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Sample records for extreme relativistic region

  1. Upper Extremity Regional Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Joseph M.; Gerancher, J.C.; Hebl, James R.; Ilfeld, Brian M.; McCartney, Colin J.L.; Franco, Carlo D.; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2009-01-01

    Brachial plexus blockade is the cornerstone of the peripheral nerve regional anesthesia practice of most anesthesiologists. As part of the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine’s commitment to providing intensive evidence-based education related to regional anesthesia and analgesia, this article is a complete update of our 2002 comprehensive review of upper extremity anesthesia. The text of the review focuses on (1) pertinent anatomy, (2) approaches to the brachial plexus and techniques that optimize block quality, (4) local anesthetic and adjuvant pharmacology, (5) complications, (6) perioperative issues, and (6) challenges for future research. PMID:19282714

  2. An extreme long-lived relativistic electron enhancement event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaochao

    2015-04-01

    An extreme long-lived intense relativistic electron enhancement event beginning in November 2004 is examined using data from Fengyun-1, POES, GOES, ACE, the Cluster Mission and geomagnetic indices. In this event, the flux of relativistic electrons (>1.6MeV) in the outer zone increased to a very high level in two days, this flux fashion had been running to the end of January 2005. It is an extreme long-lived event. We find that the high-speed solar wind and frequent impulses of solar wind dynamic pressure induced strong long-lasting ULF waves just before the enhancement, and the energetic electron flux enhanced simultaneously. Subsequently, the whistler mode chorus intensified obviously and the relativistic electron flux enhanced rapidly. We suggest that the drift-resonant acceleration by ULF waves enhanced the energetic electrons flux firstly, and local acceleration by chorus accelerated them to relativistic level sequentially.

  3. Nuclei at extreme conditions. A relativistic study

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasjev, Anatoli

    2014-11-14

    The major goals of the current project were further development of covariant density functional theory (CDFT), better understanding of its features, its application to different nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics phenomena and training of graduate and undergraduate students. The investigations have proceeded in a number of directions which are discussed in detail in the part “Accomplishments” of this report. We have studied the role of isovector and isoscalar proton-neutron pairings in rotating nuclei; based on available experimental data it was concluded that there are no evidences for the existence of isoscalar proton-neutron pairing. Generalized theoretical approach has been developed for pycnonuclear reaction rates in the crust of neutron stars and interior of white dwarfs. Using this approach, extensive database for considerable number of pycnonuclear reactions involving stable and neutron-rich light nuclei has been created; it can be used in future for the study of various nuclear burning phenomena in different environments. Time-odd mean fields and their manifestations in terminating states, non-rotating and rotating nuclei have been studied in the framework of covariant density functional theory. Contrary to non-relativistic density functional theories these fields, which are important for a proper description of nuclear systems with broken time-reversal symmetry, are uniquely defined in the CDFT framework. Hyperdeformed nuclear shapes (with semi-axis ratio 2.5:1 and larger) have been studied in the Z = 40-58 part of nuclear chart. We strongly believe that such shapes could be studied experimentally in the future with full scale GRETA detector.

  4. Relativistic electron mirrors from nanoscale foils for coherent frequency upshift to the extreme ultraviolet

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, D.; Yeung, M.; Dzelzainis, T.; Foster, P.S.; Rykovanov, S.G.; Lewis, C.LS.; Marjoribanks, R.S.; Ruhl, H.; Habs, D.; Schreiber, J.; Zepf, M.; Dromey, B.

    2013-01-01

    Reflecting light from a mirror moving close to the speed of light has been envisioned as a route towards producing bright X-ray pulses since Einstein’s seminal work on special relativity. For an ideal relativistic mirror, the peak power of the reflected radiation can substantially exceed that of the incident radiation due to the increase in photon energy and accompanying temporal compression. Here we demonstrate for the first time that dense relativistic electron mirrors can be created from the interaction of a high-intensity laser pulse with a freestanding, nanometre-scale thin foil. The mirror structures are shown to shift the frequency of a counter-propagating laser pulse coherently from the infrared to the extreme ultraviolet with an efficiency >104 times higher than in the case of incoherent scattering. Our results elucidate the reflection process of laser-generated electron mirrors and give clear guidance for future developments of a relativistic mirror structure. PMID:23612304

  5. Relativistic electron mirrors from nanoscale foils for coherent frequency upshift to the extreme ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, D; Yeung, M; Dzelzainis, T; Foster, P S; Rykovanov, S G; Lewis, C Ls; Marjoribanks, R S; Ruhl, H; Habs, D; Schreiber, J; Zepf, M; Dromey, B

    2013-01-01

    Reflecting light from a mirror moving close to the speed of light has been envisioned as a route towards producing bright X-ray pulses since Einstein's seminal work on special relativity. For an ideal relativistic mirror, the peak power of the reflected radiation can substantially exceed that of the incident radiation due to the increase in photon energy and accompanying temporal compression. Here we demonstrate for the first time that dense relativistic electron mirrors can be created from the interaction of a high-intensity laser pulse with a freestanding, nanometre-scale thin foil. The mirror structures are shown to shift the frequency of a counter-propagating laser pulse coherently from the infrared to the extreme ultraviolet with an efficiency >10(4) times higher than in the case of incoherent scattering. Our results elucidate the reflection process of laser-generated electron mirrors and give clear guidance for future developments of a relativistic mirror structure. PMID:23612304

  6. Bright subcycle extreme ultraviolet bursts from a single dense relativistic electron sheet.

    PubMed

    Ma, W J; Bin, J H; Wang, H Y; Yeung, M; Kreuzer, C; Streeter, M; Foster, P S; Cousens, S; Kiefer, D; Dromey, B; Yan, X Q; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J; Zepf, M; Schreiber, J

    2014-12-01

    Double-foil targets separated by a low density plasma and irradiated by a petawatt-class laser are shown to be a copious source of coherent broadband radiation. Simulations show that a dense sheet of relativistic electrons is formed during the interaction of the laser with the tenuous plasma between the two foils. The coherent motion of the electron sheet as it transits the second foil results in strong broadband emission in the extreme ultraviolet, consistent with our experimental observations. PMID:25526132

  7. Net Force of an Ideal Conductor on an Element of a Line of Charge Moving With Extreme Relativistic Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawley, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Considers the problem of determining the force on an element of a finite length line of charge moving horizontally with extreme relativistic speed through an evacuated space above an infinite plane ideal conducting surface. (SL)

  8. Megaparsec relativistic jets launched from an accreting supermassive black hole in an extreme spiral galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Vivek, M.; Srianand, Raghunathan; Gopal-Krishna; Vikram, Vinu; Hota, Ananda; Biju, K. G.; Sirothia, S. K.; Jacob, Joe

    2014-06-20

    The radio galaxy phenomenon is directly connected to mass-accreting, spinning supermassive black holes found in the active galactic nuclei. It is still unclear how the collimated jets of relativistic plasma on hundreds to thousands of kiloparsec scales form and why they are nearly always launched from the nuclei of bulge-dominated elliptical galaxies and not flat spirals. Here we present the discovery of the giant radio source J2345–0449 (z = 0.0755), a clear and extremely rare counterexample where relativistic jets are ejected from a luminous and massive spiral galaxy on a scale of ∼1.6 Mpc, the largest known so far. Extreme physical properties observed for this bulgeless spiral host, such as its high optical and infrared luminosity, large dynamical mass, rapid disk rotation, and episodic jet activity, are possibly the results of its unusual formation history, which has also assembled, via gas accretion from a disk, its central black hole of mass >2 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}. The very high mid-IR luminosity of the galaxy suggests that it is actively forming stars and still building a massive disk. We argue that the launch of these powerful jets is facilitated by an advection-dominated, magnetized accretion flow at a low Eddington rate onto this unusually massive (for a bulgeless disk galaxy) and possibly fast spinning central black hole. Therefore, J2345–0449 is an extremely rare, unusual galactic system whose properties challenge the standard paradigms for black hole growth and the formation of relativistic jets in disk galaxies. Thus, it provides fundamental insight into accretion disk-relativistic jet coupling processes.

  9. Towards Extreme Field Physics: Relativistic Optics and Particle Acceleration in the Transparent-Overdense Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegelich, B. Manuel

    2011-10-01

    A steady increase of on-target laser intensity with also increasing pulse contrast is leading to light-matter interactions of extreme laser fields with matter in new physics regimes which in turn enable a host of applications. A first example is the realization of interactions in the transperent-overdense regime (TOR), which is reached by interacting a highly relativistic (a0 >10), ultra high contrast laser pulse [1] with a solid density target, turning it transparent to the laser by the relativistic mass increase of the electrons. Thus, the interactions becomes volumetric, increasing the energy coupling from laser to plasma, facilitating a range of effects, including relativistic optics and pulse shaping, mono-energetic electron acceleration [3], highly efficient ion acceleration in the break-out afterburner regime [4], and the generation of relativistic and forward directed surface harmonics. Experiments at the LANL 130TW Trident laser facility successfully reached the TOR, and show relativistic pulse shaping beyond the Fourier limit, the acceleration of mono-energetic ~40 MeV electron bunches from solid targets, forward directed coherent relativistic high harmonic generation >1 keV Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) ion acceleration of Carbon to >1 GeV and Protons to >100 MeV. Carbon ions were accelerated with a conversion efficiency of >10% for ions >20 MeV and monoenergetic carbon ions with an energy spread of <20%, have been accelerated at up to ~500 MeV, demonstrating 3 out of 4 for key requirements for ion fast ignition. The shown results now approach or exceed the limits set by many applications from ICF diagnostics over ion fast ignition to medical physics. Furthermore, TOR targets traverse a wide range of HEDP parameter space during the interaction ranging from WDM conditions (e.g. brown dwarfs) to energy densities of ~1011 J/cm3 at peak, then dropping back to the underdense but extremely hot parameter range of gamma-ray bursts. Whereas today this regime can

  10. Regional frequency analysis of extreme groundwater levels.

    PubMed

    Fürst, Josef; Bichler, Andrea; Konecny, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Flood risk is generally perceived as being a consequence of surface water inundation. However, large damage is also caused by high groundwater levels. In surface hydrology, statistical frequency analysis is a standard tool to estimate discharge with a given return period or exceedance probability. First, a suitable probability distribution is fit to a series of annual maximum peaks. Second, this distribution is used to determine the discharge corresponding to the desired return period. Where only short series of recorded data are available, the estimates can often be improved by regional frequency analysis (RFA). Unfortunately, there is little information in the literature on analogous approaches for the estimation of extreme groundwater levels. In this contribution, the applicability of l-moments-based RFA for the estimation of extreme groundwater levels is investigated. The main issues specific to groundwater levels are (1) appropriate transformation of the data, (2) criteria for identification of statistically homogeneous regions, (3) consideration of correlation between sites, and (4) choice of distribution function. This study is based on data from more than 1100 observation sites in four shallow Austrian Aquifers with a record length of 10 to 50 years. Results show that homogeneous regions for l-moments-based RFA can be identified covering about one half of the total area of the aquifers. The confidence intervals for the 30- and 100-year return levels can be significantly reduced by RFA. Out of the four investigated distribution functions, none is to be preferred generally. PMID:24903411

  11. Regional Extreme Monthly Precipitation Simulated by NARCCAP RCMs

    SciTech Connect

    Gutowski, William; Arritt, R.; Kawazoe, Sho; Flory, Dave; Takle, Eugene S.; Biner, S.; Caya, Daniel; Jones, Richard; Laprise, Rene; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Mearns, L. O.; Moufouma-Okia, Wilfran; Nunes, A.; Qian, Yun; Roads, John O.; Sloan, Lisa; Snyder, Mark A.

    2010-12-15

    We analyze the ability of the NARCCAP ensemble of regional climate models to simulate extreme monthly precipitation and its supporting circulation for regions of North America, comparing 18 years of simulations driven by the NCEP-DOE reanalysis with observations. Analysis focuses the wettest 10% of months during the cold half of the year (October-March), when we assume that resolved synoptic circulation governs precipitation. For a coastal California region, the models replicate well the monthly frequency of extremes, the amount of extreme precipitation and the 500 hPa circulation anomaly associated with the extremes. For an Upper Mississippi River Basin region, the models agree with observations in both monthly frequency and magnitude, though not as closely as for coastal California. In addition, simulated circulation anomalies for extreme months are similar to those in observations. Model success appears to result in part from the substantial seasonal variation of extremes, which the models capture well.

  12. Extreme Variables in Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Peña, Carlos Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The notion that low- to intermediate-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) gain mass at a constant rate during the early stages of their evolution appears to be challenged by observations of YSOs suffering sudden increases of the rate at which they gain mass from their circumstellar discs. Also, this idea that stars spend most of their lifetime with a low accretion rate and gain most of their final mass during short-lived episodes of high accretion bursts, helps to solve some long-standing problems in stellar evolution. The original classification of eruptive variables divides them in two separate subclasses known as FU Orionis stars (FUors) and EX Lupi stars (EXors). In this classical view FUors are at an early evolutionary stage and are still gaining mass from their parent envelopes, whilst EXors are thought to be older objects only surrounded by an accretion disc. The problem with this classical view is that it excludes younger protostars which have higher accretion rates but are too deeply embedded in circumstellar matter to be observed at optical wavelengths. Optically invisible protostars have been observed to display large variability in the near-infrared. These and some recent discoveries of new eruptive variables, show characteristics that can be attributed to both of the optically-defined subclasses of eruptive variables. The new objects have been proposed to be part of a new class of eruptive variables. However, a more accepted scenario is that in fact the original classes only represent two extremes of the same phenomena. In this sense eruptive variability could be explained as arising from one physical mechanism, i.e. unsteady accretion, where a variation in the parameters of such mechanism can cause the different characteristics observed in the members of this class. With the aim of studying the incidence of episodic accretion among young stellar objects, and to characterize the nature of these eruptive variables we searched for high amplitude variability

  13. Extreme storm activity in North Atlantic and European region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyazilova, N.

    2010-09-01

    The extreme storm activity study over North Atlantic and Europe includes the analyses of extreme cyclone (track number, integral cyclonic intensity) and extreme storm (track number) during winter and summer seasons in the regions: 1) 55°N-80N, 50°W-70°E; 2) 30°N-55°N, 50°W-70°E. Extreme cyclones were selected based on cyclone centre pressure (P<=970 mbar). Extreme storms were selected from extreme cyclones based on wind velocity on 925 mbar. The Bofort scala was used for this goal. Integral cyclonic intensity (for region) includes the calculation cyclone centers number and sum of MSLP anomalies in cyclone centers. The analyses based on automated cyclone tracking algorithm, 6-hourly MSLP and wind data (u and v on 925 gPa) from the NCEP/NCAR reanalyses from January 1948 to March 2010. The comparision of mean, calculated for every ten years, had shown, that in polar region extreme cyclone and storm track number, and integral cyclonic intensity gradually increases and have maximum during last years (as for summer, as for winter season). Every ten years means for summer season are more then for winter season, as for polar, as for tropical region. Means (ten years) for tropical region are significance less then for polar region.

  14. Relativistic Electron-Electron Bremsstrahlung in Fusion Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Jia; Kawai, Norio; Kawamura, Takaichi; Maegauchi, Tetsuo; Narumi, Hajime

    1982-05-01

    Transition matrices and differential cross sections for electron-electron bremsstrahlung in relativistic energy region are calculated by the lowest-order perturbation theory of quantum electrodynamics. The bremsstrahlung spectra and emission rates are evaluated for relativistic Maxwellian plasma. The results are discussed in comparison with those obtained by non-relativistic and extreme-relativistic approximations and it is noted that the relativistic effect becomes appreciable above the order of 10 keV for the electron temperature.

  15. Near future changes of extremes and compound extremes on the regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlmeier, Katrin; Feldmann, Hendrik; Schädler, Gerd

    2013-04-01

    Reliable knowledge of near future changes of extreme and compound extreme events on the regional scale is of great importance for impact studies and planning of adaptation/mitigation strategies. Different types of extremes might intensify each other, e.g. heat waves and droughts via evapotranspiration and heat flux. Compared to projections for the end of the century, the climate change and variation signals for the near future are weaker and more contaminated by to natural variations. On the other hand several studies (e.g. Feldmann et al. [1]) have shown that extremes are likely to undergo more pronounced changes than mean values. To derive reliable estimates of these changes, ensembles of simulations are a useful method since the larger number of data allows for a better estimate of probability density function parameters and higher signal-to-noise ratios which are especially needed for the analysis of extreme events and compound extremes. Furthermore, using ensembles enables an assessment of the uncertainty of the deduced changes. Our work is based on an ensemble of high resolution regional climate simulations with a resolution of 7 km with the COSMO-CLM regional climate model using different global driving data. Our ensemble is enlarged by results from the ENSEMBLES project, thus also including different regional and global driving models. Changes between a control period (1971-200) and the near future (2011-2040) are assessed with a special focus on central Europe. The analysis focuses on extreme events related to temperature and precipitation such as heat and cold waves or dry spells with a subsequent examination of compound extreme events. Compound extreme events are defined as the simultaneous or successive occurrence of two or more extreme events (IPCC Special Report on extreme events, 2012), e.g. the simultaneous occurrence of dry periods and heat waves or cold spells and extreme precipitation. Extremes are expressed in terms of return values and

  16. Regional Scale Analysis of Extremes in an SRM Geoengineering Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthyala, R.; Bala, G.

    2014-12-01

    Only a few studies in the past have investigated the statistics of extreme events under geoengineering. In this study, a global climate model is used to investigate the impact of solar radiation management on extreme precipitation events on regional scale. Solar constant was reduced by 2.25% to counteract the global mean surface temperature change caused by a doubling of CO2 (2XCO2) from its preindustrial control value. Using daily precipitation rates, extreme events are defined as those which exceed 99.9th percentile precipitation threshold. Extremes are substantially reduced in geoengineering simulation: the magnitude of change is much smaller than those that occur in a simulation with doubled CO2. Regional analysis over 22 Giorgi land regions is also performed. Doubling of CO2 leads to an increase in intensity of extreme (99.9th percentile) precipitation by 17.7% on global-mean basis with maximum increase in intensity over South Asian region by 37%. In the geoengineering simulation, there is a global-mean reduction in intensity of 3.8%, with a maximum reduction over Tropical Ocean by 8.9%. Further, we find that the doubled CO2 simulation shows an increase in the frequency of extremes (>50 mm/day) by 50-200% with a global mean increase of 80%. In contrast, in geo-engineering climate there is a decrease in frequency of extreme events by 20% globally with a larger decrease over Tropical Ocean by 30%. In both the climate states (2XCO2 and geo-engineering) change in "extremes" is always greater than change in "means" over large domains. We conclude that changes in precipitation extremes are larger in 2XCO2 scenario compared to preindustrial climate while extremes decline slightly in the geoengineered climate. We are also investigating the changes in extreme statistics for daily maximum and minimum temperature, evapotranspiration and vegetation productivity. Results will be presented at the meeting.

  17. Multi - Region Analysis of a New Climate Extremes Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittus, A. J.; Karoly, D. J.; Lewis, S. C.; Alexander, L. V.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a new Climate Extremes Index (CEI) is introduced, extending the earlier combined CEI proposed by Karl et al. (1996). It is based on the use of standard extreme indices derived from daily meteorological station data, facilitating the computation of this index and making use of two global gridded extreme indices datasets. The index combines the fraction of area experiencing extreme conditions in daily temperature and daily and annual precipitation, therefore representing a combined measure of extremes. The analysis of this index at the global scale is limited by data availability. In this study, the four continental-scale regions analysed are Europe, North America, Asia and Australia over the period from 1951 to 2010. Additionally, the index is also computed for the entire Northern Hemisphere, corresponding to the first CEI results at the hemispheric scale. Results show statistically significant increases in the percentage area experiencing much above average warm days and nights and much below average cool days and nights for all regions, with the exception of North America for maximum temperature extremes. Increases in the area affected by precipitation extremes are also found for the Northern Hemisphere regions, particularly Europe. This study shows the potential of this new index for climate monitoring and other applications by documenting large-scale changes in the areas experiencing climate extremes. Preliminary detection and attribution results will also be presented using extreme indices computed for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 climate model simulations (Sillmann et al., 2013). Karl, T. R., R. W. Knight, D. R. Easterling, and R. G. Quayle, 1996: Indices of climate change for the United States. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 77, 279-292. Sillmann, J., V. V. Kharin, X. Zhang, F. W. Zwiers, and D. Bronaugh (2013), Climate extremes indices in the CMIP5 multimodel ensemble: Part 1. Model evaluation in the present climate, J. Geophys

  18. The Innermost Regions of Relativistic Jets: Wrapping Up the Enigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marscher, Alan P.

    2013-12-01

    What are relativistic jets like within a million Schwarzschild radii of the accreting black hole that powers them? A meeting in Granada, Spain in June 2013, organized by José L. Gómez and his conspirators brought together observers and theorists to survey the current state of observational data and efforts to interpret them. This conference summary reviews the results, insights, arguments, conflicts, and agreements that occurred during five sunny days spent in a windowless room in a hotel at the bottom of the hill that holds the heart of the beautiful city.

  19. Can quantile mapping improve precipitation extremes from regional climate models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Satyanarayana; Gobiet, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The ability of quantile mapping to accurately bias correct regard to precipitation extremes is investigated in this study. We developed new methods by extending standard quantile mapping (QMα) to improve the quality of bias corrected extreme precipitation events as simulated by regional climate model (RCM) output. The new QM version (QMβ) was developed by combining parametric and nonparametric bias correction methods. The new nonparametric method is tested with and without a controlling shape parameter (Qmβ1 and Qmβ0, respectively). Bias corrections are applied on hindcast simulations for a small ensemble of RCMs at six different locations over Europe. We examined the quality of the extremes through split sample and cross validation approaches of these three bias correction methods. This split-sample approach mimics the application to future climate scenarios. A cross validation framework with particular focus on new extremes was developed. Error characteristics, q-q plots and Mean Absolute Error (MAEx) skill scores are used for evaluation. We demonstrate the unstable behaviour of correction function at higher quantiles with QMα, whereas the correction functions with for QMβ0 and QMβ1 are smoother, with QMβ1 providing the most reasonable correction values. The result from q-q plots demonstrates that, all bias correction methods are capable of producing new extremes but QMβ1 reproduces new extremes with low biases in all seasons compared to QMα, QMβ0. Our results clearly demonstrate the inherent limitations of empirical bias correction methods employed for extremes, particularly new extremes, and our findings reveals that the new bias correction method (Qmß1) produces more reliable climate scenarios for new extremes. These findings present a methodology that can better capture future extreme precipitation events, which is necessary to improve regional climate change impact studies.

  20. Effect of Relativistic Plasma on Extreme-Ultraviolet Harmonic Emission from Intense Laser-Matter Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Krushelnick, K.; Dangor, A. E.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Rozmus, W.; Wagner, U.; Habara, H.; Norreys, P. A.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Bochkarev, S. G.; Clark, E. L.; Gopal, A.; Evans, R. G.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Tatarakis, M.; Zepf, M.

    2008-03-28

    Experiments were performed in which intense laser pulses (up to 9x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) were used to irradiate very thin (submicron) mass-limited aluminum foil targets. Such interactions generated high-order harmonic radiation (greater than the 25th order) which was detected at the rear of the target and which was significantly broadened, modulated, and depolarized because of passage through the dense relativistic plasma. The spectral modifications are shown to be due to the laser absorption into hot electrons and the subsequent sharply increasing relativistic electron component within the dense plasma.

  1. Regional frequency analysis of extreme precipitation for Sicily (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestieri, Angelo; Blenkinsop, Stephen; Fowler, Hayley; Lo Conti, Francesco; Noto, Leonardo

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of extreme precipitation has always been included among most relevant hydrological applications because of the several important activities linked to the availability of tools for the estimation of extreme rainfall quantiles. These activities include the design of hydraulic civil structures and the evaluation and management of hydraulic and hydrological risk. In this study a frequency analysis of annual maxima precipitation measurements has been carried out for the area of Sicily (Italy). A typical hierarchical regional approach has been adopted for the parameter estimation procedure based on the L-moments method. The identification of homogeneous regions within the procedure has been pursued with a data driven procedure constituted by a principal component analysis of an ensemble of selected auxiliary variables, and a K-means cluster analysis algorithm. Auxiliary variables comprise meteo-climatic information and a representation of the average seasonal distribution of intense events. Results have been evaluated by means of a Monte Carlo experiment based on the comparison between at-site and regional fitted frequency distributions. Moreover, results have been compared with previous analyses performed for the same area. The study provides an updated tool for the modelling of extreme precipitation for the area of Sicily (Italy), with different features respect to previous tools both in terms of definition of homogeneous zones and in terms of parameters of the frequency distribution. Meteo-climatic information and the seasonality of extreme events retrieved from the dataset has been proficuously exploited in the analysis.

  2. Estimating temporal changes in extreme rainfall in Sicily Region (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorso, Brunella; Aronica, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    An intensification of extreme rainfall events have characterized several areas of peninsular and insular Italy since the early 2000s, suggesting an upward ongoing trend likely driven by climate change. In the present study temporal changes in 1-, 3-, 6-, 12- and 24-hour annual maxima rainfall series from more than 200 sites in Sicily region (Italy) are examined. A regional study is performed in order to reduce the uncertainty in change detection related to the limited length of the available records of extreme rainfall series. More specifically, annual maxima series are treated according to a regional flood index - type approach to frequency analysis, by assuming stationarity on a decadal time scale. First a cluster analysis using at-site characteristics is used to determine homogeneous rainfall regions. Then, potential changes in regional L-moment ratios are analyzed using a 10-year moving window. Furthermore, the shapes of regional growth curves, derived by splitting the records into separate decades, are compared. In addition, a jackknife procedure is used to assess uncertainty in the fitted growth curves and to identify significant trends in quantile estimates. Results reveal that, despite L-moment ratios show a general decreasing trend and that growth curves corresponding to the last decade (2000-2009) are usually less steep than the ones of the previous periods, rainfall quantile estimates have increased during the 2000s due to a large increase in regional average median, mainly in Western Sicily.

  3. Regional variability of extreme rainfall events in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breza, Traian; Cheval, Sorin; Baciu, Madalina; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Antonescu, Bogdan; Burcea, Sorin

    2010-05-01

    Extreme rainfall events triggering flash floods occur quite often over the territory of Romania, leaving behind significant damages and casualties. This research is a contribution to the FP6 Project HYDRATE (Hydrometeorological data resources and technologies for effective flash flood forecasting). It aims at investigating the spatial patterns of the extreme rainfall events in Romania, based on the characteristics of their intensity-duration-frequency (IDF). The study uses the peak-over-threshold concept, which basically consists of analyzing all precipitation amounts above certain thresholds selected for different durations. The data come from 60 weather stations. They cover the warm interval (generally, April-October, but less extended for mountain stations), and at least 30 years-datasets have been used. The regional differences were retrieved from the IDF curves and they were also approached by GIS-based mapping the intensities corresponding to sub-daily durations (5 - 180 min.) and to different return periods (10,50, 100 years). The results highlight significant regional variations, that improve the understanding of the impact of the extreme rainfall events and the consequent flash floods on the natural and social environment. At the same time, overlapping the extreme rainfall data and land cover information, we have empahsized the hazard potential of the precipitation events.

  4. Peculiar pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons in the inner radiation belt and slot region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Malaspina, D. M.; Kanekal, S. G.

    2014-04-01

    The relativistic electrons in the inner radiation belt have received little attention in the past due to sparse measurements and unforgiving contamination from the inner belt protons. The high-quality measurements of the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer instrument onboard Van Allen Probes provide a great opportunity to investigate the dynamics of relativistic electrons in the low L region. In this letter, we report the newly unveiled pitch angle distribution (PAD) of the energetic electrons with minima at 90° near the magnetic equator in the inner belt and slot region. Such a PAD is persistently present throughout the inner belt and appears in the slot region during storms. One hypothesis for 90° minimum PADs is that off 90° electrons are preferentially heated by chorus waves just outside the plasmapause (which can be at very low L during storms) and/or fast magnetosonic waves which exist both inside and outside the plasmasphere.

  5. Regional Frequency and Uncertainty Analysis of Extreme Precipitation in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortuza, M. R.; Demissie, Y.; Li, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Increased frequency of extreme precipitations, especially those with multiday durations, are responsible for recent urban floods and associated significant losses of lives and infrastructures in Bangladesh. Reliable and routinely updated estimation of the frequency of occurrence of such extreme precipitation events are thus important for developing up-to-date hydraulic structures and stormwater drainage system that can effectively minimize future risk from similar events. In this study, we have updated the intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves for Bangladesh using daily precipitation data from 1961 to 2010 and quantified associated uncertainties. Regional frequency analysis based on L-moments is applied on 1-day, 2-day and 5-day annual maximum precipitation series due to its advantages over at-site estimation. The regional frequency approach pools the information from climatologically similar sites to make reliable estimates of quantiles given that the pooling group is homogeneous and of reasonable size. We have used Region of influence (ROI) approach along with homogeneity measure based on L-moments to identify the homogenous pooling groups for each site. Five 3-parameter distributions (i.e., Generalized Logistic, Generalized Extreme value, Generalized Normal, Pearson Type Three, and Generalized Pareto) are used for a thorough selection of appropriate models that fit the sample data. Uncertainties related to the selection of the distributions and historical data are quantified using the Bayesian Model Averaging and Balanced Bootstrap approaches respectively. The results from this study can be used to update the current design and management of hydraulic structures as well as in exploring spatio-temporal variations of extreme precipitation and associated risk.

  6. Regional Frequency Analysis of extreme rainfall events, Tuscany (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporali, E.; Chiarello, V.; Rossi, G.

    2014-12-01

    The assessment of extreme hydrological events at sites characterized by short time series or where no data record exists has been mainly obtained by regional models. Regional frequency analysis based on the index variable procedure is implemented here to describe the annual maximum of rainfall depth of short durations in Tuscany region. The probability distribution TCEV - Two Component Extreme Value is used in the frame of the procedure for the parameters estimation based on a three levels hierarchical approach. The methodology deal with the delineation of homogeneous regions, the identification of a robust regional frequency distribution and the assessment of the scale factor, i.e. the index rainfall. The data set includes the annual maximum of daily rainfall of 351 gauge stations with at least 30 years of records, in the period 1916 - 2012, and the extreme rainfalls of short duration, 1 hour and 3, 6, 12, 24 hours. Different subdivisions hypotheses have been verified. A four regions subdivision, coincident with four subregions, which takes into account the orography, the geomorphological and climatic peculiarities of the Tuscany region, has been adopted. Particularly, for testing the regional homogeneity, the cumulate frequency distributions of the observed skewness and variation coefficients of the recorded times series, are compared with the theoretical frequency distribution obtained through a Monte Carlo technique. The related L-skewness and L-variation coefficients are also examined. The application of the Student t -test and the Wilcoxon test for the mean, as well as the χ2 was also performed. Further tests of subdivision hypotheses have been made through the application of discordancy D and heterogeneity H tests and the analysis of the observed and the theoretical TCEV model growth curves. For each region the daily rainfall growth curve has been estimated. The growth curves for the hourly duration have been estimated when the daily rainfall growth curve

  7. Detecting overlapping instances in microscopy images using extremal region trees.

    PubMed

    Arteta, Carlos; Lempitsky, Victor; Noble, J Alison; Zisserman, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In many microscopy applications the images may contain both regions of low and high cell densities corresponding to different tissues or colonies at different stages of growth. This poses a challenge to most previously developed automated cell detection and counting methods, which are designed to handle either the low-density scenario (through cell detection) or the high-density scenario (through density estimation or texture analysis). The objective of this work is to detect all the instances of an object of interest in microscopy images. The instances may be partially overlapping and clustered. To this end we introduce a tree-structured discrete graphical model that is used to select and label a set of non-overlapping regions in the image by a global optimization of a classification score. Each region is labeled with the number of instances it contains - for example regions can be selected that contain two or three object instances, by defining separate classes for tuples of objects in the detection process. We show that this formulation can be learned within the structured output SVM framework and that the inference in such a model can be accomplished using dynamic programming on a tree structured region graph. Furthermore, the learning only requires weak annotations - a dot on each instance. The candidate regions for the selection are obtained as extremal region of a surface computed from the microscopy image, and we show that the performance of the model can be improved by considering a proxy problem for learning the surface that allows better selection of the extremal regions. Furthermore, we consider a number of variations for the loss function used in the structured output learning. The model is applied and evaluated over six quite disparate data sets of images covering: fluorescence microscopy, weak-fluorescence molecular images, phase contrast microscopy and histopathology images, and is shown to exceed the state of the art in performance. PMID:25980675

  8. Relating Regional Arctic Sea Ice and climate extremes over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita-Scholz, Monica; Grosfeld, Klaus; Lohmann, Gerrit; Scholz, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The potential increase of temperature extremes under climate change is a major threat to society, as temperature extremes have a deep impact on environment, hydrology, agriculture, society and economy. Hence, the analysis of the mechanisms underlying their occurrence, including their relationships with the large-scale atmospheric circulation and sea ice concentration, is of major importance. At the same time, the decline in Arctic sea ice cover during the last 30 years has been widely documented and it is clear that this change is having profound impacts at regional as well as planetary scale. As such, this study aims to investigate the relation between the autumn regional sea ice concentration variability and cold winters in Europe, as identified by the numbers of cold nights (TN10p), cold days (TX10p), ice days (ID) and consecutive frost days (CFD). We analyze the relationship between Arctic sea ice variation in autumn (September-October-November) averaged over eight different Arctic regions (Barents/Kara Seas, Beaufort Sea, Chukchi/Bering Seas, Central Arctic, Greenland Sea, Labrador Sea/Baffin Bay, Laptev/East Siberian Seas and Northern Hemisphere) and variations in atmospheric circulation and climate extreme indices in the following winter season over Europe using composite map analysis. Based on the composite map analysis it is shown that the response of the winter extreme temperatures over Europe is highly correlated/connected to changes in Arctic sea ice variability. However, this signal is not symmetrical for the case of high and low sea ice years. Moreover, the response of temperatures extreme over Europe to sea ice variability over the different Arctic regions differs substantially. The regions which have the strongest impact on the extreme winter temperature over Europe are: Barents/Kara Seas, Beaufort Sea, Central Arctic and the Northern Hemisphere. For the years of high sea ice concentration in the Barents/Kara Seas there is a reduction in the number

  9. Relativistic frequency upshift to the extreme ultraviolet regime using self-induced oscillatory flying mirrors.

    PubMed

    Kim, I Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Kim, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Taek; Yun, Hyeok; Yun, Sang Jae; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Yoon, Jin Woo; Yu, Tae Jun; Jeong, Tae Moon; Nam, Chang Hee; Lee, Jongmin

    2012-01-01

    Coherent short-wavelength radiation from laser-plasma interactions is of increasing interest in disciplines including ultrafast biomolecular imaging and attosecond physics. Using solid targets instead of atomic gases could enable the generation of coherent extreme ultraviolet radiation with higher energy and more energetic photons. Here we present the generation of extreme ultraviolet radiation through coherent high-harmonic generation from self-induced oscillatory flying mirrors--a new-generation mechanism established in a long underdense plasma on a solid target. Using a 30-fs, 100-TW Ti:sapphire laser, we obtain wavelengths as short as 4.9 nm for an optimized level of amplified spontaneous emission. Particle-in-cell simulations show that oscillatory flying electron nanosheets form in a long underdense plasma, and suggest that the high-harmonic generation is caused by reflection of the laser pulse from electron nanosheets. We expect this extreme ultraviolet radiation to be valuable in realizing a compact X-ray instrument for research in biomolecular imaging and attosecond physics. PMID:23187631

  10. Relativistic frequency upshift to the extreme ultraviolet regime using self-induced oscillatory flying mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, I Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Kim, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Taek; Yun, Hyeok; Yun, Sang Jae; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Yoon, Jin Woo; Yu, Tae Jun; Jeong, Tae Moon; Nam, Chang Hee; Lee, Jongmin

    2012-01-01

    Coherent short-wavelength radiation from laser–plasma interactions is of increasing interest in disciplines including ultrafast biomolecular imaging and attosecond physics. Using solid targets instead of atomic gases could enable the generation of coherent extreme ultraviolet radiation with higher energy and more energetic photons. Here we present the generation of extreme ultraviolet radiation through coherent high-harmonic generation from self-induced oscillatory flying mirrors—a new-generation mechanism established in a long underdense plasma on a solid target. Using a 30-fs, 100-TW Ti:sapphire laser, we obtain wavelengths as short as 4.9 nm for an optimized level of amplified spontaneous emission. Particle-in-cell simulations show that oscillatory flying electron nanosheets form in a long underdense plasma, and suggest that the high-harmonic generation is caused by reflection of the laser pulse from electron nanosheets. We expect this extreme ultraviolet radiation to be valuable in realizing a compact X-ray instrument for research in biomolecular imaging and attosecond physics. PMID:23187631

  11. Early Benefits of Mitigation in Risk of Regional Climate Extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavarella, Andrew; Stott, Peter; Lowe, Jason

    2015-04-01

    Large differences in climate outcomes are projected over the coming century depending on whether greenhouse gas emissions continue on a business as usual path or are substantially reduced following an aggressive mitigation strategy. However, it has previously been claimed that it will take many decades for there to be any significant difference between paths of aggressive mitigation and business as usual with the emergence of differences only seen towards the middle of the century. Here we show that important differences in our exposure to risk of climate extremes in many land regions emerges much more quickly. Without substantial mitigation, in many regions of the world, extreme (one in 20-year) seasonal, regional near surface air temperatures are found to have become more than twice as likely within only 15 years (i.e. by 2030). Therefore our exposure to climate risk is reduced substantially and rapidly with aggressive mitigation. This demonstrates that the benefits of mitigation are realised rapidly and it is not necessary to wait until the middle of the century as has previously been claimed.

  12. Projections of African drought extremes in CORDEX regional climate simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbobaniyi, Emiola; Nikulin, Grigory; Jones, Colin; Kjellström, Erik

    2013-04-01

    We investigate trends in drought extremes for different climate regions of the African continent over a combined historical and future period 1951-2100. Eight CMIP5 coupled atmospheric global climate models (CanESM2, CNRM-CM5, HadGEM2-ES, NorESM1-M, EC-EARTH, MIROC5, GFDL-ESM2M and MPI-ESM-LR) under two forcing scenarios, the relative concentration pathways (RCP) 4.5 and 8.5, with spatial resolution varying from about 1° to 3° are downscaled to 0.44° resolution by the Rossby Centre (SMHI) regional climate model RCA4. We use data from the ensuing ensembles of CORDEX-Africa regional climate simulations to explore three drought indices namely: standardized precipitation index (SPI), moisture index (MI) and difference in precipitation and evaporation (P-E). Meteorological and agricultural drought conditions are assessed in our analyses and a climate change signal is obtained for the SPI by calculating gamma functions for future SPI with respect to a baseline present climate. Results for the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios are inter-compared to assess uncertainties in the future projections. We show that there is a pronounced sensitivity to the choice of forcing GCM which indicates that assessments of future drought conditions in Africa would benefit from large model ensembles. We also note that the results are sensitive to the choice of drought index. We discuss both spatial and temporal variability of drought extremes for different climate zones of Africa and the importance of the ensemble mean. Our study highlights the usefulness of CORDEX simulations in identifying possible future impacts of climate at local and regional scales.

  13. Regional interdisciplinary paleoflood approach to assess extreme flood potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarrett, R.D.; Tomlinson, E.M.

    2000-01-01

    In the past decade, there has been a growing interest of dam safety officials to incorporate a risk-based analysis for design-flood hydrology. Extreme or rare floods, with probabilities in the range of about 10-3 to 10-7 chance of occurrence per year, are of continuing interest to the hydrologic and engineering communities for purposes of planning and design of structures such as dams [National Research Council, 1988]. The National Research Council stresses that as much information as possible about floods needs to be used for evaluation of the risk and consequences of any decision. A regional interdisciplinary paleoflood approach was developed to assist dam safety officials and floodplain managers in their assessments of the risk of large floods. The interdisciplinary components included documenting maximum paleofloods and a regional analyses of contemporary extreme rainfall and flood data to complement a site-specific probable maximum precipitation study [Tomlinson and Solak, 1997]. The cost-effective approach, which can be used in many other hydrometeorologic settings, was applied to Elkhead Reservoir in Elkhead Creek (531 km2) in northwestern Colorado; the regional study area was 10,900 km2. Paleoflood data using bouldery flood deposits and noninundation surfaces for 88 streams were used to document maximum flood discharges that have occurred during the Holocene. Several relative dating methods were used to determine the age of paleoflood deposits and noninundation surfaces. No evidence of substantial flooding was found in the study area. The maximum paleoflood of 135 m3 s-1 for Elkhead Creek is about 13% of the site-specific probable maximum flood of 1020 m3 s-1. Flood-frequency relations using the expected moments algorithm, which better incorporates paleoflood data, were developed to assess the risk of extreme floods. Envelope curves encompassing maximum rainfall (181 sites) and floods (218 sites) were developed for northwestern Colorado to help define

  14. Transitions between refrigeration regions in extremely short quantum cycles.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Tova; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2016-05-01

    The relation between the geometry of refrigeration cycles and their performance is explored. The model studied is based on a coupled spin system. Small cycle times, termed sudden refrigerators, develop coherence and inner friction. We explore the interplay between coherence and energy of the working medium employing a family of sudden cycles with decreasing cycle times. At the point of maximum coherence the cycle changes geometry. This region of cycle times is characterized by a dissipative resonance where heat is dissipated both to the hot and cold baths. We rationalize the change of geometry of the cycle as a result of a half-integer quantization which maximizes coherence. From this point on, increasing or decreasing the cycle time, eventually leads to refrigeration cycles. The transition point between refrigerators and short circuit cycles is characterized by a transition from finite to singular dynamical temperature. Extremely short cycle times reach a universal limit where all cycles types are equivalent. PMID:27300872

  15. Transitions between refrigeration regions in extremely short quantum cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Tova; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2016-05-01

    The relation between the geometry of refrigeration cycles and their performance is explored. The model studied is based on a coupled spin system. Small cycle times, termed sudden refrigerators, develop coherence and inner friction. We explore the interplay between coherence and energy of the working medium employing a family of sudden cycles with decreasing cycle times. At the point of maximum coherence the cycle changes geometry. This region of cycle times is characterized by a dissipative resonance where heat is dissipated both to the hot and cold baths. We rationalize the change of geometry of the cycle as a result of a half-integer quantization which maximizes coherence. From this point on, increasing or decreasing the cycle time, eventually leads to refrigeration cycles. The transition point between refrigerators and short circuit cycles is characterized by a transition from finite to singular dynamical temperature. Extremely short cycle times reach a universal limit where all cycles types are equivalent.

  16. Ne-like ion lasers in the extreme ultraviolet region

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Pretzler, G.; Fill, E.E.

    1995-11-01

    We report strong {ital J}=0--1, 3{ital p}-3{ital s} lasing in Ne-like scandium, calcium, potassium, and chlorine at wavelengths ranging from 35.3 nm in scandium to 52.9 nm in chlorine. The experiments were carried out with the ASTERIX IV iodine laser using a 15% prepulse 5.2 ns before the main pulse. These results extend the range of laser plasma x-ray lasers into the extreme ultraviolet region. Gain lengths between 7 and 11 were measured for the different lines. The 38.3-nm laser in calcium lased at an intensity as low as 5{times}10{sup 12} W/cm{sup {minus}2}.

  17. Extreme events evaluation over African cities with regional climate simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucchignani, Edoardo; Mercogliano, Paola; Simonis, Ingo; Engelbrecht, Francois

    2013-04-01

    The warming of the climate system in recent decades is evident from observations and is mainly related to the increase of anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations (IPCC, 2012). Given the expected climate change conditions on the African continent, as underlined in different publications, and their associated socio-economic impacts, an evaluation of the specific effects on some strategic African cities on the medium and long-term is of crucial importance with regard to the development of adaptation strategies. Assessments usually focus on averages climate properties rather than on variability or extremes, but often these last ones have more impacts on the society than averages values. Global Coupled Models (GCM) are generally used to simulate future climate scenarios as they guarantee physical consistency between variables; however, due to the coarse spatial resolution, their output cannot be used for impact studies on local scales, which makes necessary the generation of higher resolution climate change data. Regional Climate Models (RCM) describe better the phenomena forced by orography or by coastal lines, or that are related to convection. Therefore they can provide more detailed information on climate extremes that are hard to study and even harder to predict because they are, by definition, rare and obey different statistical laws. The normal bias of the RCM to represent the local climatology is reduced using adequate statistical techniques based on the comparison of the simulated results with long observational time series. In the framework of the EU-FP7 CLUVA (Climate Change and Urban Vulnerability in Africa) project, regional projections of climate change at high resolution (about 8 km), have been performed for selected areas surrounding five African cities. At CMCC, the regional climate model COSMO-CLM has been employed: it is a non-hydrostatic model. For each domain, two simulations have been performed, considering the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 emission

  18. Simulating an Extreme Wind Event in a Topographically Complex Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennard, Christopher

    2014-07-01

    Complex topography modifies local weather characteristics such as air temperature, rainfall and airflow within a larger regional extent. The Cape Peninsula around Cape Town, South Africa, is a complex topographical feature responsible for the modification of rainfall and wind fields largely downstream of the Peninsula. During the passage of a cold front on 2 October 2002, an extreme wind event associated with tornado-like damage occurred in the suburb of Manenberg, however synoptic conditions did not indicate convective activity typically associated with a tornado. A numerical regional climate model was operated at very high horizontal resolution (500 m) to investigate the dynamics of the event. The model simulated an interaction between the topography of the peninsula and an airflow direction change associated with the passage of the cold front. A small region of cyclonic circulation was simulated over Manenberg that was embedded in an area of negative vorticity and a leeward gravity wave. The feature lasted 14 min and moved in a north to south direction. Vertically, it was not evident above 220 m. The model assessment describes this event as a shallow but intense cyclonic vortex generated in the lee of the peninsula through an interaction between the peninsula and a change in wind direction as the cold front made landfall. The model did not simulate wind speeds associated with the observed damage suggesting that the horizontal grid resolution ought to be at the scale of the event to more completely understand such microscale airflow phenomena.

  19. Regional Annual Extreme Precipitation Modeling: Choose Your Parents Wisely.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennessey, N. M.

    2001-05-01

    A great deal of research has been invested in developing a better understanding of the characteristics of and descriptive models of annual extreme precipitation. Some advocate the analysis of the annual maximum series (AMS) others advocate the analysis of partial duration series (PDS). The former is easy to generate, the latter provides more information, which is advantageous for better estimation. Both schools of thought seem to agree that the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution is a good choice for the annual extreme precipitation event. Recently published work suggests that the generalized Pareto distribution (GPA) is a good choice for generating a PDS because of its analytical link with the GEV. There are, however, two well-recognized disadvantages to using the GPA for this purpose. The analyst must specify both a sampling threshold/lower-bound and a minimum time between peaks to create an acceptable PDS. Using L-moment diagrams and regional frequency analysis, a paper presented at the 1998 Spring AGU meeting suggests that daily precipitation observed in the northeast U.S. is much better described by a two parameter gamma distribution than the three parameter GPA. The 116 NOAA observatories used have periods-of-record which range from 15 to 60 complete years of no missing daily data. The observed AMS in this region is well described by a GEV. In the present work, using the L-moment estimators developed from these daily observations, serially independent gamma distributed, three parameter Pearson Type III (PE3) distributed and three parameter GPA distributed quantiles are generated for a daily period-of-record equal to that of each parent NOAA observatory. No efforts are made to specify a GPA lower bound, but many synthetic days of rainfall have negative values. The maximum value within each 365-day simulation year is retained to create three synthetic AMS, each with a different parent. L-moment diagrams of the observed, gamma day, PE3 day and GPA day

  20. Atmospheric Extreme Events in the North Atlantic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzke, C.

    2012-04-01

    An important part of European weather and climate are storms. European winter storms cause economic damage and insurance losses on the order of billions of Euro per year. European winter storms rank as the second highest cause of global natural catastrophe insurance loss. Many of these hazard events are not independent; for instance, severe storms can occur in trains of storms. Recent examples of such subsequently occurring storms include January 2008 (Paula and Resi) and March 2008 (Emma, Johanna and Kirsten). Each of these trains of storms caused damages on the order of ~€1bn. Extreme value statistics are based on the premise that extreme events are iid but this is rarely the case in natural systems where extreme events tend to cluster. Thus, no account is taken of memory and correlation that characterise many natural time series; this fundamentally limits our ability to forecast and to estimate return periods of extreme events. In my presentation I will discuss two possible causes of this clustering: (i) The propensity of extreme events to depend on large-scale circulation regimes and (ii) the long-range correlation properties of surface windspeeds enhances the likelihood of extreme events to cluster. These two characteristics affect the return periods of atmospheric extreme events and thus insurance pricing.

  1. Interference in multilayer relativistic mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzanejhad, Saeed; Sohbatzadeh, Farshad; Babaei, Javad; Taghipour, Meisam; Mohammadzadeh, Zahra

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, reflection coefficient of a relativistic ultra-thin electron multilayer is calculated using electromagnetic interference procedures. The relativistic electron layers are assumed to be formed by nonlinear plasma wake waves that constitute the electron density cusps. It is shown that the interference between successive relativistic mirrors is restricted by the condition, τ p ≫ ( 2 γ 0 ) 5 / 2 / ω p 0 , where τp is the laser pulse duration. The results showed that tailoring the pulse amplitude, incident wave frequency value, incidence angle, and plasma density leads to increasing reflection coefficient a few orders of magnitudes. This constructive interference condition can be used for increasing conversion efficiency in the reflected energy from relativistic mirrors for the purpose of generating ultra-short coherence pulses in the extreme ultraviolet and x-ray regions. We also performed reflection from relativistic thin electron layers using relativistic 1D3V electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. It was found that the results of PIC simulation are in agreement with analytical considerations.

  2. A Bayesian Hierarchical Approach to Regional Frequency Analysis of Extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, B.

    2010-12-01

    Rainfall and runoff frequency analysis is a major issue for the hydrological community. The distribution of hydrological extremes varies in space and possibly in time. Describing and understanding this spatiotemporal variability are primary challenges to improve hazard quantification and risk assessment. This presentation proposes a general approach based on a Bayesian hierarchical model, following previous work by Cooley et al. [2007], Micevski [2007], Aryal et al. [2009] or Lima and Lall [2009; 2010]. Such a hierarchical model is made up of two levels: (1) a data level modeling the distribution of observations, and (2) a process level describing the fluctuation of the distribution parameters in space and possibly in time. At the first level of the model, at-site data (e.g., annual maxima series) are modeled with a chosen distribution (e.g., a GEV distribution). Since data from several sites are considered, the joint distribution of a vector of (spatial) observations needs to be derived. This is challenging because data are in general not spatially independent, especially for nearby sites. An elliptical copula is therefore used to formally account for spatial dependence between at-site data. This choice might be questionable in the context of extreme value distributions. However, it is motivated by its applicability in spatial highly dimensional problems, where the joint pdf of a vector of n observations is required to derive the likelihood function (with n possibly amounting to hundreds of sites). At the second level of the model, parameters of the chosen at-site distribution are then modeled by a Gaussian spatial process, whose mean may depend on covariates (e.g. elevation, distance to sea, weather pattern, time). In particular, this spatial process allows estimating parameters at ungauged sites, and deriving the predictive distribution of rainfall/runoff at every pixel/catchment of the studied domain. An application to extreme rainfall series from the French

  3. Does Nudging Squelch the Extremes in Regional Climate Modeling?

    EPA Science Inventory

    An important question in regional climate downscaling is whether to constrain (nudge) the interior of the limited-area domain toward the larger-scale driving fields. Prior research has demonstrated that interior nudging can increase the skill of regional climate predictions origin...

  4. Relativistic electron flux dropouts in the outer radiation belt associated with corotating interaction regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, C.-J.; Zong, Q.-G.; Wan, W.-X.; Zhang, H.; Du, A.-M.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding how the relativistic electron fluxes drop out in the outer radiation belt under different conditions is of great importance. To investigate which mechanisms may affect the dropouts under different solar wind conditions, 1.5-6.0 MeV electron flux dropout events associated with 223 corotating interaction regions (CIRs) from 1994 to 2003 are studied using the observations of Solar, Anomalous, Magnetospheric Particle Explorer satellite. According to the superposed epoch analysis, it is found that high solar wind dynamic pressure with the peak median value of about 7 nPa is corresponding to the dropout of the median of the radiation belt content (RBC) index to 20% of the level before stream interface arrival, whereas low dynamic pressure with the peak median value of about 3 nPa is related to the dropout of the median of RBC index to 40% of the level before stream interface arrival. Furthermore, the influences of Russell-McPherron effect with respect to interplanetary magnetic field orientation on dropouts are considered. It is pointed out that under positive Russell-McPherron effect (+RM effect) condition, the median of RBC index can drop to 23% of the level before stream interface arrival, while for negative Russell-McPherron effect (-RM effect) events, the median of RBC index only drops to 37% of the level before stream interface arrival. From the evolution of phase space density profiles, the effect of +RM on dropouts can be through nonadiabatic loss.

  5. On the design of experiments for the study of extreme field limits in the ultra-relativistic interaction of electromagnetic waves with plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, Sergei V.; Esirkepov, Timur Z.; Hayashi, Yukio; Kando, Masaki; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Koga, James K.; Kondo, Kiminori; Kotaki, Hideyuki; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Bulanov, Stepan S.; Zhidkov, Alexei G.; Chen, Pisin; Neely, David; Kato, Yoshiaki; Narozhny, Nikolay B.; Korn, Georg

    2011-06-01

    The critical electric field of quantum electrodynamics, called also the Schwinger field, is so strong that it produces electron-positron pairs from vacuum, converting the energy of light into matter. Since the dawn of quantum electrodynamics, there has been a dream on how to reach it on Earth. With the rise of laser technology this field has become feasible through the construction of extremely high power lasers or/and with the sophisticated use of nonlinear processes in relativistic plasmas. This is one of the most attractive motivations for extremely high power laser development, i.e. producing matter from vacuum by pure light in fundamental process of quantum electrodynamics in the nonperturbative regime. Recently it has been realized that a laser with intensity well below the Schwinger limit can create an avalanche of electron-positron pairs similar to a discharge before attaining the Schwinger field. It has also been realized that the Schwinger limit can be reached using an appropriate configuration of laser beams. In experiments on the collision of laser light and high intensity electromagnetic pulses generated by relativistic flying mirrors, with electron bunches produced by a conventional accelerator and with laser wake field accelerated electrons the studying of extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves is proposed. The regimes of dominant radiation reaction, which completely changes the electromagnetic wave-matter interaction, will be revealed. This will result in a new powerful source of high brightness gamma-rays. A possibility of the demonstration of the electronpositron pair creation in vacuum via multi-photon processes can be realized. This will allow modeling under terrestrial laboratory conditions neutron star magnetospheres, cosmological gamma ray bursts and the Leptonic Era of the Universe.

  6. Seasonal and regional variations in extreme precipitation event frequency using CMIP5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, E.; Sriver, R. L.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Kunkel, K. E.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding how the frequency and intensity of extreme precipitation events are changing is important for regional risk assessments and adaptation planning. Here we use observational data and an ensemble of climate change model experiments (from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5)) to examine past and potential future seasonal changes in extreme precipitation event frequency over the United States. Using the extreme precipitation index as a metric for extreme precipitation change, we find key differences between models and observations. In particular, the CMIP5 models tend to overestimate the number of spring events and underestimate the number of summer events. This seasonal shift in the models is amplified in projections. These results provide a basis for evaluating climate model skill in simulating observed seasonality and changes in regional extreme precipitation. Additionally, we highlight key sources of variability and uncertainty that can potentially inform regional impact analyses and adaptation planning.

  7. The Climatology of Climate Extremes in the World's Major Growing Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troy, T.; Zhu, X.

    2015-12-01

    A stable food supply is increasingly important as global populations grow and climate variability and extremes affect crop yields. It is therefore critical to quantify the occurrence of extremes in major growing regions globally to understand the vulnerability of the global food supply to climate. First, we grid the GHCN historical climate data and evaluate the effect of gridding on estimation of agriculturally relevant climate extremes, such as heat waves, consecutive dry days, and precipitation intensity. We find that the differences between gridded indices and the raw station indices are small, mostly less than 10%. We then evaluate the climatology of climate extremes and the probability of concurrent extremes, both within one growing region and across multiple regions globally. We find that the correlation of two precipitation or temperature related indices are quite strong, such that the probability of another extreme occurring increases given the occurrence of one extreme. These results provide estimations of the global food supply's vulnerability to climate variability and extremes, which is critical for planning in the coming decades with projections of more frequent and more intense climate extremes.

  8. Modeling intersite dependence for regional frequency analysis of extreme marine events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jérôme; Bernardara, Pietro; Benoit, Michel

    2014-07-01

    The duration of observation at a site of interest is generally too low to reliably estimate marine extremes. Regional frequency analysis (RFA), by exploiting the similarity between sites, can help to reduce uncertainties inherent to local analyses. Extreme observations in a homogeneous region are especially assumed to follow a common regional distribution, up to a local index. The regional pooling method, by gathering observations from different sites into a regional sample, can be employed to estimate the regional distribution. However, such a procedure may be highly affected by intersite dependence in the regional sample. This paper derives a theoretical model of intersite dependence, dedicated to the regional pooling method in a "peaks over threshold" framework. This model expresses the tendency of sites to display a similar behavior during a storm generating extreme observations, by describing both the storm propagation in the region and the storm intensity. The proposed model allows the assessment of (i) the regional effective duration of the regional sample and (ii) different regional hazards, e.g., return periods of storms. An application to the estimation of extreme significant wave heights from the numerical sea-state database ANEMOC-2 is provided, where different patterns of regional dependence are highlighted.

  9. Hyperdeformation in the cranked relativistic mean field theory: The Z=40-58 region of the nuclear chart

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasjev, A. V.; Abusara, H.

    2008-07-15

    The systematic investigation of hyperdeformation (HD) at high spin in the Z=40-58 region of the nuclear chart was performed in the framework of the cranked relativistic mean-field theory. The properties of the moments of inertia of the HD bands, the role of the single-particle and necking degrees of freedom at HD, the spins at which the HD bands become yrast, the possibility to observe discrete HD bands, and so on are discussed in detail.

  10. Precipitation extremes in the Yangtze River Basin, China: regional frequency and spatial-temporal patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongqin David; Zhang, Qiang; Xiao, Mingzhong; Singh, Vijay P.; Leung, Yee; Jiang, Luguang

    2014-05-01

    Regional frequency analysis and spatial-temporal patterns of precipitation extremes are investigated based on daily precipitation data covering 1960-2009 using the index-flood L-moments method together with some advanced statistical tests and spatial analysis techniques. The results indicate that: (1) the entire Yangtze River basin can be divided into six homogeneous regions in terms of extreme daily precipitation index. Goodness-of-fit test indicates that Pearson type III (PE3, three parameters), general extreme-value (GEV, three parameters), and general normal (GNO, three parameters) perform well in fitting regional precipitation extremes; (2) the regional growth curves for each homogeneous region with 99 % error bands show that the quantile estimates are reliable enough and can be used when return periods are less than 100 years, and the results indicate that extreme precipitation events are highly probable to occur in regions V and VI, and hence higher risk of floods and droughts; and (3) spatial patterns of annual extreme daily precipitation with return period of 20 years indicate that precipitation amount increases gradually from the upper to the lower Yangtze River basin, showing higher risks of floods and droughts in the middle and lower Yangtze River basin, and this result is in good agreement with those derived from regional growth curves.

  11. Regional extreme rainfalls observed globally with 17 years of the Tropical Precipitation Measurement Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayabu, Yukari; Hamada, Atsushi; Mori, Yuki; Murayama, Yuki; Liu, Chuntao; Zipser, Edward

    2015-04-01

    While extreme rainfall has a huge impact upon human society, the characteristics of the extreme precipitation vary from region to region. Seventeen years of three dimensional precipitation measurements from the space-borne precipitation radar equipped with the Tropical Precipitation Measurement Mission satellite enabled us to describe the characteristics of regional extreme precipitation globally. Extreme rainfall statistics are based on rainfall events defined as a set of contiguous PR rainy pixels. Regional extreme rainfall events are defined as those in which maximum near-surface rainfall rates are higher than the corresponding 99.9th percentile in each 2.5degree x2.5degree horizontal resolution grid. First, regional extreme rainfall is characterized in terms of its intensity and event size. Regions of ''intense and extensive'' extreme rainfall are found mainly over oceans near coastal areas and are likely associated with tropical cyclones and convective systems associated with the establishment of monsoons. Regions of ''intense but less extensive'' extreme rainfall are distributed widely over land and maritime continents, probably related to afternoon showers and mesoscale convective systems. Regions of ''extensive but less intense'' extreme rainfall are found almost exclusively over oceans, likely associated with well-organized mesoscale convective systems and extratropical cyclones. Secondly, regional extremes in terms of surface rainfall intensity and those in terms of convection height are compared. Conventionally, extremely tall convection is considered to contribute the largest to the intense rainfall. Comparing probability density functions (PDFs) of 99th percentiles in terms of the near surface rainfall intensity in each regional grid and those in terms of the 40dBZ echo top heights, it is found that heaviest precipitation in the region is not associated with tallest systems, but rather with systems with moderate heights. Interestingly, this separation

  12. Controls on Extreme Droughts and Adaptation Strategies in Semiarid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, B. R.; Cook, C.; Fernando, D. N.; LeBlanc, M.

    2012-12-01

    Increasing vulnerability to droughts with reduced per capita water storage, particularly in semiarid regions, underscores the need for predictive understanding of drought controls and development of adaptation strategies for water resources management. In this study we evaluate causes of major droughts in southwest and southcentral US (California and Texas) and southeast Australia (Murray Darling Basin). Impacts of climate cycles (ENSO, PDO, AMO, NAO, IOD) and atmospheric circulation on drought initiation and persistence are examined. Effects of drought on surface water reservoir storage, groundwater storage, irrigation, and crop production are compared. Adaptation strategies being evaluated include water transfers among sectors, particularly from irrigated agriculture to other groups, increasing storage using managed aquifer recharge, water reuse, and development of new water sources (e.g. seawater desalination). It is critical to develop a broad portfolio of water sources to increase resilience to future droughts.

  13. Comparison of pointwise and regional statistical approaches to detect non stationarity in extreme rainfall events. Application to the Sahelian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panthou, G.; Vischel, T.; Lebel, T.; Quantin, G.; Favre, A.; Blanchet, J.; Ali, A.

    2012-12-01

    Studying trends in rainfall extremes at regional scale is required to provide reference climatology to evaluate General Circulation Model global predictions as well as to help managing and designing hydraulic works. The present study compares three methods to detect trends (linear and change-point) in series of daily rainfall annual maxima: (i) The first approach is widely used and consist in applying statistical stationarity tests (linear trend and change-point) on the point-wise maxima series; (ii) The second approach compares the performances of a constant and a time dependent Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution fitted to the point-wise maxima series. (iii) The last method uses an original regional statistical model based on space-time GEV distribution which is used to detect changes in rainfall extremes directly at regional scale. The three methods are applied to detect trends in extreme daily rainfall over the Sahel during the period 1950-1990 for which a network of 128 daily rain gages is available. This region has experienced an intense drought since the end of the 1960s; it is thus an interesting case-study to illustrate how a regional climate change can affect the extreme rainfall distributions. One major result is that the statistical stationarity tests rarely detect non-stationarities in the series while the two GEV-based models converge to show that the extreme rainfall series have a negative break point around 1970. The study points out the limit of the widely used classical stationarity tests to detect trends in noisy series affected by sampling errors. The use of parametric time-dependent GEV seems to reduce this effect especially when a regional approach is used. From a climatological point of view, the results show that the great Sahelian drought has been accompanied by a decrease of extreme rainfall events, both in magnitude and occurence.

  14. Allowable CO2 emissions based on projected changes in regional extremes and related impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Donat, Markus; Pitman, Andy; Knutti, Reto; Wilby, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Global temperature targets, such as the widely accepted 2°C and 1.5° limits, may fail to communicate the urgency of reducing CO2 emissions. Translation of CO2 emissions into regional- and impact-related climate targets could be more powerful because they resonate better with national interests. We illustrate this approach using regional changes in extreme temperatures and precipitation. These scale robustly with global temperature across scenarios, and thus with cumulative CO2 emissions. This is particularly relevant for changes in regional extreme temperatures on land, which are much greater than changes in the associated global mean. Linking cumulative CO2 emission targets to regional consequences, such as changing climate extremes, would be of particular benefit for political decision making, both in the context of climate negotiations and adaptation.

  15. Regional-Scale High-Latitude Extreme Geoelectric Fields Pertaining to Geomagnetically Induced Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, Antti; Bernabeu, Emanuel; Eichner, Jan; Viljanen, Ari; Ngwira, Chigomezyo

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the needs of the high-voltage power transmission industry, we use data from the high-latitude IMAGE magnetometer array to study characteristics of extreme geoelectric fields at regional scales. We use 10-s resolution data for years 1993-2013, and the fields are characterized using average horizontal geoelectric field amplitudes taken over station groups that span about 500-km distance. We show that geoelectric field structures associated with localized extremes at single stations can be greatly different from structures associated with regionally uniform geoelectric fields, which are well represented by spatial averages over single stations. Visual extrapolation and rigorous extreme value analysis of spatially averaged fields indicate that the expected range for 1-in-100-year extreme events are 3-8 V/km and 3.4-7.1 V/km, respectively. The Quebec reference ground model is used in the calculations.

  16. An update around the evidence base for the lower extremity ultrasound regional block technique

    PubMed Central

    Fanelli, Andrea; Ghisi, Daniela; Melotti, Rita Maria

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound guidance currently represents the gold standard for regional anesthesia. In particular for lower extremity blocks, despite the heterogeneity and the lack of large randomized controlled trials, current literature shows a modest improvement in block onset and quality compared with other localization techniques. This review aims to present the most recent findings on the application of ultrasound guidance for each single lower extremity approach. PMID:26918177

  17. Characterizing moisture delivery mechanisms for extreme precipitation in large geographic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, C.; Rajagopalan, B.; Gangopadhyay, S.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding dominant moisture delivery sources for extreme precipitation events is extremely important for characterizing their statistical behavior and behavior under specific climate regimes. Typically, for a given region, the largest extreme events occur in specific seasons but events occurring in off seasons can be just as socio-economically devastating. A complete picture of how and where events originate in all seasons paves the way for statistical forecasting and simulation of extreme precipitation. We present a data driven methodology applicable to large geographic regions that can partition heterogeneous areas into subregions and then characterize the moisture delivery mechanisms for each subregion under specific climate regimes (e.g., ENSO phases, PDO, etc.) and in each season. Extreme subregions are defined using a new nonparametric extreme value clustering method and moisture delivery characterization is done using the HYSPLIT storm backtracking algorithm. We apply this methodology to the Western United States where the nature of extreme events varies widely due to complex terrain, teleconnections and climate interactions.

  18. Projections of Extreme Precipitation Events in India from regional and global climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, P. A.; Shah, R.; Mishra, V.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme precipitation events pose tremendous challenges for humans and infrastructure. Precipitation extremes are projected to increase under the future climate. We examined changes in extreme precipitation events under the projected future climate in India from regional and global climate models. We obtained CMIP5 projections for 32 general circulation models (GCMs), while data for regional climate models (RCMs) were obtained from the CORDEX South Asia program. The data were analyzed for the historic (1971-1999) and projected future climate (2006-2060) for annual maximum precipitation, frequency of extreme precipitation events, mean intensity of top five precipitation events, and ratio of heavy to non-heavy precipitation. Out of the 32 GCMs, we selected the four best GCMs (BEST-GCMs) that performed better for extreme precipitation events in India. Moreover, we selected the host GCMs (HOST-GCMs) that were used as a boundary condition for the CORDEX-RCMs. We finally compared projections of extreme precipitation events from the BEST-GCMs, HOST-GCMs, and CORDEX-RCMs under the future climate. We find that the CORDEX-RCMs show a large inter-model variation leading to a high uncertainty in projections. Overall, most of the models indicate increases in extreme precipitation events under the projected future climate predominantly in the Southern peninsula.

  19. Assessing Regional Scale Variability in Extreme Value Statistics Under Altered Climate Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Brunsell, Nathaniel; Mechem, David; Ma, Chunsheng

    2015-02-20

    Recent studies have suggested that low-frequency modes of climate variability can significantly influence regional climate. The climatology associated with extreme events has been shown to be particularly sensitive. This has profound implications for droughts, heat waves, and food production. We propose to examine regional climate simulations conducted over the continental United States by applying a recently developed technique which combines wavelet multi–resolution analysis with information theory metrics. This research is motivated by two fundamental questions concerning the spatial and temporal structure of extreme events. These questions are 1) what temporal scales of the extreme value distributions are most sensitive to alteration by low-frequency climate forcings and 2) what is the nature of the spatial structure of variation in these timescales? The primary objective is to assess to what extent information theory metrics can be useful in characterizing the nature of extreme weather phenomena. Specifically, we hypothesize that (1) changes in the nature of extreme events will impact the temporal probability density functions and that information theory metrics will be sensitive these changes and (2) via a wavelet multi–resolution analysis, we will be able to characterize the relative contribution of different timescales on the stochastic nature of extreme events. In order to address these hypotheses, we propose a unique combination of an established regional climate modeling approach and advanced statistical techniques to assess the effects of low-frequency modes on climate extremes over North America. The behavior of climate extremes in RCM simulations for the 20th century will be compared with statistics calculated from the United States Historical Climatology Network (USHCN) and simulations from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP). This effort will serve to establish the baseline behavior of climate extremes, the

  20. Formation of Continuous and Episodic Relativistic Outflows in Regions of Stability and Instability in Advection-Dominated Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Truong V.; Wood, Kent S.; Wolff, Michael Thomas; Becker, Peter A.; Putney, Joy; Edge, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that particle acceleration in the vicinity of a shock in an advection-dominated accretion disk can extract enough energy to power a relativistic jet from a supermassive black hole at the center of a radio-loud active galaxy. However, to maintain a steady jet, a stable shock location is required. By employing the Chevalier & Imamura linearization method and the Nakayama instability boundary conditions, we have also shown that there is a region of the energy and angular momentum parameter space in which disk/shocks with outflows can be either stable or unstable. In a region of instability, the velocity profiles that exhibit pre-shock deceleration and pre-shock acceleration are always unstable to the zeroth mode with zero frequency of oscillation. However, in a region of stability, the zeroth mode, the fundamental, and the overtones are all stable for both pre-shock deceleration as well as pre-shock acceleration. Building on this new insight, in this paper, we explore new parameter values in the regions of stability and instability to explain the production of the observed continuous and episodic relativistic outflows (jets) in M87 and Sgr A*, respectively.

  1. Impacts of the Future Changes in Extreme Events on the Regional Crop Yield in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Nazan; Turp, M. Tufan; Ozturk, Tugba; Kurnaz, M. Levent

    2016-04-01

    The changes in extreme events caused by climate change have the greatest impact on agricultural sector specifically crop yield. Therefore, it requires a clear understanding of how extreme events affect the crop yield and how it causes high economic losses. In this research, we cover the relationship between extreme events and the crop yield in Turkey for the period of 2020 - 2045 with respect to 1980 - 2005. We focus on the role of those extreme event causing natural disasters on the regional crop yield. This research comprises 2 parts. In the first part, the projection is performed according to the business as usual scenario of IPCC, RCP8.5, via the RegCM4.4 in order to obtain extreme event indices required for the crop assessment. In the second part, the crop yield and the extreme event indices are combined by applying the econometric analysis in order to see the relationship between natural disasters and crop yield. The risks for crop yield caused by the extreme events are estimated and interpreted. This study aims to assess the effect of frequency of expected extreme events on the crop yield at the cropland of Turkey. This research has been supported by Boǧaziçi University Research Fund Grant Number 10421.

  2. More extreme precipitation in the world’s dry and wet regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donat, Markus G.; Lowry, Andrew L.; Alexander, Lisa V.; O’Gorman, Paul A.; Maher, Nicola

    2016-05-01

    Intensification of the hydrological cycle is expected to accompany a warming climate. It has been suggested that changes in the spatial distribution of precipitation will amplify differences between dry and wet regions, but this has been disputed for changes over land. Furthermore, precipitation changes may differ not only between regions but also between different aspects of precipitation, such as totals and extremes. Here we investigate changes in these two aspects in the world’s dry and wet regions using observations and global climate models. Despite uncertainties in total precipitation changes, extreme daily precipitation averaged over both dry and wet regimes shows robust increases in both observations and climate models over the past six decades. Climate projections for the rest of the century show continued intensification of daily precipitation extremes. Increases in total and extreme precipitation in dry regions are linearly related to the model-specific global temperature change, so that the spread in projected global warming partly explains the spread in precipitation intensification in these regions by the late twenty-first century. This intensification has implications for the risk of flooding as the climate warms, particularly for the world’s dry regions.

  3. Projected changes in regional climate extremes arising from Arctic sea ice loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Screen, James A.; Deser, Clara; Sun, Lantao

    2015-08-01

    The decline in Arctic sea ice cover has been widely documented and it is clear that this change is having profound impacts locally. An emerging and highly uncertain area of scientific research, however, is whether such Arctic change has a tangible effect on weather and climate at lower latitudes. Of particular societal relevance is the open question: will continued Arctic sea ice loss make mid-latitude weather more extreme? Here we analyse idealized atmospheric general circulation model simulations, using two independent models, both forced by projected Arctic sea ice loss in the late twenty-first century. We identify robust projected changes in regional temperature and precipitation extremes arising solely due to Arctic sea ice loss. The likelihood and duration of cold extremes are projected to decrease over high latitudes and over central and eastern North America, but to increase over central Asia. Hot extremes are projected to increase in frequency and duration over high latitudes. The likelihood and severity of wet extremes are projected to increase over high latitudes, the Mediterranean and central Asia; and their intensity is projected to increase over high latitudes and central and eastern Asia. The number of dry days over mid-latitude Eurasia and dry spell duration over high latitudes are both projected to decrease. There is closer model agreement for projected changes in temperature extremes than for precipitation extremes. Overall, we find that extreme weather over central and eastern North America is more sensitive to Arctic sea ice loss than over other mid-latitude regions. Our results are useful for constraining the role of Arctic sea ice loss in shifting the odds of extreme weather, but must not be viewed as deterministic projections, as they do not account for drivers other than Arctic sea ice loss.

  4. Evaluation of multiple regional climate models for summer climate extremes over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changyong; Min, Seung-Ki; Lee, Donghyun; Cha, Dong-Hyun; Suh, Myoung-Seok; Kang, Hyun-Suk; Hong, Song-You; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Baek, Hee-Jeong; Boo, Kyung-On; Kwon, Won-Tae

    2016-04-01

    In this study, five regional climate models (RCMs) participating in the CORDEX-East Asia project (HadGEM3-RA, RegCM4, SNU-MM5, SNU-WRF, and YSU-RSM) are evaluated in terms of their performances in simulating the climatology of summer extremes in East Asia. Seasonal maxima of daily mean temperature and precipitation are analyzed using the generalized extreme value method. RCMs show systematic bias patterns in both seasonal means and extremes. A cold bias is located along the coast, whereas a warm bias occurs in northern China. Overall, wet bias occurs in East Asia, but with a substantial dry bias centered in South Korea. This dry bias appears to be related to the colder ocean surface around South Korea, positioning the monsoonal front further south compared to observations. Taylor diagram analyses reveal that the models simulate temperature means more accurately compared to extremes because of the higher spatial correlation, whereas precipitation extremes are simulated better than their means because of the higher spatial variability. The latter implies that extreme rainfall events can be captured more accurately by RCMs compared to the driving GCM despite poorer simulation of mean rainfall. Inter-RCM analysis indicates a close relationship between the means and extremes in terms of model skills, but it does not show a clear relationship between temperature and precipitation. Sub-regional analysis largely supports the mean-extreme skill relationship. Analyses of frequency and intensity distributions of daily data for three selected sub-regions suggest that overall shifts of temperature distribution and biases in moderate-heavy precipitations contribute importantly to the seasonal mean biases.

  5. Comment on "Electrostatic compressive and rarefactive shocks and solitons in relativistic plasmas occurring in polar regions of pulsar"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, M. G.; Talukder, M. R.; Hossain Ali, M.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this comment is to show the solution of the KdVB equation used by Shah et al. (Astrophys. Space Sci. 335:529-537, 2011, doi: 10.1007/s10509-011-0766-y) is not correct. So, the numerical results that are predicted in this manuscript should not be helpful for further investigations in a plasma laboratory. For this reason, we have employed the Bernoulli's equation method to obtain the correct form of analytical solution to this equation, which is appropriate for the study of electrostatic compressive and rarefactive shocks and solitons in relativistic plasmas occurring in polar regions of pulsar.

  6. Evaluating regional climate models for simulating sub-daily rainfall extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés-Hernández, Virginia Edith; Zheng, Feifei; Evans, Jason; Lambert, Martin; Sharma, Ashish; Westra, Seth

    2015-11-01

    Sub-daily rainfall extremes are of significant societal interest, with implications for flash flooding and the design of urban stormwater systems. It is increasingly recognised that extreme subdaily rainfall will intensify as a result of global temperature increases, with regional climate models (RCMs) representing one of the principal lines of evidence on the likely magnitude and spatiotemporal characteristics of these changes. To evaluate the ability of RCMs to simulate subdaily extremes, it is common to compare the simulated statistical characteristics of the extreme rainfall events with those from observational records. While such analyses are important, they provide insufficient insight into whether the RCM reproduces the correct underlying physical processes; in other words, whether the model "gets the right answers for the right reasons". This paper develops a range of metrics to assess the performance of RCMs in capturing the physical mechanisms that produce extreme rainfall. These metrics include the diurnal and seasonal cycles, relationship between rainfall intensity and temperature, temporal scaling, and the spatial structure of extreme rainfall events. We evaluate a high resolution RCM—the Weather Research Forecasting model—over the Greater Sydney region, using three alternative parametrization schemes. The model shows consistency with the observations for most of the proposed metrics. Where differences exist, these are dependent on both the rainfall duration and model parameterization strategy. The use of physically meaningful performance metrics not only enhances the confidence in model simulations, but also provides better diagnostic power to assist with future model improvement.

  7. Projected changes of extreme precipitation over Contiguous United States with Nested regional climate model (NRCM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Extreme weather events have already significantly influenced North America. During 2005-2011, the extreme events have increased by 250 %, from four or fewer events occurring in 2005, while 14 events occurring in 2011 (www.ncdc.noaa.gov/billions/). In addition, extreme rainfall amounts, frequency, and intensity were all expected to increase under greenhouse warming scenarios (Wehner 2005; Kharin et al. 2007; Tebaldi et al. 2006). Global models are powerful tools to investigate the climate and climate change on large scales. However, such models do not represent local terrain and mesoscale weather systems well owing to their coarse horizontal resolution (150-300 km). To capture the fine-scale features of extreme weather events, regional climate models (RCMs) with a more realistic representation of the complex terrain and heterogeneous land surfaces are needed (Mass et al. 2002). This study uses the Nested Regional Climate model (NRCM) to perform regional scale climate simulations on a 12-km × 12-km high resolution scale over North America (including Alaska; with 600 × 515 grid cells at longitude and latitude), known as CORDEX_North America, instead of small regions as studied previously (eg., Dominguez et al. 2012; Gao et al. 2012). The performance and the biases of the NRCM extreme precipitation calculations (2000-2010) have been evaluated with PRISM precipitation (Daly et al. 1997) by Wang and Kotamarthi (2013): the NRCM replicated very well the monthly amount of extreme precipitation with less than 3% overestimation over East CONUS, and the frequency of extremes over West CONUS and upper Mississippi River Basin. The Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 and RCP 4.5 from the new Community Earth System Model version 1.0 (CESM v1.0) are dynamically downscaled to predict the extreme rainfall events at the end-of-century (2085-2095) and to explore the uncertainties of future extreme precipitation induced by different scenarios over distinct regions. We have

  8. Individual and coupled influences of AMO and ENSO on regional precipitation characteristics and extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goly, Aneesh; Teegavarapu, Ramesh S. V.

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the influences of Atlantic multidecadal oscillation (AMO) and El Niño southern oscillation (ENSO) on regional precipitation extremes and characteristics in the state of Florida is the focus of this study. Exhaustive evaluations of individual and combined influences of these oscillations using, descriptive indices-based assessment of statistically significant changes in rainfall characteristics, identification of spatially varying influences of oscillations on dry and wet spell transition states, antecedent precipitation prior to extreme events, intraevent temporal distribution of precipitation and changes in temporal occurrences of extremes including dry/wet cycles are carried out. Rain gage and gridded precipitation data analysis using parametric hypothesis tests confirm statistically significant changes in the precipitation characteristics from one phase to another of each oscillation and also in coupled phases. Spatially nonuniform and uniform influences of AMO and ENSO, respectively, on precipitation are evident. AMO influences vary in peninsular and continental parts of Florida and the warm (cool) phase of AMO contributes to increased precipitation extremes during wet (dry) season. The influence of ENSO is confined to dry season with El Niño (La Niña) contributing to increase (decrease) in extremes and total precipitation. Wetter antecedent conditions preceding daily extremes are dominant in AMO warm phase compared to the cool and are likely to impact design floods in the region. AMO influence on dry season precipitation extremes is noted for ENSO neutral years. The two oscillations in different phases modulate each other with seasonal and spatially varying impacts and implications on flood control and water supply in the region.

  9. Comparing Regional Climate Model output to observational data sets for extreme rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunyer, M. A.; Sørup, H. J. D.; Madsen, H.; Rosbjerg, D.; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, K.

    2012-04-01

    Climate model projections of changes in extreme rainfall are highly uncertain. In general, the analysis of model performance is the first step in studies that attempt to deal with this uncertainty. Model performance is often measured by comparing statistical properties of climate model output with observational data. However, in the assessment of model performance regarding extreme rainfall use of different observational datasets might lead to different conclusions. Rainfall data are often available either as point measurements or interpolated gridded data. Point measurements result in an unevenly spatially distributed dataset while gridded data obtained from the interpolation of point measurements provide data on an evenly distributed grid. Measurements of extreme rainfall events may be highly uncertain and underestimation is generally expected; furthermore, in gridded data extreme rainfall events tend to be smoothed due to the interpolation process. In addition, small variations in space and time of observed and modelled extremes may have a large impact on the assessment. The present study assesses the effect of the choice and interpretation of observation datasets on the conclusions drawn regarding the ability of Regional Climate Models (RCMs) to reproduce extreme events. Daily extreme rainfall over Denmark from an ensemble of RCMs is compared to three different observational datasets. The observational data considered are a point measurement dataset (ECA&D), a gridded dataset (E-Obs) and a re-analysis dataset (ERA-Interim). The results are compared with other recent studies considering climate model rainfall extremes. The study shows that in climate change studies dealing with extreme rainfall one must be aware of the effect and uncertainties from the use of different sources of observations to avoid overconfident and misleading conclusions.

  10. An improvement of extremality regions for Gibbs measures of the Potts model on a Cayley tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydarov, Farhod; Khakimov, Rustam

    2016-03-01

    We give a condition of extemelity for translation-invariant Gibbs measures of q—state Potts model on a Cayley tree. We'll improve the regions of extremality for some measures considered in [14]. Moreover, some results in [14] are generalized.

  11. Optical constants in the extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rife, J. C.; Osantowski, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The nature of optical constants and their measurement by reflection or absorption techniques in the extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray spectral region from 30 to 3000 eV is discussed with emphasis on mirror design. Sources of optical constant data are mentioned and reflectance measurements for SiC and Kanigen between 40 and 200 eV are reported.

  12. Modulation of extremes in the Atlantic region by modes of climate variability/change: A mechanistic coupled regional model study

    SciTech Connect

    Saravanan, Ramalingam

    2015-01-09

    During the course of this project, we have accomplished the following: 1) Explored the parameter space of component models to minimize regional model bias 2) Assessed the impact of air-sea interaction on hurricanes, focusing in particular on the role of the oceanic barrier layer 3) Contributed to the activities of the U.S. CLIVAR Hurricane Working Group 4) Assessed the impact of lateral and lower boundary conditions on extreme flooding events in the U.S. Midwest in regional model simulations 5) Analyzed the concurrent impact of El Niño-Southern Oscillation and Atlantic Meridional Mode on Atlantic Hurricane activity using observations and regional model simulations

  13. The role of regional climate model setup in simulating two extreme precipitation events in the European Alpine region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awan, Nauman Khurshid; Gobiet, Andreas; Suklitsch, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In this study we have investigated the role of domain settings and model's physics in simulating two extreme precipitation events. Four regional climate models, all driven with a re-analysis dataset were used to create an ensemble of 61 high-resolution simulations by varying physical parameterization schemes, domain sizes, nudging and nesting techniques. The two discussed events are three-day time slices taken from approximately 15-months long climate simulations. The results show that dynamical downscaling significantly improves the spatial characteristics such as correlation, variability as well as location and intensity of maximum precipitation. Spatial variability, which is underestimated by most of the simulations can be improved by choosing suitable vertical resolution, convective and microphysics scheme. The results further suggest that for studies focusing on extreme precipitation events relatively small domains or nudging could be advantageous. However, a final conclusion on this issue would be premature, since only two extreme precipitation events are considered.

  14. The role of regional climate model setup in simulating two extreme precipitation events in the European Alpine region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awan, Nauman Khurshid; Gobiet, Andreas; Suklitsch, Martin

    2014-09-01

    In this study we have investigated the role of domain settings and model's physics in simulating two extreme precipitation events. Four regional climate models, all driven with a re-analysis dataset were used to create an ensemble of 61 high-resolution simulations by varying physical parameterization schemes, domain sizes, nudging and nesting techniques. The two discussed events are three-day time slices taken from approximately 15-months long climate simulations. The results show that dynamical downscaling significantly improves the spatial characteristics such as correlation, variability as well as location and intensity of maximum precipitation. Spatial variability, which is underestimated by most of the simulations can be improved by choosing suitable vertical resolution, convective and microphysics scheme. The results further suggest that for studies focusing on extreme precipitation events relatively small domains or nudging could be advantageous. However, a final conclusion on this issue would be premature, since only two extreme precipitation events are considered.

  15. Projected changes in climate extremes over Qatar and the Arabian Gulf region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundeti, K.; Kanikicharla, K. K.; Al sulaiti, M.; Khulaifi, M.; Alboinin, N.; Kito, A.

    2015-12-01

    The climate of the State of Qatar and the adjacent region is dominated by subtropical dry, hot desert climate with low annual rainfall, very high temperatures in summer and a big difference between maximum and minimum temperatures, especially in the inland areas. The coastal areas are influenced by the Arabian Gulf, and have lower maximum, but higher minimum temperatures and a higher moisture percentage in the air. The global warming can have profound impact on the mean climate as well as extreme weather events over the Arabian Peninsula that may affect both natural and human systems significantly. Therefore, it is important to assess the future changes in the seasonal/annual mean of temperature and precipitation and also the extremes in temperature and wind events for a country like Qatar. This study assesses the performance of the Coupled Model Inter comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) simulations in present and develops future climate scenarios. The changes in climate extremes are assessed for three future periods 2016-2035, 2046-2065 and 2080-2099 with respect to 1986-2005 (base line) under two RCPs (Representative Concentrate Pathways) - RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. We analyzed the projected changes in temperature and precipitation extremes using several indices including those that capture heat stress. The observations show an increase in warm extremes over many parts in this region that are generally well captured by the models. The results indicate a significant change in frequency and intensity of both temperature and precipitation extremes over many parts of this region which may have serious implications on human health, water resources and the onshore/offshore infrastructure in this region. Data from a high-resolution (20km) AGCM simulation from Meteorological Research Institute of Japan Meteorological Agency for the present (1979-2003) and a future time slice (2075-2099) corresponding to RCP8.5 have also been utilized to assess the impact of climate change on

  16. Wave-mixing with high-order harmonics in extreme ultraviolet region

    SciTech Connect

    Dao, Lap Van; Dinh, Khuong Ba; Le, Hoang Vu; Gaffney, Naylyn; Hannaford, Peter

    2015-01-12

    We report studies of the wave-mixing process in the extreme ultraviolet region with two near-infrared driving and controlling pulses with incommensurate frequencies (at 1400 nm and 800 nm). A non-collinear scheme for the two beams is used in order to spatially separate and to characterise the properties of the high-order wave-mixing field. We show that the extreme ultraviolet frequency mixing can be treated by perturbative, very high-order nonlinear optics; the modification of the wave-packet of the free electron needs to be considered in this process.

  17. Reliability of regional and global climate models to simulate precipitation extremes over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Vimal; Kumar, Devashish; Ganguly, Auroop R.; Sanjay, J.; Mujumdar, Milind; Krishnan, R.; Shah, Reepal D.

    2014-08-01

    Extreme precipitation events over India have resulted in loss of human lives and damaged infrastructures, food crops, and lifelines. The inability of climate models to credibly project precipitation extremes in India has not been helpful to longer-term hazards resilience policy. However, there have been claims that finer-resolution and regional climate models may improve projections. The claims are examined as hypotheses by comparing models with observations from 1951-2005. This paper evaluates the reliability of the latest generation of general circulation models (GCMs), Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), specifically a subset of the better performing CMIP5 models (called "BEST-GCM"). The relative value of finer-resolution regional climate models (RCMs) is examined by comparing Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) South Asia RCMs ("CORDEX-RCMs") versus the GCMs used by those RCMs to provide boundary conditions, or the host GCMs ("HOST-GCMs"). Ensemble mean of BEST-GCMs performed better for most of the extreme precipitation indices than the CORDEX-RCMs or their HOST-GCMs. Weaker performance shown by ensemble mean of CORDEX-RCMs is largely associated with their high intermodel variation. The CORDEX-RCMs occasionally exhibited slightly superior skills compared to BEST-GCMs; on the whole RCMs failed to significantly outperform GCMs. Observed trends in the extremes were not adequately captured by any of the model ensembles, while neither the GCMs nor the RCMs were determined to be adequate to inform hydrologic design.

  18. Trends in temperature extremes over nine integrated agricultural regions in China, 1961-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xushu; Wang, Zhaoli; Zhou, Xiaowen; Lai, Chengguang; Chen, Xiaohong

    2016-06-01

    By characterizing the patterns of temperature extremes over nine integrated agricultural regions (IARs) in China from 1961 to 2011, this study performed trend analyses on 16 extreme temperature indices using a high-resolution (0.5° × 0.5°) daily gridded dataset and the Mann-Kendall method. The results show that annually, at both daytime and nighttime, cold extremes significantly decreased but warm extremes significantly increased across all IARs. Overall, nighttimes tended to warm faster than daytimes. Diurnal temperature ranges (DTR) diminished, apart from the mid-northern Southwest China Region and the mid-Loess Plateau Region. Seasonally, DTR widely diminished across all IARs during the four seasons except for spring. Higher minimum daily minimum temperature (TNn) and maximum daily maximum temperature (TXx), in both summer and winter, were recorded for most IARs except for the Huang-Huai-Hai Region; in autumn, all IARs generally encountered higher TNn and TXx. In all seasons, warming was observed at daytime and nighttime but, again, nighttimes warmed faster than daytimes. The results also indicate a more rapid warming trend in Northern and Western China than in Southern and Eastern China, with accelerated warming at high elevations. The increases in TNn and TXx might cause a reduction in agriculture yield in spring over Northern China, while such negative impact might occur in Southern China during summer. In autumn and winter, however, the negative impact possibly occurred in most of the IARs. Moreover, increased TXx in the Pearl River Delta and Yangtze River Delta is possibly related to rapid local urbanization. Climatically, the general increase in temperature extremes across Chinese IARs may be induced by strengthened Northern Hemisphere Subtropical High or weakened Northern Hemisphere Polar Vortex.

  19. Evaluation of Multiple Regional Climate Models for Summer Extremes of Temperature and Precipitation over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changyong; Min, Seung-Ki

    2014-05-01

    The regional climate models (RCMs) have been widely used to generate more detailed information in space and time of climate patterns produced by the global climate models (GCMs). Recently the international collaborative effort has been set up as the CORDEX (Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment) project which covers several regional domains including East Asia. In this study, five RCMs (HadGEM3-RA, RegCM4, SNU-MM5, SNU-WRF, and YSU-RSM) participating in the CORDEX-East Asia project are evaluated in terms of their skills at simulating climatology of summer extremes. We examine bias and RMSE and conduct a Taylor diagram analysis using seasonal maxima of daily mean temperature and daily precipitation amount over the East Asia land area from 'historical' experiments of individual RCMs and their multi-model ensemble means (MME). The APHRODITE (Asian Precipitation-Highly-Resolved Observational Data Integration Toward Evaluation) datasets on 0.5° x 0.5° grids are used as observations. Results show similar systematic bias patterns between seasonal means and extremes. A cold bias is found along the coast while a warm bias occurs in the northern China. Overall wet bias appears in East Asia but there is a substantial dry bias in South Korea. This dry bias appears related to be a cold SST (sea surface temperature) around South Korea, positioning the monsoonal front (Changma) further south than observations. Taylor diagram analyses show that temperature has better skill in means than in extremes because of higher spatial correlation whereas precipitation exhibits better skill in extremes than in means due to better spatial variability. The latter implies that extreme rainfall events may be better captured although seasonal mean precipitation tends to be overestimated by RCMs. The model performances between mean and extreme are found to be closely related, but not clearly between temperature and precipitation. Temperatures are always better simulated than

  20. Attributing extreme precipitation in the Black Sea region to sea surface warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Edmund; Semenov, Vladimir; Maraun, Douglas; Park, Wonsun; Chernokulsky, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Higher sea surface temperatures (SSTs) warm and moisten the overlying atmosphere, increasing the low-level atmospheric instability, the moisture available to precipitating systems and, hence, the potential for intense convective systems. Both the Mediterranean and Black Sea regions have seen a steady increase in summertime SSTs since the early 1980s, by over 2 K in places. This raises the question of how this SST increase has affected convective precipitation extremes in the region, and through which mechanisms any effects are manifested. In particular, the Black Sea town of Krymsk suffered an unprecedented precipitation extreme in July 2012, which may have been influenced by Black Sea warming, causing over 170 deaths. To address this question, we adopt two distinct modelling approaches to event attribution and compare their relative merits. In the first, we use the traditional probabilistic event attribution approach involving global climate model ensembles representative of the present and a counterfactual past climate where regional SSTs have not increased. In the second, we use the conditional event attribution approach, taking the 2012 Krymsk precipitation extreme as a showcase example. Under the second approach, we carry out ensemble sensitivity experiments of the Krymsk event at convection-permitting resolution with the WRF regional model, and test the sensitivity of the event to a range of SST forcings. Both experiments show the crucial role of recent Black Sea warming in amplifying the 2012 Krymsk precipitation extreme. In the conditional event attribution approach, though, the explicit simulation of convective processes provides detailed insight into the physical mechanisms behind the extremeness of the event, revealing the dominant role of dynamical (i.e. static stability and vertical motions) over thermodynamical (i.e. increased atmospheric moisture) changes. Additionally, the wide range of SST states tested in the regional setup, which would be

  1. Estimation of extreme daily precipitation: comparison between regional and geostatistical approaches.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellies, Matteo; Deidda, Roberto; Langousis, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We study the extreme rainfall regime of the Island of Sardinia in Italy, based on annual maxima of daily precipitation. The statistical analysis is conducted using 229 daily rainfall records with at least 50 complete years of observations, collected at different sites by the Hydrological Survey of the Sardinia Region. Preliminary analysis, and the L-skewness and L-kurtosis diagrams, show that the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution model performs best in describing daily rainfall extremes. The GEV distribution parameters are estimated using the method of Probability Weighted Moments (PWM). To obtain extreme rainfall estimates at ungauged sites, while minimizing uncertainties due to sampling variability, a regional and a geostatistical approach are compared. The regional approach merges information from different gauged sites, within homogeneous regions, to obtain GEV parameter estimates at ungauged locations. The geostatistical approach infers the parameters of the GEV distribution model at locations where measurements are available, and then spatially interpolates them over the study region. In both approaches we use local rainfall means as index-rainfall. In the regional approach we define homogeneous regions by applying a hierarchical cluster analysis based on Ward's method, with L-moment ratios (i.e. L-CV and L-Skewness) as metrics. The analysis results in four contiguous regions, which satisfy the Hosking and Wallis (1997) homogeneity tests. The latter have been conducted using a Monte-Carlo approach based on a 4-parameter Kappa distribution model, fitted to each station cluster. Note that the 4-parameter Kappa model includes the GEV distribution as a sub-case, when the fourth parameter h is set to 0. In the geostatistical approach we apply kriging for uncertain data (KUD), which accounts for the error variance in local parameter estimation and, therefore, may serve as a useful tool for spatial interpolation of metrics affected by high uncertainty. In

  2. Spectrum of Relativistic and Subrelativistic Cosmic Rays in the 100 pc Central Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogiel, V. A.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Kiselev, A. M.; Nobukawa, M.; Cheng, K. S.; Hui, C. Y.; Ko, C. M.; Nobukawa, K. K.; Tsuru, T. G.

    2015-08-01

    From the rate of hydrogen ionization and the gamma-ray flux, we derived the spectrum of relativistic and subrelativistic cosmic rays (CRs) nearby and inside the molecular cloud Sgr B2 near the Galactic Center. We studied two cases of CR propagation in molecular clouds: free propagation and scattering of particles by magnetic fluctuations excited by the neutral gas turbulence. We showed that in the latter case CR propagation inside the cloud can be described as diffusion with a coefficient of ˜ 3× {10}27 cm2 s-1. For the case of hydrogen ionization by subrelativistic protons, we showed that their spectrum outside the cloud is quite hard with a spectral index of δ \\gt -1. The energy density of subrelativistic protons (\\gt 50 eV cm-3) is one order of magnitude higher than that of relativistic CRs. These protons generate the 6.4 keV emission from Sgr B2, which was about 30% of the flux observed by Suzaku in 2013. Future observations for the period after 2013 may discover the background flux generated by subrelativistic CRs in Sgr B2. Alternatively, hydrogen ionization of the molecular gas in Sgr B2 may be caused by high energy electrons. We showed that the spectrum of electron bremsstrahlung is harder than the observed continuum from Sgr B2, and in principle, this X-ray component provided by electrons could be seen from the INTEGRAL data as a stationary high energy excess above the observed spectrum {E}{{x}}-2.

  3. Extreme precipitation and beach closures in the great lakes region: evaluating risk among the elderly.

    PubMed

    Bush, Kathleen F; Fossani, Cheryl L; Li, Shi; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Gronlund, Carina J; O'Neill, Marie S

    2014-02-01

    As a result of climate change, extreme precipitation events are expected to increase in frequency and intensity. Runoff from these extreme events poses threats to water quality and human health. We investigated the impact of extreme precipitation and beach closings on the risk of gastrointestinal illness (GI)-related hospital admissions among individuals 65 and older in 12 Great Lakes cities from 2000 to 2006. Poisson regression models were fit in each city, controlling for temperature and long-term time trends. City-specific estimates were combined to form an overall regional risk estimate. Approximately 40,000 GI-related hospital admissions and over 100 beach closure days were recorded from May through September during the study period. Extreme precipitation (≥90th percentile) occurring the previous day (lag 1) is significantly associated with beach closures in 8 of the 12 cities (p < 0.05). However, no association was observed between beach closures and GI-related hospital admissions. These results support previous work linking extreme precipitation to compromised recreational water quality. PMID:24534768

  4. The roles of bias-correction and resolution in regional climate simulations of summer extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PaiMazumder, Debasish; Done, James M.

    2015-09-01

    The suitability of dynamical downscaling in producing high-resolution climate scenarios for impact assessments is limited by the quality of the driving data and regional climate model (RCM) error. Multiple RCMs driven by a single global climate model simulation of current climate show a reduction in bias compared to the driving data, and the remaining bias motivates exploration of bias correction and higher RCM resolution. The merits of bias correcting the mean climate of the driving data (boundary bias correction) versus bias correcting the mean of the RCM output data are explored and compared to model resolution sensitivity. This analysis focuses on the simulation of summer temperature and precipitation extremes using a single RCM, the Nested Regional Climate Model (NRCM). The NRCM has a general cool bias for hot and cold extremes, a wet bias for wet extremes and a dry bias for dry extremes. Both bias corrections generally reduced the bias and overall error with some indication that boundary bias correction provided greater benefits than bias correcting the mean of the RCM output data, particularly for precipitation. High resolution tended not to lead to further improvements, though further work is needed using multiple resolution evaluation datasets and convection permitting resolution simulations to comprehensively assess the value of high resolution.

  5. Climate Change, Extreme Weather Events, and Human Health Implications in the Asia Pacific Region.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Jamal Hisham; Hashim, Zailina

    2016-03-01

    The Asia Pacific region is regarded as the most disaster-prone area of the world. Since 2000, 1.2 billion people have been exposed to hydrometeorological hazards alone through 1215 disaster events. The impacts of climate change on meteorological phenomena and environmental consequences are well documented. However, the impacts on health are more elusive. Nevertheless, climate change is believed to alter weather patterns on the regional scale, giving rise to extreme weather events. The impacts from extreme weather events are definitely more acute and traumatic in nature, leading to deaths and injuries, as well as debilitating and fatal communicable diseases. Extreme weather events include heat waves, cold waves, floods, droughts, hurricanes, tropical cyclones, heavy rain, and snowfalls. Globally, within the 20-year period from 1993 to 2012, more than 530 000 people died as a direct result of almost 15 000 extreme weather events, with losses of more than US$2.5 trillion in purchasing power parity. PMID:26377857

  6. Exploring regional stakeholder needs and requirements in terms of Extreme Weather Event Attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, M.; Meinke, I.; Vanderlinden, J. P.; Touili, N.; Von Storch, H.

    2015-12-01

    Extreme event attribution has increasingly received attention in the scientific community. It may also serve decision-making at the regional level where much of the climate change impact mitigation takes place. Nevertheless, there is, to date, little known about the requirements of regional actors in terms of extreme event attribution. We have therefore analysed these at the example of regional decision-makers for climate change-related activities and/or concerned with storm surge risks at the German Baltic Sea and heat wave risks in the Greater Paris area. In order to explore if stakeholders find scientific knowledge from extreme event attribution useful and how this information might be relevant to their decision-making, we consulted a diverse set of actors engaged in the assessment, mitigation and communication of storm surge, heat wave, and climate change-related risks. Extreme event attribution knowledge was perceived to be most useful to public and political awareness-raising, but was of little or no relevance for the consulted stakeholders themselves. It was not acknowledged that it would support adaptation planning as sometimes argued in the literature. The consulted coastal protection, health, and urban adaptation planners rather needed reliable statements about possible future changes in extreme events than causal statements about past events. To enhance salience, a suitable product of event attribution should be linked to regional problems, vulnerabilities, and impacts of climate change. Given that the tolerance of uncertainty is rather low, most of the stakeholders also claimed that a suitable product of event attribution is to be received from a trusted "honest broker" and published rather later, but with smaller uncertainties than vice versa. Institutional mechanisms, like regional climate services, which enable and foster communication, translation and mediation across the boundaries between knowledge and action can help fulfill such requirements

  7. On the interaction of solar near-relativistic electrons with back-scatter regions beyond 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agueda, N.; Vainio, R.; Lario, D.; Sanahuja, B.

    2010-03-01

    We study the near-relativistic (NR >30 keV) electron event observed on 2000 February 18 by the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft. Highly collimated pitch-angle distributions were observed during the first ~2 h of the event. Roel of (2008) explained this event by assuming that the propagation of NR electrons is essentially ``scatter-free'' in the inner heliosphere and that beyond 1 AU, particles are ``back-scattered'' by magnetic field compressions and irregularities. We use Monte Carlo simulations to explore this approach. We fit observational sectored intensities to assure that the directional information contained in the data is used in full. We conclude that the event cannot be explained without assuming a back-scatter region beyond 1 AU and that NR electrons propagated under weak-scattering conditions in the inner heliosphere.

  8. An analysis of ENSO impact on global extreme rainfall using a Bayesian regional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xun; Renard, Benjamin; Thyer, Mark; Westra, Seth; Lang, Michel

    2013-04-01

    El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) effects on rainfall and streamflow have been extensively reported in the Pacific region, but also in Europe and Africa. In this study, we apply a non-stationary regional extreme value model to a new global database of 11,588 high-quality sites worldwide to describe the global pattern of ENSO impact on extreme rainfall. The data are available at monthly intervals, and we focus on approximately 7000 observation sites which have series longer than 40 years. The Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), a measure of ENSO, is used as a covariate. Parameters are estimated with an MCMC method under the Bayesian framework, which allows quantifying the ENSO impact and estimating the associated credibility intervals. Three aspects are mainly considered in this study. One is to identify the regions where extreme rainfall is significantly influenced by ENSO. Another is to evaluate the extent to which ENSO exhibits asymmetric impacts between the El Niño and La Niña phases. The third aspect is to describe the spatial pattern of the impact intensity.

  9. Complex active regions as the main source of extreme and large solar proton events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishkov, V. N.

    2013-12-01

    A study of solar proton sources indicated that solar flare events responsible for ≥2000 pfu proton fluxes mostly occur in complex active regions (CARs), i.e., in transition structures between active regions and activity complexes. Different classes of similar structures and their relation to solar proton events (SPEs) and evolution, depending on the origination conditions, are considered. Arguments in favor of the fact that sunspot groups with extreme dimensions are CARs are presented. An analysis of the flare activity in a CAR resulted in the detection of "physical" boundaries, which separate magnetic structures of the same polarity and are responsible for the independent development of each structure.

  10. Improving Ramsey spectroscopy in the extreme-ultraviolet region with a random-sampling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Eramo, R.; Bellini, M.; Corsi, C.; Liontos, I.; Cavalieri, S.

    2011-04-15

    Ramsey-like techniques, based on the coherent excitation of a sample by delayed and phase-correlated pulses, are promising tools for high-precision spectroscopic tests of QED in the extreme-ultraviolet (xuv) spectral region, but currently suffer experimental limitations related to long acquisition times and critical stability issues. Here we propose a random subsampling approach to Ramsey spectroscopy that, by allowing experimentalists to reach a given spectral resolution goal in a fraction of the usual acquisition time, leads to substantial improvements in high-resolution spectroscopy and may open the way to a widespread application of Ramsey-like techniques to precision measurements in the xuv spectral region.

  11. Cyclones and extreme windstorm events over Europe under climate change: Global and regional climate model diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckebusch, G. C.; Ulbrich, U.

    2003-04-01

    More than any changes of the climate system mean state conditions, the development of extreme events may influence social, economic and legal aspects of our society. This linkage results from the impact of extreme climate events (natural hazards) on environmental systems which again are directly linked to human activities. Prominent examples from the recent past are the record breaking rainfall amounts of August 2002 in central Europe which produced widespread floodings or the wind storm Lothar of December 1999. Within the MICE (Modelling the Impact of Climate Extremes) project framework an assessment of the impact of changes in extremes will be done. The investigation is carried out for several different impact categories as agriculture, energy use and property damage. Focus is laid on the diagnostics of GCM and RCM simulations under different climate change scenarios. In this study we concentrate on extreme windstorms and their relationship to cyclone activity in the global HADCM3 as well as in the regional HADRM3 model under two climate change scenarios (SRESA2a, B2a). In order to identify cyclones we used an objective algorithm from Murry and Simmonds which was widely tested under several different conditions. A slight increase in the occurrence of systems is identified above northern parts of central Europe for both scenarios. For more severe systems (core pressure < 990 hPa) we find an increase for western Europe. Strong wind events can be defined via different percentile values of the windspeed (e.g. above the 95 percentile). By this means the relationship between strong wind events and cyclones is also investigated. For several regions (e.g. Germany, France, Spain) a shift to more deep cyclones connected with an increasing number of strong wind events is found.

  12. Scaling of precipitation extremes with temperature in the French Mediterranean region: What explains the hook shape?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobinski, P.; Alonzo, B.; Bastin, S.; Silva, N. Da; Muller, C.

    2016-04-01

    Expected changes to future extreme precipitation remain a key uncertainty associated with anthropogenic climate change. Extreme precipitation has been proposed to scale with the precipitable water content in the atmosphere. Assuming constant relative humidity, this implies an increase of precipitation extremes at a rate of about 7% °C-1 globally as indicated by the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. Increases faster and slower than Clausius-Clapeyron have also been reported. In this work, we examine the scaling between precipitation extremes and temperature in the present climate using simulations and measurements from surface weather stations collected in the frame of the HyMeX and MED-CORDEX programs in Southern France. Of particular interest are departures from the Clausius-Clapeyron thermodynamic expectation, their spatial and temporal distribution, and their origin. Looking at the scaling of precipitation extreme with temperature, two regimes emerge which form a hook shape: one at low temperatures (cooler than around 15°C) with rates of increase close to the Clausius-Clapeyron rate and one at high temperatures (warmer than about 15°C) with sub-Clausius-Clapeyron rates and most often negative rates. On average, the region of focus does not seem to exhibit super Clausius-Clapeyron behavior except at some stations, in contrast to earlier studies. Many factors can contribute to departure from Clausius-Clapeyron scaling: time and spatial averaging, choice of scaling temperature (surface versus condensation level), and precipitation efficiency and vertical velocity in updrafts that are not necessarily constant with temperature. But most importantly, the dynamical contribution of orography to precipitation in the fall over this area during the so-called "Cevenoles" events, explains the hook shape of the scaling of precipitation extremes.

  13. Trends of temperature and precipitation extremes in the Loess Plateau Region of China, 1961-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi-xiang; Wang, Meng-ben; Fan, Xiao-hui; Zhang, Feng; Zhu, Shi-zhong; Zhao, Tian-liang

    2016-05-01

    The spatial and temporal trends of 11 (7) temperature (precipitation) extreme indices are examined for the Loess Plateau Region (LPR) and its southeast and northwest sub-regions based on daily observations at 214 meteorological stations. Results show widespread significant warming trends for all the temperature extremes except for the diurnal temperature range (DTR) and the lowest daily maximum temperature in each year (TXn) during 1961-2010. When regionally averaged, a significant warming trend is detected for all the indices except for DTR and TXn in the past 50 years. Compared with the entire LPR, a significant warming trend is detected for all the indices except for DTR and TXn over the southeast sub-region of LPR; while it is observed for all the indices over the northwest. The trends for these indices are generally stronger in the northwest than in the southeast in the past 50 years. In contrast, for precipitation indices, only a small percentage of areas show significant drying or wetting trends and, when regionally averaged, none of them displays significant trends during the past 50 years. On the sub-regional scale, however, a larger percentage of areas show significant drying trends for precipitation indices generally over the southeast relative to the entire LPR, and noticeably, the sub-regional average heavy precipitation (R10mm) and wet day precipitation (PRCPTOT) display significant decreasing trends during the past 50 years; whereas only a slightly larger percentage of areas show significant wetting trends for these indices over the northwest compared with the entire LPR, and when sub-regionally averaged, none of the indices have significant trends during the past 50 years.

  14. Amplified subtropical stationary waves in boreal summer and their implications for regional water extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, J.; Li, W.; Deng, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The linkage between climate change and increased frequency/magnitude of weather extremes remains an open question in the scientific field. Here we investigate such a dynamical linkage by focusing on an amplification trend of the northern subtropical stationary waves found in recent decades. Specifically, we show that in multiple modern reanalysis products, a robust positive trend exists in a wave amplitude index defined through summer-mean tropospheric stream function field. Pronounced changes in the subtropical atmospheric circulation accompany this wave amplification, including intensified South Asian monsoon and strengthened subtropical highs over the North Pacific and North Atlantic oceans. Through modifying characteristics of large-scale moisture transport, these circulation changes are in turn coupled with changes in regional precipitation amount and the occurrence of water extremes including both droughts and heavy rainfall events. Given this connection, the amplified stationary waves have likely contributed to the elevated occurrence probabilities of droughts in the central United States, Mexico, Japan and northern China as well as those of heavy rainfall events in South Asia, southeastern China and eastern United States. Since the amplifying stationary waves are a robust feature in models' projection of future climate, our results suggest an increased risk of water extremes over the above-mentioned regions in the near future.

  15. Amplified subtropical stationary waves in boreal summer and their implications for regional water extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiacan; Li, Wenhong; Deng, Yi

    2015-10-01

    The linkage between climate change and increased frequency/magnitude of weather extremes remains an open question in the scientific field. Here we investigate such a dynamical linkage by focusing on an amplification trend of the northern subtropical stationary waves found in recent decades. Specifically, we show that in multiple modern reanalysis products, a robust positive trend exists in a wave amplitude index defined through the summer-mean tropospheric stream function field. Pronounced changes in the subtropical atmospheric circulation accompany this wave amplification, including an intensified South Asian monsoon and strengthened subtropical highs over the North Pacific and North Atlantic oceans. Through modifying the characteristics of large-scale moisture transport, these circulation changes are coupled to changes in the regional precipitation amount and the occurrence of water extremes including both droughts and heavy rainfall events. Given this connection, amplified stationary waves have likely contributed to the elevated occurrence probabilities of droughts in the central United States, Mexico, Japan, and northern China, as well as those of heavy rainfall events in South Asia, southeastern China, and the eastern United States. These results suggest that as climate warming continues, the amplification of subtropical stationary waves will increase the risk of water extremes over the above-mentioned regions.

  16. Climate change and probabilistic scenario of streamflow extremes in a cryospheric alpine region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Gao, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Future projections of streamflow extremes are of paramount significance in assessing the climate impacts on social and natural systems, particularly for the Himalayan alpine region in the Tibetan Plateau known as the Asian Water Tower. This study strives to quantify the uncertainties from different sources in simulating future extreme flows and seeks to construct reliable scenarios of future extreme flows for the headwater catchment of the Yellow River Basin in the 21st century. The results can be formulated as follows: (1) The revised snow model based on a daily active temperature method is superior to the commonly used degree-day method in simulating snowmelt processes. (2) In general, hydrological models contribute more uncertainties than the downscaling methods in high flow and low flow over the cryospheric alpine regions characterized by the snow-rainfall induced runoff processes under most scenarios. Meanwhile, impacts to uncertainty vary with time. (3) The ultimate probability of high-flow exhibits a downward trend in future by using an unconditional method, whereas positive changes in probability of low-flow are projected. The method in the work includes a variety of influence from different contributing factors (e.g. downscaling models, hydrological models, model parameters, and their simulation skills) on streamflow projection, therefore can offer more information (i.e. different percentiles of flow and uncertainty ranges) for future water resources planning compared with the purely deterministic approaches. Hence, the results are beneficial to boost our current methodologies of climate impact research in the Himalayan alpine zone.

  17. Identification of extreme precipitation threat across midlatitude regions based on short-wave circulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shih-Yu; Davies, Robert E.; Gillies, Robert R.

    2013-10-01

    most severe thunderstorms, producing extreme precipitation, occur over subtropical and midlatitude regions. Atmospheric conditions conducive to organized, intense thunderstorms commonly involve the coupling of a low-level jet (LLJ) with a synoptic short wave. The midlatitude synoptic activity is frequently modulated by the circumglobal teleconnection (CGT), in which meridional gradients of the jet stream act as a guide for short Rossby waves. Previous research has linked extreme precipitation events with either the CGT or the LLJ but has not linked the two circulation features together. In this study, a circulation-based index was developed by combining (a) the degree of the CGT and LLJ coupling, (b) the extent to which this CGT-LLJ coupling connects to regional precipitation and (c) the spatial correspondence with the CGT (short wave) trending pattern over the recent 32 years (1979-2010). Four modern-era global reanalyses, in conjunction with four gridded precipitation data sets, were utilized to minimize spurious trends. The results are suggestive of a link between the CGT/LLJ trends and several recent extreme precipitation events, including those leading to the 2008 Midwest flood in U.S., the 2011 tornado outbreaks in southeastern U.S., the 2010 Queensland flood in northeastern Australia, and to the opposite side the 2012 central U.S. drought. Moreover, an analysis of three Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 models from the historical experiments points to the role of greenhouse gases in forming the CGT trends during the warm season.

  18. Formation of Overheated Regions and Truncated Disks around Black Holes: Three-dimensional General Relativistic Radiation-magnetohydrodynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.; Ohsuga, Ken; Kawashima, Tomohisa; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro

    2016-07-01

    Using three-dimensional general relativistic radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulations of accretion flows around stellar mass black holes, we report that the relatively cold disk (≳ {10}7 {{K}}) is truncated near the black hole. Hot and less dense regions, of which the gas temperature is ≳ {10}9 {{K}} and more than 10 times higher than the radiation temperature (overheated regions), appear within the truncation radius. The overheated regions also appear above as well as below the disk, sandwiching the cold disk, leading to the effective Compton upscattering. The truncation radius is ∼ 30{r}{{g}} for \\dot{M}∼ {L}{{Edd}}/{c}2, where {r}{{g}},\\dot{M},{L}{Edd},c are the gravitational radius, mass accretion rate, Eddington luminosity, and light speed, respectively. Our results are consistent with observations of a very high state, whereby the truncated disk is thought to be embedded in the hot rarefied regions. The truncation radius shifts inward to ∼ 10{r}{{g}} with increasing mass accretion rate \\dot{M}∼ 100{L}{{Edd}}/{c}2, which is very close to an innermost stable circular orbit. This model corresponds to the slim disk state observed in ultraluminous X-ray sources. Although the overheated regions shrink if the Compton cooling effectively reduces the gas temperature, the sandwich structure does not disappear at the range of \\dot{M}≲ 100{L}{{Edd}}/{c}2. Our simulations also reveal that the gas temperature in the overheated regions depends on black hole spin, which would be due to efficient energy transport from black hole to disks through the Poynting flux, resulting in gas heating.

  19. Formation of Overheated Regions and Truncated Disks around Black Holes: Three-dimensional General Relativistic Radiation-magnetohydrodynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.; Ohsuga, Ken; Kawashima, Tomohisa; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro

    2016-07-01

    Using three-dimensional general relativistic radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulations of accretion flows around stellar mass black holes, we report that the relatively cold disk (≳ {10}7 {{K}}) is truncated near the black hole. Hot and less dense regions, of which the gas temperature is ≳ {10}9 {{K}} and more than 10 times higher than the radiation temperature (overheated regions), appear within the truncation radius. The overheated regions also appear above as well as below the disk, sandwiching the cold disk, leading to the effective Compton upscattering. The truncation radius is ˜ 30{r}{{g}} for \\dot{M}˜ {L}{{Edd}}/{c}2, where {r}{{g}},\\dot{M},{L}{Edd},c are the gravitational radius, mass accretion rate, Eddington luminosity, and light speed, respectively. Our results are consistent with observations of a very high state, whereby the truncated disk is thought to be embedded in the hot rarefied regions. The truncation radius shifts inward to ˜ 10{r}{{g}} with increasing mass accretion rate \\dot{M}˜ 100{L}{{Edd}}/{c}2, which is very close to an innermost stable circular orbit. This model corresponds to the slim disk state observed in ultraluminous X-ray sources. Although the overheated regions shrink if the Compton cooling effectively reduces the gas temperature, the sandwich structure does not disappear at the range of \\dot{M}≲ 100{L}{{Edd}}/{c}2. Our simulations also reveal that the gas temperature in the overheated regions depends on black hole spin, which would be due to efficient energy transport from black hole to disks through the Poynting flux, resulting in gas heating.

  20. Spatiotemporal distribution characteristics and attribution of extreme regional low temperature event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tai-Chen; Zhang, Ke-Quan; Su, Hai-Jing; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Gong, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Wen-Yu

    2015-10-01

    Based on an objective identification technique for regional low temperature event (OITRLTE), the daily minimum temperature in China has been detected from 1960 to 2013. During this period, there were 60 regional extreme low temperature events (ERLTEs), which are included in the 690 regional low temperature events (RLTEs). The 60 ERLTEs are analyzed in this paper. The results show that in the last 50 years, the intensity of the ERLTEs has become weak; the number of lasted days has decreased; and, the affected area has become small. However, that situation has changed in this century. In terms of spatial distribution, the high intensity regions are mainly in Northern China while the high frequency regions concentrate in Central and Eastern China. According to the affected area of each event, the 60 ERLTEs are classified into six types. The atmospheric circulation background fields which correspond to these types are also analyzed. The results show that, influenced by stronger blocking highs of Ural and Lake Baikal, as well as stronger southward polar vortex and East Asia major trough at 500-hPa geopotential height, cold air from high latitudes is guided to move southward and abnormal northerly winds at 850 hPa makes the cold air blow into China along diverse paths, thereby forming different types of regional extreme low temperatures in winter. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41305075), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB955203 and 2012CB955902), and the Special Scientific Research on Public Welfare Industry, China (Grant No. GYHY201306049).

  1. Improving plot- and regional-scale crop models for simulating impacts of climate variability and extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, F.; Rötter, R.

    2013-12-01

    Many studies on global climate report that climate variability is increasing with more frequent and intense extreme events1. There are quite large uncertainties from both the plot- and regional-scale models in simulating impacts of climate variability and extremes on crop development, growth and productivity2,3. One key to reducing the uncertainties is better exploitation of experimental data to eliminate crop model deficiencies and develop better algorithms that more adequately capture the impacts of extreme events, such as high temperature and drought, on crop performance4,5. In the present study, in a first step, the inter-annual variability in wheat yield and climate from 1971 to 2012 in Finland was investigated. Using statistical approaches the impacts of climate variability and extremes on wheat growth and productivity were quantified. In a second step, a plot-scale model, WOFOST6, and a regional-scale crop model, MCWLA7, were calibrated and validated, and applied to simulate wheat growth and yield variability from 1971-2012. Next, the estimated impacts of high temperature stress, cold damage, and drought stress on crop growth and productivity based on the statistical approaches, and on crop simulation models WOFOST and MCWLA were compared. Then, the impact mechanisms of climate extremes on crop growth and productivity in the WOFOST model and MCWLA model were identified, and subsequently, the various algorithm and impact functions were fitted against the long-term crop trial data. Finally, the impact mechanisms, algorithms and functions in WOFOST model and MCWLA model were improved to better simulate the impacts of climate variability and extremes, particularly high temperature stress, cold damage and drought stress for location-specific and large area climate impact assessments. Our studies provide a good example of how to improve, in parallel, the plot- and regional-scale models for simulating impacts of climate variability and extremes, as needed for

  2. Evaluating daily and extreme seasonal precipitations over continental Africa from a Regional Climate Model Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamba Sylla, Mouhamadou; Mariotti, Laura; Coppola, Erika; Giorgi, Filippo

    2010-05-01

    Spatial and temporal variability of rainfall over Africa offers considerable challenges on climate change over the region. This is because of the complexity of regional climates in Africa and their associated geographic features. Adding to that complexity are deserts, vegetation variations, numerous mountain chains that can alter regional climate and weather patterns, the influence of the land-sea contrast due to the presence of several large lakes and the surrounding Indian and Atlantic Oceans. This leads to strong fluctuations of rainfall that may cause drought and flood in the region. Therefore, being able to simulate the spatial distribution of mean precipitation is quite important but also capturing their occurrences and intensities is critical for Africa whose economy relies on rain-fed agriculture. The International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) Regional Climate Model (RegCM3), driven by the newly produced ERA-Interim reanalysis, is used to investigate this issue. Several indices, such as the number of wet days and their intensity, maximum dry and wet spells length and the frequency of heavy precipitation days, are used to characterize the spatial variability of seasonal extreme rainfall over continental Africa. Model results are compared to both TRMM and FEWS rainfall data. They indicate that although the model captures the location of longest and shortest wet and dry spells, it tends to extend slightly the wet spell length around mountainous regions and along the ITCZ and the dry spell length over northern and southern Africa during austral and boreal summer respectively. This is mainly visible when compared to FEWS. Extension of the wet spell length may be partly related to the overestimation of the number of wet days. As a result, the intensity due to the wet days only is slightly overpredicted in these regions. This is, in turn, linked to the tendency of the RegCM3 to produce more intense and convective rainfall events in the ITCZ and the ZAB as

  3. A multivariate regional test for trend detection in extreme rainfall: the case of extreme daily rainfall in the French Mediterranean area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, N.; Neppel, L.; Sabatier, R.

    2009-09-01

    A multivariate regional test for trend detection in extreme rainfall: the case of extreme daily rainfall in the French Mediterranean area. N. Pujol, L. Neppel, R. Sabatier The effect of human activity on the climate and on the earth global warming is now accepted by all the scientific community. In the context of a global warming one can ask for the consequences on the extreme events: in several regions their frequencies and/or their magnitude are expected to increase in the future. As the global warming starts in the beginning of the XXe century, can we already find some signal of any changes affecting the extreme events in the long series of observations? We try to bring some answer focusing on the extreme daily rainfalls in the French Mediterranean area. A set of 92 series of annual maxima daily rainfall has been sampled during at least 56 years. Those gauges have been gathered in seven homogeneous climatic regions with regard to extreme rainfall. A regional multivariate parametric test of trend detection has been developed, based on recent improvements in trend detection (Renard et al., 2008). The regional consistency is taken into account considering a common climatic trend for all the series of the same homogeneous region. The test consists of the following four steps: i) The marginal distribution of each extreme rainfall series has been modelled with the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution function and the spatial dependence between the time series of a given region has been modelled with copulas function. ii) Two models have been defined: the stationary one (M0) and the non stationary one, where the GEV position parameters are supposed to be time dependant (M1). iii) The maximization of the likelihood function with genetic algorithm has lead to the parameters estimation. iv) The likelihood ratio test has been applied to select the "best" model between M0 and M1. From a theoretical point of view, the present work underlines i) the necessity of

  4. Attributing regional effects of the 2014 Jordanian extreme drought to external climate drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergaoui, Karim; Mitchell, Dann; Zaaboul, Rashyd; Otto, Friederike; McDonnell, Rachael; Dadson, Simon; Allen, Myles

    2015-04-01

    Throughout 2014, the regions of Jordan, Israel, Lebanon and Syria have experienced a persistent draught with clear impacts on the local populations. In this study we perform an extreme event attribution analysis of how such a draught has changed under climate change, with a specific focus on the flow rate of the Upper Jordan river and the water level of Lake Tiberious (AKA the Sea of Galilee). Both of which hold major societal, political and religious importance. To perform the analysis we make use of distributed computing power to run thousands of modelled years of 2014 with slightly different initial conditions. We use an atmosphere only model (HadAM3p) with a nested 50 km regional model covering Africa and the Middle East. The 50 km model atmospheric variables will be used directly to force offline our 1 km LIS surface model. Two separate experiments and simulations are performed, 1. for all known climate forcings that are present in 2014, and 2. for a naturalised 2014 scenario where we assume humans never impacted the climate. We perform sensitivity analyses on the observed precipitation over the regions of interest, and determine that the TRMM data is in good agreement with station data obtained from the Jordanian Ministry of Water. Using a combination of the TRMM and model data we are able to make clear statements on the attribution of a 2014-like extreme draught event to human causal factors.

  5. Regional frequency analysis of extreme rainfalls using partial L moments method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Zahrahtul Amani; Shabri, Ani

    2013-07-01

    An approach based on regional frequency analysis using L moments and LH moments are revisited in this study. Subsequently, an alternative regional frequency analysis using the partial L moments (PL moments) method is employed, and a new relationship for homogeneity analysis is developed. The results were then compared with those obtained using the method of L moments and LH moments of order two. The Selangor catchment, consisting of 37 sites and located on the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia, is chosen as a case study. PL moments for the generalized extreme value (GEV), generalized logistic (GLO), and generalized Pareto distributions were derived and used to develop the regional frequency analysis procedure. PL moment ratio diagram and Z test were employed in determining the best-fit distribution. Comparison between the three approaches showed that GLO and GEV distributions were identified as the suitable distributions for representing the statistical properties of extreme rainfall in Selangor. Monte Carlo simulation used for performance evaluation shows that the method of PL moments would outperform L and LH moments methods for estimation of large return period events.

  6. Mapping extreme rainfall in a mountainous region using geostatistical techniques: a case study in Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudhomme, Christel; Reed, Duncan W.

    1999-10-01

    The spatial pattern of precipitation is known to be highly dependent on meteorological conditions and relief. However, the relationships between precipitation and topography in mountainous areas are not very well known, partly because of the complex topography in these regions, and partly because of the sparsity of information available to study such relationships in high elevation areas. The purpose of the investigation was to find a method of mapping extreme rainfall in the mountainous region of Scotland, which was easy to use and to understand, and which gave satisfactory results both in terms of statistical performance and consistency with meteorological mechanisms.Among the interpolation methods described in the literature, ordinary kriging and modified residual kriging have been found attractive by reason of their simplicity and ease of use. Both methods have been applied to map an index of extreme rainfall, the median of the annual maximum daily rainfall (RMED), in the mountainous region of Scotland. Rainfall records from a network of 1003 raingauges are used, covering Scotland with uneven density. A 4-parameter regression equation developed in a previous study, relating a transformed variable of RMED to topographical variables, is used in the modified residual kriging method. Comparing the relative performances of ordinary kriging and modified residual kriging shows that the use of topographical information helps to compensate for the lack of local data from which any interpolation method, such as ordinary kriging, might suffer, thus improving the final mapping.

  7. Detailed investigations on radiative opacity and emissivity of tin plasmas in the extreme-ultraviolet region.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jiaolong; Gao, Cheng; Yuan, Jianmin

    2010-08-01

    Radiative opacity and emissivity of tin plasmas at average ionization degree of about 10 was investigated in detail by using a fully relativistic detailed level accounting approach, in which main physical effects on the opacity were carefully taken into account. Among these physical effects, configuration interaction, in particular core-valence electron correlations, plays an important role on the determination of accurate atomic data required in the calculation of opacity. It results in a strong narrowing of lines from all transition arrays and strong absorption is located in a narrow wavelength region of 12.5-14 nm for Sn plasmas. Using a complete accurate atomic data, we investigated the opacity of Sn plasmas at a variety of physical condition. Among the respective ions of Xe6+-Xe15+ , Xe10+ has the largest absorption cross section at 13.5 nm, while the favorable physical condition for maximal absorption at 13.5 nm do not mean that Xe10+ has the largest fraction. Comparison with other theoretical results showed that a complete set of consistent accurate atomic data, which lacks very much, is essential to predict accurate opacity. Our atomic model is useful and can be applied to interpret opacity experiments. Further benchmark experiments are urgently needed to clarify the physical effects on the opacity of Sn plasmas. PMID:20866928

  8. Seismic hazard assessment in the Tibet-Himalayan region based on observed and modeled extreme earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A.; Sokolov, V. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Ground shaking due to recent catastrophic earthquakes are estimated to be significantly higher than that predicted by a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). A reason is that extreme (large magnitude and rare) seismic events are not accounted in PSHA in the most cases due to the lack of information and unknown reoccurrence time of the extremes. We present a new approach to assessment of regional seismic hazard, which incorporates observed (recorded and historic) seismicity and modeled extreme events. We apply this approach to PSHA of the Tibet-Himalayan region. The large magnitude events simulated for several thousand years in models of lithospheric block-and-fault dynamics and consistent with the regional geophysical and geodetic data are employed together with the observed earthquakes for the Monte-Carlo PSHA. Earthquake scenarios are generated stochastically to sample the magnitude and spatial distribution of seismicity (observed and modeled) as well as the distribution of ground motion for each seismic event. The peak ground acceleration (PGA) values (that is, ground shaking at a site), which are expected to be exceeded at least once in 50 years with a probability of 10%, are mapped and compared to those PGA values observed and predicted earlier. The results show that the PGA values predicted by our assessment fit much better the observed ground shaking due to the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake than those predicted by conventional PSHA. Our approach to seismic hazard assessment provides a better understanding of ground shaking due to possible large-magnitude events and could be useful for risk assessment, earthquake engineering purposes, and emergency planning.

  9. Multi-Scale Statistical Properties of Rainfall for Extreme Hydrometeorological Events in Mountainous Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykanen, D. K.

    2006-12-01

    Hydrometeorological events that produce heavy rainfall and catastrophic flooding in mountainous regions present a great challenge for forecasters. Accurate predictions of flooding resulting from this type of storm require high resolution rainfall data. In a forecast mode, output from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models must be used to drive the hydrologic models. Although much progress has been made in the past decade, the output from NWP models remains at a coarser resolution than what is needed for hydrologic predictions. Bridging the scale gap between precipitation forecasts from NWP models and the resolution needs of hydrologic models for streamflow prediction requires alternative methods such as statistical downscaling of the rainfall fields. This study quantifies the multi-scale statistical properties of rainfall for extreme hydrometeorological events in mountainous regions across scales of 1~20 km. The Buffalo Creek flood of 1996, Fort Collins flood of 1997, and several other extreme hydrometerological events in the Appalachian region and Front Range of the Rocky Mountains are included in the analysis. The following questions will be investigated: (1) does spatial scaling exist as a common feature in convective rainfall events in mountainous regions?, (2) at what spatial scales do meteorological and topographic controls manifest themselves in the space-time variability of the rainfall fields?, and (3) how does meteorological forcings and geographic location impact trends in topographic influences on the multi-scale statistical properties of rainfall? Focus is placed on linking changes in the multi-scale statistical properties with orographic influences on the rainfall and developing predictive relationships between multi-scale parameters and meteorological and topographic forcings. Differences in geographic region and predominant orographic controls (e.g., windward versus leeward forcing) on trends in multi-scale properties of rainfall is investigated

  10. Multi-model analysis of precipitation-related climatological extremes for the Carpathian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, Anna; Pongracz, Rita; Bartholy, Judit

    2015-04-01

    As a consequence of global climate change, both frequency and intensity of climatological and meteorological extremes are likely to change. These will certainly further induce various effects on hydrological extremes. Although more frequent hot weather in summer and overall warmer climatic conditions compared to the past decades are quite straightforward direct consequences of global warming, the effects on precipitation might be less clear because the higher spatial and temporal variabilities might hide robust changing signals. Nevertheless, precipitation is one of the most important meteorological variables since it considerably affects natural ecosystems and cultivated vegetation as well, as most of human activities. Extreme precipitation events - both excessive, intense rainfalls and severe droughts - may result in severe environmental, agricultural, and economical disasters. For instance, excessive precipitation may induce floods, flash-floods, landslides, traffic accidents. On the other hand, the lack of precipitation for extended period and coincidental intense heat wave often lead to severe drought events, which certainly affect agricultural production negatively, and hence, food safety might also be threatened. In order to avoid or at least reduce the effects of these precipitation-related hazards, national and local communities need to develop regional adaptation strategies, and then, act according to them. For this purpose, climatological projections are needed as a scientific basis. Coarse resolution results of global climate model (GCM) simulations must be downscaled to regional and local scales, hence better serving decision-makers' and end-users' needs. Dynamical downscaling technique applies regional climate model (RCM) to provide fine resolution climatological estimations for the future. Thus, in this study 11 completed RCM simulations with 25 km horizontal resolution are used from the ENSEMBLES database taking into account SRES A1B scenario for

  11. High-altitude cusp: The tremendous large and extremely dynamic region in geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Fritz, T. A.

    2003-04-01

    High-altitude dayside cusps (both northern and southern) are the tremendous large and extremely dynamic regions in geospace. They have a size of as large as 6 Re and are always there day after day. Turbulent diamagnetic cavities have been observed there. Associated with these cavities are charged particles with energies from 20 keV up to 10 MeV. The intensities of the cusp energetic ions are observed to increase by as large as four orders of the magnitude when compared to regions adjacent to the cusp which includes the magnetosheath. Their seed populations is a mixture of ionospheric and solar wind particles. Some of the diamagnetic cavities were independent of the IMF directions, suggesting that the cusp diamagnetic cavities are different from the magnetospheric sash predicted by MHD simulations. Turbulent electrical field with an amplitude of about 10 mV/m also presents in the cusp, and a cusp resonant acceleration mechanism is suggested.

  12. Extremely Low Ionospheric Peak Altitudes in the Polar-Hole Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.

    1999-01-01

    Vertical electron-density (N (sub e)) profiles, deduced from newly-available ISIS-II digital ionospheric topside-sounder data, are used to investigate the "polar-hole" region within the winter, nighttime polar cap ionosphere during solar minimum. The hole region is located around 0200 MLT near the poleward side of the auroral oval. Earlier investigations had revealed very low N (sub e) values in this region (down to 200/cu cm near 300 km). In the present study, such low N, values (approx. 100/cu cm) were only found near the ISIS (International Satellite for Ionospheric Study)-II altitude of 1400 km. The peak ionospheric concentration below the spacecraft remained fairly constant (approx. 10 (exp 5)/cu cm across the hole region but the altitude of the peak dropped dramatically. This peak dropped, surprisingly, to the vicinity of 100 km. These observations suggest that the earlier satellite in situ measurements, interpreted as deep holes in the ionospheric F-region concentration, could have been made during conditions of an extreme decrease in the altitude of the ionospheric N (sub e) peak. The observations, in combination with other data, indicate that the absence of an F-layer peak may be a frequent occurrence at high latitudes.

  13. Simulation of Extreme Surface Winds by Regional Climate Models in the NARCCAP Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatteberg, R.; Takle, E. S.

    2011-12-01

    Surface winds play a significant role in many natural processes as well as providing a very important ecological service for many human activities. Surface winds ventilate pollutants and heat from our cities, contribute to pollination for our crops, and regulate the fluxes of heat, moisture, and carbon dioxide from the earth's surface. Many environmental models such as biogeochemical models, crop models, lake models, pollutant transport models, etc., use surface winds as a key variable. Studies of the impacts of climate change and climate variability on a wide range of natural systems and coupled human-natural systems frequently need information on how surface wind speeds will change as greenhouse gas concentrations in the earth's atmosphere change. We have studied the characteristics of extreme winds - both high winds and low winds - created by regional climate models (RCMs) in the NARCCAP archives. We evaluated the capabilities of five RCMs forced by NCEP reanalysis data as well as global climate model (GCM) data for contemporary and future scenario climates to capture the observed statistical distribution of surface winds, both high-wind events and low-wind conditions. Our domain is limited to the Midwest (37°N to 49°N, -82°W to -101°W) with the Great Lakes masked out, which eliminates orographic effects that may contribute to regional circulations. The majority of this study focuses on the warm seasonal in order to examine derechos on the extreme high end and air pollution and plant processes on the low wind speed end. To examine extreme high winds we focus on derechos, which are long-lasting convectively driven extreme wind events that frequently leave a swath of damage extending across multiple states. These events are unusual in that, despite their relatively small spatial scale, they can persist for hours or even days, drawing energy from well-organized larger mesoscale or synoptic scale processes. We examine the ability of NARCCAP RCMs to reproduce

  14. Variability of Winter Extreme Heat Flux Events in Kuroshio Extension and Gulf Stream Extension Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Chang, P.; Wu, D.; Lin, X.

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed extreme surface heat flux events, defined by daily sensible (latent) heat flux greater than 80 percentile value (hereafter referred to as high-flux events) associated with boreal winter (NDJFM) cold-air outbreaks (CAOs) in the Kuroshio Extension Region (KER) of the Northwestern Pacific, using the high-resolution NCEP-CFSR (1979-2009) and NCEP-NCAR (1948-2009) reanalysis, and compared the results to those in the Gulf Stream Region (GSR) of the Northwestern Atlantic. The average accumulated number of days of the Pacific high-flux events, which typically last fewer than 3 days, is only less than 20% of the winter period but contributes significantly (>30%) to the total sensible and latent heat fluxes during the entire winter season in the KER. These high flux events are characterized by "cold storms" with a positive geopotential height anomaly (anti-cyclone) over Japan and a negative geopotential height anomaly (cyclone) further downstream, in between which there is an anomalous northerly wind that brings cold and dry air from the Eurasian continent to the KER. In contrast, non-event days are characterized by "warm storms" that have a cyclone (an anti-cyclone) to the west (east) of the KER, bringing warm and moist air from the subtropics to the KER. There are important differences between the Pacific and Atlantic CAOs. Generally, the Atlantic CAOs occur more frequently with stronger intensity and shorter duration than those in the Pacific. The "cold storms" in the KER also differ from those in the GSR in terms of their detailed structure and orientation relative to geographic location. However, in both the Pacific and Atlantic, interannual and longer term variations of sensible and latent heat flux are determined by the high flux events, suggesting that extreme winter storm events play an important role in the mid-latitude climate system. In the Pacific basin, decadal variability dominates the low-frequency variability of total and event-day sensible and

  15. Analysis of Extreme Events in Regional Climate Model Simulations for the Pacific Northwest using weatherathome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mera, R. J.; Mote, P.; Weber, J.

    2011-12-01

    One of the most prominent impacts of climate change over the Pacific Northwest is the potential for an elevated number of extreme precipitation events over the region. Planning for natural hazards such as increasing number of floods related to high-precipitation events have, in general, focused on avoiding development in floodplains and conditioning development to withstand inundation with a minimum of losses. Nationwide, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) estimates that about one quarter of its payments cover damage that has occurred outside mapped floodplains. It is clear that traditional flood-based planning will not be sufficient to predict and avoid future losses resulting from climate-related hazards such as high-precipitation events. In order to address this problem, the present study employs regional climate model output for future climate change scenarios to aid with the development of a map-based inventory of future hazard risks that can contribute to the development of a "planning-scale" decision support system for the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD). Climate model output is derived from the climateprediction.net (CPDN) weatherathome project, an innovative climate science experiment that utilizes volunteer computers from users worldwide to produce hundreds of thousands superensembles of regional climate simulations of the Western United States climate from 1950 to 2050. The spatial and temporal distribution of extreme weather events are analyzed for the Pacific Northwest to diagnose the model's capabilities as an input for map products such as impacts on hydrology. Special attention is given to intensity and frequency of Atmospheric River events in historical and future climate contexts.

  16. ACTIVE REGION MOSS: DOPPLER SHIFTS FROM HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Mason, Helen E.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2012-07-01

    Studying the Doppler shifts and the temperature dependence of Doppler shifts in moss regions can help us understand the heating processes in the core of the active regions. In this paper, we have used an active region observation recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode on 2007 December 12 to measure the Doppler shifts in the moss regions. We have distinguished the moss regions from the rest of the active region by defining a low-density cutoff as derived by Tripathi et al. in 2010. We have carried out a very careful analysis of the EIS wavelength calibration based on the method described by Young et al. in 2012. For spectral lines having maximum sensitivity between log T = 5.85 and log T = 6.25 K, we find that the velocity distribution peaks at around 0 km s{sup -1} with an estimated error of 4-5 km s{sup -1}. The width of the distribution decreases with temperature. The mean of the distribution shows a blueshift which increases with increasing temperature and the distribution also shows asymmetries toward blueshift. Comparing these results with observables predicted from different coronal heating models, we find that these results are consistent with both steady and impulsive heating scenarios. However, the fact that there are a significant number of pixels showing velocity amplitudes that exceed the uncertainty of 5 km s{sup -1} is suggestive of impulsive heating. Clearly, further observational constraints are needed to distinguish between these two heating scenarios.

  17. A hierarchical Bayesian regional model for nonstationary precipitation extremes in Northern California conditioned on tropical moisture exports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinschneider, Scott; Lall, Upmanu

    2015-03-01

    Warm, moist, and longitudinally confined tropical air masses are being linked to some of the most extreme precipitation and flooding events in the midlatitudes. The interannual frequency and intensity of such atmospheric rivers (ARs), or tropical moisture exports (TMEs), are connected to the risk of extreme precipitation events in areas where moisture convergence occurs. This study presents a nonstationary, regional frequency analysis of precipitation extremes in Northern California that is conditioned on the interannual variability of TMEs entering the region. Parameters of a multisite peaks-over-threshold model are allowed to vary conditional on the integrated moisture delivery from TMEs over the area. Parameters are also related to time-invariant, local characteristics to facilitate regionalization to ungaged sites. The model is developed and calibrated in a hierarchical Bayesian framework to support partial pooling and enhance regionalization skill. The model is cross validated along with two alternative, increasingly parsimonious formulations to assess the additional skill provided by the covariates. Climate diagnostics are also used to better understand the instances where TMEs fail to explain variations in rainfall extremes to provide a path forward for further model improvement. The modeling structure is designed to link seasonal forecasting and long-term projections of TMEs directly to regional models of extremes used for risk estimation. Results suggest that the inclusion of TME-based information greatly improves the characterization of extremes, particularly for their frequency of occurrence. Diagnostics indicate that the model could be further improved by considering an index for frontal systems as an additional covariate.

  18. Analysis and Modelling of Extreme Wind Speed Distributions in Complex Mountainous Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laib, Mohamed; Kanevski, Mikhail

    2016-04-01

    Modelling of wind speed distributions in complex mountainous regions is an important and challenging problem which interests many scientists from several fields. In the present research, high frequency (10 min) Swiss wind speed monitoring data (IDAWEB service, Meteosuisse) are analysed and modelled with different parametric distributions (Weibull, GEV, Gamma, etc.) using maximum likelihood method. In total, 111 stations placed in different geomorphological units and at different altitude (from 203 to 3580 meters) are studied. Then, this information is used for training machine learning algorithms (Extreme Learning Machines, Support vector machine) to predict the distribution at new places, potentially useful for aeolian energy generation. An important part of the research deals with the construction and application of a high dimensional input feature space, generated from digital elevation model. A comprehensive study was carried out using feature selection approach to get the best model for the prediction. The main results are presented as spatial patterns of distributions' parameters.

  19. Atmospheric conditions associated with extreme fire activity in the Western Mediterranean region.

    PubMed

    Amraoui, Malik; Pereira, Mário G; DaCamara, Carlos C; Calado, Teresa J

    2015-08-15

    Active fire information provided by TERRA and AQUA instruments on-board sun-synchronous polar MODIS platform is used to describe fire activity in the Western Mediterranean and to identify and characterize the synoptic patterns of several meteorological fields associated with the occurrence of extreme fire activity episodes (EEs). The spatial distribution of the fire pixels during the period of 2003-2012 leads to the identification of two most affected sub-regions, namely the Northern and Western parts of the Iberian Peninsula (NWIP) and Northern Africa (NAFR). The temporal distribution of the fire pixels in these two sub-regions is characterized by: (i) high and non-concurrent inter- and intra-annual variability with maximum values during the summer of 2003 and 2005 in NWIP and 2007 and 2012 in NAFR; and, (ii) high intra-annual variability dominated by a prominent annual cycle with a main peak centred in August in both sub-regions and a less pronounced secondary peak in March only evident in NWIP region. The 34 EEs identified were grouped according to the location, period of occurrence and spatial configuration of the associated synoptic patterns into 3 clusters (NWIP-summer, NWIP-winter and NAFR-summer). Results from the composite analysis reveal similar fire weather conditions (statistically significant positive anomalies of air temperature and negative anomalies of air relative humidity) but associated with different circulation patterns at lower and mid-levels of the atmosphere associated with the occurrence of EEs in each cluster of the Western Mediterranean region. PMID:25889542

  20. The solar extreme ultra-violet corona: Resolved loops and the unresolved active region corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirtain, Jonathan Wesley

    In this work, physical characteristics of the solar corona as observed in the Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) regime are investigated. The focus will be the regions of intense EUV radiation generally found near the locations of sunspots. These regions are commonly called active regions. Multiple space- based observing platforms have been deployed in the last decade; it is possible to use several of these observatories in combination to develop a more complete picture of the solar corona. Joint Observing Program 146 was created to collect spectroscopic intensities using the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer on Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and EUV images using NASA's Transition Region and Coronal Explorer. The emission line intensities are analyzed to develop an understanding of the temperature and density of the active region coronal plasma. However, the performance of the CDS instrument in the spatial and temporal domains is limited and to compensate for these limitations, data collected by the TRACE instrument provide a high spatial and temporal resolution set of observations. One of the most exciting unsolved problems in solar astrophysics is to understand why the corona maintains a temperature roughly two orders of magnitude higher than the underlying material. A detailed investigation of the coronal emission has provided constraints on models of the heating mechanism, since the temperature, density and evolution of emission rates for multiple ionic species are indicative of the mechanism(s) working to heat the corona. The corona appears to consist of multiple unresolved structures as well as resolved active region structures, called coronal loops. The purpose of the present work is to determine the characteristics of the unresolved background corona. Using the characterizations of the coronal unresolved background, results for loops after background subtraction are also presented. This work demonstrates the magnitude of the unresolved coronal emission with

  1. The Mass and Spin of The Extreme Narrow Line Seyfert 1 Galaxy 1H 0707-495 and Its Implications for The Trigger for Relativistic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Done, Chris; Jin, Chichuan

    2016-05-01

    Relativistic reflection models of the X-ray spectrum of the `complex' Narrow Line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) 1H 0707-495 require a high spin, moderate inclination, low mass black hole. With these parameters fixed, the observed optical/UV emission directly determines the mass accretion rate through the outer disc and hence predicts the bolometric luminosity. This is 140 - 260 × the Eddington limit. Such a disc should power a strong wind, and winds are generically expected to be clumpy. Changing inclination angle with respect to a clumpy wind structure gives a possible explanation for the otherwise puzzling difference between `complex' NLS1 such as 1H 0707-495 and `simple' ones like PG 1244+026. Lines of sight which intercept the wind show deep absorption features at iron from the hot phase of the wind, together with stochastic dips and complex absorption when the clumps occult the X-ray source (complex NLS1), whereas both these features are absent for more face-on inclination (simple NLS1). This geometry is quite different to the clean view of a flat disc which is assumed for the spin measurements in relativistic reflection models, so it is possible that even 1H 0707-495 has low spin. If so, this re-opens the simplest and hence very attractive possibility that high black hole spin is a necessary and sufficient condition to trigger highly relativistic (bulk Lorentz factor ˜10 - 15) jets.

  2. The mass and spin of the extreme Narrow Line Seyfert 1 Galaxy 1H 0707-495 and its implications for the trigger for relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Done, Chris; Jin, Chichuan

    2016-08-01

    Relativistic reflection models of the X-ray spectrum of the `complex' Narrow Line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) 1H 0707-495 require a high-spin, moderate-inclination, low-mass black hole. With these parameters fixed, the observed optical/UV emission directly determines the mass accretion rate through the outer disc and hence predicts the bolometric luminosity. This is 140-260 times the Eddington limit. Such a disc should power a strong wind, and winds are generically expected to be clumpy. Changing inclination angle with respect to a clumpy wind structure gives a possible explanation for the otherwise puzzling difference between `complex' NLS1 such as 1H 0707-495 and `simple' ones like PG 1244+026. Lines of sight which intercept the wind show deep absorption features at iron from the hot phase of the wind, together with stochastic dips and complex absorption when the clumps occult the X-ray source (complex NLS1), whereas both these features are absent for more face-on inclination (simple NLS1). This geometry is quite different from the clean view of a flat disc which is assumed for the spin measurements in relativistic reflection models, so it is possible that even 1H 0707-495 has low spin. If so, this re-opens the simplest and hence very attractive possibility that high black hole spin is a necessary and sufficient condition to trigger highly relativistic (bulk Lorentz factor ˜10-15) jets.

  3. Scintigraphic Evaluation of the Stump Region After Extremity Amputation and the Effect of Scintigraphy on Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sadic, Murat; Atilgan, Hasan Ikbal; Baskin, Aylin; Cinar, Alev; Koca, Gokhan; Demirel, Koray; Comak, Aylin; Ozyurt, Sinem; Yildirim, Sule; Korkmaz, Meliha

    2016-01-01

    Background We evaluated the stump region with scintigraphy and compared the correlation of treatment modalities and scintigraphic results. Methods Sixty-eight cases with extremity amputation were included in the study. Amputation applied cases underwent four-phase Tc-99m hydroxymethylene diphosphonate scintigraphy. Groups were performed according to the scanning time after amputation and amputation regions. After scintigraphic evaluation, results were recorded into five groups: osteomyelitis, soft-tissue infection, reactive changes secondary to surgery, chronic osteomyelitis, and normal. Post-surgical treatment modalities of the patients were determined and compared with scintigraphic results. Results In the scintigraphic evaluation of stump regions of the 68 amputated cases, 34 patients had acute osteomyelitis, one had chronic osteomyelitis, 16 had soft-tissue infection, and eight had changes secondary to the surgery. Nine of 68 cases had normal scintigraphic features. In the scintigraphic evaluation, 43 patients took antibiotic treatment and 16 had surgery. There was a strong correlation between scintigraphic results and treatment approach (P < 0.0001, r = 0.803) by means of preferred therapy and effectiveness of the therapy according to the scintigraphic results. Scintigraphy need increases with age after amputation and a negative correlation between patient age and scintigraphic need was found (P < 0.02, r = -0.339). There was no pathology in the follow-up in the cases that were scintigraphically normal. Conclusion Bone scintigraphy is a cost-effective, non-invasive, and efficient method that directs treatment in the evaluation of the stump region after amputation. PMID:26858796

  4. Impact of an extreme dry and hot summer on water supply security in an alpine region.

    PubMed

    Vanham, D; Fleischhacker, E; Rauch, W

    2009-01-01

    Climate change will induce an increasing drought risk in western and southern Europe and a resulting increase in water stress. This paper investigates the impact of both the extreme hot and dry summer of 2003 and the PRUDENCE CHRM climate change scenario summer for 2071-2100 on the monthly water balance (available water resources versus water demand) within the Kitzbueheler Region in the Austrian Alps. As a baseline period the climate normal period from 1961 to 1990 was chosen. In both summer scenarios total flow and ground water recharge decrease substantially, due to the decrease in precipitation and increase in evapotranspiration However, regional water availability is still sufficient to serve all water demand stakeholders. As a result of decreased snow cover duration, flow seasonality changes within the CHRM scenario. Especially springs are very vulnerable to these climatological conditions; average local groundwater recharge is reduced by 20% up to 70% within both scenarios. Due to the hydrogeological characteristics of the case study area and the typical small structured alpine water supply infrastructure, local deficits can occur. But also groundwater aquifers in the valleys show a decrease in water availability. These results are supported by observations made in 2003 throughout Austria and Switzerland. PMID:19214001

  5. Bacterial Diversity within the Extreme Arid Atacama Desert Soils of the Yungay Region, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connon, S. A.; Lester, E. D.; Shafaat, H. S.; Obenhuber, D. C.; Ponce, A.

    2006-12-01

    Surface and subsurface soil samples analyzed for this study were collected from the hyper-arid Yungay region of the Atacama Desert, Chile. This is the first report of microbial diversity from DNA extracted directly from these extremely desiccated soils. Our data shows that 94% of the 16S rRNA genes cloned from these soils belong to the Actinobacteria phylum. A 24-hour time course series showed a diurnal water activity (aw) cycle that peaked at 0.52 in the early predawn hours, and ranged from 0.08 0.01 during the day. All measured water activity values were below the level required for microbial growth or enzyme activity. Total organic carbon (TOC) levels in this region were just above the limits of detection and ranged from 220 660 μg/g of soil. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) levels indicated cellular biomass ranging from 2 ×105 to 7 ×106 cell equivalents per gram of soil. The culturable counts were low with most samples showing no growth on standard plates of R2A medium; the highest single count was 47 colony forming units (CFU) per gram.

  6. Climate extremes and the carbon cycle - a review using an integrated approach with regional examples for forests & native ecosystems -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, D.; Reichstein, M.; Bahn, M.; Beer, C.; Ciais, P.; Mahecha, M.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Smith, P.; van Oijen, M.; Walz, A.

    2012-04-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle provides an important biogeochemical feedback to climate and is itself particularly susceptible to extreme climate events. Climate extremes can override any (positive) effects of mean climate change as shown in European and recent US-American heat waves and dry spells. They can impact the structure, composition, and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems and have the potential to cause rapid carbon losses from accumulated stocks. We review how climate extremes like severe droughts, heat waves, extreme precipitation or storms can cause direct impacts on the CO2 fluxes [e.g. due to extreme temperature and/ or drought events] as well as lagged impacts on the carbon cycle [e.g. via an increased fire risk, or disease outbreaks and pest invasions]. The relative impact of the different climate extremes varies according to climate region and vegetation type. We present lagged effects on plant growth (and mortality) in the year(s) following an extreme event and their impacts on the carbon sequestration of forests and natural ecosystems. Comprehensive regional or even continental quantification with regard to extreme events is missing, and especially compound extreme events, the role of lagged effects and aspects of the return frequency are not studied enough. In a case study of a Mediterranean ecosystem we illustrate that the response of the net carbon balance at ecosystem level to regional climate change is hard to predict as interacting and partly compensating processes are affected and several processes which have the ability to substantially alter the carbon balance are not or not sufficiently represented in state-of-the-art biogeochemical models.

  7. Generating extreme weather event sets from very large ensembles of regional climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Neil; Guillod, Benoit; Otto, Friederike; Allen, Myles; Jones, Richard; Hall, Jim

    2015-04-01

    Generating extreme weather event sets from very large ensembles of regional climate models Neil Massey, Benoit P. Guillod, Friederike E. L. Otto, Myles R. Allen, Richard Jones, Jim W. Hall Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Extreme events can have large impacts on societies and are therefore being increasingly studied. In particular, climate change is expected to impact the frequency and intensity of these events. However, a major limitation when investigating extreme weather events is that, by definition, only few events are present in observations. A way to overcome this issue it to use large ensembles of model simulations. Using the volunteer distributed computing (VDC) infrastructure of weather@home [1], we run a very large number (10'000s) of RCM simulations over the European domain at a resolution of 25km, with an improved land-surface scheme, nested within a free-running GCM. Using VDC allows many thousands of climate model runs to be computed. Using observations for the GCM boundary forcings we can run historical "hindcast" simulations over the past 100 to 150 years. This allows us, due to the chaotic variability of the atmosphere, to ascertain how likely an extreme event was, given the boundary forcings, and to derive synthetic event sets. The events in these sets did not actually occur in the observed record but could have occurred given the boundary forcings, with an associated probability. The event sets contain time-series of fields of meteorological variables that allow impact modellers to assess the loss the event would incur. Projections of events into the future are achieved by modelling projections of the sea-surface temperature (SST) and sea-ice boundary forcings, by combining the variability of the SST in the observed record with a range of warming signals derived from the varying responses of SSTs in the CMIP5 ensemble to elevated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in three RCP scenarios. Simulating the future with a

  8. Long tails in regional surface temperature probability distributions with implications for extremes under global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, Tyler W.; Neelin, J. David

    2012-02-01

    Prior work has shown that probability distributions of column water vapor and several passive tropospheric chemical tracers exhibit longer-than-Gaussian (approximately exponential) tails. The tracer-advection prototypes explaining the formation of these long-tailed distributions motivate exploration of observed surface temperature distributions for non-Gaussian tails. Stations with long records in various climate regimes in National Climatic Data Center Global Surface Summary of Day observations are used to examine tail characteristics for daily average, maximum and minimum surface temperature probability distributions. Each is examined for departures from a Gaussian fit to the core (here approximated as the portion of the distribution exceeding 30% of the maximum). While the core conforms to Gaussian for most distributions, roughly half the cases exhibit non-Gaussian tails in both winter and summer seasons. Most of these are asymmetric, with a long, roughly exponential, tail on only one side. The shape of the tail has substantial implications for potential changes in extreme event occurrences under global warming. Here the change in the probability of exceeding a given threshold temperature is quantified in the simplest case of a shift in the present-day observed distribution. Surface temperature distributions with long tails have a much smaller change in threshold exceedances (smaller increases for high-side and smaller decreases for low-side exceedances relative to exceedances in current climate) under a given warming than do near-Gaussian distributions. This implies that models used to estimate changes in extreme event occurrences due to global warming should be verified regionally for accuracy of simulations of probability distribution tails.

  9. Empirical evidence of direct impact of extreme temperatures on wheat yield in major wheat growing region of India.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, K. K.; Mahato, S.; Jayaraman, T.

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to extreme temperatures during the grain filling stage of winter wheat may lead to reduction in the yield. Over the last decade, there has been an increasing trend of exposure to extreme temperature conditions, particularly during crop growing season. The Indo Gangetic plain (IGP) is a particular concern since an optimal temperature for wheat production already exists in the region. This is also a major concern for global wheat production since the region accounts for about 15% of the global wheat production. Previous studies conducted in this region have found a strong impact of extreme temperatures causing an early occurrence of senescence, defined as the last developmental stage of the plant. The early occurrence of senescence period induces shortening of growing season length, which is a critical grain filling stage. However, the direct effect of extreme temperatures on the yield data has not yet been looked at, which reflects the impact of extreme temperature at different growth stages including anthesis (flowering) and the grain-filling stage. Here in this study, we explore the relationship of extreme heat conditions on the yield using fixed-effect panel data model for the districts in the IGP region. The first result indicates approximately 16% reduction in wheat yield with 1˚C rise in mean growing season temperature. There is a significant negative trend between the yield and the fourth quartile of extreme temperature (>34˚C) days. Furthermore, we establish a scope of existence of a nonlinear relationship between temperature and yield, which needs to be further examined.

  10. Weak Line Quasars at High Redshift: Extremely High Accretion Rates or Anemic Broad-line Regions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemmer, Ohad; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W. N.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan, Xiaohui; Lira, Paulina; Netzer, Hagai; Plotkin, Richard M.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2010-10-01

    We present Gemini-North K-band spectra of two representative members of the class of high-redshift quasars with exceptionally weak rest-frame ultraviolet emission lines (WLQs), SDSS J114153.34+021924.3 at z = 3.55 and SDSS J123743.08+630144.9 at z = 3.49. In both sources, we detect an unusually weak broad Hβ line and place tight upper limits on the strengths of their [O III] lines. Virial, Hβ-based black hole mass determinations indicate normalized accretion rates of L/L Edd=0.4 for these sources, which is well within the range observed for typical quasars with similar luminosities and redshifts. We also present high-quality XMM-Newton imaging spectroscopy of SDSS J114153.34+021924.3 and find a hard-X-ray photon index of Γ = 1.91+0.24 -0.22, which supports the virial L/L Edd determination in this source. Our results suggest that the weakness of the broad emission lines in WLQs is not a consequence of an extreme continuum-emission source but instead due to abnormal broad emission line region properties.

  11. WEAK LINE QUASARS AT HIGH REDSHIFT: EXTREMELY HIGH ACCRETION RATES OR ANEMIC BROAD-LINE REGIONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Shemmer, Ohad; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Netzer, Hagai; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, Donald P.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan Xiaohui; Lira, Paulina; Plotkin, Richard M.; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2010-10-20

    We present Gemini-North K-band spectra of two representative members of the class of high-redshift quasars with exceptionally weak rest-frame ultraviolet emission lines (WLQs), SDSS J114153.34+021924.3 at z = 3.55 and SDSS J123743.08+630144.9 at z = 3.49. In both sources, we detect an unusually weak broad H{beta} line and place tight upper limits on the strengths of their [O III] lines. Virial, H{beta}-based black hole mass determinations indicate normalized accretion rates of L/L {sub Edd}=0.4 for these sources, which is well within the range observed for typical quasars with similar luminosities and redshifts. We also present high-quality XMM-Newton imaging spectroscopy of SDSS J114153.34+021924.3 and find a hard-X-ray photon index of {Gamma} = 1.91{sup +0.24} {sub -0.22}, which supports the virial L/L {sub Edd} determination in this source. Our results suggest that the weakness of the broad emission lines in WLQs is not a consequence of an extreme continuum-emission source but instead due to abnormal broad emission line region properties.

  12. Regional Nodal Involvement and Patterns of Spread Along In-Transit Pathways in Children With Rhabdomyosarcoma of the Extremity: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group;Rhabdomyosarcoma; Regional failure; In-transit nodes; Radiotherapy; Extremity

    SciTech Connect

    La, Trang H.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Rodeberg, David A.; Hawkins, Douglas S.; Anderson, James R.; Donaldson, Sarah S.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and prognostic factors for regional failure, with attention to the in-transit pathways of spread, in children with nonmetastatic rhabdomyosarcoma of the extremity. Methods and Materials: The Intergroup rhabdomyosarcoma studies III, IV-Pilot, and IV enrolled 226 children with rhabdomyosarcoma of the extremity. Failure at the in-transit (epitrochlear/brachial and popliteal) and proximal (axillary/infraclavicular and inguinal/femoral) lymph nodes was evaluated. The median follow-up for the surviving patients was 10.4 years. Results: Of the 226 children, 55 (24%) had clinical or pathologic evidence of either in-transit and/or proximal lymph node involvement at diagnosis. The actuarial 5-year risk of regional failure was 12%. The prognostic factors for poor regional control were female gender and lymph node involvement at diagnosis. In the 116 patients with a distal extremity primary tumor, 5% had in-transit lymph node involvement at diagnosis. The estimated 5-year incidences of in-transit and proximal nodal failure was 12% and 8%, respectively. The in-transit failure rate was 0% for patients who underwent radiotherapy and/or underwent lymph node sampling of the in-transit nodal site but was 15% for those who did not (p = .07). However, the 5-year event-free survival rate did not differ between these two groups (64% vs. 55%, respectively, p = .47). Conclusion: The high incidence of regional involvement necessitates aggressive identification and treatment of regional lymph nodes in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma of the extremity. In patients with distal extremity tumors, in-transit failures were as common as failures in more proximal regional sites. Patients who underwent complete lymph node staging with appropriate radiotherapy to the in-transit nodal site, if indicated, were at a slightly lower risk of in-transit failure.

  13. The impact of ENSO and the NAO on extreme winter precipitation in North America in observations and regional climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whan, Kirien; Zwiers, Francis

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between winter precipitation in North America and indices of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is evaluated using non-stationary generalized extreme value distributions with the indices as covariates. Both covariates have a statistically significant influence on precipitation that is well simulated by two regional climate models (RCMs), CanRCM4 and CRCM5. The observed influence of the NAO on extreme precipitation is largest in eastern North America, with the likelihood of a negative phase extreme rainfall event decreased in the north and increased in the south under the positive phase of the NAO. This pattern is generally well simulated by the RCMs although there are some differences in the extent of influence, particularly south of the Great Lakes. A La Niña-magnitude extreme event is more likely to occur under El Niño conditions in California and the southern United States, and less likely in most of Canada and a region south of the Great Lakes. This broad pattern is also simulated well by the RCMs but they do not capture the increased likelihood in California. In some places the extreme precipitation response in the RCMs to external forcing from a covariate is of the opposite sign, despite use of the same lateral boundary conditions and dynamical core. This demonstrates the importance of model physics for teleconnections to extreme precipitation.

  14. Assessment of extreme quantitative precipitation forecasts and development of regional extreme event thresholds using data from HMT-2006 and COOP observers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ralph, F.M.; Sukovich, E.; Reynolds, D.; Dettinger, M.; Weagle, S.; Clark, W.; Neiman, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Extreme precipitation events, and the quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs) associated with them, are examined. The study uses data from the Hydrometeorology Testbed (HMT), which conducted its first field study in California during the 2005/06 cool season. National Weather Service River Forecast Center (NWS RFC) gridded QPFs for 24-h periods at 24-h (day 1), 48-h (day 2), and 72-h (day 3) forecast lead times plus 24-h quantitative precipitation estimates (QPEs) fromsites in California (CA) and Oregon-Washington (OR-WA) are used. During the 172-day period studied, some sites received more than 254 cm (100 in.) of precipitation. The winter season produced many extreme precipitation events, including 90 instances when a site received more than 7.6 cm (3.0 in.) of precipitation in 24 h (i.e., an "event") and 17 events that exceeded 12.7 cm (24 h)-1 [5.0 in. (24 h)-1]. For the 90 extreme events f.7.6 cm (24 h)-1 [3.0 in. (24 h)-1]g, almost 90% of all the 270 QPFs (days 1-3) were biased low, increasingly so with greater lead time. Of the 17 observed events exceeding 12.7 cm (24 h)-1 [5.0 in. (24 h)-1], only 1 of those events was predicted to be that extreme. Almost all of the extreme events correlated with the presence of atmospheric river conditions. Total seasonal QPF biases for all events fi.e., $0.025 cm (24 h)-1 [0.01 in. (24 h)-1]g were sensitive to local geography and were generally biased low in the California-Nevada River Forecast Center (CNRFC) region and high in the Northwest River Forecast Center(NWRFC) domain. The low bias in CA QPFs improved with shorter forecast lead time and worsened for extreme events. Differences were also noted between the CNRFC and NWRFC in terms of QPF and the frequency of extreme events. A key finding from this study is that there were more precipitation events .7.6 cm (24 h)-1 [3.0 in. (24 h)21] in CA than in OR-WA. Examination of 422 Cooperative Observer Program (COOP) sites in the NWRFC domain and 400 in the CNRFC domain

  15. Projection of extreme precipitation in the context of climate change in Huang-Huai-Hai region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jun; Yan, Denghua; Yang, Zhiyong; Yuan, Zhe; Yuan, Yong; Zhang, Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Based on the national precipitation dataset (0.5∘×0.5∘) 1961-2011, published by the National Meteorological Information Center of China and the five Global Climate Models provided by ISI-MIP, annual maximum precipitation for 1 day, 3 days and 7 days could be calculated. Extreme precipitation was fitted via Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution to explore the changes of extreme precipitation with the return period of 20 years and 50 years during 1961-2000 and 2001-2050. Based on this, extreme precipitation projection in Huang-Huai-Hai region was done. The results showed that the five Global Climate Models could simulate the statistical features of extreme precipitation quite well, in which IPSL-CM5A-LR has the highest precision. Simulation of IPSL-CM5A-LR indicates that precipitation with the return period of 20 years and 50 years in the middle reaches of the Yellow River, middle and lower reaches of Huaihe River and plain area of the southern Haihe River will increase considerably in the future. Extreme precipitation in some of the places will even increase by more than 30%, which means that these places will face larger flood risk and their capacity to respond to flood disasters should be improved.

  16. Evaluation of large-scale meteorological patterns associated with temperature extremes in the NARCCAP regional climate model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loikith, Paul C.; Waliser, Duane E.; Lee, Huikyo; Neelin, J. David; Lintner, Benjamin R.; McGinnis, Seth; Mearns, Linda O.; Kim, Jinwon

    2015-12-01

    Large-scale meteorological patterns (LSMPs) associated with temperature extremes are evaluated in a suite of regional climate model (RCM) simulations contributing to the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program. LSMPs are characterized through composites of surface air temperature, sea level pressure, and 500 hPa geopotential height anomalies concurrent with extreme temperature days. Six of the seventeen RCM simulations are driven by boundary conditions from reanalysis while the other eleven are driven by one of four global climate models (GCMs). Four illustrative case studies are analyzed in detail. Model fidelity in LSMP spatial representation is high for cold winter extremes near Chicago. Winter warm extremes are captured by most RCMs in northern California, with some notable exceptions. Model fidelity is lower for cool summer days near Houston and extreme summer heat events in the Ohio Valley. Physical interpretation of these patterns and identification of well-simulated cases, such as for Chicago, boosts confidence in the ability of these models to simulate days in the tails of the temperature distribution. Results appear consistent with the expectation that the ability of an RCM to reproduce a realistically shaped frequency distribution for temperature, especially at the tails, is related to its fidelity in simulating LMSPs. Each ensemble member is ranked for its ability to reproduce LSMPs associated with observed warm and cold extremes, identifying systematically high performing RCMs and the GCMs that provide superior boundary forcing. The methodology developed here provides a framework for identifying regions where further process-based evaluation would improve the understanding of simulation error and help guide future model improvement and downscaling efforts.

  17. Storms or cold fronts: what is really responsible for the extreme waves regime in the Colombian Caribbean coastal region?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, L. J.; Ortiz-Royero, J. C.; Ruiz-Merchan, J. K.; Higgins, A. E.; Henriquez, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the contribution and importance of cold fronts and storms to extreme waves in different areas of the Colombian Caribbean in an attempt to determine the extent of the threat posed by the flood processes to which these coastal populations are exposed. Furthermore, the study wishes to establish the actions to which coastal engineering constructions should be subject. In the calculation of maritime constructions, the most important parameter is the height of the wave. For this reason, it is necessary to establish the design wave height to which a coastal engineering structure should be resistant. This wave height varies according to the return period considered. The significant height values for the areas focused on in the study were calculated in accordance with Gumbel's extreme value methodology. The methodology was evaluated using data from the reanalysis of the spectral National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WAVEWATCH III® (WW3) model for 15 points along the 1600 km of the Colombian Caribbean coastline (continental and insular) between the years 1979 and 2009. The results demonstrated that the extreme waves caused by tropical cyclones and those caused by cold fronts have different effects along the Colombian Caribbean coast. Storms and hurricanes are of greater importance in the Guajira Peninsula (Alta Guajira). In the central area (consisting of Baja Guajira, and the cities of Santa Marta, Barranquilla, and Cartagena), the strong impact of cold fronts on extreme waves is evident. However, in the southern region of the Colombian Caribbean coast (ranging from the Gulf of Morrosquillo to the Gulf of Urabá), the extreme values of wave heights are lower than in the previously mentioned regions, despite being dominated mainly by the passage of cold fronts. Extreme waves in the San Andrés and Providencia insular region present a different dynamic from

  18. An evaluation of a coupled atmosphere-ocean modelling system for regional climate studies: extreme events in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, Priscilla A.; Mulligan, Frank J.

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the ability of a coupled regional atmosphere-ocean modelling system to simulate two extreme events in the North Atlantic. In this study we use the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST; Warner et al.) modelling system with only the atmosphere and ocean models activated. COAWST couples the atmosphere model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF) to the ocean model (Regional Ocean Modelling System; ROMS) with the Model Coupling Toolkit. Results from the coupled system are compared with atmosphere only simulations of North Atlantic storms to evaluate the performance of the coupled modelling system. Two extreme events (Hurricane Katia and Hurricane Irene) were chosen to assess the level of improvement (or otherwise) arising from coupling WRF with ROMS. These two hurricanes involve different dynamics and present different challenges to the modeling system. This provides a robust assessment of the advantages or disadvantages of coupling WRF with ROMS for regional climate modelling studies of extreme events in the North Atlantic. We examine the ability of the coupled modelling system to simulate these two extreme events by comparing modelled storm tracks, storm intensities, wind speeds and sea surface temperatures with observations in all cases. The effect of domain size, and two different planetary boundary layers used in WRF are also reported.

  19. Validation of EURO-CORDEX regional climate models in reproducing the variability of precipitation extremes in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Busuioc, Aristita

    2016-04-01

    EURO-CORDEX is the European branch of the international CORDEX initiative that aims to provide improved regional climate change projections for Europe. The main objective of this paper is to document the performance of the individual models in reproducing the variability of precipitation extremes in Romania. Here three EURO-CORDEX regional climate models (RCMs) ensemble (scenario RCP4.5) are analysed and inter-compared: DMI-HIRHAM5, KNMI-RACMO2.2 and MPI-REMO. Compared to previous studies, when the RCM validation regarding the Romanian climate has mainly been made on mean state and at station scale, a more quantitative approach of precipitation extremes is proposed. In this respect, to have a more reliable comparison with observation, a high resolution daily precipitation gridded data set was used as observational reference (CLIMHYDEX project). The comparison between the RCM outputs and observed grid point values has been made by calculating three extremes precipitation indices, recommended by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection Indices (ETCCDI), for the 1976-2005 period: R10MM, annual count of days when precipitation ≥10mm; RX5DAY, annual maximum 5-day precipitation and R95P%, precipitation fraction of annual total precipitation due to daily precipitation > 95th percentile. The RCMs capability to reproduce the mean state for these variables, as well as the main modes of their spatial variability (given by the first three EOF patterns), are analysed. The investigation confirms the ability of RCMs to simulate the main features of the precipitation extreme variability over Romania, but some deficiencies in reproducing of their regional characteristics were found (for example, overestimation of the mea state, especially over the extra Carpathian regions). This work has been realised within the research project "Changes in climate extremes and associated impact in hydrological events in Romania" (CLIMHYDEX), code PN II-ID-2011-2-0073, financed by the Romanian

  20. Regional impacts of global change: seasonal trends in extreme rainfall, run-off and temperature in two contrasting regions of Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomsi, Kenza; Mahe, Gil; Tramblay, Yves; Sinan, Mohamed; Snoussi, Maria

    2016-05-01

    In Morocco, socio-economic activities are highly vulnerable to extreme weather events. This study investigates trends in mean and extreme rainfall, run-off and temperature, as well as their relationship with large-scale atmospheric circulation. It focuses on two Moroccan watersheds: the subhumid climate region of Bouregreg in the north and the semi-arid region of Tensift in the south, using data from 1977 to 2003. The study is based on a set of daily temperature, precipitation and run-off time series retrieved from weather stations in the two regions. Results do not show a homogeneous behaviour in the two catchments; the influence of the large-scale atmospheric circulation is different and a clear spatial dependence of the trend analysis linked to the distance from the coast and the mountains can be observed. Overall, temperature trends are mostly positive in the studied area, while weak statistically significant trends can be identified in seasonal rainfall, extreme rainfall events, average run-off and extreme run-off events.

  1. Resilience of coral calcification to extreme temperature variations in the Kimberley region, northwest Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandan, S. S.; Falter, J. L.; Lowe, R. J.; McCulloch, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    We report seasonal changes in coral calcification within the highly dynamic intertidal and subtidal zones of Cygnet Bay (16.5°S, 123.0°E) in the Kimberley region of northwest Australia, where the tidal range can reach nearly 8 m and the temperature of nearshore waters ranges seasonally by ~9 °C from a minimum monthly mean of ~22 °C to a maximum of over 31 °C. Corals growing within the more isolated intertidal sites experienced maximum temperatures of up to ~35 °C during spring low tides in addition to being routinely subjected to high levels of irradiance (>1500 µmol m-2 s-1) under near stagnant conditions. Mixed model analysis revealed a significant effect of tidal exposure on the growth of Acropora aspera, Dipsastraea favus, and Trachyphyllia geoffroyi ( p ≤ 0.04), as well as a significant effect of season on A. aspera and T. geoffroyi ( p ≤ 0.01, no effect on D. favus); however, the growth of both D. favus and T. geoffroyi appeared to be better suited to the warm summer conditions of the intertidal compared to A. aspera. Through an additional comparative study, we found that Acropora from Cygnet Bay calcified at a rate 69 % faster than a species from the same genus living in a backreef environment of a more typical tropical reef located 1200 km southwest of Cygnet Bay (0.59 ± 0.02 vs. 0.34 ± 0.02 g cm-2 yr-1 for A. muricata from Coral Bay, Ningaloo Reef; p < 0.001, df = 28.9). The opposite behaviour was found for D. favus from the same environments, with colonies from Cygnet Bay calcifying at rates that were 33 % slower than the same species from Ningaloo Reef (0.29 ± 0.02 vs. 0.44 ± 0.03 g cm-2 yr-1, p < 0.001, df = 37.9). Our findings suggest that adaption and/or acclimatization of coral to the more thermally extreme environments at Cygnet Bay is strongly taxon dependent.

  2. Evolution in Intensity and Frequency of Extreme Events of Precipitation in Northeast Region and Brazilian Amazon in XXI Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, P. M.; Veiga, J. A.; Correia, F. S.; Brito, A. L.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this research was evaluate changes in frequency and intensity of extreme events of precipitation in Brazilian Amazon and Northeast Region, doubling CO2 concentration in agreement of IPCC A2 emissions scenarios (Nakicenovic et al., 2001). For this evaluation was used ETA model (Chou et al., 2011), forced with CCSM3 Global model data (Meehl, 2006) to run 4 experiments, only for January, February and March: 1980-1990, 2000-2010, 2040-2050 and 2090-2100. Using the first decade as reference (1980-1990), was evaluated changes occurred in following decades, with a methodology to classify extremes events adapted from Frich (2002) and Gao (2006). Higher was the class, more intense is the event. An increase of 25% was observed in total precipitation in Brazilian Amazon for the end of XXI century and 12% for extreme events type 1, 9% for events type 2 and 10% for type 3. By the other hand, a 17% decrease of precipitation in Brazilian Northeast was observed, and a pronounced decay of 24% and 15% in extreme events contribution type 1 and 2 to total amount of precipitation, respectively. The difference between total normal type events was positive in this three decades compared with reference decade 1980-1990, varying positively from 4 to 6 thousand events included in normality by decade, these events was decreased in your majority of Class 1 events, which presented a decay of at least 3.500 events by each decade. This suggests an intensification of extreme events, considering that the amount of precipitation by class increased, and the number of events by class decreased. To Northeast region, an increasing in 9% of contribution to events type 3 class was observed, as well as in the frequency of this type of events (about of 700 more events). Major decreasing in number of classes extreme events occur in 2000-2010, to classes 1 and 3, with 7,2 and 5,6%, and by the end of century in class 3, with 4,5%. For the three analyzed decades a total decrease of 8.400 events was

  3. Assessment of climate change impact on hydrological extremes in two source regions of the Nile River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taye, M. T.; Ntegeka, V.; Ogiramoi, N. P.; Willems, P.

    2011-01-01

    The potential impact of climate change was investigated on the hydrological extremes of Nyando River and Lake Tana catchments, which are located in two source regions of the Nile River basin. Climate change scenarios were developed for rainfall and potential evapotranspiration (ETo), considering 17 General Circulation Model (GCM) simulations to better understand the range of possible future change. They were constructed by transferring the extracted climate change signals to the observed series using a frequency perturbation downscaling approach, which accounts for the changes in rainfall extremes. Projected changes under two future SRES emission scenarios A1B and B1 for the 2050s were considered. Two conceptual hydrological models were calibrated and used for the impact assessment. Their difference in simulating the flows under future climate scenarios was also investigated. The results reveal increasing mean runoff and extreme peak flows for Nyando catchment for the 2050s while unclear trend is observed for Lake Tana catchment for mean volumes and high/low flows. The hydrological models for Lake Tana catchment, however, performed better in simulating the hydrological regimes than for Nyando, which obviously also induces a difference in the reliability of the extreme future projections for both catchments. The unclear impact result for Lake Tana catchment implies that the GCM uncertainty is more important for explaining the unclear trend than the hydrological models uncertainty. Nevertheless, to have a better understanding of future impact, hydrological models need to be verified for their credibility of simulating extreme flows.

  4. Hydrologic Extremes in a changing climate: how much information can regional climate models provide?

    SciTech Connect

    Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    2012-08-14

    We proposed to identify a set of about 10 urban areas across the western U.S., and hourly precipitation data within each of these areas, which were extracted from the NCDC TD 3240. We also proposed to analyze the annual maximum series of precipitation extremes simulated for NARCCAP (using Reanalysis boundary forcing) for the grid cells close to station data, and to compare the distributions of annual maximum precipitation for accumulation intervals ranging from one to 28 hours. Recognizing that there may inevitably be differences between the station data and RCM grid cell values, we proposed to examine the scale dependence in the distributions of extremes.

  5. Ultra-Hot Plasma in Active Regions Observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.; Feldman, U.

    2008-05-01

    The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft obtains high resolution spectra of the solar atmosphere in two wavelength ranges: 170 - 210 and 250 — 290 Angstroms. These wavelength regions contain a wealth of emission lines covering temperature regions from the chromosphere/transition region (e.g., He II, Si VII) up to soft X-ray flare temperatures (Fe XXIII, Fe XXIV). EIS can obtain line profiles and intensities for the spectral lines in these wavelength regions. Of particular interest for understanding coronal heating is a line of Ca XVII, formed near a temperature of 6 MK. This line is blended with lines of Fe XI and O V. However, by using unblended lines of these ions, the Ca XVII line can be deconvolved from the blended emission. EIS has obtained many raster observations of active regions by stepping the slit in small increments across the active region, producing monochromatic images of the active region. The Ca XVII blend has been included in many of these rasters. In this paper we discuss the appearance and frequency of 6 MK plasma in active regions in the absence of strong flaring activity. This temperature region is not well-observed by normal incidence imaging spectrometers and therefore the EIS data shed light on higher temperature areas of active regions than normally available from imaging instruments alone. We discuss how to deconvolve the blend and show examples of 6 MK plasma emission in several active regions.

  6. Regional Therapy for Recurrent Metastatic Melanoma Confined to the Extremity: Hyperthermic Isolated Limb Perfusion vs. Isolated Limb Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Reintgen, Michael; Reintgen, Christian; Nobo, Christopher; Giuliano, Rosemary; Shivers, Steven; Reintgen, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Melanoma patients with recurrent disease confined to an extremity can be offered one of two regional therapies that both give high complete response rates. Isolated limb infusion (ILI) is a newer technique performed with catheters and tourniquets that has a reduced potential morbidity, decreased efficacy and does not treat the regional nodal basin. Hyperthermic Isolated Limb Perfusion (HILP) is an open surgical technique that includes removal of the regional nodal basin as part of the surgical procedure. An analysis was performed of the rates of regional nodal disease in this patient population to determine the percentage of patients with stage III metastatic disease to the lymph nodes that would be under treated with the ILI technique. A total of 229 patients underwent a HILP for melanoma with regional lymph node dissection as is our standard between July 1987 and December 2009. Ninty-two of the 229 patients (40%) had metastatic regional nodal disease documented at the time of the HILP procedure. HILP is the only technique that addresses all micrometastatic disease on the extremity. PMID:24281032

  7. Regional lidocaine anesthesia without exsanguination for outpatient management of upper extremity fractures.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, G. A.; Hayes, W. M.; Cornwal, R.

    1995-01-01

    The use of small dose intravenous lidocaine without exsanguination for upper extremity fractures in children and adults is described. A twenty-plus year experience with this technique in the outpatient setting has shown it to be effective and safe. Attention to detail is essential and inadvertent tourniquet release must be avoided. Images Figure 1 PMID:7634037

  8. Quantifying enhancement in aerosol radiative forcing during 'extreme aerosol days' in summer at Delhi National Capital Region, India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sumant; Dey, Sagnik; Srivastava, Arun

    2016-04-15

    Changes in aerosol characteristics (spectral aerosol optical depth, AOD and composition) are examined during the transition from 'relatively clean' to 'extreme' aerosol days in the summer of 2012 at Delhi National Capital Region (NCR), India. AOD smaller than 0.54 (i.e. 12-year mean AOD-1σ) represents 'relatively clean' days in Delhi during the summer. 'Extreme' days are defined by the condition when AOD0.5 exceeds 12-year mean AOD+1 standard deviation (σ). Mean (±1σ) AOD increases to 1.2±0.12 along with a decrease of Angstrom Exponent from 0.54±0.09 to 0.22±0.12 during the 'extreme' days. Aerosol composition is inferred by fixing the number concentrations of various individual species through iterative tweaking when simulated (following Mie theory) AOD spectrum matches with the measured one. Contribution of coarse mode dust to aerosol mass increased from 76.8% (relatively clean) to 96.8% (extreme events), while the corresponding contributions to AOD0.5 increased from 35.0% to 70.8%. Spectrally increasing single scattering albedo (SSA) and CALIPSO aerosol sub-type information support the dominant presence of dust during the 'extreme' aerosol days. Aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) at the top-of-the-atmosphere increases from 21.2Wm(-2) (relatively clean) to 56.6Wm(-2) (extreme), while the corresponding change in surface ADRF is from -99.5Wm(-2) to -153.5Wm(-2). Coarse mode dust contributes 60.3% of the observed surface ADRF during the 'extreme' days. On the contrary, 0.4% mass fraction of black carbon (BC) translates into 13.1% contribution to AOD0.5 and 33.5% to surface ADRF during the 'extreme' days. The atmospheric heating rate increased by 75.1% from 1.7K/day to 2.96K/day during the 'extreme' days. PMID:26855352

  9. Extreme regimes of atmospheric circulation and their role in the formation of temperature and precipitation fields in the Arctic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irina, Kulikova; Ekaterina, Kruglova; Dmitry, Kiktev; Vladimir, Tischenco; Valentina, Khan

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the extreme regimes of atmospheric circulation in the Northern Hemisphere as well as their role in the formation of monthly and seasonal anomalies of temperature and precipitation fields over Arctic region were examined using NCEP / NCAR-2 reanalysis data. To identify extreme modes, climate indexes were quantitatively assessed. The mapping of monthly and seasonal temperature and precipitation fields for the different phases of indices using composite analysis was developed. It is allowed to identify allocated geographic areas in which the influence of modes of circulation for temperature and precipitation fields in Arctic is statistically significant. Quantitative estimations of contingency of atmospheric circulation modes in the Northern Hemisphere were analyzed. Special attention has been paid to the extreme episodes of the climate circulation indices, associated with formation of significant anomalies of air temperature and precipitation. The results of numerical experiments to reproduce the extreme events on monthly and seasonal time scale on the basis of the global semi-Lagrangian model SL-AV, developed in collaboration of Institute of Numerical Mathematics and Hydrometeorological Centre of Russia, have been discussed. For this study the support has been provided by Grant of Russian Science Foundation (№14-37-00053).

  10. Relativistic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Z.

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed.

  11. Relativistic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Haba, Z

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed. PMID:19391727

  12. Bidirectional iterative parcellation of diffusion weighted imaging data: Separating cortical regions connected by the arcuate fasciculus and extreme capsule

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Dianne K.; Van Petten, Cyma; Beeson, Pélagie M.; Rapcsak, Steven Z.; Plante, Elena

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a Bidirectional Iterative Parcellation (BIP) procedure designed to identify the location and size of connected cortical regions (parcellations) at both ends of a white matter tract in diffusion weighted images. The procedure applies the FSL option “probabilistic tracking with classification targets” in a bidirectional and iterative manner. To assess the utility of BIP, we applied the procedure to the problem of parcellating a limited set of well-established gray matter seed regions associated with the dorsal (arcuate fasciculus/superior longitudinal fasciculus) and ventral (extreme capsule fiber system) white matter tracts in the language networks of 97 participants. These left hemisphere seed regions and the two white matter tracts, along with their right hemisphere homologues, provided an excellent test case for BIP because the resulting parcellations overlap and their connectivity via the arcuate fasciculi and extreme capsule fiber systems are well studied. The procedure yielded both confirmatory and novel findings. Specifically, BIP confirmed that each tract connects within the seed regions in unique, but expected ways. Novel findings included increasingly left-lateralized parcellations associated with the arcuate fasciculus/superior longitudinal fasciculus as a function of age and education. These results demonstrate that BIP is an easily implemented technique that successfully confirmed cortical connectivity patterns predicted in the literature, and has the potential to provide new insights regarding the architecture of the brain. PMID:25173414

  13. Trends and variability of daily and extreme temperature and precipitation in the Caribbean region, 1961-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, T. L.; Stephenson, T. S.; Vincent, L.; Van Meerbeeck, C.; McLean, N.

    2013-05-01

    A workshop was held at the University of the West Indies, Jamaica, in May 2012 to build capacity in climate data rescue and to enhance knowledge about climate change in the Caribbean region. Scientists brought their daily surface temperature and precipitation data for an assessment of quality and homogeneity and for the preparation of climate change indices helpful for studying climate change in their region. This study presents the trends in daily and extreme temperature and precipitation indices in the Caribbean region for records spanning the 1961-2010 and 1986-2010 intervals. Overall, the results show a warming of the surface air temperature at land stations. Region-wide, annual means of the daily minimum temperatures (+1.4°C) have increased more than the annual means of the daily maximum temperatures (+0.9°C) leading to significant decrease in the diurnal temperature range. The frequency of warm days and warm nights has increased by more than 15% while 9% fewer cool days and 13% fewer cool night were found over the 50-year interval. These frequency trends are further reflected in a rise of the annual extreme high and low temperatures by ~1°C. Changes in precipitation indices are less consistent and the trends are generally weak. Small positive trends were found in annual total precipitation, daily intensity, maximum number of consecutive dry days and heavy rainfall events particularly during the period 1986- 2010. Finally, aside from the observed climate trends, correlations between these indices and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) annual index suggest a coupling between land temperature variability and, to a lesser extent, precipitation extremes on the one hand, and the AMO signal of the North Atlantic surface sea temperatures.

  14. Trends and variability of daily and extreme temperature and precipitation in the Caribbean region, 1961-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Tannecia; Vincent, Lucie; Allen, Theodore; Van Meerbeeck, Cedric; McLean, Natalie

    2013-04-01

    A workshop was held at the University of the West Indies, Jamaica, in May 2012 to build capacity in climate data rescue and to enhance knowledge about climate change in the Caribbean region. Scientists brought their daily surface temperature and precipitation data for an assessment of quality and homogeneity and for the preparation of climate change indices helpful for studying climate change in their region. This study presents the trends in daily and extreme temperature and precipitation indices in the Caribbean region for records spanning the 1961-2010 and 1986-2010 intervals. Overall, the results show a warming of the surface air temperature at land stations. Region-wide, annual means of the daily minimum temperatures (+1.4°C) have increased more than the annual means of the daily maximum temperatures (+0.95°C) leading to significant decrease in the diurnal temperature range. The frequency of warm days and warm nights has increased by more than 15% while 7% fewer cool days and 10% fewer cool night were found over the 50-year interval. These frequency trends are further reflected in a rise of the annual extreme high and low temperatures by ~1°C. Changes in precipitation indices are less consistent and the trends are generally weak. Small positive trends were found in annual total precipitation, daily intensity, maximum number of consecutive dry days and heavy rainfall events particularly during the period 1986-2010. Finally, aside from the observed climate trends, correlations between these indices and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) annual index suggest a coupling between land temperature variability and, to a lesser extent, precipitation extremes on the one hand, and the AMO signal of the North Atlantic surface sea temperatures.

  15. Some problems in relativistic thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Veitsman, E. V.

    2007-11-15

    The relativistic equations of state for ideal and real gases, as well as for various interface regions, have been derived. These dependences help to eliminate some controversies in the relativistic thermodynamics based on the special theory of relativity. It is shown, in particular, that the temperature of system whose velocity tends to the velocity of light in vacuum varies in accordance with the Ott law T = T{sub 0}/{radical}1 - v{sup 2}/c{sup 2}. Relativistic dependences for heat and mass transfer, for Ohm's law, and for a viscous flow of a liquid have also been derived.

  16. A radar-based regional extreme rainfall analysis to derive the thresholds for a novel automatic alert system in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panziera, Luca; Gabella, Marco; Zanini, Stefano; Hering, Alessandro; Germann, Urs; Berne, Alexis

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a regional extreme rainfall analysis based on 10 years of radar data for the 159 regions adopted for official natural hazard warnings in Switzerland. Moreover, a nowcasting tool aimed at issuing heavy precipitation regional alerts is introduced. The two topics are closely related, since the extreme rainfall analysis provides the thresholds used by the nowcasting system for the alerts. Warm and cold seasons' monthly maxima of several statistical quantities describing regional rainfall are fitted to a generalized extreme value distribution in order to derive the precipitation amounts corresponding to sub-annual return periods for durations of 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. It is shown that regional return levels exhibit a large spatial variability in Switzerland, and that their spatial distribution strongly depends on the duration of the aggregation period: for accumulations of 3 h and shorter, the largest return levels are found over the northerly alpine slopes, whereas for longer durations the southern Alps exhibit the largest values. The inner alpine chain shows the lowest values, in agreement with previous rainfall climatologies. The nowcasting system presented here is aimed to issue heavy rainfall alerts for a large variety of end users, who are interested in different precipitation characteristics and regions, such as, for example, small urban areas, remote alpine catchments or administrative districts. The alerts are issued not only if the rainfall measured in the immediate past or forecast in the near future exceeds some predefined thresholds but also as soon as the sum of past and forecast precipitation is larger than threshold values. This precipitation total, in fact, has primary importance in applications for which antecedent rainfall is as important as predicted one, such as urban floods early warning systems. The rainfall fields, the statistical quantity representing regional rainfall and the frequency of alerts issued in case of

  17. Can Regional Climate Models be used in the assessment of vulnerability and risk caused by extreme events?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Ana

    2015-04-01

    Extreme meteorological events played an important role in catastrophic occurrences observed in the past over densely populated areas in Brazil. This motived the proposal of an integrated system for analysis and assessment of vulnerability and risk caused by extreme events in urban areas that are particularly affected by complex topography. That requires a multi-scale approach, which is centered on a regional modeling system, consisting of a regional (spectral) climate model coupled to a land-surface scheme. This regional modeling system employs a boundary forcing method based on scale-selective bias correction and assimilation of satellite-based precipitation estimates. Scale-selective bias correction is a method similar to the spectral nudging technique for dynamical downscaling that allows internal modes to develop in agreement with the large-scale features, while the precipitation assimilation procedure improves the modeled deep-convection and drives the land-surface scheme variables. Here, the scale-selective bias correction acts only on the rotational part of the wind field, letting the precipitation assimilation procedure to correct moisture convergence, in order to reconstruct South American current climate within the South American Hydroclimate Reconstruction Project. The hydroclimate reconstruction outputs might eventually produce improved initial conditions for high-resolution numerical integrations in metropolitan regions, generating more reliable short-term precipitation predictions, and providing accurate hidrometeorological variables to higher resolution geomorphological models. Better representation of deep-convection from intermediate scales is relevant when the resolution of the regional modeling system is refined by any method to meet the scale of geomorphological dynamic models of stability and mass movement, assisting in the assessment of risk areas and estimation of terrain stability over complex topography. The reconstruction of past extreme

  18. Relativistic tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A.

    2012-12-01

    In March 2011 Swift detected an extremely luminous and long-lived outburst from the nucleus of an otherwise quiescent, low luminosity (LMC-like) galaxy. Named Swift J1644+57, its combination of high-energy luminosity (1048 ergs s-1 at peak), rapid X-ray variability (factors of >100 on timescales of 100 seconds) and luminous, rising radio emission suggested that we were witnessing the birth of a moderately relativistic jet (Γ ˜ 2 - 5), created when a star is tidally disrupted by the supermassive black hole in the centre of the galaxy. A second event, Swift J2058+0516, detected two months later, with broadly similar properties lends further weight to this interpretation. Taken together this suggests that a fraction of tidal disruption events do indeed create relativistic outflows, demonstrates their detectability, and also implies that low mass galaxies can host massive black holes. Here, I briefly outline the observational properties of these relativistic tidal flares observed last year, and their evolution over the first year since their discovery.

  19. Laboratory calibration of density-dependent lines in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region

    SciTech Connect

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gu, M. F.; Desai, P.; Bitter, M.; Roquemore, L.; Reinke, M. L.

    2012-05-25

    We have been making spectral measurements in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) from different laboratory sources in order to investigate the electron density dependence of various astrophysically important emission lines and to test the atomic models underlying the diagnostic line ratios. The measurement are being performed at the Livermore EBIT-I electron beam ion trap, the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which together span an electron density of four orders of magnitude and which allow us to test the various models at high and low density limits. Here we present measurements of Fe XXII and Ar XIV, which include new data from an ultra high resolution ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} >4000) spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility. We found good agreement between the measurements and modeling calculations for Fe XXII, but poorer agreement for Ar XIV.

  20. Influence of Large-scale Climate Modes on Atmospheric Rivers That Drive Regional Precipitation Extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, B.; Molotch, N. P.; Waliser, D. E.; Fetzer, E. J.; Neiman, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are narrow channels of enhanced meridional water vapor transport between the tropics and extratropics that drive precipitation extremes in the west coast areas of North America and other continents. The influence of large-scale climate modes on ARs is analyzed in terms of modulation on AR frequency and AR-related snow water equivalent (SWE) anomalies, with a focus on understanding the causes of the anomalously snowy winter season of 2010/2011 in California's Sierra Nevada. Mean SWE on 1 April 2011 was ~70% above normal averaged over 100 snow sensors. AR occurrence was anomalously high during the season, with 20 AR dates from November to March and 14 dates in the month of December 2010, compared to the mean occurrence of 9 dates per season. Most of the season's ARs occurred during negative phases of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and the Pacific-North American (PNA) teleconnection pattern. Analysis of all winter ARs in California during water years 1998-2011 indicates more ARs occur during the negative phase of AO and PNA, with the increase between positive and negative phases being ~90% for AO, and ~50% for PNA. The circulation pattern associated with concurrent negative phases of AO and PNA, characterized by cyclonic anomalies centered northwest of California, provides a favorable dynamical condition for ARs. The analysis suggests that the massive Sierra Nevada snowpack during the 2010/2011 winter season is primarily related to anomalously high frequency of ARs favored by the joint phasing of -AO and -PNA, and that a secondary contribution is from increased snow accumulation during these ARs favored by colder air temperatures associated with -AO, -PNA and La Niña. The results have implications for subseasonal-to-seasonal predictability of AR activities and related weather and water extremes.

  1. Relativistic geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flury, J.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum metrology enables new applications in geodesy, including relativistic geodesy. The recent progress in optical atomic clocks and in long-distance frequency transfer by optical fiber together pave the way for using measurements of the gravitational frequency redshift for geodesy. The remote comparison of frequencies generated by calibrated clocks will allow for a purely relativistic determination of differences in gravitational potential and height between stations on Earth surface (chronometric leveling). The long-term perspective is to tie potential and height differences to atomic standards in order to overcome the weaknesses and inhomogeneity of height systems determined by classical spirit leveling. Complementarily, gravity measurements with atom interferometric setups, and satellite gravimetry with space borne laser interferometers allow for new sensitivities in the measurement of the Earth's gravity field.

  2. Relativistic klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Azuma, O.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.

    1989-03-01

    Experimental work is underway by a SLAC-LLNL-LBL collaboration to investigate the feasibility of using relativistic klystrons as a power source for future high gradient accelerators. Two different relativistic klystron configurations have been built and tested to date: a high grain multicavity klystron at 11.4 GHz and a low gain two cavity subharmonic buncher driven at 5.7 GHz. In both configurations power is extracted at 11.4 GHz. In order to understand the basic physics issues involved in extracting RF from a high power beam, we have used both a single resonant cavity and a multi-cell traveling wave structure for energy extraction. We have learned how to overcome our previously reported problem of high power RF pulse shortening, and have achieved peak RF power levels of 170 MW with the RF pulse of the same duration as the beam current pulse. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Solar near-relativistic electron observations as a proof of a back-scatter region beyond 1 AU during the 2000 February 18 event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agueda, N.; Vainio, R.; Lario, D.; Sanahuja, B.

    2010-09-01

    Aims: We study the near-relativistic (NR; >30 keV) electron event observed on 2000 February 18 by near-Earth spacecraft. Previous works have explained this event by assuming that the propagation of NR electrons is essentially “scatter-free” at heliocentric radial distances r < 1 AU, and that beyond 1 AU particles are “back-scattered” by magnetic field irregularities. Methods: Our aim is to re-visit this interplanetary propagation scenario and infer the injection profile at the Sun by fitting the electron directional intensities observed by the Advanced Composition Explorer. Results: We use a Monte Carlo transport model to explore this approach. We assume that the interplanetary magnetic field is an Archimedean spiral and that the interplanetary transport of NR electrons is characterized by a large radial mean free path (λ_r > 0.5 AU) and anisotropic pitch-angle scattering for r <1 AU, and a small radial mean free path (λ_r < 0.5 AU) and isotropic scattering in the back-scatter region. Conclusions: The event cannot be explained without assuming a back-scatter region beyond 1 AU. The best fit is obtained by assuming λ_r = 3.2 AU in the inner heliosphere and a back-scatter region characterized by a small mean free path λr = 0.2 AU located beyond 1.2 AU.

  4. Phenomenological Relativistic Energy Density Functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Lalazissis, G. A.; Kartzikos, S.; Niksic, T.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.; Ring, P.

    2009-08-26

    The framework of relativistic nuclear energy density functionals is applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of beta-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure is explored using the fully consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov model. Recent applications of energy density functionals with explicit density dependence of the meson-nucleon couplings are presented.

  5. Simulating Extreme Summer Precipitation Patterns in the North American Monsoon Region using the CCM3/HRBATS Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahmann, A. N.

    2001-12-01

    Current climate integrations with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (CCM3) show a very pronounced dry bias in summer precipitation over the North American Monsoon System (NAMS) region. Additionally, summer precipitation totals in this region show a smaller than observed interannual variability and a weak response to changes in SSTs. To understand the reasons behind the CCM3 misrepresentation of monsoonal processes in the NAMS region, we have chosen to examine model simulation during two extreme years: 1984 (wet) and 1993 (dry). These two years were selected according to observed precipitation totals in the northernmost portion, i.e. Arizona and New Mexico, of the NAMS region. Ensemble AMIP-type simulations with CCM3 in its standard configuration (i.e., at T42 resolution and coupled to its standard land surface model; LSM) show only small differences in precipitation over the NAMS region between the two chosen extreme years. When CCM3 is coupled to BATS and integrated over several years with SSTs for the two contrasting years, the differences in summer precipitation remain much smaller than the observed differences. In a final experiment, CCM3 is coupled to the fine-mesh version of BATS (named HRBATS), which is described in Hahmann and Dickinson (2001). This model allows for explicit representation of sub-grid variations in vegetation and soils and the inclusion of fractional ocean areas. In these simulations, a very pronounced difference in precipitation, comparable to the observed precipitation differences, is seen between the two contrasting years. The possible physical mechanisms that might explain these differences are explored in this talk. Possible reasons include the presence of the waters of the Gulf of California, which might provide a moisture source, and the better representation of snow cover over the prior winter and spring seasons.

  6. Interannual variability of regional evapotranspiration under precipitation extremes: A case study of the Youngsan River basin in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Youngkeun; Ryu, Youngryel; Jeon, Soohyun

    2014-11-01

    Understanding basin-scale evapotranspiration (ET) is an important issue for the management of regional water resources, especially with the recent trend of intensified precipitation (P). This study assessed the spatial and temporal variations of regional ET in response to P extremes, for various types of land-cover across the Youngsan River basin in Korea. The spatial distribution of monthly P and ET from 2001 to 2009 were estimated using rainfall records from 40 weather stations located across the basin and a satellite-derived, process-based ET model Breathing Earth System Simulator (BESS) (Ryu et al., 2011), respectively. The study periods were focused on the recent years with abnormally large, small and normal P, which were identified from anomalies in the z-sores of long-term (1973-2011) rainfall records. The variation of regional ET was assessed in terms of: (1) the controlling factors, using the statistics of related meteorological and geographical data, (2) a water-energy balance, using Budyko's framework, and (3) the water balance of four selected watersheds in the region, using the partitioning of annual P into ET and riverflow discharge (Q). The total annual ET of this region decreased in abnormally large-P year and increased in small-P year, because the ET in July to August (which accounts for more than 36% of annual ET) was limited by the available energy rather than available water due to the summer monsoon. In terms of land cover types, forests showed larger interannual variability in ET than paddy fields or cropland, with the differences in ET between large and small-P years being 108 and 82 mm yr-1, respectively. The sensitivity of annual ET to P extremes was significantly related to the leaf area index (LAI), rather than soil properties, topography, or specific land-cover type (p < 0.05, generalized linear model). However, the interannual variations of ET were not large (15-18%) compared to those of annual P (51-62%) and Q (108-232%) during 2002

  7. Signature of Nonstationarity in Precipitation Extremes over Urbanizing Regions in India Identified through a Multivariate Frequency Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jitendra; Hari, Vittal; Sharma, Tarul; Karmakar, Subhankar; Ghosh, Subimal

    2016-04-01

    The statistical assumption of stationarity in hydrologic extreme time/event series has been relied heavily in frequency analysis. However, due to the analytically perceivable impacts of climate change, urbanization and concomitant land use pattern, assumption of stationarity in hydrologic time series will draw erroneous results, which in turn may affect the policy and decision-making. Past studies provided sufficient evidences on changes in the characteristics of Indian monsoon precipitation extremes and further it has been attributed to climate change and urbanization, which shows need of nonstationary analysis on the Indian monsoon extremes. Therefore, a comprehensive multivariate nonstationary frequency analysis has been conducted for the entire India to identify the precipitation characteristics (intensity, duration and depth) responsible for significant nonstationarity in the Indian monsoon. We use 1o resolution of precipitation data for a period of 1901-2004, in a Generalized Additive Model for Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS) framework. A cluster of GAMLSS models has been developed by considering nonstationarity in different combinations of distribution parameters through different regression techniques, and the best-fit model is further applied for bivariate analysis. A population density data has been utilized to identify the urban, urbanizing and rural regions. The results showed significant differences in the stationary and nonstationary bivariate return periods for the urbanizing grids, when compared to urbanized and rural grids. A comprehensive multivariate analysis has also been conducted to identify the precipitation characteristics particularly responsible for imprinting signature of nonstationarity.

  8. Relativistic Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; Markovic, Dragoljub

    1997-06-01

    Preface; Prologue: Conference overview Bernard Carr; Part I. The Universe At Large and Very Large Redshifts: 2. The size and age of the Universe Gustav A. Tammann; 3. Active galaxies at large redshifts Malcolm S. Longair; 4. Observational cosmology with the cosmic microwave background George F. Smoot; 5. Future prospects in measuring the CMB power spectrum Philip M. Lubin; 6. Inflationary cosmology Michael S. Turner; 7. The signature of the Universe Bernard J. T. Jones; 8. Theory of large-scale structure Sergei F. Shandarin; 9. The origin of matter in the universe Lev A. Kofman; 10. New guises for cold-dark matter suspects Edward W. Kolb; Part II. Physics and Astrophysics Of Relativistic Compact Objects: 11. On the unification of gravitational and inertial forces Donald Lynden-Bell; 12. Internal structure of astrophysical black holes Werner Israel; 13. Black hole entropy: external facade and internal reality Valery Frolov; 14. Accretion disks around black holes Marek A. Abramowicz; 15. Black hole X-ray transients J. Craig Wheeler; 16. X-rays and gamma rays from active galactic nuclei Roland Svensson; 17. Gamma-ray bursts: a challenge to relativistic astrophysics Martin Rees; 18. Probing black holes and other exotic objects with gravitational waves Kip Thorne; Epilogue: the past and future of relativistic astrophysics Igor D. Novikov; I. D. Novikov's scientific papers and books.

  9. Extreme cosmic ray dominated regions: a new paradigm for high star formation density events in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Padeli P.; Thi, Wing-Fai; Miniati, Francesco; Viti, Serena

    2011-06-01

    We examine in detail the recent proposal that extreme cosmic ray dominated regions (CRDRs) characterize the interstellar medium of galaxies during events of high-density star formation, fundamentally altering its initial conditions (Papadopoulos 2010). Solving the coupled chemical and thermal state equations for dense UV-shielded gas reveals that the large CR energy densities in such systems [UCR ˜ few × (103-104) UCR, Gal] will indeed raise the minimum temperature of this phase (where the initial conditions of star formation are set) from ˜10 K (as in the Milky Way) to ˜50-100 K. Moreover in such extreme CRDRs the gas temperature remains fully decoupled from that of the dust, with Tkin≫Tdust, even at high densities [n(H2) ˜ 105-106 cm-3], quite unlike CRDRs in the Milky Way where Tk˜Tdust when n(H2) ≳ 105 cm-3. These dramatically different star formation initial conditions will (i) boost the Jeans mass of UV-shielded gas regions by factors of ˜10-100 with respect to those in quiescent or less extreme star-forming systems and (ii) 'erase' the so-called inflection point of the effective equation of state of molecular gas. Both these effects occur across the entire density range of typical molecular clouds, and may represent a new paradigm for all high-density star formation in the Universe, with CRs as the key driving mechanism, operating efficiently even in the high dust extinction environments of compact extreme starbursts. The characteristic mass of young stars will be boosted as a result, naturally yielding a top-heavy stellar initial mass function (IMF) and a bimodal star formation mode (with the occurrence of extreme CRDRs setting the branching point). Such CRDRs will be present in Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) and merger-driven gas-rich starbursts across the Universe where large amounts of molecular gas rapidly dissipate towards compact disc configurations where they fuel intense starbursts. In hierarchical galaxy formation models, CR

  10. Spatio-temporal characteristics of the extreme precipitation by L-moment-based index-flood method in the Yangtze River Delta region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yixing; Chen, Haishan; Xu, Chong-Yu; Xu, Wucheng; Chen, Changchun; Sun, Shanlei

    2016-05-01

    The regionalization methods, which "trade space for time" by pooling information from different locations in the frequency analysis, are efficient tools to enhance the reliability of extreme quantile estimates. This paper aims at improving the understanding of the regional frequency of extreme precipitation by using regionalization methods, and providing scientific background and practical assistance in formulating the regional development strategies for water resources management in one of the most developed and flood-prone regions in China, the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region. To achieve the main goals, L-moment-based index-flood (LMIF) method, one of the most popular regionalization methods, is used in the regional frequency analysis of extreme precipitation with special attention paid to inter-site dependence and its influence on the accuracy of quantile estimates, which has not been considered by most of the studies using LMIF method. Extensive data screening of stationarity, serial dependence, and inter-site dependence was carried out first. The entire YRD region was then categorized into four homogeneous regions through cluster analysis and homogenous analysis. Based on goodness-of-fit statistic and L-moment ratio diagrams, generalized extreme-value (GEV) and generalized normal (GNO) distributions were identified as the best fitted distributions for most of the sub-regions, and estimated quantiles for each region were obtained. Monte Carlo simulation was used to evaluate the accuracy of the quantile estimates taking inter-site dependence into consideration. The results showed that the root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) were bigger and the 90 % error bounds were wider with inter-site dependence than those without inter-site dependence for both the regional growth curve and quantile curve. The spatial patterns of extreme precipitation with a return period of 100 years were finally obtained which indicated that there are two regions with highest precipitation

  11. Climate change effects on extreme flows of water supply area in Istanbul: utility of regional climate models and downscaling method.

    PubMed

    Kara, Fatih; Yucel, Ismail

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the climate change impact on the changes of mean and extreme flows under current and future climate conditions in the Omerli Basin of Istanbul, Turkey. The 15 regional climate model output from the EU-ENSEMBLES project and a downscaling method based on local implications from geophysical variables were used for the comparative analyses. Automated calibration algorithm is used to optimize the parameters of Hydrologiska Byråns Vattenbalansavdel-ning (HBV) model for the study catchment using observed daily temperature and precipitation. The calibrated HBV model was implemented to simulate daily flows using precipitation and temperature data from climate models with and without downscaling method for reference (1960-1990) and scenario (2071-2100) periods. Flood indices were derived from daily flows, and their changes throughout the four seasons and year were evaluated by comparing their values derived from simulations corresponding to the current and future climate. All climate models strongly underestimate precipitation while downscaling improves their underestimation feature particularly for extreme events. Depending on precipitation input from climate models with and without downscaling the HBV also significantly underestimates daily mean and extreme flows through all seasons. However, this underestimation feature is importantly improved for all seasons especially for spring and winter through the use of downscaled inputs. Changes in extreme flows from reference to future increased for the winter and spring and decreased for the fall and summer seasons. These changes were more significant with downscaling inputs. With respect to current time, higher flow magnitudes for given return periods will be experienced in the future and hence, in the planning of the Omerli reservoir, the effective storage and water use should be sustained. PMID:26293893

  12. Climatology of Extreme Winds in the Chukchi/Beaufort Seas/Alaska Region Using the North American Regional Reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegall, S. T.; Zhang, J.

    2009-12-01

    The high-resolution (32km, 3-hourly) North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) surface winds were used to examine the detailed structures of the distribution and evolution of the surface wind across the Chukchi/Beaufort Seas/Alaska region. First the NARR surface winds were verified against the station observations over the study area and the comparisons indicate that NARR essentially captures the distribution of the observed winds in summer. However, an obvious bias exists in winter, when the easterly component of the bimodal pattern is overestimated, while the westerly component is underestimated, particularly in January. Then we used the NARR surface wind data to examine the wind field climatological features, interannual variability and long-term change over the study area by analyzing the monthly maximums, 99th, 95th, 90th, and 50th percentile wind speeds (m/s) for each month of the year from 1979-2006. Decadal differences (i.e. the difference from 2000-2006 and 1990-1999 and 1990-1999 and 1980-1989) were also investigated to understand the long-term change in the area's surface winds. The results indicated that the maximum wind speeds in the Chukchi/Beaufort Seas have lower values from January through May. Then there is a progression northward of the higher wind speeds beginning in the Bering Strait in June and continuing into the Chukchi/Beaufort Seas during July-October; in November and December the maximum winds in the area start to decrease with a southward migration into the Chukchi Sea and eventually back through the Bering Strait into the Bering Sea, which is coincident with the sea ice retreat and advance in the area. The yearly variance of the wind speeds follow a similar northward and southward migration while the highest variance happened in October. The decadal differences mainly show a large increase in the maximum winds speeds in September and October in the Chukchi Sea.

  13. Recent Advances in Regional Climate System Modeling and ClimateChange Analyses of Extreme Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Norman L.

    2004-09-24

    During the period May 2003 to May 2004, there were two CEC/PIER funded primary research activities by the Atmosphere and Ocean Sciences Group/Earth Science Division at LBNL. These activities are the implementation and testing of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Land Model (CLM) into MM5, and the analysis of extreme heat days under a new set of climate simulations. The new version of MM5,MM5-CLM, has been tested for a 90 day snowmelt period in the northwestern U.S. Results show that this new code upgrade, as compared to the MM5-NOAH, has improved snowmelt, temperature, and precipitation when compared to observations. These are due in part to a subgrid scheme,advanced snow processes, and advanced vegetation. The climate change analysis is the upper and lower IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios, representing fossil fuel intensive and energy conserving future emission scenarios, and medium and low sensitivity Global Climate Models. Results indicate that California cities will see increases in the number of heat wave and temperature threshold days from two to six times.These results may be viewed as potential outcomes based on today's decisions on emissions.

  14. DIFFRACTION, REFRACTION, AND REFLECTION OF AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE OBSERVED DURING ITS INTERACTIONS WITH REMOTE ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu; Zhao Ruijuan; Tian Zhanjun; Su Jiangtao; Li Hui; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2013-08-20

    We present observations of the diffraction, refraction, and reflection of a global extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave propagating in the solar corona. These intriguing phenomena are observed when the wave interacts with two remote active regions, and together they exhibit properties of an EUV wave. When the wave approached AR11465, it became weaker and finally disappeared in the active region, but a few minutes later a new wavefront appeared behind the active region, and it was not concentric with the incoming wave. In addition, a reflected wave was also simultaneously observed on the wave incoming side. When the wave approached AR11459, it transmitted through the active region directly and without reflection. The formation of the new wavefront and the transmission could be explained with diffraction and refraction effects, respectively. We propose that the different behaviors observed during the interactions may be caused by different speed gradients at the boundaries of the two active regions. We find that the EUV wave formed ahead of a group of expanding loops a few minutes after the start of the loops' expansion, which represents the initiation of the associated coronal mass ejection (CME). Based on these results, we conclude that the EUV wave should be a nonlinear magnetosonic wave or shock driven by the associated CME, which propagated faster than the ambient fast mode speed and gradually slowed down to an ordinary linear wave. Our observations support the hybrid model that includes both fast wave and slow non-wave components.

  15. Embedded star formation in the extended narrow line region of Centaurus A: Extreme mixing observed by MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, F.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Tadhunter, C.

    2016-05-01

    We present a detailed study of the complex ionization structure in a small (~250 pc) extended narrow line region (ENLR) cloud near Centaurus A using the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer. This cloud is located in the so-called outer filament of ionized gas (about 15 kpc from the nucleus) where jet-induced star formation has been suggested to occur by different studies. We find that, despite the small size, a mixture of ionization mechanisms is operating, resulting in considerable complexity in the spatial ionization structure. The area includes two H ii regions where star formation is occurring and another location where star formation must have ceased very recently. Interestingly, the extreme Balmer decrement of one of the star forming regions (Hα/Hβobs ~ 6) indicates that it is still heavily embedded in its natal cocoon of gas and dust. At all three locations a continuum counterpart is found with spectra matching those of O/B stars local to Centaurus A. The H ii regions are embedded in a larger gas complex which is photoionized by the radiation of the central active galactic nucleus (AGN), but the O/B stars affect the spatial ionization pattern in the ENLR cloud very locally. In particular, in the surroundings of the youngest star forming region, we can isolate a tight mixing sequence in the diagnostic diagram going from gas with ionization due to a pure stellar continuum to gas only photoionized by the AGN. These results emphasize the complexity and the mixture of processes occurring in star forming regions under the influence of an AGN radiation. This is relevant for our understanding of AGN-induced star formation suggested to occur in a number of objects, including this region of Centaurus A. They also illustrate that these young stars influence the gas over only a limited region.

  16. Charge Exchange Produced Emission of Carbon in the Iron M-shell Dominated 150-200 Å Extreme Ultraviolet Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepson, Jaan K.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Bitter, Manfred; Roquemore, A. Lane; Kaita, Robert

    2015-08-01

    We report on emission spectra in the extreme ultraviolet region 150-200 Å recorded at the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). This region is typically dominated by M-shell iron emission that is used extensively for solar observations, e.g. Hinode and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and stellar atmospheres, e.g., the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE). We find that significant emission occurs from several heretofore unmeasured lines, which can persist throughout the plasma duration. We attribute these lines to emission from K-shell carbon ions (C V and C VI). Spectral modeling of collisional excitation fails to account for these lines, but modeling of charge exchange provides a good match with the observation. Our spectral model shows that the lines are formed by charge exchange of bare and hydrogenlike carbon with neutral hydrogen. The high abundance of bare and hydrogenlike carbon in the solar wind suggests that these lines may be formed in the heliosphere and may be part of the soft X-ray background. They may thus be observed by energy dispersive instruments, such as microcalorimeters.This work was supported by the DOE General Plasma Science program. Work was performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy under Contracts DEAC52-07NA27344 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  17. The impact of changing ocean eddies pathways on regional sea surface height extremes in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunnabend, Sandra-Esther; Dijkstra, Henk A.; Kliphuis, Michael A.; van Werkhoven, Ben; Bal, Henri E.; Seinstra, Frank; Maassen, Jason; van Meersbergen, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    Ocean eddies strongly influences short-term variations in sea surface height (SSH). Changing ocean circulation can lead to shifting eddy pathways, which may cause an additional contribution to sea level extremes in different regions. Therefore, dynamic sea surface height (SSH) changes that occur in the North Atlantic due to an abrupt weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) are simulated using the Parallel Ocean Program (POP). The weakening of the AMOC is introduced by applying strong freshwater perturbations around Greenland. To study the effect of ocean model resolution, simulations are performed using a high-resolution (HR) strongly eddying model version and a low-resolution model (LR) version in which the effect of eddies is parameterized. Results show that a rapid decrease of the AMOC in the HR version leads to a change in the main eddy pathways in the North Atlantic associated with a change in the separation latitude of the Gulf Stream. This induces shorter return times of different regional and coastal extremes in North Atlantic SSH than in the LR version. This effect causes an additional short-term SSH change of several centimeters, which may occur during an already high background sea level.

  18. Laboratory Measurements for Developing Reliable Diagnostics of Stellar Coronae in the Extreme Ultraviolet and Soft X-ray Spectral Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepson, J. K.

    2004-05-01

    Chandra and XMM-Newton observations have greatly expanded our knowledge of the spectral emission of stellar coronae, revealing a complexity in the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray bands that complements past solar observations. The new observations have highlighted various shortcomings in our understanding of the spectral emission. For example, spectra in this region have many unidentified or possibly misidentified lines. Therefore, established spectral diagnostics can be impaired by previously unrecognized line blends. We are using the Livermore electron beam ion traps to simulate this emission in the laboratory. We are producing a complete catalogue of astrophysically relevant emission lines in the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions. From this catalogue we identify lines, reassess spectral diagnostics, and develop new diagnostics. Our measurements, for example, have increased the number of lines for \\ion{S}{8}--\\ion{S}{13} from 29 to 109. Measurements of iron, argon, sulfur, silicon, and magnesium are allowing us to identify previously unassigned lines in solar and stellar spectra. Moreover, we have identified a novel magnetic field diagnostic in neon-like ions. We have also reevaluated the diagnostic utility of the \\ion{Fe}{17} 3C and 3D lines, previously considered to be a prime diagnostic of opacity, instead showing them to be of use as a diagnostic of electron temperature. Research at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory conducted under the auspices of the Department of Energy and supported by a NASA SARA grant.

  19. Snow-atmosphere coupling and extremes over North America in the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diro, G. T.; Sushama, L.; Huziy, O.

    2015-12-01

    Given the importance of land in the climate system, we investigate the influence of land surface, in particular the variation in snow characteristics, on climate variability and extremes over North America using the fifth generation of Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM5). To this end, we carried out two CRCM5 simulations driven by ERA-Interim reanalysis, where snow is either prescribed (uncoupled) or evolves interactively (coupled) during the model integration. Results indicate a systematic influence of snow on the inter-annual variability of air and surface temperature throughout the winter and spring seasons. In the coupled simulations, where the snow depth and snow cover were allowed to evolve freely, the inter-annual variability of surface and near surface air temperatures were found to be larger. Comparison with the uncoupled simulation suggests that snow depth/cover variability accounts for about 70% of the total surface temperature variability over the northern Great Plains and Canadian Prairies for the winter and spring seasons. The snow-atmosphere coupling is stronger in spring than in winter, since in spring season both the albedo and the latent heat flux contribute to the variability in temperature. Snow is also found to modulate extreme temperature events such as the number of cold days over Prairies during weak La-Nina episodes. These results suggest that initializing forecast models with realistic snow condition could potentially help to improve seasonal/sub-seasonal prediction skill over these snow-atmosphere coupling hotspot regions.

  20. Extreme rainfall in South East France: added value of a convection-permitting regional climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alias, Antoinette; Déqué, Michel; Somot, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    EURO-CORDEX simulations are based on 12 km numerical model. They represent with some accuracy, compared to global coupled models used in CMIP, the surface elevation in mountainous regions. As a consequence, the geographical distribution of precipitation is better at regional scale, and the frequency of high precipitation is more realistic. However these models do not explicitly resolve the convective phenomena which are responsible for the heavy accumulated rainfall. Arome model is derived from Aladin model (used in EURO-CORDEX) but uses non-hydrostatic equations, 2.5 km horizontal resolution, and a dedicated set of physical parameterizations. Its domain covers South-East France, a region which undergoes severe rainfall events in autumn. We present ERA-interim driven simulations with Aladin (12 km) driving Arome (2.5 km). The analysis is focussed on daily and hourly precipitation in extended autumn (ASOND) in the central part of the domain. We compare Aladin (i.e. EURO-CORDEX) and Arome simulations in their ability to simulate observed data.

  1. Asparagine 326 in the extremely C-terminal region of XRCC4 is essential for the cell survival after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wanotayan, Rujira; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Imamichi, Shoji; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-02-20

    XRCC4 is one of the crucial proteins in the repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). As XRCC4 consists of 336 amino acids, N-terminal 200 amino acids include domains for dimerization and for association with DNA ligase IV and XLF and shown to be essential for XRCC4 function in DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. On the other hand, the role of the remaining C-terminal region of XRCC4 is not well understood. In the present study, we noticed that a stretch of ∼20 amino acids located at the extreme C-terminus of XRCC4 is highly conserved among vertebrate species. To explore its possible importance, series of mutants in this region were constructed and assessed for the functionality in terms of ability to rescue radiosensitivity of M10 cells lacking XRCC4. Among 13 mutants, M10 transfectant with N326L mutant (M10-XRCC4{sup N326L}) showed elevated radiosensitivity. N326L protein showed defective nuclear localization. N326L sequence matched the consensus sequence of nuclear export signal. Leptomycin B treatment accumulated XRCC4{sup N326L} in the nucleus but only partially rescued radiosensitivity of M10-XRCC4{sup N326L}. These results collectively indicated that the functional defects of XRCC4{sup N326L} might be partially, but not solely, due to its exclusion from nucleus by synthetic nuclear export signal. Further mutation of XRCC4 Asn326 to other amino acids, i.e., alanine, aspartic acid or glutamine did not affect the nuclear localization but still exhibited radiosensitivity. The present results indicated the importance of the extremely C-terminal region of XRCC4 and, especially, Asn326 therein. - Highlights: • Extremely C-terminal region of XRCC4 is highly conserved among vertebrate species. • XRCC4 C-terminal point mutants, R325F and N326L, are functionally deficient in terms of survival after irradiation. • N326L localizes to the cytoplasm because of synthetic nuclear export signal. • Leptomycin B restores the

  2. Variations in the sensitivity of US maize yield to extreme temperatures by region and growth phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Ethan E.; Huybers, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Maize yield is sensitive to high temperatures, and most large scale analyses have used a single, fixed sensitivity to represent this vulnerability over the course of a growing season. Field scale studies, in contrast, highlight how temperature sensitivity varies over the course of development. Here we couple United States Department of Agriculture yield and development data from 1981-2012 with weather station data to resolve temperature sensitivity according to both region and growth interval. On average, temperature sensitivity peaks during silking and grain filling, but there are major regional variations. In Northern states grain filling phases are shorter when temperatures are higher, whereas Southern states show little yield sensitivity and have longer grain filling phases during hotter seasons. This pattern of grain filling sensitivity and duration accords with the whole-season temperature sensitivity in US maize identified in recent studies. Further exploration of grain filling duration and its response to high temperatures may be useful in determining the degree to which maize agriculture can be adapted to a hotter climate.

  3. Risk prediction of Critical Infrastructures against extreme natural hazards: local and regional scale analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, Vittorio; Hounjet, Micheline; Burzel, Andreas; Di Pietro, Antonio; Tofani, Alberto; Pollino, Maurizio; Giovinazzi, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    Natural hazard events can induce severe impacts on the built environment; they can hit wide and densely populated areas, where there is a large number of (inter)dependent technological systems whose damages could cause the failure or malfunctioning of further different services, spreading the impacts on wider geographical areas. The EU project CIPRNet (Critical Infrastructures Preparedness and Resilience Research Network) is realizing an unprecedented Decision Support System (DSS) which enables to operationally perform risk prediction on Critical Infrastructures (CI) by predicting the occurrence of natural events (from long term weather to short nowcast predictions, correlating intrinsic vulnerabilities of CI elements with the different events' manifestation strengths, and analysing the resulting Damage Scenario. The Damage Scenario is then transformed into an Impact Scenario, where punctual CI element damages are transformed into micro (local area) or meso (regional) scale Services Outages. At the smaller scale, the DSS simulates detailed city models (where CI dependencies are explicitly accounted for) that are of important input for crisis management organizations whereas, at the regional scale by using approximate System-of-Systems model describing systemic interactions, the focus is on raising awareness. The DSS has allowed to develop a novel simulation framework for predicting earthquakes shake maps originating from a given seismic event, considering the shock wave propagation in inhomogeneous media and the subsequent produced damages by estimating building vulnerabilities on the basis of a phenomenological model [1, 2]. Moreover, in presence of areas containing river basins, when abundant precipitations are expected, the DSS solves the hydrodynamic 1D/2D models of the river basins for predicting the flux runoff and the corresponding flood dynamics. This calculation allows the estimation of the Damage Scenario and triggers the evaluation of the Impact Scenario

  4. Analysis of extreme climatic features over South America from CLARIS-LPB ensemble of regional climate models for future conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, E.; Zaninelli, P.; Carril, A.; Menendez, C.; Dominguez, M.

    2012-04-01

    An ensemble of seven regional climate models (RCM) included in the European CLARIS-LPB project (A Europe-South America Network for Climate Change Assessment and Impact Studies in La Plata Basin) are used to study how some features related to climatic extremes are projected to be changed by the end of XXIst century. These RCMs are forced by different IPCC-AR4 global climate models (IPSL, ECHAM5 and HadCM3), covering three different 30-year periods: present (1960-1990), near future (2010-2040) and distant future (2070-2100), with 50km of horizontal resolution. These regional climate models have previously been forced with ERA-Interim reanalysis, in a consistent procedure with CORDEX (A COordinated Regional climate Downscaling EXperiment) initiative for the South-America domain. The analysis shows a good agreement among them and the available observational databases to describe the main features of the mean climate of the continent. Here we focus our analysis on some topics of interest related to extreme events, such as the development of diagnostics related to dry-spells length, the structure of the frequency distribution functions over several subregions defined by more or less homogeneous climatic conditions (four sub-basins over the La Plata Basin, the southern part of the Amazon basin, Northeast Brazil, and the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ)), the structure of the annual cycle and their main features and relation with the length of the seasons, or the frequency of anomalous hot or cold events. One shortcoming that must be considered is the lack of observational databases with both time and spatial frequency to validate model outputs. At the same time, one challenging issue of this study is the regional modelling description of a continent where a huge variety of climates are present, from desert to mountain conditions, and from tropical to subtropical regimes. Another basic objective of this preliminary work is also to obtain a measure of the spread among

  5. The infrared emission of G333.6-0.2 - An extremely nonspherical H II region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, A. R.; Mcgregor, P. J.; Robinson, G.; Thomas, J. A.; Becklin, E. E.; Gatley, I.; Werner, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    The southern H II region G333.6-0.2, which has a total luminosity of 3.3 million solar luminosities (for an assumed distance of 4 kpc) was mapped at 2.2, 10, 30, 50, and 100 microns. At all wavelengths, the surface brightness of the infrared radiation is unusually high and the structure of the source is compact and symmetrical. The present observations, along with previous data, suggest that G333.6-0.2 is excited by a single luminous object or a very compact cluster, which has formed on the front surface of a dense molecular cloud as seen from the earth. It is shown that the spectral and spatial characteristics of the infrared radiation can be understood in terms of this blister model.

  6. Extreme Ground Motion Recorded in the Near-Source Region of Underground Nuclear Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Foxall, W

    2005-01-04

    Free-field recordings of underground nuclear explosions constitute a unique data set within the near-source region of seismic events ranging in magnitude from M3 to M6.5. The term ''free-field'' in this context refers to recordings from instruments emplaced in boreholes or tunnel walls such that the initial portions of the records ({approx}0.1 to 1 second) do not contain effects resulting from reflections at the free surface. In addition to the free-field instruments deployed to record ground motions from selected underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and elsewhere, surface arrays were routinely deployed to record surface accelerations and velocities from underground nuclear tests conducted at NTS.

  7. Extremely Bright Submillimeter Galaxies beyond the Lupus-I Star-forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Kawabe, R.; Shimajiri, Y.; Tsukagoshi, T.; Nakajima, Y.; Oasa, Y.; Wilner, D. J.; Chandler, C. J.; Saigo, K.; Tomida, K.; Yun, M. S.; Taniguchi, A.; Kohno, K.; Hatsukade, B.; Aretxaga, I.; Austermann, J. E.; Dickman, R.; Ezawa, H.; Goss, W. M.; Hayashi, M.; Hughes, D. H.; Hiramatsu, M.; Inutsuka, S.; Ogasawara, R.; Ohashi, N.; Oshima, T.; Scott, K. S.; Wilson, G. W.

    2015-08-01

    We report detections of two candidate distant submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), MM J154506.4‑344318 and MM J154132.7‑350320, which are discovered in the AzTEC/ASTE 1.1 mm survey toward the Lupus-I star-forming region. The two objects have 1.1 mm flux densities of 43.9 and 27.1 mJy, and have Herschel/SPIRE counterparts as well. The Submillimeter Array counterpart to the former SMG is identified at 890 μm and 1.3 mm. Photometric redshift estimates using all available data from the mid-infrared to the radio suggest that the redshifts of the two SMGs are {z}{photo}≃ 4–5 and 3, respectively. Near-infrared objects are found very close to the SMGs and they are consistent with low-z ellipticals, suggesting that the high apparent luminosities can be attributed to gravitational magnification. The cumulative number counts at {S}1.1{mm}≥slant 25 mJy, combined with the other two 1.1 mm brightest sources, are {0.70}-0.34+0.56 deg‑2, which is consistent with a model prediction that accounts for flux magnification due to strong gravitational lensing. Unexpectedly, a z\\gt 3 SMG and a Galactic dense starless core (e.g., a first hydrostatic core) could be similar in the mid-infrared to millimeter spectral energy distributions and spatial structures at least at ≳ 1\\prime\\prime . This indicates that it is necessary to distinguish the two possibilities by means of broadband photometry from the optical to centimeter and spectroscopy to determine the redshift, when a compact object is identified toward Galactic star-forming regions.

  8. Spatio-temporal analysis of the extreme precipitation by the L-moment-based index-flood method in the Yangtze River Delta region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yixing; Chen, Haishan; Xu, Chongyu; Xu, Wucheng; Chen, Changchun

    2014-05-01

    The regionalization methods which 'trade space for time' by including several at-site data records in the frequency analysis are an efficient tool to improve the reliability of extreme quantile estimates. With the main aims of improving the understanding of the regional frequency of extreme precipitation and providing scientific and practical background and assistance in formulating the regional development strategies for water resources management in one of the most developed and flood-prone regions in China, the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region, in this paper, L-moment-based index-flood (LMIF) method, one of the popular regionalization methods, is used in the regional frequency analysis of extreme precipitation; attention was paid to inter-site dependence and its influence on the accuracy of quantile estimates, which hasn't been considered for most of the studies using LMIF method. Extensive data screening of stationarity, serial dependence and inter-site dependence was carried out first. The entire YRD region was then categorized into four homogeneous regions through cluster analysis and homogenous analysis. Based on goodness-of-fit statistic and L-moment ratio diagrams, Generalized extreme-value (GEV) and Generalized Normal (GNO) distributions were identified as the best-fit distributions for most of the sub regions. Estimated quantiles for each region were further obtained. Monte-Carlo simulation was used to evaluate the accuracy of the quantile estimates taking inter-site dependence into consideration. The results showed that the root mean square errors (RMSEs) were bigger and the 90% error bounds were wider with inter-site dependence than those with no inter-site dependence for both the regional growth curve and quantile curve. The spatial patterns of extreme precipitation with return period of 100 years were obtained which indicated that there are two regions with the highest precipitation extremes (southeastern coastal area of Zhejiang Province and the

  9. Revisiting Cholera-Climate Teleconnections in the Native Homeland: ENSO and other Extremes through the Regional Hydroclimatic Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanda, A. S.; Jutla, A.; Huq, A.; Colwell, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Cholera is a global disease, with significantly large outbreaks occurring since the 1990s, notably in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia and recently in Haiti, in the Caribbean. Critical knowledge gaps remain in the understanding of the annual recurrence in endemic areas and the nature of epidemic outbreaks, especially those that follow extreme hydroclimatic events. Teleconnections with large-scale climate phenomena affecting regional scale hydroclimatic drivers of cholera dynamics remain largely unexplained. For centuries, the Bengal delta region has been strongly influenced by the asymmetric availability of water in the rivers Ganges and the Brahmaputra. As these two major rivers are known to have strong contrasting affects on local cholera dynamics in the region, we argue that the role of El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), or other phenomena needs to be interpreted in the context of the seasonal role of individual rivers and subsequent impact on local environmental processes, not as a teleconnection having a remote and unified effect. We present a modified hypothesis that the influences of large-scale climate phenomena such as ENSO and IOD on Bengal cholera can be explicitly identified and incorporated through regional scale hydroclimatic drivers. Here, we provide an analytical review of the literature addressing cholera and climate linkages and present hypotheses, based on recent evidence, and quantification on the role of regional scale hydroclimatic drivers of cholera. We argue that the seasonal changes in precipitation and temperature, and resulting river discharge in the GBM basin region during ENSO and IOD events have a dominant combined effect on the endemic persistence and the epidemic vulnerability to cholera outbreaks in spring and fall seasons, respectively, that is stronger than the effect of localized hydrological and socio-economic sensitivities in Bangladesh. In addition, systematic identification of underlying seasonal

  10. Hydrometeorological extremes reconstructed from documentary evidence for the Jihlava region in the 17th-19th centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolak, Lukas; Brazdil, Rudolf; Chroma, Katerina; Valasek, Hubert; Belinova, Monika; Reznickova, Ladislava

    2016-04-01

    Different documentary evidence (taxation records, chronicles, insurance reports etc.) is used for reconstruction of hydrometeorological extremes (HMEs) in the Jihlava region (central part of the recent Czech Republic) in the 17th-19th centuries. The aim of the study is description of the system of tax alleviation in Moravia, presentation of utilization of early fire and hail damage insurance claims and application of the new methodological approaches for the analysis of HMEs impacts. During the period studied more than 400 HMEs were analysed for the 16 estates (past basic economic units). Late frost on 16 May 1662 on the Nove Mesto na Morave estate, which destroyed whole cereals and caused damage in the forests, is the first recorded extreme event. Downpours causing flash floods and hailstorms are the most frequently recorded natural disasters. Moreover, floods, droughts, windstorms, blizzards, late frosts and lightning strikes starting fires caused enormous damage as well. The impacts of HMEs are classified into three categories: impacts on agricultural production, material property and the socio-economic impacts. Natural disasters became the reasons of losses of human lives, property, supplies and farming equipment. HMEs caused damage to fields and meadows, depletion of livestock and triggered the secondary consequences as lack of seeds and finance, high prices, indebtedness, poverty and deterioration in field fertility. The results are discussed with respect to uncertainties associated with documentary evidences and their spatiotemporal distribution. Archival records, preserved in the Moravian Land Archives in Brno and other district archives, create a unique source of data contributing to the better understanding of extreme events and their impacts.

  11. Relativistic causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, Giovanni; Owen Weatherall, James

    2014-11-01

    Relativity theory is often taken to include, or to imply, a prohibition on superluminal propagation of causal processes. Yet, what exactly the prohibition on superluminal propagation amounts to and how one should deal with its possible violation have remained open philosophical problems, both in the context of the metaphysics of causation and the foundations of physics. In particular, recent work in philosophy of physics has focused on the causal structure of spacetime in relativity theory and on how this causal structure manifests itself in our most fundamental theories of matter. These topics were the subject of a workshop on "Relativistic Causality in Quantum Field Theory and General Relativity" that we organized (along with John Earman) at the Center for Philosophy of Science in Pittsburgh on April 5-7, 2013. The present Special Issue comprises contributions by speakers in that workshop as well as several other experts exploring different aspects of relativistic causality. We are grateful to the journal for hosting this Special Issue, to the journal's managing editor, Femke Kuiling, for her help and support in putting the issue together, and to the authors and the referees for their excellent work.

  12. Risk-based consequences of extreme natural hazard processes in mountain regions - Multi-hazard analysis in Tyrol (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huttenlau, Matthias; Stötter, Johann

    2010-05-01

    weighting within the risk concept, this has sufficient implications on the results of risk analyses. Thus, an equal and scale appropriated balance of those risk components is a fundamental key factor for effective natural hazard risk analyses. The results of such analyses inform especially decision makers in the insurance industry, the administration, and politicians on potential consequences and are the basis for appropriate risk management strategies. Thereby, results (i) on an annual or probabilistic risk comprehension have to be distinguished from (ii) scenario-based analyses. The first analyses are based on statistics of periodically or episodically occurring events whereas the latter approach is especially applied for extreme, non-linear, stochastic events. Focusing on the needs especially of insurance companies, the first approaches are appropriate for premium pricing and reinsurance strategies with an annual perspective, whereas the latter is focusing on events with extreme loss burdens under worst-case criteria to guarantee accordant reinsurance coverage. Moreover, the demand of adequate loss model approaches and methods is strengthened by the risk-based requirements of the upcoming capital requirement directive Solvency II. The present study estimates the potential elements at risk, their corresponding damage potentials and the Probable Maximum Losses (PMLs) of extreme natural hazards events in Tyrol (Austria) and considers adequatly the scale dependency and balanced application of the introduced risk components. Beside the introduced analysis an additionally portfolio analysis of a regional insurance company was executed. The geocoded insurance contracts of this portfolio analysis were the basis to estimate spatial, socio-economical and functional differentiated mean insurance values for the different risk categories of (i) buildings, (ii) contents or inventory, (iii) vehicles, and (iv) persons in the study area. The estimated mean insurance values were

  13. Chromospheric and photospheric evolution of an extremely active solar region in solar cycle 19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenna-Lawlor, S. M. P.

    1981-01-01

    a comprehensive investigation was made of phenomena attending the disk passage, July 7 to 21, 1959, of active solar center HAO-59Q. At the photospheric level that comprised an aggregate of groups of sunspots of which one group, Mt. Wilson 14284, showed all the attributes deemed typical of solar regions associated with the production of major flares. A special characteristic of 59Q was its capability to eject dark material. Part of this material remained trapped in the strong magnetic fields above group 14284 where it formed a system of interrelated arches, the legs of which passed through components of the bright chromospheric network of the plage and were rooted in various underlying umbrae. Two apparently diffeent kinds of flare were identified in 59Q; namely, prominence flares (which comprised brightenings within part of the suspended dark prominence) and plage flares (which comprised brightenings within part of the chromospheric network). Prominence flares were of three varieties described as 'impact', 'stationary' and 'moving' prominence flares. Plage flares were accompanied in 3 percent of cases by Type III bursts. These latter radio events indicate the associated passage through the corona of energetic electrons in the approximate energy range 10 to 100 keV. At least 87.5 percent, and probably all, impulsive brightenings in 59Q began directly above minor spots, many of which satellites to major umbrae. Stationary and moving prominence flares were individually triggered at sites beneath which magnetic changes occurred within intervals which included each flare's flash phase.

  14. Chromospheric and photospheric evolution of an extremely active solar region in solar cycle 19

    SciTech Connect

    Mckenna-Lawlor, S.M.P.

    1981-08-01

    a comprehensive investigation was made of phenomena attending the disk passage, July 7 to 21, 1959, of active solar center HAO-59Q. At the photospheric level that comprised an aggregate of groups of sunspots of which one group, Mt. Wilson 14284, showed all the attributes deemed typical of solar regions associated with the production of major flares. A special characteristic of 59Q was its capability to eject dark material. Part of this material remained trapped in the strong magnetic fields above group 14284 where it formed a system of interrelated arches, the legs of which passed through components of the bright chromospheric network of the plage and were rooted in various underlying umbrae. Two apparently diffeent kinds of flare were identified in 59Q namely, prominence flares (which comprised brightenings within part of the suspended dark prominence) and plage flares (which comprised brightenings within part of the chromospheric network). Prominence flares were of three varieties described as 'impact', 'stationary' and 'moving' prominence flares. Plage flares were accompanied in 3 percent of cases by Type III bursts. These latter radio events indicate the associated passage through the corona of energetic electrons in the approximate energy range 10 to 100 keV. At least 87.5 percent, and probably all, impulsive brightenings in 59Q began directly above minor spots, many of which satellites to major umbrae. Stationary and moving prominence flares were individually triggered at sites beneath which magnetic changes occurred within intervals which included each flare's flash phase.

  15. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.; Fujiwara, Y.; Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.

    2015-11-01

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm2) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (Eib ≈ 150-200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when Eib is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  16. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Y; Kiyama, S; Fujiwara, Y; Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H

    2015-11-01

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm(2)) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E(ib) ≈ 150-200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E(ib) is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge. PMID:26628125

  17. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Y. E-mail: hirano.yoichi@phys.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.; Fujiwara, Y.; Sakakita, H.

    2015-11-15

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm{sup 2}) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E{sub ib} ≈ 150–200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E{sub ib} is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  18. Regional modeling sensitivity experiments for interpreting the UK Winter 2013-2014 extreme rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omrani, H.; Vautard, R.; Schaller, N.; Allen, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    During the winter 2013/2014, the UK saw heavy rainfalls associated with a succession of storms reaching Southern England causing widespread flooding, power cuts and major disruptions to transport. The January precipitation set a record for several rain gauge stations in Southern England. The aim of this study is to evaluate the contribution of the anthropogenic climate change, represented by a modification of the sea surface temperature (SST) on the January precipitation. For that, we conducted a sensitivity experiment by running a set of 108 four-months simulations using WRF model with 9 different physics and 12 different SST fields; 9 for the factual world and 99 for the counter-factual world. A spectral nudging technique was used here to ensure a same atmospheric circulation patterns for all the simulations. Therefore, only the thermodynamic effect is considered here. The analysis is focused on January precipitation over the southern England. Results show for 0,5°C SST difference over the Northern Atlantic, the precipitation in the factual simulations is between 0,4 and 8% higher than the precipitation in the counter-factual simulations depending on the physic. A validation test shows that this value is closer to 8% for the "best physic" simulation. It also show a strong spatial variability where in some region the precipitation is higher in the counter-factual world compared the factual world. Finally, a backward trajectories were calculated to evaluate the sensitivity of the moisture sources and air mass trajectories to the SST in the factual and the counter-factual world.

  19. To the Extremes! A Teacher Research Experience Program in the Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, J.; Bartholow, S.

    2014-12-01

    PolarTREC-Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating, a teacher professional development program, began with the International Polar Year in 2004 and continues today in the United States. In 2007, the National Science Foundation designated PolarTREC as potentially transformative, meaning that the "research results often do not fit within established models or theories and may initially be unexpected or difficult to interpret; their transformative nature and utility might not be recognized until years later." PolarTREC brings U.S. K-12 educators and polar researchers together through an innovative teacher research experience model. Teachers spend three to six weeks in remote arctic and Antarctic field camps. Since 2007, over 100 teachers have been placed in field experiences throughout the Arctic and Antarctic and with half of them participating in field experiences in Antarctica. During their experience, teachers become research team members filling a variety of roles on the team. They also fulfil a unique role of public outreach officer, conducting live presentations about their field site and research as well as journaling, answering questions, and posting photos. Evaluation data collected over the past eight years on program participants shows that PolarTREC has clearly achieved it goals and strongly suggests programs that link teachers and researchers can have the potential to transform the nature of science education. By giving teachers the content knowledge, pedagogical tools, confidence, understanding of science in the broader society, and experiences with scientific inquiry, participating teachers are using authentic scientific research in their classrooms. Not surprisingly this has also led to increases in student interest and knowledge about the Polar Regions. In this presentation, we will highlight the best practices of teacher research experiences as well as discuss why it is vital to have teachers and researchers work together to communicate

  20. Response of the low-latitude D region ionosphere to extreme space weather event of 14-16 December 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sushil; Kumar, Abhikesh; Menk, Frederick; Maurya, Ajeet K.; Singh, Rajesh; Veenadhari, B.

    2015-01-01

    response of the D region low-latitude ionosphere has been examined for extreme space weather event of 14-16 December 2006 associated with a X1.5 solar flare and an intense geomagnetic storm (Dst = -146 nT) using VLF signals from Northwest Cape, Australia (NWC) (19.8 kHz) and Lualualei, Hawaii (callsign NPM) (21.4 kHz) transmitters monitored at Suva (Geographic Coordinates, 18.10°S, 178.40°E), Fiji. Modeling of flare associated amplitude and phase enhancements of NWC (3.6 dB, 223°) and NPM (5 dB, 153°) using Long-Wave Propagation Capability code shows reduction in the D region reflection height (H') by 11.1 km and 9.4 km, and enhancement in ionization gradients described by increases in the exponential sharpness factor (β) by 0.122 and 0.126 km-1, for the NWC and NPM paths, respectively. During the storm the daytime signal strengths of the NWC and NPM signals were reduced by 3.2 dB on 15 and 16 December (for about 46 h) and recovered by 17 December. Modeling for the NWC path shows that storm time values of H' and β were reduced by 1.2 km and 0.06 km-1, respectively. Morlet wavelet analysis of signal amplitudes shows no clearly strong signatures of gravity wave propagation to low latitudes during the main and recovery phases. The reduction in VLF signal strength is due to increased signal attenuation and absorption by the Earth-ionosphere waveguide due to storm-induced D region ionization changes and hence changes in D region parameters. The long duration of the storm effect results from the slow diffusion of changed composition/ionization at D region altitudes compared with higher altitudes in the ionosphere.

  1. Flood risk under future climate in data sparse regions: Linking extreme value models and flood generating processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramblay, Yves; Amoussou, Ernest; Dorigo, Wouter; Mahé, Gil

    2014-11-01

    For many areas in the world, there is a need for future projections of flood risk in order to improve the possible mitigation actions. However, such an exercise is often made difficult in data-sparse regions, where the limited access to hydrometric data does not allow calibrating hydrological models in a robust way under non-stationary conditions. In this study we present an approach to estimate possible changes in flood risks, which incorporates flood generating processes into statistical models for extreme values. This approach is illustrated for a West African catchment, the Mono River (12,900 km2), with discharge, precipitation and temperature data available between 1988 and 2010 and where the dominant flood generating process is soil saturation. A soil moisture accounting (SMA) model, calibrated against a merged surface soil moisture microwave satellite dataset, is used to estimate the annual maximum soil saturation level that is related to the location parameter of a generalized extreme value model of annual maximum discharge. With such a model, it is possible to estimate the changes in flood quantiles from the changes in the annual maximum soil saturation level. An ensemble of regional climate models from the ENSEMBLES-AMMA project are then considered to estimate the potential future changes in soil saturation and subsequently the changes in flood risks for the period 2028-2050. A sensitivity analysis of the non-stationary flood quantiles has shown that with the projected changes on precipitation (-2%) and temperature (+1.22°) under the scenario A1B, the projected flood quantiles would stay in the range of the observed variability during 1988-2010. The proposed approach, relying on low data requirements, could be useful to estimate the projected changes in flood risks for other data-sparse catchments where the dominant flood-generating process is soil saturation.

  2. Sensitivity of seasonal precipitation extremes to model configuration of the Canadian Regional Climate Model over eastern Canada using historical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Philippe; Gachon, Philippe; Laprise, René

    2014-11-01

    This study analyzes the uncertainty of seasonal (winter and summer) precipitation extremes as simulated by a recent version of the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM) using 16 simulations (1961-1990), considering four sources of uncertainty from: (a) the domain size, (b) the driving Atmosphere-Ocean Global Climate Models (AOGCM), (c) the ensemble member for a given AOGCM and (d) the internal variability of the CRCM. These 16 simulations are driven by 2 AOGCMs (i.e. CGCM3, members 4 and 5, and ECHAM5, members 1 and 2), and one set of re-analysis products (i.e. ERA40), using two domain sizes (AMNO, covering all North America and QC, a smaller domain centred over the Province of Québec). In addition to the mean seasonal precipitation, three seasonal indices are used to characterize different types of variability and extremes of precipitation: the number of wet days, the maximum number of consecutive dry days, and the 95th percentile of daily precipitation. Results show that largest source of uncertainty in summer comes from the AOGCM selection and the choice of domain size, followed by the choice of the member for a given AOGCM. In winter, the choice of the member becomes more important than the choice of the domain size. Simulated variance sensitivity is greater in winter than in summer, highlighting the importance of the large-scale circulation from the boundary conditions. The study confirms a higher uncertainty in the simulated heavy rainfall than the one in the mean precipitation, with some regions along the Great Lakes—St-Lawrence Valley exhibiting a systematic higher uncertainty value.

  3. Risk-based consequences of extreme natural hazard processes in mountain regions - Multi-hazard analysis in Tyrol (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huttenlau, Matthias; Stötter, Johann

    2010-05-01

    weighting within the risk concept, this has sufficient implications on the results of risk analyses. Thus, an equal and scale appropriated balance of those risk components is a fundamental key factor for effective natural hazard risk analyses. The results of such analyses inform especially decision makers in the insurance industry, the administration, and politicians on potential consequences and are the basis for appropriate risk management strategies. Thereby, results (i) on an annual or probabilistic risk comprehension have to be distinguished from (ii) scenario-based analyses. The first analyses are based on statistics of periodically or episodically occurring events whereas the latter approach is especially applied for extreme, non-linear, stochastic events. Focusing on the needs especially of insurance companies, the first approaches are appropriate for premium pricing and reinsurance strategies with an annual perspective, whereas the latter is focusing on events with extreme loss burdens under worst-case criteria to guarantee accordant reinsurance coverage. Moreover, the demand of adequate loss model approaches and methods is strengthened by the risk-based requirements of the upcoming capital requirement directive Solvency II. The present study estimates the potential elements at risk, their corresponding damage potentials and the Probable Maximum Losses (PMLs) of extreme natural hazards events in Tyrol (Austria) and considers adequatly the scale dependency and balanced application of the introduced risk components. Beside the introduced analysis an additionally portfolio analysis of a regional insurance company was executed. The geocoded insurance contracts of this portfolio analysis were the basis to estimate spatial, socio-economical and functional differentiated mean insurance values for the different risk categories of (i) buildings, (ii) contents or inventory, (iii) vehicles, and (iv) persons in the study area. The estimated mean insurance values were

  4. Transmission filter for the extreme ultraviolet spectral region composed of a thin Saran (C/sub 2/H/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/) foil

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, J. F.; Shirey, L.; Kingman, A.

    1989-05-15

    Saran foils of 4000-A thickness have been fabricated and used astransmission filters in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region. Thetransmittances of the Saran foils were determined for the 20--620-Awavelength region. The foils transmitted radiation with wavelengths between the/ital L/ absorption edge of chlorine at 61.4 and /similar to/120 A.

  5. Homogeneous regions in Italy: an analysis of the mean and extreme climate characteristics and their impact on agriculture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, M.; Coccimiglio, P.

    2009-09-01

    Adverse environmental conditions, lasting for several days in a row, can cause stress over ecosystems, humans and animals with a negative impact on crop yield, human health, and on animal production and reproduction, to name few aspects, and therefore leading to severe economic losses. Namely, in the last decades, the enhanced frequency and intensity of summer heat waves in Italy have increased the importance of assessing the damages they cause. Another example is the occurrence of late spring frost causing damages not only to subsistence crops, but moreover for the so-called cash-crops. An example is the kiwifruit production in Italy specifically grown to fulfil the global demand, more than the national market, being the Italian production out of phase with the other major producers, such as New Zealand and South America. Using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) applied to daily maximum and minimum temperature and precipitation and then a hierarchical cluster analysis, based on Ward's method, on a set of 100 stations covering the period 1971-2006, we divided the 100 sites into 8 homogeneous classes. For each cluster the climate characteristics have been analyzed, in order to have a description of the mean climate of the cluster. In addition, we analyzed the occurrence of the extreme events in each cluster, their duration and intensity, and their trend over the last decades. Focusing on the kiwifruit production regions in Italy a first attempt is presented to compare actual/suitable production regions in Italy and similar regions in New Zealand from the point of view of their respective climate trends and variability. Long term trends in agroclimatic indices and results of comparison analysis will be discussed for regions in the two Countries. The study has been partly supported by the Short term mobility programme of the Italian National Research Council, under the sponsorship of the CNR-Agrofood Department.

  6. Analysis of Extreme Heat in Historical and Projected Climate Simulations for Regional Climate Planning Purposes in the U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geil, K.; Zeng, X.; McMahan, B.; Ferguson, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. National Climate Assessment (NCA) states that global climate models predict more extreme temperatures and more frequent, intense, and longer heat waves on a regional basis as global temperatures rise throughout the 21st century, but a thorough test of whether these models can simulate observed heat metrics and trends over the historical period was not included in the assessment. Understanding the capabilities of climate models over the historical period is crucial to assessing our confidence in their predictive ability at regional scales. Our work fills this research gap by evaluating the performance of Coupled Model Intercomparison Phase 5 (CMIP5) models as compared to observational data using multiple heat metrics. Our metrics are targeted for the southwest United States, but our regional analysis covers the entire continental U.S. and Alaska using 7 of the regions delineated by the NCA. The heat metrics include heat wave and cold wave frequency, intensity, and duration, overnight low temperatures, onset and length of the hot season, and human heat stress. For the best performing models, we compute the same heat metrics for the RCP scenarios. In addition to presenting the results of our CMIP5 historical and RCP analyses, we also describe how our results may be applied to the benefit of our community in Southern Arizona as a case study. Our research will be used by NOAA's Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS) and by an interdisciplinary collaborative team of researchers from the University of Arizona working with an electric utility to integrate climate information into their strategic planning.

  7. Relativistic fluid dynamics. Proceedings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anile, A. M.; Choquet-Bruhat, Y.

    Contents: 1. Covariant theory of conductivity in ideal fluid or solid media (B. Carter). 2. Hamiltonian techniques for relativistic fluid dynamics and stability theory (D. D. Holm). 3. Covariant fluid mechanics and thermodynamics: an introduction (W. Israel). 4. Relativistic plasmas (H. Weitzner). 5. An improved relativistic warm plasma model (A. M. Anile, S. Pennisi). 6. Relativistic extended thermodynamics II (I. Müller). 7. Relativistic extended thermodynamics: general assumptions and mathematical procedure (T. Ruggeri). 8. Relativistic hydrodynamics and heavy ion reactions (D. Strottman). 9. Some problems in relativistic hydrodynamics (C. G. van Weert).

  8. Relativistic jets in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derishev, E. V.; Zheleznyakov, V. V.; Koryagin, S. A.; Kocharovsky, Vl. V.

    The properties of the plasma state of matter are determined by the motion and the electromagnetic emission of the non-bound electrically charged particles --- electrons, positrons, protons and ions. It is not easy to create plasma in a laboratory. However this state is typical for the cosmic conditions --- at the stars and in the interstellar space. The properties of the laboratory as well as the space plasma are investigated at the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The research is focused on the mechanisms of generation and propagation of the electromagnetic radiation --- from the radio waves to the gamma-rays --- in the planetary and stellar atmospheres and at the other astrophysical objects. The extreme physical conditions for a plasma are realized near the compact objects like black holes, neutron stars and collapsing nuclei of the massive stars. The plasma could be strongly non-equlibrium and can produce strong electromagnetic fields. Its bulk motion as well as the chaotic motion of the constituting particles can be relativistic, i. e. the motion can achieve velocities close to the speed of light. The relativistic plasma is frequently observed in the form of jets.

  9. Two millennia of torrential activity reconstructed from alpine lake sediments: towards regional patterns of extreme precipitation changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, B.; Arnaud, F.; Giguet-Covex, C.; Sabatier, P.; Crouzet, C.; Delannoy, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    In mountain areas extreme precipitation events trigger torrential floods, characterized by a sudden and intense rise of discharge causing large human and economic losses. Their frequency and/or intensity are expected to increase in the context of global warming. However, the relationship between such events and climate changes remains difficult to assess. Long-term geological records of intense events could enable to extend documented records beyond the observational data for a better understanding of local to regional flood hazard patterns in relation to past climatic changes and hence improving predictive models. In this context, lake sediment records appear a relevant archive as they are continuous records in which the identification of high-energy sediment layers allows to reconstruct flood calendar. In addition, the flood intensity can be reconstructed from the coarse fraction of each flood layer. Frequency and intensity of past torrential floods were thus reconstructed from four high-elevation lake records of the French Alps, in the framework of Pygmalion research program. Studied sites were selected along a north-south transect over this region to investigate the flooding responses to different climatic influences (westerlies in the north and Mediterranean influences in the south). High-resolution geochemical and sedimentological analyses were undertaken for an exhaustive identification of flood layers and several dating methods (short-lived radionuclides, 14C, correlation with historic events, paleomagnetism) were combined to reduce age uncertainties as much as possible. Over the entire French Alps, the torrential-flood frequency increases at a secular timescale during the cold period of the Little Ice Age (LIA; 1300-1900 AD). This increase seems in agreement with a regional high wetness, already described in the literature, possibly related to an increase in cyclonic activity. Superimposed to this secular trend, a pluri-decadal variability appears at

  10. Magnetic Fields, Relativistic Particles, and Shock Waves in Cluster Outskirts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüggen, Marcus; Bykov, Andrei; Ryu, Dongsu; Röttgering, Huub

    2012-05-01

    It is only now, with low-frequency radio telescopes, long exposures with high-resolution X-ray satellites and γ-ray telescopes, that we are beginning to learn about the physics in the periphery of galaxy clusters. In the coming years, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich telescopes are going to deliver further great insights into the plasma physics of these special regions in the Universe. The last years have already shown tremendous progress with detections of shocks, estimates of magnetic field strengths and constraints on the particle acceleration efficiency. X-ray observations have revealed shock fronts in cluster outskirts which have allowed inferences about the microphysical structure of shocks fronts in such extreme environments. The best indications for magnetic fields and relativistic particles in cluster outskirts come from observations of so-called radio relics, which are megaparsec-sized regions of radio emission from the edges of galaxy clusters. As these are difficult to detect due to their low surface brightness, only few of these objects are known. But they have provided unprecedented evidence for the acceleration of relativistic particles at shock fronts and the existence of μG strength fields as far out as the virial radius of clusters. In this review we summarise the observational and theoretical state of our knowledge of magnetic fields, relativistic particles and shocks in cluster outskirts.

  11. Extreme solar energetic particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainio, Rami; Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Properties of extreme solar energetic particle (SEP) events, here defined as those leading to ground level enhancements (GLEs) of cosmic rays, are reviewed. We review recent efforts on modeling SEP acceleration to relativistic energies and present simulation results on particle acceleration at shocks driven by fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in different types of coronal magnetic structures and turbulent downstream compression regions. Based on these modeling results, we discuss the possible role of solar and CME parameters in the lack of GLEs during the present sunspot cycle. This work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA). The Academy of Finland is thanked for financial support.

  12. Regional Aerosol Optical Properties and Radiative Impact of the Extreme Smoke Event in the European Arctic in Spring 2006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund Myhre, C.; Toledano, C.; Myhre, G.; Stebel, K.; Yttri, K.; Aaltonen, V.; Johnsrud, M.; Frioud, M.; Cachorro, V.; deFrutos, A.; Lihavainen, H.; Campbell, J.; Chaikovsky, A.; Shiobara, M.; Welton, E.; Torseth, K.

    2007-01-01

    In spring 2006 a special meteorological situation occurred in the European Arctic region giving record high levels of air pollution. The synoptic situation resulted in extensive transport of pollution predominantly from agricultural fires in Eastern Europe into the Arctic region and record high air-pollution levels were measured at the Zeppelin observatory at Ni-Alesun(78deg 54'N, 11deg 53'E) in the period from 25 April to 12 May. In the present study we investigate the optical properties of the aerosols from this extreme event and we estimate the radiative forcing of this episode. We examine the aerosol optical properties from the source region and into the European Arctic and explore the evolution of the episode and the changes in the optical properties. A number of sites in Eastern Europe, Northern Scandinavia and Svalbard are included in the study. In addition to AOD measurements, we explored lidar measurements from Minsk, ALOMAR (Arctic Lidar Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research at Andenes) and Ny-Alesund. For the AERONET sites included (Minsk, Toravere, Hornsund) we have further studied the evolution of the aerosol size. Importantly, at Svalbard it is consistency between the AERONET measurements and calculations of single scattering albedo based on aerosol chemical composition. We have found strong agreement between the satellite dally MODIS AOD and the ground-based AOD observations. This agreement is crucial for the radiative forcing calculations. We calculate a strong negative radiative forcing for the most polluted days employing the analysed ground based data, MODIS AOD and a multi-stream model for radiative transfer of solar radiation.

  13. Precipitation extremes over Amazonia - atmospheric and oceanic associated features observed and simulated by HADGEM2-ES, CPTEC/INPE AGCM and Eta/CPTEC regional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, I. F.

    2013-05-01

    Extreme monthly cases of precipitation (positive and negative anomalies) over Amazonia are analyzed to show the atmospheric and oceanic related features and the ability of CPTEC AGCM and HADGEM2-ES in simulating them. Humidity flux variability over the Tropical Atlantic region is analyzed related to the precipitation variability over Amazonia. Besides the Pacific Ocean influence, the Amazonia precipitation is affected by the Tropical Atlantic Ocean, both by the SST and atmospheric flux humidity. Correlations between Atlantic SST and Amazonia precipitation show that there are specific months and areas that are affected by SST anomalies. The extreme cases are obtained from the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) applied to monthly data in four areas of Amazonia: northwest, northeast, west and east areas. The period of analysis is 1981 to 2010 to GPCP observed precipitation and CPTEC/INPE AGCM. As this AGCM is the base of the Brazilian Model of Earth System, its behavior on the mechanisms leading to extremes over Amazonia, compared to observations is discussed. Projections of extremes over the region are analyzed with results from CMIP5 HADGEM2-ES during 2073-2099 compared to 1979-2005. The regional Eta CPTEC model is also analyzed in two periods: 1960 to 1990 and 2040 to 2070, with boundary conditions of CMIP3 HADCM3 A1B scenario. The relevance of this analysis is to identify changes in frequency and intensity of extremes in the Amazon region in a higher resolution than the global models.

  14. Impact of Climate Change on Heavy Precipitation Events : Application of Extreme Value Theory to a Future Climate Simulation over the Colorado Headwaters Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, K.; Prein, A.; Rasmussen, R.; Liu, C.; Holland, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    Heavy precipitation cause devastating warm-season floods and cool-season snow and icing hazards that impact socio-economic communities of various scales. The frequency and severity of extreme precipitation events potentially are likely to be impacted by climate change. In this study we will investigate potential change in extreme precipitation intensity in a future climate over the Colorado headwaters region based on an extreme value approach ("peak-over-threshold" approach). The data come from Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations of current and future climate conducted by the Colorado Headwaters Project (e.g., Rasmussen et al. 2011). The simulations were performed over eight years with 4, 12, and 36 km horizontal grid spacing. In the current study, we first evaluate the model ability to properly represent extreme precipitation events from the current climate simulation. Then we present changes in extreme precipitation intensity in the future climate for different seasons and over eight mountain ranges of the Colorado headwaters region. Our analyses so far have shown that the 4-km model outperformed coarser grid resolution models in representing extreme precipitation compared to Snowpack Telemetry (SNOTEL) surface observations. Overall, the 10-year return level in the future climate increased (more intense extreme precipitation) for all mountain ranges in the cool season. There was a general decrease in the 10-year return level (less intense extreme precipitation) in the warm season. The sign and magnitude of the change shows regional differences possibly related to seasonal storm tracks and characteristics. Detailed analysis from case studies will be presented to illustrate the impacts of a warmer and moister atmosphere on the microphysical structure of storm clouds and surface precipitation distribution.

  15. Weak-Line Quasars at High Redshift: Extremely High Accretion Rates or Anemic Broad-Line Regions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemmer, Ohad; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Anderson, S. F.; Brandt, W. N.; Diamond-Stanic, A. M.; Fan, X.; Lira, P.; Netzer, H.; Plotkin, R. M.; Richards, G. T.; Schneider, D. P.; Strauss, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present Gemini-North K-band spectra of two representative members of the class of high-redshift quasars with exceptionally weak rest-frame ultraviolet emission lines (WLQs), SDSS J114153.34+021924.3 at z=3.55 and SDSS J123743.08+630144.9 at z=3.49. In both sources we detect an unusually weak broad Hβ line and we place tight upper limits on the strengths of their [O III] lines. Virial, Hβ-based black-hole mass determinations indicate normalized accretion rates of L/LEdd=0.4 for these sources, which is well within the range observed for typical quasars with similar luminosities and redshifts. We also present high-quality XMM-Newton imaging spectroscopy of SDSS J114153.34+021924.3 and find a hard-X-ray photon index of Γ=1.91+0.24-0.22which supports the virial L/LEdd determination in this source. Our results suggest that the weakness of the broad-emission lines in WLQs is not a consequence of an extreme continuum-emission source but instead due to abnormal broad-emission line region properties.

  16. Investigating the Influence of Anthropogenic Forcing on Observed Mean and Extreme Sea Level Pressure Trends over the Mediterranean Region

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barkhordarian, Armineh

    2012-01-01

    We investigate whether the observed mean sea level pressure (SLP) trends over the Mediterranean region in the period from 1975 to 2004 are significantly consistent with what 17 models projected as response of SLP to anthropogenic forcing (greenhouse gases and sulphate aerosols, GS). Obtained results indicate that the observed trends in mean SLP cannot be explained by natural (internal) variability. Externally forced changes are detectable in all seasons, except spring. The large-scale component (spatial mean) of the GS signal is detectable in all the 17 models in winter and in 12 of the 17 models in summer. However, the small-scalemore » component (spatial anomalies about the spatial mean) of GS signal is only detectable in winter within 11 of the 17 models. We also show that GS signal has a detectable influence on observed decreasing (increasing) tendency in the frequencies of extremely low (high) SLP days in winter and that these changes cannot be explained by internal climate variability. While the detection of GS forcing is robust in winter and summer, there are striking inconsistencies in autumn, where analysis points to the presence of an external forcing, which is not GS forcing.« less

  17. Investigating the Influence of Anthropogenic Forcing on Observed Mean and Extreme Sea Level Pressure Trends over the Mediterranean Region

    PubMed Central

    Barkhordarian, Armineh

    2012-01-01

    We investigate whether the observed mean sea level pressure (SLP) trends over the Mediterranean region in the period from 1975 to 2004 are significantly consistent with what 17 models projected as response of SLP to anthropogenic forcing (greenhouse gases and sulphate aerosols, GS). Obtained results indicate that the observed trends in mean SLP cannot be explained by natural (internal) variability. Externally forced changes are detectable in all seasons, except spring. The large-scale component (spatial mean) of the GS signal is detectable in all the 17 models in winter and in 12 of the 17 models in summer. However, the small-scale component (spatial anomalies about the spatial mean) of GS signal is only detectable in winter within 11 of the 17 models. We also show that GS signal has a detectable influence on observed decreasing (increasing) tendency in the frequencies of extremely low (high) SLP days in winter and that these changes cannot be explained by internal climate variability. While the detection of GS forcing is robust in winter and summer, there are striking inconsistencies in autumn, where analysis points to the presence of an external forcing, which is not GS forcing. PMID:22654622

  18. Is it possible to draw conclusions from mean wind statistics on extreme wind statistics?: A wind direction analysis for the Baltic Sea region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierstedt, Svenja; Zorita, Eduardo; Hünicke, Birgit

    2014-05-01

    We investigate whether direction-related statistics of extreme wind events follow statistics of mean wind and thus whether changes in mean wind statistics can be used to approximate extreme wind changes. This study shows that this hypothesis is not valid over the Baltic Sea region. Furthermore, the predominant extreme wind direction and its temporal changes are analyzed. Differences between both mean and extreme wind direction distributions are detected. Main direction for extremes is wind from South-West (SW) whereas for the mean wind all directions can be found. The distribution of extreme wind directions shows a limited spread around SW. These distributions are not just different for annual statistics for mean and extreme, but additionally across seasons. The main direction remains SW but deviations from this mean winds in springtime occur as often from SW as from NE. Extreme winds are clearly focused from W, with a stronger influence of SW. Easterly wind seems to play a minor role in extreme wind statistics. The spatially covariance of wind statistics is further investigated by an EOF- analysis, which shows seasonally independent patterns of wind direction variability. Extreme winds are mainly westerlies, thus their variability is limited to north-south directions. These variability patterns show no trends in time and are quite homogeneous over the whole region. The results show that mean wind is not a good indicator for the main direction of extreme wind. As these first results showed a limited distribution for extreme wind directions for SW we continued analyzing changes of wind extremes from W and SW in the Baltic Sea region during winter (DJF) based on regional reanalysis data (coastdat2) over the period from 1948 to 2012. Extreme winds occur mostly and are strongest in winter season. Although on average all wind directions are quite frequent over the Baltic Sea, extremes are very focused on W and SW directions. Trends in the frequencies of extremes from SW

  19. An integrated approach for identifying homogeneous regions of extreme rainfall events and estimating IDF curves in Southern Ontario, Canada: Incorporating radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paixao, Edson; Mirza, M. Monirul Qader; Shephard, Mark W.; Auld, Heather; Klaassen, Joan; Smith, Graham

    2015-09-01

    Reliable extreme rainfall information is required for many applications including infrastructure design, management of water resources, and planning for weather-related emergencies in urban and rural areas. In this study, in situ TBRG sub-daily rainfall rate observations have been supplemented with weather radar information to better capture the spatial and temporal variability of heavy rainfall events regionally. Comparison of extreme rainfall events show that the absolute differences between the rain gauge and radar generally increase with increasing rainfall. Better agreement between the two observations is found when comparing the collocated radar and TBRG annual maximum values. The median difference is <18% for the annual maximum rainfall values ⩽50 mm. The median of difference of IDF estimates obtained through the Gumbel distribution for 10-year return period values computed from TBRG and radar are also found to be 4%. The overall results of this analysis demonstrates the potential value of incorporating remotely sensed radar with traditional point source TBRG network observations to provide additional insight on extreme rainfall events regionally, especially in terms of identifying homogeneous regions of extreme rainfall. The radar observations are particularly useful in areas where there is insufficient TBRG station density to statistically capture the extreme rainfall events.

  20. Transition state region in the A-Band photodissociation of allyl iodide—A femtosecond extreme ultraviolet transient absorption study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacherjee, Aditi; Attar, Andrew R.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2016-03-01

    Femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy based on a high-harmonic generation source is used to study the 266 nm induced A-band photodissociation dynamics of allyl iodide (CH2 =CHCH2I). The photolysis of the C—I bond at this wavelength produces iodine atoms both in the ground (2P3/2, I) and spin-orbit excited (2P1/2, I*) states, with the latter as the predominant channel. Using XUV absorption at the iodine N4/5 edge (45-60 eV), the experiments constitute a direct probe of not only the long-lived atomic iodine reaction products but also the fleeting transition state region of the repulsive nIσ∗C—I excited states. Specifically, three distinct features are identified in the XUV transient absorption spectrum at 45.3 eV, 47.4 eV, and 48.4 eV (denoted transients A, B, and C, respectively), which arise from the repulsive valence-excited nσ∗ states and project onto the high-lying core-excited states of the dissociating molecule via excitation of 4d(I) core electrons. Transients A and B originate from 4d(I) → n(I) core-to-valence transitions, whereas transient C is best assigned to a 4d(I) →σ∗(C—I) transition. The measured differential absorbance of these new features along with the I/I* branching ratios known from the literature is used to suggest a more definitive assignment, albeit provisional, of the transients to specific dissociative states within the A-band manifold. The transients are found to peak around 55 fs-65 fs and decay completely by 145 fs-185 fs, demonstrating the ability of XUV spectroscopy to map the evolution of reactants into products in real time. The similarity in the energies of transients A and B with analogous features observed in methyl iodide [Attar et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 6, 5072, (2015)] together with the new observation of transient C in the present work provides a more complete picture of the valence electronic structure in the transition state region. The results provide a benchmark for

  1. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  2. How well can change diagnose the effects of coupling of the Regional Atmosphere on ET of an Irrigated Surface Under Extreme Advection of Heat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of imported heat and saturation deficit versus available energy on the energy balance of a cotton field is investigated in a semi-arid region under a range of conditions, including extreme horizontal advection of heat. Using eddy covariance measurements of water vapor fluxes, a modified Pen...

  3. Relativistic blast waves in two dimensions. I - The adiabatic case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    Approximate solutions are presented for the dynamical evolution of strong adiabatic relativistic blast waves which result from a point explosion in an ambient gas in which the density varies both with distance from the explosion center and with polar angle in axisymmetry. Solutions are analytical or quasi-analytical for the extreme relativistic case and numerical for the arbitrarily relativistic case. Some general properties of nonplanar relativistic shocks are also discussed, including the incoherence of spherical ultrarelativistic blast-wave fronts on angular scales greater than the reciprocal of the shock Lorentz factor, as well as the conditions for producing blast-wave acceleration.

  4. Response of precipitation extremes to global warming in an aqua-planet climate model: towards robust projection from regional to global scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Collins, W.; Wehner, M. F.; Williamson, D.; Olson, J.

    2010-12-01

    Robust projection of precipitation extremes is essential for human society to prepare for future climate change. To understand the inconsistencies of the projections across the climate models, a series of idealized “aquaplanet” AGCM runs have been performed with CAM3 to investigate the effects of horizontal resolution on precipitation extreme projections under two simple global warming scenarios. The absence of orography helps diagnose the response of the physics responsible for extreme rainfall to change with resolution. Results show that a uniform increase of sea surface temperature (SST) and an increase of low-to-high latitude SST gradient both lead to increase of precipitation and precipitation extremes for most latitudes. The perturbed SSTs generally have stronger impacts on precipitation extremes compared with mean precipitation. Model horizontal-resolution strongly affects the global warming signals in the extreme precipitation in the low-mid latitudes, but not in high latitude regions. This study illustrates the need for resolution-invariant treatment of atmospheric processes.

  5. How extreme are extremes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchi, Marco; Petitta, Marcello; Calmanti, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    High temperatures have an impact on the energy balance of any living organism and on the operational capabilities of critical infrastructures. Heat-wave indicators have been mainly developed with the aim of capturing the potential impacts on specific sectors (agriculture, health, wildfires, transport, power generation and distribution). However, the ability to capture the occurrence of extreme temperature events is an essential property of a multi-hazard extreme climate indicator. Aim of this study is to develop a standardized heat-wave indicator, that can be combined with other indices in order to describe multiple hazards in a single indicator. The proposed approach can be used in order to have a quantified indicator of the strenght of a certain extreme. As a matter of fact, extremes are usually distributed in exponential or exponential-exponential functions and it is difficult to quickly asses how strong was an extreme events considering only its magnitude. The proposed approach simplify the quantitative and qualitative communication of extreme magnitude

  6. The relativistic equation of state in accretion and wind flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Prasad; Mondal, Soumen

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we derive a 4-velocity distribution function for the relativistic ideal gas following the original approach of Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB). Using this distribution function, the relativistic equation of state (EOS): ρ-ρ0=(p, is expressed in the parametric form: ρ=ρ0f(λ), and p=ρ0g(λ), where λ is a parameter related to the kinetic energy, and hence, to the temperature of the gas. In the nonrelativistic limit, this distribution function perfectly reduces to original MB distribution and the EOS reduces to ρ-ρ0=3/2 p, whereas in the extreme ultra-relativistic limit, the EOS becomes ρ=3p correctly. Using these parametric equations the adiabatic index γ=cp/cv and the sound speed as are calculated as a function of λ. They also satisfy the inequalities: 4/3 ⩽γ⩽ 5/3 and as⩽ 1/√{3} perfectly. The computed distribution function, adiabatic index γ, and the sound speed as are compared with the results obtained from the canonical ensemble theory which nicely match with the standard results (Synge, 1957 and Chandrasekhar, 1939). The main advantage in using the EOS is that the probability distribution function can be factorized and therefore, may be helpful to solve complex dynamics of the astrophysical system. Interestingly, in one of the astrophysical application revels that shocks in accretion flows become unlikely and except for the region very nearby the compact object, the EOS remains non-relativistic (Mondal and Basu, 2011). We therefore, conclude that the new form of EOS will be helpful to verify many conventional ideas in many astrophysical problems.

  7. Changes of precipitation and extremes and the possible effect of urbanization in the Beijing metropolitan region during 1960-2012 based on homogenized observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Yan, Zhongwei; Tu, Kai; Wu, Hongyi

    2015-09-01

    Daily precipitation series at 15 stations in the Beijing metropolitan region (BMR) during 1960-2012 were homogenized using the multiple analysis of series for homogenization method, with additional adjustments based on analysis of empirical cumulative density function (ECDF) regarding climate extremes. The cumulative density functions of daily precipitation series, the trends of annual and seasonal precipitation, and summer extreme events during 1960-2012 in the original and final adjusted series at Beijing station were comparatively analyzed to show the necessity and efficiency of the new method. Results indicate that the ECDF adjustments can improve the homogeneity of high-order moments of daily series and the estimation of climate trends in extremes. The linear trends of the regional-mean annual and seasonal (spring, summer, autumn, and winter) precipitation series are -10.16, 4.97, -20.04, 5.02, and -0.11 mm (10 yr)-1, respectively. The trends over the BMR increase consistently for spring/autumn and decrease for the whole year/summer; however, the trends for winter decrease in southern parts and increase in northern parts. Urbanization affects local trends of precipitation amount, frequency, and intensity and their geographical patterns. For the urban-influenced sites, urbanization tends to slow down the magnitude of decrease in the precipitation and extreme amount series by approximately -10.4% and -6.0%, respectively; enhance the magnitude of decrease in precipitation frequency series by approximately 5.7%; reduce that of extremes by approximately -8.9%; and promote the decreasing trends in the summer intensity series of both precipitation and extremes by approximately 6.8% and 51.5%, respectively.

  8. Precipitation and temperature space-time variability and extremes in the Mediterranean region: evaluation of dynamical and statistical downscaling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaounas, Emmanouil; Drobinski, Philippe; Vrac, Mathieu; Bastin, Sophie; Lebeaupin-Brossier, Cindy; Stéfanon, Marc; Borga, Marco; Calvet, Jean-Christophe

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluates how statistical and dynamical downscaling models as well as combined approach perform in retrieving the space-time variability of near-surface temperature and rainfall, as well as their extremes, over the whole Mediterranean region. The dynamical downscaling model used in this study is the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with varying land-surface models and resolutions (20 and 50 km) and the statistical tool is the Cumulative Distribution Function-transform (CDF-t). To achieve a spatially resolved downscaling over the Mediterranean basin, the European Climate Assessment and Dataset (ECA&D) gridded dataset is used for calibration and evaluation of the downscaling models. In the frame of HyMeX and MED-CORDEX international programs, the downscaling is performed on ERA-I reanalysis over the 1989-2008 period. The results show that despite local calibration, CDF-t produces more accurate spatial variability of near-surface temperature and rainfall with respect to ECA&D than WRF which solves the three-dimensional equation of conservation. This first suggests that at 20-50 km resolutions, these three-dimensional processes only weakly contribute to the local value of temperature and precipitation with respect to local one-dimensional processes. Calibration of CDF-t at each individual grid point is thus sufficient to reproduce accurately the spatial pattern. A second explanation is the use of gridded data such as ECA&D which smoothes in part the horizontal variability after data interpolation and damps the added value of dynamical downscaling. This explains partly the absence of added-value of the 2-stage downscaling approach which combines statistical and dynamical downscaling models. The temporal variability of statistically downscaled temperature and rainfall is finally strongly driven by the temporal variability of its forcing (here ERA-Interim or WRF simulations). CDF-t is thus efficient as a bias correction tool but does not show any

  9. Large scale and sub-regional connections in the lead up to summer heat wave and extreme rainfall events in eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschat, Ghyslaine; Pezza, Alexandre; Simmonds, Ian; Perkins, Sarah; Cowan, Tim; Purich, Ariaan

    2015-04-01

    Australia has been exposed to a vast array of extreme weather regimes over the past few years, and the frequency and intensity of these events are expected to increase as a result of anthropogenic climate change. However, the predictability of extreme droughts, heat waves (HWs), bushfires and floods, is still hampered by our inability to fully understand how these weather systems interact with each other and with the climate system. This study brings new insight into the regional and large scale dynamics of some extreme events in Australia, by describing and comparing the climate signature of summer HWs and extreme rainfall events which have occurred in the states of Victoria and Queensland respectively, during 1979-2013. Our analyses highlight the importance of mid-latitude dynamics operating during HWs, in contrast with more tropical interactions at play during extreme rainfall events. A `common' blocking high pressure system is observed over the Tasman Sea during the two types of extreme events, and may explain why some southeastern HWs (only about 25 %) occur in close succession with floods in Queensland. However, our results suggest that there is no dynamical link between these two types of events, since the HW-related anticyclone evolves as part of a baroclinic wave train, whereas in the case of rainfall events, this structure emerges as an equivalent barotropic response to tropical convection. Sub-regional surface temperatures and air-sea fluxes also suggest that distinct processes may be operating in the lead up to these two events. Indeed, HWs tend to occur when the wave train propagates from the south Indian to the Pacific Ocean, inducing a quasi-stationary blocking high system over the Tasman Sea. This anticyclonic anomaly can then advect hot dry air towards the southern Victorian coast, where it produces HW conditions. On the other hand, extreme rainfall events mostly occur when the background conditions correspond to a La Niña state. The convection

  10. Are regional projections of extreme sea levels based on uncertain future MSL scenarios reliable? A case study for the south-eastern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangendorf, S.; Mudersbach, C.; Jensen, J.

    2012-12-01

    Recently a number of authors applied a method (offset method) to combine observations of present sea level extremes with projections of future sea level rise during the 21st century. The method provides a technique for estimating potential future exceedence probabilities based on the assumption that both variability and trends of extreme sea levels have been and will be driven by changes in MSL. This assumption has been confirmed for quasi-global (Woodworth et al. 2011) and regional data-sets (Marcos et al. 2009). However, if the assumption fails, the application of the method will result in large inaccuracies. In the present study, records from 13 tide gauges located in the German Bight, a part of the south-eastern North Sea, are investigated. Time series of extreme high sea levels, covering a period from 1900 to 2008, are analyzed relative to simultaneous changes in MSL. For that purpose in a first step only extreme sea levels have been analyzed, while in a second step MSL time series have been subtracted from the extremes to prove the evidence of trend and variability differences. The results point to a significantly stronger increase in extreme sea levels during the second half of the 20th century. While in the first half of the 20th century the evolution of extreme sea levels follows changes in MSL, in the second half a significant rise with values between 10 and 60 cm per century relative to the MSL has been observed. The divergent development varies seasonally. The largest deviations between extreme sea levels and the MSL have been detected during Season 1 [January to March], while considerably smaller but statistically significant changes have been observed during the remaining seasons. An investigation of reanalyzed datasets from the 20th century reanalysis project (20thCR) shows that large parts of the observed deviations are in phase with simultaneous changes in the local zonal extreme wind conditions and only small deviations remain. Using the above

  11. Dominant modes of blocking variability in the North Atlantic region and their relationship with extreme temperature and precipitation events over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimbu, Norel; Lohmann, Gerrit; Ionita, Monica

    2013-04-01

    A two-dimensional blocking index for the winter atmospheric circulation in the Euro- Atlantic region for the last 140 years is calculated using the 500-hPa geopotential field extracted from the 20th Century Reanalysis Project database (http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/data/gridded/data.20thC_ReanV2.html). Based on Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOFs) analysis three patterns of interannual to multidecadal blocking variability in the Euro-Atlantic region have been identified. The first pattern captures an out-of-phase relationship between the anomaly of blocking frequency over the southern Greenland to northern Scandinavia region and the western part of Europe. The corresponding principal component time series (PC1) is significantly negatively correlated with the North Atlantic (NAO) index (r=-0.75) for the period 1899 to 2010. The second pattern of blocking variability captures an in-phase blocking variability which extends from the western part of Europe to the southeastern part of Greenland. The associated time coefficients (PC2) show strong multidecadal variations over the last 140 years. These multidecadal variations are related to the amplitude and phase of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). The third pattern of blocking variability captures an out-of-phase variation between the southern part of Greenland and Scandinavian blocking. The associated time coefficients (PC3) show pronounced interannual variations which are significantly correlated with the Scandinavian pattern index. Using the E-OBS gridded high resolution data set (http://eca.knmi.nl/download/ensembles/download.php), we calculate the fields of the frequency of the extreme high and extreme low temperature events as well as the field of the frequency of the extreme high precipitation events over Europe during the period 1951 to 2010. The frequency of the extreme high temperature and precipitation events is defined as the number of days in a winter when maximum daily temperature and daily

  12. Identification of Extreme Events Under Climate Change Conditions Over Europe and The Northwest-atlantic Region: Spatial Patterns and Time Series Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckebusch, G.; Ulbrich, U.; Speth, P.

    In the context of climate change and the resulting possible impacts on socio-economic conditions for human activities it seems that due to a changed occurrence of extreme events more severe consequences have to be expected than from changes in the mean climate. These extreme events like floods, excessive heats and droughts or windstorms possess impacts on human social and economic life in different categories such as forestry, agriculture, energy use, tourism and the reinsurance business. Reinsurances are affected by nearly 70% of all insured damages over Europe in the case of wind- storms. Especially the December 1999 French windstorms caused damages about 10 billion. A new EU-founded project (MICE = Modelling the Impact of Climate Ex- tremes) will focus on these impacts caused by changed occurrences of extreme events over Europe. Based upon the output of general circulation models as well as regional climate models, investigations are carried out with regard to time series characteristics as well as the spatial patterns of extremes under climate changed conditions. After the definition of specific thresholds for climate extremes, in this talk we will focus on the results of the analysis for the different data sets (HadCM3 and CGCMII GCM's and RCM's, re-analyses, observations) with regard to windstorm events. At first the results of model outputs are validated against re-analyses and observations. Especially a comparison of the stormtrack (2.5 to 8 day bandpass filtered 500 hPa geopotential height), cyclone track, cyclone frequency and intensity is presented. Highly relevant to damages is the extreme wind near the ground level, so the 10 m wind speed will be investigated additionally. of special interest to possible impacts is the changed spatial occurrence of windspeed maxima under 2xCO2-induced climate change.

  13. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gobbin, M.

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  14. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  15. Formation process of the widespread extreme haze pollution over northern China in January 2013: Implications for regional air quality and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Minghui; Chen, Liangfu; Xiong, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Meigen; Ma, Pengfei; Tao, Jinhua; Wang, Zifeng

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we present a regional insight into characteristics and formation process of the widespread extreme haze pollution in northern China during January of 2013 using integrated satellite observations and ground measurements. Different from common regional pollution, dense haze clouds during the most polluted period not only wandered over northern China for more than one week, but also exhibited large spatial variations with some abrupt peak values in Beijing. High UV Aerosol Index (UVAI) values >2.5 indicate prevalent absorbing aerosols in upper part of the haze clouds. CALIPSO vertical detection shows that the haze layers were more than 3 km thick, with strong extinction within 1 km near surface and elevated dust layers above. Top of the more than 2 km thick dust plumes can reach 5 km, having a substantial contribution to the haze clouds. Movement of high aerosol loading regions with aerosol optical depth (AOD) exceeding 2.0 shows a notable superposition of different pollution processes within boundary layer, which largely enhanced the haze pollution. Peak value of PM10 in industrial cities of Hebei was around 1000 μg/m3, almost twice of that in usual pollution. Subsequent peak values of PM10 from south to north confirm the intense regional transport, which could be the main cause of sudden record-breaking particle concentration in Beijing. Anomalous weather conditions facilitated the unusual heavy pollution became extremely severe. Our results indicate close connections between variation of atmospheric circulation and the regional heavy pollution over northern China.

  16. The role of extreme orbits in the global organization of periodic regions in parameter space for one dimensional maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, Diogo Ricardo; Hansen, Matheus; Guarise, Gustavo; Medrano-T, Rene O.; Leonel, Edson D.

    2016-04-01

    We show that extreme orbits, trajectories that connect local maximum and minimum values of one dimensional maps, play a major role in the parameter space of dissipative systems dictating the organization for the windows of periodicity, hence producing sets of shrimp-like structures. Here we solve three fundamental problems regarding the distribution of these sets and give: (i) their precise localization in the parameter space, even for sets of very high periods; (ii) their local and global distributions along cascades; and (iii) the association of these cascades to complicate sets of periodicity. The extreme orbits are proved to be a powerful indicator to investigate the organization of windows of periodicity in parameter planes. As applications of the theory, we obtain some results for the circle map and perturbed logistic map. The formalism presented here can be extended to many other different nonlinear and dissipative systems.

  17. Spatiotemporal changes in extreme ground surface temperatures and the relationship with air temperatures in the Three-River Source Regions during 1980-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Dongliang; Jin, Huijun; Lü, Lanzhi; Zhou, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Climate changes are affecting plant growth, ecosystem evolution, hydrological processes, and water resources in the Three-River Source Regions (TRSR). Daily ground surface temperature (GST) and air temperature (Ta) recordings from 12 meteorological stations illustrated trends and characteristics of extreme GST and Ta in the TRSR during 1980-2013. We used the Mann-Kendall test and Sen's slope estimate to analyze 12 temperature extreme indices as recommended by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI). The mean annual ground surface temperatures (MAGST) are 2.4-4.3 °C higher than the mean annual air temperatures (MAAT) in the TRSR. The increasing trends of the MAGST are all higher than those of the MAAT. The multi-year average maximum GST (28.1 °C) is much higher than that of the Ta (7.6 °C), while the minimum GST (-8.7 °C) is similar to that of the minimum Ta (-6.9 °C). The minimum temperature trends are more significant than those of the maximum temperature and are consistent with temperature trends in other regions of China. Different spatiotemporal patterns of GST extremes compared to those of Ta may result from greater warming of the ground surface. Consequently, the difference between the GST and Ta increased. These findings have implications for variations of surface energy balance, sensible heat flux, ecology, hydrology, and permafrost.

  18. Combining regional climate and national human development scenarios to estimate future vulnerability to extreme climate and weather events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, A.; Nussbaumer, P.

    2009-04-01

    Extreme climate and weather events such as droughts, floods, and tropical cyclones account for over 60% of the loss of life, and over 90% of total impacts, from natural disasters. Both observed trends and global climate models (GCMs) suggest that the frequency and intensity of extreme events is increasing, and will continue to increase as a result of climate change. Among planners and policy-makers at both national and international levels there is thus concern that this rise in extreme events will lead to greater losses in the future. Since low levels of development are associated with greater numbers of people killed and needing emergency assistance from natural disasters, the concern is most pronounced for least developed countries. If, however, these countries make substantial improvements in their levels of human development, as leading forecasters suggest may be the case over the coming decades, then their vulnerability to extreme events may fall. In this study, we examine the potential combined effects of increased extreme event frequency and improved levels of human development, to generate scenarios of risk levels into the second half of the century. It is the African continent for which these results may be the most relevant, since it is widely viewed as most vulnerable to increased risks from climate change; we focus on the particular country of Mozambique, which has experienced high losses from droughts, floods, and tropical cyclones in recent decades, and stands out as being among the most vulnerable in Africa. To assess the change in risk levels from the present until 2060, we pull together three pieces of analysis. The first is a statistical analysis of the losses from 1990-2007 from climate-related disasters, using national level data from the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED) and the United Nations. From this analysis, we establish statistical relationships between several drivers of vulnerability—including country size

  19. Solution of relativistic quantum optics problems using clusters of graphical processing units

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, D.F. Hafizi, B.; Helle, M.H.

    2014-06-15

    Numerical solution of relativistic quantum optics problems requires high performance computing due to the rapid oscillations in a relativistic wavefunction. Clusters of graphical processing units are used to accelerate the computation of a time dependent relativistic wavefunction in an arbitrary external potential. The stationary states in a Coulomb potential and uniform magnetic field are determined analytically and numerically, so that they can used as initial conditions in fully time dependent calculations. Relativistic energy levels in extreme magnetic fields are recovered as a means of validation. The relativistic ionization rate is computed for an ion illuminated by a laser field near the usual barrier suppression threshold, and the ionizing wavefunction is displayed.

  20. A Very-High-Specific-Impulse Relativistic Laser Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Kimura, Itsuro

    2008-04-28

    Characteristics of compact laser plasma accelerators utilizing high-power laser and thin-target interaction were reviewed as a potential candidate of future spacecraft thrusters capable of generating relativistic plasma beams for interstellar missions. Based on the special theory of relativity, motion of the relativistic plasma beam exhausted from the thruster was formulated. Relationships of thrust, specific impulse, input power and momentum coupling coefficient for the relativistic plasma thruster were derived. It was shown that under relativistic conditions, the thrust could be extremely large even with a small amount of propellant flow rate. Moreover, it was shown that for a given value of input power thrust tended to approach the value of the photon rocket under the relativistic conditions regardless of the propellant flow rate.

  1. Query and Visualization of extremely large network datasets over the web using Quadtree based KML Regional Network Links

    SciTech Connect

    Dadi, Upendra; Liu, Cheng; Vatsavai, Raju

    2009-01-01

    Geographic data sets are often very large in size. Interactive visualization of such data at all scales is not easy because of the limited resolution of the monitors and inability of visualization applications to handle the volume of data. This is especially true for large vector datasets. The end user s experience is frequently unsatisfactory when exploring such data over the web using a naive application. Network bandwidth is another contributing factor to the low performance. In this paper, a Quadtree based technique to visualize extremely large spatial network datasets over the web is described. It involves using custom developed algorithms leveraging a PostGIS database as the data source and Google Earth as the visualization client. This methodology supports both point and range queries along with non-spatial queries. This methodology is demonstrated using a network dataset consisting of several million links. The methodology is based on using some of the powerful features of KML (Keyhole Markup Language). Keyhole Markup Language (KML) is an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standard for displaying geospatial data on Earth browsers. One of the features of KML is the notion of Network Links. Using network links, a wide range of geospatial data sources such as geodatabases, static files and geospatial data services can be simultaneously accessed and visualized seamlessly. Using the network links combined with Level of Detail principle, view based rendering and intelligent server and client-side caching, scalability in visualizing extremely large spatial datasets can be achieved.

  2. Non-relativistic leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bödeker, Dietrich; Wörmann, Mirco

    2014-02-01

    In many phenomenologically interesting models of thermal leptogenesis the heavy neutrinos are non-relativistic when they decay and produce the baryon asymmetry of the Universe. We propose a non-relativistic approximation for the corresponding rate equations in the non-resonant case, and a systematic way for computing relativistic corrections. We determine the leading order coefficients in these equations, and the first relativistic corrections. The non-relativistic approximation works remarkably well. It appears to be consistent with results obtained using a Boltzmann equation taking into account the momentum distribution of the heavy neutrinos, while being much simpler. We also compute radiative corrections to some of the coefficients in the rate equations. Their effect is of order 1% in the regime favored by neutrino oscillation data. We obtain the correct leading order lepton number washout rate in this regime, which leads to large ( ~ 20%) effects compared to previous computations.

  3. Regional Risk Assessment for the analysis of the risks related to storm surge extreme events in the coastal area of the North Adriatic Sea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Jonathan; Torresan, Silvia; Gallina, Valentina; Critto, Andrea; Marcomini, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Europe's coast faces a variety of climate change threats from extreme high tides, storm surges and rising sea levels. In particular, it is very likely that mean sea level rise will contribute to upward trends in extreme coastal high water levels, thus posing higher risks to coastal locations currently experiencing coastal erosion and inundation processes. In 2007 the European Commission approved the Flood Directive (2007/60/EC), which has the main purpose to establish a framework for the assessment and management of flood risks for inland and coastal areas, thus reducing the adverse consequences for human health, the environment, cultural heritage and economic activities. Improvements in scientific understanding are thus needed to inform decision-making about the best strategies for mitigating and managing storm surge risks in coastal areas. The CLIMDAT project is aimed at improving the understanding of the risks related to extreme storm surge events in the coastal area of the North Adriatic Sea (Italy), considering potential climate change scenarios. The project implements a Regional Risk Assessment (RRA) methodology developed in the FP7 KULTURisk project for the assessment of physical/environmental impacts posed by flood hazards and employs the DEcision support SYstem for Coastal climate change impact assessment (DESYCO) for the application of the methodology to the case study area. The proposed RRA methodology is aimed at the identification and prioritization of targets and areas at risk from water-related natural hazards in the considered region at the meso-scale. To this aim, it integrates information about extreme storm surges with bio-geophysical and socio-economic information (e.g. vegetation cover, slope, soil type, population density) of the analyzed receptors (i.e. people, economic activities, cultural heritages, natural and semi-natural systems). Extreme storm surge hazard scenarios are defined using tide gauge time series coming from 28 tide gauge

  4. SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF INTERACTION BETWEEN AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING TELESCOPE WAVE AND A CORONAL UPFLOW REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.; Ding, M. D.; Chen, P. F.; Harra, L. K.

    2011-10-20

    We report a spectroscopic analysis of an EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) wave event that occurred in active region 11081 on 2010 June 12 and was associated with an M2.0 class flare. The wave propagated nearly circularly. The southeastern part of the wave front passed over an upflow region near a magnetic bipole. Using EUV Imaging Spectrometer raster observations for this region, we studied the properties of plasma dynamics in the wave front, as well as the interaction between the wave and the upflow region. We found a weak blueshift for the Fe XII {lambda}195.12 and Fe XIII {lambda}202.04 lines in the wave front. The local velocity along the solar surface, which is deduced from the line-of-sight velocity in the wave front and the projection effect, is much lower than the typical propagation speed of the wave. A more interesting finding is that the upflow and non-thermal velocities in the upflow region are suddenly diminished after the transit of the wave front. This implies a significant change of magnetic field orientation when the wave passed. As the lines in the upflow region are redirected, the velocity along the line of sight is diminished as a result. We suggest that this scenario is more in accordance with what was proposed in the field-line stretching model of EIT waves.

  5. Double-sided Relativistic Magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonov, A. V.; Krastelev, E. G.

    1997-05-01

    A new scheme of a symmetricaly powered relativistic magnetron and several methods of localised electron flow forming in an interaction region are proposed to increase an efficiency of relativistic magnetrons. As will be shown, a very important reason is the effect of nonsymmetric feeding of power from one side of a magnetron, which is typical for experiments. One-sided powering leads to the axial drift of electrons, to the transformation of transverse velocities of electrons to longitudinal one and to the generation of a parasitic e-beam which does not take part in energy exchange between electrons and waves at all. A special driver was designed for double-sided powering of relativistic magnetrons. The proposed system is compact, rigid and capable of reliable operation at high repetition rates, which is advantageous for many applications. Several smooth-bore magnetrons were tested by means of computer simulations using PIC code KARAT. The results showed a dramatical difference between the dynamics of electron flow for one- and two-sided power feeding of a structure under test. Design of a driver and computer simulation results are presented.

  6. Relativistic neutrons in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Rudak, Bronislaw

    1989-01-01

    The acceleration of protons to relativistic energies in active galactic nuclei leads to the creation of relativistic neutrons which escape from the central engine. The neutrons decay at distances of up to 1-100 pc, depositing their energies and momenta in situ. Energy deposition by decaying neutrons may inhibit spherical accretion and drive a wind, which could be responsible for the velocity fields in emission-line regions and the outflow of broad absorption line systems. Enhanced pressure in the neutron decay region may also help to confine emission line clouds. A fraction of the relativistic proton energy is radiated in gamma-rays with energies which may be as large as about 100,000 GeV.

  7. Modeling changes in extreme snowfall events in the Central Rocky Mountains Region with the Fully-Coupled WRF-Hydro Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    gochis, David; rasmussen, Roy; Yu, Wei; Ikeda, Kyoko

    2014-05-01

    Modeling of extreme weather events often require very finely resolved treatment of atmospheric circulation structures in order to produce and localize large magnitudes of moisture fluxes that result in extreme precipitation. This is particularly true for cool season orographic precipitation processes where the representation of landform can significantly influence vertical velocity profiles and cloud moisture entrainment rates. In this work we report on recent progress in high resolution regional climate modeling of the Colorado Headwaters region using an updated version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and a hydrological extension package called WRF-Hydro. Previous work has shown that the WRF-Hydro modeling system forced by high resolution WRF model output can produce credible depictions of winter orographic precipitation and resultant monthly and annual river flows. Here we present results from a detailed study of an extreme springtime snowfall event that occurred along the Colorado Front Range in March of 2003. First an analysis of the simulated streamflows resulting from the melt out of that event are presented followed by an analysis of projected streamflows from the event where the atmospheric forcing in the WRF model is perturbed using the Psuedo-Global-Warming (PGW) perturbation methodology. Results from the impact of warming on total precipitation, snow-rain partitioning and surface hydrological fluxes (evapotranspiration and runoff) will be discussed in the context of how potential changes in temperature impact the amount of precipitation, the phase of precipitation (rain vs. snow) and the timing and amplitude of streamflow responses. It is shown that under the assumptions of the PGW method, intense precipitation rates increase during the event and, more importantly, that more precipitation falls as rain versus snow which significantly amplifies the runoff response from one where runoff is produced gradually to where runoff is more

  8. Extreme values of snow-related variables in Mediterranean regions: trends and long-term forecasting in Sierra Nevada (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Palazón, M. J.; Pimentel, R.; Herrero, J.; Aguilar, C.; Perales, J. M.; Polo, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    Mountain areas in Mediterranean regions constitute key monitoring points for climate variability and its impacts, but long time datasets are not always available due to the difficult access to high areas, relevant for capturing temperature and precipitation regimes, and the predominance of cloudy remote sensing images during the snow season. Sierra Nevada National Park (South Spain), with altitudes higher than 3500 m a.s.l., is part of the Global Change in Mountain Regions network. Snow occurrence just 40 km from the seaside determines a wide range of biodiversity, a snowmelt fluvial regime, and the associated ecosystem services. This work presents the local trend analysis of weather variables at this area together with additional snow-related variables. For this, long term point and distributed observations from weather stations and remote sensing sources were studied and used as input and calibration datasets of a physically based snow model to derive long term series of mean and maximum daily fraction of snow covered area, annual number of days with snow, annual number of days with precipitation, mean and maximum mean daily snow water equivalent, and snowmelt and evaporation volumes. The joint analysis of weather and snow variables showed a decrease trend in the persistence and extent of the snow cover area. The precipitation regime, rather than the temperature trend, seems to be the most relevant driver on the snow regime forcing in Mediterranean areas. This poses a constraint for rigorous scenario analysis in these regions, since the precipitation pattern is poorly approximated by climatic models in these regions.

  9. Extreme variation in patterns of tandem repeats in mitochondrial control region of yellow-browed tits (Sylviparus modestus, Paridae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Nian; Zhang, Hongli; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Huang, Yuan; Lei, Fumin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the evolutionary pattern and origins of tandem repeats in the mitochondrial control region of the yellow-browed tit (Sylviparus modestus), the control region and another four mitochondrial loci from fifteen individuals were analyzed. A 117-bp tandem repeat unit that repeated once, twice or three times in different individuals was found, and a rarely reported arrangement for this tandem repeats region that a 5′ imperfect copy at its downstream and a 3′ imperfect copy at its upstream was observed. The haplotype network, phylogenetic trees, and ancestral state reconstruction of the combined dataset of five loci suggested multiple origins of the same repeat number. The turnover model via slipped-strand mispairing was introduced to interpret the results, because mispairing occurred so frequently that multiple origins of certain repeat number were observed. Insertion via recombination should be a better explanation for the origin of this tandem repeat unit, considering characteristics of the combined sequence of the 3′ and 5′ imperfect copy, including identification of its homolog in other passerines and its predicted secondary structure. PMID:26288099

  10. Weakly relativistic plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Fermous, Rachid Djebli, Mourad

    2015-04-15

    Plasma expansion is an important physical process that takes place in laser interactions with solid targets. Within a self-similar model for the hydrodynamical multi-fluid equations, we investigated the expansion of both dense and under-dense plasmas. The weakly relativistic electrons are produced by ultra-intense laser pulses, while ions are supposed to be in a non-relativistic regime. Numerical investigations have shown that relativistic effects are important for under-dense plasma and are characterized by a finite ion front velocity. Dense plasma expansion is found to be governed mainly by quantum contributions in the fluid equations that originate from the degenerate pressure in addition to the nonlinear contributions from exchange and correlation potentials. The quantum degeneracy parameter profile provides clues to set the limit between under-dense and dense relativistic plasma expansions at a given density and temperature.

  11. Relativistic Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2012-03-23

    We consider the relativistic deformation of quantum waves and mechanical bodies carrying intrinsic angular momentum (AM). When observed in a moving reference frame, the centroid of the object undergoes an AM-dependent transverse shift. This is the relativistic analogue of the spin-Hall effect, which occurs in free space without any external fields. Remarkably, the shifts of the geometric and energy centroids differ by a factor of 2, and both centroids are crucial for the Lorentz transformations of the AM tensor. We examine manifestations of the relativistic Hall effect in quantum vortices and mechanical flywheels and also discuss various fundamental aspects of this phenomenon. The perfect agreement of quantum and relativistic approaches allows applications at strikingly different scales, from elementary spinning particles, through classical light, to rotating black holes. PMID:22540559

  12. Exact Relativistic `Antigravity' Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, Franklin S.

    2006-01-01

    The Schwarzschild solution is used to find the exact relativistic motion of a payload in the gravitational field of a mass moving with constant velocity. At radial approach or recession speeds faster than 3-1/2 times the speed of light, even a small mass gravitationally repels a payload. At relativistic speeds, a suitable mass can quickly propel a heavy payload from rest nearly to the speed of light with negligible stresses on the payload.

  13. Relativistic Quantum Scars

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Liang; Lai Yingcheng; Ferry, David K.; Goodnick, Stephen M.; Akis, Richard

    2009-07-31

    The concentrations of wave functions about classical periodic orbits, or quantum scars, are a fundamental phenomenon in physics. An open question is whether scarring can occur in relativistic quantum systems. To address this question, we investigate confinements made of graphene whose classical dynamics are chaotic and find unequivocal evidence of relativistic quantum scars. The scarred states can lead to strong conductance fluctuations in the corresponding open quantum dots via the mechanism of resonant transmission.

  14. Damage caused by hydrological extremes in a region of southern Italy: comparison between the period 2002-2012 and the past century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrucci, Olga; Pasqua, A. Aurora

    2013-04-01

    The concept of extreme hydrological event should be seen in a relative way, depending on the region for which it is defined, the parameters and the type of data utilized to assess it, and mainly taking into account the length of the period basing on which it is assessed. Measured data concerning rainfall and river flow, which allow statistical analysis of numerical values and assessment of events frequency, can be available for different periods, according to both the study area and the country; nevertheless, the length of the measurement series rarely exceeds 100 years. Thus, the extrapolation to the future of events trend, frequency, seasonality are based on a relatively short and recent period and even the "magnitude" and the classification of "extreme events" can be biased by the length of the observation period. Thus these characteristics may substantially change if their assessment is based on a wider temporal window. Especially in un-gauged basins and concerning severest events, historical data cannot provide systematically measured parameters but they can supply proxy data which allow enlarging the observation period, permitting a better weighing of both recent and old events. The present research is based on the use of a wide historical database concerning phenomena as floods, flash floods and landslides triggered by extreme meteorological events in Calabria (Southern Italy) since 19th century. This database is made of approximately 11,000 records and it includes data coming from different sources as newspapers, archives of national and regional agencies, scientific and technical reports, on-site surveys reports and information collected by interviewing both people involved and local administrators. The recent uploading of data concerning the effects caused in Calabria by these phenomena during the decade 2002-2012 allowed us to analyse a long and updated historical series of events. The aim is to compare -both in terms triggering rainfall and their

  15. Assessing crop-specific impacts of extremely wet (2007) and dry (2003) conditions in France on regional maize and wheat yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Velde, Marijn

    2010-05-01

    Extreme weather conditions can strongly affect agricultural production. In France, crop yields were greatly influenced by drought and heat stress in 2003 and by extremely wet conditions in 2007. Both maize and wheat yield where historically low in 2003, in contrast to 2007 when wheat yields were lower and maize yields were higher than long-term averages. Even though maize yield loss was lower in regions with higher maize irrigation percentages; yield loss was still very considerable. Remotely sensed (AMSR-E) JJA soil moisture related significantly to reported regional crop yield for 2002-2007. The spatial correlation between JJA soil moisture and wheat yield anomalies was positive in dry 2003 and negative in wet 2007. Biweekly soil moisture correlated positively from the first half of June until the second half of July in 2003. In 2007, the relation was negative the first half of June until the second half of August. An analysis with a spatial version (10 by 10 km) of the EPIC crop growth model was used to infer causal relations between rainfall, soil moisture and rainfed wheat and rainfed and irrigated maize yield. The negative impacts of the 2003 heat wave and drought on wheat yield were captured by the model, while negative damages to yield due to excessive wetness in 2007 were not. Modelling suggests that regional drought mitigation increased with increasing maize irrigation percentages from 0 to 40%. At higher irrigation percentages the compensating effect of irrigation was small. The above average maize yields in 2007 were reproduced by the model, but the below average wheat yields were not. The model overestimation of wheat yield in 2007 may be due to a misrepresentation of the impact of wet conditions on plant physiological processes, or due to the incapacity of the model to represent determining factors such as lodging and unfavourable harvesting conditions. Strenghts and limitations of this regional assessment will be discussed. Extreme events affect

  16. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-08-15

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski space-time become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  17. Assessment of ENSEMBLES regional climate models for the representation of monthly wind characteristics in the Aegean Sea (Greece): Mean and extremes analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulou, Christina; Tolika, Konstantia; Tegoulias, Ioannis; Velikou, Kondylia; Vagenas, Christos

    2013-04-01

    The main scope of the present study is the assessment of the ability of three of the most updated regional climate models, developed under the frame of the European research project ENSEMBLES (http://www.ensembles-eu.org/), to simulate the wind characteristics in the Aegean Sea in Greece. The examined models are KNMI-RACMO2, MPI-MREMO, and ICTP - RegCM3. They all have the same spatial resolution (25x25km) and for their future projections they are using the A1B SRES emission scenarios. Their simulated wind data (speed and direction) were compared with observational data from several stations over the domain of study for a time period of 25 years, from 1980 to 2004 on a monthly basis. The primer data were available every three or six hours from which we computed the mean daily wind speed and the prevailing daily wind direction. It should be mentioned, that the comparison was made for the grid point that was the closest to each station over land. Moreover, the extreme speed values were also calculated both for the observational and the simulated data, in order to assess the ability of the models in capturing the most intense wind conditions. The first results of the study showed that the prevailing winds during the winter and spring months have a north - northeastern or a south - south western direction in most parts of the Aegean sea. The models under examination seem to capture quite satisfactorily this pattern as well as the general characteristics of the winds in this area. During summer, winds in the Aegean Sea have mainly north direction and the models have quite good agreement both in simulating this direction and the wind speed. Concerning the extreme wind speed (percentiles) it was found that for the stations in the northern Aegean all the models overestimate the extreme wind indices. For the eastern parts of the Aegean the KNMI and the MPI model underestimate the extreme wind speeds while on the other hand the ICTP model overestimates them. Finally for the

  18. Stochastic spatial disaggregation of extreme precipitation to validate a regional climate model and to evaluate climate change impacts over a small watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, P.; Rousseau, A. N.

    2014-05-01

    Regional climate models (RCMs) are valuable tools to evaluate impacts of climate change (CC) at regional scale. However, as the size of the area of interest decreases, the ability of a RCM to simulate extreme precipitation events decreases due to the spatial resolution. Thus, it is difficult to evaluate whether a RCM bias on localized extreme precipitation is caused by the spatial resolution or by a misrepresentation of the physical processes in the model. Thereby, it is difficult to trust the CC impact projections for localized extreme precipitation. Stochastic spatial disaggregation models can bring the RCM precipitation data at a finer scale and reduce the bias caused by spatial resolution. In addition, disaggregation models can generate an ensemble of outputs, producing an interval of possible values instead of a unique discrete value. The objective of this work is to evaluate whether a stochastic spatial disaggregation model applied on annual maximum daily precipitation (i) enables the validation of a RCM for a period of reference, and (ii) modifies the evaluation of CC impacts over a small area. Three simulations of the Canadian RCM (CRCM) covering the period 1961-2099 are used over a small watershed (130 km2) located in southern Québec, Canada. The disaggregation model applied is based on Gibbs sampling and accounts for physical properties of the event (wind speed, wind direction, and convective available potential energy - CAPE), leading to realistic spatial distributions of precipitation. The results indicate that disaggregation has a significant impact on the validation. However, it does not provide a precise estimate of the simulation bias because of the difference in resolution between disaggregated values (4 km) and observations, and because of the underestimation of the spatial variability by the disaggregation model for the most convective events. Nevertheless, disaggregation illustrates that the simulations used mostly overestimated annual maximum

  19. Stochastic spatial disaggregation of extreme precipitation to validate a Regional Climate Model and to evaluate climate change impacts over a small watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, P.; Rousseau, A. N.

    2013-06-01

    Regional Climate Models (RCMs) are valuable tools to evaluate impacts of climate change (CC) at regional scale. However, as the size of the area of interest decreases, the ability of a RCM to simulate extreme precipitation events decreases due to the spatial resolution. Thus, it is difficult to evaluate whether a RCM bias on localized extreme precipitation is caused by the spatial resolution or by a misrepresentation of the physical processes in the model. Thereby, it is difficult to trust the CC impact projections for localized extreme precipitation. Stochastic spatial disaggregation models can bring the RCM precipitation data at a finer scale and reduce the bias caused by spatial resolution. In addition, disaggregation models can generate an ensemble of outputs, producing an interval of possible values instead of a unique discrete value. The objective of this work is to evaluate whether a stochastic spatial disaggregation model applied on annual maximum daily precipitation: (i) enables the validation of a RCM for a period of reference, and (ii) modifies the evaluation of CC impacts over a small area. Three simulations of the Canadian RCM (CRCM) covering the period 1961-2099 are used over a small watershed (130 km2) located in southern Québec, Canada. The disaggregation model applied is based on Gibbs sampling and accounts for physical properties of the event (wind speed, wind direction, and convective available potential energy (CAPE)), leading to realistic spatial distributions of precipitation. The results indicate that disaggregation has a significant impact on the validation. However it does not provide a precise estimate of the simulation bias because of the difference in resolution between disaggregated values (4 km) and observations, and because of the underestimation of the spatial variability by the disaggregation model for the most convective events. Nevertheless, disaggregation permits to determine that the simulations used mostly overestimated annual

  20. Projecting Policy-Relevant Metrics to Characterize Changing Ozone Extremes over the US: Variations by Region, Season and Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Fiore, A. M.; Correa, G. J. P.; Clifton, O.; Horowitz, L. W.; Naik, V.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission controls have led to improved air quality (particularly in the Eastern US) over the past two decades, but concerns have been raised that climate warming may offset some of these gains in the coming decades. Here we address these concerns by analyzing the effect of projected future changes of emissions and climate, in isolation and combination, on US surface ozone (O3) during the 21st century in an ensemble of simulations (3 members per scenario) performed with the GFDL chemistry-climate model CM3. We analyze two Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios: RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. Under both scenarios, NOx emissions decrease by ~80% over North America by 2100. In additional 3-member ensemble simulations, termed RCP4.5_WMGG and RCP8.5_WMGG, well-mixed greenhouse gases follow the respective RCP but O3 and aerosol precursor emissions are held at 2005 levels. These simulations enable us to isolate the role of well-mixed greenhouse gas induced climate change from that of emission reductions. Another set of simulations, following RCP8.5 but with methane (CH4) held fixed at 2005 levels, termed RCP8.5_2005CH4, allows us to quantify the background influence of CH4 on O3. For each season, we examine changes in the surface O3 distribution over the US during the 21st century, calculating policy relevant statistics: days above the current national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) of 75 ppb and other proposed future levels, as well as the probabilistic 1-year return levels for maximum daily 8-hour average ozone (MDA8 O3), within each model grid cell. Specifically, we analyze: (i) regional and seasonal changes in the frequency and return level of high O3 pollution events during the 21st century, as well as (ii) differences among the RCPs by the middle and end of the 21st century. We find that the response of surface O3 to changes in emissions and climate varies strongly, seasonally and spatially, with certain regions more prone to a 'climate

  1. Projected performance of rf-linac-driven free-electron lasers in the extreme-ultraviolet spectral region

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, B.E.

    1988-01-01

    A free-electron laser user facility for scientific experimentation in the vacuum-ultraviolet and soft x-ray spectral regions (together termed the XUV) is being developed at Los Alamos. The design includes a series of laser oscillators and amplifiers, driven by a single, rf-linear accelerator, that will generate broadly tunable, picosecond-pulse, coherent radiation from 1 to 400 nm. Below 300 nm, the peak- and average-power output of these FEL devices should surpass the capabilities of any existing, continuously tunable photon sources by many orders of magnitude. The design and output parameters of this facility will be described, including comparison with synchrotron radiation sources, and recent progress in developing the three primary components (electron beam, magnetic undulator, and resonator mirrors) will be reviewed. 23 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Remote, Real-time Investigations of Extreme Environments Using High Power and Bandwidth Cabled Observatories: The OOI Regional Scale Nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, D. S.; Delaney, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Methane hydrate deposits and hydrothermal vents are two of the most extreme environments on Earth. Seismic events and flow of gases from the seafloor support and modulate novel microbial communities within these systems. Although studied intensely for several decades, significant questions remain about the flux of heat, volatiles and microbial material from the subsurface to the hydrosphere in these dynamic environments. Quantification of microbial communities, their structure and abundances, and metabolic activities is in an infant state. To better understand these systems, the National Science Foundation's Ocean Observatory Initiative has installed high power (8 kW), high bandwidth (10 Gb/s) nodes on the seafloor that provide access to active methane seeps at Southern Hydrate Ridge, and at the most magmatically robust volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge - Axial Seamount. The real-time interactive capabilities of the cabled observatory are critical to studying gas-hydrate systems because many of the key processes occur over short time scales. Events such as bubble plume formation, the creation of collapse zones, and increased seepage in response to earthquakes require adaptive response and sampling capabilities. To meet these challenges a suite of instruments will be connected to the cable in 2013. These sensors include full resolution sampling by upward-looking sonars, fluid and gas chemical characterization by mass spectrometers and osmo samplers, long-term duration collection of seep imagery from cameras, and in situ manipulation of chemical sensors coupled with flow meters. In concert, this instrument suite will provide quantification of transient and more stable chemical fluxes. Similarly, at Axial Seamount the high bandwidth and high power fiber optic cables will be used to communicate with and power a diverse array of sensors at the summit of the volcano. Real-time high definition video will provide unprecedented views of macrofaunal and microbial communities

  3. Temperature and moisture conditions for life in the extreme arid region of the Atacama desert: four years of observations including the El Nino of 1997-1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher P.; Friedmann, E. Imre; Gomez-Silva, Benito; Caceres-Villanueva, Luis; Andersen, Dale T.; Landheim, Ragnhild

    2003-01-01

    The Atacama along the Pacific Coast of Chile and Peru is one of the driest and possibly oldest deserts in the world. It represents an extreme habitat for life on Earth and is an analog for life in dry conditions on Mars. We report on four years (September 1994-October 1998) of climate and moisture data from the extreme arid region of the Atacama. Our data are focused on understanding moisture sources and their role in creating suitable environments for photosynthetic microorganisms in the desert surface. The average air temperature was 16.5 degrees C and 16.6 degrees C in 1995 and 1996, respectively. The maximum air temperature recorded was 37.9 degrees C, and the minimum was -5.7 degrees C. Annual average sunlight was 336 and 335 W m(-2) in 1995 and 1996, respectively. Winds averaged a few meters per second, with strong fohn winds coming from the west exceeding 12 m s(-1). During our 4 years of observation there was only one significant rain event of 2.3 mm, which occurred near midnight local time. We suggest that this event was a rainout of a heavy fog. It is of interest that the strong El Nino of 1997-1998 brought heavy rainfall to the deserts of Peru, but did not bring significant rain to the central Atacama in Chile. Dew occurred at our station frequently following high nighttime relative humidity, but is not a significant source of moisture in the soil or under stones. Groundwater also does not contribute to surface moisture. Only the one rain event of 2.3 mm resulted in liquid water in the soil and beneath stones for a total of only 65-85 h over 4 years. The paucity of liquid water under stones is consistent with the apparent absence of hypolithic (under-stone) cyanobacteria, the only known primary producers in such extreme deserts.

  4. Projecting policy-relevant metrics to characterize changing ozone extremes over the US: Variations by region, season and scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Harald E.; Fiore, Arlene M.; Correa, Gus; Clifton, Olivia; Horrowitz, Larry W.; Naik, Vaishali

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission controls have led to improved air quality (particularly in the Eastern US) over the past two decades, but concerns have been raised that climate warming may offset some of these gains in the coming decades. Here we address these concerns by analyzing the effect of projected future changes of emissions and climate, in isolation and combination, on US surface ozone (O3) during the 21st century in an ensemble of simulations (3 members per scenario) performed with the GFDL chemistry-climate model CM3. We analyze two Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios: RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. Under both scenarios, NOx emissions decrease by ~80% over North America by 2100. In additional 3-member ensemble simulations, termed RCP4.5_WMGG and RCP8.5_WMGG, well-mixed greenhouse gases follow the respective RCP but O3 and aerosol precursor emissions are held at 2005 levels. These simulations enable us to isolate the role of well-mixed greenhouse gas induced climate change from that of emission reductions. Another set of simulations, following RCP8.5 but with methane (CH4) held fixed at 2005 levels, termed RCP8.5_2005CH4, allows us to quantify the background influence of CH4 on O3. For each season, we examine changes in the surface O3 distribution over the US during the 21st century, calculating policy relevant statistics: days above the current national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) of 75 ppb and other proposed future levels, as well as the probabilistic 1-year return levels for maximum daily 8-hour average ozone (MDA8 O3), within each model grid cell. Specifically, we analyze: (i) regional and seasonal changes in the frequency and return level of high O3 pollution events during the 21st century, as well as (ii) differences among the RCPs by the middle and end of the 21st century. We find that the response of surface O3 to changes in emissions and climate varies strongly, seasonally and spatially, with certain regions more prone to a 'climate

  5. Regional Projections of Extreme Apparent Temperature Days in Africa and the Related Potential Risk to Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Rebecca M.; Matooane, Mamopeli; Engelbrecht, Francois A.; Bopape, Mary-Jane M.; Landman, Willem A.; Naidoo, Mogesh; van der Merwe, Jacobus; Wright, Caradee Y.

    2015-01-01

    Regional climate modelling was used to produce high resolution climate projections for Africa, under a “business as usual scenario”, that were translated into potential health impacts utilizing a heat index that relates apparent temperature to health impacts. The continent is projected to see increases in the number of days when health may be adversely affected by increasing maximum apparent temperatures (AT) due to climate change. Additionally, climate projections indicate that the increases in AT results in a moving of days from the less severe to the more severe Symptom Bands. The analysis of the rate of increasing temperatures assisted in identifying areas, such as the East African highlands, where health may be at increasing risk due to both large increases in the absolute number of hot days, and due to the high rate of increase. The projections described here can be used by health stakeholders in Africa to assist in the development of appropriate public health interventions to mitigate the potential health impacts from climate change. PMID:26473895

  6. Regional Projections of Extreme Apparent Temperature Days in Africa and the Related Potential Risk to Human Health.

    PubMed

    Garland, Rebecca M; Matooane, Mamopeli; Engelbrecht, Francois A; Bopape, Mary-Jane M; Landman, Willem A; Naidoo, Mogesh; Merwe, Jacobus van der; Wright, Caradee Y

    2015-10-01

    Regional climate modelling was used to produce high resolution climate projections for Africa, under a "business as usual scenario", that were translated into potential health impacts utilizing a heat index that relates apparent temperature to health impacts. The continent is projected to see increases in the number of days when health may be adversely affected by increasing maximum apparent temperatures (AT) due to climate change. Additionally, climate projections indicate that the increases in AT results in a moving of days from the less severe to the more severe Symptom Bands. The analysis of the rate of increasing temperatures assisted in identifying areas, such as the East African highlands, where health may be at increasing risk due to both large increases in the absolute number of hot days, and due to the high rate of increase. The projections described here can be used by health stakeholders in Africa to assist in the development of appropriate public health interventions to mitigate the potential health impacts from climate change. PMID:26473895

  7. Overexpression of Sis2, Which Contains an Extremely Acidic Region, Increases the Expression of Swi4, Cln1 and Cln2 in Sit4 Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Di-Como, C. J.; Bose, R.; Arndt, K. T.

    1995-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIS2 gene was identified by its ability, when present on a high copy number plasmid, to increase dramatically the growth rate of sit4 mutants. SIT4 encodes a type 2A-related protein phosphatase that is required in late G1 for normal G1 cyclin expression and for bud initiation. Overexpression of SIS2, which contains an extremely acidic carboxyl terminal region, stimulated the rate of CLN1, CLN2, SWI4 and CLB5 expression in sit4 mutants. Also, overexpression of SIS2 in a CLN1 cln2 cln3 strain stimulated the growth rate and the rate of CLN1 and CLB5 RNA accumulation during late G1. The SIS2 protein fractionated with nuclei and was released from the nuclear fraction by treatment with either DNase I or micrococcal nuclease, but not by RNase A. This result, combined with the finding that overexpression of SIS2 is extremely toxic to a strain containing lower than normal levels of histones H2A and H2B, suggests that SIS2 might function to stimulate transcription via an interaction with chromatin. PMID:7705654

  8. From superdeformation to extreme deformation and clusterization in the N ≈Z nuclei of the A ≈40 mass region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, D.; Afanasjev, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    A systematic search for extremely deformed structures in the N ≈Z nuclei of the A ≈40 mass region has been performed for the first time in the framework of covariant density functional theory. At spin zero such structures are located at high excitation energies, which prevents their experimental observation. The rotation acts as a tool to bring these exotic shapes to the yrast line or its vicinity so that their observation could become possible with future generation of γ -tracking (or similar) detectors such as GRETA and AGATA. The major physical observables of such structures (such as transition quadrupole moments, as well as kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia), the underlying single-particle structure and the spins at which they become yrast or near yrast, are defined. The search for the fingerprints of clusterization and molecular structures is performed and the configurations with such features are discussed. The best candidates for observation of extremely deformed structures are identified. For several nuclei in this study (such as 36Ar), the addition of several spin units above the currently measured maximum spin of 16 ℏ will inevitably trigger the transition to hyper- and megadeformed nuclear shapes.

  9. Climatological characteristics in the extreme hyper-arid region of Pampas de La Joya, Peru. Astrobiological approach in four years of observation: 2004-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Navarro-González, Rafael; Fletcher, Lauren; Pérez-Montaño, Saúl; Condori-Apaza, Reneé; Ortega-Gutiérrez, Fernando; McKay, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the environmental conditions of temperature, moisture and radiation for four years (May 2004 to July 2008) in the area known as Pampas de La Joya in southern Peru, which recently has been considered as a new Mars analogue. The period of evaluation includes the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) during the months of September 2006 to March 2007, which, despite not having catastrophic effects like its predecessor on 1997-1998, showed an interesting increase in humidity. Our data describe the extreme conditions present in the region and their relationship with the presence of potential habitats that could allow for the survival of micro-organisms. The average environmental temperature was 18.9°C, with a maximum of 35.9°C and a minimum of -4.5°C. The annual average incident solar radiation was 508 W m-2, with high near 1060 W m-2 at noon during the driest period between September and March. The average relative humidity (RH) was 29.5, 20.1 and 20.4% for air, soil and rock, respectively. The RH had higher values at night due to fog during the months of June and August, and during the early morning between December and March. During the months of ENSO event there were four episodes of precipitation (1.1, 1.5, 2.0 and 0.9 mm), of which three increased soil and rock moisture on an average more than 45% and persisted for over 15 days after precipitation, while the atmospheric environment had no significant variations. Finally, quartz rocks and evaporite minerals colonized with micro-organisms were found as the only micro-habitats, in this region, capable of supporting life in this extreme environment.

  10. Superoscillations underlying remote state preparation for relativistic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ber, Ran; Kenneth, Oded; Reznik, Benni

    2015-05-01

    We present a physical (gedanken) implementation of a generalized remote state preparation of relativistic quantum field states for an arbitrary set of observers. The prepared states are created in regions that are outside the future light cone of the generating region. The mechanism, which is based on utilizing the vacuum state of a relativistic quantum field as a resource, sheds light on the well known Reeh-Schlieder theorem, indicating its strong connection with the mathematical phenomenon of superoscillations.

  11. Effects of Revegetation on Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Erosion-Induced Carbon Loss under Extreme Rainstorms in the Hill and Gully Region of the Loess Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yujin; Jiao, Juying; Wang, Zhijie; Cao, Binting; Wei, Yanhong; Hu, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Loess Plateau, an ecologically vulnerable region, has long been suffering from serious soil erosion. Revegetation has been implemented to control soil erosion and improve ecosystems in the Loess Plateau region through a series of ecological recovery programs. However, the increasing atmospheric CO2 as a result of human intervention is affecting the climate by global warming, resulting in the greater frequency and intensity of extreme weather events, such as storms that may weaken the effectiveness of revegetation and cause severe soil erosion. Most research to date has evaluated the effectiveness of revegetation on soil properties and soil erosion of different land use or vegetation types. Here, we study the effect of revegetation on soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and erosion-induced carbon loss related to different plant communities, particularly under extreme rainstorm events. Materials and methods: The erosion-pin method was used to quantify soil erosion, and soil samples were taken at soil depths of 0–5 cm, 5–10 cm and 10–20 cm to determine the SOC content for 13 typical hillside revegetation communities in the year of 2013, which had the highest rainfall with broad range, long duration and high intensity since 1945, in the Yanhe watershed. Results and discussion: The SOC concentrations of all plant communities increased with soil depth when compared with slope cropland, and significant increases (p < 0.05) were observed for most shrub and forest communities, particularly for natural ones. Taking the natural secondary forest community as reference (i.e., soil loss and SOC loss were both 1.0), the relative soil loss and SOC loss of the other 12 plant communities in 2013 ranged from 1.5 to 9.4 and 0.30 to 1.73, respectively. Natural shrub and forest communities showed greater resistance to rainstorm erosion than grassland communities. The natural grassland communities with lower SOC content produced lower SOC loss even with higher soil

  12. Extreme precipitation events in southestearn France in a high-resolution regional climate model : comparison of a 12 km and a 50 km hindcast with ALADIN-Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, Jeanne; Déqué, Michel; Sanchez Gomez, Emilia; Somot, Samuel

    2010-05-01

    We present a comparison of the modelling of intense precipitations over France in two regional climate simulations performed with the Limited Area Model (LAM) ALADIN-Climate, run at a 12 km and a 50 km resolution. In both experiments, the model is forced by the ERA40 re-analysis over the 1958-2000 period. We focus on the representation of the highest precipitation extremes occuring in southeastern France in Autumn. These events involve small-scale processes than can be explicitly resolved only with 2-1 km resolution non-hydrostatic models. However, previous studies have shown that regional climate models are able to simulate heavy rainfalls in this area, although the amounts of rain are much smaller than the ones that are actually observed. Here, we further explore the ability of ALADIN-Climate in reproducing these specific events and the possible added-value of a higher resolution regarding this matter. Indeed, driving the LAM with ERA40 allows the LAM to stick to the real chronology and therefore enables us to analyze its results not only from a statistical point of view but also through day-to-day diagnosis. First, we assess the performances of the model at the 12 km and 50 km resolutions by comparing the simulated daily precipitations with observations over the south east part of France. To do so, we use the high-resolution gridded SAFRAN analysis which provides series of hourly fields over the french territory at a 8 km resolution, from 1958 to 2008. We consider the differences in the upper quantiles of precipitations between the model and the data, as well as the time correlations of heavy rainfalls and the spatial rain patterns for given extreme events. Then we compare the performances of ALADIN-Climate in both simulations to the ones obtained with a statistical downscaling method we apply to the last twenty years of the ERA40 period. This method is based on a weather regime approach and uses the analog methodology (Boé and Terray, 2007) to reconstruct

  13. Relativistic Weierstrass random walks.

    PubMed

    Saa, Alberto; Venegeroles, Roberto

    2010-08-01

    The Weierstrass random walk is a paradigmatic Markov chain giving rise to a Lévy-type superdiffusive behavior. It is well known that special relativity prevents the arbitrarily high velocities necessary to establish a superdiffusive behavior in any process occurring in Minkowski spacetime, implying, in particular, that any relativistic Markov chain describing spacetime phenomena must be essentially Gaussian. Here, we introduce a simple relativistic extension of the Weierstrass random walk and show that there must exist a transition time t{c} delimiting two qualitative distinct dynamical regimes: the (nonrelativistic) superdiffusive Lévy flights, for trelativistic) Gaussian diffusion, for t>t{c} . Implications of this crossover between different diffusion regimes are discussed for some explicit examples. The study of such an explicit and simple Markov chain can shed some light on several results obtained in much more involved contexts. PMID:20866862

  14. SAMPEX Relativistic Microbursts Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.; Comess, M.; Smith, D. M.; Selesnick, R. S.; Sample, J. G.; Millan, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Relativistic (>1 MeV) electron microburst precipitation is thought to account for significant relativistic electron loss. We present the statistical and spectral analysis of relativistic microbursts observed by the Proton/Electron Telescope (PET) on board the Solar Anomalous Magnetospheric Particle Explorer(SAMPEX) satellite from 1992 to 2004. Spectrally we find that microbursts are well fit by an exponential energy distribution in the 0.5-4 MeV range with a spectral e-folding energy of E0 < 375 keV. We also discuss the comparison of morning microbursts with events at midnight, which were first identified as microbursts by O'Brien et al. (2004). Finally, we compare the loss-rates due to microbursts and non-microburst precipitation during storm times and averaged over all times.

  15. Synchrotron emissivity from mildly relativistic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1981-01-01

    Approximate analytic expressions are presented for evaluation of the frequency and angular dependence of synchrotron emissivity from mildly relativistic particles with arbitrary energy spectrum and pitch angle distribution in a given magnetic field. Results agree with previous expressions for a nonrelativistic Maxwellian particle distribution, and when extrapolated to nonrelativistic and extreme relativistic regimes, they also agree with the previous expressions obtained under those limiting conditions. The results from the analytic expression are compared with results from detailed numerical evaluations. Excellent agreement is found not only at frequencies large compared to the gyro-frequency but also at lower frequencies, in fact, all the way down to the gyro-frequency, where the analytic approximations are expected to be less accurate.

  16. Relativistic nuclear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Coester, F.

    1985-01-01

    A review is presented of three distinct approaches to the construction of relativistic dynamical models: (1) Relativistic canonical quantum mechanics. (The Hilbert space of states is independent of the interactions, which are introduced by modifying the energy operator.) (2) Hilbert spaces of manifestly covariant wave functions. (The interactions modify the metric of the Hilbert space.) (3) Covariant Green functions. In each of the three approaches the focus is on the formulation of the two-body dynamics, and problems in the construction of the corresponding many-body dynamics are discussed briefly. 21 refs.

  17. Perspective: relativistic effects.

    PubMed

    Autschbach, Jochen

    2012-04-21

    This perspective article discusses some broadly-known and some less broadly-known consequences of Einstein's special relativity in quantum chemistry, and provides a brief outline of the theoretical methods currently in use, along with a discussion of recent developments and selected applications. The treatment of the electron correlation problem in relativistic quantum chemistry methods, and expanding the reach of the available relativistic methods to calculate all kinds of energy derivative properties, in particular spectroscopic and magnetic properties, requires on-going efforts. PMID:22519307

  18. Projected sea level rise and changes in extreme storm surge and wave events during the 21st century in the region of Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannaby, H.; Palmer, M. D.; Howard, T.; Bricheno, L.; Calvert, D.; Krijnen, J.; Wood, R.; Tinker, J.; Bunney, C.; Harle, J.; Saulter, A.; O'Neill, C.; Bellingham, C.; Lowe, J.

    2015-12-01

    Singapore is an island state with considerable population, industries, commerce and transport located in coastal areas at elevations less than 2 m making it vulnerable to sea-level rise. Mitigation against future inundation events requires a quantitative assessment of risk. To address this need, regional projections of changes in (i) long-term mean sea level and (ii) the frequency of extreme storm surge and wave events have been combined to explore potential changes to coastal flood risk over the 21st century. Local changes in time mean sea level were evaluated using the process-based climate model data and methods presented in the IPCC AR5. Regional surge and wave solutions extending from 1980 to 2100 were generated using ~ 12 km resolution surge (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean - NEMO) and wave (WaveWatchIII) models. Ocean simulations were forced by output from a selection of four downscaled (~ 12 km resolution) atmospheric models, forced at the lateral boundaries by global climate model simulations generated for the IPCC AR5. Long-term trends in skew surge and significant wave height were then assessed using a generalised extreme value model, fit to the largest modelled events each year. An additional atmospheric solution downscaled from the ERA-Interim global reanalysis was used to force historical ocean model simulations extending from 1980-2010, enabling a quantitative assessment of model skill. Simulated historical sea surface height and significant wave height time series were compared to tide gauge data and satellite altimetry data respectively. Central estimates of the long-term mean sea level rise at Singapore by 2100 were projected to be 0.52 m (0.74 m) under the RCP 4.5 (8.5) scenarios respectively. Trends in surge and significant wave height 2 year return levels were found to be statistically insignificant and/or physically very small under the more severe RCP8.5 scenario. We conclude that changes to long-term mean sea level constitute the

  19. Projected sea level rise and changes in extreme storm surge and wave events during the 21st century in the region of Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannaby, Heather; Palmer, Matthew D.; Howard, Tom; Bricheno, Lucy; Calvert, Daley; Krijnen, Justin; Wood, Richard; Tinker, Jonathan; Bunney, Chris; Harle, James; Saulter, Andrew; O'Neill, Clare; Bellingham, Clare; Lowe, Jason

    2016-05-01

    Singapore is an island state with considerable population, industries, commerce and transport located in coastal areas at elevations less than 2 m making it vulnerable to sea level rise. Mitigation against future inundation events requires a quantitative assessment of risk. To address this need, regional projections of changes in (i) long-term mean sea level and (ii) the frequency of extreme storm surge and wave events have been combined to explore potential changes to coastal flood risk over the 21st century. Local changes in time-mean sea level were evaluated using the process-based climate model data and methods presented in the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report (IPCC AR5). Regional surge and wave solutions extending from 1980 to 2100 were generated using ˜ 12 km resolution surge (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean - NEMO) and wave (WaveWatchIII) models. Ocean simulations were forced by output from a selection of four downscaled ( ˜ 12 km resolution) atmospheric models, forced at the lateral boundaries by global climate model simulations generated for the IPCC AR5. Long-term trends in skew surge and significant wave height were then assessed using a generalised extreme value model, fit to the largest modelled events each year. An additional atmospheric solution downscaled from the ERA-Interim global reanalysis was used to force historical ocean model simulations extending from 1980 to 2010, enabling a quantitative assessment of model skill. Simulated historical sea-surface height and significant wave height time series were compared to tide gauge data and satellite altimetry data, respectively. Central estimates of the long-term mean sea level rise at Singapore by 2100 were projected to be 0.52 m (0.74 m) under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP)4.5 (8.5) scenarios. Trends in surge and significant wave height 2-year return levels were found to be statistically insignificant and/or physically

  20. Relativistic impulse dynamics.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Stanley M

    2011-08-01

    Classical electrodynamics has some annoying rough edges. The self-energy of charges is infinite without a cutoff. The calculation of relativistic trajectories is difficult because of retardation and an average radiation reaction term. By reconceptuallizing electrodynamics in terms of exchanges of impulses rather than describing it by forces and potentials, we eliminate these problems. A fully relativistic theory using photonlike null impulses is developed. Numerical calculations for a two-body, one-impulse-in-transit model are discussed. A simple relationship between center-of-mass scattering angle and angular momentum was found. It reproduces the Rutherford cross section at low velocities and agrees with the leading term of relativistic distinguishable-particle quantum cross sections (Møller, Mott) when the distance of closest approach is larger than the Compton wavelength of the particle. Magnetism emerges as a consequence of viewing retarded and advanced interactions from the vantage point of an instantaneous radius vector. Radiation reaction becomes the local conservation of energy-momentum between the radiating particle and the emitted impulse. A net action is defined that could be used in developing quantum dynamics without potentials. A reinterpretation of Newton's laws extends them to relativistic motion. PMID:21929132

  1. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  2. A relativistic spherical vortex

    PubMed Central

    Pekeris, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    This investigation is concerned with stationary relativistic flows of an inviscid and incompressible fluid. In choosing a density-pressure relation to represent relativistic “incompressibility,” it is found that a fluid in which the velocity of sound equals the velocity of light is to be preferred for reasons of mathematical simplicity. In the case of axially symmetric flows, the velocity field can be derived from a stream function obeying a partial differential equation which is nonlinear. A transformation of variables is found which makes the relativistic differential equation linear. An exact solution is obtained for the case of a vortex confined to a stationary sphere. One can make all three of the components of velocity vanish on the surface of the sphere, as in the nonrelativistic Hicks spherical vortex. In the case of an isolated vortex on whose surface the pressure is made to vanish, it is found that the pressure at the center of the sphere becomes negative, as in the nonrelativistic case. A solution is also obtained for a relativistic vortex advancing in a fluid. The sphere is distorted into an oblate spheroid. The maximum possible velocity of advance of the vortex is (2/3) c. PMID:16578745

  3. The Relativistic Rocket

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antippa, Adel F.

    2009-01-01

    We solve the problem of the relativistic rocket by making use of the relation between Lorentzian and Galilean velocities, as well as the laws of superposition of successive collinear Lorentz boosts in the limit of infinitesimal boosts. The solution is conceptually simple, and technically straightforward, and provides an example of a powerful…

  4. Relativistic effects on plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Benkhelifa, El-Amine; Djebli, Mourad

    2014-07-15

    The expansion of electron-ion plasma is studied through a fully relativistic multi-fluids plasma model which includes thermal pressure, ambipolar electrostatic potential, and internal energy conversion. Numerical investigation, based on quasi-neutral assumption, is performed for three different regimes: nonrelativistic, weakly relativistic, and relativistic. Ions' front in weakly relativistic regime exhibits spiky structure associated with a break-down of quasi-neutrality at the expanding front. In the relativistic regime, ion velocity is found to reach a saturation limit which occurs at earlier stages of the expansion. This limit is enhanced by higher electron velocity.

  5. Nucleosynthesis in Gamma-Ray Bursts and Supernovae: Constraints of Extremely Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, N.

    2012-08-01

    I present nucleosynthesis in explosions with relativistic jets or non- relativistic mildly aspherical components, assuming gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) or supernovae (SNe), and compare the abundance ratios of their yields with those of the extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars. The explosion with non-relativistic mildly aspherical energy deposition can explain [Mg/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Zn/Fe] but not [Ti/Fe], while the explosion with relativistic jets can explain [Ca/Fe], [Ti/Fe], and [Zn/Fe] but not [Mg/Fe]. This illustrates that the explosion with relativistic jets or non-relativistic mildly aspherical components cannot fully reproduce the EMP stars and implies that the explosion with relativistic jets and non-relativistic mildly aspherical components as in GRB-SNe could explain the abundance ratios of EMP stars simultaneously.

  6. Dynamics of relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Sol, Hélène; Mutel, Robert L.

    1998-12-01

    We discuss the structure and relativistic kinematics that develop in three spatial dimensions when a moderately hot, supersonic jet propagates into a denser background medium and encounters resistance from an oblique magnetic field. Our simulations incorporate relativistic MHD in a four-dimensional spacetime and clearly show that (a) relatively weak, oblique fields (at 1/16 of the equipartition value) have only a negligible influence on the propagating jet and they are passively pushed away by the relativistically moving head; (b) oblique fields in equipartition with the ambient plasma provide more resistance and cause bending at the jet head, but the magnitude of this deflection and the associated backflow are small compared to those identified by previous studies. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently during the simulations. The effect is analogous to pushing Japanese "noren" or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend and twist in 3-D space. Applied to relativistic extragalactic jets from blazars, the new results are encouraging since superluminal outflows exhibit bending near their sources and their environments are profoundly magnetized - but observations do not provide support for irregular kinematics such as large-scale vortical motions and pronounced reverse flows near the points of origin.

  7. Scaling of Magnetic Reconnection in Relativistic Collisionless Pair Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Guo, Fan; Daughton, William; Li, Hui; Hesse, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Using fully kinetic simulations, we study the scaling of the inflow speed of collisionless magnetic reconnection in electron-positron plasmas from the non-relativistic to ultra-relativistic limit. In the anti-parallel configuration, the inflow speed increases with the upstream magnetization parameter sigma and approaches the speed of light when sigma is greater than O(100), leading to an enhanced reconnection rate. In all regimes, the divergence of the pressure tensor is the dominant term responsible for breaking the frozen-in condition at the x-line. The observed scaling agrees well with a simple model that accounts for the Lorentz contraction of the plasma passing through the diffusion region. The results demonstrate that the aspect ratio of the diffusion region, modified by the compression factor of proper density, remains approximately 0.1 in both the non-relativistic and relativistic limits.

  8. Relativistic effects on information measures for hydrogen-like atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katriel, Jacob; Sen, K. D.

    2010-01-01

    Position and momentum information measures are evaluated for the ground state of the relativistic hydrogen-like atoms. Consequences of the fact that the radial momentum operator is not self-adjoint are explicitly studied, exhibiting fundamental shortcomings of the conventional uncertainty measures in terms of the radial position and momentum variances. The Shannon and Rényi entropies, the Fisher information measure, as well as several related information measures, are considered as viable alternatives. Detailed results on the onset of relativistic effects for low nuclear charges, and on the extreme relativistic limit, are presented. The relativistic position density decays exponentially at large r, but is singular at the origin. Correspondingly, the momentum density decays as an inverse power of p. Both features yield divergent Rényi entropies away from a finite vicinity of the Shannon entropy. While the position space information measures can be evaluated analytically for both the nonrelativistic and the relativistic hydrogen atom, this is not the case for the relativistic momentum space. Some of the results allow interesting insight into the significance of recently evaluated Dirac-Fock vs. Hartree-Fock complexity measures for many-electron neutral atoms.

  9. THE EFFECT OF HOT CORONAL ELECTRONS ON EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRAL LINES OF He II EMITTED BY SOLAR TRANSITION REGION PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, U.; Ralchenko, Yu.; Doschek, G. A.

    2010-01-01

    The cause of the lower intensities of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) He II lines emitted by coronal hole (CH) plasmas compared with quiet Sun (QS) plasmas has been the subject of many studies dating back over half a century. In this paper, we study the effect of small amounts of 'hot' electrons at coronal temperatures (T{sub e} = 1.4 x 10{sup 6} K) on the intensities of EUV He II lines, as well as on the intensities of EUV lines of C III, C IV, O III, and O IV emitted by 1.5 x 10{sup 4} K-1.5 x 10{sup 5} K (4.2 <= log T{sub e} <= 5.2) plasmas in the QS. We show that although the influence of a fraction as small as 10{sup -4}-10{sup -3} of hot electrons on the intensities of the C and O lines is noticeable, the effect on the intensities of the He lines is much larger, to the extent that it could explain the excess brightness of He II lines emitted by QS regions relative to CH plasmas.

  10. Polar summer mesospheric extreme horizontal drift speeds during interplanetary corotating interaction regions (CIRs) and high-speed solar wind streams: Coupling between the solar wind and the mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Sook; Kirkwood, Sheila; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kim, Kyung-Chan; Shepherd, Gordon G.

    2014-05-01

    We report the observation of echo extreme horizontal drift speed (EEHS, ≥ 300 m s-1) during polar mesospheric (80-90 km) summer echoes (PMSEs) by the VHF (52 MHz) radar at Esrange, Sweden, in years of 2006 and 2008. The EEHS occur in PMSEs as correlated with high-speed solar wind streams (HSSs), observed at least once in 12-17% of all hours of observation for the two summers. The EEHS rate peaks occur either during high solar wind speed in the early part of the PMSE season or during the arrival of interplanetary corotating interaction regions (CIRs) followed by peaks in PMSE occurrence rate after 1-4 days, in the latter part of the 2006 summer. The cause of EEHS rate peaks is likely under the competition between the interval of the CIR and HSS passage over the magnetosphere. A candidate process in producing EEHS is suggested to be localized strong electric field, which is caused by solar wind energy transfer from the interaction of CIR and HSS with the magnetosphere in a sequential manner. We suggest that EEHS are created by strong electric field, estimated as > 10-30 V m-1 at 85 km altitude, exceeding the mesospheric breakdown threshold field.

  11. APEX CO (9-8) MAPPING OF AN EXTREMELY HIGH VELOCITY AND JET-LIKE OUTFLOW IN A HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Keping; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf; Leurini, Silvia; Leinz, Christian

    2011-12-10

    Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) mapping observations in CO (9-8) and (4-3) toward a high-mass star-forming region, NGC 6334 I, are presented. The CO (9-8) map has a 6.''4 resolution, revealing a {approx}0.5 pc, jet-like, and bipolar outflow. This is the first map of a molecular outflow in a THz line. The CO (9-8) and (4-3) lines arising from the outflow lobes both show extremely high velocity line wings, and their ratios indicate a gas temperature greater than 100 K and a density higher than 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}. The spatial-velocity structure of the CO (9-8) data is typical of a bow-shock-driven flow, which is consistent with the association between the bipolar outflow and the infrared bow-shaped tips. In short, the observations unveil a highly excited and collimated component in a bipolar outflow that is powered by a high-mass protostar, and provide insights into the driving mechanism of the outflow. Meanwhile, the observations demonstrate that high-quality mapping observations can be performed with the new THz receiver on APEX.

  12. BROAD-LINE REGION PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN EXTREME POPULATION A QUASARS: A METHOD TO ESTIMATE CENTRAL BLACK HOLE MASS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Negrete, C. Alenka; Dultzin, Deborah; Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W. E-mail: deborah@astro.unam.mx E-mail: sulentic@iaa.es

    2012-09-20

    We describe a method for estimating physical conditions in the broad-line region (BLR) for a significant subsample of Seyfert 1 nuclei and quasars. Several diagnostic ratios based on intermediate (Al III {lambda}1860, Si III] {lambda}1892) and high (C IV {lambda}1549, Si IV {lambda}1397) ionization lines in the UV spectra of quasars are used to constrain density, ionization, and metallicity of the emitting gas. We apply the method to two extreme Population A quasars-the prototypical NLSy1 I Zw 1 and higher z source SDSS J120144.36+011611.6. Under assumptions of spherical symmetry and pure photoionization we infer BLR physical conditions: low ionization (ionization parameter <10{sup -2}), high density (10{sup 12}-10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}), and significant metal enrichment. Ionization parameter and density can be derived independently for each source with an uncertainty that is less than {+-}0.3 dex. We use the product of density and ionization parameter to estimate the BLR radius and derive an estimation of the virial black hole mass (M{sub BH}). Estimates of M{sub BH} based on the 'photoionization' analysis described in this paper are probably more accurate than those derived from the mass-luminosity correlations widely employed to compute black hole masses for high-redshift quasars.

  13. Survey of Ti-, B-, and Y-based soft x-ray -extreme ultraviolet multilayer mirrors for the 2- to 12-nm wavelength region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montcalm, Claude; Kearney, Patrick A.; Slaughter, J. M.; Sullivan, Brian T.; Chaker, M.; Pépin, Henri; Falco, Charles M.

    1996-09-01

    We have performed an experimental investigation of Ti-, B4C-, B-, and Y-based multilayer mirrors for the soft x-ray-extreme ultraviolet (XUV) wavelength region between 2.0 and 12.0 nm. Eleven different material pairs were >C/Pd, B/Mo, Y/Pd, Y/Ag, Y/Mo, Y/Nb, and Y/C. The multilayers were sputter deposited and were characterized with a number of techniques, including low-angle x-ray diffraction and normal incidence XUV reflectometry. Among the Ti-based multilayers the best results were obtained with Ti/W, with peak reflectances up to 5.2% at 2.79 nm at 61 degrees from normal incidence. The B4C/Pd and B/Mo multilayer mirrors had near-normal incidence (5 degrees) peak reflectances of 11.5% at 8.46 nm and 9.4% at 6.67 nm, respectively, whereas a Y/Mo multilayer mirror had a maximum peak reflectance of 25.6% at 11.30 nm at the same angle. The factors limiting the peak reflectance of these different multilayer mirrors are discussed.

  14. Change detection of land use and land cover in an urban region with SPOT-5 images and partial Lanczos extreme learning machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Han, Min; Yao, Wei; Chen, Liang-Chien; Xu, Shiguo

    2010-11-01

    Satellite remote sensing technology and the science associated with evaluation of land use and land cover (LULC) in an urban region makes use of the wide range images and algorithms. Improved land management capacity is critically dependent on real-time or near real-time monitoring of land-use/land cover change (LUCC) to the extent to which solutions to a whole host of urban/rural interface development issues may be well managed promptly. Yet previous processing with LULC methods is often time-consuming, laborious, and tedious making the outputs unavailable within the required time window. This paper presents a new image classification approach based on a novel neural computing technique that is applied to identify the LULC patterns in a fast growing urban region with the aid of 2.5-meter resolution SPOT-5 image products. The classifier was constructed based on the partial Lanczos extreme learning machine (PL-ELM), which is a novel machine learning algorithm with fast learning speed and outstanding generalization performance. Since some different classes of LULC may be linked with similar spectral characteristics, texture features and vegetation indexes were extracted and included during the classification process to enhance the discernability. A validation procedure based on ground truth data and comparisons with some classic classifiers prove the credibility of the proposed PL-ELM classification approach in terms of the classification accuracy as well as the processing speed. A case study in Dalian Development Area (DDA) with the aid of the SPOT-5 satellite images collected in the year of 2003 and 2007 and PL-ELM fully supports the monitoring needs and aids in the rapid change detection with respect to both urban expansion and coastal land reclamations.

  15. Changes in Seasonal and Extreme Hydrologic Conditions of the Georgia Basin/Puget Sound in an Ensemble Regional Climate Simulation for the Mid-Century

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun

    2003-12-15

    This study examines an ensemble of climate change projections simulated by a global climate model (GCM) and downscaled with a region climate model (RCM) to 40 km spatial resolution for the western North America. One control and three ensemble future climate simulations were produced by the GCM following a business as usual scenario for greenhouse gases and aerosols emissions from 1995 to 2100. The RCM was used to downscale the GCM control simulation (1995-2015) and each ensemble future GCM climate (2040-2060) simulation. Analyses of the regional climate simulations for the Georgia Basin/Puget Sound showed a warming of 1.5-2oC and statistically insignificant changes in precipitation by the mid-century. Climate change has large impacts on snowpack (about 50% reduction) but relatively smaller impacts on the total runoff for the basin as a whole. However, climate change can strongly affect small watersheds such as those located in the transient snow zone, causing a higher likelihood of winter flooding as a higher percentage of precipitation falls in the form of rain rather than snow, and reduced streamflow in early summer. In addition, there are large changes in the monthly total runoff above the upper 1% threshold (or flood volume) from October through May, and the December flood volume of the future climate is 60% above the maximum monthly flood volume of the control climate. Uncertainty of the climate change projections, as characterized by the spread among the ensemble future climate simulations, is relatively small for the basin mean snowpack and runoff, but increases in smaller watersheds, especially in the transient snow zone, and associated with extreme events. This emphasizes the importance of characterizing uncertainty through ensemble simulations.

  16. Relativistically strong electromagnetic radiation in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Kondo, K.

    2016-03-01

    Physical processes in a plasma under the action of relativistically strong electromagnetic waves generated by high-power lasers have been briefly reviewed. These processes are of interest in view of the development of new methods for acceleration of charged particles, creation of sources of bright hard electromagnetic radiation, and investigation of macroscopic quantum-electrodynamical processes. Attention is focused on nonlinear waves in a laser plasma for the creation of compact electron accelerators. The acceleration of plasma bunches by the radiation pressure of light is the most efficient regime of ion acceleration. Coherent hard electromagnetic radiation in the relativistic plasma is generated in the form of higher harmonics and/or electromagnetic pulses, which are compressed and intensified after reflection from relativistic mirrors created by nonlinear waves. In the limit of extremely strong electromagnetic waves, radiation friction, which accompanies the conversion of radiation from the optical range to the gamma range, fundamentally changes the behavior of the plasma. This process is accompanied by the production of electron-positron pairs, which is described within quantum electrodynamics theory.

  17. Plasma heating with crossing relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratan, Naren; Sircombe, Nathan; Ceurvorst, Luke; Kasim, Muhammad; Sadler, James; Bingham, Robert; Trines, Raoul; Norreys, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Plasma heating by relativistic electron beams is a powerful tool with applications including the heating of inertial confinement fusion targets and the study of matter in extreme conditions. We discuss the use of two relativistic electron beams to efficiently heat the plasma ions where the beams cross by using beam-plasma instabilities and non-linear wave coupling between Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves. Energy from the electron beams is coupled to the plasma ions as the beams become unstable and drive Langmuir waves which couple non-linearly to ion-acoustic waves which are then damped . Results of linear growth rate calculations are presented for the system of two crossing electron beams demonstrating a broad spectrum of unstable modes. Relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell simulations in two space and two momentum dimensions have been performed which demonstrate the non-linear coupling of the electron beam energy into ion-acoustic waves and the energy cascade to the background ions. Time-frequency analysis is applied to analyze the non-linear coupling between Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves in wave phase space. Structural properties of the strong turbulence produced at late times are analyzed.

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: Relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umstadter, Donald

    2003-04-01

    By focusing petawatt peak power laser light to intensities up to 1021 W cm-2, highly relativistic plasmas can now be studied. The force exerted by light pulses with this extreme intensity has been used to accelerate beams of electrons and protons to energies of a million volts in distances of only microns. This acceleration gradient is a thousand times greater than in radio-frequency-based accelerators. Such novel compact laser-based radiation sources have been demonstrated to have parameters that are useful for research in medicine, physics and engineering. They might also someday be used to ignite controlled thermonuclear fusion. Ultrashort pulse duration particles and x-rays that are produced can resolve chemical, biological or physical reactions on ultrafast (femtosecond) timescales and on atomic spatial scales. These energetic beams have produced an array of nuclear reactions, resulting in neutrons, positrons and radioactive isotopes. As laser intensities increase further and laser-accelerated protons become relativistic, exotic plasmas, such as dense electron-positron plasmas, which are of astrophysical interest, can be created in the laboratory. This paper reviews many of the recent advances in relativistic laser-plasma interactions.

  19. Consistent resolution of some relativistic quantum paradoxes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2002-12-01

    A relativistic version of the (consistent or decoherent) histories approach to quantum theory is developed on the basis of earlier work by Hartle, and used to discuss relativistic forms of the paradoxes of spherical wave packet collapse, Bohm's formulation of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox, and Hardy's paradox. It is argued that wave function collapse is not needed for introducing probabilities into relativistic quantum mechanics, and in any case should never be thought of as a physical process. Alternative approaches to stochastic time dependence can be used to construct a physical picture of the measurement process that is less misleading than collapse models. In particular, one can employ a coarse-grained but fully quantum-mechanical description in which particles move along trajectories, with behavior under Lorentz transformations the same as in classical relativistic physics, and detectors are triggered by particles reaching them along such trajectories. States entangled between spacelike separate regions are also legitimate quantum descriptions, and can be consistently handled by the formalism presented here. The paradoxes in question arise because of using modes of reasoning which, while correct for classical physics, are inconsistent with the mathematical structure of quantum theory, and are resolved (or tamed) by using a proper quantum analysis. In particular, there is no need to invoke, nor any evidence for, mysterious long-range superluminal influences, and thus no incompatibility, at least from this source, between relativity theory and quantum mechanics.

  20. Relativistic radiative transfer and relativistic plane-parallel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Relativistic radiative transfer and relativistic plane-parallel flows accelerated from their base like accretion disk winds are numerically examined under the special relativistic treatment. We first solve the relativistic transfer equation iteratively, using a given velocity field, and obtain specific intensities as well as moment quantities. Using the obtained flux, we then solve the hydrodynamical equation, and obtain the new velocity field and the mass-loss rate as an eigen value. We repeat these double-iteration processes until both the intensity and velocity profiles converge. Under this double iteration, we solve the relativistic radiative transfer equation and relativistic flows in the vertical direction, simultaneously. The flows are gradually accelerated, as the optical depth decreases towards the surface. The mass-loss rate dot{J} is roughly expressed in terms of the optical depth τb and terminal speed βs of the flow as dot{J} ˜ 10 τ_b β _s^{-3/4}.

  1. Local relativistic exact decoupling.

    PubMed

    Peng, Daoling; Reiher, Markus

    2012-06-28

    We present a systematic hierarchy of approximations for local exact decoupling of four-component quantum chemical Hamiltonians based on the Dirac equation. Our ansatz reaches beyond the trivial local approximation that is based on a unitary transformation of only the atomic block-diagonal part of the Hamiltonian. Systematically, off-diagonal Hamiltonian matrix blocks can be subjected to a unitary transformation to yield relativistically corrected matrix elements. The full hierarchy is investigated with respect to the accuracy reached for the electronic energy and for selected molecular properties on a balanced test molecule set that comprises molecules with heavy elements in different bonding situations. Our atomic (local) assembly of the unitary exact-decoupling transformation--called local approximation to the unitary decoupling transformation (DLU)--provides an excellent local approximation for any relativistic exact-decoupling approach. Its order-N(2) scaling can be further reduced to linear scaling by employing a neighboring-atomic-blocks approximation. Therefore, DLU is an efficient relativistic method well suited for relativistic calculations on large molecules. If a large molecule contains many light atoms (typically hydrogen atoms), the computational costs can be further reduced by employing a well-defined nonrelativistic approximation for these light atoms without significant loss of accuracy. We also demonstrate that the standard and straightforward transformation of only the atomic block-diagonal entries in the Hamiltonian--denoted diagonal local approximation to the Hamiltonian (DLH) in this paper--introduces an error that is on the order of the error of second-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (i.e., DKH2) when compared with exact-decoupling results. Hence, the local DLH approximation would be pointless in an exact-decoupling framework, but can be efficiently employed in combination with the fast to evaluate DKH2 Hamiltonian in order to speed up calculations

  2. Relativistic Energy Density Functionals: Exotic modes of excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Vretenar, D.; Paar, N.; Marketin, T.

    2008-11-11

    The framework of relativistic energy density functionals has been applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of {beta}-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure have been investigated with the relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We present results for the evolution of low-lying dipole (pygmy) strength in neutron-rich nuclei, and charged-current neutrino-nucleus cross sections.

  3. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Wolfram

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), shown in Fig. 1, was build to study the interactions of quarks and gluons at high energies [Harrison, Ludlam and Ozaki (2003)]. The theory of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) describes these interactions. One of the main goals for the RHIC experiments was the creation and study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), which was expected to be formed after the collision of heavy ions at a temperature of approximately 2 trillion kelvin (or equivalently an energy of 150 MeV). The QGP is the substance which existed only a few microseconds after the Big Bang. The QGP was anticipated to be weakly interacting like a gas but turned out to be strongly interacting and more like a liquid. Among its unusual properties is its extremely low viscosity [Auerbach and Schlomo (2009)], which makes the QGP the substance closest to a perfect liquid known to date. The QGP is opaque to moderate energy quarks and gluons leading to a phenomenon called jet quenching, where of a jet and its recoil jet only one is observable and the other suppressed after traversing and interacting with the QGP [Jacak and Müller (2012)]...

  4. Trying to Learn Lessons for Response to Extreme Events: Paradigm Shifts Affecting Civil Defense in the Trinational Region of Southwestern Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, G. L. P.

    2015-12-01

    The last ten years have seen several extreme climate events in southwestern Amazonia with historic impacts. The City of Rio Branco, Capital of Acre, Brazil´s westernmost State, suffered its seventh consecutive annual flooding and its worst in March 2015. The city of Tarauacá, also in Acre, registered 12 flooding events between November 2014 and April 2015. The most recent flood of the trinational Acre River in 2015 set historic records for flood stage and number of displaced persons in Cobija, the Capital of Pando, Bolivia. From February to April 2014, floods of the Madeira River disrupted the one highway between Acre and southern Brazil. Puerto Maldonado, the capital in Madre de Dios Region of Peru had its worst flood in 50 years during 2014. In 2005 and 2010, prolonged droughts combined with ignition sources resulted in tens to hundreds of thousands of hectares of fire-damaged rainforests in the Madre de Dios, Acre and Pando (MAP) Region. The Civil Defenses in these three contiguous political units faced several abrupt paradigm shifts that affected their responses: 1) The drought of 2005 showed dramatically that regional rainforests do burn; 2) The recent flooding history, particularly in 2012 and 2015, demolished the cultural icon of a nine-year recurrence interval; 3) What happens outside your territory can be devastating. The Madeira River flood impeded an estimated 200 million dollars from circulating in Acre; 4) The past can be a terrible guide. For Cobija and Rio Branco, the 2015 flood was on the order of a meter higher than any other. Many home dwellers did not evacuate in time because they used past floods as a guide; 5) A collapse in communication - cell phones, land lines, and Internet - can get worse. In 2012, such a collapse occurred in two border towns for 5 days, yet in 2015 it lasted more than 11 days. Research is needed to address how institutions linked to Civil Defense can shift paradigms in time to be more effective.

  5. Projecting Future Changes in Extreme Weather During the North American Monsoon in the Southwest with High Resolution, Convective-Permitting Regional Atmospheric Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H. I.; Castro, C. L.; Luong, T. M.; Lahmers, T.; Jares, M.; Carrillo, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Most severe weather during the North American monsoon in the Southwest U.S. occurs in association with organized convection, including microbursts, dust storms, flash flooding and lightning. Our objective is to project how monsoon severe weather is changing due to anthropogenic global warming. We first consider a dynamically downscaled reanalysis (35 km grid spacing), generated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model during the period 1948-2010. Individual severe weather events, identified by favorable thermodynamic conditions of instability and precipitable water, are then simulated for short-term, numerical weather prediction-type simulations of 24h at a convective-permitting scale (2 km grid spacing). Changes in the character of severe weather events within this period likely reflect long-term climate change driven by anthropogenic forcing. Next, we apply the identical model simulation and analysis procedures to several dynamically downscaled CMIP3 and CMIP5 models for the period 1950-2100, to assess how monsoon severe weather may change in the future and if these changes correspond with what is already occurring per the downscaled renalaysis and available observational data. The CMIP5 models we are downscaling (HadGEM and MPI-ECHAM6) will be included as part of North American CORDEX. The regional model experimental design for severe weather event projection reasonably accounts for the known operational forecast prerequisites for severe monsoon weather. The convective-permitting simulations show that monsoon convection appears to be reasonably well captured with the use of the dynamically downscaled reanalysis, in comparison to Stage IV precipitation data. The regional model tends to initiate convection too early, though correctly simulates the diurnal maximum in convection in the afternoon and subsequent westward propagation of thunderstorms. Projected changes in extreme event precipitation will be described in relation to the long-term changes in

  6. Investigating NARCCAP Precipitation Extremes via Bivariate Extreme Value Theory (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, G. B.; Cooley, D. S.; Sain, S. R.; Bukovsky, M. S.; Mearns, L. O.

    2013-12-01

    We introduce methodology from statistical extreme value theory to examine the ability of reanalysis-drive regional climate models to simulate past daily precipitation extremes. Going beyond a comparison of summary statistics such as 20-year return values, we study whether the most extreme precipitation events produced by climate model simulations exhibit correspondence to the most extreme events seen in observational records. The extent of this correspondence is formulated via the statistical concept of tail dependence. We examine several case studies of extreme precipitation events simulated by the six models of the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) driven by NCEP reanalysis. It is found that the NARCCAP models generally reproduce daily winter precipitation extremes along the Pacific coast quite well; in contrast, simulation of past daily summer precipitation extremes in a central US region is poor. Some differences in the strength of extremal correspondence are seen in the central region between models which employ spectral nudging and those which do not. We demonstrate how these techniques may be used to draw a link between extreme precipitation events and large-scale atmospheric drivers, as well as to downscale extreme precipitation simulated by a future run of a regional climate model. Specifically, we examine potential future changes in the nature of extreme precipitation along the Pacific coast produced by the pineapple express (PE) phenomenon. A link between extreme precipitation events and a "PE Index" derived from North Pacific sea-surface pressure fields is found. This link is used to study PE-influenced extreme precipitation produced by a future-scenario climate model run.

  7. Point form relativistic quantum mechanics and relativistic SU(6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klink, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    The point form is used as a framework for formulating a relativistic quantum mechanics, with the mass operator carrying the interactions of underlying constituents. A symplectic Lie algebra of mass operators is introduced from which a relativistic harmonic oscillator mass operator is formed. Mass splittings within the degenerate harmonic oscillator levels arise from relativistically invariant spin-spin, spin-orbit, and tensor mass operators. Internal flavor (and color) symmetries are introduced which make it possible to formulate a relativistic SU(6) model of baryons (and mesons). Careful attention is paid to the permutation symmetry properties of the hadronic wave functions, which are written as polynomials in Bargmann spaces.

  8. Relativistic kinetic theory of magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, Alexei; Nicolini, Piero; Tessarotto, Massimo

    2005-05-16

    Recently, an increasing interest in astrophysical as well as laboratory plasmas has been manifested in reference to the existence of relativistic flows, related in turn to the production of intense electric fields in magnetized systems. Such phenomena require their description in the framework of a consistent relativistic kinetic theory, rather than on relativistic MHD equations, subject to specific closure conditions. The purpose of this work is to apply the relativistic single-particle guiding-center theory developed by Beklemishev and Tessarotto, including the nonlinear treatment of small-wavelength EM perturbations which may naturally arise in such systems. As a result, a closed set of relativistic gyrokinetic equations, consisting of the collisionless relativistic kinetic equation, expressed in hybrid gyrokinetic variables, and the averaged Maxwell's equations, is derived for an arbitrary four-dimensional coordinate system.

  9. Spatial-temporal analysis and projection of extreme particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) levels using association rules: A case study of the Jing-Jin-Ji region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shanshan; Liu, Feng; Wang, Chen; Song, Yiliao; Qu, Jiansheng

    2015-11-01

    The Jing-Jin-Ji region of Northern China has experienced serious extreme PM concentrations, which could exert considerable negative impacts on human health. However, only small studies have focused on extreme PM concentrations. Therefore, joint regional PM research and air pollution control has become an urgent issue in this region. To characterize PM pollution, PM10 and PM2.5 hourly samples were collected from 13 cities in Jing-Jin-Ji region for one year. This study initially analyzed extreme PM data using the Apriori algorithm to mine quantitative association rules in PM spatial and temporal variations and intercity influences. The results indicate that 1) the association rules of intercity PM are distinctive, and do not completely rely on their spatial distributions; 2) extreme PM concentrations frequently occur in southern cities, presenting stronger spatial and temporal associations than in northern cities; 3) the strength of the spatial and temporal associations of intercity PM2.5 are more substantial than those of intercity PM10.

  10. Crystallization and collapse in relativistically degenerate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2013-04-15

    In this paper, it is shown that a mass density limit exists beyond which the relativistically degenerate matter would crystallize. The mass density limit, found here, is quite analogous to the mass limit predicted by Chandrasekhar for a type of compact stars called white dwarfs (M{sub Ch} Asymptotically-Equal-To 1.43 Solar Mass). In this study, the old problem of white dwarf core collapse, which has been previously investigated by Chandrasekhar using hydrostatic stability criteria, is revisited in the framework of the quantum hydrodynamics model by inspection of the charge screening at atomic scales in the relativistic degeneracy plasma regime taking into account the relativistic Fermi-Dirac statistics and electron interaction features such as the quantum statistical pressure, Coulomb attraction, electron exchange-correlation, and quantum recoil effects. It is revealed that the existence of ion correlation and crystallization of matter in the relativistically degenerate plasma puts a critical mass density limit on white dwarf core region. It is shown that a white dwarf star with a core mass density beyond this critical limit can undergo the spontaneous core collapse (SCC). The SCC phenomenon, which is dominantly caused by the electron quantum recoil effect (interference and localization of the electron wave function), leads to a new exotic state of matter. In such exotic state, the relativistic electron degeneracy can lead the white dwarf crystallized core to undergo the nuclear fusion and an ultimate supernova by means of the volume reduction (due to the enhanced compressibility) and huge energy release (due to the increase in cohesive energy), under the stars huge inward gravitational pressure. Moreover, it is found that the SCC phenomenon is significantly affected by the core composition (it is more probable for heavier plasmas). The critical mass density found here is consistent with the values calculated for core density of typical white dwarf stars.

  11. Theoretical Modelling of the Diffuse Emission of (gamma)-rays From Extreme Regions of Star Formation: The Case of Arp 220

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, D F

    2004-07-09

    Our current understanding of ultraluminous infrared galaxies suggest that they are recent galaxy mergers in which much of the gas in the former spiral disks, particularly that located at distances less than 5 kpc from each of the pre-merger nuclei, has fallen into a common center, triggering a huge starburst phenomenon. This large nuclear concentration of molecular gas has been detected by many groups, and estimates of molecular mass and density have been made. Not surprisingly, these estimates were found to be orders of magnitude larger than the corresponding values found in our Galaxy. In this paper, a self-consistent model of the high energy emission of the super-starburst galaxy Arp 220 is presented. The model also provides an estimate of the radio emission from each of the components of the central region of the galaxy (western and eastern extreme starbursts, and molecular disk). The predicted radio spectrum is found as a result of the synchrotron and free-free emission, and absorption, of the primary and secondary steady population of electrons and positrons. The latter is output of charged pion decay and knock-on leptonic production, subject to a full set of losses in the interstellar medium. The resulting radio spectrum is in agreement with sub-arcsec radio observations, what allows to estimate the magnetic field. In addition, the FIR emission is modeled with dust emissivity, and the computed FIR photon density is used as a target for inverse Compton process as well as to give account of losses in the {gamma}-ray scape. Bremsstrahlung emission and neutral pion decay are also computed, and the {gamma}-ray spectrum is finally predicted. Future possible observations with GLAST, and the ground based Cherenkov telescopes are discussed.

  12. Relativistic klystron afterburner simulation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Jong, R.A.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    1990-01-24

    We are developing computer codes for the numerical simulations of relativistic klystrons and relativistic klystron afterburners''. The purpose of this note is to discuss the main features of our numerical model. A relativistic klystron afterburner'' is a scheme to extract power from a spent FEL electron beam. Power is extracted from the beam by passing it through klystron output cavities. To study the feasibility of this concept, we are developing computer codes for the numerical simulation of relativistic klystrons and afterburners. The purpose of this note is to discuss the main features of our numerical model.

  13. Relativistic interactions and realistic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hoch, T.; Madland, D.; Manakos, P.; Mannel, T.; Nikolaus, B.A.; Strottman, D. |

    1992-12-31

    A four-fermion-coupling Lagrangian (relativistic Skyrme-type) interaction has been proposed for relativistic nuclear structure calculations. This interaction, which has the merit of simplicity, is from the outset tailored as an effective interaction for relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations. Various extensions of such a model are discussed and compared with Walecka`s meson-nucleon mean field approach. We also present results of the calculation of nuclear ground state properties with an extended (density dependent) version of the four fermion interaction in a relativistic Hartree-Fock approximation.

  14. New photon science and extreme field physics: volumetric interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with over-dense targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hegelich, Bjorn M

    2010-11-24

    The constantly improving capabilities of ultra-high power lasers are enabling interactions of matter with ever extremer fields. As both the on target intensity and the laser contrast are increasing, new physics regimes are becoming accessible and new effects materialize, which in turn enable a host of applications. A first example is the realization of interactions in the transparent-overdense regime (TOR), which is reached by interacting a highly relativistic (a{sub 0} > 10), ultra high contrast laser pulse with a solid density, nanometer target. Here, a still overdense target is turned transparent to the laser by the relativistic mass increase of the electrons, increasing the skin depth beyond the target thickness and thus enabling volumetric interaction of the laser with the entire target instead of only a small interaction region at the critical density surface. This increases the energy coupling, enabling a range of effects, including relativistic optics and pulse shaping, mono-energetic electron acceleration, highly efficient ion acceleration in the break-out afterburner regime, the generation of relativistic and forward directed surface harmonics. In this talk we will show the theoretical framework for this regime, explored by multi-D, high resolution and high density PIC simulations as well as analytic theory and present measurements and experimental demonstrations of direct relativistic optics, relativistic HHG, electron acceleration, and BOA ion acceleration in the transparent overdense regime. These effects can in turn be used in a host of applications including laser pulse shaping, ICF diagnostics, coherent x-ray sources, and ion sources for fast ignition (IFI), homeland security applications and medical therapy. This host of applications already makes transparent-overdense regime one of general interest, a situation reinforced by the fact that the TOR target undergoes an extremely wide HEDP parameter space during interaction ranging from WDM conditions

  15. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy measurements in the extreme ultraviolet region of central carbon concentrations during high power neutral beam heating in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B.C.; Fonck, R.J.; Ramsey, A.T.; Synakowski, E.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.; Taylor, G.; Valanju, P.M. . Plasma Physics Lab.; Texas Univ., Austin, TX . Fusion Research Center)

    1989-09-01

    The carbon concentration in the central region of TFTR discharges with high power neutral beam heating has been measured by charge-extracted recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) of the C{sup +5} n = 3--4 transition in the extreme ultraviolet region. The carbon concentrations were deduced from absolute measurements of the line brightness using a calculation of the beam attenuation and the appropriate cascade-corrected line excitation rates. As a result of the high ion temperatures in most of the discharges, the contribution of beam halo neutrals to the line brightness was significant and therefore had to be included in the modeling of the data. Carbon concentrations have been measured in discharges with I{sub p} = 1.0-1.6 MA and beam power in the range of 2.6-30 MW, including a number of supershots. The results are in good agreement with carbon concentrations deduced from the visible bremsstrahlung Z{sub eff} and metallic impurity concentrations measured by x-ray pulse-height analysis, demonstrating the reliability of the atomic rates used in the beam attenuation and line excitation calculations. Carbon is the dominant impurity species in these discharges; the oxygen concentration measured via CXRS in a high beam power case was 0.0006 of n{sub e}, compard to 0.04 for carbon. Trends with I{sub p} and beam power in the carbon concentration and the inferred deuteron concentration are presented. The carbon concentration is independent of I{sub p} and decreases from 0.13 at 2.6 MW beam power to 0.04 at 30 MW, while the deuteron concentration increases from 0.25 to 0.75 over the same range of beam power. These changes are primarily the result of beam particle fueling, as the carbon density did not vary significantly with beam power. The time evolutions of the carbon and deuteron concentrations during two high power beam pulses, one which exhibited a carbon bloom and one which did not, are compared. 30 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Linear and circular polarization in ultra-relativistic synchrotron sources - implications to GRB afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, Lara; Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-01-01

    Polarization measurements from relativistic outflows are a valuable tool to probe the geometry of the emission region and the microphysics of the particle distribution. Indeed, the polarization level depends on (i) the local magnetic field orientation, (ii) the geometry of the emitting region with respect to the line of sight and (iii) the electron pitch angle distribution. Here we consider optically thin synchrotron emission and we extend the theory of circular polarization from a point source to an extended radially expanding relativistic jet. We present numerical estimates for both linear and circular polarization in such systems. We consider different configurations of the magnetic field, spherical and jetted outflows, isotropic and anisotropic pitch angle distributions, and outline the difficulty in obtaining the reported high level of circular polarization observed in the afterglow of Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) 121024A. We conclude that the origin of the observed polarization cannot be intrinsic to an optically thin synchrotron process, even when the electron pitch angle distribution is extremely anisotropic.

  17. Extreme Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, Jeff; Larsen, Jon

    2013-11-01

    Acknowledgements; 1. Extreme environments: what, where, how; 2. Properties of dense and classical plasmas; 3. Laser energy absorption in matter; 4. Hydrodynamic motion; 5. Shocks; 6. Equation of state; 7. Ionization; 8. Thermal energy transport; 9. Radiation energy transport; 10. Magnetohydrodynamics; 11. Considerations for constructing radiation-hydrodynamics computer codes; 12. Numerical simulations; Appendix: units and constants, glossary of symbols; References; Bibliography; Index.

  18. Relativistic hadrons and the origin of relativistic outflows in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Contopoulos, John; Kazanas, D.

    1995-01-01

    We examine the hydrodynamic origin of relativistic outflows in active galactic nuclei (AGN). Specifically, we propose that the presence of a population of relativistic hadrons in the AGN 'central engine' and the associated neutron production suffices to produce outflows which under rather general conditions could be relativistic. The main such condition is that the size of the neutron production region be larger than the neutron flight path tau(sub n) approximately 3 x 10(exp 13) cm. This condition guarantees that the mean energy per particle in the proton fluid, resulting from the decay of the neutrons outside their production region, be greater than the proton rest mass. The expansion of this fluid can then lead naturally to a relativistic outflow by conversion of its internal energy to directed motion. We follow the development of such flows by solving the mass, energy as well as the kinetic equation for the proton gas in steady state, taking into account the source terms due to compute accurately the adiabatic index of the expanding gas, and in conjunction with Bernoulli's equation the detailed evolution of the bulk Lorentz factor. We further examine the role of large-scale magnetic fields in confining these outflows to produce the jets observed at larger scales.

  19. Relativistic models for Gaia at the (cross)check-point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertone, S.; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Crosta, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Minazzoli, O.; Angonin, M.-C.

    2013-11-01

    Given the extreme accuracy of modern space astrometry, a precise relativistic modeling of observations is required. Concerning light propagation, most approaches rely on the solution of the null-geodesic equations. However, another approach based on the Time Transfer Functions (TTF) can be used to define an astrometric observation using an integral-based method derived from the Synge World Function. The availability of several models, formulated in different and independent ways, is indeed a security against the presence of systematic errors in the analysis of future experimental results. It is the case of the forthcoming Gaia mission. In this work, we review the modeling of a Gaia-like astrometric observation using the TTF and two other approaches, namely the Gaia RElativistic Model (GREM) and the Relativistic Astrometric MODel (RAMOD), and we provide explicit relations between their characteristic quantities.

  20. Relativistic Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosler, Dominic

    In this Ph.D. thesis, I investigate the communication abilities of non-inertial observers and the precision to which they can measure parametrized states. I introduce relativistic quantum field theory with field quantisation, and the definition and transformations of mode functions in Minkowski, Schwarzschild and Rindler spaces. I introduce information theory by discussing the nature of information, defining the entropic information measures, and highlighting the differences between classical and quantum information. I review the field of relativistic quantum information. We investigate the communication abilities of an inertial observer to a relativistic observer hovering above a Schwarzschild black hole, using the Rindler approximation. We compare both classical communication and quantum entanglement generation of the state merging protocol, for both the single and dual rail encodings. We find that while classical communication remains finite right up to the horizon, the quantum entanglement generation tends to zero. We investigate the observers' abilities to precisely measure the parameter of a state that is communicated between Alice and Rob. This parameter was encoded to either the amplitudes of a single excitation state or the phase of a NOON state. With NOON states the dual rail encoding provided greater precision, which is different to the results for the other situations. The precision was maximum for a particular number of excitations in the NOON state. We calculated the bipartite communication for Alice-Rob and Alice-AntiRob beyond the single mode approximation. Rob and AntiRob are causally disconnected counter-accelerating observers. We found that Alice must choose in advance with whom, Rob or AntiRob she wants to create entanglement using a particular setup. She could communicate classically to both.

  1. Frequency agile relativistic magnetrons

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.S.; Harteneck, B.D.; Price, H.D.

    1995-11-01

    The authors are developing a family of frequency agile relativistic magnetrons to continuously cover the bands from 1 to 3 GHz. They have achieved tuning ranges of > 33%. The magnetrons have been operated repetitively in burst mode at rates up to 100 pps for 10 sec. Power is extracted from two resonators, and is in the range of 400--600 MW, fairly flat across the tuning bandwidth. They are using a network of phase shifters and 3-dB hybrids to combine the power into a single arm and to provide a continuously adjustable attenuator.

  2. Republication of: Relativistic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, H. P.

    2012-08-01

    This is a reprinting of the paper by Howard Percy Robertson, first published in 1933 in Rev. Mod. Phys., that is a very authoritative summary of relativistic cosmology at the stage at which it was up to 1933. The paper has been selected by the Editors of General Relativity and Gravitation for re-publication in the Golden Oldies series of the journal. This republication is accompanied by an editorial note written by George Ellis, and by Robertson's biography, compiled by Andrzej Krasinski from printed sources.

  3. Newtonian and relativistic cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Stephen R.; Wald, Robert M.

    2012-03-01

    Cosmological N-body simulations are now being performed using Newtonian gravity on scales larger than the Hubble radius. It is well known that a uniformly expanding, homogeneous ball of dust in Newtonian gravity satisfies the same equations as arise in relativistic Friedmann-Lemaître-Robinson-Walker cosmology, and it also is known that a correspondence between Newtonian and relativistic dust cosmologies continues to hold in linearized perturbation theory in the marginally bound/spatially flat case. Nevertheless, it is far from obvious that Newtonian gravity can provide a good global description of an inhomogeneous cosmology when there is significant nonlinear dynamical behavior at small scales. We investigate this issue in the light of a perturbative framework that we have recently developed [S. R. Green and R. M. Wald, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 83, 084020 (2011).10.1103/PhysRevD.83.084020], which allows for such nonlinearity at small scales. We propose a relatively straightforward dictionary—which is exact at the linearized level—that maps Newtonian dust cosmologies into general relativistic dust cosmologies, and we use our “ordering scheme” to determine the degree to which the resulting metric and matter distribution solve Einstein’s equation. We find that, within our ordering scheme, Einstein’s equation fails to hold at “order 1” at small scales and at “order ɛ” at large scales. We then find the additional corrections to the metric and matter distribution needed to satisfy Einstein’s equation to these orders. While these corrections are of some interest in their own right, our main purpose in calculating them is that their smallness should provide a criterion for the validity of the original dictionary (as well as simplified versions of this dictionary). We expect that, in realistic Newtonian cosmologies, these additional corrections will be very small; if so, this should provide strong justification for the use of Newtonian simulations

  4. Relativistic nuclear collisions: theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.

    1980-07-01

    Some of the recent theoretical developments in relativistic (0.5 to 2.0-GeV/nucleon) nuclear collisions are reviewed. The statistical model, hydrodynamic model, classical equation of motion calculations, billiard ball dynamics, and intranuclear cascade models are discussed in detail. Inclusive proton and pion spectra are analyzed for a variety of reactions. Particular attention is focused on how the complex interplay of the basic reaction mechanism hinders attempts to deduce the nuclear matter equation of state from data. 102 references, 19 figures.

  5. Ultrabaric relativistic superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papini, G.; Weiss, M.

    1985-09-01

    Ultrabaric superfluid solutions are obtained for Einstein's equations to examine the possibility of the existence of superluminal sound speeds. The discussion is restricted only by requiring the energy-momentum tensor and the equation of state of matter to be represented by full relativistic equations. Only a few universes are known to satisfy the conditions, and those exhibit tension and are inflationary. Superluminal sound velocities are shown, therefore, to be possible for the interior Schwarzchild metric, which has been used to explain the red shift of quasars, and the Stephiani solution (1967). The latter indicates repeated transitions between superluminal and subliminal sound velocities in the hyperbaric superfluid of the early universe.

  6. Modeling relativistic nuclear collisions.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderlik, C.; Magas, V.; Strottman, D.; Csernai, L. P.

    2001-01-01

    Modeling Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisioiis at RHIC and LHC energies using a Multi Module Model is presented. The first Module is the Effective String Rope Model for the calculation of the initial stages of the reaction; the output of this module is used as the initial state for the subsequent one-fluid hydrodynainical calculation module. It is shown that such an initial state leads to the creation of the third flow component. The hydrodynamical evolution of the energy density distribution is presented for RHIC energies. The final module describing the Freeze Out; and Hadronization is also discussed.

  7. Relativistic particle acceleration in plerions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arons, Jonathan; Tavani, Marco

    1994-01-01

    We discuss recent research on the structure and particle acceleration properties of relativistic shock waves in which the magnetic field is transverse to the flow direction in the upstream medium, and whose composition is either pure electrons and positrons or primarily electrons and positrons with an admixture of heavy ions. Particle-in-cell simulation techniques as well as analytic theory have been used to show that such shocks in pure pair plasmas are fully thermalized -- the downstream particle spectra are relativistic Maxwellians at the temperature expected from the jump conditions. On the other hand, shocks containing heavy ions which are a minority constituent by number but which carry most of the energy density in the upstream medium do put approximately 20% of the flow energy into a nonthermal population of pairs downstream, whose distribution in energy space is N(E) varies as E(exp -2), where N(E)dE is the number of particles with energy between E and E+dE. The mechanism of thermalization and particle acceleration is found to be synchrotron maser activity in the shock front, stimulated by the quasi-coherent gyration of the whole particle population as the plasma flowing into the shock reflects from the magnetic field in the shock front. The synchrotron maser modes radiated by the heavy ions are absorbed by the pairs at their (relativistic) cyclotron frequencies, allowing the maximum energy achievable by the pairs to be gamma(sub +/-)m(sub +/-)c squared = m(sub i)c squared gamma(sub 1)/Z(sub i), where gamma(sub 1) is the Lorentz factor of the upstream flow and Z(sub i) is the atomic number of the ions. The shock's spatial structure is shown to contain a series of 'overshoots' in the magnetic field, regions where the gyrating heavy ions compress the magnetic field to levels in excess of the eventual downstream value. This shock model is applied to an interpretation of the structure of the inner regions of the Crab Nebula, in particular to the 'wisps

  8. Relativistic electrons and whistlers in Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1976-01-01

    The path-integrated gain of parallel propagating whistlers driven unstable by an anisotropic distribution of relativistic electrons in the stable trapping region of Jupiter's inner magnetosphere was computed. The requirement that a gain of 3 e-foldings of power balance the power lost by imperfect reflection along the flux tube sets a stably-trapped flux of electrons which is close to the non-relativistic result. Comparison with measurements shows that observed fluxes are near the stably-trapped limit, which suggests that whistler wave intensities may be high enough to cause significant diffusion of electrons accounting for the observed reduction of phase space densities. A crude estimate of the wave intensity necessary to diffuse electrons on a radial diffusion time scale yields a lower limit for the magnetic field fluctuation intensity.

  9. General Relativistic and Newtonian White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boshkayev, K.; Rueda, J. A.; Ruffini, R.; Siutsou, I.

    2015-01-01

    The properties of uniformly rotating white dwarfs (RWDs) are analyzed within the framework of Newton's gravity and general relativity. In both cases Hartle's formalism is applied to construct the internal and external solutions to the field equations. The white dwarf (WD) matter is described by the Chandrasekhar equation of state. The region of stability of RWDs is constructed taking into account the mass-shedding limit, inverse β-decay instability, and the boundary established by the turning points of constant angular momentum J sequences which separates stable from secularly unstable configurations. We found the minimum rotation period ˜ 0.28 s in both cases and maximum rotating masses ˜ 1.534M⊙ and ˜ 1.516M⊙ for the Newtonian and general relativistic WDs, respectively. By using the turning point method we show that general relativistic WDs can indeed be axisymmetrically unstable whereas the Newtonian WDs are stable.

  10. Relativistic thermal plasmas - Pair processes and equilibria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightman, A. P.

    1982-01-01

    The work of Bisnovatyi-Kogan, Zel'dovich and Sunyaev (1971) is extended and generalized, through the inclusion of pair-producing photon processes and effects due to the finite size of the plasma, in an investigation of the equilibria of relativistic thermal plasmas which takes into account electron-positron creation and annihilation and photons produced within the plasma. It is shown that the bridge between an effectively thin plasma and an effectively thick plasma occurs in the transrelativistic region, where the dimensionless temperature value is between 0.1 and 1.0 and the temperature remains in this region over a great luminosity range.

  11. A Simple Relativistic Bohr Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzis, Andreas F.

    2008-01-01

    A simple concise relativistic modification of the standard Bohr model for hydrogen-like atoms with circular orbits is presented. As the derivation requires basic knowledge of classical and relativistic mechanics, it can be taught in standard courses in modern physics and introductory quantum mechanics. In addition, it can be shown in a class that…

  12. Nonlinear optics in relativistic plasmas.

    PubMed

    Umstadter, D; Chen, S Y; Wagner, R; Maksimchuk, A; Sarkisov, G

    1998-03-30

    We review our recent work on the various nonlinear optical processes that occur as an intense laser propagates through a relativistic plasma. These include the experimental observations of electron acceleration driven by laser-wakefield generation, relativistic self-focusing, waveguide formation and laser self-channeling. PMID:19377614

  13. relline: Relativistic line profiles calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauser, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    relline calculates relativistic line profiles; it is compatible with the common X-ray data analysis software XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) and ISIS (ascl:1302.002). The two basic forms are an additive line model (RELLINE) and a convolution model to calculate relativistic smearing (RELCONV).

  14. Workshop on Extreme Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundell, Carole; Sullivan, Mark

    2012-04-01

    abstract-type="normal">SummaryNever before has there been such a wealth of versatile ground- and space-based facilities with which to detect variable emission across the electromagnetic spectrum and beyond, to non-EM signals such as neutrinos and gravitational waves, to probe the most extreme phenomena in the Universe. The variable sky is already providing a wealth of new and surprising observations of phenomena such as GRBs, SNe and AGN that are pushing current theories beyond the state of the art. Multi-messenger follow-up will soon become de rigeur, and upcoming radio and optical all-sky transient surveys will revolutionise the study of the transient Universe. In addition to the technical and data challenges presented by such surveys, a major new challenge will be the interpretation of the wealth of available data and the identification of the underlying physics of new classes of variable (and potentially exotic) objects. Theoretical predictions will be vital for interpreting these future transient discoveries. The goal of this workshop was to bring together theorists and observers in order to identify unexplored synergies across three main research areas of extreme physics: gamma-ray bursts, supernovæ and, more generically, relativistic jets. It aimed to discuss key outstanding questions in these rapidly moving fields, such as the composition and acceleration of GRB and AGN jets, GRB progenitors and central engines, the origin of the wide range of observed variability time-scales in GRB prompt and after-glow light curves and related cosmological applications, the physics of the newly-discovered ultra-luminous SN-like optical transients-as well as to speculate on what we might hope to discover with future technology. The workshop absorbed two 90-minute sessions, selecting 3 main science topics (Relativistic Jets, GRBs and SNe) which it organised as structured discussions driven by a series of short but provocative questions. The final session featured a panel

  15. A relativistic trolley paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvejev, Vadim N.; Matvejev, Oleg V.; Grøn, Ø.

    2016-06-01

    We present an apparent paradox within the special theory of relativity, involving a trolley with relativistic velocity and its rolling wheels. Two solutions are given, both making clear the physical reality of the Lorentz contraction, and that the distance on the rails between each time a specific point on the rim touches the rail is not equal to 2 π R , where R is the radius of the wheel, but 2 π R / √{ 1 - R 2 Ω 2 / c 2 } , where Ω is the angular velocity of the wheels. In one solution, the wheel radius is constant as the velocity of the trolley increases, and in the other the wheels contract in the radial direction. We also explain two surprising facts. First that the shape of a rolling wheel is elliptical in spite of the fact that the upper part of the wheel moves faster than the lower part, and thus is more Lorentz contracted, and second that a Lorentz contracted wheel with relativistic velocity rolls out a larger distance between two successive touches of a point of the wheel on the rails than the length of a circle with the same radius as the wheels.

  16. Relativistic harmonic oscillator revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Bars, Itzhak

    2009-02-15

    The familiar Fock space commonly used to describe the relativistic harmonic oscillator, for example, as part of string theory, is insufficient to describe all the states of the relativistic oscillator. We find that there are three different vacua leading to three disconnected Fock sectors, all constructed with the same creation-annihilation operators. These have different spacetime geometric properties as well as different algebraic symmetry properties or different quantum numbers. Two of these Fock spaces include negative norm ghosts (as in string theory), while the third one is completely free of ghosts. We discuss a gauge symmetry in a worldline theory approach that supplies appropriate constraints to remove all the ghosts from all Fock sectors of the single oscillator. The resulting ghost-free quantum spectrum in d+1 dimensions is then classified in unitary representations of the Lorentz group SO(d,1). Moreover, all states of the single oscillator put together make up a single infinite dimensional unitary representation of a hidden global symmetry SU(d,1), whose Casimir eigenvalues are computed. Possible applications of these new results in string theory and other areas of physics and mathematics are briefly mentioned.

  17. Relativistic Continuum Shell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grineviciute, Janina; Halderson, Dean

    2011-04-01

    The R-matrix formalism of Lane and Thomas has been extended to the relativistic case so that the many-coupled channels problem may be solved for systems in which binary breakup channels satisfy a relative Dirac equation. The formalism was previously applied to the relativistic impulse approximation RIA and now we applied it to Quantum Hadrodynamics QHD in the continuum Tamm-Dancoff approximation TDA with the classical meson fields replaced by one-meson exchange potentials. None of the published QHD parameters provide a decent fit to the 15 N + p elastic cross section. The deficiency is also evident in inability of the QHD parameters with the one meson exchange potentials to reproduce the QHD single particle energies. Results with alternate parameters sets are presented. A. M. Lane and R. G. Thomas, R-Matrix Theory of Nuclear Reactions, Reviews of Modern Physics, 30 (1958) 257

  18. Relativistic Electron Acceleration and Loss During Small Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, B.; Millan, R. M.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H. W.

    2014-12-01

    Relativistic electron precipitation events were detected by early BARREL (Balloon Array for Radiation-belt Relativistic Electron Losses) payloads during small geomagnetic storms (minimum DST greater than -50nT), coincident with significant enhancement of relativistic electron fluxes at geosynchronous as measured by GOES. Such small geomagnetic storms have not been studied as in depth as larger storms, even though they are capable of pumping-up or depleting the radiation belts equally as extremely as their larger counterparts, this study finds. Since much of the past few years has been quiet, it is necessary to extend previous studies to include smaller storms. We perform a statistical analysis of relativistic electron flux response at geosynchronous to small geomagnetic storms over an 11 year period (1989-2000) using LANL satellite data, similar to previous studies of larger geomagnetic storms. We investigate changes in relativistic electron flux response with various solar wind parameters, as well as extend the statistical analysis of small and large geomagnetic storms with data sets now available from the Van Allen Probes.

  19. Definition of an Abrupt Transition Between Regions of Abundant and Extremely Low Magma Supplies Along the Mid-Atlantic Between 14o and 16oN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, J. F.; Fujiwara, T.

    2001-12-01

    Detailed multibeam, gravity, and magnetics studies, as well as abundant submersible and dredge sampling studies, conducted during multiple cruises over the last 13 years in the region of 14-16°N along the Mid-Atlantic have produced a remarkably complete picture of an abrupt and striking along-axis transition. The transition is from lithosphere and crust formed in a magma-starved setting to the north of ~14o20'N to lithosphere and crust formed where the magma budget was high in the south. The abrupt transition is manifest by abundant serpentinized mantle and plutonic outcrops on both sides of the rift valley to the north of 14o30' N and largely basaltic outcrops to the south of 14o30'N. In addition, morphotectonic studies indicates regularly spaced and linear N-S high-angle normal faults directly south of 14o30"N, but non-linear, highly irregularly spaced major fault line scarps and large expanses of low-angle fault surfaces exposed immediately to the north of 14o30'N. This is coupled with the formation of multiple and obvious seafloor core complexes exposing ultramafic and gabbroic rocks to the north. Core complexes are observed on both off-axis ridge flanks, even at the same latitude, suggesting flips in the polarity of low-angle detachments and a lack of strict adherence to the inside-outside corner pattern observed elsewhere for predicting polarity of detachment faulting. Detailed seafloor fabric studies also show that an E-W fabric trend exists in the north reflecting abundant linear E-W corrugations on the seafloor that abruptly disappear to the south of 14o30'N. This is consistent with a change from abundant long-lived low-angle detachment faulting and exposure of these fault surfaces to the north and a shorter offset high-angle faults to the south. A steep MBA and basalt geochemical gradient exists across the 14o30' transition and both indicate significantly thicker crust to the south. A change from regular magnetic anomalies to the south to disrupted

  20. Relativistic theory for radiative forward electron emission in heavy ion-atom encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubaßa-Amundsen, Doris; Müller, Robert; Surzhykov, Andrey; Yerokhin, Vladimir

    2014-12-01

    The forward electron emission with simultaneous photon production during the scattering of relativistic, highly stripped projectiles from light target atoms is calculated within the Dirac theory. The method of calculation is a simplification of the impulse approximation and is based on the relation of the cross section for radiative capture to continuum of loosely bound electrons to the frame-transformed electron bremsstrahlung cross section. It is demonstrated that such an approximation is well justified in a large region of energies and photon emission angles, with the exception of the extreme forward and backward emission and the soft-photon energy limit. The cusp spectrum and the corresponding angular distribution are compared to recent experimental data for the collision system 90.38 MeV/amu U88+ + N2.

  1. The effect of the replacement of forests by agricutural land on mean and extreme temperature in temperate regions from 1850 to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejeune, Quentin; Davin, Edouard; Seneviratne, Sonia

    2015-04-01

    During the industrial period, the extent of forest was reduced in favour of the expansion of agriculture in most temperate regions. This has impacted local climate conditions by modifying the physical properties of the land surface such as albedo and evapotranspiration rate. Previous modelling studies suggest that these historical land-use and land-cover changes (LULCC) have had a cooling effect annually, in some regions of a similar magnitude as the temperature changes driven by increasing greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations, but with large differences in the magnitude and the seasonal pattern of the temperature response among models [1,2]. These studies were however limited to seven GCMs, and the considered simulations were run with global non-coupled models using fixed Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs). Here, our goal is to reassess these findings using a larger number of fully coupled historical simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). We include only CMIP5 models providing at least three ensemble members, in order to take interannual variability into account. These historical simulations were driven by both natural (volcanoes) and anthropogenic forcings (GHG, land-use, aerosols). In order to disentangle the effect of LULCC from that of other forcings, we compared climate changes in neighbouring grid cells in which surface temperature is assumed to respond similarly to GHG and other large-scale forcings, but which differ in terms of land-use forcing. Our analysis confirms that the expansion of agriculture at the expense of forests lead to a local cooling in winter, with nine models out of 11 indicating such a behaviour, and it also suggests that this response was primarily driven by albedo changes. However, the results reveal a higher model disagreement than what was previously found regarding the impact on summer temperature changes, with five models out of 11 showing a warming effect of LULCC, against only one out of seven in

  2. The Southeast Asia Regional Climate Downscaling (SEACLID) / CORDEX Southeast Asia Project and The Results of Its Sensitivity Experiments of RegCM4 Cumulus and Ocean Fluxes Parameterization Schemes on Temperature and Extremes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangang, Fredolin; Juneng, Liew; Cruz, Faye; Narisma, Gemma; Dado, Julie; Van, Tan-Phan; Ngo-Duc, Thanh; Trinh-Tuan, Long; Nguyen-Xuan, Thanh; Santisirisomboon, Jerasorn; Singhruck, Patama; Gunawan, Dodo; Aldrian, Edvin

    2015-04-01

    choice of the ocean scheme can also affect the model's temperature bias, but not as much as the cumulus parameterization. For extremes, 14 indices for both rainfall and temperature were estimated. To measure the degree of similarity of the 18 experiments in both phase and shape, a statistical omega index was used. Results showed relatively higher similarities among the experiments over the mainland Asia compared to those over the Maritime continents for both seasonal and inter-annual variabilities. The extreme rainfall indices had a lower omega than those of temperature. Observed daily rainfall and temperature data at 123 meteorological stations over the SEA region were also used to validate the simulated extreme rainfall and temperature indices. Results showed higher correlations between simulated extremes and the observed ones over the mainland Asia continent compared to those over the Maritime Continent, suggesting an inappropriate quality of the extreme indices simulated by RegCM4 over the later region. Our analysis also pointed out the regions within SEA at which simulated extreme indices were more sensitive to cumulus parameterizations and ocean fluxes treatment. These results thereby highlight the need to choose the appropriate configuration for RegCM4, particularly for the SEA region, before downscaling global climate projections.

  3. Relativistic theory for localized electrostatic excitations in degenerate electron-ion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Mc Kerr, Michael; Haas, Fernando; Kourakis, Ioannis

    2014-09-01

    A self-consistent relativistic two-fluid model is proposed for electron-ion plasma dynamics. A one-dimensional geometry is adopted. Electrons are treated as a relativistically degenerate fluid, governed by an appropriate equation of state. The ion fluid is also allowed to be relativistic, but is cold, nondegenerate, and subject only to an electrostatic potential. Exact stationary-profile solutions are sought, at the ionic scale, via the Sagdeev pseudopotential method. The analysis provides the pulse existence region, in terms of characteristic relativistic parameters, associated with the (ultrahigh) particle density. PMID:25314552

  4. Relativistic positioning systems: Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchades Colmenero, Neus

    The position of users located on the Earth's surface or near it may be found with the classic positioning systems (CPS). Certain information broadcast by satellites of global navigation systems, as GPS and GALILEO, may be used for positioning. The CPS are based on the Newtonian formalism, although relativistic post-Newtonian corrections are done when they are necessary. This thesis contributes to the development of a different positioning approach, which is fully relativistic from the beginning. In the relativistic positioning systems (RPS), the space-time position of any user (ship, spacecraft, and so on) can be calculated with the help of four satellites, which broadcast their proper times by means of codified electromagnetic signals. In this thesis, we have simulated satellite 4-tuples of the GPS and GALILEO constellations. If a user receives the signals from four satellites simultaneously, the emission proper times read -after decoding- are the user "emission coordinates". In order to find the user "positioning coordinates", in an appropriate almost inertial reference system, there are two possibilities: (a) the explicit relation between positioning and emission coordinates (broadcast by the satellites) is analytically found or (b) numerical codes are designed to calculate the positioning coordinates from the emission ones. Method (a) is only viable in simple ideal cases, whereas (b) allows us to consider realistic situations. In this thesis, we have designed numerical codes with the essential aim of studying two appropriate RPS, which may be generalized. Sometimes, there are two real users placed in different positions, which receive the same proper times from the same satellites; then, we say that there is bifurcation, and additional data are needed to choose the real user position. In this thesis, bifurcation is studied in detail. We have analyzed in depth two RPS models; in both, it is considered that the satellites move in the Schwarzschild's space

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Relativistic Figures of Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mars, M.

    2009-08-01

    losing material, and the black hole transition, where rotating fluids are seen to approach black holes for suitable limits of their parameters. As the authors themselves mention, one of the emphasis of this book is placed 'on the rigorous treatment of simple models instead of trying to describe real objects with their many complex facets...'. After discussing constant density models both in Newtonian theory (the Maclaurin spheroids) and in the non-rotating relativistic case (the Schwarzschild interior model), the book concentrates on the so-called rigidly rotating disc of dust. Chapter two is mainly devoted to deriving this model and presenting its physical properties. The derivation is based in the so-called inverse scattering method of integrable systems and on a thorough knowledge of the theory of integration on Riemann surfaces. The details, which take up about one fifth of the whole length, are difficult to follow for any reader without a previous mastering of the techniques involved. For the expert, however, this part of the book is very useful because it brings together all the steps required for the complete determination of the solution. After the derivation of the disc of dust, the physical properties of the resulting one-parameter family of solutions are described, including its multipole moment structure, the existence of ergospheres, the Newtonian limit or the motion of test particles. Of particular interest is the transition from the disc of dust to the extreme black hole configuration corresponding to the limit when the parameter describing the fluid approaches its upper end. After this chapter devoted to exact models, the book looks at the problem from a completely different point of view, namely by using numerical methods. This tool has proven to be fundamental for a proper study of this physical problem. This book concentrates on the so-called pseudo-spectral methods and the use of multidomains adapted to the different regions of the spacetime with

  6. Relativistic astrophysics explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, P.

    2004-01-01

    The great success of the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) has shown that X-ray timing is an excellent tool for the study of strong gravitational fields and the measurement of fundamental physical properties of black holes and neutron stars. Here, we describe a next-generation X-ray timing mission, the Relativistic Astrophysics Explorer (RAE), designed to fit within the envelope of a medium-sized mission. The instruments will be a narrow-field X-ray detector array with an area of 6 m 2 equal to 10 times that of RXTE and a wide-field X-ray monitor. We describe the science made possible with this mission, the design of the instruments, and results on prototype large-area X-ray detectors.

  7. The Relativistic Astrophysics Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, P.

    The great success of the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) has shown that X-ray timing is an excellent tool for the study of strong gravitational fields and the measurement of fundamental physical properties of black holes and neutron stars. Here, we describe a next-generation X-ray timing mission, the Relativistic Astrophysics Explorer (RAE), designed to fit within the envelope of a medium-sized mission. The instruments will be a narrow-field X-ray detector array with an area of 60,000 cm2 equal to ten times that of RXTE and a wide-field X-ray monitor. We describe the science made possible with this mission, the design of the instruments, and results on prototype large-area X-ray detectors.

  8. Relativistic Jets in Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiqun; Woosley, S. E.; MacFadyen, A. I.

    2003-04-01

    We examine the propagation of two-dimensional relativistic jets through the stellar progenitor in the collapsar model for gamma-ray bursts. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the jet is collimated by its passage. Moreover, interaction of the jet with the star causes mixing that sporadically decelerates the jet, leading to a highly variable Lorentz factor. The jet that finally emerges has a moderate Lorentz factor, but a very large internal energy loading. In a second series of calculations we follow the emergence of such enegy-loaded jets from the star. For the initial conditions chosen, conversion of the remaining internal energy gives a terminal Lorentz factor of approximately 150. Implications of our calculations for GRB light curves, the luminosity-variability relation, and the GRB-supernova association are discussed.

  9. Photodetachment of relativistic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, J.B.; Gram, P.A.M.; Hamm, M.E.; Hamm, R.W.; Bryant, H.C.; Butterfield, K.B.; Clark, D.A.; Frost, C.A.; Smith, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    A series of fundamental laser ion beam experiments has been made feasible by the high-quality, relativistic (..beta.. = 0.842) H/sup -/ ion beam available at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The relatavistic Doppler shift of the light from an ordinary ultraviolet laser provides what is, in effect, a continuously tunable vacuum-ultraviolet laser in the rest frame of the moving ions. The Lorentz transformation of a modest laboratory magnetic field provides an electric field of several megavolts/centimeter. The latest results of photo-detachment work with H/sup -/ beams and our spectroscopic work with H/sup 0/ beams are presented. Plans for future work are discussed.

  10. Relativistic quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, S. N.; Nazin, S. S.

    2003-07-01

    The problem of unconditional security of quantum cryptography (i.e. the security which is guaranteed by the fundamental laws of nature rather than by technical limitations) is one of the central points in quantum information theory. We propose a relativistic quantum cryptosystem and prove its unconditional security against any eavesdropping attempts. Relativistitic causality arguments allow to demonstrate the security of the system in a simple way. Since the proposed protocol does not empoly collective measurements and quantum codes, the cryptosystem can be experimentally realized with the present state-of-art in fiber optics technologies. The proposed cryptosystem employs only the individual measurements and classical codes and, in addition, the key distribution problem allows to postpone the choice of the state encoding scheme until after the states are already received instead of choosing it before sending the states into the communication channel (i.e. to employ a sort of "antedate" coding).

  11. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Willen, E.H.

    1986-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a proposed research facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory to study the collision of beams of heavy ions, up to gold in mass and at beam energies up to 100 GeV/nucleon. The physics to be explored by this collider is an overlap between the traditional disciplines of nuclear physics and high energy physics and is a continuation of the planned program of light and heavy ion physics at BNL. The machine is to be constructed in the now-empty tunnel built for the former CBA project. Various other facilities to support the collider are either in place or under construction at BNL. The collider itself, including the magnets, is in an advanced state of design, and a construction start is anticipated in the next several years.

  12. Hydrodynamics of Relativistic Fireballs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piran, Tsvi; Shemi, Amotz; Narayan, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    Many models of gamma-ray bursts involve a fireball, which is an optically thick concentration of radiation energy with a high ratio of energy density to rest mass. We examine analytically and numerically the evolution of a relativistic fireball. We show that, after an early rearrangement phase, most of the matter and energy in the fireball is concentrated within a narrow shell. The shell propagates at nearly the speed of light, with a frozen radial profile, and according to a simple set of scaling laws. The spectrum of the escaping radiation is harder at early times and softer later on. Depending on the initial energy-to-mass ratio, the final outcome of a fireball is either photons with roughly the initial temperature or ultrarelativistic baryons. In the latter case, the energy could be converted back to gamma-rays via interaction with surrounding material.

  13. Extreme Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nott, Jonathan

    2006-04-01

    The assessment of risks posed by natural hazards such as floods, droughts, earthquakes, tsunamis or cyclones, is often based on short-term historical records that may not reflect the full range or magnitude of events possible. As human populations grow, especially in hazard-prone areas, methods for accurately assessing natural hazard risks are becoming increasingly important. In Extreme Events Jonathan Nott describes the many methods used to reconstruct such hazards from natural long-term records. He demonstrates how long-term (multi-century to millennial) records are essential in gaining a realistic understanding of the variability of natural hazards, and how short-term historical records can often misrepresent the likely risks associated with natural hazards. This book will form a useful resource for students taking courses covering natural hazards and risk assessment. It will also be valuable for urban planners, policy makers and non-specialists as a guide to understanding and reconstructing long-term records of natural hazards. Explains mechanisms that cause extreme events and discusses their prehistoric records Describes how to reconstruct long-term records of natural hazards in order to make accurate risk assessments Demonstrates that natural hazards can follow cycles over time and do not occur randomly

  14. Quantum speed limit for a relativistic electron in a uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamizar, D. V.; Duzzioni, E. I.

    2015-10-01

    We analyze the influence of relativistic effects on the minimum evolution time between two orthogonal states of a quantum system. Defining the initial state as a homogeneous superposition between two Hamiltonian eigenstates of an electron in a uniform magnetic field, we obtain a relation between the minimum evolution time and the displacement of the mean radial position of the electron wave packet. The quantum speed limit time is calculated for an electron dynamics described by Dirac and Schrödinger-Pauli equations considering different parameters, such as the strength of magnetic field and the linear momentum of the electron in the axial direction. We highlight that when the electron undergoes a region with extremely strong magnetic field the relativistic and nonrelativistic dynamics differ substantially, so that the description given by the Schrödinger-Pauli equation enables the electron to travel faster than c , which is prohibited by Einstein's theory of relativity. This approach allows a connection between the abstract Hilbert space and the space-time coordinates, besides the identification of the most appropriate quantum dynamics used to describe the electron motion.

  15. Strong electron correlation in UO2(-): a photoelectron spectroscopy and relativistic quantum chemistry study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Li; Su, Jing; Jian, Tian; Lopez, Gary V; Hu, Han-Shi; Cao, Guo-Jin; Li, Jun; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-03-01

    The electronic structures of actinide systems are extremely complicated and pose considerable challenges both experimentally and theoretically because of significant electron correlation and relativistic effects. Here we report an investigation of the electronic structure and chemical bonding of uranium dioxides, UO2(-) and UO2, using photoelectron spectroscopy and relativistic quantum chemistry. The electron affinity of UO2 is measured to be 1.159(20) eV. Intense detachment bands are observed from the UO2(-) low-lying (7sσg)(2)(5fϕu)(1) orbitals and the more deeply bound O2p-based molecular orbitals which are separated by a large energy gap from the U-based orbitals. Surprisingly, numerous weak photodetachment transitions are observed in the gap region due to extensive two-electron transitions, suggesting strong electron correlations among the (7sσg)(2)(5fϕu)(1) electrons in UO2(-) and the (7sσg)(1)(5fϕu)(1) electrons in UO2. These observations are interpreted using multi-reference ab initio calculations with inclusion of spin-orbit coupling. The strong electron correlations and spin-orbit couplings generate orders-of-magnitude more detachment transitions from UO2(-) than expected on the basis of the Koopmans' theorem. The current experimental data on UO2(-) provide a long-sought opportunity to arbitrating various relativistic quantum chemistry methods aimed at handling systems with strong electron correlations. PMID:24606360

  16. Relativistic spin effects in the baryon spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Garcilazo, Humberto

    2005-04-01

    We study the nonstrange baryon spectrum within a three-body theory that treats relativistically both the space and the spin variables. The relativistic effects of the spin are about one order of magnitude smaller than those due to the use of relativistic momentum variables. The relativistic treatment of the spin breaks the degenerancy that is present in the nonrelativistic model and in the model with only relativistic momentum variables.

  17. Relativistic Transformation of Solid Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Rederives the relativistic transformations of light intensity from compact sources (stars) to show where and how the transformation of a solid angle contributes. Discusses astrophysical and other applications of the transformations. (Author/CS)

  18. Simulating relativistic binaries with Whisky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiotti, L.

    We report about our first tests and results in simulating the last phase of the coalescence and the merger of binary relativistic stars. The simulations were performed using our code Whisky and mesh refinement through the Carpet driver.

  19. Conductivity of a relativistic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Braams, B.J.; Karney, C.F.F.

    1989-03-01

    The collision operator for a relativistic plasma is reformulated in terms of an expansion in spherical harmonics. This formulation is used to calculate the electrical conductivity. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Assessment and comparison of extreme sea levels and waves during the 2013/14 storm season in two UK coastal regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadey, M. P.; Brown, J. M.; Haigh, I. D.; Dolphin, T.; Wisse, P.

    2015-10-01

    The extreme sea levels and waves experienced around the UK's coast during the 2013/14 winter caused extensive coastal flooding and damage. Coastal managers seek to place such extremes in relation to the anticipated standards of flood protection, and the long-term recovery of the natural system. In this context, return periods are often used as a form of guidance. This paper provides these levels for the winter storms, and discusses their application to the given data sets for two UK case study sites: Sefton, northwest England, and Suffolk, east England. Tide gauge records and wave buoy data were used to compare the 2013/14 storms with return periods from a national data set, and also joint probabilities of sea level and wave heights were generated, incorporating the recent events. The 2013/14 high waters and waves were extreme due to the number of events, as well as the extremity of the 5 December 2013 "Xaver" storm, which had a high return period at both case study sites. The national-scale impact of this event was due to its coincidence with spring high tide at multiple locations. Given that this event is such an outlier in the joint probability analyses of these observed data sets, and that the season saw several events in close succession, coastal defences appear to have provided a good level of protection. This type of assessment could in the future be recorded alongside defence performance and upgrade. Ideally other variables (e.g. river levels at estuarine locations) would also be included, and with appropriate offsetting for local trends (e.g. mean sea-level rise) so that the storm-driven component of coastal flood events can be determined. This could allow long-term comparison of storm severity, and an assessment of how sea-level rise influences return levels over time, which is important for consideration of coastal resilience in strategic management plans.

  1. Relativistic Mean Field description of exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambhir, Y. K.

    1994-03-01

    The Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) approach which essentially is an extension of the original σ — ω model of Walecka, has been applied to exotic nuclei as an illustration. We consider nuclei near Z = 34 in the very interesting 2p-1f region. The calculated binding energies, root mean square radii, deformations and other observables are very satisfactory and are in accordance with the experiment (where available) and also with the available empirical studies. Large deformations and shape co-existence are obtained for several cases.

  2. Extreme field limits in the interaction of laser light with ultrarelativistic electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Hayashi, Y.; Kando, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Koga, J.; Kondo, K.; Kotaki, H.; Pirozhkov, A.; Bulanov, S. S.; Zhidkov, A.; Chen, P.; Neely, D.; Kato, Y.; Narozhny, N. B.; Korn, G.

    2012-07-11

    The critical electric field of quantum electrodynamics is so strong that it produces electron-positron pairs from vacuum, converting the energy of light into matter. This field has become feasible through the construction of extremely high power lasers or/and with the sophisticated use of nonlinear processes in relativistic plasmas. A feasibility of the experiments on the collision of laser light and high intensity electromagnetic pulses, generated by relativistic flying mirrors, with relativistic electrons for the studying of extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves is discussed.

  3. Relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Hadden, Samuel

    2012-02-01

    We derive a number of solutions for one-dimensional dynamics of relativistic magnetized plasma that can be used as benchmark estimates in relativistic hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic numerical codes. First, we analyze the properties of simple waves of fast modes propagating orthogonally to the magnetic field in relativistically hot plasma. The magnetic and kinetic pressures obey different equations of state, so that the system behaves as a mixture of gases with different polytropic indices. We find the self-similar solutions for the expansion of hot strongly magnetized plasma into vacuum. Second, we derive linear hodograph and Darboux equations for the relativistic Khalatnikov potential, which describe arbitrary one-dimensional isentropic relativistic motion of cold magnetized plasma and find their general and particular solutions. The obtained hodograph and Darboux equations are very powerful: A system of highly nonlinear, relativistic, time-dependent equations describing arbitrary (not necessarily self-similar) dynamics of highly magnetized plasma reduces to a single linear differential equation. PMID:22463331

  4. Relativistic theory of gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvili, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    In the present paper a relativistic theory of gravitation (RTG) is unambiguously constructed on the basis of the special relativity and geometrization principle. In this a gravitational field is treated as the Faraday--Maxwell spin-2 and spin-0 physical field possessing energy and momentum. The source of a gravitational field is the total conserved energy-momentum tensor of matter and of a gravitational field in Minkowski space. In the RTG the conservation laws are strictly fulfilled for the energy-moment and for the angular momentum of matter and a gravitational field. The theory explains the whole available set of experiments on gravity. By virtue of the geometrization principle, the Riemannian space in our theory is of field origin, since it appears as an effective force space due to the action of a gravitational field on matter. The RTG leads to an exceptionally strong prediction: The universe is not closed but just ''flat.'' This suggests that in the universe a ''missing mass'' should exist in a form of matter.

  5. New model of iron spectra in the extreme ultraviolet and application to SERTS and EUV observations: A solar active region and capella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brickhouse, N. S.; Raymond, J. C.; Smith, B. W.

    1995-04-01

    We report new predictions for the EUV spectral emission of FeIX-FeXXIV, based on data now available from the Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS) and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) spectrometers. The iron spectral emission model is the first result of a larger effort to revise the Raymond & Smith model and to update the atomic rates. We present here predicted emissivities for selected densities and temperatures applicable to various astrophysical plasmas. Comparisons of our predicted spectra with two recent observations provide important tests of the atomic data. They also test to some extent some basic assumptions of coronal emission codes: optically thin spectral lines and ionization equilibrium.

  6. New model of iron spectra in the extreme ultraviolet and application to SERTS and EUV observations: A solar active region and capella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, N. S.; Raymond, J. C.; Smith, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    We report new predictions for the EUV spectral emission of FeIX-FeXXIV, based on data now available from the Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS) and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) spectrometers. The iron spectral emission model is the first result of a larger effort to revise the Raymond & Smith model and to update the atomic rates. We present here predicted emissivities for selected densities and temperatures applicable to various astrophysical plasmas. Comparisons of our predicted spectra with two recent observations provide important tests of the atomic data. They also test to some extent some basic assumptions of coronal emission codes: optically thin spectral lines and ionization equilibrium.

  7. Assessment and comparison of extreme sea levels and waves during the 2013/2014 storm season in two UK coastal regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadey, M. P.; Brown, J. M.; Haigh, I. D.; Dolphin, T.; Wisse, P.

    2015-04-01

    The extreme sea levels and waves experienced around the UK's coast during the 2013/2014 winter caused extensive coastal flooding and damage. In such circumstances, coastal managers seek to place such extremes in relation to the anticipated standards of flood protection, and the long-term recovery of the natural system. In this context, return periods are often used as a form of guidance. We therefore provide these levels for the winter storms, as well as discussing their application to the given data sets and case studies (two UK case study sites: Sefton, northwest England; and Suffolk, east England). We use tide gauge records and wave buoy data to compare the 2013/2014 storms with return periods from a national dataset, and also generate joint probabilities of sea level and waves, incorporating the recent events. The UK was hit at a national scale by the 2013/2014 storms, although the return periods differ with location. We also note that the 2013/2014 high water and waves were extreme due to the number of events, as well as the extremity of the 5 December 2013 "Xaver" storm, which had a very high return period at both case study sites. Our return period analysis shows that the national scale impact of this event is due to its coincidence with spring high tide at multiple locations as the tide and storm propagated across the continental shelf. Given that this event is such an outlier in the joint probability analyses of these observed data sets, and that the season saw several events in close succession, coastal defences appear to have provided a good level of protection. This type of assessment should be recorded alongside details of defence performance and upgrade, with other variables (e.g. river levels at estuarine locations) included and appropriate offsetting for linear trends (e.g. mean sea level rise) so that the storm-driven component of coastal flood events can be determined. Local offsetting of the mean trends in sea level allows long-term comparison of

  8. Refining a relativistic, hydrodynamic solver: Admitting ultra-relativistic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, J. P.; Hughes, P. A.

    2009-09-01

    We have undertaken the simulation of hydrodynamic flows with bulk Lorentz factors in the range 102-106. We discuss the application of an existing relativistic, hydrodynamic primitive variable recovery algorithm to a study of pulsar winds, and, in particular, the refinement made to admit such ultra-relativistic flows. We show that an iterative quartic root finder breaks down for Lorentz factors above 102 and employ an analytic root finder as a solution. We find that the former, which is known to be robust for Lorentz factors up to at least 50, offers a 24% speed advantage. We demonstrate the existence of a simple diagnostic allowing for a hybrid primitives recovery algorithm that includes an automatic, real-time toggle between the iterative and analytical methods. We further determine the accuracy of the iterative and hybrid algorithms for a comprehensive selection of input parameters and demonstrate the latter’s capability to elucidate the internal structure of ultra-relativistic plasmas. In particular, we discuss simulations showing that the interaction of a light, ultra-relativistic pulsar wind with a slow, dense ambient medium can give rise to asymmetry reminiscent of the Guitar nebula leading to the formation of a relativistic backflow harboring a series of internal shockwaves. The shockwaves provide thermalized energy that is available for the continued inflation of the PWN bubble. In turn, the bubble enhances the asymmetry, thereby providing positive feedback to the backflow.

  9. Relativistic spectral function of nucleons in hot nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Sarkar, Sourav; Mallik, S.

    2010-10-01

    We present a simple calculation of the nucleon self-energy in nuclear matter at finite temperature in a relativistic framework, using the real-time thermal field theory. The imaginary parts of one-loop graphs are identified with discontinuities across the unitary and the Landau cuts. We find that in general both the cuts contribute significantly to the spectral function in the region of (virtual) nucleon mass usually considered, even though the unitary cut is ignored in the literature. Furthermore, our relativistic spectral function differs from the one in nonrelativistic approximation, used in some earlier calculations.

  10. On specular reflectivity measurements in high and low-contrast relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, G. E.; Link, A.; Ping, Y.; McLean, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Freeman, R. R.; Schumacher, D. W.; Tiedje, H. F.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Fedosejevs, R.; Ramis, R.

    2015-01-15

    Using both experiment and 2D3V particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we describe the use of specular reflectivity measurements to study relativistic (Iλ{sup 2 }> 10{sup 18 }W/cm{sup 2}⋅μm{sup 2}) laser-plasma interactions for both high and low-contrast 527 nm laser pulses on initially solid density aluminum targets. In the context of hot-electron generation, studies typically rely on diagnostics which, more-often-than-not, represent indirect processes driven by fast electrons transiting through solid density materials. Specular reflectivity measurements, however, can provide a direct measure of the interaction that is highly sensitive to how the EM fields and plasma profiles, critical input parameters for modeling of hot-electron generation, evolve near the interaction region. While the fields of interest occur near the relativistic critical electron density, experimental reflectivity measurements are obtained centimeters away from the interaction region, well after diffraction has fully manifested itself. Using a combination of PIC simulations with experimentally inspired conditions and an analytic, non-paraxial, pulse propagation algorithm, we calculate reflected pulse properties, both near and far from the interaction region, and compare with specular reflectivity measurements. The experiment results and PIC simulations demonstrate that specular reflectivity measurements are an extremely sensitive qualitative, and partially quantitative, indicator of initial laser/target conditions, ionization effects, and other details of intense laser-matter interactions. The techniques described can provide strong constraints on many systems of importance in ultra-intense laser interactions with matter.

  11. Quantum Chromodynamics and Nuclear Physics at Extreme Energy Density

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, B.; Bass, S.A.; Chandrasekharan, S.; Mehen, T.; Springer, R.P.

    2005-11-07

    The report describes research in theoretical quantum chromodynamics, including effective field theories of hadronic interactions, properties of strongly interacting matter at extreme energy density, phenomenology of relativistic heavy ion collisions, and algorithms and numerical simulations of lattice gauge theory and other many-body systems.

  12. Relativistic dynamical collapse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearle, Philip

    2015-05-01

    A model is discussed where all operators are constructed from a quantum scalar field whose energy spectrum takes on all real values. The Schrödinger picture wave function depends upon space and time coordinates for each particle, as well as an inexorably increasing evolution parameter s which labels a foliation of spacelike hypersurfaces. The model is constructed to be manifestly Lorentz invariant in the interaction picture. Free particle states and interactions are discussed in this framework. Then, the formalism of the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) theory of dynamical collapse is applied. The collapse-generating operator is chosen to be the particle number space-time density. Unlike previous relativistically invariant models, the vacuum state is not excited. The collapse dynamics depends upon two parameters, a parameter Λ which represents the collapse rate/volume and a scale factor ℓ. A common example of collapse dynamics, involving a clump of matter in a superposition of two locations, is analyzed. The collapse rate is shown to be identical to that of nonrelativistic CSL when the GRW-CSL choice of ℓ=a =1 0-5 cm , is made, along with Λ =λ /a3 (GRW-CSL choice λ =1 0-16s-1). The collapse rate is also satisfactory with the choice ℓ as the size of the Universe, with Λ =λ /ℓa2. Because the collapse narrows wave functions in space and time, it increases a particle's momentum and energy, altering its mass. It is shown that, with ℓ=a , the change of mass of a nucleon is unacceptably large but, when ℓ is the size of the Universe, the change of mass over the age of the Universe is acceptably small.

  13. Relativistic reflection: Review and recent developments in modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauser, T.; García, J.; Wilms, J.

    2016-05-01

    Measuring relativistic reflection is an important tool to study the innermost regions of the an accreting black hole system. In the following we present a brief review on the different aspects contributing to the relativistic reflection. The combined approach is for the first time incorporated in the new ``relxill'' model. The advantages of this more self-consistent approach are briefly summarized. A special focus is put on the new definition of the intrinsic reflection fraction in the lamp post geometry, which allows to draw conclusions about the primary source of radiation in these system. Additionally the influence of the high energy cutoff of the primary source on the reflection spectrum is motivated, revealing the remarkable capabilities of constraining E_cut by measuring relativistic reflection spectra from NuSTAR, preferably with lower energy coverage.

  14. Relativistic plasma expansion with Maxwell-Juettner distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yongsheng; Wang, Naiyan; Tang, Xiuzhang; Shi, Yijin

    2013-11-15

    A self-similar analytical solution is proposed to describe the relativistic ion acceleration with the local Maxwell-Juettner relativistic distribution electrons. It is an alternative to the existing static model [M. Passoni and M. Lontano, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 115001 (2008)], which exploits a limited solution for the acceleration potential. With our model, the potential is finite naturally and has an upper limitation proportional to the square root of the electron temperature. The divergent potential in the non-relativistic case is the linear items of the Taylor expansion of that obtained relativistic one here. The energy distribution of ions and the dependence of the ion momentum on the acceleration time are obtained analytically. Maximum ion energy has an upper limitation decided by the finite potential difference. In the ultra-relativistic region, the ion energy at the ion front is proportional to t{sup 4/5} and the energy of the ions behind the ion front is proportional to t{sup 2/3} since the field there is shielded by the ions beyond them and the field at the ion front is the most intense.

  15. The Radiation Hydrodynamics of Relativistic Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Eric R.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-07-01

    We present a method for analyzing the interaction between radiation and matter in regions of intense, relativistic shear that can arise in many astrophysical situations. We show that there is a simple velocity profile that should be manifested in regions of large shear that have “lost memory” of their boundary conditions, and we use this self-similar velocity profile to construct the surface of last scattering, or the τ ≃ 1 surface, as viewed from any comoving point within the flow. We demonstrate that a simple treatment of scattering from this τ ≃ 1 surface exactly conserves photon number, and we derive the rate at which the radiation field is heated due to the shear present in the flow. The components of the comoving radiation energy–momentum tensor are calculated, and we show that they have relatively simple, approximate forms that interpolate between the viscous (small shear) and streaming (large shear) limits. We put our expression for the energy–momentum tensor in a covariant form that does not depend on the explicit velocity profile within the fluid and, therefore, represents a natural means for analyzing general, radiation-dominated, relativistic shear flows.

  16. Relativistic breakdown in planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, J. R.

    2007-04-15

    In 2003, a new electrical breakdown mechanism involving the production of runaway avalanches by positive feedback from runaway positrons and energetic photons was introduced. This mechanism, which shall be referred to as 'relativistic feedback', allows runaway discharges in gases to become self-sustaining, dramatically increasing the flux of runaway electrons, the accompanying high-energy radiation, and resulting ionization. Using detailed Monte Carlo calculations, properties of relativistic feedback are investigated. It is found that once relativistic feedback fully commences, electrical breakdown will occur and the ambient electric field, extending over cubic kilometers, will be discharged in as little as 2x10{sup -5} s. Furthermore, it is found that the flux of energetic electrons and x rays generated by this mechanism can exceed the flux generated by the standard relativistic runaway electron model by a factor of 10{sup 13}, making relativistic feedback a good candidate for explaining terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and other high-energy phenomena observed in the Earth's atmosphere.

  17. Theory of relativistic cyclotron masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Latham, P. E.; Dumbrajs, O.

    1995-07-01

    In this paper we have made an attempt to review the present status of the theory of cyclotron masers with relativistic electron beams. After discussing the basic features of electron-cyclotron radiation under conditions of normal and anomalous Doppler frequency shifts, we consider particle deceleration by a constant amplitude electromagnetic wave in a constant magnetic field using the formalism developed earlier for cyclotron autoresonance acceleration of electrons. An optimal cyclotron resonance mismatch was found that corresponds to the possibility of complete deceleration of relativistic electrons. Then, interaction of relativistic electrons with resonator fields is considered and the efficiency increase due to electron prebunching is demonstrated in a simple model. Since an efficient interaction of relativistic electrons with the large amplitude electromagnetic field of a resonator occurs at a short distance, where electrons make a small number of electron orbits, the issue of the simultaneous interaction of electrons with the field at several cyclotron harmonics is discussed. Finally, we consider deceleration of a prebunched electron beam by a traveling electromagnetic wave in a tapered magnetic field. This simple modeling is illustrated with a number of simulations of relativistic gyroklystrons and gyrotwistrons (gyrodevices in which the bunching cavity of the gyroklystron is combined with the output waveguide of the gyro-traveling-wave-tube).

  18. Ultlra-intense laser-matter interactions at extreme parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Hegellich, Bjorn M

    2010-11-24

    The field of shortpulse lasers has seen rapid growth in the recent years with the three major boundaries of energy, pulse duration and repetition rate being pushed in ever extremer regions. At peak powers, already exceeding 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}, in virtually every experiment in relativistic laser physics, the laser pulse interacts with a more or less extended and heated plasma, due to prepulses and ASE-like pedestals on ps - ns time scales. By developing a new technique for ultrahigh contrast, we were able to initiate the next paradigm shift in relativistic laser-matter interactions, allowing us to interact ultrarelativistic pulses volumetrically with overdense targets. This becomes possible by using target and laser parameters that will turn the target relativistically transparent during the few 10s-100s femtoseconds fo the interaction. Specifically, we interact an ultraintese, ultrahigh contrast pulse with solid density, free standing, nanometer diamond target. This paradigm change towards a volumetric overdense interaction in turn enables new particle acceleration mechanisms for both electrons and ions, as well as forward directed relativistic surface harmonics. We report here on first experiments done on those topics at the 200 TW Trident laser at Los Alamos as well as at the Ti:Sapphire system at MBI. We will compare the experimental data to massive large scale 3D simulations done on the prototype of LANL's new Petafiop supercomputer Roadrunner, which is leading the current top 500 list. Specifically, we developed a shortpulse OPA based pulse cleaning technique. Fielding it at the Trident 200 TW laser at Los Alamos, we were able to improve the pulse contrast by 6 orders of magnitude to better than 2 x 10{sup -12} at less than a ps. This enabled for the first time the interaction of a 100J, 200TW laser pulse with a truly solid target with virtually no expansion before the main pulse - target interaction, making possible the use of very thin targets, The

  19. Particle Acceleration at Relativistic and Ultra-Relativistic Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meli, A.

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations using diffusive shock acceleration at relativistic and ultra-relativistic shock waves. High upstream flow gamma factors are used, Γ=(1-uup2/c2)-0.5, which are relevant to models of ultra-relativistic particle shock acceleration in the central engines and relativistic jets of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and in Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) fireballs. Numerical investigations are carried out on acceleration properties in the relativistic and ultra-relativistic flow regime (Γ ˜ 10-1000) concerning angular distributions, acceleration time scales, particle energy gain versus number of crossings and spectral shapes. We perform calculations for both parallel and oblique sub-luminal and super-luminal shocks. For parallel and oblique sub-luminal shocks, the spectra depend on whether or not the scattering is represented by pitch angle diffusion or by large angle scattering. The large angle case exhibits a distinctive structure in the basic power-law spectrum not nearly so obvious for small angle scattering. However, both cases yield a significant 'speed-up' of acceleration rate when compared with the conventional, non-relativistic expression, tacc=[c/(uup-udown)] (λup/uup+λdown/udown). An energization by a factor Γ2 for the first crossing cycle and a large energy gains for subsequent crossings as well as the high 'speed-up' factors found, are important in supporting past works, especially the models developed by Vietri and Waxman on ultra-high energy cosmic ray, neutrino and gamma-ray production in GRB. For oblique super-luminal shocks, we calculate the energy gain and spectral shape for a number of different inclinations. For this case the acceleration of particles is 'pictured' by a shock drift mechanism. We use high gamma flows with Lorentz factors in the range 10-40 which are relevant to ultra-relativistic shocks in AGN accretion disks and jets. In all investigations we closely follow the particle's trajectory along the magnetic field

  20. Representing Extremes in Agricultural Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruane, Alex

    2015-01-01

    AgMIP and related projects are conducting several activities to understand and improve crop model response to extreme events. This involves crop model studies as well as the generation of climate datasets and scenarios more capable of capturing extremes. Models are typically less responsive to extreme events than we observe, and miss several forms of extreme events. Models also can capture interactive effects between climate change and climate extremes. Additional work is needed to understand response of markets and economic systems to food shocks. AgMIP is planning a Coordinated Global and Regional Assessment of Climate Change Impacts on Agricultural Production and Food Security with an aim to inform the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report.

  1. Hydro-meteorological hazards associated with extreme precipitation events in a geomorphological-active area of Europe: Vrancea-Buzau Seismic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragota, C.; Micu, D.; Zarea, R.; Micu, M.

    2012-04-01

    When a high incidence of hydro-meteorological hazards characterizes a region where its coping capacity is poorly developed, the elements at risk vulnerability may notable increase. This is the case of Vrancea-Buzau Seismic Region, located in the Curvature Carpathians and Subcarpathians of Romania. This region is one of Europe's most landslide-prone areas, which also experiences propitious conditions for flash-floods, and is at the same time, the most active cub-crustal province of Europe. This paper aims at presenting the meteorological framework of heavy rain events occurrence, highlighting their role in the region's hydrology and geomorphology. The paper outlines some typical synoptic conditions favourable for triggering severe flash-flood and multiple-landslides events (e.g. Mediterranean fronts, retrograde Cyclones or trans-Carpathian air mass advections). By selecting several case studies (i.e. 1975 and 2005, considered the wettest years from the observational data in the region), characterizing both the Carpathian mountains and the Subcarpathian hills and depressions, a preliminary inventory of damages caused by such processes was undertaken, as a basis for a future vulnerability assessment in the region. The presence of numerous elements at risk (e.g. a dense and sometimes continuous network of villages or scattered households) overlaps one of Europe's most reduced income/family areas. Consequently, an increase of the potential losses value was observed in the last decades due to heavy rain episodes. The paper offers important results for the assessment of the flash-flood and landslide hazard at regional level (FP7 MC-ITN CHANGES Project), as a necessary input for the local strategies of risk reduction, by determining the potential recurrence intervals for certain thresholds of one of the most important triggering factors such as precipitation.

  2. Effects of D region ionization on radio wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of anomalous D region ionization upon radio wave propagation are described for the main types of disturbances: sudden ionospheric disturbances, relativistic electron events, magnetic storms, auroral disturbances, polar cap events, and stratospheric warmings. Examples of radio wave characteristics for such conditions are given for the frequencies between the extremely low (3-3000 Hz) and high (3-30 MHz) frequency domains. Statistics on the disturbance effects and radio wave data are given in order to contribute towards the evaluation of possibilities for predicting the radio effects.

  3. Fluctuations in relativistic causal hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avdhesh; Bhatt, Jitesh R.; Mishra, Ananta P.

    2014-05-01

    Formalism to calculate the hydrodynamic fluctuations by applying the Onsager theory to the relativistic Navier-Stokes equation is already known. In this work, we calculate hydrodynamic fluctuations within the framework of the second order hydrodynamics of Müller, Israel and Stewart and its generalization to the third order. We have also calculated the fluctuations for several other causal hydrodynamical equations. We show that the form for the Onsager-coefficients and form of the correlation functions remain the same as those obtained by the relativistic Navier-Stokes equation and do not depend on any specific model of hydrodynamics. Further we numerically investigate evolution of the correlation function using the one dimensional boost-invariant (Bjorken) flow. We compare the correlation functions obtained using the causal hydrodynamics with the correlation function for the relativistic Navier-Stokes equation. We find that the qualitative behavior of the correlation functions remains the same for all the models of the causal hydrodynamics.

  4. Non-Relativistic Superstring Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Bom Soo

    2007-12-14

    We construct a supersymmetric version of the 'critical' non-relativistic bosonic string theory [1] with its manifest global symmetry. We introduce the anticommuting bc CFT which is the super partner of the {beta}{gamma} CFT. The conformal weights of the b and c fields are both 1/2. The action of the fermionic sector can be transformed into that of the relativistic superstring theory. We explicitly quantize the theory with manifest SO(8) symmetry and find that the spectrum is similar to that of Type IIB superstring theory. There is one notable difference: the fermions are non-chiral. We further consider 'noncritical' generalizations of the supersymmetric theory using the superspace formulation. There is an infinite range of possible string theories similar to the supercritical string theories. We comment on the connection between the critical non-relativistic string theory and the lightlike Linear Dilaton theory.

  5. Polyanalytic relativistic second Bargmann transforms

    SciTech Connect

    Mouayn, Zouhaïr

    2015-05-15

    We construct coherent states through special superpositions of eigenstates of the relativistic isotonic oscillator. In each superposition, the coefficients are chosen to be L{sup 2}-eigenfunctions of a σ-weight Maass Laplacian on the Poincaré disk, which are associated with the eigenvalue 4m(σ−1−m), m∈Z{sub +}∩[0,(σ−1)/2]. For each nonzero m, the associated coherent states transform constitutes the m-true-polyanalytic extension of a relativistic version of the second Bargmann transform, whose integral kernel is expressed in terms of a special Appel-Kampé de Fériet’s hypergeometric function. The obtained results could be used to extend the known semi-classical analysis of quantum dynamics of the relativistic isotonic oscillator.

  6. Vacuum laser acceleration of relativistic electrons using plasma mirror injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thévenet, M.; Leblanc, A.; Kahaly, S.; Vincenti, H.; Vernier, A.; Quéré, F.; Faure, J.

    2016-04-01

    Accelerating particles to relativistic energies over very short distances using lasers has been a long-standing goal in physics. Among the various schemes proposed for electrons, vacuum laser acceleration has attracted considerable interest and has been extensively studied theoretically because of its appealing simplicity: electrons interact with an intense laser field in vacuum and can be continuously accelerated, provided they remain at a given phase of the field until they escape the laser beam. But demonstrating this effect experimentally has proved extremely challenging, as it imposes stringent requirements on the conditions of injection of electrons in the laser field. Here, we solve this long-standing experimental problem by using a plasma mirror to inject electrons in an ultraintense laser field, and obtain clear evidence of vacuum laser acceleration. With the advent of petawatt lasers, this scheme could provide a competitive source of very high charge (nC) and ultrashort relativistic electron beams.

  7. Irreversible degradation of quantum coherence under relativistic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jieci; Tian, Zehua; Jing, Jiliang; Fan, Heng

    2016-06-01

    We study the dynamics of quantum coherence under Unruh thermal noise and seek under which condition the coherence can be frozen in a relativistic setting. We find that the frozen condition is either (i) the initial state is prepared as an incoherence state or (ii) the detectors have no interaction with the external field. That is to say, the decoherence of the detectors' quantum state is irreversible under the influence of thermal noise induced by Unruh radiation. It is shown that quantum coherence approaches zero only in the limit of an infinite acceleration, while quantum entanglement could reduce to zero for a finite acceleration. It is also demonstrated that the robustness of quantum coherence is better than entanglement under the influence of the atom-field interaction for an extremely large acceleration. Therefore, quantum coherence is more robust than entanglement in an accelerating system and the coherence-type quantum resources are more accessible for relativistic quantum information processing tasks.

  8. Emission of composite light fragments in collisions of relativistic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ad'yasevich, B.P.; Antonenko, V.G.; Vinogradov, A.A.; Grigor'yan, Y.I.; Ippolitov, M.S.; Karadzhev, K.V.; Lebedev, A.L.; Man'ko, V.I.; Nikolaev, S.A.; Polunin, Y.P.; and others

    1987-11-01

    We discuss results of experiments on investigation of the spectra of p, d, and t from interactions of carbon nuclei with C, Cu, Sn, and Pb at 3.6 GeV per nucleon. Analysis of the data has shown the applicability of the coalescence model for description of the production of composite fragments in the near-target rapidity region in relativistic collisions. The size of the emission region is estimated.

  9. Regional anesthesia for an upper extremity amputation for palliative care in a patient with end-stage osteosarcoma complicated by a large anterior mediastinal mass

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Mumin; Burrier, Candice; Bhalla, Tarun; Raman, Vidya T; Martin, David P; Dairo, Olamide; Mayerson, Joel L; Tobias, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression during end-of-life care can lead to significant pain, which at times may be refractory to routine analgesic techniques. Although regional anesthesia is commonly used for postoperative pain care, there is limited experience with its use during home hospice care. We present a 24-year-old male with end-stage metastatic osteosarcoma who required anesthetic care for a right-sided above-the-elbow amputation. The anesthetic management was complicated by the presence of a large mediastinal mass, limited pulmonary reserve, and severe chronic pain with a high preoperative opioid requirement. Intraoperative anesthesia and postoperative pain management were provided by regional anesthesia using an interscalene catheter. He was discharged home with the interscalene catheter in place with a continuous local anesthetic infusion that allowed weaning of his chronic opioid medications and the provision of effective pain control. The perioperative applications of regional anesthesia in palliative and home hospice care are discussed. PMID:26442759

  10. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Guiding Relativistic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, S.; Demoulin, P.; Dasso, S.; Klein, K. L.

    2011-01-01

    The origin and the propagation of relativistic solar particles (0.5 to few Ge V) in the interplanetary medium remains a debated topic. These relativistic particles, detected at the Earth by neutron monitors have been previously accelerated close to the Sun and are guided by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines, connecting the acceleration site and the Earth. Usually, the nominal Parker spiral is considered for ensuring the magnetic connection to the Earth. However, in most GLEs the IMF is highly disturbed, and the active regions associated to the GLEs are not always located close to the solar footprint of the nominal Parker spiral. A possible explanation is that relativistic particles are propagating in transient magnetic structures, such as Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). In order to check this interpretation, we studied in detail the interplanetary medium where the particles propagate for 10 GLEs of the last solar cycle. Using the magnetic field and the plasma parameter measurements (ACE/MAG and ACE/SWEPAM), we found widely different IMF configurations. In an independent approach we develop and apply an improved method of the velocity dispersion analysis to energetic protons measured by SoHO/ERNE. We determined the effective path length and the solar release time of protons from these data and also combined them with the neutron monitor data. We found that in most of the GLEs, protons propagate in transient magnetic structures. Moreover, the comparison between the interplanetary magnetic structure and the interplanetary length suggest that the timing of particle arrival at Earth is dominantly determined by the type of IMF in which high energetic particles are propagating. Finally we find that these energetic protons are not significantly scattered during their transport to Earth.

  11. Relativistic mean field model for entrainment in general relativistic superfluid neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, G. L.; Joynt, R.

    2003-07-01

    General relativistic superfluid neutron stars have a significantly more intricate dynamics than their ordinary fluid counterparts. Superfluidity allows different superfluid (and superconducting) species of particles to have independent fluid flows, a consequence of which is that the fluid equations of motion contain as many fluid element velocities as superfluid species. Whenever the particles of one superfluid interact with those of another, the momentum of each superfluid will be a linear combination of both superfluid velocities. This leads to the so-called entrainment effect whereby the motion of one superfluid will induce a momentum in the other superfluid. We have constructed a fully relativistic model for entrainment between superfluid neutrons and superconducting protons using a relativistic σ-ω mean field model for the nucleons and their interactions. In this context there are two notions of “relativistic”: relativistic motion of the individual nucleons with respect to a local region of the star (i.e. a fluid element containing, say, an Avogadro’s number of particles), and the motion of fluid elements with respect to the rest of the star. While it is the case that the fluid elements will typically maintain average speeds at a fraction of that of light, the supranuclear densities in the core of a neutron star can make the nucleons themselves have quite high average speeds within each fluid element. The formalism is applied to the problem of slowly rotating superfluid neutron star configurations, a distinguishing characteristic being that the neutrons can rotate at a rate different from that of the protons.

  12. Theory of the relativistic gyrotwistron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Li, H.

    1992-04-01

    A generalized theory of the relativistic gyrotwistron, the device combining the elements of the gyroklystron and the gyro-traveling wave tube, is presented. A modulation of electrons in the input cavity is considered with the account of modulation in an electron axial momentum that is important for relativistic particles passing through a short cavity. A comprehensive study of large-signal operation of the output waveguide section in the cases of gyroresonance at the fundamental and second cyclotron harmonics has demonstrated a wide variety of electron bunching phenomena and the possibility of achieving high electron efficiency in a wide range of gyrotwistron parameters.

  13. Modified Graded Motor Imagery for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1 of the Upper Extremity in the Acute Phase: A Patient Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagueux, Emilie; Charest, Joelle; Lefrancois-Caron, Eve; Mauger, Marie-Eve; Mercier, Emilie; Savard, Kim; Tousignant-Laflamme, Yannick

    2012-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a pathologic condition in which the painful experience is disproportionate in time and intensity in comparison with the inciting event. At present, the pathophysiology of CRPS is not well understood. Several studies have indicated that cortical reorganization plays a role in the persistence of the symptoms.…

  14. Energy balance in the course of relativistic magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V. S.; Tolstykh, Yu. V.; Dyadechkin, S. A.

    Magnetic reconnection plays an important role in space physics, for example, in Earth's magnetosphere, on the Sun, in the magnetospheres of magnetars, pulsars, black holes, etc. Reconnection starts with abrupt drop of plasma conductivity in a small part of a current sheet, so called, diffusion region. As a result electric field is generated and is transferred by relativistic MHD surface wave from the diffusion region to the current sheet which leads to decay of the disturbed part of the current sheet into a system of slow shocks. Plasma is highly accelerated and heated at the shock fronts forming outflow region with relativistic plasma jets and weak magnetic field (Semenov & Bernikov 1991). At some stage the reconnection process has to switch-off, then outflow regions must detach from the site where the electric field was initiated, and propagate along the current sheet as solitary waves (Tolstykh et al. 2005). The energy balance of relativistic reconnection is investigated in details. It is shown that magnetic and thermal energy from the inflow region is spent for acceleration and heating of the plasma in jets. It is interesting that the temperature of the plasma in the wake of the propagating outflow regions drops after each pulse of reconnection. This differ from usual explosion which heats the plasma behind the shock front (Tolstykh et al. 2007).

  15. Relativistic Hydrodynamics for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics is essential to our current understanding of nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultrarelativistic energies (current experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, forthcoming experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider). This is an introduction to relativistic hydrodynamics for graduate students. It includes a detailed…

  16. Relativistic treatment of inertial spin effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, Lewis

    1998-03-01

    A relativistic spin operator for Dirac particles is identified and it is shown that a coupling of spin to angular velocity arises in the relativistic case, just as Mashhoon had speculated, and Hehl and Ni had demonstrated, in the non-relativistic case.

  17. Modeling terrestrial gamma ray flashes produced by relativistic feedback discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ningyu; Dwyer, Joseph R.

    2013-05-01

    This paper reports a modeling study of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) produced by relativistic feedback discharges. Terrestrial gamma ray flashes are intense energetic radiation originating from the Earth's atmosphere that has been observed by spacecraft. They are produced by bremsstrahlung interactions of energetic electrons, known as runaway electrons, with air atoms. An efficient physical mechanism for producing large fluxes of the runaway electrons to make the TGFs is the relativistic feedback discharge, where seed runaway electrons are generated by positrons and X-rays, products of the discharge itself. Once the relativistic feedback discharge becomes self-sustaining, an exponentially increasing number of relativistic electron avalanches propagate through the same high-field region inside the thundercloud until the electric field is partially discharged by the ionization created by the discharge. The modeling results indicate that the durations of the TGF pulses produced by the relativistic feedback discharge vary from tens of microseconds to several milliseconds, encompassing all durations of the TGFs observed so far. In addition, when a sufficiently large potential difference is available in thunderclouds, a self-propagating discharge known as the relativistic feedback streamer can be formed, which propagates like a conventional positive streamer. For the relativistic feedback streamer, the positive feedback mechanism of runaway electron production by the positrons and X-rays plays a similar role as the photoionization for the conventional positive streamer. The simulation results of the relativistic feedback streamer show that a sequence of TGF pulses with varying durations can be produced by the streamer. The relativistic streamer may initially propagate with a pulsed manner and turn into a continuous propagation mode at a later stage. Milliseconds long TGF pulses can be produced by the feedback streamer during its continuous propagation. However

  18. Relativistic MHD simulations of extragalactic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leismann, T.; Antón, L.; Aloy, M. A.; Müller, E.; Martí, J. M.; Miralles, J. A.; Ibáñez, J. M.

    2005-06-01

    We have performed a comprehensive parameter study of the morphology and dynamics of axisymmetric, magnetized, relativistic jets by means of numerical simulations. The simulations have been performed with an upgraded version of the GENESIS code which is based on a second-order accurate finite volume method involving an approximate Riemann solver suitable for relativistic ideal magnetohydrodynamic flows, and a method of lines. Starting from pure hydrodynamic models we consider the effect of a magnetic field of increasing strength (up to β ≡ |b|2/2p ≈ 3.3 times the equipartition value) and different topology (purely toroidal or poloidal). We computed several series of models investigating the dependence of the dynamics on the magnetic field in jets of different beam Lorentz factor and adiabatic index. We find that the inclusion of the magnetic field leads to diverse effects which contrary to Newtonian magnetohydrodynamics models do not always scale linearly with the (relative) strength of the magnetic field. The relativistic models show, however, some clear trends. Axisymmetric jets with toroidal magnetic fields produce a cavity which consists of two parts: an inner one surrounding the beam which is compressed by magnetic forces, and an adjacent outer part which is inflated due to the action of the magnetic field. The outer border of the outer part of the cavity is given by the bow-shock where its interaction with the external medium takes place. Toroidal magnetic fields well below equipartition (β = 0.05) combined with a value of the adiabatic index of 4/3 yield extremely smooth jet cavities and stable beams. Prominent nose cones form when jets are confined by toroidal fields and carry a high Poynting flux (σ≡ |b|2/ρ>0.01 and β≥ 1). In contrast, none of our models possessing a poloidal field develops such a nose cone. The size of the nose cone is correlated with the propagation speed of the Mach disc (the smaller the speed the larger is the size). If two

  19. Interaction of Relativistic Jets with Their Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna; Begelman, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic jets such as those emitted by active galactic nuclei are observed to be collimated over great distances, but the cause of this collimation is uncertain. Also not fully understood are the means by which these jets become accelerated to their extreme velocities. To probe these questions, I examine the possibility of collimation and acceleration of relativistic jets by the pressure of the ambient medium surrounding the jet base, in the limit in which the jet interior has lost causal contact with its surroundings. I model the jet with an ultrarelativistic equation of state, injected into an ambient medium that has a pressure that decreases as a power of spherical radius, p ~ r^-n. Within the range 2relativistic jets that are created by some tidal disruption events --- events in which a star passing near a supermassive black hole (SMBH) is torn apart by tidal forces, and the star material then accretes back onto the SMBH --- such as in the observations of Swift

  20. Regional climate projections of mean and extreme climate for the southwest of Western Australia (1970-1999 compared to 2030-2059)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrys, Julia; Kala, Jatin; Lyons, Thomas J.

    2016-05-01

    Projections of future climate change (1970-1999 compared to 2030-2059) for southwest Western Australia (SWWA) are analysed for a regional climate model (RCM) ensemble using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model with boundary conditions from three CMIP3 general circulation models (GCMs); CCSM3, CSIROmk3.5 and ECHAM5. We show that the RCM adds value to the GCM and we suggest that this is through improved representation of regional scale topography and enhanced land-atmosphere interactions. Our results show that the mean daytime temperature increase is larger than the nighttime increase, attributed to reduced soil moisture and hence increased surface sensible heat flux in the model, and there is statistically significant evidence that the variance of minimum temperatures will increase. Changes in summer rainfall are uncertain, with some models showing rainfall increases and others projecting reductions. All models show very large fluctuations in summer rainfall intensity which has important implications because of the increased risk of flash flooding and erosion of arable land. There is model consensus indicating a decline in winter rainfall and the spatial distribution of this rainfall decline is influenced by regional scale topography in two of the three simulations. Winter rainfall reduction is consistent with the historical trend of declining rainfall in SWWA, which has been attributed in previous research to a reduction in the number of fronts passing over the region. The continuation of this trend is evident in all models by an increase in winter mean sea level pressure in SWWA, and a reduced number of winter front days. Winter rainfall does not show any marked variations in daily intensity.

  1. MID-INFRARED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON AND H{sub 2} EMISSION AS A PROBE OF PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN EXTREME PHOTODISSOCIATION REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Berne, O.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Fuente, A.; Pilleri, P.; Joblin, C.; Gonzalez-GarcIa, M.

    2009-11-20

    Mid-infrared (mid-IR) observations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and molecular hydrogen emission are a potentially powerful tool to derive physical properties of dense environments irradiated by intense UV fields. We present new, spatially resolved, Spitzer mid-IR spectroscopy of the high UV field and dense photodissociation region (PDR) around Monoceros R2, the closest ultracompact H II region, revealing the spatial structure of ionized gas, PAHs, and H{sub 2} emissions. Using a PDR model and PAH emission feature fitting algorithm, we build a comprehensive picture of the physical conditions prevailing in the region. We show that the combination of the measurement of PAH ionization fraction and of the ratio between the H{sub 2} 0-0 S(3) and S(2) line intensities, respectively, at 9.7 and 12.3 mum, allows us to derive the fundamental parameters driving the PDR: temperature, density, and UV radiation field when they fall in the ranges T = 250-1500 K, n {sub H} = 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}, and G {sub 0} = 10{sup 3}-10{sup 5}, respectively. These mid-IR spectral tracers thus provide a tool to probe the similar but unresolved UV-illuminated surface of protoplanetary disks or the nuclei of starburst galaxies.

  2. Relativistic Transverse Gravitational Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    symmetric energy potential exists between the frames that is quantified by the instantaneous Δ {v} = v\\cdot{d}φ between them; in order for either frame to become indistinguishable from the other, such that their respective velocity and acceleration vectors are parallel, a change in velocity is required. While the qualitative features of general relativity imply this phenomenon (i.e., a symmetric potential difference between two points on a Newtonian `equipotential surface' that is similar to a friction effect), it is not predicted by the field equations due to a modeling error concerning time. This is an error of omission; time has fundamental geometric properties implied by the principles of relativity that are not reflected in the field equations. Where b is the radius and g is the gravitational acceleration characterizing a spherical geoid S of an ideal point-source gravitational field, an elegant derivation that rests on first principles shows that for two points at rest on S separated by a distance d << b, a symmetric relativistic redshift exists between these points of magnitude z = gd2/bc^2, which over 1 km at Earth sea level yields z ˜{10-17}. It can be tested with a variety of methods, in particular laser interferometry. A more sophisticated derivation yields a considerably more complex predictive formula for any two points in a gravitational field.

  3. Causal localizations in relativistic quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Castrigiano, Domenico P. L. Leiseifer, Andreas D.

    2015-07-15

    Causal localizations describe the position of quantum systems moving not faster than light. They are constructed for the systems with finite spinor dimension. At the center of interest are the massive relativistic systems. For every positive mass, there is the sequence of Dirac tensor-localizations, which provides a complete set of inequivalent irreducible causal localizations. They obey the principle of special relativity and are fully Poincaré covariant. The boosters are determined by the causal position operator and the other Poincaré generators. The localization with minimal spinor dimension is the Dirac localization. Thus, the Dirac equation is derived here as a mere consequence of the principle of causality. Moreover, the higher tensor-localizations, not known so far, follow from Dirac’s localization by a simple construction. The probability of localization for positive energy states results to be described by causal positive operator valued (PO-) localizations, which are the traces of the causal localizations on the subspaces of positive energy. These causal Poincaré covariant PO-localizations for every irreducible massive relativistic system were, all the more, not known before. They are shown to be separated. Hence, the positive energy systems can be localized within every open region by a suitable preparation as accurately as desired. Finally, the attempt is made to provide an interpretation of the PO-localization operators within the frame of conventional quantum mechanics attributing an important role to the negative energy states.

  4. Relativistic redshifts in quasar broad lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, Scott; Shen, Yue; Liu, Xin; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: yshen@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-10-10

    The broad emission lines commonly seen in quasar spectra have velocity widths of a few percent of the speed of light, so special- and general-relativistic effects have a significant influence on the line profile. We have determined the redshift of the broad Hβ line in the quasar rest frame (determined from the core component of the [O III] line) for over 20,000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 quasar catalog. The mean redshift as a function of line width is approximately consistent with the relativistic redshift that is expected if the line originates in a randomly oriented Keplerian disk that is obscured when the inclination of the disk to the line of sight exceeds ∼30°-45°, consistent with simple active galactic nucleus unification schemes. This result also implies that the net line-of-sight inflow/outflow velocities in the broad-line region are much less than the Keplerian velocity when averaged over a large sample of quasars with a given line width.

  5. Balloon Observations of Relativistic Electron Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, R. M.; Woodger, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Relativistic electron precipitation events lasting from minutes to hours have been observed by balloon-borne instrumentation since 1996. This collection of observations, including the recent BARREL observations, all occur in the noon to midnight sector. EMIC waves have been suggested as the precipitation mechanism for this type of event [Lorentzen et al., 2000 and Millan et al., 2002]. A recent study by Li et al., [2014] performed a case study which modeled the radiation belt relativistic electron pitch angle diffusion from EMIC waves which showed convincing agreement between the modeled results and the BARREL x-ray observations. A survey of the BARREL REP events suggests this type of precipitation is a very localized phenomena with most events only being observed by a single balloon at a time despite the extensive L-value and local time coverage of observations during the campaign. This result is consistent with the findings of Blum et al., [2013]. Furthermore, the balloon observations show local time energy dependence consistent with the SAMPEX observations reported by Comess et al, [2013]. In this work we address the following questions: based on the REP events observed by balloon-borne instrumentation, are these characteristics true for all identified REP events and does this support EMIC waves as the precipitation mechanism? Due to the localized region of precipitation, do these events represent a significant radiation belt loss process?

  6. The Highest Redshift Relativistic Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, C.C.; Stawarz, L.; Siemiginowska, A.; Harris, D.E; Schwartz, D.A.; Wardle, J.F.C.; Gobeille, D.; Lee, N.P.

    2007-12-18

    We describe our efforts to understand large-scale (10's-100's kpc) relativistic jet systems through observations of the highest-redshift quasars. Results from a VLA survey search for radio jets in {approx} 30 z > 3.4 quasars are described along with new Chandra observations of 4 selected targets.

  7. Proper-time relativistic dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Tepper L.; Zachary, W. W.; Lindesay, James

    1993-01-01

    Proper-time relativistic single-particle classical Hamiltonian mechanics is formulated using a transformation from observer time to system proper time which is a canonical contact transformation on extended phase space. It is shown that interaction induces a change in the symmetry structure of the system which can be analyzed in terms of a Lie-isotopic deformation of the algebra of observables.

  8. Future relativistic heavy ion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, H.G.

    1980-12-01

    Equations of state for nuclear matter and ongoing experimental studies are discussed. Relativistic heavy ion physics is the only opportunity to study in the laboratory the properties of extended multiquark systems under conditions such that quarks might run together into new arrangements previously unobserved. Several lines of further study are mentioned. (GHT)

  9. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykov, Andrei; Gehrels, Neil; Krawczynski, Henric; Lemoine, Martin; Pelletier, Guy; Pohl, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In this review we confront the current theoretical understanding of particle acceleration at relativistic outflows with recent observational results on various source classes thought to involve such outflows, e.g. gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and pulsar wind nebulae. We highlight the possible contributions of these sources to ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoine, J.-P.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of relativistic quantum mechanics is to describe the finer details of the structure of atoms and molecules, where relativistic effects become nonnegligible. It is a sort of intermediate realm, between the familiar nonrelativistic quantum mechanics and fully relativistic quantum field theory, and thus it lacks the simplicity and elegance of both. Yet it is a necessary tool, mostly for quantum chemists. Pilkuhn's book offers to this audience an up-to-date survey of these methods, which is quite welcome since most previous textbooks are at least ten years old. The point of view of the author is to start immediately in the relativistic domain, following the lead of Maxwell's equations rather than classical mechanics, and thus to treat the nonrelativistic version as an approximation. Thus Chapter 1 takes off from Maxwell's equations (in the noncovariant Coulomb gauge) and gradually derives the basic aspects of Quantum Mechanics in a rather pedestrian way (states and observables, Hilbert space, operators, quantum measurement, scattering,. Chapter 2 starts with the Lorentz transformations, then continues with the Pauli spin equation and the Dirac equation and some of their applications (notably the hydrogen atom). Chapter 3 is entitled `Quantum fields and particles', but falls short of treating quantum field theory properly: only creation/annihilation operators are considered, for a particle in a box. The emphasis is on two-electron states (the Pauli principle, the Foldy--Wouthuysen elimination of small components of Dirac spinors, Breit projection operators. Chapter 4 is devoted to scattering theory and the description of relativistic bound states. Chapter 5, finally, covers hyperfine interactions and radiative corrections. As we said above, relativistic quantum mechanics is by nature limited in scope and rather inelegant and Pilkuhn's book is no exception. The notation is often heavy (mostly noncovariant) and the mathematical level rather low. The central topic

  11. Generations of non-relativistic and relativistic average M shell fluorescence yield (ϖM) (computer code AMSFYLD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Mittal, Raj

    2014-11-01

    Average M shell fluorescence yield (ϖM) have been calculated from non-relativistic data of McGuire (Phys Rev A 1972;5:1043-47) in the region Z=60-90 and relativistic data of Chen, Crasemann and Mark (Phys Rev A 1980;21:449-53) and (Phys Rev A 1983;27:2989-94) in the region Z=70-90 on M sub-shell fluorescence yield (ωMi, i=1-5) and Coster-Kronig yield (fMij, i=1-4, j=2-5) procured from our earlier work (a computer software code MFCKYLD) using Scofield's data (Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Report UCRL 51326; 1973) on M sub-shell photo-ionization cross-sections. Subsequently, a computer software code AMSFYLD was developed to generate the yield values on computer terminal or in file for both non-relativistic and relativistic data just by entering the atomic number Z of the element through keyboard or file. The values were compared with available theoretical and experimental values in the literature. The agreement between the present data and the other supports the present values.

  12. Fast Lattice Boltzmann Solver for Relativistic Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, M.; Herrmann, H. J.; Boghosian, B. M.; Succi, S.

    2010-07-02

    A lattice Boltzmann formulation for relativistic fluids is presented and numerically validated through quantitative comparison with recent hydrodynamic simulations of relativistic fluids. In order to illustrate its capability to handle complex geometries, the scheme is also applied to the case of a three-dimensional relativistic shock wave, generated by a supernova explosion, impacting on a massive interstellar cloud. This formulation opens up the possibility of exporting the proven advantages of lattice Boltzmann methods, namely, computational efficiency and easy handling of complex geometries, to the context of (mildly) relativistic fluid dynamics at large, from quark-gluon plasmas up to supernovae with relativistic outflows.

  13. Relativistic formulation of the Voigt profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wcisło, P.; Amodio, P.; Ciuryło, R.; Gianfrani, L.

    2015-02-01

    The relativistic formulation of the Voigt profile is reported for the spontaneous emission from an atomic or molecular cloud, in coincidence with a given spectral line. We considered the simultaneous occurrence of homogeneous broadening and thermal broadening, this latter being determined by the relativistic Doppler effect. Our formula for the relativistic Voigt profile reproduces those characterizing the two available limit cases, namely, the relativistic Gaussian profile and the classical Voigt convolution. The relativistic deformation of the Voigt profile was carefully quantified at different temperatures, in the case of the molecular hydrogen spectrum.

  14. Simulations of Relativistic Extragalactic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, P. A.; Duncan, G. C.

    1994-05-01

    We present results for 2-D, axisymmetric simulations of flows with Lorentz factors ~ 5 -- 10, typical of values inferred for superluminal BL Lacs and QSOs. The simulations were performed with a numerical hydrodynamic code that admits relativistic flow speed. We exploit the property that the relativistic Euler equations for mass, momentum and total energy densities in the laboratory frame have the same form as the nonrelativistic equations, to solve for laboratory frame variables using a conventional Godunov-type scheme with approximate Riemann solver: the HLLE method. The relativistic nature of the flow is incorporated by performing a Lorentz transformation at every step, at each cell center or cell boundary where pressure, sound speed or velocity are required. Determination of the velocity in this manner is a robust algebraic procedure within which we can ensure that vrelativistic flows exhibit a less pronounced pattern of incident and reflection shocks on axis. For flows which have propagated to a fixed number of jet radii, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the contact surface is much less evident in the high Lorentz factor cases, supporting the contention that relativistic flows are less prone to such instability. We describe how the morphology of the cocoon and shocked ambient gas change with increasing Lorentz factor. This work was supported by NSF grant AST 9120224 and by the Ohio Supercomputer Center from a Cray Research Software Development Grant.

  15. Relativistic runaway electrons above thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, Nikolai G.

    A three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of the uniform relativistic runaway electron breakdown in air in the presence of static electric and magnetic fields is developed and used to calculate electron distribution functions, avalanche rates and the direction and velocity of avalanche propagation. The Monte Carlo simulation results are used in a fluid model of a runaway electron beam in the middle atmosphere accelerated by quasi-electrostatic fields following a positive lightning stroke. We consider the case of lightning discharges which drain positive charge from remote regions of a laterally extensive (>100 km) thundercloud in a thunderstorm located at ~45° geomagnetic latitude, using a translationally invariant two-dimensional model. We also consider a cylindrically symmetric model with a vertical axis of symmetry, constrained to a vertical geomagnetic field. In both models, the optical emission intensities produced by the runaway electrons are found to be negligible compared to the emissions produced by thermal electrons heated in the conventional type of breakdown. The calculated γ-ray flux is of the same order as the terrestrial γ-ray flashes observed by the BATSE detector on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The energetic electrons leaving the atmosphere undergo intense interactions with the background magnetospheric plasma, leading to rapid growth of Langmuir waves with rate found based on the energy electron distribution and intense scattering of the electrons. In the nonlinear stage, beam electrons acquire an isotropic thermal distribution with a typical energy of ~1 MeV within one interhemispheric traverse along the Earth's magnetic field lines. While the electrons within the loss cone precipitate out, most of the electrons get trapped and form detectable energetic electron curtains surrounding the Earth. Electrons with pitch angles below the loss cone encounter the Earth's atmosphere at the conjugate point, are scattered and produce light, ionization

  16. Relativistic ionization fronts in gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, Nuno; Dias, J. M.; Gallacher, J. G.; Issac, R. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Lopes, N. C.; Silva, L. O.; Mendonça, J. T.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2006-10-01

    A high-power ultra-short laser pulse propagating through a gas jet, ionizes the gas by tunnelling ionization, creating a relativistic plasma-gas interface. The relativistic ionization front that is created can be used to frequency up-shift electromagnetic radiation either in co-propagation or in counter-propagation configurations. In the counter-propagation configuration, ionization fronts can act as relativistic mirrors for terahertz radiation, leading to relativistic double Doppler frequency up-shift to the visible range. In this work, we identified and explored, the parameters that optimize the key features of relativistic ionization fronts for terahertz radiation reflection. The relativistic ionization front generated by a high power laser (TOPS) propagating in a supersonic gas jet generated by a Laval nozzle has been fully characterized. We have also performed detailed two-dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulations with Osiris 2.0 to analyze the generation and propagation of the ionization fronts.

  17. Strong electron correlation in UO{sub 2}{sup −}: A photoelectron spectroscopy and relativistic quantum chemistry study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei-Li; Jian, Tian; Lopez, Gary V.; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Su, Jing; Hu, Han-Shi; Cao, Guo-Jin; Li, Jun

    2014-03-07

    The electronic structures of actinide systems are extremely complicated and pose considerable challenges both experimentally and theoretically because of significant electron correlation and relativistic effects. Here we report an investigation of the electronic structure and chemical bonding of uranium dioxides, UO{sub 2}{sup −} and UO{sub 2}, using photoelectron spectroscopy and relativistic quantum chemistry. The electron affinity of UO{sub 2} is measured to be 1.159(20) eV. Intense detachment bands are observed from the UO{sub 2}{sup −} low-lying (7sσ{sub g}){sup 2}(5fϕ{sub u}){sup 1} orbitals and the more deeply bound O2p-based molecular orbitals which are separated by a large energy gap from the U-based orbitals. Surprisingly, numerous weak photodetachment transitions are observed in the gap region due to extensive two-electron transitions, suggesting strong electron correlations among the (7sσ{sub g}){sup 2}(5fϕ{sub u}){sup 1} electrons in UO{sub 2}{sup −} and the (7sσ{sub g}){sup 1}(5fϕ{sub u}){sup 1} electrons in UO{sub 2}. These observations are interpreted using multi-reference ab initio calculations with inclusion of spin-orbit coupling. The strong electron correlations and spin-orbit couplings generate orders-of-magnitude more detachment transitions from UO{sub 2}{sup −} than expected on the basis of the Koopmans’ theorem. The current experimental data on UO{sub 2}{sup −} provide a long-sought opportunity to arbitrating various relativistic quantum chemistry methods aimed at handling systems with strong electron correlations.

  18. Evaluating Changes in Extreme Weather During the North American Monsoon in the Southwest U.S. Using High Resolution, Convective-Permitting Regional Atmospheric Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, C. L.; Chang, H. I.; Luong, T. M.; Lahmers, T.; Jares, M.; Mazon, J.; Carrillo, C. M.; Adams, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    The North American monsoon (NAM) is the principal driver of summer severe weather in the Southwest U.S. Monsoon convection typically initiates during daytime over the mountains and may organize into mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Most monsoon-related severe weather occurs in association with organized convection, including microbursts, dust storms, flash flooding and lightning. A convective resolving grid spacing (on the kilometer scale) model is required to explicitly represent the physical characteristics of organized convection, for example the presence of leading convective lines and trailing stratiform precipitation regions. Our objective is to analyze how monsoon severe weather is changing in relation to anthropogenic climate change. We first consider a dynamically downscaled reanalysis during a historical period 1948-2010. Individual severe weather event days, identified by favorable thermodynamic conditions, are then simulated for short-term, numerical weather prediction-type simulations of 30h at a convective-permitting scale. Changes in modeled severe weather events indicate increases in precipitation intensity in association with long-term increases in atmospheric instability and moisture, particularly with organized convection downwind of mountain ranges. However, because the frequency of synoptic transients is decreasing during the monsoon, organized convection is less frequent and convective precipitation tends to be more phased locked to terrain. These types of modeled changes also similarly appear in observed CPC precipitation, when the severe weather event days are selected using historical radiosonde data. Next, we apply the identical model simulation and analysis procedures to several dynamically downscaled CMIP3 and CMIP5 models for the period 1950-2100, to assess how monsoon severe weather may change in the future with respect to occurrence and intensity and if these changes correspond with what is already occurring in the historical

  19. QED effects and radiation generation in relativistic laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Nerush, E. N.; Bashmakov, V. F.

    2011-06-01

    The radiative and quantum effects in laser plasmas are discussed. The self-consistent numerical model based on particle-in-cell and Monte-Carlo methods are developed. First we analyze the spectra of Compton backscattered photons and betatron radiation in the classical and quantum regimes. Then we address an interaction between intense laser pulse and relativistic electron beam. Finally we discuss the electron-positron pair plasma production in extremely-intense laser field. It is shown that such plasma can be an efficient source of energetic gammaquanta.

  20. Effects of relativistic electron temperature on parametric instabilities for intense laser propagation in underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yao; Zheng, Jun; Chen, Min; Yu, Lu-Le; Weng, Su-Ming; Ren, Chuang; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Sheng, Zheng-Ming E-mail: zhengming.sheng@strath.ac.uk

    2014-11-15

    Effects of relativistic electron temperature on stimulated Raman scattering and stimulated Brillouin scattering instabilities for high intensity lasers propagating in underdense plasma are studied theoretically and numerically. The dispersion relations for these instabilities are derived from the relativistic fluid equation. For a wide range of laser intensity and electron temperature, it is found that the maximum growth rate and the instability region in k-space can be reduced at relativistic electron temperature. Particle-in-cell simulations are carried out, which confirm the theoretical analysis.

  1. Quasiclassical Approximation in the Non-Relativistic and Relativistic Problems of Tunneling Ionization of a Hydrogen-Like Atom in a Uniform Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reity, O. K.; Reity, V. K.; Lazur, V. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    A recurrent scheme for finding the quasiclassical solution of the onedimensional equation obtained after the separation of variables in the Schrödinger equation in parabolic coordinates is derived. The method of quasiclassical localized states is developed for the Dirac equation with an arbitrary axially symmetric potential of barrier type which does not allow complete separation of the variables. By means of the proposed quasiclassical methods the non-relativistic and relativistic wavefunctions for hydrogenlike (H-like) atoms in an external uniform electrostatic field of intensity F are constructed in the classically forbidden and allowed regions. The general analytical expressions of the leading term of the asymptotic behaviour (at small F) of the ionization rate of an H-like atom in the uniform electrostatic field are obtained for the non-relativistic and relativistic cases.

  2. First Detection of the [O(sub III)] 88 Micrometers Line at High Redshifts: Characterizing the Starburst and Narrow-Line Regions in Extreme Luminosity Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferkinhoff, C.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Nikola, T.; Parshley, S. C.; Stacey, G. J.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.

    2010-01-01

    We have made the first detections of the 88 micrometers [O(sub III)] line from galaxies in the early universe, detecting the line from the lensed active galactic nucleus (AGN)/starburst composite systems APM 08279+5255 at z 3.911 and SMM J02399-0136 at z = 2.8076. The line is exceptionally bright from both systems, with apparent (lensed) luminosities approx.10(exp 11) Solar Luminosity, For APM 08279, the [O(sub III)] line flux can be modeled in a star formation paradigm, with the stellar radiation field dominated by stars with effective temperatures, T(sub eff) > 36,000 K, similar to the starburst found in M82. The model implies approx.35% of the total far-IR luminosity of the system is generated by the starburst, with the remainder arising from dust heated by the AGN. The 881,tm line can also be generated in the narrow-line region of the AGN if gas densities are around a few 1000 cu cm. For SMM J02399, the [O(sub III)] line likely arises from HII regions formed by hot (T(sub eff) > 40,000 K) young stars in a massive starburst that dominates the far-IR luminosity of the system. The present work demonstrates the utility of the [O(sub III)] line for characterizing starbursts and AGN within galaxies in the early universe. These are the first detections of this astrophysically important line from galaxies beyond a redshift of 0.05.s

  3. A relativistic calculation of the deuteron threshold electrodisintegration at backward angles

    SciTech Connect

    Schiavilla, Rocco

    2007-07-01

    The threshold electrodisintegration of the deuteron at backward angles is studied with a relativistic Hamiltonian, including a relativistic one-pion-exchange potential (OPEP) with off-shell terms as predicted by pseudovector coupling of pions to nucleons. The bound and scattering states are obtained in the center-of-mass frame, and then boosted from it to the Breit frame, where the evaluation of the relevant matrix elements of the electromagnetic current operator is carried out. The latter includes, in addition to one-body, also two-body terms due to pion exchange, as obtained, consistently with the OPEP, in pseudovector pion-nucleon coupling theory. The full Lorentz structure of these currents is retained. In order to estimate the magnitude of the relativistic effects we perform, for comparison, the calculation with a non-relativistic phase-equivalent Hamiltonian and the standard non-relativistic expressions for the one-body and two-body pion-exchange currents. Our results for the electrodisintegration cross section show that, in the calculations using one-body currents, relativistic corrections become significant (i.e., larger than 10%) only at high momentum transfer Q (Q2 ~ 40fm-2 and beyond). However, the inclusion of two-body currents makes the relativistic predictions considerably smaller than the corresponding non-relativistic results in the Q2 region (18-40) fm-2. The calculations based on the relativistic model also confirm the inadequacy, already established in a non-relativistic context, of the present electromagnetic current model to reproduce accurately the experimental data at intermediate values of momentum transfers.

  4. Monte Carlo Simulations of Nonlinear Particle Acceleration in Parallel Trans-relativistic Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Warren, Donald C.; Bykov, Andrei M.

    2013-10-01

    We present results from a Monte Carlo simulation of a parallel collisionless shock undergoing particle acceleration. Our simulation, which contains parameterized scattering and a particular thermal leakage injection model, calculates the feedback between accelerated particles ahead of the shock, which influence the shock precursor and "smooth" the shock, and thermal particle injection. We show that there is a transition between nonrelativistic shocks, where the acceleration efficiency can be extremely high and the nonlinear compression ratio can be substantially greater than the Rankine-Hugoniot value, and fully relativistic shocks, where diffusive shock acceleration is less efficient and the compression ratio remains at the Rankine-Hugoniot value. This transition occurs in the trans-relativistic regime and, for the particular parameters we use, occurs around a shock Lorentz factor γ0 = 1.5. We also find that nonlinear shock smoothing dramatically reduces the acceleration efficiency presumed to occur with large-angle scattering in ultra-relativistic shocks. Our ability to seamlessly treat the transition from ultra-relativistic to trans-relativistic to nonrelativistic shocks may be important for evolving relativistic systems, such as gamma-ray bursts and Type Ibc supernovae. We expect a substantial evolution of shock accelerated spectra during this transition from soft early on to much harder when the blast-wave shock becomes nonrelativistic.

  5. MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF NONLINEAR PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN PARALLEL TRANS-RELATIVISTIC SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Donald C.; Warren, Donald C.; Bykov, Andrei M. E-mail: ambykov@yahoo.com

    2013-10-10

    We present results from a Monte Carlo simulation of a parallel collisionless shock undergoing particle acceleration. Our simulation, which contains parameterized scattering and a particular thermal leakage injection model, calculates the feedback between accelerated particles ahead of the shock, which influence the shock precursor and 'smooth' the shock, and thermal particle injection. We show that there is a transition between nonrelativistic shocks, where the acceleration efficiency can be extremely high and the nonlinear compression ratio can be substantially greater than the Rankine-Hugoniot value, and fully relativistic shocks, where diffusive shock acceleration is less efficient and the compression ratio remains at the Rankine-Hugoniot value. This transition occurs in the trans-relativistic regime and, for the particular parameters we use, occurs around a shock Lorentz factor γ{sub 0} = 1.5. We also find that nonlinear shock smoothing dramatically reduces the acceleration efficiency presumed to occur with large-angle scattering in ultra-relativistic shocks. Our ability to seamlessly treat the transition from ultra-relativistic to trans-relativistic to nonrelativistic shocks may be important for evolving relativistic systems, such as gamma-ray bursts and Type Ibc supernovae. We expect a substantial evolution of shock accelerated spectra during this transition from soft early on to much harder when the blast-wave shock becomes nonrelativistic.

  6. Relativistic like structure of classical thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevedo, Hernando; Sánchez, Alberto; Vázquez, Alejandro

    2015-04-01

    We analyze in the context of geometrothermodynamics a Legendre invariant metric structure in the equilibrium space of an ideal gas. We introduce the concept of thermodynamic geodesic as a succession of points, each corresponding to a state of equilibrium, so that the resulting curve represents a quasi-static process. A rigorous geometric structure is derived in which the thermodynamic geodesics at a given point split the equilibrium space into two disconnected regions separated by adiabatic geodesics. This resembles the causal structure of special relativity, which we use to introduce the concept of adiabatic cone for thermodynamic systems. This result might be interpreted as an alternative indication of the inter-relationship between relativistic physics and classical thermodynamics.

  7. Asymptotic structure of hydromagnetically driven relativistic winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiueh, Tzihong; Li, Zhi-Yun; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1991-01-01

    A fully relativistic analysis has been performed of the asymptotic structure of stationary axisymmetric hydromagnetic winds. If a flow fills the region containing the rotation axis, then the flux surfaces in the flow must collimate to a set of current-carrying cylindrical surface extending to infinite transverse radius, collimate to a set of cylindrical surfaces extending to a finite radius, or collimate to a current-free paraboloidal field configuration which fills up the entire space. If an asymptotically cylindrical flow carries a finite current at radii well beyond the light cylinder, then the Lorentz factor of the terminal flow speed on a given flux surface is proportional to the total current enclosed within this flux surface. If a flow is of type II paraboloidal, then its asymptotic energy flux is carried entirely by the gas motion rather than the electromagnetic fields.

  8. Assessment of the Suitability of a Global Hydrodynamic Model in Simulating a Regional-scale Extreme Flood at Finer Spatial Resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, C. M. R.; Yamazaki, D.; Kim, H.; Champathong, A.; Oki, T.

    2015-12-01

    Global river models (GRMs) are elemental for large-scale predictions and impact analyses. However, they have limited capability in providing accurate flood information at fine resolution for practical purposes. Hyperresolution (~1km resolution) modelling is believed to improve the representation of topographical constraints, which consequently result to better predictions of surface water flows and flood inundation at regional to global scales. While numerous studies have shown that finer resolutions improve the predictions of catchment-scale floods using local-scale hydrodynamic models, the impact of finer spatial resolution on predictions of large-scale floods using GRMs is rarely examined. In this study, we assessed the suitability of a state-of-the-art hydrodynamic GRM, CaMa-Flood, in the hyperresolution simulation of a regional-scale flood. The impacts of finer spatial resolution and representation of sub-grid processes on simulating the 2011 immense flooding in Chao Phraya River Basin, Thailand was investigated. River maps ranging from 30-arcsecond (~1km) to 5-arcminute (~10km) spatial resolutions were generated from 90m resolution HydroSHEDS maps and SRTM3 DEM. Simulations were executed in each spatial resolution with the new multi-directional downstream connectivity (MDC) scheme in CaMa-Flood turned on and off. While the predictive capability of the model slightly improved with finer spatial resolution when MDC scheme is turned on, it significantly declined when MDC scheme is turned off; bias increased by 35% and NSE-coefficient decreased by 60%. These findings indicate that GRMs which assume single-downstream-grid flows are not suitable for hyperresolution modelling because of their limited capability to realistically represent floodplain connectivity. When simulating large-scale floods, MDC scheme is necessary for the following functions: provide additional storage for ovehrbank flows, enhance connectivity between floodplains which allow more realistic

  9. Constraining UV continuum slopes of active galactic nuclei with cloudy models of broad-line region extreme-ultraviolet emission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Moloney, Joshua; Michael Shull, J. E-mail: michael.shull@colorado.edu

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the composition and structure of the broad-line region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is important for answering many outstanding questions in supermassive black hole evolution, galaxy evolution, and ionization of the intergalactic medium. We used single-epoch UV spectra from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope to measure EUV emission-line fluxes from four individual AGNs with 0.49 ≤ z ≤ 0.64, two AGNs with 0.32 ≤ z ≤ 0.40, and a composite of 159 AGNs. With the CLOUDY photoionization code, we calculated emission-line fluxes from BLR clouds with a range of density, hydrogen ionizing flux, and incident continuum spectral indices. The photoionization grids were fit to the observations using single-component and locally optimally emitting cloud (LOC) models. The LOC models provide good fits to the measured fluxes, while the single-component models do not. The UV spectral indices preferred by our LOC models are consistent with those measured from COS spectra. EUV emission lines such as N IV λ765, O II λ833, and O III λ834 originate primarily from gas with electron temperatures between 37,000 K and 55,000 K. This gas is found in BLR clouds with high hydrogen densities (n {sub H} ≥ 10{sup 12} cm{sup –3}) and hydrogen ionizing photon fluxes (Φ{sub H} ≥ 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}).

  10. Unsteady relativistic shock-wave diffraction by cylinders and spheres.

    PubMed

    Tsai, I-Nan; Huang, Juan-Chen; Tsai, Shang-Shi; Yang, J Y

    2012-02-01

    The unsteady relativistic shock-wave diffraction patterns generated by a relativistic blast wave impinging on a circular cylinder and a sphere are numerically simulated using some high-resolution relativistic kinetic beam schemes in a general coordinate system for solving the relativistic Euler equations of gas dynamics. The diffraction patterns are followed through about 6 radii of travel of the incident shock past the body. The complete diffraction patterns, including regular reflection, transition from regular to Mach reflection, slip lines, and the complex shock-on-shock interaction at the wake region resulting from the Mach shocks collision behind the body are reported in detail. Computational results of several incident shock Mach numbers covering the near ultrarelativistic limit are studied. Various contours of flow properties including the Lorentz factor and velocity streamline plots are also presented to add a better understanding of the complex diffraction phenomena. The three-dimensional relieving effects of the sphere cases are evident and can be quantitatively evaluated as compared with the corresponding cylinder cases. PMID:22463327

  11. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION OF SELF-COLLIMATING RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian; Vaidya, Bhargav; Meliani, Zakaria E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2011-08-10

    The goal of this paper is to derive signatures of synchrotron radiation from state-of-the-art simulation models of collimating relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) jets featuring a large-scale helical magnetic field. We perform axisymmetric special relativistic MHD simulations of the jet acceleration region using the PLUTO code. The computational domain extends from the slow-magnetosonic launching surface of the disk up to 6000{sup 2} Schwarzschild radii allowing jets to reach highly relativistic Lorentz factors. The Poynting-dominated disk wind develops into a jet with Lorentz factors of {Gamma} {approx_equal} 8 and is collimated to 1{sup 0}. In addition to the disk jet, we evolve a thermally driven spine jet emanating from a hypothetical black hole corona. Solving the linearly polarized synchrotron radiation transport within the jet, we derive very long baseline interferometry radio and (sub-) millimeter diagnostics such as core shift, polarization structure, intensity maps, spectra, and Faraday rotation measure (RM) directly from the Stokes parameters. We also investigate depolarization and the detectability of a {lambda}{sup 2}-law RM depending on beam resolution and observing frequency. We find non-monotonic intrinsic RM profiles that could be detected at a resolution of 100 Schwarzschild radii. In our collimating jet geometry, the strict bimodality in the polarization direction (as predicted by Pariev et al.) can be circumvented. Due to relativistic aberration, asymmetries in the polarization vectors across the jet can hint at the spin direction of the central engine.

  12. Unsteady relativistic shock-wave diffraction by cylinders and spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, I.-Nan; Huang, Juan-Chen; Tsai, Shang-Shi; Yang, J. Y.

    2012-02-01

    The unsteady relativistic shock-wave diffraction patterns generated by a relativistic blast wave impinging on a circular cylinder and a sphere are numerically simulated using some high-resolution relativistic kinetic beam schemes in a general coordinate system for solving the relativistic Euler equations of gas dynamics. The diffraction patterns are followed through about 6 radii of travel of the incident shock past the body. The complete diffraction patterns, including regular reflection, transition from regular to Mach reflection, slip lines, and the complex shock-on-shock interaction at the wake region resulting from the Mach shocks collision behind the body are reported in detail. Computational results of several incident shock Mach numbers covering the near ultrarelativistic limit are studied. Various contours of flow properties including the Lorentz factor and velocity streamline plots are also presented to add a better understanding of the complex diffraction phenomena. The three-dimensional relieving effects of the sphere cases are evident and can be quantitatively evaluated as compared with the corresponding cylinder cases.

  13. THE EXTREME HOSTS OF EXTREME SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Neill, James D.; Quimby, Robert; Ofek, Eran; Wyder, Ted K.; Martin, D. Christopher; Barlow, Tom A.; Foster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Morrissey, Patrick; Sullivan, Mark; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Howell, D. Andrew; Nugent, Peter; Seibert, Mark; Overzier, Roderik; Neff, Susan G.; Schiminovich, David; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Heckman, Timothy M.

    2011-01-20

    We use GALEX ultraviolet (UV) and optical integrated photometry of the hosts of 17 luminous supernovae (LSNe, having peak M{sub V} < -21) and compare them to a sample of 26, 000 galaxies from a cross-match between the SDSS DR4 spectral catalog and GALEX interim release 1.1. We place the LSN hosts on the galaxy NUV - r versus M{sub r} color-magnitude diagram (CMD) with the larger sample to illustrate how extreme they are. The LSN hosts appear to favor low-density regions of the galaxy CMD falling on the blue edge of the blue cloud toward the low-luminosity end. From the UV-optical photometry, we estimate the star formation history of the LSN hosts. The hosts have moderately low star formation rates (SFRs) and low stellar masses (M{sub *}) resulting in high specific star formation rates (sSFR). Compared with the larger sample, the LSN hosts occupy low-density regions of a diagram plotting sSFR versus M{sub *} in the area having higher sSFR and lower M{sub *}. This preference for low M{sub *}, high sSFR hosts implies that the LSNe are produced by an effect having to do with their local environment. The correlation of mass with metallicity suggests that perhaps wind-driven mass loss is the factor that prevents LSNe from arising in higher-mass, higher-metallicity hosts. The massive progenitors of the LSNe (>100 M{sub sun}), by appearing in low-SFR hosts, are potential tests for theories of the initial mass function that limit the maximum mass of a star based on the SFR.

  14. Vanishing glaciers, degrading permafrost, new lakes and increasing probability of extreme floods from impact waves - a need for long-term risk reduction concerning high-mountain regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeberli, Wilfried; Schaub, Yvonne; Huggel, Christian; Boeckli, Lorenz

    2013-04-01

    As a consequence of continued global warming, rapid and fundamental changes are taking place in high-mountain regions. Within decades only, many still existing glacier landscapes will probably transform into new and strongly different landscapes of bare bedrock, loose debris, numerous lakes and sparse vegetation. These new landscapes are then likely to persist for centuries if not millennia to come. During variable but mostly extended parts of this future time period, they will be characterised by pronounced disequilibria within their geo- and ecosystems. Such disequilibria include a long-term stability reduction of steep/icy mountain slopes as a slow and delayed reaction to stress redistribution following de-buttressing by vanishing glaciers and to changes in strength and hydraulic permeability caused by permafrost warming and degradation. With the formation of many new lakes in close neighbourhood to, or even directly at the foot of, so-affected slopes, the probability of far-reaching flood waves from large rock falls into lakes is likely to increase for extended time periods. Quantitative information for anticipating possible developments exists in the European Alps. The present (2011) glacier cover is some 1800 km2, the still existing total ice volume 80 ± 20 km3 and the average loss rate about -2 km3 ice per year. The permafrost area has recently been estimated at some 3000 km2 with a total subsurface ice volume of 25 ± 2 km3; loss rates are hardly known but are certainly much smaller than for glaciers - probably by at least a factor of 10. Based on a detailed study for the Swiss Alps, total future lake volume may be assumed to be a few percent of the presently remaining glacier volume, i.e., a few km3 for the entire Alps. Forward projection of such numbers into the future indicates that glacier volumes tend to much more rapidly vanish than volumes of subsurface ice in permafrost, and lake volumes are likely to steadily increase. Already during the second

  15. Relativistic Pulsar Winds with Pressure Anisotropy and Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenbarge, Jason; Hazeltine, Richard; Mahajan, Swadesh

    2008-11-01

    A newly developed covariant fluid model for magnetized plasmas, incorporating anisotropy in both temperature and heat flow, is used to study equatorial radial profiles of density, velocity, magnetic field, pressure, and heat flow in the hot, strongly magnetized wind region beyond the light cylinder of pulsar magnetospheres. Radiative losses are assumed to have isotropized the wind region plasma so that PP. Fluid velocities are taken as mildly relativistic, while temperatures are ultra-relativistic. This study of pulsar magnetospheres extends the work by Tsikarishvili et al. to a more general fluid closure including heat flow. The general covariant fluid model in spherical geometry and equations of state for arbitrary temperature will also be presented for more general applicability. J. M. TenBarge, R. D. Hazeltine, and S. M. Mahajan, Phys. Plasmas 15, 062112 (2008)., E. G. Tsikarishvili, A. D. Rogava, and D. G. Tsiklauri, Ap. J. 439, 822 (1995).

  16. A new approach to geographic partitioning of probabilistic seismic hazard using seismic source distance with earthquake extreme and perceptibility statistics: an application to the southern Balkan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayliss, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    The southeastern European cities of Sofia and Thessaloniki are explored as example site-specific scenarios by geographically zoning their individual localized seismic sources based on the highest probabilities of magnitude exceedance. This is with the aim of determining the major components contributing to each city's seismic hazard. Discrete contributions from the selected input earthquake catalogue are investigated to determine those areas that dominate each city's prevailing seismic hazard with respect to magnitude and source-to-site distance. This work is based on an earthquake catalogue developed and described in a previously published paper by the author and components of a magnitude probability density function. Binned magnitude and distance classes are defined using a joint magnitude-distance distribution. The prevailing seismicity to each city-as defined by a child data set extracted from the parent earthquake catalogue for each city considered-is divided into distinct constrained data bins of small discrete magnitude and source-to-site distance intervals. These are then used to describe seismic hazard in terms of uni-variate modal values; that is, M* and D* which are the modal magnitude and modal source-to-site distance in each city's local historical seismicity. This work highlights that Sofia's dominating seismic hazard-that is, the modal magnitudes possessing the highest probabilities of occurrence-is located in zones confined to two regions at 60-80 km and 170-180 km from this city, for magnitude intervals of 5.75-6.00 Mw and 6.00-6.25 Mw respectively. Similarly, Thessaloniki appears prone to highest levels of hazard over a wider epicentral distance interval, from 80 to 200 km in the moment magnitude range 6.00-6.25 Mw.

  17. How does large-scale nudging in a regional climate model contribute to improving the simulation of weather regimes and seasonal extremes over North America?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas-Picher, Philippe; Cattiaux, Julien; Bougie, Alexandre; Laprise, René

    2016-02-01

    To determine the extent to which regional climate models (RCMs) preserve the large-scale atmospheric circulation of their driving fields, we investigate the ability of two RCM simulations to reproduce weather regimes over North America. Each RCM simulation is driven at its lateral boundaries by the ERA-Interim reanalysis, but one of them uses additional large-scale nudging (LSN) in the domain interior. Four weather regimes describing the variability of the large-scale atmospheric dynamics over North America are identified in winter and in summer. The analysis shows that for both seasons, the mean frequency of occurrence and persistence of the four weather regimes for the two RCM simulations are comparable to those of ERA-Interim. However, the frequency of false daily attributions of a specific regime on day-to-day and seasonal bases is significantly high, especially in summer, for the classic lateral-boundary driven simulation. Those false attributions are largely corrected with LSN. Using composite means for each weather regimes, substantial 2-m air temperature and precipitation anomalies associated to the large-scale atmospheric circulation are found. These anomalies are larger in winter than in summer. The validation of the simulations reveals that the 2-m air temperature bias is dependent on the weather regimes, especially in summer. Conversely, the precipitation bias varies significantly from one regime to another, especially in winter. Overall, the results suggest that a classic RCM simulates the mean statistics of the weather regimes well, but that LSN is necessary to reproduce daily weather regimes and seasonal anomalies that match with the driving field.

  18. EXTREMELY LARGE AND HOT MULTILAYER KEPLERIAN DISK AROUND THE O-TYPE PROTOSTAR W51N: THE PRECURSORS OF THE HCH II REGIONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Luis A.; Tang, Ya-Wen; Leurini, Silvia

    2010-12-10

    We present sensitive high angular resolution (0.''57-0.''78) SO, SO{sub 2}, CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH, HC{sub 3}N, and HCOCH{sub 2}OH line observations at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths of the young O-type protostar W51 North made with the Submillimeter Array. We report the presence of a large (about 8000 AU) and hot molecular circumstellar disk around this object, which connects the inner dusty disk with the molecular ring or toroid reported recently and confirms the existence of a single bipolar outflow emanating from this object. The molecular emission from the large disk is observed in layers with the transitions characterized by high excitation temperatures in their lower energy states (up to 1512 K) being concentrated closer to the central massive protostar. The molecular emission from those transitions with low or moderate excitation temperatures is found in the outermost parts of the disk and exhibits an inner cavity with an angular size of around 0.''7. We modeled all lines with a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) synthetic spectrum. A detailed study of the kinematics of the molecular gas together with an LTE model of a circumstellar disk shows that the innermost parts of the disk are also Keplerian plus a contracting velocity. The emission of the HCOCH{sub 2}OH reveals the possible presence of a warm 'companion' located to the northeast of the disk, however its nature is unclear. The emission of the SO and SO{sub 2} is observed in the circumstellar disk as well as in the outflow. We suggest that the massive protostar W51 North appears to be in a phase before the presence of a hypercompact or an ultracompact H II (HC/UCH II) region and propose a possible sequence on the formation of the massive stars.

  19. Relativistic stars in bigravity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Katsuki; Maeda, Kei-ichi; Tanabe, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    Assuming static and spherically symmetric spacetimes in the ghost-free bigravity theory, we find a relativistic star solution, which is very close to that in general relativity. The coupling constants are classified into two classes: Class [I] and Class [II]. Although the Vainshtein screening mechanism is found in the weak gravitational field for both classes, we find that there is no regular solution beyond the critical value of the compactness in Class [I]. This implies that the maximum mass of a neutron star in Class [I] becomes much smaller than that in general relativity (GR). On the other hand, for the solution in Class [II], the Vainshtein screening mechanism works well even in a relativistic star and the result in GR is recovered.

  20. Relativistic hydrodynamics on graphic cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, Jochen; Lindenstruth, Volker; Bleicher, Marcus

    2013-02-01

    We show how to accelerate relativistic hydrodynamics simulations using graphic cards (graphic processing units, GPUs). These improvements are of highest relevance e.g. to the field of high-energetic nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC where (ideal and dissipative) relativistic hydrodynamics is used to calculate the evolution of hot and dense QCD matter. The results reported here are based on the Sharp And Smooth Transport Algorithm (SHASTA), which is employed in many hydrodynamical models and hybrid simulation packages, e.g. the Ultrarelativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics model (UrQMD). We have redesigned the SHASTA using the OpenCL computing framework to work on accelerators like graphic processing units (GPUs) as well as on multi-core processors. With the redesign of the algorithm the hydrodynamic calculations have been accelerated by a factor 160 allowing for event-by-event calculations and better statistics in hybrid calculations.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamics of chiral relativistic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarsky, Alexey; Fröhlich, Jürg; Ruchayskiy, Oleg

    2015-08-01

    We study the dynamics of a plasma of charged relativistic fermions at very high temperature T ≫m , where m is the fermion mass, coupled to the electromagnetic field. In particular, we derive a magnetohydrodynamical description of the evolution of such a plasma. We show that, compared to conventional magnetohydronamics (MHD) for a plasma of nonrelativistic particles, the hydrodynamical description of the relativistic plasma involves new degrees of freedom described by a pseudoscalar field originating in a local asymmetry in the densities of left-handed and right-handed fermions. This field can be interpreted as an effective axion field. Taking into account the chiral anomaly we present dynamical equations for the evolution of this field, as well as of other fields appearing in the MHD description of the plasma. Due to its nonlinear coupling to helical magnetic fields, the axion field significantly affects the dynamics of a magnetized plasma and can give rise to a novel type of inverse cascade.

  2. Relativistic rocket: Dream and reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semyonov, Oleg G.

    2014-06-01

    The dream of interstellar flights persists since the first pioneers in astronautics and has never died. Many concepts of thruster capable to propel a rocket to the stars have been proposed and the most suitable among them are thought to be photon propulsion and propulsion by the products of proton-antiproton annihilation in magnetic nozzle. This article addresses both concepts allowing for cross-section of annihilation among other issues in order to show their vulnerability and to indicate the problems. The concept of relativistic matter propulsion is substantiated and discussed. The latter is argued to be the most straightforward way to build-up a relativistic rocket firstly because it is based on the existing technology of ion generators and accelerators and secondly because it can be stepped up in efflux power starting from interplanetary spacecrafts powered by nuclear reactors to interstellar starships powered by annihilation reactors. The problems imposed by thermodynamics and heat disposal are accentuated.

  3. Lower extremity muscle perforator flaps for lower extremity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hallock, Geoffrey G

    2004-10-01

    A true muscle perforator flap is distinguished by the requisite intramuscular dissection of its musculocutaneous perforator to capture the same musculocutaneous territory but with total exclusion of the muscle, and thereby results in minimal functional impairment. Adhering to this definition, several lower extremity donor sites now are available, each with specific attributes especially useful for consideration in the treatment of lower extremity defects. In this author's experience over the past two decades, 20 lower extremity muscle perforator flaps using multiple donor sites proved advantageous for lower extremity coverage problems as either a local pedicled flap or as a microsurgical tissue transfer. Significant complications occurred in 30 percent of flaps (six of 20) in that further intervention was required. Venous insufficiency and bulkiness were found to be the major inherent shortcomings. However, giant flaps, lengthy and large-caliber vascular pedicles, and the possibility for combined flaps were important assets. The choice of a lower extremity muscle perforator flap for lower extremity reconstruction limited the surgical intervention and morbidity to a single body region. PMID:15457022

  4. Extreme precipitation: Increases all round

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, William

    2016-05-01

    Globally, extreme rainfall is expected to increase with warming, but regional changes over land have been less certain. Now research shows that this intense precipitation has increased across both the wetter and the drier parts of the continents, and will continue to do so as global warming continues.

  5. Fully relativistic lattice Boltzmann algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Romatschke, P.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.

    2011-09-15

    Starting from the Maxwell-Juettner equilibrium distribution, we develop a relativistic lattice Boltzmann (LB) algorithm capable of handling ultrarelativistic systems with flat, but expanding, spacetimes. The algorithm is validated through simulations of a quark-gluon plasma, yielding excellent agreement with hydrodynamic simulations. The present scheme opens the possibility of transferring the recognized computational advantages of lattice kinetic theory to the context of both weakly and ultrarelativistic systems.

  6. Dynamics of Relativistic Magnetized Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, M.

    2001-11-01

    The dynamics of (i) relativistic blast waves propagating through magnetized medium, (ii) magnetic explosions (when most energy is released in a form of toroidal magnetic field) is considered taking into account possible inhomogeneities of density and external magnetic field and additional energy supply. Self-similar solutions for the internal structure in the bulk flow and in the strongly magnetized sheath near contact discontinuity are found.

  7. Relativistic opacities for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, C. J.; Fryer, C. L.; Hungerford, A. L.; Hakel, P.; Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the use of the Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes to generate radiative opacities for the modeling of astrophysically relevant plasmas under local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions. The atomic structure calculations are carried out in fine-structure detail, including full configuration interaction. Three example applications are considered: iron opacities at conditions relevant to the base of the solar convection zone, nickel opacities for the modeling of stellar envelopes, and samarium opacities for the modeling of light curves produced by neutron star mergers. In the first two examples, comparisons are made between opacities that are generated with the fully and semi-relativistic capabilities in the Los Alamos suite of codes. As expected for these highly charged, iron-peak ions, the two methods produce reasonably similar results, providing confidence that the numerical methods have been correctly implemented. However, discrepancies greater than 10% are observed for nickel and investigated in detail. In the final application, the relativistic capability is used in a preliminary investigation of the complicated absorption spectrum associated with cold lanthanide elements.

  8. Relativistic Tennis Using Flying Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kando, M.; Ma, J.; Fukuda, Y.; Chen, L.-M.; Daito, I.; Ogura, K.; Homma, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Sagisaka, A.; Mori, M.; Koga, J. K.; Kawachi, T.; Daido, H.; Kimura, T.; Kato, Y.; Tajima, T.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2008-06-24

    Upon reflection from a relativistic mirror, the electromagnetic pulse frequency is upshifted and the duration is shortened by the factor proportional to the relativistic gamma-factor squared due to the double Doppler effect. We present the results of the proof-of-principle experiment for frequency upshifting of the laser pulse reflected from the relativistic 'flying mirror', which is a wake wave near the breaking threshold created by a strong driver pulse propagating in underdense plasma. Experimentally, the wake wave is created by a 2 TW, 76 fs Ti:S laser pulse from the JLITE-X laser system in helium plasma with the electron density of {approx_equal}4-6x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. The reflected signal is observed with a grazing-incidence spectrograph in 24 shots. The wavelength of the reflected radiation ranges from 7 to 14 nm, the corresponding frequency upshifting factors are {approx}55-115, and the gamma-factors are y = 4-6. The reflected signal contains at least 3x10{sup 7} photons/sr. This effect can be used to generate coherent high-frequency ultrashort pulses that inherit temporal shape and polarization from the original (low-frequency) ones. Apart from this, the reflected radiation contains important information about the wake wave itself, e.g. location, size, phase velocity, etc.

  9. On the theory of magnetic field generation by relativistically strong laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhiani, V.I.; Shatashvili, N.L.; Mahajan, S.M. |

    1996-07-01

    The authors consider the interaction of subpicosecond relativistically strong short laser pulses with an underdense cold unmagnetized electron plasma. It is shown that the strong plasma inhomogeneity caused by laser pulses results in the generation of a low frequency (quasistatic) magnetic field. Since the electron density distribution is determined completely by the pump wave intensity, the generated magnetic field is negligibly small for nonrelativistic laser pulses but increases rapidly in the ultrarelativistic case. Due to the possibility of electron cavitation (complete expulsion of electrons from the central region) for narrow and intense beams, the increase in the generated magnetic field slows down as the beam intensity is increased. The structure of the magnetic field closely resembles that of the field produced by a solenoid; the field is maximum and uniform in the cavitation region, then it falls, changes polarity and vanishes. In extremely dense plasmas, highly intense laser pulses in the self-channeling regime can generate magnetic fields {approximately} 100 Mg and greater.

  10. Recollimation and Radiative Focusing of Relativistic Jets: Applications to Blazars and M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberg, Omer; Levinson, Amir

    2009-07-01

    Recent observations of M87 and some blazars reveal violent activity in small regions located at relatively large distances from the central engine. Motivated by these considerations, we study the hydrodynamic collimation of a relativistic cooling outflow using a semianalytical model developed earlier. We first demonstrate that radiative cooling of the shocked outflow layer can lead to a focusing of the outflow and its reconfinement in a region having a very small cross-sectional radius. Such a configuration can produce rapid variability at large distances from the central engine via reflections of the converging recollimation shock. Possible applications of this model to TeV blazars are discussed. We then apply our model to M87. The low radiative efficiency of the M87 jet renders focusing unlikely. However, the shallow profile of the ambient medium pressure inferred from observations results in extremely good collimation that can explain the reported variability of the X-ray flux emitted from the HST-1 knot.

  11. Nuclear chromodynamics: applications of QCD to relativistic multiquark systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Ji, C.R.

    1984-07-01

    We review the applications of quantum chromodynamics to nuclear multiquark systems. In particular, predictions are given for the deuteron reduced form factor in the high momentum transfer region, hidden color components in nuclear wavefunctions, and the short distance effective force between nucleons. A new antisymmetrization technique is presented which allows a basis for relativistic multiquark wavefunctions and solutions to their evolution to short distances. Areas in which conventional nuclear theory conflicts with QCD are also briefly reviewed. 48 references.

  12. Relativistic nuclear many-body theory

    SciTech Connect

    Serot, B.D. ); Walecka, J.D. . Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility)

    1991-09-11

    Nonrelativistic models of nuclear systems have provided important insight into nuclear physics. In future experiments, nuclear systems will be examined under extreme conditions of density and temperature, and their response will be probed at momentum and energy transfers larger than the nucleon mass. It is therefore essential to develop reliable models that go beyond the traditional nonrelativistic many-body framework. General properties of physics, such as quantum mechanics, Lorentz covariance, and microscopic causality, motivate the use of quantum field theories to describe the interacting, relativistic, nuclear many-body system. Renormalizable models based on hadronic degrees of freedom (quantum hadrodynamics) are presented, and the assumptions underlying this framework are discussed. Some applications and successes of quantum hadrodynamics are described, with an emphasis on the new features arising from relativity. Examples include the nuclear equation of state, the shell model, nucleon-nucleus scattering, and the inclusion of zero-point vacuum corrections. Current issues and problems are also considered, such as the construction of improved approximations, the full role of the quantum vacuum, and the relationship between quantum hadrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics. We also speculate on future developments. 103 refs., 18 figs.

  13. Experimental status of the AGS Relativistic Heavy Ion Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster, T.C.

    1994-10-01

    The universal motivation for colliding large nuclei at relativistic energies is the expectation that a small volume of the primordial quark soup, generally referred to as the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), can be created and studied. The QGP is formed via a phase transition caused by either the extreme baryon densities and/or the extreme temperatures achieved in the overlap zone of the two colliding nuclei. Experiments at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) using a beam of Si nuclei at 14.6 GeV per nucleon on various nuclear targets have been completed. These same experiments are now actively searching for signatures of QGP formation using a beam of Au nuclei at 11.7 GeV per nucleon. This paper briefly summarizes some of the key results from the Si beam program and the current status of the experimental Au beam program at the AGS.

  14. Precipitation of relativistic electrons of the Van Allen belts into the proton aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanova, Vania K; Miyoshi, Y; Sakaguchi, K; Shiokawa, K; Evans, D S; Connors, M

    2008-01-01

    The Van Allen electron belts consist of two regions encircling the earth in which relativistic electrons are trapped in the earth's magnetic field. Populations of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts vary greatly with geomagnetic disturbance and they are a major source of damage to space vehicles. In order to know when and by how much these populations of relativistic electrons increase, it is important to elucidate not only the cause of acceleration of relativistic electrons but also the cause of their loss from the Van Allen belts. Here we show the first evidence that left-hand polarized electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere, on the basis of results of an excellent set of ground and satellite observations showing coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The proton aurora was produced by precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV due to EMIC waves near the plasma pause, which is a manifestation of wave-particle interactions. These observations clarify that ions with energies of tens of keV affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts via parasitic resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

  15. Two-stream-like Instability in Dilute Hot Relativistic Beams and Astrophysical Relativistic Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakar, Ehud; Bret, Antoine; Milosavljević, Miloš

    2011-09-01

    Relativistic collisionless shocks are believed to be efficient particle accelerators. Nonlinear outcome of the interaction of accelerated particles that run ahead of the shock, the so-called precursor, with the unperturbed plasma of the shock upstream, is thought to facilitate additional acceleration of these particles and to possibly modify the hydrodynamic structure of the shock. We explore here the linear growth of kinetic modes appearing in the precursor-upstream interaction in relativistic shocks propagating in non- and weakly magnetized plasmas: electrostatic two-stream parallel mode and electrostatic oblique modes. The physics of the parallel and oblique modes is similar, and thus, we refer to the entire spectrum of electrostatic modes as "two-stream-like." These modes are of particular interest because they are the fastest growing modes known in this type of system. Using a simplified distribution function for a dilute ultrarelativistic beam that is relativistically hot in its own rest frame, yet has momenta that are narrowly collimated in the frame of the cold upstream plasma into which it propagates, we identify the fastest growing mode in the full k-space and calculate its growth rate. We consider all types of plasma (pairs and ions-electrons) and beam (charged and charge-neutral). We find that unstable electrostatic modes are present in any type of plasma and for any shock parameters. We further find that two modes, one parallel (k bottom = 0) and the other one oblique (k_\\bot \\sim k_\\Vert), are competing for dominance and that either one may dominate the growth rate in different regions of the phase space. The dominant mode is determined mostly by the perpendicular spread of the accelerated particle momenta in the upstream frame, which reflects the shock Lorentz factor. The parallel mode becomes more dominant in shocks with lower Lorentz factors (i.e., with larger momentum spreads). We briefly discuss possible implications of our results for

  16. Relativistic Navigation: A Theoretical Foundation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.

    1996-01-01

    We present a theoretical foundation for relativistic astronomical measurements in curved space-time. In particular, we discuss a new iterative approach for describing the dynamics of an isolated astronomical N-body system in metric theories of gravity. To do this, we generalize the Fock-Chandrasekhar method of the weak-field and slow-motion approximation (WFSMA) and develop a theory of relativistic reference frames (RF's) for a gravitationally bounded many-extended-body problem. In any proper RF constructed in the immediate vicinity of an arbitrary body, the N-body solutions of the gravitational field equations are formally presented as a sum of the Riemann-flat inertial space-time, the gravitational field generated by the body itself, the unperturbed solutions for each body in the system transformed to the coordinates of this proper RF, and the gravitational interaction term. We develop the basic concept of a general WFSMA theory of the celestial RF's applicable to a wide class of metric theories of gravity and an arbitrary model of matter distribution. We apply the proposed method to general relativity. Celestial bodies are described using a perfect fluid model; as such, they possess any number of internal mass and current multipole moments that explicitly characterize their internal structures. The obtained relativistic corrections to the geodetic equations of motion arise because of a coupling of the bodies' multiple moments to the surrounding gravitational field. The resulting relativistic transformations between the different RF's extend the Poincare group to the motion of deformable self-gravitating bodies. Within the present accuracy of astronomical measurements we discuss the properties of the Fermi-normal-like proper RF that is defined in the immediate vicinity of the extended compact bodies. We further generalize the proposed approximation method and include two Eddington parameters (gamma, Beta). This generalized approach was used to derive the

  17. Relativistic radiation transport in dispersive media

    SciTech Connect

    Kichenassamy, S.; Krikorian, R.A.

    1985-10-15

    A general-relativistic radiative transfer equation in an isotropic, weakly absorbing, nonmagnetized dispersive medium is derived using the kinetic-theoretical approach and the relativistic Hamiltonian theory of geometrical optics in those media. It yields the generally accepted classical equation in the special-relativistic approximation and in stationary conditions. The influence of the gravitational field and of space-time variations of the refractive index n on the radiation distribution is made explicit in the case of spherical symmetry.

  18. Mesoscopic Superposition States in Relativistic Landau Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bermudez, A.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.; Solano, E.

    2007-09-21

    We show that a linear superposition of mesoscopic states in relativistic Landau levels can be built when an external magnetic field couples to a relativistic spin 1/2 charged particle. Under suitable initial conditions, the associated Dirac equation produces unitarily superpositions of coherent states involving the particle orbital quanta in a well-defined mesoscopic regime. We demonstrate that these mesoscopic superpositions have a purely relativistic origin and disappear in the nonrelativistic limit.

  19. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zenitani, Seiji

    2015-04-15

    Numerical algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations are presented. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are ≈50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms.

  20. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenitani, Seiji

    2015-04-01

    Numerical algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations are presented. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are ≈50 % for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms.

  1. Strengthening Adaptation to Extreme Climate Events in Southwestern Amazonia: an Example from the Trinational Acre River Basin in the Madre de Dios/Peru - Acre/Brazil - Pando/Bolivia (MAP) Region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, I. F.

    2015-12-01

    Southwestern Amazonia, where Bolivia, Brazil and Peru meet, faces numerous challenges to the sustainable utilization of land and water resources as the region experiences rapid population and economic growth, expanding agriculture, transportation and energy sectors, along with frequent flooding and droughts. It is also predicted to be one of the most susceptible areas for climate change in the coming decade. The Acre River Basin, one of the few trinational basins in Amazonia, lies at the center of the Madre de Dios Region (Peru), Acre State (Brazil) and Pando Department (Bolivia) or MAP Region. It covers approximately 7,500 km2 and its inhabitants range from indigenous groups avoiding contact with industrial society to more than 60,000 dwellers of a binational urban center. The basin incorporates most the challenges facing the region and this paper discusses steps underway to address the basin's vulnerability to climate-related threats. A trinational group of professionals used GIS databases and local knowledge to classify these threats and possible societal responses. To prioritize threats and to propose responses, this group adapted a method proposed by the Queensland Climate Change Centre of Excellence of Australia to develop climate risk matrices for assessing impacts, adaptation, risk and vulnerability. The three priority climate variables were prolonged and more frequent droughts, more intense flooding, and more days with temperatures > 35oC. The final matrix proposed two areas of concentration - 1) Reduce the vulnerability of communities to hydro-meteorological extreme events and 2) Protect and restore ecosystems that maintain critical water-related resources with actions in public policy, capacity-building, and immediate activities. These results are being incorporated into the Amazon Project of the Global Environment Fund of the United Nations Environment Program, administered by the Amazon Cooperation Treaty Organization (ACTO).

  2. Relativistic HD and MHD modelling for AGN jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, R.; Porth, O.; Monceau-Baroux, R.; Walg, S.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic hydro and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provide a continuum fluid description for plasma dynamics characterized by shock-dominated flows approaching the speed of light. Significant progress in its numerical modelling emerged in the last two decades; we highlight selected examples of modern grid-adaptive, massively parallel simulations realized by our open-source software MPI-AMRVAC (Keppens et al 2012 J. Comput. Phys. 231 718). Hydrodynamical models quantify how energy transfer from active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets to their surrounding interstellar/intergalactic medium (ISM/IGM) gets mediated through shocks and various fluid instability mechanisms (Monceau-Baroux et al 2012 Astron. Astrophys. 545 A62). With jet parameters representative for Fanaroff-Riley type-II jets with finite opening angles, we can quantify the ISM volumes affected by jet injection and distinguish the roles of mixing versus shock-heating in cocoon regions. This provides insight in energy feedback by AGN jets, usually incorporated parametrically in cosmological evolution scenarios. We discuss recent axisymmetric studies up to full 3D simulations for precessing relativistic jets, where synthetic radio maps can confront observations. While relativistic hydrodynamic models allow one to better constrain dynamical parameters like the Lorentz factor and density contrast between jets and their surroundings, the role of magnetic fields in AGN jet dynamics and propagation characteristics needs full relativistic MHD treatments. Then, we can demonstrate the collimating properties of an overal helical magnetic field backbone and study differences between poloidal versus toroidal field dominated scenarios (Keppens et al 2008 Astron. Astrophys. 486 663). Full 3D simulations allow one to consider the fate of non-axisymmetric perturbations on relativistic jet propagation from rotating magnetospheres (Porth 2013 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 429 2482). Self-stabilization mechanisms related to the detailed

  3. Modelling Relativistic Astrophysics at the Large and Small Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugboelle, Troels

    2005-10-01

    In this thesis different numerical methods, as well as applications of the methods to a number of current problems in relativistic astrophysics, are presented. In the first part the theoretical foundation and numerical implementation of a new general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics code is discussed. A new form of the equations of motion using global coordinates, but evolving the dynamical variables from the point of view of a local observer is presented. No assumptions are made about the background metric and the design is ready to be coupled with methods solving the full Einstein equations. In the second part of the thesis important results concerning the understanding of collisionless shocks, obtained from experiments with a relativistic charged particle code, are presented. Relativistic collisionless shocks are important in a range of astrophysical objects; in particular in gamma ray burst afterglows and other relativistic jets. It is shown that a strong small scale, fluctuating, and predominantly transversal magnetic field is unavoidably generated by a two-stream instability. The magnetic energy density reaches a few percent of equipartition. A new acceleration mechanism for electrons in ion-electron collisionless shocks is proposed. The mechanism is capable of creating a powerlaw electron distribution in a collisionless shocked region. The non-thermal acceleration of the electrons is directly related to the ion current channels generated by the two-stream instability and is local in nature. Thus the observed radiation field may be tied directly to the local conditions of the plasma and could be a strong handle on the physical processes. (abridged)

  4. Generalized charge-screening in relativistic Thomas-Fermi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we study the charge shielding within the relativistic Thomas-Fermi model for a wide range of electron number-densities and the atomic-number of screened ions. A generalized energy-density relation is obtained using the force-balance equation and taking into account the Chandrasekhar's relativistic electron degeneracy pressure. By numerically solving a second-order nonlinear differential equation, the Thomas-Fermi screening length is investigated, and the results are compared for three distinct regimes of the solid-density, warm-dense-matter, and white-dwarfs (WDs). It is revealed that our nonlinear screening theory is compatible with the exponentially decaying Thomas-Fermi-type shielding predicted by the linear response theory. Moreover, the variation of relative Thomas-Fermi screening length shows that extremely dense quantum electron fluids are relatively poor charge shielders. Calculation of the total number of screening electrons around a nucleus shows that there is a position of maximum number of screening localized electrons around the screened nucleus, which moves closer to the point-like nucleus by increase in the plasma number density but is unaffected due to increase in the atomic-number value. It is discovered that the total number of screening electrons, ( N s ∝ r T F 3 / r d 3 where rTF and rd are the Thomas-Fermi and interparticle distance, respectively) has a distinct limit for extremely dense plasmas such as WD-cores and neutron star crusts, which is unique for all given values of the atomic-number. This is equal to saying that in an ultrarelativistic degeneracy limit of electron-ion plasma, the screening length couples with the system dimensionality and the plasma becomes spherically self-similar. Current analysis can provide useful information on the effects of relativistic correction to the charge screening for a wide range of plasma density, such as the inertial-confined plasmas and compact stellar objects.

  5. Relativistic and non-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic flows around compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobarry, Clark Matthew

    A set of theoretical tools are developed for studying the magnetized accretion disks and astrophysical jets in active galaxies. A general theory is developed for the steady axisymmetric flow of an ideal general-relativistic fluid around a Schwarzschild black hole. The theory leads to a second-order partial differential equation, a Grad-Shafranov equation, for the magnetic flux function psi(R, theta). The magnetic surface functions of the Grad-Shafranov method are shown to be the Lagrange multipliers of an energy principle. Thus, the magnetic surface functions are not arbitrary functions, but must be chosen consistent with physically stable equilibria. From the energy principle, a numerical artificial friction method is developed to solve the general relativistic Grad-Shafranov equation with fluid flow. This method is suited for the internal boundaries between elliptic and hyperbolic behavior present in magnetospheres with fluid flow. The friction method is shown to be compatible with a theory for the slow dissipative evolution of a nearly ideal MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) fluid. A virial theorem is derived from the basic equations of general relativistic MHD. It is used to obtain an upper bound on the total energy in the electromagnetic field in terms of the total gravitational binding energy between the black hole and the matter (and energy) outside it. An analysis is made of the motion of a charged test particle in the electromagnetic field of a magnetized accretion disk surrounding a black hole. The results are consistent with stable orbits close to the event horizon. A semi-analytical model is developed for the evolution and dissipation of narrow magnetized jets from an active galaxy. This model exhibits the acceleration and expansion of the jets with increasing axial distance from the central object.

  6. Extreme Transients in the High Energy Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2013-01-01

    The High Energy Universe is rich in diverse populations of objects spanning the entire cosmological (time)scale, from our own present-day Milky Way to the re-ionization epoch. Several of these are associated with extreme conditions irreproducible in laboratories on Earth. Their study thus sheds light on the behavior of matter under extreme conditions, such as super-strong magnetic fields (in excess of 10^14 G), high gravitational potentials (e.g., Super Massive Black Holes), very energetic collimated explosions resulting in relativistic jet flows (e.g., Gamma Ray Bursts, exceeding 10^53 ergs). In the last thirty years, my work has been mostly focused on two apparently different but potentially linked populations of such transients: magnetars (highly magnetized neutron stars) and Gamma Ray Bursts (strongly beamed emission from relativistic jets), two populations that constitute unique astrophysical laboratories, while also giving us the tools to probe matter conditions in the Universe to redshifts beyond z=10, when the first stars and galaxies were assembled. I did not make this journey alone I have either led or participated in several international collaborations studying these phenomena in multi-wavelength observations; solitary perfection is not sufficient anymore in the world of High Energy Astrophysics. I will describe this journey, present crucial observational breakthroughs, discuss key results and muse on the future of this field.

  7. Laser hosing in relativistically hot plasmas.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Mori, W B; Ren, C

    2013-04-12

    Electron response in an intense laser is studied in the regime where the electron temperature is relativistic. Equations for laser envelope and plasma density evolution, both in the electron plasma wave and ion acoustic wave regimes, are rederived from the relativistic fluid equations to include relativistic plasma temperature effect. These equations are used to study short-pulse and long-pulse laser hosing instabilities using a variational method approach. The analysis shows that relativistic electron temperatures reduce the hosing growth rates and shift the fastest-growing modes to longer wavelengths. These results resolve a long-standing discrepancy between previous nonrelativistic theory and simulations or experiments on hosing. PMID:25167277

  8. What is the relativistic spin operator?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauke, Heiko; Ahrens, Sven; Keitel, Christoph H.; Grobe, Rainer

    2014-04-01

    Although the spin is regarded as a fundamental property of the electron, there is no universally accepted spin operator within the framework of relativistic quantum mechanics. We investigate the properties of different proposals for a relativistic spin operator. It is shown that most candidates are lacking essential features of proper angular momentum operators, leading to spurious zitterbewegung (quivering motion) or violation of the angular momentum algebra. Only the Foldy-Wouthuysen operator and the Pryce operator qualify as proper relativistic spin operators. We demonstrate that ground states of highly charged hydrogen-like ions can be utilized to identify a legitimate relativistic spin operator experimentally.

  9. Dissipation in Relativistic Pair-Plasma Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    We present an investigation of the relativistic dissipation in magnetic reconnection. The investigated system consists of an electron-positron plasma. A relativistic generalization of Ohm's law is derived. We analyze a set of numerical simulations, composed of runs with and without guide magnetic field, and of runs with different species temperatures. The calculations indicate that the thermal inertia-based dissipation process survives in relativistic plasmas. For anti-parallel reconnection, it is found that the pressure tensor divergence remains the sole contributor to the reconnection electric field, whereas relativistic guide field reconnection exhibits a similarly important role of the bulk inertia terms.

  10. Dissipation in relativistic pair-plasma reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji

    2007-11-15

    An investigation into the relativistic dissipation in magnetic reconnection is presented. The investigated system consists of an electron-positron plasma. A relativistic generalization of Ohm's law is derived. A set of numerical simulations is analyzed, composed of runs with and without guide magnetic field, and of runs with different species temperatures. The calculations indicate that the thermal inertia-based dissipation process survives in relativistic plasmas. For antiparallel reconnection, it is found that the pressure tensor divergence remains the sole contributor to the reconnection electric field, whereas relativistic guide field reconnection exhibits a similarly important role of the bulk inertia terms.

  11. Relativistic Bernstein waves in a degenerate plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Muddasir; Hussain, Azhar; Murtaza, G.

    2011-09-15

    Bernstein mode for a relativistic degenerate electron plasma is investigated. Using relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell equations, a general expression for the conductivity tensor is derived and then employing Fermi-Dirac distribution function a generalized dispersion relation for the Bernstein mode is obtained. Two limiting cases, i.e., non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic are discussed. The dispersion relations obtained are also graphically presented for some specific values of the parameters depicting how the propagation characteristics of Bernstein waves as well as the Upper Hybrid oscillations are modified with the increase in plasma number density.

  12. Relativistic Plasma Polarizer: Impact of Temperature Anisotropy on Relativistic Transparency.

    PubMed

    Stark, David J; Bhattacharjee, Chinmoy; Arefiev, Alexey V; Toncian, Toma; Hazeltine, R D; Mahajan, S M

    2015-07-10

    3D particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that the enhanced transparency of a relativistically hot plasma is sensitive to how the energy is partitioned between different degrees of freedom. For an anisotropic electron distribution, propagation characteristics, like the critical density, will depend on the polarization of the electromagnetic wave. Despite the onset of the Weibel instability in such plasmas, the anisotropy can persist long enough to affect laser propagation. This plasma can then function as a polarizer or a wave plate to dramatically alter the pulse polarization. PMID:26207473

  13. Relativistic and non-relativistic solitons in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Satyendra Nath

    This thesis entitled as "Relativistic and Non-relativistic Solitons in Plasmas" is the embodiment of a number of investigations related to the formation of ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas under various physical situations. The whole work of the thesis is devoted to the studies of solitary waves in cold and warm collisionless magnetized or unmagnetized plasmas with or without relativistic effect. To analyze the formation of solitary waves in all our models of plasmas, we have employed two established methods namely - reductive perturbation method to deduce the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation, the solutions of which represent the important but near exact characteristic concepts of soliton-physics. Next, the pseudopotential method to deduce the energy integral with total nonlinearity in the coupling process for exact characteristic results of solitons has been incorporated. In Chapter 1, a brief description of plasma in nature and laboratory and its generation are outlined elegantly. The nonlinear differential equations to characterize solitary waves and the relevant but important methods of solutions have been mentioned in this chapter. The formation of solitary waves in unmagnetized and magnetized plasmas, and in relativistic plasmas has been described through mathematical entity. Applications of plasmas in different fields are also put forwarded briefly showing its importance. The study of plasmas as they naturally occur in the universe encompasses number of topics including sun's corona, solar wind, planetary magnetospheres, ionospheres, auroras, cosmic rays and radiation. The study of space weather to understand the universe, communications and the activities of weather satellites are some useful areas of space plasma physics. The surface cleaning, sterilization of food and medical appliances, killing of bacteria on various surfaces, destroying of viruses, fungi, spores and plasma coating in industrial instruments ( like computers) are some of the fields

  14. Ionospheric modification using relativistic electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Peter M.; Fraser-Smith, Anthony C.; Gilchrist, B. E.

    1990-01-01

    The recent development of comparatively small electron linear accelerators (linacs) now makes possible a new class of ionospheric modification experiments using beams of relativistic electrons. These experiments can potentially provide much new information about the interactions of natural relativistic electrons with other particles in the upper atmosphere, and it may also make possible new forms of ionization structures extending down from the lower ionosphere into the largely un-ionized upper atmosphere. The consequences of firing a pulsed 1 A, 5 Mev electron beam downwards into the upper atmosphere are investigated. If a small pitch angle with respect to the ambient geomagnetic field is selected, the beam produces a narrow column of substantial ionization extending down from the source altitude to altitudes of approximately 40 to 45 km. This column is immediately polarized by the natural middle atmosphere fair weather electric field and an increasingly large potential difference is established between the column and the surrounding atmosphere. In the regions between 40 to 60 km, this potential can amount to many tens of kilovolts and the associated electric field can be greater than the field required for breakdown and discharge. Under these conditions, it may be possible to initiate lightning discharges along the initial ionization channel. Filamentation may also occur at the lower end to drive further currents in the partially ionized gases of the stratosphere. Such discharges would derive their energy from the earth-ionosphere electrical system and would be sustained until plasma depletion and/or electric field reduction brought the discharge under control. It is likely that this artificially-triggered lightning would produce measurable low-frequency radiation.

  15. On General Relativistic Uniformly Rotating White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boshkayev, Kuantay; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo; Siutsou, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The properties of uniformly rotating white dwarfs (RWDs) are analyzed within the framework of general relativity. Hartle's formalism is applied to construct the internal and external solutions to the Einstein equations. The white dwarf (WD) matter is described by the relativistic Feynman-Metropolis-Teller equation of state which generalizes that of Salpeter by taking into account the finite size of the nuclei, and the Coulomb interactions as well as electroweak equilibrium in a self-consistent relativistic fashion. The mass M, radius R, angular momentum J, eccentricity epsilon, and quadrupole moment Q of RWDs are calculated as a function of the central density ρ c and rotation angular velocity Ω. We construct the region of stability of RWDs (J-M plane) taking into account the mass-shedding limit, inverse β-decay instability, and the boundary established by the turning points of constant J sequences which separates stable from secularly unstable configurations. We found the minimum rotation periods ~0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 2.2 s and maximum masses ~1.500, 1.474, 1.467, 1.202 M ⊙ for 4He, 12C, 16O, and 56Fe WDs, respectively. By using the turning-point method, we found that RWDs can indeed be axisymmetrically unstable and we give the range of WD parameters where this occurs. We also construct constant rest-mass evolution tracks of RWDs at fixed chemical composition and show that, by losing angular momentum, sub-Chandrasekhar RWDs (mass smaller than maximum static one) can experience both spin-up and spin-down epochs depending on their initial mass and rotation period, while super-Chandrasekhar RWDs (mass larger than maximum static one) only spin up.

  16. ON GENERAL RELATIVISTIC UNIFORMLY ROTATING WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Boshkayev, Kuantay; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo; Siutsou, Ivan E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it E-mail: siutsou@icranet.org

    2013-01-10

    The properties of uniformly rotating white dwarfs (RWDs) are analyzed within the framework of general relativity. Hartle's formalism is applied to construct the internal and external solutions to the Einstein equations. The white dwarf (WD) matter is described by the relativistic Feynman-Metropolis-Teller equation of state which generalizes that of Salpeter by taking into account the finite size of the nuclei, and the Coulomb interactions as well as electroweak equilibrium in a self-consistent relativistic fashion. The mass M, radius R, angular momentum J, eccentricity {epsilon}, and quadrupole moment Q of RWDs are calculated as a function of the central density {rho} {sub c} and rotation angular velocity {Omega}. We construct the region of stability of RWDs (J-M plane) taking into account the mass-shedding limit, inverse {beta}-decay instability, and the boundary established by the turning points of constant J sequences which separates stable from secularly unstable configurations. We found the minimum rotation periods {approx}0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 2.2 s and maximum masses {approx}1.500, 1.474, 1.467, 1.202 M {sub Sun} for {sup 4}He, {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, and {sup 56}Fe WDs, respectively. By using the turning-point method, we found that RWDs can indeed be axisymmetrically unstable and we give the range of WD parameters where this occurs. We also construct constant rest-mass evolution tracks of RWDs at fixed chemical composition and show that, by losing angular momentum, sub-Chandrasekhar RWDs (mass smaller than maximum static one) can experience both spin-up and spin-down epochs depending on their initial mass and rotation period, while super-Chandrasekhar RWDs (mass larger than maximum static one) only spin up.

  17. Nanoscale Phase Transitions under Extreme Conditions within an Ion Track

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiaming; Lang, Maik; Ewing, Rodney C.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Weber, William J.; Toulemonde, Marcel

    2010-06-30

    The dynamics of track development due to the passage of relativistic heavy ions through solids is a long-standing issue relevant to nuclear materials, age-dating of minerals, space exploration, and nanoscale fabrication of novel devices. We have integrated experimental and simulation approaches to investigate nanoscale phase transitions under the extreme conditions created within single tracks of relativistic ions in Gd2O3(TiO2)x and Gd2Zr2-xTixO7. Track size and internal structure depend on energy-density deposition, irradiation temperature, and material composition. Molecular dynamics methods based on the thermal spike model have simulated, for the first time, the internal structure of individual tracks, consistent with experimental observations. Individual ion tracks have nanoscale core-shell structures that provide a unique record of the phase transition pathways under extreme conditions.

  18. Nanoscale Phase Transitions under Extreme Conditions within an Ion Track

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiaming; Lang, Maik; Ewing, Rodney C.; Devanathan, R.; Weber, William; Toulemonde, M.

    2011-01-31

    The dynamics of track development due to the passage of relativistic heavy ions through solids is a long-standing issue relevant to nuclear materials, age dating of minerals, space exploration, and nanoscale fabrication of novel devices. We have integrated experimental and simulation approaches to investigate nanoscale phase transitions under the extreme conditions created within single tracks of relativistic ions in Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}(TiO{sub 2}){sub x} and Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2–x} Ti{sub x} O{sub 7}. Track size and internal structure depend on energy density deposition, irradiation temperature, and material composition. Based on the inelastic thermal spike model, molecular dynamics simulations follow the time evolution of individual tracks and reveal the phase transition pathways to the concentric track structures observed experimentally. Individual ion tracks have nanoscale core-shell structures that provide a unique record of the phase transition pathways under extreme conditions.

  19. Prompt Energization of Relativistic and Highly Relativistic Electrons during a Substorm Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. C.; Baker, D. N.; Erickson, P. J.; Spence, H. E.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; Shprits, Y.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Thaller, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    On March 17, 2013, a large magnetic storm significantly depleted the multi-MeV radiation belt. We present multi-instrument observations from the Van Allen Probes spacecraft RBSP-A and RBSP-B at ~6 Re in the midnight sector magnetosphere and from ground based ionospheric sensors during a substorm dipolarization followed by rapid re-energization of multi-MeV electrons. At ~ 5 Re radial distance, a 50% increase in magnetic field magnitude occurred simultaneously with dramatic increases in 100 keV electron fluxes and a 100x increase in VLF wave intensity. The 100 keV electrons and intense VLF waves provide a seed population and energy source for subsequent radiation belt enhancements. During the event, the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft were separated by ~ 1 hr along the same orbital track enabling a <~1-hr temporal specification of the multi-MeV electron re-energization. Assocated with the substorm, highly relativistic (> 2 MeV) electron fluxes increased immediately at L* ~ 4.5, and ultra-relativistic 4.5 MeV electron flux increased >90x at L*=4 in a time interval of 5 hours or less. Although plasmasphere expansion brings the enhanced radiation belt multi-MeV fluxes inside the plasmasphere several hours post-substorm, we localize their prompt re-energization during the event to regions outside the plasmasphere.

  20. Role of extreme events in vegetation dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extreme climatic events challenge the capacity of vegetation models, including Dynamic Global Vegetation Models, to predict changes in plant species dynamics at local and regional spatial scales and over time periods relevant to ecologists and managers. Extreme climatic events are defined as large,...

  1. Recent Developments in Statistical Downscaling of Extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertig, E.

    2014-12-01

    Based on the output of general circulation models (GCMs) regionalization techniques are usually applied to obtain fine-scale climate change information. Different types of regionalization techniques have been developed which comprise regional climate models and statistical downscaling approaches such as conditional weather generators, artificial neural networks, synoptic studies, and transfer functions. In the scope of climate variability and climate change the variations and changes of extremes are of special importance. Extreme events are not only of scientific interest but also have a profound impact on society. For the statistical downscaling of extremes, promising approaches have been introduced and/or developed further in the last few years. Aspects of recent developments in the scope of statistical downscaling of extremes will be presented. In this context, various approaches to downscale extremes, particularly those associated with extreme precipitation events, will be discussed. Key problems related to statistical downscaling of extremes will be addressed. Furthermore, information on Working Group 4 "Extremes" of the EU COST action VALUE (www.value-cost.eu) will be provided. VALUE systematically validates and develops downscaling methods for climate change research in order to improve regional climate change scenarios for use in climate impact studies.

  2. Photoelectron energy spectra from elastic rescattering in ultrastrong laser fields: A relativistic extension of the three-step model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, S. S.; Grugan, P. D.; Walker, B. C.

    2015-03-01

    Using a relativistic adaptation of a three-step recollision model we calculate photoelectron energy spectra for ionization with elastic scattering in ultrastrong laser fields up to 24 a.u. (2 ×1019 W/cm 2) . Hydrogenlike and noble gas species with Hartree-Fock scattering potentials show a reduction in elastic rescattering beyond 6 ×1016 W/cm 2 when the laser Lorentz deflection of the photoelectron exceeds its wave-function spread. A relativistic rescattering enhancement occurs at 2 ×1018 W/cm 2, commensurate with the relativistic motion of a classical electron in a single field cycle. The noble gas results are compared with available experiments. The theory approach is well suited to modeling scattering in the ultrastrong intensity regime that lies between traditional strong fields and extreme relativistic interactions.

  3. Magnetogenesis through Relativistic Velocity Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Evan

    Magnetic fields at all scales are prevalent in our universe. However, current cosmological models predict that initially the universe was bereft of large-scale fields. Standard magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) does not permit magnetogenesis; in the MHD Faraday's law, the change in magnetic field B depends on B itself. Thus if B is initially zero, it will remain zero for all time. A more accurate physical model is needed to explain the origins of the galactic-scale magnetic fields observed today. In this thesis, I explore two velocity-driven mechanisms for magnetogenesis in 2-fluid plasma. The first is a novel kinematic 'battery' arising from convection of vorticity. A coupling between thermal and plasma oscillations, this non-relativistic mechanism can operate in flows that are incompressible, quasi-neutral and barotropic. The second mechanism results from inclusion of thermal effects in relativistic shear flow instabilities. In such flows, parallel perturbations are ubiquitously unstable at small scales, with growth rates of order with the plasma frequency over a defined range of parameter-space. Of these two processes, instabilities seem far more likely to account for galactic magnetic fields. Stable kinematic effects will, at best, be comparable to an ideal Biermann battery, which is suspected to be orders of magnitude too weak to produce the observed galactic fields. On the other hand, instabilities grow until saturation is reached, a topic that has yet to be explored in detail on cosmological scales. In addition to investigating these magnetogenesis sources, I derive a general dispersion relation for three dimensional, warm, two species plasma with discontinuous shear flow. The mathematics of relativistic plasma, sheared-flow instability and the Biermann battery are also discussed.

  4. Relativistic Plasma Polarizer: Impact of Temperature Anisotropy on Relativistic Transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazeltine, R. D.; Stark, David J.; Bhattacharjee, Chinmoy; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Toncian, Toma; Mahajan, S. M.

    2015-11-01

    3D particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that the enhanced transparency of a relativistically hot plasma is sensitive to how the energy is partitioned between different degrees of freedom. We consider here the simplest problem: the propagation of a low amplitude pulse through a preformed relativistically hot anisotropic electron plasma to explore its intrinsic dielectric properties. We find that: 1) the critical density for propagation depends strongly on the pulse polarization, 2) two plasmas with the same density and average energy per electron can exhibit profoundly different responses to electromagnetic pulses, 3) the anisotropy-driven Weibel instability develops as expected; the timescales of the growth and back reaction (on anisotropy), however, are long enough that sufficient anisotropy persists for the entire duration of the simulation. This plasma can then function as a polarizer or a wave plate to dramatically alter the pulse polarization. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Contract Nos. DE-FG02-04ER54742 and DE-AC05-06OR23100 (D. J. S.) and NNSA Contract No. DE-FC52-08NA28512.

  5. Relativistic radiative transfer and relativistic spherical shell flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2016-06-01

    We examine a radiatively driven spherical flow from a central object, whose thickness is smaller than the radius of the central object, and a plane-parallel approximation can be used-a spherical shell flow. We first solve the relativistic radiative transfer equation iteratively, using a given velocity field, and obtain specific intensities as well as moment quantities. Using the obtained comoving flux, we then solve the relativistic hydrodynamical equation, and obtain a new velocity field. We repeat these double iteration processes until both the intensity and velocity profiles converge. We found that the flow speed v(τ) is roughly approximated as β ≡ v/c = βs(1 - τ/τb), where τ is the optical depth, τb the flow total optical depth, and c the speed of light. We further found that the flow terminal speed vs is roughly expressed as β _s ≡ v_s/c = (Γ hat{F}_0-1)τ_b/dot{m} , where Γ is the central luminosity normalized by the Eddington luminosity, hat{F}_0 the comoving flux normalized by the incident flux, and of the order of unity, and dot{m} the mass-loss rate normalized by the critical mass loss.