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  1. Improved innate immune responses by Frondanol A5, a sea cucumber extract, prevent intestinal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Janakiram, Naveena B; Mohammed, Altaf; Bryant, Taylor; Lightfoot, Stan; Collin, Peter D; Steele, Vernon E; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2015-04-01

    Sea cucumbers are a source of antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer compounds. We show that sea cucumber extract Frondanol A5 is capable of enhancing innate immune responses and inhibiting intestinal tumors in APC(Min/+) mice. APC(Min/+) mice were fed semi-purified diets containing 0, 250, or 500 ppm FrondanolA5 for 14 weeks before we assessed intestinal tumor inhibition. Dietary Frondanol A5 suppressed small intestinal polyp sizes and formation up to 30% (P < 0.02) in males and up to 50% (P < 0.01) in females. Importantly, 250 and 500 ppm Frondanol A5 diet suppressed colon tumor multiplicities by 65% (P < 0.007) and 75% (P < 0.0001), compared with untreated male APC(Min/+) mice. In female APC(Min/+) mice, both dose levels of Frondanol A5 suppressed colon tumor multiplicities up to 80% (P < 0.0001). Isolated peritoneal macrophages from treated mice showed increased phagocytosis efficiency (control 24% vs. treated 50%; P < 0.01) and an increase in GILT mRNA expression, indicating increased innate immune responses by these cells in treated animals. Similarly, we observed an increase in GILT expression in treated tumors, compared with untreated tumors. Furthermore, an increase in G-CSF cytokine, a decrease in inflammatory cytokines and marker 5-LOX, its regulator FLAP, proliferation (PCNA), and angiogenesis (VEGF) markers were observed in treatment groups. These data suggest that Frondanol A5 decreased inflammatory angiogenic molecules and increased GILT expression and macrophage phagocytosis. These decreases may have improved the innate immune systems of the treated mice, thus aiding in inhibition of intestinal tumor formation. These results suggest that Frondanol A5 exhibits significant chemopreventive potential against intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:25657017

  2. Psidium guajava leaf extract prevents intestinal colonization of Citrobacter rodentium in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pooja; Birdi, Tannaz

    2015-01-01

    Diarrheal diseases are the second highest cause of mortality of children under 5 years worldwide. There is a continuous search for developing a cost-effective treatment for diarrhea as the present ones are facing challenges. Medicinal plants can be explored further as an alternative treatment for diarrhea. Psidium guajava leaves have been used as an antidiarrheal globally. Citrobacter rodentium, a common mouse pathogen, is known to mimic the pathogenecity of enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic E. coli. It can thus present an effective model to study infectious diarrhea. In the present study, the P. guajava leaf extract was tested for its efficacy in treating infectious diarrhea using a C. rodentium mouse model. The mice in the test group (treated with P. guajava leaf extract) showed quicker clearance of infection as compared with the control group. The bacterial load in the fecal sample of the mice in the test group was high on Day 4 as compared with that in the control group, suggesting a flush out of the bacteria. In the test group, 6/7 (85.71%) mice showed clearance of infection by Day 19. The control group continued to show infection till Day 29. P. guajava leaf extract thus has the potential for use in the treatment of infectious diarrhea. PMID:25878465

  3. Improved innate immune responses by Frondanol® A5, a sea cucumber extract, prevent intestinal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Janakiram, Naveena B.; Mohammed, Altaf; Bryant, Taylor; Lightfoot, Stan; Collin, Peter D.; Steele, Vernon E.; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2015-01-01

    Sea cucumbers are a source of anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer compounds. We show that sea cucumber extract Frondanol® A5 is capable of enhancing innate immune responses and inhibiting intestinal tumors in APCMin/+ mice. APCMin/+ mice were fed semi-purified diets containing 0, 250, or 500 ppm Frondanol®A5 for 14 weeks before we assessed intestinal tumor inhibition. Dietary Frondanol® A5 suppressed small intestinal polyp sizes and formation up to 30% (p<0.02) in males and up to 50% (p<0.01) in females. Importantly, 250 and 500 ppm Frondanol® A5 diet suppressed colon tumor multiplicities by 65% (p<0.007) and 75% (p<0.0001), compared with untreated male APCMin/+ mice. In female APCMin/+ mice, both dose levels of Frondanol® A5 suppressed colon tumor multiplicities up to 80% (p<0.0001). Isolated peritoneal macrophages from treated mice showed increased phagocytosis efficiency (Control 24% Vs treated 50%; p<0.01) and an increase in GILT mRNA expression, indicating increased innate immune responses by these cells in treated animals. Similarly, we observed an increase in GILT expression in treated tumors, compared with untreated tumors. Furthermore, an increase in GCSF cytokine, a decrease in inflammatory cytokines and marker 5-LOX, its regulator FLAP, proliferation (PCNA), and angiogenesis (VEGF) markers was observed in treatment groups. These data suggest that Frondanol® A5 decreased inflammatory angiogenic molecules and increased GILT expression and macrophage phagocytosis. These decreases may have improved the innate immune systems of the treated mice, thus aiding in inhibition of intestinal tumor formation. These results suggest that Frondanol® A5 exhibits significant chemopreventive potential against intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:25657017

  4. The effect of some beverage extracts on intestinal iron absorption.

    PubMed

    el-Shobaki, F A; Saleh, Z A; Saleh, N

    1990-12-01

    The effect of some beverage extracts namely anise, mint, caraway, cumin, tilia, liquorice, karkade and tea, on the absorption of iron was tested in tied-off intestinal segments of rats. The rate of intestinal iron absorption was calculated in terms of an absorption index. The tannin, phytic acid and ascorbic acid contents of these beverages were analysed. The results show that anise, mint, caraway, cumin, tilia, liquorice, arranged in decreasing order of their effect, promoted the absorption of iron. Karkade did not exert an appreciable effect while tea inhibited absorption. The results are discussed in relation to the content of these beverages of tannins, phytic or ascorbic acids. It is recommended to offer these beverages to children and also to adults as a preventive agent to iron deficiency anemia. Also can be used for the preparation of bioavailable medicinal iron. PMID:2080638

  5. [Intestinal absorption kinetics of Polygonum capitatum extract in rats].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wu; Hou, Jia; Lu, Yuan; Chen, Peng-cheng; Liao, Shang-gao; Huang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    A UPLC-ESI-MS/MS method was used to determinate the main active fractions gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, myricetrin, hyperoside and quercitrin in Polygonum capitatum extracts by in situ intestinal perfusion models; the absorption rate constants and cumulative penetration rate of absorption were calculated. The effect of different drug concentrations, different intestine segments, bile and P-gp inhibitors on the absorption mechanism of Gallic acid and other compositions in P. capitatum extracts. The experimental results showed that gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, myricetrin and quercitrin were observed saturated at high concentration (P < 0.05). Bile had significant inhibition effect on protocatechuic acid absorption and had promotion effect on myricetrin and hyperoside absorption (P < 0.05). P-gp inhibitor verapamil could significantly enhance the absorption of Protocatechuic acid (P < 0.05). The overall trend for absorption of various compositions was that small intestine > colon. This indicated that the absorption mechanism of P. capitatum extracts in rat intestine was in line with fist-order kinetics characteristics. The composition could be absorbed in all of the different intestinal segments, and the absorption was mainly concentrated in small intestine. The protocatechuic acid may be the substrate of P-gp. PMID:27071271

  6. Green Tea Extract Improves the Postprandial Overproduction of Intestinal Apolipoprotein B-containing Lipoproteins in Fructose-Fed Hamsters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Green tea has putative medicinal properties that may be useful in preventing the metabolic syndrome since increased consumption of green tea extract (GTE) is associated with improved lipid and glucose homeostasis in human and animals. The acute effect of GTE on postprandial intestinal apoB48 product...

  7. [Preventive effect of changzhankang in experimental intestinal adhesions in rats].

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Q; Wei, J Q; Dai, D Z

    1991-08-01

    Intestinal adhesions were induced in rats by stabbing the terminal part of the ileum. Adhesion prevention by ibuprofen and changzhankang (CZK), which was composed by traditional Chinese medicines, was evaluated with a grading system. All of the 13 rats in the non-treated group created severe adhesions. The severity was significantly modified by orally administered CZK of 20 g/kg (in crude drugs) once or twice daily for five days (P less than 0.01 and P less than 0.05 compared with the non-treated). Intramuscular injection of ibuprofen (35 mg/kg, 3 times daily) also alleviated the severity of adhesions. There was no significant difference between the ibuprofen-treated and CZK-treated groups though some of the rats were virtually free from adhesion formation in the latter. It is plausible to expect CZK to become a promising drug used in treating intestinal adhesions, for the natural drug has greater security and less side effects than synthesized drugs. PMID:1954667

  8. Spasmolytic effects of Scrophularia nodosa extract on isolated rabbit intestine.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mansoor; Muhammad, Noor; Mehjabeen; Jahan, Noor; Ahmad, Manzoor; Obaidullah; Qureshi, Mahmood; Jan, Syed Umar

    2012-01-01

    Scrophularia nodosa (figwort), an indigenous medicinal plant grows in moist and cultivated waste ground. It contains saponins, cardioactive glycosides, flavonoids, resin, sugar and organic acids. It is traditionally used for anti-inflammatory purpose and in skin disorders. It has diuretic and cardiac stimulant properties. The present studies were carried out on crude extract of Scrophularia nodosa and its n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and aqueous fractions. During phytochemical studies seven known compounds of flavonoid nature were isolated from the chloroform fraction of crude extract of S. nodosa. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic (UV, IR, Mass (EIMS, HREIMS) and NMR ((1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR, DEPT, and (1)H-(1)H, COSY, HMQC, HMBC and NOESY) techniques. Compound 1 was identified as 5, 4`-hydroxy-3, 6, 7-trimethoxyflavone, compound 2 as 5-hydroxy-3,6,7,4'-tetramethoxyflavone, compound 3 as Centaurein, compound 4 as 5-hydroxy-7,8,2',3',4'-pentamethoxyflavone (Serpyllin), compound 5 as Kaempferol 7-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside, compound 6 as sakuranetin 4'-O (6''-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (Vitexoside) and compound 7 as Spinoside. Crude extract and its fractions were tested on isolated rabbit intestine (in vitro) for their effects. The results of crude extract and its fractions in different doses showed the decrease in normal movement of the smooth muscles of rabbit intestine (jejunum). The chloroform fraction showed maximum relaxant effect (77.37%) at 15mg/ml dose and aqueous fraction showed 38.56% spasmogenic response which was not present in the crude extract. Further study was carried out on different fractions to investigate the possible mechanism of action of S. nodosa extract. For this purpose spasmolytic effect of different fractions were compared with agonist and antagonist activities of standard drugs including adrenaline, atropine andacetylcholine (1x10(-2), 1x10(-4) and 10(-6) M conc.). It is

  9. Immunomodulatory effect of a wild blueberry anthocyanin-rich extract in human Caco-2 intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Taverniti, Valentina; Fracassetti, Daniela; Del Bo', Cristian; Lanti, Claudia; Minuzzo, Mario; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy; Riso, Patrizia; Guglielmetti, Simone

    2014-08-20

    Intestinal inflammation is a natural process crucial for the maintenance of gut functioning. However, abnormal or prolonged inflammatory responses may lead to the onset of chronic degenerative diseases, typically treated by means of pharmacological interventions. Dietary strategies for the prevention of inflammation are a safer alternative to pharmacotherapy. Anthocyanins and other polyphenols have been documented to display anti-inflammatory activity. In the present study, three bioactive fractions (anthocyanin, phenolic, and water-soluble fractions) were extracted from a wild blueberry powder. The Caco-2 intestinal model was used to test the immunomodulatory effect of the above fractions. Only the anthocyanin-rich fraction reduced the activation of NF-κB, induced by IL-1β in intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. Specifically, concentrations of 50 and 100 μg mL(-1) decreased NF-κB activation by 68.9 and 85.2%, respectively (p ≤ 0.05). These preliminary results provide further support for the role of food bioactives as potential dietary anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:25075866

  10. Intestinal Peyer's patches prevent tumorigenesis in Apc (Min/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Kyoko; Fujii, Gen; Sakurai, Hitomi; Yoshitome, Hiroko; Mutoh, Michihiro; Wada, Morimasa

    2015-01-01

    Peyer's patches are nodules that play a central role in intestinal immunity. Few studies demonstrate the relationship between the number of Peyer's patches and intestinal polyps. Here we identify a statistically significant inverse correlation between the quantity of Peyer's patches and of the development of intestinal polyps in Apc (Min/+) mice, which are a useful model to clarify the role of Peyer's patches in intestinal tumorigenesis. Using this model, we increased the number of Peyer's patches using 0.1% and 1% corn husk arabinoxylan through feed. Intestinal polyp formation significantly decreased, concomitant with an increase in Peyer's patches development (n = 12/group). In Aly (-/-) Apc (Min/+) mice (negative control; no Peyer's patches) there was no change in the amount of intestinal polyps (n = 10/group). Immune reaction following corn husk arabinoxylan treatment was measured by cytokine array. Increasing the number of Peyer's patches decreased interleukin-17 production, which showed a dose dependent correlation with transcription factor/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor. This study identified a relationship between levels of Peyer's patches and intestinal polyp formation, partly explained by the involvement of interleukin-17 production and β-catenin signaling in Apc (Min/+) mice. PMID:25678750

  11. [The prevention of the entry of foreign bodies into the stomach and intestines].

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, N M; Belyĭ, I S; Gaponov, V V

    1993-01-01

    On the basis of the results of treatment of 320 patients, the organization and sanitary-instructive measures aimed at prevention of getting, or development of the foreign bodies in the stomach and intestine are suggested. The primary prophylaxis (prevention of penetration of the substances which are alien to the organism into its cavities and tissues) and the secondary one (removal of the foreign bodies from the organism of a patient before their penetration into the intestine) are distinguished. PMID:10912057

  12. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients. PMID:26755265

  13. Acetonic Extract from the Feijoa sellowiana Berg. Fruit Exerts Antioxidant Properties and Modulates Disaccharidases Activities in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Turco, Fabio; Palumbo, Ilaria; Andreozzi, Paolo; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Ruberto, Francesca; Esposito, Giuseppe; Basile, Adriana; Cuomo, Rosario

    2016-08-01

    Feijoa sellowiana fruit has been shown to possess various biological activities, such as anti-bacterial and anti-cancer properties, in a variety of cellular models, but its activity on human intestinal epithelial cells has never been tested. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the acetonic extract of F. sellowiana fruits on the viability, membrane peroxidation, disaccharidases activities and proliferation of in vitro models of human intestinal epithelial cells. To obtain this goal, Caco-2 and HT-29 cells were exposed to the acetonic extract for 24 h. Cell proliferation, viability, lactase and sucrase-isomaltase activity and H2 O2 -induced membrane lipid peroxidation were tested. We found that, compared to control conditions, the acetonic extract significantly increased lactase and sucrase-isomaltase activity in Caco-2, but not HT-29, cells, decreased proliferation, had no effects on viability and restored lipid peroxidation in both cell models. This study suggests that the acetonic extract improves lactase and sucrase-isomaltase activity, inhibits cell proliferation, have no cytotoxic effects and prevent lipid peroxidation of intestinal epithelial cells. These effects may be exploited in case of disaccharidases deficit and also as an adjuvant treatment of diseases related to oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27166598

  14. Mechanisms of cinnamon extract-induced suppression of the intestinal overproduction of apolipoprotein B48-containing lipoproteins in insulin resistant high-fructose fed animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have reported previously that cinnamon extract (CE) prevents high-fructose (HF) feeding-induced whole-body insulin resistance by enhancing insulin signaling in skeletal muscle. In this study, we investigated whether intestinal apolipoprotein overproduction is inhibited by CE in this insulin-resis...

  15. Inhibitory effect of Ipomoea aquatica extracts on glucose absorption using a perfused rat intestinal preparation.

    PubMed

    Sokeng, S D; Rokeya, B; Hannan, J M A; Junaida, K; Zitech, P; Ali, L; Ngounou, G; Lontsi, D; Kamtchouing, P

    2007-12-01

    Investigations were carried out to evaluate the effect of Ipomoea aquatica aqueous and dichloromethane/methanol extracts on the glucose absorption using a rat intestinal preparation in situ. Extracts orally tested at the dose of 160 mg/kg exerted a significant inhibitory effect on glucose absorption when compared with control animals. The most pronounced effect was observed with the aqueous extract. Ouabain used as reference inhibitor strongly inhibited glucose absorption. On the other hand both plant extracts inhibited the gastrointestinal motility suggesting that the inhibition of glucose absorption is not due to the acceleration of intestinal transit. PMID:17651914

  16. Prevention of oxidative stress, inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction in the intestine by different cranberry phenolic fractions.

    PubMed

    Denis, Marie-Claude; Desjardins, Yves; Furtos, Alexandra; Marcil, Valérie; Dudonné, Stéphanie; Montoudis, Alain; Garofalo, Carole; Delvin, Edgard; Marette, André; Levy, Emile

    2015-02-01

    Cranberry fruit has been reported to have high antioxidant effectiveness that is potentially linked to its richness in diversified polyphenolic content. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of cranberry polyphenolic fractions in oxidative stress (OxS), inflammation and mitochondrial functions using intestinal Caco-2/15 cells. The combination of HPLC and UltraPerformance LC®-tandem quadrupole (UPLC-TQD) techniques allowed us to characterize the profile of low, medium and high molecular mass polyphenolic compounds in cranberry extracts. The medium molecular mass fraction was enriched with flavonoids and procyanidin dimers whereas procyanidin oligomers (DP > 4) were the dominant class of polyphenols in the high molecular mass fraction. Pre-incubation of Caco-2/15 cells with these cranberry extracts prevented iron/ascorbate-mediated lipid peroxidation and counteracted lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammation as evidenced by the decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and interleukin-6), cyclo-oxygenase-2 and prostaglandin E2. Cranberry polyphenols (CP) fractions limited both nuclear factor κB activation and Nrf2 down-regulation. Consistently, cranberry procyanidins alleviated OxS-dependent mitochondrial dysfunctions as shown by the rise in ATP production and the up-regulation of Bcl-2, as well as the decline of protein expression of cytochrome c and apoptotic-inducing factor. These mitochondrial effects were associated with a significant stimulation of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator-1-α, a central inducing factor of mitochondrial biogenesis and transcriptional co-activator of numerous downstream mediators. Finally, cranberry procyanidins forestalled the effect of iron/ascorbate on the protein expression of mitochondrial transcription factors (mtTFA, mtTFB1, mtTFB2). Our findings provide evidence for the capacity of CP to reduce intestinal OxS and inflammation while improving mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID

  17. Rifaximin Alters Intestinal Bacteria and Prevents Stress-Induced Gut Inflammation and Visceral Hyperalgesia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dabo; Gao, Jun; Gillilland, Merritt; Wu, Xiaoyin; Song, Il; Kao, John Y.; Owyang, Chung

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Rifaximin is used to treat patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders, but little is known about its therapeutic mechanism. We propose that rifaximin modulates the ileal bacterial community, reduces subclinical inflammation of the intestinal mucosa, and improves gut barrier function to reduce visceral hypersensitivity. Methods We induced visceral hyperalgesia in rats, via chronic water avoidance or repeat restraint stressors, and investigated whether rifaximin altered the gut microbiota, prevented intestinal inflammation, and improved gut barrier function. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and 454 pyrosequencing were used to analyze bacterial 16S rRNA in ileal contents from the rats. Reverse transcription, immunoblot, and histologic analyses were used to evaluate levels of cytokines, the tight junction protein occludin, and mucosal inflammation, respectively. Intestinal permeability and rectal sensitivity were measured. Results Water avoidance and repeat restraint stress each led to visceral hyperalgesia, accompanied by mucosal inflammation and impaired mucosal barrier function. Oral rifaximin altered the composition of bacterial communities in the ileum (Lactobacillus species became the most abundant) and prevented mucosal inflammation, impairment to intestinal barrier function, and visceral hyperalgesia in response to chronic stress. Neomycin also changed the composition of the ileal bacterial community (Proteobacteria became the most abundant species). Neomycin did not prevent intestinal inflammation or induction of visceral hyperalgesia induced by water avoidance stress. Conclusions Rifaximin alters the bacterial population in the ileum of rats, leading to a relative abundance of Lactobacillus. These changes prevent intestinal abnormalities and visceral hyperalgesia in response to chronic psychological stress. PMID:24161699

  18. [Can diet prevent the reoccurrence of an intestinal obstruction?].

    PubMed

    Laubé, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical obstructions are mainly linked to old age which can favour constipation and faecal impaction, to abdominal surgery, to chronic inflammatory diseases of the intestine or to digestive tract malignant tumours. In addition to monitoring the patient and ensuring their compliance with prescribed treatments, educating the patient with the aim of restoring a good nutritional status is essential. PMID:26743368

  19. All Things in Moderation: Prevention of Intestinal Adenomas by DNA Hypomethylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Ho; Laird, Peter W

    2016-07-01

    DNA hypomethylation can prevent intestinal tumorigenesis, presumably by reducing epigenetic silencing of tumor-suppressor genes. A study in this issue by Sheaffer and colleagues challenges this notion by showing that severe DNA hypomethylation by tissue-specific Dnmt1 knockout can actually promote intestinal adenoma formation. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 509-11. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Sheaffer, et al., p. 534. PMID:27190044

  20. Effect of standardized cranberry extract on the activity and expression of selected biotransformation enzymes in rat liver and intestine.

    PubMed

    Bártíková, Hana; Boušová, Iva; Jedličková, Pavla; Lněničková, Kateřina; Skálová, Lenka; Szotáková, Barbora

    2014-01-01

    The use of dietary supplements containing cranberry extract is a common way to prevent urinary tract infections. As consumption of these supplements containing a mixture of concentrated anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins has increased, interest in their possible interactions with drug-metabolizing enzymes has grown. In this in vivo study, rats were treated with a standardized cranberry extract (CystiCran®) obtained from Vaccinium macrocarpon in two dosage schemes (14 days, 0.5 mg of proanthocyanidins/kg/day; 1 day, 1.5 mg of proanthocyanidins/kg/day). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins contained in this extract on the activity and expression of intestinal and hepatic biotransformation enzymes: cytochrome P450 (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B and CYP3A), carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT). Administration of cranberry extract led to moderate increases in the activities of hepatic CYP3A (by 34%), CYP1A1 (by 38%), UGT (by 40%), CBR1 (by 17%) and GST (by 13%), while activities of these enzymes in the small intestine were unchanged. No changes in the relative amounts of these proteins were found. Taken together, the interactions of cranberry extract with simultaneously administered drugs seem not to be serious. PMID:25237750

  1. Intestinal α-glucosidase and some pancreatic enzymes inhibitory effect of hydroalcholic extract of Moringa stenopetala leaves

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Moringa stenopetala has been used in traditional health systems to treat diabetes mellitus. One of the successful methods to prevent of the onset of diabetes is to control postprandial hyperglycemia by the inhibition of α-glucosidase and pancreatic α-amylase activities, resulting in the aggressive delay of the carbohydrate digestion of absorbable monosaccharides. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of the extract of the leaves of Moringa stenopetala on α-glucosidase, pancreatic α-amylase, pancreatic lipase, and pancreatic cholesterol esterase activities, and, therefore find out the relevance of the plant in controlling blood sugar and lipid levels. Methods The dried leaves of Moringa stenopetala were extracted with hydroalcoholic solvent and dried using rotary vapor under reduced pressure. The dried extracts were determined for the total phenolic compounds, flavonoid content and condensed tannins content by using Folin-Ciocateu’s reagent, AlCl3 and vanillin assay, respectively. The dried extract of plant-based food was further quantified with respect to intestinal α-glucosidase (maltase and sucrase) inhibition and pancreatic α-amylase inhibition by glucose oxidase method and dinitrosalicylic (DNS) reagent, respectively. Results The phytochemical analysis indicated that flavonoid, total phenolic, and condensed tannin contents in the extract were 71.73 ± 2.48 mg quercetin equivalent/g of crude extract, 79.81 ± 2.85 mg of gallic acid equivalent/g of crude extract, 8.82 ± 0.77 mg catechin equivalent/g of crude extract, respectively. The extract inhibited intestinal sucrase more than intestinal maltase with IC50 value of 1.47 ± 0.19 mg/ml. It also slightly inhibited pancreatic α-amylase, pancreatic lipase and pancreatic cholesterol esterase. Conclusion The result demonstrated the beneficial biochemical effects of Moringa stenopetala by inhibiting intestinal α-glucosidase, pancreatic cholesterol esterase

  2. Antimicrobial peptide Cathelicidin-BF prevents intestinal barrier dysfunction in a mouse model of endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Song, Deguang; Zong, Xin; Zhang, Haiwen; Wang, Tenghao; Yi, Hongbo; Luan, Chao; Wang, Yizhen

    2015-03-01

    Intestinal barrier functions are altered during the development of sepsis. Cathelicidin antimicrobial peptides, such as LL-37 and mCRAMP, can protect animals against intestinal barrier dysfunction. Cathelicidin-BF (C-BF), a new cathelicidin peptide purified from the venom of the snake Bungarus fasciatus, has been shown to have both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. This study investigated whether C-BF pretreatment could protect the intestinal barrier against dysfunction in a mouse model of endotoxemia, induced by intraperitoneal injection of LPS (10mg/kg). Mice were treated with low or high dose C-BF before treatment with LPS, and samples were collected 5h after LPS treatment. C-BF reduced LPS induced intestinal histological damage and gut permeability to 4 KD Fluorescein-isothiocyanate-conjugated dextran. Pretreatment with C-BF prevented LPS induced intestinal tight junction disruption and epithelial cell apoptosis. Moreover, C-BF down regulated the expression and secretion of TNF-α, a process involving the NF-κB signaling pathway. C-BF also reduced LPS induced TNF-α expression through the NF-κB signaling pathway in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages. These findings indicate that C-BF can prevent gut barrier dysfunction induced by LPS, suggesting that C-BF may be used to develop a prophylactic agent for intestinal injury in endotoxemia. PMID:25639228

  3. Update on prevention and treatment of intestinal helminth infections.

    PubMed

    Blair, Paul; Diemert, David

    2015-03-01

    Intestinal helminth infections are some of world's most common tropical diseases and cause significant impairments in pediatric growth and cognitive impairment as well as maternal health, particularly in areas lacking adequate access to safe water or sanitation. Routine mass drug administration (MDA) of anthelminthic medications to children living in endemic areas and interventions to improve water hygiene and sanitation form the basis of current control efforts. We review recent evidence on the effectiveness of these approaches and outline the limitations of MDA, including poor cure rates against hookworm and Trichuris trichiura, rapid post-MDA reinfection, and inadequate coverage of at-risk populations. Ultimately, alternative tools and strategies, including new drugs, drug combinations, and vaccines, will be needed to control or ultimately eliminate these infections. PMID:25821189

  4. Transgenic 6F tomatoes act on the small intestine to prevent systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia caused by Western diet and intestinally derived lysophosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Navab, Mohamad; Hough, Greg; Buga, Georgette M; Su, Feng; Wagner, Alan C; Meriwether, David; Chattopadhyay, Arnab; Gao, Feng; Grijalva, Victor; Danciger, Janet S; Van Lenten, Brian J; Org, Elin; Lusis, Aldons J; Pan, Calvin; Anantharamaiah, G M; Farias-Eisner, Robin; Smyth, Susan S; Reddy, Srinivasa T; Fogelman, Alan M

    2013-12-01

    We recently reported that levels of unsaturated lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in the small intestine significantly correlated with the extent of aortic atherosclerosis in LDL receptor-null (LDLR⁻/⁻) mice fed a Western diet (WD). Here we demonstrate that WD increases unsaturated (but not saturated) LPA levels in the small intestine of LDLR⁻/⁻ mice and causes changes in small intestine gene expression. Confirmation of microarray analysis by quantitative RT-PCR showed that adding transgenic tomatoes expressing the apoA-I mimetic peptide 6F (Tg6F) to WD prevented many WD-mediated small intestine changes in gene expression. If instead of feeding WD, unsaturated LPA was added to chow and fed to the mice: i) levels of LPA in the small intestine were similar to those induced by feeding WD; ii) gene expression changes in the small intestine mimicked WD-mediated changes; and iii) changes in plasma serum amyloid A, total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol levels, and the fast-performance liquid chromatography lipoprotein profile mimicked WD-mediated changes. Adding Tg6F (but not control tomatoes) to LPA-supplemented chow prevented the LPA-induced changes. We conclude that: i) WD-mediated systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia may be in part due to WD-induced increases in small intestine LPA levels; and ii) Tg6F reduces WD-mediated systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia by preventing WD-induced increases in LPA levels in the small intestine. PMID:24085744

  5. Antibiotics modulate intestinal immunity and prevent necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm neonatal piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preterm birth, bacterial colonization, and formula feeding predispose to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Antibiotics are commonly administered to prevent sepsis in preterm infants, but it is not known whether this affects intestinal immunity and NEC resistance. We hypothesized that broad-spectrum a...

  6. Glutamate prevents intestinal atrophy via luminal nutrient sensing in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Weidong; Feng, Yongjia; Holst, Jens J.; Hartmann, Bolette; Yang, Hua; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Small intestine luminal nutrient sensing may be crucial for modulating physiological functions. However, its mechanism of action is incompletely understood. We used a model of enteral nutrient deprivation, or total parenteral nutrition (TPN), resulting in intestinal mucosal atrophy and decreased epithelial barrier function (EBF). We examined how a single amino acid, glutamate (GLM), modulates intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) growth and EBF. Controls were chow-fed mice, T1 receptor-3 (T1R3)-knockout (KO) mice, and treatment with the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-5 antagonist MTEP. TPN significantly changed the amount of T1Rs, GLM receptors, and transporters, and GLM prevented these changes. GLM significantly prevented TPN-associated intestinal atrophy (2.5-fold increase in IEC proliferation) and was dependent on up-regulation of the protein kinase pAkt, but independent of T1R3 and mGluR5 signaling. GLM led to a loss of EBF with TPN (60% increase in FITC-dextran permeability, 40% decline in transepithelial resistance); via T1R3, it protected EBF, whereas mGluR5 was associated with EBF loss. GLM led to a decline in circulating glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) during TPN. The decline was regulated by T1R3 and mGluR5, suggesting a novel negative regulator pathway for IEC proliferation not previously described. Loss of luminal nutrients with TPN administration may widely affect intestinal taste sensing. GLM has previously unrecognized actions on IEC growth and EBF. Restoring luminal sensing via GLM could be a strategy for patients on TPN.—Xiao, W., Feng, Y., Holst, J. J., Hartmann, B., Yang, H., Teitelbaum, D. H. Glutamate prevents intestinal atrophy via luminal nutrient sensing in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition. PMID:24497581

  7. Intestinal dysbiosis: novel mechanisms by which gut microbes trigger and prevent disease.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Mark A

    2014-08-01

    New research has identified specific intestinal colonizing microbes that can have significant influence on health and disease. Evidence is reviewed supporting an association between Fusobacterium nucleatum and colon cancer and for a protective role of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in inflammatory bowel disease, of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 in acute intestinal inflammation, of Bifidobacterium infantis in neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, and of Akkermansia muciniphila in obesity and diabetes. These novel bacteria are clinically relevant and present opportunities for more focused diagnosis of colon cancer and prevention of common diseases. PMID:24857830

  8. Cinnamon Extract Improves TNF-a Induced Overproduction of Intestinal ApolipoproteinB-48 Lipoproteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    TNF-alpha stimulates the overproduction of intestinal apolipoproteins. We evaluated whether a water extract of cinnamon (Cinnulin PF®) improved the dyslipidemia induced by TNF-alpha in Triton WR-1339 treated hamsters, and whether Cinnulin PF® inhibits the TNF-alpha-induced over the secretion of apoB...

  9. Biochemical investigation and gene expression analysis of the immunostimulatory functions of an edible Salacia extract in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yuriko; Ueda, Fumitaka; Kamei, Asuka; Kakinuma, Chihaya; Abe, Keiko

    2011-01-01

    Roots and bark from plants belonging to genus Salacia of the family Hippocrateaceae (Salacia reticulata, Salacia oblonga, etc.) have been used for traditional Ayurvedic medicine, particularly for the treatment of diabetes. In our study, we evaluated the gene expression profiles in the small intestinal epithelium of rats that were given a Salacia plant extract to gain insight into its effects on the small intestine. In detail, DNA microarray analysis was performed to evaluate the gene expression profiles in the rat ileal epithelium. The intestinal bacterial flora was also studied using T-RFLP (Nagashima method) in these rats. Expressions of many immune-related genes, especially Th1-related genes associated with cell-mediated immunity, were found to increase in the small intestinal epithelium and the intestinal bacterial flora became similar to those in the case with Salacia plant extract administration. Our study thus revealed that Salacia plant extract exerts bioregulatory functions by boosting intestinal immunity. PMID:21328625

  10. Colchicine prevents NSAID-induced small intestinal injury by inhibiting activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Otani, Koji; Watanabe, Toshio; Shimada, Sunao; Takeda, Shogo; Itani, Shigehiro; Higashimori, Akira; Nadatani, Yuji; Nagami, Yasuaki; Tanaka, Fumio; Kamata, Noriko; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    The inflammasome is a large, multiprotein complex that consists of a nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR), an apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain, and pro-caspase-1. Activation of the inflammasome results in cleavage of pro-caspase-1 into cleaved caspase-1, which promotes the processing of pro-interleukin (IL)-1β into mature IL-1β. We investigated the effects of colchicine on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced small intestinal injury and activation of the NLR family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. Colchicine treatment inhibited indomethacin-induced small intestinal injury by 86% (1 mg/kg) and 94% (3 mg/kg) as indicated by the lesion index 24 h after indomethacin administration. Colchicine inhibited the protein expression of cleaved caspase-1 and mature IL-1β, without affecting the mRNA expression of NLRP3 and IL-1β. Although treatment with recombinant IL-1β (0.1 μg/kg) did not change the severity of small intestinal damage, the preventive effects of colchicine were abolished by supplementation with the same dose of recombinant IL-1β. Indomethacin-induced small intestinal damage was reduced by 77%, as determined by the lesion index in NLRP3(-/-) mice, and colchicine treatment failed to inhibit small intestinal damage in NLRP3(-/-) mice. These results demonstrate that colchicine prevents NSAID-induced small intestinal injury by inhibiting activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:27585971

  11. Colchicine prevents NSAID-induced small intestinal injury by inhibiting activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Koji; Watanabe, Toshio; Shimada, Sunao; Takeda, Shogo; Itani, Shigehiro; Higashimori, Akira; Nadatani, Yuji; Nagami, Yasuaki; Tanaka, Fumio; Kamata, Noriko; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    The inflammasome is a large, multiprotein complex that consists of a nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR), an apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain, and pro-caspase-1. Activation of the inflammasome results in cleavage of pro-caspase-1 into cleaved caspase-1, which promotes the processing of pro-interleukin (IL)-1β into mature IL-1β. We investigated the effects of colchicine on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced small intestinal injury and activation of the NLR family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. Colchicine treatment inhibited indomethacin-induced small intestinal injury by 86% (1 mg/kg) and 94% (3 mg/kg) as indicated by the lesion index 24 h after indomethacin administration. Colchicine inhibited the protein expression of cleaved caspase-1 and mature IL-1β, without affecting the mRNA expression of NLRP3 and IL-1β. Although treatment with recombinant IL-1β (0.1 μg/kg) did not change the severity of small intestinal damage, the preventive effects of colchicine were abolished by supplementation with the same dose of recombinant IL-1β. Indomethacin-induced small intestinal damage was reduced by 77%, as determined by the lesion index in NLRP3−/− mice, and colchicine treatment failed to inhibit small intestinal damage in NLRP3−/− mice. These results demonstrate that colchicine prevents NSAID-induced small intestinal injury by inhibiting activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:27585971

  12. Glucose induces intestinal human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 to prevent neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, Naoya; Fujie, Yoshiko; Itoh, Tomoo; Tukey, Robert H; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2014-01-01

    Inadequate calorie intake or starvation has been suggested as a cause of neonatal jaundice, which can further cause permanent brain damage, kernicterus. This study experimentally investigated whether additional glucose treatments induce the bilirubin-metabolizing enzyme--UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1--to prevent the onset of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Neonatal humanized UGT1 (hUGT1) mice physiologically develop jaundice. In this study, UGT1A1 expression levels were determined in the liver and small intestine of neonatal hUGT1 mice that were orally treated with glucose. In the hUGT1 mice, glucose induced UGT1A1 in the small intestine, while it did not affect the expression of UGT1A1 in the liver. UGT1A1 was also induced in the human intestinal Caco-2 cells when the cells were cultured in the presence of glucose. Luciferase assays demonstrated that not only the proximal region (-1300/-7) of the UGT1A1 promoter, but also distal region (-6500/-4050) were responsible for the induction of UGT1A1 in the intestinal cells. Adequate calorie intake would lead to the sufficient expression of UGT1A1 in the small intestine to reduce serum bilirubin levels. Supplemental treatment of newborns with glucose solution can be a convenient and efficient method to treat neonatal jaundice while allowing continuous breastfeeding. PMID:25209391

  13. Magnolol pretreatment prevents sepsis-induced intestinal dysmotility by maintaining functional interstitial cells of Cajal.

    PubMed

    Miao, Bin; Zhang, Shuwen; Wang, Hong; Yang, Tiecheng; Zhou, Deshan; Wang, Bao-en

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which magnolol treatment prevents lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic dysmotility in mice. Sepsis was induced by intravenous tail vein injection of LPS (4 mg/kg body weight). Animals were divided into three groups: the magnolol-treated septic group, the placebo-treated septic group, and the control group. Intestinal transit and circular smooth muscle contraction were measured 12 h after LPS injection, and immunocytochemisty was performed to study the morphology of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs). Stem cell factor (SCF) expression and c-kit phosphorylation were determined by Western blot analysis, and the mRNA levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) were determined by RT-PCR. Nitric oxide (NO) content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration were detected using commercial kits. Intestinal transit and muscular contractility were significantly lower in the LPS-treated group than in the control group. Immunocytochemical experiments showed that the total number of ICCs, and the total and average lengths of the ICC processes were significantly decreased in the LPS-treated group compared with those in the control group. In LPS-treated animals, magnolol pretreatment significantly accelerated intestinal transit, increased circular muscle contraction, and prevented ICC morphology changes. Phosphorylation of c-kit and expression of SCF were significantly downregulated in LPS-treated animals compared with control animals. Magnolol pretreatment prevented sepsis-induced decreases in c-kit phosphorylation and SCF expression in LPS-treated animals. Magnolol pretreatment prevented the sepsis-induced increase in NO concentration, iNOS expression, and MDA concentration, and decrease in SOD activity in LPS-treated animals. Our results suggest that magnolol treatment prevents sepsis-induced intestinal dysmotility by regulating SCF/c-kit and NO signaling to maintain functional ICCs

  14. Antibiotics modulate intestinal immunity and prevent necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Michael L; Thymann, Thomas; Cilieborg, Malene S; Lykke, Mikkel; Mølbak, Lars; Jensen, Bent B; Schmidt, Mette; Kelly, Denise; Mulder, Imke; Burrin, Douglas G; Sangild, Per T

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth, bacterial colonization, and formula feeding predispose to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Antibiotics are commonly administered to prevent sepsis in preterm infants, but it is not known whether this affects intestinal immunity and NEC resistance. We hypothesized that broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment improves NEC resistance and intestinal structure, function, and immunity in neonates. Caesarean-delivered preterm pigs were fed 3 days of parenteral nutrition followed by 2 days of enteral formula. Immediately after birth, they were assigned to receive either antibiotics (oral and parenteral doses of gentamycin, ampicillin, and metronidazole, ANTI, n = 11) or saline in the control group (CON, n = 13), given twice daily. NEC lesions and intestinal structure, function, microbiology, and immunity markers were recorded. None of the ANTI but 85% of the CON pigs developed NEC lesions by day 5 (0/11 vs. 11/13, P < 0.05). ANTI pigs had higher intestinal villi (+60%), digestive enzyme activities (+53-73%), and goblet cell densities (+110%) and lower myeloperoxidase (-51%) and colonic microbial density (10(5) vs. 10(10) colony-forming units, all P < 0.05). Microarray transcriptomics showed strong downregulation of genes related to inflammation and innate immune response to microbiota and marked upregulation of genes related to amino acid metabolism, in particular threonine, glucose transport systems, and cell cycle in 5-day-old ANTI pigs. In a follow-up experiment, 5 days of antibiotics prevented NEC at least until day 10. Neonatal prophylactic antibiotics effectively reduced gut bacterial load, prevented NEC, intestinal atrophy, dysfunction, and inflammation and enhanced expression of genes related to gut metabolism and immunity in preterm pigs. PMID:24157972

  15. Antibiotics modulate intestinal immunity and prevent necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm neonatal piglets

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Michael L.; Thymann, Thomas; Cilieborg, Malene S.; Lykke, Mikkel; Mølbak, Lars; Jensen, Bent B.; Schmidt, Mette; Kelly, Denise; Mulder, Imke; Burrin, Douglas G.

    2013-01-01

    Preterm birth, bacterial colonization, and formula feeding predispose to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Antibiotics are commonly administered to prevent sepsis in preterm infants, but it is not known whether this affects intestinal immunity and NEC resistance. We hypothesized that broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment improves NEC resistance and intestinal structure, function, and immunity in neonates. Caesarean-delivered preterm pigs were fed 3 days of parenteral nutrition followed by 2 days of enteral formula. Immediately after birth, they were assigned to receive either antibiotics (oral and parenteral doses of gentamycin, ampicillin, and metronidazole, ANTI, n = 11) or saline in the control group (CON, n = 13), given twice daily. NEC lesions and intestinal structure, function, microbiology, and immunity markers were recorded. None of the ANTI but 85% of the CON pigs developed NEC lesions by day 5 (0/11 vs. 11/13, P < 0.05). ANTI pigs had higher intestinal villi (+60%), digestive enzyme activities (+53–73%), and goblet cell densities (+110%) and lower myeloperoxidase (−51%) and colonic microbial density (105 vs. 1010 colony-forming units, all P < 0.05). Microarray transcriptomics showed strong downregulation of genes related to inflammation and innate immune response to microbiota and marked upregulation of genes related to amino acid metabolism, in particular threonine, glucose transport systems, and cell cycle in 5-day-old ANTI pigs. In a follow-up experiment, 5 days of antibiotics prevented NEC at least until day 10. Neonatal prophylactic antibiotics effectively reduced gut bacterial load, prevented NEC, intestinal atrophy, dysfunction, and inflammation and enhanced expression of genes related to gut metabolism and immunity in preterm pigs. PMID:24157972

  16. Prevention of rotavirus infections in vitro with aqueous extracts of Quillaja Saponaria Molina

    PubMed Central

    Roner, Michael R; Tam, Ka Ian; Kiesling-Barrager, Melody

    2010-01-01

    Background Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea disease in newborns and young children worldwide, estimated to be responsible for over 300,000 childhood deaths every year, mostly in developing countries. Rotavirus-related deaths represent approximately 5% of all deaths in children younger than 5 years of age worldwide. Saponins are readily soluble in water and are approved by the US FDA for inclusion in beverages intended for human consumption. The addition of saponins to existing water supplies offers a new form of intervention into the cycle of rotavirus infection. We believe that saponins will ‘coat’ the epithelium of the host's small intestine and prevent attachment of rotavirus. Discussion This experiment provides in vitro data for the possibility of including saponin in drinking water to prevent infections of rotavirus. We demonstrate that microgram amounts of extract, while exhibiting no cell cytotoxicity or direct virucidal activity, prevent rotavirus from infecting its host cells. In addition, the presence of residual amounts of extract continue to block viral infection and render cells resistant to infection for at least 16 h after the removal of the extract from the cell culture media. Conclusion We demonstrate that two Quillaja extracts possess strong antiviral activity at concentrations more than 1000-fold lower than concentrations exhibiting cell cytotoxicity. Extract concentrations as high as 1000 μg/ml are not cytotoxic, but concentrations as low as 1.0 μg/ml are able to block rotavirus and reovirus attachment and infection. PMID:20725585

  17. Tissue Expander Placement to Prevent the Adverse Intestinal Effects of Radiotherapy in Malignant Pelvic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Shuichiro; Oue, Takaharu; Adachi, Kana; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Nakahata, Kengo; Ueno, Takehisa; Okuyama, Hiroomi

    2016-03-01

    We herein report the findings of 3 patients with primary Ewing sarcoma in a pelvic lesion who underwent the placement of a tissue expander (TE) before radiation therapy to prevent the adverse effects of radiotherapy. The simulation study showed that the TE drastically reduced volume of the intestine that was irradiated at all dose levels. All patients could receive the scheduled dose of radiotherapy without any acute and late complications such as diarrhea, melena, the dislodging of the TE, infection, or the formation of fistulae. In the 4-year (minimum) observation period, we did not observe intestinal complications in any of our patients. TE placement is considered to be a safe and effective method for preventing the adverse effects of radiotherapy in pediatric malignant pelvic tumors. PMID:26479989

  18. Amprolium and Furazolidone as Preventive Treatment for Intestinal Coccidiosis of Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Christiane; Morin, Michel

    1987-01-01

    Two coccidiostats, amprolium and furazolidone, were used as preventive treatments for intestinal coccidiosis in three-day-old piglets experimentally infected with 50,000 sporulated oocysts of Isospora suis. All infected piglets, treated or not, displayed clinical signs compatible with coccidiosis. Diarrhea and anorexia appeared around five days postinoculation in the non-treated and in the amprolium-treated groups; these signs were delayed to days 7 and 8 postinoculation in the furazolidone-treated group. The treatments did not prevent growth retardation. Amprolium seemed to reduce oocyst shedding whereas furazolidone had no effect. Villous atrophy was present in all infected piglets. PMID:17422910

  19. Metabolomics analysis of Cistus monspeliensis leaf extract on energy metabolism activation in human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Yoichi; Han, Junkyu; Kawada, Kiyokazu; Smaoui, Abderrazak; Isoda, Hiroko

    2012-01-01

    Energy metabolism is a very important process to improve and maintain health from the point of view of physiology. It is well known that the intracellular ATP production is contributed to energy metabolism in cells. Cistus monspeliensis is widely used as tea, spices, and medical herb; however, it has not been focusing on the activation of energy metabolism. In this study, C. monspeliensis was investigated as the food resources by activation of energy metabolism in human intestinal epithelial cells. C. monspeliensis extract showed high antioxidant ability. In addition, the promotion of metabolites of glycolysis and TCA cycle was induced by C. monspeliensis treatment. These results suggest that C. monspeliensis extract has an ability to enhance the energy metabolism in human intestinal cells. PMID:22523469

  20. Metabolomics Analysis of Cistus monspeliensis Leaf Extract on Energy Metabolism Activation in Human Intestinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Yoichi; Han, Junkyu; Kawada, Kiyokazu; Smaoui, Abderrazak; Isoda, Hiroko

    2012-01-01

    Energy metabolism is a very important process to improve and maintain health from the point of view of physiology. It is well known that the intracellular ATP production is contributed to energy metabolism in cells. Cistus monspeliensis is widely used as tea, spices, and medical herb; however, it has not been focusing on the activation of energy metabolism. In this study, C. monspeliensis was investigated as the food resources by activation of energy metabolism in human intestinal epithelial cells. C. monspeliensis extract showed high antioxidant ability. In addition, the promotion of metabolites of glycolysis and TCA cycle was induced by C. monspeliensis treatment. These results suggest that C. monspeliensis extract has an ability to enhance the energy metabolism in human intestinal cells. PMID:22523469

  1. Intestinal Absorption of Fibrinolytic and Proteolytic Lumbrokinase Extracted from Earthworm, Eisenia andrei

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiang Mei; Kim, Chung-Hyo; Lee, Chul Kyu; Shin, Jang Sik; Cho, Il Hwan

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the intestinal absorption of a fibrinolytic and proteolytic lumbrokinase extracted from Eisenia andrei, we used rat everted gut sacs and an in situ closed-loop recirculation method. We extracted lumbrokinase from Eisenia andrei, and then raised polyclonal antibody against lumbrokinase. Fibrinolytic activity and proteolytic activity in the serosal side of rat everted gut sacs incubated with lumbrokinase showed dose- and time-dependent patterns. Immunological results obtained by western blotting serosal side solution using rat everted gut sacs method showed that lumbrokinase proteins between 33.6 and 54.7 kDa are absorbed mostly by the intestinal epithelium. Furthermore, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis of plasma fractions obtained by in situ recirculation method confirmed that lumbrokinase F1 is absorbed into blood. These results support the notion that lumbrokinase can be absorbed from mucosal lumen into blood by oral administration. PMID:20473377

  2. Intestinal Absorption of Fibrinolytic and Proteolytic Lumbrokinase Extracted from Earthworm, Eisenia andrei.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiang Mei; Kim, Chung-Hyo; Lee, Chul Kyu; Shin, Jang Sik; Cho, Il Hwan; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the intestinal absorption of a fibrinolytic and proteolytic lumbrokinase extracted from Eisenia andrei, we used rat everted gut sacs and an in situ closed-loop recirculation method. We extracted lumbrokinase from Eisenia andrei, and then raised polyclonal antibody against lumbrokinase. Fibrinolytic activity and proteolytic activity in the serosal side of rat everted gut sacs incubated with lumbrokinase showed dose- and time-dependent patterns. Immunological results obtained by western blotting serosal side solution using rat everted gut sacs method showed that lumbrokinase proteins between 33.6 and 54.7 kDa are absorbed mostly by the intestinal epithelium. Furthermore, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis of plasma fractions obtained by in situ recirculation method confirmed that lumbrokinase F1 is absorbed into blood. These results support the notion that lumbrokinase can be absorbed from mucosal lumen into blood by oral administration. PMID:20473377

  3. Microscopic modeling of País grape seed extract absorption in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Morales, Cristian; Roeckel, Marlene; Fernández, Katherina

    2014-02-01

    The concentration profiles and the absorbed fraction (F) of the País grape seed extract in the human small intestine were obtained using a microscopic model simulation that accounts for the extracts' dissolution and absorption. To apply this model, the physical and chemical parameters of the grape seed extract solubility (C s), density (ρ), global mass transfer coefficient between the intestinal and blood content (k) (effective permeability), and diffusion coefficient (D) were experimentally evaluated. The diffusion coefficient (D = 3.45 × 10(-6) ± 5 × 10(-8) cm(2)/s) was approximately on the same order of magnitude as the coefficients of the relevant constituents. These results were chemically validated to discover that only the compounds with low molecular weights diffused across the membrane (mainly the (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin compounds). The model demonstrated that for the País grape seed extract, the dissolution process would proceed at a faster rate than the convective process. In addition, the absorbed fraction was elevated (F = 85.3%). The global mass transfer coefficient (k = 1.53 × 10(-4) ± 5 × 10(-6) cm/s) was a critical parameter in the absorption process, and minor changes drastically modified the prediction of the extract absorption. The simulation and experimental results show that the grape seed extract possesses the qualities of a potential phytodrug. PMID:24158737

  4. Chloride channel inhibition by a red wine extract and a synthetic small molecule prevents rotaviral secretory diarrhoea in neonatal mice

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eun-A; Jin, Byung-Ju; Namkung, Wan; Ma, Tonghui; Thiagarajah, Jay R.; Verkman, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe secretory diarrhoea in infants and young children globally. The rotaviral enterotoxin, NSP4, has been proposed to stimulate calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCC) on the apical plasma membrane of intestinal epithelial cells. We previously identified red wine and small molecule CaCC inhibitors. Objective To investigate the efficacy of a red wine extract and a synthetic small molecule, CaCCinh-A01, in inhibiting intestinal CaCCs and rotaviral diarrhoea. Design Inhibition of CaCC-dependent current was measured in T84 cells and mouse ileum. The effectiveness of an orally administered wine extract and CaCCinh-A01 in inhibiting diarrhoea in vivo was determined in a neonatal mouse model of rotaviral infection. Results Screening of ~150 red wines revealed a Cabernet Sauvignon that inhibited CaCC current in T84 cells with IC50 at a ~1:200 dilution, and higher concentrations producing 100% inhibition. A >1 kdalton wine extract prepared by dialysis, which retained full inhibition activity, blocked CaCC current in T84 cells and mouse intestine. In rotavirus-inoculated mice, oral administration of the wine extract prevented diarrhoea by inhibition of intestinal fluid secretion without affecting rotaviral infection. The wine extract did not inhibit the cystic fibrosis chloride channel (CFTR) in cell cultures, nor did it prevent watery stools in neonatal mice administered cholera toxin, which activates CFTR-dependent fluid secretion. CaCCinh-A01 also inhibited rotaviral diarrhoea. Conclusions Our results support a pathogenic role for enterocyte CaCCs in rotaviral diarrhoea and demonstrate the antidiarrhoeal action of CaCC inhibition by an alcohol-free, red wine extract and by a synthetic small molecule. PMID:24052273

  5. Effects of biodegradable Mg-6Zn alloy extracts on cell cycle of intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanhui; Yan, Jun; Zheng, Qi; Wang, Zhigang; Li, Jianan; Zhang, Xiaonong; Zhang, Shaoxiang

    2013-02-01

    In this study, intestinal epithelial cells (IEC)-6 were cultured in different concentration extracts of Mg-6Zn alloys for different time periods. We studied the indirect effects of Mg-6Zn alloys on cell cycle of IEC-6 cells. The cell cycle of IEC-6 cells was measured using flow cytometry. And, the cell cycle of IEC-6 cells was evaluated by investigating the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4, and P21 using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting tests. It was found that the IEC-6 cells displayed better cell functions in 20% extract of the Mg-6Zn alloy extracts, compared to the 100% or 60% extract. The in vitro results indicated that the conspicuous alkaline environment that is a result of rapid corrosion of Mg-6Zn alloys is disadvantageous to cell cycle of IEC-6 cells. PMID:22071354

  6. Inhibitory effects of extractives from leaves of Morus alba on human and rat small intestinal disaccharidase activity.

    PubMed

    Oku, Tsuneyuki; Yamada, Mai; Nakamura, Mariko; Sadamori, Naoki; Nakamura, Sadako

    2006-05-01

    The inhibitory effect on human and rat intestinal disaccharidase by the extractive from the leaves of Morus alba (ELM) containing 0.24 % 1-deoxynojirimycin equivalent and its inhibitory activities were investigated by the modified Dahlqvist method. In the presence of 1000-fold diluted ELM solution, the sucrase activity of four human samples was inhibited by 96 % and that of maltase and isomaltase by 95 and 99 %, respectively. The activities of trehalase and lactase were inhibited by 44 and 38 %, respectively. The human disaccharidase activities varied from sample to sample because the samples were obtained from different resected regions after surgery. However, the ratio of the inhibitory effect for sucrase, maltase, isomaltase, trehalase and lactase was very similar among the four samples, and also that of resembled rat intestinal disaccharides. The inhibitory constant of the 1-deoxynojirimycin equivalent for sucrase, maltase and isomaltase was 2.1 x 10(-4), 2.5 x 10(-4) and 4.5 x 10(-4) mm, respectively, and these inhibitory activities were shown, using rat brush border membrane vesicles, to be competitive. These results demonstrate that digestion is inhibited when an appropriate amount of ELM is orally ingested with sucrose or polysaccharide in man. When ELM was orally administered in a sucrose solution to fasted rats, the elevation in blood glucose was significantly suppressed, depending on the concentration of ELM given. These results suggest that ELM could be used as an ingredient in health foods and in foods that help to prevent diabetes. PMID:16611383

  7. Antioxidant Potential of the Methanol Extract of Parquetina nigrescens Mediates Protection Against Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Akinrinmade, Fadeyemi J; Akinrinde, Akinleye S; Soyemi, Olubisi O; Oyagbemi, Ademola A

    2016-01-01

    Parquetina nigrescens is a medicinal herb with recognized antioxidant properties and potential to alleviate conditions associated with oxidative stress, including gastric ulcers. We investigated the protective potential of methanol extract of Parquetina nigrescens (MEPN) against ischemia-reperfusion injury in the intestine of rats. Thirty (30) male Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned into five groups with Group I made up of control rats and Group II consisting of rats experimentally subjected to ischemia and reperfusion (IR) by clamping of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) for 30 minutes and 45 minutes, respectively. Groups III and IV rats also had IR, but were initially pre-treated with MEPN at 500 mg/kg and 1000 mg/kg respectively, for seven days. Rats in Group V were also pre-treated with Vitamin C, for seven days, before induction of IR. The results showed marked reduction in intestinal epithelial lesions in groups treated with MEPN, compared to the IR group which had severe villi erosion, inflammatory cell infiltration and hemorrhages. There were significant increases in Malondialdehyde (MDA) and significant reductions in reduced glutathione (GSH) and Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity with IR injury, while pre-treatment with either MEPN or Vitamin C prevented these effects. Increases in Glutathione peroxidase (GPX), Catalase (CAT) and Superoxide dismutase (SOD) with IR provided evidence for adaptive responses to oxidative injury during IR and preservation of enzyme activity by MEPN and Vitamin C. Taken together, Parquetina nigrescens provided considerable alleviation of intestinal injury produced by IR, at values much as effective as that offered by Vitamin C. PMID:26634775

  8. Oxymatrine Prevents NF-κB Nuclear Translocation And Ameliorates Acute Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Javier Rivera; Koo, Ja Seol; Goldsmith, Jason R.; Mühlbauer, Marcus; Narula, Acharan; Jobin, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Oxymatrine is a traditional Chinese herbal product that exhibits anti-inflammatory effects in models of heart, brain and liver injury. We investigated the impact of oxymatrine in an acute model of intestinal injury and inflammation. Oxymatrine significantly decreased LPS-induced NF-κB-driven luciferase activity, correlating with diminished induction of Cxcl2, Tnfα and Il6 mRNA expression in rat IEC-6 and murine BMDC. Although oxymatrine decreased LPS-induced p65 nuclear translocation and binding to the Cxcl2 gene promoter, this effect was independent of IκBα degradation/phosphorylation. DSS-induced weight loss and histological damage were ameliorated in oxymatrine-treated C57BL/6-WT-mice. While this effect correlated with reduced colonic Il6 and Il1β mRNA accumulation, global NF-κB activity as measured in NF-κBEGFP mice was unaffected. Our data demonstrate that oxymatrine reduces LPS-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation and activity independently of IκBα status, prevents intestinal inflammation through blockade of inflammatory signaling and ameliorates overall intestinal inflammation in vivo. PMID:23568217

  9. Macleaya cordata Extract Decreased Diarrhea Score and Enhanced Intestinal Barrier Function in Growing Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jun; Martínez, Yordan; Bin, Peng; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Macleaya cordata extract is of great scientific and practical interest to researchers, due to its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory responses within experimental animals. This study was designed to determine the diarrhea score and innate immunity of growing piglets after they had received Macleaya cordata extract supplements. A total of 240 growing pigs were randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatments, with 8 replicates per treatment and 10 piglets per replicate. All pigs received a basal diet containing similar amounts of nutrients. The three treatments were a control (no additive), an antibiotic (200 mg/kg colistin), and the Macleaya cordata extract supplement group (40 mg/kg Macleaya cordata extract). The diarrhea score was calculated after D 28. The jejunal samples were obtained from five piglets selected randomly from each treatment on D 28. In comparison with the control group, the dietary Macleaya cordata extract and colistin group demonstrated a substantially decreased diarrhea score. The introduction of Macleaya cordata extract supplements to the diet significantly increased volumes of ZO-1 and claudin-1, particularly in comparison with the pigs in the control group (P < 0.05). The findings indicate that Macleaya cordata extract does enhance intestinal barrier function in growing piglets and that it could be used as a viable substitute for antibiotics. PMID:27525260

  10. Prevention and Treatment of Intestinal Failure-Associated Liver Disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Bram P.; Duggan, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD), a serious complication occurring in infants, children and adults exposed to long-term parenteral nutrition (PN), causes a wide-spectrum of disease, ranging from cholestasis and steatosis to fibrosis and eventually cirrhosis. Known host risk factors for IFALD include low birth weight, prematurity, short bowel syndrome and recurrent sepsis. The literature suggests that components of PN may also play a part of the multifactorial pathophysiology. Because some intravenous lipid emulsions (ILE) may contribute to inflammation and interfere with bile excretion, treatment with ILE minimization and/or ILEs composed primarily of omega-3 fatty acids can be helpful but requires careful monitoring for growth failure and essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD). Data from randomized controlled trials are awaited to support widespread use of these approaches. Other IFALD treatments include cycling PN, ursodeoxycholic acid, sepsis prevention, photoprotection and polyvinylchloride-free tubing. Management and prevention of IFALD remains a clinical challenge. PMID:23397535

  11. A crucial role for HVEM and BTLA in preventing intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Marcos W; Turovskaya, Olga; Shaikh, Raziya B; Kim, Gisen; McCole, Declan F; Pfeffer, Klaus; Murphy, Kenneth M; Ware, Carl F; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2008-06-01

    The interaction between the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family member LIGHT and the TNF family receptor herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) co-stimulates T cells and promotes inflammation. However, HVEM also triggers inhibitory signals by acting as a ligand that binds to B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA), an immunoglobulin super family member. The contribution of HVEM interacting with these two binding partners in inflammatory processes remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of HVEM in the development of colitis induced by the transfer of CD4(+)CD45RB(high) T cells into recombination activating gene (Rag)(-/-) mice. Although the absence of HVEM on the donor T cells led to a slight decrease in pathogenesis, surprisingly, the absence of HVEM in the Rag(-/-) recipients led to the opposite effect, a dramatic acceleration of intestinal inflammation. Furthermore, the critical role of HVEM in preventing colitis acceleration mainly involved HVEM expression by radioresistant cells in the Rag(-/-) recipients interacting with BTLA. Our experiments emphasize the antiinflammatory role of HVEM and the importance of HVEM expression by innate immune cells in preventing runaway inflammation in the intestine. PMID:18519647

  12. Melatonin not only restores but also prevents the inhibition of the intestinal Ca(2+) absorption caused by glutathione depleting drugs.

    PubMed

    Areco, Vanessa; Rodriguez, Valeria; Marchionatti, Ana; Carpentieri, Agata; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori

    2016-07-01

    We have previously demonstrated that melatonin (MEL) blocks the inhibition of the intestinal Ca(2+) absorption caused by menadione (MEN). The purpose of this study were to determine whether MEL not only restores but also prevents the intestinal Ca(2+) absorption inhibited either by MEN or BSO, two drugs that deplete glutathione (GSH) in different ways, and to analyze the mechanisms by which MEN and MEL alter the movement of Ca(2+) across the duodenum. To know this, chicks were divided into four groups: 1) controls, 2) MEN treated, 3) MEL treated, and 4) treated sequentially with MEN and MEL or with MEN and MEL at the same time. In a set of experiments, chicks treated with BSO or sequentially with BSO and MEL or with BSO and MEL at the same time were used. MEL not only restored but also prevented the inhibition of the chick intestinal Ca(2+) absorption produced by either MEN or BSO. MEN altered the protein expression of molecules involved in the transcellular as well as in the paracellular pathway of the intestinal Ca(2+) absorption. MEL restored partially both pathways through normalization of the O2(-) levels. The nitrergic system was not altered by any treatment. In conclusion, MEL prevents or restores the inhibition of the intestinal Ca(2+) absorption caused by different GSH depleting drugs. It might become one drug for the treatment of intestinal Ca(2+) absorption under oxidant conditions having the advantage of low or null side effects. PMID:26970583

  13. Polyphenol-Rich Propolis Extracts Strengthen Intestinal Barrier Function by Activating AMPK and ERK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Jin, Xiaolu; Chen, Yifan; Song, Zehe; Jiang, Xiasen; Hu, Fuliang; Conlon, Michael A.; Topping, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Propolis has abundant polyphenolic constituents and is used widely as a health/functional food. Here, we investigated the effects of polyphenol-rich propolis extracts (PPE) on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells, as well as in rats. In Caco-2 cells, PPE increased transepithelial electrical resistance and decreased lucifer yellow flux. PPE-treated cells showed increased expression of the tight junction (TJ) loci occludin and zona occludens (ZO)-1. Confocal microscopy showed organized expressions in proteins related to TJ assembly, i.e., occludin and ZO-1, in response to PPE. Furthermore, PPE led to the activation of AMPK, ERK1/2, p38, and Akt. Using selective inhibitors, we found that the positive effects of PPE on barrier function were abolished in cells in which AMPK and ERK1/2 signaling were inhibited. Moreover, rats fed a diet supplemented with PPE (0.3% in the diet) exhibited increased colonic epithelium ZO-1 expression. Overall, these data suggest that PPE strengthens intestinal barrier function by activating AMPK and ERK signaling and provide novel insights into the potential application of propolis for human gut health. PMID:27164138

  14. Polyphenol-Rich Propolis Extracts Strengthen Intestinal Barrier Function by Activating AMPK and ERK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Jin, Xiaolu; Chen, Yifan; Song, Zehe; Jiang, Xiasen; Hu, Fuliang; Conlon, Michael A; Topping, David L

    2016-01-01

    Propolis has abundant polyphenolic constituents and is used widely as a health/functional food. Here, we investigated the effects of polyphenol-rich propolis extracts (PPE) on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells, as well as in rats. In Caco-2 cells, PPE increased transepithelial electrical resistance and decreased lucifer yellow flux. PPE-treated cells showed increased expression of the tight junction (TJ) loci occludin and zona occludens (ZO)-1. Confocal microscopy showed organized expressions in proteins related to TJ assembly, i.e., occludin and ZO-1, in response to PPE. Furthermore, PPE led to the activation of AMPK, ERK1/2, p38, and Akt. Using selective inhibitors, we found that the positive effects of PPE on barrier function were abolished in cells in which AMPK and ERK1/2 signaling were inhibited. Moreover, rats fed a diet supplemented with PPE (0.3% in the diet) exhibited increased colonic epithelium ZO-1 expression. Overall, these data suggest that PPE strengthens intestinal barrier function by activating AMPK and ERK signaling and provide novel insights into the potential application of propolis for human gut health. PMID:27164138

  15. Ingestion of black chokeberry fruit extract leads to intestinal and systemic changes in a rat model of prediabetes and hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Jurgoński, Adam; Juśkiewicz, Jerzy; Zduńczyk, Zenon

    2008-12-01

    This report presents a complex analysis of changes proceeding in the gut, blood and internal organs of rats with induced oxidative stress, glucose intolerance and hyperlipidemia after dietary supplementation with an extract from black chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) fruit, that is a condensed source of polyphenols (714 mg/g), especially anthocyanin glycosides (56.6%). The disturbances mimicking those observed in metabolic syndrome were induced by a high-fructose diet and simultaneous single injection of streptozotocin (20 mg/kg). Dietary supplementation with the chokeberry fruit extract (0.2%) decreased activity of maltase and sucrase as well as increased activity of lactase in the mucosa of the small intestine. Its ingestion led also to the improvement of antioxidant status, especially, the concentration of a lipid peroxidation indicator (TBARS) in organ tissues (liver, kidney and lung) was normalized; some cholesterol-lowering and distinct hypoglycemic actions were also observed. The mechanism of glucose reduction is likely to be multifactorial, and we suggest the factors related with the decreased activity of mucosal disaccharidases important for further investigation. In conclusion, chokeberry fruit derivatives may act as a promising supplementary therapeutic option in the prevention and treatment of disorders occurring in metabolic syndrome, as well as their complications. PMID:18726160

  16. Inhibitory effects of hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis) extracts on intestinal alpha-glucosidase activity and postprandial hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hiroyuki; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Yanagiya, Chikako; Mizutani, Junya; Tsuji, Masayoshi; Ishihara, Chiaki

    2003-10-01

    It has been known that Hyssopus officinalis (hyssop) is a herb that grows in the wild and is a source of natural antioxidants. We previously reported that a-glucosidase inhibitors, (2S, 3S)1-O-beta-D-6'-O-cinnamoylglucopyranosyl-3-(3", 5"-dimethoxy-4"-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,3-propanetriol and (2S, 3S)1-O-beta-D-glucopranosyl-3-(3", 5"-dimethoxy-4"-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,3-propanetriol, from the dry leaves of hyssop, were isolated. This study examined the alpha-glucosidase inhibitory effects of hyssop extracts on intestinal carbohydrate absorption in rat everted gut sac and carbohydrate-loaded hyperglycemia in mice. In the everted gut sac experiment, 10 mM sucrose- and 5 mM maltose-treated increases in glucose concentration in the serosal compartment were inhibited in the presence of 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ mL hyssop extracts, although a 10 mM glucose-induced increase in serosal glucose was not inhibited by the extracts. Additionally, hyperglycemia in sucrose- and maltose-loaded mice was significantly suppressed at an early stage, within 30 to 60 min by oral pre-administration of 300 and 100 mg/kg hyssop extracts, respectively. These findings suggest that hyssop extracts inhibited the digestion of complex carbohydrates, but not that of absorbable monosaccharide, and might be a useful supplemental food for hyperglycemia. PMID:14703310

  17. Fructose-1,6-biphosphate and nucleoside pool modifications prevent neutrophil accumulation in the reperfused intestine.

    PubMed

    Sola, Anna; Panés, Julián; Xaus, Carme; Hotter, Georgina

    2003-01-01

    Fructose-1,6-biphosphate (F16BP) attenuates ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury by inhibiting microvascular leukocyte adhesion or reducing neutrophil-derived oxygen free-radical production, but the causes of this action, the mechanisms in vivo, and the possible implication of nucleoside pool modifications are still controversial issues. We explored whether F16BP's inhibition of free-radical production and neutrophil recruitment is a result of its effect on adenosine (Ado) accumulation during intestinal I/R injury. The effects of F16BP administration were tested on the nucleotide/nucleoside metabolism at the end of the ischemic period and on microvascular neutrophil recruitment and free-radical production after reperfusion in vivo, in the presence or absence of Ado deaminase (ADA). Infusion of F16BP markedly increased endogenous Ado, decreased xanthine accumulation during the ischemic period, and inhibited neutrophil recruitment and subsequent neutrophil free-radical generation during reperfusion. Administration of ADA reversed these processes. The results provide strong evidence that F16BP prevents neutrophil accumulation and neutrophil free-radical generation during intestinal I/R by a key mechanism that modifies the nucleoside pool, leading to an endogenous accumulation of Ado and to a reduction of xanthine during ischemia. PMID:12525564

  18. Intestinal GUCY2C Prevents TGF-β Secretion Coordinating Desmoplasia and Hyperproliferation in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Ahmara V.; Lin, Jieru E.; Kim, Gilbert W.; Marszalowicz, Glen P.; Li, Peng; Stoecker, Brian A.; Blomain, Erik S.; Rattan, Satish; Snook, Adam E.; Schulz, Stephanie; Waldman, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is a multi-step process that reflects intimate reciprocal interactions between epithelia and underlying stroma. However, tumor-initiating mechanisms coordinating transformation of both epithelial and stromal components are not defined. In humans and mice, initiation of colorectal cancer is universally associated with loss of guanylin and uroguanylin, the endogenous ligands for the tumor suppressor guanylyl cyclase C (GUCY2C), disrupting a network of homeostatic mechanisms along the crypt-surface axis. Here, we reveal that silencing GUCY2C in human colon cancer cells increases Akt-dependent TGF-β secretion, activating fibroblasts through TGF-β type I receptors and Smad3 phosphorylation. In turn, activating TGF-β signaling induces fibroblasts to secrete hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), reciprocally driving colon cancer cell proliferation through cMET-dependent signaling. Elimination of GUCY2C signaling in mice (Gucy2c-/-) produces intestinal desmoplasia, with increased reactive myofibroblasts, which is suppressed by anti-TGF-β antibodies or genetic silencing of Akt. Thus, GUCY2C coordinates intestinal epithelial-mesenchymal homeostasis through reciprocal paracrine circuits mediated by TGF-β and HGF. In that context, GUCY2C signaling constitutes a direct link between the initiation of colorectal cancer and the induction of its associated desmoplastic stromal niche. The recent regulatory approval of oral GUCY2C ligands to treat chronic gastrointestinal disorders underscores the potential therapeutic opportunity for oral GUCY2C hormone replacement to prevent remodeling of the microenvironment essential for colorectal tumorigenesis. PMID:24085786

  19. Prevention of cholesterol gallstones by inhibiting hepatic biosynthesis and intestinal absorption of cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Helen H; Portincasa, Piero; de Bari, Ornella; Liu, Kristina J; Garruti, Gabriella; Neuschwander-Tetri, Brent A; Wang, David Q.-H

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol cholelithiasis is a multifactorial disease influenced by a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors, and represents a failure of biliary cholesterol homeostasis in which the physical-chemical balance of cholesterol solubility in bile is disturbed. The primary pathophysiologic event is persistent hepatic hypersecretion of biliary cholesterol, which has both hepatic and small intestinal components. The majority of the environmental factors are probably related to Western-type dietary habits, including excess cholesterol consumption. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy, one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures in the US, is nowadays a major treatment for gallstones. However, it is invasive and can cause surgical complications, and not all patients with symptomatic gallstones are candidates for surgery. The hydrophilic bile acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been employed as first-line pharmacological therapy in a subgroup of symptomatic patients with small, radiolucent cholesterol gallstones. Long-term administration of UDCA can promote the dissolution of cholesterol gallstones. However, the optimal use of UDCA is not always achieved in clinical practice because of failure to titrate the dose adequately. Therefore, the development of novel, effective, and noninvasive therapies is crucial for reducing the costs of health care associated with gallstones. In this review, we summarize recent progress in investigating the inhibitory effects of ezetimibe and statins on intestinal absorption and hepatic biosynthesis of cholesterol, respectively, for the treatment of gallstones, as well as in elucidating their molecular mechanisms by which combination therapy could prevent this very common liver disease worldwide. PMID:23419155

  20. Selective intestinal decontamination for the prevention of early bacterial infections after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Resino, Elena; San-Juan, Rafael; Aguado, Jose Maria

    2016-07-14

    Bacterial infection in the first month after liver transplantation is a frequent complication that poses a serious risk for liver transplant recipients as contributes substantially to increased length of hospitalization and hospital costs being a leading cause of death in this period. Most of these infections are caused by gram-negative bacilli, although gram-positive infections, especially Enterococcus sp. constitute an emerging infectious problem. This high rate of early postoperative infections after liver transplant has generated interest in exploring various prophylactic approaches to surmount this problem. One of these approaches is selective intestinal decontamination (SID). SID is a prophylactic strategy that consists of the administration of antimicrobials with limited anaerobicidal activity in order to reduce the burden of aerobic gram-negative bacteria and/or yeast in the intestinal tract and so prevent infections caused by these organisms. The majority of studies carried out to date have found SID to be effective in the reduction of gram-negative infection, but the effect on overall infection is limited due to a higher number of infection episodes by pathogenic enterococci and coagulase-negative staphylococci. However, difficulties in general extrapolation of the favorable results obtained in specific studies together with the potential risk of selection of multirresistant microorganisms has conditioned controversy about the routinely application of these strategies in liver transplant recipients. PMID:27468189

  1. Selective intestinal decontamination for the prevention of early bacterial infections after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Resino, Elena; San-Juan, Rafael; Aguado, Jose Maria

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection in the first month after liver transplantation is a frequent complication that poses a serious risk for liver transplant recipients as contributes substantially to increased length of hospitalization and hospital costs being a leading cause of death in this period. Most of these infections are caused by gram-negative bacilli, although gram-positive infections, especially Enterococcus sp. constitute an emerging infectious problem. This high rate of early postoperative infections after liver transplant has generated interest in exploring various prophylactic approaches to surmount this problem. One of these approaches is selective intestinal decontamination (SID). SID is a prophylactic strategy that consists of the administration of antimicrobials with limited anaerobicidal activity in order to reduce the burden of aerobic gram-negative bacteria and/or yeast in the intestinal tract and so prevent infections caused by these organisms. The majority of studies carried out to date have found SID to be effective in the reduction of gram-negative infection, but the effect on overall infection is limited due to a higher number of infection episodes by pathogenic enterococci and coagulase-negative staphylococci. However, difficulties in general extrapolation of the favorable results obtained in specific studies together with the potential risk of selection of multirresistant microorganisms has conditioned controversy about the routinely application of these strategies in liver transplant recipients. PMID:27468189

  2. Ivy water extracts as gastric ulcer preventive agents.

    PubMed

    Mulkijanyan, K; Novikova, Zh; Sulakvelidze, M; Getia, M; Mshvildadze, V; Dekanosidze, G

    2013-11-01

    In folk medicine the ivies (Hedera L. Fam.Araliaceae) are known as plants possessing diverse curative properties. A comparative phytochemical study of the biologically active water extracts of H. colchica and H. helix and evaluation of their ulcer preventive efficacy in ethanol-induced ulcer model in rats was carried out. Water extracts of H. colchica and H. helix (300 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly (p<0.01) decrease the ulcer index (0.50 and 1.38 vs 3.17 in control) and rise macroscopic curative ratio (84.2% and 56.6%, respectively). The results clearly indicate that pretreatment with water extract of H. colchica is preferable and further experiments are required to isolate the active principals responsible for itsantiulcerogenic activity. PMID:24323967

  3. Pharmacokinetics, intestinal absorption and microbial metabolism of single platycodin D in comparison to Platycodi radix extract

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jinjun; Zou, Jiashuang; Xie, Tong; Kang, An; Zhou, Wei; Deng, Haishan; Mao, Yancao; Di, Liuqing; Wang, Shouchuan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Platycodi radix, the dried root of Platycodon grandiflorum A. DC, has been widely used as food and herb medicine for treating cough, cold and other respiratory ailments, and platycodin D (PD) is one of the most important compounds in Platycodi Radix. Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetic characteristics, intestinal absorption and microbial metabolism of PD in monomer with that in Platycodi radix extract (PRE). Materials and Methods: In the pharmacokinetic study, the concentrations of PD in rat plasma were determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and the main pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by data analysis software (DAS). Besides, in vitro Caco-2 cells and fecal lysate were performed to investigate the intestinal absorption and metabolism, respectively. Results: The results from pharmacokinetics showed that the area under the curve, the peak concentration the time to reach peak concentration and mean residence time of PD in PRE were enhanced significantly compared with that in single PD. Caco-2 cells transport study indicated that the absorption of PD both in monomer and in PRE were poor owning that the permeability of PD were <1/106 cm/s. The hydrolysis degree of PD in PRE was significantly lower than that in monomer PD in fecal lysate, which might be illustrated by the other ingredients in PRE influenced the hydrolysis of PD via gut microbiota. Conclusion: These findings indicated that the difference of microbial metabolism, not apparent absorption in intestine for PD between in monomer and in PRE contributed to their pharmacokinetic difference. PMID:26600720

  4. Intestinal lipids and minerals in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats fed bitter yam (Dioscorea polygonoides) sapogenin extract.

    PubMed

    Omoruyi, Felix O; McAnuff-Harding, Marie A; Asemota, Helen N

    2006-10-01

    Yam is the leading form of staple for millions of people in the tropical and subtropical countries. They are good sources of carbohydrate. However, the protein content of yam is low. The effect of bitter yam sapogenin extract or commercial diosgenin on faecal minerals and intestinal lipids in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats was studied. Sapogenin extract or commercial diosgenin (1%) supplemented diets were fed to diabetic male Wistar rats for three weeks. Bitter yam sapogenin extract or commercial diosgenin did not significantly alter faecal magnesium, calcium, and zinc excretion but significantly decreased faecal sodium and potassium excretion. The absorption of iron was impaired by bitter yam sapogenin extract or commercial diosgenin during the first week of feeding. Bitter yam sapogenin extract or commercial diosgenin supplements significantly decreased intestinal lipids towards normal. Faecal lipids excreted was significantly higher in diabetic rats fed bitter yam sapogenin extract or commercial diosgenin for the three weeks period compared to the diabetic control group. These results show that bitter yam sapogenin extract or commercial diosgenin does not have the same effects on mineral excretion in diabetes. There was no direct correlation between the decrease in excretion of mono-valent cations and the activity of intestinal Na+/K+ATPase. PMID:17105702

  5. In vitro extraction and fermentation of polyphenols from grape seeds (Vitis vinifera) by human intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Wang, Wei; Huang, Jun; Ding, Yu; Pan, Zhouqiang; Zhao, Ya; Zhang, Renkang; Hu, Bing; Zeng, Xiaoxiong

    2016-04-20

    The effects of several parameters on the extraction yield of total polyphenols from grape seeds by pressurized liquid extraction were investigated. The highest recovery of total polyphenols occurred at 80 °C within 5 min, and a single extraction allowed a recovery of more than 97% of total polyphenols. Following the purification with macroporous resin, the effects of grape polyphenols (>94.8%) on human intestinal microbiota were monitored over 36 h incubation by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were measured by HPLC. The result showed that the grape polyphenols promoted the changes in the relevant microbial populations and shifted the profiles of SCFAs. Fermentation of grape polyphenols resulted in a significant increase in the numbers of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus-Enterococcus group and inhibition in the growth of the Clostridium histolyticum group and the Bacteroides-Prevotella group, with no significant effect on the population of total bacteria. The findings suggest that grape polyphenols have potential prebiotic effects on modulating the gut microbiota composition and generating SCFAs that contribute to the improvements of host health. PMID:26980065

  6. Is there a role for lactobacilli in prevention of urogenital and intestinal infections?

    PubMed Central

    Reid, G; Bruce, A W; McGroarty, J A; Cheng, K J; Costerton, J W

    1990-01-01

    This review describes the importance of microbial adhesion in the ecology of the urogenital and intestinal tracts and the influence of host and microbial factors in bacterial interference. In a recent revival of interest in bacterial interference, lactobacillus administration has been studied as a means of treating and preventing disease. Although evidence is conflicting, Lactobacillus acidophilus appears to be involved in beneficial antagonistic and cooperative reactions that interfere with establishment of pathogens in the gastrointestinal tract. The mechanisms of action are believed to involve competitive exclusion and production of inhibitory substances, including bacteriocins. These characteristics, as well as demonstrated adherence abilities in vitro, led to selection of certain Lactobacillus strains for clinical studies of cystitis. Weekly intravaginal Lactobacillus therapy reduced the recurrence rate of uncomplicated lower urinary tract infections in women. Use of Lactobacillus strains resistant to Nonoxynol-9, a spermicide that kills members of the protective normal vaginal flora, may have potential for use in women with recurrent cystitis using this contraceptive agent. In veterinary studies, bacterial interference by administration of probiotics has also been beneficial in disease prevention in animals. Carefully selected bacterial mixtures integrate with the gastrointestinal flora of the animals and can confer disease resistance and improve physiological function. Additional human and animal trials are needed to determine the practical, long-term usefulness of bacterial interference as a protective mechanism against infectious diseases. Images PMID:2224835

  7. Epidermal growth factor improves survival and prevents intestinal injury in a murine model of pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Jessica A; Vithayathil, Paul J; Khailova, Ludmila; Lawrance, Christopher P; Samocha, Alexandr J; Jung, Enjae; Leathersich, Ann M; Dunne, W Michael; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2011-10-01

    Mortality from pneumonia is mediated, in part, through extrapulmonary causes. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has broad cytoprotective effects, including potent restorative properties in the injured intestine. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of EGF treatment following Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. FVB/N mice underwent intratracheal injection of either P. aeruginosa or saline and were then randomized to receive either systemic EGF or vehicle beginning immediately or 24 h after the onset of pneumonia. Systemic EGF decreased 7-day mortality from 65% to 10% when initiated immediately after the onset of pneumonia and to 27% when initiated 24 h after the onset of pneumonia. Even though injury in pneumonia is initiated in the lungs, the survival advantage conferred by EGF was not associated with improvements in pulmonary pathology. In contrast, EGF prevented intestinal injury by reversing pneumonia-induced increases in intestinal epithelial apoptosis and decreases in intestinal proliferation and villus length. Systemic cytokines and kidney and liver function were unaffected by EGF therapy, although EGF decreased pneumonia-induced splenocyte apoptosis. To determine whether the intestine was sufficient to account for extrapulmonary effects induced by EGF, a separate set of experiments was done using transgenic mice with enterocyte-specific overexpression of EGF (IFABP-EGF [intestinal fatty acid-binding protein linked to mouse EGF] mice), which were compared with wild-type mice subjected to pneumonia. IFABP-EGF mice had improved survival compared with wild-type mice following pneumonia (50% vs. 28%, respectively, P < 0.05) and were protected from pneumonia-induced intestinal injury. Thus, EGF may be a potential adjunctive therapy for pneumonia, mediated in part by its effects on the intestine. PMID:21701422

  8. IL-10 producing intestinal macrophages prevent excessive anti-bacterial innate immunity by limiting IL-23 synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Petra; Morris, Venetia; Greenbaum, Jason A.; Park, Yoon; Bjoerheden, Unni; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Muffley, Tracy; Shui, Jr-Wen; Kim, Gisen; Cheroutre, Hilde; Liu, Yun- Cai; Peters, Bjoern; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Murai, Masako

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune responses are regulated in the intestine to prevent excessive inflammation. Here we show that a subset of mouse colonic macrophages constitutively produce the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. In mice infected with Citrobacter rodentium, a model for enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infection in humans, these macrophages are required to prevent intestinal pathology. IL-23 is significantly increased in infected mice with a myeloid cell-specific deletion of IL-10, and the addition of IL-10 reduces IL-23 production by intestinal macrophages. Furthermore, blockade of IL-23 leads to reduced mortality in the context of macrophage IL-10 deficiency. Transcriptome and other analyses indicate that IL-10-expressing macrophages receive an autocrine IL-10 signal. Interestingly, only transfer of the IL-10 positive macrophages could rescue IL-10 deficient infected mice. Therefore, these data indicate a pivotal role for intestinal macrophages that constitutively produce IL-10, in controlling excessive innate immune activation and preventing tissue damage after an acute bacterial infection. PMID:25959063

  9. Intestinal disaccharidases and some renal enzymes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats fed sapogenin extract from bitter yam (Dioscorea polygonoides).

    PubMed

    McAnuff-Harding, Marie A; Omoruyi, Felix O; Asemota, Helen N

    2006-04-25

    In this study, the effects of bitter yam sapogenin extract or commercial diosgenin on intestinal disaccharidases and some renal enzymes in diabetic rats were investigated. Diabetic male Wistar rats were fed diets supplemented with 1% sapogenin extract or commercial diosgenin for 3 weeks. Plasma glucose, intestinal disaccharidases and the activities of transaminases, acid phosphatase, glucose-6-phosphatase, ATP citrate lyase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase were assessed for the level of metabolic changes in the kidney of diabetic rats. Sapogenin extract or commercial diosgenin supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in lactase and maltase activities in all three regions of the intestine compared to the diabetic control group. However, the test diets significantly reduced intestinal sucrase activity in the proximal and mid regions. Test diets supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in the activities of the transaminases compared to the normal and diabetic control groups. The activity of glucose-6-phosphatase was significantly increased while the activities of ATP citrate lyase, pyruvate kinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were significantly reduced in the kidney of the diabetic control rats compared to the normal group. Test diets supplementation did not significantly alter glucose-6-phosphatase, ATP citrate lyase and pyruvate kinase activities compared to the diabetic control. However, there was a significant increase in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity toward the normal group. In conclusion, the consumption of bitter yam sapogenin extract or commercial diosgenin demonstrated hypoglycemic properties, which are beneficial in diabetes by reducing intestinal disaccharidases activities; however, bitter yam sapogenin extract may adversely affect the integrity of kidney membrane. PMID:16497337

  10. Dietary protein modifies effect of plant extracts in the intestinal ecosystem of the pig at weaning.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla, E G; Pérez, J F; Martín, M; Blandón, J C; Baucells, F; Kamel, C; Gasa, J

    2009-06-01

    The plant extract mixture (XT) used in the present experiment, containing carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and capsicum oleoresin, has previously been shown to decrease diarrhea mortality and to modify the intestinal environment of pigs after weaning. However, results obtained among experiments have not been consistent. We hypothesized that dietary protein could be a main factor determining the effect of plant extracts on intestinal environment. Thus, in the present study we assessed the effects of XT in piglet diets with different protein sources and amounts. Pigs weaned at 20 +/- 1 d of age (n = 240) were allocated to 1 of 6 treatments, which followed a factorial arrangement, with 2 amounts (as-fed basis) of the XT (0 and 200 mg/kg) and 3 diets with various amounts of CP and protein sources. Diet FM18 contained 10% of low-temperature fish meal (LT-FM) and a CP level of 18%; diet SBM18 contained 5% of LT-FM plus 9% of full fat extruded soy and a CP level of 18%; and SBM20 diet contained 10% of LT-FM plus 6.3% of full fat extruded soy and a CP level of 20%. Growth performance of the animals was recorded for 14 d, but no differences were detected among treatments. Eight pigs per treatment were killed to examine variables describing aspects of gastrointestinal ecology. For diets containing 18% CP, FM18 and SBM18, XT tended to decrease ileal digestibility of OM (P = 0.064 and 0.071, respectively) and decreased starch digestibility (P = 0.032 and 0.014, respectively). It also reduced villi length (P = 0.003 and 0.013, respectively) and tended to decrease intraepithelial lymphocyte number (P = 0.051 and 0.100, respectively) in the proximal jejunum. The XT inclusion also increased ileal lactobacilli:enterobacteria (P = 0.017) ratio and decreased VFA production in the cecum (P = 0.045) for all diets. A decreased CP level appeared to favor the effects of the studied plant extracts in a positive or negative way depending on the variable measured. The microbial differences

  11. Epidermal growth factor improves survival and prevents intestinal injury in a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Jessica A.; Vithayathil, Paul J.; Khailova, Ludmila; Lawrance, Christopher P.; Samocha, Alexandr J.; Jung, Enjae; Leathersich, Ann M.; Dunne, W. Michael; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2011-01-01

    Mortality from pneumonia is mediated, in part, through extrapulmonary causes. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has broad cytoprotective effects, including potent restorative properties in the injured intestine. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of EGF treatment following Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. FVB/N mice underwent intratracheal injection of either Pseudomonas aeruginosa or saline and were then randomized to receive either systemic EGF or vehicle beginning immediately or 24 hours after the onset of pneumonia. Systemic EGF decreased seven-day mortality from 65% to 10% when initiated immediately after the onset of pneumonia and to 27% when initiated 24 hours after the onset of pneumonia. Even though injury in pneumonia is initiated in the lungs, the survival advantage conferred by EGF was not associated with improvements in pulmonary pathology. In contrast, EGF prevented intestinal injury by reversing pneumonia-induced increases in intestinal epithelial apoptosis and decreases in intestinal proliferation and villus length. Systemic cytokines, kidney and liver function were unaffected by EGF therapy although EGF decreased pneumonia-induced splenocyte apoptosis. To determine whether the intestine was sufficient to account for extrapulmonary effects induced by EGF, a separate set of experiments were done using transgenic mice with enterocyte-specific overexpression of EGF (IFABP-EGF mice) which were compared to WT mice subjected to pneumonia. IFABP-EGF mice had improved survival compared to WT mice following pneumonia (50% vs. 28% respectively, p<0.05) and were protected from pneumonia-induced intestinal injury. Thus, EGF may be a potential adjunctive therapy for pneumonia, mediated in part by its effects on the intestine. PMID:21701422

  12. Maintenance of superior mesenteric arterial perfusion prevents increased intestinal mucosal permeability in endotoxic pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, M.P.; Kaups, K.L.; Wang, H.L.; Rothschild, H.R. )

    1991-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharide increases intestinal mucosal permeability to hydrophilic compounds such as chromium 51-labeled edetate (51Cr-EDTA). The authors sought to determine whether this phenomenon is partly mediated by lipopolysaccharide-induced mesenteric hypoperfusion. They assessed permeability in an isolated segment of ileum by measuring plasma-to-lumen clearances (C) for two probes, 51Cr-EDTA and urea, and expressing the results as a ratio (CEDTA/CUREA). In control pigs (n = 6) resuscitated with Ringer's lactate (RL), mucosal permeability was unchanged during the 210-minute period of observation. In pigs (n = 7) infused with lipopolysaccharide (50 micrograms/kg) and similarly resuscitated with RL, mesenteric perfusion (Qsma) decreased significantly and permeability increased progressively and significantly. When endotoxic pigs (n = 6) were resuscitated with a regimen (RL plus hetastarch plus dobutamine) that preserved normal Qsma, lipopolysaccharide-induced mucosal hyperpermeability was prevented. Resuscitation of endotoxic pigs (n = 6) with RL plus hetastarch provided intermediate protection against both mesenteric hypoperfusion and increased permeability. These data suggest that diminished Qsma contributes to impaired ileal mucosal barrier function in experimental endotoxicosis.

  13. Non-starch polysaccharides extracted from seaweed can modulate intestinal absorption of glucose and insulin response in the pig.

    PubMed

    Vaugelade, P; Hoebler, C; Bernard, F; Guillon, F; Lahaye, M; Duee, P H; Darcy-Vrillon, B

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the possible effects of algal polysaccharides on postprandial blood glucose and insulin responses in an animal model, the pig. Three seaweed fibres of different viscosities, extracted from Palmaria palmata (PP), Eucheuma cottonii (EC), or Laminaria digitata (LD), were compared to purified cellulose (CEL). Blood glucose and plasma insulin levels were monitored and intestinal absorption quantified for 8 h following a high carbohydrate test-meal supplemented with 5% fibre. Digestive contents were also sampled, 5 h postprandial. As compared to CEL, PP had no effect on glucose and insulin responses. The latter decreased with EC, but glucose absorption balance was not modified. LD addition resulted in a dramatically reduced glucose absorption balance, accompanied by a higher amount of starch left in the small intestine. Among polysaccharides tested, only the highly viscous alginates could affect intestinal absorption of glucose and insulin response. PMID:10737549

  14. Improvement in Human Immune Function with Changes in Intestinal Microbiota by Salacia reticulata Extract Ingestion: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Yuriko; Ueda, Fumitaka; Utsuyama, Masanori; Kamei, Asuka; Kakinuma, Chihaya; Abe, Keiko; Hirokawa, Katsuiku

    2015-01-01

    Plants belonging to the genus Salacia in the Hippocrateaceae family are known to inhibit sugar absorption. In a previous study, administration of Salacia reticulata extract in rats altered the intestinal microbiota and increased expression of immune-relevant genes in small intestinal epithelial cells. This study aimed to investigate the effect of S. reticulata extract in human subjects by examining the gene expression profiles of blood cells, immunological indices, and intestinal microbiota. The results revealed an improvement in T-cell proliferation activity and some other immunological indices. In addition, the intestinal microbiota changed, with an increase in Bifidobacterium and a decrease in Clostridium bacteria. The expression levels of many immune-relevant genes were altered in blood cells. We concluded that S. reticulata extract ingestion in humans improved immune functions and changed the intestinal microbiota. Trial Registration: UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000011732 PMID:26630568

  15. Preventive Effects of Houttuynia cordata Extract for Oral Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sekita, Yasuko; Murakami, Keiji; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Amoh, Takashi; Fujiwara, Natsumi; Ogata, Shohei; Matsuo, Takashi; Miyake, Yoichiro; Kashiwada, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata (HC) (Saururaceae) has been used internally and externally as a traditional medicine and as an herbal tea for healthcare in Japan. Our recent survey showed that HC poultice (HCP) prepared from smothering fresh leaves of HC had been frequently used for the treatment of purulent skin diseases with high effectiveness. Our experimental study also demonstrated that ethanol extract of HCP (eHCP) has antibacterial, antibiofilm, and anti-inflammatory effects against S. aureus which caused purulent skin diseases. In this study, we focused on novel effects of HCP against oral infectious diseases, such as periodontal disease and dental caries. We determined the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of water solution of HCP ethanol extract (wHCP) against important oral pathogens and investigated its cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory effects on human oral epithelial cells. wHCP had moderate antimicrobial effects against some oral microorganisms and profound antibiofilm effects against Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida albicans. In addition, wHCP had no cytotoxic effects and could inhibit interleukin-8 and CCL20 productions by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human oral keratinocytes. Our findings suggested that wHCP may be clinically useful for preventing oral infectious diseases as a mouthwash for oral care. PMID:27413739

  16. Preventive Effects of Houttuynia cordata Extract for Oral Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sekita, Yasuko; Murakami, Keiji; Amoh, Takashi; Ogata, Shohei; Matsuo, Takashi; Miyake, Yoichiro; Kashiwada, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata (HC) (Saururaceae) has been used internally and externally as a traditional medicine and as an herbal tea for healthcare in Japan. Our recent survey showed that HC poultice (HCP) prepared from smothering fresh leaves of HC had been frequently used for the treatment of purulent skin diseases with high effectiveness. Our experimental study also demonstrated that ethanol extract of HCP (eHCP) has antibacterial, antibiofilm, and anti-inflammatory effects against S. aureus which caused purulent skin diseases. In this study, we focused on novel effects of HCP against oral infectious diseases, such as periodontal disease and dental caries. We determined the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of water solution of HCP ethanol extract (wHCP) against important oral pathogens and investigated its cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory effects on human oral epithelial cells. wHCP had moderate antimicrobial effects against some oral microorganisms and profound antibiofilm effects against Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida albicans. In addition, wHCP had no cytotoxic effects and could inhibit interleukin-8 and CCL20 productions by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human oral keratinocytes. Our findings suggested that wHCP may be clinically useful for preventing oral infectious diseases as a mouthwash for oral care. PMID:27413739

  17. Role of oil extract of garlic (Allium sativum Linn.) on intestinal transference of calcium and its possible correlation with preservation of skeletal health in an ovariectomized rat model of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Maitrayee; Das, Asankur Sekhar; Das, Dolan; Mukherjee, Sandip; Mitra, Smita; Mitra, Chandan

    2006-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of an oil extract of garlic on the in vivo intestinal transference of calcium, and also to verify its role in maintaining the bone mineral content and bone tensile strength in an ovariectomized rat model of osteoporosis. The results suggest that, in this experimental model, oil extract of garlic promotes intestinal transference of calcium by modulating the activities of both intestinal alkaline phosphatase and Ca(2+) activated ATPase. Also the observed low bone mineral content and low bone tensile strength in these rats were significantly restored by garlic oil supplementation. Further, garlic oil supplementation was able to revive partially the bilateral ovariectomy-induced decrease in the serum estrogen titer. The serum parathyroid hormone level, however, was found unaltered in these rats. The garlic oil supplemented partial recovery in serum estrogen titer in bilaterally ovariectomized rat was found to be persistently associated with enhanced calcium transference and better preservation of bone mineral content. The results of this study propose that the phytoestrogenic efficacy of an oil extract of garlic prevents ovarian hormone deficiency induced bone mineral loss possibly by promoting intestinal transference of calcium through the partial revival of the serum estrogen titer. PMID:16619371

  18. Adhesive strength and curing rate of marine mussel protein extracts on porcine small intestinal submucosa*

    PubMed Central

    Ninan, Lal; Stroshine, R L; Wilker, J.J.; Shi, Riyi

    2008-01-01

    An adhesive protein extracted from marine mussel (Mytilus edulis) was used to bond strips of connective tissue for the purpose of evaluating the use of curing agents to improve adhesive curing. Specifically, mussel adhesive protein solution (MAPS, 0.5 mM dihydroxyphenylalanine) was applied, with or without the curing agents, to the ends of two overlapping strips of porcine small intestinal submucosa. The bond strength of this lap joint was determined after curing for 1 h at room temperature (25°C). The strength of joints formed using only MAPS or with only the ethyl, butyl or octyl cyanoacrylate adhesives were determined. Although joints bonded using ethyl cyanoacrylate were strongest, those using MAPS were stronger than those using butyl and octyl cyanoacrylates. The addition of 25 mM solutions of the transition metal ions V5+, Fe3+ and Cr6+, which are all oxidants, increased the bond strength of the MAPS joints. The V5+ gave the strongest bonds and the Fe3+ the second strongest. In subsequent tests with V5+ and Fe3+ solutions, the bond strength increased with V5+ concentration, but it did not increase with Fe3+ concentration. Addition of 250 mM V5+ gave a very strong bond. PMID:17434815

  19. Methods to Prevent or Treat Refractory Diseases by Focusing on Intestinal Microbes Using LPS and Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Soma, Gen-Ichiro; Inagawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal microbes are known to influence host homeostasis by producing various substances. Recently, the presence of a diverse range of intestinal microbiota has been shown to play a key role in the maintenance of health, along with influencing the host's innate immunity towards various diseases. For example, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from healthy individuals was remarkably effective in cases of refractory Clostridium difficile colitis. Conversely, decreased number of intestinal microbes resulting from the oral administration of antibiotics reportedly suppressed the antitumor effects of immunotherapy or anticancer drugs. Furthermore, it has been shown that a change in the intestinal environment triggered by oral administration of antibiotics resulted in increased number of drug-resistant microbes causing nosocomial infections. Intestinal microbes are also shown to be effective in cancer treatment as they activate macrophages at the site of cancer. One of the effects of intestinal microbes on hosts that has been gaining increasing attention is the biological regulation caused by the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) produced by Gram-negative bacteria. Among the intestinal microbiota present in the host, Gram-negative bacteria form the most dominant flora. The administration of antibiotics leads to a decreased number of intestinal microbes, as well as to suppression of cancer immunotherapy effects or anticancer drug effects, and this deterioration has been shown to be improved by oral administration of LPS. In this article, we discuss the functions of intestinal microbiota, that is currently undergoing a paradigm shift in relation to maintenance of health and the validity of LPS as a possible target for bio-treatment in the future. PMID:26168477

  20. Intrapelvic prosthesis to prevent injury of the small intestine with high dosage pelvic irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sugarbaker, P.H.

    1983-09-01

    The major complication to delivering tumoricidal dosages of radiation to the pelvis is radiation damage to the loops of the small intestine located within the radiation field. To exclude the small intestine from the pelvis after extensive pelvic surgical treatment, prosthetic materials are used. A transabdominal baffle made of prosthetic mesh separates pelvic and abdominal cavities. A Silastic implant, usually used in the reconstruction of the breast, is used in the pelvis to occupy space. In so doing, all of the small intestine can be excluded from the pelvic cavity and dosages of radiation to 6,500 rads can be administered.

  1. Selected Tea and Tea Pomace Extracts Inhibit Intestinal α-Glucosidase Activity in Vitro and Postprandial Hyperglycemia in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jungbae; Jo, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Justin S.; Ha, Kyoung-Soo; Lee, Jung-Yun; Choi, Hwang-Yong; Yu, Seok-Yeong; Kwon, Young-In; Kim, Young-Cheul

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by postprandial hyperglycemia, which is an early defect of T2DM and thus a primary target for anti-diabetic drugs. A therapeutic approach is to inhibit intestinal α-glucosidase, the key enzyme for dietary carbohydrate digestion, resulting in delayed rate of glucose absorption. Although tea extracts have been reported to have anti-diabetic effects, the potential bioactivity of tea pomace, the main bio waste of tea beverage processing, is largely unknown. We evaluated the anti-diabetic effects of three selected tea water extracts (TWE) and tea pomace extracts (TPE) by determining the relative potency of extracts on rat intestinal α-glucosidase activity in vitro as well as hypoglycemic effects in vivo. Green, oolong, and black tea bags were extracted in hot water and the remaining tea pomace were dried and further extracted in 70% ethanol. The extracts were determined for intestinal rat α-glucosidases activity, radical scavenging activity, and total phenolic content. The postprandial glucose-lowering effects of TWE and TPE of green and black tea were assessed in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and compared to acarbose, a known pharmacological α-glucosidase inhibitor. The IC50 values of all three tea extracts against mammalian α-glucosidase were lower or similar in TPE groups than those of TWE groups. TWE and TPE of green tea exhibited the highest inhibitory effects against α-glucosidase activity with the IC50 of 2.04 ± 0.31 and 1.95 ± 0.37 mg/mL respectively. Among the specific enzymes tested, the IC50 values for TWE (0.16 ± 0.01 mg/mL) and TPE (0.13 ± 0.01 mg/mL) of green tea against sucrase activity were the lowest compared to those on maltase and glucoamylase activities. In the animal study, the blood glucose level at 30 min after oral intake (0.5 g/kg body wt) of TPE and TWE of both green and black tea was significantly reduced compared to the control in sucrose-loaded SD rats. The TPE

  2. Selected tea and tea pomace extracts inhibit intestinal α-glucosidase activity in vitro and postprandial hyperglycemia in vivo.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jungbae; Jo, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Justin S; Ha, Kyoung-Soo; Lee, Jung-Yun; Choi, Hwang-Yong; Yu, Seok-Yeong; Kwon, Young-In; Kim, Young-Cheul

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by postprandial hyperglycemia, which is an early defect of T2DM and thus a primary target for anti-diabetic drugs. A therapeutic approach is to inhibit intestinal α-glucosidase, the key enzyme for dietary carbohydrate digestion, resulting in delayed rate of glucose absorption. Although tea extracts have been reported to have anti-diabetic effects, the potential bioactivity of tea pomace, the main bio waste of tea beverage processing, is largely unknown. We evaluated the anti-diabetic effects of three selected tea water extracts (TWE) and tea pomace extracts (TPE) by determining the relative potency of extracts on rat intestinal α-glucosidase activity in vitro as well as hypoglycemic effects in vivo. Green, oolong, and black tea bags were extracted in hot water and the remaining tea pomace were dried and further extracted in 70% ethanol. The extracts were determined for intestinal rat α-glucosidases activity, radical scavenging activity, and total phenolic content. The postprandial glucose-lowering effects of TWE and TPE of green and black tea were assessed in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and compared to acarbose, a known pharmacological α-glucosidase inhibitor. The IC50 values of all three tea extracts against mammalian α-glucosidase were lower or similar in TPE groups than those of TWE groups. TWE and TPE of green tea exhibited the highest inhibitory effects against α-glucosidase activity with the IC50 of 2.04 ± 0.31 and 1.95 ± 0.37 mg/mL respectively. Among the specific enzymes tested, the IC50 values for TWE (0.16 ± 0.01 mg/mL) and TPE (0.13 ± 0.01 mg/mL) of green tea against sucrase activity were the lowest compared to those on maltase and glucoamylase activities. In the animal study, the blood glucose level at 30 min after oral intake (0.5 g/kg body wt) of TPE and TWE of both green and black tea was significantly reduced compared to the control in sucrose-loaded SD rats. The TPE

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Mecistocirrus digitatus and Haemonchus contortus Intestinal Protein Extracts and Subsequent Efficacy Testing in a Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dicker, Alison J.; Inglis, Neil F.; Manson, Erin D. T.; Subhadra, Subhra; Illangopathy, Manikkavasagan; Muthusamy, Raman; Knox, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal nematode infections, such as Haemonchus contortus and Mecistocirrus digitatus, are ranked in the top twenty diseases affecting small-holder farmers' livestock, yet research into M. digitatus, which infects cattle and buffalo in Asia is limited. Intestine-derived native protein vaccines are effective against Haemonchus, yet the protective efficacy of intestine-derived M. digitatus proteins has yet to be determined. Methodology/Principal Findings A simplified protein extraction protocol (A) is described and compared to an established method (B) for protein extraction from H. contortus. Proteomic analysis of the H. contortus and M. digitatus protein extracts identified putative vaccine antigens including aminopeptidases (H11), zinc metallopeptidases, glutamate dehydrogenase, and apical gut membrane polyproteins. A vaccine trial compared the ability of the M. digitatus extract and two different H. contortus extracts to protect sheep against H. contortus challenge. Both Haemonchus fractions (A and B) were highly effective, reducing cumulative Faecal Egg Counts (FEC) by 99.19% and 99.89% and total worm burdens by 87.28% and 93.64% respectively, compared to the unvaccinated controls. There was no effect on H. contortus worm burdens following vaccination with the M. digitatus extract and the 28.2% reduction in cumulative FEC was not statistically significant. However, FEC were consistently lower in the M. digitatus extract vaccinates compared to the un-vaccinated controls from 25 days post-infection. Conclusions/Significance Similar, antigenically cross-reactive proteins are found in H. contortus and M. digitatus; this is the first step towards developing a multivalent native vaccine against Haemonchus species and M. digitatus. The simplified protein extraction method could form the basis for a locally produced vaccine against H. contortus and, possibly M. digitatus, in regions where effective cold chains for vaccine distribution are limited

  4. Aqueous extracts of husks of Plantago ovata reduce hyperglycaemia in type 1 and type 2 diabetes by inhibition of intestinal glucose absorption.

    PubMed

    Hannan, J M A; Ali, L; Khaleque, J; Akhter, M; Flatt, P R; Abdel-Wahab, Y H A

    2006-07-01

    Plantago ovata has been reported to reduce postprandial glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In the present study, the efficacy and possible modes of action of hot-water extracts of husk of P. ovata were evaluated. The administration of P. ovata (0.5 g/kg body weight) significantly improved glucose tolerance in normal, type 1 and type 2 diabetic rat models. When the extract was administered orally with sucrose solution, it suppressed postprandial blood glucose and retarded small intestinal absorption without inducing the influx of sucrose into the large intestine. The extract significantly reduced glucose absorption in the gut during in situ perfusion of small intestine in non-diabetic rats. In 28 d chronic feeding studies in type 2 diabetic rat models, the extract reduced serum atherogenic lipids and NEFA but had no effect on plasma insulin and total antioxidant status. No effect of the extract was evident on intestinal disaccharidase activity. Furthermore, the extract did not stimulate insulin secretion in perfused rat pancreas, isolated rat islets or clonal beta cells. Neither did the extract affect glucose transport in 3T3 adipocytes. In conclusion, aqueous extracts of P. ovata reduce hyperglycaemia in diabetes via inhibition of intestinal glucose absorption and enhancement of motility. These attributes indicate that P. ovata may be a useful source of active components to provide new opportunities for diabetes therapy. PMID:16870001

  5. The comparative study of acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA) and aspirin in the prevention of intestinal adenomatous polyposis in APC(Min/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruiqi; Wang, Yan; Gao, Zuhua; Qu, Xianjun

    2014-02-01

    Acetyl-11-keto-beta-BA (AKBA), a component of the gum resin of Boswellia serrata, has been recognized as a promising agent for the prevention of intestinal tumorigenesis. Aspirin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), has also been considered to have the activity against intestinal tumorigenesis. However, the prevention of colonic cancer is insufficient and no definitive recommendation has been made for clinic use. Herein, we compared the efficacy of AKBA with that of aspirin in an adenomatous polyposis coli intestinal neoplasia consecutive weeks. Mice were sacrificed by anesthetizing. The whole intestine was removed from each mouse. The number, size and histopathology of intestinal adenomatous polyps were examined under microscopy. The adenomatous polyps were removed for further analysis by the assays of western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. AKBA significantly prevented the formation of intestinal adenomatous polyps without toxicity to mice. Statistical analysis indicated that AKBA's activity both in the prevention of small intestinal and colonic polyps was more potently than aspirin. Histopathologic examination revealed that AKBA's effect, that is the reduction of polyp size and degree of dysplasia, was more prominent in larger sized polyps, especially those originating in colon. These effects of AKBA were associated with its role in the induction of apoptosis in carcinomas. The assays of western blotting and immunohistochemistry staining indicated that the efficacy of AKBA might arise from its activity in the modulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and NF-κB/COX-2 pathway in adenomatous polyps. Conclusion, AKBA by oral application prevented intestinal tumorigenesis more potential than aspirin. PMID:24647155

  6. Aqueous Extract of Agaricus blazei Murrill Prevents Age-Related Changes in the Myenteric Plexus of the Jejunum in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Santi-Rampazzo, Ana Paula; Schoffen, João Paulo Ferreira; Cirilo, Carla Possani; Zapater, Mariana Cristina Vicente Umada; Vicentini, Fernando Augusto; Soares, Andréia Assunção; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar; Buttow, Nilza Cristina; Natali, Maria Raquel Marçal

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the supplementation with aqueous extract of Agaricus blazei Murrill (ABM) on biometric and blood parameters and quantitative morphology of the myenteric plexus and jejunal wall in aging Wistar rats. The animals were euthanized at 7 (C7), 12 (C12 and CA12), and 23 months of age (C23 and CA23). The CA12 and CA23 groups received a daily dose of ABM extract (26 mg/animal) via gavage, beginning at 7 months of age. A reduction in food intake was observed with aging, with increases in the Lee index, retroperitoneal fat, intestinal length, and levels of total cholesterol and total proteins. Aging led to a reduction of the total wall thickness, mucosa tunic, villus height, crypt depth, and number of goblet cells. In the myenteric plexus, aging quantitatively decreased the population of HuC/D+ neuronal and S100+ glial cells, with maintenance of the nNOS+ nitrergic subpopulation and increase in the cell body area of these populations. Supplementation with the ABM extract preserved the myenteric plexus in old animals, in which no differences were detected in the density and cell body profile of neurons and glial cells in the CA12 and CA23 groups, compared with C7 group. The supplementation with the aqueous extract of ABM efficiently maintained myenteric plexus homeostasis, which positively influenced the physiology and prevented the death of the neurons and glial cells. PMID:25960748

  7. Effect of plant extracts and formic acid on the intestinal equilibrium of early-weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla, E G; Perez, J F; Martin, M; Kamel, C; Baucells, F; Gasa, J

    2004-11-01

    We evaluated the effects of a plant extracts mixture (XT) standardized in 5% (wt/wt) carvacrol, 3% cinnamaldehyde, and 2% capsicum oleoresin (oregano, cinnamon and Mexican pepper), alone or in combination with formic acid (FA), on the productive performance and the intestinal ecosystem of the early-weaned pig. Pigs weaned at 20 +/- 1 d of age (n = 216) were allocated in 24 pens and fed a standard medicated prestarter diet for 12 d. Twelve days after weaning, a stress management system based on social and dietary stress factors was applied to the animals, after which, each group was allocated to one of six dietary treatments, which followed a factorial arrangement, with three levels (as-fed basis) of the XT (0, 150, and 300 mg/kg) and two levels of FA (0 and 0.5%). On d 24 and 25 after the stress episode, eight pigs per treatment were killed to examine variables describing some aspects of the gastrointestinal ecology. Two days after the stress episode, an Escherichia coli K88 diarrhea episode occurred, and five casualties were registered. Four of the five deaths occurred in pens of pigs not fed the XT. The FA resulted in better G:F (P = 0.040) in coincidence with shorter villous height (P = 0.073) and lower rectal total microbial mass (P = 0.078). Both XT and FA addition increased stomach content (P = 0.006 and 0.003, respectively) and percentage of DM (P = 0.089 and 0.010, respectively), suggesting an increased gastric retention time; consequently, pH was also increased (P = 0.005 and 0.060, respectively). The XT decreased ileum total microbial mass (P = 0.025) and increased the lactobacilli:enterobacteria ratio (P = 0.002). The VFA profile in the cecum and colon was modified by XT inclusion, increasing the proportion of acetate (P = 0.018 and 0.025, respectively) and diminishing the proportion of butyrate (P = 0.096 and 0.040, respectively) and valerate (P = 0.001 and 0.039, respectively). Both XT and FA were shown to be effective in modifying the gastrointestinal

  8. Prediction of the Passive Intestinal Absorption of Medicinal Plant Extract Constituents with the Parallel Artificial Membrane Permeability Assay (PAMPA).

    PubMed

    Petit, Charlotte; Bujard, Alban; Skalicka-Woźniak, Krystyna; Cretton, Sylvian; Houriet, Joëlle; Christen, Philippe; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2016-03-01

    At the early drug discovery stage, the high-throughput parallel artificial membrane permeability assay is one of the most frequently used in vitro models to predict transcellular passive absorption. While thousands of new chemical entities have been screened with the parallel artificial membrane permeability assay, in general, permeation properties of natural products have been scarcely evaluated. In this study, the parallel artificial membrane permeability assay through a hexadecane membrane was used to predict the passive intestinal absorption of a representative set of frequently occurring natural products. Since natural products are usually ingested for medicinal use as components of complex extracts in traditional herbal preparations or as phytopharmaceuticals, the applicability of such an assay to study the constituents directly in medicinal crude plant extracts was further investigated. Three representative crude plant extracts with different natural product compositions were chosen for this study. The first extract was composed of furanocoumarins (Angelica archangelica), the second extract included alkaloids (Waltheria indica), and the third extract contained flavonoid glycosides (Pueraria montana var. lobata). For each medicinal plant, the effective passive permeability values Pe (cm/s) of the main natural products of interest were rapidly calculated thanks to a generic ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography-UV detection method and because Pe calculations do not require knowing precisely the concentration of each natural product within the extracts. The original parallel artificial membrane permeability assay through a hexadecane membrane was found to keep its predictive power when applied to constituents directly in crude plant extracts provided that higher quantities of the extract were initially loaded in the assay in order to ensure suitable detection of the individual constituents of the extracts. Such an approach is thus valuable for the high

  9. Reduction of intestinal polyp formation in min mice fed a high-fat diet with aloe vera gel extract.

    PubMed

    Chihara, Takeshi; Shimpo, Kan; Beppu, Hidehiko; Tomatsu, Akiko; Kaneko, Takaaki; Tanaka, Miyuki; Yamada, Muneo; Abe, Fumiaki; Sonoda, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Aloe vera gel supercritical CO2 extract (AVGE) has been shown to contain five phytosterols, reduce visceral fat accumulation, and influence the metabolism of glucose and lipids in animal model experiments. Recent epidemiologic studies have shown that obesity is an established risk factor for several cancers including colorectal cancer. Therefore, we examined the effects of AVGE on intestinal polyp formation in Apc-deficient Min mice fed a high-fat diet. Male Min mice were divided into normal diet (ND), high fat diet (HFD), low dose AVGE (HFD+LAVGE) and high dose AVGE (HFD+HAVGE) groups. The ND group received AIN-93G diet and the latter 3 groups were given modified high-fat AIN-93G diet (HFD) for 7 weeks. AVGE was suspended in 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and administered orally to mice in HFD+LAVGE and HFD+HAVGE groups every day (except on Sunday) for 7 weeks at a dose of 3.75 and 12.5 mg/kg body weight, respectively. ND and HFD groups received 0.5% CMC alone. Between weeks 4 and 7, body weights in the HFD and HFD+LAVGE groups were reduced more than those in the ND group. However, body weights were not reduced in the HFD+HAVGE group. Mice were sacrificed at the end of the experiment and their intestines were scored for polyps. No significant differences were observed in either the incidence and multiplicity of intestinal polyps (≥0.5 mm in a diameter) among the three groups fed HFD. However, when intestinal polyps were categorized by their size into 0.5-1.4, 1.5-2.4, or ≥2.5 mm, the incidence and multiplicity of large polyps (≥2.5 mm) in the intestine in the HFD+HAVGE group were significantly lower than those in the HFD group. We measured plasma lipid (triglycerides and total cholesterol) and adipocytokine [interleukin-6 and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin] levels as possible indicators of mechanisms of inhibition. The results showed that HMW adiponectin levels in the HFD group were significantly lower than those in the ND group. However, the

  10. Cinnamon extract regulates intestinal lipid metabolism related gene expression in primary enterocytes of rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging evidence suggests that the small intestine is not a passive organ, but is actively involved in the regulation of lipid absorption, intracellular transport, and metabolism, and is closely linked to systemic lipoprotein metabolism. We have reported previously that the water-soluble components...

  11. Lack of efficacy of blueberry in nutritional prevention of azoxymethane-initiated cancers of rat small intestine and colon

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Blueberries may lower relative risk for cancers of the gastrointestinal tract. Previous work indicated an inhibitory effect of consumed blueberry (BB) on formation of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in colons of male Fisher F344 rats (inbred strain). However, effects of BB on colon tumors and in both genders are unknown. Methods We examined efficacy of BB in inhibition of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon ACF and intestine tumors in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats (outbred strain). Pregnant rats were fed a diet with or without 10% BB powder; progeny were weaned to the same diet as their dam and received AOM as young adults. Results Male and female rats on control diet had similar numbers of ACF at 6 weeks after AOM administration. BB increased (P < 0.05) ACF numbers within the distal colon of female but not male rats. There was a significant (P < 0.05) diet by gender interaction with respect to total colon ACF number. Colon and duodenum tumor incidences were less in females than males at 17 weeks after AOM. BB tended (0.1 > P > 0.05) to reduce overall gastrointestinal tract tumor incidence in males, however, tumor incidence in females was unaffected (P > 0.1) by BB. There was a tendency (0.1 > P > 0.05) for fewer adenocarcinomas (relative to total of adenomatous polyps plus adenocarcinomas) in colons of female than male tumor-bearing rats; in small intestine, this gender difference was significant (P < 0.05). BB favored (P < 0.05) fewer adenocarcinomas and more adenomatous polyps (as a proportion of total tumor number) in female rat small intestine. Conclusion Results did not indicate robust cancer-preventive effects of BB. Blueberry influenced ACF occurrence in distal colon and tumor progression in duodenum, in gender-specific fashion. Data indicate the potential for slowing tumor progression (adenomatous polyp to adenocarcinoma) by BB. PMID:19758446

  12. Inhibiting intestinal NPC1L1 activity prevents diet-induced increase in biliary cholesterol in Golden Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Valasek, Mark A; Repa, Joyce J; Quan, Gang; Dietschy, John M; Turley, Stephen D

    2008-10-01

    Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) facilitates the uptake of sterols into the enterocyte and is the target of the novel cholesterol absorption inhibitor, ezetimibe. These studies used the Golden Syrian hamster as a model to delineate the changes in the relative mRNA expression of NPC1L1 and other proteins that regulate sterol homeostasis in the enterocyte during and following cessation of ezetimibe treatment and also to address the clinically important question of whether the marked inhibition of cholesterol absorption alters biliary lipid composition. In hamsters fed a low-cholesterol, low-fat basal diet, the abundance of mRNA for NPC1L1 in the small intestine far exceeded that in other regions of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and gallbladder. In the first study, female hamsters were fed the basal diet containing ezetimibe at doses up to 2.0 mg.day(-1).kg body wt(-1). At this dose, cholesterol absorption fell by 82%, fecal neutral sterol excretion increased by 5.3-fold, and hepatic and intestinal cholesterol synthesis increased more than twofold, but there were no significant changes in either fecal bile acid excretion or biliary lipid composition. The ezetimibe-induced changes in intestinal cholesterol handling were reversed when treatment was withdrawn. In a second study, male hamsters were given a diet enriched in cholesterol and safflower oil without or with ezetimibe. The lipid-rich diet raised the absolute and relative cholesterol levels in bile more than fourfold. This increase was largely prevented by ezetimibe. These data are consistent with the recent finding that ezetimibe treatment significantly reduced biliary cholesterol saturation in patients with gallstones. PMID:18718997

  13. Shikonin Inhibits Intestinal Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels and Prevents Rotaviral Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui

    2016-01-01

    Secretory diarrhea remains a global health burden and causes major mortality in children. There have been some focuses on antidiarrheal therapies that may reduce fluid losses and intestinal motility in diarrheal diseases. In the present study, we identified shikonin as an inhibitor of TMEM16A chloride channel activity using cell-based fluorescent-quenching assay. The IC50 value of shikonin was 6.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurements demonstrated that shikonin inhibited Eact-induced Cl(-) current in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 value of 1.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurement showed that shikonin exhibited inhibitory effect against CCh-induced Cl(-) currents in mouse colonic epithelia but did not affect cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration as well as the other major enterocyte chloride channel conductance regulator. Characterization study found that shikonin inhibited basolateral K(+) channel activity without affecting Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities. In vivo studies revealed that shikonin significantly delayed intestinal motility in mice and reduced stool water content in a neonatal mice model of rotaviral diarrhea without affecting the viral infection process in vivo. Taken together, the results suggested that shikonin inhibited enterocyte calcium-activated chloride channels, the inhibitory effect was partially through inhbition of basolateral K(+) channel activity, and shikonin could be a lead compound in the treatment of rotaviral secretory diarrhea. PMID:27601995

  14. Shikonin Inhibits Intestinal Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels and Prevents Rotaviral Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui

    2016-01-01

    Secretory diarrhea remains a global health burden and causes major mortality in children. There have been some focuses on antidiarrheal therapies that may reduce fluid losses and intestinal motility in diarrheal diseases. In the present study, we identified shikonin as an inhibitor of TMEM16A chloride channel activity using cell-based fluorescent-quenching assay. The IC50 value of shikonin was 6.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurements demonstrated that shikonin inhibited Eact-induced Cl- current in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 value of 1.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurement showed that shikonin exhibited inhibitory effect against CCh-induced Cl- currents in mouse colonic epithelia but did not affect cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration as well as the other major enterocyte chloride channel conductance regulator. Characterization study found that shikonin inhibited basolateral K+ channel activity without affecting Na+/K+-ATPase activities. In vivo studies revealed that shikonin significantly delayed intestinal motility in mice and reduced stool water content in a neonatal mice model of rotaviral diarrhea without affecting the viral infection process in vivo. Taken together, the results suggested that shikonin inhibited enterocyte calcium-activated chloride channels, the inhibitory effect was partially through inhbition of basolateral K+ channel activity, and shikonin could be a lead compound in the treatment of rotaviral secretory diarrhea. PMID:27601995

  15. Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 prevents atherosclerosis via inhibition of intestinal cholesterol absorption in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Wang, Jinfeng; Quan, Guihua; Wang, Xiaojun; Yang, Longfei; Zhong, Lili

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 on the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice. Eight-week-old ApoE(-/-) mice were fed a Western diet with or without L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 daily for 16 weeks. L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 protected ApoE(-/-) mice from atherosclerosis by reducing their plasma cholesterol levels from 923 ± 44 to 581 ± 18 mg/dl, likely via a marked decrease in cholesterol absorption caused by modulation of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1). In addition, suppression of cholesterol absorption induced reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) in macrophages through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor/liver X receptor (PPAR/LXR) pathway. Fecal lactobacillus and bifidobacterium counts were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 treatment groups than in the control groups. Furthermore, L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 was detected in the rat small intestine, colon, and feces during the feeding trial. The bacterial levels remained high even after the administration of lactic acid bacteria had been stopped for 2 weeks. These results suggest that administration of L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 can protect against atherosclerosis through the inhibition of intestinal cholesterol absorption. Therefore, L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 may be a potential therapeutic material for preventing the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25261526

  16. Development of a dual vaccine for prevention of Brucella abortus infection and Escherichia coli O157:H7 intestinal colonization.

    PubMed

    Iannino, Florencia; Herrmann, Claudia K; Roset, Mara S; Briones, Gabriel

    2015-05-01

    Zoonoses that affect human and animal health have an important economic impact. In the study now presented, a bivalent vaccine has been developed that has the potential for preventing the transmission from cattle to humans of two bacterial pathogens: Brucella abortus and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). A 66kDa chimeric antigen, composed by EspA, Intimin, Tir, and H7 flagellin (EITH7) from STEC, was constructed and expressed in B. abortus Δpgm vaccine strain (BabΔpgm). Mice orally immunized with BabΔpgm(EITH7) elicited an immune response with the induction of anti-EITH7 antibodies (IgA) that clears an intestinal infection of E. coli O157:H7 three times faster (t=4 days) than mice immunized with BabΔpgm carrier strain (t=12 days). As expected, mice immunized with BabΔpgm(EITH7) strain also elicited a protective immune response against B. abortus infection. A Brucella-based vaccine platform is described capable of eliciting a combined protective immune response against two bacterial pathogens with diverse lifestyles-the intracellular pathogen B. abortus and the intestinal extracellular pathogen STEC. PMID:25820069

  17. Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 Prevents Atherosclerosis via Inhibition of Intestinal Cholesterol Absorption in Apolipoprotein E-Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinfeng; Quan, Guihua; Wang, Xiaojun; Yang, Longfei; Zhong, Lili

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 on the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE−/−) mice. Eight-week-old ApoE−/− mice were fed a Western diet with or without L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 daily for 16 weeks. L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 protected ApoE−/− mice from atherosclerosis by reducing their plasma cholesterol levels from 923 ± 44 to 581 ± 18 mg/dl, likely via a marked decrease in cholesterol absorption caused by modulation of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1). In addition, suppression of cholesterol absorption induced reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) in macrophages through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor/liver X receptor (PPAR/LXR) pathway. Fecal lactobacillus and bifidobacterium counts were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 treatment groups than in the control groups. Furthermore, L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 was detected in the rat small intestine, colon, and feces during the feeding trial. The bacterial levels remained high even after the administration of lactic acid bacteria had been stopped for 2 weeks. These results suggest that administration of L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 can protect against atherosclerosis through the inhibition of intestinal cholesterol absorption. Therefore, L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 may be a potential therapeutic material for preventing the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25261526

  18. Green Tea Extract Improves the Post Prandial Overproduction of Intestinal Apolipoprotein B-containing Lipoproteins in Fructose Fed Hamsters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Green tea has putative medicinal properties that may be useful in preventing the metabolic syndrome. However, little is known of the effects of green tea extract (GTE) on postprandial apoB-48 containing lipoproteins and its molecular mechanisms. In a three-hour olive oil loading study, acute GTE ora...

  19. Extra virgin olive oil phenolic extracts counteract the pro-oxidant effect of dietary oxidized lipids in human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Incani, Alessandra; Serra, Gessica; Atzeri, Angela; Melis, Maria Paola; Serreli, Gabriele; Bandino, Giovanni; Sedda, Piergiorgio; Campus, Marco; Tuberoso, Carlo I G; Deiana, Monica

    2016-04-01

    The phenolic fraction of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) concentrates before absorption in the intestinal lumen, where it may contribute to the modulation of enterocytes response to oxidative and inflammatory stimuli. We evaluated the ability of two monovarietal EVOOs phenolic extracts, Bosana and Nera di Gonnos/Tonda di Cagliari, typical and widespread varieties in Sardinia (Italy), to counteract in enterocytes like Caco-2 cells the pro-oxidant action of oxidized lipids, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBH) or a mixture of oxysterols of dietary origin. We confirmed that TBH treatment causes a significant increase of ROS production, GSH depletion, increase of MDA, fatty acids hydroperoxides and 7-ketocholesterol, and showed first evidence of oxidative imbalance and cell damage due to oxysterols exposure. Preincubation of cells with the phenolic extracts significantly attenuated oxidative modifications. Bosana extract showed the highest concentration of total phenols, mainly hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol, and was the most active in presence of TBH, where the free radical scavenging activity of these simple phenols seems to be a determining factor. The two extracts were equally effective, in spite of the different composition, in presence of oxysterols, where ROS production probably occurs according to different and more complex mechanisms. PMID:26911552

  20. [Traditional Chinese medicine pairs (III)--effect of extract of Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma and Puerariae Lobatae Radix on intestinal absorption in rats].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-hang; Li, Meng-xuan; Meng, Zhao-qing; Yang, Jiao-jiao; Huang, Wen-zhe; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Wang, Yue-sheng; Xiao, Wei

    2015-08-01

    This study focused on the intestinal absorption of traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) to reveal the scientific connotation of the compatibility of TCM pairs. The single pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) was used in rats to compare the absorption of single extracts from Puerariae Lobatae Radix, single extracts from Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma, combined extracts from Puerariae Lobatae Radix and Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma and Puerariae Lobatae Radix and Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma mixture in rats. The content of puerarin, ginsenoside Rg1, ginsenoside Re and ginsenoside Rb1 in liquid were tested by HPLC. The speed constant (Ka) and apparent permeability coefficients (Papp) were calculated and compared. Specifically, the order of puerarin Ka and Papp values from high to low was Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma and Puerariae Lobatae Radix mixture > single extracts from Puerariae Lobatae Radix > combined extracts from Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma and Puerariae Lobatae Radix; the order of ginsenosides Ka and Papp values from high to low was Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma and Puerariae Lobatae Radix mixture > single extracts from Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma > combined extracts from Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma and Puerariae Lobatae Radix. The combined administration of Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma and Puerariae Lobatae Radix may improve the absorption in the intestinal tract. PMID:26677717

  1. Mechanisms of improvement of intestinal transport of baicalin and puerarin by extracts of Radix Angelicae Dahuricae.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xin-Li; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Guo-Wei; Li, Zhe; Luo, Yun; Liao, Zheng-Gen; Yan, Dong-Mei

    2015-02-01

    Radix Angelicae Dahuricae is the dried root of Angelicae Dahurica (Fisch.ex Hoffm.)Benth.et Hook.f. var.formosana (Boiss.) Shan et Yuan (Fam.Umbelliferae). The total coumarins (Cou) and volatile oil (VO) were main active components that drived from Radix Angelicae Dahuricae. Our previous studies have shown that Cou and VO could increase intestinal absorption for transmucosal drug delivery with unknown mechanism. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of Radix Angelicae Dahuricae for improving drug intestinal transport. Caco-2 cell model was used to study the effect of Radix Angelicae Dahurica on transepithelial electrical resistance. Western blot was used to study its effect on the expression of the actin and ZO-1, tight junction proteins. The effect of Radix Angelicae Dahurica on the expression of P-gp protein was investigated using flow cytometry. VO (0.036-2.88 μL/mL) and Cou (0.027-0.54 mg/mL) caused a reversible, time- and dose-dependent decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance. VO and/or Cou could inhibit the expression of the tight junction protein, ZO-1 and actin. VO and/or Cou also could inhibit the expression of P-gp. These data suggested that Radix Angelicae Dahurica increased cell permeability by affecting the expression of actin, ZO-1 or P-gp, opening the tight junction or inhibiting the efflux induced by P-gp. PMID:25312586

  2. Oral Probiotic VSL#3 Prevents Autoimmune Diabetes by Modulating Microbiota and Promoting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase-Enriched Tolerogenic Intestinal Environment.

    PubMed

    Dolpady, Jayashree; Sorini, Chiara; Di Pietro, Caterina; Cosorich, Ilaria; Ferrarese, Roberto; Saita, Diego; Clementi, Massimo; Canducci, Filippo; Falcone, Marika

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota modulates the autoimmune pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) via mechanisms that remain largely unknown. The inflammasome components are innate immune sensors that are highly influenced by the gut environment and play pivotal roles in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis. In this study we show that modifications of the gut microbiota induced by oral treatment with Lactobacillaceae-enriched probiotic VSL#3, alone or in combination with retinoic acid (RA), protect NOD mice from T1D by affecting inflammasome at the intestinal level. In particular, we show that VSL#3 treatment inhibits IL-1β expression while enhancing release of protolerogenic components of the inflammasome, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and IL-33. Those modifications of the intestinal microenvironment in VSL#3-treated NOD mice modulate gut immunity by promoting differentiation of tolerogenic CD103(+) DCs and reducing differentiation/expansion of Th1 and Th17 cells in the intestinal mucosa and at the sites of autoimmunity, that is, within the pancreatic lymph nodes (PLN) of VSL#3-treated NOD mice. Our data provide a link between dietary factors, microbiota composition, intestinal inflammation, and immune homeostasis in autoimmune diabetes and could pave the way for new therapeutic approaches aimed at changing the intestinal microenvironment with probiotics to counterregulate autoimmunity and prevent T1D. PMID:26779542

  3. Oral Probiotic VSL#3 Prevents Autoimmune Diabetes by Modulating Microbiota and Promoting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase-Enriched Tolerogenic Intestinal Environment

    PubMed Central

    Dolpady, Jayashree; Sorini, Chiara; Di Pietro, Caterina; Cosorich, Ilaria; Ferrarese, Roberto; Saita, Diego; Clementi, Massimo; Falcone, Marika

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota modulates the autoimmune pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) via mechanisms that remain largely unknown. The inflammasome components are innate immune sensors that are highly influenced by the gut environment and play pivotal roles in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis. In this study we show that modifications of the gut microbiota induced by oral treatment with Lactobacillaceae-enriched probiotic VSL#3, alone or in combination with retinoic acid (RA), protect NOD mice from T1D by affecting inflammasome at the intestinal level. In particular, we show that VSL#3 treatment inhibits IL-1β expression while enhancing release of protolerogenic components of the inflammasome, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and IL-33. Those modifications of the intestinal microenvironment in VSL#3-treated NOD mice modulate gut immunity by promoting differentiation of tolerogenic CD103+ DCs and reducing differentiation/expansion of Th1 and Th17 cells in the intestinal mucosa and at the sites of autoimmunity, that is, within the pancreatic lymph nodes (PLN) of VSL#3-treated NOD mice. Our data provide a link between dietary factors, microbiota composition, intestinal inflammation, and immune homeostasis in autoimmune diabetes and could pave the way for new therapeutic approaches aimed at changing the intestinal microenvironment with probiotics to counterregulate autoimmunity and prevent T1D. PMID:26779542

  4. Lactobacillus GG-fermented milk prevents DSS-induced colitis and regulates intestinal epithelial homeostasis through activation of epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yoda, Kazutoyo; Miyazawa, Kenji; Hosoda, Masataka; Hiramatsu, Masaru; Yan, Fang; He, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Background Fermented milk is considered one of the best sources for efficient consumption of probiotic strains by hosts to promote good health. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of orally administering LGG-fermented milk (LGG milk) on intestinal inflammation and injury and to study the mechanisms of LGG milk's action. Methods LGG milk and non-LGG-fermented milk (non-LGG milk) were administered through gavage to mice before and during dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced intestinal injury and colitis. Inflammatory/injury score and colon length were assessed. Intestinal epithelial cells were treated with the soluble fraction of LGG milk to detect its effects on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its down stream target, Akt activation, cytokine-induced apoptosis, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced disruption of tight junctions. Results LGG milk treatment significantly reduced DSS-induced colonic inflammation and injury, and colon shortening in mice, compared to that in non-LGG milk-treated and untreated mice. The soluble fraction of LGG milk, but not non-LGG milk, stimulated activation of EGFR and Akt in a concentration-dependent manner, suppressed cytokine-induced apoptosis, and attenuated H2O2-induced disruption of tight junction complex in the intestinal epithelial cells. These effects of LGG milk were blocked by the EGFR kinase inhibitor. LGG milk, but not non-LGG milk, contained two soluble proteins, p40 and p75, which have been reported to promote survival and growth of intestinal epithelial cells through activation of EGFR. Depletion of p40 and p75 from LGG milk abolished the effects of LGG milk on prevention of cytokine-induced apoptosis and H2O2-induced disruption of tight junctions. Conclusions These results suggest that LGG milk may regulate intestinal epithelial homeostasis and potentially prevent intestinal inflammatory diseases through activation of EGFR by LGG-derived proteins. PMID:23468308

  5. Probiotics Prevent Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction in Acute Pancreatitis in Rats via Induction of Ileal Mucosal Glutathione Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lutgendorff, Femke; Nijmeijer, Rian M.; Sandström, Per A.; Trulsson, Lena M.; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Timmerman, Harro M.; van Minnen, L. Paul; Rijkers, Ger T.; Gooszen, Hein G.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Söderholm, Johan D.

    2009-01-01

    Background During acute pancreatitis (AP), oxidative stress contributes to intestinal barrier failure. We studied actions of multispecies probiotics on barrier dysfunction and oxidative stress in experimental AP. Methodology/Principal Findings Fifty-three male Spraque-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into five groups: 1) controls, non-operated, 2) sham-operated, 3) AP, 4) AP and probiotics and 5) AP and placebo. AP was induced by intraductal glycodeoxycholate infusion and intravenous cerulein (6 h). Daily probiotics or placebo were administered intragastrically, starting five days prior to AP. After cerulein infusion, ileal mucosa was collected for measurements of E. coli K12 and 51Cr-EDTA passage in Ussing chambers. Tight junction proteins were investigated by confocal immunofluorescence imaging. Ileal mucosal apoptosis, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels were determined and glutamate-cysteine-ligase activity and expression were quantified. AP-induced barrier dysfunction was characterized by epithelial cell apoptosis and alterations of tight junction proteins (i.e. disruption of occludin and claudin-1 and up-regulation of claudin-2) and correlated with lipid peroxidation (r>0.8). Probiotic pre-treatment diminished the AP-induced increase in E. coli passage (probiotics 57.4±33.5 vs. placebo 223.7±93.7 a.u.; P<0.001), 51Cr-EDTA flux (16.7±10.1 vs. 32.1±10.0 cm/s10−6; P<0.005), apoptosis, lipid peroxidation (0.42±0.13 vs. 1.62±0.53 pmol MDA/mg protein; P<0.001), and prevented tight junction protein disruption. AP-induced decline in glutathione was not only prevented (14.33±1.47 vs. 8.82±1.30 nmol/mg protein, P<0.001), but probiotics even increased mucosal glutathione compared with sham rats (14.33±1.47 vs. 10.70±1.74 nmol/mg protein, P<0.001). Glutamate-cysteine-ligase activity, which is rate-limiting in glutathione biosynthesis, was enhanced in probiotic pre-treated animals (probiotics 2.88±1.21 vs. placebo 1.94±0.55 nmol/min/mg protein; P<0

  6. The impact of perception and knowledge on the treatment and prevention of intestinal worms in the Manikganj district of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Bath, Jennifer L; Eneh, Peace N; Bakken, Amanda J; Knox, Megan E; Schiedt, Michael D; Campbell, Jarryd M

    2010-12-01

    Soil transmitted helminths (STHs) affect more than one billion of the world's population and are very prevalent in regions with high poverty rates and poor sanitation. Efforts to achieve Millennium Development Goals, such as combating diseases and increasing the number of people with access to safe drinking water and proper sanitation facilities, will directly help in eliminating STHs. The Plains regions of Bangladesh has one of the highest prevalence rates of STHs, and the efforts made by the World Health Organization might not be enough to eradicate these diseases in this region before the 2015 goal. This survey was conducted in the Manikganj district of Central Bangladesh to evaluate local awareness about the transmission and prevention of STHs. The results from this survey show that although a large percentage of the respondents were knowledgeable about the spread and impact of intestinal worms, the majority of individuals still do not take the necessary steps to prevent infection. Our findings demonstrate the complexity of controlling and eliminating STHs and show that concluding efforts should incorporate additional measures for vaccine development as well as improved educational efforts that are sensitive to the region's traditions and cultures. PMID:21165336

  7. Intestine-Specific Mttp Deletion Decreases Mortality and Prevents Sepsis-Induced Intestinal Injury in a Murine Model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Jessica A.; Xie, Yan; Dunne, W. Michael; Yoseph, Benyam P.; Burd, Eileen M.; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2012-01-01

    Background The small intestine plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of sepsis and has been referred to as the “motor” of the systemic inflammatory response. One proposed mechanism is that toxic gut-derived lipid factors, transported in mesenteric lymph, induce systemic injury and distant organ failure. However, the pathways involved are yet to be defined and the role of intestinal chylomicron assembly and secretion in transporting these lipid factors is unknown. Here we studied the outcome of sepsis in mice with conditional, intestine-specific deletion of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (Mttp-IKO), which exhibit a block in chylomicron assembly together with lipid malabsorption. Methodology/Principal Findings Mttp-IKO mice and controls underwent intratracheal injection with either Pseudomonas aeruginosa or sterile saline. Mttp-IKO mice exhibited decreased seven-day mortality, with 0/20 (0%) dying compared to 5/17 (29%) control mice (p<0.05). This survival advantage in Mttp-IKO mice, however, was not associated with improvements in pulmonary bacterial clearance or neutrophil infiltration. Rather, Mttp-IKO mice exhibited protection against sepsis-associated decreases in villus length and intestinal proliferation and were also protected against increased intestinal apoptosis, both central features in control septic mice. Serum IL-6 levels, a major predictor of mortality in human and mouse models of sepsis, were elevated 8-fold in septic control mice but remained unaltered in septic Mttp-IKO mice. Serum high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were reduced in septic control mice but were increased in septic Mttp-IKO mice. The decreased levels of HDL were associated with decreased hepatic expression of apolipoprotein A1 in septic control mice. Conclusions/Significance These studies suggest that strategies directed at blocking intestinal chylomicron secretion may attenuate the progression and improve the outcome of sepsis through effects mediated by

  8. Inhibition of intestinal motility and secretion by extracts of Epilobium spp. in mice.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Federica; Fonte, Giuseppina; Saija, Antonella; Tita, Beatrice

    2006-10-11

    Ethanol extracts of the fresh aerial parts of various Epilobium species were tested to elucidate the mechanism of their gastrointestinal activity in animals. The methods of charcoal meal, castor oil-induced diarrhoea, and enteropooling assay were used to evaluate their effect on mouse gut at various dose levels. The extracts were found to have a significant activity in all models. Moreover, the extracts resulted to possess very little toxicity. Thus, it can be concluded that Epilobium possesses anti-diarrhoeal, anti-motility, and anti-secretory activities and can prove beneficial in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:16713155

  9. Pineapple Waste Extract for Preventing Oxidation in Model Food Systems.

    PubMed

    Segovia Gómez, Francisco; Almajano Pablos, María Pilar

    2016-07-01

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus) is consumed in the form of chunks (canned), cubes, fruit salad, and also in juices, concentrates, and jams. In the processes to produce these products, the waste generated represents a high percentage of the total fruit. Some studies have shown that residues of certain fruits, such as pineapple, have the same antioxidant activity as the fruit pulp. So although these residues are discarded, they could be used as an alternative source of polyphenols, as natural antioxidants. This study is focused on the antioxidant activity of wastes obtained in the production of pineapple products and their application. The polyphenols' scavenging activity was determined by the oxygen radical antioxidant capacity assay. The antioxidant potential was determined in emulsions (o/w) and in muffins, where the primary oxidation products (by peroxide value, PV) and the secondary oxidation products (by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) were analyzed. In addition the muffins were analyzed by means of a triangular sensory test. The PV method showed that pineapple waste extracts caused a reduction in oxidation products of 59% in emulsions and 91% in the muffins. The reduction in TBARs values for emulsions were 27% and for muffins were 51%. The triangular sensory test showed that the samples containing the extract were not distinguished from the control (α = 0.05). PMID:27384012

  10. Pomegranate Extracts and Cancer Prevention: Molecular and Cellular Activities

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Deeba N.; Chamcheu, Jean-Christopher; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    There is increased appreciation by the scientific community that dietary phytochemicals can be potential weapons in the fight against cancer. Emerging data has provided new insights into the molecular and cellular framework needed to establish novel mechanism-based strategies for cancer prevention by selective bioactive food components. The unique chemical composition of the pomegranate fruit, rich in antioxidant tannins and flavonoids has drawn the attention of many investigators. Polyphenol rich fractions derived from the pomegranate fruit have been studied for their potential chemopreventive and/or cancer therapeutic effects in several animal models. Although data from in vitro and in vivo studies look convincing, well designed clinical trials in humans are needed to ascertain whether pomegranate can become part of our armamentarium against cancer. This review summarizes the available literature on the effects of pomegranate against various cancers. PMID:23094914

  11. The intestinal microbiota, gastrointestinal environment and colorectal cancer: a putative role for probiotics in prevention of colorectal cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Sikes, Michael; Bruno-Bárcena, José M.

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States, and, even though 5–15% of the total CRC cases can be attributed to individual genetic predisposition, environmental factors could be considered major factors in susceptibility to CRC. Lifestyle factors increasing the risks of CRC include elevated body mass index, obesity, and reduced physical activity. Additionally, a number of dietary elements have been associated with higher or lower incidence of CRC. In this context, it has been suggested that diets high in fruit and low in meat might have a protective effect, reducing the incidence of colorectal adenomas by modulating the composition of the normal nonpathogenic commensal microbiota. In addition, it has been demonstrated that changes in abundance of taxonomic groups have a profound impact on the gastrointestinal physiology, and an increasing number of studies are proposing that the microbiota mediates the generation of dietary factors triggering colon cancer. High-throughput sequencing and molecular taxonomic technologies are rapidly filling the knowledge gaps left by conventional microbiology techniques to obtain a comprehensive catalog of the human intestinal microbiota and their associated metabolic repertoire. The information provided by these studies will be essential to identify agents capable of modulating the massive amount of gut bacteria in safe noninvasive manners to prevent CRC. Probiotics, defined as “live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host” (219), are capable of transient modulation of the microbiota, and their beneficial effects include reinforcement of the natural defense mechanisms and protection against gastrointestinal disorders. Probiotics have been successfully used to manage infant diarrhea, food allergies, and inflammatory bowel disease; hence, the purpose of this review was to examine probiotic metabolic activities that may have an

  12. Alterations in the Intestinal Assimilation of Oxidized PUFAs Are Ameliorated by a Polyphenol-Rich Grape Seed Extract in an In Vitro Model and Caco-2 Cells123

    PubMed Central

    Maestre, Rodrigo; Douglass, John D.; Kodukula, Sarala; Medina, Isabel; Storch, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The (n-3) PUFAs 20:5 (n-3) (EPA) and 22:6 (n-3) (DHA) are thought to benefit human health. The presence of prooxidant compounds in foods, however, renders them susceptible to oxidation during both storage and digestion. The development of oxidation products during digestion and the potential effects on intestinal PUFA uptake are incompletely understood. In the present studies, we examined: 1) the development and bioaccessibility of lipid oxidation products in the gastrointestinal lumen during active digestion of fatty fish using the in vitro digestive tract TNO Intestinal Model-1 (TIM-1); 2) the mucosal cell uptake and metabolism of oxidized compared with unoxidized PUFAs using Caco-2 intestinal cells; and 3) the potential to limit the development of oxidation products in the intestine by incorporating antioxidant polyphenols in food. We found that during digestion, the development of oxidation products occurs in the stomach compartment, and increased amounts of oxidation products became bioaccessible in the jejunal and ileal compartments. Inclusion of a polyphenol-rich grape seed extract (GSE) during the digestion decreased the amounts of oxidation products in the stomach compartment and intestinal dialysates (P < 0.05). In Caco-2 intestinal cells, the uptake of oxidized (n-3) PUFAs was ~10% of the uptake of unoxidized PUFAs (P < 0.05) and addition of GSE or epigallocatechin gallate protected against the development of oxidation products, resulting in increased uptake of PUFAs (P < 0.05). These results suggest that addition of polyphenols during active digestion can limit the development of (n-3) PUFA oxidation products in the small intestine lumen and thereby promote intestinal uptake of the beneficial, unoxidized, (n-3) PUFAs. PMID:23325921

  13. Effects of butyrate, avilamycin, and a plant extract combination on the intestinal equilibrium of early-weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla, E G; Nofrarías, M; Anguita, M; Castillo, M; Perez, J F; Martín-Orúe, S M; Kamel, C; Gasa, J

    2006-10-01

    We evaluated the effects of 3 additives, sodium butyrate (AC), avilamycin (AB), and a combination of plant extracts (XT), on the productive performance and the intestinal environment of the early-weaned pig. The XT was a standardized mixture with 5% (wt/wt) carvacrol (from Origanum spp.), 3% cinnamaldehyde (from Cinnamonum spp.), and 2% capsicum oleoresin (from Capsicum annum). Pigs (n = 32) weaned at 18 to 22 d of age with an initial BW of 6.0 +/- 0.10 kg were allocated to 8 pens that, in turn, were allocated to 4 treatments. The treatments included a basal diet (CT) or the basal diet supplemented with 0.3% of AC, 0.04% of AB, or 0.03% of XT. Productive performance was determined during the initial 14 d postweaning. On d 19 and 21 of the experiment, the pigs were killed to allow collection of digesta and intestinal tissue to evaluate variables indicative of aspects of the gastrointestinal environment. Treatments AB and AC improved G:F (P = 0.012 and 0.003, respectively) compared with the CT. Butyrate included in the diet was only detected in the stomach but not in cranial jejunum. When compared with CT, AC produced a lower ileal starch digestibility (P = 0.002) and a lower whole-tract OM and starch digestibility (P = 0.001 and 0.003, respectively), related to a lower VFA concentration in the cranial colon (P = 0.082) and a numerically reduced branched VFA percentage in the rectum. The AB treatment diminished propionate production in caudal colon (P = 0.002) and rectum (P = 0.012) compared with CT. The AC group exhibited deeper crypt depth in the jejunum without variations in villus height compared with CT (P = 0.042). The AC and AB groups also increased goblet cell presence in the colon (P = 0.001 and 0.032, respectively). On the other hand, AB and XT diminished intraepithelial lymphocytes in the jejunum (P = 0.003 and 0.034, respectively). The XT increased lymphocyte presence in the colon (P = 0.003). These results show the important influence of AB and AC on

  14. Berberine Prevents Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Damage During Early Phase of Sepsis in Rat through the Toll-Like Receptors Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo-xun; Wang, Xi-mo; Jiang, Tao; Gong, Jian-feng; Niu, Ling-ying

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study has shown berberine prevents damage to the intestinal mucosal barrier during early phase of sepsis in rat through mechanisms independent of the NOD-like receptors signaling pathway. In this study, we explored the regulatory effects of berberine on Toll-like receptors during the intestinal mucosal damaging process in rats. Male Sprague-Dawlay (SD) rats were treated with berberine for 5 d before undergoing cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce polymicrobial sepsis. The expression of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR 2), TLR 4, TLR 9, the activity of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), the levels of selected cytokines and chemokines, percentage of cell death in intestinal epithelial cells, and mucosal permeability were investigated at 0, 2, 6, 12 and 24 h after CLP. Results showed that the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α ) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) level were significantly lower in berberine-treated rats compared to the control animals. Conversely, the expression level of tight junction proteins, percentage of cell death in intestinal epithelial cells and the mucosal permeability were significantly higher in berberine-treated rats. The mRNA expression of TLR 2, TLR 4, and TLR 9 were significantly affected by berberine treatment. Our results indicate that pretreatment with berberine attenuates tissue injury and protects the intestinal mucosal barrier in early phase of sepsis and this may possibly have been mediated through the TLRs pathway. PMID:25605990

  15. Removal of luminal content protects the small intestine during hemorrhagic shock but is not sufficient to prevent lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Altshuler, Angelina E; Richter, Michael D; Modestino, Augusta E; Penn, Alexander H; Heller, Michael J; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2013-01-01

    The small intestine plays a key role in the pathogenesis of multiple organ failure following circulatory shock. Current results show that reduced perfusion of the small intestine compromises the mucosal epithelial barrier, and the intestinal contents (including pancreatic digestive enzymes and partially digested food) can enter the intestinal wall and transport through the circulation or mesenteric lymph to other organs such as the lung. The extent to which the luminal contents of the small intestine mediate tissue damage in the intestine and lung is poorly understood in shock. Therefore, rats were assigned to three groups: No-hemorrhagic shock (HS) control and HS with or without a flushed intestine. HS was induced by reducing the mean arterial pressure (30 mmHg; 90 min) followed by return of shed blood and observation (3 h). The small intestine and lung were analyzed for hemorrhage, neutrophil accumulation, and cellular membrane protein degradation. After HS, animals with luminal contents had increased neutrophil accumulation, bleeding, and destruction of E-cadherin in the intestine. Serine protease activity was elevated in mesenteric lymph fluid collected from a separate group of animals subjected to intestinal ischemia/reperfusion. Serine protease activity was elevated in the plasma after HS but was detected in lungs only in animals with nonflushed lumens. Despite removal of the luminal contents, lung injury occurred in both groups as determined by elevated neutrophil accumulation, permeability, and lung protein destruction. In conclusion, luminal contents significantly increase intestinal damage during experimental HS, suggesting transport of luminal contents across the intestinal wall should be minimized. PMID:24303180

  16. Wild chrysanthemum extract prevents UVB radiation-induced acute cell death and photoaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Sujiao; Jiang, Ping; Su, Weiting; Xiang, Yang; Li, Jian; Zeng, Lin; Yang, Shuangjuan

    2016-03-01

    Wild chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum indicum L.) is traditionally used in folk medicine as an anti-inflammatory agent. It is also used in the southwest plateau region of China to prevent ultraviolet-induced skin damage. However, the role and mechanism by which wild chrysanthemum prevents UV-induced skin damage and photoaging have never been investigated in vitro. In the present study, we found that aqueous extracts from wild chrysanthemum strongly reduced high-dose UVB-induced acute cell death of human immortalized keratinocytic HaCat cells. Wild chrysanthemum extract was also demonstrated to reduce low-dose UVB-induced expression of the photoaging-related matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9. The ROS level elevated by UVB irradiation was strongly attenuated by wild chrysanthemum extract. Further study revealed that wild chrysanthemum extract reduced UVB-triggered ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation and their protective role, which is partially dependent on inhibiting p38 activation. These results suggest that wild chrysanthemum extract can protect the skin from UVB-induced acute skin damage and photoaging by reducing the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and inhibiting p38 MAPK phosphorylation. The present study confirmed the protective role of wild chrysanthemum against UV-induced skin disorders in vitro and indicated the possible mechanism. Further study to identify the active components in wild chrysanthemum extract would be useful for developing new drugs for preventing and treating skin diseases, including skin cancer and photoaging, induced by UV irradiation. PMID:25052044

  17. Dietary intervention with green dwarf banana flour (Musa sp AAA) prevents intestinal inflammation in a trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid model of rat colitis.

    PubMed

    Scarminio, Viviane; Fruet, Andrea C; Witaicenis, Aline; Rall, Vera L M; Di Stasi, Luiz C

    2012-03-01

    Dietary products are among the therapeutic approaches used to modify intestinal microflora and to promote protective effects during the intestinal inflammatory process. Because the banana plant is rich in resistant starch, which is used by colonic microbiota for the anaerobic production of the short-chain fatty acids that serve as a major fuel source for colonocytes: first, green dwarf banana flour produces protective effects on the intestinal inflammation acting as a prebiotic and, second, combination of this dietary supplementation with prednisolone presents synergistic effects. For this, we used the trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS) model of rat colitis. Our results revealed that the protective effect produced by a combination of 10% green dwarf banana flour with prednisolone was more pronounced than those promoted by a single administration of prednisolone or a diet containing 10% or 20% banana flour. This beneficial effect was associated with an improvement in the colonic oxidative status because the banana flour diet prevented the glutathione depletion and inhibited myeloperoxidase activity and lipid peroxidation. In addition, the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity was associated with an inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity, a reduction in macroscopic and microscopic scores, and an extension of the lesions. In conclusion, the dietary use of the green dwarf banana flour constitutes an important dietary supplement and complementary medicine product to prevention and treatment of human inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:22464807

  18. Peptide-induced de novo bone formation after tooth extraction prevents alveolar bone loss in a murine tooth extraction model.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Ono, Takashi; Murali, Ramachandran; Mise-Omata, Setsuko; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2016-07-01

    Tooth extraction causes bone resorption of the alveolar bone volume. Although recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) markedly promotes de novo bone formation after tooth extraction, the application of high-dose rhBMP-2 may induce side effects, such as swelling, seroma, and an increased cancer risk. Therefore, reduction of the necessary dose of rhBMP-2 which can still obtain sufficient bone mass is necessary by developing a new osteogenic reagent. Recently, we showed that the systemic administration of OP3-4 peptide, which was originally designed as a bone resorption inhibitor, had osteogenic ability both in vitro and in vivo. This study evaluated the ability of the local application of OP3-4 peptide to promote bone formation in a murine tooth extraction model with a very low-dose of BMP. The mandibular incisor was extracted from 10-week-old C57BL6/J male mice and a gelatin hydrogel containing rhBMP-2 with or without OP3-4 peptide (BMP/OP3-4) was applied to the socket of the incisor. Bone formation inside the socket was examined radiologically and histologically at 21 days after the extraction. The BMP/OP3-4-group showed significant bone formation inside the mandibular extraction socket compared to the gelatin-hydrogel-carrier-control group or rhBMP-2-applied group. The BMP/OP3-4-applied mice showed a lower reduction of alveolar bone and fewer osteoclast numbers, suggesting that the newly formed bone inside the socket may prevent resorption of the cortical bone around the extraction socket. Our data revealed that OP3-4 peptide promotes BMP-mediated bone formation inside the extraction socket of mandibular bone, resulting in preservation from the loss of alveolar bone. PMID:27118173

  19. Prevention of cellular oxidative damage by an aqueous extract of Anoectochilus formosanus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leng-Fang; Lin, Chun-Mao; Shih, Chwen-Ming; Chen, Hui-Ju; Su, Borcherng; Tseng, Cheng-Chuang; Gau, Bao-Bih; Cheng, Kur-Ta

    2005-05-01

    Anoectochilus formosanus (AF) is a popular folk medicine in Taiwan whose pharmacological effects have been characterized. In this work we investigated the antioxidant properties of an aqueous extract prepared from AF. The AF extract was capable of scavenging H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner. We induced oxidative stress in HL-60 cells, either by the addition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase reaction. Apoptosis caused by oxidative damage was displayed by DNA fragmentation on gel electrophoresis, and the apoptotic fraction was quantified with flow cytometry. The cell damage induced by oxidative stress was prevented by the plant extract in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, the proteolytic cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase during the apoptotic process was also inhibited by AF extract. Our results provide the basis for determining an AF extract to be an antioxidant. PMID:15965084

  20. Preventive effects of tamarind seed coat extract on UVA-induced alterations in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Phetdee, Khemjira; Rakchai, Racharat; Rattanamanee, Kwanchai; Teaktong, Thanasak; Viyoch, Jarupa

    2014-01-01

    One of the most damaging actions on skin is from solar radiation, particularly from its ultraviolet (UV) component, through the formation of oxidative species. Thus, an antioxidant strategy that prevents the formation of these oxidants could form the basis of an efficacious cutaneous protectant. Many herbal materials contain antioxidant polyphenols, and this study assessed the possibility that tamarind seed coat extract could fulfill this role. An alcoholic extract of the tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) seed coat showed stronger antioxidant activity (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl inhibition, EC(50) = 12.9 μg/ml) than L-ascorbic acid (EC(50) = 22.9 μg/ml) and α-tocopherol (EC(50) = 29.3 μg/ml). In cultured fibroblasts taken from human skin, hydrogen peroxide (100-1000 μM) damaged 62-92% of the cells compared to only 35-47% when the cells were preincubated in extract (200 μg/ml) for 24 h. UVA (40 J/cm2) irradiation of human fibroblasts damaged 25% of the cells but the death rate was reduced to 10% with extract. UV irradiation increased the proportion of cells arrest in G(0)/G(1) phase (from 59% to 78%) but this was largely prevented by the extract (64%), according to flow cytometry. Intracellular total glutathione of UVA-irradiated cells pretreated with the extract increased to 10-25% compared to the non-pretreated group at 24-72 h after irradiation. Fibroblasts typically increased matrix metalloproteinase-1 secretion after photodamage, and this is prevented by the extract. This is the first report showing that tamarind seed coat extract is an antioxidant and can protect human skin fibroblasts from cellular damage produced by UVA and thus may form the foundation for an antiaging cosmetic. PMID:24602819

  1. Evaluation of antioxidant activity and preventing DNA damage effect of pomegranate extracts by chemiluminescence method.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shanshan; Deng, Qianchun; Xiao, Junsong; Xie, Bijun; Sun, Zhida

    2007-04-18

    The antioxidant activities of three parts (peel, juice, and seed) and extracts of three pomegranate varieties in China were investigated by using a chemiluminescence (CL) method in vitro. The scavenging ability of pomegranate extracts (PEs) on superoxide anion, hydroxide radical, and hydrogen peroxide was determined by the pyrogallol-luminol system, the CuSO4-Phen-Vc-H2O2 system, and the luminol-H2O2 system, respectively. DNA damage preventing the effect of PE was determined by the CuSO4-Phen-Vc-H2O2-DNA CL system. The results showed that the peel extract of red pomegranate had the best effect on the scavenging ability of superoxide anion because its IC50 value (4.01 +/- 0.09 microg/mL) was the lowest in all PEs. The seed extract of white pomegranate could scavenge hydroxide radical most effectively of the nine extracts (the IC50 value was 1.69 +/- 0.03 microg/mL). The peel extract of white pomegranate had the best scavenging ability on hydrogen peroxide, which had the lowest IC50 value (0.032 +/- 0.003 microg/mL) in the nine extracts. The seed extract of white pomegranate (the IC50 value was 3.67 +/- 0.03 microg/mL) was the most powerful on the DNA damage-preventing effect in all of the PEs. Also, the statistical analysis indicated that there were significant differences (at P < 0.05) among the extracts of the different varieties and parts in each system. PMID:17381116

  2. Hexane Extract of Orthosiphon stamineus Induces Insulin Expression and Prevents Glucotoxicity in INS-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hae-Jung; Choi, Yoon-Jung; Park, So-Young; Kim, Jong-Yeon; Won, Kyu-Chang; Son, Jong-Keun

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyperglycemia, a characteristic feature of diabetes, induces glucotoxicity in pancreatic β-cells, resulting in further impairment of insulin secretion and worsening glycemic control. Thus, preservation of insulin secretory capacity is essential for the management of type 2 diabetes. In this study, we evaluated the ability of an Orthosiphon stamineus (OS) extract to prevent glucotoxicity in insulin-producing cells. Methods We measured insulin mRNA expression and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in OS-treated INS-1 cells after exposure to a high glucose (HG; 30 mM) concentration. Results The hexane extract of OS elevated mRNA expression of insulin as well as pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 of INS-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The hexane OS extract also increased the levels of phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, Akt phosphorylation was elevated by treatment with 100 and 200 µmol of the hexane OS extract. Three days of HG exposure suppressed insulin mRNA expression and GSIS; these expressions were restored by treatment with the hexane OS extract. HG elevated peroxide levels in the INS-1 cells. These levels were unaffected by OS treatment under both normal and hyperglycemic conditions. Conclusion Our results suggested that the hexane extract of OS elevates insulin mRNA expression and prevents glucotoxicity induced by a 3-day treatment with HG. This was associated with the activation of PI-3K and Akt. PMID:25729713

  3. Bioactive packaging using antioxidant extracts for the prevention of microbial food-spoilage.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Diana; Gullón, Beatriz; Gullón, Patricia; Gomes, Ana; Tavaria, Freni

    2016-07-13

    Bioactive food packaging is an innovative approach for the prevention of the growth of food-spoilage microorganisms. Four active extracts from agroindustrial subproducts (Eucalyptus wood, almond shells, corn cobs and grape pomace) with demonstrated antioxidant activity have been investigated for bestowing antimicrobial activity to bioactive packaging. To carry out this evaluation, the antioxidant extracts were tested against five food pathogenic bacteria, namely, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella spp. The results obtained showed that all the tested extracts inhibited the growth of all five pathogenic bacteria. From the analysis of the minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), the Eucalyptus wood extract was the most active, being necessary only 2% (v/v) to inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, whereas almond shells extract were less active requiring 4% (w/v) to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the extract from corn cobs was bactericidal against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus at a concentration of 4% (w/v). After checking their antimicrobial activity, the antioxidant extracts have been incorporated into sodium alginate films and the maintenance of their antimicrobial properties was confirmed. This work showed that the antioxidant extracts from agroindustrial byproducts exhibited antimicrobial activity and were suitable for incorporation into edible films that could be used in bioactive packaging systems. PMID:27363903

  4. The protective effect of lemon fruit extract on histopathological changes induced in small intestines and pancreas of male mice by cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    Quita, Salwa Mohammed; Balbaid, Samira Omar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cyclophosphamide (CP) is alkylating agent and the most commonly used chemotherapeutic drug for various types of cancer; it causes severe toxicity. The aim of the research was to assess the protective effect of lemon fruit extract (LFE) against the side effects of the anti-cancer drug “cyclophosphamide” (CP). Methods This experimental study was conducted in 2015. Thirty male mice were divided into six groups: group A (control): intraperitoneal injection of saline, group B: oral LFE (10ml/kg), group C: intraperitoneal injection of CP (10 mg/kg), group D: intraperitoneal injection of CP (20 mg/kg), group E: intraperitoneal injection of CP (10 mg/kg) and oral LFE (10 ml/kg), and group F: intraperitoneal injection of CP (20 mg/kg) and oral LFE (10 ml/kg). All groups were treated daily for five consecutive days. Results The results of the group treated with the drug C and D was that, in their intestines, the effect was uneven between a severe to a sharp effect, and there was a lack of dense connective tissue and its collagen fibers and fat cells, the intestinal glands or crypt of Lieberkühn appeared few in number and distorted in composition when compared with control A, as the pancreas appeared divided into several lobes containing small numbers of pancreatic Acini, padded with secretory pyramid-shaped cells, although some of them appeared exaggerated. While treatment in group E and F resulted in the intestines and pancreas appearing to be semi-normal; regarding the pancreas, it showed an observed improvement more than the response of the intestines. Conclusion The results support the protective effect of lemon fruit extract against CP-induced intestinal and pancreatic injury. PMID:26516452

  5. Aloe vera non-decolorized whole leaf extract-induced large intestinal tumors in F344 rats share similar molecular pathways with human sporadic colorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Pandiri, Arun R; Sills, Robert C; Hoenerhoff, Mark J; Peddada, Shyamal D; Ton, Thai-Vu T; Hong, Hue-Hua L; Flake, Gordon P; Malarkey, David E; Olson, Greg R; Pogribny, Igor P; Walker, Nigel J; Boudreau, Mary D

    2011-12-01

    Aloe vera is one of the most commonly used botanicals for various prophylactic and therapeutic purposes. Recently, NTP/NCTR has demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in large intestinal tumors in F344 rats chronically exposed to Aloe barbadensis Miller (Aloe vera) non-decolorized whole leaf extract (AVNWLE) in drinking water. The morphological and molecular pathways of AVNWLE-induced large intestinal tumors in the F344 rats were compared to human colorectal cancer (hCRC) literature. Defined histological criteria were used to compare AVNWLE-induced large intestinal tumors with hCRC. The commonly mutated genes (Kras, Ctnnb1, and Tp53) and altered signaling pathways (MAPK, WNT, and TGF-β) important in hCRC were evaluated within AVNWLE-induced large intestinal tumors. Histological evaluation of the large intestinal tumors indicated eight of twelve adenomas (Ads) and four of twelve carcinomas (Cas). Mutation analysis of eight Ads and four Cas identified point mutations in exons 1 and 2 of the Kras gene (two of eight Ads, two of four Cas), and in exon 2 of the Ctnnb1 gene (three of eight Ads, one of four Cas). No Tp53 (exons 5-8) mutations were found in Ads or Cas. Molecular pathways important in hCRC such as MAPK, WNT, and TGF-β signaling were also altered in AVNWLE-induced Ads and Cas. In conclusion, the AVNWLE-induced large intestinal tumors in F344 rats share several similarities with hCRC at the morphological and molecular levels. PMID:21937742

  6. Aloe vera Non-Decolorized Whole Leaf Extract-Induced Large Intestinal Tumors in F344 Rats Share Similar Molecular Pathways with Human Sporadic Colorectal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pandiri, Arun R.; Sills, Robert C.; Hoenerhoff, Mark J.; Peddada, Shyamal D.; Ton, Thai-Vu T.; Hong, Hue-Hua L.; Flake, Gordon P.; Malarkey, David E.; Olson, Greg R.; Pogribny, Igor P.; Walker, Nigel J.; Boudreau, Mary D.

    2016-01-01

    Aloe vera is one of the most commonly used botanicals for various prophylactic and therapeutic purposes. Recently, NTP/NCTR has demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in large intestinal tumors in F344 rats chronically exposed to Aloe barbadensis Miller (Aloe vera) non-decolorized whole leaf extract (AVNWLE) in drinking water. The morphological and molecular pathways of AVNWLE-induced large intestinal tumors in the F344 rats were compared to human colorectal cancer (hCRC) literature. Defined histological criteria were used to compare AVNWLE-induced large intestinal tumors with hCRC. The commonly mutated genes (Kras, Ctnnb1, and Tp53) and altered signaling pathways (MAPK, WNT, and TGF-β) important in hCRC were evaluated within AVNWLE-induced large intestinal tumors. Histological evaluation of the large intestinal tumors indicated eight of twelve adenomas (Ads) and four of twelve carcinomas (Cas). Mutation analysis of eight Ads and four Cas identified point mutations in exons 1 and 2 of the Kras gene (two of eight Ads, two of four Cas), and in exon 2 of the Ctnnb1 gene (three of eight Ads, one of four Cas). No Tp53 (exons 5–8) mutations were found in Ads or Cas. Molecular pathways important in hCRC such as MAPK, WNT, and TGF-β signaling were also altered in AVNWLE-induced Ads and Cas. In conclusion, the AVNWLE-induced large intestinal tumors in F344 rats share several similarities with hCRC at the morphological and molecular levels. PMID:21937742

  7. Cooperative role of antibodies against heat-labile toxin and the EtpA Adhesin in preventing toxin delivery and intestinal colonization by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Roy, Koushik; Hamilton, David J; Fleckenstein, James M

    2012-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrheal disease in developing countries, where it is responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths each year. Vaccine development for ETEC has been hindered by the heterogeneity of known molecular targets and the lack of broad-based sustained protection afforded by existing vaccine strategies. In an effort to explore the potential role of novel antigens in ETEC vaccines, we examined the ability of antibodies directed against the ETEC heat-labile toxin (LT) and the recently described EtpA adhesin to prevent intestinal colonization in vivo and toxin delivery to epithelial cells in vitro. We demonstrate that EtpA is required for the optimal delivery of LT and that antibodies against this adhesin play at least an additive role in preventing delivery of LT to target intestinal cells when combined with antibodies against either the A or B subunits of the toxin. Moreover, vaccination with a combination of LT and EtpA significantly impaired intestinal colonization. Together, these results suggest that the incorporation of recently identified molecules such as EtpA could be used to enhance current approaches to ETEC vaccine development. PMID:22875600

  8. Bifidogenic effect of grain larvae extract on serum lipid, glucose and intestinal microflora in rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Oh; Park, Byung-Sung

    2015-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate whether orally administered Korean grain larvae ethanol extract (GLE) had a bifidogenic effect in normal rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into a negative control group (CO) and GLE orally administered (5.0, 7.0 and 9.0 mg/100 g body weight) groups. Thymus and spleen weights dosedependently increased by 128.58 percent and 128.58 percent, respectively, but abdominal fat decreased by 19.18 percent after GLE administration compared with that in the CO group (p less than 0.05). Serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and glucose decreased by 30.26 percent, 7.33 percent, 27.20 percent, and 6.96 percent, respectively, whereas highdensity lipoprotein cholesterol increased by 129.93 percent in the GLE groups compared with those in the CO group (p less than 0.05). IgG, IgM, IgA in the GLE groups increased 203.68 percent, 181.41 percent, and 238.25 percent, respectively, compared to that in the CO group (p less than 0.05). Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus increased by 115.74 percent and 144.28 percent, whereas Bacteroides, Clostridium, Escherichia, and Streptococcus decreased by 17.37 percent, 17.46 percent, 21.25 percent, and 19.16 percent, respectively, in the GLE groups compared with those in the CO group (p less than 0.05). Total organic acids, acetic acid, and propionic acid increased by 151.40 percent, 188.09 percent, and 150.17 percent, whereas butyric acid and valeric acid decreased by 40.65 percent and 49.24 percent, respectively, in the GLE groups as compared with those in the CO group (p less than 0.05). These results suggest that Korean GLE improves the bifidogenic effect by increasing cecal organic acids and modulating gut microflora via a selective increase in Bifidobacterium in normal rats. PMID:26333397

  9. A standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba prevents locomotion impairment induced by cassava juice in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Rivadeneyra-Domínguez, Eduardo; Vázquez-Luna, Alma; Rodríguez-Landa, Juan F.; Díaz-Sobac, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The long-term consumption of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) juice produce neurotoxic effects in the rat, characterized by an increased motor activity in the open field test and presence of uncoordinated swim (i.e., lateral swimming), in the swim test; which has been associated with damage in the hippocampus (CA1). On the other hand, flavonoids content in the Ginkgo biloba extract has been reported to produces neuroprotective effects at experimental level; therefore we hypothesized that G. biloba extract may prevents the motor alterations produced by cassava juice and reduce cellular damage in hippocampal neurons of the rat. In present study the effect of vehicle, cassava juice (linamarin, 0.30 mg/kg), G. biloba extract (dry extract, 160 mg/kg), and combination of treatment were evaluated in the open field and swim tests to identify locomotor and hippocampal alterations in adult male Wistar rats. All treatments were administered once per day, every 24 h, for 28 days, by oral rout. The effect was evaluated at 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of treatment. The results show that cassava group from day 14 of treatment increase crossing and rearing in the open field test, as compared with the vehicle group; while in the swim test produces an uncoordinated swim characterized by the lateral swim. In this same group an increase in the number of damage neurons in the hippocampus (CA1) was identified. Interestingly, both behavioral and neuronal alterations produced by cassava juice administration were prevented by treatment with G. biloba extract. The results shown that G. biloba extract exert a protective effect against behavioral and neuronal damage associated with consumption of cassava juice in the rat. These effects are possibly related with flavonoid content in the G. biloba extract. PMID:25309441

  10. [Using Metronidazole and Hydroxyapatite for preventing dry socket after extraction of impacted mandibular 3rd molar

    PubMed

    Xue, Z X; Mao, T Q

    1993-03-01

    Dry socket is one of the most frequent complications after teeth extraction,especially in impacted mandibular third molars.The etilogy and prevention is not clear.This study id based on principles of clinical epidemiology.Randomized double-blind method was carried out in 549 patients to test the value of the prophylactic use of Hydroxyapatite,to test the value of the prophylactic use of Hydroxyapatite and Metronidazole,placed in the sockets of extracted impacted mandibular third molars.The results of the incidence of DS was 7.1% of Metronidazole treated sockets,and 2.1% of Hydroxyapatite treated sockets,It is concluded that Hydroxyapatite is an effective preventive factor for dry socket,The possible mechanism of Hydroxyapatite and the dry socket etiology were discussed. PMID:15159869

  11. Study on the small intestine absorptive kinetics characters of tanshinol and protocatechualdehyde of Salvia miltiorrhiza extracts in rats in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kai; Zhai, Shuiting; Zhang, Zhidong; Wang, Guoquan; Fu, Xiaoyang; Li, Tianxiao

    2016-07-01

    In order to provide scientific basis for clinical selection of drugs, to compare and analyze the effective constitutes and the intestinal absorption in vivo in rats of the compound salvia tablets and compound salvia dropping pills (taken as the representatives). Determine the contents of tanshinol, protocatechuic aldehyde, salvianolic acid B and tanshinone II A, cryptotanshinone, ginseng saponin Rg1 and Rb1 in the compound salvia tablets and compound salvia dropping pills by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The intestinal absorption condition of the tanshinol, protocatechuic aldehyde, salvianolic acid B of the compound salvia tablets and compound salvia dropping pills in rats were detected by intestinal perfusion experiment. Only the intake of protocatechuic aldehyde in the compound salvia tablets was higher than in the compound dropping pills, the intake of the other 6 effective constitutes were all lower than in the compound dropping pills. The intestinal absorption of protocatechuic aldehyde was rather complete, while the intestinal absorption of tanshinol and salvianolic acid B were not significant. The duodenum was the main absorption region of these three components. The absorption of protocatechuic aldehyde was different in different regions of the intestines. Each intake of the effective constitutes in the tablets and dropping pills were significantly different, and the rat intestinal absorption of part of the components were different. PMID:27592492

  12. Intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of Sasa quelpaertensis leaf extract by suppressing lipopolysaccharide-stimulated inflammatory mediators in intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells co-cultured with RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Lim, Ji Ye; Min, Soo Jin; Ko, Hee-Chul; Kim, Se-Jae

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, involves chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Previously, Sasa quelpaertensis leaves have been shown to mediate anti-inflammation and anti-cancer effects, although it remains unclear whether Sasa leaves are able to attenuate inflammation-related intestinal diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of Sasa quelpaertensis leaf extract (SQE) using an in vitro co-culture model of the intestinal epithelial environment. MATERIALS/METHODS An in vitro co-culture system was established that consisted of intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was used to induce inflammation. RESULTS Treatment with SQE significantly suppressed the secretion of LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), IL-6, and IL-1β in co-cultured RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition, expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were down-regulated in response to inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation by SQE. Compared with two bioactive compounds that have previously been identified in SQE, tricin and P-coumaric acid, SQE exhibited the most effective anti-inflammatory properties. CONCLUSIONS SQE exhibited intestinal anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting various inflammatory mediators mediated through nuclear transcription factor kappa-B (NF-kB) activation. Thus, SQE has the potential to ameliorate inflammation-related diseases, including IBD, by limiting excessive production of pro-inflammatory mediators. PMID:25671061

  13. Bifidobacteria Prevent Tunicamycin-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Subsequent Barrier Disruption in Human Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Takuya; Oishi, Kenji; Wullaert, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is caused by accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER, thereby compromising its vital cellular functions in protein production and secretion. Genome wide association studies in humans as well as experimental animal models linked ER stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) with intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the mechanisms linking the outcomes of ER stress in IECs to intestinal disease have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the impact of ER stress on intestinal epithelial barrier function using human colon carcinoma-derived Caco-2 monolayers. Tunicamycin-induced ER stress decreased the trans-epithelial electrical resistance of Caco-2 monolayers, concomitant with loss of cellular plasma membrane integrity. Epithelial barrier disruption in Caco-2 cells after ER stress was not caused by caspase- or RIPK1-dependent cell death but was accompanied by lysosomal rupture and up-regulation of the ER stress markers Grp78, sXBP1 and Chop. Interestingly, several bifidobacteria species inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress and thereby diminished barrier disruption in Caco-2 monolayers. Together, these results showed that ER stress compromises the epithelial barrier function of Caco-2 monolayers and demonstrate beneficial impacts of bifidobacteria on ER stress in IECs. Our results identify epithelial barrier loss as a potential link between ER stress and intestinal disease development, and suggest that bifidobacteria could exert beneficial effects on this phenomenon. PMID:27611782

  14. GLP-2 Prevents Intestinal Mucosal Atrophy and Improves Tissue Antioxidant Capacity in a Mouse Model of Total Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Qiucheng; Bi, Jingcheng; Wang, Xinying; Jiang, Tingting; Wu, Chao; Tian, Feng; Gao, Xuejin; Wan, Xiao; Zheng, Huijun

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) on mucosal atrophy and intestinal antioxidant capacity in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Male mice (6–8 weeks old) were divided into three groups (n = 8 for each group): a control group fed a standard laboratory chow diet, and experimental TPN (received standard TPN solution) and TPN + GLP-2 groups (received TPN supplemented with 60 µg/day of GLP-2 for 5 days). Mice in the TPN group had lower body weight and reduced intestinal length, villus height, and crypt depth compared to the control group (all p < 0.05). GLP-2 supplementation increased all parameters compared to TPN only (all p < 0.05). Intestinal total superoxide dismutase activity and reduced-glutathione level in the TPN + GLP-2 group were also higher relative to the TPN group (all p < 0.05). GLP-2 administration significantly upregulated proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression and increased glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) abundance. Compared with the control and TPN + GLP-2 groups, intestinal cleaved caspase-3 was increased in the TPN group (all p < 0.05). This study shows GLP-2 reduces TPN-associated intestinal atrophy and improves tissue antioxidant capacity. This effect may be dependent on enhanced epithelial cell proliferation, reduced apoptosis, and upregulated GRP78 expression. PMID:26761030

  15. Effectiveness of artichoke extract in preventing alcohol-induced hangovers: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Pittler, Max H.; White, Adrian R.; Stevinson, Clare; Ernst, Edzard

    2003-01-01

    Background Extract of globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus) is promoted as a possible preventive or cure for alcohol-induced hangover symptoms. However, few rigorous clinical trials have assessed the effects of artichoke extract, and none has examined the effects in relation to hangovers. We undertook this study to test whether artichoke extract is effective in preventing the signs and symptoms of alcohol-induced hangover. Methods We recruited healthy adult volunteers between 18 and 65 years of age to participate in a randomized double-blind crossover trial. Participants received either 3 capsules of commercially available standardized artichoke extract or indistinguishable, inert placebo capsules immediately before and after alcohol exposure. After a 1-week washout period the volunteers received the opposite treatment. Participants predefined the type and amount of alcoholic beverage that would give them a hangover and ate the same meal before commencing alcohol consumption on the 2 study days. The primary outcome measure was the difference in hangover severity scores between the artichoke extract and placebo interventions. Secondary outcome measures were differences between the interventions in scores using a mood profile questionnaire and cognitive performance tests administered 1 hour before and 10 hours after alcohol exposure. Results Fifteen volunteers participated in the study. The mean number (and standard deviation) of alcohol units (each unit being 7.9 g, or 10 mL, of ethanol) consumed during treatment with artichoke extract and placebo was 10.7 (3.1) and 10.5 (2.4) respectively, equivalent to 1.2 (0.3) and 1.2 (0.2) g of alcohol per kilogram body weight. The volume of nonalcoholic drink consumed and the duration of sleep were similar during the artichoke extract and placebo interventions. None of the outcome measures differed significantly between interventions. Adverse events were rare and were mild and transient. Interpretation Our results suggest that

  16. Prevention of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaws secondary to tooth extractions. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Limeres, Jacobo

    2016-01-01

    Background A study was made to identify the most effective protocol for reducing the risk of osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ) following tooth extraction in patients subjected to treatment with antiresorptive or antiangiogenic drugs. Material and Methods A MEDLINE and SCOPUS search (January 2003 - March 2015) was made with the purpose of conducting a systematic literature review based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. All articles contributing information on tooth extractions in patients treated with oral or intravenous antiresorptive or antiangiogenic drugs were included. Results Only 13 of the 380 selected articles were finally included in the review: 11 and 5 of them offered data on patients treated with intravenous and oral bisphosphonates, respectively. No randomized controlled trials were found – all publications corresponding to case series or cohort studies. The prevalence of ONJ in the patients treated with intravenous and oral bisphosphonates was 6,9% (range 0-34.7%) and 0.47% (range 0-2.5%), respectively. The main preventive measures comprised local and systemic infection control. Conclusions No conclusive scientific evidence is available to date on the efficacy of ONJ prevention protocols in patients treated with antiresorptive or antiangiogenic drugs subjected to tooth extraction. Key words:Bisphosphonates, angiogenesis inhibitors, antiresorptive drugs, extraction, osteonecrosis. PMID:26827065

  17. Ninjin'yoeito and ginseng extract prevent oxaliplatin-induced neurodegeneration in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Ayano; Ohsawa, Masahiro; Motoo, Yoshiharu; Mizukami, Hajime; Makino, Toshiaki

    2015-10-01

    Ninjin'yoeito (NYT) is a formula of Japanese traditional kampo medicine composed of 12 crude drugs, and is designed to improve the decline in constitution after recovery from disease, fatigue, anemia, anorexia, perspiration during sleep, cold limbs, slight fever, chills, persistent cough, malaise, mental disequilibrium, insomnia, and constipation. Oxaliplatin (L-OHP) is a platinum-based anticancer drug used to treat colorectal, pancreatic, and stomach cancers. However, it often causes acute and chronic peripheral neuropathies including cold allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia. In this study, we investigated the preventive effects of NYT on neuronal degeneration caused by L-OHP using PC12 cells, which are derived from the rat adrenal medulla and differentiate into nerve-like cells after exposure to nerve growth factor. L-OHP treatment decreased the elongation of neurite-like projection outgrowths in differentiated PC12 cells. When PC12 cells were treated with NYT hot water extract, neurodegeneration caused by L-OHP was significantly prevented in a concentration-dependent manner. Among the 12 crude drugs composing NYT, the extract of Ginseng (the root of Panax ginseng) exhibited the strongest preventive effects on neurodegeneration in differentiated PC12 cells. By activity-guided fractionation, we found that the fraction containing ginsenosides displayed preventive activity and, among several ginsenosides, ginsenoside F2 exhibited significant preventive effects on L-OHP-induced decreases in neurite-like outgrowths in differentiated PC12 cells. These results suggest that NYT and ginseng are promising agents for preventing L-OHP-induced neuropathies and present ginsenoside F2 as one of the active ingredients in ginseng. PMID:26014046

  18. NEMO Prevents RIP Kinase 1-Mediated Epithelial Cell Death and Chronic Intestinal Inflammation by NF-κB-Dependent and -Independent Functions

    PubMed Central

    Vlantis, Katerina; Wullaert, Andy; Polykratis, Apostolos; Kondylis, Vangelis; Dannappel, Marius; Schwarzer, Robin; Welz, Patrick; Corona, Teresa; Walczak, Henning; Weih, Falk; Klein, Ulf; Kelliher, Michelle; Pasparakis, Manolis

    2016-01-01

    Summary Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) regulate gut immune homeostasis, and impaired epithelial responses are implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). IEC-specific ablation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) essential modulator (NEMO) caused Paneth cell apoptosis and impaired antimicrobial factor expression in the ileum, as well as colonocyte apoptosis and microbiota-driven chronic inflammation in the colon. Combined RelA, c-Rel, and RelB deficiency in IECs caused Paneth cell apoptosis but not colitis, suggesting that NEMO prevents colon inflammation by NF-κB-independent functions. Inhibition of receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) kinase activity or combined deficiency of Fas-associated via death domain protein (FADD) and RIPK3 prevented epithelial cell death, Paneth cell loss, and colitis development in mice with epithelial NEMO deficiency. Therefore, NEMO prevents intestinal inflammation by inhibiting RIPK1 kinase activity-mediated IEC death, suggesting that RIPK1 inhibitors could be effective in the treatment of colitis in patients with NEMO mutations and possibly in IBD. PMID:26982364

  19. Comparative investigation of in vitro biotransformation of 14 components in Ginkgo biloba extract in normal, diabetes and diabetic nephropathy rat intestinal bacteria matrix.

    PubMed

    Tang, Daoquan; Yu, Yanyan; Zheng, Xiaoxiao; Wu, Jing; Li, Yinjie; Wu, Xiaowen; Du, Qian; Yin, Xiaoxing

    2014-11-01

    Most herbal medicines will be metabolized by intestinal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract before absorbed by the small intestine. Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) possesses protective effects on the glomerulosclerosis of diabetic nephropathy (DN), but its biotransformation in diabetes and DN intestinal bacteria has not yet been recognized. In this work, a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method was established for the simultaneous quantification of 14 components in GBE in rat intestinal bacteria matrix, namely ginkgolides A, ginkgolides B, ginkgolides C, bilobalide, rutin, myricetin, quercitrin, quercetin, luteolin, genistein, kaempferol, apigenin, isorhamnetin and genkwanin. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Kromasil-C18 (4.6mm×250mm i.d., 5.0μm) analytical column maintained at 35°C. The mobile phase was a mixture of methanol (A) and 0.1% formic acid in water (B) with a step linear gradient at a flow rate of 1.0mlmin(-1). The calibration curves of these 14 analytes demonstrated good linearity within the test range (R>0.99). This validated method has successfully been applied into the pharmacokinetic study of the 14 components. More importantly, in the pharmacokinetic study, by comparing the time course of the biotransformation by normal, diabetes and DN rat intestinal bacteria, we found that the biotransformation speed and residence time of the 14 compounds in diabetes and DN rats differed obviously from that obtained in normal group, which provided valuable chemical information for further pharmacology and active mechanism research on GBE. PMID:25117949

  20. Effects of Onion (Allium cepa L.) Extract Administration on Intestinal α-Glucosidases Activities and Spikes in Postprandial Blood Glucose Levels in SD Rats Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Ho; Jo, Sung-Hoon; Kwon, Young-In; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Diets high in calories and sweetened foods with disaccharides frequently lead to exaggerated postprandial spikes in blood glucose. This state induces immediate oxidant stress and free radicals which trigger oxidative stress-linked diabetic complications. One of the therapeutic approaches for decreasing postprandial hyperglycemia is to retard absorption of glucose by the inhibition of carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes, α-amylase and α-glucosidases, in the digestive organs. Therefore, the inhibitory activity of Korean onion (Allium cepa L.) extract against rat intestinal α-glucosidases, such as sucrase, maltase, and porcine pancreatic α-amylase were investigated in vitro and in vivo. The content of quercetin in ethyl alcohol extract of onion skin (EOS) was 6.04 g/100 g dried weight of onion skin. The in vitro half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of EOS and quercetin, a major phenolic in onion, on rat intestinal sucrase were 0.40 and 0.11 mg/mL, respectively. The postprandial blood glucose lowering effects of EOS and quercetin were compared to a known type 2 diabetes drug (Acarbose), a strong α-glucosidase inhibitor in the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat model. In rats fed on sucrose, EOS significantly reduced the blood glucose spike after sucrose loading. The area under the blood glucose-time curve (AUClast) in EOS-treated SD rats (0.5 g-EOS/kg) was significantly lower than in untreated SD rats (259.6 ± 5.1 vs. 283.1 ± 19.2 h·mg/dL). The AUClast in quercetin-treated SD rats (0.5 g-quercetin/kg) was similar to in EOS-treated group (256.1 ± 3.2 vs. 259.6 ± 5.1 h·mg/dL). Results from this study indicates that although quercetin does have blood glucose lowering potential via α-glucosidase inhibition, there are other bioactive compounds present in onion skin. Furthermore, the effects of two weeks administration of EOS in a high carbohydrate-dietary mixture (Pico 5053) on sucrase and maltase activities in intestine were evaluated in SD rat model. Compared to

  1. Preventive effects of lignan extract from flax hulls on experimentally induced benign prostate hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Jean-François; Hidalgo, Sophie; Simons, Rudy; Verbruggen, Marian

    2014-06-01

    Consumption of diet rich in lignans may decrease the risk of some chronic hormonal conditions such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This study investigated whether a lignan-rich extract from flaxseed hulls, LinumLife EXTRA (LLE), could prevent BPH using the testosterone propionate (TP)-induced BPH rat model. Male Wistar-Unilever rats were randomly divided into four groups of 12 rats each: a negative control group fed with control diet and receiving daily subcutaneous injections of corn oil without TP, and three groups fed with control diet (positive control), diet containing 0.5% LLE (LLE 0.5) or 1.0% LLE (LLE 1.0) and receiving daily subcutaneous injections of TP in corn oil. Treatments with diets started 2 weeks before the induction of BPH and were carried out for 5 consecutive weeks. The influence of TP and LLE on body weight (BW), food and water consumptions, and enterolactone (ENL) levels in serum and urine of rats was examined at the end of the 5-week treatment period. TP significantly diminished the mean body weight gain (MBWG) of positive control rats and their food and water consumptions while LLE reduced significantly this MBWG reduction in a dose-dependent manner. The lignan-rich extract significantly inhibited TP-induced prostate size ratio (prostate weight/rat BW) increase in comparison with positive controls (P<.001). This effect was dose dependent. Higher serum and urine levels of ENL correlated well with the dose of extract provided to rats. It was concluded that the lignan-rich flaxseed hull extract prevented the TP-induced BPH indicating it might be beneficial in the prevention of BPH. PMID:24460407

  2. Use of Fecal Occult Blood Tests as Epidemiologic Indicators of Morbidity Associated with Intestinal Schistosomiasis during Preventive Chemotherapy in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Betson, Martha; Sousa-Figueiredo, José Carlos; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; Stothard, J. Russell

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for field-applicable markers to assess morbidity associated with intestinal schistosomiasis, especially in the context of preventive chemotherapy in young children. We investigated whether fecal occult blood (FOB) point-of-care tests could be used to assess intestinal pathology over a 12-month period in a cohort of 382 children (< 5 years of age). We found a strong association between egg-patent schistosomiasis and FOB at baseline (odds ratio [OR] = 3.1, P < 0.0001), 6 months (OR = 3.4, P < 0.0001), and 12 months (OR = 3.5, P < 0.0001), despite repeated chemotherapy. There were tendencies for prevalence of FOB to decrease in children who became egg negative and increase in those who became egg positive. Our results demonstrate overt disease in children less than five years of age. We therefore propose that FOB is useful for assessing dynamics of intestinal morbidity in young children at the community level and monitoring changes in morbidity after mass chemotherapy. PMID:22927499

  3. The schistosome glutathione S-transferase P28GST, a unique helminth protein, prevents intestinal inflammation in experimental colitis through a Th2-type response with mucosal eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Driss, V; El Nady, M; Delbeke, M; Rousseaux, C; Dubuquoy, C; Sarazin, A; Gatault, S; Dendooven, A; Riveau, G; Colombel, J F; Desreumaux, P; Dubuquoy, L; Capron, M

    2016-03-01

    Intestinal helminth parasites are potent inducers of T helper type 2 (Th2) response and have a regulatory role, notably on intestinal inflammation. As infection with schistosomes is unlikely to provide a reliable treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, we have investigated the beneficial effect of a schistosome enzymatic protein, the 28-kDa glutathione S-transferase (P28GST), on the modulation of disease activity and immune responses in experimental colitis. Our results showed that immunization with recombinant P28GST is at least as efficient as established schistosome infection to reduce colitis lesions and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Considering underlying mechanisms, the decrease of inflammatory parameters was associated with the polarization of the immune system toward a Th2 profile, with local and systemic increases of interleukin (IL)-13 and IL-5. Dense eosinophil infiltration was observed in the colons of P28GST-immunized rats and mice. Depletion of eosinophils by treatment with an anti-Siglec-F monoclonal antibody and use of IL-5-deficient mice led to the loss of therapeutic effect, suggesting the crucial role for eosinophils in colitis prevention by P28GST. These findings reveal that immunization with P28GST, a unique recombinant schistosome enzyme, ameliorates intestinal inflammation through eosinophil-dependent modulation of harmful type 1 responses, representing a new immuno-regulatory strategy against inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26174763

  4. The schistosome glutathione S-transferase P28GST, a unique helminth protein, prevents intestinal inflammation in experimental colitis through a Th2-type response with mucosal eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Driss, V; El Nady, M; Delbeke, M; Rousseaux, C; Dubuquoy, C; Sarazin, A; Gatault, S; Dendooven, A; Riveau, G; Colombel, J F; Desreumaux, P; Dubuquoy, L; Capron, M

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal helminth parasites are potent inducers of T helper type 2 (Th2) response and have a regulatory role, notably on intestinal inflammation. As infection with schistosomes is unlikely to provide a reliable treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, we have investigated the beneficial effect of a schistosome enzymatic protein, the 28-kDa glutathione S-transferase (P28GST), on the modulation of disease activity and immune responses in experimental colitis. Our results showed that immunization with recombinant P28GST is at least as efficient as established schistosome infection to reduce colitis lesions and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Considering underlying mechanisms, the decrease of inflammatory parameters was associated with the polarization of the immune system toward a Th2 profile, with local and systemic increases of interleukin (IL)-13 and IL-5. Dense eosinophil infiltration was observed in the colons of P28GST-immunized rats and mice. Depletion of eosinophils by treatment with an anti-Siglec-F monoclonal antibody and use of IL-5-deficient mice led to the loss of therapeutic effect, suggesting the crucial role for eosinophils in colitis prevention by P28GST. These findings reveal that immunization with P28GST, a unique recombinant schistosome enzyme, ameliorates intestinal inflammation through eosinophil-dependent modulation of harmful type 1 responses, representing a new immuno-regulatory strategy against inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26174763

  5. Lubiprostone prevents nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small intestinal damage by suppressing the expression of inflammatory mediators via EP4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shusaku; Kurata, Naoto; Yamaguchi, Aya; Amagase, Kikuko; Takeuchi, Koji

    2014-06-01

    Lubiprostone, a bicyclic fatty acid derived from prostaglandin E1, has been used to treat chronic constipation and irritable bowel syndrome, and its mechanism of action has been attributed to the stimulation of intestinal fluid secretion via the activation of the chloride channel protein 2/cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (ClC-2/CFTR) chloride channels. We examined the effects of lubiprostone on indomethacin-induced enteropathy and investigated the functional mechanisms involved, including its relationship with the EP4 receptor subtype. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered indomethacin (10 mg/kg p.o.) and killed 24 hours later to examine the hemorrhagic lesions that developed in the small intestine. Lubiprostone (0.01-1 mg/kg) was administered orally twice 30 minutes before and 9 h after the indomethacin treatment. Indomethacin markedly damaged the small intestine, accompanied by intestinal hypermotility, a decrease in mucus and fluid secretion, and an increase in enterobacterial invasion as well as the up-regulation of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) mRNAs. Lubiprostone significantly reduced the severity of these lesions, with the concomitant suppression of the functional changes. The effects of lubiprostone on the intestinal lesions and functional alterations were significantly abrogated by the coadministration of AE3-208 [4-(4-cyano-2-(2-(4-fluoronaphthalen-1-yl)propionylamino)phenyl)butyric acid], a selective EP4 antagonist, but not by CFTR(inh)-172, a CFTR inhibitor. These results suggest that lubiprostone may prevent indomethacin-induced enteropathy via an EP4 receptor-dependent mechanism. This effect may be functionally associated with the inhibition of intestinal hypermotility and increase in mucus/fluid secretion, resulting in the suppression of bacterial invasion and iNOS/TNFα expression, which are major pathogenic events in enteropathy. The direct activation of CFTR/ClC-2 chloride channels is not

  6. Intestinal REG3 Lectins Protect against Alcoholic Steatohepatitis by Reducing Mucosa-Associated Microbiota and Preventing Bacterial Translocation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lirui; Fouts, Derrick E; Stärkel, Peter; Hartmann, Phillipp; Chen, Peng; Llorente, Cristina; DePew, Jessica; Moncera, Kelvin; Ho, Samuel B; Brenner, David A; Hooper, Lora V; Schnabl, Bernd

    2016-02-10

    Approximately half of all deaths from liver cirrhosis, the tenth leading cause of mortality in the United States, are related to alcohol use. Chronic alcohol consumption is accompanied by intestinal dysbiosis and bacterial overgrowth, yet little is known about the factors that alter the microbial composition or their contribution to liver disease. We previously associated chronic alcohol consumption with lower intestinal levels of the antimicrobial-regenerating islet-derived (REG)-3 lectins. Here, we demonstrate that intestinal deficiency in REG3B or REG3G increases numbers of mucosa-associated bacteria and enhances bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph nodes and liver, promoting the progression of ethanol-induced fatty liver disease toward steatohepatitis. Overexpression of Reg3g in intestinal epithelial cells restricts bacterial colonization of mucosal surfaces, reduces bacterial translocation, and protects mice from alcohol-induced steatohepatitis. Thus, alcohol appears to impair control of the mucosa-associated microbiota, and subsequent breach of the mucosal barrier facilitates progression of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:26867181

  7. The novel porcine Lactobacillus sobrius strain protects intestinal cells from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 infection and prevents membrane barrier damage.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Marianna; Finamore, Alberto; Britti, Maria Serena; Konstantinov, Sergey R; Smidt, Hauke; de Vos, Willem M; Mengheri, Elena

    2007-12-01

    Lactobacilli have a potential to overcome intestinal disorders; however, the exact mode of action is still largely unknown. In this study, we have used the intestinal porcine intestinal IPEC-1 epithelial cells as a model to investigate a possible protective activity of a new Lactobacillus species, the L. sobrius DSM 16698(T), against intestinal injury induced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 infection and the underlying mechanisms. Treatment of infected cells with L. sobrius strongly reduced the pathogen adhesion. L. sobrius was also able to prevent the ETEC-induced membrane damage by inhibiting delocalization of zonula occludens (ZO)-1, reduction of occludin amount, rearrangement of F-actin, and dephosphorylation of occludin caused by ETEC. RT-PCR and ELISA experiments showed that L. sobrius counteracted the ETEC-induced increase of IL-8 and upregulated the IL-10 expression. The involvement of IL-8 in the deleterious effects of ETEC was proven by neutralization of IL-8 with a specific antibody. A crucial role of IL-10 was indicated by blockage of IL-10 production with neutralizing anti-IL-10 antibody that fully abrogated the L. sobrius protection. L. sobrius was also able to inhibit the internalization of ETEC, which was likely favored by the leaking barrier. The protective effects were not found with L. amylovorus DSM 20531(T) treatment, a strain derived from cattle waste but phylogenetically closely related to L. sobrius. Together, the data indicate that L. sobrius exerts protection against the harmful effects of ETEC by different mechanisms, including pathogen adhesion inhibition and maintenance of membrane barrier integrity through IL-10 regulation. PMID:18029488

  8. Histidine Prevents Cu-Induced Oxidative Stress and the Associated Decreases in mRNA from Encoding Tight Junction Proteins in the Intestine of Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lin; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Wu, Pei; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is a common heavy metal pollutant in aquatic environments that originates from natural as well as anthropogenic sources. The present study investigated whether Cu causes oxidative damage and induces changes in the expression of genes that encode tight junction (TJ) proteins, cytokines and antioxidant-related genes in the intestine of the grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). We demonstrated that Cu decreases the survival rate of fish and increases oxidative damage as measured by increases in malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl contents. Cu exposure significantly decreased the expression of genes that encode the tight junction proteins, namely, claudin (CLDN)-c, -3 and -15 as well as occludin and zonula occludens-1, in the intestine of fish. In addition, Cu exposure increases the mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, specifically, IL-8, TNF-α and its related signalling factor (nuclear factor kappa B, NF-κB), which was partly correlated to the decreased mRNA levels of NF-κB inhibitor protein (IκB). These changes were associated with Cu-induced oxidative stress detected by corresponding decreases in glutathione (GSH) content, as well as decreases in the copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and mRNA levels, which were associated with the down-regulated antioxidant signalling factor NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) mRNA levels, and the Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein1 (Keap1) mRNA levels in the intestine of fish. Histidine supplementation in diets (3.7 up to 12.2 g/kg) blocked Cu-induced changes. These results indicated that Cu-induced decreases in intestinal TJ proteins and cytokine mRNA levels might be partially mediated by oxidative stress and are prevented by histidine supplementation in fish diet. PMID:27280406

  9. Prevention of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes with Aged Citrus Peel (Chenpi) Extract.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingjing; Tao, Hanlin; Cao, Yong; Ho, Chi-Tang; Jin, Shengkang; Huang, Qingrong

    2016-03-16

    Chenpi is the dry peel of the plant Citrus reticulata Blanco after an aging processing. It has been used as an antidigestive and anti-inflammatory traditional medicine, as well as culinary seasoning and dietary supplement, in China. However, its efficacy and underlying scientific mechanism have not been sufficiently investigated. Chenpi is uniquely enriched with a high content of 5-demethylated polymethoxyflavones (5-OH PMFs). The effect of chenpi extract on improving metabolic features was examined using high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity/diabetes mouse model. Oral administration of 0.25 and 0.5% chenpi extract in food over 15 weeks markedly prevented HFD-induced obesity, hepatic steatosis, and diabetic symptoms. The beneficial effect is associated with 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in adipose tissue. Our results indicate that 5-OH PMFs-enriched chenpi extract is effective in preventing obesity and type 2 diabetes, and its effect might be related to improvement in lipid metabolism associated with activation of the AMPK pathway. PMID:26912037

  10. Comparative Efficacies of Amoxicillin, Clindamycin, and Moxifloxacin in Prevention of Bacteremia following Dental Extractions

    PubMed Central

    Diz Dios, P.; Tomás Carmona, I.; Limeres Posse, J.; Medina Henríquez, J.; Fernández Feijoo, J.; Álvarez Fernández, M.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacies of oral prophylactic treatment with amoxicillin (AMX), clindamycin (CLI), and moxifloxacin (MXF) in the prevention of bacteremia following dental extractions (BDE). Two hundred twenty-one adults who required dental extractions under general anesthesia were randomly assigned to a control group, an AMX group, a CLI group, and an MXF group (the individuals in the drug treatment groups received 2 g, 600 mg, and 400 mg, respectively, 1 to 2 h before anesthesia induction). Venous blood samples were collected from each patient at the baseline and 30 s, 15 min, and 1 h after the dental extractions. The samples were inoculated into BACTEC Plus aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles and were processed in a BACTEC 9240 instrument. Subculture and the further identification of the isolated bacteria were performed by conventional microbiological techniques. The prevalences of BDE in the control group, AMX group, CLI group, and MXF group were 96, 46, 85, and 57%, respectively, at 30 s; 64, 11, 70, and 24%, respectively, at 15 min; and 20, 4, 22, and 7%, respectively, at 1 h. Streptococcus spp. were the most frequently identified bacteria in all groups (44 to 68%), with the lowest percentage being detected in the AMX group (44%). AMX and MXF prophylaxis showed high efficacies in reducing the prevalence and duration of BDE, but CLI prophylaxis was noneffective. As a consequence, MXF prophylaxis is a promising antibiotic alternative for the prevention of BDE when beta-lactams are not indicated. PMID:16940094

  11. Screening of extracts from natural feed ingredients for their ability to reduce enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 adhesion to porcine intestinal epithelial cell-line IPEC-J2.

    PubMed

    González-Ortiz, G; Hermes, R G; Jiménez-Díaz, R; Pérez, J F; Martín-Orúe, S M

    2013-12-27

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 is the most prevalent enteropathogen in weaned piglets, with the ability to express fimbria F4 and specifically attach to intestinal receptors in the young piglet. The prevention of ETEC K88 adhesion to the epithelium by interfering in this fimbria-receptor recognition provides an alternative approach to prevent the initial stage of disease. The aim of this study is to screen, among different feed ingredients (FI), their ability to reduce ETEC K88 attachment to the porcine intestinal epithelial cell-line (IPEC-J2). The selected FI consisted of products of a vegetable or dairy origin, and microbial by-products, which could be suitable to be included in piglet's diet. Incubation of a mixture of each FI extract with the bacteria on IPEC-J2 monolayer was allowed. After washing with PBS to remove the non-adhered bacteria, the culture medium was added to grow the adhered bacteria and, simultaneously, to keep the cells alive. Then, the bacterial growth was monitored in a spectrophotometer reader for 12h. Casein glycomacropeptide (CGMP), locust bean (LB), exopolysaccharide (EPS) and wheat bran (WB) reduced the number of attached ETEC K88 to IPEC-J2, but no anti-adhesive effect was found for soybean hulls, sugar-beet pulp, locust gum, fructooligosaccharides, inulin, mushroom, mannanoligosaccharides or the fermented product from Aspergillus oryzae. The lineal analysis of dose responses demonstrated lineal activity (P<0.0001) for CGMP, LB, EPS and WB. These in vitro results suggest CGMP, LB, EPS and WB as good candidates to be included in piglet's diet with supported functional activity against colibacillosis. PMID:23992796

  12. Human intestinal microbiota gene risk factors for antibiotic-associated diarrhea: perspectives for prevention. Risk factors for antibiotic-associated diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    De La Cochetière, Marie France; Montassier, Emmanuel; Hardouin, Jean-Benoît; Carton, Thomas; Le Vacon, Françoise; Durand, Tony; Lalande, Valérie; Petit, Jean-Claude; Potel, Gilles; Beaugerie, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) is associated with altered intestinal microflora and other symptoms that may lead to possibly death. In critically ill patients, diarrhea increases rates of morbimortality. Assessing diarrhea risks is thus important for clinicians. For this reason, we conducted a hypothesis-generating study focused on antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) to provide insight into methods of prevention. We evaluated the hypothesis of predisposing factors within the resident intestinal microbiota in a cohort of outpatients receiving antibiotherapy. Among the pool of tested variables, only those related to bacterial 16S rRNA genes were found to be relevant. Complex statistical analyses provided further information: amid the bacteria 16S rRNA genes, eight were determined to be essential for diarrhea predisposition and characterized from the most important to the least. Using these markers, AAD risk could be estimated with an error of 2%. This molecular analysis offers new perspectives for clinical applications at the level of prevention. PMID:20186408

  13. Prevention of carcinogen-induced mouse skin papilloma by whole fruit aqueous extract of Momordica charantia.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, C; De, S; Das, S

    2000-08-01

    The anticarcinogenic effect of aqueous extract of fruit of Momordica charantia (bitter gourd), which is widely used as a vegetable in India, was studied in a two-step skin carcinogenesis model in mice. The possible mode of action was also investigated. Oral administration of the fruit extract was found to have an adverse effect on the general health and lifespan of the animals when used at a high concentration. But when this dose was reduced by half, the test extract afforded protection from the development of skin tumour and increased life expectancy. Carcinogen-induced lipid peroxidation in liver and DNA damage in lymphocytes were found to be reduced following treatment with Momordica. The fruit extract was found to significantly activate the liver enzymes glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase (P < 0.001), which showed a depression following exposure to the carcinogen. The results suggest a preventive role of water-soluble constituents of M. charantia fruit during carcinogenesis, which is mediated possibly by their modulatory effect on enzymes of the biotransformation and detoxification system of the host. PMID:10958332

  14. Ethanol extract of Moringa oliefera prevents in vitro glucose induced cataract on isolated goat eye lens

    PubMed Central

    Kurmi, Raghvendra; Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Bansal, Divya; Agnihotri, Abhishek; Dubey, Nazneen

    2014-01-01

    Aim of Study: The aim of current work was to evaluate in vitro anticataract potential of Moringa oliefera extract. Materials and Methods: Goat eye lenses were divided into 4 groups; Group served as control, Group II as toxic control, Group III and Group IV were incubated in extract (250 μg/ml and 500 μg/ml of extract of M. oliefera) Group II, III and IV were incubated in 55 mM glucose in artificial aqueous humor to induce lens opacification. Estimation of total, water soluble protein, catalase, glutathione and malondialdehyde along with photographic evaluation of lens was done. Results: Group II (toxic control) lenses showed high amount of MDA (Malondialdehyde), soluble, insoluble protein, decreased catalase and glutathione levels, while lenses treated with Moringa oliefera extract (Group III and Group IV) showed significant (* P < 0.05) reduction in MDA and increased level of catalase, glutathione, total and soluble protein. Conclusion: Results of present findings suggest protective effect of Moringa oliefera in prevention of in vitro glucose induced cataract. PMID:24008789

  15. The effects of extracts from anti-diarrheic Thai medicinal plants on the in vitro growth of the intestinal protozoa parasite: Blastocystis hominis.

    PubMed

    Sawangjaroen, Nongyao; Sawangjaroen, Kitja

    2005-04-01

    The activities of n-hexane, dichloromethane and methanol extracts from five anti-diarrheic Thai medicinal plants, Acacia catechu (Fabaceae) resin, Amaranthus spinosus (Amaranthaceae) whole plant, Brucea javanica (Simaroubaceae) seed, Piper longum (Piperaceae) fruit and Quercus infectoria (Fagaceae) nut gall were tested against the in vitro growth of fresh isolates of the intestinal protozoan parasite, Blastocystis hominis. The extracts at concentrations that ranged from 62.5 to 2000 microg/mL, were incubated with several isolates of Blastocystis hominis for 48 h. The activities were classified as killed, inhibited, moderately inhibited and not-inhibited. Dichloromethane and methanol extracts from the Brucea javanica seed and a methanol extract from Quercus infectoria nut gall showed the highest activity. At a concentration of 2000 microg/mL, the three extracts killed 82, 75 and 67% of the Blastocystis hominis samples tested and inhibited 94, 100 and 76% of them, respectively. Metronidazole, used as a reference antiprotozoan drug, at a concentration of 40 microg/mL, killed 97% of the Blastocystis hominis isolates and inhibited all samples tested at concentrations that ranged from 1.25 to 20 microg/mL. PMID:15763365

  16. Intestinal leiomyoma

    MedlinePlus

    Leiomyoma - intestine ... McLaughlin P, Maher MM. The duodenum and small intestine. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ... Roline CE, Reardon RF. Disorders of the small intestine. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  17. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  18. Eucommia ulmoides extracts prevent the formation of advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Sugawa, Hikari; Ohno, Rei-Ichi; Shirakawa, Jun-Ichi; Nakajima, Akari; Kanagawa, Amane; Hirata, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Moroishi, Narumi; Nagai, Mime; Nagai, Ryoji

    2016-06-15

    Proteins non-enzymatically react with reducing sugars to form advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), resulting in the induction of protein denaturation. Because the levels of AGE increase with age and are elevated in age-related diseases, such as diabetes and atherosclerosis, the intake of compound(s) that inhibit the formation of AGEs by daily meal may represent a potential strategy for preventing age-related diseases. In this study, we measured the inhibitory effects of several Eucommia ulmoides extracts on the formation of AGEs, N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and N(ω)-(carboxymethyl)arginine (CMA). Although a crude extract obtained from E. ulmoides bark is widely used as herbal medicine, E. ulmoides leaf extract (ELE) inhibited CML and CMA formation more effectively during the incubation of gelatin with ribose. Therefore, the inhibitory effects of compounds present in ELE on CML and CMA formation were studied. As a result, isoquercetin showed the strongest inhibitory effect of all the tested ELE components. These results indicate that the oral intake of ELE may inhibit the formation of AGEs, thereby ameliorating age-related diseases. PMID:27080730

  19. Preventive effect of Kaempferia parviflora ethyl acetate extract and its major components polymethoxyflavonoid on metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Tsutomu; Horikawa, Takumi; Ikeya, Yukinobu; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Kinoshita, Kaoru; Taguchi, Takaaki; Ichinose, Koji; Takahashi, Kunio; Aburada, Masaki

    2011-12-01

    Previously, we reported that rhizome powder of Kaempferia parviflora Wall. Ex. Baker prevented obesity and a range of metabolic diseases. In this study, to clarify which molecular mechanisms and active ingredients of K. parviflora have an anti-obesity effect, we investigated the effect of ethyl acetate extract of K. parviflora (KPE) on TSOD mice, a spontaneously obese Type II diabetes model, and on pancreatic lipase. In the TSOD groups, KPE showed a suppressive effect on body weight increase and visceral fat accumulation and also showed preventive effects on symptoms related to insulin resistance, hypertension and fatty liver. In addition, KPE also suppressed body weight increase and food intake in TSNO mice groups, which served as reference animals, at an early stage of administration. Searching for the ingredients in KPE revealed that KPE contains at least 12 kinds of polymethoxyflavonoid (PMF). Furthermore, KPE and its component PMFs showed an inhibitory effect on pancreatic lipase. The above results suggest that KPE has a preventive effect on obesity and various metabolic diseases. The mechanisms of action probably involve inhibition of pancreatic lipase by the PMFs in KPE. PMID:21907268

  20. Clinically applicable procedure for gene delivery to fetal gut by ultrasound-guided gastric injection: toward prenatal prevention of early-onset intestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    David, A L; Peebles, D M; Gregory, L; Waddington, S N; Themis, M; Weisz, B; Ruthe, A; Lawrence, L; Cook, T; Rodeck, C H; Coutelle, C

    2006-07-01

    Targeting gene therapy vectors to the fetal intestinal tract could provide a novel means toward prevention of the early postnatal intestinal pathology of cystic fibrosis and other conditions, such as congenital enteropathy, that cause intestinal failure. Among these conditions, cystic fibrosis is by far the most common lethal genetic disease. It is caused by a functional absence or deficiency of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and manifests in the gut as meconium ileus. Prenatal treatment of genetic disease may avoid early-onset tissue damage and immune sensitization, and may target cells that are less accessible in the adult. We investigated gene transfer to the fetal gut, using a minimally invasive injection technique. First-generation replication-deficient adenoviral vectors encoding the beta-galactosidase gene and transduction-enhancing agents were injected into the stomach of early-gestation fetal sheep (n = 8, 60 days of gestation; term, 145 days) under ultrasound guidance. Reporter gene expression was observed 2 days after injection in the villi of the gastrointestinal epithelia after 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside staining and beta-galactosidase immunohistochemistry of fetal tissues. Expression of beta-galactosidase, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, was enhanced after pretreatment of the fetal gut with sodium caprate, which opens tight junctions, and after adenovirus complexation with DEAE-dextran, which confers a positive charge to the virus. Instillation of the fluorocarbon perflubron after virus delivery resulted in tissue transduction from the fetal stomach to the colon. Using a clinically relevant technique, we have demonstrated widespread gene transfer to the fetal gastrointestinal epithelia. PMID:16839275

  1. Prevention of Bacterial Biofilms Formation on Urinary Catheter by Selected Plant Extracts.

    PubMed

    Adesina, T D; Nwinyi, O C; Olugbuyiro, J A O

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using Psidium guajava, Mangifera indica and Ocimum gratissimum leaf extracts in preventing Escherichia coli biofilm formation. The plants extractions were done with methanol under cold extraction. The various concentrations 5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 mg mL(-1) were used to coat 63 catheters under mild heat from water bath. Biofilm formation on the catheter was induced using cultures of E. coli. Biofilm formation was evaluated using aerobic plate count and turbidity at 600 nm. From the obtained results, Psidium guajava, Mangifera indica and Ocimum gratissimum delayed the onset of biofilm formation for a week. Ocimum gratissimum coated catheter had the highest inhibitory effect at 5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 mg mL(-1) with bacterial count ranging from 2.2 x 10(5)-7.0 x 10(4) and 5.7 x 10(5)-3.7 x10(5) for 120 and 128 h, respectively. The Psidium guajava coated catheter had the lowest inhibitory effect at 5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 mg mL(-1), with bacterial count ranging between 4.3 x 10(5)-1.9 x 10(3) and 7.7 x 10(5)-3.8 x 10(5) for 120 and 128 h, respectively. Despite the antimicrobial activities, the differences in the activity of these plant extracts were statistically not significant (p < 0.05). PMID:26364356

  2. Antioxidant effect of Phyllanthus emblica extract prevents contrast-induced acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) occurs after the administration of intravenous iodinated contrast agents. Oxidative stress has been proposed as one of the most important mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CI-AKI. The objective of this study was to investigate the antioxidant effect of the extract from Phyllanthus emblica (PE) in preventing CI-AKI. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected into eight groups, were given water (control) or PE extract (125 or 250 or 500 mg/kg/day) for 5 days before the induction of CI-AKI. Renal function and oxidative stress markers; malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity were determined in plasma and renal tissue. Kidney sections were performed for histopathological examination. Results In the contrast media (CM) group, increases in blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine were demonstrated which correlated with severity of tubular necrosis, peritubular capillary congestion and interstitial edema. Moreover, an increase in MDA and a decrease in TAC SOD and CAT activity in CM group were significantly changed when compared with the control (P < 0.05). In contrast, CI-AKI-induced rats administrated with PE extract 250 and 500 mg/kg/day significantly preserved renal function and attenuated the severity of pathological damage (P < 0.05) as well as significantly lower MDA and higher TAC, SOD and CAT than the CM group (P < 0.05). Conclusions This study demonstrated the protective role of PE extract against CI-AKI. PMID:24755233

  3. Aqueous extract of Terminalia arjuna prevents carbon tetrachloride induced hepatic and renal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Prasenjit; Sinha, Mahua; Sil, Parames C

    2006-01-01

    Background Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is a well-known hepatotoxin and exposure to this chemical is known to induce oxidative stress and causes liver injury by the formation of free radicals. Acute and chronic renal damage are also very common pathophysiologic disturbances caused by CCl4. The present study has been conducted to evaluate the protective role of the aqueous extract of the bark of Termnalia arjuna (TA), an important Indian medicinal plant widely used in the preparation of ayurvedic formulations, on CCl4 induced oxidative stress and resultant dysfunction in the livers and kidneys of mice. Methods Animals were pretreated with the aqueous extract of TA (50 mg/kg body weight) for one week and then challenged with CCl4 (1 ml/kg body weight) in liquid paraffin (1:1, v/v) for 2 days. Serum marker enzymes, namely, glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were estimated in the sera of all study groups. Antioxidant status in both the liver and kidney tissues were estimated by determining the activities of the antioxidative enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST); as well as by determining the levels of thiobarbutaric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and reduced glutathione (GSH). In addition, free radical scavenging activity of the extract was determined from its DPPH radical quenching ability. Results Results showed that CCl4 caused a marked rise in serum levels of GPT and ALP. TBARS level was also increased significantly whereas GSH, SOD, CAT and GST levels were decreased in the liver and kidney tissue homogenates of CCl4 treated mice. Aqueous extract of TA successfully prevented the alterations of these effects in the experimental animals. Data also showed that the extract possessed strong free radical scavenging activity comparable to that of vitamin C. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that the aqueous extract of the bark of TA could protect the liver and kidney tissues against CCl4

  4. Yuzu extract prevents cognitive decline and impaired glucose homeostasis in β-amyloid-infused rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hye Jeong; Hwang, Jin Taek; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Min Jung; Kang, Suna; Moon, Na Rang; Park, Sunmin

    2013-07-01

    Our preliminary study revealed that dementia induced by β-amyloid accumulation impairs peripheral glucose homeostasis (unpublished). We therefore evaluated whether long-term oral consumption of yuzu (Citrus junos Tanaka) extract improves cognitive dysfunction and glucose homeostasis in β-amyloid-induced rats. Male rats received hippocampal CA1 infusions of β-amyloid (25-35) [plaque forming β-amyloid; Alzheimer disease (AD)] or β-amyloid (35-25) [non-plaque forming β-amyloid; C (non-Alzheimer disease control)] at a rate of 3.6 nmol/d for 14 d. AD rats were divided into 2 dietary groups that received either 3% lyophilized 70% ethanol extracts of yuzu (AD-Y) or 3% dextrin (AD-C) in high-fat diets (43% energy as fat). The AD-C group exhibited greater hippocampal β-amyloid deposition, which was not detected in the C group, and attenuated hippocampal insulin signaling. Yuzu treatment prevented β-amyloid accumulation, increased tau phosphorylation, and attenuated hippocampal insulin signaling observed in AD-C rats. Consistent with β-amyloid accumulation, the AD-C rats experienced cognitive dysfunction, which was prevented by yuzu. AD-C rats gained less weight than did C rats due to decreased feed consumption, and yuzu treatment prevented the decrease in feed consumption. Serum glucose concentrations were higher in AD-C than in C rats at 40-120 min after glucose loading during an oral-glucose-tolerance test, but not at 0-40 min. Serum insulin concentrations were highly elevated in AD-C rats but not enough to lower serum glucose to normal concentrations, indicating that rats in the AD-C group had insulin resistance and a borderline diabetic state. Although AD-C rats were profoundly insulin resistant, AD-Y rats exhibited normal first and second phases of glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity and secretion. In conclusion, yuzu treatment prevented the cognitive dysfunction and impaired energy and glucose homeostasis induced by β-amyloid infusion. PMID:23719224

  5. Preventive effects of the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 on acute secretory diarrhea in a pig model of intestinal infection.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, B; Duncker, S; Barth, S; Bauerfeind, R; Gruber, A D; Deppenmeier, S; Breves, G

    2006-04-01

    Pretreatment with the probiotic Escherichia colistrain Nissle 1917 (EcN) was assessed in a pig model of intestinal infection to prevent acute secretory diarrhea. In the model 10(10) colony forming units of the porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Abbotstown (EcA) was given via orogastric tube to weaned piglets at day 21 postpartum (-EcN/+EcA group, n = 7). Forty-eight hours after challenge electrophysiological parameters of isolated intact jejunal epithelia were characterized in Ussing chambers. In agreement with clinical signs of diarrhea, tissues of challenged animals showed an overshoot of secretory response after stimulation of the cAMP-mediated second messenger pathway by forskolin, indicating higher excitability of chloride secretory systems under infected conditions. The data were compared with respective measurements from animals that got a daily dose of 10(10) cfu of the probiotic EcN over 10 days before EcA challenge (+EcN/+EcA group; n = 4), from a group that received only EcN (+EcN/-EcA; n = 4), or from a group that remained totally untreated (-EcN/-EcA; n = 6). EcN pretreatment completely abolished clinical signs of secretory diarrhea in +EcN/+EcA animals. Furthermore, jejunum epithelia of these animals did not exhibit an overshoot of secretory response upon stimulation with forskolin. Our studies demonstrate for the first time the efficacy of prophylactic EcN in pig small intestine for preventing an effect of toxigenic EcA. This infection model with freshly weaned piglets may be predestinated to further characterize EcN effects on the cellular level, i.e., involved second messenger pathways, or it may also be useful to examine the efficacy of other substrates or microbe strains against secretory stimuli. PMID:16614995

  6. Polyphenol-rich black chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) extract regulates the expression of genes critical for intestinal cholesterol flux in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohkyung; Park, Youngki; Wegner, Casey J; Bolling, Bradley W; Lee, Jiyoung

    2013-09-01

    Black chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) is a rich source of polyphenols. The hypolipidemic effects of polyphenol-rich black chokeberry extract (CBE) have been reported, but underlying mechanisms have not been well characterized. We investigated the effect of CBE on the expression of genes involved in intestinal lipid metabolism. Caco-2 cells were incubated with 50 or 100 μg/ml of CBE for 24 h for quantitative realtime polymerase chain reaction analysis. Expression of genes for cholesterol synthesis (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and sterol regulatory element binding protein 2), apical cholesterol uptake (Niemann-Pick C1 Like 1 and scavenger receptor class B Type 1) and basolateral cholesterol efflux [ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1)] was significantly decreased by CBE compared with control. Western blot analysis confirmed that CBE inhibited expression of these proteins. In contrast, CBE markedly induced mRNA and/or protein levels of ABCG5 and ABCG8 that mediate apical cholesterol efflux to the intestinal lumen. Furthermore, CBE significantly increased mRNA and protein levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, and cellular LDL uptake. Expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and lipoprotein assembly, including sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c, fatty acid synthase and acyl-CoA oxidase 1, was significantly decreased by CBE in a dose-dependent manner. Concomitantly, CBE significantly increased sirtuin 1, 3 and 5 mRNA levels, while it decreased SIRT-2. Our data suggest that hypolipidemic effects of CBE may be attributed, at least in part, to increased apical efflux of LDL-derived cholesterol and to decreased chylomicron formation in the intestine; and specific isoforms of SIRT may play an important role in this process. PMID:23517916

  7. Effects of spray-dried porcine plasma and plant extracts on intestinal morphology and on leukocyte cell subsets of weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Nofrarías, M; Manzanilla, E G; Pujols, J; Gibert, X; Majó, N; Segalés, J; Gasa, J

    2006-10-01

    We evaluated the effects of a 6% spray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP) and a plant extracts mixture (XT; 5% carvacrol, 3% cinnamaldehyde, and 2% capsicum oleoresin) on the productive performance, intestinal morphology, and leukocyte cell subsets of early-weaned pigs compared with a control group. Morphometry of the jejunum, ileum, and colon, and immune cell analysis of blood, ileocolic lymph node (LN), and ileal Peyer's patches were done in 24 weaned pigs (20 +/- 2 d) at 19 or 21 d postweaning. Although SDPP and XT treatments did not increase ADG or ADFI, SDPP improved the G:F ratio (P = 0.024) compared with the control group. Dietary SDPP reduced the percentages of blood monocytes (P = 0.006) and macrophages in ileal Peyer's patches and LN (P = 0.04), of B lymphocytes (P = 0.04) and gammadelta+ T cells in LN (P = 0.009), and of intraepithelial lymphocytes (P = 0.026) as well as the density of lamina propria cells in the colon (P < 0.01). Dietary XT reduced intraepithelial lymphocyte numbers in jejunum (P = 0.034) and the percentages of blood cytotoxic cells (P = 0.07) and B lymphocytes in LN (P = 0.03); however, XT increased blood monocytes (P = 0.038) and the density of lamina propria lymphocytes in the colon (P = 0.003). These results indicate that dietary SDPP and plant extracts can affect intestinal morphology and immune cell subsets of gut tissues and blood in weaned pigs. Furthermore, the effects of SDPP suggest lower activation of the immune system of the piglets. PMID:16971575

  8. 5MeCDDO Blocks Metabolic Activation but not Progression of Breast, Intestine, and Tongue Cancers. Is Antioxidant Response Element a Prevention Target?

    PubMed

    Lubet, Ronald A; Townsend, Reid; Clapper, Margie L; Juliana, M Margaret; Steele, Vernon E; McCormick, David L; Grubbs, Clinton J

    2016-07-01

    The preventive efficacy of the triterpenoid 5MeCDDO was tested in two models of mammary cancer, the Min model of intestinal cancer, and a chemically induced model of head and neck cancer. In one model of mammary cancer, female Sprague-Dawley rats were administered MNU at 50 days of age, and 5MeCDDO (27 ppm) was administered in the diet beginning 5 days later for the duration of the study; 5MeCDDO was ineffective. In contrast, in a model examining initiation of mammary cancers by the procarcinogen dimethyl-benzanthracene, 5, 6-benzoflavone (500 ppm, an Ah receptor agonist) or 5MeCDDO (27 or 2.7 ppm) decreased tumor multiplicity by 90%, 80%, and 50%, respectively. This anti-initiating effect which is presumably mediated by altered metabolic activation parallels our observation that 5MeCDDO induced proteins of various antioxidant response element (ARE)-related phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes [e.g., GST Pi, AKR 7A3 (aflatoxicol), epoxide hydrolase, and quinone reductase] in the liver. 5MeCDDO tested in the 4-nitroquinoline-l-oxide (4-NQO) head and neck cancer model failed to decrease tumor incidence or invasiveness. In the Min mouse model of intestinal cancer, a high dose of 5MeCDDO (80 ppm) was weakly effective in reducing adenoma multiplicity [∼30% (P < 0.05)]; however, a lower dose was totally ineffective. These findings question whether measuring increased levels of certain ARE-related genes (e.g., quinone reductase, GST Pi), indicating decreased carcinogen activation are sufficient to imply general chemopreventive efficacy of a given agent or mixture. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 616-23. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27150634

  9. Deer Bone Extract Prevents Against Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chun Nan; Min, A Young; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Shin, Suk Kyung; Yu, Ha Ni; Sohn, Eun Jeong; Ahn, Chang-Won; Jung, Sung Ug; Park, Soo-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Deer bone has been used as a health-enhancing food as well as an antiaging agent in traditional Oriental medicine. Recently, the water extract of deer bone (DBE) showed a neuroprotective action against glutamate or Aβ1–42-induced cell death of mouse hippocampal cells by exerting antioxidant activity through the suppression of MAP kinases. The present study is to examine whether DBE improves memory impairment induced by scopolamine. DBE (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg) was administered orally to mice for 14 days, and then scopolamine (2 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered together with DBE for another 7 days. Memory performance was evaluated in the Morris water maze (MWM) test and passive avoidance test. Also, brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity, biomarkers of oxidative stress and the loss of neuronal cells in the hippocampus, was evaluated by histological examinations. Administration of DBE significantly restored memory impairments induced by scopolamine in the MWM test (escape latency and number of crossing platform area), and in the passive avoidance test. Treatment with DBE inhibited the AChE activity and increased the ChAT activity in the brain of memory-impaired mice induced by scopolamine. Additionally, the administration of DBE significantly prevented the increase of lipid peroxidation and the decrease of glutathione level in the brain of mice treated with scopolamine. Also, the DBE treatment restored the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase to control the level. Furthermore, scopolamine-induced oxidative damage of neurons in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions were prevented by DBE treatment. It is suggested that DBE may be useful for memory improvement through the regulation of cholinergic marker enzyme activities and the suppression of oxidative damage of neurons in the brain of mice treated with scopolamine. PMID:25546299

  10. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Prevention Basic Facts & Information Some factors that affect your ... control of the things that you can change. Preventive Recommendations for Adults Aged 65 and Older The ...

  11. Intestinal Malrotation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines don't position themselves normally during fetal development and aren't attached inside properly as a result. The exact reason this occurs is unknown. When a fetus develops in the womb, the intestines start out ...

  12. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the major causes of intestinal obstruction in infants and children. Causes of paralytic ileus may include: Bacteria or viruses that cause intestinal infections ( gastroenteritis ) Chemical, electrolyte, or mineral imbalances (such as decreased ...

  13. Asbestos contamination in feldspar extraction sites: a failure of prevention? Commentary.

    PubMed

    Cavariani, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Fibrous tremolite is a mineral species belonging to the amphibole group. It is present almost everywhere in the world as a natural contaminant of other minerals, like talc and vermiculite. It can be also found as a natural contaminant of the chrysotile form of asbestos. Tremolite asbestos exposures result in respiratory health consequences similar to the other forms of asbestos exposure, including lung cancer and mesothelioma. Although abundantly distributed on the earth's surface, tremolite is only rarely present in significant deposits and it has had little commercial use. Significant presence of amphibole asbestos fibers, characterized as tremolite, was identified in mineral powders coming from the milling of feldspar rocks extracted from a Sardinian mining site (Italy). This evidence raises several problems, in particular the prevention of carcinogenic risks for the workers. Feldspar is widespread all over the world and every year it is produced in large quantities and it is used for several productive processes in many manufacturing industries (over 21 million tons of feldspar mined and marketed every year). Until now the presence of tremolite asbestos in feldspar has not been described, nor has the possibility of such a health hazard for workers involved in mining, milling and handling of rocks from feldspar ores been appreciated. Therefore the need for a wider dissemination of knowledge of these problems among professionals, in particular mineralogists and industrial hygienists, must be emphasized. In fact both disciplines are necessary to plan appropriate environmental controls and adequate protections in order to achieve safe working conditions. PMID:27033611

  14. Codonopsis lanceolata Extract Prevents Diet-Induced Obesity in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Kui-Jin; Kim, Young-Hyun; Kim, Dan-Bi; Shin, Gi-Hae; Cho, Ju-Hyun; Kim, Bong Kyun; Lee, Boo-Yong; Lee, Ok-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Codonopsis lanceolata extract (CLE) has been used in traditional medicine in the Asian-Pacific region for the treatment of bronchitis, cough, and inflammation. However, it is still unclear whether obesity in mice can be altered by diet supplementation with CLE. To investigate whether CLE could have preventative effects on high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, male C57BL/6 mice were placed on either a normal chow diet, 60% HFD, or a HFD supplemented with CLE (60, 180, and 360 mg/kg/day) for 12 weeks. CLE decreased body weight and subcutaneous and visceral fat weights in HFD-induced obese mice. CLE group mice showed lower fat accumulation and a smaller adipocyte area in the adipose tissue compared with the HFD group mice. CLE group mice exhibited lower serum levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL), glucose, and insulin compared with the HFD group mice. In addition, CLE decreased liver weight and lowered the increase in aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) levels in HFD-induced obese mice. These results indicate that CLE can inhibit the development of diet-induced obesity and hyperlipidemia in C57BL/6 mice. PMID:25353662

  15. Anti-Streptococcal activity of Brazilian Amazon Rain Forest plant extracts presents potential for preventive strategies against dental caries

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Juliana Paola Corrêa; de CASTILHO, Adriana Lígia; SARACENI, Cíntia Helena Couri; DÍAZ, Ingrit Elida Collantes; PACIÊNCIA, Mateus Luís Barradas; SUFFREDINI, Ivana Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Caries is a global public health problem, whose control requires the introduction of low-cost treatments, such as strong prevention strategies, minimally invasive techniques and chemical prevention agents. Nature plays an important role as a source of new antibacterial substances that can be used in the prevention of caries, and Brazil is the richest country in terms of biodiversity. Objective In this study, the disk diffusion method (DDM) was used to screen over 2,000 Brazilian Amazon plant extracts against Streptococcus mutans. Material and Methods Seventeen active plant extracts were identified and fractionated. Extracts and their fractions, obtained by liquid-liquid partition, were tested in the DDM assay and in the microdilution broth assay (MBA) to determine their minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs). The extracts were also subjected to antioxidant analysis by thin layer chromatography. Results EB271, obtained from Casearia spruceana, showed significant activity against the bacterium in the DDM assay (20.67±0.52 mm), as did EB1129, obtained from Psychotria sp. (Rubiaceae) (15.04±2.29 mm). EB1493, obtained from Ipomoea alba, was the only extract to show strong activity against Streptococcus mutans (0.08 mg/mLextracts, discovered in the Amazon rain forest, show potential as sources of new antibacterial agents for use as chemical coadjuvants in prevention strategies to treat caries. PMID:24676578

  16. Intestine Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... intestine segment, most intestine transplants involve a whole organ from a deceased donor. In addition, most intestine transplants are performed in ... blood before surgery. I am looking for ... allocation About UNOS Being a living donor Calculator - CPRA Calculator - KDPI Calculator - LAS Calculator - MELD ...

  17. Preventive Effect of TU-100 on a Type-2 Model of Colitis in Mice: Possible Involvement of Enhancing Adrenomedullin in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Toru; Miura, Naoko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), have histopathologically and immunologically different characteristics. We previously reported that a traditional Japanese medicine, daikenchuto (TU-100), ameliorated a trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid- (TNBS-) induced type-1 model colitis exhibiting histopathological features of CD through adrenomedullin (ADM) enhancement. Our current aims were to examine whether TU-100 ameliorates a type-2 model colitis that histologically resembles UC and identify the active ingredients. Methods. TU-100 was administered orally to mice with oxazolone- (OXN-) induced type-2 model colitis. The morbidity was evaluated by body weight loss and the macroscopic score of colonic lesions. ADM was quantified using an EIA kit. Results. TU-100 prevented weight loss and colon ulceration. ADM production by intestinal epithelial cells was increased by TU-100 addition. Screening to identify active ingredients showed that [6]-shogaol and hydroxy α-sanshool enhanced ADM production. Conclusions. TU-100 exerted a protective effect in OXN-induced type-2 model colitis, indicating that TU-100 may be a beneficial agent for treatment of UC. PMID:24348533

  18. Alcea rosea root extract as a preventive and curative agent in ethylene glycol-induced urolithiasis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Marzieh; Rad, Abolfazl Khajavi; Rajaei, Ziba; Hadjzadeh, Mousa-Al-Reza; Mohammadian, Nema; Tabasi, Nafiseh Sadat

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Alcea rosea L. is used in Asian folk medicine as a remedy for a wide range of ailments. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Alcea rosea roots on ethylene glycol-induced kidney calculi in rats. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, ethylene glycol (EG), curative and preventive groups. Control group received tap drinking water for 28 days. Ethylene glycol (EG), curative and preventive groups received 1% ethylene glycol for induction of calcium oxalate (CaOx) calculus formation; preventive and curative subjects also received the hydroalcoholic extract of Alcea rosea roots in drinking water at dose of 170 mg/kg, since day 0 or day 14, respectively. Urinary oxalate concentration was measured by spectrophotometer on days 0, 14 and 28. On day 28, the kidneys were removed and examined histopathologically under light microscopy for counting the calcium oxalate deposits in 50 microscopic fields. Results: In both preventive and curative protocols, treatment of rats with hydroalcoholic extract of Alcea rosea roots significantly reduced the number of kidney calcium oxalate deposits compared to ethylene glycol group. Administration of Alcea rosea extract also reduced the elevated urinary oxalate due to ethylene glycol. Conclusion: Alcea rosea showed a beneficial effect in preventing and eliminating calcium oxalate deposition in the rat kidney. This effect is possibly due to diuretic and anti-inflammatory effects or presence of mucilaginous polysaccharides in the plant. It may also be related to lowering of urinary concentration of stone-forming constituents. PMID:22701236

  19. Prevention of browning in potato with a heat-treated onion extract.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Kyung; Kim, Young-Mai; Kim, Na-Young; Kim, Gi-Nahm; Kim, Seok-Hwan; Bang, Keuk-Seung; Park, Inshik

    2002-04-01

    The inhibitory effect of an onion extract on browning of potato was investigated. The addition of the heated onion extract to potato exhibited a marked inhibitory effect on potato polyphenol oxidase and the formation of a brown color. The inhibitory effect of the onion extract was dependent upon its heating temperature. The addition of both glycine and glucose increased the inhibitory effect of the onion extract toward potato polyphenol oxidase. PMID:12036061

  20. Comparative study between two animal models of extrapyramidal movement disorders: prevention and reversion by pecan nut shell aqueous extract.

    PubMed

    Trevizol, Fabiola; Benvegnú, Dalila M; Barcelos, Raquel C S; Pase, Camila S; Segat, Hecson J; Dias, Verônica Tironi; Dolci, Geisa S; Boufleur, Nardeli; Reckziegel, Patrícia; Bürger, Marilise E

    2011-08-01

    Acute reserpine and subchronic haloperidol are animal models of extrapyramidal disorders often used to study parkinsonism, akinesia and tardive dyskinesia. In humans, these usually irreversible and disabling extrapyramidal disorders are developed by typical antipsychotic treatment, whose pathophysiology has been related to oxidative damages development. So far, there is no treatment to prevent these problems of the psychiatric clinic, and therefore further studies are needed. Here we used the animal models of extrapyramidal disorders cited above, which were performed in two distinct experiments: orofacial dyskinesia (OD)/catalepsy induced by acute reserpine and subchronic haloperidol after (experiment 1) and before (experiment 2) oral treatment with pecan shell aqueous extract (AE), a natural and promissory antioxidant. When administered previously (exp.1), the AE prevented OD and catalepsy induced by both reserpine and haloperidol. When reserpine and haloperidol were administered before the extract (exp.2), the animals developed OD and catalepsy all the same. However, the orofacial parameter (but not catalepsy) in both animal models was reversed after 7 and 14 days of AE treatment. These results indicate that, acute reserpine and subchronic haloperidol administrations induced similar motor disorders, although through different mechanisms, and therefore are important animal models to study the physiopathology of extrapyramidal disorders. Comparatively, the pecan shell AE was able to both prevent and reverse OD but only to prevent catalepsy. These results reinforce the role of oxidative stress and validate the two animal models used here. Our findings also favor the idea of prevention of extrapyramidal disorders, rather than their reversal. PMID:21356248

  1. Soluble extracts from Helicobacter pylori induce dome formation in polarized intestinal epithelial monolayers in a laminin-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Terrés, A M; Windle, H J; Ardini, E; Kelleher, D P

    2003-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomach at the interface between the mucus layer and the apical pole of gastric epithelial cells. A number of secreted and shed products from the bacteria, such as proteins and lipopolysaccharide, are likely to have a role in the pathogenesis at the epithelial level. To determine the physiological response of transporting polarized epithelia to released soluble factors from the bacterium, we used the T84 cell line. Monolayers of T84 cells were exposed to soluble extracts from H. pylori. The extracts induced rapid "dome" formation as well as an immediate decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance. Domes are fluid-filled blister-like structures unique to polarized epithelia. Their formation has been linked to sodium-transporting events as well as to diminished adherence of the cells to the substrate. H. pylori-induced dome formation in T84 monolayers was exacerbated by amiloride and inhibited by ouabain. Furthermore, it was associated with changes in the expression of the laminin binding alpha 6 beta 4 integrin and the 67-kDa laminin receptor. Domes formed primarily on laminin-coated filters, rather than on fibronectin or collagen matrices, and their formation was inhibited by preincubating the bacterial extract with soluble laminin. This effect was specific to H. pylori and independent of the urease, vacA, cagA, and Lewis phenotype of the strains. These data indicate that released elements from H. pylori can alter the physiological balance and integrity of the epithelium in the absence of an underlying immune response. PMID:12819097

  2. Ellagitannin from Quercus infectoria eradicates intestinal colonization and prevents renal injuries in mice infected with Escherichia coli O157 : H7.

    PubMed

    Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan; Suwalak, Sakol; Mitranan, Winyou

    2012-10-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents in the management of patients infected with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 : H7 remains controversial. Here, we examined the antibacterial efficacy of a natural product, ellagitannin from Quercus infectoria (Qi 4), against the organism in a murine model. Streptomycin-pretreated mice were orogastrically inoculated with 2×10(9) c.f.u. streptomycin-resistant E. coli O157 : H7. The results demonstrated a stable high level of STEC present in the faeces of the infected animals. The bacterial levels in infected mice receiving Qi 4 at MIC and 2×MIC were not significantly different from those of the untreated group (t-test; P>0.05). In contrast, Qi 4 at 4×MIC significantly reduced the numbers of STEC within 2 days (t-test; 0.05>P>0.01). No viable bacteria were detected between day 5 and day 10. Similarly, at day 10, no organisms were detected from the intestines of the Qi 4-treated group, while they were recovered at levels of 10(8-11) and 10(5-10) c.f.u. g(-1) in the colons and caeca of the infected mice, respectively. Histopathological findings from the infected kidneys revealed a marked increase in the number of mesangial cells and mesangial matrix. Ultrastructural examination of the kidneys from the infected mice also demonstrated proliferation of mesangial cells and an increase in the mesangial matrix. Cellular injury of endothelial cells with irregular borders and cytoplasmic bleb formation were noted. In contrast, the effects were not observed in the animals treated with Qi 4. The results clearly indicated that administration of Qi 4 could effectively eradicate the colonization of STEC O157 : H7 in the intestinal tract of mice and prevent renal injury. This compound may be an alternative candidate for a therapeutic agent against infections caused by this dangerous organism. PMID:22790205

  3. Evaluation of epidemiological studies of intestinal bacteria that affected occurrence of colorectal cancer: studies of prevention of colorectal tumors by dairy products and lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Atsuko; Ishikawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Tomiyo; Kono, Koichi

    2010-05-01

    Enviromental factors have been consistently associated with colon cancer risk. In particular, consumption of Western-style diet including red meat is the most widely accepted etiologic risk factor. It has been reported that dietary factors change the proportion of intestinal flora, and it also affects the composition of fecal bile acids and the intestinal activity of some mutagens. In addition, it was suggested that modulating the composition of intestinal flora may reduce the occurrence of colorectal cancer. In this review, we present the clinical studies on the association between intestinal flora and the risk of colorectal cancer that have been carried out to date. The clinical studies of intestinal bacteria related to colorectal cancer risk have not shown consistent results so far, compared with the accomplishments of some basic studies. On the other hand, it was suggested in some clinical studies that lactic acid bacteria reduce the occurrence of colorectal cancer. PMID:20508386

  4. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Treatment 2003 U.S. Outbreak African Rodent Importation Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection Treatment Smallpox ... Examining Animals with Suspected Monkeypox African Rodent Importation Ban Resources Related Links Poxvirus Molluscum Contagiosum Orf Virus ( ...

  5. Hydrophilic extract from Posidonia oceanica inhibits activity and expression of gelatinases and prevents HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cell line invasion

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Emanuela; Ramazzotti, Matteo; Fratianni, Florinda; Pessani, Daniela; Degl'Innocenti, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile is an endemic Mediterranean sea-grass distributed in the infralittoral zones, where it forms meadows playing a recognized ecological role in the coastal marine habitat. Although its use as a traditional herbal remedy is poorly documented, recent literature reports interesting pharmacological activities as antidiabetic, antioxidant and vasoprotective. Differently from previous literature, this study presents a hydrophilic extraction method that recovers metabolites that may be tested in biological buffers. We showed for the first time in the highly invasive HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cell line that our hydrophilic extract from P. oceanica was able to strongly decrease gene and protein expression of gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 and to directly inhibit in a dose-dependent manner gelatinolytic activity in vitro. Moreover, we have revealed that our extract strongly inhibited HT1080 cell migration and invasion. Biochemical analysis of the hydrophilic extract showed that catechins were the major constituents with minor contribution of gallic acid, ferulic acid and chlorogenic plus a fraction of uncharacterized phenols. However, if each individual compound was tested independently, none by itself was able to induce a direct inhibition of gelatinases as strong as that observed in total extract, opening up new routes to the identification of novel compounds. These results indicate that our hydrophilic extract from P. oceanica might be a source of new pharmacological natural products for treatment or prevention of several diseases related to an altered MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression. PMID:26176658

  6. Hydrophilic extract from Posidonia oceanica inhibits activity and expression of gelatinases and prevents HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cell line invasion.

    PubMed

    Barletta, Emanuela; Ramazzotti, Matteo; Fratianni, Florinda; Pessani, Daniela; Degl'Innocenti, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile is an endemic Mediterranean sea-grass distributed in the infralittoral zones, where it forms meadows playing a recognized ecological role in the coastal marine habitat. Although its use as a traditional herbal remedy is poorly documented, recent literature reports interesting pharmacological activities as antidiabetic, antioxidant and vasoprotective. Differently from previous literature, this study presents a hydrophilic extraction method that recovers metabolites that may be tested in biological buffers. We showed for the first time in the highly invasive HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cell line that our hydrophilic extract from P. oceanica was able to strongly decrease gene and protein expression of gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 and to directly inhibit in a dose-dependent manner gelatinolytic activity in vitro. Moreover, we have revealed that our extract strongly inhibited HT1080 cell migration and invasion. Biochemical analysis of the hydrophilic extract showed that catechins were the major constituents with minor contribution of gallic acid, ferulic acid and chlorogenic plus a fraction of uncharacterized phenols. However, if each individual compound was tested independently, none by itself was able to induce a direct inhibition of gelatinases as strong as that observed in total extract, opening up new routes to the identification of novel compounds. These results indicate that our hydrophilic extract from P. oceanica might be a source of new pharmacological natural products for treatment or prevention of several diseases related to an altered MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression. PMID:26176658

  7. Intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rege, Aparna; Sudan, Debra

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal transplantation has now emerged as a lifesaving therapeutic option and standard of care for patients with irreversible intestinal failure. Improvement in survival over the years has justified expansion of the indications for intestinal transplantation beyond the original indications approved by Center for Medicare and Medicaid services. Management of patients with intestinal failure is complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach to accurately select candidates who would benefit from rehabilitation versus transplantation. Significant strides have been made in patient and graft survival with several advancements in the perioperative management through timely referral, improved patient selection, refinement in the surgical techniques and better understanding of the immunopathology of intestinal transplantation. The therapeutic efficacy of the procedure is well evident from continuous improvements in functional status, quality of life and cost-effectiveness of the procedure. This current review summarizes various aspects including current practices and evidence based recommendations of intestinal transplantation. PMID:27086894

  8. INTESTINAL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Tzakis, Andreas G.; Todo, Satoru; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation is often the only alternative form of treatment for patients dependent on total parenteral nutrition for survival. Although a limited number of intestinal transplantations have been performed, results with FK 506 immunosuppression are comparable to those for other organ transplants. The impact of successful intestinal transplantation on gastroenterology will likely be similar to the impact of kidney and liver transplantation on nephrology and hepatology. PMID:7515221

  9. Coriandrum sativum L. seed extract mitigates lipotoxicity in RAW 264.7 cells and prevents atherogenic changes in rats

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dipak; Desai, Swati; Gajaria, Tejal; Devkar, Ranjitsinh; Ramachandran, A.V.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the efficacy of Coriandrum sativum L. (CS) in preventing in vitro low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation mediated macrophage modification. Further, an in vivo study was also conducted to confirm upon the efficacy of CS seed extract in alleviating pathophysiological alterations of high cholesterol diet induced atherosclerosis in rats. Copper mediated cell free oxidation of LDL accounted for elevated indices of malondialdehyde (MDA), lipid hydroperoxide (LHP)and protein carbonyl (PC) and a progressive increment in conjugate diene (CD) levels whereas, reverse set of changes were recorded in presence of CS extract. Cell mediated LDL oxidation (using RAW 264.7 cells) accounted for lowered MDA production and oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL) mediated cell death in presence of CS extract and the same was attributed to its potent antioxidant and free radical scavenging potentials. High cholesterol fed atherogenic rats showed elevated lipid indices, evidences of LDL oxidation, plaque formation in thoracic aorta. The same was further validated with immunostaining of cell adhesion molecules and hematoxylin and eosin (HXE) staining. However, co-supplementation of CS to atherogenic rats recorded significant lowering of the above mentioned parameters further strengthening the claim that CS extract is instrumental in preventing onset and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:26417232

  10. Vaccinium myrtillus extract prevents or delays the onset of diabetes--induced blood-retinal barrier breakdown.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Chan-Sik; Lee, Yun Mi; Sohn, Eunjin; Jo, Kyuhyung; Kim, Jin Sook

    2015-03-01

    Many dietary supplements have been sold through advertising their large number of beneficial effects. The aim of this study was to determine whether bilberries (Vaccinium myrtillus) help to prevent diabetes-induced retinal vascular dysfunction in vivo. V. myrtillus extract (VME; 100 mg/kg) was orally administered to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats for 6 weeks. All diabetic rats exhibited hyperglycemia, and VME did not affect the blood glucose levels and body weight during the experiments. In the fluorescein-dextran angiography, the fluorescein leakage was significantly reduced in diabetic rats treated with VME. VME treatment also decreased markers of diabetic retinopathy, such as retinal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and degradation of zonula occludens-1, occludin and claudin-5 in diabetic rats. In conclusion, VME may prevent or delay the onset of early diabetic retinopathy. These findings have important implications for prevention of diabetic retinopathy using a dietary bilberry supplement. PMID:25582181

  11. Novel GM1 ganglioside-like peptide mimics prevent the association of cholera toxin to human intestinal epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yu, Robert K; Usuki, Seigo; Itokazu, Yutaka; Wu, Han-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Cholera is an acute diarrheal disease caused by infection in the gastrointestinal tract by the gram-negative bacterium, Vibrio cholerae, and is a serious public health threat worldwide. There has not been any effective treatment for this infectious disease. Cholera toxin (CT), which is secreted by V. cholerae, can enter host cells by binding to GM1, a monosialoganglioside widely distributed on the plasma membrane surface of various animal epithelial cells. The present study was undertaken to generate peptides that are conformationally similar to the carbohydrate epitope of GM1 for use in the treatment of cholera and related bacterial infection. For this purpose, we used cholera toxin B (CTB) subunit to select CTB-binding peptides that structurally mimic GM1 from a dodecamer phage-display library. Six GM1-replica peptides were selected by biopanning based on CTB recognition. Five of the six peptides showed inhibitory activity for GM1 binding to CTB. To test the potential of employing the peptide mimics for intervening with the bacterial infection, those peptides were examined for their binding capacity, functional inhibitory activity and in vitro effects using a human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2 cells. One of the peptides, P3 (IPQVWRDWFKLP), was most effective in inhibiting cellular uptake of CTB and suppressing CT-stimulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate production in the cells. Our results thus provide convincing evidence that GM1-replica peptides could serve as novel agents to block CTB binding on epithelial cells and prevent the ensuing physiological effects of CT. PMID:26405107

  12. Chaperone potential of Pulicaria undulata extract in preventing aggregation of stressed proteins.

    PubMed

    Ghahghaei, Arezou; Valizadeh, Jafar; Nazari, Shahrzad; Ravandeh, Mehdi

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the effect of an aqueous extract of Pulicaria undulata on the 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT)-induced aggregation of proteins. The effects of the chaperone properties of P. undulata extract on protein aggregation were determined by measuring light scattering absorption, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The aqueous extract of P. undulata possesses good chaperone properties but the protection effect was varied in different protein. The extract showed a higher level of protection in high molecular weight proteins than in those of low molecular weight. Using a fluorescence study, the present study provides information on the hydrophobic area of proteins interacting with the P. undulata extract. In fact, by increasing the concentration of the P. undulata extract, the hydrophic area of the protein decreased. CD spectroscopy also revealed that DTT caused changes in both the tertiary and the secondary structure of the proteins, while in the presence of P. undulata extract, there was little change. Our finding suggests the possibility of using P. undulata extract for the inhibition of aggregation and the deposition of protein in disease. PMID:24599512

  13. Intestinal Parasitoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagardere, Bernard; Dumburgier, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal parasites have become a serious public health problem in tropical countries because of the climate and the difficulty of achieving efficient hygiene. The objectives of this journal issue are to increase awareness of the individual and collective repercussions of intestinal parasites, describe the current conditions of contamination and…

  14. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason Blood in the stool A lump in the abdomen Imaging tests that create pictures of the small ... help diagnose intestinal cancer and show whether it has spread. Surgery is ...

  15. Broccoli sprout extract prevents diabetic cardiomyopathy via Nrf2 activation in db/db T2DM mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zheng; Wang, Shudong; Ji, Honglei; Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Jing; Tan, Yi; Wintergerst, Kupper; Zheng, Yang; Sun, Jian; Cai, Lu

    2016-01-01

    To develop a clinic-relevant protocol for systemic up-regulation of NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to prevent diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), male db/db and age-matched wild-type (WT) mice were given sulforaphane (SFN, an Nrf2 activator) and its natural source, broccoli sprout extract (BSE) by gavage every other day for 3 months, with four groups: vehicle (0.1 ml/10 g), BSE-low dose (estimated SFN availability at 0.5 mg/kg), BSE-high dose (estimated SFN availability at 1.0 mg/kg), and SFN (0.5 mg/kg). Cardiac function and pathological changes (hypertrophy, fibrosis, inflammation and oxidative damage) were assessed by echocardiography and histopathological examination along with Western blot and real-time PCR, respectively. Both BSE and SFN significantly prevented diabetes-induced cardiac dysfunction, hypertrophy and fibrosis. Mechanistically, BSE, like SFN, significantly up-regulated Nrf2 transcriptional activity, evidenced by the increased Nrf2 nuclear accumulation and its downstream gene expression. This resulted in a significant prevention of cardiac oxidative damage and inflammation. For all these preventive effects, BSE at high dose provided a similar effect as did SFN. These results indicated that BSE at high dose prevents DCM in a manner congruent with SFN treatment. Therefore, it suggests that BSE could potentially be used as a natural and safe treatment against DCM via Nrf2 activation. PMID:27457280

  16. Broccoli sprout extract prevents diabetic cardiomyopathy via Nrf2 activation in db/db T2DM mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng; Wang, Shudong; Ji, Honglei; Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Jing; Tan, Yi; Wintergerst, Kupper; Zheng, Yang; Sun, Jian; Cai, Lu

    2016-01-01

    To develop a clinic-relevant protocol for systemic up-regulation of NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to prevent diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), male db/db and age-matched wild-type (WT) mice were given sulforaphane (SFN, an Nrf2 activator) and its natural source, broccoli sprout extract (BSE) by gavage every other day for 3 months, with four groups: vehicle (0.1 ml/10 g), BSE-low dose (estimated SFN availability at 0.5 mg/kg), BSE-high dose (estimated SFN availability at 1.0 mg/kg), and SFN (0.5 mg/kg). Cardiac function and pathological changes (hypertrophy, fibrosis, inflammation and oxidative damage) were assessed by echocardiography and histopathological examination along with Western blot and real-time PCR, respectively. Both BSE and SFN significantly prevented diabetes-induced cardiac dysfunction, hypertrophy and fibrosis. Mechanistically, BSE, like SFN, significantly up-regulated Nrf2 transcriptional activity, evidenced by the increased Nrf2 nuclear accumulation and its downstream gene expression. This resulted in a significant prevention of cardiac oxidative damage and inflammation. For all these preventive effects, BSE at high dose provided a similar effect as did SFN. These results indicated that BSE at high dose prevents DCM in a manner congruent with SFN treatment. Therefore, it suggests that BSE could potentially be used as a natural and safe treatment against DCM via Nrf2 activation. PMID:27457280

  17. Mesona Chinensis Benth extract prevents AGE formation and protein oxidation against fructose-induced protein glycation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mesona chinensis Benth (Chinese Mesona), an economically significant agricultural plant, is the most widely consumed as an herbal beverage in Southeast Asia and China. The objective of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory activity of Mesona chinensis (MC) extract on the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and protein oxidation in an in vitro model of fructose-mediated protein glycation. Methods The content of total polyphenolic compounds was measured by using Folin–Ciocalteu assay. Antiglycation activity was determined using the formation of AGE fluorescence intensity, Nϵ-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), the level of fructosamine, and the formation of amyloid cross β-structure. The protein oxidation was examined using the level of protein carbonyl content and thiol group. Results Our results revealed that the content of total polyphenolic compound in MC extract was 212.4 ± 5.6 mg gallic acid equivalents/g dried extract. MC extract (0.25-1.00 mg/mL) significantly inhibited the formation of fluorescence AGEs in fructose-glycated bovine serum albumin (BSA) during 4 weeks of study. Furthermore, MC extract also decreased the level of Nϵ-CML, fructosamine, and amyloid cross β-structure in fructose-glycated BSA. While the total thiol group was elevated and the protein carbonyl content was decreased in BSA incubated with fructose and MC extract. Conclusions The extract of MC inhibits fructose-mediated protein glycation and protein oxidation. This edible plant could be a natural rich source of antiglycation agent for preventing AGE-mediated diabetic complication. PMID:24708679

  18. Tissue-specific knockouts of ACAT2 reveal that intestinal depletion is sufficient to prevent diet-induced cholesterol accumulation in the liver and blood[S

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Kelley, Kathryn L.; Marshall, Stephanie M.; Davis, Matthew A.; Wilson, Martha D.; Sawyer, Janet K.; Farese, Robert V.; Brown, J. Mark; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2012-01-01

    Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2) generates cholesterol esters (CE) for packaging into newly synthesized lipoproteins and thus is a major determinant of blood cholesterol levels. ACAT2 is expressed exclusively in the small intestine and liver, but the relative contributions of ACAT2 expression in these tissues to systemic cholesterol metabolism is unknown. We investigated whether CE derived from the intestine or liver would differentially affect hepatic and plasma cholesterol homeostasis. We generated liver-specific (ACAT2L−/L−) and intestine-specific (ACAT2SI−/SI−) ACAT2 knockout mice and studied dietary cholesterol-induced hepatic lipid accumulation and hypercholesterolemia. ACAT2SI−/SI− mice, in contrast to ACAT2L−/L− mice, had blunted cholesterol absorption. However, specific deletion of ACAT2 in the intestine generated essentially a phenocopy of the conditional knockout of ACAT2 in the liver, with reduced levels of plasma very low-density lipoprotein and hepatic CE, yet hepatic-free cholesterol does not build up after high cholesterol intake. ACAT2L−/L− and ACAT2SI−/SI− mice were equally protected from diet-induced hepatic CE accumulation and hypercholesterolemia. These results suggest that inhibition of intestinal or hepatic ACAT2 improves atherogenic hyperlipidemia and limits hepatic CE accumulation in mice and that depletion of intestinal ACAT2 is sufficient for most of the beneficial effects on cholesterol metabolism. Inhibitors of ACAT2 targeting either tissue likely would be beneficial for atheroprotection. PMID:22460046

  19. Foodborne Pathogens Prevention and Sensory Attributes Enhancement in Processed Cheese via Flavoring with Plant Extracts.

    PubMed

    Tayel, Ahmed A; Hussein, Heba; Sorour, Noha M; El-Tras, Wael F

    2015-12-01

    Cheese contaminations with foodborne bacterial pathogens, and their health outbreaks, are serious worldwide problems that could happen from diverse sources during cheese production or storage. Plants, and their derivatives, were always regarded as the potential natural and safe antimicrobial alternatives for food preservation and improvement. The extracts from many plants, which are commonly used as spices and flavoring agents, were evaluated as antibacterial agents against serious foodborne pathogens, for example Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli O157:H7, using qualitative and quantitative assaying methods. Dairy-based media were also used for evaluating the practical application of plant extracts as antimicrobial agents. Most of the examined plant extracts exhibited remarkable antibacterial activity; the extracts of cinnamon, cloves, garden cress, and lemon grass were the most powerful, either in synthetic or in dairy-based media. Flavoring processed cheese with plant extracts resulted in the enhancement of cheese sensory attributes, for example odor, taste, color, and overall quality, especially in flavored samples with cinnamon, lemon grass, and oregano. It can be concluded that plant extracts are strongly recommended, as powerful and safe antibacterial and flavoring agents, for the preservation and sensory enhancement of processed cheese. PMID:26540146

  20. Inhalation of stable dust extract prevents allergen induced airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Peters, M; Kauth, M; Schwarze, J; Körner‐Rettberg, C; Riedler, J; Nowak, D; Braun‐Fahrländer, C; von Mutius, E; Bufe, A; Holst, O

    2006-01-01

    Background Recent epidemiological studies have shown that growing up on a traditional farm provides protection from the development of allergic disorders such as hay fever and allergic asthma. We present experimental evidence that substances providing protection from the development of allergic diseases can be extracted from dust collected in stables of animal farms. Methods Stable dust was collected from 30 randomly selected farms located in rural regions of the Alps (Austria, Germany and Switzerland). The dust was homogenised with glass beads and extracted with physiological sodium chloride solution. This extract was used to modulate immune response in a well established mouse model of allergic asthma. Results Treatment of mice by inhalation of stable dust extract during sensitisation to ovalbumin inhibited the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and airway eosinophilia upon challenge, as well as the production of interleukin 5 by splenocytes and of antigen specific IgG1 and IgE. Dust extract also suppressed the generation of human dendritic cells in vitro. The biological activity of the dust extract was not exclusively mediated by lipopolysaccharide. Conclusions Stable dust from animal farms contains strong immune modulating substances. These substances can interfere with the development of both cellular and humoral immunity against allergens, thus suppressing allergen sensitisation, airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness in a murine model of allergic asthma. PMID:16244088

  1. Intestinal steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bouguen, Guillaume; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Desreumaux, Pierre; Brunner, Thomas; Bertin, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    Steroids are fundamental hormones that control a wide variety of physiological processes such as metabolism, immune functions, and sexual characteristics. Historically, steroid synthesis was considered a function restricted to the adrenals and the gonads. In the past 20 years, a significant number of studies have demonstrated that steroids could also be synthesized or metabolized by other organs. According to these studies, the intestine appears to be a major source of de novo produced glucocorticoids as well as a tissue capable of producing and metabolizing sex steroids. This finding is based on the detection of steroidogenic enzyme expression as well as the presence of bioactive steroids in both the rodent and human gut. Within the intestinal mucosa, the intestinal epithelial cell layer is one of the main cellular sources of steroids. Glucocorticoid synthesis regulation in the intestinal epithelial cells is unique in that it does not involve the classical positive regulator steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) but a closely related homolog, namely the liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1). This local production of immunoregulatory glucocorticoids contributes to intestinal homeostasis and has been linked to pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel diseases. Intestinal epithelial cells also possess the ability to metabolize sex steroids, notably estrogen; this mechanism may impact colorectal cancer development. In this review, we contextualize and discuss what is known about intestinal steroidogenesis and regulation as well as the key role these functions play both in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25560486

  2. Intestinal and multivisceral transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Sérgio Paiva; Guardia, Bianca Della; Evangelista, Andréia Silva; Matielo, Celso Eduardo Lourenço; Neves, Douglas Bastos; Pandullo, Fernando Luis; Felga, Guilherme Eduardo Gonçalves; Alves, Jefferson André da Silva; Curvelo, Lilian Amorim; Diaz, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Rusi, Marcela Balbo; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; Pedroso, Pamella Tung; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Rocco, Rodrigo Andrey; de Almeida, Samira Scalso; de Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation has shown exceptional growth over the past 10 years. At the end of the 1990’s, intestinal transplantation moved out of the experimental realm to become a routine practice in treating patients with severe complications related to total parenteral nutrition and intestinal failure. In the last years, several centers reported an increasing improvement in survival outcomes (about 80%), during the first 12 months after surgery, but long-term survival is still a challenge. Several advances led to clinical application of transplants. Immunosuppression involved in intestinal and multivisceral transplantation was the biggest gain for this procedure in the past decade due to tacrolimus, and new inducing drugs, mono- and polyclonal anti-lymphocyte antibodies. Despite the advancement of rigid immunosuppression protocols, rejection is still very frequent in the first 12 months, and can result in long-term graft loss. The future of intestinal transplantation and multivisceral transplantation appears promising. The major challenge is early recognition of acute rejection in order to prevent graft loss, opportunistic infections associated to complications, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease and graft versus host disease; and consequently, improve results in the long run. PMID:25993080

  3. Protective action of ethanolic extract of Rosmarinus officinalis L. in gastric ulcer prevention induced by ethanol in rats.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Guilherme Pires; de Carvalho, Nelson Rodrigues; Barcelos, Rômulo Pillon; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Portella, Rafael de Lima; da Silva, Michele Hinerasky; Lugokenski, Thiago Henrique; Dias, Glaecir Roseni Mundstock; da Luz, Sônia Cristina Almeida; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Villetti, Marcos Antonio; Antunes Soares, Félix Alexandre; Fachinetto, Roselei

    2013-05-01

    The pathology of a gastric ulcer is complex and multifactorial. Gastric ulcers affect many people around the world and its development is a result of the imbalance between aggressive and protective factors in the gastric mucosa. In this study, we evaluated the ethanolic extract of Rosmarinus officinalis L. (eeRo); this plant, more commonly known as rosemary, has attracted the interest of the scientific community due to its numerous pharmacological properties and their potential therapeutic applications. Here, we tested the preventive effects of eeRo against gastric ulcer induced by 70% ethanol in male Wistar rats. In addition, we aimed to clarify the mechanism involved in the preventive action of the eeRo in gastric ulcers. Based on the analysis of markers of oxidative damage and enzymatic antioxidant defense systems, the measurement of nitrite and nitrate levels and the assessment of the inflammatory response, the eeRo exhibited significant antioxidant, vasodilator and antiinflammatory properties. PMID:23279841

  4. Prevention of oxidative stress-induced apoptosis of C2C12 myoblasts by a Cichorium intybus root extract.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Hyeon; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Yoon Suk; Kim, Tack-Joong

    2013-01-01

    Cell injury associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been reported in various muscular disorders. We found that a Cichorium intybus (Cii) extract reduced H(2)O(2)-induced viability loss in C2C12 myoblasts, inhibited oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and increased intracellular heat shock protein 70 (Hsp 70) expression. Cii also inhibited the level of intracellular ceramide. These results indicate that Cii may prevent skeletal muscle atrophy by inducing the expression of Hsp 70 and inhibiting the level of ceramide. PMID:23391909

  5. Considerations to prevent the breakdown and loss of fruit carotenoids during extraction and analysis in Musa.

    PubMed

    Davey, Mark W; Mellidou, Ifigeneia; Keulemans, Wannes

    2009-07-24

    The impact of treatments aimed at improving the robustness of protocols for the analysis of carotenoids in fruit of banana and plantain were examined. Neither the inclusion of polyvinylpolypyrrolidine in the extraction buffer, nor vigorous homogenisation with glass beads influenced recoveries or chromatographic profiles. By contrast, heating lead to losses of up to 53% and to the formation of degradation products that are no longer detectable on our RP-HPLC system. Carotenoid extracts are unstable and most sensitive to exposure to light. However, even in the dark at -20 degrees C and in the presence of antioxidants breakdown rates of around 5% per day were observed. PMID:19541318

  6. Rhodiola crenulata extract for prevention of acute mountain sickness: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rhodiola crenulata (R. crenulata) is widely used to prevent acute mountain sickness in the Himalayan areas and in Tibet, but no scientific studies have previously examined its effectiveness. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study to investigate its efficacy in acute mountain sickness prevention. Methods Healthy adult volunteers were randomized to 2 treatment sequences, receiving either 800 mg R. crenulata extract or placebo daily for 7 days before ascent and 2 days during mountaineering, before crossing over to the alternate treatment after a 3-month wash-out period. Participants ascended rapidly from 250 m to 3421 m on two separate occasions: December 2010 and April 2011. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of acute mountain sickness, as defined by a Lake Louise score ≥ 3, with headache and at least one of the symptoms of nausea or vomiting, fatigue, dizziness, or difficulty sleeping. Results One hundred and two participants completed the trial. There were no demographic differences between individuals taking Rhodiola-placebo and those taking placebo-Rhodiola. No significant differences in the incidence of acute mountain sickness were found between R. crenulata extract and placebo groups (all 60.8%; adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.69–1.52). The incidence of severe acute mountain sickness in Rhodiola extract vs. placebo groups was 35.3% vs. 29.4% (AOR = 1.42, 95% CI = 0.90–2.25). Conclusions R. crenulata extract was not effective in reducing the incidence or severity of acute mountain sickness as compared to placebo. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01536288. PMID:24176010

  7. Rosmarinus officinalis L. extract ameliorates intestinal inflammation through MAPKs/NF-κB signaling in a murine model of acute experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Medicherla, Kanakaraju; Ketkar, Avanee; Sahu, Bidya Dhar; Sudhakar, Godi; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2016-07-13

    We investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-colitis effects of Rosmarinus officinalis L. extract (RE) by using both in vitro LPS-activated mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages and in vivo dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced experimental murine colitis and suggested the underlying possible mechanisms. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis was performed to identify the major components present in the RE. The clinical signs, biochemistry, immunoblot, ELISA and histology in colon tissues were assessed in order to elucidate the beneficial effect of RE. RE suppressed the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and the expressions of inflammatory proteins in macrophages. Administration of RE (50 and 100 mg kg(-1)) also significantly reduced the severity of DSS-induced murine colitis, as assessed by the clinical symptoms, colon length and histology. RE administration prevented the DSS-induced activation of p38, ERK and JNK MAPKs, attenuated IκBα phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation and DNA binding of NF-κB (p65). RE also suppressed the COX-2 and iNOS expressions, decreased the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 cytokines and the myeloperoxidase activity in the colon tissue. Histological observation revealed that RE administration alleviated mucosal damage and inflammatory cell infiltration induced by DSS in the colon tissue. Hence, RE could be used as a new preventive and therapeutic food ingredient or as a dietary supplement for inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27349640

  8. Effects of Lycopersicon esculentum extract on hair growth and alopecia prevention.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Jung, Sung Kyu; Jeon, Min-Hee; Moon, Jin-Nam; Moon, Woi-Sook; Ji, Yi-Hwa; Choi, In Soon; Wook Son, Sang

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the potential hair growth-promoting activity and the expression of cell growth factors of Lycopersicon esculentum extracts, each 3% (w/w) of ethyl acetate extract (EAE), and supercritical CO2 extract (SCE) of L. esculentum and isolated lycopene Tween 80 solution (LTS) and test hair tonic (THT) containing LTS were applied on the dorsal skin of C57BL/6 mice, once a day for 4 weeks. At week 4, LTS and THT exhibited hair growth-promoting potential similar to that of 3% minoxidil as a positive control (PC). Further, in the LTS group, a significant increase of mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), keratinocyte growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was observed than PC, as well as the negative control (NC). In the THT group, increases in IGF-1 and decrease in VEGF and transforming growth factor-β expression were significant over the NC. In a histological examination in the THT group, the induction of anagen stage of hair follicles was faster than that of NC. In the Draize skin irritation study for THT, no observable edema or erythema was observed on all four sectors in the back skin after exposure for 24 or 72 h for any rabbit. Therefore, this study provides reasonable evidence that L. esculentum extracts promote hair growth and suggests that applications could be found in hair loss treatments without skin irritation at moderate doses. PMID:24397881

  9. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    Obstruction of the bowel may due to: A mechanical cause, which means something is in the way ... lung disease Use of certain medicines, especially narcotics Mechanical causes of intestinal obstruction may include: Adhesions or ...

  10. Pulicaria jaubertii extract prevents triglyceride deposition in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, levels of obesity in Middle Eastern countries are increasing. Phytochemicals have anti-obesogenic properties as evidenced by prevention of adipocyte differentiation. In Yemen, Pulicaria jaubertii E.Gamal-Eldin (PJ) is a food additive and a traditional medicine. We tested the ability of ex...

  11. Preventive Effect of Cichorium Intybus L. Two Extracts on Cerulein-induced Acute Pancreatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Minaiyan, Mohsen; Ghannadi, Ali-Reza; Mahzouni, Parvin; Abed, Ali-Reza

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition of pancreas with sudden onset, high mortality rate and multiple organ failure characteristics. It has been shown that oxygen free radicals have an important role in development of pancreatitis and its complications. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-hepatotoxicity and gastroprotective properties of Cichorium intybus L. suggest that this plant may have beneficial effects in the management of acute pancreatitis. Methods: Five intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of cerulean (50 μg/ kg at 1 h intervals) in mice resulted in acute pancreatitis, which was characterized by edema, neutrophil infiltration, as well as increases in the serum levels of amylase and lipase in comparison to normal mice. Different doses of C. intybus root (CRE) and aerial parts hydroalcoholic extract (CAPE) orally (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) and intraperitoneally (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) were administrated 1.0 and 0.5 h respectively before pancreatitis induction on separate groups of male mice (n=6). Control groups treated with normal saline (5 ml/ kg) similarly. Results: Both extracts in greater test doses (100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) were effective to decrease amylase (23-36%) and lipase (27-35%) levels. In oral route, the dose of 200 mg/ kg showed a significant decrease in levels of amylase (16%) and lipase (24%) activity while the greatest dose (200 mg/kg, i.p.) was only effective to diminish inflammatory features like edema and leukocyte infiltration in pancreatitis tissue (P<0.01). Vacuolization was not significantly reduced in extracts treated groups. Conclusions: These data suggest that C. intybus hydroalcoholic extracts were effective to protect against experimental acute pancreatitis and the efficacy was partly dependent to the dose and was more significant after parenteral administration. PMID:22708031

  12. Prevention of CCl(4)-induced oxidative damage in adrenal gland by Digera muricata extract in rat.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Rashid; Younus, Tahira

    2011-10-01

    Digera muricata (L.) Mart. is a weed and commonly found in waste places, road sides and in maize fields during the summer season. It possesses antioxidant capacity and is locally used for various disorders such as inflammation, urination, as refrigerant, aperient and in sexual anomalies. In this study antioxidant potential of Digera muricata methanol extract (DMME) and n-hexane extract (DMHE) was evaluated against CCl(4)-induced oxidative stress in adrenal gland of Sprague-Dawley male rats. 42 rats were equally divided into 7 groups of 6 rats in each. Group I remained untreated, while Group II treated with vehicles. Group III received only CCl(4) (1 ml/kg b.w., 10% in olive oil) once a week for 16 weeks. Group IV and VI received DMME and DMHE at a dose of 200 mg/kg b.w. along with CCl(4). Animals of Group V and VII administered with DMME and DMHE alone at a dose of 200 mg/kg b.w. once a week for 16 weeks. Lipid peroxidation significantly increased while activities of antioxidant enzymes (CAT, SOD, GST, GSR and GSH-Px) were reduced in adrenal gland samples by the administration of CCl(4). Glutathione (GSH) concentration was significantly decreased whereas DNA fragmentation% and AgNORs count was increased in adrenal gland by CCl(4) administration. Treatment of rat by both the extracts (DMME, DMHE) and CCl(4) increased the glutathione level and activities of antioxidant enzymes while reduced the lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation percent and AgNORs count in adrenal gland. These results indicate that Digera muricata extract is able to ameliorate oxidative stress in adrenal gland induced by CCl(4) in rat. PMID:21959806

  13. Small Intestine Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  14. Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum graecum) seed extract prevents ethanol-induced toxicity and apoptosis in Chang liver cells.

    PubMed

    Kaviarasan, Subramanian; Ramamurty, Nalini; Gunasekaran, Palani; Varalakshmi, Elango; Anuradha, Carani Venkatraman

    2006-01-01

    The protective effect of a polyphenolic extract of fenugreek seeds (FPEt) against ethanol (EtOH)-induced toxicity was investigated in human Chang liver cells. Cells were incubated with either 30 mM EtOH alone or together in the presence of seed extract for 24 h. Assays were performed in treated cells to evaluate the ability of seeds to prevent the toxic effects of EtOH. EtOH treatment suppressed the growth of Chang liver cells and induced cytotoxicity, oxygen radical formation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration was decreased significantly (P < 0.05) while oxidized glutathione (GSSG) concentration was significantly elevated in EtOH-treated cells as compared with normal cells. Incubation of FPEt along with EtOH significantly increased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, caused a reduction in lactate dehydrogenase leakage and normalized GSH/GSSG ratio. The extract dose-dependently reduced thiobarbituric acid reactive substances formation. Apoptosis was observed in EtOH-treated cells while FPEt reduced apoptosis by decreasing the accumulation of sub-G1 phase cells. The cytoprotective effects of FPEt were comparable with those of a positive control silymarin, a known hepatoprotective agent. The findings suggest that the polyphenolic compounds of fenugreek seeds can be considered cytoprotective during EtOH-induced liver damage. PMID:16574673

  15. Pomegranate Flower Extract does not Prevent Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jilanchi, Sima; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Mazaheri, Safoora; Talebi, Ardeshir; Zolfaghari, Behzad; Pezeshki, Zahra; Eshraghi-Jazi, Fatemeh; Moeini, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nephrotoxicity is the major side-effect of cisplatin (CDDP), and it is reported to be gender-related. We evaluated the effects of pomegranate flower extract (PFE) as an antioxidant on CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity in female rats. Methods: Twenty-three adult female rats in four groups treated as following. Groups 1 and 2 received PFE at doses of 25 and 50 (mg/kg/day), respectively, for 9 days, and from day 3 on, they also received cisplatin (CDDP) (2.5 mg/kg) daily. Group 3 was treated as group 1 expects saline instead of PFE, and group 4 received PFE (25 mg/kg/day) alone. Results: Cisplatin alone increased the serum levels of blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and nitrite; and kidney tissue damage score and kidney weight. However, PFE not only did not ameliorate the induced nephrotoxicity, but also aggravated renal tissue damage. Conclusions: Pomegranate extract as an antioxidant did not ameliorate CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity in female rats. PMID:25709800

  16. Intestinal volvulus in cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Begeman, L; St Leger, J A; Blyde, D J; Jauniaux, T P; Lair, S; Lovewell, G; Raverty, S; Seibel, H; Siebert, U; Staggs, S L; Martelli, P; Keesler, R I

    2013-07-01

    Intestinal volvulus was recognized as the cause of death in 18 cetaceans, including 8 species of toothed whales (suborder Odontoceti). Cases originated from 11 institutions from around the world and included both captive (n = 9) and free-ranging (n = 9) animals. When the clinical history was available (n = 9), animals consistently demonstrated acute dullness 1 to 5 days prior to death. In 3 of these animals (33%), there was a history of chronic gastrointestinal illness. The pathological findings were similar to those described in other animal species and humans, and consisted of intestinal volvulus and a well-demarcated segment of distended, congested, and edematous intestine with gas and bloody fluid contents. Associated lesions included congested and edematous mesentery and mesenteric lymph nodes, and often serofibrinous or hemorrhagic abdominal effusion. The volvulus involved the cranial part of the intestines in 85% (11 of 13). Potential predisposing causes were recognized in most cases (13 of 18, 72%) but were variable. Further studies investigating predisposing factors are necessary to help prevent occurrence and enhance early clinical diagnosis and management of the condition. PMID:23150643

  17. The Cimicifuga racemosa special extract BNO 1055 prevents hot flashes in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Priya; Wuttke, Wolfgang; Seidlova-Wuttke, Dana

    2010-09-01

    Hot flashes are a disorder of thermoregulation due to the lack of estrogens and are the most common and characteristic climacteric complaint. Hormone replacement therapy is the gold standard treatment but now its use is limited due to several side effects. Need therefore arises to search for non-estrogenic alternatives. It is well established that extracts of Cimicifuga racemosa (CR) ease climacteric complaints but solid animal experimental data supporting such effects are not available. The availability of sensitive transponders which record subcutaneous temperature continuously enables nowadays experiments in rats to establish whether they have hot flashes following ovariectomy (Seidlova-Wuttke et al. 2003) and if so, whether they can be influenced by the extract of CR BNO 1055. Intact Sprague-Dawley rats (n=16) were acclimatized and their subcutaneous body temperature was measured in 5 min intervals and mean values from 3h recordings were calculated. Thereafter, the rats were ovx and fed either with soy free (sf) or CR BNO 1055 (25 mg/animal/day) food. Temperature was recorded again after acute and sub-acute application of CR. In individual intact animals temperature was stable over the 3h recording period. Following ovx temperature pulses appeared with peaks occurring every 20-40 min. These fluctuations were not seen in CR BNO 1055 treated animals resulting in significantly higher mean temperatures in ovx in comparison to intact or ovx CR BNO treated rats. This reduction of hot flashes by BNO 1055 outlasted the experimental period of 3 weeks. These results suggest that the ovx rats and the new temperature-sensitive device may be useful for the study of hot flashes. Furthermore the results prove that the CR BNO 1055 exerts hot flash reducing effects. PMID:20696560

  18. Quinoa extract enriched in 20-hydroxyecdysone affects energy homeostasis and intestinal fat absorption in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Anne-Sophie; Even, Patrick; Lafont, René; Dioh, Waly; Veillet, Stanislas; Tomé, Daniel; Huneau, Jean-François; Hermier, Dominique; Quignard-Boulangé, Annie

    2014-04-10

    In a previous study, we have demonstrated that a supplementation of a high-fat diet with a quinoa extract enriched in 20-hydroxyecdysone (QE) or pure 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) could prevent the development of obesity. In line with the anti-obesity effect of QE, we used indirect calorimetry to examine the effect of dietary QE and 20E in high-fat fed mice on different components of energy metabolism. Mice were fed a high-fat (HF) diet with or without supplementation by QE or pure 20E for 3 weeks. As compared to mice maintained on a low-fat diet, HF feeding resulted in a marked physiological shift in energy homeostasis, associating a decrease in global energy expenditure (EE) and an increase in lipid utilization as assessed by the lower respiratory quotient (RQ). Supplementation with 20E increased energy expenditure while food intake and activity were not affected. Furthermore QE and 20E promoted a higher rate of glucose oxidation leading to an increased RQ value. In QE and 20E-treated HFD fed mice, there was an increase in fecal lipid excretion without any change in stool amount. Our study indicates that anti-obesity effect of QE can be explained by a global increase in energy expenditure, a shift in glucose metabolism towards oxidation to the detriment of lipogenesis and a decrease in dietary lipid absorption leading to reduced dietary lipid storage in adipose tissue. PMID:24534167

  19. Moringa oleifera leaf extract prevents isoproterenol-induced myocardial damage in rats: evidence for an antioxidant, antiperoxidative, and cardioprotective intervention.

    PubMed

    Nandave, Mukesh; Ojha, Shreesh Kumar; Joshi, Sujata; Kumari, Santosh; Arya, Dharamvir Singh

    2009-02-01

    The present study evaluated cardioprotective effect of lyophilized hydroalcoholic extract of Moringa oleifera in the isoproterenol (ISP)-induced model of myocardial infarction. Wistar albino male rats were divided into three groups and orally fed saline once daily alone (sham) or with ISP (ISP control) or ISP with M. oleifera (200 mg/kg), respectively, for 1 month. On days 29 and 30 of administration, rats of the ISP control and M. oleifera-ISP groups were administered ISP (85 mg/kg, s.c.) at an interval of 24 hours. On day 31, hemodynamic parameters (mean arterial pressure [MAP], heart rate [HR], left ventricular end-diastolic pressure [LVEDP], and left ventricular peak positive [(+) LV dP/dt] and negative [(-) LV dP/dt] pressures were recorded. At the end of the experiment, the animals were sacrificed, and hearts were excised and processed for biochemical, histopathological, and ultrastructural studies. Chronic treatment with M. oleifera demonstrated mitigating effects on ISP-induced hemodynamic [HR, (+) LV dP/dt, (-) LV dP/dt, and LVEDP] perturbations. Chronic M. oleifera treatment resulted in significant favorable modulation of the biochemical enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase-MB) but failed to demonstrate any significant effect on reduced glutathione compared to the ISP control group. Moringa treatment significantly prevented the rise in lipid peroxidation in myocardial tissue. Furthermore, M. oleifera also prevented the deleterious histopathological and ultrastructural perturbations caused by ISP. Based on the results of the present study, it can be concluded that M. oleifera extract possesses significant cardioprotective effect, which may be attributed to its antioxidant, antiperoxidative, and myocardial preservative properties. PMID:19298195

  20. Effects of cranberry extract on prevention of urinary tract infection in dogs and on adhesion of Escherichia coli to Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsin-I; Chen, Kuan-Sheng; Wang, Hsien-Chi; Lee, Wei-Ming

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine effects of cranberry extract on development of urinary tract infection (UTI) in dogs and on adherence of Escherichia coli to Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. ANIMALS 12 client-owned dogs (in vivo experiment) and 6 client-owned dogs (in vitro experiment). PROCEDURES 12 dogs with a history of recurrent UTI received an antimicrobial (n = 6) or cranberry extract (6) orally for 6 months. Dogs were monitored for a UTI. For the in vitro experiment, cranberry extract was orally administered to 6 dogs for 60 days. Voided urine samples were collected from each dog before and 30 and 60 days after onset of extract administration. Urine was evaluated by use of a bacteriostasis assay. An antiadhesion assay and microscopic examination were used to determine inhibition of bacterial adherence to MDCK cells. RESULTS None of the 12 dogs developed a UTI. The bacteriostasis assay revealed no zone of inhibition for any urine samples. Bacterial adhesion was significantly reduced after culture with urine samples obtained at 30 and 60 days, compared with results for urine samples obtained before extract administration. Microscopic examination revealed that bacterial adherence to MDCK cells was significantly reduced after culture with urine samples obtained at 30 and 60 days, compared with results after culture with urine samples obtained before extract administration. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Oral administration of cranberry extract prevented development of a UTI and prevented E coli adherence to MDCK cells, which may indicate it has benefit for preventing UTIs in dogs. PMID:27027843

  1. Prevention Effects and Possible Molecular Mechanism of Mulberry Leaf Extract and its Formulation on Rats with Insulin-Insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Li, Xuemei; Xie, Chen; Luo, Xiuzhen; Bao, Yonggang; Wu, Bin; Hu, Yuchi; Zhong, Zhong; Liu, Chang; Li, MinJie

    2016-01-01

    For centuries, mulberry leaf has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of diabetes. This study aims to test the prevention effects of a proprietary mulberry leaf extract (MLE) and a formula consisting of MLE, fenugreek seed extract, and cinnamon cassia extract (MLEF) on insulin resistance development in animals. MLE was refined to contain 5% 1-deoxynojirimycin by weight. MLEF was formulated by mixing MLE with cinnamon cassia extract and fenugreek seed extract at a 6:5:3 ratio (by weight). First, the acute toxicity effects of MLE on ICR mice were examined at 5 g/kg BW dose. Second, two groups of normal rats were administrated with water or 150 mg/kg BW MLE per day for 29 days to evaluate MLE's effect on normal animals. Third, to examine the effects of MLE and MLEF on model animals, sixty SD rats were divided into five groups, namely, (1) normal, (2) model, (3) high-dose MLE (75 mg/kg BW) treatment; (4) low-dose MLE (15 mg/kg BW) treatment; and (5) MLEF (35 mg/kg BW) treatment. On the second week, rats in groups (2)-(5) were switched to high-energy diet for three weeks. Afterward, the rats were injected (ip) with a single dose of 105 mg/kg BW alloxan. After four more days, fasting blood glucose, post-prandial blood glucose, serum insulin, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were measured. Last, liver lysates from animals were screened with 650 antibodies for changes in the expression or phosphorylation levels of signaling proteins. The results were further validated by Western blot analysis. We found that the maximum tolerance dose of MLE was greater than 5 g/kg in mice. The MLE at a 150 mg/kg BW dose showed no effect on fast blood glucose levels in normal rats. The MLE at a 75 mg/kg BW dose and MLEF at a 35 mg/kg BW dose, significantly (p < 0.05) reduced fast blood glucose levels in rats with impaired glucose and lipid metabolism. In total, 34 proteins with significant changes in expression and phosphorylation levels were identified. The

  2. Prevention Effects and Possible Molecular Mechanism of Mulberry Leaf Extract and its Formulation on Rats with Insulin-Insensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chen; Luo, Xiuzhen; Bao, Yonggang; Wu, Bin; Hu, Yuchi; Zhong, Zhong; Liu, Chang; Li, MinJie

    2016-01-01

    For centuries, mulberry leaf has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of diabetes. This study aims to test the prevention effects of a proprietary mulberry leaf extract (MLE) and a formula consisting of MLE, fenugreek seed extract, and cinnamon cassia extract (MLEF) on insulin resistance development in animals. MLE was refined to contain 5% 1-deoxynojirimycin by weight. MLEF was formulated by mixing MLE with cinnamon cassia extract and fenugreek seed extract at a 6:5:3 ratio (by weight). First, the acute toxicity effects of MLE on ICR mice were examined at 5 g/kg BW dose. Second, two groups of normal rats were administrated with water or 150 mg/kg BW MLE per day for 29 days to evaluate MLE’s effect on normal animals. Third, to examine the effects of MLE and MLEF on model animals, sixty SD rats were divided into five groups, namely, (1) normal, (2) model, (3) high-dose MLE (75 mg/kg BW) treatment; (4) low-dose MLE (15 mg/kg BW) treatment; and (5) MLEF (35 mg/kg BW) treatment. On the second week, rats in groups (2)-(5) were switched to high-energy diet for three weeks. Afterward, the rats were injected (ip) with a single dose of 105 mg/kg BW alloxan. After four more days, fasting blood glucose, post-prandial blood glucose, serum insulin, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were measured. Last, liver lysates from animals were screened with 650 antibodies for changes in the expression or phosphorylation levels of signaling proteins. The results were further validated by Western blot analysis. We found that the maximum tolerance dose of MLE was greater than 5 g/kg in mice. The MLE at a 150 mg/kg BW dose showed no effect on fast blood glucose levels in normal rats. The MLE at a 75 mg/kg BW dose and MLEF at a 35 mg/kg BW dose, significantly (p < 0.05) reduced fast blood glucose levels in rats with impaired glucose and lipid metabolism. In total, 34 proteins with significant changes in expression and phosphorylation levels were identified. The

  3. In Vivo Delivery of Tinospora cordifolia Root Extract Preventing Radiation-Induced Dystrophies in Mice Ovaries.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Riddhi

    2015-01-01

    Unconscious and unplanned radiation exposures are a severe threat to gonads particularly ovaries. The present study aims at finding radioprotective effect of Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers root extract (TCRE) in ovaries. Swiss albino mice were divided into four groups: Group 1 served as "normal" and is administered double distilled water and Group 2 is given TCRE with optimum dosage selected as 75 mg/mice. Group 3 serving the purpose of "irradiated control" were exposed to 2.5 Gy gamma radiation. Group 4 (experimental) were administered optimum dosage of TCRE with prior exposure to 2.5 Gy gamma radiation. Follicle cell counts were scored at autopsy intervals of 24 hrs, 3 days, 7 days, 15 days, and 30 days after gamma irradiation. To understand the mechanism of radioprotection, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and glutathione (GSH) levels were also measured in all groups. TCRE supplementation rendered significant protection to ovaries by restoring follicle counts; it also reduced LPO levels and increased GSH levels in ovaries. It implies that TCRE administration protects ovaries against radiation exposure. PMID:26357520

  4. In Vivo Delivery of Tinospora cordifolia Root Extract Preventing Radiation-Induced Dystrophies in Mice Ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Riddhi

    2015-01-01

    Unconscious and unplanned radiation exposures are a severe threat to gonads particularly ovaries. The present study aims at finding radioprotective effect of Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers root extract (TCRE) in ovaries. Swiss albino mice were divided into four groups: Group 1 served as “normal” and is administered double distilled water and Group 2 is given TCRE with optimum dosage selected as 75 mg/mice. Group 3 serving the purpose of “irradiated control” were exposed to 2.5 Gy gamma radiation. Group 4 (experimental) were administered optimum dosage of TCRE with prior exposure to 2.5 Gy gamma radiation. Follicle cell counts were scored at autopsy intervals of 24 hrs, 3 days, 7 days, 15 days, and 30 days after gamma irradiation. To understand the mechanism of radioprotection, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and glutathione (GSH) levels were also measured in all groups. TCRE supplementation rendered significant protection to ovaries by restoring follicle counts; it also reduced LPO levels and increased GSH levels in ovaries. It implies that TCRE administration protects ovaries against radiation exposure. PMID:26357520

  5. Methanol Extract of Euchelus asper Prevents Bone Resorption in Ovariectomised Mice Model

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Babita; Chiplunkar, Shubhada Vivek; Indap, Madhavi Manohar

    2014-01-01

    Marine molluscs are widely distributed throughout the world and many bioactive compounds exhibiting antiviral, antitumor, antileukemic, and antibacterial activity have been reported worldwide. The present study was designed to investigate the beneficial effect of methanol extract of Euchelus asper (EAME) on estrogen deficiency induced osteoporosis in ovariectomised mice model. Forty-two female Swiss albino mice were randomly assigned into Sham operated (Sham) group and six ovariectomised (OVX) subgroups such as OVX with vehicle (OVX); OVX with estradiol (2 mg/kg/day); OVX with EAME of graded doses (25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day). Bone turnover markers like serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), serum acid phosphatase (ACP), serum calcium, and histological investigations of tibia and uterus were analysed. Metaphyseal DNA content of the femur bone was also studied. Antiosteoclastogenic activity of EAME was examined. Administration of EAME was able to reduce the increased bone turnover markers in the ovariectomised mice. Histomorphometric analysis revealed an increase in bone trabeculation and restoration of trabecular separation by EAME treatment. Metaphyseal DNA content of the femur of the OVX mice was increased by EAME administration. EAME also showed a potent antiosteoclastogenic behaviour. Thus, the present study reveals that EAME was able to successfully reduce the estrogen deficiency induced bone loss. PMID:24995144

  6. Cichorium intybus Linn. Extract Prevents Type 2 Diabetes Through Inhibition of NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation.

    PubMed

    Shim, Do-Wan; Han, Ji-Won; Ji, Young-Eun; Shin, Woo-Young; Koppula, Sushruta; Kim, Myong-Ki; Kim, Tae-Kweon; Park, Pyo-Jam; Kang, Tae-Bong; Lee, Kwang-Ho

    2016-03-01

    This study provides the scientific basis for the inhibitory effect of the aerial parts of Cichorium intybus Linn. (C. intybus) on the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in vitro and on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced type-2 diabetes (T2D). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-primed bone marrow-derived macrophages were used to study the effects methanolic extract of C. intybus leaf (CI) on inflammasome activation. An insulin resistance model (mice fed a HFD) was used to study the in vivo effect of CI on T2D. CI attenuated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion by inhibiting the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in mouse bone marrow macrophages. The CI treatment attenuated the intracellular movement of NLRP3 in Triton X-100 insoluble fraction, without affecting the expression of other NLRP3 inflammasome-related proteins. Attenuated IL-1β secretion may improve glucose metabolism in the HFD-fed insulin resistance mouse model. CI also attenuated the infiltration of M1 macrophages and increased the M2 macrophage population in white adipose tissue. Collectively, our data showed that CI inhibits IL-1β secretion through attenuation of NLRP3 inflammasome activation, leading to an antidiabetic effect by improving glucose metabolism and inhibiting metainflammation. PMID:26987023

  7. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... the small intestine (duodenum) may be caused by cancer of the pancreas, scarring from an ulcer, or Crohn disease . Rarely, a gallstone, a mass of undigested food, or a collection of parasitic worms may block ... commonly caused by cancer, diverticulitis , or a hard lump of stool (fecal ...

  8. An Aqueous Extract of Radix Astragali, Angelica sinensis, and Panax notoginseng Is Effective in Preventing Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Dehong; Guo, Yijuan; Li, Xuejun; Li, Xiumin; Li, Zhipeng; Xue, Mei; Ou, Zhimin; Liu, Ming; Yang, Mingxing; Liu, Suhuan; Yang, Shuyu

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), in which inflammation has been implicated playing important roles, is one of the most common diabetes complications. Dang Gui Bu Xue Tang (DBT), an aqueous extract of Radix Astragali and Radix Angelica sinensis, is a classical prescription in Traditional Chinese Medicine for treating inflammation and ischemic diseases. Here, we investigated the effects of a modified recipe of DBT, with addition of Panax notoginseng, in treating diabetic retinopathy. An aqueous extract of Radix Astragali, Radix Angelica sinensis, and Panax notoginseng (RRP) was given to Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats and streptozotocin-induced Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Leukostasis, vascular leakage, and acellular capillaries in retinal vasculature of animals were determined. Expression of retinal inflammatory biomarkers was assessed. We found that RRP reduced leukostasis, acellular capillaries, and vascular leakage compared to diabetic control rats. We also found that RRP decreased the expression of inflammatory factors including IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, NF-κB, MCP-1, ICAM-1, or VCAM-1 in the retinas of GK rats and reversed high glucose-induced inhibition of endothelial cell migration and proliferation in vitro. We conclude that RRP has a potent effect in preventing the pathogenesis and/or progression of DR and thus may serve as a promising nontoxic therapeutic approach of DR. PMID:23662142

  9. Preventive Effects of Spirogyra neglecta and a Polysaccharide Extract against Dextran Sodium Sulfate Induced Colitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Taya, Sirinya; Kakehashi, Anna; Wongpoomchai, Rawiwan; Gi, Min; Ishii, Naomi; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) results from colonic epithelial barrier defects and impaired mucosal immune responses. In this study, we aimed to investigate the modifying effects of a Spirogyra neglecta extract (SNE), a polysaccharide extract (PE) and a chloroform fraction (CF) on dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis in mice and to determine the mechanisms. To induce colitis, ICR mice received 3% DSS in their drinking water for 7 days. Seven days preceding the DSS treatment, oral administration of SNE, PE and CF at doses of 50, 25 and 0.25 mg/kg body weight (low dose), 200, 100 and 1 mg/kg body weight (high dose) and vehicle was started and continued for 14 days. Histologic findings showed that DSS-induced damage of colonic epithelial structure and inflammation was attenuated in mice pre-treated with SNE, PE and CF. Furthermore, SNE and PE significantly protected colonic epithelial cells from DSS-induced cell cycle arrest, while SNE, PE and CF significantly diminished apoptosis. Proteome analysis demonstrated that SNE and PE might ameliorate DSS-induced colitis by inducing antioxidant enzymes, restoring impaired mitochondria function, and regulating inflammatory cytokines, proliferation and apoptosis. These results suggest that SNE and PE could prevent DSS-induced colitis in ICR mice by protection against and/or aiding recovery from damage to the colonic epithelium, reducing ROS and maintaining normal mitochondrial function and apoptosis. PMID:27221924

  10. Silver-Zeolite Combined to Polyphenol-Rich Extracts of Ascophyllum nodosum: Potential Active Role in Prevention of Periodontal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tamanai-Shacoori, Zohreh; Chandad, Fatiha; Rébillard, Amélie; Cillard, Josiane; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate various biological effects of silver-zeolite and a polyphenol-rich extract of A. nodosum (ASCOP) to prevent and/or treat biofilm-related oral diseases. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus gordonii contribute to the biofilm formation associated with chronic periodontitis. In this study, we evaluated in vitro antibacterial and anti-biofilm effects of silver-zeolite (Ag-zeolite) combined to ASCOP on P. gingivalis and S. gordonii growth and biofilm formation capacity. We also studied the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant capacities of ASCOP in cell culture models. While Ag-zeolite combined with ASCOP was ineffective against the growth of S. gordonii, it showed a strong bactericidal effect on P. gingivalis growth. Ag-zeolite combined with ASCOP was able to completely inhibit S. gordonii monospecies biofilm formation as well as to reduce the formation of a bi-species S. gordonii/P. gingivalis biofilm. ASCOP alone was ineffective towards the growth and/or biofilm formation of S. gordonii and P. gingivalis while it significantly reduced the secretion of inflammatory cytokines (TNFα and IL-6) by LPS-stimulated human like-macrophages. It also exhibited antioxidant properties and decreased LPS induced lipid peroxidation in gingival epithelial cells. These findings support promising use of these products in future preventive or therapeutic strategies against periodontal diseases. PMID:25272151

  11. Pomegranate Peel Extract Prevents Bone Loss in a Preclinical Model of Osteoporosis and Stimulates Osteoblastic Differentiation in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Spilmont, Mélanie; Léotoing, Laurent; Davicco, Marie-Jeanne; Lebecque, Patrice; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Pilet, Paul; Rios, Laurent; Wittrant, Yohann; Coxam, Véronique

    2015-11-01

    The nutritional benefits of pomegranate have attracted great scientific interest. The pomegranate, including the pomegranate peel, has been used worldwide for many years as a fruit with medicinal activity, mostly antioxidant properties. Among chronic diseases, osteoporosis, which is associated with bone remodelling impairment leading to progressive bone loss, could eventually benefit from antioxidant compounds because of the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of osteopenia. In this study, with in vivo and ex vivo experiments, we investigated whether the consumption of pomegranate peel extract (PGPE) could limit the process of osteopenia. We demonstrated that in ovariectomized (OVX) C57BL/6J mice, PGPE consumption was able to significantly prevent the decrease in bone mineral density (-31.9%; p < 0.001 vs. OVX mice) and bone microarchitecture impairment. Moreover, the exposure of RAW264.7 cells to serum harvested from mice that had been given a PGPE-enriched diet elicited reduced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption, as shown by the inhibition of the major osteoclast markers. In addition, PGPE appeared to substantially stimulate osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity at day 7, mineralization at day 21 and the transcription level of osteogenic markers. PGPE may be effective in preventing the bone loss associated with ovariectomy in mice, and offers a promising alternative for the nutritional management of this disease. PMID:26569295

  12. Pomegranate Peel Extract Prevents Bone Loss in a Preclinical Model of Osteoporosis and Stimulates Osteoblastic Differentiation in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Spilmont, Mélanie; Léotoing, Laurent; Davicco, Marie-Jeanne; Lebecque, Patrice; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Pilet, Paul; Rios, Laurent; Wittrant, Yohann; Coxam, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    The nutritional benefits of pomegranate have attracted great scientific interest. The pomegranate, including the pomegranate peel, has been used worldwide for many years as a fruit with medicinal activity, mostly antioxidant properties. Among chronic diseases, osteoporosis, which is associated with bone remodelling impairment leading to progressive bone loss, could eventually benefit from antioxidant compounds because of the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of osteopenia. In this study, with in vivo and ex vivo experiments, we investigated whether the consumption of pomegranate peel extract (PGPE) could limit the process of osteopenia. We demonstrated that in ovariectomized (OVX) C57BL/6J mice, PGPE consumption was able to significantly prevent the decrease in bone mineral density (−31.9%; p < 0.001 vs. OVX mice) and bone microarchitecture impairment. Moreover, the exposure of RAW264.7 cells to serum harvested from mice that had been given a PGPE-enriched diet elicited reduced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption, as shown by the inhibition of the major osteoclast markers. In addition, PGPE appeared to substantially stimulate osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity at day 7, mineralization at day 21 and the transcription level of osteogenic markers. PGPE may be effective in preventing the bone loss associated with ovariectomy in mice, and offers a promising alternative for the nutritional management of this disease. PMID:26569295

  13. Extracts of Rhizoma Polygonati Odorati Prevent High-Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Disorders in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shengjie; Ding, Xiaobo; Ji, Guang; Huang, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Polygonatum odoratum (Mill.) Druce belongs to the genus Polygonatum family of plants. In traditional Chinese medicine, the root of Polygonatum odoratum, Rhizoma Polygonati Odorati, is used both for food and medicine to prevent and treat metabolic disorders such as hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, obesity and cardiovascular disease. However, there is no solid experimental evidence to support these applications, and the underlying mechanism is also needed to be elucidated. Here, we examined the effect of the extract of Rhizoma Polygonati Odorati (ER) on metabolic disorders in diet-induced C57BL/6 obese mice. In the preventive experiment, the ER blocked body weight gain, and lowered serum total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and fasting blood glucose, improved glucose tolerance test (GTT) and insulin tolerance test (ITT), reduced the levels of serum insulin and leptin, and increased serum adiponectin levels in mice fed with a high-fat diet significantly. In the therapeutic study, we induced obesity in the mice and treated the obese mice with ER for two weeks. We found that ER treatments reduced serum TG and fasting blood glucose, and improved glucose tolerance in the mice. Gene expression analysis showed that ER increased the mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) γ and α and their downstream target genes in mice livers, adipose tissues and HepG2 cells. Our data suggest that ER ameliorates metabolic disorders and enhances the mRNA expression of PPARs in obese C57BL/6 mice induced by high-fat diet. PMID:24312343

  14. Aqueous extract of black tea (Camellia sinensis) prevents ethanol+cholecystokinin-induced pancreatitis in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Das, Dolan; Mukherjee, Sandip; Das, Asankur S; Mukherjee, Maitrayee; Mitra, Chandan

    2006-04-01

    Black Tea Extract (BTE), a phytocompound has been attributed with a plethora of health-promoting actions. We have previously demonstrated that BTE inhibits chronic hepatitis in a rat model induced with high-fat and ethanol (EtOH). This study reports that BTE prevents altered pancreatic acinar cell functions, oxidative stress, inflammatory changes and DNA damage in the EtOH+cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced model of pancreatitis. The EtOH+CCK model rats were administered with BTE, and were examined the activity of pancreatic digestive enzymes (amylase and lipase), proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-alpha), oxidative and antioxidative enzymes (nitric oxide, NO; malondialdehyde, MDA; superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT), antioxidant level (glutathione, GSH), histopathological changes and the integrity of genomic DNA. Results show that because of chronic EtOH treatment, serum level of amylase and lipase (two biomarkers for pancreatitis) and pancreatic levels of MDA and NO (two biomarkers of oxidative stress) increased significantly, which could be effectively blunted by BTE. BTE could normalize EtOH+CCK-induced suppressed activities of SOD and CAT, and GSH content of pancreatic tissue. Also, histopathological and inflammatory changes during EtOH+CCK-induced pancreatitis could be blunted by BTE. Furthermore, BTE could effectively reduce EtOH+CCK-induced increase in DNA fragmentation and damage. These findings suggest that BTE prevents pancreatitis caused by chronic EtOH+CCK toxicity presumably by enhancing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic activity in rats. PMID:16289561

  15. ''Sandwich'' treatment for diospyrobezoar intestinal obstruction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi-Xiong; Prasoon, Pankaj; Chen, Yan; Hu, Liang; Chen, Li

    2014-12-28

    Intestinal obstruction is a common clinical entity encountered in surgical practice. The objective of this report is to corroborate an atypical scenario of intestinal obstruction in a Chinese patient and to focus on the diagnosis and treatment. A 27-year-old male presented with a history of gastric pain combined with nausea and abdominal distension that had been present for 5 d. The presence of a foreign body was detected by computed tomography and observed as an abnormal density within the stomach. A diospyrobezoar was revealed during gastroscopy, the extraction of which was prevented due to its size and firmness. An endoscopic holmium laser joined with a snare was used to fragment the obstruction, which was followed by management with a conservative "sandwich" treatment strategy involving intestinal decompression with an ileus tube and Coca-Cola lavage between endoscopic lithotripsy fragmentation procedures. This strategy resulted in the successful removal of the diospyrobezoar along with multiple small bowel obstructions. The patient was discharged after abatement of symptoms. The case presented here demonstrates the implementation of a conservative, yet successful, treatment as an alternative to conventional surgical removal of intestinal obstructions. PMID:25561823

  16. ''Sandwich'' treatment for diospyrobezoar intestinal obstruction: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi-Xiong; Prasoon, Pankaj; Chen, Yan; Hu, Liang; Chen, Li

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal obstruction is a common clinical entity encountered in surgical practice. The objective of this report is to corroborate an atypical scenario of intestinal obstruction in a Chinese patient and to focus on the diagnosis and treatment. A 27-year-old male presented with a history of gastric pain combined with nausea and abdominal distension that had been present for 5 d. The presence of a foreign body was detected by computed tomography and observed as an abnormal density within the stomach. A diospyrobezoar was revealed during gastroscopy, the extraction of which was prevented due to its size and firmness. An endoscopic holmium laser joined with a snare was used to fragment the obstruction, which was followed by management with a conservative “sandwich” treatment strategy involving intestinal decompression with an ileus tube and Coca-Cola lavage between endoscopic lithotripsy fragmentation procedures. This strategy resulted in the successful removal of the diospyrobezoar along with multiple small bowel obstructions. The patient was discharged after abatement of symptoms. The case presented here demonstrates the implementation of a conservative, yet successful, treatment as an alternative to conventional surgical removal of intestinal obstructions. PMID:25561823

  17. Pomegranate peel extract prevents liver fibrosis in biliary-obstructed rats.

    PubMed

    Toklu, Hale Z; Dumlu, Melek U; Sehirli, Ozer; Ercan, Feriha; Gedik, Nursal; Gökmen, Vural; Sener, Goksel

    2007-09-01

    Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) is a widely used plant that has high nutritional value. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of chronic administration of pomegranate peel extract (PPE) on liver fibrosis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL) in rats. PPE (50 mg kg(-1)) or saline was administered orally for 28 days. Serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels were determined to assess liver function and tissue damage. Proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin 1 beta) in the serum and antioxidant capacity (AOC) were measured in plasma samples. Samples of liver tissue were taken for measurement of hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and collagen content. Production of reactive oxidants was monitored by chemiluminescence assay. Serum AST, ALT, LDH and cytokines were elevated in the BDL group compared with the control group; this increase was significantly decreased by PPE treatment. Plasma AOC and hepatic GSH levels were significantly depressed by BDL but were increased back to control levels in the PPE-treated BDL group. Increases in tissue MDA levels and MPO activity due to BDL were reduced back to control levels by PPE treatment. Similarly, increased hepatic collagen content in the BDL rats was reduced to the level of the control group with PPE treatment. Thus, chronic PPE administration alleviated the BDL-induced oxidative injury of the liver and improved the hepatic structure and function. It therefore seems likely that PPE, with its antioxidant and antifibrotic properties, may be of potential therapeutic value in protecting the liver from fibrosis and oxidative injury due to biliary obstruction. PMID:17939210

  18. Tunisian radish (Raphanus sativus) extract prevents cadmium-induced immunotoxic and biochemical alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    ben Salah-Abbès, Jalila; Abbès, Samir; Zohra, Haous; Oueslati, Ridha

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a known carcinogen and potent immunotoxicant in humans and animals, is dispersed throughout the environment as a result of pollution from a variety of sources. Tunisian radish (Raphanus sativus) extract (TRE) is a known anti-oxidant and free radical scavenger that has been shown to help alleviate immune system disorders, including some induced by environmental toxicants. The present study was undertaken to investigate potential protective effects of TRE against Cd-induced immunotoxicities (and general toxicities) in situ. Cadmium chloride (at 2.5 mg CdCl2/kg BW) and TRE (5, 10, or 15 mg/kg BW) were given (alone or in combination [actually, in sequence of Cd and then TRE]) to rats daily by oral gavage for 2 weeks. Results indicated that treatment with CdCl2 alone resulted in significant decreases in plasma levels of total protein, triglycerides, creatine kinase, creatinine, IgG and IgA, T-lymphocyte sub-types (CD4(+), CD3(+), CD56(+), and CD8(+)), and in thymic and hepatic indices (relative weights). In contrast, CdCl2 treatment caused significant increases in serum LDH, AST, and ALT, in the formation/release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 and TNFα), and in the relative weights of host spleen and kidneys. Rats treated with TRE alone had no discernable changes compared to the controls with regard to all test parameters. Combined treatment of CdCl2 and TRE-at any dose-resulted in a significant improvement of all test parameters compared to those seen with Cd alone. These results illustrated (and provided further support for a continuing belief in) the beneficial effects of TRE in reducing the harmful outcomes of commonly encountered toxicants (like Cd) on the immune system and on overall host health status. PMID:24524755

  19. Flavonoids Extracted from Licorice Prevents Colitis-Associated Carcinogenesis in AOM/DSS Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Huo, Xiaowei; Liu, Dongyu; Gao, Li; Li, Liyong; Cao, Li

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is generally considered as a major risk factor in the progression of colitis-associated carcinogenesis (CAC). Thus, it is well accepted that ameliorating inflammation creates a potential to achieve an inhibitory effect on CAC. Licorice flavonoids (LFs) possess strong anti-inflammatory activity, making it possible to investigate its pharmacologic role in suppressing CAC. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the anti-tumor potential of LFs, and further explore the underlying mechanisms. Firstly, an azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced mouse model was established and administered with or without LFs for 10 weeks, and then the severity of CAC was examined macroscopically and histologically. Subsequently, the effects of LFs on expression of proteins associated with apoptosis and proliferation, levels of inflammatory cytokine, expression of phosphorylated-Janus kinases 2 (p-Jak2) and phosphorylated-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (p-Stat3), and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) and P53 were assessed. We found that LFs could significantly reduce tumorigenesis induced by AOM/DSS. Further study revealed that LFs treatment substantially reduced activation of NFκB and P53, and subsequently suppressed production of inflammatory cytokines and phosphorylation of Jak2 and Stat3 in AOM/DSS-induced mice. Taken together, LFs treatment alleviated AOM/DSS induced CAC via P53 and NFκB/IL-6/Jak2/Stat3 pathways, highlighting the potential of LFs in preventing CAC. PMID:27563884

  20. Andrographis paniculata Leaf Extract Prevents Thioacetamide-Induced Liver Cirrhosis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bardi, Daleya Abdulaziz; Halabi, Mohammed Farouq; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Rouhollahi, Elham; Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Al-Wajeeh, Nahla Saeed; Ablat, Abdulwali; Abdullah, Nor Azizan; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the hepatoprotective effects of ethanolic Andrographis paniculata leaf extract (ELAP) on thioacetamide-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. An acute toxicity study proved that ELAP is not toxic in rats. To examine the effects of ELAP in vivo, male Sprague Dawley rats were given intraperitoneal injections of vehicle 10% Tween-20, 5 mL/kg (normal control) or 200 mg/kg TAA thioacetamide (to induce liver cirrhosis) three times per week. Three additional groups were treated with thioacetamide plus daily oral silymarin (50 mg/kg) or ELAP (250 or 500 mg/kg). Liver injury was assessed using biochemical tests, macroscopic and microscopic tissue analysis, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry. In addition, HepG2 and WRL-68 cells were treated in vitro with ELAP fractions to test cytotoxicity. Rats treated with ELAP exhibited significantly lower liver/body weight ratios and smoother, more normal liver surfaces compared with the cirrhosis group. Histopathology using Hematoxylin and Eosin along with Masson’s Trichrome stain showed minimal disruption of hepatic cellular structure, minor fibrotic septa, a low degree of lymphocyte infiltration, and minimal collagen deposition after ELAP treatment. Immunohistochemistry indicated that ELAP induced down regulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Also, hepatic antioxidant enzymes and oxidative stress parameters in ELAP-treated rats were comparable to silymarin-treated rats. ELAP administration reduced levels of altered serum liver biomarkers. ELAP fractions were non-cytotoxic to WRL-68 cells, but possessed anti-proliferative activity on HepG2 cells, which was confirmed by a significant elevation of lactate dehydrogenase, reactive oxygen species, cell membrane permeability, cytochrome c, and caspase-8,-9, and, -3/7 activity in HepG2 cells. A reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential was also detected in ELAP-treated HepG2 cells. The hepatoprotective effect of 500 mg/kg of ELAP is proposed to result

  1. [Intestinal endometriosis].

    PubMed

    González Rodríguez, C I; Cires, M; Jiménez, F J; Rubio, T

    2008-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic, benign gynaecological disorder that is frequent in women of a child-bearing age. It is estimated that there is some degree of endometriosis in as many as 15% of pre-menopausal women, associated with a history of infertility, caesarean antecedents, dysmenorrhoea and abnormality in uterine bleeding. It is believed to be due to the rise of menstrual contents through the Fallopian tubes (retrograde menstruation). In the intestinal affectation, the colon is the segment most frequently affected, above all at the rectosigmoidal level. The clinical features are unspecific, with abdominal pain the most frequent and/or pelvic pain of a cholic type that coincides with, or is exacerbated by, menstruation. Differential diagnosis includes intestinal inflammatory disease, diverticulitis, ischemic colitis and neoplastic processes, with the definitive diagnosis being anatomopathological. With respect to treatment, this will depend on the clinical features and the age of the patient, as well as her wishes with regard to pregnancy. PMID:18953367

  2. Intestinal spirochaetosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, F. D.; Kraszewski, A.; Gordon, J.; Howie, J. G. R.; McSeveney, D.; Harland, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    An abnormal condition of the large intestine is described in which the surface epithelium is infested by short spirochaetes. Diagnosis can be made by light microscopy. A review of 14 cases diagnosed by rectal biopsy and 62 cases involving the appendix shows no consistent symptom complex. The possible significance is discussed. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 1 PMID:5548558

  3. INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Warren H.

    1950-01-01

    Despite improvements in knowledge of the pathologic physiology of intestinal obstruction, the introduction of gastrointestinal decompression, and more effective antibiotics, obstruction remains a serious disease with a high mortality rate. Although the diagnosis is often obscure, it can usually be made with a fair degree of accuracy by the history alone; pain is fairly constant and characteristically is of a cramping type simulated by very few other lesions. Distention is present in low lesions but absent in high lesions; on the contrary, vomiting is minimal in low lesions but prominent in high lesions. Visible peristaltic waves are almost pathognomonic of intestinal obstruction. Increased peristaltic sounds, as noted by auscultation, are extremely helpful in diagnosis; they are absent in paralytic ileus. Although intestinal obstruction is a surgical lesion, it must be remembered that in the type produced by adhesions the obstruction can be relieved by gastrointestinal decompression in 80 to 90 per cent of cases. Operation is usually indicated a short time after relief because of the probability of recurrence. In practically all other types of obstruction decompression is indicated only while the patient is being prepared for operation. Obviously any type of strangulation demands early operation. Strangulation can usually be diagnosed, particularly if it develops while the patient is under observation. Increase in pain, muscle spasm and pulse rate are important indications of development of strangulation. Dehydration and electrolytic imbalance are produced almost universally in high obstruction. Usually, it is unwise to wait until these two deficiencies are corrected before operation is undertaken, but correction must be well under way at the time of operation. Resections should be avoided in the presence of intestinal obstruction, but obviously will be necessary in strangulation. Operative technique must be expert and carried out with minimal trauma. Postoperative

  4. Small intestinal ischemia and infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine; Atherosclerosis - small intestine; Hardening of the arteries - small intestine ... Embolus: Blood clots can block one of the arteries supplying the intestine. People who have had a ...

  5. Aqueous Extract of Phyllanthus niruri Leaves Displays In Vitro Antioxidant Activity and Prevents the Elevation of Oxidative Stress in the Kidney of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Giribabu, Nelli; Rao, Pasupuleti Visweswara; Kumar, Korla Praveen; Muniandy, Sekaran; Swapna Rekha, Somesula; Salleh, Naguib

    2014-01-01

    P. niruri has been reported to possess antidiabetic and kidney protective effects. In the present study, the phytochemical constituents and in vitro antioxidant activity of P. niruri leaf aqueous extract were investigated together with its effect on oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes levels in diabetic rat kidney. Results. Treatment of diabetic male rats with P. niruri leaf aqueous extract (200 and 400 mg/kg) for 28 consecutive days prevents the increase in the amount of lipid peroxidation (LPO) product, malondialdehyde (MDA), and the diminution of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity levels in the kidney of diabetic rats. The amount of LPO showed strong negative correlation with SOD, CAT, and GPx activity levels. P. niruri leaf aqueous extract exhibits in vitro antioxidant activity with IC50 slightly lower than ascorbic acid. Phytochemical screening of plant extract indicates the presence of polyphenols. Conclusion. P. niruri leaf extract protects the kidney from oxidative stress induced by diabetes. PMID:24991228

  6. Synaptic silencing and plasma membrane dyshomeostasis induced by amyloid-β peptide are prevented by Aristotelia chilensis enriched extract.

    PubMed

    Fuentealba, Jorge; Dibarrart, Andrea; Saez-Orellana, Francisco; Fuentes-Fuentes, María Cecilia; Oyanedel, Carlos N; Guzmán, José; Perez, Claudia; Becerra, José; Aguayo, Luis G

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of different types of extracellular and neurotoxic aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ). Recently, bioactive compounds extracted from natural sources showing neuroprotective properties have become of interest in brain neurodegeneration. We have purified, characterized, and evaluated the protective potential of one extract enriched in polyphenols obtained from Aristotelia chilensis (MQ), a Chilean berry fruit, in neuronal models of AD induced by soluble oligomers of Aβ1-40. For example, using primary hippocampal cultures from rats (E18), we observed neuroprotection when the neurons were co-incubated with Aβ (0.5 μM) plus MQ for 24 h (Aβ = 23 ± 2%; Aβ + MQ = 3 ± 1%; n = 3). In parallel, co-incubation of Aβ with MQ recovered the frequency of Ca2+ transient oscillations when compared to neurons treated with Aβ alone (Aβ = 72 ± 3%; Aβ + MQ = 86 ± 2%; n = 5), correlating with the changes observed in spontaneous synaptic activity. Additionally, MAP-2 immunostaining showed a preservation of the dendritic tree, suggesting that the toxic effect of Aβ is prevented in the presence of MQ. A new complex mechanism is proposed by which MQ induces neuroprotective effects including antioxidant properties, modulation of cell survival pathways, and/or direct interaction with the Aβ aggregates. Our results suggest that MQ induces changes in the aggregation kinetics of Aβ producing variations in the nucleation phase (Aβ: k1 = 2.7 ± 0.4 × 10-3 s-1 MQ: k1 = 8.3 ± 0.6 × 10-3 s-1) and altering Thioflavin T insertion in β-sheets. In conclusion, MQ induces a potent neuroprotection by direct interaction with the Aβ aggregates, generating far less toxic species and in this way protecting the neuronal network. PMID:22728896

  7. Prevention of high fructose-induced metabolic syndrome in male wistar rats by aqueous extract of Tamarindus indica seed.

    PubMed

    Shahraki, Mohammd Reza; Harati, Mehdi; Shahraki, Ahamd Reza

    2011-01-01

    Tamarindus indica is used as a traditional treatment for diabetes. To elucidate whether Tamarindus indica seed aqueous extract (TSE) ameliorates metabolic syndrome in hyperinsulinemic rats, we evaluated serum insulin, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and glucose levels in fructose-fed rats. Animals were divided into three groups; control (C) receiving tap water, fructose-fed (F) and TSE-treated fructose-fed rats (F-T) both receiving tap water supplemented with 10% (w/v) fructose. Water was prepared every day for a period of 8 weeks for all three groups. F-T rats were fed with TSE via gavage feeding at the dose of 20 mg/0.5 ml distilled water/100 g body weight per day. Fasting serum glucose levels of three groups were comparable. TSE treatment prevented the increase in fasting serum insulin, TG, TC, VLDL, and LDL in the F-T group (P<0.01) when comparing with the F group. Fructose feeding led to a decrease in fasting serum DHEAS, and HDL levels in the F group (P<0.01) compared with the control. TSE treatment prevented the decrease in fasting serum DHEAS, and HDL levels in the F-T group (P<0.01) while these results were not seen in control rats. It is indicated that the hyperinsulinemia in fructose-fed insulin resistant rats are associated with low levels of DHEAS, and HDL; and high levels of TC, VLDL, LDL, and TG. TSE supplementation probably ameliorates metabolic syndrome due to the improved insulin action. PMID:21713743

  8. High-Dose Viscum album Extract Treatment in the Prevention of Recurrent Bladder Cancer: A Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    von Schoen-Angerer, Tido; Wilkens, Johannes; Kienle, Gunver S; Kiene, Helmut; Vagedes, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Viscum album extract (European mistletoe), containing immuno-active compounds with dose-dependent cytotoxic activity, is being used as an adjuvant cancer treatment in Europe. Few studies have yet been done with high-dose, fever-inducing Viscum album treatment. Objective: To explore whether subcutaneous injections of high-dose Viscum album have a preventive effect on risk of recurrence of bladder cancer. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the case records of patients with resectable bladder cancer who underwent initiation of high-dose Viscum album treatment at our clinic between January 2006 and December 2012. Main Outcome Measures: We calculated tumor recurrence and progression risk and explored case records to assess whether treatment had a likely, possible, or unlikely beneficial effect. Results: Eight patients were identified, 7 of whom had nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer and 1 with muscle-invasive cancer. Four patients had frequently recurring tumors before treatment. Among the 8 patients, 28 episodes of recurrence were observed. Median tumor-free follow-up duration was 48.5 months. High-dose Viscum album showed a possible beneficial effect in 5 of 8 patients, could not be assessed in 2 patients, and had an uncertain effect in 1 patient. No tumor progression was observed. Treatment was generally well tolerated and no patient stopped treatment because of side effects. Conclusion: High-dose Viscum album treatment may have interrupted frequently recurring tumors in individual patients with recurrent bladder cancer. Prospective studies are needed to assess whether this treatment offers an additional, bladder-sparing preventive option for patients with intermediate- to high-risk nonmuscleinvasive bladder cancer. PMID:26517439

  9. Analysis of Cell Death Induction in Intestinal Organoids In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Grabinger, Thomas; Delgado, Eugenia; Brunner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has an important function in the absorption of nutrients contained in the food. Furthermore, it also has an important barrier function, preventing luminal pathogens from entering the bloodstream. This single cell layer epithelium is quite sensitive to various cell death-promoting triggers, including drugs, irradiation, and TNF family members, leading to loss of barrier integrity, epithelial erosion, inflammation, malabsorption, and diarrhea. In order to assess the intestinal epithelium-damaging potential of treatments and substances specific test systems are required. As intestinal tumor cell lines are a poor substitute for primary intestinal epithelial cells, and in vivo experiments in mice are costly and often unethical, the use of intestinal organoids cultured from intestinal crypts provide an ideal tool to study cell death induction and mechanisms in primary intestinal epithelial cells. This protocol describes the isolation and culture of intestinal organoids from murine small intestinal crypts, and the quantitative assessment of cell death induction in these organoids. PMID:27108433

  10. PEGylated porcine glucagon-like peptide-2 improved the intestinal digestive function and prevented inflammation of weaning piglets challenged with LPS.

    PubMed

    Qi, K K; Wu, J; Deng, B; Li, Y M; Xu, Z W

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects on intestinal function, anti-inflammatory role and possible mechanism of polyethylene glycosylated (PEGylated) porcine glucagon-like peptide-2 (pGLP-2), a long-acting form of pGLP-2, in weaning piglets challenged with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We divided 18 weaned piglets on day 21 into three groups (control, LPS and LPS+PEG-pGLP-2; n=6). The piglets from the LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 group were injected with PEG-pGLP-2 at 10 nmol/kg BW from 5 to 7 days of the trials daily. On 8th day, the piglets in the LPS and LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 groups were intraperitoneally administered with 100 µg LPS/kg. The control group was administered with the same volume of saline solution. The piglets were then sacrificed on day 28. Afterwards, serum, duodenum, jejunum and ileum samples were collected for analysis of structural and functional endpoints. LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment increased (P<0.05) lactase activities in the duodenum and the jejunum compared with LPS treatment. LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment also significantly increased sucrase activity in the jejunum compared with LPS treatment. Furthermore, LPS treatment increased (P<0.05) the mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-8, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-10 in the ileum compared with the control treatment. By contrast, LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment decreased (P<0.05) the mRNA expression levels of IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α in the ileum compared with the LPS treatment. LPS treatment also increased (P<0.05) the mRNA expression level of GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R) and the percentage of GLP-2R-positive cells in the ileum; by comparison, these results were (P<0.05) reduced by LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment. Moreover, LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment increased (P<0.05) the content of serum keratinocyte growth factor compared with the control group and the LPS group. The protective effects of PEG-pGLP-2 on intestinal digestive function were associated with the release of GLP-2R mediator (keratinocyte