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Sample records for extract cell line-dependent

  1. Casein gene expression in mouse mammary epithelial cell lines: Dependence upon extracellular matrix and cell type

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, D.; Oborn, C.J. ); Li, M.L.; Bissell, M.J. )

    1987-09-01

    The COMMA-D mammary cell line exhibits mammary-specific functional differentiation under appropriate conditions in cell culture. The cytologically heterogeneous COMMA-D parental line and the clonal lines DB-1, TA-5, and FA-1 derived from the COMMA-D parent were examined for similar properties of functional differentiation. In monolayer cell culture, the cell lines DB-1, TA-5, FA-1, and MA-4 were examined for expression of mammary-specific and epithelial-specific proteins by an indirect immunofluorescence assay. The clonal cell lines were relatively homogeneous in their respective staining properties and seemed to represent three subpopulations found in the heterogeneous parental COMMA-D lines. None of the four clonal lines appeared to represent myoepithelial cells. The cell lines were examined for expression of {beta}-casein mRNA in the presence or absence of prolactin. The inducibility of {beta}-casein in the COMMA-D cell line was further enhanced by a reconstituted basement membrane preparation enriched in laminin, collagen IV, and proteoglycans. These results support the hypothesis that the functional response of inducible mammary cell populations is a result of interaction among hormones, multiple extracellular matrix components, and specific cell types.

  2. Cell Line-Dependent Variability of Coordinate Expression of p75NTR and CRABP1 and Modulation of Effects of Fenretinide on Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaoli Pu; Wang, Simeng; Li, Xingguo; Schor, Nina F.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood neural crest tumor. Fenretinide, a retinoic acid analogue, induces accumulation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and consequent apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells. The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) enhances the antineuroblastoma cell efficacy of fenretinide in vitro. We examined the role of the retinoid binding protein, CRABP1, in p75NTR-mediated potentiation of the efficacy of fenretinide. Knockdown and overexpression, respectively, of either p75NTR or CRABP1 were effected in neuroblastoma cell lines using standard techniques. Expression was determined by qRT-PCR and confirmed at the protein level by Western blot. Metabolic viability was determined by Alamar blue assay. While protein content of CRABP1 correlated roughly with that of p75NTR in the three neuroblastoid or epithelioid human neuroblastoma cell lines studied, manipulation of p75NTR expression resulted in cell line-dependent, variable change in CRABP1 expression. Furthermore, in some cell lines, induced expression of CRABP1 in the absence of p75NTR did not alter cell sensitivity to fenretinide treatment. The effects of manipulation of p75NTR expression on CRABP1 expression and the effects of CRABP1 expression on fenretinide efficacy are therefore neuroblastoma cell line-dependent. Potentiation of the antineuroblastoma cell effects of fenretinide by p75NTR is not mediated solely through CRABP1. PMID:26843908

  3. Replication-induced DNA damage after PARP inhibition causes G2 delay, and cell line-dependent apoptosis, necrosis and multinucleation

    PubMed Central

    Dale Rein, Idun; Solberg Landsverk, Kirsti; Micci, Francesca; Patzke, Sebastian; Stokke, Trond

    2015-01-01

    PARP inhibitors have been approved for treatment of tumors with mutations in or loss of BRCA1/2. The molecular mechanisms and particularly the cellular phenotypes resulting in synthetic lethality are not well understood and varying clinical responses have been observed. We have investigated the dose- and time-dependency of cell growth, cell death and cell cycle traverse of 4 malignant lymphocyte cell lines treated with the PARP inhibitor Olaparib. PARP inhibition induced a severe growth inhibition in this cell line panel and increased the levels of phosphorylated H2AX-associated DNA damage in S phase. Repair of the remaining replication related damage caused a G2 phase delay before entry into mitosis. The G2 delay, and the growth inhibition, was more pronounced in the absence of functional ATM. Further, Olaparib treated Reh and Granta-519 cells died by apoptosis, while U698 and JVM-2 cells proceeded through mitosis with aberrant chromosomes, skipped cytokinesis, and eventually died by necrosis. The TP53-deficient U698 cells went through several rounds of DNA replication and mitosis without cytokinesis, ending up as multinucleated cells with DNA contents of up to 16c before dying. In summary, we report here for the first time cell cycle-resolved DNA damage induction, and cell line-dependent differences in the mode of cell death caused by PARP inhibition. PMID:26312527

  4. Replication-induced DNA damage after PARP inhibition causes G2 delay, and cell line-dependent apoptosis, necrosis and multinucleation.

    PubMed

    Dale Rein, Idun; Solberg Landsverk, Kirsti; Micci, Francesca; Patzke, Sebastian; Stokke, Trond

    2015-01-01

    PARP inhibitors have been approved for treatment of tumors with mutations in or loss of BRCA1/2. The molecular mechanisms and particularly the cellular phenotypes resulting in synthetic lethality are not well understood and varying clinical responses have been observed. We have investigated the dose- and time-dependency of cell growth, cell death and cell cycle traverse of 4 malignant lymphocyte cell lines treated with the PARP inhibitor Olaparib. PARP inhibition induced a severe growth inhibition in this cell line panel and increased the levels of phosphorylated H2AX-associated DNA damage in S phase. Repair of the remaining replication related damage caused a G2 phase delay before entry into mitosis. The G2 delay, and the growth inhibition, was more pronounced in the absence of functional ATM. Further, Olaparib treated Reh and Granta-519 cells died by apoptosis, while U698 and JVM-2 cells proceeded through mitosis with aberrant chromosomes, skipped cytokinesis, and eventually died by necrosis. The TP53-deficient U698 cells went through several rounds of DNA replication and mitosis without cytokinesis, ending up as multinucleated cells with DNA contents of up to 16c before dying. In summary, we report here for the first time cell cycle-resolved DNA damage induction, and cell line-dependent differences in the mode of cell death caused by PARP inhibition. PMID:26312527

  5. Human cell line-dependent WC-Co nanoparticle cytotoxicity and genotoxicity: a key role of ROS production.

    PubMed

    Paget, V; Moche, H; Kortulewski, T; Grall, R; Irbah, L; Nesslany, F; Chevillard, S

    2015-02-01

    Although tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used because of their robustness, their risk to human health remains poorly studied, despite the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifying them as "probably carcinogenic" for humans (Group 2A) in 2006. Our current study aimed at defining the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of one set of commercially available 60-nm diameter WC-Co NPs on three human cell lines representative of potential target organs: A549 (lung), Hep3B (liver), and Caki-1 (kidney). The cytotoxicity of WC-Co NPs was determined by evaluating cell impedance (xCELLigence), cell survival/death, and cell cycle checkpoints. Flow cytometry was used to not only evaluate cell cycle checkpoints, but to also estimate reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. In addition, γ-H2Ax foci detection (confocal microscopy), considered to be the most sensitive technique for studying DNA double-strand breaks, was utilized to evaluate genotoxicity. As a final part of this study, we assessed the cellular incorporation of WC-Co NPs, first byflow cytometry (side scatter), and then by confocal microscopy (light reflection) to ensure that the NPs had entered cells. Overall, our current findings demonstrate that WC-Co NPs induce cell mortality, DNA double-strand breaks, and cell cycle arrest in human renal (Caki-1) and liver (Hep3B) cell lines, but do not induce significant cytotoxic effects in A549 lung cells. Interestingly, although WC-Co NPs effectively entered the cells in all 3 lines tested, ROS were detected in Caki-1 and Hep3B, but not in A549. This may explain the great differences in the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects we observed between these lines. PMID:25398624

  6. Cell line-dependent cytotoxicity of poly(isobutylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles coated with chitosan and thiolated chitosan: Insights from cultured human epithelial HeLa, Caco2/TC7 and HT-29/MTX cells.

    PubMed

    Pradines, Bénédicte; Lievin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Vauthier, Christine; Ponchel, Gilles; Loiseau, Philippe M; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2015-08-01

    Nanoparticles composed of poly(isobutylcyanoacrylate) core coated with a mixture of chitosan and thiolated chitosan have already shown promising results in terms of mucoadhesion and permeation enhancement properties of pharmaceutical active drugs delivered via mucosal routes. In the present work, the cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles was first investigated using direct contact assay on undifferentiated human cervix epithelial HeLa cells. The results showed strong toxicity in HeLa cells for the two investigated concentrations 25 and 50 μg/mL. The cytotoxic effect was mainly attributed to the poly(isobutylcyanoacrylate) core since no significant differences in nanoparticle cytotoxicity were reported when nanoparticle shell composition was modified by adding chitosan or thiolated chitosan. In contrast, lower nanoparticle toxicity was reported using human fully-differentiated enterocyte-like Caco-2/TC7, and fully-differentiated mucus-secreting HT-29/MTX cells forming monolayer in culture mimicking an intestinal epithelial barrier. This study demonstrated that the toxicity of poly(isobutylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles is highly cell line-dependent. PMID:26051544

  7. Cytotoxic effect of RB 6145 in human tumour cell lines: dependence on hypoxia, extra- and intracellular pH and drug uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Skarsgard, L. D.; Acheson, D. K.; Vinczan, A.; Wouters, B. G.; Heinrichs, B. E.; Loblaw, D. A.; Minchinton, A. I.; Chaplin, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    Low pH and hypoxia are a common feature of many solid tumours. This study examined the effect of these two conditions on the cytotoxic properties of the bifunctional agent RB 6145, the prodrug of RSU 1069. The effect of acidic pH on RB 6145 toxicity was examined in six human tumour cell lines under hypoxic conditions and was found to have little effect in HT 29, A549, U373 and HT 144 cells. Treatment was for 1 h at 37 degrees C, pH 6.4 or 7.4. Significant potentiation of RB 6145 toxicity was observed in SiHa cells (enhancement ratio; ERpH approximately 1.6) and in U1 cells (ERpH approximately 1.4). In these two cell lines the potentiation of RB 6145 toxicity arising from hypoxia was large, with ERHyp approximately 11 and 15 in SiHa and U1 cells respectively. SiHa cells, which show a pH effect and HT 29 cells, which do not, were chosen for further comparative studies of drug uptake )nd regulation of intracellular pH. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) determinations of the uptake of RB 6145 and its dervatives showed that in SiHa cells, intracellular to extracellular drug concentration ratio (Ci/Ce) at 1 h was approximately 40% higher at pH 6.4 than at pH 7.4, whereas in HT 29 cells Ci/Ce was approximately 25% lower. Under conditions of acidic extracellular pH, regulation of pH was somewhat less effective in SiHa cells, where pHi dropped to within 0.2 pH units of the extracellular pH over a 2.5 h treatment at pH 6.4. It seems likely that increased drug uptake was at least part of the basis for the observed potentiation of RB 6145 toxicity in SiHa cells. A model which would better explain the results for both cell lines might also include the possibility that low pH per se potentiates cytotoxic damage to a modest extent and that it is offset or augmented by altered uptake in HT 29 and SiHa cells respectively. PMID:8519663

  8. Three-Dimensional Nanocomposites: Fluidics Driven Assembly of Metal Nanoparticles on Protein Nanostructures and Their Cell-Line-Dependent Intracellular Trafficking Pattern.

    PubMed

    Srikar, R; Suresh, Dhananjay; Saranathan, Sandhya; Zambre, Ajit; Kannan, Raghuraman

    2016-05-17

    Three-dimensional nanocomposites prepared using two different families of nanomaterials holds significant relevance pertaining to biological applications. However, integration of the two distinct nanomaterials with precision to control the overall compositional homogeneity of the resulting 3D nanocomposite is a synthetic challenge. Conventional reactions result in nanocomposites with heterogeneous composition and render useless. To address this challenge, we have developed a fluidics-mediated process for controlling the interaction of nanoparticles to yield a compositional uniform multidimensional nanoparticle; as an example, we demonstrated the integration of gold nanoparticles on gelatin nanoparticles. The composition of the nanocomposite is controlled by reacting predetermined number of gold nanoparticles to a known number of thiolated gelatin nanoparticles at any given time within a defined cross-sectional area. Using the fluidics process, we developed nanocomposites of different composition: [gelatin nanoparticles-(gold nanoparticles)x] where xaverage = 2, 12, or 25. The nanocomposites were further surface conjugated with organic molecules such as fluorescent dye or polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules. To study the biological behavior of nanocomposite, we investigated the cellular internalization and trafficking characteristics of nanocomposites in two human cancer cell lines. The nanocomposites exhibited a three-stage cellular release mechanism that enables the translocation of gold nanoparticles within various cellular compartments. In summary, the three-dimensional nanocomposite serves as a novel platform for developing well-defined protein-metal nanocomposites for potential drug delivery, sensory, and molecular imaging applications. PMID:27088307

  9. Lipid extraction from isolated single nerve cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnov, I. V.

    1977-01-01

    A method of extracting lipids from single neurons isolated from lyophilized tissue is described. The method permits the simultaneous extraction of lipids from 30-40 nerve cells and for each cell provides equal conditions of solvent removal at the conclusion of extraction.

  10. A Cell Extraction Method for Oily Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Lappé, Michael; Kallmeyer, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Hydrocarbons can be found in many different habitats and represent an important carbon source for microbes. As fossil fuels, they are also an important economical resource and through natural seepage or accidental release they can be major pollutants. DNA-specific stains and molecular probes bind to hydrocarbons, causing massive background fluorescence, thereby hampering cell enumeration. The cell extraction procedure of Kallmeyer et al. (2008) separates the cells from the sediment matrix. In principle, this technique can also be used to separate cells from oily sediments, but it was not originally optimized for this application. Here we present a modified extraction method in which the hydrocarbons are removed prior to cell extraction. Due to the reduced background fluorescence the microscopic image becomes clearer, making cell identification, and enumeration much easier. Consequently, the resulting cell counts from oily samples treated according to our new protocol are significantly higher than those treated according to Kallmeyer et al. (2008). We tested different amounts of a variety of solvents for their ability to remove hydrocarbons and found that n-hexane and – in samples containing more mature oils – methanol, delivered the best results. However, as solvents also tend to lyse cells, it was important to find the optimum solvent to sample ratio, at which hydrocarbon extraction is maximized and cell lysis minimized. A volumetric ratio of 1:2–1:5 between a formalin-fixed sediment slurry and solvent delivered highest cell counts. Extraction efficiency was around 30–50% and was checked on both oily samples spiked with known amounts of E. coli cells and oil-free samples amended with fresh and biodegraded oil. The method provided reproducible results on samples containing very different kinds of oils with regard to their degree of biodegradation. For strongly biodegraded oil MeOH turned out to be the most appropriate solvent, whereas for less biodegraded

  11. Cell Cycle Synchronization in Xenopus Egg Extracts.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Peter J; Neusiedler, Julia; Creavin, Kevin; Chadha, Gaganmeet Singh; Blow, J Julian

    2016-01-01

    Many important discoveries in cell cycle research have been made using cell-free extracts prepared from the eggs of the South African clawed frog Xenopus laevis. These extracts efficiently support the key nuclear functions of the eukaryotic cell cycle in vitro under apparently the same controls that exist in vivo. The Xenopus cell-free system is therefore uniquely suited to the study of the mechanisms, dynamics and integration of cell cycle regulated processes at a biochemical level. Here, we describe methods currently in use in our laboratory for the preparation of Xenopus egg extracts and demembranated sperm nuclei. We detail how these extracts can be used to study the key transitions of the eukaryotic cell cycle and describe conditions under which these transitions can be manipulated by addition of drugs that either retard or advance passage. In addition, we describe in detail essential techniques that provide a practical starting point for investigating the function of proteins involved in the operation of the eukaryotic cell cycle. PMID:26254920

  12. A cell extraction method for oily sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappé, M.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrocarbons can be found in many different habitats and represent an important carbon source for microbes. As fossil fuels, they are an important economical resource and, through natural seepage or accidental release, they can be major pollutants. Oil sands from Alberta, Canada, and samples from the seafloor of the Gulf of Mexico represent typical examples of either natural or anthropogenically affected oily sediments. DNA-specific stains and molecular probes bind to hydrocarbons, causing massive background fluorescence and thereby massively hampering cell enumeration. The cell extraction procedure of Kallmeyer et al. (2008) separates the cells from the sediment matrix, producing a sediment free cell extract that can then be used for subsequent staining and cell enumeration under a fluorescence microscope. In principle, this technique can also be used to separate cells from oily sediments, but it was not originally optimized for this application and does not provide satisfactory results. Here we present a modified extraction method in which the hydrocarbons are removed prior to cell extraction by a solvent treatment. Due to the reduced background fluorescence the microscopic image becomes clearer, making cell identification and enumeration much easier. Consequently, the resulting cell counts from oily samples treated according to our new protocol were significantly higher than those treated according to Kallmeyer et al. (2008). We tested different amounts of a variety of solvents for their ability to remove hydrocarbons and found that n-hexane and - in samples containing more biodegraded oils - methanol, delivered the best results. Because solvents also tend to lyse cells, it was important to find the optimum solvent to sample ratio, at which the positive effect of hydrocarbon extraction overcomes the negative effect of cell lysis. A volumetric ratio of 1:2 to 1:5 between a formalin-fixed sediment slurry and solvent delivered highest cell counts. Extraction

  13. Hot cell shield plug extraction apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Philip A.; Manhart, Larry K.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for moving shielding plugs into and out of holes in concrete shielding walls in hot cells for handling radioactive materials without the use of external moving equipment. The apparatus provides a means whereby a shield plug is extracted from its hole and then swung approximately 90 degrees out of the way so that the hole may be accessed. The apparatus uses hinges to slide the plug in and out and to rotate it out of the way, the hinge apparatus also supporting the weight of the plug in all positions, with the load of the plug being transferred to a vertical wall by means of a bolting arrangement.

  14. In vitro breast cancer cell lethality of Brazilian plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Suffredini, I B; Paciencia, M L B; Frana, S A; Varella, A D; Younes, R N

    2007-10-01

    In this study we screened the cytotoxicity of 1220 plant extracts obtained from 351 plants belonging to 74 families occurring in the Amazon and Atlantic rain forests against MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines. All extracts were tested at a dose of 100 microg/mL. Only 11 aqueous or organic extracts belonging to the Annonaceae, Apocynaceae, Araceae, Clusiaceae, Flacourtiaceae, Leguminosae, Olacaceae and Violaceae showed marked lethal activity. Vismia guianensis and Annona hypoglauca extracts showed the greatest lethal activity. PMID:18236788

  15. Tunable Single-Cell Extraction for Molecular Analyses.

    PubMed

    Guillaume-Gentil, Orane; Grindberg, Rashel V; Kooger, Romain; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Martinez, Vincent; Ossola, Dario; Pilhofer, Martin; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A

    2016-07-14

    Because of cellular heterogeneity, the analysis of endogenous molecules from single cells is of significant interest and has major implications. While micromanipulation or cell sorting followed by cell lysis is already used for subsequent molecular examinations, approaches to directly extract the content of living cells remain a challenging but promising alternative to achieving non-destructive sampling and cell-context preservation. Here, we demonstrate the quantitative extraction from single cells with spatiotemporal control using fluidic force microscopy. We further present a comprehensive analysis of the soluble molecules withdrawn from the cytoplasm or the nucleus, including the detection of enzyme activities and transcript abundances. This approach has uncovered the ability of cells to withstand extraction of up to several picoliters and opens opportunities to study cellular dynamics and cell-cell communication under physiological conditions at the single-cell level. PMID:27419874

  16. A new method for extraction of pectin from cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Maness, N.O.; Mort, A.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Pectin is often extracted from plant tissues using the Ca{sup ++} chelators ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA) or cyclohexane-trans-1,2 diamine tetraacetate (CDTA). While these chelators are effective in solubilizing pectin, even after extensive dialysis against distilled water, EDTA or CDTA remains associated with the pectin. The authors have found that if 500 mM imidazole buffer, pH 7.0 is substituted for 50 mM CDTA, pH 6.5, and for equivalent extraction periods, an equivalent amount of pectin with the same sugar composition is extracted. But, the imidazole buffer can be dialyzed away completely into distilled water. Their alternative procedure for extraction of pectin from cell walls will be presented. Utilization of the procedure for extraction of whole cell walls or cell walls pretreated with liquid hydrogen fluoride is discussed.

  17. Effects of biodegradable Mg-6Zn alloy extracts on cell cycle of intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanhui; Yan, Jun; Zheng, Qi; Wang, Zhigang; Li, Jianan; Zhang, Xiaonong; Zhang, Shaoxiang

    2013-02-01

    In this study, intestinal epithelial cells (IEC)-6 were cultured in different concentration extracts of Mg-6Zn alloys for different time periods. We studied the indirect effects of Mg-6Zn alloys on cell cycle of IEC-6 cells. The cell cycle of IEC-6 cells was measured using flow cytometry. And, the cell cycle of IEC-6 cells was evaluated by investigating the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4, and P21 using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting tests. It was found that the IEC-6 cells displayed better cell functions in 20% extract of the Mg-6Zn alloy extracts, compared to the 100% or 60% extract. The in vitro results indicated that the conspicuous alkaline environment that is a result of rapid corrosion of Mg-6Zn alloys is disadvantageous to cell cycle of IEC-6 cells. PMID:22071354

  18. A toxicology suite adapted for comparing parallel toxicity responses of model human lung cells to diesel exhaust particles and their extracts

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jane; Hernandez, Mark; Snawder, John E.; Handorean, Alina; McCabe, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that exposure to airborne particulate matter can be an important risk factor for some common respiratory diseases. While many studies have shown that particulate matter exposures are associated with inflammatory reactions, the role of specific cellular responses in the manifestation of primary hypersensitivities, and the progression of respiratory diseases remains unclear. In order to better understand mechanisms by which particulate matter can exert adverse health effects, more robust approaches to support in vitro studies are warranted. In response to this need, a group of accepted toxicology assays were adapted to create an analytical suite for screening and evaluating the effects of important, ubiquitous atmospheric pollutants on two model human lung cell lines (epithelial and immature macrophage). To demonstrate the utility of this suite, responses to intact diesel exhaust particles, and mass-based equivalent doses of their organic extracts were examined. Results suggest that extracts have the potential to induce greater biological responses than those associated with their colloidal counterpart. Additionally, macrophage cells appear to be more susceptible to the cytotoxic effects of both intact diesel exhaust particles and their organic extract, than epithelial cells tested in parallel. As designed, the suite provided a more robust basis for characterizing toxicity mechanisms than the analysis of any individual assay. Findings suggest that cellular responses to particulate matter are cell line dependent, and show that the collection and preparation of PM and/or their extracts have the potential to impact cellular responses relevant to screening fundamental elements of respiratory toxicity. PMID:26412929

  19. Reliable and High Efficiency Extraction of Kidney Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Nistala, Ravi; Meuth, Alex; Smith, Cassandra; Annayya, Aroor

    2016-01-01

    Immune system activation occurs in multiple kidney diseases and pathophysiological processes. The immune system consists of both adaptive and innate components and multiple cell types. Sometimes, the cell type of interest is present in very low numbers among the large numbers of total cells isolated from the kidney. Hence, reliable and efficient isolation of kidney mononuclear cell populations is important in order to study the immunological problems associated with kidney diseases. Traditionally, tissue isolation of kidney mononuclear cells have been performed via enzymatic digestions using different varieties and strengths of collagenases/DNAses yielding varying numbers of viable immune cells. Recently, with the development of the mechanical tissue disruptors for single cell isolation, the collagenase digestion step is avoided and replaced by a simple mechanical disruption of the kidneys after extraction from the mouse. Herein, we demonstrate a simple yet efficient method for the isolation of kidney mononuclear cells for every day immune cell extractions. We further demonstrate an example of subset analysis of immune cells in the kidney. Importantly, this technique can be adapted to other soft and non-fibrous tissues such as the liver and brain. PMID:27583412

  20. Fermented red ginseng extract inhibits cancer cell proliferation and viability.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jisun; Jeon, Seong Bin; Lee, Yuri; Lee, Hyeji; Kim, Ju; Kwon, Bo Ra; Yu, Kang-Yeol; Cha, Jeong-Dan; Hwang, Seung-Mi; Choi, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Yong-Seob

    2015-04-01

    Red ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) is the most widely recognized medicinal herb due to its remedial effects in various disorders, such as cancers, diabetes, and heart problems. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effect of fermented red ginseng extract (f-RGE; provided by Jeonju Biomaterials Institute, Jeonju, South Korea) in a parallel comparison with the effect of nonfermented red ginseng extract (nf-RGE; control) on several cancer cell lines--MCF-7 breast cancer cells, HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and reprogrammed MCF-7 cells (mimicking cancer stem cells). Cells were cultured at various concentrations of RGE (from 0.5 up to 5 mg/mL) and their viabilities and proliferative properties were examined. Our data demonstrate the following: (1) nf-RGE inhibited cell viability at ≥1 mg/mL for MCF-7 cells and ≥2 mg/mL for HepG2 cells, (2) in the presence of a carcinogenic agent, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), nf-RGE treatment in combination with paclitaxel synergistically decreased MCF-7 as well as HepG2 cell viability, (3) f-RGE (which contained a greater level of Rg3 content) more effectively decreased the viability of MCF-7 and HepG2 cells compared to nf-RGE, and (4) f-RGE appeared more potent for inhibiting cancerous differentiation of reprogrammed MCF-7 cells in a synergistic fashion with paclitaxel, especially in the presence of TPA, compared to nf-RGE. These findings suggest that f-RGE treatment may be more effective for decreasing cancer cell survival by inducing apoptotic cell death and also presumably for preventing cancer stem cell differentiation compared to nf-RGE. PMID:25658580

  1. Protein extracts from cultured cells contain nonspecific serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Miyara, Masatsugu; Umeda, Kanae; Ishida, Keishi; Sanoh, Seigo; Kotake, Yaichiro; Ohta, Shigeru

    2016-06-01

    Serum is an important component of cell culture media. The present study demonstrates contamination of intracellular protein extract by bovine serum albumin from the culture media and illustrates how this contamination can cause the misinterpretation of western blot results. Preliminary experiments can prevent the misinterpretation of some experimental results, and optimization of the washing process may enable specific protein detection. PMID:26967711

  2. Extraction and Elongation of Genomic DNA from a Single Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, Christelle; Tegenfeldt, Jonas; Austin, Robert

    2001-03-01

    We are developing ways to use microfabricated electrode arrays to extract genomic DNA from single E. coli cells and then move the genomic material into an dielectrophoretic trap for clean-up and fractionation. We will present some preliminary data and discuss some of basic polymer physics that impact on these experiments.

  3. The effect of ginger extract on glycoproteins of Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Zahra; Nassir-Ud-Din; Kohan, Haleemeh Kabini; Kadivar, Mehdi; Kalyee, Zahra; Rad, Behzad Laame; Iravani, Ayda; Rahimi, Nourooz Ali; Wahabi, Farideh; Sadeghi, Sedigheh; Pourfallah, Fatemeh; Arjmand, Mohammad

    2014-01-15

    Protein glycosylation is associated with the development and progression of specific diseases, including cancers. The ginger rhizome is known to have anti-cancer and anti-fungal properties. This investigation was carried out to study the effect of ginger on glycoproteins of Raji cells. A 10% yield of ginger extract was mixed with 0.01% DMSO and added to 6 x 10(4) Raji cells at different concentrations for 24, 48 and 72 h at 37 degrees C. Their half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) was determined and analyzed statistically using Graphpad prism software. Cell extracts were prepared and their glycoproteins purified using lectin-affinity chromatography (Q proteome total glycoprotein and O glycoprotein kits) and SDS PAGE was carried out. IC50 of ginger extract on Raji cells was 20 microg mL(-1) at 72 h with < 0.01 significance. Silver staining of purified glycoprotiens in Raji cells indicated the presence of O-glycans and N-glycans. N-linked mannose and N-linked sialic acids were detected with the total glycoprotein kit. O-linked galactose and O-linked sialic acids were identified with the O-glycoprotein. Ginger reduced the expression of O-linked sialic acid and also N-linked mannose on Raji cells but had no effect on other glycoproteins. Sialic acid is now well known as a cancer marker and investigations are on to use it as a drug-target in cancerous tissues. PMID:24783808

  4. Biochemical Preparation of Cell Extract for Cell-Free Protein Synthesis without Physical Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kei; Doi, Nobuhide

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) is a powerful tool for the preparation of toxic proteins, directed protein evolution, and bottom-up synthetic biology. The transcription-translation machinery for CFPS is provided by cell extracts, which usually contain 20–30 mg/mL of proteins. In general, these cell extracts are prepared by physical disruption; however, this requires technical experience and special machinery. Here, we report a method to prepare cell extracts for CFPS using a biochemical method, which disrupts cells through the combination of lysozyme treatment, osmotic shock, and freeze-thaw cycles. The resulting cell extracts showed similar features to those obtained by physical disruption, and was able to synthesize active green fluorescent proteins in the presence of appropriate chemicals to a concentration of 20 μM (0.5 mg/mL). PMID:27128597

  5. Enzymatic Activity Assays for Base Excision Repair Enzymes in Cell Extracts from Vertebrate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Çağlayan, Melike; Horton, Julie K.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported enzymatic activity assays for the base excision repair (BER) enzymes DNA polymerase β (pol β), aprataxin (APTX), and flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) in cell extracts from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Çağlayan and Wilson, 2014). Here, we describe a method to prepare cell extracts from vertebrate cells to investigate these enzymatic activities for the processing of the 5′-adenylated-sugar phosphate-containing BER intermediate. This new protocol complements our previous publication. The cell lines used are wild-type and APTX-deficient human lymphoblast cells from an Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia Type 1 (AOA1) disease patient, wild-type and APTX-null DT40 chicken B cells, and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells. This protocol is a quick and efficient way to make vertebrate cell extracts without using commercial kits. PMID:27390764

  6. Cupressus lusitanica (Cupressaceae) leaf extract induces apoptosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lopéz, L; Villavicencio, M A; Albores, A; Martínez, M; de la Garza, J; Meléndez-Zajgla, J; Maldonado, V

    2002-05-01

    A crude ethanolic extract of Cupressus lusitanica Mill. leaves demonstrate cytotoxicity in a panel of cancer cell lines. Cell death was due to apoptosis, as assessed by morphologic features (chromatin condensation and apoptotic bodies formation) and specific DNA fragmentation detected by in situ end-labeling of DNA breaks (TUNEL). The apoptotic cell death was induced timely in a dose-dependent manner. Despite the absence of changes in the expression levels of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, proapoptotic Bax protein variants omega and delta were increased. These results warrant further research of possible antitumor compounds in this plant. PMID:12007700

  7. Cell lysis and DNA extraction in microfabricated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, Christelle; Tegenfeldt, Jonas; Austin, Robert

    2002-03-01

    We are developing a microfabricated device to lyse single cells and extract the DNA. The chip consists of two parts: a diffuse mixer combined with a dielectrophoretic trap. We are working with E. coli which have been made osmoticaly unstable before loading into the chip. The cells are lysed by osmotic shock in the mixer. The lysate is then passed to the dielectrophoretic trap. Attempts to separate the genomic DNA from the lysate fragments by selectively trapping the DNA using dielectrophoresis have been made. We have encountered cell sticking problems and are investingating surface modifications using Polyethylene glycol to solve this problem.

  8. Enhanced Hole Extraction in Perovskite Solar Cells Through Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Habisreutinger, Severin N; Leijtens, Tomas; Eperon, Giles E; Stranks, Samuel D; Nicholas, Robin J; Snaith, Henry J

    2014-12-01

    Here, we report the use of polymer-wrapped carbon nanotubes as a means to enhance charge extraction through undoped spiro-OMeTAD. With this approach a good solar cell performance is achieved without the implementation of conventional doping methods. We demonstrate that a stratified two-layer architecture of sequentially deposited layers of carbon nanotubes and spiro-OMeTAD, outperforms a conventional blend of the hole-conductor and the carbon nanotubes. We also provide insights into the mechanism of the rapid hole extraction observed in the two-layer approach. PMID:26278955

  9. First extraction tests of the NSCL gas cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, L.; Lofy, P. A.; Davies, D. A.; Morrissey, D. J.; Schury, P.; Schwarz, S.; Sun, T.; Bollen, G.

    2004-12-01

    The first tests for stopping and extraction of energetic (92 MeV/u), short-lived 38Ca and 37K fragments are reported. The fragments were stopped and thermalized in 50 cm of helium at 1 bar. The ions were transported by electric fields and gas flow and jetted into an expansion chamber through a supersonic nozzle and collected on a metallic foil. The extraction efficiency was measured for different implantation rates and beam degrader thicknesses and compared with the experimental stopping efficiency in the gas cell.

  10. Probiotic Properties of Lyophilized Cell Free Extract of Lactobacillus casei

    PubMed Central

    Saadatzadeh, Afrooz; Fazeli, Mohamma Reza; Jamalifar, Hossein; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years there have been considerable interests in the use of probiotic live cells for nutritional and therapeutic purposes. This strategy can be concomitant with some limitations such as survival of live cell during the GI-transit and their effective delivery to target tissues upon ingestion. Several attempts have been made to overcome these limitations such as their microencapsulation, spray-drying and lyophilization. Objectives In this study extract of cultured probiotics without cells was evaluated for its antimicrobial effects, antioxidant activity, and its stability. Materials and Methods In this work the potential of lyophilized-cell-free-probiotic-extract (LPE) as a suitable alternative strategy for the preparation of probiotic-products was investigated. The main aim of this study was to find out the antibacterial and antioxidant activity of LPE and also its stability. LPE was obtained by centrifugation and subsequent lyophilization of the collected supernatant from culture media of Lactobacillus casei. An enzymatic reagent-kit was used for detection of its content of lactic acid. Antibacterial test was performed using agar cup-plat-method, the DPPH scavenging -assay was used to determine its antioxidant activity and during a storage course, LPE was under a long-term stability study. Results Results showed that, LPE had more antipathogenic effects, antioxidant activity, and stability during storage-time when compared to fresh probiotic-extract. Conclusions Employing the LPE as a new approach, gives novel concept of probiotic-products in food and medical marketing. PMID:24624202

  11. Lipid extraction from microalgae cell using persulfate-based oxidation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Sung, Mina; Oh, You-Kwan; Han, Jong-In

    2016-01-01

    In this study, persulfate, a solid-type oxidant, was adopted as a substitute for hydrogen peroxide in extracting lipid from microalgae biomass. Microalgae cells were concentrated at pH 3 and with 200mg/L of ferric chloride, conditions which can activate oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide and persulfate. At a persulfate concentration of 2mM and a reaction temperature of 90°C, exceedingly high extraction efficiency over 95% was obtained, which was higher than with 0.5% hydrogen peroxide at the same temperature. This result showed that persulfate is sufficiently powerful and incomparably cheap enough to replace the potent yet expensive oxidant. It appears that combining iron-based coagulation and persulfate-based lipid extraction is indeed a competitive approach that can possibly lighten the process burden for the microalgae-derived biodiesel production. PMID:26614226

  12. Simultaneous extraction of proteins and metabolites from cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Sapcariu, Sean C; Kanashova, Tamara; Weindl, Daniel; Ghelfi, Jenny; Dittmar, Gunnar; Hiller, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Proper sample preparation is an integral part of all omics approaches, and can drastically impact the results of a wide number of analyses. As metabolomics and proteomics research approaches often yield complementary information, it is desirable to have a sample preparation procedure which can yield information for both types of analyses from the same cell population. This protocol explains a method for the separation and isolation of metabolites and proteins from the same biological sample, in order for downstream use in metabolomics and proteomics analyses simultaneously. In this way, two different levels of biological regulation can be studied in a single sample, minimizing the variance that would result from multiple experiments. This protocol can be used with both adherent and suspension cell cultures, and the extraction of metabolites from cellular medium is also detailed, so that cellular uptake and secretion of metabolites can be quantified. Advantages of this technique includes:1.Inexpensive and quick to perform; this method does not require any kits.2.Can be used on any cells in culture, including cell lines and primary cells extracted from living organisms.3.A wide variety of different analysis techniques can be used, adding additional value to metabolomics data analyzed from a sample; this is of high value in experimental systems biology. PMID:26150938

  13. Simultaneous extraction of proteins and metabolites from cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Sapcariu, Sean C.; Kanashova, Tamara; Weindl, Daniel; Ghelfi, Jenny; Dittmar, Gunnar; Hiller, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Proper sample preparation is an integral part of all omics approaches, and can drastically impact the results of a wide number of analyses. As metabolomics and proteomics research approaches often yield complementary information, it is desirable to have a sample preparation procedure which can yield information for both types of analyses from the same cell population. This protocol explains a method for the separation and isolation of metabolites and proteins from the same biological sample, in order for downstream use in metabolomics and proteomics analyses simultaneously. In this way, two different levels of biological regulation can be studied in a single sample, minimizing the variance that would result from multiple experiments. This protocol can be used with both adherent and suspension cell cultures, and the extraction of metabolites from cellular medium is also detailed, so that cellular uptake and secretion of metabolites can be quantified. Advantages of this technique includes:1.Inexpensive and quick to perform; this method does not require any kits.2.Can be used on any cells in culture, including cell lines and primary cells extracted from living organisms.3.A wide variety of different analysis techniques can be used, adding additional value to metabolomics data analyzed from a sample; this is of high value in experimental systems biology. PMID:26150938

  14. Evaluation of the damage of cell wall and cell membrane for various extracellular polymeric substance extractions of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuesong; Liu, Junxin; Xiao, Benyi

    2014-10-20

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are susceptible to contamination by intracellular substances released during the extraction of EPS owing to the damage caused to microbial cell structures. The damage to cell walls and cell membranes in nine EPS extraction processes of activated sludge was evaluated in this study. The extraction of EPS (including proteins, carbohydrates and DNA) was the highest using the NaOH extraction method and the lowest using formaldehyde extraction. All nine EPS extraction methods in this study resulted in cell wall and membrane damage. The damage to cell walls, evaluated by 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate (KDO) and N-acetylglucosamine content changes in extracted EPS, was the most significant in the NaOH extraction process. Formaldehyde extraction showed a similar extent of damage to cell walls to those detected in the control method (centrifugation), while those in the formaldehyde-NaOH and cation exchange resin extractions were slightly higher than those detected in the control. N-acetylglucosamine was more suitable than KDO for the evaluation of cell wall damage in the EPS extraction of activated sludge. The damage to cell membranes was characterized by two fluorochromes (propidium iodide and FITC Annexin V) with flow cytometry (FCM) measurement. The highest proportion of membrane-damaged cells was detected in NaOH extraction (26.54% of total cells) while membrane-damaged cells comprised 8.19% of total cells in the control. PMID:25173614

  15. Toxic effects of Karenia mikimotoi extracts on mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Yan, Tian; Yu, Rencheng; Zhou, Mingjiang

    2011-07-01

    Karenia is one of the most harmful and representative red tide genus in a temperate zone. Blooms caused by this genus have resulted in massive fish death in the South China Sea and the East China Sea. However, the potential effects of this dinoflagellate on human health through the transfer of toxins via marine food webs, and the mechanisms of toxicity, are still unknown. Therefore, we examined the toxic effects of a strain of K. mikimotoi (isolated from the South China Sea) on the proliferation and morphology of four mammalian cell lines (two normal cell lines and two cancer cell lines). In addition, we carried out a preliminary investigation on the mechanism of toxicity of the alga. The results show that the polar lipid-soluble component of K. mikimotoi significantly inhibited proliferation of the four cell lines, and resulted in the cells becoming spherical, swollen and damaged. The result of Annexin V and PI double-staining confirmed that cell membranes were disrupted. The malonaldehyde (MDA) contents in the medium of the four cell lines treated with the polar-lipid extracts all increased significantly, which indicates that the polar-lipid toxins produced by K. mikimotoi could adversely affect mammalian cells by inducing lipid peroxidation. We conclude that K. mikimotoi is a potential threat to human health, and the comprehensive effect of this dinoflagellate and its mechanisms should be investigated further.

  16. Cocoa Phenolic Extract Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Martín, María Ángeles; Ramos, Sonia; Cordero-Herrero, Isabel; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in most plant foods, including green tea, grapes or cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of a cocoa phenolic extract (CPE) containing mainly flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability and oxidative status were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5–20 μg/mL CPE for 20 h evoked no cell damage and did not alter ROS production. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h increased ROS and carbonyl groups content and decreased reduced glutathione level. Pre-treatment of cells with CPE significantly prevented the t-BOOH-induced ROS and carbonyl groups and returned antioxidant defences to adequate levels. Thus, Ins-1E cells treated with CPE showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of surviving machineries in the CPE-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult. PMID:23912326

  17. Effect of chickpea aqueous extracts, organic extracts, and protein concentrates on cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Girón-Calle, Julio; Vioque, Javier; del Mar Yust, María; Pedroche, Justo; Alaiz, Manuel; Millán, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    Pulses should be part of a healthy diet, and it is also becoming clear that they have health-promoting effects. Nevertheless, most studies on the bioactive or health-promoting properties of pulses have been carried out using soybeans. We have studied cell growth-regulating properties, which may be responsible for anti-cancer properties, in chickpea seeds. Chickpea seeds are a staple in the traditional diet of many Mediterranean, Asian, and South and Central American countries. In addition, chickpea seeds have industrial applications since they can be used for the preparation of protein concentrates and isolates. The cell lines Caco-2 (epithelial intestinal) and J774 (macrophages) have been exposed to chickpea seed extracts and protein preparations in order to screen the different chickpea fractions for effects on cell growth. Both cell growth-promoting and cell growth-inhibiting effects were found. Most interestingly, a fraction soluble in ethanol and acetone specifically and almost completely inhibited the growth of Caco-2 cells exhibiting a cancerous phenotype. It is concluded that chickpea seeds are a source of bioactive components and deserve further study for their possible anti-cancer effect. PMID:15298756

  18. Accurate analytical method for the extraction of solar cell model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phang, J. C. H.; Chan, D. S. H.; Phillips, J. R.

    1984-05-01

    Single diode solar cell model parameters are rapidly extracted from experimental data by means of the presently derived analytical expressions. The parameter values obtained have a less than 5 percent error for most solar cells, in light of the extraction of model parameters for two cells of differing quality which were compared with parameters extracted by means of the iterative method.

  19. Replication and supercoiling of simian virus 40 DNA in cell extracts from human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stillman, B W; Gluzman, Y

    1985-01-01

    Soluble extracts prepared from the nucleus and cytoplasm of human 293 cells are capable of efficient replication and supercoiling of added DNA templates that contain the origin of simian virus 40 replication. Extracts prepared from human HeLa cells are less active than similarly prepared extracts from 293 cells for initiation and elongation of nascent DNA strands. DNA synthesis is dependent on addition of purified simian virus 40 tumor (T) antigen, which is isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography of extracts from cells infected with an adenovirus modified to produce large quantities of this protein. In the presence of T antigen and the cytoplasmic extract, replication initiates at the origin and continues bidirectionally. Initiation is completely dependent on functional origin sequences; a plasmid DNA containing an origin mutation known to affect DNA replication in vivo fails to replicate in vitro. Multiple rounds of DNA synthesis occur, as shown by the appearance of heavy-heavy, bromodeoxyuridine-labeled DNA products. The products of this reaction are resolved, but are relaxed, covalently closed DNA circles. Addition of a nuclear extract during DNA synthesis promotes the negative supercoiling of the replicated DNA molecules. Images PMID:3018548

  20. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate. PMID:26976217

  1. Cigarette smoke extract affects mitochondrial function in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ballweg, Korbinian; Mutze, Kathrin; Königshoff, Melanie; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2014-12-01

    Cigarette smoke is the main risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Exposure of cells to cigarette smoke induces an initial adaptive cellular stress response involving increased oxidative stress and induction of inflammatory signaling pathways. Exposure of mitochondria to cellular stress alters their fusion/fission dynamics. Whereas mild stress induces a prosurvival response termed stress-induced mitochondrial hyperfusion, severe stress results in mitochondrial fragmentation and mitophagy. In the present study, we analyzed the mitochondrial response to mild and nontoxic doses of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in alveolar epithelial cells. We characterized mitochondrial morphology, expression of mitochondrial fusion and fission genes, markers of mitochondrial proteostasis, as well as mitochondrial functions such as membrane potential and oxygen consumption. Murine lung epithelial (MLE)12 and primary mouse alveolar epithelial cells revealed pronounced mitochondrial hyperfusion upon treatment with CSE, accompanied by increased expression of the mitochondrial fusion protein mitofusin 2 and increased metabolic activity. We did not observe any alterations in mitochondrial proteostasis, i.e., induction of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response or mitophagy. Therefore, our data indicate an adaptive prosurvival response of mitochondria of alveolar epithelial cells to nontoxic concentrations of CSE. A hyperfused mitochondrial network, however, renders the cell more vulnerable to additional stress, such as sustained cigarette smoke exposure. As such, cigarette smoke-induced mitochondrial hyperfusion, although part of a beneficial adaptive stress response in the first place, may contribute to the pathogenesis of COPD. PMID:25326581

  2. Antimutagenicity of supercritical CO2 extracts of Terminalia catappa leaves and cytotoxicity of the extracts to human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ting-Fu; Weng, Yih-Ming; Lin, Shwu-Bin; Chiou, Robin Y-Y

    2003-06-01

    Natural antimutagens may prevent cancer and are therefore of great interest to oncologists and the public at large. Phytochemicals are potent antimutagen candidates. When the Ames test was applied to examine the antimutagenic potency of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) extracts of Terminalia catappa leaves at a dose of 0.5 mg/plate, toxicity and mutagenicity were not detected. The antimutagenic activity of SC-CO(2) extracts increased with decreases of temperature (60, 50, and 40 degrees C) and pressure (4000, 3000, and 2000 psi) used for extraction. The most potent antimutagenicity was observed in extracts obtained at 40 degrees C and 2000 psi. At a dose of 0.5 mg of extract/plate, approximately 80% of the mutagenicity of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P, with S-9) and 46% of the mutagenicity of N-methyl-N '-nitroguanidine (MNNG, without S-9) were inhibited. Media supplemented with SC-CO(2) extracts at a range of 0-500 microg/mL were used to cultivate human hepatoma (Huh 7) and normal liver (Chang liver) cells. The viability of the cells was assayed by measuring cellular acid phosphatase activity. A dose-dependent growth inhibition of both types of cells was observed. The SC-CO(2) extracts were more cytotoxic to Huh 7 cells than to Chang liver cells. The observation that SC-CO(2) extracts of T. catappa leaves did not induce mutagenicity at the doses tested while exhibiting potent antimutagenicity and were more cytotoxic to human hepatoma cells than to normal liver cells is of merit and warrants further investigation. PMID:12769525

  3. Cell-free protein expression based on extracts from CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Brödel, Andreas K; Sonnabend, Andrei; Kubick, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Protein expression systems are widely used in biotechnology and medicine for the efficient and economic production of therapeutic proteins. Today, cultivated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the market dominating mammalian cell-line for the production of complex therapeutic proteins. Despite this outstanding potential of CHO cells, no high-yield cell-free system based on translationally active lysates from these cells has been reported so far. To date, CHO cell extracts have only been used as a foundational research tool for understanding mRNA translation (Lodish et al., 1974; McDowell et al., 1972). In the present study, we address this fact by establishing a novel cell-free protein expression system based on extracts from cultured CHO cells. Lysate preparation, adaptation of in vitro reaction conditions and the construction of particular expression vectors are considered for high-yield protein production. A specific in vitro expression vector, which includes an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) from the intergenic region (IGR) of the Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV), has been constructed in order to obtain optimal performance. The IGR IRES is supposed to bind directly to the eukaryotic 40S ribosomal subunit thereby bypassing the process of translation initiation, which is often a major bottleneck in cell-free systems. The combination of expression vector and optimized CHO cell extracts enables the production of approximately 50 µg/mL active firefly luciferase within 4 h. The batch-type cell-free coupled transcription-translation system has the potential to perform post-translational modifications, as shown by the glycosylation of erythropoietin. Accordingly, the system contains translocationally active endogenous microsomes, enabling the co-translational incorporation of membrane proteins into biological membranes. Hence, the presented in vitro translation system is a powerful tool for the fast and convenient optimization of expression constructs, the

  4. Ethyl acetate extracts of Fructus Ligustri Lucide induce cell apoptosis in human neuroglioma cell

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yun-Bao; Shao, Yi-Meng; Chen, Jing; Xu, Song-Bai; Zhang, Xing-Dong; Liu, Hai-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Previous studies have shown that Fructus Ligustri Lucide (FLL) can be used to improve the tumor cells sensitivity to chemotherapeutics and promote cell death. However, the mechanism by which FLL mediate this effect is unclear. In the present study, ethyl acetate extracts of FLL induced cell apoptosis in human neuroglioma cell was investigated. Methods: The cell viability was detected by the CCK8 assay. The cell apoptosis was assessed by annexin V-PI double-labeling staining and hoechst 33342 staining. The protein expression of cell cycle regulators and tumor suppressors were analyzed by western blotting. Results: Treatment of human neuroglioma cell with FLL induced cell death in a dose-and time-dependent manner by using CCK8 assay. Consistent with the CCK8 assay, the flow cytometry results showed that the proportion of the early and terminal phase of apoptosis cells had gained after FLL treatment as compared to untreatment group. Moreover, human neuroglioma cells were exposed to the ethyl acetate extracts of FLL for 48 h, which resulted in an accumulation of cells in G2/Mphase. Apoptotic bodies were clearly observed in human neuroglioma cells that had been treated with FLL for 48 h and then stained with Hochest 33342. The expression of Cyclin B1, CDC2 and cdc25C were downregulated upon FLL treatment in human neuroglioma cells. The expression level of Cyclin B1, CDC2 and cdc25C was negatively correlated with the time of treatment by FLL. In contrast, p53, p21 and p16 were obviously upregulated by FLL treatment in a time-dependent manner. Conclusions: These results confirmed that FLL could induce apoptosis in human neuroglioma cells, the underlying molecular mechanisms, at least partially, through activation p21/p53 and suppression CDC2/cdc25C signaling in vitro. PMID:26064281

  5. Pluripotency and differentiation of cells from human testicular sperm extraction: An investigation of cell stemness.

    PubMed

    Sadeghian-Nodoushan, Fatemeh; Aflatoonian, Reza; Borzouie, Zahra; Akyash, Fatemeh; Fesahat, Farzaneh; Soleimani, Mehrdad; Aghajanpour, Samaneh; Moore, Harry D; Aflatoonian, Behrouz

    2016-04-01

    Human male germ-line stem cells (hmGSCs) and human testis-derived embryonic stem cell-like (htESC-like) cells are claimed to be in vitro pluripotent counterparts of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), but the origin and pluripotency of human testis-derived cell cultures are still under debate. The aim of this study was to generate putative pluripotent stem cells in vitro from human testicular sperm-extracted (TESE) samples of infertile men, and to assess their pluripotency and capacity to differentiate. TESE samples were minced, enzymatically disaggregated and dispersed into single-cell or cluster suspensions, and then cultured. Initially, cell clusters resembled those described for hmGSCs and htESC-like cells, and were positive for markers such as OCT4/POU5F1, NANOG, and TRA-2-54. Prolonged propagation of cell clusters expressing pluripotency markers did not thrive; instead, the cells that emerged possessed characteristics of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) such as STRO-1, CD105/EGLN1, CD13/ANPEP, SOX9, vimentin, and fibronectin. KIT, SOX2, and CD44 were not expressed by these MSCs. The multipotential differentiation capacity of these cells was confirmed using Oil Red-O and Alizarin Red staining after induction with specific culture conditions. It is therefore concluded that pluripotent stem cells could not be derived using the conditions previously reported to be successful for TESE samples. PMID:27077675

  6. Modulation of rabbit corneal epithelial cells fate using embryonic stem cell extract

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Weijiao; Liu, Zhiping; Liu, Ying; Ke, Qicheng; Ding, Yuanyuan; Lu, Xiaoyan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To develop a new culture system to cultivate differentiated autologous cells in vitro for cell therapy and tissue engineering. Methods After incubation in murine embryonic stem cell (ESC) extract for 1 h, streptolysin-O (SLO) permeabilized cells were resealed with CaCl2 and continually cultured for weeks. The morphological study was analyzed by light microscopy. Isolated colonies were selected and expanded to establish cell lines. Octamer-4 (Oct-4), stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA-1), transformation-related protein 63 (p63), ATP-binding cassette subfamily G, member 2 (ABCG2), and cytokeratin3 (K3) were detected by indirect immunofluorescent staining. Oct-4, K3, and p63 were also detected by RT–PCR analysis. To examine the stemness characteristics of the induced cells, both alkaline phosphatase (AKP) staining and tumorigenicity detection were performed, respectively. Results Reprogramming was induced in corneal epithelial cells. The reprogrammed cells showed characteristics similar to ESCs in the early weeks, including colony formation, positive AKP staining, and multi-potential differentiation in vivo. Oct-4 and SSEA1 protein expression was upregulated. However, these changes were not persistent or stable. With the passage of time, the colonies became flat. The ESC markers were downregulated, while epithelial cell related proteins gradually increased. Conclusions Less terminal differentiated rabbit corneal epithelial cells could be induced to a more pluripotent state with embryonic stem cell extract (ESC-E). These cells have the potential to return to the beginning of their own lineage and obtain the ability of long-term growth. Our findings indicate that this culture system can generate low-immunogenic autologous cells for use in regenerative medicine. PMID:20664691

  7. Effects of Mimosa tenuiflora bark extracts on WI38 and KB human cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, M L; Nicasio, P; Alonso-Cortés, D

    1991-01-01

    The effects of three extracts from barks of Mimosa tenuiflora (Willd) Poir, Leguminosae, on the growth rate of two human cell lines were investigated. The plant material was extracted with petroleum ether, ethylacetate and butanol, and the obtained products were evaluated in their ability to modify growth of WI38 normal embryonic fibroblasts, and KB cells from a nasopharyngeal carcinoma in tissue culture conditions. The ethylacetate and butanol extracts produced growth rate inhibition with a different pattern depending on the cell line studied; in contrast, the petroleum ether extract markedly increased proliferation of the same cells in vitro. PMID:1819991

  8. Human colon cancer HT-29 cell death responses to doxorubicin and Morus Alba leaves flavonoid extract.

    PubMed

    Fallah, S; Karimi, A; Panahi, G; Gerayesh Nejad, S; Fadaei, R; Seifi, M

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic basis for the biological properties of Morus alba flavonoid extract (MFE) and chemotherapy drug of doxorubicin on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line death are unknown. The effect of doxorubicin and flavonoid extract on colon cancer HT-29 cell line death and identification of APC gene expression and PARP concentration of HT-29 cell line were investigated. The results showed that flavonoid extract and doxorubicin induce a dose dependent cell death in HT-29 cell line. MFE and doxorubicin exert a cytotoxic effect on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line by probably promoting or induction of apoptosis. PMID:27064876

  9. Huaier Aqueous Extract Induces Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells Arrest in S Phase via JNK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengshuo; Zhang, Jialin; Li, Xin; Sun, Ning; Yu, Rui; Zhao, Bochao; Yu, Dongyang; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Yongfeng

    2015-01-01

    Huaier aqueous extract, the main active constituent of Huaier proteoglycan, has antihepatocarcinoma activity in experimental and clinical settings. However, the potential and associated antihepatoma mechanisms of Huaier extract are not yet fully understood. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to elucidate the inhibitory proliferation effect of Huaier extract on apoptosis and cycle of HepG2 and Bel-7402 cells. Our data demonstrated that incubation with Huaier extract resulted in a marked decrease in cell viability dose-dependently. Flow cytometric analysis showed that a 48 h treatment of Huaier extract caused cell apoptosis. Typical apoptotic nucleus alterations were observed with fluorescence microscope after Hoechst staining. Immunoblot analysis further demonstrated that Huaier extract activated caspase 3 and PARP. Additionally, Huaier extract inhibited the activity of p-ERK, p-p38, and p-JNK in terms of MAPK. Furthermore, Huaier extract induced HCC cells arrest in S phase and decreased the cycle related protein expression of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Studies with JNK specific inhibitor, SP600125, showed that Huaier extract induced S phase arrest and decreased β-catenin and cyclin D1 expression via JNK signaling pathway. In conclusion, we verify that Huaier extract causes cell apoptosis and induces hepatocellular carcinoma cells arrest in S phase via JNK pathway, which advances our understanding on the molecular mechanisms of Huaier extract in hepatocarcinoma management. PMID:26229542

  10. Hyperpolarized NMR of plant and cancer cell extracts at natural abundance.

    PubMed

    Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Milani, Jonas; Vuichoud, Basile; Bornet, Aurélien; Lalande-Martin, Julie; Tea, Illa; Yon, Maxime; Maucourt, Mickaël; Deborde, Catherine; Moing, Annick; Frydman, Lucio; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Natural abundance (13)C NMR spectra of biological extracts are recorded in a single scan provided that the samples are hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization combined with cross polarization. Heteronuclear 2D correlation spectra of hyperpolarized breast cancer cell extracts can also be obtained in a single scan. Hyperpolarized NMR of extracts opens many perspectives for metabolomics. PMID:26215673

  11. Chemical Characterization and in Vitro Cytotoxicity on Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells of Carica Papaya Leaf Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thao T.; Parat, Marie-Odile; Hodson, Mark P.; Pan, Jenny; Shaw, Paul N.; Hewavitharana, Amitha K.

    2015-01-01

    In traditional medicine, Carica papaya leaf has been used for a wide range of therapeutic applications including skin diseases and cancer. In this study, we investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Carica papaya leaves on the human oral squamous cell carcinoma SCC25 cell line in parallel with non-cancerous human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. Two out of four extracts showed a significantly selective effect towards the cancer cells and were found to contain high levels of phenolic and flavonoid compounds. The chromatographic and mass spectrometric profiles of the extracts obtained with Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry were used to tentatively identify the bioactive compounds using comparative analysis. The principal compounds identified were flavonoids or flavonoid glycosides, particularly compounds from the kaempferol and quercetin families, of which several have previously been reported to possess anticancer activities. These results confirm that papaya leaf is a potential source of anticancer compounds and warrant further scientific investigation to validate the traditional use of papaya leaf to treat cancer. PMID:26712788

  12. Chemical Characterization and in Vitro Cytotoxicity on Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells of Carica papaya Leaf Extracts.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao T; Parat, Marie-Odile; Hodson, Mark P; Pan, Jenny; Shaw, Paul N; Hewavitharana, Amitha K

    2016-01-01

    In traditional medicine, Carica papaya leaf has been used for a wide range of therapeutic applications including skin diseases and cancer. In this study, we investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Carica papaya leaves on the human oral squamous cell carcinoma SCC25 cell line in parallel with non-cancerous human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. Two out of four extracts showed a significantly selective effect towards the cancer cells and were found to contain high levels of phenolic and flavonoid compounds. The chromatographic and mass spectrometric profiles of the extracts obtained with Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry were used to tentatively identify the bioactive compounds using comparative analysis. The principal compounds identified were flavonoids or flavonoid glycosides, particularly compounds from the kaempferol and quercetin families, of which several have previously been reported to possess anticancer activities. These results confirm that papaya leaf is a potential source of anticancer compounds and warrant further scientific investigation to validate the traditional use of papaya leaf to treat cancer. PMID:26712788

  13. Leaf extracts from Nitraria retusa promote cell population growth of human cancer cells by inducing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In this report the phytochemical profile of Nitraria. Retusa (N. Retusa) leaf extracts were identified and their ability to induce apoptosis in human chronic myelogenous erythroleukaemia (K562) was evaluated. Methods Apoptosis of the human chronic myelogenous erythroleukaemia (K562) was evidenced by investigating DNA fragmentation, PARP cleavage and caspases 3 and 8 inducing activities, in the presence of N. retusa extracts. Results Our study revealed that the tested extracts from N. Retusa contain many useful bioactive compounds. They induced in a time-dependent manner the apoptosis the tested cancerous our cell line. This result was confirmed by ladder DNA fragmentation profile and PARP cleavage, as well as a release in caspase-3 and caspase-8 level. Conclusion Our results indicate that the tested compounds have a significant antiproliferative effect which may be due to their involvement in the induction of the extrinsic apoptosic pathway. PMID:22040460

  14. Evaluation of cytotoxicity of Moringa oleifera Lam. callus and leaf extracts on Hela cells

    PubMed Central

    Jafarain, Abbas; Asghari, Gholamreza; Ghassami, Erfaneh

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are considerable attempts worldwide on herbal and traditional compounds to validate their use as anti-cancer drugs. Plants from Moringaceae family including Moringa oleifera possess several activities such as antitumor effect on tumor cell lines. In this study we sought to determine if callus and leaf extracts of M. oleifera possess any cytotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Ethanol-water (70-30) extracts of callus and leaf of M. oleifera were prepared by maceration method. The amount of phenolic compounds of the extracts was determined by Folin Ciocalteu method. The cytotoxicity of the extracts against Hela tumor cells was carried out using MTT assay. Briefly, cells were seeded in microplates and different concentrations of the extract were added. Cells were incubated for 48 h and their viability was evaluated by addition of tetrazolium salt solution. After 3 h medium was aspirated, dimethyl sulfoxide was added and absorbance was determined at 540 nm with an ELISA plate reader. Cytotoxicity was considered when more than 50% reduction on cell survival was observed. Results: Callus and leaf extracts of M. oleifera significantly decreased the viability of Hela cells in a concentration-dependent manner. However, leaf extract of M. oleifera were more potent than that of callus extract. Conclusion: As the content of phenolic compounds of leaf extract was higher than that of callus extract, it can be concluded that phenolic compounds are involved in the cytotoxicity of M. oleifera. PMID:25337524

  15. Dichloromethane and Methanol Extracts of Scrophularia oxysepala Induces Apoptosis in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Valiyari, Samira; baradaran, behzad; Delazar, Abbas; Pasdaran, Ardalan; Zare, Fateme

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify and develop therapeutic strategies against this deadly disease. This study is the first to investigate the cytotoxic effects and the mechanism of cell death of Scrophularia oxysepala extracts in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Methods: Three extracts of Scrophularia oxysepala including the n-hexane, dichloromethane and methanol extracts were examined. MTT (3-(4,5-dimetylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) and Trypan-blue assays were performed in MCF-7 cells as well as Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) to analyze the cytotoxic activity of the extracts of Scrophularia oxysepala. Further, the apoptosis inducing action of the extracts was determined by TUNEL (terminal deoxy transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick- end labeling) test and cell death assay. Results: The results showed that the n-hexane extract had no cytotoxic effects but dichloromethane and methanol extracts significantly inhibited cell growth and viability in a dose and time dependent manner without inducing damage to non-cancerous cell line HUVEC. In addition, Cell death assay and DNA fragmentation analysis using TUNEL indicated induction of apoptosis by dichloromethane and methanol extracts of Scrophularia oxysepala in MCF-7 cells. Conclusion: Our studies suggest that this plant may contain potential bioactive compound(s) for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:24312797

  16. Effects of mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extracts Iscador on cell cycle and survival of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Harmsma, Marjan; Ummelen, Monique; Dignef, Wendy; Tusenius, Karel Jan; Ramaekers, Frans C S

    2006-06-01

    The molecular and cellular mechanisms by which mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extracts exert cytotoxic and immunomodulatory anti-tumoral effects are largely unknown. In this study the hypothesis that Iscador preparations induce tumor regression by cell cycle inhibition and/or interference with apoptotic signaling pathways in cancer cells was investigated. Also a possible effect on angiogenesis, which is a prerequisite for tumor growth in vivo, is studied in endothelial cell cultures. Furthermore, it was examined which apoptotic signaling route(s) is (are) activated by Iscador by studying specific pro-apoptotic proteins in cultured cells. To characterize these properties, 9 human cancer cell lines of different origin, one epidermis derived cell line and 2 endothelial cell cultures were incubated with different concentrations of Iscador Quercus Spezial and Iscador Malus Spezial. Cell cycle kinetic parameters were measured by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) pulse labeling and tubulin staining. Apoptotic responses were detected by M30 Cyto-Death or Annexin V/propidium iodide assays. Characterization of the apoptotic pathway(s) was performed by staining cells for amongst others active caspase 3 and cytochrome C (mitochondrial pathway), as well as active caspase 8 (death receptor pathway). The sensitivity to Iscador treatment varies strongly between different cell lines and also ing those derived from small cell lung cancer, and adenocarcinoma of the lung and breast, as well as endothelial cell cultures, Iscador caused early cell cycle inhibition followed by apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. Amongst the low responders are cell lines derived from colorectal carcinoma. In general Iscador Malus exerted a stronger response than Iscador Quercus. Apoptosis was induced by activating the mitochondrial but not the death receptor dependent pathway, at least in case of Iscador Quercus. Iscador Malus also seemed to induce apoptosis via the death receptor route, which may explain the

  17. Antioxidant effects of gastrointestinal digested purple carrot extract on the human cells of colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Olejnik, Anna; Rychlik, Joanna; Kidoń, Marcin; Czapski, Janusz; Kowalska, Katarzyna; Juzwa, Wojciech; Olkowicz, Mariola; Dembczyński, Radosław; Moyer, Mary Pat

    2016-01-01

    Purple carrot (PC) is a potential dietary constituent, which represents a valuable source of antioxidants and can modulate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in the gastrointestinal tract. Antioxidant capacity of a PC extract subjected to digestion process simulated in the artificial alimentary tract, including the stomach, small intestine and colon, was analyzed in normal human cells of colon mucosa. Results indicated that the extract obtained upon passage through the gastrointestinal tract, which could come into contact with the colonic cells in situ, was less potent than the extract, which was not subjected to digestion process. Digested PC extract exhibited intracellular ROS-inhibitory capacity, with 1mg/mL showing the ROS clearance of 18.4%. A 20.7% reduction in oxidative DNA damage due to colon mucosa cells' treatment with digested PC extract was observed. These findings indicate that PC extract is capable of colonic cells' protection against the adverse effects of oxidative stress. PMID:26213078

  18. Radical intermediate generation and cell cycle arrest by an aqueous extract of Thunbergia Laurifolia Linn. In human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jetawattana, Suwimol; Boonsirichai, Kanokporn; Charoen, Savapong; Martin, Sean M

    2015-01-01

    Thunbergia Laurifolia Linn. (TL) is one of the most familiar plants in Thai traditional medicine that is used to treat various conditions, including cancer. However, the antitumor activity of TL or its constituents has never been reported at the molecular level to support the folklore claim. The present study was designed to investigate the antitumor effect of an aqueous extract of TL in human breast cancer cells and the possible mechanism(s) of action. An aqueous crude extract was prepared from dried leaves of TL. Folin-Ciocalteu colorimetric assays were used to determine the total phenolic content. Antiproliferative and cell cycle effects were evaluated in human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells by MTT reduction assay, cell growth inhibition, clonogenic cell survival, and flow cytometric analysis. Free radical generation by the extracts was detected using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The exposure of human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells to a TL aqueous extract resulted in decreases in cell growth, clonogenic cell survival, and cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 843 μg/ml. Treatments with extract for 24 h at 250 μg/ml or higher induced cell cycle arrest as indicated by a significant increase of cell population in the G1 phase and a significant decrease in the S phase of the cell cycle. The capability of the aqueous extract to generate radical intermediates was observed at both high pH and near-neutral pH conditions. The findings suggest the antitumor bioactivities of TL against selected breast cancer cells may be due to induction of a G1 cell cycle arrest. Cytotoxicity and cell cycle perturbation that are associated with a high concentration of the extract could be in part explained by the total phenolic contents in the extract and the capacity to generate radical intermediates to modulate cellular proliferative signals. PMID:26028099

  19. Graphene oxide nanoribbon as hole extraction layer to enhance efficiency and stability of polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Xue, Yuhua; Kim, Jin Young; Baek, Jong-Beom; Durstock, Michael; Dai, Liming

    2014-02-01

    Graphene oxide nanoribbons for efficient and stable polymer solar cells are discussed. With controllable bandgap, good solubility and film forming property, graphene oxide nanoribbons serve as a new class of excellent hole extraction materials for efficient and stable polymer solar cells outperforming their counterparts based on conventional hole extraction materials, including PEDOT:PSS. PMID:24167012

  20. Red Ginseng Extract Reduced Metastasis of Colon Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Eun Young; Kim, Woo Kyoung

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of red ginseng extract on metastasis of colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Wound healing migration, cell motility, invasion, and activity, protein expression, and mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were examined in SW480 human colon cancer cells. SW480 cells were cultured with or without 100 μg/L PMA in the absence or presence of various concentrations (100, 200, or 300 μg/mL) of red ginseng extract. Red ginseng extract treatment caused significant suppression of cell motility and invasion (p<0.05) in SW480 cells. Red ginseng extract inhibited MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity and their protein and mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05) in SW480 cells. For experimental metastasis, BALB/c mice were injected intravenously with CT-26 mouse colon cancer cells in the tail vein, and were orally administered various concentrations (0, 75, 150, or 300 mg/kg body weight) of red ginseng extract for 3 weeks. Numbers of pulmonary nodules were significantly decreased in mice that were fed red ginseng extract (p<0.05). Plasma MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity significantly decreased in response to treatment with red ginseng extract in mice (p<0.05). These data suggest that red ginseng extract may be useful for prevention of cancer invasion and metastasis through inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9 pathways. PMID:23717075

  1. Uracil excision repair in Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell-free extracts.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Varshney, Umesh

    2011-05-01

    Uracil excision repair is ubiquitous in all domains of life and initiated by uracil DNA glycosylases (UDGs) which excise the promutagenic base, uracil, from DNA to leave behind an abasic site (AP-site). Repair of the resulting AP-sites requires an AP-endonuclease, a DNA polymerase, and a DNA ligase whose combined activities result in either short-patch or long-patch repair. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, has an increased risk of accumulating uracils because of its G + C-rich genome, and its niche inside host macrophages where it is exposed to reactive nitrogen and oxygen species, two major causes of cytosine deamination (to uracil) in DNA. In vitro assays to study DNA repair in this important human pathogen are limited. To study uracil excision repair in mycobacteria, we have established assay conditions using cell-free extracts of M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis (a fast-growing mycobacterium) and oligomer or plasmid DNA substrates. We show that in mycobacteria, uracil excision repair is completed primarily via long-patch repair. In addition, we show that M. tuberculosis UdgB, a newly characterized family 5 UDG, substitutes for the highly conserved family 1 UDG, Ung, thereby suggesting that UdgB might function as backup enzyme for uracil excision repair in mycobacteria. PMID:21371942

  2. The in vitro antisickling and antioxidant effects of aqueous extracts Zanthoxyllum heitzii on sickle cell disorder

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several plant extracts from Rutaceae family are currently used to the management of sickle cell disorder (SCD) in the African. Few reports have shown that extracts from Zanthoxyllum or Fagara genus demonstrated anti-sickling property. This study investigates the in vitro antisickling and antioxidant properties of extracts from Zanthoxyllum heitzii. Methods The sickling of red blood cells (RBCs) was induced using sodium metabisulfite (2%) followed by treatment with extracts at different concentrations. The osmotic fragility tests permits to explore the effect of Z. heitzii extracts on haemoglobin S solubility and sickle cells membrane stability. For each extract, qualitative phytochemical tests were used to identify the presence of alkaloids, tannins, saponins, flavonoids, glycosides and phenols, while some quantitative methods such as Folin, Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP) and diphenyl 1, 2 picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) were used to determine the antioxidant potential of these extracts. Results Sodium metabisulphite increased the sickling of RBCs from 29.62 to 55.46% during 2 h. Treatment of sickling cells with extracts at different concentrations showed that a decrease of the percentage of sickling cells was found in both induced and non induced sickling cells. The fruits extract of Z. heitzii demonstrated the best anti-sickling property. The same extract at 250 μg/mL showed the best membrane cell stability compared to others. All the extracts revealed an antioxidant and anti-radical activities although lesser compared to the standard. Conclusion The fruit extract of Z. Heitzii demonstrated the most significant antisickling effect with a potential for use in the clinical management of SCD. PMID:23829696

  3. Antimicrobial activity of Polyscias filicifolia cell biomass extracts.

    PubMed

    Furmanowa, M; Nosov, A M; Oreshnikov, A V; Klushin, A G; Kotin, M; Starościak, B; Sliwińska, A; Guzewska, J; Bloch, R

    2002-06-01

    Antibacterial activity of extracts of Polyscias filicifolia biomass from bioreactor and callus was determined using the agar disc-diffusion method. The microorganisms Staphylococcus aureus (three strains) showed the highest sensitivity to extracts of P. filicifolia biomass from a bioreactor. The values were comparable with nitrofurantoine used as a standard. Micrococcus flavus, Sreptococcus pyogenes and S. agalatiae were less sensitive. The effect of P. filicifolia callus extract on the above bacteria was less pronounced than that of extracts of biomass from a bioreactor. PMID:12116883

  4. Cancer cell cytotoxicity of extracts and small phenolic compounds from Chaga [Inonotus obliquus (persoon) Pilat].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuki; Nishida, Hiroshi; Matsugo, Seiichi; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2009-06-01

    Previously, we studied the antioxidant potential of Chaga mushroom [Inonotus obliquus (persoon) Pilat] extracts and isolated several small (poly)phenolic compounds as the major antioxidant components in the 80% methanol (MeOH) extract. In the present study, these isolated phenolic ingredients together with several other types of Chaga extracts were examined for cytotoxic effects against normal (IMR90) and cancer (A549, PA-1, U937, and HL-60) cell lines. Results revealed decoctions from both the fruiting body (FB) and sclerotium (ST) parts of Chaga, especially the ST part, showed considerable cytotoxicity toward tumor cells, but the cytotoxicity appeared to be stronger against normal cells than cancer cells. The 80% MeOH ST extract also showed the same trend. On the other hand, the 80% MeOH extract of FB showed significant cytotoxicity towards tumor cell lines without affecting normal cells, for example, the 50% lethal dose was 49.4 +/- 2.9 microg/mL for PA-1 cells versus 123.6 +/- 13.8 microg/mL for normal cells. The phenolic components isolated from the 80% MeOH extracts had markedly greater cancer cell toxicity than the extracts themselves. In particular, two out of seven compounds showed strong cytotoxicity towards several tumor cell lines without giving rise to significant cell toxicity toward normal cells. For example, the 50% lethal dose for 3,4-dihydroxybenzalacetone was 12.2 micromol/L in PA-1 cells but was 272.8 micromol/L in IMR90 cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis further revealed these phenolic ingredients have high potentiality for apoptosis induction in PA-1 cells. PMID:19627197

  5. Cytotoxic Effects of the Ethanol Bane Skin Extract in Human Prostate Cancer Pc3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Maryam; Kazerouni, Faranak; Namaki, Saeed; Darbandi Tamijani, Hassan; Rahimipour, Hooman; Boroumand, Nasrin; Barghi, Siyamak; Ebrahimi, Nazanin; Gheibi Hayat, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is extensively supposed that vegetarian diet could affect cancer progress and increase the influence of formal chemotherapy. Objectives: The present study was designed to determine the effect of the ethanol Bane skin extract against chemo resistant prostate cancer PC3 cells. Materials and Methods: PC3 and L929 cells were cultivated and then incubated in the ethanol Bane skin extract with various concentrations of 0.78, 1.5, 3.13, 6.25, 12.5 mg/mL in 3 times 24, 48, 72 hours. Cytotoxic effect of the ethanol Bane skin extract on PC3 and L929 cells was examined by MTT assay after 24, 48, and 72 hours. Morphology of PC3 cells was evaluated by Gimsa staining. Results: The ethanol Bane skin extract inhibited proliferation and caused cell death with IC50 values of 2.8 mg/mL on PC3 cells and the IC50 was 6.1 mg/mL on l929 cells. Morphological changes and apoptotic bodies were observed in PC3 cells faced with the ethanol Bane skin extract by staining with Gimsa. Conclusions: The ethanol Bane skin extract could repress the growth of PC3 cell line. This inhibitory effect of the Bane extract depended on the dose and the time on PC3. The result of this study shows that the ethanol Bane skin extract includes photochemical and inhibitory function against proliferation and inducer of apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC3 cells and also has less cytotoxic effect on l929 than PC3 cells. The ethanol Bane skin extract might be a good candidate for the new herbal anticancer drug. PMID:27482333

  6. [Validation of the Antiproliferative Effects of Euphorbia tirucalli Extracts in Breast Cancer Cell Lines].

    PubMed

    Choene, M; Motadi, L

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plant extracts have recently attracted attention of modern medical science research due to their non-lethal activity. Currently, up to 50% of the world drugs including chemotherapeutic drugs such as taxol and camptothecin are derived from natural products. Euphorbia tirucalli has a long history of usage as traditional medicine in Africa and has been widely used in the treatment of different cancers. In this study, we explore the medical properties of E. tirucalli extracts in breast cancer development. To achieve this, stems of E. tirucalli were dried, crushed and extracted with butanol, hexane or methanol (based on 1 g of dry substance in 10 mL of a solvent). The dried extracts were re-dissolved in DMSO and investigated. Composition of each extract was analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS). Extracts were found to contain different types of secondary metabolites mainly terpenes and flavonoids. Breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB 231) were treated with various concentrations of the extracts for up to 48 h. Cell viability, cell cycle, apoptosis and gene expression were analysed. In cells, extracts were found to inhibit cell proliferation in a concentration and cell type dependent manner. Analysis of the cause of antiproliferation revealed that most cells were arrested at the G0/G1 phase by p21 overexpression. In general, most pro-apoptotic genes like Bax and caspase-8 were significantly up-regulated in cells treated with plant extracts. These results suggest that the extracts might induce cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 with p21 attributing to this molecular mechanism. PMID:27028817

  7. Ramie Leaf Extracts Suppresses Adipogenic Differentiation in 3T3-L1 Cells and Pig Preadipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joomin; Kim, Ah-Ra; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2016-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the anti-obesity effect of different concentrations of extracts of hot air-dried ramie leaf (HR) and freeze-dried ramie leaf (FR) in 3T3-L1 cells and pig preadipocytes. To analyze the effect on cell proliferation, cells were treated with 25 μg/mL or 100 μg/mL HR or FR extract for 2 days. Cell differentiation was evaluated by measuring glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activities and intracellular triglyceride content. Treatment with either HR or FR extracts inhibited the proliferation of 3T3-L1 cells and pig preadipocytes in a dose-dependent manner. HR extract treatment inhibited the differentiation of both cell types more effectively than FR treatment. The extent of triglyceride accumulation decreased significantly in both cells following either HR or FR treatment. Furthermore, LPL activity significantly decreased after treatment with HR or FR extract. These results indicated that HR and FR extracts may inhibit proliferation and differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and pig preadipocytes. Further studies are needed to explore the anti-obesity effect of HR and FR extracts. PMID:26954122

  8. Ramie Leaf Extracts Suppresses Adipogenic Differentiation in 3T3-L1 Cells and Pig Preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joomin; Kim, Ah-Ra; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2016-09-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the anti-obesity effect of different concentrations of extracts of hot air-dried ramie leaf (HR) and freeze-dried ramie leaf (FR) in 3T3-L1 cells and pig preadipocytes. To analyze the effect on cell proliferation, cells were treated with 25 μg/mL or 100 μg/mL HR or FR extract for 2 days. Cell differentiation was evaluated by measuring glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activities and intracellular triglyceride content. Treatment with either HR or FR extracts inhibited the proliferation of 3T3-L1 cells and pig preadipocytes in a dose-dependent manner. HR extract treatment inhibited the differentiation of both cell types more effectively than FR treatment. The extent of triglyceride accumulation decreased significantly in both cells following either HR or FR treatment. Furthermore, LPL activity significantly decreased after treatment with HR or FR extract. These results indicated that HR and FR extracts may inhibit proliferation and differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and pig preadipocytes. Further studies are needed to explore the anti-obesity effect of HR and FR extracts. PMID:26954122

  9. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Geisen, Ulf; Zenthoefer, Marion; Peipp, Matthias; Kerber, Jannik; Plenge, Johannes; Managò, Antonella; Fuhrmann, Markus; Geyer, Roland; Hennig, Steffen; Adam, Dieter; Piker, Levent; Rimbach, Gerald; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1). Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data) and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application. PMID:26204945

  10. Direct Reprogramming of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells into Functional Renal Cells Using Cell-free Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Papadimou, Evangelia; Morigi, Marina; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Tomasoni, Susanna; Benedetti, Valentina; Longaretti, Lorena; Rota, Cinzia; Todeschini, Marta; Rizzo, Paola; Introna, Martino; Grazia de Simoni, Maria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Goligorsky, Michael S.; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    Summary The application of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine is gaining recognition. Here, we show that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), also known as bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, can be reprogrammed into renal proximal tubular-like epithelial cells using cell-free extracts. Streptolysin-O-permeabilized BMSCs exposed to HK2-cell extracts underwent morphological changes—formation of “domes” and tubule-like structures—and acquired epithelial functional properties such as transepithelial-resistance, albumin-binding, and uptake and specific markers E-cadherin and aquaporin-1. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of brush border microvilli and tight intercellular contacts. RNA sequencing showed tubular epithelial transcript abundance and revealed the upregulation of components of the EGFR pathway. Reprogrammed BMSCs integrated into self-forming kidney tissue and formed tubular structures. Reprogrammed BMSCs infused in immunodeficient mice with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury engrafted into proximal tubuli, reduced renal injury and improved function. Thus, reprogrammed BMSCs are a promising cell resource for future cell therapy. PMID:25754206

  11. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Geisen, Ulf; Zenthoefer, Marion; Peipp, Matthias; Kerber, Jannik; Plenge, Johannes; Managò, Antonella; Fuhrmann, Markus; Geyer, Roland; Hennig, Steffen; Adam, Dieter; Piker, Levent; Rimbach, Gerald; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1). Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data) and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application. PMID:26204945

  12. Effect of Uncaria tomentosa Extract on Apoptosis Triggered by Oxaliplatin Exposure on HT29 Cells.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Liliane Z; Farias, Iria Luiza G; Rigo, Melânia L; Glanzner, Werner G; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard D; Cadoná, Francine C; Cruz, Ivana B; Farias, Júlia G; Duarte, Marta M M F; Franco, Luzia; Bertol, Gustavo; Colpo, Elisangela; Brites, Patricia C; Rocha, João Batista T; Leal, Daniela B R

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. The use of herbal products as a supplement to minimize the effects of chemotherapy for cancer treatment requires further attention with respect to the activity and toxicity of chemotherapy. Uncaria tomentosa extract, which contains oxindole alkaloids, is one of these herbal products. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether Uncaria tomentosa extract modulates apoptosis induced by chemotherapy exposure. Materials and Methods. Colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT29 cells) were grown in the presence of oxaliplatin and/or Uncaria tomentosa extract. Results. The hydroalcoholic extract of Uncaria tomentosa enhanced chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, with an increase in the percentage of Annexin positive cells, an increase in caspase activities, and an increase of DNA fragments in culture of the neoplastic cells. Moreover, antioxidant activity may be related to apoptosis. Conclusion. Uncaria tomentosa extract has a role for cancer patients as a complementary therapy. Further studies evaluating these beneficial effects with other chemotherapy drugs are recommended. PMID:25505920

  13. Effect of Uncaria tomentosa Extract on Apoptosis Triggered by Oxaliplatin Exposure on HT29 Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Liliane Z.; Farias, Iria Luiza G.; Rigo, Melânia L.; Glanzner, Werner G.; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard D.; Cadoná, Francine C.; Cruz, Ivana B.; Farias, Júlia G.; Duarte, Marta M. M. F.; Franco, Luzia; Bertol, Gustavo; Colpo, Elisangela; Brites, Patricia C.; Rocha, João Batista T.; Leal, Daniela B. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. The use of herbal products as a supplement to minimize the effects of chemotherapy for cancer treatment requires further attention with respect to the activity and toxicity of chemotherapy. Uncaria tomentosa extract, which contains oxindole alkaloids, is one of these herbal products. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether Uncaria tomentosa extract modulates apoptosis induced by chemotherapy exposure. Materials and Methods. Colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT29 cells) were grown in the presence of oxaliplatin and/or Uncaria tomentosa extract. Results. The hydroalcoholic extract of Uncaria tomentosa enhanced chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, with an increase in the percentage of Annexin positive cells, an increase in caspase activities, and an increase of DNA fragments in culture of the neoplastic cells. Moreover, antioxidant activity may be related to apoptosis. Conclusion. Uncaria tomentosa extract has a role for cancer patients as a complementary therapy. Further studies evaluating these beneficial effects with other chemotherapy drugs are recommended. PMID:25505920

  14. Optoelectronic characterization of carrier extraction in a hot carrier photovoltaic cell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, James A. R.; Kauer, Matthias; Smith, Katherine; Liu, Huiyun; Stavrinou, Paul N.; Ekins-Daukes, Nicholas J.

    2016-07-01

    A hot carrier photovoltaic cell requires extraction of electrons on a timescale faster than they can lose energy to the lattice. We optically and optoelectronically characterize two resonant tunneling structures, showing their compatability with hot carrier photovoltaic operation, demonstrating structural and carrier extraction properties necessary for such a device. In particular we use time resolved and temperature dependent photoluminescence to determine extraction timescales and energy levels in the structures and demonstrate fast carrier extraction by tunneling. We also show that such devices are capable of extracting photo-generated electrons at high carrier densities, with an open circuit voltage in excess of 1 V.

  15. Marsdenia tenacissima extract restored gefitinib sensitivity in resistant non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Shu-Yan; Zhao, Ming-Bo; Zhuang, Gui-Bao; Li, Ping-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Most non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients responding to gefitinib harbor activating mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). However, the responsive cases eventually develop the resistance to gefitinib. Besides, K-ras mutations were identified as the primary resistance to gefitinib. We investigated whether Marsdenia tenacissima extract (MTE, trade name: Xiao-Ai-Ping injection) combined with gefitinib could overcome the resistance of NSCLC cells to gefitinib. NSCLC cell lines with different sensitivities to gefitinib were studied. Cell growth and apoptosis were evaluated by MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The EGFR-related signaling molecule phosphorylation was assessed by Western blotting. We found that MTE inhibited cell growth in gefitinib-sensitive and -resistant cells. In gefitinib-resistant cells, the MTE→MTE+gefitinib (M→M+G) treatment was most potent over the concurrent administration of MTE and gefitinib (M+G) or gefitinib→gefitinib+MTE (G→G+M) treatment in cell growth inhibition and apoptosis induction. The M→M+G treatment significantly reduced the phosphorylation of EGFR downstream signaling molecules PI3K/Akt/mTOR and ERK, on which MTE and gefitinib alone had no obvious effects on the resistant cells. The M→M+G treatment attenuated c-Met phosphorylation in H460 and H1975 as well. Thus, we found that the M→M+G treatment improved the sensitivity of resistant NSCLC cells carrying T790M or K-ras mutations to gefitinib, suggesting that the M→M+G treatment may be a promising therapeutic strategy to overcome gefitinib resistance in NSCLC. PMID:21757251

  16. Nanoparticles of Selaginella doederleinii leaf extract inhibit human lung cancer cells A549

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syaefudin; Juniarti, A.; Rosiyana, L.; Setyani, A.; Khodijah, S.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate cytotoxicity effect of nanoparticles of Selaginella doederleinii (S. doederleinii) leaves extract. S. doederleinii was extracted by maceration method using 70%(v/v) ethanol as solvent. Phytochemical content was analyzed qualitatively by using Harborne and Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) methods. Nanoparticle extract was prepared by ionic gelation using chitosan as encapsulant agent. Anticancer activity was performed by using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results showed that S. doederleinii contains of flavonoids. Nanoparticle of S. doederleinii leaves extract greatly inhibited A549 cells growth (cancer cells), with IC50 of 3% or 1020 μg/ml. These nanoparticles extract also inhibited the growth of Chang cells (normal cells), with IC50 of 4% or 1442 μg/ml. The effective concentration of nanoparticles extract which inhibits cancer cells without harming the normal cells is 0.5% or 167 μg/ml. Further studies are needed to obtain the concentration of nanoparticles extract which can selectively suppress cancer cells.

  17. Characterization of the effect of Epilobium extracts on human cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Vitalone, Annabella; McColl, Janice; Thome, Dean; Costa, Lucio G; Tita, Beatrice

    2003-10-01

    We have previously shown that extracts of different Epilobium species, a phytotherapeutic agent used in folk medicine as a treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia, inhibit proliferation of human prostate cells. The selectivity of this effect was evaluated in four different human cell lines (PZ-HPV-7, normal prostate cells; LNCaP, transformed prostate cells; HMEC, mammary cells, and 1321N1, astrocytoma cells). Different extracts of Epilobium species (E. rosmarinifolium, E. spicatum, and E. tetragonum) had similar growth-inhibitory effects in all cell lines tested, indicating a lack of specificity for prostate cells. Inhibition of DNA synthesis was mostly due to the nonpolar fraction of the extracts which is expected to contain flavonoids and sterols. Polar fractions were devoid of activity with the exception of that from E. rosmarinifolium. This species is the most potent in the antiproliferative effect and contains the highest concentration of oenothein B, a hydrolyzable ellagitannin. Oenothein B inhibited DNA synthesis in all four cell lines tested. Extracts of E. angustifolium (the Linné denomination of E. spicatum) and of E. spicatum from different sources were compared for their ability to inhibit DNA synthesis and for their oenothein B content. The E. angustifolium extract contained an amount of oenothein B 40-fold higher than the other extract of the same species and was ten times more potent in inhibiting DNA synthesis in a human prostate cell line. These results indicate that Epilobium extracts inhibit proliferation of prostate cells in a nonspecific manner. Oenothein B may play a role in this effect, but other active compounds are also present. The difference observed between extracts from the same species underscores the importance of determination and standardization of active ingredients in phytotherapeutic agents. PMID:12928581

  18. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. )

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  19. Antihaemolytic activity of thirty herbal extracts in mouse red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Masoumeh; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Safdari, Yaghoub

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can lead to haemolysis and eventually to diseases such as thalassemia and sickle cell anaemia. Their action can be counteracted by the antihaemolytic activity of therapeutic agents. The aim of our study was to identify plants that most efficiently counteract ROS-caused haemolysis. From ten plants known for their antioxidant activity (Orobanche orientalis G. Beck, Cucumis melo L., Albizzia julibrissin Durazz, Galium verum L., Scutellaria tournefortii Benth, Crocus caspius Fischer & Meyer, Sambucus ebulus L., Danae racemosa L., Rubus fruticsos L., and Artemisia absinthium L.) we prepared 30 extracts using three extraction methods (percolation, Soxhlet, and ultrasound-assisted extraction) to see whether the extraction method affects antihaemolytic efficiency, and one extraction method (polyphenol extraction) to see how much of this action is phenol-related. Extract antihaemolytic activity was determined in mice red blood cells and compared to that of vitamin C as a known antioxidant. Nine of our extracts were more potent than vitamin C, of which G. verum (aerial parts/percolation) and S. tournefortii (aerial parts/polyphenol) extracts were the most potent, with an IC50 of 1.32 and 2.08 μg mL⁻¹, respectively. Haemolysis inhibition depended on extract concentration and the method of extraction. These plants could provide accessible sources of natural antioxidants to the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25720027

  20. Visualization of the chromosome scaffold and intermediates of loop domain compaction in extracted mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Sheval, Eugene V; Polyakov, Vladimir Y

    2006-12-01

    A novel extraction protocol for cells cultured on coverslips is described. Observations of the extraction process in a perfusion chamber reveal that cells of all mitotic stages are not detached from coverslips during extraction, and all stages can be recognized using phase contrast images. We studied the extracted cell morphology and distribution of a major scaffold component - topoisomerase IIalpha, in extracted metaphase and anaphase cells. An extraction using 2M NaCl leads to destruction of chromosomes at the light microscope level. Immunogold studies demonstrate that the only residual structure observed is an axial chromosome scaffold that contains topoisomerase IIalpha. In contrast, mitotic chromosomes are swelled only partially after an extraction using dextran sulphate and heparin, and it appears that this treatment does not lead to total destruction of loop domains. In this case, the chromosome scaffold and numerous structures resembling small rosettes are revealed inside extracted cells. The rosettes observed condense after addition of Mg2+-ions and do not contain topoisomerase IIalpha suggesting that these structures correspond to intermediates of loop domain compaction. We propose a model of chromosome structure in which the loop domains are condensed into highly regular structures with rosette organization. PMID:17029868

  1. Selectivity of Pinus sylvestris extract and essential oil to estrogen-insensitive breast cancer cells Pinus sylvestris against cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoai, Nguyen Thi; Duc, Ho Viet; Thao, Do Thi; Orav, Anne; Raal, Ain

    2015-01-01

    Background: So far, the anticancer action of pine tree extracts has mainly been shown for the species distributed widely around the Asian countries. Objective: Therefore, this study was performed to examine the potential cytotoxicity of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) native also to the European region and growing widely in Estonia. Materials and Methods: The cytotoxic activity of methanol extract and essential oil of Scots pine needles was determined by sulforhodamine B assay in different human cancer cell lines. Results: This needle extract was found to suppress the viability of several human cancer cell lines showing some selectivity to estrogen receptor negative breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231(half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] 35 μg/ml) in comparison with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells, MCF-7 (IC50 86 μg/ml). It is the strongest cytotoxic effect at all measured, thus far for the needles and leaves extracts derived from various pine species, and is also the first study comparing the anticancer effects of pine tree extracts on molecularly different human breast cancer cells. The essential oil showed the stronger cytotoxic effect to both negative and positive breast cancer cell lines (both IC50 29 μg/ml) than pine extract (IC50 42 and 80 μg/ml, respectively). Conclusion: The data from this report indicate that Scots pine needles extract and essential oil exhibits some potential as chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agent for mammary tumors unresponsive to endocrine treatment. PMID:26664017

  2. Cardiomyocyte marker expression in a human lymphocyte cell line using mouse cardiomyocyte extract.

    PubMed

    Vojdani, Zahra; Tavakolinejad, Sima; Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Esmaeilpour, Tahereh; Rasooli, Manuchehr

    2011-03-01

    Cell transplantation shows potential for the treatment of cardiac diseases. Embryonic stem cells, cord blood and mesenchymal stem cells have been suggested as sources for transplantation therapy. Because of some technical limitations with the use of stem cells, transdifferentiation of fully differentiated cells is a potentially useful alternative. We investigated whether human peripheral blood cells could transdifferentiate into cardiomyocyte. Transdifferentiation was induced in a human B lymphocyte cell line (Raji). Cardiomyocyte extract was prepared from adult mouse cardiomyocytes. The cells were treated with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and trichostatin A, permeabilized with streptolysin O, and exposed to the mouse cardiomyocyte extract. They were cultured for 10 days, 3 weeks and 4 weeks. Cardiomyocyte markers were detected with immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Immunocytochemistry revealed that some cells expressed myosin heavy chain, α-actinin and cardiac troponin T after 3 and 4 weeks. Flow cytometry confirmed these data. In cells exposed to trichostatin A and 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and permeabilized in the presence of the cardiomyocyte extract, troponin T expression was seen in 3.53% of the cells and 3.11% of them expressed α-actinin. After exposure to the cardiomyocyte extract, some permeabilized cells adhered to the plate loosely; however, the morphology did not change significantly, and they continued to show a rounded shape after 4 weeks. Our treated lymphocytes expressed cardiomyocyte markers. Our results suggest that lymphocytes may be useful in future research as a source of cells for reprogramming procedures. PMID:21547694

  3. Interferon-γ-Mediated Natural Killer Cell Activation by an Aqueous Panax ginseng Extract

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Okumura, Ko

    2015-01-01

    Panax ginseng extracts are used in traditional herbal medicines, particularly in eastern Asia, but their effect on natural killer (NK) cell activity is not completely understood. This study aimed to examine the effects of P. ginseng extracts on the cytotoxic activity of NK cells. We orally administered P. ginseng extracts or ginsenosides to wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 (B6) and BALB/c mice and to B6 mice deficient in either recombination activating gene 2 (RAG-2) or interferon-γ (IFN-γ). We then tested the cytotoxic activity of NK cells (of spleen and liver mononuclear cells) against NK-sensitive YAC-1 cells. Oral administration of P. ginseng aqueous extract augmented the cytotoxicity of NK cells in WT B6 and BALB/c mice and in RAG-2-deficient B6 mice, but not in IFN-γ-deficient B6 mice. This effect was only observed with the aqueous extract of P. ginseng. Interestingly, the ginsenosides Rb1 and Rg1 did not augment NK cell cytotoxicity. These results demonstrated that the aqueous P. ginseng extract augmented NK cell activation in vivo via an IFN-γ-dependent pathway. PMID:26649061

  4. Apoptosis mechanism of human cholangiocarcinoma cells induced by bile extract from crocodile.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jin-He; Zhang, Wen-Qing; Song, Wei; Shen, Dong-Yan; Li, Shan-Shan; Tian, Ling; Shi, Yan; Liang, Ge; Xiong, You-Xiong; Chen, Qing-Xi

    2012-02-01

    Animal bile is popularly used as a traditional medicine in China, and bile acids are their major bioactive constituents. In the present study, effects of bile extract from crocodile gallbladder on QBC939 cell growth, cell cycle, and apoptosis were investigated by MTT assay, inverted microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, PI single- and FITC/PI double-staining flow cytometry, and western blotting. Our data have revealed that bile extract inhibited cells growth significantly, and the cell cycle was arrested in G1 phase. Bile extract induced QBC939 cell apoptosis, which was associated with collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential and increase of ROS. In bile extract-treated cells, it was observed that the expression of bcl-2 decreased and cytochrome c released to cytosol, but the expression of bax remained unchanged. The data indicated that mitochondrial pathway might play an important role in bile extract-induced apoptosis in QBC939 cells. These results provide significant insight into the anticarcinogenic action of bile extract on cholangiocarcinoma cells. PMID:22194052

  5. Cytotoxic effects of Mangifera indica L. kernel extract on human breast cancer (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines) and bioactive constituents in the crude extract

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Waterlily Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is thought to be antioxidant-rich, conferred by its functional phytochemicals. Methods The potential anticancer effects of the ethanolic kernel extract on breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) using MTT, anti-proliferation, neutral red (NR) uptake and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assays were evaluated. Cytological studies on the breast cancer cells were also conducted, and phytochemical analyses of the extract were carried out to determine the likely bioactive compounds responsible for such effects. Results Results showed the extract induced cytotoxicity in MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells with IC50 values of 30 and 15 μg/mL, respectively. The extract showed significant toxicity towards both cell lines, with low toxicity to normal breast cells (MCF-10A). The cytotoxic effects on the cells were further confirmed by the NR uptake, antiproliferative and LDH release assays. Bioactive analyses revealed that many bioactives were present in the extract although butylated hydroxytoluene, a potent antioxidant, was the most abundant with 44.65%. Conclusions M. indica extract appears to be more cytoxic to both estrogen positive and negative breast cancer cell lines than to normal breast cells. Synergistic effects of its antioxidant bioactives could have contributed to the cytotoxic effects of the extract. The extract of M. indica, therefore, has potential anticancer activity against breast cancer cells. This potential is worth studying further, and could have implications on future studies and eventually management of human breast cancers. PMID:24962691

  6. Comparison of Cell Disruption Methods for Improving Lipid Extraction from Thraustochytrid Strains

    PubMed Central

    Byreddy, Avinesh R.; Gupta, Adarsha; Barrow, Colin J.; Puri, Munish

    2015-01-01

    Lipid extraction is an integral part of biodiesel production, as it facilitates the release of fatty acids from algal cells. To utilise thraustochytrids as a potential source for lipid production. We evaluated the extraction efficiency of various solvents and solvent combinations for lipid extraction from Schizochytrium sp. S31 and Thraustochytrium sp. AMCQS5-5. The maximum lipid extraction yield was 22% using a chloroform:methanol ratio of 2:1. We compared various cell disruption methods to improve lipid extraction yields, including grinding with liquid nitrogen, bead vortexing, osmotic shock, water bath, sonication and shake mill. The highest lipid extraction yields were obtained using osmotic shock and 48.7% from Schizochytrium sp. S31 and 29.1% from Thraustochytrium sp. AMCQS5-5. Saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid contents were more than 60% in Schizochytrium sp. S31 which suggests their suitability for biodiesel production. PMID:26270668

  7. Comparison of Cell Disruption Methods for Improving Lipid Extraction from Thraustochytrid Strains.

    PubMed

    Byreddy, Avinesh R; Gupta, Adarsha; Barrow, Colin J; Puri, Munish

    2015-08-01

    Lipid extraction is an integral part of biodiesel production, as it facilitates the release of fatty acids from algal cells. To utilise thraustochytrids as a potential source for lipid production. We evaluated the extraction efficiency of various solvents and solvent combinations for lipid extraction from Schizochytrium sp. S31 and Thraustochytrium sp. AMCQS5-5. The maximum lipid extraction yield was 22% using a chloroform:methanol ratio of 2:1. We compared various cell disruption methods to improve lipid extraction yields, including grinding with liquid nitrogen, bead vortexing, osmotic shock, water bath, sonication and shake mill. The highest lipid extraction yields were obtained using osmotic shock and 48.7% from Schizochytrium sp. S31 and 29.1% from Thraustochytrium sp. AMCQS5-5. Saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid contents were more than 60% in Schizochytrium sp. S31 which suggests their suitability for biodiesel production. PMID:26270668

  8. Tomato Aqueous Extract Modulates the Inflammatory Profile of Immune Cells and Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Schwager, Joseph; Richard, Nathalie; Mussler, Bernd; Raederstorff, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Nutrients transiently or chronically modulate functional and biochemical characteristics of cells and tissues both in vivo and in vitro. The influence of tomato aqueous extract (TAE) on the in vitro inflammatory response of activated human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) and macrophages was investigated. Its effect on endothelial dysfunction (ED) was analyzed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Murine macrophages (RAW264.7 cells), PBLs and HUVECs were incubated with TAE. They were activated with LPS or TNF-α in order to induce inflammatory processes and ED, respectively. Inflammatory mediators and adhesion molecules were measured by immune assay-based multiplex analysis. Gene expression was quantified by RT-PCR. TAE altered the production of interleukins (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12) and chemokines (CCL2/MCP-1, CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL5/RANTES, CXCL8/IL-8, CXCL10/IP-10) in PBLs. TAE reduced ED-associated expression of adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1) in endothelial cell. In macrophages, the production of nitric oxide, PGE2, cytokines and ILs (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12), which reflects chronic inflammatory processes, was reduced. Adenosine was identified as the main bioactive of TAE. Thus, TAE had cell-specific and context-dependent effects. We infer from these in vitro data, that during acute inflammation TAE enhances cellular alertness and therefore the sensing of disturbed immune homeostasis in the vascular-endothelial compartment. Conversely, it blunts inflammatory mediators in macrophages during chronic inflammation. A novel concept of immune regulation by this extract is proposed. PMID:26840280

  9. Towards quantitative metabolomics of mammalian cells: development of a metabolite extraction protocol.

    PubMed

    Dietmair, Stefanie; Timmins, Nicholas E; Gray, Peter P; Nielsen, Lars K; Krömer, Jens O

    2010-09-15

    Metabolomics aims to quantify all metabolites within an organism, thereby providing valuable insight into the metabolism of cells. To study intracellular metabolites, they are first extracted from the cells. The ideal extraction procedure should immediately quench metabolism and quantitatively extract all metabolites, a significant challenge given the rapid turnover and physicochemical diversity of intracellular metabolites. We have evaluated several quenching and extraction solutions for their suitability for mammalian cells grown in suspension. Quenching with 60% methanol (buffered or unbuffered) resulted in leakage of intracellular metabolites from the cells. In contrast, quenching with cold isotonic saline (0.9% [w/v] NaCl, 0.5 degrees C) did not damage cells and effectively halted conversion of ATP to ADP and AMP, indicative of metabolic arrest. Of the 12 different extraction methods tested, cold extraction in 50% aqueous acetonitrile was superior to other methods. The recovery of a mixture of standards was excellent, and the concentration of extracted intracellular metabolites was higher than for the other methods tested. The final protocol is easy to implement and can be used to study the intracellular metabolomes of mammalian cells. PMID:20435011

  10. Aqueous Extracts of Selected Potentilla Species Modulate Biological Activity of Human Normal Colon Cells.

    PubMed

    Paduch, Roman; Wiater, Adrian; Locatelli, Marcello; Pleszczyńska, Malgorzata; Tomczyk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Potentilla L. (Rosaceae) species have been used in traditional and in folk medicine for many years. This study characterized the activity of extracts from aerial parts of selected Potentilla species: P. argentea, P. anserina, P. grandiflora and P. erecta as well as one species of closely related to the genus Potentilla, Drymocallis rupestris (syn. P. rupestris). The biological activities were analyzed using MTT, NR and DPPH assays on CCD 841 CoTr and CCD-18Co cells. Moreover, cell morphology and cytoskeletal actin F-filaments organization and IL-6 and IL-10 levels by ELISA were analyzed after 24 h of incubation. Potentilla extracts at dose levels between 25 and 250 µg/mL were analyzed. For ELISA, 15 µg/mL and 30 μg/mL were chosen. When mitochondrial succinyl dehydrogenase activity was tested (MTT assay) only extract obtained from P. erecta at lower concentrations (up to 125 µg/mL) suppressed metabolism of myofibroblasts, while epithelial cells mitochondrial enzyme activity increased after incubation with all extracts. In Neutral Red (NR) method cellular membrane disturbance of both cell cultures was found after D. rupestris and P. grandiflora addition. Moreover, strong influence on epithelial cells was also found for P. anserina. All extracts showed similar, concentration-dependent free radical scavenging (DPPH) effect. Potentilla extracts, especially at lower concentration, decreased IL-6 production in myofibroblasts but the level of the cytokine was found to be stable in epithelial cells. IL-10 analysis revealed that P. argentea, D. rupestris, P. erecta extracts decrease cytokine level in myofibroblasts, while only when higher concentration were applied, decreased cytokine level produced by epithelial cells was found. F-actin filaments staining revealed that Potentilla extracts significantly influence on cellular cytoskeleton organization. Potentilla extracts influence on cells of human colon wall lining modulating the main features of them (viability

  11. The influence of aqueous extracts of selected Potentilla species on normal human colon cells.

    PubMed

    Tomczyk, Michał; Paduch, Roman; Wiater, Adrian; Pleszczyńska, Małgorzata; Kandefer-Szerszeń, Martyna; Szczodrak, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Potentilla L. (Rosaceae) species have been used in traditional medicine in Asia, Europe and Northern America. This study analyzed the biological activity of aqueous extracts of Potentilla species (Rosaceae): Dasiphora fruticosa (syn. P. fruticosa), P. norvegica, P. pensylvanica, P. thuringiaca, P. crantzii and P. nepalensis. The activities were tested using MTT, NR and DPPH assays on normal human colon epithelium (CCD 841 CoTr) and colon myofibroblast (CCD-18Co) cells. Moreover, cell morphology using the May-Grünwald-Giemsa method, IL-6 by ELISA, and nitric oxide (NO) analysis with the Griess method in culture supernatants were performed after 24 h. Extracts were tested at dose levels between 25 and 250 microg/mL. For ELISA, 15 microg/mL was chosen. All extracts suppressed the metabolism of myofibroblasts, while epithelial cells' mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity decreased after incubation with extracts. All extracts showed a free radical scavenging (DPPH) effect in a concentration-dependent manner. The most potent was the extract from D. fruticosa, while the least action was observed for P. thuringiaca. Potentilla extracts stimulated, IL-6 production in tested cells but the level of the cytokine was found to decrease in epithelial cells. Pre-incubation of cells with LPS resulted in increased IL-6 secretion. Modulation of NO production after extract addition and cell pre-incubation with LPS was also observed. Potentilla extracts may be interesting natural factors modulating the main features of cells forming the colon wall, and thus may be potentially useful in the prophylaxis or healing of colon disorders. PMID:23757943

  12. Continuous-flow extractive desorption electrospray ionization coupled to normal phase separations and for direct lipid analysis from cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Schug, Kevin A

    2014-09-01

    Normal phase liquid chromatography is a common mode for chiral separations. Many chiral amines are used as drugs or are important intermediates for drug synthesis. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is well known for its high sensitivity. However, when using normal phase liquid chromatography, electrospray ionization is hampered by the poor ionization efficiency of analytes from organic eluents. Continuous-flow extractive desorption electrospray ionization, which introduces the eluents through a hypodermic needle into the electrospray plume is demonstrated here for its success to interface normal phase liquid chromatography to mass spectrometry detection. Such an approach was shown to be as or more sensitive than ultraviolet detection for a selected set of aromatic amine-functionalized enantiomers. Also demonstrated is the direct infusion of cell extracts to monitor phospholipids from three different bacterial cells. Despite their presence in non-electrospray-ionization-friendly extraction solvents, continuous-flow extractive desorption electrospray ionization enabled the sensitive detection of phospholipids and the ability to tune ion forms through incorporation of different spray modifiers. PMID:24923254

  13. Kefir extracts suppress in vitro proliferation of estrogen-dependent human breast cancer cells but not normal mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chujian; Chan, Hing Man; Kubow, Stan

    2007-09-01

    Anti-tumorigenic effects have been demonstrated in animal studies from the intake of kefir, a traditional fermented milk product believed to originate from the Caucasian mountains of Russia. In the present study, the antiproliferative effects of extracts of kefir, yogurt, and pasteurized cow's milk on human mammary cancer cells (MCF-7) and normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) was investigated at doses of 0.31%, 0.63%, 1.25%, 2.5%, 5%, and 10% (vol/vol). After 6 days of culture, extracts of kefir-fermented milk depressed MCF-7 cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, showing 29% inhibition of proliferation at a concentration as low as 0.63%, whereas yogurt extracts began to show dose-dependent antiproliferative effects only at the 2.5% dose. Moreover, at the 2.5% dose, kefir extracts decreased the MCF-7 cell numbers by 56%, while yogurt extracts decreased MCF-7 cell proliferation by only 14%. No antiproliferative effects of kefir extracts were observed in the HMECs, while the yogurt extracts exerted antiproliferative effects on HMECs at the 5% and 10% doses. Unfermented milk extracts stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 cells and HMECs at concentrations above 0.31%. Peptide content and capillary electrophoresis analyses showed that kefir-mediated milk fermentation led to an increase in peptide concentrations and a change in peptide profiles relative to milk or yogurt. The present findings suggest that kefir extracts contain constituents that specifically inhibit the growth of human breast cancer cells, which might eventually be useful in the prevention or treatment of breast cancer. PMID:17887934

  14. Cytotoxicity of ethanolic extracts of Artemisia annua to Molt-4 human leukemia cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cancer is the second cause of death in the United States, and current treatment is expensive and kills also healthy cells. Affordable alternatives that kill only cancer cells are needed. Artemisinin, extracted from the Artemisia annua, has potent anticancer activity and low toxicity to normal cell...

  15. Hedyotis diffusa Willd extract inhibits HT-29 cell proliferation via cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Lin, Minghe; Lin, Jiumao; Wei, Lihui; Xu, Wei; Hong, Zhenfeng; Cai, Qiaoyan; Peng, Jun; Zhu, Dezeng

    2012-08-01

    Hedyotis diffusa Willd (HDW) has long been used as an important component in several Chinese medicine formulae to clinically treat various types of cancer, including colorectal cancer (CRC). Previously, we reported that HDW inhibits CRC growth via the induction of cancer cell apoptosis and the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. In the present study, to further elucidate the mechanism of HDW-mediated antitumor activity, we investigated the effect of HDW ethanol extract (EEHDW) on the proliferation of HT-29 human colon carcinoma cells. We found that EEHDW reduced HT-29 cell viability and survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We also observed that EEHDW treatment blocked the cell cycle, preventing G1 to S progression, and reduced mRNA expression of pro-proliferative PCNA, Cyclin D1 and CDK4, but increased that of anti-proliferative p21. Our findings suggest that Hedyotis diffusa Willd may be an effective treatment for CRC via the suppression of cancer cell proliferation. PMID:23139718

  16. Fruit extract from a Sechium edule hybrid induce apoptosis in leukaemic cell lines but not in normal cells.

    PubMed

    Aguiñiga-Sánchez, Itzen; Soto-Hernández, Marcos; Cadena-Iñiguez, Jorge; Ruíz-Posadas, Lucero del Mar; Cadena-Zamudio, Jorge David; González-Ugarte, Ana Karen; Steider, Benny Weiss; Santiago-Osorio, Edelmiro

    2015-01-01

    The antiproliferative potential of a crude extract from the chayote hybrid H-837-07-GISeM® and its potential for apoptosis induction were assessed in leukaemic cell lines and normal mouse bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs). The extract strongly inhibited the proliferation of the P388, J774, and WEHI-3 cell lines (with an IC50 below 1.3 μg·mL(-1)), reduced cell viability, and induced apoptotic body production, phosphatidylserine translocation, and DNA fragmentation. However, the extract had no effect on BM-MNCs. We postulate that these properties make the extract a good candidate for an anti-tumour agent for clinical use. PMID:25611564

  17. Extracts of various species of Epilobium inhibit proliferation of human prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Vitalone, Annabella; Guizzetti, Marina; Costa, Lucio G; Tita, Beatrice

    2003-05-01

    This study examined whether various species of Epilobium, a phytotherapeutic agent used in folk medicine as a treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia, may have an antiproliferative effect in PZ-HPV-7 human prostatic epithelial cells in-vitro. The MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) test, [methyl-(3)H]thymidine incorporation into DNA and flow cytometry analysis were used to evaluate cell proliferation. Ethanolic extracts of E. spicatum, E. rosmarinifolium and E. tetragonum inhibited DNA synthesis in PZ-HPV-7 cells. While at high concentrations all extracts were cytotoxic, DNA synthesis was also decreased at levels that caused no or little cytotoxicity. Treatment of cells with Epilobium extracts did not result in a formation of DNA fragments (evaluated by the TUNEL assay) or chromatin condensation (assessed by Hoechst staining). Flow cytometry analysis indicated that Epilobium extracts inhibit the progression of the cell cycle from the G(0)/G(1) phase. These results suggest that extracts of Epilobium inhibit proliferation of human PZ-HPV-7 cells in-vitro by affecting progression of the cell cycle. This study provides some initial biological plausibility for the use of Epilobium extracts in benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:12831512

  18. Phellinus linteus extract induces autophagy and synergizes with 5-fluorouracil to inhibit breast cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Ying; Hsu, Keng-Fu; Chiang, Tai-An; Chen, Chee-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Phellinus linteus (PL) is a medicinal mushroom due to its several biological properties, including anticancer activity. However, the mechanisms of its anticancer effect remain to be elucidated. We evaluated the inhibitory effects of the ethanolic extract from the PL combined with 5-FU on MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line and to determine the mechanism of cell death. Individually, PL extract and 5-FU significantly inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells in a dose-dependent manner. PL extract (30 mg/mL) in combination with 5-FU (10 μg/mL) synergistically inhibited MDA-MB-231 cells by 1.8-fold. PL did not induce apoptosis, as demonstrated by the DNA fragmentation assay, the sub-G1 population, and staining with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide. The exposure of MDA-MB-231 cells to PL extracts resulted in several confirmed characteristics of autophagy, including the appearance of autophagic vacuoles revealed by monodansylcadaverine staining, the formation of acidic vesicular organelles, autophagosome membrane association of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) characterized by cleavage of LC3 and its punctuate redistribution, and ultrastructural observation of autophagic vacuoles by transmission electron microscopy. We concluded that PL extracts synergized with low doses of 5-FU to inhibit triple-negative breast cancer cell growth and demonstrated that PL extract can induce autophagy-related cell death. PMID:25622112

  19. Cytotoxic effects of the Viscum album L. extract on Ehrlich tumour cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cebović, Tatyana; Spasić, Slavica; Popović, Mira

    2008-08-01

    To date most pharmacological studies on mistletoe (Viscum album L.) have focused on the therapeutic properties of its polar extracts. This study examined the non-polar constituents of Viscum album and their biological activities. Supercritical CO(2) extraction coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to selectively extract and identify compounds in Viscum album leaves. Several non-polar classes of compounds were identified in the extract. In addition, a volatile fraction was identified that contained several novel terpene molecules. The hypothesis was tested that the Viscum album extract exhibits cytotoxic properties in Ehrlich carcinoma (EAC) cells in vivo due to the induction of oxidative stress. A significant reduction in the incidence of cancer was observed in all groups that received the Viscum album extract compared with the EAC control group. The largest decrease was observed in mice pretreated with the Viscum album extract, although significantly reduced numbers of EAC cells were also observed in animals with developed carcinoma. The activities of antioxidative enzymes in the EAC cells suggested the absence of oxidative stress. However, changes in the antioxidative enzymes activities observed after administration of the Viscum album extract might be due to the induction of oxidative stress in the EAC cells. PMID:18570233

  20. Berry extracts exert different antiproliferative effects against cervical and colon cancer cells grown in vitro.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Gordon J; Ross, Heather A; Ikeji, Magnus; Stewart, Derek

    2008-05-14

    Polyphenol-rich berry extracts were screened for their antiproliferative effectiveness using human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells grown in microtiter plates. Rowan berry, raspberry, lingonberry, cloudberry, arctic bramble, and strawberry extracts were effective but blueberry, sea buckthorn, and pomegranate extracts were considerably less effective. The most effective extracts (strawberry > arctic bramble > cloudberry > lingonberry) gave EC 50 values in the range of 25-40 microg/(mL of phenols). These extracts were also effective against human colon cancer (CaCo-2) cells, which were generally more sensitive at low concentrations but conversely less sensitive at higher concentrations. The strawberry, cloudberry, arctic bramble, and the raspberry extracts share common polyphenol constituents, especially the ellagitannins, which have been shown to be effective antiproliferative agents. However, the components underlying the effectiveness of the lingonberry extracts are not known. The lingonberry extracts were fractionated into anthocyanin-rich and tannin-rich fractions by chromatography on Sephadex LH-20. The anthocyanin-rich fraction was considerably less effective than the original extract, whereas the antiproliferative activity was retained in the tannin-rich fraction. The polyphenolic composition of the lingonberry extract was assessed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and was similar to previous reports. The tannin-rich fraction was almost entirely composed of procyanidins of linkage type A and B. Therefore, the antiproliferative activity of lingonberry was caused predominantly by procyanidins. PMID:18412361

  1. Effects of Parietaria judaica pollen extract on human microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Taverna, Simona; Flugy, Anna; Colomba, Paolo; Barranca, Marilisa; De Leo, Giacomo; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2008-08-01

    Pollinosis from Parietaria judaica is one of the main causes of allergy in the Mediterranean area. The present study is designed to assess if P. judaica pollens contain bioactive compounds able to elicit a functional response in endothelial cells. We have demonstrated that addition of pollen extract to human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L) induces a modification of cell morphology, actin cytoskeletal rearrangements and an increase in endothelial cell permeability. We further showed that the treatment of endothelial cells with pollen extract causes an increase of E-selectin and VCAM-1 protein levels as well as an increase of IL-8 production. The stimulation of cell-cell adhesion molecules was paralleled by a dose-dependent increase of adhesion of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) to HMVEC-L monolayer. Our results suggest for the first time that pollen affect directly endothelial cells (EC) modulating critical functions related to the inflammatory response. PMID:18515075

  2. Ethanolic rhizome extract from Kaempferia parviflora Wall. ex. Baker induces apoptosis in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Banjerdpongchai, Ratana; Suwannachot, Kittiphan; Rattanapanone, Viboon; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn

    2008-01-01

    Kaempferia parviflora Wall. ex. Baker is a Thai herb containing many flavonoids that have anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and antioxidant activities. The objective of this study was to demonstrate apoptotic effects of Kaempferia parviflora Wall. ex. Baker rhizome ethanolic extract on HL-60 cells in vitro. The extract suppressed HL-60 cell growth and decreased cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apoptotic cell death was demonstrated by changes in cell morphology, externalization of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface, loss in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and activation of caspase 3. Apoptosis induced by K. parviflora Wall. ex. Baker rhizome ethanolic extract was enhanced by treatment with paclitaxel or doxorubicin, and inhibitors of Akt, PI3-K and MEK. PMID:19256745

  3. Accurate initiation by RNA polymerase II in a whole cell extract from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Woontner, M; Jaehning, J A

    1990-06-01

    We have developed a simple procedure for isolating a transcriptional extract from whole yeast cells which obviates the requirement for nuclear isolation. Detection of accurate mRNA initiation by RNA polymerase II in the extract requires the use of a sensitive assay, recently described by Kornberg and co-workers (Lue, N. F., Flanagan, P. M., Sugimoto, K., and Kornberg, R. D. (1989) Science 246, 661-664) that involves activation by a GAL4-VP16 fusion protein and a template lacking guanosine residues in the coding strand. The extract is prepared from fresh or frozen yeast cells by disruption with glass beads and fractionation of proteins by ammonium sulfate precipitation. The alpha-amanitin-sensitive transcripts synthesized in the assay were identical to those produced in a parallel assay using a yeast nuclear extract. The activity of the whole cell extract is lower per mg of protein than a nuclear extract but proportional to the volume of the nucleus relative to the whole cell. The optimal ranges for several reaction components including template, mono- and divalent cations, and nucleotide substrate concentration were determined. Under optimal conditions the whole cell extract produced a maximum of approximately 1 X 10(-2) transcripts/template molecule in 30 min. PMID:2188968

  4. Neurogenic Effects of Cell-Free Extracts of Adipose Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Jae-Jun; Yang, Seungwon; Im, Wooseok; Kim, Manho

    2016-01-01

    Stem-cell-based therapies are regarded as promising treatments for neurological disorders, and adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are a feasible source of clinical application of stem cell. Recent studies have shown that stem cells have a therapeutic potential for use in the treatment of various illnesses through paracrine action. To examine the effects of cell components of ASCs on neural stem cells (NSCs), we treated cell-free extracts of ASCs (CFE-ASCs) containing various components with brain-derived NSCs. To elucidate the effects of CFE-ASCs in NSC proliferation, we treated mouse subventricular zone-derived cultured NSCs with various doses of CFE-ASCs. As a result, CFE-ASCs were found to induce the proliferation of NSCs under conditions of growth factor deprivation in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.01). CFE-ASCs increase the expression of neuron and astrocyte differentiation markers including Tuj-1 (p<0.05) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (p<0.01) without altering the cell’s fate in differentiating NSCs. In addition, treatment with CFE-ASCs induces an increase in neurite numbers (p<0.01) and lengths of NSCs (p<0.05). Furthermore, CFE-ASCs rescue the hydrogen peroxide-induced reduction of NSCs’ viability (p<0.05) and neurite branching (p<0.01). Findings from our study indicate that CFE-ASCs support the survival, proliferation and differentiation of NSCs accompanied with neurite outgrowth, suggesting that CFE-ASCs can modulate neurogenesis in the central nervous system. PMID:26859291

  5. Mast cells respond to urticating extract from lepidoptera larva Morpheis ehrenbergii in the rat.

    PubMed

    Galicia-Curiel, María Fernanda; Quintanar, J Luis; Jiménez, Mariela; Salinas, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells and histamine participate in toxic effects of hairs from some caterpillars. This study reports that a crude extract of Morpheis ehrenbergii caterpillar hairs induces in vitro mast cells activation, triggers the release of histamine and causes a rapid urticarial reaction in the rat skin. Heating of the extract abolishes the inflammatory reaction. These results suggest that the use of antihistamines may improve the adverse skin reactions caused by the Mexican caterpillar M. ehrenbergii. PMID:24269786

  6. Human cancer cells exhibit in vitro individual receptiveness towards different mistletoe extracts.

    PubMed

    Knöpfl-Sidler, F; Viviani, A; Rist, L; Hensel, A

    2005-06-01

    In vitro cytotoxic effects of three aqueous mistletoe extracts on cell physiology against different human tumor cell lines and primary cancer cells were investigated in order to compare the receptiveness of different cancer cells against different mistletoe products. Therefore cell proliferation (BrdU-incorporation assay), mitochondrial activity (MTT-testing) and necrotic cell toxicity (LDH assay) were assayed over serial dilutions of the test products. Data obtained with HELA-S3, MOLT-4, MFM-223, COR-L51, KPL-1 and VM-CUB1 tumor cell lines and Iscador M (20 mg/ml), Iscador Q (20 mg/ml) and Abnobaviscum Fraxini -2 (20 mg/ml) indicated significant growth-inhibition of all cell lines, but also different cell susceptibilities against the different extracts. These variations were not only monitored on established cell lines but also on primary mamma carcinoma cells from surgical resectates. Concerning cell proliferation and mitochondrial activity Abnobaviscum Fraxini exhibits stronger inhibitory effects compared to products from the Iscador series. In case the evaluation was standardized on the active contents of VAA-I within the different products, the Iscador extracts possess higher cytotoxic activity. Pure viscotoxins and mistletoe lectins exhibited less effects than the extracts. The simultaneous presence of pure mistletoe lectins and mistletoe polysaccharides diminished the VAA-mediated cytotoxic effects. The presence of fetal calf serum (FCS) in cultivation media during in vitro testing diminished the cytotoxic effects of mistletoe extracts. It was shown that in vivo application of mistletoe preparations led to the formation of antibodies against unknown compounds of the extracts, diminishing the cytotoxic effect. PMID:15997835

  7. Anticancer Effect of Ginger Extract against Pancreatic Cancer Cells Mainly through Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Autotic Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Miho; Iizuka, Mari; Kanematsu, Rie; Yoshida, Masato; Takenaga, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    The extract of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and its major pungent components, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol, have been shown to have an anti-proliferative effect on several tumor cell lines. However, the anticancer activity of the ginger extract in pancreatic cancer is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the ethanol-extracted materials of ginger suppressed cell cycle progression and consequently induced the death of human pancreatic cancer cell lines, including Panc-1 cells. The underlying mechanism entailed autosis, a recently characterized form of cell death, but not apoptosis or necroptosis. The extract markedly increased the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, decreased SQSTM1/p62 protein, and enhanced vacuolization of the cytoplasm in Panc-1 cells. It activated AMPK, a positive regulator of autophagy, and inhibited mTOR, a negative autophagic regulator. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine partially prevented cell death. Morphologically, however, focal membrane rupture, nuclear shrinkage, focal swelling of the perinuclear space and electron dense mitochondria, which are unique morphological features of autosis, were observed. The extract enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and the antioxidant N-acetylcystein attenuated cell death. Our study revealed that daily intraperitoneal administration of the extract significantly prolonged survival (P = 0.0069) in a peritoneal dissemination model and suppressed tumor growth in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer (P < 0.01) without serious adverse effects. Although [6]-shogaol but not [6]-gingerol showed similar effects, chromatographic analyses suggested the presence of other constituent(s) as active substances. Together, these results show that ginger extract has potent anticancer activity against pancreatic cancer cells by inducing ROS-mediated autosis and warrants further investigation in order to develop an efficacious candidate drug. PMID:25961833

  8. Anticancer Effect of Ginger Extract against Pancreatic Cancer Cells Mainly through Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Autotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Miho; Iizuka, Mari; Kanematsu, Rie; Yoshida, Masato; Takenaga, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    The extract of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and its major pungent components, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol, have been shown to have an anti-proliferative effect on several tumor cell lines. However, the anticancer activity of the ginger extract in pancreatic cancer is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the ethanol-extracted materials of ginger suppressed cell cycle progression and consequently induced the death of human pancreatic cancer cell lines, including Panc-1 cells. The underlying mechanism entailed autosis, a recently characterized form of cell death, but not apoptosis or necroptosis. The extract markedly increased the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, decreased SQSTM1/p62 protein, and enhanced vacuolization of the cytoplasm in Panc-1 cells. It activated AMPK, a positive regulator of autophagy, and inhibited mTOR, a negative autophagic regulator. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine partially prevented cell death. Morphologically, however, focal membrane rupture, nuclear shrinkage, focal swelling of the perinuclear space and electron dense mitochondria, which are unique morphological features of autosis, were observed. The extract enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and the antioxidant N-acetylcystein attenuated cell death. Our study revealed that daily intraperitoneal administration of the extract significantly prolonged survival (P = 0.0069) in a peritoneal dissemination model and suppressed tumor growth in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer (P < 0.01) without serious adverse effects. Although [6]-shogaol but not [6]-gingerol showed similar effects, chromatographic analyses suggested the presence of other constituent(s) as active substances. Together, these results show that ginger extract has potent anticancer activity against pancreatic cancer cells by inducing ROS-mediated autosis and warrants further investigation in order to develop an efficacious candidate drug. PMID:25961833

  9. Willow Leaves' Extracts Contain Anti-Tumor Agents Effective against Three Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    El-Shemy, Hany A.; Aboul-Enein, Ahmed M.; Aboul-Enein, Khalid Mostafa; Fujita, Kounosuke

    2007-01-01

    Many higher plants contain novel metabolites with antimicrobial, antifungal and antiviral properties. However, in the developed world almost all clinically used chemotherapeutics have been produced by in vitro chemical synthesis. Exceptions, like taxol and vincristine, were structurally complex metabolites that were difficult to synthesize in vitro. Many non-natural, synthetic drugs cause severe side effects that were not acceptable except as treatments of last resort for terminal diseases such as cancer. The metabolites discovered in medicinal plants may avoid the side effect of synthetic drugs, because they must accumulate within living cells. The aim here was to test an aqueous extract from the young developing leaves of willow (Salix safsaf, Salicaceae) trees for activity against human carcinoma cells in vivo and in vitro. In vivo Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma Cells (EACC) were injected into the intraperitoneal cavity of mice. The willow extract was fed via stomach tube. The (EACC) derived tumor growth was reduced by the willow extract and death was delayed (for 35 days). In vitro the willow extract could kill the majority (75%–80%) of abnormal cells among primary cells harvested from seven patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 13 with AML (acute myeloid leukemia). DNA fragmentation patterns within treated cells inferred targeted cell death by apoptosis had occurred. The metabolites within the willow extract may act as tumor inhibitors that promote apoptosis, cause DNA damage, and affect cell membranes and/or denature proteins. PMID:17264881

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Terminalia chebula Extract-Dependent Changes in Human Lymphoblastic T Cell Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nando Dulal; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Park, Ji Hyun; Choi, Mi Ran; Lee, Hyung Tae; Kim, Moo Sung; Lee, Sang Rin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Terminalia chebula is a native plant from southern Asia to southwestern China that is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of malignant tumors and diabetes. This plant also has antibacterial and immunomodulatory properties. The present study assessed T. chebula extract-dependent protein expression changes in Jurkat cells. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time-of-flight mass spectrometry and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) were performed to assess protein expression and networks, respectively. A comparative proteomic profile was determined in T. chebula extract (50 μg/mL)-treated and control cells; the expressions of β-tubulin, ring finger and CHY zinc finger domain containing 1, and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor kinase were significantly down-regulated in T. chebula extract-treated Jurkat cells. Moreover, the molecular basis for the T. chebula extract-dependent protein expression changes in Jurkat cells was determined by IPA. Treatment with the T. chebula extract significantly inhibited nuclear factor-κB activity and affected the proteomic profile of Jurkat cells. The molecular network signatures and functional proteomics obtained in this study may facilitate the evaluation of potential antitumor therapeutic targets and elucidate the molecular mechanism of T. chebula extract-dependent effects in Jurkat cells. PMID:22471968

  11. Evaluation of Fagara zanthoxyloides root extract in sickle cell anemia blood in vitro.

    PubMed

    Honig, G R; Farnsworth, N R; Ferenc, C; Vida, L N

    1975-01-01

    An aqueous extract was prepared from roots of Fagara zanthoxyloides and examined for evidence of an antisickling effect in vitro. Addition of 25 mg/ml of the extract to fresh blood samples from sickle anemia subjects produced no change in the blood oxygen dissociation curves, and approximately equal percentages of sickled cells were observed at comparable oxygen saturation levels in the presence or absence of the extract. These observations fail to confirm previous reports describing an antisickling effect of root extracts of Fagara zanthoxyloides. PMID:1202311

  12. Anticancer Effects of Extracts from the Fruit of Morinda Citrifolia (Noni) in Breast Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Sharma, K; Pachauri, S D; Khandelwal, K; Ahmad, H; Arya, A; Biala, P; Agrawal, S; Pandey, R R; Srivastava, A; Srivastav, A; Saxena, J K; Dwivedi, A K

    2016-03-01

    Morinda citrifolia L. (NONI) fruits have been used for thousands of years for the treatment of many health problems including cancer, cold, diabetes, flu, hypertension, and pain. Plant extracts have reported several therapeutic benefits, but extraction of individual compound from the extract often exhibits limited clinical utility as the synergistic effect of various natural ingredients gets lost. They generally constitute polyphenols and flavonoids. Studies have suggested that these phytochemicals, especially polyphenols, display high antioxidant properties, which help to reduce the risk of degenerative diseases, such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Several in-vitro and in-vivo studies have shown that Noni fruits have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-dementia, liver-protective, anticancer, analgesic, and immunomodulatory effects. Till date about 7 in vitro cancer studies have been done, but a detailed in vitro study including cell cycle and caspase activation assay on breast cancer cell line has not been done. In the present study different Noni fruit fractions have tested on cancer cell lines MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 (breast adenocarcinoma) and one non-cancer cell line HEK-293 (Human embryonic kidney). Out of which ethylacetate extract showed a higher order of in vitro anticancer activity profile. The ethylacetate extract strongly inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and HEK-293 cell lines with IC50 values of 25, 35, 60 µg/ml respectively. The extract showed increase in apoptotic cells in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells and arrested the cell cycle in the G1/S phase in MCF-7 and G0/G1 phase in MDA-MB-231 cells. Noni extract also decreases the intracellular ROS generation and mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:26158795

  13. Antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects of purple pitanga (Eugenia uniflora L.) extract on activated hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Denardin, Cristiane C; Parisi, Mariana M; Martins, Leo A M; Terra, Silvia R; Borojevic, Radovan; Vizzotto, Márcia; Perry, Marcos L S; Emanuelli, Tatiana; Guma, Fátima T C R

    2014-01-01

    The presence of phenolic compounds in fruit- and vegetable-rich diets has attracted researchers' attention due to their health-promoting effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of purple pitanga (Eugenia uniflora L.) extract on cell proliferation, viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell death and cell cycle in murine activated hepatic stellate cells (GRX). Cell viability by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was significantly decreased on cells treated with 50 and 100 µg ml(-1) of purple pitanga extract for 48 and 72 h, and the percentage of dead cell stained with 7-amino-actinomycin D was significantly higher in treated cells. The reduction of cell proliferation was dose dependent, and we also observed alterations on cell cycle progression. At all times studied, GRX cells treated with 50 and 100 µg ml(-1) of purple pitanga showed a significant reduction in cellular mitochondrial content as well as a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, our results indicated that purple pitanga extract induces early and late apoptosis/necrosis and necrotic death in GRX cells. This is the first report describing the antiproliferative, cytotoxic and apoptotic activity for E. uniflora fruits in hepatic stellate cells. The present study provides a foundation for the prevention and treatment of liver fibrosis, and more studies will be carried to elucidate this effect. PMID:23475531

  14. Wound healing potential of Spirulina platensis extracts on human dermal fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Syarina, Pauzi Nur Aimi; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Abas, Faridah; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-01-01

    Blue-green alga (Spirulina platensis) is a well renowned nutri-supplement due to its high nutritional and medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to examine the wound healing efficiency of Spirulina platensis at various solvent extracts using in vitro scratch assay on human dermal fibroblast cells (HDF). Various gradient solvent extracts (50 μg/ml of methanolic, ethanolic and aqueous extracts) from Spirulina platensis were treated on HDF cells to acquire its wound healing properties through scratch assay and in this investigation we have used allantoin, as a positive control to compare efficacy among the phytoextracts. Interestingly, aqueous extract were found to stimulate proliferation and migration of HDF cells at given concentrations and enhanced closure rate of wound area within 24 hours after treatment. Methanolic and ethanolic extracts have shown proliferative effect, however these extracts did not aid in the migration and closure of wound area when compared to aqueous extract. Based on phytochemical profile of the plant extracts analyzed by LC-MS/MS, it was shown that compounds supposedly involved in accelerating wound healing are cinnamic acid, narigenin, kaempferol, temsirolimus, phosphatidylserine isomeric derivatives and sulphoquinovosyl diacylglycerol. Our findings concluded that blue-green algae may pose potential biomedical application to treat various chronic wounds especially in diabetes mellitus patients. PMID:27004048

  15. Wound healing potential of Spirulina platensis extracts on human dermal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Syarina, Pauzi Nur Aimi; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Abas, Faridah; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-01-01

    Blue-green alga (Spirulina platensis) is a well renowned nutri-supplement due to its high nutritional and medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to examine the wound healing efficiency of Spirulina platensis at various solvent extracts using in vitro scratch assay on human dermal fibroblast cells (HDF). Various gradient solvent extracts (50 μg/ml of methanolic, ethanolic and aqueous extracts) from Spirulina platensis were treated on HDF cells to acquire its wound healing properties through scratch assay and in this investigation we have used allantoin, as a positive control to compare efficacy among the phytoextracts. Interestingly, aqueous extract were found to stimulate proliferation and migration of HDF cells at given concentrations and enhanced closure rate of wound area within 24 hours after treatment. Methanolic and ethanolic extracts have shown proliferative effect, however these extracts did not aid in the migration and closure of wound area when compared to aqueous extract. Based on phytochemical profile of the plant extracts analyzed by LC-MS/MS, it was shown that compounds supposedly involved in accelerating wound healing are cinnamic acid, narigenin, kaempferol, temsirolimus, phosphatidylserine isomeric derivatives and sulphoquinovosyl diacylglycerol. Our findings concluded that blue-green algae may pose potential biomedical application to treat various chronic wounds especially in diabetes mellitus patients. PMID:27004048

  16. High-throughput preparation methods of crude extract for robust cell-free protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong-Chan; Jewett, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Crude extract based cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) has emerged as a powerful technology platform for high-throughput protein production and genetic part characterization. Unfortunately, robust preparation of highly active extracts generally requires specialized and costly equipment and can be labor and time intensive. Moreover, cell lysis procedures can be hard to standardize, leading to different extract performance across laboratories. These challenges limit new entrants to the field and new applications, such as comprehensive genome engineering programs to improve extract performance. To address these challenges, we developed a generalizable and easily accessible high-throughput crude extract preparation method for CFPS based on sonication. To validate our approach, we investigated two Escherichia coli strains: BL21 Star™ (DE3) and a K12 MG1655 variant, achieving similar productivity (defined as CFPS yield in g/L) by varying only a few parameters. In addition, we observed identical productivity of cell extracts generated from culture volumes spanning three orders of magnitude (10 mL culture tubes to 10 L fermentation). We anticipate that our rapid and robust extract preparation method will speed-up screening of genomically engineered strains for CFPS applications, make possible highly active extracts from non-model organisms, and promote a more general use of CFPS in synthetic biology and biotechnology. PMID:25727242

  17. Do cancer cells in human and meristematic cells in plant exhibit similar responses toward plant extracts with cytotoxic activities?

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Noha S; Barakat, Hoda S; Elhallouty, Salwa; Salem, Dina

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of water extracts of Persea americana fruit, and of the leaves of Tabernamontana divericata, Nerium oleander and Annona cherimolia (positive control) on Vicia faba root cells. We had confirmed in our previously published data the cytotoxicity of these plant extracts on four human cancer cell lines: liver (HepG-2), lung (A549), colon (HT-29) and breast (MCF-7). Vicia faba roots were soaked in plant extracts at dilutions of 100, 1,250, 2,500, 5,000, 10,000, 20,000 ppm for 4 and 24 h. All treatments resulted in a significant reduction in the mitotic index in a dose dependant manner. Root cells treated with T. divericata, N. oleander and A. cherimolia exhibited a decrease in prophase cell percentage, increase in micronuclei and chromosomal abnormalities as concentration increased. The P. americana treatment showed the highest cytotoxic effect on cancer cells, prophase cell percentage increased linearly with the applied concentration and no micronuclei were detected. This study shows that root tip assay of beans can be used in initial screening for new plant extracts to validate their use as candidates for containing active cytotoxic agents against malignant cells. This will greatly help in exploring new plant extracts as drugs for cancer treatment. PMID:24705601

  18. Betanin-Enriched Red Beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) Extract Induces Apoptosis and Autophagic Cell Death in MCF-7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Nowacki, Laëtitia; Vigneron, Pascale; Rotellini, Laura; Cazzola, Hélène; Merlier, Franck; Prost, Elise; Ralanairina, Robert; Gadonna, Jean-Pierre; Rossi, Claire; Vayssade, Muriel

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have pointed out the preventive role of beetroot extracts against cancers and their cytotoxic activity on cancer cells. Among many different natural compounds, these extracts contained betanin and its stereoisomer isobetanin, which belongs to the betalain group of highly bioavailable antioxidants. However, a precise identification of the molecules responsible for this tumor-inhibitory effect was still required. We isolated a betanin/isobetanin concentrate from fresh beetroots, corresponding to the highest purified betanin extract used for studying anticancer activities of these molecules. The cytotoxicity of this betanin-enriched extract was then characterized on cancer and normal cells and we highlighted the death signalling pathways involved. Betanin/isobetanin concentrate significantly decreased cancer cell proliferation and viability. Particularly in MCF-7-treated cells, the expressions of apoptosis-related proteins (Bad, TRAILR4, FAS, p53) were strongly increased and the mitochondrial membrane potential was altered, demonstrating the involvement of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. Autophagosome vesicles in MCF-7-treated cells were observed, also suggesting autophagic cell death upon betanin/isobetanin treatment. Importantly, the betanin-enriched extract had no obvious effect towards normal cell lines. Our data bring new insight to consider the betanin/isobetanin mix as therapeutic anticancer compound, alone or in combination with classical chemotherapeutic drugs, especially in functional p53 tumors. PMID:26463240

  19. Hibiscus anthocyanins rich extract-induced apoptotic cell death in human promyelocytic leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.-C.; Huang, H.-P.; Hsu, J.-D.; Yang, S.-F.; Wang, C.-J. . E-mail: wcj@csmu.edu.tw

    2005-06-15

    Hibiscus sabdariffa Linne (Malvaceae), an attractive plant believed to be native to Africa, is cultivated in the Sudan and Eastern Taiwan. Anthocyanins exist widely in many vegetables and fruits. Some reports demonstrated that anthocyanins extracted from H. sabdariffa L., Hibiscus anthocyanins (HAs) (which are a group of natural pigments existing in the dried calyx of H. sabdariffa L.) exhibited antioxidant activity and liver protection. Therefore, in this study, we explored the effect of HAs on human cancer cells. The result showed that HAs could cause cancer cell apoptosis, especially in HL-60 cells. Using flow cytometry, we found that HAs treatment (0-4 mg/ml) markedly induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The result also revealed increased phosphorylation in p38 and c-Jun, cytochrome c release, and expression of tBid, Fas, and FasL in the HAs-treated HL-60 cells. We further used SB203580 (p38 inhibitor), PD98059 (MEK inhibitor), SP600125 (JNK inhibitor), and wortmannin (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase; PI-3K inhibitor) to evaluate their effect on the HAs-induced HL-60 death. The data showed that only SB203580 had strong potential in inhibiting HL-60 cell apoptosis and related protein expression and phosphorylation. Therefore, we suggested that HAs mediated HL-60 apoptosis via the p38-FasL and Bid pathway. According to these results, HAs could be developed as chemopreventive agents. However, further investigations into the specificity and mechanism(s) of HAs are needed.

  20. Antigenotoxic Effect of Trametes spp. Extracts against DNA Damage on Human Peripheral White Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Knežević, Aleksandar; Živković, Lada; Stajić, Mirjana; Vukojević, Jelena; Milovanović, Ivan; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Trametes species have been used for thousands of years in traditional and conventional medicine for the treatment of various types of diseases. The goal was to evaluate possible antigenotoxic effects of mycelium and basidiocarp extracts of selected Trametes species and to assess dependence on their antioxidant potential. Trametes versicolor, T. hirsuta, and T. gibbosa were the species studied. Antigenotoxic potentials of extracts were assessed on human peripheral white blood cells with basidiocarp and mycelium extracts of the species. The alkaline comet test was used for detection of DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites, as well as the extent of DNA migration. DPPH assay was used to estimate antioxidative properties of extracts. Fruiting body extracts of T. versicolor and T. gibbosa as well as T. hirsuta extracts, except that at 20.0 mg/mL, were not genotoxic agents. T. versicolor extract had at 5.0 mg/mL the greatest antigenotoxic effect in both pre- and posttreatment of leukocytes. The mycelium extracts of the three species had no genotoxic activity and significant antigenotoxic effect against H2O2-induced DNA damage, both in pre- and posttreatment. The results suggest that extracts of these three species could be considered as strong antigenotoxic agents able to stimulate genoprotective response of cells. PMID:26258163

  1. Antibacterial and Antimetastatic Potential of Diospyros lycioides Extract on Cervical Cancer Cells and Associated Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Bagla, V. P.; Lubisi, V. Z.; Ndiitwani, T.; Mokgotho, M. P.; Mampuru, L.; Mbazima, V.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is among the most prevalent forms of cancer in women worldwide. Diospyros lycioides was extracted using hexane, ethyl acetate, acetone, and methanol and finger print profiles were determined. The leaf material was tested for the presence of flavonoids, tannins, saponins, terpenoids, and cardiac glycosides using standard chemical methods and the presence of flavonoids and phenolics using thin layer chromatography. The total phenolic content was determined using Folin-Ciocalteu procedure. The four extracts were tested for antibacterial activity using bioautography against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. The acetone extract with the highest number of antibacterial and antioxidant compounds was assessed for its cytotoxicity on BUD-8 cells using the real-time xCELLigence system and its potential effects on metastatic cervical cancer (HeLa) cell migration and invasion were assessed using wound healing migration and invasion assays. The leaf extract tested positive for flavonoids, tannins, and terpenoids while the four different extracts tested in the antimicrobial assay contained constituents active against one or more of the organisms tested, except E. coli. The cytotoxicity of the acetone extract in real-time was concentration-dependent with potent ability to suppress the migration and invasion of HeLa cells. The finding demonstrates the acetone extract to contain constituents with antibacterial and antimetastatic effects on cervical cancer cells. PMID:27239210

  2. Antibacterial and Antimetastatic Potential of Diospyros lycioides Extract on Cervical Cancer Cells and Associated Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bagla, V P; Lubisi, V Z; Ndiitwani, T; Mokgotho, M P; Mampuru, L; Mbazima, V

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is among the most prevalent forms of cancer in women worldwide. Diospyros lycioides was extracted using hexane, ethyl acetate, acetone, and methanol and finger print profiles were determined. The leaf material was tested for the presence of flavonoids, tannins, saponins, terpenoids, and cardiac glycosides using standard chemical methods and the presence of flavonoids and phenolics using thin layer chromatography. The total phenolic content was determined using Folin-Ciocalteu procedure. The four extracts were tested for antibacterial activity using bioautography against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. The acetone extract with the highest number of antibacterial and antioxidant compounds was assessed for its cytotoxicity on BUD-8 cells using the real-time xCELLigence system and its potential effects on metastatic cervical cancer (HeLa) cell migration and invasion were assessed using wound healing migration and invasion assays. The leaf extract tested positive for flavonoids, tannins, and terpenoids while the four different extracts tested in the antimicrobial assay contained constituents active against one or more of the organisms tested, except E. coli. The cytotoxicity of the acetone extract in real-time was concentration-dependent with potent ability to suppress the migration and invasion of HeLa cells. The finding demonstrates the acetone extract to contain constituents with antibacterial and antimetastatic effects on cervical cancer cells. PMID:27239210

  3. Medicinal Mushroom Extracts Possess Differential Antioxidant Activity and Cytotoxicity to Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Elbatrawy, Eman Nasr; Ghonimy, Eglal AbdAllah; Alassar, Mahomud Mohammed; Wu, Fang-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Many species of edible mushrooms are known to contain a wide array of compounds with high nutritional and medicinal values. However, these values vary widely among mushroom species because of the wide diversity of compounds with different solubilities to solvents used in extraction. We report here the comparison of antioxidant activity and cytotoxicity against cancer cells in extracts of Pleurotus ostreatus, P. sajor-caju, Agaricus campestris, and A. bisporus from 7 different solvents, including water, ethanol, ethyl acetate, acetone, chloroform, hexane, and petroleum ether. The extracts were analyzed for their antioxidant activities using the % DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazylhydrate) scavenging activity method. Our results revealed that the water extracts exhibited the highest % DPPH scavenging activity in comparison to all other solvent extracts. The highest value was obtained from the water extract of P. sajor-caju (78.1%), and the lowest one was from the hexane extract of A. bisporus (0.8%). In general, extracts from nonpolar solvents exhibited much lower antioxidant activities than those from polar solvents. The cytotoxic effects of these extracts were evaluated using 2 cancer cell lines of larynx carcinoma (HEp-2) and breast carcinoma (MCF-7). When added into Hep-2 cells, the hexane extracts from P. ostreatus, P. sajor-caju, A. bisporus, and A. campestris yielded the highest IC50 values of 1.7 ± 1.56, 2.1 ± 2.82, 4.4 ± 1.71, and 2.2 ± 1.34 μg/mL, respectively, in comparison to all other solvent extracts. Similar IC50 values were obtained when the MCF-2 cancer cells were tested, suggesting that hexane is the preferred solvent to extract the anticancer compounds from these mushrooms. Our results also indicated that extracts from solvents with nonpolar or intermediate polarity were more potent than those with high polarity in their cytotoxicity against cancer cells, and extracts from different mushrooms by the same solvent possessed varied degrees of

  4. Extracts from Flammulina velutipes Inhibit the Adhesion of Pathogenic Fungi to Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kashina, Svetlana; Villavicencio, Lérida Liss Flores; Balleza, Marco; Sabanero, Gloria Barbosa; Tsutsumi, Víctor; López, Myrna Sabanero

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recently, extracts from natural sources have been tested for their antifungal properties. In this aspect, Flammulina velutipes extracts possess a significant amount of branch-chained carbohydrates with mannose moieties that, hypothetically, can reduce the adhesion. Objective: In this study, we assessed the capacity of extracts from F. velutipes (wild-type AQF-1 and ATCC 34574 as the reference strain) to inhibit the adhesion of S. schenkii and C. albicans to epithelial cells. Materials and Methods: The aqueous extracts from F. velutipes strains were obtained by sonication, total carbohydrate and protein was analyzed by Dubois and Lowry methods respectively. Effect of the extracts (50, 100 and 150 μg/mL) on the fungi adhesion to host cells was evaluated after 1 h interaction, and the percentage of inhibition of adhesion was measured. After of interaction the cytoskeleton from cell was analyzed with phalloidin-FITC. Results: The extract from strain AQF-1 (50, 100 and 150 μg/mL) inhibited the adhesion of: S. schenkii in a dose-dependent manner (4.9, 7.5 and 12.7%, respectively) and C. albicans in a dose-independent manner (5.2%). The percentage of inhibition by extracts from the strain ATCC34574 at the same concentrations, shown that are dose independent for both fungi: 3.9% for S. schenkii and 2.6% for C. albicans. Conclusion: The extracts from F. velutipes inhibit the adhesion of pathogenic fungi to host cells. The mechanism molecular is unknown; however, is probably an interaction between the polysaccharides from extracts with the fungi receptors. This aspect is currently analyzed. SUMMARY The yields of mycelium from two strains of F. velutipes and the extract from it were similar.Extracts from both strains have inhibited adhesion of S. schenkii and C. albicans to epithelial cells in vitro, but the extract from strain AQF-1 was more effective.The extracts have not prevented damage to epithelial cells caused by pathogenic fungi. Abbreviation Used: YPG

  5. Protective effect of aqueous extract from Spirulina platensis against cell death induced by free radicals

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Spirulina is a commercial alga well known to contain various antioxidants, especially phycocyanin. Apart from being sold as a nutraceutical, Spirulina is incorporated as a functional ingredient in food products and beverages. Most of the previous reports on antioxidant activity of Spirulina were based on chemical rather than cell-based assays. The primary objective of this study was to assess the antioxidant activity of aqueous extract from Spirulina based on its protective effect against cell death induced by free radicals. Methods The antioxidant activity of the cold water extract from food-grade Spirulina platensis was assessed using both chemical and cell-based assays. In the cell-based assay, mouse fibroblast cells (3T3) cells were incubated for 1 h in medium containing aqueous extract of Spirulina or vitamin C (positive control) at 25, 125 and 250 μg/mL before the addition of 50 μM 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) or 3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS). The cells were incubated for another 24 h before being assessed for cell death due to apoptosis using the Cell Death Detection ELISA Kit. Spectrophotometric assays based on DPPH and ABTS were also used to assess the antioxidant activity of the extract compared to vitamin C and vitamin E (positive controls). Results Spirulina extract did not cause cytotoxic effect on 3T3 cells within the range of concentrations tested (0 - 250 μg/mL). The extract reduced significantly (p < 0.05) apoptotic cell death due to DPPH and ABTS by 4 to 5-fold although the activity was less than vitamin C. Based on the DPPH assay, the radical scavenging activity of the extract was higher than phycocyanin and was at least 50% of vitamin C and vitamin E. Based on the ABTS assay, the antioxidant activity of the extract at 50 μmug/mL was as good as vitamin C and vitamin E. Conclusions The results showed that aqueous extract of Spirulina has a protective effect against apoptotic cell death due to free radicals

  6. Cinnamon extract induces tumor cell death through inhibition of NFκB and AP1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cinnamomum cassia bark is the outer skin of an evergreen tall tree belonging to the family Lauraceae containing several active components such as essential oils (cinnamic aldehyde and cinnamyl aldehyde), tannin, mucus and carbohydrate. They have various biological functions including anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammation, anti-diabetic and anti-tumor activity. Previously, we have reported that anti-cancer effect of cinnamon extracts is associated with modulation of angiogenesis and effector function of CD8+ T cells. In this study, we further identified that anti-tumor effect of cinnamon extracts is also link with enhanced pro-apoptotic activity by inhibiting the activities NFκB and AP1 in mouse melanoma model. Methods Water soluble cinnamon extract was obtained and quality of cinnamon extract was evaluated by HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography) analysis. In this study, we tested anti-tumor activity and elucidated action mechanism of cinnamon extract using various types of tumor cell lines including lymphoma, melanoma, cervix cancer and colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo mouse melanoma model. Results Cinnamon extract strongly inhibited tumor cell proliferation in vitro and induced active cell death of tumor cells by up-regulating pro-apoptotic molecules while inhibiting NFκB and AP1 activity and their target genes such as Bcl-2, BcL-xL and survivin. Oral administration of cinnamon extract in melanoma transplantation model significantly inhibited tumor growth with the same mechanism of action observed in vitro. Conclusion Our study suggests that anti-tumor effect of cinnamon extracts is directly linked with enhanced pro-apoptotic activity and inhibition of NFκB and AP1 activities and their target genes in vitro and in vivo mouse melanoma model. Hence, further elucidation of active components of cinnamon extract could lead to development of potent anti-tumor agent or complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of

  7. HTML Extraction Algorithm Based on Property and Data Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnamasari, Detty; Wayan Simri Wicaksana, I.; Harmanto, Suryadi; Yuniar Banowosari, Lintang

    2013-06-01

    The data available on the Internet is in various models and formats. One form of data representation is a table. Tables extraction is used in process more than one table on the Internet from different sources. Currently the effort is done by using copy-paste that is not automatic process. This article presents an approach to prepare the area, so tables in HTML format can be extracted and converted into a database that make easier to combine the data from many resources. This article was tested on the algorithm 1 used to determine the actual number of columns and rows of the table, as well as algorithm 2 are used to determine the boundary line of the property. Tests conducted at 100 tabular HTML format, and the test results provide the accuracy of the algorithm 1 is 99.9% and the accuracy of the algorithm 2 is 84%.

  8. Inula Viscosa Extracts Induces Telomere Shortening and Apoptosis in Cancer Cells and Overcome Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Merghoub, Nawal; El Btaouri, Hassan; Benbacer, Laila; Gmouh, Saïd; Trentesaux, Chantal; Brassart, Bertrand; Terryn, Christine; Attaleb, Mohammed; Madoulet, Claudie; Benjouad, Abdelaziz; Amzazi, Saaïd; El Mzibri, Mohammed; Morjani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase is activated in human papillomavirus (HPV) positive cervical cancer and targeting telomeres offers a novel anticancer therapeutic strategy. In this study, the telomere targeting properties, the cytotoxic as well as the pro-apoptotic effects of hexane (IV-HE) and dichloromethane (IV-DF) fractions from Inula viscosa L. extracts were investigated on human cervical HeLa and SiHa cancer cells. Our data demonstrate that IV-HE and IV-DF extracts were able to inhibit cell growth in HeLa and SiHa cells in a dose-dependent manner and studied resistant cell lines exhibited a resistance factor less than 2 when treated with the extracts. IV-HE and IV-DF extracts were able to inhibit telomerase activity and to induce telomere shortening as shown by telomeric repeat amplification protocol and TTAGGG telomere length assay, respectively. The sensitivity of fibroblasts to the extracts was increased when telomerase was expressed. Finally, IV-HE and IV-DF were able to induce apoptosis as evidenced by an increase in annexin-V labeling and caspase-3 activity. This study provides the first evidence that the IV-HE and IV-DF extracts from Inula viscosa L. target telomeres induce apoptosis and overcome drug resistance in tumor cells. Future studies will focus on the identification of the molecules involved in the anticancer activity. PMID:26771897

  9. Hexane Extract of Orthosiphon stamineus Induces Insulin Expression and Prevents Glucotoxicity in INS-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hae-Jung; Choi, Yoon-Jung; Park, So-Young; Kim, Jong-Yeon; Won, Kyu-Chang; Son, Jong-Keun

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyperglycemia, a characteristic feature of diabetes, induces glucotoxicity in pancreatic β-cells, resulting in further impairment of insulin secretion and worsening glycemic control. Thus, preservation of insulin secretory capacity is essential for the management of type 2 diabetes. In this study, we evaluated the ability of an Orthosiphon stamineus (OS) extract to prevent glucotoxicity in insulin-producing cells. Methods We measured insulin mRNA expression and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in OS-treated INS-1 cells after exposure to a high glucose (HG; 30 mM) concentration. Results The hexane extract of OS elevated mRNA expression of insulin as well as pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 of INS-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The hexane OS extract also increased the levels of phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, Akt phosphorylation was elevated by treatment with 100 and 200 µmol of the hexane OS extract. Three days of HG exposure suppressed insulin mRNA expression and GSIS; these expressions were restored by treatment with the hexane OS extract. HG elevated peroxide levels in the INS-1 cells. These levels were unaffected by OS treatment under both normal and hyperglycemic conditions. Conclusion Our results suggested that the hexane extract of OS elevates insulin mRNA expression and prevents glucotoxicity induced by a 3-day treatment with HG. This was associated with the activation of PI-3K and Akt. PMID:25729713

  10. Anticarcinogenic activity of polyphenolic extracts from grape stems against breast, colon, renal and thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sahpazidou, Despina; Geromichalos, George D; Stagos, Dimitrios; Apostolou, Anna; Haroutounian, Serkos A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Tzanakakis, George N; Hayes, A Wallace; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2014-10-15

    A major part of the wineries' wastes is composed of grape stems which are discarded mainly in open fields and cause environmental problems due mainly to their high polyphenolic content. The grape stem extracts' use as a source of high added value polyphenols presents great interest because this combines a profitable venture with environmental protection close to wine-producing zones. In the present study, at first, the Total Polyphenolic Content (TPC) and the polyphenolic composition of grape stem extracts from four different Greek Vitis vinifera varieties were determined by HPLC methods. Afterwards, the grape stem extracts were examined for their ability to inhibit growth of colon (HT29), breast (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-23), renal (786-0 and Caki-1) and thyroid (K1) cancer cells. The cancer cells were exposed to the extracts for 72 h and the effects on cell growth were evaluated using the SRB assay. The results indicated that all extracts inhibited cell proliferation, with IC₅₀ values of 121-230 μg/ml (MCF-7), 121-184 μg/ml (MDA-MD-23), 175-309 μg/ml (HT29), 159-314 μg/ml (K1), 180-225 μg/ml (786-0) and 134->400 μg/ml (Caki-1). This is the first study presenting the inhibitory activity of grape stem extracts against growth of colon, breast, renal and thyroid cancer cells. PMID:24508987

  11. Regenerative Astaxanthin Extraction from a Single Microalgal (Haematococcus pluvialis) Cell Using a Gold Nano-Scalpel.

    PubMed

    Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Gwak, Raekeun; Kang, Mijeong; Shim, Tae Soup; Cho, Soojeong; Lee, Jiye; Oh, You-Kwan; Lee, Kyubock; Kim, Bongsoo

    2015-10-14

    Milking of microalgae, the process of reusing the biomass for continuous production of target compounds, can strikingly overcome the time and cost constraints associated with biorefinery. This process can significantly improve production efficiency of highly valuable chemicals, for example, astaxanthin (AXT) from Haematococcus pluvialis. Detailed understanding of the biological process of cell survival and AXT reaccumulation after extraction would be of great help for successful milking. Here we report extraction of AXT from a single cell of H. pluvialis through incision of the cell wall by a gold nanoscalpel (Au-NS), which allows single-cell analysis of wound healing and reaccumulation of AXT. Interestingly, upon the Au-NS incision, the cell could reaccumulate AXT at a rate two times faster than the control cells. Efficient extraction as well as minimal cellular damage, keeping cells alive, could be achieved with the optimized shape and dimensions of Au-NS: a well-defined sharp tip, thickness under 300 nm, and 1-3 μm of width. The demonstration of regenerative extraction of AXT at a single cell level hints toward the potential of a milking process for continuous recovery of target compounds from microalgae while keeping the cells alive. PMID:26397314

  12. Differential Response of Two Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines to the Phenolic Extract from Flaxseed Oil.

    PubMed

    Sorice, Angela; Guerriero, Eliana; Volpe, Maria Grazia; Capone, Francesca; La Cara, Francesco; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Colonna, Giovanni; Costantini, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have evidenced that the phenolic components from flaxseed (FS) oil have potential health benefits. The effect of the phenolic extract from FS oil has been evaluated on two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and MDA-MB231, and on the human non-cancerous breast cell line, MCF10A, by SRB assay, cellular death, cell cycle, cell signaling, lipid peroxidation and expression of some key genes. We have evidenced that the extract shows anti-proliferative activity on MCF7 cells by inducing cellular apoptosis, increase of the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase and of lipid peroxidation, activation of the H2AX signaling pathway, and upregulation of a six gene signature. On the other hand, on the MDA-MB2131 cells we verified only an anti-proliferative activity, a weak lipid peroxidation, the activation of the PI3K signaling pathway and an up-regulation of four genes. Overall these data suggest that the extract has both cytotoxic and pro-oxidant effects only on MCF7 cells, and can act as a metabolic probe, inducing differences in the gene expression. For this purpose, we have performed an interactomic analysis, highlighting the existing associations. From this approach, we show that the phenotypic difference between the two cell lines can be explained through their differential response to the phenolic extract. PMID:27005599

  13. Cardiomyocyte Marker Expression in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts by Cell-Free Cardiomyocyte Extract and Epigenetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Heidari, Fatemeh; Esmaeilpour, Tahereh; Vojdani, Zahra; Mostafavi-Pour, Zohrah; Rohani, Leili

    2014-01-01

    Background: The regenerative capacity of the mammalian heart is quite limited. Recent reports have focused on reprogramming mesenchymal stem cells into cardiomyocytes. We investigated whether fibroblasts could transdifferentiate into myocardium. Methods: Mouse embryonic fibroblasts were treated with Trichostatin A (TSA) and 5-Aza-2-Deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC). The treated cells were permeabilized with streptolysin O and exposed to the mouse cardiomyocyte extract and cultured for 1, 10, and 21 days. Cardiomyocyte markers were detected by immunohistochemistry. Alkaline phosphatase activity and OCT4 were also detected in cells treated by chromatin-modifying agents. Results: The cells exposed to a combination of 5-aza-dC and TSA and permeabilized in the presence of the cardiomyocyte extract showed morphological changes. The cells were unable to express cardiomyocyte markers after 24 h. Immunocytochemical assays showed a notable degree of myosin heavy chain and α-actinin expressions after 10 days. The expression of the natriuretic factor and troponin T occurred after 21 days in these cells. The cells exposed to chromatin-modifying agents also expressed cardiomyocyte markers; however, the proportion of reprogrammed cells was clearly smaller than that in the cultures exposed to 5-aza-dC , TSA, and extract. Conclusion: It seems that the fibroblasts were able to eliminate the previous epigenetic markers and form new ones according to the factors existing in the extract. Since no beating was observed, at least up to 21 days, the cells may need an appropriate extracellular matrix for their function. PMID:24753644

  14. Mechanistic evaluation of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract-induced genotoxicity in L5178Y cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haixia; Guo, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Suhui; Dial, Stacey L; Guo, Lei; Manjanatha, Mugimane G; Moore, Martha M; Mei, Nan

    2014-06-01

    Ginkgo biloba has been used for many thousand years as a traditional herbal remedy and its extract has been consumed for many decades as a dietary supplement. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract is a complex mixture with many constituents, including flavonol glycosides and terpene lactones. The National Toxicology Program 2-year cancer bioassay found that G. biloba leaf extract targets the liver, thyroid gland, and nose of rodents; however, the mechanism of G. biloba leaf extract-associated carcinogenicity remains unclear. In the current study, the in vitro genotoxicity of G. biloba leaf extract and its eight constituents was evaluated using the mouse lymphoma assay (MLA) and Comet assay. The underlying mechanisms of G. biloba leaf extract-associated genotoxicity were explored. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract, quercetin, and kaempferol resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the mutant frequency and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Western blot analysis confirmed that G. biloba leaf extract, quercetin, and kaempferol activated the DNA damage signaling pathway with increased expression of γ-H2AX and phosphorylated Chk2 and Chk1. In addition, G. biloba leaf extract produced reactive oxygen species and decreased glutathione levels in L5178Y cells. Loss of heterozygosity analysis of mutants indicated that G. biloba leaf extract, quercetin, and kaempferol treatments resulted in extensive chromosomal damage. These results indicate that G. biloba leaf extract and its two constituents, quercetin and kaempferol, are mutagenic to the mouse L5178Y cells and induce DSBs. Quercetin and kaempferol likely are major contributors to G. biloba leaf extract-induced genotoxicity. PMID:24595819

  15. An Aqueous Extract of Tuberaria lignosa Inhibits Cell Growth, Alters the Cell Cycle Profile, and Induces Apoptosis of NCI-H460 Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Joana M; Lopes-Rodrigues, Vanessa; Xavier, Cristina P R; Lima, M João; Lima, Raquel T; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Vasconcelos, M Helena

    2016-01-01

    Tuberaria lignosa (Sweet) Samp. is found in European regions, and has antioxidant properties due to its composition in ascorbic acid and phenolic compounds. Given its traditional use and antioxidant properties, the tumor cell growth inhibitory potential of aqueous extracts from T. lignosa (prepared by infusion and decoction) was investigated in three human tumor cell lines: MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma), NCI-H460 (non-small cell lung cancer), and HCT-15 (human colorectal adenocarcinoma). Both extracts inhibited the growth of these cell lines; the most potent one being the T. lignosa extract obtained by infusion in the NCI-H460 cells (GI50 of approximately 50 μg/mL). Further assays were carried out with this extract in NCI-H460 cells. At 100 μg/mL or 150 μg/mL it caused an increase in the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase and a decrease of cells in S phase of the cell cycle. Additionally, these concentrations caused an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells. In agreement, a decrease in total poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and pro-caspase 3 levels was found. In conclusion, the T. lignosa extract obtained by infusion was more potent in NCI-H460 cells, altering the cell cycle progression and inducing apoptosis. This work highlights the importance of T. lignosa as a source of bioactive compounds with tumor cell growth inhibitory potential. PMID:27164073

  16. The in vitro impact of toothpaste extracts on cell viability.

    PubMed

    Cvikl, Barbara; Lussi, Adrian; Gruber, Reinhard

    2015-06-01

    Toothpastes contain three main components: detergents, abrasives, and fluoride. Detergents, particularly sodium lauryl sulfate, have been proposed as components that enable toothpastes to produce cytotoxic effects in vitro. However, not all toothpastes contain sodium lauryl sulfate, and almost no studies have found an association between detergents and the in vitro cytotoxicity of toothpastes. The present study examined the in vitro cytotoxicity of nine commercially available toothpastes containing four different detergents. Toothpastes were diluted in serum-free medium, centrifuged, and filter sterilized. The half-lethal concentration of the toothpaste-conditioned medium (TCM) was calculated based on the formation of formazan by gingival fibroblasts, oral squamous cell carcinoma HSC-2 cells, and L929 cells. Cell proliferation was analyzed, and live-dead staining was performed, after exposure of cells to conditioned medium prepared with 1% toothpaste (1% TCM). It was found that toothpastes containing sodium lauryl sulfate and amine fluoride strongly inhibited cell viability with the half-lethal concentration being obtained with conditioned medium prepared with approximately 1% toothpaste (1% TCM). Toothpastes containing cocamidopropyl betaine and Steareth-20 showed higher half-lethal concentration values, with the half-lethal concentration being obtained with conditioned medium prepared with 10% (10% TCM) and 70% (70% TCM) toothpaste, respectively. Proliferation and live-dead data were consistent with the cell-viability analyses. These results demonstrate that the type of detergent in toothpastes can be associated with changes in in vitro cell toxicity. PMID:25782087

  17. Huaier Extract Induces Autophagic Cell Death by Inhibiting the mTOR/S6K Pathway in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolong; Qi, Wenwen; Li, Yaming; Zhang, Ning; Dong, Lun; Sun, Mingjuan; Cun, Jinjing; Zhang, Yan; Lv, Shangge; Yang, Qifeng

    2015-01-01

    Huaier extract is attracting increased attention due to its biological activities, including antitumor, anti-parasite and immunomodulatory effects. Here, we investigated the role of autophagy in Huaier-induced cytotoxicity in MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468 and MCF7 breast cancer cells. Huaier treatment inhibited cell viability in all three cell lines and induced various large membranous vacuoles in the cytoplasm. In addition, electron microscopy, MDC staining, accumulated expression of autophagy markers and flow cytometry revealed that Huaier extract triggered autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy attenuated Huaier-induced cell death. Furthermore, Huaier extract inhibited the mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR)/S6K pathway in breast cancer cells. After implanting MDA-MB-231 cells subcutaneously into the right flank of BALB/c nu/nu mice, Huaier extract induced autophagy and effectively inhibited xenograft tumor growth. This study is the first to show that Huaier-induced cytotoxicity is partially mediated through autophagic cell death in breast cancer cells through suppression of the mTOR/S6K pathway. PMID:26134510

  18. Huaier Extract Induces Autophagic Cell Death by Inhibiting the mTOR/S6K Pathway in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaming; Zhang, Ning; Dong, Lun; Sun, Mingjuan; Cun, Jinjing; Zhang, Yan; Lv, Shangge; Yang, Qifeng

    2015-01-01

    Huaier extract is attracting increased attention due to its biological activities, including antitumor, anti-parasite and immunomodulatory effects. Here, we investigated the role of autophagy in Huaier-induced cytotoxicity in MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468 and MCF7 breast cancer cells. Huaier treatment inhibited cell viability in all three cell lines and induced various large membranous vacuoles in the cytoplasm. In addition, electron microscopy, MDC staining, accumulated expression of autophagy markers and flow cytometry revealed that Huaier extract triggered autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy attenuated Huaier-induced cell death. Furthermore, Huaier extract inhibited the mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR)/S6K pathway in breast cancer cells. After implanting MDA-MB-231 cells subcutaneously into the right flank of BALB/c nu/nu mice, Huaier extract induced autophagy and effectively inhibited xenograft tumor growth. This study is the first to show that Huaier-induced cytotoxicity is partially mediated through autophagic cell death in breast cancer cells through suppression of the mTOR/S6K pathway. PMID:26134510

  19. Physicochemical characterization of wet microalgal cells disrupted with instant catapult steam explosion for lipid extraction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Huang, Rui; Li, Tao; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-09-01

    Instant catapult steam explosion (ICSE) was employed to disrupt wet microalgal cells for efficient lipid extraction. Physicochemical properties of exploded cells were investigated through SEM, TEM, FTIR, and TGA. The exploded cells increased in fractal dimension (1.53-1.65) when preheat time was prolonged from 0 min to 5 min and in surface pore area when steam pressure was increased. Meanwhile, the exploded cells decreased in mean size (1.69-1.44 μm) when the filling ratio of wet microalgal biomass in the preheat chamber decreased (75-12.5%). Flash evaporation and volume expansion exploded the cell walls and released the cytoplasm of the microalgal cells. These phenomena decreased the carbohydrate content and increased the lipid content in the exploded biomass. However, ICSE treatment did not change the lipid compositions in the microalgal cells. Using isopropanol as a cosolvent significantly increased the yield of lipids extracted with hexane from the exploded wet microalgal biomass. PMID:25983224

  20. In vitro effects of extracts of extra virgin olive oil on human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pampaloni, Barbara; Mavilia, Carmelo; Fabbri, Sergio; Romani, Annalisa; Ieri, Francesca; Tanini, Annalisa; Tonelli, Francesco; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower incidence of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases, and some types of cancer. Recent interest has been focused on the biological activity of phenolic compounds present in extra virgin olive oils (EVOOs). Both in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that EVOO components have positive effects on metabolic parameters, such as plasma lipoproteins, oxidative damage, inflammatory markers, platelet function, and antimicrobial activity. We have investigated the possible interactions between 2 extracts of extra virgin olive oil and estrogen receptor β (ERβ) in an in vitro model of colon cancer. The qualification and quantification of the components of the 2 samples tested showed that phenolic compounds-hydroxytyrosol, secoiridoids, and lignans-are the major represented compounds. EVOO extracts were tested on a colon cancer cell line engineered to overexpress ERβ (HCT8-β8). By using custom made Oligo microarray, gene expression profiles of colon cancer cells challenged with EVOO-T extracts when compared with those of cells exposed to 17β-estradiol (17β-E2). This study demonstrated that the EVOO extracts tested showed an antiproliferative effect on colon cancer cells through the interaction with estrogen-dependent signals involved in tumor cell growth. Specifically, the ability of EVOO extracts to inhibit cell proliferation was superimposable to the activation of the ERβ receptor, similar to what was observed after 17β-E2 challenge. PMID:25207387

  1. Neuroprotective effect of some plant extracts in cultured CT105-induced PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Tae; Kim, Jeong Do; Lyu, Yeoung-Su; Lee, Min-Yung; Kang, Hyung-Won

    2006-10-01

    Carboxyl-terminal fragments of APP (CT) have been found in plaques, microvessels and the neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of AD patients. These carboxyl-terminal fragments, which contain the complete Abeta sequence, appear to be toxic to neurons in culture cells. However, the possible role of other cleaved products of APP is less clear. We showed that a recombinant carboxy-terminal 105 amino acid fragment (CT105) of APP induced strong neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. We prepared alcoholic extract from Oriental herbal plants and screened their protective effects against CT105-induced cell death in PC12 cells after the treatment of these extracts. Of the 10 kinds of plant extracts, 12 kinds of extracts had considerable protective effects against CT105-induced cell death, especially, Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus (UREU), Gastrodia elata (GAE), Evodia officinalis (EO) and Panax ginseng (PAG) showed the most protective effect at the concentration of 50 microg/ml. BuOH extract of UREU and GAE possessed the strongest protective effects against neurotoxicity of CT105-induced PC12 cells and showed inhibitory effect with IC50 values of 4.8 and 8.3 microg/ml, respectively. These plants are promising candidates of neuroprotective effects and would be useful for the treatment of the neuronal degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's diseases. PMID:17015944

  2. Clinacanthus nutans Extracts Are Antioxidant with Antiproliferative Effect on Cultured Human Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yoke Keong; Tan, Jun Jie; Teh, Soek Sin; Mah, Siau Hui; Ee, Gwendoline Cheng Lian; Chiong, Hoe Siong; Ahmad, Zuraini

    2013-01-01

    Clinacanthus nutans Lindau leaves (CN) have been used in traditional medicine but the therapeutic potential has not been explored for cancer prevention and treatment. Current study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant and antiproliferative effects of CN, extracted in chloroform, methanol, and water, on cancer cell lines. Antioxidant properties of CN were evaluated using DPPH, galvinoxyl, nitric oxide, and hydrogen peroxide based radical scavenging assays, whereas the tumoricidal effect was tested on HepG2, IMR32, NCL-H23, SNU-1, Hela, LS-174T, K562, Raji, and IMR32 cancer cells using MTT assay. Our data showed that CN in chloroform extract was a good antioxidant against DPPH and galvinoxyl radicals, but less effective in negating nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide radicals. Chloroform extract exerted the highest antiproliferative effect on K-562 (91.28 ± 0.03%) and Raji cell lines (88.97 ± 1.07%) at 100  μ g/ml and the other five cancer cell lines in a concentration-dependent manner, but not on IMR-32 cells. Fourteen known compounds were identified in chloroform extract, which was analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectra analysis. In conclusion, CN extracts possess antioxidant and antiproliferative properties against cultured cancer cell lines, suggesting an alternate adjunctive regimen for cancer prevention or treatment. PMID:23533485

  3. Clinacanthus nutans Extracts Are Antioxidant with Antiproliferative Effect on Cultured Human Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Yoke Keong; Tan, Jun Jie; Teh, Soek Sin; Mah, Siau Hui; Ee, Gwendoline Cheng Lian; Chiong, Hoe Siong; Ahmad, Zuraini

    2013-01-01

    Clinacanthus nutans Lindau leaves (CN) have been used in traditional medicine but the therapeutic potential has not been explored for cancer prevention and treatment. Current study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant and antiproliferative effects of CN, extracted in chloroform, methanol, and water, on cancer cell lines. Antioxidant properties of CN were evaluated using DPPH, galvinoxyl, nitric oxide, and hydrogen peroxide based radical scavenging assays, whereas the tumoricidal effect was tested on HepG2, IMR32, NCL-H23, SNU-1, Hela, LS-174T, K562, Raji, and IMR32 cancer cells using MTT assay. Our data showed that CN in chloroform extract was a good antioxidant against DPPH and galvinoxyl radicals, but less effective in negating nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide radicals. Chloroform extract exerted the highest antiproliferative effect on K-562 (91.28 ± 0.03%) and Raji cell lines (88.97 ± 1.07%) at 100 μg/ml and the other five cancer cell lines in a concentration-dependent manner, but not on IMR-32 cells. Fourteen known compounds were identified in chloroform extract, which was analysed by gas chromatography—mass spectra analysis. In conclusion, CN extracts possess antioxidant and antiproliferative properties against cultured cancer cell lines, suggesting an alternate adjunctive regimen for cancer prevention or treatment. PMID:23533485

  4. Extraction of tumor-specific antigen from cells and plasma membranes of line-10 hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Leonard, E J; Richardson, A K; Hardy, A S; Rapp, H J

    1975-07-01

    Tumor-specific antigen was extracted with 3 M KCl from line-10 guinea pig hepatoma cells. The yield of antigenic activity, estimated by production of delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions in line-10 immune guinea pigs, was 10-30% of the antigen present in intact cells. By ultracentrifugation criteria, the extracted antigen was soluble. Gel filtration, ion exchange chromatography, and salting-out studies showed that the antigen was heterogeneous in size and net charge. The possibility that 3 M KCl extracted a homogeneous population of molecules associating into polymers of various sizes at low ionic strength was ruled out by heterogeneity on Sephadex G-200 chromatography at high ionic strength. After osmotic lysis of sucrose-loaded line-10 cells, whole plasma membranes or large membrane fragments were obtained in a yield of about 20%. The isolation procedure did not cause detectable loss of membrane antigenic activity. The membranes had 33 skin test U/mg membrane protein, compared to the intact cell value of 1.7 skin test U/mg cell protein. Extracts of plasma membranes had 10-20% of the antigenic activity of the starting membrane material. In contrast to the wide variety of proteins liberated from intact cells, much of the protein extracted from the membranes was in the molecular weight range above 250,000. PMID:169367

  5. Antiadopogenic effects of rice hull smoke extract in 3T3-L1 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study investigates the inhibitory effects of a rice hull smoke extract (RHSE) against adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 pre-adipocyte cells. At concentrations of 0.1% and 0.5% RHSE, MDI-induced cells were shown to reduce their cellular lipid content by about 72% and 88%, respectively, compared to ...

  6. Genomic DNA extraction from cells by electroporation on an integrated microfluidic platform

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Tao; Bao, Ning; Sriranganathanw, Nammalwar; Li, Liwu; Lu, Chang

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of genetic analysis of cells involves chemical lysis for release of DNA molecules. However, chemical reagents required in the lysis interfere with downstream molecular biology and often require removal after the step. Electrical lysis based on irreversible electroporation is a promising technique to prepare samples for genetic analysis due to its purely physical nature, fast speed, and simple operation. However, there has been no experimental confirmation on whether electrical lysis extracts genomic DNA from cells in a reproducible and efficient fashion in comparison to chemical lysis, especially for eukaryotic cells that have most of DNA enclosed in the nucleus. In this work, we construct an integrated microfluidic chip that physically traps a low number of cells, lyses the cells using electrical pulses rapidly, then purifies and concentrates genomic DNA. We demonstrate that electrical lysis offers high efficiency for DNA extraction from both eukaryotic cells (up to ~36% for Chinese hamster ovary cells) and bacterial cells (up to ~45% for Salmonella typhimurium) that is comparable to the widely-used chemical lysis. The DNA extraction efficiency has dependence on both electric parameters and relative amount of beads used for DNA adsorption. We envision that electroporation-based DNA extraction will find use in ultrasensitive assays that benefit from minimal dilution and simple procedure. PMID:23061629

  7. Cytotoxic Activities against Breast Cancer Cells of Local Justicia gendarussa Crude Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Abd Samad, Azman; Jamil, Shajarahtunnur

    2014-01-01

    Justicia gendarussa methanolic leaf extracts from five different locations in the Southern region of Peninsular Malaysia and two flavonoids, kaempferol and naringenin, were tested for cytotoxic activity. Kaempferol and naringenin were two flavonoids detected in leaf extracts using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID). The results indicated that highest concentrations of kaempferol and naringenin were detected in leaves extracted from Mersing with 1591.80 mg/kg and 444.35 mg/kg, respectively. Positive correlations were observed between kaempferol and naringenin concentrations in all leaf extracts analysed with the Pearson method. The effects of kaempferol and naringenin from leaf extracts were examined on breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468) using MTT assay. Leaf extract from Mersing showed high cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 with IC50 values of 23 μg/mL and 40 μg/mL, respectively, compared to other leaf extracts. Kaempferol possessed high cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 with IC50 values of 23 μg/mL and 34 μg/mL, respectively. These findings suggest that the presence of kaempferol in Mersing leaf extract contributed to high cytotoxicity of both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cancer cell lines. PMID:25574182

  8. Polyphenolic composition of grape stem extracts affects antioxidant activity in endothelial and muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Stagos, Dimitrios; Spanidis, Ypatios; Liosi, Maria; Apostolou, Anna; Priftis, Alexandros; Haroutounian, Serko; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Kouretas, Demetrios

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was the assessment of the antioxidant effects of polyphenolic extracts derived from the stems of three Greek grape varieties (Moshomayro, Mavrotragano and Mandilaria) in endothelial (EA.hy926) and muscle (C2C12) cells. We also investigated the effects of the polyphenolic composition on the antioxidant effects of the grape stem extracts. For this purpose, the endothelial and muscle cells were treated with low non-cytotoxic concentrations of the extracts for 24 h in order to assess the effects of the extracts on cellular redox status using oxidative stress biomarkers. The oxidative stress markers were thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyl (CARB) levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and glutathione (GSH) levels. The results revealed that treatment of the EA.hy926 cells with Mandilaria extract significantly decreased the TBARS levels by 14.8% and the CARB levels by 25.9 %, while it increased the GSH levels by 15.8% compared to the controls. Moreover, treatment of the EA.hy926 cells with Mavrotragano extract significantly increased the GSH levels by 20.2%, while it significantly decreased the TBARS and CARB levels by 12.5% and 16.6%, respectively. Treatment of the C2C12 cells with Mandilaria extract significantly decreased the TBARS levels by 47.3 %, the CARB levels by 39.0 % and the ROS levels by 21.8%, while it increased the GSH levels by 22.6% compared to the controls. Moreover, treatment of the C2C12 cells with Mavrotragano significantly decreased the TBARS, CARB and ROS levels by 36.2%, 35.9% and 16.5%, respectively. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledgel, our results demonstrate for the first time that treatment with grape stem extracts at low concentrations improves the redox status of endothelial and muscle cells. Thus, grape stem extracts may be used for developing antioxidant food supplements or biofunctional foods. However, it was also found that the polyphenolic composition of grape stem

  9. Polyphenolic composition of grape stem extracts affects antioxidant activity in endothelial and muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    GOUTZOURELAS, NIKOLAOS; STAGOS, DIMITRIOS; SPANIDIS, YPATIOS; LIOSI, MARIA; APOSTOLOU, ANNA; PRIFTIS, ALEXANDROS; HAROUTOUNIAN, SERKO; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.; KOURETAS, DEMETRIOS

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was the assessment of the antioxidant effects of polyphenolic extracts derived from the stems of three Greek grape varieties (Moshomayro, Mavrotragano and Mandilaria) in endothelial (EA.hy926) and muscle (C2C12) cells. We also investigated the effects of the polyphenolic composition on the antioxidant effects of the grape stem extracts. For this purpose, the endothelial and muscle cells were treated with low non-cytotoxic concentrations of the extracts for 24 h in order to assess the effects of the extracts on cellular redox status using oxidative stress biomarkers. The oxidative stress markers were thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyl (CARB) levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and glutathione (GSH) levels. The results revealed that treatment of the EA.hy926 cells with Mandilaria extract significantly decreased the TBARS levels by 14.8% and the CARB levels by 25.9 %, while it increased the GSH levels by 15.8% compared to the controls. Moreover, treatment of the EA.hy926 cells with Mavrotragano extract significantly increased the GSH levels by 20.2%, while it significantly decreased the TBARS and CARB levels by 12.5% and 16.6%, respectively. Treatment of the C2C12 cells with Mandilaria extract significantly decreased the TBARS levels by 47.3 %, the CARB levels by 39.0 % and the ROS levels by 21.8%, while it increased the GSH levels by 22.6% compared to the controls. Moreover, treatment of the C2C12 cells with Mavrotragano significantly decreased the TBARS, CARB and ROS levels by 36.2%, 35.9% and 16.5%, respectively. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledgel, our results demonstrate for the first time that treatment with grape stem extracts at low concentrations improves the redox status of endothelial and muscle cells. Thus, grape stem extracts may be used for developing antioxidant food supplements or biofunctional foods. However, it was also found that the polyphenolic composition of grape stem

  10. Scrophularia orientalis extract induces calcium signaling and apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lange, Ingo; Moschny, Julia; Tamanyan, Kamilla; Khutsishvili, Manana; Atha, Daniel; Borris, Robert P; Koomoa, Dana-Lynn

    2016-04-01

    Effective neuroblastoma (NB) treatments are still limited despite treatment options available today. Therefore, this study attempted to identify novel plant extracts that have anticancer effects. Cytotoxicity and increased intracellular calcium levels were determined using the Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay and Fluo4-AM (acetoxymethyl) staining and fluorescence microscopy in NB cells in order to screen a library of plant extracts. The current study examined the anticancer effects of a dichloromethane extract from Scrophularia orientalis L. (Scrophulariaceae), a plant that has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. This extract contained highly potent agents that significantly reduced cell survival and increased calcium levels in NB cells. Further analysis revealed that cell death induced by this extract was associated with intracellular calcium release, opening of the MPTP, caspase 3- and PARP-cleavage suggesting that this extract induced aberrant calcium signaling that resulted in apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. Therefore, agents from Scrophularia orientalis may have the potential to lead to new chemo-therapeutic anticancer drugs. Furthermore, targeting intracellular calcium signaling may be a novel strategy to develop more effective treatments for NB. PMID:26848085

  11. Scrophularia orientalis extract induces calcium signaling and apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    LANGE, INGO; MOSCHNY, JULIA; TAMANYAN, KAMILLA; KHUTSISHVILI, MANANA; ATHA, DANIEL; BORRIS, ROBERT P.; KOOMOA, DANA-LYNN

    2016-01-01

    Effective neuroblastoma (NB) treatments are still limited despite treatment options available today. Therefore, this study attempted to identify novel plant extracts that have anticancer effects. Cytotoxicity and increased intracellular calcium levels were determined using the Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay and Fluo4-AM (acetoxymethyl) staining and fluorescence microscopy in NB cells in order to screen a library of plant extracts. The current study examined the anticancer effects of a dichloromethane extract from Scrophularia orientalis L. (Scrophulariaceae), a plant that has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. This extract contained highly potent agents that significantly reduced cell survival and increased calcium levels in NB cells. Further analysis revealed that cell death induced by this extract was associated with intracellular calcium release, opening of the MPTP, caspase 3- and PARP-cleavage suggesting that this extract induced aberrant calcium signaling that resulted in apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. Therefore, agents from Scrophularia orientalis may have the potential to lead to new chemo therapeutic anticancer drugs. Furthermore, targeting intracellular calcium signaling may be a novel strategy to develop more effective treatments for NB. PMID:26848085

  12. Lentinula edodes (Shiitake) mushroom extract protects against hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxicity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, U R; Chong, Y L; Mahmood, A A; Indran, M; Abdullah, Noorlidah; Vikineswary, S

    2009-04-01

    Lentinula edodes (Berk) Pegler, commonly known as Shiitake mushroom has been used as medicinal food in Asian countries, especially in China and Japan and is believed to possess strong immunomodulatory property. In the present study, the methanolic extract of the fruit bodies of L. edodes was investigated for cytoprotective effect against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by measuring the activities of xanthine oxidase (XO) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) . H2O2 at a concentration of 5 microM caused 50% inhibition of PBMCs viability. The extract improved the PBMC viability and exerted a dose-dependent protection against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity. At 100 microg/ml of extract concentration, the cell viability increased by 60% compared with the PBMCs incubated with H2O2 alone. The extract also inhibited XO activity in PBMC, while showing moderate stimulatory effect on GPx. However, in the presence of H2O2 alone, both the enzyme activities were increased significantly. The GPx activity increased, possibly in response to the increased availability of H2O2 in the cell. When the cells were pretreated with the extract and washed (to remove the extract) prior to the addition of H2O2, the GPx and XO activities as well as the cell viability were comparable to those when incubated with the extract alone. Thus, it is suggested that one of the possible mechanisms via which L. edodes methanolic extract confers protection against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in PBMC is by inhibiting the superoxide-producing XO and increasing GPx activity which could rapidly inactivate H2O2. PMID:19517993

  13. The potential anticancer activity of extracts derived from the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis on human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    SATO, DAISUKE; KONDO, SEIJI; YAZAWA, KAZUNAGA; MUKUDAI, YOSHIKI; LI, CHUNNAN; KAMATANI, TAKAAKI; KATSUTA, HIDEYUKI; YOSHIHAMA, YASUTO; SHIROTA, TATSUO; SHINTANI, SATORU

    2013-01-01

    Various herb products derived from plants have potent biological effects including anticancer activity. In the present study, the antitumor activity of a herbal product derived from the Scutellaria baicalensis (S. baicalensis) was examined, using in vitro assays in a human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell line. Results showed that S. baicalensis root extract at the concentration of 100 μg/ml inhibited monolayer- and anchorage-independent growth in human OSCC cell lines, while not affecting the adhering abilities of cells. This suggested that it did not alter the expression of any of the adhesion receptors that mediate cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. The S. baicalensis root extract demonstrated potent cytostatic and apoptotic effects due to the downregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 expression and its partner cyclin D1, resulting in G1 arrest and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Additionally, the S. baicalensis root extract was found to have blocked vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced migration and tube formation in human endothelial cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that as a herbal product, the S. baicalensis root extract is a potential inhibitor of tumori- and angiogenesis and may be valuable in the development of pharmaceutical medications for the treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:24649131

  14. Urtica dioica dichloromethane extract induce apoptosis from intrinsic pathway on human prostate cancer cells (PC3).

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, A; Mansoori, B; Aghapour, M; Baradaran, B

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is considered as the major cause of death among men around the world. There are a number of medicinal plants triggering apoptosis response in cancer cells, thus have a therapeutic potential. Therefore, further studies to characterize beneficial properties of these plants in order to introduce novel anti-cancer drugs are the interest of recent researches on the alternative medicine. On the other hand, due to traditional uses and availability of Urtica dioica extract, we decided to evaluate the efficacy of this medicinal herb on pc3 prostate cancer cell line. In the present study the cytotoxic effects of Urtica dioica extract were assessed by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and trypan blue viability dye. Then, DNA fragmentation and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay were exploited to measure cell death and apoptosis stage. The expression levels of caspase 3, caspase 9 and Bcl-2 genes were quantified by Real-Time PCR. Finally, Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. MTT assay showed that dichloromethanolic extract of Urtica dioica significantly inhibited the cell growth. According to the DNA fragmentation and TUNEL assay results, the herbal extract was able to induce apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Our findings also demonstrated that the plant extract substantially increases the caspase 3 and 9 mRNA expression, while decreases Bcl-2. Cell cycle arrest was occurred in G2 stage, due to the results of flow cytometry. These results indicate that dichloromethanolic extract of Urtica dioica can successfully induce apoptosis in PC3 cells. Therefore, it could be used as a novel therapeutic candidate for prostate tumor treatment. PMID:27064877

  15. Berberis libanotica Ehrenb extract shows anti-neoplastic effects on prostate cancer stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    El-Merahbi, Rabih; Liu, Yen-Nien; Eid, Assaad; Daoud, Georges; Hosry, Leina; Monzer, Alissar; Mouhieddine, Tarek H; Hamade, Aline; Najjar, Fadia; Abou-Kheir, Wassim

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), including those of advanced prostate cancer, are a suggested reason for tumor resistance toward conventional tumor therapy. Therefore, new therapeutic agents are urgently needed for targeting CSCs. Despite the minimal understanding of their modes of action, natural products and herbal therapies have been commonly used in the prevention and treatment of many cancers. Berberis libanotica Ehrenb (BLE) is a plant rich in alkaloids which may possess anti-cancer activity and a high potential for eliminating CSCs. We tested the effect of BLE on prostate cancer cells and our data indicated that this extract induced significant reduction in cell viability and inhibited the proliferation of human prostate cancer cell lines (DU145, PC3 and 22Rv1) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. BLE extract induced a perturbation of the cell cycle, leading to a G0-G1 arrest. Furthermore, we noted 50% cell death, characterized by the production of high levels of reactive oxidative species (ROS). Inhibition of cellular migration and invasion was also achieved upon treatment with BLE extract, suggesting a role in inhibiting metastasis. Interestingly, BLE extract had a major effect on CSCs. Cells were grown in a 3D sphere-formation assay to enrich for a population of cancer stem/progenitor cells. Our results showed a significant reduction in sphere formation ability. Three rounds of treatment with BLE extract were sufficient to eradicate the self-renewal ability of highly resistant CSCs. In conclusion, our results suggest a high therapeutic potential of BLE extract in targeting prostate cancer and its CSCs. PMID:25380390

  16. Ethanolic Extracts of California Mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana Besser) Are Cytotoxic against Normal and Cancerous Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Somaweera, Himali; Lai, Gary C.; Blackeye, Rachel; Littlejohn, Beverly; Kirksey, Justine; Aguirre, Richard M.; LaPena, Vince; Pasqua, Anna; Hintz, Mary McCarthy

    2013-01-01

    California mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana Besser) is used by many tribes throughout California to treat a variety of conditions, including colds, allergies, and pain. California mugwort is also utilized as women’s medicine. Its use is on the rise outside of Native communities, often without the guidance of a traditional healer or experienced herbalist. Because it has been shown to have antiproliferative activity against plant and animal cells, we investigated whether California mugwort extracts have an effect on normal human cells as well as estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and estrogen receptor negative (ER−) human breast cancer cells. Ethanolic and aqueous extracts of A. douglasiana leaves were tested for cytotoxicity against unstimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC), as well as against an ER+ human breast cancer cell line (BT-474) and an ER− human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231). An ethanolic leaf extract killed hPBMC, BT-474, and MDA-MB-231 cells with IC50 values of 23.6 ± 0.3, 27 ± 5, and 37 ± 4 μg/ml, respectively. An aqueous extract killed hPBMC with an IC50 value of 60 ± 10 μg/ml, but had no effect on the two cancer cell lines at concentrations up to 100 μg/ml. The results of this study indicate that the cytotoxicity of California mugwort extends to normal human cells, as well as cancerous cells. Therefore, until further is known about the safety of this medicine, caution should be taken when consuming extracts of California mugwort, whether as a tincture or as a tea. PMID:24073389

  17. Pharmacological activity of Kaempferia parviflora extract against human bile duct cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Leardkamolkarn, Vijittra; Tiamyuyen, Sunida; Sripanidkulchai, Bung-orn

    2009-01-01

    A crude ethanol extract of Kaemperia parviflora Wall. Ex Baker and a purified compound, 5,7,4-trimethoxyflavone (KP.8.10), were evaluated for pharmacological effects on human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines (HuCCA-1 and RMCCA-1). The cells were incubated with various concentrations of extract for various time periods and metabolic activity (MTT assay) was assessed for cell viability. The results showed a dose-dependent effect of both crude ethanol extract and the pure compound. CC50s for the crude extract on HuCCA-1 and RMCCA-1 cells were 46.1 microg/ml and 62.0 microg/ml, respectively. Values for the pure compound could not be determined because of solubility problems. Interestingly, K. parviflora ethanol extract and KP.8.10 at low concentrations (10-20 microg/ml and 2.5-5 microg/ml, respectively) markedly reduced rhHGF-induced invasion by HuCCA-1 and RMCCA-1 cells across matrix-coated transwell plates. Higher concentrations of K. parviflora ethanol extract (60 and 80 microg/ml) and KP.8.10 (20 microg /ml) dramatically changed the cellular morphology and caused death in both cell types. KP.8.10 further exhibited progressive action via caspase-3 mitochondrial enzyme activation, enhancing cellular toxicity in a time-dose dependent fashion. Therefore, 5,7,4-trimethoxyflavone appeared to be a bioactive component of K. parviflora extract capable of exerting anti-cancer action. The results suggested a benefit of this edible plant in prevention and treatment of cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:19827897

  18. Induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human colorectal carcinoma by Litchi seed extract.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Ping; Lin, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Chiu-Chen; Lin, Yi-Hsien; Chou, Jyh-Ching; Tsia, Yu-Ting; Su, Jhih-Rou; Chung, Yuan-Chiang

    2012-01-01

    The Litchi (Litchi chinensis) fruit products possess rich amounts of flavanoids and proanthocyanidins. Its pericarp has been shown to inhibit breast and liver cancer cell growth. However, the anticolorectal cancer effect of Litchi seed extract has not yet been reported. In this study, the effects of polyphenol-rich Litchi seed ethanol extract (LCSP) on the proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis of two colorectal cancer cell lines Colo320DM and SW480 were examined. The results demonstrated that LCSP significantly induced apoptotic cell death in a dose-dependent manner and arrested cell cycle in G2/M in colorectal carcinoma cells. LCSP also suppressed cyclins and elevated the Bax : Bcl-2 ratio and caspase 3 activity. This study provides in vitro evidence that LCSP serves as a potential chemopreventive agent for colorectal cancer. PMID:23093841

  19. In vitro cytotoxic screening of 31 crude extracts of Thai herbs on a chondrosarcoma cell line and primary chondrocytes and apoptotic effects of selected extracts.

    PubMed

    Ruamrungsri, Napat; Siengdee, Puntita; Sringarm, Korawan; Chomdej, Siriwadee; Ongchai, Siriwan; Nganvongpanit, Korakot

    2016-04-01

    Thirty-one dichloromethane and methanol crude extracts of 16 herb species used in Thai traditional folk medicine were studied for their cytotoxic activities on the SW 1353 chondrosarcoma cell line and primary chondrocytes. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) cell viability assay and flow cytometric method were used as screening tools for cytotoxicity testing. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) was measured and reported for each crude extract. Apoptosis, necrosis, and cell viability were measured by flow cytometry at IC50. Two out of 31 herbal extracts, methanol extracts of Paris polyphylla var. chinensis and Ficus thailandica C.C. Berg & S. Gardner, showed potent anticancer activity. They demonstrated high apoptosis induction activity in SW 1353 cells but had less effect on percentage of viability and necrosis of normal chondrocyte cells. Cytotoxic screening and apoptosis assays suggest the potential anticancer activity of some plants used in Thai traditional medicine and provide information concerning their direct effects. PMID:26857828

  20. The Effects of Aqueous Extract of Alpinia Galangal on Gastric Cancer Cells (AGS) and L929 Cells in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hadjzadeh, Mosa-Al-Reza; Ghanbari, Habib; Keshavarzi, Zakieh; Tavakol-Afshari, Jalil

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the incidence of gastric cancer is declining during the last half century, this cancer still is the second morbid cancer in the world after lung cancer. The incidence of gastric cancer is 26 per 100,000 in Iran. This study evaluated the effect of Alpinia galangal on AGS cells (human gastric adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line) and L929 cells (as a standard cell line originated from mouse fibroblast cells). Methods After culturing the cells in Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) medium, the cells were incubated with different doses of Alpinia galangal (0 (control), 125, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 µg/ml) in 24, 48 and 72 hour periods and then, cells viability were assessed using MTT based cell proliferation assay. Results After 24 hours, the percentage of living AGS cells compared to the control group showed no significant decrease at the concentrations of 125 and 250µg/ml. But in the rest concentrations were significant (p<0.05). Only, the percentage of surviving L929 cells at concentration of 125µg/ml of the extract was not significant, but these percentages in the other concentrations were significant. After 48 and 72h incubation, in the last three extract concentrations, the percentage of living AGS and L929 cells significantly decreased compared to control cells (p<0.05). Conclusion We have demonstrated, using cell culture model, anti-proliferative effect of aqueous extract of Alpinia galangal on human gastric tumor (AGS) and L929 cell lines. This effect was prominent in high concentrations. PMID:25250165

  1. Screening nephroprotective compounds from cortex Moutan by mesangial cell extraction and UPLC.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Huang, Limei; Zhu, Jianliang; Bu, Wenjie; Sun, Jing; Fang, Zhaohui

    2015-06-01

    A method for screening nephroprotective compounds in cortex Moutan, a common traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in treating diabetic nephropathy with renal mesangial cell extraction and ultra performance liquid chromatography technique was described in this paper. We hypothesize that the compounds which bind to cell membranes under pathological conditions may be the bioactive compounds in TCMs. Mesangial cells were cultured in medium containing 5 mM (physiological, NG) or 30 mM (pathological, HG) glucose for 48 h and then incubated with cortex Moutan extract. After the unbound substances were washed off, the cell membrane-bound compounds were dissociated and concentrated by an SPE column. By comparing the chromatograms of NG and HG cultured-cell extractions and cortex Moutan extract, three compounds bound to both NG and HG-cultured mesangial cells were identified as paeoniflorin, pentagalloylglucose (PGG) and paeonol. In vitro studies showed that paeoniflorin, PGG and paeonol reduced the activity of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH) activity, and decreased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and fibronectin in high glucose cultured mesangial cells. The results indicate that paeonol, paeoniflorin and PGG may be the nephroprotective compounds from cortex Moutan. This study is expected to provide a more reliable and effective method for screening bioactive compounds from the complex TCM systems. PMID:25156360

  2. Methanolic extracts of bitter melon inhibit colon cancer stem cells by affecting energy homeostasis and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kwatra, Deep; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Ramamoorthy, Prabhu; Standing, David; Moran, Elizabeth; Velayutham, Ravichandiran; Mitra, Ashim; Umar, Shahid; Anant, Shrikant

    2013-01-01

    Bitter melon fruit is recommended in ancient Indian and Chinese medicine for prevention/treatment of diabetes. However its effects on cancer progression are not well understood. Here, we have determined the efficacy of methanolic extracts of bitter melon on colon cancer stem and progenitor cells. Both, whole fruit (BMW) and skin (BMSk) extracts showed significant inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation, with BMW showing greater efficacy. In addition, the cells were arrested at the S phase of cell cycle. Moreover, BMW induced the cleavage of LC3B but not caspase 3/7, suggesting that the cells were undergoing autophagy and not apoptosis. Further confirmation of autophagy was obtained when western blots showed reduced Bcl-2 and increased Beclin-1, Atg 7 and 12 upon BMW treatment. BMW reduced cellular ATP levels coupled with activation of AMP activated protein kinase; on the other hand, exogenous additions of ATP lead to revival of cell proliferation. Finally, BMW treatment results in a dose-dependent reduction in the number and size of colonospheres. The extracts also decreased the expression of DCLK1 and Lgr5, markers of quiescent, and activated stem cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the extracts of bitter melon can be an effective preventive/therapeutic agent for colon cancer. PMID:23533514

  3. Chromatin remodeling by cell cycle stage-specific extracts from Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Thiriet, C; Hayes, J J

    1999-03-01

    Remodeling of chromatin is an essential process allowing the establishment of specific genetic programs. The slime mold Physarum polycephalum presents the attractive advantage of natural synchrony of the cell cycle in several million nuclei. Whole-cell extracts prepared at precise stages during the cell cycle were tested for the ability to induce remodeling in erythrocyte nuclei as monitored by microscopy, protamine competition assays, micrococcal nuclease digestions, and release of histone H5. Extracts derived from two specific cell cycle stages caused opposite types of changes in erythrocyte nuclei. An increase in chromatin compaction was imparted by extracts prepared during S-phase while extracts harvested at the end of G2-phase caused increases in nuclear volume, DNA accessibility, and release of linker histone. We also found that late G2 extracts had the ability to alter the DNase I digestion profile of mononucleosomes reconstituted in vitro in a classical nucleosomes remodeling assay. The relevance of these finding to the Physarum cell cycle is discussed. PMID:10219572

  4. In vitro cytotoxicity screening of wild plant extracts from Saudi Arabia on human breast adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ali, M A; Abul Farah, M; Al-Hemaid, F M; Abou-Tarboush, F M

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the in vitro anticancer activities of a total of 14 wild angiosperms collected in Saudi Arabia. The cytotoxic activity of each extract was assessed against human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cell lines by using the MTT assay. Among the plants screened, the potential cytotoxic activity exhibited by the extract of Lavandula dentata (Lamiaceae) was identified, and we analyzed its anticancer potential by testing antiproliferative and apoptotic activity. Our results clearly show that ethanolic extract of L. dentata exhibits promising cytotoxic activity with an IC50 value of 39 μg/mL. Analysis of cell morphological changes, DNA fragmentation and apoptosis (using an Annexin V assay) also confirmed the apoptotic effect of L. dentata extract, and thus, our data call for further investigations to determine the active chemical constituent(s) and their mechanisms of inducing apoptosis. PMID:24938609

  5. Dyes extracted from Trigonella seeds as photosensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batniji, Amal; Abdel-Latif, Monzir S.; El-Agez, Taher M.; Taya, Sofyan A.; Ghamri, Hatem

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the extract of Trigonella seeds was used as sensitizer for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The natural dye was extracted from the seeds using water and alcohol as solvents for the raw material. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of Trigonella extract solution and dye adsorbed on TiO2 film were measured. DSSCs sensitized by Trigonella extracted using water as a solvent exhibited better performance with efficiency of 0.215 %. The performance of the fabricated DSSCs was attempted to enhance by acid treatment of the FTO substrates with HNO3, H3PO4, and H2SO4. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the fabricated cells was also carried out.

  6. Effects of the flower extract of Ixora coccinea Linn. On the meristematic cells of Allium Cepa

    PubMed Central

    Latha, P.G.; Chandralekha, C.T.; Vilasini, G.; Panikkar, K.R.

    1998-01-01

    The aqueous extract of flowers of I. coccinea was evaluated for its cytotoxic and mutagenic effects on the meristematic cells of onion root tip. The percentage of abnormalities was found to increase with the increase in the concentration of the extract from 20 to 60 mg/ml. With 80 mg/ml completed arrest or total inhibition of cell division was observed. The major abnormalities were unprinted chromosomes at metaphase. Stickiness and clumping of chromosomes were induced by higher concentrations of the extract. Sticky anaphase bridges and formation of micronuclei were induced at the highest concentration (80mg/ml) tried. The significance of these abnormalities is discussed in detail. The results point to the potential use of the aqueous extract of flowers of I. coccinea in the chemotherapy of cancer. PMID:22556853

  7. Effects of the flower extract of Ixora coccinea Linn. On the meristematic cells of Allium Cepa.

    PubMed

    Latha, P G; Chandralekha, C T; Vilasini, G; Panikkar, K R

    1998-04-01

    The aqueous extract of flowers of I. coccinea was evaluated for its cytotoxic and mutagenic effects on the meristematic cells of onion root tip. The percentage of abnormalities was found to increase with the increase in the concentration of the extract from 20 to 60 mg/ml. With 80 mg/ml completed arrest or total inhibition of cell division was observed. The major abnormalities were unprinted chromosomes at metaphase. Stickiness and clumping of chromosomes were induced by higher concentrations of the extract. Sticky anaphase bridges and formation of micronuclei were induced at the highest concentration (80mg/ml) tried. The significance of these abnormalities is discussed in detail. The results point to the potential use of the aqueous extract of flowers of I. coccinea in the chemotherapy of cancer. PMID:22556853

  8. Direct acid methylation for extraction of fatty acid content from microalgae cells.

    PubMed

    Frigo-Vaz, Benjamin D; Wang, Ping

    2014-08-01

    Direct acid methylation was examined as a means for both analysis of fatty acid content in microalgal cells and biodiesel production without pretreatment. Microalgal cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Dunaliella tertiolecta were prepared and examined. It appeared that direct acid methylation extracted higher fatty acid content than the solvent-based Soxhlet extraction process. It also revealed that the latter was prone to extract a significant amount of nonlipid hydrophobic impurities, including hydrophobic proteins and phytol-type compounds, while direct methylation produces essentially pure ester product. This work demonstrates that direct acid methylation provides superior fatty acid extraction, promising an efficient process for either quantification of lipid content or production of biodiesel. PMID:24838798

  9. [Research advances on DNA extraction methods from peripheral blood mononuclear cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ying; Yu, Chen-Xi

    2014-10-01

    DNA extraction is a basic technology of molecular biology. The purity and the integrality of DNA structure are necessary for different experiments of gene engineering. As commonly used materials in the clinical detection, the fast, efficient isolation and extraction of genomic DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells is very important for the inspection and analysis of clinical blood. At present, there are many methods for extracting DNA, such as phenol-chloroform method, salting out method, centrifugal adsorption column chromatography method (artificial methods), magnetic beads (semi-automatic method) and DNA extraction kit. In this article, a brief review of the principle for existing DNA blood extraction method, the specific steps and the assessment of the specific methods briefly are summarized. PMID:25338615

  10. Pharmacological screening of bryophyte extracts that inhibit growth and induce abnormal phenotypes in human HeLa cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Krzaczkowski, Lucie; Wright, Michel; Rebérioux, Delphine; Massiot, Georges; Etiévant, Chantal; Gairin, Jean Edouard

    2009-08-01

    Antitumor activities of substances from natural sources apart from vascular plants and micro-organisms have been poorly investigated. Here we report on a pharmacological screening of a bryophyte extract library using a phenotypic cell-based assay revealing microtubules, centrosomes and DNA. Among the 219 moss extracts tested, we identified 41 extracts acting on cell division with various combinations of significant effects on interphasic and mitotic cells. Seven extracts were further studied using a cell viability assay, cell cycle analysis and the phenotypic assay. Three distinct pharmacological patterns were identified including two unusual phenotypes. PMID:19709324

  11. Time analysis of corneal endothelial cell density after cataract extraction.

    PubMed

    Galin, M A; Lin, L L; Fetherolf, E; Obstbaum, S A; Sugar, A

    1979-07-01

    Serial endothelial photographs were taken preoperatively and postoperatively in 200 eyes; 111 eyes contained a Rayner iris clip lens, 54 eyes contained a Fyodorov Sputnik lens, and 35 eyes had no lens. Central endothelial cell density was changed in all instances, with counts in implanted eyes declining 25 to 30%, and in nonimplanted eyes 10 to 15%. In both instances, the decline essentially ceased at about three months. The cause of the greater decline in implanted eyes appeared to be mechanical and subsequent cell loss after the 90-day period was virtually equal for the two groups. Methods that may be used to alter the difference in cell density occurring with implantation are best analyzed by using the 90-day period data for comparison. PMID:464015

  12. Measurement of TACE Activity in Extracts from Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiuling; Padilla, Mabel T.; Lin, Yong

    2016-01-01

    In cigarette smoke–induced and inflammation-associated lung cancer development, cigarette smoke extract (CSE) activates tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) secretion from macrophages. TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE), also known as α-Secretase or ADAM17 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease), is a member of the ADAM family of metalloproteases. TACE mediated ectodomain shedding leads to the conversion of the inactive TNF-α precursor into the active mature pro-inflammatory cytokine. The SensoLyte 520 TACE (α-Secretase) Activity Assay Kit was used to detect TACE activity in CSE-activated macrophages. This assay is reliable, reproducible and easy to carry out in 96 well plate format.

  13. Leaf extracts from Moricandia arvensis promote antiproliferation of human cancer cells, induce apoptosis, and enhance antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Skandrani, Ines; Boubaker, Jihed; Bhouri, Wissem; Limem, Ilef; Kilani, Soumaya; Ben Sghaier, Mohamed; Neffati, Aicha; Bouhlel, Ines; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro antiproliferative, apoptotic, and antioxidant activities from leaf extracts of Moricandia arvensis, which are used in traditional cooking and medicines, were investigated. The MTT assay revealed that only TOF (total oligomer flavonoids), ethyl acetate (EA), chloroform (Chl), and petroleum ether (PE) extracts inhibited the proliferation of K562 cells. Apoptosis plays a very important role in the treatment of cancer by promoting the apoptosis of cancer cells and limiting the concurrent death of normal cells. Thus, the possible effects of M. arvensis extracts on the induction of apoptosis in human leukemic cells (K562 cells) were investigated. The electrophoretic analysis of DNA fragmentation confirms that TOF, Chl, PE, and EA extracts provoke DNA fragmentation. Using the lipid peroxidation inhibitory assay, the antioxidant capacity of M. arvensis extracts was evaluated by the ability of each extract to inhibit malondialdehyde formation. It was revealed that EA and TOF extracts are the most active in scavenging the hydroxyl radicals. PMID:19995267

  14. Cytotoxic effect of Argentine medicinal plant extracts on human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Ruffa, M J; Ferraro, G; Wagner, M L; Calcagno, M L; Campos, R H; Cavallaro, L

    2002-03-01

    Methanolic extracts from Achyrocline satureioides (Dc.) Lam, Aristolochia macroura Gomez, Lithraea molleoides (Vell.) Engl., Schinus molle L., unlike those from Celtis spinosa Spreng, Chenopodium ambrosioides L., Petiveria alliacea L., and Plantago major L. showed cytotoxic activity against a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, Hep G2. Schinus molle L. was the most active (IC50=50+/-7 microg/ml). These results call for further studies of these extracts. PMID:11849838

  15. In vitro cytotoxic activity of leaves extracts of Holarrhena antidysenterica against some human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Hussain, Shabir; Bakshi, Manish; Bhat, Neha; Saxena, Ajit Kumar

    2014-02-01

    In vitro cytotoxic potential of extracts (95% and 50% ethanolic extract and hot water extract at concentration of 100 microg/ml) from leaves of Holarrhena antidysenterica was evaluated against fourteen human cancer cell lines--A-549, COLO-205, DU-145, HeLa, HEP-2, IMR-32, KB, MCF-7, NCI-H23, OVCAR-5, SiHa, SK-N-MC, SW-620 and ZR-75-1 from nine different tissues (breast, colon, cervix, CNS, lung, liver, oral, ovary and prostate) using SRB assay. The 95% ethanolic extract displayed maximum anti-proliferative effect in the range of 73-92% against eight human cancer cell lines, while 50% ethanolic extract showed cytotoxic activity in the range of 70-94% against seven human cancer cell lines. However, the hot water extract did not show any activity. Among the fractions of 95% and 50% ethanolic extract, significant cytotoxic activity was found in the chloroform soluble fraction of 95% ethanolic extract at 100 microg/ml; it inhibited the growth in the range of 71-99% of seven human cancer cell lines from five different tissues viz., OVCAR-5 (ovary), HT-29 (colon), SK-N-MC (neuroblastoma), HEP-2 (liver), COLO-205 (colon), NIH-OVCAR-3 (ovary) and A-549 (lung). The cytotoxic activity of chloroform soluble fraction was found to be higher than 5-flurouracil, adriamycin, mitomycin-c and paclitaxel (anticancer drugs used as positive controls). Further in vivo studies and identification of active components from the chloroform fraction and their exact mechanism of action could be useful in designing new anticancer therapeutic agents. PMID:24791416

  16. Specific initiation by RNA polymerase I in a whole-cell extract from yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, M C; Choe, S Y; Reeder, R H

    1991-01-01

    A protocol is described for making a soluble whole-cell extract from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) that supports active and specific transcription initiation by RNA polymerases I, II, and III. Specific initiation by polymerase I decreases in high-density cultures, paralleling the decrease in abundance of the endogenous 35S rRNA precursor. This extract should be useful for studying the molecular mechanisms that regulate rRNA transcription in yeast. Images PMID:1992452

  17. Annona squamosa Linn: cytotoxic activity found in leaf extract against human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Shen; Rizwani, Ghazala H; Guo, Huiqin; Ahmed, Mansoor; Ahmed, Maryam; Hassan, Syed Zeeshan; Hassan, Amir; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Xu, Rui-Hua

    2014-09-01

    Cancer is a common cause of death in human populations. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy still remain the corner stone of treatment. However, herbal medicines are gaining popularity on account of their lesser harmful side effects on non-targeted human cells and biological environment. Annona squamosa Linn is a common delicious edible fruit and its leaf have been used for the treatment in various types of diseases. The objective of present study is to determine the anticancer potential of the organic and aqueous extracts of leaf of Annona squamosa L. MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazole-2yl)-2, 5-biphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay against hepatocellular carcinoma cell line BEL-7404, lung cancer line H460, human epidermoid carcinoma cell line KB-3-1, prostatic cancer cell line DU145, breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-435, and colon cancer cell line HCT-116 Human primary embryonic kidney cell line HEK293 as control were used for the study. The crude extract (Zcd) and Ethyl acetate extract (ZE) were found significant anticancer activity only on human epidermoid carcinoma cell line KB-3-1 and colon cancer cell line HCT-116. PMID:25176251

  18. Serum proteins are extracted along with monolayer cells in plasticware and interfere with protein analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xin; Meng, Yuling; Kalkanis, Steven N.

    2016-01-01

    Washing and lysing monolayer cells directly from cell culture plasticware is a commonly used method for protein extraction. We found that multiple protein bands were enriched in samples with low cell numbers from the 6-well plate cultures. These proteins contributed to the overestimation of cell proteins and led to the uneven protein loading in Western blotting analysis. In Coomassie blue stained SDS-PAGE gels, the main enriched protein band is about 69 kDa and it makes up 13.6% of total protein from 104 U251n cells. Analyzed by mass spectrometry, we identified two of the enriched proteins: bovine serum albumin and bovine serum transferrin. We further observed that serum proteins could be extracted from other cell culture plates, dishes and flasks even after washing the cells 3 times with PBS. A total of 2.3 mg of protein was collected from a single well of the 6-well plate. A trace amount of the protein band was still visible after washing the cells 5 times with PBS. Thus, serum proteins should be considered if extracting proteins from plasticware, especially for samples with low cell numbers.

  19. Antiproliferative Activity of T. welwitschii Extract on Jurkat T Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Moyo, Batanai; Mukanganyama, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Triumfetta welwitschii is a plant used traditionally for the treatment of fever and diarrhoea. Previous work has shown that T. welwitschii has antibacterial activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate T. welwitschii extract for anticancer activity against Jurkat T cells. The Jurkat T cell line is used to study acute T cell leukaemia. An antiproliferation assay, determination of induction of apoptosis, the determination of the effect of the combination of the extract and GSH, and effects of the extract on DNA leakage were conducted. T. welwitschii was found to decrease cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. T. welwitschii caused apoptosis in the Jurkat T cells as shown by DNA fragmentation. When T. welwitschii was combined with reduced GSH, it was found that the growth of the Jurkat T cells was significantly reduced compared to untreated cells after 72 h of treatment. This was unexpected, as cancer cells have elevated levels of GSH compared to normal cells. The results of this study show that T. welwitschii is a potential source of compounds that may serve as leads for anticancer compounds. PMID:26557698

  20. Effect of Epilobium angustifolium L. extracts and polyphenols on cell proliferation and neutral endopeptidase activity in selected cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kiss, A; Kowalski, J; Melzig, M F

    2006-01-01

    The ability of Epilobium extracts and polyphenols to induce neutral endopeptidase (NEP) activity and to inhibit the proliferation in cell lines with high NEP expression (SK-N-SH) and with low NEP expression (PC-3) was investigated. Epilobium extracts enhanced in a dose-depend manner NEP activity in both cell lines with additional inhibition of cell proliferation. The sensitivity of cells depended on basal enzyme activity. SK-N-SK cells were much more sensitive than PC-3 cells. Oenothein B enhanced NEP activity at a concentration of 5-40 microM while quercetin-3-glucuronide and quercetin-3-O-(6"-gal-loyl) galactoside showed slight or no activity at a concentration of 100 microM. The comparison of activities of the extracts with oenothein B, a dimeric macrocyclic ellagitannin, suggests that the latter is mostly responsible for the observed effects. Taking into account the role of NEP in the homeostasis of signalling peptides, Epilobium angustifolium extracts may be a potential herbal remedy in diseases connected with the disturbed metabolism of signaling peptides caused by an unbalanced neutral endopeptidase activity. PMID:16454210

  1. Immunochemistry of a Formamide-extracted Antigen from Clostridium perfringens Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Howard M.; Brenner, Kristen; Hall, Herbert E.

    1969-01-01

    The type-specific antigen of a strain of Clostridium perfringens involved in food poisoning was isolated from the cell wall by the use of hot formamide. The antigen appears to consist of polysaccharide or mucopeptide. The formamide extract was shown to be heterogeneous by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200. The serologically active fraction contained about 25% of the amount of protein present in the original formamide extract. Hexosamine, acetyl groups, and carbohydrate also were detected. The formamide extract showed a high degree of serological activity. The serological activity was increased twofold on Sephadex gel filtration. Images PMID:4310078

  2. Pressurized liquid extraction of Aglaonema sp. iminosugars: Chemical composition, bioactivity, cell viability and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, S; Martín-Ortiz, A; Carrero-Carralero, C; Ramos, S; Sanz, M L; Soria, A C

    2016-08-01

    Pressurized liquid extraction of Aglaonema sp. iminosugars has been optimized. A single cycle under optimal conditions (80mg, 100°C, 2min) was enough to extract ⩾96% of most iminosugars. Further incubation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for 5h removed coextracted interfering low molecular weight carbohydrates from extracts of different Aglaonema cultivars. A complete characterization of these extracts was carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: three iminosugars were tentatively identified for the first time; α-homonojirimycin and 2,5-dideoxy-2,5-imino-d-mannitol were the major iminosugars determined. α-Glucosidase inhibition activity, cell viability and thermal stability of Aglaonema extracts were also evaluated. Extracts with IC50 for α-glucosidase activity in the 0.010-0.079mgmL(-1) range showed no decrease of Caco-2 cell viability at concentrations lower than 125μgmL(-1) and were stable at 50°C for 30days. These results highlight the potential of Aglaonema extracts as a source of bioactives to be used as functional ingredients. PMID:26988476

  3. Study of the betulin enriched birch bark extracts effects on human carcinoma cells and ear inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pentacyclic triterpenes, mainly betulin and betulinic acid, are valuable anticancer agents found in the bark of birch tree. This study evaluates birch bark extracts for the active principles composition. Results New improved extraction methods were applied on the bark of Betula pendula in order to reach the maximum content in active principles. Extracts were analyzed by HPLC-MS, Raman, SERS and 13C NMR spectroscopy which revealed a very high yield of betulin (over 90%). Growth inhibiting effects were measured in vitro on four malignant human cell lines: A431 (skin epidermoid carcinoma), A2780 (ovarian carcinoma), HeLa (cervix adenocarcinoma) and MCF7 (breast adenocarcinoma), by means of MTT assay. All of the prepared bark extracts exerted a pronounced antiproliferative effect against human cancer cell lines. In vivo studies involved the anti-inflammatory effect of birch extracts on TPA-induced model of inflammation in mice. Conclusions The research revealed the efficacy of the extraction procedures as well as the antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory effects of birch extracts. PMID:23158079

  4. Saw Palmetto Extract Inhibits Metastasis and Antiangiogenesis through STAT3 Signal Pathway in Glioma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hong; Shen, Jinglian; Yang, Yang; Che, Yuqin

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3) plays an important role in the proliferation and angiogenesis in human glioma. Previous research indicated that saw palmetto extract markedly inhibited the proliferation of human glioma cells through STAT3 signal pathway. But its effect on tumor metastasis and antiangiogenesis is not clear. This study is to further clear the impact of saw palmetto extract on glioma cell metastasis, antiangiogenesis, and its mechanism. TUNEL assay indicated that the apoptotic cells in the saw palmetto treated group are higher than that in the control group (p < 0.05). The apoptosis related protein is detected and the results revealed that saw palmetto extract inhibits the proliferation of human glioma. Meanwhile pSTAT3 is lower in the experimental group and CD34 is also inhibited in the saw palmetto treated group. This means that saw palmetto extract could inhibit the angiogenesis in glioma. We found that saw palmetto extract was an important phytotherapeutic drug against the human glioma through STAT3 signal pathway. Saw palmetto extract may be useful as an adjunctive therapeutic agent for treatment of individuals with glioma and other types of cancer in which STAT3 signaling is activated. PMID:26788112

  5. In vitro cancer cell growth inhibition and antioxidant activity of Bombax ceiba (Bombacaceae) flower extracts.

    PubMed

    Tundis, Rosa; Rashed, Khaled; Said, Ataa; Menichini, Francesco; Loizzo, Monica R

    2014-05-01

    The flowers of Bombax ceiba were investigated for their chemical composition, antioxidant effects and antiproliferative activity against seven human cancer cell lines. The antiproliferative responses of diethyl ether (DE) and light petroleum (PE) extracts were evaluated by sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay against MCF-7, HeLa, COR-L23, C32, A375, ACHN, and LNCaP cells in comparison with a human normal cell line, 142BR. Moreover, extracts were characterized by GC-MS analysis and tested for their antioxidant properties by different in vitro systems, namely DPPH, Fe-chelating activity and beta-carotene bleaching test. Both PE and DE extracts showed the highest antiproliferative activity against human renal adenocarcinoma (ACHN) in a concentration-dependent manner. PE extract showed the highest radical scavenging activity against the DPPH radical, while DE extract was more active in the beta-carotene bleaching test. The presence of beta-sitosterol and some fatty acids may contribute to the bioactivity of B. ceiba flower extracts. PMID:25026723

  6. Continuous nucleus extraction by optically-induced cell lysis on a batch-type microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Hsuan; Hung, Lien-Yu; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2016-04-12

    The extraction of a cell's nucleus is an essential technique required for a number of procedures, such as disease diagnosis, genetic replication, and animal cloning. However, existing nucleus extraction techniques are relatively inefficient and labor-intensive. Therefore, this study presents an innovative, microfluidics-based approach featuring optically-induced cell lysis (OICL) for nucleus extraction and collection in an automatic format. In comparison to previous micro-devices designed for nucleus extraction, the new OICL device designed herein is superior in terms of flexibility, selectivity, and efficiency. To facilitate this OICL module for continuous nucleus extraction, we further integrated an optically-induced dielectrophoresis (ODEP) module with the OICL device within the microfluidic chip. This on-chip integration circumvents the need for highly trained personnel and expensive, cumbersome equipment. Specifically, this microfluidic system automates four steps by 1) automatically focusing and transporting cells, 2) releasing the nuclei on the OICL module, 3) isolating the nuclei on the ODEP module, and 4) collecting the nuclei in the outlet chamber. The efficiency of cell membrane lysis and the ODEP nucleus separation was measured to be 78.04 ± 5.70% and 80.90 ± 5.98%, respectively, leading to an overall nucleus extraction efficiency of 58.21 ± 2.21%. These results demonstrate that this microfluidics-based system can successfully perform nucleus extraction, and the integrated platform is therefore promising in cell fusion technology with the goal of achieving genetic replication, or even animal cloning, in the near future. PMID:26987542

  7. Retama monosperma n-hexane extract induces cell cycle arrest and extrinsic pathway-dependent apoptosis in Jurkat cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Retama monosperma L. (Boiss.) or Genista monosperma L. (Lam.), locally named as “R’tam”, is an annual and spontaneous plant belonging to the Fabaceae family. In Morocco, Retama genus is located in desert regions and across the Middle Atlas and it has been widely used in traditional medicine in many countries. In this study, we show that Retama monosperma hexane extract presents significant anti-leukemic effects against human Jurkat cells. Methods Human Jurkat cells, together with other cell lines were screened with different concentrations of Retama monosperma hexane extract at different time intervals. Growth inhibition was determined using luminescent-based viability assays. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry analysis. Combined caspase 3 and 7 activities were measured using luminometric caspase assays and immunoblots were performed to analyze expression of relevant pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. GC-MS were used to determine the chemical constituents of the active extract. Results Retama monosperma hexane extract (Rm-HE) showed significant cytotoxicity against Jurkat cells, whereas it proved to be essentially ineffective against both normal mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3) and normal lymphocytes (TK-6). Cytometric analysis indicated that Rm-HE promoted cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction accompanied by DNA damage induction indicated by an increase in p-H2A.X levels. Rm-HE induced apoptosis was partially JNK-dependent and characterized by an increase in Fas-L levels together with activation of caspases 8, 3, 7 and 9, whereas neither the pro-apoptotic nor anti-apoptotic mitochondrial membrane proteins analyzed were significantly altered. Chemical identification analysis indicated that α-linolenic acid, campesterol, stigmasterol and sitosterol were the major bioactive components within the extract. Conclusions Our data suggest that bioactive compounds present in Rm-HE show significant anti leukemic activity inducing

  8. Anticancer activity of Petroselinum sativum seed extracts on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Farshori, Nida Nayyar; Al-Sheddi, Ebtesam Saad; Al-Oqail, Mai Mohammad; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz Ali; Siddiqui, Maqsood Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological and preventive properties of Petroselinum sativum seed extracts are well known, but the anticancer activity of alcoholic extracts and oil of Petroselinum sativum seeds on human breast cancer cells have not been explored so far. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the cytotoxic activities of these extracts against MCF-7 cells. Cells were exposed to 10 to 1000 μg/ml of alcoholic seed extract (PSA) and seed oil (PSO) of Petroselinum sativum for 24 h. Post-treatment, percent cell viability was studied by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2, 5-biphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and neutral red uptake (NRU) assays, and cellular morphology by phase contrast inverted microscopy. The results showed that PSA and PSO significantly reduced cell viability, and altered the cellular morphology of MCF-7 cells in a concentration dependent manner. Concentrations of 50 μg/ml and above of PSA and 100 μg/ml and above of PSO were found to be cytotoxic in MCF-7 cells. Cell viability at 50, 100, 250, 500 and 1000 μg/ml of PSA was recorded as 81%, 57%, 33%, 8% and 5%, respectively, whereas at 100, 250, 500, and 1000 μg/ml of PSO values were 90%, 78%, 62%, and 8%, respectively by MTT assay. MCF-7 cells exposed to 250, 500 and 1000 μg/ml of PSA and PSO lost their typical morphology and appeared smaller in size. The data revealed that the treatment with PSA and PSO of Petroselinum sativum induced cell death in MCF-7 cells. PMID:24289568

  9. Wharton’s Jelly-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells can Differentiate into Hepatocyte-like Cells by HepG2 Cell Line Extract

    PubMed Central

    Borhani-Haghighi, Maryam; Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Ayatollahi, Maryam; Vojdani, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background Wharton’s jelly is an unlimited source of stem cells that can be used in cell therapy and tissue engineering without any ethical concern. It has been revealed the cell-free extract could be effective to induce cell differentiation. The objective of this study was to induce Wharton’s jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into hepatocyte-like cells by premeabilization of the cells in the presence of HepG2 cell line extract. Methods MSCs were isolated from the umbilical cord, CD marker profile and their differentiation potential into adipogenic and osteogenic lineages were determined. The cells were then, permeabilized by streptolysin O in the presence of HepG cell extract. The treated cells were cultured for 17 days. The cell phenotype was evaluated and the hepatocyte specific markers were detected by immunofluorescence and immunocytochemistry. The Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) reaction and the cellular uptake of indocyanine green were performed to evaluate the functional behavior of the differentiated cells. Results The phenotype of extract-treated MSCs changed into a round or polygonal cells with few short processes and they could express high level of albumin, cytokeratin 18 and 19. The MSCs also could store glycogen and uptake and release indocyanine green. Conclusion We demonstrated for the first time that Wharton’s jelly-derived MSCs could differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells by premeabilization of them in the presence of HepG2 cell extract. This study suggests a feasible method to differentiate MSCs into functional hepatocyte-like cells. PMID:25821294

  10. In vivo cell characteristic extraction and identification by photoacoustic flow cytography

    PubMed Central

    He, Guo; Xu, Dong; Qin, Huan; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2015-01-01

    We present a photoacoustic flow cytography with fast cross-sectional (B-scan) imaging to precisely identify specific cells in vivo. The B-scan imaging speed of the system is up to 200 frame/s with a lateral resolution of 1.5 μm, which allows to dynamically image the flowing cells within the microvascular. The shape, size and photoacoustic intensity of the target cells are extracted from streaming images and integrated into a standard pattern to distinguish cell types. Circulating red blood cells and melanoma cells in blood vessels are simultaneously identified on melanoma-bearing mouse model. The results demonstrate that in vivo photoacoustic flow cytography can provide cells characteristics analysis and cell type’s visual identification, which will be applied for noninvasively monitoring circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and analyzing hematologic diseases. PMID:26504626

  11. Antiproliferative activities of Garcinia bracteata extract and its active ingredient, isobractatin, against human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tao; Li, Wei; Wang, Yan-Yan; Zhong, Qing-Qing; Wang, Shu-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Ren, Dong-Mei; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2014-03-01

    In our cell based screening of antitumor ingredients from plants, the EtOH extract of Garcinia bracteata displayed antiproliferative effect against human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells, human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, and human prostate cancer PC3 cells. Phytochemical investigation of this active extract produced nine ingredients, and their structures were established by analysis of MS and NMR spectra. Antiproliferative evaluation of isolated ingredients on A549, MCF-7 and PC3 cells indicated that a xanthone named isobractatin (1) exhibited potent antiproliferative activity against the above three human cancer cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 2.90 to 4.15 μM. Treatment of PC3 cells with 1 led to an enhancement of the cell apoptosis, and arrested cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. The G0/G1 phase cycle-related proteins analysis showed that the expressions of cyclins D1 and E were reduced by 1, whereas the protein level of cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor P21 was induced. Additionally, 1 enhanced PC3 cell apoptosis by activations of Bax, caspases 3 and 9, and by inhibition of Bcl-2. Our combined data illustrated that isobractatin (1) was the antiproliferative ingredient of G. bracteata against three human cancer cell lines, which exerted its antiproliferatrive effect via cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. PMID:23812779

  12. From the Cover: Hysteresis drives cell-cycle transitions in Xenopus laevis egg extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Wei; Moore, Jonathan; Chen, Katherine; Lassaletta, Antonio D.; Yi, Chung-Seon; Tyson, John J.; Sible, Jill C.

    2003-02-01

    Cells progressing through the cell cycle must commit irreversibly to mitosis without slipping back to interphase before properly segregating their chromosomes. A mathematical model of cell-cycle progression in cell-free egg extracts from frog predicts that irreversible transitions into and out of mitosis are driven by hysteresis in the molecular control system. Hysteresis refers to toggle-like switching behavior in a dynamical system. In the mathematical model, the toggle switch is created by positive feedback in the phosphorylation reactions controlling the activity of Cdc2, a protein kinase bound to its regulatory subunit, cyclin B. To determine whether hysteresis underlies entry into and exit from mitosis in cell-free egg extracts, we tested three predictions of the Novak-Tyson model. (i) The minimal concentration of cyclin B necessary to drive an interphase extract into mitosis is distinctly higher than the minimal concentration necessary to hold a mitotic extract in mitosis, evidence for hysteresis. (ii) Unreplicated DNA elevates the cyclin threshold for Cdc2 activation, indication that checkpoints operate by enlarging the hysteresis loop. (iii) A dramatic "slowing down" in the rate of Cdc2 activation is detected at concentrations of cyclin B marginally above the activation threshold. All three predictions were validated. These observations confirm hysteresis as the driving force for cell-cycle transitions into and out of mitosis.

  13. Dye-sensitized solar cells with natural dyes extracted from plant seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ghamri, Hatem S.; El-Agez, Taher M.; Taya, Sofyan A.; Abdel-Latif, Monzir S.; Batniji, Amal Y.

    2014-12-01

    The application of natural dyes extracted from plant seeds in the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) has been explored. Ten dyes were extracted from different plant seeds and used as sensitizers for DSSCs. The dyes were characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. DSSCs were prepared using TiO2 and ZnO nanostructured mesoporous films. The highest conversion efficiency of 0.875 % was obtained with an allium cepa (onion) extract-sensitized TiO2 solar cell. The process of TiO2-film sintering was studied and it was found that the sintering procedure significantly affects the response of the cell. The short circuit current of the DSSC was found to be considerably enhanced when the TiO2 semiconducting layer was sintered gradually.

  14. Anti-Proliferative and Apoptotic Effects of Methanolic Extracts from Different Cladonia Species on Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Z M; Ersoz, M; Acikgoz, B; Karalti, I; Cobanoglu, G; Sesal, C

    2015-01-01

    This study tries to elucidate the anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of methanolic lichen extracts from Cladonia rangiformis and Cladonia convolute in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Lichen extracts (0-2 mg/ml) were added to MCF-7 cells for 24 h. Cell viability was tested using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol- 2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cell proliferation was observed using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labelling and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) by immunocytochemistry. The TUNEL method was used for cell death detection. The effective dose (ED50) values of methanolic extracts from C. rangiformis and C. convolute were found to be 0.905 and 0.977 mg/ml, respectively. Treatment with C. rangiformis methanolic extract (0.2-0.8 mg/ml) dose-dependently inhibited proliferation of MCF-7 cells as detected by BrdU incorporation. The inhibition was started in 0.2 mg/ml concentration of C. convoluta methanolic extract. The percent of PCNA immunopositive cells showed a decrease in MCF-7 cells treated with two lichen extracts compared to control MCF-7. Both methanolic extracts showed a significant increase in percentage of apoptosis-positive cells. These results indicate that methanolic lichen extracts from C. rangiformis and C. convolute inhibited proliferation of MCF-7 cells and caused apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. The lichens may be novel natural agents for treating breast cancer disease. PMID:26213854

  15. Extracts of centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A375 human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weina; Liu, Rui; Qi, Junpeng; Zhang, Yanmin

    2014-07-01

    Extracts from the centipede Scolopendra genus, have been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of various diseases and have been found to exhibit anticancer activity in tumor cells. To investigate the potential and associated antitumor mechanism of alcohol extracts of the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans (AECS), cell viability, cell cycle and cell apoptosis were studied and the results revealed that AECS inhibits A375 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, AECS was found to arrest the cell cycle of A375 cells at the S phase, which was accompanied by a marked increase in the protein levels of cyclin E and a decrease in the protein levels of cyclin D1. In a cell culture system, AECS markedly induced the apoptosis of A375 cells, which was closely associated with the effects on the Bcl-2 family, whereby decreased Bcl-2 and increased Bak, Bax and Bad expression levels were observed. The underlying mechanism of AECS inhibiting A375 cell proliferation was associated with the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, indicating that AECS may present as a potential therapeutic agent for administration in human melanoma cancer intervention. PMID:24959287

  16. Pacific island 'Awa (Kava) extracts, but not isolated kavalactones, promote proinflammatory responses in model mast cells.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Lori M N; Park, Christy; Stokes, Alexander J; Gomes, Henry Halenani; Turner, Helen

    2012-12-01

    Kava ('Awa) is a traditional water-based beverage in Pacific island communities, prepared from the ground root and stems of Piper methysticum. Kava use is associated with an ichthyotic dermatitis and delayed type hypersensitivity reactions. In the current study we collated preparative methodologies from cultural practitioners and recreational kava users in various Pacific communities. We standardized culturally informed aqueous extraction methods and prepared extracts that were subjected to basic physicochemical analysis. Mast cells exposed to these extracts displayed robust intracellular free calcium responses, and concomitant release of proinflammatory mediators. In contrast, mast cells were refractory to single or combinatorial stimulation with kavalactones, including methysticin, dihydromethysticin and kavain. Moreover, we reproduced a traditional modification of the kava preparation methodology, pre-mixing with the mucilage of Hibiscus tiliaceus, and observed its potentiating effect on the activity of aqueous extracts in mast cells. Taken together, these data indicate that water extractable active ingredients may play a role in the physiological and pathophysiological effects of kava, and suggests that mast cell activation may be a mechanistic component of kava-related skin inflammations. PMID:22473598

  17. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N.; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of γ-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition. PMID:26419945

  18. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of γ-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition. PMID:26419945

  19. Activity Markers of the Anti-Breast Carcinoma Cell Growth Fractions of Vernonia amygdalina Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Oyugi, Daniel A.; Luo, Xuan; Lee, Ken S.; Hill, Brandon; Izevbigie, Ernest B.

    2010-01-01

    Vernonia amygdalina (VA) is an edible plant of the Asteraceae family used in many herbal formulations prescribed by herbalists for many diseases. We have previously reported that aqueous VA extracts inhibit the growth of estrogen receptor-positive human breast cancerous cells in vitro. Activity markers of the VA extracts have not been previously identified or characterized. Hence, the objective of this study was to identify activity markers of the VA extracts associated with cell growth inhibition. Extraction of VA with multiple solvents of various polarity indexes yielded three fractions (A1-2, B-3) that significantly inhibited cell growth (p <0.05) at 0.1 mg/ml concentration. At a higher concentration of 1 mg/ml, six fractions of hexane, chloroform, butanol, and ethyl acetate (A1-3, B2-4) inhibited DNA synthesis by 76, 98, 94, 98, 98, and 96% respectively. These fractions were UV-detected from 250–730 nm; and all showed three distinct peaks around 410, 431, and 664 nm. Furthermore, HPLC analysis of the fractions revealed similar retention times of 2.213, 2.167, and 2.151 min respectively. Bioactivity assays showed that HPLC retention of approximately 2 min is required for cell growth-inhibitory activity of VA fractions. Interestingly, all active fractions exhibited HPLC peaks at approximately 2 min. Therefore, the UV and HPLC peaks may be used as predictive tools to determine VA extracts activities. PMID:19176872

  20. Evaluation of antioxidant and cytoprotective activities of Artemisia ciniformis extracts on PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Mojarrab, Mahdi; Nasseri, Sajjad; Hosseinzadeh, Leila; Farahani, Farah

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): In the current study antioxidant capacities of five different extracts of Artemisia ciniformis aerial parts were evaluated by cell-free methods. Then seven fractions of the potent extract were selected and their antioxidant capacity was assayed by cell free and cell based methods. Materials and Methods: Antioxidant ability was measured using the: 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging test, β-carotene bleaching (BCB) method and ferrous ion chelating (FIC) assay. Total phenolic contents (TPC) of all the samples also were determined. The cytoprotective effect of fractions was evaluated by measuring the viability of cells after exposure to doxorubicin (DOX). The mechanism of action was studied by investigating caspase-3, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), the level of super-oxide dismutase (SOD) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Results: Hydroethanolic extract exhibited a notably higher antioxidant activity and phenolic content. Among the fractions (A to G) of hydroethanolic extract, the highest antioxidant capacity was observed in the Fraction E. Moreover, 24 hr pretreatment of PC12 cells with fractions B, C and D decreased DOX-induced cytotoxicity. In addition, pre-treatment of cells with fraction B resulted in significant decrease in generation of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increase in the activity of SOD. We were able to demonstrate remarkable reduction in the activity of caspase-3 and increase in MMP in PC12 cells following pretreatment with fraction B. Conclusion: Our observations indicated that the fraction B of A. ciniformis hydroetanolic extract possessed protective effect on oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by DOX in PC12 cells. PMID:27279988

  1. Molecular extraction in single live cells by sneaking in and out magnetic nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Deng, Liangzi; Lan, Yucheng; Zhang, Xiaoliu; Gao, Zhonghong; Chu, Ching-Wu; Cai, Dong; Ren, Zhifeng

    2014-01-01

    Extraction of intracellular molecules is crucial to the study of cellular signal pathways. Disruption of the cellular membrane remains the established method to release intracellular contents, which inevitably terminates the time course of biological processes. Also, conventional laboratory extractions mostly use bulky materials that ignore the heterogeneity of each cell. In this work, we developed magnetized carbon nanotubes that can be sneaked into and out of cell bodies under a magnetic force. Using a testing model with overexpression of GFP, the nanotubes successfully transported the intracellular GFP out at the single-cell level. The confined nanoscale invasiveness did not change cell viability or proliferation. This study presents the proof of concept of a previously unidentified real-time and single-cell approach to investigate cellular biology, signal messengers, and therapeutic effects with nanomaterials. PMID:25030447

  2. Effects of extracts of Salvadora persica on proliferation and viability of human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaei, Fahimeh sadat; Moezizadeh, Maryam; Javand, Fateme

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Efficacy of an ideal antimicrobial agent depends on its ability to eliminate microorganisms while causing minimal toxicity to host cells. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of ethanolic and water extracts of Salvadora persica (SP) on proliferation and viability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, the effects of seven concentrations of ethanolic and water extracts of SP (ranging from 5.75 mg/ml to 0.08 mg/ml) on hDPSCs were evaluated using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Water extract of SP only had cytotoxic effect at 5.75 mg/ml concentration; and caused significant cell proliferation at 1.43-0.08 mg/ml concentrations at 24 h (P < 0.05). At 48 h, only 0.17 and 0.08 mg/ml concentrations caused significant cell proliferation (P < 0.05). Ethanolic extract of SP at 5.75-1.43 mg/ml concentrations showed severe cytotoxic effects at 24 and 48 h. Other concentrations had no significant effects on cells (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The highest concentrations of both water and ethanolic extracts of SP had cytotoxic effects on hDPSCs. Water extract of SP has favorable effects on cell proliferation at specific concentrations in a time-dependent manner. PMID:26180418

  3. Inhibition of Hedgehog-Signaling Driven Genes in Prostate Cancer Cells by Sutherlandia frutescens Extract

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan; Starkey, Nicholas; Lei, Wei; Li, Jilong; Cheng, Jianlin; Folk, William R.; Lubahn, Dennis B.

    2015-01-01

    Sutherlandia frutescens (L) R. Br. (Sutherlandia) is a South African botanical that is traditionally used to treat a variety of health conditions, infections and diseases, including cancer. We hypothesized Sutherlandia might act through Gli/ Hedgehog (Hh)-signaling in prostate cancer cells and used RNA-Seq transcription profiling to profile gene expression in TRAMPC2 murine prostate cancer cells with or without Sutherlandia extracts. We found 50% of Hh-responsive genes can be repressed by Sutherlandia ethanol extract, including the canonical Hh-responsive genes Gli1 and Ptch1 as well as newly distinguished Hh-responsive genes Hsd11b1 and Penk. PMID:26710108

  4. High Performance PbS Quantum Dot/Graphene Hybrid Solar Cell with Efficient Charge Extraction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells are fabricated from multilayer stacks of lead sulfide (PbS) CQD and single layer graphene (SG). The inclusion of graphene interlayers is shown to increase power conversion efficiency by 9.18%. It is shown that the inclusion of conductive graphene enhances charge extraction in devices. Photoluminescence shows that graphene quenches emission from the quantum dot suggesting spontaneous charge transfer to graphene. CQD photodetectors exhibit increased photoresponse and improved transport properties. We propose that the CQD/SG hybrid structure is a route to make CQD thin films with improved charge extraction, therefore resulting in improved solar cell efficiency. PMID:27213219

  5. High Performance PbS Quantum Dot/Graphene Hybrid Solar Cell with Efficient Charge Extraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Sung; Neo, Darren C J; Hou, Bo; Park, Jong Bae; Cho, Yuljae; Zhang, Nanlin; Hong, John; Pak, Sangyeon; Lee, Sanghyo; Sohn, Jung Inn; Assender, Hazel E; Watt, Andrew A R; Cha, SeungNam; Kim, Jong Min

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells are fabricated from multilayer stacks of lead sulfide (PbS) CQD and single layer graphene (SG). The inclusion of graphene interlayers is shown to increase power conversion efficiency by 9.18%. It is shown that the inclusion of conductive graphene enhances charge extraction in devices. Photoluminescence shows that graphene quenches emission from the quantum dot suggesting spontaneous charge transfer to graphene. CQD photodetectors exhibit increased photoresponse and improved transport properties. We propose that the CQD/SG hybrid structure is a route to make CQD thin films with improved charge extraction, therefore resulting in improved solar cell efficiency. PMID:27213219

  6. Remodeling of ribosomal genes in somatic cells by Xenopus egg extract

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrup, Olga; Hyttel, Poul; Klaerke, Dan A.; Collas, Philippe

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} Xenopus egg extract remodels nuclei and alter cell growth characteristics. {yields} Ribosomal genes are reprogrammed within 6 h after extract exposure. {yields} rDNA reprogramming involves promoter targeting of SNF2H remodeling complex. {yields} Xenopus egg extract does not initiate stress-related response in somatic cells. {yields} Aza-cytidine elicits a stress-induced response in reprogrammed cells. -- Abstract: Extracts from Xenopus eggs can reprogram gene expression in somatic nuclei, however little is known about the earliest processes associated with the switch in the transcriptional program. We show here that an early reprogramming event is the remodeling of ribosomal chromatin and gene expression. This occurs within hours of extract treatment and is distinct from a stress response. Egg extract elicits remodeling of the nuclear envelope, chromatin and nucleolus. Nucleolar remodeling involves a rapid and stable decrease in ribosomal gene transcription, and promoter targeting of the nucleolar remodeling complex component SNF2H without affecting occupancy of the transcription factor UBF and the stress silencers SUV39H1 and SIRT1. During this process, nucleolar localization of UBF and SIRT1 is not altered. On contrary, azacytidine pre-treatment has an adverse effect on rDNA remodeling induced by extract and elicits a stress-type nuclear response. Thus, an early event of Xenopus egg extract-mediated nuclear reprogramming is the remodeling of ribosomal genes involving nucleolar remodeling complex. Condition-specific and rapid silencing of ribosomal genes may serve as a sensitive marker for evaluation of various reprogramming methods.

  7. Review Paper on Cell Membrane Electroporation of Microalgae using Electric Field Treatment Method for Microalgae Lipid Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joannes, C.; Sipaut, C. S.; Dayou, J.; Yasir, S. M.; Mansa, R. F.

    2015-04-01

    The paper reviews the recent studies on the lipid extraction of microalgae that mainly highlighted on the cell disruption method using variety of microalgae species. Selection of cell disruption method and devices are crucial in order to achieve the highest extraction percentage of lipid and other valuable intracellular (proteins, carotenoids and chlorophylls) from microalgae cell. Pulsed electric field (PEF) and electrochemical lysis methods were found to be potential for enhancing the extraction efficiencies either conducted in single step extraction or used as pre-treatment followed by conventional extraction method. The PEF technology capable to extract lipid as high as 75%. While, electrochemical lysis treatment capable to extract lipid approximately 93% using Stainless Steel (SS) and Ti/IrO2 as the cathode and anode electrode respectively. PEF technology and electrochemical lysis are still considered to be a new method for microalgae lipid extraction and further investigation can still be done for better improvement of the system.

  8. Induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human HCC MHCC97H cells with Chrysanthemum indicum extract

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zong-Fang; Wang, Zhi-Dong; Ji, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Shu; Huang, Chen; Li, Jun; Xia, Xian-Ming

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of Chrysanthemum indicum extract (CIE) on inhibition of proliferation and on apoptosis, and the underlying mechanisms, in a human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) MHCC97H cell line. METHODS: Viable rat hepatocytes and human endothelial ECV304 cells were examined by trypan blue exclusion and MTT assay, respectively, as normal controls. The proliferation of MHCC97H cells was determined by MTT assay. The cellular morphology of MHCC97H cells was observed by phase contrast microscopy. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze cell apoptosis with annexin V/propidium iodide (PI), mitochondrial membrane potential with rhodamine 123 and cell cycle with PI in MHCC97H cells. Apoptotic proteins such as cytochrome C, caspase-9, caspase-3 and cell cycle proteins, including P21 and CDK4, were measured by Western blotting. RESULTS: CIE inhibited proliferation of MHCC97H cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner without cytotoxicity in rat hepatocytes and human endothelial cells. CIE induced apoptosis of MHCC97H cells in a concentration-dependent manner, as determined by flow cytometry. The apoptosis was accompanied by a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome C and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. CIE arrested the cell cycle in the S phase by increasing P21 and decreasing CDK4 protein expression. CONCLUSION: CIE exerted a significant apoptotic effect through a mitochondrial pathway and arrested the cell cycle by regulation of cell cycle-related proteins in MHCC97H cells without an effect on normal cells. The cancer-specific selectivity shown in this study suggests that the plant extract could be a promising novel treatment for human cancer. PMID:19777612

  9. Aqueous extract of Costus arabicus inhibits calcium oxalate crystal growth and adhesion to renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    de Cógáin, Mitra R; Linnes, Michael P; Lee, Hyo Jung; Krambeck, Amy E; de Mendonça Uchôa, Julio Cezar; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lieske, John C

    2015-04-01

    Costus arabicus L. (C. arabicus) is a plant used in Brazilian folk medicine to treat urolithiasis; however, its mechanism of action is unclear. The interaction between calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals and the renal epithelium is important in calculogenesis, and compounds that modulate this process represent candidate therapeutic agents for stone prevention. Therefore, we assessed the inhibitory activity of C. arabicus on CaOx crystallization and the interaction of CaOx crystals with the renal epithelium. A seeded CaOx monohydrate (COM) crystallization system was used to study the effect of C. arabicus on crystal growth. Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were used to study [(14)C] COM crystal adhesion in the presence and absence of an aqueous extract of C. arabicus. Cytotoxicity was assessed using a tetrazolium (MTS) cell proliferation assay. Aqueous extracts of C. arabicus decreased crystal growth in a concentration-dependent fashion. Precoating crystals with C. arabicus extract prevented their adhesion to MDCK cells, while pretreating cells did not show any effect. The extract was non-cytotoxic in concentrations of at least 1 mg/ml, which is likely above concentrations achievable in the urine following oral ingestion and excretion. No inhibitory activity was found in hexane, methyl chloride, n-butanol and ethyl acetate fractions of an ethanol extract of the herb. An aqueous extract of C. arabicus may disrupt calculogenesis by interacting with CaOx crystal surfaces. Activity was present in the aqueous extract; therefore, this agent may be bioavailable when administered orally. Fractionation results suggest that the active agent might be a polar polysaccharide. Further identification and characterization along these lines may be warranted. PMID:25652357

  10. Cell nucleus targeting for living cell extraction of nucleic acid associated proteins with intracellular nanoprobes of magnetic carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Hu, Zhengyan; Qin, Hongqiang; Liu, Fangjie; Cheng, Kai; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2013-08-01

    Since nanoparticles could be ingested by cells naturally and target at a specific cellular location as designed, the extraction of intracellular proteins from living cells for large-scale analysis by nanoprobes seems to be ideally possible. Nucleic acid associated proteins (NAaP) take the crucial position during biological processes in maintaining and regulating gene structure and gene related behaviors, yet there are still challenges during the global investigation of intracellular NAaP, especially from living cells. In this work, a strategy to extract intracellular proteins from living cells with the magnetic carbon nanotube (oMWCNT@Fe3O4) as an intracellular probe is developed, to achieve the high throughput analysis of NAaP from living human hepatoma BEL-7402 cells with a mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach. Due to the specific intracellular localization of the magnetic carbon nanotubes around nuclei and its strong interaction with nucleic acids, the highly efficient extraction was realized for cellular NAaP from living cells, with the capability of identifying 2383 intracellular NAaP from only ca. 10,000 living cells. This method exhibited potential applications in dynamic and in situ analysis of intracellular proteins. PMID:23815738

  11. Cytochalasin-like activity in cultured aorta smooth muscle cells (ASMC) is increased in extracts of growing cells

    SciTech Connect

    Magargal, W.W.

    1987-05-01

    A cytochalasin-like protein, present in cultured chicken embryo fibroblasts, is increased in cells transformed by Rous sarcoma virus. They find similar activity present in ASMC. Confluent cultured porcine and rat, ASMC, were homogenized in Buffer A and centrifuged at 200,000g for 35 min. Resulting extracts reduced the low shear viscosity of F-actin. To determine whether the activity alters during the growth of non-transformed cells, cultured rat ASMC were plated at 2 x 10/sup 4/ cells/cm/sup 2/ in medium plus 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). After 3 days actively growing cells (by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation) were either scraped into phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or fed media plus 1% FBS. Three days later the fed cells were scraped into PBS (nongrowing, /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation). Cells in PBS were pelleted, homogenized in Buffer A, and centrifuged as above. Extracts from the growing and nongrowing cells reduced the low shear viscosity of actin. However, the ED/sub 50/ for growing cells was 8..mu..g and 15..mu..g for nongrowing cells. These results support those obtained with normal and transformed CEF's. This evidence indicates a relationship between cytochalasin-like activity and the growth state of cells in culture.

  12. Cytotoxic Activity of Piper cubeba Extract in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Graidist, Potchanapond; Martla, Mananya; Sukpondma, Yaowapa

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of a crude extract of Piper cubeba against normal and breast cancer cell lines. To prepare the extract, P. cubeba seeds were ground, soaked in methanol and dichloromethane and isolated by column chromatography. Fractions were tested for cytotoxicity effects on normal fibroblast (L929), normal breast (MCF-12A) and breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231). The most effective fraction was selected for DNA fragmentation assay to detect apoptotic activity. The results showed that the methanolic crude extract had a higher cytotoxic activity against MDA-MB-468 and MCF-7 than a dichloromethane crude extract. Then, the methanolic crude extract was separated into six fractions, designated A to F. Fraction C was highly active against breast cancer cell lines with an IC50 value less than 4 μg/mL. Therefore, Fraction C was further separated into seven fractions, CA to CG. The 1H-NMR profile showed that Fraction CE was long chain hydrocarbons. Moreover, Fraction CE demonstrated the highest activity against MCF-7 cells with an IC50 value of 2.69 ± 0.09 μg/mL and lower cytotoxicity against normal fibroblast L929 cells with an IC50 value of 4.17 ± 0.77 μg/mL. Finally, DNA fragmentation with a ladder pattern characteristic of apoptosis was observed in MCF-7, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-231 and L929 cells, but not in MCF-12A cells. PMID:25867951

  13. Cytotoxic activity of Piper cubeba extract in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Graidist, Potchanapond; Martla, Mananya; Sukpondma, Yaowapa

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of a crude extract of Piper cubeba against normal and breast cancer cell lines. To prepare the extract, P. cubeba seeds were ground, soaked in methanol and dichloromethane and isolated by column chromatography. Fractions were tested for cytotoxicity effects on normal fibroblast (L929), normal breast (MCF-12A) and breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231). The most effective fraction was selected for DNA fragmentation assay to detect apoptotic activity. The results showed that the methanolic crude extract had a higher cytotoxic activity against MDA-MB-468 and MCF-7 than a dichloromethane crude extract. Then, the methanolic crude extract was separated into six fractions, designated A to F. Fraction C was highly active against breast cancer cell lines with an IC50 value less than 4 μg/mL. Therefore, Fraction C was further separated into seven fractions, CA to CG. The 1H-NMR profile showed that Fraction CE was long chain hydrocarbons. Moreover, Fraction CE demonstrated the highest activity against MCF-7 cells with an IC50 value of 2.69 ± 0.09 μg/mL and lower cytotoxicity against normal fibroblast L929 cells with an IC50 value of 4.17 ± 0.77 μg/mL. Finally, DNA fragmentation with a ladder pattern characteristic of apoptosis was observed in MCF-7, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-231 and L929 cells, but not in MCF-12A cells. PMID:25867951

  14. Cytotoxic Activity of the Methanolic Extract of Turnera diffusa Willd on Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Avelino-Flores, María del Carmen; Cruz-López, María del Carmen; Jiménez-Montejo, Fabiola E.; Reyes-Leyva, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Turnera diffusa Willd, commonly known as Damiana, is employed in traditional medicine as a stimulant, aphrodisiac, and diuretic. Its leaves and stems are used for flavoring and infusion. Damiana is considered to be safe for medicinal use by the FDA. Pharmacological studies have established the hypoglycemic, antiaromatase, prosexual, estrogenic, antibacterial, and antioxidant activity of T. diffusa. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible cytotoxic effect of extracts and organic fractions of this plant on five tumor cell lines (SiHa, C-33, Hep G2, MDA-MB-231, and T-47D) and normal human fibroblasts. The results show that the methanolic extract (TdM) displayed greater activity on MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells (with an IC50 of 30.67 μg/mL) than on the other cancer cell lines. Four organic fractions of this extract exhibited activity on this cancer cell line. In the most active fraction (F4), two active compounds were isolated, arbutin (1) and apigenin (2). This is the first report of a cytotoxic effect by T. diffusa on cancer cells. The IC50 values suggest that the methanolic extract of T. diffusa has potential as an anticancer therapy. PMID:25299247

  15. On-chip Extraction of Intracellular Molecules in White Blood Cells from Whole Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jongchan; Hyun, Ji-Chul; Yang, Sung

    2015-10-01

    The extraction of virological markers in white blood cells (WBCs) from whole blood—without reagents, electricity, or instruments—is the most important first step for diagnostic testing of infectious diseases in resource-limited settings. Here we develop an integrated microfluidic chip that continuously separates WBCs from whole blood and mechanically ruptures them to extract intracellular proteins and nucleic acids for diagnostic purposes. The integrated chip is assembled with a device that separates WBCs by using differences in blood cell size and a mechanical cell lysis chip with ultra-sharp nanoblade arrays. We demonstrate the performance of the integrated device by quantitatively analyzing the levels of extracted intracellular proteins and genomic DNAs. Our results show that compared with a conventional method, the device yields 120% higher level of total protein amount and similar levels of gDNA (90.3%). To demonstrate its clinical application to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnostics, the developed chip was used to process blood samples containing HIV-infected cells. Based on PCR results, we demonstrate that the chip can extract HIV proviral DNAs from infected cells with a population as low as 102/μl. These findings suggest that the developed device has potential application in point-of-care testing for infectious diseases in developing countries.

  16. Cytotoxic activity of the methanolic extract of Turnera diffusa Willd on breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Avelino-Flores, María Del Carmen; Cruz-López, María del Carmen; Jiménez-Montejo, Fabiola E; Reyes-Leyva, Julio

    2015-03-01

    Turnera diffusa Willd, commonly known as Damiana, is employed in traditional medicine as a stimulant, aphrodisiac, and diuretic. Its leaves and stems are used for flavoring and infusion. Damiana is considered to be safe for medicinal use by the FDA. Pharmacological studies have established the hypoglycemic, antiaromatase, prosexual, estrogenic, antibacterial, and antioxidant activity of T. diffusa. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible cytotoxic effect of extracts and organic fractions of this plant on five tumor cell lines (SiHa, C-33, Hep G2, MDA-MB-231, and T-47D) and normal human fibroblasts. The results show that the methanolic extract (TdM) displayed greater activity on MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells (with an IC50 of 30.67 μg/mL) than on the other cancer cell lines. Four organic fractions of this extract exhibited activity on this cancer cell line. In the most active fraction (F4), two active compounds were isolated, arbutin (1) and apigenin (2). This is the first report of a cytotoxic effect by T. diffusa on cancer cells. The IC50 values suggest that the methanolic extract of T. diffusa has potential as an anticancer therapy. PMID:25299247

  17. Methanol and Butanol Extracts of Paeonia lutea Leaves Repress Metastasis of Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mukudai, Yoshiki; Zhang, Meilin; Shiogama, Sunao; Kondo, Seiji; Ito, Chihiro; Motohashi, Hiromi; Kato, Kosuke; Fujii, Miharu; Shintani, Satoru; Shigemori, Hideyuki; Yazawa, Kazunaga; Shirota, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is one of the most common cancers of the head and neck region worldwide and is generally treated surgically in combination with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. However, anticancer agents have numerous serious side effects, and alternative, less toxic agents that are effective as chemotherapeutics for SCC are required. The Paeoniaceae family is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine. We examined methanol and butanol extracts of Paeonia lutea (P. lutea) leaves for their potential as an anticancer agent. Both extracts decreased the proliferation of SCC cells, induced apoptotic cell death, and modulated migration, adhesion, chemotaxis, and haptotaxis in an extracellular matrix- (ECM-) dependent manner due to altered expression of several integrin subunits. Subsequently, SCC cells were subcutaneously transplanted into athymic nude mice; the extracts reduced the metastasis of SCC cells but had little effect on the volume of the primary tumor or survival or body weight of the mice. The results suggest that the extracts may hold promise for preventing cancer metastasis. PMID:27293462

  18. Antiproliferation and induction of apoptosis by Moringa oleifera leaf extract on human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sreelatha, S; Jeyachitra, A; Padma, P R

    2011-06-01

    Medicinal plants provide an inexhaustible source of anticancer drugs in terms of both variety and mechanism of action. Induction of apoptosis is the key success of plant products as anticancer agents. The present study was designed to determine the antiproliferative and apoptotic events of Moringa oleifera leaf extract (MLE) using human tumor (KB) cell line as a model system. KB cells were cultured in the presence of leaf extracts at various concentrations for 48 h and the percentage of cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay. MLE showed a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation of KB cells. The antiproliferative effect of MLE was also associated with induction of apoptosis as well as morphological changes and DNA fragmentation. The morphology of apoptotic nuclei was quantified using DAPI and propidium iodide staining. The degree of DNA fragmentation was analyzed using agarose gel electrophoresis. In addition, MLE at various concentrations was found to induce ROS production suggesting modulation of redox-sensitive mechanism. Eventually, HPTLC analysis indicated the presence of phenolics such as quercetin and kaempferol. Thus, these findings suggest that the leaf extracts from M. oleifera had strong antiproliferation and potent induction of apoptosis. Thus, it indicates that M. oleifera leaf extracts has potential for cancer chemoprevention and can be claimed as a therapeutic target for cancer. PMID:21385597

  19. On-chip Extraction of Intracellular Molecules in White Blood Cells from Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jongchan; Hyun, Ji-chul; Yang, Sung

    2015-01-01

    The extraction of virological markers in white blood cells (WBCs) from whole blood—without reagents, electricity, or instruments—is the most important first step for diagnostic testing of infectious diseases in resource-limited settings. Here we develop an integrated microfluidic chip that continuously separates WBCs from whole blood and mechanically ruptures them to extract intracellular proteins and nucleic acids for diagnostic purposes. The integrated chip is assembled with a device that separates WBCs by using differences in blood cell size and a mechanical cell lysis chip with ultra-sharp nanoblade arrays. We demonstrate the performance of the integrated device by quantitatively analyzing the levels of extracted intracellular proteins and genomic DNAs. Our results show that compared with a conventional method, the device yields 120% higher level of total protein amount and similar levels of gDNA (90.3%). To demonstrate its clinical application to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnostics, the developed chip was used to process blood samples containing HIV-infected cells. Based on PCR results, we demonstrate that the chip can extract HIV proviral DNAs from infected cells with a population as low as 102/μl. These findings suggest that the developed device has potential application in point-of-care testing for infectious diseases in developing countries. PMID:26464211

  20. Apoptotic potential role of Agave palmeri and Tulbaghia violacea extracts in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mthembu, Nonkululeko N; Motadi, Lesetja Raymond

    2014-09-01

    Cervical cancer, a gynaecological malignant disorder, is a common cause of death in females in Sub-Saharan Africa, striking nearly half a million of lives each year worldwide. Currently, more than 50 % of all modern drugs in clinical use are of natural products, many of which have an ability to control cancer cells (Madhuri and Pandey, Curr Sci 96:779-783, 2009; Richter, Traditional medicines and traditional healers in South Africa, 2003). In South Africa, plants used to treat cancer are rare even though majority of our population continue to put their trust in traditional medicine. In this study we aimed to screen Agave palmeri (AG) and Tulbaghia violacea (TV) for potential role in inducing cell death in cervical cancer cell lines HeLa and ME-180, and in normal human fibroblast cell line KMST-6 cell lines. To achieve this, AG and TV crude extracts were utilized to screen for apoptosis induction, inhibition of cell proliferation followed by elucidation of the role of Bax, Bcl-2, p53, Rb, RBBP and Mdm2 genes in cervical cancer. In brief, plant leaves and roots were collected, crushed and methanolic extracts obtained. Different concentrations of the stock extracts were used to treat cancer cells and measure cell death using the [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay and flow cytometry. Western blot was applied to measure gene expression at protein level using RBBP6, p53, Mdm2, Rb, Bax, Bcl-2 and β-actin mouse monoclonal primary antibodies (IgG) and goat anti mouse coupled with horseradish peroxidase secondary antibody from Santa Cruz Biotechnology and real time-PCR was used for mRNA expression level. Plant extracts of AG and TV were time (24 h) and dose (50, 100, 150 μg/ml) dependent in their induction of cell death with an IC50 ~ 150 μg/ml. A further mixed respond by several genes was observed following treatment with the two plant extracts where RBBP6 was seen to be spliced in cancer cells while Bax was induced and Bcl-2 was

  1. Study of apoptosis induced by cytostatics and vegetal extracts on human endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Bârzu, Simona Natalia; Bădulescu, Maria Mihaela; Lupu, Andreea Roxana; Cremer, Lidia; Szegli, G; Kerek, F; Călugăru, Ana

    2008-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the biological process by which new capillaries are formed from pre-existing vessels, is a tightly controlled and complex process involving several factors with both stimulating and inhibiting steps. In solid tumor growth, a specific clinical turning point is the transition to the vascular phase. Once it develops an intrinsic vascular network, a tumor grows indefinitely. Tumor angiogenesis depends mainly on the release by neoplasic cells of growth factors specific for endothelial cells (ECs), able to stimulate growth of the host blood vessels. The aim of this study was to analyze the apoptotic effect of some cytostatics, Vinblastine, Rapamycin and Doxorubicin, and vegetal extracts (called VOB) isolated and purified from Vitis sp., on human EA.hy926 endothelial cell line. In a proliferation assay using Crystal Violet, we demonstrated that Vinblastine and Rapamycin cytostatics have synergistic effect on endothelial cell line EA.hy926 growth inhibition. The inhibitory effects of Vinblastine and Doxorubicin were enhanced by VOB vegetal extracts. A combined treatment of cytostatics and VOB vegetal extracts resulted in a stronger antiproliferative effect of EA.hy926 endothelial cells. Results obtained regarding the apoptosis induced on EA.hy926 endothelial cells showed that each compound alone was able to induce a significant percent of apoptotic cells in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:19284159

  2. Primula auriculata Extracts Exert Cytotoxic and Apoptotic Effects against HT-29 Human Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Behzad, Sahar; Ebrahim, Karim; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud; Haeri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Primula auriculata (Tootia) is one of the most important local medicinal plants in Hamedan district, Iran. To investigate cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction of crude methanolic extract and different fraction of it, we compared several methods on HT-29 human colon Adenocarcinoma cells. Cancer cell proliferation was measured by 3-(4, 5‑dimethylthiazolyl)2, 5‑diphenyl‑tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and apoptosis induction was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy (acridin orange/ethidium bromide, annexin V/propidium iodide staining, TUNEL assay and Caspase-3 activity assay). Crude methanolic extract (CM) inhibited the growth of malignant cells in a dose-dependent manner. Among solvent fractions, the dichloromethane fraction (CF) was found to be the most toxic compared to other fractions. With double staining methods, high percentage of 40 µg/mL of (CM) and (CF) treated cells exhibited typical characteristics of apoptotic cells. Apoptosis induction was also revealed by apoptotic fragmentation of nuclear DNA and activation of caspas-3 in treated cells. These findings indicate that crude methanolic extract and dichloromethan fraction of P.auriculata induced apoptosis and inhibited proliferation in colon cancer cells and could be used as a source for new lead structures in drug design to combat colon cancer. PMID:27610172

  3. Primula auriculata Extracts Exert Cytotoxic and Apoptotic Effects against HT-29 Human Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Behzad, Sahar; Ebrahim, Karim; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud; Haeri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Primula auriculata (Tootia) is one of the most important local medicinal plants in Hamedan district, Iran. To investigate cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction of crude methanolic extract and different fraction of it, we compared several methods on HT-29 human colon Adenocarcinoma cells. Cancer cell proliferation was measured by 3-(4, 5‑dimethylthiazolyl)2, 5‑diphenyl‑tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and apoptosis induction was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy (acridin orange/ethidium bromide, annexin V/propidium iodide staining, TUNEL assay and Caspase-3 activity assay). Crude methanolic extract (CM) inhibited the growth of malignant cells in a dose-dependent manner. Among solvent fractions, the dichloromethane fraction (CF) was found to be the most toxic compared to other fractions. With double staining methods, high percentage of 40 µg/mL of (CM) and (CF) treated cells exhibited typical characteristics of apoptotic cells. Apoptosis induction was also revealed by apoptotic fragmentation of nuclear DNA and activation of caspas-3 in treated cells. These findings indicate that crude methanolic extract and dichloromethan fraction of P.auriculata induced apoptosis and inhibited proliferation in colon cancer cells and could be used as a source for new lead structures in drug design to combat colon cancer. PMID:27610172

  4. Wild chrysanthemum extract prevents UVB radiation-induced acute cell death and photoaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Sujiao; Jiang, Ping; Su, Weiting; Xiang, Yang; Li, Jian; Zeng, Lin; Yang, Shuangjuan

    2016-03-01

    Wild chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum indicum L.) is traditionally used in folk medicine as an anti-inflammatory agent. It is also used in the southwest plateau region of China to prevent ultraviolet-induced skin damage. However, the role and mechanism by which wild chrysanthemum prevents UV-induced skin damage and photoaging have never been investigated in vitro. In the present study, we found that aqueous extracts from wild chrysanthemum strongly reduced high-dose UVB-induced acute cell death of human immortalized keratinocytic HaCat cells. Wild chrysanthemum extract was also demonstrated to reduce low-dose UVB-induced expression of the photoaging-related matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9. The ROS level elevated by UVB irradiation was strongly attenuated by wild chrysanthemum extract. Further study revealed that wild chrysanthemum extract reduced UVB-triggered ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation and their protective role, which is partially dependent on inhibiting p38 activation. These results suggest that wild chrysanthemum extract can protect the skin from UVB-induced acute skin damage and photoaging by reducing the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and inhibiting p38 MAPK phosphorylation. The present study confirmed the protective role of wild chrysanthemum against UV-induced skin disorders in vitro and indicated the possible mechanism. Further study to identify the active components in wild chrysanthemum extract would be useful for developing new drugs for preventing and treating skin diseases, including skin cancer and photoaging, induced by UV irradiation. PMID:25052044

  5. The metabolism of glyoxylate by cell-free extracts of Pseudomonas sp

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, E.; Hullin, R. P.

    1966-01-01

    1. Extracts of Pseudomonas sp. grown on butane-2,3-diol oxidized glyoxylate to carbon dioxide, some of the glyoxylate being reduced to glycollate in the process. The oxidation of malate and isocitrate, but not the oxidation of pyruvate, can be coupled to the reduction of glyoxylate to glycollate by the extracts. 2. Extracts of cells grown on butane-2,3-diol decarboxylated oxaloacetate to pyruvate, which was then converted aerobically or anaerobically into lactate, acetyl-coenzyme A and carbon dioxide. The extracts could also convert pyruvate into alanine. However, pyruvate is not an intermediate in the metabolism of glyoxylate since no lactate or alanine could be detected in the reaction products and no labelled pyruvate could be obtained when extracts were incubated with [1-14C]glyoxylate. 3. The 14C was incorporated from [1-14C]glyoxylate by cell-free extracts into carbon dioxide, glycollate, glycine, glutamate and, in trace amounts, into malate, isocitrate and α-oxoglutarate. The 14C was initially incorporated into isocitrate at the same rate as into glycine. 4. The rate of glyoxylate utilization was increased by the addition of succinate, α-oxoglutarate or citrate, and in each case α-oxoglutarate became labelled. 5. The results are consistent with the suggestion that the carbon dioxide arises by the oxidation of glyoxylate via reactions catalysed respectively by isocitratase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and α-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. PMID:16742456

  6. Charge extraction from nanostructured hybrid organic-inorganic photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Chiatzun

    Conjugated polymers are attractive for use in photovoltaic (PV) cells because they are highly absorptive, their absorption spectrum can be tuned to match various regions of the solar spectrum and their solubility in common solvents enables the use of low-cost printing technique to mass produce PV panels. Photoexcitation of conjugated polymers forms excitons, which are bound electron-hole pairs. In order to convert these excitons into free carriers, the polymers have to be blended with an electron acceptor in close promixity of ˜10 nm. The charge transfer process at the donor-acceptor interface provides the necessary driving force to split excitons, while the close proximity guarantees excitons reaching an interface before decaying. Once the carriers are split, they have to be transported to their respective electrodes before recombining. Ordered nanostructured titania (TiO2) matrix infiltrated with conjugated polymers is a promising acceptor-donor system, which can potentially meet these requirements. In this work, several optimizations are shown to be essential for increasing the performance of TiO2/polymer cells. First, we measure the hole mobility of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) in a thin film diode in the space-charge limited regime. We show that the mobility increases with the polymer molecular weight and can be correlated to the film morphology. The anisotropy in P3HT chain packing suggests that its diode mobility of 10-4 cm 2/Vs can be further enhanced upon chain alignment in straight nanopores. Second, we investigate the use of molecular surface modification to control the interfacial energetics and charge transfer dynamics. By introducing dipoles at the TiO2/P3HT interface, the interfacial energy offset can be changed resulting in a concomitant change in the open circuit voltage. In addition, certain modifiers improve exciton harvesting by mediating charge transfer from the polymer to TiO2. We further show that the use of an amphiphilic molecule

  7. Methanolic Extract of Ganoderma lucidum Induces Autophagy of AGS Human Gastric Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Reis, Filipa S; Lima, Raquel T; Morales, Patricia; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Vasconcelos, M Helena

    2015-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is one of the most widely studied mushroom species, particularly in what concerns its medicinal properties. Previous studies (including those from some of us) have shown some evidence that the methanolic extract of G. lucidum affects cellular autophagy. However, it was not known if it induces autophagy or decreases the autophagic flux. The treatment of a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (AGS) with the mushroom extract increased the formation of autophagosomes (vacuoles typical from autophagy). Moreover, the cellular levels of LC3-II were also increased, and the cellular levels of p62 decreased, confirming that the extract affects cellular autophagy. Treating the cells with the extract together with lysossomal protease inhibitors, the cellular levels of LC3-II and p62 increased. The results obtained proved that, in AGS cells, the methanolic extract of G. lucidum causes an induction of autophagy, rather than a reduction in the autophagic flux. To our knowledge, this is the first study proving that statement. PMID:26426001

  8. Effects of Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.) A. Gray Extract on Adipocyte Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Giacomo, Claudia; Vanella, Luca; Sorrenti, Valeria; Santangelo, Rosa; Barbagallo, Ignazio; Calabrese, Giovanna; Genovese, Carlo; Mastrojeni, Silvana; Ragusa, Salvatore; Acquaviva, Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.) A. Gray (Asteraceae) is widely used in traditional medicine. There is increasing interest on the in vivo protective effects of natural compounds contained in plants against oxidative damage caused from reactive oxygen species. In the present study the total phenolic and flavonoid contents of aqueous, methanol and dichloromethane extracts of leaves of Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.) A. Gray were determined; furthermore, free radical scavenging capacity of each extract and the ability of these extracts to inhibit in vitro plasma lipid peroxidation were also evaluated. Since oxidative stress may be involved in trasformation of pre-adipocytes into adipocytes, to test the hypothesis that Tithonia extract may also affect adipocyte differentiation, human mesenchymal stem cell cultures were treated with Tithonia diversifolia aqueous extract and cell viability, free radical levels, Oil-Red O staining and western bolt analysis for heme oxygenase and 5'-adenosine monophoshate-activated protein kinase were carried out. Results obtained in the present study provide evidence that Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.) A. Gray exhibits interesting health promoting properties, resulting both from its free radical scavenger capacity and also by induction of protective cellular systems involved in cellular stress defenses and in adipogenesis of mesenchymal cells. PMID:25848759

  9. Effects of Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.) A. Gray extract on adipocyte differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Di Giacomo, Claudia; Vanella, Luca; Sorrenti, Valeria; Santangelo, Rosa; Barbagallo, Ignazio; Calabrese, Giovanna; Genovese, Carlo; Mastrojeni, Silvana; Ragusa, Salvatore; Acquaviva, Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.) A. Gray (Asteraceae) is widely used in traditional medicine. There is increasing interest on the in vivo protective effects of natural compounds contained in plants against oxidative damage caused from reactive oxygen species. In the present study the total phenolic and flavonoid contents of aqueous, methanol and dichloromethane extracts of leaves of Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.) A. Gray were determined; furthermore, free radical scavenging capacity of each extract and the ability of these extracts to inhibit in vitro plasma lipid peroxidation were also evaluated. Since oxidative stress may be involved in trasformation of pre-adipocytes into adipocytes, to test the hypothesis that Tithonia extract may also affect adipocyte differentiation, human mesenchymal stem cell cultures were treated with Tithonia diversifolia aqueous extract and cell viability, free radical levels, Oil-Red O staining and western bolt analysis for heme oxygenase and 5'-adenosine monophoshate-activated protein kinase were carried out. Results obtained in the present study provide evidence that Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.) A. Gray exhibits interesting health promoting properties, resulting both from its free radical scavenger capacity and also by induction of protective cellular systems involved in cellular stress defenses and in adipogenesis of mesenchymal cells. PMID:25848759

  10. Antitumor activity of ethanol extract from Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves towards human acute myeloid leukemia cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhamanbaeva, G T; Murzakhmetova, M K; Tuleukhanov, S T; Danilenko, M P

    2014-12-01

    We studied the effects of ethanol extract from Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves on the growth and differentiation of human acute myeloid leukemia cells (KG-1a, HL60, and U937). The extract of Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves inhibited cell growth depending on the cell strain and extract dose. In a high concentration (100 μg/ml), the extract also exhibited a cytotoxic effect on HL60 cells. Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves extract did not affect cell differentiation and did not modify the differentiating effect of calcitriol, active vitamin D metabolite. Inhibition of cell proliferation was paralleled by paradoxical accumulation of phase S cells (synthetic phase) with a reciprocal decrease in the count of G1 cells (presynthetic phase). The extract in a concentration of 100 μg/ml induced the appearance of cells with a subdiploid DNA content (sub-G1 phase cells), which indicated induction of apoptosis. The antiproliferative effect of Hippophae rhamnoides L. extract on acute myeloid leukemia cells was at least partially determined by activation of the S phase checkpoint, which probably led to deceleration of the cell cycle and apoptosis induction. PMID:25432283

  11. Sensitization of K562 Leukemia Cells to Doxorubicin by the Viscum album Extract.

    PubMed

    Srdic-Rajic, Tatjana; Tisma-Miletic, Nevena; Cavic, Milena; Kanjer, Ksenija; Savikin, Katarina; Galun, Danijel; Konic-Ristic, Aleksandra; Zoranovic, Tamara

    2016-03-01

    Toxicity of conventional chemotherapeutics highlights the requirement for complementary or alternative medicines that would reduce side effects and improve their anticancer effectiveness. European mistletoe (Viscum album) has long been used as a complementary and alternative medicine supporting cancer therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate synergistic antitumor action of V. album extract and doxorubicin during co-treatment of chemoresistant chronic myelogenic leukemia K562 cells. Combined treatment of leukemia cells led to inhibitory synergism at sub-apoptotic doxorubicin concentrations and multifold reduction of cytotoxic effects in healthy control cells. Prolonged co-treatment was associated with reduced G2/M accumulation and increased expression of early and late apoptotic markers. Our data indicate that V. album extract increases antileukemic effectiveness of doxorubicin against resistant K562 cells by preventing G2/M arrest and inducing apoptosis. PMID:26692465

  12. Callicarpa longissima extract, carnosol-rich, potently inhibits melanogenesis in B16F10 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yamahara, Minori; Sugimura, Koji; Kumagai, Ayako; Fuchino, Hiroyuki; Kuroi, Azusa; Kagawa, Mai; Itoh, Yumi; Kawahara, Hidehisa; Nagaoka, Yasuo; Iida, Osamu; Kawahara, Nobuo; Takemori, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hideto

    2016-01-01

    Cosmetic industries focus on developing materials and resources that regulate skin pigmentation. Melanin, the major pigment in human skin, protects the skin against damage from ultraviolet light. An ethanolic extract of the leaves of Callicarpa longissima inhibits melanin production in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells by suppressing microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) gene expression. Following purification and analysis using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), NMR, and biochemical assays, carnosol was determined to be responsible for the major inhibitory effect of the C. longissima extract on melanin production. Carnosol is an oxidative product of carnosic acid, whose presence in the extract was also confirmed by an authentic reference. The carnosol and carnosic acid content in the extract was approximately 16% (w/w). These results suggest that C. longissima is a novel, useful, and attractive source of skin-whitening agents. PMID:26267810

  13. Growth inhibitory effects of crude pomegranate peel extract on chronic myeloid leukemia, K562 cells

    PubMed Central

    Asmaa, Mat Jusoh Siti; Ali, Al-Jamal Hamid; Farid, Johan Muhammad; Azman, Seeni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pomegranate (Punica granatum) is currently a member of Lythraceae family which has potentially cytotoxic activities. Numerous studies have been done on cytotoxic components of pomegranate's juices, barks and leaves. The peels, which considered as a waste, contain higher antioxidant components compared with other parts of the plant. Aim: To investigate the potential anti-cancer activity of pomegranate peel on growth and cell death mechanisms of chronic myeloid leukemic (CML) cells, K562. Materials and Methods: Punica granatum peels extract (PGPE) was extracted by successive ethanol extraction, 80% (v/v), freeze dried, diluted to 20 mg/mL working concentration and was subjected to phytochemical screening. K562 cell was treated with crude PGPE for 72 h. Following IC50 concentration, the apoptosis, cell cycle and protein analysis were evaluated. Cell growth inhibition assay was performed by conventional trypan blue exclusion assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle were analyzed by flow-cytometry using BD apoptosis and cell cycle kits and protein analysis by western blotting. All the results are expressed as mean ± standard error of mean of three independent experiments. Statistical analysis was performed by nonparametric Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: Results demonstrated that PGPE promotes growth inhibition of K562 cells mainly via G2/M phase arrest while still conserving apoptosis induction, but at a lower rate. Apoptosis activities were proposed by the up-regulation of caspases and cytochrome c with an elevated level of p21 and p53. Conclusion: PGPE caused an inhibition in cell proliferation of CML cell mainly by cell cycle arrest. PMID:26097816

  14. Modulation of P-glycoprotein function and multidrug resistance in cancer cells by Thai plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Takano, M; Kakizoe, S; Kawami, M; Nagai, J; Patanasethnont, D; Sripanidkulchai, B; Yumoto, R

    2014-11-01

    The effects of ethanol extracts from Thai plants belonging to the families of Annonaceae, Rutaceae, and Zingiberaceae on P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function and multidrug resistance were examined in paclitaxel-resistant HepG2 (PR-HepG2) cells. All the extracts tested, significantly increased the accumulation of [3H]paclitaxel, a P-gp substrate, in the cells. Among nine extracts, Z01 and Z02, extracts from Curcuma comosa and Kaempferia marginata (Zingiberaceae family), respectively, potently increased the accumulation. In addition, Z01 and Z02 increased the accumulation of other P-gp substrates, rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin, in PR-HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Increased accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin by Z01 and Z02 was also confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The effect of Z01 and Z02 pretreatment on the expression of MDR1 mRNA was also examined. The expression of MDR1 mRNA was not affected by the treatment of PR-HepG2 cells with these extracts for 48 hours. Cytotoxicity of paclitaxel was examined by XTT and protein assays in the absence and presence of Z02. Z02 potentiated the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in PR-HepG2 cells. These results suggest that Curcuma comosa and Kaempferia marginata belonging to Zingiberaceae are useful sources to search for new P-gp modulator(s) that can be used to overcome multidrug resistance of cancer cells. PMID:25985578

  15. Herbal Extracts Induce Dermal Papilla Cell Proliferation of Human Hair Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Rastegar, Hosein; Aghaei, Mahmoud; Barikbin, Behrooz; Ehsani, Amirohushang

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of people suffering from balding or hair thinning is increasing, despite the advances in various medical therapies. Therefore, it is highly important to develop new therapies to inhibit balding and increase hair proliferation. Objective We investigated the effects of herbal extracts commonly used for improving balding in traditional medicine to identify potential agents for hair proliferation. Methods The expression levels of 5α-reductase isoforms (type I and II) were analyzed using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in the human follicular dermal papilla cells (DPCs). The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenylteterazolium bromide and bromodeoxyuridine tests were used to evaluate the cell proliferation effect of herbal extracts in DPCs. The expression levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), Akt, cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4), B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) were measured using western blot analysis. Results The 5α-reductase isoform mRNAs and proteins were detected in the cultured DPCs, and the expression level of 5α-R2 in DPCs in the presence of the herbal extracts was gradually decreased. Herbal extracts were found to significantly increase the proliferation of human DPCs at concentrations ranging from 1.5% to 4.5%. These results show that the herbal extracts tested affected the protein expressions of ERK, Akt, cyclin D1, Cdk4, Bcl-2, and Bax in DPCs. Conclusion These results suggest that herbal extracts exert positive effects on hair proliferation via ERK, Akt, cyclin D1, and Cdk4 signaling in DPCs; they also suggest that herbal extracts could be a great alternative therapy for increasing hair proliferation. PMID:26719634

  16. Antiproliferatory Effects of Crab Shell Extract on Breast Cancer Cell Line (MCF7)

    PubMed Central

    Rezakhani, Leila; Rashidi, Zahra; Mirzapur, Pegah

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women. Despite various pharmacological developments, the identification of new therapies is still required for treating breast cancer. Crab is often recommended as a traditional medicine for cancer. This study aimed to determine the in vitro effect of a hydroalcoholic crab shell extract on a breast cancer cell line. Methods In this experimental study, MCF7 breast cancer cell line was used. Crab shell was powdered and a hydroalcoholic (70° ethanol) extract was prepared. Five concentrations (100, 200, 400, 800, and 1,000 µg/mL) were added to the cells for three periods, 24, 48, and 72 hours. The viability of the cells were evaluated using trypan blue and 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays. Cell apoptosis was determined using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling method. Nitric oxide (NO) level was assessed using the Griess method. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance, and p<0.05 was considered significant. Results Cell viability decreased depending on dose and time, and was significantly different in the groups that were treated with 400, 800, and 1,000 µg/mL doses compared to that in the control group (p<0.001). Increasing the dose significantly increased apoptosis (p<0.001). NO secretion from MCF7 cells significantly decreased in response to different concentrations of the extract in a dose- and time-dependent manner (p<0.050). Conclusion The crab shell extract inhibited the proliferation of MCF7 cells by increasing apoptosis and decreasing NO production. PMID:25320619

  17. Quantitative cell lysis of indigenous microorganisms and rapid extraction of microbial DNA from sediment.

    PubMed Central

    Moré, M I; Herrick, J B; Silva, M C; Ghiorse, W C; Madsen, E L

    1994-01-01

    This study reports improvements in two of the key steps, lysis of indigenous cells and DNA purification, required for achieving a rapid nonselective protocol for extracting nucleic acids directly from sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-treated sediment rich in organic matter. Incorporation of bead-mill homogenization into the DNA extraction procedure doubled the densitometrically determined DNA yield (11.8 micrograms of DNA.g [dry weight] of sediment-1) relative to incorporation of three cycles of freezing and thawing (5.2 micrograms of DNA.g [dry weight] of sediment-1). The improved DNA extraction efficiency was attributed to increased cell lysis, measured by viable counts of sediment microorganisms which showed that 2 and 8%, respectively, survived the bead-mill homogenization and freeze-thaw procedures. Corresponding measurements of suspensions of viable Bacillus endospores demonstrated that 2 and 94% of the initial number survived. Conventional, laser scanning epifluorescence phase-contrast, and differential interference-contrast microscopy revealed that small coccoid bacterial cells (1.2 to 0.3 micron long) were left intact after combined SDS and bead-mill homogenization of sediment samples. Estimates of the residual fraction of the fluorescently stained cell numbers indicated that 6% (2.2 x 10(8) cells.g [dry weight] of sediment-1) of the original population (3.8 x 10(9) cells.g [dry weight] of sediment-1) remained after treatment with SDS and bead-mill homogenization. Thus, lysis of total cells was less efficient than that of cells which could be cultured. The extracted DNA was used to successfully amplify nahR, the regulatory gene for naphthalene catabolism in Pseudomonas putida G7, by PCR.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8017936

  18. Nitrogenase activity in cell-free extracts of the blue-green alga, Anabaena cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Smith, R V; Evans, M C

    1971-03-01

    Cell-free extracts with high nitrogenase activity were prepared by sonic oscillation and French press treatment from the blue-gree alga Anabaena cylindrica. Extracts were prepared from cells grown on a 95% N(2)-5% CO(2) gas mixture followed by a period of nitrogen starvation under an atmosphere of 95% argon-5% CO(2). No increase in the specific activity of extracts was achieved by breaking heterocysts. Activity (assayed by acetylene reduction) was found to be dependent on adenosine triphosphate (ATP), an ATP-generating system, and a low-potential reductant. Na(2)S(2)O(2) employed as reductant supports higher rates of nitrogenase activity than reduced ferredoxin. The activity is associated with a small-particle fraction that can be sedimented by ultracentrifugation. In contrast to the particulate nitrogenase of Azotobacter, which is stable in air, the A. cylindrica nitrogenase is an oxygen sensitive as nitrogenase prepared from anaerobic bacteria. PMID:4994040

  19. In vitro anticancer activity of extracts of Mentha Spp. against human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Hussain, Shabir; Gupta, Moni; Saxena, Ajit Kumar

    2014-10-01

    In vitro anticancer potential of methanolic and aqueous extracts of whole plants of Mentha arvensis, M. longifolia, M. spicata and M. viridis at concentration of 100 μg/ml was evaluated against eight human cancer cell lines--A-549, COLO-205, HCT-116, MCF-7, NCI-H322, PC-3, THP-1 and U-87MG from six different origins (breast, colon, glioblastoma, lung, leukemia and prostate) using sulphorhodamine blue (SRB) assay. Methanolic extracts of above-mentioned Mentha Spp. displayed anti-proliferative effect in the range of 70-97% against four human cancer cell lines, namely COLO-205, MCF-7, NCI-H322 and THP-1; however, aqueous extracts were found to be active against HCT-116 and PC-3. The results indicate that Mentha Spp. contain certain constituents with cytotoxic properties which may find use in developing anticancer agents. PMID:25630112

  20. Endothelial cell cytotoxicity of cotton bracts tannin and aqueous cotton bracts extract

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.M.; Hanson, M.N.; Rohrbach, M.S.

    1986-04-01

    Using an in vitro cytotoxicity assay based on the release of /sup 51/Cr from cultured porcine thoracic aortic and pulmonary arterial endothelial cells, we have demonstrated that cotton bracts tannin is a potent endothelial cell cytotoxin. It produces dose-dependent lethal injury to both types of endothelial cells with the aortic cells, being somewhat more sensitive to tannin-mediated injury than the pulmonary arterial cells. Cytotoxic injury to the cells was biphasic. During the first 3 hr of exposure to tannin, no lethal injury was detected. However, during this period, profound changes in morphology were observed suggesting sublethal injury to the cells preceded the ultimate toxic damage. Comparison of the cytotoxicity dose curves for aqueous bracts extracts with those for tannin demonstrated that tannin was major cytotoxin present in bracts.

  1. Effect of Rumex Aquaticus Herba Extract Against Helicobacter pylori-Induced Inflammation in Gastric Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Jeong Hoon; Khin, Phyu Phyu; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the characteristics of Helicobacter pylori and the effect of Rumex Aquaticus Herba extract on the expression of cytokines in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. Cultured human adenocarcinoma gastric cells (AGS) were infected by H. pylori in RPMI 1640 media. Cell growth was measured by trypan blue assay. Western blot analysis was performed to investigate effect of extract containing Quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucuronopyranoside (ECQ) on the expression of inflammatory factors and the inhibition on cell growth. Furthermore, we compared the inhibitory effects with various combinations of clarithromycin, amoxicillin, omeprazole, and ECQ. The urease test with Christensen's Urea Agar was performed to identify the urease activity of H. pylori and the effect ECQ has on urease activity. When the cells were exposed to H. pylori, the trypan blue assay revealed a decrease in the rate of cell growth. Western blot analysis showed that H. pylori-infected cells had increased levels of degraded IκB-α and inflammatory factors. Pretreatment with ECQ inhibited interleukin expression induced by H. pylori in a dose-dependent manner. A combination of ECQ and antibiotics inhibited cytokine expression more effectively than other treatments. H. pylori displayed significant urease activity. ECQ did not significantly inhibit urease activity. These data suggest that H. pylori infection has cytotoxic effects against AGS cells, and ECQ may inhibit the production of proinflammatory cytokines in H. pylori-infected AGS cells. PMID:26580421

  2. Use of Non-Conventional Cell Disruption Method for Extraction of Proteins from Black Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Čolnik, Maja; Primožič, Mateja; Knez, Željko; Leitgeb, Maja

    2016-01-01

    The influence of pressure and treatment time on cells disruption of different black yeasts and on activities of extracted proteins using supercritical carbon dioxide process was studied. The cells of three different black yeasts Phaeotheca triangularis, Trimatostroma salinum, and Wallemia ichthyophaga were exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2) by varying pressure at fixed temperature (35°C). The black yeasts cell walls were disrupted, and the content of the cells was spilled into the liquid medium. The impact of SC CO2 conditions on secretion of enzymes and proteins from black yeast cells suspension was studied. The residual activity of the enzymes cellulase, β-glucosidase, α-amylase, and protease was studied by enzymatic assay. The viability of black yeast cells was determined by measuring the optical density of the cell suspension at 600 nm. The total protein concentration in the suspension was determined on UV-Vis spectrophotometer at 595 nm. The release of intracellular and extracellular products from black yeast cells was achieved. Also, the observation by an environmental scanning electron microscopy shows major morphological changes with SC CO2-treated cells. The advantages of the proposed method are in a simple use, which is also possible for heat-sensitive materials on one hand and on the other hand integration of the extraction of enzymes and their use in biocatalytical reactions. PMID:27148527

  3. Caspase dependent apoptotic inhibition of melanoma and lung cancer cells by tropical Rubus extracts.

    PubMed

    George, Blassan Plackal Adimuriyil; Abrahamse, Heidi; Hemmaragala, Nanjundaswamy M

    2016-05-01

    Rubus fairholmianus Gard. inhibits human melanoma (A375) and lung cancer (A549) cell growth by the caspase dependent apoptotic pathway. Herbal products have a long history of clinical use and acceptance. They are freely available natural compounds that can be safely used to prevent various ailments. The plants and plant derived products became the basis of traditional medicine system throughout the world for thousands of years. The effects of R. fairholmianus root acetone extract (RFRA) on the proliferation of A375 and A549 cells was examined in this study. RFRA led to a decrease in cell viability, proliferation and an increase in cytotoxicity in a dose dependent manner when compared with control and normal skin fibroblast cells (WS1). The morphology of treated cells supported apoptotic cell death. Annexin V/propidium iodide staining indicated that RFRA induced apoptosis in A375 and A549 cells and the percentages of early and late apoptotic populations significantly increased. Moreover, the apoptotic inducing ability of RFRA when analysing effector caspase 3/7 activity, indicated a marked increase in treated cells. In summary, we have shown the anticancer effects of RFRA in A375 and A549 cancer cells via induction of caspase dependent apoptosis in vitro. The extract is more effective against melanoma; which may suggest the usefulness of RFRA-based anticancer therapies. PMID:27133056

  4. Use of Non-Conventional Cell Disruption Method for Extraction of Proteins from Black Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Čolnik, Maja; Primožič, Mateja; Knez, Željko; Leitgeb, Maja

    2016-01-01

    The influence of pressure and treatment time on cells disruption of different black yeasts and on activities of extracted proteins using supercritical carbon dioxide process was studied. The cells of three different black yeasts Phaeotheca triangularis, Trimatostroma salinum, and Wallemia ichthyophaga were exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2) by varying pressure at fixed temperature (35°C). The black yeasts cell walls were disrupted, and the content of the cells was spilled into the liquid medium. The impact of SC CO2 conditions on secretion of enzymes and proteins from black yeast cells suspension was studied. The residual activity of the enzymes cellulase, β-glucosidase, α-amylase, and protease was studied by enzymatic assay. The viability of black yeast cells was determined by measuring the optical density of the cell suspension at 600 nm. The total protein concentration in the suspension was determined on UV–Vis spectrophotometer at 595 nm. The release of intracellular and extracellular products from black yeast cells was achieved. Also, the observation by an environmental scanning electron microscopy shows major morphological changes with SC CO2-treated cells. The advantages of the proposed method are in a simple use, which is also possible for heat-sensitive materials on one hand and on the other hand integration of the extraction of enzymes and their use in biocatalytical reactions. PMID:27148527

  5. Antiproliferative activity of chloroformic extract of Persian Shallot, Allium hirtifolium, on tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ghodrati Azadi, Hamideh; Ghaffari, Seyed Mahmood; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Ahmadian, Shahin; Vahedi, Fatemeh

    2008-03-01

    Allium hirtifolim (Persian Shallot) belongs to Allium genus (Alliaceae family). We investigated the in vitro effects of chloroformic extract of A. hirtifolium and its Allicin on the proliferation of HeLa (cervical cancer), MCF7 (human, caucasion, breast, adenocarcinoma) and L929 (mouse, C3H/An, connective) cell lines. Our results showed that components of A. hirtifolium might inhibit proliferation of tumor cell lines. This inhibition in HeLa and MCF-7 cells was dose-dependent. The presence of Allicin was evaluated by TLC method in bulbs and the extract of A. hirtifolium was analyzed by HPLC. MTT test was performed 24, 48 and 72 h after cell culture. A significant decrease in cell lines was observed in HeLa and MCF-7 as compared to L929 cell lines. DNA fragmentation analysis revealed a large number of apoptotic cells in treated HeLa and MCF-7 cell groups, but no effects in L929 cells. Therefore A. hirtifolium might be a candidate for tumor suppression. PMID:19002856

  6. EFFECT OF A FAT BODY EXTRACT ON LARVAL MIDGUT CELLS AND GROWTH OF LEPIDOPTERA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An extract of fat body (FBX) prepared from green fat body tissue from newly ecdysed pupae of Manduca sexta must be added to cultures with a very low (1 pg/ l) titer of insect molting hormone (20-hydroxyecdysone, 20E) in order to induce midgut stem cells to multiply in vitro. However, FBX fed or...

  7. Anti-Proliferative Effect of Rosmarinus officinalis L. Extract on Human Melanoma A375 Cells.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Lucia; Cicconi, Rosella; Mignogna, Giuseppina; Giorgi, Alessandra; Mattei, Maurizio; Graziani, Giulia; Ferracane, Rosalia; Grosso, Alessandro; Aducci, Patrizia; Schininà, M Eugenia; Marra, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) has been used since ancient times in traditional medicine, while nowadays various rosemary formulations are increasingly exploited by alternative medicine to cure or prevent a wide range of health disorders. Rosemary's bioproperties have prompted scientific investigation, which allowed us to ascertain antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cytostatic, and cytotoxic activities of crude extracts or of pure components. Although there is a growing body of experimental work, information about rosemary's anticancer properties, such as chemoprotective or anti-proliferative effects on cancer cells, is very poor, especially concerning the mechanism of action. Melanoma is a skin tumor whose diffusion is rapidly increasing in the world and whose malignancy is reinforced by its high resistance to cytotoxic agents; hence the availability of new cytotoxic drugs would be very helpful to improve melanoma prognosis. Here we report on the effect of a rosemary hydroalcoholic extract on the viability of the human melanoma A375 cell line. Main components of rosemary extract were identified by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) and the effect of the crude extract or of pure components on the proliferation of cancer cells was tested by MTT and Trypan blue assays. The effect on cell cycle was investigated by using flow cytometry, and the alteration of the cellular redox state was evaluated by intracellular ROS levels and protein carbonylation analysis. Furthermore, in order to get information about the molecular mechanisms of cytotoxicity, a comparative proteomic investigation was performed. PMID:26176704

  8. Anti-Proliferative Effect of Rosmarinus officinalis L. Extract on Human Melanoma A375 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, Lucia; Cicconi, Rosella; Mignogna, Giuseppina; Giorgi, Alessandra; Mattei, Maurizio; Graziani, Giulia; Ferracane, Rosalia; Grosso, Alessandro; Aducci, Patrizia; Schininà, M. Eugenia; Marra, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) has been used since ancient times in traditional medicine, while nowadays various rosemary formulations are increasingly exploited by alternative medicine to cure or prevent a wide range of health disorders. Rosemary’s bioproperties have prompted scientific investigation, which allowed us to ascertain antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cytostatic, and cytotoxic activities of crude extracts or of pure components. Although there is a growing body of experimental work, information about rosemary’s anticancer properties, such as chemoprotective or anti-proliferative effects on cancer cells, is very poor, especially concerning the mechanism of action. Melanoma is a skin tumor whose diffusion is rapidly increasing in the world and whose malignancy is reinforced by its high resistance to cytotoxic agents; hence the availability of new cytotoxic drugs would be very helpful to improve melanoma prognosis. Here we report on the effect of a rosemary hydroalcoholic extract on the viability of the human melanoma A375 cell line. Main components of rosemary extract were identified by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) and the effect of the crude extract or of pure components on the proliferation of cancer cells was tested by MTT and Trypan blue assays. The effect on cell cycle was investigated by using flow cytometry, and the alteration of the cellular redox state was evaluated by intracellular ROS levels and protein carbonylation analysis. Furthermore, in order to get information about the molecular mechanisms of cytotoxicity, a comparative proteomic investigation was performed. PMID:26176704

  9. Extracts from presumed "reduced harm" cigarettes induce equivalent or greater toxicity in antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Vassallo, Robert; Wang, Lei; Hirano, Yoshimi; Walters, Paula; Grill, Diane

    2015-09-01

    The tobacco industry has promoted certain cigarette products with claims that their use may be less harmful to the smoker as they purportedly deliver lower amounts of toxic chemicals compared to conventional cigarettes. This study was designed to compare the relative antigen presenting cellular toxicity of Eclipse, a presumed reduced exposure product (PREP) cigarette, when compared with the reference research 3R4F cigarettes (Kentucky University). Utilizing a murine macrophage cell line, murine bone marrow derived dendritic cells (DCs) and human monocyte-derived DCs incubated with extracts generated from Eclipse and Kentucky reference 3R4F cigarettes, we determined the relative toxic effects of the different cigarette smoke extracts on cellular viability, oxidative stress, T-helper-1 (Th-1) polarizing cytokine production and general gene expression. Eclipse and 3R4F cigarette smoke extracts induced equivalent oxidatively-mediated cellular heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein levels in macrophages and DCs. Cellular viability determination demonstrated greater induction of cell death by apoptosis and necrosis by Eclipse extracts in DCs. The production of the key Th-1 polarizing cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12) by activated DCs or macrophages was suppressed to an equivalent or greater extent by Eclipse extracts. Microarray studies performed on bone marrow derived murine DCs incubated with Eclispe or 3R4F cigarette extracts showed identical genotoxic profiles. These studies imply that presumed reduced harm Eclipse cigarettes induce equivalent or greater antigen presenting cell dysfunction relative to 3R4F cigarettes and illustrate the importance of independent validation and testing of similar products claimed to be associated with reduced toxicity relative to other cigarettes. PMID:26169828

  10. Cytotoxic activity of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) seed extract and oil against human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yu Hua; Tan, Wai Yan; Tan, Chin Ping; Long, Kamariah; Nyam, Kar Lin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the cytotoxic properties of both the kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) seed extract and kenaf seed oil on human cervical cancer, human breast cancer, human colon cancer and human lung cancer cell lines. Methods The in vitro cytotoxic activity of the kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) seed extract and kenaf seed oil on human cancer cell lines was evaluated by using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and sulforhodamine B assays. Cell morphological changes were observed by using an inverted light microscope. Results The kenaf seed extract (KSE) exhibited a lower IC50 than kenaf seed oil (KSO) in all of the cancer cell lines. Morphological alterations in the cell lines after KSE and KSO treatment were observed. KSE and KSO possessed effective cytotoxic activities against all the cell lines been selected. Conclusions KSE and KSO could be potential sources of natural anti-cancer agents. Further investigations on using kenaf seeds for anti-proliferative properties are warranted. PMID:25183141