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Sample records for extrachromosomal circles structurally

  1. Formation of extrachromosomal circles from telomeric DNA in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Sarit; Méchali, Marcel

    2002-12-01

    Instability and plasticity of telomeric DNA, which includes extrachromosomal DNA, are usually correlated with the absence of telomerase and with abnormal growth of mammalian cells. Here, we show the formation of extrachromosomal circular DNA of telomeric repeats (tel-eccDNA) during the development of Xenopus laevis. Tel-eccDNA is double-stranded relaxed circles composed of the vertebrate consensus telomeric repeats [TTAGGG](n). Its size varies from <2 to >20 kb and it comprises up to 10% of the total cellular telomere content of the early embryo (pre-MBT stage). The amount of tel-eccDNA is reduced in later developmental stages and in adult tissues. Using a cell-free system derived from Xenopus egg extracts, we show that tel-eccDNA can be formed de novo from the telomere chromosomal tracts of sperm nuclei and naked DNA in a replication-independent manner. These results reveal an unusual plasticity of telomeric DNA during normal development of Xenopus. PMID:12446568

  2. Amplified DNAs in laboratory stocks of Leishmania tarentolae: extrachromosomal circles structurally and functionally similar to the inverted-H-region amplification of methotrexate-resistant Leishmania major

    SciTech Connect

    Petrillo-Peixoto, M.L.; Beverley, S.M. )

    1988-12-01

    We describe the structure of amplified DNA that was discovered in two laboratory stocks of the protozoan parasite Leishmania tarentolae. Restriction mapping and molecular cloning revealed that a region of 42 kilobases was amplified 8- to 30-fold in these lines. Southern blot analyses of digested DNAs or chromosomes separated by pulsed-field electrophoresis showed that the amplified DNA corresponded to the H region, a locus defined originally by its amplification in methotrexate-resistant Leishmania major. Similarities between the amplified DNA of the two species included (i) extensive cross-hybridization; (ii) approximate conservation of sequence order; (iii) extrachromosomal localization; (iv) an overall inverted, head-to-head configuration as a circular 140-kilobase tetrameric molecule; (v) two regions of DNA sequence rearrangement, each of which was closely associated with the two centers of the inverted repeats; (vi) association with methotrexate resistance; and (vii) phenotypically conservative amplification, in which the wild-type chromosomal arrangement was retained without apparent modification. Our data showed that amplified DNA mediating drug resistance arose in unselected L. tarentolae, although the pressures leading to apparently spontaneous amplification and maintenance of the H region are not known. The simple structure and limited extent of DNA amplified in these and other Leishmania lines suggests that the study of gene amplification in Leishmania spp. offers an attractive model system for the study of amplification in cultured mammalian cells and tumors. We also introduced a method for measuring the size of large circular DNAs, using gamma-irradiation to introduce limited double-strand breaks followed by sizing of the linear DNAs by pulsed-field electrophoresis.

  3. Identification of extrachromosomal circular DNA in hop via rolling circle amplification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During a survey looking for viruses affecting hop plants in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, a circular DNA molecule was identified via rolling circle amplification (RCA) and later characterized. The 5.7 kb long molecule only matched in a minor cover to a microsatellite region in the Humulus lupulus...

  4. Archaeal Extrachromosomal Genetic Elements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haina; Peng, Nan; Shah, Shiraz A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Research on archaeal extrachromosomal genetic elements (ECEs) has progressed rapidly in the past decade. To date, over 60 archaeal viruses and 60 plasmids have been isolated. These archaeal viruses exhibit an exceptional diversity in morphology, with a wide array of shapes, such as spindles, rods, filaments, spheres, head-tails, bottles, and droplets, and some of these new viruses have been classified into one order, 10 families, and 16 genera. Investigation of model archaeal viruses has yielded important insights into mechanisms underlining various steps in the viral life cycle, including infection, DNA replication and transcription, and virion egression. Many of these mechanisms are unprecedented for any known bacterial or eukaryal viruses. Studies of plasmids isolated from different archaeal hosts have also revealed a striking diversity in gene content and innovation in replication strategies. Highly divergent replication proteins are identified in both viral and plasmid genomes. Genomic studies of archaeal ECEs have revealed a modular sequence structure in which modules of DNA sequence are exchangeable within, as well as among, plasmid families and probably also between viruses and plasmids. In particular, it has been suggested that ECE-host interactions have shaped the coevolution of ECEs and their archaeal hosts. Furthermore, archaeal hosts have developed defense systems, including the innate restriction-modification (R-M) system and the adaptive CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) system, to restrict invasive plasmids and viruses. Together, these interactions permit a delicate balance between ECEs and their hosts, which is vitally important for maintaining an innovative gene reservoir carried by ECEs. In conclusion, while research on archaeal ECEs has just started to unravel the molecular biology of these genetic entities and their interactions with archaeal hosts, it is expected to accelerate in the next decade. PMID

  5. Extrachromosomal genetic elements in Micrococcus.

    PubMed

    Dib, Julián Rafael; Liebl, Wolfgang; Wagenknecht, Martin; Farías, María Eugenia; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Micrococci are Gram-positive G + C-rich, nonmotile, nonspore-forming actinomycetous bacteria. Micrococcus comprises ten members, with Micrococcus luteus being the type species. Representatives of the genus play important roles in the biodegradation of xenobiotics, bioremediation processes, production of biotechnologically important enzymes or bioactive compounds, as test strains in biological assays for lysozyme and antibiotics, and as infective agents in immunocompromised humans. The first description of plasmids dates back approximately 28 years, when several extrachromosomal elements ranging in size from 1.5 to 30.2 kb were found in Micrococcus luteus. Up to the present, a number of circular plasmids conferring antibiotic resistance, the ability to degrade aromatic compounds, and osmotolerance are known, as well as cryptic elements with unidentified functions. Here, we review the Micrococcus extrachromosomal traits reported thus far including phages and the only quite recently described large linear extrachromosomal genetic elements, termed linear plasmids, which range in size from 75 kb (pJD12) to 110 kb (pLMA1) and which confer putative advantageous capabilities, such as antibiotic or heavy metal resistances (inferred from sequence analyses and curing experiments). The role of the extrachromosomal elements for the frequently proven ecological and biotechnological versatility of the genus will be addressed as well as their potential for the development and use as genetic tools. PMID:23138713

  6. Extrachromosomal circular DNA is common in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Henrik D.; Parsons, Lance; Jørgensen, Tue S.; Botstein, David; Regenberg, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    Examples of extrachromosomal circular DNAs (eccDNAs) are found in many organisms, but their impact on genetic variation at the genome scale has not been investigated. We mapped 1,756 eccDNAs in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome using Circle-Seq, a highly sensitive eccDNA purification method. Yeast eccDNAs ranged from an arbitrary lower limit of 1 kb up to 38 kb and covered 23% of the genome, representing thousands of genes. EccDNA arose both from genomic regions with repetitive sequences ≥15 bases long and from regions with short or no repetitive sequences. Some eccDNAs were identified in several yeast populations. These eccDNAs contained ribosomal genes, transposon remnants, and tandemly repeated genes (HXT6/7, ENA1/2/5, and CUP1-1/-2) that were generally enriched on eccDNAs. EccDNAs seemed to be replicated and 80% contained consensus sequences for autonomous replication origins that could explain their maintenance. Our data suggest that eccDNAs are common in S. cerevisiae, where they might contribute substantially to genetic variation and evolution. PMID:26038577

  7. Efficient gene transfer in C.elegans: extrachromosomal maintenance and integration of transforming sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Mello, C C; Kramer, J M; Stinchcomb, D; Ambros, V

    1991-01-01

    We describe a dominant behavioral marker, rol-6(su-1006), and an efficient microinjection procedure which facilitate the recovery of Caenorhabditis elegans transformants. We use these tools to study the mechanism of C.elegans DNA transformation. By injecting mixtures of genetically marked DNA molecules, we show that large extrachromosomal arrays assemble directly from the injected molecules and that homologous recombination drives array assembly. Appropriately placed double-strand breaks stimulated homologous recombination during array formation. Our data indicate that the size of the assembled transgenic structures determines whether or not they will be maintained extrachromosomally or lost. We show that low copy number extrachromosomal transformation can be achieved by adjusting the relative concentration of DNA molecules in the injection mixture. Integration of the injected DNA, though relatively rare, was reproducibly achieved when single-stranded oligonucleotide was co-injected with the double-stranded DNA. Images PMID:1935914

  8. Automatic Detection and Quantification of WBCs and RBCs Using Iterative Structured Circle Detection Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Alomari, Yazan M.; Zaharatul Azma, Raja

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation and counting of blood cells are considered as an important step that helps to extract features to diagnose some specific diseases like malaria or leukemia. The manual counting of white blood cells (WBCs) and red blood cells (RBCs) in microscopic images is an extremely tedious, time consuming, and inaccurate process. Automatic analysis will allow hematologist experts to perform faster and more accurately. The proposed method uses an iterative structured circle detection algorithm for the segmentation and counting of WBCs and RBCs. The separation of WBCs from RBCs was achieved by thresholding, and specific preprocessing steps were developed for each cell type. Counting was performed for each image using the proposed method based on modified circle detection, which automatically counted the cells. Several modifications were made to the basic (RCD) algorithm to solve the initialization problem, detecting irregular circles (cells), selecting the optimal circle from the candidate circles, determining the number of iterations in a fully dynamic way to enhance algorithm detection, and running time. The validation method used to determine segmentation accuracy was a quantitative analysis that included Precision, Recall, and F-measurement tests. The average accuracy of the proposed method was 95.3% for RBCs and 98.4% for WBCs. PMID:24803955

  9. Ku suppresses formation of telomeric circles and alternative telomere lengthening in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zellinger, Barbara; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Puizina, Jasna; Schirato, Martina; Riha, Karel

    2007-07-01

    Telomeres in mammals and plants are protected by the terminal t loop structure, the formation of which parallels the first steps of intrachromatid homologous recombination (HR). Under some circumstances, cells can also utilize an HR-based mechanism (alternative lengthening of telomeres [ALT]) as a back-up pathway for telomere maintenance. We have found that the Ku70/80 heterodimer, a central nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair factor, inhibits engagement of ALT in Arabidopsis telomerase-negative cells. To further assess HR activities at telomeres, we have developed a sensitive assay for detecting extrachromosomal telomeric circles (t circles) that may arise from t loop resolution and aberrant HR. We show that Ku70/80 specifically inhibits circle formation at telomeres, but not at centromeric and rDNA repeats. Ku inactivation results in increased formation of t circles that represent approximately 4% of total telomeric DNA. However, telomeres in ku mutants are fully functional, indicating that telomerase efficiently heals ongoing terminal deletions arising from excision of the t circles. PMID:17612498

  10. [Electron microscopic research on the extrachromosomal genetic elements of Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, E V; Vorob'eva, N V; Romashchenko, A G; Serdiukova, N A; Khristoliubova, N B

    1986-08-01

    The structural organization of extrachromosomal genetic elements were studied in a subfraction obtained after centrifugation of the lysate of E. coli spheroplasts. With this method of isolation, the tertiary structure of the extrachromosomal genetic elements was preserved. The majority of DNA macromolecules were released in the form of single and connected rosettes. Typical rosettes composed of radial loops of DNA clustered around the central dense core (the diameter is about 60 nm). The mean length of the rosette loops was 1.06 +/- 0.4 micron. Both relaxed folded and supercoiled folded forms of DNA were observed on the preparation. Sometimes the rosettes were connected with large aggregates of DNA (possibly the material of bacterial chromosomes) and had the appearance of thick fibers with numerous lateral loops. Linear, cyclic and various replicative forms of DNA have also been observed. It is assumed that rosettes of the extrachromosomal elements of E. coli reflect one of the levels of organization of prokaryotic genetic material. PMID:3535183

  11. Solving Problems through Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grahamslaw, Laura; Henson, Lisa H.

    2015-01-01

    Several problem-solving interventions that utilise a "circle" approach have been applied within the field of educational psychology, for example, Circle Time, Circle of Friends, Sharing Circles, Circle of Adults and Solution Circles. This research explored two interventions, Solution Circles and Circle of Adults, and used thematic…

  12. Analysis of extrachromosomal Ac/Ds transposable elements.

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunova, V; Levy, A A

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism of transposition of the maize Ac/Ds elements is not well understood. The true transposition intermediates are not known and it has not been possible to distinguish between excision models involving 8-bp staggered cuts or 1-bp staggered cuts followed by hairpin formation. In this work, we have analyzed extrachromosomal excision products to gain insight into the excision mechanism. Plasmid rescue was used to demonstrate that Ds excision is associated with the formation of circular molecules. In addition, we present evidence for the formation of linear extrachromosomal species during Ds excision. Sequences found at the termini of circular and linear elements showed a broad range of nucleotide additions or deletions, suggesting that these species are not true intermediates. Additional nucleotides adjacent to the termini in extrachromosomal elements were compared to the sequence of the original donor site. This analysis showed that: (1) the first nucleotide adjacent to the transposon end was significantly more similar to the first nucleotide flanking the element in the donor site than to a random sequence and (2) the second and farther nucleotides did not resemble the donor site. The implications of these findings for excision models are discussed. PMID:10790408

  13. Amplification of a Zygosaccharomyces bailii DNA Segment in Wine Yeast Genomes by Extrachromosomal Circular DNA Formation

    PubMed Central

    Galeote, Virginie; Bigey, Frédéric; Beyne, Emmanuelle; Novo, Maite; Legras, Jean-Luc; Casaregola, Serge; Dequin, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    We recently described the presence of large chromosomal segments resulting from independent horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin. We report here evidence for the amplification of one of these segments, a 17 kb DNA segment from Zygosaccharomyces bailii, in the genome of S. cerevisiae strains. The copy number, organization and location of this region differ considerably between strains, indicating that the insertions are independent and that they are post-HGT events. We identified eight different forms in 28 S. cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin, with up to four different copies in a single strain. The organization of these forms and the identification of an autonomously replicating sequence functional in S. cerevisiae, strongly suggest that an extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA) molecule serves as an intermediate in the amplification of the Z. bailii region in yeast genomes. We found little or no sequence similarity at the breakpoint regions, suggesting that the insertions may be mediated by nonhomologous recombination. The diversity between these regions in S. cerevisiae represents roughly one third the divergence among the genomes of wine strains, which confirms the recent origin of this event, posterior to the start of wine strain expansion. This is the first report of a circle-based mechanism for the expansion of a DNA segment, mediated by nonhomologous recombination, in natural yeast populations. PMID:21423766

  14. Alternative model for chromatin organization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomal DNA plasmid TRP1 RI circle (YARp1).

    PubMed Central

    Long, C M; Brajkovich, C M; Scott, J F

    1985-01-01

    TRP1 RI circle (now designated YARp1, yeast acentric ring plasmid 1) is a 1,453-base-pair artificial plasmid composed exclusively of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomal DNA. It contains both the TRP1 gene and ARS1 (a DNA sequence that permits extrachromosomal maintenance of recombinant plasmids). This high-copy-number, relatively stable plasmid was shown to be organized into nucleosomes comparable to typical yeast chromatin, containing a possible maximum of nine nucleosomes per circle. Therefore, YARp1 can be used to examine the structure of chromatin of both a chromosomally derived replicator and a functional gene. By mapping regions of micrococcal nuclease cleavage in chromatin versus purified DNA, we located the positions of protected regions on the circle with reference to six unique restriction sites. Measurements made on patterns of early digestion products indicated that a region of approximately 300 base pairs in the vicinity of ARS1 was strongly resistant to micrococcal nuclease. The remainder of the plasmid appeared to be associated with five positioned nucleosomes and two nonnucleosomal, partially protected regions on the bulk of the molecules. After similar extents of digestion, naked DNA did not exhibit an equivalent pattern, although some hypersensitive cleavage sites matched sites found in the chromatin. These results are consistent with the interpretation that the protected domains are aligned with respect to a specific site or sites on the small circular chromatin. Images PMID:3018502

  15. Efficient amplification of self-gelling polypod-like structured DNA by rolling circle amplification and enzymatic digestion

    PubMed Central

    Yata, Tomoya; Takahashi, Yuki; Tan, Mengmeng; Hidaka, Kumi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Endo, Masayuki; Takakura, Yoshinobu; Nishikawa, Makiya

    2015-01-01

    The application of DNA as a functional material such as DNA hydrogel has attracted much attention. Despite an increasing interest, the high cost of DNA synthesis is a limiting factor for its utilization. To reduce the cost, we report here a highly efficient amplification technique for polypod-like structured DNA (polypodna) with adhesive ends that spontaneously forms DNA hydrogel. Two types of polypodna with three (tripodna) and four (tetrapodna) pods were selected, and a template oligodeoxynucleotide, containing a tandem sequence of a looped tripodna or tetrapodna, respectively, along with restriction enzyme (TspRI) sites, was designed. The template was circularized using T4 DNA ligase, and amplified by rolling circle amplification (RCA). The RCA product was highly viscous and resistant to restriction digestion. Observation under an electron microscope revealed microflower-like structures. These structures were composed of long DNA and magnesium pyrophosphate, and their treatment with EDTA followed by restriction digestion with TspRI resulted in numerous copies of polypodna with adhesive ends, which formed a DNA hydrogel. Thus, we believe this technique provides a new approach to produce DNA nanostructures, and helps in expanding their practical applications. PMID:26462616

  16. Experimental Analysis of a Paternally Inherited Extrachromosomal Factor

    PubMed Central

    Werren, John H.; van den Assem, Johannes

    1986-01-01

    Virtually all known cases of extrachromosomal inheritance involve cytoplasmic inheritance through the maternal line. Recently, a paternally transmitted factor that causes the production of all-male families has been discovered in a parasitic wasp. The wasp has haplodiploid sex determination: male offspring are haploid and usually develop from unfertilized eggs, whereas females are diploid and usually develop from fertilized eggs. It has been postulated that this paternal sex-ratio factor (psr) is either (1) an infectious agent (a venereal disease) that is transmitted to the female reproductive tract during copulation with an infected male and, subsequently, causes all-male families or (2) a male cytoplasmic factor that is transmitted by sperm to eggs upon egg fertilization and, somehow, causes loss of the paternal set of chromosomes.—Experimental evidence is presented which shows that the factor requires egg fertilization for transmission to the next generation; therefore, it is likely to be a cytoplasmic factor. Significant potential intragenomic conflict results from the presence of this factor and two other sex-ratio distorters in this wasp species. PMID:17246344

  17. Argonaute Proteins Affect siRNA Levels and Accumulation of a Novel Extrachromosomal DNA from the Dictyostelium Retrotransposon DIRS-1*

    PubMed Central

    Boesler, Benjamin; Meier, Doreen; Förstner, Konrad U.; Friedrich, Michael; Hammann, Christian; Sharma, Cynthia M.; Nellen, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The retrotransposon DIRS-1 is the most abundant retroelement in Dictyostelium discoideum and constitutes the pericentromeric heterochromatin of the six chromosomes in D. discoideum. The vast majority of cellular siRNAs is derived from DIRS-1, suggesting that the element is controlled by RNAi-related mechanisms. We investigated the role of two of the five Argonaute proteins of D. discoideum, AgnA and AgnB, in DIRS-1 silencing. Deletion of agnA resulted in the accumulation of DIRS-1 transcripts, the expression of DIRS-1-encoded proteins, and the loss of most DIRS-1-derived secondary siRNAs. Simultaneously, extrachromosomal single-stranded DIRS-1 DNA accumulated in the cytoplasm of agnA− strains. These DNA molecules appear to be products of reverse transcription and thus could represent intermediate structures before transposition. We further show that transitivity of endogenous siRNAs is impaired in agnA− strains. The deletion of agnB alone had no strong effect on DIRS-1 transposon regulation. However, in agnA−/agnB− double mutant strains strongly reduced accumulation of extrachromosomal DNA compared with the single agnA− strains was observed. PMID:25352599

  18. Uncovering novel mobile genetic elements and their dynamics through an extra-chromosomal sequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Douglas R; Utter, Bryan; Fischetti, Vincent A

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major clinically important pathogen with well-studied phage contributions to its virulence potential. In this commentary, we describe our method to enrich and sequence stealth extra-chromosomal DNA elements in the bacterial cell, allowing the identification of novel extra-chromosomal prophages in S. aureus clinical strains. Extra-chromosomal sequencing is a useful and broadly applicable tool to study bacterial genomics, giving a temporal glance at the extra-chromosomal compartment of the cell and allowing researchers to uncover lower-copy plasmidial elements (e.g., prophages) as well as gain a greater understanding of mobile genetic elements that shuffle on and off the chromosome. Here, we describe how episomal and plasmidial DNA elements can have profound downstream effects on the host cell and surrounding bacterial population, and discuss specific examples of their importance in Gram-positive bacteria. We also offer potential avenues of future research where extra-chromosomal sequencing may play a key role in our understanding of the complete virulence potential of infectious bacteria. PMID:27581613

  19. Extrachromosomal DNA and cell differentiation in cultured pea roots (Pisum sativum)

    SciTech Connect

    Van't Hof, J.

    1986-01-01

    Histological, cytological and molecular analyses of DNA replication and differentiation and meristematic precursors of vascular parenchyma in cultured pea roots show that the initial steps in the transition from a dividing to a differentiated cell involve retardation of DNA replication in late S phase and production of extrachromosomal molecules by excision from late replicating chromosomal DNA. Portions of the extrachromosomal DNA are displaced by a strand displacement mechanism thereby producing free single-stranded molecules. That extrachromosomal molecules have rDNA reflects the fact that in pea roots replication of the ribosomal genes is maximal during late S phase (unpublished results). It is likely, therefore, that the excised late replicating DNA contains some rDNA sequences. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Recumbent Stone Circles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    During the 1970s and early 1980s, British archaeoastronomers were striving to bridge the interpretative gulf between the "megalithic observatories" of Alexander Thom and an archaeological mainstream that, generally speaking, was hostile to any mention of astronomy in relation to the megalithic monuments of Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Britain. The Scottish recumbent stone circles (RSCs) came to represent an example where sounder methodology could overcome many of the data selection issues that had beset earlier studies and, with due restraint, produce credible interpretations. Systematic studies of their orientations consistently concluded that the RSCs had a strong lunar connection, and it was widely envisaged that they were the setting for ceremonies associated with the appearance of the moon over the recumbent stone. Other evidence such as the presence of white quartz and the spatial distribution of cupmarks appeared to back up this conclusion. New archaeological investigations since 1999 have challenged and modified these conclusions, confirming in particular that the circles were built to enclose cairns rather than to demarcate open spaces. Yet the restricted pattern of orientations of these structures could only have been achieved by reference to the basic diurnal motions of the skies, and orientation in relation to simple observations of the midsummer moon remains the most likely reading of the alignment evidence taken as a whole. On the other hand, a consideration of the broader context, which includes the nearby Clava cairns, highlights instead the symbolic importance of the sun.

  1. [Willis and his circle].

    PubMed

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P

    2012-01-01

    Thomas Willis (1621-1675) grew up in Wiltshire and studied medicine in Oxford, at a time when the city was besieged and then occupied by Parliamentarian troops. He started his career as a country doctor while concurrently taking part in informal gatherings with other scientists (William Petty, Christopher Wren and, later on, Robert Hooke, Richard Lower and Robert Boyle). They performed physical and chemical experiments and carried out a variety of tests on animals. After the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 Willis combined his practice with academic teaching. From then on he focused his studies on the structure and function of the brain, dissecting brains after removal from the skull and fixation in 'spirit of wine'. In his 'Cerebri anatome' of 1664, illustrated by Wren, he drew attention to the arterial circle at the base of the brain, including its physiological advantages. This arterial circle had been incompletely described by others in the past and fully, but only in writing, by Wepfer in 1658. PMID:22436528

  2. Get to Know a Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neel-Romine, LeAnn E.; Paul, Sara; Shafer, Kathryn G.

    2012-01-01

    Middle-grades students have a concept image of a circle, but they lack experience in the act of defining. The structure of definitions needs to include conditions that are necessary and sufficient. Most students are able to identify necessary conditions, but they have trouble determining if sufficient conditions are met. How do teachers engage…

  3. Talking Circles Promote Equitable Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Teachers facilitate math talk in the classroom, but introducing a structured discussion format called the "talking circle" can influence opportunities for equitable student participation. Drawing on his reflections over the 2013-14 academic year and reviewing his detailed teaching notes and lesson plans, Marcus Hung takes a close look at…

  4. Elimination of extrachromosomally amplified MYC genes from human tumor cells reduces their tumorigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Von Hoff, D D; McGill, J R; Forseth, B J; Davidson, K K; Bradley, T P; Van Devanter, D R; Wahl, G M

    1992-01-01

    Oncogene amplification has been observed in a broad spectrum of human tumors and has been associated with a poor prognosis for patients with several different types of malignancies. Importantly, at biopsy, the amplified genes localize to acentric extrachromosomal elements such as double-minute chromosomes (DMs) in the vast majority of cases. We show here that treatment of several human tumor cell lines with low concentrations of hydroxyurea accelerates the loss of their extrachromosomally amplified oncogenes. The decreases in MYC copy number in a human tumor cell line correlated with a dramatic reduction in cloning efficiency in soft agar and tumorigenicity in nude mice. No effect on gene copy number or tumorigenicity was observed for a closely related cell line containing the same number of chromosomally amplified MYC genes. One step involved in the accelerated loss of extrachromosomal elements is shown to involve their preferential entrapment of DMs within micronuclei. The data suggest that agents that accelerate the loss of extrachromosomally amplified genes could provide valuable tools for moderating the growth of a large number of human neoplasms. Images PMID:1518843

  5. Polygons and Their Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Paul

    2009-01-01

    In order to find its circumference, Archimedes famously boxed the circle between two polygons. Ending the first of a series of articles (MT179) with an aside, Francis Lopez-Real reverses the situation to ask: Which polygons can be boxed between two circles? (The official term for such polygons is "bicentric".) The sides of these polygons are…

  6. Managing Quality Circles Effectively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterwhite, Frank J. Omowale

    Specifically designed for teachers, administrators, and other school decision-makers, this monograph outlines ways quality circles can be used to improve educational planning and decision-making. The first of four sections defines quality circles as a group of workers who identify, analyze, and propose solutions to problems within their scope of…

  7. Literature Circles: Getting Started.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Lisa

    Literature Circles are a great way to supplement a reading program in a literature-based classroom. In this lesson plan, students create and answer comprehension questions, discover new vocabulary, and examine elements of literature. The students feel ownership in Literature Circles, because they are responsible for the meeting. Any genre of…

  8. Literature Circles. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chia-Hui

    The use of literature circles has been discussed in a variety of academic journals, conference papers, and workshops. Teachers at all grade levels use literature circles as a vehicle through which students learn to: think critically about literature; express their thoughts in oral and written forms; and better enjoy their literacy experiences.…

  9. Sun Circle: An Archeoastronomical Monument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanz, C.

    2013-04-01

    The Sun Circle is a ceremonial structure in a public park in Tucson, Arizona, designed to track the Sun's movement through the sky over the course of the year. It is also a place where people who use the park—walkers, joggers, bikers, skaters—can pause and sit down and enjoy a little rest. Although it is a modern construction, it draws its inspiration from ancient archeoastronomical structures of the American southwest.

  10. Circle Time in Preschool: An Analysis of Educational Praxis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Lena Rubinstein

    1994-01-01

    Observations and interviews of five groups of children and staff at different day-care centers found that circle time is both a ritual and a meeting. For staff, circle time allowed for structuring of activities and a sense of accomplishment. For the children, circles were both a positive, affirmatory experience and a restraint, wherein discipline…

  11. T cell receptor gene deletion circles identify recent thymic emigrants in the peripheral T cell pool

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Fan-kun; Chen, Chen-lo H.; Six, Adrien; Hockett, Richard D.; Cooper, Max D.

    1999-01-01

    Progenitor cells undergo T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements during their intrathymic differentiation to become T cells. Rearrangements of the variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments of the TCR genes result in deletion of the intervening chromosomal DNA and the formation of circular episomes as a byproduct. Detection of these extrachromosomal excision circles in T cells located in the peripheral lymphoid tissues has been viewed as evidence for the existence of extrathymic T cell generation. Because all of the T cells in chickens apparently are generated in the thymus, we have employed this avian model to determine the fate of the V(D)J deletion circles. In normal animals we identified TCR Vγ-Jγ and Vβ-Dβ deletion circles in the blood, spleen, and intestines, as well as in the thymus. Thymectomy resulted in the gradual loss of these DNA deletion circles in all of the peripheral lymphoid tissues. A quantitative PCR analysis of Vγ1-Jγ1 and Vβ1-Dβ deletion circles in splenic γδ and Vβ1+ αβ T cells indicated that their numbers progressively decline after thymectomy with a half-life of approximately 2 weeks. Although TCR deletion circles therefore cannot be regarded as reliable indicators of in situ V(D)J rearrangement, measuring their levels in peripheral T cell samples can provide a valuable index of newly generated T cells entering the T cell pool. PMID:9990059

  12. Epigenetic Repeat-Induced Gene Silencing in the Chromosomal and Extrachromosomal Contexts in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Mitsuda, Sho-Hei; Shimizu, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    A plasmid bearing both a replication initiation region and a matrix attachment region is spontaneously amplified in transfected mammalian cells and generates plasmid repeats in the extrachromosomal double minutes (DMs) or the chromosomal homogeneously staining region (HSR). Generally, the repeat sequences are subject to repeat-induced gene silencing, the mechanism of which remains to be elucidated. Previous research showed that gene expression from the same plasmid repeat was higher from repeats located at DMs than at the HSR, which may reflect the extrachromosomal environment of the DMs. In the current study, plasmid repeats in both DMs and HSR were associated with repressive histone modifications (H3K9me3, H3K9me2), and the levels of repressive chromatin markers were higher in HSR than in DMs. Inactive chromatin is known to spread to neighboring regions in chromosome arm. Here, we found that such spreading also occurs in extrachromosomal DMs. Higher levels of active histone modifications (H3K9Ac, H3K4me3, and H3K79me2) were detected at plasmid repeats in DMs than in HSR. The level of DNA CpG methylation was generally low in both DMs and HSR; however, there were some hypermethylated copies within the population of repeated sequences, and the frequency of such copies was higher in DMs than in HSR. Together, these data suggest a "DNA methylation-core and chromatin-spread" model for repeat-induced gene silencing. The unique histone modifications at the extrachromosomal context are discussed with regard to the model. PMID:27525955

  13. Epigenetic Repeat-Induced Gene Silencing in the Chromosomal and Extrachromosomal Contexts in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuda, Sho-hei; Shimizu, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    A plasmid bearing both a replication initiation region and a matrix attachment region is spontaneously amplified in transfected mammalian cells and generates plasmid repeats in the extrachromosomal double minutes (DMs) or the chromosomal homogeneously staining region (HSR). Generally, the repeat sequences are subject to repeat-induced gene silencing, the mechanism of which remains to be elucidated. Previous research showed that gene expression from the same plasmid repeat was higher from repeats located at DMs than at the HSR, which may reflect the extrachromosomal environment of the DMs. In the current study, plasmid repeats in both DMs and HSR were associated with repressive histone modifications (H3K9me3, H3K9me2), and the levels of repressive chromatin markers were higher in HSR than in DMs. Inactive chromatin is known to spread to neighboring regions in chromosome arm. Here, we found that such spreading also occurs in extrachromosomal DMs. Higher levels of active histone modifications (H3K9Ac, H3K4me3, and H3K79me2) were detected at plasmid repeats in DMs than in HSR. The level of DNA CpG methylation was generally low in both DMs and HSR; however, there were some hypermethylated copies within the population of repeated sequences, and the frequency of such copies was higher in DMs than in HSR. Together, these data suggest a “DNA methylation-core and chromatin-spread” model for repeat-induced gene silencing. The unique histone modifications at the extrachromosomal context are discussed with regard to the model. PMID:27525955

  14. Induction of differentiation in HL60 cells by the reduction of extrachromosomally amplified c-myc.

    PubMed Central

    Eckhardt, S G; Dai, A; Davidson, K K; Forseth, B J; Wahl, G M; Von Hoff, D D

    1994-01-01

    Oncogene amplification in tumor cells results in the overexpression of proteins that confer a growth advantage in vitro and in vivo. Amplified oncogenes can reside intrachromosomally, within homogeneously staining regions (HSRs), or extrachromosomally, within double minute chromosomes (DMs). Since previous studies have shown that low concentrations of hydroxyurea (HU) can eliminate DMs, we studied the use of HU as a gene-targeting agent in tumor cells containing extrachromosomally amplified oncogenes. In a neuroendocrine cell line (COLO 320), we have shown that HU can eliminate amplified copies of c-myc located on DMs, leading to a reduction in tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. To determine whether the observed reduction in tumorigenicity was due to differentiation, we next investigated whether HU could induce differentiation in HL60 cells containing extrachromosomally amplified c-myc. We compared the effects of HU, as well as two other known differentiating agents (dimethyl sulfoxide and retinoic acid), on c-myc gene copy number, c-myc expression, and differentiation in HL60 cells containing amplified c-myc genes either on DMs or HSRs. We discovered that HU and dimethyl sulfoxide reduced both c-myc gene copy number and expression and induced differentiation in cells containing c-myc amplified on DMs. These agents failed to have similar effects on HL60 cells with amplified c-myc in HSRs. By contrast, retinoic acid induced differentiation independent of the localization of amplified c-myc. These data illustrate the utility of targeting extrachromosomal DNA to modulate tumor phenotype and reveal that both HU and dimethyl sulfoxide induce differentiation in HL60 cells through DM elimination. Images PMID:8022834

  15. Extrachromosomal DNA of pea (Pisum sativum) root-tip cells replicates by strand displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Krimer, D.B.; Van't Hof, J.

    1983-04-01

    In cultured pea roots there is extrachromosomal DNA associated with cells that differentiate from the G/sub 2/ phase of the cell cycle that is absent from those that differentiate from the G/sub 1/ phase. The authors examined this extrachromosomal DNA by electron microscopy and found that it consisted of three types: (i) double-stranded linear molecules with single-stranded branches (74%), (ii) double-stranded molecules without branches (26%), and (iii) free single-stranded molecules. The double-stranded molecules with or without branches were similar in length, having a modal length of 10-15 ..mu..m. The free single-stranded molecules were shorter and had a mean length of 3.8 ..mu..m. The length of the branches attached to the duplex molecules was only slightly less than that of the free form. The duplex molecules with branches were interpreted as configurations reflecting an ongoing strand-displacement process that results in free single-stranded molecules. Finally, measurements on duplex molecules with multiple branches suggested that the extrachromosomal DNA may exist in the form of tandemly repeated sequences. 8 references, 8 figures.

  16. Beyond the chromosome: the prevalence of unique extra-chromosomal bacteriophages with integrated virulence genes in pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Utter, Bryan; Deutsch, Douglas R; Schuch, Raymond; Winer, Benjamin Y; Verratti, Kathleen; Bishop-Lilly, Kim; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Fischetti, Vincent A

    2014-01-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus, the disease impact of chromosomally integrated prophages on virulence is well described. However, the existence of extra-chromosomal prophages, both plasmidial and episomal, remains obscure. Despite the recent explosion in bacterial and bacteriophage genomic sequencing, studies have failed to specifically focus on extra-chromosomal elements. We selectively enriched and sequenced extra-chromosomal DNA from S. aureus isolates using Roche-454 technology and uncovered evidence for the widespread distribution of multiple extra-chromosomal prophages (ExPΦs) throughout both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant strains. We completely sequenced one such element comprised of a 43.8 kbp, circular ExPΦ (designated ФBU01) from a vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) strain. Assembly and annotation of ФBU01 revealed a number of putative virulence determinants encoded within a bacteriophage immune evasion cluster (IEC). Our identification of several potential ExPΦs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) also revealed numerous putative virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes. We describe here a previously unidentified level of genetic diversity of stealth extra-chromosomal elements in S. aureus, including phages with a larger presence outside the chromosome that likely play a prominent role in pathogenesis and strain diversity driven by horizontal gene transfer (HGT). PMID:24963913

  17. Quantization on the circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merad, M.

    2006-05-01

    We present, via the path-integral approach, the quantum study of a particle without spin constrained to move on a circle and subjected to the action of an external field (V, A). In the first stage, we follow the Faddeev-Senjanovic constraints technique that is essentially based on the Dirac algorithm; and in the second stage, we use the path-integral coherent state relative to the circle, compatible with the topological properties. In the two cases, the free particle and the problem of the magnetic field are shown as an illustrative calculation.

  18. A stem-loop structure, sequence non-specific, at the origin of DNA replication of porcine circovirus is essential for termination but not for initiation of rolling-circle DNA replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A stem-loop structure, formed by a pair of inverted repeats during DNA replication, is a conserved feature at the origin of DNA replication among plant and animal viruses, bacteriophages and plasmids that replicate their genomes via the rolling-circle replication (RCR) mechanism. In this work, a hea...

  19. Why Story Circle Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, George Ella

    2016-01-01

    If adult attention is screen scrambled, what about kids, whose brains are still developing? In a world where we are over stimulated and hyperlinked-in we are deprived of the kind of time with a person or experience that deepens and sustains us. Here, poet laureate George Ella Lyon writes that the story circle can be such an experience. A school…

  20. Circling "the Scourge"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Bess

    2005-01-01

    In Kenya alone, where the infection rate is estimated to have reached 13 percent of the population, 27,000 teachers will die and more than 2 million children will lose one or both parents to AIDS in the next five years. The Kenyan project uses "study circles," in which teachers learn together about HIV, script new sexual behaviors for themselves,…

  1. QWL Strategies: Quality Circles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martell, Charles; Tyson, John

    1983-01-01

    Proposes use of quality circles (QCs)--groups of employees who meet to learn and apply techniques for solving problems affecting work or workplace--to involve library employees in decision-making process and improve morale and product/service quality. Basic philosophy, establishment of QC, and QC techniques are noted. Twelve references are…

  2. Collaboration through Study Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Martha L.

    2005-01-01

    Communities are telling inspiring stories about what happens when they use public dialogue and action to involve large numbers of citizens--with the greatest diversity possible--in a search for common ground to resolve tough issues like race, community police relations, and education reform. These efforts, often called "study circles," are…

  3. Review: The Closing Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Two views of prominent biologists are presented side-by-side. Focal point is Barry Commoner's book, The Closing Circle, with a subsequent review by Paul Ehrlich. Growth of population, increases in affluence, and increased pollution from products of technology are considered. (BL)

  4. Japanese Quality Control Circles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishiyama, Kazuo

    In recent years, United States scholars with an interest in international business and organizational communication have begun to notice the success of Japanese "quality control circles." These are small groups, usually composed of seven to ten workers, who are organized at the production levels within most large Japanese factories. A typical…

  5. Circles Inscribed in Rhombuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V.K.

    2013-01-01

    In this teaching oriented article, I am introducing the concept of an equilateral rhombus, which is completely characterized. Three main theorems are given with proofs in Section 2. Most of the time, the rhombuses that are discussed are not squares. For a given circle of a specified radius sigma greater than?0, there is exactly one equilateral…

  6. Inside Larry's Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Alice

    2009-01-01

    Last spring, students from several North Carolina middle schools were invited to participate in the annual Celebrate the Arts festival in Columbus Country. Larry Hewett, a local art teacher, had been selected to instruct the middle-school students. Larry's River Rock Circles project was made as the starting point for the Celebrate the Arts…

  7. Breaking the Sacred Circle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bill, Willard E.

    Intended as a basis for student discussions on American Indian issues, this article provides background on American Indian and Alaskan Native spiritual values and the white man's disruption of the Sacred Circle of Life. The foundation of the philosophies of North American indigenous peoples was the idea of cyclical reaffirmation and the goal of…

  8. Literature Circles Go Digital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, Karen; Faughnan, Michelle; Ham, Susan; Miller, Melissa; Armstrong, Traci; Crandall, Cassandra; Garrison, Julia; Marrone, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a literature circle of seven pre-service teacher education students who read "Al Capone Shines My Shoes" (G. Choldenko, 2009). Students used the Internet to complete their roles, shared what they learned as they discussed the book, and then wrote about the digital experience. Four themes emerged from an analysis of…

  9. VIEW DOWN BIRCH CIRCLE FROM CORNER OF BIRCH CIRCLE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW DOWN BIRCH CIRCLE FROM CORNER OF BIRCH CIRCLE AND ELM DRIVE. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Locating Problems with Quality Circles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Donald D.; Bednar, David A.

    1985-01-01

    Five categories of common quality circles problems are identified to help firms anticipate difficulties and avert circle failures. These categories include encountered internal problems, encountered external problems, created internal problems, created external problems, and interface problems. Solutions are suggested. (CT)

  11. Black Pine Circle Project

    ScienceCinema

    Mytko, Christine

    2014-09-15

    A group of seventh graders from Black Pine Circle school in Berkeley had the opportunity to experience the Advanced Light Source (ALS) as "users" via a collaborative field trip and proposal project. The project culminated with a field trip to the ALS for all seventh graders, which included a visit to the ALS data visualization room, a diffraction demonstration, a beamline tour, and informative sessions about x-rays and tomography presented by ALS scientists.

  12. Black Pine Circle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mytko, Christine

    2014-03-31

    A group of seventh graders from Black Pine Circle school in Berkeley had the opportunity to experience the Advanced Light Source (ALS) as "users" via a collaborative field trip and proposal project. The project culminated with a field trip to the ALS for all seventh graders, which included a visit to the ALS data visualization room, a diffraction demonstration, a beamline tour, and informative sessions about x-rays and tomography presented by ALS scientists.

  13. Visualization and quantitative analysis of extrachromosomal telomere-repeat DNA in individual human cells by Halo-FISH

    PubMed Central

    Komosa, Martin; Root, Heather; Meyn, M. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Current methods for characterizing extrachromosomal nuclear DNA in mammalian cells do not permit single-cell analysis, are often semi-quantitative and frequently biased toward the detection of circular species. To overcome these limitations, we developed Halo-FISH to visualize and quantitatively analyze extrachromosomal DNA in single cells. We demonstrate Halo-FISH by using it to analyze extrachromosomal telomere-repeat (ECTR) in human cells that use the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) pathway(s) to maintain telomere lengths. We find that GM847 and VA13 ALT cells average ∼80 detectable G/C-strand ECTR DNA molecules/nucleus, while U2OS ALT cells average ∼18 molecules/nucleus. In comparison, human primary and telomerase-positive cells contain <5 ECTR DNA molecules/nucleus. ECTR DNA in ALT cells exhibit striking cell-to-cell variations in number (<20 to >300), range widely in length (<1 to >200 kb) and are composed of primarily G- or C-strand telomere-repeat DNA. Halo-FISH enables, for the first time, the simultaneous analysis of ECTR DNA and chromosomal telomeres in a single cell. We find that ECTR DNA comprises ∼15% of telomere-repeat DNA in GM847 and VA13 cells, but <4% in U2OS cells. In addition to its use in ALT cell analysis, Halo-FISH can facilitate the study of a wide variety of extrachromosomal DNA in mammalian cells. PMID:25662602

  14. Visualization and quantitative analysis of extrachromosomal telomere-repeat DNA in individual human cells by Halo-FISH.

    PubMed

    Komosa, Martin; Root, Heather; Meyn, M Stephen

    2015-02-27

    Current methods for characterizing extrachromosomal nuclear DNA in mammalian cells do not permit single-cell analysis, are often semi-quantitative and frequently biased toward the detection of circular species. To overcome these limitations, we developed Halo-FISH to visualize and quantitatively analyze extrachromosomal DNA in single cells. We demonstrate Halo-FISH by using it to analyze extrachromosomal telomere-repeat (ECTR) in human cells that use the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) pathway(s) to maintain telomere lengths. We find that GM847 and VA13 ALT cells average ∼80 detectable G/C-strand ECTR DNA molecules/nucleus, while U2OS ALT cells average ∼18 molecules/nucleus. In comparison, human primary and telomerase-positive cells contain <5 ECTR DNA molecules/nucleus. ECTR DNA in ALT cells exhibit striking cell-to-cell variations in number (<20 to >300), range widely in length (<1 to >200 kb) and are composed of primarily G- or C-strand telomere-repeat DNA. Halo-FISH enables, for the first time, the simultaneous analysis of ECTR DNA and chromosomal telomeres in a single cell. We find that ECTR DNA comprises ∼15% of telomere-repeat DNA in GM847 and VA13 cells, but <4% in U2OS cells. In addition to its use in ALT cell analysis, Halo-FISH can facilitate the study of a wide variety of extrachromosomal DNA in mammalian cells. PMID:25662602

  15. Introducing healing circles and talking circles into primary care.

    PubMed

    Mehl-Madrona, Lewis; Mainguy, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    We report on the incorporation of a North American aboriginal procedure called "the talking circle" into primary care in areas serving this population. Communication is regulated through the passing of a talking piece (an object of special meaning or symbolism to the circle facilitator, who is usually called the circle keeper). Twelve hundred people participated in talking circles in which 415 attended 4 sessions and completed pre- and postquestionnaires. Outcome measures included baseline and end Measure Your Medical Outcome Profile version 2 forms. Participation in at least 4 talking circles resulted in a statistically significant improvement in reported symptoms and overall quality of life (p < 0.001 and effect sizes ranging from 0.75 to 1.19). The talking circle is a useful tool to use with Native Americans. It may be useful as a means to reduce health care costs by providing other alternative settings to deal with stress-related and other life problems. PMID:24867544

  16. Extrachromosomal recombination substrates recapitulate beyond 12/23 restricted VDJ recombination in nonlymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, David; Bassing, Craig H; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Cheng, Hwei-Ling; Schatz, David G; Alt, Frederick W

    2003-01-01

    V(D)J recombination occurs efficiently only between gene segments flanked by recombination signals (RSs) containing 12 and 23 base pair spacers (the 12/23 rule). A further limitation "beyond the 12/23 rule" (B12/23) exists at the TCRbeta locus and ensures Dbeta usage. Herein, we show that extrachromosomal V(D)J recombination substrates recapitulate B12/23 restriction in nonlymphoid cells. We further demonstrate that the Vbeta coding flank, the 12-RS heptamer/nonamer, and the 23-RS spacer each can significantly influence B12/23 restriction. Finally, purified core RAG1 and RAG2 proteins (together with HMG2) also reproduce B12/23 restriction in a cell-free system. Our findings indicate that B12/23 restriction of V(D)J recombination is cemented at the level of interactions between the RAG proteins and TCRbeta RS sequences. PMID:12530976

  17. Oxidative stress and starvation in Dinoroseobacter shibae: the role of extrachromosomal elements

    PubMed Central

    Soora, Maya; Tomasch, Jürgen; Wang, Hui; Michael, Victoria; Petersen, Jörn; Engelen, Bert; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Cypionka, Heribert

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAP) are abundant in the photic zone of the marine environment. Dinoroseobacter shibae, a representative of the Roseobacter group, converts light into additional energy that enhances its survival especially under starvation. However, light exposure results in the production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species in AAPs. Here we investigated the response of D. shibae to starvation and oxidative stress, focusing on the role of extrachromosomal elements (ECRs). D. shibae possessing five ECRs (three plasmids and two chromids) was starved for 4 weeks either in the dark or under light/dark cycles and the survival was monitored. Transcriptomics showed that on the chromosome genes with a role in oxidative stress response and photosynthesis were differentially expressed during the light period. Most extrachromosomal genes in contrast showed a general loss of transcriptional activity, especially in dark-starved cells. The observed decrease of gene expression was not due to plasmid loss, as all five ECRs were maintained in the cells. Interestingly, the genes on the 72-kb chromid were the least downregulated, and one region with genes of the oxygen stress response and a light-dependent protochlorophyllide reductase of cyanobacterial origin was strongly activated under the light/dark cycle. A Δ72-kb curing mutant lost the ability to survive under starvation in a light/dark cycle demonstrating the essential role of this chromid for adaptation to starvation and oxidative stress. Our data moreover suggest that the other four ECRs of D. shibae have no vital function under the investigated conditions and therefore were transcriptionally silenced. PMID:25859246

  18. Characterization of Rhizobium grahamii extrachromosomal replicons and their transfer among rhizobia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rhizobium grahamii belongs to a new phylogenetic group of rhizobia together with Rhizobium mesoamericanum and other species. R. grahamii has a broad-host-range that includes Leucaena leucocephala and Phaseolus vulgaris, although it is a poor competitor for P. vulgaris nodulation in the presence of Rhizobium etli or Rhizobium phaseoli strains. This work analyzed the genome sequence and transfer properties of R. grahamii plasmids. Results Genome sequence was obtained from R. grahamii CCGE502 type strain isolated from Dalea leporina in Mexico. The CCGE502 genome comprises one chromosome and two extrachromosomal replicons (ERs), pRgrCCGE502a and pRgrCCGE502b. Additionally, a plasmid integrated in the CCGE502 chromosome was found. The genomic comparison of ERs from this group showed that gene content is more variable than average nucleotide identity (ANI). Well conserved nod and nif genes were found in R. grahamii and R. mesoamericanum with some differences. R. phaseoli Ch24-10 genes expressed in bacterial cells in roots were found to be conserved in pRgrCCGE502b. Regarding conjugative transfer we were unable to transfer the R. grahamii CCGE502 symbiotic plasmid and its megaplasmid to other rhizobial hosts but we could transfer the symbiotic plasmid to Agrobacterium tumefaciens with transfer dependent on homoserine lactones. Conclusion Variable degrees of nucleotide identity and gene content conservation were found among the different R. grahamii CCGE502 replicons in comparison to R. mesoamericanum genomes. The extrachromosomal replicons from R. grahamii were more similar to those found in phylogenetically related Rhizobium species. However, limited similarities of R. grahamii CCGE502 symbiotic plasmid and megaplasmid were observed in other more distant Rhizobium species. The set of conserved genes in R. grahamii comprises some of those that are highly expressed in R. phaseoli on plant roots, suggesting that they play an important role in root colonization

  19. Nonselective Persistence of a Rickettsia conorii Extrachromosomal Plasmid during Mammalian Infection.

    PubMed

    Riley, Sean P; Fish, Abigail I; Garza, Daniel A; Banajee, Kaikhushroo H; Harris, Emma K; del Piero, Fabio; Martinez, Juan J

    2016-03-01

    Scientific analysis of the genus Rickettsia is undergoing a rapid period of change with the emergence of viable genetic tools. The development of these tools for the mutagenesis of pathogenic bacteria will permit forward genetic analysis of Rickettsia pathogenesis. Despite these advances, uncertainty still remains regarding the use of plasmids to study these bacteria in in vivo mammalian models of infection, namely, the potential for virulence changes associated with the presence of extrachromosomal DNA and nonselective persistence of plasmids in mammalian models of infection. Here, we describe the transformation of Rickettsia conorii Malish 7 with the plasmid pRam18dRGA[AmTrCh]. Transformed R. conorii stably maintains this plasmid in infected cell cultures, expresses the encoded fluorescent proteins, and exhibits growth kinetics in cell culture similar to those of nontransformed R. conorii. Using a well-established murine model of fatal Mediterranean spotted fever, we demonstrate that R. conorii(pRam18dRGA[AmTrCh]) elicits the same fatal outcomes in animals as its untransformed counterpart and, importantly, maintains the plasmid throughout infection in the absence of selective antibiotic pressure. Interestingly, plasmid-transformed R. conorii was readily observed both in endothelial cells and within circulating leukocytes. Together, our data demonstrate that the presence of an extrachromosomal DNA element in a pathogenic rickettsial species does not affect either in vitro proliferation or in vivo infectivity in models of disease and that plasmids such as pRam18dRGA[AmTrCh] are valuable tools for the further genetic manipulation of pathogenic rickettsiae. PMID:26755154

  20. Circle of Ashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Circle of Ashes

    This plot tells astronomers that a pulsar, the remnant of a stellar explosion, is surrounded by a disk of its own ashes. The disk, revealed by the two data points at the far right from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, is the first ever found around a pulsar. Astronomers believe planets might rise up out of these stellar ashes.

    The data in this plot, or spectrum, were taken by ground-based telescopes and Spitzer. They show that light from around the pulsar can be divided into two categories: direct light from the pulsar, and light from the dusty disk swirling around the pulsar. This excess light was detected by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Dust gives off more infrared light than the pulsar because it's cooler.

    The pulsar, called 4U 0142+61, was once a massive star, until about 100,000 years ago, when it blew up in a supernova explosion and scattered dusty debris into space. Some of that debris was captured into what astronomers refer to as a 'fallback disk,' now circling the leftover stellar core, or pulsar. The disk resembles protoplanetary disks around young stars, out of which planets are thought to be born.

    The data have been corrected to remove the effects of light scattering from dust that lies between Earth and the pulsar.

    The ground-based data is from the Keck I telescope atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

  1. Introducing Healing Circles and Talking Circles into Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Mehl-Madrona, Lewis; Mainguy, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    We report on the incorporation of a North American aboriginal procedure called “the talking circle” into primary care in areas serving this population. Communication is regulated through the passing of a talking piece (an object of special meaning or symbolism to the circle facilitator, who is usually called the circle keeper). Twelve hundred people participated in talking circles in which 415 attended 4 sessions and completed pre- and postquestionnaires. Outcome measures included baseline and end Measure Your Medical Outcome Profile version 2 forms. Participation in at least 4 talking circles resulted in a statistically significant improvement in reported symptoms and overall quality of life (p < 0.001 and effect sizes ranging from 0.75 to 1.19). The talking circle is a useful tool to use with Native Americans. It may be useful as a means to reduce health care costs by providing other alternative settings to deal with stress-related and other life problems. PMID:24867544

  2. Transaction Circles with Digital Texts as a Foundation for Democratic Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Transaction circles weave together elements of guided reading and literature circles in an open conversational structure that supports students as agentive learners. Discourse within these circles utilizing digital informational texts assist in the development of democratic practices even in a time when federal mandates limit curricula and…

  3. Structuring waveguide-grating-based wavelength-division multiplexing/optical code division multiple access network codecs over topology of concentric circles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jen-Fa; Nieh, Ta-Chun; Chen, Kai-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The cyclic period and free spectral range of arrayed-waveguide gratings (AWG) in a wavelength-division multiplexing/optical code division multiple access optical code division multiple access network are exploited. The total optical network unit (ONU) of network capacity is partitioned into groups of different wavelength in accordance with the geographical location of subscribers based on the radial distance of the ONU to the optical line terminal. Combining concentric circles round by round for ONU groups enables a fixed round-trip time in the data transmission and a significant increase in system performance. Using AWG router, the proposed topology of concentric circles retains signature orthogonality and minimizes wavelength collisions on the photo-detector. Furthermore, the adoption of extended M-sequence codes corresponding to the AWG codec provides a simpler, more efficient coding procedure and accommodates more users in a single group.

  4. Function of circle of Willis

    PubMed Central

    Vrselja, Zvonimir; Brkic, Hrvoje; Mrdenovic, Stefan; Radic, Radivoje; Curic, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 400 years ago, Thomas Willis described the arterial ring at the base of the brain (the circle of Willis, CW) and recognized it as a compensatory system in the case of arterial occlusion. This theory is still accepted. We present several arguments that via negativa should discard the compensatory theory. (1) Current theory is anthropocentric; it ignores other species and their analog structures. (2) Arterial pathologies are diseases of old age, appearing after gene propagation. (3) According to the current theory, evolution has foresight. (4) Its commonness among animals indicates that it is probably a convergent evolutionary structure. (5) It was observed that communicating arteries are too small for effective blood flow, and (6) missing or hypoplastic in the majority of the population. We infer that CW, under physiologic conditions, serves as a passive pressure dissipating system; without considerable blood flow, pressure is transferred from the high to low pressure end, the latter being another arterial component of CW. Pressure gradient exists because pulse wave and blood flow arrive into the skull through different cerebral arteries asynchronously, due to arterial tree asymmetry. Therefore, CW and its communicating arteries protect cerebral artery and blood–brain barrier from hemodynamic stress. PMID:24473483

  5. Tandem Repeats in Extrachromosomal Ribosomal DNA of Dictyostelium Discoideum, Resulting from Chromosomal Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Cole, R. A.; Williams, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA in the simple eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum is readily separated from chromosomal DNA by orthogonal field electrophoresis (OFAGE), forming a prominent band in the 110-kb region of the gel. Here we show that mutations in at least two chromosomal genes give rise to a ladder of rDNA bands increasing in size up to about 300 kb. One of these mutations, the rrcA350 allele, which is recessive to wild type and maps to the centromere-proximal region of linkage group II, has an unstable phenotype; spontaneous revertants, which no longer exhibit the rDNA ladder, have been recovered. Another mutation rrc-351, provisionally mapped to linkage group IV, is dominant to wild type. The rDNA ladder is caused by concatamerization of a 34-kb fragment in the nontranscribed central spacer region of the 88-kb linear rDNA palindrome. Restriction enzyme analysis has revealed that each concatamer is generated by crossovers between two rDNA molecules. PMID:1582557

  6. Amplicon rearrangements during the extrachromosomal and intrachromosomal amplification process in a glioma

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Nicolas; Gibaud, Anne; Lemoine, Frédéric; de la Grange, Pierre; Debatisse, Michelle; Malfoy, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of gene amplification in tumour cells are poorly understood and the relationship between extrachromosomal DNA molecules, named double minutes (dmins), and intrachromosomal homogeneously staining regions (hsr) is not documented at nucleotide resolution. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization and whole genome sequencing, we studied a xenografted human oligodendroglioma where the co-amplification of the EGFR and MYC loci was present in the form of dmins at early passages and of an hsr at later passages. The amplified regions underwent multiple rearrangements and deletions during the formation of the dmins and their transformation into hsr. In both forms of amplification, non-homologous end-joining and microhomology-mediated end-joining rather than replication repair mechanisms prevailed in fusions. Small fragments, some of a few tens of base pairs, were associated in contigs. They came from clusters of breakpoints localized hundreds of kilobases apart in the amplified regions. The characteristics of some pairs of junctions suggest that at least some fragments were not fused randomly but could result from the concomitant repair of neighbouring breakpoints during the interaction of remote DNA sequences. This characterization at nucleotide resolution of the transition between extra- and intrachromosome amplifications highlights a hitherto uncharacterized organization of the amplified regions suggesting the involvement of new mechanisms in their formation. PMID:25378339

  7. Development of an extrachromosomal cloning vector system for use in Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Sartakova, M; Dobrikova, E; Cabello, F C

    2000-04-25

    Molecular genetic analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi, the cause of Lyme disease, has been hampered by the absence of any means of efficient generation, identification, and complementation of chromosomal and plasmid null gene mutants. The similarity of borrelial G + C content to that of Gram-positive organisms suggested that a wide-host-range plasmid active in Gram-positive bacteria might also be recognized by borrelial DNA replication machinery. One such plasmid, pGK12, is able to propagate in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and carries erythromycin and chloramphenicol resistance markers. pGK12 propagated extrachromosomally in B. burgdorferi B31 after electroporation but conferred only erythromycin resistance. pGK12 was used to express enhanced green fluorescent protein in B31 under the control of the flaB promoter. Escherichia coli transformed with pGK12 DNA extracted from B31 expressing only erythromycin resistance developed both erythromycin and chloramphenicol resistance, and plasmid DNA isolated from these transformed E. coli had a restriction pattern similar to the original pGK12. Our data indicate that the replicons of pGK12 can provide the basis to continue developing efficient genetic systems for B. burgdorferi together with the erythromycin resistance and reporter egfp genes. PMID:10781091

  8. Chromosomally and Extrachromosomally Mediated High-Level Gentamicin Resistance in Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Sendi, Parham; Furitsch, Martina; Mauerer, Stefanie; Florindo, Carlos; Kahl, Barbara C; Shabayek, Sarah; Berner, Reinhard; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus [GBS]) is a leading cause of sepsis in neonates. The rate of invasive GBS disease in nonpregnant adults also continues to climb. Aminoglycosides alone have little or no effect on GBS, but synergistic killing with penicillin has been shown in vitro. High-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) in GBS isolates, however, leads to the loss of a synergistic effect. We therefore performed a multicenter study to determine the frequency of HLGR GBS isolates and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms leading to gentamicin resistance. From eight centers in four countries, 1,128 invasive and colonizing GBS isolates were pooled and investigated for the presence of HLGR. We identified two strains that displayed HLGR (BSU1203 and BSU452), both of which carried the aacA-aphD gene, typically conferring HLGR. However, only one strain (BSU1203) also carried the previously described chromosomal gentamicin resistance transposon designated Tn3706. For the other strain (BSU452), plasmid purification and subsequent DNA sequencing resulted in the detection of plasmid pIP501 carrying a remnant of a Tn3 family transposon. Its ability to confer HLGR was proven by transfer into an Enterococcus faecalis isolate. Conversely, loss of HLGR was documented after curing both GBS BSU452 and the transformed E. faecalis strain from the plasmid. This is the first report showing plasmid-mediated HLGR in GBS. Thus, in our clinical GBS isolates, HLGR is mediated both chromosomally and extrachromosomally. PMID:26729498

  9. Introducing Motion in a Circle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, John

    2001-01-01

    Motion in a circle troubled Newton and his contemporaries and troubles students today. Presents a clear presentation of certain aspects, particularly centripetal acceleration and centrifugal force. (Author/MM)

  10. Director Circles of Conic Sections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2002-01-01

    Given a conic section, the locus of a moving point in the plane of the conic section such that the two tangent lines drawn to the conic section from the moving point are all mutually perpendicular is a curve. In the case of an ellipse and hyperbola this curve is a circle referred to as the director circle. In the case of the parabola this curve…

  11. Induction of circles of heterogeneous sizes in carcinogen-treated cells: two-dimensional gel analysis of circular DNA molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, S; Lavi, S

    1996-01-01

    Extrachromosomal circular DNA molecules are associated with genomic instability, and circles containing inverted repeats were suggested to be the early amplification products. Here we present for the first time the use of neutral-neutral two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis as a technique for the identification, isolation, and characterization of heterogeneous populations of circular molecules. Using this technique, we demonstrated that in N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-treated simian virus 40-transformed Chinese hamster cells (CO60 cells), the viral sequences are amplified as circular molecules of various sizes. The supercoiled circular fraction was isolated and was shown to contain molecules with inverted repeats. 2D gel analysis of extrachromosomal DNA from CHO cells revealed circular molecules containing highly repetitive DNA which are similar in size to the simian virus 40-amplified molecules. Moreover, enhancement of the amount of circular DNA was observed upon N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine treatment of CHO cells. The implications of these findings regarding the processes of gene amplification and genomic instability and the possible use of the 2D gel technique to study these phenomena are discussed. PMID:8628266

  12. Study Circle Guide: Adult Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL), 2006

    2006-01-01

    This study circle was created by the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL). The study circle is part of NCSALL's efforts to help connect research and practice in the field of adult basic education and adult literacy. The Adult Student Persistence Study Circle is one of a series of study circles that NCSALL has…

  13. Two Circles and Their Common Tangents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2002-01-01

    Given two circles C 1 and C 2 in a plane such that neither one of the two circles is contained in the other, there are either four common tangents when the circles do not intersect at all or the circles have three common tangents when they touch each other externally or only two common tangents when the circles intersect exactly at two points. The…

  14. Regulation and targeting of recombination in extrachromosomal substrates carrying immunoglobulin switch region sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, H; Maizels, N

    1994-01-01

    We have used extrachromosomal substrates carrying immunoglobulin heavy-chain S mu and S gamma 3 switch region sequences to study activation and targeting of recombination by a transcriptional enhancer element. Substrates are transiently introduced into activated primary murine B cells, in which recombination involving S-region sequences deletes a conditionally lethal marker, and recombination is measured by transformation of Escherichia coli in the second step of the assay. Previously we found that as many as 25% of replicated substrates recombined during 40-h transfection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated primary cells and that efficient recombination was dependent on the presence of S-region sequences as well as a transcriptional activator region in the constructs (H. Leung and N. Maizels, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89:4154-4158, 1992). Here we show that recombination of the switch substrates is threefold more efficient in LPS-cultured primary B cells than in the T-cell line EL4; the activities responsible for switch substrate recombination thus appear to be more abundant or more active in cells which can carry out chromosomal switch recombination. We test the role of the transcriptional activator region and show that the immunoglobulin heavy-chain intron enhancer (E mu) alone stimulates recombination as well as E mu combined with a heavy-chain promoter and that mutations that diminish enhancer-dependent transcription 500-fold diminish recombinational activation less than 2-fold. These observations suggest that the enhancer stimulates recombination by a mechanism that does not depend on transcript production or that is insensitive to the level of transcript production over a very broad range. Furthermore, we find that E mu stimulates recombination when located either upstream or downstream of S mu but that the position of the recombinational activator does affect the targeting of recombination junctions, suggesting that the relatively imprecise targeting of

  15. Son-Killer: A Third Extrachromosomal Factor Affecting the Sex Ratio in the Parasitoid Wasp, NASONIA (=MORMONIELLA) VITRIPENNIS

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Samuel Way

    1985-01-01

    An extrachromosomal factor, termed son-killer (sk), affects the sex ratio in a parasitoid wasp, Nasonia (=Mormoniella ) vitripennis. The factor is maternally transmitted and alters the secondary sex ratio of an infected female through mortality of approximately 80% of the male embryos. No effect on the primary (zygotic) sex ratio is observed. Ninety-five percent of the daughters of an infected female inherit son-killer. The factor can also be transmitted contagiously when the progeny of infected and uninfected females develop simultaneously on a single host. In newly infected strains, the sex ratio effects are equivalent to those in the original. PMID:3988039

  16. The Circle Approach to Trigonometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kevin c.; LaForest, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    How do students think about an angle measure of ninety degrees? How do they think about ratios and values on the unit circle? How might angle measure be used to connect right-triangle trigonometry and circular functions? And why might asking these questions be important when introducing trigonometric functions to students? When teaching…

  17. Making Decisions in Quality Circles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Mildred

    This monograph provides educational staff with a theoretical basis for decision-making skills for application in quality circles. Roadblocks to good decisions are outlined, as well as the differences between group decision-making and individual decision-making (both have problems). The influence of values and personality characteristics on…

  18. Charlotte Circle Outreach. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Mary Lynne; Rose, Terry L.; Prendergast, Donna

    This final report details the activities of the Charlotte Circle Outreach, a program designed to provide technical assistance and training to early intervention programs offering services to infants and young children with substantial disabilities, ages birth through two years. This mission was accomplished through cooperative planning with…

  19. On a Family of Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeman, Timothy G.

    2011-01-01

    We generalize a standard example from precalculus and calculus texts to give a simple description in polar coordinates of any circle that passes through the origin. We discuss an occurrence of this formula in the context of medical imaging. (Contains 1 figure.)

  20. On the Circle of Apollonius

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayoub, Ayoub B.

    2006-01-01

    The circle discussed in this paper is named after "The Great Geometer of Antiquity", that is Apollonius of Perga (ca. 262-190 BCE). Among his many contributions to geometry is a book with the title "Plane Loci." This book included, among others, a problem about the locus of a point moving in a plane such that the ratio of its distances from two…

  1. Digital Storytelling: Reinventing Literature Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Maryann Tatum

    2012-01-01

    New literacies in reading research demand the study of comprehension skills using multiple modalities through a more complex, multi-platform view of reading. Taking into account the robust roll of technology in our daily lives, this article presents an update to the traditional literature circle lesson to include digital storytelling and…

  2. Cervical keratinocytes containing stably replicating extrachromosomal HPV-16 are refractory to transformation by oncogenic H-Ras

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Kristi L.; Barriga, Felicia; Lace, Michael J.; Turek, Lubomir P.; Zamba, Gideon J.; Domann, Frederick E.; Lee, John H.; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.

    2007-01-01

    Ras expression in human epithelial cells with integrated HPV genomes has been shown to cause tumorigenic transformation. The effects of Ras in cells representing early stage HPV-associated disease (i.e., when HPV is extrachromosomal and the oncogenes are under control of native promoters) have not been examined. Here, we used human cervical keratinocyte cell lines containing stably replicating extrachromosomal HPV-16 and present the novel finding that these cells resist transformation by oncogenic H-Ras. Ras expression consistently diminished anchorageindependent growth (AI), reduced E6 and E7 expression, and caused p53 induction in these cells. Conversely, AI was enhanced or maintained in Ras-transduced cervical cells that were immortalized with a 16E6/E7 retrovirus, and minimal effects on E6 and E7 expression were observed. Ras expression with either episomal HPV-16 or LXSN-E6/E7 was insufficient for tumorigenic growth suggesting that other events are needed for tumorigenic transformation. In conclusion, our results indicate that Ras-mediated transformation depends on the context of HPV oncogene expression and that this is an important point to address when developing HPV tumor models. PMID:16945398

  3. Quality circles: Organizational adaptations, improvements and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tortorich, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effective application in industry and government of quality circles work was demonstrated. The results achieved in quality and productivity improvements and cost savings are impressive. The circle process should be institutionalized within industry and government. The stages of circle program growth, innovations that help achieve circle process institutionalization, and the result achieved at Martin Marietta's Michoud Division and within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are addressed.

  4. Yarning Circles in the Literacy Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Kathy A.; Sunderland, Naomi; Davis-Warra, John

    2014-01-01

    This article explains how the speaking and listening practice of yarning circles can be used in the literacy classroom. The article opens with an account of a live enactment of yarning circles with elementary students in a mainstream classroom in Australia. It explains the purpose and origin of yarning circles in Indigenous communities, and…

  5. Science Literacy Circles: Big Ideas about Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devick-Fry, Jane; LeSage, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Science literacy circles incorporate the organization of both science notebooks and literature circles to help K-8 students internalize big ideas about science. Using science literacy circles gives students opportunities to engage in critical thinking as they inductively develop understanding about science concepts. (Contains 1 table and 7…

  6. Creating Circle of Courage Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Bockern, Steve; McDonald, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Dream what a school would be like in which the purpose is to meet the needs of children and the larger community so that all can lead a good life. Using the Circle of Courage[TM]--a model grounded in values of deep respect for the dignity of all--the authors of this article outline overarching goals and indicators that can turn this dream into…

  7. Resistance of Spiroplasma citri Lines to the Virus SVTS2 Is Associated with Integration of Viral DNA Sequences into Host Chromosomal and Extrachromosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Y.; Melcher, U.; Davis, R. E.; Fletcher, J.

    1995-01-01

    Spiroplasmavirus SVTS2, isolated from Spiroplasma melliferum TS2, produces plaques when inoculated onto lawns of Spiroplasma citri M200H, a derivative of the type strain Maroc R8A2. S. citri strains MR2 and MR3, originally selected as colonies growing within plaques on a lawn of M200H inoculated with SVTS2, were resistant to SVTS2. Genomic DNA fingerprints and electrophoretic protein profiles of M200H, MR2, and MR3 were similar, but three proteins present in M200H were missing or significantly reduced in both resistant lines. None of these three polypeptides reacted with antiserum against S. citri membrane proteins, indicating that they probably are not surface-located virus receptors. Electroporation with SVTS2 DNA produced 1.5 x 10(sup5) transfectants per (mu)g of DNA in M200H but none in MR2 or MR3, suggesting that resistance may result from inhibition of viral replication. The digestion patterns of the extrachromosomal double-stranded (ds) DNA of these lines were similar. Three TaqI fragments of MR2 extrachromosomal DNA that were not present in M200H extrachromosomal DNA hybridized strongly to an SVTS2 probe, and two of these fragments plus an additional one hybridized with the MR3 extrachromosomal DNA, indicating that a fragment of SVTS2 DNA was present in the extrachromosomal ds DNA of MR2 and MR3 but not of M200H. When the restricted genomes of all three lines were probed with SVTS2 DNA, strong hybridization to two EcoRI fragments of chromosomal MR2 and MR3 DNA but not M200H DNA indicated that SVTS2 DNA had integrated into the genomes of MR2 and MR3 but not of M200H. When MR3 extrachromosomal ds DNA containing a 2.1-kb SVTS2 DNA fragment was transfected into M200H, the transformed spiroplasmas were resistant to SVTS2. These results suggest that SVTS2 DNA fragments, possibly integrated into the chromosomal or extrachromosomal DNA of a previously susceptible spiroplasma, may function as viral incompatibility elements, providing resistance to superinfection by

  8. Structures of replication initiation proteins from staphylococcal antibiotic resistance plasmids reveal protein asymmetry and flexibility are necessary for replication

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Stephen B.; Phillips, Simon E.V.; Thomas, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a continual threat to human health, often residing in extrachromosomal plasmid DNA. Plasmids of the pT181 family are widespread and confer various antibiotic resistances to Staphylococcus aureus. They replicate via a rolling circle mechanism that requires a multi-functional, plasmid-encoded replication protein to initiate replication, recruit a helicase to the site of initiation and terminate replication after DNA synthesis is complete. We present the first atomic resolution structures of three such replication proteins that reveal distinct, functionally relevant conformations. The proteins possess a unique active site and have been shown to contain a catalytically essential metal ion that is bound in a manner distinct from that of any other rolling circle replication proteins. These structures are the first examples of the Rep_trans Pfam family providing insights into the replication of numerous antibiotic resistance plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative phage and the mobilisation of DNA by conjugative transposons. PMID:26792891

  9. Structures of replication initiation proteins from staphylococcal antibiotic resistance plasmids reveal protein asymmetry and flexibility are necessary for replication.

    PubMed

    Carr, Stephen B; Phillips, Simon E V; Thomas, Christopher D

    2016-03-18

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a continual threat to human health, often residing in extrachromosomal plasmid DNA. Plasmids of the pT181 family are widespread and confer various antibiotic resistances to Staphylococcus aureus. They replicate via a rolling circle mechanism that requires a multi-functional, plasmid-encoded replication protein to initiate replication, recruit a helicase to the site of initiation and terminate replication after DNA synthesis is complete. We present the first atomic resolution structures of three such replication proteins that reveal distinct, functionally relevant conformations. The proteins possess a unique active site and have been shown to contain a catalytically essential metal ion that is bound in a manner distinct from that of any other rolling circle replication proteins. These structures are the first examples of the Rep_trans Pfam family providing insights into the replication of numerous antibiotic resistance plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative phage and the mobilisation of DNA by conjugative transposons. PMID:26792891

  10. Soma to germline inheritance of extrachromosomal genetic information via a LINE-1 reverse transcriptase-based mechanism.

    PubMed

    Spadafora, Corrado

    2016-08-01

    Mature spermatozoa are permeable to foreign DNA and RNA molecules. Here I propose a model, whereby extrachromosomal genetic information, mostly encoded in the form of RNA in somatic cells, can cross the Weismann barrier and reach epididymal spermatozoa. LINE-1 retrotransposon-derived reverse transcriptase (RT) can play key roles in the process by expanding the RNA-encoded information. Retrotransposon-encoded RT is stored in mature gametes, is highly expressed in early embryos and undifferentiated cells, and becomes downregulated in differentiated cells. In turn, RT plays a role in developmental control, as its inhibition arrests developmental progression of early embryos with globally altered transcriptomic profiles. Thus, sperm cells act as recipients, and transgenerational vectors of somatically derived genetic information which they pass to the next generation with the potential to modify the fate of the developing embryos. PMID:27315018

  11. A Variant of K-Theory and Topological T-Duality for Real Circle Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomi, Kiyonori

    2015-03-01

    For a space with involutive action, there is a variant of K-theory. Motivated by T-duality in type II orbifold string theory, we establish that a twisted version of the variant enjoys a topological T-duality for Real circle bundles, i.e., circle bundles with real structure.

  12. The Southern Ocean CIRCLE initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, E. J.; Ellis-Evans, J. C.

    2003-04-01

    The circumpolar Southern Ocean is the principal ocean connection between the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, and exerts a profound influence on world climate through ocean circulation and its major role in the global carbon cycle. It is a major repository of biodiversity and also the only ocean system where significant marine living resources are yet to be fully exploited. However, this key component of the Earth System is still poorly understood, in part due to the logistical problems of a harsh, remote location and the circumpolar nature of the environment. Circumpolar patterns of variability have now been recognized and the current challenge is to understand how, at a circumpolar scale, this variability is generated, its impact on the regional biogeochemical cycles, its interaction with ecosystem processes and the links to global scale processes. Many of these scientific issues can only be addressed by Southern Ocean scale studies, and although a range of national and international research programmes are already targeting particular aspects, the research effort is largely uncoordinated. The European Polar Board is sponsoring a pan-European initiative (Southern Ocean CIRCLE) to coordinate the currently disparate Southern Ocean research effort and this initiative aims to address climate variability, biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem dynamics with particular reference to the links between these aspects in the circumpolar Southern Ocean. This poster outlines the development of the SO CIRCLE initiative, the major areas of science and proposals for implementation. It also outlines how SO CIRCLE will link to other programmes with a Southern Ocean component (e.g. CLIVAR, CliC, GLOBEC, SOLAS). A key aspect of the initiative will be to coordinate European scientific effort in the Southern Ocean with that of the wider international community.

  13. Circle detection using scan lines and histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Zhang, Feng; Du, Zhenhong; Liu, Renyi

    2013-11-01

    Circle detection is significant in image processing and pattern recognition. We present a new algorithm for detecting circles, which is based on the global geometric symmetry of circles. First, the horizontal and vertical midpoint histograms of the edge image are obtained by using scan lines. Then, we apply the peak-finding algorithm to the midpoint histograms to look for the center of the circle. The normalized radius histogram is finally used to verify the existence of the circle and extract its radius. Synthetic images with different levels of pepper noise and real images containing several circles have been taken to test the performance. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm has the advantage of computational efficiency as compared with the randomized Hough transform and some other algorithms.

  14. Assessment of the Circle of Willis with Cranial Tomography Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Karatas, Ayse; Coban, Gokmen; Cinar, Celal; Oran, Ismail; Uz, Aysun

    2015-01-01

    Background The circle of Willis is a major collateral pathway important in ischemic conditions. The aim of our study was to assess the structural characteristics of the circle of Willis within the Turkish adult population, along with variations and arteries involved in the measurement of diameters and lengths on cranial computed tomography angiography (CTA). Material/Methods One hundred adult patients who underwent CTA images were evaluated retrospectively. Results Results of the study revealed 82% adult, 17% fetal, and 1% transitional configurations. A complete polygonal structure was observed in 28% of cases. Variations of the circle of Willis were more common in the posterior portion. Hypoplasia was found to be the most common variation and was observed as a maximum in the posterior communicating artery (AComP). Conclusions The patency and size of arteries in the circle of Willis are important in occlusive cerebrovascular diseases and cerebrovascular surgery. Although CTA is an easily accessible non-invasive clinical method for demonstrating the vascular structure, CTA should be evaluated taking into account image resolution quality and difficulties in the identification of small vessels. PMID:26343887

  15. Vortex arrays as emergent collective phenomena for circle swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, A.; Löwen, H.

    2013-03-01

    Collective properties of many rodlike circle swimmers are explored by computer simulations in two spatial dimensions. In the model considered, the center of mass of a single swimmer moves on a circle with radius R. Therefore, the model provides an interpolation between an interacting self-propelled-rod model for linear swimmers (R→∞) and that of interacting passive rotors (R=0). We map out the state diagram for various swimmer densities and radii R. For increasing density, the dilute state is followed by vortices consisting of single particles (singlet-vortex state), where neighboring particles are perpendicularly oriented, and vortices of swimmer pairs (doublet-vortex state). The vortices exhibit strong structural ordering on an array. At higher densities, a slowed rotor fluid with a significant degree of mutual rotation hindrance occurs. The single-particle vortex structure becomes unstable above a threshold in the circling radius R, while pair vortices are stable only for intermediate radii R. A simple theory is proposed to predict the topology of the state diagram. Our results are verifiable for bacterial and artificial rodlike circle swimmers.

  16. The Reading Circle Movement in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spearman, Mindy

    2007-01-01

    In the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries, state-sponsored reading circles provided American teachers with an opportunity for low-cost professional development. Teachers who participated in reading circles read professional literature, discussed the material with colleagues, and, occasionally, completed written assignments based on the…

  17. Drum Circles and the National Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidyk, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The beauty of hand drums is that a child of nearly any age can grab one and get a sound. So how can classroom teachers incorporate this enjoyable activity into something that's actually educational? For young students especially, a drum circle can be liberating. Children can be given various responsibilities--as participants, circle organizers,…

  18. Building Background Knowledge within Literature Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barone, Diane; Barone, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined the strength of literature circles in developing background knowledge--an acknowledged sticking point in the development of understanding for middle graders--with a special focus on the literature circle role of "investigator," where it is student initiative and not teacher direction that guides comprehension. Observing…

  19. Is that Square Really a Circle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher E.

    2013-01-01

    While teaching a methods class for preservice secondary school mathematics teachers, Christopher E. Smith found that although all students could draw a reasonably close approximation of a circle, not all could provide an entirely accurate definition of a circle. A discussion with students led him to think about ways of reintroducing students to…

  20. Beyond Quality Circles: Self-Managing Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Henry P., Jr.; Dean, James W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    This article reviews the quality circle concept, shows why its characteristics appeal to American executives, and examines some of its limitations. It looks at self-managing teams and discusses the reasons that adoptions have been relatively few. It then shows what organizational conditions are necessary for quality circles to evolve into teams.…

  1. Unit Circles and Inverse Trigonometric Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera, Azael

    2014-01-01

    Historical accounts of trigonometry refer to the works of many Indian and Arab astronomers on the origin of the trigonometric functions as we know them now, in particular Abu al-Wafa (ca. 980 CE), who determined and named all known trigonometric functions from segments constructed on a regular circle and later on a unit circle (Moussa 2011;…

  2. Developing Soft Skills Using "Literature Circles"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azmi, Mohd Nazri Bin Latiff

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of the implementation of "Literature Circles" in an Active Learning classroom in relations to developing soft skills among university students. The use of Literature Circles is a well-known strategy in teaching the students to be more creative, independent, and think out of the box. A group of…

  3. Extrachromosomal homologous DNA recombination in plant cells is fast and is not affected by CpG methylation.

    PubMed Central

    Puchta, H; Kocher, S; Hohn, B

    1992-01-01

    Using a sensitive transient assay, we investigated extrachromosomal homologous DNA recombination (ECR) in plant cells. As the plant genome is highly C methylated, we addressed the question of whether CpG methylation has an influence on DNA recombination efficiencies. Whereas the expression level of the fully CpG-methylated DNA molecules was reduced drastically, we found no significant changes in ECR efficiencies between two partly CpG-methylated plasmids or between one fully CpG-methylated and one nonmethylated plasmid. Using a modified polymerase chain reaction analysis, we were able to detect recombination between two fully CpG-methylated plasmids. Furthermore, we characterized the kinetics of the ECR reaction. Cotransfection of plasmids carrying truncated copies of the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene resulted in enzyme activity with a delay of only half an hour compared with that of the plasmid carrying the functional marker gene. This indicates that the ECR reaction itself requires no more than 30 min. By polymerase chain reaction, we were able to detect the recombined GUS gene as early as 2 h after transfection. This result and the time course of the transient GUS activity indicate that ECR occurs mainly early after transfection. The biological significance of this finding is discussed, and properties of ECR and intrachromosomal recombination are compared. Images PMID:1630452

  4. Small RNA-based feedforward loop with AND-gate logic regulates extrachromosomal DNA transfer in Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Papenfort, Kai; Espinosa, Elena; Casadesús, Josep; Vogel, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer via plasmid conjugation is a major driving force in microbial evolution but constitutes a complex process that requires synchronization with the physiological state of the host bacteria. Although several host transcription factors are known to regulate plasmid-borne transfer genes, RNA-based regulatory circuits for host–plasmid communication remain unknown. We describe a posttranscriptional mechanism whereby the Hfq-dependent small RNA, RprA, inhibits transfer of pSLT, the virulence plasmid of Salmonella enterica. RprA employs two separate seed-pairing domains to activate the mRNAs of both the sigma-factor σS and the RicI protein, a previously uncharacterized membrane protein here shown to inhibit conjugation. Transcription of ricI requires σS and, together, RprA and σS orchestrate a coherent feedforward loop with AND-gate logic to tightly control the activation of RicI synthesis. RicI interacts with the conjugation apparatus protein TraV and limits plasmid transfer under membrane-damaging conditions. To our knowledge, this study reports the first small RNA-controlled feedforward loop relying on posttranscriptional activation of two independent targets and an unexpected role of the conserved RprA small RNA in controlling extrachromosomal DNA transfer. PMID:26307765

  5. Biomechanical analysis of circles on pommel horse.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Toshiyuki; Fuchimoto, Takafumi; Gervais, Pierre

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the principal mechanics of circles. Seventeen university male gymnasts performed circles on an instrumented pommel horse model that enabled the pommel reaction forces to be recorded at 1000 Hz with two force plates. The circles were also videotaped using two digital video cameras operating at 60 frames per second. During circles, the vertical component of the reaction forces peaked in the double-hand support phases. Changes in the velocity of the centre of mass corresponded to the change in the tangential components of horizontal reaction forces. The velocity of the centre of mass had its peaks in the single-hand support phases and its local minimums in the double-hand support phases. The velocity of the ankles and that of the centre of mass of the head and trunk were minimal in the single-hand support phases and were maximal in the double-hand support phases. These results suggest that the circles were composed of vertical movements and two kinds of rotations: rotation of the centre of mass and rotation of the body itself about the centre of mass. These two kinds of rotations, which influence the legs' rotational velocity, are phase dependent. To further our understanding of circles, research on circles in different orientations on the pommel horse will be beneficial. PMID:19391492

  6. Effects of substrate structure on the kinetics of circle opening reactions of the self-splicing intervening sequence from Tetrahymena thermophila: evidence for substrate and Mg2+ binding interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, N; Tomka, M; Kierzek, R; Bevilacqua, P C; Turner, D H

    1989-01-01

    The self-splicing intervening sequence from the precursor rRNA of Tetrahymena thermophila cyclizes to form a covalently closed circle. This circle can be reopened by reaction with oligonucleotides or water. The kinetics of circle opening as a function of substrate and Mg2+ concentrations have been measured for dCrU, rCdU, dCdT, and H2O addition. Comparisons with previous results for rCrU suggest: (1) the 2' OH of the 5' sugar of a dinucleoside phosphate is involved in substrate binding, and (2) the 2' OH of the 3' sugar of a dimer substrate is involved in Mg2+ binding. Evidently, the binding site for a required Mg2+ ion is dependent on both the ribozyme and the dimer substrate. The apparent activation energy and entropy for circle opening by hydrolysis are 31 kcal/mol and 50 eu, respectively. The large, positive activation entropy suggests a partial unfolding of the ribozyme is required for reaction. Images PMID:2643083

  7. [Health education based on culture circles].

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Estela Maria Leite Meirelles; Vieira, Neiva Francenely Cunha

    2010-01-01

    This study aims at systematizing with the participants of Culture Circles a proposal of reconstruction of actions of health education that show the necessary competences to the nurses of Family Health Program for a practice in education on critical and reflexive health. It is constituted of a research action, where the researcher based in "Paulo Freire Method" is encouraging debates in eight Culture Circles having the participation of ten nurses. The Circles give them the training of a political conscience , essential to the process of " empowerment " of the health professional in practicing his socio-politics competence. The proposal of achieving the Culture Circles establish a link of complicity between health professionals and communitarian groups with the actions of health promotion. PMID:20658073

  8. Quality Circles and Health Promotion Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Nicholas; Corry, James M.

    1986-01-01

    This article explores the process of health education program planning, presents the model of quality circles, and examines the variables upon which decisions for or against specific programs are made within an institution. (MT)

  9. The experience of meaning in circle dance

    PubMed Central

    Borges da Costa, Ana L.; Cox, Diane L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Circle dance, which derives from the tradition of folk dances, is practised worldwide. This article explores the meanings participants attribute to it. In-depth interviews with 39 participants, teachers and coordinators of teacher training programmes from the circle dance network in the United Kingdom were undertaken. Applying a constructivist grounded theory approach, major categories, representing respectively the experiences of circle dance participants, teachers and coordinators, were developed. This article specifically focuses on the first major category, termed “I can't imagine life without it”, which relates to the experience of 22 dancers. From an occupational perspective, the study reveals how participants realise a sense of meaning and satisfaction through engagement in circle dance and the potential contribution of this occupation to well-being. PMID:27366111

  10. Teachers' Pets II--Circling Carts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Robert

    1975-01-01

    Describes a demonstration which illustrates that a body moving with constant speed can be accelerating. The students ride in a circle on a cart made with plywood and roller skates and equipped with bubble accelerometers. (MLH)

  11. Dark circles: etiology and management options.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, Daniel P; Goldman, Mitchel P

    2015-01-01

    Given their multifactorial nature and the fact that individual patients may have more than a single underlying cause, cosmetic practitioners should be well versed in a number of potential treatment options encompassing all facets of under-eye dark circles. New therapeutic options are also forthcoming. Longer-lasting HA fillers, wavelength tunable laser devices, and topicals speeding up healing and enhancing results after fractionated laser therapy will all serve to make the future of dark circle treatment unabatedly bright. PMID:25440739

  12. Sets that Contain Their Circle Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Greg

    2008-01-01

    Say that a subset S of the plane is a "circle-center set" if S is not a subset of a line, and whenever we choose three non-collinear points from S, the center of the circle through those three points is also an element of S. A problem appearing on the Macalester College Problem of the Week website stated that a finite set of points in the plane,…

  13. Analysis of the VPE sequences in the Caenorhabditis elegans vit-2 promoter with extrachromosomal tandem array-containing transgenic strains.

    PubMed Central

    MacMorris, M; Spieth, J; Madej, C; Lea, K; Blumenthal, T

    1994-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans vit genes, encoding vitellogenins, are abundantly expressed in the adult hermaphrodite intestine. Two repeated elements, vit promoter element 1 (VPE1 [TGTCAAT]) and VPE2 (CTGATAA), have been identified in the 5' flanking DNA of each of the vit genes of C. elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae. These elements have previously been shown to be needed for correctly regulated expression of a vit-2/vit-6 fusion gene in low-copy-number, integrated transgenes. Here we extend the analysis of the function of VPE1 and VPE2 by using transgenic lines carrying large, extrachromosomal arrays of the test genes. The results validate the use of such arrays for transgenic analysis of gene regulation in C. elegans, by confirming previous findings showing that the VPE1 at -45 and both VPE2s are sites of activation. Additional experiments now indicate that when the -45 VPE1 is inverted or replaced by a VPE2, nearly total loss of promoter function results, suggesting that the highly conserved -45 VPE1 plays a unique role in vit-2 promoter function. In contrast, single mutations eliminating the three upstream VPE1s are without effect. However, in combination in double and triple mutants, these upstream VPE1 mutations cause drastic reductions in expression levels. The -150 VPE2 can be replaced by a XhoI site (CTCGAG), and the -90 VPE2 can be eliminated, as long as the overlapping VPE1 is left intact, but when these two replacements are combined, activity is lost. Thus, the promoter must have at least one VPE2 and it must have at least two VPE1s, one at -45 and one additional upstream element. Images PMID:8264616

  14. Rapid Evolution of Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Xylose Fermentation through Formation of Extra-chromosomal Circular DNA

    PubMed Central

    Demeke, Mekonnen M.; Foulquié-Moreno, María R.; Dumortier, Françoise; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2015-01-01

    Circular DNA elements are involved in genome plasticity, particularly of tandem repeats. However, amplifications of DNA segments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reported so far involve pre-existing repetitive sequences such as ribosomal DNA, Ty elements and Long Terminal Repeats (LTRs). Here, we report the generation of an eccDNA, (extrachromosomal circular DNA element) in a region without any repetitive sequences during an adaptive evolution experiment. We performed whole genome sequence comparison between an efficient D-xylose fermenting yeast strain developed by metabolic and evolutionary engineering, and its parent industrial strain. We found that the heterologous gene XylA that had been inserted close to an ARS sequence in the parent strain has been amplified about 9 fold in both alleles of the chromosomal locus of the evolved strain compared to its parent. Analysis of the amplification process during the adaptive evolution revealed formation of a XylA-carrying eccDNA, pXI2-6, followed by chromosomal integration in tandem arrays over the course of the evolutionary adaptation. Formation of the eccDNA occurred in the absence of any repetitive DNA elements, probably using a micro-homology sequence of 8 nucleotides flanking the amplified sequence. We isolated the pXI2-6 eccDNA from an intermediate strain of the evolutionary adaptation process, sequenced it completely and showed that it confers high xylose fermentation capacity when it is transferred to a new strain. In this way, we have provided clear evidence that gene amplification can occur through generation of eccDNA without the presence of flanking repetitive sequences and can serve as a rapid means of adaptation to selection pressure. PMID:25738959

  15. Characterization of the extrachromosomal function (ECF) sigma factors of Arcobacter butzleri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most commonly reported cause of bacterial foodborne illness in North America. C. jejuni decorates its surface polysaccharides with a variety of variable phosphorylated structures, including O-methyl phosphoramidate (MeOPN) modifications on the capsular polysaccharide. Alt...

  16. Physiological and lifestyle factors contributing to risk and severity of peri-orbital dark circles in the Brazilian population*

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Mary S; Schalka, Sérgio; Vanderover, Garrett; Fthenakis, Christina G.; Christopher, J; Bombarda, Patricia Camarano Pinto; Bueno, Juliana Regina; Viscomi, Bianca Lenci Inácio; Bombarda Júnior, Mário Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Peri-orbital dark circles are a cosmetic concern worldwide, and have been attributed to hyperpigmentation from allergy or atopic dermatitis, blood stasis, structural shadowing effects, and a thin epidermis/dermis under the eye. It is of interest to better understand lifestyle and demographic risk factors and the relative impact of melanin, blood and epidermal/dermal factors on the severity of Peri-orbital dark circles. OBJECTIVE To compare by non-invasive imaging the impact of biological factors to a visual grading scale for Peri-orbital dark circles, and test the correlation of various demographic factors with Peri-orbital dark circles. METHODS Subjects completed a lifestyle and health survey, and Peri-orbital dark circles severity was evaluated using standardized photographs. Hyperspectral image analysis was used to assess the contributions of melanin, blood volume, degree of blood oxygen saturation, and dermal scattering. RESULTS Family history was the most significant risk factor for Peri-orbital dark circles. The average age of onset was 24 years, and earlier onset correlated with higher severity scores. Asthma was significantly associated with Peri-orbital dark circles scores, but self-reported allergy was not. In this study, sleep was not correlated with Peri-orbital dark circles scores. Hyperspectral imaging indicated that melanin was the dominant correlate for Peri-orbital dark circles severity, while oxygen saturation was secondary. The difference between under-eye and cheek measurements for ∆L*and ∆E* were the most significant instrumental parameters correlated with visual assessment of Peri-orbital dark circles severity. CONCLUSION Although typically associated with lack of sleep, risk of Peri-orbital dark circles is primarily hereditary. The main factors contributing to the appearance of Peri-orbital dark circles are melanin and (deoxygenated) blood. PMID:26375218

  17. Experiments Testing the Causes of Namibian Fairy Circles

    PubMed Central

    Tschinkel, Walter R.

    2015-01-01

    The grasslands on the sandy soils of the eastern edge of the Namib Desert of Namibia are strikingly punctuated by millions of mostly regularly-spaced circular bare spots 2 to 10 m or more in diameter, generally with a margin of taller grasses. The causes of these so called fairy circles are unknown, but several hypotheses have been advanced. In October 2009, we set up experiments that specifically tested four hypothesized causes, and monitored these 5 times between 2009 and 2015. Grass exclusion in circles due to seepage of subterranean vapors or gases was tested by burying an impermeable barrier beneath fairy circles, but seedling density and growth did not differ from barrier-less controls. Plant germination and growth inhibition by allelochemicals or nutrient deficiencies in fairy circle soils were tested by transferring fairy circle soil to artificially cleared circles in the grassy matrix, and matrix soil to fairy circles (along with circle to circle and matrix to matrix controls). None of the transfers changed the seedling density and growth from the control reference conditions. Limitation of plant growth due to micronutrient depletion within fairy circles was tested by supplementing circles with a micronutrient mixture, but did not result in differences in plant seedling density and growth. Short-range vegetation competitive feedbacks were tested by creating artificially-cleared circles of 2 or 4 m diameter located 2 or 6 m from a natural fairy circle. The natural circles remained bare and the artificial circles revegetated. These four experiments provided evidence that fairy circles were not caused by subterranean vapors, that fairy circle soil per se did not inhibit plant growth, and that the circles were not caused by micronutrient deficiency. There was also no evidence that vegetative feedbacks affected fairy circles on a 2 to 10 m scale. Landscape-scale vegetative self-organization is discussed as a more likely cause of fairy circles. PMID:26510015

  18. Expanding-Circle Students Learning "Standard English" in the Outer-Circle Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Yoko

    2011-01-01

    Drawing upon Kachru's concentric circles of English, the present study explores whether middle-class Japanese students who chose to study English solo at private language schools in Singapore diverge from many others who (wish to) study inner-circle English. The study is stimulated by the repeated interdisciplinary findings that, in spite of the…

  19. Gradual regime shifts in fairy circles.

    PubMed

    Zelnik, Yuval R; Meron, Ehud; Bel, Golan

    2015-10-01

    Large responses of ecosystems to small changes in the conditions--regime shifts--are of great interest and importance. In spatially extended ecosystems, these shifts may be local or global. Using empirical data and mathematical modeling, we investigated the dynamics of the Namibian fairy circle ecosystem as a case study of regime shifts in a pattern-forming ecosystem. Our results provide new support, based on the dynamics of the ecosystem, for the view of fairy circles as a self-organization phenomenon driven by water-vegetation interactions. The study further suggests that fairy circle birth and death processes correspond to spatially confined transitions between alternative stable states. Cascades of such transitions, possible in various pattern-forming systems, result in gradual rather than abrupt regime shifts. PMID:26362787

  20. Generic Rigidity for Circle Diffeomorphisms with Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocić, Saša

    2016-06-01

    We prove that {C^r}-smooth ({r > 2}) circle diffeomorphisms with a break, i.e., circle diffeomorphisms with a single singular point where the derivative has a jump discontinuity, are generically, i.e., for almost all irrational rotation numbers, not {C^{1+\\varepsilon}}-rigid, for any {\\varepsilon > 0}. This result complements our recent proof, joint with Khanin (Geom Funct Anal 24:2002-2028, 2014), that such maps are generically {C^1}-rigid. It stands in remarkable contrast to the result of Yoccoz (Ann Sci Ec Norm Sup 17:333-361, 1984) that {C^r}-smooth circle diffeomorphisms are generically {C^{r-1-κ}}-rigid, for any {κ > 0}.

  1. Gradual regime shifts in fairy circles

    PubMed Central

    Zelnik, Yuval R.; Meron, Ehud; Bel, Golan

    2015-01-01

    Large responses of ecosystems to small changes in the conditions—regime shifts—are of great interest and importance. In spatially extended ecosystems, these shifts may be local or global. Using empirical data and mathematical modeling, we investigated the dynamics of the Namibian fairy circle ecosystem as a case study of regime shifts in a pattern-forming ecosystem. Our results provide new support, based on the dynamics of the ecosystem, for the view of fairy circles as a self-organization phenomenon driven by water–vegetation interactions. The study further suggests that fairy circle birth and death processes correspond to spatially confined transitions between alternative stable states. Cascades of such transitions, possible in various pattern-forming systems, result in gradual rather than abrupt regime shifts. PMID:26362787

  2. Generic Rigidity for Circle Diffeomorphisms with Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocić, Saša

    2016-05-01

    We prove that C^r -smooth (r > 2 ) circle diffeomorphisms with a break, i.e., circle diffeomorphisms with a single singular point where the derivative has a jump discontinuity, are generically, i.e., for almost all irrational rotation numbers, not C^1+ɛ -rigid, for any ɛ > 0 . This result complements our recent proof, joint with Khanin (Geom Funct Anal 24:2002-2028, 2014), that such maps are generically C^1 -rigid. It stands in remarkable contrast to the result of Yoccoz (Ann Sci Ec Norm Sup 17:333-361, 1984) that C^r -smooth circle diffeomorphisms are generically C^r-1-κ -rigid, for any κ > 0.

  3. Reflection positivity for the circle group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeb, K.-H.; Ólafsson, G.

    2015-04-01

    In this note we characterize those unitary one-parameter groups (Utc)t∈R which admit euclidean realizations in the sense that they are obtained by the analytic continuation process corresponding to reflection positivity from a unitary representation U of the circle group. These are precisely the ones for which there exists an anti-unitary involution J commuting with Uc. This provides an interesting link with the modular data arising in Tomita-Takesaki theory. Introducing the concept of a positive definite function with values in the space of sesquilinear forms, we further establish a link between KMS states and reflection positivity on the circle.

  4. Double devil's staircase in circle maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazaeri, Amin; Satija, Indubala I.

    1992-07-01

    Motivated by the existence of a fractal phase boundary for the occurrence of Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser tori in two-parameter area-preserving maps, we study the two-parameter circle map with two inflection points. The critical surface of the mode-locked windows is found to obey additive rules for the bistability regimes caused by cusp catastrophe. This results in the double devil's staircase for the mode-locked windows and a fractal curve for a critical set of parameter values for the breakup of the invariant circles.

  5. Literature Circles Go to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Ronna J.

    2011-01-01

    In basic writing classrooms and scholarship, reading too often remains invisible; neither research nor established practice provides tangible activities to support reading and connect it to writing. This article documents a search for structured, scaffolded, low-stakes reading activities, a search that moves off the college campus and into the…

  6. Promoting Staff Support in Schools: Solution Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Emma; Henderson, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The Solution Circle (SC) approach is a flexible tool which encourages participants to maintain a positive, creative approach to problem-solving. This project focussed on the introduction of this approach to staff in a primary and a secondary school. The rationale was to implement a problem-solving/discussion tool that would allow staff to utilise…

  7. Raccoon Circles: A Handbook for Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Jim

    This handbook presents a collection of over 35 experiential and adventure-based activities using only a single item of equipment--a 15-foot long section of 1-inch tubular climbing webbing, called a raccoon circle. Some of the activities are quiet, some are loud, and they range from low to high challenge levels. Different-sized groups can be…

  8. Literature Circles as Support for Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elhess, Mohamed; Egbert, Joy

    2015-01-01

    There are many instructional approaches for helping English language learners improve both reading comprehension and overall language proficiency. One such approach, the literature circle--which is somewhat like a student book club in the classroom--has drawn a great deal of attention in recent years (Schlick Noe and Johnson 1999). Many teachers…

  9. Circles and the Lines That Intersect Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Ellen L.; Rhee, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Clay and Rhee use the mathematics topic of circles and the lines that intersect them to introduce the idea of looking at the single mathematical idea of relationships--in this case, between angles and arcs--across a group of problems. They introduce the mathematics that underlies these relationships, beginning with the questions…

  10. Community Social Work and the Learning Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavan, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Outlines an approach for introducing students to Community Social Work by use of clear, engaging stated objectives. Approach is called the Learning Circle and was devised as a tool to enhance student participation and to stimulate networking, dialogue and conversation about social work commitment to community intervention and community-based…

  11. Conversations among Writers in Authors Circles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villaume, Susan Kidd; Brabham, Edna Greene

    2001-01-01

    Searches for examples of Authors Circles by talking with classroom teachers, surveying recent editions of this and other journals, and scanning library shelves for books on workshops and methods that incorporate student discussion with the teaching of writing. Discovers that descriptions of teacher-student conferences dominate explanations,…

  12. Adult Multiple Intelligences. NCSALL Study Circle Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrella, A.; Hofer, J.; Bubp, S.; Finn-Miller, S.; Graves, N.; Meador, P.

    2004-01-01

    This Study Circle guide was created by the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL) as part of the Practitioner Dissemination and Research Network (PDRN). The guide is part of NCSALL's effort to help connect research and practice in the field of adult basic education and adult literacy. The purpose of the study circle…

  13. Syllable Circles for Pronunciation Learning and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, John; Cullen, Charlie; Gardiner, Keith; Savage, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Syllable Circles are interactive visualizations representing prominence as a feature in short phrases or multi-syllable words. They were designed for computer-aided pronunciation teaching. This study explores whether and how interactive visualizations can affect language learners' awareness of prominence, or stress, in English pronunciation. The…

  14. VIEW OF NORTHWEST BEND IN BIRCH CIRCLE. VIEW FACING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF NORTHWEST BEND IN BIRCH CIRCLE. VIEW FACING WEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. VIEW OF BIRCH CIRCLE, FROM INTERSECTION WITH DATE DRIVE. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BIRCH CIRCLE, FROM INTERSECTION WITH DATE DRIVE. VIEW FACING WEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. VIEW OF ELM DRIVE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH ELM CIRCLE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ELM DRIVE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH ELM CIRCLE. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. VIEW ACROSS BIRCH CIRCLE, SHOWING PLAYGROUND #1 NEAR DATE DRIVE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW ACROSS BIRCH CIRCLE, SHOWING PLAYGROUND #1 NEAR DATE DRIVE. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. A Spring Playscape Project: Building a Tree Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Rusty

    2009-01-01

    The Tree Circle is a green gathering area for children made by planting trees in a circle. For children, the Tree Circle becomes a magical place for dramatic play, quiet retreat, or lively nature exploration. For teachers and parents it becomes a shady grove for snacks and stories. The trees create a sweet spot that changes during the seasons and…

  19. The Critique Circle: A Technique for Teaching Oral Performance Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirvela, David P.

    The critique circle is a pedagogical technique for involving students in the process of oral evaluative criticism of performance work. After the performance of scenes, students gather in a circle. Any student may begin the critique and responses proceed around the circle in a clockwise fashion, with the rules requiring each student to evaluate or…

  20. Effective Teaching Circles: Support for Math Anxious Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Mary Ann; Harrington, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Teaching circles are an innovative mechanism to support faculty and improve student learning. This article describes the use of instructor teaching circles to support math-anxious students at a mid-sized urban university, including the purposes, formation, and sometimes surprising outcomes associated with using this method. Teaching circles for…

  1. Multiple Intelligence Literature Circles: A JFL and an EFL Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sai, Michiko; Hsu, Jeng-yih

    2007-01-01

    The idea of literature circles is not new; however, it is hardly adapted in a second language classroom. In Taiwan, using literature circles to teach a second/foreign language is even less seen. The two college teachers-researchers reported their experiences of trying out literature circles in a JFL (Japanese as a Foreign Language) and an EFL…

  2. The Acoustic Reality of the Kachruvian Circles: A Rhythmic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, Ee Ling

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates whether the rhythmic properties of varieties of English found in each of the concentric circles of Kachru's model can, in any way, be elucidated by the "Three Circles" model. A measurement and comparison of the rhythm of three varieties of English: British English (from the Inner Circle), Singapore English (from the Outer…

  3. VIEW OF FACILITY 628 ON BIRCH CIRCLE, ON THE CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF FACILITY 628 ON BIRCH CIRCLE, ON THE CORNER OF CEDAR DRIVE AND BIRCH CIRCLE, ON THE NAVY SIDE OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD. VIEW FACING NORTH/NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. Extra-chromosomal DNA maintenance in Bacillus subtilis, dependence on flagellation factor FliF and moonlighting mediator EdmS.

    PubMed

    Hakumai, Yuichi; Shimomoto, Kouko; Ashiuchi, Makoto

    2015-05-15

    Extra-chromosomal DNA maintenance (EDM) as an important process in the propagation and genetic engineering of microbes. Bacillus subtilis EdmS (formerly PgsE), a protein comprising 55 amino acids, is a mediator of the EDM process. In this study, the effect of mutation of global regulators on B. subtilis EDM was examined. Mutation of the swrA gene abolished EdmS-mediated EDM. It is known that swrA predominantly regulates expression of the fla/che operon in B. subtilis. We therefore performed EDM analysis using fla/che-deletion mutants and identified an EDM-mediated EDM cooperator in the flgB-fliL region. Further genetic investigation identified the flagellation factor FliF is a crucial EDM cooperator. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of the moonlighting function of FliF in DNA maintenance. PMID:25843804

  5. Distortion theorems for polynomials on a circle

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinin, V N

    2000-12-31

    Inequalities for the derivatives with respect to {phi}=arg z the functions ReP(z), |P(z)|{sup 2} and arg P(z) are established for an algebraic polynomial P(z) at points on the circle |z|=1. These estimates depend, in particular, on the constant term and the leading coefficient of the polynomial P(z) and improve the classical Bernstein and Turan inequalities. The method of proof is based on the techniques of generalized reduced moduli.

  6. Rolling circle amplification of metazoan mitochondrialgenomes

    SciTech Connect

    Simison, W. Brian; Lindberg, D.R.; Boore, J.L.

    2005-07-31

    Here we report the successful use of rolling circle amplification (RCA) for the amplification of complete metazoan mt genomes to make a product that is amenable to high-throughput genome sequencing techniques. The benefits of RCA over PCR are many and with further development and refinement of RCA, the sequencing of organellar genomics will require far less time and effort than current long PCR approaches.

  7. Walking in circles: a modelling approach

    PubMed Central

    Maus, Horst-Moritz; Seyfarth, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Blindfolded or disoriented people have the tendency to walk in circles rather than on a straight line even if they wanted to. Here, we use a minimalistic walking model to examine this phenomenon. The bipedal spring-loaded inverted pendulum exhibits asymptotically stable gaits with centre of mass (CoM) dynamics and ground reaction forces similar to human walking in the sagittal plane. We extend this model into three dimensions, and show that stable walking patterns persist if the leg is aligned with respect to the body (here: CoM velocity) instead of a world reference frame. Further, we demonstrate that asymmetric leg configurations, which are common in humans, will typically lead to walking in circles. The diameter of these circles depends strongly on parameter configuration, but is in line with empirical data from human walkers. Simulation results suggest that walking radius and especially direction of rotation are highly dependent on leg configuration and walking velocity, which explains inconsistent veering behaviour in repeated trials in human data. Finally, we discuss the relation between findings in the model and implications for human walking. PMID:25056215

  8. Walking in circles: a modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Maus, Horst-Moritz; Seyfarth, Andre

    2014-10-01

    Blindfolded or disoriented people have the tendency to walk in circles rather than on a straight line even if they wanted to. Here, we use a minimalistic walking model to examine this phenomenon. The bipedal spring-loaded inverted pendulum exhibits asymptotically stable gaits with centre of mass (CoM) dynamics and ground reaction forces similar to human walking in the sagittal plane. We extend this model into three dimensions, and show that stable walking patterns persist if the leg is aligned with respect to the body (here: CoM velocity) instead of a world reference frame. Further, we demonstrate that asymmetric leg configurations, which are common in humans, will typically lead to walking in circles. The diameter of these circles depends strongly on parameter configuration, but is in line with empirical data from human walkers. Simulation results suggest that walking radius and especially direction of rotation are highly dependent on leg configuration and walking velocity, which explains inconsistent veering behaviour in repeated trials in human data. Finally, we discuss the relation between findings in the model and implications for human walking. PMID:25056215

  9. A simple technique for morphological measurement of cerebral arterial circle variations using public domain software (Osiris).

    PubMed

    Ansari, Saeed; Dadmehr, Majid; Eftekhar, Behzad; McConnell, Douglas J; Ganji, Sarah; Azari, Hassan; Kamali-Ardakani, Shahab; Hoh, Brian L; Mocco, J

    2011-12-01

    This article describes a straightforward method to measure the dimensions and identify morphological variations in the cerebral arterial circle using the general-purpose software program Osiris. This user-friendly and portable program displays, manipulates, and analyzes medical digital images, and it has the capability to determine morphometric properties of selected blood vessels (or other anatomical structures) in humans and animals. To ascertain morphometric variations in the cerebral arterial circle, 132 brains of recently deceased fetuses, infants, and adults were dissected. The dissection procedure was first digitized, and then the dimensions were measured with Osiris software. Measurements of each vessel's length and external diameters were used to identify and classify morphological variations in the cerebral arterial circle. The most commonly observed anatomical variations were uni- and bilateral hypoplasia of the posterior communicating artery. This study demonstrates that public domain software can be used to measure and classify cerebral arterial circle vessels. This method could be extended to examine other anatomical regions or to study other animals. Additionally, knowledge of variations within the circle could be applied clinically to enhance diagnostic and treatment specificity. PMID:22254161

  10. The Life Cycle and Life Span of Namibian Fairy Circles

    PubMed Central

    Tschinkel, Walter R.

    2012-01-01

    In Namibia of southwestern Africa, the sparse grasslands that develop on deep sandy soils under rainfall between 50 and 100 mm per annum are punctuated by thousands of quasi-circular bare spots, usually surrounded by a ring of taller grass. The causes of these so-called “fairy circles” are unknown, although a number of hypotheses have been proposed. This paper provides a more complete description of the variation in size, density and attributes of fairy circles in a range of soil types and situations. Circles are not permanent; their vegetative and physical attributes allow them to be arranged into a life history sequence in which circles appear (birth), develop (mature) and become revegetated (die). Occasionally, they also enlarge. The appearance and disappearance of circles was confirmed from satellite images taken 4 years apart (2004, 2008). The frequency of births and deaths as a fraction of the total population of circles allowed the calculation of an approximate turnover rate, and from this, an estimate of circle lifespan. Lifespan appeared to vary with circle size, with small circles averaging about 24 years, and larger ones 43–75 years. Overall lifespan averaged about 41 yr. A second, independent estimate of lifespan was made by revisiting circles 2 to 9 years after their clear status had been confirmed. This resulted in a lifespan estimate of about 60 years. Any causal explanation of fairy circles must include their birth, development and death, their mean lifespan and the variation of their features under different conditions. PMID:22761663

  11. Talking Circles, Leadership Competencies, and Inclusive Learning: Expanding the Frame of Business Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, David A.; Beard Adams, Kathy M.

    2008-01-01

    Business education typically embodies traditional organizational values, structures, and processes that focus learning mostly on uniformity and efficiency. In contrast, many First Nation peoples have long used the imagery of a circle as a guiding metaphor for both organizing and educating in ways that respect diversity and align themselves with…

  12. The rolling-circle melting-pot model for porcine circovirus DNA replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A stem-loop structure, formed by a pair of inverted repeats during DNA replication, is a conserved feature at the origin of DNA replication (Ori) among plant and animal viruses, bacteriophages and plasmids that replicate their genomes via the rolling-circle replication (RCR) mechanism. Porcine circo...

  13. Infinite Maxwell fisheye inside a finite circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yangjié; Chen, Huanyang

    2015-12-01

    This manuscript proposes a two-dimensional heterogeneous imaging medium composed of an isotropic refractive index. We exploit conformal-mapping to transfer the full Maxwell fisheye into a finite circle. Unlike our previous design that requires a mirror of Zhukovski airfoil shape, this approach can work without a mirror, while offering a comparable imaging resolution. This medium may also be used as an isotropic gradient index lens to transform a light source inside it into two identical sources of null interference. A merit of this approach is reduction of the near-zero-index area from an infinite zone into a finite one, which shall ease its realization.

  14. Attributions of Quality Circles' Failure: Differences among Top Management, Supporting Staff, and Quality Circle Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Thomas Li-Ping; Butler, Edie Aguilar

    For the past two decades, Japanese management practices have attracted a great deal of attention in the United States. Quality Circles (QCs) have been considered to be one of the most promising approaches to improving American workers' productivity. QCs are defined as small groups of employees from the same work area who meet to identify, analyze,…

  15. Expanding Circles within the Outer Circle: The Rural Kisii in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michieka, Martha M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates a range of factors that have contributed to the limited spread of English to rural Kisii, Kenya, making the presence of English in this non-urban context fall closer to an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) or Expanding Circle continuum than to the expected English as a Second Language (ESL) context. Kenya is an Outer Circle…

  16. Critical invariant circles in asymmetric and multiharmonic generalized standard maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Adam M.; Meiss, James D.

    2014-04-01

    Invariant circles play an important role as barriers to transport in the dynamics of area-preserving maps. KAM theory guarantees the persistence of some circles for near-integrable maps, but far from the integrable case all circles can be destroyed. A standard method for determining the existence or nonexistence of a circle, Greene's residue criterion, requires the computation of long-period orbits, which can be difficult if the map has no reversing symmetry. We use de la Llave's quasi-Newton, Fourier-based scheme to numerically compute the conjugacy of a Diophantine circle conjugate to rigid rotation, and the singularity of a norm of a derivative of the conjugacy to predict criticality. We study near-critical conjugacies for families of rotational invariant circles in generalizations of Chirikov's standard map.

  17. The arithmetic of elliptic fibrations in gauge theories on a circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Thomas W.; Kapfer, Andreas; Klevers, Denis

    2016-06-01

    The geometry of elliptic fibrations translates to the physics of gauge theories in F-theory. We systematically develop the dictionary between arithmetic structures on elliptic curves as well as desingularized elliptic fibrations and symmetries of gauge theories on a circle. We show that the Mordell-Weil group law matches integral large gauge transformations around the circle in Abelian gauge theories and explain the significance of Mordell-Weil torsion in this context. We also use Higgs transitions and circle large gauge transformations to introduce a group law for genus-one fibrations with multi-sections. Finally, we introduce a novel arithmetic structure on elliptic fibrations with non-Abelian gauge groups in F-theory. It is defined on the set of exceptional divisors resolving the singularities and divisor classes of sections of the fibration. This group structure can be matched with certain integral non-Abelian large gauge transformations around the circle when studying the theory on the lower-dimensional Coulomb branch. Its existence is required by consistency with Higgs transitions from the non-Abelian theory to its Abelian phases in which it becomes the Mordell-Weil group. This hints towards the existence of a new underlying geometric symmetry.

  18. General view, showing eastern view from atop hemi circle. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view, showing eastern view from atop hemi circle. - Arlington Memorial Bridge, Spanning Potomac River between Lincoln Memorial & Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. Existence of Chimera State on Two Parallel Circles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Larry; Yang, Pei-Kun

    2016-06-01

    A nonlocal coupling system with oscillators on two parallel circles can evolve into a chimera state for suitable values of the parameters α and β. The parameter β is the distance between the circles and affects the phase-locked areas of the chimera state. The Kuramoto theory successfully describes whether and where the oscillators are phase-locked or drifting. The position difference ΔX describes the displacement of phase-locked areas between the circles. The dynamics of the model with four oscillators also show similar phenomena. The position difference ΔX results from the arrangement of oscillators on the two parallel circles.

  20. GENERATING FRACTAL PATTERNS BY USING p-CIRCLE INVERSION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, José L.; Rubiano, Gustavo N.; Zlobec, Borut Jurčič

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce the p-circle inversion which generalizes the classical inversion with respect to a circle (p = 2) and the taxicab inversion (p = 1). We study some basic properties and we also show the inversive images of some basic curves. We apply this new transformation to well-known fractals such as Sierpinski triangle, Koch curve, dragon curve, Fibonacci fractal, among others. Then we obtain new fractal patterns. Moreover, we generalize the method called circle inversion fractal be means of the p-circle inversion.

  1. No evidence for anomalously low variance circles on the sky

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Adam; Scott, Douglas; Zibin, James P. E-mail: dscott@phas.ubc.ca

    2011-04-01

    In a recent paper, Gurzadyan and Penrose claim to have found directions on the sky centred on which are circles of anomalously low variance in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These features are presented as evidence for a particular picture of the very early Universe. We attempted to repeat the analysis of these authors, and we can indeed confirm that such variations do exist in the temperature variance for annuli around points in the data. However, we find that this variation is entirely expected in a sky which contains the usual CMB anisotropies. In other words, properly simulated Gaussian CMB data contain just the sorts of variations claimed. Gurzadyan and Penrose have not found evidence for pre-Big Bang phenomena, but have simply re-discovered that the CMB contains structure.

  2. Outer Circle Versus Inner Circle: Special Considerations While Rejuvenating an Indian Face Using Fillers

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: An oval face, pronounced cheek bones, a defined jaw line and a smooth Ogee curve are global aesthetic beauty goals. Though criteria are similar the Indian face poses some unique challenges because of the innate differences in skeletal shape, size, and soft tissue disposition. Width of the malar prominences and mandibular angles along with height are smaller compared to the other Asian and Caucasian populations along with a much heavier soft tissue disposition. This creates unique deficits and places unique demands on aesthetic intervention. Objectives: The evolution of practice patterns has lead to a variety of newer approaches; however, it is still common to target the nasolabial and mid-face volumizing as basic intervention for facial beautifying and rejuvenation. As aging progresses, Indian faces tend to get fuller and the tissue then descends downwards similar to other ethnic groups albeit more aggressive due to higher volumes of facial fat pad and smaller bone framework. Any excess correction in the inner circle zones will further add to the bulk along with cumulative remnants of previously administered fillers. Methods: In a younger face when the goal is beautification the attempt is to address the specific structural deficit on the outer bony framework along with the chin. This enhances the appearance immediately as well as holds up the tissue descent as they age. When the goal is youthful transition of an aging face, then again the bony changes further enhance the deficit in framework and the loss of fat pads along the periphery that is lateral forehead, temples and lateral cheek. Fat pad correction will give the most natural and best results as against working on the anterior mid cheek, nasolabials and angle of the mouth in a soft tissue heavy center zone of the face. Botulinum toxin and hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers remain the most popular facial injectables used for facial rejuvenation and structural enhancement. Results: Naturally enhanced

  3. Collusive attacks to "circle-type" multi-party quantum key agreement protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Xiao, Di; Jia, Heng-Yue; Liu, Run-Zong

    2016-05-01

    We find that existing multi-party quantum key agreement (MQKA) protocols designed for fairness of the key are, in fact, unfair. Our analysis shows that these protocols are sensitive to collusive attacks; that is, dishonest participants can collaborate in predetermining the key without being detected. In fact, the transmission structures of the quantum particles in those unfair MQKA protocols, three of which have already been analyzed, have much in common. We call these unfair MQKA protocols circle-type MQKA protocols. Likewise, the transmission structures of the quantum particles in MQKA protocols that can resist collusive attacks are also similar. We call such protocols complete-graph-type MQKA protocols. A MQKA protocol also exists that can resist the above attacks but is still not fair, and we call it the tree-type MQKA protocol. We first point out a common, easily missed loophole that severely compromises the fairness of present circle-type MQKA protocols. Then we show that two dishonest participants at special positions can totally predetermine the key generated by circle-type MQKA protocols. We anticipate that our observations will contribute to secure and fair MQKA protocols, especially circle-type protocols.

  4. Distribution of Circles on a Circle and Correlation Between Vortex Rings of Superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onur Fen, Mehmet; Erkoç, Šakír

    2007-05-01

    Superfluids are characterized by absence of viscosity. When superfluids are rotated, differently from normal fluids, they form more than one vortex in the containers where they are placed. The number of vortices change as the rotation velocity changes, but this change is not linear. M.W. Zwierlein et al. observed the vortices in experiments, observing up to a number of 80. Experiments also showed that the vortex distributions cannot include large spaces. By using experimental data, we noticed that when we think of vortices as vortex rings, their centers are at the same geometric location and these geometric locations are concentric circles. We generalized the distribution of these geometric places and formulized it. Our formula includes the magic circle numbers. When the number of vortices reach these magic numbers, the number of geometric locations increase by 1.

  5. Conceptions and Representations: The Circle as an Example.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janvier, Claude

    This paper, which addresses the issue of representation as an internal construct corresponding to an external abstract configuration, attempts to extend A. A. DiSessa's phenomenological primitives to mathematics (particularly to the notion of circle). Various acceptations of the word representation are examined, using the notion of a circle as an…

  6. Quality Circles: Applications in Vocational Education. Information Series No. 249.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Russell F.; Rehg, Virgil R.

    A strategy for increasing worker participation in an effort to remedy the problems of declining productivity and quality is the quality circles concept. The quality circles process involves small groups of employees who meet voluntarily on a regular basis to identify, analyze, and develop solutions to problems and to implement the solutions when…

  7. Growing a Circle of Courage Culture: One School's Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espiner, Deborah; Guild, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Mt. Richmond Special School is the first Circle of Courage school in New Zealand. The school reflects the richness of the cultural and learning diversity found in many New Zealand schools. Located in the heart of South Auckland, the school's 130 students represent a wide range of ethnic backgrounds. The universal values in the Circle of Courage…

  8. 29 CFR 1620.26 - Red circle rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Red circle rates. 1620.26 Section 1620.26 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.26 Red circle rates. (a) The term “red circle” rate is used to describe certain unusual, higher than...

  9. The Japanese Quality Control Circle: Why It Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watanabe, Susumu

    1991-01-01

    The competitiveness of Japanese industry is in part because of their quality circles. Despite the West's interest in most Japanese business practices, quality circles have been difficult to transplant. This may be a result of misconceptions about their nature and the erroneous idea that workers' motivation is sociocultural, whereas in fact it is…

  10. DETAIL VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF CHANNING WAY. SEEN FROM EAST SIDE OF CIRCLE LOOKING NORTH AT 2395 PIEDMONT, SIGMA PI HOUSE BY FREDERICK H. REIMERS, 1928. Photograph by Brian Grogan, July 8, 2007 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. Using Social Psychology To Make Quality Circles More Effective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smither, Robert D.

    Quality circles have proliferated in organizations throughout the 1980s, but their success depends on careful planning and monitoring, and on an awareness of social psychology and group dynamics. This presentation accordingly evaluates some of the assumptions of the literature on quality circles and suggests ways in which social psychology…

  12. Participation and Gender in Circle-Time Situations in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emilson, Anette; Johansson, Eva

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to investigate participatory values in relation to gender, as expressed in interactions between teachers and children in circle-time situations in Swedish and Norwegian preschools. This paper reports evidence from three research questions: How is children's participation conditioned in circle-time situations? How are…

  13. Quality Circles in Higher Education: Quality, Satisfaction, and Climate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Carol; Healy, Margaret

    The effect of quality circles at Iowa State University on absenteeism, performance evaluation, perceptions of the organization climate, job satisfaction, and perceived opportunities for professional and personal growth was measured in this study. The process of quality circles is designed to promote job fulfillment and organizational productivity…

  14. An Effective Time and Management Strategy in Quality Circles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Don E.

    Contending that participation in quality circles enhances effective time management by school administrators and teachers, this guide provides both a theoretical briefing and practical recommendations for better time management. A pre- posttest prefaces a review of basic concepts of quality circles with reference to the work of Abraham Maslow,…

  15. VIEW OF THE OUTER RING OF CENTER CIRCLE, LOOKING NORTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE OUTER RING OF CENTER CIRCLE, LOOKING NORTH. GRANITE COPING DEFINES THE SWAIN FAMILY PLOT, WHICH CONTAINS A CELTIC CROSS, ON WHICH THE CIRCLE REFERS TO ETERNAL LIFE, AND A RECLINING HUMAN FIGURE IN ETERNAL SLEEP - Woodlands Cemetery, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. Empowerment of Children through Circle Time: Myth or Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Bernie

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this paper is circle time, a widely used method in primary schools in Ireland and elsewhere. It involves children sitting in a circle with their teacher using method-specific techniques and strategies for self-esteem enhancement, promoting positive relationships and development of social skills. Qualitative research was undertaken in…

  17. Study Circles and the Dialogue to Change Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Mary; Brophy, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The origins of study circles can be traced back to the Chautauqua movement in the USA in the late nineteenth century. However, interest diminished in the USA and the Swedes discovered and enthusiastically imported the study circle idea as a remedy to their problems of poverty and illiteracy and to educate the broadest possible spectrum of society…

  18. From Skeptic to Believer: One Teacher's Journey Implementing Literature Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Deanna; Ainley, Glenna

    2008-01-01

    This is the story of one middle school teacher's journey of implementing literature circles with English language learners. Theory and research suggest that literature circles are valuable and important for young adolescents yet many teachers are still skeptical about implementing them. During this three-month study 22 sixth graders, 12 of them…

  19. The Sacred Circle: A Process Pedagogy of Healing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regnier, Robert

    1994-01-01

    The process pedagogy proposed here, based on Canadian Plains Indians' Sacred Circle teaching and educational practices at an aboriginal high school, views healing as transition toward meaning, wholeness, connectedness, and balance. The paper examines Whitehead's criticism of western metaphysics, the Sacred Circle as expression of aboriginal…

  20. Families and the Circle of Courage[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfat, Thom; Van Bockern, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The Circle of Courage philosophy encourages thoughts about the importance of courage in the lives of children and young people--the courage to face what life offers and the resilience to handle life's challenges. Belonging, mastery, independence, and generosity, the four areas identified by the Circle of Courage, are pathways to help young people…

  1. VIEW OF BIRCH CIRCLE, SHOWING SEGMENT WHICH FORMS THE WESTERNMOST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BIRCH CIRCLE, SHOWING SEGMENT WHICH FORMS THE WESTERNMOST BOUNDARY OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD. VIEW FACING NORTH/NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. VIEW OF PLAYGROUND #4 NEAR ELM CIRCLE, SHOWING PICNIC TABLE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PLAYGROUND #4 NEAR ELM CIRCLE, SHOWING PICNIC TABLE. VIEW FACING EAST/NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. VIEW OF ELM CIRCLE, FROM BETWEEN FACILITIES 750 AND 750. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ELM CIRCLE, FROM BETWEEN FACILITIES 750 AND 750. VIEW FACING EAST/NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. VIEW OF PLAYGROUND #3 ON SOUTHERN PORTION OF BIRCH CIRCLE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PLAYGROUND #3 ON SOUTHERN PORTION OF BIRCH CIRCLE, SHOWING BENCH AND DRINKING FOUNTAIN. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. VIEW OF BIRCH CIRCLE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH CEDAR DRIVE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BIRCH CIRCLE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH CEDAR DRIVE, ON THE MARINE SIDE OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD. RESIDENTIAL TOWER VISIBLE ON FAR RIGHT. VIEW FACING EAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. VIEW OF BACKYARD AREA BEHIND FACILITIES 529 (BIRCH CIRCLE) AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BACKYARD AREA BEHIND FACILITIES 529 (BIRCH CIRCLE) AND 606 (CEDAR DRIVE). VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. VIEW OF DATE DRIVE, FROM INTERSECTION WITH BIRCH CIRCLE, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF DATE DRIVE, FROM INTERSECTION WITH BIRCH CIRCLE, WITH FACILITY 809 ON LEFT, 816 ON RIGHT. NOTE THE MANY DATE PALMS. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. Ethical dimension of circle Integrative Community Therapy on qualitative research.

    PubMed

    Santos, Paula Renata Miranda Dos; Cerencovich, Elisangela; Araújo, Laura Filomena Santos de; Bellato, Roseney; Maruyama, Sonia Ayako Tao

    2014-12-01

    This study discusses ethical issues in research involving human beings and seeks to understand the relationship between qualitative research and the ethical care guidelines for Integrative Community Therapy (ICT) circles based on Resolution 466/12 of the National Health Council of the Ministry of Health of Brazil. This is documentary research, which analyzed Resolution 466/12 and ICT circles seeking to make a connection between the ethical guidelines contained in both. The analysis of the corpus was directed toward the construction of the following results: the person's perception, cultural diversity and community. It also brings in consideration of the influence of the ethical dimension of the ICT circles on qualitative research. We conclude that ICT circles are innovative in the sense of the diversity of participants and respect for cultural and social differences. Thus, ICT circles promote acquisition of quality information for social research as well as compliance with the ethical guidelines outlined in Resolution No. 466/12. PMID:25830749

  9. Sleep disturbances and PTSD: a perpetual circle?

    PubMed Central

    van Liempt, Saskia

    2012-01-01

    Background Sleep facilitates the consolidation of fear extinction memory. Nightmares and insomnia are hallmark symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), possibly interfering with fear extinction and compromising recovery. A perpetual circle may develop when sleep disturbances increase the risk for PTSD and vice versa. To date, therapeutic options for alleviating sleep disturbances in PTSD are limited. Methods We conducted three studies to examine the relationship between sleep and posttraumatic symptoms: (1) a prospective longitudinal cohort study examining the impact of pre-deployment insomnia symptoms and nightmares on the development of PTSD; (2) a cross-sectional study examining subjective sleep measures, polysomnography, endocrinological parameters, and memory in veterans with PTSD, veterans without PTSD, and healthy controls (HCs); (3) a randomized controlled trial (RCT) (n=14) comparing the effect of prazosin and placebo on sleep disturbances in veterans with PTSD. In addition to these studies, we systematically reviewed the literature on treatment options for sleep disturbances in PTSD. Results Pre-deployment nightmares predicted PTSD symptoms at 6 months post-deployment; however, insomnia symptoms did not. Furthermore, in patients with PTSD, a correlation between the apnea index and PTSD severity was observed, while obstructive sleep apnea syndrome was not more prevalent. We observed a significant increase in awakenings during sleep in patients with PTSD, which were positively correlated with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, negatively correlated with growth hormone (GH) secretion, and the subjective perception of sleep depth. Also, heart rate was significantly increased in PTSD patients. Interestingly, plasma levels of GH during the night were decreased in PTSD. Furthermore, GH secretion and awakenings were independent predictors for delayed recall, which was lower in PTSD. In our RCT, prazosin was not associated with improvement of any

  10. Inhomogeneous field theory inside the arctic circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegra, Nicolas; Dubail, Jérôme; Stéphan, Jean-Marie; Viti, Jacopo

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by quantum quenches in spin chains, a one-dimensional toy-model of fermionic particles evolving in imaginary-time from a domain-wall initial state is solved. The main interest of this toy-model is that it exhibits the arctic circle phenomenon, namely a spatial phase separation between a critically fluctuating region and a frozen region. Large-scale correlations inside the critical region are expressed in terms of correlators in a (euclidean) two-dimensional massless Dirac field theory. It is observed that this theory is inhomogenous: the metric is position-dependent, so it is in fact a Dirac theory in curved space. The technique used to solve the toy-model is then extended to deal with the transfer matrices of other models: dimers on the honeycomb and square lattice, and the six-vertex model at the free fermion point (Δ =0 ). In all cases, explicit expressions are given for the long-range correlations in the critical region, as well as for the underlying Dirac action. Although the setup developed here is heavily based on fermionic observables, the results can be translated into the language of height configurations and of the gaussian free field, via bosonization. Correlations close to the phase boundary and the generic appearance of Airy processes in all these models are also briefly revisited in the appendix.

  11. Controlled Microwave Heating Accelerates Rolling Circle Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Takeo; Suzuki, Takamasa; Mineki, Shigeru; Ohuchi, Shokichi

    2015-01-01

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) generates single-stranded DNAs or RNA, and the diverse applications of this isothermal technique range from the sensitive detection of nucleic acids to analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Microwave chemistry is widely applied to increase reaction rate as well as product yield and purity. The objectives of the present research were to apply microwave heating to RCA and indicate factors that contribute to the microwave selective heating effect. The microwave reaction temperature was strictly controlled using a microwave applicator optimized for enzymatic-scale reactions. Here, we showed that microwave-assisted RCA reactions catalyzed by either of the four thermostable DNA polymerases were accelerated over 4-folds compared with conventional RCA. Furthermore, the temperatures of the individual buffer components were specifically influenced by microwave heating. We concluded that microwave heating accelerated isothermal RCA of DNA because of the differential heating mechanisms of microwaves on the temperatures of reaction components, although the overall reaction temperatures were the same. PMID:26348227

  12. Continuous, Full-Circle Arctangent Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C.; Howard, David E.; Smith, Dennis A.

    2005-01-01

    A circuit generates an analog voltage proportional to an angle, in response to two sinusoidal input voltages having magnitudes proportional to the sine and cosine of the angle, respectively. That is to say, given input voltages proportional to sin(Omega(t))sin(Theta) and sin(Omega(t))cos(Theta) [where Theta denotes the angle, mega denotes 2(pi) x a carrier frequency, and t denotes time], the circuit generates a steady voltage proportional to Theta. The output voltage varies continuously from its minimum to its maximum value as Theta varies from -180deg to 180deg. While the circuit could accept input modulated sine and cosine signals from any source, it must be noted that such signals are typical of the outputs of shaft-angle resolvers in electromagnetic actuators used to measure and control shaft angles for diverse purposes like aiming scientific instruments and adjusting valve openings. In effect, the circuit is an analog computer that calculates the arctangent of the ratio between the sine and cosine signals. The full-circle angular range of this arctangent circuit stands in contrast to the range of prior analog arctangent circuits, which is from slightly greater than -90deg to slightly less than +90deg. Moreover, for applications in which continuous variation of output is preferred to discrete increments of output, this circuit offers a clear advantage over resolver- to-digital integrated circuits.

  13. 6. Threequarter view of Awing, building 500, from Minuteman Circle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Three-quarter view of A-wing, building 500, from Minuteman Circle looking northeast - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  14. General view, showing detail atop hemi circle at southern end ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view, showing detail atop hemi circle at southern end of Memorial Avenue. - Arlington Memorial Bridge, Spanning Potomac River between Lincoln Memorial & Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. 7. VIEW NORTHWEST, OLD WHITE HORSE PIKE FORM CIRCLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW NORTHWEST, OLD WHITE HORSE PIKE FORM CIRCLE - White Horse Pike Rond Point, Intersection of Crescent Boulevard (U.S. Route 130), White Horse Pike (U.S. Route 30), & Clay Avenue, Collingswood, Camden County, NJ

  16. Circles South East: the first 10 years 2002-2012.

    PubMed

    Bates, Andrew; Williams, Dominic; Wilson, Chris; Wilson, Robin J

    2014-07-01

    This article describes the first 10 years of the implementation of Circles of Support and Accountability (Circles) in the management of sexual offenders in South-East England by Circles South East (CSE). The Circles of 71 core members are reviewed in detail, with reference to demographic data, offense and sentencing histories, risk assessment data, and considerations regarding Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements. A group of 71 comparison subjects who were referred to CSE and deemed suitable for but did not receive the service was identified. Follow-up behaviors of both groups are examined (including all forms of reconviction, breach of orders, and prison recall). Over a comparable follow-up period of 55 months, the incidence of violent and contact sexual reconviction in the comparison group was significantly higher than for the Circles cohort. Comparisons are made between expected and actual levels of sexual reconviction, with the Circles cohort showing lower than expected rate of sexual reconviction but not to a statistically significant degree. PMID:23615793

  17. Maxi-circles, glycosomes, gene transposition, expression sites, transsplicing, transferrin receptors and base J.

    PubMed

    Borst, Piet

    2016-01-01

    This is a personal story of the author of his research on trypanosomatids, covering a period of 1970-2015. Some of the highlights include the discovery of new aspects of kDNA, the mini-circle heterogeneity and the maxi-circle; the glycosome; the discovery of gene transposition as a major mechanism for antigenic variation; trans-splicing as an essential step in the synthesis of all trypanosome mRNAs; Pulsed Field Gradient gels to size-fractionate chromosome-sized DNA molecules of protozoa; the sequence of trypanosome telomeres and their growth and contraction; the first ABC-transporter of trypanosomatids, LtpgpA; the variable transferrin receptor of T. brucei and its role in Fe uptake; and base J, its structure, biosynthesis and function. PMID:27021571

  18. Putting the Unit in Pre-Service Secondary Teachers' Unit Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kevin C.; LaForest, Kevin R.; Kim, Hee Jung

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a teaching experiment that explored two pre-service secondary teachers' meanings for the unit circle. Our analyses suggest that the participants' initial unit circle meanings predominantly consisted of calculational strategies for relating a given circle to what they called "the unit circle." These strategies did not entail…

  19. Three Concentric Circles: Young Chinese English Learners' Perceptions of Purposeful Audiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jack Jinghui

    2015-01-01

    English learners have more access to communicate with different purposeful audiences across the Three Concentric Circles of English (Kachu, 1985): the Inner Circle, the Outer Circle and the Expanding Circle. However, young language learners' purposeful audience as a focus of communication has not been emphasized as much as other linguistic…

  20. Coal geology of the Northeast Circle area, McCone and Dawson counties, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wincentsen, Herbert

    1979-01-01

    The Northeast Circle area is in central McCone and northern Dawson Counties, northeastern Montana. The area encompasses about 940 square miles and has a maximum relief of greater than 1,000 feet. The lowest point (altitude of less than 2,200 feet) is in the Redwater River Valley in the northern part of the area. The highest point (altitude of less than 3,200 feet) is on the Yellowstone-Missouri divide, located in parts of Tps. 18 and 19 N., Rso 49, 50, and 51E., and T. 20 N., Rs. 52 and 53 E. Surface exposures in most of the area consist of yellowish or light-colored sandy shales of the Tongue River Member of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. The coal beds in the Northeast Circle area occur in the lower 500 feet of this member and are persistent in the field. The predominant structural features of the area are the northeast end of the Weldon monocline-fault in Tps. 21 and 22 N., R. 47 E., and a small steep depression near Circle in sec. 10, T. 19 N., R. 48 E. Otherwise, the structure of the area is nearly flat. Coal in the Northeast Circle area is composed of six main beds: the S, L1, R, Q, P, and Pust beds, in ascending stratigraphic order. Of these, the S, Pust, and P beds are the thickest. The S bed is more than 20 feet thick in some places, but usually ranges in thickness from 6 to 10 feet. The Pust bed, which is about 430-490 feet above the S bed, is more than 18 feet thick in the upper bench and as much as 9 feet thick in the lower bench. Coal thickness in the P bed varies from 0 to 10.5 feet. The other coal seams in the area are generally less than 5 feet thick. All coals are lignite in rank.

  1. The Influence of Copy-Number of Targeted Extrachromosomal Genetic Elements on the Outcome of CRISPR-Cas Defense

    PubMed Central

    Severinov, Konstantin; Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Semenova, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotic type I CRISPR-Cas systems respond to the presence of mobile genetic elements such as plasmids and phages in two different ways. CRISPR interference efficiently destroys foreign DNA harboring protospacers fully matching CRISPR RNA spacers. In contrast, even a single mismatch between a spacer and a protospacer can render CRISPR interference ineffective but causes primed adaptation—efficient and specific acquisition of additional spacers from foreign DNA into the CRISPR array of the host. It has been proposed that the interference and primed adaptation pathways are mediated by structurally different complexes formed by the effector Cascade complex on matching and mismatched protospacers. Here, we present experimental evidence and present a simple mathematical model that shows that when plasmid copy number maintenance/phage genome replication is taken into account, the two apparently different outcomes of the CRISPR-Cas response can be accounted for by just one kind of effector complex on both targets. The results underscore the importance of consideration of targeted genome biology when considering consequences of CRISPR-Cas systems action.

  2. Circling behavior following unilateral kainic acid injections into rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R J; Reavill, C; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1981-12-01

    Unilateral injection of kainic acid (2.5-25 nmol) into rat anterior caudate putamen induced dose-related circling behaviour. Kainic acid (10 nmol) consistently caused initial weak ipsiversive circling lasting 1 h followed by prolonged strong contraversive rotation lasting in excess of 10 h. Unilateral intrastriatal administration of L-glutamic acid, or of monosodium L-glutamate, to normal rats, or administration of monosodium L-glutamate to rats with extensive decortication, did not induce circling behaviour. The simultaneous unilateral injection of monosodium L-glutamate (1 mumol) with kainic acid (10 nmol) did not modify circling behaviour induced by kainic acid. However, extensive decortication greatly reduced circling induced by unilateral intrastriatal kainic acid (10 nmol), and effect not reversed by the simultaneous administration of monosodium L-glutamate (1 mumol). Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the left nigrostriatal pathway abolished the initial ipsiversive rotation and potentiated the subsequent contraversive rotation for up to 4 h after intrastriatal injection of kainic acid (10 nmol). Peripheral administration of haloperidol (1 mg/kg i.p.) also abolished initial ipsiversive rotation and decreased the subsequent contraversive rotation. Electro-coagulation of the ipsilateral strio-nigral pathway prolonged the initial ipsiversive rotation produced by kainic acid, but markedly attenuated contraversive rotation. These findings suggest that circling induced by intrastriatal administration of kainic acid depends on intact corticostriate pathways, but it cannot be reproduced or modified by intrastriatal administration of glutamate. Kainic acid circling appears to be mediated via strio-nigral pathways, and to be modulated by dopaminergic function. PMID:7333356

  3. Circles of Support and personalization: Exploring the economic case.

    PubMed

    Wistow, Gerald; Perkins, Margaret; Knapp, Martin; Bauer, Annette; Bonin, Eva-Maria

    2016-06-01

    Circles of Support aim to enable people with learning disabilities (and others) to live full lives as part of their communities. As part of a wider study of the economic case for community capacity building conducted from 2012 to 2014, we conducted a mixed methods study of five Circles in North West England. Members of these Circles were supporting adults with moderate to profound learning disabilities and provided accounts of success in enabling the core member to live more independent lives with improved social care outcomes within cost envelopes that appeared to be less than more traditional types of support. The Circles also reported success in harnessing community resources to promote social inclusion and improve well-being. This very small-scale study can only offer tentative evidence but does appear to justify more rigorous research into the potential of Circles to secure cost-effective means of providing support to people with learning disabilities than the alternative, which in most cases would have been a long-term residential care placement. PMID:27004913

  4. Design of Circle Array Pattern for Transparent Nanomesh-Type Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seungsu; Ganorkar, Shraddha; Kim, Jungyoon; Kim, Young-Hwan; Kim, Yong Tae; Kim, Seong-Il

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we report simulation results for the optical properties of nanomesh-type electrodes for transparent electrode. Usually, indium tin oxide (ITO) is commonly used for transparent conductor to solar cell, display, LED and other electronic modules. However, the cost is high due to the rarity of indium. An alternative way is use of transparent nanomesh-type metal electrode for solar cell. Finite different time domain (FDTD) method was used to simulate and analyze their optical properties. Various array patterns (square, circle and circle hexagonal array) of metal on glass (SiO2) substrates were designed and their properties of transmission and reflection were simulated by using the broad band (λ = 300~1200 nm) plane wave source. To compare basic characteristics of each pattern, various structural parameters such as hole diameter, pitch and metal thickness were applied. The effect of three typical metals, such as Ag, Au, and Al was also compared. In the results, we will discuss about large dip of transmission appeared at the particular wavelength region from the circle array pattern, which is design with pitch of 500 nm at the wavelength range 700 to 800 nm. The surface plasmonpolaritons (SPP) effect can be the cause of large dip and we could find a broad and high transmission from the properly designed in nanomesh-type electrodes, which was calculated as a function of wavelength. PMID:26726388

  5. Discovery of fairy circles in Australia supports self-organization theory.

    PubMed

    Getzin, Stephan; Yizhaq, Hezi; Bell, Bronwyn; Erickson, Todd E; Postle, Anthony C; Katra, Itzhak; Tzuk, Omer; Zelnik, Yuval R; Wiegand, Kerstin; Wiegand, Thorsten; Meron, Ehud

    2016-03-29

    Vegetation gap patterns in arid grasslands, such as the "fairy circles" of Namibia, are one of nature's greatest mysteries and subject to a lively debate on their origin. They are characterized by small-scale hexagonal ordering of circular bare-soil gaps that persists uniformly in the landscape scale to form a homogeneous distribution. Pattern-formation theory predicts that such highly ordered gap patterns should be found also in other water-limited systems across the globe, even if the mechanisms of their formation are different. Here we report that so far unknown fairy circles with the same spatial structure exist 10,000 km away from Namibia in the remote outback of Australia. Combining fieldwork, remote sensing, spatial pattern analysis, and process-based mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that these patterns emerge by self-organization, with no correlation with termite activity; the driving mechanism is a positive biomass-water feedback associated with water runoff and biomass-dependent infiltration rates. The remarkable match between the patterns of Australian and Namibian fairy circles and model results indicate that both patterns emerge from a nonuniform stationary instability, supporting a central universality principle of pattern-formation theory. Applied to the context of dryland vegetation, this principle predicts that different systems that go through the same instability type will show similar vegetation patterns even if the feedback mechanisms and resulting soil-water distributions are different, as we indeed found by comparing the Australian and the Namibian fairy-circle ecosystems. These results suggest that biomass-water feedbacks and resultant vegetation gap patterns are likely more common in remote drylands than is currently known. PMID:26976567

  6. An efficient circle detector not relying on edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jia; Huang, Panfeng; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Bin

    2016-06-01

    Accurate and efficient detection of circular modules fixed on non-cooperative target is a key technology for Tethered Space Robot. This paper presents an efficient circle detector based on region-growing of gradient and histogram distribution of Euclidean distance. Region-growing of gradient is applied to generate arc support regions from single point. And the corresponding square fitting areas are defined to accelerate the detection and decrease storage. A histogram is then used to count frequency of the distances that participates in the accumulator and the parameters of each circle are acquired. Finally, a verification strategy of circular integrity is designed to test the detection results. We have tested our algorithm on 35 images dealing with kinds of circles and ellipses. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is able to detect circular objects under occlusion, image noises and moderate shape deformations with a good precision.

  7. The Circle of Apollonius and Its Applications in Introductory Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partensky, Michael B.

    2008-02-01

    The circle of Apollonius is named after the ancient geometrician Apollonius of Perga. This beautiful geometric construct can be helpful when solving some general problems of geometry and mathematical physics, optics, and electricity. Here we discuss two of its applications: localizing an object in space and calculating electric fields. First, we pose an entertaining localization problem to trigger students' interest in the subject. Analyzing this problem, we introduce the circle of Apollonius and show that this geometric technique helps solve the problem in an elegant and intuitive manner. Then we switch to seemingly unrelated problems of calculating the electric fields. We show that the zero equipotential line for two unlike charges is the Apollonius circle for these two charges and use this discovery to find the electric field of a charge positioned near a grounded conductive sphere. Finally, we pose some questions for further examination.

  8. Marrying Heterogeneous Circles of Trust: No Silver Bullet Yet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ates, Mikaël; Gravier, Christophe; Fayolle, Jacques; Sauviac, Bruno

    2008-11-01

    Numerous business and state-owned entities assert the need of secured information exchanges on digital identities based on trusted third parties. Entities trusting each other create a federation. At first, it is necessary for them to formalize this alliance with legal documents. In a second time, an architecture of identity federation will allow them to establish technical trust links, creating a circle of trust, most often with a public key infrastructure. The real challenge for the identity federation domain is the interoperability of information systems thanks to normalized and standardized protocols, that is to say, realize interconnection of circles of trust.

  9. Easing The Calculation Of Bolt-Circle Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.

    1995-01-01

    Bolt Circle Calculation (BOLT-CALC) computer program used to reduce significant time consumed in manually computing trigonometry of rectangular Cartesian coordinates of holes in bolt circle as shown on blueprint or drawing. Eliminates risk of computational errors, particularly in cases involving many holes or in cases in which coordinates expressed to many significant digits. Program assists in many practical situations arising in machine shops. Written in BASIC. Also successfully compiled and implemented by use of Microsoft's QuickBasic v4.0.

  10. A Phase Transition for Circle Maps and Cherry Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmisano, Liviana

    2013-07-01

    We study C 2 weakly order preserving circle maps with a flat interval. The main result of the paper is about a sharp transition from degenerate geometry to bounded geometry depending on the degree of the singularities at the boundary of the flat interval. We prove that the non-wandering set has zero Hausdorff dimension in the case of degenerate geometry and it has Hausdorff dimension strictly greater than zero in the case of bounded geometry. Our results about circle maps allow to establish a sharp phase transition in the dynamics of Cherry flows.

  11. Computing circles and spheres of arithmitic least squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nievergelt, Yves

    1994-07-01

    A proof of the existence and uniqueness of L. Moura and R. Kitney's circle of least squares leads to estimates of the accuracy with which a computer can determine that circle. The result shows that the accuracy deteriorates as the correlation between the coordinates of the data points increases in magnitude. Yet a numerically more stable computation of eigenvectors yields the limiting straight line, which a further analysis reveals to be the line of total least squares. The same analysis also provides generalizations to fitting spheres in higher dimensions.

  12. Toroidal Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Fullerene Crop Circles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We investigate energetics and structure of circular and polygonal single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using large scale molecular simulations on NAS SP2, motivated by their unusual electronic and magnetic properties. The circular tori are formed by bending tube (no net whereas the polygonal tori are constructed by turning the joint of two tubes of (n, n), (n+1, n-1) and (n+2, n-2) with topological pentagon-heptagon defect, in which n =5, 8 and 10. The strain energy of circular tori relative to straight tube decreases by I/D(sup 2) where D is torus diameter. As D increases, these tori change from buckling to an energetically stable state. The stable tori are perfect circular in both toroidal and tubular geometry with strain less than 0. 03 eV/atom when D greater than 10, 20 and 40 nm for torus (5,5), (8,8) and (10, 10). Polygonal tori, whose strain is proportional to the number of defects and I/D are energetically stable even for D less than 10 nm. However, their strain is higher than that of perfect circular tori. In addition, the local maximum strain of polygonal tori is much higher than that of perfect circular tori. It is approx. 0.03 eV/atom or less for perfect circular torus (5,5), but 0.13 and 0.21 eV/atom for polygonal tori (6,4)/(5,5) and (7,3)/(5,5). Therefore, we conclude that the circular tori with no topological defects are more energetically stable and kinetically accessible than the polygonal tori containing the pentagon-heptagon defects for the laser-grown SWNTs and Fullerene crop circles.

  13. Production of dumbbell probe through hairpin cleavage-ligation and increasing RCA sensitivity and specificity by circle to circle amplification

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hua; Tang, Suming; Hu, Tianyu; Zhao, Guojie; Guan, Yifu

    2016-01-01

    Dumbbell probe (DP) attracts increasing interests in rolling circle amplification (RCA). A universal DP production method through cleavage-ligation of hairpin was proposed and optimized. The production is characterized by restriction endonuclease (RE)-induced cleavage ends ligation. It has the advantage of phosphorylation-free, splint-free and purification-free. To optimize designing, we found that the position of RE cleavage sequence in the stem and the primer position in the loop affected the formation and amplification of DP obviously. Both sticky and blunt ends cleaved by RE produce DP efficiently. Moreover, we introduced this DP into circle to circle (C2C) RCA based on the same cleavage-ligation principle, and acquired high sensitivity. By combining a two-ligation design and the C2C strategy, specificity for detecting let-7 family members was increased extremely. Furthermore, coreaction of different steps facilitated convenient formation and amplification process of DP. PMID:27385060

  14. The Study Circle--For Learning and Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjerkaker, Sturla

    2006-01-01

    The study circle is described as a democratic and emancipatory method for learning that can be summarized in three words: learning by sharing. This method offers opportunities and possibilities for all participants to contribute their previous knowledge and experiences through open and democratic dialogue. As a method for "liberal adult…

  15. School of Urban Wilderness Survival and the Circle of Courage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlowe, Jay M.; Pearl, Nick L.; Marlowe, Mike J.

    2009-01-01

    Brendtro, Brokenleg, and Van Bockern (2002) describe the Circle of Courage model for creating environments in which all children can thrive. This approach blends youth developmental research, the wisdom of pioneer workers, and Native American philosophies of child care. This model for reclaiming youth at risk posits four elements as essential for…

  16. Reading without Teachers: Literature Circles in an EFL Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Jeng-yih Tim

    2004-01-01

    Unsuccessful college education often turns our students into book haters who will stop reading as soon as they graduate. The idea of literature circles embraces the concept of "reading for fun" and is intended to create more independent readers and book addicts who will continuously read for the rest of their lives. Pioneers in literacy theories…

  17. The 2004 Presidential Election and Young Voters. CIRCLE Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Young people?s interest in the 2004 presidential election is at its highest since 1992. According to a September MTV/The Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning & Engagement (CIRCLE) poll conducted by CBS News, 81 percent of young registered voters are paying close attention to the campaign, compared to 85 percent in 1992, the last…

  18. Novice Teachers Learn About Literature Circles through Collaborative Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Barbara H.; Resta, Virginia; Davis, Laura L.; Camacho, Alexa

    2001-01-01

    Suggests that literature circles can provide a stimulating and motivating method of teaching reading, and they help increase student reading performance as measured on a criterion-referenced test. Notes that when students participate in literature discussion groups their reading level and motivation can increase. (SG)

  19. The Characterizations of Triangles Using the Nine-Point Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    In this note, primarily intended for high school students and high school teachers, characterizations of a right triangle and an equilateral triangle in the Euclidean plane are presented using the nine-point circle of a given triangle. Geometrical applications are explored along with their possible uses in the teaching environment. (Contains 4…

  20. VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF CHANNING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF CHANNING WAY. SEEN FROM SW CORNER TOWARDS 2395 PIEDMONT, SIGMA PI HOUSE BY FREDERICK H. REIMERS, 1928. LOOKING NORTH. Photograph by Brian Grogan, July 8, 2007 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF CHANNING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF CHANNING WAY. SEEN FROM NE CORNER LOOKING SW. Photograph by Fredrica Drotos and Michael Kelly, July 9, 2006 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. Sacred Circles: 2000 Years of North American Indian Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of American Indian Education, 1977

    1977-01-01

    "Sacred Circles" opened April 16, 1977 at the Nelson Gallery of Art-Atkins Museum of Fine Arts in Kansas City for its only showing in the Americas; the 850 objects on loan from 90 museums and private collectors included the "Adena Pipe" (considered the most important archaeological object found in the eastern US). (JC)

  3. Full Circle: A New Look at Multiage Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Penelle; Doan, Jane

    Noting that there is a great demand for information to help educators learn about and develop programs in multiage education, this book shares many ideas on multiage instruction. The 12 chapters of the book are: (1) "Circling Back" (Jane Doan), on the resurgence of interest in the multiage movement; (2) "One Day" (Penelle Chase), exploring a day…

  4. The Circle of Courage and Erikson's Psychological Stages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughlan, Felicity; Welsh-Breetzke, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Describes the application of positive youth development principles to challenges faced by adolescent females in South Africa. A mainline, Euro-centric theory, Erikson's life stages (1963), is compared with the Circle of Courage model based on Native American Tribal wisdom. The differences and correlation in these approaches are explored through…

  5. VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF CHANNING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF CHANNING WAY VIEW OF 2401 PIEDMONT, ALPHA EPSILON PHI HOUSE BY RATCLIFF & RATCLIFF, 1958. SEEN FROM NW CORNER LOOKING SE. Photograph by Brian Grogan, July 8, 2007 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. The Sharing Circle: Themes for Home and School Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Carol

    This guide describes a program that turns ordinary show-and-tell time into a theme-related sharing time, or "sharing circle." In this program, each child is assigned a special sharing day once a month, with the sharing days evenly distributed throughout the month and with no more than three children sharing on a particular day. Monthly themes are…

  7. The Misuse of the Circle Notation to Represent Aromatic Rings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belloli, Robert C.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the confusion and erroneous conclusions that can result from the overuse and misuse of the circle notation to represent aromaticity in polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons. Includes nature of the problem, textbook treatment, and a possible compromise method of representation. (Author/JN)

  8. Revisiting Cyberbullying in Schools Using the Quality Circle Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Simone; Smith, Peter K.; Blumberg, Herbert H.

    2012-01-01

    An earlier study reported the use of Quality Circles (QC) in a UK school in the context of understanding and reducing bullying and cyberbullying. Here, we report further work in the same school setting. The QC approach allows explorative analysis of problems in school settings, whereby students embark on a problem-solving exercise over a period of…

  9. The Circle of Apollonius and Its Applications in Introductory Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partensky, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    The circle of Apollonius is named after the ancient geometrician Apollonius of Perga. This beautiful geometric construct can be helpful when solving some general problems of geometry and mathematical physics, optics, and electricity. Here we discuss two of its applications: localizing an object in space and calculating electric fields. First, we…

  10. Literature Circles: A Perfect Match for Online Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittingham, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the author's search for an appropriate and satisfying online teaching method. After experimenting with several methods (chat room, discussion board, student led discussion), the author reached back to his face-to-face classroom success with literature circles. This article reports the results of research conducted by the…

  11. Circle Time for Social and Emotional Learning in Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cefai, Carmel; Ferrario, Erika; Cavioni, Valeria; Carter, Audrey; Grech, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the findings and implications of a semi-randomised control trial study on the effectiveness of circle time (CT) on primary school students' social and emotional learning, as well as classroom teachers' and students' experience of CT. A social and emotional learning programme was delivered through CT by trained…

  12. United States Participation in the Pacific Circle Consortium. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    The goal of the Pacific Circle Project is to improve international and intercultural understanding among the people and nations of the Pacific. Consortium member countries are Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States. Within the countries are chosen member institutions. Two major types of activities of the consortium are the exchange…

  13. Using Literature Circles to Discuss Social Justice in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madhuri, Marga; Walker, Nancy; Landmann-Johnsey, Erica; Laughter, Judson

    2015-01-01

    Literacy educators feel it is incumbent on teacher preparation programs to prepare teacher candidates with the dispositions and competencies needed to work with students from diverse racial, cultural, and economic backgrounds. As a way to initiate the discussion and help candidates examine their own views on race, literature circles are used. The…

  14. A Paradigm Shift to Reading around the Hermeneutic Circle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Elizabeth E.

    The background, challenge, opportunity, and excitement of hermeneutics can be explored in three signposts of a hermeneutic turn in a doctoral research proposal: from being gifted to gifted reading, from method to interpretation, and from metacognition to the hermeneutic circle. A change in the research site of a study of the metacognitive…

  15. Maximum-likelihood estimation of circle parameters via convolution.

    PubMed

    Zelniker, Emanuel E; Clarkson, I Vaughan L

    2006-04-01

    The accurate fitting of a circle to noisy measurements of circumferential points is a much studied problem in the literature. In this paper, we present an interpretation of the maximum-likelihood estimator (MLE) and the Delogne-Kåsa estimator (DKE) for circle-center and radius estimation in terms of convolution on an image which is ideal in a certain sense. We use our convolution-based MLE approach to find good estimates for the parameters of a circle in digital images. In digital images, it is then possible to treat these estimates as preliminary estimates into various other numerical techniques which further refine them to achieve subpixel accuracy. We also investigate the relationship between the convolution of an ideal image with a "phase-coded kernel" (PCK) and the MLE. This is related to the "phase-coded annulus" which was introduced by Atherton and Kerbyson who proposed it as one of a number of new convolution kernels for estimating circle center and radius. We show that the PCK is an approximate MLE (AMLE). We compare our AMLE method to the MLE and the DKE as well as the Cramér-Rao Lower Bound in ideal images and in both real and synthetic digital images. PMID:16579374

  16. Examining Circle of Security™: A Review of Research and Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The Circle of Security™ interventions are psychosocial treatments intended to increase maternal sensitivity and thus child attachment security in infants and young children. A small number of publications have reported empirical research on outcomes of these treatments. This article reviews the research evidence, plausibility, theoretical…

  17. Intersections of a Circle and a Square: An Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canada, Dan; Blair, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The investigation of how a circle and square lying in the same plane could intersect each other is an excellent example of geometric problem-solving. This paper explores three facets of the investigation: (1) finding out how many points of intersection are possible, (2) classifying the different ways of intersection, and (3) determining which ways…

  18. First Nations Education in Canada: The Circle Unfolds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battiste, Marie, Ed.; Barman, Jean, Ed.

    This collection of 15 writings by Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal educators examines the issues and dilemmas of First Nations education in Canada 25 years after the beginnings of First Nations control of education. Organized around the concept of the Sacred Circle, the essays are grouped into four sections: reconceptualizing First Nations education,…

  19. Innovation and Organizational Communication in Corporate America: The Rhetorical Visions of Managers, Facilitators, and Employees on Quality Circles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyo, Bassey A.

    1992-01-01

    Examines the dynamics of organizational communication following corporate implementation of quality circles. Describes the rhetorical visions of people at three organizational levels closely associated with quality circles: (1) managers; (2) facilitators who organize the quality circles; and (3) employees. (SR)

  20. "Vicious circles": the development of morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Owen-Smith, Amanda; Donovan, Jenny; Coast, Joanna

    2014-09-01

    Although there has been extensive research around the etiology of moderate obesity, there are still important questions relating to the development and lived experience of extreme obesity. We present a synthesis of data from two in-depth qualitative studies in which morbidly obese participants (N = 31) were able to explain the development of the condition in their own terms. We identified consistent themes in the two datasets, and undertook a detailed data synthesis. Particularly salient themes in the development of morbid obesity related to family structures and early socialization experiences, and the role of emotional distress was dominant in both initial weight gain and ongoing cycles of loss and regain. All informants accepted some responsibility for their health state, but identified a number of mitigating factors that limited personal culpability that were often related to the fulfillment of gendered social expectations. PMID:25079501

  1. Late Mousterian persistence near the Arctic Circle.

    PubMed

    Slimak, Ludovic; Svendsen, John Inge; Mangerud, Jan; Plisson, Hugues; Heggen, Herbjørn Presthus; Brugère, Alexis; Pavlov, Pavel Yurievich

    2011-05-13

    Palaeolithic sites in Russian high latitudes have been considered as Upper Palaeolithic and thus representing an Arctic expansion of modern humans. Here we show that at Byzovaya, in the western foothills of the Polar Urals, the technological structure of the lithic assemblage makes it directly comparable with Mousterian Middle Palaeolithic industries that so far have been exclusively attributed to the Neandertal populations in Europe. Radiocarbon and optical-stimulated luminescence dates on bones and sand grains indicate that the site was occupied during a short period around 28,500 carbon-14 years before the present (about 31,000 to 34,000 calendar years ago), at the time when only Upper Palaeolithic cultures occupied lower latitudes of Eurasia. Byzovaya may thus represent a late northern refuge for Neandertals, about 1000 km north of earlier known Mousterian sites. PMID:21566192

  2. Topographic control of sorted circle morphology on Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Joana; Hauber, Ernst; Reiss, Dennis; Hiesinger, Harald; Johnsson, Andreas; van Gasselt, Stephan; Balme, Matt; Head, Jim; de Verra, Jean-Pierre; Steinbrügge, Gregor; Jaumann, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Patterned ground is a typical phenomenon in polar, subpolar and alpine regions [1]. As it is commonly (but not necessarily!) related to freeze-thaw cycles, its presence on Mars could possibly point to locations and periods where and when liquid water existed in the recent past [2]. Sorted circles are a class of patterned ground that was tentatively identified in Elysium Planitia (Mars) [3], but this interpretation has been challenged on the basis of physical considerations [4]. Without direct access to potential patterned ground on Mars, the analysis of terrestrial analogues can inform the interpretation of Martian landforms. Svalbard (Norway) offers a wide variety of permafrost features that are morphologically analogous to Martian cold-climate landforms [5]. It hosts some of the best examples of sorted circles on Earth, which are located on the westernmost tip of Brøgger peninsula, on a broad strand flat that is characterized by a series of postglacial beach ridges [6]. Here we report on our analysis of sorted circle morphology (especially their plan-view shape, i.e. their "roundness" or ellipticity) and its correlation with local topography (slopes, curvature). Sorted circle morphology was determined from HRSC-AX images (for details on the flight campaign and image properties see ref [5]) and through field work. Topographic information comes from a 50 cm gridded DEM derived from HRSC-AX stereo images. We measured sorted circle morphology (ellipticity, azimuth of major axis) along a WNW-ESE traverse that runs from the inland towards the sea and is oriented perpendicular to the local beach ridge trend. Selected areas with homogeneous sorted circle appearance were visually mapped, and compared to the average slope, aspect, and the calculated topographic wetness index (TWI). Furthermore the whole traverse was classified into four different morphologies of the sorted patterned ground (sorted circles, sorted "ellipses", sorted nets and areas without patterned ground

  3. From EUCLID to Ptolemy in English Crop Circles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, G. S.

    1997-12-01

    The late Lord Soli Zuckerman, science advisor to several British governments, encouraged the author, an astronomer, to test the theory that all crop circles were made by hoaxers. Within the hundreds of formations in Southern England he saw a thread of surprising historical content at the intellectual level of College Dons. One diagram in celestial mechanics involved triple conjunctions of Mercury, Venus and Mars every 67 2/3 years. Ptolemy's fourth musical scale, tense diatonic, occurred in the circles during the period 1978-88. Starting on E, Ptolemaic ratios make our perfect diatonic scale of white notes on the keyboard of the piano or church organ. For separated circles the ratio was given by diameters, and for concentric circles it was diameters squared. A series of rotationally symmetric figures began in 1988 which combined Ptolemy's ratios with Euclid's theorems. In his last plane theorem, Euclid (Elements 13,12) proved that the square on the side of an equilateral triangle is 3 times the square on the circum-circle radius -- diatonic note G(2). From the 1988 figure one can prove the square on the side is 16/3 times the square on the semi-altitude, giving note F(3). Later rotational figures over the next 5 years led to diatonic ratios for the hexagon, square and triangle. They gave with the exactness of Euclidean theorems the notes F, C(2) and E(2), and they are the only regular polygons to do so. Although these 4 crop theorems derive from Euclid, they were previously unknown as a set in the literature, nor had the Ptolemaic connection been published. Professional magazines asked the readers to provide a fifth theorem that would generate the above 4 theorems, but none was forthcoming. Ultimately the cicle makers showed knowledge of this generating theorem using a 200-ft design at Litchfield, Hampshire. After 1993, rotationally symmetric geometries continued to appear, but with much more complicated patterns. One design showed 6 crescent moons in a hexagon

  4. Expanding the Reach of Extension to Underserved Audiences through Study Circles in Rural Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, Melissa; Petty, Barbara; Hansen, Lyle; Hoffman, Katie; Wittman, Grace

    2012-01-01

    Extension educators expanded the reach of their programming to underserved audiences through the implementation of Study Circles in rural Southern Idaho. Study Circles gave educators entry into communities by establishing relationships necessary for long-term change. Study Circle discussions in rural Southern Idaho led to stronger relationships…

  5. Getting Started with Literature Circles. The Bill Harp Professional Teachers Library Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noe, Katherine L. Schlick; Johnson, Nancy J.

    Designed to help teachers get started using literature circles in their classrooms, this book gives teachers a boost to begin, offers some insights from other teachers, and helps teachers clarify where to go next. It notes that literature circles (or literature study groups, book clubs, or discussion circles) take many forms and engage students in…

  6. Around the CIRCLE: Research and Practice. Volume 5, Number 1, Fall 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE), 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE) promotes research on the civic and political engagements of Americans between the ages of 15 and 25. The following topics are covered in this issue of "Around the CIRCLE": (1) Common Social Studies Teaching Practices and their Civic Outcomes; (2) CIRCLE Jointly Hosts…

  7. Native American Values and Management Education: Envisioning an Inclusive Virtuous Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verbos, Amy Klemm; Gladstone, Joe S.; Kennedy, Deanna M.

    2011-01-01

    Circles are symbols of interconnectedness. Behavioral circles can be vicious or virtuous. Many American Indians are caught in a vicious circle of exclusion from the purported benefits of Westernization, entrapment in its negative elements, and the ongoing undermining of their culture and thus their identities. Yet Native Americans, along with many…

  8. Calculation of Latitude and Longitude for Points on Perimeter of a Circle on a Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Heidi E.

    2015-08-14

    This document describes the calculation of the Earth-Centered Earth Fixed (ECEF) coordinates for points lying on the perimeter of a circle. Here, the perimeter of the circle lies on the surface of the sphere and the center of the planar circle is below the surface. These coordinates are converted to latitude and longitude for mapping fields on the surface of the earth.

  9. The Chicken and the Egg: Inviting Response and Talk through Socratic Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styslinger, Mary E.; Pollock, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    This collaborative inquiry answers the following questions: 1) What is the nature of talk during Socratic Circles? 2) What is student response to talk? 3) How might knowing more about student response to talk and the nature of talk improve teaching during Socratic Circles? The article first describes the process of implementing Socratic Circles,…

  10. Problematizing Literature Circles as Forums for Discussion of Multicultural and Political Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thein, Amanda Haertling; Guise, Megan; Sloan, DeAnn Long

    2011-01-01

    In a six-week literature circle unit in a tenth-grade classroom, one group of students discussed Dorothy Allison's novel "Bastard out of Carolina." By criteria frequently used to judge the quality of discussion, this literature circle was successful. However, several key moments are highlighted that point to the limits of literature circles as…