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Sample records for extrapancreatic autoimmune lesions

  1. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease: autoimmune pancreatitis and extrapancreatic manifestations*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Daniel Alvarenga; Kido, Ricardo Yoshio Zanetti; Barros, Ricardo Hoelz de Oliveira; Martins, Daniel Lahan; Penachim, Thiago José; Caserta, Nelson Marcio Gomes

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease with pancreatic and extrapancreatic involvement, including the biliary and renal systems. Given the importance of imaging methods for the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease and its differentiation from pancreatic adenocarcinoma, we emphasize important abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings related to this recently recognized systemic autoimmune disease. PMID:27141136

  2. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases. PMID:26675058

  3. Sensitization to and Challenge with Gliadin Induce Pancreatitis and Extrapancreatic Inflammation in HLA-DQ8 Mice: An Animal Model of Type 1 Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Jihun; Kim, Mi-Young; Park, Do Hyun; Song, Tae Jun; Kim, Sun A; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong Wan; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to establish a pathogenetic mechanism of pancreatitis in celiac disease and IgG4-related disease using gluten-sensitive human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ8 transgenic mice. Methods Transgenic mice expressing HLA-DQ8 genes were utilized. Control mice were not sensitized but were fed gliadin-free rice cereal. Experimental groups consisted of gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice; nonsensitized mice with cerulein hyperstimulation; and gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice with cerulein hyperstimulation. Results Gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice with cerulein hyperstimulation showed significant inflammatory cell infiltrates, fibrosis and acinar atrophy compared with the control mice and the other experimental groups. The immunohistochemical analysis showed greater IgG1-positive plasma cells in the inflammatory infiltrates of gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice with cerulein hyperstimulation compared with the control mice and the other experimental groups. Gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice with cerulein hyperstimulation or gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice showed IgG1-stained inflammatory cell infiltrates in the extrapancreatic organs, including the bile ducts, salivary glands, kidneys, and lungs. Conclusions Gliadin-sensitization and cerulein hyperstimulation of gluten-sensitive HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice resulted in pancreatitis and extrapancreatic inflammation. This animal model suggests that chronic gliadin ingestion in a susceptible individual with the HLA-DQ8 molecule may be associated with pancreatitis and extrapancreatic inflammation. PMID:27114422

  4. Autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Omiyale, Ayodeji Oluwarotimi

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  5. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  6. Autoimmune control of lesion growth in CNS with minimal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathankumar, R.; Mohan, T. R. Krishna

    2013-07-01

    Lesions in central nervous system (CNS) and their growth leads to debilitating diseases like Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer's etc. We developed a model earlier [1, 2] which shows how the lesion growth can be arrested through a beneficial auto-immune mechanism. We compared some of the dynamical patterns in the model with different facets of MS. The success of the approach depends on a set of control parameters and their phase space was shown to have a smooth manifold separating the uncontrolled lesion growth region from the controlled. Here we show that an optimal set of parameter values exist in the model which minimizes system damage while, at once, achieving control of lesion growth.

  7. Neutrophilic Skin Lesions in Autoimmune Connective Tissue Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hau, Estelle; Vignon Pennamen, Marie-Dominique; Battistella, Maxime; Saussine, Anne; Bergis, Maud; Cavelier-Balloy, Benedicte; Janier, Michel; Cordoliani, Florence; Bagot, Martine; Rybojad, Michel; Bouaziz, Jean-David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The pathophysiology of neutrophilic dermatoses (NDs) and autoimmune connective tissue diseases (AICTDs) is incompletely understood. The association between NDs and AICTDs is rare; recently, however, a distinctive subset of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE, the prototypical AICTD) with neutrophilic histological features has been proposed to be included in the spectrum of lupus. The aim of our study was to test the validity of such a classification. We conducted a monocentric retrospective study of 7028 AICTDs patients. Among these 7028 patients, a skin biopsy was performed in 932 cases with mainly neutrophilic infiltrate on histology in 9 cases. Combining our 9 cases and an exhaustive literature review, pyoderma gangrenosum, Sweet syndrome (n = 49), Sweet-like ND (n = 13), neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis (n = 6), palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis (n = 12), and histiocytoid neutrophilic dermatitis (n = 2) were likely to occur both in AICTDs and autoinflammatory diseases. Other NDs were specifically encountered in AICTDs: bullous LE (n = 71), amicrobial pustulosis of the folds (n = 28), autoimmunity-related ND (n = 24), ND resembling erythema gyratum repens (n = 1), and neutrophilic annular erythema (n = 1). The improvement of AICTDS neutrophilic lesions under neutrophil targeting therapy suggests possible common physiopathological pathways between NDs and AICTDs. PMID:25546688

  8. Evidence against extrapancreatic insulin synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Eng, J; Yalow, R S

    1981-01-01

    Labeled and unlabeled insulin in acid/ethanol tissue extracts can be concentrated up to 100-fold by using a hydrophobic adsorption technique. After adsorption to and elution from an octadecylsilyl silica column, insulin is recovered in yields greater than 75%. By using this method of concentration, insulin in brain tissues of three of four fed rats and one rabbit was found to be less than 20% of plasma concentration. The kidney is the only extrapancreatic organ in which insulin is observed to be markedly above plasma levels. Porcine-insulin-like material was not detectable in guinea pig tissues (less than 0.02 ng/g). It is concluded that insulin is not synthesized in brain or other extrapancreatic tissues and that other mammalian insulins are not found in guinea pig tissues. PMID:6270683

  9. Influence of diet on vascular lesions in autoimmune-prone B/W mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, G; Alonso, D R; Tanaka, T; Thaler, H T; Yunis, E J; Good, R A

    1983-01-01

    Autoimmune-prone B/W mice, which are known to develop severe glomerulonephritis and vasculitis, also are found to develop arteritis and proliferative and fatty-proliferative lesions of the aorta and its branches as well as renal inflammatory lesions. High intake of saturated fat in the diet enhances the development of these atherosclerotic and autoimmune lesions significantly in female mice, whereas restriction of dietary calories and fat inhibits their development. Ad lib feeding of laboratory chow, high in fiber and low in fat, does not foster development of vascular lesions but does permit the development of autoimmune renal disease. Images PMID:6572374

  10. Hypermethylation of MST1 in IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis and rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuhara, Takataro; Tomiyama, Takashi; Yasuda, Kaneki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Yoshio; Son, Yonsu; Nomura, Shosaku; Uchida, Kazushige; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Kinashi, Tatsuo

    2015-08-07

    The serine/threonine kinase Mst1 plays important roles in the control of immune cell trafficking, proliferation, and differentiation. Previously, we reported that Mst1 was required for thymocyte selection and regulatory T-cell functions, thereby the prevention of autoimmunity in mice. In humans, MST1 null mutations cause T-cell immunodeficiency and hypergammaglobulinemia with autoantibody production. RASSF5C(RAPL) is an activator of MST1 and it is frequently methylated in some tumors. Herein, we investigated methylation of the promoter regions of MST1 and RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from patients with IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Increased number of CpG methylation in the 5′ region of MST1 was detected in AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions, whereas AIP patients without extrapancreatic lesions were similar to controls. In RA patients, we detected a slight increased CpG methylation in MST1, although the overall number of methylation sites was lower than that of AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions. There were no significant changes of the methylation levels of the CpG islands in the 5′ region of RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from AIP and RA patients. Consistently, we found a significantly down-regulated expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells of AIP patients. Our results suggest that the decreased expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells due to hypermethylation of the promoter contributes to the pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP. - Highlights: • Mst1 controls immune cells trafficking, cell proliferation and differentiation. • Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an idiopathic pancreatitis affecting multiple organs. • Decreased MST1 expression and increased CpG methylation of promoter of MST1 in AIP. • Slight increased CpG methylation of MST1 in rheumatoid arthritis patients. • MST1 contributes pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP.

  11. Evidence of Extrapancreatic Glucagon Secretion in Man.

    PubMed

    Lund, Asger; Bagger, Jonatan I; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Christensen, Mikkel; Grøndahl, Magnus; Hartmann, Bolette; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Hansen, Carsten P; Storkholm, Jan H; van Hall, Gerrit; Rehfeld, Jens F; Hornburg, Daniel; Meissner, Felix; Mann, Matthias; Larsen, Steen; Holst, Jens J; Vilsbøll, Tina; Knop, Filip K

    2016-03-01

    Glucagon is believed to be a pancreas-specific hormone, and hyperglucagonemia has been shown to contribute significantly to the hyperglycemic state of patients with diabetes. This hyperglucagonemia has been thought to arise from α-cell insensitivity to suppressive effects of glucose and insulin combined with reduced insulin secretion. We hypothesized that postabsorptive hyperglucagonemia represents a gut-dependent phenomenon and subjected 10 totally pancreatectomized patients and 10 healthy control subjects to a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test and a corresponding isoglycemic intravenous glucose infusion. We applied novel analytical methods of plasma glucagon (sandwich ELISA and mass spectrometry-based proteomics) and show that 29-amino acid glucagon circulates in patients without a pancreas and that glucose stimulation of the gastrointestinal tract elicits significant hyperglucagonemia in these patients. These findings emphasize the existence of extrapancreatic glucagon (perhaps originating from the gut) in man and suggest that it may play a role in diabetes secondary to total pancreatectomy. PMID:26672094

  12. Pancreatic and extrapancreatic effects of GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Valverde, I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Malaisse, W J

    2002-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), an incretin hormone which helps to regulate plasma glucose levels, is considered a potential agent for the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus, because of its insulinotropic capacity and insulinomimetic actions. In normal conditions, the beta-cell secretory response to GLP-1 is modulated by the extracellular concentration of D-glucose; however, the recognition of D-glucose by the beta-cell is often impaired in type-2 diabetes, and this could impede the full GLP-1 insulinotropic action. Non-glucidic substrates, such as the dimethyl ester of succinic acid, restore the effect of GLP-1 in the isolated perfused rat pancreas of normal or diabetic rats, in the absence of any other exogenous nutrient; likewise, the dimethyl ester of succinic or L-glutamic acid, and the monomethyl ester of pyruvic acid, potentiate the in vivo beta-cell secretory response to GLP-1 in normal and diabetic rats. Therefore, it was proposed that nutrients susceptible to bypass the site-specific defects of the diabetic beta-cell, could be used to potentiate and/or prolong the insulinotropic action of antidiabetic agents such as GLP-1. In vitro, GLP-1 insulin-like effects on glucose metabolism have been documented in normal and diabetic rat liver, and in rat and human skeletal muscle. In rat and human adipocytes, GLP-1 is lipolytic and/or lipogenic, and also stimulates parameters involved in the glucose metabolism. In liver, muscle and fat, GLP-1 seems to act through specific receptors, apparently different--at least in liver and muscle--in structure or signaling pathway from the pancreatic one. It is proposed that an inositolphosphoglycan might be a second messenger of GLP-1 action in extrapancreatic tissues. PMID:12688638

  13. Extrapancreatic spread of acute pancreatitis: New observations with real-time US

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, R.B.; Laing, F.C.; Wing, V.W.

    1986-06-01

    Real-time ultrasonography (US) was compared with abdominal computed tomography (CT) in 40 patients with moderate to severe acute pancreatitis. Emphasis was placed on the ability of US to disclose peri-pancreatic involvement of the anterior pararenal spaces, lesser sac, and transverse mesocolon. When a real-time US scanning technique emphasizing semierect patient positioning and coronal views was used, 20 of 26 lesions in the anterior pararenal space (77%) and 14 of 14 abnormalities in the lesser sac (100%) were visualized. Abnormalities in the transverse mesocolon, however, were poorly detected on US scans. Ten patients (25%) in the study had extrapancreatic abnormalities missed by US. CT remains the imaging method of choice in patients with clinically moderate to severe pancreatitis. In patients with mild pancreatitis, the real-time US technique the authors describe improved extrapancreatic visualization compared with previous studies using static scanners. A new US observation of perivascular spread of acute pancreatitis around the splenic and portal veins is described.

  14. Autoimmune pancreatitis: Multimodality non-invasive imaging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Crosara, Stefano; D'Onofrio, Mirko; De Robertis, Riccardo; Demozzi, Emanuele; Canestrini, Stefano; Zamboni, Giulia; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto

    2014-12-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is characterized by obstructive jaundice, a dramatic clinical response to steroids and pathologically by a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, with or without a pancreatic mass. Type 1 AIP is the pancreatic manifestation of an IgG4-related systemic disease and is characterized by elevated IgG4 serum levels, infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells and extrapancreatic lesions. Type 2 AIP usually has none or very few IgG4-positive plasma cells, no serum IgG4 elevation and appears to be a pancreas-specific disorder without extrapancreatic involvement. AIP is diagnosed in approximately 2%-6% of patients that undergo pancreatic resection for suspected pancreatic cancer. There are three patterns of autoimmune pancreatitis: diffuse disease is the most common type, with a diffuse, "sausage-like" pancreatic enlargement with sharp margins and loss of the lobular contours; focal disease is less common and manifests as a focal mass, often within the pancreatic head, mimicking a pancreatic malignancy. Multifocal involvement can also occur. In this paper we describe the features of AIP at ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance and positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging, focusing on diagnosis and differential diagnosis with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. It is of utmost importance to make an early correct differential diagnosis between these two diseases in order to identify the optimal therapeutic strategy and to avoid unnecessary laparotomy or pancreatic resection in AIP patients. Non-invasive imaging plays also an important role in therapy monitoring, in follow-up and in early identification of disease recurrence. PMID:25493001

  15. Autoimmune pancreatitis: Multimodality non-invasive imaging diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Crosara, Stefano; D'Onofrio, Mirko; De Robertis, Riccardo; Demozzi, Emanuele; Canestrini, Stefano; Zamboni, Giulia; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is characterized by obstructive jaundice, a dramatic clinical response to steroids and pathologically by a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, with or without a pancreatic mass. Type 1 AIP is the pancreatic manifestation of an IgG4-related systemic disease and is characterized by elevated IgG4 serum levels, infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells and extrapancreatic lesions. Type 2 AIP usually has none or very few IgG4-positive plasma cells, no serum IgG4 elevation and appears to be a pancreas-specific disorder without extrapancreatic involvement. AIP is diagnosed in approximately 2%-6% of patients that undergo pancreatic resection for suspected pancreatic cancer. There are three patterns of autoimmune pancreatitis: diffuse disease is the most common type, with a diffuse, “sausage-like” pancreatic enlargement with sharp margins and loss of the lobular contours; focal disease is less common and manifests as a focal mass, often within the pancreatic head, mimicking a pancreatic malignancy. Multifocal involvement can also occur. In this paper we describe the features of AIP at ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance and positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging, focusing on diagnosis and differential diagnosis with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. It is of utmost importance to make an early correct differential diagnosis between these two diseases in order to identify the optimal therapeutic strategy and to avoid unnecessary laparotomy or pancreatic resection in AIP patients. Non-invasive imaging plays also an important role in therapy monitoring, in follow-up and in early identification of disease recurrence. PMID:25493001

  16. A method for histopathological study of the multifocal nature of spinal cord lesions in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Boyden, Alexander W.; Leidinger, Mariah R.; Lambertz, Allyn M.; Ofori-Amanfo, Georgina; Naumann, Paul W.; Goeken, J. Adam; Karandikar, Nitin J.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a well-established mouse model for multiple sclerosis and is characterized by infiltration of mononuclear cells and demyelination within the central nervous system along with the clinical symptoms of paralysis. EAE is a multifocal and random disease, which sometimes makes histopathologic analysis of lesions difficult as it may not be possible to predict where lesions will occur, especially when evaluating cross sections of spinal cord. Consequently, lesions may be easily missed due to limited sampling in traditional approaches. To evaluate the entire length of the spinal cord while maintaining anatomic integrity, we have developed a method to section the cord within the decalcified spinal column, which allows for the study of the multifocal nature of this disease and also minimizes handling artifact. HE and Luxol fast blue staining of these spinal cord sections revealed a paucity of lesions in some areas, while others showed marked inflammation and demyelination. The percentage of spinal cord affected by EAE was evaluated at four separate areas of longitudinally sectioned cord and it varied greatly within each animal. Immunohistochemical staining of in situ spinal cords which had undergone decalcification was successful for key immuno-markers used in EAE research including CD3 for T cells, B220 for B cells and F4/80 for murine macrophages. This method will allow investigators to look at the entire spinal cord on a single slide and evaluate the spinal cord with and without classic EAE lesions. PMID:26855861

  17. Defining and Regulating Acute Inflammatory Lesion Formation during the Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis and Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Christopher; Smith, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The primary pathology of the human central nervous system disease multiple sclerosis (MS) and the animal counterpart experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) includes immunological and inflammatory events. Immune system involvement in MS has been widely debated but the role of inflammation has received less attention. Classic acute inflammation features vasculitis, resident tissue macrophage and mast cell participation plus the involvement of circulatory-derived neutrophils and platelets. Pre-lesion development in MS incorporates cerebral vasculitis, activated resident microglia in normal appearing white matter together with infiltrating cell types and factors indicative of an acute inflammatory reaction. Similarly, the formation of perivascular lesions during early EAE includes characteristic neurovasculitis, the participation of central nervous system microglial phenotypes plus haemopoietic cells and mediators, signifying an ongoing acute inflammatory response. EAE has been extensively used as a screen to select drugs for MS treatment but has been criticised as unrepresentative of the human condition due to fundamental differences in disease induction and pathogenesis. The review provides compelling evidence for a distinct acute inflammatory phase in MS lesion formation that is convincingly reproduced in early EAE pathology. Moreover, consideration of drug efficacy studies undertaken during initial EAE validates the occurrence of an acute inflammatory phase in disease pathogenesis. Critical appraisal, recognition and acceptance of the mutual acute inflammatory components inherent in the primary pathology of MS and EAE reveals new targets and encourages confident and reliable employment of the animal model in the assessment of novel compounds for the control of key primary pathological events in human demyelinating disease. PMID:26177741

  18. Extrapancreatic solid pseudopapillary tumors: A clinicopathological analysis of two cases

    PubMed Central

    GUO, XINGMEI; LI, NAN; REN, KAI; WU, LIGAO; MA, LI; WU, SHIWU; XIE, FENGMEI; FENG, ZHENZHONG

    2016-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary tumors (SPTs) are unusual neoplasms that mostly occur in the pancreas, and predominantly affect young women. As a low-grade malignant neoplasm of the exocrine pancreas, they occasionally metastasize, usually to the liver or peritoneum. It has been reported that <1% of SPTs are primary extrapancreatic SPTs. In the present study, we present two rare, but conspicuous extrapancreatic SPTs. Both occurred in young women, and showed good prognoses following surgery. One was a recurrent SPT of the pancreas that metastasized to the ovary, and the other was a distinct primary neoplasm that arose in the retroperitoneal area. The pathological features of the two tumors, including solid and pseudopapillary growth patterns with pale or eosinophilic cytoplasm, were characteristic of SPTs of the pancreas. However, in the case of the metastatic ovarian tumor, focal necrosis and an increased nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio were observed. The presence of positive nuclear-cytoplasmic β-catenin, the loss of membranous E-cadherin expression, and a perinuclear punctate CD99 staining pattern on immunohistochemistical analysis, were essential features for diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to compare the morphological and immunohistochemical features of these tumors with those typical of pancreatic SPTs, and to raise awareness that SPTs are able to metastasize to unusual sites, and may also arise as primary tumors outside the pancreas, which may lead to diagnostic dilemmas. PMID:27123293

  19. Insulin is ubiquitous in extrapancreatic tissues of rats and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, J L; Havrankova, J; Lesniak, M A; Brownstein, M; Roth, J

    1980-01-01

    Insulin has been detected, at levels higher than those in plasma, in a broad range of extrapancreatic tissues in both rats and humans. Rat liver insulin was shown to be indistinguishable from genuine insulin by radioimmunoassay, Sephadex chromatography, bioassay, and antibody neutralization. Liver insulin (like brain insulin) was unchanged in ob/ob mice, in rats treated with streptozotocin, or in fasted rats, despite marked alterations in pancreatic secretion of insulin and in liver content of insulin receptors. Insulin was found in cultured human IM-9 lymphocytes and cultured fibroblasts at concentrations greater than 100 times the levels in the media. IM-9 lymphocyte insulin also was shown to be indistinguishable from genuine insulin, by the same criteria used for liver insulin. The insulin concentration in cultured human cells was unaffected by depletion of insulin from the culture medium or by addition of beef insulin to the medium. The data suggest that a part, if not all, of the extrapancreatic tissue insulin is independent of plasma insulin and may be synthesized by the tissues themselves. PMID:6987656

  20. Autoimmune myelopathies.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Eoin P

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune myelopathies are a heterogeneous group of immune-mediated spinal cord disorders with a broad differential diagnosis. They encompass myelopathies with an immune attack on the spinal cord (e.g., aquaporin-4-IgG (AQP4-IgG) seropositive neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and its spectrum disorders (NMOSD)), myelopathies occurring with systemic autoimmune disorders (which may also be due to coexisting NMO/NMOSD), paraneoplastic autoimmune myelopathies, postinfectious autoimmune myelopathies (e.g., acute disseminated encephalomyelitis), and myelopathies thought to be immune-related (e.g., multiple sclerosis and spinal cord sarcoidosis). Spine magnetic resonance imaging is extremely useful in the evaluation of autoimmune myelopathies as the location of signal change, length of the lesion, gadolinium enhancement pattern, and evolution over time narrow the differential diagnosis considerably. The recent discovery of multiple novel neural-specific autoantibodies accompanying autoimmune myelopathies has improved their classification. These autoantibodies may be pathogenic (e.g., AQP4-IgG) or nonpathogenic and more reflective of a cytotoxic T-cell-mediated autoimmune response (collapsin response mediator protein-5(CRMP5)-IgG). The presence of an autoantibody may help guide cancer search, assist treatment decisions, and predict outcome/relapse. With paraneoplastic myelopathies the initial goal is detection and treatment of the underlying cancer. The aim of immunotherapy in all autoimmune myelopathies is to maximize reversibility, maintain benefits (while preventing relapse), and minimize side effects. PMID:27112686

  1. Cross-Disease Transcriptomics: Unique IL-17A Signaling in Psoriasis Lesions and an Autoimmune PBMC Signature.

    PubMed

    Swindell, William R; Sarkar, Mrinal K; Liang, Yun; Xing, Xianying; Gudjonsson, Johann E

    2016-09-01

    Transcriptome studies of psoriasis have identified robust changes in mRNA expression through large-scale analysis of patient cohorts. These studies, however, have analyzed all mRNA changes in aggregate, without distinguishing between disease-specific and nonspecific differentially expressed genes (DEGs). In this study, RNA-seq meta-analysis was used to identify (1) psoriasis-specific DEGs altered in few diseases besides psoriasis and (2) nonspecific DEGs similarly altered in many other skin conditions. We show that few cutaneous DEGs are psoriasis specific and that the two DEG classes differ in their cell type and cytokine associations. Psoriasis-specific DEGs are expressed by keratinocytes and induced by IL-17A, whereas nonspecific DEGs are expressed by inflammatory cells and induced by IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived DEGs were more psoriasis specific than cutaneous DEGs. Nonetheless, peripheral blood mononuclear cell DEGs associated with major histocompatibility complex class I and natural killer cells were commonly downregulated in psoriasis and other autoimmune diseases (e.g., multiple sclerosis, sarcoidosis, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis). These findings demonstrate "cross-disease" transcriptomics as an approach to gain insights into the cutaneous and noncutaneous psoriasis transcriptomes. This highlighted unique contributions of IL-17A to the cytokine network and uncovered a blood-based gene signature that links psoriasis to other diseases of autoimmunity. PMID:27206706

  2. Understanding mechanisms of vitiligo development in Smyth line of chickens by transcriptomic microarray analysis of evolving autoimmune lesions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Smyth line (SL) of chicken is an excellent avian model for human autoimmune vitiligo. The etiology of vitiligo is complicated and far from clear. In order to better understand critical components leading to vitiligo development, cDNA microarray technology was used to compare gene expression profiles in the target tissue (the growing feather) of SL chickens at different vitiligo (SLV) states. Results Compared to the reference sample, which was from Brown line chickens (the parental control), 395, 522, 524 and 526 out of the 44 k genes were differentially expressed (DE) (P ≤ 0.05) in feather samples collected from SL chickens that never developed SLV (NV), from SLV chickens prior to SLV onset (EV), during active loss of pigmentation (AV), and after complete loss of melanocytes (CV). Comparisons of gene expression levels within SL samples (NV, EV, AV and CV) revealed 206 DE genes, which could be categorized into immune system-, melanocyte-, stress-, and apoptosis-related genes based on the biological functions of their corresponding proteins. The autoimmune nature of SLV was supported by predominant presence of immune system related DE genes and their remarkably elevated expression in AV samples compared to NV, EV and/or CV samples. Melanocyte loss was confirmed by decreased expression of genes for melanocyte related proteins in AV and CV samples compared to NV and EV samples. In addition, SLV development was also accompanied by altered expression of genes associated with disturbed redox status and apoptosis. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of DE genes provided functional interpretations involving but not limited to innate and adaptive immune response, oxidative stress and cell death. Conclusions The microarray results provided comprehensive information at the transcriptome level supporting the multifactorial etiology of vitiligo, where together with apparent inflammatory/innate immune activity and oxidative stress, the adaptive immune response plays a

  3. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice lacking glial fibrillary acidic protein is characterized by a more severe clinical course and an infiltrative central nervous system lesion.

    PubMed Central

    Liedtke, W.; Edelmann, W.; Chiu, F. C.; Kucherlapati, R.; Raine, C. S.

    1998-01-01

    Insights into the role of the astrocyte intermediate filament protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), have only recently emerged with reports on subtle abnormalities in GFAP-deficient mice, including the documentation of defective long-term maintenance of central nervous system myelination. Here, we extend these observations by examining the astroglial response in GFAP-/- mice with autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model for multiple sclerosis. Clinically, the monophasic disease was more severe in GFAP-/- mice than in wild-type littermates despite increased remyelination in the former. More in keeping with the clinical course was the observation of an infiltrative EAE lesion in GFAP-/- mice. GFAP-/- astrocytes had a reduced cytoarchitectural stability as evidenced by less abundant and irregularly spaced hemidesmosomes. The blunt GFAP-/- astrocyte processes possessed intermediate filaments consisting mainly of vimentin, though to a lesser degree than in the wild-type. In contrast, in wild-type littermates, GFAP was most abundant and nestin occurred at lower levels. Taken together, the present study introduces the novel concepts that GFAP plays an important role in the control of clinical disease associated with formation of a clearly defined edge to the EAE lesion and that GFAP is operative in the regulation of the intermediate filament components in reactive fibrillary astrogliosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9422542

  4. Oxytocin increases extrapancreatic glucagon secretion and glucose production in pancreatectomized dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Altszuler, N.; Puma, F.; Winkler, B.; Fontan, N.; Saudek, C.D.

    1986-05-01

    Infusion of oxytocin into normal dogs increases plasma levels of insulin and glucagon and glucose production and uptake. To determine whether infused oxytocin also increases glucagon secretion from extrapancreatic sites, pancreatectomized dogs, off insulin of 18 hr, were infused with oxytocin and plasma glucagon, and glucose production and uptake were measured using the (6-/sup 3/H)glucose primer-infusion technique. The diabetic dogs, in the control period, had elevated plasma glucose and glucagon levels, an increased rate of glucose production, and a relative decrease in glucose uptake (decreased clearance). Infusion of oxytocin (500 ..mu..U/kg/min) caused a rise in plasma glucagon and glucose levels, increased glucose production, and further decreased glucose clearance. it is concluded that oxytocin can stimulate secretion of extrapancreatic glucagon, which contributes to the increased glucose production.

  5. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Autoimmune Hepatitis Page Content On this page: What is autoimmune ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is autoimmune hepatitis? Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic—or long lasting— ...

  6. A limited autoimmunity to p185neu elicited by DNA and allogeneic cell vaccine hampers the progression of preneoplastic lesions in HER-2/NEU transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lo Iacono, M; Cavallo, F; Quaglino, E; Rolla, S; Iezzi, M; Pupa, S M; De Giovanni, C; Lollini, P-L; Musiani, P; Forni, G; Calogero, R A

    2005-01-01

    Prevention of the progression of precancerous lesions by vaccines is virtually uncharted territory. Their potential, however, is being assessed in transgenic mice which develop autochthonous tumors with defined stages of progression. In this paper we show that the DNA micro-array technology significantly helps assessment of the preventive efficacy of a combined DNA and cell vaccine. All female rat Her-2/neu transgenic BALB/c (BALB-neuT) mice develop an invasive carcinoma in each of their mammary glands within 25 weeks of age. This is elicited by the activated transforming rat Her-2/neu oncogene embedded in their genome. We have previously shown that vaccination of mice bearing multiple in situ carcinomas with DNA plasmids which code for the extracellular and transmembrane domain of rat p185neu, the product of the rat Her-2/neu oncogene, followed by a boost with rat p185neu+ allogeneic cells engineered to secrete interferon-gamma, keeps 48% of mice tumor free until week 32. We have now extended our follow-up until mice reach one year of age and show that protection vanishes as time progresses. This observation suggests that the accuracy of the results studying immunotherapy against life-threatening tumors is a function of the length of the follow-up. The application of microarrays, and the concordance of morphologic and gene expression data led us to identify antibody as the main mechanism induced by vaccination. Protection is associated with a break of tolerance and a limited autoimmunity against the endogenous mouse p185neu. PMID:15888257

  7. [Autoimmune pancreatitis as an element of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome].

    PubMed

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-05-26

    Autoimmune pancreatitis constantly belongs to diseases which often causes significant diagnostic problem and often runs out with surgical intervention as considered to be a pancreatic cancer. Important although usually underestimated problems are polyglandular syndromes, which may consist of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) problem as well. This case report is an example of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS), which was connected with the surgical treatment with biliary bypass anastomosis because of the unresectable lesion in the head of pancreas. The definite remission of the pancreatic lesion finally came after a steroid therapy. Differentiation between neoplastic and inflammatory pancreatic tumors very often remains a serious clinical problem. On grounds of imaging and cytopathology exams it is often difficult to decide about the nature of a lesion. The negative result of cytopathological biopsy examination does not finally settle straightforward diagnosis. Diagnostic problems affect also autoimmune pancreatitis. It is worth to undertake attempts to differentiate pancreatic lesions especially in cases of concomitance with other autoimmune polyglandular syndromes. That is because it is connected with completely different treatment and outcome. We should remember about diagnostic criteria of autoimmune pancreatitis. Appropriate diagnosis for patients with AIP gives them a chance to avoid serious surgical resection and possible complications. PMID:27234865

  8. Silica, Silicosis, and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Kenneth Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response, which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements, suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, and autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However, numerous questions remain unanswered. PMID:27014276

  9. Silica, Silicosis, and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Kenneth Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response, which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements, suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, and autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However, numerous questions remain unanswered. PMID:27014276

  10. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases. These include: Graves disease Inflammatory bowel disease Rheumatoid arthritis Scleroderma Sjogren syndrome Systemic lupus erythematosus Thyroiditis Type 1 diabetes Ulcerative colitis Autoimmune hepatitis may occur in family ...

  11. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Lupoid hepatitis; Chronic acute liver disease ... This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy body tissue and harmful, outside ...

  12. Autoimmune disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... exact cause of autoimmune disorders is unknown. One theory is that some microorganisms (such as bacteria or viruses) or drugs may trigger changes that confuse the immune system. This may happen ...

  13. [Autoimmune encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Davydovskaya, M V; Boyko, A N; Beliaeva, I A; Martynov, M Yu; Gusev, E I

    2015-01-01

    The authors consider the issues related to pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune encephalitis. It has been demonstrated that the development of autoimmune encephalitis can be associated with the oncologic process or be of idiopathic character. The pathogenesis of autoimmune encephalitis is caused by the production of antibodies that directly or indirectly (via T-cell mechanism) damage exo-and/or endocellular structures of the nerve cells. The presence of antobodies to endocellular structures of neurons in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with autoimmune encephalitis in the vast majority of cases (> 95%) indicates the concomitant oncologic process, the presence of antibodies to membranes or neuronal synapses can be not associated with the oncologic process. Along with complex examination, including neuroimaging, EEG, cerebrospinal fluid and antibodies, the diagnostic algorithm in autoimmune encephalitis should include the search for the nidus of cancer. The treatment algorithm in autoimmune encephalitis included the combined immunosupressive therapy, plasmapheresis, immunoglobulines, cytostatics as well as treatment of the oncologic process. PMID:26322363

  14. Autoimmune encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, Frank; Armangue, Thaís; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 10 years the continual discovery of novel forms of encephalitis associated with antibodies to cell-surface or synaptic proteins has changed the paradigms for diagnosing and treating disorders that were previously unknown or mischaracterized. We review here the process of discovery, the symptoms, and the target antigens of twelve autoimmune encephatilic disorders, grouped by syndromes and approached from a clinical perspective. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis, several subtypes of limbic encephalitis, stiff-person spectrum disorders, and other autoimmune encephalitides that result in psychosis, seizures, or abnormal movements are described in detail. We include a novel encephalopathy with prominent sleep dysfunction that provides an intriguing link between chronic neurodegeneration and cell-surface autoimmunity (IgLON5). Some of the caveats of limited serum testing are outlined. In addition, we review the underlying cellular and synaptic mechanisms that for some disorders confirm the antibody pathogenicity. The multidisciplinary impact of autoimmune encephalitis has been expanded recently by the discovery that herpes simplex encephalitis is a robust trigger of synaptic autoimmunity, and that some patients may develop overlapping syndromes, including anti-NMDAR encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica or other demyelinating diseases. PMID:25315420

  15. The autoimmune diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, N.R.; Mackay, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 25 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Genetic Predisposition to Autoimmune Diseases; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Autoimmune Aspects of Rheumatoid Arthritis; Immunology of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes; and Adrenal Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndromes.

  16. Autoimmune synaptopathies.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Sarah J; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Vincent, Angela

    2016-02-01

    Autoantibodies targeting proteins at the neuromuscular junction are known to cause several distinct myasthenic syndromes. Recently, autoantibodies targeting neurotransmitter receptors and associated proteins have also emerged as a cause of severe, but potentially treatable, diseases of the CNS. Here, we review the clinical evidence as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence that autoantibodies account for myasthenic syndromes and autoimmune disorders of the CNS by disrupting the functional or structural integrity of synapses. Studying neurological and psychiatric diseases of autoimmune origin may provide new insights into the cellular and circuit mechanisms underlying a broad range of CNS disorders. PMID:26806629

  17. [Autoimmune encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Günther, Albrecht; Schubert, Julia; Brämer, Dirk; Witte, Otto Wilhelm

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis, an inflammatory disease of the brain, is usually attributed to antibody-mediated damage and dysfunction of neuronal structures. A distinction is made between onconeuronal antibodies (directed against intracellular neuronal antigens with resulting paraneoplastic neurological syndromes) and antibodies directed against neuronal cell surface proteins (with resulting synaptic encephalopathies). Anti-NMDA-Receptor-Encephalitis, the most common form of autoimmune encephalopathy, is characterized by a phased course of disease. Early disease phase involves nonspecific prodromes (fatigue, fever, headache) which lead to family doctor or emergency department consultation. Subsequently, neuropsychiatric behavioural problems, seizures, disturbance of memory and finally coma, dysautonomia and respiratory insufficiency often result in major complications (e.g. status epilepticus) necessitating intensive care treatment. The diagnosis is secured by detection of auto-antibodies in serum or cerebrospinal fluid. An intensive search for tumors is also recommended. The treatment of autoimmune encephalitis comprises of immunomodulatory and immunosuppessive strategies. Tumor therapy is the most important treatment of autoimmune encephalitis by onconeuronal antibodies. PMID:27557073

  18. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider will closely monitor and manage any side effects that may occur, as high doses of prednisone are often prescribed to treat autoimmune hepatitis. Immune system suppressors. Medications that suppress the immune system prevent the body from making autoantibodies and block the immune reaction ...

  19. Autoimmune pancreatitis: an illustrated guide to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Proctor, R D; Rofe, C J; Bryant, T J C; Hacking, C N; Stedman, B

    2013-04-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) remains one of the rarer forms of pancreatitis but has become increasingly well recognized and widely diagnosed as it is an important differential, particularly due to the dramatic response to appropriate therapy. It is now best considered as part of a multisystem disease and the notion of "IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease" has become widely recognized as the number of extra-pancreatic associations of AIP grows. More recently AIP has been classified into two subtypes: lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP) and idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) with distinct geographical, age and sex distributions for the two subtypes, in addition to different pathological characteristics. The role of imaging is crucial in AIP and should be considered in conjunction with clinical, serological, and histopathological findings to make the diagnosis. Radiologists are uniquely placed to raise the possibility of AIP and aid the exclusion of significant differentials to allow the initiation of appropriate management and avoidance of unnecessary intervention. Radiological investigation may reveal a number of characteristic imaging findings in AIP but appearances can vary considerably and the focal form of AIP may appear as a pancreatic mass, imitating pancreatic carcinoma. This review will illustrate typical and atypical appearances of AIP on all imaging modes. Emphasis will be placed on the imaging features that are likely to prove useful in discriminating AIP from other causes prior to histopathological confirmation. In addition, examples of relevant differential diagnoses are discussed and illustrated. PMID:23177083

  20. [Extrapancreatic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists: an open window towards new treatment goals in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Salvador, Javier; Andrada, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    The wide ubiquity of GLP-1 receptors in the body has stimulated the search for different extrapancreatic actions of GLP-1 and its receptor agonists. Thus, severe cardioprotective effects directed on myocardial ischaemia and dysfunction as well as diverse antiaterogenic actions have been reported. Also, native and GLP-1 receptor agonists have demonstrated significant beneficial effects on liver steatosis and fibrosis and on neuronal protection in experimental models of Alzheimer, and Parkinson's disease as well as on cerebral ischaemia. Recent evidences suggest that these drugs may also be useful for prevention and treatment of diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy and peripheral neuropathy. Good results have also been reported in psoriasis. Despite we still need confirmation that these promising effects can be applied to clinical practice, they offer new interesting perspectives for treatment of type 2 diabetes associated complications and give to GLP-1 receptor agonists an even more integral position in diabetes therapy. PMID:25437463

  1. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePlus

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider diagnose ...

  2. Evaluation of Parotid Lesions.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Edward C; Mallen-St Clair, Jon; St John, Maie A

    2016-04-01

    The differential diagnosis of a parotid lesion is broad, and the otolaryngologist must consider inflammatory, neoplastic, autoimmune, traumatic, infectious, or congenital causes. A comprehensive history and physical examination, in conjunction with judicious use of radiographic imaging (MRI, computed tomography, ultrasonography, nuclear medicine studies), laboratory studies, and pathologic analysis (fine-needle aspiration, core biopsy, incisional biopsy), facilitates making an accurate diagnosis. This article reviews the key history and physical elements and adjunctive diagnostic tools available for working up parotid lesions. PMID:26902978

  3. Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, Frank; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Bien, Christian G; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The term autoimmune encephalitis is used to describe a group of disorders characterised by symptoms of limbic and extra-limbic dysfunction occurring in association with antibodies against synaptic antigens and proteins localised on the neuronal cell surface. In recent years there has been a rapidly expanding knowledge of these syndromes resulting in a shift in clinical paradigms and new insights into pathogenic mechanisms. Since many patients respond well to immunosuppressive treatment, the recognition of these disorders is of utmost importance. In general, there are no brain-imaging modalities or biomarkers specific of these disorders other than the demonstration of the neuronal antibodies. A disease classification based on these antibodies provides information on prognosis and paraneoplastic aetiology. This article focuses on recent clinical advances, newly characterised antibodies and treatment approaches to these disorders. PMID:27330568

  4. Aquaporin-4 autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Zekeridou, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and a related spectrum of inflammatory CNS disorders are unified by detection of a serum autoantibody specific for the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel, which is abundant in astrocytic foot processes. The classic clinical manifestations of NMO are optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis. Newly recognized manifestations of AQP4 autoimmunity include lesions of circumventricular organs and skeletal muscle. NMO is commonly relapsing, is frequently accompanied by other autoimmune disorders, and sometimes occurs in a paraneoplastic context. The goals of treatment are to minimize neurologic disability in the acute attack and thereafter to prevent relapses and cumulative disability. The disease specificity of AQP4 immunoglobulin (Ig) G approaches 100% using optimized molecular-based detection assays. Clinical, immunohistopathologic, and in vitro evidence support this antibody being central to NMO pathogenesis. Current animal models yield limited histopathologic characteristics of NMO, with no clinical deficits to date. Recent descriptions of a myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein autoantibody in a minority of patients with NMO spectrum phenotype who lack AQP4-IgG predict serologic delineation of additional distinctive disease entities. PMID:26185772

  5. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:24839445

  6. Extrapancreatic organ impairment during acute pancreatitis induced by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction. Effect of N-acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Manuel A; Ramudo, Laura; De Dios, Isabel

    2007-01-01

    Summary Multiple organ failure is frequently associated with acute pancreatitis (AP). Our aim was to study pulmonary, hepatic and renal complications developed in the course of AP experimentally induced in rats by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction (BPDO), differentiating the complications caused by AP itself, from those directly caused by bile duct obstruction (BDO), after ligating the choledocus. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was administered as a therapeutic approach. Myeloperoxidase activity revealed neutrophil infiltration in lungs from 12 h after BDO, even if AP was not triggered. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity indicated hepatocyte death from 48 h after BDO, and from 24 h following BPDO-induced AP onwards, an effect delayed until 48 h by NAC treatment. Rats with single cholestasis (BDO) and rats with BPDO-induced AP showed a significant increase in plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and bilirubin concentration from 12 h onwards, whose values were reduced by NAC treatment at early BPDO. No renal failure was found during 120 h of bile-pancreatic obstruction. Our results showed lung and liver impairment as a result of BDO, even if AP does not develop. Pancreatic damage and extrapancreatic complications during AP induced by BPDO were palliated by NAC treatment. PMID:17877536

  7. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Patient Health Information ... with a hearing loss. How Does the Healthy Ear Work? The ear has three main parts: the ...

  8. Perspectives on autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, I.R.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: HLA and Autoimmunity; Self-Recognition and Symmetry in the Immune System; Immunology of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus; Multiple Sclerosis; Autoimmunity and Immune Pathological Aspects of Virus Disease; Analyses of the Idiotypes and Ligand Binding Characteristics of Human Monoclonal Autoantibodies to DNA: Do We Understand Better Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Autoimmunity and Rheumatic Fever; Autoimmune Arthritis Induced by Immunization to Mycobacterial Antigens; and The Interaction Between Genetic Factors and Micro-Organisms in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Facts and Fiction.

  9. Commensal Flora, is it an Unwelcomed Companion as a Triggering Factor of Autoimmune Pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Haruta, Ikuko; Shimizu, Kyoko; Yanagisawa, Naoko; Shiratori, Keiko; Yagi, Junji

    2012-01-01

    The etiopathogenesis of many autoimmune disorders has not been identified. The aim of this paper is to focus on the involvement of bacterial exposure, as an environmental factor, in the pathogenesis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), which is broadly categorized as autoimmune disorders involving pancreatic lesions. Avirulent and/or commensal bacteria, which may have an important role(s) as initiating/progressing factors in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorder AIP, will be emphasized. PMID:22485093

  10. [Autoimmune hepatitis and overlap syndrome: therapy].

    PubMed

    Löhr, H F

    2002-08-21

    Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) represent acute and chronic inflammatory liver diseases in which immune reactions against host antigens are found to be the major pathological mechanism. Only for AIH there is evidence of an autoimmune etiology and humoral and cellular immune reactions are found directed against various liver cell antigens. By diverse autoantibodies several subgroups of autoimmune hepatitis can be distinguished. A very important disease promoting factor seems to be the genetically determined background for autoimmunity characterized by the HLA haplotype A1, B8 and DR3, respectively DR4. Although the histopathology of AIH shows no pathognomonic features distinguishing this type of hepatitis from virus induced chronic hepatitis there are some distinct characteristic morphological lesions. If untreated the prognosis of AIH is unfavourable but the benefit from immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprin is well established. In the last years there was increasing evidence for an overlap syndrome between AIH and PBC and rarely AIH and PSC. These patients are characterized by PBC characteristic bileduct lesions and oftenly antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA). They also show AIH typical inflammatory hepatic lesions in the periportal areas and portal tracts and oftenly the typical genetical background, the HLA haplotype A1, B8, DR3 or DR4. Most of these patients respond probably to a combination therapy containing prednisolon, azathioprine and ursodesoxycholic acid that leads to the reduction of the inflammatory activity. PMID:12233265

  11. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-22

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  12. Specific autoantigens in experimental autoimmunity-associated atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Merched, Aksam J; Daret, Danièle; Li, Lan; Franzl, Nathalie; Sauvage-Merched, Maria

    2016-06-01

    Higher cardiovascular morbidity in patients with a wide range of autoimmune diseases highlights the importance of autoimmunity in promoting atherosclerosis. Our purpose was to investigate the mechanisms of accelerated atherosclerosis and identified vascular autoantigens targeted by autoimmunity. We created a mouse model of autoimmunity-associated atherosclerosis by transplanting bone marrow from FcγRIIB knockout (FcRIIB(-/-)) mice into LDL receptor knockout mice. We characterized the cellular and molecular mechanisms of atherogenesis and identified specific aortic autoantigens using serologic proteomic studies. En face lesion area analysis showed more aggressive atherosclerosis in autoimmune mice compared with control mice (0.64 ± 0.12 vs 0.32 ± 0.05 mm(2); P < 0.05, respectively). At the cellular level, FcRIIB(-/-) macrophages showed significant reduction (46-72%) in phagocytic capabilities. Proteomic analysis revealed circulating autoantibodies in autoimmune mice that targeted 25 atherosclerotic lesion proteins, including essential components of adhesion complex, cytoskeleton, and extracellular matrix, and proteins involved in critical functions and pathways. Microscopic examination of atherosclerotic plaques revealed essential colocalization of autoantibodies with endothelial cells, their adherence to basement membranes, the internal elastica lamina, and necrotic cores. The new vascular autoimmunosome may be a useful target for diagnostic and immunotherapeutic interventions in autoimmunity-associated diseases that have accelerated atherosclerosis.-Merched, A. J., Daret, D., Li, L., Franzl, N., Sauvage-Merched, M. Specific autoantigens in experimental autoimmunity-associated atherosclerosis. PMID:26891734

  13. Environmental Basis of Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Floreani, Annarosa; Leung, Patrick S C; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-06-01

    The three common themes that underlie the induction and perpetuation of autoimmunity are genetic predisposition, environmental factors, and immune regulation. Environmental factors have gained much attention for their role in triggering autoimmunity, with increasing evidence of their influence as demonstrated by epidemiological studies, laboratory research, and animal studies. Environmental factors known to trigger and perpetuate autoimmunity include infections, gut microbiota, as well as physical and environmental agents. To address these issues, we will review major potential mechanisms that underlie autoimmunity including molecular mimicry, epitope spreading, bystander activation, polyclonal activation of B and T cells, infections, and autoinflammatory activation of innate immunity. The association of the gut microbiota on autoimmunity will be particularly highlighted by their interaction with pharmaceutical agents that may lead to organ-specific autoimmunity. Nonetheless, and we will emphasize this point, the precise mechanism of environmental influence on disease pathogenesis remains elusive. PMID:25998909

  14. Autoimmune liver disease, autoimmunity and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marco; Neuberger, James M

    2014-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) represent the three major autoimmune liver diseases (AILD). PBC, PSC, and AIH are all complex disorders in that they result from the effects of multiple genes in combination with as yet unidentified environmental factors. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified numerous risk loci for PBC and PSC that host genes involved in innate or acquired immune responses. These loci may provide a clue as to the immune-based pathogenesis of AILD. Moreover, many significant risk loci for PBC and PSC are also risk loci for other autoimmune disorders, such type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting a shared genetic basis and possibly similar molecular pathways for diverse autoimmune conditions. There is no curative treatment for all three disorders, and a significant number of patients eventually progress to end-stage liver disease requiring liver transplantation (LT). LT in this context has a favourable overall outcome with current patient and graft survival exceeding 80% at 5years. Indications are as for other chronic liver disease although recent data suggest that while lethargy improves after transplantation, the effect is modest and variable so lethargy alone is not an indication. In contrast, pruritus rapidly responds. Cholangiocarcinoma, except under rigorous selection criteria, excludes LT because of the high risk of recurrence. All three conditions may recur after transplantation and are associated with a greater risk of both acute cellular and chronic ductopenic rejection. It is possible that a crosstalk between alloimmune and autoimmune response perpetuate each other. An immunological response toward self- or allo-antigens is well recognised after LT in patients transplanted for non-autoimmune indications and sometimes termed "de novo autoimmune hepatitis". Whether this is part of the spectrum of rejection or an autoimmune

  15. Metals and kidney autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Bigazzi, P E

    1999-01-01

    The causes of autoimmune responses leading to human kidney pathology remain unknown. However, environmental agents such as microorganisms and/or xenobiotics are good candidates for that role. Metals, either present in the environment or administered for therapeutic reasons, are prototypical xenobiotics that cause decreases or enhancements of immune responses. In particular, exposure to gold and mercury may result in autoimmune responses to various self-antigens as well as autoimmune disease of the kidney and other tissues. Gold compounds, currently used in the treatment of patients with progressive polyarticular rheumatoid arthritis, can cause a nephrotic syndrome. Similarly, an immune-mediated membranous nephropathy frequently occurred when drugs containing mercury were commonly used. Recent epidemiologic studies have shown that occupational exposure to mercury does not usually result in autoimmunity. However, mercury induces antinuclear antibodies, sclerodermalike disease, lichen planus, or membranous nephropathy in some individuals. Laboratory investigations have confirmed that the administration of gold or mercury to experimental animals leads to autoimmune disease quite similar to that observed in human subjects exposed to these metals. In addition, studies of inbred mice and rats have revealed that a few strains are susceptible to the autoimmune effects of gold and mercury, whereas the majority of inbred strains are resistant. These findings have emphasized the importance of genetic (immunogenetic and pharmacogenetic) factors in the induction of metal-associated autoimmunity. (italic)In vitro(/italic) and (italic)in vivo(/italic) research of autoimmune disease caused by mercury and gold has already yielded valuable information and answered a number of important questions. At the same time it has raised new issues about possible immunostimulatory or immunosuppressive mechanisms of xenobiotic activity. Thus it is evident that investigations of metal

  16. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... With #25FOR25 Campaign During National Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA officially kicks of National Autoimmune DIsease Awareness ... Click here to read more. Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA and the NCAPG held two important events ...

  17. The Autoimmune Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Ramirez-Santana, Carolina; Alzate, Maria A.; Molano-Gonzalez, Nicolas; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology), which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation). As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology). In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures – internal and external – across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics) to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein, we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status (SES), gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents, and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied. PMID:27199979

  18. The Autoimmune Ecology.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Ramirez-Santana, Carolina; Alzate, Maria A; Molano-Gonzalez, Nicolas; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology), which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation). As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology). In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures - internal and external - across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics) to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein, we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status (SES), gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents, and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied. PMID:27199979

  19. Genetic basis of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Marson, Alexander; Housley, William J.; Hafler, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases affect up to approximately 10% of the population. While rare Mendelian autoimmunity syndromes can result from monogenic mutations disrupting essential mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance, more common human autoimmune diseases are complex disorders that arise from the interaction between polygenic risk factors and environmental factors. Although the risk attributable to most individual nucleotide variants is modest, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have the potential to provide an unbiased view of biological pathways that drive human autoimmune diseases. Interpretation of GWAS requires integration of multiple genomic datasets including dense genotyping, cis-regulatory maps of primary immune cells, and genotyped studies of gene expression in relevant cell types and cellular conditions. Improved understanding of the genetic basis of autoimmunity may lead to a more sophisticated understanding of underlying cellular phenotypes and, eventually, novel diagnostics and targeted therapies. PMID:26030227

  20. Autoimmune autonomic disorders.

    PubMed

    Mckeon, Andrew; Benarroch, Eduardo E

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune autonomic disorders occur because of an immune response directed against sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric ganglia, autonomic nerves, or central autonomic pathways. In general, peripheral autoimmune disorders manifest with either generalized or restricted autonomic failure, whereas central autoimmune disorders manifest primarily with autonomic hyperactivity. Some autonomic disorders are generalized, and others are limited in their anatomic extent, e.g., isolated gastrointestinal dysmotility. Historically, these disorders were poorly recognized, and thought to be neurodegenerative. Over the last 20 years a number of autoantibody biomarkers have been discovered that have enabled the identification of certain patients as having an autoimmune basis for either autonomic failure or hyperactivity. Peripheral autoimmune autonomic disorders include autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG), paraneoplastic autonomic neuropathy, and acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy. AAG manifests with acute or subacute onset of generalized or selective autonomic failure. Antibody targeting the α3 subunit of the ganglionic-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α3gAChR) is detected in approximately 50% of cases of AAG. Some other disorders are characterized immunologically by paraneoplastic antibodies with a high positive predictive value for cancer, such as antineuronal nuclear antibody, type 1 (ANNA-1: anti-Hu); others still are seronegative. Recognition of an autoimmune basis for autonomic disorders is important, as their manifestations are disabling, may reflect an underlying neoplasm, and have the potential to improve with a combination of symptomatic and immune therapies. PMID:27112689

  1. Malignancy and the benign lymphoepithelial lesion.

    PubMed

    Batsakis, J G; Bernacki, E G; Rice, D H; Stebler, M E

    1975-02-01

    The benign lymphoepithelial lesion of salivary glands is now considered the histological hallmark of a variety of clinical and pathological disorders affecting salivary tissues. Malignancy arising in the lesion is uncommon, but may take origin in either the epithelial or lymphoreticular components. Lymphomas and pseudolymphomas associated with salivary gland lymphoepithelial lesions have been predominately extra-salivary and strongly correlated with Sjögren's syndrome. Epithelial malignancy has not been associated with autoimmunity and with few exceptions has been of the anaplastic type. This report presents two patients with intra-salivary lymphomas arising in a benign lymphoepithelial lesion of salivary glands and a patient with anaplastic carcinoma arising in the epithelial islands of the lesion. The fourth patient manifested pseudolymphomatous lymphoreticular hyperplasia in lung and submandibular gland and illustrates the possible multiple organ involvement that may occur in patients with benign lymphoepithelial lesion, even without clinical evidence of concommitant autoimmune disorders. PMID:1172885

  2. Autoimmunity in visual loss.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel; Wong, Sui; Plant, Gordon T

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of autoimmune disorders which can affect visual function. There are a very large number of mechanisms in the visual pathway which could potentially be the targets of autoimmune attack. In practice it is the retina and the anterior visual pathway (optic nerve and chiasm) that are recognised as being affected in autoimmune disorders. Multiple Sclerosis is one of the commonest causes of visual loss in young adults because of the frequency of attacks of optic neuritis in that condition, however the basis of the inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis and the confirmation of autoimmunity is lacking. The immune process is known to be highly unusual in that it is not systemic and confined to the CNS compartment. Previously an enigmatic partner to Multiple Sclerosis, Neuromyelitis Optica is now established to be autoimmune and two antibodies - to Aquaporin4 and to Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein - have been implicated in the pathogenesis. The term Chronic Relapsing Inflammatory Optic Neuropathy is applied to those cases of optic neuritis which require long term immunosuppression and hence are presumed to be autoimmune but where no autoimmune pathogenesis has been confirmed. Optic neuritis occurring post-infection and post vaccination and conditions such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and various vasculitides may cause direct autoimmune attack to visual structures or indirect damage through occlusive vasculopathy. Chronic granulomatous disorders such as Sarcoidosis affect vision commonly by a variety of mechanisms, whether and how these are placed in the autoimmune panoply is unknown. As far as the retina is concerned Cancer Associated Retinopathy and Melanoma Associated Retinopathy are well characterised clinically but a candidate autoantibody (recoverin) is only described in the former disorder. Other, usually monophasic, focal retinal inflammatory disorders (Idiopathic Big Blind Spot Syndrome, Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy and Acute Macular

  3. Autoimmunity in picornavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Koenig, Andreas; Reddy, Jay; Huber, Sally; Buskiewicz, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Enteroviruses are small, non-enveloped, positive-sense single-strand RNA viruses, and are ubiquitously found throughout the world. These viruses usually cause asymptomatic or mild febrile illnesses, but have a propensity to induce severe diseases including type 1 diabetes and pancreatitis, paralysis and neuroinflammatory disease, myocarditis, or hepatitis. This pathogenicity may result from induction of autoimmunity to organ-specific antigens. While enterovirus-triggered autoimmunity can arise from multiple mechanisms including antigenic mimicry and release of sequestered antigens, the recent demonstration of T cells expressing dual T cell receptors arising as a natural consequence of Theiler's virus infection is the first demonstration of this autoimmune mechanism. PMID:26554915

  4. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care ... anti-mitochondrial antibodies, you are likely to have primary biliary cirrhosis. If the immune proteins are high and albumin ...

  5. Understanding Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Autoimmune Diseases Progress and Promise Key Words The Immune System Your immune system is the network of cells and tissues throughout ... having two parts: the acquired and the innate immune systems. The acquired (or adaptive) immune system develops as ...

  6. Autoimmune Autonomic Ganglionopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... usf.edu/ARDCRC/professional/register/index.htm Organizations Organizations Listen Nonprofit support and advocacy groups bring together ... endorsement by GARD. Suggest an organization to add. Organizations Supporting this Disease American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association ( ...

  7. Autoimmunity in 2014.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo

    2015-10-01

    Our PubMed search for peer-reviewed articles published in the 2014 solar year retrieved a significantly higher number of hits compared to 2013 with a net 28 % increase. Importantly, full articles related to autoimmunity constitute approximately 5 % of immunology articles. We confirm that our understanding of autoimmunity is becoming a translational paradigm with pathogenetic elements rapidly followed by new treatment options. Furthermore, numerous clinical and pathogenetic elements and features are shared among autoimmune diseases, and this is well illustrated in the recent literature. More specifically, the past year witnessed critical revisions of our understanding and management of antiphospholipid syndrome with new exciting data on the pathogenicity of the serum anti-beta2 glycoprotein autoantibody, a better understanding of the current and new treatments for rheumatoid arthritis, and new position papers on important clinical questions such as vaccinations in patients with autoimmune disease, comorbidities, or new classification criteria. Furthermore, data confirming the important connections between innate immunity and autoimmunity via toll-like receptors or the critical role of T regulatory cells in tolerance breakdown and autoimmunity perpetuation were also reported. Lastly, genetic and epigenetic data were provided to confirm that the mosaic of autoimmunity warrants a susceptible individual background which may be geographically determined and contribute to the geoepidemiology of diseases. The 2014 literature in the autoimmunity world should be cumulatively regarded as part of an annus mirabilis in which, on a different level, the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American College of Rheumatology in Boston was attended by over 16,000 participants with over selected 3000 abstracts. PMID:26335699

  8. Opportunistic autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yi-chi M.; Wei, Wei-Zen; Tomer, Yaron

    2013-01-01

    Rapid advances in our understanding of the immune network have led to treatment modalities for malignancies and autoimmune diseases based on modulation of the immune response. Yet therapeutic modulation has resulted in immune dysregulation and opportunistic autoimmune sequelae, despite prescreening efforts in clinical trials. This review focuses on recent clinical data on opportunistic autoimmune disorders arising from three immunotherapeutic modalities: (1) systemic immunomodulators, including interferon-α (also used to treat hepatitis C patients) and interferon-β; (2) monoclonal antibodies to CTLA-4 and CD52, and (3) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Uncategorized predisposing factors in these patients include major histocompatibility complex and gender genetics, prevalence of different autoimmune diseases, prior chemotherapy, underlying disorder (e.g., hepatitis C), and preconditioning regimens as part of organ and stem cell transplants. Not unexpectedly, the prevalent autoimmune thyroid disease surfaced frequently. Our combination models to study the balance between thyroid autoimmunity and tumor immunity upon regulatory T-cell perturbation are briefly described. PMID:20146718

  9. Autoimmunity in 2013.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    The peer-reviewed publications in the field of autoimmunity published in 2013 represented a significant proportion of immunology articles and grew since the previous year to indicate that more immune-mediated phenomena may recognize an autoimmune mechanism and illustrated by osteoarthritis and atherosclerosis. As a result, our understanding of the mechanisms of autoimmunity is becoming the paradigm for translational research in which the progress in disease pathogenesis for both tolerance breakdown and inflammation perpetuation is rapidly followed by new treatment approaches and clinical management changes. The similarities across the autoimmune disease spectrum outnumber differences, particularly when treatments are compared. Indeed, the therapeutics of autoimmune diseases are based on a growing armamentarium that currently includes monoclonal antibodies and small molecules which act by targeting molecular markers or intracellular mediators with high specificity. Among the over 100 conditions considered as autoimmune, the common grounds are well illustrated by the data reported for systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis or by the plethora of studies on Th17 cells and biomarkers, particularly serum autoantibodies. Further, we are particularly intrigued by studies on the genomics, epigenetics, and microRNA at different stages of disease development or on the safe and effective use of abatacept acting on the costimulation of T and B cells in rheumatoid arthritis. We are convinced that the data published in 2013 represent a promising background for future developments that will exponentially impact the work of laboratory and clinical scientists over the next years. PMID:24819586

  10. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wei; Feng, Xuebing; Li, Xia; Wang, Dandan; Sun, Lingyun

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune disorders are a complicated and varied group of diseases arising from inappropriate immune responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that ongoing inflammatory and immune responses are associated with increased oxygen consumption, a process resulting in localized tissue hypoxia within inflammatory lesions ("inflammatory hypoxia"), in which hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), an oxygen-sensitive transcription factor that allows adaptation to hypoxia environments, has been shown to play an important function. HIF-1 is a regulator of angiogenesis and immune system. Besides, HIF-1-mediated metabolic shift and fibrosis may also play crucial roles in some autoimmune disorders. Firstly, we briefly summarize the role of HIF-1 in angiogenesis, immune responses and fibrosis. Secondly, we will show the major recent findings demonstrating a role for HIF-1 signaling in autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, psoriasis, systemic sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. The growing evidences may prompt HIF-1 to be a new target for treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27071377

  11. Autoimmune movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Mckeon, Andrew; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune movement disorders encapsulate a large and diverse group of neurologic disorders occurring either in isolation or accompanying more diffuse autoimmune encephalitic illnesses. The full range of movement phenomena has been described and, as they often occur in adults, many of the presentations can mimic neurodegenerative disorders, such as Huntington disease. Disorders may be ataxic, hypokinetic (parkinsonism), or hyperkinetic (myoclonus, chorea, tics, and other dyskinetic disorders). The autoantibody targets are diverse and include neuronal surface proteins such as leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and glycine receptors, as well as antibodies (such as intracellular antigens) that are markers of a central nervous system process mediated by CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. However, there are two conditions, stiff-person syndrome (also known as stiff-man syndrome) and progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), that are always autoimmune movement disorders. In some instances (such as Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody-1 (PCA-1) autoimmunity), antibodies detected in serum and cerebrospinal fluid can be indicative of a paraneoplastic cause, and may direct the cancer search. In other instances (such as 65kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) autoimmunity), a paraneoplastic cause is very unlikely, and early treatment with immunotherapy may promote improvement or recovery. Here we describe the different types of movement disorder and the clinical features and antibodies associated with them, and discuss treatment. PMID:27112684

  12. Autoimmunity and Asbestos Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pfau, Jean C.; Serve, Kinta M.; Noonan, Curtis W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite a body of evidence supporting an association between asbestos exposure and autoantibodies indicative of systemic autoimmunity, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), a strong epidemiological link has never been made to specific autoimmune diseases. This is in contrast with another silicate dust, crystalline silica, for which there is considerable evidence linking exposure to diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma. Possible contributing factors to the absence of a stronger epidemiological association between asbestos and autoimmune disease include (a) a lack of statistical power due to relatively small or diffuse exposure cohorts, (b) exposure misclassification, (c) latency of clinical disease, (d) mild or subclinical entities that remain undetected or masked by other pathologies, or (e) effects that are specific to certain fiber types, so that analyses on mixed exposures do not reach statistical significance. This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity. These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease. PMID:24876951

  13. Autoimmune basal ganglia disorders.

    PubMed

    Dale, Russell C; Brilot, Fabienne

    2012-11-01

    The basal ganglia are deep nuclei in the brain that include the caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and substantia nigra. Pathological processes involving the basal ganglia often result in disorders of movement and behavior. A number of different autoimmune disorders predominantly involve the basal ganglia and can result in movement and psychiatric disorders. The classic basal ganglia autoimmune disorder is Sydenham chorea, a poststreptococcal neuropsychiatric disorder. Resurgence in the interest in Sydenham chorea is the result of the descriptions of other poststreptococcal neuropsychiatric disorders including tics and obsessive-compulsive disorder, broadly termed pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection. Encephalitic processes affecting the basal ganglia are also described including the syndromes basal ganglia encephalitis, encephalitis lethargica, and bilateral striatal necrosis. Last, systemic autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome can result in chorea or parkinsonism. Using paradigms learned from other autoantibody associated disorders, the authors discuss the autoantibody hypothesis and the role of systemic inflammation in autoimmune basal ganglia disorders. Identification of these entities is important as the clinician has an increasing therapeutic repertoire to modulate or suppress the aberrant immune system. PMID:22832771

  14. Experimental Autoimmune Breast Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kesaraju, Pavani; Jaini, Ritika; Johnson, Justin M.; Altuntas, Cengiz Z.; Gruden, Jessica J.; Sakalar, Cagri; Tuohy, Vincent K.

    2013-01-01

    Mastitis is a substantial clinical problem in lactating women that may result in severe pain and abrupt termination of breastfeeding, thereby predisposing infants to long-term health risks. Many cases of mastitis involve no known infectious agent and may fundamentally be due to autoimmune-mediated inflammation of the breast. Herein, we develop a murine model of autoimmune mastitis and provide a detailed characterization of its resulting phenotype of breast failure and lactation insufficiency. To generate breast-specific autoimmunity, we immunized SWXJ mice with recombinant mouse α-lactalbumin, a lactation-dependent, breast-specific differentiation protein critical for production of lactose. Mice immunized with α-lactalbumin showed extensive T-cell–mediated inflammation in lactating normal breast parenchyma but none in nonlactating normal breast parenchyma. This targeted autoimmune attack resulted in breast failure characterized by lactation insufficiency and decreased ability to nurture offspring. Although immunization with α-lactalbumin had no effect on fertility and birth numbers, pups nursed by α-lactalbumin–immunized mice showed significantly disrupted growth often accompanied by kwashiorkor-like nutritional abnormalities, including alopecia, liver toxicity, and runting. This experimental model of autoimmune breast failure has useful applications for prophylactic breast cancer vaccination and for addressing inflammatory complications during breastfeeding. In addition, this model is suited for investigating nutritionally based “failure-to-thrive” issues, particularly regarding the long-term implications of postnatal nutritional deprivation. PMID:22901749

  15. Reconceiving autoimmunity: An overview.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Alfred I

    2015-06-21

    Three interconnected positions are advocated: (1) although serving as a useful model, the immune self does not exist as such; (2) instead of a self/nonself demarcation, the immune system 'sees' itself, i.e., it does not ignore the 'self' or attack the 'other;' but exhibits a spectrum of responses, which when viewed from outside the system appear as discrimination of 'self' and 'nonself' based on certain criteria of reactivity. When immune reactions are conceived in terms of normal physiology and open exchange with the environment, where borders dividing host and foreign are elusive and changing, host defense is only part of the immune system's functions, which actually comprise two basic tasks: protection, i.e., to preserve host integrity, and maintenance of organismic identity. And thus (3) if the spectrum of immunity is enlarged, differentiating low reactive 'autoimmune' reactions from activated immune responses against the 'other' is only a matter of degree. Simply, all immunity is 'autoimmunity,' and the pathologic state of immunity directed at normal constituents of the organism is a particular case of dis-regulation, which appropriately is designated, autoimmune. Other uses of 'autoimmunity' and its congeners function as the semantic remnants of Burnet's original self/nonself theory and should be replaced. A new nomenclature is proposed, concinnity, which more accurately designates the physiology of the animal's ordinary housekeeping economy mediated by the immune system than 'autoimmunity' when used to describe such normal functions. PMID:24880023

  16. Pregnancy with autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Braga, António Costa; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Braga, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to review our experience with gestations in autoimmune hepatitis patients. Background: There are only limited data describing pregnancy in patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Patients and methods: Retrospective analysis of pregnancies with autoimmune hepatitis followed in Centro Hospitalar do Porto, Portugal in the last ten years. Results: We reported nine pregnancies in seven patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Two patients had documented liver cirrhosis prior to the pregnancy. In this study, 66.7% of patients were treated with azathioprine and 88.9% with prednisolone. Clinical improvements were observed in 11.1% of pregnancies and 22.2% exacerbations were diagnosed. There were six live births and two preterm deliveries (preterm delivery rate of 33%). We also report three first trimester miscarriages (early gestation miscarriage rate of 33%). There were no neonatal or maternal deaths. Conclusion: The favorable obstetric outcome is a realistic expectation in patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Tight monitoring and control of asymptomatic and unpredictable exacerbations, which are unrelated to the severity of the underlying disease, are essential to the prognosis of the current pregnancy. PMID:27458515

  17. Harlequin syndrome in a patient with putative autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy.

    PubMed

    Karam, Chafic

    2016-01-01

    The author presents a patient with Harlequin and Horner syndromes as part of an autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy and suggests implication for work-up and management. In general, Harlequin and Horner syndromes are reported to be caused by either a structural lesion of the sympathetic pathway or, when no structural lesion is found, are presumed to be idiopathic. In this paper, a 76 year old man developed a Harlequin and Horner syndromes in the setting of subacute autonomic failure and other systemic features. The patient's symptoms improved with a short course of intravenous methylprednisolone. An autoimmune etiology should be considered in patients with Harlequin syndrome and immunomodulatory treatment could be attempted, especially when there is evidence of a more generalized autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy. PMID:26704065

  18. Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Sudulagunta, Sreenivasa Rao; Sodalagunta, Mahesh Babu; Khorram, Hadi; Sepehrar, Mona; Aheta Sham, Mohammed; Nidsale Sudarshan, Ranjitha; Gangadharappa, Rekha

    2015-10-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO or Devic's syndrome) is a rare demyelinating disease of the CNS that predominantly affects the spinal cord and optic nerves and shares many clinical and radiological features with multiple sclerosis (MS). The association of NMO with autoimmune thyroiditis has been reported very rarely. Early differentiation between NMO and MS is very important because they have different natural courses and treatment regimens. We report a case regarding a 53-year-old woman who was admitted initially with hiccups and paraesthesias, but was not evaluated during first two episodes and presented with severe progression of NMO. Patient was found to have autoimmune thyroiditis with lymphocytic infiltration of thyroid which progressed to hypothyroidism. NMO was diagnosed with seropositivity for NMO-IgG and longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (three or more spinal segments). Patient poorly responded to treatment due to the lack of early diagnosis and aggressive immunosuppressant therapy. PMID:26568836

  19. Epigenetics and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Quintero-Ronderos, Paula; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladis

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics is defined as the study of all inheritable and potentially reversible changes in genome function that do not alter the nucleotide sequence within the DNA. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modification, nucleosome positioning, and microRNAs (miRNAs) are essential to carry out key functions in the regulation of gene expression. Therefore, the epigenetic mechanisms are a window to understanding the possible mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of complex diseases such as autoimmune diseases. It is noteworthy that autoimmune diseases do not have the same epidemiology, pathology, or symptoms but do have a common origin that can be explained by the sharing of immunogenetic mechanisms. Currently, epigenetic research is looking for disruption in one or more epigenetic mechanisms to provide new insights into autoimmune diseases. The identification of cell-specific targets of epigenetic deregulation will serve us as clinical markers for diagnosis, disease progression, and therapy approaches. PMID:22536485

  20. EBV and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Ascherio, Alberto; Munger, Kassandra L

    2015-01-01

    Although a role of EBV in autoimmunity is biologically plausible and evidence of altered immune responses to EBV is abundant in several autoimmune diseases, inference on causality requires the determination that disease risk is higher in individuals infected with EBV than in those uninfected and that in the latter it increases following EBV infection. This determination has so far been possible only for multiple sclerosis (MS) and, to some extent, for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), whereas evidence is either lacking or not supportive for other autoimmune conditions. In this chapter, we present the main epidemiological findings that justify the conclusion that EBV is a component cause of MS and SLE and possible mechanisms underlying these effects. PMID:26424654

  1. Autoimmunity in 2015.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    Compared to the clear trend observed in previous years, the number of peer-reviewed articles published during 2015 and retrieved using the "autoimmunity" key word declined by 4 %, while remaining 5 % of immunology articles. On the other hand, a more detailed analysis of the published articles in leading immunology and autoimmunity journals revealed exciting scenarios, with fascinating lines of evidence being supported by convincing data and likely followed by rapid translational or clinical developments. As examples, the study of the microbiome, the development of new serum or other tissue biomarkers, and a more solid understanding of disease pathogenesis and tolerance breakdown mechanisms have been central issues in the past year. Furthermore and similar to the oncology field, progress in the understanding of single autoimmune condition is becoming most specific with psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis being ideal paradigms with treatment options diverging after decades of common therapies, as illustrated by IL17-targeting approaches. The ultimate result of these advances is towards personalized medicine with an ideal approach being tailored on a single patient, based on a finely tuned definition of the immunogenetics, epigenetics, microbiome, and biomarkers. Finally, experimental reports suggest that cancer-associated immune mechanisms or the role of T and B cell subpopulations should be better understood in autoimmune diseases. While we hailed the 2014 literature in the autoimmunity world as part of an annus mirabilis, we should not be mistaken in the strong stimulus of research in autoimmunity represented by the 2015 articles that will be summarized in this article. PMID:27422713

  2. Autoimmune hepatitis. Definition--classification--histopathology--immunopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H; Dienes, H P

    1996-09-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a distinct form of acute and chronic inflammatory liver disease in which immune reactions against host antigens are found to be the major pathological mechanism. If left untreated it carries an unfavourable prognosis, and the diagnosis should be made as soon as possible. The diagnostic approach has been greatly facilitated by the establishment of a panel of marker autoantibodies, which do not define distinct therapeutic groups of AIH, but do allow a subgrouping based on differences in patient populations, some clinical features and prognosis. The characterization of organ-specific components of the liver cell surface as targets of cellular and humoral autoimmune reactions give new insights into the pathogenesis of the disease, even though the primary event triggering the disease remains to be defined. The most important disease-promoting factor seems to be a genetically determined background for autoimmunity. Without this different environmental factors, including viruses, toxins, cytokines and drugs, are only able to induce transient autoimmune phenomena and not autoimmune disease. The histopathology of AIH is in keeping with the present pathogenetic concept. Although there is no pathognomonic feature distinguishing this type of hepatitis from virus-induced forms, some distinct morphological lesions are regarded as characteristic. Clinical research on AIH has benefited greatly from observations of experimental AIH in mice. Recognition of the critical role of autoreactive T-lymphocytes in the pathogenesis and the observation of spontaneous recovery from AIH in the animal model associated with antigen-specific and antigen-non-specific T-cell suppression have made basic contributions to our improved understanding of the natural course of AIH in humans. PMID:8865847

  3. Immunotherapeutic strategies in autoimmune uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Papotto, Pedro Henrique; Marengo, Eliana Blini; Sardinha, Luiz Roberto; Goldberg, Anna Carla; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune uveitis is an organ-specific disorder characterized by irreversible lesions to the eye that predominantly affect people in their most productive years and is among the leading causes of visual deficit and blindness. Currently available therapies are effective in the treatment of a wide spectrum of uveitis, but are often associated with severe side effects. Here, we review ongoing research with promising immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies, describing their specific features, interactions and the responses triggered by the targeted immune molecules that aim to minimize clinical complications and the likelihood of disease relapse. We first review the main features of the disease, diagnostic tools, and traditional forms of therapy, as well as the animal models predominantly used to understand the pathogenesis and test the novel intervention approaches aiming to control the acute immune and inflammatory responses and to dampen chronic responses. Both exploratory research and clinical trials have targeted either the blockade of effector pathways or of their companion co-stimulatory molecules. Examples of targets are T cell receptors (CD3), their co-stimulatory receptors (CD28, CTLA-4) and corresponding ligands (B7-1 and B7-2, also known as CD80 and CD86), and cytokines like IL-2 and their receptors. Here, we summarize the available evidence on effectiveness of these treatments in human and experimental uveitis and highlight a novel CD28 antagonist monovalent Fab′ antibody, FR104, which has shown preclinical efficacy suppressing effector T cells while enhancing regulatory T cell function and immune tolerance in a humanized graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) mice model and is currently being tested in a mouse autoimmune uveitis model with encouraging results. PMID:24833504

  4. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. PMID:26575109

  5. Autoimmunity and Turner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lleo, Ana; Moroni, Luca; Caliari, Lisa; Invernizzi, Pietro

    2012-05-01

    Turner Syndrome (TS) is a common genetic disorder, affecting female individuals, resulting from the partial or complete absence of one sex chromosome, and occurring in approximately 50 per 100,000 liveborn girls. TS is associated with reduced adult height and with gonadal dysgenesis, leading to insufficient circulating levels of female sex steroids and to infertility. Morbidity and mortality are increased in TS but average intellectual performance is within the normal range. TS is closely associated to the presence of autoantibodies and autoimmune diseases (AID), especially autoimmune thyroiditis and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the fact that the strong association between TS and AID is well known and has been widely studied, the underlying immunopathogenic mechanism remains partially unexplained. Recent studies have displayed how TS patients do not show an excess of immunogenic risk markers. This is evocative for a higher responsibility of X-chromosome abnormalities in the development of AID, and particularly of X-genes involved in immune response. For instance, the long arm of the X chromosome hosts a MHC-locus, so the loss of that region may lead to a deficiency in immune regulation. Currently no firm guidelines for diagnosis exist. In conclusion, TS is a condition associated with a number of autoimmune manifestations. Individuals with TS need life-long medical attention. As a consequence of these findings, early diagnosis and regular screening for potential associated autoimmune conditions are essential in the medical follow-up of TS patients. PMID:22154619

  6. Autoimmunity in Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Martín Martorell, P; Roep, B O; Smit, J W A; Martorell, P M

    2002-08-01

    Addison's disease has a low incidence and is most frequently the result of an autoimmune disease in developed countries. Addison's disease can present as an isolated entity or in combination with other autoimmune diseases: Addison's disease can be part of the distinct polyglandular autoimmune syndromes APS I and II. Autoantibodies in patients with isolated Addison's disease are directed against the enzymes involved in steroid synthesis, P45oc21, P45oscc and P45oc17. Addison's disease, both isolated and in the context of APS II, has been associated with the haplotype HLA-A1, -B8 and DR3. The value of the increased expression of these molecules on adrenocortical cells could point towards an infectious pathogenesis. Given the prevalence, up to 80 %, of autoantibodies in Addison's disease as well as the high predictive value for developing the disease when antibodies are present (41% in three years), we advise screening high-risk populations, such as patients with other autoimmune endocrinopathies or their relatives for the presence of these antibodies. The adrenocortical function of patients positive for antibodies should be followed yearly. PMID:12430572

  7. Aquaporin-4 autoimmunity masquerading as a brainstem tumor.

    PubMed

    Lim, Byung Chan; Chae, Jong Hee; Kim, Seung-Ki; Park, Sung-Hye; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Phi, Ji Hoon

    2014-09-01

    Brainstem glioma is a highly devastating disease, and any mass-like lesion in the brainstem can raise suspicion of this diagnosis. However, other inflammatory, demyelinating, or degenerative diseases can mimic brainstem glioma in clinical presentation and imaging features. Therefore, diagnosis based solely on imaging is often insufficient for brainstem lesions and may lead to incorrect diagnosis and treatment. This case report is the first description of central nervous system aquaporin-4 (AQP4) autoimmunity confined mainly to the brainstem. It demonstrates the wide spectrum of neuroinflammatory diseases in children and highlights the utility of surgical biopsy for suspicious brainstem lesions with atypical imaging features for glioma. PMID:25014325

  8. [Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes : An overview].

    PubMed

    Komminoth, P

    2016-05-01

    Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes (PGAS), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndromes (APS), are a heterogeneous group of rare, genetically caused diseases of the immune system which lead to inflammatory damage of various endocrine glands resulting in malfunctions. In addition, autoimmune diseases of non-endocrine organs may also be found. Early diagnosis of PGAS is often overlooked because of heterogeneous symptoms and the progressive occurrence of the individual diseases. The two most important forms of PGAS are the juvenile and adult types. The juvenile type (PGAS type 1) is caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene on chromosome 21, exhibits geographic variations in incidence and is defined by the combination of mucocutaneous candidiasis, Addison's disease and hypoparathyroidism. In addition, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) syndrome and other autoimmune diseases can also occur. The adult form of PGAS (PGAS type 2) is a multigenetic disorder associated with some HLA haplotypes, is more common than the juvenile type, shows female predominance and exhibits the combination of type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease and other autoimmune disorders. The histological alterations in affected organs of PGAS patients are similar to findings in sporadically occurring autoimmune diseases of these organs but there are no pathognomic fine tissue findings. If patients exhibit autoimmune changes in two different endocrine glands or if there are indications of several autoimmune disorders from the patient history, it is important to consider PGAS and inform the clinicians of this suspicion. PMID:27099223

  9. Extrapancreatic roles of glimepiride on osteoblasts from rat manibular bone in vitro: Regulation of cytodifferentiation through PI3-kinases/Akt signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Pan; Xiong, Wei; Liu, Hongchen; Ma, Junli; Gu, Bin; Wu, Xia

    2011-04-01

    Glimepiride, a third-generation sulfonylurea, has also been reported to have extrapancreatic functions including activation of PI3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt in rat adipocytes, skeletal muscle and endothelial cells. It is tempting to speculate that glimepiride would improve bone-implant contact in diabetic patients by mediating the activity of GLUT1 and 3 via the PI3K/Akt pathway. In this study, we investigated the effects of glimepiride on rat mandible osteoblasts cultured under two different levels of glucose. Cell proliferation was determined by the MTT assay. The supernatant was used to measure alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. Glucose uptake was determined by measuring the rate of 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) uptake. Western blotting was performed used to determine collagen I and PI3K/Akt expression. RT-PCR was performed used to determine osteocalcin (OCN) mRNA expression. We found that hyperglycemia down-regulated proliferation, ALP activity, OCN mRNA and GLUT3 protein expression in rat osteoblasts, and upregulated collagen I and GLUT1 protein expressions. Glimepiride enhanced the proliferation, ALP activity and OCN mRNA levels, and upregulated collagen I and GLUT1 and 3 protein expressions of rat osteoblasts at two different glucose concentrations. This study also provides the first evidence that glimepiride stimulates the phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt in osteoblasts and ameliorated the damage caused by high concentrations of glucose through the PI3K/Akt pathway. PMID:21055727

  10. Autoimmune thyroiditis associated with neuromyelitis optica (NMO).

    PubMed

    Sudulagunta, Sreenivasa Rao; Sodalagunta, Mahesh Babu; Khorram, Hadi; Sepehrar, Mona; Gonivada, Jayadevappa; Noroozpour, Zahra; Prasad, Nagendra

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO or Devic's syndrome) is a rare relapsing demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that mainly affects the spinal cord and optic nerves and shares many clinical and radiological features with multiple sclerosis. The association of NMO with other autoimmune diseases was reported, but very few reports described association with autoimmune thyroid disease. Early differentiation between NMO and multiple sclerosis is very important as the natural course and treatment regimens differ significantly. We report a case of a 50-year-old woman who was admitted initially with vomiting, hiccups and paraesthesias but was not diagnosed with NMO and presented with a severe progression of the disease. The patient was also diagnosed to have autoimmune thyroiditis with lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid which progressed from hyperthyroidism to hypothyroidism. NMO diagnosis was established with seropositivity for NMO-IgG and MRI showing longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (3 or more spinal segments). In spite of treatment, the response was poor due to lack of early diagnosis and aggressive immunosuppressant therapy. PMID:26633965

  11. [Autoimmune thyroiditis and thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Krátký, Jan; Jiskra, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Association between autoimmune thyroiditis (CLT) and thyroid cancer remains not clear. Although both diseases often occur simultaneously in histological samples, it is not yet clear whether CLT can be regarded as a risk factor for thyroid malignancy. This review focus on the known epidemiological and molecular genetics links between both diseases. Most studies have shown a significant association between thyroid cancer and positive antibodies to thyroglobulin and histological evidence of CLT, as well. Both disorders share some risk factors (greater incidence in women, in areas with adequate supply of iodine and in patients after radiotherapy of the neck) and molecular genetics linkage. For example: RET/PTC rearrangements could be more often found in carcinomas associated with CLT, but this mutation could be found in benign lesions such as CLT, as well. CLT seems to be a positive prognostic factor in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. It is associated with less invasive forms of tumor, lower occurrence of infiltrated lymphatic nodes and a lower risk of recurrence. PMID:26486481

  12. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Masamitsu

    2008-03-01

    Diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) requires both serologic evidence of an autoantibody and hemolysis. Based on the characteristic temperature reactivity of the autoantibody to red cell membranes, AIHA is classified into warm AIHA or cold AIHA (cold agglutinin disease and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria). Sensitized RBCs are destructed by intravascular and/or extravascular hemolysis. On the basis of etiology, AIHA are classified as idiopathic or secondary. The common cause of secondary AIHA is lymphoproliferative disorders, autoimmune diseases, and infections. The first line therapy of patients with warm AIHA is glucocorticoids and primary treatment for cold AIHA is avoiding cold exposure. The other standard treatments include splenectomy and immunosuppressive drugs. Recently, rituximab, a monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, has been used in refractory AIHA with excellent responses. PMID:18326320

  13. [Diagnostics of autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Beleznay, Zsuzsanna; Regenass, Stephan

    2008-09-01

    Autoantibodies play a key role in diagnostic laboratories as markers of autoimmune diseases. In addition to their role as markers they mediate diverse effects in vivo. Autoantibodies with protective effect have been described. Natural protective IgM autoantibodies against tumour-antigens of malignant cells or their precursors may contribute to increased survival rates of carcinoma patients. In a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus it has been shown that anti-dsDNA IgM autoantibodies protect from glomerular damage. In contrast, a direct pathogenic role of autoantibodies has been well established e.g. in myasthenia gravis or in Goodpasture syndrome. Similarly autoantibodies against SSA Ro52 are detrimental in neonatal lupus erythematosus with congenital heart block. Moreover, putatively protective autoantibodies may become pathogenic during the course of the disease such as the onconeuronal autoantibodies whose pathogenicity depends on their compartmentalisation. In patients with paraneoplastic syndromes tumour cells express proteins that are also naturally present in the brain. Anti-tumour autoantibodies which temporarily suppress tumour growth can provoke an autoimmune attack on neurons once having crossed the blood-brain barrier and cause specific neurological symptoms. Only a restricted number of autoantibodies are useful follow-up markers for the effectiveness of treatment in autoimmune diseases. Certain autoantibodies hold prognostic value and appear years or even decades before the diagnosis of disease such as the antimitochondrial antibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis or anti-citrullinated protein (CCP)-antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis. It is crucial to know whether the autoantibodies in question recognise linear or conformational epitopes in order to choose the appropriate detection methods. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy remains a very useful tool for confirmation of results of commercially available immunoassays and for detection of

  14. Cytokines and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, M G; Pozzilli, P; Thorpe, R

    1994-01-01

    Although the immunopathology of most autoimmune diseases has been well defined, the mechanisms responsible for the breakdown of self-tolerance and which lead to the development of systemic and organ-specific autoaggression are still unclear. Evidence has accumulated which supports a role for a disregulated production of cytokines by leucocytes and possibly other cells in the pathogenesis of some autoimmune diseases. However, due to the complexity and heterogeneity of cytokine effects in the regulation of the immune response, it is difficult to determine whether abnormalities in the patterns of cytokine production are primary or secondary to the pathological process. Confusion is also caused by the fact that the biological activities of cytokines are multiple and often overlapping, and consequently it is difficult to focus on a unique effect of any one cytokine. Characterization of the potential and actual involvement of cytokines is important not only for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune conditions, but particularly because of the implications for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies for the prevention and treatment of the diseases. PMID:8149655

  15. Autoimmune mechanisms in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Reeves, W H

    1991-09-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic papulosquamous skin disorder affecting 1% to 3% of the general population. There is increasing evidence that immunologic mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, and that a link between psoriasis and autoimmunity may exist. A variety of autoantibodies has been observed in psoriasis including antinuclear antibodies, antibodies to small nuclear and cytoplasmic ribonucleoproteins, and antibodies to epidermal cells. UV light treatment of psoriasis may play a role in inducing these autoantibodies in some individuals. Recent evidence that activated T cells in psoriatic plaques may produce interferon-gamma leading to the appearance of ectopic class II major histocompatibility products on the surface of keratinocytes also supports the idea of a link between psoriasis and disordered immunoregulation. The immunologic abnormalities in psoriasis and the association of psoriasis with particular types of autoantibodies raise the possibility that a common etiology may underlie both psoriasis and autoimmunity in some patients, but the different responses of the two diseases to UV light treatment and certain pharmacological agents suggest that psoriasis may not have an autoimmune pathogenesis. PMID:1931571

  16. Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Smyk, Daniel S.; Rigopoulou, Eirini I.; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L.; Kriese, Stephen; Burroughs, Andrew K.; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P.

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was first used to describe cases of pancreatitis with narrowing of the pancreatic duct, enlargement of the pancreas, hyper-γ-globulinaemia, and antinuclear antibody (ANA) positivity serologically. The main differential diagnosis, is pancreatic cancer, which can be ruled out through radiological, serological, and histological investigations. The targets of ANA in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis do not appear to be similar to those found in other rheumatological diseases, as dsDNA, SS-A, and SS-B are not frequently recognized by AIP-related ANA. Other disease-specific autoantibodies, such as, antimitochondrial, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies or diabetes-specific autoantibodies are virtually absent. Further studies have focused on the identification of pancreas-specific autoantigens and reported significant reactivity to lactoferrin, carbonic anhydrase, pancreas secretory trypsin inhibitor, amylase-alpha, heat-shock protein, and plasminogen-binding protein. This paper discusses the findings of these investigations and their relevance to the diagnosis, management, and pathogenesis of autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:22844291

  17. Melanocyte antigen triggers autoimmunity in human psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Akiko; Siewert, Katherina; Stöhr, Julia; Besgen, Petra; Kim, Song-Min; Rühl, Geraldine; Nickel, Jens; Vollmer, Sigrid; Thomas, Peter; Krebs, Stefan; Pinkert, Stefan; Spannagl, Michael; Held, Kathrin; Kammerbauer, Claudia; Besch, Robert; Dornmair, Klaus; Prinz, Jörg C

    2015-12-14

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a common T cell-mediated inflammatory skin disease with a suspected autoimmune pathogenesis. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I allele, HLA-C*06:02, is the main psoriasis risk gene. Epidermal CD8(+) T cells are essential for psoriasis development. Functional implications of HLA-C*06:02 and mechanisms of lesional T cell activation in psoriasis, however, remained elusive. Here we identify melanocytes as skin-specific target cells of an HLA-C*06:02-restricted psoriatic T cell response. We found that a Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 T cell receptor (TCR), which we had reconstituted from an epidermal CD8(+) T cell clone of an HLA-C*06:02-positive psoriasis patient specifically recognizes HLA-C*06:02-positive melanocytes. Through peptide library screening, we identified ADAMTS-like protein 5 (ADAMTSL5) as an HLA-C*06:02-presented melanocytic autoantigen of the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 TCR. Consistent with the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1-TCR reactivity, we observed numerous CD8(+) T cells in psoriasis lesions attacking melanocytes, the only epidermal cells expressing ADAMTSL5. Furthermore, ADAMTSL5 stimulation induced the psoriasis signature cytokine, IL-17A, in CD8(+) T cells from psoriasis patients only, supporting a role as psoriatic autoantigen. This unbiased analysis of a TCR obtained directly from tissue-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells reveals that in psoriasis HLA-C*06:02 directs an autoimmune response against melanocytes through autoantigen presentation. We propose that HLA-C*06:02 may predispose to psoriasis via this newly identified autoimmune pathway. PMID:26621454

  18. Melanocyte antigen triggers autoimmunity in human psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Akiko; Siewert, Katherina; Stöhr, Julia; Besgen, Petra; Kim, Song-Min; Rühl, Geraldine; Nickel, Jens; Vollmer, Sigrid; Thomas, Peter; Krebs, Stefan; Pinkert, Stefan; Spannagl, Michael; Held, Kathrin; Kammerbauer, Claudia; Besch, Robert; Dornmair, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a common T cell–mediated inflammatory skin disease with a suspected autoimmune pathogenesis. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I allele, HLA-C*06:02, is the main psoriasis risk gene. Epidermal CD8+ T cells are essential for psoriasis development. Functional implications of HLA-C*06:02 and mechanisms of lesional T cell activation in psoriasis, however, remained elusive. Here we identify melanocytes as skin-specific target cells of an HLA-C*06:02–restricted psoriatic T cell response. We found that a Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 T cell receptor (TCR), which we had reconstituted from an epidermal CD8+ T cell clone of an HLA-C*06:02–positive psoriasis patient specifically recognizes HLA-C*06:02–positive melanocytes. Through peptide library screening, we identified ADAMTS-like protein 5 (ADAMTSL5) as an HLA-C*06:02–presented melanocytic autoantigen of the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 TCR. Consistent with the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1-TCR reactivity, we observed numerous CD8+ T cells in psoriasis lesions attacking melanocytes, the only epidermal cells expressing ADAMTSL5. Furthermore, ADAMTSL5 stimulation induced the psoriasis signature cytokine, IL-17A, in CD8+ T cells from psoriasis patients only, supporting a role as psoriatic autoantigen. This unbiased analysis of a TCR obtained directly from tissue-infiltrating CD8+ T cells reveals that in psoriasis HLA-C*06:02 directs an autoimmune response against melanocytes through autoantigen presentation. We propose that HLA-C*06:02 may predispose to psoriasis via this newly identified autoimmune pathway. PMID:26621454

  19. The spectrum of autoimmune encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Divyanshu; Sawhney, Anshudha; Greenberg, Benjamin; Lowden, Andrea; Warnack, Worthy; Khemani, Pravin; Stuve, Olaf; Vernino, Steven

    2015-10-15

    Despite being a potentially reversible neurological condition, no clear guidelines for diagnosis or management of autoimmune encephalitis exist. In this study we analyzed clinical presentation, laboratory and imaging characteristics, and outcome of autoimmune encephalitis from three teaching hospitals. Non-paraneoplastic autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies against membrane antigens was the most common syndrome, especially in the pediatric population. Clinical outcome was better for patients with shorter latency from symptom onset to diagnosis and initiation of immunomodulation. Patients with underlying malignancy were less likely to respond well to immunomodulatory therapy. The clinical spectrum of autoimmune encephalitis is fairly broad, but prompt recognition and treatment often leads to excellent outcome. PMID:26439968

  20. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation. PMID:26875020

  1. Autoimmune muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Mammen, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Patients with polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) present with the subacute onset of symmetric proximal muscle weakness, elevated muscle enzymes, myopathic findings on electromyography, and autoantibodies. DM patients are distinguished by their cutaneous manifestations. Characteristic features on muscle biopsy include the invasion of nonnecrotic muscle fibers by T cells in PM, perifascicular atrophy in DM, and myofiber necrosis without prominent inflammation in IMNM. Importantly, these are regarded as autoimmune diseases and most patients respond partially, if not completely, to immunosuppressive therapy. Patients with inclusion body myositis (IBM) usually present with the insidious onset of asymmetric weakness in distal muscles (e.g., wrist flexors, and distal finger flexors), often when more proximal muscle groups are relatively preserved. Although IBM muscle biopsies usually have focal invasion of myofibers by lymphocytes, the majority of IBM biopsies also include rimmed vacuoles. While most IBM patients do have autoantibodies, treatment with immunosuppressive agents does not improve their clinical course. Along with the presence of abnormally aggregated proteins on muscle biopsy, the refractory nature and relentless course of IBM suggest that the underlying pathophysiology may include a dominant myodegenerative component. This chapter will focus on the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and treatment of the autoimmune myopathies and IBM. An emphasis will be placed on recent advances, indicating that these are a diverse family of diseases and that each of more than a dozen myositis autoantibodies is associated with a distinct clinical phenotype. PMID:27112692

  2. [Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Vera; Conde, Marta; Figueiredo, António; Vasconcelos, Júlia; Dias, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    The Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) is an impairment of lymphocyte apoptosis expressed by generalized non-malignant lymphoproliferation, lymphadenopathy and/or splenomegaly. This article describes a seven and 14 year old males. The first one was admitted at 3 years of age with fever, bicytopenia and generalized lymphadenopathy. Hystopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed reactive follicular hyperplasia and marked paracortical expansion. He was readmitted three years later presenting herpes zoster and similar clinical features. High levels of IL-10 and increasing tendency of Fas-L in plasma and serum. The second child was admitted at 13 years of age presenting thigh and gluteus cellulitis, anemia and neutropenia. T lymphocytes aß+CD4-CD8- 3,1%. Hystopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed marked paracortical hyperplasia. Both children are treated with mycophenolate mofetil with good response. ALPS is an underestimated entity that must be considered in non malign lymphoproliferation, autoimmunity and expansion of an unusual population of a/ßCD3+CD4-CD8-(double-negative T cells>1%). PMID:22525637

  3. [Hydroxychloroquine for autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Danza, Álvaro; Graña, Diego; Goñi, Mabel; Vargas, Andrea; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo

    2016-02-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is by far the most frequently used antimalarial for the management of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases. It has immunomodulatory, hypolipidemic, hypoglycemic and antithrombotic properties and it diminishes the risk of malignancies. The most important mechanisms to explain the immunomodulatory actions are its ability to reduce inflammatory pathways and Toll-like receptors activation. The safety profile is favorable. In spite of its low frequency, retinal toxicity is potentially severe. In systemic lupus erythematous HCQ therapy reduces activity, the accrual of organ damage, risk of infections and thrombosis and improves the cardiometabolic profile. It contributes to induce lupus nephritis remission, spares steroid use and increases survival rates. In rheumatoid arthritis, it improves cardiometabolic risk and has a favorable effect in joint inflammation. In Sjögren's syndrome, an increased lacrimal quality as well as an improvement in objective and subjective inflammatory markers has been demonstrated with HCQ. In Antiphospholipid Syndrome, HCQ is effective in primary and secondary thrombosis prevention. The effectiveness of the drug in other systemic autoimmune diseases is less established. HCQ therapy may improve dermatological manifestations in Dermatomyositis and may have a positive effects in the treatment of Sarcoidosis and Still disease. PMID:27092678

  4. Infections and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Bach, Jean-François

    2005-01-01

    The high percentage of disease-discordant pairs of monozygotic twins demonstrates the central role of environmental factors in the etiology of autoimmune diseases. Efforts were first focussed on the search for triggering factors. The study of animal models has clearly shown that infections may trigger autoimmune diseases, as in the case of Coxsackie B4 virus in type I diabetes and the encephalomyocarditis virus in autoimmune myositis, two models in which viruses are thought to act by increasing immunogenicity of autoantigens secondary to local inflammation. The induction of a Guillain-Barré syndrome in rabbits after immunization with a peptide derived from Campylobacter jejuni is explained by mimicry between C. jejuni antigens and peripheral nerve axonal antigens. Other models involve chemical modification of autoantigens, as in the case of iodine-induced autoimmune thyroiditis. These mechanisms have so far only limited clinical counterparts (rheumatic fever, Guillain-Barré syndrome and drug-induced lupus or myasthenia gravis) but one may assume that unknown viruses may be at the origin of a number of chronic autoimmune diseases, such as type I diabetes and multiple sclerosis) as illustrated by the convergent data incriminating IFN-alpha in the pathophysiology of type I diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus. Perhaps the difficulties met in identifying the etiologic viruses are due to the long lag time between the initial causal infection and onset of clinical disease. More surprisingly, infections may also protect from autoimmune diseases. Western countries are being confronted with a disturbing increase in the incidence of most immune disorders, including autoimmune and allergic diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, and some lymphocyte malignancies. Converging epidemiological evidence indicates that this increase is linked to improvement of the socio-economic level of these countries, posing the question of the causal relationship and more precisely the

  5. Environmental Triggers of Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Burek, C. Lynne; Talor, Monica V.

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis is among the most prevalent of all the autoimmunities. Autoimmune thyroiditis is multifactorial with contributions from genetic and environmental factors. Much information has been published about the genetic predisposition to autoimmune thyroiditis both in experimental animals and humans. There is, in contrast, very little data on environmental agents that can serve as the trigger or autoimmunity in a genetically predisposed host. The best-established environmental factor is excess dietary iodine. Increased iodine consumption is strongly implicated as a trigger for thyroiditis, but only in genetically susceptible individuals. However, excess iodine is not the only environmental agent implicated as a trigger leading to autoimmune thyroiditis. There are a wide variety of other synthetic chemicals that affect the thyroid gland or have the ability to promote immune dysfunction in the host. These chemicals are released into the environment by design, such as in pesticides, or as a by-product of industry. Candidate pollutants include polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polybrominated biphenols, and polychlorinated biphenols, among others. Infections are also reputed to trigger autoimmunity and may act alone or in concert with environmental chemicals. We have utilized a unique animal model, the NOD.H2h4 mouse to explore the influence of iodine and other environmental factors on autoimmune thyroiditis. PMID:19818584

  6. Environmental triggers of autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Burek, C Lynne; Talor, Monica V

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis is among the most prevalent of all the autoimmunities. Autoimmune thyroiditis is multifactorial with contributions from genetic and environmental factors. Much information has been published about the genetic predisposition to autoimmune thyroiditis both in experimental animals and humans. There is, in contrast, very little data on environmental agents that can serve as the trigger for autoimmunity in a genetically predisposed host. The best-established environmental factor is excess dietary iodine. Increased iodine consumption is strongly implicated as a trigger for thyroiditis, but only in genetically susceptible individuals. However, excess iodine is not the only environmental agent implicated as a trigger leading to autoimmune thyroiditis. There are a wide variety of other synthetic chemicals that affect the thyroid gland or have the ability to promote immune dysfunction in the host. These chemicals are released into the environment by design, such as in pesticides, or as a by-product of industry. Candidate pollutants include polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polybrominated biphenols, and polychlorinated biphenols, among others. Infections are also reputed to trigger autoimmunity and may act alone or in concert with environmental chemicals. We have utilized a unique animal model, the NOD.H2(h4) mouse to explore the influence of iodine and other environmental factors on autoimmune thyroiditis. PMID:19818584

  7. Mast Cell and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunzhi; Chen, Guangjie

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are important in innate immune system. They have been appreciated as potent contributors to allergic reaction. However, increasing evidence implicates the important role of mast cells in autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Here we review the current stage of knowledge about mast cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:25944979

  8. Autoimmunity in neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    Newsom-Davis, J

    1988-01-01

    A number of confounding factors can be identified from the search for autoimmune mechanisms over the last 2 decades that may be relevant for future studies. (1) An apparently homogeneous clinical disorder may represent more than one disease process and thereby imply antibody/antigen heterogeneity as, for example, in MG with and without detectable anti-AChR antibodies. In some cases, physiologic studies allow the different forms of the disease to be distinguished as in AIDP and acute inflammatory axonal polyneuropathy. (2) A homogeneous disorder (e.g., LEMS) may have at least two different triggering mechanisms (SCLC and an unknown stimulus). (3) Antigen density may be too low to be detected by the immunohistologic techniques available, as initially occurred in MG and LEMS. (4) Autoantibodies may be detected that are irrelevant to the primary disease, such as anti-striated muscle antibodies in MG. (5) Poor antibody cross-reactivity between species may mean that the pathogenic antibody is undetected in binding assays or in experimental passive transfer studies. For example, anti-AChR antibody in MG shows less than 5% reactivity with Torpedo AChR. (6) A poor regenerative capacity of the target antigen may mean that reduction of circulating autoantibodies by either plasma exchange or ISD treatment is not associated with detectable clinical improvement, as may be the case in SSN in which DRG cells appear to be the target. TABLE 5 summarizes the extent to which the data reviewed have established a role for pathogenic antibodies in the light of the postulates for autoimmunity set out earlier and ranks the disorders accordingly. Only in MG with detectable anti-AChR antibody are all the postulates met, including definition of the antigen, experimental passive transfer by the IgG fraction of MG sera, active immunization of experimental animals, and propagation. In both LEMS and the IgM kappa anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy the antigen is known, although better

  9. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Dacie, J V

    1975-10-01

    Warm-type autoantibodies of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) are usually IgG but may be IgM or IgA. They are usual Rh specific. Cold-type antibodies are IgM or IgG (Donath-Landsteiner [DL] antibody). IgM antibodies are usually anit-l (occasionally anti-i) and DL antibodies anti-P. The warm IgG antibodies do not fix complement (C); they cause red blood cell (RBC) destruction predominantly in the spleen as the result of interaction between fixing; they cause RBC destruction either by intravascular lysis (complement sequence completed) or by interaction between C3-coated RBCs and phagocytes in liver and spleen. Gentic factors, immunoglobulin deficiency, somatic mutation, viral infections and drugs, and failure of T-lymphocyte function, all probably play a part in breaking immunological tolerance and the development of AIHA. PMID:1164110

  10. Update on Autoimmune Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), a liver disorder affecting both children and adults, is characterized by inflammatory liver histology, elevated transaminase levels, circulating nonorganspecific autoantibodies, and increased levels of immunoglobulin G, in the absence of a known etiology. Two types of AIH are recognized according to seropositivity: smooth muscle antibody and/or antinuclear antibody define AIH type 1 and antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 and/or liver cytosol type 1 define AIH type 2. AIH type 1 affects both adults and children, while AIH type 2 is mainly a paediatric disease, though it does occasionally affects young adults. AIH should be considered during the diagnostic workup of any patient with increased liver enzyme levels. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone with or without azathioprine, with symptom free long-term survival for the majority of patients. For those who do not respond to standard treatment, or who are difficult-to-treat, mycophenolate mofetil and, in the absence of a response, calcineurin inhibitors should be tried in addition to steroids. The pathogenesis of AIH is not fully understood, although there is mounting evidence that genetic susceptibility, molecular mimicry and impaired immunoregulatory networks contribute to the initiation and perpetuation of the autoimmune attack. Liver damage is thought to be mediated primarily by CD4 T-cells, although recent studies support the involvement of diverse populations, including Th17 cells. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of AIH is likely to contribute to the development of novel treatments, such as the adoptive transfer of autologous expanded antigenspecific regulatory T-cells, which ultimately aim at restoring tolerance to liver-derived antigens. PMID:26357634

  11. Type 1 diabetes associated autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Kahaly, George J; Hansen, Martin P

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is increasing in prevalence worldwide. The economic costs are considerable given the cardiovascular complications and co-morbidities that it may entail. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the loss of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. The pathogenesis of T1D is complex and multifactorial and involves a genetic susceptibility that predisposes to abnormal immune responses in the presence of ill-defined environmental insults to the pancreatic islets. Genetic background may affect the risk for autoimmune disease and patients with T1D exhibit an increased risk of other autoimmune disorders such as autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease, autoimmune gastritis, coeliac disease and vitiligo. Approximately 20%-25% of patients with T1D have thyroid antibodies, and up to 50% of such patients progress to clinical autoimmune thyroid disease. Approximately 0.5% of diabetic patients have concomitant Addison's disease and 4% have coeliac disease. The prevalence of autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anemia is 5% to 10% and 2.6% to 4%, respectively. Early detection of antibodies and latent organ-specific dysfunction is advocated to alert physicians to take appropriate action in order to prevent full-blown disease. Patients and family members should be educated to be able to recognize signs and symptoms of underlying disease. PMID:26903475

  12. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  13. Questions and Answers on Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Updates Join Our Email List For Email Marketing you can trust. Contact AARDA National Office 22100 ... Grassroots Fundraising Workplace Giving Special Events AARDA on Facebook Copyright © 2004 - 2016. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association, ...

  14. Sensory Neuronopathy and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Alberto R. M.; Nunes, Marcelo B.; Nucci, Anamarli; França, Marcondes C.

    2012-01-01

    Sensory neuronopathies (SNs) are a specific subgroup of peripheral nervous system diseases characterized by primary degeneration of dorsal root ganglia and their projections. Multifocal sensory symptoms often associated to ataxia are the classical features of SN. Several different etiologies have been described for SNs, but immune-mediated damage plays a key role in most cases. SN may herald the onset of some systemic autoimmune diseases, which further emphasizes how important the recognition of SN is in clinical practice. We have thus reviewed available clinical, neurophysiological, and therapeutic data on autoimmune disease-related SN, namely, in patients with Sjögren's syndrome, autoimmune hepatitis, and celiac disease. PMID:22312482

  15. Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases in Children

    PubMed Central

    Cappa, Marco; Bizzarri, Carla; Crea, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    The two major autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) include Graves' disease (GD) and autoimmune thyroiditis (AT); both of which are characterized by infiltration of the thyroid by T and B cells reactive to thyroid antigens, by the production of thyroid autoantibodies and by abnormal thyroid function (hyperthyroidism in GD and hypothyroidism in AT). While the exact etiology of thyroid autoimmunity is not known, it is believed to develop when a combination of genetic susceptibility and environmental encounters leads to breakdown of tolerance. It is important to recognize thyroid dysfunction at an early stage by maintaining an appropriate index of suspicion. PMID:21209713

  16. [Molecular diagnosis of autoimmune dermatoses].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, K; Hertl, M; Sitaru, C

    2016-01-01

    Bullous autoimmune diseases are organ-specific disorders characterized by an autoantibody-mediated blistering of skin and mucous membranes. The detection of tissue-bound and serum autoantibodies is prerequisite for the diagnosis of autoimmune blistering diseases. The individual entities of this group may be difficult to differentiate on clinical grounds alone. An accurate diagnosis is however important for prognosis and therapy. A preliminary diagnostic step includes direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, which provide information about the binding pattern and isotype of autoantibodies and allow the diagnosis of the autoimmune blistering disease. Subsequent characterization of the molecular specificity of autoantibodies is necessary for the exact classification of autoimmune bullous dermatoses. The quantitative measurement of autoantibodies against structural proteins of the skin may be often used to assess disease severity at follow-up. PMID:26612472

  17. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-03-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26761426

  18. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Statistics Your source for autoimmune related disease information. **We need your input** We want to know of your experiences with Non- ... email address with us. Please be assured that we will always keep your email private. We will ...

  19. Sialic acids and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Vinay S; Pillai, Shiv

    2016-01-01

    An important underlying mechanism that contributes to autoimmunity is the loss of inhibitory signaling in the immune system. Sialic acid-recognizing Ig superfamily lectins or Siglecs are a family of cell surface proteins largely expressed in hematopoietic cells. The majority of Siglecs are inhibitory receptors expressed in immune cells that bind to sialic acid-containing ligands and recruit SH2-domain-containing tyrosine phosphatases to their cytoplasmic tails. They deliver inhibitory signals that can contribute to the constraining of immune cells, and thus protect the host from autoimmunity. The inhibitory functions of CD22/Siglec-2 and Siglec-G and their contributions to tolerance and autoimmunity, primarily in the B lymphocyte context, are considered in some detail in this review. The relevance to autoimmunity and unregulated inflammation of modified sialic acids, enzymes that modify sialic acid, and other sialic acid-binding proteins are also reviewed. PMID:26683151

  20. Autoimmune sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Silber, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    A number of autoantibodies, some paraneoplastic, are associated with sleep disorders. Morvan syndrome and limbic encephalitis, associated with voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibodies, principally against CASPR2 and LGI1, can result in profound insomnia and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Patients with aquaporin-4 antibodies and neuromyelitis optica may develop narcolepsy in association with other evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction, sometimes as the initial presentation. Central sleep apnea and central neurogenic hypoventilation are found in patients with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antibody encephalitis, and obstructive sleep apnea, stridor, and hypoventilation are prominent features of a novel tauopathy associated with IgLON5 antibodies. In addition, paraneoplastic diseases may involve the hypothalamus and cause sleep disorders, particularly narcolepsy and RBD in those with Ma1 and Ma2 antibodies. Patients with antineuronal nuclear autoantibodies type 2 may develop stridor. Several lines of evidence suggest that narcolepsy is an autoimmune disorder. There is a strong relationship with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQB1*06:02 haplotype and polymorphisms in the T-cell receptor alpha locus and purinergic receptor P2Y11 genes. Patients with recent-onset narcolepsy may have high titers of antistreptococcal or other antibodies, although none has yet been shown to be disease-specific but, supporting an immune basis, recent evidence indicates that narcolepsy in children can be precipitated by one type of vaccination against the 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza pandemic. PMID:27112685

  1. Autoimmune and inflammatory epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Nabbout, Rima

    2012-09-01

    The role of immunity and inflammation in epilepsy have long been suggested by the anticonvulsant activity of steroids in some infancy and childhood epilepsies. The role of fever and infection in exacerbating seizures due to possible proinflammatory molecules, the increased frequency of seizures in systemic autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematous, and, recently, the detection of autoantibodies in some unexplained epilepsies reinforced the causal place of immunity and inflammation in epilepsies with unknown etiology. In this article, we summarize epilepsies where clinical and biologic data strongly support the pathogenic role of autoantibodies (e.g., limbic encephalitides, N-methyl-d-aspartate [NMDA] encephalitis) and epilepsies where immune-mediated inflammation occurs, but the full pathogenic cascade is either not clear (e.g., Rasmussen's encephalitis) or only strongly hypothesized (idiopathic hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia syndrome [IHHS] and fever-induced refractory epilepsy in school-aged children [FIRES]). We emphasize the electroclinical features that would help to diagnose these conditions, allowing early immunomodulating therapy. Finally, we raise some questions that remain unclear regarding diagnosis, mechanisms, and future therapies. PMID:22946722

  2. Progesterone and Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Grant C.

    2011-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in human immune systems is most apparent in the female predominance of certain autoimmune diseases (ADs) like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Epidemiologic, observational and experimental evidence strongly suggest sex steroids are important modulators of genetic risk in human AD. In this regard, the roles of progesterone (Pg), an immunomodulatory female sex steroid, are poorly understood. Several lines of investigation indicate Pg and synthetic progestins impact risk of AD and immune-mediated injury in different ways depending on their concentrations and their engagement of various Pg receptors expressed in immune organs, immune cells or tissues targeted by immune attack. At low physiologic levels, Pg may enhance interferon-alpha (IFN-α) pathways important in SLE pathogenesis. Commonly used synthetic progestins may have the opposite effect. At pregnancy levels, Pg may suppress disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and multiple sclerosis (MS) via inhibition of T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 pathways and induction of anti-inflammatory molecules. Importantly, Pg’s immunomodulatory effects differ from those of estrogens and androgens. An additional layer of complexity arises from apparent interdependence of sex hormone signaling pathways. Identifying mechanisms by which Pg and other sex steroids modulate risk of AD and immune-mediated injury will require clarification of their cellular and molecular targets in vivo. These future studies should be informed by recent genetic discoveries in human AD, particularly those revealing their sex-specific genetic associations. PMID:22193289

  3. Heparanase and Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Simeonovic, Charmaine J.; Ziolkowski, Andrew F.; Wu, Zuopeng; Choong, Fui Jiun; Freeman, Craig; Parish, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    Heparanase (Hpse) is the only known mammalian endo-β-d-glucuronidase that degrades the glycosaminoglycan heparan sulfate (HS), found attached to the core proteins of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Hpse plays a homeostatic role in regulating the turnover of cell-associated HS and also degrades extracellular HS in basement membranes (BMs) and the extracellular matrix (ECM), where HSPGs function as a barrier to cell migration. Secreted Hpse is harnessed by leukocytes to facilitate their migration from the blood to sites of inflammation. In the non-obese diabetic (NOD) model of autoimmune Type 1 diabetes (T1D), Hpse is also used by insulitis leukocytes to solubilize the islet BM to enable intra-islet entry of leukocytes and to degrade intracellular HS, an essential component for the survival of insulin-producing islet beta cells. Treatment of pre-diabetic adult NOD mice with the Hpse inhibitor PI-88 significantly reduced the incidence of T1D by ~50% and preserved islet HS. Hpse therefore acts as a novel immune effector mechanism in T1D. Our studies have identified T1D as a Hpse-dependent disease and Hpse inhibitors as novel therapeutics for preventing T1D progression and possibly the development of T1D vascular complications. PMID:24421779

  4. Autoimmune AQP4 channelopathies and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Hinson, Shannon R; Lennon, Vanda A; Pittock, Sean J

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorders (SD) represent an evolving group of central nervous system (CNS)-inflammatory autoimmune demyelinating diseases unified by a pathogenic autoantibody specific for the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel. It was historically misdiagnosed as multiple sclerosis (MS), which lacks a distinguishing biomarker. The discovery of AQP4-IgG moved the focus of CNS demyelinating disease research from emphasis on the oligodendrocyte and myelin to the astrocyte. NMO is recognized today as a relapsing disease, extending beyond the optic nerves and spinal cord to include brain (especially in children) and skeletal muscle. Brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities, identifiable in 60% of patients at the second attack, are consistent with MS in 10% of cases. NMOSD-typical lesions (another 10%) occur in AQP4-enriched regions: circumventricular organs (causing intractable nausea and vomiting) and the diencephalon (causing sleep disorders, endocrinopathies, and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis). Advances in understanding the immunobiology of AQP4 autoimmunity have necessitated continuing revision of NMOSD clinical diagnostic criteria. Assays that selectively detect pathogenic AQP4-IgG targeting extracellular epitopes of AQP4 are promising prognostically. When referring to AQP4 autoimmunity, we suggest substituting the term "autoimmune aquaporin-4 channelopathy" for the term "NMO spectrum disorders." Randomized clinical trials are currently assessing the efficacy and safety of newer immunotherapies. Increasing therapeutic options based on understanding the molecular pathogenesis is anticipated to improve the outcome for patients with AQP4 channelopathy. PMID:27112688

  5. [Foot lesions].

    PubMed

    Stelzner, C; Schellong, S; Wollina, U; Machetanz, J; Unger, L

    2013-11-01

    The foot is the target organ of a variety of internal diseases. Of upmost importance is the diabetic foot syndrome (DFS). Its complex pathophysiology is driven by the diabetic neuropathy, a vastly worsening effect is contributed by infection and ischemia. Seemingly localised lesions have the potential for phlegmone and septicaemia if not diagnosed and drained early. The acral lesions of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) have unique features as well. However, their life-threatening potential is lower than that of DFS even if the limb is critical. Notably, isolated foot lesions with a mere venous cause may arise from insufficient perforator veins; the accompanying areas of haemosiderosis will lead the diagnostic path. Cholesterol embolization (blue toe syndrome, trash foot) elicits a unique clinical picture and will become more frequent with increasing numbers of catheter-based procedures. Finally, descriptions are given of podagra and of foot mycosis as disease entities not linked to perfusion. The present review focuses on the depiction of disease and its diagnosis, leaving therapeutic considerations untouched. PMID:24114468

  6. Chronic autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Litta Modignani, R; Barantani, E; Mazzolari, M; Pincetti Nervi, M; Macchi, R

    1991-01-01

    A total of 67 patients with chronic autoimmune thyroid disease were followed, mainly as outpatients, for a period of a few months to over 15 years. The diagnosis was euthyroidism (n = 16, 23.8%), subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 20, 29.8%), primary hypothyroidism (n = 28, 41.7%) or hashitoxicosis (n = 3, 4.47%). Patients with goiters fit Hashimoto's original description of "struma lymphomatosa". The diagnosis was made on clinical grounds and the usual laboratory hormonal tests. Histological examination was carried out at surgery or by fine needle aspiration in 35 patients (52.2%), and a clinical diagnosis was made in 32 (47.7%). Three patients had juvenile Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Most patients were in the fourth, fifth or sixth decade (64.8%), and of these 12 (18%) had subclinical hypothyroidism, which should be suspected when thyrotropin (TSH) is twice the upper normal limit. In these cases thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) testing and evaluation of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) and anti-microsomal antigen antibodies (MsAb) are mandatory. Hypothyroidism with few symptoms develops insidiously in young or elderly patients; the most sensitive test is TSH assay in conjunction with tests for TgAb and MsAb. L-thyroxine administration may be harmful in older patients with late diagnosed primary hypothyroidism. Thyroid supplementation is suggested for patients with subclinical hypothyroidism if TSH values are above 10 mU/L; otherwise they should be followed up annually, as should patients with positive thyroid autoantibodies who are still euthyroid. PMID:1804288

  7. Estrogens and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Capellino, Silvia; Sulli, Alberto; Serioli, Bruno; Secchi, Maria Elena; Villaggio, Barbara; Straub, Rainer H

    2006-11-01

    Sex hormones are implicated in the immune response, with estrogens as enhancers at least of the humoral immunity and androgens and progesterone (and glucocorticoids) as natural immune-suppressors . Several physiological, pathological, and therapeutic conditions may change the serum estrogen milieu and/or peripheral conversion rate, including the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, postpartum period, menopause, being elderly, chronic stress, altered circadian rhythms, inflammatory cytokines, and use of corticosteroids, oral contraceptives, and steroid hormonal replacements, inducing altered androgen/estrogen ratios and related effects. In particular, cortisol and melatonin circadian rhythms are altered, at least in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and partially involve sex hormone circadian synthesis and levels as well. Abnormal regulation of aromatase activity (i.e., increased activity) by inflammatory cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6) may partially explain the abnormalities of peripheral estrogen synthesis in RA (i.e., increased availability of 17-beta estradiol and possible metabolites in synovial fluids) and in systemic lupus erythematosus, as well as the altered serum sex-hormone levels and ratio (i.e., decreased androgens and DHEAS). In the synovial fluids of RA patients, the increased estrogen concentration is observed in both sexes and is more specifically characterized by the hydroxylated forms, in particular 16alpha-hydroxyestrone, which is a mitogenic and cell proliferative endogenous hormone. Local effects of sex hormones in autoimmune rheumatic diseases seems to consist mainly in modulation of cell proliferation and cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, Il-1, IL-12). In this respect, it is interesting that male patients with RA seem to profit more from anti-TNFalpha strategies than do female patients. PMID:17261796

  8. Cutaneous manifestations as presenting sign of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in childhood.

    PubMed

    Auricchio, Luigi; Vitiello, Laura; Adriani, Marsilio; Ferri, Pasqualina; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Pettinato, Guido; Racioppi, Luigi; Maiuri, Luigi; Dianzani, Umberto; Pignata, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome is a disorder due to a defect of lymphocyte apoptosis, whose clinical manifestations consist of hyperplasia of lymphoid tissues and autoimmune diseases. We report on a 26-month-old child who presented with frequent eruptions of weals and angioedema without any apparent triggering factor, who subsequently developed an erythematopapular rash with a histological pattern of a lymphoplasmacellular infiltrate. Familial anamnesis revealed a history of lymphoadenomegaly and massive spleen and liver enlargement in her sister. Functional and molecular analysis led to a diagnosis of type 1a autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. Immunophenotyping of the cutaneous lesion revealed the presence of an inflammatory infiltrate with a considerably high number of Langerhans cells. Cutaneous features such as urticaria, angioedema and vasculitis in children with a personal and familial history of hyperplasia of lymphoid tissues may be a presenting sign of a systemic disease, such as autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. PMID:15942224

  9. [Retinoid therapy for autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, Hiroshi; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Shudo, Koichi

    2006-06-01

    Retinoid is a collective term for compounds which bind to and activate retinoic acid receptors (RARalpha, beta, gamma and RXRalpha, beta, gamma), members of nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. The most important endogeneous retinoid is all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) which is an RARalpha, beta and gamma ligand. ATRA and its mimics have been in clinical use for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and some skin diseases. Many synthetic retinoids have been developed and attempts to improve their medicinal properties have been made. Among them, tamibarotene (Am80) is an RARalpha- and RARbeta-specific (but RARgamma- and RXRs-nonbinding) synthetic retinoid that is effective in the treatment of psoriasis patients and relapsed APL. Experimentally, this compound is also active in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. On this background, possible application of retinoids for the treatment of autoimmune diseases was discussed. In particular, Th1 dominant autoimmune diseases may be the targets of the retinoids. PMID:16819260

  10. [Bullous autoimmune disorders in children].

    PubMed

    Sárdy, M; Kasperkiewicz, M

    2013-06-01

    We review the pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and therapy of autoimmune bullous skin diseases of childhood, especially of the most common linear IgA dermatosis. In autoimmune bullous diseases, autoantibodies are formed against different adhesion molecules of the skin. These are not only pathophysiologically relevant, but also serve as basis for diagnosis and follow-up of these diseases. In case an autoimmune bullous disease is suspected, histopathology and immunohistopathology (direct immunofluorescence microscopy) as well as serological tests (indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, ELISA, immunoblot) should be performed. Therapy depends on the diagnosis. In IgA-mediated pathogenesis, dapsone can be successfully used. In IgG-mediated diseases, immunosuppression with corticosteroids and steroid-sparing agents should be initiated, although only local therapy is sufficient to control a self-limiting pemphigus neonatorum. In dermatitis herpetiformis, a life-long gluten-free diet is recommended. PMID:23677541

  11. Free radical theory of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Subburaj

    2006-01-01

    Background Despite great advances in clinical oncology, the molecular mechanisms underlying the failure of chemotherapeutic intervention in treating lymphoproliferative and related disorders are not well understood. Hypothesis A hypothetical scheme to explain the damage induced by chemotherapy and associated chronic oxidative stress is proposed on the basis of published literature, experimental data and anecdotal observations. Brief accounts of multidrug resistance, lymphoid malignancy, the cellular and molecular basis of autoimmunity and chronic oxidative stress are assembled to form a basis for the hypothesis and to indicate the likelihood that it is valid in vivo. Conclusion The argument set forward in this article suggests a possible mechanism for the development of autoimmunity. According to this view, the various sorts of damage induced by chemotherapy have a role in the pattern of drug resistance, which is associated with the initiation of autoimmunity. PMID:16759382

  12. [Infectious agents and autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Riebeling-Navarro, C; Madrid-Marina, V; Camarena-Medellín, B E; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Barrera, R

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the molecular aspects of the relationships between infectious agents and autoimmune diseases, the mechanisms of immune response to infectious agents, and the more recent hypotheses regarding the cause of autoimmune diseases are discussed. The antigens are processed and selected by their immunogenicity, and presented by HLA molecules to the T cell receptor. These events initiate the immune response with the activation and proliferation of T-lymphocytes. Although there are several hypotheses regarding the cause of autoimmune diseases and too many findings against and in favor of them, there is still no conclusive data. All these hypothesis and findings are discussed in the context of the more recent advances. PMID:1615352

  13. Thyroid dysfunction: an autoimmune aspect.

    PubMed

    Khan, Farah Aziz; Al-Jameil, Noura; Khan, Mohammad Fareed; Al-Rashid, May; Tabassum, Hajera

    2015-01-01

    Auto immune thyroid disease (AITD) is the common organ specific autoimmune disorder, Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) and Grave's disease (GD) are its well-known sequelae. It occurs due to loss of tolerance to autoantigens thyroid peroxidase (TPO), thyroglobulin (Tg), thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSH-R) which leads to the infiltration of the gland. T cells in chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (cAIT) induce apoptosis in thyroid follicular cells and cause destruction of the gland. Presences of TPO antibodies are common in HT and GD, while Tg has been reported as an independent predictor of thyroid malignancy. Cytokines are small proteins play an important role in autoimmunity, by stimulating B and T cells. Various cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-14, TNF-α and IFN-γ are found in thyroid follicular cells which enhance inflammatory response with nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins. PMID:26221205

  14. Skin involvement and outcome measures in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, J; Atzeni, F; Baldini, C; Bombardieri, S; Dalakas, M C; Demirkesen, C; Yazici, H; Mat, C; Werth, V P; Sarzi-Puttini, P

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on skin manifestations that can be observed in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Sjögren syndrome (SS), dermatomyositis (DM) and Behçet syndrome (BS). In RA the most widely recognized skin lesion is the rheumatoid nodule. Other cutaneous manifestations can be observed either non-specific or related to the disease itself and/or to the commonly used drugs. Cutaneous manifestations are considered one of the most typical extraglandular features of primary SS, generally they are distinguished in vasculitic and non vasculitic lesions. Among non-vasculitc lesions, skin dryness (xerosis) has been shown to be very common in pSS while vasculitis lesions include typically flat and palpable purpura and urticarial vasculits. In DM the skin manifestations are also frequent and include a heliotrope rash (blue-purple discoloration) on the upper eyelids with edema, a flat red rash on the face and upper trunk, and erythema of the knuckles with a raised violaceous scaly eruption (Gottron rash). The most frequent mucocutaneous finding in BS is aphthous stomatitis which can not usually be differentiated from idiopatic reccurrent aphthous stomatitis on clinical grounds. The most typical skin manifestations are nodular lesions, which are commonly seen in BS and may be due to panniculitis [erythema nodosum (EN)-like lesions] or superficial thrombophlebitis. PMID:16466625

  15. Viruses, cytokines, antigens, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Gianani, R; Sarvetnick, N

    1996-01-01

    To explain the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, we hypothesize that following an infection the immune response spreads to tissue-specific autoantigens in genetically predisposed individuals eventually determining progression to disease. Molecular mimicry between viral and self antigens could, in some instances, initiate autoimmunity. Local elicitation of inflammatory cytokines following infection probably plays a pivotal role in determining loss of functional tolerance to self autoantigens and the destructive activation of autoreactive cells. We also describe the potential role of interleukin 10, a powerful B-cell activator, in increasing the efficiency of epitope recognition, that could well be crucial to the progression toward disease. PMID:8637859

  16. Shaking Out Clues to Autoimmune Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Autoimmunity-Causing T Cells Landmark Analysis Probes Nature vs. Nurture in Multiple Sclerosis Understanding Autoimmune Diseases Immune Cells Reference: Nature. 2013 Mar 6. doi: 10.1038/nature11981. [Epub ...

  17. Cell therapy for autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dazzi, Francesco; van Laar, Jacob M; Cope, Andrew; Tyndall, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Cell therapy, pioneered for the treatment of malignancies in the form of bone marrow transplantation, has subsequently been tested and successfully employed in autoimmune diseases. Autologous haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become a curative option for conditions with very poor prognosis such as severe forms of scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, and lupus, in which targeted therapies have little or no effect. The refinement of the conditioning regimens has virtually eliminated transplant-related mortality, thus making HSCT a relatively safe choice. Although HSCT remains a nonspecific approach, the knowledge gained in this field has led to the identification of new avenues. In fact, it has become evident that the therapeutic efficacy of HSCT cannot merely be the consequence of a high-dose immuno-suppression, but rather the result of a resetting of the abnormal immune regulation underlying autoimmune conditions. The identification of professional and nonprofessional immunosuppressive cells and their biological properties is generating a huge interest for their clinical exploitation. Regulatory T cells, found abnormal in several autoimmune diseases, have been proposed as central to achieve long-term remissions. Mesenchymal stem cells of bone marrow origin have more recently been shown not only to be able to differentiate into multiple tissues, but also to exert a potent antiproliferative effect that results in the inhibition of immune responses and prolonged survival of haemopoietic stem cells. All of these potential resources clearly need to be investigated at the preclinical level but support a great deal of enthusiasm for cell therapy of autoimmune diseases. PMID:17367542

  18. Diet, microbiota and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vieira, S M; Pagovich, O E; Kriegel, M A

    2014-05-01

    There is growing evidence that the commensal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (the gut microbiota) influence the development of autoimmunity in rodent models. Since humans have co-evolved with commensals for millennia, it is likely that people, who are genetically predisposed to autoimmunity, harbor gut microbial communities that similarly influence the onset and/or severity of disease. Beyond the current efforts to identify such disease-promoting or -preventing commensals ("pathobionts" or "symbionts"), it will be important to determine what factors modulate them. Dietary changes are known to affect both the composition and function of the gut microbial communities, which in turn can alter the innate and adaptive immune system. In this review, we focus on the relationships between diet, microbiota, and autoimmune diseases. We hypothesize that the beneficial and life-prolonging effects of caloric restriction on a variety of autoimmune models including lupus might partly be mediated by its effects on the gut microbiome and associated virome, the collection of all viruses in the gut. We give recent examples of the immunomodulatory potential of select gut commensals and their products or diet-derived metabolites in murine models of arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes. Lastly, we summarize the published phenotypes of germ-free mouse models of lupus and speculate on any role of the diet-sensitive microbiome and virome in systemic lupus and the related antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:24763536

  19. Cholestatic phenotypes of autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J

    2014-09-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis can have cholestatic features that are outside the codified diagnostic criteria. These features have uncertain effects on the clinical presentation and progression of disease. Patients with autoimmune hepatitis can have antimitochondrial antibodies and coincidental bile duct injury or loss (2%-13% of patients), focal biliary strictures and dilations based on cholangiography (2%-11%), or histologic changes of bile duct injury or loss in the absence of other features (5%-11%). These findings probably represent atypical manifestations of autoimmune hepatitis or variants of primary biliary cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis, depending on the predominant findings. Serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and γ-glutamyl transferase, histologic features of bile duct injury, and findings from cholangiography are associated with responsiveness to corticosteroid therapy and individualized alternative treatments. Corticosteroid therapy, in combination with low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid, has been promulgated by international societies, but these recommendations are not based on strong evidence. The frequency, variable outcomes, and uncertainties in diagnosis and management of the cholestatic phenotypes must be addressed by a collaborative investigational network. This network should define the genetic and pathologic features of these disorders, standardize their nomenclature, and establish a treatment algorithm. In this review, the different cholestatic phenotypes of autoimmune hepatitis, mechanisms of pathogenesis, current management strategies and outcomes, and opportunities for improving understanding and therapy are presented. PMID:24013108

  20. Rebooting autoimmunity with autologous HSCT.

    PubMed

    Snowden, John A

    2016-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is increasingly used for severe autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, but the mechanisms involved have yet to be elucidated. In this issue of Blood, Delemarre et al report their findings in both animal and human models which provide insights into restoration of functionality and diversity within the regulatory T-cell (Treg) compartment following HSCT. PMID:26744435

  1. Rethinking Mechanisms of Autoimmune Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Shiv

    2016-01-01

    Why exactly some individuals develop autoimmune disorders remains unclear. The broadly accepted paradigm is that genetic susceptibility results in some break in immunological tolerance, may enhance the availability of autoantigens, and may enhance inflammatory responses. Some environmental insults that occur on this background of susceptibility may then contribute to autoimmunity. In this review we discuss some aspects related to inhibitory signaling and rare genetic variants, as well as additional factors that might contribute to autoimmunity including the possible role of clonal somatic mutations, the role of epigenetic events and the contribution of the intestinal microbiome. Genetic susceptibility alleles generally contribute to the loss of immunological tolerance, the increased availability of asutoantigens, or an increase in inflammation. Apart from common genetic variants, rare loss-of-function genetic variants may also contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. Studies of an inhibitory signaling pathway in B cells helped identify a negative regulatory enzyme called sialic acid acetyl esterase. The study of rare genetic variants of this enzyme provides an illustrative example showing the importance of detailed functional analyses of variant alleles and the need to exclude functionally normal common or rare genetic variants from analysis. It has also become clear that pathways that are functionally impacted by either common or rare defective variants can also be more significantly compromised by gene expression changes that may result from epigenetic alterations. Another important and evolving area that has been discussed relates to the role of the intestinal microbiome in influencing helper T cell polarization and the development of autoimmunity. PMID:23809879

  2. Thyroid autoimmunity in pregnant Nigerians

    PubMed Central

    Kayode, Oluwatosin O.; Odeniyi, Ifedayo A.; Iwuala, Sandra; Olopade, Oluwarotimi B.; Fasanmade, Olufemi A.; Ohwovoriole, Augustine E.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Thyroid autoimmunity is a recognized disorder in pregnancy and is associated with a number of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Aim: This study set out to determine the relationship between pregnancy and thyroid autoimmunity in Nigerian women. Settings and Design: This was an analytical cross-sectional study carried out in a tertiary hospital in South Western Nigeria with a total study population of 108 pregnant and 52 nonpregnant women. Subjects and Methods: Serum thyroid stimulating hormone, free thyroxine and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO-Ab) were quantitatively determined using enzyme linked immuno-assays. Pregnant women were grouped into three categories (<14 weeks, 14–28 weeks and > 28 weeks). The relationship between pregnancy and thyroid autoimmunity was determined using Spearman correlation. Analysis of variance was used in comparison of means, Chi-square test used in analyzing proportions while P ≤ 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The mean age of the pregnant women was 30.4 ± 6.0 years while the mean gestational age of all pregnant women was 20.6 ± 9.6 weeks. The mean TPO-Ab of 11.58 IU/ml in the pregnant was significantly higher than that of the controls of 7.23 IU/ml (P < 0.001). Out of 108 pregnant women, 27 (25%) had elevated TPO-Ab as against about 2% of the nonpregnant women levels P < 0.001. The number of pregnant women with elevated TPO-Ab levels decreased from 33.3% in the first group to 25.6% and 15.2% in the second and third groups. Conclusion: Thyroid autoimmunity expressed by the presence of TPO-Ab is high among pregnant Nigerian women and the frequency of autoimmunity appears to decline with advancing gestational age. PMID:26425470

  3. Cerebriform Cutaneous Lesions in Pemphigus Vegetans.

    PubMed

    Rebello, Meryl Sonia; Ramesh, Bhat M; Sukumar, D; Alapatt, Geethu F

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus vegetans is an autoimmune bullous disorder characterized by vegetating lesions commonly over the flexures. A 42-year-old female patient came with pemphigus vegetans presenting with interesting cerebriform morphology of the cutaneous lesions over the flexures. Cerebriform tongue, a morphology with typical pattern of sulci and gyri over dorsum of the tongue is a well-known sign seen in pemphigus vegetans. Interestingly, we noticed the typical sulci and gyri pattern in the skin lesions of pemphigus vegetans over the flexures of the body. This clinical sign can be used as a clue in the diagnosis of pemphigus vegetans. Morphology and physical characteristics are important for the diagnosis of the disease. Clinical signs always give a clue to the probable or possible diagnosis in most of the dermatological conditions. PMID:27057025

  4. Thyroid autoimmunity and polyglandular endocrine syndromes.

    PubMed

    Wémeau, Jean-Louis; Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Ryndak, Amélie; Vanhove, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Even though autoimmune thyroiditis is considered as the most emblematic type of organ-specific autoimmune disorder of autoimmunity, autoimmune thyroid diseases can be associated with other autoimmune endocrine failures or non-endocrine diseases (namely vitiligo, pernicious anemia, myasthenia gravis, autoimmune gastritis, celiac disease, hepatitis). Thyroid disorders, which are the most frequent expression of adult polyendocrine syndrome type 2, occur concomitantly with or secondarily to insulinodependent diabetes, premature ovarian failure, Addison's disease (Schmidt syndrome, or Carpenter syndrome if associated with diabetes). Testicular failure and hypoparathyroidism are unusual. The disease is polygenic and multifactorial. Disorders of thyroid autoimmunity are, surprisingly, very rare in polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (or APECED) beginning during childhood. They are related to mutations of the AIRE gene that encodes for a transcriptional factor implicated in central and peripheral immune tolerance. Hypothyroidism can also be observed in the very rare IPEX and POEMS syndromes. PMID:23624130

  5. Anoctamin 2 identified as an autoimmune target in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Mitsios, Nicholas; Kockum, Ingrid; Khademi, Mohsen; Zandian, Arash; Sjöberg, Ronald; Forsström, Björn; Bredenberg, Johan; Lima Bomfim, Izaura; Holmgren, Erik; Grönlund, Hans; Guerreiro-Cacais, André Ortlieb; Abdelmagid, Nada; Uhlén, Mathias; Waterboer, Tim; Alfredsson, Lars; Mulder, Jan; Schwenk, Jochen M.; Olsson, Tomas; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system and also is regarded as an autoimmune condition. However, the antigenic targets of the autoimmune response in MS have not yet been deciphered. In an effort to mine the autoantibody repertoire within MS, we profiled 2,169 plasma samples from MS cases and population-based controls using bead arrays built with 384 human protein fragments selected from an initial screening with 11,520 antigens. Our data revealed prominently increased autoantibody reactivity against the chloride-channel protein anoctamin 2 (ANO2) in MS cases compared with controls. This finding was corroborated in independent assays with alternative protein constructs and by epitope mapping with peptides covering the identified region of ANO2. Additionally, we found a strong interaction between the presence of ANO2 autoantibodies and the HLA complex MS-associated DRB1*15 allele, reinforcing a potential role for ANO2 autoreactivity in MS etiopathogenesis. Furthermore, immunofluorescence analysis in human MS brain tissue showed ANO2 expression as small cellular aggregates near and inside MS lesions. Thus this study represents one of the largest efforts to characterize the autoantibody repertoire within MS. The findings presented here demonstrate that an ANO2 autoimmune subphenotype may exist in MS and lay the groundwork for further studies focusing on the pathogenic role of ANO2 autoantibodies in MS. PMID:26862169

  6. Anoctamin 2 identified as an autoimmune target in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Mitsios, Nicholas; Kockum, Ingrid; Khademi, Mohsen; Zandian, Arash; Sjöberg, Ronald; Forsström, Björn; Bredenberg, Johan; Lima Bomfim, Izaura; Holmgren, Erik; Grönlund, Hans; Guerreiro-Cacais, André Ortlieb; Abdelmagid, Nada; Uhlén, Mathias; Waterboer, Tim; Alfredsson, Lars; Mulder, Jan; Schwenk, Jochen M; Olsson, Tomas; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-02-23

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system and also is regarded as an autoimmune condition. However, the antigenic targets of the autoimmune response in MS have not yet been deciphered. In an effort to mine the autoantibody repertoire within MS, we profiled 2,169 plasma samples from MS cases and population-based controls using bead arrays built with 384 human protein fragments selected from an initial screening with 11,520 antigens. Our data revealed prominently increased autoantibody reactivity against the chloride-channel protein anoctamin 2 (ANO2) in MS cases compared with controls. This finding was corroborated in independent assays with alternative protein constructs and by epitope mapping with peptides covering the identified region of ANO2. Additionally, we found a strong interaction between the presence of ANO2 autoantibodies and the HLA complex MS-associated DRB1*15 allele, reinforcing a potential role for ANO2 autoreactivity in MS etiopathogenesis. Furthermore, immunofluorescence analysis in human MS brain tissue showed ANO2 expression as small cellular aggregates near and inside MS lesions. Thus this study represents one of the largest efforts to characterize the autoantibody repertoire within MS. The findings presented here demonstrate that an ANO2 autoimmune subphenotype may exist in MS and lay the groundwork for further studies focusing on the pathogenic role of ANO2 autoantibodies in MS. PMID:26862169

  7. MicroRNA in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pauley, Kaleb M.; Cha, Seunghee; Chan, Edward K.L.

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small conserved non-coding RNA molecules that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression by targeting the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of specific messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for degradation or translational repression. miRNA-mediated gene regulation is critical for normal cellular functions such as the cell cycle, differentiation, and apoptosis, and as much as one-third of human mRNAs may be miRNA targets. Emerging evidence has demonstrated that miRNAs play a vital role in the regulation of immunological functions and the prevention of autoimmunity. Here we review the many newly discovered roles of miRNA regulation in immune functions and in the development of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease. Specifically, we discuss the involvement of miRNA regulation in innate and adaptive immune responses, immune cell development, T regulatory cell stability and function, and differential miRNA expression in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:19303254

  8. Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune hypophysitis.

    PubMed

    Falorni, Alberto; Minarelli, Viviana; Bartoloni, Elena; Alunno, Alessia; Gerli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmmune hypophysitis (AH) is the consequence of an immune-mediated inflammation of the pituitary gland. The initial pituitary enlargement, secondary to infiltration and oedema, can evolve to remission, for spontaneous or pharmacological resolution of the inflammation, or evolve to progressive diffuse destruction with gland atrophy for fibrotic replacement, thus leading to various degrees of pituitary dysfunction. The autoimmune process against the pituitary gland is made evident by the appearance of circulating autoantibodies (APA), mainly detected by indirect immunofluorescence on cryostatic sections of human or primate pituitary. Among the target autoantigens recognized by APA are alpha-enolase, gamma-enolase, the pituitary gland specific factors (PGSF) 1 and 2 and corticotroph-specific transcription factor (TPIT). However, the low diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of APA for AH strongly limit the clinical use of this marker. AH should be considered in the differential diagnosis of non-secreting space-occupying lesions of sella turcica, to avoid misdiagnosis that may lead to an aggressive surgery approach, since endocrine dysfunction and the compressive effect may be transient. PMID:24434361

  9. Sweet syndrome on a patient with autoimmune hepatitis on azathioprine and CMV infection.

    PubMed

    Xenophontos, Eleni; Ioannou, Antreas; Constantinides, Thrasos; Papanicolaou, Eleni

    2016-02-01

    Sweet syndrome (SS) is a rare inflammatory process presenting with painful erythematous skin eruptions, accompanied by fever and neutrophilia. It is associated with upper respiratory infection in fertile women (classic form), malignancy, infections, drugs and autoimmune diseases. Its pathogenesis remains to be determined. Nevertheless, cytokines may have a prominent role, due to a rapid response after corticosteroid administration. We describe a 32-year-old female with autoimmune hepatitis on azathioprine and prednisone, presenting with fever and inflammatory skin eruptions. Histologic examination of the skin lesions showed neutrophilic infiltrations of the dermis, confirming the diagnosis of SS. Concurrently, she tested borderline positive for recent CMV infection. PMID:26913201

  10. Animal Models of Autoimmune Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Soliven, Betty

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS) comprises the cranial nerves, the spinal nerves with their roots and rami, dorsal root ganglia neurons, the peripheral nerves, and peripheral components of the autonomic nervous system. Cell-mediated or antibody-mediated immune attack on the PNS results in distinct clinical syndromes, which are classified based on the tempo of illness, PNS component(s) involved, and the culprit antigen(s) identified. Insights into the pathogenesis of autoimmune neuropathy have been provided by ex vivo immunologic studies, biopsy materials, electrophysiologic studies, and experimental models. This review article summarizes earlier seminal observations and highlights the recent progress in our understanding of immunopathogenesis of autoimmune neuropathies based on data from animal models. PMID:24615441

  11. Propylthiouracil-induced autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Paiaulla, Santosh; Venkategowda, Pradeep Marur; Rao, S. Manimala; Balaraju, Banda

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a condition characterized by excessive production of thyroid hormones. Propylthiouracil (PTU) is commonly used as first line drug in the management of hyperthyroidism. This is a case report of 24-year-old female, a known case of hyperthyroidism since 4 years, who came with a history of fever and myalgia since 3 days and dyspnea with coughing out of blood since 1 day. Patient was taking PTU (100 mg per day) since 4 years for hyperthyroidism. Patient was immediately intubated for type-II respiratory failure. Diagnosed to be having PTU-induced autoimmune disease. PTU was stopped and treated with methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Clinical features improved over a period of 8 days and discharged home successfully. Having a high suspicion for the onset of autoimmune disease in hyperthyroidism patients who are on PTU therapy and timely treatment with immunosuppressants and supportive care along with the withdrawal of the drug can make a difference in morbidity and mortality. PMID:26321810

  12. Progranulin antibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Thurner, Lorenz; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Klemm, Philipp; Zaks, Marina; Kemele, Maria; Hasenfus, Andrea; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Systemic vasculitides constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases. Autoimmunity mediated by B lymphocytes and their humoral effector mechanisms play a major role in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) as well as in non-ANCA associated primary systemic vasculitides and in the different types of autoimmune connective tissue disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect autoantibodies in systemic vasculitides, we screened protein macroarrays of human cDNA expression libraries with sera from patients with ANCA-associated and ANCA-negative primary systemic vasculitides. This approach led to the identification of antibodies against progranulin, a 88 kDA secreted glycoprotein with strong anti-inflammatory activity in the course of disease of giant-cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica (14/65), Takayasu's arteritis (4/13), classical panarteritis nodosa (4/10), Behcet's disease (2/6) and in the course of disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (31/75), Churg-Strauss syndrome (7/23) and in microscopic polyangiitis (7/19). In extended screenings the progranulin antibodies were also detected in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (39/91) and rheumatoid arthritis (16/44). Progranulin antibodies were detected only in 1 of 97 healthy controls. Anti-progranulin positive patients with systemic vasculitides, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis had significant lower progranulin plasma levels, indicating a neutralizing effect. In light of the anti-inflammatory effects of progranulin, progranulin antibodies might exert pro-inflammatory effects thus contributing to the pathogenesis of the respective autoimmune diseases and might serve as a marker for disease activity. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that a positive progranulin antibody status was associated with active disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:23149338

  13. [Autoimmune hepatitis induced by isotretionine].

    PubMed

    Guzman Rojas, Patricia; Gallegos Lopez, Roxana; Ciliotta Chehade, Alessandra; Scavino, Yolanda; Morales, Alejandro; Tagle, Martín

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a teenage patient with the diagnosis of drug induced autoimmune hepatitis. The patient is a 16 years old female, with the past medical history of Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism controlled with levothyroxine, who started treatment with Isotretionin (®Accutane) 20 mg q/12 hours for a total of 3 months for the treatment of severe acne. The physical examination was within normal limits and the results of the laboratory exams are: Baseline values of ALT 28 U/L, AST 28 U/L. Three months later: AST 756 U/L, ALT 1199U/L, alkaline phosphatase 114 U/L, with normal bilirrubin levels throughout the process. The serology studies were negative for all viral hepatitis; ANA titers were positive (1/160) and igG levels were also elevated. A liver biopsy was performed, and was compatible with the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis. Corticosteroid therapy was started with Prednisone 40 mg per day one week after stopping the treatment with isotretionin, observing an improvement in the laboratory values. We describe this case and review the world literature since there are no reported cases of Isotretinoin-induced autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:27131947

  14. LRP1 expression in microglia is protective during CNS autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Tzu-Ying; Guo, Yong; Seki, Scott M; Rosen, Abagail M; Johanson, David M; Mandell, James W; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Gaultier, Alban

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a devastating neurological disorder characterized by the autoimmune destruction of the central nervous system myelin. While T cells are known orchestrators of the immune response leading to MS pathology, the precise contribution of CNS resident and peripheral infiltrating myeloid cells is less well described. Here, we explore the myeloid cell function of Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1), a scavenger receptor involved in myelin clearance and the inflammatory response, in the context of Multiple sclerosis. Supporting its central role in Multiple sclerosis pathology, we find that LRP1 expression is increased in Multiple sclerosis lesions in comparison to the surrounding healthy tissue. Using two genetic mouse models, we show that deletion of LRP1 in microglia, but not in peripheral macrophages, negatively impacts the progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of Multiple sclerosis. We further show that the increased disease severity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is not due to haplodeficiency of the Cx3cr1 locus. At the cellular level, microglia lacking LRP1 adopt a pro-inflammatory phenotype characterized by amoeboid morphology and increased production of the inflammatory mediator TNF-α. We also show that LRP1 functions as a robust inhibitor of NF-kB activation in myeloid cells via a MyD88 dependent pathway, potentially explaining the increase in disease severity observed in mice lacking LRP1 expression in microglia. Taken together, our data suggest that the function of LRP1 in microglia is to keep these cells in an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective status during inflammatory insult, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and potentially in Multiple sclerosis. PMID:27400748

  15. Tuftsin-driven experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis recovery requires neuropilin-1.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Jillian C; Tsirka, Stella E

    2016-06-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model of demyelinating autoimmune disease, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), which is characterized by central nervous system white matter lesions, microglial activation, and peripheral T-cell infiltration secondary to blood-brain barrier disruption. We have previously shown that treatment with tuftsin, a tetrapeptide generated from IgG proteolysis, dramatically improves disease symptoms in EAE. Here, we report that microglial expression of Neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) is required for tuftsin-driven amelioration of EAE symptoms. Nrp1 ablation in microglia blocks microglial signaling and polarization to the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype, and ablation in either the microglia or immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs) reduces extended functional contacts between them and Treg activation, implicating a role for microglia in the activation process, and more generally, how immune surveillance is conducted in the CNS. Taken together, our findings delineate the mechanistic action of tuftsin as a candidate therapeutic against immune-mediated demyelinating lesions. GLIA 2016;64:923-936. PMID:26880314

  16. Autoimmunity in primary T-cell immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Gholamreza; Ghanavatinejad, Alireza; Abolhassani, Hassan; Yazdani, Reza; Rezaei, Nima; Mirshafiey, Abbas; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2016-09-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID) are a genetically heterogeneous group of more than 270 disorders that affect distinct components of both humoral and cellular arms of the immune system. Primary T cell immunodeficiencies affect subjects at the early age of life. In most cases, T-cell PIDs become apparent as combined T- and B-cell deficiencies. Patients with T-cell PID are prone to life-threatening infections. On the other hand, non-infectious complications such as lymphoproliferative diseases, cancers and autoimmunity seem to be associated with the primary T-cell immunodeficiencies. Autoimmune disorders of all kinds (organ specific or systemic ones) could be subjected to this class of PIDs; however, the most frequent autoimmune disorders are immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). In this review, we discuss the proposed mechanisms of autoimmunity and review the literature reported on autoimmune disorder in each type of primary T-cell immunodeficiencies. PMID:27063703

  17. Hematolymphoid lesions of the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Crane, Genevieve M; Duffield, Amy S

    2016-03-01

    Various hematolymphoid lesions involve the sinonasal tract, including aggressive B, T, and NK-cell neoplasms; myeloid sarcoma; low-grade lymphomas; indolent T-lymphoblastic proliferations; and Rosai-Dorfman disease. Differentiating aggressive lymphomas from non-hematopoietic neoplasms such as poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, olfactory neuroblastoma, or sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma may pose diagnostic challenges. In addition, the necrosis, vascular damage, and inflammatory infiltrates that are associated with some hematolymphoid disorders can result in misdiagnosis as infectious, autoimmune, or inflammatory conditions. Here, we review hematolymphoid disorders involving the sinonasal tract including their key clinical and histopathologic features. PMID:26472692

  18. Cardiovascular disease in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Hollan, Ivana; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Ahearn, Joseph M; Cohen Tervaert, J W; Curran, Sam; Goodyear, Carl S; Hestad, Knut A; Kahaleh, Bashar; Riggio, Marcello; Shields, Kelly; Wasko, Mary C

    2013-08-01

    Various autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARDs), including rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus, are associated with premature atherosclerosis. However, premature atherosclerosis has not been uniformly observed in systemic sclerosis. Furthermore, although experimental models of atherosclerosis support the role of antiphospholipid antibodies in atherosclerosis, there is no clear evidence of premature atherosclerosis in antiphospholipid syndrome (APA). Ischemic events in APA are more likely to be caused by pro-thrombotic state than by enhanced atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) in ARDs is caused by traditional and non-traditional risk factors. Besides other factors, inflammation and immunologic abnormalities, the quantity and quality of lipoproteins, hypertension, insulin resistance/hyperglycemia, obesity and underweight, presence of platelets bearing complement protein C4d, reduced number and function of endothelial progenitor cells, apoptosis of endothelial cells, epigenetic mechanisms, renal disease, periodontal disease, depression, hyperuricemia, hypothyroidism, sleep apnea and vitamin D deficiency may contribute to the premature CVD. Although most research has focused on systemic inflammation, vascular inflammation may play a crucial role in the premature CVD in ARDs. It may be involved in the development and destabilization of both atherosclerotic lesions and of aortic aneurysms (a known complication of ARDs). Inflammation in subintimal vascular and perivascular layers appears to frequently occur in CVD, with a higher frequency in ARD than in non-ARD patients. It is possible that this inflammation is caused by infections and/or autoimmunity, which might have consequences for treatment. Importantly, drugs targeting immunologic factors participating in the subintimal inflammation (e.g., T- and B-cells) might have a protective effect on CVD. Interestingly, vasa vasorum and cardiovascular adipose tissue may

  19. Development of a disease registry for autoimmune bullous diseases: initial analysis of the pemphigus vulgaris subset.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amit Aakash; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Sirois, David; Werth, Victoria P; Rengarajan, Badri; Zrnchik, William; Attwood, Kristopher; Sinha, Animesh A

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare, potentially life threatening, autoimmune blistering skin disease. The International Pemphigus and Pemphigoid Foundation (IPPF) has recently developed a disease registry with the aim to enhance our understanding of autoimmune bullous diseases with the long-term goal of acquiring information to improve patient care. Patients were recruited to the IPPF disease registry through direct mail, e-mail, advertisements, and articles in the IPPF-quarterly, -website, -Facebook webpage, and IPPF Peer Health Coaches to complete a 38-question survey. We present here the initial analysis of detailed clinical information collected on 393 PV patients. We report previously unrecognized gender differences in terms of lesion location, autoimmune comorbidity, and delay in diagnosis. The IPPF disease registry serves as a useful resource and guide for future clinical investigation. PMID:24691863

  20. Beneficial effect of testosterone in the treatment of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.A.; Young, P.R.; Penhale, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Early thymectomy and sublethal irradiation of normal rats consistently induces a sex-dependent chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Females are much more susceptible to this autoimmune disorder than are males. The possible therapeutic effects of testosterone (Te) on established autoimmune thyroiditis has been investigated in this model. The pathologic condition of the gland before treatment was monitored by a thyroid grafting and extirpation techniques. Te administration by either parenteral injection or implantation caused significant regression of established thyroiditis. Repeated doses of Te ester in oil were found to be more effective than powdered free-Te given by implantation, and frequently produced complete resolution of chronic lesions involving the entire gland. In these thyroids, there was reappearance of normal thyroid architecture and complete absence of mononuclear cellular infiltration. However, no inhibitory effect on serum autoantibody production to thyroglobulin was noted with any form of Te treatment. These observations strengthen the concept that cellular rather than humoral mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of thyroiditis.

  1. Autoimmune thrombocytopenia (AITP) and thyroid autoimmune disease (TAD): overlapping syndromes?

    PubMed Central

    Cordiano, I; Betterle, C; Spadaccino, C A; Soini, B; Girolami, A; Fabris, F

    1998-01-01

    The pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia associated with TAD and the occurrence of overlapping traits between TAD and AITP are still a matter of debate. For this reason, we investigated for the presence and specificity of platelet and thyroid autoantibodies in 18 TAD patients with thrombocytopenia, 19 TAD patients without thrombocytopenia and in 22 patients with primary AITP without clinical signs of TAD. Platelet-associated IgG and/or specific circulating platelet autoantibodies were detected in 83% of patients with TAD and thrombocytopenia, in 10% of patients with TAD without thrombocytopenia and in 86% of patients with primary AITP. The reactivity of serum autoantibodies, assayed by MoAb immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA), was directed against platelet glycoproteins Ib and/or IIb/IIIa in 50% of the patients with TAD and thrombocytopenia, as in 46% of the patients with primary AITP. Thyroid autoantibodies were found in 89% of patients with TAD and thrombocytopenia, in 95% of patients with TAD without thrombocytopenia, and in 18% of patients with primary AITP. Thyrotropin (TSH) levels determined in three of four AITP patients with thyroid autoantibodies revealed a subclinical hyperthyroidism in one patient. The present study supports the autoimmune aetiology of thrombocytopenia associated with TAD, since the prevalence and specificity of platelet autoantibodies are similar in TAD and primary AITP. The results indicate also that there exists an overlap between thyroid and platelet autoimmunity with or without clinical manifestations. PMID:9737665

  2. Anatabine ameliorates experimental autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Caturegli, Patrizio; De Remigis, Alessandra; Ferlito, Marcella; Landek-Salgado, Melissa A; Iwama, Shintaro; Tzou, Shey-Cherng; Ladenson, Paul W

    2012-09-01

    Tobacco smoking favorably influences the course of Hashimoto thyroiditis, possibly through the antiinflammatory proprieties of nicotine. In this study we tested anatabine, another tobacco alkaloid, in a model of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis. Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis was induced by different doses of thyroglobulin, to produce a disease of low, moderate, or high severity, in 88 CBA/J female mice: 43 drank anatabine supplemented water and 45 regular water. Mice were bled after immunization and killed to assess thyroid histopathology, thyroglobulin antibodies, T(4), and thyroid RNA expression of 84 inflammatory genes. We also stimulated in vitro a macrophage cell line with interferon-γ or lipopolysaccharide plus or minus anatabine to quantitate inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2 protein expression. Anatabine reduced the incidence and severity of thyroiditis in the moderate disease category: only 13 of 21 mice (62%) developed thyroid infiltrates when drinking anatabine as compared with 22 of 23 (96%) controls (relative risk 0.59, P = 0.0174). The median thyroiditis severity was 0.5 and 2.0 in anatabine and controls, respectively (P = 0.0007 by Wilcoxon rank sum test). Anatabine also reduced the antibody response to thyroglobulin on d 14 (P = 0.029) and d 21 (P = 0.045) after immunization and improved the recovery of thyroid function on d 21 (P = 0.049). In the thyroid transcriptome, anatabine restored expression of IL-18 and IL-1 receptor type 2 to preimmunization levels. Finally, anatabine suppressed in a dose-dependent manner macrophage production of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2. Anatabine ameliorates disease in a model of autoimmune thyroiditis, making the delineation of its mechanisms of action and potential clinical utility worthwhile. PMID:22807490

  3. Thymoma with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kensuke; Inomata, Minehiko; Shiraishi, Shiori; Hayashi, Ryuji; Tobe, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old Japanese male was referred to our hospital with abnormal chest X-ray results and severe Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. He was diagnosed with a stage IV, WHO type A thymoma and was treated with oral prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day) and subsequent chemotherapy. After chemotherapy, the patient underwent surgical resection of the thymoma. Hemolysis rapidly disappeared and did not return after the discontinuation of oral corticosteroids. Corticosteroid therapy may be preferable to chemotherapy or thymoma surgical resection in the management of autoimmune hemolytic anemia with thymoma. PMID:25722666

  4. The Immunogenetics of Autoimmune Cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Palak J; Hirschfield, Gideon M

    2016-02-01

    The immune-mediated hepatobiliary diseases, primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis are relatively rare, albeit and account for a significant amount of liver transplant activity and liver-related mortality globally. Precise disease mechanisms are yet to be described although a contributory role of genetic predisposition is firmly established. In addition to links with the major histocompatibility complex, a number of associations outside this region harbor additional loci which underscore the fundamental role of breaks in immune tolerance and mucosal immunogenicity in the pathogenesis of autoimmune biliary disease. We provide an overview of these key discoveries before discussing putative avenues of therapeutic exploitation based on existing findings. PMID:26593288

  5. Immunomodulatory vaccines against autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Sela, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Vaccines are for healthy people, to prevent them from becoming ill. Such prophylactic vaccines have been a great success. Therapeutic vaccines become more and more important, especially as life expectancy increases. Efforts to develop vaccines against such diseases as cancer, AIDS, hepatitis, tuberculosis, Alzheimer disease, and mad cow disease have not yet reached the stage where they can be successfully used on a daily basis. However, significant progress has been made in the realm of autoimmune diseases, resulting (at least in one case) in an immunomodulatory vaccine against multiple sclerosis that was developed in the author's laboratory, and that is in daily use by about 100,000 patients. The drug or therapeutic vaccine against the exacerbating-remitting type of multiple sclerosis is a copolymer of four amino acid residues, denoted Copaxone, which are related to myelin basic protein. This paper discusses Copaxone as well as a candidate immunomodulatory vaccine against myasthenia gravis, a peptide derived from the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Copolymer 1 (Cop 1, glatiramer acetate, Copaxone) is a synthetic amino acid random copolymer that is immunologically cross-reactive with myelin basic protein and suppresses experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in several animal species. Cop 1 slows the progression of disability and reduces the relapse rate in exacerbating-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. Cop 1 is a potent inducer of T helper 2 (Th2) regulatory cells in mice and humans; and Th2 cells are found in both the brains and spinal cords of Cop 1-treated mice and humans. MG and experimental autoimmune MG are T cell-regulated, antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. Two peptides, representing sequences of the human AChR-alpha-subunit, p195-212 and p259-271, are immunodominant T-cell epitopes in MG patients and two strains of mice. Altered peptide ligand, composed of the randomly arranged two single amino acid analogs inhibits in vitro and in vivo MG

  6. Therapy of autoimmune bullous diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mutasim, Diya F

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases result from an immune response to molecular components of the desmosome or basement membrane. Bullous diseases are associated with a high degree of morbidity and occasional mortality. Therapy of bullous diseases consists of suppressing the immune system, controlling inflammation and improving healing of erosions. The therapeutic agents used in the treatment of bullous diseases may be associated with high morbidity and occasional mortality. Successful treatment requires understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease process and the pharmacology of the drugs being used. PMID:18360613

  7. Autoimmune Cytopenias In Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Podjasek, Jenna C.; Abraham, Roshini S.

    2012-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a humoral immunodeficiency whose primary diagnostic features include hypogammaglobulinemia involving two or more immunoglobulin isotypes and impaired functional antibody responses in the majority of patients. While increased susceptibility to respiratory and other infections is a common thread that binds a large cross-section of CVID patients, the presence of autoimmune complications in this immunologically and clinically heterogeneous disorder is recognized in up to two-thirds of patients. Among the autoimmune manifestations reported in CVID (20–50%; Chapel et al., 2008; Cunningham-Rundles, 2008), autoimmune cytopenias are by far the most common occurring variably in 4–20% (Michel et al., 2004; Chapel et al., 2008) of these patients who have some form of autoimmunity. Association of autoimmune cytopenias with granulomatous disease and splenomegaly has been reported. The spectrum of autoimmune cytopenias includes thrombocytopenia, anemia, and neutropenia. While it may seem paradoxical “prima facie” that autoimmunity is present in patients with primary immune deficiencies, in reality, it could be considered two sides of the same coin, each reflecting a different but inter-connected facet of immune dysregulation. The expansion of CD21 low B cells in CVID patients with autoimmune cytopenias and other autoimmune features has also been previously reported. It has been demonstrated that this unique subset of B cells is enriched for autoreactive germline antibodies. Further, a correlation has been observed between various B cell subsets, such as class-switched memory B cells and plasmablasts, and autoimmunity in CVID. This review attempts to explore the most recent concepts and highlights, along with treatment of autoimmune hematological manifestations of CVID. PMID:22837758

  8. Autoimmune cytopenias in common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Podjasek, Jenna C; Abraham, Roshini S

    2012-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a humoral immunodeficiency whose primary diagnostic features include hypogammaglobulinemia involving two or more immunoglobulin isotypes and impaired functional antibody responses in the majority of patients. While increased susceptibility to respiratory and other infections is a common thread that binds a large cross-section of CVID patients, the presence of autoimmune complications in this immunologically and clinically heterogeneous disorder is recognized in up to two-thirds of patients. Among the autoimmune manifestations reported in CVID (20-50%; Chapel et al., 2008; Cunningham-Rundles, 2008), autoimmune cytopenias are by far the most common occurring variably in 4-20% (Michel et al., 2004; Chapel et al., 2008) of these patients who have some form of autoimmunity. Association of autoimmune cytopenias with granulomatous disease and splenomegaly has been reported. The spectrum of autoimmune cytopenias includes thrombocytopenia, anemia, and neutropenia. While it may seem paradoxical "prima facie" that autoimmunity is present in patients with primary immune deficiencies, in reality, it could be considered two sides of the same coin, each reflecting a different but inter-connected facet of immune dysregulation. The expansion of CD21 low B cells in CVID patients with autoimmune cytopenias and other autoimmune features has also been previously reported. It has been demonstrated that this unique subset of B cells is enriched for autoreactive germline antibodies. Further, a correlation has been observed between various B cell subsets, such as class-switched memory B cells and plasmablasts, and autoimmunity in CVID. This review attempts to explore the most recent concepts and highlights, along with treatment of autoimmune hematological manifestations of CVID. PMID:22837758

  9. Neuromyelitis optica accompanied by nephrotic syndrome and autoimmune-related pancytopenia.

    PubMed

    ZhangBao, Jingzi; Zhou, Lei; Lu, Jiahong; Xi, Jianying; Zhao, Chongbo; Quan, Chao

    2016-05-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) associated with nephrotic syndrome and autoimmune-related pancytopenia has not been reported previously. We report herein a young woman who initially presented with bilateral blurring of vision and numbness in her hands. MRI disclosed multiple white matter lesions and a long cervical spinal cord lesion extending to the medulla oblongata. Serum aquaporin-4 antibody was positive and the patient was diagnosed with NMO. While in the hospital, she presented with hypoproteinemia and heavy proteinuria, meeting the diagnostic criteria of nephrotic syndrome. After high-dose methylprednisolone treatment, her vision improved significantly and urine protein quantity decreased. However, the patient subsequently developed severe pancytopenia with a positive Coombs' test. Thrombocytopenia finally led to uncontrollable gastrointestinal bleeding as the direct cause of the patient's death. This case illustrates the extremely rare condition of concurrence of NMO, nephrotic syndrome, and autoimmune pancytopenia in one patient, which suggests the involvement of organs beyond the central nervous system in NMO spectrum disorders. PMID:27237748

  10. Practical considerations on the use of rituximab in autoimmune neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kosmidis, Mixalis L.; Dalakas, Marinos C.

    2010-01-01

    Rituximab (Mabthera, Rituxan) is a chimeric human/murine monoclonal antibody against CD-20 surface antigen expressed on B-cells. Rituximab, by causing B-cell depletion, appears to be effective in several autoimmune disorders; it has been approved for rheumatoid arthritis and is a promising new agent in the treatment of several autoimmune neurological disorders. A controlled study in patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis has shown that rituximab significantly reduces the number of new MRI lesions and improves clinical outcome; it also showed some promise in a subset of patients with primary progressive MS. The drug is also effective in a number of patients with Devic’s disease, myasthenia gravis, autoimmune neuropathies, and inflammatory myopathies. The apparent effectiveness of rituximab has moved B-cells into the center stage of clinical and laboratory investigation of autoimmune neurological disorders. We review the evidence-based effectiveness of rituximab in neurological disorders based on controlled trials and anecdotal reports, including our own experience, and address the immunobiology of B-cells in autoimmune central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorders. In addition, we provide practical guidelines on how best to use this drug in clinical practice and highlight its potential toxicity. PMID:21179602

  11. Proliferating brain cells are a target of neurotoxic CSF in systemic autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Sakic, Boris; Kirkham, David L.; Ballok, David A.; Mwanjewe, James; Fearon, Ian M.; Macri, Joseph; Yu, Guanhua; Sidor, Michelle M.; Denburg, Judah A.; Szechtman, Henry; Lau, Jonathan; Ball, Alexander K.; Doering, Laurie C.

    2006-01-01

    Brain atrophy, neurologic and psychiatric (NP) manifestations are common complications in the systemic autoimmune disease, lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we show that the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from autoimmune MRL-lpr mice and a deceased NP-SLE patient reduce the viability of brain cells which proliferate in vitro. This detrimental effect was accompanied by periventricular neurodegeneration in the brains of autoimmune mice and profound in vivo neurotoxicity when their CSF was administered to the CNS of a rat. Multiple ionic responses with microfluorometry and protein peaks on electropherograms suggest more than one mechanism of cellular demise. Similar to the CSF from diseased MRL-lpr mice, the CSF from a deceased SLE patient with a history of psychosis, memory impairment, and seizures, reduced viability of the C17.2 neural stem cell line. Proposed mechanisms of cytotoxicity involve binding of intrathecally synthesized IgG autoantibodies to target(s) common to different mammalian species and neuronal populations. More importantly, these results indicate that the viability of proliferative neural cells can be compromised in systemic autoimmune disease. Antibody-mediated lesions of germinal layers may impair the regenerative capacity of the brain in NP-SLE and possibly, brain development and function in some forms of CNS disorders in which autoimmune phenomena have been documented. PMID:16198428

  12. Cardiovascular Involvement in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amaya-Amaya, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT) was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD. PMID:25177690

  13. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Yoshiyuki; Tomer, Yaron

    2005-01-01

    The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine) is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions) that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4) and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg). Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity. PMID:15712599

  14. Defining and analyzing geoepidemiology and human autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Yinon; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2010-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases cumulatively affect 5-10% of the industrial world population and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In recent decades rates are rising worldwide, and autoimmunity can no longer be associated solely with the more developed "Western" countries. Geoepidemiology of autoimmune diseases portrays the burden of these illnesses across various regions and ethnic populations. Furthermore, Geoepidemiology may yield important clues to the genetic and triggering environmental mechanisms of autoimmunity. In this review we compiled and discuss in depth abundant geoepidemiological data pertaining to four major autoimmune conditions, namely type-1 diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, autoimmune thyroid disease, and inflammatory bowel disease. The following key results manifested in this review: 1) Ethno-geographic gradients in autoimmune disease risk are attributable to a complex interplay of genetic and environmental pressures. 2) Industrial regions, particularly Northern Europe and North America, still exhibit the highest rates for most autoimmune diseases. 3) Methods particularly useful in demonstrating the significant influence of genetic and environmental factors include comparative ethnic differences studies, migration studies, and recognition of 'hotspots'. 4) Key environmental determinants of geographical differences include diminished ultraviolet radiation exposure, Western or affluence-related lifestyle, infection exposure, environmental pollutants, nutritional factors and disease-specific precipitants (e.g., iodine exposure). PMID:20034761

  15. Helicobacter pylori and skin autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Magen, Eli; Delgado, Jorge-Shmuel

    2014-02-14

    Autoimmune skin diseases are characterized by dysregulation of the immune system resulting in a loss of tolerance to skin self-antigen(s). The prolonged interaction between the bacterium and host immune mechanisms makes Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) a plausible infectious agent for triggering autoimmunity. Epidemiological and experimental data now point to a strong relation of H. pylori infection on the development of many extragastric diseases, including several allergic and autoimmune diseases. H. pylori antigens activate cross-reactive T cells and induce autoantibodies production. Microbial heat shock proteins (HSP) play an important role of in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases because of the high level of sequence homology with human HSP. Eradication of H. pylori infection has been shown to be effective in some patients with chronic autoimmune urticaria, psoriasis, alopecia areata and Schoenlein-Henoch purpura. There is conflicting and controversial data regarding the association of H. pylori infection with Behçet's disease, scleroderma and autoimmune bullous diseases. No data are available evaluating the association of H. pylori infection with other skin autoimmune diseases, such as vitiligo, cutaneous lupus erythematosus and dermatomyositis. The epidemiological and experimental evidence for a possible role of H. pylori infection in skin autoimmune diseases are the subject of this review. PMID:24587626

  16. Sex bias in CNS autoimmune disease mediated by androgen control of autoimmune regulator.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meng-Lei; Bakhru, Pearl; Conley, Bridget; Nelson, Jennifer S; Free, Meghan; Martin, Aaron; Starmer, Joshua; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Su, Maureen A

    2016-01-01

    Male gender is protective against multiple sclerosis and other T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. This protection may be due, in part, to higher androgen levels in males. Androgen binds to the androgen receptor (AR) to regulate gene expression, but how androgen protects against autoimmunity is not well understood. Autoimmune regulator (Aire) prevents autoimmunity by promoting self-antigen expression in medullary thymic epithelial cells, such that developing T cells that recognize these self-antigens within the thymus undergo clonal deletion. Here we show that androgen upregulates Aire-mediated thymic tolerance to protect against autoimmunity. Androgen recruits AR to Aire promoter regions, with consequent enhancement of Aire transcription. In mice and humans, thymic Aire expression is higher in males compared with females. Androgen administration and male gender protect against autoimmunity in a multiple sclerosis mouse model in an Aire-dependent manner. Thus, androgen control of an intrathymic Aire-mediated tolerance mechanism contributes to gender differences in autoimmunity. PMID:27072778

  17. Cell mediated immune regulation in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Gillissen, G; Pusztai-Markos, Z

    1979-01-01

    Autoimmunity is the term for the immune conditions characterized by a specific humoral or cell mediated response to the body's own tissues. The termination of the natural state of self tolerance may lead to immunopathological manifestations with clinical consequences, i.e. autoimmune diseases. In a very general sense, one may classify autoimmune diseases into two groups with respect to the underlying mechanism: 1. There are autoimmune diseases which develop in the presence of a normal intact regulation mechanism. 2. Another group whose development must be understood on the basis of a cellular dysfunction. In the first case, dequestered or semi-sequestered autoantigens are liberated as a consequence of exogenic influences inducing the sensitization of immunocompetent cells. The immune system then reacts with these autoantigens in the same way as with foreign substances. This kind of autoimmune disease will, however, not be dealt with here. In the second case, autoantigens are normally, i.e. in healthy individuals, accessible to the immunocompetent cells. To understand the reason for the development of an autoimmune reaction one must first clarify the mechanism of self tolerance. Then one must examine the way in which a break of this physiological state takes place. One of the major unanswered questions is the relative importance of antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immune mechanisms in the onset and further development of autoimmune diseases. Recently it has been suggested that a dysfunction at the cellular level might represent the basic cause which induces the termination of selftolerance. Most of the conceptions about the mechanism by which autoimmune diseases are triggered were gained through experiments with animals. It is, however, difficult to use these experimental results to explain human diseases; in humans many questions are still open. Undoubtedly, the mechanisms of induction and maintenance of self tolerance and also the ways in which autoimmune

  18. Diagnosis and Treatment of Autoimmune Pancreatitis in China: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Han; Tian, Bo; Wang, Luowei; Li, Zhaoshen

    2015-01-01

    Aims To provide comprehensive data on the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) patients in China. Design A systematic review. Methods All clinical studies concerning AIP from China published between January 2006 and June 2014 were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Results A total of 26 original articles involving 706 AIP patients were included with an estimated proportion of type 2 AIP as 4.7%. In the 706 AIP patients, the range of mean/median age was 48.6–67.0 years old and the male to female ratio was 4.47:1. The common presentations included obstructive jaundice (pooled rate: 63.4%, 95%CI: 55.4%–71.0%) and abdominal symptoms (pooled rate: 62.3%, 95%CI: 52.4%–71.7%). Biliary involvement was the most common extrapancreatic manifestations, especially the lower part of the common bile duct (pooled rate: 62.3%, 95%CI: 49.9%–73.9%). According to the imaging examinations, 53.8% and 41.6% patients were classified into focal-type and diffuse-type, respectively. Notably, upstream pancreatic duct dilatation was found in parts of patients (pooled rate: 13.8%, 95%CI: 6.6%–23.1%). The levels of serum IgG4 were elevated in most patients (pooled rate: 86.0%, 95%CI: 74.2%–94.6%). Nearly three tenths AIP patients received surgery (pooled rate: 29.7%, 95%CI: 18.1%–42.8%) due to mimicked malignancy. Steroid treatment was given to 78.4% patients (95%CI: 65.3%–89.1%) with a pooled remission rate of 96.2% (95%CI: 94.0%–97.9%). The pooled relapse rate was 13.8% (95%CI: 7.2%–22.0%) with the mean follow-up time ranging from 12 to 45 months. Conclusion Type 1 is the predominant type of Chinese AIP patients and the clinical features, diagnostic modalities and therapeutic regimen were similar with those in other countries. Knowledge of AIP should be more widespread to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:26110658

  19. Amplification of autoimmune disease by infection

    PubMed Central

    Posnett, David N; Yarilin, Dmitry

    2005-01-01

    Reports of infection with certain chronic persistent microbes (herpesviruses or Chlamydiae) in human autoimmune diseases are consistent with the hypothesis that these microbes are reactivated in the setting of immunodeficiency and often target the site of autoimmune inflammation. New experimental animal models demonstrate the principle. A herpesvirus or Chlamydia species can be used to infect mice with induced transient autoimmune diseases. This results in increased disease severity and even relapse. The evidence suggests that the organisms are specifically imported to the inflammatory sites and cause further tissue destruction, especially when the host is immunosuppressed. We review the evidence for the amplification of autoimmune inflammatory disease by microbial infection, which may be a general mechanism applicable to many human diseases. We suggest that patients with autoimmune disorders receiving immunosuppressing drugs should benefit from preventive antiviral therapy. PMID:15743493

  20. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome disguised as mental illness.

    PubMed

    Wei, Randy; Chang, Allen; Rockoff, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Our case acts to highlight the numerous presentations of polyglandular autoimmune syndromes. A 62-year-old Taiwanese woman with a history of schizophrenia presented to our emergency department with a brain tumour causing her headaches. She was admitted due to severe anaemia, and after further investigation, the patient was discovered to have pernicious anaemia and autoimmune thyroiditis-consistent with the diagnosis of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome IIIb. Her underlying primary psychiatric diagnosis was then questioned. The diagnosis of her endocrinopathies were likely delayed for many years due to the psychiatric disorder which may have been due to her long-standing autoimmune hypothyroidism and/or vitamin B12 deficiency. Initial treatment brought about major behavioural improvement, and encourages physicians to investigate secondary causes of psychosis and other coexisting autoimmune diseases when a patient presents with one endocrinopathy. PMID:23632176

  1. Apoptosis in autoimmune and non-autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Ludgate, M; Jasani, B

    1997-06-01

    The elimination of autoreactive T cells in the thymus involves the process of programmed cell death. Animal model studies, using the lpr and gld strains of mice, have identified FAS receptor (FAS) and FAS ligand (FAS-L) as important components of this mechanism. Whether FAS and FAS-L are also implicated in the autoimmune destruction of a target organ, such as the thyroid, remain hypothetical. An accompanying paper in this issue has addressed the question by FACS and immunocytochemical analysis of FAS expression and apoptosis in thyrocytes grown in culture and in intact thyroid tissues obtained from Hashimoto's thyroiditis, multinodular goitre and Graves' disease. The overall results suggest that the degree of FAS expression on target cells may determine their sensitivity to T-cell mediated cytotoxicity in the absence of perforin or granzyme directed apoptosis mechanisms. PMID:9274519

  2. Diagnostic criteria of autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Grant, Charlotte R; Longhi, Maria Serena; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic immune-mediated liver disorder characterised by female preponderance, elevated transaminase and immunoglobulin G levels, seropositivity for autoantibodies and interface hepatitis. Presentation is highly variable, therefore AIH should be considered during the diagnostic workup of any increase in liver enzyme levels. A set of inclusion and exclusion criteria for the diagnosis of AIH have been established by the International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group (IAIHG). There are two main types of AIH: type 1, positive for anti-nuclear (ANA) and/or anti-smooth muscle antibodies (SMAs) and type 2, defined by the presence of anti-liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM-1) and/or anti-liver cytosol type 1 (LC-1) autoantibodies. The central role of autoantibodies in the diagnosis of AIH has led the IAIHG to produce a consensus statement detailing appropriate and effective methods for their detection. Autoantibodies should be tested by indirect immunofluorescence at an initial dilution of 1/40 in adults and 1/10 in children on a freshly prepared rodent substrate that includes kidney, liver and stomach sections to allow for the simultaneous detection of all reactivities relevant to AIH. Anti-LKM-1 is often confused with anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA) if rodent kidney is used as the sole immunofluorescence substrate. The identification of the molecular targets of anti-LKM-1 and AMA has led to the establishment of immuno-assays based on the use of the recombinant or purified autoantigens. Perinuclear anti-nuclear neutrophil antibody (p-ANNA) is an additional marker of AIH-1; anti soluble liver antigen (SLA) antibodies are specific for autoimmune liver disease, can be present in AIH-1 and AIH-2 and are associated with a more severe clinical course. Anti-SLA are detectable by ELISA or radio-immuno-assays, but not by immunofluorescence. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted promptly to

  3. Immunomodulatory vaccination in autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Urbanek-Ruiz, Irene; Ruiz, Pedro J; Steinman, Lawrence; Fathman, C Garrison

    2002-06-01

    The development of vaccines is arguably the most significant achievement in medicine to date. The practice of innoculation with the fluid from a sore to protect from a disease actually dates back to ancient China; however, with the introduction of Jenner's smallpox vaccine, and greater understanding of the immune system, vaccines have become specific and systematic. Traditional vaccines have used killed pathogens (hepatitis A and the Salk polio vaccines), immunogenic subunits of a given pathogen (hepatitis B subunit vaccine), or live attenuated pathogens (measles, mumps, rubella, Sabin polio vaccines) to generate protective immunity. Currently, a new generation of vaccines that use the genetic material of a pathogen to elicit protective immunity are being developed. Although the most widespread and successful use of vaccines today remains in the arena of infectious diseases, manipulations of immune responses to protect against cancers, neurologic diseases, and autoimmunity are being explored rigorously. PMID:12092460

  4. Successful pregnancy with autoimmune cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Braga, António; Braga, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy with liver cirrhosis is a rare and dangerous event that exposes mother and fetus to potentially lethal risks. During pregnancy, hepatic decompensation could suffice and the development of hepatic failure and encephalopathy could occur. The incidence of obstetric complications is also increased with a high rate of pre-eclampsia, postpartum bleeding, preterm delivery and stillbirth. We report a case of a 27-year-old woman with autoimmune hepatitis and liver cirrhosis complicated by splenomegaly, oesophageal varices and severe thrombocytopaenia. During pregnancy, close clinical and analytical surveillance was performed. She was medicated with corticosteroids, azathioprine and propranolol. At the 25th week of gestation, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed to control oesophageal varices. This patient had an uneventful pregnancy until 37 weeks. At 37th week of gestation, after spontaneous rupture of membranes, signs of acute fetal distress were observed, and an urgent caesarean was performed. Good neonatal and maternal outcomes were achieved. PMID:26825934

  5. Activation of benign autoimmunity as both tumor and autoimmune disease immunotherapy: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Irun R

    2014-11-01

    Here, I consider how benign autoimmunity, the immunological homunculus, can be used to reinstate the healthy regulation of inflammation in both autoimmune diseases and in tumor immunotherapy. Different autoimmune diseases manifest clinically distinct phenotypes, but, in general, they all result from the transition of benign, healthy recognition of key body molecules into a damaging effector reaction. Tumors, in contrast to autoimmune diseases, grow by subverting the immune system into supporting and protecting the growing tumor from immune surveillance. Therefore our therapeutic aim in autoimmune disease is to induce the immune system to down-regulate the specific autoimmune effector reaction that causes the disease; in tumor immunotherapy, on the contrary, we aim to deprive the growing tumor of its illicit activation of immune suppression and to unleash an autoimmune disease targeted to the tumor. The recent success of anti-PD1 and anti-CTLR4 treatments exemplify the reinstatement of tumor autoimmunity subsequent to inhibition of immune suppression. With regard to the therapy of autoimmune diseases, I cite examples of immune system down-regulation of autoimmune diseases by T cell vaccination or HSP60 peptide treatment. Inducing the immune system to regulate itself is safer than global immune suppression and may be more effective in the long run. PMID:24924121

  6. Rett syndrome: An autoimmune disease?

    PubMed

    De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Rovero, Paolo; Durand, Thierry; Ciccoli, Lucia; Papini, Anna Maria; Hayek, Joussef

    2016-04-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disease, previously included into the autistic spectrum disorders, affecting almost exclusively females (frequency 1:10,000). RTT leads to intellective deficit, purposeful hands use loss and late major motor impairment besides featuring breathing disorders, epilepsy and increased risk of sudden death. The condition is caused in up to 95% of the cases by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Our group has shown a number of previously unrecognized features, such as systemic redox imbalance, chronic inflammatory status, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease-like lung disease, and erythrocyte morphology changes. While evidence on an intimate involvement of MeCP2 in the immune response is cumulating, we have recently shown a cytokine dysregulation in RTT. Increasing evidence on the relationship between MeCP2 and an immune dysfunction is reported, with, apparently, a link between MECP2 gene polymorphisms and autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic sclerosis. Antineuronal (i.e., brain proteins) antibodies have been shown in RTT. Recently, high levels of anti-N-glucosylation (N-Glc) IgM serum autoantibodies [i.e., anti-CSF114(N-Glc) IgMs] have been detected by our group in a statistically significant number of RTT patients. In the current review, the Authors explore the current evidence, either in favor or against, the presence of an autoimmune component in RTT. PMID:26807990

  7. Immunoadsorption therapy in autoimmune encephalitides

    PubMed Central

    Golombeck, Kristin S.; Bien, Corinna; Abu-Tair, Mariam; Brand, Marcus; Bulla-Hellwig, Michael; Lohmann, Hubertus; Münstermann, Dieter; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Thölking, Gerold; Valentin, Rainer; Wiendl, Heinz; Melzer, Nico; Bien, Christian G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: It was hypothesized that in encephalitides with autoantibodies directed to CNS surface antigens an antibody-removing intervention might speed up recovery. Methods: The outcome of autoimmune encephalitis in 19 patients with antibodies against surface antigens (leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 [LGI1], n = 3; contactin-associated protein-2 [CASPR2], n = 4; NMDA receptor [NMDAR], n = 7) and intracellular antigens (glutamic acid decarboxylase [GAD], n = 5) after immunoadsorption in addition to corticosteroid therapy was evaluated retrospectively. Modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores and data on seizures, memory, and antibody titers directly after immunoadsorption (early follow-up) and after a median of 4 months (late follow-up) were compiled. Results: Immediately after immunoadsorption, 9 of 14 patients with antibodies against LGI1, CASPR2, or NMDAR (64%), but none with GAD antibodies, had improved by at least one mRS point. Five of the 7 patients with LGI1 or CASRP2 antibodies had become seizure-free, and 2 patients with NMDAR antibodies had a memory improvement of more than 1 SD of a normal control population. At late follow-up, 12 of 14 patients with surface antibodies had improved (86%), and none of the patients with GAD antibodies. Conclusions: It is suggested that addition of immunoadsorption to immunosuppression therapy in patients with surface antibodies may accelerate recovery. This supports the pathogenic role of surface antibodies. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that immunoadsorption combined with immunosuppression therapy is effective in patients with autoimmune encephalitis with surface antibodies. PMID:26977423

  8. Noonan's Syndrome and Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vesterhus, Per; Aarskog, Dagfinn

    1973-01-01

    Thyroid abnormalities were studies in seven boys and three girls, 4- to 17-years-old, with Noonan's syndrome, characterized by mental retardation, ocular anomalies (wide spaced eyes, drooped eye lids, or strabismus), heart lesions, characteristics of Turner's syndrome, and normal karyotypes (chromosome arrangement). (MC)

  9. The Diagnosis and Treatment of Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis causes subacute deficits of memory and cognition, often followed by suppressed level of consciousness or coma. A careful history and examination may show early clues to particular autoimmune causes, such as neuromyotonia, hyperekplexia, psychosis, dystonia, or the presence of particular tumors. Ancillary testing with MRI and EEG may be helpful for excluding other causes, managing seizures, and, rarely, for identifying characteristic findings. Appropriate autoantibody testing can confirm specific diagnoses, although this is often done in parallel with exclusion of infectious and other causes. Autoimmune encephalitis may be divided into several groups of diseases: those with pathogenic antibodies to cell surface proteins, those with antibodies to intracellular synaptic proteins, T-cell diseases associated with antibodies to intracellular antigens, and those associated with other autoimmune disorders. Many forms of autoimmune encephalitis are paraneoplastic, and each of these conveys a distinct risk profile for various tumors. Tumor screening and, if necessary, treatment is essential to proper management. Most forms of autoimmune encephalitis respond to immune therapies, although powerful immune suppression for weeks or months may be needed in difficult cases. Autoimmune encephalitis may relapse, so follow-up care is important. PMID:26754777

  10. Human autoimmune diseases: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-10-01

    There have been significant advances in our understanding of human autoimmunity that have led to improvements in classification and diagnosis and, most importantly, research advances in new therapies. The importance of autoimmunity and the mechanisms that lead to clinical disease were first recognized about 50 years ago following the pioneering studies of Macfarlane Burnett and his Nobel Prize-winning hypothesis of the 'forbidden clone'. Such pioneering efforts led to a better understanding not only of autoimmunity, but also of lymphoid cell development, thymic education, apoptosis and deletion of autoreactive cells. Contemporary theories suggest that the development of an autoimmune disease requires a genetic predisposition and environmental factors that trigger the immune pathways that lead, ultimately, to tissue destruction. Despite extensive research, there are no genetic tools that can be used clinically to predict the risk of autoimmune disease. Indeed, the concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins is 12-67%, highlighting not only a role for environmental factors, but also the potential importance of stochastic or epigenetic phenomena. On the other hand, the identification of cytokines and chemokines, and their cognate receptors, has led to novel therapies that block pathological inflammatory responses within the target organ and have greatly improved the therapeutic effect in patients with autoimmune disease, particularly rheumatoid arthritis. Further advances involving the use of multiplex platforms for diagnosis and identification of new therapeutic agents should lead to major breakthroughs within the next decade. PMID:26212387

  11. Cutting-edge issues in autoimmune orchitis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Clovis A; Cocuzza, Marcello; Borba, Eduardo F; Bonfá, Eloísa

    2012-04-01

    Autoimmune orchitis is a relevant cause of decreased fecundity in males, and it is defined as a direct aggression to the testis with the concomitant presence of anti-sperm antibodies (ASA). The presence of these specific antibodies has been observed in approximately 5-12% of infertile male partners. Primary autoimmune orchitis is defined by isolated infertility with ASA but without evidence of a systemic disease. Secondary causes of orchitis and/or testicular vasculitis are uniformly associated with autoimmune diseases, mainly in primary vasculitis such as polyarteritis nodosa, Behçet's disease, and Henoch-Schönlein purpura. The overall frequencies of acute orchitis and ASA in rheumatic diseases are 2-31% and 0-50%, respectively. The pathogenesis of primary/secondary autoimmune orchitis is not completely understood but probably involves the access of immune cells to the testicular microenvironment due to inflammation, infection or trauma, leading to apoptosis of spermatocytes and spermatids. Glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive drugs are indicated in autoimmune orchitis-associated active systemic autoimmune diseases. However, there are no standardized treatment options, and the real significance of ASA in infertile men is still controversial. Assisted reproductive technologies such as intrauterine insemination, in vitro fertilization, and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) are therapeutic options for male infertility associated with these autoantibodies. ICSI is considered to be the best choice for patients with severe sperm autoimmunity, particularly in males with low semen counts or motility. PMID:21842235

  12. Extrapancreatic effects of incretin hormones: evidence for weight-independent changes in morphological aspects and oxidative status in insulin-sensitive organs of the obese nondiabetic Zucker rat (ZFR).

    PubMed

    Colin, Ides M; Colin, Henri; Dufour, Ines; Gielen, Charles-Edouard; Many, Marie-Christine; Saey, Jean; Knoops, Bernard; Gérard, Anne-Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Incretin-based therapies are widely used to treat type 2 diabetes. Although hypoglycemic actions of incretins are mostly due to their insulinotropic/glucagonostatic effects, they may also influence extrapancreatic metabolism. We administered exendin-4 (Ex-4), a long-acting glucagon-like peptide receptor agonist, at low dose (0.1 nmol/kg/day) for a short period (10 days), in obese nondiabetic fa/fa Zucker rats (ZFRs). Ex-4-treated ZFRs were compared to vehicle (saline)-treated ZFRs and vehicle- and Ex-4-treated lean rats (LRs). Blood glucose levels were measured at days 0, 9, and 10. Ingested food and animal weight were recorded daily. On the day of sacrifice (d10), blood was sampled along with liver, epididymal, subcutaneous, brown adipose, and skeletal muscle tissues from animals fasted for 24 h. Plasma insulin and blood glucose levels, food intake, and body and epididymal fat weight were unchanged, but gross morphological changes were observed in insulin-sensitive tissues. The average size of hepatocytes was significantly lower in Ex-4-treated ZFRs, associated with decreased number and size of lipid droplets and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) staining, a marker of oxidative stress (OS). Myocytes, which were smaller in ZFRs than in LRs, were significantly enlarged and depleted of lipid droplets in Ex-4-treated ZFRs. Weak HNE staining was increased by Ex-4. A similar observation was made in brown adipose tissue, whereas the elevated HNE staining observed in epididymal adipocytes of ZFRs, suggestive of strong OS, was decreased by Ex-4. These results suggest that incretins by acting on OS in insulin-sensitive tissues may contribute to weight-independent improvement in insulin sensitivity. PMID:27511983

  13. Immunopathology: autoimmune glial diseases and differentiation from multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Bogdan F Gh; Lucchinetti, Claudia F

    2016-01-01

    While multiple sclerosis (MS) is often referred to as an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease, neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is currently the only proven and well-characterized autoimmune disease affecting the glial cells. The target antigen is the water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4), expressed on astrocytes, and antibodies against AQP4 (AQP4-IgG) are present in the serum of NMO patients. Clinical, serologic, cerebrospinal fluid, and neuroimaging criteria help differentiate NMO from other central nervous system inflammatory demyelinating disorders. Pathologically, the presence of dystrophic astrocytes, myelin vacuolation, granulocytic inflammatory infiltrates, vascular hyalinization, macrophages containing glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive debris and/or the absence of Creutzfeldt-Peters cells is more characteristic, but not specific, for NMO. These findings should prompt the neuropathologist to perform AQP4 immunohistochemistry, and recommend serologic testing for AQP4-IgG to exclude a diagnosis of NMO/NMO spectrum disorder (NMOSD). Loss of AQP4 on biopsied active demyelinating lesions and/or seropositivity for AQP4-IgG may confirm the diagnosis of NMO/NMOSD, which is important because treatments that are suitable for MS can aggravate NMO. Few other putative glial antigens have been postulated, but their pathogenic role remains to be demonstrated. PMID:27112673

  14. Pathogenesis of Chagas' Disease: Parasite Persistence and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Hecht, Mariana M.; Guimaro, Maria C.; Sousa, Alessandro O.; Nitz, Nadjar

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Acute Trypanosoma cruzi infections can be asymptomatic, but chronically infected individuals can die of Chagas' disease. The transfer of the parasite mitochondrial kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) minicircle to the genome of chagasic patients can explain the pathogenesis of the disease; in cases of Chagas' disease with evident cardiomyopathy, the kDNA minicircles integrate mainly into retrotransposons at several chromosomes, but the minicircles are also detected in coding regions of genes that regulate cell growth, differentiation, and immune responses. An accurate evaluation of the role played by the genotype alterations in the autoimmune rejection of self-tissues in Chagas' disease is achieved with the cross-kingdom chicken model system, which is refractory to T. cruzi infections. The inoculation of T. cruzi into embryonated eggs prior to incubation generates parasite-free chicks, which retain the kDNA minicircle sequence mainly in the macrochromosome coding genes. Crossbreeding transfers the kDNA mutations to the chicken progeny. The kDNA-mutated chickens develop severe cardiomyopathy in adult life and die of heart failure. The phenotyping of the lesions revealed that cytotoxic CD45, CD8+ γδ, and CD8α+ T lymphocytes carry out the rejection of the chicken heart. These results suggest that the inflammatory cardiomyopathy of Chagas' disease is a genetically driven autoimmune disease. PMID:21734249

  15. Inhibition of experimental autoimmune orchitis by fossil diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustuoabad, Oscar D.; Meiss, Roberto P.; Molinolo, Alfredo R.; Mayer, Alejandro M. S.

    1985-06-01

    Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) induced in Swiss mice could be reduced by means of the utilization of micronized frustules of fossil diatoms (DS) containing 54% of SiO2. Experimental mice were sensitized with testicular Antigen (Ag) in Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA) inoculated twice, on day 0 and day 21. 100 μg of DS suspension was inoculated into sensitized mice 10 times, once every 4 days, subcutaneously, starting on day 7 after the first Ag inoculation. Mice receiving the DS treatment showed a diminution of the delayed hypersensitivity reaction, lower antibody titer and decreased incidence of testicular injury as well as reduced grade and extension of the lesions. Possible explanation of these results would suggest alteration of monocyte and/or macrophage normal behaviour as well as alteration of antibody synthesis by different mechanisms.

  16. Molecular diagnosis of autoimmune blistering diseases.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Daisuke; Dainichi, Teruki; Hamada, Takahiro; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases are the best-characterized autoimmune skin diseases. Molecular diagnosis of these diseases has become possible due to the identification of their target autoantigens over the past three decades. In this review, we summarize methodology for categorizing autoimmune bullous diseases by means of combinations of direct and indirect immunofluorescence techniques using normal human skin sections, rat bladder sections and COS7 cells transfected with desmocollins 1-3 encoded vectors, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and immunoblotting with normal human epidermal extracts, dermal extracts, purified proteins from cell cultures and recombinant proteins. PMID:23325635

  17. Autoimmune Hemolysis: A Journey through Time

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John

    2015-01-01

    Summary The existence of autoimmune diseases in humans has been known for almost 100 years. Currently, autoimmune pathogenesis has been attributed to more than 40 human diseases; yet it is still not clear what immune abnormalities conclusively prove underlying autoimmune pathogenesis. Hence, although much has been learned, research is still needed for complete elucidation of the mechanisms of the immune dysregulation in AIHA. Better understanding of the underlying mechanism(s) may allow for development of more specific therapies of these not uncommon and often difficult-to-treat disorders. PMID:26696795

  18. Phosphodiesterase 4-targeted treatments for autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Advancements in phosphodiesterase (PDE)-targeted therapies have shown promise in recent years for treating patients with a variety of autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the development of PDE4 inhibitors and the associated literature with a focus on treatments for autoimmune diseases. After the initial investigations of the prototypic PDE inhibitor, rolipram, more selective inhibitors targeting the PDE4 isozyme have been developed. With phase II and phase III clinical trials currently underway to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the latest generation of PDE4 inhibitors, namely apremilast, a new class of treatments may be around the corner for patients suffering from chronic, autoimmune diseases. PMID:23557064

  19. Presence of Autoimmune Antibody in Chikungunya Infection

    PubMed Central

    Maek-a-nantawat, Wirach; Silachamroon, Udomsak

    2009-01-01

    Chikungunya infection has recently re-emerged as an important arthropod-borne disease in Thailand. Recently, Southern Thailand was identified as a potentially endemic area for the chikungunya virus. Here, we report a case of severe musculoskeletal complication, presenting with muscle weakness and swelling of the limbs. During the investigation to exclude autoimmune muscular inflammation, high titers of antinuclear antibody were detected. This is the report of autoimmunity detection associated with an arbovirus infection. The symptoms can mimic autoimmune polymyositis disease, and the condition requires close monitoring before deciding to embark upon prolonged specific treatment with immunomodulators. PMID:19997520

  20. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  1. B Cells with Regulatory Function in Animal Models of Autoimmune and Non-Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mei; Wang, Zuomin; Han, Xiaozhe

    2015-01-01

    Although the identification of B cell subsets with negative regulatory functions and the definition of their mechanisms of action are recent events, the important negative regulatory roles of B cells in immune responses are now broadly recognized. There is an emerging appreciation for the pivotal role played by B cells in several areas of human diseases including autoimmune diseases and non-autoimmune diseases such as parasite infections and cancer. The recent research advancement of regulatory B cells in human disease coincides with the vastly accelerated pace of research on the bridging of innate and adaptive immune system. Current study and our continued research may provide better understanding of the mechanisms that promote regulatory B10 cell function to counteract exaggerated immune activation in autoimmune as well as non-autoimmune conditions. This review is focused on the current knowledge of BREG functions studied in animal models of autoimmune and non-autoimmune diseases. PMID:26236565

  2. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  3. Cardiovascular disease biomarkers across autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Ahearn, Joseph; Shields, Kelly J; Liu, Chau-Ching; Manzi, Susan

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is increasingly recognized as a major cause of premature mortality among those with autoimmune disorders. There is an urgent need to identify those patients with autoimmune disease who are at risk for CVD so as to optimize therapeutic intervention and ultimately prevention. Accurate identification, monitoring and stratification of such patients will depend upon a panel of biomarkers of cardiovascular disease. This review will discuss some of the most recent biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases in autoimmune disease, including lipid oxidation, imaging biomarkers to characterize coronary calcium, plaque, and intima media thickness, biomarkers of inflammation and activated complement, genetic markers, endothelial biomarkers, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Clinical implementation of these biomarkers will not only enhance patient care but also likely accelerate the pharmaceutical pipeline for targeted intervention to reduce or eliminate cardiovascular disease in the setting of autoimmunity. PMID:26168705

  4. Microbiota at the crossroads of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Shamriz, Oded; Mizrahi, Hila; Werbner, Michal; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Avni, Orly; Koren, Omry

    2016-09-01

    Autoimmune diseases have a multifactorial etiology including genetic and environmental factors. Recently, there has been increased appreciation of the critical involvement of the microbiota in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, although in many cases, the cause and the consequence are not easy to distinguish. Here, we suggest that many of the known cues affecting the function of the immune system, such as genetics, gender, pregnancy and diet, which are consequently involved in autoimmunity, exert their effects by influencing, at least in part, the microbiota composition and activity. This, in turn, modulates the immune response in a way that increases the risk for autoimmunity in predisposed individuals. We further discuss current microbiota-based therapies. PMID:27392501

  5. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  6. Myeloid derived suppressor cells and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Boros, Peter; Ochando, Jordi; Zeher, Margit

    2016-08-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are a heterogeneous group of immature myeloid cells with immunoregulatory function. When activated and expanded, these cells can suppress T cell functions via cell-to cell interactions as well as soluble mediators. Recent studies investigated the involvement of MDSC in autoimmune diseases. Some papers have described beneficial effect of MDSC during the course of autoimmune diseases, and suggest a potential role as a treatment option, while others failed to detect these effects. Their contributions to autoimmune diseases are not fully understood, and many questions and some controversies remain as to the expansion, activation, and inhibitory functions of MDSC. This review aims to summarize current knowledge of MDSC in autoimmune disorders. PMID:27240453

  7. Deleterious versus protective autoimmunity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kostic, Milos; Stojanovic, Ivana; Marjanovic, Goran; Zivkovic, Nikola; Cvetanovic, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorder of central nervous system, in which myelin specific CD4(+) T cells have a central role in orchestrating pathological events involved in disease pathogenesis. There is compelling evidence that Th1, Th9 and Th17 cells, separately or in cooperation, could mediate deleterious autoimmune response in MS. However, the phenotype differences between Th cell subpopulations initially employed in MS pathogenesis are mainly reflected in the different patterns of inflammation introduction, which results in the development of characteristic pathological features (blood-brain barrier disruption, demyelination and neurodegeneration), clinically presented with MS symptoms. Although, autoimmunity was traditionally seen as deleterious, some studies indicated that autoimmunity mediated by Th2 cells and T regulatory cells could be protective by nature. The concept of protective autoimmunity in MS pathogenesis is still poorly understood, but could be of great importance in better understanding of MS immunology and therefore, creating better therapeutic strategies. PMID:25944389

  8. Shaping the spectrum - From autoinflammation to autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Hedrich, Christian M

    2016-04-01

    Historically, autoimmune-inflammatory disorders were subdivided into autoinflammatory vs. autoimmune diseases. About a decade ago, an immunological continuum was proposed, placing "classical" autoinflammatory disorders, characterized by systemic inflammation in the absence of high-titer autoantibodies or autoreactive T lymphocytes, at the one end, and autoimmune disorders at the other end. We provide an overview of recent developments and observations, filling in some of the gaps and showing strong interconnections between innate and adaptive immune mechanisms, indicating that disorders from both ends of the immunological spectrum indeed share key pathomechanisms. We focus on three exemplary disorders: i) systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis representing "classical" autoinflammatory disorders; ii) psoriasis, a mixed pattern disease; and iii) systemic lupus erythematosus, a prototypical autoimmune disease. We summarize scientific observations suggesting that, depending on disease stages and/or duration, individualized treatment targeting innate or adaptive immune mechanisms in disorders from either end of the immunological spectrum may control disease activity. PMID:26948930

  9. Role of neutrophils in systemic autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils have emerged as important regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses. Recent evidence indicates that neutrophils display marked abnormalities in phenotype and function in various systemic autoimmune diseases, and may play a central role in initiation and perpetuation of aberrant immune responses and organ damage in these conditions. This review discusses the putative roles that neutrophils and aberrant neutrophil cell death play in the pathogenesis of various systemic autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, small vessel vasculitis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24286137

  10. Celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Jones, M Keston; Kingham, Jeremy G C

    2007-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy is relatively common in western populations with prevalence around 1%. With the recent availability of sensitive and specific serological testing, many patients who are either asymptomatic or have subtle symptoms can be shown to have CD. Patients with CD have modest increases in risks of malignancy and mortality compared to controls. The mortality among CD patients who comply poorly with a gluten-free diet is greater than in compliant patients. The pattern of presentation of CD has altered over the past three decades. Many cases are now detected in adulthood during investigation of problems as diverse as anemia, osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, unexplained neurological syndromes, infertility and chronic hypertransaminasemia of uncertain cause. Among autoimmune disorders, increased prevalence of CD has been found in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune liver diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. Prevalence of CD was noted to be 1% to 19% in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, 2% to 5% in autoimmune thyroid disorders and 3% to 7% in primary biliary cirrhosis in prospective studies. Conversely, there is also an increased prevalence of immune based disorders among patients with CD. The pathogenesis of co-existent autoimmune thyroid disease and CD is not known, but these conditions share similar HLA haplotypes and are associated with the gene encoding cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4. Screening high risk patients for CD, such as those with autoimmune diseases, is a reasonable strategy given the increased prevalence. Treatment of CD with a gluten-free diet should reduce the recognized complications of this disease and provide benefits in both general health and perhaps life expectancy. It also improves glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and enhances the absorption of medications for associated hypothyroidism and osteoporosis. It

  11. Renal cell carcinoma and autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Lands, R; Foust, J

    1996-04-01

    A previously healthy man who became bedridden because of malaise, fatigue, and weakness was found to have an autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). In the course of his evaluation for the AIHA, he was found, coincidentally, to have a renal cell carcinoma. The AIHA was marginally responsive to therapy with corticosteroids, but it resolved promptly after excision of the cancer. This case represents probably a rarely observed association between a nonhematologic malignancy and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. PMID:8614893

  12. Intermittent cyclophosphamide treatment of autoimmune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Weinerman, Brian; Maxwell, Ian; Hryniuk, William

    1974-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide was given intermittently rather than daily to 14 patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura. Eight patients responded and six did not. In those who responded the rise in platelet count was rapid, and in all patients the lack of toxicity was striking. Intermittent cyclophosphamide seems effective in some cases of autoimmune thrombocytopenia and is safe, at least in the short term. Controlled trials would be required to prove that intermittent is better than daily administration. PMID:4473260

  13. [Autoimmune connective tissue diseases and vaccination].

    PubMed

    Więsik-Szewczyk, Ewa; Jahnz-Różyk, Karina

    2015-01-01

    The idea that infectious agents can induce autoimmune diseases in genetically susceptible subjects has been a matter of discussion for years. Moreover, increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and introduction of prophylactic vaccinations from early childhood suggest that these two trends are linked. In the medical literature and even non-professional media, case reports or events temporally related to vaccination are reported. It raises the issue of vaccination safety. In everyday practice medical professionals, physicians, rheumatologists and other specialists will be asked their opinion of vaccination safety. The decision should be made according to evidence-based medicine and the current state of knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a potential mechanism which links infections, vaccinations and autoimmunity. We present an overview of published case reports, especially of systemic connective tissue diseases temporally related to vaccination and results from case-nested studies. As yet, no conclusive evidence supports a causal relationship between vaccination and autoimmune diseases. It has to be determined whether the performed studies are sufficiently sensitive to detect the link. The debate is ongoing, and new data may be required to explain the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We would like to underscore the need for prophylactic vaccination in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases and to break down the myth that the vaccines are contraindicated in this target group. PMID:27259225

  14. Autoimmune encephalitis and its relation to infection.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Arun; Benavides, David R

    2015-03-01

    Encephalitis, an inflammatory condition of the brain that results in substantial morbidity and mortality, has numerous causes. Over the past decade, it has become increasingly recognized that autoimmune conditions contribute significantly to the spectrum of encephalitis causes. Clinical suspicion and early diagnosis of autoimmune etiologies are of particular importance due to the need for early institution of immune suppressive therapies to improve outcome. Emerging clinical observations suggest that the most commonly recognized cause of antibody-mediated autoimmune encephalitis, anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis, may in some cases be triggered by herpes virus infection. Other conditions such as Rasmussen's encephalitis (RE) and febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES) have also been posited to be autoimmune conditions triggered by infectious agents. This review focuses on emerging concepts in central nervous system autoimmunity and addresses clinical and mechanistic findings linking autoimmune encephalitis and infections. Particular consideration will be given to anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis and its relation to herpes simplex encephalitis. PMID:25637289

  15. Autoimmune liver disease in Noonan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Loddo, Italia; Romano, Claudio; Cutrupi, Maria Concetta; Sciveres, Marco; Riva, Silvia; Salpietro, Annamaria; Ferraù, Valeria; Gallizzi, Romina; Briuglia, Silvana

    2015-03-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is characterized by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) is a cryptogenic, chronic and progressive necroinflammatory liver disease. Common features of AIH are hypergammaglobulinemia (IgG), presence of circulating autoantibodies, histological picture of interface hepatitis and response to immunosuppressant drugs. Conventional treatment with Prednisone and Azathioprine is effective in most patients. We describe the case of a 6 years-old girl with Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1. Molecular analysis of PTPN11 gene showed heterozygous mutation c.923A>G (Asn308Ser) in exon 8. Though association between NS and autoimmune disorders is known, this is the second case of association between Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1 described in literature. In the management of NS, an accurate clinical evaluation would be recommended. When there is a clinical suspicion of autoimmune phenomena, appropriate laboratory tests should be performed with the aim of clarifying whether the immune system is involved in NS. We think that autoimmunity represents a characteristic of NS, even if the etiopathogenesis is still unknown. PMID:25595571

  16. Environmental Exposures and Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Environmental exposures, ranging from perchlorate in rocket fuel to polychlorinated biphenols, have been shown to influence thyroid function. Although most of these agents are associated with reduced thyroid hormone levels or impaired thyroid hormone action, a number of environmental exposures confer an increased risk of autoimmune thyroid disease. Summary Factors that increase autoimmune thyroid disease risk include radiation exposure, both from nuclear fallout and medical radiation, increased iodine intake, as well as several contaminants in the environment that influence the thyroid. Although ∼70% of the risk for developing autoimmune thyroid disease is attributable to genetic background, environmental triggers are thought to play a role in the development of autoimmune thyroid disease in susceptible individuals. Conclusions Understanding the association of environmental agents with thyroid dysfunction can be utilized to reduce the risk to populations. Knowledge of the specific factors that trigger autoimmune thyroid disease and their mode of action, however, may also inform risk reduction in the individual patient. These factors are especially relevant for those at increased risk of autoimmune thyroid disease based on family history. PMID:20578899

  17. Secondary autoimmune cytopenias in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kerry A; Woyach, Jennifer A

    2016-04-01

    Secondary autoimmune cytopenias in chronic lymphocytic leukemia are distinct clinical entities that require specific management. These autoimmune disorders have a complex pathogenesis that involves both the leukemic cells and the immune environment in which they exist. The mechanism is not the same in all cases, and to varying degrees involves the chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells in antibody production, antigen presentation, and stimulation of T cells and bystander polyclonal B cells. Diagnosis of autoimmune cytopenias can be challenging as it is difficult to differentiate between autoimmunity and bone marrow failure due to disease progression. There is a need to distinguish these causes, as prognosis and treatment are not the same. Evidence regarding treatment of secondary autoimmune cytopenias is limited, but many effective options exist and treatment can be selected with severity of disease and patient factors in mind. With new agents to treat CLL coming into widespread clinical use, it will be important to understand how these will change the natural history and treatment of autoimmune cytopenias. PMID:27040709

  18. Solving the puzzle of autoimmunity: critical questions

    PubMed Central

    Smilek, Dawn E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in delineating the pathogenic mechanisms of autoimmune disease, the puzzle that reveals the true picture of these diverse immunological disorders is yet to be solved. We know that the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci as well as many different genetic susceptibility loci with relatively small effect sizes predispose to various autoimmune diseases and that environmental factors are involved in triggering disease. Models for mechanisms of disease become increasingly complex as relationships between components of both the adaptive and innate immune systems are untangled at the molecular level. In this article, we pose some of the important questions about autoimmunity where the answers will advance our understanding of disease pathogenesis and improve the rational design of novel therapies. How is autoimmunity triggered, and what components of the immune response drive the clinical manifestations of disease? What determines whether a genetically predisposed individual will develop an autoimmune disease? Is restoring immune tolerance the secret to finding cures for autoimmune disease? Current research efforts seek answers to these big questions. PMID:25750735

  19. Smell and autoimmunity: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Netta; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; de Carolis, Caterina; Perricone, Roberto; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-08-01

    The sense of smell is an ancient sensory modality vital for sampling and perceiving the chemical composition of surrounding environments. Olfaction involves a pathway of biochemical and electrophysiological processes, which allows the conversion of molecular information into sensations. Disturbances in the olfactory function have been investigated mainly in neurological/neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases; impaired sense of smell has been associated with depressed mood. Only recently, smell capability was tested in other diseases, particularly autoimmune diseases. Shoenfeld and colleagues opened this chapter showing that patients affected with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have disturbances in their olfactory functions and revealed its association with neuropsychiatric manifestations of the disease. This evidence was confirmed in experimental models and replicated in other SLE populations. The connection between autoimmunity and the sense of smell was lately emphasized by studies on patients with Sjögren's syndrome and in patients with other autoimmune/immune-mediated diseases, such as polydermatomyositis, recurrent spontaneous abortion, and hereditary angioedema. Genetic susceptibility and hormonal and environmental factors may play a role in these conditions. Olfactory receptor gene clusters are located in proximity to key locus of susceptibility for autoimmune diseases such as the major histocompatibility complex, suggesting not only a physic linkage, but a functional association. Nonetheless, gender- and hormone-mediated effects are fundamental in the development of autoimmune diseases. The different connections between smell and autoimmunity, genes and hormones may suggest that this is another tessera of a mosaic which is waiting the answer of Oedipus. PMID:23233263

  20. Virus infection, antiviral immunity, and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Getts, Daniel R.; Chastain, Emily M. L.; Terry, Rachael L.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary As a group of disorders, autoimmunity ranks as the third most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western World. However, the etiology of most autoimmune diseases remains unknown. Although genetic linkage studies support a critical underlying role for genetics, the geographic distribution of these disorders as well as the low concordance rates in monozygotic twins suggest that a combination of other factors including environmental ones are involved. Virus infection is a primary factor that has been implicated in the initiation of autoimmune disease. Infection triggers a robust and usually well-coordinated immune response that is critical for viral clearance. However, in some instances, immune regulatory mechanisms may falter, culminating in the breakdown of self-tolerance, resulting in immune-mediated attack directed against both viral and self-antigens. Traditionally, cross-reactive T-cell recognition, known as molecular mimicry, as well as bystander T-cell activation, culminating in epitope spreading, have been the predominant mechanisms elucidated through which infection may culminate in an T-cell-mediated autoimmune response. However, other hypotheses including virus-induced decoy of the immune system also warrant discussion in regard to their potential for triggering autoimmunity. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which virus infection and antiviral immunity contribute to the development of autoimmunity. PMID:23947356

  1. [Autoimmune Associated Encephalitis and Dementia].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies against various neural surface antigens induce cognitive impairments. Anti-VGKC (voltage gated potassium channel) complex antibodies are well known as one of the causative autoantibodies. An anti-VGKC antibody was identified as the autoantibody in acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome), which causes muscle cramps and difficulty in opening the palm of the hands. However, this antibody also tests positive in autoimmune limbic encephalitis, which has a subacute progress and causes poor memory or epilepsy attacks. Typical cases have a distinctive adult-onset, frequent, brief dystonic seizure semiology that predominantly affects the arms and ipsilateral face. It has now been termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures. In recent years, the true target antigens of the anti-VGKC antibody of this VGKC limbic encephalitis have been recognized as leucine rich glioma inactivated protein (LGI)-1 and others. These antibodies to amnesia-related LGI-1 in limbic encephalitis neutralize the LGI-1-ADAM22 (an anchor protein) interaction and reduce synaptic AMPA receptors. There have been reports of limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC complex antibodies mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Less than 2% of the patients with sporadic CJD (sCJD) develop serum anti-VGKC complex antibodies and, when positive, only at low titres. Low titres of these antibodies occur only rarely in suspected patients with sCJD, and when present, should be interpreted with caution. PMID:27056852

  2. [Thrombophilia, autoimmunity, and perioperative thromboprophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Rubio-Jurado, Benjamín; Salazar-Páramo, Mario; Medrano-Múnoz, Fabiola; González-Ojeda, Alejandro; Nava, Arnulfo

    2007-01-01

    Thrombosis is observed in several areas of medicine. Equilibrium between pro- and anticoagulant factors is required for maintaining blood flow. Tissue injury from multiple causes may induce coagulum formation mediated by coagulation pathway activation. Tissue factor (F III) + F VIIa interacts with both platelet and endothelial cell receptors. This coagulation model displays four stages: a) initiation, b) amplification, c) propagation and d) stabilization. Development of thrombosis is associated with either primary or hereditary and acquired factors. Primary thrombophilia is determined genetically by a hypercoagulative state shown by loss of natural anticoagulant activity, such as antithrombin III, C, S protein or procoagulant activity gaining resistance to activated C protein: factor V (Leiden), prothrombin and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations. Acquired thrombophilia mainly relates to an autoimmune condition such as the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies or lupus anticoagulant. Surgical procedures enhance mechanisms that predispose to thrombosis, e.g., acidosis, hypothermia, plasma expanders, extracorporeal circulation, duration of surgical procedure, and tissue manipulation. Adequate classification of the patient's thrombosis risk and adequate use of primary and secondary prophylactic recommendations in these groups of patients is necessary. PMID:18053365

  3. Autoimmune neurologic disorders in children.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ming; Gorman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune neurologic diseases are of major clinical importance in children. Antibody-mediated diseases of the central nervous system are now increasingly recognized in childhood, where the antibodies bind to cell surface epitopes on neuronal or glial proteins, and the patients demonstrate either focal or more generalized clinical signs depending on the extent of brain regions targeted by the antibodies. The antibodies are directed towards ion channels, receptors, and membrane proteins; and the diseases include limbic encephalitis and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-antibody encephalitis, among many others. Additionally there are conditions where the wider immune system is implicated. Neurologic features like seizures, movement disorders, autonomic dysfunction, and sleep disorders, with neuroimaging and electrophysiologic features, may indicate a specific antibody-mediated or immune disorder. Often, phenotypic overlap is observed between these conditions, and phenotypic variation seen in children with the same condition. Nevertheless, many patients benefit from immunotherapy with substantial improvement, although huge efforts are still required to optimize the outcome for many patients. In many patients no antibodies have yet been identified, even though they respond to immunotherapies. Here we describe the known antibodies and associated diseases, discuss conditions that are thought to be immune-mediated but have no known immunologic biomarker, and provide guidelines for the investigation and classification of these disorders. PMID:27112693

  4. The autoimmune basis of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Mahlios, Josh; De la Herrán-Arita, Alberto K; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2013-10-01

    Narcolepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagonic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, and disturbed nocturnal sleep patterns. Narcolepsy is caused by the loss of hypocretin (orexin)-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. Evidence, such as a strong association with HLA DQB1*06:02, strongly suggests an autoimmune basis targeting hypocretin neurons. Genome-wide association studies have strengthened the association between narcolepsy and immune system gene polymorphisms, including the identification of polymorphisms in the T cell receptor alpha locus, TNFSF4 (also called OX40L), Cathepsin H (CTSH) the purinergic receptor P2RY11, and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1. Recently, attention has been raised regarding a spike in cases of childhood narcolepsy in 2010 following the 2009 H1N1 pandemic (pH1N1) in China and vaccination with Pandemrix, an adjuvanted H1N1 vaccine that was used in Europe. How the immune system may be involved in disease initiation and/or progression remains a challenge to researchers. Potential immunological pathways that could lead to the specific elimination of hypocretin producing neurons include molecular mimicry or bystander activation, and are likely a combination of genetic and environmental factors, such as upper airway infections. PMID:23725858

  5. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70–85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6–12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80–90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:25271314

  6. Repigmentation of vitiligo lesions in a child with celiac disease after a gluten-free diet.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-García, Cristina; González-Hernández, S; Pérez-Robayna, N; Guimerá, F; Fagundo, E; Sánchez, R

    2011-01-01

    There is a well-established association of vitiligo with autoimmune conditions, and circulating autoantibodies to melanocytes have been demonstrated in the serum of patients with vitiligo. We present a case of repigmentation of vitiligo lesions in a girl with celiac disease after initiating a gluten-free diet, which to our knowledge has not been reported. PMID:21504457

  7. High-dose-rate intraluminal brachytherapy for paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Cho, Dong-Hyu

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome (PAMS), also known as paraneoplasic pemphigus, involves the skin, internal organs and mucosa. PAMS-associated mortality may occur as a result of autoantibody formation against internal tumors and their infiltration into organs other than the skin lesions that characterize PAMS. The most common symptoms of PAMS include pain associated with continuous oral ulceration and resistance to pharmacological treatment. The present study reports the case of a 42-year-old female patient who was admitted with an 8-month history of erosive skin lesions within the trunk region, oral mucosa and vaginal mucosa. The patient was diagnosed with PAMS based on computed tomography scans and histological analyses of the lesions. The lymphoid hyperplasia in the retroperitoneum and lesions in the vaginal mucosa and trunk area were improved following pharmacological treatment and resection of the lymph node showing hyperplasia. However, the oral lesion was treated with intraluminal brachytherapy due to its resistance to long-term pharmacological treatment. The majority of the lesions were improved following treatment, in the absence of any severe side effects. In addition, neither worsening nor progression of the oral lesion was observed during the 4-year follow-up period. PMID:27602070

  8. Immunological profile of HTLV-1-infected patients associated with infectious or autoimmune dermatological disorders.

    PubMed

    Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana Grazziela Alves; Passos, Livia; Duarte, Mariana Costa; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Trindade, Bruno Caetano; Dos Santos Dias, Raquel; Martins, Marina Lobato; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Barbara de Freitas; Guedes, Antônio Carlos; Gonçalves, Denise Utsch; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the frequency, the activation and the cytokine and chemokine profile of HTLV-1 carriers with or without dermatological lesions were thoroughly described and compared. The results indicated that HTLV-1-infected patients with dermatological lesions have distinct frequency and activation status when compared to asymptomatic carriers. Alterations in the CD4(+)HLA-DR(+), CD8(+) T cell, macrophage-like and NKT subsets as well as in the serum chemokines CCL5, CXCL8, CXCL9 and CXCL10 were observed in the HTLV-1-infected group with skin lesions. Additionally, HTLV-1 carriers with dermatological skin lesions showed more frequently high proviral load as compared to asymptomatic carriers. The elevated proviral load in HTLV-1 patients with infectious skin lesions correlated significantly with TNF-α/IL-10 ratio, while the same significant correlation was found for the IL-12/IL-10 ratio and the high proviral load in HTLV-1-infected patients with autoimmune skin lesions. All in all, these results suggest a distinct and unique immunological profile in the peripheral blood of HTLV-1-infected patients with skin disorders, and the different nature of skin lesion observed in these patients may be an outcome of a distinct unbalance of the systemic inflammatory response upon HTLV-1 infection. PMID:23936564

  9. Immunological Profile of HTLV-1-Infected Patients Associated with Infectious or Autoimmune Dermatological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Mariana Costa; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Trindade, Bruno Caetano; dos Santos Dias, Raquel; Martins, Marina Lobato; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Barbara de Freitas; Guedes, Antônio Carlos; Gonçalves, Denise Utsch; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the frequency, the activation and the cytokine and chemokine profile of HTLV-1 carriers with or without dermatological lesions were thoroughly described and compared. The results indicated that HTLV-1-infected patients with dermatological lesions have distinct frequency and activation status when compared to asymptomatic carriers. Alterations in the CD4+HLA-DR+, CD8+ T cell, macrophage-like and NKT subsets as well as in the serum chemokines CCL5, CXCL8, CXCL9 and CXCL10 were observed in the HTLV-1-infected group with skin lesions. Additionally, HTLV-1 carriers with dermatological skin lesions showed more frequently high proviral load as compared to asymptomatic carriers. The elevated proviral load in HTLV-1 patients with infectious skin lesions correlated significantly with TNF-α/IL-10 ratio, while the same significant correlation was found for the IL-12/IL-10 ratio and the high proviral load in HTLV-1-infected patients with autoimmune skin lesions. All in all, these results suggest a distinct and unique immunological profile in the peripheral blood of HTLV-1-infected patients with skin disorders, and the different nature of skin lesion observed in these patients may be an outcome of a distinct unbalance of the systemic inflammatory response upon HTLV-1 infection. PMID:23936564

  10. Differing roles for members of the phospholipase A2 superfamily in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Kalyvas, Athena; Baskakis, Constantinos; Magrioti, Victoria; Constantinou-Kokotou, Violetta; Stephens, Daren; López-Vales, Rubèn; Lu, Jian-Qiang; Yong, V. Wee; Dennis, Edward A.; Kokotos, George

    2009-01-01

    The phospholipase A2 (PLA2) superfamily hydrolyzes phospholipids to release free fatty acids and lysophospholipids, some of which can mediate inflammation and demyelination, hallmarks of the CNS autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis. The expression of two of the intracellular PLA2s (cPLA2 GIVA and iPLA2 GVIA) and two of the secreted PLA2s (sPLA2 GIIA and sPLA2 GV) are increased in different stages of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. We show using small molecule inhibitors, that cPLA2 GIVA plays a role in the onset, and iPLA2 GVIA in the onset and progression of EAE. We also show a potential role for sPLA2 in the later remission phase. These studies demonstrate that selective inhibition of iPLA2 can ameliorate disease progression when treatment is started before or after the onset of symptoms. The effects of these inhibitors on lesion burden, chemokine and cytokine expression as well as on the lipid profile provide insights into their potential modes of action. iPLA2 is also expressed by macrophages and other immune cells in multiple sclerosis lesions. Our results therefore suggest that iPLA2 might be an excellent target to block for the treatment of CNS autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:19218359

  11. Human T lymphotropic virus type I in arthropathy and autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, K; Sumida, T; Hasunuma, T

    1996-08-01

    The progressive nature of the disease and the persistent inflammation affecting various organs are common features of idiopathic autoimmune disorders of unknown etiology. Therefore, the HTLV-I-associated disorders described in the present review are outstandingly important models for our understanding of the pathologic mechanisms of organ-specific immune disorders. HTLV-I arthropathy is characterized by chronic inflammatory and proliferative synovitis with lymphoid follicles and pannus formation in the affected joints, indistinguishable from the findings in idiopathic RA. The presence of the tax gene in HTLV-I-negative SS patients suggests that it is responsible for the exocrine gland abnormality, characterized by extensive lymphoproliferative epithelial lesions. Furthermore, the pulmonary lesions of HTLV-I bronchopneumonopathy are similar to those of idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis. Based on these observations, the clinical findings associated with the immunologic abnormalities in HTLV-I-infected patients provide us with valuable information for understanding the pathogenetic mechanisms of chronic inflammatory conditions associated with immune regulatory disorders. Although the clinical and pathologic features of the 2 common HTLV-I-associated disorders, ATL and HAM/TSP, have been well characterized and are clearly distinguishable from those of the idiopathic forms of these disorders, other HTLV-I-related autoimmune diseases, e.g., arthropathy, SS, or bronchopneumonopathy, are clinically indistinguishable from the idiopathic forms of the diseases. Such similarity may serve as a clue to the pathogenetic mechanisms of idiopathic autoimmune disorders. PMID:8702452

  12. Analysis of the autoimmune regulator gene in patients with autoimmune non-APECED polyendocrinopathies.

    PubMed

    Palma, Alessia; Gianchecchi, Elena; Palombi, Melania; Luciano, Rosa; Di Carlo, Pierluigi; Crinò, Antonino; Cappa, Marco; Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2013-09-01

    The pathogenesis of autoimmunity was derived from a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. AIRE gene variants and, in particular, heterozygous loss-of-function mutations were also discovered in organ-specific autoimmune disorders, possibly contributing to their etiopathogenesis. It was suggested that even predisposition to develop certain autoimmune conditions may be derived from AIRE gene polymorphisms including S278R and intronic IVS9+6 G>A. In this study we unravel the hypothesis on whether AIRE gene variants may predispose individuals to associated autoimmune conditions in 41 Italian patients affected by non-APECED autoimmune polyendocrinopathies. We could not detect any heterozygous mutations of the AIRE gene. Although a trend of association was observed, heterozygous polymorphisms S278R and IVS9+6 G>A were detected in patients without statistically significant prevalence than in controls. Their putative contribution to autoimmune polyendocrinopathies and their predictive value in clinical strategies of disease development could be unravelled by analysing a larger sample of diseased patients and healthy individuals. PMID:23643663

  13. Ghost cell lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, E.; Jimson, Sudha; Masthan, K. M. K.; Balachander, N.

    2015-01-01

    Ghost cells have been a controversy for a long time. Ghost cell is a swollen/enlarged epithelial cell with eosnophilic cytoplasm, but without a nucleus. In routine H and E staining these cells give a shadowy appearance. Hence these cells are also called as shadow cells or translucent cells. The appearance of these cells varies from lesion to lesion involving odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions. This article review about the origin, nature and significance of ghost cells in different neoplasms. PMID:26015694

  14. [Surprising white lesions].

    PubMed

    Nolte, J W; van der Waal, I

    2011-09-01

    A 46-year-old man appeared with white lesions of the oral cavity. A previously taken biopsy revealed no classifying diagnosis and treatment with mouth rinse produced no improvement. A new biopsy was taken, on which the pathologist performed additional tests. This resulted in the diagnosis 'syphilis'. The patient was treated with benzylpenicillin and the oral white lesions disappeared. Although nowadays syphilis is rare, special attention is required when noticing these kinds of lesions of the oral cavity. PMID:21957637

  15. Role of IgE in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Sanjuan, Miguel A; Sagar, Divya; Kolbeck, Roland

    2016-06-01

    There is accumulating evidence to suggest that IgE plays a significant role in autoimmunity. The presence of circulating self-reactive IgE in patients with autoimmune disorders has been long known but, at the same time, largely understudied. However, studies have shown that the increased IgE concentration is not associated with higher prevalence for atopy and allergy in patients with autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus. IgE-mediated mechanisms are conventionally known to facilitate degranulation of mast cells and basophils and promote TH2 immunity, mechanisms that are not only central to mounting an appropriate defense against parasitic worms, noxious substances, toxins, venoms, and environmental irritants but that also trigger exuberant allergic reactions in patients with allergies. More recently, IgE autoantibodies have been recognized to participate in the self-inflicted damaging immune responses that characterize autoimmunity. Such autoimmune responses include direct damage on tissue-containing autoantigens, activation and migration of basophils to lymph nodes, and, as observed most recently, induction of type 1 interferon responses from plasmacytoid dendritic cells. The importance of IgE as a central pathogenic mechanism in autoimmunity has now been clinically validated by the approval of omalizumab, an anti-IgE mAb, for patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria and for the clinical benefit of patients with bullous pemphigoid. In this review we summarize recent reports describing the prevalence of self-reactive IgE and discuss novel findings that incriminate IgE as central in the pathogenesis of inflammatory autoimmune disorders. PMID:27264000

  16. Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders without and with autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) can coexist with non-organ-specific or organ-specific autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the features between NMOSD without and with autoimmune diseases, and NMOSD with non-organ-specific and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Methods One hundred and fifty five NMOSD patients without autoimmune diseases (n = 115) and with autoimmune diseases (n = 40) were enrolled. NMOSD with autoimmune diseases were divided by organ-specific autoimmune diseases. The clinical, laboratory and magnetic resonance imaging features between two groups were assessed. Results Motor deficit was less frequent in NMOSD patients with non-organ-specific autoimmune diseases (p = 0.024). Cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell and protein, serum C-reactive protein and immunoglobulin G were lower in NMOSD patients without autoimmune diseases, while several autoantibodies seropositivity and thyroid indexes were significantly higher in NMOSD patients with autoimmune diseases (p < 0.05). No difference was found in other clinical and laboratory characteristics between different NMOSD subtypes (p > 0.05). NMOSD patients with autoimmune diseases had higher brain abnormalities than NMOSD without autoimmune diseases (p < 0.001). Conclusions The characteristics between NMOSD without and with autoimmune diseases were similar. NMOSD with autoimmune diseases have high frequency of brain abnormalities. PMID:25135481

  17. Bartonella henselae Infection: An Uncommon Mimicker of Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Maritsi, Despoina N; Zarganis, Diagoras; Metaxa, Zoi; Papaioannou, Georgia; Vartzelis, George

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a seven-year-old immunocompetent female patient who developed systemic symptoms mimicking an autoimmune rather than an infectious disease. The patient presented with rash, biquotidian fever, night sweats, and arthralgias. There was no antecedent history of cat contact. Investigations showed increased inflammatory markers, leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, hypercalcemia, and raised angiotensin-converting enzyme. Interferon-gamma releasing assay for tuberculosis infection was negative. Abdominal imaging demonstrated multifocal lesions of the liver and spleen (later proved to be granulomata), chest X-ray showed enlarged hilar lymph nodes, and ophthalmology review revealed uveitis. Clinical, laboratory, and imaging features pointed towards sarcoidosis. Subsequently, raised titers (IgM 1 : 32, IgG 1 : 256) against Bartonella confirmed the diagnosis of B. henselae infection. She was treated with gentamycin followed by ciprofloxacin; repeat investigations showed complete resolution of findings. The presence of hepatic and splenic lesions in children with bartonellosis is well documented. Our case, however, exhibited certain unusual findings such as the coexistence of acute ocular and systemic involvement in an immunocompetent host. Serological testing is an inexpensive and effective way to diagnose bartonellosis in immunocompetent patients; we suggest that bartonella serology is included in the baseline tests performed on children with prolonged fever even in the absence of contact with cats in countries where bartonellosis is prevalent. PMID:23424700

  18. Autoimmunity and auto-immune syndromes associated with and preceding the development of lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Polliack, A; Lugassy, G

    1992-11-01

    In this report the association of autoimmunity and autoimmune syndromes with lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) is described in 15 patients. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) developed in 10 patients, Hodgkin's disease (HD) in 3 and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in two. In most instances clinical and laboratory phenomena preceded the development/diagnosis of these disorders. Manifestations ranged from the presence of autoantibodies in the serum to the presence of both ill defined or incomplete autoimmune syndromes including cold urticaria, Raynaud's phenomenon, cold agglutinin disease, thyroiditis, nephrotic syndrome and vasculitis to typical systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and even one of scleroderma. It is suggested that in some patients (in)complete clinical manifestations of autoimmunity may precede the development of lymphoid neoplasias. The link between autoimmunity and lymphoproliferative disorders is briefly discussed. PMID:1434818

  19.  An autoimmune polyglandular syndrome complicated with celiac disease and autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Dieli-Crimi, Romina; Núñez, Concepción; Estrada, Lourdes; López-Palacios, Natalia

    2016-01-01

     Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is a combination of different autoimmune diseases. The close relationship between immune-mediated disorders makes it mandatory to perform serological screening periodically in order to avoid delayed diagnosis of additional autoimmune diseases. We studied a patient with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who later developed an autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) and was referred to our hospital with a serious condition of his clinical status. The patient was suffering from an advance stage of celiac disease (CD), the delay in its diagnosis and in the establishment of a gluten-free dietled the patient to a severe proteincalorie malnutrition. Later, the patient developed an autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). We consider that clinical deterioration in patients with APS should alert physicians about the possible presence of other immune-mediated diseases. Periodic screening for autoantibodies would help to prevent delayed diagnosis and would improve patient's quality of life. PMID:27236159

  20. Autoimmune Encephalitis in Postpartum Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Bergink, Veerle; Armangue, Thaís; Titulaer, Maarten J.; Markx, Sander; Dalmau, Josep; Kushner, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Significant immunological alterations have been observed in women with first-onset affective psychosis during the postpartum period. Recent studies have highlighted the possibility that a subset of patients with first-onset severe psychiatric episodes might suffer from undiagnosed autoimmune encephalitis. Therefore, the authors performed a three-step immunohistochemistry-based screening for CNS autoantibodies in a large cohort of patients with postpartum psychosis and matched postpartum comparison subjects. Method Ninety-six consecutive patients with postpartum psychosis and 64 healthy postpartum women were included. Screening for antibodies in patient serum was performed using immunohistochemistry. Samples showing any staining were further examined by immunocytochemistry using live hippocampal neurons and cell-based assays to test for anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antibodies. Cell-based assays for all other known CNS antigens were performed in those samples with immunocytochemistry labeling but negative for NMDA receptor antibodies. Results Four patients (4%) with neuropil labeling suggestive for extracellular antigen reactivity were identified. Serum samples from all four patients showed clear extracellular labeling of live hippocampal neurons. Two women had the specific staining pattern characteristic for anti-NMDA receptor antibody positivity, which was confirmed by cell-based assays. Neither patient with anti-NMDA receptor antibody positivity had evidence of an ovarian teratoma. The other two patients tested negative by cell-based assays for all known CNS antigens. None of the matched postpartum comparison subjects had confirmed neuronal surface antibodies. The two patients with anti-NMDA receptor antibodies both showed extrapyramidal symptoms following initiation of treatment with low-dose haloperidol. Conclusions In patients with acute psychosis during the postpartum period, systematic screening for anti-NMDA receptor autoantibodies

  1. Protective autoimmunity in cancer (review).

    PubMed

    Toubi, E; Shoenfeld, Y

    2007-01-01

    Not all malignant cells progress to invasive cancer, some may even regress, but the early detection of abnormal cells can be crucial for patient survival. Immune surveillance mechanisms are complex and provide continuous efforts for the removal of transformed cells. Naturally occurring antibodies are frontier soldiers that act as the first line of defense in the battle against cancer. During the process of carcinogenesis naturally occurring antibody responses to tumor antigens were found to be associated with improved survival and protection against the spread of cancer. Using the human hybridoma technology, a series of tumor-binding antibodies can be isolated as they have several common features: they are germ-line coded IgM antibodies, they bind to various tumor-antigens, they induce apoptosis of malignant cells, and most importantly they detect not only malignant cells but also the precursor stages (i.e., autoantigens). Natural protective autoantibodies against tumor-antigens were isolated from patients and healthy donors reflecting the development of naturally occurring B-cell responses during the process of cancer evolvement. They fulfill the definition of autoantibodies since they are self-reactive and they also bind altered self-antigens such as tumor cells. In this regard various autoantibodies such as anti-dsDNA and anti-Fas autoantibodies were found to be significantly higher in patients with various carcinomas, thus playing a role for their improved survival. Targeting T-regulatory cells, namely the expression of CTLA-4 was also found to improve survival in cancer patients. Autoimmunity and malignancy frequently coexist and they may share etiological and pathological mechanisms. Therefore, the efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulins or CTLA-4 blockade was also employed as a treatment for prevention of malignancy and metastases spread. PMID:17143505

  2. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis. PMID:25915571

  3. Sclerosing Lesions of the Orbit: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lokdarshi, Gautam; Pushker, Neelam; Bajaj, Mandeep S.

    2015-01-01

    Orbital sclerosing inflammation is a distinct group of pathologies characterized by indolent growth with minimal or no signs of inflammation. However, contrary to earlier classifications, it should not be considered a chronic stage of acute inflammation. Although rare, orbital IgG4-related disease has been associated with systemic sclerosing pseudotumor-like lesions. Possible mechanisms include autoimmune and IgG4 related defective clonal proliferation. Currently, there is no specific treatment protocol for IgG4-related disease although the response to low dose steroid provides a good response as compared to non-IgG4 sclerosing pseudotumor. Specific sclerosing inflammations (e.g. Wegener's disease, sarcoidosis, Sjogren's syndrome) and neoplasms (lymphoma, metastatic breast carcinoma) should be ruled out before considering idiopathic sclerosing inflammation as a diagnosis. PMID:26692715

  4. Molecular Diagnosis in Autoimmune Skin Blistering Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Otten, J.V.; Hashimoto, T.; Hertl, M.; Payne, A.S.; Sitaru, C.

    2014-01-01

    Blister formation in skin and mucous membranes results from a loss of cell-cell or cell-matrix adhesion and is a common outcome of pathological events in a variety of conditions, including autoimmune and genetic diseases, viral and bacterial infections, or injury by physical and chemical factors. Autoantibodies against structural components maintaining cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion induce tissue damage in autoimmune blistering diseases. Detection of these autoantibodies either tissue-bound or circulating in serum is essential to diagnose the autoimmune nature of disease. Various immunofluorescence methods as well as molecular immunoassays, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting, belong to the modern diagnostic algorithms for these disorders. There is still a considerable need to increase awareness of the rare autoimmune blistering diseases, which often show a severe, chronic-relapsing course, among physicians and the public. This review article describes the immunopathological features of autoimmune bullous diseases and the molecular immunoassays currently available for their diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:24160488

  5. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist’s viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling. PMID:26576102

  6. Neurologic autoimmunity: mechanisms revealed by animal models.

    PubMed

    Bradl, Monika; Lassmann, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, neurologic autoimmunity has become a major consideration in the diagnosis and management of patients with many neurologic presentations. The nature of the associated antibodies and their targets has led to appreciation of the importance of the accessibility of the target antigen to antibodies, and a partial understanding of the different mechanisms that can follow antibody binding. This chapter will first describe the basic principles of autoimmune inflammation and tissue damage in the central and peripheral nervous system, and will then demonstrate what has been learnt about neurologic autoimmunity from circumstantial clinical evidence and from passive, active, and occasionally spontaneous or genetic animal models. It will cover neurologic autoimmune diseases ranging from disorders of neuromuscular transmission, peripheral and ganglionic neuropathy, to diseases of the central nervous system, where autoantibodies are either pathogenic and cause destruction or changes in function of their targets, where they are harmless bystanders of T-cell-mediated tissue damage, or are not involved at all. Finally, this chapter will summarize the relevance of current animal models for studying the different neurologic autoimmune diseases, and it will identify aspects where future animal models need to be improved to better reflect the disease reality experienced by affected patients, e.g., the chronicity or the relapsing/remitting nature of their disease. PMID:27112675

  7. How I treat autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, João Bosco

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) represents a failure of apoptotic mechanisms to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis, permitting accumulation of lymphoid mass and persistence of autoreactive cells that often manifest in childhood with chronic nonmalignant lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and recurring multilineage cytopenias. Cytopenias in these patients can be the result of splenic sequestration as well as autoimmune complications manifesting as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, and autoimmune neutropenia. More than 300 families with hereditary ALPS have now been described; nearly 500 patients from these families have been studied and followed worldwide over the last 20 years by our colleagues and ourselves. Some of these patients with FAS mutations affecting the intracellular portion of the FAS protein also have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. The best approaches to diagnosis, follow-up, and management of ALPS, its associated cytopenias, and other complications resulting from infiltrative lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity are presented. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrial.gov as #NCT00001350. PMID:21885601

  8. Kappa opioid receptor activation alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and promotes oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Du, Changsheng; Duan, Yanhui; Wei, Wei; Cai, Yingying; Chai, Hui; Lv, Jie; Du, Xiling; Zhu, Jian; Xie, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by autoimmune damage to the central nervous system. All the current drugs for MS target the immune system. Although effective in reducing new lesions, they have limited effects in preventing the progression of disability. Promoting oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination and recovery of neurons are the new directions of MS therapy. The endogenous opioid system, consisting of MOR, DOR, KOR and their ligands, has been suggested to participate in the pathogenesis of MS. However, the exact receptor and mechanism remain elusive. Here we show that genetic deletion of KOR exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, whereas activating KOR with agonists alleviates the symptoms. KOR does not affect immune cell differentiation and function. Instead, it promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination both in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that targeting KOR might be an intriguing way to develop new MS therapies that may complement the existing immunosuppressive approaches. PMID:27040771

  9. Kappa opioid receptor activation alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and promotes oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination.

    PubMed

    Du, Changsheng; Duan, Yanhui; Wei, Wei; Cai, Yingying; Chai, Hui; Lv, Jie; Du, Xiling; Zhu, Jian; Xie, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by autoimmune damage to the central nervous system. All the current drugs for MS target the immune system. Although effective in reducing new lesions, they have limited effects in preventing the progression of disability. Promoting oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination and recovery of neurons are the new directions of MS therapy. The endogenous opioid system, consisting of MOR, DOR, KOR and their ligands, has been suggested to participate in the pathogenesis of MS. However, the exact receptor and mechanism remain elusive. Here we show that genetic deletion of KOR exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, whereas activating KOR with agonists alleviates the symptoms. KOR does not affect immune cell differentiation and function. Instead, it promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination both in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that targeting KOR might be an intriguing way to develop new MS therapies that may complement the existing immunosuppressive approaches. PMID:27040771

  10. Preinvasive lesions

    Cancer.gov

    This definition is for allocation of lesions with preinvasive/borderline properties. It is currently aimed at newly identified neoplasms, which may be similar to those described in humans. In mouse pathology, many adenomas may be preinvasive/borderline lesions. However, their inclusion in the preinvasive category can be justified only upon development of better diagnostic criteria.

  11. Noninfectious penile lesions.

    PubMed

    Teichman, Joel M H; Sea, Jason; Thompson, Ian M; Elston, Dirk M

    2010-01-15

    Family physicians commonly diagnose and manage penile cutaneous lesions. Noninfectious lesions may be classified as inflammatory and papulosquamous (e.g., psoriasis, lichen sclerosus, angiokeratomas, lichen nitidus, lichen planus), or as neoplastic (e.g., carcinoma in situ, invasive squamous cell carcinoma). The clinical presentation and appearance of the lesions guide the diagnosis. Psoriasis presents as red or salmon-colored plaques with overlying scales, often with systemic lesions. Lichen sclerosus presents as a phimotic, hypopigmented prepuce or glans penis with a cellophane-like texture. Angiokeratomas are typically asymptomatic, well-circumscribed, red or blue papules, whereas lichen nitidus usually produces asymptomatic pinhead-sized, hypopigmented papules. The lesions of lichen planus are pruritic, violaceous, polygonal papules that are typically systemic. Carcinoma in situ should be suspected if the patient has velvety red or keratotic plaques of the glans penis or prepuce, whereas invasive squamous cell carcinoma presents as a painless lump, ulcer, or fungating irregular mass. Some benign lesions, such as psoriasis and lichen planus, can mimic carcinoma in situ or squamous cell carcinoma. Biopsy is indicated if the diagnosis is in doubt or neoplasm cannot be excluded. The management of benign penile lesions usually involves observation or topical corticosteroids; however, neoplastic lesions generally require surgery. PMID:20082512

  12. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuyet A; Krakowski, Andrew C; Naheedy, John H; Kruk, Peter G; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2015-12-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  13. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  14. Extragastric Dieulafoy's lesion

    PubMed Central

    Gauci, James; Galea, Samuel; Galea, Joseph; Schembri, Mark

    2014-01-01

    A 74-year-old man on warfarin for aortic valve replacement presented with recurrent episodes of melaena. An initial oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) was normal, as were red cell scanning and colonoscopy. It was a third OGD that revealed the cause of the melaena—a vascular lesion in the duodenum, at the junction between D1 and D2. An extragastric Dieulafoy's lesion was diagnosed, and the lesion was injected with epinephrine and tattooed. Over the following months, episodes of bleeding recurred despite further attempts at injection. Percutaneous radiologically assisted embolisation of the gastroduodenal artery, and eventually duodenotomy and oversuturing of the lesion were performed to no avail. The patient has undergone over 10 endoscopies, and has received over 70 units of packed red cells to date, since his initial presentation 6 years ago. Attempts to stop the bleeding permanently have been difficult, highlighting the complexity of managing such a lesion. PMID:25216921

  15. Autoimmune Myocarditis, Valvulitis, and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jennifer M.; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Fairweather, DeLisa; Huber, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac myosin-induced autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) is a model of inflammatory heart disease initiated by CD4+ T cells (Smith and Allen 1991; Li, Heuser et al. 2004). It is a paradigm of the immune-mediated cardiac damage believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of a subset of postinfectious human cardiomyopathies (Rose, Herskowitz et al. 1993). Myocarditis is induced in susceptible mice by immunization with purified cardiac myosin (Neu, Rose et al. 1987) or specific peptides derived from cardiac myosin (Donermeyer, Beisel et al. 1995; Pummerer, Luze et al. 1996) (see Basic Protocol 1), or by adoptive transfer of myosin-reactive T cells (Smith and Allen 1991) (see Alternate Protocol). Myocarditis has been induced in Lewis rats by immunization with purified rat or porcine cardiac myosin (Kodama, Matsumoto et al. 1990; Li, Heuser et al. 2004) (see Basic Protocol 2) or S2-16 peptide (Li, Heuser et al. 2004), or by adoptive transfer of T cells stimulated by specific peptides derived from cardiac myosin (Wegmann, Zhao et al. 1994). Myocarditis begins 12 to 14 days after the first immunization, and is maximal after 21 days. Other animal models commonly used to study myocarditis development include the pathogen-induced models in which disease is initiated by viral infection. The first murine model of acute viral myocarditis causes sudden death via viral damage to cardiomyocytes (Huber, Gauntt et al. 1998; Horwitz, La Cava et al. 2000; Fong 2003; Fuse, Chan et al. 2005; Fairweather and Rose 2007; Cihakova and Rose 2008) whereas the second model is based on inoculation with heart-passaged coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) that includes damaged heart proteins (Fairweather, Frisancho-Kiss et al. 2004; Fairweather D 2004; Fairweather and Rose 2007; Cihakova and Rose 2008) In addition to the protocols used to induce EAM in mice and rats, support protocols are included for preparing purified cardiac myosin using mouse or rat heart tissue (see Support Protocol 1), preparing purified

  16. Understanding autoimmunity: The ion channel perspective.

    PubMed

    RamaKrishnan, Anantha Maharasi; Sankaranarayanan, Kavitha

    2016-07-01

    Ion channels are integral membrane proteins that orchestrate the passage of ions across the cell membrane and thus regulate various key physiological processes of the living system. The stringently regulated expression and function of these channels hold a pivotal role in the development and execution of various cellular functions. Malfunction of these channels results in debilitating diseases collectively termed channelopathies. In this review, we highlight the role of these proteins in the immune system with special emphasis on the development of autoimmunity. The role of ion channels in various autoimmune diseases is also listed out. This comprehensive review summarizes the ion channels that could be used as molecular targets in the development of new therapeutics against autoimmune disorders. PMID:26854401

  17. Macrophage activation syndrome in autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Deane, Sean; Selmi, Carlo; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a phenomenon characterized by cytopenia, organ dysfunction, and coagulopathy associated with an inappropriate activation of macrophages. Current diagnostic criteria are imprecise, but the syndrome is now recognized as a form of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis that is characteristically associated with autoimmune diatheses. The diagnosis of incipient MAS in patients with autoimmune disease requires a high index of suspicion, as several characteristics of the disorder may be present in the underlying condition or infectious complications associated with the treatment thereof. Proposed treatment regimens include aggressive approaches that require validation in future controlled studies. This review discusses the major aspects of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of MAS with a focus on the association with autoimmune disease. PMID:20407267

  18. Immunogenetics of autoimmune diseases in Asian Indians.

    PubMed

    Mehra, N K; Kaur, Gurvinder; Kanga, Uma; Tandon, Nikhil

    2002-04-01

    The HLA class II molecules play a critical role in the processing and presentation of specific peptides derived from autoantigens of pancreatic beta cells or gluten for T cell scrutiny in IDDM and CD. In the present study, extended DR3-positive haplotypes associated with autoimmunity in northern Indian patients have been reported. The haplotype A26-B8-DR3 was the most common autoimmunity-favoring haplotype encountered among these patients. This association is, indeed, unique to Indian autoimmune patients, as it replaces the otherwise most commonly associated Caucasian haplotype A1-B8-DR3 (AH8.1) in this population. Further, CD patients revealed 100% association with DQB1*0201 along with DQA*0501 (97%) either in cis or trans configuration. PMID:12021136

  19. HTLV-1, Immune Response and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Quaresma, Juarez A S; Yoshikawa, Gilberto T; Koyama, Roberta V L; Dias, George A S; Fujihara, Satomi; Fuzii, Hellen T

    2015-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (PET/HAM) is involved in the development of autoimmune diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and Sjögren’s Syndrome (SS). The development of HTLV-1-driven autoimmunity is hypothesized to rely on molecular mimicry, because virus-like particles can trigger an inflammatory response. However, HTLV-1 modifies the behavior of CD4+ T cells on infection and alters their cytokine production. A previous study showed that in patients infected with HTLV-1, the activity of regulatory CD4+ T cells and their consequent expression of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are altered. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying changes in cytokine release leading to the loss of tolerance and development of autoimmunity. PMID:26712781

  20. Pregnancy and autoimmune connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Marder, Wendy; Littlejohn, Emily A; Somers, Emily C

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune connective tissue diseases predominantly affect women and often occur during the reproductive years. Thus, specialized issues in pregnancy planning and management are commonly encountered in this patient population. This chapter provides a current overview of pregnancy as a risk factor for onset of autoimmune disease, considerations related to the course of pregnancy in several autoimmune connective tissue diseases, and disease management and medication issues before pregnancy, during pregnancy, and in the postpartum period. A major theme that has emerged across these inflammatory diseases is that active maternal disease during pregnancy is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, and that maternal and fetal health can be optimized when conception is planned during times of inactive disease and through maintaining treatment regimens compatible with pregnancy. PMID:27421217

  1. Epidemiology of Autoimmune Diseases in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, William W.; Rose, Noel R.; Kalaydjian, Amanda; Pedersen, Marianne G.; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2007-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of the autoimmune diseases taken together has not been done heretofore. The National Patient Register of Denmark is used to estimate population prevalence of 31 possible or probable autoimmune diseases. Record linkage is used to estimate 465 pairwise comorbidities in individuals among the 31 diseases, and familial aggregation among sibs, parents and offspring. The prevalence of any of the 31 diseases in the population is more than 5%. Within individuals, there is extensive comorbidity across the 31 diseases. Within families, aggregation is strongest for individual diseases, and weak across diseases. These data confirm the importance of the autoimmune diseases as a group, and suggest that common etiopathologies exist among them. PMID:17582741

  2. Commensal microbiota influence systemic autoimmune responses

    PubMed Central

    Van Praet, Jens T; Donovan, Erin; Vanassche, Inge; Drennan, Michael B; Windels, Fien; Dendooven, Amélie; Allais, Liesbeth; Cuvelier, Claude A; van de Loo, Fons; Norris, Paula S; Kruglov, Andrey A; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Rabot, Sylvie; Tito, Raul; Raes, Jeroen; Gaboriau-Routhiau, Valerie; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Van de Wiele, Tom; Eberl, Gérard; Ware, Carl F; Elewaut, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies are a hallmark feature of generalized autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis. However, the processes underlying the loss of tolerance against nuclear self-constituents remain largely unresolved. Using mice deficient in lymphotoxin and Hox11, we report that approximately 25% of mice lacking secondary lymphoid organs spontaneously develop specific antinuclear antibodies. Interestingly, we find this phenotype is not caused by a defect in central tolerance. Rather, cell-specific deletion and in vivo lymphotoxin blockade link these systemic autoimmune responses to the formation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue in the neonatal period of life. We further demonstrate antinuclear antibody production is influenced by the presence of commensal gut flora, in particular increased colonization with segmented filamentous bacteria, and IL-17 receptor signaling. Together, these data indicate that neonatal colonization of gut microbiota influences generalized autoimmunity in adult life. PMID:25599993

  3. Gq-Coupled Receptors in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Shi, Guixiu

    2016-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins can be divided into Gi, Gs, Gq/11, and G12/13 subfamilies according to their α subunits. The main function of G proteins is transducing signals from G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), a family of seven transmembrane receptors. In recent years, studies have demonstrated that GPCRs interact with Gq, a member of the Gq/11 subfamily of G proteins. This interaction facilitates the vital role of this family of proteins in immune regulation and autoimmunity, particularly for Gαq, which is considered the functional α subunit of Gq protein. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms through which Gq-coupled receptors control autoreactive lymphocytes is critical and may provide insights into the treatment of autoimmune disorders. In this review, we summarize recent advances in studies of the role of Gq-coupled receptors in autoimmunity, with a focus on their pathologic role and downstream signaling. PMID:26885533

  4. MicroRNAs in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zigang; Li, Wenhui; Fu, Baoquan

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) are featured by body's immune responses being directed towards its own specific target organs or multiple organ systems, causing persistent inflammation and consequent tissue damage. miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs in a size of approximately 22 nt that play important regulatory roles in many organisms by cleavage or translational inhibition of targeted mRNAs. Many miRNAs are reported to be differentially expressed in ADs and may play a pivotal role in regulating immune responses and autoimmunity. In this review, current research progress in the miRNAs in ADs was elucidated. PMID:24991561

  5. [Ludwig van Beethoven: an autoimmune deafness?].

    PubMed

    Davies, P J

    1995-01-01

    The author reminds us of the great moments of Beethoven's life and of the different stages of his deafness onset, until to last instants. The post-mortem examination, performed by doctor Wagner, and the scientific studies of the remains, during the exhumations, are reported. Beethoven's deafness was clearly a sensorineural impairment and the previously suggested prevalent hypotheses are discussed. A new theory is emphasized, based on modern studies about autoimmune sensorineural hearing losses in relation with chronic inflammatory bowel ailment. Conclusion is that Beethoven's deafness was probably owing to a primary autoimmune degeneration of the organ of Corti, giving rise to atrophy of the auditory nerve. PMID:11615339

  6. Pharmacologic Therapies for Rheumatologic and Autoimmune Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bays, Alison M; Gardner, Gregory

    2016-07-01

    Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are commonly prescribed by rheumatologists to reduce disease activity and induce remission in autoimmune conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. Steroids are sometimes used in combination with DMARD therapy and should be used at the lowest effective dose for the least amount of time. There are many biologic agents available for use for inflammatory arthritis and other autoimmune conditions. Care should be taken when prescribing and managing DMARDS, steroids and biologic agents medications with a careful eye towards screening for infectious disease, vaccination, bone heath and lab monitoring. PMID:27235612

  7. The immunofluorescence techniques in the diagnosis of endocrine autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Betterle, Corrado; Zanchetta, Renato

    2012-08-01

    In the study of autoimmune diseases, the laboratory plays a very important role. We describe the immunofluorescence techniques (direct, indirect, complement-fixing, double) for determining the presence of autoantibodies and their role in the autoimmune endocrine diseases. PMID:26000129

  8. Total Recovery from Monoclonal Gammopathy and Autoimmune Phenomena After Parathyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Carlos A; Echeverri, Andrés F; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Based on the observation of a patient with a causal relationship between hyperparathyroidism and development of both autoimmune disease and paraproteinemia, we hypothesize a novel cause of autoimmunity triggered in the context of hyperparathyroidism. PMID:22870165

  9. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... polyglandular syndrome, type 1 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, type 1 is an inherited condition that affects many of ...

  10. Role of soluble and cell surface molecules in the pathogenesis of autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Drosera, M; Facchetti, F; Landolfo, S; Mondini, M; Nyberg, F; Parodi, A; Santoro, A; Zampieri, S; Doria, A

    2006-01-01

    The skin is one of the most commonly involved tissue in rheumatic autoimmune diseases. Different mechanisms are thought to be implicated in the pathogenesis of skin lesions. In genetically predisposed individuals, ultraviolet (UV) light can contribute to the induction of skin lesions via an inflammatory process. UV light promotes the release of cytokines by keratinocytes and the induction of adhesion molecules on the surface of epidermal cells initiating a cascade of inflammatory events and recruiting immunoinflammatory cells into the skin. In this review data regarding the expression of TNF-alpha in lesional skin tissue from subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus patients and the role of interferons in the pathogenesis of skin manifestations of rheumatic autoimmune diseases are reported. In addition, an overview on the expression of cellular adhesion molecules in these diseases is provided.UV light can also induce apoptosis in keratinocytes. During this cell death several enzymes became activated. Among them, desoxyribonuclease (DNase) is an enzyme involved in degrading DNA during apoptosis. Data regarding the activity of DNAse in patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus as a possible risk factor for the development of systemic disease are here reported. PMID:16466628

  11. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  12. Oral Lesions in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  13. Retinal lesions in septicemia.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, M; Barnea, Y; Geyer, O; Siegman-Igra, Y

    1993-12-15

    We explored the association between septicemia and specific retinal lesions in a prospective controlled study. Hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots, or Roth's spots were found in 24 of 101 septicemic patients (24%), compared to four of 99 age- and gender-matched control patients (4%) (P = .0002). There was no significant association between types of organisms or focus of infection and the presence of specific lesions. Histologic examination of affected eyes disclosed cytoid bodies in the nerve fiber layer without inflammation. A definite association between septicemia and retinal lesions was found and indicates the need for routine ophthalmoscopy in septicemic patients. PMID:8250076

  14. Therapeutic strategies for autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Manns, Michael P; Strassburg, Christian P

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a disease of unknown etiology. However, a loss of tolerance against the patient's own liver is regarded as the main pathogenetic mechanism. Immunosuppressive therapy prolongs survival in patients with severe AIH. Two phases of therapy have to be distinguished. In newly diagnosed AIH, induction of remission is the main goal. Here predniso(lo)ne alone or in combination with azathioprine has been shown to induce remission in the majority of patients. In the past, reduction of aminotransferase levels below two times the upper limit of normal was the aim of therapy. Nowadays, normalization of aminotransferase levels should be achieved. The majority of patients usually respond to therapy within 6-12 months. A significant reduction in aminotransferase levels is achieved within a few weeks of therapy. Improvement in clinical symptoms is followed by improvement in biochemical parameters of disease activity and then by significant improvement in histological disease activity. Around 20-40% of patients do not achieve remission. In these patients, alternative therapies should be evaluated for the individual patient. Prospective controlled trials with a larger number of patients are missing in this population. At the moment, mycophenolate mofetil at a dose of 2 × 1 g daily, either given alone or in combination with predniso(lo)ne, is able to achieve remission in a significant proportion of patients. Based on recent retrospective observations, mycophenolate mofetil is beneficial in patients who were previously azathioprine intolerant rather than azathioprine failure patients. Again, prospective trials are missing. Alternative drugs include cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin A, tacrolimus and others. Women in particular suffer from steroid-specific side effects, including weight gain, moon face, diabetes, glaucoma and bone disease. Recently, a topical steroid, budesonide, was shown to induce disease remission in combination with azathioprine. The second

  15. Requirements for innate immune pathways in environmentally induced autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Kenneth Michael; Kono, Dwight H

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that environmental triggers in combination with genetic and stochastic factors play an important role in spontaneous autoimmune disease. Although the specific environmental agents and how they promote autoimmunity remain largely unknown, in part because of diverse etiologies, environmentally induced autoimmune models can provide insights into potential mechanisms. Studies of idiopathic and environmentally induced systemic autoimmunity show that they are mediated by common adaptive immune response genes. By contrast, although the innate immune system is indispensable for autoimmunity, there are clear differences in the molecular and cellular innate components that mediate specific systemic autoimmune diseases, suggesting distinct autoimmune-promoting pathways. Some of these differences may be related to the bifurcation of toll-like receptor signaling that distinguishes interferon regulatory factor 7-mediated type I interferon production from nuclear factor-κB-driven proinflammatory cytokine expression. Accordingly, idiopathic and pristane-induced systemic autoimmunity require both type I interferon and proinflammatory cytokines whereas the less aggressive mercury-induced autoimmunity, although dependent on nucleic acid-binding toll-like receptors, does not require type I interferon but needs proinflammatory cytokines. Scavenger receptors and the inflammasome may contribute to silica-induced autoimmunity. Greater understanding of the innate mechanisms responsible for idiopathic and environmentally induced autoimmunity should yield new information into the processes that instigate and drive systemic autoimmunity. PMID:23557436

  16. Autoimmunity in Coxsackievirus B3 induced myocarditis: role of estrogen in suppressing autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Picornaviruses are small, non-enveloped, single stranded, positive sense RNA viruses which cause multiple diseases including myocarditis/dilated cardiomyopathy, type 1 diabetes, encephalitis, myositis, orchitis and hepatitis. Although picornaviruses directly kill cells, tissue injury primarily results from autoimmunity to self antigens. Viruses induce autoimmunity by: aborting deletion of self-reactive T cells during T cell ontogeny; reversing anergy of peripheral autoimmune T cells; eliminating T regulatory cells; stimulating self-reactive T cells through antigenic mimicry or cryptic epitopes; and acting as an adjuvant for self molecules released during virus infection. Most autoimmune diseases (SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Grave’s disease) predominate in females, but diseases associated with picornavirus infections predominate in males. T regulatory cells are activated in infected females because of the combined effects of estrogen and innate immunity. PMID:20963181

  17. Scurfy mice: A model for autoimmune disease

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    Autoimmune disease-the condition in which the body attacks its own tissue-has been an object of public concern recently. Former President George Bush and his wife Barbara both are afflicted with Graves' disease in which the body's own immune system attakcs the thyroid gland. The safety of breast implants was called into question because of evidence that some recipients had developed autoimmune disorders such a rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and scleroderma. Women, the media pointed out, have a higher-than-average incidence of many autoimmune disorders. These events suggest the need to know more about what makes the immune system work so well and what makes it go awry. At ORNL's Biology Division, progress is being in understanding the underlying causes of immune disease by studying mice having a disease that causes them to be underdeveloped; to have scaly skin, small ears, and large spleens; to open their eyes late; and to die early. These [open quotes]scurfy[close quotes]mice are helping us better understand the role of the thymus gland in autoimmune disease.

  18. Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders after streptococcus infection.

    PubMed

    Maini, Baljeet; Bathla, Manish; Dhanjal, Gurdeep S; Sharma, Prem D

    2012-10-01

    Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infection (PANDAS) is a group of disorders recently recognized as a clinical entity. A case of PANDAS is described here, which remitted after 1 month of treatment. Recent Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus infection should be considered in a child who presents with a sudden explosive onset of tics or obsessive compulsive symptoms. PMID:23372243

  19. Autism and Autoimmune Disease: A Family Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Money, John; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Described in a family in which the youngest boy has early infantile autism, Addison's disease, and moniliasis and two older boys have autoimmune disease with hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, moniliasis, and either alopecia totalis or diabetes mellitus, while the oldest boy and parents are symptom free. (KW)

  20. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches. PMID:26117595

  1. Follicular Helper T Cells in Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Scherm, Martin G; Ott, Verena B; Daniel, Carolin

    2016-08-01

    The development of multiple disease-relevant autoantibodies is a hallmark of autoimmune diseases. In autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D), a variable time frame of autoimmunity precedes the clinically overt disease. The relevance of T follicular helper (TFH) cells for the immune system is increasingly recognized. Their pivotal contribution to antibody production by providing help to germinal center (GC) B cells facilitates the development of a long-lived humoral immunity. Their complex differentiation process, involving various stages and factors like B cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6), is strictly controlled, as anomalous regulation of TFH cells is connected with immunopathologies. While the adverse effects of a TFH cell-related insufficient humoral immunity are obvious, the role of increased TFH frequencies in autoimmune diseases like T1D is currently highlighted. High levels of autoantigen trigger an excessive induction of TFH cells, consequently resulting in the production of autoantibodies. Therefore, TFH cells might provide promising approaches for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27324759

  2. CNS autoimmune inflammation: RICK must NOD!

    PubMed

    Kang, Zizhen; Gulen, Muhammet Fatih; Li, Xiaoxia

    2011-01-28

    In this issue of Immunity, Shaw et al. (2011) report that the NOD-RICK signaling axis is required for the activation of dendritic cells infiltrating the central nervous system, leading to reactivation of antigen-specific T cells and autoimmune inflammation. PMID:21272781

  3. Talar Dome Lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... be helpful in reducing the pain and inflammation. Physical therapy . Range-of-motion and strengthening exercises are beneficial once the lesion is adequately healed. Physical therapy may also include techniques to reduce pain and ...

  4. Hypervascular liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Kamaya, Aya; Maturen, Katherine E; Tye, Grace A; Liu, Yueyi I; Parti, Naveen N; Desser, Terry S

    2009-10-01

    Hypervascular hepatocellular lesions include both benign and malignant etiologies. In the benign category, focal nodular hyperplasia and adenoma are typically hypervascular. In addition, some regenerative nodules in cirrhosis may be hypervascular. Malignant hypervascular primary hepatocellular lesions include hepatocellular carcinoma, fibrolamellar carcinoma, and peripheral cholangiocarcinoma. Vascular liver lesions often appear hypervascular because they tend to follow the enhancement of the blood pool; these include hemangiomas, arteriovenous malformations, angiosarcomas, and peliosis. While most gastrointestinal malignancies that metastasize to the liver will appear hypovascular on arterial and portal-venous phase imaging, certain cancers such as metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (including pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, carcinoid, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors) tend to produce hypervascular metastases due to the greater recruitment of arterial blood supply. Finally, rare hepatic lesions such as glomus tumor and inflammatory pseudotumor may have a hypervascular appearance. PMID:19842564

  5. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  6. PROGESTERONE TREATMENT REDUCES DISEASE SEVERITY AND INCREASES IL-10 IN EXPERIMENTAL AUTOIMMUNE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS

    PubMed Central

    Yates, M.A; Li, Y.; Chlebeck, P.; Proctor, T.; Vandenbark, A.A.; Offner, H.

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian hormones, including progesterone, are known to have immunomodulatory and neuroprotective effects which may alter the disease course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In the current study, we examined the treatment potential of progesterone beginning at the onset of EAE symptoms. Progesterone treated animals showed reduced peak disease scores and cumulative disease indices, and decreased inflammatory cytokine secretion (IL-2 and IL-17). In addition, increased production of IL-10 was accompanied by increased numbers of CD19+ cells and an increase in CD8+ cells. Decreased chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in the spinal cord also contributed to decreased lesions in the spinal cord. PMID:20153059

  7. Imaging combined autoimmune and infectious disease microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewart, Tom; Raha, Sandeep; Kus, Dorothy; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial and viral pathogens are implicated in many severe autoimmune diseases, acting through such mechanisms as molecular mimicry, and superantigen activation of T-cells. For example, Helicobacter pylori, well known cause of stomach ulcers and cancers, is also identified in ischaemic heart disease (mimicry of heat shock protein 65), autoimmune pancreatitis, systemic sclerosis, autoimmune thyroiditis (HLA DRB1*0301 allele susceptibility), and Crohn's disease. Successful antibiotic eradication of H.pylori often accompanies their remission. Yet current diagnostic devices, and test-limiting cost containment, impede recognition of the linkage, delaying both diagnosis and therapeutic intervention until the chronic debilitating stage. We designed a 15 minute low cost 39 antigen microarray assay, combining autoimmune, viral and bacterial antigens1. This enables point-of-care serodiagnosis and cost-effective narrowly targeted concurrent antibiotic and monoclonal anti-T-cell and anti-cytokine immunotherapy. Arrays of 26 pathogen and 13 autoimmune antigens with IgG and IgM dilution series were printed in triplicate on epoxysilane covalent binding slides with Teflon well masks. Sera diluted 1:20 were incubated 10 minutes, washed off, anti-IgG-Cy3 (green) and anti-IgM-Dy647 (red) were incubated for 5 minutes, washed off and the slide was read in an ArrayWoRx(e) scanning CCD imager (Applied Precision, Issaquah, WA). As a preliminary model for the combined infectious disease-autoimmune diagnostic microarray we surveyed 98 unidentified, outdated sera that were discarded after Hepatitis B antibody testing. In these, significant IgG or IgM autoantibody levels were found: dsDNA 5, ssDNA 11, Ro 2, RNP 7, SSB 4, gliadin 2, thyroglobulin 13 cases. Since control sera showed no autoantibodies, the high frequency of anti-DNA and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies found in infected sera lend increased support for linkage of infection to subsequent autoimmune disease. Expansion of the antigen

  8. Multiple Osteolytic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vinayachandran, Divya; Sankarapandian, Sathasivasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Several systemic diseases initially present with various oral manifestations. Investigation of these oral symptoms may at times lead to the diagnosis of grave underlying life-threatening conditions. We present one such case, where the patient manifested with gross enlargement of the mandible, along with lesions in the lower limbs. These lesions were the initial manifestation and on further investigations the patient was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. PMID:24516769

  9. Petrous Apex Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Amedee, Ronald G.; Gianoli, Gerard J.; Mann, Wolf J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to detail our experience in treating 69 patients over the past 6 years with pathologic processes involving the petrous apex. These included 25 (36%) primary petrous apex lesions, 40 (58%) lesions that involved the petrous apex by direct invasion from an adjacent region, and four (6%) lesions that were the result of metastatic spread from a distant site. Although lesions of the petrous apex are uncommon, they may present significant morbidity to the patient. The symptoms elicited by these lesions are usually vague and nonlocalizing in the early stages but may progress to include multiple cranial neuropathies. Successful results are contingent on early diagnosis, which requires a high index of suspicion and use of appropriate imaging modalities. Thorough preoperative assessment with use of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and carotid arteriography is essential to plan the surgical approach. We present this collection of patients in order to aid in the further preoperative characterization of the differences in primary and secondary lesions of the petrous apex. PMID:17170919

  10. Colorectal Subepithelial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Most of subepithelial lesion (SEL) being identified was accidentally discovered as small bulging lesion covered with normal mucosa from endoscopic screening. The type of treatment and prognosis vary depending on the type of tumor, it would be crucial to perform an accurate differential diagnosis. Since the differentiation of SEL relied on the indirect findings observed from the mucosal surface using an endoscopy only in the past, it was able to confirm the presence of lesion only but difficult to identify complex detailed nature of the lesion. However, after the endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) was introduced, it became possible to identify extrinsic compression, and size of intramural tumors, internal properties and contour so that it gets possible to have differential diagnosis of lesions and prediction on the lesion whether it is malignant or benign. In addition, the use of EUS-guided fine needle aspiration and EUS-guided core biopsy made it possible to make histological differential diagnosis. This study intended to investigate endoscopic and EUS findings, histological diagnosis, treatment regimen and impression of colorectal SELs. PMID:26240803

  11. Prenatal immunotoxicant exposure and postnatal autoimmune disease.

    PubMed Central

    Holladay, S D

    1999-01-01

    Reports in humans and rodents indicate that immune development may be altered following perinatal exposure to immunotoxic compounds, including chemotherapeutics, corticosteroids, polycyclic hydrocarbons, and polyhalogenated hydrocarbons. Effects from such exposure may be more dramatic or persistent than following exposure during adult life. For example, prenatal exposure to the insecticide chlordane or to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[(italic)a(/italic)]pyrene produces what appears to be lifelong immunosuppression in mice. Whether prenatal immunotoxicant exposure may predispose the organism to postnatal autoimmune disease remains largely unknown. In this regard, the therapeutic immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA) crosses the placenta poorly. However, lethally irradiated rodents exposed to CsA postsyngeneic bone marrow transplant (i.e., during re-establishment of the immune system) develop T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease, suggesting this drug may produce a fundamental disruption in development of self-tolerance by T cells. The environmental contaminant 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-(italic)p(/italic)-dioxin (TCDD) crosses the placenta and produces fetal thymic effects (italic)in vivo(/italic) similar to effects of CsA in fetal thymic organ culture, including inhibited thymocyte maturation and reduced expression of thymic major histocompatability complex class II molecules. These observations led to the suggestion that gestational exposure to TCDD may interfere with normal development of self-tolerance. Possibly supporting this hypothesis, when mice predisposed to development of autoimmune disease were treated with TCDD during gestation, postnatal autoimmunity was exacerbated. Similar results have been reported for mice exposed to diethylstilbestrol during development. These reports suggest that prenatal exposure to certain immunotoxicants may play a role in postnatal expression of autoimmunity. PMID:10502532

  12. Transitioning from Idiopathic to Explainable Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis lacks an identifiable cause, and its diagnosis requires the exclusion of etiologically defined diseases that resemble it. Insights into its pathogenesis are moving autoimmune hepatitis from an idiopathic to explainable disease, and the goal of this review is to describe the insights that are hastening this transition. Two types of autoimmune hepatitis are justified by serological markers, but they also have distinctive genetic associations (DRB1 and DQB1 genes) and autoantigens. DRB1 alleles are the principal susceptibility factors in white adults, and a six amino acid sequence encoded in the antigen-binding groove of class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex can influence the selection of autoantigens. Polymorphisms, including variants of SH2B3 and CARD10 genes, may affect immune reactivity and disease severity. The cytochrome mono-oxygenase, CYP2D6, is the autoantigen associated with type 2 autoimmune hepatitis, and it shares homologies with multiple viruses that might promote self-intolerance by molecular mimicry. Chemokines, especially CXCL9 and CXCL10, orchestrate the migration of effector cells to sites of injury and are associated with disease severity. Cells of the innate and adaptive immune responses promote tissue damage, and possible deficiencies in the number and function of regulatory T cells may facilitate the injurious process. Receptor-mediated apoptosis is the principal mechanism of hepatocyte loss, and cell-mediated and antibody-dependent mechanisms of cytotoxicity also contribute. Insights that explain autoimmune hepatitis will allow triggering exogenous antigens to be characterized, risk management to be improved, prognostic indices to be refined, and site-specific therapeutic interventions to emerge. PMID:25999246

  13. Inflammasomes and human autoimmunity: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chin-An; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2015-07-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein complexes composed of a NOD-like receptor (NLR)/an AIM-like receptor (ALR), the adapter molecule apoptosis-associated speck-like protein that contains a CARD (ASC), and caspase-1. Active caspase-1 cleaves pro-IL-1β and pro-IL-18 to IL-1β and IL-18, resulting in inflammation. Genetic mutations in inflammasomes were first recognized to result in autoinflammatory diseases, which are characterized by the absence of both autoantibodies and autoreactive-T/B cells. However, there is increasing attention being placed on genetic polymorphisms that are involved in the components of inflammasomes, and these have implications for innate immunity and the natural history of autoimmune diseases. For example, while the NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 1 (NLRP1) haplotypes contributes to susceptibility to developing vitiligo; there are other single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that alters the susceptibility and severity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Indeed, there are multiple factors that contribute to lowering the threshold of immunity and inflammasomes play a key role in this threshold. For example, IL-1β and IL-18 further perpetuate Th17 responses and endothelial cell damage, which potentiate a number of autoimmune diseases, including synovitis in RA, cardiovascular disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). There is also increasing data on the role of innate immunity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), in lupus nephritis, and in a variety of autoimmune pathologies in which activation of the innate immune system is the driver for the adaptive system. Indeed, it is likely that the chronic pathology of autoimmunity is mediated in part by otherwise innocent bystander cells, augmented by inflammasomes. PMID:26005048

  14. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune disease: Cause or bystander

    PubMed Central

    Smyk, Daniel S; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Sakkas, Lazaros I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main cause of chronic gastritis and a major risk factor for gastric cancer. This pathogen has also been considered a potential trigger of gastric autoimmunity, and in particular of autoimmune gastritis. However, a considerable number of reports have attempted to link H. pylori infection with the development of extra-gastrointestinal autoimmune disorders, affecting organs not immediately relevant to the stomach. This review discusses the current evidence in support or against the role of H. pylori as a potential trigger of autoimmune rheumatic and skin diseases, as well as organ specific autoimmune diseases. We discuss epidemiological, serological, immunological and experimental evidence associating this pathogen with autoimmune diseases. Although over one hundred autoimmune diseases have been investigated in relation to H. pylori, we discuss a select number of papers with a larger literature base, and include Sjögrens syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, autoimmune skin conditions, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, autoimmune thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica and autoimmune liver diseases. Specific mention is given to those studies reporting an association of anti-H. pylori antibodies with the presence of autoimmune disease-specific clinical parameters, as well as those failing to find such associations. We also provide helpful hints for future research. PMID:24574735

  15. Evaluation of autoimmune phenomena in patients with pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS).

    PubMed

    Stagi, Stefano; Rigante, Donato; Lepri, Gemma; Bertini, Federico; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Falcini, Fernanda

    2014-12-01

    The pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) are basically characterized by obsessive-compulsive symptoms and/or tics triggered by group-A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus infections. Poor data are available about the clear definition of PANDAS's autoimmune origin. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of autoimmune phenomena, including thyroid function abnormalities, specific celiac disease antibodies, and positivity of organ- or nonorgan-specific autoantibodies in a large cohort of Caucasian children and adolescents with PANDAS. Seventy-seven consecutive patients (59 males, 18 females; mean age 6.3±2.5 years, range 2.0-14.5 years) strictly fulfilling the clinical criteria for PANDAS diagnosis were recruited. In all subjects we evaluated serum concentrations of free-T3, free-T4, thyrotropin, and the following auto-antibodies: anti-thyroperoxidase, anti-thyroglobulin, anti-thyrotropin receptor, anti-gliadin, anti-endomysium, anti-tissue transglutaminase, anti-nuclear, anti-smooth muscle, anti-extractable nuclear antigens, anti-phospholipid, plus lupus-like anticoagulant. The results were compared with those obtained from 197 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (130 males, 67 females; mean age 6.8±2.9 years, range 2.3-14.8 years). The frequencies of subclinical (3.8% vs 3.6%) and overt hypothyroidism (1.2% vs 0%), autoimmune thyroiditis (2.46% vs 1.14%), celiac disease (1.2% vs 0.05%), and positivity of organ- and nonorgan-specific autoantibodies (5.1% vs 4.8%) were not statistically significant between patients with PANDAS and controls. Evaluating the overall disease duration, we did not observe any significant difference between patients with (3.4±2.15 years) and without (3.4±2.89 years) autoimmune abnormalities. However, PANDAS patients with autoimmune diseases or positivity for any organ- and nonorgan-specific antibodies showed significantly higher anti-streptolysin O and anti-DNAse B

  16. Dilemmas in autoimmune pancreatitis. Surgical resection or not?

    PubMed

    Hoffmanova, I; Gurlich, R; Janik, V; Szabo, A; Vernerova, Z

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment is not commonly recommended in the management of autoimmune pancreatitis. The article describes a dilemma in diagnostics and treatment of a 68-year old man with the mass in the head of the pancreas that mimicked pancreatic cancer and that was diagnosed as a type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (IgG4-related pancreatitis) after a surgical resection. Diagnosis of the autoimmune pancreatitis is a real clinical challenge, as in the current diagnostic criteria exists some degree of overlap in the findings between autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer (indicated by the similarity in radiologic findings, elevation of IgG4, sampling errors in pancreatic biopsy, and the possibility of synchronous autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer). Despite the generally accepted corticosteroids as the primary treatment modality in autoimmune pancreatitis, we believe that surgical resection remains necessary in a specific subgroup of patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (Fig. 4, Ref. 37). PMID:27546699

  17. The role of epigenetic mechanisms and processes in autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Judith M; McCombe, Pamela A

    2012-01-01

    The lack of complete concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins suggests that nongenetic factors play a major role in determining disease susceptibility. In this review, we consider how epigenetic mechanisms could affect the immune system and effector mechanisms in autoimmunity and/or the target organ of autoimmunity and thus affect the development of autoimmune diseases. We also consider the types of stimuli that lead to epigenetic modifications and how these relate to the epidemiology of autoimmune diseases and the biological pathways operative in different autoimmune diseases. Increasing our knowledge of these epigenetic mechanisms and processes will increase the prospects for controlling or preventing autoimmune diseases in the future through the use of drugs that target the epigenetic pathways. PMID:23055689

  18. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  19. [Ocular fundus lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus model mice].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, A; Yokoyama, T; Kodera, S; Zhang, D; Hirose, S

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate spontaneous development of the ocular fundus abnormalities associated with collagen disease, we investigated the ocular fundus lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) models. (NZW x BXSB) F1 mice were employed as SLE models with antiphospholipid syndrome. The abnormal findings in the ocular fundus were recorded with a fundus camera for small animals (KOWA Co., Ltd.), and the chorioretinal lesions were studied histopathologically. As in the systemic symptoms of SLE, the incidence of ocular fundus abnormalities in these (NZW x BXSB) F1 mice was significantly higher in males than in females, suggesting the influence of the Yaa (Y chromosome-linked autoimmune acceleration) gene. Lesions in the fundus appeared in the form of white spots, which increased in number along with the course of the disease. The lesion developed into retinal detachment in some animals. Dilatation of veins and narrowing of arteries were marked. These lesions were very similar to multifocal posterior pigment epitheliopathy (MPPE) in humans in that white spots appear first and then develop into exudative retinal detachment caused by retinal pigment epithelial disorder. Histopathological findings included 1. structural destruction of the photoreceptor cell layer, 2. degeneration and loss of the retinal pigment epithelium, and 3. narrowing and occlusion of the choriocapillaris associated with thrombus formation, cellular infiltration into the surrounding tissues, and wall thickening of the choroidal arterioles. The study of these SLE mouse may contribute to the elucidation of abnormalities in the fundus associated with collagen diseases, including the relationship between thrombus formation and antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:9489364

  20. Advanced MRI and staging of multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Absinta, Martina; Sati, Pascal; Reich, Daniel S

    2016-06-01

    Over the past few decades, MRI-based visualization of demyelinated CNS lesions has become pivotal to the diagnosis and monitoring of multiple sclerosis (MS). In this Review, we outline current efforts to correlate imaging findings with the pathology of lesion development in MS, and the pitfalls that are being encountered in this research. Multimodal imaging at high and ultra-high magnetic field strengths is yielding biologically relevant insights into the pathophysiology of blood-brain barrier dynamics and both active and chronic inflammation, as well as mechanisms of lesion healing and remyelination. Here, we parallel the results in humans with advances in imaging of a primate model of MS - experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the common marmoset - in which demyelinated lesions resemble their human counterparts far more closely than do EAE lesions in the rodent. This approach holds promise for the identification of innovative biological markers, and for next-generation clinical trials that will focus more on tissue protection and repair. PMID:27125632

  1. Secondary autoimmune diseases occurring after HSCT for an autoimmune disease: a retrospective study of the EBMT Autoimmune Disease Working Party.

    PubMed

    Daikeler, Thomas; Labopin, Myriam; Di Gioia, Massimo; Abinun, Mario; Alexander, Tobias; Miniati, Irene; Gualandi, Francesca; Fassas, Athanasios; Martin, Thierry; Schwarze, Carl Philipp; Wulffraat, Nico; Buch, Maya; Sampol, Antonia; Carreras, Enric; Dubois, Benedicte; Gruhn, Bernd; Güngör, Tayfun; Pohlreich, David; Schuerwegh, Annemie; Snarski, Emilian; Snowden, John; Veys, Paul; Fasth, Anders; Lenhoff, Stig; Messina, Chiara; Voswinkel, Jan; Badoglio, Manuela; Henes, Jörg; Launay, David; Tyndall, Alan; Gluckman, Eliane; Farge, Dominique

    2011-08-11

    To specify the incidence and risk factors for secondary autoimmune diseases (ADs) after HSCT for a primary AD, we retrospectively analyzed AD patients treated by HSCT reported to EBMT from 1995 to 2009 with at least 1 secondary AD (cases) and those without (controls). After autologous HSCT, 29 of 347 patients developed at least 1 secondary AD within 21.9 (0.6-49) months and after allogeneic HSCT, 3 of 16 patients. The observed secondary ADs included: autoimmune hemolytic anemia (n = 3), acquired hemophilia (n = 3), autoimmune thrombocytopenia (n = 3), antiphospholipid syndrome (n = 2), thyroiditis (n = 12), blocking thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody (n = 1), Graves disease (n = 2), myasthenia gravis (n = 1), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 2), sarcoidosis (n = 2), vasculitis (n = 1), psoriasis (n = 1), and psoriatic arthritis (n = 1). After autologous HSCT for primary AD, the cumulative incidence of secondary AD was 9.8% ± 2% at 5 years. Lupus erythematosus as primary AD, and antithymocyte globulin use plus CD34(+) graft selection were important risk factors for secondary AD by multivariate analysis. With a median follow-up of 6.2 (0.54-11) years after autologous HSCT, 26 of 29 patients with secondary AD were alive, 2 died during their secondary AD (antiphospholipid syndrome, hemophilia), and 1 death was HSCT-related. This European multicenter study underlines the need for careful management and follow-up for secondary AD after HSCT. PMID:21596847

  2. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in a case of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Hajra, Adrija; Bandyopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti

    2016-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a demyelinating disease that may occur in a postvaccination condition or as a parainfectious encephalomyelitis. It is almost always monophasic. The underlying pathogenesis of ADEM may include perivascular inflammation, oedema and demyelination in the central nervous system. We present a case of a 15-year-old girl who was diagnosed as having ADEM, as well as detected to be a follow-up case of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia on steroid treatment. She presented with progressive weakness of the right lower limb for the past 4 days. MRI showed multiple subcortical lesions of varying size showing hyperintensities in T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). The patient responded well to steroid therapy. No residual lesion was found on follow-up. Very few cases have been found with this rare association in the literature. PMID:27268491

  3. [Oral symptoms of immunologic disorders. Part I. Systemic autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Márton, Krisztina

    2003-02-01

    Polysystemic autoimmune diseases often cause orofacial and stomatognathic symptoms. Inflammation of the temporomandibular joint only rarely and slightly reduces the range of mouth opening (rheumatoid arthritis), which is much more restricted in systemic sclerosis due to fibrosis of perioral soft tissues. Weakness of masticatory and pharyngeal muscles in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies results in dysphagia and dystonia. Ulcerations, petechiae, teleangiectasia, and lichenoid lesions are the characteristic symptoms of oral mucosal involvement, but drugs used in systemic treatment can also cause very similar side effects. Salivary gland hypofunction (Sjögren's syndrome) is common, and in addition to the subjective complaints, leads to objective pathologic alterations such as oral mycotic infections, purulent sialadenitis, and increased caries prevalence. The side effects of steroid administration should be taken into account also during dental treatments. Regular dental follow-up and treatment is a basic part of the complex care of these patients in order to diagnose and cure oral abnormalities and salivary gland hypofunction in time. Impairment of hand functions (rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma) reduces the oral hygienic activity and therefore special devices, local antiseptics and local fluoride preparations are necessary. PMID:12666389

  4. Targeting Syk in Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Guo-Min; Kyttaris, Vasileios C.; Tsokos, George C.

    2016-01-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is a member of the Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases, which associates directly with surface receptors, including B-cell receptor and Fcγ receptor, and is involved in a variety of signal transduction pathways. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus are autoimmune diseases in which autoantibodies, immune complexes, and autoreactive T cells account for the expression of tissue inflammation and damage. Syk inhibitors efficiently suppress RA in patients albeit in the expression of unwanted side effects, including gastrointestinal effects, hypertension, and neutropenia. Syk inhibitors also inhibit clinical manifestations in lupus-prone mice. Here, we review the evidence that supports the use of Syk inhibitors to treat rheumatic and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27014261

  5. Is Tourette's syndrome an autoimmune disease?

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, P J; Kallenberg, C G M; Korf, J; Minderaa, R B

    2002-01-01

    We provide a review of recent research findings which support the involvement of autoimmunity in childhood-onset tic disorders, in particular the presence of antineuronal autoantibodies, D8/17 B lymphocyte overexpression, a marker of chorea associated with streptococcal infection, and possible beneficial effects of immunomodulatory intervention. One of the most controversial areas in this field is the validity of the proposed PANDAS concept. Some researchers have delineated a putatively unique subgroup of patients, from the spectrum of illness encompassing Tourette's syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), whose tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms are shown to arise in response to beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections. They designated it by the term pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). Herein we additionally present pros and cons concerning the concept of PANDAS. Finally, recommendations for future research directions are given. PMID:12082557

  6. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome presenting with glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Kanegane, Hirokazu; Vilela, Maria Marluce dos Santos; Wang, Yue; Futatani, Takeshi; Matsukura, Hiroyoshi; Miyawaki, Toshio

    2003-05-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized clinically by chronic non-malignant lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity and is caused by a genetic defect in programmed cell death (apoptosis). Most patients with ALPS have heterozygous mutations in the Fas gene. We describe an 11-year-old Brazilian boy with hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, hemolytic anemia, and hypergammaglobulinemia since early infancy. T cell lines from the patient were defective in Fas-mediated apoptosis. He was diagnosed as having ALPS and found to have a novel Fas gene mutation (IVS4+1G>A). In addition, he presented with glomerulonephritis in infancy. An aunt and uncle who had the same Fas mutations also had histories of glomerulonephritis. Although glomerulonephritis is common in Fas-deficient mice, it is infrequent in human ALPS. Corticosteroid therapy ameliorated the glomerulonephritis in our patient, as well as his lymphoproliferation, anemia, and hypergammaglobulinemia. This study suggests that glomerulonephritis is one of the characteristic features of ALPS. PMID:12736807

  7. Fetal microchimeric cells in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lepez, Trees; Vandewoestyne, Mado; Deforce, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) show a female predominance, with an increased incidence in the years following parturition. Fetal microchimerism has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of AITD. However, only the presence of fetal microchimeric cells in blood and in the thyroid gland of these patients has been proven, but not an actual active role in AITD. Is fetal microchimerism harmful for the thyroid gland by initiating a Graft versus Host reaction (GvHR) or being the target of a Host versus Graft reaction (HvGR)? Is fetal microchimerism beneficial for the thyroid gland by being a part of tissue repair or are fetal cells just innocent bystanders in the process of autoimmunity? This review explores every hypothesis concerning the role of fetal microchimerism in AITD. PMID:23723083

  8. [Biochemical and immunological markers of autoimmune thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Biktagirova, E M; Sattarova, L I; Vagapova, G R; Skibo, Y V; Chuhlovina, E N; Kravtsova, O A; Abramova, Z I

    2016-05-01

    Correlations between biochemical and immunological markers of programmed cell death (apoptosis), and the functional state of the thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism, euthyroidism, hypothyroidism) have been investigated in autoimmune thyroiditis (AT) (also known as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis). Annexin V, TRAIL and TNF-a, as well as DNA-hydrolyzing antibodies were used as the main markers. Increased levels of TRAIL were found in the serum of AT patients (hyperthyroidism>hypothyroidism>euthyroidism) compared with healthy individuals. The highest frequency of antibodies to denatured DNA (Abs-dDNA) had the highest frequency in AT patients (97%) compared with healthy controls. Among these patients, 75% had hyperthyroidism, 85% had hypothyroidism, and 84.7% had euthyroidism. Abs hydrolyzing activity demonstrated correlation dependence with symptoms of the thyroid dysfunction. PMID:27563001

  9. Autoimmune Myopathies: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Jean-Philippe; Marie, Isabelle; Jouen, Fabienne; Boyer, Olivier; Martinet, Jérémie

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) as a whole represent a major health concern and remain a medical and scientific challenge. Some of them, such as multiple sclerosis or type 1 diabetes, have been actively investigated for many decades. Autoimmune myopathies (AIMs), also referred to as idiopathic inflammatory myopathies or myositis, represent a group of very severe AID for which we have a more limited pathophysiological knowledge. AIM encompass a group of, individually rare but collectively not so uncommon, diseases characterized by symmetrical proximal muscle weakness, increased serum muscle enzymes such as creatine kinase, myopathic changes on electromyography, and several typical histological patterns on muscle biopsy, including the presence of inflammatory cell infiltrates in muscle tissue. Importantly, some AIMs are strongly related to cancer. Here, we review the current knowledge on the most prevalent forms of AIM and, notably, the diagnostic contribution of autoantibodies. PMID:27379096

  10. Autoimmunity vs. cancer: predator vs. alien?

    PubMed

    Berens, Christian; Lauber, Kirsten; Herrmann, Martin

    2013-08-01

    "The enemy of my enemy is my friend." According to this motto, the human protagonists in Paul W. S. Anderson's science-fiction movie "Alien vs. Predator" (2004) solidarize with a predator in order to fight the aliens. Can this ancient and simple logic be transferred to the field of oncology and cancer immunotherapy? Can we utilize mechanisms known from the context of autoimmunity to fight cancer? Here, we summarize immune cell-mediated detection of danger and damage, central and peripheral tolerance, immunoregulation and immune privilege--processes known to be deregulated in the context of autoimmunity. We discuss them with special regard towards their misusage by tumors and pathogens and how they might be instrumentalized in the context of anti-cancer immunotherapy. PMID:23706137

  11. [Glycosylation of autoantibodies in autoimmunes diseases].

    PubMed

    Goulabchand, R; Batteux, F; Guilpain, P

    2013-12-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications, involved in the well described protein biosynthesis process. Protein glycosylation seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of auto-immune diseases. Herein are described the main alterations of autoantibody glycosylation associated with autoimmunes diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, IgA glomerulonephritis, Schoenlein-Henoch purpura, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, myasthenia gravis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener). Molecular identification of altered immunoglobulin glycosylation could lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of those diseases, might allow an evaluation of their biological activity and could even be a new therapeutic target. PMID:24139501

  12. Fibrosis in autoimmune and cholestatic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Penz-Österreicher, Melitta; Österreicher, Christoph H; Trauner, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Autoimmune and cholestatic liver disease account for a significant part of end-stage liver disease and are leading indications for liver transplantation. Especially cholestatic liver diseases (primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis) appear to be different from other chronic liver diseases with regards to pathogenesis. Portal fibroblasts located in the connective tissue surrounding bile ducts appear to be different from hepatic stellate cells with regards to expression of marker proteins and response the profibrogenic and mitogenic stimuli. In addition there is increasing evidence for a cross talk between activated cholangiocytes and portal myofibroblasts. Several animal models have improved our understanding of the mechanisms underlying these chronic liver diseases. In the present review, we discuss the current concepts and ideas with regards to myofibroblastic cell populations, mechanisms of fibrosis, summarize characteristic histological findings and currently employed animal models of autoimmune and cholestatic liver disease. PMID:21497742

  13. The mechanisms behind helminth's immunomodulation in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Bashi, Tomer; Bizzaro, Giorgia; Ben-Ami Shor, Dana; Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-02-01

    The incidence of autoimmune diseases has risen throughout the last half a century, mostly in the industrialized world. Helminths and their derivatives were found to have a protective role in autoimmunity and inflammatory conditions, as they manipulate the immune network, attenuating the host's cellular and humoral responses. Indeed, various helminth species used in several human and animal models were shown to limit inflammatory activity in a variety of diseases including inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. Our review will focus on the main mechanisms by which helminths and their secreted molecules modulate the host's immune system. The main pathways induce a shift from Th1 to Th2 phenotype, accelerate T regulatory and B regulatory phenotypes, and attenuate the levels of the inflammatory cytokines, leading to a tolerable scenario. PMID:25449677

  14. Total lymphoid irradiation in alloimmunity and autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Strober, S.

    1987-12-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation has been used as an immunosuppressive regimen in autoimmune disease and organ transplantation. The rationale for its use originated from studies of patients with Hodgkin disease, in whom this radiotherapy regimen was noted to induce profound and long-lasting immune suppression and yet was well tolerated, with few long-term side effects. Total lymphoid irradiation is a unique immunosuppressive regimen that produces a selective (and long-lasting) reduction in the number and function of helper T cells and certain subsets of B cells. Conventional immunosuppressive drugs show little selectivity, and their effects are short-lived. The most important aspect of total lymphoid irradiation is the potential for achieving transplantation tolerance and permanent remissions in autoimmune disease in laboratory animals. Attempts are being made to achieve similar goals in humans given total lymphoid irradiation, so that immunosuppressive drugs can be ultimately withdrawn from transplant recipients and patients with lupus nephritis. 28 references.

  15. Autoimmune Hepatitis with Anti Centromere Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lodh, Moushumi; Pradhan, Debkant; Parida, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    We present the case report of a 49-year-old type 2 diabetes mellitus patient presenting with abdominal pain and black stool for 15 days. A proper workup of laboratory investigations helped us diagnose autoimmune hepatitis with anticentromere antibodies. The authors would like to highlight that screening AIH patients for anticentromere antibody is not mandatory but can be considered, especially in the presence of disease-related symptomatology for quicker, more accurate diagnosis and optimum management. PMID:25379307

  16. Natural regulatory T cells in autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Elaine V.; La Cava, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The suppressive/immunomodulatory function of CD4+CD25+Foxp+ regulatory T (Treg) cells is crucial for the maintenance of immune homeostasis, which helps to prevent autoimmunity and reduce the inflammation induced by pathogens and environmental insults. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the types and mechanisms of action of Treg cells and their role in the immune tolerance to self antigens, with a particular focus on naturally occurring Treg cells. PMID:21091291

  17. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Ana M. C.; Weiner, Howard L.

    2006-01-01

    Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag) that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10) and Th3 (TGF-β) regulatory T cells (Tregs) plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral), formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy. PMID:17162357

  18. Refractory Autoimmune Hepatitis: Beyond Standard Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Jonah N; Te, Helen S

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) can be difficult to control, particularly in some African-Americans. When standard therapy of prednisone and azathioprine is ineffective or poorly tolerated, alternative therapies are resorted to. We report two patients with AIH who were refractory to or intolerant of standard therapy. They initially responded to a combination of tacrolimus and MMF, but eventually developed acute flares of the disease that had to be managed with sirolimus, and in one case, rituximab, to achieve remission. PMID:26725067

  19. THE AUTOIMMUNE CONSTELLATION IN LICHEN AMYLOIDOSIS.

    PubMed

    Andrese, Elena; Vâţă, D; Ciobanu, Delia; Stătescu, Laura; Solovăstru, Laura Gheucă

    2015-01-01

    Localized cutaneous amyloidosis is a rare disease among white people, being more common in South-Asia, China and South America. The disease is characterized by deposition of amyloid material in the papillary dermis without visceral involvement. Nevertheless, there is a growing list of immune-mediated disorders that have been linked to cutaneous amyloidosis. We present two cases of concomitant occurrence of lichen amyloidosis and autoimmune thyroiditis/atopic dermatitis in two Caucasian women. PMID:26793847

  20. Association between chronic urticaria and thyroid autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Cebeci, Filiz; Tanrikut, Ayşenur; Topcu, Elif; Onsun, Nahide; Kurtulmus, Neslihan; Uras, Ahmet R

    2006-01-01

    The association between chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and thyroid autoimmunity has most often been suggested in studies investigating thyroid microsomal antibodies, which are less sensitive and specific than anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies, moreover these studies were not case-control studies in large series. By comparing a large patient series presenting with CIU with a large numbered control group we aimed to learn the extent of autoimmune thyroid disease. We compared the frequency of thyroid autoantibodies in 140 patients with CIU with 181 age-and sex-matched volunteers. Thyroid function tests and thyroid autoantibodies were measured by chemiluminescent immunometric assay in study groups. The frequency of thyroid autoantibodies was significantly higher in patients with CIU than that in healthy controls (29.28 %/5.52%; p < 0.001). Of 41 patients, 10 had thyroid dysfunction and the other cases were euthyroid. The higher frequency of these antibodies in our patients shows that there was a strong association between CIU and thyroid autoimmunity. PMID:16935798

  1. Environmentally induced autoimmune diseases: potential mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, T; Richardson, B

    1999-01-01

    Environmental and other xenobiotic agents can cause autoimmunity. Examples include drug-induced lupus, toxic oil syndrome, and contaminated l-tryptophan ingestion. Numerous mechanisms, based on (italic)in vitro(/italic) evidence and animal models, have been proposed to explain how xenobiotics induce or accelerate autoimmunity. The majority of these can be divided into three general categories. The first is those inhibiting the processes involved in establishing tolerance by deletion. Inhibiting deletion can result in the release of newly generated autoreactive cells into the periphery. The second mechanism is the modification of gene expression in the cells participating in the immune response, permitting lymphocytes to respond to signals normally insufficient to initiate a response or allowing the antigen-presenting cells to abnormally stimulate a response. Abnormal gene expression can thus disrupt tolerance maintained by suppression or anergy, permitting activation of autoreactive cells. The third is the modification of self-molecules such that they are recognized by the immune system as foreign. Examples illustrating these concepts are presented, and related mechanisms that have the potential to similarly affect the immune system are noted. Some mechanisms appear to be common to a variety of agents, and different mechanisms appear to produce similar diseases. However, evidence that any of these mechanisms are actually responsible for xenobiotic-induced human autoimmune disease is still largely lacking, and the potential for numerous and as yet unidentified mechanisms also exists. PMID:10502539

  2. Neuronal Surface Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Linnoila, Jenny J.; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, many autoimmune encephalitides have been identified, with specific clinical syndromes and associated antibodies against neuronal surface antigens. There is compelling evidence that many of these antibodies are pathogenic and most of these encephalitides are highly responsive to immunotherapies. The clinical spectra of some of these antibody-mediated syndromes, especially those reported in only a few patients, are evolving. Others, such as anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis, are well characterized. Diagnosis involves recognizing the specific syndromes and identifying the antibody in a patient’s cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and/or serum. These syndromes are associated with variable abnormalities in CSF, magnetic resonance imaging, and electroencephalography. Treatment is often multidisciplinary and should be focused upon neutralizing the effects of antibodies and eliminating their source. Overlapping disorders have been noted, with some patients having more than one neurologic autoimmune disease. In other patients, viral infections such as herpes simplex virus encephalitis trigger robust antineuronal autoimmune responses. PMID:25369441

  3. Automation, consolidation, and integration in autoimmune diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Tozzoli, Renato; D'Aurizio, Federica; Villalta, Danilo; Bizzaro, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Over the past two decades, we have witnessed an extraordinary change in autoimmune diagnostics, characterized by the progressive evolution of analytical technologies, the availability of new tests, and the explosive growth of molecular biology and proteomics. Aside from these huge improvements, organizational changes have also occurred which brought about a more modern vision of the autoimmune laboratory. The introduction of automation (for harmonization of testing, reduction of human error, reduction of handling steps, increase of productivity, decrease of turnaround time, improvement of safety), consolidation (combining different analytical technologies or strategies on one instrument or on one group of connected instruments) and integration (linking analytical instruments or group of instruments with pre- and post-analytical devices) opened a new era in immunodiagnostics. In this article, we review the most important changes that have occurred in autoimmune diagnostics and present some models related to the introduction of automation in the autoimmunology laboratory, such as automated indirect immunofluorescence and changes in the two-step strategy for detection of autoantibodies; automated monoplex immunoassays and reduction of turnaround time; and automated multiplex immunoassays for autoantibody profiling. PMID:26138781

  4. The Dopaminergic System in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Rodrigo; Contreras, Francisco; Zouali, Moncef

    2014-01-01

    Bidirectional interactions between the immune and the nervous systems are of considerable interest both for deciphering their functioning and for designing novel therapeutic strategies. The past decade has brought a burst of insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in neuroimmune communications mediated by dopamine. Studies of dendritic cells (DCs) revealed that they express the whole machinery to synthesize and store dopamine, which may act in an autocrine manner to stimulate dopamine receptors (DARs). Depending on specific DARs stimulated on DCs and T cells, dopamine may differentially favor CD4+ T cell differentiation into Th1 or Th17 inflammatory cells. Regulatory T cells can also release high amounts of dopamine that acts in an autocrine DAR-mediated manner to inhibit their suppressive activity. These dopaminergic regulations could represent a driving force during autoimmunity. Indeed, dopamine levels are altered in the brain of mouse models of multiple sclerosis (MS) and lupus, and in inflamed tissues of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The distorted expression of DARs in peripheral lymphocytes of lupus and MS patients also supports the importance of dopaminergic regulations in autoimmunity. Moreover, dopamine analogs had beneficial therapeutic effects in animal models, and in patients with lupus or RA. We propose models that may underlie key roles of dopamine and its receptors in autoimmune diseases. PMID:24711809

  5. Renal involvement in autoimmune connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that share certain clinical presentations and a disturbed immunoregulation, leading to autoantibody production. Subclinical or overt renal manifestations are frequently observed and complicate the clinical course of CTDs. Alterations of kidney function in Sjögren syndrome, systemic scleroderma (SSc), auto-immune myopathies (dermatomyositis and polymyositis), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy (APSN) as well as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are frequently present and physicians should be aware of that. In SLE, renal prognosis significantly improved based on specific classification and treatment strategies adjusted to kidney biopsy findings. Patients with scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), which is usually characterized by severe hypertension, progressive decline of renal function and thrombotic microangiopathy, show a significant benefit of early angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor use in particular and strict blood pressure control in general. Treatment of the underlying autoimmune disorder or discontinuation of specific therapeutic agents improves kidney function in most patients with Sjögren syndrome, auto-immune myopathies, APSN and RA. In this review we focus on impairment of renal function in relation to underlying disease or adverse drug effects and implications on treatment decisions. PMID:23557013

  6. PRENATAL TCDD IN MICE INCREASES ADULT AUTOIMMUNITY

    PubMed Central

    Holladay, Steven D.; Gogal, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Two immunologically-different mouse strains, C57BL/6 and SNF1, were exposed to a mid-gestation dose of TCDD. The C57BL/6 mouse has a high-affinity aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and is sensitive to TCDD. The SNF1 mouse has a low-affinity AhR but spontaneously develops autoimmune nephritis. Autoreactive Vβ+CD4+17a and Vβ+CD3+ T cells were increased at 24-weeks-of-age in offspring of C57BL/6 mice, more so in females than males. The cytokine IFN-γ was elevated in the females, while IL-10 was elevated in males. Phenotypic changes in B-lineage cells were present in bone marrow and spleen, and circulating autoantibodies were increased after prenatal TCDD. Kidneys of males showed significant anti-IgG and anti-C3 deposition, suggesting early-stage autoimmune disease. The SNF1 offspring similarly showed increased peripheral Vβ+ cells in the females, increased autoantibody production in both sexes, and increased IFN-γ production in females. Male SNF1 mice had increased anti-IgG and anti-C3 deposition in kidneys. Both mouse models therefore showed clear signatures of enhanced autoimmunity after prenatal TCDD. PMID:20728533

  7. Achalasia and thyroid disease: possible autoimmune connection?

    PubMed

    Quidute, Ana Rosa P; Freitas, Eduardo Vasconcelos de; Lima, Tadeu Gonçalves de; Feitosa, Ana Márcia Lima; Santos, Joyce Paiva dos; Correia, José Walter

    2012-12-01

    Many cases have been published showing a co-existence of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs) and other autoimmune diseases. About a quarter of patients with achalasia have a concurrent thyroid disease, most commonly associated with hypothyroidism. Although relatively rare, the association of achalasia and hyperthyroidism requires attention. The physiopathology of Grave's Disease (GD) involves B- and T-mediator lymphocytes, which have an affinity for known thyroid antigens: thyroglobulin, thyroid-peroxidase, and thyrotrophin receptor. Currently, however, the real physiopathogenesis of achalasia continues to be unknown. Some important findings are suggestive of an autoimmune mechanism: significant infiltration of the myoenteric plexus by monocytes, presence of the class II-Human Histocompatibility Complex DQwl antigen and antibodies to myoenteric neurons. The present case reports a patient who, despite testing negative for Chagas' disease, had achalasia, progressed to developing significant wasting and worsening of his quality of life, was later diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. After endoscopic esophageal dilatation and radioiodine ablation of the thyroid gland, there was great improvement in the patient clinical condition. PMID:23329193

  8. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Bühler, Silja; Hatz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals with autoimmune diseases treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and in particular biological therapies is also rising. The autoimmune disease itself as well as the immunosuppressive therapy increases the risk of infection in this population. Particularly the risk of vaccine-preventable infections is elevated. Thus, preventing infections by the means of vaccination is of utmost importance. The Division of Infectious Diseases of the Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, performed a literature search on the topic of vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases upon request by the Swiss Federal Commission for Vaccination Issues. Overall, data are scarce. The following main points were retrieved from the literature: Inactivated vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity may be reduced under immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to the generally recommended basic vaccinations, specific vaccinations, such as influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are indicated in these patient groups. Live vaccines are generally contraindicated under immunosuppressive therapy due to safety concerns. However, specific exceptions apply. Furthermore, certain time intervals for the administration of live vaccines after pausing or ceasing an immunosuppressive therapy should be respected. PMID:27268452

  9. Autoimmune Pathogenesis of Chagas Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Kevin M.; Engman, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Chagas heart disease is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy that develops in approximately one-third of individuals infected with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Since the discovery of T. cruzi by Carlos Chagas >100 years ago, much has been learned about Chagas disease pathogenesis; however, the outcome of T. cruzi infection is highly variable and difficult to predict. Many mechanisms have been proposed to promote tissue inflammation, but the determinants and the relative importance of each have yet to be fully elucidated. The notion that some factor other than the parasite significantly contributes to the development of myocarditis was hypothesized by the first physician-scientists who noted the conspicuous absence of parasites in the hearts of those who succumbed to Chagas disease. One of these factors—autoimmunity—has been extensively studied for more than half a century. Although questions regarding the functional role of autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of Chagas disease remain unanswered, the development of autoimmune responses during infection clearly occurs in some individuals, and the implications that this autoimmunity may be pathogenic are significant. In this review, we summarize what is known about the pathogenesis of Chagas heart disease and conclude with a view of the future of Chagas disease diagnosis, pathogenesis, therapy, and prevention, emphasizing recent advances in these areas that aid in the management of Chagas disease. PMID:25857229

  10. Targeting the Fc receptor in autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinrui; Kimberly, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Fc receptors and their interaction with immunoglobulin and innate immune opsonins such as CRP are key players in humoral and cellular immune responses. As the effector mechanism for some therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and often a contributor to the pathogenesis and progression of autoimmunity, FcRs are promising targets for treating autoimmune diseases. Areas covered This review discusses the nature of different Fc receptors and the various mechanisms of their involvement in initiating and modulating immunocyte functions and their biological consequences. It describes a range of current strategies in targeting Fc receptors and manipulating their interaction with specific ligands while presenting the pros and cons of these approaches. This review also discusses potential new strategies including regulation of FcR expression and receptor cross-talk. Expert opinion Fc receptors are appealing targets in the treatment of inflammatory autoimmune diseases. However, there are still knowledge limitations and technical challenges, the most important being a better understanding of the individual roles of each of the Fc receptors and enhancement of the specificity in targeting particular cell types and specific Fc receptors. PMID:24521454

  11. Complement C5 in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE) Facilitates Remyelination and Prevents Gliosis

    PubMed Central

    Weerth, Susanna H.; Rus, Horea; Shin, Moon L.; Raine, Cedric S.

    2003-01-01

    Activation of the classical complement system is known to play a central role in autoimmune demyelination. We have analyzed the role of complement component C5 in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) using C5-deficient (C5-d) and C5-sufficient (C5-s) mice. Both groups of mice displayed early onset EAE, a short recovery phase, and similar stable chronic courses. However, in contrast to the clinical similarities, marked differences were apparent by histopathology. During acute EAE in C5-d, a delay in inflammatory cell infiltration and tissue damage was observed along with restricted lesion areas, which in C5-s mice were more extensive and diffuse. More striking were the differences in chronic lesions. In C5-d mice, inflammatory demyelination and Wallerian degeneration were followed by axonal depletion and severe gliosis, while in C5-s, the same initial signs were followed by axonal sparing and extensive remyelination. In C5-d, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting showed an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein and a decrease in neurofilament protein, proteolipid protein, and several pro-inflammatory markers. These results in the EAE model indicate that absence of C5 resulted in fiber loss and extensive scarring, whereas presence of C5-favored axonal survival and more efficient remyelination. PMID:12937147

  12. Time-Dependent Progression of Demyelination and Axonal Pathology in MP4-Induced Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Stormanns, Eva R.; Recks, Mascha S.; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by inflammation, demyelination and axonal pathology. Myelin basic protein/proteolipid protein (MBP-PLP) fusion protein MP4 is capable of inducing chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in susceptible mouse strains mirroring diverse histopathological and immunological hallmarks of MS. Limited availability of human tissue underscores the importance of animal models to study the pathology of MS. Methods Twenty-two female C57BL/6 (B6) mice were immunized with MP4 and the clinical development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was observed. Methylene blue-stained semi-thin and ultra-thin sections of the lumbar spinal cord were assessed at the peak of acute EAE, three months (chronic EAE) and six months after onset of EAE (long-term EAE). The extent of lesional area and inflammation were analyzed in semi-thin sections on a light microscopic level. The magnitude of demyelination and axonal damage were determined using electron microscopy. Emphasis was put on the ventrolateral tract (VLT) of the spinal cord. Results B6 mice demonstrated increasing demyelination and severe axonal pathology in the course of MP4-induced EAE. In addition, mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in the nearest neighbor neurofilament distance (NNND) as early signs of axonal damage were evident with the onset of EAE. In semi-thin sections we observed the maximum of lesional area in the chronic state of EAE while inflammation was found to a similar extent in acute and chronic EAE. In contrast to the well-established myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) model, disease stages of MP4-induced EAE could not be distinguished by assessing the extent of parenchymal edema or the grade of inflammation. Conclusions Our results complement our previous ultrastructural studies of B6 EAE models and suggest that B6 mice immunized with different antigens constitute

  13. Genital lesions following bestiality.

    PubMed

    Mittal, A; Shenoi, S D; Kumar, K B; Sharma, P V

    2000-01-01

    A 48-year-old man presented with painful genital lesions with history of bestiality and abnor-mal sexual behaviour. Examination revealed multiple irregular tender ulcers and erosions, with phimosis and left sided tender inguinal adenopathy. VDRL, TPHA, HIV-ELISA were negative. He was treated with ciprofloxacin 500mg b.d. along with saline compresses with complete resolution. PMID:20877040

  14. Open questions in autoimmunity: discussions from the 2013 Controversies in Rheumatology and Autoimmunity Meeting.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-01-01

    The recent CORA (Controversies in Rheumatology and Autoimmunity) meeting held in 2013 represented a unique opportunity for rheumatologists to address several topics. Among these, four topics include: (i) the role of epigenetic changes in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as shown by studies in monozygotic twins; (ii) the cardiovascular and atherosclerotic risk in patients with RA treated with biologics; (iii) the use of new biomarkers for the diagnosis and follow-up of RA and other autoimmune diseases, as represented by the new automatic machines for anti-nuclear antibodies detection, or ultrasound imaging to follow RA progression; and (iv) the latest guidelines on how to use and manage biologic therapies in RA and other autoimmune diseases, such as lupus. In summary, we will herein present these topics of discussion and underline the conclusions obtained by rheumatologists during the 2013 CORA Meeting. PMID:24642104

  15. Tracking early autoimmune disease by bioluminescent imaging of NF-kappaB activation reveals pathology in multiple organ systems.

    PubMed

    Zangani, Michael; Carlsen, Harald; Kielland, Anders; Os, Audun; Hauglin, Harald; Blomhoff, Rune; Munthe, Ludvig A; Bogen, Bjarne

    2009-04-01

    It is desirable to have an early and sensitive detection marker of autoimmune disease in intact animals. Nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB is a transcription factor that is associated with inflammatory responses and immune disorders. Previously, we demonstrated that so-called idiotypic-driven T-B cell collaboration in mice doubly transgenic for paired immunoglobulin and T cell receptor transgenes resulted in a systemic autoimmune disease with systemic lupus erythematosus-like features. Here, we investigated NF-kappaB activation by including an NF-kappaB-responsive luciferase reporter transgene in this animal model. Triply transgenic mice developed bioluminescence signals from diseased organs before onset of clinical symptoms and autoantibody production, and light emissions correlated with disease progression. Signals were obtained from secondary lymphoid organs, inflamed intestines, skin lesions, and arthritic joints. Moreover, bioluminescence imaging and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that a minority of mice suffered from an autoimmune disease of the small intestine, in which light emissions correlated with antibodies against tissue transglutaminase and gliadin. Detection of luciferase by immunohistochemistry revealed NF-kappaB activation in collaborating B and T cells, as well as in macrophages. These results demonstrate that bioluminescent in vivo imaging of NF-kappaB activation can be used for early and sensitive detection of autoimmune disease in an experimental mouse model, offering new possibilities for the evaluation of anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:19286564

  16. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhiyuan; Zou, Jing; Zhao, Lingling; Cheng, Yan; Cai, Hanqing; Li, Mo; Liu, Edwin; Yu, Liping; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA) amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v). The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD), and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; p< 0.0001) or NAITD (3.1%; P < 0.0001) or healthy controls (1%; p<0.0001). The patients with APS3v having both T1D and AITD were 36% positive for TGA, significantly higher than patients with T1D alone (p = 0.040) or with AITD alone (p = 0.017). T1D and AITD were found to have a 20% and 30% frequency of overlap respectively at diagnosis. In conclusion, TGA positivity was high in the Chinese population having existing T1D and/or AITD, and even higher when both diseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients. PMID:27427767

  17. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhiyuan; Zou, Jing; Zhao, Lingling; Cheng, Yan; Cai, Hanqing; Li, Mo; Liu, Edwin; Yu, Liping; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA) amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v). The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD), and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; p< 0.0001) or NAITD (3.1%; P < 0.0001) or healthy controls (1%; p<0.0001). The patients with APS3v having both T1D and AITD were 36% positive for TGA, significantly higher than patients with T1D alone (p = 0.040) or with AITD alone (p = 0.017). T1D and AITD were found to have a 20% and 30% frequency of overlap respectively at diagnosis. In conclusion, TGA positivity was high in the Chinese population having existing T1D and/or AITD, and even higher when both diseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients. PMID:27427767

  18. Gene Expression Profiling in Dermatitis Herpetiformis Skin Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dolcino, M.; Cozzani, E.; Riva, S.; Parodi, A.; Tinazzi, E.; Lunardi, C.; Puccetti, A.

    2012-01-01

    Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is an autoimmune blistering skin disease associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy (CD). In order to investigate the pathogenesis of skin lesions at molecular level, we analysed the gene expression profiles in skin biopsies from 6 CD patients with DH and 6 healthy controls using Affymetrix HG-U133A 2.0 arrays. 486 genes were differentially expressed in DH skin compared to normal skin: 225 were upregulated and 261 were downregulated. Consistently with the autoimmune origin of DH, functional classification of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) indicates a B- and T-cell immune response (LAG3, TRAF5, DPP4, and NT5E). In addition, gene modulation provides evidence for a local inflammatory response (IL8, PTGFR, FSTL1, IFI16, BDKRD2, and NAMPT) with concomitant leukocyte recruitment (CCL5, ENPP2), endothelial cell activation, and neutrophil extravasation (SELL, SELE). DEGs also indicate overproduction of matrix proteases (MMP9, ADAM9, and ADAM19) and proteolytic enzymes (CTSG, ELA2, CPA3, TPSB2, and CMA1) that may contribute to epidermal splitting and blister formation. Finally, we observed modulation of genes involved in cell growth inhibition (CGREF1, PA2G4, and PPP2R1B), increased apoptosis (FAS, TNFSF10, and BASP1), and reduced adhesion at the dermal epidermal junction (PLEC1, ITGB4, and LAMA5). In conclusion, our results identify genes that are involved in the pathogenesis of DH skin lesions. PMID:22991566

  19. Gene expression profiling in dermatitis herpetiformis skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Dolcino, M; Cozzani, E; Riva, S; Parodi, A; Tinazzi, E; Lunardi, C; Puccetti, A

    2012-01-01

    Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is an autoimmune blistering skin disease associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy (CD). In order to investigate the pathogenesis of skin lesions at molecular level, we analysed the gene expression profiles in skin biopsies from 6 CD patients with DH and 6 healthy controls using Affymetrix HG-U133A 2.0 arrays. 486 genes were differentially expressed in DH skin compared to normal skin: 225 were upregulated and 261 were downregulated. Consistently with the autoimmune origin of DH, functional classification of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) indicates a B- and T-cell immune response (LAG3, TRAF5, DPP4, and NT5E). In addition, gene modulation provides evidence for a local inflammatory response (IL8, PTGFR, FSTL1, IFI16, BDKRD2, and NAMPT) with concomitant leukocyte recruitment (CCL5, ENPP2), endothelial cell activation, and neutrophil extravasation (SELL, SELE). DEGs also indicate overproduction of matrix proteases (MMP9, ADAM9, and ADAM19) and proteolytic enzymes (CTSG, ELA2, CPA3, TPSB2, and CMA1) that may contribute to epidermal splitting and blister formation. Finally, we observed modulation of genes involved in cell growth inhibition (CGREF1, PA2G4, and PPP2R1B), increased apoptosis (FAS, TNFSF10, and BASP1), and reduced adhesion at the dermal epidermal junction (PLEC1, ITGB4, and LAMA5). In conclusion, our results identify genes that are involved in the pathogenesis of DH skin lesions. PMID:22991566

  20. The MicroRNA-21 in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaowen; Wan, Xiaochun; Ruan, Qingguo

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is an oncomiR and significantly upregulated in a wide range of cancers. It is strongly involved in apoptosis and oncogenesis, since most of its reported targets are tumor suppressors. Recently, miR-21 was found to be correlated with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and may play an essential role in regulating autoimmune responses. In particular, miR-21 promotes Th17 cell differentiation, which mediates the development of multiple autoimmune diseases. In this article, we review the current research on the mechanisms that regulate miR-21 expression, the potential of miR-21 as a diagnostic biomarker for autoimmune disease and the mechanisms by which miR-21 promotes the development of autoimmune disease. We also discussed the therapeutic potential of targeting miR-21 in treating patients with autoimmune disease. PMID:27271606

  1. Immunodeficiency and autoimmunity: lessons from systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Grammatikos, Alexandros P.; Tsokos, George C.

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that systemic autoimmunity and immunodeficiency are not separate entities, but rather interconnected processes. Immunodeficiency results from distinct defects of the immune response and primarily presents as infections, but also frequently with autoimmune features. Systemic autoimmunity is the combined effect of multiple genetic variations, infectious and immunoregulatory factors that result in dominant autoimmune manifestations in addition to frequent and opportunistic infections. The overlap in disease manifestations and symptoms suggests that immunodeficiency should be considered in the presence of autoimmunity, and vice versa. In this review, we present the shared or similar aspects of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity using systemic lupus erythematosus as a paradigm and discuss the implications for clinical care. PMID:22177735

  2. Smoke and autoimmunity: The fire behind the disease.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Carlo; Versini, Mathilde; Ben-Ami, Dana; Gertel, Smadar; Watad, Abdulla; Segel, Michael J; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Conti, Fabrizio; Cantarini, Luca; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Antonelli, Alessandro; Amital, Howard; Valesini, Guido; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-04-01

    The association between smoke habit and autoimmunity has been hypothesized a long time ago. Smoke has been found to play a pathogenic role in certain autoimmune disease as it may trigger the development of autoantibodies and act on pathogenic mechanism possibly related with an imbalance of the immune system. Indeed, both epidemiological studies and animal models have showed the potential deleterious effect caused by smoke. For instance, smoke, by provoking oxidative stress, may contribute to lupus disease by dysregulating DNA demethylation, upregulating immune genes, thereby leading to autoreactivity. Moreover, it can alter the lung microenvironment, facilitating infections, which, in turn, may trigger the development of an autoimmune condition. This, in turn, may result in a dysregulation of immune system leading to autoimmune phenomena. Not only cigarette smoke but also air pollution has been reported as being responsible for the development of autoimmunity. Large epidemiological studies are needed to further explore the accountability of smoking effect in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26772647

  3. Autoimmunity-related neutrophilic dermatosis: a newly described entity that is not exclusive of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Saeb-Lima, Marcela; Charli-Joseph, Yann; Rodríguez-Acosta, Elva Dalia; Domínguez-Cherit, Judith

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophilic dermatoses have long been known to be associated with autoinmune systemic diseases. Recently, a small number of cases of a disorder distinct from Sweet syndrome or bullous lupus erythematosus (LE) have been described as specifically related to systemic LE under diverse terms, including nonbullous neutrophilic dermatosis, nonbullous neutrophilic LE, and Sweet-like neutrophilic dermatosis. We describe 7 patients that developed urticarial lesions in the context of a known or concurrently diagnosed autoimmune connective tissue disease. Of a total of 7 patients, 6 were afflicted by systemic LE and 1 by rheumatoid arthritis and secondary Sjögren syndrome. Histological findings in all patients included an interstitial and perivascular neutrophilic infiltrate with leukocytoclasia, vacuolar alteration along the dermal-edidermal junction, and no vasculitis. Most patients had active systemic disease at the time of the cutaneous eruption. Skin lesions resolved rapidly after the administration of immunomodulating agents. In conclusion, we provide additional evidence of the existence of a recently defined nonbullous neutrophilic dermatosis in the context of autoimmune connective tissue diseases and propose the term autoimmunity-related neutrophilic dermatosis as an appropriate designation. Furthermore, we believe that this entity should prompt physicians to screen the presence of an active systemic disorder in afflicted patients. PMID:23518639

  4. Autoimmune myasthenia gravis, immunotherapy and thymectomy in children.

    PubMed

    Ware, Tyson L; Ryan, Monique M; Kornberg, Andrew J

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune myasthenia gravis is a rare condition in children. Identifying antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor is helpful in making the diagnosis. However, seronegative cases do exist and need to be distinguished from congenital forms of myasthenia. There is little published experience to inform the judicious management of autoimmune myasthenia gravis in children. In this article, we report our experience in the management of 12 cases of autoimmune myasthenia gravis in children in the modern era of medical immunotherapy and thymectomy. PMID:21911294

  5. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik; Seguin, Amélie; Mousson, Christiane; Servais, Aude; Bordessoule, Dominique; Perez, Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Veyradier, Agnès; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Hamidou, Mohamed; Coppo, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center registry between October, 2000 and May, 2009. Clinical and laboratory data available at time of TTP diagnosis were recovered. Each center was contacted to collect the more recent data and diagnosis criteria for autoimmunity. Fifty-six patients presented an autoimmune disorder in association with TTP, 9 years before TTP (median; min: 2 yr, max: 32 yr) (26 cases), at the time of TTP diagnosis (17 cases) or during follow-up (17 cases), up to 12 years after TTP diagnosis (mean, 22 mo). The most frequent autoimmune disorder reported was systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (26 cases) and Sjögren syndrome (8 cases). The presence of additional autoimmune disorders had no impact on outcomes of an acute TTP or the occurrence of relapse. Two factors evaluated at TTP diagnosis were significantly associated with the development of an autoimmune disorder during follow-up: the presence of antidouble stranded (ds)DNA antibodies (hazard ratio (HR): 4.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.64–15.14]) and anti-SSA antibodies (HR: 9.98; 95% CI [3.59–27.76]). A follow-up across many years is necessary after an acute TTP, especially when anti-SSA or anti-dsDNA antibodies are present on TTP diagnosis, to detect autoimmune disorders early before immunologic events spread to prevent disabling complications. PMID:26496263

  6. Ovarian autoimmune disease: clinical concepts and animal models

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Bryce D; Kinsey, William K; McGinnis, Lynda K; Christenson, Lane K; Jasti, Susmita; Stevens, Anne M; Petroff, Brian K; Petroff, Margaret G

    2014-01-01

    The ovary is not an immunologically privileged organ, but a breakdown in tolerogenic mechanisms for ovary-specific antigens has disastrous consequences on fertility in women, and this is replicated in murine models of autoimmune disease. Isolated ovarian autoimmune disease is rare in women, likely due to the severity of the disease and the inability to transmit genetic information conferring the ovarian disease across generations. Nonetheless, autoimmune oophoritis is often observed in association with other autoimmune diseases, particularly autoimmune adrenal disease, and takes a toll on both society and individual health. Studies in mice have revealed at least two mechanisms that protect the ovary from autoimmune attack. These mechanisms include control of autoreactive T cells by thymus-derived regulatory T cells, as well as a role for the autoimmune regulator (AIRE), a transcriptional regulator that induces expression of tissue-restricted antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells during development of T cells. Although the latter mechanism is incompletely defined, it is well established that failure of either results in autoimmune-mediated targeting and depletion of ovarian follicles. In this review, we will address the clinical features and consequences of autoimmune-mediated ovarian infertility in women, as well as the possible mechanisms of disease as revealed by animal models. PMID:25327908

  7. Epigenetics of autoantigens: new opportunities for therapy of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Radic, Marko; Muller, Sylviane

    2013-01-01

    The field of epigenetics requires that traditional divisions between scientific disciplines give way to cross-fertilization of concepts and ideas from different areas of investigation. Such is the case with research in autoimmunity. Recent discoveries of stimuli that induce autoimmunity reveal that epigenetic marks of autoantigens are recognized by autoreactive B and T cell receptors. Thus, insights into the initiation of autoimmunity, its prevention and therapy will arise from understanding the biochemistry, cell biology and microbiology of autoantigen epigenetics. Here, we highlight potential benefits from the inhibition of a histone modifying enzyme and the administration of a phosphorylated, spliceosome-derived peptide, in the treatment of autoimmunity. PMID:25512708

  8. The target tissue in autoimmunity--an influential niche.

    PubMed

    Hill, Natasha J; Hultcrantz, Monica; Sarvetnick, Nora; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin

    2007-03-01

    Central and peripheral tolerance mechanisms were for a long time the only regulatory circuits known in autoimmunity. It is now becoming clear that the target tissue itself may have the capacity to control its own destiny. Here we review mechanisms by which the target tissue regulates local inflammation, and the way this could influence progression to overt autoimmunity. Moreover, we discuss recent data showing that physiological properties of the target tissue can determine the organ specificity of autoimmune disease. These recent discoveries and ideas concerning the regulatory potential of the target tissue may, in the future, add a new dimension to our concept of regulatory circuits in autoimmunity. PMID:17301949

  9. Autoimmune vitiligo in rheumatic disease in the mestizo Mexican population

    PubMed Central

    Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Pérez-Pérez, Elena; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pacheco-Tovar, María-Guadalupe; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a chronic disease characterized by the dysfunction or destruction of melanocytes with secondary depigmentation. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of vitiligo associated with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The clinical records from a 10-year database of patients with rheumatic diseases and associated vitiligo was analysed, with one group of patients having autoimmune rheumatic disease and another non-autoimmune rheumatic disease. Available serum samples were used to assess the anti-melanocyte antibodies. A total of 5,251 individual clinical files were archived in the last 10 years, and these patients underwent multiple rheumatology consultations, with 0.3% of the group presenting with vitiligo. The prevalence of vitiligo in the autoimmune rheumatic disease group was 0.672%, which was mainly associated with lupus and arthritis. However, patients with more than one autoimmune disease had an increased relative risk to develop vitiligo, and anti-melanocyte antibodies were positive in 92% of these patients. By contrast, the prevalence was 0.082% in the group that lacked autoimmune rheumatic disease and had negative autoantibodies. In conclusion, the association between vitiligo and autoimmune rheumatic diseases was relatively low. However, the relative risk increased when there were other autoimmune comorbidities, such as thyroiditis or celiac disease. Therefore, the presence of multiple autoimmune syndromes should be suspected. PMID:27446537

  10. Type 1 diabetes and polyglandular autoimmune syndrome: A review

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Martin P; Matheis, Nina; Kahaly, George J

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder caused by inflammatory destruction of the pancreatic tissue. The etiopathogenesis and characteristics of the pathologic process of pancreatic destruction are well described. In addition, the putative susceptibility genes for T1D as a monoglandular disease and the relation to polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PAS) have also been well explored. The incidence of T1D has steadily increased in most parts of the world, especially in industrialized nations. T1D is frequently associated with autoimmune endocrine and non-endocrine diseases and patients with T1D are at a higher risk for developing several glandular autoimmune diseases. Familial clustering is observed, which suggests that there is a genetic predisposition. Various hypotheses pertaining to viral- and bacterial-induced pancreatic autoimmunity have been proposed, however a definitive delineation of the autoimmune pathomechanism is still lacking. In patients with PAS, pancreatic and endocrine autoantigens either colocalize on one antigen-presenting cell or are expressed on two/various target cells sharing a common amino acid, which facilitates binding to and activation of T cells. The most prevalent PAS phenotype is the adult type 3 variant or PAS type III, which encompasses T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease. This review discusses the findings of recent studies showing noticeable differences in the genetic background and clinical phenotype of T1D either as an isolated autoimmune endocrinopathy or within the scope of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. PMID:25685279

  11. Demyelinative chiamal lesions.

    PubMed

    Spector, R H; Glaser, J S; Schatz, N J

    1980-12-01

    To clarify the clinical syndrome of demyelinative chiasmal involvement, six case histories were analyzed and the literature was reviewed. This entitity is characterized by especial predilection for women in the third to fifth decades; visual deficites of a chiasmal pattern that may be modest to marked, with a generallly good prognosis for functional recovery; and other signs and symptoms, not necessarily severe, of scattered lesions of the neuraxis. Neuroradiological studies, especially laminography of the sellar area and computerized tomography, must be employed to rule out a suprasellar mass lesion. The efficacy of systemic corticosteroid therapy is moot, but it seems reasonable to use such agents during acute stages, especially where vision is severely reduced on both sides. PMID:7447764

  12. Novel lesion detection aids.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, K W; Longbottom, C; Ellwood, R; Lussi, A

    2009-01-01

    Several non-invasive and novel aids for the detection of (and in some cases monitoring of) caries lesions have been introduced in the field of 'caries diagnostics' over the last 15 years. This chapter focusses on those available to dentists at the time of writing; continuing research is bound to lead to further developments in the coming years. Laser fluorescence is based on measurements of back-scattered fluorescence of a 655-nm light source. It enhances occlusal and (potentially) approximal lesion detection and enables semi-quantitative caries monitoring. Systematic reviews have identified false-positive results as a limitation. Quantitative light-induced fluorescence is another sensitive method to quantitatively detect and measure mineral loss both in enamel and some dentine lesions; again, the trade-offs with lower specificity when compared with clinical visual detection must be considered. Subtraction radiography is based on the principle of digitally superimposing two radiographs with exactly the same projection geometry. This method is applicable for approximal surfaces and occlusal caries involving dentine but is not yet widely available. Electrical caries measurements gather either site-specific or surface-specific information of teeth and tooth structure. Fixed-frequency devices perform best for occlusal dentine caries but the method has also shown promise for lesions in enamel and other tooth surfaces with multi-frequency approaches. All methods require further research and further validation in well-designed clinical trials. In the future, they could have useful applications in clinical practice as part of a personalized, comprehensive caries management system. PMID:19494675

  13. Large leg ulcers due to autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rozin, Alexander P.; Egozi, Dana; Ramon, Yehuda; Toledano, Kohava; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Markovits, Doron; Schapira, Daniel; Bergman, Reuven; Melamed, Yehuda; Ullman, Yehuda; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Large leg ulcers (LLU) may complicate autoimmune diseases. They pose a therapeutic challenge and are often resistant to treatment. To report three cases of autoimmune diseases complicated with LLU. Case Report Case 1. A 55-year old woman presented with long-standing painful LLU due to mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Biopsy from the ulcer edge showed small vessel vasculitis. IV methylprednisolone (MethP) 1 G/day, prednisolone (PR) 1mg/kg, monthly IV cyclophosphamide (CYC), cyclosporine (CyA) 100mg/day, IVIG 125G, ciprofloxacin+IV Iloprost+enoxaparin+aspirin (AAVAA), hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HO), maggot debridement and autologous skin transplantation were performed and the LLU healed. Case 2. A 45-year old women with MCTD developed multiple LLU’s with non-specific inflammation by biopsy. MethP, PR, hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), azathioprine (AZA), CYC, IVIG, AAVAA failed. Treatment for underlying the LLU tibial osteomyelitis and addition of CyA was followed by the LLU healing. Case 3. A 20-year-old man with history of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) developed painful LLU’s due to small vessel vasculitis (biopsy). MethP, PR 1 mg/kg, CYC, CyA 100 mg/d, AAVAA failed. MRSA sepsis and relapse of systemic PAN developed. IV vancomycin, followed by ciprofloxacin, monthly IVIG (150 g/for 5 days) and infliximab (5 mg/kg) were instituted and the LLU’s healed. Conclusions LLU are extremely resistant to therapy. Combined use of multiple medications and services are needed for healing of LLU due to autoimmune diseases. PMID:21169912

  14. [Atopy and autoimmunity -- a case report].

    PubMed

    Alfaro, M; Tapadinhas, F; Neves, Am; Costa Trindade, J

    2007-01-01

    Atopy, immunodeficiency and autoimmunity are manifestations of immune system dysfunction. Classically atopy and autoimmunity are referred as distinct immunological reactions. Recent studies suggest the existence of common pathogenic mechanisms. We report the case of a teenager with familial history of asthma and miasthenia gravis in her mother (HLA- B8+) and personal history of recurrent upper respiratory infections from two to four years old, and pneumonia since five years old (3 or 4 episodes/ year, in three consecutive years), with associated dyspnoea and hypoxemia, requiring frequently hospital admission. Investigation was initially negative for atopy markers, and excluded other hypothesis as tuberculosis, cystic fibrosis, -1 antitrypsin deficiency, congenital heart disease, bronchopulmonary malformations or foreign body aspiration. Latter, further exams finally confirmed atopy with a raised IgE, positive RAST and cutaneous sensitivity tests (for house dust mites and pollen) and revealed circulating immune complexes and IgG 2, 3 e 4 deficit. Most frequent autoantibodies and precipitins study were negative, and histocompatibility antigens study revealed HLA- B8 (as her mother). Ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy and respiratory function tests were normal. Antihistamines, topical corticoids and bronchodilators were done with an excellent clinical response. At 16 years- old she is admitted again with the diagnosis of erythema nodosum and the clinical suspicion of Sweet's syndrome, having a good evolution. The relation between atopy and autoimmunity is enfatized by the authors. This simultaneous occurrence does not correspond merely to a statistical association, but may represent a global immune system impairment, with the involvement of different types of hypersensibility. PMID:17962891

  15. Dendritic cells in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Kabel, P J; Voorbij, H A; van der Gaag, R D; Wiersinga, W M; de Haan, M; Drexhage, H A

    1987-01-01

    Dendritic cells form a morphologically distinct class of cells characterized by shape, reniform nucleus, absent to weak acid-phosphatase activity and strong Class II MHC determinant positivity. Functionally they are the most efficient cells in antigen presentation to T-lymphocytes which indicates their role in the initiation of an immune response. Using immunehistochemical techniques we studied the presence of dendritic cells in normal Wistar rat and human thyroids, in thyroids of BBW rats developing thyroid autoimmunity and in Graves' goitres. Dendritic cells could be identified in all thyroids studied and were positioned underneath the thyrocytes in between the follicles. Skin dendritic cells travel via lymphatics to draining lymph nodes, thus forming an antigen presenting cell system. It is likely that a similar cell system exists on the level of the thyroid for dendritic cells have also been detected in thyroid draining lymph nodes. In normal thyroid tissue of both human and rat dendritic cells were relatively scarce. During the initial phases of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BBW rat (before the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) numbers of thyroid dendritic cells increased. Intrathyroidal T-helper cells, B-cells or plasma cells could not be found. The thyroid draining lymph node contained large numbers of plasma cells. During the later stages of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BB/W rat (after the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) and in Graves' goitres dendritic cells were not only present in high number, but 20-30% were seen in contact with now-present intrathyroidal T-helper lymphocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3475920

  16. Proteome-wide survey of the autoimmune target repertoire in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    Landegren, Nils; Sharon, Donald; Freyhult, Eva; Hallgren, Åsa; Eriksson, Daniel; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Bensing, Sophie; Wahlberg, Jeanette; Nelson, Lawrence M; Gustafsson, Jan; Husebye, Eystein S; Anderson, Mark S; Snyder, Michael; Kämpe, Olle

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) is a monogenic disorder that features multiple autoimmune disease manifestations. It is caused by mutations in the Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene, which promote thymic display of thousands of peripheral tissue antigens in a process critical for establishing central immune tolerance. We here used proteome arrays to perform a comprehensive study of autoimmune targets in APS1. Interrogation of established autoantigens revealed highly reliable detection of autoantibodies, and by exploring the full panel of more than 9000 proteins we further identified MAGEB2 and PDILT as novel major autoantigens in APS1. Our proteome-wide assessment revealed a marked enrichment for tissue-specific immune targets, mirroring AIRE's selectiveness for this category of genes. Our findings also suggest that only a very limited portion of the proteome becomes targeted by the immune system in APS1, which contrasts the broad defect of thymic presentation associated with AIRE-deficiency and raises novel questions what other factors are needed for break of tolerance. PMID:26830021

  17. Familial Aggregation and Segregation Analysis in Families Presenting Autoimmunity, Polyautoimmunity, and Multiple Autoimmune Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Castiblanco, John; Sarmiento-Monroy, Juan Camilo; Mantilla, Ruben Dario; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Studies documenting increased risk of developing autoimmune diseases (ADs) have shown that these conditions share several immunogenetic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology). This report explored familial aggregation and segregation of AD, polyautoimmunity, and multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) in 210 families. Familial aggregation was examined for first-degree relatives. Segregation analysis was implemented as in S.A.G.E. release 6.3. Data showed differences between late- and early-onset families regarding their age, age of onset, and sex. Familial aggregation of AD in late- and early-onset families was observed. For polyautoimmunity as a trait, only aggregation was observed between sibling pairs in late-onset families. No aggregation was observed for MAS. Segregation analyses for AD suggested major gene(s) with no clear discernible classical known Mendelian transmission in late-onset families, while for polyautoimmunity and MAS no model was implied. Data suggest that polyautoimmunity and MAS are not independent traits and that gender, age, and age of onset are interrelated factors influencing autoimmunity. PMID:26697508

  18. Proteome-wide survey of the autoimmune target repertoire in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1

    PubMed Central

    Landegren, Nils; Sharon, Donald; Freyhult, Eva; Hallgren, Åsa; Eriksson, Daniel; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Bensing, Sophie; Wahlberg, Jeanette; Nelson, Lawrence M.; Gustafsson, Jan; Husebye, Eystein S.; Anderson, Mark S.; Snyder, Michael; Kämpe, Olle

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) is a monogenic disorder that features multiple autoimmune disease manifestations. It is caused by mutations in the Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene, which promote thymic display of thousands of peripheral tissue antigens in a process critical for establishing central immune tolerance. We here used proteome arrays to perform a comprehensive study of autoimmune targets in APS1. Interrogation of established autoantigens revealed highly reliable detection of autoantibodies, and by exploring the full panel of more than 9000 proteins we further identified MAGEB2 and PDILT as novel major autoantigens in APS1. Our proteome-wide assessment revealed a marked enrichment for tissue-specific immune targets, mirroring AIRE’s selectiveness for this category of genes. Our findings also suggest that only a very limited portion of the proteome becomes targeted by the immune system in APS1, which contrasts the broad defect of thymic presentation associated with AIRE-deficiency and raises novel questions what other factors are needed for break of tolerance. PMID:26830021

  19. Cold agglutinin-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Randen, Ulla; Tjønnfjord, Geir E

    2015-06-01

    Cold antibody types account for about 25% of autoimmune hemolytic anemias. Primary chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD) is characterized by a clonal lymphoproliferative disorder. Secondary cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS) complicates specific infections and malignancies. Hemolysis in CAD and CAS is mediated by the classical complement pathway and is predominantly extravascular. Not all patients require treatment. Successful CAD therapy targets the pathogenic B-cell clone. Complement modulation seems promising in both CAD and CAS. Further development and documentation are necessary before clinical use. We review options for possible complement-directed therapy. PMID:26043385

  20. Role of extracellular vesicles in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Turpin, Delphine; Truchetet, Marie-Elise; Faustin, Benjamin; Augusto, Jean-François; Contin-Bordes, Cécile; Brisson, Alain; Blanco, Patrick; Duffau, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) consist of exosomes released upon fusion of multivesicular bodies with the cell plasma membrane and microparticles shed directly from the cell membrane of many cell types. EVs can mediate cell-cell communication and are involved in many processes including inflammation, immune signaling, angiogenesis, stress response, senescence, proliferation, and cell differentiation. Accumulating evidence reveals that EVs act in the establishment, maintenance and modulation of autoimmune processes among several others involved in cancer and cardiovascular complications. EVs could also present biomedical applications, as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets or agents for drug delivery. PMID:26554931

  1. Autoimmune demyelination in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Tabira, T

    1988-01-01

    Autoimmune demyelination was studied in EAE induced by active challenge or by transfer of effector T-cell lines or clones specific for myelin basic protein or proteolipid apoprotein. The following points became clear: (1) Proteolipid apoprotein is responsible for widespread demyelination; (2) demyelination is more significant in EAE with a more chronic disease process; (3) a single T-cell clone can mediate significant demyelination without the aid of recipient-derived T-cell populations; (4) the difference in vulnerability between axons and myelin may account for the T-cell-mediated demyelination; and (5) effector T-cell clones can be activated by allogeneic antigens. PMID:2462801

  2. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Packman, Charles H

    2015-09-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  3. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  4. AUTOIMMUNE HYPOTHYROIDISM IN PATIENT WITH NEUROFIBROMATOSIS-1.

    PubMed

    Faraz, Ahmed; Nafees, Taha; Ahmed, Syed Arsalan; Rizvi, Shahraiz Shah

    2015-01-01

    A 53 year old woman, diagnosed with Neurofibromatosis I with multiple neurfibromas over trunk, upper limb & lower limb, she had café au lait spots on her abdomen skin. She was admitted to the tertiary care setup with the complains of cold intolerance, numbness in the limbs, high blood pressure & constipation, patient also had complain of weight gain, lab revealed high TSH, low Free thyroid hormones & positive anti thyroglobulin antibodies. Case was diagnosed with autoimmune hypothyroidism. This is the first case reported with such association of these two diseases. PMID:27004358

  5. Treating prolactinoma can prevent autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Watad, Abdulla; Versini, Mathilde; Jeandel, Pierre-Yves; Amital, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-04-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a pleiotropic hormone; in addition to a wide variety of endocrine effects, PRL also exhibits immunostimulating effects. Therefore, there is increasing evidence linking PRL with a large number of systemic and organ specific autoimmune diseases. Herein, we report the case of an adolescent girl diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) occurring in the context of untreated prolactinoma evolving since childhood. This raises the exciting question of the involvement of PRL in the pathogenesis of MS. It is likely that early treatment of hyperprolactinemia in this case would have significantly reduced the risk of developing MS or even prevented its occurrence. PMID:25468803

  6. Insulin Autoimmune Syndrome Accompanied by Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Ito, Harumi; Miyake, Takafumi; Nakashima, Kazuo; Ito, Yuji; Tanahashi, Chisato; Uchigata, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    In 1981, a 48-year old man was diagnosed with insulin autoimmune syndrome. In 2005, he experienced a substantial increase in his monoclonal insulin antibody levels; in 2006 and 2007, serum monoclonal gammopathy and an 11% marrow plasmacyte ratio were confirmed. In 2012, asymptomatic multiple myeloma was diagnosed based on an increased γ-globulin fraction and serum M-protein (IgG) levels. The insulin antibody binding rate was 75.4% in 2005 and 78.8% in 2012. In 2012, he was hospitalized for ileus and died. Autopsy identified multiple myeloma and no endocrinological tumors in the pancreas. PMID:27522998

  7. Improving diagnosis of atraumatic splenic lesions, part I: nonneoplastic lesions.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zina J; Oh, Sarah K; Chernyak, Victoria; Flusberg, Milana; Rozenblit, Alla M; Kaul, Bindu; Stein, Marjorie W; Mazzariol, Fernanda S

    2016-01-01

    Focal atraumatic splenic lesions often pose a diagnostic challenge on cross-sectional imaging. They can be categorized based on etiology as nonneoplastic (reviewed in Part I), benign neoplastic, and malignant neoplastic lesions. Lesions can also be characterized based on prevalence as common, uncommon, and rare. Familiarity with pertinent clinical parameters, etiology, pathology, prevalence, and ancillary features such as splenomegaly, concomitant hepatic involvement, and extrasplenic findings, in addition to knowledge of imaging spectra of these lesions, can improve diagnostic confidence. Since the nonneoplastic lesions are usually easily recognized, it is critical that the radiologist identifies them avoiding unnecessary work up. PMID:27317223

  8. Cannabidiol Limits T Cell–Mediated Chronic Autoimmune Myocarditis: Implications to Autoimmune Disorders and Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Shin; Erdelyi, Katalin; Matyas, Csaba; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Varga, Zoltan V; Liaudet, Lucas; Hask’, György; ’iháková, Daniela; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pal

    2016-01-01

    Myocarditis is a major cause of heart failure and sudden cardiac death in young adults and adolescents. Many cases of myocarditis are associated with autoimmune processes in which cardiac myosin is a major autoantigen. Conventional immunosuppressive therapies often provide unsatisfactory results and are associated with adverse toxicities during the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychoactive constituent of marijuana that exerts antiinflammatory effects independent of classical cannabinoid receptors. Recently, 80 clinical trials have investigated the effects of CBD in various diseases from inflammatory bowel disease to graft versus host disease. CBD-based formulations are used for the management of multiple sclerosis in numerous countries, and CBD also received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of refractory childhood epilepsy and glioblastoma multiforme. Herein, using a well-established mouse model of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) induced by immunization with cardiac myosin emmulsified in adjuvant resulting in T cell–mediated inflammation, cardiomyocyte cell death, fibrosis and myocardial dysfunction, we studied the potential beneficial effects of CBD. EAM was characterized by marked myocardial T-cell infiltration, profound inflammatory response and fibrosis (measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, histology and immunohistochemistry analyses) accompanied by marked attenuation of both systolic and diastolic cardiac functions measured with a pressure-volume conductance catheter technique. Chronic treatment with CBD largely attenuated the CD3+ and CD4+ T cell–mediated inflammatory response and injury, myocardial fibrosis and cardiac dysfunction in mice. In conclusion, CBD may represent a promising novel treatment for managing autoimmune myocarditis and possibly other autoimmune disorders and organ transplantation. PMID:26772776

  9. PRKDC mutations associated with immunodeficiency, granuloma, and autoimmune regulator–dependent autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Anne-Laure; Verronese, Estelle; Rice, Gillian I.; Fouyssac, Fanny; Bertrand, Yves; Picard, Capucine; Chansel, Marie; Walter, Jolan E.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Butte, Manish J.; Nadeau, Kari Christine; Csomos, Krisztian; Chen, David J.; Chen, Karin; Delgado, Ana; Rigal, Chantal; Bardin, Christine; Schuetz, Catharina; Moshous, Despina; Reumaux, Héloïse; Plenat, François; Phan, Alice; Zabot, Marie-Thérèse; Balme, Brigitte; Viel, Sébastien; Bienvenu, Jacques; Cochat, Pierre; van der Burg, Mirjam; Caux, Christophe; Kemp, E. Helen; Rouvet, Isabelle; Malcus, Christophe; Méritet, Jean-Francois; Lim, Annick; Crow, Yanick J.; Fabien, Nicole; Ménétrier-Caux, Christine; De Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Walzer, Thierry; Belot, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Background PRKDC encodes for DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), a kinase that forms part of a complex (DNA-dependent protein kinase [DNA-PK]) crucial for DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination. In mice DNA-PK also interacts with the transcription factor autoimmune regulator (AIRE) to promote central T-cell tolerance. Objective We sought to understand the causes of an inflammatory disease with granuloma and autoimmunity associated with decreasing T- and B-cell counts over time that had been diagnosed in 2 unrelated patients. Methods Genetic, molecular, and functional analyses were performed to characterize an inflammatory disease evocative of a combined immunodeficiency. Results We identified PRKDC mutations in both patients. These patients exhibited a defect in DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination. Whole-blood mRNA analysis revealed a strong interferon signature. On activation, memory T cells displayed a skewed cytokine response typical of TH2 and TH1 but not TH17. Moreover, mutated DNA-PKcs did not promote AIRE-dependent transcription of peripheral tissue antigens in vitro. The latter defect correlated in vivo with production of anti–calcium-sensing receptor autoantibodies, which are typically found in AIRE-deficient patients. In addition, 9 months after bone marrow transplantation, patient 1 had Hashimoto thyroiditis, suggesting that organ-specific autoimmunity might be linked to nonhematopoietic cells, such as AIRE-expressing thymic epithelial cells. Conclusion Deficiency of DNA-PKcs, a key AIRE partner, can present as an inflammatory disease with organ-specific autoimmunity, suggesting a role for DNA-PKcs in regulating autoimmune responses and maintaining AIRE-dependent tolerance in human subjects. PMID:25842288

  10. Genetic susceptibility to autoimmune liver disease.

    PubMed

    Mattner, Jochen

    2011-01-27

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) are considered as putative autoimmune diseases of the liver. Whereas strong evidence that bacterial infection may trigger PBC exists, the etiologies for PSC and AIH remain unknown. Although there have been significant discoveries of genetic polymorphisms that may underlie the susceptibility to these liver diseases, their associations with environmental triggers and the subsequent implications have been difficult to elucidate. While single nucleotide polymorphisms within the negative costimulatory molecule cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) have been suggested as genetic susceptibility factors for all three disorders, we discuss the implications of CTLA-4 susceptibility alleles mainly in the context of PBC, where Novosphingobium aromaticivorans, an ubiquitous alphaproteobacterium, has recently been specifically associated with the pathogenesis of this devastating liver disease. Ultimately, the discovery of infectious triggers of PBC may expand the concept of genetic susceptibility in immune-mediated liver diseases from the concept of aberrant immune responses against self-antigens to insufficient and/or inappropriate immunological defense mechanisms allowing microbes to cross natural barriers, establish infection and damage respective target organs. PMID:21307981

  11. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  12. Cacao polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zempo, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Watanabe, Ryo; Wakayama, Kouji; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2016-04-01

    Myocarditis is a clinically severe disease; however, no effective treatment has been established. The aim of this study was to determine whether cacao bean (Theobroma cacao) polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis. We used an experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) model in Balb/c mice. Mice with induced EAM were treated with a cacao polyphenol extract (CPE, n=12) or vehicle (n=12). On day 21, hearts were harvested and analyzed. Elevated heart weight to body weight and fibrotic area ratios as well as high cardiac cell infiltration were observed in the vehicle-treated EAM mice. However, these increases were significantly suppressed in the CPE-treated mice. Reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed that mRNA expressions of interleukin (Il)-1β, Il-6, E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and collagen type 1 were lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. The mRNA expressions of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (Nox)2 and Nox4 were increased in the vehicle-treated EAM hearts, although CPE treatment did not significantly suppress the transcription levels. However, compared with vehicle treatment of EAM hearts, CPE treatment significantly suppressed hydrogen peroxide concentrations. Cardiac myeloperoxidase activity, the intensity of dihydroethidium staining and the phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB p65 were also lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. Our data suggest that CPE ameliorates EAM in mice. CPE is a promising dietary supplement to suppress cardiovascular inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:26657007

  13. Novel Therapies for Thyroid Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Poupak; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Elia, Giusy; Nasini, Francesco; Colaci, Michele; Giuggioli, Dilia; Vita, Roberto; Benvenga, Salvatore; Ferri, Clodoveo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR)3 and its interferon(IFN)γ-dependent chemokines (CXCL10, CXCL9, CXCL11) are implicated in the immune-pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroiditis (AT), Graves disease (GD) and Graves Ophthalmopathy (GO). In tissue, recruited Th1 lymphocytes produce IFNγ, enhancing the tissue secretion of IFNγ-inducible chemokines, initiating and perpetuating the autoimmune process. Patients with AT (with hypothyroidism), and with GO and GD, particularly in the active phase, have high IFNγ-inducible chemokines. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ or -α agonists and methimazole exert an immune-modulation on CXCR3 chemokines in AT, GD and GO. Other studies are ongoing to evaluate new molecules acting as antagonists of CXCR3, or blocking CXCL10, in Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT), GD and GO. Recently, novel molecules targeting the various agents involved in the pathogenesis of GO, such as rituximab, have been proposed as an alternative to corticosteroids. However, randomized and controlled studies are needed to generalize these interesting results. PMID:26900630

  14. Regulatory T cells in spontaneous autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Furtado, G C; Olivares-Villagómez, D; Curotto de Lafaille, M A; Wensky, A K; Latkowski, J A; Lafaille, J J

    2001-08-01

    Spontaneous experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) develops in 100% of mice harboring a monoclonal myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific CD4+ alphabeta T-cell repertoire. Monoclonality of the alphabeta T-cell repertoire can be achieved by crossing MBP-specific T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice with either RAG-/- mice or TCR alpha-/-/TCR beta-/- double knockout mice. Spontaneous EAE can be prevented by a single administration of purified CD4+ splenocytes or thymocytes obtained from wild-type syngeneic mice. The regulatory T cells (T-reg) that protect from spontaneous EAE need not express the CD25 marker, as effective protection can be attained with populations depleted of CD25+ T cells. Although the specificity of the regulatory T cells is important for their generation or regulatory function, T cells that protect from spontaneous EAE can have a diverse TCR alpha and beta chain composition. T-reg cells expand poorly in vivo, and appear to be long lived. Finally, precursors for T-reg are present in fetal liver as well as in the bone marrow of aging mice. We propose that protection of healthy individuals from autoimmune diseases involves several layers of regulation, which consist of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells, CD4+CD25- T-reg cells, and anti-TCR T cells, with each layer potentially operating at different stages of T-helper cell-mediated immune responses. PMID:11722629

  15. Immunomodulation of Autoimmune Arthritis by Herbal CAM

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H.; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Berman, Brian M.; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating autoimmune disease of global prevalence. The disease is characterized by synovial inflammation leading to cartilage and bone damage. Most of the conventional drugs used for the treatment of RA have severe adverse reactions and are quite expensive. Over the years, increasing proportion of patients with RA and other immune disorders are resorting to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for their health needs. Natural plant products comprise one of the most popular CAM for inflammatory and immune disorders. These herbal CAM belong to diverse traditional systems of medicine, including traditional Chinese medicine, Kampo, and Ayurvedic medicine. In this paper, we have outlined the major immunological pathways involved in the induction and regulation of autoimmune arthritis and described various herbal CAM that can effectively modulate these immune pathways. Most of the information about the mechanisms of action of herbal products in the experimental models of RA is relevant to arthritis patients as well. The study of immunological pathways coupled with the emerging application of genomics and proteomics in CAM research is likely to provide novel insights into the mechanisms of action of different CAM modalities. PMID:21234398

  16. Vitamin D, steroid hormones, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Paolino, Sabrina; Sulli, Alberto; Smith, Vanessa; Pizzorni, Carmen; Seriolo, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    The endogenous serum metabolite of vitamin D (calcitriol, 1,25(OH)2 D3 ) is considered a true steroid hormone (D hormone), and like glucocorticoids (GCs) and gonadal hormones, may exert several immunomodulatory activities. Serum vitamin D deficiency (25(OH) D), and therefore reduced 1,25(OH)2 D3 availability, is considered a risk factor for several chronic/inflammatory or autoimmune conditions, including infectious diseases, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and especially autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD). In ARD in particular, 1,25(OH)2 D3 regulates both innate and adaptive immunity, potentiating the innate response (antimicrobial activity) but reducing adaptive immunity (antigen presentation, T and B cell activities). Regarding a possible synergism between vitamin D and GCs, several studies show that 1,25(OH)2 D3 has significant additive effects on dexamethasone-mediated inhibition of human lymphocyte and monocyte proliferation. Conversely, vitamin D deficiency seems to play a role in increasing autoantibody production by B cells, and seasonal vitamin D declines may trigger flares in ARD, as recently shown. Finally, 1,25(OH)2 D3 seems to reduce aromatase activity and limit the negative effects related to increased peripheral estrogen metabolism (cell proliferation, B cell overactivity). PMID:24739090

  17. Screening tests for autoimmune-related immunotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Pieters, R; Albers, R

    1999-01-01

    A large number of chemicals induce or exacerbate autoimmune-like diseases in man. Because of the complexity of processes involved, these adverse effects are often if not always missed in standard toxicity testing. To date no validated and generally applicable predictive animal model exists and only a few chemicals have actually been shown to induce adverse autoimmune effects in certain animals. The popliteal lymph node assay (PLNA) is a very promising animal test to (pre)screen for systemic immunosensitizing, including autoimmunogenic potential. This review describes the essentials of the various PLNAs against the background of current understanding of chemically induced systemic immunostimulation. The most simple primary PLNA measures enlargement of the popliteal lymph node 6-8 days after subcutaneous injection of a chemical into the footpad. The primary PLNA can distinguish between immunostimulating (both sensitizers and irritants) and innocent chemicals but does not assess the involvement of T cells or immunosensitization. For this, but also for elucidation of relevant mechanisms, detection of anamnestic responses in secondary PLNAs or responses to reporter antigens in the modified PLNA are suitable. To date over 100 compounds (drugs and environmental pollutants) have been tested, and results show a good correlation with reported immunostimulating (both autoimmunogenic and allergic) potential. Importantly, no false-negative chemicals were detected if metabolism was considered. The various types of the PLNA, but in particular the secondary and modified PLNAs, await extensive validation before they can be recommended as a standard test for autoimmunogenic potential. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10502529

  18. Autoimmune Hepatitis in Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tanner I; Kagihara, Jaclyn E; Tsai, Naoky C S; Roytman, Marina M

    2015-08-01

    Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) is a poorly understood disease. There has been a paucity of reports on the epidemiology and clinical course of AIH in multiethnic populations. The aim of this study is to examine the clinical and serologic features of AIH in the multiethnic population of Hawai'i. This was a retrospective, cross-sectional study of a cohort of patients seen between 2010-2013 in a tertiary referral center in Hawai'i. All 32 patients were diagnosed according to International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group (IAIHG) criteria. The mean (SD) age of diagnosis was 49.4 (17.5) years, 75% of patients were female, 72% were Asian, 19% were Caucasian, 6% were Pacific Islander, and 3% were African American. When compared to Caucasians, Asians had lower transaminase levels and international normalized ratio (INR), and were more likely to have anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) seropositivity at presentation. Asians were also older at diagnosis and more likely to achieve complete or partial remission. Patients diagnosed before the age of 40 had higher levels of total bilirubin at presentation compared to those diagnosed after the age of 40. No significant differences were observed between genders. Asian patients with type I AIH present later in life with more favorable laboratory values, and have a superior treatment response compared to Caucasians. Diagnosis before the age of 40 is associated with less favorable laboratory values at diagnosis. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings and determine the reason for the ethnic differences. PMID:26279964

  19. Autoimmune pathogenesis in dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Wan, Shu-Wen; Cheng, Hsien-Jen; Lei, Huan-Yao; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenic mechanisms of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) caused by dengue virus (DV) infection remain unresolved. Patients with DHF/DSS are characterized by several manifestations, including severe thrombocytopenia, vascular leakage, and hepatomegaly. In addition to the effect of virus load and virus variation, abnormal immune responses of the host after DV infection may also account for the progression of DHF/DSS. Actually, viral autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous viral infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus, human hepatitis C virus, human cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, Epstein- Barr virus, and DV. In this review, we discuss the implications of autoimmunity in dengue pathogenesis. Antibodies directed against DV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) showed cross-reactivity with human platelets and endothelial cells, which lead to platelet and endothelial cell damage and inflammatory activation. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that anti-DV NS1 is involved in the pathogenesis of DF and DHF/DSS, and this may provide important information in dengue vaccine development. PMID:16817755

  20. Autoimmunity in chronic urticaria and urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Napoli, D C; Freeman, T M

    2001-07-01

    In contrast to acute urticaria, etiology cannot be identified in most cases of chronic urticaria. Recent evidence suggests that a subset of patients with chronic urticaria may have an autoimmune basis for their condition. The demonstration of antithyroid autoantibodies in some patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) provides support for an association. However, the discovery of a positive skin test response to intradermal injection of autologous serum in as many as 60% of patients with CIU led to the identification of autoantibodies to IgE and the alpha-chain of the high-affinity IgE receptor, Fc epsilon RI alpha. Additional studies have demonstrated that some of these autoantibodies are capable of releasing histamine from donor basophils and mast cells. This article reviews the literature that addresses a possible autoimmune etiology in a subset of patients with CIU. Urticarial vasculitis is differentiated from chronic urticaria based on clinical features and biopsy findings of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Most cases of urticarial vasculitis are secondary to an underlying systemic disease. The presence of autoantibodies has also been demonstrated in a subset of patients with primary urticarial vasculitis. This article briefly reviews some of this data. PMID:11892055

  1. Immune-Neuroendocrine Interactions and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Luis J.; Navarro, Carmen; Medina, Gabriela; Vera-Lastra, Olga; Blanco, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between immune-neuroendocrine system is firmly established. The messengers of this connection are hormones, neuropeptides, neurotransmitters and cytokines. The immune-neuroendocrine system have the capacity to synthesize and release these molecules, which, in turn, can stimulate or suppress the activity of immune or neuroendocrine cells by binding to receptors. In fact, hormones, neuropeptides and neurotransmitters participate in innate and adaptive immune response.Autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD) are characterized by aberrant production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are a potent activator of the HPA axis. In consequence, high levels of pro-inflammatory hormones such as estrogens and prolactin, and low levels of glucocorticoids, an anti-inflammatory hormone, have been described in the active phase of ARD. In addition, high levels of pro-inflammatory hormones and cytokines have also been frequently detected in organ involvement of patients with ARD, suggesting an abnormal local neuroendocrine immune interaction. There is evidence that hormonal changes may appear before the symptomatic phase of the disease. Therefore, it is possible that a pro-inflammatory hormone favors the rupture of tolerance, which is a key feature of autoimmune diseases. The interactions between the immune-neuroendocrine system have a major impact on our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms, diagnosis and therapy of ARD. PMID:17162354

  2. Selected Aspects in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, György; Huszthy, Peter C.; Fossum, Even; Konttinen, Yrjö; Nakken, Britt; Szodoray, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune processes can be found in physiological circumstances. However, they are quenched with properly functioning regulatory mechanisms and do not evolve into full-blown autoimmune diseases. Once developed, autoimmune diseases are characterized by signature clinical features, accompanied by sustained cellular and/or humoral immunological abnormalities. Genetic, environmental, and hormonal defects, as well as a quantitative and qualitative impairment of immunoregulatory functions, have been shown in parallel to the relative dominance of proinflammatory Th17 cells in many of these diseases. In this review we focus on the derailed balance between regulatory and Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Additionally, we depict a cytokine imbalance, which gives rise to a biased T-cell homeostasis. The assessment of Th17/Treg-cell ratio and the simultaneous quantitation of cytokines, may give a useful diagnostic tool in autoimmune diseases. We also depict the multifaceted role of dendritic cells, serving as antigen presenting cells, contributing to the development of the pathognomonic cytokine signature and promote cellular and humoral autoimmune responses. Finally we describe the function and role of extracellular vesicles in particular autoimmune diseases. Targeting these key players of disease progression in patients with autoimmune diseases by immunomodulating therapy may be beneficial in future therapeutic strategies. PMID:26300591

  3. Gender differences in autoimmunity associated with exposure to environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, K. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmunity is thought to result from a combination of genetics, environmental triggers, and stochastic events. Gender is also a significant risk factor with many diseases exhibiting a female bias. Although the role of environmental triggers, especially medications, in eliciting autoimmunity is well established less is known about the interplay between gender, the environment and autoimmunity. This review examines the contribution of gender in autoimmunity induced by selected chemical, physical and biological agents in humans and animal models. Epidemiological studies reveal that environmental factors can be associated with a gender bias in human autoimmunity. However many studies show that the increased risk of autoimmunity is often influenced by occupational exposure or other gender biased activities. Animal studies, although often prejudiced by the exclusive use of female animals, reveal that gender bias can be strain specific suggesting an interaction between sex chromosome complement and background genes. This observation has important implications because it argues that within a gender biased disease there may be individuals in which gender does not contribute to autoimmunity. Exposure to environmental factors, which encompasses everything around us, adds an additional layer of complexity. Understanding how the environment influences the relationship between sex chromosome complement and innate and adaptive immune responses will be essential in determining the role of gender in environmentally-induced autoimmunity. PMID:22137891

  4. IL-2: a two-faced master regulator of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rahul; Fu, Shu Man; Ju, Shyr-Te

    2011-03-01

    CD4(+) T-cell (Th) cytokines provide important regulatory and effector functions of T-cells. Among them, IL-2 plays a unique role. IL-2 is required for the generation and maintenance of regulatory T-cells (Treg) to provide lifelong protection from autoimmune disease. Whether IL-2 is also required for autoimmune disease development is less clear as Il2(-/)(-) mice themselves spontaneously develop multi-organ inflammation (MOI). In this communication, we discuss evidence that support the thesis that IL-2 is required for the development of autoimmune response, although some aspects of autoimmune response are not regulated by IL-2. Potential IL-2-dependent mechanisms operating at specific stages of the inflammation process are presented. The interplays among Treg, IL-2, autoimmune response and adaptive immunity are discussed. Overall, available information indicates that IL-2 is a two-faced master regulator of autoimmunity: one to prevent autoimmunity while the other promotes autoimmune response. The latter is an unfortunate consequence of IL-2 function that is used to promote the adaptive immune response against foreign antigens and pathogens. PMID:21282039

  5. Introducing Polyautoimmunity: Secondary Autoimmune Diseases No Longer Exist

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Alberto; Mantilla, Rubén D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Similar pathophysiological mechanisms within autoimmune diseases have stimulated searches for common genetic roots. Polyautoimmunity is defined as the presence of more than one autoimmune disease in a single patient. When three or more autoimmune diseases coexist, this condition is called multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS). We analyzed the presence of polyautoimmunity in 1,083 patients belonging to four autoimmune disease cohorts. Polyautoimmunity was observed in 373 patients (34.4%). Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS) were the most frequent diseases encountered. Factors significantly associated with polyautoimmunity were female gender and familial autoimmunity. Through a systematic literature review, an updated search was done for all MAS cases (January 2006–September 2011). There were 142 articles retrieved corresponding to 226 cases. Next, we performed a clustering analysis in which AITD followed by systemic lupus erythematosus and SS were the most hierarchical diseases encountered. Our results indicate that coexistence of autoimmune diseases is not uncommon and follows a grouping pattern. Polyautoimmunity is the term proposed for this association of disorders, which encompasses the concept of a common origin for these diseases. PMID:22454759

  6. Cystic Lesions of the Mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Daniel; Suby-Long, Thomas; Restrepo, Carlos S

    2016-06-01

    Cystic lesions are commonly seen in the mediastinum, and they may arise from virtually any organ. The vast majority of these lesions are benign and result in no symptoms. When large, cysts may produce symptoms related to compression of adjacent structures. The most common mediastinal cysts are pericardial and foregut duplication cysts. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance are routinely used to evaluate these lesions. Although computed tomography offers superior spatial resolution, magnetic resonance is useful in differentiating cysts that contain proteinaceous material from solid lesions. Occasionally, cysts arise from solid lesions, such as thymoma or teratoma. Although cysts are alike in appearance, location helps narrowing the differential diagnoses. PMID:27261346

  7. [Multifocal Vitelliform Retinal Lesion].

    PubMed

    Streicher, T; Špirková, J; Ilavská, M

    2015-06-01

    The authors present retrospective follow up of patient with bilateral multifocal vitelliform retinal lesion during the 18 years period. At this time, spontaneous improvement of objective picture on retina and subjective visual troubles was observed. It is probable, that this case is a part of the same symptom complex as a variant of Best´s hereditary disease. This conclusion was based on initial stadium of phenotypical expressivity and additional evaluations. The course and outcomes of visual functions were different. The hereditary transmission was not confirmed. PMID:26201364

  8. Applications of Next-generation Sequencing in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yiyangzi; Shi, Na; Li, Mengtao; Chen, Fei; Niu, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous disorders caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Although numerous causal genes have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), these susceptibility genes are correlated to a relatively low disease risk, indicating that environmental factors also play an important role in the pathogenesis of disease. The intestinal microbiome, as the main symbiotic ecosystem between the host and host-associated microorganisms, has been demonstrated to regulate the development of the body’s immune system and is likely related to genetic mutations in systemic autoimmune diseases. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, with high-throughput capacity and accuracy, provides a powerful tool to discover genomic mutations, abnormal transcription and intestinal microbiome identification for autoimmune diseases. In this review, we briefly outlined the applications of NGS in systemic autoimmune diseases. This review may provide a reference for future studies in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:26432094

  9. Nucleic acid recognizing Toll-like receptors and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    von Landenberg, Philipp; Bauer, Stefan

    2007-12-01

    The understanding of autoimmune diseases experienced an impressive boost since the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been identified as possible key players in autoimmune pathophysiology. Although these receptors recognize a variety of structures derived from viruses, bacteria, and fungi leading to subsequent initiation of the relevant immune responses, recent data support the idea that TLRs are crucial in the induction and perpetuation of certain autoimmune diseases, especially the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this review, we will summarize recent data on involvement of TLRs in the development of autoimmune diseases. We will focus on TLRs 7, 8, and 9 that were originally identified as receptors specific for bacterial and viral RNA/DNA, but more recent in vitro and in vivo studies have linked these receptors to the detection of host RNA, DNA, and RNA-associated or DNA-associated proteins in the context of autoimmunity. PMID:18060756

  10. Recurrence of autoimmune liver diseases after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Nabiha; Renner, Eberhard L

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the most effective treatment modality for end stage liver disease caused by many etiologies including autoimmune processes. That said, the need for transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), but not for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), has decreased over the years due to the availability of effective medical treatment. Autoimmune liver diseases have superior transplant outcomes than those of other etiologies. While AIH and PBC can recur after LT, recurrence is of limited clinical significance in most, but not all cases. Recurrent PSC, however, often progresses over years to a stage requiring re-transplantation. The exact incidence and the predisposing factors of disease recurrence remain debated. Better understanding of the pathogenesis and the risk factors of recurrent autoimmune liver diseases is required to develop preventive measures. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of incidence, diagnosis, risk factors, clinical course, and treatment of recurrent autoimmune liver disease (AIH, PBC, PSC) following LT. PMID:26689244

  11. Reactive oxygen species in organ-specific autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Di Dalmazi, Giulia; Hirshberg, Jason; Lyle, Daniel; Freij, Joudeh B; Caturegli, Patrizio

    2016-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been extensively studied in the induction of inflammation and tissue damage, especially as it relates to aging. In more recent years, ROS have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Here, ROS accumulation leads to apoptosis and autoantigen structural changes that result in novel specificities. ROS have been implicated not only in the initiation of the autoimmune response but also in its amplification and spreading to novel epitopes, through the unmasking of cryptic determinants. This review will examine the contribution of ROS to the pathogenesis of four organ specific autoimmune diseases (Hashimoto thyroiditis, inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, and vitiligo), and compare it to that of a better characterized systemic autoimmune disease (rheumatoid arthritis). It will also discuss tobacco smoking as an environmental factor endowed with both pro-oxidant and anti-oxidant properties, thus capable of differentially modulating the autoimmune response. PMID:27491295

  12. Auto-immune encephalitis as differential diagnosis of infectious encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Armangue, Thaís; Leypoldt, Frank; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To describe the main types of autoimmune encephalitis with special emphasis on those associated with antibodies against neuronal cell surface or synaptic proteins, and the differential diagnosis with infectious encephalitis. Recent findings There is a continuous expansion of the number of cell surface or synaptic proteins that are targets of autoimmunity. The most recently identified include the mGluR5, DPPX, and the GABAAR. In these and previously known autoimmune encephalitis (NMDAR, AMPAR, GABABR, LGI1, CASPR2), the prodromal symptoms or types of presentations often suggest a viral encephalitis. We review here clues that help in the differential diagnosis with infectious encephalitis. Moreover, recent investigations indicate that viral encephalitis (e.g., herpes simplex) can trigger synaptic autoimmunity. In all these disorders immunotherapy is usually effective. Summary Autoimmune encephalitis comprises an expanding group of potentially treatable disorders that should be included in the differential diagnosis of any type of encephalitis. PMID:24792345

  13. Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily in Neuroinflammation and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Sonar, Sandip; Lal, Girdhari

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) molecules play an important role in the activation, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of immune cells into the central nervous system (CNS). Several TNF superfamily molecules are known to control alloimmunity, autoimmunity, and immunity. Development of transgenic and gene knockout animals, and monoclonal antibodies against TNFSF molecules have increased our understanding of individual receptor–ligand interactions, and their intracellular signaling during homeostasis and neuroinflammation. A strong clinical association has been observed between TNFSF members and CNS autoimmunity such as multiple sclerosis and also in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Therefore, they are promising targets for alternative therapeutic options to control autoimmunity. Although, TNFSF ligands are widely distributed and have diverse functions, we have restricted the discussions in this review to TNFSF receptor–ligand interactions and their role in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammation and CNS autoimmunity. PMID:26257732

  14. [Three cases of childhood-onset autoimmune pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Murata, Shinya; Yoden, Atsushi; Aomatsu, Tomoki; Inoue, Keisuke; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Here we present 3 cases of childhood-onset autoimmune pancreatitis: 2 cases in boys aged 4 and 16 years, diagnosed with ulcerative colitis; 1 case in a previously healthy 10-year-old boy. All 3 boys presented with abdominal pain associated with elevated pancreatic enzyme levels. Immunoglobulin G4 levels were elevated only in the 16-year-old boy. However, pancreatic enlargement together with narrowing of the main pancreatic duct was evident on computed tomography in all 3 cases. Autoimmune pancreatitis is an uncommon disease in childhood, and only 3 cases affecting patients under 17 years of age have previously been reported in Japan. Autoimmune pancreatitis may be latent in children with pancreatitis who have chronic or intermittent abdominal symptoms. In addition, it is necessary to recognize autoimmune pancreatitis as a complication of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. The clinical features of pediatric autoimmune pancreatitis remain unclear, and an accumulation of cases is necessary. PMID:25100354

  15. Transfer of hematopoietic stem cells encoding autoantigen prevents autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Steptoe, Raymond J; Ritchie, Janine M; Harrison, Leonard C

    2003-05-01

    Bone marrow or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a potential treatment for autoimmune disease. The clinical application of this approach is, however, limited by the risks associated with allogeneic transplantation. In contrast, syngeneic transplantation would be safe and have wide clinical application. Because T cell tolerance can be induced by presenting antigen on resting antigen-presenting cells (APCs), we reasoned that hematopoietic stem cells engineered to express autoantigen in resting APCs could be used to prevent autoimmune disease. Proinsulin is a major autoantigen associated with pancreatic beta cell destruction in humans with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and in autoimmune NOD mice. Here, we demonstrate that syngeneic transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells encoding proinsulin transgenically targeted to APCs totally prevents the development of spontaneous autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. This antigen-specific immunotherapeutic strategy could be applied to prevent T1D and other autoimmune diseases in humans. PMID:12727927

  16. Applications of Next-generation Sequencing in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yiyangzi; Shi, Na; Li, Mengtao; Chen, Fei; Niu, Haitao

    2015-08-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous disorders caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Although numerous causal genes have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), these susceptibility genes are correlated to a relatively low disease risk, indicating that environmental factors also play an important role in the pathogenesis of disease. The intestinal microbiome, as the main symbiotic ecosystem between the host and host-associated microorganisms, has been demonstrated to regulate the development of the body's immune system and is likely related to genetic mutations in systemic autoimmune diseases. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, with high-throughput capacity and accuracy, provides a powerful tool to discover genomic mutations, abnormal transcription and intestinal microbiome identification for autoimmune diseases. In this review, we briefly outlined the applications of NGS in systemic autoimmune diseases. This review may provide a reference for future studies in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:26432094

  17. Autoimmunity: from black water fever to regulatory function.

    PubMed

    Chang, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmunity is a field that has only been around for a little over a century. Initially, it was thought that autoimmunity could not happen, that the body would never turn on itself (i.e. "horror autotoxicus"). It was only around the First World War that autoimmunity was recognized as the pathogenesis of various diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. The discovery of Compound E led to successful treatment of patients with autoimmune diseases, but it was not till later that the adverse effects of this class of drugs were elucidated. The "modern" age of autoimmunity began around 1945 with the description of blackwater fever, and most of the subsequent research on hemolytic anemia and the role of an autoantibody in its pathogenesis led to a description of the anti-globulin reaction. The lupus erythematous (LE) cell was recognized in the mid-1940s by Hargreaves. His research carried on into the 1960s. Rheumatoid factor was also first described in the 1940s as yet another serum factor with activity against globulin-coated sheep red blood cells. The concept of autoimmunity really gained a foothold in the 1950s, when autoimmune thyroid disease and idiopathic thrombocytopenia were first described. Much has happened since then, and our understanding of autoimmunity has evolved now to include mechanisms of apoptosis, signaling pathway derangements, and the discovery of subsets of T cells with regulatory activity. The modern day study of autoimmunity is a fascinating area of research, and full understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is far from being completely elucidated. PMID:24491820

  18. [Primary immunodeficiencies presenting with autoimmune cytopenias in adults].

    PubMed

    Sève, P; Broussolle, C; Pavic, M

    2013-03-01

    Although primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are typically marked by increased susceptibility to infections, autoimmune manifestations have increasingly been recognized as an important component of several forms of PID. Here, we discuss two forms of PID in which autoimmune cytopenias are particularly common and may be the first manifestation of the disease in adults: autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Approximately one fifth of patients with CVID develop autoimmune diseases, and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AHA) are the most common. Since autoimmune cytopenias frequently precede the diagnosis of CVID, testing for immunoglobulin levels should be performed in patients diagnosed with AITP and AHA. Patients with CVID in association with autoimmune cytopenias have a "particular phenotype" with lower susceptibility to infection and higher susceptibility to autoimmune manifestations and, for patients with AHA, a more frequent development of splenomegaly and lymphoma. Corticosteroids and high doses of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) seem to have the same efficacy as in idiopathic AITP and AHA. Splenectomy and rituximab are as effective as in idiopathic autoimmune cytopenias but are associated with an increased risk of severe infection and should, in our opinion, be considered only for those rare patients with "refractory diseases". The course and outcome of autoimmune cytopenias is not affected by supportive IVIg therapy. Autoimmune destruction of blood cells affects over 70% of ALPS patients. The median age of first presentation is 24 months of age, but with increasing awareness of this condition, adults with autoimmune cytopenias are now being diagnosed more frequently. Testing for ALPS should therefore be considered in young adults with unexplained Evan's syndrome. Patients usually respond to immunosuppressive medications, including corticosteroids. Unlike many patients

  19. Xanthogranulomatous hypophysitis: a rare and often mistaken pituitary lesion

    PubMed Central

    Gopal-Kothandapani, Jaya Sujatha; Bagga, Veejay; Wharton, Stephen B; Connolly, Daniel J; Sinha, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Summary Xanthogranulomatous hypophysitis (XGH) is a very rare form of pituitary hypophysitis that may present both clinically and radiologically as a neoplastic lesion. It may either be primary with an autoimmune aetiology and can occur in isolation or as a part of autoimmune systemic disease or secondary as a reactive degenerative response to an epithelial lesion (e.g. craniopharyngioma (CP), Rathke's cleft cyst, germinoma and pituitary adenomas) or as a part of a multiorgan systemic involvement such as tuberculosis, sarcoidosis or granulomatosis. It may also present with a variation of symptoms in children and adults. Our case series compares the paediatric and adult presentations of XGH and the differential diagnoses considered in one child and two adult patients, highlighting the wide spectrum of this condition. Endocrine investigations suggested panhypopituitarism in all three patients and imaging revealed a suprasellar mass compressing the optic chiasm suggestive of CP or Rathke's cleft cyst in one patient and non-functioning pituitary macroadenoma in two patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated mixed signal intensities on T1- and T2-weighted sequences. Following endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery, histological analysis revealed necrotic material with a xanthogranulomatous reaction confirming XGH in two patients and a necrobiotic granulomatous chronic inflammatory infiltrate with neutrophils in one patient, which is not typical of current descriptions of this disorder. This case series describes the wide spectrum of XGH disease that is yet to be defined. Mixed signal intensities on T1- and T2-weighted MRI sequences may indicate XGH and diagnosis is confirmed by histology. Histological variation may indicate an underlying systemic process. Learning points XGH is a rare form of pituitary hypophysitis with a wide clinical and histological spectrum and can mimic a neoplastic lesion.XGH primarily presents with growth arrest in children and pubertal

  20. Current treatment strategies in autoimmune hemolytic disorders.

    PubMed

    Barcellini, Wilma

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a heterogeneous disease usually classified according to the thermal range of the autoantibody in warm, cold and mixed forms. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. Corticosteroids are the first-line therapy for warm AIHA. For refractory/relapsed cases, the choice is between splenectomy (effective in ∼70% cases but with a presumed cure rate of 20%) and rituximab (effective in ∼70-80% of cases), which is becoming the preferred second-line treatment, and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins and danazol. For severe or refractory cases, last option treatments are plasma-exchange, high-dose cyclophosphamide and alemtuzumab. As regards cold agglutinin disease, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:26343892

  1. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: classification and therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Sève, Pascal; Philippe, Pierre; Dufour, Jean-François; Broussolle, Christiane; Michel, Marc

    2008-12-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon cause of anemia. Classifications of AIHA include warm AIHA, cold AIHA (including mainly chronic cold agglutinin disease and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria), mixed-type AIHA and drug-induced AIHA. AIHA may also be further subdivided on the basis of etiology. Management of AIHA is based mainly on empirical data and on small, retrospective, uncontrolled studies. The therapeutic options for treating AIHA are increasing with monoclonal antibodies and, potentially, complement inhibitory drugs. Based on data available in the literature and our experience, we propose algorithms for the treatment of warm AIHA and cold agglutinin disease in adults. Therapeutic trials are needed in order to better stratify treatment, taking into account the promising efficacy of rituximab. PMID:21082924

  2. Pharmacometabolomics-aided Pharmacogenomics in Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Katsila, Theodora; Konstantinou, Evangelia; Lavda, Ioanna; Malakis, Harilaos; Papantoni, Ioanna; Skondra, Lamprini; Patrinos, George P

    2016-03-01

    Inter-individual variability has been a major hurdle to optimize disease management. Precision medicine holds promise for improving health and healthcare via tailor-made therapeutic strategies. Herein, we outline the paradigm of "pharmacometabolomics-aided pharmacogenomics" in autoimmune diseases. We envisage merging pharmacometabolomic and pharmacogenomic data (to address the interplay of genomic and environmental influences) with information technologies to facilitate data analysis as well as sense- and decision-making on the basis of synergy between artificial and human intelligence. Humans can detect patterns, which computer algorithms may fail to do so, whereas data-intensive and cognitively complex settings and processes limit human ability. We propose that better-informed, rapid and cost-effective omics studies need the implementation of holistic and multidisciplinary approaches. PMID:27077110

  3. Is narcolepsy a classical autoimmune disease?

    PubMed

    Arango, María-Teresa; Kivity, Shaye; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-02-01

    Narcolepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness. It is caused by the loss of orexin producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. Current evidences suggest an autoimmune mediated process causing the specific loss of orexin neurons. The high association of the disease with the HLA DQB1*06:02, as well as the link with environmental factors and are important clues supporting this theory. Recently, the association between the occurrence of the disease and vaccination campaign after the 2009 H1N1 pandemic highlighted the importance to increase the knowledge in the Pandora box of the vaccines. This review discusses the last finding regarding the pathogenesis of the disease and its relationship with the H1N1 vaccines. PMID:25447795

  4. Cannabinoids and autoimmune diseases: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Katchan, Valeria; David, Paula; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-06-01

    Cannabinoids have shown to have a variety effects on body systems. Through CB1 and CB2 receptors, amongst other, they exert an effect by modulating neurotransmitter and cytokine release. Current research in the role of cannabinoids in the immune system shows that they possess immunosuppressive properties. They can inhibit proliferation of leucocytes, induce apoptosis of T cells and macrophages and reduce secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In mice models, they are effective in reducing inflammation in arthritis, multiple sclerosis, have a positive effect on neuropathic pain and in type 1 diabetes mellitus. They are effective as treatment for fibromyalgia and have shown to have anti-fibrotic effect in scleroderma. Studies in human models are scarce and not conclusive and more research is required in this field. Cannabinoids can be therefore promising immunosuppressive and anti-fibrotic agents in the therapy of autoimmune disorders. PMID:26876387

  5. Th17 Cells in Immunity and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Bedoya, Simone Kennedy; Lam, Brandon; Lau, Kenneth; Larkin, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Th17 and IL-17 play important roles in the clearance of extracellular bacterial and fungal infections. However, strong evidence also implicates the Th17 lineage in several autoimmune disorders including multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, and asthma. The Th17 subset has also been connected with type I diabetes, although whether it plays a role in the pathogenicity of or protection from the disease remains a controversial issue. In this review we have provided a comprehensive overview of Th17 pathogenicity and function, including novel evidence for a protective role of Th17 cells in conjunction with the microbiota gut flora in T1D onset and progression. PMID:24454481

  6. Pharmacometabolomics-aided Pharmacogenomics in Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Katsila, Theodora; Konstantinou, Evangelia; Lavda, Ioanna; Malakis, Harilaos; Papantoni, Ioanna; Skondra, Lamprini; Patrinos, George P.

    2016-01-01

    Inter-individual variability has been a major hurdle to optimize disease management. Precision medicine holds promise for improving health and healthcare via tailor-made therapeutic strategies. Herein, we outline the paradigm of “pharmacometabolomics-aided pharmacogenomics” in autoimmune diseases. We envisage merging pharmacometabolomic and pharmacogenomic data (to address the interplay of genomic and environmental influences) with information technologies to facilitate data analysis as well as sense- and decision-making on the basis of synergy between artificial and human intelligence. Humans can detect patterns, which computer algorithms may fail to do so, whereas data-intensive and cognitively complex settings and processes limit human ability. We propose that better-informed, rapid and cost-effective omics studies need the implementation of holistic and multidisciplinary approaches. PMID:27077110

  7. A Genomic Approach to Human Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Virginia; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The past decade has seen an explosion in the use of DNA-based microarrays. These techniques permit to assess RNA abundance on a genome-wide scale. Medical applications emerged in the field of cancer, with studies of both solid tumors and hematological malignancies leading to the development of tests that are now used to personalize therapeutic options. Microarrays have also been used to analyze the blood transcriptome in a wide range of diseases. In human autoimmune diseases, these studies are showing potential for identifying therapeutic targets as well as biomarkers for diagnosis, assessment of disease activity and response to treatment. More quantitative and sensitive high throughput RNA profiling methods are starting to be available and will be necessary for transcriptome analyses to become routine tests in the clinical setting. We expect this to crystallize within the coming decade, as they become part of the personalized medicine armamentarium. PMID:20192809

  8. Characterization of immune response to neurofilament light in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Autoimmunity to neuronal proteins occurs in several neurological syndromes, where cellular and humoral responses are directed to surface as well as intracellular antigens. Similar to myelin autoimmunity, pathogenic immune response to neuroaxonal components such as neurofilaments may contribute to neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis. Methods We studied the immune response to the axonal protein neurofilament light (NF-L) in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis animal model of multiple sclerosis. To examine the association between T cells and axonal damage, pathology studies were performed on NF-L immunized mice. The interaction of T cells and axons was analyzed by confocal microscopy of central nervous system tissues and T-cell and antibody responses to immunodominant epitopes identified in ABH (H2-Ag7) and SJL/J (H2-As) mice. These epitopes, algorithm-predicted peptides and encephalitogenic motifs within NF-L were screened for encephalitogenicity. Results Confocal microscopy revealed both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells alongside damaged axons in the lesions of NF-L immunized mice. CD4+ T cells dominated the areas of axonal injury in the dorsal column of spastic mice in which the expression of granzyme B and perforin was detected. Identified NF-L epitopes induced mild neurological signs similar to the observed with the NF-L protein, yet distinct from those characteristic of neurological disease induced with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. Conclusions Our data suggest that CD4+ T cells are associated with spasticity, axonal damage and neurodegeneration in NF-L immunized mice. In addition, defined T-cell epitopes in the NF-L protein might be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:24053384

  9. A cholera toxoid-insulin conjugate as an oral vaccine against spontaneous autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bergerot, I; Ploix, C; Petersen, J; Moulin, V; Rask, C; Fabien, N; Lindblad, M; Mayer, A; Czerkinsky, C; Holmgren, J; Thivolet, C

    1997-04-29

    Mucosally induced immunological tolerance is an attractive strategy for preventing or treating illnesses resulting from untoward inflammatory immune reactions against self- or non-self-antigens. Oral administration of relevant autoantigens and allergens has been reported to delay or suppress onset of clinical disease in a number of experimental autoimmune and allergic disorders. However, the approach often requires repeated feeding of large amounts of tolerogens over long periods and is only partly effective in animals already systemically sensitized to the ingested antigen such as in animals already harboring autoreactive T cells, and thus presumably also in humans with an autoimmune disease. We have recently shown that oral administration of microgram amounts of antigen coupled to cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), can effectively suppress systemic T cell reactivity in naive as well as in immune animals. We now report that feeding small amounts (2-20 microg) of human insulin conjugated to CTB can effectively suppress beta cell destruction and clinical diabetes in adult nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. The protective effect could be transferred by T cells from CTB-insulin-treated animals and was associated with reduced lesions of insulitis. Furthermore, adoptive co-transfer experiments involving injection of Thy-1,2 recipients with diabetogenic T cells from syngeneic mice and T cells from congenic Thy-1,1 mice fed with CTB-insulin demonstrated a selective recruitment of Thy-1,1 donor cells in the peripancreatic lymph nodes concomitant with reduced islet cell infiltration. These results suggest that protection against autoimmune diabetes can be achieved by feeding minute amounts of a pancreas islet cell autoantigen linked to CTB and appears to involve the selective migration and retention of protective T cells into lymphoid tissues draining the site of organ injury. PMID:9114038

  10. A case of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type III complicated with autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Oki, Kenji; Yamane, Kiminori; Koide, Junko; Mandai, Koichi; Nakanishi, Shuhei; Fujikawa, Rumi; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2006-10-01

    A 58-year-old woman complaining of finger tremor was referred to our hospital. The diagnosis of Graves' disease was made based on increased free triiodothyronine (18.88 pg/ml) and free thyroxine (7.47 ng/dl), low TSH (<0.005 microIU/ml) and increased TSH receptor binding antibody activity (70.9%). Serum level of AST (62 U/l) and ALT (93 U/l) were increased and liver biopsy revealed linkage of adjacent portal areas by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates and fibrosis with piecemeal necrosis. Although antinuclear antibody was negative, these findings indicated that she had autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) according to the criteria of the International Autoimmune Hepatitis Scoring System. Slowly progressive type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) was confirmed by a diabetic response pattern due to 75 g-oral glucose tolerance test, and seropositivity towards anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (725 U/ml) and islet cell (80 JDF Units) antibodies. This case exhibited an extremely rare combination of three different autoimmune diseases, including Graves' disease, slowly progressive type 1 DM and AIH, and had no known sensitive human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing or haplotype for these disorders. Although it is common for patients with Graves' disease to exhibit abnormal liver function, it is important to make an accurate diagnosis of AIH because of this life-threatening disorder. PMID:16946565

  11. The role of parvovirus B19 in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jonathan R

    2016-04-01

    Human parvovirus B19 is a single-stranded DNA virus which preferentially targets the erythroblasts in the bone marrow. B19 infection commonly causes erythema infectiosum, arthralgia, fetal death, transient aplastic crisis in patients with shortened red cell survival, and persistent infection in people who are immunocompromised. Less common clinical manifestations include atypical skin rashes, neurological syndromes, cardiac syndromes, and various cytopenias. B19 infection has also been associated with development of a variety of different autoimmune diseases, including rheumatological, neurological, neuromuscular, cardiovascular, haematological, nephrological and metabolic. Production of a variety of autoantibodies has been demonstrated to occur during B19 infection and these have been shown to be key to the pathogenesis of the particular disease process in a significant number of cases, for example, production of rheumatoid factor in cases of B19-associated rheumatoid arthritis and production of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in patients with B19-associated type 1 diabetes mellitus. B19 infection has also been associated with the development of multiple autoimmune diseases in 12 individuals. Documented mechanisms in B19-associated autoimmunity include molecular mimicry (IgG antibody to B19 proteins has been shown to cross react with a variety of recognised human autoantigens, including collagen II, keratin, angiotensin II type 1 receptor, myelin basic protein, cardiolipin, and platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb/IIIa), B19-induced apoptosis with presentation of self-antigens to T lymphocytes, and the phospholipase activity of the B19 unique VP1 protein. PMID:26644521

  12. Autoinflammation and autoimmunity: bridging the divide.

    PubMed

    Doria, A; Zen, M; Bettio, S; Gatto, M; Bassi, N; Nalotto, L; Ghirardello, A; Iaccarino, L; Punzi, L

    2012-11-01

    As soon as autoinflammatory diseases (AIDs) emerged as new entities, they have been linked to the well known world of autoimmunity. In fact, AIDs and systemic autoimmune diseases (ADs), share some characteristics: they start with the prefix "auto" to define a pathological process directed against self; they are systemic diseases, frequently involving musculoskeletal system; both include monogenic and polygenic diseases. From the pathogenetic point of view, they are characterized by a chronic activation of immune system, which eventually leads to tissue inflammation in genetically predisposed individuals. Nevertheless, the specific effectors of the damage are different in the two groups of diseases: in AIDs the innate immune system directly causes tissue inflammation, whereas in ADs the innate immune system activates the adaptive immune system which, in turn, is responsible for the inflammatory process. Mutations in inflammasome-related proteins, particularly in NOD-like receptor (NLR) genes, have been strongly associated to the occurrence of AIDs, whereas the link between inflammasome and ADs is less clear. However, a role for this multiprotein-complex in some ADs can be postulated, since a wide spectrum of endogenous danger signals can activate NLRs and inflammasome products, including IL-1ß, can activate adaptive immunity. An association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) localized in the inflammasome gene NLRP1 and systemic lupus erythematosus has recently been reported. AIDs and ADs are currently subdivided into two different groups, but looking at their similarities they might be considered as a single group of diseases with a large immune pathological and clinical spectrum which includes at one end pure ADs and at the other end pure AIDs. PMID:22878274

  13. The role of autoimmunologists in investigating and treating autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Barabas, Arpad Zsigmond; Cole, Chad Douglas; Graeff, Richard Milton; Lafreniere, Rene; Weir, Donald Mackay

    2011-01-01

    The role of an autoimmunologist is to investigate and cultivate knowledge of normal and abnormal immune responses against self, which includes developing practical know-how to manipulate autoimmune activity and direct positive autoimmune outcomes. Where a subject develops an abnormal immune response directed against normal self, resulting in an autoimmune disease, the specialist should be able to diagnose the problem and institute an appropriate treatment. Obversely, where a subject lacks an immune response against cells bearing antigens that are abnormal or not quite self, i.e., cancer cells, the specialist should ideally be able to institute a specific cancer cell killing regimen. Essentially there are two beneficial and two harmful aspects of autoimmunity autoimmunologists should be familiar with. The beneficial aspects are the immune responses that assist in the clearance of cellular breakdown products and the elimination of cancer cells. The harmful aspects consist of immune responses, or lack thereof, that manifest in autoimmune disorders, i.e., autoimmune diseases and cancer. Recent medical discoveries, especially the modified vaccination technique developed by the Barabas research group, show great promise in both preventing and curing autoimmune disorders by utilizing the immune system's natural abilities to re-establish normal health. PMID:20887816

  14. Complement inhibitors to treat IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-11-01

    Complement activation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia may exacerbate extravascular hemolysis and may occasionally result in intravascular hemolysis. IgM autoantibodies as characteristically found in cold autoantibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia, in cold agglutinin disease but also in a considerable percentage of patients with warm autoantibodies are very likely to activate complement in vivo. Therapy of IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia mainly aims to decrease autoantibody production. However, most of these treatments require time to become effective and will not stop immediate ongoing complement-mediated hemolysis nor prevent hemolysis of transfused red blood cells. Therefore pharmacological inhibition of the complement system might be a suitable approach to halt or at least attenuate ongoing hemolysis and improve the recovery of red blood cell transfusion in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. In recent years, several complement inhibitors have become available in the clinic, some of them with proven efficacy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. In the present review, we give a short introduction on the pathogenesis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, followed by an overview on the complement system with a special focus on its regulation. Finally, we will discuss complement inhibitors with regard to their potential efficacy to halt or attenuate hemolysis in complement-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia. PMID:26521297

  15. Autoimmune disease: Conceptual history and contributions of ocular immunology.

    PubMed

    Margo, Curtis E; Harman, Lynn E

    2016-01-01

    Medical historians identify the mid-20th century as the time when the scientific and medical communities acknowledged the existence of autoimmune disease. Several conditions including sympathetic ophthalmia and endophthalmitis phacoanaphylactica, however, were proposed as autoimmune disorders much earlier. During the first half of the century, autoimmune disease was viewed as biologically implausible. Paul Ehrlich coined the term horror autotoxicus to emphasize that autoimmunity would contradict nature's aversion to self-injury. The discoveries of allergy and anaphylaxis were the first clues that the immune system was capable of self-harm. A major obstacle to comprehending the pathogenesis of autoimmunity was how the immune system distinguishes foreign from self, a process eventually understood in the context of immune tolerance. Investigators of sympathetic ophthalmia and endophthalmitis phacoanaphylactica were positioned to invalidate horror autotoxicus but lacked sufficiently convincing experimental and clinical evidence to accomplish the task. Seminal studies of chronic thyroiditis and a series of clinical laboratory breakthroughs led to the general acceptance of autoimmune disease in the 1950s. The travails encountered by ophthalmic investigators offer insights into the how medical ideas take shape. We review the contributions of ocular immunology to the conceptual development of autoimmune disease and explore the reasons why the concept caught on slowly. PMID:27131478

  16. Parallel Aspects of the Microenvironment in Cancer and Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Rahat, Michal A; Shakya, Jivan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and autoimmune diseases are fundamentally different pathological conditions. In cancer, the immune response is suppressed and unable to eradicate the transformed self-cells, while in autoimmune diseases it is hyperactivated against a self-antigen, leading to tissue injury. Yet, mechanistically, similarities in the triggering of the immune responses can be observed. In this review, we highlight some parallel aspects of the microenvironment in cancer and autoimmune diseases, especially hypoxia, and the role of macrophages, neutrophils, and their interaction. Macrophages, owing to their plastic mode of activation, can generate a pro- or antitumoral microenvironment. Similarly, in autoimmune diseases, macrophages tip the Th1/Th2 balance via various effector cytokines. The contribution of neutrophils, an additional plastic innate immune cell population, to the microenvironment and disease progression is recently gaining more prominence in both cancer and autoimmune diseases, as they can secrete cytokines, chemokines, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as acquire an enhanced ability to produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that are now considered important initiators of autoimmune diseases. Understanding the contribution of macrophages and neutrophils to the cancerous or autoimmune microenvironment, as well as the role their interaction and cooperation play, may help identify new targets and improve therapeutic strategies. PMID:26997761

  17. Compromised central tolerance of ICA69 induces multiple organ autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yong; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Tajima, Asako; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; He, Jing; Bertera, Suzanne; Owens, Gregory; Pietropaolo, Massimo; Rudert, William A.; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    For reasons not fully understood, patients with an organ-specific autoimmune disease have increased risks of developing autoimmune responses against other organs/tissues. We identified ICA69, a known β-cell autoantigen in Type 1 diabetes, as a potential common target in multi-organ autoimmunity. NOD mice immunized with ICA69 polypeptides exhibited exacerbated inflammation not only in the islets, but also in the salivary glands. To further investigate ICA69 autoimmunity, two genetically modified mouse lines were generated to modulate thymic ICA69 expression: the heterozygous ICA69del/wt line and the thymic medullary epithelial cell-specific deletion Aire-ΔICA69 line. Suboptimal central negative selection of ICA69-reactive T-cells was observed in both lines. Aire-ΔICA69 mice spontaneously developed coincident autoimmune responses to the pancreas, the salivary glands, the thyroid, and the stomach. Our findings establish a direct link between compromised thymic ICA69 expression and autoimmunity against multiple ICA69-expressing organs, and identify a potential novel mechanism for the development of multi-organ autoimmune diseases. PMID:25088457

  18. Parallel Aspects of the Microenvironment in Cancer and Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rahat, Michal A.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and autoimmune diseases are fundamentally different pathological conditions. In cancer, the immune response is suppressed and unable to eradicate the transformed self-cells, while in autoimmune diseases it is hyperactivated against a self-antigen, leading to tissue injury. Yet, mechanistically, similarities in the triggering of the immune responses can be observed. In this review, we highlight some parallel aspects of the microenvironment in cancer and autoimmune diseases, especially hypoxia, and the role of macrophages, neutrophils, and their interaction. Macrophages, owing to their plastic mode of activation, can generate a pro- or antitumoral microenvironment. Similarly, in autoimmune diseases, macrophages tip the Th1/Th2 balance via various effector cytokines. The contribution of neutrophils, an additional plastic innate immune cell population, to the microenvironment and disease progression is recently gaining more prominence in both cancer and autoimmune diseases, as they can secrete cytokines, chemokines, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as acquire an enhanced ability to produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that are now considered important initiators of autoimmune diseases. Understanding the contribution of macrophages and neutrophils to the cancerous or autoimmune microenvironment, as well as the role their interaction and cooperation play, may help identify new targets and improve therapeutic strategies. PMID:26997761

  19. Complement inhibitors to treat IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia may exacerbate extravascular hemolysis and may occasionally result in intravascular hemolysis. IgM autoantibodies as characteristically found in cold autoantibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia, in cold agglutinin disease but also in a considerable percentage of patients with warm autoantibodies are very likely to activate complement in vivo. Therapy of IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia mainly aims to decrease autoantibody production. However, most of these treatments require time to become effective and will not stop immediate ongoing complement-mediated hemolysis nor prevent hemolysis of transfused red blood cells. Therefore pharmacological inhibition of the complement system might be a suitable approach to halt or at least attenuate ongoing hemolysis and improve the recovery of red blood cell transfusion in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. In recent years, several complement inhibitors have become available in the clinic, some of them with proven efficacy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. In the present review, we give a short introduction on the pathogenesis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, followed by an overview on the complement system with a special focus on its regulation. Finally, we will discuss complement inhibitors with regard to their potential efficacy to halt or attenuate hemolysis in complement-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia. PMID:26521297

  20. Andersson lesion in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dhakad, Urmila; Das, Siddharth K

    2013-01-01

    A middle-aged male patient developed acute back pain and a lumbar vertebral lesion following trivial physical trauma. The lesion was considered as tuberculous on vertebral x-rays and MRI. After biopsy of the lesion and spinal fixation, the patient was kept on empirical antituberculous treatment (ATT) to which he did not respond. On re-evaluation he was diagnosed to have an Andersson lesion in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). ATT was stopped and he was successfully managed by rest, steroids, methotrexate and sulfasalazine. A careful look at the patient's plain x-ray spine and awareness about the lesion can avoid misdiagnosis of this characteristic vertebral lesion found in AS. PMID:23559648

  1. T lymphocyte line specific for thyroglobulin produces or vaccinates against autoimmune thyroiditis in mice.

    PubMed

    Maron, R; Zerubavel, R; Friedman, A; Cohen, I R

    1983-11-01

    We investigated Ly-1+ T lymphocyte line cells specifically reactive to thyroglobulin (Tg) that were isolated from mice primed with mouse Tg in adjuvant. Intravenous inoculation of as few as 10(5) line cells was sufficient to cause severe and prolonged thyroiditis in recipient mice that were intact, irradiated, or athymic nudes. Disease was independent of circulating Tg antibodies, suggesting that anti-Tg T lymphocytes could cause thyroiditis unaided by antibodies. Thyroiditogenic T lymphocytes could be isolated as cell lines from apparently healthy mice that had been immunized with non-thyroiditogenic bovine Tg in adjuvant, which indicates that autoimmune effector T lymphocytes may develop covertly in the course of immunization with foreign antigens. Finally, a single i.v. inoculation of anti-Tg T lymphocyte line cells attenuated by irradiation vaccinated mice completely against subsequent development of autoimmune thyroiditis produced either by active immunization to Tg or by passive transfer of intact line cells. Vaccinated mice that were protected from inflammatory lesions of thyroiditis still produced high titers of Tg antibodies in response to active immunization. Thus, vaccination specifically inhibited thyroiditogenic T lymphocytes but not helper T lymphocytes required for the production of Tg autoantibodies. PMID:6195260

  2. Latent virus infection upregulates CD40 expression facilitating enhanced autoimmunity in a model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Casiraghi, Costanza; Citlali Márquez, Ana; Shanina, Iryna; Steven Horwitz, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been identified as a putative environmental trigger of multiple sclerosis (MS) by multiple groups working worldwide. Previously, we reported that when experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in mice latently infected with murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (γHV-68), the murine homolog to EBV, a disease more reminiscent of MS developed. Specifically, MS-like lesions developed in the brain that included equal numbers of IFN-γ producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and demyelination, none of which is observed in MOG induced EAE. Herein, we demonstrate that this enhanced disease was dependent on the γHV-68 latent life cycle and was associated with STAT1 and CD40 upregulation on uninfected dendritic cells. Importantly, we also show that, during viral latency, the frequency of regulatory T cells is reduced via a CD40 dependent mechanism and this contributes towards a strong T helper 1 response that resolves in severe EAE disease pathology. Latent γ-herpesvirus infection established a long-lasting impact that enhances subsequent adaptive autoimmune responses. PMID:26356194

  3. Membrane-Associated Ubiquitin Ligase SAUL1 Suppresses Temperature- and Humidity-Dependent Autoimmunity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Disch, Eva-Maria; Tong, Meixuezi; Kotur, Tanja; Koch, Gerald; Wolf, Carl-Asmus; Li, Xin; Hoth, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved elaborate mechanisms to regulate pathogen defense. Imbalances in this regulation may result in autoimmune responses that are affecting plant growth and development. In Arabidopsis, SAUL1 encodes a plant U-box ubiquitin ligase and regulates senescence and cell death. Here, we show that saul1-1 plants exhibit characteristics of an autoimmune mutant. A decrease in relative humidity or temperature resulted in reduced growth and systemic lesioning of saul1-1 rosettes. These physiological changes are associated with increased expression of salicylic acid-dependent and pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. Consistently, resistance of saul1-1 plants against Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326, P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000, or Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis Noco2 was enhanced. Transmission electron microscopy revealed alterations in saul1-1 chloroplast ultrastructure and cell-wall depositions. Confocal analysis on aniline blue-stained leaf sections and cellular universal micro spectrophotometry further showed that these cell-wall depositions contain callose and lignin. To analyze signaling downstream of SAUL1, we performed epistasis analyses between saul1-1 and mutants in the EDS1/PAD4/SAG101 hub. All phenotypes observed in saul1-1 plants at low temperature were dependent on EDS1 and PAD4 but not SAG101. Taken together, SAUL1 negatively regulates immunity upstream of EDS1/PAD4, likely through the degradation of an unknown activator of the pathway. PMID:26505534

  4. Xanthomatous hypophysitis associated with autoimmune disease in an elderly patient: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Fukui, Issei; Kita, Daisuke; Miyamori, Tadao; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Xanthomatous hypophysitis (XH) is an extremely rare form of primary hypophysitis characterized by infiltration of the pituitary gland by mixed types of inflammatory cells, including foamy cells, plasma cells, and small mature lymphocytes. XH manifests as varying degrees of hypopituitarism. Although several previous reports have denied a possible contribution of autoimmune mechanism, the exact pathogenesis of XH remains unclear. Case Description: We describe the case of a 72-year-old woman with a history of rheumatoid arthritis and Sjögren's syndrome who presented with panhypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus. At the time of her visit, she also experienced relapsed rheumatoid arthritis and Sjögren's syndrome, manifesting as arthralgia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a multicystic mass in the sellar and suprasellar regions. In the course of steroid replacement therapy for hypocortisolism, the patient's arthralgia diminished, and MRI revealed shrinkage of the mass. XH was diagnosed histologically following a transsphenoidal endoscopic biopsy, and it was the oldest case of XH. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this patient is the oldest of reported patients diagnosed with XH. Steroid therapy may be effective to XH temporarily. XH should be considered when diagnosing pituitary cystic lesions in elderly patients with autoimmune disease. PMID:27500004

  5. Perivenular Brain Lesions in a Primate Multiple Sclerosis Model at 7T-MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gaitán, María I.; Maggi, Pietro; Wohler, Jillian; Leibovitch, Emily; Sati, Pascal; Calandri, Ismael L.; Merkle, Hellmut; Massacesi, Luca; Silva, Afonso C.; Jacobson, Steven; Reich, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide in vivo assessment of tissue damage, allowing evaluation of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesion evolution over time – a perspective not obtainable with postmortem histopathology. Relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an experimental model of MS that can be induced in the common marmoset, a small new world primate, and that causes perivenular white matter lesions similar to those observed in MS. Methods Brain lesion development and evolution were studied in vivo and postmortem in 4 marmosets with EAE through serial T2- and T2*-weighted scans at 7 tesla. Supratentorial white matter lesions were identified and characterized. Results Of 97 lesions observed, 86 (88%) were clearly perivenular, and 62 (72%) developed around veins that were visible even prior to EAE induction. The perivenular configuration was confirmed by postmortem histopathology. Most affected veins, and their related perivascular Virchow-Robin spaces, passed into the subarachnoid space rather than the ventricles. Conclusion As in human MS, the intimate association between small veins and EAE lesions in the marmoset can be studied with serial in vivo MRI. This further strengthens the usefulness of this model for understanding the process of perivenular lesion development and accompanying tissue destruction in MS. PMID:23773983

  6. Focal lesions in normal liver.

    PubMed

    Semelka, Richard C; Martin, Diego R; Balci, N Cem

    2005-10-01

    A variety of lesions occur in the normal liver. This review will describe the most common benign, malignant, and infectious lesions. Illustration will be made of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the most common of these. Due to the high accuracy for liver lesion detection and characterization, and the intrinsic safety of the modality, MR should be considered the primary imaging tool to investigate liver diseases. PMID:16174062

  7. Damage to the Optic Chiasm in Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein–Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Mice

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Sheryl L; Palmer, Vanessa L; Whittaker, Heather; Smith, Blair Cardigan; Kim, Annie; Schellenberg, Angela E; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Buist, Richard; Del Bigio, Marc R; Martin, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Optic chiasm lesions in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)–experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice were characterized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and validated using electron microscopy (EM). MR images were collected from 3 days after induction to remission, approximately 20 days after induction. Hematoxylin and eosin, solochrome cyanin–stained sections, and EM images were obtained from the optic chiasms of some mice approximately 4 days after disease onset when their scores were thought to be the highest. T2-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient map hyperintensities corresponded to abnormalities in the optic chiasms of EAE mice. Mixed inflammation was concentrated at the lateral surface. Degeneration of oligodendrocytes, myelin, and early axonal damage were also apparent. A marked increase in chiasm thickness was observed. T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI can detect abnormalities in the optic chiasms of MOG-EAE mice. MRI is an important method in the study of this model toward understanding optic neuritis. PMID:25520558

  8. Central histamine H3 receptor signaling negatively regulates susceptibility to autoimmune inflammatory disease of the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Teuscher, Cory; Subramanian, Meena; Noubade, Rajkumar; Gao, Jian Feng; Offner, Halina; Zachary, James F.; Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P.

    2007-01-01

    Histamine (HA), a biogenic amine with a broad spectrum of activities in both physiological and pathological settings, plays a key regulatory role in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, the autoimmune model of multiple sclerosis. HA exerts its effect through four G protein-coupled receptors designated HA receptor H1, H2, H3, and H4. We report here that, compared with wild-type animals, mice with a disrupted HA H3 receptor (H3RKO), the expression of which is normally confined to cells of the nervous system, develop more severe disease and neuroinflammation. We show that this effect is associated with dysregulation of blood–brain barrier permeability and increased expression of MIP-2, IP-10, and CXCR3 by peripheral T cells. Our data suggest that pharmacological targeting of the H3R may be useful in preventing the development and formation of new lesions in multiple sclerosis, thereby significantly limiting the progression of the disease. PMID:17548817

  9. Damage to the optic chiasm in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Sheryl L; Palmer, Vanessa L; Whittaker, Heather; Smith, Blair Cardigan; Kim, Annie; Schellenberg, Angela E; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Buist, Richard; Del Bigio, Marc R; Martin, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Optic chiasm lesions in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice were characterized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and validated using electron microscopy (EM). MR images were collected from 3 days after induction to remission, approximately 20 days after induction. Hematoxylin and eosin, solochrome cyanin-stained sections, and EM images were obtained from the optic chiasms of some mice approximately 4 days after disease onset when their scores were thought to be the highest. T2-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient map hyperintensities corresponded to abnormalities in the optic chiasms of EAE mice. Mixed inflammation was concentrated at the lateral surface. Degeneration of oligodendrocytes, myelin, and early axonal damage were also apparent. A marked increase in chiasm thickness was observed. T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI can detect abnormalities in the optic chiasms of MOG-EAE mice. MRI is an important method in the study of this model toward understanding optic neuritis. PMID:25520558

  10. Pigmented Lesion of Buccal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  11. Stress-induced cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1992-05-01

    The increasing occurrence of dental lesions at the cervical surfaces requires more knowledge of the causes of the process. Acidic and abrasive mechanisms have clearly been documented as causes but the stress theory by Lee and Eakle is still controversial. This report describes several incidences of possible stress-induced lesions according to the characteristics described by Lee and Eakle. The occurrences of subgingival lesions lend credence to the stress-induction theory by exclusion of other superimposing etiologic factors. With the current concepts, a perceptive approach to the treatment of cervical lesions can be executed. PMID:1527763

  12. Pigmented lesion of buccal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  13. Vaccine against autoimmune disease: antigen-specific immunotherapy✩

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Robert P; Jabri, Bana

    2013-01-01

    Recent interest in testing whether the success of antigen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT) for autoimmune diseases in mice can be translated to humans has highlighted the need for better tools to study and understand human autoimmunity. Clinical development of ASIT for allergy has been instructive, but limited understanding of CD4 T cell epitope/determinant hierarchies hampers the rational design and monitoring of ASIT. Definitive identification of pathogenic T cell epitopes as is now known in celiac disease and recent initiatives to optimize immune monitoring will facilitate rational design, monitoring and mechanistic understanding of ASIT for human autoimmune diseases. PMID:23478068

  14. Extracorporeal photopheresis for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Adamski, Jill; Kinard, Theresa; Ipe, Tina; Cooling, Laura

    2015-04-01

    The immune system is tasked with the unique challenge of recognizing foreign pathogens and damaged cells while at the same time preserving and protecting the integrity of "self". When this process fails, severe consequences including cancer and autoimmunity are the end result. Current therapies aimed at treating autoimmune disorders result in generalized immunosuppression and place the patient at increased risk for infection and malignancy. ECP is a potential therapeutic intervention that recapitulates natural physiologic processes of tolerance induction to restore immune homeostasis. Several clinical trials suggest that ECP may be used to treat a broad spectrum of autoimmune diseases. PMID:25886694

  15. [Progression of right internal carotid artery stenosis in ischemic stroke patient with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome: A case report].

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Yuka; Matsuo, Ryu; Fukushima, Yoshihisa; Fukuda, Kenji; Kamouchi, Masahiro; Kitazono, Takanari

    2013-01-01

    A 40-year-old man who presented with left hemiparesis was admitted to our hospital. He had tachycardia and a fever. He had a 25-year history of insulin therapy for diabetes mellitus. Brain magnetic resonance (MR) images showed fresh infarction in the right hemisphere, and carotid ultrasonography showed stenosis of the right internal carotid artery (ICA). We determined that atherothrombotic brain infarction had likely occurred. After admission, the right ICA became narrow and finally occluded. Computed tomography revealed the presence of a thrombus in the right ICA, and gadolinium-enhanced MRA showed vasculitis of the ICA. In laboratory tests, his thyroid hormones were elevated. He was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. After treatment, the tachycardia and high fever were improved. Because of a positive anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody test result, he was diagnosed with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. We found that he had anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome because he was positive for anti-beta-glycoprotein I antibody. These findings suggested that his condition was autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3. He received prednisolone and warfarin. After 3 months, his neurological findings were improved; however, occlusion of the ICA remained. Autoimmunity was considered to be the cause of ICA occlusion. Ischemic stroke with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome is very rare and is associated with progressive carotid lesions in juvenile patients. It is necessary to diagnose and treat this condition as soon as possible. PMID:23892964

  16. Defective sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) phosphorylation exacerbates TH17-mediated autoimmune neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Garris, Christopher S; Wu, Linfeng; Acharya, Swati; Arac, Ahmet; Blaho, Victoria A; Huang, Yingxiang; Moon, Byoung San; Axtell, Robert C; Ho, Peggy P; Steinberg, Gary K; Lewis, David B; Sobel, Raymond A; Han, David K; Steinman, Lawrence; Snyder, Michael P; Hla, Timothy; Han, May H

    2013-11-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling regulates lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs into systemic circulation. The sphingosine phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) agonist FTY-720 (Gilenya) arrests immune trafficking and prevents multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses. However, alternative mechanisms of S1P-S1P1 signaling have been reported. Phosphoproteomic analysis of MS brain lesions revealed S1P1 phosphorylation on S351, a residue crucial for receptor internalization. Mutant mice harboring an S1pr1 gene encoding phosphorylation-deficient receptors (S1P1(S5A)) developed severe experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) due to autoimmunity mediated by interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing helper T cells (TH17 cells) in the peripheral immune and nervous system. S1P1 directly activated the Jak-STAT3 signal-transduction pathway via IL-6. Impaired S1P1 phosphorylation enhances TH17 polarization and exacerbates autoimmune neuroinflammation. These mechanisms may be pathogenic in MS. PMID:24076635

  17. Fortuitously discovered liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Sharma, Malay; Gibson, Robert N; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Jenssen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The fortuitously discovered liver lesion is a common problem. Consensus might be expected in terms of its work-up, and yet there is none. This stems in part from the fact that there is no preventive campaign involving the early detection of liver tumors other than for patients with known liver cirrhosis and oncological patients. The work-up (detection and differential diagnosis) of liver tumors comprises theoretical considerations, history, physical examination, laboratory tests, standard ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound techniques, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, as well as image-guided biopsy. CEUS techniques have proved to be the most pertinent method; these techniques became part of the clinical routine about 10 years ago in Europe and Asia and are used for a variety of indications in daily clinical practice. CEUS is in many cases the first and also decisive technical intervention for detecting and characterizing liver tumors. This development is reflected in many CEUS guidelines, e.g., in the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) guidelines 2004, 2008 and 2012 as well as the recently published World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology-EFSUMB guidelines 2012. This article sets out considerations for making a structured work-up of incidental liver tumors feasible. PMID:23745019

  18. Cystic lesions of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Ralph H.; Fukushima, Noriyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Summary In contrast to the relatively uniform pathology and the unyielding dismal outcome associated with infiltrating ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, cystic lesions have a broad spectrum of gross and microscopic pathologies, and a range of clinical outcomes. The common cystic lesions of the pancreas are reviewed with emphasis on practical tips for distinguishing between the main entities. PMID:20953247

  19. Hamartomatous tongue lesions in children.

    PubMed

    Kreiger, Portia A; Ernst, Linda M; Elden, Lisa M; Kazahaya, Ken; Alawi, Faizan; Russo, Pierre A

    2007-08-01

    The incidence and spectrum of tongue lesions in children, in particular tongue hamartomas, is relatively unknown. We report a retrospective review of all tongue lesions seen at a major tertiary care children's hospital over an 18-year period with an emphasis on describing tongue hamartomas. A total of 135 tongue lesions were identified. Vascular/lymphatic lesions (36/135) were the most common followed by mucus extravasation phenomenon (22/135). Interestingly, hamartomatous lesions (18/135) were the third most common lesion category identified. Lingual hamartomas were predominantly submucosal in location and were classified histologically by tissue composition as follows: neurovascular (2/18), smooth muscle predominant (5/18), fat predominant (1/18), and smooth muscle and fat containing (10/18). All 5 smooth muscle predominant hamartomas also contained vasculature, and 1 case additionally contained salivary gland tissue. The single fat predominant hamartoma additionally contained vessels and salivary gland. The final 10 hamartomas contained varying amounts of both smooth muscle and fat, and also admixed combinations of vessels, nerves, and salivary glands. Two of these 10 cases additionally contained foci of choristomatous elements, including cutaneous adnexal structures and cartilage. Most patients with hamartomatous lesions were young, 2 years or less. Eight cases were congenital in origin. Females outnumbered males by 2:1. The majority of lesions (16/18) were dorsal in location, and 4 patients had a syndromic association, all oral-facial-digital syndrome. PMID:17667541

  20. Nonsurgical management of periapical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marina; de Ataide, Ida

    2010-01-01

    Periapical lesions develop as sequelae to pulp disease. They often occur without any episode of acute pain and are discovered on routine radiographic examination. The incidence of cysts within periapical lesions varies between 6 and 55%. The occurrence of periapical granulomas ranges between 9.3 and 87.1%, and of abscesses between 28.7 and 70.07%. It is accepted that all inflammatory periapical lesions should be initially treated with conservative nonsurgical procedures. Studies have reported a success rate of up to 85% after endodontic treatment of teeth with periapical lesions. A review of literature was performed by using electronic and hand searching methods for the nonsurgical management of periapical lesions. Various methods can be used in the nonsurgical management of periapical lesions: the conservative root canal treatment, decompression technique, active nonsurgical decompression technique, aspiration-irrigation technique, method using calcium hydroxide, Lesion Sterilization and Repair Therapy, and the Apexum procedure. Monitoring the healing of periapical lesions is essential through periodic follow-up examinations. PMID:21217952

  1. DNA methylation perspectives in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao; Hu, Lei; Luo, Zhi-Ying; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    DNA methylation is now widely recognized as being critical to maintain the function of immune cells. Recent studies suggest that aberrant DNA methylation levels not only can result in immune cells autoreactivity in vitro, but also are related to autoimmunity in vivo. Environmental factors and genetic polymorphisms cause abnormal methylation, which affects the expression of certain immune-related genes, being becoming hot spot of explaining the mechanism of autoimmune diseases. This paper reviews the importance of abnormal methylation during the development of common autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes, aiming at a better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and providing new ideas for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:26821302

  2. Interleukin-1: Ariadne's Thread in Autoinflammatory and Autoimmune Disorders.

    PubMed

    Cantarini, Luca; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Cattalini, Marco; Vitale, Antonio; Galeazzi, Mauro; Rigante, Donato

    2015-02-01

    Autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders are characterized by chronic activation of the immune system, which leads to systemic self-directed inflammation in genetically predisposed individuals. Mutations in inflammasome-related proteins have been associated with autoinflammatory disorders, and the link between inflammasome and autoimmune disorders is becoming increasingly clear. As researchers learn more about these two areas, other disorders that were once thought to be autoimmune are now being considered autoinflammatory, or as having at least an autoinflammatory component. This review depicts the role of interleukin-1 as "Ariadne's thread" on the path through the labyrinth of autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders and emphasizes the blurred boundary between innate and adaptive immune systems. PMID:26223084

  3. Epigenetic mechanisms in systemic lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hedrich, Christian M.; Tsokos, George C.

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenic origin of autoimmune diseases can be traced to both genetic susceptibility and epigenetic modifications arising from exposure to the environment. Epigenetic modifications influence gene-expression and alter cellular functions without modifying the genomic sequence. CpG-DNA methylation, histone-tail modifications, and micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are the main epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases is essential for the introduction of effective, target-directed, and tolerated therapies. In this review, we summarize recent findings that signify the importance of epigenetic modifications in autoimmune disorders while focusing on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We discuss future directions in basic research, autoimmune diagnostics, and applied therapy. PMID:21885342

  4. A clinical approach to diagnosis of autoimmune encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Graus, Francesc; Titulaer, Maarten J; Balu, Ramani; Benseler, Susanne; Bien, Christian G; Cellucci, Tania; Cortese, Irene; Dale, Russell C; Gelfand, Jeffrey M; Geschwind, Michael; Glaser, Carol A; Honnorat, Jerome; Höftberger, Romana; Iizuka, Takahiro; Irani, Sarosh R; Lancaster, Eric; Leypoldt, Frank; Prüss, Harald; Rae-Grant, Alexander; Reindl, Markus; Rosenfeld, Myrna R; Rostásy, Kevin; Saiz, Albert; Venkatesan, Arun; Vincent, Angela; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Waters, Patrick; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-04-01

    Encephalitis is a severe inflammatory disorder of the brain with many possible causes and a complex differential diagnosis. Advances in autoimmune encephalitis research in the past 10 years have led to the identification of new syndromes and biomarkers that have transformed the diagnostic approach to these disorders. However, existing criteria for autoimmune encephalitis are too reliant on antibody testing and response to immunotherapy, which might delay the diagnosis. We reviewed the literature and gathered the experience of a team of experts with the aims of developing a practical, syndrome-based diagnostic approach to autoimmune encephalitis and providing guidelines to navigate through the differential diagnosis. Because autoantibody test results and response to therapy are not available at disease onset, we based the initial diagnostic approach on neurological assessment and conventional tests that are accessible to most clinicians. Through logical differential diagnosis, levels of evidence for autoimmune encephalitis (possible, probable, or definite) are achieved, which can lead to prompt immunotherapy. PMID:26906964

  5. Central tolerance to self revealed by the autoimmune regulator.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alice Y; Anderson, Mark S

    2015-11-01

    The autoimmune regulator (Aire) was initially identified as the gene causing multiorgan system autoimmunity in humans, and deletion of this gene in mice also resulted in organ-specific autoimmunity. Aire regulates the expression of tissue-specific antigens (TSAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), which play a critical role in the negative selection of autoreactive T cells and the generation of regulatory T cells. More recently, the role of Aire in the development of mTECs has helped elucidate its ability to present the spectrum of TSAs needed to prevent autoimmunity. Molecular characterization of the functional domains of Aire has revealed multiple binding partners that assist Aire's function in altering gene transcription and chromatin remodeling. These recent advances have further highlighted the importance of Aire in central tolerance. PMID:26579596

  6. [Treatment and results of therapy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Tasić, J; Macukanović, L; Pavlović, M; Koraćević, S; Govedarević, N; Kitić, Lj; Tijanić, I; Bakić, M

    1994-01-01

    Basic principles in the therapy of idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody were glucocorticoides and splenectomy. Immunosupresive drugs, plasmaferesis and intravenous high doses gamma globulin therapy are also useful. In secundary autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody we treated basic illness. During the period of 1990-1992 we treated 21 patients with primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia and 6 patients with secondary /4 CLL and 2 Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma/. Complete remission we found as a normalisation of reticulocites and hemoglobin level respectively. Complete remission by corticoides we got in 14/21 patients, partial response in 2/21 respectively. Complete response by splenectomy we got in 2/3 splenoctomized patients (idiopathic type). For successful treatment secondary hemolytic anemias we treated primary diseases (CLL and malignant lymphoma) and we got in 4/6 patients complete remission. Our results were standard in both type of autoimmune hemolytic anaemias induced by warm antibody. PMID:18173205

  7. Autoimmune and Lymphoproliferative Complications of Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Maglione, Paul J

    2016-03-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is frequently complicated by the development of autoimmune and lymphoproliferative diseases. With widespread use of immunoglobulin replacement therapy, autoimmune and lymphoproliferative complications have replaced infection as the major cause of morbidity and mortality in CVID patients. Certain CVID complications, such as bronchiectasis, are likely to be the result of immunodeficiency and are associated with infection susceptibility. However, other complications may result from immune dysregulation rather than immunocompromise. CVID patients develop autoimmunity, lymphoproliferation, and granulomas in association with distinct immunological abnormalities. Mutations in transmembrane activator and CAML interactor, reduction of isotype-switched memory B cells, expansion of CD21 low B cells, heightened interferon signature expression, and retained B cell function are all associated with both autoimmunity and lymphoproliferation in CVID. Further research aimed to better understand that the pathological mechanisms of these shared forms of immune dysregulation may inspire therapies beneficial for multiple CVID complications. PMID:26857017

  8. Autoimmune hepatitis triggered by Brucella infection or doxycycline or both.

    PubMed

    Selimoglu, M A; Ertekin, V

    2003-09-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a disorder of unknown aetiology in which progressive destruction of the hepatic parenchyma occurs, often progressing to cirrhosis. Hepatitis A, Ebstein-Barr virus and measles virus have been identified as triggers for autoimmune hepatitis in susceptible individuals. There are also reports about herbal medicine and minocycline. A case with autoimmune hepatitis triggered by Brucella infection or doxycycline, or both, is presented. An 11-year-old female patient treated with six weeks of doxycycline and three weeks of streptomycine for brucellosis presented with histologically proven autoimmune hepatitis (AH) and responded to corticosteroid treatment. Since neither brucellosis nor doxcycyline as triggering factors for AH have been described so far, these two entities are discussed and the literature reviewed. PMID:14529072

  9. Role of “Western Diet” in Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Manzel, Arndt; Muller, Dominik N.; Hafler, David A.; Erdman, Susan E.; Linker, Ralf A.; Kleinewietfeld, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Developed societies, although having successfully reduced the burden of infectious disease, constitute an environment where metabolic, cardiovascular, and autoimmune diseases thrive. Living in westernized countries has not fundamentally changed the genetic basis on which these diseases emerge, but has strong impact on lifestyle and pathogen exposure. In particular, nutritional patterns collectively termed the “Western diet”, including high-fat and cholesterol, high-protein, high-sugar, and excess salt intake, as well as frequent consumption of processed and ‘fast foods’, promote obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. These factors have also gained high interest as possible promoters of autoimmune diseases. Underlying metabolic and immunologic mechanisms are currently being intensively explored. This review discusses the current knowledge relative to the association of “Western diet” with autoimmunity, and highlights the role of T cells as central players linking dietary influences to autoimmune pathology. PMID:24338487

  10. Antigen-based immunotherapy for autoimmune disease: current status

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Darren Lowell; Ponda, Punita

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are common chronic disorders that not only have a major impact on the quality of life but are also potentially life-threatening. Treatment modalities that are currently favored have conferred significant clinical benefits, but they may have considerable side effects. An optimal treatment strategy for autoimmune disease would specifically target disease-associated antigens and limit systemic side effects. Similar to allergen-specific immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis, antigen-specific immunotherapy for autoimmune disease aims to induce immune deviation and promote tolerance to specific antigens. In this review, we present the current status of studies and clinical trials in both human and animal hosts that use antigen-based immunotherapy for autoimmune disease. PMID:27471707

  11. The role of PTPN22 in autoimmunity: learning from mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Junfeng; Petersen, Frank; Yu, Xinhua

    2014-03-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor 22 (PTPN22) represents a strong susceptibility gene which is shared by many autoimmune diseases. Exploring the mechanism behind this association could help to understand their pathogenesis as well as to identify novel therapeutical targets. Recently, multiple mouse models including knock-out, knock-in, knock-down and transgenic mice were generated to delineate PTPN22s function in this context. Depending on the genetic background, mouse PTPN22_619W mutation results in spontaneous autoimmunity, essentially replicating the risk effect of the PTPN22_620W in human autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, findings from mouse models shed new light on both cellular as well as molecular mechanisms of the effect of PTPN22 on adaptive and innate immunity. Here we review recently emerged evidence of the interconnection between mouse PTPN22 and autoimmunity. We also discuss the consistence and discrepancy between findings derived from human and mouse studies. PMID:24189282

  12. Autoimmune regulator and self-tolerance - molecular and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Jakub; Husebye, Eystein S

    2016-05-01

    The establishment of central tolerance in the thymus is critical for avoiding deleterious autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune regulator (AIRE), the causative gene in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 (APS-1), is crucial for the establishment of self-tolerance in the thymus by promoting promiscuous expression of a wide array of tissue-restricted self-antigens. This step is critical for elimination of high-affinity self-reactive T cells from the immunological repertoire, and for the induction of a specific subset of Foxp3(+) T-regulatory (Treg ) cells. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances in our understanding of how AIRE operates on molecular and cellular levels, as well as of how its loss of function results in breakdown of self-tolerance mechanisms characterized by a broad and heterogeneous repertoire of autoimmune phenotypes. PMID:27088911

  13. Tips for Getting a Proper Diagnosis of an Autoimmune Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... that are suspected to be autoimmune-related. The diseases themselves can affect almost any part of the body, including the kidneys, skin, heart, liver, lymph nodes, thyroid and the central nervous system. ...

  14. Oxidative DNA damage and cellular sensitivity to oxidative stress in human autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, S; Harris, G; Denman, M A; Blake, D R; Winyard, P G

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To estimate the extent of genomic DNA damage and killing of lymphocytes by reactive oxygen intermediates in autoimmune diseases. METHODS--8-Oxo-7-hydrodeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), a promutagenic DNA lesion induced by reactive oxygen intermediates, was measured by high performance liquid chromatography, coupled with electrochemical detection, in hydrolysates of DNA which had been extracted from lymphocyte and polymorphonuclear leucocyte fractions of human blood. In addition, human primary blood lymphocytes stimulated by concanavalin A were assayed for cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide on day 0, by assessing cell proliferation during seven days of culture. RESULTS--Constitutive 8-oxodG was detectable (mean (2 SEM) moles 8-oxodG/10(6) moles deoxyguanosine) in DNA isolated from normal human blood lymphocytes (68 (8), n = 26) and polymorphonuclear leucocytes (118 (24), n = 24). Lymphocyte DNA from donors with the following inflammatory autoimmune diseases contained significantly higher levels of 8-oxodG than that from healthy donors: rheumatoid arthritis (98 (16)), systemic lupus erythematosus (137 (28)), vasculitis (100 (32)), and Behçet's disease (92 (19)). Lymphocyte 8-oxodG levels in non-autoimmune controls and patients with scleroderma were not significantly different from those of healthy controls. The levels of 8-oxodG were significantly higher in the DNA from normal polymorphonuclear leucocytes than in paired DNA samples from normal lymphocytes, but there were no differences between levels of 8-oxodG in polymorphonuclear leucocytes from normal subjects and the patients studied. Levels of 8-oxodG did not correlate with disease duration, disease severity, or age. Lymphocytes from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis, but not those with scleroderma, also showed cellular hypersensitivity to the toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide. CONCLUSION--There was increased genomic DNA damage, and increased susceptibility to

  15. Methimazole-induced insulin autoimmune syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nidhi; Savani, Malvi; Agarwal, Manyoo; Kadaria, Dipen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypoglycemia in a critical care setting is often multifactorial with iatrogenic insulin use, sulfonylurea (SU) use, sepsis, adrenal insufficiency and insulinoma among the common causes. Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) is a rare cause of hypoglycemia characterized by the presence of insulin-binding autoantibodies to the sulfhydryl group-containing agents. We report a case of methimazole-induced IAS managed in the intensive care unit. Case presentation: A 76-year-old woman with a history of primary hyperthyroidism was sent from a nursing home for unresponsiveness. Vital signs were significant for hypotension (74/46) and low blood sugars. Fluid resuscitations with normal saline and 50% dextrose stabilized the blood pressure (BP) to 135/75 and her blood glucose to 264. Due to respiratory distress and septic appearance, she required emergency intubation. Nursing home medications were noted for methimazole and absence of any insulin or SU use. Empiric antibiotic treatment was started and fluid resuscitation was continued while home medications were held. Her laboratory values were significant for elevated creatinine, lactic acid, serum cortisol, C-peptide, and insulin. Her cultures, SU screen and computerized tomography (CT) scan were negative for significant findings. On day 2, in addition to 10% dextrose, octreotide was initiated for recurrent hypoglycemia. Her blood glucose (BG) continued to drop throughout the day for which she required glucagon support and a D20 infusion. By day 4, the rate of infusion was titrated up and her BG continued to drop to <60 mg/dl despite D20, octreotide and tube feeds with concentrated calories (1.5 cal/ml). Due to her declining health, her family endorsed palliative care and she was extubated. After day 11, her hypoglycemic episodes resolved and she remained endogenously euglycemic. Conclusions: IAS is associated with methimazole use due to formation of autoantibodies to insulin after its interaction with Sulfhydryl (SH

  16. Autoimmune cytopenias in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, facts and myths.

    PubMed

    Tandra, Pavankumar; Krishnamurthy, Jairam; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj; Newman, Kam; Armitage, James O; Akhtari, Mojtaba

    2013-01-01

    CLL has been defined as presence of more than 5000 small mature appearing monoclonal B lymphocytes with a specific immunophenotype in peripheral blood. It is a well-known fact that CLL is associated with autoimmune cytopenias. CLL cells are CD5(+) B lymphocytes, and usually are not the "guilty" cells which produce autoantibodies. T cell defect is another characteristic of CLL and the total number of T cells is increased, and there is inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is the most common autoimmune complication of CLL and has been reported in 10-25% of CLL patients. However, the stage-adjusted estimated rate of AIHA in CLL is about 5%. Conversely, CLL is three times more common in patients who present with AIHA. Direct agglutinin test (DAT) is positive in 7-14% of CLL patients but AIHA may also occur in DAT negative patients. Autoimmune thrombocytopenia (AIT) is the second most common complication of CLL and has been reported in 2-3% of patients. DAT is positive in AIT but presence of antiplatelet antibodies is neither diagnostic nor reliable. Autoimmune neutropenia (AIN) and pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) are very rare complications of CLL and like other autoimmune complications of CLL may occur at any clinical stage. It is believed that most case reports of AIN and PRCA in CLL actually belong to large granular lymphocytic leukemia (LGL). Non-hematologic autoimmune complications of CLL including cold agglutinin disease (CAD), paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP), acquired angioedema, and anti-myelin associated globulin are rare. Before starting any treatment, clinicians should distinguish between autoimmune cytopenias and massive bone marrow infiltration since autoimmune complications of CLL are not necessarily equal to advanced disease with poor prognosis. According to IWCLL guideline, steroids are the mainstay of treatment of simple autoimmunity. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), cyclosporine, and rituximab are used in complex, steroid

  17. Direct acting antiviral therapy is curative for chronic hepatitis C/autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sahebjam, Farhad; Hajdu, Cristina H; Nortey, Esther; Sigal, Samuel H

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune phenomena are common in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Management of chronic hepatitis C/autoimmune hepatitis syndrome has until recently been problematic due to the adverse effects of interferon on autoimmune processes and immunosuppression on viral replication. In this report we describe 3 patients with chronic hepatitis C/autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome who responded rapidly to direct acting anti-viral therapy. The resolution of the autoimmune process supports a direct viral role in its pathophysiology. PMID:27190580

  18. Acute myeloid leukemia developing in patients with autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Safaa M.; Fouad, Tamer M; Summa, Valentina; Hasan, Syed KH; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia is an unfortunate complication of cancer treatment, particularly for patients with highly curable primary malignancies and favorable life expectancy. The risk of developing therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia also applies to patients with non-malignant conditions, such as autoimmune diseases treated with cytotoxic and/or immunosuppressive agents. There is considerable evidence to suggest that there is an increased occurrence of hematologic malignancies in patients with autoimmune diseases compared to the general population, with a further increase in risk after exposure to cytotoxic therapies. Unfortunately, studies have failed to reveal a clear correlation between leukemia development and exposure to individual agents used for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Given the dismal outcome of secondary acute myeloid leukemia and the wide range of available agents for treatment of autoimmune diseases, an increased awareness of this risk and further investigation into the pathogenetic mechanisms of acute leukemia in autoimmune disease patients are warranted. This article will review the data available on the development of acute myeloid leukemia in patients with autoimmune diseases. Possible leukemogeneic mechanisms in these patients, as well as evidence supporting the association of their primary immunosuppressive status and their exposure to specific therapies, will also be reviewed. This review also supports the idea that it may be misleading to label leukemias that develop in patients with autoimmune diseases who are exposed to cytotoxic agents as ‘therapy-related leukemias’. A better understanding of the molecular defects in autoimmune disease patients who develop acute leukemia will lead to a better understanding of the association between these two diseases entities. PMID:22180424

  19. Self-Antigen Presentation by Dendritic Cells in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Ann-Katrin; Rupp, Anne; Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    The operation of both central and peripheral tolerance ensures the prevention of autoimmune diseases. The maintenance of peripheral tolerance requires self-antigen presentation by professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered as major APCs involved in this process. The current review discusses the role of DCs in autoimmune diseases, the various factors involved in the induction and maintenance of tolerogenic DC phenotype, and pinpoints their therapeutic capacity as well as potential novel targets for future clinical studies. PMID:24592266

  20. Chronic autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura. A 3-year study.

    PubMed

    Fotos, P G; Graham, W L; Bowers, D C; Perfetto, S P

    1983-06-01

    Idiopathic (autoimmune) thrombocytopenic purpura (ATP) is accepted to be a disorder resulting from accelerated platelet destruction attributed to an autoimmune process. The patient whose case is presented in this article was first seen by a dentist. The oral findings have been documented as the case was followed for 3 years through acute exacerbations, pregnancy, and delivery of an infant with thrombocytopenia. The patient was managed with intermittent steroid therapy and splenectomy. PMID:6576288

  1. Radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) of the nonpalpable breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Zgajnar, J; Hocevar, M; Frkovic-Grazio, S; Hertl, K; Schweiger, E; Besic, N

    2004-01-01

    Standard localization techniques of the nonpalpable breast lesions (guide wire, carbon, skin marking) have several disadvantages. Radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) was recently proposed as a better alternative resulting in wider surgical margins and lower average specimen weight. The aim of our study was to compare ROLL to our previously published series of the standard guidewire localization, performed at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana. ROLL was performed in 110 nonpalpable breast lesions. Human serum albumin macroaggregats, marked with 1.8-5.5 MBq 99mTc was injected in the nonpalpable lesion. During surgery the radioactive breast tissue was excised using hand held gamma probe. Nonpalpable breast lesions were excised in all 110 patients. The definitive histology revealed 32 invasive carcinomas, 19 DCIS, 5 LCIS in and 54 benign breast lesions. Mean specimen weight was 40 g which is less in comparison to 53 g of the guidewire series (p=0.002). Surgical margins were clear in 36/51 (70%) invasive breast cancer or DCIS patients and close or involved in 15/51 (30%) patients. Compared to the guidewire series, where 41/92 (44%) margins were clear and 51/92 (56%) were close or involved, the difference was statistically significant (p=0.005). ROLL proved to be superior to guidewire localization in our series, allowing excision of the nonpalpable breast lesion with wider surgical margins despite lower average specimen weight. PMID:15640944

  2. Common variable immunodeficiency and autoimmunity--an inconvenient truth.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; Miao, Qi; Chang, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric; Ma, Xiong

    2014-08-01

    Coexisting morbidities in CVID include bronchiectasis, autoimmunity and malignancies. The incidence of autoimmune disease in CVID patients may approach 20% of cases. The most common autoimmune disease found in CVID patients is autoimmune cytopenia, but rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and now primary biliary cirrhosis have also been reported. The coexistence of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity appears paradoxical, since one represents a hypoimmune state and the other a hyperimmune state. However, this paradox may not actually be all that implausible due to the complex nature of immune cells, signaling pathways and their interactions. The cellular alterations in combined variable immunodeficiency include a range of T and B cell abnormalities. Selective immune derangements found in CVID include a downregulation of regulatory T cells (Treg cells), accelerated T cell apoptosis, abnormal cytokine production secondary to cytokine gene polymorphisms and increased autoreactive B cell production. The impact of these abnormalities on T and B cell interaction may not only explain the immunodeficiency but also the development of autoimmunity in select groups of patients with CVID. The variability in the clinical manifestations of CVID as a result of this immune interaction suggests that CVID is not one disease but many. This is important because it follows that the treatment of CVID may not always be the same, but may need to be directed specifically towards each individual patient. PMID:24747700

  3. Targeting Dendritic Cell Function during Systemic Autoimmunity to Restore Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Mackern-Oberti, Juan P.; Vega, Fabián; Llanos, Carolina; Bueno, Susan M.; Kalergis, Alexis M.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases can damage nearly every tissue or cell type of the body. Although a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, current therapies have not been improved, remain unspecific and are associated with significant side effects. Because dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in promoting immune tolerance against self-antigens (self-Ags), current efforts are focusing at generating new therapies based on the transfer of tolerogenic DCs (tolDCs) during autoimmunity. However, the feasibility of this approach during systemic autoimmunity has yet to be evaluated. TolDCs may ameliorate autoimmunity mainly by restoring T cell tolerance and, thus, indirectly modulating autoantibody development. In vitro induction of tolDCs loaded with immunodominant self-Ags and subsequent cell transfer to patients would be a specific new therapy that will avoid systemic immunosuppression. Herein, we review recent approaches evaluating the potential of tolDCs for the treatment of systemic autoimmune disorders. PMID:25229821

  4. Targeting dendritic cell function during systemic autoimmunity to restore tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mackern-Oberti, Juan P; Vega, Fabián; Llanos, Carolina; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2014-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases can damage nearly every tissue or cell type of the body. Although a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, current therapies have not been improved, remain unspecific and are associated with significant side effects. Because dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in promoting immune tolerance against self-antigens (self-Ags), current efforts are focusing at generating new therapies based on the transfer of tolerogenic DCs (tolDCs) during autoimmunity. However, the feasibility of this approach during systemic autoimmunity has yet to be evaluated. TolDCs may ameliorate autoimmunity mainly by restoring T cell tolerance and, thus, indirectly modulating autoantibody development. In vitro induction of tolDCs loaded with immunodominant self-Ags and subsequent cell transfer to patients would be a specific new therapy that will avoid systemic immunosuppression. Herein, we review recent approaches evaluating the potential of tolDCs for the treatment of systemic autoimmune disorders. PMID:25229821

  5. Autoimmunity and infection in common variable immunodeficiency (CVID).

    PubMed

    Patuzzo, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Alessandro; Tinazzi, Elisa; Veneri, Dino; Argentino, Giuseppe; Moretta, Francesca; Puccetti, Antonio; Lunardi, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by primary hypogammaglobulinemia. B and T cell abnormalities have been described in CVID. Typical clinical features of CVID are recurrent airway infections; lymphoproliferative, autoinflammatory, or neoplastic disorders; and autoimmune diseases among which autoimmune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is the most common. The coexistence of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity appears paradoxical, since one represents a hypoimmune state and the other a hyperimmune state. Considering both innate and adaptive immune response abnormalities in CVID, it is easier to understand the mechanisms that lead to a breakdown of self-tolerance. CD21(low) B cells derive from mature B cells that have undergone chronic immune stimulation; they are increased in CVID patients. The expansion of CD21(low) B cells is also observed in certain autoimmune diseases. We have studied CD21(low) B cells in patients with CVID, CVID, and ITP and with ITP only. We observed a statistically significant increase in the CD21(low) population in the three pathological groups. Moreover, we found statistical differences between the two groups of CVID patients: patients with ITP had a higher percentage of CD21(low) cells. Our data suggest that CD21(low) cells are related to autoimmunity and may represent a link between infection and autoimmunity. PMID:27392505

  6. MicroRNA control in the development of systemic autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian immune responses are intended to eradicate microbial pathogens and thus protect individuals from the harmful effects of such infections. However, unresolved inflammation can be devastating to the host and cause tissue damage and organ malfunction. Immune responses can even mistakenly target self-antigens and mediate autoimmune inflammation. Consequently, a variety of cellular and molecular mechanisms have evolved to control the inflammatory responses, and many of these safeguards or triggers are perturbed in the setting of autoimmunity. In this review, we discuss the emerging roles of cellular non-coding RNAs, and in particular microRNAs (miRNAs), in the regulation of autoimmune inflammation. How miRNAs function to impact the onset, magnitude, and resolution of inflammatory responses and recent observations regarding links between miRNAs and specific autoimmune disorders will be addressed. Finally, the diagnostic and therapeutic relevance of miRNAs involved in autoimmunity will be considered. It is clear that, taken together, mammalian miRNAs are integral to the pathogenesis of mammalian autoimmune diseases and may be effective targets of next-generation therapeutics aimed at eradicating tissue inflammation. PMID:23379780

  7. The Immunopathogenesis of Chronic Autoimmune Thyroiditis One Century after Hashimoto

    PubMed Central

    Weetman, Anthony P

    2013-01-01

    Hakaru Hashimoto described 4 patients with a hitherto unknown cause for goitre, struma lymphomatosa, a century ago. He was careful to distinguish this from Riedel thyroiditis but it has become clear that fibrosis and atrophy of the thyroid are indeed components of Hashimoto thyroiditis, and in rare cases IgG4-related sclerosing disease may be an outcome. Although the cause of the lymphocytic infiltration was unknown to Hashimoto, we now know through the pioneering studies of N.R. Rose and E. Witebsky [J Immunol 1956;76:417–427] that this condition is the archetype for autoimmune destruction as a disease mechanism. In the last two decades in particular, there has been huge interest in unravelling the genetic basis for this and related autoimmune disorders. The list of polymorphisms associated with autoimmune thyroid disease grows each year, and in the case of vitiligo, which is frequently found in association with thyroid autoimmunity, we know that 27 separate susceptibility loci account for less than 20% of the heritability of this condition. Environmental and existential factors may turn out to be just as complex in number and in interactions. We can thus imagine a ‘Swiss cheese’ model for the causation of autoimmune thyroid disease, in which the effects of cumulative weaknesses line up – like the holes in slices of cheese – to allow the catastrophic event of autoimmune destruction to occur. PMID:24783026

  8. Autoimmune disease: A role for new anti-viral therapies?

    PubMed

    Dreyfus, David H

    2011-12-01

    Many chronic human diseases may have an underlying autoimmune mechanism. In this review, the author presents a case of autoimmune CIU (chronic idiopathic urticaria) in stable remission after therapy with a retroviral integrase inhibitor, raltegravir (Isentress). Previous reports located using the search terms "autoimmunity" and "anti-viral" and related topics in the pubmed data-base are reviewed suggesting that novel anti-viral agents such as retroviral integrase inhibitors, gene silencing therapies and eventually vaccines may provide new options for anti-viral therapy of autoimmune diseases. Cited epidemiologic and experimental evidence suggests that increased replication of epigenomic viral pathogens such as Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) in chronic human autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and multiple sclerosis (MS) may activate endogenous human retroviruses (HERV) as a pathologic mechanism. Memory B cells are the reservoir of infection of EBV and also express endogenous retroviruses, thus depletion of memory b-lymphocytes by monoclonal antibodies (Rituximab) may have therapeutic anti-viral effects in addition to effects on B-lymphocyte presentation of both EBV and HERV superantigens. Other novel anti-viral therapies of chronic autoimmune diseases, such as retroviral integrase inhibitors, could be effective, although not without risk. PMID:21871974

  9. Role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Kristen R; Liu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent an important class of immunoregulatory cells that can be activated to suppress T cell functions. These MDSCs can inhibit T cell functions through cell surface interactions and the release of soluble mediators. MDSCs accumulate in the inflamed tissues and lymphoid organs of patients with autoimmune diseases. Much of our knowledge of MDSC function has come from studies involving cancer models, however many recent studies have helped to characterize MDSC involvement in autoimmune diseases. MDSCs are a heterogeneous group of immature myeloid cells with a number of different functions for the suppression of T cell responses. However, we have yet to fully understand their contributions to the development and regulation of autoimmune diseases. A number of studies have described beneficial functions of MDSCs during autoimmune diseases, and thus there appears to be a potential role for MDSCs in the treatment of these diseases. Nevertheless, many questions remain as to the activation, differentiation, and inhibitory functions of MDSCs. This review aims to summarize our current knowledge of MDSC subsets and suppressive functions in tissue-specific autoimmune disorders. We also describe the potential of MDSC-based cell therapy for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and note some of hurdles facing the implementation of this therapy. PMID:25621222

  10. Occupational exposure to crystalline silica and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed Central

    Parks, C G; Conrad, K; Cooper, G S

    1999-01-01

    Occupational exposure to silica dust has been examined as a possible risk factor with respect to several systemic autoimmune diseases, including scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and some of the small vessel vasculitidies with renal involvement (e.g., Wegener granulomatosis). Crystalline silica, or quartz, is an abundant mineral found in sand, rock, and soil. High-level exposure to respirable silica dust can cause chronic inflammation and fibrosis in the lung and other organs. Studies of specific occupational groups with high-level silica exposure (e.g., miners) have shown increased rates of autoimmune diseases compared to the expected rates in the general population. However, some clinic- and population-based studies have not demonstrated an association between silica exposure and risk of autoimmune diseases. This lack of effect may be due to the limited statistical power of these studies to examine this association or because the lower- or moderate-level exposures that may be more common in the general population were not considered. Experimental studies demonstrate that silica can act as an adjuvant to nonspecifically enhance the immune response. This is one mechanism by which silica might be involved in the development of autoimmune diseases. Given that several different autoimmune diseases may be associated with silica dust exposure, silica dust may act to promote or accelerate disease development, requiring some other factor to break immune tolerance or initiate autoimmunity. The specific manifestation of this effect may depend on underlying differences in genetic susceptibility or other environmental exposures. PMID:10970168

  11. Dentition and lesion history.

    PubMed

    Eggertsson, H; Ferreira-Zandona, A

    2009-01-01

    Dental caries is a process that typically keeps recurring throughout life, and the consequences are too often seen as irreversible damage to the dentition. At various stages of life, different parts of the dentition are affected, and the effects continue to be seen in the dentition long after the events took place. They bear witness to previous occurrences of this process throughout the lifetime of an individual. This chapter reviews the linkage between the caries process and the dental caries lesion history of the human dentition. The prevalence and distribution of the caries burden are very variable and closely tied to cultural aspects. In the primary dentition, income and education have been found to be inversely associated with: (1) any early childhood caries and (2) the maxillary incisor caries pattern. A positive association between these caries patterns and minority ethnicity/race status was also identified. These patterns are different from those of the permanent dentition. Well-documented changes in caries prevalence have been observed throughout history, most closely tied to availability and amount of refined sugar consumed. Changes in caries rates are also well documented in the 20th century, mainly with the advent of fluoride in several forms, first as a steep decline and recently as being relatively unchanged. It is likely that there will be dramatic changes in the rates and distribution of dental caries in the future, due to changes in behavioural factors and therapeutic measures. The description drawn is based on the dental caries pattern experienced in modern western societies. PMID:19494678

  12. Spectrum of prostatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prostate gland of male reproductive system is about the size of walnut and surrounds the urethra. Most frequently encountered diseases affecting prostate are Prostatitis, Benign prostatic hyperplasia and Prostatic cancer .Our objective of study was to evaluate the spectrum and correlation of prostatic lesions with presenting complaints of patient. Methods It was a cross-sectional study conducted in Pathology Department of Dow Medical College, Dow University of Health Sciences during the period of 1st January 2010 to December 2012. Pathology department of Dow Medical College collected specimens from both Civil Hospital and Lyari General Hospital Karachi, Pakistan. Specimens were taken through transurethral resection of prostate (TURP), simple prostatectomy and radical prostatectomy. A questionnaire was made and information including name, age, ward name of hospital, laboratory number, clinical diagnosis and symptoms were noted in it. Data was entered and analyzed through SPSS 19. Result During the targeted months, 48 prostatic specimens were received with a mean age of 65.7 + -7.6 years. Common presenting complains were urinary retention in 23(47.9%) patients, followed by dribbling in 12(25%). Out of 48 patients, 42 have Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and 6 have Prostatic Adenocarcinoma. Both Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and Prostatic Adenocarcinoma were more prevalent in the age group of 60-70 years. Conclusion Frequency of prostatic cancer is on the rise and measures should be taken for its early detection. Screening protocols and awareness programs need to be introduced. Screening programs should be focused on level of androgens and molecular pathogenesis. PMID:24063260

  13. Ocular Involvement in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Generali, Elena; Cantarini, Luca; Selmi, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    Eye involvement represents a common finding in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, particularly rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome, seronegative spondyloarthropathy, and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis. The eye is a privileged immune site but commensal bacteria are found on the ocular surface. The eye injury may be inflammatory, vascular or infectious, as well as iatrogenic, as in the case of hydroxychloroquine, chloroquine, corticosteroids, and bisphosphonates. Manifestations may affect different components of the eye, with episcleritis involving the episclera, a thin layer of tissue covering the sclera; scleritis being an inflammation of the sclera potentially leading to blindness; keratitis, referring to corneal inflammation frequently associated with scleritis; and uveitis as the inflammation of the uvea, including the iris, ciliary body, and choroid, subdivided into anterior, posterior, or panuveitis. As blindness may result from the eye involvement, clinicians should be aware of the possible manifestations and their management also independent of the ophthalmologist opinion as the therapeutic approach generally points to the underlying diseases. In some cases, the eye involvement may have a diagnostic implication, as for episcleritis in rheumatoid arthritis, or acute anterior uveitis in seronegative spondyloarthritis. Nonetheless, some conditions lack specificity, as in the case of dry eye which affects nearly 30 % of the general population. The aim of this review is to elucidate to non-ophthalmologists the major ocular complications of rheumatic diseases and their specific management and treatment options. PMID:26494481

  14. Autoimmune thyroid disease in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Pyne, D; Isenberg, D

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To report the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease and thyroid antibodies in 300 patients with SLE, followed up at our centre between 1978 and 2000, by a retrospective analysis of case notes. Results: The prevalence (5.7%) of hypothyroidism in our cohort was higher than in the normal population (1%), while that of hyperthyroidism (1.7%) was not significantly different. Overall 42/300 (14%) of our cohort had thyroid antibodies, rising to 15/22 (68%) in the subgroup who also had thyroid disease (p<0.001). Both antimicrosomal and antithyroglobulin antibodies were detected. The antibodies were found in equally high frequency in the hyperthyroid subgroup (80% patients), whereas in the hypothyroid subgroup antimicrosomal antibodies were more frequent than antithyroglobulin antibodies (64% v 41%). There was no significant difference in the frequency with which antimicrosomal or antithyroglobulin antibodies were detected between the hyperthyroid and hypothyroid subgroups (p>0.2). Conclusion: Our patients with SLE had a prevalence of hypothyroidism, but not hyperthyroidism, greater than that of the normal population. The presence of either condition was associated with a higher frequency of both antimicrosomal and antithyroglobulin antibodies. PMID:11779764

  15. Calcium, channels, intracellular signaling and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Jorge-Hernán; Bonilla-Abadía, Fabio; Cañas, Carlos A; Tobón, Gabriel J

    2014-01-01

    Calcium (Ca²⁺) is an important cation able to function as a second messenger in different cells of the immune system, particularly in B and T lymphocytes, macrophages and mastocytes, among others. Recent discoveries related to the entry of Ca²⁺ through the store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) has opened a new investigation area about the cell destiny regulated by Ca²⁺ especially in B and T lymphocytes. SOCE acts through calcium-release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. The function of CRAC depends of two recently discovered regulators: the Ca²⁺ sensor in the endoplasmic reticulum or stromal interaction molecule (STIM-1) and one subunit of CRAC channels called Orai1. This review focuses on the role of Ca²⁺ signals in B and T lymphocytes functions, the signalling pathways leading to Ca²⁺ influx, and the relationship between Ca²⁺ signals and autoimmune diseases. PMID:24001934

  16. New Genetic Insights from Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Terry F.; Latif, Rauf; Yin, Xiaoming

    2012-01-01

    The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs) (Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis) are complex genetic diseases which most likely have more than 20 genes contributing to the clinical phenotypes. To date, the genes known to be contributing fall into two categories: immune regulatory genes (including HLA, CTLA4, PTPN22, CD40, CD25, and FCRL3) and thyroid-specific genes (TG and TSHR). However, none of these genes contribute more than a 4-fold increase in risk of developing one of these diseases, and none of the polymorphisms discovered is essential for disease development. Hence, it appears that a variety of different gene interactions can combine to cause the same clinical disease pattern, but the contributing genes may differ from patient to patient and from population to population. Furthermore, this possible mechanism leaves open the powerful influence of the environment and epigenetic modifications of gene expression. For the clinician, this means that genetic profiling of such patients is unlikely to be fruitful in the near future. PMID:22530160

  17. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 with anorexia.

    PubMed

    Kahara, Toshio; Wakakuri, Hitomi; Takatsuji, Juri; Motoo, Iori; Shima, Kosuke R; Ishikura, Kazuhide; Usuda, Rika; Noda, Yatsugi

    2012-01-01

    A 71-year-old man with diabetes mellitus visited our hospital with complaints of anorexia and weight loss (12 kg/3 months). He had megaloblastic anemia, cobalamin level was low, and autoantibody to intrinsic factor was positive. He was treated with intramuscular cyanocobalamin, and he was able to consume meals. GAD autoantibody and ICA were positive, and he was diagnosed with slowly progressive type 1 diabetes mellitus (SPIDDM). Thyroid autoantibodies were positive. According to these findings, he was diagnosed with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 with SPIDDM, pernicious anemia, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Extended periods of cobalamin deficiency can cause serious complications such as ataxia and dementia, and these complications may not be reversible if replacement therapy with cobalamin is delayed. Although type 1 diabetes mellitus with coexisting pernicious anemia is very rare in Japan, physicians should consider the possibility of pernicious anemia when patients with diabetes mellitus have cryptogenic anorexia with the finding of significant macrocytosis (MCV > 100 fL). PMID:23304573

  18. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis: Case report with history of urticaria, petechiae and palpable pinpoint purpura triggered by medical abortion.

    PubMed

    Mbonile, Lumuli

    2016-04-01

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (APD) is a rare autoimmune response to raised endogenous progesterone levels that occur during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Cutaneous, mucosal lesions and other systemic manifestations develop cyclically during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle when progesterone levels are elevated. APD symptoms usually start 3 - 10 days before menstruation and resolve 1 - 2 days after menstruation ceases. A 30-year-old woman presented with urticaria, petechiae and palpable pinpoint purpura lesions of the legs, forearms, neck and buttocks 1 week prior to her menses starting and 2 months after a medical abortion. She was diagnosed with allergic contact dermatitis and topical steroids were prescribed. Her skin conditions did not improve and were associated with her menstrual cycle. We performed an intradermal test using progesterone, which was positive. She was treated with oral contraceptive pills and the symptoms were resolved. This is a typical case of APD triggered by increased sensitivity to endogenous progesterone induced a few months after medical abortion. PMID:27032848

  19. Efficacy of Mitochondrial Antioxidant Plastoquinonyl-decyl-triphenylphosphonium Bromide (SkQ1) in the Rat Model of Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Andreev-Andrievskiy, Alexander A.; Kolosova, Nataliya G.; Stefanova, Natalia A.; Lovat, Maxim V.; Egorov, Maxim V.; Manskikh, Vasily N.; Zinovkin, Roman A.; Galkin, Ivan I.; Prikhodko, Anastasia S.; Skulachev, Maxim V.; Lukashev, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common autoimmune diseases. Many antioxidants have been tested in arthritis, but their efficacy was, at best, marginal. In this study, a novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, plastoquinonyl-decyl-triphenylphosphonium bromide (SkQ1), was tested in vivo to prevent and cure experimental autoimmune arthritis. In conventional Wistar rats, SkQ1 completely prevented the development of clinical signs of arthritis if administered with food before induction. Further, SkQ1 significantly reduced the fraction of animals that developed clinical signs of arthritis and severity of pathological lesions if administration began immediately after induction of arthritis or at the onset of first symptoms (day 14 after induction). In specific pathogen-free Wistar rats, SkQ1 administered via gavage after induction of arthritis did not reduce the fraction of animals with arthritis but decreased the severity of lesions upon pathology examination in a dose-dependent manner. Efficacious doses of SkQ1 were in the range of 0.25–1.25 nmol/kg/day (0.13–0.7 μg/kg/day), which is much lower than doses commonly used for conventional antioxidants. SkQ1 promoted apoptosis of neutrophils in vitro, which may be one of the mechanisms underlying its pharmacological activity. Considering its low toxicity and the wide therapeutic window, SkQ1 may be a valuable additional therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27293517

  20. Treatment of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis with different natural compounds

    PubMed Central

    LI, MAN; CHEN, XIAOMING; LIU, JUANJUAN; WANG, DONGMEI; GAN, LU; LV, XIN; QIAO, YU

    2016-01-01

    Uveitis is an important eye disease that potentially causes loss of sight. Although extensive studies have been conducted on uveitis, the exact pathogenesis remains to be determined. The effects of treatment with natural compounds on an experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) rat model were examined in the present study. A total of 25 rats were divided into 5 groups: Alkaloids (n=5), saponins (n=5), flavonoids (n=5), phenols (n=5), and the normal saline group (n=5). The rats in each group were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of proper alkaloids (berberine hydrochloride), saponins (steroidal saponins), flavonoids (baicalein), or phenols (chlorogenic acid) or physiological saline, respectively. The rats' aqueous humour and crystalline lens was then observed under the slit lamp periodically, looking for signs of inflammation. After 2 weeks, the rats were sacrificed and the degree of pathological changes on their eyeballs under different treatment methods were determined using an optical microscope. The expression of the interleukin (IL)-17 gene in the ocular tissues of the rats was assessed via RT-PCR and western blot analysis. Apoptosis on the rats' retinal tissues was detected using flow cytometry. The results showed that rats injected with phenols (chlorogenic acid) had serious ocular vascular dilatation, iris hemorrhage and purulent exudation; those injected with alkaloids (berberine hydrochloride) and flavonoids (baicalein) had a more mild form of inflammation; and those administered saponins (steroidal saponins) had only mild inflammation signs. Following detection of IL-17 mRNA and protein expression levels in the ocular tissues of rats of the five groups, it was found that their expression was lowest in the saponin-treated group and the other differences in expression were all statistically significant (P<0.05). A comparison with other groups revealed that cell apoptosis in the eyes of rats in the saponin group was the most prominent, reflecting

  1. Treatment of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis with different natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Chen, Xiaoming; Liu, Juanjuan; Wang, Dongmei; Gan, Lu; Lv, Xin; Qiao, Yu

    2016-06-01

    Uveitis is an important eye disease that potentially causes loss of sight. Although extensive studies have been conducted on uveitis, the exact pathogenesis remains to be determined. The effects of treatment with natural compounds on an experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) rat model were examined in the present study. A total of 25 rats were divided into 5 groups: Alkaloids (n=5), saponins (n=5), flavonoids (n=5), phenols (n=5), and the normal saline group (n=5). The rats in each group were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of proper alkaloids (berberine hydrochloride), saponins (steroidal saponins), flavonoids (baicalein), or phenols (chlorogenic acid) or physiological saline, respectively. The rats' aqueous humour and crystalline lens was then observed under the slit lamp periodically, looking for signs of inflammation. After 2 weeks, the rats were sacrificed and the degree of pathological changes on their eyeballs under different treatment methods were determined using an optical microscope. The expression of the interleukin (IL)‑17 gene in the ocular tissues of the rats was assessed via RT‑PCR and western blot analysis. Apoptosis on the rats' retinal tissues was detected using flow cytometry. The results showed that rats injected with phenols (chlorogenic acid) had serious ocular vascular dilatation, iris hemorrhage and purulent exudation; those injected with alkaloids (berberine hydrochloride) and flavonoids (baicalein) had a more mild form of inflammation; and those administered saponins (steroidal saponins) had only mild inflammation signs. Following detection of IL‑17 mRNA and protein expression levels in the ocular tissues of rats of the five groups, it was found that their expression was lowest in the saponin‑treated group and the other differences in expression were all statistically significant (P<0.05). A comparison with other groups revealed that cell apoptosis in the eyes of rats in the saponin group was the most prominent

  2. Immunoglobulin G4-related multiple cardiovascular lesions successfully treated with a combination of open surgery and corticosteroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Kan-o, Meikun; Kado, Yuichiro; Sadanaga, Atsushi; Tamiya, Sadafumi; Toyoshima, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Masato

    2015-06-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease, a newly emerging systemic autoimmune disorder, can potentially involve the cardiovascular system. The standard treatment for immunoglobulin G4-related cardiovascular disease has not been established. We encountered a very rare case of an immunoglobulin G4-related inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm coexisting with a coronary artery aneurysm and periarteritis. The patient underwent surgical resection for the abdominal aortic aneurysm, followed by successful corticosteroid therapy for the coronary artery lesions. This is the first report of steroid-sensitive immunoglobulin G4-related coronary artery disease. A carefully planned treatment strategy for the multiple cardiovascular lesions was invaluable in the present case. PMID:24360234

  3. Dual Roles of Immunoregulatory Cytokine TGF-β in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmunity-Mediated Organ Damage1

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Vijay; Lienesch, Douglas W.; Zhou, Min; Bommireddy, Ramireddy; Azhar, Mohamad; Doetschman, Thomas; Singh, Ram Raj

    2008-01-01

    Ample evidence suggests a role of TGF-β in preventing autoimmunity. Multiorgan inflammatory disease, spontaneous activation of self-reactive T cells, and autoantibody production are hallmarks of autoimmune diseases, such as lupus. These features are reminiscent of the immunopathology manifest in TGF-β1-deficient mice. In this study, we show that lupus-prone (New Zealand Black and White)F1 mice have reduced expression of TGF-β1 in lymphoid tissues, and TGF-β1 or TGF-β1-producing T cells suppress autoantibody production. In contrast, the expression of TGF-β1 protein and mRNA and TGF-β signaling proteins (TGF-β receptor type II and phosphorylated SMAD3) increases in the target organs, i.e., kidneys, of these mice as they age and develop progressive organ damage. In fact, the levels of TGF-β1 in kidney tissue and urine correlate with the extent of chronic lesions that represent local tissue fibrosis. In vivo TGF-β blockade by treatment of these mice with an anti-TGF-β Ab selectively inhibits chronic fibrotic lesions without affecting autoantibody production and the inflammatory component of tissue injury. Thus, TGF-β plays a dual, seemingly paradoxical, role in the development of organ damage in multiorgan autoimmune diseases. According to our working model, reduced TGF-β in immune cells predisposes to immune dysregulation and autoantibody production, which causes tissue inflammation that triggers the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as TGF-β in target organs to counter inflammation. Enhanced TGF-β in target organs, in turn, can lead to dysregulated tissue repair, progressive fibrogenesis, and eventual end-organ damage. PMID:18209088

  4. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Mattigatti, Sudha; Managoli, Noopur A; Rairam, Surabhi G; Patil, Ashwini M

    2013-01-01

    Abfraction or Theory of Abfraction is a theory explaining the non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). It suggests that they are caused by flexural forces, usually from cyclic loading; the enamel, especially at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), undergoes this pattern of destruction by separating the enamel rods. Clinical aspect importance of these ineart lesions are at most important to be detected for early intervention and treatment modalities as options during the progression of the disease. How to cite this article: Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Mattigatti S, Managoli NA, Rairam SG, Patil AM. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):142-5. PMID:24324319

  5. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  6. Celiac autoimmunity in autoimmune thyroid disease is highly prevalent with a questionable impact

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bharat Rakeshkumar; Joshi, Ameya S.; Varthakavi, Premlata K.; Chadha, Manoj D.; Bhagwat, Nikhil M.; Pawal, Pratibha S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is 10–12% in the general population worldwide. Among various disorders co-existing with AITD, the concomitance of celiac disease (CD) with AITD results in poor absorption of thyroid medications and results in higher doses of the same. Institution of gluten-free diet (GFD) in this cohort helps reduce medication doses. Aim: To screen patients with AITD for the presence of celiac autoimmunity (CA). Materials and Methods: A total of 280 consecutive patients with AITD attending the thyroid Out-patient Department of a tertiary care hospital were screened for the presence of tissue transglutaminase antibodies (immunoglobulin A tissue transglutaminase). Those with a positive titer (but < 10 times the upper limit of normal) underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and duodenal mucosal biopsy for the diagnosis of CD, followed by institution of GFD in confirmed cases. Results: Of a total of 280 (182 females and 98 males) patients with AITD screened, 24 (8.6%) turned out to be positive for CA. Of 24 (8.6%), 15 (8.24%) females and 9 (9.18%) males were positive for CA. There was no statistically significant difference in the thyroxine doses required for normalization of thyroid function and the weight of the patients in CA positive and CA negative patients. Conclusions: The prevalence of CD in patients with AITD is much greater than in the general population. This forms the basis for screening patients with AITD for presence of CD. PMID:26904476

  7. Approaches to Managing Autoimmune Cytopenias in Novel Immunological Disorders with Genetic Underpinnings Like Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V. Koneti

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disorder of apoptosis. It is frequently caused by mutations in FAS (TNFRSF6) gene. Unlike most of the self-limiting autoimmune cytopenias sporadically seen in childhood, multi lineage cytopenias due to ALPS are often refractory, as their inherited genetic defect is not going to go away. Historically, more ALPS patients have died due to overwhelming sepsis following splenectomy to manage their chronic cytopenias than due to any other cause, including malignancies. Hence, current recommendations underscore the importance of avoiding splenectomy in ALPS, by long-term use of corticosteroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents like mycophenolate mofetil and sirolimus. Paradigms learnt from managing ALPS patients in recent years is highlighted here and can be extrapolated to manage refractory cytopenias in patients with as yet undetermined genetic bases for their ailments. It is also desirable to develop international registries for children with rare and complex immune problems associated with chronic multilineage cytopenias in order to elucidate their natural history and long-term comorbidities due to the disease and its treatments. PMID:26258116

  8. Induction of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Mice and Evaluation of the Disease-dependent Distribution of Immune Cells in Various Tissues.

    PubMed

    Barthelmes, Julia; Tafferner, Nadja; Kurz, Jennifer; de Bruin, Natasja; Parnham, Michael J; Geisslinger, Gerd; Schiffmann, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is presumed to be an inflammatory autoimmune disease, which is characterized by lesion formation in the central nervous system (CNS) resulting in cognitive and motor impairment. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a useful animal model of MS, because it is also characterized by lesion formation in the CNS, motor impairment and is also driven by autoimmune and inflammatory reactions. One of the EAE models is induced with a peptide derived from the myelin oligodendrocyte protein (MOG)35-55 in mice. The EAE mice develop a progressive disease course. This course is divided into three phases: the preclinical phase (day 0 - 9), the disease onset (day 10 - 11) and the acute phase (day 12 - 14). MS and EAE are induced by autoreactive T cells that infiltrate the CNS. These T cells secrete chemokines and cytokines which lead to the recruitment of further immune cells. Therefore, the immune cell distribution in the spinal cord during the three disease phases was investigated. To highlight the time point of the disease at which the activation/proliferation/accumulation of T cells, B cells and monocytes starts, the immune cell distribution in lymph nodes, spleen and blood was also assessed. Furthermore, the levels of several cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-23, TNFα, IFNγ) in the three disease phases were determined, to gain insight into the inflammatory processes of the disease. In conclusion, the data provide an overview of the functional profile of immune cells during EAE pathology. PMID:27214391

  9. Epigenetics and autoimmune diseases: the X chromosome-nucleolus nexus

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Wesley H.; Renaudineau, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur more often in females, suggesting a key role for the X chromosome. X chromosome inactivation, a major epigenetic feature in female cells that provides dosage compensation of X-linked genes to avoid overexpression, presents special vulnerabilities that can contribute to the disease process. Disruption of X inactivation can result in loss of dosage compensation with expression from previously sequestered genes, imbalance of gene products, and altered endogenous material out of normal epigenetic context. In addition, the human X has significant differences compared to other species and these differences can contribute to the frequency and intensity of the autoimmune disease in humans as well as the types of autoantigens encountered. Here a link is demonstrated between autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, and the X chromosome by discussing cases in which typically non-autoimmune disorders complicated with X chromosome abnormalities also present lupus-like symptoms. The discussion is then extended to the reported spatial and temporal associations of the inactive X chromosome with the nucleolus. When frequent episodes of cellular stress occur, the inactive X chromosome may be disrupted and inadvertently become involved in the nucleolar stress response. Development of autoantigens, many of which are at least transiently components of the nucleolus, is then described. Polyamines, which aid in nucleoprotein complex assembly in the nucleolus, increase further during cell stress, and appear to have an important role in the autoimmune disease process. Autoantigenic endogenous material can potentially be stabilized by polyamines. This presents a new paradigm for autoimmune diseases: that many are antigen-driven and the autoantigens originate from altered endogenous material due to episodes of cellular stress that disrupt epigenetic control. This suggests that epigenetics and the X chromosome are important aspects of autoimmune

  10. Breaking Tolerance to Thyroid Antigens: Changing Concepts in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid autoimmunity involves loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins in genetically susceptible individuals in association with environmental factors. In central tolerance, intrathymic autoantigen presentation deletes immature T cells with high affinity for autoantigen-derived peptides. Regulatory T cells provide an alternative mechanism to silence autoimmune T cells in the periphery. The TSH receptor (TSHR), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and thyroglobulin (Tg) have unusual properties (“immunogenicity”) that contribute to breaking tolerance, including size, abundance, membrane association, glycosylation, and polymorphisms. Insight into loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins comes from spontaneous and induced animal models: 1) intrathymic expression controls self-tolerance to the TSHR, not TPO or Tg; 2) regulatory T cells are not involved in TSHR self-tolerance and instead control the balance between Graves' disease and thyroiditis; 3) breaking TSHR tolerance involves contributions from major histocompatibility complex molecules (humans and induced mouse models), TSHR polymorphism(s) (humans), and alternative splicing (mice); 4) loss of tolerance to Tg before TPO indicates that greater Tg immunogenicity vs TPO dominates central tolerance expectations; 5) tolerance is induced by thyroid autoantigen administration before autoimmunity is established; 6) interferon-α therapy for hepatitis C infection enhances thyroid autoimmunity in patients with intact immunity; Graves' disease developing after T-cell depletion reflects reconstitution autoimmunity; and 7) most environmental factors (including excess iodine) “reveal,” but do not induce, thyroid autoimmunity. Micro-organisms likely exert their effects via bystander stimulation. Finally, no single mechanism explains the loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins. The goal of inducing self-tolerance to prevent autoimmune thyroid disease will require accurate prediction of at-risk individuals together with an antigen

  11. A New Targeted Model of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in the Common Marmoset.

    PubMed

    Stassart, Ruth Martha; Helms, Gunther; Garea-Rodríguez, Enrique; Nessler, Stefan; Hayardeny, Liat; Wegner, Christiane; Schlumbohm, Christina; Fuchs, Eberhard; Brück, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common cause for sustained disability in young adults, yet treatment options remain very limited. Although numerous therapeutic approaches have been effective in rodent models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), only few proved to be beneficial in patients with MS. Hence, there is a strong need for more predictive animal models. Within the past decade, EAE in the common marmoset evolved as a potent, alternative model for MS, with immunological and pathological features resembling more closely the human disease. However, an often very rapid and severe disease course hampers its implementation for systematic testing of new treatment strategies. We here developed a new focal model of EAE in the common marmoset, induced by myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) immunization and stereotactic injections of proinflammatory cytokines. At the injection site of cytokines, confluent inflammatory demyelinating lesions developed that strongly resembled human MS lesions. In a proof-of-principle treatment study with the immunomodulatory compound laquinimod, we demonstrate that targeted EAE in marmosets provides a promising and valid tool for preclinical experimental treatment trials in MS research. PMID:26207848

  12. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: From lab to bedside.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, R K; Das, Sudipta Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is not an uncommon clinical disorder and requires advanced, efficient immunohematological and transfusion support. Many AIHA patients have underlying disorder and therefore, it is incumbent upon the clinician to investigate these patients in detail, as the underlying condition can be of a serious nature such as lymphoproliferative disorder or connective tissue disorder. Despite advances in transfusion medicine, simple immunohematological test such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT) still remains the diagnostic hallmark of AIHA. The sensitive gel technology has enabled the immunohematologist not only to diagnose serologically such patients, but also to characterize red cell bound autoantibodies with regard to their class, subclass and titer in a rapid and simplified way. Detailed characterization of autoantibodies is important, as there is a relationship between in vivo hemolysis and strength of DAT; red cell bound multiple immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin G subclass and titer. Transfusing AIHA patient is a challenge to the immunohematologist as it is encountered with difficulties in ABO grouping and cross matching requiring specialized serological tests such as alloadsorption or autoadsorption. At times, it may be almost impossible to find a fully matched unit to transfuse these patients. However, transfusion should not be withheld in a critically ill patient even in the absence of compatible blood. The "best match" or "least incompatible units" can be transfused to such patients under close supervision without any serious side-effects. All blood banks should have the facilities to perform the necessary investigations required to issue "best match" packed red blood cells in AIHA. Specialized techniques such as elution and adsorption, which at times are helpful in enhancing blood safety in AIHA should be established in all transfusion services. PMID:24678166

  13. Sclerosing cholecystitis associated with autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Tu, Yuyang; Nakajima, Hitoshi; Egawa, Naoto; Tsuruta, Kouji; Okamoto, Atsutake; Horiguchi, Shinichirou

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the histopathological and radiological findings of the gallbladder in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). METHODS: The radiological findings of the gallbladder of 19 AIP patients were retrospectively reviewed. Resected gallbladders of 8 AIP patients were examined histologically and were immunostained with anti-IgG4 antibody. Controls consisted of gallbladders resected for symptomatic gallstones (n = 10) and those removed during pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic carcinoma (n = 10), as well as extrahepatic bile ducts and pancreases removed by pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic carcinoma (n = 10). RESULTS: Thickening of the gallbladder wall was detected by ultrasound and/or computed tomography in 10 patients with AIP (3 severe and 7 moderate); in these patients severe stenosis of the extrahepatic bile duct was also noted. Histologically, thickening of the gallbladder was detected in 6 of 8 (75%) patients with AIP; 4 cases had transmural lymphoplasmacytic infiltration with fibrosis, and 2 cases had mucosal-based lymphoplasmacytic infiltration. Considerable transmural thickening of the extrahepatic bile duct wall with dense fibrosis and diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration was detected in 7 patients. Immunohistochemically, severe or moderate infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells was detected in the gallbladder, bile duct, and pancreas of all 8 patients, but was not detected in controls. CONCLUSION: Gallbladder wall thickening with fibrosis and abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells is frequently detected in patients with AIP. We propose the use of a new term, sclerosing cholecystitis, for these cases that are induced by the same mechanism as sclerosing pancreatitis or sclerosing cholangitis in AIP. PMID:16773691

  14. Autoimmune Basis for Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongliang; Yu, Xichun; Liles, Campbell; Khan, Muneer; Vanderlinde‐Wood, Megan; Galloway, Allison; Zillner, Caitlin; Benbrook, Alexandria; Reim, Sean; Collier, Daniel; Hill, Michael A.; Raj, Satish R.; Okamoto, Luis E.; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Aston, Christopher E.; Kem, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) have exaggerated orthostatic tachycardia often following a viral illness, suggesting autoimmunity may play a pathophysiological role in POTS. We tested the hypothesis that they harbor functional autoantibodies to adrenergic receptors (AR). Methods and Results Fourteen POTS patients (7 each from 2 institutions) and 10 healthy subjects were examined for α1AR autoantibody‐mediated contractility using a perfused rat cremaster arteriole assay. A receptor‐transfected cell‐based assay was used to detect the presence of β1AR and β2AR autoantibodies. Data were normalized and expressed as a percentage of baseline. The sera of all 14 POTS patients demonstrated significant arteriolar contractile activity (69±3% compared to 91±1% of baseline for healthy controls, P<0.001) when coexisting β2AR dilative activity was blocked; and this was suppressed by α1AR blockade with prazosin. POTS sera acted as a partial α1AR antagonist significantly shifting phenylephrine contractility curves to the right. All POTS sera increased β1AR activation (130±3% of baseline, P<0.01) and a subset had increased β2AR activity versus healthy subjects. POTS sera shifted isoproterenol cAMP response curves to the left, consistent with enhanced β1AR and β2AR agonist activity. Autoantibody‐positive POTS sera demonstrated specific binding to β1AR, β2AR, and α1AR in transfected cells. Conclusions POTS patients have elevated α1AR autoantibodies exerting a partial peripheral antagonist effect resulting in a compensatory sympathoneural activation of α1AR for vasoconstriction and concurrent βAR‐mediated tachycardia. Coexisting β1AR and β2AR agonistic autoantibodies facilitate this tachycardia. These findings may explain the increased standing plasma norepinephrine and excessive tachycardia observed in many POTS patients. PMID:24572257

  15. P-glycoprotein in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    García-Carrasco, M; Mendoza-Pinto, C; Macias Díaz, S; Vera-Recabarren, M; Vázquez de Lara, L; Méndez Martínez, S; Soto-Santillán, P; González-Ramírez, R; Ruiz-Arguelles, A

    2015-07-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is a transmembrane protein of 170 kD encoded by the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR-1) gene, localized on chromosome 7. More than 50 polymorphisms of the MDR-1 gene have been described; a subset of these has been shown to play a pathophysiological role in the development of inflammatory bowel disease, femoral head osteonecrosis induced by steroids, lung cancer and renal epithelial tumors. Polymorphisms that have a protective effect on the development of conditions such as Parkinson disease have also been identified. P-glycoprotein belongs to the adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter superfamily and its structure comprises a chain of approximately 1280 aminoacid residues with an N-C terminal structure, arranged as 2 homologous halves, each of which has 6 transmembrane segments, with a total of 12 segments with 2 cytoplasmic nucleotide binding domains. Many cytokines like interleukin 2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha increase Pgp expression and activity. Pgp functions as an efflux pump for a variety of toxins in order to protect particular organs and tissues as the central nervous system. Pgp transports a variety of substrates including glucocorticoids while other drugs such as tacrolimus and cyclosporine A act as modulators of this protein. The most widely used method to measure Pgp activity is flow cytometry using naturally fluorescent substrates such as anthracyclines or rhodamine 123. The study of drug resistance and its association to Pgp began with the study of resistance to chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer and antiretroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus; however, the role of Pgp in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis has been a focus of study lately and has emerged as an important mechanism by which treatment failure occurs. The present review analyzes the role of Pgp in these autoimmune diseases. PMID:25712147

  16. Autoimmune mechanisms in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Knip, Mikael; Siljander, Heli

    2008-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is perceived as a chronic immune-mediated disease with a subclinical prodromal period characterized by selective loss of insulin-producing beta-cells in the pancreatic islets in genetically susceptible subjects. Autoreactive T cells, both CD4 and CD8 cells, have been implicated as active players in beta-cell destruction. A series of autoantigens have been identified in T1D including insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the protein tyrosine phosphatase-related islet antigen 2 (IA-2), and most recently the zinc transporter Slc30A8 residing in the insulin secretory granule of the beta-cell. The issue whether there is any primary autoantigen in T1D has remained controversial. Given that there are two major HLA haplotypes conferring disease susceptibility, i.e. the DR3-DQ2 haplotype and the DR4-DQ8 haplotype, one may assume that there will be at least two primary antigens in T1D. The first signs of beta-cell autoimmunity might appear already during the first year of life. Autoantibodies may be considered as markers of an ongoing disease process in the pancreatic islets, and they can be used for prediction of T1D in non-diabetic individuals. Autoantigen-specific T-cell responses have been detected from peripheral blood in both patients with T1D and in unaffected subjects, but a clear discrimination between diabetic and non-diabetic subjects have rarely been seen until recently. PMID:18625444

  17. Autoimmune uveitis: clinical, pathogenetic, and therapeutic features.

    PubMed

    Prete, Marcella; Dammacco, Rosanna; Fatone, Maria Celeste; Racanelli, Vito

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune uveitis (AU), an inflammatory non-infectious process of the vascular layer of the eye, can lead to visual impairment and, in the absence of a timely diagnosis and suitable therapy, can even result in total blindness. The majority of AU cases are idiopathic, whereas fewer than 20 % are associated with systemic diseases. The clinical severity of AU depends on whether the anterior, intermediate, or posterior part of the uvea is involved and may range from almost asymptomatic to rapidly sight-threatening forms. Race, genetic background, and environmental factors can also influence the clinical picture. The pathogenetic mechanism of AU is still poorly defined, given its remarkable heterogeneity and the many discrepancies between experimental and human uveitis. Even so, the onset of AU is thought to be related to an aberrant T cell-mediated immune response, triggered by inflammation and directed against retinal or cross-reactive antigens. B cells may also play a role in uveal antigen presentation and in the subsequent activation of T cells. The management of AU remains a challenge for clinicians, especially because of the paucity of randomized clinical trials that have systematically evaluated the effectiveness of different drugs. In addition to topical treatment, several different therapeutic options are available, although a standardized regimen is thus far lacking. Current guidelines recommend corticosteroids as the first-line therapy for patients with active AU. Immunosuppressive drugs may be subsequently required to treat steroid-resistant AU and for steroid-sparing purposes. The recent introduction of biological agents, such as those targeting tumor necrosis factor-α, is expected to remarkably increase the percentages of responders and to prevent irreversible sight impairment. This paper reviews the clinical features of AU and its crucial pathogenetic targets in relation to the current therapeutic perspectives. Also, the largest clinical trials

  18. Modelling autoimmune rheumatic disease: a likelihood rationale.

    PubMed

    Ulvestad, E

    2003-07-01

    Immunoglobulins (Igs) and autoantibodies are commonly tested in sera from patients with suspected rheumatic disease. To evaluate the clinical utility of the tests in combination, we investigated sera from 351 patients with autoimmune rheumatic disease (ARD) rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and 96 patients with nonautoimmune rheumatic disease (NAD) (fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, etc.). Antinuclear antibodies (ANA), rheumatoid factor (RF), antibodies against DNA and extractable nuclear antigens (anti-ENA), IgG, IgA and IgM were measured for all patients. Logistic regression analysis of test results was used to calculate each patient's probability for belonging to the ARD or NAD group as well as likelihood ratios for disease. Test accuracy was investigated using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) plots and nonparametric ROC analysis. Neither concentrations of IgG, IgA, IgM, anti-DNA nor anti-ENA gave a significant effect on diagnostic outcome. Probabilities for disease and likelihood ratios calculated by combining RF and ANA performed significantly better at predicting ARD than utilization of the diagnostic tests in isolation (P < 0.001). At a cut-off level of P = 0.73 and likelihood ratio = 1, the logistic model gave a specificity of 93% and a sensitivity of 75% for the differentiation between ARD and NAD. When compared at the same level of specificity, ANA gave a sensitivity of 37% and RF gave a sensitivity of 56.6%. Dichotomizing ANA and RF as positive or negative did not reduce the performance characteristics of the model. Combining results obtained from serological analysis of ANA and RF according to this model will increase the diagnostic utility of the tests in rheumatological practice. PMID:12828565

  19. MRI of Focal Liver Lesions.

    PubMed

    Albiin, Nils

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging, MRI has more advantages than ultrasound, computed tomography, CT, positron emission tomography, PET, or any other imaging modality in diagnosing focal hepatic masses. With a combination of basic T1 and T2 weighted sequences, diffusion weighted imaging, DWI, and hepatobiliary gadolinium contrast agents, that is gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA) and gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB), most liver lesions can be adequately diagnosed. Benign lesions, as cyst, hemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia, FNH or adenoma, can be distinguished from malignant lesions. In a non-cirrhotic liver, the most common malignant lesions are metastases which may be hypovascular or hypervascular. In the cirrhotic liver hepatocellular carcinoma, HCC, is of considerable importance. Besides, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and other less common malignancies has to be assessed. In this review, the techniques and typical MRI features are presented as well as the new algorithm issued by American Association for the Study of the Liver Diseases (AASLD). PMID:23049491

  20. Electrocautery for Precancerous Anal Lesions

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a randomized clinical trial conducted in Amsterdam suggest that electrocautery is better than topical imiquimod or fluorouracil at treating potentially precancerous anal lesions in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.