activity; such a mechanism may give the immune system data that can be cognitively interpreted for consequential activities. This article reviews the findings that support this notion and describe the dynamic interactions between participants of the inflammatory processes. PMID:11097214

  15. Tissue Extracellular Matrix Nanoparticle Presentation in Electrospun Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Matt; Mao, Hai-Quan; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials derived from the decellularization of mature tissues retain biological and architectural features that profoundly influence cellular activity. However, the clinical utility of such materials remains limited as the shape and physical properties are difficult to control. In contrast, scaffolds based on synthetic polymers can be engineered to exhibit specific physical properties, yet often suffer from limited biological functionality. This study characterizes composite materials that present decellularized extracellular matrix (DECM) particles in combination with synthetic nanofibers and examines the ability of these materials to influence stem cell differentiation. Mechanical processing of decellularized tissues yielded particles with diameters ranging from 71 to 334 nm. Nanofiber scaffolds containing up to 10% DECM particles (wt/wt) derived from six different tissues were engineered and evaluated to confirm DECM particle incorporation and to measure bioactivity. Scaffolds containing bone, cartilage, and fat promoted osteogenesis at 1 and 3 weeks compared to controls. In contrast, spleen and lung DECM significantly reduced osteogenic outcomes compared to controls. These findings highlight the potential to incorporate appropriate source DECM nanoparticles within nanofiber composites to design a scaffold with bioactivity targeted to specific applications. PMID:24971329

  16. Fibroblast extracellular matrix and adhesion on microtextured polydimethylsiloxane scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Morgan M; Parrillo, Allegra; Thomas, Gawain M; McGimpsey, W Grant; Wen, Qi; Bellin, Robert M; Lambert, Christopher R

    2015-05-01

    The immediate physical and chemical surroundings of cells provide important biochemical cues for their behavior. Designing and tailoring biomaterials for controlled cell signaling and extracellular matrix (ECM) can be difficult due to the complexity of the cell-surface relationship. To address this issue, our research has led to the development of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) scaffold with defined microtopography and chemistry for surface driven ECM assembly. When human fibroblasts were cultured on this microtextured PDMS with 2-6 µm wide vertical features, significant changes in morphology, adhesion, actin cytoskeleton, and fibronectin generation were noted when compared with cells cultured on unmodified PDMS. Investigation of cellular response and behavior was performed with atomic force microscopy in conjunction with fluorescent labeling of focal adhesion cites and fibronectin in the ECM. Changes in the surface topography induced lower adhesion, an altered actin cytoskeleton, and compacted units of fibronectin similar to that observed in vivo. Overall, these findings provide critical information of cell-surface interactions with a microtextured, polymer substrate that can be used in the field of tissue engineering for controlling cellular ECM interactions. PMID:25142015

  17. Cellular and extracellular matrix modulation of corneal stromal opacity.

    PubMed

    Torricelli, Andre A M; Wilson, Steven E

    2014-12-01

    Stromal transparency is a critical factor contributing to normal function of the visual system. Corneal injury, surgery, disease and infection elicit complex wound healing responses that serve to protect against insults and maintain the integrity of the cornea, and subsequently to restore corneal structure and transparency. However, in some cases these processes result in prolonged loss of corneal transparency and resulting diminished vision. Corneal opacity is mediated by the complex actions of many cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines produced by the epithelial cells, stromal cells, bone marrow-derived cells, lacrimal tissues, and nerves. Myofibroblasts, and the disorganized extracellular matrix produced by these cells, are critical determinants of the level and persistence of stromal opacity after corneal injury. Decreases in corneal crystallins in myofibroblasts and corneal fibroblasts contribute to cellular opacity in the stroma. Regeneration of a fully functional epithelial basement membrane (BM) appears to have a critical role in the maintenance of corneal stromal transparency after mild injuries and recovery of transparency when opacity is generated after severe injuries. The epithelial BM likely has a regulatory function whereby it modulates epithelium-derived growth factors such as transforming growth factor (TGF) β and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) that drive the development and persistence of myofibroblasts from precursor cells. The purpose of this article is to review the factors involved in the maintenance of corneal transparency and to highlight the mechanisms involved in the appearance, persistency and regression of corneal opacity after stromal injury. PMID:25281830

  18. Extracellular matrix stiffness dictates Wnt expression through integrin pathway.

    PubMed

    Du, Jing; Zu, Yan; Li, Jing; Du, Shuyuan; Xu, Yipu; Zhang, Lang; Jiang, Li; Wang, Zhao; Chien, Shu; Yang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness plays a significant role in regulating the phenotypes and behaviors of many cell types. However, the mechanism underlying the sensing of mechanical cues and subsequent elasticity-triggered pathways remains largely unknown. We observed that stiff ECM significantly enhanced the expression level of several members of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in both bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and primary chondrocytes. The activation of β-catenin by stiff ECM is not dependent on Wnt signals but is elevated by the activation of integrin/ focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathway. The accumulated β-catenin then bound to the wnt1 promoter region to up-regulate the gene transcription, thus constituting a positive feedback of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. With the amplifying effect of positive feedback, this integrin-activated β-catenin/Wnt pathway plays significant roles in mediating the enhancement of Wnt signal on stiff ECM and contributes to the regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and primary chondrocyte phenotype maintenance. The present integrin-regulated Wnt1 expression and signaling contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of cell behaviors by ECM elasticity. PMID:26854061

  19. The significance of the extracellular matrix in intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Austin, G; Fisher, S; Dickson, D; Anderson, D; Richardson, S

    1993-01-01

    To what extent might change sin the extracellular matrix proteins in intracranial aneurysms (IA) or parent artery (PA) wall contribute to enlargement? Using IA specimens obtained from the coroner's office, the wall structure by light (Trichrome and Actin stains) and immunofluorescent microscopy (IF) (collagen I and fibronectin) have been studied in 18 specimens. It is well known that IA only arise when there is a deficiency in the internal elastic membrane and some breakdown in the media. The results show a normal three layer structure of intima, media, (muscularis), and adventitia in the PA extending out into the neck of the aneurysm. Immunofluorescent stains (IS) show collagen I and fibronectin limited to the adventitia and muscularis, respectively, of the PA and control arteries. The enlarging IA wall shows almost complete loss of this architecture. By IF stain, collagen I and fibronectin are intermingled throughout the IA wall. It is postulated that loss of structure and the confining muscularis layer permit easier elastic enlargement from a more or less homogeneous wall structure. PMID:7681275

  20. The extracellular matrix as a cell survival factor.

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, J E; Fazeli, B; Schwartz, M A

    1993-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) or apoptosis is a naturally occurring cell suicide pathway induced in a variety of cell types. In many cases, PCD is induced by the withdrawal of specific hormones or growth factors that function as survival factors. In this study, we have investigated the potential role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) as a cell survival factor. Our results indicate that in the absence of any ECM interactions, human endothelial cells rapidly undergo PCD, as determined by cell morphology, nuclei fragmentation, DNA degradation, protein cross-linking, and the expression of the PCD-specific gene TRPM-2. PCD was blocked by plating cells on an immobilized integrin beta 1 antibody but not by antibodies to either the class I histocompatibility antigen (HLA) or vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), suggesting that integrin-mediated signals were required for maintaining cell viability. Treatment of the cells in suspension with the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate also blocked PCD. When other cell types were examined, some, but not all, underwent rapid cell death when deprived of adhesion to the ECM. These results suggest that in addition to regulating cell growth and differentiation, the ECM also functions as a survival factor for many cell types. Images PMID:8257797

  1. Expression of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins: A macroarray study

    PubMed Central

    FUTYMA, KONRAD; MIOTŁA, PAWEŁ; RÓŻYŃSKA, KRYSTYNA; ZDUNEK, MAŁGORZATA; SEMCZUK, ANDRZEJ; RECHBERGER, TOMASZ; WOJCIEROWSKI, JACEK

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common gynecological malignancies in Poland, with well-established risk factors. Genetic instability and molecular alterations responsible for endometrial carcinogenesis have been systematically investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate, by means of cDNA macroarrays, the expression profiles of genes encoding extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in ECs. Tissue specimens were collected during surgical procedures from 40 patients with EC, and control tissue was collected from 9 patients with uterine leiomyomas. RNA was isolated and RT-PCR with radioisotope-labeled cDNA was performed. The levels of ECM protein gene expression in normal endometrial tissues were compared to the expression of these genes in EC specimens. Statistically significant differences in gene expression, stratified by clinical stage of the ECs, were detected for aggrecan, vitronectin, tenascin R, nidogen and two collagen proteins: type VIII chain α1 and type XI chain α2. All of these proteins were overexpressed in stage III endometrial carcinomas compared to levels in stage I and II uterine neoplasms. In conclusion, increased expression of genes encoding ECM proteins may play an important role in facilitating accelerated disease progression of human ECs. PMID:25231141

  2. Extracellular matrix stiffness dictates Wnt expression through integrin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Zu, Yan; Li, Jing; Du, Shuyuan; Xu, Yipu; Zhang, Lang; Jiang, Li; Wang, Zhao; Chien, Shu; Yang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness plays a significant role in regulating the phenotypes and behaviors of many cell types. However, the mechanism underlying the sensing of mechanical cues and subsequent elasticity-triggered pathways remains largely unknown. We observed that stiff ECM significantly enhanced the expression level of several members of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in both bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and primary chondrocytes. The activation of β-catenin by stiff ECM is not dependent on Wnt signals but is elevated by the activation of integrin/ focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathway. The accumulated β-catenin then bound to the wnt1 promoter region to up-regulate the gene transcription, thus constituting a positive feedback of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. With the amplifying effect of positive feedback, this integrin-activated β-catenin/Wnt pathway plays significant roles in mediating the enhancement of Wnt signal on stiff ECM and contributes to the regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and primary chondrocyte phenotype maintenance. The present integrin-regulated Wnt1 expression and signaling contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of cell behaviors by ECM elasticity. PMID:26854061

  3. EVALUATION OF THE EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX OF INJURED SUPRASPINATUS IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Luiz Henrique Oliveira; Ikemoto, Roberto; Mader, Ana Maria; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva; Munhoz, Bruna; Murachovsky, Joel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the evolution of injuries of the supraspinatus muscle by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and anatomopathological analysis in animal model (Wistar rats). Methods: Twenty-five Wistar rats were submitted to complete injury of the supraspinatus tendon, then subsequently sacrificed in groups of five animals at the following periods: immediately after the injury, 24h after the injury, 48h after, 30 days after and three months after the injury. All groups underwent histological and IHC analysis. Results: Regarding vascular proliferation and inflammatory infiltrate, we found a statistically significant difference between groups 1(control group) and 2 (24h after injury). IHC analysis showed that expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) showed a statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 2, and collagen type 1 (Col-1) evaluation presented a statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 4. Conclusion: We observed changes in the extracellular matrix components compatible with remodeling and healing. Remodeling is more intense 24h after injury. However, VEGF and Col-1 are substantially increased at 24h and 30 days after the injury, respectively. Level of Evidence I, Experimental Study. PMID:26997907

  4. Extracellular Matrix and the Mechanics of Large Artery Development

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jeffrey K.; Wagenseil, Jessica E.

    2012-01-01

    The large, elastic arteries, as their name suggests, provide elastic distention and recoil during the cardiac cycle in vertebrate animals. The arteries are distended from the pressure of ejecting blood during active contraction of the left ventricle (LV) during systole, and recoil to their original dimensions during relaxation of the LV during diastole. The cyclic distension occurs with minimal energy loss, due to the elastic properties of one of the major structural extracellular matrix (ECM) components, elastin. The maximum distension is limited to prevent damage to the artery by another major ECM component, collagen. The mix of ECM components in the wall largely determines the passive mechanical behavior of the arteries and the subsequent load on the heart during systole. While much research has focused on initial artery formation, there has been less attention on the continuing development of the artery to produce the mature composite wall complete with endothelial cells (ECs), smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and the necessary mix of ECM components for proper cardiovascular function. This review focuses on the physiology of large artery development, including SMC differentiation and ECM production. The effects of hemodynamic forces and ECM deposition on the evolving arterial structure and function are discussed. Human diseases and mouse models with genetic mutations in ECM proteins that affect large artery development are summarized. A review of constitutive models and growth and remodeling theories is presented, along with future directions to improve understanding of ECM and the mechanics of large artery development. PMID:22584609

  5. Extracellular matrix, biotensegrity and tumor microenvironment. An update and overview.

    PubMed

    Noguera, R; Nieto, O A; Tadeo, I; Fariñas, F; Alvaro, T

    2012-06-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) constitutes a three-dimensional network that surrounds all cells, organs and tissues in the body. It forms a biophysical filter for protection, nutrition and cell innervation, as well as the medium for facilitating immune response, angiogenesis, fibrosis and tissue regeneration. It is the mechanism by which mechanical forces are transmitted to the basement membrane which, through the integrins, supports the tensegrity system and activates the epigenetic mechanisms of the cell. A review and update on current knowledge on this topic reveals how disturbance of the ECM leads to a loss of efficient filtering, nutrition, elimination, and cell denervation functions, in addition to loss of regeneration capacity and disorders in mechanotransduction. Furthermore, such disturbance results in a loss of substrate, and with it the ability to provide a proper immune response against tumor, toxic and infectious agents. Reciprocal communication between ECM stromal and parenchymatous cells directs gene expression. The oncogenic capacity of the stroma derives from the associated cells as well as from the tumor cells, the angiogenic microenvironment and from an alteration in tensegrity; all of which are dependent on the ECM. It has been shown that the malignant phenotype is reversible by correction of the altered cues of the ECM. PMID:22473691

  6. Responses of fibroblasts to anchorage of dorsal extracellular matrix receptors.

    PubMed

    Beningo, Karen A; Dembo, Micah; Wang, Yu-li

    2004-12-28

    Fibroblasts in 2D cultures differ dramatically in behavior from those in the 3D environment of a multicellular organism. However, the basis of this disparity is unknown. A key difference is the spatial arrangement of anchored extracellular matrix (ECM) receptors to the ventral surface in 2D cultures and throughout the entire surface in 3D cultures. Therefore, we asked whether changing the topography of ECM receptor anchorage alone could invoke a morphological response. By using polyacrylamide-based substrates to present anchored fibronectin or collagen on dorsal cell surfaces, we found that well spread fibroblasts in 2D cultures quickly changed into a bipolar or stellate morphology similar to fibroblasts in vivo. Cells in this environment lacked lamellipodia and large actin bundles and formed small focal adhesions only near focused sites of protrusion. These responses depend on substrate rigidity, calcium ion, and, likely, the calcium-dependent protease calpain. We suggest that fibroblasts respond to both spatial distribution and mechanical input of anchored ECM receptors. Changes in cell shape may in turn affect diverse cellular activities, including gene expression, growth, and differentiation, as shown in numerous previous studies. PMID:15601776

  7. Spherical indentation of free-standing acellular extracellular matrix membranes.

    PubMed

    Cloonan, Aidan J; O'Donnell, Michael R; Lee, William T; Walsh, Michael T; De Barra, Eamonn; McGloughlin, Tim M

    2012-01-01

    Numerous scaffold materials have been developed for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications to replace or repair damaged tissues and organs. Naturally occurring scaffold materials derived from acellular xenogeneic and autologous extracellular matrix (ECM) are currently in clinical use. These biological scaffold materials possess inherent variations in mechanical properties. Spherical indentation or ball burst testing has commonly been used to evaluate ECM and harvested tissue due to its ease of use and simulation of physiological biaxial loading, but has been limited by complex material deformation profiles. An analytical methodology has been developed and applied to experimental load-deflection data of a model hyperelastic material and lyophilized ECM scaffolds. An optimum rehydration protocol was developed based on water absorption, hydration relaxation and dynamic mechanical analysis. The analytical methodology was compared with finite element simulations of the tests and excellent correlation was seen between the computed biaxial stress resultants and geometry deformations. A minimum rehydration period of 5 min at 37°C was sufficient for the evaluated multilaminated ECM materials. The proposed approach may be implemented for convenient comparative analysis of ECM materials and source tissues, process optimization or during lot release testing. PMID:21864728

  8. The extracellular matrix: Tools and insights for the "omics" era.

    PubMed

    Naba, Alexandra; Clauser, Karl R; Ding, Huiming; Whittaker, Charles A; Carr, Steven A; Hynes, Richard O

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a fundamental component of multicellular organisms that provides mechanical and chemical cues that orchestrate cellular and tissue organization and functions. Degradation, hyperproduction or alteration of the composition of the ECM cause or accompany numerous pathologies. Thus, a better characterization of ECM composition, metabolism, and biology can lead to the identification of novel prognostic and diagnostic markers and therapeutic opportunities. The development over the last few years of high-throughput ("omics") approaches has considerably accelerated the pace of discovery in life sciences. In this review, we describe new bioinformatic tools and experimental strategies for ECM research, and illustrate how these tools and approaches can be exploited to provide novel insights in our understanding of ECM biology. We also introduce a web platform "the matrisome project" and the database MatrisomeDB that compiles in silico and in vivo data on the matrisome, defined as the ensemble of genes encoding ECM and ECM-associated proteins. Finally, we present a first draft of an ECM atlas built by compiling proteomics data on the ECM composition of 14 different tissues and tumor types. PMID:26163349

  9. The Extracellular Matrix Contributes to Mechanotransduction in Uterine Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Leppert, Phyllis C.; Jayes, Friederike L.; Segars, James H.

    2014-01-01

    The role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and mechanotransduction as an important signaling factor in the human uterus is just beginning to be appreciated. The ECM is not only the substance that surrounds cells, but ECM stiffness will either compress cells or stretch them resulting in signals converted into chemical changes within the cell, depending on the amount of collagen, cross-linking, and hydration, as well as other ECM components. In this review we present evidence that the stiffness of fibroid tissue has a direct effect on the growth of the tumor through the induction of fibrosis. Fibrosis has two characteristics: (1) resistance to apoptosis leading to the persistence of cells and (2) secretion of collagen and other components of the ECM such a proteoglycans by those cells leading to abundant disposition of highly cross-linked, disoriented, and often widely dispersed collagen fibrils. Fibrosis affects cell growth by mechanotransduction, the dynamic signaling system whereby mechanical forces initiate chemical signaling in cells. Data indicate that the structurally disordered and abnormally formed ECM of uterine fibroids contributes to fibroid formation and growth. An appreciation of the critical role of ECM stiffness to fibroid growth may lead to new strategies for treatment of this common disease. PMID:25110476

  10. Engineering extracellular matrix structure in 3D multiphase tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gillette, Brian M.; Rossen, Ninna S.; Das, Nikkan; Leong, Debra; Wang, Meixin; Dugar, Arushi; Sia, Samuel K.

    2011-01-01

    In native tissues, microscale variations in the extracellular matrix (ECM) structure can drive different cellular behaviors. Although control over ECM structure could prove useful in tissue engineering and in studies of cellular behavior, isotropic 3D matrices poorly replicate variations in local microenvironments. In this paper, we demonstrate a method to engineer local variations in the density and size of collagen fibers throughout 3D tissues. The results showed that, in engineered multiphase tissues, the structures of collagen fibers in both the bulk ECM phases (as measured by mesh size and width of fibers) as well as at tissue interfaces (as measured by density of fibers and thickness of tissue interfaces) could be modulated by varying the collagen concentrations and gelling temperatures. As the method makes use of a previously published technique for tissue bonding, we also confirmed that significant adhesion strength at tissue interfaces was achieved under all conditions tested. Hence, this study demonstrates how collagen fiber structures can be engineered within all regions of a tightly integrated multiphase tissue scaffold by exploiting knowledge of collagen assembly. PMID:21840047

  11. Extracellular matrix as an inductive scaffold for functional tissue reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    BROWN, BRYAN N.; BADYLAK, STEPHEN F.

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a meshwork of both structural and functional proteins assembled in unique tissue-specific architectures. The ECM both provides the mechanical framework for each tissue and organ and is a substrate for cell signaling. The ECM is highly dynamic, and cells both receive signals from the ECM and contribute to its content and organization. This process of “dynamic reciprocity” is key to tissue development and for homeostasis. Based upon these important functions, ECM-based materials have been used in a wide variety of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches to tissue reconstruction. It has been demonstrated that ECM-based materials, when appropriately prepared, can act as inductive templates for constructive remodeling. Specifically, such materials act as templates for the induction of de novo functional, site-appropriate, tissue formation. Herein, the diverse structural and functional roles of the ECM are reviewed to provide a rationale for the use of ECM scaffolds in regenerative medicine. Translational examples of ECM scaffolds in regenerative are provided, and the potential mechanisms by which ECM scaffolds elicit constructive remodeling are discussed. A better understanding of the ability of ECM scaffold materials to define the microenvironment of the injury site will lead to improved clinical outcomes associated with their use. PMID:24291155

  12. Using Extracellular Matrix Proteomics: To Understand Left Ventricular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Merry L.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Lange, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Survival following myocardial infarction (MI) has improved substantially over the last 40 years; however, the incidence of subsequent congestive heart failure has dramatically increased as a consequence. Discovering plasma markers that signify adverse cardiac remodeling may allow high-risk patients to be recognized earlier and may provide an improved way to assess treatment efficacy. Alterations in extracellular matrix (ECM) regulate cardiac remodeling following MI and potentially provide a large array of candidate indicators. The field of cardiac proteomics has progressed rapidly over the past 20 years, since publication of the first two-dimensional electrophoretic gels of left ventricle proteins. Proteomic approaches are now routinely utilized to better understand how the left ventricle responds to injury. In this review, we will discuss how methods have developed to allow comprehensive evaluation of the ECM proteome. We will explain how ECM proteomic data can be used to predict adverse remodeling for an individual patient and highlight future directions. Although this review will focus on the use of ECM proteomics to better understand post-MI remodeling responses, these approaches have applicability to a wide-range of cardiac pathologies, including pressure overload hypertrophy, viral myocarditis, and non-ischemic heart failure. PMID:22337931

  13. Substrate stiffness regulates extracellular matrix deposition by alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Jessica L; Safi, Asmahan; Wei, Xiaoding; Espinosa, Horacio D; Budinger, GR Scott; Takawira, Desire; Hopkinson, Susan B; Jones, Jonathan CR

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to address whether a stiff substrate, a model for pulmonary fibrosis, is responsible for inducing changes in the phenotype of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in the lung, including their deposition and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Methods Freshly isolated lung AEC from male Sprague Dawley rats were seeded onto polyacrylamide gel substrates of varying stiffness and analyzed for expression and organization of adhesion, cytoskeletal, differentiation, and ECM components by Western immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Results We observed that substrate stiffness influences cell morphology and the organization of focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, however, we found that substrate stiffness has no influence on the differentiation of type II into type I AEC, nor does increased substrate stiffness lead to an epithelial–mesenchymal transition. In contrast, our data indicate that substrate stiffness regulates the expression of the α3 laminin subunit by AEC and the organization of both fibronectin and laminin in their ECM. Conclusions An increase in substrate stiffness leads to enhanced laminin and fibronectin assembly into fibrils, which likely contributes to the disease phenotype in the fibrotic lung. PMID:23204878

  14. Targeting the neural extracellular matrix in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Soleman, S; Filippov, M A; Dityatev, A; Fawcett, J W

    2013-12-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is known to regulate important processes in neuronal cell development, activity and growth. It is associated with the structural stabilization of neuronal processes and synaptic contacts during the maturation of the central nervous system. The remodeling of the ECM during both development and after central nervous system injury has been shown to affect neuronal guidance, synaptic plasticity and their regenerative responses. Particular interest has focused on the inhibitory role of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and their formation into dense lattice-like structures, termed perineuronal nets (PNNs), which enwrap sub-populations of neurons and restrict plasticity. Recent studies in mammalian systems have implicated CSPGs and PNNs in regulating and restricting structural plasticity. The enzymatic degradation of CSPGs or destabilization of PNNs has been shown to enhance neuronal activity and plasticity after central nervous system injury. This review focuses on the role of the ECM, CSPGs and PNNs; and how developmental and pharmacological manipulation of these structures have enhanced neuronal plasticity and aided functional recovery in regeneration, stroke, and amblyopia. In addition to CSPGs, this review also points to the functions and potential therapeutic value of these and several other key ECM molecules in epileptogenesis and dementia. PMID:24012743

  15. Mechanocompatible Polymer-Extracellular-Matrix Composites for Vascular Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Suen, Rachel; Wang, Jiao-Jing; Zhang, Zheng J; Wertheim, Jason A; Ameer, Guillermo A

    2016-07-01

    Small-diameter vascular grafts developed from vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) can potentially be used for bypass surgeries and other vascular reconstruction and repair procedures. The addition of heparin to the ECM improves graft hemocompatibility but often involves chemical cross-linking, which increases ECM mechanical stiffness compared to native arteries. Herein, the importance of maintaining ECM mechanocompatibility is demonstrated, and a mechanocompatible strategy to immobilize heparin onto the ECM via a biodegradable elastomer is described. Specifically, poly(1,8-octamethylene citrate)-co-cysteine is hybridized to the ECM, forming a polymer-ECM composite that allows for heparin immobilization via maleimide-thiol "click" chemistry. Heparinized composites reduce platelet adhesion by >60% in vitro, without altering the elastic modulus of the ECM. In a rat abdominal aortic interposition model, intimal hyperplasia in heparinized mechanocompatible grafts is 65% lower when compared to ECM-only control grafts at four weeks. In contrast, grafts that are heparinized with carbodiimide chemistry exhibit increased intimal hyperplasia (4.2-fold) and increased macrophage infiltration (3.5-fold) compared to ECM-only control grafts. All grafts show similar, partial endothelial cell coverage and little to no ECM remodeling. Overall, a mechanocompatible strategy to improve ECM thromboresistance is described and the importance of ECM mechanical properties for proper in vivo graft performance is highlighted. PMID:27109033

  16. The Biology of the Escherichia coli Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Hufnagel, David A.; DePas, William H.; Chapman, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Chapter Summary Escherichia coli (E. coli) is one of the world’s best-characterized organisms, as it has been extensively studied for over a century. However, most of this work has focused on E. coli grown under laboratory conditions that do not faithfully simulate its natural environments. Therefore, the historical perspectives on E. coli physiology and life cycle are somewhat skewed toward experimental systems that feature E. coli growing logarithmically in a test tube. Typically a commensal bacterium, E. coli resides in the lower intestines of a slew of animals. Outside of the lower intestine, E. coli can adapt and survive in a very different set of environmental conditions. Biofilm formation allows E. coli to survive, and even thrive, in environments that do not support the growth of planktonic populations. E. coli can form biofilms virtually everywhere; in the bladder during a urinary tract infection, on in-dwelling medical devices, and outside of the host on plants and in the soil. The E. coli extracellular matrix, primarily composed of the protein polymer named curli and the polysaccharide cellulose, promotes adherence to organic and inorganic surfaces, and resistance to desiccation, the host immune system and other antimicrobials. The pathways that govern E. coli biofilm formation, cellulose production, and curli biogenesis will be discussed in this book chapter, which concludes with insights into the future of E. coli biofilm research and potential therapies. PMID:26185090

  17. Brain extracellular matrix retains connectivity in neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Bikbaev, Arthur; Frischknecht, Renato; Heine, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The formation and maintenance of connectivity are critically important for the processing and storage of information in neuronal networks. The brain extracellular matrix (ECM) appears during postnatal development and surrounds most neurons in the adult mammalian brain. Importantly, the removal of the ECM was shown to improve plasticity and post-traumatic recovery in the CNS, but little is known about the mechanisms. Here, we investigated the role of the ECM in the regulation of the network activity in dissociated hippocampal cultures grown on microelectrode arrays (MEAs). We found that enzymatic removal of the ECM in mature cultures led to transient enhancement of neuronal activity, but prevented disinhibition-induced hyperexcitability that was evident in age-matched control cultures with intact ECM. Furthermore, the ECM degradation followed by disinhibition strongly affected the network interaction so that it strongly resembled the juvenile pattern seen in naïve developing cultures. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the ECM plays an important role in retention of existing connectivity in mature neuronal networks that can be exerted through synaptic confinement of glutamate. On the other hand, removal of the ECM can play a permissive role in modification of connectivity and adaptive exploration of novel network architecture. PMID:26417723

  18. The Extracellular Matrix in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: Target and Source

    PubMed Central

    Mižíková, Ivana; Morty, Rory E.

    2015-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common complication of preterm birth that contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality in neonatal intensive care units. BPD results from life-saving interventions, such as mechanical ventilation and oxygen supplementation used to manage preterm infants with acute respiratory failure, which may be complicated by pulmonary infection. The pathogenic pathways driving BPD are not well-delineated but include disturbances to the coordinated action of gene expression, cell–cell communication, physical forces, and cell interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM), which together guide normal lung development. Efforts to further delineate these pathways have been assisted by the use of animal models of BPD, which rely on infection, injurious mechanical ventilation, or oxygen supplementation, where histopathological features of BPD can be mimicked. Notable among these are perturbations to ECM structures, namely, the organization of the elastin and collagen networks in the developing lung. Dysregulated collagen deposition and disturbed elastin fiber organization are pathological hallmarks of clinical and experimental BPD. Strides have been made in understanding the disturbances to ECM production in the developing lung, but much still remains to be discovered about how ECM maturation and turnover are dysregulated in aberrantly developing lungs. This review aims to inform the reader about the state-of-the-art concerning the ECM in BPD, to highlight the gaps in our knowledge and current controversies, and to suggest directions for future work in this exciting and complex area of lung development (patho)biology. PMID:26779482

  19. Abnormal expression of laminin suggests disturbance of sarcolemma-extracellular matrix interaction in Japanese patients with autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy deficient in adhalin.

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, I; Yamada, H; Fukunaga, H; Iwaki, H; Okubo, R; Nakagawa, M; Osame, M; Roberds, S L; Shimizu, T; Campbell, K P

    1994-01-01

    Dystrophin is associated with several novel sarcolemmal proteins, including a laminin-binding extracellular glycoprotein of 156 kD (alpha-dystroglycan) and a transmembrane glycoprotein of 50 kD (adhalin). Deficiency of adhalin characterizes a severe autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy prevalent in Arabs. Here we report for the first time two mongoloid (Japanese) patients with autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy deficient in adhalin. Interestingly, adhalin was not completely absent and was faintly detectable in a patchy distribution along the sarcolemma in our patients. Although the M and B2 subunits of laminin were preserved, the B1 subunit was greatly reduced in the basal lamina surrounding muscle fibers. Our results raise a possibility that the deficiency of adhalin may be associated with the disturbance of sarcolemma-extracellular matrix interaction leading to sarcolemmal instability. Images PMID:8040315

  20. Brain extracellular matrix meets COST--matrix for European research networks.

    PubMed

    Gajović, Srećko; Pochet, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Today's researchers are faced with a change from curiosity-driven to mandate-driven research. These two approaches are well combined within scientific networks (Actions) supported by the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) program. The functioning of COST Actions, although directed only to networking, has a substantial impact on European science and can be compared to the functioning of the extracellular matrix in the brain, which although scarce plays a key role in initiation, maintenance, and plasticity of intercellular interactions in the nervous system. COST networks enable interdisciplinary approach and support early-stage researchers, which is a vital asset for the advancement of science. PMID:25410370

  1. Mice lacking the extracellular matrix protein MAGP1 display delayed thrombotic occlusion following vessel injury

    PubMed Central

    Werneck, Claudio C.; Vicente, Cristina P.; Weinberg, Justin S.; Shifren, Adrian; Pierce, Richard A.; Broekelmann, Thomas J.; Tollefsen, Douglas M.

    2008-01-01

    Mice lacking the extracellular matrix protein microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 (MAGP1) display delayed thrombotic occlusion of the carotid artery following injury as well as prolonged bleeding from a tail vein incision. Normal occlusion times were restored when recombinant MAGP1 was infused into deficient animals prior to vessel wounding. Blood coagulation was normal in these animals as assessed by activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time. Platelet number was lower in MAGP1-deficient mice, but the platelets showed normal aggregation properties in response to various agonists. MAGP1 was not found in normal platelets or in the plasma of wild-type mice. In ligand blot assays, MAGP1 bound to fibronectin, fibrinogen, and von Willebrand factor, but von Willebrand factor was the only protein of the 3 that bound to MAGP1 in surface plasmon resonance studies. These findings show that MAGP1, a component of microfibrils and vascular elastic fibers, plays a role in hemostasis and thrombosis. PMID:18281502

  2. Structural homology between lymphocyte receptors for high endothelium and class III extracellular matrix receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gallatin, W M; Wayner, E A; Hoffman, P A; St John, T; Butcher, E C; Carter, W G

    1989-01-01

    We have identified extensive structural homology between one type of heterotypic adhesion receptor (HAR) involved in lymphocyte interactions with high endothelium in lymphoid organs and a collagen-binding protein, termed class III extracellular matrix receptor (ECMRIII), expressed on most nucleated cell types. Both receptors have been described as heterogeneous 90-kDa transmembrane glycoproteins, referred to here as gp90. Monoclonal anti-HAR antibodies, Hermes-1 and Hutch-1, and monoclonal anti-ECMRIII antibodies, P1G12 and P3H9, were utilized to compare the two receptors. (i) All these monoclonal antibodies immunoprecipitated major gp90 components as well as uncharacterized additional higher molecular mass antigens of 120-200 kDa in human and macaque fibroblasts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. (ii) Competitive binding analyses with the antibodies identified distinct epitopes present on gp90. (iii) Enzymatic and chemical digestions generated identical peptide fragments from all the antigens in human and macaque fibroblasts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. (iv) Sequential immunoprecipitation with P1G12 followed by the other monoclonal antibodies indicated that all gp90 species reactive with Hermes-1 and Hutch-1 also expressed the P1G12 defined epitope. In reciprocal experiments, Hermes-1 and Hutch-1 immunoprecipitation did not completely remove all P1G12-reactive gp90 from cellular extracts. One inference from these data would be that gp90 is serologically heterogeneous, encompassing HARs as a major subset of this broadly expressed class of molecules. Images PMID:2471973

  3. In silico analysis suggests interaction between Ebola virus and the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Veljkovic, Veljko; Glisic, Sanja; Muller, Claude P; Scotch, Matthew; Branch, Donald R; Perovic, Vladimir R; Sencanski, Milan; Veljkovic, Nevena; Colombatti, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    The worst Ebola virus (EV) outbreak in history has hit Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea hardest and the trend lines in this crisis are grave, and now represents a global public health threat concern. Limited therapeutic and/or prophylactic options are available for people suffering from Ebola virus disease (EVD) and further complicate the situation. Previous studies suggested that the EV glycoprotein (GP) is the main determinant causing structural damage of endothelial cells that triggers the hemorrhagic diathesis, but molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remains elusive. Using the informational spectrum method (ISM), a virtual spectroscopy method for analysis of the protein-protein interactions, the interaction of GP with endothelial extracellular matrix (ECM) was investigated. Presented results of this in silico study suggest that Elastin Microfibril Interface Located Proteins (EMILINs) are involved in interaction between GP and ECM. This finding could contribute to a better understanding of EV/endothelium interaction and its role in pathogenesis, prevention and therapy of EVD. PMID:25745423

  4. The role of cell-extracellular matrix interactions in glomerular injury.

    PubMed

    Borza, Corina M; Pozzi, Ambra

    2012-05-15

    Glomerulosclerosis is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix within the glomeruli of the kidney, glomerular cell death, and subsequent loss of functional glomeruli. While in physiological situations the levels of extracellular matrix components are kept constant by a tight balance between formation and degradation, in the case of injury that results in fibrosis there is increased matrix deposition relative to its breakdown. Multiple factors control matrix synthesis and degradation, thus contributing to the development of glomerulosclerosis. This review focuses primarily on the role of cell-matrix interactions, which play a critical role in governing glomerular cell cues in both healthy and diseased kidneys. Cell-extracellular matrix interactions are made possible by various cellular receptors including integrins, discoidin domain receptors, and dystroglycan. Upon binding to a selective extracellular matrix protein, these receptors activate intracellular signaling pathways that can either downregulate or upregulate matrix synthesis and deposition. This, together with the observation that changes in the expression levels of matrix receptors have been documented in glomerular disease, clearly emphasizes the contribution of cell-matrix interactions in glomerular injury. Understanding the molecular mechanisms whereby extracellular matrix receptors regulate matrix homeostasis in the course of glomerular injury is therefore critical for devising more effective therapies to treat and ideally prevent glomerulosclerosis. PMID:22417893

  5. THE ROLE OF CELL-EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX INTERACTIONS IN GLOMERULAR INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Borza, Corina M.; Pozzi, Ambra

    2013-01-01

    Glomerulosclerosis is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix within the glomeruli of the kidney, glomerular cell death, and subsequent loss of functional glomeruli. While in physiological situations the levels of extracellular matrix components are kept constant by a tight balance between formation and degradation, in the case of injury that results in fibrosis there is increased matrix deposition relative to its breakdown. Multiple factors control matrix synthesis and degradation, thus contributing to the development of glomerulosclerosis. This review focuses primarily on the role of cell-matrix interactions, which play a critical role in governing glomerular cell cues in both healthy and diseased kidneys. Cell-extracellular matrix interactions are made possible by various cellular receptors including integrins, discoidin domain receptors, and dystroglycan. Upon binding to a selective extracellular matrix protein, these receptors activate intracellular signaling pathways that can either downregulate or upregulate matrix synthesis and deposition. This, together with the observation that changes in the expression levels of matrix receptors have been documented in glomerular disease, clearly emphasizes the contribution of cell-matrix interactions in glomerular injury. Understanding the molecular mechanisms whereby extracellular matrix receptors regulate matrix homeostasis in the course of glomerular injury is therefore critical for devising more effective therapies to treat and ideally prevent glomerulosclerosis. PMID:22417893

  6. Shell Extracts from the Marine Bivalve Pecten maximus Regulate the Synthesis of Extracellular Matrix in Primary Cultured Human Skin Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Latire, Thomas; Legendre, Florence; Bigot, Nicolas; Carduner, Ludovic; Kellouche, Sabrina; Bouyoucef, Mouloud; Carreiras, Franck; Marin, Frédéric; Lebel, Jean-Marc; Galéra, Philippe; Serpentini, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Mollusc shells are composed of more than 95% calcium carbonate and less than 5% of an organic matrix consisting mostly of proteins, glycoproteins and polysaccharides. Previous studies have elucidated the biological activities of the shell matrices from bivalve molluscs on skin, especially on the expression of the extracellular matrix components of fibroblasts. In this work, we have investigated the potential biological activities of shell matrix components extracted from the shell of the scallop Pecten maximus on human fibroblasts in primary culture. Firstly, we demonstrated that shell matrix components had different effects on general cellular activities. Secondly, we have shown that the shell matrix components stimulate the synthesis of type I and III collagens, as well as that of sulphated GAGs. The increased expression of type I collagen is likely mediated by the recruitment of transactivating factors (Sp1, Sp3 and human c-Krox) in the −112/−61 bp COL1A1 promoter region. Finally, contrarily to what was obtained in previous works, we demonstrated that the scallop shell extracts have only a small effect on cell migration during in vitro wound tests and have no effect on cell proliferation. Thus, our research emphasizes the potential use of shell matrix of Pecten maximus for dermo-cosmetic applications. PMID:24949635

  7. Shell extracts from the marine bivalve Pecten maximus regulate the synthesis of extracellular matrix in primary cultured human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Latire, Thomas; Legendre, Florence; Bigot, Nicolas; Carduner, Ludovic; Kellouche, Sabrina; Bouyoucef, Mouloud; Carreiras, Franck; Marin, Frédéric; Lebel, Jean-Marc; Galéra, Philippe; Serpentini, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Mollusc shells are composed of more than 95% calcium carbonate and less than 5% of an organic matrix consisting mostly of proteins, glycoproteins and polysaccharides. Previous studies have elucidated the biological activities of the shell matrices from bivalve molluscs on skin, especially on the expression of the extracellular matrix components of fibroblasts. In this work, we have investigated the potential biological activities of shell matrix components extracted from the shell of the scallop Pecten maximus on human fibroblasts in primary culture. Firstly, we demonstrated that shell matrix components had different effects on general cellular activities. Secondly, we have shown that the shell matrix components stimulate the synthesis of type I and III collagens, as well as that of sulphated GAGs. The increased expression of type I collagen is likely mediated by the recruitment of transactivating factors (Sp1, Sp3 and human c-Krox) in the -112/-61 bp COL1A1 promoter region. Finally, contrarily to what was obtained in previous works, we demonstrated that the scallop shell extracts have only a small effect on cell migration during in vitro wound tests and have no effect on cell proliferation. Thus, our research emphasizes the potential use of shell matrix of Pecten maximus for dermo-cosmetic applications. PMID:24949635

  8. Process-induced extracellular matrix alterations affect the mechanisms of soft tissue repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Sandor, Maryellen; Lombardi, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrices derived from animal tissues for human tissue repairs are processed by various methods of physical, chemical, or enzymatic decellularization, viral inactivation, and terminal sterilization. The mechanisms of action in tissue repair vary among bioscaffolds and are suggested to be associated with process-induced extracellular matrix modifications. We compared three non-cross-linked, commercially available extracellular matrix scaffolds (Strattice, Veritas, and XenMatrix), and correlated extracellular matrix alterations to in vivo biological responses upon implantation in non-human primates. Structural evaluation showed significant differences in retaining native tissue extracellular matrix histology and ultrastructural features among bioscaffolds. Tissue processing may cause both the condensation of collagen fibers and fragmentation or separation of collagen bundles. Calorimetric analysis showed significant differences in the stability of bioscaffolds. The intrinsic denaturation temperature was measured to be 51°C, 38°C, and 44°C for Strattice, Veritas, and XenMatrix, respectively, demonstrating more extracellular matrix modifications in the Veritas and XenMatrix scaffolds. Consequently, the susceptibility to collagenase degradation was increased in Veritas and XenMatrix when compared to their respective source tissues. Using a non-human primate model, three bioscaffolds were found to elicit different biological responses, have distinct mechanisms of action, and yield various outcomes of tissue repair. Strattice permitted cell repopulation and was remodeled over 6 months. Veritas was unstable at body temperature, resulting in rapid absorption with moderate inflammation. XenMatrix caused severe inflammation and sustained immune reactions. This study demonstrates that extracellular matrix alterations significantly affect biological responses in soft tissue repair and regeneration. The data offer useful insights into the rational design of

  9. Extracellular Matrix and Dermal Fibroblast Function in the Healing Wound

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Lauren E.; Minasian, Raquel A.; Caterson, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Fibroblasts play a critical role in normal wound healing. Various extracellular matrix (ECM) components, including collagens, fibrin, fibronectin, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans, and matricellular proteins, can be considered potent protagonists of fibroblast survival, migration, and metabolism. Recent Advances: Advances in tissue culture, tissue engineering, and ex vivo models have made the examination and precise measurements of ECM components in wound healing possible. Likewise, the development of specific transgenic animal models has created the opportunity to characterize the role of various ECM molecules in healing wounds. In addition, the recent characterization of new ECM molecules, including matricellular proteins, dermatopontin, and FACIT collagens (Fibril-Associated Collagens with Interrupted Triple helices), further demonstrates our cursory knowledge of the ECM in coordinated wound healing. Critical Issues: The manipulation and augmentation of ECM components in the healing wound is emerging in patient care, as demonstrated by the use of acellular dermal matrices, tissue scaffolds, and wound dressings or topical products bearing ECM proteins such as collagen, hyaluronan (HA), or elastin. Once thought of as neutral structural proteins, these molecules are now known to directly influence many aspects of cellular wound healing. Future Directions: The role that ECM molecules, such as CCN2, osteopontin, and secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine, play in signaling homing of fibroblast progenitor cells to sites of injury invites future research as we continue investigating the heterotopic origin of certain populations of fibroblasts in a healing wound. Likewise, research into differently sized fragments of the same polymeric ECM molecule is warranted as we learn that fragments of molecules such as HA and tenascin-C can have opposing effects on dermal fibroblasts. PMID:26989578

  10. Milk extracellular vesicles accelerate osteoblastogenesis but impair bone matrix formation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina C; Arntz, Onno J; Blaney Davidson, Esmeralda N; van Lent, Peter L E M; Koenders, Marije I; van der Kraan, Peter M; van den Berg, Wim B; Ferreira, Adaliene V M; van de Loo, Fons A J

    2016-04-01

    The claimed beneficial effect of milk on bone is still a matter for debate. Recently extracellular vesicles (EVs) that contain proteins and RNA were discovered in milk, but their effect on bone formation has not yet been determined. We demonstrated previously that bovine milk-derived EVs (BMEVs) have immunoregulatory properties. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of BMEVs on osteogenesis by mice and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Oral delivery of two concentrations of BMEVs to female DBA/1J mice during 7weeks did not alter the tibia trabecular bone area; however, the osteocytes number increased. In addition, the highest dose of BMEVs markedly increased the woven bone tissue, which is more brittle. The exposure of hMSCs to BMEVs during 21days resulted in less mineralization but higher cell proliferation. Interestingly BMEVs reduced the collagen production, but enhanced the expression of genes characteristic for immature osteoblasts. A kinetic study showed that BMEVs up-regulated many osteogenic genes within the first 4days. However, the production of type I collagen and expression of its genes (COL1A1 and COL1A2) were markedly reduced at days 21 and 28. At day 28, BMEVs again lead to higher proliferation, but mineralization was significantly increased. This was associated with increased expression of sclerostin, a marker for osteocytes, and reduced osteonectin, which is associated to bone matrix formation. Our study adds BMEVs to the list of milk components that can affect bone formation and may shed new light on the contradictory claims of milk on bone formation. PMID:27012623

  11. Structural Determinants of Binding of Aromates to Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yufen; Lukacova, Viera; Bartus, Vladimir; Balaz, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    For small molecules acting in tissues, including signaling peptides, effectors, inhibitors, and other drug candidates, nonspecific binding to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a critical phenomenon affecting their disposition, toxicity, and other effects. A commercially available ECM mimic, forming a solidified layer at the bottom of the vials, was used to measure the association constants of 25 simple aromatic compounds to two forms of ECM proteins, solidified (s-ECM) and dissolved (d-ECM) in the buffer during the incubation. Except for small homologous series, the binding data did not correlate with the lipophilicity and acidity of the compounds, contrary to a common expectation for nonspecific binding. To elucidate the putative structures of averaged binding sites of s-ECM and d-ECM, the Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) was applied in a modified version taking into consideration that multiple modes and multiple species may be involved. The method shapes a receptor site model from a set of grid points, in which the interaction energies between a probe atom and superimposed ligands are calculated. Electrostatic and steric energies in the grid points are characterized by regression coefficients. The forward-selection, nonlinear regression analysis was used to optimize the coefficients in the novel multi-species, multi-mode CoMFA models. These models showed satisfactory descriptive and predictive abilities for both s-ECM and d-ECM binding data, which were better than those obtained with the standard, one-mode CoMFA analysis. The calibrated models, defining the electrostatic and van der Waals regions of putative binding sites, are suitable for the prediction of ECM binding for untested chemicals. PMID:17226922

  12. Customized Interface Biofunctionalization of Decellularized Extracellular Matrix: Toward Enhanced Endothelialization.

    PubMed

    Aubin, Hug; Mas-Moruno, Carlos; Iijima, Makoto; Schütterle, Nicolas; Steinbrink, Meike; Assmann, Alexander; Gil, Francesc Javier; Lichtenberg, Artur; Pegueroles, Marta; Akhyari, Payam

    2016-05-01

    Interface biofunctionalization strategies try to enhance and control the interaction between implants and host organism. Decellularized extracellular matrix (dECM) is widely used as a platform for bioengineering of medical implants, having shown its suitability in a variety of preclinical as well as clinical models. In this study, specifically designed, custom-made synthetic peptides were used to functionalize dECM with different cell adhesive sequences (RGD, REDV, and YIGSR). Effects on in vitro endothelial cell adhesion and in vivo endothelialization were evaluated in standardized models using decellularized ovine pulmonary heart valve cusps (dPVCs) and decellularized aortic grafts (dAoGs), respectively. Contact angle measurements and fluorescent labeling of custom-made peptides showed successful functionalization of dPVCs and dAoGs. The functionalization of dPVCs with a combination of bioactive sequences significantly increased in vitro human umbilical vein endothelial cell adhesion compared to nonfunctionalized controls. In a functional rodent aortic transplantation model, fluorescent-labeled peptides on dAoGs were persistent up to 10 days in vivo under exposure to systemic circulation. Although there was a trend toward enhanced in vivo endothelialization of functionalized grafts compared to nonfunctionalized controls, there was no statistical significance and a large biological variability in both groups. Despite failing to show a clear biological effect in the used in vivo model system, our initial findings do suggest that endothelialization onto dECM may be modulated by customized interface biofunctionalization using the presented method. Since bioactive sequences within the dECM-synthetic peptide platform are easily interchangeable and combinable, further control of host cell proliferation, function, and differentiation seems to be feasible, possibly paving the way to a new generation of multifunctional dECM scaffolds for regenerative medicine. PMID

  13. 3D Extracellular Matrix from Sectioned Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Catherine B; Cukierman, Edna; Artym, Vira V

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) matrices have significant advantages compared to conventional two-dimensional (2D) matrices for studying cell adhesion, migration, and tissue organization. Cellular behavior is dependent on the surrounding matrix environment for signaling and induction of biological responses (Carletti, et al., 2011; Pampaloni, et al., 2007; Vlodavsky, 1999). 2D cultures induce an artificial polarity in cultured cells between upper and lower surfaces not present normally in the in vivo environment. No longer nonpolar, many aspects of cellular behavior are altered (Beacham, et al., 2007; Grinnell and Petroll, 2010; Yamada and Cukierman, 2007). In addition, 2D models lack the physical properties of 3D matrix, such as topography, stiffness, and dimensionality. To begin to mimic the 3D environment of in vivo connective tissue extracellular matrix (ECM), collagen gels have been used widely (see Unit 10.3). Culture of cells in collagen gels results in a bipolar fibroblast morphology that resembles the in vivo phenotype (Friedl and Brocker, 2000; Even-Ram and Yamada, 2005; Grinnell and Petroll, 2010). Although more physiological, 3D collagen gels lack the complex biochemical and physical microenvironment present in an in vivo ECM that regulates cellular physiological properties (Beacham, et al., 2007). A variety of methods to create a more in vivo-like ECM have been published (Yamada and Cukierman, 2007). Adding critical ECM components to 3D collagen matrices, including fibronectin, hyaluronan, link protein and glycosaminoglycans, can more accurately mimic the structural microenvironment of the native ECM (Friedl and Brocker, 2000). Other ECM models use cultured cell lines, such as fibroblasts, to derive an ECM lattice through secretion of an organized ECM (Beacham, et al., 2007). Different cell lines have been chosen to generate a specific microenvironment for study of particularly types of cellular behavior (Kutys and Yamada, 2013). For example, cultured bovine

  14. Temporal Regulation of Venous Extracellular Matrix Components during Arteriovenous Fistula Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael R.; Yamamoto, Kota; Protack, Clinton D.; Tsuneki, Masayuki; Kuwahara, Go; Assi, Roland; Brownson, Kirstyn E.; Bai, Hualong; Madri, Joseph A.; Dardik, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The venous limb of arteriovenous fistulae (AVF) adapts to the arterial environment by dilation and wall thickening; however the temporal regulation of the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) components in the venous limb of the maturing AVF has not been well characterized. We used a murine model of AVF maturation that recapitulates human AVF maturation to determine the temporal pattern of expression of these ECM components. Methods Aortocaval fistulae were created in C57BL/6J mice and the venous limb was analyzed on post-operative days 1, 3, 7, 21, and 42. A gene microarray analysis was performed on day 7; results were confirmed by qPCR, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Proteases, protease-inhibitors, collagens, glycoproteins and other non-collagenous proteins were characterized. Results The maturing AVF has increased expression of many ECM components, including increased collagen and elastin. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) showed increased mRNA and protein expression during the first 7 days of maturation. Increased collagen and elastin expression was also significant at day 7. Expression of structural proteins was increased later during AVF maturation. Osteopontin (OPN) expression was increased at day 1 and sustained during AVF maturation. Conclusion During AVF maturation there is significantly increased expression of ECM components, each of which shows distinct temporal patterns during AVF maturation. Increased expression of regulatory proteins such as MMP and TIMP precedes increased expression of structural proteins such as collagen and elastin, potentially mediating a controlled pattern of ECM degradation and vessel remodeling without structural failure. PMID:25262757

  15. The extracellular glycoprotein SPARC interacts with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB and -BB and inhibits the binding of PDGF to its receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Raines, E.W.; Lane, T.F.; Iruela-Arispe, M.L.; Ross, R.; Sage, E.H. )

    1992-02-15

    Interactions among growth factors, cells, and extracellular matrix are critical to the regulation of directed cell migration and proliferation associated with development wound healing, and pathologic processes. Here the authors report the association of PDGF-AB and -BB, but not PDGF-AA, with the extracellular glycoprotein SPARC. Complexes of SPARC and {sup 125}I-labeled PDGF-BB or -AB were specifically immunoprecipitated by anti-SPARC immunoglobulins. {sup 125}I-PDGF-BB and -AB also bound specifically to SPARC that was immobilized on microtiter wells or bound to nitrocellulose after transfer from SDS/polyacrylamide gels. The binding of PDGF-BB to SPARC was pH-dependent; significant binding was detectable only above pH 6.6. Enhanced expression of both PDGF-B chain and SPARC was seen in advanced lesions of atherosclerosis. They suggest that the coordinate expression of SPARC and PDGF-B-containing dimers following vascular injury may regulate the activity of specific dimeric forms of PDGF in vivo.

  16. Oxidation and modification of extracellular matrix and its role in disease.

    PubMed

    Chuang, C Y; Degendorfer, G; Davies, M J

    2014-09-01

    There is accumulating evidence that damage to extracellular materials and particularly the extracellular matrix, can play a major role in multiple human pathologies. In contrast to cells, the extracellular compartment of most biological tissues is relatively poorly equipped to prevent or repair damage caused by oxidation due to lower levels of antioxidant defenses (low molecular mass and enzymatic) and repair systems (both catabolic and enzymatic). The extracellular compartment is therefore likely to be subject to both an increased extent of damage and an overall accumulation of damage due to slow turnover and/or poor repair. The nature and consequences of damage to the extracellular matrix is poorly understood, despite evidence that changes in matrix structure influences not only structural integrity, but also cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and signaling, and cytokine and growth factor binding. In this article the nature of the extracellular matrix is briefly reviewed, together with evidence for the presence of matrix modifications in cardiovascular disease. The oxidants and mechanisms that are known to damage extracellular matrix are reviewed, together with the limited data available to date on how such changes affect structural properties and cellular behavior. PMID:24796988

  17. Extracellular matrix remodelling in response to venous hypertension: proteomics of human varicose veins

    PubMed Central

    Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Oklu, Rahmi; Lynch, Marc; Fava, Marika; Baig, Ferheen; Yin, Xiaoke; Barwari, Temo; Potier, David N.; Albadawi, Hassan; Jahangiri, Marjan; Porter, Karen E.; Watkins, Michael T.; Misra, Sanjay; Stoughton, Julianne; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Aims Extracellular matrix remodelling has been implicated in a number of vascular conditions, including venous hypertension and varicose veins. However, to date, no systematic analysis of matrix remodelling in human veins has been performed. Methods and results To understand the consequences of venous hypertension, normal and varicose veins were evaluated using proteomics approaches targeting the extracellular matrix. Varicose saphenous veins removed during phlebectomy and normal saphenous veins obtained during coronary artery bypass surgery were collected for proteomics analysis. Extracellular matrix proteins were enriched from venous tissues. The proteomics analysis revealed the presence of >150 extracellular matrix proteins, of which 48 had not been previously detected in venous tissue. Extracellular matrix remodelling in varicose veins was characterized by a loss of aggrecan and several small leucine-rich proteoglycans and a compensatory increase in collagen I and laminins. Gene expression analysis of the same tissues suggested that the remodelling process associated with venous hypertension predominantly occurs at the protein rather than the transcript level. The loss of aggrecan in varicose veins was paralleled by a reduced expression of aggrecanases. Chymase and tryptase β1 were among the up-regulated proteases. The effect of these serine proteases on the venous extracellular matrix was further explored by incubating normal saphenous veins with recombinant enzymes. Proteomics analysis revealed extensive extracellular matrix degradation after digestion with tryptase β1. In comparison, chymase was less potent and degraded predominantly basement membrane-associated proteins. Conclusion The present proteomics study provides unprecedented insights into the expression and degradation of structural and regulatory components of the vascular extracellular matrix in varicosis. PMID:27068509

  18. Targeted rehabilitation after extracellular matrix scaffold transplantation for the treatment of volumetric muscle loss.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Natalie E; Stearns, Kristen M; Brown, Elke H P; Rubin, J Peter; Boninger, Michael L; Dearth, Christopher L; Ambrosio, Fabrisia; Badylak, Stephen F

    2014-11-01

    Rehabilitation therapy is an important aspect of recovery after volumetric muscle loss. However, the traditional rehabilitation approach involves a period of rest and passive loading followed by gradual active loading. Extracellular matrix is a naturally occurring material consisting of structural proteins that provide mechanical strength, structural support, and functional molecules with diverse bioactive properties. There is evidence to suggest that the addition of aggressive regenerative rehabilitation protocols immediately after surgical implantation of an extracellular matrix scaffold to an area of volumetric muscle loss has significant benefits for extracellular matrix remodeling. Rehabilitation exercises likely provide the needed mechanical signals to encourage cell migration and site-specific differentiation in the temporal framework required for constructive remodeling. Herein, the authors review the literature and present an example of an aggressive rehabilitation program implemented immediately after extracellular matrix transplantation into a severely injured quadriceps muscle. PMID:25133624

  19. The extracellular matrix proteins laminin and fibronectin contain binding domains for human plasminogen and tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Moser, T L; Enghild, J J; Pizzo, S V; Stack, M S

    1993-09-01

    This study describes the binding of plasminogen and tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) to the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and laminin. Plasminogen bound specifically and saturably to both fibronectin and laminin immobilized on microtiter wells, with Kd(app) values of 115 and 18 nM, respectively. Limited proteolysis by endoproteinase V8 coupled with ligand blotting analysis showed that both plasminogen and t-PA preferentially bind to a 55-kDa fibronectin fragment and a 38-kDa laminin fragment. Amino acid sequence analysis demonstrated that the 5-kDa fragment originates with the fibronectin amino terminus whereas the laminin fragment was derived from the carboxyl-terminal globular domain of the laminin A chain. Ligand blotting experiments using isolated plasminogen domains were also used to identify distinct regions of the plasminogen molecule involved in fibronectin and laminin binding. Solution phase fibronectin binding to immobilized plasminogen was mediated primarily via lysine binding site-dependent interactions with plasminogen kringles 1-4. Lysine binding site-dependent binding of soluble laminin to immobilized plasminogen kringles 1-5 as well as an additional lysine binding site-independent interaction between mini-plasminogen and the 38-kDa laminin A chain fragment were also observed. These studies demonstrate binding of plasminogen and tissue-type plasminogen activator to specific regions of the extracellular matrix glycoproteins laminin and fibronectin and provide further insight into the mechanism of regulation of plasminogen activation by components of the extracellular matrix. PMID:8360181

  20. Rat pancreatic stellate cells secrete matrix metalloproteinases: implications for extracellular matrix turnover

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, P A; McCarroll, J A; Park, S; Wu, M-J; Pirola, R; Korsten, M; Wilson, J S; Apte, M V

    2003-01-01

    Background: Pancreatic fibrosis is a characteristic feature of chronic pancreatic injury and is thought to result from a change in the balance between synthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recent studies suggest that activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a central role in pancreatic fibrogenesis via increased synthesis of ECM proteins. However, the role of these cells in ECM protein degradation has not been fully elucidated. Aims: To determine: (i) whether PSCs secrete matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and, if so (ii) whether MMP and TIMP secretion by PSCs is altered in response to known PSC activating factors such as tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), ethanol, and acetaldehyde. Methods: Cultured rat PSCs (n=3–5 separate cell preparations) were incubated at 37°C for 24 hours with serum free culture medium containing TNF-α (5–25 U/ml), TGF-β1 (0.5–1 ng/ml), IL-6 (0.001–10 ng/ml), ethanol (10–50 mM), or acetaldehyde (150–200 μM), or no additions (controls). Medium from control cells was examined for the presence of MMPs by zymography using a 10% polyacrylamide-0.1% gelatin gel. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to examine gene expression of MMP9 and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases TIMP1 and TIMP2. Western blotting was used to identify a specific MMP, MMP2 (a gelatinase that digests basement membrane collagen and the dominant MMP observed on zymography) and a specific TIMP, TIMP2. Reverse zymography was used to examine functional TIMPs in PSC secretions. The effect of TNF-α, TGF-β1, and IL-6 on MMP2 secretion was assessed by densitometry of western blots. The effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on MMP2 and TIMP2 secretion was also assessed by this method. Results: Zymography revealed that PSCs secrete a number of MMPs including proteinases with molecular

  1. Influence of the extracellular matrix on endogenous and transplanted stem cells after brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Roll, Lars; Faissner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The limited regeneration capacity of the adult central nervous system (CNS) requires strategies to improve recovery of patients. In this context, the interaction of endogenous as well as transplanted stem cells with their environment is crucial. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms could help to improve regeneration by targeted manipulation. In the course of reactive gliosis, astrocytes upregulate Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and start, in many cases, to proliferate. Beside GFAP, subpopulations of these astroglial cells coexpress neural progenitor markers like Nestin. Although cells express these markers, the proportion of cells that eventually give rise to neurons is limited in many cases in vivo compared to the situation in vitro. In the first section, we present the characteristics of endogenous progenitor-like cells and discuss the differences in their neurogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. As the environment plays an important role for survival, proliferation, migration, and other processes, the second section of the review describes changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM), a complex network that contains numerous signaling molecules. It appears that signals in the damaged CNS lead to an activation and de-differentiation of astrocytes, but do not effectively promote neuronal differentiation of these cells. Factors that influence stem cells during development are upregulated in the damaged brain as part of an environment resembling a stem cell niche. We give a general description of the ECM composition, with focus on stem cell-associated factors like the glycoprotein Tenascin-C (TN-C). Stem cell transplantation is considered as potential treatment strategy. Interaction of transplanted stem cells with the host environment is critical for the outcome of stem cell-based therapies. Possible mechanisms involving the ECM by which transplanted stem cells might improve recovery are discussed in the last section. PMID:25191223

  2. Role of extracellular matrix in development of skeletal muscle and postmortem aging of meat.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takanori

    2015-11-01

    The integrity of skeletal muscle is maintained by the intramuscular connective tissues (IMCTs) that are composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules such as collagens, proteoglycans, and glycoproteins. The ECM plays an important role not only in providing biomechanical strength of the IMCT, but also in regulating muscle cell behavior. Some ECM molecules, such as decorin and laminin, modulate the activity of myostatin that regulates skeletal muscle mass. Furthermore, it has been shown that decorin activates Akt downstream of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) and enhances the differentiation of myogenic cells, suggesting that decorin acts as a signaling molecule to myogenic cells. With animal growth, the structural integrity of IMCT increases; collagen fibrils within the endomysium associate more closely with each other, and the collagen fibers in the perimysium become increasingly thick and their wavy pattern grows more regular. These changes increase the mechanical strength of IMCT, contributing to the toughening of meat. However, in highly marbled beef cattle like Wagyu, intramuscular fat deposits mainly in the perimysium between muscle fiber bundles during the fattening period. The development of adipose tissues appears to disorganize the structure of IMCT and contributes to the tenderness of Wagyu beef. The IMCT was considered to be rather immutable compared to myofibrils during postmortem aging of meat. However, several studies have shown that collagen networks in the IMCT are disintegrated and proteoglycan components are degraded during postmortem aging. These changes in ECM appear to reduce the mechanical strength of IMCT and contribute to the tenderness of uncooked meat or cooked meat at low temperature. Thus, the ECM plays a multifunctional role in skeletal muscle development and postmortem aging of meat. PMID:26141816

  3. Modulation of the extracellular matrix patterning of thrombospondins by actin dynamics and thrombospondin oligomer state

    PubMed Central

    Hellewell, Andrew L.; Gong, Xianyun; Schärich, Karsten; Christofidou, Elena D.; Adams, Josephine C.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombospondins (TSPs) are evolutionarily-conserved, secreted glycoproteins that interact with cell surfaces and extracellular matrix (ECM) and have complex roles in cell interactions. Unlike the structural components of the ECM that form networks or fibrils, TSPs are deposited into ECM as arrays of nanoscale puncta. The cellular and molecular mechanisms for the patterning of TSPs in ECM are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated whether the mechanisms of TSP patterning in cell-derived ECM involves actin cytoskeletal pathways or TSP oligomer state. From tests of a suite of pharmacological inhibitors of small GTPases, actomyosin-based contractility, or actin microfilament integrity and dynamics, cytochalasin D and jasplakinolide treatment of cells were identified to result in altered ECM patterning of a model TSP1 trimer. The strong effect of cytochalasin D indicated that mechanisms controlling puncta patterning depend on global F-actin dynamics. Similar spatial changes were obtained with endogenous TSPs after cytochalasin D treatment, implicating physiological relevance. Under matched experimental conditions with ectopically-expressed TSPs, the magnitude of the effect was markedly lower for pentameric TSP5 and Drosophila TSP, than for trimeric TSP1 or dimeric Ciona TSPA. To distinguish between the variables of protein sequence or oligomer state, we generated novel, chimeric pentamers of TSP1. These proteins accumulated within ECM at higher levels than TSP1 trimers, yet the effect of cytochalasin D on the spatial distribution of puncta was reduced. These findings introduce a novel concept that F-actin dynamics modulate the patterning of TSPs in ECM and that TSP oligomer state is a key determinant of this process. PMID:26182380

  4. Extracellular Matrix Components Regulate Cellular Polarity and Tissue Structure in the Developing and Mature Retina

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Shweta; Hunter, Dale D.; Brunken, William J.

    2015-01-01

    While genetic networks and other intrinsic mechanisms regulate much of retinal development, interactions with the extracellular environment shape these networks and modify their output. The present review has focused on the role of one family of extracellular matrix molecules and their signaling pathways in retinal development. In addition to their effects on the developing retina, laminins play a role in maintaining Müller cell polarity and compartmentalization, thereby contributing to retinal homeostasis. This article which is intended for the clinical audience, reviews the fundamentals of retinal development, extracellular matrix organization and the role of laminins in retinal development. The role of laminin in cortical development is also briefly discussed. PMID:26730321

  5. Functional roles of membrane glycoprotein CD36.

    PubMed

    Daviet, L; McGregor, J L

    1996-01-01

    Cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions are mediated by a number of membrane glycoproteins. On the basis of structural homologies, several families of cell adhesion molecules (integrins, selectins, immunoglobulins, cadherins, leucine-rich glycoproteins) have been established. Since 1991, a new family of CD36-like proteins has been identified. CD36 is a cell surface glycoprotein that interacts with a large variety of ligands. CD36 has been implicated in thrombosis, vascular biology, lipid metabolism and atherogenesis. In this review, we aim to summarize our present knowledge on this important, multifunctional glycoprotein. PMID:21043590

  6. Cartilage extracellular matrix metabolism differs in serum and synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Martin, James A; Wilkey, Andrew L; Brand, Richard A

    2002-01-01

    Most cartilage explant culture studies assume conventional serum-supplemented growth media are biologically equivalent to the natural synovial fluid which baths cartilage in vivo. Few studies have systematically compared the effects of serum versus synovial fluid in culture. To address this assumption we conducted a series of studies to determine if cartilage matrix synthesis is significantly different in serum-based versus synovial fluid-based media. Normal bovine cartilage explants were cultured in DMEM either alone or supplemented with bovine serum or bovine synovial fluid. Matrix synthesis was measured with radiolabeling techniques. We then compared responses to insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I, a stimulator of matrix synthesis), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta, an inhibitor of matrix synthesis). We observed significantly lower matrix synthesis activity in synovial fluid versus serum. Caution shoud be used in extrapolating studies of cartilage grown in media supplemented with serum rather than synovial fluid. PMID:12843702

  7. Elasticity-mediated nematiclike bacterial organization in model extracellular DNA matrix.

    PubMed

    Smalyukh, Ivan I; Butler, John; Shrout, Joshua D; Parsek, Matthew R; Wong, Gerard C L

    2008-09-01

    DNA is a common extracellular matrix component of bacterial biofilms. We find that bacteria can spontaneously order in a matrix of aligned concentrated DNA, in which rod-shaped cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa follow the orientation of extended DNA chains. The alignment of bacteria is ensured by elasticity and liquid crystalline properties of the DNA matrix. These findings show how behavior of planktonic bacteria may be modified in extracellular polymeric substances of biofilms and illustrate the potential of using complex fluids to manipulate embedded nanosized and microsized active particles. PMID:18850984

  8. The extracellular matrix and blood vessel formation: not just a scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, John M; Simons, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The extracellular matrix plays a number of important roles, among them providing structural support and information to cellular structures such as blood vessels imbedded within it. As more complex organisms have evolved, the matrix ability to direct signalling towards the vasculature and remodel in response to signalling from the vasculature has assumed progressively greater importance. This review will focus on the molecules of the extracellular matrix, specifically relating to vessel formation and their ability to signal to the surrounding cells to initiate or terminate processes involved in blood vessel formation. PMID:17488472

  9. Molecular Control of Vascular Tube Morphogenesis and Stabilization: Regulation by Extracellular Matrix, Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Endothelial Cell-Pericyte Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, George E.; Stratman, Amber N.; Sacharidou, Anastasia

    Recent studies have revealed a critical role for both extracellular matrices and matrix metalloproteinases in the molecular control of vascular morphogenesis and stabilization in three-dimensional (3D) tissue environments. Key interactions involve endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes, which coassemble to affect vessel formation, remodeling, and stabilization events during development and postnatal life. EC-pericyte interactions control extracellular matrix remodeling events including vascular basement membrane matrix assembly, a necessary step for endothelial tube maturation and stabilization. ECs form tube networks in 3D extracellular matrices in a manner dependent on integrins, membrane-type metalloproteinases, and the Rho GTPases, Cdc42 and Rac1. Recent work has defined an EC lumen signaling complex of proteins composed of these proteins that controls 3D matrix-specific signaling events required for these processes. The EC tube formation process results in the creation of a network of proteolytically generated vascular guidance tunnels. These tunnels are physical matrix spaces that regulate vascular tube remodeling and represent matrix conduits into which pericytes are recruited to allow dynamic cell-cell interactions with ECs. These dynamic EC-pericyte interactions induce vascular basement membrane matrix deposition, leading to vessel maturation and stabilization.

  10. The Matrix Reloaded: How Sensing the Extracellular Matrix Synchronizes Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Nitai

    2015-01-01

    In response to chemical communication, bacterial cells often organize themselves into complex multicellular communities that carry out specialized tasks. These communities are frequently referred to as biofilms, which involve the collective behavior of different cell types. Like cells of multicellular eukaryotes, the biofilm cells are surrounded by self-produced polymers that constitute the extracellular matrix (ECM), which binds them to each other and to the surface. In multicellular eukaryotes, it has been evident for decades that cell-ECM interactions control multiple cellular processes during development. While cells both in biofilms and in multicellular eukaryotes are surrounded by ECM and activate various genetic programs, until recently it has been unclear whether cell-ECM interactions are recruited in bacterial communicative behaviors. In this review, we describe the examples reported thus far for ECM involvement in control of cell behavior throughout the different stages of biofilm formation. The studies presented in this review have provided a newly emerging perspective of the bacterial ECM as an active player in regulation of biofilm development. PMID:25825428

  11. Extracellular Matrix and Regenerative Therapies from the Cardiac Perspective.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Arin; Parmaksız, Mahmut; Elçin, A Eser; Elçin, Y Murat

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death and a major cause of financial burden. Regenerative therapies for heart diseases bring the promise of alternative treatment modalities for myocardial infarction, ischemic heart disease, and congestive heart failure. Although, clinical trials attest to the safety of stem cell injection therapies, researchers need to overcome the underlying mechanisms that are limiting the success of future regenerative options. This article aims to review the basic scientific concepts in the field of mechanobiology and the effects of extracellular functions on stem cell fate. PMID:26668014

  12. Formation of atypical podosomes in extravillous trophoblasts regulates extracellular matrix degradation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anand; Dash, Philip R.

    2012-01-01

    Throughout pregnancy the cytotrophoblast, the stem cell of the placenta, gives rise to the differentiated forms of trophoblasts. The two main cell lineages are the syncytiotrophoblast and the invading extravillous trophoblast. A successful pregnancy requires extravillous trophoblasts to migrate and invade through the decidua and then remodel the maternal spiral arteries. Many invasive cells use specialised cellular structures called invadopodia or podosomes in order to degrade extracellular matrix. Despite being highly invasive cells, the presence of invadapodia or podosomes has not previously been investigated in trophoblasts. In this study these structures have been identified and characterised in extravillous trophoblasts. The role of specialised invasive structures in trophoblasts in the degradation of the extracellular matrix was compared with well characterised podosomes and invadopodia in other invasive cells and the trophoblast specific structures were characterised by using a sensitive matrix degradation assay which enabled visualisation of the structures and their dynamics. We show trophoblasts form actin rich protrusive structures which have the ability to degrade the extracellular matrix during invasion. The degradation ability and dynamics of the structures closely resemble podosomes, but have unique characteristics that have not previously been described in other cell types. The composition of these structures does not conform to the classic podosome structure, with no distinct ring of plaque proteins such as paxillin or vinculin. In addition, trophoblast podosomes protrude more deeply into the extracellular matrix than established podosomes, resembling invadopodia in this regard. We also show several significant pathways such as Src kinase, MAPK kinase and PKC along with MMP-2 and 9 as key regulators of extracellular matrix degradation activity in trophoblasts, while podosome activity was regulated by the rigidity of the extracellular matrix. PMID

  13. Tissue architecture and breast cancer: the role of extracellular matrix and steroid hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, R K; Bissell, M J

    2000-06-01

    The changes in tissue architecture that accompany the development of breast cancer have been the focus of investigations aimed at developing new cancer therapeutics. As we learn more about the normal mammary gland, we have begun to understand the complex signaling pathways underlying the dramatic shifts in the structure and function of breast tissue. Integrin-, growth factor-, and steroid hormone-signaling pathways all play an important part in maintaining tissue architecture; disruption of the delicate balance of signaling results in dramatic changes in the way cells interact with each other and with the extracellular matrix, leading to breast cancer. The extracellular matrix itself plays a central role in coordinating these signaling processes. In this review, we consider the interrelationships between the extracellular matrix, integrins, growth factors, and steroid hormones in mammary gland development and function.

  14. Extracellular matrix of adipogenically differentiated mesenchymal stem cells reveals a network of collagen filaments, mostly interwoven by hexagonal structural units.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mujib; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is the non-cellular component of tissues, which not only provides biological shelter but also takes part in the cellular decisions for diverse functions. Every tissue has an ECM with unique composition and topology that governs the process of determination, differentiation, proliferation, migration and regeneration of cells. Little is known about the structural organization of matrix especially of MSC-derived adipogenic ECM. Here, we particularly focus on the composition and architecture of the fat ECM to understand the cellular behavior on functional bases. Thus, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were adipogenically differentiated, then, were transferred to adipogenic propagation medium, whereas they started the release of lipid droplets leaving bare network of ECM. Microarray analysis was performed, to indentify the molecular machinery of matrix. Adipogenesis was verified by Oil Red O staining of lipid droplets and by qPCR of adipogenic marker genes PPARG and FABP4. Antibody staining demonstrated the presence of collagen type I, II and IV filaments, while alkaline phosphatase activity verified the ossified nature of these filaments. In the adipogenic matrix, the hexagonal structures were abundant followed by octagonal structures, whereas they interwoven in a crisscross manner. Regarding molecular machinery of adipogenic ECM, the bioinformatics analysis revealed the upregulated expression of COL4A1, ITGA7, ITGA7, SDC2, ICAM3, ADAMTS9, TIMP4, GPC1, GPC4 and downregulated expression of COL14A1, ADAMTS5, TIMP2, TIMP3, BGN, LAMA3, ITGA2, ITGA4, ITGB1, ITGB8, CLDN11. Moreover, genes associated with integrins, glycoproteins, laminins, fibronectins, cadherins, selectins and linked signaling pathways were found. Knowledge of the interactive-language between cells and matrix could be beneficial for the artificial designing of biomaterials and bioscaffolds. PMID:23851162

  15. Symposium: Role of the extracellular matrix in mammary development. Regulation of milk protein and basement membrane gene expression: The influence of the extracellular matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Aggeler, J.; Park, C.S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1988-10-01

    Synthesis and secretion of milk proteins ({alpha}-casein, {beta}-casein, {gamma}-casein, and transferrin) by cultured primary mouse mammary epithelial cells is modulated by the extracellular matrix. In cells grown on released or floating type I collagen gels, mRNA for {beta}-casein and transferrin is increased as much as 30-fold over cells grown on plastic. Induction of {beta}-casein expression depends strongly on the presence of lactogenic hormones, especially prolactin, in the culture. When cells are plated onto partially purified reconstituted basement membrane, dramatic changes in morphology and milk protein gene expression are observed. Cells cultured on the matrix for 6 to 8 d in the presence of prolactin, insulin, and hydrocortisone form hollow spheres and duct-like structures that are completely surrounded by matrix. The cells lining these spheres appear actively secretory and are oriented with their apices facing the lumen. Hybridization experiments indicate that mRNA for {beta}-casein can be increased as much as 70-fold in these cultures. Because > 90% of the cultured cells synthesize immunoreactive {beta}-casein, as compared with only 40% of cells in the late pregnant gland, the matrix appears to be able to induce protein expression in previously silent cells. Synthesis of laminin and assembly of a mammary-specific basal lamina by cells cultured on different extracellular matrices also appears to depend on the presence of lactogenic hormones. These studies provide support for the concept of dynamic reciprocity in which complex interactions between extracellular matrix and the cellular cytoskeleton contribute to the induction and maintenance of tissue-specific gene expression in the mammary gland.

  16. [Effect of fibronectin on the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins in periodontal ligament cells].

    PubMed

    Wan, L; Wu, Z; Zhou, Y

    1996-11-01

    Immunofluorescence staining method and fluorescence spectrophotometry were used to study the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins in periodontal ligament cells (PDL cells) when exogenous fibronectin (FN) existed. The results showed that the right amount of exogenous FN (0.044 mumol/l) could increase the amount of type I collagen and type III collagen in PDL cells (P < 0.01), inhibit the synthesis of FN itself (P < 0.01). It suggested that exogenous FN can effect the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins so as to promote a new connective tissue attachment formation. PMID:9592289

  17. Depressed immune surveillance against cancer: role of deficient T cell: extracellular matrix interactions.

    PubMed

    Górski, A; Castronovo, V; Stepień-Sopniewska, B; Grieb, P; Ryba, M; Mrowiec, T; Korczak-Kowalska, G; Wierzbicki, P; Matysiak, W; Dybowska, B

    1994-07-01

    Although T cells infiltrate malignant tumors, the local immune response is usually inefficient and tumors escape destruction. While extracellular matrix proteins strongly costimulate T cell responses in normal individuals, our studies indicate that peripheral blood T cells from cancer patients and tumor infiltrating cells respond poorly or are resistant to stimulative signals mediated by collagen I and IV and fibronectin. Moreover, the adhesive properties of cancer T cells are markedly depressed. Those functional deficiencies are paralleled by variable deficits in integrin and non-integrin T cell receptors for extracellular matrix. Immunotherapy with BCG causes a dramatic but transient increase in T cell: ECM interactions. PMID:7827959

  18. Guided extracellular matrix formation from fibroblast cells cultured on bio-inspired configurable multiscale substrata

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Won-Gyu; Kim, Jangho; Choung, Yun-Hoon; Chung, Yesol; Suh, Kahp Y.; Pang, Changhyun; Chung, Jong Hoon; Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2015-01-01

    Engineering complex extracellular matrix (ECM) is an important challenge for cell and tissue engineering applications as well as for understanding fundamental cell biology. We developed the methodology for fabrication of precisely controllable multiscale hierarchical structures using capillary force lithography in combination with original wrinkling technique for the generation of well-defined native ECM-like platforms by culturing fibroblast cells on the multiscale substrata [1]. This paper provides information on detailed characteristics of polyethylene glycol-diacrylate multiscale substrata. In addition, a possible model for guided extracellular matrix formation from fibroblast cells cultured on bio-inspired configurable multiscale substrata is proposed. PMID:26543882

  19. Effect of insoluble extracellular matrix molecules on Fas expression in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fine, A; Miranda, K; Farmer, S R; Anderson, N L

    1998-03-01

    Fas, which functions to initiate a signal causing apoptosis, is expressed in epithelia, thus, suggesting a role in controlling cell number during states of cell and matrix turnover. In view of this, we hypothesized that cell-matrix interactions may be an important determinant of Fas expression in epithelial cells. To investigate this, we examined the effect of insoluble extracellular matrix molecules on Fas expression in murine lung epithelial (MLE) cells, a transformed mouse lung epithelial cell line. We report that 1) insoluble extracellular matrices increased Fas mRNA in a time and concentration-dependent manner; 2) induced increases in Fas mRNA were associated with concomitantly increased Fas protein; and 3) nonspecific adherence to a polylysine substrate did not induce Fas mRNA. Consistent with these findings, Fas-induced apoptosis was significantly enhanced in cultures plated on type IV collagen. Employing rat hepatocytes, we confirmed that the insoluble extracellular matrix also increases Fas expression in primary epithelial cells. By amplifying Fas-mediated apoptosis, these data suggest a mechanism whereby the extracellular matrix regulates the fate of specific epithelial cell populations. PMID:9462690

  20. Alterations in the biosynthesis of extracellular matrix molecules in connective tissues by electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ciombor, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) of certain configurations have been shown to be effective clinically in promoting the healing of fracture non-unions and are believed to enhance calcification of extracellular matrix. In vitro studies have suggested that PEMFs may also have the effect of modifying the extracellular matrix by promoting the synthesis of matrix molecules. This study examines the effect of one particular type of PEMF and a sinusoidal continuous wave upon the extracellular matrix and calcification of endochondral ossification in vivo. The pulsed magnetic field (SS-22) utilized in these studies is being used clinically for the treatment of fracture non-unions, a condition in which the bone is not restored to form or function. The sinusoidal continuous wave was designed to provide a 5 Gauss amplitude at a 15 Hz. rate. The synthesis of cartilage molecules is enhanced by this type of PEMF and since wave and subsequent endochondral calcification is stimulated. Histomorphometric studies indicate that the maturation of bone trabeculae is also promoted by this type of PEMF stimulation. These results indicate that a specific PEMF or continuous waveform can change the composition of cartilage extracellular matrix in vivo and raises the possibility that the effects on other processes of endochondral ossification (e.g., fracture healing and growth plates) may occur through a similar mechanism.

  1. Degenerated human intervertebral discs contain autoantibodies against extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Capossela, S; Schläfli, P; Bertolo, A; Janner, T; Stadler, B M; Pötzel, T; Baur, M; Stoyanov, J V

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of intervertebral discs (IVDs) is associated with back pain and elevated levels of inflammatory cells. It has been hypothesised that discogenic pain is a direct result of vascular and neural ingrowth along annulus fissures, which may expose the avascular nucleus pulposus (NP) to the systemic circulation and induce an autoimmune reaction. In this study, we confirmed our previous observation of antibodies in human degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs cultured in vitro. We hypothesised that the presence of antibodies was due to an autoimmune reaction against specific proteins of the disc. Furthermore we identified antigens which possibly trigger an autoimmune response in degenerative disc diseases. We demonstrated that degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs contain IgG antibodies against typical extracellular proteins of the disc, particularly proteins of the NP. We identified IgGs against collagen type II and aggrecan, confirming an autoimmune reaction against the normally immune privileged NP. We also found specific IgGs against collagens types I and V, but not against collagen type III. In conclusion, this study confirmed the association between disc degeneration and autoimmunity, and may open the avenue for future studies on developing prognostic, diagnostic and therapy-monitoring markers for degenerative disc diseases. PMID:24706108

  2. The Extracellular Domain of Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein Elicits Atypical Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Rat and Macaque Species

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Alan D.; Taslim, Najla; Reece, Shaun P.; Grebenciucova, Elena; Ray, Richard H.; Rosenbaum, Matthew D.; Wardle, Robert L.; Van Scott, Michael R.; Mannie, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) are advantageous in that the heterogeneity of clinical signs appears more reflective of those in multiple sclerosis (MS). Conversely, models of classical EAE feature stereotypic progression of an ascending flaccid paralysis that is not a characteristic of MS. The study of atypical EAE however has been limited due to the relative lack of suitable models that feature reliable disease incidence and severity, excepting mice deficient in gamma-interferon signaling pathways. In this study, atypical EAE was induced in Lewis rats, and a related approach was effective for induction of an unusual neurologic syndrome in a cynomolgus macaque. Lewis rats were immunized with the rat immunoglobulin variable (IgV)-related extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (IgV-MOG) in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) followed by one or more injections of rat IgV-MOG in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA). The resulting disease was marked by torticollis, unilateral rigid paralysis, forelimb weakness, and high titers of anti-MOG antibody against conformational epitopes of MOG, as well as other signs of atypical EAE. A similar strategy elicited a distinct atypical form of EAE in a cynomolgus macaque. By day 36 in the monkey, titers of IgG against conformational epitopes of extracellular MOG were evident, and on day 201, the macaque had an abrupt onset of an unusual form of EAE that included a pronounced arousal-dependent, transient myotonia. The disease persisted for 6–7 weeks and was marked by a gradual, consistent improvement and an eventual full recovery without recurrence. These data indicate that one or more boosters of IgV-MOG in IFA represent a key variable for induction of atypical or unusual forms of EAE in rat and Macaca species. These studies also reveal a close correlation between humoral immunity against conformational epitopes of MOG, extended confluent demyelinating plaques in spinal cord

  3. The extracellular matrix as a modulator of the inflammatory and reparative response following myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Dobaczewski, Marcin; Gonzalez-Quesada, Carlos; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic alterations in the cardiac extracellular matrix following myocardial infarction not only determine the mechanical properties of the infarcted heart, but also directly modulate the inflammatory and reparative response. During the inflammatory phase of healing, rapid activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) causes degradation of the cardiac extracellular matrix. Matrix fragments exert potent pro-inflammatory actions, while MMPs process cytokines and chemokines altering their biological activity. In addition, vascular hyperpermeability results in extravasation of fibronectin and fibrinogen leading to formation of a plasma-derived provisional matrix that serves as a scaffold for leukocyte infiltration. Clearance of the infarct from dead cells and matrix debris is essential for resolution of inflammation and marks the transition to the proliferative phase. The fibrin-based provisional matrix is lysed and cellular fibronectin is secreted. ED-A fibronectin, mechanical tension and Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β are essential for modulation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, the main collagen-secreting cells in the wound. The matricellular proteins thrombospondin-1 and -2, osteopontin, tenascin-C, periostin, and secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) are induced in the infarct regulating cellular interactions and promoting matrix organization. As the infarct matures, matrix cross-linking results in formation of a dense collagen-based scar. At this stage, shielding of fibroblasts from external mechanical tension by the mature matrix network may promote deactivation and cellular quiescence. The components of the extracellular matrix do not passively follow the pathologic alterations of the infarcted heart but critically modulate inflammatory and reparative pathways by transducing signals that affect cell survival, phenotype and gene expression. PMID:19631653

  4. Printing three-dimensional tissue analogues with decellularized extracellular matrix bioink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, Falguni; Jang, Jinah; Ha, Dong-Heon; Won Kim, Sung; Rhie, Jong-Won; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Deok-Ho; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2014-06-01

    The ability to print and pattern all the components that make up a tissue (cells and matrix materials) in three dimensions to generate structures similar to tissues is an exciting prospect of bioprinting. However, the majority of the matrix materials used so far for bioprinting cannot represent the complexity of natural extracellular matrix (ECM) and thus are unable to reconstitute the intrinsic cellular morphologies and functions. Here, we develop a method for the bioprinting of cell-laden constructs with novel decellularized extracellular matrix (dECM) bioink capable of providing an optimized microenvironment conducive to the growth of three-dimensional structured tissue. We show the versatility and flexibility of the developed bioprinting process using tissue-specific dECM bioinks, including adipose, cartilage and heart tissues, capable of providing crucial cues for cells engraftment, survival and long-term function. We achieve high cell viability and functionality of the printed dECM structures using our bioprinting method.

  5. Printing three-dimensional tissue analogues with decellularized extracellular matrix bioink

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Falguni; Jang, Jinah; Ha, Dong-Heon; Won Kim, Sung; Rhie, Jong-Won; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Deok-Ho; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2014-01-01

    The ability to print and pattern all the components that make up a tissue (cells and matrix materials) in three dimensions to generate structures similar to tissues is an exciting prospect of bioprinting. However, the majority of the matrix materials used so far for bioprinting cannot represent the complexity of natural extracellular matrix (ECM) and thus are unable to reconstitute the intrinsic cellular morphologies and functions. Here, we develop a method for the bioprinting of cell-laden constructs with novel decellularized extracellular matrix (dECM) bioink capable of providing an optimized microenvironment conducive to the growth of three-dimensional structured tissue. We show the versatility and flexibility of the developed bioprinting process using tissue-specific dECM bioinks, including adipose, cartilage and heart tissues, capable of providing crucial cues for cells engraftment, survival and long-term function. We achieve high cell viability and functionality of the printed dECM structures using our bioprinting method. PMID:24887553

  6. Extracellular matrix structure and nano-mechanics determine megakaryocyte function.

    PubMed

    Malara, Alessandro; Gruppi, Cristian; Pallotta, Isabella; Spedden, Elise; Tenni, Ruggero; Raspanti, Mario; Kaplan, David; Tira, Maria Enrica; Staii, Cristian; Balduini, Alessandra

    2011-10-20

    Cell interactions with matrices via specific receptors control many functions, with chemistry, physics, and membrane elasticity as fundamental elements of the processes involved. Little is known about how biochemical and biophysical processes integrate to generate force and, ultimately, to regulate hemopoiesis into the bone marrow-matrix environment. To address this hypothesis, in this work we focus on the regulation of MK development by type I collagen. By atomic force microscopy analysis, we demonstrate that the tensile strength of fibrils in type I collagen structure is a fundamental requirement to regulate cytoskeleton contractility of human MKs through the activation of integrin-α2β1-dependent Rho-ROCK pathway and MLC-2 phosphorylation. Most importantly, this mechanism seemed to mediate MK migration, fibronectin assembly, and platelet formation. On the contrary, a decrease in mechanical tension caused by N-acetylation of lysine side chains in type I collagen completely reverted these processes by preventing fibrillogenesis. PMID:21828129

  7. Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins impairs migration of immune cells.

    PubMed

    Haucke, Elisa; Navarrete-Santos, Alexander; Simm, Andreas; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Hofmann, Britt

    2014-01-01

    The immune response during aging and diabetes is disturbed and may be due to the altered migration of immune cells in an aged tissue. Our study should prove the hypothesis that age and diabetes-related advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have an impact on the migration and adhesion of human T-cells. To achieve our purpose, we used in vitro AGE-modified proteins (soluble albumin and fibronectin [FN]), as well as human collagen obtained from bypass graft. A Boyden chamber was used to study cell migration. Migrated Jurkat T-cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and cell adhesion by crystal violet staining. Actin polymerization was determined by phalloidin-Alexa-fluor 488-labeled antibody and fluorescence microscopy. We found that significantly fewer cells (50%, p = 0.003) migrated through methylglyoxal modified FN. The attachment to FN in the presence of AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) was also reduced (p < 0.05). In ex vivo experiments, isolated collagen from human vein graft material negatively affected the migration of the cells depending on the grade of AGE modification of the collagen. Collagen with a low AGE level reduced the cell migration by 30%, and collagen with a high AGE level by 60%. Interaction of the cells with an AGE-modified matrix, but not with soluble AGEs like BSA-AGE per se, was responsible for a disturbed migration. The reduced migration was accompanied by an impaired actin polymerization. We conclude that AGEs-modified matrix protein inhibits cell migration and adhesion of Jurkat T-cells. PMID:24635174

  8. Characterization of the Vibrio cholerae Extracellular Matrix: A Top-Down Solid-State NMR Approach

    PubMed Central

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Fong, Jiunn C.N.; Yildiz, Fitnat; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are communities of bacterial cells surrounded by a self-secreted extracellular matrix. Biofilm formation by Vibrio cholerae, the human pathogen responsible for cholera, contributes to its environmental survival and infectivity. Important genetic and molecular requirements have been identified for V. cholerae biofilm formation, yet a compositional accounting of these parts in the intact biofilm or extracellular matrix has not been described. As insoluble and non-crystalline assemblies, determinations of biofilm composition pose a challenge to conventional biochemical and biophysical analysis. The V. cholerae extracellular matrix composition is particularly complex with several proteins, complex polysaccharides, and other biomolecules having been identified as matrix parts. We developed a new top-down solid-state NMR approach to spectroscopically assign and quantify the carbon pools of the intact V. cholerae extracellular matrix using 13C CPMAS and 13C{15N}, 15N{31P}, and 13C{31P}REDOR. General sugar, lipid, and amino acid pools were first profiled and then further annotated and quantified as specific carbon types, including carbonyls, amides, glycyl carbons, and anomerics. In addition, 15N profiling revealed a large amine pool relative to amide contributions, reflecting the prevalence of molecular modifications with free amine groups. Our top-down approach could be implemented immediately to examine the extracellular matrix from mutant strains that might alter polysaccharide production or lipid release beyond the cell surface; or to monitor changes that may accompany environmental variations and stressors such as altered nutrient composition, oxidative stress or antibiotics. More generally, our analysis has demonstrated that solid-state NMR is a valuable tool to characterize complex biofilm systems. PMID:24911407

  9. Cyclopamine disrupts tumor extracellular matrix and improves the distribution and efficacy of nanotherapeutics in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Ting; Shen, Shun; She, Xiaojian; Tuo, Yanyan; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Xinguo

    2016-10-01

    The dense extracellular matrix in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma dramatically reduces the penetration and efficacy of nanotherapeutics. Disruption of the tumor extracellular matrix may help improve the distribution and efficacy of nanotherapeutics in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we tested whether cyclopamine, a special inhibitor of the hedgehog signaling pathway with powerful anti-fibrotic activity, could promote the penetration and efficacy of nanotherapeutics in pancreatic cancer. It was shown that cyclopamine disrupted tumor extracellular fibronectins, decompressed tumor blood vessels, and improved tumor perfusion. Furthermore, cyclopamine improved the accumulation and intratumoral distribution of i.v.-administered fluorescence indicator-labeled nanoparticles. Finally, cyclopamine also significantly improved the tumor growth inhibition effect of i.v.-injected nanotherapeutics in pancreatic tumor xenograft mouse models. Thus, cyclopamine may have great potential to improve the therapeutic effects of nanomedicine in patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:27376555

  10. Macromolecular Crowding Directs Extracellular Matrix Organization and Mesenchymal Stem Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Adam S.; Loe, Felicia C.; Li, Ran; Raghunath, Michael; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.

    2012-01-01

    Microenvironments of biological cells are dominated in vivo by macromolecular crowding and resultant excluded volume effects. This feature is absent in dilute in vitro cell culture. Here, we induced macromolecular crowding in vitro by using synthetic macromolecular globules of nm-scale radius at physiological levels of fractional volume occupancy. We quantified the impact of induced crowding on the extracellular and intracellular protein organization of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) via immunocytochemistry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and AFM-enabled nanoindentation. Macromolecular crowding in extracellular culture media directly induced supramolecular assembly and alignment of extracellular matrix proteins deposited by cells, which in turn increased alignment of the intracellular actin cytoskeleton. The resulting cell-matrix reciprocity further affected adhesion, proliferation, and migration behavior of MSCs. Macromolecular crowding can thus aid the design of more physiologically relevant in vitro studies and devices for MSCs and other cells, by increasing the fidelity between materials synthesized by cells in vivo and in vitro. PMID:22649562

  11. Macromolecularly crowded in vitro microenvironments accelerate the production of extracellular matrix-rich supramolecular assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pramod; Satyam, Abhigyan; Fan, Xingliang; Collin, Estelle; Rochev, Yury; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Gorelov, Alexander; Dillon, Simon; Joshi, Lokesh; Raghunath, Michael; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies based on the principles of tissue engineering by self-assembly put forward the notion that functional regeneration can be achieved by utilising the inherent capacity of cells to create highly sophisticated supramolecular assemblies. However, in dilute ex vivo microenvironments, prolonged culture time is required to develop an extracellular matrix-rich implantable device. Herein, we assessed the influence of macromolecular crowding, a biophysical phenomenon that regulates intra- and extra-cellular activities in multicellular organisms, in human corneal fibroblast culture. In the presence of macromolecules, abundant extracellular matrix deposition was evidenced as fast as 48 h in culture, even at low serum concentration. Temperature responsive copolymers allowed the detachment of dense and cohesive supramolecularly assembled living substitutes within 6 days in culture. Morphological, histological, gene and protein analysis assays demonstrated maintenance of tissue-specific function. Macromolecular crowding opens new avenues for a more rational design in engineering of clinically relevant tissue modules in vitro. PMID:25736020

  12. Macromolecularly crowded in vitro microenvironments accelerate the production of extracellular matrix-rich supramolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pramod; Satyam, Abhigyan; Fan, Xingliang; Collin, Estelle; Rochev, Yury; Rodriguez, Brian J; Gorelov, Alexander; Dillon, Simon; Joshi, Lokesh; Raghunath, Michael; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies based on the principles of tissue engineering by self-assembly put forward the notion that functional regeneration can be achieved by utilising the inherent capacity of cells to create highly sophisticated supramolecular assemblies. However, in dilute ex vivo microenvironments, prolonged culture time is required to develop an extracellular matrix-rich implantable device. Herein, we assessed the influence of macromolecular crowding, a biophysical phenomenon that regulates intra- and extra-cellular activities in multicellular organisms, in human corneal fibroblast culture. In the presence of macromolecules, abundant extracellular matrix deposition was evidenced as fast as 48 h in culture, even at low serum concentration. Temperature responsive copolymers allowed the detachment of dense and cohesive supramolecularly assembled living substitutes within 6 days in culture. Morphological, histological, gene and protein analysis assays demonstrated maintenance of tissue-specific function. Macromolecular crowding opens new avenues for a more rational design in engineering of clinically relevant tissue modules in vitro. PMID:25736020

  13. First demonstration of decorin, an extracellular matrix molecule, in bovine mammary tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the mammary gland, the extracellular matrix (ECM) is secreted by and surrounds cells located in both mammary parenchyma (PAR) and stroma. Decorin is an ECM proteoglycan with cell growth regulatory effects mediated by its ability to interact with growth factors or up-regulation of cyclin-dependent...

  14. Dynamic compressive behavior of human meniscus correlates with its extra-cellular matrix composition.

    PubMed

    Bursac, P; Arnoczky, S; York, A

    2009-01-01

    The menisci of the knee play a significant role in the complex biomechanics of the joint and are critically important in maintaining articular cartilage health. While a general form-function relationship has been identified for the structural orientation of the extra-cellular matrix of the meniscus, the role of individual biochemical components has yet to be fully explored. To determine if correlations exist between the dynamic and static compressive modulus of human menisci and their major extra-cellular matrix constituents (collagen, glycosoaminoglycan and water content), 12 lateral and 11 medial menisci from 13 adult donors were examined. The results showed that in dynamic compression at high loading frequencies (0.1-1 Hz) the menisci behave as a rubber-like elastic material while at lower frequencies (0.01-0.03 Hz) significant viscous dissipation occurs. While regional variations in compressive moduli and extra-cellular matrix composition were observed, the magnitude of both dynamic and static compressive moduli were found to be insensitive to collagen content (p>0.4). However, this magnitude was found to significantly increase with increasing glycosaminoglycan content (p<0.001) and significantly decrease with increasing water content (p<0.001). The results of this study identify significant relationships between the viscoelastic behavior of the meniscus and its extra-cellular matrix composition. PMID:19581729

  15. Thrombospondin-1 expression in breast cancer: prognostic significance and association with p53 alterations, tumour angiogenesis and extracellular matrix components.

    PubMed

    Ioachim, E; Damala, K; Tsanou, E; Briasoulis, E; Papadiotis, E; Mitselou, A; Charhanti, A; Doukas, M; Lampri, L; Arvanitis, D L

    2012-02-01

    Thrombospondin (TSP-1) is a 450-kd adhesive glycoprotein that was initially discovered in platelets and subsequently in a variety of cell types. Several reports suggest that TSP-1 possesses tumour suppressor function, through its ability to inhibit tumour neovascularization. In this study we investigated tissue sections from 124 breast carcinomas for the immuno-histochemical expression of TSP-1 protein and its relationship to several clinicopathological parameters. The possible relationship to hormone receptors content, p53 protein, proliferation associated indices, angiogenesis, VEGF expression and extracellular matrix components (tenascin, fibronectin, laminin, collagen type IV and syndecan-1) was also estimated. TSP-1 was detected in the perivascular tissue, at the epithelial-stromal junction, in the stroma and in the tumour cells. High tumour cell TSP-1 expression was observed in 9.7%, moderate in 17.7%, mild in 10.5%, while 62.1% of the cases were negative for TSP-1 expression. The survival analysis showed an increased risk of recurrence associated with low TSP-1 tumour cell expression. High stromal TSP-1 expression was observed in 3.2% of the cases, moderate in 3.3%, mild in 27.4%, while 63.6% of the cases showed absence of TSP-1 expression. This expression was higher in invasive lobular type of breast cancer and inversely correlated with the lymph node involvement and the estrogen receptor content. Stromal TSP-1 expression was also positively correlated with extracellular matrix components expression, tenascin, fibronectin, collagen type IV, laminin, and syndecan-1. The relationship of TSP-1 expression with tumor angiogenesis, growth fraction and p53 protein expression was not significant. Our data suggest that TSP-1 expression seems to be associated with favorable biological behavior and may have clinical value in terms of predicting the risk of recurrence. In addition, TSP-1 might not be a direct anti-angiogenic factor, although it seems to be implicated

  16. Extracellular Matrix Molecular Remodeling in Human Liver Fibrosis Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Baiocchini, Andrea; Montaldo, Claudia; Conigliaro, Alice; Grimaldi, Alessio; Correani, Virginia; Mura, Francesco; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Rotiroti, Nicolina; Brenna, Alessia; Montalbano, Marzia; D’Offizi, Gianpiero; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Alessandro, Riccardo; Piacentini, Mauro; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Maras, Bruno; Del Nonno, Franca; Tripodi, Marco; Mancone, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver damage leads to pathological accumulation of ECM proteins (liver fibrosis). Comprehensive characterization of the human ECM molecular composition is essential for gaining insights into the mechanisms of liver disease. To date, studies of ECM remodeling in human liver diseases have been hampered by the unavailability of purified ECM. Here, we developed a decellularization method to purify ECM scaffolds from human liver tissues. Histological and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that the ECM scaffolds, devoid of plasma and cellular components, preserved the three-dimensional ECM structure and zonal distribution of ECM components. This method has been then applied on 57 liver biopsies of HCV-infected patients at different stages of liver fibrosis according to METAVIR classification. Label-free nLC-MS/MS proteomics and computation biology were performed to analyze the ECM molecular composition in liver fibrosis progression, thus unveiling protein expression signatures specific for the HCV-related liver fibrotic stages. In particular, the ECM molecular composition of liver fibrosis was found to involve dynamic changes in matrix stiffness, flexibility and density related to the dysregulation of predominant collagen, elastic fibers and minor components with both structural and signaling properties. This study contributes to the understanding of the molecular bases underlying ECM remodeling in liver fibrosis and suggests new molecular targets for fibrolytic strategies. PMID:26998606

  17. Neoplastic extracellular matrix environment promotes cancer invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sundquist, Elias; Renko, Outi; Salo, Sirpa; Magga, Johanna; Cervigne, Nilva K; Nyberg, Pia; Risteli, Juha; Sormunen, Raija; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Zandonadi, Flávia; Paes Leme, Adriana F; Coletta, Ricardo D; Ruskoaho, Heikki; Salo, Tuula

    2016-06-10

    The invasion of carcinoma cells is a crucial feature in carcinogenesis. The penetration efficiency not only depends on the cancer cells, but also on the composition of the tumor microenvironment. Our group has developed a 3D invasion assay based on human uterine leiomyoma tissue. Here we tested whether human, porcine, mouse or rat hearts as well as porcine tongue tissues could be similarly used to study carcinoma cell invasion in vitro. Three invasive human oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (HSC-3, SCC-25 and SCC-15), melanoma (G-361) and ductal breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-231) cell lines, and co-cultures of HSC-3 and carcinoma-associated or normal oral fibroblasts were assayed. Myoma tissue, both native and lyophilized, promoted invasion and growth of the cancer cells. However, the healthy heart or tongue matrices were unable to induce the invasion of any type of cancer cells tested. Moreover, when studied in more detail, small molecular weight fragments derived from heart tissue rinsing media inhibited HSC-3 horizontal migration. Proteome analysis of myoma rinsing media, on the other hand, revealed migration enhancing factors. These results highlight the important role of matrix composition for cancer invasion studies in vitro and further demonstrate the unique properties of human myoma organotypic model. PMID:27090016

  18. Physicomechanical properties of the extracellular matrix of a demineralized bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilova, I. A.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Nikolaev, S. V.; Podorozhnaya, V. T.; Uvarkin, P. V.; Ratushnyak, A. S.; Chebodaeva, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    The article describes the results of a study of physicomechanical properties of a demineralized bone matrix of human cancellous and compact bones. A demineralized cancellous bone was shown to have the best characteristics of a porous system for colonization of matrices by cells. The ultimate stress and elasticity modulus of samples of demineralized femoral heads isolated in primary hip replacement was demonstrated to vary in wide ranges. The elasticity modulus ranged from 50 to 250 MPa, and the tensile strength varied from 1.1 to 5.5 MPa. Microhardness measurements by the recovered indentation method were not possible because of the viscoelastic properties of a bone material. To study the piezoelectric properties of samples, a measuring system was developed that comprised a measuring chamber with contact electrodes, a system for controlled sample loading, an amplifier-converter unit, and signal recording and processing software. The measurement results were used to determine the dependence of the signal amplitude on the dynamic deformation characteristics. The findings are discussed in terms of the relationship between the mechanical and electrical properties and the structure of the organic bone component.

  19. Inhaled Steroids Modulate Extracellular Matrix Composition in Bronchial Biopsies of COPD Patients: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Lisette I. Z.; Strebus, Jolanda; Budulac, Simona E.; Lapperre, Therese S.; Sterk, Peter J.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Mauad, Thais; Timens, Wim; Hiemstra, Pieter S.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Smoking and inflammation contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which involves changes in extracellular matrix. This is thought to contribute to airway remodeling and airflow obstruction. We have previously observed that long-term treatment with inhaled corticosteroids can not only reduce bronchial inflammation, but can also attenuate lung function decline in moderate-severe COPD. We hypothesized that inhaled corticosteroids and current smoking modulate bronchial extracellular matrix components in COPD. Objective To compare major extracellular matrix components (elastic fibers; proteoglycans [versican, decorin]; collagens type I and III) in bronchial biopsies 1) after 30-months inhaled steroids treatment or placebo; and 2) between current and ex-smokers with COPD. Methods We included 64 moderate-severe, steroid-naive COPD patients (24/40 (ex)-smokers, 62±7 years, 46 (31–54) packyears, post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 62±9% predicted) at baseline in this randomized, controlled trial. 19 and 13 patients received 30-months treatment with fluticasone or placebo, respectively. Bronchial biopsies collected at baseline and after 30 months were studied using (immuno)histochemistry to evaluate extracellular matrix content. Percentage and density of stained area were calculated by digital image analysis. Results 30-Months inhaled steroids increased the percentage stained area of versican (9.6% [CI 0.9 to 18.3%]; p = 0.03) and collagen III (20.6% [CI 3.8 to 37.4%]; p = 0.02) compared to placebo. Increased collagen I staining density correlated with increased post-bronchodilator FEV1 after inhaled steroids treatment (Rs = 0.45, p = 0.04). There were no differences between smokers and ex-smokers with COPD in percentages and densities for all extracellular matrix proteins. Conclusions These data show that long-term inhaled corticosteroids treatment partially changes the

  20. Lung fibrotic tenascin-C upregulation is associated with other extracellular matrix proteins and induced by TGFβ1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive parenchymal lung disease of unknown aetiology and poor prognosis, characterized by altered tissue repair and fibrosis. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a critical component in regulating cellular homeostasis and appropriate wound healing. The aim of our study was to determine the expression profile of highlighted ECM proteins in IPF lungs. Methods ECM gene and protein expression was analyzed by cDNA microarrays, rt-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western-blot in lungs from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), categorized as chronic (cHP) and subacute (saHP), and healthy lung tissue. Primary fibroblast cultures from normal subjects and fibrotic patients were studied to evaluate tenascin-C (TNC) synthesis. Results A total of 20 ECM proteins were upregulated and 6 proteins downregulated in IPF. TNC was almost undetected in normal lungs and significantly upregulated in fibrotic lungs (IPF and cHP) compared to saHP. Furthermore, it was located specifically in the fibroblastic foci areas of the fibrotic lung with a subepithelial gradient pattern. TNC levels were correlated with fibroblastic foci content in cHP lungs. Versican and fibronectin glycoproteins were associated with TNC, mainly in fibroblastic foci of fibrotic lungs. Fibroblasts from IPF patients constitutively synthesized higher levels of TNC than normal fibroblasts. TNC and α-sma was induced by TGF-β1 in both fibrotic and normal fibroblasts. TNC treatment of normal and fibrotic fibroblasts induced a non-significant increased α-sma mRNA. Conclusions The difference in ECM glycoprotein content in interstitial lung diseases could contribute to the development of lung fibrosis. The increase of TNC in interstitial areas of fibrotic activity could play a key role in the altered wound healing. PMID:25064447

  1. Local fluid transfer regulation in heart extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    McGee, Maria P; Morykwas, Michael J; Jordan, James E; Wang, Rui; Argenta, Louis C

    2016-06-01

    The interstitial myocardial matrix is a complex and dynamic structure that adapts to local fluctuations in pressure and actively contributes to the heart's fluid exchange and hydration. However, classical physiologic models tend to treat it as a passive conduit for water and solute, perhaps because local interstitial regulatory mechanisms are not easily accessible to experiment in vivo. Here, we examined the interstitial contribution to the fluid-driving pressure ex vivo. Interstitial hydration potentials were determined from influx/efflux rates measured in explants from healthy and ischemia-reperfusion-injured pigs during colloid osmotic pressure titrations. Adaptive responses were further explored by isolating myocardial fibroblasts and measuring their contractile responses to water activity changes in vitro. Results show hydration potentials between 5 and 60 mmHg in healthy myocardia and shifts in excess of 200 mmHg in edematous myocardia after ischemia-reperfusion injury. Further, rates of fluid transfer were temperature-dependent, and in collagen gel contraction assays, myocardial fibroblasts tended to preserve the micro-environment's hydration volume by slowing fluid efflux rates at pressures above 40 mmHg. Our studies quantify components of the fluid-driving forces in the heart interstitium that the classical Starling's equation does not explicitly consider. Measured hydration potentials in healthy myocardia and shifts with edema are larger than predicted from the known values of hydrostatic and colloid osmotic interstitial fluid pressures. Together with fibroblast responses in vitro, they are consistent with regulatory mechanisms that add local biological controls to classic fluid-balance models. PMID:26961911

  2. Morphological Characterization of Organized Extracellular Matrix Deposition by Ascorbic Acid-Stimulated Human Corneal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Hutcheon, Audrey E. K.; Melotti, Suzanna A.; Zieske, James D.; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Ruberti, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the structure and morphology of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesized by untransformed, cultured human corneal fibroblasts in long-term cultures. Methods Human corneal stromal keratocytes were expanded in transwell culture in the presence of fetal bovine serum and a stable derivative of Vitamin C. The cells were allowed to synthesize a fibrillar ECM for up to five weeks. Constructs were assessed via light (phase contrast and differential interference contrast) and transmission (standard and quick freeze/deep etch) microscopy. Results Electron micrographs revealed stratified constructs with multiple parallel layers of cells and an extracellular matrix comprising parallel arrays of small, polydisperse fibrils (27–51 nm) which often alternate in direction. Differential interference contrast images demonstrated oriented ECM fibril arrays parallel to the plane of the construct while quick-freeze deep etch micrographs showed the details of the matrix interaction with fibroblasts via arrays of membrane surface structures. Conclusions Human keratocytes, cultured in a stable Vitamin C derivative, are capable of assembling extracellular matrix which comprise parallel arrays of ECM fibrils. The resulting constructs, which are highly cellular, exhibit morphology similar to the developing mammalian stroma where organized matrix is derived. The appearance of arrays of structures on the cell membranes suggest a role in the local organization of synthesized ECM. This model could provide critical insight into the fundamental processes which govern the genesis of organized connective tissues such as the cornea and may provide a scaffolding suitable for tissue-engineering a biomimetic stroma. PMID:17724187

  3. All-trans retinoic acid and extracellular Ca2+ differentially influence extracellular matrix production by human skin in organ culture.

    PubMed Central

    Varani, J.; Larson, B. K.; Perone, P.; Inman, D. R.; Fligiel, S. E.; Voorhees, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    Two-mm full-thickness punch biopsies of human skin were placed in organ culture in a serum-free, growth factor-free basal medium. Under conditions of low extracellular Ca2+ (0.15 mmol/L), the tissue quickly degenerated. However, degeneration was prevented when the extracellular Ca2+ concentration was increased to 1.4 mmol/L. The tissue remained histologically normal in appearance and biochemically active for up to 12 days. The addition of 3 mumol/L all-trans retinoic acid (RA) to the low-Ca2+ culture medium also prevented tissue degeneration. However, in contrast to what was seen in the presence of 1.4 mmol/L Ca2+, epidermal differentiation did not occur normally in the presence of RA. Rather, the upper layers of the epidermis routinely separated from the underlying basal cells. Fibronectin production by the organ cultured skin was examined. Biosynthetic labeling/immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that incubation of the tissue in basal medium containing 1.4 mmol/L Ca2+ resulted in a high level of fibronectin production relative to the amount produced in basal medium containing 0.15 mmol/L Ca2+. In contrast, the addition of 3 mumol/L RA to the low Ca2+ basal medium did not stimulate fibronectin production. Similar results were observed in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays where the addition of Ca2+ to a final concentration of 1.4 mmol/L stimulated fibronectin and thrombospondin production whereas RA (3 mumol/L) did not. Although RA by itself failed to stimulate extracellular matrix production, the addition of 3 mumol/L RA to basal medium containing 1.4 mmol/L Ca2+ led to a further increase in fibronectin production over that seen in the presence of 1.4 mmol/L Ca2+ alone. Taken together, these data indicate that although either 1.4 mmol/L Ca2+ or 3 mumol/L RA facilitates survival of organ-cultured skin in basal medium, they have very different effects on extracellular matrix production. This supports the view, based on histological appearance, that the two

  4. The extracellular-matrix-retaining cyanobacterium Nostoc verrucosum accumulates trehalose, but is sensitive to desiccation.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Toshio; Kumihashi, Keisuke; Kunita, Shinpei; Masaura, Takuya; Inoue-Sakamoto, Kaori; Yamaguchi, Masaaki

    2011-08-01

    The aquatic cyanobacterium Nostoc verrucosum forms macroscopic colonies, which consist of both cellular filaments and massive extracellular matrix material. In this study, the physiological features of N. verrucosum were investigated and compared with those of the anhydrobiotic cyanobacterium Nostoc commune. Nostoc verrucosum cells were sensitive to desiccation, but tolerant of freeze-thawing treatment in terms of both cell viability and photosynthetic O(2) evolution. Natural colonies of these cyanobacteria contained similar levels of chlorophyll a, carotenoids, the UV-absorbing pigments scytonemin and mycosporine-like amino acids, and uronic acid [a component of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS)]. EPS from both N. verrucosum and N. commune indicated low acidity and a high affinity for divalent cations, although their sugar compositions differed. The WspA protein, known to be a major component of the extracellular matrix of N. commune, was detected in N. verrucosum. Desiccation caused similarly high levels of trehalose accumulation in both cyanobacteria. Although previously considered relevant to anhydrobiosis in the terrestrial cyanobacterium N. commune, the data presented here suggest that extracellular matrix production and trehalose accumulation are not enough for standing extreme desiccation in N. verrucosum. PMID:21507024

  5. Changes in the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) of proliferating rat parotid acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Broverman, R L; Nguyen, K H; da Silveira, A; Brinkley, L L; Macauley, S P; Zeng, T; Yamamoto, H; Tarnuzzer, R W; Schultz, G S; Kerr, M; Humphreys-Beher, M G

    1998-07-01

    Tissue morphogenesis, development, and maintenance of function are mediated by signals generated through the composition of the extracellular matrix. The regulation of the composition of matrix is determined by enzymes specific for their degradation, the matrix metalloproteinases. Chronic injections of the beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol, result in a non-neoplastic hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the rat parotid gland. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases, as measured by gelatin zymography and enzymatic digestion of Azocoll substrates by gland lysates, decreased significantly (P < 0.05) following 24 hrs of agonist treatment, and slowly recovered to control values by 6 days of treatment. Daily administration of the broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor Galardin for 3 days in combination with isoproterenol resulted in enhanced gland hypertrophy compared with that produced by isoproterenol alone. Given alone, Galardin also caused hypertrophy. The relative abundance of mRNA for the extracellular matrix molecules, collagens I and III and fibronectin, declined rapidly following the initiation of beta-agonist treatment in vivo, while laminin B1 and B2 mRNA levels increased initially before declining below control levels. These changes in patterns of mRNA levels also were observed in the concentrations of glandular protein when Western dot blot analysis of collagens I and III and laminin, respectively, was used. The importance of laminin, in vivo, was demonstrated by coinjection of anti-laminin antibody along with isoproterenol, which resulted in the inhibition of beta-agonist-induced parotid gland hypertrophy and hyperplasia. These data suggest that modulation of the ECM is associated with isoproterenol-induced salivary gland hypertrophy and hyperplasia. It is likely that this modulation of the ECM takes place through transcriptional regulation of some ECM genes and regulation of matrix-degrading enzyme activity. PMID:9663435

  6. A Peanut Nodule Lectin in Infected Cells and in Vacuoles and the Extracellular Matrix of Nodule Parenchyma.

    PubMed Central

    VandenBosch, K. A.; Rodgers, L. R.; Sherrier, D. J.; Kishinevsky, B. D.

    1994-01-01

    Root nodules on peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) accumulate a galactose/lactose-binding lectin that is similar, but not identical, to the major seed lectin in peanut. The function of the peanut nodule lectin (PNL) is not known. In the current study, we have investigated the location of lectin in the nodule using immunogold labeling and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays (ELISA). Lectin was most abundant in the nodule parenchyma, where it accumulated in vacuoles, suggesting a possible role as a vegetative storage protein. Lectin was also detected in the extracellular matrix in the nodule parenchyma, a location that corresponds to the tissue layer forming a barrier to oxygen diffusion. The potential for interactions between PNL and other cell wall components, including a previously described high-molecular weight glycoprotein that co-localizes with PNL, is discussed. Within infected cells, lectin was not detectable by immunogold labeling within the cytoplasm, but light labeling was suggestive of lectin localization within the symbiosome lumen. Analysis of fractionated symbiosomes by the more sensitive ELISA technique confirmed that lectin was present within the symbiosome, but was not bound to bacteroids. Our results indicate that PNL probably plays several roles in this nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. PMID:12232084

  7. Activin A Suppresses Osteoblast Mineralization Capacity by Altering Extracellular Matrix (ECM) Composition and Impairing Matrix Vesicle (MV) Production*

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Rodrigo D. A. M.; Eijken, Marco; Bezstarosti, Karel; Demmers, Jeroen A. A.; van Leeuwen, Johannes P. T. M.

    2013-01-01

    During bone formation, osteoblasts deposit an extracellular matrix (ECM) that is mineralized via a process involving production and secretion of highly specialized matrix vesicles (MVs). Activin A, a transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily member, was previously shown to have inhibitory effects in human bone formation models through unclear mechanisms. We investigated these mechanisms elicited by activin A during in vitro osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Activin A inhibition of ECM mineralization coincided with a strong decline in alkaline phosphatase (ALP1) activity in extracellular compartments, ECM and matrix vesicles. SILAC-based quantitative proteomics disclosed intricate protein composition alterations in the activin A ECM, including changed expression of collagen XII, osteonectin and several cytoskeleton-binding proteins. Moreover, in activin A osteoblasts matrix vesicle production was deficient containing very low expression of annexin proteins. ECM enhanced human mesenchymal stem cell osteogenic development and mineralization. This osteogenic enhancement was significantly decreased when human mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on ECM produced under activin A treatment. These findings demonstrate that activin A targets the ECM maturation phase of osteoblast differentiation resulting ultimately in the inhibition of mineralization. ECM proteins modulated by activin A are not only determinant for bone mineralization but also possess osteoinductive properties that are relevant for bone tissue regeneration. PMID:23781072

  8. Effect of spaceflight on the extracellular matrix of skeletal muscle after a crush injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, W. T.; Fritz, V. K.; Burkovskaia, T. E.; Il'ina-Kakueva, E. I.

    1992-01-01

    The organization and composition of the extracellular matrix were studied in the crush-injured gastrocnemius muscle of rats subjected to 0 G. After 14 days of flight on Cosmos 2044, the gastrocnemius muscle was removed and evaluated by histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques from the five injured flight rodents and various earth-based treatment groups. In general, the repair process was similar in all injured muscle samples with regard to the organization of the extracellular matrix and myofibers. Small and large myofibers were present within an expanded extracellular matrix, indicative of myogenesis and muscle regeneration. In the tail-suspended animals, a more complete repair was observed with nonenlarged area of nonmuscle cells or matrix material visible. In contrast, the muscle samples from the flight animals were less well organized and contained more macrophages and blood vessels in the repair region, indicative of a delayed repair process, but did not demonstrate any chronic inflammation. Myofiber repair did vary in muscles from the different groups, being slowest in the flight animals and most complete in the tail-suspended ones.

  9. Biochemical evidence of a role for matrix trimerization in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein incorporation.

    PubMed

    Tedbury, Philip R; Novikova, Mariia; Ablan, Sherimay D; Freed, Eric O

    2016-01-12

    The matrix (MA) domain of HIV Gag has important functions in directing the trafficking of Gag to sites of assembly and mediating the incorporation of the envelope glycoprotein (Env) into assembling particles. HIV-1 MA has been shown to form trimers in vitro; however, neither the presence nor the role of MA trimers has been documented in HIV-1 virions. We developed a cross-linking strategy to reveal MA trimers in virions of replication-competent HIV-1. By mutagenesis of trimer interface residues, we demonstrated a correlation between loss of MA trimerization and loss of Env incorporation. Additionally, we found that truncating the long cytoplasmic tail of Env restores incorporation of Env into MA trimer-defective particles, thus rescuing infectivity. We therefore propose a model whereby MA trimerization is required to form a lattice capable of accommodating the long cytoplasmic tail of HIV-1 Env; in the absence of MA trimerization, Env is sterically excluded from the assembling particle. These findings establish MA trimerization as an obligatory step in the assembly of infectious HIV-1 virions. As such, the MA trimer interface may represent a novel drug target for the development of antiretrovirals. PMID:26711999

  10. Sum of the Parts: Composition and Architecture of the Bacterial Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    McCrate, Oscar A.; Zhou, Xiaoxue; Reichhardt, Courtney; Cegelski, Lynette

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are complex multicellular assemblies that exhibit resistance to antibiotics and contribute to the pathogenesis of serious and chronic infectious diseases. New approaches and quantitative data are needed to define the molecular composition of bacterial biofilms. E. coli biofilms are known to contain polysaccharides and functional amyloid fibers termed curli, yet accurate determinations of biofilm composition at the molecular level have been elusive. The ability to define the composition of the extracellular matrix is crucial for the elucidation of structure–function relationships that will aid the development of chemical strategies to disrupt biofilms. We have developed an approach that integrates non-perturbative preparation of the extracellular matrix with electron microscopy, biochemistry and solid-state NMR spectroscopy to define the chemical composition of the intact and insoluble extracellular matrix of a clinically important pathogenic bacterium—uropathogenic E. coli. Our data permitted a sum-of-all-the-parts analysis. Electron microscopy revealed supramolecular shell-like structures that encapsulated single cells and enmeshed the bacterial community. Biochemical and solid-state NMR measurements of the matrix and constitutive parts established that the matrix is composed of two major components, curli and cellulose, each in a quantifiable amount. This approach to quantifying the matrix composition is widely applicable to other organisms and to examining the influence of biofilm inhibitors. Collectively, our NMR spectra and the electron micrographs of the purified ECM inspire us to consider the biofilm matrix not as an undefined slime, but as an assembly of polymers with a defined composition and architecture. PMID:23827139

  11. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Controls VEGF Signaling and Processing in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sack, Kelsey D; Teran, Madelane; Nugent, Matthew A

    2016-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF) drives endothelial cell maintenance and angiogenesis. Endothelial cell behavior is altered by the stiffness of the substrate the cells are attached to suggesting that VEGF activity might be influenced by the mechanical cellular environment. We hypothesized that extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness modifies VEGF-cell-matrix tethering leading to altered VEGF processing and signaling. We analyzed VEGF binding, internalization, and signaling as a function of substrate stiffness in endothelial cells cultured on fibronectin (Fn) linked polyacrylamide gels. Cell produced extracellular matrices on the softest substrates were least capable of binding VEGF, but the cells exhibited enhanced VEGF internalization and signaling compared to cells on all other substrates. Inhibiting VEGF-matrix binding with sucrose octasulfate decreased cell-internalization of VEGF and, inversely, heparin pre-treatment to enhance Fn-matrix binding of VEGF increased cell-internalization of VEGF regardless of matrix stiffness. β1 integrins, which connect cells to Fn, modulated VEGF uptake in a stiffness dependent fashion. Cells on hard surfaces showed decreased levels of activated β1 and inhibition of β1 integrin resulted in a greater proportional decrease in VEGF internalization than in cells on softer matrices. Extracellular matrix binding is necessary for VEGF internalization. Stiffness modifies the coordinated actions of VEGF-matrix binding and β1 integrin binding/activation, which together are critical for VEGF internalization. This study provides insight into how the microenvironment may influence tissue regeneration and response to injury and disease. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2026-2039, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26773314

  12. Heterogeneous expression of extracellular matrix molecules in the red nucleus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Rácz, É; Gaál, B; Matesz, C

    2016-05-13

    Previous studies in our laboratory showed that the organization and heterogeneous molecular composition of extracellular matrix is associated with the variable cytoarchitecture, connections and specific functions of the vestibular nuclei and two related areas of the vestibular neural circuits, the inferior olive and prepositus hypoglossi nucleus. The aim of the present study is to reveal the organization and distribution of various molecular components of extracellular matrix in the red nucleus, a midbrain premotor center. Morphologically and functionally the red nucleus is comprised of the magno- and parvocellular parts, with overlapping neuronal population. By using histochemical and immunohistochemical methods, the extracellular matrix appeared as perineuronal net, axonal coat, perisynaptic matrix or diffuse network in the neuropil. In both parts of the red nucleus we have observed positive hyaluronan, tenascin-R, link protein, and lectican (aggrecan, brevican, versican, neurocan) reactions. Perineuronal nets were detected with each of the reactions and the aggrecan showed the most intense staining in the pericellular area. The two parts were clearly distinguished on the basis of neurocan and HAPLN1 expression as they have lower intensity in the perineuronal nets of large cells and in the neuropil of the magnocellular part. Additionally, in contrast to this pattern, the aggrecan was heavily labeled in the magnocellular region sharply delineating from the faintly stained parvocellular area. The most characteristic finding was that the appearance of perineuronal nets was related with the neuronal size independently from its position within the two subdivisions of red nucleus. In line with these statements none of the extracellular matrix molecules were restricted exclusively to the magno- or parvocellular division. The chemical heterogeneity of the perineuronal nets may support the recently accepted view that the red nucleus comprises more different populations of

  13. A novel extensin that may organize extracellular matrix biogenesis in Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Ertl, H; Hallmann, A; Wenzl, S; Sumper, M

    1992-06-01

    ISG is a sulphated, extracellular glycoprotein synthesized for only a few minutes in inverting Volvox embryos and inverting sperm cell packets. This control operates at the level of transcription. ISG has been characterized by studies of protein chemistry and electron microscopy. The primary structure of ISG has been derived from genomic DNA and cDNA. ISG is composed of a globular and a rod-shaped domain. The rod-shaped domain represents a member of the extensin family with numerous repeats of Ser-(Hyp)4-6 motifs. A synthetic decapeptide matching the C-terminal sequence is able to disaggregate the organism into individual cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy localizes ISG within the boundary zone of the ECM. PMID:1600938

  14. Extracellular matrix-associated proteins form an integral and dynamic system during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weipeng; Sun, Jin; Ding, Wei; Lin, Jinshui; Tian, Renmao; Lu, Liang; Liu, Xiaofen; Shen, Xihui; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Though the essential role of extracellular matrix in biofilm development has been extensively documented, the function of matrix-associated proteins is elusive. Determining the dynamics of matrix-associated proteins would be a useful way to reveal their functions in biofilm development. Therefore, we applied iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics to evaluate matrix-associated proteins isolated from different phases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853 biofilms. Among the identified 389 proteins, 54 changed their abundance significantly. The increased abundance of stress resistance and nutrient metabolism-related proteins over the period of biofilm development was consistent with the hypothesis that biofilm matrix forms micro-environments in which cells are optimally organized to resist stress and use available nutrients. Secreted proteins, including novel putative effectors of the type III secretion system were identified, suggesting that the dynamics of pathogenesis-related proteins in the matrix are associated with biofilm development. Interestingly, there was a good correlation between the abundance changes of matrix-associated proteins and their expression. Further analysis revealed complex interactions among these modulated proteins, and the mutation of selected proteins attenuated biofilm development. Collectively, this work presents the first dynamic picture of matrix-associated proteins during biofilm development, and provides evidences that the matrix-associated proteins may form an integral and well regulated system that contributes to stress resistance, nutrient acquisition, pathogenesis and the stability of the biofilm. PMID:26029669

  15. Soil organic matter and the extracellular microbial matrix show contrasting responses to C and N availability

    PubMed Central

    Redmile-Gordon, M.A.; Evershed, R.P.; Hirsch, P.R.; White, R.P.; Goulding, K.W.T.

    2015-01-01

    An emerging paradigm in soil science suggests microbes can perform ‘N mining’ from recalcitrant soil organic matter (SOM) in conditions of low N availability. However, this requires the production of extracellular structures rich in N (including enzymes and structural components) and thus defies stoichiometric expectation. We set out to extract newly synthesised peptides from the extracellular matrix in soil and compare the amino acid (AA) profiles, N incorporation and AA dynamics in response to labile inputs of contrasting C/N ratio. Glycerol was added both with and without an inorganic source of N (10% 15N labelled NH4NO3) to a soil already containing a large pool of refractory SOM and incubated for 10 days. The resulting total soil peptide (TSP) and extracellular pools were compared using colorimetric methods, gas chromatography, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. N isotope compositions showed that the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) contained a greater proportion of products formed de novo than did TSP, with hydrophobic EPS-AAs (leucine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, hydroxyproline and tyrosine) deriving substantially more N from the inorganic source provided. Quantitative comparison between extracts showed that the EPS contained greater relative proportions of alanine, glycine, proline, phenylalanine and tyrosine. The greatest increases in EPS-peptide and EPS-polysaccharide concentrations occurred at the highest C/N ratios. All EPS-AAs responded similarly to treatment whereas the responses of TSP were more complex. The results suggest that extracellular investment of N (as EPS peptides) is a microbial survival mechanism in conditions of low N/high C which, from an evolutionary perspective, must ultimately lead to the tendency for increased N returns to the microbial biomass. A conceptual model is proposed that describes the dynamics of the extracellular matrix in response to the C/N ratio of labile inputs. PMID:26339106

  16. Endocytosis of collagen by hepatic stellate cells regulates extracellular matrix dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yan; Mukhopadhyay, Dhriti; Drinane, Mary; Ji, Baoan; Li, Xing; Cao, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) generate matrix, which in turn may also regulate HSCs function during liver fibrosis. We hypothesized that HSCs may endocytose matrix proteins to sense and respond to changes in microenvironment. Primary human HSCs, LX2, or mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) [wild-type; c-abl−/−; or Yes, Src, and Fyn knockout mice (YSF−/−)] were incubated with fluorescent-labeled collagen or gelatin. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and confocal microscopy were used for measuring cellular internalization of matrix proteins. Targeted PCR array and quantitative real-time PCR were used to evaluate gene expression changes. HSCs and LX2 cells endocytose collagens in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Endocytosed collagen colocalized with Dextran 10K, a marker of macropinocytosis, and 5-ethylisopropyl amiloride, an inhibitor of macropinocytosis, reduced collagen internalization by 46%. Cytochalasin D and ML7 blocked collagen internalization by 47% and 45%, respectively, indicating that actin and myosin are critical for collagen endocytosis. Wortmannin and AKT inhibitor blocked collagen internalization by 70% and 89%, respectively, indicating that matrix macropinocytosis requires phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling. Overexpression of dominant-negative dynamin-2 K44A blocked matrix internalization by 77%, indicating a role for dynamin-2 in matrix macropinocytosis. Whereas c-abl−/− MEF showed impaired matrix endocytosis, YSF−/− MEF surprisingly showed increased matrix endocytosis. It was also associated with complex gene regulations that related with matrix dynamics, including increased matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) mRNA levels and zymographic activity. HSCs endocytose matrix proteins through macropinocytosis that requires a signaling network composed of PI3K/AKT, dynamin-2, and c-abl. Interaction with extracellular matrix regulates matrix dynamics through modulating multiple gene expressions including MMP-9

  17. How Osteoblasts Sense their Environment: Integrin-Extracellular Matrix Interactions and Mechanical Loading of Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth K.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Osteoblasts are the cells responsible for forming and replacing bone throughout life. We know that mechanical stimulation through weight-bearing at I gravity on Earth is needed to maintain healthy bone, and that osteoblasts play a critical role in that process. Over the last 9 years in my laboratory at NASA ARC, we have studied the regulation of osteoblast function by interactions between the extracellular matrix and die cell. Using a cell culture approach, we defined the repertoire of adhesion receptors, called integrins, which are expressed on the osteoblast surface, as well as specific extracellular matrix proteins, which are needed for cellular differentiation and survival. We are now extending these observations to determine if integrin signaling is involved in the skeletal responses to disuse and recovery from disuse using the rodent model of hindlimb unloading by tail suspension. Together, our cell culture and animal studies are providing new insight into the regulation of osteoblast function in bone.

  18. Immunohistochemical study of cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix components in the notochord and notochordal sheath of amphioxus

    PubMed Central

    Bočina, Ivana; Saraga-Babić, Mirna

    2006-01-01

    A major cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix proteins of the amphioxus notochordal cells and sheath were detected by immunohistochemical techniques. The three-layered amphioxus notochordal sheath strongly expressed fish collagen type I in its outer and middle layers, while in the innermost layer expression did not occur. The amphioxus notochordal sheath was reactive to applied anti-human antibodies for intermediate filament proteins such as cytokeratins, desmin and vimentin, as well as to microtubule components (ß-tubulin), particularly in the area close to the epipharyngeal groove. Alpha-smooth muscle actin was expressed in some notochordal cells and in the area of the notochordal attachment to the sheath. Thus muscular nature of notochordal cells was shown by immunohistochemistry in tissue section. Our results confirm that genes encoding intermediate filament proteins, microtubules and microfilaments are highly conserved during evolution. Collagen type I was proven to be the key extracellular matrix protein that forms the amphioxus notochordal sheath. PMID:16733537

  19. Designer Extracellular Matrix Based on DNA-Peptide Networks Generated by Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Finke, Alexander; Bußkamp, Holger; Manea, Marilena; Marx, Andreas

    2016-08-16

    Cell proliferation and differentiation in multicellular organisms are partially regulated by signaling from the extracellular matrix. The ability to mimic an extracellular matrix would allow particular cell types to be specifically recognized, which is central to tissue engineering. We present a new functional DNA-based material with cell-adhesion properties. It is generated by using covalently branched DNA as primers in PCR. These primers were functionalized by click chemistry with the cyclic peptide c(RGDfK), a peptide that is known to predominantly bind to αvβ3 integrins, which are found on endothelial cells and fibroblasts, for example. As a covalent coating of surfaces, this DNA-based material shows cell-repellent properties in its unfunctionalized state and gains adhesiveness towards specific target cells when functionalized with c(RGDfK). These cells remain viable and can be released under mild conditions by DNase I treatment. PMID:27410200

  20. Chondroitinase injection improves keloid pathology by reorganizing the extracellular matrix with regenerated elastic fibers.

    PubMed

    Ishiko, Toshihiro; Naitoh, Motoko; Kubota, Hiroshi; Yamawaki, Satoko; Ikeda, Mika; Yoshikawa, Katsuhiro; Fujita, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroaki; Kurahashi, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2013-05-01

    Keloids are a proliferative fibrotic disease characterized by abnormal accumulation of extracellular matrix in the dermis. Keloid lesions lack skin plasticity due to deficiencies in elastic fiber formation in the extracellular matrix. The loss of elastic fiber is caused by excessive accumulation of chondroitin sulfate (CS), a sulfated glycosaminoglycan. However, there is no radical cure for keloids. Using a model system, we show herein that treatment of keloid tissues with chondroitinase ABC, an enzyme that specifically digests CS, improves clinical features of keloids. Keloid tissues obtained from patients were grafted on nude mice, and chondroitinase ABC was injected into the grafted keloid tissues. Chondroitinase ABC treatment significantly reduced the volume of keloid implants concomitant with recovery of elastic fiber formation. These results suggest that chondroitinase ABC injection is an effective therapy for keloid. PMID:23451938

  1. Regulation of Extracellular Matrix Remodeling Proteins by Osteoblasts in Titanium Nanoparticle-Induced Aseptic Loosening Model.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jing; Hou, Yanhua; Fu, Na; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Li, Guo; Peng, Qiang; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-10-01

    Titanium (Ti)-wear particles, formed at the bone-implant interface, are responsible for aseptic loosening, which is a main cause of total joint replacement failure. There have been many studies on Ti particle-induced function changes in mono-cultured osteoblasts and synovial cells. However, little is known on extracellular matrix remodeling displayed by osteoblasts when in coexistence with Synovial cells. To further mimic the bone-implant interface environment, we firstly established a nanoscaled-Ti particle-induced aseptic loosening system by co-culturing osteoblasts and Synovial cells. We then explored the impact of the Synovial cells on Ti particle-engulfed osteoblasts in the mimicked flamed niche. The matrix metalloproteinases and lysyl oxidases expression levels, two protein families which are critical in osseointegration, were examined under induction by tumor necrosis factor-alpha. It was found that the co-culture between the osteoblasts and Synovial cells markedly increased the migration and proliferation of the osteoblasts, even in the Ti-particle engulfed osteoblasts. Importantly, the Ti-particle engulfed osteoblasts, induced by TNF-alpha after the co-culture, enhanced the release of the matrix metalloproteinases and reduced the expressions of lysyl oxidases. The regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling at the protein level was further assessed by investigations on gene expression of the matrix metalloproteinases and lysyl oxidases, which also suggested that the regulation started at the genetic level. Our research work has therefore revealed the critical role of multi cell-type interactions in the extracellular matrix remodeling within the peri-prosthetic tissues, which provides new insights on aseptic loosening and brings new clues about incomplete osseointegration between the implantation materials and their surrounding bones. PMID:26502645

  2. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrhart, E.J.; Gillette, E.L.; Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

    1996-02-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by {gamma} irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin inummoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrhart, E. J.; Gillette, E. L.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chaterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by gamma irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin immunoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid-remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

  4. Prion permissive pathways: extracellular matrix genes control susceptibility to prion infection

    PubMed Central

    Imberdis, Thibaut; Harris, David A

    2014-01-01

    There are wide variations in the susceptibility of humans, animals, and cultured cell lines to infection by prions. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Marbiah et al (2014) identified a gene regulatory network that regulates the susceptibility of cultured cells to prion infection. Surprisingly, a number of these genes impact the structure of the extracellular matrix. These results have important implications for understanding mechanisms of prion infection and also suggest new therapeutic targets. PMID:24952893

  5. An Assay to Quantify Chemotactic Properties of Degradation Products from Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Sicari, Brian M.; Zhang, Li; Londono, Ricardo; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2015-01-01

    The endogenous chemotaxis of cells toward sites of tissue injury and/or biomaterial implantation is an important component of the host response. Implanted biomaterials capable of recruiting host stem/progenitor cells to a site of interest may obviate challenges associated with cell transplantation. An assay for the identification and quantification of chemotaxis induced by surgically placed biologic scaffolds composed of extracellular matrix is described herein. PMID:24155230

  6. Bral1: "Superglue" for the extracellular matrix in the brain white matter.

    PubMed

    Cicanic, Michal; Sykova, Eva; Vargova, Lydia

    2012-04-01

    Bral1 is a link protein that stabilizes the binding between lecticans and hyaluronic acid and thus maintains the extracellular matrix assembly in the CNS. Bral1 is specifically located in the white matter around the nodes of Ranvier. Recent studies suggest its function in promoting saltatory neural conduction. This article reviews the current knowledge about the structure, expression and function of this link protein. PMID:22300985

  7. The ECM-Cell Interaction of Cartilage Extracellular Matrix on Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuyun; Huang, Jingxiang; Guo, Weimin; Chen, Jifeng; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Bin; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Aiyuan; Wang, Yu; Xu, Wenjing; Lu, Shibi; Yuan, Mei; Guo, Quanyi

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) is composed primarily of the network type II collagen (COLII) and an interlocking mesh of fibrous proteins and proteoglycans (PGs), hyaluronic acid (HA), and chondroitin sulfate (CS). Articular cartilage ECM plays a crucial role in regulating chondrocyte metabolism and functions, such as organized cytoskeleton through integrin-mediated signaling via cell-matrix interaction. Cell signaling through integrins regulates several chondrocyte functions, including differentiation, metabolism, matrix remodeling, responses to mechanical stimulation, and cell survival. The major signaling pathways that regulate chondrogenesis have been identified as wnt signal, nitric oxide (NO) signal, protein kinase C (PKC), and retinoic acid (RA) signal. Integrins are a large family of molecules that are central regulators in multicellular biology. They orchestrate cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesive interactions from embryonic development to mature tissue function. In this review, we emphasize the signaling molecule effect and the biomechanics effect of cartilage ECM on chondrogenesis. PMID:24959581

  8. Virion incorporation of envelope glycoproteins with long but not short cytoplasmic tails is blocked by specific, single amino acid substitutions in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Freed, E O; Martin, M A

    1995-01-01

    Incorporation of envelope glycoproteins into a budding retrovirus is an essential step in the formation of an infectious virus particle. By using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified specific amino acid residues in the matrix domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag protein that are critical to the incorporation of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins into virus particles. Pseudotyping analyses were used to demonstrate that two heterologous envelope glycoproteins with short cytoplasmic tails (the envelope of the amphotropic murine leukemia virus and a naturally truncated HIV-2 envelope) are efficiently incorporated into HIV-1 particles bearing the matrix mutations. Furthermore, deletion of the cytoplasmic tail of HIV-1 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein gp41 from 150 to 7 or 47 residues reversed the incorporation block imposed by the matrix mutations. These results suggest the existence of a specific functional interaction between the HIV-1 matrix and the gp41 cytoplasmic tail. PMID:7853546

  9. N-terminal specific conjugation of extracellular matrix proteins to 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde functionalized polyacrylamide hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jessica P; Kassianidou, Elena; MacDonald, James I; Francis, Matthew B; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Polyacrylamide hydrogels have been used extensively to study cell responses to the mechanical and biochemical properties of extracellular matrix substrates. A key step in fabricating these substrates is the conjugation of cell adhesion proteins to the polyacrylamide surfaces, which typically involves nonspecifically anchoring these proteins via side-chain functional groups. This can result in a loss of presentation control and altered bioactivity. Here, we describe a new functionalization strategy in which we anchor full-length extracellular matrix proteins to polyacrylamide substrates using 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, which can be co-polymerized into polyacrylamide gels and used to immobilize proteins by their N-termini. This one-step reaction proceeds under mild aqueous conditions and does not require additional reagents. We demonstrate that these substrates can readily conjugate to various extracellular matrix proteins, as well as promote cell adhesion and spreading. Notably, this chemistry supports the assembly and cellular remodeling of large collagen fibers, which is not observed using conventional side-chain amine-conjugation chemistry. PMID:27348850

  10. Quantitation and relative distribution of extracellular matrix in Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm

    SciTech Connect

    Van Pett, K.; Schurman, D.J.; Smith, R.L. )

    1990-05-01

    The relationship between adherence of bacteria to foreign bodies and their deposition of extracellular matrix was examined on glass and suture material. To quantitate bacterial adherence, uptake of ({sup 3}H)thymidine into bacterial DNA was analyzed. Corresponding amounts of extracellular matrix were measured by a new technique using ({sup 14}C)glucose incorporation. This study shows that ({sup 14}C)glucose preferentially labeled bacterial strains in proportion to biofilm production. The ratio of {sup 3}H{sup 14}C in high biofilm producers was 0.9 and in low producers it was 3.7. Radioactive identification of organisms as high and low producers was confirmed by electron microscopy. The results presented here show that production and accumulation of biofilm over time is a stable characteristic in different strains of S. epidermidis. The use of ratios reflecting radiolabeling of bacteria and biofilm by ({sup 3}H)thymidine and ({sup 14}C)glucose, respectively, is a quantitative yet simple technique to assess extracellular matrix of different strains of S. epidermidis.